Dell PowerEdge T105 Systems Owner`s manual

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Dell™ PowerEdge™ T105 Systems
Hardware Owner’s Manual
w w w. d e l l . c o m | s u p p o r t . d e l l . c o m
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Notes, Notices, and Cautions
NOTE: A NOTE indicates important information that helps you make better use of
your computer.
NOTICE: A NOTICE indicates either potential damage to hardware or loss of data
and tells you how to avoid the problem.
CAUTION: A CAUTION indicates a potential for property damage, personal injury,
or death.
____________________
Information in this document is subject to change without notice.
© 2007-2009 Dell Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in any manner whatsoever without the written permission of Dell Inc. is strictly
forbidden.
Trademarks used in this text: Dell, the DELL logo, Inspiron, Dell Precision, Dimension, OptiPlex,
Latitude, PowerEdge, PowerVault, PowerApp, PowerConnect, XPS, and Dell OpenManage are
trademarks of Dell Inc.; Microsoft, MS-DOS, Windows, and Windows Server are either trademarks or
registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries; Red Hat
is a registered trademark of Red Hat, Inc.; UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the
United States and other countries; EMC is a registered trademark of EMC Corporation.
Other trademarks and trade names may be used in this document to refer to either the entities claiming
the marks and names or their products. Dell Inc. disclaims any proprietary interest in trademarks and
trade names other than its own.
March 2009
P/N JN551
Rev. A01
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Contents
1
About Your System .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other Information You May Need
. . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing System Features During Startup .
11
. . . . . .
12
Front-Panel Features and Indicators
. . . . . . . . . .
13
Back-Panel Features and Indicators
. . . . . . . . . .
15
. . . . . . . . . . .
16
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16
Connecting External Devices .
NIC Indicator Codes
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
17
Diagnostic Lights
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18
System Messages
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20
Power Supply Indicators .
Warning Messages
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostics Messages
Alert Messages
2
11
29
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
30
Using the System Setup Program
. . . . . .
31
Entering the System Setup Program .
. . . . . . . . . .
31
Responding to Error Messages.
. . . . . . . . . .
31
. . . . . . . . .
32
. . . . . . . . . . .
33
Using the System Setup Program
Exiting the System Setup Program
Contents
3
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System Setup Options
Main Screen
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
33
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
33
. . . . . . . . . . . .
35
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36
Memory Information Screen
CPU Information Screen
SATA Configuration Screen .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
36
Integrated Devices Screen .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
37
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
38
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
39
System Security Screen
Exit Screen
System and Setup Password Features.
. . . . . . . . .
39
. . . . . . . . . . . .
40
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
42
Using the System Password
Using the Setup Password
Disabling a Forgotten Password
3
. . . . . . . . . .
Installing System Components
Recommended Tools .
Inside the System.
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
45
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
46
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
47
Closing the System .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
47
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
48
Removing the Front Drive Bezel
. . . . . . . . . .
49
Replacing the Front Drive Bezel
. . . . . . . . . .
49
Removing an Insert on the Front Drive Bezel .
. . .
50
Replacing an Insert on the Front Drive Bezel.
. . .
50
. . . . . .
51
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
52
Removing and Inserting Blank Drive Inserts
Diskette Drive
Removing the Diskette Drive
Installing a Diskette Drive.
Contents
45
Opening the System
Front Drive Bezel .
4
43
. . . . . . . . . . . .
52
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
54
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Optical and Tape Drives .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .
57
. . . . . . . . .
60
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
64
Removing an Optical or Tape Drive .
Installing an Optical or Tape Drive
Hard Drives.
57
. . . . . . . . .
64
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
64
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
66
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
70
Hard Drive Installation Guidelines
Removing a Hard Drive .
Installing a Hard Drive
Expansion Cards .
Removing an Expansion Card
. . . . . . . . . . .
70
Installing an Expansion Card .
. . . . . . . . . . .
72
. . . . . . . . . .
73
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
75
SAS Controller Expansion Card
Memory
Memory Module Upgrade Kits
. . . . . . . . . . .
Memory Module Installation Guidelines .
. . . . .
Addressing Memory With 8-GB Configurations
(Microsoft® Windows® Operating
System Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. .
76
77
. . . . . . . . . . . .
77
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
79
Installing a Memory Module
Removing the Processor
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
79
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
82
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
83
Replacing the Processor .
Cooling Fans .
75
. . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a Memory Module .
Microprocessor
75
Removing the Cooling Fans .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
84
Replacing the Cooling Fans .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
86
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
88
System Battery .
Removing the System Battery
. . . . . . . . . . .
89
Installing the System Battery .
. . . . . . . . . . .
90
Contents
5
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Power Supply
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Power Supply
. . . . . . . . . . . .
91
Installing the Power Supply.
. . . . . . . . . . . .
93
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
93
Chassis Intrusion Switch
Removing the Chassis Intrusion Switch
. . . . . .
93
Installing the Chassis Intrusion Switch .
. . . . . .
94
. . . . . . . . .
95
Removing the Bezel .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
95
Replacing the Bezel .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
96
Bezel (Service Only Parts Procedure) .
I/O Panel Assembly (Service Only Parts
Procedure) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .
97
Removing the I/O Panel Assembly
. . . . . . . . .
97
Replacing the I/O Panel Assembly
. . . . . . . . .
98
System Board (Service Only Parts Procedure)
4
. . . .
100
Removing the System Board
. . . . . . . . . . .
100
Installing the System Board .
. . . . . . . . . . .
101
Troubleshooting Your System
. . . . . . . .
103
. . . . . . . .
103
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
103
Safety First—For You and Your System
Start-Up Routine
Checking the Equipment .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting External Connections .
104
105
. . . . . . . . . . .
105
Troubleshooting Serial I/O Problems
. . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting a Serial I/O Device
Troubleshooting a USB Device
Contents
104
. . . . . .
Troubleshooting the Keyboard
Troubleshooting the Mouse .
104
. . . . .
. . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting the Video Subsystem
6
91
106
. . . . . . .
107
. . . . . . . . . .
107
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Troubleshooting a NIC .
Troubleshooting a Wet System
109
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting a Damaged System
. . . . . . . . . .
110
Troubleshooting the System Battery.
. . . . . . . . . .
111
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
112
Troubleshooting Power Supply
Troubleshooting System Cooling Problems .
Troubleshooting a Fan
. . . . . .
113
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
113
Troubleshooting System Memory
. . . . . . . . . . . .
114
Troubleshooting a Diskette Drive
. . . . . . . . . . . .
116
Troubleshooting an Optical Drive .
Troubleshooting a Hard Drive
. . . . .
119
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
120
Troubleshooting a SAS or SAS RAID Controller
Troubleshooting Expansion Cards .
. . . .
122
. . . . . . . . . . .
123
Troubleshooting the Microprocessor
Using Dell PowerEdge Diagnostics .
125
. . . . . . . . . .
Running the System Diagnostics .
System Diagnostics Features
118
. . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting an External SCSI Tape Drive
5
108
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . .
127
. . . . . . . . . .
127
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
127
When to Use the System Diagnostics .
Running the System Diagnostics
. . . . . . . . .
128
. . . . . . . . . . . .
128
System Diagnostics Testing Options
. . . . . . . . . .
Contents
128
7
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Using the Custom Test Options
. . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Devices for Testing .
. . . . . . . . . .
129
Selecting Diagnostics Options
. . . . . . . . . .
129
. . . . . . . .
130
. . . . . . . . . . .
131
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
131
Viewing Information and Results .
6
Jumpers and Connectors .
System Board Jumpers .
System Board Connectors
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disabling a Forgotten Password.
7
Getting Help .
135
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
137
Obtaining Assistance
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
137
Online Services .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
138
Support Service .
. . . . . . . .
139
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
139
Dell Enterprise Training and Certification .
. . . . . .
139
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
139
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
139
Problems With Your Order .
Product Information
Returning Items for Warranty Repair or Credit
Contents
133
. . . . . . . . . . .
Automated Order-Status Service .
8
129
. . . .
140
Before You Call .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
140
Contacting Dell .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
142
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Glossary
Index
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
173
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
185
Contents
9
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10
Contents
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About Your System
This section describes the physical, firmware, and software interface features
that provide and ensure the essential functioning of your system. The
physical connectors on your system’s front and back panels provide
convenient connectivity and system expansion capability. The system
firmware, applications, and operating systems monitor the system and
component status and alert you when a problem arises. System conditions
can be reported by any of the following:
•
Front or back panel indicators
•
System messages
•
Warning messages
•
Diagnostics messages
•
Alert messages
This section describes each type of message, lists the possible causes, and
provides steps to resolve any problems indicated by a message. The system
indicators and features are illustrated in this section.
Other Information You May Need
CAUTION: The Product Information Guide provides important safety and
regulatory information. Warranty information may be included within this
document or as a separate document.
•
The Getting Started Guide provides an overview of system features, setting
up your system, and technical specifications.
•
CDs included with your system provide documentation and tools for
configuring and managing your system.
•
Systems management software documentation describes the features,
requirements, installation, and basic operation of the software.
•
Operating system documentation describes how to install (if necessary),
configure, and use the operating system software.
•
Documentation for any components you purchased separately provides
information to configure and install these options.
About Your System
11
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•
Updates are sometimes included with the system to describe changes to
the system, software, and/or documentation.
NOTE: Always check for updates on support.dell.com and read the updates
first because they often supersede information in other documents.
•
Release notes or readme files may be included to provide last-minute
updates to the system or documentation or advanced technical reference
material intended for experienced users or technicians.
Accessing System Features During Startup
Table 1-1 describes keystrokes that may be entered during startup to access
system features. If your operating system begins to load before you enter the
keystroke, allow the system to finish booting, and then restart your system
and try again.
Table 1-1.
Keystrokes for Accessing System Features
Keystroke
Description
<F2>
Enters the System Setup program. See "Using the System Setup
Program" on page 31.
<F10>
Opens the utility partition, allowing you to run the system
diagnostics. See "Running the System Diagnostics" on page 128.
<F11>
Enters the boot menu selection screen, allowing you to choose a boot
device.
<F12>
Initiates PXE boot.
<Ctrl+C>
Option is displayed for some SAS controller expansion cards. Enters
the SAS Configuration Utility, which includes RAID configuration
options. See your SAS adapter User’s Guide for more information.
<Ctrl+S>
Option is displayed only if you have PXE support enabled through
the System Setup Program (see Table 2-1). This keystroke allows you
to configure NIC settings for PXE boot. For more information, see
the documentation for your integrated NIC.
12
About Your System
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Front-Panel Features and Indicators
Figure 1-1 shows the controls, indicators, and connectors located on the
system's front panel. Table 1-2 provides component descriptions.
Figure 1-1. Front-Panel Features and Indicators
1
6
5
4
3
2
Table 1-2.
Front-Panel Components
Item
Component
1
USB connectors (2)
Icon
Description
Connects USB 2.0-compliant
devices to the system.
About Your System
13
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Table 1-2.
Front-Panel Components (continued)
Item
Component
2
power button
Icon
Description
The power button controls the DC
power supply output to the system.
NOTE: If you turn off the system using
the power button and the system is
running an ACPI-compliant operating
system, the system performs a
graceful shutdown before the power
is turned off. If the system is not
running an ACPI-compliant operating
system, the power is turned off
immediately after the power button is
pressed.
3
power light
No light — The system is off.
Steady green — The system is
powered on.
Blinking green — The system is in a
low power state.
Steady amber — A BIOS failure
occurred before Power-On Self Test
(POST). See "Diagnostic Lights" on
page 18.
Blinking amber — There is a
problem with the power supply.
4
flex bay
Holds an optional diskette drive.
5
lower 5.25-inch drive
bay
Holds an optional optical or tape
backup unit drive.
6
upper 5.25-inch drive
bay
Holds an optical drive.
14
About Your System
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Back-Panel Features and Indicators
Figure 1-2 shows the controls, indicators, and connectors located on the
system's back panel.
Figure 1-2. Back-Panel Features and Indicators
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
1
voltage selection switch
2
power connector
3
USB connectors (5)
4
NIC connector
5
video connector
6
serial connector
7
I/O expansion-card slots (4)
About Your System
15
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Connecting External Devices
When connecting external devices to your system, follow these guidelines:
•
Most devices must be connected to a specific connector and device drivers
must be installed before the device operates properly. (Device drivers are
normally included with your operating system software or with the device
itself.) See the documentation that accompanied the device for specific
installation and configuration instructions.
•
Always attach an external device while your system and the device are
turned off. Next, turn on any external devices before turning on the system
(unless the documentation for the device specifies otherwise).
See "Using the System Setup Program" on page 31 for information about
enabling, disabling, and configuring I/O ports and connectors.
NIC Indicator Codes
The NIC on the back panel has an indicator that provides information on
network activity and link status. See Figure 1-3. Table 1-3 lists the NIC
indicator codes.
Figure 1-3.
NIC Indicators
1
1
16
link indicator
About Your System
2
2
activity indicator
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Table 1-3.
NIC Indicator Codes
Indicator Type
Indicator Code
Description
Activity
Off
When off at the same time that the link indicator
is off, the NIC is not connected to the network or
the NIC is disabled in the System Setup
program. See "Using the System Setup Program"
on page 31.
Blinking
Indicates that network data is being sent or
received.
Off
When off at the same time that the activity
indicator is off, the NIC is not connected to the
network or the NIC is disabled in the System
Setup program. See "Using the System Setup
Program" on page 31.
Yellow
1000-Mbps connection
Orange
100-Mbps connection
Green
10-Mbps connection
Link
Power Supply Indicators
The voltage selection switch on the back panel of the system allows you to
select one of two primary voltage inputs. Ensure that the switch is set to the
proper voltage according to Table 1-4.
Table 1-4.
Voltage Selection Switch
If your power source is: The voltage selection switch should be set to:
110 V
115
220 V
230
For information on system power requirements, see "Technical Specifications"
in your Getting Started Guide.
About Your System
17
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Diagnostic Lights
The four diagnostic indicator lights on the system front panel display error
codes during system startup. Table 1-5 lists the causes and possible corrective
actions associated with these codes. A highlighted circle indicates the light is
on; a non-highlighted circle indicates the light is off.
NOTE: If the power LEDs blink amber, there is a problem with the power supply. If
the power LED shows a solid amber, a BIOS failure occurred before Power-On Self
Test (POST).
Table 1-5.
Code
Diagnostic Indicator Codes
Causes
Corrective Action
The computer is in a
Plug the computer into a working
normal off condition or a electrical outlet and press the
possible pre-BIOS failure power button.
has occurred.
The diagnostic lights are
not lit after the system
successfully boots to the
operating system.
The system is in a normal Information only.
operating condition after
POST.
BIOS checksum failure
detected; system is in
recovery mode.
See "Getting Help" on page 137.
Possible processor failure. See "Troubleshooting the
Microprocessor" on page 125.
18
Memory failure.
See "Troubleshooting System
Memory" on page 114.
Possible expansion card
failure.
See "Troubleshooting Expansion
Cards" on page 123.
About Your System
book.book Page 19 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Table 1-5.
Code
Diagnostic Indicator Codes (continued)
Causes
Corrective Action
Possible video failure.
See "Getting Help" on page 137.
Diskette drive or hard
drive failure.
Ensure that the diskette drive and
hard drive are properly connected.
See "Hard Drives" on page 64 or
"Diskette Drive" on page 52 for
information on the drives
installed in your system.
Possible USB failure.
See "Troubleshooting a USB
Device" on page 107.
No memory modules
detected.
See "Troubleshooting System
Memory" on page 114.
System board failure.
See "Getting Help" on page 137.
Memory configuration
error.
See "Troubleshooting System
Memory" on page 114.
Possible system board
resource and/or system
board hardware failure.
See "Getting Help" on page 137.
Possible system resource
configuration error.
See "Getting Help" on page 137.
Other failure.
Ensure that the diskette drive,
optical drive, and hard drives are
properly connected. See
"Troubleshooting Your System"
on page 103 for the appropriate
drive installed in your system. If
the problem persists, see "Getting
Help" on page 137.
About Your System
19
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System Messages
System messages appear on the screen to notify you of a possible problem
with the system. Table 1-6 lists the system messages that can occur and the
probable cause and corrective action for each message.
NOTE: If you receive a system message that is not listed in Table 1-6, check the
documentation for the application that is running when the message appears or the
operating system's documentation for an explanation of the message and
recommended action.
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. See your Product
Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working
inside the computer, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.
Table 1-6.
System Messages
Message
Causes
Corrective Actions
Do not use these
characters in filenames.
A filename cannot
contain any of the
following characters:
\ / : * ? “ < > |
The application that
you are trying to open
is missing an essential
file.
Remove and then
reinstall the application.
Alert! Cover was
previously opened.
The system was
opened.
Information only. To
reset the chassis
intrusion switch, see
"Using the System Setup
Program" on page 31.
Alert! Error
initializing PCI
Express slot n (or
bridge).
The system
See "Troubleshooting
encountered a problem Expansion Cards" on
while trying to
page 123.
configure a PCIe
expansion card.
A required .DLL file
was not found
20
About Your System
See the application’s
documentation for
installation instructions.
book.book Page 21 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Table 1-6.
System Messages (continued)
Message
Causes
Corrective Actions
Use only Dell supported
processors. See the
Getting Started Guide for
a list of supported
processors.
Alert! Incompatible
processor detected.
Alert! Previous fan
failure.
The fan caused errors
the last time the
system was used.
Ensure that nothing is
blocking the airflow
vents and that all fans
are properly installed and
operating correctly. See
"Troubleshooting
System Cooling
Problems" on page 113.
Alert! Previous
Processor Thermal
Failure
The processor
overheated the last
time the system was
used.
Ensure that nothing is
blocking the airflow
vents and that all fans
are properly installed and
operating correctly. Also,
ensure that the processor
heat sink is properly
installed. See
"Microprocessor" on
page 79.
Attachment failed to
respond
The diskette or harddrive controller cannot
send data to the
associated drive.
See "Troubleshooting a
Diskette Drive" on
page 116 or
"Troubleshooting a Hard
Drive" on page 120.
Bad command or file
name
Ensure that you have
spelled the command
correctly, have put spaces
in the proper place, and
have used the correct
pathname.
About Your System
21
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Table 1-6.
System Messages (continued)
Message
Causes
Bad error-correction
The diskette or hardcode (ECC) on disk read drive controller
detected an
uncorrectable read
error.
Corrective Actions
See "Troubleshooting a
Diskette Drive" on
page 116 or
"Troubleshooting a Hard
Drive" on page 120.
CAUTION! NVRAM_CLR
jumper is installed on
system board. Please
run SETUP
NVRAM jumper is
installed.
After an NVRAM jumper
is installed, run the
System Setup program.
See "Using the System
Setup Program" on
page 31.
CD-ROM drive not found
The operating system
cannot read from the
CD-ROM drive.
See "Troubleshooting an
Optical Drive" on
page 118.
Controller has failed
The hard drive or the See "Troubleshooting a
associated controller is Hard Drive" on page 120.
defective.
Data error
The diskette drive or
For the operating
hard drive cannot read system, run the
the data.
appropriate utility to
check the file structure
of the diskette drive or
hard drive. See your
operating system
documentation for
information on running
these utilities.
Decreasing available
memory
One or more memory
modules might be
faulty or improperly
seated.
22
About Your System
Reinstall the memory
modules and, if
necessary, replace them.
See "Troubleshooting
System Memory" on
page 114.
book.book Page 23 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Table 1-6.
System Messages (continued)
Message
Causes
Corrective Actions
Diskette drive 0 seek
failure
A cable might be loose See "Troubleshooting a
or the system
Diskette Drive" on
configuration
page 116.
information might not
match the hardware
configuration.
Diskette read failure
The diskette might be
defective, or a cable
might be loose.
If the diskette-drive
indicator turns on, try a
different disk. See
"Troubleshooting a
Diskette Drive" on
page 116.
Diskette subsystem
reset failed
The diskette drive
controller might be
faulty.
Run the system
diagnostics. See
"Running the System
Diagnostics" on
page 128.
Diskette write
protected
The diskette is writeprotected.
Slide the write-protect
notch to the open
position.
Drive not ready
No diskette is in the
drive.
Insert a diskette in the
drive.
General failure
The operating system is This message is usually
unable to carry out the followed by specific
command.
information. Take the
appropriate action to
resolve the problem.
Hard disk Fan was not
detected
The processor cooling
fan is faulty or the fan
assembly is not
installed correctly.
Ensure that the
processor cooling shroud
is properly installed. See
"Troubleshooting
System Cooling
Problems" on page 113
and "Microprocessor" on
page 79.
About Your System
23
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Table 1-6.
System Messages (continued)
Message
Causes
Corrective Actions
Heatsink was not
detected.
Heatsink failure.
Ensure heatsink and
shroud assembly are
properly attached. See
Figure 3-21.
Insert bootable media
The operating system is Insert a bootable
trying to boot from a
diskette or CD.
nonbootable diskette or
CD.
Keyboard Controller
Failure
A cable or connector
might be loose, or the
keyboard or
keyboard/mouse
controller might be
faulty.
Keyboard Stuck Key
Failure
Keyboard failure
NIC failure.
No boot device
available
See "Troubleshooting
the Keyboard" on
page 105.
See "Troubleshooting a
NIC" on page 108.
The system cannot find If the diskette drive is
the diskette or hard
your boot device, ensure
drive.
that a bootable disk is in
the drive.
If the hard drive is your
boot device, ensure that
the hard drive is
installed, the interface
cable is properly
connected, and the hard
drive is partitioned as a
boot device.
Enter the System Setup
program and verify the
boot sequence
information. See "Using
the System Setup
Program" on page 31.
