E.F. Johnson Company 002-9750-003 Service manual

SERVICE
MANUAL
MULTI-NET ® II MOBILE
SUMMIT DM 975X/977X
800 or 900 MHZ MOBILE RADIO
®
MULTI-NET® II
13.6 VDC, 15 or 30 Watts
Part No. 242-97xx-111
Fifth Printing
December 2000
Supersedes 001-9750-005, 2/97
MULTI-NET®
®
SUMMIT DM 975x/977x
800/900 MHz TRUNKED
RADIO
13.6 VDC, 15 or 30/35 Watts, FM
806-821 MHz Tx, 851-866 MHz Rx (975x)
896-902 MHz Tx, 935-941 MHz Rx (977x)
Part No. 242-97xx-111
Copyright © 2000 by the E.F. Johnson Company
The E.F. Johnson Company designs and manufactures two-way radio equipment to serve
a wide variety of communication needs. E.F. Johnson produces equipment for land mobile
radio and mobiletelephone services which include business, industrial, government, public safety, and personal users.
Viking Head/EF Johnson logo, Summit®, Multi-Net®, LTR®, Viking®, Avenger®, and Call
Guard® are registered trademarks of the E.F. Johnson Company. All other company and/
or product names used in this manual are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of
their respective manufacturer.
Information in this manual is subject to change without notice.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1
GENERAL INFORMATION
3
OPERATION
1.1
1.2
3.1
3.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.9
SCOPE OF MANUAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Selectable Systems and Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Front and Remote Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
NPSPAC Models (800 MHz Only) . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
PART NUMBER BREAKDOWN . . . . . . . . . . .1-2
TRANSCEIVER IDENTIFICATION . . . . . . . .1-2
ACCESSORIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
PRODUCT WARRANTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
FACTORY CUSTOMER SERVICE . . . . . . . .1-5
FACTORY RETURNS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-5
REPLACEMENT PARTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
2
INSTALLATION
2.1
GENERAL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Scope Of Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Performance Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Transceiver Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Power Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Selecting A Mounting Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
TRANSCEIVER INSTALLATION . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Mounting Transceiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
POWER CABLE INSTALLATION . . . . . . . . . 2-2
ACCESSORY CABLE INSTALLATION . . . . 2-3
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
Internal/External Speaker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
Ignition Sense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
Horn Alert. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
External Public Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
Input B (Emergency Switch) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
REMOTE CONTROL UNIT INSTALLATION 2-5
Setting Programming Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
Using Setup Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
Mounting Remote Control UniT . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
Using An External Speaker With A Remote
Control Unit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8
Microphone Hanger Sense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8
INSTALLING OPTION SWITCH KEY CAPS 2-8
INSTALLING DC NOISE FILTER KIT . . . . . . 2-9
TRANSCEIVER MOUNTING TRAY
INSTALLATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10
Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10
Locking and Unlocking Transceiver . . . . . . . . 2-10
FEATURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
FRONT PANEL CONTROLS & DISPLAY. . 3-1
Front Panel Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Display. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
OPERATING MODES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Multi-Net and LTR Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Conventional Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Multi-Net and LTR System/Groups . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
SCAN (SYSTEM AND GROUP) . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Multiple- and Single-Site Scan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Scan Resume Delay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
Transmitting In The Scan Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
Fixed Transmit In Scan Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
Scan List Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
Group Scan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
Scanning The Various Types Of Systems. . . . . . 3-9
OPTION SWITCH AND MENU MODE
FUNCTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
A/D (Scan List Programming) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
Auto-Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
Auxiliary 1 and 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
Backlight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
Bank Select . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
Call Guard Squelch Disable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
Emergency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
Encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
External PA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
Home System/Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
Horn/Light Alert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
LTR System Search Select . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
Menu Select Switch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
Monitor Mode Select Switch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
Phone Mode Select . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
Priority. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
Radio Sounds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
Scan On/Off. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
Scan List Save . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
Scan Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
Status Select . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
Talk-Around . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
Viewing Angle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
GENERAL FEATURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
Time-Out Timer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
Call Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
Proceed (Clear-To-Talk) Tone . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-13
Horn/Light Alert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-13
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
i
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
TABLE OF CONTENTS (CONT’D)
Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14
Banks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14
Power Turn-Off Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-15
Emergency Calls. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-15
Programmable Power Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16
Automatic Transmitter Thermal Foldback . . . . 3-16
Data System/Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16
Encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16
Phone Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-17
Display Of Software Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-18
3.7
MULTI-NET MODE FEATURES . . . . . . . . . .3-18
Busy Queuing (Multi-Net) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-18
Auto-Registration (Multi-Net) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-19
Transmitting Status Information (Multi-Net) . . 3-20
Special Calls (Multi-Net) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-20
Transmit Inhibit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-22
Access Priority (Multi-Net) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-22
Camp-On Prevent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-22
3.8
LTR MODE FEATURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-23
Free System Ringback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-23
System Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-23
Transpond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-23
Transmit Inhibit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-23
3.9
CONVENTIONAL MODE FEATURES . . . .3-23
Transmit Disable On Busy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-23
Call Guard Squelch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-24
Monitor Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-24
Repeater Talk-Around . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-24
Priority Group Sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-25
Receive-Only Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-25
3.10 MISCELLANEOUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-25
Supervisory Tones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-25
Display Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-26
3.11 TEST MODE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-28
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-28
Receive-Transmit-RSSI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-28
Power Level 1 Set (Std Band) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-29
Power Level 1 Set (Talk-Around Band). . . . . . 3-30
Power Levels 2, 3, 4, 2W . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-30
Modulation Balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-30
Transmitter Hum and Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-30
DC Voltage Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-30
Display Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-30
4
TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
4.1
GENERAL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Programming Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Computer Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Remote Programming Interface (RPI) . . . . . . . . 4-1
EEPROM Data Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Software Version Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Computers Running Windows® . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Software Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
ii
Hardware Hookup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Minimum Free Memory Required . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Starting The Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Header Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Special Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
MAIN MENU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
Set Up New Configuration File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
Open Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
Modify Current Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
Upload Configuration From Radio . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Download Configuration To Radio. . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Print Current Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Modify Printer/serial Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Configuration File Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
MODIFY RADIO FILE MENU . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
Edit Main Radio Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
Define Option Buttons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
Setup Menu Functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8
Create/Edit/Copy/Delete System. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8
Create/Edit/Copy/Delete Bank . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-10
Programming Prestored Telephone Numbers . . 4-11
Editing Unique ID Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11
ADDITIONAL PROGRAMMING
INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11
Repeater Number Programming (Multi-Net and
LTR). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11
Channel Number Programming. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12
Access Priority Programming (Multi-Net Only) 4-12
Site Number Programming (Multi-Net Only) . . 4-12
Specifying RIC-equipped Repeaters . . . . . . . . . 4-12
Wide Area Group Tracking Programming . . . . 4-13
PROGRAMMING ONE TRANSCEIVER WITH
ANOTHER (CLONING) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13
WRITE-ON FLASH PROGRAMMING . . . . 4-13
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13
Programming Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14
Programming “A” Model Transceivers. . . . . . . 4-14
Programming Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14
UNIVERSAL INTERFACE
PROGRAMMING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14
Main Parameters Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15
System Parameters Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-16
Auxiliary and Emergency Switch Programming 4-16
5
MULTI-NET SYSTEM OVERVIEW
5.1
MULTI-NET SYSTEM COMPONENTS . . . .
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mobile Transceivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Repeaters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-1
5-1
5-2
5-2
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
TABLE OF CONTENTS (CONT’D)
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
5.8
Radio Network Terminal (RNT) . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
Dispatch Consoles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) . . 5-2
DEFINITIONS OF MULTI-NET TERMS . . . . 5-3
HOME AND STATUS REPEATERS . . . . . . . 5-4
HOME CHANNEL BACKUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-4
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Selecting Repeater To Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Assigning The Status Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Detecting Defective Repeaters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
MOBILE-REPEATER DATA SIGNALING . .5-5
REPEATER DATA BUS SIGNALING . . . . . . 5-5
STANDARD AND SPECIAL CALLS . . . . . . . 5-6
OTHER MULTI-NET FEATURES . . . . . . . . . . 5-6
Unique ID Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6
Access and Receive Priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6
All Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Interrogate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Mobile Disable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Dynamic Reprogramming of Group 11 . . . . . . . 5-7
Dynamic Move To New System/group . . . . . . . 5-7
ID Validation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
System Key. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Dynamic Channel Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
Emergency Calls. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
Auto-registration (Roaming) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
Busy Queuing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
Sending Status Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
Transmit Inhibit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
Voice Encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9
6
CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
6.1
GENERAL TRANSCEIVER DESCRIPTION 6-1
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
Synthesizer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
Receiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
Transmitter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
Audio/Logic Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
SYNTHESIZER CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION . .6-2
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
Voltage-Controlled Oscillator Module. . . . . . . . 6-2
VCO and TCXO Modulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4
Active Filter (Q800), Buffer Amplifier
(Q801, Q802) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4
Prescaler (U800) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5
Synthesizer Integrated Circuit (U801) . . . . . . . . 6-5
Lock Detect (Q808, Q809) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-6
Charge Pump (Q804-Q807) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7
Voltage Multiplier (CR804A/B, CR805A/B). . . 6-7
RECEIVER CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION . . . . . . 6-7
RF Amplifier (Q290) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7
First Mixer (Q205) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
6.7
7
SERVICING
7.1
GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Periodic Checks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Schematic Diagrams and Component Layouts . .
Replacement Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Transceiver For Testing . . . . . . . . .
Surface-Mounted Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CMOS Handling Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SYNTHESIZER TROUBLESHOOTING . . . .
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TCXO (Y800) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VCO Module and Prescaler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synthesizer (U801) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Determining Counter Divide Numbers . . . . . . . .
RECEIVER TROUBLESHOOTING . . . . . . . .
TRANSMITTER TROUBLESHOOTING. . . .
AUDIO/LOGIC BOARD
TROUBLESHOOTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digital Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analog Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SURFACE MOUNTED DEVICES (SMDs) . .
Servicing Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
iii
Crystal Filters (Z205, Z206), IF Amplifier . . . . . 6-8
Second Mixer/Detector (U200) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8
Audio Power Amplifier (U100) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9
13.8-Volt Switch (Q100, Q103, Q106-Q108). . . 6-9
TRANSMITTER CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION. . 6-9
Power Amplifier Module (U500) . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9
Driver (Q500), Final Amplifier (Q501) . . . . . . . 6-9
Antenna Switch (CR502, CR506, CR507) . . . . . 6-9
Power Control (U504, Q511, Q502, Q506) . . . 6-10
AUDIO/LOGIC BOARD DIGITAL CIRCUIT
DESCRIPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11
Microprocessor (U401) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11
Memory and I/O Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-13
Digital Signal Processor (U300-U302) . . . . . . . 6-14
AUDIO/LOGIC BOARD RECEIVE SIGNAL
PROCESSING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-14
Receive Audio Processing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-14
Receive Data Processing (U606A-D) . . . . . . . . 6-15
Squelch Circuit (U607B, U607C) . . . . . . . . . . . 6-15
RSSI Comparator (U602C) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-16
TRANSMIT AUDIO/DATA PROCESSING 6-16
Microphone Amplifier (U603D), Filter (U603B,
U603C, U604D) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-16
Mute Gate (U609C), Summing Amplifier
(U604A) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-16
Compressor (U100B), Limiter (U604C) . . . . . . 6-16
Splatter Filter (U604C, U605D), Summing
Amplifier (U605A) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-17
Transmit Data Circuit (U607D, U607A). . . . . . 6-17
7-1
7-1
7-1
7-1
7-1
7-1
7-1
7-2
7-2
7-2
7-2
7-3
7-5
7-5
7-5
7-5
7-5
7-5
7-5
7-5
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
TABLE OF CONTENTS (CONT’D)
Identifying SMD Resistors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SMD Capacitor Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SMD Inductor Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Transistor/Diode Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8
8.1
ALIGNMENT PROCEDURE AND
PERFORMANCE TESTS
RF Board
8.5
8.6
GENERAL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
Test Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
FREQUENCY ADJUSTMENT. . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
TRANSMITTER TUNEUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
C511 Adjustment (30 or 35 Watt Models Only) 8-2
Power Level 1 Adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
Power Level 2-4, 2W Adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
Modulation Balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
Transmit Data Level Adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
Transmit Audio Limiting Adjust . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
RECEIVER ALIGNMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
Front End Alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
RSSI Detect Adjust. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
Squelch Adjust . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
Local Tone Level Adjust . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5
RECEIVER PERFORMANCE TESTS . . . . . . 8-6
TRANSMITTER PERFORMANCE TESTS . . 8-6
9
PARTS LIST
8.2
8.3
8.4
RF and PA Board Component Locator Guide 10-5
Audio/Logic Board Comp. Locator Guide. . . 10-8
Interconnect Schematic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-11
Display Board Schematic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-12
Display Board Layout. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-13
7-5
7-6
7-7
7-7
Revised 800 MHz Schematic . . . . . . . . . . . .
800/900 MHz Board Layout. . . . . . . . . . . . .
900 MHz Schematic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unrevised 800 MHz Schematic . . . . . . . . . .
10-14
10-15
10-16
10-17
PA Board
Revised 800 MHz, 35W Schematic . . . . . . .
Revised 800 MHz, 15W Schematic . . . . . . .
Revised 800 MHz, 15W/35W Board Layout
900 MHz, 30W Schematic . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
900 MHz, 15W Schematic . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
900 MHz/Unrev. 800 MHz Board Layout . .
Unrevised 800 MHz, 35W Schematic . . . . .
Unrevised 800 MHz, 15W Schematic . . . . .
10-18
10-19
10-20
10-21
10-22
10-23
10-24
10-25
Audio/Logic Board
Schematic (Part 1 of 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Schematic (Part 2 of 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Board Layout Top View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Board Layout Bottom View . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Revised Compandor Board Schematic. . . . .
Revised Compandor Board Layout . . . . . . .
10-26
10-27
10-28
10-29
10-30
10-30
Remote Transceiver
RF and PA Boards, Hardware and Miscellaneous 9-1
Audio/Logic Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-9
Front Panel Assembly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-15
Compandor Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-16
Hardware and Cable Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-16
Remote Control Unit and Remote Kit . . . . . . . 9-17
Accessory Wire Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-17
Transceiver Mounting Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-17
Transceiver Exploded View (Part 1) . . . . . . . . 9-19
Transceiver Exploded View (Part 2) . . . . . . . . 9-20
Interconnect Schematic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-31
Control Unit Interface Board Schematic . . . 10-32
Control Unit Interface Board Layout . . . . . . 10-33
APPENDIX A
A.1
A.2
A.3
10
SCHEMATIC DIAGRAMS AND
COMPONENT LAYOUTS
A.4
A.5
Miscellaneous
Basing Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Standard Amplified Dynamic Microphone . .
Transceiver-To-Transceiver Cloning Cable .
RPI (Part No. 023-9800-000) Schematic. . . .
RPI-To-Transceiver Programming Cable . . .
RPI (Part No. 023-9800-000) Board Layout .
A.6
10-1
10-2
10-3
10-3
10-4
10-4
A.7
A.8
iv
REVISION SUMMARY
INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
TRANSCEIVER OPERATING SOFTWARE
UPDATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
REVISION LETTER CHANGES . . . . . . . . . . A-1
Transceiver Revision Letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
Control Unit Revision Letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
PROGRAMMING SOFTWARE CHANGES. A-1
REMOTE CONTROL UNIT
COMPATIBILITY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3
WIDE AREA GROUP TRACKING
PROGRAMMING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3
NEW FEATURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4
Bank Start at Home Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4
Group Proceed Tone Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4
OTHER LATE CHANGES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
TABLE OF CONTENTS (CONT’D)
APPENDIX B UNIVERSAL DIGITAL AND
DATA INTERFACE
B.1
B.2
B.3
B.4
B.5
B.6
B.7
B.8
4-6
4-7
4-8
4-9
4-10
5-1
6-1
6-2
7-1
8-1
8-2
8-3
8-4
B-1
B-2
B-3
B-4
GENERAL INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1
Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1
Universal Interface Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1
POWER SUPPLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2
RECEIVE AUDIO SIGNALS . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2
Pin Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2
Receive Audio Gating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2
TRANSMIT AUDIO SIGNALS . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2
Pin Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2
Transmit Audio Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2
INPUT CONTROL SIGNALS . . . . . . . . . . . . B-5
OUTPUT CONTROL SIGNALS . . . . . . . . . . B-5
INTERFACING WITH A DATA MODEM . . . B-7
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-7
Modem Control Lines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-7
ARQ Arbitration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-7
SERIAL BUS PROTOCOL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-8
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-8
Physical Signal Path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-9
Character Level Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-9
Message Level Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-9
Message Supervision Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-10
Serial Port Command Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . B-10
Response Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-15
LIST OF TABLES
1-1
1-2
3-1
3-2
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
7-1
7-2
A-1
A-2
A-3
B-1
B-3
B-2
B-5
B-4
B-6
B-7
B-8
LIST OF FIGURES
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-6
3-1
3-2
3-3
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
Setup Menu Functions Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
Telephone Numbers Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11
Setup/Change Unique ID Screen. . . . . . . . . . . 4-11
Main Universal Interface Screen . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15
System Universal Interface Screen . . . . . . . . . 4-16
Multi-Net System Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Transceiver Block Diagram. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3
U801 Block Diagram. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5
Simplified Synthesizer Block Diagram . . . . . . . 7-3
Test Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
Transmitter Test Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
Receiver Test Setup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
Alignment Point Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5
Universal Interface Pin Designations . . . . . . . . B-1
Receive Audio Signal Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-3
Transmit Audio Signal Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . B-4
Serial Bus Encode/Decode Diagram . . . . . . . . B-10
97xx Front Mount Installation Components. . . . 2-1
Accessory Jack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
Remote Mount Installation Components . . . . . . 2-5
Remote Control Unit Programming Switches . . 2-7
DC Noise FIlter Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9
Locking Tray Installation Diagram . . . . . . . . . 2-10
Front Panel Controls. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Back Panel Jacks And Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Front Panel Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Programming Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Programming Software Menu Structure. . . . . . . 4-4
Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
Modify Radio File Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
Define Option Buttons Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
v
Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
E.F. Johnson Multi-Net Transceivers . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Multi-Net Standard & Spec. Call Rx Priority . . 3-6
Menu Mode And Option Switch Functions . . . . 3-9
Main Radio Parameters Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-17
Multi-Net System Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-18
LTR System Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-21
Conventional System Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . 4-23
Create/Edit Bank Screen Parameters . . . . . . . . 4-25
Call Guard (CTCSS/DCS) Codes and Tones . . 4-26
Ceramic SMD Capacitor Identification . . . . . . . 7-6
SMD Inductor Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7
Operating Software Version Numbers . . . . . . . . A-2
Part Changes Through January 1995 . . . . . . . . . A-4
Additional Changes Through May 1998 . . . . . . A-7
Power Supply Pin Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2
Receive Audio Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-3
Receive Audio Pin Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-3
Transmit Audio Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-4
Transmit Audio Pin Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-4
Control Signal Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-5
Serial Bus Pin Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-8
UPDATE_DISPLAY Message Coding . . . . . . B-18
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
GENERAL INFORMATION
SECTION 1 GENERAL INFORMATION
1.1 SCOPE OF MANUAL
programming software listed in Table 1-1. Transceiver
operating parameters are stored in an EEPROM reprogrammable memory. Refer to Section 4 for more
programming information.
This service manual contains installation, operation, programming, alignment, and service information
for the E.F. Johnson Summit® DM 975x and 977x
transceivers.
The operating code (firmware) for the microprocessor is stored in a flash-type memory device. This
allows the operating program to be updated using E.F.
Johnson Write-On programming software and the
standard transceiver programming setup. This simplifies software updates because the microprocessor or an
EPROM does not need to be changed. The latest
Write-On software and operating code can be downloaded from the E.F. Johnson ACESSM Bulletin Board
System. Refer to Section 4.6 for more information on
flash programming.
NOTE: The 900 MHz (977x) Summit DM model is no
longer available.
1.2 EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTION
1.2.1 GENERAL
The 975x/977x are full featured, high performance transceivers that operate in the Multi-Net®,
LTR®, and conventional modes. The 975x is an 800
MHz transceiver which operates on the 760 trunked
channels from 806-824 MHz (mobile transmit). The
receive channels are 45 MHz above these frequencies
(851-869 MHz). The 977x is a 900 MHz transceiver
which operates on the 479 trunked channels from 896902 MHz (mobile transmit). The receive channels are
39 MHz above these frequencies (935-941 MHz).
Standard analog frequency modulation is utilized.
1.2.3 SELECTABLE SYSTEMS AND GROUPS
The maximum number of systems that can be
programmed is determined by the type of system and
the number of groups that are programmed. If only
single-group systems are programmed, up to 73 MultiNet, 66 LTR, or 100 conventional systems can be
programmed. Then as more groups are programmed,
the number of systems decreases. If the maximum
number of groups are programmed (11 Multi-Net, 10
LTR/conventional), up to 32 Multi-Net, 30 LTR, or 32
conventional systems can be programmed. When data
is being entered using the programming software,
there is a running indication of the amount of
EEPROM memory left.
The last digit of the model number (97x3, 97x4,
97x5, and 97x6) denotes front or remote mounting and
power output as shown in Table 1-2. This table also
lists other E.F. Johnson Multi-Net transceivers and the
distinguishing features of each.
Like all E.F. Johnson Multi-Net and LTR transceivers, the 975/977x is digitally synthesized and logic
controlled. In the Multi-Net or LTR modes, all the user
has to do to make a call is select the desired system
and group and press the push-to- talk switch. If a busy
or out-of-range condition is not indicated by special
tones, the path to the other party is complete and
speaking can begin. Channel selection, monitoring
before transmitting, and squelch control are all
performed by the logic.
With conventional operation, each system selects
a channel, and the group switch selects the Call Guard
(CTCSS or digital) signaling and other parameters on
that channel.
1.2.4 FRONT AND REMOTE MOUNTING
The 97x3/97x5 transceivers are designed for front
mounting within reach of the operator, and the 97x4/
97x6 are designed for remote mounting in a location
such as the trunk (see Table 1-2). The remote control
unit cable connects to the remote interface pigtail
coming from the back of the transceiver (see
Figure 2-3). This pigtail is standard with remote mount
transceivers only.
1.2.2 PROGRAMMING
Transceiver programming is performed using a
dealer-supplied personal computer and the E.F.
Johnson RPI (Remote Programming Interface) and
1-1
Revised February 1997
Part No. 001-9750-005
GENERAL INFORMATION
1.5 ACCESSORIES
The remote control unit uses the same front panel
assembly that is used on front mount transceivers.
Therefore, it operates the same as a front-mount transceiver. A Remote Conversion Kit is available which
converts the front panel of a front mount transceiver to
a remote control unit (see Table 1-1). The remote
control unit has an internal 5-watt speaker or an
external 15-watt speaker can be used. Dual transceiver controls are also available when the remote
control unit is connected to a standard front mount
transceiver.
The accessories available for this transceiver are
listed in Table 1-2. A brief description of several of
these accessories follows.
Mounting Hardware - The mounting hardware and
DC power cable are shown in Figures 2-1 and 2-3 in
Section 2. A 22-foot DC power cable is used for both
front and remote mount applications. The cable is cut
to the required length at installation and any excess
discarded. The accessory cable is used to connect such
things as an external speaker, public address, ignition
sense input, and a horn alert to the transceiver. It
includes two 22-foot and three 2-foot wires that are
connected as required to external points. The adapter
cable is used to connect a 86xx-series power cable to
these transceivers.
1.2.5 NPSPAC MODELS (800 MHZ ONLY)
All 800 MHz versions of this transceiver meet the
stricter specifications established by NPSPAC
(National Public Safety Panel Advisory Committee)
for public safety frequencies from 821-824 and 866869 MHz. Deviation is less on NPSPAC channels;
however, no alignment change is required because it is
automatically set for the correct level when a public
safety channel is selected (see Appendix A.2).
Key Cap Kit - This kit includes key caps labeled for
all the functions that can be controlled by the six front
panel option switches. Also included are blank key
caps for unused switches. An extraction tool for
removing the key caps is included in the cable and
hardware kit. Refer to Section 2.6 for key cap installation information.
1.3 PART NUMBER BREAKDOWN
The following is a breakdown of the part number
used to identify this transceiver:
Lockable Mounting Tray - This bracket allows the
transceiver to be locked in place to guard against theft.
In addition, it allows it to be easily unlocked and
removed from the vehicle. Refer to Section 2.8 for
installation information.
242 - 97 x x - 111
5 = 800 MHz
7 = 900 MHz
3 = 15W, Frt Mt
4 = 15W, Rem Mt
5 = 30/35W, Frt Mt
6 = 30/35W, Rem Mt
Microphones and Speaker - The microphones in
Table 1-1 have an impedance of 620 ohms. All DTMF
microphones are backlighted. The environmentally
sealed microphones are sealed against such things as
rain, sand, and dust.
1.4 TRANSCEIVER IDENTIFICATION
The external 15-watt speaker can be used in place
of the internal 5-watt speaker. It is non- amplified and
weatherproof. This speaker is connected to pins 1 and
2 of the accessory connector pigtail on the back of the
transceiver.
The transceiver identification number is printed
on a label that is affixed to the bottom cover. The
following information is contained in that number:
Model
97xx
8th
Digit
Revision Manufacture
Plant
Letter
Date
x
A
24 3
Warranty
Number
A
Week No.
Remote Kits - The remote conversion kit converts the
front panel of a front-mount transceiver to a remote
control unit. It includes a blank cover plate with a
programming jack for the transceiver, a housing with
interface board to form the remote control unit, a
remote pigtail cable, and a 17-foot control cable. The
remote control unit uses the internal 5-watt speaker or
12345
A=
Year
1-2
Revised February 1997
Part No. 001-9750-005
GENERAL INFORMATION
Table 1-1 ACCESSORIES
Accessory
Mounting Accessories [1]
Mounting bracket & hardware kit
DC power cable & hardware, 22'
Accessory cable
Key cap kit, Summit
Lockable Mounting Tray
Adapter cable (to use 86xx-series
power cable with 97xx)
Part No.
Remote conversion kit
Remote control unit kit, Summit
250-9701-001
023-9701-002
UD2I universal interface cable
Factory installed
Field installed
023-9750-001
597-2002-245
Compandor kit
Factory installed
Field installed
023-9750-002
250-9750-002
Part No.
Programming Accessories
Remote prog interface (RPI)
023-9800-000
Cable, RPI to transceiver
023-9750-005
Cable, xcvr-xcvr (cloning)
597-2002-268
Cable, RPI to cmptr, 6’ DB9 M - DB9 F 597-5900-002
Cable, RPI to cmptr, 6’ DB25 M - DB9F 597-0005-057
PC Programming software, 3.5” diskette 023-9998-278
[1] Included with all transceivers
585-7000-185
023-9650-006
250-0740-310
587-9650-010
589-0016-028
587-9650-015
587-9650-012
250-0742-011
250-0151-006
Control station power supply
11 amp, 115 VAC, 60 Hz
15 amp, 115 VAC, 60 Hz
11 amp, 230 VAC, 50 Hz
15 amp, 230 VAC, 50 Hz
Accessory
023-9750-012
023-9750-010
023-9750-011
587-9650-008
Microphones
Standard amplified dynamic
Standard, environ sealed
DTMF w/o memory
DTMF w/o mem, env seal WR805
DTMF w/20 no. mem, envir seal
Desk microphone
External speaker, 5" 15W 3.2 ohm
environmental sealed
Encryption kit
Factory installed
Field installed
DC noise filter kit
Factory installed
Field installed
Table 1-1 ACCESSORIES (Continued)
the 15W external speaker. The remote control unit kit
includes the Summit DM control unit, remote pigtail
cable, and 17-ft. control cable. A microphone is not
included. Dual transceiver controls are provided by
connecting this control unit to a standard front mount
transceiver.
UD2I Kit - This is the Universal Digital and Data
Interface pigtail cable that installs in the transceiver to
provide connections to external data equipment. The
Validation Key is no longer required to use this interface. Refer to Section 4.7 for more information.
Compandor Kit - The compandor kit includes a board
which installs in the option slots of the transceiver.
This board provides 2:1 compression of the transmit
audio and 1:2 expansion of the receive audio to minimize noise in the audio signal.
NOTE: Companding is not compatible with encryption, so those features cannot be used together.
Encryption Kit - The encryption kit includes an
encryption board which installs in the option slots of
the transceiver. Voice encryption provides security
from unauthorized monitoring of conversation by
casual eavesdropping and analog scanners. Refer to
Section 5.8.16 for more information on the encryption
feature.
023-9750-003
250-9750-003
023-9750-004
542-5010-003
DC Noise Filter Kit - The DC noise filter kit includes
a filter choke that installs in the transceiver in the main
13.8-volt supply line. This filter provides additional
attenuation of vehicle electrical system noise. Installation is described in Section 2.7.
585-4001-201
585-4001-202
585-4001-203
585-4001-204
1-3
Revised February 1997
Part No. 001-9750-005
GENERAL INFORMATION
Table 1-2 E.F. JOHNSON MULTI-NET TRANSCEIVERS
M-Net/LTR/
System/
Power
Conv
Groups
Output
Operation; Conv
[1]
Talk-Around
Transceiver
Freq
(MHz)
8160 Avenger SK
8161 Avenger SK
8162 Avenger SK
8163 Avenger SK
800
800
900
900
Portable
Portable
Portable
Portable
1 & 3W
1 & 2W
1 & 2W
1 & 2W
14/11
14/11
14/11
14/11
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Small size, Qk Sel Sw
Small size, Qk Sel Sw, Intrin Safe
Small size, Qk Sel Sw
Small size, Qk Sel Sw, Intrin Safe
8585 Viking CM
8586 Viking CM
8587 Viking CM
8588 Viking CM
8590 Viking CM
8591 Viking CM
800
800
800
800
900
900
Portable
Portable
Portable
Portable
Portable
Portable
1.8/3.0W
1.5/2.5W
1.8/3.0W
1.5/2.5W
1W
1W
14/11
14/11
14/11
14/11
14/11
14/11
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Hi Pwr, Quick Select Switch
Hi Pwr, Qk Sel Sw, Intrin Safe
Hi Pwr, Qk Sel Sw, NPSPAC
Hi Pwr, Qk Sel, Intrin Safe, NPSPAC
Quick Select Switch
Qk Sel Sw, Intrin Safe
8605*
8606*
8615*
8616*
8620*
8621*
8622*
8655*
800
800
800
800
800
800
800
900
Frt Mount
Frt Mount
Frt Mount
Frt Mount
Rem Mount
Rem Mount
Rem Mount
Frt Mount
15W
15W
35W
35W
35W
35W
12W
30W
16/11
16/11
16/11
16/11
16/11
16/11
16/11
16/11
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Talk-Arnd N/A
Yes
9753 Summit DM
9754 Summit DM
9755 Summit DM
9756 Summit DM
9773 Summit DM*
9774 Summit DM*
9775 Summit DM*
9776 Summit DM*
800
800
800
800
900
900
900
900
Frt Mount
Rem Mount
Frt Mount
Rem Mount
Frt Mount
Rem Mount
Frt Mount
Rem Mount
15W
15W
35W
35W
15W
15W
30W
30W
32/11
32/11
32/11
32/11
32/11
32/11
32/11
32/11
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Type
Special Features
Low Power
Low Power, NPSPAC
High Power
High Power, NPSPAC
High Power, Remote Mount
High Pwr, Rem Mt, NPSPAC
Full Duplex
High Power
Hi Spec/Full Feature, Low Pwr
Hi Spec/Full Feature, Low Pwr
Hi Spec/Full Feature, Hi Pwr
Hi Spec/Full Feature, Hi Pwr
Hi Spec/Full Feature, Low Pwr
Hi Spec/Full Feature, Low Pwr
Hi Spec/Full Feature, Hi Pwr
Hi Spec/Full Feature, Hi Pwr
9883
800
Frt Mount 15 or 30W 40/16
Yes
Full Featured, dual BW, high tier
9896
900
Frt Mount 15 or 30W 40/16
Yes
Full Featured, high tier
[1] All except 98xx have up to 11 groups per Multi-Net system and up to 10 groups per LTR or conv system (the 98xx can
have up to 16 groups with any type of system). The 97xx and 98xx transceiver maximum number of systems is variable. The
minimum number is shown and the maximum number depends on the type and number of groups in each (see Section 1.2.3).
* Discontinued Models
1-4
Revised February 1997
Part No. 001-9750-005
GENERAL INFORMATION
When your call is answered at the E.F. Johnson
Company, you will hear a brief message informing
you of numbers that can be entered to reach various
departments. This number may be entered during or
after the message using a tone-type telephone. If you
have a pulse-type telephone, wait until the message is
finished and an operator will come on the line to assist
you. When you enter some numbers, another number
is requested to further categorize the type of information you need. You may also enter the 4-digit extension number of the person that you want to reach if
you know what it is.
Control Station Power Supply - The 11-ampere
versions are used with the 15-watt transceivers only,
and the 15-ampere models can be used with all
models. The transceiver slides into the power supply
housing and receives power from banana jacks on the
back of the power supply. The standard power cable is
used for connecting power, and the internal transceiver
speaker provides speaker audio.
Programming Hardware and Software - The RPI
provides the interface between the programming
computer and transceiver. This RPI is used for
programming both radio personality information and
the Write-On™ flash memory (see Section 1.2.2).
If you are calling from outside the continental
United States, the Customer Service telephone
numbers are as follows:
The cables from the RPI to the computer and
transceiver are not included with the RPI and must be
ordered separately. The transceiver programming software is available for IBM PC or compatible computers
only. The operating parameters are programmed using
the software listed in Table 1-1, and the Write-On flash
memory is programmed using different software available on the ACESSM system (see Section 4.6). The
cloning cable allows one transceiver to program
another with identical information. Refer to Section 4
for more programming information.
Customer Service Department - (507) 835-6911
Customer Service FAX Machine - (507) 835-6969
NOTE: Emergency 24-hour technical support is also
available at the 1-800 and preceding numbers during
off hours, holidays, and weekends.
You may also contact the Customer Service
Department by mail. Please include all information
that may be helpful in solving your problem. The
mailing address is as follows:
1.6 PRODUCT WARRANTY
E.F. Johnson Company
Customer Service Department
299 Johnson Avenue
P.O. Box 1249
Waseca, MN 56093-0514
The warranty statement for this transceiver is
available from your product supplier or from the
Warranty Department, E.F. Johnson Company, 299
Johnson Avenue, P.O. Box 1249, Waseca, MN 560930514. This information may also be requested from the
Warranty Department by phone as described in the
next section. The Warranty Department may also be
contacted for Warranty Service Reports, claim forms,
or any other questions concerning warranties or
warranty service.
1.8 FACTORY RETURNS
Repair service is normally available through local
authorized E.F. Johnson Land Mobile Radio Service
Centers. If local service is not available, the equipment
can be returned to the factory for repair. However, it is
recommended that you contact the Field Service
Department before returning equipment. A service
representative may be able to suggest a solution to the
problem so that return of the equipment would not be
necessary.
1.7 FACTORY CUSTOMER SERVICE
The Customer Service Department of the E.F.
Johnson Company provides customer assistance on
technical problems and the availability of local and
factory repair facilities. Customer Service hours are
7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Central Time, Monday - Friday.
From within the continental United States, the
Customer Service Department can be reached at the
following toll-free number: 1-800-328-3911
Be sure to fill out a Factory Repair Request Form
#271 for each unit to be repaired, whether it is in or
out of warranty. These forms are available free of
1-5
Revised February 1997
Part No. 001-9750-005
GENERAL INFORMATION
1.9 REPLACEMENT PARTS
charge by calling the repair lab (see Section 1.7) or by
requesting them when you send a unit in for repair.
Clearly describe the difficulty experienced in the space
provided and also note any prior physical damage to
the equipment. Then include a form in the shipping
container with each unit. Your phone number and
contact name are very important because there are
times when the technicians have specific questions
that need to be answered in order to completely identify and repair a problem.
E.F. Johnson replacement parts can be ordered
directly from the Service Parts Department. To order
parts by phone, dial the toll-free number as described
in Section 1.7. When ordering, please supply the part
number and quantity of each part ordered. E.F.
Johnson dealers also need to give their account
number.
If there is uncertainty about the part number,
include the designator (C112, for example) and the
model number of the equipment the part is from.
When returning equipment for repair, it is also a
good idea to use a PO number or some other reference
number on your paperwork in case you need to call the
repair lab about your unit. These numbers are referenced on the repair order and it makes it easier and
faster to locate your unit in the lab.
You may also send your order by mail or FAX.
The mailing address is as follows and the FAX number
is shown in Section 1.7.
Return Authorization (RA) numbers are not
necessary unless you have been given one by the Field
Service Department. They require RA numbers for
exchange units or if they want to be aware of a specific
problem. If you have been given an RA number, reference this number on the Factory Repair Request Form
sent with the unit. The repair lab will then contact the
Field Service Department when the unit arrives.
E.F. Johnson Company
Service Parts Department
299 Johnson Avenue
P.O. Box 1249
Waseca, MN 56093-0514
1-6
Revised February 1997
Part No. 001-9750-005
GENERAL INFORMATION
SUMMIT® DM 975x (800 MHz) SPECIFICATIONS
The following are general specifications intended for use in testing and servicing this transceiver. For current
advertised specifications, refer to the specification sheet available from the Marketing Department. Specifications
are subject to change without notice.
GENERAL
Operating Modes
Frequency Range
Systems
Groups
Mounting Location
Transmit/Receive Separation
Channel Spacing
Channel Increment
Frequency Stability
Dimensions and Weight
Power Requirement
Compliance
Multi-Net, LTR, and Conventional
Transmit - 806-824 MHz Std, 851-869 MHz conv talk-around
Receive - 851-869 MHz
Variable from 31-100 depending on type and number of groups
Up to 11 per system Multi-Net; up to 10 per system LTR and conv
9753/9755 - Dash, convertible to remote mount
9754/9756 - Remote
45 MHz standard, 0 MHz conventional talk-around
25 kHz standard, 12.5 kHz offset
12.5 kHz
1.5 PPM (–30° to +60° C/–22° to +140° F)
2.1" (5.3 cm) H, 7.2" (18.2 cm) W, 8.3" (21.1 cm) L, 5.0 lb (2.3 kg)
13.6 volts, negative ground
FCC Parts 15 and 90
RECEIVER
Sensitivity (12 dB SINAD)
Selectivity
Intermodulation
Spurious and Image Rejection
Maximum Channel Spread
Audio Response
Audio Power Output/Distortion
RF Input Impedance
Current Drain (maximum)
0.30 microvolt
–75 dB
–75 dB
–75 dB (–70 dB half IF)
18 MHz
6 dB per octave de-emphasis per TIA 603 specification
12 watts with external 4-ohm speaker, distortion less than 3%
50 ohms
1.0 ampere (standby), 3.0 ampere (rated audio output)
TRANSMITTER
RF Output Power (20% duty cycle)
Power Output Range
Spurious and Harmonic Emissions
FM Hum and Noise (TIA)
Audio Modulation
Audio Distortion
Audio Frequency Response
Maximum Channel Spread
Current Drain (maximum)
RF Output Impedance
Circuit Protection
9753/9754 - 15 watts (12 watts talk-around)
9755/9756 - 35 watts (30 watts talk-around)
1-2 watts or 3 dB below rated (PC programmable)
–78 dB (35W), –75 dB (15W)
–48 dB
16K0F1D, 16K0F3E, 16K0F3D, 14K0F1D, 14K0F3E, 14K0F3D
Less than 3% at 1 kHz
6 dB per octave pre-emphasis per TIA 603 specification
18 MHz (no degradation); 63 MHz (talk-around .75 dB degrad)
9753/9754 (15W) - 8 amperes; 9755/9756 (35W) - 15 amperes
50 ohms
15-ampere fuse in power cable
1-7
Revised February 1997
Part No. 001-9750-005
GENERAL INFORMATION
SUMMIT® DM 977x (900 MHz) SPECIFICATIONS
The following are general specifications intended for use in testing and servicing this transceiver. For current
advertised specifications, refer to the specification sheet available from the Marketing Department. Specifications
are subject to change without notice.
GENERAL
Operating Modes
Frequency Range
Systems
Groups
Mounting Location
Transmit/Receive Separation
Channel Spacing
Channel Increment
Frequency Stability
Dimensions and Weight
Power Requirement
Compliance
Multi-Net, LTR, and Conventional
Transmit - 896-902 MHz Std, 935-941 MHz conv talk-around
Receive - 935-941 MHz
Variable from 31-100 depending on type and number of groups
Up to 11 per system Multi-Net; up to 10 per system LTR and conv
9773/9775 - Dash, convertible to remote mount
9774/9776 - Remote
39 MHz standard, 0 MHz conventional talk-around
12.5 kHz
12.5 kHz
± 1.5 PPM (–30° to +60° C/–22° to +140° F)
2.1" (5.3 cm) H, 7.2" (18.2 cm) W, 8.3" (21.1 cm) L, 5.0 lb (2.3 kg)
13.6 volts, negative ground
FCC Parts 15 and 90
RECEIVER
Sensitivity (12 dB SINAD)
Selectivity
Intermodulation
Spurious and Image Rejection
Maximum Channel Spread
Audio Response
Audio Power Output/Distortion
RF Input Impedance
Current Drain (maximum)
0.30 microvolt
–70 dB
–70 dB
–75 dB
6 MHz
6 dB per octave de-emphasis per TIA 603 specification
12 watts with external 3-ohm speaker, distortion less than 3%
50 ohms
1.0 ampere (standby), 3.0 ampere (rated audio output)
TRANSMITTER
RF Output Power (20% duty cycle)
Power Output Range
Spurious and Harmonic Emissions
FM Hum and Noise (TIA)
Audio Modulation
Audio Distortion
Audio Frequency Response
Maximum Channel Spread
Current Drain (maximum)
RF Output Impedance
Circuit Protection
9773/9774 - 15 watts (12 watts talk-around)
9775/9776 - 30 watts (25 watts talk-around)
1-2 watts or 3 dB below rated (PC programmable)
–67 dB (15-watt models), –70 dB (30-watt models)
–45 dB
11K0F3E, 11KOF1D, 11KOF3D
Less than 3% at 1 kHz
6 dB per octave pre-emphasis per TIA 603 specification
6 MHz standard and talk-around
9773/9774 (15W) - 10 amperes; 9775/9776 (30W) - 15 amperes
50 ohms
15-ampere fuse in power cable
1-8
Revised February 1997
Part No. 001-9750-005
INSTALLATION
SECTION 2 INSTALLATION
Item
No.
Description
Item
No.
Part No.
Description
Part No.
1
Amplified dynamic mic
250-0740-310
7
Self-drilling screw (4)
575-9077-565
2
Screw, 4-20 x 5/8” thread frmg (3) 575-5604-020
8
Knob (4)
547-0016-005
3
Screw, 4-24 x 1/4” sheet metal (3)
575-3604-008
9
Power cable (22') and hardware
023-9750-010
4
Microphone hanger clip
023-3514-001
10
Accessory wire and hardware
023-9750-011
5
Mic hanger ground wire
023-7171-911
11
5" remote speaker
250-0151-006
6
Transceiver mounting bracket
017-2226-034
---
Butt splice connector (2)
586-9008-061
Figure 2-1 97xx Front Mount Installation Components
2.1 GENERAL
2.1.2 PERFORMANCE TESTS
2.1.1 SCOPE OF INSTRUCTIONS
Although each transceiver is carefully aligned
and tested at the factory, shipment can alter these
settings or damage the transceiver. Therefore, it is
good practice to check transceiver performance before
it is placed in service. Performance tests are located in
Sections 8.5 and 8.6.
Since each installation is somewhat unique, the
following installation instructions are intended only as
a general guide to installing this transceiver. Described
are the intended use of the mounting hardware and the
electrical connections that should be made.
2-1
Revised February 1997
Part No. 001-9750-005
INSTALLATION
2.1.3 TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
2.2 TRANSCEIVER INSTALLATION
The transceiver needs to be programmed before it
is placed in service unless it was ordered as factory
programmed. Programming instructions are located in
Section 4. Transceivers not factory programmed are
shipped programmed with test channels and other
factory test parameters.
2.2.1 GENERAL
Cable and Hardware Kit, Part No. 023-9750-010,
includes a 22-foot power cable, microphone hanger,
hanger ground wire, splice connectors, and all the
hardware (such as screws) that is normally required for
installation. Transceiver Mounting Kit, Part No. 0239750-012, includes a mounting bracket with knobs and
mounting screws. Accessory Wire Kit, Part No. 0239750-011, includes a wire assembly that is used to
connect the ignition sense input and accessories. These
components are shown in Figures 2-1
and 2-3.
The control unit used with remote-mount models
does not require special programming. However, it
does have several programming switches that may
need to be changed in some circumstances. Refer to
Section 2.5 for more information.
2.1.4 POWER SOURCE
2.2.2 MOUNTING TRANSCEIVER
This transceiver is designed for installation only
in vehicles which have a 12-volt, negative ground
electrical system. This type of electrical system has the
negative battery terminal connected directly to the
vehicle chassis. Other types of electrical systems
require a voltage converter.
a. Check the area underneath the selected mounting
area for wiring, brake and gas lines, or other components that could be damaged when the mounting
bracket is installed. Then install the mounting
bracket using the included self-drilling screws or
other screws if desired.
2.1.5 SELECTING A MOUNTING LOCATION
b. Install the transceiver in the bracket using the
included knobs.
c. With front-mount transceivers, install the microphone hanger in a convenient location using the
screws for sheet metal or plastic. The hanger must
be connected to chassis ground for proper operation
of functions such as monitoring and scan. If
required, ground the hanger using the included
ground wire.
The front-mount transceivers are designed for
mounting in a location near the operator such as the
dash, console, or transmission hump. The remotemount transceivers are designed for mounting in a
location such as the trunk.
WARNING
2.3 POWER CABLE INSTALLATION
The mounting location of the transceiver or control
unit can affect safe operation of the vehicle. Follow
these precautions when installing this transceiver:
a. Disconnect the negative cable from the battery to
prevent damage from accidental short circuits.
•
Mount it where it does not interfere with operation
of the vehicle controls.
•
Mount it where the operator can easily see the
display and reach the controls.
NOTE: Both leads of the power cable should be
connected directly to the vehicle battery. Connection
to other points may result in increased interference
from the vehicle's electrical system. If noise is still a
problem, an optional DC noise filter is available (see
Table 1-1).
•
Mount it where it will not likely cause additional
injury in case of an accident.
b. Route the red power cable to the battery. If there is
excess cable, cut it off at a convenient location and
2-2
Revised February 1997
Part No. 001-9750-005
INSTALLATION
Figure 2-2 Accessory Jack
alert, public address, and external emergency switch
accessories.
then splice it using the included butt splice connectors. You may also need to cut the cable if it must be
routed through the firewall and there is no opening
large enough to clear the fuseholder. If a hole is
drilled in the firewall, be sure to seal it when the installation is complete.
Two 8-pin connectors are included. One has a
jumper installed from pin 1 to 3 for routing audio to
the internal speaker (see next section). Also included
are two 22-foot and three 2-foot wires with attached
pins that can be used as required. Refer to Figure 2-2
and install this cable as described in the following
information.
c. Connect the red power cable to the positive (+) terminal of the battery.
d. Connect the blue cable to the negative (–) battery
terminal.
NOTE: The ignition sense input must always be
connected because the transceiver does not operate if
it is not. In addition, the speaker jumper must be
installed to route audio to the internal speaker (except
remote-mount models).
e. Plug the power cable into the transceiver and reconnect the negative battery cable.
f. Install the antenna according to the manufacturer's
instructions. The transceiver has an “N” connector.
Check VSWR. Reflected power should be less than
4% of forward power (VSWR less than 1.5 to 1).
2.4.2 INTERNAL/EXTERNAL SPEAKER
CAUTION
2.4 ACCESSORY CABLE INSTALLATION
Do not connect either speaker output to a supply
voltage because serious damage to the audio amplifier
will result. (The amplifier is designed to withstand
momentary grounding of the speaker outputs.)
2.4.1 GENERAL
Accessory Cable Kit, Part No. 023-9750-011, is
standard with Summit DM transceivers. This cable in
this kit plugs into the accessory pigtail coming from
the back of the transceiver. It is used for connecting
the ignition sense input and the external speaker, horn
Internal Speaker
To enable the internal speaker of front-mount
transceivers, insert the plug with the jumper from pin
1 to 3 into the accessory jack. This routes the audio on
2-3
Revised February 1997
Part No. 001-9750-005
INSTALLATION
2.4.4 HORN ALERT
pin 1 back in to the internal speaker connected to pin
3. The other internal speaker terminal is internally
connected to pin 2.
The horn alert feature enables the vehicle horn or
some other type of alert such as the lights when a call
is received that is programmed for this feature. For
more operation information, refer to Section 2.4.4.
External Speaker
With front-mount transceivers, 4-ohm, 15-watt
external speaker, Part No. 250-0151-006, or equivalent
can be connected to pins 1 and 2 of the accessory
connector. Proceed as follows:
b. If installing the external speaker listed above, the
connector pins are already attached to the speaker
wires. Insert one pin into the pin 1 location and the
other into the pin 2 location. If installing some other
speaker, use a 2- or 22-foot wire as required.
When the horn alert is enabled, pin 4 of the accessory connector goes low for 0.5 second and then high
for 0.5 second for three cycles. It then goes back to the
disabled mode which is a high impedance state.
Maximum sink current is 500 mA. Some type of
dealer-supplied horn alert driver is required to use this
output. To connect the horn alert driver circuit to pin 4,
use an accessory cable wire. If connecting to the coil
of a relay, a diode should be connected across the relay
coil with the cathode to the battery side. This protects
Q403 on the audio/logic board when the relay deenergizes.
Remote-mount Transceivers
2.4.5 EXTERNAL PUBLIC ADDRESS
With remote-mount transceivers, two wires
coming from the control cable connector are inserted
into the pin 1 and 2 slots to apply speaker audio to the
remote control unit. Refer to Section 2.5.3 for more
information.
The speaker and microphone audio signals can be
routed to an external public address system. A Public
Address option button or menu parameter is required
to control this feature. Refer to Section 3.5.10 for
operation information.
2.4.3 IGNITION SENSE
The public address output is pin 7 of the accessory connector. This AC-coupled output is limited to
300-3000 Hz. The typical output level is 2.2 V P-P,
and output impedance is less than 200 ohms. Use an
included accessory cable wire assembly to connect this
output.
a. Locate the connector included in the Accessory
Wire Kit that does not have pins 1 and 3 jumpered.
This ignition sense line is pin 6 of the accessory
connector. It is connected using an included wire
assembly. When the ignition sense input is connected
to a source switched by the vehicle ignition switch, it
provides the following functions.
2.4.6 INPUT B (EMERGENCY SWITCH)
a. Power automatically turns on and off with the ignition switch.
An emergency switch can be used to set up a high
priority call (see Section 3.6.8). A front-panel option
button or an external switch such as a foot-operated
type can be used. The external emergency switch input
is pin 8 of the accessory connector. This input is active
low and has an internal pull-up resistor. Therefore, a
SPST normally open switch is used with one terminal
connected to pin 8 and the other to chassis ground.
(Chassis ground is available at pin 5 of the accessory
connector.) Use an included accessory cable wire
assembly to connect this switch. Refer to Section 4.7
for programming information.
b. A turn-off delay can be programmed (see Section
3.6.7). An automatic turn-off delay may prevent
accidental discharge of the vehicle battery if the
transceiver is left on for extended periods (1 or 2
days). Standby current is approximately 1 ampere.
If these features are not used and transceiver
power is to be controlled by the front-panel power
switch only, the ignition sense input can be connected
to an unswitched source.
2-4
Revised February 1997
Part No. 001-9750-005
INSTALLATION
Item
No.
Description
Part
Number
Item
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Amplified dynamic mic
Screw, 4-20 x 5/8” thrd frmg (3)
Screw, 4-24 x 1/4” sheet metal (3)
Microphone hanger clip
Mic hanger ground wire
Transceiver mounting bracket
Self-drilling screw, 1.25" (4)
Transceiver 1/4”
Control unit #10
250-0740-310
575-5604-020
575-3604-008
023-3514-001
023-7171-911
017-2226-034
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
575-9077-565
575-9077-545
Part
Number
Description
Knob (4)
Power cable (22') and hard
Accessory wire and hardware
5" remote speaker (optional)
Plastic washer (2)
Stainless steel spring washer
Knob (2)
Control head mounting bracket
Control cable (17')
547-0016-005
023-9750-010
023-9750-011
250-0151-006
596-6400-015
596-9260-001
032-0792-015
017-2226-050
597-2002-262
Figure 2-3 Remote Mount Installation Components
2.5 REMOTE CONTROL UNIT INSTALLATION
Section 4. However, there are DIP switches on the
control unit interface board that configure the control
unit for various applications. These switches are
factory preset and should not need to be changed when
installing a remote-mount transceiver. However, if you
want to verify the position of these switches or
2.5.1 SETTING PROGRAMMING SWITCHES
The remote control unit does not require any
programming by the computer setup described in
2-5
Revised February 1997
Part No. 001-9750-005
INSTALLATION
“Disabled” is selected. When “Remote” is selected,
the transceiver and control unit volume controls
operate in parallel (the volume level is the sum of the
levels set by both controls). When “Disabled” is
selected, only the transceiver volume control sets the
volume level. In the dual control configuration, the
levels of the transceiver and control unit internal
speakers are the same.
program special configurations, refer to the information which follows. The location of these switches is
shown in Figure 2-4.
NOTE: In the following information, an asterisk (*)
indicates the factory default setting.
IIC Driver U102 Configuration (S100 1-4)
1
U102 out*
U102 in
On
Off
2
S100
3
Off
On
The “Local” setting provides a locally controlled
audio output that can be routed to a separate audio
amplifier. However, in the current configuration, this
setting cannot be used because the signal is routed to
the microprocessor and improper operation will result.
4
On
Off
Off
On
LCD Viewing Angle (S101 4)
S100, 1-4 are used to switch IIC bus driver U102
in or out of the circuit. Currently, this driver is not
used, so it is always switched out.
S101-4
Settable by menu mode*
Fixed viewing angle
Control Unit Address Programming (S101 5, 6)
Address
5
110*
Off
S101
6
Off
S101-4 programs if the LCD viewing angle can
be set by the menu mode or is a fixed setting. If it is
settable by the menu mode, that mode and the “VIEW
ADJUST” parameter must be enabled by transceiver
programming. Any change is then permanently stored
in the control unit EEPROM memory. The displays of
the transceiver or other control units are not affected
because they can only be changed locally.
R133
In
Currently, address information is not used, so any
address can be programmed.
NOTE: R133 should always be “in” because if it is
“out” and TP100 is brought low to enter the setup
mode, the control unit EEPROM memory is erased.
If “Fixed” is programmed, the factory default
viewing angle is selected on power up. This default
setting can be changed by the Setup Mode (see Section
2.5.2). If a change is made by the menu mode with
“Fixed” programmed, that setting is retained only until
power is turned off.
Volume Control Configuration (S100 5, 6)
S100
5
6
Off
Off
On
On
Off
Off
Off
On
Backlight On-Off (S101-3)
Remote (standard)*
Disabled (dual control)
Local
S101-3
Settable by menu mode*
Fixed (factory setting = on)
S100, 5 and 6 select which unit controls the
volume. With a remote-mount transceiver, the
“Remote” configuration is selected so that the control
unit volume control adjusts the volume of the internal
or external speaker (see Section 2.5.4).
Off
On
S101-5 programs if the backlight can be turned
on and off by the menu mode or is fixed. Operation is
similar to the LCD viewing angle described in the
preceding section. If “Fixed” is programmed, the
factory default setting of “on” can be changed by the
setup mode.
When a control unit is used with a front-mount
transceiver to provide dual controls, “Remote” or
2-6
Revised February 1997
Part No. 001-9750-005
INSTALLATION
Figure 2-4 Remote Control Unit Programming Switches
c. To change the default backlight condition, press the
Select switch so that the backlight is either on or off
as desired.
Keypad and Knob Disable (S101-1, 2)
S101-1
Select Knob Enabled
Select Knob Disabled
Keypad Enabled
Keypad Disabled
Off
On
-----
S101-2
d. To change the LCD viewing angle, rotate the Select
switch in either direction to achieve the desired
sharpness.
----Off
On
e. When the desired configurations have been
selected, exit the setup mode by turning power off
and then on again. The selected condition is stored
in the EEPROM as it is selected.
S101-1 can be used to disable the Select knob and
S101-2 can be used to disable the option keys. You
may want to disable these controls in applications
where the control unit acts as a slave and all control
functions are performed by the master at another
location.
2.5.3 MOUNTING REMOTE CONTROL UNIT
A diagram showing a remote transceiver installation is located in Figure 2-3. A control unit mounting
bracket, 17-foot control cable, and mounting hardware are included with remote mount transceivers.
Install the control unit as follows:
2.5.2 USING SETUP MODE
The control unit has a setup mode that can be
selected to program the default setting of the LCD
viewing angle and backlight when “Fixed” is selected
as described in the preceding information. Proceed as
follows:
a. Check the area underneath the selected mounting
location to make sure there is nothing that will be
damaged when the mounting screws are installed.
Then install the mounting bracket using the
included self-drilling screws or other screws if
desired.
a. Remove the back cover of the control unit and locate
TP100 on the interface board (see Figure 2-4).
b. Install the control unit in the bracket using the
included plastic washers, spring washers, and knobs
as shown in Figure 2-3.
b. With control unit power turned on, momentarily
ground TP100 to select the setup mode.
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Part No. 001-9750-005
INSTALLATION
(high) state. This is sensed by the microprocessor
which may then initiate such actions as halting scanning or enabling the conventional monitor mode.
c. Install the microphone hanger in a convenient location using the screws for sheet metal or plastic. The
hanger must be connected to chassis ground for
proper operation of functions such as monitoring
and scan. If required, ground the hanger using the
included ground wire.
To prevent this from happening, the transceiver
should be programmed as a remote-mount type by
selecting “Yes” for the “Remote Trunk Mount” parameter on the Main Radio Parameters screen (see Section
4.3.2). The microprocessor then assumes that the
hanger line is always in an on-hook state (low). This is
the only special transceiver programming that is
required to use the remote control unit.
d. Route the control cable from the transceiver to the
control unit and plug it into both.
e. To route speaker audio to the control unit, insert the
two wires on the transceiver end of the control cable
into the slots for pins 1 and 2 of the accessory connector (see Figures 2-2 and 2-3). The order of these
wires is not important.
In dual control applications, the hanger line is
controlled by a microphone, so this parameter should
be programmed “No”. The hanger line is not used in
remote-mount configurations because the microprocessor detects the control unit hanger status from data
on the serial data bus.
NOTE: If the control unit is being used with a frontmount transceiver to provide dual controls, a jumper
must also be connected between pins 1 and 3 of the
accessory connector to route audio to the transceiver
speaker.
2.5.4 USING AN EXTERNAL SPEAKER WITH A
REMOTE CONTROL UNIT
2.6 INSTALLING OPTION SWITCH KEY CAPS
A 12-watt external speaker (such as the one listed
in Table 1-1) can be used in place of the 5-watt
speaker in the control unit. Instead of connecting the
two control cable wires to the accessory connector as
described in step e above, connect the external speaker
to pins 1 and 2 of that connector instead. It is not
recommended that an external speaker be used if an
internal speaker is also being used such as in dual
control applications.
A key cap kit included with each transceiver (see
Table 1-1). This kit includes key caps labeled for each
option that can be programmed and also blank keys for
unused positions.
A key cap removal tool is included with each
transceiver in the cable and hardware kit. This tool is
simply a narrow strip of metal. To remove a key with
this tool, hold it perpendicular to the front panel and
then slide it under the lower side of the key. This
releases the key so that it can be pulled out. To install a
new key cap, simply press it into the opening.
2.5.5 MICROPHONE HANGER SENSE
When the blank front panel is installed on a transceiver, the microphone hanger line goes to an off-hook
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INSTALLATION
2.7 INSTALLING DC NOISE FILTER KIT
The DC Noise Filter Kit is available as a field or
factory installed option as described in Section 1.5.
This kit contains filter choke, Part No. 542-5010-005,
which is installed in the main 13.8-volt line on the PA
board. To install this choke, proceed as follows:
a. Remove both the red and blue power cable leads
from the PC board as shown in Figure 2-5. This provides the needed access to the front of the choke.
b. Prepare the leads of the choke so that they are
approximately 1/8” below the lowest part of the
choke.
c. Install the choke in the PC board holes provided and
solder the leads using a soldering iron with a long,
narrow tip. Removal of the PA board should not be
required.
d. Install the blue and red power cable leads in the
holes shown in Figure 2-5. Make sure that these
wires or the choke leads do not extend too far into
the board because a direct short to the chassis could
result.
Figure 2-5 DC Noise FIlter Installation
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INSTALLATION
2.8 TRANSCEIVER MOUNTING TRAY
INSTALLATION
b. Install lock bracket MP1 using the four self-drilling
screws (HW3) and washers (HW5) included. Make
sure that there is nothing under the mounting location that will be damaged.
2.8.1 DESCRIPTION
Optional Transceiver Locking Tray, Part No. 5857000-185, is a lockable mounting bracket for Summit
DM transceivers and other transceivers that use that
chassis. This bracket provides theft protection and
allows the transceiver to be quickly removed from the
vehicle.
2.8.3 LOCKING AND UNLOCKING
TRANSCEIVER
To insert the transceiver with attached mounting
bracket into the locking bracket, set it over the locking
bracket and push it rearward slightly if necessary so
that it seats. Then pull it forward until it latches.
2.8.2 INSTALLATION
Refer to Figure 2-6 and proceed as follows:
The lock operates in a manner similar to most
glove compartment locks. To release the transceiver,
press the button and at the same time push the transceiver rearward. The key locks the button so that it
cannot be pressed.
a. Install the transceiver in bracket MP2 using the four
10-32 x 1/2” screws (HW2) included. If desired, this
mounting bracket can be used to mount the transceiver directly to the vehicle.
Figure 2-6 Locking Tray Installation Diagram
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Part No. 001-9750-005
OPERATION
SECTION 3 OPERATION
•
•
3.1 FEATURES
NOTE: System operator programming determines the
availability of some of the preceding features.
CONVENTIONAL FEATURES
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
GENERAL FEATURES
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Up to 32-100 systems programmable (the maximum
varies with type and no. of groups)
Each system programmable for Multi-Net, LTR, or
conventional operation
Up to 11 (Multi-Net) or 10 (LTR and conventional)
groups programmable per system
Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) with backlight
Six programmable option switches
System scan
Group scan (except some early versions)
User programmable system and group scan list
Phone mode
Horn or light alert to signal when a call is received
Call indicator
Proceed (clear-to-talk) tone
Emergency switch
Banks of systems programmable
Time-out timer
Five different power levels programmable on each
system
Write-On flash memory for convenient software
updates
Voice encryption available
UD2I universal interface available (later models)
Compatible with Summit control unit
Cloning ability which allows one transceiver to
program another with same information
NOTE: The remote control unit front panel is the same
as the front panel on front mount transceivers.
3.2.1 FRONT PANEL CONTROLS
FRONT PANEL CONTROLS
On-Off/Volume - Pressing this knob turns power on
and off. The vehicle ignition switch may also control
power (see Section 3.6.7). Rotating this control sets
the volume level.
Select Switch - This switch changes the selected
system or group number and is also used at other
times, such as in the Menu Mode, to select parameters
(see Section 3.5).
When it is used to change the selected system or
group, turning it clockwise increases the system or
group number and turning it counterclockwise
decreases the system or group number. Only system/
groups in the current bank can be selected (see Section
3.6.6). After the highest system or group is displayed,
the display wraps around to the lowest system or
group and vice versa. When wrap-around occurs, a
beep sounds.
Busy queuing
Auto-registration
Status message transmission
Unique ID calls to specific mobiles
Transmit inhibit
A bar above the system or group number indicates which is changed by this switch. To switch this
bar between the system and group displays, press the
Select switch. The transceiver can be programmed so
that this bar defaults to either the system or group
LTR FEATURES
•
•
Busy indicator
Tone (CTCSS) and digital Call Guard squelch
Transmit disable on busy
Monitor switch
Repeater talk-around
Priority group sampling
Receive-only channels
3.2 FRONT PANEL CONTROLS AND DISPLAY
MULTI-NET FEATURES
•
•
•
•
•
Transpond
Transmit inhibit
Free system ringback
System search
3-1
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Part No. 001-9750-005
OPERATION
PTT Switch
Optional DTMF
Microphone
Option
Switches (6)
Display
Transmit Indicator
Mic Jack
On-Off/Volume
Select Switch
Speaker
Figure 3-1 Front Panel Controls
Power Jack - Connection point for the 12-volt, negative ground power source.
display. In addition, the return time can be
programmed for 1-15 seconds or infinite. (The return
time is the time that elapses before the bar goes back
to the default position.)
Accessory Jack - Connection point for the ignition
sense line and also accessories such as an external
speaker and horn alert (see Section 2.4).
Option Switches - Up to six option switches can be
individually programmed to control various functions.
The function controlled by a key is indicated by the
key cap. Refer to Section 3.5 for more information on
the option switches.
Remote Control Unit Jack - Connection point for the
remote control unit. The pigtail with this jack is
optional with front mount transceivers.
Transmit Indicator - This red indicator shows when
the transmitter is keyed.
Microphone Jack - Connection point for the microphone or the programming cable when programming
the transceiver (see Section 4).
Speaker - There is a 5-watt, 16-ohm speaker located
behind the grille. If higher power output is desired, an
optional 4-ohm external speaker may be used to
provide up to 12 watts of power. The internal speaker
is disabled when an external speaker is used (see
Sections 2.4.2 and 2.5.4).
DC Power
Jack
Remote Control
Unit Jack
REAR PANEL JACKS AND CONNECTORS
Accessory
Jack
Antenna
Jack
Figure 3-2 Back Panel Jacks And Connectors
Antenna Jack - Type N jack for connecting antenna.
3-2
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OPERATION
3.2.2 DISPLAY
P1/P2 - When a conventional system is selected,
“P1” indicates that a call is being received on a
priority 1 group, and “P2” indicates that a call is
being received on a priority 2 group. Refer to
Section 3.5.17 for more information.
Backlight - The display has a backlight which can be
programmed to automatically turn on with transceiver
power or it can be controlled manually by the BKLHT
option switch or Menu Mode “BACKLIGHT”
parameter (see Section 3.5.5).
