Moxa Technologies E Series User`s manual

Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
User’s Manual
First Edition, June 2013
www.moxa.com/product
© 2013 Moxa Inc. All rights reserved.
Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
User’s Manual
The software described in this manual is furnished under a license agreement and may be used only in accordance with
the terms of that agreement.
Copyright Notice
© 2013 Moxa Inc. All rights reserved.
Trademarks
The MOXA logo is a registered trademark of Moxa Inc.
All other trademarks or registered marks in this manual belong to their respective manufacturers.
Disclaimer
Information in this document is subject to change without notice and does not represent a commitment on the part of
Moxa.
Moxa provides this document as is, without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied, including, but not limited
to, its particular purpose. Moxa reserves the right to make improvements and/or changes to this manual, or to the
products and/or the programs described in this manual, at any time.
Information provided in this manual is intended to be accurate and reliable. However, Moxa assumes no responsibility for
its use, or for any infringements on the rights of third parties that may result from its use.
This product might include unintentional technical or typographical errors. Changes are periodically made to the
information herein to correct such errors, and these changes are incorporated into new editions of the publication.
Technical Support Contact Information
www.moxa.com/support
Moxa Americas
Moxa China (Shanghai office)
Toll-free: 1-888-669-2872
Toll-free: 800-820-5036
Tel:
+1-714-528-6777
Tel:
+86-21-5258-9955
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Fax:
+86-21-5258-5505
Moxa Europe
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Tel:
+49-89-3 70 03 99-0
Tel:
+886-2-8919-1230
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Fax:
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Tel:
+91-80-4172-9088
Fax:
+91-80-4132-1045
Table of Contents
1.
About this Manual ............................................................................................................................. 1-1
2.
Getting Started.................................................................................................................................. 2-1
USB Console Configuration (115200, None, 8, 1, VT100) ......................................................................... 2-2
Configuration by Command Line Interface(CLI) ...................................................................................... 2-4
Configuration by Web Browser ............................................................................................................. 2-6
Disabling Telnet and Browser Access ..................................................................................................... 2-8
3.
Featured Functions ........................................................................................................................... 3-1
Home ................................................................................................................................................ 3-2
System Settings ................................................................................................................................. 3-2
System Information ..................................................................................................................... 3-2
User Account .............................................................................................................................. 3-3
Network ..................................................................................................................................... 3-5
Date and Time ............................................................................................................................ 3-6
IEEE 1588 PTP ............................................................................................................................ 3-8
Warning Notification .................................................................................................................. 3-12
MAC Address Table .................................................................................................................... 3-17
System Files ............................................................................................................................. 3-18
Turbo Ring DIP Switch ............................................................................................................... 3-21
Restart..................................................................................................................................... 3-22
Factory Default ......................................................................................................................... 3-22
VLAN............................................................................................................................................... 3-22
The Virtual LAN (VLAN) Concept .................................................................................................. 3-22
Sample Applications of VLANs Using Moxa Switches ....................................................................... 3-25
Configuration Virtual LAN ........................................................................................................... 3-26
802.1Q VLAN Settings................................................................................................................ 3-26
Port-Based VLAN Settings........................................................................................................... 3-28
VLAN Table ............................................................................................................................... 3-28
Port ................................................................................................................................................ 3-29
Port Settings............................................................................................................................. 3-29
Port Status ............................................................................................................................... 3-30
Link Aggregation ....................................................................................................................... 3-30
The Port Trunking Concept ......................................................................................................... 3-31
Link-Swap Fast Recovery ........................................................................................................... 3-32
Multicast .......................................................................................................................................... 3-33
The Concept of Multicast Filtering ................................................................................................ 3-33
IGMP Snooping ......................................................................................................................... 3-36
IGMP Snooping Setting .............................................................................................................. 3-36
IGMP Group Status .................................................................................................................... 3-37
Stream Table ............................................................................................................................ 3-37
Static Multicast Address ............................................................................................................. 3-38
GMRP....................................................................................................................................... 3-39
QoS ................................................................................................................................................ 3-39
The Traffic Prioritization Concept ................................................................................................. 3-39
Configuring Traffic Prioritization .................................................................................................. 3-41
CoS Classification ...................................................................................................................... 3-41
CoS Mapping ............................................................................................................................ 3-44
DSCP Mapping .......................................................................................................................... 3-45
Rate Limiting ............................................................................................................................ 3-45
Security........................................................................................................................................... 3-48
Login Authentication .................................................................................................................. 3-49
Management Interface ............................................................................................................... 3-50
Trusted Access .......................................................................................................................... 3-51
Authentication Certificate ........................................................................................................... 3-52
IEEE 802.1X ............................................................................................................................. 3-52
IEEE 802.1X Setting .................................................................................................................. 3-53
Local Database ......................................................................................................................... 3-54
RADIUS Server Settings ............................................................................................................. 3-55
Port Security............................................................................................................................. 3-55
Port Access Control Table ........................................................................................................... 3-56
Broadcast Storm Protection ........................................................................................................ 3-56
Loop Protection ......................................................................................................................... 3-57
DHCP .............................................................................................................................................. 3-57
IP-Port Binding.......................................................................................................................... 3-57
DHCP Relay Agent ..................................................................................................................... 3-58
SNMP .............................................................................................................................................. 3-60
SNMP Read/Write Settings.......................................................................................................... 3-61
Trap Settings ............................................................................................................................ 3-62
Industrial Protocol ............................................................................................................................ 3-63
Diagnostics ...................................................................................................................................... 3-63
LLDP ........................................................................................................................................ 3-63
Ping ......................................................................................................................................... 3-64
Port Mirror ................................................................................................................................ 3-65
Monitoring ....................................................................................................................................... 3-65
System Utilization ..................................................................................................................... 3-65
Statistics .................................................................................................................................. 3-66
SFP DDM .................................................................................................................................. 3-68
Event Log ................................................................................................................................. 3-69
A.
MIB Groups ....................................................................................................................................... A-1
1
1.
About this Manual
Thank you for purchasing a Moxa managed Ethernet switch. Read this user’s manual to learn how to connect
your Moxa switch to Ethernet-enabled devices used for industrial applications.
The following two chapters are covered in this user manual:
 Getting Started
This chapter explains how the initial installation process for Moxa switch. There are three ways to access
Moxa switch's configuration settings: the USB console, command line interface, and web-based interface.
 Featured Functions
This chapter explains how to access Moxa switch's various configuration, monitoring, and administration
functions. These functions can be accessed by serial, Telnet command line, or web-based interface. The
web-based interface is the most user-friendly way to configure Moxa switch. In this chapter, we use the
web console interface to introduce the functions.
2
2.
Getting Started
In this chapter we explain how to install a Moxa switch for the first time. There are three ways to access the
Moxa switch’s configuration settings: USB console, command line interface, or web-based interface. If you do
not know the Moxa switch’s IP address, you can open the USB console by connecting the Moxa switch to a PC’s
USB port with a USB cable. You can open the Telnet or web-based console over an Ethernet LAN or over the
Internet.
The following topics are covered in this chapter:
 USB Console Configuration (115200, None, 8, 1, VT100)
 Configuration by Command Line Interface(CLI)
 Configuration by Web Browser
 Disabling Telnet and Browser Access
Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
Getting Started
USB Console Configuration (115200, None, 8, 1,
VT100)
NOTE
•
You cannot connect to the USB console and command line interface at the same time.
•
You can connect to the web console and another console (serial or Telnet) at the same time. However, we
strongly recommend that you do NOT do so. Following this advice will allow you to maintain better control
over the Moxa switch’s configuration.
NOTE
We recommend using PComm Terminal Emulator when opening the USB console. This software can be
downloaded free of charge from the Moxa website.
Before running PComm Terminal Emulator, please install the USB console driver to your PC then connect the
Moxa switch’s USB console port to your PC’s USB port with USB cable.
After installing PComm Terminal Emulator, open the Moxa switch’s USB console as follows:
1. From the Windows desktop, click Start  Programs  PComm Lite 1.3  Terminal Emulator.
2. Select Open under the Port Manager menu to open a new connection.
2-2
Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
Getting Started
3. The Property window should open. On the Communication Parameter tab for Ports, select the COM
port that is being used for the console connection. Set the other fields as follows: 115200 for Baud Rate,
8 for Data Bits, None for Parity, and 1 for Stop Bits.
4. On the Terminal tab, select VT100 for Terminal Type, and then click OK to continue.
5. In the terminal window, the Moxa switch will prompt you to select a terminal type. Enter 1 to select
ansi/vt100 and then press Enter.
2-3
Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
Getting Started
6. The USB console will prompt you to log in. Press Enter and select admin or user. Use the down arrow key
on your keyboard to select the Password field and enter a password if desired. This password will be
required to access any of the consoles (web, serial, Telnet).
NOTE
By default, the password assigned to Moxa switch is ‘moxa’. Please change the default password after 1st log
in consideration of higher security level.
7. The Main Menu of the Moxa switch’s USB console should appear. (In PComm Terminal Emulator, you can
adjust the font by selecting Font… from the Edit menu.)
8. Use the following keys on your keyboard to navigate the Moxa switch’s USB console:
Key
Function
Up, down, right, left arrow keys, Tab
Move the onscreen cursor
Enter
Display and select options
Space
Toggle options
Esc
Previous menu
Configuration by Command Line Interface(CLI)
Opening the Moxa switch’s Telnet or web console over a network requires that the PC host and Moxa switch are
on the same logical subnet. You may need to adjust your PC host’s IP address and subnet mask. By default, the
Moxa switch’s IP address is 192.168.127.253 and the Moxa switch’s subnet mask is 255.255.255.0 (referred to
as a Class B network). Your PC’s IP address must be set to 192.168.xxx.xxx if the subnet mask is 255.255.0.0,
or to 192.168.127.xxx if the subnet mask is 255.255.255.0.
2-4
Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
NOTE
Getting Started
To connect to the Moxa switch’s Telnet or web console, your PC host and the Moxa switch must be on the
same logical subnet.
NOTE
When connecting to the Moxa switch’s Telnet or web console, first connect one of the Moxa switch’s Ethernet
ports to your Ethernet LAN, or directly to your PC’s Ethernet port. You may use either a straight-through or
cross-over Ethernet cable.
NOTE
The Moxa switch’s default IP address is 192.168.127.253.
After making sure that the Moxa switch is connected to the same LAN and logical subnet as your PC, open the
Moxa switch’s Telnet console as follows:
1. Click Start  Run from the Windows Start menu and then Telnet to the Moxa switch’s IP address from the
Windows Run window. You may also issue the Telnet command from a DOS prompt.
2. In the terminal window, the Telnet console will prompt you to select a terminal type. Type 1 to choose
ansi/vt100, and then press Enter.
3. The Telnet console will prompt you to log in. Press Enter and then select admin or user. Use the down
arrow key on your keyboard to select the Password field and enter a password if desired. This password
will be required to access any of the consoles (web, serial, Telnet). If you do not wish to create a password,
leave the Password field blank and press Enter.
2-5
Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
Getting Started
4. The Main Menu of the Moxa switch’s Telnet console should appear.
5. In the terminal window, select Preferences… from the Terminal menu on the menu bar.
6. The Terminal Preferences window should appear. Make sure that VT100 Arrows is checked.
7. Use the following keys on your keyboard to navigate inside the Moxa switch’s Telnet console:
NOTE
Key
Function
Up, down, right, left arrow keys, Tab
Move the onscreen cursor
Enter
Display and select options
Space
Toggle options
Esc
Previous menu
The Telnet console looks and operates in precisely the same manner as the USB console.
Configuration by Web Browser
The Moxa switch’s web console is a convenient platform for modifying the configuration and accessing the
built-in monitoring and network administration functions. You can open the Moxa switch’s web console using a
standard web browser, such as Internet Explorer.
NOTE
To connect to the Moxa switch’s Telnet or web console, your PC host and the Moxa switch must be on the
same logical subnet.
NOTE
If the Moxa switch is configured for other VLAN settings, you must make sure your PC host is on the
management VLAN.
2-6
Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
NOTE
Getting Started
When connecting to the Moxa switch’s Telnet or web console, first connect one of the Moxa switch’s Ethernet
ports to your Ethernet LAN, or directly to your PC’s Ethernet port. You may use either a straight-through or
cross-over Ethernet cable.
NOTE
The Moxa switch’s default IP address is 192.168.127.253.
After making sure that the Moxa switch is connected to the same LAN and logical subnet as your PC, open the
Moxa switch’s web console as follows:
1. Connect your web browser to the Moxa switch’s IP address by entering it in the Address or URL field.
2. The Moxa switch’s web console will open, and you will be prompted to log in. Select the login account
(admin or user) and enter the Password. This password will be required to access any of the consoles (web,
serial, Telnet). If you do not wish to create a password, leave the Password field blank and press Enter.
NOTE
By default, the password assigned to Moxa switch is ‘moxa’. Please change the default password after 1st log
in at User Account configuration page in consideration of higher component security.
3. After logging in, you may need to wait a few moments for the web console to appear. Use the folders in the
left navigation panel to navigate between different pages of configuration options.