24
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Table 1-6.
System Messages (continued)
Message
Causes
Corrective Actions
No timer tick interrupt A chip on the system
board might be
malfunctioning.
Run the system
diagnostics. See
"Running the System
Diagnostics" on
page 127.
Non-system disk or disk The diskette in the
error
diskette drive or your
hard drive does not
have a bootable
operating system
installed on it.
Replace the diskette with
one that has a bootable
operating system or
remove the diskette, and
then restart the system.
If the problem persists,
see "Troubleshooting a
Diskette Drive" on
page 116 or
"Troubleshooting a Hard
Drive" on page 120.
If the problem persists,
see "Getting Help" on
page 137.
Not a boot diskette
The operating system is Insert a diskette that has
trying to boot from a
a bootable operating
diskette that does not system.
have a bootable
operating system
installed on it.
You have too many
Not enough memory or
programs open.
resources. Close some
programs and try again.
Close all windows and
open the program that
you want to use. In some
cases, you might have to
restart your system to
restore system resources.
If so, try opening the
program that you want
to use first
About Your System
25
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Table 1-6.
System Messages (continued)
Message
Causes
See "Troubleshooting a
Hard Drive" on page 120.
If the problem persists,
see "Getting Help" on
page 137.
Operating system not
found
PCI BIOS failed to
install
Corrective Actions
BIOS checksum failure Ensure that all network
detected.
cards and connections
are functioning properly.
See "Troubleshooting
System Memory" on
page 114."
If the problem persists,
see "Getting Help" on
page 137."
Plug and play
configuration error
An attached device is See "Troubleshooting
improperly configured. Your System" on
page 103.
Read fault
The operating system
cannot read from the
diskette or hard drive,
the system could not
find a particular sector
on the disk, or the
requested sector is
defective.
See "Troubleshooting a
Diskette Drive" on
page 116 or
"Troubleshooting a Hard
Drive" on page 120.
Requested sector not
found
The operating system
cannot read from the
diskette or hard drive,
the system could not
find a particular sector
on the disk, or the
requested sector is
defective.
See "Troubleshooting a
Diskette Drive" on
page 116 or
"Troubleshooting a Hard
Drive" on page 120.
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Table 1-6.
System Messages (continued)
Message
Causes
Corrective Actions
Reset failed
The disk reset
operation failed.
See "Troubleshooting a
Diskette Drive" on
page 116 or
"Troubleshooting a Hard
Drive" on page 120.
Run the system
diagnostics. See
"Running the System
Diagnostics" on
page 127. Also, see
"Troubleshooting a Hard
Drive" on page 120.
SATA PortX device not
found.
NOTE: X is the drive number
(A-D).
A faulty diskette drive
or hard drive.
See "Troubleshooting a
Diskette Drive" on
page 116 or
"Troubleshooting a Hard
Drive" on page 120.
SMART Failure Predicted The Disk Monitoring
on Hard Disk (SATA
System detected an
port #)
error, or the SMART
drive function failed.
WARNING: It is
See "Troubleshooting a
Hard Drive" on page 120.
Sector not found
Seek error
advisable to
immediately back up
your data and replace
your hard-disk drive by
calling your support
desk or Dell Inc.
System Fan was not
detected
The processor cooling
fan is faulty or the fan
assembly is not
installed correctly.
If the problem persists,
see "Getting Help" on
page 137
Ensure that the
processor cooling shroud
is properly installed. See
"Troubleshooting
System Cooling
Problems" on page 113
and "Microprocessor" on
page 79.
About Your System
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Table 1-6.
System Messages (continued)
Message
Causes
Corrective Actions
The amount of system
memory has changed
Memory has been
added or removed, or a
memory module may
be faulty.
If memory has been
added or removed, this
message is informative
and can be ignored. If
memory has not been
added or removed, check
the SEL to determine if
single-bit or multi-bit
errors were detected and
replace the faulty
memory module. See
"Troubleshooting
System Memory" on
page 114.
The file being copied
is too large for the
destination drive.
The file that you are
Try increasing disk space
trying to copy is too
on the destination drive
large to fit on the disk. by deleting unnecessary
files.
Time-of-day not set —
please run SETUP
program
The time or date stored
in the System Setup
program does not
match the system
clock.
Enter the System Setup
program and correct the
Date and Time options.
See "Using the System
Setup Program" on
page 31. If the problem
persists, see
"Troubleshooting the
System Battery" on
page 111.
Timer chip counter 2
failed
A chip on the system
board might be
malfunctioning.
Run the system
diagnostics. See
"Running the System
Diagnostics" on
page 127.
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Table 1-6.
System Messages (continued)
Message
Causes
Corrective Actions
Warning! A fatal error
has caused system
reset!
A multibit ECC error
has occurred.
Run the system
diagnostics. See
"Running the System
Diagnostics" on
page 127.
Please check the system
event log.
Warning: The installed A DIMM configuration
memory configuration is is unsupported. The
not optimal.
installed memory
modules are not
matched pairs.
Reinstall the memory
modules and, if
necessary, replace them.
See "Troubleshooting
System Memory" on
page 114.
Write fault
The operating system
Write fault on selected cannot write to the
diskette drive or hard
drive
drive.
See "Troubleshooting a
Diskette Drive" on
page 116 or
"Troubleshooting a Hard
Drive" on page 120.
<drive letter>:\ is not The diskette drive
accessible. The device cannot read the
is not ready.
diskette.
Insert a diskette into the
drive or replace the
existing diskette, and try
again.
Warning Messages
A warning message alerts you to a possible problem and prompts you to
respond before the system continues a task. For example, before you format a
diskette, a message will warn you that you may lose all data on the diskette.
Warning messages usually interrupt the task and require you to respond by
typing y (yes) or n (no).
NOTE: Warning messages are generated by either the application or the operating
system. For more information, see the documentation that accompanied the
operating system or application.
About Your System
29
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Diagnostics Messages
When you run system diagnostics, an error message may result. Diagnostic
error messages are not covered in this section. Record the message on a copy
of the Diagnostics Checklist in "Getting Help" on page 137, and then follow
the instructions in that section for obtaining technical assistance.
Alert Messages
Systems management software generates alert messages for your system. Alert
messages include information, status, warning, and failure messages for drive,
temperature, fan, and power conditions. For more information, see the
systems management software documentation.
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About Your System
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Using the System Setup Program
After you set up your system, run the System Setup program to familiarize
yourself with your system configuration and optional settings. Record the
information for future reference.
You can use the System Setup program to:
•
Change the system configuration stored in NVRAM after you add, change,
or remove hardware
•
Set or change user-selectable options—for example, the time or date
•
Enable or disable integrated devices
•
Correct discrepancies between the installed hardware and configuration
settings
Entering the System Setup Program
1 Turn on or restart your system.
2 Press <F2> immediately after you see the following message:
Please wait
If your operating system begins to load before you press <F2>, allow the
system to finish booting, and then restart your system and try again.
NOTE: To ensure an orderly system shutdown, see the documentation that
accompanied your operating system.
Responding to Error Messages
You can enter the System Setup program by responding to certain error
messages. If an error message appears while the system is booting, make a
note of the message. Before entering the System Setup program, see "System
Messages" on page 20 for an explanation of the message and suggestions for
correcting errors.
NOTE: After installing a memory upgrade, it is normal for your system to send a
message the first time you start your system.
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31
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Using the System Setup Program
Table 2-1 lists the keys that you use to view or change information on the
System Setup program screens, and to exit the program.
Table 2-1.
System Setup Program Navigation Keys
Keys
Action
Tab or <Shift><Tab>
Cycles cursor up and down.
Down arrow or Up arrow
Moves cursor up and down.
Spacebar, <+>,<–>, left
and right arrow
Cycles through the settings in a field. In many fields,
you can also type the appropriate value.
<Enter>
Allows you to open a window, edit the date and time,
or confirm your setting change and move the cursor
back to the option menu
<Esc>
Displays three options:
• Save changes and Exit
• Discard changes and Exit
• Opens the System Setup Exit screen
<F1>
Displays the System Setup program's help file for the
selected field.
<Alt-B>
Reboots the system.
<Alt-F>
Loads the defaults for all fields.
<Alt-D>
Loads the default for the selected field.
<Alt-R>
Restores original values.
<Alt-X>
Exits the operating system without saving.
Ctrl-Alt-Del
Reboots without saving.
Home/End
Moves cursor to the first item or last item.
<A>
Sets SATA controller to ATA mode.
<0>
Sets SATA controller to off.
NOTE: For most of the options, any changes that you make are recorded but do not
take effect until you restart the system.
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Exiting the System Setup Program
If you have made no changes in the BIOS, the system continues the POST
after you press <Esc> to exit the System Setup program.
If you have made changes in the BIOS, the Exit screen displays the following
options after you press <Esc> to exit the System Setup program:
•
Save Changes and Exit
•
Discard Changes and Exit
•
Return to Setup
System Setup Options
Main Screen
When you enter the System Setup program, the main System Setup program
screen appears (see Figure 2-1).
Figure 2-1. Main System Setup Program Screen
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Table 2-2 through Table 2-9 lists the options and descriptions for each group
of information fields that appear on the main System Setup program screen.
NOTE: The options for the System Setup program change based on the system
configuration.
NOTE: The System Setup program defaults are listed under their respective
options, where applicable.
Table 2-2.
Main System Options
Option
Description
System Time
Resets the time on the system’s internal clock.
System Date
Resets the date on the system’s internal calendar.
Memory Information
See "Memory Information Screen" on page 35.
CPU Information
Displays information for the processor installed in the
system. See "CPU Information Screen" on page 36.
SATA Configuration
Enables or disables a Serial Advanced Technology
Attachment (SATA) device (such as hard drive, CD drive,
or DVD drive). See "SATA Configuration Screen" on
page 36.
Boot Sequence
Determines the order in which the system searches for
(Diskette drive default) boot devices during system startup. The default boot
sequence is as follows: the diskette drive, hard drive, SATA
CD-ROM drive, USB devices, and embedded NICs.
Use the + or – keys to navigate through the list of devices
and the space key to disable or enable the device. A V next
to the device indicates that the boot device is enabled.
NOTE: At least one device must be enabled for the system to
boot. If all devices are disabled, an error message notifies
you to enable at least one of the devices.
Hard-Disk Drive
Sequence
Displays the sequence of the bootable hard-disk device
models, beginning with the embedded SATA device on
Port A. Use the + or – keys to change the device sequence.
Integrated Devices
Displays the settings for integrated devices. See "Integrated
Devices Screen" on page 37.
System Security
Displays the settings for security devices. See "System
Security Screen" on page 38.
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Table 2-2.
Main System Options (continued)
Option
Description
System Event Log
Allows you to display or clear the system event log. The
default setting for the Clear System Event Log field is No.
Keyboard NumLock
Determines whether your system starts up with the
NumLock mode activated on 101- or 102-key keyboards
(does not apply to 84-key keyboards).The default setting is
On.
Report Keyboard Errors Enables or disables reporting of keyboard errors during the
POST. Select Report for host systems that have keyboards
attached. Select Do Not Report to suppress all error
messages relating to the keyboard or keyboard controller
during POST. This setting does not affect the operation of
the keyboard itself if a keyboard is attached to the system.
The default setting is Report.
Memory Information Screen
Table 2-3 lists the options and descriptions for the information fields that
appear on the CPU Information screen.
Table 2-3.
Memory Information Screen
Option
Description
System Memory Size
Displays the amount of system memory. This option does
not have user-selectable settings.
System Memory Type
Displays the type of system memory. This option does not
have user-selectable settings.
System Memory Speed
Displays the speed of system memory in MHz. This option
does not have user-selectable settings.
Video Memory
Displays the amount of video memory.
System Memory Testing Determines if memory is being tested during POST. This
option is Enabled by default.
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CPU Information Screen
Table 2-4 lists the options and descriptions for the information fields that
appear on the CPU Information screen.
Table 2-4. CPU Information Screen
Option
Description
64-Bit
Specifies if the installed processor supports AMD® 64-bit
extensions. This option does not have user-selectable
settings.
Core Speed
Displays the clock speed of the processor. This option does
not have user-selectable settings.
Bus Speed
Displays the bus speed of the processor. This option does
not have user-selectable settings.
Demand-Based Power
Management
When set to Enabled, the CPU Performance State Tables
are reported to the operating system. When set to
Disabled (the default), the Performance State Tables are
not reported to the operating system.
Processor 1 ID
Displays the family and model number of each processor.
This option does not have user-selectable settings.
Level2 Cache
Displays the amount of cache memory for the processor.
This option does not have user-selectable settings.
Number of Cores
Displays the number of cores in the processor. This option
does not have user-selectable settings.
SATA Configuration Screen
Table 2-5 lists the options and descriptions for the information fields that
appear on the SATA Configuration screen.
NOTE: When a SAS Card is installed in the system, the SATA Configuration screen
changes. The SATA controller field displays ATA Mode and will be unchoosable.
Both Port A and Port B display off and are also unchoosable. When the SAS Card is
plugged out, the SATA Configuration screen settings will be loaded to default
values.
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Table 2-5.
SATA Configuration Screen
Option
Description
SATA Controller
Allows the integrated SATA controller to be set to Off or
ATA Mode. Off disables the SATA subsystem. ATA Mode
sets the SATA subsystem to Native IDE mode.
Port A
Displays the model number, drive type, and size of the
device attached to Port A. When set to Auto (default), the
port is enabled if devices are attached to the port.
Port B
Displays the model number, drive type, and size of the
device attached to Port B. When set to Auto (default), the
port is enabled if devices are attached to the port.
Port C
Displays the model number, drive type, and size of the
device attached to Port C. When set to Auto (default), the
port is enabled if devices are attached to the port.
Port D
Displays the model number, drive type, and size of the
device attached to Port D. When set to Auto (off is the
default), the port is enabled if devices are attached to the
port.
Integrated Devices Screen
Table 2-6 lists the options and descriptions for the information fields that
appear on the Integrated Devices screen.
Table 2-6.
Integrated Devices Screen
Option
Description
Diskette Controller
Enables the diskette controller. When set to Auto (the
default), each channel of the diskette controller is enabled
if IDE devices are attached to the channel and the external
diskette controller is not detected.
User Accessible USB
Ports
Enables or disables the system's USB ports. Options are All
Ports On or All Ports Off. Disabling the USB ports makes
system resources available for other devices.
Internal USB Port
Indicates whether the internal USB port is On (the
default) or Off.
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Table 2-6. Integrated Devices Screen (continued)
Option
Description
Embedded Gb NIC 1
Enables or disables the system's integrated NIC. Options
are Enabled with PXE (the default) and Disabled. PXE
support allows the system to boot from the network.
Changes take effect after the system reboots.
MAC Address
Displays the MAC address for the integrated 10/100/1000
NIC. This field does not have user-selectable settings.
Serial Port
Sets how the built-in serial port operates. When set to
Auto, the built-in serial port automatically remaps to the
next available port address if a duplicate port address is
installed using a serial port expansion card.
System Security Screen
Table 2-7 lists the options and descriptions for the information fields that
appear on the System Security screen.
Table 2-7. System Security Screen
Option
Description
System Password
Displays the current status of your system's password
security feature and allows you to assign and verify a new
system password. Default is Not Enabled.
NOTE: See "Using the System Password" on page 40 for
instructions on assigning a system password and using or
changing an existing system password.
Setup Password
Restricts access to the System Setup program in the same
way that you restrict access to your system using the system
password feature. Default is Not Enabled.
NOTE: See "Using the Setup Password" on page 42 for
instructions on assigning a setup password and using or
changing an existing setup password.
After Power Failure
38
Determines how the system reacts when power is restored
to the system. If system is set to Last State (the default),
the system returns to the last power state. On turns on the
system after power is restored. When set to Off, the system
remains off after power is restored.
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Table 2-7.
System Security Screen (continued)
Option
Description
Chassis Intrusion
Reporting
Allows you to set the Chassis Intrusion Reporting feature.
Default is Enabled.
Exit Screen
After you press <Esc> to exit the System Setup program, the Exit screen
displays the following options:
•
Save Changes and Exit
•
Discard Changes and Exit
•
Return to Setup
System and Setup Password Features
NOTICE: The password features provide a basic level of security for the data on
your system. If your data requires more security, use additional forms of protection,
such as data encryption programs.
NOTICE: Anyone can access the data stored on your system if you leave the
system running and unattended without having a system password assigned or if
you leave your system unlocked so that someone can disable the password by
changing a jumper setting.
Your system is shipped to you without the system password feature enabled. If
system security is a concern, operate your system only with system password
protection.
To change or delete an existing password, you must know the password (see
"Deleting or Changing an Existing System Password" on page 41). If you
forget your password, you cannot operate your system or change settings in
the System Setup program until a trained service technician changes the
password jumper setting to disable the passwords, and erases the existing
passwords. This procedure is described in "Disabling a Forgotten Password"
on page 135.
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Using the System Password
After a system password is assigned, only those who know the password have
full use of the system. When the System Password option is set to Enabled,
the system prompts you for the system password after the system starts.
NOTE: If you have assigned a setup password (see "Using the Setup Password" on
page 42), the system accepts your setup password as an alternate system
password.
Assigning a System Password
Before you assign a system password, enter the System Setup program and
check the System Password option.
When a system password is assigned, the setting shown for the System
Password option is Enabled. If the setting shown for the Password Status is
Unlocked, you can change the system password. If the Password Status
option is Locked, you cannot change the system password. When the system
password feature is disabled by a jumper setting, the system password is
Disabled, and you cannot change or enter a new system password.
When a system password is not assigned and the password jumper on the
system board is in the enabled (default) position, the setting shown for the
System Password option is Not Enabled and the Password Status field is
Unlocked. To assign a system password:
1 Verify that the Password Status option is set to Unlocked.
2 Highlight the System Password option and press <Enter>.
3 Type your new system password.
You can use up to 32 characters in your password.
As you press each character key (or the spacebar for a blank space), a
placeholder appears in the field.
The password assignment is case-sensitive. However, certain key
combinations are not valid. If you enter one of these combinations, the
system beeps. To erase a character when entering your password, press the
<Backspace> key.
NOTE: To escape from the field without assigning a system password, press
<Enter> to move to another field, or press <Esc> at any time prior to
completing step 5.
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4 Press <Enter>.
5 To confirm your password, type it a second time and press <Enter>.
6 Press <Enter> again to continue.
The setting shown for the System Password changes to Enabled.
7 Save and exit the System Setup program and begin using your system.
NOTE: Password protection does not take effect until you reboot the system.
Using Your System Password to Secure Your System
NOTE: If you have assigned a setup password (see "Using the Setup Password" on
page 42), the system accepts your setup password as an alternate system
password.
When the Password Status option is set to Unlocked, you have the option to
leave the password security enabled or to disable the password security.
To leave the password security enabled:
1 Turn on or reboot your system by pressing <Ctrl><Alt><Del>.
2 Type your password and press <Enter>.
When you turn on or reboot your system, type your password and press
<Enter> at the prompt.
After you type the correct system password and press <Enter>, your system
operates as usual.
If an incorrect system password is entered, the system displays a message and
prompts you to re-enter your password. You have three attempts to enter the
correct password. After the third unsuccessful attempt, the system displays an
error message stating that the system has halted.
NOTE: You can use the Password Status option in conjunction with the System
Password and Setup Password options to further protect your system from
unauthorized changes.
Deleting or Changing an Existing System Password
1 Enter the System Setup program by pressing <F2> during POST.
2 Select the System Security screen field to verify that the Password Status
option is set to Unlocked.
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3 When prompted, type the valid system password and press <Enter>.
Press <Enter> in the new password field and press <Enter> in the
confirm new password field.
4 Confirm that Not Enabled is displayed for the System Password option.
If Not Enabled is displayed for the System Password option, the system
password has been deleted. If Enabled is displayed for the System
Password option, press the <Alt><b> key combination to restart the
system, and then repeat steps 2 through 5.
Using the Setup Password
Assigning a Setup Password
You can assign (or change) a setup password only when the Setup Password
option is set to Not Enabled. To assign an setup password, highlight the
Setup Password option and press the <Enter> key. The system prompts you
to enter and verify the password. If a character is illegal for password use, the
system beeps.
NOTE: The setup password can be the same as the system password. If the two
passwords are different, the setup password can be used as an alternate system
password. However, the system password cannot be used in place of the setup
password.
You can use up to 32 characters in your password.
As you press each character key (or the spacebar for a blank space), a
placeholder appears in the field.
The password assignment is case-sensitive. However, certain key
combinations are not valid. If you enter one of these combinations, the
system beeps. To erase a character when entering your password, press the
<Backspace> key.
After you verify the password, the Setup Password setting changes to
Enabled. The next time you enter the System Setup program, the system
prompts you for the setup password.
A change to the Setup Password option becomes effective immediately
(restarting the system is not required).
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Operating With a Setup Password Set
If Setup Password is Enabled, you must enter the correct setup password
before you can modify the System Setup options. When you start the System
Setup program, the program prompts you to enter a password.
If you do not enter the correct password in three attempts, the system
displays an error message stating that the system has halted.
Deleting or Changing an Existing Setup Password
1 Enter the System Setup program and select the System Security option.
2 Highlight the Setup Password option, press <Enter> to access the setup
password window. Type the correct password and press <Enter>, then
press <Enter> twice to clear the existing setup password.
The setting changes to Not Enabled.
3 If you want to assign a new setup password, perform the steps in "Assigning
a Setup Password" on page 42.
Disabling a Forgotten Password
See "Disabling a Forgotten Password" on page 135.
