Audiovox CCS-100 Service manual

Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Contents
Introduction..................................................................................................................................... 1
Materials ......................................................................................................................................... 2
Preparations..................................................................................................................................... 3
Remove plastic body panels ........................................................................................................3
Alternative 1: For Servo Installation In Right Roll Bar Cover (Fairing Protector) ................ 3
Alternative 2: For Servo Installation In Left Front Upper Cowl ............................................ 4
Remove the air cleaner housing assembly...................................................................................4
Vacuum System .............................................................................................................................. 5
Making the Vacuum Canister ......................................................................................................6
Attaching the Vacuum Canister...................................................................................................9
Vacuum Connections...................................................................................................................9
Servo ............................................................................................................................................. 12
Servo Setup ................................................................................................................................12
Servo Installation .......................................................................................................................14
Alternative 1: Right Roll Bar Cover (Fairing Protector) ...................................................... 14
Alternative 2: Left Front Upper Cowl .................................................................................. 15
Combined Servo & VC Mount ..................................................................................................... 17
Several Views of the Combined Servo & VC....................................................................... 19
Throttle.......................................................................................................................................... 20
Actuator Cable Anchor ..............................................................................................................20
Alternative 1: Forward Pulling ............................................................................................. 20
Alternative 2: Rear Pulling ................................................................................................... 21
Carburetor Connections .............................................................................................................22
Alternative 1: Downward Bellcrank For Forward Pulling Actuator..................................... 22
Alternative 2: Upward Bellcrank For Rear Pulling Actuator ............................................... 24
Chain Connections.....................................................................................................................25
Electrical System .......................................................................................................................... 26
Handlebar Control Unit .............................................................................................................26
Main Wiring Harness.................................................................................................................27
Wire connections .......................................................................................................................28
Afterwards..................................................................................................................................... 29
Reactivate the electrical system. ................................................................................................29
Replace the body parts...............................................................................................................29
Test ride. ....................................................................................................................................29
ON/OFF .....................................................................................................................................29
SET SPEED ...............................................................................................................................29
ACCEL ......................................................................................................................................29
COAST ......................................................................................................................................29
RESUME ...................................................................................................................................30
DISENGAGE.............................................................................................................................30
i
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Disclaimer
These instructions reflect the efforts of Dave Steven, Chuck Chiodini, and Bruce Pickett to
install the Audiovox CCS100 Electronic Cruise Control into each of their Honda Pacific Coast
motorcycles. We would like to thank Alan Hall and Rick Corwine for their efforts in reviewing
this document.
The authors of these instructions, and the owner of the web site, and anyone else associated
with this project, disclaim any responsibility for any injuries to persons or damage to property
that may occur by anyone using these instructions or any portion thereof. The users of these
instructions bear full responsibility for their use.
ii
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Introduction
When riding on long stretches of roadway, motorcyclists often find it convenient to relax their
grip on the throttle handle and rest their hand. Many PC800 riders use the Throttlemeister and
Vista Cruise throttle locks, or the Throttle Rocker wrist rest, because these are easy to install and
inexpensive. But while these devices have their places, they don't really substitute for a cruise
control, because they will not by themselves maintain a bike's speed constant over varying
terrain. And while there are some specialty cruise controls, such as the MotorCycle Cruise from
Australia, there aren't many, and they tend to be expensive - in the range of $500US.
But cruise controls for automobiles abound, and they cost as little as a Throttlemeister throttle
lock - however, the instructions for these do not accommodate installation on motorcycles. Some
motorcyclists have experimented with adapting automotive cruise controls on their motorcycles
with good results. But only a few people are known to have tried this for the Honda Pacific Coast
PC800. These instructions detail the process of installing an Audiovox CCS100 electronic cruise
control on the PC800.
The Audiovox CCS100 is available in many auto parts stores such as Schucks, Pep Boys and JC
Whitney. The CCS100 kit contains numerous parts, many of which are not needed for the PC
installation. Some of the kit's parts may be modified for use on the PC800. A few minor parts
must be purchased but these items are low in cost and are available from most hardware or auto
parts stores. The major departure from an automotive installation is the need for a vacuum
canister (made from PVC pipe) and the fact you don’t need to install any magnets or pickups.
Page 1
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Materials
•
•
•
•
•
•
1 - Audiovox Model CCS100 cruise control kit
2 - U-bolts, 3/4" dia. x 1-1/4" long x 1/4" thread
1 - commercial vacuum canister (Audiovox p/n 250-6019, available from JC Whitney), or
o PVC or ABS pipe
o PVC or ABS end caps
o 1/8" hose barb to ¼" MIP adapter
o Emissions check valve; NAPA p/n 730-1347
o PVC or ABS cement
Electrical tape
RTV silicon sealer (clear)
cable ties
Page 2
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Preparations
Read everything before doing anything!
