HP Compaq Elite 8000f USDT Specifications

Maintenance and Service Guide
HP Compaq 8000f Elite Business PC
Ultra-slim Desktop
© Copyright 2010 Hewlett-Packard
Development Company, L.P. The
information contained herein is subject to
change without notice.
Microsoft and Windows are trademarks of
Microsoft Corporation in the U.S. and other
countries.
The only warranties for HP products and
services are set forth in the express
warranty statements accompanying such
products and services. Nothing herein
should be construed as constituting an
additional warranty. HP shall not be liable
for technical or editorial errors or omissions
contained herein.
This document contains proprietary
information that is protected by copyright.
No part of this document may be
photocopied, reproduced, or translated to
another language without the prior written
consent of Hewlett-Packard Company.
HP Compaq 8000f Elite Business PC
Ultra-slim Desktop
First Edition (February 2010)
Document Part Number: 605648-001
About This Book
WARNING! Text set off in this manner indicates that failure to follow directions could result in bodily
harm or loss of life.
CAUTION: Text set off in this manner indicates that failure to follow directions could result in
damage to equipment or loss of information.
NOTE:
Text set off in this manner provides important supplemental information.
iii
iv
About This Book
Table of contents
1 Product Features ............................................................................................................................................ 1
Front Panel Components ..................................................................................................................... 1
Rear Panel Components ...................................................................................................................... 2
2 Installing and Customizing the Software ...................................................................................................... 3
Installing the Windows Operating System ............................................................................................ 3
Downloading Microsoft Windows Updates ........................................................................................... 3
Installing or Upgrading Device Drivers (Windows systems) ................................................................. 4
Customizing the Monitor Display (Windows systems) .......................................................................... 4
Launching Windows XP from Windows 7 ............................................................................................. 4
Accessing Disk Image (ISO) Files ........................................................................................................ 4
3 Computer Setup (F10) Utility ......................................................................................................................... 6
Computer Setup (F10) Utilities ............................................................................................................. 6
Using Computer Setup (F10) Utilities .................................................................................. 7
Computer Setup—File ......................................................................................................... 8
Computer Setup—Storage .................................................................................................. 9
Computer Setup—Security ................................................................................................ 10
Computer Setup—Power ................................................................................................... 15
Computer Setup—Advanced ............................................................................................. 16
Recovering the Configuration Settings ............................................................................................... 19
4 Serial ATA (SATA) Drive Guidelines and Features .................................................................................... 20
SATA Hard Drives .............................................................................................................................. 20
SATA Hard Drive Cables .................................................................................................................... 20
SATA Data Cable .............................................................................................................. 20
SMART ATA Drives ............................................................................................................................ 21
Hard Drive Capacities ........................................................................................................................ 21
5 Identifying the Chassis, Routine Care, and Disassembly Preparation .................................................... 22
Chassis Designations ......................................................................................................................... 22
Ultra-Slim Desktop (USDT) ................................................................................................ 22
Electrostatic Discharge Information .................................................................................................... 23
v
Generating Static ............................................................................................................... 23
Preventing Electrostatic Damage to Equipment ................................................................ 23
Personal Grounding Methods and Equipment ................................................................... 24
Grounding the Work Area .................................................................................................. 24
Recommended Materials and Equipment .......................................................................... 24
Operating Guidelines .......................................................................................................................... 25
Routine Care ...................................................................................................................................... 26
General Cleaning Safety Precautions ................................................................................ 26
Cleaning the Computer Case ............................................................................................ 26
Cleaning the Keyboard ...................................................................................................... 26
Cleaning the Monitor .......................................................................................................... 27
Cleaning the Mouse ........................................................................................................... 27
Service Considerations ...................................................................................................................... 27
Power Supply Fan ............................................................................................................. 27
Tools and Software Requirements .................................................................................... 28
Screws ............................................................................................................................... 28
Cables and Connectors ..................................................................................................... 28
Hard Drives ........................................................................................................................ 28
Lithium Coin Cell Battery ................................................................................................... 29
6 Removal and Replacement Procedures ..................................................................................................... 30
Preparation for Disassembly .............................................................................................................. 30
Serial Number Location ...................................................................................................................... 31
Security Lock Provisions .................................................................................................................... 32
Installing a Security Lock ................................................................................................... 32
HP/Kensington MicroSaver Security Cable Lock .............................................. 32
Padlock ............................................................................................................. 33
HP Business PC Security Lock ......................................................................... 33
Front Bezel Security .......................................................................................... 36
Computer Access Panel ..................................................................................................................... 38
Front Bezel ......................................................................................................................................... 39
Bezel Blank ........................................................................................................................................ 40
Installing Additional Memory .............................................................................................................. 41
SODIMMs .......................................................................................................................... 41
DDR3-SDRAM SODIMMs ................................................................................................. 41
Populating SODIMM Sockets ............................................................................................ 42
Installing SODIMMs ........................................................................................................... 43
Cable Management ............................................................................................................................ 45
Replacing the Optical Drive ................................................................................................................ 46
Removing the Existing Optical Drive ................................................................................. 46
Preparing the New Optical Drive ....................................................................................... 47
Installing the New Optical Drive ......................................................................................... 48
Hard Drive .......................................................................................................................................... 49
vi
Hard Drive Cage ................................................................................................................................. 53
Port Cover .......................................................................................................................................... 54
Front Fan ............................................................................................................................................ 55
Card Reader ....................................................................................................................................... 56
Speaker .............................................................................................................................................. 57
Heat sink ............................................................................................................................................ 58
Processor ........................................................................................................................................... 59
System Board ..................................................................................................................................... 61
Rear Fan ............................................................................................................................................ 62
Battery ................................................................................................................................................ 63
Changing from Desktop to Tower Configuration ................................................................................ 65
Power Supply, External ...................................................................................................................... 66
Appendix A Connector Pin Assignments ...................................................................................................... 67
Keyboard ............................................................................................................................................ 67
Mouse ................................................................................................................................................. 67
Ethernet BNC ..................................................................................................................................... 67
Ethernet RJ-45 ................................................................................................................................... 68
Serial Interface, Powered and Non-Powered ..................................................................................... 68
USB .................................................................................................................................................... 68
Microphone ......................................................................................................................................... 69
Headphone ......................................................................................................................................... 69
Line-in Audio ...................................................................................................................................... 69
Line-out Audio .................................................................................................................................... 69
Monitor ............................................................................................................................................... 70
DisplayPort ......................................................................................................................................... 70
4-Pin Power (for CPU) ........................................................................................................................ 71
6-Pin Power (for CPU) (CMT, SFF) .................................................................................................... 71
SATA Data and Power ....................................................................................................................... 71
PCI Express ....................................................................................................................................... 72
PCI Express ....................................................................................................................................... 73
Appendix B Power Cord Set Requirements .................................................................................................. 74
General Requirements ....................................................................................................................... 74
Japanese Power Cord Requirements ................................................................................................ 74
Country-Specific Requirements .......................................................................................................... 75
Appendix C Backup and Recovery ................................................................................................................ 76
Windows 7 – Backup and Recovery ................................................................................................... 76
Backing up your information .............................................................................................. 76
Performing a recovery ....................................................................................................... 77
Using the Windows recovery tools .................................................................... 78
Using F11 .......................................................................................................... 78
vii
Using a Windows 7 operating system DVD (purchased separately) ................. 79
Windows Vista – Backup and Recovery ............................................................................................. 80
Backing up your information .............................................................................................. 80
Performing a recovery ....................................................................................................... 81
Using the Windows recovery tools .................................................................... 81
Using F11 .......................................................................................................... 82
Using a Windows Vista operating system DVD (purchased separately) ........... 82
Appendix D Computer Diagnostic Features .................................................................................................. 84
Hewlett-Packard Vision Diagnostics ................................................................................................... 84
Accessing HP Vision Diagnostics ...................................................................................... 84
Survey Tab ........................................................................................................................ 85
Test Tab ............................................................................................................................. 85
Status Tab ......................................................................................................................... 86
History Tab ........................................................................................................................ 87
Errors Tab .......................................................................................................................... 87
Help Tab ............................................................................................................................ 87
Saving and Printing Information in HP Vision Diagnostics ................................................ 88
Downloading the Latest Version of HP Vision Diagnostics ................................................ 88
Protecting the Software ...................................................................................................................... 89
Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics ...................................................................................... 90
Safety and Comfort ............................................................................................................................ 90
Before You Call for Technical Support ............................................................................................... 90
Helpful Hints ....................................................................................................................................... 91
Solving General Problems .................................................................................................................. 93
Solving Power Problems .................................................................................................................... 97
Solving Diskette Problems ................................................................................................................. 98
Solving Hard Drive Problems ........................................................................................................... 101
Solving Media Card Reader Problems ............................................................................................. 104
Solving Display Problems ................................................................................................................. 106
Solving Audio Problems ................................................................................................................... 110
Solving Printer Problems .................................................................................................................. 113
Solving Keyboard and Mouse Problems .......................................................................................... 114
Solving Hardware Installation Problems ........................................................................................... 116
Solving Network Problems ............................................................................................................... 118
Solving Memory Problems ............................................................................................................... 122
Solving Processor Problems ............................................................................................................ 124
Solving CD-ROM and DVD Problems .............................................................................................. 125
Solving USB Flash Drive Problems .................................................................................................. 128
Solving Front Panel Component Problems ...................................................................................... 129
Solving Internet Access Problems .................................................................................................... 130
Solving Software Problems .............................................................................................................. 133
viii
Contacting Customer Support .......................................................................................................... 134
Appendix F POST Error Messages ............................................................................................................... 135
POST Numeric Codes and Text Messages ..................................................................................... 136
Interpreting POST Diagnostic Front Panel LEDs and Audible Codes .............................................. 143
Appendix G Password Security and Resetting CMOS ............................................................................... 146
Resetting the Password Jumper ...................................................................................................... 147
Clearing and Resetting the CMOS ................................................................................................... 148
Appendix H Drive Protection System (DPS) ................................................................................................ 150
Accessing DPS Through Computer Setup ....................................................................................... 151
Appendix I Specifications ............................................................................................................................. 152
Index ................................................................................................................................................................. 154
ix
x
1
Product Features
Front Panel Components
Drive configuration may vary by model.
Figure 1-1 Front Panel Components
Table 1-1 Front Panel Components
1
Optical Drive
5
Microphone/Headphone Connector
2
System Power LED
6
USB (Universal Serial Bus) Ports
3
SD Media Card Reader (optional)
7
Hard Drive Activity Light
4
Headphone Connector
8
Dual-State Power Button
NOTE: When a device is plugged into the Microphone/Headphone Connector, a dialog box will pop up
asking if you want to use the connector for a microphone line Line-In device or a headphone. You can
reconfigure the connector at any time by double-clicking the Realtek HD Audio Manager icon in the Windows
taskbar.
NOTE: The Power On Light is normally green when the power is on. If it is flashing red, there is a problem
with the computer and it is displaying a diagnostic code.
Front Panel Components
1
Rear Panel Components
Figure 1-2 Rear Panel Components
Table 1-2 Rear Panel Components
1
Line-Out Connector for powered audio
devices (green)
6
Power Cord Connector
2
PS/2 Keyboard Connector (purple)
7
Line-In Audio Connector (blue)
3
Universal Serial Bus (USB) (6)
8
PS/2 Mouse Connector (green)
4
DisplayPort Monitor Connector
9
RJ-45 Network Connector
5
VGA Monitor Connector (blue)
NOTE: Arrangement and number of connectors may vary by model.
When a device is plugged into the blue Line-In Audio Connector, a dialog box will pop up asking if you want to use the
connector for a line-in device or a microphone. You can reconfigure the connector at any time by double-clicking the Realtek
HD Audio Manager icon in the Windows taskbar.
2
Chapter 1 Product Features
2
Installing and Customizing the
Software
If your computer was not shipped with a Microsoft operating system, some portions of this
documentation do not apply. Additional information is available in online help after you install the
operating system.
NOTE: If the computer was shipped with Windows Vista or Windows 7 loaded, you will be prompted
to register the computer with HP Total Care before installing the operating system. You will see a
brief movie followed by an online registration form. Fill out the form, click the Begin button, and follow
the instructions on the screen.
CAUTION: Do not add optional hardware or third-party devices to the computer until the operating
system is successfully installed. Doing so may cause errors and prevent the operating system from
installing properly.
NOTE: Be sure there is a 10.2-cm (4-inch) clearance at the back of the unit and above the monitor
to permit the required airflow.
Installing the Windows Operating System
The first time you turn on the computer, the operating system is installed automatically. This process
takes about 5 to 10 minutes, depending on which operating system is being installed. Carefully read
and follow the instructions on the screen to complete the installation.
CAUTION: Once the automatic installation has begun, DO NOT TURN OFF THE COMPUTER
UNTIL THE PROCESS IS COMPLETE. Turning off the computer during the installation process may
damage the software that runs the computer or prevent its proper installation.
NOTE: If the computer shipped with more than one operating system language on the hard drive,
the installation process could take up to 60 minutes.
If your computer was not shipped with a Microsoft operating system, some portions of this
documentation do not apply. Additional information is available in online help after you install the
operating system.
Downloading Microsoft Windows Updates
1.
To set up your Internet connection, click Start > Internet Explorer and follow the instructions on
the screen.
2.
Once an Internet connection has been established, click the Start button.
3.
Select the All Programs menu.
Installing the Windows Operating System
3
4.
Click on the Windows Update link.
In Windows Vista and Windows 7, the Windows Update screen appears. Click view available
updates and make sure all critical updates are selected. Click the Install button and follow the
instructions on the screen.
In Windows XP, you will be directed to the Microsoft Windows Update Web site. If you see
one or more pop-up windows that ask you to install a program from http://www.microsoft.com,
click Yes to install the program. Follow the instructions on the Microsoft Web site to scan for
updates and install critical updates and service packs.
It is recommended that you install all of the critical updates and service packs.
5.
After the updates have been installed, Windows will prompt you to reboot the machine. Be sure
to save any files or documents that you may have open before rebooting. Then select Yes to
reboot the machine.
Installing or Upgrading Device Drivers (Windows
systems)
When installing optional hardware devices after the operating system installation is complete, you
must also install the drivers for each of the devices.
If prompted for the i386 directory, replace the path specification with C:\i386, or use the Browse
button in the dialog box to locate the i386 folder. This action points the operating system to the
appropriate drivers.
Obtain the latest support software, including support software for the operating system from
http://www.hp.com/support. Select your country and language, select Download drivers and
software (and firmware), enter the model number of the computer, and press Enter.
Customizing the Monitor Display (Windows systems)
If you wish, you can select or change the monitor model, refresh rates, screen resolution, color
settings, font sizes, and power management settings. To do so, right-click on the Windows Desktop,
then click Personalize in Windows Vista and Windows 7 or Properties in Windows XP to change
display settings. For more information, refer to the online documentation provided with the graphics
controller utility or the documentation that came with your monitor.
Launching Windows XP from Windows 7
Windows XP Mode for Windows 7 allows you to install and launch Windows XP applications from the
Windows 7 taskbar. This feature is available on some computer models only.
To set up from a pre-installed Windows 7 desktop, click Start > Windows Virtual PC > Virtual
Windows XP and follow the instructions on the screen.
Accessing Disk Image (ISO) Files
There are disk image files (ISO files) included on your PC that contain the installation software for
additional software. These CD image files are located in the folder C:\SWSetup\ISOs. Each .iso file
can be burned to CD media to create an installation CD. It is recommended that these disks be
4
Chapter 2 Installing and Customizing the Software
created and the software installed in order to get the most from your PC. The software and image file
names are:
●
Corel WinDVD SD and BD – installation software for WinDVD – used to play DVD movies
●
HP Insight Diagnostics OR Vision Diagnostics – software to perform diagnostic activities on your
PC
Accessing Disk Image (ISO) Files
5
3
Computer Setup (F10) Utility
Computer Setup (F10) Utilities
Use Computer Setup (F10) Utility to do the following:
6
●
Change factory default settings.
●
Set the system date and time.
●
Set, view, change, or verify the system configuration, including settings for processor, graphics,
memory, audio, storage, communications, and input devices.
●
Modify the boot order of bootable devices such as hard drives, diskette drives, optical drives, or
USB flash media devices.
●
Enable Quick Boot, which is faster than Full Boot but does not run all of the diagnostic tests run
during a Full Boot. You can set the system to:
❑
always Quick Boot (default);
❑
periodically Full Boot (from every 1 to 30 days); or
❑
always Full Boot.
●
Select Post Messages Enabled or Disabled to change the display status of Power-On Self-Test
(POST) messages. Post Messages Disabled suppresses most POST messages, such as
memory count, product name, and other non-error text messages. If a POST error occurs, the
error is displayed regardless of the mode selected. To manually switch to Post Messages
Enabled during POST, press any key (except F1 through F12).
●
Establish an Ownership Tag, the text of which is displayed each time the system is turned on or
restarted.
●
Enter the Asset Tag or property identification number assigned by the company to this computer.
●
Enable the power-on password prompt during system restarts (warm boots) as well as during
power-on.
●
Establish a setup password that controls access to the Computer Setup (F10) Utility and the
settings described in this section.
●
Secure integrated I/O functionality, including the serial, USB, or parallel ports, audio, or
embedded NIC, so that they cannot be used until they are unsecured.
●
Enable or disable removable media boot ability.
●
Enable or disable legacy diskette write ability (when supported by hardware).
Chapter 3 Computer Setup (F10) Utility
●
Solve system configuration errors detected but not automatically fixed during the Power-On SelfTest (POST).
●
Replicate the system setup by saving system configuration information on diskette and restoring
it on one or more computers.
●
Execute self-tests on a specified ATA hard drive (when supported by drive).
●
Enable or disable DriveLock security (when supported by drive).
Using Computer Setup (F10) Utilities
Computer Setup can be accessed only by turning the computer on or restarting the system.
To access the Computer Setup Utilities menu, complete the following steps:
1.
Turn on or restart the computer. If you are in Microsoft Windows, click Start > Shut Down >
Restart.
2.
As soon as the computer is turned on, press F10 when the monitor light turns green to enter
Computer Setup. Press Enter to bypass the title screen, if necessary.
NOTE: If you do not press F10 at the appropriate time, you must restart the computer and
again press F10 when the monitor light turns green to access the utility.
3.
Select your language from the list and press Enter.
4.
A choice of five headings appears in the Computer Setup Utilities menu: File, Storage, Security,
Power, and Advanced.
5.
Use the arrow (left and right) keys to select the appropriate heading. Use the arrow (up and
down) keys to select the option you want, then press Enter. To return to the Computer Setup
Utilities menu, press Esc.
6.
To apply and save changes, select File > Save Changes and Exit.
●
If you have made changes that you do not want applied, select Ignore Changes and Exit.
●
To reset to factory settings or previously saved default settings (some models), select
Apply Defaults and Exit. This option will restore the original factory system defaults.
CAUTION: Do NOT turn the computer power OFF while the BIOS is saving the Computer Setup
(F10) changes because the CMOS could become corrupted. It is safe to turn off the computer only
after exiting the F10 Setup screen.
Table 3-1 Computer Setup (F10) Utility
Heading
Table
File
Computer Setup—File on page 8
Storage
Computer Setup—Storage on page 9
Security
Computer Setup—Security on page 10
Power
Computer Setup—Power on page 15
Advanced
Computer Setup—Advanced on page 16
Computer Setup (F10) Utilities
7
Computer Setup—File
NOTE: Support for specific Computer Setup options may vary depending on the hardware
configuration.
Table 3-2 Computer Setup—File
Option
Description
System Information
Lists:
●
Product name
●
SKU number (some models)
●
Processor type/speed/stepping
●
Cache size (L1/L2) (dual core processors have this listed twice)
●
Installed memory size/speed, number of channels (single or dual) (if applicable)
●
Integrated MAC address for embedded, enabled NIC (if applicable)
●
System BIOS (includes family name and version)
●
Chassis serial number
●
Asset tracking number
●
ME firmware version
●
Management mode
About
Displays copyright notice.
Set Time and Date
Allows you to set system time and date.
Flash System ROM
Allows you to update the system ROM with a BIOS image file located on a USB flash media
device or CD-ROM.
Replicated Setup
Save to Removable Media
Saves system configuration, including CMOS, to a formatted 1.44-MB diskette, a USB flash media
device, or a diskette-like device (a storage device set to emulate a diskette drive).
Restore from Removable Media
Restores system configuration from a diskette, a USB flash media device, or a diskette-like
device.
Default Setup
Save Current Settings as Default
Saves the current system configuration settings as the default.
Restore Factory Settings as Default
Restores the factory system configuration settings as the default.
8
Apply Defaults and
Exit
Applies the currently selected default settings and clears any established passwords.
Ignore Changes
and Exit
Exits Computer Setup without applying or saving any changes.
Save Changes and
Exit
Saves changes to system configuration or default settings and exits Computer Setup.
Chapter 3 Computer Setup (F10) Utility
Computer Setup—Storage
NOTE: Support for specific Computer Setup options may vary depending on the hardware
configuration.
Table 3-3 Computer Setup—Storage
Option
Description
Device Configuration
Lists all installed BIOS-controlled storage devices.
When a device is selected, detailed information and options are displayed. The following options
may be presented:
CD-ROM: No emulation options available.
Hard Disk: Size, model, serial number, connector color, SMART, emulation type.
●
None (prevents BIOS data accesses and disables it as a boot device)
●
Hard Disk (treated as a hard disk)
Translation Mode (ATA disks only)
Lets you select the translation mode to be used for the device. This enables the BIOS to access
disks partitioned and formatted on other systems and may be necessary for users of older
versions of UNIX (e.g., SCO UNIX version 3.2). Options are Automatic, Bit-Shift, LBA Assisted,
User, and Off.
CAUTION: Ordinarily, the translation mode selected automatically by the BIOS should not be
changed. If the selected translation mode is not compatible with the translation mode that was
active when the disk was partitioned and formatted, the data on the disk will be inaccessible.
Default Values (ATA disks only)
NOTE: This feature appears only when User translation mode is selected.
Allows you to specify the parameters (logical cylinders, heads, and sectors per track) used by the
BIOS to translate disk I/O requests (from the operating system or an application) into terms the
hard drive can accept. Logical cylinders may not exceed 1024. The number of heads may not
exceed 256. The number of sectors per track may not exceed 63. These fields are only visible
and changeable when the drive translation mode is set to User.
SATA Defaults
Translation Mode (ATA disks only)
Lets you select the translation mode to be used for the device. This enables the BIOS to access
disks partitioned and formatted on other systems and may be necessary for users of older
versions of UNIX (e.g., SCO UNIX version 3.2). Options are Automatic, Bit-Shift, LBA Assisted,
User, and Off.
CAUTION: Ordinarily, the translation mode selected automatically by the BIOS should not be
changed. If the selected translation mode is not compatible with the translation mode that was
active when the disk was partitioned and formatted, the data on the disk will be inaccessible.
Computer Setup (F10) Utilities
9
Table 3-3 Computer Setup—Storage (continued)
Storage Options
Removable Media Boot
Enables/disables ability to boot the system from removable media.
SATA Emulation
Allows you to choose how the SATA controller and devices are accessed by the operating
system. There are three supported options: IDE, RAID, and AHCI.
IDE - This is the most backwards-compatible setting of the three options. Operating systems
usually do not require additional driver support in IDE mode.
AHCI (default option) - Allows operating systems with AHCI device drivers loaded to take
advantage of more advanced features of the SATA controller.
DPS Self-Test
Allows you to execute self-tests on ATA hard drives capable of performing the Drive Protection
System (DPS) self-tests.
NOTE: This selection will only appear when at least one drive capable of performing the DPS
self-tests is attached to the system.
Boot Order
Allows you to:
●
Specify the order in which attached devices (such as a USB flash media device, hard drive,
optical drive, or network interface card) are checked for a bootable operating system image.
Each device on the list may be individually excluded from or included for consideration as a
bootable operating system source.
●
Specify the order of attached hard drives. The first hard drive in the order will have priority in
the boot sequence and will be recognized as drive C (if any devices are attached).
NOTE: MS-DOS drive lettering assignments may not apply after a non-MS-DOS operating
system has started.
Shortcut to Temporarily Override Boot Order
To boot one time from a device other than the default device specified in Boot Order, restart the
computer and press F9 when the monitor light turns green. After POST is completed, a list of
bootable devices is displayed. Use the arrow keys to select the preferred bootable device and
press Enter. The computer then boots from the selected non-default device for this one time.
Computer Setup—Security
NOTE: Support for specific Computer Setup options may vary depending on the hardware
configuration.
Table 3-4 Computer Setup—Security
Option
Description
Setup Password
Allows you to set and enable a setup (administrator) password.
NOTE: If the setup password is set, it is required to change Computer Setup options, flash the
ROM, and make changes to certain plug and play settings under Windows.
See the Desktop Management Guide for more information.
10
Chapter 3 Computer Setup (F10) Utility
Table 3-4 Computer Setup—Security (continued)
Power-On Password
Allows you to set and enable a power-on password. The power-on password prompt appears
after a power cycle. If the user does not enter the correct power-on password, the unit will not
boot.
NOTE: This password does not appear on warm boots , such as Ctrl+Alt+Delete or Restart
from Windows, unless enabled in Password Options (see below).
See the Desktop Management Guide for more information.
Password Options
Allows you to enable/disable:
(This selection appears
only if a power-on
password or setup
password is set.)
●
Lock Legacy Resources (appears if a setup password is set)
●
Network Server Mode (appears if a power-on password is set)
●
Password Prompt on Warm Boot (Ctrl+Alt+Delete) (appears if a power-on password is set)
●
Setup Browse Mode (appears if a setup password is set) (allows viewing, but not changing,
the F10 Setup Options without entering setup password)
●
Stringent Password (appears if a power-on password is set), which when enabled bypasses
the onboard password jumper to disable the power-on password.
●
Password prompt on F9, F11, & F12 (allows access to menus without entering setup
password)
See the Desktop Management Guide for more information.
Smart Cover (some
models)
Allows you to:
●
Lock/unlock the Cover Lock.
●
Set the Cover Removal Sensor to Disable/Notify User/Setup Password.
NOTE: Notify User alerts the user that the sensor has detected that the cover has been
removed. Setup Password requires that the setup password be entered to boot the computer if
the sensor detects that the cover has been removed.
This feature is supported on some models only. See the Desktop Management Guide for more
information.
Device Security
Allows you to set Device Available/Device Hidden for:
●
Serial ports
●
Parallel port
●
System audio
●
Network controllers (some models)
●
Embedded security device (some models)
●
SATA0
●
SATA1 (some models)
●
SATA2 (some models)
●
SATA3 (some models)
●
eSATA (some models)
Computer Setup (F10) Utilities
11
Table 3-4 Computer Setup—Security (continued)
USB Security
Allows you to set Device Available/Device Hidden for:
●
●
●
Front USB Ports
◦
USB Port 3
◦
USB Port 4
◦
USB Port 5
◦
USB Port 6
Rear USB Ports
◦
USB Port 7
◦
USB Port 8
◦
USB Port 9
◦
USB Port 10
◦
USB Port 11
◦
USB Port 12
Accessory USB Ports
◦
USB Port 1
◦
USB Port 2
Slot Security
Allows you to disable any PCI or PCI Express slot
Network Service Boot
Enables/disables the computer’s ability to boot from an operating system installed on a network
server. (Feature available on NIC models only; the network controller must be either a PCI
expansion card or embedded on the system board.)
