CIGWELD 300Pi Specifications

Operating Manual
Transtig 200 Pi
Transtig 200 Pi
Transtig 250 Pi
Transtig 300 Pi
719438
Issue 3
0502
(Power Source)
(Plant)
(Power Source)
(Power Source)
Part No.
700720
700730
700721
700722
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
Manufacturer and Merchandiser of Quality Consumables and Equipment: CIGWELD
Address:
71 Gower St, Preston
Victoria 3072
Australia
Description of equipment: Welding Equipment (GTAW & MMAW). CIGWELD Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi and
associated accessories.
* Serial numbers are unique with each individual piece of equipment and details description, parts used to manufacture a
unit and date of manufacture.
* The equipment conforms to all applicable aspects and regulations of the ‘Low Voltage Directive’(Directive 73/23/EU,
as recently changed in Directive93/63/EU and to the National legislation for the enforcement of the Directive.
National Standard and Technical Specifications
The product is designed to a number of standards and technical requirements among them are:
* IEC 60974-1 (BS 638-PT10)(EN 60 974-1) applicable to welding equipment and associated accessories.
* AS/NZS 3652-(EMC Directive EN50199) applicable to arc welding equipment - generic emissions and regulations.
* UL (Underwriters Laboratory) rating 94VO flammability testing for all printed - circuit boards used.
* 92/31/EEC-EMC Directive EN50199 applicable to arc welding equipment - generic emissions and regulations.
* Extensive product design verification is conducted at the manufacturing facility as part of the routine design and
manufacturing process, to ensure the product is safe and performs as specified. Rigorous testing is incorporated into the
manufacturing process to ensure the manufactured product meets or exceeds all design specifications.
CIGWELD has been manufacturing and merchandising an extensive equipment range with superior performance, ultra
safe operation and world class quality for more than 30 years and will continue to achieve excellence.
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Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
CONTENTS
Page
1. Introduction ......................................................................................................................5
2. Electromagnetic Compatibility ........................................................................................7
3. General Information.........................................................................................................9
4. Safe Practices For The Use Of Welding Equipment .....................................................11
5. Resuscitation For Electric Shock Victims......................................................................12
6. Specifications ..................................................................................................................14
7. Voltage Reduction Device (VRD)...................................................................................20
8. Installation Recommendations .......................................................................................21
9. High Frequency Considerations.....................................................................................22
10. Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi Controls ..........................................................................23
11. Set-up For MMAW (Stick) and GTAW (TIG) .............................................................26
12. Sequence Of Operation..................................................................................................26
13. Basic TIG Welding Guide .............................................................................................32
14. Basic Arc Welding Guide ..............................................................................................34
15. Routine Inspection, Testing & Maintenance.................................................................35
16. Basic Troubleshooting ...................................................................................................36
TABLES
Table 1 - Filter lens size verses welding current .................................................................................. 12
Table 2 - Weld Process selection verses Weld Mode for Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi........................ 15
Table 3 - Weld Parameter Descriptions for Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi............................................ 16
Table 4 - Weld Parameters for Transtig 200Pi .................................................................................... 16
Table 5 - Weld Parameters for Transtig 250Pi .................................................................................... 17
Table 6 - Weld Parameters for Transtig 300Pi .................................................................................... 17
Table 7 - PULSE FREQ. Range and Incremental Units....................................................................... 17
Table 8 - 240V Mains Current Circuit sizes to achieve maximum current............................................ 22
Table 9 - Current ranges for varies tungsten electrode sizes................................................................ 32
Table 10 - CIGWELD tungsten electrode types.................................................................................. 32
Table 11 - TIG welding parameters .................................................................................................... 33
Table 12 - Filler wire selection guide .................................................................................................. 33
Table 13 - Shielding gas selection....................................................................................................... 33
Table 14 - TIG welding parameters for low carbon & low alloy steel pipe .......................................... 34
Table 15 - Types of Electrodes........................................................................................................... 35
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Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
FIGURES
Figure 1 – Transtig 200 Pi Power Source............................................................................................23
Figure 2 – Transtig 250 Pi Power Source............................................................................................23
Figure 3 – Transtig 300 Pi Power Source............................................................................................24
Figure 4 – Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi Set-up...................................................................................26
Figure 5 – STICK mode .....................................................................................................................27
Figure 6 – HF TIG STD Mode – PULSE OFF ....................................................................................27
Figure 7 – HF TIG STD Mode – PULSE ON......................................................................................27
Figure 8 – HF TIG SLOPE Mode – PULSE OFF................................................................................28
Figure 9 – HF TIG SLOPE Mode – PULSE ON .................................................................................28
Figure 10 – HF TIG REPEAT Mode – PULSE OFF ...........................................................................28
Figure 11 – HF TIG REPEAT Mode – PULSE ON.............................................................................29
Figure 12 – HF TIG SPOT Mode – PULSE OFF ................................................................................29
Figure 13 – HF TIG SPOT Mode – PULSE ON..................................................................................29
Figure 14 – LIFT TIG STD Mode – PULSE OFF................................................................................30
Figure 15 – LIFT TIG STD Mode – PULSE ON .................................................................................30
Figure 16 – LIFT TIG SLOPE Mode – PULSE OFF...........................................................................30
Figure 17 – LIFT TIG SLOPE Mode – PULSE ON ............................................................................31
Figure 18 – LIFT TIG REPEAT Mode – PULSE OFF ........................................................................31
Figure 19 – LIFT TIG REPEAT Mode – PULSE ON..........................................................................31
Figure 20 – Transtig 300 Pi Save / Load Operation.............................................................................32
Figure 21 – Example of insufficient gap or incorrect sequence ............................................................38
Figure 22 – Example of lack of fusion.................................................................................................38
Figure 23 – Examples of slag inclusion................................................................................................38
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Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
1. Introduction
1.1 Notes, Cautions and Warnings
Throughout this manual, notes, cautions, and warnings are used to highlight important information.
These highlights are categorised as follows:
NOTE
An operation, procedure, or background information which requires additional emphasis or is helpful in
efficient operation of the system.
CAUTION
A procedure which, if not properly followed, may cause damage to the equipment.
WARNING
A procedure which, if not properly followed, may cause injury to the operator or others in the operating area.
1.2 Important Safety Precautions
WARNING 1
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF WELDING ARC EQUIPMENT CAN BE DANGEROUS
AND HAZARDOUS TO YOUR HEALTH.
To prevent possible injury, read, understand and follow all warnings, safety precautions and instructions
before using the equipment. Call your local distributor if you have any questions.
GASES AND FUMES
Gases and fumes produced during the welding process can be dangerous and hazardous to your
health.
♦ Keep all fumes and gases from the breathing area. Keep your head out of the welding fume plume.
♦ Use an air-supplied respirator if ventilation is not adequate to remove all fumes and gases.
♦ The kinds of fumes and gases from the welding arc depend on the kind of metal being used, coatings on the
metal, and the different processes. You must be very careful when cutting or welding any metals which may
contain one or more of the following:
Antimony
Beryllium
Cobalt
Manganese
Selenium
Arsenic
Cadmium
Copper
Mercury
Silver
Barium
Chromium
Lead
Nickel
Vanadium
♦ Always read the Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS’s) that should be supplied with the material you are
using. These MSDS’s will give you the information regarding the kind and amount of fumes and gases that
may be dangerous to your health.
♦ Use special equipment, such as water or down draft cutting tables, to capture fumes and gases.
♦ Do not use the welding torch in an area where combustible or explosive gases or materials are located.
♦ Phosgene, a toxic gas, is generated from the vapours of chlorinated solvents and cleansers. Remove all
sources of these vapours.
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Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
♦ Refer to the Victorian Occupational Health and safety (Confined Spaces) Regulations 1996 and Code of
Practice or its equivalent for other states and / or countries.
ELECTRIC SHOCK
Electric Shock can injure or kill. The welding arc process uses and produces high voltage electrical
energy. This electric energy can cause severe or fatal shock to the operator or others in the
workplace.
♦ Never touch any parts that are electrically “live” or “hot.”
♦ Wear dry gloves and clothing. Insulate yourself from the work piece or other parts of the welding circuit.
♦ Repair or replace all worn or damaged parts.
♦ Extra care must be taken when the workplace is moist or damp.
♦ Install and maintain equipment according with local regulations.
♦ Disconnect power supply before performing any service or repairs.
♦ Read and follow all the instructions in the Operating Manual.
FIRE AND EXPLOSION
Fire and explosion can be caused by hot slag, sparks, or the welding arc.
♦ Be sure there is no combustible or flammable material in the workplace. Any material that cannot be
removed must be protected.
♦ Ventilate all flammable or explosive vapours from the workplace.
♦ Do not cut or weld on containers that may have held combustibles.
♦ Provide a fire watch when working in an area where fire hazards may exist.
♦ Hydrogen gas may be formed and trapped under aluminium workpieces when they are cut underwater or
while using a water table. DO NOT cut aluminium alloys underwater or on a water table unless the
hydrogen gas can be eliminated or dissipated. Trapped hydrogen gas that is ignited will cause an explosion.
NOISE
Noise can cause permanent hearing loss. Plasma arc processes can cause noise levels to exceed safe
limits. You must protect your ears from loud noise to prevent permanent loss of hearing.
♦ To protect your hearing from loud noise, wear protective earplugs and/or earmuffs. Protect others in the
workplace.
♦ Noise levels should be measured to be sure the decibels (sound) do not exceed safe levels.
ARC RAYS
Arc Rays can injure your eyes and burn your skin. The welding arc process produces very bright
ultra violet and infra red light. These arc rays will damage your eyes and burn your skin if you are
not properly protected.
♦ To protect your eyes, always wear a welding face shield. Also always wear safety glasses with side shields,
goggles or other protective eye wear.
♦ Wear welding gloves and suitable clothing to protect your skin from the arc rays and sparks.
♦ Keep welding face shield and safety glasses in good condition. Replace lenses when cracked, chipped or
dirty.
♦ Protect others in the work area from the arc rays. Use protective booths, screens or shields.
♦ Use the shade of lens as recommended in this Operating Manual.
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Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
2. Electromagnetic Compatibility
WARNING 2
Extra precautions for Electromagnetic Compatibility may be required when this Welding Power Source is
used in a domestic situation.
2.1 Installation and use - Users Responsibility
The user is responsible for installing and using the welding equipment according to the
manufacturer’s instructions. If electromagnetic disturbances are detected then it shall be the
responsibility of the user of the welding equipment to resolve the situation with the technical
assistance of the manufacturer. In some cases this remedial action may be as simple as earthing the
welding circuit, see NOTE 1. In other cases it could involve constructing an electromagnetic screen
enclosing the Welding Power Source and the work, complete with associated input filters. In all
cases, electromagnetic disturbances shall be reduced to the point where they are no longer
troublesome.
NOTE 1
The welding circuit may or may not be earthed for safety reasons. Changing the earthing arrangements
should only be authorised by a person who is competent to assess whether the changes will increase the risk
of injury, e.g. by allowing parallel welding current return paths which may damage the earth circuits of
other equipment. Further guidance is given in IEC 974-13 Arc Welding Equipment - Installation and use
(under preparation).
2.2 Assessment of Area
Before installing welding equipment, the user shall make an assessment of potential electromagnetic
problems in the surrounding area. The following shall be taken into account
i)
Other supply cables, control cables, signalling and telephone cables; above, below
and adjacent to the welding equipment.
ii) Radio and television transmitters and receivers.
iii) Computer and other control equipment.
iv) Safety critical equipment, e.g. guarding of industrial equipment.
v) The health of people around, e.g. the use of pacemakers and hearing aids.
vi) Equipment used for calibration and measurement.
vii) The time of day that welding or other activities are to be carried out.
viii) The immunity of other equipment in the environment: the user shall ensure that other
equipment being used in the environment is compatible: this may require additional
protection measures.