2-7
Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
Getting Started
Disabling Telnet and Browser Access
If you are connecting the Moxa switch to a public network but do not intend to manage it over the network, we
suggest disabling both the Telnet and web consoles. This is done from the USB console by navigating to
System Identification under Basic Settings. Disable or enable the Telnet Console and Web
Configuration as shown below:
2-8
3
3.
Featured Functions
In this chapter, we explain how to access the Moxa switch’s various configuration, monitoring, and
administration functions. These functions can be accessed by serial, Telnet, or web console. The USB console
can be used if you do not know the Moxa switch’s IP address and requires that you connect the Moxa switch to
a PC COM port. The Telnet and web consoles can be opened over an Ethernet LAN or the Internet.
The web console is the most user-friendly interface for configuring a Moxa switch. In this chapter, we use the
web console interface to introduce the functions. There are only a few differences between the web console,
USB console, and Telnet console.
The following topics are covered in this chapter:
 Home
 System Settings
 VLAN
 Port
 Multicast
 QoS
 Security
 DHCP
 SNMP
 Industrial Protocol
 Diagnostics
 Monitoring
Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
Featured Functions
Home
The Home page shows the summary of the Moxa switch information including System Information,
Redundancy Protocol, Event log and Device virtualization panel. With the organized key summary, the
operators can easily understand the system and port link status at a glance.
System Settings
The System Settings section includes the most common settings required by administrators to maintain and
control a Moxa switch.
System Information
Defining System Information items to make different switches easier to identify that are connected to your
network.
Switch Name
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Max. 30 characters
This option is useful for differentiating between the roles or
none
applications of different units. Example: Factory Switch 1.
NOTE
To follow the PROFINET I/O naming rule, the character of Switch Name only supports a-z/A-Z/0-9/-/., and the
name can't start with port-xyz/port-xyz-abcde where xyzabcde=0...9 or in format n.n.n.n where n=0...9
Switch Location
Setting
Description
Max. 80 characters
This option is useful for differentiating between the locations of Switch Location
Factory Default
different units. Example: production line 1.
3-2
Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
Featured Functions
Switch Description
Setting
Description
Max. 30 characters
This option is useful for recording a more detailed description of Switch Model name
Factory Default
the unit.
Contact Information
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Max. 30 characters
This option is useful for providing information about who is
None
responsible for maintaining this unit and how to contact this
person.
User Account
The Moxa switch supports the management of accounts, including establishing, activating, modifying, disabling
and removing accounts. There are two levels of configuration access, admin and user. The account belongs to
admin privilege has read/write access of all configuration parameters, while the account belongs to user
authority has read access to view the configuration only.
NOTE
1. In consideration of higher security level, strongly suggest to change the default password after first log in
2. The user with ‘admin’ account name can’t be deleted and disabled by default
Active
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Checked
The Moxa switch can be accessed by the activated user name
Enabled
Unchecked
The Moxa switch can’t be accessed by the non-activated user
Authority
Setting
Description
Factory Default
admin
The account has read/write access of all configuration
admin
parameters.
user
The account can only read configuration but without any
modification.
3-3
Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
Featured Functions
Create New Account
Input the user name, password and assign the authority to the new account. Once apply the new setting, the
new account will be shown under the Account List table.
Setting
Description
Factory Default
User Name
User Name
None
Password for the user account.
None
(Max. of 30 characters)
Password
Minimum requirement is 4 characters, maximum of 16
characters
Modify Existing Account
Select the existing account from the Account List table. Modify the details accordingly then apply the setting to
save the configuration.
Delete Existing Account
Select the existing account from the Account List table. Press delete button to delete the account.
3-4
Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
Featured Functions
Network
Network configuration allows users to configure both IPv4 and IPv6 parameters for management access over
the network. The Moxa switch supports both IPv4 and IPv6, and can be managed through either of these
address types.
IP Setting
The IPv4 settings include the switch’s IP address and subnet mask, as well as the IP address of the default
gateway. In addition, input cells are provided for the IP addresses of a 1st and 2nd DNS server.
The IPv6 settings include two distinct address types—Link-Local Unicast addresses and Global Unicast
addresses. A Link-Local address makes the switch accessible over IPv6 for all devices attached to the same
local subnet. To connect to a larger network with multiple segments, the switch must be configured with a
Global Unicast address.
Get IP From
Setting
Description
Factory Default
DHCP
The Moxa switch’s IP address will be assigned automatically by DHCP
the network’s DHCP server.
BOOTP
The Moxa switch’s IP address will be assigned automatically by
Manual
The Moxa switch’s IP address must be set manually.
the network’s BootP server.
Switch IP Address
Setting
Description
Factory Default
IP address for the Moxa Assigns the Moxa switch’s IP address on a TCP/IP network.
192.168.127.253
switch
Switch Subnet Mask
Setting
Description
Subnet mask for the
Identifies the type of network the Moxa switch is connected to 24(255.255.255.0)
Factory Default
Moxa switch
(e.g., 255.255.0.0 for a Class B network, or 255.255.255.0 for
a Class C network).
Default Gateway
Setting
Description
Factory Default
IP address for gateway Specifies the IP address of the router that connects the LAN to None
an outside network.
3-5
Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
Featured Functions
DNS IP Address
Setting
Description
Factory Default
IP address for DNS
Specifies the IP address of the DNS server used by your
None
server
network. After specifying the DNS server’s IP address, you can
use the Moxa switch’s URL (e.g., www.PT.company.com) to
open the web console instead of entering the IP address.
IP address for 2nd DNS Specifies the IP address of the secondary DNS server used by None
server
your network. The Moxa switch will use the secondary DNS
server if the first DNS server fails to connect.
IPv6 Global Unicast Address Prefix (Prefix Length: 64 bits) Default Gateway
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Global Unicast Address The prefix value must be formatted according to the RFC 2373 None
Prefix
“IPv6 Addressing Architecture,” using 8 colon-separated 16-bit
hexadecimal values. One double colon may be used in the
address to indicate the appropriate number of zeros required to
fill the undefined fields.
IPv6 Global Unicast Address
Setting
Description
None
Displays the IPv6 Global Unicast address. The network portion None
Factory Default
of the Global Unicast address can be configured by specifying
the Global Unicast Prefix and using an EUI-64 interface ID in
the low order 64 bits. The host portion of the Global Unicast
address is automatically generated using the modified EUI-64
form of the interface identifier (Switch’s MAC address).
IPv6 Link-Local Address
Setting
Description
None
The network portion of the Link-Local address is FE80 and the None
Factory Default
host portion of the Link-Local address is automatically
generated using the modified EUI-64 form of the interface
identifier (Switch’s MAC address)
IPv6 Neighbor Cache
The information in the neighbor cache that includes the neighboring node’s IPv6 address, the corresponding
Link-Layer address, and the current state of the entry.
Date and Time
The Moxa switch has a time calibration function based on information from an NTP server or user specified time
and date. Functions such as automatic warning emails can therefore include time and date stamp.
NOTE
The Moxa switch does not have a real time clock. The user must update the Current Time and Current Date
to set the initial time for the Moxa switch after each reboot, especially when there is no NTP server on the LAN
or Internet connection.
3-6
Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
Featured Functions
System Up Time
Indicates how long the Moxa switch remained up since the last cold start.
Current Time
Setting
Description
Factory Default
User-specified time
Indicates time in yyyy-mm-dd format.
None
Clock Source
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Local
Configure clock source from local time
Local
NTP
Configure clock source from NTP
SNTP
Configure clock source from SNTP
Time Zone
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Time zone
Specifies the time zone, which is used to determine the local
GMT (Greenwich
time offset from GMT (Greenwich Mean Time).
Mean Time)
Daylight Saving Time
The Daylight Saving Time settings are used to automatically set the Moxa switch’s time forward according to
national standards.
Start Date
Setting
Description
Factory Default
User-specified date
Specifies the date that Daylight Saving Time begins.
None
Setting
Description
Factory Default
User-specified date
Specifies the date that Daylight Saving Time ends.
None
End Date
Offset
Setting
Description
Factory Default
User-specified hour
Specifies the number of hours that the time should be set
None
forward during Daylight Saving Time.
3-7
Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
NOTE
Featured Functions
Changing the time zone will automatically correct the current time. Be sure to set the time zone before setting
the time.
Time Server IP/Name
Setting
Description
Factory Default
IP address or name of
The IP or domain address (e.g., 192.168.1.1,
None
time server
time.stdtime.gov.tw, or time.nist.gov).
IP address or name of
The Moxa switch will try to locate the secondary NTP server if
secondary time server
the first NTP server fails to connect.
Enable NTP/SNTP Server
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Enable/Disable
Enables SNTP/NTP server functionality for clients
Disabled
IEEE 1588 PTP
The following information is taken from the NIST website at http: //ieee1588.nist.gov/intro.htm:
“Time measurement can be accomplished using the IEEE Standard for a Precision Clock Synchronization
Protocol for Networked Measurement and Control Systems (IEEE 1588-2008) to synchronize real-time clocks
incorporated within each component of the electrical power system for power automation applications.
IEEE 1588, which was published in November 2002, expands the performance capabilities of Ethernet
networks to control systems that operate over a communication network. In recent years an increasing number
of electrical power systems have been using a more distributed architecture with network technologies that
have less stringent timing specifications. IEEE 1588 generates a master-slave relationship between the clocks,
and enforces the specific timing requirements in such power systems. All devices ultimately get their time from
a clock known as the grandmaster clock. In its basic form, the protocol is intended to be administration free.”
How does an Ethernet Switch Affect 1588 Synchronization?
The following content is taken from the NIST website at http: //ieee1588.nist.gov/switch.htm:
“An Ethernet switch potentially introduces multi-microsecond fluctuations in the latency between the 1588
grandmaster clock and a 1588 slave clock. Uncorrected these fluctuations will cause synchronization errors.
The magnitude of these fluctuations depend on the design of the Ethernet switch and the details of the
communication traffic. Experiments with prototype implementations of IEEE 1588 indicate that with suitable
care the effect of these fluctuations can be successfully managed. For example, use of appropriate statistics in
the 1588 devices to recognized significant fluctuations and use suitable averaging techniques in the algorithms
controlling the correction of the local 1588 clock will be the good design means to achieve the highest time
accuracy.”
3-8
Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
Featured Functions
Can Ethernet switches be designed to avoid the effects of these
fluctuations?
A switch can be designed to support IEEE 1588 while avoiding the effects of queuing. In this case two
modifications to the usual design of an Ethernet switch are necessary:
1. The Boundary Clock and Transparent Clock functionalities defined by IEEE 1588 must be implemented
in the switch.
2. The switch must be configured such that it does not pass IEEE 1588 message traffic using the normal
communication mechanisms of the switch.
Such an Ethernet switch will synchronize clocks directly connected to one of its ports to the highest possible
accuracy.
PTP Settings
Operation
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Enable IEEE 1588 PTP
Globally disables or enables IEEE 1588 operation.
Disabled
3-9
Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
Featured Functions
Clock Mode (sets the switch’s clock mode)
Setting
Description
Factory Default
v1 BC
Operates as an IEEE 1588 v1 boundary clock.
v1 BC
v2 E2E 2-step TC
Operates as an edge-to-edge IEEE 1588 v2 transparent clock
with 2-step method.
v2 E2E 1-step TC
Operates as an edge-to-edge IEEE 1588 v2 transparent clock
v2 P2P 2-step TC
Operates as a peer-to-peer IEEE 1588 v2 transparent clock
with 1-step method.
with 1-step method.
v2 E2E BC
Operates as an edge-to-edge IEEE 1588 v2 boundary clock
v2 P2P BC
Operates as a peer-to-peer IEEE 1588 v2 boundary clock
SyncInterval (sets the synchronization message time interval)
Setting
Description
Factory Default
0, 1, 2, 3, or 4
0 (1 s), 1 (2 s), 2 (4 s), 3 (8 s), or 4 (16 s). Supported in IEEE 0
1588 V1.
-3, -2, -1, 0, or 1
-3 (128 ms), -2 (256 ms), -1 (512 ms), 0 (1 s), or 1 (2 s).
Supported in IEEE 1588 V2.
Delay-request Minimum Interval
Setting
Description
Factory Default
0, 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5
Minimum delay request message interval
0 (1 sec.)
Setting
Description
Factory Default
_DFLT (0), _ALT(1),
Subdomain name (IEEE 1588-2002) or the domain Number
0(default domain)
_ALT(2), or _ALT(3)
(IEEE 1588-2008) fields in PTP messages
Domain
Transport mode
Setting
Description
Factory Default
IPv4 or 802.3/Ethernet IEEE 1588 PTP V1 supports IPv4 only
IPv4
IEEE 1588 PTP V2 supports both IPv4 and IPv6.
Role
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Member or Master
Set this switch to be the Member or Grand Master
Member
Announce Interval (sets the announce message interval)
Setting
Description
Factory Default
0, 1, 2, 3, or 4
0 (1 s), 1 (2 s), 2 (4 s), 3 (8 s), or 4 (16 s)
1 (2 s)
Announce Timeout
Setting
Description
Factory Default
2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, or The multiple of announce message receipt timeout by the
10
3
announce message interval.