System IDs
Allows you to set:
DriveLock Security
●
Asset tag (18-byte identifier), a property identification number assigned by the company to
the computer.
●
Ownership tag (80-byte identifier) displayed during POST.
●
Chassis serial number or Universal Unique Identifier (UUID) number. The UUID can only be
updated if the current chassis serial number is invalid. (These ID numbers are normally set in
the factory and are used to uniquely identify the system.)
●
Keyboard locale setting (for example, English or German) for System ID entry.
Allows you to assign or modify a master or user password for hard drives. When this feature is
enabled, the user is prompted to provide one of the DriveLock passwords during POST. If neither
is successfully entered, the hard drive will remain inaccessible until one of the passwords is
successfully provided during a subsequent cold-boot sequence.
NOTE: This selection will only appear when at least one drive that supports the DriveLock
feature is attached to the system.
See the Desktop Management Guide for more information.
12
Chapter 3 Computer Setup (F10) Utility
Table 3-4 Computer Setup—Security (continued)
System Security
(some models: these
options are hardware
dependent)
Data Execution Prevention (some models) (enable/disable) - Helps prevent operating system
security breaches.
PAVP (Models with Blu-ray drives) (disabled/min/max) - PAVP enables the Protected Audio Video
Path in the Chipset. This may allow viewing of some protected high definition content that would
otherwise be prohibited from playback. Selecting Max will assign 96 Megabytes of system
memory exclusively to PAVP.
Virtualization Technology (some models) (enable/disable) - Controls the virtualization features of
the processor. Changing this setting requires turning the computer off and then back on.
Virtualization Technology Directed I/O (some models) (enable/disable) - Controls virtualization
DMA remapping features of the chipset. Changing this setting requires turning the computer off
and then back on.
Trusted Execution Technology (some models) (enable/disable) - Controls the underlying
processor and chipset features needed to support a virtual appliance. Changing this setting
requires turning the computer off and then back on. To enable this feature you must enable the
following features:
●
Embedded Security Device Support
●
Virtualization Technology
●
Virtualization Technology Directed I/O
Embedded Security Device Support (some models) (enable/disable) - Permits activation and
deactivation of the Embedded Security Device. Changing this setting requires turning the
computer off and then back on.
NOTE: To configure the Embedded Security Device, a Setup password must be set.
●
Reset to Factory Settings (some models) (Do not reset/Reset) - Resetting to factory defaults
will erase all security keys. Changing this setting requires turning the computer off and then
back on.
CAUTION: The embedded security device is a critical component of many security
schemes. Erasing the security keys will prevent access to data protected by the Embedded
Security Device. Choosing Reset to Factory Settings may result in significant data loss.
OS management of Embedded Security Device (some models) (enable/disable) - This option
allows the user to limit operating system control of the Embedded Security Device. Changing this
setting requires turning the computer off and then back on. This option allows the user to limit OS
control of the Embedded Security Device.
●
Reset of Embedded Security Device through OS (some models) (enable/disable) - This
option allows the user to limit the operating system ability to request a Reset to Factory
Settings of the Embedded Security Device. Changing this setting requires turning the
computer off and then back on.
NOTE: To enable this option, a Setup password must be set.
Computer Setup (F10) Utilities
13
Table 3-4 Computer Setup—Security (continued)
Master Boot Record
Security
Protects the master boot record from viruses or other corruption. Saves of copy of the current
master boot record.
Setup Security Level
Provides a method to allow end-users limited access to change specified setup options, without
having to know the Setup Password.
This feature allows the administrator the flexibility to protect changes to essential setup options,
while allowing the user to view system settings and configure nonessential options. The
administrator specifies access rights to individual setup options on a case-by-case basis via the
Setup Security Level menu. By default, all setup options are assigned Setup Password, indicating
the user must enter the correct Setup Password during POST to make changes to any of the
options. The administrator may set individual items to None, indicating the user can make
changes to the specified options when setup has been accessed with invalid passwords. The
choice, None, is replaced by Power-On Password if a Power-On Password is enabled.
NOTE: Setup Browse Mode must be set to Enable in order for the user to enter Setup without
knowing the setup password.
14
Chapter 3 Computer Setup (F10) Utility
Computer Setup—Power
NOTE: Support for specific Computer Setup options may vary depending on the hardware
configuration.
Table 3-5 Computer Setup—Power
Option
Description
OS Power
Management
●
Runtime Power Management— Enable/Disable. Allows certain operating systems to reduce
processor voltage and frequency when the current software load does not require the full
capabilities of the processor.
●
Idle Power Savings—Extended/Normal. Allows certain operating systems to decrease the
processors power consumption when the processor is idle.
●
ACPI S3 Hard Disk Reset—Enabling this causes the BIOS to ensure hard disks are ready to
accept commands after resuming from S3 before returning control to the operating system.
●
ACPI S3 PS2 Mouse Wakeup—Enables or disables waking from S3 due to any PS2 mouse
activity or a button click only.
●
USB Wake on Device Insertion (some models)—Allows system to wake from Standby on
USB device insertion.
●
Unique Sleep State Blink Rates—Enable/Disable. This feature is designed to provide a
visual indication of what sleep state the system is in. Each sleep state has a unique blink
pattern.
◦
S0 = Solid green LED.
◦
S3 = 3 blinks at 1Hz (50% duty cycle) followed by a pause of 2 seconds (green LED) —
repeated cycles of 3 blinks and a pause.
◦
S4 = 4 blinks at 1Hz (50% duty cycle) followed by a pause of 2 seconds (green LED) —
repeated cycles of 4 blinks and a pause.
◦
S5 = LED is off.
NOTE: If this feature is disabled, S4 and S5 both have the LED off. S1 (no longer
supported) and S3 use 1 blink per second.
Hardware Power
Management
SATA Power Management enables or disables SATA bus and/or device power management.
S5 Maximum Power Savings—Turns off power to all nonessential hardware when system is off to
meet EUP Lot 6 requirement of less than 1 Watt power usage.
Thermal
Fan idle mode—This bar graph controls the minimum permitted fan speed.
NOTE: This setting only changes the minimum fan speed. The fans are still automatically
controlled.
Computer Setup (F10) Utilities
15
Computer Setup—Advanced
NOTE: Support for specific Computer Setup options may vary depending on the hardware
configuration.
Table 3-6 Computer Setup—Advanced (for advanced users)
Option
Heading
Power-On Options
Allows you to set:
●
16
POST mode (QuickBoot, Clear Memory, FullBoot, or FullBoot Every x Days).
◦
QuickBoot = Do not clear memory or perform a memory test.
◦
FullBoot = Memory test (count) on cold boot. Clears memory on all boots.
Chapter 3 Computer Setup (F10) Utility
Table 3-6 Computer Setup—Advanced (for advanced users) (continued)
◦
Clear Memory = No memory count on cold boot. Clears memory on all boots.
◦
FullBoot Every x Days = Memory count on 1st cold boot on or after the xth day. No
more memory counts until 1st cold boot on or after x days. Clears memory on all boots.
●
POST messages (enable/disable).
●
F9 prompt (hidden/displayed). Enabling this feature will display the text F9 = Boot Menu
during POST. Disabling this feature prevents the text from being displayed. However,
pressing F9 will still access the Shortcut Boot [Order] Menu screen. See Storage > Boot
Order for more information.
●
F10 prompt (hidden/displayed). Enabling this feature will display the text F10 = Setup during
POST. Disabling this feature prevents the text from being displayed. However, pressing F10
will still access the Setup screen.
●
F11 prompt (hidden/displayed). Setting this feature to displayed will display the text F11 =
Recovery during POST. Hiding the feature prevents the text from being displayed. However,
pressing F11 will still attempt to boot to the HP Backup and Recovery partition. See Factory
Recovery Boot Support for more information.
●
F12 prompt (hidden/displayed). Enabling this feature will display the text F12 = Network
during POST. Disabling this feature prevents the text from being displayed. However,
pressing F12 will still force the system to attempt booting from the network.
●
Factory Recovery Boot Support (enable/disable). Enabling this feature will cause an
additional prompt, F11 = Recovery, to be displayed during POST on systems with
HP Backup and Recovery software installed and configured with a recovery partition on the
boot hard drive. Pressing F11 causes the system to boot to the recovery partition and launch
HP Backup and Recovery. The F11 = Recovery prompt can be hidden with the F11 prompt
(hidden/displayed) option (see above).
●
Option ROM Prompt (enable/disable). Enabling this feature will cause the system to display
a message before loading option ROMs. (This feature is supported on some models only.)
●
Remote Wakeup Boot Source (remote server/local hard drive).
●
After Power Loss (off/on/previous state): Setting this option to:
◦
Off—causes the computer to remain powered off when power is restored.
◦
On—causes the computer to power on automatically as soon as power is restored.
◦
Previous state—causes the computer to power on automatically as soon as power is
restored, if it was on when power was lost.
NOTE: If you turn off power to the computer using the switch on a power strip, you will not be
able to use the suspend/sleep feature or the Remote Management features.
●
POST Delay (None, 5, 10 15, or 20 seconds). Enabling this feature will add a user-specified
delay to the POST process. This delay is sometimes needed for hard disks on some PCI
cards that spin up very slowly, so slowly that they are not ready to boot by the time POST is
finished. The POST delay also gives you more time to select F10 to enter Computer (F10)
Setup.
●
Bypass F1 Prompt on Configuration Changes (Enable/Disable). Allows you to set the
computer not to confirm when changes were made.
Execute Memory Test
(some models)
Restarts the computer and executes the POST memory test/logging.
BIOS Power-On
Allows you to set the computer to turn on automatically at a time you specify.
Onboard Devices
Allows you to set resources for or disable onboard system devices (diskette controller, serial port,
or parallel port).
Computer Setup (F10) Utilities
17
Table 3-6 Computer Setup—Advanced (for advanced users) (continued)
PCI Devices
PCI VGA
Configuration
●
Lists currently installed PCI devices and their IRQ settings.
●
Allows you to reconfigure IRQ settings for these devices or to disable them entirely. These
settings have no effect under an ACPI-based operating system.
Displayed only if there are multiple PCI video adapters in the system. Allows you to specify which
VGA controller will be the “boot” or primary VGA controller.
NOTE: In order to see this entry, you must enable Integrated Video (Advanced > Device
Options) and Save Changes and Exit.
Bus Options
Device Options
18
On some models, allows you to enable or disable:
●
PCI SERR# Generation.
●
PCI VGA Palette Snooping, which sets the VGA palette snooping bit in PCI configuration
space; only needed when more than one graphics controller is installed.
Allows you to set:
●
Printer mode (Bi-Directional, EPP + ECP, Output Only).
●
Num Lock State at Power-On (off/on).
●
S5 Wake on LAN (enable/disable).
◦
To disable Wake on LAN during the off state (S5), use the arrow (left and right) keys to
select the Advanced > Device Options menu and set the S5 Wake on LAN feature to
Disable. This obtains the lowest power consumption available on the computer during
S5. It does not affect the ability of the computer to Wake on LAN from suspend or
hibernation, but will prevent it from waking from S5 via the network. It does not affect
operation of the network connection while the computer is on.
◦
If a network connection is not required, completely disable the network controller (NIC)
by using the arrow (left and right) keys to select the Security > Device Security menu.
Set the Network Controller option to Device Hidden. This prevents the network
controller from being used by the operating system and reduces the power used by the
computer in S5.
●
Multi-Processor (enable/disable). This option may be used to disable multi-processor support
under the OS.
●
Internal Speaker (some models) (does not affect external speakers).
●
NIC PXE Option ROM Download (enable/disable). The BIOS contains an embedded NIC
option ROM to allow the unit to boot through the network to a PXE server. This is typically
used to download a corporate image to a hard drive. The NIC option ROM takes up memory
space below 1MB commonly referred to as DOS Compatibility Hole (DCH) space. This
space is limited. This F10 option will allow users to disable the downloading of this
embedded NIC option ROM thus giving more DCH space for additional PCI cards which may
need option ROM space. The default will be to have the NIC option-ROM-enabled.
Chapter 3 Computer Setup (F10) Utility
Table 3-6 Computer Setup—Advanced (for advanced users) (continued)
Management Devices
The Management Devices menu will only be displayed in the Advanced menu when the BIOS
detects multiple management options.
This option is for installed NIC cards that support ASF or DASH. Use the Management Devices
menu to select if the BIOS management operations will be through the embedded solution or one
of the installed NIC cards.
Management
Operations
Allows you to set:
●
MEBx Setup Prompt (enable/disable). Enabling this feature displays the CTRL+P prompt
during POST. Disabling this feature prevents the prompt from being displayed. However,
pressing Ctrl+P still accesses the utility used to configure manageability settings.
The CTRL+P function activates the MEBx Setup menu. If the Setup Password is configured,
the user will be prompted to correctly enter it before being allowed to enter the MEBx Setup.
It the password is entered incorrectly three times, the MEBx Setup will not be activated.
●
Intel Remote PC Assist Prompt (Hidden/Displayed). Displaying this feature displays the
CTRL+ALT+F1 prompt during POST. Hiding this feature prevents the prompt from being
displayed. However, pressing Ctrl+Alt+F1 still accesses the utility used to attempt to connect
to remote help server or services.
●
Intel PC Assist Timeout (5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 120, 180, 240 seconds). Allows the
user/administrator is set a time limit for Remote Help to establish contact with a remote
server when initiated.
●
SOL Terminal Emulation Mode. Selects between VT100 and ANSI SOL terminal emulation.
SOL terminal emulation mode is only activated during remote AMT redirection operations.
The emulation options allow administrators to select which mode works best with their
console.
●
SOL Local Keyboard (enable/disable). Disable or enable client keyboard during SOL
sessions. Some remote remediation may involve having the local client boot a remote image
provided by an administrator. This option determines if the BIOS will keep the local keyboard
enabled or disabled for possible local client interaction. If the local keyboard is disabled, all
keyboard input is only accepted from the remote source.
●
Unprovision AMT on next boot. Allows reset of AMT settings.
Recovering the Configuration Settings
This method of recovery requires that you first perform the Save to Removable Media command
with the Computer Setup (F10) Utility before Restore is needed. (See Save to Removable Media
on page 8 in the Computer Setup—File table.)
NOTE: It is recommended that you save any modified computer configuration settings to a diskette,
a USB flash media device, or a diskette-like device (a storage device set to emulate a diskette drive)
and save the diskette or device for possible future use.
To restore the configuration, insert the diskette, USB flash media device, or other storage media
emulating a diskette with the saved configuration and perform the Restore from Removable Media
command with the Computer Setup (F10) Utility. (See Restore from Removable Media on page 8 in
the Computer Setup—File table.)
Recovering the Configuration Settings
19
4
Serial ATA (SATA) Drive Guidelines
and Features
NOTE: HP only supports the use of SATA hard drives on these models of computer. No Parallel
ATA (PATA) drives are supported.
SATA Hard Drives
Serial ATA Hard Drive Characteristics
Number of pins/conductors in data cable
7/7
Number of pins in power cable
15
Maximum data cable length
39.37 in (100 cm)
Data interface voltage differential
400-700 mV
Drive voltages
3.3 V, 5 V, 12 V
Jumpers for configuring drive
N/A
Data transfer rate
3.0 Gb/s
SATA Hard Drive Cables
SATA Data Cable
Always use an HP approved SATA 3.0 Gb/s cable as it is fully backwards compatible with the SATA
1.5 Gb/s drives.
Current HP desktop products ship with SATA 3.0 Gb/s hard drives.
SATA data cables are susceptible to damage if overflexed. Never crease a SATA data cable and
never bend it tighter than a 30 mm (1.18 in) radius.
The SATA data cable is a thin, 7-pin cable designed to transmit data for only a single drive.
20
Chapter 4 Serial ATA (SATA) Drive Guidelines and Features
SMART ATA Drives
The Self Monitoring Analysis and Recording Technology (SMART) ATA drives for the HP Personal
Computers have built-in drive failure prediction that warns the user or network administrator of an
impending failure or crash of the hard drive. The SMART drive tracks fault prediction and failure
indication parameters such as reallocated sector count, spin retry count, and calibration retry count. If
the drive determines that a failure is imminent, it generates a fault alert.
Hard Drive Capacities
The combination of the file system and the operating system used in the computer determines the
maximum usable size of a drive partition. A drive partition is the largest segment of a drive that may
be properly accessed by the operating system. A single hard drive may therefore be subdivided into a
number of unique drive partitions in order to make use of all of its space.
Because of the differences in the way that drive sizes are calculated, the size reported by the
operating system may differ from that marked on the hard drive or listed in the computer specification.
Drive size calculations by drive manufacturers are bytes to the base 10 while calculations by
Microsoft are bytes to the base 2.
Drive/Partition Capacity Limits
Maximum Size
File System
Controller Type
Operating System
Partition
Drive
FAT 32
ATA
Windows XP/Windows Vista/Windows 7
32 GB
2 TB
NTFS
ATA
Windows XP/Windows Vista/Windows 7
2 TB
2 TB
SMART ATA Drives
21
5
Identifying the Chassis, Routine Care,
and Disassembly Preparation
This chapter provides general service information for the computer. Adherence to the procedures and
precautions described in this chapter is essential for proper service.
CAUTION: When the computer is plugged into an AC power source, voltage is always applied to
the system board. You must disconnect the power cord from the power source before opening the
computer to prevent system board or component damage.
Chassis Designations
Ultra-Slim Desktop (USDT)
Figure 5-1 Ultra-Slim Desktop chassis
22
Chapter 5 Identifying the Chassis, Routine Care, and Disassembly Preparation
Electrostatic Discharge Information
A sudden discharge of static electricity from your finger or other conductor can destroy static-sensitive
devices or microcircuitry. Often the spark is neither felt nor heard, but damage occurs. An electronic
device exposed to electrostatic discharge (ESD) may not appear to be affected at all and can work
perfectly throughout a normal cycle. The device may function normally for a while, but it has been
degraded in the internal layers, reducing its life expectancy.
Networks built into many integrated circuits provide some protection, but in many cases, the
discharge contains enough power to alter device parameters or melt silicon junctions.
Generating Static
The following table shows that:
●
Different activities generate different amounts of static electricity.
●
Static electricity increases as humidity decreases.
Relative Humidity
Event
55%
40%
10%
Walking across carpet
7,500 V
15,000 V
35,000 V
Walking across vinyl floor
3,000 V
5,000 V
12,000 V
Motions of bench worker
400 V
800 V
6,000 V
Removing DIPs from plastic tube
400 V
700 V
2,000 V
Removing DIPs from vinyl tray
2,000 V
4,000 V
11,500 V
Removing DIPs from Styrofoam
3,500 V
5,000 V
14,500 V
Removing bubble pack from PCB
7,000 V
20,000 V
26,500 V
Packing PCBs in foam-lined box
5,000 V
11,000 V
21,000 V
These are then multi-packaged inside plastic tubes, trays, or Styrofoam.
NOTE:
700 volts can degrade a product.
Preventing Electrostatic Damage to Equipment
Many electronic components are sensitive to ESD. Circuitry design and structure determine the
degree of sensitivity. The following packaging and grounding precautions are necessary to prevent
damage to electric components and accessories.
●
To avoid hand contact, transport products in static-safe containers such as tubes, bags, or
boxes.
●
Protect all electrostatic parts and assemblies with conductive or approved containers or
packaging.
●
Keep electrostatic sensitive parts in their containers until they arrive at static-free stations.
●
Place items on a grounded surface before removing them from their container.
Electrostatic Discharge Information
23
●
Always be properly grounded when touching a sensitive component or assembly.
●
Avoid contact with pins, leads, or circuitry.
●
Place reusable electrostatic-sensitive parts from assemblies in protective packaging or
conductive foam.
Personal Grounding Methods and Equipment
Use the following equipment to prevent static electricity damage to equipment:
●
Wrist straps are flexible straps with a maximum of one-megohm ± 10% resistance in the ground
cords. To provide proper ground, a strap must be worn snug against bare skin. The ground cord
must be connected and fit snugly into the banana plug connector on the grounding mat or
workstation.
●
Heel straps/Toe straps/Boot straps can be used at standing workstations and are compatible
with most types of shoes or boots. On conductive floors or dissipative floor mats, use them on
both feet with a maximum of one-megohm ± 10% resistance between the operator and ground.
Static Shielding Protection Levels
Method
Voltage
Antistatic plastic
1,500
Carbon-loaded plastic
7,500
Metallized laminate
15,000
Grounding the Work Area
To prevent static damage at the work area, use the following precautions:
●
Cover the work surface with approved static-dissipative material. Provide a wrist strap connected
to the work surface and properly grounded tools and equipment.
●
Use static-dissipative mats, foot straps, or air ionizers to give added protection.
●
Handle electrostatic sensitive components, parts, and assemblies by the case or PCB laminate.
Handle them only at static-free work areas.
●
Turn off power and input signals before inserting and removing connectors or test equipment.
●
Use fixtures made of static-safe materials when fixtures must directly contact dissipative
surfaces.
●
Keep work area free of nonconductive materials such as ordinary plastic assembly aids and
Styrofoam.
●
Use field service tools, such as cutters, screwdrivers, and vacuums, that are conductive.
Recommended Materials and Equipment
Materials and equipment that are recommended for use in preventing static electricity include:
24
●
Antistatic tape
●
Antistatic smocks, aprons, or sleeve protectors
Chapter 5 Identifying the Chassis, Routine Care, and Disassembly Preparation
●
Conductive bins and other assembly or soldering aids
●
Conductive foam
●
Conductive tabletop workstations with ground cord of one-megohm +/- 10% resistance
●
Static-dissipative table or floor mats with hard tie to ground
●
Field service kits
●
Static awareness labels
●
Wrist straps and footwear straps providing one-megohm +/- 10% resistance
●
Material handling packages
●
Conductive plastic bags
●
Conductive plastic tubes
●
Conductive tote boxes
●
Opaque shielding bags
●
Transparent metallized shielding bags
●
Transparent shielding tubes
Operating Guidelines
To prevent overheating and to help prolong the life of the computer:
●
Keep the computer away from excessive moisture, direct sunlight, and extremes of heat and
cold.
●
Operate the computer on a sturdy, level surface. Leave a 10.2-cm (4-inch) clearance on all
vented sides of the computer and above the monitor to permit the required airflow.
●
Never restrict the airflow into the computer by blocking any vents or air intakes. Do not place the
keyboard, with the keyboard feet down, directly against the front of the desktop unit as this also
restricts airflow.
●
Occasionally clean the air vents on all vented sides of the computer. Lint, dust, and other foreign
matter can block the vents and limit the airflow. Be sure to unplug the computer before cleaning
the air vents.
●
Never operate the computer with the cover or side panel removed.
●
Do not stack computers on top of each other or place computers so near each other that they
are subject to each other’s re-circulated or preheated air.
●
If the computer is to be operated within a separate enclosure, intake and exhaust ventilation
must be provided on the enclosure, and the same operating guidelines listed above will still
apply.
●
Keep liquids away from the computer and keyboard.
Operating Guidelines
25
●
Never cover the ventilation slots on the monitor with any type of material.
●
Install or enable power management functions of the operating system or other software,
including sleep states.
Routine Care
General Cleaning Safety Precautions
1.
Never use solvents or flammable solutions to clean the computer.
2.
Never immerse any parts in water or cleaning solutions; apply any liquids to a clean cloth and
then use the cloth on the component.
3.
Always unplug the computer when cleaning with liquids or damp cloths.
4.
Always unplug the computer before cleaning the keyboard, mouse, or air vents.
5.
Disconnect the keyboard before cleaning it.
6.
Wear safety glasses equipped with side shields when cleaning the keyboard.
Cleaning the Computer Case
Follow all safety precautions in General Cleaning Safety Precautions on page 26 before cleaning the
computer.
To clean the computer case, follow the procedures described below:
●
To remove light stains or dirt, use plain water with a clean, lint-free cloth or swab.
●
For stronger stains, use a mild dishwashing liquid diluted with water. Rinse well by wiping it with
a cloth or swab dampened with clear water.
●
For stubborn stains, use isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol. No rinsing is needed as the alcohol will
evaporate quickly and not leave a residue.
●
After cleaning, always wipe the unit with a clean, lint-free cloth.
●
Occasionally clean the air vents on the computer. Lint and other foreign matter can block the
vents and limit the airflow.
Cleaning the Keyboard
Follow all safety precautions in General Cleaning Safety Precautions on page 26 before cleaning the
keyboard.
To clean the tops of the keys or the keyboard body, follow the procedures described in Cleaning the
Computer Case on page 26.
When cleaning debris from under the keys, review all rules in General Cleaning Safety Precautions
on page 26 before following these procedures:
26
Chapter 5 Identifying the Chassis, Routine Care, and Disassembly Preparation
CAUTION: Use safety glasses equipped with side shields before attempting to clean debris from
under the keys.
●
Visible debris underneath or between the keys may be removed by vacuuming or shaking.
●
Canned, pressurized air may be used to clean debris from under the keys. Caution should be
used as too much air pressure can dislodge lubricants applied under the wide keys.
●
If you remove a key, use a specially designed key puller to prevent damage to the keys. This
tool is available through many electronic supply outlets.
CAUTION: Never remove a wide leveled key (like the space bar) from the keyboard. If these
keys are improperly removed or installed, the keyboard may not function properly.
●
Cleaning under a key may be done with a swab moistened with isopropyl alcohol and squeezed
out. Be careful not to wipe away lubricants necessary for proper key functions. Use tweezers to
remove any fibers or dirt in confined areas. Allow the parts to air dry before reassembly.
Cleaning the Monitor
●
Wipe the monitor screen with a clean cloth moistened with water or with a towelette designed for
cleaning monitors. Do not use sprays or aerosols directly on the screen; the liquid may seep into
the housing and damage a component. Never use solvents or flammable liquids on the monitor.
●
To clean the monitor body follow the procedures in Cleaning the Computer Case on page 26.
Cleaning the Mouse
Before cleaning the mouse, ensure that the power to the computer is turned off.
●
Clean the mouse ball by first removing the retaining plate and the ball from the housing. Pull out
any debris from the ball socket and wipe the ball with a clean, dry cloth before reassembly.
●
To clean the mouse body, follow the procedures in Cleaning the Computer Case on page 26.
Service Considerations
Listed below are some of the considerations that you should keep in mind during the disassembly and
assembly of the computer.
Power Supply Fan
The power supply fan is a variable-speed fan based on the temperature in the power supply.
CAUTION: The cooling fan is always on when the computer is in the “On” mode. The cooling fan is
off when the computer is in “Standby,” “Suspend,” or “Off” modes.
