COMMUNITY
SOLUTIONS
™
Owner’s Manual
SLS Full-Range Loudspeakers
And
SBS Subwoofers
A T R A D I T I O N O F E X C E L L E N C E A N D I N N O VAT I O N
Since the founding of our company in 1968, Community has been a constant developer and innovator
of loudspeaker technology. Many of our engineering achievements were undertaken to solve problems,
when no prior solutions existed. Others resulted from simply seeing a better way to do things.
Over the years our technologies have been imitated, and our methods have become common practice
throughout the professional sound industry. However, developments like carbon fiber diaphragm
compression drivers still stand alone, and well ahead of the competition. Just a few of Community’s
unique accomplishments include the following:
• First successful fiberglass mid, high frequency, and large-format bass horns.
• First compression loaded mid-range horn for touring systems - the LMF.
• First suspension-less diaphragm HF driver - the VHF100.
• First mid-range, full-decade (200 Hz - 2 kHz) high-power compression driver - the M4.
• First carbon fiber diaphragm compression drivers - M4, EM280, EM282.
• First Ferrofluid-cooled professional woofers - the VBS Series.
• First product series with all drivers Ferrofluid-cooled.
• First air-cooled loudspeakers for touring systems - AirForce.
• First three-way cinema loudspeaker systems - Paramount Executive Studio Theatre, Warner Bros.
screening theatre and dubbing rooms.
• First electro-acoustic system to equal the sound level of pneumatic warning sirens.
• First to provide loudspeaker coverage over an entire country - Denmark Emergency System.
• First comprehensive, calibrated data acquisition of sound reinforcement products.
• First integral signal-aligned three-way sound reinforcement systems - RS Series.
• First pro audio company with an Internet Web site.
• First all horn-loaded, high-fidelity, weather-resistant loudspeaker - R2 Series.
In line with our history of excellence and innovation, each Community product is manufactured in
accordance with a complicated and exacting chain of procedures that ensure absolute quality.
With our unique designs, our sophisticated techniques, and our proprietary materials and transducers,
we are committed to bringing only the finest audio products to the many thousands of professional
sound engineers, performers, and end users who rely on them daily.
Community Professional Loudspeakers
333 East Fifth Street
Chester, PA 19013-4511 USA
TEL: 1-(610) 876-3400 FAX: 1-(610) 874-0190
© 2010 All Rights Reserved
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
E C S TAT E M E N T O F C O N F O R M I T Y
This document confirms that the range of products of Community Professional Loudspeakers bearing
the CE label meets all of the requirements in the EMC directive 89/336/EEC laid down by the Member
States Council for adjustment of legal requirements. Furthermore, the products comply with the rules
and regulations referring to the electromagnetic compatibility of devices from 30-August-1995.
The Community Professional Loudspeaker products bearing the CE label comply with the following
harmonized or national standards:
DIN EN 55013:08-1991
DIN EN 55020:05-1995
DIN EN 55082-1:03-1993
The authorized declaration and compatibility certification resides with the manufacturer and can be
viewed upon request. The responsible manufacturer is the company:
Community Light & Sound
333 East Fifth Street
Chester, PA 19013
USA
TEL: 1-610 876-3400
FAX: 1-610 874-0190
Chester, PA USA July 2010
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER
PAGE
FIGURES and TABLES
PAGE
EC Statement of Conformity .............................................................................................. 3
1.
Introduction and Safety Information ..................................................................... 5
2.
Introduction to Electronically Controlled Loudspeaker Systems ............................ 6
3.
Unpacking and Inspection .................................................................................... 7
Quick Start-up – Passive Mode / SBS Subwoofer ............................................................... 8
Quick Start-up – Biamplified Mode ................................................................................... 9
4.
Physical Features ................................................................................................. 10
5.
General Description ............................................................................................. 12
6.
Operating Modes ................................................................................................. 16
6.1
Electronic Controller Options ............................................................................... 16
7.
System Configurations ......................................................................................... 17
8.
Choosing Power Amplification ............................................................................. 19
9.
Operating Requirements ...................................................................................... 20
10.
Electrical Installation ............................................................................................ 22
10.5
Connecting the Loudspeakers ............................................................................. 23
11.
Physical Installation ............................................................................................. 25
12.
Acoustical Adjustments........................................................................................ 32
13.
Operating Precautions.......................................................................................... 35
14.
Operating Precautions – SLS918 ........................................................................... 40
15.