Phone
Sys/Grp
MON
Monitor
BUSY
Alphanumeric Display
ON/OF - When the menu mode is selected by the
MENU switch, “ON” indicates that the displayed
parameter is active, and “OF” indicates that it is
inactive.
Encryption Enabled
- Indicates that the function controlled by the
option switch above it is active. For example, this
symbol below the Scan switch indicates that the
scan mode is enabled. Only certain switches
require this indicator.
CALL
System Status Group
Number Display Number
- Indicates that the displayed system/group is
programmed for telephone or special calls.
Figure 3-3 Front Panel Display
- Indicates that encryption is enabled.
System Number - Indicates the currently selected
system number. System numbers up to 99 can be
programmed.
MON - Indicates that the monitor mode has been
enabled by taking the microphone off-hook or pressing
the MON switch (conventional systems only). The
monitor mode disables Call Guard squelch and scanning so that all messages are heard on the channel.
Group Number - Indicates the currently selected
group number. Group numbers up to 11 (Multi- Net)
or 1 (LTR/conventional) can be programmed.
Alphanumeric Display - This 10-character area of the
display indicates the unique identification for the
selected group. For example, “GAS TRUCK” can be
displayed when a certain group is selected. It also
displays telephone numbers in the phone mode and
various error and status messages.
BUSY - Indicates when the selected system/group is
busy (conventional systems only). If this indication
appears but no message is heard and Call Guard
squelch is programmed, a call for someone else was
probably detected.
- Rotating clock-like symbols in both positions
indicate that system scanning is occurring. This is
also indicated during programming.
CALL - Indicates that a call was received while the
user was away from the vehicle. It is turned off by
pressing the Select switch, an option switch, or the
microphone push-to-talk switch, or by turning power
off and then on again. Refer to Section 3.6.2 for more
information.
- This symbol in the left position indicates that
the displayed system is in the scan list. Likewise,
this symbol in the right position indicates that the
displayed group is in the scan list.
“–” - The bars above the system and group digits indicate which display will be changed if the Select switch
is turned. Refer to the Select switch description in the
preceding section for more information.
Status Display - These two characters indicate the
following status information:
- This symbol in the right position indicates that
group scanning is occurring.
3-3
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Part No. 001-9750-005
OPERATION
3.3 OPERATING MODES
are no tones or display messages to indicate busy and
out-of-range conditions.
3.3.1 INTRODUCTION
Monitoring Before Transmitting
Each selectable system can be programmed with
a unique set of transceiver operating parameters. One
of these parameters is the operating mode which can
be Multi-Net, LTR, or conventional. The type or types
of operation programmed is determined by the radio
equipment that is being accessed by that system. The
basic operating differences between these system
types are as follows.
If the Transmit Disable On Busy feature is
programmed (see Section 3.9.1), monitoring is
performed automatically. Otherwise, it is performed as
follows:
•
If not scanning, note if “BUSY” is being displayed.
If it is not, the channel is free and a message can be
transmitted.
•
If scanning, take the microphone off-hook to halt
scanning and enable the monitor mode (indicated by
“MON” in display). The monitor mode (see Section
3.9.3) can also be selected by the MON switch if
available. This mode disables any squelch control
features so that all messages are heard. If no
messages are heard, the channel is free and a
message can be transmitted. If the transceiver is
programmed to not detect an off-hook condition, the
MON switch or the Transmit Disable On Busy
feature must be used to perform monitoring.
3.3.2 MULTI-NET AND LTR MODES
The Multi-Net mode provides the most powerful
operating features. Features available only with MultiNet operation include Busy Queuing, Status Messages,
Auto-Registration, and special calls (see Sections 5.7
and 5.8).
The LTR mode of operation is similar to the
Multi-Net mode. The main difference is that the
preceding features are not available. The features that
are unique to LTR operation are described in Section
3.8. In both the Multi-Net and LTR modes, channel
selection and monitoring before transmitting are
performed automatically by the transceiver. Telephone calls (if available) can be placed almost as
conveniently as with a standard telephone. Busy and
out-of-range conditions are indicated by special tones
and display messages.
3.3.4 MULTI-NET AND LTR SYSTEM/GROUPS
Systems
When the system is programmed for Multi-Net or
LTR operation, information such as home repeater, all
encode and decode ID codes, and call indicator and
horn alert operation is programmed. The ID codes can
be fixed priority, selectable, and block types. The
types of ID codes and the number of ID codes that can
be programmed in each category are as follows. Any
combination of codes can be programmed and all
codes can be different.
3.3.3 CONVENTIONAL MODE
General
Selecting a conventional system selects a specific
radio channel, and selecting a group (if available)
selects the type of squelch control used on that channel
such as carrier or Call Guard tone (CTCSS) or digital
squelch. This selects the specific mobiles or group of
mobiles being called and which calls are received on
that channel.
Decode (Receive)
Encode (Transmit)
Fixed Priority
2 (M-Net & LTR)
Channel selection is performed manually by
selecting a system. Monitoring can be performed automatically or manually (see next paragraph) When it is
performed automatically, a special tone and display
message indicate a busy condition. Otherwise, there
--Selectable
11 (Multi-Net)
10 (LTR)
3-4
11 (Multi-Net)
10 (LTR)
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Part No. 001-9750-005
OPERATION
immediately drops that call and switches to another
repeater to receive the higher priority call.
Block
Up to all 225 (M-Net)
Up to all 250 (LTR)
-----
The priority order of the receive ID codes is as
follows:
Groups
1.Fixed Priority ID Code 1
2.Fixed Priority ID Code 2
3.Selectable ID Codes (with last sel revert prog)
4.Block ID codes
Each group switch position selects one of the
selectable ID codes. Only the selected ID code is
encoded when transmitting because it is not possible to
encode more than one code. Group scan programming
determines how the selectable ID codes are detected.
Without group scan, only the selected ID code is
decoded; with group scan, all selectable codes are
decoded.
For example, if a call is being received on selectable group 4 and a call is detected on priority ID 2, the
call on group 4 is immediately dropped and the transceiver switches to the call on priority ID 2.
The fixed priority and block ID codes are always
decoded regardless of which group is selected or group
scan programming (if the system is selected or
scanned). When a fixed priority ID code is detected,
the selectable groups of that system are checked to see
if any are programmed with the same code. If one is
the same, the number and unique identification of that
group are displayed. If none are programmed with the
priority ID code, “PRIORITY 1” or “PRIORITY 2” is
displayed and the group number does not change.
When a block ID code is detected, the group number
never changes and “BLOCK CALL” is displayed.
If the system is programmed for Multi-Net operation, incoming call information is received on both the
status repeater and the repeater to which a mobile is
trunked (refer to Section 5.6). Therefore, a priority call
is not missed even if a mobile is not using its home
repeater. With LTR operation, call information is
received on only the home repeater. Therefore, priority
calls are not detected while trunked to some other
repeater. Other times when priority calls could be
missed with both types of systems are when some
other system not programmed with the priority ID is
being monitored and while transmitting.
The Scan Resume Delay described in Section
3.4.3 determines how long the priority or block group
is displayed after the call ends. In addition, if a priority
call is received on a selectable group, the “Scan Revert
Mode” programming described in Sections 3.4.4 and
3.4.5 determines if a response occurs on the displayed,
last selected, or fixed group. With block calls and
priority calls not on a selectable group, a response can
be made by manually selecting a system/group
programmed for that purpose.
With Multi-Net operation, certain types of special
calls may also interrupt standard or other special calls.
Table 3-1 shows which Multi-Net calls can interrupt
another type. Multi-Net operation also has an access
priority which is discussed in Section 5.8.2.
Standard Calls
Standard calls are between mobiles or groups of
mobiles assigned to the same home repeater. They use
the standard group ID codes from 1-225 as described
in Section 5.7 (1-250 with LTR calls). A standard call
is placed by simply selecting a group programmed
with the desired group ID and then pressing the PTT
switch. No number is dialed using a keypad as with
special calls. To receive a standard call, the mobile
must be programmed to decode the group ID code
being transmitted. With all Multi-Net calls, unique ID
code information is also transmitted by the originating
mobile. However, it is not decoded when receiving a
standard call.
Receive Priority ID Codes
The fixed, selectable, and block ID codes have a
priority order so that an incoming call with a higher
priority ID code can interrupt a lower priority call in
progress. One use of receive priority is to allow a
dispatcher to interrupt calls in progress with an important “all call” message. If the transceiver detects a call
with a higher priority ID than the one it is receiving, it
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Part No. 001-9750-005
OPERATION
Table 3-1 Multi-Net Standard And Special Call Receive Priority
Interrupting Call
Call in Progress
Standard InterconInterroAuxiliary
Group
nect
gate
Kill
Reassign
Emergency
All Call
Standard Group
[1]
[1]
[1]
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Interconnect
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Auxiliary
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Interrogate
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Kill
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Reassignment
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Emergency
No
No
No
No
No
No
--Yes
All Call
No
No
No
No
No
No
[2]
-[1] With these calls, the priority order is determined by the type of ID code as described in Section 3.3.4.
[2] Since the “All Call” call goes out on all system repeaters, the emergency call is not sent until that call is
finished.
3.4 SCAN (SYSTEM AND GROUP)
While scanning is occurring (rotating symbols in
the status display), the display always indicates the
system/group on which a transmission would occur.
However, when a call is received, the display changes
to the system/group of the call and this may not be
where a transmission occurs (see Section 3.5.21).
When the delay period expires (see Section 3.4.3), the
system/group on which transmissions occur is again
displayed.
3.4.1 INTRODUCTION
The system scan feature monitors the
programmed systems of the current bank. When a
message is detected that the transceiver is programmed
to receive, scanning stops and the message is received.
Shortly after the message is complete, scanning
resumes.
System scanning is turned on and off by the
SCAN option switch (see Section 3.5.19). When
system scanning is enabled by an option switch, a
triangle ( ∆ ) is indicated in the display below the
switch. The microphone must also be on-hook for
scanning to occur (unless off-hook detection has been
disabled by programming). When system scanning is
actually occurring, either “SNGLE SCAN” (singlesite) or “MULTI SCAN” (multi-site) is indicated in the
alphanumeric display (see next section). In addition,
two rotating symbols are present in the status display
between the system and group numbers as described in
Section 3.2.
3.4.2 MULTIPLE- AND SINGLE-SITE SCAN
Scanning is sequential through the programmed
systems in the current bank unless they have been
deleted from the scan list or single-site scan is used.
The selected system and group can be changed while
scanning using the Select switch in the normal manner.
Scanning temporarily halts while the change is being
made.
Single-Site Scan - Calls are detected on only systems
in the current bank that are programmed with the site
number of the revert system. For example, if System 2
was displayed when scanning was turned on, only
systems programmed with the System 2 site number
are scanned. For more information on sites, refer to
Sections 4.4.4 and 5.4.
Each bank can be programmed for either MultiSite or Single-Site scan. This can also be selected by
the user if the Menu Mode “SCAN SELCT” parameter
is available (see Section 3.5.21). The type of scanning
currently selected is indicated by “SNGLE SCAN” or
“MULTI SCAN” in the alphanumeric display when
scanning is occurring. The single-site type should be
used when only Multi-Net systems programmed with
the same site number are to be scanned. Otherwise, the
multiple-site type should be used. These types of scan
operate as follows:
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Receive Delay
If LTR or conventional systems are also
programmed, they are skipped in the scan sequence
because only Multi-Net systems are scanned. If an
attempt is made to enter scanning on with an LTR or
conventional system displayed, scanning can be
selected only if Multi-Net auto-registration is enabled.
Auto-registration then occurs and scanning begins on
that site. If auto-registration is not programmed, an
error tone sounds, “NOT MULTI” is displayed, and
the scan mode is not entered.
When a message is received while scanning, there
is a programmable delay of 0-7 seconds before scanning resumes (if it has not been disabled, such as by
taking the microphone off-hook). This delay is called
Receive Delay Time and it prevents another message
from being received before a response can be made.
This delay is also in effect if a front panel control is
changed while scanning such as to select another
system/group. This timer is reset if another call is
received.
The single-site type of scanning is very efficient
because only the status repeater of the site is monitored which means that no waiting is required to
change channels. The data from the status repeater is
checked against the home repeater/group ID codes of
all selectable systems programmed with that site
number. If there is a match, the transceiver switches to
the appropriate repeater and receives the call.
Transmit Delay
The Receive Delay Time controls the scan delay
until the transmitter is keyed and then the Call Delay
Time controls the delay. This time is also programmable for 0-7 seconds and it ensures that a response to
your message is heard instead of some other message
occurring on another system/group. The Call Delay
Timer remains active for the remainder of the conversation and controls when normal scanning resumes
even if additional responses are received.
If no traffic is detected on the status channel for a
period of time, the transceiver begins scanning the
home repeaters of all systems programmed with the
site number being scanned. This ensures that scanning
occurs even if the status repeater is not on the air. The
status channel also continues to be scanned, and
normal scanning of the status channel resumes when
messages are again detected. When home repeaters are
scanned, data messages are decoded for only as long
as necessary to detect all calls on that repeater.
Scan Continue Timer
There is also a scan continue timer that can be
programmed. This timer controls the maximum time
that a call is received before scanning resumes. This
prevents scanning from being delayed for long periods
by lengthy calls. This time can be programmed for 060 seconds in 1-second increments. If “0” is
programmed, there is no time limit and the entire
message is always received.
Multiple-Site Scan - This type of scan is programmed
when more than one site is scanned or if LTR or
conventional systems are to be scanned. The status
channels of Multi-Net systems are scanned as are the
home repeater of LTR systems and the channels of
conventional systems. As with Single-Site Scan, if the
status channel of a particular Multi-Net site is not in
service, the home channels are scanned until messages
are again detected on that status channel. All system/
groups in the current bank (see Section 3.6.6) are
scanned unless they are deleted from the scan list.
3.4.4 TRANSMITTING IN THE SCAN MODE
NOTE: If Auto-Registration is used, the revert system
may change automatically. Refer to Section 3.7.2 for
more information.
Programming of the “Scan Revert Mode” radio
parameter determines the system/group on which
transmissions occur in the scan mode. In addition, if
this programming causes the selected system/group to
change, it affects the system/group that is selected
when the scan mode is exited by pressing the Scan
switch. An exception when it does not control the
transmit system/group is if the bank is programmed
3.4.3 SCAN RESUME DELAY
NOTE: The following timers are also used is some circumstances when not scanning, such as when priority
or block calls are received as described in Section
3.3.4.
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3.4.6 SCAN LIST PROGRAMMING
with a fixed transmit system/group as described in
Section 3.4.5. The three programmable configurations
are as follows:
Systems and groups can be added to or deleted
from the scan list if the transceiver is equipped with an
A/D (add/delete) option switch. The bar above the
system or group indicates which will change when the
A/D switch is pressed. To switch this bar between the
system and group displays, press the Select switch.
Last Selected System/Group - Transmissions always
occur on the system/group that was last selected by the
Select switch. To respond to a call not on the selected
system/group, the scan mode must be exited by
pressing the scan switch. If this is done before scanning resumes, the system/group of the call becomes
the selected system/group and it is not necessary to
change it manually. The system/group of the call is
displayed until the microphone is taken off-hook, the
PTT switch is pressed, or the scan delay expires.
The scan list status of a system or group is indicated in the status display. An
next to the system
number indicates that the displayed system is in the
scan list and scanned normally. Likewise, an next to
the group number indicates that the displayed group is
in the scan list. When scanning is occurring, the scan
list status is not indicated because the rotating scanning
indicators are displayed.
Last Received - The selected system/group changes to
the system/group of a call. Therefore, the user can
always respond to a call without having to manually
change the system/group.
The selected group is always scanned, even if it is
deleted. Therefore, if all systems or groups are deleted,
the selected group is still scanned. Systems and groups
can be deleted from the scan list while listening to a
message on the system or group by pressing the A/D
key in the normal manner. Scanning resumes shortly
after the system or group is deleted. Deleting a system
only temporarily deletes the groups associated with that
system. Therefore, when a system is added back into
the scan list, the original group scan list is again active.
Temporary Last Received - The system/group
changes to the system/group of a call for only the
duration of the scan resume delay period described in
Section 3.4.3. Then when the delay expires, the
selected system/group is again displayed. Therefore, a
response to a call can be made without changing the
selected system/group if it occurs before scanning
resumes.
The transceiver can be programmed to either save
or not save changes to the scan list. This programming
can be done by the system operator or by the user if the
Menu Mode “SCAN SAV” parameter is selectable.
Changes are saved when “ON” is selected, and not
saved when “OFF” is selected. Therefore, to store a list
with the menu mode, select “ON”, program the list,
then select “OFF”. When power is cycled, the scan list
then returns to the status the existed when “OFF” was
selected. If the menu parameter is not selectable, the
scan list returns to the last selected status if “ON” is
programmed, and to the dealer programmed default
state if “OFF” is programmed.
NOTE: If a transmit request is received from a data
device, the preceding programming is overridden (see
Section 3.6.11).
3.4.5 FIXED TRANSMIT IN SCAN MODE
If a system and group are entered for the “Fixed
System/Group Transmit During Scan” bank parameter,
this programming may take precedence over the “Scan
Revert Mode” programming described in the preceding
section. If the transmitter then is keyed while scanning
is occurring (rotating status display), transmissions
occur on the programmed fixed system/group. In addition, it becomes the selected system/group. Since taking
the microphone off-hook halts scanning unless off-hook
detection is disabled, the transmitter must usually be
keyed with the microphone on-hook. If the transmitter
is keyed with scanning halted or when no system/group
is programmed for this parameter, the programming
described in the preceding section takes precedence.
3.4.7 GROUP SCAN
Each system can be programmed for Group Scan
using the programming software. There is no switch for
selecting this feature. Group scanning occurs whenever
a system programmed for group scan is selected or
scanned with the microphone on-hook (the scan mode
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Table 3-2 Menu Mode And Option Switch Functions
FUNCTION
A/D (Scn List Prg)
Auto-Registration
Auxiliary 1
Auxiliary 2
Backlight
Bank Select
Call Guard Disable
Emergency
Encryption
Ext PA (Mic audio)
Ext PA (Rx audio)
Home Sys/Grp
Horn/Light Alert
MENU OPTION SWITCH
ITEM SWITCH LABEL
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
A/D
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
AUX 1
AUX 2
BKLHT
BANK
CG
EMER
ENCPT
PA-MC
PA-RX
HOME
HORN
FUNCTION
MENU OPTION SWITCH
ITEM SWITCH LABEL
LTR System Search
Menu Mode Select
Monitor
Phone Mode Select
Priority
Radio Tones
Scan On/Off
Scan List Save
Scan Type
Siren (see Aux 1/2)
Status Select
Talk-Around
Viewing Angle Adj
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
MENU
MON
PHONE
PRI
X
SCAN
X
X
X
SIREN
STAT
TA
X
X
X
X
X
are received regardless of which group is selected or
group scan programming (if the system is selected or
scanned).
does not need to be selected). If off-hook detection is
disabled by programming, group scanning is always
enabled if it is programmed. Group scanning is indicated when all the segments of the status display adjacent to the group number are on. There is no group
scan indicator when system scanning because rotating
symbols appear in both locations of the status display.
Conventional Systems
Group scan programming also determines
whether calls are received on all groups or only the
last selected group of conventional systems. Call
Guard squelch is detected on the selectable groups of
conventional systems if the monitor mode is not
enabled (see Section 3.9.3). If the monitor mode is
enabled, all calls occurring on a system (channel) are
received.
When group scan is occurring, calls are received
on all selectable groups of a system regardless of which
is selected. In addition, the display automatically
changes to the group on which a call is received.
Without group scan, calls are received on only the last
selected group of each system. The group scan list can
be programmed as described in the preceding section.
In addition, the scan resume delay information
described in Section 3.4.3 also applies to group
scanning.
Priority groups can also be sampled when scanning conventional systems. This feature ensures that
important calls on the priority group or groups are not
missed while listening to calls on non-priority groups.
See Section 3.5.17 for more information.
3.4.8 SCANNING THE VARIOUS TYPES OF
SYSTEMS
3.5 OPTION SWITCH AND MENU MODE
FUNCTIONS
Scanning Multi-Net and LTR Systems
3.5.1 INTRODUCTION
Group scan programming described in the
preceding section controls whether all groups or only
the last selected group of Multi-Net and LTR systems
are scanned. If fixed priority or block ID codes (see
Section 3.3.4) or Multi-Net ID codes 236 or 237 (see
Table 4-2) are programmed, calls on those ID codes
This transceiver can be equipped with up to six
option switches. The functions which can be
controlled by these switches are indicated in Table 3-2
by an “X” in the “OPTION SWITCH” column.
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If the transceiver is equipped with a MENU
option switch, the Menu Mode can also be selected to
control various functions. The functions that can be
controlled by the Menu Mode are indicated in
Table 3-2 by an “X” in the “MENU ITEM” column.
which is changed. To move this bar between the
system and group, press the Select switch. An asterisk
in the status display next to the system or group
indicates that it is in the scan list. Refer to Section
3.4.6 for more information.
System operator programming controls which
functions are displayed in the Menu Mode and also
which option switches are available. Therefore, a function can be fixed by system operator programming by
disabling that menu item, programming the default
condition, and not programming an option switch to
control it. Refer to Section 3.6.5 for more information
on creating a radio profile. If a function is assigned to
an option switch, it is not available as a menu item.
3.5.3 AUTO-REGISTRATION
This Menu mode feature is indicated by “MN
AUTOREG”, and it is used to turn Multi-Net autoregistration on and off (see Section 3.7.2).
3.5.4 AUXILIARY 1 AND 2
Up to two auxiliary functions can be turned on
and off by the Menu Mode “AUX 1” and “AUX 2”
parameters or the AUX 1 and AUX 2 option switches.
(There is also a SIREN key cap that can be used for
these switches.) When a switch is used, the on condition is indicated by a triangle in the display under the
switch. The output lines for these functions come from
optional universal interface connector J601. Auxiliary
1 is pin 14 (AUX 1), and Auxiliary 2 is pin 16
(OUTPUT B). These outputs are active high. Refer to
Section 4.7 for programming information.
If a call is received or transmitted while in the
Menu Mode, the Menu Mode is exited and any
changes are saved. The menu mode is selected as
follows. The Menu Mode and option switch functions
are described in the following sections.
Selecting The Menu Mode
a. Press the MENU switch to select the Menu Mode.
Then turn the Select switch to select the parameter
to be modified.
An appropriate driver circuit is required to utilize
these outputs. Maximum source current of AUX 1 is
50 mA and the output voltage is 8 VDC ±10%.
OUTPUT B is a TTL output that can provide approximately 10 mA of drive current.
b. If the parameter has only on/off choices, the current
status is shown as “ON” or “OF” in the status display (located between the system and group numbers). To change the status, press the Select switch.
3.5.5 BACKLIGHT
c. If the parameter has several choices, the current status is displayed by pressing the Select switch and
changed by rotating the switch.
The Menu Mode “BACKLIGHT” parameter or
the BKLHT option switch can be used to turn the
display backlight on and off. This light allows the
display and option keys to be seen in low-light conditions. If this feature is not controlled by the Menu
mode or option switch, it is usually programmed
“Enabled” so that it turns on with transceiver power.
d. The Menu mode is exited and the changes saved by
pressing the MENU switch or if a call is received or
the transmitter keyed. Changes are automatically
saved and the Menu mode exited 2 seconds after
changing a parameter or 10 seconds after no
activity.
3.5.6 BANK SELECT
3.5.2 A/D (SCAN LIST PROGRAMMING)
If banks of systems have been programmed, the
Menu Mode “BANK SELCT” parameter or the
BANK option key is used to enable the bank select
mode. The Select switch is then turned to move to the
desired bank and then pressed to select that bank.
Refer to Section 3.6.6 for more information.
The A/D option switch is used to add system/
groups to or delete them from the scan list. Pressing
this switch changes the status of either the displayed
system or group. The bar above the number indicates
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OPERATION
3.5.7 CALL GUARD SQUELCH DISABLE
HOME option switch. This function can also be used
in the scan mode (scanning halts for the length of the
receive scan delay).
The CG option switch is used to disable both
transmit and receive Call Guard squelch on the
selected conventional system/group (if it has been
programmed). It does not affect Call Guard squelch
operation on other system/groups. The disable mode is
indicated by a triangle in the display under the switch.
See Section 3.6.2 for more information.
3.5.12 HORN/LIGHT ALERT
An external alert such as the vehicle's horn or
lights can be used to signal a call. The Menu Mode
“HORN/LIGHT” parameter or the HORN option
switch can be used to turn this alert on or off. The on
condition of the switch is indicated by a triangle in the
display under the switch. See the Horn Alert description in Section 3.6.4 for more information.
3.5.8 EMERGENCY
This switch is normally the switch on the left side
of the display. It can also be an external type such as a
foot-operated switch. The Emergency switch is
pressed to transmit a high priority message. Refer to
Section 3.6.8 for more information.
3.5.13 LTR SYSTEM SEARCH SELECT
The Menu Mode “LTR SEARCH” parameter
enables or disables the LTR system search feature
(refer to Section 3.5.13). If it is enabled, the transceiver automatically searches for an in-range system
whenever an out-of-range condition occurs when
making an LTR telephone call.
3.5.9 ENCRYPTION
The ENCYPT option switch or “ENCRYPTION”
Menu Mode parameter allows the user to override the
system operator programming on the group. The
triangle/circle symbol indicates when encryption is
enabled. Refer to Section 3.6.12 for more
information.
3.5.14 MENU SELECT SWITCH
The MENU option switch selects the Menu mode
described in Section 3.5.
3.5.10 EXTERNAL PA
If the vehicle is equipped with a public address
system, this feature allows the transceiver microphone
to be used to speak over that system. Either the Menu
Mode “EXTERNL PA” or the PA-MC option switch
can be used to activate this feature. When this feature
is active, the transmitter is disabled and the alphanumeric display indicates “MIC TO PA”. The PA output
is pin 7 of the accessory cable (see Section 2.4.5).
3.5.15 MONITOR MODE SELECT SWITCH
The MON option switch is used to select the
monitor mode described in Section 3.9.3.
3.5.16 PHONE MODE SELECT
The receive audio signal can also be heard on the
public address system (as well as from the regular
speaker). Either the Menu Mode “EXTERNL PA”
parameter or the PA-RX option switch can be used to
activate this feature. The alphanumeric display indicates “RCV AUD PA” when this feature is active. The
output for this function is also pin 7 of the accessory
cable.
The PHONE option switch or “TELEPHONE”
menu parameter is used to select the phone mode
which is used to place telephone calls. Refer to Section
3.6.13 for more information on this mode.
3.5.17 PRIORITY
The PRI option switch or Menu Mode
“PRIORITY” parameter enables or disables priority
group sampling on conventional systems if priority
groups are programmed. Refer to Section 3.5.17 for
more information.
3.5.11 HOME SYSTEM/GROUP
Each bank can be programmed with a “home”
system/group that can be selected by pressing the
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OPERATION
3.5.18 RADIO SOUNDS
that condition. Refer to Section 3.7.3 for more information.
The Menu Mode “RADIO SNDS” parameter
selects the tones that are heard when switches are
pressed or busy or out-of-range conditions exist. If this
menu item is not enabled, the tones that sound are
fixed by system operator programming. The four
available conditions are as follows:
3.5.23 TALK-AROUND
The Menu Mode “TALKAROUND” parameter
or TA option switch is used to turn talk-around on and
off on conventional groups. Refer to Section 3.9.4 for
more information.
Silent - No tones at all sound.
Key Beeps Only- Only the option switch and
Select switch beeps sound.
Alert Tones Only - The proceed, busy, and intercept tones sound, but not the key beeps.
All Tones - All tones sound.
3.5.24 VIEWING ANGLE
The Menu Mode “VIEW ADJ” parameter sets the
viewing angle of the display. This provides optimal
intensity when the Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) is
viewed from the selected viewing angle. If you have
trouble viewing information in the display, especially
in low-light conditions, try changing this parameter.
3.5.19 SCAN ON/OFF
The SCAN option switch can be used to turn the
system scan feature on and off (see Section 3.4). The
on condition is indicated by a triangle under the
switch. Without this switch, scanning is not available.
Viewing angles represented by 0-15 can be
selected. “0” = -45° and “15” = +45° . Note that when
toggling from “15” to “0”, the display may appear to
indicate all 8's. However, this is not what is actually
being displayed because the correct information is
indicated when it is viewed from -45° .
3.5.20 SCAN LIST SAVE
The Menu Mode “SCAN SAV” parameter selects
if changes to the scan list are saved when power is
turned off. If “ON” is selected they are saved, and if
“OF” is programmed they are not saved. Refer to
Section 3.4.6 for more information.
3.6 GENERAL FEATURES
3.6.1 TIME-OUT TIMER
The Time-Out Timer automatically disables the
transmitter if it is keyed continuously for longer than
the programmed time. It is programmable using the
programming software for 0.5-5 minutes in halfminute increments. It can also be disabled by programming “disabled”. When the timer times out, the transmitter is automatically disabled, the intercept tone
sounds, and “TX TIMEOUT” is displayed. Five
seconds before time-out occurs, a warning beep
sounds. The timer is reset by releasing the PTT switch.
This feature prevents a channel from being kept
continuously busy by an accidentally keyed transmitter. It also prevents possible transmitter damage
caused by transmitting for extended periods.
3.5.21 SCAN TYPE
The Menu Mode “SCAN SELCT” parameter
selects the type of system scanning that occurs when it
is enabled by the SCAN switch. Either “MULTI SITE”
or “SNGLE SITE” can be selected. The type of scanning is indicated in the alphanumeric display when
scanning is occurring. Refer to Section 3.4.2 for more
information.
3.5.22 STATUS SELECT
The Menu Mode “STATUS” parameter or STAT
option switch is used to display or change the status
message that is being transmitted each time the transmitter is keyed with a Multi-Net system selected. Up
to eight status messages may be programmed by the
programming software. The Select switch is rotated to
choose the desired condition and then pressed to select
3.6.2 CALL INDICATOR
The call indicator is the word “CALL” in the
display. The purpose of this indicator is to show when
a call is received while the user was away from the
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OPERATION
individually enabled or disabled on each dispatch
group (a fixed delay of approximately 500 ms occurs
with interconnect and auxiliary calls). This feature can
be used to delay speaking with calls which have a
longer setup time. This delay is available only with
transceiver software, Version 222 or later, and
programming software, Version 206 or later.
vehicle. To turn this indicator off, change any front
panel control, take the microphone off-hook, press the
PTT switch, or turn power off and then on again. The
call indicator operates in both the scan and non-scan
modes. It is disabled during the scan delay periods
described in Section 3.4.3.
With Multi-Net and LTR operation, the call indicator can be programmed to activate on specific fixed
priority and selectable ID codes. It does not activate
when calls are received on block ID codes. With
conventional operation, the call indicator can be
programmed to activate on each group. If a group is
programmed for carrier squelch or if the monitor
mode is enabled, it turns on when a carrier is detected.
If Call Guard squelch is used, it turns on when the
Call Guard tone or code is detected.
3.6.4 HORN/LIGHT ALERT
General
This feature activates an external alert such as the
vehicle's horn or lights when calls are received on
groups or priority ID codes programmed for this
feature. When enabled as described in this section, the
alert turns on for 0.5 second and off for 0.5 second for
three cycles (3 seconds). It then goes back to the
disabled state. Installation is described in Section 2.4.4.
3.6.3 PROCEED (CLEAR-TO-TALK) TONE
NOTE: In early 1996, a new version of transceiver
software began shipping that allows two modes of
horn alert operation to be programmed. New programming software is also required to program the
additional mode. The transceiver software is Version
213 or later (see Appendix A), and the programming
software is Version 204 or later (see Section 4.1.5).
Another change occurred with Version 214 software to
make Mode A totally manual (Mode A-1 described
below is then no longer available).
This is a short tone that sounds when the PTT
switch is pressed. It indicates that the radio system has
been successfully accessed (data handshake
completed) and speaking can begin. It is available on
LTR and Multi-Net systems without any special
programming and can be enabled or disabled on
conventional systems. This and other tones can also be
enabled or disabled by the Radio Sounds parameter
described in Section 3.5.18.
When making any type of Multi-Net or LTR call,
if the busy tone sounds and “SYSTEM BSY” is
displayed when the PTT switch is pressed, the system
is busy. If the PTT switch is held down, the system is
accessed and the proceed tone sounds when it is available. If an out-of-range or some other error condition
exists, the intercept tone sounds and the error condition is displayed.
Operation in Mode A and B
Horn alert operation of earlier models (versions
prior to 213) is always Mode A-1. The revised transceiver software and programming software are
required to program Mode B.
A power-off delay can be programmed to occur
when power is turned off by the ignition switch (see
Section 3.6.7). If the ignition switch does not control
power, only the front panel power switch affects operation in the following modes. Once transceiver power
is turned off by the power or ignition switch or turnoff delay, the horn alert is no longer functional.
If the proceed tone has been programmed on
conventional systems, it does not sound if the channel
is busy, but does sound even if an out-of-range condition exists. This occurs because there is no handshake
that can be used to detect this condition. The channel
should still be monitored manually because the transmitter always keys when the PTT switch is pressed
(unless the Transmit Disable On Busy feature is being
used).
Mode A-1 (Automatic Off/Manual On)
(Transceiver Software Version 213 and earlier)
With later models, a proceed tone delay of 125 1875 ms can be programmed on each system and then
Ignition Switch - The horn alert always turns off when
the ignition switch is turned on (with the power switch
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OPERATION
on) but does not automatically turn back on again
when the ignition switch is turned off. Therefore, it
must be manually turned on after starting the vehicle.
Mode A2 - If the horn alert is to be always enabled
when transceiver power is on, this mode could be
used.
Power Switch - The current horn alert mode does not
change when power is turned on and off using the
front panel power switch.
Mode B - This mode could be used if the ignition
switch controls power. The horn alert is then always
disabled when the ignition switch is on and enabled
during the turn-off delay. However, if the ignition
switch does not control power, it cannot be used
because the horn alert turns off the first time power is
turned on and there is no way to turn it back on.
Mode A-2 (Manual On and Off)
(Transceiver Software Version 214 and later)
The current horn alert mode does not change
when power is turned on and off by either the power or
ignition switch.
3.6.5 PROFILE
Mode B (Automatic Off and On)
(Transceiver Software Version 213 and later)
When programming the menu described in
Section 3.5, a default setting for most items can also
be selected. This default setting can establish the
power-on profile of the transceiver. For example, the
backlight could be on when power is turned on.
Ignition Switch - The horn alert is always off when the
ignition switch is turned on, and always turns on when
the ignition switch is turned off (if there is a power-off
delay programmed).
However, if an item can be changed by the user in
the Menu Mode or by an option switch, it returns to
the condition that was last selected by the user. Therefore, the default setting is fixed only if the parameter is
not controlled by the Menu Mode or an option switch.
The functions that can be programmed in the profile
are as follows. If a function is not programmable, it
returns to the last selected state or the state it was in
when power was turned off.
Power Switch - The horn alert is always off when the
power switch is turned on.
Option Switch and Menu Mode Control
The HORN option switch or Menu Mode
“HORN/LIGHT” parameter (see Section 3.5.12) can
be used to change the current condition. However, the
automatic operation described in the preceding modes
overrides an on or off condition that may have been
selected by the switch or menu parameter.
Auto-Registration
Auxiliary 1 and 2
Backlight Control
Bank Select
Encryption
External PA
LTR System Search
Permanently Enabling Horn Alert
The profile programming for the horn alert in the
Menu screen (see next section) is in effect only until
the first time it is manually or automatically changed.
If neither an option switch or menu parameter is
programmed and the default is set to “disabled”,
operation is as follows:
Priority
Radio Sounds
Scan List Save
Scan Type Select
Talk-around
Status
View Angle Adjust
3.6.6 BANKS
Banks of systems can be programmed to allow
the transceiver to operate with different radio personalities. For example, one bank could be programmed
for operation in Chicago and another for operation in
St. Louis. Each bank can contain any of the systems
that have been programmed, and they can be
numbered differently. Only the systems in the
currently selected bank can be selected or scanned.
Mode A1 - If the ignition switch controls power, this
mode cannot be used because the horn alert automatically turns off the first time the ignition switch is
turned on and there is then no way to turn it back on. If
the ignition switch does not control power, the horn
alert is always enabled when transceiver power is on.
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OPERATION
The general operation of Emergency Calls is
described in Section 5.8.11. The two basic operating
modes of the emergency switch are Manual Transmit
and Automatic Transmit. Multi-Net systems can be
programmed for either type; LTR and conventional
systems can be programmed for the manual type only.
To initiate changing from one bank to another, the
BANK option switch or Menu mode “BANK SELCT”
parameter is used. The Select switch is then turned to
move to the desired bank and pressed to select that
bank. The current bank is identified by the unique
identification which temporarily appears in the alphanumeric display when the switch is pressed or the
menu parameter selected. For example, “CHICAGO”
and “ST LOUIS” could be displayed to identify the
banks used for those cities.
When the Emergency switch is pressed, “EMERGENCY” and the group identification are alternately
displayed (unless the display of this message has been
disabled by programming). The transceiver then looks
at the emergency call information programmed in the
currently selected system (or revert system if system
scanning). If there is no emergency information
programmed in that system, it looks at the default
emergency information programmed for that bank. It
then switches to the specified emergency system/
group. Operation from this point is controlled by
Manual/Automatic programming. Operation in those
modes is as follows:
Each bank can be programmed so that either the
last selected or home system/group is displayed when
the bank is selected or power is turned on. To have this
feature, transceiver software Version 216 or later and
programming software Version 205 or later are
required. With earlier versions, the last selected
system/group is always displayed.
3.6.7 POWER TURN-OFF DELAY
Manual Transmit
The transceiver can be programmed so that the
vehicle ignition switch as well as the front-panel power
switch controls transceiver power. With transceiver
operating software Version 205 or earlier (see
Appendix A), turn-off delays of Immediate, 10, 20, 30,
60, 120, or 240 minutes or Forever (no turn off) can be
programmed. With Version 206 or later, delays of
Immediate, 10 or 30 minutes, 1, 8, 10, or 12 hours or
Forever can be programmed. The delay can be canceled
at any time by turning power off using the front-panel
switch or turning the ignition switch back on.
Automatic transmissions do not occur in the
manual mode. However, this mode minimizes, as
much as possible, the chance that the system will be
busy when a call is placed. The transceiver locks on
the emergency system/group (other system/groups
cannot be selected), scanning is disabled, and all transmissions occur at access priority 1 (except on LTR and
conventional systems which do not use access
priority). The only calls received are those occurring
on the emergency system/group or “all calls”. Calls on
the selectable, fixed priority, and block ID codes of
that system are not received.
A delay allows features such as the horn alert and
call indicator to remain active for the programmed
delay time after the ignition switch is turned off. At the
same time, advantages of ignition switch control can
be utilized such as preventing battery discharge that
may result if the transceiver is accidentally left on.
Other mobiles may also join in the conversation,
either by selecting the emergency mode or selecting
that system/group. In this case, all rules of normal
transmission and reception apply. To exit the emergency mode and resume normal transceiver operation
after the emergency call is completed, transceiver
power is turned off and then on again.
3.6.8 EMERGENCY CALLS
Introduction
Automatic Transmit
The EMER (emergency) option switch is used to
manually or automatically place a high-priority call.
When this switch is programmed, it is the switch on
the left side of the display because that switch is
designed to make it less likely to be pressed accidentally. An external switch, such as a foot-actuated type,
can also be used (see Section 2.4.6).
When the Emergency switch is activated with
Automatic Transmit programmed, system and group
selection and scanning are disabled and the transceiver
begins automatically transmitting the Emergency Alert
call. This call is transmitted on the programmed emer-
3-15
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OPERATION
If temperature continues to increase at the 2-watt
level to the point where more serious damage could
occur (this should seldom happen), the transmitter is
disabled, a warning tone sounds, and “NO POWER” is
displayed. The transmitter remains disabled until
temperature decreases to the first temperature limit.
Power output is then produced at the 2-watt level. The
temperature limits are fixed in hardware.
gency system/group every 10 seconds using access
priority 1.
When the emergency call is received by the
dispatcher, a warning tone sounds and the mobile's
unique ID and other information is displayed on the
console. The dispatcher then acknowledges the call by
transmitting an Emergency Answer call. When this
call is detected by the mobile, it halts automatic transmissions. However, system and group selection and
scanning remain disabled until the emergency call
sequence ends. In addition, any further transmissions
occur at the access priority programmed for the group
selected by the emergency switch.
3.6.11 DATA SYSTEM/GROUPS
When digital equipment such as a mobile data
terminal is connected to the transceiver, the transceiver
can be programmed so that data transmissions occur
on a data system/group. Data transmissions can be
enabled or disabled on each Multi-Net, LTR, and
conventional group by programming.
The emergency call sequence ends and normal
transceiver operation resumes when the dispatcher
transmits an Emergency Termination call or transceiver power is turned off and then on again. If the
push-to-talk switch is pressed before the Emergency
Acknowledge call is received, the Emergency Alert
transmissions continue only until the push-to-talk
switch is released.
If the selected system/group is not programmed
for data transmissions, the first data group in the
current system is selected. If there is no data group
programmed in the current system, the bank data
system/group is selected. If there is no data system/
group programmed in the current bank, “NO DAT
GRP” is displayed, an error tone sounds, and the original system/group continues to be displayed. Data
transmissions are initiated by a signal on pin 1 of
Universal Interface connector J601.
3.6.9 PROGRAMMABLE POWER OUTPUT
One of five power output levels can be
programmed for each Multi-Net, LTR, and conventional system. The actual power output at each level is
set in the test mode (see Section 3.11). For example,
the power output could be programmed as follows:
3.6.12 ENCRYPTION
1 = Rated Power
2 = 25 watts
3 = 20 watts
4 = 15 watts
2W = 2 watts
NOTE: Encryption is not compatible with companding; therefore, those features cannot be used together.
As described in Section 1.5, voice encryption
provides protection from casual eavesdropping and
analog scanners. Each Multi-Net, LTR, or conventional group can be individually programmed by the
system operator for encryption. Then when one of
those groups is selected, encryption is automatically
enabled or disabled.
3.6.10 AUTOMATIC TRANSMITTER THERMAL
FOLDBACK
The temperature of the power amplifier is monitored by the control logic when transmitting. If a
temperature is detected that could damage the power
amplifier module or other devices, power is automatically cut back to the 2-watt level (no message is
displayed). After sufficient cooling occurs, power
output returns to the full output level. This provides
hysteresis so that power is not cut back again after
only a short transmission.
Encryption can also be manually enabled or
disabled by the ENCPT option switch or the Menu
Mode “ENCRYPTION” parameter. This allows the
user to override the group encryption programming if
desired. Selecting another system or group causes this
feature to revert to the dealer programmed state for
that group. When encryption is enabled on the selected
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Part No. 001-9750-005
OPERATION
The identification could include, for example, up to
ten digits of the number being dialed or the name of
the person or place being called.
group (by dealer programming or the user), the circle/
triangle symbol shown in Figure 3-3 is displayed.
If the transceiver has Version 206 or earlier software (see Appendix A), encryption must be enabled to
transmit or receive an encrypted call. With Version
207 or later software, the transceiver can be
programmed so that encrypted calls are received even
if encryption is not enabled (encryption must be
enabled only to transmit an encrypted call). To have
this operation, the encryption parameter on the “Main
Radio Parameters” screen must be programmed “Yes”.
The outputs which control encryption are J601, pin 15
of the universal interface cable and wire-out 7
(Output A).
To use the Phone Mode, proceed as follows:
a. Press the PHONE switch or select the TELEPHONE menu parameter. This displays the first RIC
system/group in the current bank. If none are programmed, “NO RIC” is displayed. The status display indicates “PH” until a system/group is selected.
b. To scroll through the available telephone system/
groups, turn the Select switch. RIC system/groups
are indicated by the handset symbol in the display.
When the desired system/ group is displayed, select
it by pressing the Select switch.
3.6.13 PHONE MODE
c. The alphanumeric display then indicates “SELECT
NBR”. If you wish to manually dial the telephone
number using a DTMF microphone, momentarily
press the PTT switch to obtain a dial tone and then
dial the number using a DTMF keypad. Proceed to
step g.
NOTE: The phone mode is available in transceivers
which have Version 203 or later software (see
Appendix A).
The Phone Mode is selected by the PHONE
option key or the Menu Mode “TELEPHONE” parameter. This mode makes placing telephone calls more
convenient by displaying systems and groups
programmed for RIC telephone calls. It also can be
used to recall and dial prestored telephone numbers.
Only RIC-type calls can be placed using this mode.
d. If you wish to recall a prestored number, rotate the
Select switch to scroll through the programmed
numbers. The unique identification programmed
with each number is indicated in the alphanumeric
display.
When the select switch is turned in the Phone
Mode, Multi-Net and LTR system/groups and conventional systems in the current bank that are programmed
for RIC calls are displayed. RIC calls can be placed on
conventional systems with this transceiver if the
repeater being accessed is equipped for RIC calls.
e. When the desired number is displayed, select that
number by pressing the Select switch.
f. To transmit the displayed number, momentarily
press the PTT switch to obtain a dial tone and then
momentarily press it again to transmit the number.
Up to ten 29-digit telephone numbers can be
prestored by system operator programming. These
numbers can then be recalled and dialed by the user
without the need for a DTMF microphone. This limits
calls to only the prestored numbers if desired. Calls
can also be placed to other numbers using a DTMF
microphone.
g. To terminate the call by sending the # character and
exit the Phone Mode, press the PHONE switch or if
using the Menu Mode, press the MENU switch. The
transceiver then returns to the system/group that was
selected before the Phone Mode was entered.
A unique identification of up to ten characters is
stored with each number. This identification is then
displayed when the number is recalled (the actual telephone number that is transmitted is not displayed).
There is also a 10-second timer that is active in
the phone mode until the number is transmitted. If no
activity is detected for 10 seconds, the Phone Mode is
automatically exited.
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OPERATION
3.6.14 DISPLAY OF SOFTWARE VERSION
access is completed. When the access is successful, a
beep (standard and auxiliary calls) or a dial tone (telephone calls) sounds and the call can then be placed in
the normal manner.
When transceiver power is turned on, the transceiver software version number and other information
is briefly displayed as shown in the following illustration. Currently, all Summit transceivers are Tier 3. The
operating software can be updated by Write-On Flash
programming as described in Section 4.6. Refer to
Appendix A for information on the various versions
that have been released.
Freq Band
When auto-registration is active (see next section)
and the transceiver software is Version 206 or later
(see Section 3.6.14), the queue status is maintained
even if registration on another site occurs. With earlier
versions of software, the queue is suspended if this
occurs.
When the access is successfully completed by the
transceiver as described, the repeater hangtime indicator is set. This holds the repeater for the length of
the hangtime programmed by the System Management
Module. If no call is made by the user during this
hangtime, the queue mode is exited and the transceiver
returns to normal operation.
Software Version Tier
Number
3.7 MULTI-NET MODE FEATURES
Exiting The Queue Mode
3.7.1 BUSY QUEUING (MULTI-NET)
When the queue mode is exited, “IN QUEUE” is
no longer displayed. This mode can be exited at any
time by momentarily pressing the PTT switch (except
if responding to a call on another group). It is also
exited if any of the following occur.
Introduction
Busy queuing places the call in a queue if the
system is busy when the PTT switch is pressed. Then,
when the system becomes available, the user is alerted
by a tone and the call can be placed if desired. An
available system is determined in the normal manner
by the access priority of the selected group and the
current access priority being transmitted by the
repeater (see Section 5.8.2).
Busy queuing is a system parameter, so it is
enabled or disabled on each Multi-Net system. It functions with both standard and special calls on Multi-Net
systems only. The queue mode is entered automatically when the PTT switch is released with the busy
tone sounding. The busy tone then stops sounding and
“IN QUEUE” is displayed in the alphanumeric
display.
•
A call is received on the selected group
•
Any of the front panel switches are changed or the
PTT switch is pressed while no call is being
received
•
A Reassign Select command is received
Receiving Calls In The Queue Mode
While in the queue mode, calls are received
normally. In addition, if group scanning is
programmed on the selected system, calls are received
on the other selectable groups. However, since system
scanning is temporarily disabled, calls are not received
on other programmed systems. If a call is received
while in queue, the user can respond to the call in the
usual manner and then normal queuing of a call
resumes shortly after the call is finished. The length of
the delay before queuing resumes is set by the receive
scan delay timer.
When the system becomes available, the transceiver waits a random time and accesses the repeater.
This random delay minimizes the chance of collisions
with other mobiles in queue. If an access attempt is
unsuccessful, another access is attempted after a
random time delay. This continues until a successful
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OPERATION
3.7.2 AUTO-REGISTRATION (MULTI-NET)
Revert group selection is determined by the
programming of the bank “Wide Area Group
Tracking” parameter. If this parameter is programmed
“Yes”, the revert group does not change (it is the same
as it was before registration on the new site occurred).
If this parameter is “No”, the revert group is the group
that was displayed when that system was last selected.
Refer to Section 4.4.6 for more information on proper
wide area group tracking programming.
Introduction
Auto-registration is also described briefly in
Section 5.8.12. This feature permits telephone and
unique ID calls to be automatically routed to the site in
which a mobile is operating. Standard calls can also be
routed if the Site Tracking Module (STM) in the RNT
is configured appropriately. To utilize auto-registration, it must be enabled by system operator programming and system scanning must be enabled by the
SCAN switch. In addition, it must be enabled by the
Menu Mode “MN AUTOREG” parameter if it can be
selected.
NOTE: The preceding “Wide Area Group Tracking”
parameter is available only if the transceiver has software Version 206 or later (see Appendix A). With earlier versions, the “No” condition is always selected.
Scanning With Auto-Registration
Auto-registration effectively controls the revert
(selected) system when scanning (refer to Section
3.4.4). Therefore, auto-registration can be used with
the “Last Selected” and “Temporary” modes but not
“Last Received”.
Auto-registration functions with both single- and
multiple-site scan (see Section 3.4.2) and scanning
continues in the normal manner. However, if LTR or
conventional systems are scanned in addition to MultiNet systems, registration occurs only on Multi-Net
systems.
Upon entering the scan mode or if the signal from
the currently registered site is weak, the transceiver
begins checking all programmed status channels to
locate one with suitable signal strength. When one is
located, a registration message is sent to the repeater.
The repeater then forwards the information to the
RNT. The location of the mobile is then known and
when a call to that mobile is placed, it is automatically
routed to the correct site.
Scan Dropout Criteria
The point at which registration on another site
occurs is controlled by the percentage of good data
messages that must be received over a 10-second
period to stay on the current site. With this transceiver,
this percentage can be programmed for 50-100% on
each Multi-Net site. The default is 75% (33 good
messages out of 44). The higher the percentage, the
sooner auto-registration occurs.
When the mobile is searching for a site on which
to register, “AUTO REG” and the scan message are
alternately displayed. If a user wants to maintain
communication on a site regardless of signal strength,
auto-registration or scanning can be turned off. This
permits communication with a group in marginal
signal conditions.
Wide Area Coverage Enhancements
With software Version 206 or later, the following
enhancements have been made to provide better wide
area coverage. The programming of the bank “Wide
Area Group Tracking” parameter does not affect these
features. (That parameter controls only the revert
group that is selected after registration occurs.)
Revert System/Group After Registration
After registration occurs, “AUTO REG” is no
longer displayed and the revert system is the next
higher system with a different site number that could
be accessed (wrap-around occurs after the highest
system is checked). For example, if System 3 was
selected and System 5 is the next system with a
different site number, that system becomes the revert
system if it can be accessed.
•
3-19
The transceiver registers on a site even when not
actively scanning (such as when the microphone is
off-hook). Other requirements are that the singlesite type of scanning must be selected and scanning
must be enabled by the Scan switch.
Revised February 1997
Part No. 001-9750-005
OPERATION
•
The transceiver can exit a site while receiving a call,
register on a new site, and then continue receiving
the call on the new site.
•
A call can be received on a new site before
registration occurs.
Auxiliary - These calls allow a mobile to communicate with any individual mobile or a group of mobiles
at the same site or another Multi-Net site (when
several Multi-Net systems form a network). Calls to
specific mobiles are called Unique ID calls, and calls
to groups are called Directed Group calls. Directed
Group calls allow communication with groups that are
otherwise not accessible because no selectable system
has been programmed with the home repeater or group
ID of those mobiles. Directed Group calls can be made
to any home repeater on any group ID from 1-225.
3.7.3 TRANSMITTING STATUS INFORMATION
(MULTI-NET)
Status messages can be transmitted whenever the
PTT switch is pressed with a Multi-Net system
selected. The Menu Mode “STATUS” parameter or the
STAT option switch is used to display or change the
current status condition that is transmitted (see Section
3.5.22). When the status select mode is enabled using
either of these methods, the current status condition is
momentarily indicated in the alphanumeric display.
The Select switch is then rotated to cycle through the
available choices and pressed to select the desired
choice.
Transceiver Programming For Special Calls
To originate a special call, the transceiver must
have one of its selectable group positions programmed
for the special call being made (Interconnect or Auxiliary) as shown in the following chart. ID code 236
programs Auxiliary calls and ID code 237 programs
Interconnect calls. This chart also shows which ID
must be programmed to hear a response or receive a
special call. These IDs may be fixed or selectable as
described in Section 3.3.4.
For example, status conditions such as “AT
SITE”, “LEVNG SITE”, or “UNLOADING” can be
programmed. The status condition is then displayed on
the dispatcher's console along with the mobile's ID
number whenever the transmitter is keyed. The transmission of status messages is also described briefly in
Section 5.8.14.
Type of Call
Interconnect
Auxiliary
Unique ID
Dir Group
3.7.4 SPECIAL CALLS (MULTI-NET)
Originating Mobile
Encode ID
Receiving Mobile
Decode ID
Interconnect
Interconnect
Auxiliary
Auxiliary
Auxiliary
Group ID
NOTE: Auxiliary Calls = ID Code 236; Interconnect
(Telephone) Calls = ID Code 237
Introduction
NOTE: Even if ID codes 236 and 237 are selectable
codes, they are treated like fixed codes when calls are
received. Therefore, calls on those codes are received
regardless of which group is selected or group scan
programming (as long as the system is selected or
scanned). Refer to Section 3.3.4 for more information.
Special calls use the special call group ID codes
from 226-254 as described in Section 5.7. The special
calls usually originated by a mobile are Interconnect
and Auxiliary calls. Most other special calls such as
Interrogate, Mobile Disable, and Reassignment are
originated by the system operator or a dispatcher. The
mobile-originate calls are described in the following
information and the other special calls are described in
Section 5.
It can be seen from the chart that with special
Directed Group calls, the auxiliary ID is encoded to
place the call, and the specified group ID is decoded to
receive the call. This is because the call is converted to
a standard group call by the RNT. In addition, when a
landside call is made to a specific mobile, it is always
classified as an interconnect call even though the
unique ID of the mobile may be specified (refer to
“Landside-Originate Special Calls” which follows).
Mobile-Originate Special Calls
Interconnect - These are telephone calls to or from a
mobile made through the Public Switched Telephone
Network (PSTN).
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Part No. 001-9750-005
OPERATION
Special Call Authorization
Directed Group Call (Current Site)
When a mobile is programmed to make Interconnect calls, system authorization is needed before
service is available. This authorization is performed by
the system operator using the System Management
Module of the RNT. This authorization also determines what type of service is available. For example, a
mobile may be authorized to dial local numbers only.
This authorization is keyed to the mobile's unique ID
which is transmitted when any call is made.
2-digit home repeater number +
3-digit group ID
Directed Group Call (Directed Site)
3-digit site number +
2-digit home repeater number +
3-digit group ID
e. Release the PTT switch if it was pressed to dial the
number. A beep should then sound which indicates
that the number was accepted by the system. If this
beep does not sound, an unauthorized number may
have been dialed or a dialing mistake may have been
made.
With all Auxiliary calls, no special authorization
is required. All that is needed is proper programming
of the mobiles originating and receiving the call.
Therefore, a Unique ID call can be made to any mobile
in the same site or some other site that is programmed
for Auxiliary calls. The same applies to Directed
Group calls except that the mobile receiving the call
does not need to be programmed for Auxiliary calls,
just the standard group ID being transmitted.
f. Interconnect Call - The normal landside ringing or
busy tone is then heard. After the party answers,
press the PTT switch and respond.
Unique ID Call - A “ringing” tone is heard which
indicates that the mobile is being rung. If there is no
answer, the ringing stops after several rings and the
call is automatically terminated by the system. When
the party answers, press the PTT switch and respond.
Placing a Special Call
The procedure for placing a special call is as
follows.
Directed Group Call - A second beep sounds
which indicates that the path to the mobile is
complete and speaking can begin (no ringing of the
other mobile occurs).
a. Select the group programmed for Interconnect or
Auxiliary calls, whichever is to be made.
NOTE: It is not possible to talk and listen at the
same time because this transceiver operates halfduplex.
b. Momentarily press the PTT switch until the proceed
tone sounds. A dial tone should be returned.
c. If an Interconnect call is being made, dial the telephone number of the landside party you are calling.
g. When the call is finished, terminate it by pressing
the # key. Three rapid beeps indicate that the call has
been terminated.
d. If an Auxiliary call is being made, dial the 4-8 digit
number which specifies the destination of the call.
The digits dialed for each type of call are as follows:
Receiving Special Calls
Unique ID Call (Current Site)
When an Interconnect or Unique ID call is
received, “ringing” is heard from the speaker. The call is
then answered in the normal manner. If it is a Directed
Group call, only the voice of the calling party is heard
because no ringing occurs. The originating party usually
terminates the call when it is finished. If the three beeps
which indicate that the call has terminated are not heard,
press the # key to terminate the call.
4-digit unique ID of mobile/dispatcher
Unique ID Call (Directed Site)
3-digit site ID +
4-digit unique ID of mobile/dispatcher
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OPERATION
To make another call attempt, the PTT switch
must be released and then pressed again. However, it
is a good idea to wait a few seconds because the 5second timer does not count down while the PTT
switch is pressed. It is not possible to complete the call
by keeping the PTT switch pressed with the intercept
tone sounding.
Landside-Originate Special Calls
Calls can be also be made from any landside telephone to specific mobiles (Interconnect calls) or
groups (Directed Group calls). Calls can also be
placed to other sites in a manner similar to when they
are mobile dialed.
One use of this feature is to prevent the accidental
interruption of a call in progress. This could happen
when the other transmitting party unkeys or if an ID
code with a higher priority is transmitted. Another use
of this feature could be to provide an audible indication that the party being called is busy. This feature is
available only on Multi-Net and LTR systems. A
similar Transmit Disable On Busy feature is available
on conventional systems.
If the system has DID lines, the landside caller
can dial a mobile directly because each mobile that
can receive these calls is given its own phone number.
If the system has standard trunk lines, the telephone
number of the system is dialed. Then when the system
answers, a short tone sounds to indicate that the digits
specifying the destination of the call should be dialed.
The same digits are dialed as when the call is mobile
originated as described in “Placing a Special Call”.
The landside telephone must generate DTMF tones to
dial these digits.
3.7.6 ACCESS PRIORITY (MULTI-NET)
After these digits are dialed, a beep is heard
which indicates that the number was accepted by the
system. Ringing then indicates that the mobile is being
rung unless it is a Directed Group call. With those
calls, no ringing of the mobile occurs and another beep
is heard which indicates the path is complete and
speaking should begin.
Refer to Section 5.8.2.
3.7.7 CAMP-ON PREVENT
This feature prevents a user from “camping on” a
channel by continuously pressing the PTT switch
while a message is being received. When the CampOn Prevent feature is programmed and the user presses
the PTT switch while a message is being received, the
transmitter is disabled, “TX DIS BSY” is displayed,
and the dial tone sounds until the PTT switch is
released. Therefore, accesses can be attempted only by
pressing the PTT switch during quiet times.
After the mobile answers, the landside party
should respond in the normal manner. Remember that
the mobile is operating half duplex and cannot hear the
landside party while transmitting. When the call is
finished, it should be terminated by one of the parties
by pressing the # key. Three beeps indicate that the
call has terminated.
This feature is available only when placing MultiNet standard (mobile-to-mobile) calls. In addition, the
selected encode ID must be the same as the ID on
which the call is being received. It is not available
with Multi-Net special calls or any type of LTR or
conventional call. In addition, transceiver software,
Version 223 or later and programming software,
Version 207 or later, must are required.
3.7.5 TRANSMIT INHIBIT
This feature prevents the transmitter from keying
if the party being called is busy with another call. To
enable this feature, the transceiver is programmed with
a block of transmit inhibit ID codes that can include up
to all 225 standard ID codes with Multi-Net operation,
or up to all 250 ID codes with LTR operation. If a code
within this block has been detected up to 5 seconds
before the PTT switch is pressed, the transmitter does
not key, the intercept tone sounds, and “TX INHIBIT”
is indicated in the alphanumeric display.
When this feature is not used and the PTT switch is
pressed while a message is being received, the message
continues to be received normally and access is automatically attempted as soon as the message is complete.
If a large number of mobiles do this during busy periods,
collisions may occur and the “camping” mobiles may
have a better chance getting a free channel.
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Part No. 001-9750-007
OPERATION
3.8 LTR MODE FEATURES
and a dial tone sounds. If the number is not dialed
within a few seconds, normal operation resumes. This
mode can be canceled at any time by activating any
user control.
3.8.1 FREE SYSTEM RINGBACK
If a busy condition exists when making an LTR
telephone call, the Free System Ringback feature automatically signals when the system is no longer busy. If
the busy tone sounds and “SYSTEM BSY” is
displayed when the PTT switch is pressed, this feature
is automatically selected when the PTT switch is
released. A confirmation tone then sounds and
“RINGBACK” is indicated in the alphanumeric
display.
3.8.3 TRANSPOND
Each of the selectable ID codes of an LTR system
can be programmed for transpond. This feature allows
the person making a call to determine if the mobile
being called is in service. If a call is received on an ID
code programmed for transpond, the transceiver waits
until the originating transceiver unkeys. It then automatically transmits two data messages with the second
containing the turn-off code. This causes the transceiver originating the call to briefly unsquelch. If the
originating transceiver has a call indicator, it will also
turn on if the ID code has been programmed for a call
indicator. Transpond is not available on the fixed
priority and block IDs.
When a RIC-equipped repeater becomes available, a ringing tone sounds followed by a dial tone
when the handshake is completed. The call should
then go through if it is tried again. This mode can be
canceled at any time by activating any user control. If
scanning is enabled, it continues in the normal manner
when the Free System Ringback mode is exited. No
special programming is required to enable this feature,
and it functions on LTR telephone calls only. RICequipped repeaters must be specified as described in
Section 4.4.5 for proper operation of this feature.
3.8.4 TRANSMIT INHIBIT
The LTR Transmit Inhibit feature operates the
same as the Multi-Net Transmit Inhibit feature
described in Section 3.7.5.
3.8.2 SYSTEM SEARCH
3.9 CONVENTIONAL MODE FEATURES
If an out-of-range condition exists when
attempting an LTR telephone call, this feature automatically searches for a system within range. The
system search feature is available only with LTR telephone calls and only if it has been enabled by dealer
programming or the user with the Menu mode “LTR
SYSTEM SEARCH” parameter (see Section 3.5.13).
If this feature is enabled and the intercept tone sounds
when the PTT switch is pressed, it is automatically
selected when the PTT switch is released. A confirmation tone sounds and “SYS SEARCH” is indicated in
the display.
3.9.1 TRANSMIT DISABLE ON BUSY
This feature disables the transmitter if the channel
is busy (carrier present) when the PTT switch is
pressed. When the transmitter is disabled by this
feature, the busy tone sounds and “TX DIS BSY” is
indicated in the alphanumeric display. It is not possible
to access a channel by holding down the PTT switch
until the channel is no longer busy. If this feature is
disabled, the transmitter can be keyed even if the
channel is busy.
The transceiver then attempts to access, in
succession, other systems that have a RIC ID
programmed in any group position. As each system is
searched, a beep sounds. Each system is accessed only
once. If no system could be accessed, the intercept
tone sounds, “NO RIC FND” is displayed, the feature
deactivates, and the system/group does not change. If a
system is accessed, the new system/group is selected
This feature can be enabled or disabled on each
conventional group by dealer programming. Some
repeaters may have delayed drop-out (hang time)
which would cause this feature to disable the transmitter even if no busy condition exists. To key the
transmitter in this situation, release the PTT switch and
press it again within 1 second.
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OPERATION
3.9.2 CALL GUARD SQUELCH
each second. When the data is decoded, 23-bit samples
are taken and then the bits are rotated to determine if a
valid code was received.
Tone (CTCSS), digital, or inverted digital Call
Guard squelch can be programmed on each conventional transmit and receive group in any order desired.
A tone Call Guard reverse burst and digital Call Guard
turn-off code can also be programmed to eliminate the
squelch tail (noise burst) in the receiving transceiver
when the PTT switch is released. The reverse burst and
turn-off code are always detected by this transceiver
on receive groups programmed with Call Guard
squelch.
Digital Call Guard squelch can be programmed as
normal or inverted. The only difference is that the
wave-form is inverted when “IDCG” is selected. The
inverted type may need to be programmed if the signal
is inverted by the repeater or another transceiver. If
standard noninverted digital Call Guard squelch does
not function, try changing to the other type.
3.9.3 MONITOR MODE
The Call Guard squelch feature eliminates
distracting messages intended for others using the
channel. This is done by using a subaudible tone or
digital code to control the squelch. This tone or code is
unique to an individual user or user group on that
channel. This tone or code is transmitted with the
voice signal, but is not heard because it is in the
subaudible range and is attenuated by a filter. Call
Guard squelch must be used in both the transmitting
and receiving transceiver to be functional.
The monitor mode allows all activity on a
channel to be monitored when Call Guard squelch or
other types of decoders are used to control the squelch.
The monitor mode disables these features so that all
messages on the channel are heard. To select the
monitor mode, take the microphone off-hook or press
the MON option switch if available. The monitor
mode is indicated by “MON” in the display.
If off-hook detection has been disabled by
programming, the MON switch must always be used
to select the monitor mode or the Transmit Disable On
Busy feature should be programmed. If scanning is
occurring, the MON switch is not detected and monitoring is enabled only by taking the microphone offhook if the selected (revert) system is a conventional
system (and off-hook detection has not been disabled).