PDelay-request Minimum Interval
Setting
-1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5
Description
Factory Default
Minimal delay request message interval:
0 (1 sec)
-1 (512 ms), 0 (1 s), 1 (2 s), 2 (4 s), 3 (8 s), 4 (16 s), 5(32s)
(Available in Clock Mode: v2 P2P 2-step TC, and v2 P2P BC)
priority1
Setting
Description
Factory Default
0 to 255
Set first priority value; 0 = highest priority, 255 = lowest
128
priority.
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priority2
Setting
Description
Factory Default
0 to 255
Set second priority value; 0 = highest priority, 255 = lowest
128
priority.
Clock Class
Setting
Description
0 to 255
The clockClass attribute denotes the traceability of the time or 248
Factory Default
frequency distributed by the grandmaster clock.
Clock Accuracy
Setting
Description
Factory Default
0x21
The clockAccuracy characterizes a clock for the purpose of the 0x21
best master clock (BMC) algorithm. This value is fixed at 0x21,
which means the time of the EDS switch is accurate to within
100 ns.
Timescale Type
Setting
Description
Factory Default
PTP or ARB
•
PTP
PTP timescale: In normal operation, the epoch is the PTP
epoch and the timescale is continuous. The time unit is SI
seconds, as realized on the rotating geoid (SI: International
System).
•
ARB timescale: In normal operation, the epoch is set by an
administrative procedure. The epoch can be reset during
normal operation. Between invocations of the
administrative procedure, the timescale is continuous.
Additional invocations of the administrative procedure may
introduce discontinuities in the overall timescale.
ARB Time
Setting
Description
Factory Default
0 to 255
The geoid of the PTP clock reference time (seconds).
0
Setting
Description
Factory Default
True or False
The last minute of the current UTC day contains 59 seconds. If False
Leap59
the epoch is not PTP, the value will be set to FALSE.
Leap61
Setting
Description
Factory Default
True or False
The last minute of the current UTC day contains 61 seconds. If False
the epoch is not PTP, the value will be set to FALSE.
UTC Offset Valid
Setting
Description
True or False
The initialization value will be TRUE if the value of the current False
Factory Default
UTC offset is known to be correct; otherwise, it will be FALSE.
UTC Offset
Setting
Description
Factory Default
0 to 255
The known UTC offset (seconds).
0
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PTP Status
Indicates the current IEEE 1588 PTP status.
PTP Port Settings
Enable/Disable PTP setting by each port.
Warning Notification
Since industrial Ethernet devices are often located at the endpoints of a system, these devices will not always
know what is happening elsewhere on the network. This means that an industrial Ethernet switch that connects
to these devices must provide system maintainers with real-time alarm messages. Even when control
engineers are out of the control room for an extended period of time, they can still be informed of the status of
devices almost instantaneously when exceptions occur. The Moxa switch supports different approaches to warn
engineers automatically, such as email, trap, syslog and relay output. It also supports two digital inputs to
integrate sensors into your system to automate alarms by email and relay output.
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System Event Settings
System Events are related to the overall function of the switch. Each event can be activated independently with
different warning approaches. Administrator also can decide the severity of each system event.
System Events
Description
Cold Start
Power is cut off and then reconnected.
Warm Start
Moxa switch is rebooted, such as when network parameters are changed
(IP address, subnet mask, etc.).
Configuration Change
Any configuration item has been changed.
Power Transition (OnOff)
Moxa switch is powered down.
Power Transition (OffOn)
Moxa switch is powered up.
Authentication Fail
An incorrect password was entered.
Password Change
User change account password
TACACS Authentication Fail
An incorrect authentication details were entered
RADIUS Authentication Fail
An incorrect authentication details were entered
RSTP Topology Changed
If any Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol switches have changed their position
(applies only to the root of the tree)
RSTP Root Changed
If RSTP root has changed
Topology Changed
If the Master of the Turbo Ring has changed or the backup path is activated
If the Turbo Ring path is disconnected
If the MSTP topology has changed
DI1 (OnOff)
Digital Input 1 is triggered by on to off transition
DI1 (OffOn)
Digital Input 1 is triggered by off to on transition
ABC-02 Status
Detects if ABC-02-USB-T is connected or disconnected to switch
When ABC-02-USB-T automatically import/export/backup configuration
Master Changed
Master of the Turbo Ring has changed
Coupling Changed
Backup path is activated
Turbo Ring Break
Turbo Ring path is disconnected
Web log in
Any account log in to the web-based configuration console
Rate Limit On/Off
When the port disabled due to the ingress throughput exceed the setting
rate limit.
Port Looping
Port looping event is triggered
LLDP Table Change
Nearly connected devices are changed and shown in the LLDP table
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There are four response actions available on the EDS E series when events are triggered.
Action
Description
Trap
The EDS E series will send notification to the trap server when event is triggered
E-Mail
The EDS E series will send notification to the email server defined in the Email Setting
Syslog
The EDS E series will record a syslog to syslog server defined in Syslog Server Setting
Relay
The EDS E series support digital inputs to integrate sensors. When event is triggered, the
device will automate alarms by relay output
Severity
Severity
Description
Emergency
System is unusable
Alert
Action must be taken immediately
Critical
Critical conditions
Error
Error conditions
Warning
Warning conditions
Notice
Normal but significant condition
Information
Informational messages
Debug
Debug-level messages
Port Event Settings
Port Events are related to the activity of a specific port.
Port Events
Warning e-mail is sent when…
Link-ON
The port is connected to another device.
Link-OFF
The port is disconnected (e.g., the cable is pulled out, or the opposing
Traffic-Overload
The port’s traffic surpasses the Traffic-Threshold for that port (provided
device shuts down).
this item is Enabled).
Traffic-Threshold (%)
Enter a nonzero number if the port’s Traffic-Overload item is Enabled.
Traffic-Duration (sec.)
A Traffic-Overload warning is sent every Traffic-Duration seconds if the
average Traffic-Threshold is surpassed during that time period.
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There are four response actions available on the EDS E series when events are triggered.
Action
Description
Trap
The EDS E series will send notification to the trap server when event is triggered
E-Mail
The EDS E series will send notification to the email server defined in the Email Setting
Syslog
The EDS E series will record a syslog to syslog server defined in Syslog Server Setting
Relay
The EDS E series support digital inputs to integrate sensors. When event is triggered, the
device will automate alarms by relay output
Severity
NOTE
Severity
Description
Emergency
System is unusable
Alert
Action must be taken immediately
Critical
Critical conditions
Error
Error conditions
Warning
Warning conditions
Notice
Normal but significant condition
Information
Informational messages
Debug
Debug-level messages
The Traffic-Overload, Traffic-Threshold (%), and Traffic-Duration (sec.) Port Event items are related. If you
Enable the Traffic-Overload event, then be sure to enter a nonzero Traffic-Threshold percentage, as well as a
Traffic-Duration between 1 and 300 seconds.
Email Settings
Mail Server IP/Name
Setting
Description
Factory Default
IP address
The IP Address of your email server.
None
User Name
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Max. 45 of charters
Your email account.
None
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Password
The email account password.
None
Password Setting
Email Address
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Max. of 30 characters
You can set up to 4 email addresses to receive alarm emails
None
from the Moxa switch.
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Send Test Email
After you complete the email settings, you should first click Apply to activate those settings, and then press
the Test button to verify that the settings are correct.
NOTE
Auto warning e-mail messages will be sent through an authentication protected SMTP server that supports
the CRAM-MD5, LOGIN, and PAIN methods of SASL (Simple Authentication and Security Layer)
authentication mechanism.
We strongly recommend not entering your Account Name and Account Password if auto warning e-mail
messages can be delivered without using an authentication mechanism.
Syslog Server Settings
The Syslog function provides the event logs for the syslog server. The function supports 3 configurable syslog
servers and syslog server UDP port numbers. When an event occurs, the event will be sent as a syslog UDP
packet to the specified syslog servers. Each Syslog server can be activated separately by selecting the check
box and enable it.
Syslog Server 1/2/3
Setting
Description
Factory Default
IP Address
Enter the IP address of Syslog server 1/2/3, used by your
None
network.
Port Destination
Enter the UDP port of Syslog server 1/2/3.
(1 to 65535)
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Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
NOTE
Featured Functions
The following events will be recorded into the Moxa switch’s Event Log table, and will then be sent to the
specified Syslog Server:
•
Cold start
•
Warm start
•
Configuration change activated
•
Power 1/2 transition (Off (On), Power 1/2 transition (On (Off))
•
Authentication fail
•
Password change
•
Redundancy protocol/Topology changed
•
Master setting is mismatched
•
ABC-02 status
•
Web log in
•
Rate Limit on/off(Disable port)
•
Port looping
•
Port traffic overload
•
dot1x Auth Fail
•
Port link off/on
Relay Warning Status
When relay warning triggered by either system or port events, administrator can decide to shut down the
hardware warning buzzer by clicking Apply button. The event still be recorded in the event list.
MAC Address Table
The MAC address table shows the MAC address list pass through Moxa switch. The length of time(Ageing time:
15 to 3825 seconds) is the parameter defines the length of time that a MAC address entry can remain in the
Moxa switch. When an entry reaches its aging time, it “ages out” and is purged from the switch, effectively
cancelling frame forwarding to that specific port.
The MAC Address table can be configured to display the following Moxa switch MAC address groups, which are
selected from the drop-down list.
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Drop Down List
ALL
Select this item to show all of the Moxa switch’s MAC addresses.
ALL Learned
Select this item to show all of the Moxa switch’s Learned MAC addresses.
ALL Static
Select this item to show all of the Moxa switch’s Static, Static Lock, and Static
Multicast MAC addresses.
ALL Multicast
Select this item to show all of the Moxa switch’s Static Multicast MAC addresses.
Port x
Select this item to show all of the MAC addresses dedicated ports.
The table displays the following information:
MAC
This field shows the MAC address.
Type
This field shows the type of this MAC address.
Port
This field shows the port that this MAC address belongs to.
System Files
Firmware Upgrade
Moxa switch supports 3 ways to upgrade the up-to-date firmware including local database, remote TFTP server,
and Auto-backup-configurator(ABC-02).
Local
1. Download the updated firmware (*.rom) file from Moxa’s website (www.moxa.com).
2. Browse the (*.rom) file and press the Upgrade button
TFTP Server
1. Enter the TFTP Serve IP
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2. Input the firmware file name (*.rom) and press the Upgrade button
Auto-Backup-Configurator(ABC-02)
1. Download the updated firmware (*.rom) file from Moxa’s website (www.moxa.com).
2. Save the file to ABC-02’s Moxa folder. The file name can’t be longer than 8 characters and make sure the
extension file name is (.rom)
3. Browse the firmware from ABC-02 and press the Upgrade button
Configuration Backup and Restore
Moxa switch supports 3 ways to backup and restore configuration file to/from local database, remote TFTP
server, and Auto-backup-configurator(ABC-02).
Local
1. Click Backup button to backup the configuration file to local database
2. Browse the configuration file from local database and press the Restore button
TFTP Server
1. Enter the TFTP Serve IP
2. Input the backup/restore file name(support up to 54 characters includes .ini) and then press the
Backup/Restore button
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Auto-Backup-Configurator(ABC-02)
1. Click Backup to save the configuration file to the ABC-02. The file will be saved in the Moxa folder of the
ABC-02. The file name is “Sys.ini”.
The configuration file will be saved into ABC-02-USB’s “Moxa” folder, with 2 files independently. Named by
“Sys.ini” and “MAC.ini”. The purpose of saving into two files is to identify the file while using Auto load
configuration from ABC to system when boot up.
Note: MAC.ini is named by switch MAC address last 6 digits without space
2. Click Browse to select the configuration file. Then click Restore to start loading into your switch.
3. Auto load configuration from ABC to system when boot up
Select check box of Auto load configuration from ABC to system when boot up then click Apply. This
function is enabled by default.
Power off your switch first, and then plug in the ABC-02. Then power on your switch, the system will detect
the configuration file on the ABC-02 automatically. The switch will recognize the file name with following
sequence priority:
First priority: MAC.ini
Second priority: Sys.ini
If no matching configuration file is found, the fault LED light will turn on. The switch will boot up normally.
Note: MAC.ini is named by switch MAC address last 6 digits without space
4. Auto backup to ABC-02 when configuration change
Select check box of Auto backup to ABC-02 when configuration change then click Apply. This
function is disabled by default.
The ABC-02 is capable of backing up switch configuration files automatically. While the ABC-02 is plugged
into the switch, enable the “Auto backup to ABC-02 when configuration change” option. Then click “Apply”.
Once this configuration is modified, the switch will back up the current configuration under the “/His_ini”
folder in the ABC-02. The file name will be the system date/time (MMDDHHmm.ini).
Note: MM=month, DD=day, HH=hour, mm=minutes, from system time
Log File Backup
Moxa switch offers 3 ways to backup log files: the local database, remote TFTP server, and
Auto-Backup-Configurator (ABC-02).
Local
Click the Backup button to backup the log file to local database
TFTP Server
Enter the TFTP Serve IP and file name then enter the Backup button
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Auto-Backup-Configurator(ABC-02)
Click Backup to save the configuration file to the ABC-02. The file will be saved in the Moxa folder of the
ABC-02. The file name is “Sys.ini”.