You must disconnect the power cord from the power source before opening the computer to prevent
system board or component damage.
Service Considerations
27
Tools and Software Requirements
To service the computer, you need the following:
●
Torx T-15 screwdriver (HP screwdriver with bits, PN 161946-001)
●
Torx T-15 screwdriver with small diameter shank (for certain front bezel removal)
●
Flat-bladed screwdriver (may sometimes be used in place of the Torx screwdriver)
●
Phillips #2 screwdriver
●
Diagnostics software
●
HP tamper-resistant T-15 wrench (Smart Cover FailSafe Key, PN 166527-001) or HP tamperresistant bits (Smart Cover FailSafe Key, PN 166527-002)
Screws
The screws used in the computer are not interchangeable. They may have standard or metric threads
and may be of different lengths. If an incorrect screw is used during the reassembly process, it can
damage the unit. HP strongly recommends that all screws removed during disassembly be kept with
the part that was removed, then returned to their proper locations.
CAUTION: Metric screws have a black finish. U.S. screws have a silver finish and are used on hard
drives only.
CAUTION: As each subassembly is removed from the computer, it should be placed away from the
work area to prevent damage.
Cables and Connectors
Most cables used throughout the unit are flat, flexible cables. These cables must be handled with
care to avoid damage. Apply only the tension required to seat or unseat the cables during insertion or
removal from the connector. Handle cables by the connector whenever possible. In all cases, avoid
bending or twisting the cables, and ensure that the cables are routed in such a way that they cannot
be caught or snagged by parts being removed or replaced.
CAUTION: When servicing this computer, ensure that cables are placed in their proper location
during the reassembly process. Improper cable placement can damage the computer.
Hard Drives
Handle hard drives as delicate, precision components, avoiding all physical shock and vibration. This
applies to failed drives as well as replacement spares.
28
●
If a drive must be mailed, place the drive in a bubble-pack mailer or other suitable protective
packaging and label the package “Fragile: Handle With Care.”
●
Do not remove hard drives from the shipping package for storage. Keep hard drives in their
protective packaging until they are actually mounted in the CPU.
●
Avoid dropping drives from any height onto any surface.
●
If you are inserting or removing a hard drive, turn off the computer. Do not remove a hard drive
while the computer is on or in standby mode.
Chapter 5 Identifying the Chassis, Routine Care, and Disassembly Preparation
●
Before handling a drive, ensure that you are discharged of static electricity. While handling a
drive, avoid touching the connector. For more information about preventing electrostatic
damage, refer to Electrostatic Discharge Information on page 23
●
Do not use excessive force when inserting a drive.
●
Avoid exposing a hard drive to liquids, temperature extremes, or products that have magnetic
fields such as monitors or speakers.
Lithium Coin Cell Battery
The battery that comes with the computer provides power to the real-time clock and has a minimum
lifetime of about three years.
See the appropriate removal and replacement chapter for the chassis you are working on in this
guide for instructions on the replacement procedures.
WARNING! This computer contains a lithium battery. There is a risk of fire and chemical burn if the
battery is handled improperly. Do not disassemble, crush, puncture, short external contacts, dispose
in water or fire, or expose it to temperatures higher than 140ºF (60ºC). Do not attempt to recharge the
battery.
NOTE: Batteries, battery packs, and accumulators should not be disposed of together with the
general household waste. In order to forward them to recycling or proper disposal, please use the
public collection system or return them to HP, their authorized partners, or their agents.
Service Considerations
29
6
Removal and Replacement Procedures
Adherence to the procedures and precautions described in this chapter is essential for proper service.
After completing all necessary removal and replacement procedures, run the Diagnostics utility to
verify that all components operate properly.
NOTE:
Not all features listed in this guide are available on all computers.
Preparation for Disassembly
See Identifying the Chassis, Routine Care, and Disassembly Preparation on page 22 for initial safety
procedures.
1.
Remove/disengage any security devices that prohibit opening the computer (Security Lock
Provisions on page 32).
2.
Close any open software applications.
3.
Exit the operating system.
4.
Remove any compact disc from the computer.
5.
Turn off the computer and any peripheral devices that are connected to it.
CAUTION: Turn off the computer before disconnecting any cables.
Regardless of the power-on state, voltage is always present on the system board as long as the
system is plugged into an active AC outlet. In some systems the cooling fan is on even when the
computer is in the “Standby,” or “Suspend” modes. The power cord should always be
disconnected before servicing a unit.
6.
Disconnect the power cord from the electrical outlet and then from the computer.
7.
Disconnect all peripheral device cables from the computer.
NOTE: During disassembly, label each cable as you remove it, noting its position and routing.
Keep all screws with the units removed.
CAUTION: The screws used in the computer are of different thread sizes and lengths; using
the wrong screw in an application may damage the unit.
8.
30
If the PC is mounted in the accessory mounting stand, remove it from the stand.
Chapter 6 Removal and Replacement Procedures
Serial Number Location
Each computer has a unique serial number and a product ID that are located on the top of the
computer when it is in the tower configuration. Keep these numbers available for use when contacting
customer service for assistance.
Figure 6-1 Serial Number and Product ID Location
Serial Number Location
31
Security Lock Provisions
NOTE: For information on data security features, refer to the Desktop Management Guide and the
HP ProtectTools Security Manager Guide (some models) at http://www.hp.com.
The security locks displayed below and on the following pages can be used to secure the computer.
Installing a Security Lock
HP/Kensington MicroSaver Security Cable Lock
There are two cable lock slots on the rear of the computer. The slot next to the thumbscrew should be
used when there is no port cover. The slot on the far right should be used when a port cover is
installed.
Figure 6-2 Installing a Cable Lock with No Port Cover
Figure 6-3 Installing a Cable with a Port Cover Installed
32
Chapter 6 Removal and Replacement Procedures
Padlock
Figure 6-4 Installing a Padlock
HP Business PC Security Lock
1.
Fasten the security cable by looping it around a stationary object.
Figure 6-5 Securing the Cable to a Fixed Object
Security Lock Provisions
33
2.
Thread the keyboard and mouse cables through the lock.
Figure 6-6 Threading the Keyboard and Mouse Cables
3.
Screw the lock to the chassis using the screw provided.
Figure 6-7 Attaching the Lock to the Chassis
34
Chapter 6 Removal and Replacement Procedures
4.
Insert the plug end of the security cable into the lock (1) and push the button in (2) to engage the
lock. Use the key provided to disengage the lock.
Figure 6-8 Engaging the Lock
Security Lock Provisions
35
Front Bezel Security
The front bezel can be locked in place by installing a security screw provided by HP. To install the
security screw:
1.
Remove/disengage any security devices that prohibit opening the computer.
2.
Remove all removable media, such as compact discs or USB flash drives, from the computer.
3.
Turn off the computer properly through the operating system, then turn off any external devices.
4.
Disconnect the power cord from the power outlet and disconnect any external devices.
CAUTION: Regardless of the power-on state, voltage is always present on the system board
as long as the system is plugged into an active AC outlet. You must disconnect the power cord
to avoid damage to the internal components of the computer.
5.
If the computer is on a stand, remove the computer from the stand.
6.
Remove the access panel and front bezel.
7.
Remove the black screw on the front of the chassis behind the bezel. The screw is located next
to the optical drive and is labeled "BEZEL."
Figure 6-9 Retrieving the Front Bezel Security Screw
8.
36
Replace the front bezel.
Chapter 6 Removal and Replacement Procedures
9.
Install the security screw through the middle front bezel release tab and into the chassis to
secure the front bezel in place.
Figure 6-10 Installing the Front Bezel Security Screw
10. Replace the access panel.
11. If the computer was on a stand, replace the stand.
12. Reconnect the power cord and turn on the computer.
13. Lock any security devices that were disengaged when the access panel was removed.
Security Lock Provisions
37
Computer Access Panel
To access internal components, you must remove the access panel:
1.
Prepare the computer for disassembly (Preparation for Disassembly on page 30).
2.
Loosen the thumbscrew on the rear of the computer (1), slide the access panel toward the front
of the computer, and then lift it off (2).
Figure 6-11 Removing the Computer Access Panel
To install the access panel, reverse the removal procedure.
38
Chapter 6 Removal and Replacement Procedures
Front Bezel
1.
Prepare the computer for disassembly (Preparation for Disassembly on page 30).
2.
Remove the computer access panel (Computer Access Panel on page 38).
3.
Lift up the three tabs on the side of the bezel (1), then rotate the bezel off the chassis (2).
Figure 6-12 Removing the Front Bezel
To install the front bezel, reverse the removal procedure.
Front Bezel
39
Bezel Blank
On some models, there is a bezel blank covering the external drive bay that needs to be removed
before installing a drive. To remove a bezel blank:
1.
Remove the computer access panel (Computer Access Panel on page 38).
2.
Remove the front bezel (Front Bezel on page 39).
3.
Push the two retaining tabs that hold the bezel blank in place towards the outer right edge of the
bezel (1) and pull the bezel blank inwards to remove it (2).
Figure 6-13 Removing a Bezel Blank
40
Chapter 6 Removal and Replacement Procedures
Installing Additional Memory
The computer comes with double data rate 3 synchronous dynamic random access memory (DDR3SDRAM) small outline dual inline memory modules (SODIMMs).
SODIMMs
The memory sockets on the system board can be populated with up to two industry-standard
SODIMMs. These memory sockets are populated with at least one preinstalled SODIMM. To achieve
the maximum memory support, you can populate the system board with up to 8-GB of memory.
DDR3-SDRAM SODIMMs
For proper system operation, the SODIMMs must be:
●
industry-standard 204-pin
●
unbuffered non-ECC PC3-8500 DDR3-1066 MHz-compliant or PC3-10600 DDR3-1333 MHzcompliant
●
1.5 volt DDR3-SDRAM SODIMMs
The DDR3-SDRAM SODIMMs must also:
●
support CAS latency 7 DDR3 1066 MHz (7-7-7 timing) and CAS latency 9 DDR3 1333 MHz
(9-9-9 timing)
●
contain the mandatory Joint Electronic Device Engineering Council (JEDEC) specification
In addition, the computer supports:
●
512-Mbit, 1-Gbit, and 2-Gbit non-ECC memory technologies
●
single-sided and double-sided SODIMMS
●
SODIMMs constructed with x8 and x16 devices; SODIMMs constructed with x4 SDRAM are not
supported
NOTE:
The system will not operate properly if you install unsupported SODIMMs.
Installing Additional Memory
41
Populating SODIMM Sockets
There are two SODIMM sockets on the system board, with one socket per channel. The sockets are
labeled XMM1 and XMM3. The XMM1 socket operates in memory channel A. The XMM3 socket
operates in memory channel B.
Figure 6-14 SODIMM Socket Locations
Table 6-1 SODIMM Socket Locations
Item
Description
Socket Color
1
SODIMM1 socket, Channel A
Black
2
SODIMM3 socket, Channel B
White
NOTE: A SODIMM must occupy the black XMM1 socket. Otherwise, the
system will display a POST error message indicating that a memory module
must be installed in the black socket.
The system will automatically operate in single channel mode, dual channel mode, or flex mode,
depending on how the SODIMMs are installed.
42
●
The system will operate in single channel mode if the SODIMM sockets are populated in one
channel only.
●
The system will operate in a higher-performing dual channel mode if the memory capacity of the
SODIMM in Channel A is equal to the memory capacity of the SODIMM in Channel B.
●
The system will operate in flex mode if the memory capacity of the SODIMM in Channel A is not
equal to the memory capacity of the SODIMM in Channel B. In flex mode, the channel populated
with the least amount of memory describes the total amount of memory assigned to dual
channel and the remainder is assigned to single channel. If one channel will have more memory
than the other, the larger amount should be assigned to channel A.
●
In any mode, the maximum operational speed is determined by the slowest SODIMM in the
system.
Chapter 6 Removal and Replacement Procedures
Installing SODIMMs
CAUTION: You must disconnect the power cord before adding or removing memory modules.
Regardless of the power-on state, voltage is always supplied to the memory modules as long as the
computer is plugged into an active AC outlet. Adding or removing memory modules while voltage is
present may cause irreparable damage to the memory modules or system board.
The memory module sockets have gold-plated metal contacts. When upgrading the memory, it is
important to use memory modules with gold-plated metal contacts to prevent corrosion and/or
oxidation resulting from having incompatible metals in contact with each other.
Static electricity can damage the electronic components of the computer or optional cards. Before
beginning these procedures, ensure that you are discharged of static electricity by briefly touching a
grounded metal object.
When handling a memory module, be careful not to touch any of the contacts. Doing so may damage
the module.
1.
Prepare the computer for disassembly (Preparation for Disassembly on page 30).
2.
Remove the access panel (Computer Access Panel on page 38).
3.
Locate the memory module sockets on the system board.
WARNING! To reduce risk of personal injury from hot surfaces, allow the internal system
components to cool before touching.
4.
If you are adding a second SODIMM, remove the SODIMM from the top XMM1 socket to access
the bottom XMM3 socket. Press outward on the two latches on each side of the SODIMM (1)
then pull the SODIMM out of the socket (2).
Figure 6-15 Removing a SODIMM
Installing Additional Memory
43
5.
Slide the new SODIMM into the socket at approximately a 30° angle (1) then press the SODIMM
down (2) so that the latches lock it in place.
Figure 6-16 Installing a SODIMM
NOTE: A memory module can be installed in only one way. Match the notch on the module
with the tab on the memory socket.
A SODIMM must occupy the XMM1 (top) socket.
6.
Replace the SODIMM in the DIMM1 socket if it was removed.
7.
Replace the access panel.
8.
If the computer was on a stand, replace the stand.
9.
Reconnect the power cord and turn on the computer.
10. Lock any security devices that were disengaged when the computer cover or access panel was
removed.
The computer automatically recognizes the additional memory when you turn on the computer.
44
Chapter 6 Removal and Replacement Procedures
Cable Management
Always follow good cable management practices when working inside the computer.
●
Keep cables away from major heat sources like the heat sink.
●
Do not jam cables on top of expansion cards or memory modules. Printed circuit cards like these
are not designed to take excessive pressure on them.
●
Keep cables clear of sliding or moveable parts to prevent their being cut or crimped when the
parts are moved.
●
Do not bend any cable sharply. A sharp bend can break the internal wires.
●
Never bend a SATA data cable tighter than a 30 mm (1.18 in) radius.
●
Never crease a SATA data cable.
●
Do not rely on components like the drive cage, power supply, or computer cover to push cables
down into the chassis. Always position the cables to lay properly by themselves.
System board connectors are color-coded to make it easier to find the proper connection.
Connector Name
Connector Color
Description
CHFAN
Maroon
Front chassis fan
CHFAN2
Brown
Rear chassis fan
SPKR
White
Internal speaker
SATA0
Black
Hard drive data and power
SATA1
White
Optical drive data
SATA PWR1
White
Optical drive power
Cable Management
45
Replacing the Optical Drive
The Ultra-Slim Desktop uses a slimline Serial ATA (SATA) optical drive.
Removing the Existing Optical Drive
1.
Prepare the computer for disassembly (Preparation for Disassembly on page 30).
2.
If the computer is on a stand, remove the computer from the stand and lay the computer down.
3.
Remove the computer access panel (Computer Access Panel on page 38).
4.
Disconnect the cable on the rear of the optical drive (1), push the green release latch on the right
rear side of the drive toward the center of the drive (2), then slide the drive forward and out of
the bay through the front bezel (3).
Figure 6-17 Removing the Optical Drive
46
Chapter 6 Removal and Replacement Procedures
Preparing the New Optical Drive
Before the new optical drive can be used, the release latch must be attached.
1.
Peel the backing off the adhesive on the release latch.
2.
Without allowing the release latch to touch the optical drive, carefully align the holes on the
release latch with the pins on the side of the optical drive. Make sure the release latch is
oriented properly.
3.
Insert the pin at the front of the optical drive into the hole at the end of the release latch, and
press firmly.
4.
Insert the second pin, and press the entire release latch firmly to fasten the latch securely to the
optical drive.
Figure 6-18 Aligning the Release Latch
Replacing the Optical Drive
47
Installing the New Optical Drive
NOTE: If you are installing an optical drive in a bay that did not previously have a drive in it, you
must remove the access panel and the bezel blank covering the opening of the bay before
proceeding. Follow the procedures in Computer Access Panel on page 38 and Bezel Blank
on page 40.
1.
Attach the release latch to the new optical drive. Refer to Preparing the New Optical Drive
on page 47.
2.
With the back of the optical drive facing the computer and the release latch on the inner side of
the drive, align the drive with the opening in the front bezel.
3.
Slide the optical drive through the front bezel all the way into the bay so that it locks in place (1),
then connect the cable to the rear of the drive (2).
Figure 6-19 Installing the Optical Drive
48
Chapter 6 Removal and Replacement Procedures
Hard Drive
NOTE: The Ultra-Slim Desktop supports only 2.5-inch Serial ATA (SATA) internal hard drives;
parallel ATA (PATA) internal hard drives are not supported.
Before you remove the old hard drive, be sure to back up the data from the old hard drive so that you
can transfer the data to the new hard drive.
The 2.5-inch hard drive is enclosed in a carrier under the optical drive.
1.
Prepare the computer for disassembly (Preparation for Disassembly on page 30).
2.
If the computer is on a stand, remove the computer from the stand and lay the computer down.
3.
Remove the computer access panel (Computer Access Panel on page 38).
4.
Remove the optical drive. Refer to Removing the Existing Optical Drive on page 46 for
instructions.
5.
Press in the release latch on the left side of the hard drive carrier (1) then rotate the carrier
handle to the right (2).
Figure 6-20 Unlocking the Hard Drive Carrier
Hard Drive
49
6.
Lift the hard drive carrier straight up and out of the chassis.
Figure 6-21 Removing the Hard Drive Carrier
7.
Remove the four guide screws from the sides of the hard drive carrier.
Figure 6-22 Removing the Guide Screws
8.
Lift the hard drive up to the top of the carrier (1) and slide the drive out of the carrier (2).
Figure 6-23 Removing the Hard Drive from the Carrier
50
Chapter 6 Removal and Replacement Procedures
9.
Position the hard drive so that the top of the hard drive is up against the top of the carrier (1) so
that the circuit board on the bottom of the hard drive does not come in contact wit the tabs on the
bottom of the carrier, then slide the new hard drive into the carrier (2).
CAUTION: Do not allow the circuit board on the bottom of the hard drive to scrape along the
tabs on the bottom of the carrier when sliding the hard drive into the carrier. Doing so can cause
irreparable damage to the hard drive.
Figure 6-24 Sliding the Hard Drive into the Carrier
10. Set the hard drive down into the bottom of the carrier (1), then replace the four guide screws on
the sides of the carrier to secure the drive in the carrier (2).
Figure 6-25 Lowering the Hard Drive and Replacing the Guide Screws
Hard Drive
51
11. To place the hard drive carrier back in the chassis, align the guide screws with the slots on the
drive bay, drop the carrier straight down into the drive bay (1), and press the handle on the
carrier all the way down (2) so that the drive is properly seated and locked in place.
Figure 6-26 Installing the Hard Drive Carrier
12. Replace the optical drive and reconnect the cable on the back of the optical drive.
13. Replace the computer access panel.
14. If the computer was on a stand, replace the stand.
15. Reconnect the power cord and turn on the computer.
16. Lock any security devices that were disengaged when the computer cover or access panel was
removed.
NOTE: No configuration of the SATA hard drive is necessary; the computer automatically
recognizes it the next time you turn on the computer.
52
Chapter 6 Removal and Replacement Procedures
Hard Drive Cage
The drive cage sits behind the USB ports on the front of the chassis.
1.
Prepare the computer for disassembly (Preparation for Disassembly on page 30).
2.
Remove the computer access panel (Computer Access Panel on page 38).
3.
Remove the optical drive and connector (Removing the Existing Optical Drive on page 46).
4.
Remove the hard drive (Hard Drive on page 49).
5.
Remove the two Torx T15 screws that secure the cage to the chassis (1), lift the tab (2) on the
hard drive cage, slide the cage toward the rear of the unit (3), and then pull the cage up and out
of the chassis.
Figure 6-27 Removing the hard drive cage
To install the hard drive cage, reverse the removal procedures.
Hard Drive Cage
53
Port Cover
An optional rear port cover is available for the computer.
To install the port cover:
1.
Thread the cables through the bottom hole on the port cover (1) and connect the cables to the
rear ports on the computer.
2.
Insert the hooks on the port cover into the slots on the rear of the chassis, then slide the cover to
the right to secure it in place (2).
Figure 6-28 Installing a Port Cover
NOTE: For security purposes, you can install an optional cable lock to the chassis that locks the
port cover and secures the computer. See Installing a Security Lock on page 32.
The port cover is secured in place by a retention lever just inside the port cover opening. To remove
the port cover, pull the lever back towards the port cover opening (1), then slide the cover to the left
and off the computer (2).
Figure 6-29 Removing a Port Cover
54
Chapter 6 Removal and Replacement Procedures
Front Fan
The front fan sits against the front on the left side of the chassis.
1.
Prepare the computer for disassembly (Preparation for Disassembly on page 30).
2.
Remove the computer access panel (Computer Access Panel on page 38).
3.
Disconnect the fan control cable from the red system board connector labeled CHFAN.
4.
Tilt the fan slightly toward the rear of the computer, and then lift the fan straight up and out of the
chassis.
Figure 6-30 Removing the front fan
To install the front fan, reverse the removal procedure.
Front Fan
55
Card Reader
The card reader is secured to the front right corner of the chassis.
1.
Prepare the computer for disassembly (Preparation for Disassembly on page 30).
2.
Remove the computer access panel (Computer Access Panel on page 38).
3.
Remove the front bezel (Front Bezel on page 39).
4.
Disconnect the cable from the black system board connector labeled MEDIA.
5.
On the outside of the chassis, remove the one torx T15 screw that secures the card reader to
the chassis.
Figure 6-31 Removing the card reader
6.
Pull the reader away from the front of the chassis while threading the cable through the slot in
the front of the chassis.
To install the card reader, reverse the removal procedure.
56
Chapter 6 Removal and Replacement Procedures
Speaker
The speaker is secured to the front of the chassis between the fan and the I/O ports.
1.
Prepare the computer for disassembly (Preparation for Disassembly on page 30).
2.
Remove the computer access panel (Computer Access Panel on page 38).
3.
Remove the front bezel (Front Bezel on page 39).
4.
Disconnect the speaker cable from the white system board connector labeled SPKR.
5.
From the outside of the chassis, remove the two torx T8 screws that secure the speaker to the
chassis, and then from the inside of the chassis, slide the speaker up and lift it out.
Figure 6-32 Removing the speaker
To install the speaker, reverse the removal procedure.
Speaker
57
Heat sink
The heat sink is secured by four Torx T15 screws. It does not have an attached fan.
1.
Prepare the computer for disassembly (Preparation for Disassembly on page 30).
2.
Remove the computer access panel (Computer Access Panel on page 38).
3.
Lift the front fan up and place it on top of the optical drive to access the front bezel release tabs.
You do not need to disconnect the fan cable from the system board.
4.
Loosen the four Torx T15 screws that secure the heat sink to the system board, and then lift the
heat sink from the system board.
Figure 6-33 Removing the heat sink
CAUTION: Heat sink retaining screws should be removed in diagonally opposite pairs (as in
an X) to even the downward forces on the processor to avoid damage that could require
replacing the system board.
5.
Lay the heat sink on its top in a safe area to prevent the thermal grease from contaminating the
work surface.
If reusing the existing heat sink go to step 1.
If using a new heat sink, go to step 3.
58
1.
If reusing the existing heat sink, clean bottom of the heat sink and apply the thermal grease
provided in the spares kit to the top of the processor.
2.
Position the heat sink atop the processor.
3.
If using a new heat sink, remove the protective covering from the bottom of the heat sink and
place it in position atop the processor.
4.
Secure the heat sink to the system board and system board tray with the 4 captive screws and
attach the heat sink control cable and the thermal sensor cable to the system board.
Chapter 6 Removal and Replacement Procedures
CAUTION: Heat sink retaining screws should be tightened in diagonally opposite pairs (as in
an X) to evenly seat the heat sink on the processor. This is especially important as the pins on
the socket are very fragile and any damage to them may require replacing the system board.
Processor
1.
Prepare the computer for disassembly (Preparation for Disassembly on page 30).
2.
Remove the computer access panel (Computer Access Panel on page 38).
3.
Remove the heat sink (Heat sink on page 58).
4.
Rotate the processor locking lever to its full open position (1).
5.
Raise and rotate the microprocessor retainer to its fully open position (2).
6.
Carefully lift the processor from the socket (3).
CAUTION: Do NOT handle the pins in the processor socket. These pins are very fragile and
handling them could cause irreparable damage. Once pins are damaged it may be necessary to
replace the system board.
The heat sink must be installed within 24 hours of installing the processor to prevent damage to
the processor’s solder connections.
Figure 6-34 Removing the processor
To install a new processor:
1.
Place the processor in its socket and close the retainer.
2.
Secure the locking lever.
If reusing the existing heat sink, go to step 3.
If using a new heat sink, go to step 5.
3.
If reusing the existing heat sink, clean bottom of the heat sink and apply the thermal grease
provided in the spares kit to the top of the processor.
Processor
59
4.
Position the heat sink atop the processor.
5.
If using a new heat sink, remove the protective covering from the bottom of the heat sink and
place it in position atop the processor.
6.
Secure the heat sink to the system board and system board tray with the 4 captive screws and
attach the heat sink control cable to the system board.
CAUTION: Heat sink retaining screws should be tightened in diagonally opposite pairs (as in
an X) to evenly seat the heat sink on the processor. This is especially important as the pins on
the socket are very fragile and any damage to them may require replacing the system board.
NOTE: After installing a new processor onto the system board, always update the system ROM to
ensure that the latest version of the BIOS is being used on the computer. The latest system BIOS can
be found on the Web at: http://h18000.www1.hp.com/support/files.
60
Chapter 6 Removal and Replacement Procedures
System Board
CAUTION: Be very careful when removing or replacing the system board to prevent damaging it.
1.
Prepare the computer for disassembly (Preparation for Disassembly on page 30).
2.
Remove the computer access panel (Computer Access Panel on page 38).
3.
Remove the front bezel (Front Bezel on page 39).
4.
Remove the optical drive (Removing the Existing Optical Drive on page 46).
5.
Remove the memory modules (Installing Additional Memory on page 41).
6.
Remove the front fan (Front Fan on page 55).
7.
Remove the hard drive (Hard Drive on page 49).
8.
Remove the heat sink (Heat sink on page 58).
9.
Remove the hard drive cage (Hard Drive Cage on page 53).
10. Remove the front I/O panel cage:
a.
Remove the screw from the right side of the cage that secures the I/O panel cage to the
front of the chassis (1).
b.
Press the tab on right side of the cage (2), and then swing the right side of the cage away
from the chassis to remove it (3).
NOTE: If the cage sticks and will not come loose, press down on the top of the panel near
the tab while pressing the tab.