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Installing System Components
This section describes how to install the following system components:
•
Front drive bezel
•
Diskette drive
•
Optical and tape drives
•
Hard drives
•
Expansion cards
•
SAS controller card
•
Memory
•
Microprocessor
•
Cooling fans
•
System battery
•
Power supply
•
Chassis intrusion switch
•
Bezel
•
I/O panel
•
System board
Recommended Tools
You may need the following items to perform the procedures in this section:
•
#2 Phillips screwdriver
•
Wrist grounding strap
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Inside the System
In Figure 3-1, the system cover is opened to provide an interior view of the
system.
Figure 3-1.
Inside the System
10
1
2
9
8
3
7
6
5
4
1
power supply
2
heat sink and shroud assembly
3
system board
4
hard drives (2)
5
3.5-inch drive bay
6
tape backup unit
7
5.25-inch drive bays (2)
8
bezel sliding plate release
9
drive cage
10
processor cooling fan
The system board can accommodate one processor, four expansion cards, and
four memory modules. The hard drive bays provide space for up to two SAS
or SATA hard drives. Drive bays in the front of the system provide space for
an optical drive, an optional tape drive or second optical drive, and an
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Installing System Components
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optional diskette drive. A controller expansion card is required for SAS hard
drives. Power is supplied to the system board and internal peripherals through
a single nonredundant power supply.
Opening the System
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
2 Press the power button to ground the system board.
3 Lay the system on its side as shown in Figure 3-2.
4 Open the system by sliding the cover release tab toward the rear of the
system and lifting the cover off. See Figure 3-2.
Closing the System
1 Ensure that all internal cables are connected and folded out of the way.
2 Ensure that no tools or extra parts are left inside the system.
3 Reinstall the system cover:
a
Insert the bottom edge of the cover into the bottom of the system
chassis. See Figure 3-2.
b
Press down on the cover until the cover release tab snaps into place.
4 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
After you open and close the cover, the chassis intrusion detector, if
enabled, causes the following message to appear on the screen at the next
system start-up:
Alert! Cover was previously opened.
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5 To reset the chassis intrusion detector, press <F2> to enter the System
Setup program. See "Using the System Setup Program" on page 31.
NOTE: If a setup password has been assigned by someone else, contact your
network administrator for information on resetting the chassis intrusion
detector.
Figure 3-2.
Opening and Closing the System
1
1
release tab
Front Drive Bezel
The front drive bezel is the cover for the optional diskette and 5.25-inch
drives. To remove or install a drive, you must first remove the front drive
bezel.
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CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
Removing the Front Drive Bezel
1 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
2 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
NOTE: The sliding plate secures and releases the front drive bezel and helps
to secure the drives.
3 Slide the lever on the sliding plate in the direction of the arrow until it
releases the front drive bezel from its side hinges. See Figure 3-3.
4 Carefully tilt the front drive bezel away from the chassis and lift it out as
shown in Figure 3-3.
5 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
Replacing the Front Drive Bezel
1 With the front drive bezel tilted away from the chassis, place the bottom
tabs of the bezel into their slots of the chassis. Refer to the lower arrow in
Figure 3-3.
2 Snap the bezel into place.
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Figure 3-3.
Removing and Replacing the Front Drive Bezel
1
2
1
sliding plate
2
front drive bezel
Removing an Insert on the Front Drive Bezel
If you install a drive in the 3.5-inch or 5.25-inch drive bays, first remove the
corresponding insert on the front drive bezel. Push the insert gently from the
front of the bezel. Then from the back of the bezel, squeeze the tab upward
on the end of the insert and rotate the insert away from the bezel. See
Figure 3-4.
Replacing an Insert on the Front Drive Bezel
If you remove a drive in the 3.5-inch or 5.25-inch drive bays, replace the
corresponding insert on the front drive bezel. From the back of the bezel, fit
the tab on the end of the insert into the notch on the bezel and snap the other
end of the insert into place. See Figure 3-4.
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Figure 3-4.
Removing and Replacing the Front Drive Bezel Insert
1
2
4
3
1
front drive bezel
2
insert tab
3
drive bezel insert
4
screws for an optional
5.25-inch drive (3)
Removing and Inserting Blank Drive Inserts
Depending on the configuration of your system, a blank drive insert might be
installed in place of an optical or diskette drive. These are essential for airflow
efficiency and for keeping dust out of the system.
You must remove the blank drive insert if you decide to replace it with an
optional diskette or optical drive. From the back of the blank drive insert,
slide the lever on the sliding plate in the direction of the arrow until the
shoulder screw is released. Then pull the PVC tab to remove the blank drive
insert.
To replace the blank drive insert, align the bottom of it with the sliding plate
and gently push it back until the shoulder screw locks into place. See
Figure 3-5.
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Figure 3-5. Removing and Replacing the Blank Drive Insert
3
2
1
1
tab
2
3
drive blank alignment screw
blank drive insert
Diskette Drive
The 3.5-inch drive bay supports an optional standard diskette drive.
Removing the Diskette Drive
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
2 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
3 Remove the front drive bezel. See "Removing the Front Drive Bezel" on
page 49.
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4 Disconnect the power and data cables from the diskette drive. See
Figure 3-6.
5 Slide the lever on the sliding plate in the direction of the arrow. See
Figure 3-6.
6 Hold the lever in position and slowly pull the drive out of the bay.
Figure 3-6. Removing or Installing a Diskette Drive
1
4
2
3
1
sliding plate
2
drive bay screw slots
3
diskette drive
4
diskette drive shoulder screw
7 If you are permanently removing the drive, replace the 3.5-inch insert on
front drive bezel. See "Replacing an Insert on the Front Drive Bezel" on
page 50.
If you are replacing the diskette drive, see "Installing a Diskette Drive" on
page 54.
8 Replace the front drive bezel. See "Replacing the Front Drive Bezel" on
page 49.
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9 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
10 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
Installing a Diskette Drive
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
2 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
3 Unpack the replacement diskette drive, and prepare it for installation.
4 Check the documentation for the drive to verify that it is configured for
your system.
5 Remove the front drive bezel. See "Removing the Front Drive Bezel" on
page 49.
6 Remove the 3.5-inch insert on the front drive bezel. See "Removing an
Insert on the Front Drive Bezel" on page 50.
7 Remove the four shoulder screws from the back of the insert. See
Figure 3-4; the 3.5-inch insert holds four screws.
8 Attach the four screws to the diskette drive as shown in Figure 3-7.
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Figure 3-7. Installing Diskette Drive Shoulder Screws
1
1
screws (4)
9 From the front of the chassis, slide the drive into the drive bay until the
shoulder screws fit into their slots and snap securely into the sliding plate.
10 Connect the P7 power cable to the drive. See Figure 3-8.
11 Connect the data cable from the drive to the diskette drive connector
(FLOPPY) on the system board. See Figure 3-8 and Figure 6-2.
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Figure 3-8. Cabling the Optional Diskette Drive to the Hard Drive
7
8
1
6
2
3
4
5
1
system board
2
diskette drive connector
3
diskette drive ribbon cable
4
heat sink shroud tab (2)
5
SATA power convert cable
6
diskette drive ribbon cable
7
cable clip
8
SATA hard drive cables (2)
12 Replace the front drive bezel. See "Replacing the Front Drive Bezel" on
page 49.
13 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
14 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
15 Enter the System Setup program and ensure that the drive’s controller is
enabled. See "Using the System Setup Program" on page 31.
16 (Optional) Test the drive by running the system diagnostics. See "Running
the System Diagnostics" on page 127.
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Optical and Tape Drives
In the upper 5.25-inch drive bay, you can install only an optical drive. In the
lower 5.25-inch drive bay, you can install either an optical or a tape backup
unit.
Removing an Optical or Tape Drive
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
2 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
3 Remove the front drive bezel. See "Removing the Front Drive Bezel" on
page 49.
4 Disconnect the power and data cables from the back of the drive. See
Figure 3-9 for disconnecting SCSI connections and Figure 3-10 for
disconnecting SATA connections.
5 Slide the lever on the sliding plate in the direction of the arrow to release
the shoulder screw.
6 Slide the drive out to remove it from the drive bay.
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Figure 3-9.
Removing and Installing an Optical or Tape Drive (SCSI Connection)
1
2
3
4
58
1
sliding plate
2
optical drive shoulder screw
3
optical drive
4
drive bay screw slots
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Figure 3-10.
Removing and Installing an Optical or Tape Drive (SATA Connection)
1
2
3
4
1
sliding plate
2
optical drive shoulder screw
3
optical drive
4
drive bay screw slots
7 If you are installing another drive in the bay, see "Installing an Optical or
Tape Drive" on page 60.
8 If the drive is being permanently removed, install an insert on front drive
bezel. See "Replacing an Insert on the Front Drive Bezel" on page 50.
9 Replace the front drive bezel. See "Replacing the Front Drive Bezel" on
page 49.
10 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
11 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
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Installing an Optical or Tape Drive
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Unpack the drive and prepare it for installation. For instructions, see the
documentation that accompanied the drive.
If you are installing a SCSI tape drive, you must have a SCSI controller
card installed (see "Installing an Expansion Card" on page 72) and
configure the tape drive according to the documentation that came with
the tape drive, based on the following guidelines:
a
Each device attached to a SCSI host adapter must have a unique
SCSI ID number (narrow SCSI devices use IDs 0 to 7; wide SCSI
devices use IDs from 0 to 15). Set the drive’s SCSI ID to avoid
conflicts with other devices on the SCSI bus. For the default SCSI ID
setting, see the documentation provided with the drive.
NOTE: There is no requirement that SCSI ID numbers be assigned
sequentially or that devices be attached to the cable in order by ID number.
b
SCSI logic requires that the two devices at opposite ends of a SCSI
chain be terminated and that all devices in between be unterminated.
Therefore, you enable the tape drive’s termination if it is the last
device in a chain of devices (or sole device) connected to the SCSI
controller.
2 Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect
the system from the electrical outlet.
3 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
4 Remove the front drive bezel. See "Removing the Front Drive Bezel" on
page 49.
5 If another drive is installed, remove it (see "Removing an Optical or Tape
Drive" on page 57) and remove the three shoulder screws to attach to the
new drive (see Figure 3-11).
6 If the drive bay is empty, remove the insert on the front drive bezel. See
"Removing an Insert on the Front Drive Bezel" on page 50.
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7 Remove the three shoulder screws from the insert, and attach one of them
to the row of holes and two to the bottom row of holes on the drive. See
Figure 3-11.
Figure 3-11.
Installing Optical or Tape Drive Shoulder Screws
1
1
screws (3)
8 Gently slide the drive into place until you hear a click or feel the drive
securely installed.
9 Attach the SCSI power cable (see Figure 3-12) or SATA power cable (see
Figure 3-13) to the drive. Ensure that cables are secured in their respective
clips.
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Figure 3-12. Cabling SCSI to the Optical Disk Drive
6
7
8
1
5
2
4
3
62
1
SCSI card
3
SCSI card
4
optical disk drive
5
SATA power convert cable
6
top clip on heat sink shroud
7
SCSI cable
8
system board
Installing System Components
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Figure 3-13.
Cabling a SATA Controller to the Optical Disk Drive
4
5
1
3
2
1
system board
2
optical disk drive
3
SATA power cable
4
cable clip
5
SATA optical disk cable
10 Attach the data cable. If you are installing a SCSI tape drive, connect the
SCSI interface cable in the drive kit from the SCSI controller card to the
drive. See Figure 3-12.
11 Check all cable connections, and fold cables out of the way to allow for
airflow between the fan and cooling vents.
12 Replace the front drive bezel. See "Replacing the Front Drive Bezel" on
page 49.
13 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
14 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
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15 (Optional) Test the drive by running the system diagnostics. See "Running
the System Diagnostics" on page 127.
Hard Drives
NOTE: The system’s drive configuration must consist of all SATA hard drives or all
SAS hard drives.
Hard Drive Installation Guidelines
Your system contains up to two SATA or SAS hard drives in internal drive
bays. Both drives must be either SAS or SATA; mixed configurations are not
supported. Up to two SATA drives may be connected to the system’s
integrated SATA controller or to an optional SAS controller expansion card.
Up to two SAS drives may be connected to an optional SAS controller
expansion card. Table 3-1 describes the possible drive configurations.
Table 3-1.
Hard-Drive Configurations
Drive
Drive Type Location
Number
Controller
Connector
1
integrated SATA controller
SATA_A
SAS expansion card (slot 2)
HDD0
SATA
HDD0
1
SAS
HDD0
SAS expansion card (slot 2)
HDD0
2
SATA
HDD1
integrated SATA
SATA_B
SAS expansion card (slot 2)
HDD1
SAS expansion card (slot 2)
HDD1
2
SAS
HDD1
Removing a Hard Drive
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
2 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
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3 Disconnect the hard drive power cable from the hard drive that you are
removing.
4 Disconnect the blue data cable from the hard drive that you are removing
by pulling up on the blue tab.
5 Press the blue tabs on each side of the hard-drive bracket toward each
other and slide the drive and its bracket up and out of the bay. See
Figure 3-14.
Figure 3-14.
Removing and Installing a Hard Drive in the Drive Carrier
1
2
1
hard drive power cable
2
hard drive in primary hard drive bay
NOTE: If you do not intend to replace the drive, it is highly recommended that you
remove the drive from the guide bracket (see Figure 3-15) and insert the empty
guide bracket back into the drive bay. This eliminates the likelihood that the empty
bracket will be misplaced or improperly stored while not in use.
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6 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
7 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
Installing a Hard Drive
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Unpack the replacement hard drive and prepare it for installation.
2 Check the documentation for the hard drive to verify that the drive is
configured for your system.
3 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
4 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
5 If you are replacing a hard drive, remove the drive that you are replacing
(see "Removing a Hard Drive" on page 64).
If there is a hard-drive bracket in the empty hard-drive bay, remove the
bracket by pressing the two tabs toward each other and pulling it up and
out of the drive bay.
If a replacement hard drive does not have the hard-drive bracket attached,
remove the bracket from the old drive.
6 Snap the new drive into the guide bracket. See Figure 3-15.
7 Insert the guide bracket assembly into the drive bay until it snaps into
place. See Figure 3-14.
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Figure 3-15.
Installing a Hard Drive in a Drive Bracket
1
2
1
hard drive
2
hard drive bracket
NOTICE: SAS drives and SATA drives cannot be mixed in the system. The drives
must be either SATA or SAS hard drives.
NOTE: The SAS controller card must be installed in either PCIe SLOT1 or PCIe
SLOT2. See Figure 6-2.
8 Connect the power cable to the hard drive.
9 Connect the data cable to the hard drive:
•
For connection to the integrated SATA controller (SATA hard drives
only), connect the SATA data cable to the SATA_A (first drive) and
SATA_B (second drive) connectors on the system board. See
Figure 3-16. See Figure 6-2 for the location of the hard drive
connectors on the system board.
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•
For connection to a SAS controller expansion card (SAS or SATA hard
drives), connect the data cable from the SAS controller card and the
power cable as shown in Figure 3-17. See "SAS Controller Expansion
Card" on page 73 for instructions about installing the card and
routing the cables.
Figure 3-16.
Cabling a SATA Hard Drive to the Integrated SATA Controller
1
2
3
68
1
SATA_B data cable to system board
2
4
SATA_A data cable to system board
3
power cable to hard drive
4
SATA data cable to hard drive
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Figure 3-17.
Attaching a SAS or SATA Hard Drive to a SAS Controller Expansion Card
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
power cable to hard drive (female)
2
power cable to hard drive (male)
3
SAS or SATA hard drives (2)
4
data cable to hard drive
5
data cable to SAS controller card
6
SAS controller card
10 Ensure that all connectors are properly cabled and firmly seated.
11 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
12 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
See the documentation that came with the drive for instructions on
installing any software required for drive operation.
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13 Press <F2> to enter the System Setup program (see "Entering the System
Setup Program" on page 31), and ensure that the drive’s controller is
enabled.
14 Exit the System Setup program and reboot the system.
15 Partition and logically format the drive.
See the documentation for your operating system for instructions.
16 (Optional) Test the hard drive by running the system diagnostics. See
"Running the System Diagnostics" on page 127.
17 If the drive you just installed is the primary drive, install your operating
system on the hard drive.
Expansion Cards
The system board can accommodate up to four expansion cards:
•
One 3.3-V, half-length 32-bit, 33-MHz PCI (slot 4)
•
One 2.5-Gb/sec PCIe x1 (slot 3)
•
Two 2.5-Gb/sec PCIe x8 (slots 1 and 2)
See Figure 6-2 for the location of the expansion card slots.
NOTE: The size of the expansion card connectors for the PCI x8 card is PCI x16.
Removing an Expansion Card
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
2 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
3 On the inside of the chassis, press the release tab of the card retention
door, and then pull down on the retention door’s latch on the outside of
the chassis to open the door. See Figure 3-18.
4 If necessary, disconnect any cables from the card.
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5 Grasp the card by its top corners and ease it out of its connector.
6 If you are removing the card permanently, install a filler bracket in the
empty card slot.
NOTE: Filler brackets must be installed over empty expansion card slots to
maintain Federal Communications Commission (FCC) certification of the
system. The brackets also keep dust and dirt out of the system and aid in
proper cooling and airflow inside the system.
Figure 3-18.
Removing and Installing an Expansion Card
1
2
3
4
1
expansion card
2
alignment guide
3
card retention door
4
release tab
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7 Close the card retention door to secure the remaining card(s) in the
system. See Figure 3-18.
8 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
9 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
10 Remove the card’s device driver from the operating system.
Installing an Expansion Card
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
2 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
3 On the inside of the chassis, press the release tab of the card retention
door, and then pull down on the retention door’s latch on the outside of
the chassis to open the door. See Figure 3-18.
4 If you are installing a new card, remove the filler bracket.
NOTE: Keep this bracket in case you need to remove the expansion card.
Filler brackets must be installed over empty expansion-card slots to maintain
FCC certification of the system. The brackets also keep dust and dirt out of the
system and aid in proper cooling and airflow inside the system.
5 Prepare the card for installation.
See the documentation that came with the card for information on
configuring the card, making internal connections, or otherwise
customizing it for your system.
NOTE: Some NICs automatically start the system when they are connected to
a network.
6 Insert the card into the expansion card connector on the system board
(SLOT1, SLOT2, SLOT3, or SLOT4) and press down firmly. Ensure that
the card is fully seated in the slot and all cards and filler brackets are flush
with the alignment bar. See Figure 6-2 for the location of the four
expansion card connectors.
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7 Close the card retention door to secure the card(s) in the system.
NOTICE: Do not route card cables over or behind the cards. Cables routed over the
cards can prevent the system cover from closing properly or cause damage to the
equipment.
8 Connect any cables that should be attached to the card.
See the documentation for the card for information about the card’s cable
connections.
9 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
10 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
11 Install any device drivers required for the card as described in the
documentation for the card.
SAS Controller Expansion Card
Read the installation instructions in the documentation for your SAS
controller card. Install the card in expansion card connector SLOT1 or
SLOT2 (see "Installing an Expansion Card" on page 72), and connect the
hard-drive activity indicator cable from the card to the AUXLED1 connector
on the system board (see Figure 6-2 for the connector location). Fasten the
cables to the slots as indicated in Figure 3-19 to manage the slack.
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Figure 3-19. Cabling a SAS or SATA Hard Drive to a SAS Controller Expansion Card
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
7
8
1
SAS card
2
clip on hard disk drive fan shroud
3
power cable
4
hard disk drive fan
5
power cable
6
top notch on heat sink fan shroud
7
SAS cable
8
retaining tabs on top of heat sink
shroud
9
retaining clip on top of heat sink fan
shroud
See "Hard Drives" on page 64 for information about connecting hard drives.
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Memory
The four memory module connectors on the system board can accommodate
from 512 MB to 8 GB of 667-MHz and 800-MHz unbuffered ECC DDR II
single or dual-rank memory modules. See Figure 6-2 for the location of the
four memory module connectors.
NOTE: When installing memory, take care to install it in the proper slots according
to the configuration guidelines in Table 3-2. Installing memory in the wrong slots will
significantly reduce system performance. See Figure 6-2 for slot locations.
Memory Module Upgrade Kits
The system is upgradable to 8 GB by installing combinations of 512-MB,
1-GB, and 2-GB 667-MHz or 800-MHz unbuffered ECC DDR II single or
dual-rank memory modules. You can purchase memory upgrade kits from
Dell.
Memory Module Installation Guidelines
•
If only one memory module is installed, it must be installed in connector
DIMM_1.
•
If only one memory module is installed in connector DIMM_1, its capacity
can be 512 MB, 1 GB, or 2 GB.
•
If more than one memory module is installed, the memory modules must
be installed in pairs of matched memory size, speed, and technology.
•
Memory modules must be installed in ordered pairs in connectors
DIMM_1 and DIMM_2, and then DIMM_3 and DIMM_4.
•
If a processor with a slower front-side bus rating than the memory is
installed, the memory will operate at the processor’s slower front-side bus
speed.
NOTICE: If you remove your original memory modules from the system during a
memory upgrade, keep them separate from any new memory modules that you may
have, even if you purchased the new memory modules from Dell. Use only
unbuffered ECC DDR II memory modules.
Table 3-2 illustrates memory configuration guidelines. It is important to
follow the slot installation configurations shown here to achieve maximum
memory performance.
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Table 3-2.
