HP Kayak XA Technical information

Technical Reference Manual
Hardware and BIOS
HP KAYAK XA PC WORKSTATION
Notice
The information contained in this document is subject to change without notice.
Hewlett-Packard makes no warranty of any kind with regard to this
material, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of
merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose.
Hewlett-Packard shall not be liable for errors contained herein or for incidental
or consequential damages in connection with the furnishing, performance, or use
of this material.
Hewlett-Packard assumes no responsibility for the use or reliability of its
software on equipment that is not furnished by Hewlett-Packard.
This document contains proprietary information that is protected by copyright.
All rights are reserved. No part of this document may be photocopied,
reproduced, or translated to another language without the prior written consent
of Hewlett-Packard Company.
AdobeTM is a trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated which may be registered
in certain jurisdictions.
Microsoft®, Windows® and MS-DOS® are U.S. registered trademarks of
Microsoft Corporation.
MMXTM is a U.S. trademark of Intel Corporation.
NetscapeTM is a U.S. trademark of Netscape Communications Corporation.
Pentium® is a U.S. registered trademark of Intel Corporation.
SoundBlasterTM is a trademark of Creative Technology Limited.
Windows NT® is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
Hewlett-Packard France
38053 Grenoble Cedex 9
France
Preface
This manual is a technical reference and BIOS document for engineers and
technicians providing system level support. It is assumed that the reader
possesses a detailed understanding of AT-compatible microprocessor
functions and digital addressing techniques.
Technical information that is readily available from other sources, such as
manufacturer’s proprietary publications, has not been reproduced.
This manual contains summary information only. For additional reference
material, refer to the bibliography, on the next page.
Conventions
The following conventions are used throughout this manual to identify
specific numeric elements:
❒ Hexadecimal numbers are identified by a lower case h.
For example, 0FFFFFFFh or 32F5h
❒ Binary numbers and bit patterns are identified by a lower case b.
For example, 1101b or 10011011b
3
Bibliography
❒ HP Kayak XA PC Workstation DT User’s Guide manual (D4790-90001).
❒ HP Kayak XA PC Workstation MT User’s Guide manual (D4800-90001).
❒ HP Kayak XA PC Workstation (Desktop and Minitower) Familiarization
Guide (online - D4790-90901).
❒ HP Network Administrator’s Guide (online).
❒ HP Kayak XA PC Workstation Service Handbook 1st edition (5966-8261).
❒ HP Support Assistant CD-ROM (by subscription).
Data sheets can be obtained at:
❒ Analog AD1816 (sound card controller)
http:\\www.analog.com\products\sheets\ad1816a.html.
❒ Cirrus 5465 (graphic controller)
http:\\www.cirus.com\products\categories\graphicsvid.html.
❒ Intel Chipsets. 440LX AGPSet (82443LX) and,
PIIX4 PCI/ISA Bridge Chip (82371SB)
http:\\www.intel.com\pcisets\datashts\index.html.
❒ Memory
http:\\www.chips.ibm.com\products\memory\sdamart\sdramart.html.
❒ Pentium II Processor
http:\\www.intel.com\design\pcisets\datashts\index.html.
❒ SCSI Chips
http:\\www.symbios.com\products\scsichps.html.
❒ Super I/O
http:\\www.national.com\catalog\personal_superi_desktop.html.
For further information about the availability and where to find the different
documentation, refer to page 21.
4
How to use this online guide
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System Overview
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5
6
Contents
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Bibliography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
How to use this online guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1 System Overview
Package for the Desktop Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Package for the Minitower Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
HP Kayak XA PC Workstation Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Hardware Control Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Specifications and Characteristic Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Physical Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electrical Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Environmental Specifications (Desktop and Minitower) . . . . . . . . . . . .
16
16
20
Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Where to Find the Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22
2 System Board
System Board and Backplane Boards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Architectural View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Chip-Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
The PAC Chip (440LX). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The PIIX4, PCI/ISA Bridge Chip (82371AB) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
30
32
7
Contents
Cache Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
34
Devices on the Processor-Local Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Intel Pentium II Microprocessor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
35
Main Memory Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Devices on the PCI Bus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Integrated Drive Electronics (IDE). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Universal Serial Bus (USB) Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other PCI Accessory Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
39
40
40
Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP) Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Devices on the SM Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Serial EEPROM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LM75 Chip. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Main PLL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
43
44
44
Devices on the ISA Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
The Super I/O Controller (NS 82317) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Audio Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flash EEPROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Board Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Little Ben . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other ISA Accessory Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
45
46
47
48
50
51
3 Interface Devices and Mass-Storage Drives
Cirrus 5465 Graphics Controller Chip. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Video Memory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Available Video Resolutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
56
56
57
SCSI / LAN Combo Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
8
Contents
PCI Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSI Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSI / PCI LAN Combo Board Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
58
59
60
10BT/100TX LAN Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
10BT/100TX LAN Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote Power On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
62
62
Mass-Storage Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Hard Disk Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flexible Disk Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CD-ROM Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
64
64
65
Connectors and Sockets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
4 HP BIOS
HP/Phoenix BIOS Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Using the HP Setup Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Advanced Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Boot Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Power Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Symbios Logic SCSI Configuration Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Default Settings You Can Change. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the SCSI Configuration Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
77
78
Power Saving and Ergonometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Power-On from Space-Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Soft Power Down. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
79
79
BIOS Addresses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
System Memory Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
80
9
Contents
HP I/O Port Map (I/O Addresses Used by the System) . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DMA Channel Controllers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interrupt Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Interrupt Request Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
81
82
83
83
5 Power-On Self-Test and Error Messages
Order in Which the Tests are Performed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Error Message Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Beep Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Lights on the Hardware Control Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Appendix
Video Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Standard VGA Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Extended Video Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maximum Refresh Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BIOS Modes Supported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10
100
101
105
105
1
System Overview
This manual describes the HP Kayak XA PC Workstation, and provides
detailed system specifications.
This chapter introduces the external features, and lists the specifications
and characteristic data of the system. It also summarizes the documentation
which is available.
11
1 System Overview
Package for the Desktop Models
Package for the Desktop Models
Front view
(Multimedia models only)
Front view with
cover removed
Four accessory
board slots
Hard disk drive
(below power
supply unit)
Video memory
24X CD-ROM drive
Main memory
modules
Flexible disk drive
Rear view
(All icons
shown here are
for information, and do not
necessarily
appear on the
PC).
12
USB
Parallel
Display
Keyboard
Mouse
Serial A
1 System Overview
Package for the Minitower Models
Package for the Minitower Models
Main memory Modules
Front view with
cover removed
Video Memory Upgrade
Six accessory board slots
Hard disk drive
24X CD-ROM drive
Rear view
Serial
Mouse
Keyboard
Display
Parallel
USB
(All icons shown here are for
information, and do not necessarily appear on the PC).
13
1 System Overview
HP Kayak XA PC Workstation Overview
HP Kayak XA PC Workstation Overview
Component
1.
2.
Desktop
Minitower
Microprocessor
233, 266 or 300 MHz Pentium II MMX processor with 512 KB cache memory
Main memory
Three DIMM sockets using:
32 MB, 64 MB or 128 MB ECC SDRAM to a maximum of 384 MB, or
16 MB, 32 MB, or 64 MB non-ECC SDRAM to a maximum of 192 MB
Graphics controller
Integrated AGP video controller with 2 MB of built-in video memory and 2 MB of removable video memory
(Rev. A).
Or, an on-board 4 MB (soldered onto the system board) video module (Rev B).
Communications
2 USB connectors, 1 serial port, 1 parallel port
Mass storage
2.5 GB IDE, or 2.1 or 4.5 GB SCSI
5 shelves (3 front-access, 2 internal1)
2.5 or 4.3 GB IDE, or 4.5 GB SCSI
6 shelves (4 front access, 2 internal)
Accessory board slots
5 slots
(1 ISA, 2 PCI2, 2 combination ISA/PCI)
6 slots
(2 ISA, 2 PCI, 2 combination ISA/PCI)
SCSI connectors
(SCSI models only)
Ultra-wide internal SCSI connector and Ultra-narrow external SCSI connector
Audio
Integrated 16-bit hi-fi audio processor with music synthesizer and mixer
CD-ROM drive
24X speed IDE CD-ROM on all models
Flexible disk drive
New version without bezel
New version without bezel
Power supply
Input voltage: 100-127, 200-240V ~
Input frequency: 50/60Hz
Maximum output power: 120W continuous
Input voltage: 100-127, 200-240V ~
Input frequency: 50/60Hz
Maximum output power: 160W continuous
Power saving
On (idle - no file transfer) - Windows 95: 32W (115V/60Hz), 35W (230V/50Hz)
On (idle - no file transfer) - Windows NT 4.0: 45W (115V/60Hz), 45W (230V/50Hz)
Sleep/Suspend mode - Windows 95: 25.5W (115V/60Hz), 29W (230V/50Hz)
Off: 1.6W (115V/60Hz), 3W (230V/50Hz)
Models with a LAN or LAN/SCSI board only have one internal mass storage shelf.
Models with a LAN or LAN/SCSI board only have one PCI slot.
14
1 System Overview
Hardware Control Panel
Hardware Control Panel
Desktop Hardware
Control Panel
Hard Disk Activity
Light
Network Activity
Light
PC Lock Activity
Light
Reset
Button
Power On Status Light
PC Lock Button
Power On/Off Button
Volume Control
Speaker Out for Headset
Microphone connector
Minitower Hardware
Control Panel
Power on Status
Light
Hard Disk Activity
Light
Network Activity
Light
PC Lock Activity
Light
Reset Button
Power On/Off Button
Volume Control
PC Lock Button
Speaker Out for Headset
Microphone connector
15
1 System Overview
Specifications and Characteristic Data
Specifications and Characteristic Data
Physical Characteristics
Desktop
Characteristic
Description
Weight
(excluding display and keyboard)
9 kg (20 pounds)
Dimensions
Width: 43.5 cm (17.1 inches)
Height: 13.2 cm (5.2 inches)
Depth: 44.6 cm (17.5 inches)
Footprint
0.194 m2 (2.08 ft2)
Keyboard
18 inches (W) by 7 inches (D) by 1.3 inches (H), when flat, or
18 inches (W) by 7 inches (D) by 2 inches (H), when standing
Minitower
Characteristic
Description
Weight
(excluding display and keyboard)
15 kg (33 pounds)
Dimensions
Width: 19.2 cm (7.56 inches)
Height: 43.8 cm (17.24 inches)
Depth: 44 cm (17.32 inches)
Footprint
0.085 m2 (0.91 ft2)
Keyboard
18 inches (W) by 7 inches (D) by 1.3 inches (H), when flat, or
18 inches (W) by 7 inches (D) by 2 inches (H), when standing
Electrical Specifications
Desktop
Parameter
Input voltage
100-127
Vac
Power
Total Rating
Notes
200-240
Vac
Selected
automatically1
120 W
Voltage range
90 to 264 VAC
Frequency range
45 Hz to 66 Hz
Input Surge Current Protection
Maximum of 90A
Safety Ground Leakage Current
> 3.5mA
16
Typical per
PCI
Accessory
Slot
Typical per
ISA
Accessory
Slot
1 System Overview
Specifications and Characteristic Data
Desktop
Parameter
Total Rating
Notes
Efficiency
70% at maximum power output
Output Voltage Regulation
Min
Nom
Max
11.0
12.0
13.0
4.8
5.0
5.25
3.15
3.3
3.6
-4.5
-5.0
-5.5
-10.8
-12.0
-13.2
4.7
5.0
5.3
Overvoltage Protection
Typical per
PCI
Accessory
Slot
Typical per
ISA
Accessory
Slot
(5 VStd By)
Not more than 6.5V for 5V output
Not more than 16V for 12V output
Isolation Voltage
3000Vac primary/secondary
1500Vac primary/ground
Safety Standard
Minitower
IEC950/UL 1950/CSA950/EN60950
Maximum input current
3A
Current at +5 V
14 A
2.5 A
1A
Current at +3.3 V
8A
—
—
Total cumulated current on
+3.3 V and +5 V
20 A
—
—
Current at -5 V
0.1 A
—
0.2 A
Current at +5V standby
0.3 A
—
0.2 A
Current at +12 V
4A
0.2 A
0.2 A
Current at -12 V
0.3 A
0.2 A
0.5 A
Total Rating
Typical per
PCI
Accessory
Slot
Typical per
ISA
Accessory
Slot
Parameter
Input voltage
100-127
Vac
200-240
Vac
Notes
Manual Switch2
17
1 System Overview
Specifications and Characteristic Data
Desktop
Parameter
Power
Total Rating
Notes
Typical per
PCI
Accessory
Slot
Typical per
ISA
Accessory
Slot
2.5 A
1A
160 W
(200 W peak)
Voltage range
90-140
Vac
Frequency range
180-264
Vac
45 Hz to 66 Hz
Maximum input current
5A
Input Surge Current Protection
Maximum of 90A
Safety Ground Leakage Current
> 3.5mA
Efficiency
75% at maximum power output
Output Voltage Regulation
Min
Nom
Max
11.0
12.0
13.0
4.8
5.0
5.25
3.15
3.3
3.6
-4.5
-5.0
-5.5
-10.8
-12.0
-13.2
4.7
5.0
5.3
Overvoltage Protection
(5 VStd By)
Not more than 6.5V for 5V output
Not more than 16V for 12V output
Isolation Voltage
3000Vac primary/secondary
1500Vac primary/ground
Safety Standard
Output Voltage Regulation
IEC950/UL 1950/CSA950/EN60950
Min
Nom
Max
Current at +5 V
20 A
Current at +3.3 V
12 A
—
Total cumulated current on
+3.3 V and +5 V
20 A
—
Current at -5 V
0.2 A
—
0.2 A
Current at +5V standby
0.3 A
—
1A
18
1 System Overview
Specifications and Characteristic Data
Desktop
Parameter
Total Rating
Notes
Typical per
PCI
Accessory
Slot
Typical per
ISA
Accessory
Slot
Current at +12 V
4.4 A
—
0.2 A
0.2 A
Current at -12 V
0.5 A
—
0.2 A
0.5 A
1.Note
that even though the desktop power supply is autoselect, it is not a full range power supply.
It works in 2 input voltage range and not in one big 90 V to 240 V range.
2.On minitower models, always check the voltage switch position at first power-on.
An attempt to draw too much current (such as a short circuit across edgeconnector pins, or an accessory board that is not suitable for these PC
Workstations), will cause the overload protection in the power supply to be
triggered, and the PC Workstation could fail to boot.
Both power supplied on the desktop and minitower models are new
compare to the ones used on previous platforms (Vectra VL 6/xxx and XA 6/
xxx). The difference is at the V standby level, which has been extended to
deliver 300mA instead of 100mA. This extra current is required by the
100TX hardware layer so it can perform a remote power-on at reception of a
magic frame. Using an older power supply for a repair will prevent a remote
power-on at reception of a magic frame.
NOTE
When the PC Workstation is turned off with the power button on the front
panel, the power consumption falls below 5 Watts, but is not zero. The special
on/off method used by this PC Workstation extends the lifetime of the power
supply. To reach zero power consumption in “off” mode, either unplug the PC
Workstation from the power outlet or use a power block with a switch. You
should be aware that the PC Workstation will lose its time settings within a
few days if you unplug the PC, or switch off the PC Workstation at the power
block.