Figure 6-35 Removing the I/O panel cage
11. Remove the heat sink (Heat sink on page 58).
12. Disconnect all cables connected to the system board, noting their location for reinstallation.
System Board
61
13. Remove the three remaining screws that secure the system board to the chassis.
Figure 6-36 Removing the system board
14. Slide system board toward the front of the unit until the rear connectors are clear of their slots in
the chassis.
15. Lift the rear of the system board until it clears the chassis, and then remove the system board
from the chassis.
To install the system board, reverse the removal procedure.
NOTE:
BIOS.
When replacing the system board, you must also change the chassis serial number in the
Rear Fan
The rear fan is secured to the rear right corner of the chassis. You must remove the system board
before you can remove the rear fan.
62
1.
Prepare the computer for disassembly (Preparation for Disassembly on page 30).
2.
Remove the computer access panel (Computer Access Panel on page 38).
3.
Remove the front bezel (Front Bezel on page 39).
4.
Remove the optical drive (Removing the Existing Optical Drive on page 46).
5.
Remove the memory modules (Installing Additional Memory on page 41).
6.
Remove the front fan (Front Fan on page 55).
7.
Remove the hard drive (Hard Drive on page 49).
8.
Remove the heat sink (Heat sink on page 58).
Chapter 6 Removal and Replacement Procedures
9.
Remove the hard drive cage (Hard Drive Cage on page 53).
10. Remove the system board (System Board on page 61).
11. Disconnect the fan control cable from the red/brown system board connector labeled CHFAN2.
12. From the outside of the chassis, remove the four Phillips screws that secure the fan to the
chassis, then from the inside of the chassis, slide the fan forward and lift it up and out of the
chassis.
Figure 6-37 Removing the rear fan
To install the rear fan, reverse the removal procedure.
Battery
The battery that comes with your computer provides power to the real-time clock and has a lifetime of
about three years. When replacing the battery, use a battery equivalent to the battery originally
installed on the computer. The computer comes with a 3-volt lithium coin cell battery.
NOTE: The lifetime of the lithium battery can be extended by plugging the computer into a live AC
wall socket. The lithium battery is only used when the computer is NOT connected to AC power.
WARNING! This computer contains an internal lithium manganese dioxide battery. There is a risk of
fire and burns if the battery is not handled properly. To reduce the risk of personal injury:
Do not attempt to recharge the battery.
Do not expose to temperatures higher than 140°F (60°C).
Do not disassemble, crush, puncture, short external contacts, or dispose of in fire or water.
Replace the battery only with the HP spare designated for this product.
CAUTION: Before replacing the battery, it is important to back up the computer CMOS settings.
When the battery is removed or replaced, the CMOS settings will be cleared. Refer to Computer
Setup (F10) Utility on page 6 for information on backing up the CMOS settings.
NOTE: HP encourages customers to recycle used electronic hardware, HP original print cartridges,
and rechargeable batteries. For more information about recycling programs, go to http://www.hp.com/
recycle.
Battery
63
CAUTION: Static electricity can damage the electronic components of the computer or optional
equipment. Before beginning these procedures, ensure that you are discharged of static electricity by
briefly touching a grounded metal object.
1.
Prepare the computer for disassembly (Preparation for Disassembly on page 30).
2.
Remove the computer access panel (Computer Access Panel on page 38).
3.
Pull back on the clip (1) that holds the battery in place, then remove the battery (2).
4.
Insert the new battery and position the clip back in place.
Figure 6-38 Removing the battery
64
5.
After the battery has been replaced, reverse the disassembly procedure.
6.
Plug in the computer and turn on power to the computer.
7.
Reset the date and time, your passwords, and any special system setups, using Computer
Setup. Refer to the Computer Setup (F10) Utility Guide.
Chapter 6 Removal and Replacement Procedures
Changing from Desktop to Tower Configuration
1.
Prepare the computer for disassembly (Preparation for Disassembly on page 30).
2.
Place the computer firmly down into the stand.
Figure 6-39 Placing the Computer on the Stand
3.
Reconnect the external equipment, plug the power cord into a power outlet, and turn the
computer on.
4.
Lock any security devices that were disengaged when the computer cover or access panel was
removed.
To change from the tower configuration to the desktop configuration, reverse the previous steps.
NOTE: An optional Quick Release mounting bracket is available from HP for mounting the computer
to a wall, desk, or swing arm.
Changing from Desktop to Tower Configuration
65
Power Supply, External
The USDT chassis uses an external power supply.
WARNING! To reduce potential safety issues, only the power supply provided with the computer, a
replacement power supply provided by HP, or a power supply purchased as an accessory from HP
should be used with the computer.
66
Chapter 6 Removal and Replacement Procedures
A
Connector Pin Assignments
This appendix contains the pin assignments for many computer and workstation connectors. Some of
these connectors may not be used on the product being serviced.
Keyboard
Connector and Icon
Pin
Signal
1
Data
2
Unused
3
Ground
4
+5 VDC
5
Clock
6
Unused
Pin
Signal
1
Data
2
Unused
3
Ground
4
+5 VDC
5
Clock
6
Unused
Pin
Signal
1
Data
2
Ground
Mouse
Connector and Icon
Ethernet BNC
Connector and Icon
Keyboard
67
Ethernet RJ-45
Connector and Icon
Pin
Signal
1
(+) Transmit Data
2
(-) Transmit Data
3
(+) Receive Data
4
Unused
5
Unused
6
(-) Receive Data
7
Unused
8
Unused
Serial Interface, Powered and Non-Powered
Connector and Icon
Pin
Signal
1
Carrier Detect (12V if powered)
2
Receive Data
3
Transmit Data
4
Data Terminal Ready
5
Signal Ground
6
Data Set Ready
7
Request to Send
8
Clear to Send
9
Ring Indicator (5V if powered)
Pin
Signal
1
+5 VDC
2
- Data
3
+ Data
4
Ground
USB
Connector and Icon
68
Appendix A Connector Pin Assignments
Microphone
Connector and Icon (1/8” miniphone)
1 2 3
Pin
Signal
1 (Tip)
Audio_left
2 (Ring)
Power_Right
3 (Shield)
Audio_right
Pin
Signal
1 (Tip)
Audio_left
2 (Ring)
Power_Right
3 (Shield)
Ground
Pin
Signal
1 (Tip)
Audio_In_Left
2 (Ring)
Audio_In_Right
3 (Shield)
Ground
Pin
Signal
1 (Tip)
Audio_Out_Left
2 (Ring)
Audio_Out_Right
3 (Shield)
Ground
Headphone
Connector and Icon (1/8” miniphone)
1 2 3
Line-in Audio
Connector and Icon (1/8” miniphone)
1 2 3
Line-out Audio
Connector and Icon (1/8” miniphone)
1 2 3
Microphone
69
Monitor
Connector and Icon
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1
Red Analog
9
+5V (fused)
2
Green Analog
10
Ground
3
Blue Analog
11
Not used
4
Not used
12
DDC Serial Data
5
Ground
13
Horizontal Sync
6
Ground
14
Vertical Sync
7
Ground
15
DDC Serial Clock
8
Ground
DisplayPort
Connector and Icon
TOP ROW
BOTTOM ROW
Pin
Signal Type
Pin Name
Pin
Signal Type
Pin Name
1
Ground
GND
2
In
Hot Plug Detect
3
Out
ML Lane 0 (p)
4
CONFIG
CONFIG 1
5
Out
ML Lane 0 (n)
6
CONFIG
CONFIG 2
7
Ground
GND
8
GND
GND
9
Out
ML Lane 1 (p)
10
Out
ML Lane 3 (p)
Ground
70
11
Out
ML Lane 1 (n)
12
Out
ML Lane 3 (n)
13
Ground
GND
14
GND
GND
15
Out
ML Lane 2 (p)
16
I/O
AUX CH (p)
17
Out
ML Lane 2 (n)
18
I/O
AUX CH (n)
19
Ground
GND
20
PWR Out
DP_PWR
Appendix A Connector Pin Assignments
4-Pin Power (for CPU)
Connector and Icon
Pin
Signal
1
GND
2
GND
3
+12V CPU
4
-12V CPU
Pin
Signal
1
GND
2
GND
3
GND
4
12V CPU
5
12V CPU
6
+12V
6-Pin Power (for CPU) (CMT, SFF)
Connector and Icon
6
4
SATA Data and Power
Drive Connector
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
S1
Ground
S2
A+
S3
A-
S4
Ground
S5
B-
S6
B+
S7
Ground
P1
Ground
P2
V 3.3
P3
V 3.3
P4
Ground
P5
B-
P6
Ground
P7
V5
P8
V5
P9
V5
P10
Ground
P11
Reserved
P12
Ground
P13
V 12
P14
V12
P15
V 12
S = Data, P = Power
4-Pin Power (for CPU)
71
PCI Express
x1, x4, x8, and x16 PCI Express Connector
Pin A
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1
PRSNT1
6
JTAG3
11
PERST#
16
PERp0
21
PERp1
2
+12V
7
JTAG4
12
GND
17
PERn0
22
PERn1
3
+12V
8
JTAG5
13
REFCLK+
18
GND
23
GND
4
GND
9
+3.3V
14
REFCLK-
19
RSVD
24
GND
5
JTAG2
10
+3.3V
15
GND
20
GND
25
PERp2
26
PERn(2)
31
GND
36
PERn4
41
GND
46
GND
27
GND
32
RSVD
37
GND
42
GND
47
PERp7
28
GND
33
RSVD
38
GND
43
PERp6
48
PERn7
29
PERp3
34
GND
39
PERp5
44
PERn6
49
GND
30
PERn3
35
PERp4
40
PERn5
45
GND
50
RSVD
51
GND
56
PERp9
61
PERn10
66
GND
71
GND
52
PERp8
57
PERn9
62
GND
67
GND
72
PERp13
53
PERN8
58
GND
63
GND
68
PERp12
73
PERn13
54
GND
59
GND
64
PERp11
69
PERn12
74
GND
55
GND
60
PERp10
65
PERn11
70
GND
75
GND
76
PERp14
81
PERn15
77
PERn14
82
GND
78
GND
79
GND
80
PERp15
NOTE: x1 PCI Express uses pins 1-18
x4 PCI Express uses pins 1-32
x8 PCI Express uses pins 1-49
x16 PCI Express uses pins 1-8
72
Appendix A Connector Pin Assignments
PCI Express
x1, x4, x8, and x16 PCI Express Connector
Pin B
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1
+12V
6
SMDAT
11
WAKE#
16
GND
21
GND
2
+12V
7
GND
12
RSVD
17
GND
22
GND
3
RSVD
8
+3.3 V
13
GND
18
GND
23
PETp2
4
GND
9
JTAG1
14
PETp0
19
PETp1
24
PETn2
5
SMCLK
10
3.3vAux
15
PETn0
20
PETn1
25
GND
26
GND
31
PRSNT2#
36
GND
41
PETp6
46
PETn7
27
PETp3
32
GND
37
PETp5
42
PRTn6
47
GND
28
PETn3
33
PETp4
38
PETn5
43
GND
48
PRSNT2#
29
GND
34
PETn4
39
GND
44
GND
49
GND
30
RSVD
35
GND
40
GND
45
PETp7
50
PETp8
51
PETn8
56
GND
61
GND
66
PETp12
71
PETn13
52
GND
57
GND
62
PETp11
67
PETn12
72
GND
53
GND
58
PETp10
63
PETn11
68
GND
73
GND
54
PETp9
59
PETn10
64
GND
69
GND
74
PETp14
55
PETn9
60
GND
65
GND
70
PETp13
75
PETn14
76
GND
81
PRSNT2#
77
GND
82
RSVD
78
PETp15
79
PETn15
80
GND
NOTE: x1 PCI Express uses pins 1-18
x4 PCI Express uses pins 1-32
x8 PCI Express uses pins 1-49
x16 PCI Express uses pins 1-8
PCI Express
73
B
Power Cord Set Requirements
The power supplies on some computers have external power switches. The voltage select switch
feature on the computer permits it to operate from any line voltage between 100-120 or 220-240 volts
AC. Power supplies on those computers that do not have external power switches are equipped with
internal switches that sense the incoming voltage and automatically switch to the proper voltage.
The power cord set received with the computer meets the requirements for use in the country where
you purchased the equipment.
Power cord sets for use in other countries must meet the requirements of the country where you use
the computer.
General Requirements
The requirements listed below are applicable to all countries:
1.
The power cord must be approved by an acceptable accredited agency responsible for
evaluation in the country where the power cord set will be installed.
2.
The power cord set must have a minimum current capacity of 10A (7A Japan only) and a
nominal voltage rating of 125 or 250 volts AC, as required by each country’s power system.
3.
The diameter of the wire must be a minimum of 0.75 mm2 or 18AWG, and the length of the cord
must be between 1.8 m (6 feet) and 3.6 m (12 feet).
The power cord should be routed so that it is not likely to be walked on or pinched by items placed
upon it or against it. Particular attention should be paid to the plug, electrical outlet, and the point
where the cord exits from the product.
WARNING! Do not operate this product with a damaged power cord set. If the power cord set is
damaged in any manner, replace it immediately.
Japanese Power Cord Requirements
For use in Japan, use only the power cord received with this product.
CAUTION: Do not use the power cord received with this product on any other products.
74
Appendix B Power Cord Set Requirements
Country-Specific Requirements
Additional requirements specific to a country are shown in parentheses and explained below.
Country
Accrediting Agency
Country
Accrediting Agency
Australia (1)
EANSW
Italy (1)
IMQ
Austria (1)
OVE
Japan (3)
METI
Belgium (1)
CEBC
Norway (1)
NEMKO
Canada (2)
CSA
Sweden (1)
SEMKO
Denmark (1)
DEMKO
Switzerland (1)
SEV
Finland (1)
SETI
United Kingdom (1)
BSI
France (1)
UTE
United States (2)
UL
Germany (1)
VDE
1.
The flexible cord must be Type HO5VV-F, 3-conductor, 0.75mm2 conductor size. Power cord set fittings (appliance
coupler and wall plug) must bear the certification mark of the agency responsible for evaluation in the country where it
will be used.
2.
The flexible cord must be Type SVT or equivalent, No. 18 AWG, 3-conductor. The wall plug must be a two-pole
grounding type with a NEMA 5-15P (15A, 125V) or NEMA 6-15P (15A, 250V) configuration.
3.
Appliance coupler, flexible cord, and wall plug must bear a “T” mark and registration number in accordance with the
Japanese Dentori Law. Flexible cord must be Type VCT or VCTF, 3-conductor, 0.75 mm2 conductor size. Wall plug
must be a two-pole grounding type with a Japanese Industrial Standard C8303 (7A, 125V) configuration.
Country-Specific Requirements
75
C
Backup and Recovery
Windows 7 – Backup and Recovery
To protect your information, use Windows Backup and Restore to back up individual files and folders,
back up your entire hard drive (select models only), create system repair discs (select models only),
or create system restore points. In case of system failure, you can use the backup files to restore the
contents of your computer.
Windows Backup and Restore provides the following options:
●
Creating a system repair disc (select models only)
●
Backing up individual files and folders
●
Creating a system image (select models only)
●
Scheduling automatic backups (select models only)
●
Creating system restore points
●
Recovering individual files
●
Restoring the computer to a previous state
●
Recovering information using recovery tools
NOTE:
For detailed instructions, perform a search for these topics in Help and Support.
NOTE: In case of system instability, HP recommends that you print the recovery procedures and
save them for later use.
Backing up your information
Recovery after a system failure is as complete as your most current backup. You should create
system repair discs (select models only) and your initial backup immediately after software setup. As
you add new software and data files, you should continue to back up your system on a regular basis
to maintain a reasonably current backup. The system repair discs (select models only) are used to
start up (boot) the computer and repair the operating system in case of system instability or failure.
Your initial and subsequent backups allow you to restore your data and settings if a failure occurs.
You can back up your information to an optional external hard drive, a network drive, or discs.
Note the following when backing up:
76
●
Store personal files in the Documents library, and back it up regularly.
●
Back up templates that are stored in their associated programs.
Appendix C Backup and Recovery
●
Save customized settings that appear in a window, toolbar, or menu bar by taking a screen shot
of your settings. The screen shot can be a time-saver if you have to reset your preferences.
To create a screen shot:
1.
Display the screen you want to save.
2.
Copy the screen image:
To copy only the active window, press Alt+Print Scrn.
To copy the entire screen, press Print Scrn.
3.
Open a word-processing document, and then select Edit > Paste.
The screen image is added to the document.
4.
●
Save the document.
When backing up to discs, use any of the following types of discs (purchased separately): CD-R,
CD-RW, DVD+R, DVD+R DL, DVD-R, DVD-R DL, or DVD±RW. The discs you use will depend
on the type of optical drive installed in your computer.
NOTE: DVDs and DVDs with double-layer (DL) support store more information than CDs, so
using them for backup reduces the number of recovery discs required.
●
When backing up to discs, number each disc before inserting it into the optical drive of the
computer.
To create a backup using Backup and Restore, follow these steps:
NOTE: The backup process may take over an hour, depending on file size and the speed of the
computer.
1.
Select Start > All Programs > Maintenance > Backup and Restore.
2.
Follow the on-screen instructions to set up your backup, create a system image (select models
only), or create a system repair disc (select models only).
NOTE: Windows includes the User Account Control feature to improve the security of your
computer. You may be prompted for your permission or password for tasks such as installing
software, running utilities, or changing Windows settings. Refer to Help and Support for more
information.
Performing a recovery
In case of system failure or instability, the computer provides the following tools to recover your files:
●
Windows recovery tools: You can use Windows Backup and Restore to recover information you
have previously backed up. You can also use Windows Startup Repair to fix problems that might
prevent Windows from starting correctly.
●
F11 recovery tools: You can use the F11 recovery tools to recover your original hard drive
image. The image includes the Windows operating system and software programs installed at
the factory.
Windows 7 – Backup and Recovery
77
NOTE: If you are unable to boot (start up) your computer and you cannot use the system repair
discs you previously created (select models only), you must purchase a Windows 7 operating system
DVD to reboot the computer and repair the operating system. For additional information, refer to the
“Using a Windows 7 operating system DVD (purchased separately)” section in this guide.
Using the Windows recovery tools
To recover information you previously backed up, follow these steps:
1.
Select Start > All Programs > Maintenance > Backup and Restore.
2.
Follow the on-screen instructions to recover your system settings, your computer (select models
only), or your files.
NOTE: Windows includes the User Account Control feature to improve the security of your
computer. You may be prompted for your permission or password for tasks such as installing
software, running utilities, or changing Windows settings. Refer to Help and Support for more
information.
To recover your information using Startup Repair, follow these steps:
CAUTION: Using Startup Repair completely erases hard drive contents and reformats the hard
drive. All files you have created and any software installed on the computer are permanently
removed. When reformatting is complete, the recovery process restores the operating system, as well
as the drivers, software, and utilities from the backup used for recovery.
1.
If possible, back up all personal files.
2.
If possible, check for the presence of the Windows partition and the HP Recovery partition.
To check for the Windows partition, select Start > Computer.
To check for the HP Recovery partition, select Start, right-click Computer, click Manage, and
then click Disk Management.
NOTE: If the Windows partition and the HP Recovery partition are not listed, you must recover
your operating system and programs using the Windows 7 operating system DVD and the Driver
Recovery disc (both purchased separately). For additional information, refer to the “Using a
Windows 7 operating system DVD (purchased separately)” section in this guide.
3.
If the Windows partition and the HP Recovery partition are listed, restart the computer, and then
press F8 before the Windows operating system loads.
4.
Select Startup Repair.
5.
Follow the on-screen instructions.
NOTE: For additional information on recovering information using the Windows tools, perform a
search for these topics in Help and Support.
Using F11
CAUTION: Using F11 completely erases hard drive contents and reformats the hard drive. All files
you have created and any software installed on the computer are permanently removed. The F11
recovery tool reinstalls the operating system and HP programs and drivers that were installed at the
factory. Software not installed at the factory must be reinstalled.
78
Appendix C Backup and Recovery
To recover the original hard drive image using F11, follow these steps:
1.
If possible, back up all personal files.
2.
If possible, check for the presence of the HP Recovery partition: select Start, right-click
Computer, click Manage, and then click Disk Management.
NOTE: If the HP Recovery partition is not listed, you must recover your operating system and
programs using the Windows 7 operating system DVD and the Driver Recovery disc (both
purchased separately). For additional information, refer to the “Using a Windows 7 operating
system DVD (purchased separately)” section in this guide.
3.
Turn on or restart the computer, and then press F11 while the “<F11 = Recovery>” message is
displayed at the bottom of the screen.
4.
Follow the on-screen instructions.
Using a Windows 7 operating system DVD (purchased separately)
If you are unable to boot (start up) your computer and you cannot use the system repair discs you
previously created (select models only), you must purchase a Windows 7 operating system DVD to
reboot the computer and repair the operating system. Make sure that your most recent backup
(stored on discs or on an external drive) is easily accessible.
CAUTION: Using a Windows 7 operating system DVD completely erases hard drive contents and
reformats the hard drive. All files you have created and any software installed on the computer are
permanently removed. When reformatting is complete, the recovery process helps you restore the
operating system, as well as drivers, software, and utilities.
To initiate recovery using a Windows 7 operating system DVD, follow these steps:
NOTE:
This process takes several minutes.
1.
If possible, back up all personal files.
2.
Restart the computer, and then insert the Windows 7 operating system DVD into the optical
drive before the Windows operating system loads.
3.
When prompted, press any keyboard key.
4.
Follow the on-screen instructions.
5.
Click Next.
6.
Select Repair your computer.
7.
Follow the on-screen instructions.
Windows 7 – Backup and Recovery
79
Windows Vista – Backup and Recovery
To protect your information, use the Backup and Restore Center to back up individual files and
folders, back up your entire hard drive (select models only), or create system restore points. In case
of system failure, you can use the backup files to restore the contents of your computer.
The Backup and Restore Center provides the following options:
●
Backing up individual files and folders
●
Backing up the entire hard drive (select models only)
●
Scheduling automatic backups (select models only)
●
Creating system restore points
●
Recovering individual files
●
Restoring the computer to a previous state
●
Recovering information using recovery tools
NOTE:
For detailed instructions, perform a search for these topics in Help and Support.
NOTE: In case of system instability, HP recommends that you print the recovery procedures and
save them for later use.
Backing up your information
Recovery after a system failure is as complete as your most current backup. You should create your
initial backup immediately after software setup. As you add new software and data files, you should
continue to back up your system on a regular basis to maintain a reasonably current backup.
You can back up your information to an optional external hard drive, a network drive, or discs.
Note the following when backing up:
●
Store personal files in the Documents folder, and back it up regularly.
●
Back up templates that are stored in their associated programs.
●
Save customized settings that appear in a window, toolbar, or menu bar by taking a screen shot
of your settings. The screen shot can be a time-saver if you have to reset your preferences.
To create a screen shot:
1.
Display the screen you want to save.
2.
Copy the screen image:
To copy only the active window, press Alt+Print Scrn.
To copy the entire screen, press Print Scrn.
3.
Open a word-processing document, and then select Edit > Paste.
The screen image is added to the document.
4.
80
Save the document.
Appendix C Backup and Recovery
●
When backing up to discs, use any of the following types of discs (purchased separately): CD-R,
CD-RW, DVD+R, DVD+R DL, DVD-R, DVD-R DL, or DVD±RW. The discs you use will depend
on the type of optical drive installed in your computer.
NOTE: DVDs and DVDs with double-layer (DL) support store more information than CDs, so
using them for backup reduces the number of recovery discs required.
●
When backing up to discs, number each disc before inserting it into the optical drive of the
computer.
To create a backup using Backup and Restore Center, follow these steps:
NOTE: The backup process may take over an hour, depending on file size and the speed of the
computer.
1.
Select Start > All Programs > Maintenance > Backup and Restore Center.
2.
Follow the on-screen instructions to back up your entire computer (select models only) or your
files.
NOTE: Windows includes the User Account Control feature to improve the security of your
computer. You may be prompted for your permission or password for tasks such as installing
software, running utilities, or changing Windows settings. Refer to Help and Support for more
information.
Performing a recovery
In case of system failure or instability, the computer provides the following tools to recover your files:
●
Windows recovery tools: You can use the Backup and Restore Center to recover information
you have previously backed up. You can also use Windows Startup Repair to fix problems that
might prevent Windows from starting correctly.
●
F11 recovery tools: You can use the F11 recovery tools to recover your original hard drive
image. The image includes the Windows operating system and software programs installed at
the factory.
NOTE: If you are unable to boot (start up) your computer, you must purchase a Windows Vista
operating system DVD to reboot the computer and repair the operating system. For additional
information, refer to the “Using a Windows Vista operating system DVD (purchased separately)”
section in this guide.
Using the Windows recovery tools
To recover information you previously backed up, follow these steps:
1.
Click Start > All Programs > Maintenance > Backup and Restore Center.
2.
Follow the on-screen instructions to recover your entire computer (select models only) or your
files.
NOTE: Windows includes the User Account Control feature to improve the security of your
computer. You may be prompted for your permission or password for tasks such as installing
software, running utilities, or changing Windows settings. Refer to Help and Support for more
information.
To recover your information using Startup Repair, follow these steps:
Windows Vista – Backup and Recovery
81
CAUTION: Using Startup Repair completely erases hard drive contents and reformats the hard
drive. All files you have created and any software installed on the computer are permanently
removed. When reformatting is complete, the recovery process restores the operating system, as well
as the drivers, software, and utilities from the backup used for recovery.
1.
If possible, back up all personal files.
2.
If possible, check for the presence of the Windows partition and the HP Recovery partition. To
find the partitions, select Start > Computer.
NOTE: If the Windows partition and the HP Recovery partition have been deleted, you must
recover your operating system and programs using the Windows Vista operating system DVD
and the Driver Recovery disc (both purchased separately). For additional information, refer to
the “Using a Windows Vista operating system DVD (purchased separately)” section in this guide.
3.
Restart the computer, and then press F8 before the Windows operating system loads.
4.
Select Repair your computer.
5.
Follow the on-screen instructions.
NOTE: For additional information on recovering information using the Windows tools, perform a
search for these topics in Help and Support.
Using F11
CAUTION: Using F11 completely erases hard drive contents and reformats the hard drive. All files
you have created and any software installed on the computer are permanently removed. The F11
recovery tool reinstalls the operating system and HP programs and drivers that were installed at the
factory. Software not installed at the factory must be reinstalled.
To recover the original hard drive image using F11, follow these steps:
1.
If possible, back up all personal files.
2.
If possible, check for the presence of the HP Recovery partition: select Start, right-click
Computer, click Manage, and then click Disk Management.
NOTE: If the HP Recovery partition has been deleted, you must recover your operating system
and programs using the Windows Vista operating system DVD and the Driver Recovery disc
(both purchased separately). For additional information, refer to the “Using a Windows Vista
operating system DVD (purchased separately)” section in this guide.
3.
Turn on or restart the computer, and then press F11 while the “<F11 = Recovery>” message is
displayed at the bottom of the screen.