Tone-type Call Guard squelch utilizes subaudible
tones from 67-250.3 Hz. Although there are 38 tones
assigned, the top five are normally not used because of
their close proximity to the voice band which starts at
300 Hz. A reverse burst can be transmitted when the
push-to-talk switch is released to eliminate the squelch
tail (noise burst) in the receiving transceiver. The
reverse burst is a 180-degree phase reversal for a
length of time determined by the tone frequency.
Call Guard squelch can also be disabled on the
selected system/group by the Call Guard option switch
if available (see Section 3.5.7). This switch disables
both transmit and receive Call Guard signaling, while
the monitor mode disables only receive Call Guard
signaling.
Digital Call Guard squelch uses digital data
instead of subaudible tones to control the squelch. This
data consists of continuous repetitions of 23-bit words.
No bit or word synchronization information is used.
When the push-to-talk switch is released, a turn-off
code can be transmitted. This eliminates the squelch
tail similar to the reverse burst with tone-type Call
Guard squelch.
3.9.4 REPEATER TALK-AROUND
Normally, all transmissions go through a repeater.
However, there may be times when the user is out of
range of the repeater system and is unable to talk to
anyone even though the mobile being called is a short
distance away. In this situation, the repeater talkaround feature can be used to transmit on the receive
frequency so that transmissions do not have to go
through a repeater. Any conventional group can be
programmed for talk-around (unless it has been
Although there are thousands of possible code
combinations with 23 bits, only 83 are unique with the
data scheme used. The number specified when the
code is programmed is actually a seed for a special
algorithm used to generate the 23-bit data word. The
data is transmitted at a rate of 134.4 bits per second.
Therefore, approximately six words are transmitted
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Part No. 001-9750-005
OPERATION
detected on the first priority group but is detected on
the second priority group if is programmed. If the PRI
option switch or the Menu mode “PRIORITY” parameter is available (see Section 3.5.17), priority sampling
can be turned on and off.
disabled at the system level). Talk-around is then
enabled by simply selecting one of those groups. The
unique identification can be used to identify which
groups are programmed with this feature.
If talk-around has not been disabled on the
system by system operator programming, the Menu
Mode “TALKAROUND” parameter or the TA option
switch (see Section 3.5) can be used to turn talkaround on and off. In the Menu mode, talk-around is
enabled when “ON” is indicated in the status display.
With an option switch, a triangle is indicated under the
switch if it is enabled by the switch or programmed on
the selected system/group. If the switch is pressed with
talk-around disabled, “NO TALK” is displayed.
Changing the selected system or group causes the
programmed default talk-around condition to be
selected.
3.9.6 RECEIVE-ONLY GROUPS
Conventional groups can be programmed so that
transmitting is disabled (monitor only). This is done
using the TX DIS parameter on the group screen. If the
PTT switch is pressed with one of these groups
selected, the intercept tone sounds and “TX
DISABLE” is displayed.
3.10 MISCELLANEOUS
3.10.1 SUPERVISORY TONES
3.9.5 PRIORITY GROUP SAMPLING
There are supervisory tones that are heard at
various times when operating the transceiver. Some or
all of these tones can be enabled and disabled by
system operator programming or by the user if the
Menu Mode “RADIO SNDS” parameter is enabled
(see Section 3.5.18). These tones are as follows and
they are heard in only the Multi-Net and LTR modes
unless stated otherwise.
Priority group sampling ensures that messages on
conventional priority groups are not missed while
listening to messages on other conventional groups.
Both a first and second priority group can be designated in each bank by system operator programming.
When a message is received on a priority 1 group,
“P1” is indicated in the status display, and when a
message is received on a priority 2 group, “P2” is
indicated.
Busy Tone - This tone is similar to the standard telephone busy tone, and it indicates that the radio system
is currently busy. It consists of combined 480 Hz and
620 Hz tones switched on and off at approximately a 2
Hz rate. It sounds with all types of Multi-Net and LTR
calls and also when the Multi-Net Busy Queuing
feature is used. “SYSTEM BSY” is also displayed
when this tone sounds.
Priority group sampling occurs only when system
scanning is enabled. In addition, it must be the
“Multiple-Site” type as described in Section 3.4.2. The
first priority system/group is sampled while listening
to a message on the second priority group but not vice
versa. The transceiver can be programmed so that the
first priority group is sampled every 0.5, 1, or 2
seconds or not at all if “Disabled” is programmed. The
second priority group is always sampled every 2
seconds. When a first priority system/group is sampled
while listening to a message on some other system/
group, a series of “ticks” are heard. These ticks are
brief interruptions of the audio signal that occur when
sampling takes place.
Intercept Tone - This is a siren-like tone consisting of
700 Hz and 900 Hz tones alternating at approximately
a 2 Hz rate. This tone indicates the following out-ofrange or other error conditions:
•
This feature is available only on conventional
systems. In addition, sampling does not occur while
listening to a Multi-Net or LTR call or when transmitting any type of call. Call Guard squelch is not
3-25
When this tone sounds 2-3 seconds after pressing the
PTT switch and “OUT-OF-RNG” is also displayed,
the data handshake with the repeater could not be
completed. The usual cause of this is an out of radio
range condition. Twelve attempts are made on
Multi-Net systems and six access attempts are made
on LTR systems before this tone sounds. No more
Revised February 1997
Part No. 001-9750-005
OPERATION
number of the system and then when the system
answers, a number specifying the mobile being called.
This tone sounds to indicate when the number of the
mobile should be entered.
access attempts are then made until the push-to-talk
switch is released and then pressed again.
•
•
•
If this tone sounds after the transmitter has been
keyed for an extended time and the transmitter turns
off and “TX TIMEOUT” is displayed, the transmitter has been disabled by the Time-Out Timer
feature (see Section 3.6.1).
LTR TELEPHONE CALL TONES
NOTE: The following tones are produced by the LTR
RIC interconnect equipment and are heard only when
placing LTR telephone calls.
If this tone sounds as soon as the push-to-talk switch
is pressed with a conventional channel selected and
“TX DIS BSY” is displayed, the channel is busy and
the transmitter was disabled by the Transmit Disable
On Busy feature (see Section 3.9.1). If “TX
DISABLE” is displayed instead, a conventional
receive-only channel is selected (see Section 3.9.6).
Reorder Tone - Three beeps which indicate that the
call has been terminated by the system.
Return Time Warning Tone - Two beeps which warn
that you have not transmitted for an extended period.
If you do not transmit within 5 seconds, the call is
automatically terminated by the system. The time
between transmissions is one of the parameters used
by the system to detect the end of a call when the #
character is not sent.
If the push-to-talk switch is pressed while receiving
an LTR call, this tone sounds and “TX DIS BSY” is
displayed.
Proceed (Clear-To-Talk) Tone - This is a 20 millisecond burst of the 700 Hz tone which sounds after the
push-to-talk switch is pressed to indicate when talking
can begin (see Section 3.6.3).
Conversation Time-Out Tone - Calls are limited to a
certain length by the system. Thirty seconds before
this time is reached, a “tick” begins sounding each
second. When the 30-second time expires, the call is
automatically terminated by the system.
Key Press Tone - This is a 30 millisecond burst of the
700 Hz tone that sounds to indicate when a key or the
Select switch is pressed or turned.
Turn-Around Tone - This is a single beep which may
be used to indicate to the landside party when to
respond to your transmission. It sounds when you
release the PTT switch, and you may partially hear this
tone.
MULTI-NET SPECIAL CALL TONES
NOTE: The following tones are produced by the MultiNet RNT and are heard only when placing special
calls.
Proceed Tone - This tone consists of two beeps and it
tells the landside caller when to enter the five-digit
number specifying the mobile being called. Dialing of
this number must be started within 5 seconds of
hearing this tone, and a tone-type telephone must be
used.
Confirmation Tone - A short tone which sounds
when the number dialed is accepted by the system.
Call Proceed Tone - With Multi-Net Directed Group
calls, ringing does not occur after the number is dialed.
Instead, this short tone sounds after the confirmation
tone to indicate that the audio path is complete and
speaking can begin.
3.10.2 DISPLAY MESSAGES
The following messages may appear in the tencharacter alphanumeric display.
End Call Tone - Three beeps which sound when the
end of the call has been detected by the system.
ALL CALL - Indicates that the Multi-Net “All Call”
special call is being received. This is a high priority
call to all mobiles assigned to a site. If another call is
being received, it is dropped to receive this call.
Proceed Dialing Tone - When placing a landsideoriginate call to a mobile, the caller may dial the
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Part No. 001-9750-005
OPERATION
AUTO REG - Indicates that the transceiver is
attempting to register on another system. Refer to
“Auto-Registration” description on Section 3.7.2.
NO TALK - Indicates that talk-around has been
disabled on the selected conventional system by
programming (refer to Section 3.9.4).
BLOCK CALL - Indicates that the call is being
received on a Multi-Net or LTR block ID code (refer
to Section 3.3.4).
NOT MULTI - Indicates that an attempt was made to
enable a Multi-Net feature on an LTR or conventional
system.
CLONING - Indicates that one transceiver is
programming another using the cloning feature
described in Section 4.5.
NOT ON CONV - Indicates that an attempt was made
to enable a conventional mode feature on a Multi-Net
or LTR system.
EMERGENCY - Indicates that the emergency switch
has been pressed (refer to Section 3.6.8).
OUT-OF-LOK - Indicates that the synthesizer is
unlocked. The transceiver is nonfunctional until lock
is re-established. Troubleshoot the synthesizer if this
indication persists for an extended period.
GPSCN DSBL - Indicates that an attempt was made
to delete a group from the scan list with group scanning disabled.
HI BATTERY - The transceiver senses the battery
voltage and if it rises to a point where transceiver
damage may result (above 18.5 VDC), the intercept
tone sounds and this message is displayed.
NO ACCESS - Indicates the inability to access the
system, perhaps because of an out-of-range condition.
Once this indication appears, no more access attempts
are made until the PTT switch is released and then
pressed again.
IN QUEUE - Indicates that the call has been placed in
a queue by the Multi-Net Busy Queuing feature (refer
to Section 3.7.1).
PRIORITY 1 OR 2 - Indicates that a Multi-Net or
LTR call is being received on one of the fixed priority
ID codes (refer to Section 3.3.4).
MIC TO PA - Indicates that the microphone audio is
being routed to the public address system (refer to
Section 3.5.10).
PROG ERROR - Indicates an EEPROM read error.
Check the transceiver programming or EEPROM if
this indication persists.
MULTI-SCAN - Indicates that multiple-site scanning
is occurring (refer to Section 3.4.2).
PROG MODE - Indicates that the transceiver is being
programmed.
NO DAT GRP - Indicates that no valid data group
could be found for the data transmission (refer to
Section 3.6.11).
RCV AUD PA - Indicates that the receive audio signal
is being routed to the public address system (refer to
Section 3.5.10).
NO NUMBERS - Indicates that the Phone Mode is
selected and no telephone numbers have been preprogrammed (refer to Section 3.6.13).
REM ERROR - Indicates that a non-Summit or early
control unit is being used (see Appendix A.A.5).
RING BACK - Indicates that the LTR Free System
Ringback mode has been entered (refer to Section
3.8.1).
NO POWER - Indicates that the transmitter temperature is excessive and the transmitter has been shut
down (refer to Section 3.6.10).
SELECT NBR - Displayed in the Phone Mode to
indicate that a preprogrammed telephone number
should be selected or the number should be dialed
manually (refer to Section 3.6.13).
NO RIC FND - Indicates that no RIC system/groups
could be found in the Phone Mode (refer to Section
3.6.13).
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Part No. 001-9750-005
OPERATION
The various test functions are selected by
pressing or rotating the front panel Select switch. The
display indicates the mode that is currently selected
and also such things as the selected frequency, power
level, or operating mode. While in the test mode, the
front panel option switches function as follows:
SNGLE SCAN - Indicates that the single-site type of
scanning is occurring (refer to Section 3.4.2.
SUMMIT 8 or 9 V 2xx X - This message is displayed
for an instant when transceiver power is turned on.
“SUMMIT” is the model of the transceiver, “8” indicates an 800 MHz mode, and “9” indicates a 900 MHz
model. The number after “V” indicates the version of
software being used by the transceiver, and the last
digit indicates the tier level of the transceiver (refer to
Section 3.6.14).
Center Switch - Selects the test channel bank as
described in the next section.
Left Switch - The switch to the left of the display turns
monitoring on and off.
SYS SEARCH - Indicates that the LTR System
Search mode has been entered (refer to Section
3.5.13).
All Other Option Switches - Adjust the display viewing
angle.
SYSTEM BSY - Indicates that the radio system is
currently busy.
The eight test functions that can be selected are as
follows. These functions are described in more detail
in the Sections 3.11.2 - 3.11.9.
• Receive-Transmit-RSSI
• Power Level 1 Set (Std band)
• Power Level 1 Set (T/A band)
• Power Levels 2, 3, 4, 2W Set
• Balance Adjust
• Transmit Hum and Noise
• DC Voltage Check
• Display Test
TYPE ERROR - Indicates that an attempt was made
to clone two different types of transceivers.
TX DISABLE - Indicates that the selected conventional system is programmed for monitoring only
(refer to Section 3.9.6).
TX DIS BSY - Indicates that the transmitter has been
disabled by the conventional Transmit Disable On
Busy feature (refer to Section 3.9.1). This also indicates that the transmitter has been keyed while
receiving an LTR call.
NOTE: The alignment procedure in Section 8
describes how these test functions are used to make
transceiver adjustments.
TX INHIBIT - Indicates that the transmitter has been
disabled by the LTR/Multi-Net Transmit Inhibit
feature (refer to Section 3.7.5).
3.11.2 RECEIVE-TRANSMIT-RSSI
TX TIMEOUT - Indicates that the transmitter has
been disabled by the Time-Out Timer (refer to Section
3.6.1).
3.11.1 INTRODUCTION
The RX-TX-RSSI function is used to align the
transmitter and receiver and set the RSSI detect level.
This is the only test function in which both the microphone audio and transmit data signals are enabled. The
data signal generated is the 151.4 Hz tone Call Guard
frequency. The receiver squelch is controlled by noise
only.
This transceiver has a test mode that is used to
perform testing and alignment. This mode is enabled
by turning transceiver power on with the RxD and
TxD lines of the microphone connector shorted
together (P2, pins 10 and 13). When the test mode is
entered, the display indicates “RX-TX-RSSI” which is
the first test function.
If the transceiver has Version 207 or later software (see Appendix A), a total of 18 test channels,
arranged as three banks of six channels each, can be
selected (see list on next page). With earlier software,
only the channels in Bank 0 can be selected. The test
channels are fixed and cannot be reprogrammed using
the programming software.
3.11 TEST MODE
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Part No. 001-9750-005
OPERATION
800 MHz TEST FREQUENCIES
Prog Ch No.
Rx Freq
900 MHz TEST FREQUENCIES
Tx Freq
Prog Ch No.
Block 0
001
381
920
004 [TA]
379 [TA]
918 [TA]
851.0125 MHz
860.5125 MHz
869.9875 MHz
851.0875 MHz
860.4625 MHz
869.9625 MHz
851.0625 MHz
860.3125 MHz
869.7750 MHz
851.1625 MHz
860.3625 MHz
869.8875 MHz
806.0125 MHz
815.5125 MHz
824.9875 MHz
851.0875 MHz
860.4625 MHz
869.9625 MHz
001
240
479
006 [TA]
246 [TA]
473 [TA]
851.2125 MHz
860.5625 MHz
869.8000 MHz
851.2625 MHz
860.4125 MHz
869.9125 MHz
935.0125 MHz
938.0000 MHz
940.9875 MHz
935.0750 MHz
938.0750 MHz
940.9125 MHz
896.0125 MHz
899.0000 MHz
901.9875 MHz
935.0750 MHz
938.0750 MHz
940.9125 MHz
Block 1
806.0625 MHz
815.3125 MHz
824.7750 MHz
851.1625 MHz
860.3625 MHz
869.8875 MHz
003
242
475
008 [TA]
250 [TA]
469 [TA]
Block 2
009
383
905
011 [TA]
377 [TA]
914 [TA]
Tx Freq
Block 0
Block 1
003
373
903
007 [TA]
375 [TA]
912 [TA]
Rx Freq
935.0375 MHz
938.0250 MHz
940.9375 MHz
935.1000 MHz
938.1250 MHz
940.8625 MHz
896.0375 MHz
899.0250 MHz
901.9375 MHz
935.1000 MHz
938.1250 MHz
940.8625 MHz
Block 2
806.2125 MHz
815.5625 MHz
824.8000 MHz
851.2625 MHz
860.4125 MHz
869.9125 MHz
005
244
477
009 [TA]
252 [TA]
471 [TA]
935.0625 MHz
938.0500 MHz
940.9625 MHz
935.1125 MHz
938.1500 MHz
940.8875 MHz
896.0625 MHz
899.0500 MHz
901.9625 MHz
935.1125 MHz
938.1500 MHz
940.8875 MHz
[TA] = Talk-around channels (transmit frequency is
the same as the receive frequency).
[TA] = Talk-around channels (transmit frequency is
the same as the receive frequency).
The test channel block should be selected while
one of the eight test functions listed above is
displayed. This is done by pressing the center option
switch above the display. The selected block (0, 1, 2)
is indicated by the right-most character of the display.
channel number. When a carrier is being detected, HI
is indicated, and when no carrier is being detected, LO
is indicated.
3.11.3 POWER LEVEL 1 SET (STD BAND)
The desired test frequency is then selected by
pressing the Select switch with “RX-TX-RSSI” in the
display and then turning the switch. The display indicates the channel that is selected. Talk-around channels are indicated by “TA” after the channel number.
To return to the function select mode, press the Select
switch.
The PWR SET function is used to set the maximum
power output level for the standard (non talk-around)
band. Two different power levels are set. PWR SET 1
sets the power output for the low end of the band
(channel 1) and PWR SET 2 sets it for the high end of
the band (channel 918 or 479). These settings allow
the microprocessor to maintain arelatively constant
power output over the entire operating band. When the
system power level is programmed (see Section 4.3.5),
this is the power level selected by Level 1.
The state of the RSSI detect line (U412, pin 7) is
indicated in the display immediately to the right of the
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Part No. 001-9750-005
OPERATION
(see Section 8). The 2W setting can also be in this
range or 1-2 watts.
Microphone audio, data, and the receiver are all
disabled by this function. Power is adjusted by rotating
the Select switch with the PTT switch pressed. The
display indicates the relative set point from 0-127 (127
is maximum power).
3.11.6 MODULATION BALANCE
The BAL ADJUST function is used to set modulation balance over the entire standard and talk-around
frequency bands. This allows the microprocessor to
compensate for any changes that occur across the
band. This function generates a 67 Hz square wave
that is applied to the modulation circuitry. The microphone audio signal and receiver are disabled.
To exit this mode, the power setting of both PWR
SET 1 and PWR SET 2 must be checked by pressing
the PTT switch. The settings are saved in memory
when the mode is exited. The triangle/circle (encryption) symbol indicates if the current setting has been
checked. The maximum power output that can be set is
the rated power for the model of transceiver and the
type of channel (standard or talk-around). Refer to
Section 8 for more information.
To enable the balance adjust function, press the
Select switch when BAL ADJUST is displayed. BAL
ADJ 1 is then displayed which indicates the first
channel. The demodulated signal is viewed on the
CRT of a communications monitor and the Select
switch is rotated with the PTT switch pressed to
achieve the best square wave.
3.11.4 POWER LEVEL 1 SET (TALK-AROUND
BAND)
The TA PWR SET function is used to set the
maximum power output for talk-around band. The
procedure is the same as for standard channels
described in Section 3.11.3 except that talk-around
channels on each end of the band are selected.
The balance for the other channels is set by
pressing the Select switch to select the next channel
and then repeating this adjustment. BAL ADJ 1 - BAL
ADJ 6 correspond to the six channels listed in Section
3.11.2. To exit this mode, all six channels must be
checked. The triangle/circle (encryption) symbol indicates that the current channel has been checked. The
settings are saved in memory when the mode is exited.
3.11.5 POWER LEVELS 2, 3, 4, 2W
The PWR LEVELS function is used to set power
levels 2, 3, 4, and 2W that can be selected for each
system when programming the transceiver. These
power levels apply to both standard and talk-around
channels. Power level 1 is set by the PWR SET and
TA PWR SET functions described in the preceding
and following sections. When this function is selected,
the data and microphone audio signals are disabled,
and only channel 381 (800 MHz) or 240 (900 MHz) is
selected.
3.11.7 TRANSMITTER HUM AND NOISE
This function is used to check transmitter hum
and noise. The six channels in Section 3.11.2 are
selected by the Select switch, and the transmit audio
signal and receiver are disabled.
To change the power levels, press the Select
switch when PWR LEVELS is displayed. PWR
LVL 2 - PWR LVL 4 and 2W PWR LVL are then
selected by turning the Select switch. To change the
power of the displayed parameter, turn the Select
switch with the PTT switch pressed. The relative
power output is indicated by 0-127 as described in
Section 3.11.3. The settings are saved in memory
when this mode is exited.
3.11.8 DC VOLTAGE CHECK
This function displays the voltage of the 13.8V
power supply. Transmit channel 1 is selected, and both
microphone audio and transmit data are disabled.
3.11.9 DISPLAY TEST
This function tests all segments of the display in
sequence. If the PTT switch is pressed, all segments
are enabled but no power output is produced.
The power levels that can be set can be any power
in the minimum to maximum range for that transceiver
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Part No. 001-9750-005
TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
SECTION 4 TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
Remote Programming Interface (RPI)
Cable
Part No. 023-9800-000
Part No. 023-9750-005
To
Battery
To
Antenna
To
Ign Sense
Figure 4-1 Programming Setup
4.1 GENERAL
The cables from the RPI to the computer and
transceiver are not included with the RPI. The 9800
RPI has a female DB9 connector for the computer
connection. Since most computers have a male DB9 or
DB25 connector, a male DB9 to female DB9 or DB25
cable is usually required. Earlier RPIs such as the 9750
have a female DB25 connector. These are standard
cables available at most computer supply stores or
suitable cables are listed in Table 1-1.
4.1.1 PROGRAMMING SETUP
The following items are required to program the
transceiver and control unit. The part numbers of this
equipment are shown in Section 1-1 in Section 1. A
programming set-up is shown above.
•
•
•
•
IBM® PC or compatible personal computer
E.F. Johnson Rem Prog Interface (RPI)
Cables from the RPI to the computer and transceiver
or control unit
E.F. Johnson Summit programming software.
The cable from the RPI to the transceiver or
control unit (remote versions) has a connector which
plugs into the microphone jack. The cable for this
application is also listed in Table 1-1.
4.1.2 COMPUTER DESCRIPTION
4.1.3 REMOTE PROGRAMMING INTERFACE
(RPI)
The programming software is designed to run on
an IBM PC or compatible computer that meets the
following minimum requirements:
•
•
•
•
The RPI provides the required interface between
the computer and transceiver. It converts the RS-232
logic levels from the computer to the TTL logic levels
required by the transceiver microprocessor and vice
versa. This RPI (P.N. 023-9800-000) programs standard personality information and also the Write-On
flash memory (see next section).
A 3-1/2” disk drive and hard disk drive
640K of memory
MS-DOS version 3.0 or higher
An unused serial port
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With Summit DM and Viking® HT/GT transceivers, the switch on the RPI selects either the standard or Flash programming mode. The indicator is
green when the standard mode is selected and red
when the Flash mode is selected.
Version 204 - Became available in early 1996. This
version has an additional parameter on the “Main Radio
Parameters” screen for specifying the horn alert operating mode (see Section 3.6.4).
4.1.4 EEPROM DATA STORAGE
Version 205 - Became available mid 1997. This version
added an additional “Start At Home” parameter on the
Create/Edit Bank screen (see Section 3.6.6).
Information which changes from transceiver to
transceiver is stored by EEPROM U406 on the audio/
logic board. This type of device stores data indefinitely without the need for a constant power supply.
The transceiver can be removed from the vehicle or
even stored on a shelf indefinitely without affecting
programming. Since an EEPROM is also reprogrammable, a new device is not needed if programming
must be changed.
Version 206 - Became available in late 2000. This version added an additional proceed tone delay time screen
that is selectable by pressing the F6 key from a group
programming screen (see Section 3.6.3).
The operating program of the transceiver is stored
by Flash memory U404 on the audio/logic board. If
this program needs to be updated, reprogramming is
performed using the same programming setup.
However, special programming software is required.
The procedure for reprogramming the Flash memory
is located in Section 4.7.
This programming software is backward compatible which means it can also program all transceivers
with early versions of software. However, added
features are not available unless the transceiver software is also updated. The files generated by an earlier
programming software version are automatically
converted to a new format hen they are opened and
then saved or downloaded. Once a file is converted to
the new format, it cannot be used by an earlier version.
Refer to Appendix A.4 for more information on software revisions.
4.1.5 SOFTWARE VERSION NUMBER
4.1.6 COMPUTERS RUNNING WINDOWS®
NOTE: All transceivers with operating software Version 206 or later (see Appendix A) must be programmed using Version 202 or later programming
software. Failure to do so may result in erratic transceiver operation.
The Summit DM programming software is a
DOS program that is not designed to run in Windows.
Therefore, if applicable, Windows must be exited and
the program run in the DOS mode.
4.1.7 SOFTWARE INSTALLATION
This section describes programming software
Version 206 which became available in late 2000. The
main features of this and earlier releases are as
follows:
When you receive the programming software,
make a backup copy and store the master in a safe
place. You may want to create a separate directory for
programming. For example, to create a directory
called RADIOPRG on drive C: using DOS, type C:
(Enter) to make it the current directory if necessary.
Then type MD \RADIOPRG (Enter). To change to that
directory, type CD \RADIOPRG.
Version 202 - Had additional screens for programming
the UD2I (universal interface) and has an additional parameter in the bank screen for programming “Wide
Area Group Tracking”. Refer to Appendix A.4 for more
information.
The programming software is shipped in a
compressed format. The name of the compressed file
is SUMMIT2.EXE and unpacks into two files called
SUMMIT.EXE and DM_PGMR.HLP. These files are
approximately 454K and 78K in size, respectively.
Version 203 - Became available in January 1995. This
version has an additional question on the “Main Radio
Parameters” screen for specifying if encryption is installed. See Section 3.6.12 for more information.
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4.1.11 HEADER INFORMATION
To unpack these files so that they can be used,
first make sure that the current directory is destination
directory for these files. For example, if hard drive C:
is the destination, make it the current directory (if
required) by typing C: (Enter). Then if using a subdirectory, type CD as just described. Then insert the
program disk in the computer and type A:SUMMIT2
(or B:SUMMIT2 if drive B: is being used). The two
program files are then automatically unpacked into the
current directory.
The following information is contained in the
header area at the top of the screen.
Free Space - Displays the amount of space remaining in
the transceiver EEPROM if it was programmed with
the current information. The maximum number of
systems that can be programmed is determined by the
system type and the number of groups that are
programmed in each system.
4.1.8 HARDWARE HOOKUP
Radio Model - Displays the transceiver model and frequency range of the file being edited. This information
is specified when a new file is created and cannot be
changed later. The extension of the file name
(xxxxxxxx.ext) indicates the model. For example,
“.SM8” indicates that the file is for a Summit DM 800
MHz transceiver. To display the radio serial number,
press the F7 key when in the Main menu (see Section
4.3).
The programming setup is shown in Figure 4-1.
The cable from the RPI to the transceiver is connected
to the microphone jack of the transceiver with front
mount models. With remote mount models, it can be
connected to either the microphone jack of the control
unit or the programming jack on the blank front panel
of the transceiver. The RPI has a switch which must be
in the correct position. Make sure that the standard
mode, indicated by a green light, is selected.
File Name - Displays the name of the transceiver configuration file that is currently being edited. If a new file
is created and it has not yet been saved, it is called
“NEW”.
4.1.9 MINIMUM FREE MEMORY REQUIRED
Approximately 525K of free conventional
memory is required to run this program (use the
CHKDSK or MEM command to display the amount of
free memory). If you have at least 640K of memory
and not enough is available, there may be other
programs that are also being loaded into conventional
memory. Refer to your MS-DOS® manual for information on how these programs can be moved or
disabled to make more space available.
4.1.12 SPECIAL KEYS
Escape - The Escape key is pressed to go back to the
preceding screen. If information was changed in the
current screen, the changes on that screen are saved in
a buffer but not to a disk file.
Return - Pressing the Return key (or ENTER on some
keyboards) usually executes the changes made to a parameter or screen. The change is saved in a buffer but
not to a disk file.
4.1.10 STARTING THE PROGRAM
Arrow Keys - The arrow keys are usually used to move
the cursor or highlight bar to the next or previous
parameter.
Turn the computer on as described in the
computer instruction manual. Once the DOS prompt
has been obtained, start the program by typing
SUMMIT and pressing Enter. The SUMMIT.EXE and
DM_PGMR.HLP files should be in the current directory as described in Section 4.1.10.
Numbers/Letters Preceding Description - An alternative method for quickly selecting screens or functions is to press the number or letter key preceding the
description when applicable.
NOTE: The program automatically detects most video
cards. If it does not operate properly with a monochrome monitor, try starting it in the monochrome
mode by typing SUMMIT M.
F1 (Help Select) - Displays help information on the selected parameter.
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Figure 4-2 Programming Software Menu Structure
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F2 (Help Screen) - Displays help information on the
displayed screen.
F3, F8 - Not used.
F4 - F6 - Use varies according to the screen that is selected. Refer to the separate screen descriptions for
more information.
F7 - When in the main menu, displays the serial number
of the transceiver being programmed (see next section).
F9 (Prev Menu) - Returns to the previous menu or
screen.
Figure 4-3 Main Menu
F10 (Exit Program) - Exits the program and returns to
the operating system. Before exit occurs, a prompt appears to allow the current file to be saved. If it is not
saved in this manner or has not been previously saved
using “Configuration File Utilities” screen, all changes
will be lost.
F7 (Show SN) - Displays the serial number of the transceiver. This number is the same as the identification
number described in Section 1.4, and it is stored in
memory and cannot be changed.
4.2 MAIN MENU
4.2.2 SET UP NEW CONFIGURATION FILE
4.2.1 INTRODUCTION
This function is used to create a new configuration file. The type of radio is selected and then the
Modify Radio File menu described in Section 4.3 is
displayed. The radio type specified for a file cannot be
changed after it is selected. Therefore, it is not
possible to copy a file of one radio type and then edit it
for use as another type.
The Main Menu appears when the program is
started. This menu is used to select the function to be
performed. It selects if a new configuration file is to be
created, an old file edited, or the current file is to be
printed, saved or downloaded to a radio. It is also used
to upload a file from a radio, and to copy, rename, or
delete a disk file. This menu is shown in Figure 4-3,
and the parameters in it are described in the following
information. A block diagram showing the structure of
the program is shown in Figure 4-2.
4.2.3 OPEN CONFIGURATION FILE
This function is selected to open a configuration
file stored on disk and load it into memory. The files in
the current directory are displayed and then the arrow
and Return keys are used to select the desired file. If
the file is in another directory, press the Escape key
and then F5 to change the current directory (see
Section 4.2.1). After the file is opened, it can be
edited, downloaded, printed, saved, copied, or
renamed using the functions described in the next
sections.
The following function keys perform special
functions in this menu. Other function keys that are
active in this menu are described in the preceding
section.
F5 (Change Dir) - Displays the screen that changes the
current directory. When a configuration file is loaded
from or saved to disk, it is always from or to the current
directory. Therefore, if you need to change this directory, select this screen.
4.2.4 MODIFY CURRENT CONFIGURATION
FILE
F6 (Show Files) - Displays the names of all radio configuration files that are in the current directory.
This function is selected to edit the file currently
residing in memory. This file must have been previ-
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ously loaded from disk as described in the preceding
section or from a transceiver as described in the next
section. If there is no file currently in memory, a
message is displayed. This function displays the
Modify Radio File menu described in Section 4.3.
When the program is started, the last file edited is
automatically loaded if it is in the current directory.
4.2.5 UPLOAD CONFIGURATION FROM RADIO
This function is selected to copy (upload) a file
stored in a transceiver into the computer memory. It
can be used to check transceiver programming or use
the data stored in one transceiver as a basis for
programming another transceiver. The screen
displayed by this function is shown below.
4.2.8 MODIFY PRINTER/SERIAL PORTS
This function is used to specify the computer port
used by the printer and RPI (see Section 4.1.3). The
printer can be connected to either parallel port LPT1 or
LPT2 (a serial port cannot be used). The RPI can be
connected to serial port COM1 or COM2. There is
also an option to either save or not save the selected
configuration for the next time that the program is run.
The screen displayed by this function is shown below.
Use the arrow keys and spacebar to display the desired
configuration and then press Return with “Save
Changes” highlighted to select that configuration.
4.2.6 DOWNLOAD CONFIGURATION TO
RADIO
This function is selected to program the transceiver with the configuration file that is currently in
memory. Follow the instructions on the screen. If some
data is incorrect or has not been entered, a message is
displayed and the file is not downloaded. When
programming is occurring, “PROG MODE” and the
rotating scan indicators are displayed.
4.2.9 CONFIGURATION FILE UTILITIES
4.2.7 PRINT CURRENT CONFIGURATION FILE
This function is selected to save, copy, rename, or
delete a radio configuration file. The “Save” function
saves the current configuration file to disk. This function should be used periodically while editing a file to
ensure that all data is not lost if a power failure occurs
or program execution is interrupted for some other
reason.
This function is selected to print the information
in the current file. The computer port used for the
printer can be selected as described in the next section.
The file information can also be printed to a disk file
instead of the printer. It is always printed to a file
called PRINTOUT.PRN. Therefore, if there is already
a file by that name in the current directory, it will be
overwritten. The screen displayed by this function
follows.
The copy, rename, and delete functions are
performed on disk files. The files in the current direc-
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Number/Letters Preceding The Parameter - An alternate method for quickly selecting these screens is to
press the number or letter key preceding the description. For example, to select the Setup Menu screen,
press “3”.
tory are listed and then the arrow and Return keys are
used to select the file. When copying a file, it must be
given a new name and/or destination in the destination box. The screen displayed by this function
follows.
F5 (Show Banks) - Displays the alpha tag of each bank
programmed in the current radio file.
F6 (Show Systems) - Displays the alpha tag and type
of all systems programmed in the current radio file.
“M” = Multi-Net, “L” = LTR, and “C” = conventional.
4.3.2 EDIT MAIN RADIO PARAMETERS
This function selects the Main Radio Parameters
screen which is used to program transceiver parameters that are the same for all banks and systems. This
screen and the parameters it programs are described in
Section 4-1.
4.3 MODIFY RADIO FILE MENU
4.3.1 INTRODUCTION
The Status Definitions section of the screen is
used to program the status conditions that are
displayed by the STAT option switch or Menu Mode
“STATUS” parameter. Status information is transmitted in the Multi-Net mode only (see Section 3.7.3).
The Modify Radio File menu is used to select the
screens which program the various types of radio
configuration information. This menu is shown in
Figure 4-4, and the screens selected by this menu are
described in the following information. The Main
Menu functions described in Sections 4.2.2 and 4.2.4
select this menu.
The Universal Interface (UD2I) Options screen is
selected by pressing the F4 key while the Main Radio
Parameters screen is displayed. If the Universal Interface feature is used, this screen programs the parameters that are the same for all systems. The Universal
Interface parameters that can be different for each
system are programmed by the screen displayed by
pressing key from the system programming screen.
Refer to Section 4.7 for more information on
Universal Interface Programming.
4.3.3 DEFINE OPTION BUTTONS
The Define Option Buttons screen shown in
Figure 4-5 programs the six option buttons on the front
panel of the transceiver or control unit. The arrow keys
select the button to be programmed and the Return key
is pressed to move to the box on the right which lists
the available choices for that button. Use the arrow
and PgUp/PgDn keys to move the highlight block to
the desired choice and select that choice by pressing
the Return key.
Figure 4-4 Modify Radio File Menu
The following keys have special functions in this
menu. Other special keys are described in Section
4.1.12.
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An on-off indicator is available in the display for
only the first three keys. Since some functions require
this indicator, they are not displayed for the keys that
do not have an indicator. Refer to Section 3.5 for more
information on the option switches.
edited is selected from a list of the current systems that
is displayed. The arrow and Return keys are used to
select the desired system.
The Multi-Net, LTR, and conventional Create/
Edit System screens and descriptions of the parameters
they program are located in the following tables:
4.3.4 SETUP MENU FUNCTIONS
Multi-Net Screen - Table 4-2
LTR Screen - Table 4-3
Conventional Screen - Table 4-4
The Setup Menu screen is shown in Figure 4-6.
This screen specifies which menu items can be
selected by the user. Some functions are also controllable by an option switch. If an option switch has been
programmed, the function cannot be enabled in the
menu.
Copy System
If an item is programmed as not selectable (INCL
= No), it is fixed in the condition displayed in the
Default column (if an option switch is not
programmed). For example, if Backlight Control = No
and Default = Enabled, the BACKLIGHT menu
parameter is not selectable by the user and the backlight is always on when power is on.
This screen is used to create a new system by
copying information from another. The system to be
copied is selected from a list and then the alpha tag for
the new system is entered. This function does not copy
anything to a disk file; it only copies to a new system
in the buffer.
If a menu item is selectable, the default condition
exists only until that function is changed by the user
(the last selected and not this default condition is
selected when power is turned on). Use the arrow keys
and spacebar to select the desired parameter in each
column. Refer to Section 3.5 for more information on
Menu Mode parameters.
Delete System
This screen is used to delete a current system.
The system to be deleted is selected from a list. This
function does not delete anything on disk; it only
deletes the selected system in the buffer.
Programming Group Information
4.3.5 CREATE/EDIT/COPY/DELETE SYSTEM
The group parameter screen is displayed from the
system screen by pressing F6. With LTR systems, this
screen is also used to program channel information.
The group screens and descriptions are shown in the
tables listed in the preceding “Edit System” section.
To return to the system screen, press the F9 or Escape
key.
Create System
The Create System functions are used to create
new LTR, Multi-Net, or conventional systems. The
alpha tag for the new system is entered and then the
Create/Edit System screen is displayed. The system
alpha tag can be up to ten characters long, similar to
the bank alpha tag. The system alpha tag is used only
for programming and is not displayed by the
transceiver.
To program the PTT (proceed) tone delay time,
press the F6 key from the applicable group screen. The
following screen is then displayed to program the
delay time for the system and select the group on
which the delay is active. Numbers from 1-15 can be
entered, with each number representing a delay of 125
ms. For example, entering “4” programs a delay of 4 x
125 or 500 ms.
Edit System
The Edit System function is used to change the
parameters of a current system. The system to be
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Figure 4-5 Define Option Buttons Screen
Figure 4-6 Setup Menu Functions Screen
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4.3.6 CREATE/EDIT/COPY/DELETE BANK
Create Bank
This Create Bank function is used to create a new
bank. At least one bank must be created even if banks
are not going to be selected. Banks are identified by
alpha tag and selected by the BANK option switch or
“Bank Select” Menu Mode parameter. An alpha tag
can have up to ten characters. Most printable ASCII
characters can be used except the following:
PTT Tone Delay Programming Screen
#
&
(
)
,
.
:
;
[
]
After the alpha tag is entered, the Create/Edit
Bank screen is displayed. This screen is used to edit
information unique to a bank. This screen and the
parameters it programs are described in Table 4-5.
Linking Systems To A Bank
A system can be linked to a previously created
bank from the Create/Edit System screen as follows or
from the Create/Edit Bank screen described in Section
4.3.6. To do this, proceed as follows:
Edit Bank
The Edit Bank function is used to change parameters of previously created banks. The bank to be edited
is selected from a list of the current banks, and the
arrow and Return keys are used to select the desired
bank. The Create/Edit Bank screen is then displayed
(see preceding “Create Bank” description).
a. When system information is being programmed, the
current banks are displayed on the right side of the
screen. If the current system is in a bank, there is a
system number to the right of the bank name. If it is
not in the bank, “xx” is indicated.
b. To add or delete the current system, press the F5 key
and then use the arrow keys to highlight the desired
bank. To add the current system to that bank, press
the “A” key; to delete it from that bank, press the
“D” key.
Copy Bank
This screen is used to create a new bank by
copying information from another bank. The bank to
be copied is selected from a list and then the alpha tag
for the new bank is entered. This does not copy
anything to a disk file; only to another bank in the
buffer.
c. If a system was added, the highlight bar moves to
the system number column. This column programs
the number of that system in the displayed bank.
Enter the desired number from 1-99. Press the
Return key once to make the change and press it
again to go back to editing system information.
Delete Bank
This function is used to delete a current bank. The
bank to be deleted is selected from a list. This does not
delete anything on disk; only the selected bank in the
buffer.
Programming System Universal Interface Options
Linking Systems To A Bank
To display the screen that programs the Universal
Interface parameters for the system, press the F4 key.
Refer to Section 4.7 for more information on
Universal Interface programming.
Systems are created using the Create System
screen or Copy System functions. The programmed
systems can then be linked to a bank from either the
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4.3.8 EDITING UNIQUE ID CODES
System programming screen (see Section 4.3.5) or the
Create/Edit Bank screen.
The unique ID code programmed for each MultiNet system can be edited by selecting the “Setup/
Change Unique ID” parameter in the Modify Radio
File menu (see Figure 4-4). This displays the screen
shown in Figure 4-8. This screen allows all Multi-Net
unique ID's to be conveniently edited without having
to display each system screen.
Systems are identified by alpha tags, and numbers
are assigned when a system is linked to a bank.
Different system numbers can be assigned in each
bank even if identical systems are used in the banks.
To link a system to a bank from the Create/Edit Bank
screen, proceed as follows:
a. When bank information is being programmed, the
current systems are displayed on the right side of the
screen. If a system is in the current bank, there is a
system number to the right of the bank name. If it is
not in the bank, “xx” is indicated.
b. To add or delete a system, press the F6 key and then
use the arrow keys to highlight the desired system.
To add that system to the current bank, press the “A”
key; to delete it from that bank, press the “D” key.
c. If a system was added, the highlight bar moves to
the system number column. This programs the number of that system in the current bank. Enter the
desired number from 1-99. Press the Return key
once to make the change and press it again to go
back to editing bank information.
Figure 4-7 Telephone Numbers Screen
4.3.7 PROGRAMMING PRESTORED
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
If the PHONE option switch or “TELEPHONE”
menu parameter is programmed, the Phone Mode can
be selected to place telephone calls (see Section
3.6.13). The Telephone Numbers screen shown in
Figure 4-7 can then be used to prestore up to ten telephone numbers. This screen is selected by the “Setup
Prestored Telephone Numbers” parameter in the
Modify Radio File menu (see Figure 4-4).
Figure 4-8 Setup/Change Unique ID Screen
4.4 ADDITIONAL PROGRAMMING
INFORMATION
4.4.1 REPEATER NUMBER PROGRAMMING
(MULTI-NET AND LTR)
The alpha tag and not the telephone number is
displayed when a number is recalled. This alpha tag
can include any ten characters except the ones listed in
Section 4.3.6. Telephone numbers up to 29 digits long
can be programmed. Do not enter dashes. The “*” and
“#” characters program the DTMF tone for those characters. If “Assigned” is “No”, the telephone number
cannot be recalled by the user.
Each Multi-Net repeater site can have up to 30
repeaters, and each LTR repeater site can have up to
20 repeaters. The repeaters at the same site are
assigned a unique number from 1-30 or 1-20. With
Multi-Net systems, these numbers can be assigned
arbitrarily as long as no two repeaters have the same
number.
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priority number being transmitted is greater than the
priority number assigned to the ID code being transmitted, the system cannot be accessed at that time.
There are various schemes that the repeater may use to
determine the current system priority. Refer to the
setup section of the repeater service manual for more
information.
With LTR systems, they can also be assigned
arbitrarily. However, for maximum system efficiency,
a scheme should be used which equalizes, as much as
possible, the gaps between numbers. For example, a
five-repeater system should use numbers 1, 5, 9, 13,
and 17. The number assigned to a repeater is
programmed in the repeater, the mobiles assigned to
that home repeater, and the System Management
Module (Multi-Net only).
4.4.4 SITE NUMBER PROGRAMMING
(MULTI-NET ONLY)
4.4.2 CHANNEL NUMBER PROGRAMMING
Each Multi-Net repeater site must be assigned a
number from 1-255. A repeater site is defined as a
group of repeaters which share the same high-speed
data bus (refer to Section 5.6). The site number
programmed in the mobile is used for controlling scanning. A site number is also transmitted in the form of
DTMF tones when a special call is made by a mobile
to a different site. The System Management Module
uses the site information to route the call. Refer to
Section 5.7 for more information on special calls.
With LTR operation, the mobile transceiver is
programmed with the channel number of each repeater
it can access. With Multi-Net operation, this is not
necessary because the mobile transceiver receives “go
to” channel information over the air. The only channels that are programmed in Multi-Net systems are the
home and status channels. This allows channels to be
added to the system without reprogramming the
mobiles.
If there is only one site that can be accessed by
the mobiles, the site number of the repeater system can
be selected arbitrarily. Each selectable system of the
mobile is then programmed with that site number. If
there are several sites that can be accessed, each site
must be assigned a unique number. Each selectable
system of the mobile is then programmed with the
number of the site that is accessed by that system.
Each Multi-Net system can be programmed with
a different home repeater number if desired. However,
systems with the same site number must be
programmed with the same status channel number.
Refer to Section 4.4.4 for more information on site
numbers.
The channel numbers used to program this transceiver are listed at the end of this section. The channels used for programming channels 1-600 are the
same as the FCC channel numbers. However, for
channels above 600, a special programming channel
number is used because some frequencies were
skipped by the FCC scheme. A –12.5 kHz offset can
be specified for channels 1-600 because they have a 25
kHz spacing. This offset does not apply to channels
above 600 because they already have a 12.5 kHz
spacing.
4.4.5 SPECIFYING RIC-EQUIPPED
REPEATERS
4.4.3 ACCESS PRIORITY PROGRAMMING
(MULTI-NET ONLY)
When programming the channel numbers of LTR
systems, you can specify if the repeater is equipped
with an E.F. Johnson RIC (repeater interconnect)
controller. If a system with a transmit ID code
programmed for RIC is then selected, the transceiver
will attempt to access only repeaters specified as
equipped with repeater interconnect. This allows both
RIC and non-RIC repeaters to be programmed in each
system.
Each Multi-Net encode (transmit) ID code is
programmed with an access priority number from 1-5.
As stated in Section 5.8.2, this access priority and the
current system priority being transmitted by the
repeater determine if the system can be accessed. If the
Without this feature, the transceiver may trunk to
a repeater not equipped with a RIC drawer when a RIC
call is made. No dial tone or other supervision is then
returned when the PTT switch is released which may
be confusing to the user.
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TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
4.4.6 WIDE AREA GROUP TRACKING
PROGRAMMING
4.5 PROGRAMMING ONE TRANSCEIVER WITH
ANOTHER (CLONING)
When Wide Area Group Tracking is enabled with
Multi-Net Auto-Registration (see Section 3.7.2), the
same group remains selected when auto-registration
on another system occurs. This allows a companion
group to be automatically selected in the new system.
For example, the transceiver can be programmed so
that if a telephone group is selected and auto-registration occurs on a new system, a telephone group is also
selected on the new system. Without wide area group
tracking, the last selected group of the new system is
selected.
One transceiver can be used to program another
with identical information. One use of this type of
programming may be to reprogram a transceiver in the
field where a computer is not available. Transceivers
of different types cannot be used. For example, do not
use an 800 MHz model to program a 900 MHz model.
Proceed as follows:
a. Turn the power of both transceivers off. Connect
Cloning Cable, Part No. 597-2002-268, between the
microphone connectors of the transceivers.
b. Turn the power of the master (source) transceiver
on. Then turn the power of the slave (destination)
transceiver on.
With this type of operation, it is important that the
same groups in all systems be programmed. If autoregistration occurs on a system that does not have the
group programmed (ASN = No), the next higher
programmed group is selected and displayed. The
selected group then changes by one or more which is
probably not the desired operation. This occurs
because all groups that are higher in number are pulled
down to fill the empty position(s). Therefore, the
group also changes when auto-registration occurs on
that system with a group selected that is higher than
the unprogrammed group.
c. Programming is indicated by “CLONING” in the
alphanumeric display and the rotating scanning
indicators in the status display of both transceivers.
In addition, the system and group number are displayed by the master transceiver.
d. When programming is finished, the displays return
to normal.
4.6 WRITE-ON FLASH PROGRAMMING
4.6.1 INTRODUCTION
Therefore, when programming wide area group
tracking, observe the following rules:
•
Assign companion groups in sequence starting with
Group 1 and make sure that the same groups are
programmed in each participating system.
The E.F. Johnson Write-On flash programming
feature allows the transceiver operating software
(firmware) to be updated without replacing the microcomputer or a memory device such as an EPROM.
•
If groups are programmed that are not companions
with groups in other systems, program them above
the companion range. Then do not leave one of
those groups selected after using it for a call because
if auto-registration occurs, an unexpected group
may be selected.
This reprogramming of the operating software
should not be confused with the programming of operating parameters described in the preceding sections.
Although both programming procedures use essentially the same programming setup, the software and
procedures are different.
When the transceiver is programmed, the
programming software does not allow the transceiver
to be programmed if all programmed systems do not
have the same number of programmed groups.
However, it does not check to make sure that the same
groups are programmed in each system.
Currently, the Write-On flash programming software is available only by downloading it from the E.F.
Johnson ACES® Bulletin Board System. To access
this system, dial toll-free from the U.S. and Canada
800-227-3997 (N, 8, 1, ANSI). From other countries,
dial 507-835-8607. If you do not know your login ID
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Part No. 001-9750-007
TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
023-9750-000 or 023-9800-000, can be used (the
earlier 023-5810-000 model will not work).
or have questions about accessing the ACES system,
call 800-328-3911, extension 7 (USA and Canada) or
507-835-6222, extension 2100 (international).
NOTE: The RPI must always be connected to the front
panel jack of the transceiver (it cannot be connected to
the microphone jack of a remote control unit).
4.6.2 PROGRAMMING FILES
The files required to flash program a transceiver
are contained in a compressed self-extracting file called
DMFLASH.EXE. This file is located in the
MNFLASH download area of the ACES system. Once
this file is downloaded, simply type DMFLASH (Enter)
at the DOS prompt to extract the following files:
File Name
b. Set the switch on the RPI so that it is toward the
LED.
c. Start the program by typing DM_LOAD (Enter) at
the DOS prompt. When the opening screen is displayed, turn transceiver power on. If power is
already on, cycle power off and then on. The transceiver display should be blank and the RPI LED
should be amber.
Description
DM_LOAD.EXE
READ.ME
BOOTLOAD.S19
PREBOOT.S19
Flash loader program
Programming instructions
Flash loader hex file
Flash loader hex file
SUMMIT_1.S19
SUMMIT_2.S19
Radio software hex file
Radio software hex file
d. Highlight the first selection in the loader program's
menu and then press the Enter key to begin the data
transfer. Programming requires approximately 90
seconds.
e. Disconnect the programming cable from the transceiver and cycle power off and on. Verify that the
new revision number is displayed momentarily
when power is turned on (see Section 3.6.14).
The SUMMIT_x.S19 files contain the actual code
that is loaded into the transceiver by the program.
These are the files that are changed when the radio
operating software is updated.
4.7 UNIVERSAL INTERFACE PROGRAMMING
4.6.3 PROGRAMMING “A” MODEL
TRANSCEIVERS
4.7.1 INTRODUCTION
The UD2I™ (Universal Digital and Data Interface) feature is available on all Summit DM transceivers that have Version 207 or later operating software (see Appendix A). Optional universal interface
pigtail cable assembly, Part No. 597-2002-245, is
required to utilize this interface (Validation Key, Part
No. 250-9750-050, is no longer required). This cable
provides a female 25-pin D-type connector for interfacing with the data equipment.
NOTE: Before any Summit DM “A” revision letter
transceiver and also “B” revision letter 9755 transceivers can be connected to the RPI module, pin 1 of
power amplifier module U500 must be desoldered and
lifted from the board.
If this is not done with these transceivers, the
transmitter may erroneously key when the RPI switch
is moved to the flash position. This may result in
excessive current draw that could damage the antenna
switching circuitry. Diodes CR506 and CR507 and RF
amplifier Q290 could be destroyed. Fuse F500 may
also blow if the power supply can produce enough
current. This problem has been corrected in later
models, so this modification is not required.
This is a non-proprietary interface that can be used
to connect various types of data equipment such as
modems and data terminals to the transceiver. A
detailed description on the operation of this interface is
located in Appendix B. This information can be used to
design and set up equipment for use with this interface.
4.6.4 PROGRAMMING PROCEDURE
Various aspects of this interface are programmable using the standard transceiver programming
software (Version 202 or later). The parameters that
a. Connect the programming hardware listed in setup
as described in Section 4.1.1. Only RPI, Part No.
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Audio Circuit States
Audio_Rx - Modes 1*, 2, 3, 4
Audio_Tx - Modes 1*, 2, 3, 4
can be programmed and configurations that can be
selected for each are described in the following information. Since the specific configuration of these
parameters is determined by the equipment being
used, detailed programming instructions are not
included in this manual (this information should be
provided by the equipment manufacturer).
NOTE: The system level programming described in the
next section overrides the preceding Audio Rx/Tx programming except if “Undefined” is programmed.
Inputs
NOTE: All interface parameters should be left in the
default condition (indicated by *) unless instructed
otherwise in the installation information provided with
the data equipment. Failure to do so may result in
improper transceiver operation.
PTT_Request_N - PTT_Request_N_Std*
PTT_Request_N_Inh
PTT_Request_N_Data
PTT_Request_N_Data_R
Undefined
Input_A - Call_Indicator*
Mic_Mute
Horn
Data_ARQ
Undefined
Input_B - Emergency*
Mic_Mute
Horn
Call_Indicator
Undefined
Outputs
PTT - PTT_Tx_Sense*
PTT_Standard
PTT_Tx_Sense
Undefined
BSY_Out - Bsy_Out_Access_Denied*
Busy_Out_RSSI
Undefined
Output_A - Clear_Code*
Clear-To_Send
Monitor_Hanger
Tx_Audio_En
Aux2
Undefined
Output_B - Aux2*
Rx_Data_Group
Clear_to_Send
Monitor_Hanger
Tx_Audio_En
Undefined
Figure 4-9 Main Universal Interface Screen
4.7.2 MAIN PARAMETERS SCREEN
Universal interface parameters that are the same
for all systems are programmed using the main
Universal Interface Options screen shown in
Figure 4-9. This screen is selected by pressing the F4
key from the Main Radio Parameters screen (see
Section 4.3.2). The parameters that can be
programmed using this screen and the available
choices are as follows:
NOTE: For more information on the configuration
selected by each option, refer to Appendix B.
MAIN PARAMETERS
* Default condition. Do not select “Undefined”
because improper operation may result.
Disable UI Bus - Yes, No*
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SYSTEM PARAMETERS
Audio Circuit States
Audio_Rx - Modes 1-4, Undefined*
Audio_Tx - Modes 1-4, Undefined*
* Default condition. If “Undefined” is selected, the
radio-level parameter programmed in the preceding
section is in effect.
Figure 4-10 System Universal Interface
Screen
4.7.4 AUXILIARY AND EMERGENCY SWITCH
PROGRAMMING
When the Auxiliary 2 function is programmed, it
uses the OUTPUT B line of the universal interface
(see Section 3.5.4). For proper operation of this
switch, OUTPUT B must be programmed for the
default condition of AUX2. Universal interface
programming does not affect the Auxiliary 1 function.
4.7.3 SYSTEM PARAMETERS SCREEN
There are also two parameters that can be
different for each system. These parameters are
programmed using the system Universal Interface
Options screen shown in Figure 4-10. This screen is
selected from the applicable system programming
screen by pressing the F4 key. The parameters that can
be programmed using this screen and the available
choices are as follows:
NOTE: The problem of the Auxiliary 2 output always
going to the active state at power-up has been corrected with Version 206 and later transceiver operating software.
When an external emergency switch is used, it is
connected to INPUT B of the universal interface (see
Section 2.4.6). For proper operation of this switch,
INPUT B must be programmed for the default condition of EMERGENCY.
NOTE: For more information on the configuration
selected by each of the following parameters, refer to
Appendix B.
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Table 4-1 Main Radio Parameters Screen
Parameter
Receive Delay Time
Call Delay Time
Scan Continue Time
Acceptable Responses
0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7
seconds
0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7
seconds
0-60 seconds
Description
Time before scanning resumes after a message is received (Section 3.4.3).
Time before scanning resumes after message is transmitted (Section 3.4.3).
Maximum time that a call is monitored before scanning resumes (Section
3.4.3).
Scan Revert Mode
Temporary, Last
Selects the system/group that is selected when the transmitter is keyed in
Received, Last Selected the scan mode or the scan mode is exited (Sections 3.4.4 and 3.4.5).
Ignition Sense Delay Forever, Immediate, 10, Selects power turn-off delay (Sections 2.4.3 and 3.6.7). If a transceiver
Time
30 minutes, 1, 8, 10, 12 with Version 205 or earlier operating software is programmed, the times
hours
are 10, 20, 30 minutes, 1, 2, or 4 hours.
Conv Proceed to Talk Enabled, Disabled
Enables or disables the proceed-to-talk tone on conventional systems. It is
Tone
always enabled on Multi-Net and LTR systems (Section 3.6.3).
Transmit Time-Out
0.5-5 minutes in 0.5 min Programs the Time-Out Timer (Section 3.6.1).
Time
steps, Disabled
Mic Hanger
Enabled, Disabled
When “Disabled” is programmed, taking the microphone off-hook does
not enable the monitor mode or disable system and group scanning.
Display Emergency
Yes, No
When “No” is programmed, the display does not indicate “EMERGENCY” when the Emergency switch is pressed (Section 3.6.8).
Priority 1 Sampling
Disabled, 500 ms, 1 or 2 Selects how often the Priority 1 system/group (if programmed) is sampled
Time
seconds
on conventional systems (Section 3.5.17).
Select Knob Default Systems or Groups
Programs if the bar in the next parameter goes to the system or group display when power is turned on or the return time expires.
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Table 4-1 Main Radio Parameters Screen (Continued)
Parameter
Select Knob Return
Time
Remote Trunk Mount
Radio Has Encryption
Installed
Horn Honk Mode
Radio Can Be Disabled
(MN Only)
Radio Can Be Interrogated (MN Only)
Status Definitions
Dispatch Tx Camp-On
Acceptable Responses
Description
0-15 seconds in 1-sec
steps
Programs the delay after a change is made before the bar returns to the
default display programmed above. “0” programs no return. This bar indicates which display will be changed by the Select switch (Section 3.2).
Yes, No
Programs the transceiver as a front or remote mount type. This is required
for proper operation of the microphone hanger (seeSection 2.5.5).
Yes, No
“Yes” is programmed if encryption is installed. This routes all receive
audio to the encryption module so that encrypted calls are received even if
encryption is disabled (Section 3.6.12).
Mode A or Mode B
Programs the horn alert operating mode (Section 3.6.4).
Yes, No
Selects if the transceiver can be disabled by the Multi-Net Mobile Disable
message (Section 5.8.5).
Yes, No
Selects if the transceiver can be interrogated to determine its status (Section 5.8.4).
Up to 10 characters (A-Z, Programs the message that is displayed for up to eight status conditions
0-9, etc.)
(Section 3.7.3).
Yes, No
Selecting “No” disables camp-on. Then if the PTT switch is pressed while
receiving a call, the transmitter is disabled and the busy tone sounds until
the PTT switch is released (Section 3.7.7).
Table 4-2 Multi-Net System Parameters
Parameter
Acceptable Responses
Alpha Tag
Any keyboard character
Site
1-255
Description
Changes the 10-character alpha tag for the selected system. The system
alpha tag is used only for programming and is not displayed by the transceiver.
Programs the site number of the system (Section 4.4.4).
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Table 4-2 Multi-Net System Parameters (Continued)
Parameter
Offset
Acceptable Responses
Description
Yes, No
Programs if channels are offset 12.5 kHz on the low side. This applies to
channels 1-600 only (Section 4.4.2).
Home Repeater
1-30
Programs the number of the home repeater of the transceiver (Section
Number
4.4.1).
Home Repeater
1-920 (800 MHz)
Programs the channel number of the home repeater (Section 4.4.2). ChanChannel
1-479 (900 MHz)
nel numbers are shown in the table at the end of this section.
Status Repeater Chan- 1-920 (800 MHz)
Programs the channel number of the status repeater (Section 5.3). Channel
nel
1-479 (900 MHz)
numbers are shown in the table at the end of this section.
Transmit Inhibit ID
1-225
Programs the block of transmit inhibit ID codes up to all 225. If an ID code
within this block is decoded up to 5 seconds before the PTT switch is
pressed, the transmitter does not key (Section 3.7.5).
Block Decode
1-225
Programs a block of ID codes up to all 225 that are decoded regardless of
the group selected (Section 3.3.4).
Key
--This is a number unique to your system assigned by the E.F. Johnson Company (Section 5.8.9).
Unique ID
1-8163
Programs the unique ID of the mobile (Section 5.8.1). Each Multi-Net system can be programmed with a different unique ID if necessary.
Emergency System/
Any programmed system/ Programs the system/group on which emergency calls are made when the
Group; Automatic
group; Auto = Yes or No emergency switch is pressed, if applicable. Auto specifies if automatic
transmitting occurs (Section 3.6.8).
Power Level
1, 2, 3, 4, 2W
Programs the output power selected by this system. The power output produced by these numbers is set in the test mode. See Section 3.6.9 for more
information.
Queue
Enabled, Disabled
Programs if busy queuing occurs on the system (Section 3.7.1).
Group Scan
Enabled, Disabled
Programs if group scanning occurs on the system (Section 3.4.7).
Scan List
Yes, No
Programs if the system is scanned (Section 3.4.6).
Companding
Yes, No
Programs if companding is used on the system (Section 1.5).
Scan Dropout
50-100%
Programs the percentage of good data messages that must be detected to
Criteria
stay on the current site with auto-registration. The default is 75% (Section
3.7.2).
Priority 1/2 Decode
1-225, 236, 237 [1]
Programs the priority decode (receive) ID codes (Section 3.3.4).
Call Light
Yes, No
Programs if the Call indicator lights when a call is received on that ID code
(Section 3.6.2).
Horn
Yes, No
Programs if the horn sounds when a call is received on that ID code (Section 3.6.4).
Encryption
Yes, No
Programs if encryption is used on calls received on that ID code (Section
3.6.12).
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Table 4-2 Multi-Net System Parameters (Continued)
MULTI-NET GROUP PARAMETERS
(The Group Parameter screen is selected by pressing F6)
Parameter
Asn
Alpha Tag
Acceptable Responses
Description
Yes, No
A-Z, 0-9, etc.
Specifies if the group will be selectable.
Specifies the 10-character alpha tag that is displayed when the group is
selected.
Group Enc/Dec
1-225, 236, 237 [1]
Specifies the encode (transmit) and decode (receive) ID codes for that
selectable group.
Call Light
Enabled, Disabled
Programs if the Call indicator lights when a call is received on that group
(Section 3.6.2).
Horn
Enabled, Disabled
Programs if the horn sounds when a call is received on that group (Section
3.6.4).
Encrypt
Enabled, Disabled
Programs if encryption is used on calls received and transmitted on that
group (Section 3.6.12).
Scan List
Yes, No
Programs if that group is scanned by the group scan feature (Section
3.4.7).
Pri (Priority)
1-5
Programs the transmit access priority for that group. “1” is the highest priority and “5” the lowest priority (Section 5.8.2).
Data
Yes, No
Programs if that group can be used for data transmissions (Section 3.6.11).
[1] 236 = Auxiliary Calls, 237 = Telephone (Interconnect) Calls. See Section 3.7.4.
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Table 4-3 LTR System Parameters
Parameter
Alpha Tag
Acceptable Responses
Description
Any keyboard character
Changes the 10-character alpha tag for the selected system. The system
alpha tag is used only for programming and is not displayed by the transceiver.
Home Repeater
1-20
Programs the number of the home repeater of the transceiver (Section
4.4.1).
Area
0, 1
Selects the area of the LTR system. “0” is usually programmed unless two
systems are close enough to interfere with each other. One is then programmed “0” and the other “1”.
Repeater Interconnect 1-250
Programs the block of Repeater Interconnect (RIC) ID codes up to all 250.
If an ID code within this block is selected or decoded, the transceiver
enters the RIC operating mode and telephone calls can be placed or
received.
Transmit Inhibit ID
1-250
Programs the block of transmit inhibit ID codes up to all 250. If an ID code
within this block is decoded up to 5 seconds before the PTT switch is
pressed, the transmitter does not key (Section 3.7.5).
Block Decode
1-250
Programs a block of ID codes up to all 250 that are decoded regardless of
the group selected (Section 3.3.4).
Emergency System/
Any programmed system/ Programs the system/group on which emergency calls are made when the
Group; Auto
group; Auto = Yes or No emergency switch is pressed, if applicable. With LTR systems, automatic
transmission are not available, so “Auto” = “No” (Section 3.6.8).
Power Level
1, 2, 3, 4, 2W
Programs the output power selected by this system. The power output produced by these numbers is set in the test mode (Section 3.6.9).
Group Scan
Enabled, Disabled
Programs if group scanning occurs on the system (Section 3.4.7).
Scan List
Yes, No
Programs if the system is scanned (Section 3.4.6).
Companding
Yes, No
Programs if companding is used on the system (Section 1.5).
Priority 1/2 Decode
1-250
Programs the priority decode (receive) ID codes (Section 3.3.4).
Call Light
Yes, No
Programs if the Call indicator lights when a call is received on that ID code
(Section 3.6.2).
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Table 4-3 LTR System Parameters (Continued)
Parameter
Acceptable Responses
Horn
Yes, No
Encrypt
Yes, No
Asn
Alpha Tag
Group Enc/Dec
Call Light
Horn
Encrypt
Scan List
Transpond
Data
Repeater Channel
Number (Chn)
Ofst (Offset)
RIC
Description
Programs if the horn sounds when a call is received on that ID code (Section 3.6.4).
Programs if encryption is used on calls received on that ID code (Section
3.6.12).
LTR GROUP PARAMETERS
(The Group Parameter screen is selected by pressing F6)
Yes, No
Specifies if the group will be selectable.