19
1 System Overview
Specifications and Characteristic Data
Environmental Specifications (Desktop and Minitower)
Environmental Specifications (System Processing Unit, with Hard Disk)
Operating Temperature
+5°C to +40°C (+ 40°F to 104° F)
Recommended Operating
Temperature
+15°C to +70°C (+59°F to +158°F)
Storage Temperature
-40°F to +158°F (-40°C to +70°C)
Over Temperature Shutdown
+50°C (+122°F)
Operating Humidity
15% to 80% (relative)
Storage Humidity
8% to 80% (relative)
Acoustic noise emission:
Sound power
Sound pressure
(as defined ISO 7779)
LwA ≤ 42 db
LpA ≤ 37 db
Operating Altitude
10000 ft (3100m) max
Storage Altitude
15000ft (4600m) max
Operating temperature and humidity ranges may vary depending upon the
mass storage devices installed. High humidity levels can cause improper
operation of disk drives. Low humidity levels can aggravate static electricity
problems and cause excessive wear of the disk surface.
20
1 System Overview
Documentation
Documentation
The table below summarizes the availability of documentation that is
appropriate to the HP Kayak XA PC Workstations.
Only selected publications are available on paper. Most are available as
viewable files (which can also be printed) from the HP division support
servers, and on the HP Support Assistant CD-ROM.
Division Support
Server
(where available)
Online at HP
WWW Site
(see address
below)
Paper-based
HP Kayak XA PC Workstation User’s
Guide
PDF file
PDF file
DT: D4790A
HP Kayak XA PC Workstation
Familiarization Guide (D4790-90901)
PDF file
PDF file
no
HP Kayak XA PC Workstation
Technical Reference Manual
PDF file
PDF file
no
HP Kayak XA PC Workstation Service
Handbook (1st Edition)
PDF file
PDF file
5966-8261
WinHelp, HTML and
text formats
PDF file
no
PDF file
PDF file
no
Network Administrators Guide
HP 10/100BT NightDIRECTOR/10
Ethernet Card Installation Guide
(D3998-90001)
MT: D4800A
Each PDF file (Portable Document Format) can be viewed on the screen by
opening the file with Acrobat Reader. To print the document, press Ctrl+P
whilst you have the document on the screen. You can use the page-up, pagedown, goto page, search string functions to read the document on the
screen.
Access HP World Wide
Web
Additional online support documentation, BIOS upgrades and drivers are
available from HP’s World Wide Web site, at the following address:
World-Wide Web URL:
http://www.hp.com/go/kayaksupport
21
1 System Overview
Documentation
Where to Find the Information
The following table summarizes the availability of information within the HP
Kayak XA PC Workstation documentation set.
User Guide
User Online
Familiarization
Guide
Service
Handbook
Technical
Reference
Manual
Introducing the computer
Product features
Key features
Key features1
New features
Exploded view
Key features
Parts list
Product range
Product model
numbers
CPL dates
Using the computer
Connecting cables and
turning on
Keyboard, mouse, display,
network, printer, power
Finding on-line
information
Finding READ.MEs and
on-line documentation
Configuring your
Web Browser
Setting Up and Using Your
PC Workstation
Software license
agreement
Working in
comfort
S/w license
agreement
Environmental
Formal documents
System overview
Warranty information
Upgrading the computer
Opening the computer
Full details
New procedures
Supported
accessories
Some part number details
Full PN details
Replacing accessories
How to install
New procedures
Installing drivers
Configuring devices
Fields and their
options within Setup
Full PN details
Configuring the HP
Enhanced
Keyboard
Key fields
Key fields
Repairing the computer
Troubleshooting
Basic
Technical information
Basic
22
Repair policy
Detailed
Service notes
Advanced
Advanced
1 System Overview
Documentation
Familiarization
Guide
Service
Handbook
Jumpers, switches and
connectors
Jumpers, switches
and connectors
Basic details
How to replace
Upgrading
Jumpers,
switches and
connectors
User Guide
System board
BIOS
Power-On Self-Test
routines (POST)
User Online
Technical
Reference
Manual
Jumpers, switches
and connectors
Chip-set details
Technical details
Memory maps
Error codes and
suggestions for
corrective action
Order of tests
Key error codes and
suggestions for corrective
action
Complete list
Peripheral Devices
Setting up and configuring
Audio User’s Guide
LAN Administrator’s
Guide
1.For
Setting up and configuring
Setting up,
configuring and
troubleshooting
Setting up and
configuring
the address, refer to “Access HP World Wide Web” on page 21.
23
1 System Overview
Documentation
24
2
System Board
This chapter describes the components of the system board, taking in turn
the components of the Processor-Local Bus, the Peripheral Component
Interconnect (PCI) bus, the System Management (SM) bus and the Industry
Standard Architecture (ISA) bus and the AGP Accelerated Graphics Port
Controller.
25
2 System Board
System Board and Backplane Boards
System Board and Backplane Boards
Both desktop and minitower models have an AGP graphics controller built
into the system board.
1
1.
26
Also includes: SCSI Led and external SCSI cable detection.
2 System Board
System Board and Backplane Boards
Desktop
Backplane
(front view)
Slot 1(the top slot). Can be used for a
32-bit PCI board).
Slot 2. Can be used for a 32-bit PCI or
a 16-bit ISA board (maximum length
17-cm/6.7-inches).
Slot 3. Can be used for either a fulllength 32-bit PCI or a full-length 16bit ISA board.
Slot 4 (the bottom slot). Can be used
for a full-length 16-bit ISA board.
J12
J6
J10
System board slot.
Desktop
Backplane
(rear view)
Slot 5 (the supplementary slot) is under
the power supply unit. There is probably
already a LAN board or a SCSI/LAN
board installed in this slot. This slot can
be used for a 32-bit PCI board (maximum length 16-cm/6.3-inch).
J7
Desktop Backplane PCI Mapping Table
Device
#AD[xx]
PCI Device
Slot#
0
11
440LX PAC
4
15
PIIX4
12
23
J12
3
6
17
J6
2
10
21
J10
1
7
18
J7
Rear of Backplane
Board
11
22
(not used)
27
2 System Board
System Board and Backplane Boards
Minitower
Backplane
(top view)
Slots 5 and 6. These slots can be used
for full-length 16-bit ISA boards.
Slot 4. These slots can be used for a
16-bit ISA or a 32-bit PCI board.
J12
Slots 2 and 3. Can be used for 32-bit
PCI boards.The maximum length for a
board in slot 2 is 17-cm/6.7 inches.
J6
Slot 1. Can be used for a 16-bit ISA or
a 32-bit PCI board (17-cm/6.7 inch
maximum length).
J1
J2
System board slot.
Minitower Backplane PCI Mapping Table
28
Device
#AD[xx]
PCI Device
Slot#
0
11
440LX PAC
4
15
PIIX4
12
23
J12
4
6
17
J6
3
10
21
J10
2
7
18
J7
1
11
22
(not used)
2 System Board
Architectural View
Architectural View
Intel Pentium II Processor
Address (32)
Control
Processor-Local
(GTL) Bus (64 bit,
66 MHz)
Data (64)
440 LX PAC
82443LX
Memory Bus
72-bit ECC
Main Memory
3 DIMMS
(Serial Presence
Detect)
LAN/SCSI
Cirrus
AGP
CL5465
PCI Bus
(32 bit, 33 MHz)
PCI Slots
Clock
Clock
PCI/ISA Bridge (PIIX4)
82371AB
IDE
USB
USB
Interrupt
Controller
Ultra DMA
Controller
PCI Bus
Interface
SMBus
Controller
ISA Bus
Interface
CK4D
PLL
SMBUS
LM75
Serial
EEPROM
ISA Slots
ISA Bus
(16 bit, 8.25MHz)
29F002T Flash
EEPROM
Little Ben
Super I/O
NS82317
AD-1816
Audio
29
2 System Board
Chip-Set
Chip-Set
The Intel AGPset is comprised of two chips. The 440LX PAC chip and the
PIIX4chip.
• The PAC chip (440LX) is the bridge between four buses: the PL (GTL)
bus, the main memory bus, the PCI bus and the AGP (graphic) bus.
• The PIIX4 chip is the bridge between three buses: the PCI bus, the SM bus
and the ISA bus. In addition, it contains the IDE controller, USB
controller and Power Management logic
The PAC Chip (440LX)
The PAC chip, called the Intel 440LX AGPset, is contained in a Ball Grid
Array (BGA) package, giving a smaller footprint and higher reliability.
The PAC chip integrates a Host-to-PCI bridge, optimized DRAM controller
and data path, and an Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP) interface. The AGP
is a high performance, component level interconnect, targeted at 3D
graphics applications.
PL Bus Interface
The PAC chip monitors each cycle that is initiated by the processor, and
forwards those to the PCI bus that are not targeted at the local memory. It
translates PL bus cycles into PCI bus cycles.
The chip can support one or two Pentium II processors, at up to 66 MHz FSB
clock frequency. Refer to page 35 for a description of the devices on the
Processor-Local Bus.
PCI Bus Interface
The PCI bus interface is PCI 2.1 compliant.
Sequential PL-to-PCI memory write cycles are translated into PCI zero wait
state burst cycles. The maximum PCI burst transfer can be between
256 bytes and 4 KB. The chip supports advanced snooping for PCI master
bursting, and provides a pre-fetch mechanism dedicated for IDE read.
The PCI arbiter supports PCI bus arbitration for up to six masters using a
rotating priority mechanism. Its hidden arbitration scheme minimizes
arbitration overhead. Additional logic on the PC Workstation extends the
number of fully supported masters to seven (440LX master not counted).
Refer to page 39 for a description of the devices on the Processor-Local Bus.
30
2 System Board
Chip-Set
AGP Bus Interface
A controller for the AGP (Accelerated Graphics Port) slot is integrated in the
440LX PAC chip. The PAC chip supports only a synchronous AGP interface,
coupling to the host bus frequency. The AGP characteristics are described in
detail in “Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP) Controller” on page 41.
Main Memory Controller The main memory controller supports three DIMM slots. Each slot can host
a 168-pin unbuffered SDRAM module, running at 66MHz, for a total of up to
348 MB of dynamic random access memory (ECC SDRAM).
The memory bus is 72-bits wide, comprised of 64 bits of data and 8 bits of
ECC. Refer to “Main Memory Bus” on page 38, for more detail on the main
memory.
Read/Write Buffers
The PAC chip defines a data buffering scheme to support the required level
of concurrent operations and provide adequate sustained bandwidth
between the DRAM subsystem and all other system interfaces (CPU, AGP
and PCI).
System Clocking
The PAC chip operates the host interface at 66MHz, PCI at 33 MHz and AGP
at 66/133 MHz. Coupling between all interfaces and internal logic is done in a
synchronous manner. The PAC chip is not designed to support host bus
frequencies lower than 66 MHz. The clocking scheme uses an external clock
synthesizer (which produces reference clocks for the host, AGP and PCI
interfaces).
31
2 System Board
Chip-Set
The PIIX4, PCI/ISA Bridge Chip (82371AB)
The universal host controller interface (UHCI) chip, known as PIIX4, is
encapsulated in a Ball Grid Array (BGA) package.
The PIIX4 chip is a multi-function PCI device implementing a PCI-to-ISA
bridge function, a PCI IDE function, a Universal Bus host/hub function, and
an Enhanced Power Management function.
The following figure shows an example of the system block diagram using
the PIIX4 chip.
Second Level
Cache
Processor
Host Bus
Cirrus AGP
CL5465
AGP Bus
Host-to-PCI
Bridge
Memory Bus
Main Memory
DRAM
PCI Bus (3.3V or 5V, 30/33 MHz)
Hard Disk
Hard Disk
BMI IDE
Ultra DMA/33
USB 1
PCI/ISA Bridge (PIIX4)
82371AB
PCI Slots
USB2
GP[I,O] (30+)
SM Bus
CD-ROM
ISA/EIO Bus (3.3V; 5V Tolerant)
32
Audio
KBD
SP, PP,
FDC, IR
BIOS
2 System Board
Chip-Set
PCI Bus Interface
This part of the chip is responsible for transferring data between the PCI bus
and the ISA expansion bus. It performs PCI-to-ISA, and ISA-to-PCI bus cycle
translation. It supports the Plug-and-Play mechanism. Data buffers are
provided, to isolate the PCI and ISA buses. Refer to page 39 for a description
of the devices on the PCI Bus.
ISA Bus Interface
As well as accepting cycles from the PCI bus interface, and translating them
for the ISA bus, the ISA bus interface also requests the PCI master bridge to
generate PCI cycles on behalf of a DMA or ISA master. The ISA bus interface
contains a standard ISA bus controller and data buffering logic. It can
directly support six ISA slots without external data or address buffering.
Refer to page 45 for a description of the devices on the ISABus.
SMBus Controller
The System Management (SM) bus is a two-wire serial bus provided by the
PIIX4 controller. It runs at a maximum of 16 kHz. The bus monitors some of
the hardware functions of the main board, both during boot-up and run-time.
All accesses to the SM bus are handled by the main processor, via the PIIX4
SM bus registers. Refer to page 43 for a description of the devices on the SM
(System Management) Bus.
IDE Controller
The PCI master/slave IDE controller, supporting four devices, two on each of
two channels, is described on page 39.
USB Controller
The PCI USB (Universal Serial Bus) controller, supports two stacked USB
connectors on the back panel. These ports are built into the PIIX4
controller, as standard USB ports. The USB is described in detail on page 40.
Ultra DMA Controller
The seven channel DMA controller incorporates the functionality of two
82C37 DMA controllers. Channels 0 to 3 are for 8-bit DMA devices, while
channels 5 to 7 are for 16-bit devices (see page 82). The channels can be
programmed for any of the four transfer modes: the three active modes
(single, demand, block), can perform three different types of transfer: read,
write and verify. The address generation circuitry supports a 24-bit address
for DMA devices.
Interrupt Controller
The interrupt controller incorporates the functionality of two 82C59
interrupt controllers. The two controllers are cascaded, supporting 15
interrupts (edge/level triggered). A table on page 83 shows how the master
33
2 System Board
Chip-Set
and slave controllers are connected.
Counter / Timer
The chip contains a three-channel 82C54 counter/timer. The counters use a
division of the 14.318 MHz OSC input as the clock source.
Serial EEPROM
This is the non-volatile memory which holds the values for the Setup
program (they are no longer stored in the CMOS memory). The Serial
EEPROM is described on page 43.
Cache Memory
There are two integrated circuits sealed within a single Pentium II package.
One of these contains the Level-2 (L2) cache memory chip; the other
contains the processor, which itself includes two banks of Level-1 (L1)
cache memory.
The L1 cache memory has a total capacity of 32KB (16 KB data, 16 KB
instruction). The L2 cache memory has a capacity 512 KB, and is composed
of four-way set-associative static RAM. Data is stored in lines of 32-bytes
(256 bits). Thus two consecutive 128-bit transfers with the main memory
are involved for each transaction.
The amount of cache memory is set by Intel at the time of manufacture, so
cannot be changed.
34
2 System Board
Devices on the Processor-Local Bus
Devices on the Processor-Local Bus
The Processor-Local (PL) bus of the Pentium II processors, also referred to
as their FSB (Front Side Bus), is implemented in the GTL+ technology. This
technology features open-drain signal drivers that are pulled-up to 1.5 V
through 56 ohm resistors on both ends of the bus; these resistors also act as
bus terminators, and are integrated in the Pentium II processors.
The supported operating frequencies of the GTL+ bus are 60 MHz and
66 MHz. The width of the data bus is 64 bits, the width of the address is 32
bits.