4.
Follow the on-screen instructions.
Using a Windows Vista operating system DVD (purchased separately)
If you are unable to boot (start up) your computer, you must purchase a Windows Vista operating
system DVD to reboot the computer and repair the operating system. Make sure that your most
recent backup (stored on discs or on an external drive) is easily accessible.
CAUTION: Using a Windows Vista operating system DVD completely erases hard drive contents
and reformats the hard drive. All files you have created and any software installed on the computer
are permanently removed. When reformatting is complete, the recovery process helps you restore the
operating system, as well as drivers, software, and utilities.
82
Appendix C Backup and Recovery
To initiate recovery using a Windows Vista operating system DVD, follow these steps:
NOTE:
This process takes several minutes.
1.
If possible, back up all personal files.
2.
Restart the computer, and then insert the Windows Vista operating system DVD into the optical
drive before the Windows operating system loads.
3.
When prompted, press any keyboard key.
4.
Follow the on-screen instructions.
5.
Click Next.
6.
Select Repair your computer.
7.
Follow the on-screen instructions.
Windows Vista – Backup and Recovery
83
D
Computer Diagnostic Features
Hewlett-Packard Vision Diagnostics
NOTE:
HP Vision Diagnostics is included on CD with some computer models only.
The Hewlett-Packard Vision Diagnostics utility allows you to view information about the hardware
configuration of the computer and perform hardware diagnostic tests on the subsystems of the
computer. The utility simplifies the process of effectively identifying, diagnosing, and isolating
hardware issues.
The Survey tab is displayed when you invoke HP Vision Diagnostics. This tab shows the current
configuration of the computer. From the Survey tab, there is access to several categories of
information about the computer. Other tabs provide additional information, including diagnostic test
options and test results. The information in each screen of the utility can be saved as an html file and
stored on a USB flash drive.
Use HP Vision Diagnostics to determine if all the devices installed on the computer are recognized by
the system and functioning properly. Running tests is optional but recommended after installing or
connecting a new device.
You should run tests, save the test results, and print them so that you have printed reports available
before placing a call to the Customer Support Center.
NOTE:
Third party devices may not be detected by HP Vision Diagnostics.
Accessing HP Vision Diagnostics
To access HP Vision Diagnostics, you must create a Recovery Disc Set then boot to the CD
containing the utility. It can also be downloaded from http://www.hp.com and either burned to CD or
installed to a USB flash drive. See Downloading the Latest Version of HP Vision Diagnostics
on page 88 for more information.
NOTE: HP Vision Diagnostics is included as part of the Recovery Disk Set with some computer
models only.
If you have already downloaded HP Vision Diagnostics to either CD or USB Flash drive, then begin
the following procedure at step 2.
84
1.
In Windows Explorer, go to C:\SWSetup\ISOs and burn the file Vision Diagnostics.ISO to a
CD or copy it to a USB flash drive.
2.
While the computer is on, insert the CD in the Optical Drive or USB flash drive in a USB port on
the computer.
3.
Shut down the operating system and turn off the computer.
Appendix D Computer Diagnostic Features
4.
Turn on the computer. The system will boot into HP Vision Diagnostics.
NOTE: If the system does not boot to the CD in the optical drive or to the USB flash drive, you
may need to change the boot order in the Computer Setup (F10) utility.
5.
At the boot menu, select either the HP Vision Diagnostics utility to test the various hardware
components in the computer or the HP Memory Test utility to test memory only.
NOTE: The HP Memory Test is a comprehensive memory diagnostic utility that is run as a
stand-alone application, outside of HP Vision Diagnostics.
6.
If running HP Vision Diagnostics, select the appropriate language and click Continue.
7.
In the End User License Agreement page, select Agree if you agree with the terms. The HP
Vision Diagnostics utility launches with the Survey tab displayed.
Survey Tab
The Survey tab displays important system configuration information.
In the View level field, you can select the Summary view to see limited configuration data or select
the Advanced view to see all the data in the selected category. By default, the View Level is set to
Overview which displays general information about all of the component categories.
In the Category field, you can select the following categories of information to display:
All—Gives a listing of all categories of information about the computer.
Architecture—Provides system BIOS and PCI device information.
Asset Control—Shows product name, system serial number, asset tag and universal unique ID
information.
Audio—Displays information about the audio controllers present in the system, including PCI audio
cards.
Communication—Shows information about the computer parallel (LPT) and serial (COM) port
settings, plus USB and network controller information.
Graphics—Shows information about the graphics controller of the computer.
Input Devices—Shows information about the keyboard, mouse, and other input devices connected
to the computer.
Memory—Shows information about all memory in the computer. This includes memory slots on the
system board and any memory modules installed.
Processors—Shows information about the processor(s) installed in the computer, including clock
speeds and cache sizes.
Storage—Shows information about storage media connected to the computer. This list includes all
hard drives and optical drives.
System—Shows information about the computer model, internal fans, chassis, and BIOS.
Test Tab
The Test tab allows you to choose various parts of the system to test. You can also choose the type
of test and testing mode.
Hewlett-Packard Vision Diagnostics
85
There are three types of tests to choose from:
●
Quick Test—Provides a predetermined script where a sample of each hardware component is
exercised. You may further modify which of the Quick tests are executed by selecting or
deselecting individual tests in the hardware component check list.
●
Complete Test—Provides a predetermined script where each hardware component is fully
tested. You may further modify which of the Complete tests are executed by selecting or
deselecting individual tests in the hardware component check list.
●
Custom Test—Provides the most flexibility in controlling the testing of a system. The Custom
Test mode allows you to specifically select which devices, tests, and test parameters are run.
By default, the three test modes do not display prompts and require no interaction. If errors are found,
they are displayed when testing is complete.
However, for each test type, you may also optionally add interactive tests by clicking the Include
interactive tests box under Test mode. Selecting interactive tests provides the maximum control
over the testing process. The diagnostic software will prompt you for input during tests.
NOTE: Memory can not be tested from within the HP Vision Diagnostics application. To test the
memory in your computer, you must exit HP Vision Diagnostics, boot to either the CD or USB flash
drive and select HP Memory Test from the boot menu.
To begin testing:
1.
Select the Test tab.
2.
Select the type of tests you want to run: Quick, Complete, or Custom.
3.
Include optional interactive tests by selecting Include interactive tests.
4.
Choose how you want the test to be executed, either Number of Loops or Total Test Time.
When choosing to run the test over a specified number of loops, enter the number of loops to
perform. If you want the diagnostic test for a specified time period, enter the amount of time in
minutes.
5.
Click the Start Test button to start the testing. The Status tab, which allows you to monitor the
progress of the tests, is automatically displayed during the testing process. When the tests are
complete, the Status tab shows whether the devices passed or failed.
6.
If errors are found, go to the Errors tab to display detailed information and recommended
actions.
Status Tab
The Status tab displays the status of the selected tests. The main progress bar displays the percent
complete of the current set of tests. While testing is in progress, a Cancel Testing button is displayed
for use if you want to cancel the test.
The Status tab also shows:
86
●
The devices being tested
●
The test status (running, waiting, passed, or failed) of each device being tested
●
The overall test progress of all devices being tested
Appendix D Computer Diagnostic Features
●
The test progress for each device being tested
●
The elapsed test times for each device being tested
History Tab
The History tab contains information on past test executions.
The History Log displays all tests that have been executed, the number of times of execution, the
number of times failed, the date each test was executed, and the time it took to complete each test.
The Clear History button will clear the contents of the History Log.
The contents of the History Log may be saved as a HTML file to USB flash drive by clicking the Save
button.
Errors Tab
The Errors tab displays detailed information about any errors found, as well as any recommended
actions.
The Error Log displays the tests for devices that have failed during the diagnostic testing and includes
the following columns of information.
●
The Device section displays the device tested.
●
The Test section displays the type of test run.
●
The Times Failed is the number of times the device has failed a test.
●
The Defect Code provides a numerical code for the failure. The error codes are defined in the
Help tab.
●
The Description section describes the error that the diagnostic test found.
●
The Reason section describes the likely cause of the error.
●
The Recommended Repair will give a recommended action that should be performed to
resolve the failed hardware.
●
The Warranty ID is a unique error code associated with the specific error on your computer.
When contacting the HP Support Center for assistance with a hardware failure, please be
prepared to provide the Warranty ID.
The Clear Errors button will clear the contents of the Error Log.
The contents of the Error Log may be saved as a HTML file to USB flash drive by clicking the Save
button.
Help Tab
The Help tab contains a Vision Help section, and a Test Components section. This tab includes
search and index features. You may also review the HP End User License Agreement (EULA), as
well as the HP Vision Diagnostic application version information on this tab.
The Vision Help section contains information on the major functions of Hewlett-Packard Vision
Diagnostics.
Hewlett-Packard Vision Diagnostics
87
The Test Components section provides a description of each test, as well as the parameters that
may be adjusted when running in Custom test mode.
The Defect codes section contains information on the numerical error code that may appear in the
Errors tab.
The Memory test tab section provides information on the HP Memory Test application that may be
launched from the boot menu.
The HP Support section provides information on obtaining technical support from HP.
Saving and Printing Information in HP Vision Diagnostics
You can save the information displayed in the HP Vision Diagnostics Survey, History and Errors
tabs to a USB flash drive. You can not save to the hard drive. The system will automatically create an
html file that has the same appearance as the information displayed on the screen.
1.
Insert a USB flash drive if running HP Vision Diagnostics from CD.
2.
Click Save in the bottom on any of the Survey, History or Errors tabs. All three log files will be
saved regardless of from which tab the Save button was clicked.
3.
Select the drive onto which you will save the log files and click the Save button. Three html files
will be saved to the inserted USB flash drive.
NOTE: Do not remove the USB flash drive until you see a message indicating that the html
files have been written to the media.
4.
Print the desired information from the storage device used to save it.
NOTE: To exit HP Vision Diagnostics, click the Exit Diagnostics button at the bottom of the screen.
Be sure to remove the USB flash drive or CD from the optical drive.
Downloading the Latest Version of HP Vision Diagnostics
1.
Go to http://www.hp.com.
2.
Click the Software & Drivers link.
3.
Select Download drivers and software (and firmware).
4.
Enter your product name in the text box and press the Enter key.
5.
Select your specific computer model.
6.
Select your OS.
7.
Click the Diagnostic link.
8.
Click the Hewlett-Packard Vision Diagnostics link.
9.
Click the Download button.
NOTE: The download includes instructions on how to create the bootable CD or the bootable USB
flash drive.
88
Appendix D Computer Diagnostic Features
Protecting the Software
To protect software from loss or damage, you should keep a backup copy of all system software,
applications, and related files stored on the hard drive. See the operating system or backup utility
documentation for instructions on making backup copies of data files.
Protecting the Software
89
E
Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
This chapter provides information on how to identify and correct minor problems, such as diskette
drive, hard drive, optical drive, graphics, audio, memory, and software problems. If you encounter
problems with the computer, refer to the tables in this chapter for probable causes and recommended
solutions.
NOTE: For information on specific error messages that may appear on the screen during Power-On
Self-Test (POST) at startup, refer to Appendix A, POST Error Messages on page 135.
Safety and Comfort
WARNING! Misuse of the computer or failure to establish a safe and comfortable work environment
may result in discomfort or serious injury. Refer to the Safety & Comfort Guide at http://www.hp.com/
ergo for more information on choosing a workspace and creating a safe and comfortable work
environment. For more information, refer to the Safety & Regulatory Information guide.
Before You Call for Technical Support
If you are having problems with the computer, try the appropriate solutions below to try to isolate the
exact problem before calling for technical support.
90
●
Run the HP diagnostic tool.
●
Run the hard drive self-test in Computer Setup.
●
Check the Power LED on the front of the computer to see if it is flashing red. The flashing lights
are error codes that will help you diagnose the problem. Refer to Appendix A, POST Error
Messages on page 135 for more information.
●
If the screen is blank, plug the monitor into a different video port on the computer if one is
available. Or, replace the monitor with a monitor that you know is functioning properly.
●
If you are working on a network, plug another computer with a different cable into the network
connection. There may be a problem with the network plug or cable.
●
If you recently added new hardware, remove the hardware and see if the computer functions
properly.
●
If you recently installed new software, uninstall the software and see if the computer functions
properly.
●
Boot the computer to the Safe Mode to see if it will boot without all of the drivers loaded. When
booting the operating system, use “Last Known Configuration.”
Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
●
Refer to the comprehensive online technical support at http://www.hp.com/support.
●
Refer to Helpful Hints on page 91 in this guide.
To assist you in resolving problems online, HP Instant Support Professional Edition provides you with
self-solve diagnostics. If you need to contact HP support, use HP Instant Support Professional
Edition's online chat feature. Access HP Instant Support Professional Edition at: http://www.hp.com/
go/ispe.
Access the Business Support Center (BSC) at http://www.hp.com/go/bizsupport for the latest online
support information, software and drivers, proactive notification, and worldwide community of peers
and HP experts.
If it becomes necessary to call for technical assistance, be prepared to do the following to ensure that
your service call is handled properly:
●
Be in front of your computer when you call.
●
Write down the computer serial number, product ID number, and monitor serial number before
calling.
●
Spend time troubleshooting the problem with the service technician.
●
Remove any hardware that was recently added to your system.
●
Remove any software that was recently installed.
●
Restore the system from backups that you created or restore the system to its original factory
condition. Refer to Backup and Recovery on page 76 for more information.
CAUTION: Restoring the system will erase all data on the hard drive. Be sure to back up all data
files before running the restore process.
NOTE: For sales information and warranty upgrades (Care Packs), call your local authorized
service provider or dealer.
Helpful Hints
If you encounter problems with the computer, monitor, or software, see the following list of general
suggestions before taking further action:
●
Check that the computer and monitor are plugged into a working electrical outlet.
●
Check that the voltage select switch (some models) is set to the appropriate voltage for your
region (115V or 230V).
●
Check that the computer is turned on and the green power light is on.
●
Check that the monitor is turned on and the green monitor light is on.
●
Check the Power LED on the front of the computer to see if it is flashing red. The flashing lights
are error codes that will help you diagnose the problem. Refer to Appendix A, POST Error
Messages on page 135 for more information.
●
Turn up the brightness and contrast controls of the monitor if the monitor is dim.
●
Press and hold any key. If the system beeps, then the keyboard should be operating correctly.
●
Check all cable connections for loose connections or incorrect connections.
Helpful Hints
91
●
Wake the computer by pressing any key on the keyboard or pressing the power button. If the
system remains in suspend mode, shut down the computer by pressing and holding the power
button for at least four seconds then press the power button again to restart the computer. If the
system will not shut down, unplug the power cord, wait a few seconds, then plug it in again. The
computer will restart if it is set to power on automatically as soon as power is restored in
Computer Setup. If it does not restart, press the power button to start the computer.
●
Reconfigure the computer after installing a non-plug and play expansion board or other option.
See Solving Hardware Installation Problems on page 116 for instructions.
●
Be sure that all the needed device drivers have been installed. For example, if you are using a
printer, you need a driver for that model printer.
●
Remove all bootable media (diskette, CD, or USB device) from the system before turning it on.
●
If you have installed an operating system other than the factory-installed operating system,
check to be sure that it is supported on the system.
●
If the system has multiple video sources (embedded, PCI, or PCI-Express adapters) installed
(embedded video on some models only) and a single monitor, the monitor must be plugged into
the monitor connector on the source selected as the primary VGA adapter. During boot, the
other monitor connectors are disabled and if the monitor is connected into these ports, the
monitor will not function. You can select which source will be the default VGA source in
Computer Setup.
CAUTION: When the computer is plugged into an AC power source, there is always voltage applied
to the system board. You must disconnect the power cord from the power source before opening the
computer to prevent system board or component damage.
92
Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
Solving General Problems
You may be able to easily resolve the general problems described in this section. If a problem
persists and you are unable to resolve it yourself or if you feel uncomfortable about performing the
operation, contact an authorized dealer or reseller.
WARNING! When the computer is plugged into an AC power source, voltage is always applied to
the system board. To reduce the risk of personal injury from electrical shock and/or hot surfaces, be
sure to disconnect the power cord from the wall outlet and allow the internal system components to
cool before touching.
Table E-1 Solving General Problems
Computer appears locked up and will not turn off when the power button is pressed.
Cause
Solution
Software control of the power switch is not functional.
1.
Press and hold the power button for at least four
seconds until the computer turns off.
2.
Disconnect the power cord from the electrical outlet.
Computer will not respond to USB keyboard or mouse.
Cause
Solution
Computer is in standby mode.
To resume from standby mode, press the power button or
press any key.
CAUTION: When attempting to resume from standby
mode, do not hold down the power button for more than four
seconds. Otherwise, the computer will shut down and you
will lose any unsaved data.
System has locked up.
Restart computer.
Computer date and time display is incorrect.
Cause
Solution
RTC (real-time clock) battery may need to be replaced.
First, reset the date and time under Control Panel
(Computer Setup can also be used to update the RTC date
and time). If the problem persists, replace the RTC battery.
See the Hardware Reference Guide for instructions on
installing a new battery, or contact an authorized dealer or
reseller for RTC battery replacement.
NOTE: Connecting the computer to a live AC outlet
prolongs the life of the RTC battery.
Cursor will not move using the arrow keys on the keypad.
Cause
Solution
The Num Lock key may be on.
Press the Num Lock key. The Num Lock light should not be
on if you want to use the arrow keys. The Num Lock key can
be disabled (or enabled) in Computer Setup.
Solving General Problems
93
Table E-1 Solving General Problems (continued)
There is no sound or sound volume is too low.
Cause
Solution
System volume may be set low or muted.
1.
Check the F10 BIOS settings to make sure the internal
system speaker is not muted (this setting does not
affect the external speakers).
2.
Make sure the external speakers are properly
connected and powered on and that the speakers'
volume control is set correctly.
3.
Use the system volume control available in the
operating system to make sure the speakers are not
muted or to increase the volume.
Cannot remove computer cover or access panel.
Cause
Solution
Smart Cover Lock, featured on some computers, is locked.
Unlock the Smart Cover Lock using Computer Setup.
The Smart Cover FailSafe Key, a device for manually
disabling the Smart Cover Lock, is available from HP. You
will need the FailSafe Key in case of forgotten password,
power loss, or computer malfunction. Order PN 166527-001
for the wrench-style key or PN 166527-002 for the
screwdriver bit key.
Poor performance is experienced.
94
Cause
Solution
Processor is hot.
1.
Make sure airflow to the computer is not blocked. Leave
a 10.2-cm (4-inch) clearance on all vented sides of the
computer and above the monitor to permit the required
airflow.
2.
Make sure fans are connected and working properly
(some fans only operate when needed).
3.
Make sure the processor heatsink is installed properly.
Hard drive is full.
Transfer data from the hard drive to create more space on
the hard drive.
Low on memory.
Add more memory.
Hard drive fragmented.
Defragment hard drive.
Program previously accessed did not release reserved
memory back to the system.
Restart the computer.
Virus resident on the hard drive.
Run virus protection program.
Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
Table E-1 Solving General Problems (continued)
Poor performance is experienced.
Cause
Solution
Too many applications running.
1.
Close unnecessary applications to free up memory.
2.
Add more memory. Some applications run in the
background and can be closed by right-clicking on their
corresponding icons in the task tray. To prevent these
applications from launching at startup, go to Start >
Run (Windows XP) or Start > All Programs >
Accessories > Run (Windows Vista and Windows 7)
and type msconfig. On the Startup tab of the System
Configuration Utility, clear applications that you do not
want to launch automatically.
1.
Lower the display resolution for the current application
or consult the documentation that came with the
application for suggestions on how to improve
performance by adjusting parameters in the application.
2.
Add more memory.
3.
Upgrade the graphics solution.
Some software applications, especially games, are stressful
on the graphics subsystem
Cause unknown.
Restart the computer.
Computer powered off automatically and the Power LED flashes Red two times, once every second, followed by a
two second pause, and the computer beeps two times. (Beeps stop after fifth iteration but LEDs continue flashing).
Cause
Solution
Processor thermal protection activated:
1.
Ensure that the computer air vents are not blocked and
the processor cooling fan is running.
2.
Open hood, press power button, and see if the
processor fan spins. If the processor fan is not spinning,
make sure the fan's cable is plugged onto the system
board header.
3.
If fan is plugged in, but is not spinning, then replace the
heatsink/fan assembly.
4.
Contact an authorized reseller or service provider.
A fan may be blocked or not turning.
OR
The heatsink is not properly attached to the processor.
Solving General Problems
95
Table E-1 Solving General Problems (continued)
System does not power on and the LEDs on the front of the computer are not flashing.
Cause
Solution
System unable to power on.
Press and hold the power button for less than 4 seconds. If
the hard drive LED turns green, then:
1.
Check that the voltage selector, located on the rear of
the power supply on some models, is set to the
appropriate voltage. Proper voltage setting depends on
your region.
2.
Remove the expansion cards one at a time until the
5V_aux light on the system board turns on.
3.
Replace the system board.
OR
Press and hold the power button for less than 4 seconds. If
the hard drive LED does not turn on green then:
96
Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
1.
Check that the unit is plugged into a working AC outlet.
2.
Open hood and check that the power button harness is
properly connected to the system board.
3.
Check that both power supply cables are properly
connected to the system board.
4.
Check to see if the 5V_aux light on the system board is
turned on. If it is turned on, then replace the power
button harness.
5.
If the 5V_aux light on the system board is off, then
replace the power supply.
6.
Replace the system board.
Solving Power Problems
Common causes and solutions for power problems are listed in the following table.
Table E-2 Solving Power Problems
Power supply shuts down intermittently.
Cause
Solution
Voltage selector switch on rear of computer chassis (some
models) not switched to correct line voltage (115V or 230V).
Select the proper AC voltage using the selector switch.
Power supply will not turn on because of internal power
supply fault.
Contact an authorized service provider to replace the power
supply.
Computer powered off automatically and the Power LED flashes Red two times, once every second, followed by a
two second pause, and the computer beeps two times. (Beeps stop after fifth iteration but LEDs continue flashing.)
Cause
Solution
Processor thermal protection activated:
1.
Ensure that the computer air vents are not blocked and
the processor cooling fan is running.
2.
Open hood, press power button, and see if the
processor fan spins. If the processor fan is not spinning,
make sure the fan's cable is plugged onto the system
board header.
3.
If fan is plugged in, but is not spinning, then replace the
heatsink/fan assembly.
4.
Contact an authorized reseller or service provider.
A fan may be blocked or not turning.
OR
The heatsink is not properly attached to the processor.
Power LED flashes Red four times, once every second, followed by a two second pause, and the computer beeps
four times. (Beeps stop after fifth iteration but LEDs continue flashing.)
Cause
Solution
The incorrect external power supply adapter is being used on
the USDT.
The USDT power supply adapter must be at 135W and use
the Smart ID technology before the system will power up.
Replace the power supply adapter with the HP-supplied
USDT power supply adapter.
Solving Power Problems
97
Solving Diskette Problems
Common causes and solutions for diskette problems are listed in the following table.
NOTE: The computer does not support internal diskette drives. Only USB diskette drives are
supported.
NOTE: You may need to reconfigure the computer when you add or remove hardware, such as an
additional diskette drive. See Solving Hardware Installation Problems on page 116 for instructions.
Table E-3 Solving Diskette Problems
Diskette drive light stays on.
Cause
Solution
Diskette is damaged.
In Microsoft Windows XP, right-click Start, click Explore,
and select a drive. Select File > Properties > Tools. Under
Error-checking click Check Now.
In Microsoft Windows Vista and Windows 7, right-click Start,
click Explore, and right-click on a drive. Select
Properties then select the Tools tab. Under Error-checking
click Check Now.
Diskette is incorrectly inserted.
Remove diskette and reinsert.
Drive cable is not properly connected.
Reconnect drive cable. Ensure that all four pins on the
diskette power cable are connected to the drive.
Drive not found.
Cause
Solution
Cable is loose.
Reseat diskette drive data and power cable.
Removable drive is not seated properly.
Reseat the drive.
Diskette drive cannot write to a diskette.
Cause
Solution
Diskette is not formatted.
Format the diskette.
From Windows Explorer select the disk (A) drive.
2.
Right-click the drive letter and select Format.
3.
Select the desired options, and click Start to begin
formatting the diskette.
Diskette is write-protected.
Use another diskette or remove the write protection.
Writing to the wrong drive.
Check the drive letter in the path statement.
Not enough space is left on the diskette.
1.
Use another diskette.
2.
Delete unneeded files from diskette.
Diskette is damaged.
98
1.
Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
Replace the damaged disk.
Table E-3 Solving Diskette Problems (continued)
Cannot format diskette.
Cause
Solution
Invalid media reported.
When formatting a disk in MS-DOS, you may need to specify
diskette capacity. For example, to format a 1.44-MB diskette,
type the following command at the MS-DOS prompt:
FORMAT A: /F:1440
Disk may be write-protected.
Open the locking device on the diskette.
A problem has occurred with a disk transaction.
Cause
Solution
The directory structure is bad, or there is a problem with a
file.
In Microsoft Windows XP, right-click Start, click Explore,
and select a drive. Select File > Properties > Tools. Under
Error-checking, click Check Now.
In Microsoft Windows Vista and Windows 7, right-click Start,
click Explore, and right-click on a drive. Select
Properties then select the Tools tab. Under Error-checking
click Check Now.
Diskette drive cannot read a diskette.
Cause
Solution
You are using the wrong diskette type for the drive type.
Check the type of drive that you are using and use the
correct diskette type.
You are reading the wrong drive.
Check the drive letter in the path statement.
Diskette is damaged.
Replace the diskette with a new one.
“Invalid system disk” message is displayed.
Cause
Solution
A diskette that does not contain the system files needed to
start the computer has been inserted in the drive.
When drive activity stops, remove the diskette and press the
Spacebar. The computer should start up.
Diskette error has occurred.
Restart the computer by pressing the power button.
Cannot Boot to Diskette.
Cause
Solution
Diskette is not bootable.
Replace with a bootable diskette.
Solving Diskette Problems
99
Table E-3 Solving Diskette Problems (continued)
Cannot Boot to Diskette.
Cause
Solution
Diskette boot has been disabled in Computer Setup.
1.
Run Computer Setup and enable USB device in
Storage > Boot Order.
2.
Run Computer Setup and enable diskette boot in
Storage > Storage Options > Removable Media
Boot.
NOTE: Both steps should be used as the Removable
Media Boot function in Computer Setup overrides the Boot
Order enable command.
Network server mode is enabled in Computer Setup.
100 Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
Run Computer Setup and disable Network Server Mode in
Security > Password Options.
Solving Hard Drive Problems
Table E-4 Solving Hard Drive Problems
Hard drive error occurs.
Cause
Solution
Hard disk has bad sectors or has failed.
1.
In Microsoft Windows XP, right-click Start, click
Explore, and select a drive. Select File > Properties >
Tools. Under Error-checking, click Check Now.
In Microsoft Windows Vista and Windows 7, right-click
Start, click Explore, and right-click on a drive. Select
Properties then select the Tools tab. Under Errorchecking click Check Now.