The size of the surrounding area to be considered will depend on the structure of the building and
other activities that are taking place. The surrounding area may extend beyond the boundaries of the
premises.
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Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
2.3 Methods of Reducing Electromagnetic Emissions
a) Mains Supply
Welding equipment should be connected to the mains supply according to the manufacturer’s
recommendations. If interference occurs, it may be necessary to take additional precautions such
as filtering of the mains supply. Consideration should be given to shielding the supply cable of
permanently installed welding equipment in metallic conduit or equivalent.
Shielding should be electrically continuous throughout its length. The shielding should be
connected to the Welding Power Source so that good electrical contact is maintained between
the conduit and the Welding Power Source enclosure.
b) Maintenance of Welding Equipment
The welding equipment should be routinely maintained according to the manufacturer’s
recommendations. All access and service doors and covers should be closed and properly
fastened when the welding equipment is in operation. The welding equipment should not be
modified in any way except for those changes and adjustments covered in the manufacturer’s
instructions. In particular, the spark gaps of arc striking and stabilising devices should be
adjusted and maintained according to the manufacturer’s recommendations.
c) Welding Cables
The welding cables should be kept as short as possible and should be positioned close together,
running at or close to the floor level.
d) Equipotential Bonding
Bonding of all metallic components in the welding installation and adjacent to it should be
considered. However, metallic components bonded to the work piece will increase the risk that
the operator could receive a shock by touching the metallic components and the electrode at the
same time. The operator should be insulated from all such bonded metallic components.
e) Earthing of the Workpiece
Where the workpiece is not bonded to earth for electrical safety, nor connected to earth because
of it’s size and position, e.g. ship’s hull or building steelwork, a connection bonding the
workpiece to earth may reduce emissions in some, but not all instances. Care should be taken to
prevent the earthing of the workpiece increasing the risk of injury to users, or damage to other
electrical equipment. Where necessary, the connection of the workpiece to earth should be made
by direct connection to the workpiece, but in some countries where direct connection is not
permitted, the bonding should be achieved by suitable capacitance, selected according to
national regulations.
f) Screening and Shielding
Selective screening and shielding of other cables and equipment in the surrounding area may
alleviate problems of interference. Screening the entire welding installation may be considered
for special applications.
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Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
3. General Information
The Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi are light weight, constant current power sources incorporating the latest
digital inverter technology to provide exceptional DC arc characteristics. TIG welding features include
torch trigger latch operation (Slope), pre/post gas flow control, pulse control, spot weld control, TIG DC
HF start, TIG DC lift arc start, hot start control and Up/Down Slope (crater fill) control.
The Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi also has outstanding arc characteristics across a wide range of Manual
Metal Arc Welding (MMAW) electrodes. MMAW welding features include built in VRD, hot start control
and built-in arc force function.
Welding trials, with Voltage Reduction Device turned ON, have shown:
♦ A superior arc initiation characteristics with all types of electrodes due in part to the very fast response
time of the machine once a resistance of less than 175 ohms is sensed, but also due to the hot-start
feature;
♦ Excellent arc stability afforded by the digital inverter technology;
♦ Good restrike characteristics with rutile coated and iron-powder electrodes (even though the machine is
in the low OCV mode), made possible by the fast response time and the presence of the hot-start
feature.
Typical applications are maintenance, site work, breakdowns, repairs, light structures and is supplied with a
2.5-3 metre primary lead.
3.1 User Responsibility
This equipment will perform as per the information contained herein when installed, operated,
maintained and repaired in accordance with the instructions provided. This equipment must be
checked periodically. Defective equipment (including welding leads) should not be used. Parts that
are broken, missing, plainly worn, distorted or contaminated, should be replaced immediately. Should
such repairs or replacements become necessary, it is recommended that appropriately qualified
persons approved by CIGWELD carry out such repairs. Advice in this regard can be obtained by
contacting accredited CIGWELD Distributor.
This equipment or any of its parts should not be altered from standard specification without prior
written approval of CIGWELD. The user of this equipment shall have the sole responsibility for any
malfunction which results from improper use or unauthorised modification from standard
specification, faulty maintenance, damage or improper repair by anyone other than appropriately
qualified persons approved by CIGWELD.
3.2 Duty Cycle
Duty Cycle is the amount of arc-on time (actual welding or cutting time) during any 10 minute period
that a machine can operate at it’s rated output without damaging internal components. For example,
the Transtig 250Pi is designed for 40% duty cycle at 250 amps. This means that it has been designed
and built to provide the rated amperage, 250 amps, for 4 minutes out of every 10 minute period
(40% of 10 minutes is 4 minutes). During the other 6 minutes of the 10 minute period the Transtig
250Pi must idle and be allowed to cool. The thermal cut-out will operate if the duty cycle is
exceeded. As a general rule, a machine rated at more than 35% duty cycle would be more than
ample duty cycle for the majority of general-purpose non-automatic welding. Note that all duty
cycles are calculated for a maximum ambient temperature of 40°C as per IEC 60974-1. Duty cycles
must be reduced, ie reduce the arc-on time, when the ambient temperature exceeds 40°C.
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Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
3.3 Terms Of Warranty - April 2002
1. The Trade Practices Act 1974 (Commonwealth) and similar State Territory legislation relating to the supply
of goods and services, protects consumers' interests by ensuring that consumers are entitled in certain
situations to the benefit of various conditions, warranties, guarantees, rights and remedies (including
warranties as to merchantability and fitness for purpose) associated with the supply of goods and services. A
consumer should seek legal advice as to the nature and extent of these protected interests. In some
circumstances, the supplier of goods and services may legally stipulate that the said conditions, warranties,
guarantees, rights and remedies are limited or entirely excluded. The warranties set out in Clause 2 shall be
additional to any non-excludable warranties to which the Customer may be entitled pursuant to any statute.
2. Subject to Clause 3. CIGWELD gives the following warranties to the Customer:
Insofar as they are manufactured or imported by CIGWELD, goods will upon delivery be of merchantable
quality and reasonably fit for the purpose for which they are supplied by CIGWELD.
CIGWELD will repair or, at its option, replace those of the goods which, upon examination, are found by
CIGWELD to be defective in workmanship and/or materials.
CIGWELD reserves the right to request documented evidence of date of purchase.
3. The Warranty in Clause 2;
Is conditional upon:
The Customer notifying CIGWELD or our Accredited Distributor in writing of its claim within seven (7) days
of becoming aware of the basis thereof, and at its own expense returning the goods which are the subject of
the claim to CIGWELD or nominated Accredited Distributor/Accredited Service Agent.
The goods being used in accordance with the Manufacturer's Operating Manuals, and under competent
supervision.
Does not apply to:
Obsolete goods sold at auction, second-hand goods and prototype goods.
Breakdown or malfunction caused by accident, misuse or normal wear and tear.
Repairs or replacement made other than by CIGWELD or Accredited Service Agents, unless by prior
arrangement with CIGWELD.
Replacement parts or accessories which may affect product safety or performance and which are not
manufactured, distributed or approved by CIGWELD.
4. CIGWELD declares that, to the extent permitted by law, it hereby limits its liability in respect of the supply of
goods which are not of a kind ordinarily acquired for personal, domestic or household use or consumption to
any one or more of the following (the choice of which shall be at the option of CIGWELD).
The replacement of the goods or the supply of equivalent goods.
The repair of goods.
The payment of cost of replacing the goods or acquiring equivalent goods.
The payment of the cost of having goods repaired.
5. Except as provided in Clauses 2 to 4 above, to the extent permitted by statute, CIGWELD hereby excludes all
liability for any loss, damage, death or injury of any kind whatsoever occasioned to the Customer in respect of
the supply of goods including direct, indirect, consequential or incidental loss, damage or injury of any kind.
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Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
3.4 Warranty Schedule - March 2001
These warranty periods relate to the warranty conditions in clause 2. All warranty periods are from date of sale from
the Accredited Distributor of the equipment. Notwithstanding the foregoing, in no event shall the warranty period
extend more than the time stated plus one year from the date CIGWELD delivered the product to the Accredited
Distributor. Unless otherwise stated the warranty period includes parts and labour.
CIGWELD reserves the right to request documented evidence of date of purchase.
WARRANTY PERIOD
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
Main Power Magnetics...................................................................................2 years (Labour 1 year)
Original Main Power Rectifiers, Control P.C. Boards .....................................2 years (Labour 1 year)
All other circuits and components including, but not limited to, relays,
switches, contactors, solenoids, fans, power switch semi-conductors............................1 year
Please note that the information detailed in this statement supersedes any prior published data produced by
CIGWELD.
WARNING 3
For the purpose of safety and performance and to protect your CIGWELD Equipment Warranty always use
genuine CIGWELD replacement parts and accessories.
4. Safe Practices For The Use Of Welding Equipment
In many situations the “striking” voltage can be hazardous. Any person touching simultaneously the
electrode lead/terminal and the work lead/terminal may receive a serious electrical shock. Additional
precautions must be exercised where two Welding Power Sources are being used close to each other
because, under certain conditions, the voltages between the welding terminals of the two Welding Power
Sources could be two times the specified open circuit voltage.
It is essential that the Welding Power Source be correctly installed, if necessary, by a qualified electrician
and maintained in sound mechanical and electrical condition. It is also important that the Welding Power
Source be switched off when not in use.
4.1 Precautions to be Taken by Operators
♦ Whenever practicable, all parts of the welding circuit should be isolated from earth and other
conducting material and under no circumstances should any earthing conductor of the electrical
installation be used in place of the work lead.
♦ The Mains supply voltage should be switched off before connecting or disconnecting welding
leads. Welding lead connections must have clean contact surfaces and must be securely tightened.
Poor connections will result in overheating and loss of welding current. All parts of the welding
circuit, including the return paths, are to be considered electrically alive, so the operator must
ensure that no part of the body is placed in such a position that it will provide a path for an electric
current.
♦ Welding operators should avoid direct contact with the work to be welded or against any metal in
contact with the work. When this cannot be avoided the operator must not touch any exposed
portion of the electrode holder with any part of the body. Should this occur, the operator will risk
completing the electrical circuit through the body.
♦ When welding in confined spaces, where reasonable movement is restricted, particular care must
be taken to ensure that the area is well ventilated and the operator is under constant observation
by a person who can immediately switch off the power and give assistance in an emergency.
♦ The flux covering of an electrode cannot be assumed to provide effective insulation, consequently
an insulating glove must be worn when placing an electrode into its holder, or should it be
necessary to handle an electrode once it is in contact with its holder.
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Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
♦ During pauses between welding runs, electrode holders should be so placed that they cannot make
electrical contact with persons or conductive objects.
♦ The welding leads, both the electrode lead and the work lead, must be protected from damage.
Damaged leads must not be used.
♦ Keep combustible materials away from the welding area. Have a suitable fire extinguisher handy.
♦ Do not stand on damp ground when welding.
4.2 Personal Protection
The radiation from an electric arc during the welding process can seriously harm eyes and skin. It is
essential that the following precautions be taken:
♦ Gloves should be flameproof gauntlet type to protect hands and wrists from heat burns and
harmful radiations. They should be kept dry and in good repair.