The control signals of the PL bus allows the implementation of a “split transaction” bus protocol. This allows the Pentium II processor to send its
request (such as asking for the contents of a given memory address) and
then to release the bus, rather than waiting for the result, thereby allowing
to accept another request. The 440LX as target device then requests the bus
again when it is ready to respond, and sends the requested data packet. Up
to four transactions are allowed to be outstanding at any given time.
Intel Pentium II Microprocessor
The Pentium II processor has several high-performance features that
enhance performance:
• Dual Independent Bus architecture, which combines a dedicated 64-bit
L2 cache bus (supporting level cache sizes of 256K or 512K), plus a 64-bit
system bus with ECC that enables multiple simultaneous transactions (refer to above “split -transaction”).
• Intel MMX technology, which gives higher performance for media, communications and 3D applications.
• Dynamic execution to speed up software performance.
The Pentium II processor and level-2 cache memory are packaged in a selfcontained, pre-sealed module, installed in a socket on the system board.
35
2 System Board
Devices on the Processor-Local Bus
The heat-sink is supplied with the processor, and is bolted to it by the
manufacturer. The module is held in place by a bracket. There are two
plastic clips, one on the top of each pillar of the bracket, to hold the
processor module in place.
To remove the old processor module:
1 Press the two plastic clips towards each other.
2 Carefully pull the processor module away from its connector on the
system board.
Only upgrades, pin compatible with the original processor, manufactured by
Intel, are supported.
Plastic clips
Bracket pillars
36
Heat sink
2 System Board
Devices on the Processor-Local Bus
Bus Frequencies
There is a 14.318 MHz crystal oscillator on the system board. This frequency
is multiplied to 66 MHz by a phase locked loop. This is further scaled by an
internal clock multiplier within the processor.
For example, the Pentium II 300 MHz processor multiplies the 66 MHz
system clock by 4.5. Switches 1 and 2, on the system board switches, set the
frequency of the Processor-Local bus, which for all HP Kayak XA PC
Workstation models, is 66 MHz. Switches 3, 4 and 5 set the clock multiplier
ratio.
Switch
Switch2
1
2
Processor
Local Bus
Frequency1
233 MHz
Open
Open
66 MHz
33 MHz
266 MHz
Open
Open
66 MHz
300 MHz
Open
Open
333 MHz
Open
Open
Processor
Frequency
PCI Bus
Frequency
ISA Bus
Frequency
Frequency
Ratio
Processor:
Local Bus
3
4
5
8.25 MHz
Open
Closed
Closed
3.5 : 1
33 MHz
8.25 MHz
Closed
Open
Open
4:1
66 MHz
33 MHz
8.25 MHz
Closed
Open
Closed
4.5 : 1
66 MHz
33 MHz
8.25 MHz
Closed
Closed
Open
5:1
1.
Processor bus frequency is always set at 66MHz for all XA PC Workstations models.
Switches are provided to match the system board to processor frequency when a
system board repair is performed.
2.
The computer may execute erratically, if at all, or may overheat, if it is
configured to operate at a higher processor speed than the processor is
capable of supporting. This can cause damage to the computer.
Setting the switches to operate at a slower speed, than the processor is
capable of supporting, can still cause erratic behavior in some cases, and
would reduce the instruction throughput in others.
37
2 System Board
Main Memory Bus
Main Memory Bus
The memory bus is 72-bits wide, comprised of 64 bits of data and 8 bits of
ECC. It is connected to the Main Memory and to the PAC (440LX) chip.
There are three 168-pin DIMM slots on the system board for installing main
memory; slots A, B and C. All HP Kayak XA PC Workstation models are
supplied with one memory module (either 16 MB, 32 MB or 64 MB ECC
SDRAM) in one of the three slots, leaving the other slots free for memory
upgrades.
The slots can be filled in any order, but there is a performance advantage in
filling the slots in the order A, B, C. Memory upgrades are available in single
32 MB, 64 MB or 128 MB ECC SDRAM modules. Note that replacement of
the supplied memory module may be necessary to obtain the 384 MB
maximum memory, unless the supplied module was 128 MB.
With non-ECC SDRAM memory modules, a maximum of 192 MB can be
obtained. These memory modules can be either; 16 MB, 32 MB or 64 MB.
NOTE
If ECC and non-ECC memory modules are both installed, ECC will be
invalidated for all memory modules.
Error Correcting Code
Operation
The error correcting code (ECC) memory of the HP Kayak XA PC
Workstation allows any single bit error that occurs in any 72-bit line of
memory (64 data bits plus 8 parity bits) to be corrected (automatically and
transparently) by the PAC chip.
The ECC detects single and dual bit errors. It can correct single bit errors
during SDRAM reads. The corrected data is transmitted to the requester
(PCI or CPU) but not written back to the SDRAM. A double bit error would
cause an NMI to be generated, and the PC Workstation to be halted.
If more bits are faulty within any given 72-bit line, the effect is the same as it
would have been without error correction. The effect of executing a faulty
instruction is always unpredictable, and might cause the program to ‘hang’.
The effect of reading a faulty data word is often similarly unpredictable, but
can sometimes be tolerated (for instance, it might merely appear as a
corrupted pixel on a video display).
38
2 System Board
Devices on the PCI Bus
Devices on the PCI Bus
Chip-set Interrupt Connection
Device
Name
Device
Number
Function
PL/PCI bridge
440LX PAC
0
N/A
Virtual PCI-to-PCI bridge (AGP)
440LX PAC
1
PIIX4
4
PCI Device
PCI/ISA bridge
AD[xx]
INTA
INTB
INTC
INTD
11
—
—
—
—
N/A
12
—
—
—
—
0
15
—
—
—
—
IDE controller
1
—
—
—
—
USB Host controller
2
—
—
—
—
Power Management and SM Bus
3
—
—
—
—
PCI slot #1 (LAN) - Minitower
16
7
0-7
18
A
B
C
D
17
10
0-7
21
D
A
B
C
18
6
0-7
17
C
D
A
B
19
12
0-7
23
B
C
D
A
Backplane Rear Board - Desktop
PCI slot #2 - Minitower
PCI slot #1 - Desktop
PCI slot #3 - Minitower
PCI slot #2 - Desktop
PCI slot #4 - Minitower
PCI slot #3 - Desktop
The distribution of the interrupt lines is described more fully on page 83.
Integrated Drive Electronics (IDE)
The IDE controller is implemented as part of the PIIX4 chip (the PCI/ISA
bridge). It is driven from the PCI bus, and has PCI-Master capability. It
supports Enhanced IDE (EIDE) and Standard IDE. To use the Enhanced
IDE features the drives must be compliant with Enhanced IDE.
The IDE controller supports two devices (one master and one slave)
connected to a single channel. The channel is fitted with an IDE cable with
two connectors.
39
2 System Board
Devices on the PCI Bus
It is possible to mix a fast and a slow device, such as a hard disk drive and a
a CD-ROM, on the same channel without affecting the performance of the
fast device. The BIOS determines automatically, the fastest configuration
that each device supports. However, in general, the IDE cable is
recommended for CD-ROM drives, and the SCSI cables for hard disk drives.
Universal Serial Bus (USB) Controller
The USB controller is implemented as part of the PIIX4 chip. It is accessed
through the PCI bus, and provides support for the two stacked USB
connectors on the back panel. Over-current detection and protection is
provided, but shared between the two ports.
USB works only if the USB interface has been enabled within the HP Setup
program. Currently, only the Microsoft Windows 95 and Windows NT
operating systems provides support for the USB.
The Microsoft Supplement 2.1 software called (called USBSupp.exe), which
provides support of the Universal Serial Bus, can be obtained from the
Hewlett-Packard World Wide Web site (refer to “Access HP World Wide
Web” on page 21).
Other PCI Accessory Devices
PCI accessory boards are for high-speed peripheral accessories. A network
board could already occupy one of the PCI slots. A diagram showing the PCI
slots that are available for the desktop and minitower models is on page 27.
Plug and Play
The HP Kayak XA/ PC Workstations have a “PnP level 1.0A” BIOS and
meets the “Windows 95 Required” level for Plug and Play. Accessory boards
which are Plug and Play are automatically configured by the BIOS.
40
2 System Board
Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP) Controller
Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP) Controller
The AGP technology was developed as a means to access system memory as
a viable alternative to augmenting the memory of the graphics subsystem
needed for high quality 3D graphics applications. All models of HP Kayak
XA PC Workstations support an AGP (Accelerated Graphics Port) device
(Laguna Graphic Controller from Cirrus).
The AGP bus is based upon a 66 MHz, 32 Bit PCI bus architecture, to which
several signal groups have been added. These additional signals allow to
implement AGP specific control and transfer mechanisms, which are:
• Pipelining and sideband addressing. These control mechanisms increase the bus efficiency compared to the PCI protocol.
• Double clocking (2x mode). This is a transfer mechanism that doubles
the peak transfer rate to 528 MB/s, as two 32 Bit words are transferred in
each clock period (2 x 32 bits x 66 MHz).
AGP specific transactions always use pipelining. The other two mechanisms
can combine independently to pipelining, which leads to these operating
modes:
• FRAME based AGP. Only the PCI protocol is used: 66 MHz, 32 Bits, 3.3V,
264 MB/s peak transfer rate.
• 1 X AGP with pipelining, sideband addressing can be added: 66 MHz, 32
Bits, 3.3V, increased bus efficiency, 264 MB/s peak transfer rate.
• 2 X AGP with Pipelining, sideband addressing can be added: 66 MHz double clocked, 32 Bits, 3.3V, increased bus efficiency, 528 MB/s peak transfer rate.
41
2 System Board
Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP) Controller
AGP PCI Bus
Implementation
In the below diagram, the AGP Bus is viewed as a PCI bus with extra data
lines.
Pentium II Processor
66 MHz
PCI Bus # 1
AGP
Device
LX-Device 1
AGP Port
Virtual PCI-PCI Bridge
440 LX - Device 0
Host to PCI Bridge
PCI Bus # 0
PCI/ISA Bridge (PIIX4)
33 MHz
42
2 System Board
Devices on the SM Bus
Devices on the SM Bus
Device
PIIX4 SM Bus Master
Serial EEPROM
SM Bus Address
10
A8, AA, AC, AE
LM75
90
SDRAM slot 1
A0
SDRAM slot 2
A2
SDRAM slot 3
A4
PLL
D2
The System Management (SM) bus is used to monitor several of the
hardware functions (such as voltage levels, temperature, fan speed, DIMM
presence and type) of the system board. It is controlled by the SM bus
controller located in the PIIX4 chip.
Serial EEPROM
This is the non-volatile memory which holds the default values for the CMOS
memory (in the event of battery failure).
When installing a new system board, the Serial EEPROM will have a blank
serial number field. This will be detected automatically by the BIOS, which
will then prompt the user for the serial number which is printed on the
identification label on the back of the PC Workstation.
The computer uses 4 Kbit of Serial EEPROM implemented within a single
512 K ✕ 8-bit ROM chip. Serial EEPROM is ROM in which one byte at a time
can be returned to its unprogrammed state by the application of appropriate
electrical signals. In effect, it can be made to behave like very slow, nonvolatile RAM. It is used for storing the tatoo string, the serial number, and
the parameter settings for the Setup program.
43
2 System Board
Devices on the SM Bus
LM75 Chip
The LM75 chip is a temperature sensor and alarm located on the system
board. It is used to measure the temperature in one area of the PC
Workstation, and to send an alarm to the processor in case of overheating.
This chip includes a security mechanism which prevents the system fan
from being disabled using software controls so long as the temperature
measured by the sensor is above the maximum operating temperature.
Main PLL
The registers of the main PLL are accessed through the SM bus. These
registers control the PLL clock signal outputs and are write-only.
WARNING:
Writing over the SM bus may be destructive to the PC Workstation, as it
allows to access information necessary to the System BIOS, without which
the system will not run.
44
2 System Board
Devices on the ISA Bus
Devices on the ISA Bus
ISA Device
Index
Data
Ultra I/O
2Eh
2Fh
Little Ben (HP ASIC)
96h
97h
The Super I/O Controller (NS 82317)
The Ultra I/O chip (NS 82317) provides the control for two FDD devices,
one serial port and one bidirectional multi-mode parallel port.
Serial / parallel
communications ports
The 9-pin serial port (whose pin layouts are depicted on page 71) supports
RS-232-C and are buffered by 16550A UARTs, with 16 Byte FIFOs. They can
be programmed as COM1, COM2, COM3, COM4, or disabled.
The 25-pin parallel port (also depicted on page 71) is Centronics
compatible, supporting IEEE 1284. It can be programmed as LPT1, LPT2, or
disabled. It can operate in the following four modes:
❒ Standard mode (PC/XT, PC/AT, and PS/2 compatible).
❒ Bidirectional mode (PC/XT, PC/AT, and PS/2 compatible).
❒ Enhanced mode (enhanced parallel port, EPP, compatible).
❒ High speed mode (MS/HP extended capabilities port, ECP, compatible).
FDC
The integrated flexible disk controller (FDC) supports any combination of
two of the following: tape drives, 3.5-inch flexible disk drives, 5.25-inch
flexible disk drives. It is software and register compatible with the 82077AA,
and 100% IBM compatible. It has an A and B drive-swapping capability and a
non-burst DMA option.
RTC
The real-time clock (RTC) is 146818A-compatible. With an accuracy of
20 ppm (parts per million). The configuration RAM is implemented as 256
bytes of CMOS memory.
Keyboard and Mouse
Controller
The computer has an 8042-based keyboard and mouse controller. The
connector pin layouts are shown on page 71.
45
2 System Board
Devices on the ISA Bus
Audio Controller
The HP Kayak XA PC Workstation has an audio chip (AD1816) integrated
on the system board. This single chip is a Plug and Play multimedia audio
subsystem for concurrently processing multiple digital streams of 16-bit
stereo audio.
Host Interface
The AD1816 audio chip contains all necessary ISA bus logic on chip. This
logic includes address decoding for all onboards resources, control and signal
interpretation, DMA selection and control logic, IRQ selection and control
logic, and all interface configuration logic.
Audio Chip
Specifications
It is driven from the ISA bus, and has the following specification:
Feature:
Description:
Digitized Sounds
•
•
•
•
16-bit and 8-bit stereo sampling from 4 kHz to 55.2 kHz
Programmable sample rates with 1 Hz resolution
Hardware Full Duplex Conversion
16-bit software-based real-time audio compression/
decompression system
Music Synthesizer
•
Integrated OPL3 compatible music synthesizer
Mixer
•
•
AC’97 and MPC-3 audio mixer
Input mixing sources: microphone, LINE In,
CD Audio, AUX Audio, and digitized sounds
Output mixing of all audio sources to the LINE Out or
integrated PC Workstation speaker
Multiple source recording and Left/Right channels
swapping or mixing
•
•
Line Input
•
•
Input impedance: 15 kohms
Input range: 0 to 2 Vpp
Line Output
•
Stereo output of 5 mW per channel with headphone
speakers (impedance >600 ohms)
Audio Front Panel
•
•
•
Microphone input jack
Stereo output jack
Master volume control potentiometer
46
2 System Board
Devices on the ISA Bus
Feature:
Description:
Microphone Input
•
Stereo Out Jack
•
•
•
20 dB gain preamplifier. The boost can be muted with
software
16-level programmable volume control
Input impedance: 600 ohms
Sensitivity: 30 mVpp to 200 mVpp
•
Impedance: 32 ohms
The headphones jack and the stereo-out (audio) jack can be used
interchangeably. The Windows 95 and Windows NT operating systems each
have integrated drivers (Directions III).