2.
Use a utility to locate and block usage of bad sectors. If
necessary, reformat the hard disk.
Disk transaction problem.
Cause
Solution
Either the directory structure is bad or there is a problem with
a file.
In Microsoft Windows XP, right-click Start, click Explore,
and select a drive. Select File > Properties > Tools. Under
Error-checking, click Check Now.
In Microsoft Windows Vista, right-click Start, click Explore,
and right-click on a drive. Select Properties then select the
Tools tab. Under Error-checking click Check Now.
Drive not found (identified).
Cause
Solution
Cable could be loose.
Check cable connections.
The system may not have automatically recognized a newly
installed device.
See reconfiguration directions in the Solving Hardware
Installation Problems on page 116 section. If the system still
does not recognize the new device, check to see if the
device is listed within Computer Setup. If it is listed, the
probable cause is a driver problem. If it is not listed, the
probable cause is a hardware problem.
If this is a newly installed drive, run the Computer Setup
utility and try adding a POST delay under Advanced >
Power-On Options.
The device is attached to a SATA port that has been hidden
in Computer Setup.
Run the Computer Setup utility and ensure Device Available
is selected for the device's SATA port in Security > Device
Security.
Drive responds slowly immediately after power-up.
Run Computer Setup and increase the POST Delay in
Advanced > Power-On Options.
Solving Hard Drive Problems 101
Table E-4 Solving Hard Drive Problems (continued)
Nonsystem disk/NTLDR missing message.
Cause
Solution
The system is trying to start from a diskette that is not
bootable.
Remove the diskette from the diskette drive.
The system is trying to start from the hard drive but the hard
drive may have been damaged.
1.
Insert a bootable diskette into the diskette drive and
restart the computer.
2.
Check the hard drive format using fdisk: If NTFS
formatting, use a third party reader to evaluate the
drive. If FAT32 formatting, the hard drive cannot be
accessed.
1.
Insert a bootable diskette into the diskette drive and
restart the computer.
2.
Check the hard drive format using Fdisk: If NFTFS
formatting, use a third party reader to evaluate the
drive. If FAT32 formatting, the hard drive cannot be
accessed.
3.
Install system files for the appropriate operating system.
System files missing or not properly installed.
Hard drive boot has been disabled in Computer Setup.
Run the Computer Setup utility and enable the hard drive
entry in the Storage > Boot Order list.
Bootable hard drive is not attached as first in a multi-hard
drive configuration.
If attempting to boot from a hard drive, ensure it is attached
to dark blue SATA connector on the system board.
Bootable hard drive's controller is not listed first in the Boot
Order.
Run the Computer Setup utility and select Storage > Boot
Order and ensure the bootable hard drive's controller is
listed immediately under the Hard Drive entry.
Computer will not boot from hard drive.
Cause
Solution
The device is attached to a SATA port that has been hidden
in Computer Setup.
Run the Computer Setup utility and ensure Device Available
is selected for the device's SATA port in Security > Device
Security.
Boot order is not correct.
Run the Computer Setup utility and change boot sequence in
Storage > Boot Order.
Hard Drive's “Emulation Type” is set to “None.”
Run the Computer Setup utility and change the “Emulation
Type” to “Hard Disk” in the device's details under Storage >
Device Configuration.
Hard drive is damaged.
Observe if the front panel Power LED is blinking RED and if
any beeps are heard. See Appendix A, POST Error
Messages on page 135 to determine possible causes for the
blinking red and beep codes.
See the Worldwide Limited Warranty for terms and
conditions.
102 Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
Table E-4 Solving Hard Drive Problems (continued)
Computer seems to be locked up.
Cause
Solution
Program in use has stopped responding to commands.
Attempt the normal Windows “Shut Down” procedure. If this
fails, press the power button for four or more seconds to turn
off the power. To restart the computer, press the power
button again.
The removable hard drive has no power to the hard drive enclosure.
Cause
Solution
The lock on the enclosure is not turned to the “ON” position.
Insert the key and turn the lock clockwise 90 degrees. The
green LED on the front of the enclosure should be on.
Power cable from the computer power supply to the
enclosure frame is not properly connected.
Check the power supply to make sure it is properly
connected to the rear of the enclosure frame.
The removable hard drive is not recognized by the computer.
Cause
Solution
The removable hard drive carrier is not fully seated in the
enclosure frame or the hard drive is not fully seated in the
carrier.
Push the carrier into the enclosure frame so that the
connector on the rear of the frame is properly seated. If this
does not solve the problem, turn off the computer, remove
the carrier, and check to see if the connector on the hard
drive is properly seated in the carrier.
The removable hard drive enclosure is beeping and the green LED is flashing.
Cause
Solution
Fan failure alarm on the removable hard drive enclosure has
been activated.
Shut down the computer and contact HP for a replacement
enclosure.
Solving Hard Drive Problems 103
Solving Media Card Reader Problems
Table E-5 Solving Media Card Reader Problems
Media card will not work in a digital camera after formatting it in Microsoft Windows XP or Microsoft Windows Vista.
Cause
Solution
By default, Windows XP and Windows Vista will format any
media card with a capacity greater than 32MB with the
FAT32 format. Most digital cameras use the FAT (FAT16 &
FAT12) format and can not operate with a FAT32 formatted
card.
Either format the media card in the digital camera or select
FAT file system to format the media card in a computer with
Windows XP or Windows Vista.
A write-protected or locked error occurs when attempting to write to the media card.
Cause
Solution
Media card is locked. Locking the media card is a safety
feature that prevents writing to and deleting from an SD/
Memory Stick/PRO card.
If using an SD card, make sure that the lock tab located on
the right of the SD card is not in the locked position. If using
a Memory Stick/PRO card, make sure that the lock tab
located on the bottom of the Memory Stick/PRO card is not
in the locked position.
Can not write to the media card.
Cause
Solution
The media card is a read-only memory (ROM) card.
Check the manufacturer’s documentation included with your
card to see if it writable. Refer to the previous section for a
list of compatible cards.
Media card is locked. Locking the media card is a safety
feature that prevents writing to and deleting from an SD/
Memory Stick/PRO card.
If using an SD card, make sure that the lock tab located on
the right of the SD card is not in the locked position. If using
a Memory Stick/PRO card, make sure that the lock tab
located on the bottom of the Memory Stick/PRO card is not
in the locked position.
Unable to access data on the media card after inserting it into a slot.
Cause
Solution
The media card is not inserted properly, is inserted in the
wrong slot, or is not supported.
Ensure that the card is inserted properly with the gold
contact on the correct side. The green LED will light if
inserted properly.
104 Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
Table E-5 Solving Media Card Reader Problems (continued)
Do not know how to remove a media card correctly.
Cause
Solution
The computer’s software is used to safely eject the card.
Open My Computer (Windows XP) or Computer (Windows
Vista and Windows 7), right-click on the corresponding drive
icon, and select Eject. Then pull the card out of the slot.
NOTE: Never remove the card when the green LED is
flashing
After installing the media card reader and booting to Windows, the reader and the inserted cards are not recognized
by the computer.
Cause
Solution
The operating system needs time to recognize the device if
the reader was just installed into the computer and you are
turning the PC on for the first time.
Wait a few seconds so that the operating system can
recognize the reader and the available ports, and then
recognize whatever media is inserted in the reader.
After inserting a media card in the reader, the computer attempts to boot from the media card.
Cause
Solution
The inserted media card has boot capability.
If you do not want to boot from the media card, remove it
during boot or do not select the option to boot from the
inserted media card during the boot process.
Solving Media Card Reader Problems 105
Solving Display Problems
If you encounter display problems, see the documentation that came with the monitor and to the
common causes and solutions listed in the following table.
Table E-6 Solving Display Problems
Blank screen (no video).
Cause
Solution
Monitor is not turned on and the monitor light is not on.
Turn on the monitor and check that the monitor light is on.
Bad monitor.
Try a different monitor.
The cable connections are not correct.
Check the cable connection from the monitor to the computer
and to the electrical outlet.
You may have a screen blanking utility installed or energy
saver features are enabled.
Press any key or click the mouse button and, if set, type your
password.
System ROM is corrupted; system is running in Boot Block
Emergency Recovery Mode (indicated by eight beeps).
Reflash the system ROM with the latest BIOS image.
You are using a fixed-sync monitor and it will not sync at the
resolution chosen.
Be sure that the monitor can accept the same horizontal
scan rate as the resolution chosen.
Computer is in standby mode.
Press the power button to resume from standby mode.
CAUTION: When attempting to resume from standby
mode, do not hold down the power button for more than four
seconds. Otherwise, the computer will shut down and you
will lose any unsaved data.
Monitor cable is plugged into the wrong connector.
If the computer system has both an integrated graphics
connector and an add-in graphics card connector, plug the
monitor cable into the graphics card connector on the back of
the computer.
Monitor settings in the computer are not compatible with the
monitor.
1.
In Windows XP Control Panel, double-click the Display
icon and select the Settings tab.
In Windows Vista or Windows 7 Control Panel, under
Appearance and Personalization, select Adjust
screen resolution.
2.
Monitor is configured to use an input that is not active.
Use the sliding control to reset the resolution.
Use the monitor's on-screen menu controls to select the
input that is being driven by the system. Refer to the
monitor's user documentation for more information on the onscreen controls and settings.
Cannot enable integrated graphics after installing a PCI Express graphics card.
Cause
Solution
On systems with Intel integrated graphics, the integrated
graphics cannot be enabled after installing a PCI Express
x16.
Integrated graphics can be used if there is a graphics card in
the PCI, PCI Express x1, or PCI Express x4 slot. It cannot be
used if there is a graphics card in the PCI Express x16 slot.
106 Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
Table E-6 Solving Display Problems (continued)
Blank screen and the power LED flashes Red five times, once every second, followed by a two second pause, and
the computer beeps five times. (Beeps stop after fifth iteration but LEDs continue flashing.)
Cause
Solution
Pre-video memory error.
1.
Reseat DIMMs. Power on the system.
2.
Make sure a DIMM is installed in the black DIMM
connector first if there is only one DIMM in the system.
3.
Replace third-party memory with HP memory.
4.
Replace the system board.
Blank screen and the power LED flashes Red six times, once every second, followed by a two second pause, and
the computer beeps six times. (Beeps stop after fifth iteration but LEDs continue flashing.)
Cause
Solution
Pre-video graphics error.
For systems with a graphics card:
1.
Reseat the graphics card. Power on the system.
2.
Replace the graphics card.
3.
Replace the system board.
For systems with integrated graphics, replace the system
board.
Blank screen and the power LED flashes Red seven times, once every second, followed by a two second pause, and
the computer beeps seven times. (Beeps stop after fifth iteration but LEDs continue flashing.)
Cause
Solution
System board failure (ROM detected failure prior to video).
Replace the system board.
Monitor does not function properly when used with energy saver features.
Cause
Solution
Monitor without energy saver capabilities is being used with
energy saver features enabled.
Disable monitor energy saver feature.
Dim characters.
Cause
Solution
The brightness and contrast controls are not set properly.
Adjust the monitor brightness and contrast controls.
Cables are not properly connected.
Check that the graphics cable is securely connected to the
graphics card and the monitor.
Solving Display Problems 107
Table E-6 Solving Display Problems (continued)
Blurry video or requested resolution cannot be set.
Cause
Solution
If the graphics controller was upgraded, the correct graphics
drivers may not be loaded.
Install the video drivers included in the upgrade kit.
Monitor is not capable of displaying requested resolution.
Change requested resolution.
Graphics card is bad.
Replace the graphics card.
The picture is broken up, rolls, jitters, or flashes.
Cause
Solution
The monitor connections may be incomplete or the monitor
may be incorrectly adjusted.
1.
Be sure the monitor cable is securely connected to the
computer.
2.
In a two-monitor system or if another monitor is in close
proximity, be sure the monitors are not interfering with
each other’s electromagnetic field by moving them
apart.
3.
Fluorescent lights or fans may be too close to the
monitor.
Monitor needs to be degaussed.
Degauss the monitor. Refer to the documentation that came
with the monitor for instructions.
Image is not centered.
Cause
Solution
Position may need adjustment.
Press the monitor's Menu button to access the OSD menu.
Select ImageControl/ Horizontal Position or Vertical
Position to adjust the horizontal or vertical position of the
image.
“No Connection, Check Signal Cable” displays on screen.
Cause
Solution
Monitor video cable is disconnected.
Connect the video cable between the monitor and computer.
CAUTION: Ensure that the computer power is off while
connecting the video cable.
“Out of Range” displays on screen.
Cause
Solution
Video resolution and refresh rate are set higher than what
the monitor supports.
Restart the computer and enter Safe Mode. Change the
settings to a supported setting then restart the computer so
that the new settings take effect.
108 Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
Table E-6 Solving Display Problems (continued)
Vibrating or rattling noise coming from inside a CRT monitor when powered on.
Cause
Solution
Monitor degaussing coil has been activated.
None. It is normal for the degaussing coil to be activated
when the monitor is powered on.
Clicking noise coming from inside a CRT monitor.
Cause
Solution
Electronic relays have been activated inside the monitor.
None. It is normal for some monitors to make a clicking noise
when turned on and off, when going in and out of standby
mode, and when changing resolutions.
High pitched noise coming from inside a flat panel monitor.
Cause
Solution
Brightness and/or contrast settings are too high.
Lower brightness and/or contrast settings.
Fuzzy focus; streaking, ghosting, or shadowing effects; horizontal scrolling lines; faint vertical bars; or unable to
center the picture on the screen (flat panel monitors using an analog VGA input connection only).
Cause
Solution
Flat panel monitor’s internal digital conversion circuits may
be unable to correctly interpret the output synchronization of
the graphics card.
1.
Select the monitor’s Auto-Adjustment option in the
monitor’s on-screen display menu.
2.
Manually synchronize the Clock and Clock Phase onscreen display functions. To download a SoftPaq that
will assist you with the synchronization, go to the
following Web site, select the appropriate monitor, and
download either SP32347 or SP32202:
http://www.hp.com/support
1.
Reseat the graphics card.
2.
Replace the graphics card.
Graphics card is not seated properly or is bad.
Certain typed symbols do not appear correct.
Cause
Solution
The font you are using does not support that particular
symbol.
Use the Character Map to locate and select the appropriate
symbol. Click Start > All Programs > Accessories >
System Tools > Character Map. You can copy the symbol
from the Character Map into a document.
Solving Display Problems 109
Solving Audio Problems
If the computer has audio features and you encounter audio problems, see the common causes and
solutions listed in the following table.
Table E-7 Solving Audio Problems
Sound cuts in and out.
Cause
Solution
Processor resources are being used by other open
applications.
Shut down all open processor-intensive applications.
Direct sound latency, common in many media player
applications.
In Windows XP only:
1.
From the Control Panel, select Sounds and Audio
Devices.
2.
On the Audio tab, select a device from the Sound
Playback list.
3.
Click the Advanced button and select the Performance
tab.
4.
Set the Hardware acceleration slider to None and the
Sample rate conversion quality slider to Good and
retest the audio.
5.
Set the Hardware acceleration slider to Full and the
Sample rate conversion quality slider to Best and
retest the audio.
Sound does not come out of the speaker or headphones.
Cause
Solution
Software volume control is turned down or muted.
Double-click the Speaker icon on the taskbar, then make
sure that Mute is not selected and use the volume slider to
adjust the volume.
Audio is hidden in Computer Setup.
Enable the audio in Computer Setup: Security >
Device Security > System Audio.
The external speakers are not turned on.
Turn on the external speakers.
The audio device may be connected to the wrong jack.
Ensure that the device is connected to the correct jack on the
computer. The speakers should be plugged into the rear lineout jack and the headphones should be plugged into the
front headphone jack.
External speakers plugged into the wrong audio jack on a
recently installed sound card.
See the sound card documentation for proper speaker
connection.
Digital CD audio is not enabled.
Enable digital CD audio. In the Device Manager, right-click
on the CD/DVD device and select Properties. Make sure
Enable digital CD audio for this CD-ROM device is
checked.
Headphones or devices connected to the line-out connector
mute the internal speaker.
Turn on and use headphones or external speakers, if
connected, or disconnect headphones or external speakers.
110 Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
Table E-7 Solving Audio Problems (continued)
Sound does not come out of the speaker or headphones.
Cause
Solution
Computer is in standby mode.
Press the power button to resume from standby mode.
CAUTION: When attempting to resume from standby
mode, do not hold down the power button for more than four
seconds. Otherwise, the computer will shut down and you
will lose any unsaved data.
Internal speaker is disabled in Computer Setup.
Enable the internal speaker in Computer Setup. Select
Advanced > Device Options > Internal Speaker.
The application is set to use a different audio device than
speakers.
Some graphics cards support audio over the DisplayPort
connection, so multiple audio devices may be listed in
Device Manager. Make sure the correct device is being
used.
Some applications can select which audio output device is
used.
Make sure the application has selected the correct audio
device.
The operating system controls may be set to use a different
audio device as the default output device than what is
expected.
Set the operating system to use the correct audio device.
Sound from headphones is not clear or muffled.
Cause
Solution
Headphones are plugged into the rear audio output
connector. The rear audio output connector is for powered
audio devices and is not designed for headphone use.
Plug the headphones into the headphone connector on the
front of the computer.
Computer appears to be locked up while recording audio.
Cause
Solution
The hard disk may be full.
Before recording, make sure there is enough free space on
the hard disk. You can also try recording the audio file in a
compressed format.
Line-in jack is not functioning properly.
Cause
Solution
Jack has been reconfigured in the audio driver or application
software.
In the audio driver or application software, reconfigure the
jack or set the jack to its default value.
Solving Audio Problems 111
Table E-7 Solving Audio Problems (continued)
There is no sound or sound volume is too low.
Cause
Solution
The application is set to use a different audio device than
speakers.
Some graphics cards support audio over the DisplayPort
connection, so multiple audio devices may be listed in
Device Manager. Make sure the correct device is being
used.
Some applications can select which audio output device is
used.
Make sure the application has selected the correct audio
device.
The operating system controls may be set to use a different
audio device as the default output device than what is
expected.
Set the operating system to use the correct audio device.
112 Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
Solving Printer Problems
If you encounter printer problems, see the documentation that came with the printer and to the
common causes and solutions listed in the following table.
Table E-8 Solving Printer Problems
Printer will not print.
Cause
Solution
Printer is not turned on and online.
Turn the printer on and make sure it is online.
The correct printer drivers for the application are not
installed.
1.
Install the correct printer driver for the application.
2.
Try printing using the MS-DOS command:
DIR C:\ > [printer port]
where [printer port] is the address of the printer being
used. If the printer works, reload the printer driver.
If you are on a network, you may not have made the
connection to the printer.
Make the proper network connections to the printer.
Printer may have failed.
Run printer self-test.
Printer will not turn on.
Cause
Solution
The cables may not be connected properly.
Reconnect all cables and check the power cord and
electrical outlet.
Printer prints garbled information.
Cause
Solution
The correct printer driver for the application is not installed.
Install the correct printer driver for the application.
The cables may not be connected properly.
Reconnect all cables.
Printer memory may be overloaded.
Reset the printer by turning it off for one minute, then turn it
back on.
Printer is offline.
Cause
Solution
The printer may be out of paper.
Check the paper tray and refill it if it is empty. Select online.
Solving Printer Problems 113
Solving Keyboard and Mouse Problems
If you encounter keyboard or mouse problems, see the documentation that came with the equipment
and to the common causes and solutions listed in the following table.
Table E-9 Solving Keyboard Problems
Keyboard commands and typing are not recognized by the computer.
Cause
Solution
Keyboard connector is not properly connected.
1.
On the Windows XP or Windows 7 Desktop, click Start
> Shut Down.
On the Windows Vista Desktop, click Start, click the
arrow on the lower right corner of the Start menu, then
select Shut Down.
2.
After the shutdown is complete, reconnect the keyboard
to the back of the computer and restart the computer.
Program in use has stopped responding to commands.
Shut down your computer using the mouse and then restart
the computer.
Keyboard needs repairs.
See the Worldwide Limited Warranty for terms and
conditions.
Computer is in standby mode.
Press the power button to resume from standby mode.
CAUTION: When attempting to resume from standby
mode, do not hold down the power button for more than four
seconds. Otherwise, the computer will shut down and you
will lose any unsaved data.
Cursor will not move using the arrow keys on the keypad.
Cause
Solution
The Num Lock key may be on.
Press the Num Lock key. The Num Lock light should not be
on if you want to use the arrow keys. The Num Lock key can
be disabled (or enabled) in Computer Setup.
Table E-10 Solving Mouse Problems
Mouse does not respond to movement or is too slow.
Cause
Solution
Mouse connector is not properly plugged into the back of the
computer.
Shut down the computer using the keyboard.
Program in use has stopped responding to commands.
114 Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
1.
Press the Ctrl and Esc keys at the same time (or press
the Windows logo key) to display the Start menu.
2.
Use the arrow keys to select Shut Down and then
press the Enter key.
3.
After the shutdown is complete, plug the mouse
connector into the back of the computer (or the
keyboard) and restart.
Shut down the computer using the keyboard then restart the
computer.
Table E-10 Solving Mouse Problems (continued)
Mouse does not respond to movement or is too slow.
Cause
Solution
Mouse may need cleaning.
Remove the roller ball cover on the mouse and clean the
internal components.
Mouse may need repair.
See the Worldwide Limited Warranty for terms and
conditions.
Computer is in standby mode.
Press the power button to resume from standby mode.
CAUTION: When attempting to resume from standby
mode, do not hold down the power button for more than four
seconds. Otherwise, the computer will shut down and you
will lose any unsaved data.
Mouse will only move vertically, horizontally, or movement is jerky.
Cause
Solution
Mouse roller ball or the rotating encoder shafts that make
contact with the ball are dirty.
Remove roller ball cover from the bottom of the mouse and
clean the internal components with a mouse cleaning kit
available from most computer stores.
Solving Keyboard and Mouse Problems 115
Solving Hardware Installation Problems
You may need to reconfigure the computer when you add or remove hardware, such as an additional
drive or expansion card. If you install a plug and play device, Windows automatically recognizes the
device and configures the computer. If you install a non–plug and play device, you must reconfigure
the computer after completing installation of the new hardware. In Windows, use the Add Hardware
Wizard and follow the instructions that appear on the screen.
WARNING! When the computer is plugged into an AC power source, voltage is always applied to
the system board. To reduce the risk of personal injury from electrical shock and/or hot surfaces, be
sure to disconnect the power cord from the wall outlet and allow the internal system components to
cool before touching.
Table E-11 Solving Hardware Installation Problems
A new device is not recognized as part of the system.
Cause
Solution
Device is not seated or connected properly.
Ensure that the device is properly and securely connected
and that pins in the connector are not bent down.
Cable(s) of new external device are loose or power cables
are unplugged.
Ensure that all cables are properly and securely connected
and that pins in the cable or connector are not bent down.
Power switch of new external device is not turned on.
Turn off the computer, turn on the external device, then turn
on the computer to integrate the device with the computer
system.
When the system advised you of changes to the
configuration, you did not accept them.
Reboot the computer and follow the instructions for
accepting the changes.
A plug and play board may not automatically configure when
added if the default configuration conflicts with other devices.
Use Windows Device Manager to deselect the automatic
settings for the board and choose a basic configuration that
does not cause a resource conflict. You can also use
Computer Setup to reconfigure or disable devices to resolve
the resource conflict.
USB ports on the computer are disabled in Computer Setup.
Run the Computer Setup utility and ensure that Enable is
selected for the appropriate USB ports under Security >
USB Security.
Computer will not start.
Cause
Solution
Wrong memory modules were used in the upgrade or
memory modules were installed in the wrong location.
1.
Review the documentation that came with the system to
determine if you are using the correct memory modules
and to verify the proper installation.
NOTE:
116 Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
SODIMM1 must always be installed.
2.
Observe the beeps and LED lights on the front of the
computer. Beeps and flashing LEDs are codes for
specific problems.
3.
If you still cannot resolve the issue, contact Customer
Support.
Table E-11 Solving Hardware Installation Problems (continued)
Power LED flashes Red five times, once every second, followed by a two second pause, and the computer beeps
five times. (Beeps stop after fifth iteration but LEDs continue flashing.)
Cause
Solution
Memory is installed incorrectly or is bad.
CAUTION: To avoid damage to the DIMMs or the system
board, you must unplug the computer power cord before
attempting to reseat, install, or remove a DIMM module.
1.
Reseat DIMMs. Power on the system.
2.
Make sure a DIMM is installed in the black DIMM
connector first if there is only one DIMM in the system.
NOTE: On USDT models, SODIMM1 must always be
installed.
3.
Replace third-party memory with HP memory.
4.
Replace the system board.
Power LED flashes Red six times, once every second, followed by a two second pause, and the computer beeps six
times. (Beeps stop after fifth iteration but LEDs continue flashing.)
Cause
Solution
Graphics card is not seated properly or is bad, or system
board is bad.
For systems with a graphics card:
1.
Reseat the graphics card. Power on the system.
2.
Replace the graphics card.
3.
Replace the system board.
For systems with integrated graphics, replace the system
board.
Power LED flashes Red ten times, once every second, followed by a two second pause, and the computer beeps ten
times. (Beeps stop after fifth iteration but LEDs continue flashing.)
Cause
Solution
Bad option card.
1.
Check each option card by removing the cards one at
time (if multiple cards), then power on the system to see
if fault goes away.
2.
Once bad card is identified, remove and replace bad
option card.
3.
Replace the system board.
Solving Hardware Installation Problems 117
Solving Network Problems
Some common causes and solutions for network problems are listed in the following table. These
guidelines do not discuss the process of debugging the network cabling.
Table E-12 Solving Network Problems
Wake-on-LAN feature is not functioning.
Cause
Solution
S5 Maximum Power Saving feature is enabled.
Disable the S5 Maximum Power Saving option in Computer
Setup. Select Power > Hardware Power Management > S5
Maximum Power Saving.
S5 Wake on LAN is disabled.
: Enable the S5 Wake on LAN option in Computer Setup.
Select Advanced > Device Options > S5 Wake on LAN.
Wake-on-LAN is not enabled.
To enable Wake-on-LAN in Windows XP:
1.
Select Start > Control Panel.
2.
Double-click Network Connections.
3.
Double-click Local Area Connection.
4.
Click Properties.
5.
Click Configure.
6.
Click the Power Management tab, then select the
check box to Allow this device to bring the computer
out of standby.
To enable Wake-on-LAN in Windows Vista:
1.
Select Start > Control Panel.
2.
Under Network and Internet, select View network
status and tasks.
3.
In the Tasks list, select Manage network connections.
4.
Double-click Local Area Connection.
5.
Click the Properties button.
6.
Click the Configure button.
7.
Click the Power Management tab, then select the
check box to Allow this device to wake the computer.
To enable Wake-on-LAN in Windows 7:
118 Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
1.
Select Start > Control Panel.
2.
Under Network and Internet, select View network
status and tasks.
3.
Click Local Area Connection.