Remove plastic body panels
Alternative 1: For Servo Installation In
Right Roll Bar Cover (Fairing
Protector)
The following plastic body panels must be
removed regardless of which servo
mounting location is chosen. Additional
panels must be removed for mounting the
servo in the Left Front Upper Cowl (see
Alternative 2).
(numbers in parentheses refer to panel
numbers in the PC800 Service Manual)
• Air Duct/Maintenance Lids (#10)
• Side Covers (#11)
• Right Fairing Protector (#7)
• Center Covers (#4)
• Top Shelter (#5)
• Handle Center Cover (#22)
• Handle Upper Cover (#23)
Page 3
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Alternative 2: For Servo Installation
In Left Front Upper Cowl
In addition to the panels removed for
Alternative 1, the following panels
must be removed (numbers in
parentheses refer to panel numbers in
the PC800 Service Manual):
• Mirrors (#1)
• Wind screen (#2)
o air duct grill
o garnish
o frame
o screen
o rubber seat
o air duct
• Meter Panel (#9)
• Meter Visor (#6)
Removal of the following additional
panels may make it easier to install the
cruise control system, although it is
possible to do the installation without
removing them:
• Fairing Protectors (#7)
• Front Lower Cowl (#8)
• Front Upper Cowl (#3)
Remove the air cleaner
housing assembly
•
•
•
•
remove 2 self taping screws
holding the auto fuel valve to the
housing
loosen the connecting tube band
clamp screws on each carburetor
intake
loosen the spring clamp on the
breather tube at the rear of the
housing and remove the breather
tube
lift the assembly out of the way
Page 4
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Vacuum System
The CCS100 cruise control requires a constant source of vacuum. Vacuum is what supplies the
mechanical power for the throttle actuator. The Pacific Coast's two carburetors each have a
vacuum source. The vacuum source on the #1 (left) carburetor is used to provide vacuum to the
auto fuel valve; however, the one on the #2 (right) carburetor is normally unused and is capped
off. It is possible to use only one vacuum source to supply the servo, but this may not provide
sufficient vacuum under all situations. It is recommended that both carburetor vacuum sources
should be used.
When a vehicle is using cruise control while traveling up long hills, more suction is needed for
the servo to pull the throttle further and harder. On vehicles with larger engines, there is often
enough suction available to provide all the needs of the cruise control servo without needing
assistance. But on small vehicles such as the PC800, the meager suction provided by the
carburetors can easily be overcome by hard pulls, causing the cruise control to slacken off.
Consequently, the PC800 needs the assistance of a vacuum reserve. The vacuum canister (VC)
provides this extra vacuum reserve to help the CCS100 maintain a constant pull.
Since there is limited space within the PC800's fairings within which to mount equipment, the
size of the vacuum canister will be limited in order to fit inside. Since it may be impractical to
install a single, large volume vacuum canister, if more vacuum reserve is needed, two or more
smaller vacuum canisters may be connected in series with additional lengths of vacuum tubing.
Also, it is not required that the vacuum canister be located next to the servo; they could be
separated by several feet, as long as there is sufficient length of vacuum tubing.
Page 5
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Making the Vacuum Canister
Ready-made vacuum canisters that include internal vacuum check valves are available at many
auto parts stores that sell cruise controls kits - JC Whitney, a major catalog auto parts retailer,
sells one for around $10US. The JC Whitney vacuum canister is about 4 inches in diameter and
about 5 inches long, with an internal volume of about 60 cubic inches. This VC has been used
with very good results on the PC800, but because of its large diameter, finding a location big
enough to accommodate it within the PC800's plastic may be a challenge. You can also make
one from parts readily available at hardware stores.
PVC or ABS plastic pipes and fittings can be readily used to fabricate vacuum canisters of nearly
any size. Carefully measure the space where the vacuum canister will be located and size the
parts accordingly, for there is very limited space within the PC800's fairings. The volume of a
cylinder may be calculated with the formula:
where:
2
V = volume
⎡D⎤
V =π ×⎢ ⎥ ×L
π = Pi = 3.1416
⎣2⎦
D = diameter
L = length
Some common VC dimensions:
Inside Diameter Length Volume
1-1/2”
10”
18 ci
2”
10”
31 ci
3”
10”
70 ci
4”
5”
60 ci
Page 6
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Drill two holes in the end of one
of the end caps that are sized
appropriately for the adapters
that you are using. Dry thread the
barbed adapters into the holes so
that threads are cut into the
plastic. Remove the adapters and
clean off any loose particles.