Servicing .............................................................................................................. 41
16.
Technical Specifications ....................................................................................... 42
17.
In Case of Difficulty ............................................................................................. 44
18.
Warranty Information ........................................................................................... 47
19.
Replacement Parts List ......................................................................................... 49
Index ............................................................................................................................ 50-51
Quick Start-up – PASSIVE Mode / SBS Subwoofer .............................................................. 8
Quick Start-up – BIAMPLIFIED Mode .................................................................................. 9
Fig 1: Physical Features ................................................................................................. 10
Fig 2: Configurations Using A System Controller............................................................ 18
Fig 3: Configurations Using A System Controller............................................................ 19
Fig 4: Wiring for SLS in Passive Mode ............................................................................. 23
Fig 5: Wiring for SLS in Biamplified Mode ....................................................................... 24
Fig 6: Wiring for SBS Subwoofers ................................................................................... 24
Fig 7: Feet Installation and Stacking Enclosures ............................................................. 25
Fig 8: Installing a Custom Grille Cloth............................................................................ 26
Fig 9: Working Load Limits (WLL) for Mounting/Rigging Points ...................................... 28
Fig 10: Mounting/Rigging Point Locations ....................................................................... 28
Fig 11: Working Load Limits (WLL) for Pull-back Points.................................................... 29
Fig 12: Stand and Bracket Mounting Points ...................................................................... 30
Fig 13: SBS25 Pole Socket ................................................................................................ 31
Fig 14: Effects of Amplifier Clipping ................................................................................ 37
Fig 15: Sound Exposure Limits......................................................................................... 38
Fig 16: Servicing SLS Drivers ............................................................................................ 41
Table 1: Product Listing ..................................................................................................... 12
Table 2: Amplifier Power for SLS in Passive Mode with Electronic Controller ...................... 20
Table 3: Amplifier Power for SLS in Biamplified Mode with Controller ................................ 20
Table 4: Amplifier Power for SBS with Electronic Controller ................................................ 21
Table 5: Loudspeaker Wire Selection ................................................................................. 22
Table 6: Omnimount™ Bracket Selection............................................................................ 30
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
COMMUNITY SOLUTIONS™ OWNER’S MANUAL
1 INTRODUCTION
Welcome! You’ve joined the group of people that have chosen high quality Community loudspeaker
systems and components for 30 years. We’re really gratified you did and we will do our best to make
sure you are satisfied with your new loudspeaker.
In order for you to get the most effective use of this product please take a few minutes to read this
manual. We have included a great deal of useful information that will help you to realize the best
performance, operation, sound quality, and reliability from your new loudspeaker.
1.1 Community Solutions Loudspeaker Systems
This manual contains information for the proper set-up and operation of the Community Solutions
Series loudspeaker systems consisting of the SLS full-range loudspeakers and SBS subwoofers. While
every attempt has been made to ensure this information is correct and up to date, Community
continuously incorporates worthwhile improvements to each product which may include changes
and/or modifications not contained in this manual.
1.2 IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
The terms “Caution,” “Warning,” and “Danger” are used throughout this manual to alert the reader to
important safety considerations. If you have any questions about any aspects of these cautions,
contact your local dealer, distributor or Community.
CAUTION: describes an operating condition or user action that may expose the equipment or
user to potential damage or danger.
WARNING: describes an operating condition or user action that will cause damage to the
equipment or injure the user.
DANGER: describes an operating condition or user action that will immediately damage the
equipment or be extremely dangerous or possibly life-threatening to the user.
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
2 INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONICALLY-CONTROLLED
LOUDSPEAKER SYSTEMS
In simple terms, an electronically-controlled loudspeaker system consists of:
1. The loudspeaker components and enclosure.
2. An associated electronic device that modifies the source signal in some fashion.
3. The power amplifier used to drive the loudspeaker system.
A properly designed electronically-controlled loudspeaker system, in combination with a power
amplifier of appropriate rating, will provide enhanced performance over a non-electronicallycontrolled loudspeaker in one or more of the following ways:
•
•
•
•
•
Improved frequency response
Maximized power handling
Higher acoustic output
Lowered distortion
Protection of the loudspeaker system components
All loudspeaker systems have frequency response limitations. Flat response from a system is typically
attained by lowering the output in certain portions of the system’s passband to match the lower output
of the system at other frequencies within its passband. As a consequence the overall sensitivity of the
system is lowered. Rather than modifying the system, the input signal may be modified by an
electronic controller to compensate for those areas within the system’s passband where it would
normally have lower output. In this way flat frequency response can be achieved while maintaining the
sensitivity of the system.