♦ Protective clothing must protect the operator from burns, spatter and harmful radiation. Woollen
clothing is preferable to cotton because of its greater flame resistance. Clothing should be free
from oil or grease. Wear leggings and spats to protect the lower portion of the legs and to
prevent slag and molten metal from falling into boots or shoes.
♦ Face Shield
It is recommended to use a welding face shield, conforming to the relevant standards, when
electric arc welding. Use a welding face shield in serviceable condition and fitted with an eye filter
lens to safely reduce harmful radiation from the arc as per Table 1.
Description of Process
Approximate Range of
Welding Current Amperes
Filters Recommended
Shade Number
40-100
100-200
200-300
300-400
5-100
100-200
200-250
250-350
8
10
11
12
10
11
12
13
MMAW Stick Welding Electrodes
MMAW Stick Welding Electrodes
MMAW Stick Welding Electrodes
MMAW Stick Welding Electrodes
GTAW Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG)
GTAW Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG)
GTAW Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG)
GTAW Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG)
Table 1 - Filter lens size verses welding current
Protective filter lenses are provided to reduce the intensity of radiation entering the eye thus
filtering out harmful infra-red, ultra-violet radiation and a percentage of the visible light. Such
filter lenses are incorporated within face shields. To prevent damage to the filter lenses from
molten or hard particles an additional hard clear glass or special clear external cover lens is
provided. This cover lens should always be kept in place and replaced before the damage impairs
your vision while welding.
5. Resuscitation For Electric Shock Victims
Electric shock may kill immediately. Early resuscitation is required if a life is to be saved. Every Second
Counts! Electrical currents may:
♦ Stop the heart;
♦ Cause contraction of the muscles of the body;
♦ Paralyse breathing due to paralysis of the centre of respiration in the brain;
♦ Cause burns.
The victims often cannot free themselves from the current and may not be able to breathe due to fixation of
the chest.
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Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
5.1 Resuscitation
Efficient resuscitation requires training which is available from the St John’s Ambulance Association,
Red Cross and other sources.
1 Don’t become a victim. Switch off power if
possible. If not, remove victim from contact,
using some insulating material.
2 If unconscious, place victim on their side and
clear vomit and other foreign matter from
mouth. Check for breathing by look, listen and
feel. If not breathing, commence expired air
resuscitation (E.A.R.). This should take no
longer than 3 or 4 seconds.
3 Place victim flat on their back on a hard surface,
open airway – using head tilt and jaw support as
shown.
4 Begin artificial breathing - 5 full breaths in 10
seconds, sealing nostrils with cheek or holding
nose closed.
5 Check carotid pulse in neck. If pulse is present,
continue E.A.R.
15 breaths per minute for adults.
20 breaths per minute for children.
6 If pulse is absent and you have been trained,
begin cardio pulmonary resuscitation (C.P.R).
Cardiac Compression – depress lower end of
breast bone (sternum) 4cm to 5cm, less for small
children.
One rescuer - 2 breaths, 15 compressions in 15
seconds, i.e. 4 cycles per minute.
Two rescuers - 1 breath, 5 compressions in 5
seconds, i.e. 12 cycles per minute.
7 Check for return of pulse and breathing after 1
minute and at least every 2 minutes. Continue
uninterrupted until trained assistance is
available. When breathing and pulse return,
turn on side and continue observation.
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Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
6. Specifications
Description (NOTE 2)
Transtig 200Pi
Transtig 250Pi
Transtig 300Pi
Power Source Part Number
700720
700721
700722
Plant Part Number
700730
N/A
N/A
Fan Cooled
Fan Cooled
Fan Cooled
Heavy Duty Inverter;
DC GTAW (TIG) &
MMAW (Stick)
Heavy Duty Inverter;
DC GTAW (TIG) &
MMAW (Stick)
Heavy Duty Inverter;
DC GTAW (TIG) &
MMAW (Stick)
8kg
18kg
22kg
H260mm x W130mm
x D340mm
H360mm x W180mm
x D420mm
H420mm x W210mm
x D450mm
Designed to European Standard
IEC 60974-1
IEC 60974-1
IEC 60974-1
Number of Phases
Single Phase
Three Phase
Three Phase
Nominal Supply Voltage
240V ±10%
415V ±10%
415V ±10%
50/60Hz
50/60Hz
50/60Hz
Mains Fuse & Circuit to suit factory fitted
Lead that will achieve the following rated weld
current/weld process:
GTAW Current & Duty Cycle
MMAW Current & Duty Cycle
ª 16A
100A @ 100%
65A @ 100%
ª 17A/Phase
ª 22A/Phase
250A @ 40%
250A @ 40%
300A @ 30%
300A @ 30%
Mains Fuse & Circuit to achieve the
maximum rated weld current/weld process,
refer to section 8.4 on page 21:
GTAW Current & Duty Cycle
MMAW Current & Duty Cycle
ª 34A
µ200A @ 20%
µ140A @ 25%
ª 17A/Phase
ª 22A/Phase
250A @ 40%
250A @ 40%
300A @ 30%
300A @ 30%
Maximum TIG Current & Duty Cycle
µ200A @ 20%
250A @ 40%
300A @ 30%
Maximum MMAW Current & Duty Cycle
µ160A @ 19%
250A @ 40%
300A @ 30%
GTAW Welding Current @ 100% Duty Cycle
100A
160A
160A
MMAW Welding Current @ 100% Duty Cycle
70A
160A
160A
Effective Input Current for Max Welding
Current @ 100% Duty Cycle
17A
10.8A/Phase
12A/Phase
Maximum Input Current for Max Welding
Current
34A
17A/Phase
22A/Phase
Maximum Input Current for Short Circuit
34A
17A/Phase
22A/Phase
♣ 10kVA
♣ 12.5kVA
♣ 16kVA
Flexible Supply Cable Size Factory Fitted
20A Heavy Duty
25A Heavy Duty
25A Heavy Duty
Thermal Protection
Thermal Sensors
Thermal Sensors
Thermal Sensors
5 – 200A
5 – 250A
5 – 300A
67V
62V
62V
Cooling
Welder Type & Welding process
Welding Power Source mass
Dimensions
Nominal Supply Frequency
Single Phase Generator Requirement
Welding Current Range
Nominal Open Circuit Voltage (OCV)
ª Motor start fuses or thermal circuit breakers are recommended for this application.
♣ The Generators stated kVA ratings MUST be adhered to minimise the welding Power Source’s possible
failure as a result of inadequate Mains Power at the welder’s MAXIMUM welding current and MAXIMUM
duty cycle. Warranty will be void if the welding Power Source fails as a result of being operated on
inadequate Mains Power.
µ To achieve these ratings, the 15 Amp plug (as supplied) must be replaced with a 20 Amp plug. This must be
carried out by a qualified electrical tradesperson.
14
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
NOTE 2
Due to variations that can occur in manufactured products, claimed performance, voltages, ratings, all capacities,
measurements, dimensions and weights quoted are approximate only. Achievable capacities and ratings in use and
operation will depend upon correct installation, use, applications, maintenance and service.
6.1 Weld Parameter Ranges and Controls
a) Weld Process selection for Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
Weld Mode
Weld Process
Selection
STD
SLOPE
REPEAT
SPOT
PULSE
ON/OFF
STICK
HF
TIG
LIFT
TIG
ü
û
û
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
û
û
ü
ü
û
ü
Description
2T operation in TIG Modes
4T operation in TIG Modes with crater fill
4T operation in TIG Modes with repeat operation
and crater fill
2T operation spot welding in HF TIG
Pulse operation in TIG Modes
Table 2 - Weld Process selection verses Weld Mode for Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
b) Weld Parameter Descriptions for Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
Parameter
PRE-FLOW
HOT START
INITIAL CUR.
UP SLOPE
PEAK CUR.
BASE (WELD) TIG
BASE (WELD)
STICK
SPOT TIME
PULSE WIDTH
PULSE FREQ.
Description
This parameter operates in TIG modes only and is used to get gas to the weld
zone prior to striking the arc, once the torch trigger switch has been pressed. This
control is used to dramatically reduce weld porosity at the start of a weld.
This parameter operates in all weld modes and is used to heat up the weld zone in
TIG modes or improve the start characteristics for stick electrodes. e.g. low
hydrogen electrodes . It sets the peak start current on top of the BASE (WELD)
current.
e.g. HOT START current = 150 amps when BASE (WELD) = 100 amps &
HOT START = 50A
This parameter operates in SLOPE or REPEAT (4T) TIG modes only and is used
to set the start current for TIG. The Start Current remains on until the torch
trigger switch is released after it has been depressed.
This parameter operates in TIG modes only and is used to set the time for the
weld current to ramp up, after the torch trigger switch has been pressed then
released, from INITIAL CUR to PEAK or BASE current
This parameter sets the PEAK weld current when in PULSE mode
This parameter sets the TIG WELD current in STD, SLOPE, REPEAT and SPOT
modes when PULSE is off. This parameter also sets the BASE (background) weld
current when PULSE is on.
This parameter sets the STICK weld current.
This parameter sets the duration of the SPOT TIME in HF TIG mode only
This parameter sets the percentage on time of the PULSE FREQUENCY for
PEAK weld current when the PULSE is on.
This parameter sets the PULSE FREQUENCY when the PULSE is on.
15
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
Parameter
DOWN SLOPE
CRATER CUR.
POST-FLOW
Description
This parameter operates in TIG modes only and is used to set the time for the
weld current to ramp down, after the torch trigger switch has been pressed, to
CRATER CUR. This control is used to eliminate the crater that can form at the
completion of a weld.
This parameter operates in SLOPE or REPEAT (4T) TIG modes only and is used
to set the finish current for TIG. The CRATER Current remains on until the torch
trigger switch is released after it has been depressed.
This parameter operates in TIG modes only and is used to adjust the post gas
flow time once the arc has extinguished. This control is used to dramatically
reduce oxidation of the tungsten electrode.
Table 3 - Weld Parameter Descriptions for Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
c) Weld Parameters for Transtig 200Pi
Weld Mode
Weld
Parameter
PRE-FLOW
Parameter
Range
0.0 to 1.0 sec
Factory
Setting
0.1 sec
Incremental
Unit
0.1 sec
STICK
HF
TIG
LIFT
TIG
1A
û
ü
û
û
û
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
û
ü
ü
ü
HOT START
0 to 70A
20A
1A
INITIAL CUR.
5 to 200A
30A
1A
UP SLOPE
0 to 15 sec
1 sec
0.1 sec
PEAK CUR.
5 to 200A
120A
5 to 200A
80A
1A
BASE (WELD)
STICK
û
ü
ü
5 to 160A
80A
1A
SPOT TIME
0.5 to 5.0 sec
2 sec
0.1 sec
PULSE WIDTH
15 to 80%
50%
1%
PULSE FREQ.
0.5 to 500Hz
100.0Hz
See Table 7
DOWN SLOPE
0 to 25 sec
3 sec
0.1 sec
CRATER CUR.
5 to 200A
30A
1A
POST-FLOW
0.0 to 60 sec
10 sec
0.1 sec
ü
û
û
û
û
û
û
û
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
û
û
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
BASE (WELD) TIG
Table 4 - Weld Parameters for Transtig 200Pi
d) Weld Parameters for Transtig 250Pi
Weld Mode
Weld
Parameter
PRE-FLOW
Parameter
Range
0.0 to 1.0 sec
Factory
Setting
0.1 sec
Incremental
Unit
0.1 sec
HOT START
0 to 70A
20A
1A
INITIAL CUR.