Memory Configuration Guidelines
Total Memory
DIMM_1
DIMM_2
DIMM_3
DIMM_4
512 MB
512 MB
none
none
none
1 GB
1 GB
none
none
none
2 GB
2 GB
none
none
none
1 GB
512 MB
512 MB
none
none
2 GB
512 MB
512 MB
512 MB
512 MB
2 GB
1 GB
1 GB
none
none
3 GB
1 GB
1 GB
512 MB
512 MB
3 GB
512 MB
512 MB
1 GB
1 GB
4 GB
2 GB
2 GB
none
none
4 GB
1 GB
1 GB
1 GB
1 GB
5 GB
2 GB
2 GB
512 MB
512 MB
5 GB
512 MB
512 MB
2 GB
2 GB
6 GB
2 GB
2 GB
1 GB
1 GB
6 GB
1 GB
1 GB
2 GB
2 GB
8 GB
2 GB
2 GB
2 GB
2 GB
Addressing Memory With 8-GB Configurations (Microsoft® Windows®
Operating System Only)
Your system supports a maximum of 8 GB of memory using four 2-GB
memory modules. Current operating systems can use a maximum of 8 GB of
address space; however, the amount of memory available to the operating
system is slightly less than 8 GB.
NOTE: Depending on the type of PCI/PCIe expansion cards that are installed in
your system, your system may only support a maximum of 7.4 GB of memory or less.
The following components require address space:
76
•
System ROM
•
Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controllers (APIC)
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•
Integrated PCI devices (such as NICs) and SCSI controllers
•
PCI expansion cards
At start-up, the BIOS identifies the components that require address space.
The BIOS dynamically calculates the amount of reserved address space
required. The BIOS then subtracts the reserved address space from 8 GB to
determine the amount of usable space.
•
If the total installed system memory is less than the usable space, all
installed system memory is available for use only by the operating system.
•
If the total installed system memory is equal to or greater than the usable
address space, a small portion of installed memory is available for use by
the operating system.
Removing a Memory Module
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
2 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
3 Press out on the securing clip at each end of the memory module
connector. See Figure 3-20.
4 Grasp the memory module and pull it out of the connector.
If the module is difficult to remove, gently move the module back and
forth to remove it from the connector.
Installing a Memory Module
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
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2 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
3 Press on the securing clip at each end of the memory module connector.
See Figure 3-20.
4 Align the memory module’s edge connector with the alignment key in the
connector.
The memory module connector has an alignment key that allows the
memory module to be installed in the connector in only one way.
5 Applying even pressure to both ends of the module, insert the module into
the connector and carefully press the module into place.
Figure 3-20.
Installing and Removing a Memory Module
1
4
3
2
1
memory module
2
alignment key
3
connector
4
memory module socket ejectors (2)
6 Pull up on the securing clips to lock the module into place.
If you insert the module correctly, the securing clips snap into the cutouts
at each end of the module.
When the memory module is properly seated in the connector, the
securing clips on the memory module socket should align with the
securing clips on the other connectors with memory modules installed.
7 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
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8 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
The system detects that the new memory does not match the existing
configuration information and generates the following message:
The amount of system memory has changed.
Strike the F1 key to continue, F2 to run the setup
utility
9 Press <F2> to enter the System Setup program and check the value for
Memory Information. See "System Setup Options" on page 33.
The system should have changed the value for Memory Information to
reflect the newly installed memory. Verify the new value. If it is correct,
skip to step 13.
10 If the memory value is incorrect, turn off the system and attached
peripherals, and disconnect the system from the electrical outlet.
11 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
12 Ensure that the installed memory modules are seated properly in their
connectors, and repeat step 7 through step 9.
13 When the Memory Information value is correct, press <Esc> to exit the
System Setup program.
14 Run the system diagnostics to verify that the memory modules are
operating properly. See "Running the System Diagnostics" on page 128.
Microprocessor
You can upgrade the system processor to take advantage of future options in
speed and functionality. The processor and its associated internal cache
memory are contained in a 939-pin micro pin grid array (PGA) package.
Removing the Processor
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
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CAUTION: The processor and heat sink can get very hot during normal operation.
Ensure that they have had sufficient time to cool before you touch them.
1 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
2 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
3 Detach the diskette cable that is braced on top of the shroud assembly and
move it aside.
4 Using a #2 Phillips screwdriver, loosen the two captive screws holding the
heat sink and shroud assembly in place.
These captive screws are adjacent to the processor cooling fan housing. See
Figure 3-21.
5 Tilt the heat sink and shroud assembly away from the fan housing on its
pivot bracket and lift it out.
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Figure 3-21.
Installing and Removing the Heat Sink
1
2
3
4
1
heat sink and shroud assembly
2
pivot bracket
3
captive screws (2)
4
diskette cable
6 Open the processor cover by sliding the release lever from under the
release lever latch on the socket. Then, pull the lever back until it is
vertically straight to release the processor. See Figure 3-22.
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Figure 3-22.
Installing and Removing a Processor
1
4
2
3
1
pin 1 marker
2
release lever
3
socket
4
processor
NOTICE: Do not pry the processor from the socket by a single edge. This could
result in damage to the processor’s delicate connections.
NOTICE: Be careful not to touch or drop any foreign materials on the socket
connector pads.
7 Lift the processor straight up and out of the socket.
Leave the release lever and retention latch in the release position so that
the socket is ready for the new processor.
Replacing the Processor
1 Unpack the new processor.
2 Ensure that the contacts on the bottom of the replacement processor are
free from dirt or other foreign material.
3 Align the pin 1 marker of the replacement processor so that it points in the
same direction as the yellow arrow indicator on the system board. See
Figure 3-22.
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NOTICE: Use caution when removing and installing the processor. Damaging the
processor socket connectors can damage the system board.
4 Carefully set the processor in the processor frame. Ensure that the notched
edge of the processor fits securely over the matching tab on the processor
frame. Do not press down on the processor. If the processor is seated
correctly, it should fit snugly in the socket frame. See Figure 3-22.
5 Lower the retention latch onto the processor, and then rotate the release
lever latch back toward the system board until it snaps into place.
6 Clean the thermal grease from the bottom of the heat sink.
NOTICE: Ensure that you apply new thermal grease. Applying new thermal grease
is critical to ensuring proper thermal bonding as well as optimal processor
operation.
7 Apply new thermal grease to the top of the processor.
8 Place the heat sink assembly back onto the heat sink assembly bracket and
tilt the heat sink assembly down on the system board. See Figure 3-21.
9 Align the two captive screws properly with the system board, then tighten
them to secure the heat sink assembly to the system board.
10 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
11 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
Cooling Fans
The system contains two cooling fans, one for the processor and one for the
card cage. Each contains a shroud that is part of the cooling fan assembly.
The fan and shroud are replaced as a unit.
NOTE: If you are removing the larger processor cooling fan, you must first remove
the heat sink and shroud assembly. See "Removing the Processor" on page 79
(however, do not remove the processor) and Figure 3-24.
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Removing the Cooling Fans
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
2 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
3 Disconnect the fan’s power cable from the system board.
4 If you are removing the smaller hard drive cooling fan (see Figure 3-23):
a
Squeeze the two release tabs together at the top of the fan cage that
attaches the fan to the chassis bracket mount.
b
Lift the fan out.
NOTE: The SAS hard drive cooling fan is present only if a SAS 6i/R integrated
controller card is installed.
5 If you are removing the larger processor cooling fan:
84
a
Remove the heat sink and shroud assembly. See "Removing the
Processor" on page 79. Do not remove the processor, however.
b
Press the side release tab that attaches the processor cooling fan to the
chassis (see Figure 3-24).
c
Press the bottom release tab and shift it forward to maneuver the
bottom securing tabs out of their mounting holes (see Figure 3-24).
d
Slide the fan toward the back panel and lift the fan out.
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Figure 3-23.
Removing and Installing the SAS Controller Cooling Fan
1
2
4
3
1
top release tabs
2
cooling fan
3
bottom connectors
4
bracket mount
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Figure 3-24.
Removing and Installing the Heat Sink Cooling Fan
1
2
3
4
1
bottom release tab
2
side release tab
3
connector for processor fan
(CPU_CAGE)
4
bottom mounting holes
Replacing the Cooling Fans
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
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If you are replacing the hard drive cooling fan:
1 Align the bottom connectors on the replacement fan with the mounting
holes in the system chassis.
2 Squeeze the top two release tabs and maneuver the assembly forward so
that it locks into place.
If you are replacing the processor cooling fan:
1 Align the bottom connectors on the replacement fan with the mounting
holes in the system chassis. Align the slots on the side of the replacement
fan with the securing tabs on the chassis bracket mount.
2 Slide the fan toward the front panel until it snaps into place.
3 Secure the cables into the slots on the heat sink fan shroud to manage
unwanted slack. See Figure 3-25.
4 Attach the fan cable to the system board. See Figure 6-2 for the location of
the connector.
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Figure 3-25. Cabling the Heat Sink Cooling Fan
1
2
3
4
5
1
heat sink fan shroud
2
cable slot
3
tab
4
fan connector cable
5
heat sink fan
5 Replace the heat sink and shroud assembly (see "Removing the Processor"
on page 79).
6 Reconnect the fan power cable to the system board.
7 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
System Battery
A coin-cell battery maintains system configuration, date, and time
information. The battery can last several years.
To determine whether you need to replace the battery, see "Troubleshooting
the System Battery" on page 111.
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You can operate your system without a battery; however, without a battery,
the configuration information is erased if the system is turned off or
unplugged from the electrical outlet. In this case, you must enter the System
Setup program and reset the configuration options.
CAUTION: A new battery can explode if it is incorrectly installed. Replace the
battery only with the same or equivalent type recommended by the manufacturer.
Discard used batteries according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
Removing the System Battery
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Enter the System Setup program and record the option settings on the
System Setup screens. See "Using the System Setup Program" on page 31.
2 Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect
the system from the electrical outlet.
3 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
4 See Figure 6-2 for the location of the system battery and then remove any
cables that block access to the battery.
NOTICE: If you use a blunt, nonconductive object to depress the tab next to the
battery, be careful not to touch the system board with the object. Ensure that the
object is inserted between the battery and the tab before you attempt to depress
the tab. Do not pry out the battery. You may damage the system board by prying off
the socket or by breaking circuit traces on the system board.
5 Press the tab on the battery socket to release the battery, then lift the
battery out of the socket. See Figure 3-26.
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Figure 3-26.
Removing and Installing the System Battery
2
3
1
1
battery socket
3
tab
2
system battery
Installing the System Battery
1 Install the new battery with the "+" facing up, and press down until it
snaps into place. See Figure 3-26.
2 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
3 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
4 Enter the System Setup program to confirm that the battery operates
properly. See "Using the System Setup Program" on page 31.
5 From the main screen, select System Time to enter the correct time and
date.
6 Re-enter any system configuration information that is no longer displayed
on the System Setup screens, and then exit the System Setup program.
7 To test the newly installed battery, see "Troubleshooting the System
Battery" on page 111.
8 After an hour, reconnect the system to a power source and turn it on.
9 Enter the System Setup program. If the time and date are still incorrect,
see "Getting Help" on page 137.
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10 Properly dispose of the old battery. For more information, see your Product
Information Guide.
Power Supply
Removing the Power Supply
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
2 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
3 Depending on your system configuration, disconnect the following power
cables:
•
P1 and P2 to the system board
•
P3 and P5 to the SATA or SAS drives
•
P7 to the diskette drive
•
P8, P9, and P10 to the optical and tape drives
NOTE: Note the routing of the DC power cables underneath the tabs in the
system frame as you release the tabs and remove the cables from the system
board and drives. You must route these cables properly when you replace
them to prevent their being pinched or crimped.
4 Remove the heat sink and shroud assembly. Loosen the two captive screws
holding the heat sink and shroud assembly in place.
These captive screws are adjacent to the processor cooling fan housing. See
Figure 3-21.
5 Tilt the heat sink and shroud assembly away from the fan housing and lift
it out.
6 Remove the I/O panel and SATA cables (if present) attached to the
routing clips on the side of the power supply.
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7 Using a #2 Phillips screwdriver, remove the four Phillips screws that secure
the power supply to the back panel.
8 Press the power-supply release tab down and slide the power supply toward
the front of the system, then lift it out of the system chassis. See
Figure 3-27.
9 Remove the cable clip and set it aside to attach to the new power supply.
Figure 3-27.
Removing the Power Supply
1
2
3
92
1
power supply release tab
2
4
power supply
3
screws (4)
4
cable clip
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Installing the Power Supply
1 Attach the cable clip to the new power supply.
2 Align the power supply mounting holes with the mounting holes on the
back panel.
3 Slide the power supply toward the back panel until it snaps into place over
the power-supply release tab.
4 Using a #2 Phillips screwdriver, install the four Phillips screws that secure
the power supply to the back panel.
5 Reattach the I/O panel and SATA cables (if present) to the routing clip on
the side of the power supply.
6 Depending on your system configuration, connect the following power
cables:
•
P1 and P2 to the system board
•
P3 and P5 to the SATA or SAS drives
•
P7 to the diskette drive
•
P8, P9, and P10 to the optical and tape drives
7 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
Chassis Intrusion Switch
Removing the Chassis Intrusion Switch
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
2 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
3 Disconnect the chassis intrusion switch cable from the INTRUSION
connector on the system board. See Figure 3-28.
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4 Slide the chassis intrusion switch out of the securing bracket notch. See
Figure 3-28.
5 Remove the switch and its attached cable from the system.
Figure 3-28.
Removing and Installing the Chassis Intrusion Switch
1
2
3
1
chassis intrusion switch
3
INTRUSION connector
2
securing bracket notch
Installing the Chassis Intrusion Switch
1 Align the chassis intrusion switch with the securing bracket notch. See
Figure 3-28.
2 Slide the switch into the securing bracket notch.
3 Connect the switch cable to the INTRUSION connector on the system
board.
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4 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
5 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system.
Bezel (Service Only Parts Procedure)
Removing the Bezel
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
2 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
3 Remove the heat sink and shroud assembly. See "Removing the Processor"
on page 79. Do not remove the processor, however.
4 Remove the large processor cooling fan. See "Removing the Cooling Fans"
on page 84.
5 Remove the two bezel release screws. See Figure 3-29.
6 Slide the bezel toward the top of the system, then lift it outward.
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Figure 3-29.
Removing the Bezel
1
4
3
1
alignment slot
2
2
bezel release screws (2)
3
bezel
4
alignment tab
Replacing the Bezel
1 Align the bezel with the chassis frame and slide it into position.
2 Secure the alignment tabs into their alignment slots.
3 Attach the two bezel release screws to secure the bezel to the system
chassis. See Figure 3-29.
4 Replace the processor fan. See "Replacing the Cooling Fans" on page 86.
5 Reinstall the heat sink and shroud assembly. See "Replacing the Processor"
on page 82.
6 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
7 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system.
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I/O Panel Assembly (Service Only Parts
Procedure)
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
Removing the I/O Panel Assembly
1 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
2 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
3 Remove the heat sink and shroud assembly. See "Removing the Processor"
on page 79. Do not remove the processor, however.
4 Remove the processor cooling fan. See "Removing the Cooling Fans" on
page 84.
5 Remove the front bezel. See "Removing the Bezel" on page 95.
NOTICE: Carefully note the routing of each cable before you disconnect it, so that
you are sure to re-route cables correctly.
6 Disconnect the I/O panel ribbon cable from the I/O panel connector by
pulling the yellow cable loop.
7 Remove the mounting screw holding the I/O panel assembly to the front
chassis. See Figure 3-30.
8 Lift the I/O panel assembly out of the system.
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Figure 3-30.
Removing and Installing the I/O Panel Assembly
1
2
3
4
5
1
screw on the I/O panel
2
I/O panel assembly
3
alignment stop on chassis
4
I/O panel securing slot
5
holding tab on the chassis
Replacing the I/O Panel Assembly
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Fit the I/O panel assembly so that the holding tab on the front of the
chassis catches at its bottom securing slot and the I/O panel assembly lines
up with the alignment stop. See Figure 3-30.
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2 Secure the I/O panel assembly by replacing the screw. See Figure 3-30.
3 Secure the I/O panel ribbon cable through the clips beneath the 3.5
optional diskette drive and on the side of the power supply shroud, and
connect the I/O panel ribbon cable to the new I/O panel connector. See
Figure 3-31.
Figure 3-31.
Cabling the I/O Panel Assembly
4
5
1
3
2
1
I/O panel connector
2
I/O panel assembly
3
4-pin power cable to system board
4
cable clip on power supply
5
I/O panel ribbon cable
4 Replace the large processor cooling fan. See "Replacing the Cooling Fans"
on page 86.
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5 Replace the heat sink and shroud assembly. See "Replacing the Processor"
on page 82.
NOTE: To prevent damaging the processor, clean the heat sink to remove any
thermal grease and then apply fresh thermal grease to the processor before
installing the heat sink.
6 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
7 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system.
System Board (Service Only Parts Procedure)
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
CAUTION: The heat sink can get hot during operation. To avoid burns, ensure that
the system has sufficient time to cool before removing the system board.
Removing the System Board
1 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
2 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
3 Depending on your configuration, disconnect the following cables from
the system board. See Figure 6-2 for connector locations.
100
•
Two power-supply cables from the POWER and POWER12V1
connectors
•
Diskette data cable from the FLOPPY connector
•
I/O panel cable from the CONTROL-PANEL connector
•
Processor cooling fan cable from the FAN1 connector
•
Card cage cooling fan cable from the FAN2 connector
•
SATA hard-drive data cable(s) from the SATA connector(s)
•
Intrusion switch cable from the INTRUSION connector
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4 Remove all expansion cards and any attached cables. See "Removing an
Expansion Card" on page 70.
5 Remove all memory modules. See "Memory" on page 75.
NOTE: Record the memory-module socket locations to ensure proper
reinstallation of the memory modules.
CAUTION: The processor and heat sink can become extremely hot. Allow
sufficient time for the processor and heat sink to cool before handling.
NOTICE: To prevent damaging the processor, do not pry the heat sink off of the
processor.
6 Remove the processor. See "Removing the Processor" on page 79.
7 Using a #2 Phillips screwdriver, remove the six system board mounting
screws that secure the system board to the chassis. See Figure 6-2.
8 Using a #2 Phillips screwdriver, remove the two processor heat sink pivot
mount screws and remove the pivot mount from the system board. See
Figure 6-2. The heat sink pivot mount screws are green and are longer than
the system board mounting screws.
9 Carefully route any loose cables away from the edges of the system board.
10 Gently slide the system board toward the front of the system, then lift the
system board up and out of the chassis.
Installing the System Board
1 After removing the old system board, lower the new system board into the
chassis, aligning the I/O ports on the system board with the I/O connector
openings on the back panel of the chassis.
2 Using a #2 Phillips screwdriver, install the six screws on the system board
that secure it to the chassis. See Figure 6-2.
3 Using a #2 Phillips screwdriver, attach the processor heat sink pivot
mount to the system board. See Figure 6-2.
NOTICE: To prevent damaging the processor, clean the heat sink to remove any
thermal grease and then apply fresh thermal grease to the processor before
installing the heat sink.
4 Replace the processor, and the heat sink and shroud assembly. See
"Replacing the Processor" on page 82.
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5 Install the memory modules in the same sockets from which they were
removed. See "Installing a Memory Module" on page 77.
6 Install the expansion cards and connect any cables. See "Installing an
Expansion Card" on page 72.
7 Depending on your configuration, connect the following cables that you
removed in "Removing the System Board" on page 100. See Figure 6-2.
•
Two power-supply cables to the POWER and POWER12V1
connectors
•
If applicable, diskette data cable to the FLOPPY connector
•
I/O panel cable to the CONTROL-PANEL connector
•
Processor cooling fan cable to the FAN1 connector
•
Card cage cooling fan cable to the FAN2 connector
•
SATA hard-drive data cable(s) to the SATA connector(s)
•
Intrusion switch cable from the INTRUSION connector
8 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
9 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system.
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Troubleshooting Your System
Safety First—For You and Your System
To perform certain procedures in this document, you must remove the system
cover and work inside the system. While working inside the system, do not
attempt to service the system except as explained in this guide and elsewhere
in your system documentation.
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
Start-Up Routine
Look and listen during the system's start-up routine for the indications
described in Table 4-1.
Table 4-1.
Start-Up Routine Indications
Look/listen for:
Action
A code displayed on the system
diagnostic indicators.
See "Diagnostic Lights" on page 18.
An error message displayed on the
monitor.
See "System Messages" on page 20.
The monitor's power indicator.
See "Troubleshooting the Video Subsystem"
on page 104.
The keyboard indicators.
See "Troubleshooting the Keyboard" on
page 105.
The USB diskette drive activity
indicator.
See "Troubleshooting a Diskette Drive" on
page 116.
The USB CD drive activity indicator.
See "Troubleshooting an Optical Drive" on
page 118.
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Table 4-1.
Start-Up Routine Indications (continued)
Look/listen for:
Action
The hard-drive activity indicator.
See "Troubleshooting a Hard Drive" on
page 120.
An unfamiliar constant scraping or
grinding sound when you access a
drive.
See "Getting Help" on page 137.
Checking the Equipment
This section provides troubleshooting procedures for external devices
attached to the system, such as the monitor, keyboard, or mouse. Before you
perform any of the procedures, see "Troubleshooting External Connections"
on page 104.
Troubleshooting External Connections
Loose or improperly connected cables are the most likely source of problems
for the system, monitor, and other peripherals (such as a printer, keyboard,
mouse, or other external device). Ensure that all external cables are securely
attached to the external connectors on your system. See Figure 1-2 for the
back-panel connectors on your system.
Troubleshooting the Video Subsystem
Problem
•
Monitor is not working properly.
•
Video memory is faulty.
Action
1 Check the system and power connections to the monitor.
2 Determine whether the system has an expansion card with a video output
connector.
In this system configuration, the monitor cable should normally be
connected to the connector on the expansion card, not to the system’s
integrated video connector.
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To verify that the monitor is connected to the correct video connector,
turn off the system and wait for 1 minute, then connect the monitor to the
other video connector and turn the system on again.