Flash EEPROM
The PC Workstation uses 256 KB of Flash EEPROM implemented using one
8-bit ROM chip. Flash EEPROM is ROM in which the whole memory can be
returned to its unprogrammed state by the application of appropriate
electrical signals to its pins. It can then be reprogrammed with the latest
upgrade firmware.
The System ROM contains: the LAN boot firmware, and the system BIOS
(including the boot code, the ISA and PCI initialization, the Setup program
and the Power-On Self-Test routines, video BIOS, plus their error
messages). These are summarized in Chapters 4 and 5.
The Flash EEPROMs on the HP Kayak XA PC Workstation implement a
bootblock feature which allows recovery from a failed attempt at updating
the System BIOS. The bootblock contains the minimum system BIOS
information necessary to reprogram the Flash EEPROM.
47
2 System Board
Devices on the ISA Bus
System Board Switches
The first two of the system board switches set the frequency of the
Processor-Local bus, and the next three the ratio of processor-frequency to
Processor-Local-bus-frequency, as summarized on page 37.
The next five switches set the configuration for the PC Workstation, as
summarized in the table below.
Switch
Switch Function
Default
1
Open
Reserved - Do not use (always set to Open).
Open
2-5
-
Bus Frequencies (see the table on page 37).
-
Retain or clear the CMOS configuration stored in serial EEPROM:
6
Open
Do not clear CMOS.
Closed
Clear CMOS and reload default values in Setup.
Open
Enable or disable User and System Administrator Passwords stored in
EEPROM:
7
Open
Enable passwords.
Closed
Disable /Clear User and Administrator passwords.
Open
Keyboard power-on:
8
Open
Disable keyboard power on.
Closed
Enable keyboard power on.
Closed
Boot block:
9
10
48
Open
Idle. Normal operation
Closed
Recovery boot active. Enable crisis recovery.
Open
Reserved = do not use
Open
Open
2 System Board
Devices on the ISA Bus
The following diagrams show the position of the system board switches on
the desktop and minitower models.
BIOS Update Crisis
Recovery Procedure
If, for example, during a BIOS update process, the procedure is interrupted
by a power failure, and the system does not start, then you can still recover
the situation of a destroyed system BIOS. However, it should be noted that
during the recovery procedure, there is no image on the screen, nor access
to the keyboard or mouse (only “vital” devices that are required to boot on
the floppy are initialized). Follow these steps to recover the BIOS:
1 Ensure that you have created a DOS-bootable diskette. This floppy diskette contains all the recovery and system BIOS programming software
(phlash.exe, platform.bin and hblxxxyy.Ful). Include the flash command
in the autoexec.bat, for example: phlash /mode=3 HC1xyyzz.Ful
H = HP Professional PC
C = Kayak XA (Pentium II models)
1 = Kayak family
x = major revision
yy = minor revision
zz = language
2 Turn off the computer. Set Switch 9 to the Closed position.
3 Insert the DOS-bootable diskette.
49
2 System Board
Devices on the ISA Bus
4 Power on the computer.
5 During the recovery process, short beeps are emitted. The recover
process is finished when there is a much longer beep (after approximately
1 to 2 minutes).
6 Power off the computer. Press the power ON/OFF button (for about 5
seconds), until the ON/OFF light switches off. Set the switch 9 to the
Open position.
Updating the system
ROM
The System ROM can be updated with the latest BIOS firmware. This can be
downloaded from HP’s World Wide Web site:
http://www.hp.com/go/kayaksupport
To download a BIOS upgrade, connect to the HP Web site and follow the onscreen instructions to download the flash utility programs (FLASH.BAT,
AUTOEXEC.BAT and PHLASH.EXE), the BIOS file (HC11xx.FUL), and a file
called pfmhd106.bin, onto a bootable diskette.
Before updating the System ROM, it is necessary to disable the “PSWRD”
switch on the system switches (SW-7), and to type in the System
Administrator’s Password when starting up the computer. The PCI and PnP
information is erased in the process.
Do not switch off the computer until the system BIOS update procedure has
completed, successfully or not, otherwise irrecoverable damage to the ROM
may be caused. While updating the flash ROM, the power supply switch and
the reset button are disabled to prevent accidental interruption of the flash
programming process.
Little Ben
Little Ben is an HP application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), designed
to be a companion to the Ultra I/O chip, that is connected between the chipset and the processor. It contains the following:
• BIOS timer
❒ hardware wired 50 ms long 880 Hz beep module.
❒ automatic blinker that feeds the LEDs module with a 1 Hz oscillator
signal.
• Security protection (access, flash and anti-virus protection)
❒ For 128, 256 or 512 KB Flash EEPROMs.
50
2 System Board
Devices on the ISA Bus
❒ For the Ultra I/O space: the Serial EEPROM, serial port, parallel port
and mass storage drives (disable write on Flexible Disk Drive, disable
boot on any drive, disable use of any embedded drive)
• Advanced Power Management (APM) version 1.2
• Glue logic (such as programmable chip selects)
When the user requests a ShutDown from the operating system, the
environment is first cleared. Any request to turn off the PC Workstation,
from the control panel, or from the operating system, can only be granted if
the PC Workstation is not locked by Little Ben’s lock bit (otherwise the
power remains on, a red light is illuminated, and the buzzer is sounded).
Other ISA Accessory Devices
ISA accessory boards are for slow peripheral accessories. A diagram
showing the ISA slots that are available for the desktop and minitower
models is on page 27.
Plug and Play
All PCI accessory boards are Plug and Play, although not all ISA boards are.
Check the accessory board’s documentation if you are unsure.
In general, in a Plug and Play configuration, resources for an ISA board have
to be reserved first (using the Setup utility) and then you can plug in your
board.
The procedure for installing an ISA accessory board that is not Plug and
Play is described in the User’s Guide that is supplied with the PC
Workstation.
NOTE
The Windows NT 4.0 operating system is not Plug and Play. Information
explained above is only applicable for Plug and Play operating systems (for
example, Windows 95).
51
2 System Board
Devices on the ISA Bus
52
3
Interface Devices and Mass-Storage Drives
This chapter describes the graphics, mass storage and audio devices which
are supplied with the computer. It also summarizes the pin connections on
the internal and external connectors.
53
3 Interface Devices and Mass-Storage Drives
Cirrus 5465 Graphics Controller Chip
Cirrus 5465 Graphics Controller Chip
The HP Kayak XA PC Workstation Desktop and Minitower models are
supplied with a Cirrus 5465 graphics controller chip integrated on the
system board (refer to the architectural view on page 29 for its location).
This chip integrates the necessary hardware for a flexible multimedia
display system. Including an integrated palette DAC, clock generators,
Enhanced V-Port bus for easy expandability, glueless AGP/PCI host
interface, glueless Rambus channels, and a 64-bit graphics engine featuring
GUI acceleration hardware (such as BitBLT, color expansion, 3D engine, and
hardware cursor).
The Cirrus 5465 Graphics Controller Chip also offers advanced features
such as BitBLT and line accleration, a general-purpose I/O port for
expansion, front-end and back-end video playback scaling, and color-space
conversion for video applications.
The Cirrus 5465 Graphics Controller Chip uses one of two Rambus channels
providing 500 to 600 Mbytes/second of memory bandwidth, displaying truecolor images of up to 1024 x 768 resolution, and 256-color modes that can
reach a maximum of 1600 x 1200 resolution.
The Cirrus Logic AGP 5465, can be characterized as follows:
• 100% hardware- and BIOS-compatible with IBM® VGA display standard.
• 64-bit video memory access with 2 MB, 50 ns, EDO, video DRAM (this is
not upgradeable since it is already fitted to capacity).
• 24-bit pixel bus (video playback width).
• 24-bit fractional component of texel addressing.
• 4- and 8-bit indexed texture source to 16- and 24-bpp display modes.
• Acceleration for playback, continuous interpolation on X, continuous
interpolation on Y.
• Chroma keying for substitution of graphics on video.
• Color expansion for 8-, 16-, 24-, and 32-bpp modes.
• Color keying for substitution of video on graphics.
• Color key support.
• DDC 2B compliant.
54
3 Interface Devices and Mass-Storage Drives
Cirrus 5465 Graphics Controller Chip
• Green power saving features.
• GUI acceleration width (in bits).
• Hardware acceleration of graphical user interface (GUI) operations
through a bit-block transfer mechanism.
• Hardware cursor.
• Integrated programmable, dual-clock synthesizer.
• Integrated triple 8-bit DAC.
• Integrated 24-bit, 135 MHz RAMDAC.
• Lighted and shaded textures with Gouraud ramp and transparent texture.
• Maximum pixel clock.
• Maximum memory clock.
• PCI Bus Master mode for 2D/3D display list instruction fetch (Processor
mode) and data fetch and store to system memory.
• Point and line draw support via polygon engine DDAs.
• Specular lighting.
• Standard and Enhanced Video Graphics Array (VGA) modes.
• Superior TV-like quality video performance: hardware video window; YUV
video support; color key, chroma key; X & Y interpolated zooming.
• Support for up to 4 MB, 50 ns EDO video DRAM (though space is only
provided on the system board for 2 MB).
• Support for Gouraud shading in 8-, 16-, and 24-bpp display modes.
• Texture map source from system memory or RDRAM.
• Three-operand BitBLT.
• Video Overlay Support.
• Video playback acceleration.
• X, Y interpolated scaling.
• YCrCb support.
• YUV-to-RGB conversion in stretch engine path, supports MPEG textures.
• Z-storage and retrieval from either system memory or RDRAM.
55
3 Interface Devices and Mass-Storage Drives
Cirrus 5465 Graphics Controller Chip
Connectors
The Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) defines a standard
video connector, variously known as the VESA feature connector,
auxiliary connector, or pass-through connector. The graphics controller
supports an input/output VESA feature connector. This connector (whose
pin names are listed in a table on page 71) is integrated on the system board,
and is connected directly to the pixel data bus and the synchronization
signals.
Video Memory
The HP Kayak Workstation PCs are supplied with 4 MB of video memory
integrated on the system board (revision B). There is either, an on-board
4 MB video memory soldered onto the system board. Or, 2 MB of built-in
video memory (revision A) and a 2 MB video memory module installed in
the video memory upgrade socket, giving 4 MB in total.
The video RAM (also known as the frame buffer) is a local block of 50 ns
EDO DRAM for holding both the on-screen surface (reflecting what is
currently displayed on the screen), and the off-screen surface (video frame,
fonts, double buffer).
The following diagrams show the position of the video memory module on
the minitower and desktop computers.
The soldered video memory (revision B) is located in the same area on the
system board as the video memory module.
56
3 Interface Devices and Mass-Storage Drives
Cirrus 5465 Graphics Controller Chip
Available Video Resolutions
The number of colors supported is limited by the graphics device and the
video memory. The resolution/color/refresh-rate combination is limited by a
combination of the display driver, the graphics device, and the video
memory. If the resolution/refresh-rate combination is set higher than the
display can support, you risk damaging the display.
The following table, lists the video resolutions that are embedded in the
system BIOS.
Resolution
Minimum video memory required for these color scales
256 colors
(8 bits per
pixel)
16.7 M
colors
true-color
(24 bits per
pixel)
16.7 M
colors
true-color
(32 bits per
pixel)
640 ✕ 480
2 MB
60, 75, 85 Hz
800 ✕ 600
2 MB
60, 75, 85 Hz
1024 ✕ 768
1.
64 K colors
hi-color
(16 bits per
pixel)
Refresh rates1
2 MB
1280 ✕ 1024
2 MB
1600 ✕ 1200
2 MB
4 MB
4 MB
4 MB
Not Available
Not Available
i43, 60, 75, 85 Hz
i43, 60, 75, 85 Hz
i48, 60, 75, 85 Hz
The display may not support the refresh rates shown here. Refer to the User’s Guide supplied with
the display for details of the refresh rates supported.
A complete list of available standard VGA and enhanced video modes are
shown in the Appendix on page 100.
57
3 Interface Devices and Mass-Storage Drives
SCSI / LAN Combo Board
SCSI / LAN Combo Board
Certain HP Kayak XA PC Workstations are supplied with an integrated
SCSI / 10BT/100TX LAN combo board. Because the SCSI / LAN combo
board includes two controllers, only one PCI slot is necessary for installing
this board. The PCI and SCSI controllers access the PCI bus through a PCI
bridge. The SCSI and PCI functionalities of the SYM8751SP are contained
within the Symbios Logic SYM5C875J PCI-SCSI I/O Processor chip.
The following hardware functional diagram shows the SCSI part of the SCSI/
LAN Combo board.
5V
Term. Power
External connector (8 bits)
50-pins high density
To ExtStart Connector
Internal connector (16 bits)
Ext. Device
Int. Device
Termination L
PCI Bus
68-pins high density
Ext. Device
Term. Power
Fuse 3A
Termination H
SCSI Controller
SCSI LED
LED connector
(not loaded)
12V
Osc.
VPP Translator
40MHz
eeprom
24C16
Clock
Data
SYM53C875
Flash Memory
28F020
64KBytes
2KBytes
PCI Bus
PCI Interface
The PCI interface operates as a 32-bit DMA bus master. The connection is
made through the edge connector. The signal definitions and pin numbers
conform to the PCI Local Bus Specification Revision 2.0 standard. The PCI
interface conforms to the PCI universal signaling environment for a 5 volt or
3.3 volt PCI bus.
58
3 Interface Devices and Mass-Storage Drives
SCSI / LAN Combo Board
10BT/100TX PCI LAN
Connector
The LAN adapter supports the following two standards: 100 VG-AnyLAN,
100 Mbits per second over 4-pair, category-3, unshielded twisted pair
(UTP), voice grade (VG) cable (IEEE 802.12 standard for Ethernet);
10 BaseT, 10 Mbits per second, ISO 8802-3 (IEEE 802.3 standard). On the
rear panel there is one RJ-45 unshielded-twisted-pair (UTP) connector. The
10BT/100TX LAN Features on page 62 are also valid for the 10 BT/100 TX
PCI LAN controller.
SCSI Interface
The Symbios Logic SYM5C875J PCI-SCSI I/O Processor chip connects
directly the SCSI bus and generates timing and protocol in compliance with
the SCSI standard.
The SCSI interface operates as 16-bit, synchronous or asynchronous, singleended, and supports Ultra SCSI protocols and 16-bit arbitration. The
interface is made through two (and only two) of the connectors J2, J3 and
J4.
Connector
Description
Location
J2
Shielded 68-pin high density right-angle receptacle.
Protrudes through the
rear panel bracket.
J3
68-pin high density right-angle receptacle.
Internal connector at the
end of the board.
J4
External Start, SCSI Led and External SCSI cable
detection.
Internal connector at the
bottom right-hand-side of
the Combo card.
Ultra wide (16-bit) SCSI The Ultra wide 16-bit SCSI connector is for internal devices and has an
address range from 0 to 15, with the SCSI address 0 used by the first SCSI
connector
hard disk drive and SCSI address 7 reserved for the integrated SCSI
controller (the default for wide and narrow SCSI devices).
Data is transferred at 40 MB per second on 16-bit wide, single-ended bus.
The controller is fitted with a 16-bit SCSI flat cable with five connectors,
plus a SCSI termination device; so a maximum of 4 internal wide-SCSI hard
drives are supported.
59
3 Interface Devices and Mass-Storage Drives
SCSI / LAN Combo Board
By default, the internal SCSI bus is configured to run in Ultra-SCSI mode
(providing a maximum band-width of 40 MB/s. The user may configure the
SCSI system using the SCSI Configuration Utility, included in the system
BIOS. This utility is described in more detail on page 77.