5 to 250A
30A
1A
UP SLOPE
0 to 15 sec
1 sec
0.1 sec
PEAK CUR.
5 to 250A
120A
1A
16
STICK
HF
TIG
LIFT
TIG
û
ü
û
û
û
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
û
ü
ü
ü
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
Weld Mode
Weld
Parameter
BASE (WELD) TIG
or STICK
Parameter
Range
Factory
Setting
Incremental
Unit
5 to 250A
80A
1A
SPOT TIME
0.5 to 5.0 sec
2 sec
0.1 sec
PULSE WIDTH
15 to 80%
50%
1%
PULSE FREQ.
0.5 to 500Hz
100.0Hz
See Table 7
DOWN SLOPE
0 to 25 sec
3 sec
0.1 sec
CRATER CUR.
5 to 250A
30A
1A
POST-FLOW
0.0 to 60 sec
10 sec
0.1 sec
STICK
HF
TIG
LIFT
TIG
ü
û
û
û
û
û
û
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
û
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
Table 5 - Weld Parameters for Transtig 250Pi
e) Weld Parameters for Transtig 300Pi
Weld Mode
Weld
Parameter
PRE-FLOW
Parameter
Range
0.0 to 1.0 sec
Factory
Setting
0.1 sec
Incremental
Unit
0.1 sec
HOT START
0 to 70A
20A
1A
INITIAL CUR.
5 to 300A
30A
1A
UP SLOPE
0 to 15 sec
1 sec
0.1 sec
PEAK CUR.
5 to 300A
120A
1A
BASE (WELD) TIG
or STICK
5 to 300A
80A
1A
SPOT TIME
0.5 to 5.0 sec
2 sec
0.1 sec
PULSE WIDTH
15 to 80%
50%
1%
PULSE FREQ.
0.5 to 500Hz
100.0Hz
See Table 7
DOWN SLOPE
0 to 25 sec
3 sec
0.1 sec
CRATER CUR.
5 to 300A
30A
1A
POST-FLOW
0.0 to 60 sec
10 sec
0.1 sec
STICK
HF
TIG
LIFT
TIG
û
ü
û
û
û
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
û
ü
ü
ü
ü
û
û
û
û
û
û
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
û
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
Table 6 - Weld Parameters for Transtig 300Pi
PULSE FREQ. Range
0.5 to 20Hz
Incremental Unit
0.1Hz
20 to 100Hz
1Hz
100 to 500Hz
5Hz
Table 7 - PULSE FREQ. Range and Incremental Units
6.2 Power Source Features
Feature
New Digital Control
Description
• Almost all welding parameters are adjustable
Touch Panel Switches
• Touch switches eliminate mechanical damage
17
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
Feature
Front Control Cover
Description
• Protects front panel controls
Digital Meter
• Displays selected weld parameter value
• Displays average weld current when welding
• Displays average weld current for 8 seconds after weld
has been completed
• A selected weld parameter value can be adjusted at any
time even whilst welding
Save/Load (recall)
(Transtig 300Pi only)
• Five welding programs can be saved or loaded
(recalled) by using the Save/Load buttons
• The programs remain in EEPROM even when the
Mains supply voltage is turned off
• Current programs in the EEPROM can be updated at
any time using the save button
Intelligent Fan Control
(Transtig 250Pi, 300Pi only)
• The intelligent cooling system is designed to reduce
dust and foreign material build-up, whilst providing
optimum cooling.
• Fan speed reduces approximately 30 seconds after
machine is turned on
• Fan speed increases when internal components reaches
operating temperature
ON/OFF switch
• Mains ON/OFF switch located on rear panel
Voltage Reduction Device (VRD)
• VRD fully complies to IEC 90674-1
• With VRD TURNED ON and Stick mode selected, the
green VRD light is ON when not welding
• With VRD TURNED ON and Stick mode selected, the
red VRD light is ON when welding
• With VRD TURNED OFF and Stick mode selected,
the red VRD light is ON when not welding and
welding
• Expense after market VRD NOT required
Control Knob
• For the selected weld parameter, rotating the knob
clockwise increase the parameter
• Rotating the knob anti-clockwise decrease the
parameter
• A selected weld parameter value can be adjusted at any
time even whilst welding
• Pushing the knob in sets the selected parameter then
displays the next parameter
Self Diagnosis Using Error Codes
• An error code is displayed on the Digital Meter when a
problem occurs with Mains supply voltage or internal
component problems. Refer to section 16.3 on page 39
Buzzer
• Buzzer identifies when a parameter is set, error code is
displayed or program is saved (Transtig 300 Pi only)
18
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
6.3 Product Contents
Description
Welding Power Source
Multi-pin plug
Gas Fitting
Two Dinse Connectors
Operating Manual
TIG torch SA174D1
Lead set 5M 200A
Regulator/Flowmeter
Gas Hose with fittings
Product Bag
Kit TIG torch
Transtig 200Pi
700730 (Plant)
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
Transtig 200Pi
700720
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
—
—
—
—
—
—
Transtig 250Pi
700721
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
—
—
—
—
—
—
Transtig 300Pi
700722
ü
ü
ü
ü
ü
—
—
—
—
—
—
Transtig
250Pi
OTD10/4007
Remote ON/OFF Switch
ü
ü
—
OTD10/4013
Remote ON/OFF Switch & Current Control
ü
ü
—
OTD10/4014
Remote Pendant Current Control
ü
ü
—
OTD10/4016
Remote Foot Current Control
ü
ü
—
OTD10/2001
Remote ON/OFF Switch
—
—
ü
OTD10/2004
Remote ON/OFF Switch & Current Control
—
—
ü
OTD10/2005
Remote Pendant Current Control
—
—
ü
OTD10/2007
Remote Foot Current Control
—
—
646323
5M 200A Welding Lead Set
—
646325
8M 400A Welding Lead Set
ü
—
ü
—
ü
ü
453833
Hiderok Helmet
ü
704829
8M 250A Work Lead
ü
—
704828
8M 330A Work Lead
ü
—
ü
—
ü
ü
646363
Wire Brush, 4 rows
ü
ü
ü
BGSAK2
TIG Torch Accessory Kit
ü
ü
ü
304710402
190A TIG Torch, 4M, Rigid Neck, Switch
ü
—
—
308710402
190A TIG Torch, 8M, Rigid Neck, Switch
ü
—
—
304720401
250A TIG Torch, 4M, Rigid Neck, Switch
—
ü
ü
308720401
250A TIG Torch, 4M, Flex Neck, Switch
—
ü
ü
BGSAK2
TIG Torch Accessory Start up Kit
ü
ü
ü
301526
Flowmeter/Regulator
ü
ü
ü
Part Number
Description
19
Transtig
300Pi
Transtig
200Pi
6.4 Accessories
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
7. Voltage Reduction Device (VRD)
WARNING
WELDING IN HAZARDOUS ENVIRONMENTS
Before welding in hazardous environments the VOLTAGE REDUCTION DEVICE (VRD) MUST BE TURNED
ON. For example confined spaces, wet areas and hot humid conditions are classed as hazardous environments.
WARNING
VRD TURN ON PROCEDURE
CIGWELD recommends that an Accredited CIGWELD Service Agent TURNS ON the VOLTAGE REDUCTION
DEVICE (VRD) as they have the knowledge and equipment to preform this operation.
WARNING TO EMPLOYERS
Workplace safety legislation imposes substantial duties on employers to provide a safe workplace and equipment for its
employees.
If an employer fails to do so criminal prosecution of the company and its senior officers and employees may result with
substantial penalties including fines and in certain cases jail sentences.
It is therefore essential employers acquire safe equipment and ensure its employees are properly trained in its use.
7.1 VRD Specification
With the VRD TURN ON, this equipment meets the following specifications
Description
VRD Open Circuit Voltage
VRD Resistance
VRD Turn OFF Time
Transtig 200Pi,
250Pi, 300Pi
15.3 to 19.8V
Notes
Open circuit voltage between welding
terminals
148 to 193 ohms The required resistance between welding
terminals to turn ON the welding power
0.2 to 0.3 seconds The time taken to turn OFF the welding
power once the welding current has
stopped
7.2 VRD Maintenance
Routine inspection and testing (power source)
An inspection of the power source, an insulation resistance test and an earthing resistance test shall
be carried out in accordance with clause 4.1 of AS 1647.2
a) For transportable equipment, at least once every 3 months; and
b) For fixed equipment, at least once every 12 months.
The owners of the equipment shall keep a suitable record of the periodic tests.
Note 3
A transportable power source is any equipment that is not permanently connected and fixed in the position
in which it is operated.
20
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
In addition to the above tests and specifically in relation to the VRD fitted to this machine, the
following periodic tests should also be conducted by an accredited CIGWELD service agent.
Description
AS3195 & IEC 60974-1 Requirements
VRD Open Circuit Voltage
Less than 20V; at Vin=240V or 415V
VRD Turn ON Resistance
Less than 200 ohms
VRD Turn OFF Time
Less than 0.3 seconds
If this equipment is used in a hazardous location or environments with a high risk of electrocution
then the above tests should be carried out prior to entering this location.
8. Installation Recommendations
8.1 Environment
The Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi is designed for use in hazardous environments when the VRD is
TURNED ON.
a) Examples of environments with increased hazardous environments are i)
In locations in which freedom of movement is restricted, so that the operator is
forced to perform the work in a cramped (kneeling, sitting or lying) position with
physical contact with conductive parts;
ii) In locations which are fully or partially limited by conductive elements, and in which
there is a high risk of unavoidable or accidental contact by the operator, or
iii) In wet or damp hot locations where humidity or perspiration considerable reduces the
skin resistance of the human body and the insulation properties of accessories.
b) Environments with hazardous environments do not include places where electrically
conductive parts in the near vicinity of the operator, which can cause increased hazard,
have been insulated.
8.2 Location
Be sure to locate the welder according to the following guidelines:
a) In areas, free from moisture and dust. b) Ambient temperature between 0°C to 40°C.
c) In areas, free from oil, steam and
d) In areas, not subjected to abnormal vibration
corrosive gases.
or shock.
e) In areas, not exposed to direct sunlight f) Place at a distance of 300mm or more from
or rain.
walls or similar that could restrict natural air
flow for cooling.
8.3 Ventilation
Since the inhalation of welding fumes can be harmful, ensure that the welding area is effectively
ventilated.
8.4 Mains Supply Voltage Requirements
The Mains supply voltage should be within ± 10% of the rated Mains supply voltage. Too low a
voltage may cause the fuse or circuit breaker to rupture due to the increased primary current. Too
high a supply voltage will cause the Power Source components to fail.
21
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
8.5 240V Mains Current Circuit Requirements for the Transtig 200 Pi
The Welding Power Source must be:
♦ Correctly installed, if necessary, by a qualified electrician.
♦ Correctly earthed (electrically) in accordance with local regulations.
♦ Connected to the correct size 240V Mains Current Circuit as per the Specifications
WARNING 4
CIGWELD advises that this equipment be electrically connected by a qualified electrical trades-person.
The following 240V Mains Current Circuit recommendations are required to obtain the maximum
welding current and duty cycle from this welding equipment:
Model
Mains Supply Lead
Size (Factory
Fitted)
Minimum 240V Mains
Current Circuit Size
TIG Current
& Duty Cycle
Transtig 200Pi
2.5 mm2
34 Amps
200A @ 20%
Table 8 - 240V Mains Current Circuit sizes to achieve maximum current
9. High Frequency Considerations
9.1 Introduction
The importance of correct installation of high frequency welding equipment cannot be overemphasised. Interference due to high frequency initiated or stabilised arc is almost invariably traced
to improper installation. The following information is intended as a guide for personnel installing
high frequency welding machines.