Apply JB Weld to the new
threads in the cap holes and
reinsert the adapters, tightening
them down flush. Apply
additional JB Weld to the adapter
threads inside the cap and ensure
that they are well sealed to the
cap. Make sure that air will flow
through the canister unimpeded.
Allow the JB Weld to set
thoroughly before attaching the
end cap to the pipe.
Cut a piece of pipe to length.
Square the ends and clean off any
loose pieces. Clean and prime the
pipe and end caps. Cement both
caps to the pipe ends with
appropriate cement (i.e., PVC or
ABS cement).
Caution - do not test the air flow
by sucking on the fittings by
mouth - there may be toxic fumes
inside the canister resulting from
the glue.
Page 7
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
The vacuum canister pictured above has an internal volume of about 18 cubic inches. If this does
not provide sufficient vacuum reserve for the servo, multiple vacuum canisters may be
constructed and connected in series. The picture below shows two identical vacuum canisters
joined together by JB Weld and cable ties. A short piece of vacuum tubing connects the two
canisters together to provide a total volume of 35 cubic inches for the vacuum reserve.
Below is an example of an even larger vacuum canister made from black ABS pipe and fittings.
It has an inside diameter of 3" and length of 10", giving it a volume of 70 cubic inches. The
construction methodology is the same as that of the canister with the white PVC pipes and
fittings. This design attaches the vacuum check valve directly to the vacuum canister, thus
eliminating one of the barbed hose connectors. A small hole was drilled into the end cap and the
check valve was secured in it with JB Weld.
Page 8
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Attaching the Vacuum Canister
The vacuum canister is attached to
frame struts under the front left
fairing near the connection point for
the left mirror. With the hose barbs
on the vacuum canister pointed down
and to the rear, attach it to the lower
of the two fairing side struts with
several long, sturdy cable ties. Make
sure that there is sufficient space to
attach the vacuum hoses to the hose
barbs on the canister.
Vacuum Connections
Use the long rubber vacuum tubing supplied in the CCS100 kit. Additional tubing and fittings
may possibly be needed, depending upon how many connections are made.
These instructions call for making connections to both carburetors' vacuum ports. It is suggested
that both ports are necessary to provide sufficient suction for the cruise control vacuum system.
If, however, you choose to use only a single vacuum port, simpler connections may be made
using only the #2 carburetor's vacuum port.
Page 9
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Locate the capped-off vacuum port
on the #2 (right) carburetor; this is
an "L" shaped tube near the lower,
front, right corner of the #2
carburetor. Remove the vacuum
cap and its spring clip (you may
want to save it for the future, "just
in case", but you don't have to).
Secure a length of vacuum tubing
to this port - its length will be
trimmed to fit later. If you will be
using only a single vacuum port,
this tubing can be run directly to
the check valve and vacuum
canister, and you can disregard the
following instructions for attaching
to the #1 carburetor vacuum port.
Locate the vacuum port on the #1
(left) carburetor; this is an "L"
shaped tube near the lower, rear
left corner of the #1 carburetor.
There will be an existing vacuum
line attached here to supply
vacuum for the auto fuel valve that
is normally attached to the rear of
the carburetor air box. This line is
secured to the vacuum port with a
small spring clip. Compress the
spring clip and remove the line
from the port, but leave the 7-inch
length of tubing connected to the
auto fuel valve. Secure one arm of
a vacuum "tee" fitting into this
line. Insert the stem of the "tee" fitting into a 3-inch length of vacuum tubing, and then secure the
other end of that 3" tubing onto the open vacuum port. Next, secure a 12-inch length of vacuum
tubing to the last open arm of the "tee" fitting. Run the loose end of the 12" line around to the
front of the carburetors to meet up with the vacuum line attached to the #2 carburetor vacuum
port. Trim these two lines where they meet and join them together onto two arms of another
vacuum "tee". Finally, attach a long length of vacuum tubing to the stem of the second "tee".
Run the line towards the bike frame's steering head and pass it through an opening on the left
side where some wire bundles already pass through.
Page 10
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
If the vacuum canister does not have an integral check
valve, then a separate one is needed in the vacuum
line to prevent the vacuum reserve in the VC from
being lost when carburetor suction decreases. The
check valve may be installed at any convenient
location in the vacuum line between the carburetors'
vacuum source(s) and the vacuum canister(s). Identify
the vacuum side of the check valve; the vacuum side
must be mounted towards the carburetors. The
vacuum side may be labeled, but if you can't tell
which side is which, blow through one end of the
valve (don't suck on the valve with your mouth
because if there is something in the valve, you could
aspirate it). If the flow is blocked, that's the vacuum
side, but if air flows freely, that's the supply side.