4.
Click the Properties button.
5.
Click the Configure button.
6.
Click the Power Management tab, then select the
check box to Allow this device to wake the computer.
Table E-12 Solving Network Problems (continued)
Network driver does not detect network controller.
Cause
Solution
Network controller is disabled.
1.
Run Computer Setup and enable network controller.
2.
Enable the network controller in the operating system
via Device Manager.
Incorrect network driver.
Check the network controller documentation for the correct
driver or obtain the latest driver from the manufacturer’s Web
site.
Network status link light never flashes.
NOTE: The network status light is supposed to flash when there is network activity.
Cause
Solution
No active network is detected.
Check cabling and network equipment for proper connection.
Network controller is not set up properly.
Check for the device status within Windows, such as Device
Manager for driver load and the Network Connections applet
within Windows for link status.
Network controller is disabled.
1.
Run Computer Setup and enable network controller.
2.
Enable the network controller in the operating system
via Device Manager.
Network driver is not properly loaded.
Reinstall network drivers.
System cannot autosense the network.
Disable auto-sensing capabilities and force the system into
the correct operating mode.
Diagnostics reports a failure.
Cause
Solution
The cable is not securely connected.
Ensure that the cable is securely attached to the network
connector and that the other end of the cable is securely
attached to the correct device.
The cable is attached to the incorrect connector.
Ensure that the cable is attached to the correct connector.
There is a problem with the cable or a device at the other
end of the cable.
Ensure that the cable and device at the other end are
operating correctly.
Network controller interrupt is shared with an expansion
board.
Under the Computer Setup Advanced menu, change the
resource settings for the board.
The network controller is defective.
Contact an authorized service provider.
Solving Network Problems 119
Table E-12 Solving Network Problems (continued)
Diagnostics passes, but the computer does not communicate with the network.
Cause
Solution
Network drivers are not loaded, or driver parameters do not
match current configuration.
Make sure the network drivers are loaded and that the driver
parameters match the configuration of the network controller.
Make sure the correct network client and protocol is installed.
The network controller is not configured for this computer.
Select the Network icon in the Control Panel and configure
the network controller.
Network controller stopped working when an expansion board was added to the computer.
Cause
Solution
Network controller interrupt is shared with an expansion
board.
Under the Computer Setup Advanced menu, change the
resource settings for the board.
The network controller requires drivers.
Verify that the drivers were not accidentally deleted when the
drivers for a new expansion board were installed.
The expansion board installed is a network card (NIC) and
conflicts with the embedded NIC.
Under the Computer Setup Advanced menu, change the
resource settings for the board.
Network controller stops working without apparent cause.
Cause
Solution
The files containing the network drivers are corrupted.
Reinstall the network drivers, using the Recovery Disc Set
created from the hard drive's Recovery Partition.
The cable is not securely connected.
Ensure that the cable is securely attached to the network
connector and that the other end of the cable is securely
attached to the correct device.
The network controller is defective.
Contact an authorized service provider.
New network card will not boot.
Cause
Solution
New network card may be defective or may not meet
industry-standard specifications.
Install a working, industry-standard NIC, or change the boot
sequence to boot from another source.
Cannot connect to network server when attempting Remote System Installation.
Cause
Solution
The network controller is not configured properly.
Verify Network Connectivity, that a DHCP Server is present,
and that the Remote System Installation Server contains the
NIC drivers for your NIC.
120 Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
Table E-12 Solving Network Problems (continued)
System setup utility reports unprogrammed EEPROM.
Cause
Solution
Unprogrammed EEPROM.
Contact an authorized service provider.
Solving Network Problems 121
Solving Memory Problems
If you encounter memory problems, some common causes and solutions are listed in the following
table.
CAUTION: Power may still be supplied to the DIMMs when the computer is turned off (depending
on the Management Engine (ME) settings). To avoid damage to the DIMMs or the system board, you
must unplug the computer power cord before attempting to reseat, install, or remove a DIMM module.
For those systems that support ECC memory, HP does not support mixing ECC and non-ECC
memory. Otherwise, the computer will not boot the operating system.
NOTE: The memory count will be affected by configurations with the Management Engine (ME)
enabled. The ME uses 8MB of system memory in single channel mode or 16MB of memory in dualchannel mode to download, decompress, and execute the ME firmware for Out-of-Band (OOB), thirdparty data storage, and other management functions.
Table E-13 Solving Memory Problems
System will not boot or does not function properly after installing additional memory modules.
Cause
Solution
A memory module is not installed in the XMM1 socket.
Ensure that a memory module is installed in the black
SODIMM1 socket on the system board.
Memory module is not the correct type or speed grade for
the system or the new memory module is not seated
properly.
Replace module with the correct industry-standard device for
the computer. On some models, ECC and non-ECC memory
modules cannot be mixed.
Out of memory error.
Cause
Solution
Memory configuration may not be set up correctly.
Use the Device Manager to check memory configuration.
You have run out of memory to run the application.
Check the application documentation to determine the
memory requirements.
Memory count during POST is wrong.
Cause
Solution
The memory modules may not be installed correctly.
Check that the memory modules have been installed
correctly and that proper modules are used.
Integrated graphics may use system memory.
No action required.
122 Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
Table E-13 Solving Memory Problems (continued)
Insufficient memory error during operation.
Cause
Solution
Too many Terminate and Stay Resident programs (TSRs)
are installed.
Delete any TSRs that you do not need.
You have run out of memory for the application.
Check the memory requirements for the application or add
more memory to the computer.
Power LED flashes Red five times, once every second, followed by a two second pause, and the computer beeps
five times. (Beeps stop after fifth iteration but LEDs continue flashing.)
Cause
Solution
Memory is installed incorrectly or is bad.
1.
Reseat DIMMs. Power on the system.
2.
Make sure a DIMM is installed in the black DIMM
connector first if there is only one DIMM in the system.
3.
Replace third-party memory with HP memory.
4.
Replace the system board.
Solving Memory Problems 123
Solving Processor Problems
If you encounter processor problems, common causes and solutions are listed in the following table.
Table E-14 Solving Processor Problems
Poor performance is experienced.
Cause
Solution
Processor is hot.
1.
Make sure the airflow to the computer is not blocked.
2.
Make sure the fans are connected and working properly
(some fans only operate when needed).
3.
Make sure the processor heatsink is installed properly.
Power LED flashes Red three times, once every second, followed by a two second pause.
Cause
Solution
Processor is not seated properly or not installed.
1.
Check to see that the processor is present.
2.
Reseat the processor.
Power LED flashes Red eleven times, once every second, followed by a two second pause.
Cause
Solution
The current processor does not support a feature previously
enabled on this system.
1.
Install a TXT capable processor.
2.
Disable TXT in the Computer Setup (F10) utility.
3.
Reinstall the original processor.
124 Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
Solving CD-ROM and DVD Problems
If you encounter CD-ROM or DVD problems, see the common causes and solutions listed in the
following table or to the documentation that came with the optional device.
Table E-15 Solving CD-ROM and DVD Problems
System will not boot from CD-ROM or DVD drive.
Cause
Solution
The device is attached to a SATA port that has been hidden
in the Computer Setup utility.
Run the Computer Setup utility and ensure Device Available
is selected for the device's SATA port in Security > Device
Security.
Removable Media Boot is disabled in the Computer Setup
utility.
Run the Computer Setup utility and enable booting to
removable media in Storage > Storage Options. Ensure
CD-ROM is enabled in Storage > Boot Order.
Network Server Mode is enabled in Computer Setup.
Run the Computer Setup utility and disable Network Server
Mode in Security > Password Options.
Non-bootable CD in drive.
Try a bootable CD in the drive.
Boot order not correct.
Run the Computer Setup utility and change boot sequence in
Storage > Boot Order.
Drive not found (identified).
Cause
Solution
Cable could be loose.
Check cable connections.
The system may not have automatically recognized a newly
installed device.
See reconfiguration directions in the Solving Hardware
Installation Problems on page 116 section. If the system still
does not recognize the new device, check to see if the
device is listed within Computer Setup. If it is listed, the
probable cause is a driver problem. If it is not listed, the
probable cause is a hardware problem.
If this is a newly installed drive, run the Computer Setup
utility and try adding a POST delay under Advanced >
Power-On Options.
The device is attached to a SATA port that has been hidden
in Computer Setup.
Run the Computer Setup utility and ensure Device Available
is selected for the device's SATA port in Security > Device
Security.
Drive responds slowly immediately after power-up.
Run Computer Setup and increase the POST Delay in
Advanced > Power-On Options.
CD-ROM or DVD devices are not detected or driver is not loaded.
Cause
Solution
Drive is not connected properly or not properly configured.
See the documentation that came with the optional device.
Solving CD-ROM and DVD Problems 125
Table E-15 Solving CD-ROM and DVD Problems (continued)
Movie will not play in the DVD drive.
Cause
Solution
Movie may be regionalized for a different country.
See the documentation that came with the DVD drive.
Decoder software is not installed.
Install decoder software.
Damaged media.
Replace media.
Movie rating locked out by parental lock.
Use DVD software to remove parental lock.
Media installed upside down.
Reinstall media.
PAVP support is disabled (Blu ray only).
Set the Protected Audio Video Path (PAVP) option to “Min” in
Computer Setup. Select Security > System Security >
Protected Audio Video Path (PAVP).
Cannot eject compact disc (tray-load unit).
Cause
Solution
Disc not properly seated in the drive.
Turn off the computer and insert a thin metal rod into the
emergency eject hole and push firmly. Slowly pull the tray
out from the drive until the tray is fully extended, then remove
the disc.
CD-ROM, CD-RW, DVD-ROM, or DVD-R/RW drive cannot read a disc or takes too long to start.
Cause
Solution
Media has been inserted upside down.
Re-insert the media with the label facing up.
The DVD-ROM drive takes longer to start because it has to
determine the type of media played, such as audio or video.
Wait at least 30 seconds to let the DVD-ROM drive
determine the type of media being played. If the disc still
does not start, read the other solutions listed for this topic.
CD or DVD disc is dirty.
Clean CD or DVD with a CD cleaning kit, available from most
computer stores.
Windows does not detect the CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive.
1.
Use Device Manager to remove or uninstall the device.
2.
Restart the computer and let Windows detect the CD or
DVD driver.
Recording or copying CDs is difficult or impossible.
Cause
Solution
Wrong or poor quality media type.
1.
Try using a slower speed when recording.
2.
Verify that you are using the correct media for the drive.
3.
Try a different brand of media. Quality varies widely
between manufacturers.
126 Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
USDT computer boots too slow after removing a CD-ROM or DVD drive.
Cause
Solution
The system is searching for the drive during boot because
the drive cable is still attached to the system board.
Disconnect the drive cable from the system board.
Solving CD-ROM and DVD Problems 127
Solving USB Flash Drive Problems
If you encounter USB flash drive problems, common causes and solutions are listed in the following
table.
Table E-16 Solving USB Flash Drive Problems
USB flash drive is not seen as a drive letter in Windows.
Cause
Solution
The drive letter after the last physical drive is not available.
Change the default drive letter for the flash drive in Windows.
USB flash drive not found (identified).
Cause
Solution
The device is attached to a USB port that has been hidden in
Computer Setup.
Run the Computer Setup utility and ensure that “Device
Available” is selected for “Front USB Ports” and “Rear USB
Ports” under Security > USB Security.
The device was not properly seated before power-up.
Ensure the device is fully inserted into the USB port before
applying power to the system
System will not boot from USB flash drive.
Cause
Solution
Boot order is not correct.
Run the Computer Setup utility and change boot sequence in
Storage > Boot Order.
Removable Media Boot is disabled in the Computer Setup
utility.
Run the Computer Setup utility and enable booting to
removable media in Storage > Storage Options. Ensure
USB is enabled in Storage > Boot Order.
The image on the device is not bootable.
Follow the procedures described in the “ROM Flash:
Replicating the Setup: Creating a Bootable Device:
Supported USB Flash Media Device” section of the
Maintenance and Service Guide.
The computer boots to DOS after making a bootable flash drive.
Cause
Solution
Flash drive is bootable.
Install the flash drive only after the operating system boots.
128 Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
Solving Front Panel Component Problems
If you encounter problems with devices connected to the front panel, refer to the common causes and
solutions listed in the following table.
Table E-17 Solving Front Panel Component Problems
A USB device, headphone, or microphone is not recognized by the computer.
Cause
Solution
Device is not properly connected.
1.
Turn off the computer.
2.
Reconnect the device to the front of the computer and
restart the computer.
The device does not have power.
If the USB device requires AC power, be sure one end is
connected to the device and one end is connected to a live
outlet.
The correct device driver is not installed.
1.
Install the correct driver for the device.
2.
You might need to reboot the computer.
1.
If possible, replace the cable.
2.
Restart the computer.
1.
Replace the device.
2.
Restart the computer.
The cable from the device to the computer does not work.
The device is not working.
USB ports on the computer are disabled in Computer Setup.
Run the Computer Setup utility and ensure that Device
Available is selected for appropriate USB ports under
Security > USB Security.
Solving Front Panel Component Problems 129
Solving Internet Access Problems
If you encounter Internet access problems, consult your Internet Service Provider (ISP) or refer to the
common causes and solutions listed in the following table.
Table E-18 Solving Internet Access Problems
Unable to connect to the Internet.
Cause
Solution
Internet Service Provider (ISP) account is not set up
properly.
Verify Internet settings or contact your ISP for assistance.
Modem is not set up properly.
Reconnect the modem. Verify the connections are correct
using the quick setup documentation.
Web browser is not set up properly.
Verify that the Web browser is installed and set up to work
with your ISP.
Cable/DSL modem is not plugged in.
Plug in cable/DSL modem. You should see a “power” LED
light on the front of the cable/DSL modem.
Cable/DSL service is not available or has been interrupted
due to bad weather.
Try connecting to the Internet at a later time or contact your
ISP. (If the cable/DSL service is connected, the “cable” LED
light on the front of the cable/DSL modem will be on.)
The CAT5 UTP cable is disconnected.
Connect the CAT5 UTP cable between the cable modem
and the computers’s RJ-45 connector. (If the connection is
good, the “PC” LED light on the front of the cable/DSL
modem will be on.)
130 Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
Table E-18 Solving Internet Access Problems (continued)
Unable to connect to the Internet.
Cause
Solution
IP address is not configured properly.
Contact your ISP for the correct IP address.
Cookies are corrupted. (A “cookie” is a small piece of
information that a Web server can store temporarily with the
Web browser. This is useful for having the browser
remember some specific information that the Web server can
later retrieve.)
Windows XP
1.
Select Start > Control Panel.
2.
Double-click Internet Options.
3.
On the General tab, click the Delete Cookies button.
Windows Vista
1.
Select Start > Control Panel.
2.
Click Network and Internet.
3.
Click Internet Options.
4.
In the Browsing history section on the General tab,
click the Delete button.
5.
Click the Delete cookies button.
Windows 7
1.
Select Start > Control Panel.
2.
Click Network and Internet.
3.
Click Internet Options.
4.
In the Browsing history section on the General tab,
click the Delete button.
5.
Select the Cookies check box and click the Delete
button.
Cannot automatically launch Internet programs.
Cause
Solution
You must log on to your ISP before some programs will start.
Log on to your ISP and launch the desired program.
Solving Internet Access Problems 131
Table E-18 Solving Internet Access Problems (continued)
Internet takes too long to download Web sites.
Cause
Solution
Modem is not set up properly.
Verify that the modem is connected and communicating
properly.
Windows XP
1.
Select Start > Control Panel.
2.
Double-click System.
3.
Click the Hardware tab.
4.
In the Device Manager area, click the Device Manager
button.
5.
Double-click Modems.
6.
Double-click Agere Systems PCI-SV92PP Soft
Modem.
7.
On the General tab, click Diagnostics.
8.
Click Query Modem. A “Success” response indicates
the modem is connected and working properly.
Windows Vista
1.
Select Start > Control Panel.
2.
Click on System and Maintenance.
3.
Click on System.
4.
In the Tasks list, select Device Manager.
5.
Double-click Modems.
6.
Double-click Agere Systems PCI-SV92PP Soft
Modem.
7.
On the General tab, click Diagnostics.
8.
Click Query Modem. A “Success” response indicates
the modem is connected and working properly.
Windows 7
132 Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
1.
Select Start > Control Panel.
2.
Click on Hardware and Sound.
3.
Click on Device Manager.
4.
Double-click Modems.
5.
Double-click Agere Systems PCI-SV92PP Soft
Modem.
6.
On the General tab, click Diagnostics.
7.
Click Query Modem. A “Success” response indicates
the modem is connected and working properly.
Solving Software Problems
Most software problems occur as a result of the following:
●
The application was not installed or configured correctly.
●
There is insufficient memory available to run the application.
●
There is a conflict between applications.
●
Be sure that all the needed device drivers have been installed.
●
If you have installed an operating system other than the factory-installed operating system,
check to be sure it is supported on the system.
If you encounter software problems, see the applicable solutions listed in the following table.
Table E-19 Solving Software Problems
Computer will not continue and no HP logo screen has appeared.
Cause
Solution
POST error has occurred.
Observe the beeps and LED lights on the front of the
computer. See Appendix A, POST Error Messages
on page 135 to determine possible causes.
See the Restore Kit or the Worldwide Limited Warranty for
terms and conditions.
Computer will not continue after HP logo screen has appeared.
Cause
Solution
System files may be damaged.
Use recovery diskette to scan hard drive for errors.
“Illegal Operation has Occurred” error message is displayed.
Cause
Solution
Software being used is not Microsoft-certified for your
version of Windows.
Verify that the software is certified by Microsoft for your
version of Windows (see program packaging for this
information).
Configuration files are corrupt.
If possible, save all data, close all programs, and restart the
computer.
Solving Software Problems 133
Contacting Customer Support
For help and service, contact an authorized reseller or dealer. To locate a reseller or dealer near you,
visit http://www.hp.com.
NOTE: If you take the computer to an authorized reseller, dealer, or service provider for service,
remember to provide the setup and power-on passwords if they are set.
Refer to the number listed in the warranty or in the Support Telephone Numbers guide for technical
assistance.
134 Appendix E Troubleshooting Without Diagnostics
F
POST Error Messages
This appendix lists the error codes, error messages, and the various indicator light and audible
sequences that you may encounter during Power-On Self-Test (POST) or computer restart, the
probable source of the problem, and steps you can take to resolve the error condition.
POST Message Disabled suppresses most system messages during POST, such as memory count
and non-error text messages. If a POST error occurs, the screen will display the error message. To
manually switch to the POST Messages Enabled mode during POST, press any key (except F10,
F11, or F12). The default mode is POST Message Disabled.
The speed at which the computer loads the operating system and the extent to which it is tested are
determined by the POST mode selection.
Quick Boot is a fast startup process that does not run all of the system level tests, such as the
memory test. Full Boot runs all of the ROM-based system tests and takes longer to complete.
Full Boot may also be enabled to run every 1 to 30 days on a regularly scheduled basis. To establish
the schedule, reconfigure the computer to the Full Boot Every x Days mode, using Computer Setup.
135
POST Numeric Codes and Text Messages
This section covers those POST errors that have numeric codes associated with them. The section
also includes some text messages that may be encountered during POST.
NOTE:
The computer will beep once after a POST text message is displayed on the screen.
Table F-1 Numeric Codes and Text Messages
Control panel message
Description
Recommended action
101-Option ROM Checksum Error
System ROM or expansion board option
ROM checksum.
1.
Verify the correct ROM.
2.
Flash the ROM if needed.
3.
If an expansion board was recently
added, remove it to see if the problem
remains.
4.
Clear CMOS. (See Appendix B,
Password Security and Resetting
CMOS on page 146.)
5.
If the message disappears, there may
be a problem with the expansion card.
6.
Replace the system board.
1.
Clear CMOS. (See Appendix B,
Password Security and Resetting
CMOS on page 146.)
2.
Remove expansion boards.
3.
Replace the system board.
1.
If a PCI expansion card was recently
added, remove it to see if the problem
remains.
2.
In Computer Setup, set Advanced >
Device Options > NIC PXE Option
ROM Download to DISABLE to
prevent PXE option ROM for the
internal NIC from being downloaded
during POST to free more memory for
an expansion card's option ROM.
Internal PXE option ROM is used for
booting from the NIC to a PXE server.
103-System Board Failure
110-Out of Memory Space for Option ROMs
162-System Options Not Set
DMA or timers.
Recently added PCI expansion card
contains an option ROM too large to
download during POST.
Configuration incorrect.
RTC (real-time clock) battery may need to
be replaced.
Run Computer Setup and check the
configuration in Advanced > Onboard
Devices.
Reset the date and time under Control
Panel. If the problem persists, replace the
RTC battery. See the Hardware Reference
Guide for instructions on installing a new
battery, or contact an authorized dealer or
reseller for RTC battery replacement.
136 Appendix F POST Error Messages
Table F-1 Numeric Codes and Text Messages (continued)
Control panel message
Description
Recommended action
163-Time & Date Not Set
Invalid time or date in configuration
memory.
RTC (real-time clock) battery may need to
be replaced.
Reset the date and time under Control
Panel (Computer Setup can also be used).
If the problem persists, replace the RTC
battery. See the Hardware Reference Guide
for instructions on installing a new battery,
or contact an authorized dealer or reseller
for RTC battery replacement.
163-Time & Date Not Set
CMOS jumper may not be properly
installed.
Check for proper placement of the CMOS
jumper if applicable.
164-MemorySize Error
Memory amount has changed since the last
boot (memory added or removed).
Press the F1 key to save the memory
changes.
164-MemorySize Error
Memory configuration incorrect.
1.
Run Computer Setup or Windows
utilities.
2.
Make sure the memory module(s) are
installed properly.
3.
If third-party memory has been added,
test using HP-only memory.
4.
Verify proper memory module type.
1.
Ensure memory modules are correctly
installed.
2.
Verify proper memory module type.
3.
Remove and replace the identified
faulty memory module(s).
4.
If the error persists after replacing
memory modules, replace the system
board.
A memory module in memory socket
identified in the error message is missing
critical SPD information, or is incompatible
with the chipset.
1.
Verify proper memory module type.
2.
Try another memory socket.
3.
Replace DIMM with a module
conforming to the SPD standard.
214-DIMM Configuration Warning
Populated DIMM Configuration is not
optimized.
Rearrange the DIMMs so that each channel
has the same amount of memory.
219-ECC Memory Module Detected ECC
Modules not supported on this Platform
Recently added memory module(s) support
ECC memory error correction.
1.
If additional memory was recently
added, remove it to see if the problem
remains.
2.
Check product documentation for
memory support information.
1.
Reconnect keyboard with computer
turned off.
2.
Check connector for bent or missing
pins.
3.
Ensure that none of the keys are
depressed.
4.
Replace keyboard.
201-Memory Error
213-Incompatible Memory Module in
Memory Socket(s) X, X, ...
301-Keyboard Error
RAM failure.
Keyboard failure.
POST Numeric Codes and Text Messages 137
Table F-1 Numeric Codes and Text Messages (continued)
Control panel message
Description
Recommended action
303-Keyboard Controller Error
I/O board keyboard controller.
1.
Reconnect keyboard with computer
turned off.
2.
Replace the system board.
1.
Reconnect the keyboard with computer
turned off.
2.
Ensure that none of the keys are
depressed.
3.
Replace the keyboard.
4.
Replace the system board.
1.
Reseat the graphics card
(if applicable).
2.
Clear CMOS. (See Appendix B,
Password Security and Resetting
CMOS on page 146.)
3.
Verify monitor is attached and turned
on.
4.
Replace the graphics card (if possible).
304-Keyboard or System Unit Error
501-Display Adapter Failure
Keyboard failure.
Graphics display controller.
510-Flash Screen Image Corrupted
Flash Screen image has errors.
Reflash the system ROM with the latest
BIOS image.
511-CPU, CPUA, or CPUB Fan not
Detected
CPU fan is not connected or may have
malfunctioned.
1.
Reseat CPU fan.
2.
Reseat fan cable.
3.
Replace CPU fan.
1.
Reseat chassis, rear chassis, or front
chassis fan.
2.
Reseat fan cable.
3.
Replace chassis, rear chassis, or front
chassis fan.
1.
Reseat front chassis fan.
2.
Reseat fan cable.
3.
Replace front chassis fan.
1.
Reseat power supply fan.
2.
Reseat fan cable.
3.
Replace power supply fan.
1.
Check and/or replace cables.
2.
Clear CMOS. (See Appendix B,
Password Security and Resetting
CMOS on page 146.)
3.
Replace diskette drive.
4.
Replace the system board.
512-Chassis, Rear Chassis, or Front
Chassis Fan not Detected
513-Front Chassis fan not detected
515-Power Supply fan not detected
601-Diskette Controller Error
Chassis, rear chassis, or front chassis fan is
not connected or may have malfunctioned.
Front chassis fan is not connected or may
have malfunctioned.
Power supply fan is not connected or may
have malfunctioned.
Diskette controller circuitry or floppy drive
circuitry incorrect.
138 Appendix F POST Error Messages
Table F-1 Numeric Codes and Text Messages (continued)
Control panel message
Description
Recommended action
605-Diskette Drive Type Error
Mismatch in drive type.
1.
Disconnect any other diskette
controller devices (tape drives).
2.
Clear CMOS. (See Appendix B,
Password Security and Resetting
CMOS on page 146.)
660-Display cache is detected unreliable
Integrated graphics controller display cache
is not working properly and will be disabled.
Replace system board if minimal graphics
degrading is an issue.
912-Computer Cover Has Been Removed
Since Last System Startup
Computer cover was removed since last
system startup.
No action required.
917-Front Audio Not Connected
Front audio harness has been detached or
unseated from motherboard.
Reconnect or replace front audio harness.
918-Front USB Not Connected
Front USB harness has been detached or
unseated from motherboard.
Reconnect or replace front USB harness.
921-Device in PCI Express slot failed to
initialize
There is an incompatibility/problem with this
device and the system or PCI Express Link
could not be retrained to an x1.
Try rebooting the system. If the error
reoccurs, the device may not work with this
system
1151-Serial Port A Address Conflict
Detected
Both external and internal serial ports are
assigned to COM1.
1.
Remove any serial port expansion
cards.
2.
Clear CMOS. (See Appendix B,
Password Security and Resetting
CMOS on page 146.)
3.
Reconfigure card resources and/or run
Computer Setup or Windows utilities.
1.
Remove any serial port expansion
cards.
2.
Clear CMOS. (See Appendix B,
Password Security and Resetting
CMOS on page 146.)
3.
Reconfigure card resources and/or run
Computer Setup or Windows utilities.
1.
Remove any serial port expansion
cards.
2.
Clear CMOS. (See Appendix B,
Password Security and Resetting
CMOS on page 146.)
3.
Reconfigure card resources and/or run
Computer Setup or Windows utilities.
1.
Determine if hard drive is giving correct
error message. Enter Computer Setup
and run the Drive Protection System
test under Storage > DPS Self-test.
2.
Apply hard drive firmware patch
if applicable. (Available at
http://www.hp.com/support.)