Auto backup of event log to prevent overwrite
This function is designed to maintain a long-term record the switch log files. Moxa Ethernet switches are
capable of saving 1000 entries of event logs. When the 1000-entry storage limit is reached, the switch will
delete the oldest saved event log. The ABC-02 can help to backup these event logs. When switch log entries
reach 1000, the ABC-02 will back up the earliest 100 entries of the switch.
Enable the “Auto backup of event log to prevent overwrite”. Then click “Apply”. After that, when the
ABC-02 is plugged into the switch, the event logs will always be saved to the ABC-02 automatically when switch
log entries reach 1000.Each backup will save the earliest 100 logs to ABC-02 in one single file. The file will
named by current system time MMDDHHmm.ini and save into His_log folder.
Note: MM=month, DD=day, HH=hour, mm=minutes, from system time
The log file includes following information
Index
Event index assigned to identify the event sequence.
Bootup
This field shows how many times the Moxa switch has been rebooted or cold started.
Number
Date
The date is updated based on how the current date is set in the Basic Setting page.
Time
The time is updated based on how the current time is set in the Basic Setting page.
System
The system startup time related to this event.
Startup Time
Event
Events that have occurred.
Log File Backup
The Moxa switch reset button allows quick configuration and log files backup to ABC-02. Press the Reset
button on top of EDS switch, the switch will start backing up current system configuration files and event logs
to the ABC-02.
NOTE
DO NOT remove the ABC-02 when performing upgrade, backup, or restore functions.
Turbo Ring DIP Switch
The Turbo Ring DIP Switch page allows users to disable the 4th DIP switch located on the EDS’s outer casing.
The default is enabled with Turbo Ring v2 protocol. Once user changes the 4th hardware DIP switch
configuration to ON, the switch will start to initiate the Turbo Ring redundancy protocol based on the
configuration. The detailed description is given below:
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Enable the Turbo Ring DIP switch
The Turbo Ring protocol can be
Enable the Turbo Ring DIP switch
activated by DIP switch
configuration
Disable the Turbo Ring DIP switch
The Turbo Ring protocol can’t be
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activated by DIP switch
configuration
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Set DIP switch as Turbo Ring
Enable Turbo Ring protocol when
Set DIP switch as Turbo Ring v2
Set DIP switch as Turbo Ring v2
Enable Turbo Ring v2 protocol
DIP switch change to ON
when DIP switch change to ON
NOTE
If the 4th DIP switch (Turbo Ring) is configured to ‘ON’, users will not be able to disable the Turbo Ring DIP
switch from web interface, console, and Telnet.
Restart
This function provides users with a quick way to restart the system.
Factory Default
This function provides users with a quick way of restoring the Moxa switch’s configuration to factory defaults.
The function is available in the USB serial, Telnet, web-based consoles and hardware reset button.
NOTE
After restoring the factory default configuration, you will need to use the default network settings to
re-establish the web or Telnet console connection with the Moxa switch.
VLAN
Setting up Virtual LANs (VLANs) on your Moxa switch increases the efficiency of your network by dividing the
LAN into logical segments, as opposed to physical segments. In general, VLANs are easier to manage.
The Virtual LAN (VLAN) Concept
What is a VLAN?
A VLAN is a group of devices that can be located anywhere on a network, but which communicate as if they are
on the same physical segment. With VLANs, you can segment your network without being restricted by
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physical connections—a limitation of traditional network design. With VLANs you can segment your network
according into:
•
Departmental groups—You could have one VLAN for the marketing department, another for the finance
department, and another for the product development department.
•
Hierarchical groups—You could have one VLAN for directors, another for managers, and another for
general staff.
•
Usage groups—You could have one VLAN for email users and another for multimedia users.
Switch A
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Backbone connects multiple switches
Switch B
1
Department 1
VLAN 1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Department 2
VLAN 2
Department 3
VLAN 3
Benefits of VLANs
The main benefit of VLANs is that they provide a network segmentation system that is far more flexible than
traditional networks. Using VLANs also provides you with three other benefits:
•
VLANs ease the relocation of devices on networks: With traditional networks, network administrators
spend much of their time dealing with moves and changes. If users move to a different subnetwork, the
addresses of each host must be updated manually. With a VLAN setup, if a host orignally on VLAN Marketing,
for example, is moved to a port on another part of the network, and retains its original subnet membership,
you only need to specify that the new port is on VLAN Marketing. You do not need to do any re-cabling.
•
VLANs provide extra security: Devices within each VLAN can only communicate with other devices on
the same VLAN. If a device on VLAN Marketing needs to communicate with devices on VLAN Finance, the
traffic must pass through a routing device or Layer 3 switch.
•
VLANs help control traffic: With traditional networks, congestion can be caused by broadcast traffic that
is directed to all network devices, regardless of whether or not they need it. VLANs increase the efficiency
of your network because each VLAN can be set up to contain only those devices that need to communicate
with each other.
VLANs and the Rackmount switch
Your Moxa switch provides support for VLANs using IEEE Std 802.1Q-1998. This standard allows traffic from
multiple VLANs to be carried across one physical link. The IEEE Std 802.1Q-1998 standard allows each port on
your Moxa switch to be placed as follows:
•
On a single VLAN defined in the Moxa switch
•
On several VLANs simultaneously using 802.1Q tagging
The standard requires that you define the 802.1Q VLAN ID for each VLAN on your Moxa switch before the
switch can use it to forward traffic:
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Managing a VLAN
A new or initialized Moxa switch contains a single VLAN—the Default VLAN. This VLAN has the following
definition:
•
VLAN Name—Management VLAN
•
802.1Q VLAN ID—1 (if tagging is required)
All the ports are initially placed on this VLAN, and it is the only VLAN that allows you to access the management
software of the Moxa switch over the network.
Communication Between VLANs
If devices connected to a VLAN need to communicate to devices on a different VLAN, a router or Layer 3
switching device with connections to both VLANs needs to be installed. Communication between VLANs can
only take place if they are all connected to a routing or Layer 3 switching device.
VLANs: Tagged and Untagged Membership
The Moxa switch supports 802.1Q VLAN tagging, a system that allows traffic for multiple VLANs to be carried
on a single physical link (backbone, trunk). When setting up VLANs you need to understand when to use
untagged and tagged membership of VLANs. Simply put, if a port is on a single VLAN it can be an untagged
member, but if the port needs to be a member of multiple VLANs, tagged membership must be defined.
A typical host (e.g., clients) will be untagged members of one VLAN, defined as an Access Port in a Moxa
switch, while inter-switch connections will be tagged members of all VLANs, defined as a Trunk Port in a Moxa
switch.
The IEEE Std 802.1Q-1998 defines how VLANs operate within an open packet-switched network. An 802.1Q
compliant packet carries additional information that allows a switch to determine which VLAN the port belongs
to. If a frame is carrying the additional information, it is known as a tagged frame.
To carry multiple VLANs across a single physical link (backbone, trunk), each packet must be tagged with a
VLAN identifier so that the switches can identify which packets belong in which VLAN. To communicate between
VLANs, a router must be used.
The Moxa switch supports three types of VLAN port settings:
•
Access Port: The port connects to a single device that is not tagged. The user must define the default port
PVID that assigns which VLAN the device belongs to. Once the ingress packet of this Access Port egresses
to another Trunk Port (the port needs all packets to carry tag information), the Moxa switch will insert this
PVID into this packet so the next 802.1Q VLAN switch can recognize it.
•
Trunk Port: The port connects to a LAN that consists of untagged devices, tagged devices and/or switches
and hubs. In general, the traffic of the Trunk Port must have a Tag. Users can also assign a PVID to a Trunk
Port. The untagged packet on the Trunk Port will be assigned the port default PVID as its VID.
•
Hybrid Port: The port is similar to a Trunk port, except users can explicitly assign tags to be removed from
egress packets.
The following section illustrates how to use these ports to set up different applications.
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Sample Applications of VLANs Using Moxa Switches
In this application,
•
Port 1 connects a single untagged device and assigns it to VLAN 5; it should be configured as Access Port
with PVID 5.
•
Port 2 connects a LAN with two untagged devices belonging to VLAN 2. One tagged device with VID 3 and
one tagged device with VID 4. It should be configured as Trunk Port with PVID 2 for untagged device and
Fixed VLAN (Tagged) with 3 and 4 for tagged device. Since each port can only have one unique PVID, all
untagged devices on the same port must belong to the same VLAN.
•
Port 3 connects with another switch. It should be configured as Trunk Port GVRP protocol will be used
•
Port 4 connects a single untagged device and assigns it to VLAN 2; it should be configured as Access Port
•
Port 5 connects a single untagged device and assigns it to VLAN 3; it should be configured as Access Port
through the Trunk Port.
with PVID 2.
with PVID 3.
•
Port 6 connect a single untagged device and assigns it to VLAN 5; it should be configured as Access Port
•
Port 7 connects a single untagged device and assigns it to VLAN 4; it should be configured as Access Port
with PVID 5.
with PVID 4.
After the application is properly configured:
•
Packets from Device A will travel through Trunk Port 3 with tagged VID 5. Switch B will recognize its VLAN,
pass it to port 6, and then remove tags received successfully by Device G, and vice versa.
•
Packets from Devices B and C will travel through Trunk Port 3 with tagged VID 2. Switch B recognizes its
VLAN, passes it to port 4, and then removes tags received successfully by Device F, and vice versa.
•
Packets from Device D will travel through Trunk Port 3 with tagged VID 3. Switch B will recognize its VLAN,
pass to port 5, and then remove tags received successfully by Device H. Packets from Device H will travel
through Trunk Port 3 with PVID 3. Switch A will recognize its VLAN and pass it to port 2, but will not
remove tags received successfully by Device D.
•
Packets from Device E will travel through Trunk Port 3 with tagged VID 4. Switch B will recognize its VLAN,
pass it to port 7, and then remove tags received successfully by Device I. Packets from Device I will travel
through Trunk Port 3 with tagged VID 4. Switch A will recognize its VLAN and pass it to port 2, but will not
remove tags received successfully by Device E.
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Configuration Virtual LAN
VLAN Settings
To configure 802.1Q VLAN and port-based VLANs on the Moxa switch, use the VLAN Settings page to
configure the ports.
VLAN Mode
Setting
Description
Factory Default
802.1Q VLAN
Set VLAN mode to 802.1Q VLAN
802.1Q VLAN
Port-based VLAN
Set VLAN mode to Port-based VLAN
802.1Q VLAN Settings
The EDS E series support quick setting panel for VLAN setting. Administrator can configure VLAN by ports group and add
the setting to the VLAN ID Configuration Table. Once the configuration is finalized, then activate the final setting to
system by pressing Apply button.
Port Settings
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Port name from 1 to 7 or G1 to G16
Assign Port name
none
Group ports need to separate by “,” or “:”.
for configuration
(e.g. “G1, G3” means apply the setting to port G1 and
G3; “G1:G3” means apply the setting from G1 to G3)
Enable GVRP
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Enable/Disable
Enables or disables the GVRP function.
Enable
Management VLAN ID
Setting
Description
Factory Default
VLAN ID from 1 to 4094 Assigns the VLAN ID of this Moxa switch.
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Port Type
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Access
Port type is used to connect single devices without tags.
Access
Trunk
Select Trunk port type to connect another 802.1Q VLAN aware
switch
Hybrid
Select Hybrid port to connect another Access 802.1Q VLAN
aware switch or another LAN that combines tagged and/or
untagged devices and/or other switches/hubs.
ATTENTION
For communication redundancy in the VLAN environment, set Redundant Port Coupling Port and
Coupling Control Port as Trunk Port since these ports act as the backbone to transmit all packets of
different VLANs to different Moxa switch units.
Port PVID
Setting
Description
VID ranges from 1 to
Sets the default VLAN ID for untagged devices that connect to 1
Factory Default
4094
the port.
Tagged VLAN
Setting
Description
VID ranges from 1 to
This field will be active only when selecting the Trunk or Hybrid None
Factory Default
4094
port type. Set the other VLAN ID for tagged devices that
connect to the port. Use commas to separate different VIDs.
Untagged VLAN
Setting
Description
Factory Default
VID range from 1 to
This field will be active only when selecting the Hybrid
None
4094
port type. Set the other VLAN ID for tagged devices that
connect to the port and tags that need to be removed in egress
packets. Use commas to separate different VIDs.
Forbidden VLAN
Setting
Description
VID ranges from 1 to
This field will be active only when selecting the Trunk or Hybrid None
Factory Default
4094
port type. Set the other VLAN IDs that will not be supported by
this port. Use commas to separate different VIDs.
NOTE
Quick Setting Panel provides a quick way to setup multiple VLAN ports with the same setting.
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Port-Based VLAN Settings
Check each specific port to assign its VLAN ID in the table. The maximum VLAN ID is the same as your number
of switch ports.
NOTE
When Port-based VLAN configured, IGMP will be automatically disabled.
VLAN Table
Use the 802.1Q VLAN table to review the VLAN groups that were created, Joined Access Ports, Trunk
Ports, and Hybrid Ports, and use the Port-based VLAN table to review the VLAN groups and Joined
Ports.