9.2 Warning
a) Explosives
The high frequency section of this machine has an output similar to a radio transmitter. The
machine should NOT be used in the vicinity of blasting operations due to the danger of
premature firing.
b) Computers
It is also possible that operation close to computer installations may cause computer
malfunction.
9.3 High Frequency Interference
Interference may be transmitted by a high frequency initiated or stabilised arc welding machine in the
following ways:
a) Direct Radiation
Radiation from the machine can occur if the case is metal and is not properly earthed. It can
occur through apertures such as open access panels. The shielding of the high frequency unit in
the Power Source will prevent direct radiation if the equipment is properly earthed.
22
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
b) Transmission via the Supply Lead
Without adequate shielding and filtering, high frequency energy may be fed to the wiring within
the installation (mains) by direct coupling. The energy is then transmitted by both radiation and
conduction. Adequate shielding and filtering is provided in the Power Source.
c) Radiation from Welding Leads
Radiated interference from welding leads, although pronounced in the vicinity of the leads,
diminishes rapidly with distance. Keeping leads as short as possible will minimise this type of
interference. Looping and suspending of leads should be avoided where possible.
d) Re-radiation from Unearthed Metallic Objects
A major factor contributing to interference is re-radiation from unearthed metallic objects close
to the welding leads. Effective earthing of such objects will prevent re-radiation in most cases.
10. Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi Controls
1
6
Transtig 200 Pi
WARNING
PROTECT YOURSELF AND OTHERS, READ AND UNDERSTAND
THIS LABEL. DO NOT REMOVE, DESTROY OR COVER THIS
WARNING. With the VRD enabled, this welding equipment is
suitable for use in environments with increased hazard of
electricshock.
2
*This welding equipment has a factory fitted
VOLTAGE REDUCTION DEVICE (VRD) which
complies to IEC 974-1 & AS3195.
If the Factory set shut down time is changed
then this equipment no longer complies to
IEC 974-1 or AS3195.
Read and understand the operating
manual and your employer’s safety
practices.
Keep all fumes and gases away from
your head and general breathing area.
Remove combustibles from working
Potentially lethal voltages may be present on
the output of this equipment.
Do not touch electrically live parts. Insulate
yourself and others from work and ground.
Use a welding shield with proper filter.
Use proper protective ear muffs or
7
5
4
3
8
Figure 1 – Transtig 200 Pi Power Source
6
1
2
3
5
8
4
Figure 2 – Transtig 250 Pi Power Source
23
7
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
1
7
6
2
5
3
8
4
Figure 3 – Transtig 300 Pi Power Source
10.1 Control Knob •
This control sets the selected weld parameter, rotating it clockwise increase the parameter whilst
anti-clockwise rotation decreases the parameter. Pushing the knob in sets the adjusted parameter and
the intelligent controls proceeds to the next weld parameter for the selected weld mode.
10.2 Remote Control Socket
E
‚
2
1
12345678
a) Transtig 200 Pi, 250 Pi
5 4 3
The 8 pin Remote Control Socket is used to
8 7 6
connect remote current control devices to the
welding Power Source. To make connections, align keyway, insert plug, and
Front view of 8-Socket Receptacle
rotate threaded collar fully clockwise.
Socket Pin
1
2
3
4
5k Ohms
Function
Mains Earth
Torch Switch Input (24V) to energise weld current.
(connect pins 2 & 3 to turn on welding current)
Torch Switch Input (0V) to energise weld current
(connect pins 2 & 3 to turn on welding current)
Connect pin 4 to pin 8 to instruct machine that a remote control device is connected
(12V DC supply)
5
5k ohm (maximum) connection to 5k ohm remote control potentiometer
6
Zero ohm (minimum) connection to 5k ohm remote control potentiometer
7
Wiper arm connection to 5k ohm remote control potentiometer
8
Connect pin 4 to pin 8 to instruct machine that a remote control device is connected
(0V)
24
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
E
b) Transtig 300 Pi
The 14 pin Remote Control Socket
is used to connect remote current
control devices to the welding Power
Source. To make connections,
align keyway, insert plug, and rotate
threaded collar fully clockwise.
Socket Pin
A
A
A B C D E F G H I J K LMN
B
C
L
D
I
N
M
E
5k ohms
J
K
H
G
F
Front view of 14
Socket Receptacle
Function
Torch Switch Input (24V) to energise weld current.
(connect pins A & B to turn on welding current)
B
Torch Switch Input (0V) to energise weld current
(connect pins A & B to turn on welding current)
C
D
5k ohm (maximum) connection to 5k ohm remote control potentiometer
Zero ohm (minimum) connection to 5k ohm remote control potentiometer
E
Wiper arm connection to 5k ohm remote control potentiometer
F
Connect pin 4 to pin 8 to instruct machine that a remote control device is connected
(0V)
G
Mains Earth
H,I,J,K
Not Used
L
Connect pin 4 to pin 8 to instruct machine that a remote control device is connected
(12V DC supply)
M
OK to move current detect signal for robotics applications
N
OK to move current detect signal for robotics applications
10.3 Positive Terminal ƒ
Welding current flows from the Power Source via heavy duty bayonet type terminal. It is essential,
however, that the male plug is inserted and turned securely to achieve a sound electrical connection.
10.4 Negative Terminal „
Welding current flows from the Power Source via heavy duty bayonet type terminal. It is essential,
however, that the male plug is inserted and turned securely to achieve a sound electrical connection.
CAUTION 1
Loose welding terminal connections can cause overheating and result in the male plug being fused in the
bayonet terminal.
10.5 Gas Outlet …
The Gas Outlet is control by an in-built solenoid valve and is a 5/8 18 UNF female gas fitting.
10.6 ON/OFF Switch †
This switch connects the Mains supply voltage to the inverter when in the ON position. This enables
the user to commence welding
25
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
WARNING 5
When the welder is connected to the Mains supply voltage, the internal electrical components maybe at
240V potential with respect to earth.
10.7 Input Cable ‡
The input cable connects the Mains supply voltage to the equipment.
10.8 Gas Inlet ˆ
The Gas Inlet connects the welding gas to the in-built solenoid valve. A 5/8 18UNF male nut &
nipple is supplied with the Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi to connect a 5mm ID gas hose to the Gas
Inlet fitting.
11. Set-up For MMAW (Stick) and GTAW
(TIG)
Conventional operating procedures apply when using
the Welding Power Source, i.e. connect work lead
directly to workpiece and electrode lead is used to
hold electrode. Wide safety margins provided by the
coil design ensure that the Welding Power Source will
withstand short term overload without adverse
effects. The welding current range values should be
used as a guide only. Current delivered to the arc is
dependent on the welding arc voltage, and as welding
arc voltage varies between different classes of
electrodes, welding current at any one setting would
vary according to the type of electrode in use. The
operator should use the welding current range values as
a guide, then finally adjust the current setting to suit the
application.
Figure 4 – Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi Set-up
WARNING 6
Before connecting the work clamp to the work and inserting the electrode in the
electrode holder make sure the Mains power supply is switched off.
CAUTION 2
Remove any packaging material prior to use. Do not block the air vents at the front or rear or sides of the Welding
Power Source.
CAUTION 3
DO NOT change the Weld Mode or Weld Process Mode until after POST-FLOW time has finished.
12. Sequence Of Operation
NOTE 4
The control panels shown operation are the same for all models. The Transtig 200Pi control panels are shown
throughout this section. To view each individual weld parameter value press the left or right arrow buttons or press
the control knob.
26
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
12.1 Stick Welding
VRD
ON
PULSE
OFF
Refer to Manual
for correct use
HOT
START
STD
PULSE
ON
PEAK
PULSE
CUR.
WIDTH
PULSE
BASE
FREQ.
(WELD)
UP
SLOPE
INITIAL
CUR.
SLOPE
DOWN
SLOPE
CRATER
CUR.
(m)sec
SPOT
•Connect work lead to negative terminal
•Connect electrode lead to positive terminal
•Set HOT START current, press control knob
POST-FLOW
%
•Refer to section 7 on page 20 for
recommendations on VRD.
•Switch machine on
SPOT
TIME
PRE-FLOW
Hz
REPEAT
•Refer to NOTE 4 on page 26
A
•Set BASE (WELD) current, press control knob
STICK
•Connect remote control device if required
HF TIG
•Commence welding
LIFT TIG
Figure 5 – STICK mode
12.2 HF TIG Welding
PULSE
VRD
ON
OFF
Refer to Manual
for correct use
UP
SLOPE
HOT
START
INITIAL
CUR.
•Refer to NOTE 4 on page 26
•Refer to CAUTION 3 on page 26
•Connect work lead to positive terminal
•Connect TIG torch to negative terminal
•Switch machine on
•Set PRE-FLOW time, press control knob
•Set HOT START current, press control knob
•Set BASE (WELD) current, press control knob
•Set POST-FLOW time, press control knob
•Connect remote control device if required
•Commence welding
STD
PULSE
ON
PEAK
PULSE
CUR.
WIDTH
PULSE
FREQ.
BASE
(WELD)
SLOPE
DOWN
SLOPE
CRATER
CUR.
REPEAT
SPOT
SPOT
TIME
POST-FLOW
PRE-FLOW
STICK
HF TIG
Hz
(m)sec
%
A
LIFT TIG
Figure 6 – HF TIG STD Mode – PULSE OFF
PULSE
VRD
ON
OFF
Refer to Manual
for correct use
UP
SLOPE
HOT
START
PULSE
ON
PEAK
PULSE
CUR.
WIDTH
PULSE
BASE
FREQ.
(WELD)
INITIAL
CUR.
•Refer to NOTE 4 on page 26
•Refer to CAUTION 3 on page 26
•Connect work lead to positive terminal
•Connect TIG torch to negative terminal
•Switch machine on
•Set PRE-FLOW time, press control knob
•Set HOT START current, press control knob
•Set PEAK CUR current, press control knob
•Set BASE (WELD) current, press control knob
•Set PULSE WIDTH % for PEAK CUR, press
control knob
•Set PULSE FREQ, press control knob
•Set POST-FLOW time, press control knob
•Connect remote control device if required
•Commence welding
STD
SLOPE
DOWN
SLOPE
CRATER
CUR.
REPEAT
SPOT
SPOT
TIME
POST-FLOW
PRE-FLOW
STICK
HF TIG
Hz
(m)sec
%
A
LIFT TIG
Figure 7 – HF TIG STD Mode – PULSE ON
27
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
PULSE
VRD
ON
OFF
Refer to Manual
for correct use
UP
SLOPE
HOT
START
•Refer to NOTE 4 on page 26
•Refer to CAUTION 3 on page 26
•Connect work lead to positive terminal
•Connect TIG torch to negative terminal
•Switch machine on, press control knob
•Set PRE-FLOW time, press control knob
•Set HOT START current, press control knob
•Set INTIAL CUR current, press control knob
•Set UP SLOPE time, press control knob
•Set BASE (WELD) current, press control knob
•Set DOWN SLOPE time, press control knob
•Set CRATER CUR current, press control knob
•Set POST-FLOW time, press control knob
•Connect remote control device if required
•Commence welding
STD
PULSE
ON
PEAK
PULSE
CUR.
WIDTH
PULSE
BASE
FREQ.
(WELD)
SLOPE
DOWN
SLOPE
CRATER
CUR.
REPEAT
SPOT
SPOT
TIME
INITIAL
CUR.