A-Z, 0-9, etc.
Specifies the 10-character alpha tag that is displayed when the group is
selected.
1-250
Specifies the encode (transmit) and decode (receive) ID codes for that
selectable group.
Enabled, Disabled
Programs if the Call indicator lights when a call is received on that group
(Section 3.6.2).
Enabled, Disabled
Programs if the horn sounds when a call is received on that group (Section
3.6.4).
Enabled, Disabled
Programs if encryption is used on calls received and transmitted on that ID
code (Section 3.6.12).
Yes, No
Programs if that group is scanned by the group scan feature (Section
3.4.7).
Enabled, Disabled
Programs if transponding occurs when a call is received on that group
(Section 3.8.3).
Yes, No
Programs if that group can be used for data transmissions (Section 3.6.11).
1-920 (800 MHz)
Programs the channel number of each of the repeaters at the site (Section
1-479 (900 MHz)
4.4.2). Channel numbers are shown in the table at the end of this section.
Yes, No
Programs if channels are offset 12.5 kHz on the low side. This can be programmed for channels 1-600 only (Section 4.4.2).
Yes, No
Programs if the repeater is equipped with a RIC drawer (Section 4.4.5).
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Table 4-4 Conventional System Parameters
Parameter
Alpha Tag
Acceptable Responses
Description
Any keyboard character
Changes the 10-character alpha tag for the selected system. The system
alpha tag is used only for programming and is not displayed by the transceiver.
Channel Number
1-920 (800 MHz)
Programs the channel number of that system. Channel numbers are shown
1-479 (900 MHz)
in the table at the end of this section.
Offset
Yes, No
Programs if the channel is offset 12.5 kHz on the low side. This is programmable for 800 MHz channels 1-600 only (Section 4.4.2).
Alpha Tag
Any keyboard character Changes the 10-character alpha tag for the selected system. The system
alpha tag is used only for programming and is not displayed by the transceiver.
RIC
Yes, No
Programs if the repeater is equipped with RIC interconnect.
Scan List
Yes, No
Programs if the system is scanned (Section 3.4.6).
Group Scan
Enabled, Disabled
Programs if group scanning occurs on the system (Section 3.4.7).
Emergency System/
Any programmed system/ Programs the system/group on which emergency calls are made when the
Group; Auto
group; Auto = Yes or No emergency switch is pressed, if applicable. On conventional systems, automatic transmission are not available, so “Auto” = “No” (Section 3.6.8).
Power Level
1, 2, 3, 4, 2W
Programs the output power selected by this system. The power output produced by these numbers is set in the test mode (Section 3.6.10).
Companding
Yes, No
Programs if companding is used on the system (Section 1.5).
Talk-Around Allowed Yes, No
Programs if talk-around can be programmed on any of the groups in that
system (Section 3.9.4).
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Table 4-4 Conventional System Parameters (Continued)
CONVENTIONAL GROUP PARAMETERS
(The Group Parameter screen is selected by pressing F6)
Parameter
Asn
Alpha Tag
Acceptable Responses
Description
Yes, No
A-Z, 0-9, etc.
Specifies if the group will be selectable.
Specifies the 10-character alpha tag that is displayed when the group is
selected.
Tx CG
None, CG, DCG, IDCG, Programs the type of transmit Call Guard squelch for the indicated group
EXT
(Section 3.6.2).
CG = Tone (CTCSS), DCG = digital, IDCG = Inverted digital, EXT = External decoder (not supported)
CG Value
Tone number or digital
If CG was selected, the tone number from 1-38 is entered. If digital was
code
selected, the digital code is selected. These numbers are listed in Table 4-6.
Rx CG
None, CG, DCG, IDCG, Programs the type of Receive Call Guard squelch for the indicated group
EXT
(Section 3.6.2).
CG Value
Tone number or digital
If CG was selected, the tone number from 1-38 is entered. If digital was
code
selected, the digital code is selected. These numbers are listed in Table 4-6.
Send TO (Transmit
Yes, No
If “yes” is programmed, the Call Guard turn-off code is sent when the PTT
Turn-Off Code)
switch is released (Section 3.6.2).
Talk-Around
Yes, No
If “yes” is programmed, transmission is on the receive frequency (Table
3.9.4). “NA” is displayed if talk-around was disabled on the system screen.
Call Light
Yes, No
Programs if the Call indicator lights when a call is received on that group
(Section 3.6.2).
Horn
Yes, No
Programs if the horn sounds when a call is received on that group (Section
3.6.4).
Encryption
Yes, No
Programs if encryption is used on calls received and transmitted on that
group (Section 3.6.12).
Disable-Busy
Yes, No
Programs if Transmit Disable On Busy feature is active on that group
(Section 3.9.1).
Transmit Disable
Yes, No
Programs if group is receive-only (Section 3.9.6).
4-24
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
Table 4-4 Conventional System Parameters (Continued)
Parameter
Acceptable Responses
Scan List
Yes, No
Data
Yes, No
Description
Programs if that group is scanned by the group scan feature (Section
3.4.7).
Programs if that group can be used for data transmissions (Section 3.6.11)
Table 4-5 Create/Edit Bank Screen Parameters
Parameter
Acceptable Responses
Alpha Tag
A-Z, 0-9, etc.
Number of Systems in --Bank
Home System/ Group Any system/group in
selected bank
Priority 1 System/
Any conventional system/
Group
group in selected bank
Priority 2 System/
Any conventional system/
Group
group in selected bank
Emergency System/
Any system/group in the
Group Default
current configuration file
Emergency Automatic Yes, No
Fixed System/ Group Any system/group in
Transmit During Scan selected bank
Description
Changes the alpha tag for the selected bank.
The number of systems that have been assigned to that bank. Systems are
assigned by pressing F6 (see Section 4.3.6).
Programs the system/group that is selected when the HOME key is pressed
(Section 3.5.11).
Programs the priority 1 system/group when priority group sampling is
used on conventional systems (Section 3.5.17).
Programs the priority 2 system/group (if used) when priority group sampling is used on conventional systems (Section 3.5.17).
Programs the default system/group that is selected if no emergency system/group is programmed in the selected system (Section 3.6.8).
Programs if manual or automatic transmit occurs when the emergency
switch is pressed on Multi-Net systems (Section 3.6.8).
If a system/group is entered, it has precedence over the Scan Revert Mode
parameter in the General Radio Parameters Screen when this bank is
selected. Transmissions in the scan mode then always occur on this system/group (Section 3.4.5).
4-25
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
Table 4-5 Create/Edit Bank Screen Parameters (Continued)
Parameter
Data System/Group
Scan Type
Wide Area Group
Tracking (MN only)
Start At Home
Acceptable Responses
Description
Any system/group in
Programs the default system/group that is selected for a data transmission
selected bank
if the selected group is not programmed for data (Section 3.6.11).
Multi-Site or Single-Site Programs the type of scanning that occurs when the scan mode is selected
(Section 3.4.2). This can also be changed by the user by the SCAN SELCT
menu item (Section 3.5.19).
Yes, No
If “Yes” is programmed, the selected group does not change when registration occurs. If “No” is programmed, it changes to the last selected group of
the new system (Section 3.7.2).
Yes, No
If “Yes” is programmed, the bank home system/group is always selected
when power is turned on or the bank is selected. If “No” is programmed,
the last selected system/group is always displayed (Section 3.5.11).
Table 4-6 Call Guard (CTCSS/DCS) Codes and Tones
Recommended Tone Call Guard Codes
Code
Freq
Code
Freq
Code
Freq
Code
Freq
09
91.5
18
123.0
27
167.9
01
67.0
10
94.8
19
127.3
28
173.8
02
71.9
11**
97.4
20
131.8
29
179.9
03
74.4
12
100.0
21
136.5
30
186.2
04
77.0
13
103.5
22
141.3
31
192.8
05
79.7
14
107.2
23
146.2
32
203.5
06
82.5
15
110.9
24
151.4
33
210.7
07
85.4
16
114.8
25
156.7
34*
218.1
08
88.5
17
118.8
26
162.2
35*
225.7
* These tones normally are not used because of their close proximity to the voice frequencies
** This tone is normally not used because it may cause interference with adjacent tones.
Code
Freq
36*
37*
38*
39**
40**
41**
42**
233.6
241.8
250.3
69.3
206.5
229.1
254.1
654
662
664
703
712
723
731
732
734
743
754
Recommended Digital Call Guard Codes
023
025
026
031
032
043
047
051
054
065
071
072
073
074
114
115
116
125
131
132
134
143
152
155
156
162
165
172
174
205
223
226
243
244
245
251
261
263
265
271
306
311
315
331
343
346
351
364
365
371
411
412
413
423
4-26
431
432
445
464
465
466
503
506
516
532
546
565
606
612
624
627
631
632
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
800 MHz CHANNEL TABLE
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
851.0125
851.0375
851.0625
851.0875
851.1125
851.1375
851.1625
851.1875
851.2125
851.2375
851.2625
851.2875
851.3125
851.3375
851.3625
851.3875
851.4125
851.4375
851.4625
851.4875
851.5125
851.5375
851.5625
851.5875
851.6125
851.6375
851.6625
851.6875
851.7125
851.7375
851.7625
851.7875
851.8125
851.8375
851.8625
851.8875
851.9125
851.9375
851.9625
851.9875
852.0125
852.0375
852.0625
852.0875
852.1125
852.1375
852.1625
852.1875
852.2125
852.2375
852.2625
852.2875
852.3125
852.3375
806.0125
806.0375
806.0625
806.0875
806.1125
806.1375
806.1625
806.1875
806.2125
806.2375
806.2625
806.2875
806.3125
806.3375
806.3625
806.3875
806.4125
806.4375
806.4625
806.4875
806.5125
806.5375
806.5625
806.5875
806.6125
806.6375
806.6625
806.6875
806.7125
806.7375
806.7625
806.7875
806.8125
806.8375
806.8625
806.8875
806.9125
806.9375
806.9625
806.9875
807.0125
807.0375
807.0625
807.0875
807.1125
807.1375
807.1625
807.1875
807.2125
807.2375
807.2625
807.2875
807.3125
807.3375
TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
4-27
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
852.3625
852.3875
852.4125
852.4375
852.4625
852.4875
852.5125
852.5375
852.5625
852.5875
852.6125
852.6375
852.6625
852.6875
852.7125
852.7375
852.7625
852.7875
852.8125
852.8375
852.8625
852.8875
852.9125
852.9375
852.9625
852.9875
853.0125
853.0375
853.0625
853.0875
853.1125
853.1375
853.1625
853.1875
853.2125
853.2375
853.2625
853.2875
853.3125
853.3375
853.3625
853.3875
853.4125
853.4375
853.4625
853.4875
853.5125
853.5375
853.5625
853.5875
853.6125
853.6375
853.6625
853.6875
807.3625
807.3875
807.4125
807.4375
807.4625
807.4875
807.5125
807.5375
807.5625
807.5875
807.6125
807.6375
807.6625
807.6875
807.7125
807.7375
807.7625
807.7875
807.8125
807.8375
807.8625
807.8875
807.9125
807.9375
807.9625
807.9875
808.0125
808.0375
808.0625
808.0875
808.1125
808.1375
808.1625
808.1875
808.2125
808.2375
808.2625
808.2875
808.3125
808.3375
808.3625
808.3875
808.4125
808.4375
808.4625
808.4875
808.5125
808.5375
808.5625
808.5875
808.6125
808.6375
808.6625
808.6875
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
800 MHz CHANNEL TABLE
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
853.7125
853.7375
853.7625
853.7875
853.8125
853.8375
853.8625
853.8875
853.9125
853.9375
853.9625
853.9875
854.0125
854.0375
854.0625
854.0875
854.1125
854.1375
854.1625
854.1875
854.2125
854.2375
854.2625
854.2875
854.3125
854.3375
854.3625
854.3875
854.4125
854.4375
854.4625
854.4875
854.5125
854.5375
854.5625
854.5875
854.6125
854.6375
854.6625
854.6875
854.7125
854.7375
854.7625
854.7875
854.8125
854.8375
854.8625
854.8875
854.9125
854.9375
854.9625
854.9875
855.0125
855.0375
808.7125
808.7375
808.7625
808.7875
808.8125
808.8375
808.8625
808.8875
808.9125
808.9375
808.9625
808.9875
809.0125
809.0375
809.0625
809.0875
809.1125
809.1375
809.1625
809.1875
809.2125
809.2375
809.2625
809.2875
809.3125
809.3375
809.3625
809.3875
809.4125
809.4375
809.4625
809.4875
809.5125
809.5375
809.5625
809.5875
809.6125
809.6375
809.6625
809.6875
809.7125
809.7375
809.7625
809.7875
809.8125
809.8375
809.8625
809.8875
809.9125
809.9375
809.9625
809.9875
810.0125
810.0375
TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
4-28
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
855.0625
855.0875
855.1125
855.1375
855.1625
855.1875
855.2125
855.2375
855.2625
855.2875
855.3125
855.3375
855.3625
855.3875
855.4125
855.4375
855.4625
855.4875
855.5125
855.5375
855.5625
855.5875
855.6125
855.6375
855.6625
855.6875
855.7125
855.7375
855.7625
855.7875
855.8125
855.8375
855.8625
855.8875
855.9125
855.9375
855.9625
855.9875
856.0125
856.0375
856.0625
856.0875
856.1125
856.1375
856.1625
856.1875
856.2125
856.2375
856.2625
856.2875
856.3125
856.3375
856.3625
856.3875
810.0625
810.0875
810.1125
810.1375
810.1625
810.1875
810.2125
810.2375
810.2625
810.2875
810.3125
810.3375
810.3625
810.3875
810.4125
810.4375
810.4625
810.4875
810.5125
810.5375
810.5625
810.5875
810.6125
810.6375
810.6625
810.6875
810.7125
810.7375
810.7625
810.7875
810.8125
810.8375
810.8625
810.8875
810.9125
810.9375
810.9625
810.9875
811.0125
811.0375
811.0625
811.0875
811.1125
811.1375
811.1625
811.1875
811.2125
811.2375
811.2625
811.2875
811.3125
811.3375
811.3625
811.3875
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
800 MHz CHANNEL TABLE
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
232
233
234
235
236
237
238
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
256
257
258
259
260
261
262
263
264
265
266
267
268
269
270
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
232
233
234
235
236
237
238
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
256
257
258
259
260
261
262
263
264
265
266
267
268
269
270
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
856.4125
856.4375
856.4625
856.4875
856.5125
856.5375
856.5625
856.5875
856.6125
856.6375
856.6625
856.6875
856.7125
856.7375
856.7625
856.7875
856.8125
856.8375
856.8625
856.8875
856.9125
856.9375
856.9625
856.9875
857.0125
857.0375
857.0625
857.0875
857.1125
857.1375
857.1625
857.1875
857.2125
857.2375
857.2625
857.2875
857.3125
857.3375
857.3625
857.3875
857.4125
857.4375
857.4625
857.4875
857.5125
857.5375
857.5625
857.5875
857.6125
857.6375
857.6625
857.6875
857.7125
857.7375
811.4125
811.4375
811.4625
811.4875
811.5125
811.5375
811.5625
811.5875
811.6125
811.6375
811.6625
811.6875
811.7125
811.7375
811.7625
811.7875
811.8125
811.8375
811.8625
811.8875
811.9125
811.9375
811.9625
811.9875
812.0125
812.0375
812.0625
812.0875
812.1125
812.1375
812.1625
812.1875
812.2125
812.2375
812.2625
812.2875
812.3125
812.3375
812.3625
812.3875
812.4125
812.4375
812.4625
812.4875
812.5125
812.5375
812.5625
812.5875
812.6125
812.6375
812.6625
812.6875
812.7125
812.7375
TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
271
272
273
274
275
276
277
278
279
280
281
282
283
284
285
286
287
288
289
290
291
292
293
294
295
296
297
298
299
300
301
302
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
310
311
312
313
314
315
316
317
318
319
320
321
322
323
324
4-29
271
272
273
274
275
276
277
278
279
280
281
282
283
284
285
286
287
288
289
290
291
292
293
294
295
296
297
298
299
300
301
302
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
310
311
312
313
314
315
316
317
318
319
320
321
322
323
324
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
857.7625
857.7875
857.8125
857.8375
857.8625
857.8875
857.9125
857.9375
857.9625
857.9875
858.0125
858.0375
858.0625
858.0875
858.1125
858.1375
858.1625
858.1875
858.2125
858.2375
858.2625
858.2875
858.3125
858.3375
858.3625
858.3875
858.4125
858.4375
858.4625
858.4875
858.5125
858.5375
858.5625
858.5875
858.6125
858.6375
858.6625
858.6875
858.7125
858.7375
858.7625
858.7875
858.8125
858.8375
858.8625
858.8875
858.9125
858.9375
858.9625
858.9875
859.0125
859.0375
859.0625
859.0875
812.7625
812.7875
812.8125
812.8375
812.8625
812.8875
812.9125
812.9375
812.9625
812.9875
813.0125
813.0375
813.0625
813.0875
813.1125
813.1375
813.1625
813.1875
813.2125
813.2375
813.2625
813.2875
813.3125
813.3375
813.3625
813.3875
813.4125
813.4375
813.4625
813.4875
813.5125
813.5375
813.5625
813.5875
813.6125
813.6375
813.6625
813.6875
813.7125
813.7375
813.7625
813.7875
813.8125
813.8375
813.8625
813.8875
813.9125
813.9375
813.9625
813.9875
814.0125
814.0375
814.0625
814.0875
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
800 MHz CHANNEL TABLE
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
325
326
327
328
329
330
331
332
333
334
335
336
337
338
339
340
341
342
343
344
345
346
347
348
349
350
351
352
353
354
355
356
357
358
359
360
361
362
363
364
365
366
367
368
369
370
371
372
373
374
375
376
377
378
325
326
327
328
329
330
331
332
333
334
335
336
337
338
339
340
341
342
343
344
345
346
347
348
349
350
351
352
353
354
355
356
357
358
359
360
361
362
363
364
365
366
367
368
369
370
371
372
373
374
375
376
377
378
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
859.1125
859.1375
859.1625
859.1875
859.2125
859.2375
859.2625
859.2875
859.3125
859.3375
859.3625
859.3875
859.4125
859.4375
859.4625
859.4875
859.5125
859.5375
859.5625
859.5875
859.6125
859.6375
859.6625
859.6875
859.7125
859.7375
859.7625
859.7875
859.8125
859.8375
859.8625
859.8875
859.9125
859.9375
859.9625
859.9875
860.0125
860.0375
860.0625
860.0875
860.1125
860.1375
860.1625
860.1875
860.2125
860.2375
860.2625
860.2875
860.3125
860.3375
860.3625
860.3875
860.4125
860.4375
814.1125
814.1375
814.1625
814.1875
814.2125
814.2375
814.2625
814.2875
814.3125
814.3375
814.3625
814.3875
814.4125
814.4375
814.4625
814.4875
814.5125
814.5375
814.5625
814.5875
814.6125
814.6375
814.6625
814.6875
814.7125
814.7375
814.7625
814.7875
814.8125
814.8375
814.8625
814.8875
814.9125
814.9375
814.9625
814.9875
815.0125
815.0375
815.0625
815.0875
815.1125
815.1375
815.1625
815.1875
815.2125
815.2375
815.2625
815.2875
815.3125
815.3375
815.3625
815.3875
815.4125
815.4375
TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
379
380
381
382
383
384
385
386
387
388
389
390
391
392
393
394
395
396
397
398
399
400
401
402
403
404
405
406
407
408
409
410
411
412
413
414
415
416
417
418
419
420
421
422
423
424
425
426
427
428
429
430
431
432
4-30
379
380
381
382
383
384
385
386
387
388
389
390
391
392
393
394
395
396
397
398
399
400
401
402
403
404
405
406
407
408
409
410
411
412
413
414
415
416
417
418
419
420
421
422
423
424
425
426
427
428
429
430
431
432
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
860.4625
860.4875
860.5125
860.5375
860.5625
860.5875
860.6125
860.6375
860.6625
860.6875
860.7125
860.7375
860.7625
860.7875
860.8125
860.8375
860.8625
860.8875
860.9125
860.9375
860.9625
860.9875
861.0125
861.0375
861.0625
861.0875
861.1125
861.1375
861.1625
861.1875
861.2125
861.2375
861.2625
861.2875
861.3125
861.3375
861.3625
861.3875
861.4125
861.4375
861.4625
861.4875
861.5125
861.5375
861.5625
861.5875
861.6125
861.6375
861.6625
861.6875
861.7125
861.7375
861.7625
861.7875
815.4625
815.4875
815.5125
815.5375
815.5625
815.5875
815.6125
815.6375
815.6625
815.6875
815.7125
815.7375
815.7625
815.7875
815.8125
815.8375
815.8625
815.8875
815.9125
815.9375
815.9625
815.9875
816.0125
816.0375
816.0625
816.0875
816.1125
816.1375
816.1625
816.1875
816.2125
816.2375
816.2625
816.2875
816.3125
816.3375
816.3625
816.3875
816.4125
816.4375
816.4625
816.4875
816.5125
816.5375
816.5625
816.5875
816.6125
816.6375
816.6625
816.6875
816.7125
816.7375
816.7625
816.7875
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
800 MHz CHANNEL TABLE
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
433
434
435
436
437
438
439
440
441
442
443
444
445
446
447
448
449
450
451
452
453
454
455
456
457
458
459
460
461
462
463
464
465
466
467
468
469
470
471
472
473
474
475
476
477
478
479
480
481
482
483
484
485
486
433
434
435
436
437
438
439
440
441
442
443
444
445
446
447
448
449
450
451
452
453
454
455
456
457
458
459
460
461
462
463
464
465
466
467
468
469
470
471
472
473
474
475
476
477
478
479
480
481
482
483
484
485
486
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
861.8125
861.8375
861.8625
861.8875
861.9125
861.9375
861.9625
861.9875
862.0125
862.0375
862.0625
862.0875
862.1125
862.1375
862.1625
862.1875
862.2125
862.2375
862.2625
862.2875
862.3125
862.3375
862.3625
862.3875
862.4125
862.4375
862.4625
862.4875
862.5125
862.5375
862.5625
862.5875
862.6125
862.6375
862.6625
862.6875
862.7125
862.7375
862.7625
862.7875
862.8125
862.8375
862.8625
862.8875
862.9125
862.9375
862.9625
862.9875
863.0125
863.0375
863.0625
863.0875
863.1125
863.1375
816.8125
816.8375
816.8625
816.8875
816.9125
816.9375
816.9625
816.9875
817.0125
817.0375
817.0625
817.0875
817.1125
817.1375
817.1625
817.1875
817.2125
817.2375
817.2625
817.2875
817.3125
817.3375
817.3625
817.3875
817.4125
817.4375
817.4625
817.4875
817.5125
817.5375
817.5625
817.5875
817.6125
817.6375
817.6625
817.6875
817.7125
817.7375
817.7625
817.7875
817.8125
817.8375
817.8625
817.8875
817.9125
817.9375
817.9625
817.9875
818.0125
818.0375
818.0625
818.0875
818.1125
818.1375
TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
487
488
489
490
491
492
493
494
495
496
497
498
499
500
501
502
503
504
505
506
507
508
509
510
511
512
513
514
515
516
517
518
519
520
521
522
523
524
525
526
527
528
529
530
531
532
533
534
535
536
537
538
539
540
4-31
487
488
489
490
491
492
493
494
495
496
497
498
499
500
501
502
503
504
505
506
507
508
509
510
511
512
513
514
515
516
517
518
519
520
521
522
523
524
525
526
527
528
529
530
531
532
533
534
535
536
537
538
539
540
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
863.1625
863.1875
863.2125
863.2375
863.2625
863.2875
863.3125
863.3375
863.3625
863.3875
863.4125
863.4375
863.4625
863.4875
863.5125
863.5375
863.5625
863.5875
863.6125
863.6375
863.6625
863.6875
863.7125
863.7375
863.7625
863.7875
863.8125
863.8375
863.8625
863.8875
863.9125
863.9375
863.9625
863.9875
864.0125
864.0375
864.0625
864.0875
864.1125
864.1375
864.1625
864.1875
864.2125
864.2375
864.2625
864.2875
864.3125
864.3375
864.3625
864.3875
864.4125
864.4375
864.4625
864.4875
818.1625
818.1875
818.2125
818.2375
818.2625
818.2875
818.3125
818.3375
818.3625
818.3875
818.4125
818.4375
818.4625
818.4875
818.5125
818.5375
818.5625
818.5875
818.6125
818.6375
818.6625
818.6875
818.7125
818.7375
818.7625
818.7875
818.8125
818.8375
818.8625
818.8875
818.9125
818.9375
818.9625
818.9875
819.0125
819.0375
819.0625
819.0875
819.1125
819.1375
819.1625
819.1875
819.2125
819.2375
819.2625
819.2875
819.3125
819.3375
819.3625
819.3875
819.4125
819.4375
819.4625
819.4875
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
800 MHz CHANNEL TABLE
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
541
542
543
544
545
546
547
548
549
550
551
552
553
554
555
556
557
558
559
560
561
562
563
564
565
566
567
568
569
570
571
572
573
574
575
576
577
578
579
580
581
582
583
584
585
586
587
588
589
590
591
592
593
594
541
542
543
544
545
546
547
548
549
550
551
552
553
554
555
556
557
558
559
560
561
562
563
564
565
566
567
568
569
570
571
572
573
574
575
576
577
578
579
580
581
582
583
584
585
586
587
588
589
590
591
592
593
594
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
864.5125
864.5375
864.5625
864.5875
864.6125
864.6375
864.6625
864.6875
864.7125
864.7375
864.7625
864.7875
864.8125
864.8375
864.8625
864.8875
864.9125
864.9375
864.9625
864.9875
865.0125
865.0375
865.0625
865.0875
865.1125
865.1375
865.1625
865.1875
865.2125
865.2375
865.2625
865.2875
865.3125
865.3375
865.3625
865.3875
865.4125
865.4375
865.4625
865.4875
865.5125
865.5375
865.5625
865.5875
865.6125
865.6375
865.6625
865.6875
865.7125
865.7375
865.7625
865.7875
865.8125
865.8375
819.5125
819.5375
819.5625
819.5875
819.6125
819.6375
819.6625
819.6875
819.7125
819.7375
819.7625
819.7875
819.8125
819.8375
819.8625
819.8875
819.9125
819.9375
819.9625
819.9875
820.0125
820.0375
820.0625
820.0875
820.1125
820.1375
820.1625
820.1875
820.2125
820.2375
820.2625
820.2875
820.3125
820.3375
820.3625
820.3875
820.4125
820.4375
820.4625
820.4875
820.5125
820.5375
820.5625
820.5875
820.6125
820.6375
820.6625
820.6875
820.7125
820.7375
820.7625
820.7875
820.8125
820.8375
TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
595
596
597
598
599
600
601
602
603
604
605
606
607
608
609
610
611
612
613
614
615
616
617
618
619
620
621
622
623
624
625
626
627
628
629
630
631
632
633
634
635
636
637
638
639
640
641
642
643
644
645
646
647
648
4-32
595
596
597
598
599
600
601
602
603
604
605
606
607
608
609
610
611
612
613
614
615
616
617
618
619
620
621
622
623
624
625
626
627
628
629
630
631
632
633
634
635
636
637
638
639
640
641
642
643
644
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
865.8625
865.8875
865.9125
865.9375
865.9625
865.9875
866.0000
866.0125
866.0250
866.0375
866.0500
866.0625
866.0750
866.0875
866.1000
866.1125
866.1250
866.1375
866.1500
866.1625
866.1750
866.1875
866.2000
866.2125
866.2250
866.2375
866.2500
866.2625
866.2750
866.2875
866.3000
866.3125
866.3250
866.3375
866.3500
866.3625
866.3750
866.3875
866.4000
866.4125
866.4250
866.4375
866.4500
866.4625
866.4750
866.4875
866.5000
866.5125
866.5250
866.5375
866.5500
866.5625
866.5750
866.5875
820.8625
820.8875
820.9125
820.9375
820.9625
820.9875
821.0000
821.0125
821.0250
821.0375
821.0500
821.0625
821.0750
821.0875
821.1000
821.1125
821.1250
821.1375
821.1500
821.1625
821.1750
821.1875
821.2000
821.2125
821.2250
821.2375
821.2500
821.2625
821.2750
821.2875
821.3000
821.3125
821.3250
821.3375
821.3500
821.3625
821.3750
821.3875
821.4000
821.4125
821.4250
821.4375
821.4500
821.4625
821.4750
821.4875
821.5000
821.5125
821.5250
821.5375
821.5500
821.5625
821.5750
821.5875
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
800 MHz CHANNEL TABLE
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
649
650
651
652
653
654
655
656
657
658
659
660
661
662
663
664
665
666
667
668
669
670
671
672
673
674
675
676
677
678
679
680
681
682
683
684
685
686
687
688
689
690
691
692
693
694
695
696
697
698
699
700
701
702
645
646
647
648
649
650
651
652
653
654
655
656
657
658
659
660
661
662
663
664
665
666
667
668
669
670
671
672
673
674
675
676
677
678
679
680
681
682
683
684
685
686
687
688
689
690
691
692
693
694
695
696
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
866.6000
866.6125
866.6250
866.6375
866.6500
866.6625
866.6750
866.6875
866.7000
866.7125
866.7250
866.7375
866.7500
866.7625
866.7750
866.7875
866.8000
866.8125
866.8250
866.8375
866.8500
866.8625
866.8750
866.8875
866.9000
866.9125
866.9250
866.9375
866.9500
866.9625
866.9750
866.9875
867.0000
867.0125
867.0250
867.0375
867.0500
867.0625
867.0750
867.0875
867.1000
867.1125
867.1250
867.1375
867.1500
867.1625
867.1750
867.1875
867.2000
867.2125
867.2250
867.2375
867.2500
867.2625
821.6000
821.6125
821.6250
821.6375
821.6500
821.6625
821.6750
821.6875
821.7000
821.7125
821.7250
821.7375
821.7500
821.7625
821.7750
821.7875
821.8000
821.8125
821.8250
821.8375
821.8500
821.8625
821.8750
821.8875
821.9000
821.9125
821.9250
821.9375
821.9500
821.9625
821.9750
821.9875
822.0000
822.0125
822.0250
822.0375
822.0500
822.0625
822.0750
822.0875
822.1000
822.1125
822.1250
822.1375
822.1500
822.1625
822.1750
822.1875
822.2000
822.2125
822.2250
822.2375
822.2500
822.2625
TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
703
704
705
706
707
708
709
710
711
712
713
714
715
716
717
718
719
720
721
722
723
724
725
726
727
728
729
730
731
732
733
734
735
736
737
738
739
740
741
742
743
744
745
746
747
748
749
750
751
752
753
754
755
756
4-33
697
698
699
700
701
702
703
704
705
706
707
708
709
710
711
712
713
714
715
716
717
718
719
720
721
722
723
724
725
726
727
728
729
730
731
732
733
734
735
736
737
738
739
740
741
742
743
744
745
746
747
748
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
867.2750
867.2875
867.3000
867.3125
867.3250
867.3375
867.3500
867.3625
867.3750
867.3875
867.4000
867.4125
867.4250
867.4375
867.4500
867.4625
867.4750
867.4875
867.5000
867.5125
867.5250
867.5375
867.5500
867.5625
867.5750
867.5875
867.6000
867.6125
867.6250
867.6375
867.6500
867.6625
867.6750
867.6875
867.7000
867.7125
867.7250
867.7375
867.7500
867.7625
867.7750
867.7875
867.8000
867.8125
867.8250
867.8375
867.8500
867.8625
867.8750
867.8875
867.9000
867.9125
867.9250
867.9375
822.2750
822.2875
822.3000
822.3125
822.3250
822.3375
822.3500
822.3625
822.3750
822.3875
822.4000
822.4125
822.4250
822.4375
822.4500
822.4625
822.4750
822.4875
822.5000
822.5125
822.5250
822.5375
822.5500
822.5625
822.5750
822.5875
822.6000
822.6125
822.6250
822.6375
822.6500
822.6625
822.6750
822.6875
822.7000
822.7125
822.7250
822.7375
822.7500
822.7625
822.7750
822.7875
822.8000
822.8125
822.8250
822.8375
822.8500
822.8625
822.8750
822.8875
822.9000
822.9125
822.9250
822.9375
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
800 MHz CHANNEL TABLE
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
757
758
759
760
761
762
763
764
765
766
767
768
769
770
771
772
773
774
775
776
777
778
779
780
781
782
783
784
785
786
787
788
789
790
791
792
793
794
795
796
797
798
799
800
801
802
803
804
805
806
807
808
809
810
749
750
751
752
753
754
755
756
757
758
759
760
761
762
763
764
765
766
767
768
769
770
771
772
773
774
775
776
777
778
779
780
781
782
783
784
785
786
787
788
789
790
791
792
793
794
795
796
797
798
799
800
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
867.9500
867.9625
867.9750
867.9875
868.0000
868.0125
868.0250
868.0375
868.0500
868.0625
868.0750
868.0875
868.1000
868.1125
868.1250
868.1375
868.1500
868.1625
868.1750
868.1875
868.2000
868.2125
868.2250
868.2375
868.2500
868.2625
868.2750
868.2875
868.3000
868.3125
868.3250
868.3375
868.3500
868.3625
868.3750
868.3875
868.4000
868.4125
868.4250
868.4375
868.4500
868.4625
868.4750
868.4875
868.5000
868.5125
868.5250
868.5375
868.5500
868.5625
868.5750
868.5875
868.6000
868.6125
822.9500
822.9625
822.9750
822.9875
823.0000
823.0125
823.0250
823.0375
823.0500
823.0625
823.0750
823.0875
823.1000
823.1125
823.1250
823.1375
823.1500
823.1625
823.1750
823.1875
823.2000
823.2125
823.2250
823.2375
823.2500
823.2625
823.2750
823.2875
823.3000
823.3125
823.3250
823.3375
823.3500
823.3625
823.3750
823.3875
823.4000
823.4125
823.4250
823.4375
823.4500
823.4625
823.4750
823.4875
823.5000
823.5125
823.5250
823.5375
823.5500
823.5625
823.5750
823.5875
823.6000
823.6125
TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
811
812
813
814
815
816
817
818
819
820
821
822
823
824
825
826
827
828
829
830
831
832
833
834
835
836
837
838
839
840
841
842
843
844
845
846
847
848
849
850
851
852
853
854
855
856
857
858
859
860
861
862
863
864
4-34
801
802
803
804
805
806
807
808
809
810
811
812
813
814
815
816
817
818
819
820
821
822
823
824
825
826
827
828
829
830
-
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
868.6250
868.6375
868.6500
868.6625
868.6750
868.6875
868.7000
868.7125
868.7250
868.7375
868.7500
868.7625
868.7750
868.7875
868.8000
868.8125
868.8250
868.8375
868.8500
868.8625
868.8750
868.8875
868.9000
868.9125
868.9250
868.9375
868.9500
868.9625
868.9750
868.9875
869.0000
869.0125
869.0250
869.0375
869.0500
869.0625
869.0750
869.0875
869.1000
869.1125
869.1250
869.1375
869.1500
869.1625
869.1750
869.1875
869.2000
869.2125
869.2250
869.2375
869.2500
869.2625
869.2750
869.2875
823.6250
823.6375
823.6500
823.6625
823.6750
823.6875
823.7000
823.7125
823.7250
823.7375
823.7500
823.7625
823.7750
823.7875
823.8000
823.8125
823.8250
823.8375
823.8500
823.8625
823.8750
823.8875
823.9000
823.9125
823.9250
823.9375
823.9500
823.9625
823.9750
823.9875
824.0000
824.0125
824.0250
824.0375
824.0500
824.0625
824.0750
824.0875
824.1000
824.1125
824.1250
824.1375
824.1500
824.1625
824.1750
824.1875
824.2000
824.2125
824.2250
824.2375
824.2500
824.2625
824.2750
824.2875
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
800 MHz CHANNEL TABLE
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
865
866
867
868
869
870
871
872
873
874
875
876
877
878
879
880
881
882
883
884
885
886
887
888
889
890
891
892
-
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
869.3000
869.3125
869.3250
869.3375
869.3500
869.3625
869.3750
869.3875
869.4000
869.4125
869.4250
869.4375
869.4500
869.4625
869.4750
869.4875
869.5000
869.5125
869.5250
869.5375
869.5500
869.5625
869.5750
869.5875
869.6000
869.6125
869.6250
869.6375
824.3000
824.3125
824.3250
824.3375
824.3500
824.3625
824.3750
824.3875
824.4000
824.4125
824.4250
824.4375
824.4500
824.4625
824.4750
824.4875
824.5000
824.5125
824.5250
824.5375
824.5500
824.5625
824.5750
824.5875
824.6000
824.6125
824.6250
824.6375
TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
893
894
895
896
897
898
899
900
901
902
903
904
905
906
907
908
909
910
911
912
913
914
915
916
917
918
919
920
4-35
-
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
869.6500
869.6625
869.6750
869.6875
869.7000
869.7125
869.7250
869.7375
869.7500
869.7625
869.7750
869.7875
869.8000
869.8125
869.8250
869.8375
869.8500
869.8625
869.8750
869.8875
869.9000
869.9125
869.9250
869.9375
869.9500
869.9625
869.9750
869.9875
824.6500
824.6625
824.6750
824.6875
824.7000
824.7125
824.7250
824.7375
824.7500
824.7625
824.7750
824.7875
824.8000
824.8125
824.8250
824.8375
824.8500
824.8625
824.8750
824.8875
824.9000
824.9125
824.9250
824.9375
824.9500
824.9625
824.9750
824.9875
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
900 MHz CHANNEL TABLE
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
935.0125
935.0250
935.0375
935.0500
935.0625
935.0750
935.0875
935.1000
935.1125
935.1250
935.1375
935.1500
935.1625
935.1750
935.1875
935.2000
935.2125
935.2250
935.2375
935.2500
935.2625
935.2750
935.2875
935.3000
935.3125
935.3250
935.3375
935.3500
935.3625
935.3750
935.3875
935.4000
935.4125
935.4250
935.4375
935.4500
935.4625
935.4750
935.4875
935.5000
935.5125
935.5250
935.5375
935.5500
935.5625
935.5750
935.5875
935.6000
935.6125
935.6250
935.6375
935.6500
935.6625
935.6750
896.0125
896.0250
896.0375
896.0500
896.0625
896.0750
896.0875
896.1000
896.1125
896.1250
896.1375
896.1500
896.1625
896.1750
896.1875
896.2000
896.2125
896.2250
896.2375
896.2500
896.2625
896.2750
896.2875
896.3000
896.3125
896.3250
896.3375
896.3500
896.3625
896.3750
896.3875
896.4000
896.4125
896.4250
896.4375
896.4500
896.4625
896.4750
896.4875
896.5000
896.5125
896.5250
896.5375
896.5500
896.5625
896.5750
896.5875
896.6000
896.6125
896.6250
896.6375
896.6500
896.6625
896.6750
TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
4-36
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
935.6875
935.7000
935.7125
935.7250
935.7375
935.7500
935.7625
935.7750
935.7875
935.8000
935.8125
935.8250
935.8375
935.8500
935.8625
935.8750
935.8875
935.9000
935.9125
935.9250
935.9375
935.9500
935.9625
935.9750
935.9875
936.0000
936.0125
936.0250
936.0375
936.0500
936.0625
936.0750
936.0875
936.1000
936.1125
936.1250
936.1375
936.1500
936.1625
936.1750
936.1875
936.2000
936.2125
936.2250
936.2375
936.2500
936.2625
936.2750
936.2875
936.3000
936.3125
936.3250
936.3375
936.3500
896.6875
896.7000
896.7125
896.7250
896.7375
896.7500
896.7625
896.7750
896.7875
896.8000
896.8125
896.8250
896.8375
896.8500
896.8625
896.8750
896.8875
896.9000
896.9125
896.9250
896.9375
896.9500
896.9625
896.9750
896.9875
897.0000
897.0125
897.0250
897.0375
897.0500
897.0625
897.0750
897.0875
897.1000
897.1125
897.1250
897.1375
897.1500
897.1625
897.1750
897.1875
897.2000
897.2125
897.2250
897.2375
897.2500
897.2625
897.2750
897.2875
897.3000
897.3125
897.3250
897.3375
897.3500
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
900 MHz CHANNEL TABLE
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
936.3625
936.3750
936.3875
936.4000
936.4125
936.4250
936.4375
936.4500
936.4625
936.4750
936.4875
936.5000
936.5125
936.5250
936.5375
936.5500
936.5625
936.5750
936.5875
936.6000
936.6125
936.6250
936.6375
936.6500
936.6625
936.6750
936.6875
936.7000
936.7125
936.7250
936.7375
936.7500
936.7625
936.7750
936.7875
936.8000
936.8125
936.8250
936.8375
936.8500
936.8625
936.8750
936.8875
936.9000
936.9125
936.9250
936.9375
936.9500
936.9625
936.9750
936.9875
937.0000
937.0125
937.0250
897.3625
897.3750
897.3875
897.4000
897.4125
897.4250
897.4375
897.4500
897.4625
897.4750
897.4875
897.5000
897.5125
897.5250
897.5375
897.5500
897.5625
897.5750
897.5875
897.6000
897.6125
897.6250
897.6375
897.6500
897.6625
897.6750
897.6875
897.7000
897.7125
897.7250
897.7375
897.7500
897.7625
897.7750
897.7875
897.8000
897.8125
897.8250
897.8375
897.8500
897.8625
897.8750
897.8875
897.9000
897.9125
897.9250
897.9375
897.9500
897.9625
897.9750
897.9875
898.0000
898.0125
898.0250
TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
4-37
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
937.0375
937.0500
937.0625
937.0750
937.0875
937.1000
937.1125
937.1250
937.1375
937.1500
937.1625
937.1750
937.1875
937.2000
937.2125
937.2250
937.2375
937.2500
937.2625
937.2750
937.2875
937.3000
937.3125
937.3250
937.3375
937.3500
937.3625
937.3750
937.3875
937.4000
937.4125
937.4250
937.4375
937.4500
937.4625
937.4750
937.4875
937.5000
937.5125
937.5250
937.5375
937.5500
937.5625
937.5750
937.5875
937.6000
937.6125
937.6250
937.6375
937.6500
937.6625
937.6750
937.6875
937.7000
898.0375
898.0500
898.0625
898.0750
898.0875
898.1000
898.1125
898.1250
898.1375
898.1500
898.1625
898.1750
898.1875
898.2000
898.2125
898.2250
898.2375
898.2500
898.2625
898.2750
898.2875
898.3000
898.3125
898.3250
898.3375
898.3500
898.3625
898.3750
898.3875
898.4000
898.4125
898.4250
898.4375
898.4500
898.4625
898.4750
898.4875
898.5000
898.5125
898.5250
898.5375
898.5500
898.5625
898.5750
898.5875
898.6000
898.6125
898.6250
898.6375
898.6500
898.6625
898.6750
898.6875
898.7000
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
900 MHz CHANNEL TABLE
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
232
233
234
235
236
237
238
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
256
257
258
259
260
261
262
263
264
265
266
267
268
269
270
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
232
233
234
235
236
237
238
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
256
257
258
259
260
261
262
263
264
265
266
267
268
269
270
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
937.7125
937.7250
937.7375
937.7500
937.7625
937.7750
937.7875
937.8000
937.8125
937.8250
937.8375
937.8500
937.8625
937.8750
937.8875
937.9000
937.9125
937.9250
937.9375
937.9500
937.9625
937.9750
937.9875
938.0000
938.0125
938.0250
938.0375
938.0500
938.0625
938.0750
938.0875
938.1000
938.1125
938.1250
938.1375
938.1500
938.1625
938.1750
938.1875
938.2000
938.2125
938.2250
938.2375
938.2500
938.2625
938.2750
938.2875
938.3000
938.3125
938.3250
938.3375
938.3500
938.3625
938.3750
898.7125
898.7250
898.7375
898.7500
898.7625
898.7750
898.7875
898.8000
898.8125
898.8250
898.8375
898.8500
898.8625
898.8750
898.8875
898.9000
898.9125
898.9250
898.9375
898.9500
898.9625
898.9750
898.9875
899.0000
899.0125
899.0250
899.0375
899.0500
899.0625
899.0750
899.0875
899.1000
899.1125
899.1250
899.1375
899.1500
899.1625
899.1750
899.1875
899.2000
899.2125
899.2250
899.2375
899.2500
899.2625
899.2750
899.2875
899.3000
899.3125
899.3250
899.3375
899.3500
899.3625
899.3750
TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
271
272
273
274
275
276
277
278
279
280
281
282
283
284
285
286
287
288
289
290
291
292
293
294
295
296
297
298
299
300
301
302
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
310
311
312
313
314
315
316
317
318
319
320
321
322
323
324
4-38
271
272
273
274
275
276
277
278
279
280
281
282
283
284
285
286
287
288
289
290
291
292
293
294
295
296
297
298
299
300
301
302
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
310
311
312
313
314
315
316
317
318
319
320
321
322
323
324
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
938.3875
938.4000
938.4125
938.4250
938.4375
938.4500
938.4625
938.4750
938.4875
938.5000
938.5125
938.5250
938.5375
938.5500
938.5625
938.5750
938.5875
938.6000
938.6125
938.6250
938.6375
938.6500
938.6625
938.6750
938.6875
938.7000
938.7125
938.7250
938.7375
938.7500
938.7625
938.7750
938.7875
938.8000
938.8125
938.8250
938.8375
938.8500
938.8625
938.8750
938.8875
938.9000
938.9125
938.9250
938.9375
938.9500
938.9625
938.9750
938.9875
939.0000
939.0125
939.0250
939.0375
939.0500
899.3875
899.4000
899.4125
899.4250
899.4375
899.4500
899.4625
899.4750
899.4875
899.5000
899.5125
899.5250
899.5375
899.5500
899.5625
899.5750
899.5875
899.6000
899.6125
899.6250
899.6375
899.6500
899.6625
899.6750
899.6875
899.7000
899.7125
899.7250
899.7375
899.7500
899.7625
899.7750
899.7875
899.8000
899.8125
899.8250
899.8375
899.8500
899.8625
899.8750
899.8875
899.9000
899.9125
899.9250
899.9375
899.9500
899.9625
899.9750
899.9875
900.0000
900.0125
900.0250
900.0375
900.0500
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
900 MHz CHANNEL TABLE
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
325
326
327
328
329
330
331
332
333
334
335
336
337
338
339
340
341
342
343
344
345
346
347
348
349
350
351
352
353
354
355
356
357
358
359
360
361
362
363
364
365
366
367
368
369
370
371
372
373
374
375
376
377
378
325
326
327
328
329
330
331
332
333
334
335
336
337
338
339
340
341
342
343
344
345
346
347
348
349
350
351
352
353
354
355
356
357
358
359
360
361
362
363
364
365
366
367
368
369
370
371
372
373
374
375
376
377
378
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
939.0625
939.0750
939.0875
939.1000
939.1125
939.1250
939.1375
939.1500
939.1625
939.1750
939.1875
939.2000
939.2125
939.2250
939.2375
939.2500
939.2625
939.2750
939.2875
939.3000
939.3125
939.3250
939.3375
939.3500
939.3625
939.3750
939.3875
939.4000
939.4125
939.4250
939.4375
939.4500
939.4625
939.4750
939.4875
939.5000
939.5125
939.5250
939.5375
939.5500
939.5625
939.5750
939.5875
939.6000
939.6125
939.6250
939.6375
939.6500
939.6625
939.6750
939.6875
939.7000
939.7125
939.7250
900.0625
900.0750
900.0875
900.1000
900.1125
900.1250
900.1375
900.1500
900.1625
900.1750
900.1875
900.2000
900.2125
900.2250
900.2375
900.2500
900.2625
900.2750
900.2875
900.3000
900.3125
900.3250
900.3375
900.3500
900.3625
900.3750
900.3875
900.4000
900.4125
900.4250
900.4375
900.4500
900.4625
900.4750
900.4875
900.5000
900.5125
900.5250
900.5375
900.5500
900.5625
900.5750
900.5875
900.6000
900.6125
900.6250
900.6375
900.6500
900.6625
900.6750
900.6875
900.7000
900.7125
900.7250
TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
379
380
381
382
383
384
385
386
387
388
389
390
391
392
393
394
395
396
397
398
399
400
401
402
403
404
405
406
407
408
409
410
411
412
413
414
415
416
417
418
419
420
421
422
423
424
425
426
427
428
429
430
431
432
4-39
379
380
381
382
383
384
385
386
387
388
389
390
391
392
393
394
395
396
397
398
399
400
401
402
403
404
405
406
407
408
409
410
411
412
413
414
415
416
417
418
419
420
421
422
423
424
425
426
427
428
429
430
431
432
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
939.7375
939.7500
939.7625
939.7750
939.7875
939.8000
939.8125
939.8250
939.8375
939.8500
939.8625
939.8750
939.8875
939.9000
939.9125
939.9250
939.9375
939.9500
939.9625
939.9750
939.9875
940.0000
940.0125
940.0250
940.0375
940.0500
940.0625
940.0750
940.0875
940.1000
940.1125
940.1250
940.1375
940.1500
940.1625
940.1750
940.1875
940.2000
940.2125
940.2250
940.2375
940.2500
940.2625
940.2750
940.2875
940.3000
940.3125
940.3250
940.3375
940.3500
940.3625
940.3750
940.3875
940.4000
900.7375
900.7500
900.7625
900.7750
900.7875
900.8000
900.8125
900.8250
900.8375
900.8500
900.8625
900.8750
900.8875
900.9000
900.9125
900.9250
900.9375
900.9500
900.9625
900.9750
900.9875
901.0000
901.0125
901.0250
901.0375
901.0500
901.0625
901.0750
901.0875
901.1000
901.1125
901.1250
901.1375
901.1500
901.1625
901.1750
901.1875
901.2000
901.2125
901.2250
901.2375
901.2500
901.2625
901.2750
901.2875
901.3000
901.3125
901.3250
901.3375
901.3500
901.3625
901.3750
901.3875
901.4000
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
900 MHz CHANNEL TABLE
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
433
434
435
436
437
438
439
440
441
442
443
444
445
446
447
448
449
450
451
452
453
454
455
456
433
434
435
436
437
438
439
440
441
442
443
444
445
446
447
448
449
450
451
452
453
454
455
456
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
940.4125
940.4250
940.4375
940.4500
940.4625
940.4750
940.4875
940.5000
940.5125
940.5250
940.5375
940.5500
940.5625
940.5750
940.5875
940.6000
940.6125
940.6250
940.6375
940.6500
940.6625
940.6750
940.6875
940.7000
901.4125
901.4250
901.4375
901.4500
901.4625
901.4750
901.4875
901.5000
901.5125
901.5250
901.5375
901.5500
901.5625
901.5750
901.5875
901.6000
901.6125
901.6250
901.6375
901.6500
901.6625
901.6750
901.6875
901.7000
TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
Prog Chan. FCC Chan.
No.
No.
457
458
459
460
461
462
463
464
465
466
467
468
469
470
471
472
473
474
475
476
477
478
479
4-40
457
458
459
460
461
462
463
464
465
466
467
468
469
470
471
472
473
474
475
476
477
478
479
Mobile Rx
Freq.
Mobile Tx
Freq
940.7125
940.7250
940.7375
940.7500
940.7625
940.7750
940.7875
940.8000
940.8125
940.8250
940.8375
940.8500
940.8625
940.8750
940.8875
940.9000
940.9125
940.9250
940.9375
940.9500
940.9625
940.9750
940.9875
901.7125
901.7250
901.7375
901.7500
901.7625
901.7750
901.7875
901.8000
901.8125
901.8250
901.8375
901.8500
901.8625
901.8750
901.8875
901.9000
901.9125
901.9250
901.9375
901.9500
901.9625
901.9750
901.9875
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
MULTI-NET SYSTEM OVERVIEW
SECTION 5 MULTI-NET SYSTEM OVERVIEW
REPEATERS
(UP TO 30 PER RNT)
OTHER
RNT'S
AND
SYSTEMS
AUDIO AND
DATA LINK
MULTI-NET 856x/7x/8x/9x, 8605/15/22/55,
RADIO NETWORK
TERMINAL (RNT)
SUMMIT DM 975x/977x MOBILE TRANSCEIVERS MULTI-NET
PUBLIC
SWITCHED
TELEPHONE
NETWORK
(PSTN)
AUDIO AND
DATA LINK
LTR 98xx, 8600/04, 856x/857x, 5876, 86xx,
VIKING GT/HT 965x/967x MOBILE TRANSCEIVERS
LTR
DISPATCHER CONSOLE
AUDIO AND
DATA LINK
CONVENTIONAL 98xx, 5876, 71x6/718x
CONVENTIONAL
SYSTEM MANAGEMENT MODULE
USAGE ACCOUNTING SYSTEM
Figure 5-1 Multi-Net System Components
5.1 MULTI-NET SYSTEM COMPONENTS
1. Advanced features such as up to 8000 Unique ID
codes, automatic mobile identification, roaming,
and five levels of priority access are available if
Multi-Net signaling is used.
NOTE: For more information on Multi-Net systems,
refer to the Multi-Net Application Note, Part No.
009-3039-003.
2. Users of different types of radio equipment can talk
to each other. For example, a mobile operating on a
Multi-Net 800 MHz channel could talk to a mobile
operating on a conventional UHF channel.
5.1.1 INTRODUCTION
The basic components of a Multi-Net system are
shown in Figure 5-1. Because of the built-in adaptability of a Multi-Net system, one can be designed to
meet the communication needs of almost any type of
user. The following are some operating features that a
Multi-Net system can provide:
3. Wide area radio coverage can be provided so that a
mobile could talk to another mobile that is using a
repeater that may be hundreds of miles away. That
repeater may be part of the same Multi-Net system
5-1
Revised February 1997
Part No. 001-9750-005
MULTI-NET SYSTEM OVERVIEW
5.1.4 RADIO NETWORK TERMINAL (RNT)
or another Multi-Net system. Phone lines or some
other type of link can be used to provide a communication path.
The RNT along with the SMM (System Management Module) control the Multi-Net system. The
SMM is an IBM® PC or compatible computer that is
running Multi-Net software. This computer connects
to the RNT and is used by the system manager to
control the system. The SMM also continuously monitors RNT operation and maintains usage information
which can be monitored by the Usage Accounting
System. Such activities as dynamic reprogramming of
mobiles and disabling of lost or stolen mobiles are
also performed by the SMM.
Multi-Net systems are not restricted to a certain
type of signaling. For example, an entire Multi-Net
system could be designed using conventional channels
which use tone or digitally controlled squelch. The
various types of signaling can also be mixed in a
system. For example, there could be ten channels
using Multi-Net signaling, ten channels using LTR
signaling, and ten channels using conventional
signaling. Your E.F. Johnson representative can
provide more information on the capabilities of MultiNet systems.
A single RNT can control up to 30 repeaters
which is the maximum allowed by the FCC at one
site. The RNT is configured with one Channel Interface Module (CIM) for each repeater it controls and
an Intelligent Dispatch Module (IDM) for each E.F.
Johnson Dispatch Console. It also contains a Telephone Interface Module (TIM) for each telephone line
used for interconnect calls and other modules.
The following information describes the MultiNet components shown in Figure 5-1.
5.1.2 MOBILE TRANSCEIVERS
The mobile and handheld transceivers used in a
Multi-Net system must be compatible with the type of
signaling being used (Multi-Net, LTR, or conventional) and also the frequency range of the system
(800 or 900 MHz). E.F. Johnson mobile transceivers
that can be programmed for Multi-Net signaling are
listed in Table 1-2. All Multi-Net transceivers are
triple mode which means that they can be
programmed for Multi-Net, LTR, and conventional
(non-trunked) operation. There are also many other
E.F. Johnson transceivers available that can be
programmed for LTR and/or conventional operation.
5.1.5 DISPATCH CONSOLES
One or more E.F. Johnson Dispatch Consoles or
other consoles can be connected to the RNT using
direct connection, phone lines, or other types of links.
Depending on the capabilities of the particular
console, the dispatcher can perform such functions as
placing calls to specific mobiles, placing calls to other
dispatchers, patching mobiles together so they can talk
to each other, and monitoring status messages from
mobiles.
5.1.3 REPEATERS
5.1.6 PUBLIC SWITCHED TELEPHONE
NETWORK (PSTN)
The specific E.F. Johnson Summit® QX repeater
model that is used in a Multi-Net system is determined
by frequency range and desired RF power output.
Models are available for the 800 and 900 MHz
frequency ranges and with standard or high power
output. One repeater is required for each RF channel.
When telephone (interconnect) calls are placed
by transceivers, the RNT routes the call to the PSTN.
The specific transceivers which can place calls and
other interconnect parameters are controlled by the
system manager through the SMM and also by the
programming of the transceivers.
The Summit QX contains a main processor card
which controls signaling on that channel. This card
also allows the RNT to control the repeater. The
specific card that is used is determined by the type of
signaling used (Multi-Net, LTR, or conventional).
The option to route telephone calls through a
Private Automatic Branch Exchange (PABX) is available. The calling features of the PABX can then be
utilized.
5-2
Revised February 1997
Part No. 001-9750-005
MULTI-NET SYSTEM OVERVIEW
5.2 DEFINITIONS OF MULTI-NET TERMS
Radio Network Terminal (RNT) - The RNT together
with the System Management Module provide control
of a Multi-Net system. The RNT can interconnect
several different forms of communication to form a
communication network. Refer to Section 5.1.4 for
more information.
Conventional System - A type of radio system that is
licensed to operate on only a single channel. There is
no automatic access to several channels.
Home Repeater - All Multi-Net mobiles have one of
the site repeaters assigned as their “home” repeater.
When standard dispatch (group) calls are placed, the
home repeater and group ID code identify the mobile
or group of mobiles that receive the call.
Selectable Group - Each selectable system can be
programmed with several selectable groups. Each
selectable group contains ID codes which specify the
mobile or group of mobiles being called, which calls
are received, and other call information (see Section
3.3.4).
Logic Trunked Radio (LTR) - This E.F. Johnson
radio system provides the basis for the Multi-Net radio
system. Both LTR and Multi-Net systems utilize a
channel management concept called trunking (see
“Trunked Radio System” which follows). Logic
circuitry in the mobile transceivers and repeaters
controls trunking. It continually monitors the system
and generates data messages which update the mobiles
and repeaters as to which repeaters are free and which
mobiles are receiving calls.
Selectable System - This usually refers to one of the
systems selectable by the transceiver System Select
function. Each selectable system can be programmed
with a unique set of operating parameters such as
home repeater, group ID codes, and unique ID (see
Section 3.3.4).
Site - Repeaters that are physically located together
and connected to the same high-speed data bus.
Mobile - This term refers to a transceiver mounted in a
vehicle but it can also be applied to other types of
transceivers because they all operate basically the
same. The other types of transceivers are portables and
control stations. A control station is essentially a
mobile transceiver used at a stationary location such as
at an office site.
Specialized Mobile Radio System (SMRS) - A
conventional or trunked radio system owned by an
entrepreneur who makes a profit by selling service on
the system. The entrepreneur is licensed for a base/
mobile relay facility and all users of mobiles or control
stations on his system are licensed as SMRS “users”.
The entrepreneur can also be licensed as a user on his
own system. An SMRS may provide service to any of
the radio services in the Public Safety and Industrial/
Land Transportation (PSIT) categories. In addition, the
Federal Government and individuals may be licensed
to use an SMRS.
Monitor Repeater - This is the repeater that a mobile
is currently monitoring for update messages. This
repeater may be either the mobile's home repeater or
the site status repeater. When a mobile is not receiving
a call, it continually monitors the update messages for
incoming call and free repeater information. When
making a call, the mobile may be trunked to any of the
site repeaters that are not busy.
Status Repeater - One Multi-Net repeater at a site is
designated to transmit update information for all calls
occurring at that site. This repeater is also available for
voice traffic, but is not assigned as a home repeater for
any mobiles because none of its mobiles would have
home channel backup (see Sections 5.3 and 5.4).
Multi-Net System - An advanced radio system which
provides enhanced operating features such as autoregistration (roaming), busy queuing, emergency
messages, and priority access. It utilizes trunking
similar to an LTR system.
Trunked Radio System - A radio system which
utilizes multiple radio channels and automatic channel
switching to allow all system uses to access any
channel that is not in use. This results in minimum
waiting to make a call and maximum utilization of
system channels.
Public Safety - A radio service used by the Local
Government, Police, Fire, Highway Maintenance,
Forestry Conservation, and Special Emergency Radio
services.
5-3
Revised February 1997
Part No. 001-9750-005
MULTI-NET SYSTEM OVERVIEW
5.3 HOME AND STATUS REPEATERS
repeater became inoperative, all the mobiles assigned
to that home repeater would not be able to place or
receive calls. To prevent this from happening, each site
utilizing Multi-Net signaling has a repeater called a
status repeater which transmits update messages for all
calls occurring at the site. All mobiles assigned to the
site can receive update messages from either the status
or home repeater. Therefore, if a home repeater fails,
the status repeater can still be monitored for the information needed to place and receive calls.
When a mobile transceiver is programmed, it is
assigned “home” and “status” repeaters. The status
repeater is used by a mobile as its primary source of
incoming call and free repeater information. When a
mobile is not receiving a call, it is continually monitoring its status or home repeater for this information.
In addition, the home repeater and group ID code are
used to identify mobiles when standard group calls are
placed.
5.4.2 SELECTING REPEATER TO MONITOR
One repeater at a site is designated as the status
repeater. This repeater transmits update information
for all calls occurring at that site. The status repeater is
also available for voice traffic, but is usually not
assigned as a home repeater for any mobiles. The
reason for this is that mobiles assigned to the status
repeater would not have home channel backup.
However, no degradation in system calling efficiency
occurs if this is done.
Each selectable Multi-Net system of a mobile is
programmed with the channel numbers of the status
and home repeaters. When transceiver power is turned
on, it checks the status repeater. If valid data is
detected, that repeater becomes the monitor repeater. If
valid data is not detected, the home repeater is monitored. The monitor repeater does not change unless
valid data is no longer detected or a system
programmed for a different site is selected. Transceiver performance is not affected by which repeater is
being monitored.
The status repeater transmits continuous update
messages at all times. A home repeater transmits
continuous update messages when it is in use or if any
of its mobiles are trunked out to another repeater.
During idle times, non-status repeaters transmit update
messages every 10 seconds. Therefore, a mobile just
coming into service quickly receives information as to
which channel to use.
5.4.3 ASSIGNING THE STATUS CHANNEL
Each selectable system of a mobile is
programmed with a status channel and also the number
of the site that is accessed by that system. For proper
mobile operation, the same status channel must be
programmed in all systems which access that site. For
example, if systems 1, 3, and 4 access site 128, those
systems must be programmed with the same status
channel.
If the home repeater is being monitored and it is
not busy, it is used to make a call. Otherwise, the
transceiver may be trunked to any repeater at the site
to make a call. The repeater to which a mobile is
trunked is selected randomly.
5.4.4 DETECTING DEFECTIVE REPEATERS
Group ID codes 1-225 are assignable on each
home repeater for standard dispatch calls. For
example, if the system has ten channels, up to 2250
different group ID codes can be assigned. Group ID
codes specify the specific mobile or group of mobiles
being called and the mobile or group of mobiles from
which calls are received.
If a repeater is defective, it is important that it is
taken off the air as quickly as possible to ensure that
all transceivers are receiving quality service. To detect
improper operation, calls can be periodically placed
through an optional test mobile by the System
Analyzer. A test mobile is simply a transceiver located
off-site that has attenuated power output.
5.4 HOME CHANNEL BACKUP
These calls use the Interrogate special call
described in Section 5.8.4, and they are placed through
each repeater in the site. This call exercises the
repeater RF receive, RF transmit, and logic circuitry. If
the proper response is not received from the repeater
5.4.1 INTRODUCTION
If mobiles were limited to just their home
repeater to receive update information and that
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If it is a home repeater, these messages are for its
assigned mobiles that are being trunked to other
repeaters. If it is the status repeater, messages to all
mobiles currently using the site are transmitted. If it
has assigned mobiles, this includes messages to those
mobiles. For example, assume that five different transceivers are making calls. If all have Repeater 1 as their
home repeater, the data message order on Repeater 1 is
as follows: 1 2 3 1 4 5 1 2 3 and so on. Therefore, in
this case, the maximum number of data messages that
would occur before repeating is six.
by the RNT, the SMM alerts the system operator. The
faulty repeater may then be automatically or manually
shut down by the SMM.
5.5 MOBILE-REPEATER DATA SIGNALING
The setup and control of a call is performed by
exchanging data messages between the mobile and
repeater. This data signaling occurs continuously with
voice because it is at the subaudible frequency of 150
Hz. This allows operation without a dedicated control
channel. Therefore, all channels can be used for voice
communication.
The calls that can be placed and received are
determined by the ID codes programmed into the
transceiver by the system operator. Therefore, other
users in the system cannot eavesdrop on conversations
of other groups. Although traffic can be monitored by
a receiver tuned to the channels being used, that may
even be difficult because a complete conversation may
include several exchanges occurring on various channels.
When a mobile initiates a call, a data “handshake” occurs with the repeater. This handshake
occurs in only half a second, and it tells the mobile
that the system has been successfully accessed and that
the signal is not occurring on the wrong channel
because of intermodulation. One advantage of using a
handshake to access a channel is that it prevents a
mobile with a stronger signal from capturing a channel
in use.
Since Multi-Net and LTR signaling is different,
the mobile must be programmed for the type of
signaling being used. For example, if the selectable
system of the mobile is programmed for Multi-Net
operation, it cannot be selected to place calls on an
LTR system and vice versa. However, since all current
Multi-Net transceivers can be programmed for MultiNet, LTR, and conventional operation, all the user has
to do to place a different type of call is select another
system.
Data messages are continuously transmitted to the
repeater by the calling mobile while a conversation is
in progress. A repeater is held for only the duration of
the transmission with standard dispatch (mobile-tomobile) calls. Some special calls, such as telephone
and unique ID, hold the repeater for the duration of the
call.
5.6 REPEATER DATA BUS SIGNALING
When a mobile is trunked to another repeater to
receive a call, additional data messages are transmitted
continuously by that mobile's home repeater, the status
repeater (see Section 5.4), and the repeater to which
the mobile was trunked. The messages on the home
and status repeaters tell mobiles just coming into
service which repeater to switch to in order to receive
the call. Messages on the repeater being used by the
transceiver keep it updated on what calls are being
received by other mobiles assigned to its home
repeater. Therefore, calls with a higher receive priority
are not missed even when trunked to another repeater.