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Port
Port Settings
Port settings are included to give the user control over port access, port transmission speed, flow control, and
port type (MDI or MDIX).
Enable
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Checked
Allows data transmission through the port.
Enabled
Unchecked
Immediately shuts off port access.
Media Type
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Media type
Displays the media type for each module’s port
N/A
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Max. 63 characters
Specifies an alias for the port to help administrators
None
Description
differentiate between different ports. Example: PLC 1
Speed
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Auto
Allows the port to use the IEEE 802.3u protocol to negotiate
Auto
with connected devices. The port and connected devices will
determine the best speed for that connection.
1G-Full
Choose one of these fixed speed options if the connected
100M-Full
Ethernet device has trouble auto-negotiating for line speed.
100M-Half
10M-Full
10M-Half
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FDX Flow Ctrl
This setting enables or disables flow control for the port when the port’s Speed is set to Auto. The final result
will be determined by the Auto process between the Moxa switch and connected devices.
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Enable
Enables flow control for this port when the port’s Speed is set to Disabled
Disable
Disables flow control for this port when the port’s Speed is set
Auto.
to Auto.
MDI/MDIX
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Auto
Allows the port to auto-detect the port type of the connected
Auto
Ethernet device and change the port type accordingly.
MDI
Choose MDI or MDIX if the connected Ethernet device has
MDIX
trouble auto-negotiating for port type.
Port Status
Below table shows the status of each port including the information of media type, link status, flow control and
port state.
Link Aggregation
Link aggregation involves grouping links into a link aggregation group. A MAC client can treat link aggregation
groups as if they were a single link.
The Moxa switch’s port trunking feature allows devices to communicate by aggregating up to 4 trunk groups,
with a maximum of 8 ports for each group. If one of the 8 ports fails, the other seven ports will automatically
provide backup and share the traffic.
Port trunking can be used to combine up to 8 ports between two Moxa switches. If all ports on both switches
are configured as 100BaseTX and they are operating in full duplex, the potential bandwidth of the connection
will be 1600 Mbps.
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The Port Trunking Concept
Moxa has developed a port trunking protocol that provides the following benefits:
•
Greater flexibility in setting up your network connections, since the bandwidth of a link can be doubled,
tripled, or quadrupled.
•
Redundancy—if one link is broken, the remaining trunked ports share the traffic within this trunk group.
•
Load sharing—MAC client traffic can be distributed across multiple links.
To avoid broadcast storms or loops in your network while configuring a trunk, first disable or disconnect all
ports that you want to add to the trunk or remove from the trunk. After you finish configuring the trunk, enable
or re-connect the ports.
If all ports on both switch units are configured as 100BaseTX and they are operating in full duplex mode, the
potential bandwidth of the connection will be up to 1.6 Gbps. This means that users can double, triple, or
quadruple the bandwidth of the connection by port trunking between two Moxa switches.
Each Moxa switch can set a maximum of 3 port trunking groups. When you activate port trunking, certain
settings on each port will be reset to factory default values or disabled:
•
Communication redundancy will be reset
•
802.1Q VLAN will be reset
•
Multicast Filtering will be reset
•
Port Lock will be reset and disabled.
•
Set Device IP will be reset
•
Mirror will be reset
After port trunking has been activated, you can configure these items again for each trunking port.
Port Trunking
The Port Trunking Settings page is where ports are assigned to a trunk group.
Step 1:
Select the desired Trunk Group
Step 2:
Select the Trunk Type (Static or LACP).
Step 3:
Select the Trunk Group to modify the desired ports if necessary
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Trunk Group (maximum of 4 trunk groups)
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Trk1, Trk2, Trk3, Trk4
Specifies the current trunk group.
Trk1
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Static
Selects Moxa’s static trunking protocol.
Static
LACP
Selects LACP (IEEE 802.3ad, Link Aggregation Control
Static
(depends on switching
chip capability; some
Moxa switches only
support 3 trunk
groups)
Trunk Type
Protocol).
Trunking Status
The Trunking Status table shows the Trunk Group configuration status.
Link-Swap Fast Recovery
The Link-Swap Fast Recovery function, which is enabled by default, allows the Moxa switch to return to normal
operation extremely quickly after devices are unplugged and then re-plugged into different ports. The recovery
time is on the order of a few milliseconds (compare this with standard commercial switches for which the
recovery time could be on the order of several minutes). To disable the Link-Swap Fast Recovery function, or
to re-enable the function after it has already been disabled, access either the Console utility’s Link-Swap
recovery page, or the Web Browser interface’s Link-Swap fast recovery page, as shown below.
Link-Swap-Fast-Recovery
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Enable/Disable
Checkmark the checkbox to enable the
Enable
Link-Swap-Fast-Recovery function
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Multicast
Multicast filtering improves the performance of networks that carry multicast traffic. This section explains
multicasts, multicast filtering, and how multicast filtering can be implemented on your Moxa switch.
The Concept of Multicast Filtering
What is an IP Multicast?
A multicast is a packet sent by one host to multiple hosts. Only those hosts that belong to a specific multicast
group will receive the multicast. If the network is set up correctly, a multicast can only be sent to an
end-station or a subset of end-stations on a LAN or VLAN that belong to the multicast group. Multicast group
members can be distributed across multiple subnets, so that multicast transmissions can occur within a
campus LAN or over a WAN. In addition, networks that support IP multicast send only one copy of the desired
information across the network until the delivery path that reaches group members diverges. To make more
efficient use of network bandwidth, it is only at these points that multicast packets are duplicated and
forwarded. A multicast packet has a multicast group address in the destination address field of the packet’s IP
header.
Benefits of Multicast
The benefits of using IP multicast are:
•
It uses the most efficient, sensible method to deliver the same information to many receivers with only one
transmission.
•
It reduces the load on the source (for example, a server) since it will not need to produce several copies of
the same data.
•
It makes efficient use of network bandwidth and scales well as the number of multicast group members
increases.
•
Works with other IP protocols and services, such as Quality of Service (QoS).
Multicast transmission makes more sense and is more efficient than unicast transmission for some applications.
For example, multicasts are often used for video-conferencing, since high volumes of traffic must be sent to
several end-stations at the same time, but where broadcasting the traffic to all end-stations would cause a
substantial reduction in network performance. Furthermore, several industrial automation protocols, such as
Allen-Bradley, EtherNet/IP, Siemens Profibus, and Foundation Fieldbus HSE (High Speed Ethernet), use
multicast. These industrial Ethernet protocols use publisher/subscriber communications models by
multicasting packets that could flood a network with heavy traffic. IGMP Snooping is used to prune multicast
traffic so that it travels only to those end destinations that require the traffic, reducing the amount of traffic on
the Ethernet LAN.
Multicast Filtering
Multicast filtering ensures that only end-stations that have joined certain groups receive multicast traffic. With
multicast filtering, network devices only forward multicast traffic to the ports that are connected to registered
end-stations. The following two figures illustrate how a network behaves without multicast filtering, and with
multicast filtering.
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Network without multicast filtering
All hosts receive the multicast
traffic, even if they don’t need it.
Network with multicast filtering
Hosts only receive dedicated
traffic from other hosts
belonging to the same group.
Multicast Filtering and Moxa’s Industrial Rackmount Switches
The Moxa switch has three ways to achieve multicast filtering: IGMP (Internet Group Management Protocol)
Snooping, GMRP (GARP Multicast Registration Protocol), and adding a static multicast MAC manually to filter
multicast traffic automatically.
Snooping Mode
Snooping Mode allows your switch to forward multicast packets only to the appropriate ports. The switch
snoops on exchanges between hosts and an IGMP device, such as a router, to find those ports that want to join
a multicast group, and then configures its filters accordingly.
Query Mode
Query mode allows the Moxa switch to work as the Querier if it has the lowest IP address on the subnetwork to
which it belongs.
NOTE
IGMP Snooping Enhanced mode is only provided in Layer 2 switches.
IGMP querying is enabled by default on the Moxa switch to ensure proceeding query election. Enable query
mode to run multicast sessions on a network that does not contain IGMP routers (or queriers). Query mode
allows users to enable IGMP snooping by VLAN ID. Moxa switches support IGMP snooping version 1, version 2
and version 3. Version 2 is compatible with version 1.The default setting is IGMP V1/V2. "
NOTE
Moxa Layer 3 switches are compatible with any device that conforms to the IGMP v2 and IGMP v3 device
protocols. Layer 2 switches only support IGMP v1/v2.
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IGMP Multicast Filtering
IGMP is used by IP-supporting network devices to register hosts with multicast groups. It can be used on all
LANs and VLANs that contain a multicast capable IP router, and on other network devices that support
multicast filtering. Moxa switches support IGMP version 1, 2 and 3. IGMP version 1 and 2 work as follows::
•
The IP router (or querier) periodically sends query packets to all end-stations on the LANs or VLANs that are
connected to it. For networks with more than one IP router, the router with the lowest IP address is the
querier. A switch with IP address lower than the IP address of any other IGMP queriers connected to the LAN
or VLAN can become the IGMP querier.
•
When an IP host receives a query packet, it sends a report packet back that identifies the multicast group
that the end-station would like to join.
•
When the report packet arrives at a port on a switch with IGMP Snooping enabled, the switch knows that the
port should forward traffic for the multicast group, and then proceeds to forward the packet to the router.
•
When the router receives the report packet, it registers that the LAN or VLAN requires traffic for the
multicast groups.
•
When the router forwards traffic for the multicast group to the LAN or VLAN, the switches only forward the
traffic to ports that received a report packet.
IGMP version 3 supports “source filtering,” which allows the system to define how to treat packets from
specified source addresses. The system can either white-list or black-list specified sources.
IGMP version comparison
IGMP Version
Main Features
Reference
V1
a. Periodic query
RFC-1112
V2
Compatible with V1 and adds:
RFC-2236
a. Group-specific query
b. Leave group messages
c. Resends specific queries to verify leave message was the last one in
the group
d. Querier election
V3
Compatible with V1, V2 and adds:
RFC-3376
a. Source filtering
- accept multicast traffic from specified source
- accept multicast traffic from any source except the specified source
GMRP (GARP Multicast Registration Protocol)
Moxa switches support IEEE 802.1D-1998 GMRP (GARP Multicast Registration Protocol), which is different from
IGMP (Internet Group Management Protocol). GMRP is a MAC-based multicast management protocol, whereas
IGMP is IP-based. GMRP provides a mechanism that allows bridges and end stations to register or de-register
Group membership information dynamically. GMRP functions similarly to GVRP, except that GMRP registers
multicast addresses on ports. When a port receives a GMRP-join message, it will register the multicast
address to its database if the multicast address is not registered, and all the multicast packets with that
multicast address are able to be forwarded from this port. When a port receives a GMRP-leave message, it will
de-register the multicast address from its database, and all the multicast packets with this multicast address
will not be able to be forwarded from this port.
Static Multicast MAC
Some devices may only support multicast packets, but not support either IGMP Snooping or GMRP. The Moxa
switch supports adding multicast groups manually to enable multicast filtering.
Enabling Multicast Filtering
Use the USB console or web interface to enable or disable IGMP Snooping and IGMP querying. If IGMP Snooping
is not enabled, then IP multicast traffic is always forwarded, flooding the network.
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IGMP Snooping
IGMP Snooping provides the ability to prune multicast traffic so that it travels only to those end destinations
that require that traffic, thereby reducing the amount of traffic on the Ethernet LAN.
IGMP Snooping Setting
Enable IGMP Snooping (Global)
Setting
Description
Enable/Disable
Checkmark the Enable IGMP Snooping checkbox near the top of Disabled
Factory Default
the window to enable the IGMP Snooping function globally.
Query Interval (sec)
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Numerical value, input
Sets the query interval of the Querier function globally. Valid
125 seconds
by the user
settings are from 20 to 600 seconds.
Enable IGMP Snooping
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Enable/Disable
Enables or disables the IGMP Snooping function on that
Enabled if IGMP
particular VLAN.
Snooping is enabled
globally
Querier
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Disable
Disables the Moxa switch’s querier function.
V1/V2
V1/V2 and V3 checkbox V1/V2: Enables switch to send IGMP snooping version 1 and 2
queries
V3: Enables switch to send IGMP snooping version 3 queries
Static Multicast Querier Port
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Select/Deselect
Select the ports that will connect to the multicast routers.
Disabled
These ports will receive all multicast packets from the source.
This option is only active when IGMP Snooping is enabled.
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NOTE
Featured Functions
If a router or layer 3 switch is connected to the network, it will act as the Querier, and consequently this
Querier option will be disabled on all Moxa layer 2 switches.
If all switches on the network are Moxa layer 2 switches, then only one layer 2 switch will act as Querier.
IGMP Group Status
The Moxa switch displays the current active IGMP groups that were detected. View IGMP group setting per
VLAN ID on this page.
The information shown in the table includes:
•
Dynamic Router Port: This indicates that a multicast router connects to/sends packets from these port(s).