All loudspeaker systems have power handling limitations beyond which they can be damaged. An
electronic model may be developed with characteristics that help prevent exceeding the mechanical
and/or thermal limits of the system’s components. For example, suppose it can be determined with
accuracy that an input signal of 20 volts to the voice coil of a driver will cause the voice coil former to
strike the rear of the magnet assembly. If the electronic model for this speaker is designed so that the
input signal to the driver’s voice coil may never exceed 19.5 volts, then it should never be capable of
bottoming out.
Some other important operational characteristics may also be addressed by a controller. One is
compensating for the natural characteristics of human hearing, which does not “hear” low frequencies
and high frequencies as well at lower sound pressure levels. The controller can increase the output of
these frequencies at low volume (in essence, a sophisticated loudness control). The controller can
then reduce the output at these frequencies as the signal level is increased. Another is providing an
electronic crossover function; while yet another might be to correct for phase anomalies in the
loudspeaker system.
A properly designed electronic system controller will provide the necessary equalization, compression,
and limiting required for the associated loudspeaker system. It will do this inaudibly when the
loudspeaker system is operated within its rated power constraints. Even when this boundary is
exceeded, it will apply control in a manner that is audibly acceptable.
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
3 UNPACKING AND INSPECTION
The Community SLS and SBS loudspeakers are inherently rugged and are carefully packed in well
designed cartons. It is a good idea to carefully inspect the unit after it has been removed from the
packaging as sometimes there is hidden damage due to some unfortunate incident in shipment.
Please note that once the shipment has left Community (or the dealer), the responsibility for damage is
borne by the freight company. This means that if there is damage, you must file a claim with the
freight company. Each freight company has its own set of regulations that must be followed and forms
that must be filled out. Therefore the freight company must be contacted as soon as a shipping
damage problem is discovered. Save the carton and packing material because many damage claims
will be considered invalid if these are thrown away. The Community dealer and the factory will try to
help in any way possible. Remember, though, it is up to the party receiving the shipment to file a
damage claim.
It is always a good idea to keep the carton and packing material in case the unit must be shipped back
to your dealer or export distributor.
The shipping carton contains the following items:
(1)
(Lot)
(4)
(4)
(1)
(1)
(1)
Loudspeaker system
Packing material
Filister head screws
Rubber feet
Owner’s manual
Neutrik Speakon in-line connector model NL4FC
5/32” Allen wrench
3.1 IMPORTANT NOTE – Mounting/Rigging Points
The eight SLS and SBS mounting/rigging points found on the top and bottom of the enclosure must
either be used for mounting hardware or “plugged” with the hex-socket screws provided. The reason
for this is that if all these holes are not plugged up, they can create air leaks in the enclosure that will
compromise the low frequency performance with reduced output and/or distortion.
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
FIGURE 1: Physical Features
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
4 PHYSICAL FEATURES
MOUNTING / RIGGING POINTS
(See FIGURE 1)
DESCRIPTION
MOUNTING / RIGGING POINTS
4 on top corners. 3/8”-16 Captive internal nuts.
MOUNTING / RIGGING POINTS
4 on bottom corners. 3/8”-16 Captive internal nuts.
REAR PANEL PULL-BACK POINT
3/8”-16 T-nuts. On SLS models the primary use is to retain the
enclosure’s rear panel. May also be used as a pull-back point. 2
1
1
OTHER MOUNTING POINTS
BOTTOM STAND & BRACKET MOUNTS
GRILLE RETAINERS AND DAMPERS
#10-24 T-nuts accept Ultimate Support™ stand adapters, and
5/16”-18
T-nuts accept Omnimount™ brackets or similar. The T-nut mounts
are supplied only on SLS915, SLS918, SLS920 and SBS12.
The grille is retained by a #8 x 1-1/2” screw in each corner. 3M
Quick-locks are used for damping grille resonances and are
fastened to the grille and enclosure with 6-32 machine screws and
#8 screws.
INPUT PANELS
For signal connections to the loudspeaker. Also contains wiring
information, power handling, and, for SLS models, the PASSIVE /
BIAMP switch.