A single-line, high-speed serial data bus interconnects the control logic of the repeaters at a site.
Control information is exchanged between repeaters
via this bus. Repeaters in a Multi-Net system utilize a
logic control technique called distributive processing
in which the logic of each repeater performs all the
control functions on that channel. This eliminates the
need for a separate controller at each site.
When a repeater is in use, it places information
on this data bus which includes the home repeater
number and the group and unique ID code of the
mobile using the channel. This information is monitored by the other repeaters at the site so that they can
determine which repeaters are free and also if any of
their assigned mobiles are trunked to other repeaters.
The sequence of data messages transmitted on a
home or status repeater follows: Every third data
message is the message to the mobile using that
repeater. Then alternating between those messages are
the messages to the other mobiles receiving calls.
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5.8 OTHER MULTI-NET FEATURES
With Multi-Net signaling, repeater data bus
synchronization is done distributively. Therefore, no
single repeater is responsible for data bus synchronization. If any of the repeaters at the site become inoperative, the others continue to operate normally.
5.8.1 UNIQUE ID CODES
Each selectable system of a transceiver is
programmed with a unique ID code in addition to the
group ID codes. Unique ID codes are assigned on a
site-wide basis, not on a repeater basis as with group
IDs. Up to 8000 unique ID codes can be assigned per
RNT.
5.7 STANDARD AND SPECIAL CALLS
Introduction
The two types of calls that can be made with
Multi-Net signaling are Standard (dispatch) and
Special. Group ID codes 1-225 are used for Standard
calls, and group ID codes 226-255 are used for Special
Calls. The following information describes these calls.
Whenever a transceiver makes a call, it always
transmits the unique ID programmed in the system in
addition to the selected group ID. Any control point
equipped with a console that can receive the call then
displays the ID of the calling unit. This provides automatic identification of transceivers making calls.
Standard Calls
Unique IDs also permit individual mobile units to
be called. This is done using the special calls described
in the preceding section. Calls can also be made to
individual transceivers using standard call group IDs
1-225 if an ID code is assigned to only one transceiver.
As stated earlier, up to 225 group ID codes are
assignable on each Multi-Net home repeater. When a
transceiver monitors its home or status repeater, it
receives data messages containing a home repeater
number, group ID, and unique ID code (see Section
5.8.1). When it detects its home repeater and a group
ID from 1-225 that it is programmed to decode, it
unsquelches and the call is received. The correct
unique ID code does not need to be detected to receive
a Standard Call.
5.8.2 ACCESS AND RECEIVE PRIORITY
The priority access feature allows users that have
a greater need to communicate, access to the system
first. There are five levels of priority, with 1 the
highest priority and 5 the lowest priority. Each
repeater determines the current priority level using an
algorithm that is selected by the programming of the
main processor card. The access priority information
is then transmitted in the data messages to the mobiles
monitoring that repeater.
Standard Calls can be placed only to mobiles
assigned to the same home repeater. However, each
selectable system of a transceiver can be programmed
with a different home repeater which allows calls to
mobiles assigned to other repeaters. Refer to Section
3.3.4 for more information on standard calls.
Special Calls
When a transceiver is programmed, a priority
level between 1 and 5 is assigned to each group ID that
is encoded (transmitted). If the priority level transmitted by the repeater is higher than that programmed
for the selected group, a busy indication is produced
when the PTT switch is pressed and the call cannot be
placed at that time.
If a group ID from 226-255 is received, a Special
Call is indicated and the transceiver responds
according to the type of call. Special calls are used to
perform many of the special Multi-Net features
described later in this section. The special calls usually
originated by a mobile are Interconnect and Auxiliary.
Most other special calls such as Interrogate, Mobile
Disable, and Reassignment are originated by the
system operator or a dispatcher. Generally, a transceiver must decode its unique ID code to respond to a
Special Call. Refer to Section 3.7.4 for more information on special calls.
There is also a priority order when receiving
messages if the selected system of the transceiver is
programmed with two or more receive group ID
codes. This permits a call with a higher priority ID
code to interrupt a call with a lower priority ID code.
Receive priority occurs only with standard group calls.
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Telephone and other special calls cannot be interrupted
by standard calls. Refer to Section 3.7.4 for more
information.
group reprogrammable in this manner prevents the
transceiver from becoming inoperative because of a
programming error caused by a poor RF signal.
5.8.3 ALL CALL
Dynamic reprogramming is performed by the
system manager. The data transmitted to the mobile
includes the selectable system to be changed, the new
encode and decode ID codes, and the access priority of
the encode code. One use of this feature is to allow a
transceiver to place or receive calls for which it was
not originally programmed.
“All Call” is another of the special calls described
earlier. This call goes out to all mobiles assigned to the
site. It can be transmitted by the system operator or by
a dispatcher that is authorized to do so. It is received
by all mobiles assigned to the site because it goes out
to all repeaters simultaneously and has the highest
priority. Therefore, all calls in progress are dropped to
receive it. If a mobile is turned on, the only time that
this message can be missed is while it is in the transmit
mode.
5.8.7 DYNAMIC MOVE TO NEW SYSTEM/
GROUP
The dynamic reprogramming feature just
described does not change the currently selected group
of the transceiver. This can be done using the dynamic
move to system/group special call. The procedure is
similar to that used for dynamic reprogramming.
When this message is detected by the mobile, it automatically switches to the system and group number
contained in the message. One use of this feature is to
make sure that mobiles are set to the correct system/
group to receive an important “all call” message. It can
also be used in conjunction with the dynamic reprogramming command to send a special message.
5.8.4 INTERROGATE
A dispatcher with the proper authority can interrogate any mobile unit in the field. A special interrogate message is sent that contains the unique ID code
of the affected mobile. If that mobile is turned on, it
will automatically transmit a message back to the
dispatcher that identifies it and sends one of eight
status indications which are then displayed at the
dispatch point (see Section 5.8.14). This feature can be
used for such things as determining if a transceiver is
in service or assisting in the recovery of lost or stolen
units. It is also used to detect defective repeaters (see
Section 5.4.4).
5.8.8 ID VALIDATION
ID validation is the process of making sure that
only the mobiles authorized service on the system can
use it. This function is performed by the System
Management Module. Both group and unique ID
codes are checked. If an ID code is detected that is not
authorized for service, a turn-off code is transmitted to
the mobile or mobiles receiving the call. This effectively disables the unauthorized mobile because its
calls are not received.
5.8.5 MOBILE DISABLE
If a transceiver is lost or stolen or is being used to
interfere with communications or monitor sensitive
transmissions, it can be temporarily or permanently
disabled by the system manager using the Mobile
Disable special call. After this call is sent, verification
is returned by the transceiver indicating that it has
been successfully disabled. To make a permanently
disabled transceiver operational again, it must be
returned for reprogramming.
5.8.9 SYSTEM KEY
The system repeaters and all mobiles are
programmed with a unique System Key. The function
of the System Key is to ensure that only authorized
users can access a Multi-Net system. The repeater
System Key is programmed at the factory, and the
mobile system key is programmed into the transceiver
by the system operator. The System Key is a number
that is used by both the repeaters and the mobiles to
encode the data stream. If both are not programmed
5.8.6 DYNAMIC REPROGRAMMING OF GROUP
11
Group 11 of each selectable system can be
dynamically reprogrammed over the air. That group is
the only one that can be reprogrammed over the air
and also by the PC programmer. Making only one
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Most Multi-Net transceivers also have a programmable parameter called Auto-Registration Dropout
Criteria. This parameter determines the point at which
the mobile attempts to register on another site. This is
controlled by the percentage of good data messages
that the mobile receives over a 10-second period. If it
is programmable, it can be set for 50-100%. If it is not,
it is fixed at 50%. This percentage sets the number of
good messages that must be received to stay on the
current site. Therefore, the higher the percentage, the
sooner auto-registration occurs.
with the proper key, communication is not possible.
The System Key is provided to the system operator by
the E.F. Johnson Company.
5.8.10 DYNAMIC CHANNEL ASSIGNMENT
When channels (repeaters) are added to a MultiNet system, mobiles do not have to be brought back in
for reprogramming because they are informed over the
air as to which channel number to use to place or
receive a call. The only channel numbers programmed
into the mobiles are the home and status channels.
5.8.11 EMERGENCY CALLS
5.8.13 BUSY QUEUING
An emergency switch is available with all MultiNet transceivers. This switch can be used in emergency situations to quickly place calls or transmit an
emergency code. The transceiver can be programmed
so that the emergency message is transmitted either
automatically or manually.
The busy queuing feature places the call in a
queue if the system is busy when the PTT switch is
pressed. Then when the system becomes available, the
user is alerted by a tone and the call can be placed if
desired. An available system is determined in the
normal manner by the access priority of the selected
group and the current access priority being transmitted by the repeater. Refer to Section 3.7.1 for more
information on this feature.
When automatic operation is programmed, the
transceiver automatically transmits the emergency
code on the designated system/group until an acknowledgment is received from the dispatcher. When
manual operation is programmed, the transceiver goes
to the designated system/group but no message is automatically transmitted. This ensures that when the user
does transmit the message, it is transmitted at the
highest priority. Refer to Section 3.6.8 for more information.
5.8.14 SENDING STATUS INFORMATION
One of up to eight preprogrammed status conditions can be transmitted to the dispatcher. Conditions
such as “AT SCENE” or “IN PURSUIT” can be
selected by the user. Then when the transmitter keys, a
number representing that status is transmitted and a
message along with the mobile's unique ID are
displayed on the dispatcher's console. Refer to Section
3.7.3 for more information.
5.8.12 AUTO-REGISTRATION (ROAMING)
Auto-registration (roaming) can be used to automatically track the location of mobiles in multi-site
systems. Calls can then be automatically routed to the
correct site. This eliminates the need to enter the site
of the mobile when placing a call.
5.8.15 TRANSMIT INHIBIT
The Transmit Inhibit feature prevents the transmitter from keying if the mobile being called is busy
with another call. The transceiver is programmed with
a block of transmit inhibit ID codes that can include up
to all 225. If a code within this block is detected up to
5 seconds before the push-to-talk switch is pressed, the
transmitter does not key and the user is alerted by a
tone and message in the display if applicable. Refer to
Section 3.7.5 for more information.
Auto-registration occurs only when the mobile is
in the system scanning mode. If the mobile moves out
of radio range of the site in which it is currently registered, it begins searching for another site. When one is
found, it automatically registers on the new site. When
the transceiver is searching for a new site, the user is
alerted by a message in the display. Refer to Section
3.7.2 for more information.
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5.8.16 VOICE ENCRYPTION
Encryption can be used with Multi-Net, LTR, and
conventional operation. Each group can be
programmed for encryption and then when that group
is selected, encryption is automatically enabled. The
user can also manually turn encryption on and off. The
encryption mode is indicated in the display or by a
front-panel indicator.
NOTE: Voice encryption is currently not available for
E.F. Johnson 900 MHz transceivers.
Optional voice encryption provides security from
unauthorized monitoring of conversations by casual
eavesdropping and analog scanners. Multi-Net encryption employs Continuous Sync™ technology to
provide fast synchronization and decoding of
messages. This means that calls can be received even
if the transceiver is turned on in the middle of a
message or if a call is entered from the scan mode.
NOTE: Encryption is not compatible with companding; therefore, those features cannot be used together.
An OTAR (Over-The-Air-Reprogramming)
system is available which allows the system operator
to periodically change part of the encryption code and
certain other parameters. This system uses a speciallyequipped mobile transceiver, modem, IBM® PC or
compatible computer, and special OTAR software.
Encryption encodes the audio signal using a
special code sequence. Over five-billion different
codes are available, and only other mobiles with the
same code sequence can receive a call. Encryption is
available on both group and telephone calls (either
mobile- and landside-originated). With telephone
calls, dialing is normally completed before encryption
is enabled.
™ Continuous Sync is a trademark of Transcrypt International
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CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
SECTION 6 CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
6.1 GENERAL TRANSCEIVER DESCRIPTION
6.1.3 RECEIVER
6.1.1 INTRODUCTION
The receiver is a double-conversion type with
intermediate frequencies of 52.950 MHz and 450 kHz.
Receiver selectivity is enhanced by two 52.950 MHz
crystal filters and a 450 kHz ceramic filter. Two bandpass filters in the front end attenuate the image, half
IF, injection, and other frequencies which could
degrade receiver performance.
The Summit 97xx transceiver contains the
following PC board assemblies: RF, PA (power amplifier), audio/logic, and display. The RF board contains
the synthesizer and receiver sections, and the PA
board contains the transmitter section. The audio/logic
board contains the digital control and audio and data
processing circuitry. The display board is used in
front-mount models and the remote control unit of
remote-mount models. General descriptions follow
and more detailed descriptions are located in Sections
6.2-6.7. A transceiver block diagram is shown in
Figure 6-1.
6.1.4 TRANSMITTER
The transmitter amplifies the +10 dBm synthesizer signal to produce a power output of 15 or 30/35
watts, depending on model. All data and audio modulation of the transmit signal occurs in the synthesizer.
The power control circuit allows the microprocessor
to directly control transmitter power output. This
permits each selectable system to be programmed with
a different setting if desired. The ambient temperature
of 30/35-watt models is also monitored by the microprocessor so that power can be cut back if temperature
becomes excessive.
Circuit protection is provided by a 15-ampere
fuse in the power cable and a 4-ampere fuse on the PA
board and also by regulators which automatically limit
current. The fuse on the PA board protects low-power
circuits such as the audio power amplifier and the 5-,
8-, and 9-volt regulators. The power cable fuse
protects the high-power circuits in the transmitter such
as the driver and final.
6.1.5 AUDIO/LOGIC BOARD
Microprocessor-based logic on the audio/logic
board controls such functions as synthesizer programming, scan, data encoding and decoding, and the
display. In addition to the digital control circuitry, the
audio/logic board contains analog circuits which
provide amplification, filtering, and other processing
of the audio, data, and Call Guard signals.
6.1.2 SYNTHESIZER
The synthesizer output signal is the transmit
frequency in the transmit mode and the receive first
injection frequency in the receive mode. This signal is
routed by a switching circuit to either first mixer Q206
on the RF board or power amplifier module U500 on
the PA board.
Information which changes from transceiver to
transceiver such as channels to be selected and various
operating parameters is programmed into the transceiver by a personal computer connected to the frontpanel microphone jack. This information is stored in
EEPROM U406. Since this type of memory device is
nonvolatile and reprogrammable, battery backup or
extra PROMs are not required.
Channels are selected by programming the
counters in synthesizer chip U801 to divide by a
certain number. This data comes from microprocessor
U401 located on the audio/logic board. The frequency
stability of the synthesizer is determined by the
stability of TCXO (temperature compensated crystal
oscillator) A800. The stability of A800 is ±1.5 PPM
for both 800 and 900 MHz from –22° to +140° F
(–30° to +60° C).
The operating program is stored in flash EPROM
U404. This type of memory can be reprogrammed by
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CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
transmit frequency in the transmit mode and 52.950
MHz below the receive frequency in the receive mode.
Therefore, its operating band is approximately 798869 MHz (800 MHz models) or 882-941 MHz (900
MHz models). Transistor bias is provided by R920 and
R921, and stabilization is provided by R922. L921 is
an RF choke and C926 is a bypass capacitor. C922,
C923, and R924 provide feedback to start and maintain oscillation and also match the oscillator to the
tank circuit.
the microprocessor similar to an EEPROM. This
allows the operating program to be updated using the
standard programming setup and special software.
This eliminates the need to change a ROM or the
microprocessor to update software.
6.2 SYNTHESIZER CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
6.2.1 INTRODUCTION
A block diagram of the synthesizer is shown in
Section 6-1. The synthesizer output signal is produced
by a VCO (voltage-controlled oscillator) located on a
separate module. The frequency of this oscillator is
controlled by a DC voltage produced by the phase
detector in synthesizer chip U801. The phase detector
senses the phase and frequency of two input signals
and if they are not the same, the VCO control voltage
increases or decreases until they are synchronized. The
VCO is then “locked” on frequency.
The tank circuit consists of a section of microstrip; varactor diodes CR901, CR903, and CR904;
capacitors C920, C921, C901, C903, C905, C909; and
several other components. The microstrip is a shortened half-wave line which provides series inductance
and shunt capacitance.
The output signal on the collector of Q920 is
coupled by C932 to buffer amplifier Q930/Q940. This
is a shared-bias amplifier which provides amplification and also isolation between the VCO and the
stages which follow. The signal is coupled from Q930
to Q940 by C935. The resistors in this circuit provide
biasing and stabilization, and C931 and C934 are
bypass capacitors. C932, C933, and C937 provide
impedance matching and DC blocking.
One input to the phase detector is the reference
frequency (fR) derived from the TCXO. The TCXO
frequency is divided by 1400 by the reference counter
in U801 to produce a reference frequency of 12.5 kHz.
This frequency is the same for all channels. In addition, the third harmonic of the TCXO frequency is
used to lock the receiver second injection oscillator on
frequency.
Frequency Control and Modulation
The other input signal to the phase detector (fV)
is derived from the VCO signal. The VCO signal is
divided by prescaler U800 and the N counter in U801
to produce this signal. The prescaler and N counter are
programmed for each channel to produce an input
frequency to the phase detector that is the same as the
fR input when the VCO is oscillating on the correct
frequency.
The VCO frequency is controlled in part by the
DC voltage applied across varactor diode CR901. As
the voltage across a reverse-biased varactor diode
increases, its capacitance decreases. The result is that
the VCO frequency increases as the control voltage
increases and vice versa. The control line is isolated
from tank circuit RF by choke L901 and decoupling
capacitor C902. The amount of frequency change
produced by CR901 is set by series capacitor C901.
6.2.2 VOLTAGE-CONTROLLED OSCILLATOR
MODULE
The VCO frequency is modulated in a similar
manner. The transmit audio/data signal is applied
across varactor diode CR903. This varies the VCO
frequency at an audio rate. The amount of modulation
is set by C903 along with varactor diode CR904 and
capacitor C912 (see next paragraph). R901 provides a
DC ground on the anodes of CR903 and CR904, and
isolation is provided by R900, C904, and C852.
NOTE: The VCO module is not repairable because it
is a hybrid with many of the components printed on a
ceramic substrate.
VCO (Q920), Buffer Amplifier (Q930, Q940)
Q920 is a bipolar transistor configured as a
common collector oscillator. It oscillates on the
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CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
Figure 6-1 Transceiver Block Diagram
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CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
The capacitive leg is formed by C905, PIN diode
CR905, and C906. When the Q6 output of U802 is a
high level and the Q7 output is a low level, CR905 is
forward biased and C905 and C906 are effectively
connected to the tank circuit. This decreases the resonant frequency of the tank circuit. L905/L906 and
C907/C908 provide isolation. The inductive leg is
formed by C909, a section of microstrip (which
provides series inductance), and by C910. When this
leg is switched into the tank circuit, the resonant
frequency increases.
The DC voltage applied across CR904 provides
compensation to keep modulation relatively flat over
the entire bandwidth of the VCO. This compensation
is required because modulation tends to increase as the
VCO frequency gets higher (capacitance of CR901
gets lower). CR904 also balances the modulation
signals applied to the VCO and TCXO (see next
section).
The DC voltage applied across CR904 comes
from a D/A converter on the audio/logic board. This
D/A converter is formed by a resistor network
controlled by shift register U450 and the microprocessor. As the VCO frequency increases, this DC
voltage also increases which lowers the amount of
capacitance applied to the tank circuit and therefore
the amount of modulation produced. R802 applies a
DC biasing voltage to CR903; C834 provides DC
blocking; and C850 attenuates AC signals applied
through R802. RF isolation is provided by C912,
R902, C846, and R805.
6.2.3 VCO AND TCXO MODULATION
Both the VCO and TCXO are modulated to
achieve the required frequency response. If only the
VCO was modulated, the phase detector in U801
would sense the frequency change and increase or
decrease the VCO control voltage to counteract the
change, especially at the lower audio frequencies. If
only the TCXO was modulated, the VCO frequency
would not change fast enough, especially at the high
audio frequencies. Modulating both the VCO and
TCXO produces a flat response. One function of the
DC voltage applied to J200, pin 20 is to balance these
signals so that modulation of the VCO is equal to that
of the TCXO. The other is frequency compensation
described in the preceding section.
VCO Frequency Shift
The VCO must be capable of producing frequencies from approximately 798-869 MHz (800 MHz
models) or 882-941 (900 MHz models) to produce the
required receive injection, transmit, and repeater talkaround frequencies. If this large of a shift was
achieved by varying the VCO control voltage, the
VCO gain would be undesirably high. Therefore,
capacitance and inductance is switched in and out of
the tank circuit to provide a coarse shift in frequency.
6.2.4 ACTIVE FILTER (Q800), BUFFER
AMPLIFIER (Q801, Q802)
Q800 functions as a capacitance multiplier to
provide a filtered 8-volt supply to the VCO module
and shift register U802. R801 provides bias and C802
provides the capacitance that is multiplied. If a noise
pulse or other voltage change appears on the collector,
the base voltage does not change significantly because
of C802. Therefore, base current does not change and
the voltage on the emitter remains constant. R800
provides isolation, and C800, C801, and C836
decouple RF.
This switching is controlled by shift register
U802 and PIN diodes CR905 and CR909. When a PIN
diode is forward biased, it presents a very low impedance to RF; and when it is reverse biased, it presents a
very high impedance. The capacitive and inductive
legs of the tank circuit are switched as follows:
Mode
Transmit
Receive
Talk-Around
Switching
Neither switched in
C leg switched in
L leg switched in
The output signal on pin 2 of the VCO module is
at a level of approximately 0 dBm and is applied to the
base of Q801. This stage amplifies the signal to
approximately 12 dBm and also provides additional
isolation. Impedance matching between the VCO
module and Q801 is provided by a section of microstrip and C808. Q802 provides a Q801 bias current that
NOTE: The C and L legs are never switched in at the
same time.
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CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
Figure 6-2 U801 Block Diagram
receiver, and CR902 presents a high-impedance into
the transmitter. L800/C841 and L803/C813 neutralize
the slight capacitance of the diode when it is reverse
biased to improve isolation.
remains stable over changes in temperature. flows so
that the voltage drop across R809 equals the drop
across R815 and the base- emitter junction of Q802.
Impedance matching with the RF coupler on the
output of Q801 is provided by an inductor formed by
microstrip and by C810. R807 across the section of
microstrip lowers the gain of Q801 so that it remains
stable. C811 and C812 are RF decoupling capacitors.
6.2.5 PRESCALER (U800)
U800 is a dual-modulus prescaler. A prescaler is
a counter capable of operating at high frequencies, and
dual modulus refers to the two divide numbers, 128
and 129. This counter divides an input signal in the
800 MHz range down to the 6 MHz range so that it is
within the operating range of the counters in U801.
The prescaler divides by 128 when the control input
(pin 6) is high, and by 129 when it is low. The RF
coupler on the input couples the forward power
component of the synthesizer signal. Other parts on
the input of U800 provide impedance matching and
the required input level.
The circuit on the output of the coupler switches
the synthesizer signal to either the receiver or transmitter. In the transmit mode, the Q4 output of shift
register U802 is high and the Q3 output is low.
Current then flows through R812, L803, CR802,
CR803, and R813 which forward biases both diodes.
The quarter-wave line between the two diodes is then
effectively AC grounded through CR803 and C815.
When one end of a quarter-wave line is grounded, the
other end presents a high impedance to the quarterwave frequency. This effectively blocks the RF signal
from the receiver, and CR802 provides a low-impedance path through C814 to the transmitter.
6.2.6 SYNTHESIZER INTEGRATED CIRCUIT
(U801)
Introduction
In the receive mode, the Q4 and Q3 outputs of
U802 are the opposite states, so both diodes are
reverse biased. The quarter-wave line is then no longer
grounded and provides a low-impedance path to the
A block diagram of synthesizer U801 is shown in
Figure 6-2. This device contains reference (R), N, and
A counters; phase and lock detectors, and counter
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CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
counter reaches zero. Both counters then reset and the
cycle is repeated. The A counter is always
programmed with a smaller number than the N
counter. While the A counter is counting down, the
modulus control output to the prescaler (pin 12) is low
and the prescaler divides by 129. Then when the A
counter is halted, the modulus control output is high
and the prescaler divides by 128.
programming circuitry. The basic operation was
described in Section 6.2.1.
Channel Programming
Channels are selected by programming the R, N,
and A counters in U801 to divide by a certain number.
The programming of these counters is performed by
the microprocessor using data stored in EEPROM
U406. These counters are programmed as follows:
To illustrate the operation of the prescaler, N, and
A counters, a example will be used. Assume a transmit
frequency of 813.4875 (800 MHz channel 300) is
selected. Since the VCO oscillates on the transmit
frequency in the transmit mode, this is the frequency
that must be produced by the VCO. To produce this
frequency, the N and A counters are programmed as
follows:
N = 508
A = 55
Data to be loaded into U801 is first clocked
through shift register U802. It is fed into U801 on the
DATA input (pin 10) and clocked in a bit at a time by a
low-to-high transition on the CLOCK input (pin 9).
Data is first loaded into the 1-bit register (see
Figure 6-2) and then into the 7-, 10-, and 14-bit registers. The last bit is present in the 1-bit register, and it
determines which counter will be programmed. If this
bit is a 1, the data is latched by all three counters when
the latch ENABLE input (pin 11) goes high. If it is a 0,
it is latched by only the A and N counters.
To determine the overall divide number of the
prescaler, the number of input pulses required to
produce one N counter output pulse can be counted. In
this example, the prescaler divides by 129 for 129 x 55
or 7095 input pulses. It then divides by 128 for 128 x
(508 - 55) or 57,984 input pulses. The overall divide
number K is therefore 57,984 + 7095 or 65,079. The
VCO frequency of 813.4875 MHz divided by 65,079
equals 12.5 kHz which is equal to the fR input to the
phase detector.
U801 Operation
As stated earlier, the divide numbers of the
counters in U801 are chosen so that when the VCO is
operating on the correct frequency, the fR and fV
phase detector inputs are the same frequency.
The overall divide number K can also be determined by the following formula:
The fR input is produced by dividing the 17.500
MHz TCXO frequency on pin 1 by 1400. This
produces an fR frequency of 12.5 kHz. Using this
frequency allows channels to be changed in 12.5 kHz
steps. A 12.5 kHz fR frequency is used for all channels. The TCXO frequency is buffered and then fed
out of U801 again on pin 14 to the voltage multiplier
and second injection circuits. The stability of the
TCXO frequency determines the stability of the
transmit and receive signals.
K = 128N + A
Where: N = N counter divide number
A = A counter divide number
NOTE: The formula for determining the N and A
counter divide numbers is described in Section 7.2.5.
The fV input is produced by dividing the VCO
frequency using prescaler U800 and the N counter in
U801. As described in Figure 6.2.5, the prescaler
divides by 128 or 129. This divide number is
controlled by the N and A counters as follows:
6.2.7 LOCK DETECT (Q808, Q809)
When the synthesizer is locked on frequency, the
lock detect output on U801, pin 7 is basically a high
voltage because only very narrow negative-going
pulses are present. If the synthesizer is out-of-lock, the
negative-going pulses widen as the difference between
fR and fV increases.
Both the N and A counters begin counting down
from the number that they were programmed with.
When the A counter reaches zero, it halts until the N
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CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
6.2.9 VOLTAGE MULTIPLIER (CR804A/B,
CR805A/B)
This lock detect signal is integrated by Q808 and
Q809. C831 charges through R830 and R832 and
discharges through C831 and Q808. When the
negative-going lock detect pulses widen, C831
discharges to the turn-off point of Q809. The collector
of Q809 then goes high and this signal is applied to the
5D pin of input latch U411 on the audio/logic board.
The voltage multiplier circuit provides a supply
voltage of approximately 25 volts to the charge pump
circuit. This supply voltage is required so that the
charge pump can provide the required voltage swing to
the VCO. The AC input signal to the multiplier is the
buffered 17.500 MHz TCXO signal from pin 14 of
U801. This signal is approximately 8 volts P-P and is
coupled by C822 to CR805A which provides rectification. This results in a voltage across C823 of approximately 9 volts. Also applied to C823 is a 9-volt supply
fed through R814 and CR805B. Therefore, the voltage
across C823 is the sum of these two 9-volt signals
minus the voltage drop of the diodes or approximately
16 volts.
Therefore, a high signal indicates an out-of- lock
condition and a low signal a locked condition. When
an out-of-lock condition is detected by the microprocessor, transmitting is inhibited so that an improper
frequency is not transmitted.
6.2.8 CHARGE PUMP (Q804-Q807)
The charge pump circuit charges and discharges
C805, C806, and C807 in the loop filter to produce the
VCO control voltage. Pulses which control the charge
pump are fed out of U801 on pins 15 and 16. When
both inputs to the phase detector are in phase, the
output signals on pins 15 and 16 are high except for a
very short period when both pulse low in phase. If the
frequency of the fR input to the phase detector is
higher than that of the fV input (or if the phase of fR
leads fV), the VCO frequency is too low. The negative-going pulses on the UP output (pin 16) then
become much wider and the DOWN output (pin 15)
stays essentially high. If the frequency of fV is higher
than that of fR (VCO frequency is high), the opposite
occurs.
CR804A/B, C821, and C824 form another
voltage adder circuit similar to the one just discussed.
The voltage across C824 is the 16-volt supply from
C823 plus the 9-volt supply rectified by C821 and
CR804A.
6.3 RECEIVER CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
6.3.1 RF AMPLIFIER (Q290)
NOTE: Bandpass filter Z290 and RF amplifier Q290
are located on the PA board.
The receive signal is fed from the antenna jack
through the harmonic filter and antenna switch (see
Section 6.4.3) to bandpass filter Z290. With 800 MHz
models, this is a three-pole filter with a center
frequency of 860 MHz and bandwidth of 18 MHz.
With 900 MHz models, it is a two-pole filter with a
center frequency of 938 MHz and a bandwidth of 6
MHz. This filter attenuates the image and other
unwanted frequencies and also prevents the injection
signal from being fed back to the antenna.
C803 provides DC blocking to enhance balanced
operation of the charge pump. Q805 and Q806 are
level translators which make the 5-volt levels of U801
compatible with the 9- and 25-volt supplies to Q804
and Q807. When a negative-going pulse appears on
pin 16, Q805 turns on which turns Q804 on. The loop
filter capacitors then charge through Q804 and R819
which increases the VCO control voltage. When a
negative-going pulse occurs on pin 15, Q806 turns on
which turns Q807 on. The loop filter capacitors then
discharge through Q807 and R828 which decreases the
control voltage.
From Z290 the signal is fed to RF amplifier
Q290. This stage amplifies the receive signal to
recover filter loses and improve sensitivity. Impedance
matching between Z290 and Q290 is provided by two
sections of microstrip and C297. Diode CR290
protects the base-emitter junction of Q290 from
damage caused by high-level input signals. A constant
bias current is provided by Q291. Transistor Q290 is
The loop filter formed by C805-C807, R806,
R845, and C836 provides low-pass filtering of the
signal from the charge pump. This filtering controls
synthesizer stability and lock-up time and suppresses
the reference frequency (12.5 kHz).
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CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
biased so that the voltage drop across R297 is equal to
the drop across R294 and the base- emitter of Q291.
This arrangement provides a bias that remains stable
as changes occur in temperature.
in Section 6.3.1. The output of the IF amplifier is
applied to a 6 dB pad and then to crystal filter Z206.
This is a two-pole filter with a bandwidth of 18 kHz
(800 MHz) or 10 kHz (900 MHz) at the –3 dB points.
Impedance matching with filter Z201 on the RF
board is provided by a section of microstrip and C296.
R295 lowers the gain of Q290 so that it remains stable.
C293, C294, C291, C292, and C298 decouple various
RF signals.
6.3.4 SECOND MIXER/DETECTOR (U200)
U200 contains second mixer and oscillator,
limiter, detector, audio preamplifier, squelch, and
RSSI stages. The second injection signal is 450 kHz
below the 52.950 MHz IF signal or 52.500 MHz.
Coarse frequency adjustment for the internal oscillator in U200 is provided by L206 and C239. Fine
adjust is provided by the third harmonic of the TCXO
frequency (17.500 MHz x 3 = 52.500 MHz). A twopole filter formed by C240-C244, L208, and L200 is
tuned to that frequency, and the output locks the oscillator to 52.500 MHz.
6.3.2 FIRST MIXER (Q205)
Bandpass filter Z201 on the RF board is similar to
Z290 and provides additional filtering of the receive
signal. The output of Z201 is applied to a 50-ohm, 3dB pad formed by R203-R204. This pad is used to set
the input level to mixer Q206. Impedance matching
between the pad and Q206 is provided by a section of
microstrip and C204. Q206 is biased using the same
method as used with Q290. The injection signal is
applied to the emitter of Q206 and is at a level of
approximately 10 dBm. It is 52.950 MHz below the
receive frequency in order to produce a first IF of
52.950 MHz. Filtering of the injection signal is
provided by Z202. This is a two-pole bandpass filter
with a center frequency of 807 MHz and a bandwidth
of 18 MHz (800 MHz models) or a center frequency of
885 MHz and a bandwidth of 6 MHz (900 MHz
models).
The 450 kHz output of the internal doublebalanced mixer is fed out on pin 19 and back in again
on pin 17. It is then applied to another mixer which is
used in this application for amplification only. The
output of this mixer is fed out on pin 6 and applied to a
four-pole ceramic filter which is used to attenuate
wideband noise. The 450 kHz signal is then fed back
into U200 on pin 7 and applied to a limiter/amplifier
stage. This limiter amplifies the 450 kHz signal and
then limits it to a specific value. This eliminates amplitude variations present in the signal.
From the limiter the signal is fed to the quadrature detector. An external phase shift network
connected to pin 12 shifts the phase of one of the
detector inputs 90 degrees at 450 kHz (the other inputs
are unshifted in phase). When modulation occurs, the
frequency of the IF signal changes at an audio rate as
does the phase of the shifted signal. The detector,
which has no output with a 90-degree phase shift,
converts this phase shift into an audio signal. T204 is
tuned to provide maximum undistorted output from
the detector.
The 52.950 MHz output of Q205 is matched by
L203, C201, and C202 to a 50-ohm, 3-dB pad formed
by R215, R217, and R218. R210 is used to lower the
Q of L203. Matching between the pad and crystal filter
Z205 is provided by C221, C207, and L202.
6.3.3 CRYSTAL FILTERS (Z205, Z206), IF
AMPLIFIER (Q203)
Z205 is a four-pole crystal filter with a –3 dB
bandwidth of 15 kHz (800 MHz) or 8 kHz (900 MHz).
This filter attenuates wideband noise, adjacent channels, frequencies resulting from inter modulation, and
other undesired frequencies.
The detected audio signal is fed out of U200 on
pin 13 and amplified by U201A which has a gain of
approximately three at 800 MHz or six at 900 MHz.
R207 and R213 provide a bias voltage of approximately 3.0 volts. The output of this stage is fed to the
receive audio processing circuitry on the
audio/logic board.
The output of this filter is applied to IF amplifier
Q203. Matching between this stage and filter Z205 is
provided by C220, L205, and C217. A constant bias
current is provided by Q202 similar to Q291 described
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6.4 TRANSMITTER CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
Pin 10 of U200 is the output of an internal RSSI
(receive signal strength indicator) circuit. It provides a
high-impedance current sink that increases in conduction in proportion to increases in the IF signal level.
The result is that the voltage on pin 10 decreases as the
IF signal strength increases and vice versa. This signal
is buffered by U201B and then fed to comparator
U602C on the audio/logic board. The microprocessor
uses this indication and the noise squelch indication to
control receiver muting and data detection.
NOTE: RF amplifier Q290 is described in Section
6.3.1.
6.4.1 POWER AMPLIFIER MODULE (U500)
The RF input signal to the transmitter on J501,
pin 18, is at a level of approximately +10 dBm. This
signal is applied to a 11 dB pad formed by R506R508 which sets the correct input level to U500.
Power amplifier module U500 amplifies this signal to
approximately 6 watts. VS1, VCTRL, and VS2 are
supply inputs to separate amplifier stages in U500.
Controlling the voltage on the VCTRL input controls
the power output of the transmitter. Various capacitors
on these supply inputs isolate the supply from various
AC signals present in U500.
6.3.5 AUDIO POWER AMPLIFIER (U100)
The audio signal from the front panel volume
control (front mount) or digital volume control U600
on the audio/logic board (remote mount) is applied to
amplifier U100. This is a bridge amplifier which
provides up to 12 watts of power into a 4-ohm speaker.
CR100, R109, R110, and C115 provide the biasing
voltage, and the output is stabilized by R107/C118 and
R108/C119. When an external speaker is used, it is
connected by a wire harness to J101, pins 1 and 2.
When the internal 16-ohm speaker is used, a jumper is
installed between pins 1 and 3 of J101 and the speaker
is connected to J100. R120 limits power to this
speaker to approximately 5 watts to prevent damage to
the speaker.
6.4.2 DRIVER (Q500), FINAL AMPLIFIER (Q501)
Driver Q500 amplifies a 6-watt input signal to
approximately 20 watts. C558, C559, and C519
provide impedance matching with U500. Inductor
L500 provides self biasing of Q500. Supply current to
Q500 flows through R587, and the voltage drop across
this resistor is monitored by U504B in the power
control circuit (see Section 6.4.4). L501 is an RF
choke, and C517, C518, and C555 isolate the supply
voltage from AC signals present in Q500.
6.3.6 13.8-VOLT SWITCH (Q100, Q103, Q106Q108)
If the transceiver is a 15-watt model, the output
signal from Q500 is applied to the directional coupler
and Q501 is not used. If it is a 30/35-watt model, final
amplifier Q501 amplifies the Q500 output signal to
approximately 35/40 watts. Impedance matching
between Q500 and Q501 is provided by L501, C539,
and three sections of microstrip. L503 provides self
biasing of Q501. Capacitors and a section of microstrip on the collector of Q501 provide impedance
matching with the directional coupler.
The 13.8-volt switch circuit is controlled by the
front panel or remote control unit power switch. When
power is turned on, the power switch grounds the
emitter of Q402 on the audio/logic board. Then if this
transistor is turned on by the ignition sense line or the
4Q output of latch U409, a low voltage is applied to
the base of Q103 on the RF board. The 13.8-volt
switch circuit is then turned on and approximately 13
volts appear on the collector of series-pass transistor
Q100.
6.4.3 ANTENNA SWITCH (CR502, CR506,
CR507)
The 0.8-volt drop of this circuit provides about 30
dB attenuation of noise pulses less than 1.6-volt P-P
that are present in the 13.8-volt supply from the
vehicle. This lessens the amount of vehicle noise in
circuits powered by the 13.8-volt supply such as audio
amplifier U100.
The output signal of Q501 is fed through the
directional coupler (next section) and then applied to
an antenna switching network. This network connects
the antenna to the receiver in the receive mode and the
transmitter in the transmit mode.
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CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
power levels that can be programmed using the test
mode (see Section 3.11). Power output is controlled by
varying the supply voltage to one of the amplifier
stages in power amplifier module U500. The microprocessor also monitors transmitter temperature and if
it is not in the normal range, power is automatically
cut back to prevent damage.
In the transmit mode, Q507 and Q514 are turned
on. Current then flows through Q507, L506, CR506,
and shunt networks CR507/L508/R514 and CR502/
L507/ R528. Diodes CR502, CR506, and CR507 are
PIN diodes. This type of diode has a very low impedance to RF when forward biased and a very high
impedance to RF when reverse biased. Therefore, in
the transmit mode the RF signal has a low-impedance
path through CR506 to the antenna.
Directional Coupler, Forward/Reverse Power
Amplifiers
The sections of microstrip connected to the
cathode of CR507 are quarter-wave lines. In the
transmit mode, one end of these lines is effectively
grounded by CR502/C532 and CR507/C531. When
one end of a quarter-wave line is grounded, the other
end presents a high impedance to the quarter-wave
frequency. Therefore, there is a high-impedance path
into the receiver for the transmit signal. Two quarterwave sections are used to provide the required isolation. L506-L508 and the 39 pF and 0.01 µF capacitors
isolate the supply voltage from RF signals. R528 and
R514 provide current limiting.
A directional coupler is used to sense the forward
and reverse power components of the RF signal. A
sample of the forward power signal is rectified by
CR505. Current flows through R538, R539, CR505,
R541, and R566. RF in the DC signal is attenuated by
R541, C571 and C552. Frequency compensation is
provided by C544. The reverse power component is
detected in a similar manner.
U504A and U504C are configured as noninverting amplifiers. Therefore, an increase in the level
of the forward or reverse power causes the output to
increase. U504A has unity gain and U504C has a gain
of approximately four. C542 and C536 attenuate RF
frequencies by causing them to be applied to both
inputs. They then become common mode signals that
are not amplified.
In the receive mode, Q507 and Q514 are off, so
the PIN diodes are reverse biased. Therefore, the
receive signal has a high-impedance path into the
transmitter and a low-impedance path into the receiver
because the quarter-wave lines are no longer
grounded. L510 and C561 neutralize the small capacitance of CR506 in the receive mode to improve isolation.
Summing Amplifier (U504D), Current Sense (U504B)
The output of U504D is the sum of the input
signals from the forward and reverse power amplifiers.
Since this is also a non-inverting amplifier, the output
increases as the input increases. The gain is set at
about two by R563 and R500.
A harmonic filter is formed by a section of
microstrip and C549, C502, C500, and C567. This is a
low-pass filter which attenuates frequencies above the
transmit band. R527 dissipates any static electricity
that may build up on the antenna.
Current to driver Q500 is sensed by detecting the
voltage drop across R587. U504B is a differential
amplifier with a gain of ten set by R568/R561 and
R585/R586. As current to Q500 increases, the output
of U504B increases and vice versa.
6.4.4 POWER CONTROL (U504, Q511, Q502,
Q506)
General
Amplifiers (Q511, Q502, Q506), Shift Register
(U503)
The power control circuit senses forward and
reverse power and also current to driver Q500 to
control transmitter power output. Instead of using a
potentiometer to provide a fixed power output, a D/A
converter is used so that it can be controlled by the
microprocessor. Each selectable system can be
programmed for a different power level. There are five
Q511 is a series-pass transistor which controls the
supply voltage to an amplifier stage in U500. Transistor Q502 provides drive to Q511. The emitter
voltage of Q502 is controlled by R580 and summing
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CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
amplifier U504D. The base voltage of Q502 is
controlled by current sense amplifier Q506 and a D-A
converter formed by shift register U503 and a resistor
network.
the data bus (AD0-AD7) to be used for memory
addressing as well as data input and output. For more
information, see “Address/Data Bus” description
which follows.
As the voltage from the D-A converter increases,
Q502 and Q511 turn on more which causes power
output to increase. If current becomes excessive, Q506
turns on more which lowers the base voltage of Q502
and lowers power output. If forward or reverse power
increase, the output of summing amplifier U504D
increases. This increases the emitter voltage of Q502
which then turns off more and lowers power output.
C584 delays power output for a few milliseconds to
stabilize the power control loop. C540 provides negative feedback to stabilize the circuit.
The operating speed of the microprocessor is set
by crystal Y300. The 8 MHz frequency of this crystal
is divided by four by an internal divider to produce as
internal operating frequency of 2 MHz.
Memory
The operating program is stored in external flash
EPROM U404. This is a 128K x 8 memory device
which contains the instructions used by the microprocessor to provide transceiver control. The use of a
flash EPROM allows the operating program to be
updated using the standard programming setup and
special software. This eliminates the need to remove
the transceiver and change a ROM or the microprocessor to update software. When reprogramming of
this EPROM occurs, the MODA/ MODB inputs of the
microprocessor are pulled low to put it in a special
bootstrap mode. In addition, a 12 VDC Vpp voltage
generated by the RPI is applied to U404.
Shift register U503 controls the output voltage to
the power control circuit by changing the logic levels
applied to the resistor network connected to the O0-O6
pins. It also controls transmit switch Q507/Q514
which is connected to the Q7 pin. R558 and C565
form an RC network which prevents momentary
power output when transceiver power is turned on.
These components hold the OE (output enable) input
low for a short time which disables the O0-O7 outputs.
Information which changes from transceiver to
transceiver is stored in EEPROM (electrical erasable
memory) U406. This device contains the information
loaded into the transceiver by the personal computer
programming described in Section 4. An EEPROM
can be reprogrammed by the microprocessor many
times, and it maintains stored data without the need for
a continuous power supply.
6.5 AUDIO/LOGIC BOARD DIGITAL CIRCUIT
DESCRIPTION
6.5.1 MICROPROCESSOR (U401)
General
The control logic for this transceiver is based on
an MC68HCP11A0 eight-bit microprocessor. This
particular device has an internal 256-byte static RAM
but no internal ROM or EEPROM. Therefore, all
program memory is stored in external memory
devices. Besides several general purpose inputs and
outputs, this device has an eight-channel A/D (analogto-digital) converter and synchronous and asynchronous serial ports. The A/D converter allows it to
monitor analog voltages such as the 13.8-volt supply
and the transmitter temperature.
CAUTION: EEPROM U406 is not replaceable
because it is cemented to the PC board. Attempting to
remove this part may seriously damage the board.
Temporary data storage is provided by RAM
U405. This device is used as a “scratchpad” by the
microprocessor while it is controlling the transceiver.
This is a static-type RAM which means that it does not
require periodic refreshing to maintain its contents.
However, the data is lost when transceiver power is
turned off.
The microprocessor operates in the expanded
mode which is selected by a high level on the MODA
and MODB pins. This mode allows external memory
and peripheral devices to be accessed by a multiplexed
address/data bus. Multiplexing allows the eight pins of
Reset
The microprocessor is reset when transceiver
power is turned on and also when the 5-volt supply
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This voltage decreases as power amplifier temperature increases.
drops below the normal range. Reset clears several
internal registers and restarts the operating program.
This prevents improper operation resulting from lowvoltage conditions.
PE1 - Analog DC voltage of 0-5 volts from the directional coupler on the PA board that increases with the
reflected power. This and the PE2 input are currently
not used.
Power-on reset occurs automatically for 4064
clock cycles whenever power is applied to the VDD
input of the microprocessor. Low-voltage reset is initiated by low-voltage sensor U400. When the 5-volt
supply drops below the normal range, the output
applied to the RESET input goes low. This resets the
microprocessor and also inhibits operation for as long
as it is low. The microprocessor also has internal reset
circuits which cause reset if problems occur with the
clock signal, illegal op codes, or a watchdog timer
circuit.
PE2 - Analog DC voltage of 0-5 volts from the directional coupler on the PA board that increases with
forward power.
PE3 - Analog DC voltage of 0-5 volts that senses the
13.8 VDC battery voltage. This voltage is divided
down to the 0-5 volt range by R781 and R793, and
noise is attenuated by C822.
PE4 - Analog DC voltage of 0-5 volts from the remote
control unit volume control. The microprocessor
senses this level to digitally control speaker volume
using volume control IC U600. R785 pulls this input
low when a remote control unit is not used so that the
output level of U600 is minimum. R792 and C621
attenuate noise on the line. This input is not used with
front-mount transceivers because volume is controlled
by the front panel volume control.
Address/Data Bus
A/D0-A/D7 - To minimize the number of pins
required, the lower eight bits of the sixteen-bit address
are multiplexed with the eight data bits. During the
first half of a bus cycle, address bits A0-A7 are
present, and during the second half, the bus is used as
a bi-directional data bus. The eight address bits are
latched by address latch U402 when a pulse occurs on
the AS pin.
PE5, PE6, PE7 - Not used.
AS (Address Strobe) - The address information on
AD0-AD7 is latched by U402 when a high-to-low
transition occurs on this output.
Serial IIC Interface
The serial IIC port provides data communication
with the front panel and the remote control unit. With
the front panel, data communication is only one-way
(towards the panel). With the remote control unit, it is
bi-directional. Whenever the front panel or remote
control unit requires service from the microprocessor,
it issues a request on the SRV REQ RM N (remote) or
SRV REQ FP N (front panel) input of latch U411.
E - This output is used to enable external devices
during the second half of the bus cycle. It goes high
when the external device can place data on the data
bus.
R/W - This output indicates the direction of data on
the data bus. It is high for read operations and low for
write operations.
PA5 (IIC SCL) - Buffered clock output to front panel
and remote control unit.
A/D Converter Inputs
VREFH/VREFL - These inputs provide the reference voltages for the A/D converter circuitry. R403
and C402 attenuate noise present in the 5-volt supply
applied to VREFH.
PA6 (IIC SDA Out) - Data output to front panel and
remote control unit.
PE0 - Analog DC voltage of 0-5 volts from thermistor
RT500 on the PA board (30/35-watt models only).
PA0 (IIC SDA In) - Data input from remote control
unit.
PA7 - See “Serial Peripheral Interface” description.
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CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
the digital signal processor circuit in the slave configuration.
Serial RS-232 Interface
The serial RS-232 port has three functions. First,
it provides data communication with the computer
used to program the transceiver. Connection is made
via the microphone connector on either the front panel
or remote control unit.
PD5 (SS) - In the slave configuration, this is the slave
select input and the master forces it low when it is
ready to transfer data. In the master configuration, it
can be used as a general-purpose output.
Second, it is used for reprogramming the flash
memory (see preceding “Memory” description). This
type of programming can be done only from the
microphone jack of front-mount units or the jack on
the front panel of remote-mount units. (It cannot be
done from the microphone jack of the remote control
unit.)
PA7 - Slave select input.
Software Serial Bus
A serial bus created using general purpose
outputs and controlled by software provides programming data for shift registers U450-U452 and volume
control U600 on the audio/logic board, shift register
U802 and synthesizer U801 on the RF board, and shift
register U503 on the PA board. The data is latched by
these devices by strobe pulses on the 1Q, 2Q, and 3Q
outputs of latch U408. This allows three different
destinations to be programmed.
Third, it provides communication via the
universal interface. This allows external equipment to
control transceiver functions. Communication can not
occur simultaneously with both sources.
This port is an asynchronous full-duplex type
using a standard NRZ (nonreturn-to-zero) data format
(one start bit, eight or nine data bits, and one stop bit).
PA3 - Serial clock output. Data on PA4 is clocked
through the shift registers by low-to-high transitions
on this line.
PD0 (RxD) - Serial data input.
PA4 - Serial data output.
PD1 (TxD) - Serial data output.
Serial Peripheral Interface
6.5.2 MEMORY AND I/O ADDRESSING
This serial port is used for communication with
the digital signal processor circuit. This is a synchronous port which means that a separate clock signal is
used to indicate when data on the data line is valid.
Either a master or slave configuration may be used. In
the master configuration, the microprocessor generates
the clock and other control signals. In the slave configuration, these signals are generated by the digital
signal processor circuit.
Several memory devices (U404-U406) and other
input/output devices (U408-U412) are connected to
the parallel data bus of the microprocessor (AD0AD7). To direct data on this bus to or from the desired
device, the specific device involved must be selected.
This is done using a memory mapping technique. Not
all of the 128K of memory addressable by sixteen bits
(A0-A15) plus a page bit (PA3) is used by 128K
EPROM U404. This allows the unused addresses to be
used for chip select.
PD2 (MISO), PD3 (MOSI) - These pins are used for
transmitting and receiving the serial data. MOSI
stands for Master Out Slave In and MISO stands for
Master In Slave Out. When this port is configured as a
master, MISO is the data input and MOSI is the data
output. When the port is configured as a slave, the role
of these pins is reversed.
Decoding of chip select information on the
address bus is performed by PALs U403 and U407. A
PAL (programmable array logic) device is custom
programmed to provide the desired outputs when
specific inputs are applied. U403 decodes the chip
select signals for the memory chips and also generates
write enable and output enable signals. U407 decodes
the chip select signals for the latches. In addition, it
provides reset protected chip select for EEPROM
PD4 (SCK) - This pin is the serial clock output in the
master configuration and the serial clock input from
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CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
U406. This prevents inadvertent writing to that device.
The F7 output of U407 is not used.
pin 2. If the RX LOOP signal is high, the opposite
occurs.
6.5.3 DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSOR (U300U302)
R644, R645, and C639 are used to minimize the
“click” heard when the gate opens and closes. R625
and C638 attenuate noise present in the logic signal.
Diode CR601 closes both U608A and U608C whenever mute gate U608B is closed. This improves isolation.
The digital signal processor circuit is not used in
early units. It is used to generate DTMF tones when
telephone numbers are recalled and transmitted in the
Phone Mode. It is not used to generate tone (CTCSS)
or digital Call Guard signaling.
High-Pass and Low-Pass Filtering
U300 is a special microprocessor optimized for
math-type operations. A digital signal processor circuit
converts an analog input to digital data, performs
digital processing on this data, and then converts to
digital data back into an analog output. PAL U302 is
used to control serial data communication with microprocessor U401. A/D converter U304 converts the
input tones to digital data, and latch U301 and the
resistor network provide the D/A conversion. U305A
and U305B provide low-pass filtering of the input and
output tones.
A six-pole high-pass filter consisting of U601B,
U601C, and U602D attenuates LTR data, Call Guard
tones or data, and other frequencies below 300 Hz that
are present in the receive audio signal. The overall
gain of this filter is approximately unity. The signal is
then fed to U601A which provides 6 dB per octave deemphasis of the signal. This removes the pre-emphasis
that was put in when it was transmitted. The signal is
then fed to U602A which provides three poles of lowpass filtering. This attenuates noise and other frequencies above 3 kHz.
6.6 AUDIO/LOGIC BOARD RECEIVE SIGNAL
PROCESSING
Expander (U100A)
NOTE: The compandor board is optional.
6.6.1 RECEIVE AUDIO PROCESSING
The demodulated receive audio signal from the
RF board is fed onto the audio/logic board on J300,
pin 11. The signal is fed to the following circuits: (1)
receive audio circuit, (2) receive data circuit, (3)
squelch circuit, (4) digital signal processing circuit,
and (5) universal interface (J403, pin 1). The following
information describes the receive audio circuit and
later sections describe the other circuits.
If optional companding is used, jumper R634 is
removed and the compandor board is installed.
Companding is the compressing and then expanding of
the audio signal to reduce noise. This also increases
the dynamic range of the audio signal which is otherwise limited by channel spacing. The signal undergoes
a 2:1 compression in the transmitter and then a 1:2
expansion in the receiver to return it to the original
condition. For example, a +1 dB change in audio level
at the input of the expander produces a +2 dB change
on the output.
A gating circuit consisting of U608A and U608C
routes either the audio signal from the receiver or from
J403, pin 2 of the universal interface to the high-pass
filter. Normally, the RX LOOP signal applied to
inverter Q600 is low. Q600 is then off and an 8 volt
level is applied to the control input (pin 13) of gate
U608A. The gate then passes the receiver signal to the
filter. The low level on the control input of gate
U608C causes that gate to block the signal from J403,
Gates U102C and U102D bypass expander
U100A when companding is not used on a selectable
system or when performing testing. U101B provides
buffering, and C111 couples the signal to pin 3 of
U100A which is the input of an internal variable gain
stage. Likewise, C110 couples the signal to pin 2
which is the input of an internal rectifier. The output of
this rectifier is averaged across C109 and then used to
control the gain of the variable gain stage.
Gating Circuit (U608A, U608C)
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CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
This channel of U600 is normally not used with
front-mount transceivers and is programmed for
maximum attenuation because the PE4 input is pulled
low by R785. An exception may be when a remote
control unit is used with a front-mount transceiver to
provide dual controls. The volume controls of both
units can then operate in parallel so that the volume is
the sum of both controls (see Section 2.5.1). The
second channel of U600 is not used at this time.
The value of C109 controls the rate at which gain
changes in response to changes in the input level. Pin
5 is the inverting input of an internal operational
amplifier and pin 7 is the output of this amplifier.
R108 sets amplifier gain, and C108 minimizes distortion in the expander.
Mute Gate (U608B), Summing Amplifier (U602B)
6.6.2 RECEIVE DATA PROCESSING (U606A-D)
Gate U608B mutes the receive audio signal when
no signal is being received or if the message is
intended for someone else. This gate is controlled by
the Q6 output of shift register U451. The microprocessor has total control over receiver squelch because
there is no control input from the squelch circuit. The
line to CR601 closes gates U608A and U608C when
U608B is closed. This improves isolation in the
squelched mode.
The receive audio signal on J300, pin 11 is also
fed to a receive data processing circuit consisting of
U606A-U606D. U606D and U606A form a four-pole
low-pass filter which attenuates voice and harmonic
frequencies above the data band. The passband of this
filter is controlled by Q610. When LTR data, digital
Call Guard data, or low frequency tone Call Guard
tones are received, Q610 is turned on and the cut-off
frequency is approximately 150 Hz. Then when a
high-frequency tone Call Guard tone is received, Q610
is turned off and the cut-off frequency is approximately 220 Hz. Turning Q610 on switches additional
capacitance into the circuit.
Summing amplifier U602B amplifies the
following signals: (1) receive audio, (2) supervisory
tones 1 and 2 from latch U409, (3) receive audio from
the universal interface, and (4) tones from the digital
signal processor circuit. The gain of the amplifier is
controlled by R640 and R639.
U606B and U606C form a DC restoration circuit
which converts the data from AC floating at half
supply to a digital signal at 0- and 5-volt levels which
can be detected by the microprocessor. U606B is a
standard noninverting amplifier with the gain set by
R726 and R786 (R726 is AC grounded by C710).
Diodes CR610A/B charge and discharge C710 to
establish a DC reference on U606C, pin 9 and U606B,
pin 6. This reference is the average of the positive- and
negative-going alternations of the data signal.
Volume Control (U600), Summing Amplifier (U801D)
With front-mount transceivers, volume is
controlled by the front panel volume control in the
standard manner. The output of summing amplifier
U602B is fed to the top of the volume connected to
J401, pin 21 and then back in on J401, pin 19 from the
wiper. This signal is then coupled by C624 to pin 13 of
summing amplifier U601D.
The output signal from U606B is applied to
U606C which functions as a comparator. When pin 10
rises above the reference on pin 9, the output on pin 8
goes to a high level. Conversely, when the level on pin
10 falls below the reference, the output goes to a low
level. R728 and R729 provide 0- and 5-volt output
levels to the logic.
With remote-mount transceivers, the volume is
controlled by integrated circuit U600. The output
signal of summing amplifier U602B is coupled by
C600 to pin 2 which is the input of one of the channels
of U600. The controlled output is fed out on pin 8 and
coupled by C625 to pin 13 of the summing amplifier.
6.6.3 SQUELCH CIRCUIT (U607B, U607C)
The volume control of the remote control unit
actually controls a DC voltage applied to the microprocessor on PE4 (pin 44). The microprocessor then
programs U600 for the desired volume level using the
serial bus on the PA3 and PA4 pins.
The microprocessor uses inputs from this circuit
and the RSSI circuit to determine when to mute or
unmute the receive audio and also to determine when
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CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
valid data may be present. The squelch circuit is
controlled by the amount of noise present in the
receive audio signal. When no signal or a weak signal
is being received by the receiver, there is a large
amount of noise present. Conversely, when a strong
signal is being received, there is very little noise
present.
If the remote control unit is used, a 600-ohm
balanced line is used to apply the audio signal to
differential amplifier U603A. Using a balanced line
minimizes the affect of common mode noise signals
picked up by the cable to the control unit. R660/ R661
provide a 600-ohm input impedance, C662/C663
provide DC blocking, and R662-R666 set the gain.
Part of the receive audio signal on J300, pin 11 is
fed to a squelch circuit consisting of U607B and
U607C. This filter attenuates voice, LTR data, and
Call Guard frequencies so that only noise frequencies
from 7-8 kHz are passed. The output of this filter is
applied across a resistor network which sets the input
level to the rectifier. Potentiometer R748 sets the
threshold level of the circuit, and RT600 provides
temperature compensation.
The output of the microphone amplifier is fed to
J403, pin 5 of the universal interface and also to
transmit loop gate U609A. That gate and gate U609B
route either the microphone or the universal interface/
wire-out 4 transmit audio signal to U603B. The microphone signal is enabled when TX LOOP is low, and
the other signal is enabled when it is high.
A four-pole high-pass filter formed by U603B
and U603C attenuates frequencies less than 300 Hz
that could cause interference with LTR data and Call
Guard signals that are in that band. The signal is then
fed to U604D which is a three-pole low- pass filter
which attenuates noise and harmonics. The output of
this filter is fed to mute gate U609C and also to the
external PA switching circuit.
C722 and C723 charge through R765 and
CR620A. The discharge path of C722 is through
CR620B, and the discharge path of C723 is through
R751. When the voltage across C723 rises above the
reference on U607C, pin 10 the output on pin 8 goes
low. Conversely, when the voltage across C723 falls
below the reference on pin 10, the output goes high.
R754 provides hysteresis to the triggering level to
prevent an intermittent squelch signal when receiving
a weak or fading signal.
6.7.2 MUTE GATE (U609C), SUMMING
AMPLIFIER (U604A)
Gate U609C is used to block the microphone
audio signal when other signals are being transmitted
such as DTMF tones. A high level on the control input
(pin 6) passes the signal and a low level blocks the
signal.
6.6.4 RSSI COMPARATOR (U602C)
The RSSI (receive signal strength indicator)
signal is applied to comparator U602C. The level of
this signal is inversely proportional to receive signal
strength. Therefore, it decreases as signal strength
increases. The reference level on U602C, pin 10 is set
to be a resistor network. Potentiometer U758 sets the
threshold level of the circuit. When the level of the
received signal rises so that the RSSI voltage drops to
the threshold level, the output of U602C goes high.
The microphone audio signal is then applied to
summing amplifier U604A. Other inputs to this amplifier are the transmit audio signal from the digital
signal processor circuit and the ECD (external coded
data) signal from J403, pin 7 of the universal interface.
The ECD signal is passed when the TX ECD
ENABLE signal on the control input of gate U609D is
a high level. The relative gain of these inputs is set by
a series resistor and by R683. The ECD input provides
an input point after the filter and before the limiter for
data from external sources.
6.7 TRANSMIT AUDIO/DATA PROCESSING
6.7.1 MICROPHONE AMPLIFIER (U603D),
FILTER (U603B, U603C, U604D)
6.7.3 COMPRESSOR (U100B), LIMITER
(U604C)
The signal from the microphone of front- mount
transceivers is coupled by C661 to summing amplifier
U603D. R655, R656, and C660 provide a bias supply
to the microphone.
NOTE: The compandor board is an optional
accessory.
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CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
provided by R708 and R709. The output of the summing
amplifier is fed to the synthesizer on the RF board.
If optional companding is used, jumper R690 is
removed and the compandor board is installed.
Companding is the compressing and then expanding of
the audio signal to reduce noise. This also increases
the dynamic range of the audio signal which is otherwise limited by channel spacing. The signal undergoes
a 2:1 compression in the transmitter and then a 1:2
expansion in the receiver to return it to the original
condition. For example, a +2 dB change in audio level
at the input of the compressor produces a +1 dB
change on the output.
The wideband data input from J403, pin 8 of the
universal interface allows data to be injected after the
limiter circuit. If DC coupling is desired, jumper resistors R707 and R705 can be installed and R706
removed. Data injected at this point is gated by U606C
which passes the signal when the control input (pin
12) is a high level.
A DC bias of 2.5 VDC ±2% (50 mV) must be
applied to the wideband data input (J403-8) if DC
coupling is used. This bias keeps the TCXO on
frequency since this input is a direct coupled path to
the TCXO. The TCXO frequency may also need to be
readjusted if DC coupling is used.
Gates U102A and U102B bypass expander
U100B when companding is not used on a selectable
system or when performing testing. U101A provides
buffering, and C101 couples the signal to pin 11 of
U100B which is the input of an internal summing
point. Pin 10 of U100B is the output of an internal
operational amplifier, and pin 12 is the inverting input
of this amplifier.
NOTE: The use of the wideband data input requires
that the user provide modulation limiting and splatter
filter circuitry and then obtain FCC reapproval of the
transmitter.
A portion of the output signal is coupled by C103
to pin 15, and by C104 to pin 14. Pin 15 is the input of
an internal rectifier, and pin 14 is the input of an
internal variable gain stage. The output of the rectifier
is averaged across C106 and then used to control the
gain of the variable gain stage. The value of C106
controls the rate at which the gain changes in response
to changes in the input level. C107 minimizes distortion in the compressor.
6.7.5 TRANSMIT DATA CIRCUIT (U607D, U607A)
The transmit LTR data and Call Guard tone/data
signal is generated by the microprocessor on the 7Q
and 8Q outputs of output latch U409. The four logic
combinations possible on these two lines are applied to
a resistor network formed by R732-R735. This
network produces a four-step approximation of a sine
wave which is then applied to a low-pass filter formed
by U607D and U607A. This filter attenuates
harmonics present in the sine wave which provides
smoothing of the stepped sine wave.
The output of the compressor is applied to U604B
which provides limiting and 6 dB per octave preemphasis. Limiting prevents over-modulation caused
by high-level input signals. This stage is an amplifier
which limits by saturating. R692 sets the gain of this
amplifier. R693 and R694 set the input level to the
next stage, and C685 provides DC blocking.
The passband of this filter is controlled by Q612.
When LTR data, digital Call Guard data, or lowfrequency tone Call Guard tones are transmitted, Q612
is turned on and the cut-off frequency is approximately
150 Hz. Then when a high-frequency tone Call Guard
tone is transmitted, Q612 is turned off and the cut-off
frequency is approximately 220 Hz. Turning Q612 on
switches additional capacitance into the circuit.
6.7.4 SPLATTER FILTER (U604C, U605D),
SUMMING AMPLIFIER (U605A)
U604C and U605D form a five-pole low-pass
splatter filter which attenuates frequencies over 3 kHz.
This prevents adjacent channel interference caused by
harmonic frequencies produced by amplitude limiting.
U610B provides gating of the data signal. When
the control input (pin 5) of this gate is a high level, the
data signal is passed to summing amplifier U605A.
Test gate U610A is used in the test mode to bypass the
data around the data filter so that modulation balance
can be set.
Summing amplifier U605A amplifies the sum of
the transmit audio, transmit data, and wideband data
signals. The audio and data modulation levels are
adjusted by R701 and R703. A 2.5-volt bias voltage is
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CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
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SERVICING
SECTION 7 SERVICING
7.1 GENERAL
mode is especially useful when the transceiver is
programmed for LTR operation because the logic
inhibits operation until a handshake is completed with
a repeater.