Simply press fitting the vacuum hoses onto the fittings may
allow in-leakage of air into the vacuum system, and thus
reduce the vacuum power available to the servo. Use either
vacuum clamps or silicon sealant on all joints. Cable ties
pulled tight may be used as inexpensive vacuum clamps. If
adhesives are used, apply them only to the fittings and not
the hoses, so that the hoses do not become accidentally
sealed shut.
Make sure that there is sufficient slack in the vacuum tubing and that it doesn't interfere with
anything, or rub on any sharp edges. Trim it to length and attach it to one of the hose nipples on
the previously installed vacuum canister. Attach the remainder to the vacuum canister's second
hose nipple. If there is an additional vacuum canister, run this line to it, otherwise, it will be
attached to the port on the servo after that has been installed.
It is critically important that all joints in the vacuum system are tightly secured.
Poor performance of the cruise control system may result from in-leakage of air
into the vacuum system!
Page 11
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Servo
The servo is the electronic brains as well as the
mechanical muscle of the cruise control system. It
should be protected as much as possible from heat
and electrical interference.
The servo sensitivity and other settings are set via the
internal DIP switches. The degree of sensitivity
needed for smooth operation of the servo depends
upon the length of the bellcrank arm used to attach
the servo actuator cable to the carburetor throttle
linkage. If a rear-pulling actuator configuration is
used, a long bellcrank may be installed, and the servo
may be set to low sensitivity as the Audiovox
installation manual suggests for light vehicles. But if
a forward-pulling actuator configuration is used, the
bellcrank on the throttle will necessarily be short in order to clear the engine shroud, and the
servo will need to be set to high sensitivity to compensate.
Servo Setup
Remove the two screws from the access cover on the back
of the servo. Inside the servo, remove the black jumper
just below the LED and to the left of the DIP switches; this
is necessary for using the cruise control with the PC800's
manual transmission. Set the internal DIP switches per the
following tables:
SW1 SW2 SW3 SW4 SW5
ON OFF OFF
Vacuum
4000 Pulses Tach
Per Mile
only Sensitivity see below
SW6
OFF
Control
Switch
Normally
Open
SW7
ON
Tach
Source
Is Coil
The sensitivity of the servo is set via switches #4 & #5.
Vacuum
Sensitivity
SW4 SW5
Low
ON
OFF
Medium
OFF
OFF
High
OFF
ON
Page 12
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
The choice of sensitivity settings depends a great deal on the length of the bellcrank arm, and the
desired responsiveness of the system. The shorter the bellcrank, the higher the sensitivity needed
to actuate it. Higher sensitivity settings require more vacuum since the actuator is required to
move more frequently. Systems using short bellcranks of 1" to 1-1/2" may need the sensitivity
set to "high". Those systems with longer bellcranks that allow for full travel of the actuator will
probably use "low" or "medium" sensitivity. It is suggested that the "medium" sensitivity setting
be tried first for any new system design; adjustments to the sensitivity can then be made after
system testing. Note that with higher sensitivity settings, there may be sharper throttle responses
that could jerk the rider.
Attach the main wiring harness plug to the
connector inside the servo. The gray and black pair
of wires that are used for the magnetic drive line
sensor will not be used and may be clipped off from
the wiring harness. Reattach the access cover,
making sure that the wires are laid out flat as the
cover is tightened down.
Depending on the orientation of the servo when it
is mounted, the curved mounting bracket may
remain where it was installed by the factory, or it
may be rotated 180° from its original position, or
it may be removed completely.
If the servo will be mounted to the frame, two
3/4"-inch U-bolts can be used for attachment. But
first, the bracket must have a couple extra holes
drilled to match the width of the U-bolts. Clean
off any burrs from the drilled bracket.
In installations where there is minimal room, as
when installing extra-capacity vacuum canisters,
it may be necessary to remove the servo bracket
completely and secure the servo to the frame
using large cable ties.
Page 13
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Servo Installation
The servo and vacuum canister have successfully been located in several different locations and
orientations on the PC800. Two alternative mounting locations are discussed below.
Alternative 1: Right Roll Bar Cover (Fairing Protector)
•
•
Advantages
Very easy access to servo
Easy to route actuator cable to throttle
•
•
•
Disadvantages
Electro-mechanical components are
close to engine heat
Servo may be subjected to road spray
through openings in the cowl and
fairing
Tight space limitations
Inside the right roll bar cover is a limited amount of empty space into which the servo and a short
vacuum canister can be fitted. Since this is right next to the engine casing, which gets quite hot,
try to keep the cruise control hardware as far away as possible.