SCSI-configured-automatically (SCAM) support is provided at level 2, for
Plug and Play. However, hot swap is not supported. The controller is BBS
compliant.
External (8-bit) SCSI
connector
The Ultra narrow 8-bit SCSI connector uses addresses ranging from 0 to 7. As
with the 16-bit internal SCSI connector, the SCSI address 0 is used by the first
SCSI hard disk drive and SCSI address 7 is reserved for the integrated SCSI
controller (the default for wide and narrow SCSI devices).
SCSI / PCI LAN Combo Board Features
Interface
PCI Interface
Features
Full 32-bit DMA bus master.
Zero wait-state bus master data bursts.
Universal PCI bus voltage support.
SCSI Interface
16-bit single ended.
Automatically enabled active termination
Fast and Ultra SCSI data transfer capability.
SCSI TERMPWR source with auto-resetting circuit breaker
SCAM (SCSI Configured AutoMatically).
Serial NVRAM (Non-Volatile RAM) for configuration utility and SCAM.
Flash BIOS.
Fast and Ultra SCSI controlled by external SCSI cable detection.
Ultra speed requires 1.5m maximum SCSI bus.
60
3 Interface Devices and Mass-Storage Drives
10BT/100TX LAN Controller
10BT/100TX LAN Controller
Certain models of the HP Kayak XA PC Workstation are supplied only with
a 10BT/100TX LAN adapter which supports the following standards:
100 Mbits per second over 2-pair, category-5, unshielded twisted pair
(UTP), or shielded twisted pair (STP); 10 BaseT, 10 Mbits per second, ISO
8802-3 (IEEE 802.3 standard).
On the rear panel there is one RJ-45 connector. There is an LED which
indicates the LAN connection status as follows:
• Off - when there is no Autonegotiation response (for example, when the
LAN cable is not connected to the network HUB.
• Blinking - during Autonegotiation
• Green (ON) - the connection has passed the Autonegotiation and a link
has been established between the LAN adapter and the network HUB/
Switch.
The LAN adapter contains a connector to which an internal LAN cable may
be connected to the external start connector on the system board, necessary
for the use of the Remote Power On feature, described in detail in the User’s
Guide provided with the PC Workstation. The LAN adapter that uses the
Remote Power On feature must be installed nearer the processors than any
other supplementary LAN adapter card.
Internal LAN connector for External
Start (Remote On)
Optional ROM Socket
LAN cable connector (RJ-45)
NOTE
Refer to the User’s Guide for details concerning system configuration
changes necessary after installing a LAN adapter.
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3 Interface Devices and Mass-Storage Drives
10BT/100TX LAN Controller
10BT/100TX LAN Features
Feature:
Description:
LAN Controller
AMD PCNET-Fast chip
RJ45 Connector
10BT/100TX autonegotiation
Remote Boot
Protocols integrated in System BIOS
ExtStart Connector
•
•
Connection to CPU board
LAN remote power on signals
Remote Power On
•
Full remote power on with Magic Packet
Remote Wake Up
•
Wake Up from Suspend state with Magic Packet
Remote Power On
Remote Power On (RPO) is available at 10 and 100 Mbits per second.
Vstandby requirements
supporting RPO
The Vstandby requirements for HP network cards supporting RPO, is:
• A power supply able to deliver at least 250mA on Vstandby output. This is
the case for all HP Kayak systems.
Optional Bootrom Socket It is possible to add a flash device on the network card socket with a specific
LAN bootrom code. This new bootrom code will be seen and mapped
automatically by the system BIOS instead of the embedded version (system
BIOS).
NOTE
At the time this TRM was produced, there was no flashing tool available to
allow you to update the bootrom content in the flash on the LAN adapter. A
flashing tool for any AMD based card may be available, but in order to use this
tool on HP cards, only 29fxxx flash devices must be used. At present, no test
has been carried out using this tool on HP cards.
Flash / ROM Devices
The 10BT/100TX card provides a PLCC 32-pin socket and any size of flash
device can be used up to 256KB§.
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3 Interface Devices and Mass-Storage Drives
10BT/100TX LAN Controller
Installing Two LAN
From a pure network standpoint, this is supported and both cards will be
Remote Power On Cards functional (for example, from the operating system, it will be possible to have
two LAN cards up and running at the same time).
However, there are restrictions due to the remote manageability boot
features implementation. To support these features, an internal cable is
required between the LAN card and the system board. Only one card can be
attached to this cable, therefore remote manageability features are
supported only on one card.
The problem is that current BIOS and hardware implementation doesn’t
allow to identify to which card the cable is attached and this may result in
having none of the remote capabilities working properly. Also, remote boot
can only work on one card.
Therefore, if a customer wants to use two HP LAN cards without using HP
LAN enhanced features (Remote boot, Remote power on), then there is no
problem. However, if there is a requirement to use the HP LAN enhanced
features, then it is not possible, at the present time, to use the two LAN
cards on one system.
Even though it is possible to install two LAN Remote Power On cards in the
computer, only one card is seen by the operating system.
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3 Interface Devices and Mass-Storage Drives
Mass-Storage Drives
Mass-Storage Drives
The IDE controller is described on page 39. The flexible disk controller is
described on page 45.
Hard Disk Drives
A 3.5-inch hard disk drive is supplied on an internal shelf in some models.
2.5 GB
Ultra-ATA 33
4.3 GB
Ultra-ATA 33
2.1 GB
SCSI
4.5 GB
SCSI
HP part number
D2678-6X001
D2677-6X001
D5094-6X001
D5095-6X001
Manufacturer
Quantum
Quantum
Quantum
Quantum
Product name
Stratus
Stratus
Viking
Viking
Average seek time
11.0 ms
11.0 ms
8 ms
8 ms
Revolutions per minute (RPM)
5400
5400
7200
7200
Average Latency
5.6 ms
5.6 ms
4.17 ms
4.17 ms
Maximum internal transfer rate
16.7/33 MB/s
16.7/33 MB/s
83 -140 MB/s
83-140 MB/s
Maximum external transfer rate
NA
NA
10 MB/s (avg)
40 MB/s (max)
10 MB/s (avg)
40 MB/s (max)
Flexible Disk Drives
Both desktop and minitower models are supplied with the new bezelless
version of the drive (either Sony or Alps).
64
3 Interface Devices and Mass-Storage Drives
Mass-Storage Drives
CD-ROM Drives
Most models have a 24✕ Max IDE CD-ROM drive supplied in a 5.25-inch
front-access shelf ATAPI, supporting ATAPI commands and with audio
playback capability. It can play any standard CD-Audio discs, in addition to
CD-ROM discs, conforming to optical and mechanical standards as specified
in the Red and Yellow Book.
Features of the
Panasonic CD-ROM
(CD-585-B)
•
•
•
•
•
•
Application Disc type (confirmed by Red, Yellow, Green, Orange Book).
CD-ROM data disc (Mode 1 and Mode 2).
Photo-CD Multisession.
CD Audio disc.
Mixed mode CD-ROM disc (data and audio).
CD-ROM XA, CD-I, CD-Extra, CD-R, CD-RW.
Description
HP product number
Disc Diameter
Data Block Size
Storage Capacity
Read Mode
Burst Transfer Rate
Access Time
Data Error Rate
Spin Up Time
Buffer Memory Size
D4383A
120 mm
2,048 bytes (Mode-1)
2,336 bytes (Mode-2)
650 Mbytes (Mode-1)
742 Mbytes (Mode-2)
Full CAV1 10.3X to 24X
PIO mode 4 - 16.6 Mbytes/s maximum
Single Word DMA Mode 2 - 8.3 Mbytes/s maximum
Multi Word DMA Mode 2 - 16.6 Mbytes/s maximum.
Average Stroke (1 / 3) 90 ms
Full Stroke 150 ms
Less than 10-12 (Mode-1)
Less than 10-9 (Mode-2)2
From standby mode. Typical 6s to drive ready mode
With tray loading. Typical 8.5s to drive ready mode.3
128 kbytes
1.
CAV = Constant Angular Velocity
It is assumed that raw error rate of the disc is 10-3 in the worst case.
This excludes “retries”.
3.
Photo-CD (Multisession) is not applicable.
2.
If a disk is still in the drive after power failure or drive failure, the disk can
be reclaimed by inserting a stout wire, such as the end of a straightened
paper-clip, into the small hole at the bottom of the door.
65
3 Interface Devices and Mass-Storage Drives
Connectors and Sockets
Connectors and Sockets
IDE and Flexible Disk
Drive Connectors
IDE Connector
Pin
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27
29
31
33
35
37
39
Signal
Reset#
HD7
HD6
HD5
HD4
HD3
HD2
HD1
HD0
Ground 7
DMARQ
DIOW#
DIOR#
IORDY
DMACK#
INTRQ
DA1
DA0
CS1FX
DASP#
Flexible Disk Drive Data Connector
Pin
Signal
Pin
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
Ground
HD8
HD9
HD10
HD11
HD12
HD13
HD14
HD15
orientation key
Ground 2
Ground 3
Ground 4
CSEL
Ground 5
IOCS16#
PDIAG#
DA2
CS3FX
Ground 6
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27
29
31
33
Signal
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Pin
Signal
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
LDENSEL#
Microfloppy
EDENSEL
INDX#
MTEN1#
DRSEL0#
DRSEL1#
DTEN0#
DIR#
STP#
WRDATA#
WREN#
TRK0#
WRPRDT#
RDDATA#
HDSEL1#
DSKCHG#
Status Panel Connector
Status Panel Connector
USB Stacked Connector
USB Stacked Connector
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1
3
5
7
9
Red Led
Reset
Ground
On_Off Button
Lock Leds
2
4
6
8
10
Green Led
Lock
Power Leds
Lan Led
IDE/SCSI Led
1
3
5
7
9
11
USB0 Power
USB0 Pos.
USB1 Power
USB1 Pos.
Chassis Ground
Chassis Ground
2
4
6
8
10
12
USB0 Neg.
Chassis Ground
USB1 Neg.
Chassis Ground
Chassis Ground
Chassis Ground
66
3 Interface Devices and Mass-Storage Drives
Connectors and Sockets
Power Supply Connector
Power Supply Connector for System Board
Battery Pack Connector
Pin
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
Power Supply 3V3
for System
PCI Wakeup Connector
Pin
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
Signal
Ground
Ground
5V STDBY
+5 Volt supply
-12 Volt supply
Low Power
+12 Volt supply
Power Supply 3V3 for System
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1 Ground
2 Ground
3 Ground
4 + 3V3 Volt supply
5 + 3V3 Volt supply 6 + 3V3 Volt supply
Power Supply 3V3
on Backplane
Fan Connector
on Backplane
Signal
PwrGood
Remote On
Ground
+12 Volt supply
+5 Volt supply
+5 Volt supply
-5 Volt supply
-12 Volt supply
Power Supply 3V3 on Backplane
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1 + 3V3 Volt supply 2 + 3V3 Volt supply
3 Ground
4 Ground
5 + 3V3 Volt supply 6 + 3V3 Volt supply
Battery Pack
Connector
Pin
Signal
1 VBAT
2
3 NC
4 Ground
PCI Wakeup (J25)
Pin
Signal
1 Ground
2 PCI Wakeup
3 Ground
Fan Connector
Pin
Signal
1 Ground
2 12V Power
3 Control Signal
ExtStart Connector
ExtStart Connector (J24)
Pin
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
Signal
SCSI Led
Ring
LAN Wake
Enable Remote On
External Reset
VStandby
Not connected
Pin
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
Signal
Ultra SCSI
Ground
VStandby Modem
LAN Start
LAN Led
Not connected
67
3 Interface Devices and Mass-Storage Drives
Connectors and Sockets
16-Bit SCSI Connector
16-Bit SCSI Connector
Pin
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27
29
31
33
Signal
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
TERMPWR3
RESERVED2
EXTARBACK
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
Pin
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
Signal
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
TERMPWR4
not connected
CGROUND0
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
Pin
35
37
39
41
43
45
47
49
51
53
55
57
59
61
63
65
67
Signal
SCD12
SCD14
SCDP1
SCD1
SCD3
SCD5
SCD7
not connected
not connected
not connected
ATN
BSY
RST
SEL
REQ
SCD8
SCD10
Pin
36
38
40
42
44
46
48
50
52
54
56
58
60
62
64
66
68
Signal
SCD13
SCD15
SCD0
SCD2
SCD4
SCD6
SCDP
INT_DEV
not connected
not connected
not connected
ACK
MSG
C_D
I_O
SCD9
SCD11
8-Bit SCSI Connector
16-Bit SCSI Connector
Pin
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
68
Signal
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
RESERVED1
not connected
Pin
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
Signal
SCD0
SCD1
SCD2
SCD3
SCD4
SCD5
SCD6
SCD7
SCDP
not connected
EXTDEV
RESERVED3
TERMPWR
Pin
27
29
31
33
35
37
39
41
43
45
47
49
51
Signal
RESERVED2
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
not connected
CGROUND1
Pin
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
42
44
46
48
50
52
Signal
RESERVED4
not connected
ATN
not connected
BSY
ACK
RST
MSG
SEL
C_D
REQ
I_O
CGROUND2
3 Interface Devices and Mass-Storage Drives
Connectors and Sockets
Internal Audio
Connectors
CD AUDIO Connector
Pin
1
2
3
4
Signal
Analog Ground
CD Right Channel
Analog Ground
CD Left Channel
AUX Connector
I/O
IN
IN
Audio Front Panel Connector
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
External Audio
Connectors
Internal Speaker
Connector
Package Intrusion
Connector
Signal
Analog Ground
Key Way
Front Panel input Left
Front Panel Return Left
Front panel Input Right
Pin
1
2
3
4
Signal
Analog Ground
AUX Right Channel
Analog Ground
AUX Left Channel
Front Panel Microphone Connector
(Rev. A)
I/O
IN
OUT
IN
Pin
Signal
1 MIC Signal + Power (tip)
2 Analog Ground
3 MIC Signal + Power (ring)
6
Front Panel Return Right OUT
7
8
9
10
Volume Low Limit
Volume High Limit
Volume Adjust Left
Volume Adjust Right
Pin
Signal
1 MIC Signal + Power (ring)
2 Analog Ground
3 MIC Signal + Power (tip)
-
I/O
IN
IN
I/O
IN
-
Front Panel Microphone Connector
(Rev. B)
I/O
IN
-
On the PC Workstation there is a Headphone Out jack and Microphone In jack
on the Audio Front Panel. A Line In jack, Line Out jack and Mic In jack
connector are located on the rear panel. These external jacks are standard
connectors.
Internal Speaker (J18)
Pin
Signal
1 Speaker Signal
2 Analog Ground
Package Intrusion (J8)
Pin
Signal
1 Open detect
2 Ground
69
3 Interface Devices and Mass-Storage Drives
Connectors and Sockets
VGA DB15 Connector
VGA DB Connector Pins
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
VESA Pass-Through
Connector
Standard VGA
Analog RED
Analog GREEN
Analog BLUE
Monitor ID2
n/c
Analog RED return
Analog GREEN return
Analog BLUE return
n/c
Digital ground
Monitor ID 0
Monitor ID 1
HSYNC
VSYNC
n/c
DDC2B
Analog RED
Analog GREEN
Analog BLUE
Monitor ID2
DDC return
Analog RED
Analog GREEN
Analog BLUE
VCC supply (optional)
Digital ground
Monitor ID 0
Data:SDA
HSYNC
VSYNC
Clock:SCL
VESA Pass-Through Connector
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
Z
Ground
Ground
Ground
EVIDEO#
ESYNC#
EDCLK#
I2C Clock1
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
VCLK
I2C Data1
1.