POST-FLOW
PRE-FLOW
STICK
HF TIG
Hz
(m)sec
%
A
LIFT TIG
Figure 8 – HF TIG SLOPE Mode – PULSE OFF
PULSE
VRD
ON
OFF
Refer to Manual
for correct use
UP
SLOPE
HOT
START
STD
PULSE
ON
PEAK
PULSE
CUR.
WIDTH
PULSE
FREQ.
BASE
(WELD)
SLOPE
DOWN
SLOPE
CRATER
CUR.
REPEAT
SPOT
SPOT
TIME
INITIAL
CUR.
POST-FLOW
PRE-FLOW
STICK
HF TIG
Hz
(m)sec
%
A
LIFT TIG
Figure 9 – HF TIG SLOPE Mode – PULSE ON
PULSE
VRD
ON
OFF
Refer to Manual
for correct use
HOT
START
UP
SLOPE
STD
PULSE
ON
PEAK
PULSE
CUR.
WIDTH
PULSE
BASE
FREQ.
(WELD)
INITIAL
CUR.
SLOPE
DOWN
SLOPE
CRATER
CUR.
REPEAT
SPOT
SPOT
TIME
POST-FLOW
PRE-FLOW
STICK
HF TIG
Hz
(m)sec
%
A
LIFT TIG
Figure 10 – HF TIG REPEAT Mode – PULSE OFF
28
•Refer to NOTE 4 on page 26
•Refer to CAUTION 3 on page 26
•Connect work lead to positive terminal
•Connect TIG torch to negative terminal
•Switch machine on
•Set PRE-FLOW time, press control knob
•Set HOT START current, press control knob
•Set INTIAL CUR current, press control knob
•Set UP SLOPE time, press control knob
•Set PEAK CUR current, press control knob
•Set BASE (WELD) current, press control knob
•Set PULSE WIDTH % for PEAK CUR, press
control knob
•Set PULSE FREQ, press control knob
•Set DOWN SLOPE time, press control knob
•Set CRATER CUR current, press control knob
•Set POST-FLOW time, press control knob
•Connect remote control device if required
•Commence welding
•Refer to NOTE 4 on page 26
•Refer to CAUTION 3 on page 26
•Connect work lead to positive terminal
•Connect TIG torch to negative terminal
•Switch machine on
•Set PRE-FLOW time, press control knob
•Set HOT START current, press control knob
•Set INTIAL CUR current, press control knob
•Set UP SLOPE time, press control knob
•Set BASE (WELD) current, press control knob
•Set DOWN SLOPE time, press control knob
•Set CRATER CUR current, press control knob
•Set POST-FLOW time, press control knob
•Connect remote control device if required
•Commence welding
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
PULSE
VRD
ON
OFF
Refer to Manual
for correct use
UP
SLOPE
HOT
START
STD
PULSE
ON
PEAK
PULSE
CUR.
WIDTH
PULSE
BASE
FREQ.
(WELD)
SLOPE
DOWN
SLOPE
CRATER
CUR.
REPEAT
SPOT
SPOT
TIME
INITIAL
CUR.
POST-FLOW
PRE-FLOW
STICK
HF TIG
Hz
(m)sec
%
A
LIFT TIG
Figure 11 – HF TIG REPEAT Mode – PULSE ON
PULSE
VRD
ON
OFF
Refer to Manual
for correct use
UP
SLOPE
HOT
START
STD
PULSE
ON
PEAK
PULSE
CUR.
WIDTH
PULSE
BASE
FREQ.
(WELD)
INITIAL
CUR.
•Refer to CAUTION 3 on page 26
•Connect work lead to positive terminal
•Connect TIG torch to negative terminal
•Switch machine on
•Set PRE-FLOW time, press control knob
•Set HOT START current, press control knob
•Set BASE (WELD) current, press control knob
•Set SPOT TIME , press control knob
•Set POST-FLOW time, press control knob
•Connect remote control device if required
•Commence welding
SLOPE
DOWN
SLOPE
CRATER
CUR.
REPEAT
SPOT
SPOT
TIME
POST-FLOW
PRE-FLOW
STICK
HF TIG
Hz
(m)sec
%
A
•Refer to NOTE 4 on page 26
•Refer to CAUTION 3 on page 26
•Connect work lead to positive terminal
•Connect TIG torch to negative terminal
•Switch machine on
•Set PRE-FLOW time, press control knob
•Set HOT START current, press control knob
•Set INTIAL CUR current, press control knob
•Set UP SLOPE time, press control knob
•Set PEAK CUR current, press control knob
•Set BASE (WELD) current, press control knob
•Set PULSE WIDTH % for PEAK CUR, press
control knob
•Set PULSE FREQ, press control knob
•Set DOWN SLOPE time, press control knob
•Set CRATER CUR current, press control knob
•Set POST-FLOW time, press control knob
•Connect remote control device if required
•Commence welding
•Refer to NOTE 4 on page 26
LIFT TIG
Figure 12 – HF TIG SPOT Mode – PULSE OFF
PULSE
VRD
ON
OFF
Refer to Manual
for correct use
UP
SLOPE
HOT
START
INITIAL
CUR.
•Refer to NOTE 4 on page 26
STD
PULSE
ON
PEAK
PULSE
CUR.
WIDTH
PULSE
BASE
FREQ.
(WELD)
SLOPE
DOWN
SLOPE
CRATER
CUR.
REPEAT
SPOT
SPOT
TIME
POST-FLOW
PRE-FLOW
STICK
HF TIG
Hz
(m)sec
%
A
LIFT TIG
Figure 13 – HF TIG SPOT Mode – PULSE ON
29
•Refer to CAUTION 3 on page 26
•Connect work lead to positive terminal
•Connect TIG torch to negative terminal
•Switch machine on
•Set PRE-FLOW time, press control knob
•Set HOT START current, press control knob
•Set PEAK CUR current, press control knob
•Set BASE (WELD) current, press control knob
•Set SPOT TIME , press control knob
•Set PULSE WIDTH % for PEAK CUR, press
control knob
•Set PULSE FREQ, press control knob
•Set POST-FLOW time, press control knob
•Connect remote control device if required
•Commence welding
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
12.3 LIFT TIG Welding
PULSE
VRD
ON
OFF
Refer to Manual
for correct use
UP
SLOPE
HOT
START
•Refer to NOTE 4 on page 26
STD
PULSE
ON
PEAK
PULSE
CUR.
WIDTH
PULSE
BASE
FREQ.
(WELD)
•Refer to CAUTION 3 on page 26
•Connect work lead to positive terminal
•Connect TIG torch to negative terminal
•Switch machine on
•Set PRE-FLOW time, press control knob
•Set BASE (WELD) current, press control knob
•Set POST-FLOW time, press control knob
•Connect remote control device if required
•Commence welding
SLOPE
REPEAT
DOWN
SLOPE
SPOT
CRATER
CUR.
SPOT
TIME
INITIAL
CUR.
POST-FLOW
PRE-FLOW
STICK
HF TIG
Hz
(m)sec
%
A
LIFT TIG
Figure 14 – LIFT TIG STD Mode – PULSE OFF
PULSE
VRD
ON
OFF
Refer to Manual
for correct use
UP
SLOPE
HOT
START
INITIAL
CUR.
•Refer to NOTE 4 on page 26
•Refer to CAUTION 3 on page 26
•Connect work lead to positive terminal
•Connect TIG torch to negative terminal
•Switch machine on
•Set PRE-FLOW time, press control knob
•Set PEAK CUR current, press control knob
•Set BASE (WELD) current, press control knob
•Set PULSE WIDTH % for PEAK CUR, press
control knob
•Set PULSE FREQ, press control knob
•Set POST-FLOW time, press control knob
•Connect remote control device if required
•Commence welding
STD
PULSE
ON
PEAK
PULSE
CUR.
WIDTH
PULSE
FREQ.
BASE
(WELD)
SLOPE
REPEAT
DOWN
SLOPE
SPOT
CRATER
CUR.
SPOT
TIME
POST-FLOW
PRE-FLOW
STICK
HF TIG
Hz
(m)sec
%
A
LIFT TIG
Figure 15 – LIFT TIG STD Mode – PULSE ON
PULSE
VRD
ON
OFF
Refer to Manual
for correct use
HOT
START
UP
SLOPE
•Refer to NOTE 4 on page 26
•Refer to CAUTION 3 on page 26
•Connect work lead to positive terminal
•Connect TIG torch to negative terminal
•Switch machine on
•Set PRE-FLOW time, press control knob
•Set INTIAL CUR current, press control knob
•Set UP SLOPE time, press control knob
•Set BASE (WELD) current, press control knob
•Set DOWN SLOPE time, press control knob
•Set CRATER CUR current, press control knob
•Set POST-FLOW time, press control knob
•Connect remote control device if required
•Commence welding
STD
PULSE
ON
PEAK
PULSE
CUR.
WIDTH
PULSE
BASE
FREQ.
(WELD)
SLOPE
REPEAT
DOWN
SLOPE
SPOT
CRATER
CUR.
SPOT
TIME
INITIAL
CUR.
POST-FLOW
PRE-FLOW
STICK
HF TIG
Hz
(m)sec
%
A
LIFT TIG
Figure 16 – LIFT TIG SLOPE Mode – PULSE OFF
30
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
PULSE
VRD
ON
OFF
Refer to Manual
for correct use
HOT
START
UP
SLOPE
STD
PULSE
ON
PEAK
PULSE
CUR.
WIDTH
PULSE
BASE
FREQ.
(WELD)
INITIAL
CUR.
SLOPE
REPEAT
DOWN
SLOPE
SPOT
CRATER
CUR.
SPOT
TIME
POST-FLOW
PRE-FLOW
STICK
HF TIG
Hz
(m)sec
%
A
LIFT TIG
Figure 17 – LIFT TIG SLOPE Mode – PULSE ON
PULSE
VRD
ON
OFF
Refer to Manual
for correct use
HOT
START
UP
SLOPE
STD
PULSE
ON
PEAK
PULSE
CUR.
WIDTH
PULSE
FREQ.
BASE
(WELD)
SLOPE
REPEAT
DOWN
SLOPE
SPOT
CRATER
CUR.
SPOT
TIME
INITIAL
CUR.
POST-FLOW
PRE-FLOW
STICK
HF TIG
Hz
(m)sec
%
A
LIFT TIG
•Refer to NOTE 4 on page 26
•Refer to CAUTION 3 on page 26
•Connect work lead to positive terminal
•Connect TIG torch to negative terminal
•Switch machine on
•Set PRE-FLOW time, press control knob
•Set INTIAL CUR current, press control knob
•Set UP SLOPE time, press control knob
•Set PEAK CUR current, press control knob
•Set BASE (WELD) current, press control knob
•Set PULSE WIDTH % for PEAK CUR, press
control knob
•Set PULSE FREQ, press control knob
•Set DOWN SLOPE time, press control knob
•Set CRATER CUR current, press control knob
•Set POST-FLOW time, press control knob
•Connect remote control device if required
•Commence welding
•Refer to NOTE 4 on page 26
•Refer to CAUTION 3 on page 26
•Connect work lead to positive terminal
•Connect TIG torch to negative terminal
•Switch machine on
•Set PRE-FLOW time, press control knob
•Set INTIAL CUR current, press control knob
•Set UP SLOPE time, press control knob
•Set BASE (WELD) current, press control knob
•Set DOWN SLOPE time, press control knob
•Set CRATER CUR current, press control knob
•Set POST-FLOW time, press control knob
•Connect remote control device if required
•Commence welding
Figure 18 – LIFT TIG REPEAT Mode – PULSE OFF
PULSE
VRD
ON
OFF
Refer to Manual
for correct use
HOT
START
UP
SLOPE
STD
PULSE
ON
PEAK
PULSE
CUR.