Above: Chuck Chiodini's "Scooter" with servo and vacuum canister mounted inside the right roll
bar cover.
Page 14
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January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Alternative 2: Left Front Upper Cowl
•
•
•
•
Advantages
Keeps electromechanical components
away from engine heat, electrical
interference, and road spray
Substantial empty space for installing
servo and vacuum canister
Easy access to fuse block and electrical
connections
Easy to route actuator cable to throttle
•
Disadvantages
Most of bike's forward plastic panels
must be removed for servicing or
adjusting servo
Inside the left front upper cowl is a great deal of empty space, and also two frame struts to which
hardware may be secured.
Here, the servo was mounted to the frame strut using
the factory bracket and U-bolts. The white, twincylinder vacuum canister is mounted to the strut
below.
The actuator cable has more length than is needed, so
it must be routed in such a fashion as to use up some
of its length. As the actuator cable leaves the back of
the servo, it gently bends down and around to create a
large 360-degree loop. This loop will be tucked
inside the left front fairing and hidden when the
Tupperware is reinstalled. Pass the cable over the
frame towards the carburetor. Make sure that the
cable remains clear of the steering head and forks.
Loosely attach it to the anchor with its two hex nuts.
It will need to be adjusted after the bead chain is attached between the actuator cable and
bellcrank.
In the installation below, the factory bracket was removed
from the servo to minimize space, and the servo was
mounted to the upper frame strut with large cable ties.
Extra space was required to accommodate the extra-large,
black ABS vacuum canister mounted to the strut below.
Page 15
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
It is important to avoid tight bends in the actuator cable. The cable has more length than is
needed, so it must be routed in such a fashion as to use up some of its length. As the actuator
cable leaves the back of the servo, route the cable downward behind the left side body panel.
Make certain that the cable will not interfere with the air duct/maintenance lid. Curve the cable
back up toward the fuel filler box.
Finally, attach the vacuum line from the vacuum canister to the port on the side of the servo.
Make sure that all vacuum connections are well sealed!
Page 16
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Combined Servo & VC Mount
Subsequent to the original publishing of these installation instructions, an alternative approach
was developed which combined the servo and vacuum canister (VC) on a single mount. The
original instructions have been maintained, but this section has been added to describe the
alternative approach.
On this installation, a bracket was made to hold both the servo and the VC inside the PC’s left
upper fairing. This method utilized a ready-made VC purchased from JC Whitney. This VC
contained an integral check valve and was ready-to-install. Its small size (5” x 4” diameter)
allowed for easy installation.
The Audiovox CCS100 kit contains a metal
strap that may be used for the mounting bracket
for the servo and VC. A pair of holes were
drilled at the top of the bracket to receive a 1"
U-bolt. The U-bolt fits around the upper fairing
frame brace.
The holes in the bracket for the U-bolt are on drilled on
a diagonal to line up with the holes in the mounting tab
attached to the servo.
Note - with the servo cable extended to the right, and
with the servo's vacuum nipple facing you, the curved
metal mounting tab should be at the rear and extending
upward from the servo. As it comes from the factory,
the tab extends downward. The tab should be
unscrewed from the servo, reversed, and reattached.
Page 17
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
The U-bolt fits around the upper fairing frame brace
and through the servo/VC mounting bracket. Make
sure that the frame brace does not become crushed
or bent from over-tightening the nuts on the U-bolt.
The bracket is angled forward so that the servo
cable will be angled downward and rearward in
order to pass under the left pocket in the dash
panel deck.
Page 18
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Several Views of the Combined Servo & VC
Looking upwards from below the mounted
servo/VC.
View from in front of the mounted servo/VC.
Servo accessible through dash panel left speaker
hole.
Page 19
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Throttle
Actuator Cable Anchor
The actuator cable must be anchored to a stable mount in which to pull the throttle against. There
are two alternative methods for anchoring the cable: to the front, or to the rear. A rearward
pulling cable will allow for the use of a longer bellcrank.
Alternative 1: Forward Pulling
•
Advantages
Easy to route actuator cable
•
•
•
Disadvantages
Awkward attachments of brackets to
frame
Mounting brackets can interfere with
operation of throttle cables or choke
cable
Potential interference with carburetor
airbox
The actuator cable needs to be mounted so that there is a long, unobstructed path between the
cable anchor and the bellcrank on the throttle. The PC's air cleaner box normally sits above the
carburetors and is an obstruction that needs to be avoided. Consequently, for a forward-pulling
actuator, the anchor point needs to be located far to the left of the centerline of the main throttle
cables. There are few easy attachment points near where the actuator anchor needs to be
mounted. Whereas it is possible to drill holes into the frame to which the anchor could be
secured with bolts, this is not advised since this increases the risk of weakening the frame.