3 Run the appropriate online diagnostic test. See "Using Dell PowerEdge
Diagnostics" on page 127.
If the tests run successfully, the problem is not related to video hardware.
If the tests fail, see "Getting Help" on page 137.
Troubleshooting the Keyboard
Problem
•
System message indicates a problem with the keyboard.
•
Keyboard is not functioning properly.
Action
1 Enter the System Setup program and ensure that the USB ports are
enabled. See "Using the System Setup Program" on page 31.
2 Examine the keyboard and its cable for signs of damage.
3 Swap the faulty keyboard with a working keyboard.
If the problem is resolved, replace the faulty keyboard. See "Getting Help"
on page 137.
4 Run the appropriate online diagnostic test. See "Using Dell PowerEdge
Diagnostics" on page 127.
If the problem is not resolved, see "Getting Help" on page 137.
Troubleshooting the Mouse
Problem
•
System message indicates a problem with the mouse.
•
Mouse is not functioning properly.
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Action
1 Run the appropriate online diagnostic test. See "Using Dell PowerEdge
Diagnostics" on page 127.
If the test fails, continue to the next step.
2 Examine the mouse and its cable for signs of damage.
If the mouse is not damaged, go to step 4.
If the mouse is damaged, continue to the next step.
3 Swap the faulty mouse with a working mouse.
If the problem is resolved, replace the faulty mouse. See "Getting Help" on
page 137.
4 Enter the System Setup program and ensure that the mouse controller is
enabled. See "Using the System Setup Program" on page 31.
If the problem is not resolved, see "Getting Help" on page 137.
Troubleshooting Serial I/O Problems
Problem
•
Error message indicates a problem with a serial port.
•
Device connected to a serial port is not operating properly.
Action
1 Enter the System Setup program and ensure that the serial port is enabled
and configured correctly for your application. See "Using the System Setup
Program" on page 31.
2 If the problem is confined to a particular application, see the application
documentation for specific port configuration requirements that the
program may require.
3 Run the appropriate online diagnostic test. See "Running the System
Diagnostics" on page 127.
If the tests run successfully but the problem persists, see "Troubleshooting
a USB Device" on page 107.
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Troubleshooting a Serial I/O Device
Problem
•
Device connected to the serial port is not operating properly.
Action
1 Turn off the system and any peripheral devices connected to the serial
port.
2 Swap the serial interface cable with a working cable, and turn on the
system and the serial device.
If the problem is resolved, replace the interface cable. See "Getting Help"
on page 137.
3 Turn off the system and the serial device, and swap the device with a
comparable device.
4 Turn on the system and the serial device.
If the problem is resolved, replace the serial device. See "Getting Help" on
page 137.
If the problem persists, see "Getting Help" on page 137.
Troubleshooting a USB Device
Problem
•
System message indicates a problem with a USB device.
•
Device connected to a USB port is not operating properly.
Action
1 Enter the System Setup program and ensure that the USB ports are
enabled. See "Using the System Setup Program" on page 31.
2 Turn off the system and any USB devices.
3 Disconnect the USB devices, and connect the malfunctioning device to
the other USB connector.
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4 Turn on the system and the reconnected device.
If the problem is resolved, the USB connector might be defective. See
"Getting Help" on page 137.
5 If possible, swap the interface cable with a working cable.
If the problem is resolved, replace the interface cable. See "Getting Help"
on page 137.
6 Turn off the system and the USB device, and swap the device with a
comparable device.
7 Turn on the system and the USB device.
If the problem is resolved, replace the USB device. See "Getting Help" on
page 137.
If the problem persists, see "Getting Help" on page 137.
Troubleshooting a NIC
Problem
•
NIC cannot communicate with network.
Action
1 Run the appropriate online diagnostic test. See "Using Dell PowerEdge
Diagnostics" on page 127.
2 Check the appropriate indicator on the NIC connector. See "NIC
Indicator Codes" on page 16.
•
If the link indicator does not light, check all cable connections.
•
If the activity indicator does not light, the network driver files might
be damaged or missing.
Remove and reinstall the drivers if applicable. See the NIC's
documentation.
•
Change the autonegotiation setting, if possible.
•
Use another connector on the switch or hub.
If you are using a NIC card instead of an integrated NIC, see the
documentation for the NIC card.
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3 Ensure that the appropriate drivers are installed and the protocols are
bound. See the NIC's documentation.
4 Enter the System Setup program and confirm that the NICs are enabled.
See "Using the System Setup Program" on page 31.
5 Ensure that the NICs, hubs, and switches on the network are all set to the
same data transmission speed. See the network equipment
documentation.
6 Ensure that all network cables are of the proper type and do not exceed the
maximum length.
If the problem persists, see "Getting Help" on page 137.
Troubleshooting a Wet System
Problem
•
Liquid spilled on the system.
•
Excessive humidity.
Action
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
2 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
3 Remove all expansion cards installed in the system. See "Removing an
Expansion Card" on page 70.
4 Let the system dry thoroughly for at least 24 hours.
5 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
6 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
If the system does not start properly, see "Getting Help" on page 137.
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7 If the system starts properly, shut down the system and reinstall all of the
expansion cards that you removed. See "Installing an Expansion Card" on
page 72.
8 Run the appropriate online diagnostic test. See "Using Dell PowerEdge
Diagnostics" on page 127.
If the tests fail, see "Getting Help" on page 137.
Troubleshooting a Damaged System
Problem
•
System was dropped or damaged.
Action
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
2 Ensure that the following components are properly installed:
•
Expansion cards
•
Power supply
•
Fans
•
Processors and heat sinks
•
Optional installed drivers
•
Memory modules
3 Ensure that all cables are properly connected.
4 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
5 Run the system board tests in the system diagnostics. See "Running the
System Diagnostics" on page 127.
If the tests fail, see "Getting Help" on page 137.
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Troubleshooting the System Battery
Problem
•
System message indicates a problem with the battery.
•
System Setup program loses system configuration information.
•
System date and time do not remain current.
NOTE: If the system is turned off for long periods of time (for weeks or months), the
NVRAM may lose its system configuration information. This situation is caused by a
defective battery.
Action
1 Re-enter the time and date through the System Setup program. See "Using
the System Setup Program" on page 31.
2 Turn off the system and disconnect it from the electrical outlet for at least
one hour.
3 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet and turn on the system.
4 Enter the System Setup program. See "Using the System Setup Program"
on page 31.
If the date and time are not correct in the System Setup program, replace
the battery. See "System Battery" on page 88.
If the problem is not resolved by replacing the battery, see "Getting Help"
on page 137.
NOTE: Some software may cause the system time to speed up or slow down. If the
system seems to operate normally except for the time kept in the System Setup
program, the problem may be caused by software rather than by a defective
battery.
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Troubleshooting Power Supply
Problem
•
Power-supply fault indicator is blinking amber.
Action
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Run the appropriate online diagnostics test. See "Running the System
Diagnostics" on page 127.
2 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
3 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
4 Locate the faulty power supply.
The power supply's fault indicator is lit. See "Power Supply Indicators" on
page 17.
NOTICE: Setting the voltage selection switch to an improper setting can damage
your system.
5 Ensure that the power supply is properly installed by removing and
reinstalling it. See "Installing the Power Supply" on page 93.
NOTE: After installing a power supply, allow several seconds for the system
to recognize the power supply and to determine if it is working properly. The
power indicator turns green to signify that the power supply is functioning
properly.
6 If the problem is resolved, close the system. See "Closing the System" on
page 47.
If the problem persists, remove the faulty power supply. See "Removing
the Power Supply" on page 91.
7 Install a new power supply. See "Installing the Power Supply" on page 93.
If the problem persists, see "Getting Help" on page 137.
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Troubleshooting System Cooling Problems
Problem
•
Systems management software issues a fan-related error message.
Action
Ensure that none of the following conditions exist:
•
System cover, drive blank, or front or back filler panel is removed.
•
Ambient temperature is too high.
•
External airflow is obstructed.
•
Cables inside the system obstruct airflow.
•
An individual cooling fan is removed or has failed. See "Troubleshooting a
Fan" on page 113.
Troubleshooting a Fan
Problem
•
System-status indicator is amber.
•
System management software issues a fan-related error message.
Action
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Run the appropriate diagnostic test. See "Using Dell PowerEdge
Diagnostics" on page 127.
2 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
3 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
CAUTION: The cooling fans are hot-pluggable. To maintain proper cooling while
the system is on, only replace one fan at a time.
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4 Locate the faulty fan indicated by the diagnostic software or the fan
indicator that is blinking amber. For the identification number of each fan,
see "Removing and Installing the Heat Sink Cooling Fan" on page 86.
5 Ensure that the faulty fan's power cable is firmly attached to the fan power
connector. For a hot-plug fan, remove and reseat the fan. See "Cooling
Fans" on page 83.
NOTE: Wait 30 seconds for the system to recognize the fan and determine
whether it is working properly.
6 Reconnect the system to its electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
7 If the problem is not resolved, install a new fan. See "Cooling Fans" on
page 83.
If the replacement fan is working properly, close the system. See "Closing
the System" on page 47.
If the replacement fan does not operate, see "Getting Help" on page 137.
Troubleshooting System Memory
Problem
•
Faulty memory module.
•
Faulty system board.
•
Diagnostic indicator code indicates a problem with system memory.
Action
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 If the system is operational, run the appropriate online diagnostic test. See
"Using Dell PowerEdge Diagnostics" on page 127.
If diagnostics indicates a fault, follow the corrective actions provided by
the diagnostic program. If the problem is not resolved or if the system is
not operational, continue to the next step.
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2 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, unplug the system from the
power source and press the power button, and then reconnect the system
to power.
3 Turn on the system and attached peripherals and, as the system boots,
note the messages on the screen.
If an error messages appears indicating a fault with a specific memory
module, go to step 12.
If any other system message appears that indicates a nonspecific memory
problem, continue to the next step.
4 Enter the System Setup program and check the system memory setting.
See "Using the System Setup Program" on page 31.
If the installed memory does not match the amount of memory shown in
the System Setup program, proceed to the next step.
If the memory settings and installed memory indicate no problems, go to
step 12.
5 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
6 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
7 Ensure that the memory banks are populated correctly. See "Memory
Module Installation Guidelines" on page 75.
If the memory modules are populated correctly, continue to the next step.
8 Reseat the memory modules in their sockets. See "Installing a Memory
Module" on page 77.
9 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
10 Reconnect the system to its electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
11 Enter the System Setup program and check the system memory setting.
See "Using the System Setup Program" on page 31.
If the amount of memory installed still does not match the system
memory setting, proceed to the next step.
12 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from its electrical outlet.
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13 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
NOTE: Several configurations for the memory modules exist; see "Memory Module
Installation Guidelines" on page 75.
14 If a diagnostic test or error message indicates a specific memory module as
faulty, swap or replace the module. Otherwise, swap the memory module
in the first DIMM socket with a module of the same type and capacity that
is known to be good. See "Installing a Memory Module" on page 77.
15 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
16 Reconnect the system to its electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
17 As the system boots, observe any error message that appears and the
diagnostic indicators on the front of the system.
18 If the memory problem is still indicated, repeat step 12 through step 17 for
each memory module installed.
If the problem persists, see "Getting Help" on page 137.
Troubleshooting a Diskette Drive
Problem
•
Error message indicates a diskette drive problem.
Action
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Enter the System Setup program and verify that the diskette drive is
configured correctly. See "Using the System Setup Program" on page 31.
2 Remove the bezel. See "Removing the Bezel" on page 95.
3 Run the appropriate online diagnostic test. See "Using Dell PowerEdge
Diagnostics" on page 127.
4 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
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5 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
6 Ensure that the diskette drive interface cable is securely connected to the
diskette drive and the system board.
7 Ensure that a power cable is properly connected to the drive.
8 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
9 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
10 Run the appropriate online diagnostic test to see whether the diskette
drive works correctly.
If the problem persists, continue with the following steps.
11 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from its electrical outlet.
12 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
13 Remove all expansion cards installed in the system. See "Removing an
Expansion Card" on page 70.
14 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
15 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
16 Run the appropriate online diagnostic test to see whether the diskette
drive works correctly.
If the tests run successfully, an expansion card may be conflicting with the
diskette drive logic, or an expansion card may be faulty. Continue to the
next step.
If the tests fail, see "Getting Help" on page 137.
17 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
18 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
19 Reinstall one of the expansion cards you removed in step 13. See
"Installing an Expansion Card" on page 72.
20 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
21 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
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22 Run the appropriate online diagnostic test to see whether the diskette
drive works correctly.
23 Repeat step 17 through step 22 until all expansion cards are reinstalled or
one of the expansion cards causes the tests to fail.
If the problem is not resolved, see "Getting Help" on page 137.
Troubleshooting an Optical Drive
Problem
•
System cannot read data from a CD or DVD in an optical drive.
•
Optical drive indicator does not blink during boot.
Action
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Remove the bezel. See "Removing the Bezel" on page 95.
2 Try using a different CD or DVD that you know works properly.
3 Enter the System Setup program and ensure that the drive’s IDE
controller is enabled. See "Using the System Setup Program" on page 31.
4 Run the appropriate online diagnostic test. See "Using Dell PowerEdge
Diagnostics" on page 127.
5 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
6 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
7 Ensure that the interface cable is securely connected to the optical drive
and to the controller.
8 Ensure that a power cable is properly connected to the drive.
9 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
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10 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
If the problem is not resolved, see "Getting Help" on page 137.
Troubleshooting an External SCSI Tape Drive
Problem
•
Defective tape drive
•
Defective tape cartridge
•
Missing or corrupted tape-backup software or tape drive device driver
•
Defective SCSI controller
Action
1 Remove the tape cartridge you were using when the problem occurred, and
replace it with a tape cartridge that you know works.
2 Ensure that the SCSI device drivers for the tape drive are installed and are
configured correctly. See "Installing an Optical or Tape Drive" on page 60.
3 Reinstall the tape-backup software as instructed in the tape-backup
software documentation.
4 Ensure that the tape drive’s interface/DC power cable is connected to the
tape drive and SCSI controller card.
5 Verify that the tape drive is configured for a unique SCSI ID number and
that the tape drive is terminated or not terminated, based on the interface
cable used to connect the drive.
See the documentation for the tape drive for instructions on selecting the
SCSI ID number and enabling or disabling termination.
6 Run the appropriate online diagnostics tests. See "Using Dell PowerEdge
Diagnostics" on page 127.
7 Open or remove the bezel. See "Removing the Bezel" on page 95.
8 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
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CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
9 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
10 Ensure that the SCSI controller card is firmly seated in its connector. See
"Installing an Expansion Card" on page 72.
11 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
12 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
13 If the problem is not resolved, see the documentation for the tape drive for
additional troubleshooting instructions.
14 If you cannot resolve the problem, see "Getting Help" on page 137 for
information on obtaining technical assistance.
Troubleshooting a Hard Drive
Problem
•
Device driver error.
•
One or more hard drives not recognized by the system.
Action
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
NOTICE: This troubleshooting procedure can destroy data stored on the hard
drive. Before you proceed, back up all files on the hard drive.
1 Run the appropriate online diagnostics test. See "Using Dell PowerEdge
Diagnostics" on page 127.
Depending on the results of the diagnostics test, proceed as needed
through the following steps.
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2 If you are experiencing problems with multiple hard drives, skip to step 6.
For a problem with a single hard drive, continue to the next step.
3 If your system has a SAS RAID controller, perform the following steps.
a
Restart the system and press <Ctrl><R> to enter the host adapter
configuration utility program.
See the documentation supplied with the host adapter for information
about the configuration utility.
b
Ensure that the hard drive has been configured correctly for the RAID.
c
Exit the configuration utility and allow the system to boot to the
operating system.
4 Ensure that the required device drivers for your SAS controller card or SAS
RAID controller are installed and are configured correctly. See the
operating system documentation for more information.
5 Verify that the controller is enabled and the drives appear in the System
Setup program. See "Using the System Setup Program" on page 31.
6 Check the cable connections inside the system:
a
Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and
disconnect the system from the electrical outlet.
b
Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
c
Verify that the cable connections between the hard drive(s) and the
drive controller are correct, whether the connections are to the SATA
connectors on the system board, a SAS expansion card, or a SAS RAID
controller. See "Hard Drives" on page 64.
d
Verify that the SAS or SATA cables are securely seated in their
connectors.
e
Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
f
Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system
and attached peripherals.
If the problem persists, see "Getting Help" on page 137.
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Troubleshooting a SAS or SAS RAID Controller
NOTE: When troubleshooting a SAS RAID controller, also see the documentation
for your operating system and the controller.
Problem
•
Error message indicates a problem with the SAS or SAS RAID controller.
•
SAS or SAS RAID controller performs incorrectly or not at all.
Action
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Run the appropriate online diagnostic test. See "Using Dell PowerEdge
Diagnostics" on page 127.
2 Enter the System Setup program and ensure that the SAS or SAS RAID
controller is enabled. See "Using the System Setup Program" on page 31.
3 Restart the system and press the applicable key sequence to enter the
configuration utility program:
•
<Ctrl><C> for a SAS controller
•
<Ctrl><R> for a SAS RAID controller
See the controller's documentation for information about configuration
settings.
4 Check the configuration settings, make any necessary corrections, and
restart the system.
If the problem is not resolved, continue to the next step.
5 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from its electrical outlet.
6 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
7 Ensure that the controller card is firmly seated into the system board
connector. See "Installing an Expansion Card" on page 72.
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8 If you have a SAS RAID controller, ensure that the following RAID
components are properly installed and connected:
•
Memory module
•
Battery
9 Verify that the cable connections between the hard drives and the SAS
controller are correct. See "Hard Drives" on page 64.
Ensure that the cables are firmly connected to the SAS controller and the
hard drives.
10 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
11 Reconnect the system to its electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals. If the problem persists, see "Getting Help" on
page 137.
Troubleshooting Expansion Cards
NOTE: When troubleshooting an expansion card, see the documentation for your
operating system and the expansion card.
Problem
•
Error message indicates a problem with an expansion card.
•
Expansion card performs incorrectly or not at all.
Action
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 Run the appropriate online diagnostic test for the expansion card which is
exhibiting issues. See "Using Dell PowerEdge Diagnostics" on page 127.
Follow any recommended actions provided by the diagnostics. If the
problem persists, go to the next step.
2 Open or remove the bezel. See "Removing the Bezel" on page 95.
3 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
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4 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
5 Ensure that each expansion card is firmly seated in its connector. See
"Installing an Expansion Card" on page 72.
6 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
7 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
If the problem persists, go to the next step.
8 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
9 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
10 Remove all expansion cards in the system. See "Removing an Expansion
Card" on page 70.
NOTE: If your operating system is running off a disk controller card (such as a SAS
controller card), do not remove it.
11 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
12 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
13 Run the appropriate online diagnostic test.
If the tests fail, see "Getting Help" on page 137.
14 For each expansion card you removed in step 10, perform the following steps:
a
Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the
system from the electrical outlet.
b
Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
c
Reinstall one of the expansion cards.
d
Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
e
Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system
and attached peripherals.
f
Run the appropriate online diagnostic test.
If the tests fail, repeat step 14 for each expansion card until you are
able to single out the faulty expansion card.
If the tests fail for all expansion cards, see "Getting Help" on page 137.
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Troubleshooting the Microprocessor
Problem
•
Error message indicates a processor problem.
•
Diagnostic indicator code indicates a problem with the processor or system
board.
•
A heat sink is not installed for the processor.
Action
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
1 If possible, run the appropriate online diagnostics test. See "Using Dell
PowerEdge Diagnostics" on page 127.
2 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
3 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
4 Ensure that the processor and heat sink are properly installed. See
"Replacing the Processor" on page 82.
5 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
6 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
7 If possible, run the appropriate online diagnostic test. See "Running the
System Diagnostics" on page 127.
If the tests fail or the problem persists, continue to the next step.
8 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
9 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
10 Replace the processor. See "Replacing the Processor" on page 82.
11 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
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12 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system and
attached peripherals.
13 Run the appropriate online diagnostic test. See "Running the System
Diagnostics" on page 127.
If the problem persists, the system board is faulty. See "Getting Help" on
page 137.
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Running the System Diagnostics
If you experience a problem with your system, run the diagnostics before
calling for technical assistance. The purpose of the diagnostics is to test your
system's hardware without requiring additional equipment or risking data
loss. If you are unable to fix the problem yourself, service and support
personnel can use diagnostics test results to help you solve the problem.
Using Dell PowerEdge Diagnostics
To assess a system problem, first use the online Dell™ PowerEdge™
Diagnostics. Dell PowerEdge Diagnostics is a suite of diagnostic programs, or
test modules, that include diagnostic tests on chassis and storage components
such as hard drives, physical memory, communications and printer ports,
NICs, CMOS, and more. If you are unable to identify the problem using the
PowerEdge Diagnostics, then use the system diagnostics.
The files required to run PowerEdge Diagnostics for systems running
supported Microsoft® Windows® and Linux operating systems are available
at support.dell.com and on the CDs that came with your system. For
information about using diagnostics, see the Dell PowerEdge Diagnostics
User's Guide.
System Diagnostics Features
The system diagnostics provides a series of menus and options for particular
device groups or devices. The system diagnostics menus and options allow
you to:
•
Run tests individually or collectively.
•
Control the sequence of tests.
•
Repeat tests.
•
Display, print, or save test results.
•
Temporarily suspend testing if an error is detected or terminate testing
when a user-defined error limit is reached.
•
View help messages that briefly describe each test and its parameters.
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•
View status messages that inform you if tests are completed successfully.
•
View error messages that inform you of problems encountered during
testing.