•
Static Router Port: Displays the static multicast querier port(s)
•
Querier Connected Port: Displays the port which is connected to the querier
•
Role: Indicates if the switch is a querier. Displays Querier or Non-Querier
•
Group: Displays the multicast group addresses
•
Port: Displays the port which receive the multicast stream/the port the multicast stream is forwarded to
•
Version: Displays the IGMP Snooping version
•
Filter Mode: Indicates the multicast source address is included or excluded. Displays Include or Exclude
•
Sources: Displays the multicast source address when IGMP v3 is enabled
when IGMP v3 is enabled
Stream Table
This page displays the multicast stream forwarding status. It allows you to view the status per VLAN ID.
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Stream Group: Multicast group IP address
Stream Source: Multicast source IP address
Port: Which port receives the multicast stream
Member ports: Ports the multicast stream is forwarded to
Static Multicast Address
NOTE
01:00:5E:XX:XX:XX on this page is the IP multicast MAC address. Please activate IGMP Snooping for automatic
classification.
MAC Address
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Integer
Input the number of the VLAN that the host with this MAC
None
address belongs to.
Member Port
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Select/Deselect
Checkmark the appropriate check boxes to select the join ports None
for this multicast group.
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GMRP
GMRP is a MAC-based multicast management protocol, whereas IGMP is IP-based. GMRP provides a
mechanism that allows bridges and end stations to register or un-register Group membership information
dynamically.
Enable GMRP
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Select/Deselect
Checkmark the check boxes to enable GMRP function for the
None
port listed in the Port column.
GMRP Status
The Moxa switch displays the current active GMRP groups that were detected.
MAC Address: The Multicast MAC address
Static Port: This multicast address is defined by static multicast
Learned Port: This multicast address is learned by GMRP
QoS
The Moxa switch’s traffic prioritization capability provides Quality of Service (QoS) to your network by making
data delivery more reliable. You can prioritize traffic on your network to ensure that high priority data is
transmitted with minimum delay. Traffic can be controlled by a set of rules to obtain the required Quality of
Service for your network. The rules define different types of traffic and specify how each type should be treated
as it passes through the switch. The Moxa switch can inspect both IEEE 802.1p/1Q layer 2 CoS tags, and even
layer 3 TOS information to provide consistent classification of the entire network. The Moxa switch’s QoS
capability improves the performance and determinism of industrial networks for mission critical applications.
The Traffic Prioritization Concept
Traffic prioritization allows you to prioritize data so that time-sensitive and system-critical data can be
transferred smoothly and with minimal delay over a network. The benefits of using traffic prioritization are:
•
•
Improve network performance by controlling a wide variety of traffic and managing congestion.
Assign priorities to different categories of traffic. For example, set higher priorities for time-critical or
business-critical applications.
•
Provide predictable throughput for multimedia applications, such as video conferencing or voice over IP,
and minimize traffic delay and jitter.
•
Improve network performance as the amount of traffic grows. Doing so will reduce costs since it will not be
necessary to keep adding bandwidth to the network.
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Traffic prioritization uses the four traffic queues that are present in your Moxa switch to ensure that high
priority traffic is forwarded on a different queue from lower priority traffic. Traffic prioritization provides Quality
of Service (QoS) to your network.
Moxa switch traffic prioritization depends on two industry-standard methods:
•
IEEE 802.1D—a layer 2 marking scheme.
•
Differentiated Services (DiffServ)—a layer 3 marking scheme.
IEEE 802.1D Traffic Marking
The IEEE Std 802.1D, 1998 Edition marking scheme, which is an enhancement to IEEE Std 802.1D, enables
Quality of Service on the LAN. Traffic service levels are defined in the IEEE 802.1Q 4-byte tag, which is used to
carry VLAN identification as well as IEEE 802.1p priority information. The 4-byte tag immediately follows the
destination MAC address and Source MAC address.
The IEEE Std 802.1D, 1998 Edition priority marking scheme assigns an IEEE 802.1p priority level between 0
and 7 to each frame. The priority marking scheme determines the level of service that this type of traffic should
receive. Refer to the table below for an example of how different traffic types can be mapped to the eight IEEE
802.1p priority levels.
IEEE 802.1p Priority Level
IEEE 802.1D Traffic Type
0
Best Effort (default)
1
Background
2
Standard (spare)
3
Excellent Effort (business critical)
4
Controlled Load (streaming multimedia)
5
Video (interactive media); less than 100 milliseconds of latency and jitter
6
Voice (interactive voice); less than 10 milliseconds of latency and jitter
7
Network Control Reserved traffic
Even though the IEEE 802.1D standard is the most widely used prioritization scheme in the LAN environment,
it still has some restrictions:
•
It requires an additional 4-byte tag in the frame, which is normally optional for Ethernet networks. Without
this tag, the scheme cannot work.
•
The tag is part of the IEEE 802.1Q header, so to implement QoS at layer 2, the entire network must
•
It is only supported on a LAN and not across routed WAN links, since the IEEE 802.1Q tags are removed
implement IEEE 802.1Q VLAN tagging.
when the packets pass through a router.
Differentiated Services (DiffServ) Traffic Marking
DiffServ is a Layer 3 marking scheme that uses the DiffServ Code Point (DSCP) field in the IP header to store
the packet priority information. DSCP is an advanced intelligent method of traffic marking that allows you to
choose how your network prioritizes different types of traffic. DSCP uses 64 values that map to user-defined
service levels, allowing you to establish more control over network traffic.
The advantages of DiffServ over IEEE 802.1D are:
•
You can configure how you want your switch to treat selected applications and types of traffic by assigning
•
No extra tags are required in the packet.
•
DSCP uses the IP header of a packet to preserve priority across the Internet.
•
DSCP is backwards compatible with IPV4 TOS, which allows operation with existing devices that use a layer
various grades of network service to them.
3 TOS enabled prioritization scheme.
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Traffic Prioritization
Moxa switches classify traffic based on layer 2 of the OSI 7 layer model, and the switch prioritizes received
traffic according to the priority information defined in the received packet. Incoming traffic is classified based
upon the IEEE 802.1D frame and is assigned to the appropriate priority queue based on the IEEE 802.1p
service level value defined in that packet. Service level markings (values) are defined in the IEEE 802.1Q
4-byte tag, and consequently traffic will only contain 802.1p priority markings if the network is configured with
VLANs and VLAN tagging. The traffic flow through the switch is as follows:
•
A packet received by the Moxa switch may or may not have an 802.1p tag associated with it. If it does not,
then it is given a default 802.1p tag (which is usually 0). Alternatively, the packet may be marked with a
+new 802.1p value, which will result in all knowledge of the old 802.1p tag being lost.
•
Because the 802.1p priority levels are fixed to the traffic queues, the packet will be placed in the
appropriate priority queue, ready for transmission through the appropriate egress port. When the packet
reaches the head of its queue and is about to be transmitted, the device determines whether or not the
egress port is tagged for that VLAN. If it is, then the new 802.1p tag is used in the extended 802.1D header.
•
The Moxa switch will check a packet received at the ingress port for IEEE 802.1D traffic classification, and
then prioritize it based on the IEEE 802.1p value (service levels) in that tag. It is this 802.1p value that
determines which traffic queue the packet is mapped to.
Traffic Queues
The hardware of Moxa switches has multiple traffic queues that allow packet prioritization to occur. Higher
priority traffic can pass through the Moxa switch without being delayed by lower priority traffic. As each packet
arrives in the Moxa switch, it passes through any ingress processing (which includes classification,
marking/re-marking), and is then sorted into the appropriate queue. The switch then forwards packets from
each queue.
Moxa switches support two different queuing mechanisms:
•
Weight Fair: This method services all the traffic queues, giving priority to the higher priority queues.
Under most circumstances, the Weight Fair method gives high priority precedence over low priority, but in
the event that high priority traffic does not reach the link capacity, lower priority traffic is not blocked.
•
Strict: This method services high traffic queues first; low priority queues are delayed until no more high
priority data needs to be sent. The Strict method always gives precedence to high priority over low priority.
Configuring Traffic Prioritization
Quality of Service (QoS) provides a traffic prioritization capability to ensure that important data is delivered
consistently and predictably. The Moxa switch can inspect IEEE 802.1p/1Q layer 2 CoS tags, and even layer 3
TOS information, to provide a consistent classification of the entire network. The Moxa switch’s QoS capability
improves your industrial network’s performance and determinism for mission critical applications.
CoS Classification
There are two CoS classification settings depending on the specific model of the switch
Type
Model
Type1
EDS-510E
Type2
EDS-G508E, EDS-G512E-4GSFP, EDS-G516E-4GSFP
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Type 1
The Moxa switch supports inspection of layer 3 TOS and/or layer 2 CoS tag information to determine how to
classify traffic packets.
Queuing Mechanism
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Weight Fair
The Moxa switch has 4 priority queues. In the weight fair
Weight Fair
scheme, an 8, 4, 2, 1 weighting is applied to the four priorities.
This approach prevents the lower priority frames from being
starved of opportunity for transmission with only a slight delay
to the higher priority frames.
Strict
In the Strict-priority scheme, all top-priority frames egress a
port until that priority’s queue is empty, and then the next
lower priority queue’s frames egress. This approach can cause
the lower priorities to be starved of opportunity for transmitting
any frames but ensures that all high priority frames will egress
the switch as soon as possible.
TOS Inspection
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Enable/Disable
Enables or disables the Moxa switch for inspecting Type of
Enabled
Service (TOS) bits in the IPV4 frame to determine the priority
of each frame.
COS Overwriting
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Enable/Disable
Enables or disables the Moxa switch for inspecting 802.1p COS Enabled
tags in the MAC frame to determine the priority of each frame.
Priority
Setting
Description
Port priority
The port priority has 4 priority queues. Low, normal, medium, 3(Normal)
Factory Default
high priority queue option is applied to each port.
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NOTE
Featured Functions
The priority of an ingress frame is determined in the following order:
1. TOS Inspection
2. CoS Overwriting
3. Priority
NOTE
The designer can enable these classifications individually or in combination. For instance, if a “hot” higher
priority port is required for a network design, Inspect TOS and Inspect CoS can be disabled. This setting
leaves only port default priority active, which results in all ingress frames being assigned the same priority on
that port.
Type 2
Queuing Mechanism
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Weight Fair
The Moxa switch has 4 priority queues. In the weight fair
Weight Fair
scheme, an 8, 4, 2, 1 weighting is applied to the four priorities.
This approach prevents the lower priority frames from being
starved of opportunity for transmission with only a slight delay
to the higher priority frames.
Strict
In the Strict-priority scheme, all top-priority frames egress a
port until that priority’s queue is empty, and then the next
lower priority queue’s frames egress. This approach can cause
the lower priorities to be starved of opportunity for transmitting
any frames but ensures that all high priority frames will egress
the switch as soon as possible.
TOS Inspection
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Enable/Disable
Enables or disables the Moxa switch for inspecting Type of
Enabled
Service (TOS) bits in the IPV4 frame to determine the priority
of each frame.
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COS Overwriting
Setting
Description
Enable/Disable
Enables or disables the Moxa switch for inspecting 802.1p COS Enabled
Factory Default
tags in the MAC frame to determine the priority of each frame.
Priority
Setting
Description
Port priority
The port priority has 4 priority queues. Low, normal, medium, High
Factory Default
high priority queue option is applied to each port.
NOTE
The priority of an ingress frame is determined in the following order:
1. Priority
2. ToS Inspection
3. CoS Overwriting
CoS Mapping
CoS Value and Priority Queues
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Low/Normal/
Maps different CoS values to 4 different egress queues.
Low
Medium/High
Normal
Medium
High
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DSCP Mapping
DSCP Value and Priority Queues
Setting
Description
Low/Normal/
Maps different TOS values to 4 different egress queues.
Factory Default
Medium/High
0 to 15: Low
16 to 31: Normal
32 to 47: Medium
48 to 63: High
Rate Limiting
In general, one host should not be allowed to occupy unlimited bandwidth, particularly when the device
malfunctions. For example, so-called “broadcast storms” could be caused by an incorrectly configured topology,
or a malfunctioning device. Moxa industrial Ethernet switches not only prevents broadcast storms, but can also
be configured to a different ingress rate for all packets, giving administrators full control of their limited
bandwidth to prevent undesirable effects caused by unpredictable faults.
Traffic Rate Limiting Settings
Please note that two types of bandwidth management settings are available, depending on the specific model
of switch.
Type
Model
Type1
EDS-510E
Type2
EDS-G508E, EDS-G512E-4GSFP, EDS-G516E-4GSFP
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Type 1
Ingress Rate Limit – Normal
Control Mode
Description
Factory Default
Normal
Set the max. ingress rate limit for different packet types
Normal
Port Disable
When the ingress multicast and broadcast packets exceed the
ingress rate limit, the port will be disabled for a certain period.
During this period, all packets from this port will be discarded.
Ingress Rate Limit - Normal
Policy
Description
Factory Default
Limit All
Select the ingress rate limit for different packet types from the Limit Broadcast 8M
Limit Broadcast,
following options: Unlimited, 128K, 256K, 512K, 1M, 2M, 4M,
Multicast, Flooded
8M
Unicast
Limit Broadcast,
Multicast
Limit Broadcast
Egress Rate Limit
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Egress rate
Select the ingress rate limit (% of max. throughput) for all
Unlimited
packets from the following options: Not Limited, 3%, 5%, 10%,
15%, 25%, 35%, 50%, 65%, 85%
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Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
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Ingress Rate Limit – Port Disable
Setting
Description
Port disable duration
When the ingress multicast and broadcast packets exceed the 30 second
Factory Default
(1~65535 seconds)
ingress rate limit, the port will be disabled for this period of
time. During this time, all packets from this port will be
discarded.