Y
P[0]
P[1]
P[2]
P[3]
P[4]
P[5]
P[6]
P[7]
DCLK
Blank#
HSYNC
VSYNC
Ground
These pins are reserved by VESA.
70
3 Interface Devices and Mass-Storage Drives
Connectors and Sockets
Socket Pin Layouts
Ethernet UTP Connector
VGA Connector
Keyboard and Mouse Connector
Parallel Port Connector
Serial Port Connector
71
3 Interface Devices and Mass-Storage Drives
Connectors and Sockets
72
4
HP BIOS
The Setup program and BIOS are summarized in the two sections of this
chapter. The POST routines are described in the next chapter.
73
4 HP BIOS
HP/Phoenix BIOS Summary
HP/Phoenix BIOS Summary
The System ROM contains the POST (power-on self-test) routines, and the
BIOS: the System BIOS, video BIOS (for models with an integrated video
controller), and low option ROM. This chapter, and the following one, give
an overview of the following aspects:
• menu-driven Setup with context-sensitive help, described next in this
chapter.
• The address space, with details of the interrupts used, described at the
end of this chapter.
• The Power-On-Self-Test or POST, which is the sequence of tests the
computer performs to ensure that the system is functioning correctly,
described in the next chapter.
The system BIOS is identified by the version number HC.11.xx. The
procedure for updating the System ROM firmware is described on page 50.
Using the HP Setup Program
Press
, to run the Setup program, while the initial “Kayak” logo is being
displayed immediately after restarting the PC.
Alternatively, press
to view the summary configuration screen. By
default, this remains on the screen for 20 seconds, but by pressing
once,
it can be held on the screen indefinitely until
is pressed again. Pressing
will cause the computer to be turned off.
The band along the top of the Setup screen offers five menus: Main,
Advanced, Security, Boot, Power and Exit. These are selected using the left
and right arrow keys. For a more complete description, see the User’s Guide
that was supplied with the PC Workstation.
Main Menu
The Main Menu presents a list of fields, such as “System Time” and “Key
Click”.
74
4 HP BIOS
HP/Phoenix BIOS Summary
Advanced Menu
The Advanced Menu does not have the same structure as the Main Menu
and Power Menu. Instead of presenting a list of fields, it offers a list of
sub-menus. The Advanced Menu contains the following sub-menus:
• Memory and Cache. Define how to configure the specified block of
memory.
• Video. Set the best ergonomic refresh rate supported by the display. This
feature, can also be used to set the preferred refresh rate for each graphic
mode.
• Flexible Disk Drives. Enable or disable the on-board flexible disk
controller.
• IDE Devices. Configure IDE Primary and Secondary devices.
• SCSI Interface. Enable or disable the integrated SCSI interface. In the
Ultra SCSI item, the Auto option will enable or disable automatically the
Ultra SCSI by the BIOS, depending on whether external SCSI devices are
detected or not.
• Integrated Network Interface. Enable or disable the integrated network
interface. This feature must be enabled when an ethernet card is installed.
• Integrated Peripherals. Enable or disable the on-board parallel and
serial ports at the specified address.
• Integrated USB Interface. Enable or disable the integrated USB
(Universal Serial Bus) interface.
• Integrated Audio Interface. Enable or disable the audio interface. This
feature is useful on non plug-and-play operating systems, because the
integrated audio chip is plug-and-play.
• PCI Devices. Enable this option if you need the BIOS to set the PCI Bus
Master bit. This could be necessary for some older PCI accessory boards.
• ISA Resource Exclusion. reserves interrupts for legacy ISA devices to
prevent conflict with PCI/PnP devices.
75
4 HP BIOS
HP/Phoenix BIOS Summary
Security
Sub-menus are presented for changing the characteristic and values of the
System Administrator Password, User Password, Hardware Protection and
Boot Device Security, the amount of protection against the system’s drives
and network connections, and the amount of protection against being able
to boot from the system’s drives and network connections. The Security
Menu contains the following sub-menus:
• User Password. This password can only be set when an administrator
password has been set. The User Password prevents unauthorized use of
the computer, protects stored data.
• Administrator Password. This password prevents unauthorized access
to the computer’s configuration. It can also be used to start the computer.
• Hardware Protection. The following devices can have their accesses
unlocked/locked: Integrated Flexible Disk Controller, Integrated ICD
Controller, Integrated Data Communications Ports and Integrated
Interfaces.
• Boot Device Security. Select which devices are to be used for booting up
the system. The option Disabled prevents unauthorized use of a device to
start the computer.
Boot Menu
Select the order of the devices from which the BIOS attempts to boot the
operating system. During POST, if the BIOS is unsuccessful at booting from
one device, it will then try the next one on the Boot Device Priority list
until an operating system is found.
The QuickBoot Mode option allows the system to skip certain tests while
booting. This decreases the time needed to boot the system.
Power Menu
This menu allows you to set the standby delay. It also allows the system
administrator to decide whether the mouse is enabled as a means of
reactivating the system from Standby. It is also possible to specify whether
the space-bar is enabled as a means of reactivating the system from Off.
76
4 HP BIOS
Symbios Logic SCSI Configuration Utility
Symbios Logic SCSI Configuration Utility
The Symbios Logic SCSI Configuration Utility lets you view and change the
default configuration for the host adapter and all SCSI devices connected to
it, or for individual SCSI devices. If, while using this utility, you accidentally
disable all the controllers, pressing
during the power-on self test (after
the memory test) lets you recover and configure settings.
Default Settings You Can Change
The following two tables show the configuration settings that can be
changed. The first table shows the global settings which impact the host
adapter and all SCSI devices connected to it. The second table shows the
device settings which apply to individual devices.
Settings for the Host Adapter and All Devices
Default Settings
SCAM Support
On
Parity Checking
Enabled
Host Adapter SCSI ID
7
Scan Order
Low to High (0-Max)
Settings for Individual SCSI Devices
Default Settings
Synchronous Transfer Rate (MB/sec)
40
Data Width
16
Disconnect
On
Read Write I/O Timeout (secs)
10
Scan for Devices at Boot Time
Yes
Scan for SCSI LUNs
Yes
Queue Tags
Enabled
77
4 HP BIOS
Symbios Logic SCSI Configuration Utility
Starting the SCSI Configuration Utility
You access the SCSI Configuration Utility by pressing
when the message
Press F6 to start Configuration Utility... is displayed during the
PC Workstation’s start-up routine. A further message is then displayed:
Please wait, invoking Configuration Utility... before the Main
menu of the Symbios Logic SCSI Configuration utility appears.
The Symbios Logic SCSI Configuration Utility is described in detail in the
User’s Guide supplied with the PC Workstation.
78
4 HP BIOS
Power Saving and Ergonometry
Power Saving and Ergonometry
Full On
Standby
Suspend
Shutdown
Normal speed
Normal speed
Halted
Halted
On
Blanked, <30 W, on
models with integrated
graphics
Blanked, <5 W (typ)
Blanked, <5 W (typ)
Hard disk drive
Normal speed
Normal speed
Halted
Halted
Power
consumption
24 W to 62 W depending
on configuration & activity
<30 W (230V, 50 Hz)
<27 W (115V, 60 Hz)
<25 W (230V, 50 Hz)
<21 W (115V, 60 Hz)
<5 W
(plugged in but turned off)
Keyboard, mouse
Keyboard, mouse,
network (RPO)
Space bar
Instantaneous
a few seconds
Boot delay
Processor
Display
Resume events
Resume delay
Power-On from Space-Bar
The power-on from the space-bar function is enabled, provided that:
• The computer is connected to a Power-On keyboard (recognizable by the
Power-On icon on the space bar).
• The computer is running a Windows operating system.
• The function has not been disabled by setting SW-8 to open on the system
board switches.
• The function has not been disabled in the “Power” menu of the Setup
program.
Soft Power Down
When the user requests the operating system to shutdown, the environment
is cleared, and the computer is powered off. Soft Power Down is available
with the Windows NT and Windows 95 operating systems.
The hardware to do this is contained within the PIIX4. This chip is described
on page 50.
79
4 HP BIOS
BIOS Addresses
BIOS Addresses
This section provides a summary of the main features of the HP system
BIOS. This is software that provides an interface between the computer
hardware and the operating system.
The procedure for updating the System ROM firmware is described on page
50.
System Memory Map
Reserved memory used by accessory boards must be located in the area
from C8000h to EFFFFh.
0000 0000 - 0000 03FF
Real-mode IDT
0000 0400 - 0000 04FF
BIOS Data Area
0000 0500 - 0009 FC00
Used by OS
0009 FC00 - 0009 FFFF
Extended BIOS Data Area
000A_0000 - 000B_FFFF
Video RAM or
SMRAM (not visible unless in SMM)
000C 0000 - 000C 7FFF
Video ROM
000C 8000 - 000F FFFF
Adapter ROM, RAM, memory-mapped registers
000E 0000 - 000F FFFF
128 KB BIOS (Flash/Shadow)1
10 0000 - FF FFFF
Memory (1 MB to 16 MB)
100 0000 - 1FF FFFF
Memory (16 MB to 32 MB)
200 0000 -3FF FFFF
Memory (32 MB to 64 MB)
400 0000 -1FFF FFFF
Memory (64 MB to 512 MB)
FFFE 0000 - FFFF FFFF
128 KB BIOS (Flash)
1.
This is for Physical memory. As soon as the PST has
been completed, the E000-EFFF area has to be released for UMBs.
80
4 HP BIOS
BIOS Addresses
HP I/O Port Map (I/O Addresses Used by the System1)
Peripheral devices, accessory devices and system controllers are accessed
via the system I/O space, which is not located in system memory space. The
64 KB of addressable I/O space comprises 8-bit and 16-bit registers (called
I/O ports) located in the various system components. When installing an
accessory board, ensure that the I/O address space selected is in the free
area of the space reserved for accessory boards (100h to 3FFh).
Although the Setup program can be used to change some of the settings, the
following address map is not completely BIOS dependent, but is determined
partly by the operating system. Note that some of the I/O addresses are
allocated dynamically.
I/O Address Ports
0000 - 000F
0020 - 0021
002E - 002F
0040 - 0043
0060, 0064
0061
0070
0070 - 0071
0080
0081 - 0083, 008F
0092
0096 - 0097
00A0 - 00A1
00C0 - 00DF
00F0 - 00FF
0130 - 013F
0170 - 0177
01F0 - 01F7
0200 - 0207
0220 - 0232
0278 - 027F
02E8 - 02EF
02F8 - 02FF
0372 - 0377
1.
Function
DMA controller 1
Master interrupt controller (8259)
NS-317 Configuration registers
Timer 1
Keyboard controller (reset, slow A20)
Port B (speaker, NMI status and control)
Bit 7: NMI mask register
RTC and CMOS data
Manufacturing port (POST card)
DMA low page register
PS/2 reset and Fast A20
Little Ben
Slave interrupt controller
DMA controller 2
Co-processor error
AD1816 sound system
IDE secondary channel
IDE primary channel
AD1816 Joystick port
AD1816 Soundblaster
LPT 2
Serial port 4 (COM4)
Serial port 2 (COM2)
IDE secondary channel, secondary flexible disk drive
If configured.
81
4 HP BIOS
BIOS Addresses
I/O Address Ports
Function
0378 - 037A
0388 - 038B
03B0 - 03DF
03E8 - 03EF
03F0h- 03F5
03F6
03F7
03F8 - 03FF
04D0 - 04D1
0678 - 067B
0778 - 077B
0CF8 - 0CFF
LPT1
AD1816 Ad-lib (FM)
VGA
COM3
Flexible disk drive controller
IDE primary channel
Flexible disk drive controller
COM1
Interrupt edge/level control
LPT2 ECP
LPT1 ECP
PCI configuration space
DMA Channel Controllers
Only “I/O-to-memory” and “memory-to-I/O” transfers are allowed.
“I/O-to-I/O” and “memory-to-memory” transfers are disallowed by the
hardware configuration.
The system controller supports seven DMA channels, each with a page
register used to extend the addressing range of the channel to 16 MB. The
following table summarizes how the DMA channels are allocated.
DMA controller
Channel
82
Function
0
AD1816 Capture
1
AD1816 Playback
2
NS317 Flexible disk controller
3
NS317 LPT ECP
4
Used to cascade DMA channels 0-3
5
Free
6
Free
7
Free
4 HP BIOS
BIOS Addresses
Interrupt Controllers
The Interrupt Requests (IRQ) are numbered sequentially, starting with the
master controller, and followed by the slave.
IRQ
(Interrupt Vector)
Interrupt Request Description
INTR
IRQ1
NS317 Keyboard Controller
IRQ0
PIIX4 System Timer
IRQ3
IRQ4
NS317 COM1, COM3
IRQ5
AD1816, LPT2
IRQ6
NS317 Flexible Disk Controller
IRQ7
NS317 LPT1
IRQ8
NS317 RTC
IRQ9
IRQ10
IRQ11
IRQ12
NS317 Mouse
not connected
IRQ14
PIIX4 IDE
IRQ15
PCI Interrupt Request Lines
PCI devices generate interrupt requests using up to four PCI interrupt
request lines (INTA#, INTB#, INTC#, and INTD#).
PCI interrupts can be shared; several devices can use the same interrupt.
However, optional system performance is reached when minimizing the
sharing of interrupts. Refer to pages 27 and 28 for the Desktop and Minitower Backplane PCI Mapping tables, and page 39 for a table of the PCI
device interrupts.
83
4 HP BIOS
BIOS Addresses
84
5
Power-On Self-Test and Error Messages
This chapter describes the Power-On Self-Test (POST) routines, which are
contained in the computer’s ROM BIOS, the error messages which can
result, and the suggestions for corrective action.
85
5 Power-On Self-Test and Error Messages
Order in Which the Tests are Performed
Order in Which the Tests are Performed
Each time the system is powered on, or a reset is performed, the POST is
executed. The POST process verifies the basic functionality of the system
components and initializes certain system parameters.
The POST starts by displaying a graphic screen of the HP PC Workstation’s
logo when the PC is restarted. If you wish to view the POST details, press
to get the HP Summary Screen.
If the POST detects an error, the error message is displayed inside a view
system errors screen, in which the error message utility (EMU) not only
displays the error diagnosis, but the suggestions for corrective action (see
page 93for a brief summary). Error codes are no longer displayed.
Devices, such as memory and newly installed hard disks, are configured
automatically. The user is not requested to confirm the change. Newly
removed hard disks are detected, and the user is prompted to confirm the
new configuration by pressing
. Note, though, that the POST does not
detect when a hard disk drive has been otherwise changed.
During the POST, the BIOS and other ROM data is copied into high-speed
shadow RAM. The shadow RAM is addressed at the same physical location
as the original ROM in a manner which is completely transparent to
applications. It therefore appears to behave as very fast ROM. This
technique provides faster access to the system BIOS firmware.
An example of an Error
Code Message
This example explains the different coding messages that appear in the lower
left corner of the screen when the POST detects an error during startup.
For example, if the error 0101 - 52 is displayed.
• 0101 - Post Error Code failure. This error code is accompanied by short
message. For this example, the message “keyboard error” is displayed.
A table listing the error codes, causes and symptoms is on page 94.
• 52 - Post Checkpoint Code. This checkpoint code indicates that a test has
failed at this stage of the POST.
A table listing the error codes, causes and symptoms is on page 87.