7.1.1 PERIODIC CHECKS
This transceiver should be put on a regular maintenance schedule to ensure that it continues to operate
properly. Important checks are receiver sensitivity and
transmitter frequency, deviation, and power output.
Performance tests for checking these and other parameters are located in Sections 8.5 and 8.6.
7.1.5 SURFACE-MOUNTED COMPONENTS
Surface-mounted components are used extensively in this transceiver. Because of the small size of
these components and PC board traces on which they
are mounted, special care must be used when replacing
surface-mounted devices. Multi-leaded components
such as integrated circuits must usually be removed
using a heat gun or some other type of heat source that
heats the entire component. Care must then be used so
that any nearby heat-sensitive components are not
damaged. Surface-mounted components should not be
reused since they may be damaged by the unsoldering
process. For information on identifying surfacemounted components, refer to Section 7.6.
7.1.2 SCHEMATIC DIAGRAMS AND
COMPONENT LAYOUTS
Schematic diagrams and component layouts for
the various PC boards used in this transceiver are
located in the back of this manual. There are schematics for the RF, power amplifier, audio/logic, and
display boards. There is also an interconnect schematic which shows the interconnections between these
boards.
The component layouts permit easy location of
components and measurement points. A component
locator guide and PC board grid are also provided to
aid in locating components on the RF, PA, and audio/
logic boards. This guide lists the grid location of the
parts on these boards.
7.1.6 CMOS HANDLING TECHNIQUES
Several of the integrated circuits used in this
transceiver, including the microprocessor, are CMOS
devices. The part number of CMOS integrated circuits
usually has a “3” as the fourth digit (544-3xxx-xxx).
CMOS devices have a very high open circuit impedance, so are particularly susceptible to damage from
static charges. Damaging static charges may be present
even if no static arcs are observed. In addition, damage
may not be immediately apparent because the device
may only be weakened. Therefore, when handling
CMOS devices, observe the following precautions:
7.1.3 REPLACEMENT PARTS
A replacement parts list for this transceiver is
located in Section 9. The parts for all PC boards and
the chassis are combined together in one listing. Parts
are listed alphanumerically according to designator.
For information on ordering parts, refer to Section 1.9.
Also included at the end of Section 9 are exploded
views which show the location of the mechanical
parts.
7.1.4 CONFIGURING TRANSCEIVER FOR
TESTING
This transceiver has a test mode which is selected
to perform testing. This test mode is described in
Section 3.11 and it permits the transceiver to be operated like a standard dispatch transceiver. The test
7-1
•
Before touching the transceiver or a CMOS device,
discharge any built-up static charge on your body by
touching a good earth ground.
•
Ground all test equipment and make sure that the
soldering iron tip is grounded.
•
Connect ground leads before test probes. Leave the
CMOS device in its conductive shipping container
until it is inserted in the PC board.
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
SERVICING
Once the device is installed in the PC board, it is
protected by internal diode protection circuits, so the
chance of damage is reduced. A service bench protection kit, Part No. 299-0026-001, can be ordered from
the Service Parts Department. This kit includes a
conductive mat, wrist strap, and grounding strap with a
1 megohm resistor to eliminate static build-up on the
body.
7.2.3 VCO MODULE AND PRESCALER
7.2 SYNTHESIZER TROUBLESHOOTING
The output level of the VCO module can be
measured at pin 2 of the module. Use an RF voltmeter
or some other type of high-impedance meter. The
minimum output level at this point should be 0 dBm.
Supply Voltage
The supply voltage on pin 4 of the VCO modules
should be 8.0 VDC.
Output Level
7.2.1 INTRODUCTION
When there is a synthesizer malfunction, the
VCO is usually not locked on frequency. When the
VCO is unlocked, the collector of Q809 on the RF
board goes high and this signal is applied to the 5D of
input latch U411 on the audio/logic board. When an
unlocked condition is detected by the logic, transmitting and receiving are disabled and “OUT-OF-LOK” is
indicated in the alphanumeric display.
Control Voltage
Check the DC voltage at pin 12 of the VCO
module with a channel near the center of the band
selected. If the VCO is locked on frequency, it should
be a steady DC voltage near 9.5 volts ± 2.0 volts. If it
is not locked on frequency, it should be near the lower
or upper end of its range (3 or 18 volts).
When the VCO is unlocked, the fR and fV inputs
to the phase detector are usually not the same
frequency (refer to Figure 6-1). The phase detector in
U801 then causes the VCO control voltage to go to the
high or low end of its operating range. This in turn
causes the VCO to oscillate at the high or low end of
its frequency range.
Frequency Shift Circuit
The levels on pins 5, 6, 7, and 8 of the VCO module
should be as follows for the various operating modes:
As shown in Figure 7-1, a loop is formed by VCO
Q920, prescaler U800, and the N counter and phase
detector in U801. Therefore, if any of these components begin to operate improperly, improper signals
appear throughout the loop. However, correct operation of the counters can still be verified by measuring
the input and output frequencies to check the divide
number. Proceed as follows to check the input and
output signals of the synthesizer to determine if it is
operating properly.
Mode
Pin 5
Pin 6
Pin 7
Pin 8
Transmit
Receive
Talk-Around
L
L
H
H
H
L
H
L
H
L
H
L
Prescaler (U800)
7.2.2 TCXO (Y800)
Since the VCO frequency is in the 800 or 900
MHz range, it may be difficult to measure. However,
the output frequency of prescaler U800 can be checked
to see if it is in the correct range. If it is not, the prescaler or the VCO module may be defective.
Check the signal at pin 5 of TCXO (temperature
compensated crystal oscillator) Y800. It should be
17.500 MHz at a level of approximately 1.5 V P-P. If
this signal is not present replace the TCXO because it
is not serviceable.
The VCO frequency in the receive mode should
be in the 798-817 MHz range (800 MHz models) or in
the 882-888 MHz range (900 MHz models). (The
VCO frequency in receive mode is 52.950 MHz less
than the channel frequency.) The prescaler divide
7-2
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
SERVICING
Figure 7-1 Simplified Synthesizer Block Diagram
channel you have selected is calculated as described in
Section 7.2.5. The input and output frequencies can be
measured as follows:
number can be determined as follows (calculation of
A and N is described in Section 7.2.5).
Prescaler Div No. = 128 + A/N
U801, pin 8 Frequency
= N Counter Div No.
U803, pin 3 Frequency
For example, for 800 MHz channel 300
(transmit), Prescaler Div No. = 128 + 55/508 or
128.108.
For example, the N counter divide number for
800 MHz channel 300 (transmit) is 508. If the VCO is
locked on frequency, the following frequencies should
be measured. If the VCO is not locked on frequency,
the input and output frequencies may be different, but
the divide number should be the same.
7.2.4 SYNTHESIZER (U801)
Reference Counter - If the reference oscillator
checked out okay in Section 7.2.2, the reference
counter in U801 can be checked. The reference
counter divides by 1400 for all channels (17.500 MHz
÷1400 = 12.5 kHz).
6.350 MHz
= 508
12.5 kHz
The fR frequency can be measured at U801, pin
13 (see Figure 6-2), and it should be present even if
the VCO is not locked on frequency. If the reference
oscillator frequency is correct and the frequency on
pin 13 is not correct, U803 may be defective or the
control logic may be programming the reference
counter with the wrong divide number.
NOTE: If a changing control voltage is causing the
VCO frequency to be unstable, temporarily ground the
control line which is pin 12 of the VCO module.
The preceding frequencies may not be exactly as
calculated due to counter accuracy and resolution
limitations. If the divide number is not correct, U801
may be defective or the control logic may be programming the N counter with the wrong number. If the
N Counter - To check the operation of the N counter,
the input and output frequencies can be measured to
check the divide number. The divide number for the
7-3
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
SERVICING
Lock Detector - When the VCO is locked on
frequency, the waveform at U801, pin 7 should be as
follows. The lock detect signal on the collector of
Q809 should then be low. When the VCO is unlocked,
the negative-going pulses should be much wider than
those shown and the signal on the collector of Q809
should be high (5V).
divide number is correct, continue the checks which
follow.
Phase Detector - When the VCO is not locked on
frequency, the fR and fV inputs to the phase detector
are probably not the same frequency. Measure the
frequency at fR (pin 13) and fV (pin 3) and then check
the phase detector outputs (DOWN and UP pins). If
the phase detector is operating properly, these outputs
should be as follows:
fV greater than fR - The negative-going pulses on
the DOWN output (pin 15) should be much wider
than the negative-going pulses on the UP output
(pin 16). The DC voltage on pin 12 of the VCO
module should be near 1 volt.
fV less than fR - The negative-going pulses on the
UP output (pin 16) should be much wider than the
negative-going pulses on the DOWN output (pin
15). The DC voltage on pin 12 of the VCO should
be near 20 volts.
Modulus Control Signal - The frequency of the
modulus control output on U801, pin 12 should be
equal to the N counter output frequency on pin 3
(either in or out of lock). When the VCO is in lock,
this frequency should be the fR frequency (12.5 kHz).
If the preceding phase detector output signals are
not measured when the VCO is out of lock, U801 or
the charge pump circuit may be defective. If the phase
detector and charge pump are operating properly,
check the lock detector and prescaler as described in
the following information.
The duty cycle of the modulus control signal
determines the divide number of the prescaler. The
duty cycle should be as follows:
When the VCO is locked on frequency, the
following waveforms should be observed at the points
indicated (all pulses should occur simultaneously).
A counter divide number
T1
=
N counter divide number
T2
If the modulus control signal is not correct, U801
may be defective or the logic may not be programming
the correct divide number.
7-4
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
SERVICING
7.2.5 DETERMINING COUNTER DIVIDE
NUMBERS
7.5 AUDIO/LOGIC BOARD
TROUBLESHOOTING
The R, N, and A counter divide numbers can be
determined as follows:
7.5.1 DIGITAL CIRCUITS
Because of the complexity of the digital portion
of the audio/logic board, troubleshooting may be difficult. Special test equipment and a thorough understanding of the operating software may be needed to
isolate a problem. Therefore, if a problem is suspected
with the digital circuitry, verify that the 5-volt and 8volt supply voltages are correct and then replace the
audio/logic board.
R (Reference) Counter
R = 17.500 MHz ÷12.5 kHz or 1400 (all channels)
N Counter
First, determine overall divide number Nt:
7.5.2 ANALOG CIRCUITS
Nt = VCO Freq ÷ 12.5 kHz
Then determine N as follows:
The analog circuits on the audio/logic board can
be checked by measuring the AC and DC voltages
shown on Part 2 of the audio/logic board schematic
diagram.
N = Integer (whole number) Nt ÷ 128
For example, for 800 MHz transmit channel 300
the VCO oscillates at 813.4875 MHz. Nt = 813.4875 ÷
128 or 65,079. N = 65,079 ÷ 128 or 508.43. Integer of
508.43 = 508.
7.6 SURFACE MOUNTED DEVICES (SMDs)
7.6.1 SERVICING TECHNIQUES
A Counter
Most of the components used in this transceiver
are the surface mounted type. Since these components
and the circuit traces on which they are mounted are
very small in size, special care must be used when they
are replaced. Multi-leaded components such as integrated circuits must usually be removed using a heat
gun or some other type of heat source that heats the
entire device. Take care so that nearby components are
not damaged. Surface mounted components should not
be reused since they may be damaged by the unsoldering process.
A = Nt – (128 x N)
For example, for channel 300, 128 x N = 128 x
508 or 65,024. A = 65,079 – 65,024 or 55.
7.3 RECEIVER TROUBLESHOOTING
To isolate a receiver problem to a defective
section, check the DC and RF voltages shown on the
schematic diagram.
7.6.2 IDENTIFYING SMD RESISTORS
The value of resistors is indicated by a number
printed on the resistor. A three-digit number is used to
identify ±5% and ±10% resistors, and a four-digit
number is used to identify ±1% resistors. Refer to the
following information.
7.4 TRANSMITTER TROUBLESHOOTING
To isolate a transmitter problem to a defective
section, check the DC and RF voltages shown on the
schematic diagram.
± 5% And ± 10% Resistors (P.N. 569-0115-XXX)
NOTE: With 30/35-watt transceivers, make sure that
the leads of thermistor RT500 do not loop near Q502
or Q511 because spurious breakup may result.
The three-digit number used to identify ±5% and
±10% resistors corresponds to the last three digits of
the E.F. Johnson part number. This number is derived
7-5
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
SERVICING
Table 7-1 Ceramic SMD Capacitor Identification
as follows. For example, “273” indicates a 27k ohm
resistor and “339” indicates a 3.3 ohm resistor.
American EIA Standard Japanese EIA Standard
X X X
Value in ohms
Multiplier
0=0
1 = 10
2 = 100
3 = 1000
4 = 10,000
5 = 100,000
6 = 1,000,000
7 = 10,000,000
8 = .01
9 = .1
± 1% Resistors (P.N. 569-0111-xxx)
Some resistors with a ±1% tolerance are identified by a four-digit number and others may not have a
marking. When identified with a four-digit number,
the first three digits are the value and the fourth is the
multiplier. For example, “5761” indicates a 5.76k ohm
resistor.
7.6.3 SMD CAPACITOR IDENTIFICATION
Ceramic SMD Capacitors (P.N. 510-36xx-xxx)
Ceramic SMD capacitors are identified using
either an American or Japanese EIA standard. The
American standard uses a single letter or number to
indicate the value, and the color of this letter or
number to indicate the multiplier. The Japanese standard uses a letter to indicate the value followed by a
number to indicate the multiplier. The values for both
standards are shown in the following table. For
example, if there is a single black “E” on the capacitor,
it uses the American standard and its value is 15 pF.
The same value is identified with the Japanese standard by “E1”.
XX = N150
XX = N220
XX = N330
XX = N470
XX = N750
Value
(pF)
First Letter/
Number
Value
(pF)
A
B
C
D
E
H
I
J
K
L
N
O
R
S
T
V
W
X
Y
Z
3
4
7
9
10
11
12
13
15
16
18
20
22
24
27
30
33
36
39
43
47
51
56
62
68
75
82
91
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
J
K
L
M
N
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
1.0
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.5
1.6
1.8
2.0
2.2
2.4
2.7
3.0
3.3
3.6
3.9
4.3
4.7
5.1
5.6
6.2
6.8
7.5
8.2
9.1
Color
Multiplier
Second
Number
Multiplier
0.1
1
10
100
1000
10,000
0
1
2
3
4
5
1
10
100
1000
10,000
100,000
Orange
Black
Green
Blue
Violet
Red
The Japanese standard may also utilize a bar to
indicate the temperature coefficient. The following
coefficients are indicated by this bar. For example,
“A2” indicates a 100 pF NPO capacitor.
XX = NPO
First Letter/
Number
Tantalum SMD Capacitors (P.N. 510-26xx-xxx)
Tantalum SMD capacitor identification varies
with vendor and physical size of the capacitor. The
positive (+) end is usually indicated by a colored band
or beveled edge. The value and voltage may be indicated by printing on the capacitor or by using a special
code.
|XX = X7R
7-6
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
SERVICING
Table 7-2 SMD Inductor Identification
7.6.4 SMD INDUCTOR IDENTIFICATION
SMD inductors (P.N. 542-9000-xxx) use three
colored dots to indicate the value. The two dots on the
left side indicate the first and second digits of the
value in nanohenries, and the single dot on the right
side indicates the multiplier (see Table 7-2). For
example, brown, black, and red dots indicate a value
of 10 nH x 100 which is 1000 nH (1.0 µH). The last
three digits of the part number are also the value and
multiplier.
7.6.5 TRANSISTOR/DIODE IDENTIFICATION
Surface mounted transistors and diodes are identified by a special number. Refer to page 10-1 for more
information.
7-7
Color
1st Digit
2nd Digit
Black
Brown
Red
Orange
Yellow
Green
Blue
Violet
Gray
White
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Multiplier
(Last PN Digit)
1 (7)
10 (8)
100 (9)
1000 (0)
10,000 (1)
100,000 (2)
------0.1 (6)
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
SERVICING
7-8
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
ALIGNMENT PROCEDURE AND PERFORMANCE TESTS
SECTION 8 ALIGNMENT PROCEDURE AND PERFORMANCE TESTS
8.1 GENERAL
8.1.1 INTRODUCTION
The following alignment should be performed if
repairs are made that could affect the factory alignment. Performance tests are located in Sections 8.5
and 8.6, and it is recommended that these tests be run
on transceivers before they are placed in service.
To perform this alignment, the test mode
described in Section 3.11 must be selected. This mode
configures the transceiver as required to perform the
various adjustments. A special test mode is required
because the transceiver does not unsquelch or key up
in the LTR mode until the proper data handshake
occurs.
The test mode is selected by turning power on
with the RxD and TxD lines of the microphone
connector shorted together (P2, pins 10 and 13). When
the test mode is selected, “RX-TX-RSSI” (the first test
function) is displayed continuously. The Bank 0 test
channels should be used for this alignment. See
Section 3.11.2 for more information.
Cable End
of Jack
8.1.2 TEST CABLES
CAUTION
Figure 8-1 Test Cables
Applying a positive DC voltage to either audio amplifier output (even momentarily) will seriously damage
the device. Momentarily grounding an output should
not result in damage.
NOTE: Transceivers with Version 207 or later software have three banks of test channels. Select Bank 0
for this alignment (see Section 3.11.2).
Two test cables are required to perform transceiver alignment. One cable connects to the accessory
pigtail and the other connects to the microphone jack.
These cables are shown in Figure 8-1.
8.2 FREQUENCY ADJUSTMENT
For transceiver power to turn on, the ignition
sense input of the accessory pigtail (J100, pin 6) must
be connected to 13.8 volts. To perform receiver alignment, a 4.0-ohm, 15-watt speaker load must be
connected to the external speaker outputs of this cable
(pins 1 and 2). The microphone cable is required to
select the test mode, inject the transmit audio signal,
and key the transmitter.
* Setting with 900 MHz models
a. Connect the test setup shown in Figure 8-2. Select
the test mode and Ch 381 (860.5125) or Ch 240*
(938.0000) of the RX-TX-RSSI function (see
Section 3.11.2).
b. Connect a DC voltmeter to the wire-out on the
collector of Q804/Q807 on the RF board (see alignment points diagram in Figure 8-4).
8-1
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
ALIGNMENT PROCEDURE AND PERFORMANCE TESTS
Refer to Section 8.3.2 for information on how to
make these adjustments.
c. The meter reading should be 9.5V ± 2.0V. Also
check the other receive test channels. The voltage
should be 3-18 VDC. If this voltage is not within
these ranges, there is a problem with the synthesizer
(the VCO control voltage is not adjustable).
NOTE: A tuning tool with a 0.030" square tip (JCM
4193) is required to adjust C511 in the next step.
This tool is available from the Service Parts Dept.
by ordering P.N. 721-0015-171.
d. Key the transmitter and monitor the transmit signal
with a communications monitor set to the transmit
frequency (815.5125 or 899.0000* MHz). Adjust
the capacitor in TCXO Y800 for the transmit frequency ± 150 Hz.
c. Key the transmitter and adjust C511 for maximum
power output.
d. Rotate the Select switch until the display indicates
Ch 918 TA (869.9625) or Ch 473 TA* (940.9125) to
select the talk-around mode. Key the transmitter and
power output should be greater than the following
levels. If not, readjust C511.
800 MHz
900 MHz
32W
27W
8.3.2 POWER LEVEL 1 ADJUSTMENT
This adjustment sets the power level 1 power
output. Both POWER SET and TA PWR SET are
selected. POWER SET sets the power output on the
low and high ends of the standard band, and TA PWR
SET sets it on the high and low ends of the talk-around
band. This parameter should always be set to the rated
power output because it is used to adjust the power
level across the band.
Figure 8-2 Transmitter Test Setup
8.3 TRANSMITTER TUNEUP
8.3.1 C511 ADJUSTMENT (30 OR 35 WATT
MODELS ONLY)
a. Press and rotate the Select switch to select the
POWER SET function of the test mode (see Section
3.11.3). Press the Select switch to display PWR
SET 1.
NOTE: Do not key the transmitter for extended
periods when performing the following adjustments.
b. Key the transmitter and rotate the Select switch to
set the power output for the following level (several
rotations may be required). The relative power output is indicated by 0-127 in the display (127 is maximum power). Unkey the transmitter to store the
setting.
NOTE: For accurate power measurement at 800 and
900 MHz, use a minimum number of connectors with a
teflon or better dielectric. If coaxial cable is used, it
should be a minimum length of a low-loss type.
a. Connect the test setup shown in Figure 8-2. Select
the test mode and Ch 001 (851.0125) or Ch 001*
(935.0125) of the RX-TX-RSSI function (see Section 3.11.2). An alignment points diagram is located
in Figure 8-4.
15W Models
800 MHz
900 MHz
35W
30W
c. Rotate the Select switch to display PWR SET 2 and
repeat the preceding adjustment.
b. The test mode POWER SET and TA PWR SET
functions must be preset for maximum power (127).
* Setting with 900 MHz models
15W
15W
30/35W Models
8-2
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
ALIGNMENT PROCEDURE AND PERFORMANCE TESTS
a. Press and rotate the Select switch to select the BAL
ADJUST function of the test mode (see Section
3.11.6). Press the Select switch to display
BAL ADJ 1.
d. Press and rotate the Select switch to select the TA
PWR SET function (see Section 3.11.4). Press the
Select switch to display TA PWR 1.
e. Key the transmitter and rotate the Select switch to
set the power output for the following level. Unkey
the transmitter to store the setting.
15W Models
800 MHz
900 MHz
12W
12W
b. Key the transmitter and view the demodulated signal on the CRT of a communications monitor.
Adjust R703 on the audio/logic board for a deviation of 3 - 5 kHz (800 MHz) or 2 - 3 kHz (900 MHz).
30/35W Models
c. Rotate the Select switch so that the demodulated
signal is a square wave with no tilt or overshoot.
Unkey the transmitter to store the setting.
30W
25W
f. Rotate the Select switch to obtain TA PWR SET 2
and repeat the preceding adjustment.
d. Repeat the preceding adjustment for BAL ADJ 2
through BAL ADJ 6.
8.3.3 POWER LEVEL 2-4, 2W ADJUSTMENT
8.3.5 TRANSMIT DATA LEVEL ADJUSTMENT
This adjustment sets the power levels selected
when the system is programmed for power levels 2-4
or 2W. The rated power output level is shown in step b
of the preceding section.
a. Press and rotate the Select switch to select the RXTX-RSSI function (see Section 3.11.2). Press and
rotate the Select switch to display Ch 918TA
(869.9625) or Ch 473TA* (940.9125).
a. Press and rotate the Select switch to select the
POWER LEVELS function of the test mode (see
Section 3.11.5). Press the Select switch to display
PWR LVL 2.
b. Key the transmitter and monitor the transmit signal
with a communications monitor. Adjust R703 on the
audio/logic board for a deviation of 1.0 kHz ± 50 Hz
(800 MHz) or 800 Hz ± 50 Hz (900 MHz).
b. Key the transmitter and turn the Select switch to
obtain the desired power output for that level. Any
power level from half rated to rated can be selected.
Unkey the transmitter to store the setting.
8.3.6 TRANSMIT AUDIO LIMITING ADJUST
c. Rotate the Select switch to display PWR LVL 3 and
set the power output for the desired level from half
rated to rated. Unkey the transmitter to store the setting.
a. Inject a 1 kHz, 2V rms signal at pin 11 of microphone jack P2. (The test channel is the same as that
used in the preceding section.)
b. Adjust R701 on the audio/logic board so that total
deviation (data + audio) is as follows. See Section
1.2.5 for more NPSPAC information.
d. Rotate the Select switch to display PWR LVL 4 and
set the power output the desired level from half rated
to rated. Unkey the transmitter to store the setting.
e. Rotate the Select switch to display 2W PWR LVL
and set the power output for 1.8 watts (or other levels from 1-2 W if desired). Unkey the transmitter to
store the setting.
Total Deviation
800 MHz Std and
NPSPAC Models
900 MHz Models
4.7 kHz ± 100 Hz
2.3 kHz ± 50 Hz
8.3.4 MODULATION BALANCE
c. Check deviation on the other test frequencies. It
must be within the preceding ranges. If it is not,
readjust R701.
This adjustment sets modulation balance across
the standard and talk-around frequency bands.
* Setting with 900 MHz models
8-3
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
ALIGNMENT PROCEDURE AND PERFORMANCE TESTS
8.4 RECEIVER ALIGNMENT
i. Tune L202, L205, and L209 for a maximum IF
level. Repeat if necessary. Remove the oscilloscope
or voltmeter.
8.4.1 FRONT END ALIGNMENT
CAUTION
j. Tune L201 for minimum audio distortion which
should be 3% or less.
Do not transmit with the signal generator connected
because severe generator damage could result.
8.4.2 RSSI DETECT ADJUST
a. Connect the test setup shown in Figure 8-3. Select
the test mode and Ch 001 (851.0125) or Ch 001*
(935.0125) of the RX-TX-RSSI function (see
Section 3.11.2). An alignment points diagram is
located in Figure 8-4.
a. With the signal generator and test mode setting used
in the preceding section, adjust the generator output
level for 6 dB SINAD.
b. Observe the area of the display immediately to the
right of the frequency. Either LO or HI is indicated
to show the status of the carrier detect line.
b. Connect the RF signal generator to the antenna jack.
Set it to the channel frequency with an output level
which provides –50 dBm (700 mV) at the transceiver.
c. If necessary, adjust R758 on the audio/logic board
counterclockwise so that LO is indicated. Then
slowly turn R758 clockwise until HI is displayed
continuously.
c. Adjust the transceiver volume control for approximately 1/3 volume. If necessary, unsquelch the
receiver by adjusting R748 on the audio/logic board
clockwise. The option button to the left of the display can also be used to unsquelch the transceiver in
the test mode.
d. Remove the signal generator input signal. The display should change to LO. If RSSI trip points do not
occur at these levels, repeat steps a-c.
800 MHz Models
d. Set the generator modulation for 1 kHz at 3 kHz
deviation. Tune Z204 on the RF board for maximum
audio output.
e. Tune L201, L202, and L205 for minimum distortion. Repeat if necessary. (L201 is not used in later
models; see Appendix A.)
f. Retune L201 for best SINAD sensitivity (if applicable). Do not readjust L202 or L205. Distortion
should remain below 3%.
Figure 8-3 Receiver Test Setup
8.4.3 SQUELCH ADJUST
900 MHz Models
g. Set the generator modulation for 1 kHz at 1.5 kHz
deviation. Tune Z204 on the RF board for maximum
audio output.
a. With the signal generator and test mode setting used
in the preceding section, adjust the generator output
level for 5 dB SINAD.
h. Connect an oscilloscope or RF voltmeter (that is
capable of responding to 53 MHz signals) to the IF
test point which is the Q203, collector wire-out (see
Figure 8-4).
b. The receiver should be unsquelched (audio
enabled). If not, rotate R748 clockwise. Then slowly
turn R748 counterclockwise until the audio just
squelches (mutes).
* Setting with 900 MHz models
8-4
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
ALIGNMENT PROCEDURE AND PERFORMANCE TESTS
8.4.4 LOCAL TONE LEVEL ADJUST
c. Increase the generator output until the receiver
unsquelches. This should occur by 9 dB SINAD ± 2
dB. Then decrease the output until the receiver
squelches. This should occur by 5 dB ± 2 dB. If not,
repeat the preceding step.
R643 adjusts the level of the tone which indicates such things as when a key is pressed. To enable
this tone, press a front panel key or turn the Select
switch. Adjust R643 for the desired tone level
(approximately midrange).
Figure 8-4 Alignment Point Diagrams
8-5
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
ALIGNMENT PROCEDURE AND PERFORMANCE TESTS
PERFORMANCE TESTS
8.5 RECEIVER PERFORMANCE TESTS
8.6 TRANSMITTER PERFORMANCE TESTS
CAUTION
NOTE: For accurate power measurement at 800 and
900 MHz, use a minimum number of connectors with a
teflon or better dielectric. If coaxial cable is used, it
should be a minimum length of a low-loss type.
Do not transmit with the signal generator connected
because severe generator damage could result.
a. Connect the test cables shown in Figure 8-1 to the
microphone and accessory jacks. Connect the test
setup shown in Figure 8-2.
Applying a positive DC voltage to either audio amplifier output (even momentarily) will seriously damage
the device. Grounding an output should not result in
damage.
b. Select the test mode RX-TX-RSSI function as
described in Section 8.1.1. Press and turn the Select
switch to select Ch 381 (860.5125) or Ch 240*
(938.0000).
a. Connect the test cables shown in Figure 8-1 to the
microphone and accessory jacks. Connect the test
setup shown in Figure 8-3.
c. Key the transmitter and note the power output on the
six test channels. Power output on the three standard
channels should be as indicated in Section 8.3.2,
step b and power output on the talk-around channels
should be as indicated in step e of that section.
(Talk-around channels have “TA” after the channel
number or frequency.)
b. Select the test mode RX-TX-RSSI function as
described in Section 8.1.1. Press and turn the Select
switch to select Ch 381 (860.5125) or Ch 240*
(938.0000).
c. Connect the RF signal generator to the antenna jack.
Set it to the channel frequency with an output of –47
dBm (1000 mV) modulated with 1 kHz at 3 kHz
deviation (800 MHz) or 1.5 kHz deviation (900
MHz).
d. If some systems are to be programmed for less than
standard power output, check power levels 2-4 and
2W as described in Section 8.3.3.
e. Select Ch 381 (860.5125) or Ch 240* (938.0000)
and monitor the transmit signal with a communications monitor set to 815.5125 or 899.0000* MHz.
The transmit frequency should be within ± 1.5 PPM
(800 and 900 MHz). (At room temperature, it should
be within ± 150 Hz.) This also checks the receive
frequency.
d. Adjust the volume control for an audio output level
of 6.9V rms across a 4-ohm load (12W). Distortion
should be less than 3%.
e. Decrease the generator output to obtain 12 dB
SINAD. The generator output should be –111 dBm
(0.63 mV) maximum (with a 6 dB pad).
f. With no microphone audio input signal, monitor the
transmit data signal. Deviation should be 1 kHz ± 50
Hz (800 MHz) or 800 Hz ± 50 Hz (900 MHz).
f. Also check the channels at the low and high ends of
the band.
g. Inject a 2V rms 1 kHz signal at pin 11 of microphone
jack P2. Total deviation (audio + data) should be as
indicated in Section 8.3.6, step b. Also check the
other test channels.
* Setting with 900 MHz models
8-6
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
PARTS LIST
SECTION 9 PARTS LIST
Ref No.
Description
Ref No.
Part No.
C 206
C 207
C 208
RF AND PA BOARDS, HARDWARE
AND MISCELLANEOUS
A 001
Stabilization board, 800 MHz PA
0.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
0.01 µH smd inductor
Pigtail cable, remote/accessory
(standard w/remote mount)
Pigtail cable, accessory only
(standard w/front mount)
023-9884-533
510-3606-103
542-9001-107
597-2002-250
Pigtail cable, universal interface
597-2002-245
VCO assembly, 800 MHz
VCO assembly, 900 MHz
023-9650-911
023-9670-911
C 100
C 101
C 102
C 103
C 104
C 105
C 106
C 107
C 108
C 109
C 110
C 111
C 112
C 113
C 114
C 115
C 116
C 117
C 118
C 119
C 120
C 121
15 µF 20V tantalum smd
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
10 µF 16V tantalum smd
1.0 µF 16V tantalum smd
10 µF 16V tantalum smd
10 µF 16V tantalum smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
10 µF 16V tantalum smd
10 µF 16V tantalum smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 0805 smd
10 µF 16V tantalum smd
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
10 µF 16V tantalum smd
1.0 µF 16V tantalum smd
10 µF 16V tantalum smd
.22 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.22 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
10 µF 16V tantalum smd
510-2626-150
510-3607-104
510-3605-103
510-3607-104
510-2625-100
510-2625-109
510-2625-100
510-2625-100
510-3605-103
510-2625-100
510-2625-100
510-3605-103
510-3615-390
510-2625-100
510-3607-104
510-2625-100
510-2625-109
510-2625-100
510-3607-224
510-3607-224
510-3615-390
510-2625-100
C 200
C 201
C 202
C 204
C 205
100 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
33 pF ±5% NPO cer smd
33 pF ±5% NPO cer smd
100 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
510-3601-101
510-3601-330
510-3601-330
510-3601-101
510-3601-390
A 301
A 902
C 210
C 212
C 213
C 215
C 217
597-2002-230
C 220
C 221
C 222
C 223
C 225
C 229
C 230
C 231
C 232
C 233
C 234
C 235
C 237
C 239
C 240
C 241
C 242
9-1
Description
1.0 µF 16V tantalum smd
39 pF ±5% NPO cer smd
6.8 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz only)
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
6.8 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
100 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
12 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz)
10 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz)
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
10 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz)
7.5 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz)
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
5.6 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(w/Z206, see Table A-2)
.001 µF ±5% NPO cer smd
(w/o Z206, see Table A-2)
.001 µF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
2.7 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz)
4.7 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz)
8.2 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz)
6.8 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz)
15 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
1.0 µF 16V tantalum smd
.001 µF ±5% NPO cer smd
(w/o Z206, see Table A-2)
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
15 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
15 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
10 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
10 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
Part No.
510-2625-109
510-3601-390
510-3601-689
510-3605-103
510-3615-390
510-3601-689
510-3601-101
510-3601-120
510-3601-100
510-3601-390
510-3601-100
510-3601-759
510-3605-103
510-3605-103
510-3615-390
510-3601-569
510-3601-102
510-3601-102
510-3601-279
510-3601-479
510-3601-829
510-3601-689
510-3601-150
510-2625-109
510-3601-102
510-3605-103
510-3601-150
510-3601-150
510-3601-100
510-3601-100
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
PARTS LIST
RF and PA Boards, Misc
Ref No.
C 243
C 244
C 246
C 247
C 248
C 249
C 251
C 253
C 254
C 255
C 256
C 257
C 258
C 259
C 260
C 291
C 292
C 293
C 294
C 296
C 297
C 298
C 500
C 501
C 502
C 504
Description
Part No.
Ref No.
10 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
15 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
4.7 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.001 µF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
22 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
2.7 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz)
2.2 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz)
8.2 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz)
5.6 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz)
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
510-3601-100
510-3601-150
510-3601-479
510-3605-103
510-3605-103
510-3601-102
510-3605-103
510-3607-104
510-3607-104
510-3607-104
510-3607-104
510-3605-103
510-3605-103
510-3615-390
510-3601-220
510-3615-390
510-3605-103
510-3605-103
510-3605-103
510-3615-279
C 505
C506
510-3601-229
C 512
C 513
2.7 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz)
2.2 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz)
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
(800 MHz)
.001 µF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz)
2.7 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz)
2.2 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz)
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
(800 MHz)
.001 µF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz)
510-3615-279
C 507
C 508
C 509
C 510
C 511
510-3615-829
C 514
C 515
C 516
C 517
C 518
C 519
510-3601-569
510-3615-390
510-3601-229
Description
Part No.
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
12 pF hi q cer smd
(30/35W models only)
12 pF hi q cer smd
(30/35W models only)
20 pF 250V mini mica
(800 MHz 35W models)
15 pF 250V mini mica
(900 MHz 30W models)
18 pF 250V mini mica
(800 MHz 35W models)
15 pF 250V mini mica
(900 MHz, 30W models)
2.7 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
3.3 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz, 35W revised board)
1.0 -4.5 pF variable capacitor
(800 MHz, 35W unrevised board)
1.0 to 4.5 pF smd variable
(900 MHz, 30W models)
510-3615-390
510-3663-120
510-3663-120
510-0020-200
510-0020-150
510-0020-180
510-0020-150
510-3615-279
510-3602-339
187-0103-175
512-1008-001
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz only)
470 µF 25V electrolytic
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
4.3 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz)
4.7 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz)
510-3605-103
510-3615-390
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
2.7 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(30/35W only)
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
510-3615-390
510-3605-103
510-3615-390
510-3605-103
510-3605-103
510-3615-390
510-3615-279
510-4064-471
510-3605-103
510-3615-390
510-3615-390
510-3605-103
510-3615-439
510-3615-479
510-3607-104
C 520
C 521
C 522
C 523
C 524
C 525
C 526
510-3602-102
510-3615-279
510-3601-229
510-3607-104
C 527
C 528
C 529
510-3602-102
9-2
510-3605-103
510-3615-390
510-3615-390
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
PARTS LIST
RF and PA Boards, Misc
Ref No.
C 530
C 531
C 532
C 533
C 534
C 535
C 536
C 537
C 538
C 539
C 540
C 541
C 542
C 543
C 544
C 545
C 546
C 547
C 548
C 549
Description
2.7 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz 15W)
4.3 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz 35W)
1 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz 30W)
5.6 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz)
4.7 pF 250V mini mica
(900 MHz)
4.7 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz)
3.3 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz)
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
1.2 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
15 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz 15W)
6.8 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz 35W)
6.8 pF ±10% 50V high Q smd
(900 MHz 15W)
3.9 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz 30W)
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
1.2 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
2.7 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz 15W)
3.9 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz 15W)
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(30/35W)
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
3.9 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz)
3.3 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz)
Part No.
Ref No.
Description
Part No.
510-3615-279
C 550
C 551
C 552
C 553
510-3615-439
510-3615-109
510-3615-569
C 554
C 555
C 556
510-3615-479
510-3615-479
C 557
C 558
510-3615-339
510-3605-103
510-3615-129
510-3615-390
510-3615-390
510-3615-390
510-3615-390
510-3615-150
C 559
C 560
C 561
C 562
510-3615-689
510-3663-689
510-3615-399
510-3607-104
510-3615-390
510-3615-390
510-3615-390
510-3615-129
510-3605-103
510-3615-279
C 563
C 564
C 565
C 567
510-3614-399
510-3615-390
C 568
510-3615-390
510-3615-399
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
2200 µF 25V electrolytic
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.047 µF ±5% 100V polyester
(900 MHz 15W only)
4.7 µF 20V tantalum smd
4.7 µF 20V tantalum smd
3.9 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz 15W)
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
12 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz)
5.6 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz)
12 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz)
10 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz 15W)
6.8 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz 30W)
22 µF 16V tantalum smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
9.1 pF ±10% 50V high Q smd
(800 MHz 15W)
15 pF ±10% 50V high Q smd
(30/35W)
12 pF ±10% 50V high Q smd
(900 MHz 15W)
15 pF ±10% 50V high Q smd
(All except following)
12 pF ±10% 50V high Q smd
(900 MHz 15W)
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
3.9 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz)
3.3 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz)
56 pF ±10% 50V high Q smd
(800 MHz, 35W)
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz, 30W)
510-3605-103
510-4064-222
510-3605-103
510-1031-473
510-2626-479
510-2626-479
510-3614-399
510-3601-390
510-3614-120
510-3614-569
510-3614-120
510-3614-100
510-3614-689
510-2625-220
510-3615-390
510-3663-919
510-3663-150
510-3663-120
510-3663-150
510-3663-120
510-3605-103
510-3605-103
510-3615-399
510-3615-339
510-3663-560
510-3615-390
510-3615-339
9-3
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
PARTS LIST
RF and PA Boards, Misc
Ref No.
C 569
C 570
C 571
C 572
C 579
C 584
C 586
C 590
C 593
C 594
C 595
C 596
C 800
C 801
C 802
C 803
C 805
C 806
C 807
C 808
C 809
C 810
C 811
C 812
C 813
C 814
C 815
C 818
C 819
C 820
C 821
C 822
C 823
C 824
C 826
C 827
Description
56 pF ±10% 50V high Q smd
(800 MHz, 35W)
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz, 30W)
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
1.0 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
4.7 µF 20V tantalum smd
47 µF 20V tantalum smd
(revised 800 MHz PA boards)
.047 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
820 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
820 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
47 µF 20V tantalum smd
0.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.001 µF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
.001 µF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
22 µF 16V tantalum smd
1.0 µF 35V tantalum smd
.01 µF ±5% 63V polyester
.22 µF ±5% 63V polyester
.001 µF ±5% 63V polyester
10 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
2.2 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz)
1.5 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz)
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
.001 µF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
10 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
4.7 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
.001 µF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
4.7 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
10 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
1.0 µF 35V tantalum smd
1.0 µF 35V tantalum smd
2.2 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
.001 µF ±5% NPO cer smd
Part No.
Ref No.
510-3663-560
C 828
C 829
C 831
C 832
C 834
C 836
C 837
C 838
C 839
C 840
C 841
C 842
C 843
C 844
C 846
C 850
C 852
C 853
510-3615-390
510-3615-390
510-3615-390
510-3606-105
510-2626-479
510-2624-470
510-3606-473
510-3615-390
510-3615-390
510-3601-821
510-3601-821
510-2624-470
510-3606-104
510-3601-102
510-3601-102
510-2625-220
510-2628-109
510-1033-103
510-1033-224
510-1033-102
510-3601-100
510-3605-103
510-3601-229
510-3601-159
510-3615-390
510-3601-102
510-3601-100
510-3615-390
510-3601-479
510-3601-102
510-3601-479
510-3601-100
510-3605-103
510-3605-103
510-2628-109
510-2628-109
510-3601-229
510-3601-102
9-4
Description
.001 µF ±5% NPO cer smd
.001 µF ±5% NPO cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
27 pF ±5% NPO cer smd
.22 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.001 µF ±5% NPO cer smd
.001 µF ±5% NPO cer smd
.001 µF ±5% NPO cer smd
.001 µF ±5% NPO cer smd
.001 µF ±5% NPO cer smd
10 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
.001 µF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
5.6 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
1.0 µF 35V tantalum smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
Part No.
510-3601-102
510-3601-102
510-3605-103
510-3601-270
510-3607-224
510-3601-102
510-3601-102
510-3601-102
510-3601-102
510-3601-102
510-3601-100
510-3601-102
510-3605-103
510-3601-569
510-3615-390
510-2628-109
510-3615-390
510-3615-390
CH 101 Chassis, black
015-0905-021
CR 100
CR 101
CR 102
CR 103
CR 290
CR 500
CR 502
CR 503
CR 504
CR 505
CR 506
CR 507
CR 508
CR 509
CR 802
CR 803
CR 804
CR 805
Switching diode SOT-23
Switching diode SOT-23
6.2V zener ±5% SOT
Switching diode SOT-23
Switching diode SOT-23
Switching diode SOT-23
Switching diode SOT-23
Transient suppressor
HC diode SOT-23
HC diode SOT-23
PIN diode
PIN diode
Switching diode SOT-23
Switching diode SOT-23
Switching diode SOT-23
Switching diode SOT-23
Dual switching diode SOT-23
Dual switching diode SOT-23
523-1504-002
523-1504-002
523-2016-629
523-1504-002
523-1504-002
523-1504-002
523-1504-001
523-2906-001
523-1504-016
523-1504-016
523-1504-032
523-1504-032
523-1504-002
523-1504-002
523-1504-001
523-1504-001
523-1504-023
523-1504-023
EP 205 Miniature crystal pin insulator
EP 500 .37 x .37 ferrite bead
010-0345-280
517-2002-003
F 500
534-0009-040
Fuse, 4-amp subminiature
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
PARTS LIST
RF and PA Boards, Misc
Ref No.
Description
HW 001 Captive screw, covers
HW 002 Screw, 6-32 x 5/16” Torx
HW 003 Plug, option cable hole
HW 004 Heat sink clip
HW 005 O-ring 1/8”x 1/4”
HW 006 Washer, .16 ID nylon
HW 007 1/8” ID rub split grommet
HW 008 Rubber bumper
HW 008 Ground clip
(900 MHz, 30W only)
HW 009 Flat steel washer, .167 x .277
HW 015 Grommet
HW 016 Grommet
HW 017 Plug, accessory cable hole
HW 150 Screw, 4-40 x .3125 pan head
HW 300 Bottom shield snubber
HW 500 Socket, fuse
537-9007-045
575-0006-010
032-0792-075
017-2226-030
574-2002-001
596-4408-015
574-0002-015
574-1008-002
017-2226-040
J 002
J 003
J 200
J 201
J 501
RF board to PA board connector
20-pin RF to A/L board header
20-pin connector
20-pin connector
20-pin connector
515-9006-110
515-7181-025
515-7111-230
515-7111-230
515-7111-230
L 200
L 201
L 202
L 203
L 204
L 205
L 206
L 207
L 208
L 209
0.39 µH smd inductor
0.9 µH variable inductor
0.9 µH variable inductor
0.39 µH smd inductor
0.047 µH smd inductor
0.9 µH variable inductor
0.39 µH smd inductor
.39 µH smd inductor
0.39 µH smd inductor
.9 µH variable inductor
(900 MHz only)
8T 22 AWG smd inductor
(800 MHz)
6T 22 AWG smd inductor
(900 MHz)
8T 22 AWG smd inductor
(All except the following)
4T 22 AWG smd inductor
(900 MHz, 15W)
8T 22 AWG smd inductor
(800 MHz 35W)
542-9001-398
542-1012-008
542-1012-008
542-9001-398
542-9001-477
542-1012-008
542-9001-398
542-9001-398
542-9001-398
542-1012-008
L 500
L 501
L 503
Ref No.
Part No.
L 504
L 506
596-9408-009
574-0002-007
574-0002-007
032-0792-075
575-0604-010
018-1134-135
515-5006-002
L 507
L 508
L 510
L 520
L 800
L 801
L 803
MP 000
MP 002
MP 003
MP 156
MP 157
MP 200
MP 300
MP 500
MP 501
MP 502
MP 503
MP 504
MP 505
MP 506
542-0016-008
542-0015-006
MP 508
MP 509
MP 510
MP 990
MP 991
NP 008
542-0016-008
542-0015-004
542-0016-008
9-5
Description
Part No.
6T 22 AWG smd inductor
(900 MHz 30W)
4T 22 AWG smd inductor
(800 MHz 35W)
2T 22 AWG smd inductor
(900 MHz 30W)
6T 22 AWG smd inductor
(800 MHz 15W)
8T 22 AWG smd inductor
(All others)
6T 22 AWG smd inductor
(800 MHz 15W)
542-0015-006
8T 22 AWG smd inductor
(800 MHz 35W)
5T 22 AWG smd inductor
(900 MHz)
6T 22 AWG smd inductor
6T 22 AWG smd inductor
70 µH 15A filter choke
.047 µH smd inductor
.01 µH smd inductor
.047 µH smd inductor
542-0016-008
Keycap set, Summit
Top cover, black
Bottom cover, black
Top cover gasket
Bottom cover gasket
Insulator, filter Z201
Foam tape
Shield, low-pass filter
Shield, coax ground
Transistor ground tab
Transistor ground tab
Transistor ground tab
Transistor ground tab
Jumper strap, 15W
(15W only)
Transistor ground tab
Transistor ground tab
Module shield
Mic gasket
Seal, mic connector
Summit DM label
587-9650-008
015-0905-026
015-0905-031
032-0792-060
032-0792-064
018-1132-095
574-3002-013
017-2226-036
017-2226-017
017-2225-527
017-2225-527
017-2225-527
017-2225-527
017-2224-340
542-0015-004
542-0015-002
542-0015-006
542-0016-008
542-0015-006
542-0015-005
542-0015-006
542-0015-006
542-5010-003
542-9001-477
542-9001-107
542-9001-477
017-2225-527
017-2225-527
017-2226-019
574-3002-121
032-0792-129
559-9001-334
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
PARTS LIST
RF and PA Boards, Misc
Ref No.
P 100
P 101
Description
2-pin header
3-pin header
515-9031-201
515-9031-202
PC 210 PC board, RF
PC 500 PC board, PA unrevised
PC board, PA revised
035-9650-210
035-9650-510
035-9650-530
Q 100
Q 101
Q 102
Q 103
Q 104
Q 106
Q 107
Q 108
Q 200
Q 201
Q 202
Q 203
Q 205
Q 290
Q 291
Q 500
576-0002-057
576-0001-300
576-0002-603
576-0003-657
576-0001-300
576-0003-658
576-0001-300
576-0001-300
576-0003-650
576-0006-020
576-0003-650
576-0003-634
576-0003-649
576-0003-649
576-0003-650
576-0004-805
Q 501
Q 502
Q 503
Q 504
Q 506
Q 507
Q 510
Q 511
Q 514
Q 800
Q 801
Q 802
Q 804
Q 805
Q 806
PNP TO-220
NPN low-noise amp
PNP 6-amp power
PNP low-noise amp
NPN low-noise amp
NPN amplifier
NPN low-noise amp
NPN low-noise amp
PNP low-noise amp
P-channel JFET
PNP low noise amp
NPN VHF/UHF amp
NPN wideband amp
NPN wideband amp
PNP low noise amp
NPN 20W 870 MHz amp
(800 MHz)
NPN 20W 900 MHz amp
(900 MHz)
NPN 45W 870 MHz amp
(800 MHz 35W)
NPN 45W 896-940 MHz amp
(900 MHz 30W)
NPN low-noise amp
NPN low-noise amp
NPN low-noise amp
NPN low-noise amp
NPN amplifier
PNP switching
PNP 6-amp power
PNP switching
NPN low-noise amp
NPN wideband amp
PNP low noise amp
PNP low noise amp
PNP low-noise RF amp
PNP low-noise RF amp
Ref No.
Part No.
576-0004-901
576-0004-817
576-0004-818
576-0001-300
576-0001-300
576-0001-300
576-0001-300
576-0003-658
576-0003-612
576-0002-603
576-0003-612
576-0001-300
576-0003-649
576-0003-650
576-0003-650
576-0003-608
576-0003-608
Part No.
Q 807
Q 808
Q 809
NPN low-noise amp
PNP low noise amp
PNP low noise amp
576-0001-300
576-0003-650
576-0003-650
R 100
R 101
R 102
R 103
R 104
R 105
R 106
R 107
R 108
R 109
R 110
R 111
R 112
R 113
R 114
R 115
R 116
R 117
R 118
R 120
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
220 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
27k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
220 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
2.7 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
33 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
33k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
33k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
54.9k ohm ±1% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±1% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
17.8k ohm ±1% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
7.5k ohm ±1% 1/8W smd
2.2 ohm ±5% 1W smd
569-0105-104
569-0105-103
569-0105-102
569-0105-221
569-0105-273
569-0105-221
569-0105-103
569-0105-279
569-0105-330
569-0105-104
569-0105-104
569-0105-333
569-0105-333
569-0111-472
569-0111-501
569-0105-102
569-0111-425
569-0105-104
569-0111-385
569-0175-229
R 200
R 201
R 202
R 203
R 204
R 205
2.2k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
4.7k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
18 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
270 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
270 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
91k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(800 MHz)
56k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(900 MHz)
270k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
560 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
4.7k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
4.7k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(800 MHz)
3.9k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(900 MHz)
569-0105-222
569-0105-472
569-0105-180
569-0105-271
569-0105-271
569-0105-913
R 206
R 207
R 208
R 209
R 210
R 211
R 212
R 213
9-6
Description
569-0105-563
569-0105-274
569-0105-103
569-0105-101
569-0105-103
569-0105-561
569-0105-472
569-0105-101
569-0105-472
569-0105-392
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
PARTS LIST
RF and PA Boards, Misc
Ref No.
R 214
R 215
R 216
R 217
R 218
R 220
R 221
R 222
R 223
R 224
R 225
R 226
R 230
R 232
R 234
R 235
R 236
R 237
R 290
R 291
R 294
R 295
R 297
R 500
R 501
R 503
R 506
R 507
R 508
R 510
R 511
R 512
R 513
R 514
R 515
R 516
R 517
R 519
R 521
Description
100 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
270 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
0 ohm jumper
(900 MHz only)
18 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
270 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
330 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.8k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
150 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
33 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
150 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
39k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
330k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
4.7k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
4.7k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
220 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
91 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
82 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
91 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
330 ohm ±5% 1W smd
(All except 900 MHz 15W)
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(Unrevised PA board)
68k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(Revised PA board)
100 ohm 3/4W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
Ref No.
Part No.
569-0105-101
569-0105-271
569-0105-001
R 522
R 525
R 526
R 527
R 528
R 531
R 534
R 536
R 537
R 538
R 539
R 540
R 541
R 543
R 544
R 545
R 546
R 547
R 548
R 550
R 551
R 552
R 553
R 554
R 555
R 558
R 559
R 560
R 561
R 563
R 564
R 565
R 566
R 568
569-0105-180
569-0105-271
569-0105-331
569-0105-103
569-0105-182
569-0105-101
569-0105-151
569-0105-330
569-0105-151
569-0105-103
569-0105-102
569-0105-393
569-0105-334
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-472
569-0105-103
569-0105-472
569-0105-221
569-0105-101
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-910
569-0105-820
569-0105-910
569-0175-331
569-0105-104
569-0105-102
569-0105-473
R 571
R 575
R 576
569-0105-683
569-0135-101
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-104
569-0105-103
9-7
Description
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
20k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
470 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
330 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100 ohm 3/4W smd
100 ohm 3/4W smd
330 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
20k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
20k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
20k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
20k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
20k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
20k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
20k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1M ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(800 MHz 15W)
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(All others)
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(All 800 MHz)
43 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(900 MHz 15W)
39 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(900 MHz 30W)
Part No.
569-0105-102
569-0105-102
569-0105-203
569-0105-104
569-0105-471
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-331
569-0135-101
569-0135-101
569-0105-331
569-0105-102
569-0105-102
569-0105-203
569-0105-203
569-0105-203
569-0105-203
569-0105-203
569-0105-203
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-203
569-0105-103
569-0105-105
569-0105-104
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-102
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-102
569-0105-103
569-0105-102
569-0105-101
569-0105-430
569-0105-390
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
PARTS LIST
RF and PA Boards, Misc
Ref No.
R 577
R 580
R 585
R 586
R 587
R 589
R 590
R 591
R592
R 800
R 801
R 802
R 803
R 805
R 806
R 807
R 808
R 809
R 810
R 811
Description
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(800 MHz 15W)
1.5k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(800 MHz 35W)
330 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(900 MHz, 15W)
680 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(900 MHz 30W)
220 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(800 MHz 15W)
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(All others)
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
.03 ohm ±5% 2W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
0 ohm jumper
10 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.8k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(800 MHz, w/-500 Y800)
39k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(900 MHz, w/-500 Y800)
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(all w/-521 Y800, see Table A-2)
470k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(800 MHz, w/-500 Y800)
220k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(800 MHz, w/-521 Y800, see Table
A-2)
820k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(900 MHz, w/-500 Y800)
560k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(900 MHz, w/-521 Y800, see Table
A-2)
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
18k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
180 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
68k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
4.7k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
150 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
Part No.
Ref No.
569-0105-102
R 812
R 813
R 814
R 815
R 819
569-0105-152
569-0105-331
569-0105-681
569-0105-221
569-0105-103
R 820
569-0105-102
R 821
R 822
R 823
R 824
R 826
R 827
569-0105-103
569-2019-307
569-0105-103
569-0105-102
569-0105-103
569-0105-001
569-0105-100
569-0105-182
569-0105-473
R 828
569-0105-393
R 829
Description
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
33k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(800 MHz)
220 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(900 MHz)
820 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(800 MHz)
910 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(900 MHz)
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
3.3k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
3.3k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
820 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(800 MHz)
910 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(900 MHz)
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(800 MHz)
220 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(900 MHz)
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
Part No.
569-0105-102
569-0105-102
569-0105-101
569-0105-333
569-0105-102
569-0105-221
569-0105-821
569-0105-911
569-0105-104
569-0105-103
569-0105-332
569-0105-332
569-0105-103
569-0105-821
569-0105-911
569-0105-102
569-0105-221
569-0105-103
569-0105-104
R 830
R 831
R 832
R 833
R 834
R 835
R 836
R 837
R 838
R 840
R 842
R 843
R 844
R 845
569-0105-474
569-0105-224
569-0105-824
569-0105-564
569-0105-102
569-0105-183
569-0105-181
569-0105-683
569-0105-101
569-0105-472
569-0105-151
R 846
9-8
220k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
150k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
150 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
2.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
68k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(800 MHz)
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(900 MHz)
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
569-0105-224
569-0105-102
569-0105-154
569-0105-103
569-0105-151
569-0105-202
569-0105-103
569-0105-683
569-0105-100
569-0105-103
569-0105-104
569-0105-102
569-0105-102
569-0105-473
569-0105-104
569-0105-102
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
PARTS LIST
RF and PA Boards, Misc
Ref No.
R 847
R 848
R 849
R 851
RT 500
Description
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
Thermistor, 10k ohm
(30/35W)
Part No.
Ref No.
569-0105-102
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-3012-001
Z 206
Z 290
U 100
U 101
U 102
U 200
U 201
U 500
U 503
U 504
U 800
U 801
U 802
W 003
W 150
W 501
W 502
Y 800
Z 200
Z 201
Z 202
Z 204
Z 205
Audio amp, 20W 7240A
Regulator, 5V, 0.5A 78M05
Regulator, +8V 1.5A 7808
FM IF system 3362
Op amp, dual 532
Power amp module 6W
(800 MHz, unrevised PA)
Power amp module 6W
(800 MHz, revised PA)
Power amp module 6W
(900 MHz)
Shift register, 8-stage 4094
Op amp, quad 224
Prescaler ÷128/129 MC12052
Synthesizer 145158
Shift register, 8-stage 4094
544-2006-018
544-2003-079
544-2003-009
544-2026-016
544-2019-004
544-4001-047
Remote control cable, 17 ft.
Prog jack/cable assy (rem xcvr)
PA deck DC power cable assembly
PA deck RF cable assembly
TCXO 17.500 MHz 1.5 PPM
(Later models, see Table A-2)
450 kHz 15 kHz ceramic filter
(800 MHz)
450 kHz 9 kHz ceramic filter
(900 MHz)
860 MHz 20 MHz bw 3P filter
(800 MHz)
938 kHz 6 MHz bw 3P filter
(900 MHz)
807 MHz 18 MHz bw 2P filter
(800 MHz)
885 kHz 6 MHz bw 2P filter
(900 MHz)
455 kHz variable inductor w/cap
52.95 MHz 15 kHz bw 4P filter
(800 MHz)
597-2002-262
023-2002-266
597-2002-235
597-2002-240
518-7009-521
Ref No.
544-4001-048
544-4001-049
Description
52.95 MHz 8 kHz bw 4P filter
(900 MHz)
52.95 MHz 18 kHz bw 2P filter
(800 MHz)
52.95 MHz 10 kHz bw 2P filter
(900 MHz)
860 MHz 20 MHz bw 3P filter
(800 MHz)
938 MHz 6 MHz bw 2P filter
(900 MHz)
Description
Part No.
532-0009-011
532-0009-010
532-0009-012
532-2007-011
532-2006-015
Part No.
AUDIO/LOGIC BOARD
544-3016-094
544-2020-014
544-3954-040
544-3016-058
544-3016-094
C 300
C 302
C 303
C 304
C 305
C 306
C 400
C 401
C 402
C 403
C 404
C 405
C 406
C 407
C 408
C 409
C 410
C 411
C 412
C 413
C 415
C 416
C 417
C 418
C 600
C 601
532-2006-032
532-2006-034
532-2007-011
532-2007-012
532-2006-011
532-2006-014
542-1012-010
532-0009-009
9-9
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
470 pF ±5% NPO cer smd
470 pF ±5% NPO cer smd
470 pF ±5% NPO cer smd
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
470 pF ±5% NPO cer smd
30 pF ±5% NPO cer smd
30 pF ±5% NPO cer smd
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
10 µF 16V tantalum smd
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.001 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
1.0 µF 16V tantalum smd
10 µF 16V tantalum smd
39 pF ±5% NPO cer smd
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
1.0 µF 16V tantalum smd
1.0 µF 16V tantalum smd
510-3607-104
510-3601-471
510-3601-471
510-3601-471
510-3607-104
510-3601-471
510-3601-300
510-3601-300
510-3607-104
510-2625-100
510-3607-104
510-3605-102
510-3607-104
510-3607-104
510-3607-104
510-3607-104
510-3607-104
510-3607-104
510-3607-104
510-3607-104
510-2625-109
510-2625-100
510-3601-390
510-3607-104
510-2625-109
510-2625-109
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
PARTS LIST
Audio/Logic Board
Ref No.
C 602
C 603
C 604
C 605
C 606
C 607
C 608
C 609
C 610
C 611
C 612
C 613
C 614
C 615
C 616
C 617
C 618
C 619
C 620
C 621
C 622
C 624
C 625
C 626
C 627
C 628
C 629
C 630
C 631
C 632
C 633
C 634
C 635
C 636
C 638
C 639
C 640
C 641
C 642
C 643
C 644
C 645
C 646
C 647
C 648
Description
.22 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.22 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
1.0 µF 16V tantalum smd
1.0 µF 16V tantalum smd
10 µF 16V tantalum smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.01 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.01 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.01 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.01 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.01 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.01 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.01 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.001 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.1 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO cer smd
1.0 µF 16V tantalum smd
1.0 µF 16V tantalum smd
1.0 µF 16V tantalum smd
.22 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.22 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.0022 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer
.0068 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.0082 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer
.0068 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer
.0033 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer
.0068 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer
.0068 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer
.0056 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer
.0068 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
4.7 µF 10V tantalum smd
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.039 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.0022 µF X7R 50V cer smd
4.7 µF 10V tantalum smd
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.22 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
100 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
1.0 µF 16V tantalum smd
.0068 µF X7R 50V cer smd
Part No.
Ref No.
510-3607-224
510-3607-224
510-2625-109
510-2625-109
510-2625-100
510-3605-103
510-3606-103
510-3606-103
510-3606-103
510-3606-103
510-3606-103
510-3606-103
510-3606-103
510-3606-102
510-3607-104
510-3607-104
510-3601-390
510-3601-390
510-3601-390
510-2625-109
510-2625-109
510-2625-109
510-3607-224
510-3607-224
510-3605-222
510-3605-682
510-3605-153
510-3605-822
510-3605-682
510-3605-332
510-3605-682
510-3605-682
510-3605-562
510-3605-682
510-3605-153
510-2624-479
510-3605-153
510-3606-393
510-3605-222
510-2624-479
510-3605-153
510-3607-224
510-3601-101
510-2625-109
510-3605-682
C 650
C 651
C 652
C 653
C 660
C 661
C 662
C 663
C 664
C 665
C 666
C 667
C 668
C 669
C 670
C 671
C 672
C 673
C 674
C 675
C 676
C 677
C 678
C 679
C 680
C 681
C 682
C 683
C 684
C 685
C 686
C 687
C 688
C 689
C 690
C 691
C 692
C 693
C 694
C 695
C 696
C 697
C 698
C 705
C 706
9-10
Description
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.047 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
4.7 µF 10V tantalum smd
.047 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
4.7 µF 20V tantalum smd
.047 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.047 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.047 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.047 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.22 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.001 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
680 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
.001 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.0068 µF X7R 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.039 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.0022 µF X7R 50V cer smd
4.7 µF 10V tantalum smd
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.047 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
4.7 µF 20V tantalum smd
4.7 µF 20V tantalum smd
4.7 µF 10V tantalum smd
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.22 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.0012 µF X7R 50V cer smd
4.7 µF 10V tantalum smd
.0033 µF X7R 50V cer smd
560 pF ±5% NPO cer smd
.0047 µF X7R ±10% 50V smd
56 pF ±5% NPO cer smd
4.7 µF 10V tantalum smd
4.7 µF 10V tantalum smd
4.7 µF 10V tantalum smd
1.0 µF 16V tantalum smd
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
4.7 µF 10V tantalum smd
.047 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.047 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
4.7 µF 10V tantalum smd
.01 µF X7R ±5% cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±5% cer smd
Part No.
510-3605-103
510-3606-473
510-2624-479
510-3606-473
510-2626-479
510-3606-473
510-3606-473
510-3606-473
510-3606-473
510-3605-153
510-3607-224
510-3605-102
510-3601-681
510-3605-102
510-3605-103
510-3605-682
510-3605-103
510-3605-153
510-3606-393
510-3605-222
510-2624-479
510-3605-153
510-3606-473
510-2624-479
510-2624-479
510-2624-479
510-3605-153
510-3607-224
510-3605-122
510-2624-479
510-3605-332
510-3601-561
510-3605-472
510-3601-560
510-2624-479
510-2624-479
510-2624-479
510-2625-109
510-3605-153
510-2624-479
510-3606-473
510-3606-473
510-2624-479
510-3609-103
510-3609-103
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
PARTS LIST
Audio/Logic Board
Ref No.
C 707
C 708
C 709
C 710
C 711
C 712
C 713
C 714
C 715
C 716
C 717
C 719
C 720
C 721
C 722
C 723
C 730
C 731
C 732
C 733
C 734
C 735
C 736
C 783
C 786
C 788
Description
Part No.
0.1 µF X7R ±5% 50V cer smd
.0033 µF X7R ±5% cer smd
.0022 µF X7R ±5% cer smd
10 µF 16V tantalum smd
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±5% cer smd
.01 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
0.1 µF X7R ±5% 50V cer smd
.0033 µF X7R ±5% cer smd
.0022 µF X7R ±5% cer smd
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±5% cer smd
1200 pF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
1200 pF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.22 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
4.7 µF 10V tantalum smd
4.7 µF 10V tantalum smd
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.01 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
.22 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
4.7 µF 10V tantalum smd
4.7 µF 20V tantalum smd
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
510-3610-104
510-3609-332
510-3609-222
510-2625-100
510-3605-153
510-3609-103
510-3606-103
510-3610-104
510-3609-332
510-3609-222
510-3605-153
510-3609-103
510-3605-122
510-3605-122
510-3605-103
510-3607-224
510-3605-153
510-2624-479
510-2624-479
510-3605-153
510-3605-103
510-3605-103
510-3607-224
510-2624-479
510-2624-479
510-3605-153
CR 400 Dual switching, common cathode
CR 401 Switching diode
CR 500- 18V ±5% zener diode
CR516
CR 600 Dual switching, common anode
CR 601 Dual switching, common cathode
CR 610 Dual sw diode (unrevised bd)
UHF/VHF band sw diode (rev bd)
CR 611 UHF/VHF band sw diode (rev bd)
CR 620 Dual switching diode
523-1504-024
523-1504-022
523-1504-023
523-1504-012
523-1504-012
523-1504-023
J 001
J 002
J 300
J 400
J 401
J 402
J 403
586-3502-002
586-3502-002
515-7111-230
515-7111-254
515-7111-283
515-7111-262
515-7111-262
Solderless pin
Solderless pin
20-pin connector
5-pin connector
30-pin zif connector
13-pin connector
13-pin connector
Ref No.