WIDTH
PULSE
BASE
FREQ.
(WELD)
INITIAL
CUR.
SLOPE
REPEAT
DOWN
SLOPE
SPOT
CRATER
CUR.
SPOT
TIME
POST-FLOW
PRE-FLOW
STICK
HF TIG
Hz
(m)sec
%
A
LIFT TIG
Figure 19 – LIFT TIG REPEAT Mode – PULSE ON
31
•Refer to NOTE 4 on page 26
•Refer to CAUTION 3 on page 26
•Connect work lead to positive terminal
•Connect TIG torch to negative terminal
•Switch machine on
•Set PRE-FLOW time, press control knob
•Set INTIAL CUR current, press control knob
•Set UP SLOPE time, press control knob
•Set PEAK CUR current, press control knob
•Set BASE (WELD) current, press control knob
•Set PULSE WIDTH % for PEAK CUR, press
control knob
•Set PULSE FREQ, press control knob
•Set DOWN SLOPE time, press control knob
•Set CRATER CUR current, press control knob
•Set POST-FLOW time, press control knob
•Connect remote control device if required
•Commence welding
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
12.4 Save / Load Operation on Transtig 300 Pi
VRD
ON
PULSE
ON
OFF
Refer to Manual
for correct use
HOT
START
•A total number of 5 programs can be saved into
the Transtig 300 Pi memory
SAVE the Current Weld Parameters into
Memory
•Press the SAVE button
•Select a memory location by rotating the control
knob, 1 to 5 is displayed on the meter
•After selecting the desired memory location (ie 1
to 5), press the control knob and the machine
give a small beep to confirm the weld
parameters from the control panel are saved.
LOAD (retrieve) a Program to Control Panel
•Press the LOAD button
•Select a memory location by rotating the control
knob, 1 to 5 is displayed on the meter
•After selecting the desired memory location (ie 1
to 5), press the control knob and the machine
give a small beep to confirm the weld
parameters are loaded onto the control panel
PULSE
PEAK
CUR.
UP
SLOPE
PULSE
WIDTH
DOWN
SLOPE
PULSE
FREQ.
BASE
(WELD)
CRATER
CUR.
INITIAL
CUR.
SPOT
TIME
POST-FLOW
PRE-FLOW
STD
Hz
(m)sec
%
STICK
A
SLOPE
HF TIG
REPEAT
LIFT TIG
SPOT
SAVE
LOAD
Figure 20 – Transtig 300 Pi Save / Load Operation
13. Basic TIG Welding Guide
13.1 Electrode Polarity
Connect the TIG torch to the ‘− ’ terminal and the work lead to the ‘+’ terminal for direct current
straight polarity. Direct current straight polarity is the most widely used polarity for DC TIG
welding. It allows limited wear of the electrode since 70% of the heat is concentrated at the work
piece.
13.2 Tungsten Electrode Current Ranges
Electrode Diameter (mm)
1.0
1.6
2.4
3.2
Constant Current (A)
2 – 30
8 – 70
12 – 150
20 – 250
Table 9 - Current ranges for varies tungsten electrode sizes
13.3 CIGWELD Tungsten Electrode Types
Electrode Type
(Ground Finish)
Thoriated 2%
Ceriated 2%
Welding Application
DC welding of mild steel, stainless
steel and copper.
DC & AC welding of mild steel,
stainless steel, copper, aluminium,
magnesium and their alloys
Features
Excellent arc starting, Long life,
High current carrying capacity.
Longer life, More stable arc,
Easier starting, Wider current
range, Narrower more
concentrated arc.
Table 10 - CIGWELD tungsten electrode types
NOTE 5
DC welders can not be used for major AC welding application.
32
Colour
Code
Red
Grey
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
13.4 Welding Parameters for Stainless Steel
Base Metal
Thickness
1.0mm
1.2mm
DC Current DC Current Filler Rod Dia. Argon Gas
(if required)
Flow Rate
Range for
Range for
Litres/min.
Mild Steel Stainless Steel
35-45
20-30
1.6mm
5-7
40-50
25-35
45-55
30-45
1.6mm
7
50-60
35-50
60-70
40-60
1.6mm
7
70-90
50-70
80-100
65-85
2.4mm
7
90-115
90-110
115-135
100-125
3.2mm
10
140-165
125-150
160-175
135-160
4.0mm
10
170-200
160-180
7
1.6mm
3.2mm
4.8mm
6.4mm
Joint Type
Butt/Corner
Lap/ Fillet
Butt/Corner
Lap/ Fillet
Butt/Corner
Lap/ Fillet
Butt/Corner
Lap/ Fillet
Butt/Corner
Lap/ Fillet
Butt/Corner
Lap/ Fillet
Table 11 - TIG welding parameters
13.5 Guide for Selecting Filler Wire Diameter
Welding Current (A)
10-20
20-50
50 – 100
100 – 200
Filler Wire Diameter (mm). Refer to NOTE 6.
1.2
1.2 - 1.6
1.6 - 2.4
1.6 - 3.2
Table 12 - Filler wire selection guide
NOTE 6
The filler wire diameter specified in Table 12 is a guide only, other diameter wires may be used according to
the welding application.
13.6 Shielding Gas Selection
Alloy
Shielding Gas
Argoshield is a registered trade mark of BOC Gases Limited.
Carbon Steel
Stainless Steel
Nickel Alloy
Copper
Titanium
Welding Argon; 100% Ar
Welding Argon, Argoshield 71T, 80T, 81T
Welding Argon, Argoshield 71T
Welding Argon, Argoshield 81T
Welding Argon, Argoshield 80T, 81T
Table 13 - Shielding gas selection
33
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
13.7 Welding Parameters for Low Carbon & Low Alloy Steel Pipe
Electrode Type &
Diameter
Current Range DC
Amperes
Filler Rod for
Root Pass
Thoriated 2%
2.4 mm
120 - 170
Yes
Thoriated 2%
2.4 mm
100 - 160
Yes
Thoriated 2%
2.4 mm
90 - 130
No
Joint Preparation
Table 14 - TIG welding parameters for low carbon & low alloy steel pipe
14. Basic Arc Welding Guide
14.1 Electrode Polarity
Stick electrodes are generally connected to the ‘+’terminal and the work lead to the ‘− ’terminal but
if in doubt consult the electrode manufacturers literature.
14.2 Effects of Stick Welding Various Materials
a) High tensile and alloy steels
The two most prominent effects of welding these steels are the formation of a hardened zone in
the weld area, and, if suitable precautions are not taken, the occurrence in this zone of underbead cracks. Hardened zone and under-bead cracks in the weld area may be reduced by using
the correct electrodes, preheating, using higher current settings, using larger electrodes sizes,
short runs for larger electrode deposits or tempering in a furnace.
b) Manganese steels
The effect on manganese steel of slow cooling from high temperatures is to embrittle it. For this
reason it is absolutely essential to keep manganese steel cool during welding by quenching after
each weld or skip welding to distribute the heat.
c) Cast Iron
Most types of cast iron, except white iron, are weldable. White iron, because of its extreme
brittleness, generally cracks when attempts are made to weld it. Trouble may also be
experienced when welding white-heart malleable, due to the porosity caused by gas held in this
type of iron.
d) Copper and alloys
The most important factor is the high rate of heat conductivity of copper, making preheating of
heavy sections necessary to give proper fusion of weld and base metal.
14.3 Types of Electrodes
Arc Welding electrodes are classified into a number of groups depending on their applications. There
are a great number of electrodes used for specialised industrial purposes which are not of particular
interest for everyday general work. These include some low hydrogen types for high tensile steel,
cellulose types for welding large diameter pipes, etc.
The range of electrodes dealt with in this publication will cover the vast majority of applications likely
to be encountered; are all easy to use and all will work on even the most basic of welding machines.
34
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
Metals being
joined
Electrode Size
& Part No.
CIGWELD
Electrode
Comments
Mild steel
2.5mm 611182
3.2mm 611183
4.0mm 611184
Satincraft 13
(AS/NZS E4113-0)
Ideal electrodes for all general
purpose work. Features include out
standing operator appeal, easy arc
starting and low spatter.
Mild steel
2.5mm 611242
3.2mm 611243
4.0mm 611244
Ferrocraft 21
(AS/NZS E4818-2)
All positional electrode for use on
mild and galvanised steel furniture,
plates, fences, gates, pipes and tanks
etc. Especially suitable for verticaldown welding.
Cast iron
3.2mm 611733
4.0mm 611734
Castcraft100
Suitable for joining all cast irons
except white cast iron.
Stainless steel
2.5mm 611652
3.2mm 611653
Satincrome 318L-17
(AS/NZS E316L-17)
High corrosion resistance. Ideal for
dairy work, etc. On stainless steels.
Copper, Bronze,
Brass, etc.
3.2mm 611783
Bronzecraft
(AS/NZS E6200-A2)
Easy to use electrode for marine
fittings, water taps and valves, water
trough float arms, etc. Also for
joining copper to steel and for bronze
overlays on steel shafts.
High Alloy Steels,
Dissimilar Metals,
Crack Resistance.
All Hard-To-Weld
Jobs.
2.5mm 611702
3.2mm 611703
4.0mm 611704
Weldall
(AS/NZS E312-17)
Weldall does truly what its name
states. It will weld even the most
problematical jobs such as springs,
shafts, broken joins mild steel to
stainless and alloy steels.
Not suitable for Aluminium.
Table 15 - Types of Electrodes
For HARDFACING of Steels, CIGWELD TOOLCRAFT is an electrode that produces an extremely hard
weld deposit. It is ideal for building up axes, wedges, slasher blades, worn cams, rock drills, earth moving and
digging equipment, etc.
15. Routine Inspection, Testing & Maintenance
WARNING 7
There are extremely dangerous voltage and power levels present inside this product. Do not attempt to open or
repair unless you are an Accredited CIGWELD Service Agent. Disconnect the Welding Power Source from the
Mains Supply Voltage before disassembling.
An inspection of the power source, an insulation resistance test and an earthing resistance test shall be
carried out in accordance with clause 4.1 of AS 1647.2
a) For transportable equipment, at least once every 3 months; and
b) For fixed equipment, at least once every 12 months.
The owners of the equipment shall keep a suitable record of the periodic tests.
Note 7
A transportable power source is any equipment that is not permanently connected and fixed in the position in
which it is operated.
35
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
In addition to the above tests and specifically in relation to the VRD fitted to this machine, the following
periodic tests should also be conducted by an accredited CIGWELD service agent.
Description
AS3195 & IEC 60974-1 Requirements
VRD Open Circuit Voltage
Less than 20V; at Vin=240V
VRD Turn ON Resistance
Less than 200 ohms
VRD Turn OFF Time
Less than 0.3 seconds
If this equipment is used in a hazardous location or environments with a high risk of electrocution then the
above tests should be carried out prior to entering this location.
Welding equipment should be regularly checked by a qualified electrical tradesperson to ensure that:
• The main earth wire of the electrical installation is intact.
• Power point for the Welding Power Source is effectively earthed and of adequate current rating.
• Plugs and cord extension sockets are correctly wired.
• Flexible cord is of the 3-core tough rubber or plastic sheathed type of adequate rating, correctly
connected and in good condition.