The CCS100 kit contains both straight and "L"shaped brackets, either of which is long enough to
extend from a pair of existing holes in the top of the
frame near the steering head. The holes in these
brackets will need to be enlarged in order to match
the narrower spacing of the holes on the frame.
Ensure that the throttle and choke cables are not
obstructed or put into a bind.
Page 20
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
The cable anchor itself is bolted to the bracket and
should be pointed directly at the throttle bellcrank to
minimize friction on the cable exiting the casing end.
It is important to avoid tight bends in the actuator
cable.
Alternative 2: Rear Pulling
•
•
•
Advantages
Easy to route actuator cable
No interference with throttle cables,
choke cable, or carburetor air box
Anchor easily attaches to trunk release
bracket
Disadvantages
Shorten the anchor bracket so that it has only three
open mounting holes. Make opposing double bends
in the bracket so that the anchor's position will be
offset outwards by about an inch. The unused
mounting ears on the side of the anchor may be left
alone, or they may be cut off as in the picture at left.
Angle the anchor downward slightly on the bracket,
and securely tighten the bolt, lock washer, and nut.
Attach the anchor bracket to the forward bolt holding
the trunk release bracket to the fuel filler box. Attach
the actuator cable to the anchor; it will need to be
adjusted later after the bead chain is attached between
the actuator cable and bellcrank. Make sure that the
anchor points the cable directly at the throttle so that
it will not rub on the end of its sheath when it moves
in and out.
Page 21
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Carburetor Connections
A connection to the throttle linkage on the carburetor is needed for the servo actuator cable to
pull upon. This may be done with a "bellcrank", which is an extension arm attached to the
throttle. The cruise control installation manual says to "match the actuator pull to throttle travel,
so to be greater than 40 mm, but less than 45 mm, to avoid a condition where the actuator is
pulling past the full throttle stop and introducing the possibility of damaging the linkage."
Alternative 1: Downward Bellcrank For Forward Pulling Actuator
•
•
Advantages
Short design is less susceptible to
bending
Full 50º rotation of throttle pulley
•
•
•
•
Disadvantages
Provides less than the recommended
40-45 mm throw of CC actuator cable
Short throw requires the use of a higher
vacuum sensitivity setting, which may
result in sharp throttle responses that
could jerk the rider.
Actuator must pull harder to achieve
the same throttle rotation as a longer
bellcrank
Potential for actuator cable or bead
chain rubbing or snagging on engine
shroud
To accommodate the forward-pulling actuator, a bellcrank attached to the throttle must extend
downward. Because of the limited space created by the engine shroud, the bellcrank cannot be
much more than 1" to 1-1/2" inches long. Full rotation of the throttle is about 50º, so a 1" (25
mm) bellcrank will have a throw of about 22 mm. Thus, full rotation of the throttle can be
achieved, but only with about half the throw recommended for the CC actuator.
Reshape the "throttle mounting bracket (#28)" in the
CCS100 kit. Cut it to length with a saw and rough
shape with a bench grinder or file. Drill the mounting
hole larger, and then shape with a small flat file to fit
the flattened shaft for the throttle pulley. Use a round
"rattail" file to make indentations to fit the
projections on the throttle pulley. This makes for a
very secure linkage by having the bellcrank closely
fit around the throttle pulley's projections.
Page 22
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
On the side of the #1 (left) carburetor, remove the nut
that secures the throttle pulley to its shaft. Attach the
fabricated bellcrank to the shaft, then use a small
amount of Locktite or blue RTV on the threads of the
shaft, and secure the nut back in place. (Caution - do
not get any thread locking compound on any of the
bike's plastic, as this may cause damage).
Anchor, forward-pulling actuator cable, and downward bellcrank
Page 23
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Alternative 2: Upward Bellcrank For Rear Pulling Actuator
•
•
•
Advantages
Allows for recommended 40-45mm full
throw of CC actuator cable
Allows full 50º rotation of throttle
pulley
Cable and chain are not near anything
to rub upon
•
Disadvantages
Must be bent around the choke cable,
therefore design is somewhat weaker
than a straight bellcrank
To form the bellcrank, start
with a flat piece of metal 3inches long by one-half inch
wide. This will be bent into a
dog-leg shape, as shown
below:
On the carburetor above and
behind the throttle pulley is the
connection for the choke cable.
In order for the bellcrank to miss
hitting the choke cable, it is
necessary to angle the bellcrank
outwards from where it connects
to the throttle.