J 404
J 405
523-1504-022
523-1504-017
523-2016-180
9-11
Description
12-pin connector
6-pin connector
Part No.
515-7111-261
515-7111-255
PC 313 PC board, audio/logic
035-9750-320
Q 300
Q 400
Q 401
Q 402
Q 403
Q 404
Q 450
Q 451
Q 452
Q 600
Q 601
Q 602
Q 610
Q 612
NPN amplifier SOT-23
PNP digital w/res SOT-23
NPN amplifier SOT-23
NPN amplifier SOT-23
N-channel MOSFET enhanc mode
NPN dual digital w/res SOT-25
NPN amplifier SOT-23
PNP switching SOT-23
PNP digital w/res SOT-23
NPN amplifier SOT-23
NPN amplifier SOT-23
NPN low noise amplifier
NPN amplifier SOT-23
NPN amplifier SOT-23
576-0003-616
576-0003-621
576-0003-616
576-0003-616
576-0006-114
576-0003-626
576-0003-616
576-0003-612
576-0003-621
576-0003-616
576-0003-616
576-0001-300
576-0003-616
576-0003-616
R 300
R 301
R 302
R 303
R 304
R 305
R 306
R 307
R 308
R 309
R 310
R 311
R 312
R 313
R 314
R 315
R 316
R 317
R 318
R 319
R 320
R 321
R 322
R 323
R 324
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
22k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
22k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
22k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
22k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
22k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
22k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
22k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
22k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
22k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
470k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
2.2k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
82k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
82k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
2.2k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
22k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
569-0105-113
569-0105-223
569-0105-223
569-0105-113
569-0105-223
569-0105-113
569-0105-223
569-0105-113
569-0105-223
569-0105-113
569-0105-223
569-0105-113
569-0105-223
569-0105-113
569-0105-223
569-0105-113
569-0105-223
569-0105-474
569-0105-104
569-0105-222
569-0105-823
569-0105-823
569-0105-222
569-0105-113
569-0105-223
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
PARTS LIST
Audio/Logic Board
Ref No.
R 325
R 326
R 400
R 401
R 402
R 403
R 404
R 405
R 406
R 407
R 408
R 409
R 410
R 411
R 412
R 413
R 414
R 415
R 416
R 417
R 418
R 419
R 420
R 422
R 423
R 424
R 425
R 426
R 427
R 428
R 429
R 430
R 431
R 432
R 433
R 434
R 435
R 436
R 437
R 438
R 439
R 440
R 441
R 442
R 444
Description
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
3.3k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10M ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
Part No.
Ref No.
569-0105-113
569-0105-332
569-0105-113
569-0105-106
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-104
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-104
R 445
R 446
R 447
R 448
R 449
R 450
R 451
R 452
R 453
R 454
R 455
R 456
R 457
R 458
R 459
R 460
R 461
R 462
R 463
R 464
R 465
R 466
R 467
R 468
R 469
R 470
R 471
R 472
R 473
R 474
R 475
R 480
R 481
R 482
R 483
R 484
R 485
R 486
R 487
R 488
R 489
R 490
R 492
R 493
R 494
9-12
Description
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
22k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
22k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
22k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
22k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
22k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
22k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
22k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
4.7k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
4.7k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
15k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
4.7k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
2.2k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
150 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
220 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
220 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
220 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
220 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
6.8k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
6.8k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
Part No.
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-104
569-0105-223
569-0105-223
569-0105-113
569-0105-223
569-0105-113
569-0105-223
569-0105-113
569-0105-223
569-0105-113
569-0105-223
569-0105-113
569-0105-223
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-472
569-0105-113
569-0105-472
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-153
569-0105-472
569-0105-113
569-0105-222
569-0105-113
569-0105-151
569-0105-101
569-0105-101
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-113
569-0105-221
569-0105-221
569-0105-221
569-0105-221
569-0105-101
569-0105-682
569-0105-682
569-0105-113
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
PARTS LIST
Audio/Logic Board
Ref No.
R 500
R 501
R 502
R 503
R 601
R 602
R 606
R 607
R 608
R 609
R 610
R 612
R 613
R 614
R 615
R 616
R 617
R 618
R 619
R 620
R 621
R 622
R 623
R 624
R 625
R 627
R 628
R 630
R 631
R 632
R 633
R 634
R 635
R 636
R 637
R 639
R 640
R 641
R 642
R 643
R 644
R 645
R 646
R 647
R 648
Description
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
Zero ohm jumper
1k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
6.8k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
5.1k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
68k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
68k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
27k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
2.2k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
820k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
2.2k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
2.7k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1M ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
2.2k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
12k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
560k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
2.2k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
18k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
68k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
2.2k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
4.7k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
27k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
3.9k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
3.9k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
3.9k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
Zero ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
68k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
68k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
220k ohm smd trimmer
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
470k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
Part No.
Ref No.
569-0105-103
569-0105-102
569-0105-001
569-0105-102
569-0105-682
569-0105-512
569-0105-103
569-0105-683
569-0105-683
569-0105-683
569-0105-222
569-0105-473
569-0105-824
569-0105-102
569-0105-222
569-0105-272
569-0105-105
569-0105-222
569-0105-123
569-0105-564
569-0105-222
569-0105-183
569-0105-683
569-0105-222
569-0105-472
569-0105-113
569-0105-273
569-0105-392
569-0105-392
569-0105-392
569-0105-102
569-0105-001
569-0105-104
569-0105-104
569-0105-473
569-0105-683
569-0105-683
569-0105-102
569-0105-104
562-0130-224
569-0105-104
569-0105-104
569-0105-474
569-0105-113
569-0105-104
R 650
R 655
R 656
R 657
R 658
R 659
R 660
R 661
R 662
R 663
R 664
R 665
R 666
R 667
R 668
R 669
R 670
R 671
R 672
R 673
R 674
R 675
R 676
R 677
R 678
R 679
R 680
R 681
R 682
R 683
R 684
R 685
R 686
R 687
R 688
R 689
R 690
R 691
R 692
R 693
R 694
R 695
R 696
R 697
R 698
9-13
Description
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
620 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
620 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
150k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
470k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
620k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
620 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
620 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
110k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
110k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
220k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
220k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
110k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
4.7k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
470k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
68k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
180k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
820k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
7.5k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
560k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.2k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
3.9k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
3.9k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
3.9k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
470k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
27k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
Zero ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
15k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
560k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
390 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
680 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
Zero ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
39k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
82k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
68k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
Part No.
569-0105-473
569-0105-621
569-0105-621
569-0105-154
569-0105-474
569-0105-624
569-0105-621
569-0105-621
569-0105-114
569-0105-114
569-0105-224
569-0105-224
569-0105-114
569-0105-472
569-0105-474
569-0105-683
569-0105-113
569-0105-184
569-0105-824
569-0105-752
569-0105-564
569-0105-122
569-0105-392
569-0105-392
569-0105-392
569-0105-473
569-0105-104
569-0105-104
569-0105-104
569-0105-104
569-0105-474
569-0105-104
569-0105-104
569-0105-473
569-0105-273
569-0105-473
569-0105-001
569-0105-153
569-0105-564
569-0105-391
569-0105-681
569-0105-001
569-0105-393
569-0105-823
569-0105-683
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
PARTS LIST
Audio/Logic Board
Ref No.
Description
Part No.
R 699
150k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
569-0105-154
R 700
R 701
R 702
R 703
R 704
82k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
470k ohm smd trimmer
3.3k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
220k ohm smd trimmer
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(w/-500 Y800, see Table A-2)
18k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(w/-521 Y800, see Table A-2)
0 ohm jumper smd
470k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
0 ohm jumper smd
1.50k ohm ±1% 1/8W smd
1.50k ohm ±1% 1/8W smd
2.2k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
33k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
2.2k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
470k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
3.3k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
330k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W (unrev bd)
75k ohm ±5% 1/8W (rev bd)
270k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
22k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.50k ohm ±1% 1/8W smd
1.50k ohm ±1% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
569-0105-823
562-0130-474
569-0105-332
562-0130-224
569-0105-473
R 705
R 706
R 707
R 708
R 709
R 710
R 711
R 712
R 713
R 714
R 715
R 716
R 717
R 718
R 719
R 720
R 721
R 722
R 723
R 724
R 726
R 727
R 728
R 729
R 730
R 731
R 732
R 733
R 734
R 735
R 736
R 737
R 738
R 739
Ref No.
R 740
R 745
R 746
R 747
R 748
R 749
R 751
R 752
R 753
R 754
R 755
R 756
R 757
R 758
R 759
R 760
R 761
R 763
R 764
R 765
R 767
R 768
R 770
R 771
R 772
R 773
R 774
R 775
R 776
R 777
R 778
R 779
R 780
R 781
R 782
R 785
R 786
R 789
R 790
R 791
R 792
R 793
R 795
R 796
569-0105-183
569-0105-001
569-0105-474
569-0105-001
569-0111-318
569-0111-318
569-0105-222
569-0105-473
569-0105-473
569-0105-333
569-0105-222
569-0105-102
569-0105-102
569-0105-102
569-0105-474
569-0105-332
569-0105-104
569-0105-104
569-0105-473
569-0105-473
569-0105-334
569-0105-104
569-0105-753
569-0105-274
569-0105-113
569-0105-223
569-0105-473
569-0105-473
569-0105-113
569-0105-473
569-0111-318
569-0111-318
569-0105-104
569-0105-104
569-0105-473
569-0105-473
9-14
Description
330k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
15k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
270k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm smd trimmer
Zero ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
180k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
68k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
820 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
33k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
8.2k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
22k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
3.3k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1k ohm smd trimmer
Zero ohm jumper smd
56k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
2.2k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
22k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
0 ohm jumper
1.2k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
68k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
68k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
68k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
11.0k ohm 1% 1/8W smd
2.2k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
470k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
220k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.0k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
3.4k ohm ±1% 1/8W smd
11k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
620k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(900 MHz only)
Part No.
569-0105-334
569-0105-153
569-0105-102
569-0105-274
562-0130-103
569-0105-001
569-0105-184
569-0105-683
569-0105-821
569-0105-333
569-0105-822
569-0105-223
569-0105-332
562-0130-102
569-0105-001
569-0105-563
569-0105-222
569-0105-113
569-0105-223
569-0105-001
569-0105-122
569-0105-102
569-0105-473
569-0105-473
569-0105-104
569-0105-104
569-0105-104
569-0105-104
569-0105-473
569-0105-473
569-0105-683
569-0105-683
569-0105-683
569-0101-405
569-0105-222
569-0105-474
569-0105-224
569-0105-102
569-0105-102
569-0105-102
569-0105-102
569-0101-352
569-0105-113
569-0105-624
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
PARTS LIST
Audio/Logic Board
Ref No.
Description
RT 600 Thermistor 1k ohm
Part No.
Ref No.
Description
Part No.
FRONT PANEL ASSEMBLY
569-3013-002
(Both Front and Remote Models)
U 300 Microprocessor, DSP TMS320C17 544-5003-150
U 301 Latch, 3-state 74HC573
544-3766-573
U 302 Prgmble array logic I/O custom
544-9017-005
U 304 Serial A/D converter 145040
544-2034-003
U 305 Op amp, dual 532
544-2019-004
U 400 Low voltage sensor 33164
544-2003-074
U 401 Microprocessor, 8-bit 68HC11
544-5011-301
U 402 Latch, 3-state, octal 74HC573
544-3766-573
U 403 Prg array logic, address decoder
544-9017-003
U 404 EPROM 128K x 8 flash 28F010
544-5011-589
(flash reprogramming required after replacement)
U 405 Static RAM 8K x 8 4464
544-5002-115
Not Replaceable
U 406 EEPROM 8K x 8 28C64
(return radio to E.F. Johnson Depot Repair for service)
U 407 Prgrmble array logic I/O decoder 544-9017-004
U 408 D F-F 3-state, octal 74HC574
544-3766-574
U 409 D F-F 3-state, octal 74HC574
544-3766-574
U 410 Latch, 3-state, octal 74HC573
544-3766-573
U 411 Latch, 3-state, octal 74HC573
544-3766-573
U 412 Latch, 3-state, octal 74HC573
544-3766-573
U 413 Buffer, hex open drain 74C906
544-3716-906
U 414 Buffer, hex open drain 74C906
544-3716-906
U 415 Regulator, 5V 0.5A 78M05
544-2003-079
U 450 Shift register, 8-stage 4094
544-3016-094
U 451 Shift register, 8-stage 4094
544-3016-094
U 452 Shift register, 8-stage 4094
544-3016-094
U 600 Volume control, 2-channel 87032 544-0004-208
U 601 Op amp, quad 224
544-2020-014
U 602 Op amp, quad 224
544-2020-014
U 603 Op amp, quad 224
544-2020-014
U 604 Op amp, quad 224
544-2020-014
U 605 Op amp, quad 224
544-2020-014
U 606 Op amp, quad 224
544-2020-014
U 607 Op amp, quad 224
544-2020-014
U 608 Analog switch, quad 4066
544-3016-066
U 609 Analog switch, quad 4066
544-3016-066
U 610 Analog switch, quad 4066
544-3016-066
X 401
Y 300
Socket, 32-pin
8.0 MHz crystal
515-5020-002
521-0008-001
9-15
A 151 Front panel assembly, black
C 101 4.7 µF 10V tantalum smd
DS 100 Liquid crystal display assembly
DS 101- LED, green smd
DS 120
DS 121- LED, green smd
DS 126
DS 127 LED, red smd
HW 010 Washer
HW 011 Spanner nut, 3/8” x 7mm
587-9650-002
510-2624-479
549-4501-010
549-4003-011
549-4101-001
596-9410-010
013-1313-018
J 101
J 102
J 103
LS 001
18-pin connector
Elastomeric connector
2-pin connector, speaker wire
Speaker, 2 x 3” 16-ohm
515-7111-266
515-9900-002
515-9031-281
589-1015-006
MP 101
MP 102
MP 103
MP 108
MP 151
MP 152
MP 153
MP 154
MP 155
MP 158
MP 161
MP 162
Display bezel
Display gasket
Light pipe
Support, keypad
Gasket, front lens
Control knob
Control knob
Speaker membrane
Pad, display board
Front panel lens
Keypad, standard
Speaker retainer
017-2226-046
018-1136-120
032-0792-032
017-2226-090
018-1136-108
032-0792-010
032-0792-010
018-1136-112
018-1136-122
032-0792-034
032-0792-030
016-2187-250
NP 007
P 002
PC100
PC150
Q 101
Johnson label
13-pin microphone connector
PC board, display
Flex circuit
PNP low noise amp
559-9001-310
515-1009-025
035-9650-110
035-9650-150
576-0003-650
R 101
R 102
R 103
R 105
R 106
R 107
R 108
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
180k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
62 ohm 3/4W smd
62 ohm 3/4W smd
62 ohm 3/4W smd
62 ohm 3/4W smd
569-0105-104
569-0105-104
569-0105-184
569-0135-620
569-0135-620
569-0135-620
569-0135-620
549-4001-145
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
PARTS LIST
Ref No.
Description
Part No.
S 154
S 155
10k ohm volume pot/push-on sw
Switch, rotary and push
562-0018-075
583-2042-001
U101
U102
LCD driver 8576
LCD driver 8676
544-2027-010
544-2027-010
Ref No.
Description
Ref No.
Part No.
COMPANDOR KIT
Part No. 250-9750-002
C 100
C 101
C 102
C 103
C 104
C 105
C 106
C 107
C 108
C 109
C 110
C 111
C 112
C 113
C 114
.22 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
4.7 µF 10V tantalum smd
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
10 µF 16V tantalum smd
10 µF 16V tantalum smd
1.0 µF 16V tantalum smd
10 µF 16V tantalum smd
220 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
220 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
1.0 µF 16V tantalum smd
1.0 µF ±10% X7R 16V cer smd
1.0 µF ±10% X7R 16V cer smd
.015 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
.015 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
1.0 µF 16V tantalum smd
DS 100 LED, green
HW 001 Foam strip
J 001 Socket, 7-pin female
J 100 Terminal strip, 7-pin
PC 100 PC board, compandor
Q 100 NPN general purpose
R 100
R 101
R 102
R 103
R 104
R 105
R 106
R 107
R 108
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
220k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
2.2k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
15k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
15k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
270k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
560k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
2.2k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
33k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
510-3607-224
510-2624-479
510-3605-153
510-2625-100
510-2625-100
510-2625-109
510-2625-100
510-3601-221
510-3601-221
510-2625-109
510-3606-105
510-3606-105
510-3605-153
510-3605-153
510-2625-109
Description
Part No.
R 109
R 110
R 111
R 112
R 113
R 114
R 115
R 116
R 117
68k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
68k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
390 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
6.8k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
5.1k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.5k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.5k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.5k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1.5k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
569-0105-683
569-0105-683
569-0105-391
569-0105-682
569-0105-512
569-0105-682
569-0105-682
569-0105-682
569-0105-682
U 100
U 101
U 102
Compandor SO-16 SA571D
Op amp (dual) 532
Analog switch 4066B
544-2022-005
544-2019-004
544-3016-066
HARDWARE AND CABLE KIT
Part No. 023-9750-010
A 001
Fused DC power cable
023-9650-008
(see separate listing which follows)
A 002 Mic clip ground wire
023-7171-911
EP 002 Ring terminal, 3/4” 10-12 AWG
586-0001-036
EP 003 Ring terminal, 3/8” 10-12 AWG
586-0001-019
F 101 Fuse, 15 amp 32V
534-0016-015
HW 000 Key extraction tool
017-2226-000
HW 001 Butt splice insulated (2)
586-9008-061
HW 002 Screw, 4-40 x 3/8” pan head (1)
575-0604-012
HW 003 Screw, 4-24 x 5/16” phil (3)
575-3604-010
HW 004 Screw, 4-20 x 5/8” phil (3)
575-5604-020
MP 001 Heavy-duty mic clip
023-3514-001
549-4003-011
042-0361-342
515-5006-280
515-7110-440
035-9750-010
576-0003-616
Fused DC Power Cable
Part No. 023-9650-008
EP 101 Female crimp pin
FH 001 Fuse holder in-line includes:
Contact
Body
Knob
Spring
HW 101 Wire seal
ML 001 Neg ative ground warning tag
ML 002 Jump start warning label
P 101 2-pin female power connector
W 101 Wire, 12 AWG stranded blue
W 102 Wire, 12 AWG stranded red
569-0105-104
569-0105-224
569-0105-222
569-0105-153
569-0105-153
569-0105-274
569-0105-274
569-0105-222
569-0105-683
9-16
515-9032-540
534-1004-037
534-1004-031
534-1004-032
534-1004-035
574-9025-035
559-4014-001
559-4057-010
515-9032-535
597-7021-206
597-7021-202
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
PARTS LIST
Ref No.
Description
Ref No.
Part No.
ACCESSORY WIRE KIT
C 300 4.7 µF 10V tantalum smd
C 301 .047 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
C 302 4.7 µF 10V tantalum smd
C 303 .015 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
C 304 4.7 µF 10V tantalum smd
C 305 .015 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
F 200 Fuse, 0.6A smd
HW 001 Screw, self drill #10
HW 002 Screw, captive .75
HW 005 Polyethylene washer .937
HW 006 Washer, spring ss 3/4" OD
J 001 Solderless pin
J 002 Solderless pin
J 100 Connector, 16-pin
J 200 Connector, 30-pin
J 300 Connector, 3-pin
MP 001 Housing, control head black
MP 002 Mounting bracket, control head
MP 003 Gasket, transceiver block-off nil
MP 004 Block-off fort panel, xcvr black
MP 005 Seal, mic connector
MP 006 Knob, control unit mounting
MP 007 Rear cover, control unit black
MP 010 Gasket, control unit rear cover
NP 008 Johnson label
P 100 8-pin receptacle housing
PC 100 PC board, remote interface
Q 100 NPN amplifier SOT-23
Q 101 PNP digital w/res SOT-23
Q 102 NPN dual digital w/res SOT-25
Q 103 PNP switching SOT-23
R 100 10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
R 101 10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
R 102 10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
R 103 10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
R 104 10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
R 105 10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
R 106 10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
R 107 10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
R 108 10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
R 109 10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
R 110 10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
R 111 10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
R 112 10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
R 113 10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
Part No. 023-9750-011
Fuseholder components:
EP 001 Contact
F 001
Fuse, 1A 250V FB AGC
MP001 Fuseholder body
MP002 Fuseholder knob
MP003 Fuseholder spring
HW 001 Pin contact, crimp type
P 101 8-pin receptacle housing
586-9004-001
534-0003-020
534-1004-031
534-1004-032
534-1004-035
515-1501-055
515-1501-050
TRANSCEIVER MOUNTING KIT
Part No. 023-9750-012
HW 001 Self-drilling screw 1/4” (4)
HW 002 Self-drilling screw #10 (4)
MP 101 Knob 10-32 1/2”
MP 201 Transceiver mounting bracket
Ref No.
Description
575-9077-565
575-9077-545
547-0016-003
017-2226-034
Part No.
REMOTE CONTROL UNIT AND
REMOTE KIT
A 000
C 100
C 101
C 102
C 103
C 200
C 201
C 202
C 203
C 204
C 205
C 206
C 207
C 208
C 209
C 210
C 211
C 212
C 213
C 214
C 215
C 216
Front panel assembly
(See separate listing)
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
18 pF ±5% NPO cer smd
18 pF ±5% NPO cer smd
4.7 µF 10V tantalum smd
15 µF 20V tantalum smd
15 µF 20V tantalum smd
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
10 µF 16V tantalum smd
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
10 µF 16V tantalum smd
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
10 µF 16V tantalum smd
.015 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
560 pF ±5% NPO cer smd
4.7 µF 10V tantalum smd
.01 µF ±10% X7R 50V cer smd
Description
510-3605-153
510-3601-180
510-3601-180
510-2624-479
510-2626-150
510-2626-150
510-3605-153
510-2625-100
510-3605-153
510-3615-390
510-3605-153
510-2625-100
510-3605-153
510-3615-390
510-3605-153
510-2625-100
510-3605-153
510-3615-390
510-3601-561
510-2624-479
510-3606-103
9-17
Part No.
510-2624-479
510-3606-473
510-2624-479
510-3606-153
510-2624-479
510-3606-153
534-5001-002
575-9077-545
575-9606-018
596-6400-015
596-9260-001
586-3502-002
586-3502-002
515-7000-668
515-7111-283
515-7000-643
032-0792-130
017-2226-050
032-0792-068
032-0792-007
032-0792-129
032-0792-015
032-0792-135
032-0792-066
559-9001-310
515-1501-050
035-9701-100
576-0003-616
576-0003-621
576-0003-626
576-0003-612
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
PARTS LIST
Remote Control Unit/Remote Kit
Ref No.
R 114
R 115
R 116
R 117
R 118
R 119
R 120
R 121
R 122
R 123
R 124
R 125
R 126
R 127
R 128
R 129
R 130
R 131
R 132
R 133
R 134
R 135
R 136
R 137
R 138
R 139
R 140
R 141
R 142
R 143
R 144
R 145
R 146
R 147
R 148
R 149
R 150
R 151
R 152
R 153
R 155
R 157
R 158
R 159
R 162
R 163
Description
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
330k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10m ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
Jumper
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
4.7k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
4.7k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
15k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
4.7k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
620 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
2.2k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
560 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
560 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
5.6k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
5.6k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
Part No.
Ref No.
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-334
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-106
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-001
569-0105-103
569-0105-472
569-0105-103
569-0105-472
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-153
569-0105-472
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-621
569-0105-222
569-0105-103
569-0105-561
569-0105-561
569-0105-562
569-0105-562
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
569-0105-103
9-18
Description
Part No.
R 164
R 200
R 201
R 202
R 203
R 204
R 205
R 206
R 207
R 208
R 209
R 210
R 300
R 301
R 302
R 303
R 304
R 305
R 306
R 307
R 308
R 309
R 310
R 311
R 312
R 313
R 314
R 315
150 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
Jumper
Jumper
Jumper
Jumper
39 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
1 ohm ±10% cer smd
2.7 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
6.8k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
4.7k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
Jumper
Jumper
620 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
620 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
470k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
150k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
470k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
4.7k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
100k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
620 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
150k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
150k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
4.7k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
620 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
2.2 ohm ±5% 1W smd
569-0105-151
569-0105-001
569-0105-001
569-0105-001
569-0105-001
569-0115-390
569-0115-109
569-0115-279
569-0105-682
569-0105-472
569-0105-001
569-0105-001
569-0105-621
569-0105-621
569-0105-474
569-0105-104
569-0105-104
569-0105-154
569-0105-474
569-0105-472
569-0105-104
569-0105-104
569-0105-621
569-0105-154
569-0105-154
569-0105-472
569-0105-621
569-0175-229
S 100
S 101
U 100
U 101
U 102
U 103
U 200
U 201
U 202
U 300
U 301
DIP switch 6-position
583-5100-106
DIP switch 6-position
583-5100-106
Microprocessor w/Summit rem soft 023-9998-324
Low voltage sensor MC33164D
544-2003-074
IIC bidirectional xcvr P828715TD 544-5001-329
Buffer, open drain 744C906
544-3716-906
Regulator, 5V 100 mA LM78l05 544-2603-039
Regulator, 8V 500 mA 78M08
544-2003-081
Regulator, 8V 500 mA 78M08
544-2003-081
Op amp, dual SO-8 532
544-2019-004
Analog switch 4066
544-3016-066
W 002
W 003
W 150
X 100
Y 100
Control head pigtail cable
Control cable, 17 ft.
Prog jack/cable assy (xcvr)
Socket, PLCC 44-pin smd
Crystal, 4.0 MHz
597-2002-264
597-2002-262
597-2002-266
515-5020-004
521-0004-002
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
TRANSCEIVER EXPLODED VIEW (PART 1)
9-19
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
Remote Control Parts
TRANSCEIVER EXPLODED VIEW (PART 2)
9-20
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
SCHEMATIC DIAGRAMS AND COMPONENT LAYOUTS
SECTION 10 SCHEMATIC DIAGRAMS AND COMPONENT LAYOUTS
BASING DIAGRAMS
TRANSISTORS
Part Number
576-0001-300
576-0002-057
576-0003-603
576-0003-608
576-0003-612
576-0003-616
576-0003-618
576-0003-621
576-0003-626
576-0003-634
576-0003-650
576-0003-657
576-0003-658
576-0004-805
576-0004-817
576-0004-818
576-0004-901
576-0006-114
Basing Diagram Identification
1
2
3
1
1
1
4
1
5
1
1
1
6
6
6
6
7
1R
7F
2T
10
3B
2A
1A
-
Number on Schematic
DIODES
523-1504-001
523-1504-002
523-1504-012
523-1504-016
523-1504-017
523-1504-022
523-1504-023
523-1504-024
523-1504-032
-
4D
5A
A2
5F
5D
5B
A7
A1
-
10-1
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
SCHEMATIC DIAGRAMS AND COMPONENT LAYOUTS
STANDARD AMPLIFIED DYNAMIC MICROPHONE
Part No. 250-0740-310
Ref No.
Description
Part No.
Ref No.
Amplified Dynamic Microphone
Part No. 250-0740-310
C 001
C 002
EP002
EP004
HW001
HW004
MK001
MP001
MP002
MP003
MP004
MP005
3.3 µF 16V tantalum chip
220 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer chip
Mic cord w/Hirose connector
Terminal (on hanger)
Screw 4-20 x 3/8
Screw 2-56 x 3/8
Dynamic mic cartridge
Case front black
Case back black
Actuator black
Cartridge gasket
Blast filter
MP006
MP007
MP008
MP009
MP010
MP011
MP012
MP020
NP001
PC001
Q 001
R 001
R 002
S 001
510-2625-339
510-3602-221
597-2002-255
022-0069-011
575-5604-012
575-1602-012
589-1011-003
032-0426-100
032-0427-100
032-0428-050
032-0429-075
018-1033-002
10-2
Description
Part No.
Switch bracket
Hanger button
Crimp retainer
Rubber bumper
Backing plate
Strain relief, mic cord
Shim support, rubber bumper
Foam support
Nameplate
PC board, amplifier
NPN amplifier SOT-23
51k ohm ±5% 1/8W chip
18 ohm ±5% 1/8W chip
Leaf switch SPST
017-1885-030
013-1216-005
017-2222-006
018-0798-009
015-0876-026
032-0429-086
017-2222-007
018-0798-012
559-0039-026
035-0441-020
576-0003-658
569-0115-513
569-0115-180
583-1004-031
Revised May 1998
Part No. 001-9750-006
TRANSCEIVER-TO-TRANSCEIVER CLONING CABLE
PART NO. 597-2002-268
P3
RS - 232 / TTL CONVERTER
HANGER
1
3
5
1
OUT
GND
4, 5
R19
1
J4
7
5
3
1
10 8
6
4
2
IN
C15
4.7
R25
10K
2, 3, 6, 7
NC
6
B
TO TRANSCEIVER
T1 IN
R1 IN
V POS
V NEG
R12
10k
J2
DCD
15
TxD
13
RxD
6
C2 POS
C1 POS
4
+
+
3
9
4
5
C1 NEG
C2 NEG
R2 OUT
R2 IN
C16
+ 10
C14
4.7
SG
DSR
8
RTS
7
T2 IN
CTS
T2 OUT
VCC
R23
4
C13
1
CR6
R13
10K
4
SOURCE
VCC
22k
C6
.1
+
C10
10
OUT
6
7
8
9
1
3
J7
IN
+
2
J3
DC POWER JACK
CR1
1
GND
C4
.1
4
5
10k
2
U1
MC78M05
3
3
P5
5V REGULATOR
R24
SI
1
2
C18
10
C11
10
+
C5
.1
CR2
CR4
VCC
CR3
RXD
R27
1k
GND
CURRENT
LIMITER
MIC AUDIO OUT
HANGER
4
GND
SERIAL PORT
CR7
14
BATTERY
3
5
R1 OUT
10
Q1
3658
2
1
8
CR8
J5
C17
10
+
+
12V VPP
10
TI OUT
J6
DTR
GND
9
VCC
2
VCC
TxD
8
1
12
U3
LM7L12
GND
7
A
16
R21
470
12V REGULATOR
BATTERY
6
9
R20
10k
11
NC
1
VCC
GND
4
2
2
U004
MAX232
R22
470
RxD
P4
3
4
VCC
GND
2
TO TRANSCEIVER
C3
.1
DB9 TO COMPUTER
J4
20V PROG
R26
1
CR9
Q3
6026
4
R1
22k
R2
22k
L1
20nH
RX AUDIO IN
R14
100k
1
62
CR10
+
C17
22k
C8
47
Q2
3657
TxD
2
R8
47.5k
5
J5
C7
.01
A123456B
R16
22k
R18
1k
RED
U2
MC33063
R15
CR5
BATTERY
R9
1k
DC - DC CONVERTER
R7
3.01k
3
SC
VCC
SE
IS
CI
DC
TC
GND
DS1
6
GRN
R4
7
8
R11
180
4
C9
.001
1
R5
S1
+
C12
4.7
R10
1k
J8
RX AUDIO OUT
1
R6
1
J1
MIC AUDIO IN
NOTES:
1. All Resistors Are In Ohms and All Capacitors Are In
Microfarads Unless Otherwise Specified.
2. DCE (Default) 2-4, 1-3
DTE - 1-2, 3-4
3. J7, 1-2 Jumper Normally Not Installed. This Jumper Is
Used Only When The RPI Power Supply Must Provide
The Battery Supply To The External Device Connected
To J4 or J5.
4. R2, R23, And R24 Can Provide These Options:
Option 1 (Default) - R2, R25 In, R23, R24 Out
Option 2 - R23 In, R2, R24, R25 Out
Option 3 - R24, R25 In, R2, R23 Out
RPI (PART NO. 023-9800-000) SCHEMATIC
10-3
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
Q2
C
B
C4
U1
Q3
E
2
J1
B C E
R17 C7
R18 R16
C10
CR7
C5
C18
J8
R12
J4
R27
C
CR10
9
R15 R14
10
CR9
R26
RPI-TO-TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING CABLE
Part No. 023-9750-005
C11
1
1
C16
L1
CR5
2
J6
4
3
1
R11
8
3
R6
S1
R5
C9
U2
R4
5
C12
J5
1
3
8
U3
4
5
6
8B
R19
1
C13
4
1
CR8
R13
J2
9
5
CR1
J3
R2
R24
R1
6
C15 C17
1
16
J7
C8
1
C14
U4
R7
5
C
2
C6
7A
8
R8
4
Q1 E
1
8
C3
7
9
R25
R20
R21
R22
CR6
R23
R9
B
DS1
1
R10
CR2
CR4
CR3
RPI (PART NO. 023-9800-000) BOARD LAYOUT
10-4
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
SCHEMATIC DIAGRAMS AND COMPONENT LAYOUTS
RF AND PA BOARD COMPONENT LOCATOR GUIDE
The following guide can be used to locate components on the RF and PA boards. Refer to the grid around the
board to determine the approximate location of a component.
Com
A 902
C 100
C 101
C 102
C 103
C 104
C 105
C 106
C 107
C 108
C 109
C 110
C 111
C 112
C 113
C 114
C 115
C 116
C 117
C 118
C 119
C 120
C 121
C 200
C 201
C 202
C 204
C 205
C 206
C 207
C 208
C 210
C 212
C 213
C 215
C 217
C 220
C 221
C 222
C 223
Loc
A2
C1
C3
B1
C1
C2
B1
C1
B1
B5
C3
A5
C3
C3
C3
C2
C2
C2
C2
C2
C2
C3
C3
B6
C6
C6
C6
B6
B5
C6
C6
B6
B6
C5
C6
B6
B6
C6
C6
C5
Board
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
Com
C 225
C 229
C 230
C 231
C 232
C 233
C 237
C 239
C 240
C 241
C 242
C 243
C 244
C 246
C 247
C 248
C 249
C 251
C 253
C 254
C 255
C 256
C 257
C 258
C 259
C 260
C 291
C 292
C 293
C 294
C 296
C 297
C 298
C 500
C 501
C 502
C 504
C 505
C 506
C 507
Loc
C6
B6
B6
A6
A6
A6
B6
A6
A5
A5
A5
A5
A5
A5
A6
A5
A5
A5
B5
B5
A5
B6
B6
B6
B6
A5
B4
B4
B5
B5
A4
A5
B5
D6
C6
D6
B6
D2
D4
C4
Board
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
Com
C 508
C 509
C 510
C 511
C 512
C 513
C 514
C 515
C 516
C 517
C 518
C 519
C 520
C 521
C 522
C 523
C 524
C 525
C 526
C 527
C 528
C 529
C 530
C 531
C 532
C 533
C 534
C 535
C 536
C 537
C 538
C 539
C 540
C 541
C 542
C 543
C 544
C 545
C 546
C 547
10-5
Loc
D4
C4
B6
C5
C7
A5
A1
C2
C2
C4
C4
D3
C7
D5
D5
C2
B2
B4
C5
C7
C6
B6
C4
B7
A6
B6
C5
B6
C6
B3
B2
C4
C5
C2
C6
B6
C6
B6
C4
C5
Board
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
Com
C 548
C 549
C 550
C 551
C 552
C 553
C 554
C 555
C 556
C 558
C 559
C 560
C 561
C 562
C 563
C 564
C 565
C 567
C 568
C 569
C 570
C 571
C 579
C 584
C 586
C 590
C 800
C 801
C 802
C 803
C 805
C 806
C 807
C 808
C 809
C 810
C 811
C 812
C 813
C 814
Loc
D1
D7
C6
B1
C6
C3
D5
C3
C4
D3
C3
B3
C7
C3
D3
C5
B3
D5
D7
D7
C6
C6
B3
B4
B6
D3
B1
A1
B1
A4
C2
C2
B2
B3
B3
B3
B3
B3
C3
C3
Board
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
SCHEMATIC DIAGRAMS AND COMPONENT LAYOUTS
RF and PA Board Component Locator Guide (Cont’d)
Com
Loc
C 815
C 818
C 819
C 820
C 821
C 822
C 823
C 824
C 826
C 827
C 828
C 829
C 831
C 832
C 834
C 836
C 837
C 838
C 839
C 840
C 841
C 842
C 843
C 844
C 846
C 850
C 852
C 853
CR 100
CR 101
CR 102
CR 103
CR 290
CR 500
CR 502
CR 503
CR 504
CR 505
CR 506
CR 507
CR 508
CR 509
CR 802
CR 803
CR 804
C5
A4
B4
B4
A4
A4
A4
A4
B3
B4
B4
B4
C4
B4
B3
B1
A3
A3
A3
A3
C4
B3
B4
B4
B2
B2
B2
B2
C2
C1
B1
C1
B5
B5
B6
B1
C6
C6
D7
B7
C6
B6
C3
C5
A4
Board
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
RF
RF
RF
Com
Loc
Board
Com
CR 805
EP 205
EP 500
F 500
J 002
J 003
J 200
J 201
J 501
L 200
L 201
L 202
L 203
L 204
L 205
L 206
L 207
L 208
L 209
L 500
L 501
L 503
L 504
L 506
L 507
L 508
L 510
L 520
L 800
L 801
L 803
MP502
MP503
MP504
MP505
MP506
P 100
P 101
Q 100
Q 101
Q 102
Q 103
Q 104
Q 106
Q 107
A4
A6\C6
D1
A2
C3/A3
B5
B5
C3
A3
A5
A6
C6
C6
C6
B6
A6
B6
A5
B6
D3
C4
D4
D5
C7
B6
B7
C7
C1
C5
B3
C3
B2
D2
D3
C3
C4
B3
C3
C1
C1
B1
C1
C1
C1
C1
RF
RF
PA
PA
RF/PA
RF
RF
RF
PA
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
RF
RF
RF
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
Q 108
Q 200
Q 202
Q 203
Q 205
Q 290
Q 291
Q 500
Q 501
Q 502
Q 503
Q 504
Q 506
Q 507
Q 510
Q 511
Q 514
Q 800
Q 801
Q 802
Q 804
Q 805
Q 806
Q 807
Q 808
Q 809
R 001
R 002
R 100
R 101
R 102
R 103
R 104
R 105
R 106
R 107
R 108
R 109
R 110
R 111
R 113
R 114
R 115
R 116
R 117
10-6
Loc
C1
B6
B6
B6
C6
A5
B5
D3
C4
B5
B3
B5
B5
B5
B6
B4
B5
B1
B3
B3
B3
B4
B3
B3
C4
C4
D1
D1
C1
C1
C1
C1
B1
C1
B1
C2
C2
C2
C2
C2
C1
C1
C1
C2
C2
Board
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
PA
PA
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
Com
R 118
R 120
R 200
R 201
R 202
R 203
R 204
R 205
R 206
R 207
R 208
R 209
R 210
R 211
R 212
R 213
R 214
R 215
R 216
R 217
R 218
R 220
R 221
R 222
R 223
R 224
R 225
R 226
R 232
R 234
R 235
R 236
R 237
R 290
R 291
R 294
R 295
R 297
R 500
R 501
R 503
R 506
R 507
R 508
R 510
Loc
C2
C3
B6
B5
C6
C6
C6
B6
B6
B6
C6
B6
C6
C6
C6
B5
B5
C6
C6
C6
C6
B6
B6
B6
B6
B6
B6
B6
A5
B5
B5
A6
A6
B5
B5
B5
B5
B5
C5
B5
B5
B3
B3
B3
C3
Board
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
SCHEMATIC DIAGRAMS AND COMPONENT LAYOUTS
RF and PA Board Component Locator Guide (Cont’d)
Com
R 511
R 512
R 513
R 514
R 515
R 516
R 517
R 519
R 521
R 522
R 525
R 526
R 527
R 528
R 531
R 534
R 536
R 537
R 538
R 539
R 540
R 541
R 543
R 544
R 545
R 546
R 547
R 548
R 550
R 551
R 552
Loc
C5
C6
C6
B6
C6
C5
B5
C5
C6
B3
B3
B4
D7
B6
B5
B4
C6
C5
C6
C6
C6
C6
B4
B4
B4
B4
B3
B4
B4
B4
B4
Board
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
Com
R 553
R 554
R 555
R 558
R 559
R 560
R 561
R 563
R 564
R 565
R 566
R 568
R 571
R 575
R 576
R 577
R 580
R 585
R 586
R 587
R 589
R 590
R 591
R 800
R 801
R 802
R 803
R 805
R 806
R 807
R 808
Loc
B4
B4
B3
B3
A3
B3
B6
B5
B5
B5
C6
C6
B5
B5
B5
B5
B5
B6
B6
C3
B5
C5
B6
B1
B1
B2
B2
B2
B1
A3
B3
Board
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
PA
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
Com
R 809
R 810
R 811
R 812
R 813
R 814
R 815
R 819
R 820
R 821
R 822
R 823
R 824
R 826
R 827
R 828
R 829
R 830
R 831
R 832
R 833
R 834
R 835
R 836
R 837
R 838
R 840
R 842
R 843
R 844
R 845
10-7
Loc
B3
B3
C3
C3
C4
A4
B3
B3
B3
B4
B4
B4
B3
B3
B3
B3
C3
C4
C4
C4
C4
B4
B3
B4
B4
B4
A3
A3
A3
A3
B2
Board
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
Com
Loc
R 846
R 847
R 848
R 849
R 851
RT 500
RT 501
RT 502
U 100
U 101
U 102
U 200
U 201
U 500
U 503
U 504
U 800
U 801
U 802
W 501
W 502
Y 800
Z 200
Z 201
Z 202
Z 204
Z 205
Z 206
Z 290
A3
A3
A3
A3
B4
C4
B5
B5
C2
C4
C2
A5
B5
C2
B4
C6
B4
A4
A3
D1
D5
A4
B5
C5
C5
B5
C6
A6
A5
Board
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
PA
PA
PA
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
PA
PA
PA
RF
RF
RF
PA
PA
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
RF
PA
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
SCHEMATIC DIAGRAMS AND COMPONENT LAYOUTS
AUDIO/LOGIC BOARD COMPONENT LOCATOR GUIDE
The following guide can be used to locate components on the audio/logic board. Refer to the grid around the
board to determine the approximate location of a component.
Comp
C 300
C 302
C 303
C 304
C 305
C 306
C 400
C 401
C 402
C 403
C 404
C 405
C 406
C 407
C 408
C 409
C 410
C 411
C 412
C 413
C 415
C 416
C 417
C 418
C 600
C 601
C 602
C 603
C 604
C 605
C 606
C 607
C 608
C 609
C 610
C 611
C 612
C 613
C 614
C 615
C 616
C 617
Loc Top/Bot
B4
D4
D4
D4
D5
D4
D3
D3
E2
B4
B3
B3
D1
B1
D1
C2
B3
B2
B2
B2
E5
A1
A1
D2
D8
C8
D7
D7
E6
D6
A4
A4
A4
A4
A6
A7
B8
D7
D8
D6
E5
B4
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
TOP
BOT
TOP
BOT
TOP
BOT
TOP
BOT
BOT
TOP
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
BOT
TOP
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
Comp
C 618
C 619
C 620
C 621
C 622
C 624
C 625
C 626
C 627
C 628
C 629
C 630
C 631
C 632
C 633
C 634
C 635
C 636
C 638
C 639
C 640
C 641
C 642
C 643
C 644
C 645
C 646
C 647
C 648
C 650
C 651
C 652
C 653
C 660
C 661
C 662
C 663
C 664
C 665
C 666
C 667
C 668
Loc Top/Bot
B4
D8
D1
E2
B3
C7
C7
B7
D7
C7
B7
B7
B7
B8
B8
B7
D6
B7
B7
D4
C7
D7
C7
B7
B8
C7
D7
D7
D7
B7
D7
E6
C8
B4
A4
B4
B4
A4
A6
B6
B5
A5
TOP
TOP
BOT
TOP
BOT
TOP
TOP
BOT
TOP
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
BOT
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
Comp
C 669
C 670
C 671
C 672
C 673
C 674
C 675
C 676
C 677
C 678
C 679
C 680
C 681
C 682
C 683
C 684
C 685
C 686
C 687
C 688
C 689
C 690
C 691
C 692
C 693
C 694
C 695
C 696
C 697
C 698
C 705
C 706
C 707
C 708
C 709
C 710
C 711
C 712
C 713
C 714
C 715
C 716
10-8
Loc Top/Bot
B5
A5
A5
A5
A5
A5
A5
A5
A5
A6
B6
B6
A6
B5
A6
A4
A7
A6
A7
A7
A7
A7
B7
C6
B6
C6
C7
B7
A7
A7
D7
D7
C7
C7
C7
D7
B6
B5
A6
A5
B6
B6
BOT
TOP
BOT
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
BOT
TOP
TOP
BOT
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
BOT
BOT
TOP
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
Comp
C 717
C 719
C 720
C 721
C 722
C 723
C 730
C 731
C 732
C 733
C 734
C 735
C 736
C 783
C 786
C 788
CR 400
CR 401
CR 500
CR 501
CR 502
CR 503
CR 504
CR 505
CR 506
CR 507
CR 508
CR 509
CR 510
CR 511
CR 5 12
CR 513
CR 514
CR 515
CR 516
CR 600
CR 601
CR 610
CR 620
J 001
J 002
J 300
Loc Top/Bot
A7
B5
B6
B6
B5
B5
A6
A6
A6
A6
A7
A7
D4
A4
E3
D7
E5
E2
A1
A2
A3
C5
A3
D1
A2
A2
D5
D3
A3
E4
E4
D5
D5
D5
A1
B8
B6
D6
B5
A4
A2
C5
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
TOP
BOT
TOP
TOP
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
BOT
BOT
TOP
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
SCHEMATIC DIAGRAMS AND COMPONENT LAYOUTS
Audio/Logic Board Component Locator Guide (Cont’d)
Comp
J 400
J 401
J 402
J 403
J 404
J 405
Q 300
Q 400
Q 401
Q 402
Q 403
Q 404
Q 450
Q 451
Q 452
Q 600
Q 601
Q 602
Q 610
Q 612
R 300
R 301
R 302
R 303
R 304
R 305
R 306
R 307
R 308
R 309
R 310
R 311
R 312
R 313
R 314
R 315
R 316
R 317
R 318
R 319
R 320
R 321
R 322
R 323
R 324
R 325
Loc Top/Bot
E4
A3
D5
C8
D6
A1
C3
D3
D3
E5
E5
E5
B4
B3
B3
B6
A6
B7
C7
C7
B4
B3
B3
B3
B3
C3
C3
C3
C3
C3
C3
C3
C3
C3
C3
C3
C3
C4
D4
C4
D4
D4
D5
D3
B3
D3
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
BOT
BOT
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
BOT
Comp
R 326
R 400
R 401
R 402
R 403
R 404
R 405
R 406
R 407
R 408
R 409
R 410
R 411
R 412
R 413
R 414
R 415
R 416
R 417
R 418
R 419
R 420
R 422
R 423
R 424
R 425
R 426
R 427
R 428
R 429
R 430
R 431
R 432
R 433
R 434
R 435
R 436
R 437
R 438
R 439
R 440
R 441
R 442
R 44=i
R 4:15
R 446
Loc Top/Bot
B3
D1
D3
D1
E3
B2
C1
C1
C1
C2
A2
A2
A3
A3
A3
A3
A2
A2
A3
A2
A3
B3
B1
B1
B1
E4
E4
E4
E4
B1
B1
B1
A1
A1
A1
A1
A1
E4
E3
E4
E4
E4
E3
D7
E2
E5
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
TOP
TOP
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
Comp
R 447
R 448
R 449
R 450
R 451
R 452
R 453
R 454
R 455
R 456
R 457
R 458
R 459
R 460
R 461
R 462
R 463
R 464
R 465
R 466
R 467
R 468
R 469
R 470
R 471
R 472
R 473
R 474
R 475
R 480
R 481
R 482
R 483
R 484
R 485
R 486
R 487
R 488
R 489
R 490
R 492
R 493
R 494
R 500
R 501
R 502
10-9
Loc Top/Bot
B2
B3
E5
D6
D6
D6
D6
D6
D6
D6
D6
D6
D6
E6
D5
E6
E4
E4
E4
E4
E4
E4
E4
E4
E4
E4
B4
B3
B3
B3
A3
E3
D6
D5
E3
D5
D5
C5
C5
A2
A3
B3
B3
E4
A2
B1
BOT
BOT
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
Comp
R 503
R 601
R 602
R 606
R 607
R 608
R 609
R 610
R 612
R 613
R 614
R 615
R 616
R 617
R 618
R 619
R 620
R 621
R 622
R 623
R 624
R 625
R 627
R 628
R 630
R 631
R 632
R 633
R 634
R 635
R 636
R 637
R 639
R 640
R 641
R 642
R 643
R 644
R 645
R 646
R 647
R 648
R 650
R 655
R 656
R 657
Loc Top/Bot
A1
A4
A4
C7
C7
C7
C7
C6
B7
B8
D6
D4
C6
C7
C7
B8
B7
B7
B7
D6
D6
B6
D7
D7
C7
C7
B7
E7
C7
C8
B7
B7
C7
D7
E7
B6
E7
D4
D4
C8
B6
D7
C6
A4
A4
A4
TOP
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
TOP
TOP
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
TOP
TOP
BOT
TOP
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
TOP
BOT
BOT
TOP
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
SCHEMATIC DIAGRAMS AND COMPONENT LAYOUTS
Audio/Logic Board Component Locator Guide (Cont’d)
Comp
R 658
R 659
R 660
R 661
R 662
R 663
R 664
R 665
R 666
R 667
R 668
R 669
R 670
R 671
R 672
R 673
R 674
R 675
R 676
R 677
R 678
R 679
R 680
R 681
R 682
R 683
R 684
R 685
R 686
R 687
R 688
R 689
R 690
R 691
R 692
R 693
R 694
R 695
R 696
R 697
R 698
R 699
R 700
R 701
R 702
R 703
R 704
Loc Top/Bot
A4
A4
D6
D6
A4
A5
A4
A5
A4
A5
B5
B5
B6
B5
A5
A5
A5
A7
A4
A5
A5
A5
A5
A6
A6
B6
A6
A6
A6
B5
A6
A6
B6
A6
B6
A7
B6
A7
A6
A6
A7
A7
A8
B8
A7
B7
A7
BOT
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
BOT
TOP
BOT
Comp
R 705
R 706
R 707
R 708
R 709
R 710
R 711
R 712
R 713
R 714
R 715
R 716
R 717
R 718
R 719
R 720
R 721
R 722
R 723
R 724
R 726
R 727
R 728
R 729
R 730
R 731
R 732
R 733
R 734
R 735
R 736
R 737
R 738
R 739
R 740
R 745
R 746
R 747
R 748
R 749
R 751
R 752
R 753
R 754
R 755
R 756
R 757
Loc Top/Bot
B7
B7
B7
B6
B8
A7
C6
B8
B8
A5
A5
A5
A6
C4
A6
D7
B7
C7
C7
C7
D6
D7
D6
D6
B6
A6
B5
B5
B5
B5
B5
B5
A5
A5
B6
B6
B6
A6
B5
B5
B5
B5
B6
B5
B5
B5
C7
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
TOP
TOP
BOT
TOP
BOT
TOP
BOT
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
TOP
Comp
R 758
R 759
R 760
R 761
R 762
R 763
R 764
R 765
R 766
R 767
R 768
R 770
R 771
R 772
R 773
R 774
R 775
R 776
R 777
R 778
R 779
R 780
R 781
R 782
R 785
R 786
R 789
R 790
R 791
R 792
R 793
R 795
RT 600
U 300
U 302
U 304
U 305
U 400
U 401
U 402
U 403
U 404
U 405
U 406
U 407
U 408
U 409
10-10
Loc Top/Bot
C7
C7
C7
C8
C8
C7
C8
B5
C6
B7
B7
A6
A6
A7
A7
A6
A7
A6
A6
A7
A7
B7
B3
E4
E2
D6
E2
E2
E2
E2
B3
E2
B5
C4
D4
D3
D4
D1
D2
D2
B1
C2
C1
C3
E3
D3
C2
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
B07
BOT
BOT
B07
TOP
TOP
BOT
BO7
TOP
BOT
BOT
TOP
B0T
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
BOT
Comp
U 410
U 411
U 412
U 413
U 414
U 415
U 450
U 451
U 452
U 600
U 601
U 602
U 603
U 604
U 605
U 606
U 607
U 608
U 609
U 610
Y 300
WO 001
WO 002
WO 003
WO 004
WO 005
WO 006
WO 007
WO 008
WO 009
WO 010
WO 011
WO 012
WO 013
WO 014
WO 015
WO 016
WO 017
WO 018
WO 019
WO 020
WO 021
WO 022
WO 023
Loc Top/Bot
B2
B2
E3
B2
E3
A1
E5
E5
B4
D8
C7
D7
A4
A6
B7
D7
B6
B7
A5
A6
D2
B8
B8
B8
B8
B6
B6
B6
B6
A8
C8
B8
B8
B8
B8
B8
B5
B8
A8
C8
E7
E7
E7
A7
BOT
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
BOT
TOP
BOT
BOT
BOT
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
TOP
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
10-11
INTERCONNECT SCHEMATIC
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
DISPLAY BOARD SCHEMATIC
10-12
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
DISPLAY BOARD TOP VIEW
DISPLAY BOARD BOTTOM VIEW
10-13
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
RF BOARD SCHEMATIC (REVISED 800 MHZ)
10-14
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
RF BOARD BOARD LAYOUT (ALL 800/900 MHZ)
10-15
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
RF BOARD BOARD SCHEMATIC (900 MHZ)
10-16
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
RF BOARD BOARD SCHEMATIC (UNREVISED 800 MHZ)
10-17
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
8V
SHIFT REGISTER
(D/A CONVERTER)
R522
1k RT500
10k
Part of
J501
Not Used
14
U503
4094
8V
R525
1k
C525
39pF
Q503
1300
R559
100k
16 VDD
R558
1M
R560
10k
O6 12
15 OE
PA Enable
1 Strobe
6
Data
2 Data
15
Clock
3 Clock
11
Reverse Pwr
8
Forward Pwr
O7
Gnd
R552
10k
2
+ 3
C596
0.1 CURRENT
SENSE
C543
R568
39pF
1k
C504
0.1
AMPLIFIER
Q506
1300
8V
U504B
224
R586
10k
CR509
BATT
19
C516
39pF
16
8V In
18
Tx RF In
R507
82
R506
91
1
POWER AMP
MODULE
SOURCE
8V
1 In
2
Vctrl
U500
C519
4.3
L500
C518
0.01
R510
330
1W
L501
C517 +
39pF
C555
4.7
C590
39pF
C521
0.01
C554
4.7 +
C558
12pF
C539
6.8pF
Q500
4805
C559
12pF
C562
15pF
C563
15pF
FINAL AMP
C530
4.3pF
L503
C290
39pF
C514
470
C292
0.01
R297
100
BIASING
Q291
3650
SOURCE
BATT
EP500
+
C551 +
2200
C548
39pF
C593
820pF
C505
39pF
C294
0.01
R295
220
C296
2.7pF
Rx RF Out
Power
Connector
C536
39pF
+ 12
U504C
224
0.01
uH
C522
39pF
R565
1k
R294
4.7k
CR503
24V
RF R290
AMP 4.7k
Q290
3649
Q507
1300
R517
10k
C550
0.01
R521
10k
C570
39pF
L504
Q501
4818
R540
1k
R541
1k
CR504
CR505
C507
12pF
C509
18pF
REVERSE
C511
1-4.5 pF
C526
2.7pF
8V
R575
1k
R564
10k
R539
330
FORWARD
A500
L510
C544
1.2pF
A502
CR506
C561
39pF
C568
56pF
C549
3.9pF
C569
56pF
C502
2.7pF
C500
2.7pF
HARMONIC
FILTER
C567
3.9pF
ANTENNA JACK
W502
R527
100k
ANTENNA SWITCH
C520
39pF
R514
100
R531
10k
R291
10k
R538
100
R536
330
L506
C512
0.01
C571
39pF
R537
100
C534
1.2pF
0.01 uF
TRANSMIT
SWITCH
C297
8.2pF
CR290
A001
Stabilization Bd
C508
20pF
8V
C298
39pF
C506
12pF
Filter Cap
+
12
BATT
C515
0.01
F500
4A
C293
0.01
8V
CR508
DRIVER
2
20
11
R589
10k
C552
0.01
10
3
Vss
Out 4
R508
91
Fused Batt Out
13
14
R590
1k
C545
0.01
R577
1.5k
R576
100
R587
0.03
17
Q510
3612
8V
R519
100k
R511
100k
R516
10k
R591
10k
R503
10k
Q504
1300
R566
10k
C579
47
+
13
TO
RF BOARD
U504A
224
CR500
9
C538
39pF
REVERSE
POWER
AMP
7
4
C524
0.01
R512
1k
C501
0.1
R561
100k
5 +
R585
1k
C537
39pF
9
8
C535
39pF
6
3
11
4
C542
39pF
+ 10
R580
220
C572
1
10
R515
10k
PA B+ SWITCH
BATT
C564
0.01
C584
0.047
R554
20k
8
R500
10k
R592
0
R553
10k
R543
20k
O0 4
C557
39pF
FORWARD
POWER AMP
POWER CONTROL
U504D
224
1
Q502
1300
R551
10k
R544
20k
O1 5
Q511
2603
R555
10k
R545
20k
O2 6
SUMMING
AMPLIFIER
R563
10k
C595
47
R550
10k
R546
20k
O3 7
C594
820pF +
R571
10k
R547
20k
O4 14
C565
0.01
AMPLIFIER
8V
R534
10k
R548
20k
O5 13
5
7
R526
20k
Q514
3612
C529
39pF
TX 8V
SWITCH
R528
470
R501
10k
C533
0.01
L508
C527
0.01
C528
39pF
C531
5.6pF
C532
4.7pF
L507
C586
39pF
CR507
CR502
C510
2.7pF
Z290
PA BOARD BOARD SCHEMATIC (REVISED 800 MHZ, 35W)
10-18
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
8V
SHIFT REGISTER
(D/A CONVERTER)
R522
1k
Part of
J501
Not Used
14
U503
4094
8V
R525
1k
C525
39pF
Q503
1300
R559
100k
16 VDD
R558
1M
R560
10k
O6 12
15 OE
5
6
Data
2 Data
15
Clock
3 Clock
11
Reverse Pwr
8
Forward Pwr
O0 4
O7
Gnd
2
+ 3
C584
0.047
R554
20k
C596
0.1 CURRENT
SENSE
C543
R568
39pF
10k
C501
0.1
R561
100k
4
C504
0.1
R586
10k
CR509
BATT
19
C516
39pF
16
8V In
U504B
224
18
Tx RF In
R506
91
1
2
Vctrl
1 In
C517
39pF
+
C555
4.7
C519
4.3
L500
C558
12pF
R510
330
1W
L501
Q500
FINAL AMP 4805
0.01 uF
C562
9.1pF
C559
12pF
8V
C590
39pF
C521
0.01
C522
C554
39pF + 4.7
C293
0.01
C514
470
C292
0.01
C298
39pF
R297
100
BIASING
Q291
3650
SOURCE
BATT
EP500
+
Power
Connector
C551 +
2200
C548
39pF
C593
820pF
C505
39pF
C294
0.01
R295
220
C296
2.7pF
Rx RF Out
CR503
24V
R517
10k
C550
0.01
R577
1k
R576
100
C552
0.01
C570
39pF
R540
1k
R541
1k
CR504
CR505
C539
15pF
10
R538
100
R536
330
REVERSE
MP506
R565
1k
R294
4.7k
Q507
1300
RF R290
AMP 4.7k
Q290
3618
C530
2.7pF
L506
C512
0.01
8V
R575
1k
R564
10k
L510
C561
39pF
C568
39pF
C549
3.9pF
C569
39pF
C502
2.7pF
C500
2.7pF
HARMONIC
FILTER
C567
3.9pF
W502
R527
100k
ANTENNA SWITCH
C520
39pF
R514
100
R531
10k
R291
10k
C544
1.2pF
A502
C546
2.7pF
TRANSMIT
SWITCH
C297
8.2pF
CR290
R539
330
FORWARD
A500
C563
15pF
C571
39pF
R537
100
C534
1.2pF
0.01
uH
Filter Cap
C291
39pF
8V
R521
10k
CR506
F500
4A
Fused Batt Out
+
12
C518
0.01
Out 4
R508
91
2
20
C515
0.01
3
Vss
U500
C545
0.01
C536
39pF
+ 12
U504C
224
A001
Stabilization Board
POWER AMP
MODULE
R507
82
13
14
R590
1k
R589
10k
CR508
R587
0.03
17
Q510
3612
8V
R519
100k
R511
100k
11
R591
10k
R503
10k
Q504
1300
R566
10k
C579
47
+
13
SOURCE
8V
R516
10k
AMPLIFIER
Q506
1300
8V
9
TO
RF BOARD
U504A
224
CR500
5 +
C538
39pF
R512
1k
REVERSE
POWER
AMP
7
R585
10k
C524
0.01
9
C564
0.01
3
C537
39pF
4
C542
39pF
8
C535
39pF
6
10
R515
10k
PA B+ SWITCH
BATT
+ 10
R580
220
C572
1
11
R500
10k
R592
0
R553
10k
8
FORWARD
POWER AMP
POWER CONTROL
1
C557
39pF
R552
10k
R543
20k
U504D
224
Q502
1300
R551
10k
R544
20k
O1 5
Q511
2603
R555
10k
R545
20k
O2 6
1 Strobe
SUMMING
AMPLIFIER
R563
10k
C595
47
R550
10k
R546
20k
O3 7
C594
820pF +
R571
10k
R547
20k
O4 14
C565
0.01
AMPLIFIER
8V
R534
10k
R548
20k
O5 13
PA Enable
7
R526
20k
Q514
3612
C529
39pF
TX 8V
SWITCH
R528
470
R501
10k
L508
C527
0.01
C533
0.01
C528
39pF
C531
5.6pF
C532
4.7pF
L507
C586
39pF
CR507
CR502
C510
2.7pF
Z290
PA BOARD BOARD SCHEMATIC (REVISED 800 MHZ, 15W)
10-19
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
2
3
A001 Stabilization
Board (15W Versions)
DC Power Cable
Blue
4
5
6
A001 Stabilization
Board (30W Versions)
With 15W Version, These Components Deleted and Q501 Replaced by Jumper MP506
7
Coax To Antenna Jack
C549
D
C534
C521
R1
R2
C502
C567
C590
C505
D
C500
Red
L500
C522
1
R527
EP500
C1
L503
20
+
11
R503
R591
R586
E
Z290
L510
C520
C512
C150
CR502
C297
R541
Q514
B
R564
C532
C293
R291
C298
B
L507
R528
C
C586
R575
R501
R294
C294
R290
C
CR509
C
C571
R539
C504
C531
C543
C545
E
R585
R563
C503
Q504
R517
R580
R576
R577
Q507
Q502
R297
Q290
RT502
E
B
Q510
B
B
E
Q291
CR290
R295
E
B
E
R565
R531
C594
C584
R554
R552
C596
R548
R547
C
C296
C514
C
E
RT501
C292
C291
R551
R546
8
1
C290
R545
E
B
R553
R544
U503
R559
C
Q503
R506
R508
R560
B
R543
C535
C
B
CR500
B
C
Q506
B
9
16
C565
R507
R558
1
R526
E
Q511
R589
E
C
R571
R534 C
C572
R592
R525
R555
R522
C551
C557
C537
R550
C579
+
B
C524
C538
CR503
C525
R536
R568
7
C595
2
CR508
U504
CR507
1
8
C
C527
R500
R512
C528
14
C540
C542
L508
R511
R590
C518
C533
C517
R587
L506
C544
R566
R514
C564
R519
C555
R538
R521
R561
U500
C534
C552
C550
C529
R537
RT500
R505
C
R540
L501
R510
C515
C501
C516
C509
CR505
C570
B
C530
C561
CR504
C507
3
R515
C562
C
Q501
CR506
C569
C511
E
R513
C559
C593
C506
C536
C539
L504
R516
Q500
L520
C591 C592
C563
C558
C568
C508
B
C519
4
C526
C548
A
F500
A
J501
10
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
PA BOARD BOARD LAYOUT (REVISED 800 MHZ, 15W/35W)
15W MODELS
10-20
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
PA BOARD SCHEMATIC (900 MHZ, 30W)
10-21
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
PA BOARD SCHEMATIC (900 MHZ, 15W)
10-22
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
15W MODELS
PA BOARD BOARD LAYOUT (900 MHZ/UNREVISED 800 MHZ, 15W/30W/35W)
10-23
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
PA BOARD SCHEMATIC (UNREVISED 800 MHZ, 35W)
10-24
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
PA BOARD SCHEMATIC (UNREVISED 800 MHZ, 15W)
10-25
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
AUDIO/LOGIC BOARD SCHEMATIC (PART 1 OF 2)
10-26
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
AUDIO/LOGIC BOARD SCHEMATIC (PART 2 OF 2)
10-27
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
AUDIO/LOGIC BOARD LAYOUT (TOP VIEW)
10-28
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
AUDIO/LOGIC BOARD LAYOUT (BOTTOM VIEW)
10-29
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
Part of
J100
6
BYPASS GATE
Rx Audio In
U102D
MC14066
11
10
12
EXPANDER
7
C102
.015
6
SOURCE
8V
5
2
U101B
2904
Rx Audio Out
R107
2.2k
VREF
C109
1
+
SOURCE
VREF
R112
6.8k
+
C114
1
6
8V
Thd Trim
1 Rect Cap
R111
390
8
C113
0.015
Rx Audio Out
5
3
2
U102A
14066
4
R109
68k
R117
1.3k
U102B
14066
2
Compandor Enable
C112
0.015
COMPRESSOR
Audio Out
R101
220k
C101
4.7
+
R100
100k
+
3 +
R102
2.2k
11
Res R1
R116
1.5k
Output
10
Rect In 15
16 Rect Cap
AG In 14
C107
220pF
9
Thd Trm
Inv In
12
C103
10
C104
10
+
VREF
C105
1
U100B
SA5710
+
2
U101A
2904
1
DS100
Q100
3616
1
C100
0.22
R104
15k
R103
15k
+
1
R115
1.5k
9
C108
22pF
13
3
R108
33k
Inv In 5
8
R110
68k
R113
5.1k
4
7
Output
3 AG In
5 +
U102C
14066
R114
1.5k
Res R1 6
Rect In
C111
0.1
7
R105
270k
U100A
SA5710
C110
0.1
R106
560k
Rx Audio Out
Ground
C106
10
REVISED COMPANDOR BOARD SCHEMATIC
REVISED COMPANDOR BOARD LAYOUT
10-30
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
REMOTE TRANSCEIVER INTERCONNECT SCHEMATIC
10-31
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
REMOTE CONTROL UNIT INTERFACE BOARD SCHEMATIC
10-32
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
REMOTE CONTROL UNIT INTERFACE BOARD TOP VIEW
REMOTE CONTROL UNIT INTERFACE BOARD BOTTOM VIEW
10-33
Revised January 1995
Part No. 001-9750-003
REVISION SUMMARY
APPENDIX A REVISION SUMMARY
A.1 INTRODUCTION
“C” (all except 9755), “D” (9755) - These models have
Version 204 software that supports the horn alert feature for interconnect and Multi-Net unique ID calls (see
Table A-1).