SLS signal Input: 4 terminal NL4MP jacks. Accept NL4FC in-line
connectors. Used for both PASSIVE and BIAMPLIFIED modes. Use
terminals #1 +/– for PASSIVE mode or for BIAMPLIFIED LF input. Use
terminals #2 +/– for BIAMPLIFIED HF input (not used for PASSIVE
mode). 4
SLS signal Input. Accept dual banana type plugs. Use right dual
jack for PASSIVE mode input or for BIAMPLIFIED LF input. Use left
dual jack for BIAMPLIFIED HF input. Red = +, black = –. 4
Used to select an SLS loudspeaker’s operating mode. Down position
is for PASSIVE mode (single amplifier) and up position is for
BIAMPLIFIED mode (separate LF and HF amplifiers). Only on SLS
models.
SBS signal input. 4 terminal NL4MP jacks. Accept NL4FC in-line
connectors. Use terminals #1 +/–. Terminals #2 +/– are not used.
INPUT PANEL
NEUTRIK SPEAKONS
3
DUAL BANANA JACKS
3
PASSIVE / BIAMP SWITCH
NEUTRIK SPEAKONS
3
4
DUAL BANANA JACK
SBS signal input. Accepts dual banana type plug. Red = +, Black =
–. Wired in parallel with terminals #1 +/– of Neutrik Speakon. 4
3
OTHER FEATURES
Use only for handling – Do NOT use for mounting or hanging the
enclosure. Handles are standard only on black versions.
HANDLES
POLE SOCKET – 1-3/8” Diameter
Supplied on top of SBS25 only. Use for SB5 mounting pole accessory
for pole mounting an SLS915, SLS918 or SLS920 on the SBS25.
Community Solutions™ Logo
LOGO
Footnotes for Physical Features
1
WLL (Working Load Limits) =
300 lb. (136.1 kg) vertical (0º) pull per point.
75 lb. (34 kg) horizontal (90º) pull per point.
CAUTION:
2
Refer to SECTION 11.2 “Mounting and Rigging” for further information.
WLL (Working Load Limits) =
60 lb. (27.2 kg) pull in any direction from 0º to 90º per point.
CAUTION:
3
Refer to SECTION 11.2 “Mounting and Rigging” for further information.
Use either type of connector – Neutrik or dual banana jacks.
Refer to SECTION 10.5 “Connecting the Loudspeakers” for further information.
The unused Neutrik or dual banana jacks can be used as signal outputs for paralleling a 2nd
loudspeaker.
4
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
5 GENERAL DESCRIPTION
The Community Solutions loudspeaker systems are electronically-controlled speaker systems with
features and functions designed for both permanent installation and portable applications. There are
two product groups: the SLS series of full-range loudspeakers and the SBS series of subwoofers. From
the smallest to the largest model, the SLS and SBS products represent Community’s commitment to
meeting the audio requirements for sound reinforcement with performance, quality, and reliability.
All SLS models are designed to cover the full audio range except for the extreme bass frequencies. All
drivers are horn-loaded for maximum efficiency and pattern control. Wavefront Coherent™ technology
provides optimum signal alignment of the different drivers by mechanical positioning. For additional
bass output at the extreme low end of the audio frequency range, the SBS subwoofers are used to
produce added depth and impact. The SBS subwoofers are vented designs and are manufactured to
precisely match corresponding SLS models both in terms of their enclosure sizes (except the SBS45)
and acoustic performance.
MODEL
SLS915
2-way full-range
SLS918
SLS920
3-way full-range
3-way full-range
LOW
FREQUENCY
(2) 6.5” (165
mm)
(1) 12” (305 mm)
(2) 8” (203 mm)
SLS960
3-way full-range
(2) 10” (254 mm)
SLS980
3-way full-range
(2) 15” (381 mm)
Vented
Vented
Vented
Vented
(1)
(2)
(2)
(4)
SBS12
SBS22
SBS25
SBS45
TYPE
subwoofer
subwoofer
subwoofer
subwoofer
12”
12”
15”
15”
(305
(305
(381
(381
mm)
mm)
mm)
mm)
MID
FREQUENCY
n/a
(2) 6.5” (165 mm)
(1) 2” (51 mm)
M200
(1) 2” (51 mm)
M200
(1) 2” (51 mm)
M200
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
HIGH FREQUENCY
(1) 1” (25 mm)VHF100
(1) 1” (25 mm) VHF100
(1) 1” (25 mm) VHF100
(1) 1” (25 mm) VHF100
(1) 1” (25 mm) VHF100
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Table 1: Product Listing
5.1
Drivers
The SLS and SBS systems use proprietary drivers designed and, in the case of the compression drivers,
built by Community using the latest technologies in materials.