When to Use the System Diagnostics
If a major component or device in the system does not operate properly,
component failure may be indicated. As long as the microprocessor and the
system's input/output devices (monitor, keyboard, and diskette drive) are
functioning, you can use the system diagnostics to help identify the problem.
Running the System Diagnostics
The system diagnostics is run from the utility partition on your hard drive.
NOTICE: Use the system diagnostics to test only your system. Using this program
with other systems may cause invalid results or error messages. In addition, use
only the program that came with your system (or an updated version of that
program).
1 As the system boots, press <F10> during POST.
2 From the utility partition main menu, select Run System Diagnostics, or
select Run Memory Diagnostics if you are troubleshooting memory.
When you start the system diagnostics, a message is displayed stating that the
diagnostics are initializing. Next, the Diagnostics menu appears. The menu
allows you to run all or specific diagnostics tests or to exit the system
diagnostics.
NOTE: Before you read the rest of this section, start the system diagnostics so that
you can see the utility on your screen.
System Diagnostics Testing Options
Click the testing option in the Main Menu window. Table 5-1 provides a
brief explanation of testing options.
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Table 5-1.
System Diagnostics Testing Options
Testing Option
Function
Express Test
Performs a quick check of the system. This option runs device
tests that do not require user interaction. Use this option to
quickly identify the source of your problem.
Extended Test
Performs a more thorough check of the system. This test can
take an hour or longer.
Custom Test
Tests a particular device.
Information
Displays test results.
Using the Custom Test Options
When you select Custom Test in the Main Menu window, the Customize
window appears and allows you to select the device(s) to be tested, select
specific options for testing, and view the test results.
Selecting Devices for Testing
The left side of the Customize window lists devices that can be tested.
Devices are grouped by device type or by module, depending on the option
you select. Click the (+) next to a device or module to view its components.
Click (+) on any component to view the tests that are available. Clicking a
device, rather than its components, selects all of the components of the
device for testing.
NOTE: After you select all the devices and components that you want to test,
highlight All Devices and then click Run Tests.
Selecting Diagnostics Options
Use the Diagnostics Options area to select how you want to test a device. You
can set the following options:
•
Non-Interactive Tests Only — When checked, runs only tests that require
no user intervention.
•
Quick Tests Only — When checked, runs only the quick tests on the
device. Extended tests will not run when you select this option.
•
Show Ending Timestamp — When checked, time stamps the test log.
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•
Test Iterations — Selects the number of times the test is run.
•
Log output file pathname — When checked, enables you to specify where
the test log file is saved.
Viewing Information and Results
The tabs in the Customize window provide information about the test and
the test results. The following tabs are available:
130
•
Results — Displays the test that ran and the result.
•
Errors — Displays any errors that occurred during the test.
•
Help — Displays information about the currently selected device,
component, or test.
•
Configuration — Displays basic configuration information about the
currently selected device.
•
Parameters — If applicable, displays parameters that you can set for the
test.
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Jumpers and Connectors
This section provides specific information about the system jumpers and
describes the connectors on the various boards in the system.
System Board Jumpers
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. Before performing any
procedure, see your Product Information Guide for complete information about
safety precautions, working inside the computer and protecting against
electrostatic discharge.
Figure 6-1 shows the location of the configuration jumpers on the system
board. Table 6-1 lists the jumper settings.
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Figure 6-1.
Table 6-1.
System Board Jumpers
System Board Jumper Settings
Jumper
Setting
PWRD_EN
Description
(default) The password feature is enabled.
The password feature is disabled.
NVRAM_CLR
(default) The configuration settings in NVRAM are
retained at system boot.
The configuration settings in NVRAM are cleared
at next system boot.
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System Board Connectors
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. See your Product
Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working
inside the computer, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.
See Figure 6-2 and Table 6-2 for the location and description of the system
board connectors.
Figure 6-2. System Board Connectors
18
19 20
21 22
23
24 25
26
1
2
3
4
5
17
6
16
7
15
8
9
14
10
13
12
11
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Table 6-2.
System Board Connectors
Item
Connector
Description
1
CONTROL-PANEL
front panel
2
USBBACK1
USB connector
3
NIC1
NIC connector
4
J5
POWER CONNECTOR drive
5
J1
video connector
6
J2
Serial connector
7
BATTERY
battery socket
8
PCIE_X8_1
PCIe x8
9
PCIE_X8_2
PCIe x8
10
PCI
32-bit, 33-MHz PCI
11
PCIE_X1
PCIe x1
12
FLOPPY1
diskette drive
13
USB7 - Internal USB
Internal USB key
14
FAN2
drive cage fan
15
FAN1
processor fan
16
AUXLED1
auxiliary hard drive LED
17
CPU
processor
18
POWER12V1
power
19
1
DIMM_1 memory module
20
2
DIMM_2 memory module
21
3
DIMM_3 memory module
22
4
DIMM_4 memory module
23
SATA_A
SATA drive
24
SATA_B
SATA drive
25
SATA_C
SATA drive
26
SATA_D
SATA drive
134
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Disabling a Forgotten Password
The password jumper on the system board enables the system password
features or disables them and clears any password(s) currently in use.
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove the system
cover and access any of the components inside the system. See your Product
Information Guide for complete information about safety precautions, working
inside the computer, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.
1 Turn off the system and attached peripherals, and disconnect the system
from the electrical outlet.
2 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
3 Move the PWRD_EN jumper to the disabled position.
See Figure 6-1 to locate the password jumper on the system board.
4 Close the system. See "Closing the System" on page 47.
5 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn on the system.
The existing passwords are not disabled (erased) until the system boots
with the password jumper plug removed. However, before you assign a new
system and/or setup password, you must install the jumper plug.
NOTE: If you assign a new system and/or setup password with the jumper
plug still removed, the system disables the new password(s) the next time it
boots.
6 Turn off the system, including any attached peripherals, and disconnect
the system from the electrical outlet.
7 Open the system. See "Opening the System" on page 47.
8 Move the PWRD_EN jumper from the disabled position to the enabled
position.
9 Close the system, reconnect the system to the electrical outlet, and turn
on the system.
10 Assign a new system and/or setup password.
To assign a new password using the System Setup program, see "Using the
System Password" on page 40.
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Getting Help
Obtaining Assistance
If you experience a problem with your computer, you can complete the
following steps to diagnose and troubleshoot the problem:
1 See "Troubleshooting Your System" on page 103 for information and
procedures that pertain to the problem your computer is experiencing.
2 See "Running the System Diagnostics" on page 127 for procedures on how
to run Dell Diagnostics.
3 Fill out the "Diagnostics Checklist" on page 141.
4 Use Dell's extensive suite of online services available at Dell Support
(support.dell.com) for help with installation and troubleshooting
procedures. See "Online Services" on page 138 for a more extensive list of
Dell Support online.
5 If the preceding steps have not resolved the problem, see "Contacting
Dell" on page 142.
NOTE: Call Dell Support from a telephone near or at the computer so that the
support staff can assist you with any necessary procedures.
NOTE: Dell's Express Service Code system may not be available in all countries.
When prompted by Dell's automated telephone system, enter your Express
Service Code to route the call directly to the proper support personnel. If you
do not have an Express Service Code, open the Dell Accessories folder,
double-click the Express Service Code icon, and follow the directions.
For instructions on using the Dell Support, see "Support Service" on
page 139.
NOTE: Some of the following services are not always available in all locations
outside the continental U.S. Call your local Dell representative for information on
availability.
Getting Help
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Online Services
You can learn about Dell products and services on the following websites:
www.dell.com
www.dell.com/ap (Asian/Pacific countries only)
www.dell.com/jp (Japan only)
www.euro.dell.com (Europe only)
www.dell.com/la (Latin American and Caribbean countries)
www.dell.ca (Canada only)
You can access Dell Support through the following websites and e-mail
addresses:
•
Dell Support websites
support.dell.com
support.jp.dell.com (Japan only)
support.euro.dell.com (Europe only)
•
Dell Support e-mail addresses
mobile_support@us.dell.com
support@us.dell.com
la-techsupport@dell.com (Latin America and Caribbean countries only)
apsupport@dell.com (Asian/Pacific countries only)
•
Dell Marketing and Sales e-mail addresses
apmarketing@dell.com (Asian/Pacific countries only)
sales_canada@dell.com (Canada only)
•
Anonymous file transfer protocol (FTP)
ftp.dell.com
Log in as user: anonymous, and use your e-mail address as your password.
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Automated Order-Status Service
To check on the status of any Dell products that you have ordered, you can go
to support.dell.com, or you can call the automated order-status service. A
recording prompts you for the information needed to locate and report on
your order. For the telephone number to call for your region, see "Contacting
Dell" on page 142.
Support Service
Dell's support service is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to answer your
questions about Dell hardware. Our support staff use computer-based
diagnostics to provide fast, accurate answers.
To contact Dell's support service, see "Before You Call" on page 140 and then
see the contact information for your region.
Dell Enterprise Training and Certification
Dell Enterprise Training and Certification is available; see
www.dell.com/training for more information. This service may not be offered
in all locations.
Problems With Your Order
If you have a problem with your order, such as missing parts, wrong parts, or
incorrect billing, contact Dell for customer assistance. Have your invoice or
packing slip handy when you call. For the telephone number to call for your
region, see "Contacting Dell" on page 142.
Product Information
If you need information about additional products available from Dell, or if
you would like to place an order, visit the Dell website at www.dell.com. For
the telephone number to call for your region or to speak to a sales specialist,
see "Contacting Dell" on page 142.
Getting Help
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Returning Items for Warranty Repair or Credit
Prepare all items being returned, whether for repair or credit, as follows:
1 Call Dell to obtain a Return Material Authorization Number, and write it
clearly and prominently on the outside of the box. For the telephone
number to call for your region, see "Contacting Dell" on page 142.
2 Include a copy of the invoice and a letter describing the reason for the
return.
3 Include a copy of the Diagnostics Checklist (see "Diagnostics Checklist"
on page 141), indicating the tests that you have run and any error
messages reported by the Dell Diagnostics (see "Running the System
Diagnostics" on page 127).
4 Include any accessories that belong with the item(s) being returned (such
as power cables, media such as CDs and diskettes, and guides) if the return
is for credit.
5 Pack the equipment to be returned in the original (or equivalent) packing
materials.
You are responsible for paying shipping expenses. You are also responsible for
insuring any product returned, and you assume the risk of loss during
shipment to Dell. Collect On Delivery (C.O.D.) packages are not accepted.
Returns that are missing any of the preceding requirements will be refused at
Dell’s receiving dock and returned to you.
Before You Call
NOTE: Have your Express Service Code ready when you call. The code helps Dell’s
automated-support telephone system direct your call more efficiently.
Remember to fill out the Diagnostics Checklist (see "Diagnostics Checklist"
on page 141). If possible, turn on your computer before you call Dell for
assistance and call from a telephone at or near the computer. You may be
asked to type some commands at the keyboard, relay detailed information
during operations, or try other troubleshooting steps possible only at the
computer itself. Ensure that the computer documentation is available.
CAUTION: Before working inside your computer, follow the safety instructions in
your Product Information Guide.
140
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Diagnostics Checklist
Name:
Date:
Address:
Phone number:
Service Tag (bar code on the back or bottom of the computer):
Express Service Code:
Return Material Authorization Number (if provided by Dell support technician):
Operating system and version:
Devices:
Expansion cards:
Are you connected to a network? Yes No
Network, version, and network adapter:
Programs and versions:
See your operating system documentation to determine the contents of the
system’s start-up files. If the computer is connected to a printer, print each file.
Otherwise, record the contents of each file before calling Dell.
Error message, beep code, or diagnostic code:
Description of problem and troubleshooting procedures you performed:
Getting Help
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Contacting Dell
For customers in the United States, call 800-WWW-DELL (800-999-3355).
NOTE: If you do not have an active Internet connection, you can find contact
information on your purchase invoice, packing slip, bill, or Dell product catalog.
Dell provides several online and telephone-based support and service options.
Availability varies by country and product, and some services may not be
available in your area. To contact Dell for sales, technical support, or
customer service issues:
1 Visit support.dell.com.
2 Verify your country or region in the Choose A Country/Region drop-down
menu at the bottom of the page.
3 Click Contact Us on the left side of the page.
4 Select the appropriate service or support link based on your need.
5 Choose the method of contacting Dell that is convenient for you.
Depending on your region, the methods include either by phone, online
chat, or e-mail.
The following table provides a listing of the support e-mail addresses and
phone numbers and codes by country. If you need assistance in determining
which codes to use, contact a local or an international operator.
NOTE: Toll-free numbers are for use within the country for which they are listed.
NOTE: The contact information provided in the following table was deemed correct
at the time that this document went to print and is subject to change.
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Anguilla
Online Support
support.dell.com/ai
E-mail Address
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support,
Customer Service, Sales
142
Getting Help
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
toll free: 800-335-0031
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Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Antigua and Barbuda
Online Support
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
www.dell.com/ag
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support,
Customer Service, Sales
1-800-805-5924
Aomen
Technical Support
toll-free: 0800-105
Country Code: 853
Customer Service
(Xiamen, China)
34 160 910
Transaction Sales (Xiamen,
China)
29 693 115
Argentina (Buenos
Aires)
Online Support
www.dell.com/ar
E-mail for Desktops and
Portables
la-techsupport@dell.com
Country Code: 54
E-mail for Servers and
EMC® Storage Products
la_enterprise@dell.com
City Code: 11
Customer Service
toll-free: 0-800-666-0789
Technical Support
toll-free: 0-800-222-0154
International Access
Code: 00
or toll-free: 0-800-444-0724
Sales
Aruba
Online Support
toll-free: 0-800-666-0789
www.dell.com/aw
la-techsupport@dell.com
Australia (Sydney)
Technical Support
toll-free: 800-1727
Customer Service and
Sales
toll-free: 800-1729
Online Support
International Access
Code: 0011
support.ap.dell.com
support.ap.dell.com/contactus
Country Code: 61
City Code: 2
Technical Support
Getting Help
143
book.book Page 144 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
Technical Support for XPS
computers only
toll-free: 1300 790 877
Home and Home Office
toll-free: 1300-655-533
Medium and Large
Business
toll-free: 1800-633-559
Small Business, Education,
Local Government
toll-free: 1800-060-889
Customer Service
Home and Home Office
toll-free: 1800-812-393
(option 3)
Medium and Large
Business, Education, Local
Government
toll-free: 1300-303-270
(option 3)
24-Hour Automated Order
Status Service
toll-free: 1300-662-196
Austria (Vienna)
NOTE: The phone numbers
International Access
Code: 900
in this section should be
called from within Austria
only.
Country Code: 43
City Code: 1
Online Support
support.euro.dell.com
tech_support_central_europe@dell.com
144
Getting Help
Technical Support for XPS
computers only
08 20 24 05 30 81
Large Business Support
08 20 24 05 30 55
Technical Support at
Home
08 20 24 05 30 92
Home/Small Business Sales
08 20 24 05 30 00
Home/Small Business Fax
08 20 24 05 30 49
book.book Page 145 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Bahamas
Service Type
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
Home/Small Business
Customer Service
08 20 24 05 30 14
Home/Small Business
Support
08 20 24 05 30 17
Preferred
Accounts/Corporate
Customer Service
08 20 24 05 30 16
Preferred
Accounts/Corporate
Support
08 20 24 05 30 17
Switchboard
08 20 24 05 30 00
Online Support
www.dell.com/bs
la-techsupport@dell.com
Barbados
Technical Support
toll-free: 1-866-874-3038
Customer Service and
Sales
toll-free: 1-866-296-9683
Online Support
www.dell.com/bb
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support
1-800-534-3349
Customer Service and
Sales
1-800-534-3142
Belgium (Brussels)
Online Support
International Access
Code: 00
Technical Support for XPS
computers only
support.euro.dell.com
02 481 92 96
Country Code: 32
General Support
02 481 92 88
City Code: 2
General Support Fax
02 481 92 95
Customer Service
02 713 15 65
Corporate Sales
02 481 91 00
Fax
02 481 92 99
Switchboard
02 481 91 00
Getting Help
145
book.book Page 146 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Belize
Online Support
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
www.dell.com/bz
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support,
Customer Service, Sales
Bermuda
Online Support
811-866-686-9880
or (512) 723-0010
www.dell.com/bm
la-techsupport@dell.com
Bolivia
Technical Support
1-877-890-0754
Customer Service and
Sales
1-877-890-0751
Online Support
www.dell.com/bo
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support,
Customer Service, Sales
Brazil
Online Support
International Access
Code: 00
Country Code: 55
City Code: 51
www.dell.com/br
BR_TechSupport@dell.com
Technical Support
Technical Support Fax
Customer Service Fax
Sales
British Virgin Islands
toll-free: 800-10-0238
or EEUU (512) 723-0010
Online Support
0800 970 3355
51 2104 5470
51 2104 5480
0800 970 3390
www.dell.com/vg
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support,
Customer Service, Sales
146
Getting Help
toll-free: 1-866-278-6820
or (512) 723-0010
book.book Page 147 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Brunei
Technical Support
(Penang, Malaysia)
Country Code: 673
Customer Service (Penang,
Malaysia)
24-Hour Automated Order
Status Service
Transaction Sales (Penang,
Malaysia)
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
604 633 4966
604 633 3101
or toll-free: 801 1012
toll-free: 801 1044
604 633 3101
or toll-free: 801 1012
Getting Help
147
book.book Page 148 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Canada (North York,
Ontario)
Online Order Status
www.dell.ca/ostatus
Online Support
support.ca.dell.com
International Access
Code: 011
AutoTech (automated
Hardware and Warranty
Support)
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
toll-free: 1-800-247-9362
Customer Service
Home/Home Office
toll-free: 1-800-847-4096
Small Business
toll-free: 1-800-906-3355
Medium/Large Business,
Government, Education
toll-free: 1-800-387-5757
Hardware Warranty Phone
Support
XPS Computers Only
toll-free: 1-866-398-8977
Computers for
Home/Home Office
toll-free: 1-800-847-4096
Computers for
Small/Medium/Large
Business, Government
toll-free: 1-800-387-5757
Printers, Projectors,
Televisions, Handheld,
Digital Jukebox, and
Wireless
1-877-335-5767
Sales
Home and Home Office
Sales
toll-free: 1-800-999-3355
Small Business
toll-free: 1-800-387-5752
Medium/Large Business,
Government
toll-free: 1-800-387-5755
Spare Parts and Extended
Service
148
Getting Help
1 866 440 3355
book.book Page 149 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Cayman Islands
Online Support
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
www.dell.com/ky
la-techsupport@dell.com
Chile (Santiago)
Technical Support
1-877-261-0242
Customer Service and
Sales
1-877-262-5415
Online Support
Country Code: 56
City Code: 2
www.dell.com/cl
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support
toll-free: 800-20-20-44 (CTC)
Sales and Customer
Support
toll-free: 800-20-20-44 (CTC)
or 123-00-20-37-62 (ENTEL)
China (Xiamen)
Online Support
or 123-00-20-34-77 (ENTEL)
support.dell.com.cn
Country Code: 86
City Code: 592
Technical Support E-mail
support.dell.com.cn/email
Customer Service E-mail
customer_cn@dell.com
Technical Support Fax
592 818 1350
Technical Support – XPS
computers only
toll-free: 800 858 0540
Technical Support – Dell™
Dimension™ and Dell
Inspiron™
toll-free: 800 858 2969
Technical Support – Dell
OptiPlex™, Dell
Latitude™, and Dell
Precision™
toll-free: 800 858 0950
Technical Support – Dell
PowerEdge™ and Dell
PowerVault™
toll-free: 800 858 0960
Getting Help
149
book.book Page 150 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Technical Support –
Projectors, PDAs, Switches,
Routers, etc.