• Welding terminals are shrouded to prevent inadvertent contact or short circuit.
• The frame of the Welding Power Source is effectively earthed.
• Welding leads and electrode holder are in good condition.
• The Welding Power Source is clean internally, especially from metal filing, slag, and loose material. If
any parts are damaged for any reason, replacement is recommended.
15.1 Face Shield Maintenance (where supplied)
The face shield and lens should be cleaned after use with a soft cloth.
16. Basic Troubleshooting
WARNING 8
There are extremely dangerous voltage and power levels present inside this product. Do not attempt to open or
repair unless you are an Accredited CIGWELD Service Agent and you have had training in power measurements
and troubleshooting techniques.
If major complex subassemblies are faulty, then the Welding Power Source must be returned to an
Accredited CIGWELD Service Agent for repair.
The basic level of troubleshooting is that which can be performed without special equipment or knowledge.
16.1 TIG Welding Problems
Description
1
Electrode melts when
arc is struck.
2
Dirty weld pool.
Possible Cause
Remedy
Electrode is connected to the ‘+’
terminal.
Connect the electrode to the ‘− ’
terminal.
A Electrode contaminated through
contact with work piece or filler
rod material.
A Clean the electrode by grinding off
the contaminates.
B Gas contaminated with air.
B Check gas lines for cuts and loose
fitting or change gas cylinder.
36
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
Description
3
Electrode melts or
oxidises when an arc
is struck.
Possible Cause
Remedy
A No gas flowing to welding region.
A Check the gas lines for kinks or
breaks and gas cylinder contents.
B Torch is clogged with dust.
B Clean torch
C Gas hose is cut.
C Replace gas hose.
D Gas passage contains impurities.
D Disconnect gas hose from torch
then raise gas pressure and blow
out impurities.
E Gas regulator turned off.
E Turn on.
F Torch valve is turned off.
F Turn on.
G The electrode is too small for the
welding current.
G Increase electrode diameter or
reduce the welding current.
4
Poor weld finish.
Inadequate shielding gas.
Increase gas flow or check gas line
for gas flow problems.
5
Arc flutters during
TIG welding.
Tungsten electrode is too large for
the welding current.
Select the right size electrode.
Refer to Table 9.
6
Welding arc can not
be established.
7
Arc start is not
smooth.
A Work clamp is not connected to the A Connect the work clamp to the
work piece or the work/torch leads
work piece or connect the
are not connected to the right
work/torch leads to the right
welding terminals.
welding terminals.
B Torch lead is disconnected.
B Connect it to the ‘− ‘terminal.
C Gas flow incorrectly set, cylinder
empty or the torch valve is off.
C Select the right flow rate, change
cylinders or turn torch valve on.
A Tungsten electrode is too large for
the welding current.
A Select the right size electrode.
Refer to Table 9.
B The wrong electrode is being used
for the welding job
B Select the right electrode type.
Refer to Table 10.
C Gas flow rate is too high.
C Select the correct rate for the
welding job.
Refer to Table 11.
D Incorrect shielding gas is being
used.
D Select the right shielding gas.
Refer to Table 13.
E Poor work clamp connection to
work piece.
E Improve connection to work piece.
16.2 Stick Welding Problems
Description
Possible Cause
1 Gas pockets or voids in A Electrodes are damp.
weld metal (Porosity). B Welding current is too high.
C Surface impurities such as oil,
grease, paint, etc.
2 Crack occurring in
A Rigidity of joint.
weld metal soon after
solidification
commences
B Insufficient throat thickness.
C Cooling rate is too high.
37
Remedy
A Dry electrodes before use.
B Reduce welding current.
C Clean joint before welding.
A Redesign to relieve weld joint of
severe stresses or use crack
resistance electrodes.
B Travel slightly slower to allow
greater build up in throat.
C Preheat plate and cool slowly.
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
Description
Possible Cause
3 A gap is left by failure A Welding current is too low.
of the weld metal to fill B Electrode too large for joint.
the root of the weld.
C Insufficient gap.
D Incorrect sequence.
Remedy
A Increase welding current
B Use smaller diameter
electrode.
C Allow wider gap.
D Use correct build-up sequence.
Figure 21 – Example of insufficient gap or incorrect sequence
4 Portions of the weld
run do not fuse to the
surface of the metal or
edge of the joint.
A Small electrodes used on heavy
cold plate.
B Welding current is too low.
A Use larger electrodes and pre-heat
the plate.
B Increase welding current
C Wrong electrode angle.
C Adjust angle so the welding arc is
directed more into the base metal
D Reduce travel speed of electrode
D Travel speed of electrode is too
high.
E Scale or dirt on joint surface.
E Clean surface before welding.
Figure 22 – Example of lack of fusion
5 Non-metallic particles A Non-metallic particles may be
are trapped in the weld
trapped in undercut from previous
metal (slag inclusion).
run.
B Joint preparation too restricted.
C
D
E
F
A If bad undercut is present, clean slag
out and cover with a run from a
smaller diameter electrode.
B Allow for adequate penetration and
room for cleaning out the slag.
Irregular deposits allow slag to be C If very bad, chip or grind out
trapped.
irregularities.
Lack of penetration with slag
D Use smaller electrode with sufficient
trapped beneath weld bead.
current to give adequate penetration.
Use suitable tools to remove all slag
from corners.
Rust or mill scale is preventing full E Clean joint before welding.
fusion.
Wrong electrode for position in
F Use electrodes designed for position
which welding is done.
in which welding is done, otherwise
proper control of slag is difficult.
Figure 23 – Examples of slag inclusion
38
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
16.3 Power Source Problems
Description
1 The welding arc
cannot be established
Possible Cause
Remedy
A The Mains supply voltage has not
been switched ON.
A Switch ON the Mains supply
voltage.
B The Welding Power Source switch
is switched OFF.
B Switch ON the Welding Power
Source.
C Loose connections internally.
C Have an Accredited CIGWELD
Service Agent repair the connection.
2 Maximum output
welding current can
not be achieved with
nominal Mains supply
voltage.
Defective control circuit
Have an Accredited CIGWELD
Service Agent inspect then repair
the welder.
3 Welding current
reduces when welding
Poor work lead connection to the
work piece.
Ensure that the work lead has a
positive electrical connection to the
work piece.
4 No gas flow when the
torch trigger switch is
depressed.
A Gas hose is cut.
B Gas passage contains impurities.
C Gas regulator turned off.
D Torch trigger switch lead is
disconnected or switch/cable is
faulty.
5 Gas flow won’t shut off A Weld Mode (STD, SLOPE,
REPEAT or SPOT) was changed
before POST-FLOW gas time had
finished.
B Gas valve is faulty.
C Gas valve jammed open.
6
D POST-FLOW control is set to 60
sec.
The TIG electrode has
The Weld Process Mode (STICK,
been contaminated due
HF TIG or LIFT TIG) was changed
to the gas flow shutting
before POST-FLOW gas time had
off before the profinished.
grammed POST-FLOW
time has elapsed
39
A Replace gas hose.
B Disconnect gas hose from the rear of
Power Source then raise gas
pressure and blow out impurities.
C Turn gas regulator on.
D Reconnect lead or repair faulty
switch/cable.
A Strike an arc to complete the weld
cycle.
OR
Must switch machine off then on to
reset solenoid valve.
B Have an Accredited CIGWELD
Service Agent replace gas valve.
C Have an Accredited CIGWELD
Service Agent repair or replace gas
valve.
D Reduce POST-FLOW time.
Do not change Weld Process Mode
before the POST-FLOW gas time
had finished.
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
16.4 Power Source Error Codes
Description
1 E01 error code displayed
Temperature sensor TH1 (protects IGBTs) is
greater than 80ºC for about 1 second
2 E02 error code displayed
Temperature sensor TH2 (protects secondary
diodes) is greater than 80ºC for about 1 second
Possible Cause
Remedy
A The Welding Power Source’s duty cycle A Let Power Source cool down t
within its duty cycle.
has been exceeded.
B Fan ceases to operate.
B
Have an Accredited CIGWEL
Agent investigate
C Air flow is restricted by vents being
blocked
C
Unblock vents then let Power
cool down.
A The Welding Power Source’s duty cycle A Let Power Source cool down t
has been exceeded.
within its duty cycle.
B Fan ceases to operate.
B
Have an Accredited CIGWEL
Agent investigate
C Air flow is restricted by vents being
blocked
C
Unblock vents then let Power
cool down.
A Primary current is too high because
welding arc is too long.
A Reduce length of welding arc
(Only applicable to 250Pi & 300Pi)
3 E03 error code displayed
Primary (input) current too high
B Mains supply voltage is more than 10% B
below nominal voltage
Have an Accredited CIGWEL
Agent or a qualified electrici
for low Mains voltage.
4 E11 error code displayed
Over mains supply (input) voltage at primary
capacitors is exceeded for one second
Mains supply voltage is greater than the
nominal voltage plus 10%
Have an Accredited CIGWEL
Agent or a qualified electrici
the Mains voltage.
5 E14 error code displayed
Under mains supply (input) voltage warning
primary capacitors is reduced for one second
Mains supply voltage warning; it is
down to 340V ac for 3 phase machine
Have an Accredited CIGWEL
Agent or a qualified electrici
the Mains voltage.
40
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
Description
Possible Cause
Remedy
6 E12 error code displayed
Under mains supply (input) voltage primary
capacitors is reduced for one second
A Mains supply voltage warning; it is
down to 304V ac for 3 phase machine.
A Have an Accredited CIGWEL
Agent or a qualified electrici
the Mains voltage
B One phase has dropped out for 3 phase
machine
B
Have an Accredited CIGWEL
Agent or a qualified electrici
the primary cable & fuses.
7 E81 error code displayed
Wrong mains supply (input) voltage connected
When 3 phase machine is first turned
on with the wrong mains supply (input)
voltage connected
Have an Accredited CIGWEL
Agent or a qualified electrici
the Mains voltage
8 E82 error code displayed
Link switch plug not connected
Link switch plug not connected
Have an Accredited CIGWEL
Agent check connector plug
PCB
9 E83 error code displayed
CPU checks mains supply (input) voltage when
the on/off switch on rear panel of machine is
turned ON.
The mains supply (input) voltage
fluctuates and is not stable.
Have an Accredited CIGWEL
Agent check connector plug
PCB and the Mains voltage
10 E85 error code displayed
Primary capacitors are not charging correctly
The primary capacitors pre-charge
circuit is not functioning correctly
Have an Accredited CIGWEL
Agent check the primary circ
main PCB
11 E93 error code displayed
Memory chip (EEPROM) on control PCB can
not read/write weld parameters
Memory chip (EEPROM) error
Have an Accredited CIGWEL
Agent check the control PCB
12 E94 error code displayed
Temperature sensor TH1 for IGBTs or sensor
TH2 for secondary diodes are open circuit
The Welding Power Source’s
temperature sensors have
malfunctioned.
Have an Accredited CIGWEL
Agent check or replace the te
sensors.
(Only applicable to 250Pi & 300Pi)
(Only applicable to 250Pi & 300Pi)
41
Transtig 200Pi, 250Pi, 300Pi
Description
13 E99 error code displayed
Mains supply (input) voltage has been turned
off but control circuit has power from the
primary capacitors
Possible Cause
Remedy
A Main on/off switch on machine has
been turned off
A Turn on/off switch on.
B Mains supply (input) voltage has been
turned off
B
42
Have an Accredited CIGWEL
Agent or a qualified electrici
the Mains voltage and fuses