86
5 Power-On Self-Test and Error Messages
Order in Which the Tests are Performed
The following table lists the POST checkpoint codes written at the start of
each test.
Checkpoint
Code
POST Routine Description
02h
Verify Real Mode
03h
Disable Non-Maskable Interrupt (NMI)
04h
Get CPU type
06h
Initialize system hardware
08h
Initialize chipset with initial POST values
09h
Set IN POST flag
0Ah
Initialize CPU registers
0Bh
Enable CPU cache
0Ch
Initialize caches to initial POST values
0Eh
Initialize I/O component
0Fh
Initialize the local bus IDE
10h
Initialize Power Management
11h
Load alternate registers with initial POST values
12h
Restore CPU control word during warm boot
13h
Initialize PCI Bus Mastering devices
14h
Initialize keyboard controller
17h
Initialize cache before memory autosize
18h
8254 timer initialization
1Ah
8237 DMA controller initialization
1Ch
Reset Programmable Interrupt Controller
24h
Set ES segment register to 4 GB
26h
Enable A20 line
28h
Autosize DRAM
29h
Initialize POST Memory Manager
87
5 Power-On Self-Test and Error Messages
Order in Which the Tests are Performed
Checkpoint
Code
88
POST Routine Description
2Ah
Clear 512 KB base RAM
32h
Test CPU bus-clock frequency
33h
Initialize POST Dispatch Manager
34h
Test CMOS RAM
35h
Initialize alternate chipset registers
36h
Warm start shutdown
37h
Reinitialize the chipset (MB only)
38h
Shadow system BIOS ROM
39h
Reinitialize the cache (MB only)
3Ah
Autosize cache
3Ch
Configure advanced chipset registers
3Dh
Load alternate registers with CMOS values
40h
Set initial CPU speed
42h
Initialize interrupt vectors
44h
Initialize BIOS interrupts
45h
POST device initialization
47h
Initialize manager for PCI Option ROMs (Rel. 5.1 and earlier)
48h
Check video configuration against CMOS
49h
Initialize PCI bus and devices
4Ah
Initialize all video adapters in system
4Bh
Display QuietBoot screen
4Ch
Shadow video BIOS ROM
4Eh
Display BIOS copyright notice
50h
Display CPU type
51h
Initialize EISA board
5 Power-On Self-Test and Error Messages
Order in Which the Tests are Performed
Checkpoint
Code
POST Routine Description
52h
Test keyboard
54h
Set key click if enabled
56h
Enable keyboard
59h
Initialize POST display service
5Ah
Display prompt “Press F2 to enter SETUP”
5Bh
Disable CPU cache
5Ch
Test RAM between 512 and 640 KB
60h
Test extended memory
62h
Test extended memory address lines
64h
Jump to UserPatch1
66h
Configure advanced cache registers
67h
Initialize Multi Processor APIC
68h
Enable external and CPU caches
69h
Setup System Management Mode (SMM) area
6Ah
Display external L2 cache size
6Ch
Display shadow-area message
6Eh
Display possible high address for UMB recovery
70h
Display error messages
72h
Check for configuration errors
74h
Test real-time clock
76h
Check for keyboard errors
7Ah
Test for key lock on
7Ch
Set up hardware interrupt vectors
7Eh
Initialize coprocessor if present
80h
Disable onboard Super I/O ports and IRQs
89
5 Power-On Self-Test and Error Messages
Order in Which the Tests are Performed
Checkpoint
Code
90
POST Routine Description
81h
Late POST device initialization
82h
Detect and install external RS 232 ports
83h
Configure non-MCD IDE controllers
84h
Detect and install external parallel ports
85h
Initialize PC-compatible PnP ISA devices
86h
Re-initialize onboard I/O ports
87h
Configure Motherboard Configurable Devices
88h
Initialize BIOS Data Area
89h
Enable Non-Maskable Interrupts (NMIs)
8Ah
Initialize Extended BIOS Data Area
8Bh
Test and initialize PS/2
8Ch
Initialize floppy controller
8Fh
Determine number of ATA drives
90h
Initialize hard disk controllers
91h
Initialize local-bus hard disk controllers
92h
Jump to UsersPatch2
93h
Build MPTABLE for multi-processor boards
94h
Disable A20 address line (Rel. 5.1 and earlier)
95h
Install CD ROM for boot
96h
Clear huge ES segment register
97h
Fixup Multi Processor table
99h
Check for SMART drive
9Ah
Shadow option ROMs
9Ch
Set up Power Management
9Eh
Enable hardware interrupts
5 Power-On Self-Test and Error Messages
Order in Which the Tests are Performed
Checkpoint
Code
POST Routine Description
9Fh
Determine number of ATA and SCSI drives
A0h
Set time of day
A2h
Check key lock
A4h
Initialize typematic rate
A8h
Erase F2 prompt
AAh
Scan for F2 key stroke
ACh
Enter SETUP
AEh
Clear IN POST flag
B0h
Check for errors
B2h
POST done - prepare to boot operating system
B5H
Terminate QuietBoot
B6h
Check password (optional)
B8h
Clear global descriptor table
B9h
Clean up all graphics
BAh
Initialize DMI parameters
BBh
Initialize PnP Option ROMs
BCh
Clear parity checkers
BDh
Display MultiBoot menu
BEh
Clear screen optional
BFh
Check virus and backup reminders
C0h
Try to boot with INT 19
C1h
Initialize POST Error Manager (PEM)
C2h
Initialize error logging
C3h
Initialize error display function
C4h
Initialize system error handling
91
5 Power-On Self-Test and Error Messages
Order in Which the Tests are Performed
Checkpoint
Code
POST Routine Description
The following are for boot block in Flash ROM
92
E0h
Initialize the chipset
E1h
Initialize the bridge
E2h
Initialize the CPU
E3h
Initialize system timer
E4h
Initialize system I/O
E5h
Check force recovery boot
E6h
Checksum BIOS ROM
E7h
Go to BIOS
E8h
Set Huge Segment
E9h
Initialize Multi Processor
EAh
Initialize OEM special code
EBh
Initialize PIC and DMA
ECh
Initialize Memory type
EDh
Initialize Memory size
EEh
Shadow Boot Block
EFh
System memory test
F0h
Initialize interrupt vectors
F1h
Initialize Run Time Clock
F2h
Initialize video
F3h
Initialize beeper
F4h
Initialize boot
F5h
Clear Huge segment
F6h
Boot to Mini DOS
F7h
Boot to Full DOS
5 Power-On Self-Test and Error Messages
Error Message Summary
Error Message Summary
The EMU utility (.COM application written in C language) is to provide full
screen online help messages (localized) on most common POST errors.
When an error is generated in POST during the boot process, EMU is run by
typing ENTER. The entry point of each EMU message is a 4-digits error
code generated by POST.
If the POST reports an error, one of the following four error categories will
be displayed.
Category #1:
if the error requires to run Setup, the POST should prompt:
<F1= Continue>, <F2= Setup>, <Enter= View System Error>
and pause. (refer to autoconfig specification for more details on POST prompts)
Category #2:
if the error is only a warning (i.e. key stuck), the POST should prompt:
<Enter= View System Error>
for 2 seconds then boot. (refer to autoconfig specification for more details on POST prompts)
Category #3:
if the error is because a device has been unplugged or removed, the POST should prompt :
“If errors are reported because one or more of the listed components have been removed,
press <F4> to validate the changes.”
<F1= Continue>, <F2= Setup>, <F4= Validate Change>, <Enter= View System
Error>
and pause. (refer to autoconfig specification for more details on POST prompts)
Category #4:
if the error is serious, the POST should prompt:
The BIOS has detected a serious problem that prevents your PC from booting.”
<F2= Setup>, <Enter= View System Error>
and stop. Only the setup and the EMU can be run. The BIOS must never boot on HDD.
93
5 Power-On Self-Test and Error Messages
Error Message Summary
The following table list the error codes, causes and symptoms and the
accompanied short message that are displayed in the upper left corner of
the screen.
Code #
Cause / Symptom
Short message (US)
0000h
Any POST error that is not listed below
System error
0010h
CMOS Checksum error (if no Serial EEProm)
Incorrect CMOS Checksum
0011h
Date and Time most (CMOS backed up from SE2P)
Date and Time Lost
0012h
PC configuration lost (both SE2P and CMOS lost)
Incorrect PC Configuration
0020h
Any POST error regarding an AT option ROM
Option ROM Error
0021h
Any POST error regarding an external PCI card issue
PCI Error
0022h
Any POST regarding an AT PnP issue
ISA P1P Error
0030h
Unsupported CPU speed switch setting
Wrong CPU Speed Setting
0040h
Serial number corrupted (bad checksum or null #)
Invalid PC Serial Number
0041
Product flag not initialized or bad
Invalid Internal product type
0050h
Fan not connected (according to CPU)
Fan Not Connected
0060h
RPO initialization failure
Remote Power On Error
0100h
Keyboard stuck key
Keyboard Error
0101h
Keyboard self-test failure
Keyboard Error
0102h
Keyboard controller I/O access failure
Keyboard Error
0103h
Keyboard not connected
Keyboard Not Connected
0105h
Mouse self-test failure
Mouse Error
0106h
Mouse not detected (but configured in CMOS)
Mouse Error
0108h
Mouse and Keyboard connectors reversed
Keyboard and Mouse Error
0200h
Conflict on serial port (@, IRQ)
Serial Port Error
0201h
Conflict on parallel port (@, IRQ, DMA)
Parallel Port Error
0300h
Floppy A: self-test failure
Flexible Disk Drive A Error
0301h
Floppy B: self-test failure
Flexible Disk Drive B Error
94
5 Power-On Self-Test and Error Messages
Error Message Summary
Code #
Cause / Symptom
Short message (US)
0310h
Floppy A: not detected (but configured in CMOS)
Flexible Disk Drive Error
0311h
Floppy B: not detected (but configured in CMOS)
Flexible Disk Drive Error
0305h
Floppy A: plugged on Floppy B: connector
Flexible Disk Drive Error
0306h
General failure on floppy controller
Flexible Disk Drive Error
0307h
Conflict on floppy disk controller
Flexible Disk Drive Error
0400h
CD-ROM test failure
CD-ROM Error
0401h
CD-ROM not detected (but configured in CMOS)
CD-ROM Error
0500h
General failure on HDD onboard primary ctrl
IDE Device Error
0501h
General failure on HDD onboard secondary ctrl
IDE Device Error
0510h
HDD # 0 self-test error
IDE Device # 0 Error
0511h
HDD # 1 self-test error
IDE Device # 1 Error
0512h
HDD # 2 self-test error
IDE Device # 2 Error
0513h
HDD # 3 self-test error
IDE Device # 3 Error
0520h
HDD # 0 not detected (but configured in CMOS)
IDE Device # 0 Error
0521h
HDD # 1 not detected (but configured in CMOS)
IDE Device # 1 Error
0522h
HDD # 2 not detected (but configured in CMOS)
IDE Device # 2 Error
0523h
HDD # 3 not detected (but configured in CMOS)
IDE Device # 3 Error
0530h
Found a drive on slave connector only (primary)
IDE Device Error
0531h
Found a drive on slave connector only (secondary)
IDE Device Error
0540h
Conflict on hard disk controller
IDE Device Error
0600h
Found less video memory than configured in CMOS
Video Memory Error
0700h
Found less DRAM memory than at previous boot
System Memory Error
0711h
Defective SIMM (module 1, bank 1)
System Memory Error
0712h
Defective SIMM (module 2, bank 1)
System Memory Error
0721h
Defective SIMM (module 1, bank 2)
System Memory Error
0722h
Defective SIMM (module 2, bank 2)
System Memory Error
95
5 Power-On Self-Test and Error Messages
Error Message Summary
Code #
Cause / Symptom
Short message (US)
0731h
Defective SIMM (module 1, bank 3)
System Memory Error
0732h
Defective SIMM (module 2, bank 3)
System Memory Error
0800h
Found lower cache size than configured
System Cache Error
0801h
Cache self-test failure
System Cache Error
0900h
Lan (Chanteclerc) self-test failure
Integrated LAN Error
0901h
Lan (Chanteclerc) not detected (but enabled in Setup)
Integrated LAN Error
0A00h
Plug and Play video auto-setting failure (DDC hang)
DDC Video Error
The following table summarizes the most significant of the problems that
can be reported.
Message
Explanation or Suggestions for Corrective Action
Operating system not found
Check whether the disk, HDD, FDD or CD-ROM disk drive is
connected.
If it is connected, check that it is detected by POST.
Check that your boot device is enabled on the Setup Security
menu.
If the problem persists, check that the boot device contains the
operating system.
Missing operating system
If you have configured HDD user parameters, check that they are
correct. Otherwise, use HDD type “Auto” parameters.
Resource Allocation Conflict -PCI
device 0079 on system board
Clear CMOS.
Video Plug and Play interrupted or
failed. Re-enable in Setup and try again
You may have powered your computer Off/On too quickly and the
computer turned off Video plug and play as a protection.
System CMOS checksum bad - run
Setup
CMOS contents have changed between 2 power-on sessions. Run
Setup for configuration.
No message, system “hangs”
Check that cache memory and main memory are correctly set in
their sockets.
Other
An error message may be displayed and the computer may “hang”
for 20 seconds and then beep. The POST is probably checking for a
mass storage device which it cannot find and the computer is in
Time-out Mode. After Time-out, run Setup to check the
configuration.
4-4-2-4
Switch 9 is not correctly set or flash is corrupted. The BIOS update
crisis recovery procedure is to be used.
96
5 Power-On Self-Test and Error Messages
Beep Codes
Beep Codes
If a terminal error occurs during POST, the system issues a beep code before
attempting to display the error in the upper left corner of the screen. Beep
codes are useful for identifying the error when the system is unable to
display the error message.
Beep Pattern
Beep
Code
Numeric
Code
Description
—
-- -- ---
1-2-2-3
16h
BIOS ROM check-sum failure
—
---
— —
1-3-1-1
20h
DRAM refresh test failure
—
---
— ---
1-3-1-3
22h
8742 Keyboard controller test failure
—
---
---- —
1-3-4-1
2Ch
RAM failure on address line xxxx1
—
--- ---- ---
1-3-4-3
2Eh
RAM failure on data bits xxxx1 of low byte of memory bus
-- ---
2-1-2-3
46h
ROM copyright notice check failure
-- -- --- —
2-2-3-1
58h
Unexpected interrupts test failure
1-2
98h
Video configuration failure or option ROMs check-sum
failure
---- ---- -- ----
4-4-2-4
F7
Crisis Recovery Failure
-
1
B4h
This does not indicate an error. There is one short beep
before system startup.
-- —
—
--
1.If the BIOS detects error 2C or 2E (base 512K RAM error), it displays
an additional word-bitmap (xxxx) indicating the address line or bits that
failed. For example, “2C 0002” means address line 1 (bit one set) has
failed. “2E 1020” means data bits 12 and 5 (bits 12 and 5 set) have failed
in the lower 16 bits.
97
5 Power-On Self-Test and Error Messages
Lights on the Hardware Control Panel
Lights on the Hardware Control Panel
When the computer is first powered on, the power-on light on the status
panel illuminates yellow for about a second before changing to green. This
change of color is caused by the execution of an instruction early in the
System BIOS code.
If the light remains at yellow, therefore, it indicates a failure of the processor
or the System ROM in the instruction-fetch process. Check that the
processor is correctly seated in its socket, and that the memory DIMMS and
accessory cards are properly installed.