toll-free: 800 858 2920
Technical Support –
Printers
toll-free: 800 858 2311
Customer Service
toll-free: 800 858 2060
Customer Service Fax
150
Getting Help
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
592 818 1308
Home and Small Business
toll-free: 800 858 2222
Preferred Accounts
Division
toll-free: 800 858 2557
Large Corporate Accounts
GCP
toll-free: 800 858 2055
Large Corporate Accounts
Key Accounts
toll-free: 800 858 2628
Large Corporate Accounts
North
toll-free: 800 858 2999
Large Corporate Accounts
North Government and
Education
toll-free: 800 858 2955
Large Corporate Accounts
East
toll-free: 800 858 2020
Large Corporate Accounts
East Government and
Education
toll-free: 800 858 2669
Large Corporate Accounts
Queue Team
toll-free: 800 858 2572
Large Corporate Accounts
South
toll-free: 800 858 2355
Large Corporate Accounts
West
toll-free: 800 858 2811
Large Corporate Accounts
Spare Parts
toll-free: 800 858 2621
book.book Page 151 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Colombia
Online Support
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
www.dell.com/co
la-techsupport@dell.com
Costa Rica
Technical Support
01-800-915-5704
Customer Service and
Sales
01-800-915-4755
Spare Parts, Software,
Peripherals and Warranty
Sales
toll free: 01-800-915-6158
Ink and Toner Sales
toll free: 01-800-915-5676
Online Support
www.dell.com/cr
la-techsupport@dell.com
Czech Republic
(Prague)
International Access
Code: 00
Country Code: 420
Technical Support
0800-012-0232
Customer Service and
Sales
0800-012-0231
Online Support
support.euro.dell.com
czech_dell@dell.com
Technical Support
22537 2727
Customer Service
22537 2707
Fax
22537 2714
Technical Fax
22537 2728
Switchboard
22537 2711
Getting Help
151
book.book Page 152 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Denmark
(Copenhagen)
Online Support
International Access
Code: 00
Country Code: 45
Dominica
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
support.euro.dell.com
Technical Support for XPS
computers only
7010 0074
Technical Support
7023 0182
Customer Service –
Relational
7023 0184
Home/Small Business
Customer Service
3287 5505
Switchboard – Relational
3287 1200
Switchboard Fax –
Relational
3287 1201
Switchboard – Home/Small
Business
3287 5000
Switchboard Fax –
Home/Small Business
3287 5001
Online Support
www.dell.com/dm
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support,
Customer Service, Sales
Dominican Republic
Online Support
toll-free: 1-866-278-6821
or (512) 723-0010
www.dell.com/do
la-techsupport@dell.com
152
Getting Help
Technical Support
1-800-156-1834
Customer Service and
Sales
1-800-156-1588
book.book Page 153 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Ecuador
Online Support
(calling from Quito and
Guayaquil only)
Technical Support,
Customer Service, Sales
(calling from Quito)
Technical Support,
Customer Service, Sales
(calling from Guayaquil)
El Salvador
Online Support
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
www.dell.com/ec
la-techsupport@dell.com
toll-free: 999-119-877-6553355
or EEUU (512) 723-0020
toll-free: 1-800-999-119-877655-3355
www.dell.com/sv
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support
toll free: 800-6100 (ANTEL)
or 800-6170 (Telefonica)
Customer Service and
Sales
Finland (Helsinki)
International Access
Code: 990
Country Code: 358
City Code: 9
France (Paris)
(Montpellier)
Online Support
toll free: 800-6100 (ANTEL)
or 800-6132 (Telefonica)
support.euro.dell.com
fi_support@dell.com
Technical Support
0207 533 555
Customer Service
0207 533 538
Switchboard
0207 533 533
Fax
0207 533 530
Sales under 500 employees
0207 533 540
Sales over 500 employees
0207 533 533
Online Support
support.euro.dell.com
International Access
Code: 00
Country Code: 33
City Codes: (1) (4)
Technical Support for XPS
computers only
0825 387 129
Getting Help
153
book.book Page 154 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
Home and Small Business
Technical Support
0825 387 270
Customer Service
0825 823 833
Switchboard
0825 004 700
Switchboard (calls from
outside of France)
Sales
04 99 75 40 00
0825 004 700
Fax
0825 004 701
Fax (calls from outside of
France)
04 99 75 40 01
Corporate
Germany (Frankfurt)
International Access
Code: 00
Technical Support
0825 004 719
Customer Service
0825 338 339
Switchboard
01 55 94 71 00
Sales
01 55 94 71 00
Fax
01 55 94 71 01
Online Support
support.euro.dell.com
tech_support_central_europe@dell.com
Country Code: 49
City Code: 69
154
Getting Help
Technical Support for XPS
computers only
069 9792 7222
Technical Support
069 9792-7200
Technical Support at
Home
069 9792-7230
Home/Small Business
Customer Service
0180-5-224400
Global Segment Customer
Service
069 9792-7320
book.book Page 155 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Preferred Accounts
Customer Service
069 9792-7320
Large Accounts Customer
Service
069 9792-7320
Public Accounts Customer
Service
069 9792-7320
Switchboard
069 9792-7000
Greece
Online Support
International Access
Code: 00
Technical Support
Country Code: 30
Grenada
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
support.euro.dell.com
00800-44 14 95 18
Gold Service Technical
Support
2108129811
Switchboard
2108129810
Gold Service Switchboard
2108129811
Sales
2108129800
Fax
2108129812
Online Support
www.dell.com/gd
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support,
Customer Service, Sales
Guatemala
Online Support
toll-free: 1-866-540-3355
www.dell.com/gt
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support,
Customer Service, Sales
Guyana
Online Support
Technical Support,
Customer Service, Sales
Haiti
Online Support
1-800-999-0136
la-techsupport@dell.com
toll-free: 1-877-440-6511
www.dell.com/ht
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support,
Customer Service, Sales
toll free: 183-866-686-9849
or (512) 723-0010
Getting Help
155
book.book Page 156 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Honduras
Online Support
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
www.dell.com/hn
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support,
Customer Service, Sales
toll free: 800-0123-866-6869848
or EEUU (512) 723-0020
Hong Kong
Online Support
International Access
Code: 001
Country Code: 852
India
support.ap.dell.com
support.ap.dell.com/contactus
Technical Support – XPS
computers only
00852-3416 6923
Technical Support –
Dimension and Inspiron
00852-2969 3188
Technical Support –
OptiPlex, Latitude, and
Dell Precision
00852-2969 3191
Technical Support –
Servers and Storage
00852-2969 3196
Technical Support –
Projectors, PDAs, Switches,
Routers, etc.
00852-3416 0906
Customer Service
00852-3416 0910
Large Corporate Accounts
00852-3416 0907
Global Customer Programs
00852-3416 0908
Medium Business Division
00852-3416 0912
Home and Small Business
Division
00852-2969 3105
Online Support
support.ap.dell.com
Portable and Desktop Support
Portables, Desktop, and Peripherals E-mail
support.ap.dell.com/ap/en/emaildell
156
Getting Help
book.book Page 157 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
Portable Support E-mail
india_support_notebook@dell.com
Phone Numbers
080-25068032 or 080-25068034
or your city STD code + 60003355
or toll-free: 1-800-425-9046
Server Support
E-mail
india_support_server@dell.com
Phone Numbers
080-25068032 or 080-25068034
or your city STD code + 60003355
or toll-free: 1-800-425-8045
Gold Support Only
eec_ap@dell.com
E-mail
Phone Numbers
080-25068033
or your city STD code + 60003355
or toll-free: 1-800-425-9045
XPS Support Only
E-mail
Phone Numbers
Indiaxps_AP@dell.com
080-25068066
or toll-free: 1-800-425-2066
Customer Service
Home and Small Business
India_care_HSB@dell.com
Large Corporate Accounts
India_care_REL@dell.com
toll-free: 1800-4254051
toll-free: 1800-4252067
Sales
Getting Help
157
book.book Page 158 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Ireland (Cherrywood)
Service Type
Large Corporate Accounts
1600 33 8044
Home and Small Business
1600 33 8046
Online Support
support.euro.dell.com
International Access
Code: 00
Country Code: 353
City Code: 1
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
dell_direct_support@dell.com
Technical Support
XPS computers only
1850 200 722
Business computers
1850 543 543
Home computers
1850 543 543
At Home Support
1850 200 889
Sales
Home
1850 333 200
Small Business
1850 664 656
Medium Business
1850 200 646
Large Business
1850 200 646
Sales E-mail
Dell_IRL_Outlet@dell.com
Customer Service
Home and Small Business
01 204 4014
Business (greater than 200
employees)
1850 200 982
General
158
Getting Help
Fax/Sales Fax
01 204 0103
Switchboard
01 204 4444
U.K. Customer Service
(dial within U.K. only)
0870 906 0010
Corporate Customer Service
(dial within U.K. only)
0870 907 4499
U.K. Sales (dial within
U.K. only)
0870 907 4000
book.book Page 159 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Italy (Milan)
Online Support
International Access
Code: 00
Home and Small Business
Country Code: 39
City Code: 02
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
support.euro.dell.com
Technical Support
02 577 826 90
Customer Service
02 696 821 14
Fax
02 696 821 13
Switchboard
02 696 821 12
Corporate
Technical Support
02 577 826 90
Customer Service
02 577 825 55
Fax
02 575 035 30
Switchboard
Jamaica
(dial from within
Jamaica only)
Japan (Kawasaki)
Online Support
02 577 821
www.dell.com/jm
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support
toll free: 1-800-975-1646
Customer Service and
Sales
toll free: 1-800-404-9205
Online Support
support.jp.dell.com
International Access
Code: 001
Country Code: 81
City Code: 44
Technical Support – XPS
computers only
Technical Support outside
of Japan – XPS computers
only
Technical Support –
Dimension and Inspiron
toll-free: 0120-937-786
81-44-520-1235
toll-free: 0120-198-226
Getting Help
159
book.book Page 160 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Technical Support outside
of Japan – Dimension, and
Inspiron
Technical Support – Dell
Precision, OptiPlex, and
Latitude
160
Getting Help
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
81-44-520-1435
toll-free: 0120-198-433
Technical Support outside
of Japan – Dell Precision,
OptiPlex, and Latitude
81-44-556-3894
Technical Support – Dell
PowerApp, Dell
PowerEdge, Dell
PowerConnect™, and Dell
PowerVault
toll-free: 0120-198-498
Technical Support outside
of Japan – PowerApp,
PowerEdge,
PowerConnect, and
PowerVault
81-44-556-4162
Technical Support –
Projectors, PDAs, Printers,
Routers
toll-free: 0120-981-690
Technical Support outside
of Japan – Projectors,
PDAs, Printers, Routers
81-44-556-3468
Faxbox Service
044-556-3490
24-Hour Automated Order
Status Service
044-556-3801
Customer Care
044-556-4240
Business Sales Division –
up to 400 employees
044-556-3344
book.book Page 161 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
Preferred Accounts
Division Sales – over 400
employees
044-556-3433
Public Sales – government
agencies, educational
institutions, and medical
institutions
044-556-5963
Global Segment Japan
044-556-3469
Individual User
044-556-1657
Individual User Online
Sales
044-556-2203
Individual User Real Site
Sales
044-556-4649
Switchboard
044-556-4300
Korea (Seoul)
Online Support
International Access
Code: 001
Technical Support for XPS
computers only
toll-free: 080-999-0283
Country Code: 82
Technical Support
toll-free: 080-200-3800
City Code: 2
Customer Service
toll-free: 080-999-0270
Technical Support –
Dimension, PDA,
Electronics, and
Accessories
toll-free: 080-200-3801
Sales
toll-free: 080-200-3600
support.ap.dell.com
Fax
2194-6202
Switchboard
2194-6000
Getting Help
161
book.book Page 162 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Latin America
Customer Technical
Support (Austin, Texas,
U.S.A.)
512 728-4093
Customer Service (Austin,
Texas, U.S.A.)
512 728-3619
Fax (Technical Support
and Customer Service)
(Austin, Texas, U.S.A.)
512 728-3883
Sales (Austin, Texas,
U.S.A.)
512 728-4397
Sales Fax (Austin, Texas,
U.S.A.)
Luxembourg
Online Support
International Access
Code: 00
Support
Country Code: 352
Home/Small Business Sales
Corporate Sales
Customer Service
Fax
Malaysia (Penang)
Online Support
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
512 728-4600
or 512 728-3772
support.euro.dell.com
342 08 08 075
+32 (0)2 713 15 96
26 25 77 81
+32 (0)2 481 91 19
26 25 77 82
support.ap.dell.com
International Access
Code: 00
Country Code: 60
City Code: 4
162
Getting Help
Technical Support – XPS
computers only
toll-free: 1 800 885 784
Technical Support – Dell
Precision, OptiPlex, and
Latitude
toll-free: 1 800 880 193
Technical Support –
Dimension, Inspiron, and
Electronics and Accessories
toll-free: 1 800 881 306
book.book Page 163 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Technical Support –
PowerApp, PowerEdge,
PowerConnect, and
PowerVault
toll-free: 1800 881 386
Customer Service
toll-free: 1800 881 306
(option 4)
24-Hour Automated Order
Status Service
Mexico
International Access
Code: 00
Country Code: 52
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
1 800 88 4432
Transaction Sales
toll-free: 1 800 888 202
Corporate Sales
toll-free: 1 800 888 213
Online Support
www.dell.com/mx
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support
001-866-563-4425
Sales
50-81-8800
or 001-800-725-3355
Customer Service
001-877-384-8979
or 001-877-269-3383
Spare Parts, Software,
Peripherals and Warranty
Sales
Ink and Toner Sales
001-866-390-4629
toll free 001-866-851-1754
Main
50-81-8800
or 001-800-111-3355
or 001-866-851-1754
Montserrat
Online Support
support.dell.com.ag
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support,
Customer Service, Sales
toll-free: 1-866-278-6822
Getting Help
163
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Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Netherlands Antilles
Online Support
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
www.dell.com/an
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support,
Customer Service, Sales
Netherlands
(Amsterdam)
International Access
Code: 00
Country Code: 31
City Code: 20
164
Getting Help
Online Support
toll free: 001-866-379-1022
support.euro.dell.com
Technical Support for XPS
computers only
020 674 45 94
Technical Support
020 674 45 00
Technical Support Fax
020 674 47 66
Home/Small Business
Customer Service
020 674 42 00
Relational Customer
Service
020 674 4325
Home/Small Business Sales
020 674 55 00
Relational Sales
020 674 50 00
Home/Small Business Sales
Fax
020 674 47 75
Relational Sales Fax
020 674 47 50
Switchboard
020 674 50 00
Switchboard Fax
020 674 47 50
book.book Page 165 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
New Zealand
Online Support
support.ap.dell.com
International Access
Code: 00
Country Code: 64
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
support.ap.dell.com/contactus
Technical Support
toll-free: 0800-441-567
Home and Home Office
toll-free: 0800-446-255
Business, Education, and
Government
toll-free: 0800-444-617
PowerEdge and PowerVault
toll-free: 0800-335-540
toll-free: 0800-443-563
Technical Support for XPS
computers only
Customer Service
Home and Small Business
Business, Education, and
Government
24-Hour Automated Order
Status Service
Sales
Home and Home Office
Nicaragua
toll-free: 0800-289-3355
(option 3)
toll-free: 0800-941-128
(option 3)
toll-free: 0800-449-602
toll-free: 0800 441 567
toll-free: 0800-289-3355
Small Business
toll-free: 0800-941-121
Business, Education, and
Government
toll-free: 0800-941-128
Online Support
www.dell.com/ni
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support
toll free: 001-800-220-1378
Customer Service and
Sales
toll free: 001-800-220-1377
Getting Help
165
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Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Norway (Lysaker)
Online Support
International Access
Code: 00
Technical Support for XPS
computers only
815 35 043
Country Code: 47
Technical Support
671 16882
Relational Customer
Service
671 17575
Home/Small Business
Customer Service
23162298
Switchboard
671 16800
Fax Switchboard
671 16865
Panama
Online Support
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
support.euro.dell.com
www.dell.com/pa
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support
toll free: 001-800-507-1385
(C&W)
or 001-866-633-4097
(Clarocom)
Customer Service, Sales
toll free: 001-800-507-1264
(C&W)
or 001-866-422-7964
(Clarocom and
Movistar)
or 001-800-507-1786 (TC)
Paraguay
Online Support
(Asuncion only)
www.dell.com/py
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support,
Customer Service, Sales
dial 008-11-800, then have
the operator
dial 866-686-9848
or EEUU (512) 723-0020
166
Getting Help
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Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Peru
Online Support
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
www.dell.com/pe
la-techsupport@dell.com
Poland (Warsaw)
International Access
Code: 011
Country Code: 48
City Code: 22
Technical Support
0800-50-869
Customer Service and
Sales
0800-50-669
Online Support
support.euro.dell.com
pl_support_tech@dell.com
Customer Service Phone
57 95 700
Customer Service
57 95 999
Sales
57 95 999
Customer Service Fax
57 95 806
Reception Desk Fax
57 95 998
Switchboard
57 95 999
Portugal
Online Support
International Access
Code: 00
Technical Support
707200149
Customer Service
800 300 413
Country Code: 351
Sales
Fax
Puerto Rico
Online Support
support.euro.dell.com
800 300 410 or 800 300 411
or 800 300 412 or
21 422 07 10
21 424 01 12
www.dell.com/pr
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support
toll-free: 1-866-390-4695
Spare Parts, Software,
Peripherals and Warranty
Sales
toll-free: 1-866-390-4691
Ink and Toner Sales
toll-free: 1-866-851-1760
Customer Service and
Sales
1-877-537-3355
Getting Help
167
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Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
St. Kitts and Nevis
Online Support
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
www.dell.com/kn
la-techsupport@dell.com
St. Lucia
Technical Support
toll-free: 1-877-441-4734
Customer Service and
Sales
toll-free: 1-866-540-3355
Online Support
www.dell.com/lc
la-techsupport@dell.com
St. Vincent and the
Grenadines
Technical Support
toll-free: 1-866-464-4352
Customer Service and
Sales
toll-free: 1-866-540-3355
Online Support
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support
toll-free: 1-866-464-4353
Customer Service and
Sales
toll-free: 1-866-540-3355
Singapore (Singapore)
NOTE: The phone numbers
International Access
Code: 005
in this section should be
called from within
Singapore or Malaysia only.
Country Code: 65
www.dell.com/vc
Online Support
support.ap.dell.com
Technical Support
168
Getting Help
XPS computers only
toll-free: 1 800 394 7464
Dimension, Inspiron, and
Electronics and Accessories
toll-free: 1 800 394 7430
OptiPlex, Latitude, and
Dell Precision
toll-free: 1 800 394 7488
PowerApp, PowerEdge,
PowerConnect, and
PowerVault
toll-free: 1 800 394 7478
book.book Page 169 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
Customer Service
toll-free: 1 800 394 7430
(option 4)
24-Hour Automated Order
Status Service
toll-free: 1 800 394 7476
Sales
Slovakia (Prague)
International Access
Code: 00
Country Code: 421
Transaction Sales
toll-free: 1 800 394 7412
Corporate Sales
toll-free: 1 800 394 7419
Online Support
support.euro.dell.com
czech_dell@dell.com
Technical Support
02 5750 8303
Enterprise GOLD
02 5750 8308
Business Support
02 5750 8301
Customer Service
420 22537 2707
Fax
02 5441 8328
Tech Fax
02 5441 8328
Switchboard (Sales)
02 5441 7585
South Africa
(Johannesburg)
Online Support
International Access
Code:
Gold Queue
011 709 7713
Technical Support
011 709 7710
Customer Service
011 709 7707
Sales
011 709 7700
Fax
011 706 0495
Switchboard
011 709 7700
Technical Support,
Customer Service, and
Sales (Penang, Malaysia)
604 633 4810
09/091
Country Code: 27
City Code: 11
Southeast Asian and
Pacific Countries
support.euro.dell.com
dell_za_support@dell.com
Getting Help
169
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Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Spain (Madrid)
Online Support
International Access
Code: 00
Home and Small Business
Country Code: 34
City Code: 91
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
support.euro.dell.com
Technical Support
902 100 130
Customer Service
902 118 540
Sales
902 118 541
Switchboard
902 118 541
Fax
902 118 539
Corporate
Technical Support
902 100 130
Customer Service
902 115 236
Switchboard
91 722 92 00
Fax
Suriname
Online Support
91 722 95 83
www.dell.com/sr
la-techsupport@dell.com
Technical Support,
Customer Service, Sales
Sweden (Upplands
Vasby)
International Access
Code: 00
Country Code: 46
City Code: 8
170
Getting Help
Online Support
Technical Support for XPS
computers only
toll-free: 156-866-686-9850
or (512) 723-0010
support.euro.dell.com
77 134 03 40
Technical Support
08 590 05 199
Relational Customer
Service
08 590 05 642
Home/Small Business
Customer Service
08 587 70 527
Employee Purchase
Program (EPP) Support
020 140 14 44
Technical Support Fax
08 590 05 594
Sales
08 587 705 81
book.book Page 171 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Country (City)
International Access
Code Country Code
City Code
Service Type
Switzerland (Geneva)
Online Support
International Access
Code: 00
Country Code: 41
City Code: 22
Area Codes,
Local Numbers, and
Toll-Free Numbers
Web and E-mail Address
support.euro.dell.com
Tech_support_central_Europe@dell.com
Technical Support for XPS
computers only
0848 338 857
Technical Support – Home
and Small Business
0844 811 411
Technical Support at
Home
0848 338 860
Technical Support –
Corporate
0844 822 844
Customer Service – Home
and Small Business
0848 802 202
Getting Help
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172
Getting Help
book.book Page 173 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
Glossary
This section defines or identifies technical terms, abbreviations, and
acronyms used in your system documents.
A — Ampere(s).
AC — Alternating current.
ACPI — Advanced Configuration and Power Interface. A standard interface for
enabling the operating system to direct configuration and power management.
ambient temperature — The temperature of the area or room where the system is
located.
ANSI — American National Standards Institute. The primary organization for
developing technology standards in the U.S.
application — Software designed to help you perform a specific task or series of tasks.
Applications run from the operating system.
ASCII — American Standard Code for Information Interchange.
asset tag — An individual code assigned to a system, usually by an administrator, for
security or tracking purposes.
backup — A copy of a program or data file. As a precaution, back up your system’s
hard drive on a regular basis. Before making a change to the configuration of your
system, back up important start-up files from your operating system.
backup battery — A battery that maintains system configuration, date, and time
information in a special section of memory when the system is turned off.
beep code — A diagnostic message in the form of a pattern of beeps from your
system’s speaker. For example, one beep, followed by a second beep, and then a burst
of three beeps is beep code 1-1-3.
BIOS — Basic input/output system. Your system’s BIOS contains programs stored on
a flash memory chip. The BIOS controls the following:
• Communications between the processor and peripheral devices
• Miscellaneous functions, such as system messages
bit — The smallest unit of information interpreted by your system.
blade — A module that contains a processor, memory, and a hard drive. The modules
are mounted into a chassis that includes power supplies and fans.
BMC — Baseboard management controller.
Glossary
173
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boot routine — A program that clears all memory, initializes devices, and loads the
operating system when you start your system. Unless the operating system fails to
respond, you can reboot (also called warm boot) your system by pressing
<Ctrl><Alt><Del>. Otherwise, you must restart the system by pressing the reset
button or by turning the system off and then back on.
bootable diskette — A diskette that is used to start your system if the system will not
boot from the hard drive.
BTU — British thermal unit.
bus — An information pathway between the components of a system. Your system
contains an expansion bus that allows the processor to communicate with controllers
for the peripheral devices connected to the system. Your system also contains an
address bus and a data bus for communications between the processor and RAM.