Ingress (fps)
Select the ingress rate (fps) limit for all packets from the
Unlimited
following options: Not Limited, 4464, 7441, 14881, 22322,
37203, 52084, 74405
Type 2
Ingress Rate Limit – Drop Packet
Setting
Description
Ingress rate
Select the ingress/egress rate limit (% of max. throughput) for Unlmited
Factory Default
all packets from the following options: Not Limited, 3%, 5%,
10%, 15%, 25%, 35%, 50%, 65%, 85%
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Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
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Ingress Rate Limit – Disable Port
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Duration (1~65535
When the ingress packets exceed the ingress rate limit, the
30 seconds
seconds)
port will be disabled for a certain period.
Ingress (frame per
Select the ingress rate (fps) limit for all packets from the
second)
following options: Not Limited, 4464, 7441, 14881, 22322,
Unlimited
37203, 52084, 74405
Security
Security can be categorized in two levels: the user name/password level, and the port access level. Moxa
switches provide many kinds of security functions, including Login Authentication, Management Interface,
Trusted Access, Authentication Certificate, IEEE 802.1A, Port Security, and Loop Protection.
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Login Authentication
Moxa switches provide two different user login options: Terminal Access Controller Access-Control System Plus
(TACACS+) and Remote Authentication Dial In User Service (RADIUS). The TACACS+ and RADIUS mechanism
is a centralized “AAA” (Authentication, Authorization and Accounting) system for connecting to network
services. The fundamental purpose of both TACACS+ and RADIUS is to provide an efficient and secure
mechanism for user account management.
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Authentication Protocol Authentication protocol selection
Server IP/Name
TACACS+
Set IP address of an external TACACS+/RADIUS server as the None
authentication database
TCP/UDP Port
Set communication port of an external TACACS+/RADIUS
TACACS+: 49
server as the authentication database
RADIUS: 1812
Shared Key
Set specific characters for server authentication verification
None
Authentication Type
Authentication mechanism selection. The ASCII, PAP, CHAP,
ASCII for TACACS+
MSCHAP are for TACACS+, and the EAP-MD5 is for RADIUS.
Timeout (sec)
The timeout period to wait for a server response
TACACS+: 30
RADIUS: 5
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Management Interface
Enable HTTP
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Select/Deselect
Checkmark the appropriate check boxes to enable HTTP.
Select
Port: 80
Enable SSL
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Select/Deselect
Checkmark the appropriate check boxes to enable SSL.
Select
Port: 443
Enable Telnet
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Select/Deselect
Checkmark the appropriate check boxes to enable Telnet
Select
Port: 23
Enable SSH
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Select/Deselect
Checkmark the appropriate check boxes to enable SSH
Select
Port: 5
Web Auto Logout (min)
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Integer
Sets the web auto logout period
5
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Trusted Access
The Moxa switch uses an IP address-based filtering method to control access.
You may add or remove IP addresses to limit access to the Moxa switch. When the accessible IP list is enabled,
only addresses on the list will be allowed access to the Moxa switch. Each IP address and netmask entry can be
tailored for different situations:
•
Grant access to one host with a specific IP address
For example, enter IP address 192.168.1.1 with netmask 255.255.255.255 to allow access to 192.168.1.1
only.
•
Grant access to any host on a specific subnetwork
For example, enter IP address 192.168.1.0 with netmask 255.255.255.0 to allow access to all IPs on the
subnet defined by this IP address/subnet mask combination.
•
Grant access to all hosts
Make sure the accessible IP list is not enabled. Remove the checkmark from Enable the accessible IP
list.
The following table shows additional configuration examples:
Hosts That Need Access
Input Format
Any host
Disable
192.168.1.120
192.168.1.120 / 255.255.255.255
192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.254
192.168.1.0 / 255.255.255.0
192.168.0.1 to 192.168.255.254
192.168.0.0 / 255.255.0.0
192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.126
192.168.1.0 / 255.255.255.128
192.168.1.129 to 192.168.1.254
192.168.1.128 / 255.255.255.128
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Authentication Certificate
SSL Certificate Re-generate
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Select/Deselect
Enable the SSL Certificate Re-generate
Deselect
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Select/Deselect
Enable the SSH Key Re-generate
Deselect
SSH Key Re-generate
IEEE 802.1X
The IEEE 802.1X standard defines a protocol for client/server-based access control and authentication. The
protocol restricts unauthorized clients from connecting to a LAN through ports that are open to the Internet,
and which otherwise would be readily accessible. The purpose of the authentication server is to check each
client that requests access to the port. The client is only allowed access to the port if the client’s permission is
authenticated.
Three components are used to create an authentication mechanism based on 802.1X standards:
Client/Supplicant, Authentication Server, and Authenticator.
Client/Supplicant: The end station that requests access to the LAN and switch services and responds to the
requests from the switch.
Authentication Server: The server that performs the actual authentication of the supplicant.
Authenticator: Edge switch or wireless access point that acts as a proxy between the supplicant and the
authentication server, requesting identity information from the supplicant, verifying the information with the
authentication server, and relaying a response to the supplicant.
The Moxa switch acts as an authenticator in the 802.1X environment. A supplicant and an authenticator
exchange EAPOL (Extensible Authentication Protocol over LAN) frames with each other. We can either use an
external RADIUS server as the authentication server, or implement the authentication server in the Moxa
switch by using a Local User Database as the authentication look-up table. When we use an external RADIUS
server as the authentication server, the authenticator and the authentication server exchange EAP frames
between each other.
Authentication can be initiated either by the supplicant or the authenticator. When the supplicant initiates the
authentication process, it sends an EAPOL-Start frame to the authenticator. When the authenticator initiates
the authentication process or when it receives an EAPOL Start frame, it sends an EAP Request/Identity
frame to ask for the username of the supplicant.
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IEEE 802.1X Setting
Authentication Option
Setting
Description
Local
Select this option when setting the Local User Database as the Local
Factory Default
(Max. of 32 users)
authentication database.
Radius
Select this option to set an external RADIUS server as the
authentication database. The authentication mechanism is
EAP-MD5.
Radius, Local
Select this option to make using an external RADIUS server as
the authentication database the first priority. The
authentication mechanism is EAP-MD5 The first priority is to set
the Local User Database as the authentication database.
Re-Auth (Global)
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Enable/Disable
Select enable to require re-authentication of the client after a
Enable
preset time period of no activity has elapsed.
Re-Auth Period (sec)
Setting
Description
Factory Default
60 to 65535
Sets the Re-Auth period
3600
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Select/Deselect
Checkmark the checkbox under the 802.1X column to enable
Deselect
Enable 802.1X
IEEE 802.1X for one or more ports. All end stations must enter
usernames and passwords before access to these ports is
allowed.
Re-Auth
Setting
Description
Select/Deselect
Select enable to require re-authentication of the client by port Deselect
Factory Default
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Local Database
When setting the Local User Database as the authentication database, set the database first.
Local User Database Setup
Setting
Description
Factory Default
User Name
User Name for the Local User Database
None
Password for the Local User Database
None
Confirm Password for the Local User Database
None
Description for the Local User Database
None
(Max. of 30 characters)
Password
(Max. of 16 characters)
Confirm Password
(Max. of 16 characters)
Description
(Max. of 30 characters)
NOTE
The user name for the Local User Database is case-insensitive.
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RADIUS Server Settings
Apply Login Authentication Setting
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Select/Deselect
Enable to use the same setting as Auth Server
Deselect
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Server IP/Name
Specifies the IP/name of the server
None
Server Port
Specifies the port of the server
1812
Server Shared Key
Specifies the shared key of the server
None
Server Setting
Port Security
The Moxa switch supports adding unicast groups manually if required.
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Static Unicast MAC Address
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Port
Associates the static address to a dedicated port.
1 or 1-1
MAC Address
Adds the static unicast MAC address into the address table.
None
Port Access Control Table
The port status will show authorized or unauthorized.
Broadcast Storm Protection
The Broadcast Storm Protection is only available for EDS-G508E, EDS-G512E-4GSFP, and EDS-G516E-4GSFP
series.
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Enable/Disable
This enables or disables Broadcast Storm Protection for
Enable
unknown broadcast packet globally
This enables or disables Broadcast Storm Protection for
unknown multicast packets and unicast packets globally
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Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
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Loop Protection
Enable Loop Protection
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Enable
Enable the loop protection function
Disable
Disable
Disable the loop protection function
DHCP
IP-Port Binding
Designated IP Address
Setting
Description
Factory Default
IP Address
Set the desired IP of connected devices.
None
Option 82 is used by the relay agent to insert additional information into the client’s DHCP request. The Relay
Agent Information option is inserted by the DHCP relay agent when forwarding client-originated DHCP packets
to a DHCP server. Servers can recognize the Relay Agent Information option and use the information to
implement IP addresses to Clients.
When Option 82 is enabled on the switch, a subscriber device is identified by the switch port through which it
connects to the network (in addition to its MAC address). Multiple hosts on the subscriber LAN can be connected
to the same port on the access switch and are uniquely identified.
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The Option 82 information contains 2 sub-options, Circuit ID and Remote ID, which define the relationship
between the end device IP and the DHCP Option 82 server. The Circuit ID is a 4-byte number generated by the
Ethernet switch—a combination of physical port number and VLAN ID. The format of the Circuit ID is shown
below:
FF–VV–VV–PP
This is where the first byte “FF” is fixed to “01”, the second and the third byte “VV-VV” is formed by the port
VLAN ID in hex, and the last byte “PP” is formed by the port number in hex. For example:
01–00–0F–03 is the “Circuit ID” of port number 3 with port VLAN ID 15.
The “Remote ID” identifies the relay agent itself and can be one of the following:
1. The IP address of the relay agent.
2. The MAC address of the relay agent.
3. A combination of IP address and MAC address of the relay agent.
4. A user-defined string.
DHCP Relay Agent
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Server IP Address
1st Server
Setting
Description
IP address for the 1st
Assigns the IP address of the 1st DHCP server that the switch None
Factory Default
DHCP server
tries to access.
2nd Server
Setting
Description
Factory Default
IP address for the 2nd
Assigns the IP address of the 2nd DHCP server that the switch None
DHCP server
tries to access.
3rd Server
Setting
Description
IP address for the 3rd
Assigns the IP address of the 3rd DHCP server that the switch None
Factory Default
DHCP server
tries to access.
4th Server
Setting
Description
IP address for the 4th
Assigns the IP address of the 4th DHCP server that the switch None
Factory Default
DHCP server
tries to access.
DHCP Option 82
Enable Option 82
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Enable or Disable
Enable or disable the DHCP Option 82 function.
Disable
Description
Factory Default
IP
Uses the switch’s IP address as the remote ID sub.
IP
MAC
Uses the switch’s MAC address as the remote ID sub.
IP
Client-ID
Uses a combination of the switch’s MAC address and IP address IP
Assign Remote-ID by
Setting
as the remote ID sub.
Other
Uses the user-designated ID sub.
IP
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Max. 12 characters
Displays the value that was set. Complete this field if type is set Switch IP address
Value
to Other.
Remote-ID
Setting
Description
read-only
The actual hexadecimal value configured in the DHCP server for COA87FFD
Factory Default
the Remote-ID. This value is automatically generated
according to the Value field. Users cannot modify it.
DHCP Function Table
Enable
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Enable or Disable
Enable or disable the DHCP Option 82 function for this port.
Disable
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SNMP
The Moxa switch supports SNMP V1, V2c, and V3. SNMP V1 and SNMP V2c use a community string match for
authentication, which means that SNMP servers access all objects with read-only or read/write permissions
using the community strings public and private by default. SNMP V3 requires that you select an authentication
level of MD5 or SHA, and is the most secure protocol. You can also enable data encryption to enhance data
security.
Supported SNMP security modes and levels are shown in the following table. Select the security mode and level
that will be used to communicate between the SNMP agent and manager.
Protocol
Version
UI Setting
Authentication
SNMP V1,
V1, V2c Read Community string
V2c
Community
V1, V2c
Encryption
Method
No
Uses a community string match for
authentication.
Community string
No
Write/Read
Uses a community string match for
authentication.
Community
SNMP V3
No-Auth
No
No
Uses an account with admin or user to access
objects
MD5 or SHA
Authentication
No
Provides authentication based on HMAC-MD5,
based on MD5 or
or HMAC-SHA algorithms. 8-character
SHA
passwords are the minimum requirement for
authentication.
MD5 or SHA
Authentication
Data
Provides authentication based on HMAC-MD5
based on MD5 or
encryption
or HMAC-SHA algorithms, and data encryption
SHA
key
key. 8-character passwords and a data
encryption key are the minimum requirements
for authentication .and encryption.
These parameters are configured on the SNMP page. A more detailed explanation of each parameter is given
below the figure.