The square hole that is filed in
the lower end of the bellcrank is
offset at an angle. This angle is
not critical; an offset of
anywhere from 15º to 35º is fine.
It is okay to align the bellcrank to
the throttle by "eyeball", and cut
the square hole to fit. Just make
sure that there is enough movement to the throttle so that the actuator can not bind.
Page 24
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Upward bellcrank, rear-pulling actuator cable, and anchor:
Chain Connections
Locate the "bead chain eyelet connector (#25)" and "slotted head shoulder bolt with lock washer
and hex nut (#34)" from the CCS100 kit. Attach the eyelet to the bellcrank using the shoulder
bolt. Ensure that the bolt, washer, and nut are tightened securely.
Attach the bead chain from the servo actuator cable to the eyelet connector on the bellcrank.
Adjust the attachment point on the bead chain to remove most of the slack from the chain and
actuator cable, but leave a slight amount of sag. Too tight a cable will throw off your idle
adjustment. Fine adjustments to the cable/chain tension may be made with the nuts on the
actuator cable anchor mount. Once the cable/chain tension is correct, securely tighten the cable
anchor nuts. Excess beads may be removed from the end of the chain. Pay attention to the note in
the Cruise Control Installation Manual Insert regarding "safe bead installation requirements";
never have less than 7 beads in the chain. It is also important to ensure that nothing rubs, catches
or chafes the action of the actuator cable and chain.
Reinstall the air box onto the carburetors, attach all connections, and tighten down all clamps.
Make sure that there is no interference between the air box and any of the cruise control parts.
Page 25
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Electrical System
Disconnect the bike's power before making any electrical connections.
Handlebar Control Unit
The kit's "dash-mounted control switch", as the name implies, is
normally mounted on the dash of an automobile, but on the PC,
an ideal mounting location is on the right handlebar in the space
between the Run switch and the starter button. There are a
couple of square inches of empty, flat space there into which
the control switch easily fits.
Using clear silicon sealant, seal the back of the
switch box along the seams and around the wire hole
to help seal out moisture out of the switch. Keep the
sealant off of the removable backing for the adhesive.
Let the sealant cure before mounting the switch.
Place the template from the instruction sheet over the
mounting space on the Handle Upper Cover and
mark the plastic where the elongated hole needs to be
made to pass through the wiring bundle from the
control switch. You can either drill through the
plastic, or melt through with a soldering iron. After
the hole has been roughed out, clean it up with a file
or a Dremel tool. Make sure that there are no sharp
edges on the plastic. Pass the six wires from the
control switch through the hole in the Handle Upper Cover. Peel off the backing from the
mounting tape on the control switch, and carefully align the switch to the Handle Upper Cover
and press the control switch into place.
The wires may be secured to the inside surface of the
Handle Upper Cover either by gluing them, or using cable
ties with self-adhesive tie mounts. Take up the slack in the
wires, but do not cut off the wire ends, because these have
integral terminals which must be inserted into the
connector.
Insert the four colored wire terminals (red, brown, green,
yellow) into the supplied connector housing, following the
color order guide that is attached to the connector. Bundle
the excess wire and secure it with a small cable zip tie. The
Page 26
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
The black wire is a ground connection
and is required to be connected for the
CC to work. The grey wire provides
power to illuminate the control switch; if
you do not wish to have the control
switch illuminated, you can leave the
grey wire unconnected. Trim the black
& grey wires to the same length as the
other control switch wires, and attach
quick disconnect terminals to them;
either spade or bullet terminals are fine, just make sure that the appropriate mates are used later
on the matching supply wires from the main wiring harness.
Main Wiring Harness
The main wiring harness connects to
the back of the servo. The wires can
all be covered with the black
convoluted tubing to make a neat
bundle. Route the bundled wires
back along the left side of the bike
towards the fuse block near where
the left maintenance cover will be;
make sure that the wires will not
interfere with the placement of the
maintenance cover and duct when it
is installed.
Locate the brown, green and yellow
colored wires. These must be
separated from the other wires in the
bundle and routed up into the Handle
Cover where they will connect to the
control switch wiring connector. The
wires should pass up through the
central opening in the Handle Lower
Cover that is still mounted to the handlebars. Route the wires to the right handle to meet up with
the wiring coming from the control switch.
Locate the connector housing with a single red lead and in-line fuse already in it. Insert the three
colored wire terminals (brown, green, yellow) into the connector housing, following the color
order guide that is attached to the connector. Route the red wire from the connector back so that
it follows exactly the same route as the brown, green, and yellow wires; these wires may be
covered with a section of black convoluted tubing to protect and conceal them where they pass
from the bike's body up into the steering handle covers.