This appendix describes the changes that have
been made to the Summit DM transceivers and
programming software through May 1998. The
component changes that have been made through
January 1995 are listed in Table A-2, and additional
component changes made through May 1998 are listed
in Table A-3.
“E” (all models) - These models have the Version 206
software described in Table A-1. In addition, they have
a small add-on board which provides static protection
diodes on certain accessory cable lines. (Revision letter
“D” was skipped on all but 9755 so that all models
would have the same revision letter.)
A.2 TRANSCEIVER OPERATING SOFTWARE
UPDATES
“F” (all models) - These models have an audio/logic
board that is upgraded with static protection diodes
CR500-CR515 to eliminate the need for the add-on
board implemented with “E” models.
There have been several updates to the transceiver operating software since the Summit DM transceivers began shipping. The version number of the
software is briefly displayed when power is turned on
(see Section 3.6.14).
“G” (all models) - These models have the Version 214
software described in Table A-1. In addition, diode
CR601 on the audio/logic board has been deleted.
The operating software can be updated in the
field by Write-On™ Flash Programming as described
in Section 4.7. The transceiver operating software
should not be confused with the programming software described in the rest of Section 4. Table A-1 lists
the versions of transceiver operating software that
have been released and describes the main changes
that occurred with each.
“H” (all models) - These models have the Version 215
software described in Table A-1. No hardware changes
occurred.
A.3.2 CONTROL UNIT REVISION LETTER
The changes that occurred with each control unit
revision letter change are as follows:
A.3 REVISION LETTER CHANGES
“B” - These models include U102 (IIC buffer). “A”
models do not include this part because it was not available. Currently, this device is not used.
A.3.1 TRANSCEIVER REVISION LETTER
The transceiver revision letter is part of the identification number described in Section 1.4. The
changes that occurred with each revision letter change
are as follows:
“C” - These models have upgraded software to make
them compatible with Summit transceivers which have
Version 206 or later operating software. Refer to Section A-5 for more information.
“B” (9755 only) - These models have an updated PA
board that eliminated the need to cut a pad to install the
optional DC line filter. This was never required on other models.
A.4 PROGRAMMING SOFTWARE CHANGES
Version 202 Software
“B” (all except 9755), “C” (9755) - These models have
an updated PA board that eliminated the need to lift the
lead of U500, pin 1 before flash programming (see Section 4.7).
Version 202 of the programming software was
released in November 1994. This or a later version is
required to program transceivers with Version 206 or
A-1
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
REVISION SUMMARY
Table A-1 Operating Software Version Numbers
Approx
Version
Release
Number
Date
Description
NOTES
201
9/93
Original release
202
11/93
Added automatic NPSPAC deviation adjust and fixed
various minor problems.
203
2/94
Added telephone mode and provided NPSPAC deviation in test mode. Also fixed various minor problems.
204
3/94
Added horn alert for interconnect and unique ID calls. Revision letter* changed to “C” except for 9755
Fixed minor problems.
which changed to “D”.
205
4/94
Fixed various minor problems.
206
11/94
Changed power turn-off delay times, added auto-reg- Version 202 or later programming software
istration wide area group tracking features, and fixed must be used. In addition, only Summit control
various minor problems.
units with a revision letter of “C” or later can be
used. Transceiver revision letter changed to “E”
(all models).
207
1/95
Added UD2I (universal interface) features and addi- Version 203 or later programming software
tional channels to test mode. Also added the ability to must be used to have the new encryption
feature.
decode encrypted calls even if encryption is not
enabled.
208
6/95
Fixed several minor problems.
209
7/95
Fixed several minor problems.
210
9/95
Added UD2I validation indication and fixed minor
problems.
211, 212
---
These revision numbers were skipped.
213
4/96
Added horn alert modes and fixed minor problems.
214
12/96
Added UD2I support for the Status Message Unit
(SMU), changed Mode A horn alert operation, and
fixed several minor problems.
Revision letter* to “G”. When transceivers with
revision letter “F” or earlier are upgraded with
this software and the UD2I feature is used,
diode CR601 must be removed for proper operation of that interface.
215
1/97
Fixed a minor problem.
Transceiver revision letter to “H”.
216
5/97
Added “Start At Home” bank feature (see Section 7) Programming software Version 205 or later is
and fixed minor problems.
required to program this feature.
217
7/97
Changed UD2I lockout commands to allow a system
number to be specified and fixed several minor
problems.
218
9/97
Fixed a minor ignition sense problem.
219
2/98
Fixed Data PTT/ARQ arbitration problem and several
minor UD2I and other problems.
220
5/98
Fixed a minor conventional scanning problem.
221
6/98
Fixed a minor problem with transmit keying during
time out period.
222
9/00
Added per group variable proceed tone delay and
fixed other minor problems.
Programming software Version 206 or later is
required to the program variable delay feature.
* Refer to Section 1.4 for revision letter information.
A-2
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
REVISION SUMMARY
to Section 3.6.4 for more information on horn alert
operation.
later operating software (see Section A.2). If the earlier
version (201) is used to program those transceivers, erratic operation will result.
Version 205 Software
The Version 202 software has added screens for
programming the UD2I universal interface features
that became available with these transceivers. Other
enhancements are a unique ID programming screen
and system key verification before Multi-Net system
data can be uploaded from a transceiver (see Section
4.1.5). It also has new times for the turn-off delay.
Version 205 of the programming software was
released mid 1997. The only change to this software is
an additional question on the Create/Edit Bank screen
to program the “Start At Home” feature added to the
transceiver. Refer to Section 7 for more
information.
This software is backward compatible which
means it can be used to program earlier model transceivers. The unique interface and wide area group
tracking programming are ignored by earlier transceivers. The new power turn-off delay times are determined by the transceiver software and not the
programming software (see following).
Version 206 Software
If the transceiver has Version 205 or earlier operating software, the programming software times of 10
or 30 minutes and 1, 8, 10, or 12 hours actually
program times of 10, 20, or 30 minutes and 1, 2, or 4
hours, respectively. (For example, 1 hour programs 30
minutes.)
A.5 REMOTE CONTROL UNIT COMPATIBILITY
Version 206 of the programming software was
released in October 2000. The only change was to add
the variable delay programming screen. This screen is
displayed by pressing the F6 key when a group
programming screen is displayed (see Section 4.3.5).
As indicated in Table A-1, if the transceiver has
Version 206 or later operating software, it will operate
only with Summit control units that have a revision
letter of “C” or later. If an earlier control unit is used,
it displays “RMT ERROR” on power up and is
nonfunctional. The new “C” or later Summit control
units will also work with earlier Summit transceivers.
Files generated by Version 201 programming
software are automatically converted to a new format
when they are loaded and then saved or downloaded
by the new software. Once a file is converted to the
new format, it cannot be used by the Version 201 software. Refer to Section 4.1.5 for more information.
To use earlier “A” or “B” control units with this
software, microcomputer U100 in the control unit
must be replaced with a new device containing the
upgraded software. The new part number of U100 is
023-9998-324.
Version 203 Software
NOTE: If a transceiver with Version 205 or earlier
software is flash programmed with newer software,
the remote control unit software must also be updated
(if applicable).
Version 203 of the programming software was
released in January 1995. The only change to this software is an additional question on the Main Radio
Parameters screen which asks if the encryption option
is installed. Refer to Section 3.6.12 for more information on encryption operation.
Version 204 Software
A.6 WIDE AREA GROUP TRACKING
PROGRAMMING
Version 204 of the programming software was
released in early 1996. The only change to this software is an additional question on the Main Radio
Parameters screen to select the horn alert mode. Refer
When Wide Area Group Tracking is enabled with
Multi-Net Auto-Registration (see Section 3.7.2), the
same group remains selected when auto-registration
on another system occurs. This allows a companion
A-3
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
REVISION SUMMARY
group to be automatically selected in the new system.
For example, the transceiver can be programmed so
that if a telephone group is selected and auto-registration occurs on a new system, a telephone group is also
selected on the new system. Without wide area group
tracking, the last selected group of the new system is
selected. With this type of operation, it is important
that the same groups in all systems be programmed.
Refer to Section 4.4.6 for more information.
displayed when the bank is selected or power is turned
on. Conversely, if it is programmed “NO”, the last
selected system/group is displayed.
A.7 NEW FEATURES
A.7.2 GROUP PROCEED TONE DELAY
A.7.1 BANK START AT HOME FEATURE
A proceed tone delay time programmable on each
system and selectable on a per group basis was added
with the release of Version 222 transceiver software in
September 2000. Programming software, Version 206
or later is required to program this feature. Refer to
Section 3.6.3 for more information.
Programming software Version 205 or later is
required to program this feature (see Section 4). If
earlier versions of the transceiver or programming software are used, the “NO” configuration is always
selected.
The bank “Start At Home” feature was added with
the release of Version 216 transceiver software in May
of 1997 (see Table A-1). When this feature is
programmed “Yes”, the bank home system/group is
Table A-2 Summit DM Part Changes Through January 1995
Component
No.
Old Description
(New Description of Added Parts)
Old Part No.
(Location)
New Part No.
Action
RF AND PA BOARDS, HARDWARE/MISCELLANEOUS
C 234
C 260
C 557
5.6 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
10 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz)
9.1 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(900 MHz)
9.1 pF ±5% NPO 50V smd
(900 MHz)
6.8 pF ±5% NPO smd
(800 MHz)
6.2 pF ±5% NPO smd
(900 MHz)
47 pF ±5% NPO 50V smd
(800 MHz)
15 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
(800 MHz)
1 µF 16V tantalum
10 pF ±5% NPO cer smd
39 pF ±5% NPO cer smd
HW 8
Rubber bumper
C 208
C 217
C 221
C 229
C 230
C 233
510-3601-569
510-3601-100
510-3601-689
510-3601-120
Changed
Changed
510-3601-919
510-3601-100
Changed
510-3601-919
510-3601-759
Changed
510-3601-689
510-3601-569
Changed
510-3601-629
510-3601-569
Changed
510-3601-470
510-3601-102
Changed
(Z206)
510-3601-150
Added
(U201A, pin 2)
510-3601-100
(Q511, C)
510-2625-109
510-3601-220
510-3601-390
Changed
Changed
Added
574-1008-002
Added
---
A-4
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
REVISION SUMMARY
Table A-2 Summit DM Part Changes Through January 1995 (Continued)
Component
No.
Old Description
(New Description of Added Parts)
Old Part No.
(Location)
New Part No.
Action
HW 8
HW 9
Ground clip (900 MHz only)
.167 x .277 steel flat washer
--(cover screws)
017-2226-040
596-9408-009
Added
Added
L 207
L 501
1.0 µH smd inductor (800 MHz)
8T 22 AWG smd inductor
(900 MHz, 15W only)
Shield, coax ground
P-channel JFET
542-9001-109
542-0015-008
542-9001-398
542-0016-004
Changed
Changed
--(U201A, pin 1)
017-2226-017
576-0006-020
Added
Added
33k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
430 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(900 MHz, 15W)
Thermistor, 10k ohm
(900 MHz only)
Thermistor, 1k ohm
(900 MHz only)
(Near U100, pin 3)
(U802, pin 6)
569-0105-431
569-0105-333
569-0105-103
569-0105-331
Added
Added
Changed
MP501
Q 201
R 112
R 230
R 577
RT501
RT502
569-3013-007
---
Deleted
569-3013-002
---
Deleted
AUDIO/LOGIC BOARD
C 630
CR500-CR516
R 500
R 501
R 502
R 503
R 602
R 606
R 643
R 694
R 701
R 703
R 748
R 758
R 767
R 768
R 796
U 300
U 403
U 407
.0068 µF X7R ±10% 50V cer smd
510-3605-682
--18V zener ±5% SOT
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(J400, pin 3)
1k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(J300, pin 8)
Zero ohm jumper smd
(U404, pin 24)
1k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
(J401, pin 9)
4.7k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
569-0105-472
569-0105-472
4.7k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
220k ohm smd trimmer
562-0138-224
390 ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
569-0105-391
470k ohm smd trimmer
562-0138-474
220k ohm smd trimmer
562-0138-224
10k ohm smd trimmer
562-0138-103
1k ohm smd trimmer
562-0138-102
1.5k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
569-0105-152
1.5k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
569-0105-152
(U603D, pin 13)
620k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd (900 MHz)
Microprocessor, DSP
544-5003-101
Prog array logic, address decoder
023-9998-271
Prog array logic, I/O decoder
023-9998-272
FRONT PANEL ASSEMBLY
510-3605-822
523-2016-180
569-0105-103
569-0105-102
569-0105-001
569-0105-102
576-0105-512
569-0105-103
562-0130-224
569-0105-681
562-0130-474
562-0130-224
562-0130-103
562-0138-102
569-0105-122
569-0102-102
569-0105-624
023-9998-309
544-9017-003
544-9017-004
Changed
Added
Added
Added
Added
Added
Changed
Changed
Changed
Changed
Changed
Changed
Changed
Changed
Changed
Changed
Added
Changed
Changed
Changed
MP108
R 101
R 102
Support, keypad
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
10k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
017-2226-090
569-0105-104
569-0105-104
Added
Changed
Changed
--569-0105-103
569-0105-103
A-5
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
REVISION SUMMARY
Table A-2 Summit DM Part Changes Through January 1995 (Continued)
Component
No.
Old Description
(New Description of Added Parts)
Old Part No.
(Location)
New Part No.
Action
TCXO CHANGE
In early 1995, a running change was made to the TCXO of all models. When the new TCXO is used (the part number is
printed on the case), the value of three resistors must also be changed. The parts that changed are as follows. The new (-521)
TCXO can also be used with early models because no PC board change was required.
R 802
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
569-0105-473
569-0105-104
Changed
(800 MHz)
39k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
569-0105-393
569-0105-104
Changed
(900 MHz)
R 803
470k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
569-0105-474
569-0105-224
Changed
(800 MHz)
820k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
569-0105-824
569-0105-564
Changed
(900 MHz)
R 704
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
569-0105-473
569-0105-183
Changed
(on audio/logic board)
Y 800
TCXO, 17.500 MHz, 1.5 PPM
518-7217-500
518-7009-521
Changed
Z206 FILTER CHANGE
Also in early 1995, a running change was made to 2-pole crystal filter Z206 in the receiver of 800 MHz models. This filter is
being deleted in all 800 MHz Summit DM transceivers (it continues to be used in all 900 MHz models). No degradation in
performance results at 800 MHz when this filter is deleted. The following parts are changed when this filter is not used:
C 229
5.6 pF ±5% 50V cer smd
510-3601-569
510-3601-102
Changed
C 230
.001 µF ±5% NPO 50V smd
510-3601-102
--Deleted
510-3601-x79
--Deleted
C 231
2.7 (800)/4.7 (900) pF ±5% NPO smd
C 232
8.2 (800)/6.8 (900) pF ±5% NPO smd
510-3601-xx9
--Deleted
C 233
15 pF ±5% 50V cer smd
510-3601-150
--Deleted
(C229-U200, pin 24) 510-3601-102
Added
C 235
.001 µF ±5% NPO 50V smd
L 201
0.9 µH variable inductor
542-1012-008
--Deleted
L 207
.39 µH smd inductor
542-9001-398
--Deleted
Z 206
52.95 MHz 2-pole filter
532-0009-01x
--Deleted
(Summit DM 800 MHz only)
A-6
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
REVISION SUMMARY
NOTE: The changes in the following table have been made to the schematics and parts list in this manual.
Table A-3 Additional Summit DM Part Changes Through May 1998
Component
No.
New Description
New Part No.
Old Part No.
Action
Same
Error on schematic (10
pF should be 22 pF)
Changed type
RF AND PA BOARDS
C 260
22 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
C 506
12 pF ±10% 50V hi Q smd
510-3663-120
510-3614-120
(800 MHz, 35W only)
12 pF ±10% 50V hi Q smd
510-3663-120
510-3614-120
(800 MHz, 35W only)
Variable capacitor
187-0103-175
512-1008-001
(800 MHz, 35W only)
39 pF ±5% NPO 50V cer smd
--510-3615-390
(800 MHz, 35W only)
56 pF ±10% 50V high Q smd
510-3663-560
510-3615-390
(800 MHz, 35W only)
56 pF ±10% 50V high Q smd
510-3663-560
510-3615-390
(800 MHz, 35W only)
56k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
569-0105-563
569-0105-473
(900 MHz)
47k ohm ±5% 1/8W smd
--569-0105-473
(800 MHz, 35W only)
HARDWARE AND CABLE KIT (Part No. 023-9750-010)
C 507
C 511
C 547
C 568
C 569
R 205
R 513
EP 002
EP 003
510-3601-220
Changed type
Changed
Deleted
Changed
Changed
Changed
Deleted
Ring terminal, 3/4” 10-12 AWG
586-0001-036
586-0007-022
Ring terminal, 3/8” 10-12 AWG
586-0001-019
586-0007-010
ACCESSORY WIRE KIT (Part No. 023-9750-011)
Changed
Changed
EP 001
F 001
MP001
MP002
MP003
Fuseholder includes:
Contact
586-9004-001
-Fuse, 1A 250V FB AGC
534-0003-020
--Fuseholder body
534-1004-031
--Fuseholder knob
534-1004-032
--Fuseholder spring
534-1004-035
--TRANSCEIVER MOUNTING KIT (Part No. 023-9750-012)
Added fuse and holder
----------
MP101
Knob 10-32 x 1.18
Changed
547-0016-007
A.8 OTHER LATE CHANGES
574-0016-003
this board was a different power module (U500). A
stabilization board was also added across final amplifier Q501. This manual contains new schematics and
board layout for this revised board.
This manual (Part No. 001-9750-007) has been
updated with changes that have been made through
November 2000. A summary of late hardware changes
follows.
Compandor Board - Several part changes have been
made to the optional compandor board. The current
schematic and board layout are shown on page 10-20.
Revised 800 MHz PA Board - In mid 2000 a new 800
MHz PA board was implemented. The main change to
A-7
Revised December 2000
Part No. 001-9750-007
UNIVERSAL DIGITAL AND DATA INTERFACE
APPENDIX B UNIVERSAL DIGITAL AND DATA INTERFACE
B.1 GENERAL INFORMATION
DB25
Connector
J601
7
B.1.1 SCOPE
This appendix describes the Universal Digital and
Data Interface (UD2I™) as it functions with Summit®
DM Multi-Net® transceivers. This interface is also
available for Viking® HT. However, operation with
this transceiver is slightly different (the logic levels of
some lines are inverted).
RX AUDIO
Rx Demod Out
8
Rx Demod In
9
Rx Filt Out
10
Rx Aud In
TX AUDIO
Although this interface is available for Summit
DM transceivers with software Version 207 or later,
this description applies specifically to operation with
software Version 214 or later. Therefore, there may be
slight operation differences with the earlier versions of
software. Refer to Appendix A for more information
on software revisions. Transceiver software can easily
be updated using Flash programming. Refer to Section
4.7 for more information.
11
Tx Mic Out
12
Tx Mic In
13
Tx ECD In
20
Tx WB In
CONTROL
B.1.2 UNIVERSAL INTERFACE DESCRIPTION
The universal interface provides a means of
conveniently connecting external equipment to the
transceiver. Types of equipment that may be connected
include modems and data terminals.
To utilize the Universal Interface, the optional
universal interface cable (see Table 1-1) must be
factory or field installed in the transceiver. This cable
is approximately 1-foot long and connects to J403 and
J404 on the audio/logic board. It has a standard female
DB-25 connector (see below) for connecting the
external equipment. Also required is transceiver software Version 207 or later as described in the preceding
section.
1
PTT Request N
2
Squelch Req N
3
Input A
4
Input B
5
PTT
6
Busy Out
14
Aux 1
15
Output A
16
Output B
21
RSSI
SERIAL DATA BUS
NOTE: Validation Key, Part No. 250-9750-050, is no
longer required to use this interface.
.
17
TxD TTL U
18
RxD TTL U
SUPPLY
22
Sw Batt
23
8 VDC
19
GND
24
GND
Figure B-1 Universal Interface Pin Designations
B-1
Revised May 1998
Part No. 001-9750-006
UNIVERSAL DIGITAL AND DATA INTERFACE
CAUTION: The DB25 universal interface connector is
a non-standard port. Therefore, do not connect any
equipment to this port not specially designed for this
interface because equipment damage may result.
•
Normally, there is no need to make internal modifications to the transceiver because connection points
commonly used are available at the connector and
programmable internal gating circuits provide the
required routing of audio signals. The programming of
the universal interface functions is performed using
the same software used to program the transceiver as
described in Section 4. Universal interface programming is described in Section 4.8.
B.3.1 PIN DESCRIPTIONS
Internal accessories installed in the option slots such
as encryption or compandor modules.
B.3 RECEIVE AUDIO SIGNALS
Descriptions of the receive audio pins are located
in Table 2, and a block diagram showing how these
signals are internally routed to the receive audio
processing and gating circuitry is shown in Figure 2.
B.3.2 RECEIVE AUDIO GATING
The receive audio gating circuitry has been
designed to provide several choices for receive audio
routing (such as injecting before or after filtering and
de-emphasis). The receive audio routing for the
universal interface can be programmed for the four
modes shown in Table 3. Each mode enables and
disables the gates (indicated by “Mx”) so that the
audio output signal from the external equipment (indicated by “Device x”) is routed to the desired filtering
circuit. These modes are programmed for each selectable system as described in Section 4.8.3. The desired
mode can also be selected by data on the Serial Data
Bus (see Section B.8).
Gating of the receive and transmit audio signals
in Figure 1 is programmable on a system by system
basis (each selectable system can be programmed for a
different configuration) and are also controllable
dynamically by the Serial Data Bus. The control functions are programmable only on a radio-wide basis
(they are the same for all selectable systems and
groups). Refer to Sections B.3, B.4, and B.5 for more
information on the audio and control signals.
B.2 POWER SUPPLY
Table B-1 Power Supply Pin Description
Function
Pin
B.4 TRANSMIT AUDIO SIGNALS
Description
B.4.1 PIN DESCRIPTIONS
Switched Battery 22 Standard battery voltage fused by 4ampere fuse F500 on the PA board.
Maximum source current is 300mA.
8 volts DC
23 Regulated 8-volt supply (±5%).
Maximum source current is 300mA.
Ground
19, Radio chassis ground.
24
Descriptions of the transmit audio pins are
located in Table 4, and a block diagram showing how
these signals are internally routed to the transmit audio
filtering and gating circuitry is shown in Figure 3.
B.4.2 TRANSMIT AUDIO PROGRAMMING
A description of the power supply lines is located
in Table 1. Since the Switched Battery and 8-volt
power sources used by the universal interface also
provide power to other accessories, the total power
consumption of all accessories must not exceed the
limits stated in Table 1. Other accessories which use
the universal interface power sources are as
follows:
•
As with the receive audio circuitry, the transmit
audio circuitry has been designed to provide several
choices for routing (such as injecting before or after
bandpass the bandpass filter). The transmit audio
routing can be programmed for the four modes shown
in Table 5. These modes are programmed for each
selectable system as described in Section 4.8.3. The
desired mode can also be selected by data on the Serial
Data Bus (see Section B.8).
Equipment connected to the remote interface (J402)
such as a remote control unit.
B-2
Revised May 1998
Part No. 001-9750-006
UNIVERSAL DIGITAL AND DATA INTERFACE
Table B-2 Receive Audio Pin Description
Pin
Description
Rx Demod Out
Function
7
Rx Filt Out
9
Rx Demod In
8
Rx Aud In
10
Buffered discriminator output before any filtering. DC coupled with 3.8-volt DC bias. Output
impedance less than 600 ohms. Output level 1V P-P at 60% system deviation. Response +1/-3 dB
DC - 5 kHz. This output is shared with internal option wire-out 1.
Output from 300-3000 Hz bandpass filter and de-emphasis circuits. AC coupled with 3.2-volt DC
bias. Output impedance less than 600 ohms. Output level 2.0V P-P at 60% system deviation.
Response 300-3000 Hz TIA. This output is shared with internal option wire-out 13.
Input to 300-3000 Hz bandpass filter and de-emphasis circuits. AC coupled with input impedance
greater than 25k ohms. Input level 1-volt P-P nominal. Signal is subjected to 300-3000 Hz TIA
filter and de-emphasis. This input is shared with internal option wire-out 2.
Input to final audio amplifier chain after the mute gate and filtering but before volume control. AC
coupled with input impedance greater than 10k ohms. Input level 0.7-volt P-P nominal.
Rx Demod
M3
M1
Bandpass
Filter
De-Emphasis
Rx Mute
Gate
M2
Rx
Demod
Out
Rx
Audio
In
Rx Filt
Out
Rx
Demod
In
Device
A
Device
B
NOTES:
1. “Rx Audio In” is hard wired in at all times.
2. Gates M1 and M2 are complementary only
and cannot be controlled independently.
Methods of Connecting
External Devices To
Universal Interface
Device
C
Device
D
Figure B-2 Receive Audio Signal Routing
Table B-3 Receive Audio Programming
Device
Mode
M1
M2
M3
(Default)
Device A
Device B
Device C
Device D
1
2
3
4
4
Closed
Open
Closed
Open
Open
Open
Closed
Open
Closed
Closed
Squelch Ctrl
Closed
Open
Open
Open
B-3
Revised May 1998
Part No. 001-9750-006
UNIVERSAL DIGITAL AND DATA INTERFACE
Table B-4 Transmit Audio Pin Description
Pin
Description
Tx Mic Out
Function
11
Tx Mic In
12
Tx ECD In
13
Tx WB In
20
Buffered single-ended microphone signal before any filtering. DC coupled with 3.2-volt DC bias.
Output impedance less than 200 ohms. Output level 1V P-P nominal. This output is shared with
internal option wire-out 3.
Input before 300-3000 Hz TIA bandpass filtering, pre-emphasis, and limiting. Therefore, this input
signal will pass through these circuits. The input impedance is greater than 24k ohms, and the
nominal input level is 1-volt P-P at 60% system deviation. This input is shared with internal option
wire-out 4.
This External Coded Data input bypasses bandpass filtering but not pre-emphasis and limiting. It
could be used for modems and other equipment that produce signaling in the 4 Hz - 3000 Hz range.
AC coupled with input impedance greater than 20k ohms, and nominal input level is 1-volt P-P at
60% system deviation.
This wideband data input permits direct modulation of the transmit signal since it is after the filtering and deviation limiting circuitry. When the standard DC coupling is used, a DC bias of 2.5 volts
±2% (50 mV) must be applied to this input. This keeps the TCXO on frequency since there is then
a DC path directly to the TCXO modulation input. The TCXO frequency may need to be readjusted when DC coupling is used. Nominal input level is 1-volt P-P at 60% system deviation.
Optional AC coupling is available by removing jumper R707 on the audio/logic board. AC coupled input impedance is greater than 20k ohms. Frequency response is DC - 4800 Hz (DC coupled)
or 4 Hz - 4800 Hz (AC coupled). NOTE: Since signals on this input bypass the deviation limiting
circuitry, the user assumes all responsibility for FCC compliance when this port is used.
M4
Bandpass
Filter
Tx
Mic Out
Device
A
Pre-Emphasis/
Limiter
Splatter
Filter
To
Synthesizer
M5
M6
M7
Tx
Mic In
Tx
ECD In
Tx
WB In
Device
B
Methods of
Connecting
External
Devices To
Universal
Interface
Device
C
Device
D
Device
E
NOTES:
1. Gates M4 and M5 are complementary only, and cannot be controlled independently.
2. M4/M5 - Tx Loop Enable, M6 - Tx ECD Enable, M7 - Tx WB Enable
Figure B-3 Transmit Audio Signal Routing
Table B-5 Transmit Audio Programming
Device
Mode
M4
M5
M6
M7
(Default)
Device A
Device B
Device C
Device D
Device E
1
2
3
4
3
4
Closed
Open
Open
Open
Open
Open
Open
Closed
Closed
Closed
Closed
Closed
Open
Open
Closed
Open
Closed
Open
Open
Open
Open
Closed
Open
Closed
B-4
Revised May 1998
Part No. 001-9750-006
UNIVERSAL DIGITAL AND DATA INTERFACE
B.5 INPUT CONTROL SIGNALS
B.6 OUTPUT CONTROL SIGNALS
The universal interface has four input control
signals. Two of these signals are dedicated to push-totalk and squelch functions, and the other two (Input A/
B) are user programmable for various functions. All
programmable control input functions are set on a
radio-wide basis (they are the same for all selectable
systems and groups).
The universal interface has six output control
signals. One of these signals is an analog output dedicated to the RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator)
function, three are digital outputs dedicated to special
functions, and two are user programmable functions.
All programmable control output functions are set on a
radio-wide basis.
All control inputs are CMOS and are internally
pulled to 5-volts by 11k-ohm resistors. Also, all
operate without any switch debounce. Refer to the first
part of Table 6 for a description of the input control
signals. Programming of these signals is described in
Section 4.8.2.
All outputs except RSSI and AUX1 are CMOS
outputs. Therefore, they have a 220-ohm output
impedance and can source 20 mA maximum. Refer to
the last part of Table 6 for a description of the output
control signals. Programming of these signals is
described in Section 4.8.2.
Table B-6 Control Signal Description
Function
Pin
Description
INPUTS
PTT Req N
1
Active low input which allows external control of transmitter keying. This line is shared with
option wire-out 6. This input has four programmable options as follows:
Squelch Req N
2
Input A
3
Standard (default) - Standard PTT operation like that of the microphone PTT signal.
Inhibit - When activated, the radio ignores the microphone PTT signal.
Data - When used in conjunction with the INPUT A “DATA ARQ” option, the radio goes to the
data priority system/group and waits for activity on the DATA ARQ input. Microphone audio is
muted. Upon completion of the transmission, that radio remains on the system/group on which
the data transmission occurred. Refer to Section 7.3 for more information on ARQ arbitration.
Data R (Revert) - Same as the preceding function except that upon completion of the transmission, the radio returns to the previous system/group.
Active low input which mutes the receive audio. Activation of this input mutes the receive audio
immediately, regardless of its current state. This input has no programmable options.
Active low multi-purpose input line programmable for the following functions:
4
Call Indicator (default) - When activated, the call indication “CALL” is displayed. It is turned
off by pressing a front panel key or taking the microphone off-hook. This function is also
programmable for Input B.
Mic Mute - When activated, the microphone audio signal is muted regardless of the current status. This function is also programmable for Input B.
Horn - When activated, the horn alert output of the accessory interface is enabled for three
cycles and then goes to the disabled state in the normal manner described in Section 3.6.4. This
function is also programmable for Input B.
Data ARQ - When used in conjunction with the preceding PTT Req N “Data” option, the radio
uses this line to arbitrate data packet transmission and reception on an LTR or Multi-Net system.
Refer to Section 7.3 for more information on ARQ arbitration.
Active low multi-purpose input line programmable for the following functions:
Input B
Emergency (default) - When activated, produces the same result as pressing the front panel
emergency switch.
Mic Mute - Same as the preceding Input A function.
Horn - Same as the preceding Input A function.
Call Indicator - Same as the preceding Input A function.
B-5
Revised May 1998
Part No. 001-9750-006
UNIVERSAL DIGITAL AND DATA INTERFACE
Table B-6 Control Signal Description (Continued)
Function
Pin
Description
OUTPUTS
RSSI Out
21
AUX1
14
PTT
5
Busy Out
Output A
Output B
6
15
16
Direct analog RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indicator) output. The DC voltage of this output
decreases from 8 - 0 volts as signal strength increases. Output impedance is greater than 100k
ohms.
Active high output which is controlled by the AUX 1 option switch or menu parameter (see Section 3.5.4). This output can be used to control an external accessory. The output levels are 0 and 8
volts DC ±10%. Maximum source current is 50 mA. Therefore, a driver circuit of some type may
be required. This output is shared with the option wire-out 8.
Active low output which provides the PTT signal to an external device. This output is shared with
the option wire-out 9. Programmable options are as follows. (With the Viking HT, this signal is
active high.)
Tx Sense (default) - Indicates that the transmitter is currently activated.
Standard - Indicates that the microphone PTT switch is pressed (the transmitter may or may not
be activated, depending on the current mode).
This output which provides channel/system information to an external device. Programmable
options are as follows:
Access Denied (default) - When accessing the system/channel, this output indicates a busy or
out-of-range condition. This output is active low.
RSSI - Output from the RSSI (Receive Signal Strength Indicator) circuit. This is a logic output
that reacts faster than noise squelch. Therefore, it is also subject to more falsing. Typical noise
squelch response at -116 dB is 50 ms with 6 dB of hysteresis, and typical RSSI response at this
level is 5 ms with 4 dB hysteresis. This output is active high.
Multi-purpose output programmable for the following functions. This is a CMOS output that can
source up to 20 mA as described in Section 6. It is shared with option wire-out 7. NOTE: When
the encryption option is installed, this option is dedicated to the Clear Code function and the
other options are not available.
Clear Code (default) - Active high output that indicates that the transmit audio signal is to be
encrypted.
Clear-to-Send - Active low output that indicates that a trunking channel has been accessed and
all overhead activities completed. This function is also programmable for Output B.
Monitor Hanger - Active low output that indicates that the microphone is on-hook (a high indicates that it is off-hook). This function is also programmable for Output B.
Tx Audio Enable - Active high output that indicates that the internal transmit audio signal is
muted. This function is also programmable for Output B.
Auxiliary 2 - Same as the following Output B function.
Multi-purpose output programmable for the following functions. This is a CMOS output that can
source up to 20 mA as described in Section 6.
Auxiliary 2 (default) - Active high output which is controlled by the AUX2 option switch or
menu parameter (see Section 3.5.4). This output can be used to control an external accessory. The
preceding Output A parameter can also be programmed for this function.
Rx Data Group - Active low output that indicates that a call is being received on a group programmed for data signaling (see Section 3.6.11).
Clear-to-Send - Same as preceding Output A function.
Monitor Hanger - Same as preceding Output A function.
Tx Audio Enable - Same as preceding Output A function.
B-6
Revised May 1998
Part No. 001-9750-006
UNIVERSAL DIGITAL AND DATA INTERFACE
B.7 INTERFACING WITH A DATA MODEM
B.7.3 ARQ ARBITRATION
B.7.1 GENERAL
Introduction
The following information describes how an
external data modem can be connected to the universal
interface. Described are the lines that are used and
how they should be programmed for proper modem
operation.
ARQ is used on all LTR and Multi-Net data channels, but not on conventional channels. Its purpose is
to provide an efficient scheme for ACK/NACK
responses to each block of a multi-block message. It
eliminates the normal repeater handshake interval
usually required to change transmitting stations. The
scheme takes advantage of a repeater time-out that
terminates repeater transmission after a 1 second
(minimum) interruption of the repeater received
subaudible data stream.
B.7.2 MODEM CONTROL LINES
The following control lines should be
programmed as indicated in parentheses for proper
modem operation. For more information on these
lines, refer to Sections B.5 and B.6 and Table 6.
To use this facility, the transmitting modem, on
reaching end-of-block, briefly pauses the radio RF
transmission (for less than 1 second) to listen for the
ACK/NACK response. The receiving modem, on
detecting end-of-block, inserts its RF transmitted
ACK/NACK response. The transmitting modem
resumes transmission with the next data block. This
sequence is repeated for each data block in the multiblock message.
PTT Request N (Data) - This input is used for
transmit/receive arbitration.
Input A (Data ARQ) - This input is also used for
transmit/receive arbitration.
To implement this feature it is necessary for the
modem to operate two radio input signals rather than
the single “DATA PTT” signal that might be expected.
This is necessary in order to define the various state
changes that the radio must execute. Therefore, if LTR
or Multi-Net data channels are used, both radio input
signals must be operated even if the ACK/NACK
feature is not used.
PTT (Tx Sense) - This output indicates to the data
modem the current state of the power amplifier (if it is
keyed or not).
Output A (Clear-to-Send) - This output may be
programmed if desired to indicate to the modem when
the transmit channel is connected and available for
data transmission. Note that this function is restricted
to the Clear Code function when encryption is used
(see description in Table 6).
The DATA ARQ and DATA PTT lines must be
used to set up a data transmission when operating in
the LTR or Multi-Net modes (this protocol does not
apply to conventional operation). Data transmissions
cannot be set up using any of the other lines.
Output B (Rx Data Group) - This output indicates to
the modem that a call is occurring on a “data” group.
Busy Out (Access Denied or RSSI) - This output can
be programmed for either of the available options. If
“Access Denied” is programmed, it indicates to the
modem that an access failure has occurred because of
a busy or out-of-range condition. If “RSSI” is
programmed, this output can be used to indicate to the
modem a busy condition on a conventional channel.
This can be used to determine channel availability in
the receive mode.
When a block of data is received, ARQ arbitration can also be used to provide a quick acknowledgment without the overhead of a repeater handshake.
LTR and Multi-Net repeaters monitor for embedded
data from the transmitting mobile and stop transmitting if this data is not detected for a fixed time (1
second minimum). The ARQ protocol utilizes this
time-out delay to send a short acknowledgment to the
B-7
Revised May 1998
Part No. 001-9750-006
UNIVERSAL DIGITAL AND DATA INTERFACE
2. The modem must then activate (ground) the DATA
PTT (PTT REQ N) line for the transmission of any
ACKs or NACKs. During this time, the radio does
not encode any subaudible data.
transmitting mobile. Normal embedded data flow then
resumes before time-out occurs.
Modem Initiated Transmission
3. For the reception of any more data, the modem must
release the DATA PTT line. During this time, the
radio decodes subaudible data.
1. A data transmission is initiated by the modem by
activating (grounding) the DATA PTT (PTT REQ
N) line followed by activating (grounding) the
DATA ARQ (INPUT A) line. The DATA PTT signal
must lead the DATA ARQ signal by at least 3 ms (5
ms typical), and the DATA PTT line must remain
active for the entire data transmission/acknowledge
session.
4. For all subsequent high-to-low transitions on the
DATA PTT line, the radio transmits without
decoding subaudible data.
5. For all subsequent low-to-high transitions on the
DATA PTT line, the radio receives and decodes
subaudible data.
2. After successfully accessing the system/channel, the
modem must release the DATA ARQ line and then
transmit a data block. A successful access is indicated by a high signal on the CLEAR-TO-SEND
(OUTPUT A) line.
6. The data session is completed by releasing the
DATA ARQ line (the DATA PTT line must be
released first if not already in that state).
3. When ACKs or NACKs are expected, the modem
must activate (ground) the DATA ARQ line. During
this time the radio receives, but does not decode,
subaudible data.
B.8 SERIAL BUS PROTOCOL
4. For all subsequent low-to-high transitions on the
DATA ARQ line, the radio transmits modem data
and encodes subaudible data.
B.8.1 INTRODUCTION
The information which follows defines the serial
bus command and response protocol supported by the
universal interface of the Summit® DM transceiver.
(The protocol for the Viking® HT is different.)
5. For all subsequent high-to-low transitions on the
DATA ARQ line, the radio receives ACKs or
NACKs without decoding subaudible data.
Table B-7 Serial Bus Pin Description
6. The data session is completed by releasing the
DATA PTT line (the DATA ARQ line must be
released first if not already in that state). At this time
the radio transmits the turn-off code and returns to
the idle state.
Function
Rx D TTL U
Tx D TTL U
Modem Initiated Reception
Pin
Description
18 Serial receive data line (unbuffered).
TTL voltage levels are used.
17 Serial transmit data line (unbuffered). TTL voltage levels are used.
The serial bus is a component of the universal
interface which also includes the discrete signals
described earlier in this appendix. The serial bus
provides direct control of various transceiver functions
and also duplicates most of the functions provided by
the discrete lines. Therefore, a very dynamic and flexible interface is provided by using only the serial bus
and appropriately conditioning audio input and output
signals.
1. A data reception is initiated by the modem by activating (grounding) the DATA ARQ (INPUT A) line
while receiving a call on a data group. A call on a
data group is indicated by a low signal on the RX
DATA GROUP (OUTPUT B) line. The DATA ARQ
signal must lead the DATA PTT signal by at least 3
ms (5 ms typical), and the DATA ARQ
signal must remain active for the entire data transmission/acknowledge session.
B-8
Revised May 1998
Part No. 001-9750-006
UNIVERSAL DIGITAL AND DATA INTERFACE
a common format. The following is a description of
the message elements.
This serial bus is the same bus that is used for
transceiver programming and remote control. It is
available on the following connectors:
Sync Supervision Length Message Checksum
1 byte
1 byte
1 byte 0 to N bytes
1 byte
Universal Interface (J601) - TxD TTL U, RxD TTL U
Remote Interface (J600) - TxD TTL R, RxD TTL R
Sync - The first message character of each command
or response is a unique sync character (0x7E). If the
sync character or the escape character appear at any
other position in the message format, it must be
preceded by an inserted escape character (0x81).
Microphone Jack (J2) - TxD TTL, RxD TTL
Flash Programming Jack (J405) - TxD TTL, RxD TTL
B.8.2 PHYSICAL SIGNAL PATH
Supervision - The second character of each message
contains the command or response Supervision Type.
The electrical characteristics of the signals which
implement the serial bus are described in the
preceding table. These characteristics apply to the
serial bus signals on all four connectors described in
the preceding section. The serial interface is a fullduplex asynchronous serial port providing a standard
NRZ format at standard baud rates. Timing conforms
to the standard RS-232 protocol, but the levels are
TTL only.
Length - The third character is the message length of
the entire command/response message, not counting
the initial sync or any inserted escape characters that
must be sent for embedded sync/escape characters. The
checksum character is, however, included in the length
calculation. No message length can exceed 32 bytes.
Message - The next block of characters is the event
message data which is sent to or from the radio. This
character block contains the event message and always
begins with an Event Type character. Each Event Type
is associated with a fixed format and length for the remainder of the message data block.
B.8.3 CHARACTER LEVEL PROTOCOL
The character level protocol for data exchange
between the radio and an external device has the
following characteristics:
Checksum - The last message character is the two’s
compliment of the sum of characters of the entire message. Excluded are inserted escape characters that must
be sent for embedded sync characters. A message is
considered complete when all the bytes have been
received.
1. The character format is one start bit, 8 data bits, one
stop bit, no parity.
2. Transmission speed is 9600 baud.
Distinguishing Embedded Sync and Escape Characters
3. No hardware or software flow control is used.
4. All data exchange is binary using a sync escape
protocol.
General
Figure 4 illustrates the encoding/decoding
process described in the preceding information. The
following example list shows how embedded sync and
escape characters are distinguished from the primary
use of these characters (see preceding “Sync”
description).
The message level information exchange
protocol uses a variable length command and response
message structure. All commands and responses share
<ESCAPE> <SYNC> - Embedded sync character in
the data stream. The first escape character is absorbed
and only the sync remains.
B.8.4 MESSAGE LEVEL PROTOCOL
B-9
Revised May 1998
Part No. 001-9750-006
UNIVERSAL DIGITAL AND DATA INTERFACE
Serial Port Command Messages
Message to be Sent
Message Received
Checksum Added
Checksum Verified
Escape Inserted as
Required
Escapes Deleted
as Required
Sync Added
To Front
ACK (0x01) - This message tells the external device
that the previous message was received correctly.
NACK (0x02) - This command tells the external
device that the previous message as received contained
errors.
UI_CMD (0x10) - This command tells the radio that
the specified event (and data, if any) has occurred and
the radio should respond to it.
UI_RSP (0x0D) - This command is response to a
UI_CMD or it informs an external device that an event
has occurred.
Sync Removed
From Front
B.8.6 SERIAL PORT COMMAND MESSAGES
Serial Link
The following events must have the Supervision
of <UI_CMD> (0x10). The first byte of the data field
contains the command subcode. The data field of each
command subcode is shown.
Serial Link
AUDIO_GATE
Figure B-4 Serial Bus Encode/Decode Diagram
<ESCAPE> <ESCAPE> - Embedded escape character in the data stream. The first escape character is absorbed and only the second escape remains.
AUDIO_GATE
1 byte
<ESCAPE> <ESCAPE> <ESCAPE> <SYNC> Embedded escape character followed by another embedded sync character. The first and third escapes are
absorbed and the original data remains.
Gate
1 byte
State
1 byte
This tells the radio to open or close the specified
audio gate (see Sections 3 and 4). Transmit gate
changes are ignored if not in the transmit mode, and
the gates revert to the previous state when the transmit
mode is exited.
<NON ESCAPE> <SYNC> - This is the normal end
of one message and the start of another.
AUDIO_GATE = 0x01
Gate = Gate (M) number 0x01 - 0x07
State = New state (0 = closed, non 0 = open)
<SYNC> <NON SYNC> - This is the normal start of
a message.
AUDIO_PA
<NON ESCAPE> <NON SYNC> - This is normal
data.
AUDIO_PA
1 byte
State
1 byte
B.8.5 MESSAGE SUPERVISION TYPES
NOTE: The last two digits of the number in parentheses are the hexadecimal code for the message. For
example, 0x20 is equal to decimal 32.
This tells the radio to route the receive or
transmit audio to the external PA port or to mute the
external PA.
The following commands have been defined for
the universal interface.
AUDIO_PA = 0x03
State = New state (0 = mute, 1 = rx audio, 2 = tx audio)
B-10
Revised May 1998
Part No. 001-9750-006
UNIVERSAL DIGITAL AND DATA INTERFACE
Serial Port Command Messages (Cont’d)
CALL_IND = 0x06
State = New state (0 = off, non 0 = on)
AUDIO_PATH
AUDIO_PATH
1 byte
Mode
1 byte
Path
1 byte
CHANGE_SYS_GRP
CHANGE_SYS_GRP
1 byte
This tells the radio to set the specified receive or
transmit audio path mode (see Sections 3 and 4).
Transmit audio path changes are ignored if not in the
transmit mode, and the gates revert to the previous
state when the transmit mode is exited.
System
1 byte
Group
1 byte
This tells the radio to change to the specified
system and group. The radio responds with the
SYS_GRP response message
AUDIO_PATH = 0x04
Mode = Mode being set (1 = rx path, 2 = tx path)
Path = Path being set for mode 0x01 - 0x06
CHANGE_SYS_GRP = 0x07
System = New system number
Group = New group number
BLOCK_DECODE
CLEAR_LOCKOUT_GID
BLOCK_DECODE
1 byte
State
1 byte
CLEAR_LOCKOUT_GID
1 byte
This directs the radio to disable block decoding.
If the radio is in a call, this function will not go into
effect until the current call has ended. This command
is global with all non-conventional systems.
System No.
1 byte
This tells the radio to clear the lock out of a
selected GID (group ID) from block decoding. This
reverses the action of a SET_LOCKOUT_GID. If the
ID is not locked out, no action is taken.
BLOCK_DECODE = 0x1A
State = New state (1 = off, 0 = on)
CLEAR_LOCKOUT_GID = 0x1E
Decode ID = Group decode ID to lock out of the block
decode range
System Number = System of group ID to be cleared.
This parameter is available with Version 217 and
later software. System number 255 (0xFF) is a wild
card and matches any system. With old format messages, the system number defaults to 255 for backwards compatibility.
BUTTON_PRESSED
BUTTON_PRESSED
1 byte
Decode ID
1 byte
Button
1 byte
This tells the radio to simulate that the specified
button has been pressed.
DISPLAY_MESSAGE
BUTTON_PRESSED = 0x05
Button = Button number 0x01-0x05 (left to right)
Display_Message
1 byte
String
10 bytes
CALL_IND
CALL_IND
1 byte
This tells the radio to display the specified
message. Note that the string must be 10 bytes when
included or garbage characters will appear on the
radio’s display. Only upper case or numeral ASCII
characters should be sent. A message displayed in this
manner will not be preempted until one of the
following occurs:
State
1 byte
This tells the radio to turn the call indicator on or
off.
B-11
Revised May 1998
Part No. 001-9750-006
UNIVERSAL DIGITAL AND DATA INTERFACE
Serial Port Command Messages (Cont’d)
•
•
•
This tells the radio that the mic hanger has been
placed on or off hook. This message is ignored if the
microphone is actually off-hook.
An operator action occurs
An operator action is simulated
A DISPLAY_MESSAGE is sent with no string (the
data field contains only the sub-op code
DISPLAY_MESSAGE)
MIC_HANGER = 0x09
State = New state (0 = off-hook, non 0 = on-hook)
DISPLAY_MESSAGE = 0x08
String = 10-character string to display
INTERCEPT_TONE
GET_DISPLAY_UPDATE
INTERCEPT_TONE
1 byte
State
1 byte
GET_DISPLAY_UPDATE
1 byte
This tells the radio to turn the intercept tone on or
off. Note that the tone is generated by the radio’s
microprocessor and can be distorted if the radio is
commanded to perform another action while the tone
is turned on.
This requests an UPDATE_DISPLAY response
be sent with the current display contents.
GET_DISPLAY_UPDATE = 0x20
INTERCEPT_TONE = 0x0A
State = New state (0 = off, non 0 = on)
GET_LOCKOUT_GID
NOTIFY_ENABLE_FLAGS
GET_LOCKOUT_GID
1 byte
NOTIFY_EVENT Event Event Event Event
_FLAGS
Group 1 Group2 Group3 Group4
1 byte
1 byte 1 byte 1 byte 1 byte
This tells the radio to send a LOCKOUT_GID
message containing the block decode IDs that are
currently locked out from the receive mode.
This message controls which, if any, asynchronous notification messages are to be enabled. When
enabled, radio events such as button pushes are
reported in the <UI_RSP> RADIO_NOTIFY
message. A logic 1 enables reporting and a logic 0
disables reporting. Refer to the UI_DISCONNECT
message description for information on how it affects
the flags.
GET_LOCKOUT_GID = 0x1F
GET_RADIO_STATUS
GET_RADIO_STATUS
1 byte
NOTIFY_ENABLE_FLAGS = 0x0B
Event Group 1-3 = Refer to RADIO_NOTIFY message
description for definitions.
This tells the radio to send a RADIO_STATUS
message containing the current status of several radio
options.
PTT_EVENT
GET_RADIO_STATUS = 0x23
PTT Event
1 byte
MIC_HANGER
Mic Hanger
1 byte
State
1 byte
State
1 byte
This tells the radio that the PTT switch has been
pressed or released.
B-12
Revised May 1998
Part No. 001-9750-006
UNIVERSAL DIGITAL AND DATA INTERFACE
Serial Port Command Messages (Cont’d)
RETURN_SYS_GRP
PTT_EVENT = 0x0C
State = New state (0 = released, non 0 = pressed)
RETURN_SYS_GRP
1 byte
RESET
RESET
1 byte
This tells the radio to reply with the radio’s
current system and group using the SYS_GRP
response message.
This tells the radio to configure event flags, I/O
options, and audio path options to default states.
RETURN_SYS_GRP = 0x10
RESET = 0x0D
RETURN_UNIQUE_ID
RETURN_GRP_ID
RETURN_UNIQUE_ID
1 byte
RETURN_GRP_ID
1 byte
This tells the radio to reply with the Unique ID
(or UID) of the current Multi-Net system using a
UNIQUE_ID message.
This tells the radio to reply with the current
Group ID data items using the GRP_ID response
message.
RETURN_UNIQUE_ID = 0x22
RETURN_GRP_ID = 0x0E
SELECT_KNOB_EVENT
RETURN_LAST_RX_GROUP
SELECT_KNOB_EVENT Knob Event
1 byte
1 byte
RETURN_LAST RX_GROUP
1 byte
This tells the radio that the select knob has been
rotated up, rotated down, or pushed.
This tells the radio to reply with the Group
Decode ID and Home Repeater Number for the last
received call using the LAST_RX_GROUP response
message.
SELECT_KNOB_EVENT = 0x11
Knob Event = 0 = down, 1 = up, 2 = push
SEND_DTMF_DIGITS
RETURN_LAST_RX_GROUP = 0x1C
RETURN_RX_UNIQUE_ID
SEND_DTMF_DIGITS
1 byte
Digits
2 to 28 bytes
RETURN_RX_UNIQUE_ID
1 byte
This tells the radio to send the specified DTMF
digits (approximately 70 ms on, 70 ms off).
This tells the radio to reply with the Unique ID
(or UID) of the current or most recent call using the
RX_UNIQUE_ID response message.
SEND_DTMF_DIGITS = 0x12
Digits = 1 to 27 digits followed by a NULL byte. Digits
are encoded as the ASCII characters “0” to “9”, “*”,
and “#”.
RETURN_RX_UNIQUE_ID = 0x0F
B-13
Revised May 1998
Part No. 001-9750-006
UNIVERSAL DIGITAL AND DATA INTERFACE
Serial Port Command Messages (Cont’d)
SET_RX_TX_GROUP_ID
SET_AUTO_DISPLAY
SET_AUTO_DISPLAY
1 byte
Status
1 byte
SET_RX_TX_GROUP_ID
1 byte
SET_AUTO_DISPLAY = 0x24
Status = New status (0 = off, 1 = on)
SET_LOCKOUT_GID
Decode ID
1 byte
Encode ID
1 byte
This tells the radio to set the Group Decode ID
(used for received calls) and Group Encode ID (used
for transmit calls) to the specified values. If the radio
is scanning, this command is ignored. If the radio is
involved in a call, the changes take effect when the
call is concluded. Priority calls are not affected. If
scanning is enabled after this command has been sent,
the specified values are in effect for all nonconventional systems. If either of the parameter values
is zero, this command has the effect of canceling any
previous SET_RX_TX_GROUP_ID commands.
This tells the radio to send and UPDATE_
DISPLAY message whenever the contents of the radio
display change.
SET_LOCKOUT_GID
1 byte
Decode ID
1 byte
System No.
1 byte
SET_RX_TX_GROUP_ID = 0x1B
Decode ID = New decode ID (0 = reset to programmed
value)
Encode ID = New encode ID (0 = reset to programmed
value)
This tells the radio to lock out a selected GID
(group ID) from block decoding. A LOCKOUT_GID_
RSP message is sent in response to this message. Up
to five decode IDs may be locked out at any time.
SET_STATUS_FIELD
SET_LOCKOUT_GID = 0x1D
Decode ID = Group decode ID to lock out of the block
decode range
System Number = System of group ID to be locked out.
This parameter is available with Version 217 and
later software. System number 255 (0xFF) is a wild
card and matches any system. With old format messages, the system number defaults to 255 for backwards compatibility.
SET_STATUS_FIELD
1 byte
Status
1 byte
This tells the radio to display the specified
message in the two digit status field.
SET_STATUS_FIELD = 0x15
State = Displayed status value
SET_PTT
SET_PTT
1 byte
SOUND_BEEP
Option
1 byte
SOUND_BEEP
1 byte
This tells the radio to set the specified PTT_
REQUEST_N input option.
This tells the radio to sound a beep.
SET_PTT = 0x14
Option = PTT_REQUEST_N option:
0 = Standard PTT operation
1 = Inhibit PTT operation
2 = Data PTT (no revert operation)
3 = Data PTT (revert operation)
4 = Release serial override (return to programmed
operation)
15 = Undefined (disable signal)
SOUND_BEEP = 0x16
SOUND_HORN
SOUND_HORN
1 byte
B-14
Revised May 1998
Part No. 001-9750-006
UNIVERSAL DIGITAL AND DATA INTERFACE
Serial Port Response Messages (Cont’d)
B.8.7 RESPONSE MESSAGES
This tells the radio to enable its internal horn
switch (pulse on for 0.5 second and off for 0.5 second
for 3 cycles). Note that many internal actions can
cancel this operation including many serial
commands. Once sent, no other serial commands
should be sent for three seconds to allow the sequence
to complete.
The following responses must have a Supervision
of <UI_RSP> (0x0D). The first byte of the data field
contains the response subcode. The data field of each
response subcode is shown.
DTMF_DIGITS_SENT
SOUND_HORN = 0x17
DTMF_DIGITS_SENT
1 byte
SOUND_RING
SOUND_RING
1 byte
This is a response to a SEND_DTMF_
DIGITS<digits> message, and it informs an external
device that the requested DTMF digits have been sent.
This tells the radio to produce a 1 second ringing
tone. Several internal operations can cause this tone to
be distorted since it is produced directly by the microprocessor, so no serial commands should be sent
during the one second period that this tone sounds.
DTMF_DIGITS_SENT = 0x01
GRP_ID
GRP_ID Tx Encode ID Rx Decode ID Home Rptr
1 byte
1 byte
1 byte
1 byte
SOUND_RING = 0x18
TOGGLE_BACKLIGHT
This is a response to a RETURN_GRP_ID
message, and it provides the external device with
information on the requested Group ID data items. If
the radio is scanning when this message is sent, information on the revert system and group is returned.
TOGGLE_BACKLIGHT
1 byte
This tells the radio to toggle the backlight. Note
that the current backlight status can be retrieved in the
response to a GET_RADIO_STATUS message.
TOGGLE_BACKLIGHT = 0x21
GRP_ID = 0x03
Tx encode ID = Encode ID that was set
Rx decode ID = Decode ID that was set
Home Rptr = Home repeater that was set
UI_DISCONNECT
LAST_RX_GROUP
LAST_RX_GROUP Rx Encode ID
1 byte
1 byte
UI_DISCONNECT
1 byte
This tells the radio that the external device will
be disconnecting itself from the radio after sending
this message. This command causes all RADIO_
ENABLE_NOTIFY flags to be returned to the poweron default configuration (all flags set to zero). Any
pending outgoing messages are purged.
Home Rptr
1 byte
This is a response to a RETURN_LAST_RX_
GROUP message.
LAST_RX_GROUP = 0x0A
Rx decode ID = Decode ID of last non-conventional
call received
Home Rptr = Home repeater number of last nonconventional call received
UI_DISCONNECT = 0x19
B-15
Revised May 1998
Part No. 001-9750-006
UNIVERSAL DIGITAL AND DATA INTERFACE
Serial Port Response Messages (Cont’d)
PTT_RESULT = 0x04
Result = Result of PTT press (1 = success, 2 = busy,
3 = out of range)
LOCKOUT_GID
LOCKOUT_GID Count
1 byte
1 byte
Decode IDs
Count bytes
System No.
1 byte
RADIO_READY
This is a response to a GET_LOCKOUT_GID
message.
RADIO_READY
1 byte
LOCKOUT_GID = 0x0D
Count = Number of decode IDs in this message
Decode ID = Decode IDs that are now locked out (0
indicates an empty lockout slot)
System Number = System of each locked out group ID.
This parameter is available with Version 217 and
later software. System number 255 (0xFF) is a wild
card and matches any system. With old format messages, the system number defaults to 255 for backwards compatibility. Also for compatibility, this
message contains all (count) decode IDs followed
by all (count) system numbers in the same order.
This is a response to a RESET<–> message
informing an external device that the radio is reset and
ready for universal interface operation.
RADIO_READY = 0x05
RADIO_NOTIFY
RADIO_NOTIFY Event Event Event Event
Group 1 Group2 Group3 Group4
1 byte
1 byte 1 byte 1 byte 1 byte
LOCKOUT_GID_RSP
LOCKOUT_GID_RSP
1 byte
Decode ID
1 byte
This is a response to a radio event. The message
is transmitted only if the enable flag associated with
the event has been enabled (see NOTIFY_ENABLE_
FLAGS command). A “1” bit indicates the associated
event occurred and a “0” bit indicates the inactive
state.
System No.
1 byte
This is a response to a LOCKOUT_GID
message.
RADIO_NOTIFY = 0x06
LOCKOUT_GID_RSP = 0x0E
Decode ID = Decode ID that is now locked out (0
indicates failed to lockout requested ID)
System Number = System of the locked out group ID.
This parameter is available with Version 217 and
later software. System number 255 (0xFF) is a wild
card and matches any system. With old format messages, the system number defaults to 255 for backwards compatibility.
Event group 1 = Bit field (Bit 0 = LSB)
Bit 0 = Button 1 pressed (left)
Bit 1 = Button 2 pressed
Bit 2 = Button 3 pressed
Bit 3 = Button 4 pressed
Bit 4 = Button 5 pressed
Bit 5 = Button 6 pressed
Bit 6 = ZERO (reserved)
Bit 7 = ZERO (reserved)
PTT_RESULT
PTT_RESULT
1 byte
Event group 2 = bit field (Bit 0 = LSB)
Bit 0 = Select knob rotate down
Bit 1 = Select knob rotate up
Bit 2 = Select knob push
Bit 3 = PTT pressed
Bit 4 = PTT released
This is a response to a PTT_EVENT (pressed),
informing an external device that the attempt to access
the channel/system has succeeded or failed because
the channel/system was busy or out of range.
B-16
Revised May 1998
Part No. 001-9750-006
UNIVERSAL DIGITAL AND DATA INTERFACE
Serial Port Response Messages (Cont’d)
Bit 3 = Encryption
Bit 4 = System
Bit 5 = Transmitting
Bit 6 = Phone Group
Bit 7 = Backlight
Bit 5 = Rx valid call started
Bit 6 = Rx valid call ended
Bit 7 = ZERO (reserved)
Event group 3 = Bit field (Bit 0 = LSB)
Status 3 = Bit field (Bit 0 = LSB)
Bit 0 = Rx on data group started
Bit 1 = Rx on data group ended
Bit 2 = Tx audio mute
Bit 3 = Tx audio unmute
Bit 4 = Mic off hook
Bit 5 = Mic on hook
Bit 6 = Clear to send asserted
Bit 7 = Clear to send released
Bit 0 = Rx Valid Call
Bit 1 = Group scan active
Bit 2 = System scan active
Bits 3 - 7 = (Reserved)
RX_UNIQUE_ID
Event group 4 = Bit field (Bit 0 = LSB)
RX_UNIQUE_ID
1 byte
Bit 0 = System scan started
Bit 1 = System scan stopped
Bit 2 = Group scan started
Bit 3 = Group scan stopped
Bits 4 - 7 = Zero (reserved)
This is a response to a RETURN_RX_UNIQUE
_ID message, informing an external device of the last
received Unique ID (UID).
RX_UNIQUE_ID = 0x07
UID high byte = High order byte of the UID
UID low byte = Low order byte of the UID
RADIO_STATUS
RADIO_STATUS
1 byte
UID High Byte UID Low Byte
1 byte
1 byte
Status 1
1 byte
Status 2
1 byte
Status 3
1 byte
SYS_GRP
SYS_GRP
1 byte
This is a response to a GET_RADIO_STATUS
message. Note that many of these bits reflect the
current status of a physical universal interface
connector signal.
System
1 byte
Group
1 byte
This is a response to RETURN_SYS_GRP and
CHANGE_SYS_GRP messages, informing an
external device of the currently active system and
group numbers. If the radio is scanning when this
message is sent, the revert system and group is
returned.
RADIO_STATUS = 0x0C
Status 1 = Bit field (Bit 0 = LSB)
Bit 0 = PTT_REQ_IN
Bit 1 = SQUELCH_REQ_IN
Bit 2 = INPUT_A
Bit 3 = INPUT_B
Bit 4 = BSY_OUT
Bit 5 = PTT
Bit 6 = OUTPUT_A
Bit 7 = OUTPUT_B
SYS_GRP = 0x08
System = Currently active system number
Group = Currently active group number
SYS_GRP_INVALID
SYS_GRP_INVALID
1 byte
Status 2 = Bit field (Bit 0 = LSB)
System
1 byte
Group
1 byte
This is a response to a CHANGE_SYS_GRP
message, informing an external device that the
requested system/group does not exist. The parameter
Bit 0 = Scanning Enabled
Bit 1 = MIC On Hook
Bit 2 = Call Light
B-17
Revised May 1998
Part No. 001-9750-006
UNIVERSAL DIGITAL AND DATA INTERFACE
Serial Port Response Messages (Cont’d)
This is a response to either a GET_DISPLAY_
UPDATE or SET_AUTO_DISPLAY message which
is used to display the specified information in the 10character alphanumeric and 2-character status display.
field includes the requested system and group
numbers.
SYS_GRP_INVALID = 0x09
System = Currently active system number
Group = Currently active group number
UPDATE_DISPLAY = 0x0B
The Compressed String is a series of three 3-byte
message blocks as shown in Table 8 which follows.
Each block contains four display characters in a
compressed ASCII format. The display characters in
the message are as follows:
UNIQUE_ID
UNIQUE_ID
1 byte
UID High Byte UID Low Byte
1 byte
1 byte
ADx = Alphanumeric display characters. AD0 is the
left-most character and AD9 is the right-most
character.
This is a response to a RETURN_UNIQUE_ID
message, informing an external device of the current
system’s Unique ID (UID). The returned ID is
0xFFFF if the current system is not a Multi-Net
system.
SDx = Status display characters. SD0 is the left character and SD1 the right character.
UNIQUE_ID = 0x0F
UID high byte = High order byte of the UID
UID low byte = Low order byte of the UID
The character to be displayed is in a compressed
ASCII format encoded as follows:
UPDATE_DISPLAY
Compressed Code = ASCII code – (minus) 0x20
UPDATE_DISPLAY
1 byte
NOTE: The two digits after the “x” in 0x20 above are
the hexadecimal code. For example, 0x20 is equal to
decimal 32.
Compressed String
9 bytes
Table B-8 UPDATE_DISPLAY Message Coding
Message Block 0
Byte
Bit 1
1
2 3 4 5
AD0 Character
6
7
2
3
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
AD1 Character
AD2 Character
AD3 Character
Message Block 1
Byte
4
5
6
Bit 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48
AD4 Character
AD5 Character
AD6 Character
AD7 Character
Message Block 2
Byte
7
8
9
Bit 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72
AD8 Character
AD9 Character
SD0 Character
SD1 Character
B-18
Revised May 1998
Part No. 001-9750-006
Part Number 001-9750-007
12-00 hph Printed in U.S.A.