C — Celsius.
cache — A fast storage area that keeps a copy of data or instructions for quick data
retrieval. When a program makes a request to a disk drive for data that is in the cache,
the disk-cache utility can retrieve the data from RAM faster than from the disk drive.
CD — Compact disc. CD drives use optical technology to read data from CDs.
cm — Centimeter(s).
cmos — Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor.
component — As they relate to DMI, components include operating systems,
computer systems, expansion cards, and peripherals that are compatible with DMI.
Each component is made up of groups and attributes that are defined as relevant to
that component.
COM n — The device names for the serial ports on your system.
control panel — The part of the system that contains indicators and controls, such as
the power button and power indicator.
controller — A chip that controls the transfer of data between the processor and
memory or between the processor and a peripheral.
conventional memory — The first 640 KB of RAM. Conventional memory is found in
all systems. Unless they are specially designed, MS-DOS® programs are limited to
running in conventional memory.
coprocessor — A chip that relieves the system’s processor of specific processing tasks.
A math coprocessor, for example, handles numeric processing.
CPU — Central processing unit. See processor.
DC — Direct current.
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Glossary
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DDR — Double-data rate. A technology in memory modules that potentially doubles
the output.
device driver — A program that allows the operating system or some other program to
interface correctly with a peripheral. Some device drivers—such as network drivers—
must be loaded from the config.sys file or as memory-resident programs (usually, from
the autoexec.bat file). Others must load when you start the program for which they
were designed.
DHCP — Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. A method of automatically
assigning an IP address to a client system.
diagnostics — A comprehensive set of tests for your system.
DIMM — Dual in-line memory module. See also memory module.
DIN — Deutsche Industrie Norm.
directory — Directories help keep related files organized on a disk in a hierarchical,
“inverted tree” structure. Each disk has a “root” directory. Additional directories that
branch off the root directory are called subdirectories. Subdirectories may contain
additional directories branching off them.
DMA — Direct memory access. A DMA channel allows certain types of data transfer
between RAM and a device to bypass the processor.
DMI — Desktop Management Interface. DMI enables the management of your
system’s software and hardware by collecting information about the system’s
components, such as the operating system, memory, peripherals, expansion cards, and
asset tag.
DNS — Domain Name System. A method of translating Internet domain names, such
as www.dell.com, into IP addresses, such as 143.166.83.200.
DRAM — Dynamic random-access memory. A system’s RAM is usually made up
entirely of DRAM chips.
DVD — Digital versatile disc.
ECC — Error checking and correction.
EEPROM — Electronically erasable programmable read-only memory.
EMC — Electromagnetic compatibility.
EMI — Electromagnetic interference.
ERA — Embedded remote access. ERA allows you to perform remote, or "out-ofband," server management on your network server using a remote access controller.
ESD — Electrostatic discharge.
ESM — Embedded server management.
Glossary
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expansion bus — Your system contains an expansion bus that allows the processor to
communicate with controllers for peripherals, such as NICs.
expansion card — An add-in card, such as a NIC or SCSI adapter, that plugs into an
expansion-card connector on the system board. An expansion card adds some
specialized function to the system by providing an interface between the expansion
bus and a peripheral.
expansion-card connector — A connector on the system board or riser board for
plugging in an expansion card.
F — Fahrenheit.
FAT — File allocation table. The file system structure used by MS-DOS to organize
and keep track of file storage. The Microsoft® Windows® operating systems can
optionally use a FAT file system structure.
flash memory — A type of EEPROM chip that can be reprogrammed from a utility on
diskette while still installed in a system; most EEPROM chips can only be rewritten
with special programming equipment.
format — To prepare a hard drive or diskette for storing files. An unconditional format
deletes all data stored on the disk.
FSB — Front-side bus. The FSB is the data path and physical interface between the
processor and the main memory (RAM).
ft — Feet.
FTP — File transfer protocol.
g — Gram(s).
G — Gravities.
Gb — Gigabit(s); 1024 megabits or 1,073,741,824 bits.
GB — Gigabyte(s); 1024 megabytes or 1,073,741,824 bytes. However, when referring
to hard-drive capacity, the term is usually rounded to 1,000,000,000 bytes.
graphics mode — A video mode that can be defined as x horizontal by y vertical pixels
by z colors.
group — As it relates to DMI, a group is a data structure that defines common
information, or attributes, about a manageable component.
guarding — A type of data redundancy in which a set of physical drives stores data and
an additional drive stores parity data. See also mirroring, striping, and RAID.
h — Hexadecimal. A base-16 numbering system, often used in programming to
identify addresses in the system’s RAM and I/O memory addresses for devices. In text,
hexadecimal numbers are often followed by h.
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headless system — A system or device that functions without having a keyboard,
mouse, or monitor attached. Normally, headless systems are managed over a network
using an Internet browser.
host adapter — A host adapter implements communication between the system’s bus
and the controller for a peripheral device. (Hard-drive controller subsystems include
integrated host adapter circuitry.) To add a SCSI expansion bus to your system, you
must install or connect the appropriate host adapter.
Hz — Hertz.
I/O — Input/output. A keyboard is an input device, and a monitor is an output device.
In general, I/O activity can be differentiated from computational activity.
ID — Identification.
IDE — Integrated drive electronics. A standard interface between the system board
and storage devices.
integrated mirroring — Provides simultaneous physical mirroring of two drives.
Integrated mirroring functionality is provided by the system’s hardware. See also
mirroring.
internal processor cache — An instruction and data cache built into the processor.
IP — Internet Protocol.
IPX — Internet package exchange.
IRQ — Interrupt request. A signal that data is about to be sent to or received by a
peripheral device travels by an IRQ line to the processor. Each peripheral connection
must be assigned an IRQ number. Two devices can share the same IRQ assignment,
but you cannot operate both devices simultaneously.
jumper — Small blocks on a circuit board with two or more pins emerging from them.
Plastic plugs containing a wire fit down over the pins. The wire connects the pins and
creates a circuit, providing a simple and reversible method of changing the circuitry in
a board.
K — Kilo-; 1000.
Kb — Kilobit(s); 1024 bits.
KB — Kilobyte(s); 1024 bytes.
Kbps — Kilobit(s) per second.
KBps — Kilobyte(s) per second.
key combination — A command requiring you to press multiple keys at the same time
(for example, <Ctrl><Alt><Del>).
kg — Kilogram(s); 1000 grams.
Glossary
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kHz — Kilohertz.
KMM — Keyboard/monitor/mouse.
KVM — Keyboard/video/mouse. KVM refers to a switch that allows selection of the
system from which the video is displayed and for which the keyboard and mouse are
used.
LAN — Local area network. A LAN is usually confined to the same building or a few
nearby buildings, with all equipment linked by wiring dedicated specifically to the
LAN.
lb — Pound(s).
LCD — Liquid crystal display.
LED — Light-emitting diode. An electronic device that lights up when a current is
passed through it.
Linux — An operating system similar to the UNIX® operating system that runs on a
variety of hardware systems. Linux is open source software, which is freely available;
however, the full distribution of Linux along with technical support and training are
available for a fee from vendors such as Red Hat® Software.
local bus — On a system with local-bus expansion capability, certain peripheral
devices (such as the video adapter circuitry) can be designed to run much faster than
they would with a traditional expansion bus. See also bus.
LVD — Low voltage differential.
m — Meter(s).
mA — Milliampere(s).
MAC address — Media Access Control address. Your system’s unique hardware
number on a network.
mAh — Milliampere-hour(s).
Mb — Megabit(s); 1,048,576 bits.
MB — Megabyte(s); 1,048,576 bytes. However, when referring to hard-drive capacity,
the term is often rounded to mean 1,000,000 bytes.
Mbps — Megabits per second.
MBps — Megabytes per second.
MBR — Master boot record.
memory address — A specific location, usually expressed as a hexadecimal number, in
the system’s RAM.
memory module — A small circuit board containing DRAM chips that connects to the
system board.
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memory — An area in your system that stores basic system data. A system can contain
several different forms of memory, such as integrated memory (ROM and RAM) and
add-in memory modules (DIMMs).
MHz — Megahertz.
mirroring — A type of data redundancy in which a set of physical drives stores data
and one or more sets of additional drives stores duplicate copies of the data. Mirroring
functionality is provided by software. See also guarding, integrated mirroring, striping,
and RAID.
mm — Millimeter(s).
ms — Millisecond(s).
MS-DOS® — Microsoft Disk Operating System.
NAS — Network Attached Storage. NAS is one of the concepts used for implementing
shared storage on a network. NAS systems have their own operating systems,
integrated hardware, and software that are optimized to serve specific storage needs.
NIC — Network interface controller. A device that is installed or integrated in a
system to allow connection to a network.
NMI — Nonmaskable interrupt. A device sends an NMI to signal the processor about
hardware errors.
ns — Nanosecond(s).
NTFS — The NT File System option in the Windows 2000 operating system.
NVRAM — Nonvolatile random-access memory. Memory that does not lose its
contents when you turn off your system. NVRAM is used for maintaining the date,
time, and system configuration information.
parity — Redundant information that is associated with a block of data.
partition — You can divide a hard drive into multiple physical sections called
partitions with the fdisk command. Each partition can contain multiple logical drives.
You must format each logical drive with the format command.
PCI — Peripheral Component Interconnect. A standard for local-bus
implementation.
PDU — Power distribution unit. A power source with multiple power outlets that
provides electrical power to servers and storage systems in a rack.
peripheral — An internal or external device, such as a diskette drive or keyboard,
connected to a system.
PGA — Pin grid array. A type of processor socket that allows you to remove the
processor chip.
Glossary
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pixel — A single point on a video display. Pixels are arranged in rows and columns to
create an image. A video resolution, such as 640 x 480, is expressed as the number of
pixels across by the number of pixels up and down.
POST — Power-on self-test. Before the operating system loads when you turn on your
system, the POST tests various system components such as RAM and hard drives.
processor — The primary computational chip inside the system that controls the
interpretation and execution of arithmetic and logic functions. Software written for
one processor must usually be revised to run on another processor. CPU is a synonym
for processor.
protected mode — An operating mode that allows operating systems to implement:
• A memory address space of 16 MB to 4 GB
• Multitasking
• Virtual memory, a method for increasing addressable memory by using the hard drive
The Windows 2000 and UNIX 32-bit operating systems run in protected mode.
MS-DOS cannot run in protected mode.
PS/2 — Personal System/2.
PXE — Preboot eXecution Environment. A way of booting a system via a LAN
(without a hard drive or bootable diskette).
RAC — Remote access controller.
RAID — Redundant array of independent disks. A method of providing data
redundancy. Some common implementations of RAID include RAID 0, RAID 1,
RAID 5, RAID 10, and RAID 50. See also guarding, mirroring, and striping.
RAM — Random-access memory. The system’s primary temporary storage area for
program instructions and data. Any information stored in RAM is lost when you turn
off your system.
RAS — Remote Access Service. This service allows users running the Windows
operating system to remotely access a network from their system using a modem.
readme file — A text file, usually shipped with software or hardware, that contains
information supplementing or updating the product’s documentation.
read-only file — A read-only file is one that you are prohibited from editing or
deleting.
ROM — Read-only memory. Your system contains some programs essential to its
operation in ROM code. A ROM chip retains its contents even after you turn off your
system. Examples of code in ROM include the program that initiates your system’s
boot routine and the POST.
ROMB — RAID on motherboard.
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rpm — Revolutions per minute.
RTC — Real-time clock.
SAS — Serial-attached SCSI.
SATA — Serial Advanced Technology Attachment. A standard interface between the
system board and storage devices.
SCSI — Small computer system interface. An I/O bus interface with faster data
transmission rates than standard ports.
SDRAM — Synchronous dynamic random-access memory.
sec — Second(s).
serial port — An I/O port used most often to connect a modem to your system. You
can usually identify a serial port on your system by its 9-pin connector.
service tag — A bar code label on the system used to identify it when you call Dell for
technical support.
simple disk volume — The volume of free space on a single dynamic, physical disk.
SMART — Self-Monitoring Analysis and Reporting Technology. Allows hard drives to
report errors and failures to the system BIOS and then display an error message on the
screen.
SMP — Symmetric multiprocessing. Used to describe a system that has two or more
processors connected via a high-bandwidth link and managed by an operating system,
where each processor has equal access to I/O devices.
SNMP — Simple Network Management Protocol. A standard interface that allows a
network manager to remotely monitor and manage workstations.
spanning — Spanning, or concatenating, disk volumes combines unallocated space
from multiple disks into one logical volume, allowing more efficient use of all the
space and all drive letters on a multiple-disk system.
striping — Disk striping writes data across three or more disks in an array, but only
uses a portion of the space on each disk. The amount of space used by a "stripe" is the
same on each disk used. A virtual disk may use several stripes on the same set of disks
in an array. See also guarding, mirroring, and RAID.
SVGA — Super video graphics array. VGA and SVGA are video standards for video
adapters with greater resolution and color display capabilities than previous standards.
system board — As the main circuit board, the system board usually contains most of
your system’s integral components, such as the processor, RAM, controllers for
peripherals, and various ROM chips.
system configuration information — Data stored in memory that tells a system what
hardware is installed and how the system should be configured for operation.
Glossary
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system diskette — See bootable diskette.
system memory — See RAM.
System Setup program — A BIOS-based program that allows you to configure your
system’s hardware and customize the system’s operation by setting features such as
password protection. Because the System Setup program is stored in NVRAM, any
settings remain in effect until you change them again.
system.ini file — A start-up file for the Windows operating system. When you start
Windows, it consults the system.ini file to determine a variety of options for the
Windows operating environment. Among other things, the system.ini file records
which video, mouse, and keyboard drivers are installed for Windows.
TCP/IP — Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol.
termination — Some devices (such as the last device at each end of a SCSI cable)
must be terminated to prevent reflections and spurious signals in the cable. When
such devices are connected in a series, you may need to enable or disable the
termination on these devices by changing jumper or switch settings on the devices or
by changing settings in the configuration software for the devices.
TOE — TCP/IP offload engine.
UNIX — Universal Internet Exchange. UNIX, the precursor to Linux, is an operating
system written in the C programming language.
uplink port — A port on a network hub or switch used to connect to other hubs or
switches without requiring a crossover cable.
UPS — Uninterruptible power supply. A battery-powered unit that automatically
supplies power to your system in the event of an electrical failure.
USB — Universal Serial Bus. A USB connector provides a single connection point for
multiple USB-compliant devices, such as mice and keyboards. USB devices can be
connected and disconnected while the system is running.
utility — A program used to manage system resources—memory, disk drives, or
printers, for example.
UTP — Unshielded twisted pair. A type of wiring used to connect systems in a
business or home to a telephone line.
V — Volt(s).
VAC — Volt(s) alternating current.
VDC — Volt(s) direct current.
VGA — Video graphics array. VGA and SVGA are video standards for video adapters
with greater resolution and color display capabilities than previous standards.
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video adapter — The logical circuitry that provides (in combination with the monitor)
your system’s video capabilities. A video adapter may be integrated into the system
board or may be an expansion card that plugs into an expansion slot.
video driver — A program that allows graphics-mode application programs and
operating systems to display at a chosen resolution with the desired number of colors.
Video drivers may need to match the video adapter installed in the system.
video memory — Most VGA and SVGA video adapters include memory chips in
addition to your system’s RAM. The amount of video memory installed primarily
influences the number of colors that a program can display (with the appropriate video
drivers and monitor capabilities).
video resolution — Video resolution (800 x 600, for example) is expressed as the
number of pixels across by the number of pixels up and down. To display a program at
a specific graphics resolution, you must install the appropriate video drivers and your
monitor must support the resolution.
W — Watt(s).
WH — Watt-hour(s).
win.ini file — A start-up file for the Windows operating system. When you start
Windows, it consults the win.ini file to determine a variety of options for the
Windows operating environment. The win.ini file also usually includes sections that
contain optional settings for Windows application programs that are installed on the
hard drive.
Windows 2000 — An integrated and complete Microsoft Windows operating system
that does not require MS-DOS and that provides advanced operating system
performance, improved ease of use, enhanced workgroup functionality, and simplified
file management and browsing.
Windows Powered — A Windows operating system designed for use on NAS systems.
For NAS systems, the Windows Powered operating system is dedicated to file service
for network clients.
Windows Server 2003 — A set of Microsoft software technologies that enable software
integration through the use of XML Web services. XML Web services are small
reusable applications written in XML that allow data to be communicated between
otherwise unconnected sources.
XML — Extensible Markup Language. XML is a way to create common information
formats and to share both the format and the data on the World Wide Web, intranets,
and elsewhere.
ZIF — Zero insertion force.
Glossary
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184
Glossary
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Index
Numbers
C
3.5-inch drive
removing, 52
cable clip, 92
5.25-inch drive
installing, 60
A
admin password
assigning, 42
using, 42
alert messages, 30
CD/DVD drive
installing, 60
removing, 57
troubleshooting, 118
chassis intrusion switch
installing, 94
removing, 93
replacing, 94
checking equipment, 104
closing the system, 47
connecting external devices, 16
B
battery
installing, 88
removing, 89
troubleshooting, 111
bezel
installing, 96
removing, 95
replacing, 96
bezel (front drive)
insert, 50
removing, 49
replacing, 49
connectors, 133
back-panel, 15
front-panel, 13
NICs, 15
serial port, 15
USB, 13, 15
video, 15
contacting Dell, 142
cooling fans
installing, 86
removing, 84
replacing, 86
troubleshooting, 113
Index
185
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D
F
damaged systems
troubleshooting, 110
features
back-panel, 15
front-panel, 13
Dell
contacting, 142
diagnostics
advanced testing options, 129
testing options, 128
when to use, 128
DIMM
sockets, 75
diskette drive
installing, 54
removing, 52
replacing, 54
troubleshooting, 116
DVD drive. See CD/DVD drive.
E
error messages, 31
systems management, 20
expansion cards, 70
installing, 72
removing, 70
replacing, 72
troubleshooting, 123
external devices
connecting, 16
186
Index
H
hard drive
installing, 66
removing, 64
troubleshooting, 120
I
I/O panel
installing, 98
removing, 97
replacing, 98
indicators
back-panel, 15
front-panel, 13
NIC, 16
insert on front drive bezel
removing, 50
replacing, 50
installing
5.25-inch drive, 60
bezel, 96
CD/DVD drive, 60
chassis intrusion switch, 94
book.book Page 187 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
installing (continued)
cooling fans, 86
diskette drive, 54
expansion cards, 72
hard drive, 66
I/O panel, 98
memory, 77
power supply, 93
processor, 82
system battery, 88
system board, 101
tape drive, 60
J
jumpers, 131
K
keyboard
troubleshooting, 105
messages
alert, 30
error messages, 31
system, 20
warning, 29
microprocessor
removing, 79
replacing, 82
troubleshooting, 125
mouse
troubleshooting, 105
N
NICs
connectors, 15
indicators, 16
troubleshooting, 108
O
opening the system, 47
M
memory
4-GB configurations, 76
branches, 75
channels, 75
installing, 77
removing, 77
replacing, 77
troubleshooting, 114
upgrade kits, 75
options
system setup program, 33
P
password
admin, 42
disabling, 43, 135
features, 39
system, 40
phone numbers, 142
Index
187
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POST
accessing system features, 12
power supply
installing, 93
removing, 91
replacing, 93
troubleshooting, 112
processor
installing, 82
removing, 79
replacing, 82
troubleshooting, 125
S
R
recommended tools, 45
removing
3.5-inch drive, 52
bezel, 95
CD/DVD drive, 57
chassis intrusion switch, 93
cooling fans, 84
diskette drive, 52
expansion cards, 70
front drive bezel, 49
hard drive, 64
I/O panel, 97
memory, 77
power supply, 91
processor, 79
system battery, 89
system board, 100
tape drive, 57
188
replacing
bezel, 96
chassis intrusion switch, 94
cooling fans, 86
diskette drive, 54
expansion cards, 72
front drive bezel, 49
I/O panel, 98
memory, 77
power supply, 93
processor, 82
system board, 101
Index
safety, 103
SAS controller card
installing, 73
troubleshooting, 122
SAS hard drive. See hard drive.
SATA hard drive. See hard drive.
securing your system, 41
serial port
connector, 15
setup password
changing, 43
setup password features, 39
startup
accessing system features, 12
status messages
systems management, 20
book.book Page 189 Wednesday, April 15, 2009 8:47 PM
support
contacting Dell, 142
T
system
closing, 47
opening, 47
tape drive
installing, 60
removing, 57
troubleshooting, 119
system battery
removing, 89
telephone numbers, 142
system board
connectors, 133
installing, 101
jumpers, 131
removing, 100
replacing, 101
system cooling
troubleshooting, 113
system features
accessing, 12
system messages, 20
system password
assigning, 40
deleting, 41
using, 40
system password features, 39
system setup program
entering, 31
options, 33
using, 32
system setup screens
main, 33
system options, 34
troubleshooting
CD/DVD drive, 118
cooling fans, 113
damaged system, 110
diskette drive, 116
expansion cards, 123
external connections, 104
hard drive, 120
keyboard, 105
memory, 114
microprocessor, 125
mouse, 105
NIC, 108
power supply, 112
SAS controller card, 122
start-up routine, 103
system battery, 111
system cooling, 113
tape drive, 119
USB device, 107
video, 104
wet system, 109
U
upgrade kits
memory, 75
Index
189
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USB device
connectors (back panel), 15
connectors (front panel), 13
troubleshooting, 107
W
warning messages, 29
warranty, 11
wet system
troubleshooting, 109
V
video
connector, 15
troubleshooting, 104
190
Index