Page 27
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Splice a wire into the parking lights wiring
to supply power for the handlebar control
switch (grey wire). Make a connection to
ground for the control switch, too (black
wire). Route these wires through the
convoluted tubing up into the handlebar
covers. Attach terminals to these wires to
mate with those from the handlebar control
switch.
Join the connectors for the red, brown,
green, and yellow wires from the main
harness and the control switch in the Handle
Upper Cover. Connect the grey and black
wires, too.
Reattach the Handle Upper Cover, making
sure that all wiring is clear of obstructions.
Wire connections
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Brown, yellow, and green wires from control switch and servo: join matching colored
wires together via connector plugs.
Black wires from servo and control switch: Connect to ground
Fused orange wire from control switch: Connect to any switched power that is
conveniently available.
Grey wire from control switch: Connect to any fused, switched power that is
conveniently available, such as that for the parking lights.
Red wire from servo: Connect to the black/brown lighting wire exiting the fuse box on
the bike’s left side.
Blue wire from servo: Connect to the blue/orange wire on the turquoise spade on the
lower coil on the left side of the bike.
Purple wire from servo: Connect to the green/yellow wire in the rear brake light wiring
bundle located on the forward side of the left trunk. Note - this wire will normally exhibit
low voltage (8-9 volts) coming from the servo. This is a safety feature that allows the
servo to sense that the brake lights are intact. If the servo cannot sense current flowing to
ground through the brake light bulbs, it will not allow the speed control to be activated.
Certain brake light modulators may have an effect on the operation of the servo's brake
light sensor.
Check all wiring for proper routing, avoiding chafing, moving parts, hot engine parts and any of
the four sparkplug wires. Wire bundles may be secured into lengths of convoluted tubing to
make for a tidy appearance and to protect the wiring.
Page 28
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
Afterwards
Reactivate the electrical system.
Replace the body parts.
Test ride.
Each time the ignition switch or the cruise control switch is turned OFF, the system is
deenergized. To reenergize the system, the ignition switch must be turned on, and the cruise
control switch must be moved to the ON position. The cruise control switch can be left ON at all
times without causing any damage to the system.
ON/OFF
Move the ON/OFF switch to the ON position. The light in the center of the cruise control switch
will illuminate. This prepares the system for operation.
SET SPEED
After turning the system ON, wait at least 3 seconds before attempting to set your speed. To
operate the system, drive the vehicle at a steady speed above 35 mph. Press the SET/COAST
switch and release it, then slowly relax the throttle. Your SET SPEED is now programmed into
the cruise control's memory, and your driving speed should remain within 2 mph of your set
speed. If you want to increase your speed, simply advance the throttle. When you release the
throttle, you will return to your original SET SPEED.
ACCEL
You can increase you SET SPEED using the RESUME/ACCEL feature. Your vehicle will
accelerate as you hold this switch to the RESUME/ACCEL position. When you release the
switch, your SET SPEED will be reprogrammed to the present speed of the vehicle. You can also
increase your SET SPEED gradually by quickly pressing and releasing the RESUME/ACCEL
switch; each time you press and release the switch, your speed will increase by approximately
1/2 mph.
COAST
To reduce your SET SPEED, press and hold the SET/ COAST button. This erases the previously
programmed SET SPEED, and allows the vehicle to coast. Just before slowing to the speed you
want, release the button. Your present speed will be reprogrammed as the new SET SPEED,
providing the vehicle is traveling faster than 35 mph. You can also decrease your SET SPEED
gradually by quickly pressing and releasing the SET/ COAST switch. Each time you press and
release the switch, your speed will decrease by approximately 1/2 mph.
Page 29
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006
Installing the Audiovox CCS100 Cruise Control on the
Honda Pacific Coast PC800 Motorcycle
RESUME
Whenever you use the brakes to slow or stop the vehicle, the cruise control will disengage but
retain the programmed SET SPEED. To return to the SET SPEED, accelerate to a speed above
35 mph, then press and release the RESUME/ACCEL switch. The vehicle will automatically
accelerate to the programmed SET SPEED, and hold that speed. When using the RESUME
feature, you should be in the correct gear for your SET SPEED.
DISENGAGE
You can disengage from the SET SPEED in several ways:
Gently tap the brakes to activate the brake lights.
Turn the control switch to the OFF position.
Press the clutch. This will cause the engine to rev slightly before disengaging.
Page 30
Copyright © 2001-2006 by Bruce Pickett. Copying or printing for personal use is permitted. All other rights reserved.
January 21, 2006