3.
Back up contents and replace hard
drive.
1152-Serial Port B Address Conflict
Detected
1155-Serial Port Address Conflict Detected
1720-SMART Hard Drive Detects Imminent
Failure
Both external and internal serial ports are
assigned to COM2.
Both external and internal serial ports are
assigned to same IRQ.
Hard drive is about to fail. (Some hard
drives have a hard drive firmware patch that
will fix an erroneous error message.)
POST Numeric Codes and Text Messages 139
Table F-1 Numeric Codes and Text Messages (continued)
Control panel message
Description
Recommended action
1796-SATA Cabling Error
One or more SATA devices are improperly
attached. For optimal performance, the
SATA 0 and SATA 1 connectors must be
used before SATA 2 and SATA 3.
Ensure SATA connectors are used in
ascending order. For one device, use SATA
0. For two devices, use SATA 0 and SATA
1. For three devices, use SATA 0, SATA 1,
and SATA 2.
1801-Microcode Patch Error
Processor is not supported by ROM BIOS.
1.
Upgrade BIOS to proper version.
2.
Change the processor.
1.
Reboot the computer.
2.
Unplug the power cord, re-seat the
memory modules, and reboot the
computer.
3.
If the memory configuration was
recently changed, unplug the
computer, restore the original memory
configuration, and reboot the
computer.
4.
If the error persists, replace the system
board.
1.
Reboot the computer.
2.
Unplug the power cord, re-seat the
memory modules, and reboot the
computer.
3.
If the memory configuration was
recently changed, unplug the power
cord, restore the original memory
configuration, and reboot the
computer.
4.
If the error persists, replace the system
board.
1.
Reboot the computer.
2.
Unplug the power cord, re-seat the
memory modules, and reboot the
computer.
3.
If the memory configuration was
recently changed, unplug the power
cord, restore the original memory
configuration, and reboot the
computer.
4.
If the error persists, replace the system
board.
2200-PMM Allocation Error during MEBx
Download
2201-MEBx Module did not checksum
correctly
2202-PMM Deallocation Error during MEBx
cleanup
2211-Memory not configured correctly for
proper MEBx execution
Memory error during POST execution of the
Management Engine (ME) BIOS Extensions
option ROM.
Memory error during POST execution of the
Management Engine (ME) BIOS Extensions
option ROM.
Memory error during POST execution of the
Management Engine (ME) BIOS Extensions
option ROM.
SODIMM1 is not installed.
140 Appendix F POST Error Messages
Make sure there is a memory module in the
black SODIMM1 socket and that it is
properly seated.
Table F-1 Numeric Codes and Text Messages (continued)
Control panel message
Description
Recommended action
2212-USB Key Provisioning failure writing to
device
USB device used for USB key provisioning
will not allow BIOS to update provision file
properly.
1.
Try a different USB key device for
provisioning.
2.
If the error persists, update to the latest
BIOS version and ME firmware
version.
3.
If the error still persists, replace the
system board.
1.
Reboot the computer.
2.
If the error persists, update to the latest
BIOS version and ME firmware
version.
3.
If the error still persists, replace the
system board.
1.
Update to the latest ME firmware
version.
2.
If the error persists and system BIOS
has been recently updated, restore
previous system BIOS version.
3.
If the error still persists, replace the
system board.
1.
Recreate the provisioning file using
third party management console
software.
2.
If the error persists and system BIOS
has been recently updated, restore
previous system BIOS version.
Otherwise, update the ME firmware
version.
3.
If the error still persists, replace the
system board.
1.
Reboot the computer.
2.
If the error persists and system BIOS
has been recently updated, restore
previous system BIOS version.
Otherwise, update the ME firmware
version.
3.
If the error still persists, replace the
system board.
1.
Reboot the computer.
2.
If the error persists, update to the latest
BIOS version and ME firmware
version.
3.
If the error still persists, replace the
system board.
2217-ME Firmware Version request failure
2218-ME Firmware Version should be
updated
2219-USB Key Provisioning file has invalid
header identifier
2220-USB Key Provisioning file has
mismatch version
2230-General error during MEBx execution
ME firmware is not properly responding to
BIOS query for version information.
ME firmware must be updated to match
current functionality contained in the system
BIOS.
Provisioning file contained on the USB key
has been corrupted or is not a valid version
for the current ME firmware.
Provisioning file contained on the USB key
is not a valid version for the current ME
firmware.
Error occurred during MEBx execution
which fails into the “General” grouping.
Status information displayed along with the
error provides further clarity into the failure.
MEBx handles transference of information
between the system BIOS and ME
firmware.
POST Numeric Codes and Text Messages 141
Table F-1 Numeric Codes and Text Messages (continued)
Control panel message
Description
Recommended action
2231-ME error during MEBx execution
Error occurred during MEBx execution
which fails into “ME” grouping.
1.
Reboot the computer.
2.
If the error persists, update to the latest
BIOS version and ME firmware
version.
3.
If the error still persists, replace the
system board.
1.
Reboot the computer.
2.
If the error persists, update to the latest
BIOS version and ME firmware
version.
3.
If the error still persists, replace the
system board.
1.
Reboot the computer.
2.
If the error persists, update to the latest
BIOS version and ME firmware
version.
3.
If the error still persists, replace the
system board.
Special system configurations with reduced
ME firmware image require BIOS control of
ME firmware upgrading. A failure has
occurred after the ME firmware update
process in which the BIOS could not relock
the ME firmware region.
1.
Reboot the computer.
2.
If the error persists, update to the latest
BIOS version and ME firmware
version.
3.
If the error still persists, replace the
system board.
Special system configurations with reduced
ME firmware image require BIOS control of
ME firmware upgrading. A failure has
occurred prior to the ME firmware update
process in which the BIOS could not unlock
the ME firmware region.
1.
Reboot the computer.
2.
If the error persists, update to the latest
BIOS version and ME firmware
version.
3.
If the error still persists, replace the
system board.
Invalid Electronic Serial Number
Electronic serial number is missing.
Enter the correct serial number in Computer
Setup.
Network Server Mode Active and No
Keyboard Attached
Keyboard failure while Network Server
Mode enabled.
1.
Reconnect keyboard with computer
turned off.
2.
Check connector for bent or missing
pins.
3.
Ensure that none of the keys are
depressed.
4.
Replace keyboard.
2232-AMT error during MEBx execution
2233-HECI error during MEBx execution
2239-ME image lock failure
2240-ME image unlock failure
Parity Check 2
Error occurred during MEBx execution
which fails into “AMT” grouping.
Error occurred during MEBx execution
which fails into “MEI or HECI” grouping.
Parity RAM failure.
142 Appendix F POST Error Messages
Run Computer Setup and Diagnostic
utilities.
Interpreting POST Diagnostic Front Panel LEDs and
Audible Codes
This section covers the front panel LED codes as well as the audible codes that may occur before or
during POST that do not necessarily have an error code or text message associated with them.
WARNING! When the computer is plugged into an AC power source, voltage is always applied to
the system board. To reduce the risk of personal injury from electrical shock and/or hot surfaces, be
sure to disconnect the power cord from the wall outlet and allow the internal system components to
cool before touching.
NOTE: If you see flashing LEDs on a PS/2 keyboard, look for flashing LEDs on the front panel of
the computer and refer to the following table to determine the front panel LED codes.
Recommended actions in the following table are listed in the order in which they should be
performed.
Not all diagnostic lights and audible codes are available on all models.
Table F-2 Diagnostic Front Panel LEDs and Audible Codes
Activity
Beeps
Possible Cause
Recommended Action
Green Power LED On.
None
Computer on.
None
Green Power LED flashes
every two seconds.
None
Computer in Suspend to
RAM mode (some models
only) or normal Suspend
mode.
None required. Press any key or move the
mouse to wake the computer.
Red Power LED flashes two
times, once every second,
followed by a two second
pause. Beeps stop after fifth
iteration but LEDs continue
until problem is solved.
2
Processor thermal
protection activated:
1.
Ensure that the computer air vents are not
blocked and the processor cooling fan is
running.
2.
Open hood, press power button, and see if
the processor fan spins. If the processor fan
is not spinning, make sure the fan's cable is
plugged onto the system board header.
3.
If fan is plugged in, but is not spinning, then
replace heatsink/fan assembly.
4.
Contact an authorized reseller or service
provider.
Processor not installed
(not an indicator of bad
processor).
1.
Check to see that the processor is present.
2.
Reseat the processor.
The incorrect external
power supply adapter is
being used on the USDT.
The USDT power supply adapter must be at
135W and use the Smart ID technology before
the system will power up. Replace the power
supply adapter with the HP-supplied USDT
power supply adapter.
A fan may be blocked or
not turning.
OR
The heatsink/fan
assembly is not properly
attached to the processor.
Red Power LED flashes three
times, once every second,
followed by a two second
pause. Beeps stop after fifth
iteration but LEDs continue
until problem is solved.
3
Red Power LED flashes four
times, once every second,
followed by a two second
pause. Beeps stop after fifth
iteration but LEDs continue
until problem is solved.
4
Interpreting POST Diagnostic Front Panel LEDs and Audible Codes 143
Table F-2 Diagnostic Front Panel LEDs and Audible Codes (continued)
Activity
Beeps
Possible Cause
Recommended Action
Red Power LED flashes five
times, once every second,
followed by a two second
pause. Beeps stop after fifth
iteration but LEDs continue
until problem is solved.
5
Pre-video memory error.
CAUTION: To avoid damage to the DIMMs or
the system board, you must unplug the computer
power cord before attempting to reseat, install, or
remove a DIMM module.
Red Power LED flashes six
times, once every second,
followed by a two second
pause. Beeps stop after fifth
iteration but LEDs continue
until problem is solved.
6
Pre-video graphics error.
1.
Reseat DIMMs.
2.
Make sure a DIMM is installed in the black
DIMM connector first if there is only one
DIMM in the system.
3.
Replace third-party memory with HP
memory.
4.
Replace the system board.
For systems with a graphics card:
1.
Reseat the graphics card.
2.
Replace the graphics card.
3.
Replace the system board.
For systems with integrated graphics, replace
the system board.
Red Power LED flashes
seven times, once every
second, followed by a two
second pause. Beeps stop
after fifth iteration but LEDs
continue until problem is
solved.
7
System board failure
(ROM detected failure
prior to video).
Replace the system board.
Red Power LED flashes eight
times, once every second,
followed by a two second
pause. Beeps stop after fifth
iteration but LEDs continue
until problem is solved.
8
Invalid ROM based on
bad checksum.
1.
Reflash the system ROM with the latest
BIOS image.
2.
Replace the system board.
Red Power LED flashes nine
times, once every second,
followed by a two second
pause. Beeps stop after fifth
iteration but LEDs continue
until problem is solved.
9
1.
Check that the voltage selector, located on
the rear of the power supply (some
models), is set to the appropriate voltage.
Proper voltage setting depends on your
region.
2.
Unplug the AC power cord from the
computer, wait 30 seconds, then plug the
power cord back in to the computer.
3.
Replace the system board.
4.
Replace the processor.
1.
Check each option card by removing the
card (one at a time if multiple cards), then
power on the system to see if fault goes
away.
2.
Once a bad card is identified, remove and
replace the bad option card.
3.
Replace the system board.
Red Power LED flashes ten
times, once every second,
followed by a two second
pause. Beeps stop after fifth
iteration but LEDs continue
until problem is solved.
10
144 Appendix F POST Error Messages
System powers on but is
unable to boot.
Bad option card.
Table F-2 Diagnostic Front Panel LEDs and Audible Codes (continued)
Activity
Beeps
Possible Cause
Recommended Action
Red Power LED flashes
eleven times, once every
second, followed by a two
second pause. Beeps stop
after fifth iteration but LEDs
continue until problem is
solved.
11
The current processor
does not support a
feature previously
enabled on this system.
1.
Install a TXT capable processor.
2.
Disable TXT in the Computer Setup (F10)
utility.
3.
Reinstall the original processor.
System does not power on
and LEDs are not flashing.
None
System unable to power
on.
Press and hold the power button for less than 4
seconds. If the hard drive LED turns green, the
power button is working correctly. Try the
following:
1.
Check that the voltage selector (some
models), located on the rear of the power
supply, is set to the appropriate voltage.
Proper voltage setting depends on your
region.
2.
Replace the system board.
OR
Press and hold the power button for less than 4
seconds. If the hard drive LED does not turn on
green then:
1.
Check that the unit is plugged into a
working AC outlet.
2.
Open hood and check that the power button
harness is properly connected to the
system board.
3.
Check that both power supply cables are
properly connected to the system board.
4.
Check to see if the 5V_aux light on the
system board is turned on. If it is turned on,
then replace the power button harness. If
the problem persists, replace the system
board.
5.
If the 5V_aux light on the system board is
not turned on, remove the expansion cards
one at a time until the 5V_aux light on the
system board turns on. It the problem
persists, replace the power supply.
Interpreting POST Diagnostic Front Panel LEDs and Audible Codes 145
G
Password Security and Resetting
CMOS
This computer supports security password features, which can be established through the Computer
Setup Utilities menu.
This computer supports two security password features that are established through the Computer
Setup Utilities menu: setup password and power-on password. When you establish only a setup
password, any user can access all the information on the computer except Computer Setup. When
you establish only a power-on password, the power-on password is required to access Computer
Setup and any other information on the computer. When you establish both passwords, only the
setup password will give you access to Computer Setup.
When both passwords are set, the setup password can also be used in place of the power-on
password as an override to log in to the computer. This is a useful feature for a network administrator.
If you forget the password for the computer, you can clear that password so you can gain access to
the information on the computer by resetting the password jumper.
CAUTION: Pushing the CMOS button will reset CMOS values to factory defaults. It is important to
back up the computer CMOS settings before resetting them in case they are needed later. Back up is
easily done through Computer Setup.
146 Appendix G Password Security and Resetting CMOS
Resetting the Password Jumper
To disable the power-on or setup password features, or to clear the power-on or setup passwords,
complete the following steps:
1.
Shut down the operating system properly, then turn off the computer and any external devices,
and disconnect the power cord from the power outlet.
2.
With the power cord disconnected, press the power button again to drain the system of any
residual power.
WARNING! To reduce the risk of personal injury from electrical shock and/or hot surfaces, be
sure to disconnect the power cord from the wall outlet, and allow the internal system
components to cool before touching.
CAUTION: When the computer is plugged in, the power supply always has voltage applied to
the system board even when the unit is turned off. Failure to disconnect the power cord can
result in damage to the system.
Static electricity can damage the electronic components of the computer or optional equipment.
Before beginning these procedures, ensure that you are discharged of static electricity by briefly
touching a grounded metal object. See the Safety & Regulatory Information guide for more
information.
3.
Remove the computer cover or access panel.
4.
Locate the header and jumper.
NOTE: The password jumper is green so that it can be easily identified. For assistance
locating the password jumper and other system board components, see the Illustrated Parts &
Service Map (IPSM) for that particular system. The IPSM can be downloaded from
http://www.hp.com/support.
5.
Remove the jumper from pins 1 and 2. Place the jumper on either pin 1 or 2, but not both, so
that it does not get lost.
6.
Replace the computer cover or access panel.
7.
Reconnect the external equipment.
8.
Plug in the computer and turn on power. Allow the operating system to start. This clears the
current passwords and disables the password features.
9.
To establish new passwords, repeat steps 1 through 4, replace the password jumper on pins 1
and 2, then repeat steps 6 through 8. Establish the new passwords in Computer Setup.
Resetting the Password Jumper 147
Clearing and Resetting the CMOS
The computer’s configuration memory (CMOS) stores information about the computer’s configuration.
The CMOS button resets CMOS but does not clear the power-on and setup passwords.
Clearing CMOS will clear the Active Management Technology (AMT) settings in the Management
Engine BIOS Extension (MEBx), including the password. The password will default to “admin” and will
need to be reset. The AMT settings will also need to be reset. To access the MEBx, press Ctrl+P
during POST.
1.
Turn off the computer and any external devices, and disconnect the power cord from the power
outlet.
2.
Disconnect the keyboard, monitor, and any other external equipment connected to the computer.
WARNING! To reduce the risk of personal injury from electrical shock and/or hot surfaces, be
sure to disconnect the power cord from the wall outlet, and allow the internal system
components to cool before touching.
CAUTION: When the computer is plugged in, the power supply always has voltage applied to
the system board even when the unit is turned off. Failure to disconnect the power cord can
result in damage to the system.
Static electricity can damage the electronic components of the computer or optional equipment.
Before beginning these procedures, ensure that you are discharged of static electricity by briefly
touching a grounded metal object. See the Safety & Regulatory Information guide for more
information.
3.
Remove the computer cover or access panel.
CAUTION: Pushing the CMOS button will reset CMOS values to factory defaults. It is
important to back up the computer CMOS settings before resetting them in case they are
needed later. Back up is easily done through Computer Setup.
148 Appendix G Password Security and Resetting CMOS
4.
Locate, press, and hold the CMOS button in for five seconds.
NOTE: Make sure you have disconnected the AC power cord from the wall outlet. The CMOS
button will not clear CMOS if the power cord is connected.
Figure G-1 CMOS button
NOTE: For assistance locating the CMOS button and other system board components, see the
Illustrated Parts & Service Map (IPSM) for that particular system.
5.
Replace the computer cover or access panel.
6.
Reconnect the external devices.
7.
Plug in the computer and turn on power.
NOTE: You will receive POST error messages after clearing CMOS and rebooting advising
you that configuration changes have occurred. Use Computer Setup to reset any special system
setups along with the date and time.
Clearing and Resetting the CMOS 149
H
Drive Protection System (DPS)
The Drive Protection System (DPS) is a diagnostic tool built into the hard drives installed in some
computers. DPS is designed to help diagnose problems that might result in unwarranted hard drive
replacement.
When these systems are built, each installed hard drive is tested using DPS, and a permanent record
of key information is written onto the drive. Each time DPS is run, test results are written to the hard
drive. Your service provider can use this information to help diagnose conditions that caused you to
run the DPS software.
Running DPS will not affect any programs or data stored on the hard drive. The test resides in the
hard drive firmware and can be executed even if the computer will not boot to an operating system.
The time required to execute the test depends on the manufacturer and size of the hard drive; in most
cases, the test will take approximately two minutes per gigabyte.
Use DPS when you suspect a hard drive problem. If the computer reports a SMART Hard Drive
Detect Imminent Failure message, there is no need to run DPS; instead, back up the information on
the hard drive and contact a service provider for a replacement hard drive.
150 Appendix H Drive Protection System (DPS)
Accessing DPS Through Computer Setup
When the computer does not power on properly you should use Computer Setup to access the DPS
program. To access DPS, perform the following steps:
1.
Turn on or restart the computer.
2.
When the F10 Setup message appears in the lower-right corner of the screen, press the F10
key.
NOTE: If you do not press the F10 key while the message is displayed, you must turn the
computer off, then on again, to access the utility.
A choice of five headings appears in the Computer Setup Utilities menu: File, Storage,
Security, Power, and Advanced.
3.
Select Storage > DPS Self-Test.
The screen will display the list of DPS-capable hard drives that are installed on the computer.
NOTE: If no DPS-capable hard drives are installed, the DPS Self-Test option will not appear
on the screen.
4.
Select the hard drive to be tested and follow the screen prompts to complete the testing process.
When the test has been completed, one of three messages will be displayed:
●
Test Succeeded. Completion Code 0.
●
Test Aborted. Completion Code 1 or 2.
●
Test Failed. Drive Replacement Recommended. Completion Code 3 through 14.
If the test failed, the completion code should be recorded and reported to your service provider for
help in diagnosing the computer problem.
Accessing DPS Through Computer Setup 151
I
Specifications
Table I-1 Specifications
Desktop Dimensions (in the desktop position)
Height
2.60 in
6.6 cm
Width
9.90 in
25.1 cm
Depth
10.00 in
25.4 cm
Approximate Weight
6.75 lb
3.07 kg
Weight Supported (maximum distributed load in desktop position)
77 lb
35 kg
Operating
50° to 95° F
10° to 35° C
Nonoperating
-22° to 140° F
-30° to 60° C
(depth will increase if the computer is equipped with a port security bracket)
Temperature Range (values subject to change with increasing altitude above sea
level)
NOTE: Operating temperature is derated 1.0° C per 300 m (1,000 ft) to 3,000 m (10,000 ft) above sea level, no direct
sustained sunlight. Maximum rate of change is 10° C (50° F)/Hr. The upper limit may be limited by the type and number of
options installed.
Relative Humidity (noncondensing)
Operating (28° C (82.4° F) max wet bulb)
10-90%
10-90%
Nonoperating (38.7° C (101.66° F) max wet bulb)
5-95%
5-95%
Operating
10,000 ft
3,048 m
Nonoperating
30,000 ft
9,144 m
Maximum
549 BTU/hr
132 kg-cal/hr
Typical (idle)
133 BTU/hr
33.5 kg-cal/hr
Maximum Altitude (unpressurized)
Heat Dissipation
Power Supply
Operating Voltage Range
90-264 VAC
Rated Voltage Range1
100-240 VAC
Rated Line Frequency
50-60 Hz
Power Output
135 W
152 Appendix I Specifications
Table I-1 Specifications (continued)
Rated Input Current (maximum)1
1
2.4A @ 100VAC
1.2A @ 200VAC
This system utilizes an active power factor corrected external power supply. This allows the system to pass the CE mark
requirements for use in the countries of the European Union. The active power factor corrected power supply also has the
added benefit of not requiring an input voltage range select switch.
153
Index
Symbols/Numerics
4-pin power pin assignments 71
6-pin power pin assignments 71
A
access panel
locking and unlocking 32
removing 38
access panel, locked 94
audible codes 143
audio
connectors 1
audio problems 110
B
backing up files 76, 80
Backup and Restore 76, 77
Backup and Restore
Center 80, 81
battery
disposal 29
removal and replacement 63
beep codes 143
bezel, removing 39
boot problems 127
booting options
Full Boot 135
Quick Boot 135
C
cable connections 45
cable lock 32
cable management 45
cable pinouts, SATA data
card reader, removal and
replacement 56
cautions
AC power 22
cables 28
cooling fan 27
154 Index
20
electrostatic discharge 23
keyboard cleaning 27
keyboard keys 27
CD-ROM or DVD problems 125
chassis, illustrated 22
cleaning
computer 26
mouse 27
safety precautions 26
CMOS
backing up 136
clearing and resetting 148
components
front panel 1
rear panel 2
computer
changing from desktop to
tower 65
cleaning 26
security locks 32
specifications 152
connector
audio line-in 2
audio line-out 2
DisplayPort monitor 2
headphone 1
power cord 2
PS/2 keyboard 2
PS/2 mouse 2
RJ-45 2
VGA monitor 2
connector pin assignments 67
country power cord set
requirements 75
creating a backup 76, 80
Customer Support 90, 134
D
diagnostics utility 84
disassembly preparation 30
diskette problems 98
DisplayPort monitor connector
identified 2
pin assignments 70
drive
installing optical drive 48
removing optical drive 46
Drive Protection System
(DPS) 150
E
electrostatic discharge (ESD)
preventing damage 23
error
codes 90, 143
messages 136
ethernet
BNC pin assignments 67
RJ-45 pin assignments 68
F
F11 recovery 78, 82
fan, power supply 27
flash drive problems 128
flashing LEDs 143
front bezel
removing and replacing
removing blanks 40
security 36
front fan, removal and
replacement 55
front panel
components 1
front panel problems 129
G
general problems 93
grounding methods 24
39
H
hard drive
activity light 1
proper handling 28
SATA characteristics 20
hard drive cage, removal and
replacement 53
hard drive problems 101
hard drive recovery 78, 82
hardware installation
problems 92
headphone connector 1
headphone pin assignments 69
heat sink, removal and
replacement 58
helpful hints 91
I
installing
memory module 43
optical drive 48
security locks 32
SODIMMs 43
internal components,
accessing 38
Internet access problems
M
Media Card Reader
problems 104
memory module,
specifications 41
memory problems 122
microphone
connector 1
pin assignments 69
monitor
connecting 2
pin assignments 70
monitor problems 106
mouse
cleaning 27
connector 2
pin assignments 67
mouse problems 114
N
network problems 118
numeric error codes 136
130
K
keyboard
cleaning 26
connector 2
pin assignments 67
keyboard problems 114
L
LEDs
blinking power 143
blinking PS/2 keyboard 143
system power 1
line-in
audio pin assignments 69
connector 2
line-out
audio pin assignments 69
connector 2
locks
cable lock 32
front bezel 36
HP Business PC Security
Lock 33
padlock 33
O
operating guidelines 25
optical drive
attaching release latch 47
installing 48
location 1
removing 46
optical drive problems 125
overheating, prevention 25
P
padlock 33
password
clearing 136
power-on 136
setup 136
PCI Express pin assignments 72
ports
front 1
rear 2
POST error messages 90
power
button 1
cord connector 2
power cord set requirements
country specific 75
power problems 97
power supply
fan 27
operating voltage range 152
power-on password 136
printer problems 113
problems
audio 110
CD-ROM or DVD 125
diskette 98
flash drive 128
front panel 129
general 93
hard drive 101
hardware installation 92
Internet access 130
keyboard 114
Media Card Reader 104
memory 122
monitor 106
mouse 114
network 118
power 97
printer 113
processor 124
software 133
processor problems 124
processor, removal and
replacement 59
product ID location 31
R
rear fan, removal and
replacement 62
rear panel components 2
recovering information 77, 81
recovery partition 78, 82
release latch, attaching optical
drive 47
removal and replacement
battery 63
card reader 56
front fan 55
hard drive cage 53
heat sink 58
processor 59
rear fan 62
speaker 57
system board 61
removing
access panel 38
Index 155
bezel blanks 40
front bezel 39
optical drive 46
resetting
CMOS 136
password jumper 136
restoring the hard drive 78, 82
RJ-45 connector 2
S
safety and comfort 90
safety precautions, cleaning 26
SATA
connectors on system
board 20
data cable pinouts 20
hard drive characteristics 20
pin assignments 71
screws, correct size 28
security
cable lock 32
front bezel 36
HP Business PC Security
Lock 33
padlock 33
serial interface pin
assignments 68
serial number location 31
service considerations 27
setup password 136
SODIMMs
installing 41
specifications 41
software
backing up 89
problems 133
servicing computer 28
spare part number
tamper-resistant wrench 28
Torx T-15 screwdriver 28
speaker, removal and
replacement 57
specifications
computer 152
SODIMMs 41
static electricity 23
system board
removal and replacement 61
SATA connectors 20
system power LED 1
156 Index
T
tamper-proof screws
tool 28
temperature control 25
tools, servicing 28
Torx T15 screwdriver 28
tower configuration 65
U
unlocking access panel 32
USB pin assignments 68
USB ports
front panel 1
rear panel 2
V
ventilation, proper 25
VGA monitor connector 2
Vision Diagnostics 84
W
Wake-on-LAN feature 118
Windows 7 operating system
DVD 79
Windows Vista operating system
DVD 82