98
Appendix
99
Appendix
Video Modes
Video Modes
Standard VGA Modes
Mode
No.
VESA®
No.
No. of
Colors
Char. x
Row
Char. x
Cell
Resolution
Interface
Type
0, 1
0, 1
16/256K
40 x 25
9 x 16
360 x 400
Text
2, 3
2, 3
16/256K
80 x 25
9 x 16
720 x 400
Text
4, 5
4, 5
4/256K
40 x 25
8x8
320 x 200
6
6
2/256K
80 x 25
8x8
7
7
Monochrome
80 x 25
D
D
16/256K
E
E
F
Pixel
Freq.
MHz
Horizontal
Refresh
Vertical
Refresh
14
31.5
70
28
31.5
70
Graphics
12.5
31.5
70
640 x 200
Graphics
25
31.5
70
9 x 16
720 x 400
Text
28
31.5
70
40 x 25
8x8
320 x 200
Graphics
12.5
31.5
70
16/256K
80 x 25
8 x 14
640 x 200
Graphics
25
31.5
70
F
Monochrome
80 x 25
8 x 14
640 x 350
Graphics
25
31.5
70
10
10
16/256K
80 x 25
8 x 14
640 x 350
Graphics
25
31.5
70
11
11
2/256K
80 x 25
8 x 16
640 x 480
Graphics
25
31.5
60
111
11
2/256K
80 x 25
8 x 16
640 x 480
Graphics
31.5
37.5
75
12
12
16/256K
80 x 25
8 x 16
640 x 480
Graphics
25
31.5
60
122
122
16/256K
80 x 25
8 x 16
640 x 480
Graphics
31.5
37.5
75
13
13
256/256K
40 x 25
8x8
320 x 200
Graphics
12.5
31.5
70
1.
Interlaced mode.
Higher refresh modes available with generic fix-up TSR.
2.
NOTE
An 8 x 14 font for the EGA modes can be provided with a DOS TSR
(terminate and stay resident) program. If the TSR has not been loaded when
the mode is set, the 8 x 16 font is used with the two bottom rows deleted. This
causes truncation of characters with descenders, but does not restrict
program operation. The TSR should be used for absolute compatibility with
DOS applications that use the 8 x 14 font.
100
Appendix
Video Modes
Extended Video Modes
Mode
No.
VESA®
No.
No. of
Colors
Char. x
Row
Char. x
Cell
Resolution
Interface
Type
5E
100
256/256K
80 x 25
8 x 16
640 x 400
Graphics
7A
-
64K
-
-
640 x 400
5F
101
256/256K
80 x 30
8 x 16
5F
101
256/256K
80 x 30
5F
101
256/256K
5F
101
64
Pixel
Freq.
MHz
Horizontal
Refresh
Vertical
Refresh
25
31.5
70
Graphics
25
31.5
70
640 x 480
Graphics
25
31.5
60
8 x 16
640 x 480
Graphics
31.5
37.9
72
80 x 30
8 x 16
640 x 480
Graphics
31.5
37.5
75
256/256K
80 x 30
8 x 16
640 x 480
Graphics
36
43.3
85
111
64K
-
-
640 x 200
Graphics
25
31.5
60
64
111
64K
-
-
640 x 350
Graphics
31.5
37.9
72
64
111
64K
-
-
640 x 350
Graphics
31.5
37.5
75
64
111
64K
-
-
640 x 480
Graphics
36
43.3
85
71
112
16M
-
-
640 x 480
Graphics
25
31.5
60
71
112
16M
-
-
640 x 480
Graphics
31.5
37.9
72
71
112
16M
-
-
640 x 480
Graphics
31.5
37.5
75
71
112
16M
-
-
640 x 480
Graphics
36
43.3
85
761
-
16M+A2
-
-
640 x 480
Graphics
25
31.5
60
761
-
16M+A
-
-
640 x 480
Graphics
31.5
37.9
72
761
-
16M+A
-
-
640 x 480
Graphics
31.5
37.5
75
761
-
16M+A
-
-
640 x 480
Graphics
36
43.3
85
58, 6A
102
16/256K
100 x 37
8 x 16
800 x 600
Graphics
36
35.2
56
58, 6A
102
16/256K
100 x 37
8 x 16
800 x 600
Graphics
40
37.8
60
58, 6A
102
16/256K
100 x 37
8 x 16
800 x 600
Graphics
50
48.1
72
58, 6A
102
16/256K
100 x 37
8 x 16
800 x 600
Graphics
49.5
46.9
75
58, 6A
102
16/256K
100 x 37
8 x 16
800 x 600
Graphics
56.25
53.7
85.1
5C
103
256/256K
100 x 37
8 x 16
800 x 600
Graphics
36
35.2
56
101
Appendix
Video Modes
Mode
No.
VESA®
No.
No. of
Colors
Char. x
Row
Char. x
Cell
Resolution
Interface
Type
5C
103
256/256K
100 x 37
8 x 16
800 x 600
Graphics
5C
103
256/256K
100 x 37
8 x 16
800 x 600
5C
103
256/256K
100 x 37
8 x 16
5C
103
256/256K
100 x 37
65
114
64K
65
114
65
Pixel
Freq.
MHz
Horizontal
Refresh
Vertical
Refresh
40
37.9
60
Graphics
50
48.1
72
800 x 600
Graphics
49.5
46.9
75
8 x 16
800 x 600
Graphics
56.25
53.7
85.1
-
-
800 x 600
Graphics
36
35.2
56
64K
-
-
800 x 600
Graphics
40
37.8
60
114
64K
-
-
800 x 600
Graphics
50
48.1
72
65
114
64K
-
-
800 x 600
Graphics
49.5
46.9
75
65
114
64K
-
-
800 x 600
Graphics
56.25
53.7
85.1
78
115
16M
-
-
800 x 600
Graphics
36
35.2
56
78
115
16M
-
-
800 x 600
Graphics
40
37.9
60
78
115
16M
-
-
800 x 600
Graphics
50
48.1
72
78
115
16M
-
-
800 x 600
Graphics
49.5
46.9
75
78
115
16M
-
-
800 x 600
Graphics
56.25
53.7
85.1
721
-
16M+A2
-
-
800 x 600
Graphics
36
35.2
56
721
-
16M+A2
-
-
800 x 600
Graphics
40
37.8
60
721
-
16M+A2
-
-
800 x 600
Graphics
50
48.1
72
721
-
16M+A2
-
-
800 x 600
Graphics
49.5
46.9
75
721
-
16M+A2
-
-
800 x 600
Graphics
56.25
53.7
85.1
5D3
104
16/256K
128 x 48
8 x 16
1024 x 768
Graphics
44.9
35.5
43i3
5D
104
16/256K
128 x 48
8 x 16
1024 x 768
Graphics
65
48.3
60
5D
104
16/256K
128 x 48
8 x 16
1024 x 768
Graphics
75
56
70
5D
104
16/256K
128 x 48
8 x 16
1024 x 768
Graphics
78.7
60
75
5D
104
16/256K
128 x 48
8 x 16
1024 x 768
Graphics
94.5
68.3
85
603
105
256/256K
128 x 48
8 x 16
1024 x 768
Graphics
44.9
35.5
43i3
102
Appendix
Video Modes
Mode
No.
VESA®
No.
No. of
Colors
Char. x
Row
Char. x
Cell
Resolution
Interface
Type
60
105
256/256K
128 x 48
8 x 16
1024 x 768
Graphics
60
105
256/256K
128 x 48
8 x 16
1024 x 768
60
105
256/256K
128 x 48
8 x 16
60
105
256/256K
128 x 48
743
117
64K
74
117
74
Pixel
Freq.
MHz
Horizontal
Refresh
Vertical
Refresh
65
48.3
60
Graphics
75
56
70
1024 x 768
Graphics
78.7
60
75
8 x 16
1024 x 768
Graphics
94.5
68.3
85
-
-
1024 x 768
Graphics
44.9
35.5
43i3
64K
-
-
1024 x 768
Graphics
65
48.3
60
117
64K
-
-
1024 x 768
Graphics
75
56
70
74
117
64K
-
-
1024 x 768
Graphics
78.7
60
75
74
117
64K
-
-
1024 x 768
Graphics
94.5
68.3
85
79
118
16M
-
-
1024 x 768
Graphics
44.9
35.5
43i3
79
118
16M
-
-
1024 x 768
Graphics
65
48.3
60
79
118
16M
-
-
1024 x 768
Graphics
75
56
70
79
118
16M
-
-
1024 x 768
Graphics
78.7
60
75
79
118
16M
-
-
1024 x 768
Graphics
94.5
68.3
85
731
-
16M+A2
-
-
1024 x 768
Graphics
44.9
35.5
43i3
731
-
16M+A2
-
-
1024 x 768
Graphics
65
48.3
60
731
-
16M+A2
-
-
1024 x 768
Graphics
75
56
70
731
-
16M+A2
-
-
1024 x 768
Graphics
78.7
60
75
731
-
16M+A2
-
-
1024 x 768
Graphics
94.5
68.3
85
6C3
106
16/256K
160 x 64
8 x 16
1280 x 1024
Graphics
75
48
43i3
6C
106
16/256K
160 x 64
8 x 16
1280 x 1024
Graphics
108
65
60
6C
106
16/256K
160 x 64
8 x 16
1280 x 1024
Graphics
126
76
71.2
6C
106
16/256K
160 x 64
8 x 16
1280 x 1024
Graphics
135
80
75
6C
106
16/256K
160 x 64
8 x 16
1280 x 1024
Graphics
157
91.1
85
6D3
-
256/256K
160 x 64
8 x 16
1280 x 1024
Graphics
75
48
43i3
103
Appendix
Video Modes
Mode
No.
VESA®
No.
No. of
Colors
Char. x
Row
Char. x
Cell
Resolution
Interface
Type
6D
-
256/256K
160 x 64
8 x 16
1280 x 1024
Graphics
6D
-
256/256K
160 x 64
8 x 16
1280 x 1024
6D
-
256/256K
160 x 64
8 x 16
6D
-
256/256K
160 x 64
75
11A
64K
75
11A
75
Pixel
Freq.
MHz
Horizontal
Refresh
Vertical
Refresh
108
65
60
Graphics
126
76
71.2
1280 x 1024
Graphics
135
80
75
8 x 16
1280 x 1024
Graphics
157
91.1
85
-
-
1280 x 1024
Graphics
75
48
43i3
64K
-
-
1280 x 1024
Graphics
108
65
60
11A
64K
-
-
1280 x 1024
Graphics
126
76
71.2
75
11A
64K
-
-
1280 x 1024
Graphics
135
80
75
75
11A
64K
-
-
1280 x 1024
Graphics
157
91.1
85
7B
-
256/256K
200 x 75
8 x 16
1600 x 1200
Graphics
135
62.5
48i3
7B
-
256/256K
200 x 75
8 x 16
1600 x 1200
Graphics
162
75
60
1.16M
colors, but with 32-bit-per-pixel format.
indicates 16M colors + Alpha Channel
3.Interlaced mode.
2.+A
NOTE
An 8 x 14 font for mode 55h is provided with a DOS TSR (terminate and stay
resident) program. If the TSR has not been loaded when the mode is set, the
8 x 16 font is used with the two bottom rows deleted. This causes truncation
of characters with descenders, but does not restrict program operation nor
does it make characters particularly difficult to read. For absolute
compatibility with some DOS applications that use the 8 x 14 font, the TSR
should be used.
It should also be noted, that some modes are not supported by all monitors.
The fastest refresh rate for that particular monitor type selected is
automatically used.
104
Appendix
Video Modes
Maximum Refresh Rates
Resolution
170-MHz DAC
230-MHz DAC
1024 x 768
100+ Hz
100+ Hz
1280 x 1024
85 Hz
100+ Hz
1600 x 1200
60 Hz
85 Hz
BIOS Modes Supported
Mode
VESA®
Mode
No.
VGA
0
VGA
1
VGA
2
VGA
3
VGA
4
VGA
5
VGA
6
VGA
Cirrus
Logic
Mode No.
dX
dY
Text bpp1
Colors
Refresh
Rates
Mode
Type2
40
25
40 x 25
64, 16 gray
70
V
40
25
40 x 25
64, 16/8 color
70
V
80
25
80 x 25
64, 16 gray
70
V
2, 3
80
25
80 x 25
64, 16/8 color
70
V
4, 5
320
200
4 (256)
70
V
320
200
4, gray
70
V
6
640
200
2, gray
70
V
7
7
80
25
2,
monochrome
70
V
VGA
D
D
320
200
16
70
V
VGA
E
E
640
200
16 planar
70
V
VGA
F
F
640
350
monochrome
70
V
VGA
10
10
640
350
16, 64
70
V
VGA
11
11
640
480
80 x 25
2
60
V
VGA
12
12
640
480
80 x 25
16 planar
60
V
VGA
13
13
640
200
40 x 25
256 linear
60
V
Cirrus
Logic
11C3
7A
640
400
16
65K
70
S, L, T
VESA
100
5E
640
400
8
256
70
S, L, T
0, 1
105
Appendix
Video Modes
Mode
VESA®
Mode
No.
Cirrus
Logic
Mode No.
dX
dY
Text bpp1
Colors
VESA
101
5F
640
480
8
VESA
111
64
640
480
VESA
112
71
640
Cirrus
Logic
11D3
76
VESA
102
VESA
Refresh
Rates
Mode
Type2
256
60, 72,
75, 85
S, L, T
16
65K
60, 72,
75, 85
S, L, T
480
24
16M
60, 72,
75, 85
S, L, T
640
480
32
16M
60, 72,
75, 85
S, L, T
58, 6A
640
600
4
16
56, 60, 72,
75, 85
S
103
5C
640
600
8
256
56, 60, 72,
75, 85
S, L, T
VESA
114
65
800
600
16
65K
56, 60, 72,
75, 85
S, L, T
VESA
115
78
800
600
24
16M
56, 60, 72,
75, 85
S, L, T
Cirrus
Logic
11E3
72
1024
600
32
16M
56, 60, 72,
75, 85
S, L, T
VESA
104
5D
1024
768
4
16
43i, 60, 70,
75, 85
S
VESA
105
60
1024
768
8
256
43i, 60, 70,
75, 85
S, L, T
VESA
117
74
1024-
768
16
65K
43i, 60, 70,
75, 85
S, L, T
VESA
118
79
1024
768
24
16M
43i, 60, 70,
75, 85
S, L, T
Cirrus
Logic
11F3
73
1024
768
32
16M
43i, 60, 70,
75, 85
S, L, T
VESA
106
6C
1280
1024
4
16
43i, 60, 70,
71.2, 75, 85
S
106
Appendix
Video Modes
Mode
VESA®
Mode
No.
Cirrus
Logic
Mode No.
dX
dY
Text bpp1
Colors
VESA
107
6D
1280
1024
8
VESA
11A
75
1280
1024
Cirrus
Logic
1203
7B
1600
1200
Refresh
Rates
Mode
Type2
256
43i, 60, 70,
71.2, 75, 85
S, L, T
16
65K
43i, 60, 70,
71.2, 75, 85
S, L, T
8
256
48i, 60, 65,
70, 75, 80,
85
S, L, T
1.
16 bpp is 5:6:5 (RGB); 24 bpp is 24 bpp packed pixel; 32 bpp is 24 bpp packed into a 32-bit
dword.
2.
“V” indicates VGA compatible mode;
“S” indicates Super VGA mode;
“L” indicates Linear mode;
“T” indicates Tiled mode.
3.
VBE v2.0 reported mode number.
107
Appendix
Video Modes
108