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SNMP Read/Write Settings
SNMP Versions
Setting
Description
Factory Default
V1, V2c, V3, or
Specifies the SNMP protocol version used to manage the
V1, V2c
V1, V2c, or
switch.
V3 only
V1, V2c Read Community
Setting
Description
Max. 30 characters
Specifies the community string to authenticate the SNMP agent Public
Factory Default
for read-only access. The SNMP agent will access all objects
with read-only permissions using this community string.
V1, V2c Write/Read Community
Setting
Description
Max. 30 characters
Specifies the community string to authenticate the SNMP agent Private
Factory Default
for read/write access. The SNMP server will access all objects
with read/write permissions using this community string.
For SNMP V3, two levels of privilege are available accessing the Moxa switch. Admin privilege provides access
and authorization to read and write the MIB file. User privilege allows reading of the MIB file only.
Admin Auth. Type (for SNMP V1, V2c, V3, and V3 only)
Setting
Description
Factory Default
No-Auth
Allows the admin account to access objects without
No
MD5-
Authentication will be based on the HMAC-MD5 algorithms.
Auth
8-character passwords are the minimum requirement for
authentication.
No
authentication.
SHA-
Authentication will be based on the HMAC-SHA algorithms.
Auth
8-character passwords are the minimum requirement for
No
authentication.
Enable Admin Data Encryption Key (for SNMP V1, V2c, V3, and V3 only)
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Enable
Enables data encryption using the specified data encryption
No
key (between 8 and 30 characters).
Disable
Specifies that data will not be encrypted.
No
User Auth. Type (for SNMP V1, V2c, V3 and V3 only)
Setting
Description
Factory Default
No-Auth
Allows the admin account and user account to access objects
No
without authentication.
MD5-Auth
Authentication will be based on the HMAC-MD5 algorithms.
No
8-character passwords are the minimum requirement for
authentication.
SHA-Auth
Authentication will be based on the HMAC-SHA algorithms.
No
8-character passwords are the minimum requirement for
authentication.
Enable User Data Encryption Key (for SNMP V1, V2c, V3 and V3 only)
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Enable
Enables data encryption using the specified data encryption
No
key (between 8 and 30 characters).
Disable
No data encryption
No
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Trap Settings
SNMP traps allow an SNMP agent to notify the NMS of a significant event. The switch supports two SNMP modes,
Trap mode and Inform mode.
SNMP Trap Mode—Trap
In Trap mode, the SNMP agent sends an SNMPv1 trap PDU to the NMS. No acknowledgment is sent back from
the NMS so the agent has no way of knowing if the trap reached the NMS.
SNMP Trap Mode—Inform
SNMPv2 provides an inform mechanism. When an inform message is sent from the SNMP agent to the NMS, the
receiver sends a response to the sender acknowledging receipt of the event. This behavior is similar to that of
the get and set requests. If the SNMP agent does not receive a response from the NMS for a period of time, the
agent will resend the trap to the NMS agent. The maximum timeout time is 300 sec (default is 1 sec), and the
maximum number of retries is 99 times (default is 1 time). When the SNMP agent receives acknowledgement
from the NMS, it will stop resending the inform messages.
Host IP Address 1
Setting
Description
Factory Default
IP or name
Specifies the IP address or name of the primary trap server
None
used by your network.
1st Trap Community
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Max. 30 characters
Specifies the community string to use for authentication.
Public
Setting
Description
Factory Default
IP or name
Specifies the IP address or name of the secondary trap server None
Host IP Address 2
used by your network.
2nd Trap Community
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Max. 30 characters
Specifies the community string to use for authentication.
Public
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Industrial Protocol
The Moxa switch supports 3 industrial protocols, EtherNet/IP, Modbus TCP and PROFITNET I/O. Those 3
protocols can be enable/disabled by checkbox selection.
NOTE
1. IGMP Snooping and IGMP Query functions will be enabled automatically to be properly integrated in
Rockwell systems for multicast Implicit (I/O) Messaging for efficient EtherNet/IP communication.
2. EtherNet/IP can’t be enabled while IGMP snooping is disabled due to VLAN setting.
Diagnostics
The Moxa switch provides three important tools for administrators to diagnose network systems.
LLDP
Overview
LLDP is an OSI Layer 2 protocol defined by IEEE 802.11AB. LLDP standardizes the self-identification
advertisement method, and allows each networking device, such as a Moxa managed switch, to periodically
send its system and configuration information to its neighbors. Because of this, all LLDP devices are kept
informed of each other’s status and configuration, and with SNMP, this information can be transferred to
Moxa’s MXview for auto-topology and network visualization.
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From the switch’s web interface, you can enable or disable LLDP, and set the LLDP transmit interval. In addition,
you can view each switch’s neighbor-list, which is reported by its network neighbors. Most importantly,
enabling the LLDP function allows Moxa’s MXview to automatically display the network’s topology and system
setup details, such as VLAN and Trunking, for the entire network.
Configuring LLDP Settings
General Settings
LLDP
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Enable or Disable
Enables or disables the LLDP function.
Enable
Message Transmit Interval
Setting
Description
Factory Default
5 to 32768 sec.
Sets the transmit interval of LLDP messages, in seconds.
5 (seconds)
LLDP Table
The LLDP Table displays the following information:
Port
The port number that connects to the neighbor device.
Neighbor ID
A unique entity (typically the MAC address) that identifies a neighbor device.
Neighbor Port
The port number of the neighbor device.
Neighbor Port Description
A textual description of the neighbor device’s interface.
Neighbor System
Hostname of the neighbor device.
Ping
The Ping function uses the ping command to give users a simple but powerful tool for troubleshooting network
problems. The function’s most unique feature is that even though the ping command is entered from the user’s
PC keyboard, the actual ping command originates from the Moxa switch itself. In this way, the user can
essentially sit on top of the Moxa switch and send ping commands out through its ports.
To use the Ping function, type in the desired IP address, and then press Enter from the Console utility, or click
Ping when using the Web Browser interface.
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Port Mirror
The Port Mirror function can be used to monitor data being transmitted through a specific port. This is done by
setting up another port (the mirror port) to receive the same data being transmitted from, or both to and from, the
port under observation. Using a mirror port allows the network administrator to sniff the observed port to keep tabs
on network activity.
Port Mirroring Settings
Setting
Description
Monitored Port
Select the number of the ports whose network activity will be monitored. Multiple port
selection is acceptable.
Sniffer Mode
Select one of the following two watch direction options:
•
RX:
Select this option to monitor only those data packets coming into the Moxa switch’s
port.
•
TX:
Select this option to monitor only those data packets being sent out through the
Moxa switch’s port.
•
TX/RX:
Select this option to monitor data packets both coming into, and being sent out
through, the Moxa switch’s port.
Mirror Port
Select the number of the port that will be used to monitor the activity of the monitored
port.
Monitoring
You can monitor statistics in real time from the Moxa switch’s/DSL extender’s web console and USB console.
System Utilization
System Utilization display the system resource utilized status. By monitoring the information can easy and
quick understand the switch working status
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CPU Utilization
Setting
Description
Read-only
The CPU usage volume in the past 5 seconds, 30 seconds, and Past 5 secs
Factory Default
5 minutes
Free Memory
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Read-only
The immediately free memory of the switch
None
Setting
Description
Factory Default
Read-only
The immediately system power consumption information. The None
Power Consumption
measurement tolerance is 7% (Unit: watts.)
Statistics
Access the Monitor by selecting Monitoring from the left selection bar. Monitor by System allows the user to
view a graph that shows the combined data transmission activity of all of the Moxa switch’s 18 ports. Click one
of the four options—Total Packets, TX Packets, RX Packets, or Error Packets—to view transmission
activity of specific types of packets. Recall that TX Packets are packets sent out from the Moxa switch, RX
Packets are packets received from connected devices, and Error Packets are packets that did not pass TCP/IP’s
error checking algorithm. The Total Packets option displays a graph that combines TX, RX, and TX Error, RX
Error Packets activity. The graph displays data transmission activity by showing Packets/s (i.e., packets per
second, or pps) versus sec. (seconds). In fact, three curves are displayed on the same graph: Uni-cast
packets (in red color), Multi-cast packets (in green color), and Broad-cast packets (in blue color). The graph
is updated every few seconds, allowing the user to analyze data transmission activity in real-time.
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Monitor by Port
Access the Monitor by Port function by selecting FE or GE Ports or Port i, in which i = 1, 2, …, G2, from the
left pull-down list. The Port i options are identical to the Monitor by System function discussed above, in that
users can view graphs that show All Packets, TX Packets, RX Packets, or Error Packets activity, but in this case,
only for an individual port. The All Ports option is essentially a graphical display of the individual port activity
that can be viewed with the Console Monitor function discussed above. The All Ports option shows three vertical
bars for each port. The height of the bar represents Packets/s for the type of packet, at the instant the bar is
being viewed. That is, as time progresses, the height of the bar moves up or down so that the user can view the
change in the rate of packet transmission. The blue colored bar shows Uni-cast packets, the red colored bar
shows Multi-cast packets, and the orange colored bar shows Broad-cast packets. The graph is updated every
few seconds, allowing the user to analyze data transmission activity in real-time.
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Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
Featured Functions
SFP DDM
Optical fiber is commonly used for long distance data transmission. However, when link issues occur, it is very
costly to trouble shoot the fiber cable and fiber transceiver at remote sites. To solve this problem, Moxa
industrial Ethernet switches provide digital diagnostic and monitoring functions on Moxa SFP optical fiber links
and allow users to measure optical parameters and its performance from center site. This function can greatly
facilitate the trouble shooting process for optical fiber links and reduce costs for onsite debug.
NOTE
Parameter
Description
Port No.
Switch port number with SFP plugged in
Model Name
Moxa SFP model name
Temperature (°C)
SFP casing temperature
Voltage (V)
Voltage supply to the SFP
Tx power (dBm)
The amount of light being transmitted into the fiber optic cable
Rx power (dBm)
The amount of light being received from the fiber optic cable
Certain tolerances exist between real data and measured data
Parameters
Tolerance
Temperature (°C)
± 3°C
Voltage (V)
± 0.1V
Tx power (dBm)
± 3dB
Rx power (dBm)
± 3dB
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Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
Featured Functions
Event Log
The Event Log Table displays the following information:
Index
Event index assigned to identify the event sequence.
Bootup Number
This field shows how many times the Moxa switch has been rebooted or cold started.
Date
The date is updated based on how the current date is set in the Basic Setting page.
Time
The time is updated based on how the current time is set in the Basic Setting page.
System Startup
The system startup time related to this event.
Time
Event
NOTE
Events that have occurred.
The following events will be recorded into the Moxa switch’s Event Log Table:
•
Cold start
•
Warm start
•
Configuration change activated
•
Power 1/2 transition (Off ( On), Power 1/2 transition (On ( Off))
•
Authentication fail
•
Topology changed
•
Master setting is mismatched
•
Port traffic overload
•
dot1x Auth Fail
•
Port link off/on
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MIB Groups
The Moxa switch comes with built-in SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol) agent software that
supports cold/warm start trap, line up/down trap, and RFC 1213 MIB-II.
The standard MIB groups that the Moxa switch supports are as follows:
MIB II.1—System Group
sysORTable
MIB II.2—Interfaces Group
ifTable
MIB II.4 – IP Group
ipAddrTable
ipNetToMediaTable
IpGroup
IpBasicStatsGroup
IpStatsGroup
MIB II.5—ICMP Group
IcmpGroup
IcmpInputStatus
IcmpOutputStats
MIB II.6—TCP Group
tcpConnTable
TcpGroup
TcpStats
MIB II.7—UDP Group
udpTable
UdpStats
MIB II.10—Transmission Group
dot3
dot3StatsTable
MIB II.11—SNMP Group
SnmpBasicGroup
SnmpInputStats
SnmpOutputStats
MIB II.17—dot1dBridge Group
dot1dBase
dot1dBasePortTable
dot1dStp
dot1dStpPortTable
dot1dTp
dot1dTpFdbTable
dot1dTpPortTable
Moxa E Series Managed Ethernet Switch
MIB Groups
dot1dTpHCPortTable
dot1dTpPortOverflowTable
pBridgeMIB
dot1dExtBase
dot1dPriority
dot1dGarp
qBridgeMIB
dot1qBase
dot1qTp
dot1qFdbTable
dot1qTpPortTable
dot1qTpGroupTable
dot1qForwardUnregisteredTable
dot1qStatic
dot1qStaticUnicastTable
dot1qStaticMulticastTable
dot1qVlan
dot1qVlanCurrentTable
dot1qVlanStaticTable
dot1qPortVlanTable
The Moxa switch also provides a private MIB file, located in the file Moxa-[switch’s model name]-MIB.my
on the Moxa switch utility CD-ROM.
Public Traps
•
Cold Start
•
Link Up
•
Link Down
•
Authentication Failure
•
dot1dBridge New Root
•
dot1dBridge Topology Changed
Private Traps
•
Configuration Changed
•
Power On
•
Power Off
•
Traffic Overloaded
•
Turbo Ring Topology Changed
•
Turbo Ring Coupling Port Changed
•
Turbo Ring Master Mismatch
•
PortLoopDetectedTrap
•
RateLimitedOnTrap
•
LLDPChgTrap
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