5.1.1 High Frequency Driver
The high frequency driver for all SLS systems is the 1” (25 mm) exit, VHF100 compression driver with a
Mylar ring radiator diaphragm. Only the center of the diaphragm is used for support with the voice coil
attached to its perimeter. This allows for a relatively large voice coil diameter providing low inductance
and very high peak power handling capabilities in excess of 100W. At the same time it provides the
small diaphragm area necessary to reproduce the small wavelengths of the highest audible
frequencies. The first diaphragm break-up mode is beyond 18 kHz – a remarkable achievement for a
high power tweeter.
5.1.2 Mid Frequency Drivers
The SLS920, SLS960 and SLS980 systems feature the M200 midrange driver. This 2” (51 mm) exit
compression driver has a tough, low resonant frequency Mylar diaphragm and suspension. Its long
excursion capability accommodates a low 1.8:1 compression ratio design that results in exceptionally
low distortion. The large magnetic structure and large, edge-wound voice coil provides high
sensitivity along with a high 75W RMS power handling capability down to 400 Hz. The SLS915 and
SLS918 midrange is reproduced through their dual 6.5” (165 mm) cone drivers described in SECTION
5.1.3.
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
5.1.3 Low Frequency Drivers
The low frequency drivers in the larger SLS and SBS loudspeakers are triple spider, high sensitivity cone
type transducers. The 6.5” (165 mm) driver used in the SLS915 and SLS918 and the 8” (203 mm)
SLS920 LF drivers are dual spider designs. The multiple spider suspensions provide superior
mechanical damping for the cones resulting in “tight” low frequency reproduction at very low distortion
levels. Distortion is further reduced by using high linearity edge suspensions made of a newly
developed material called Santoprene™. Power handling and clean reproduction are further enhanced
by large magnetic structures, edge-wound voice coils, high stiffness-to-mass cones, and high
temperature Kapton voice coil formers.
5.1.4 Ferrofluid Cooling
All Community Solutions drivers are specifically designed to be Ferrofluid-cooled. Ferrofluid is a
viscous liquid that is attracted by magnetic fields. The liquid is injected into the voice coil gap during
manufacturing and is permanently retained by the magnetism in the gap. Different Ferrofluid
formulations are used for the LF and HF drivers to match the particular physics of their operation.
Ferrofluid provides several important benefits for the SLS and SBS drivers. It improves the focusing of
magnetic field in the voice coil gap to maximize efficiency and adds mechanical damping to the
moving assembly to lower distortion. Its heat conducting properties transfer heat away from the voice
coil to maximize power handling and improve reliability by preventing heat-induced voice coil
deformations.
This also minimizes power compression that normally results from increased
impedances due to voice coil heating at high power levels. A final benefit of Ferrofluid is that it helps
keep the voice coil centered in the magnetic gap during high excursions avoiding the common
problem of voice coil rubs that typically cause noticeable distortion.
5.2
Wavefront Coherent™ Design
5.3
Pattern Control Horns
All SLS full-range models use Wavefront Coherent designs. This technology consists of a one piece,
hand-laminated, fiberglass baffle that becomes an integral part of the enclosure during
manufacturing. The baffle is shaped to provide the horn-loading for the drivers. In addition the baffle
precisely positions the individual drivers in the vertical plane parallel to the front of the enclosure.
This controls the relative positions so that the wavefront from the driver for each frequency range
leaves the enclosure acoustically synchronized with the sound from the other drivers. Thus the sound
in the individual frequency ranges all arrive at the listener’s ears at the same point in time. This is
especially critical in the at the crossover points where sound from two different drivers overlap to some
extent. Without proper alignment, frequency response and phase anomalies will occur in this overlap
region.
The horn-loading for the SLS drivers is accomplished using mathematically correct Pattern Control
designs. In addition to providing high efficiency, this ensures tight, consistent, predictable horizontal
and vertical coverage throughout each driver’s operating range. Unlike two-way bass reflex / horn
driver combinations, full frequency Pattern Control technology projects articulate transient response
and high intelligibility over long distances. This is particularly true in difficult acoustic conditions
where Pattern Control keeps the sound focused to help prevent energizing reverberant fields and
generating unwanted sound reflections.
5.4
Input Panels
The steel input panels have Neutrik Speakon and dual banana jack input connectors. The panels also
contain important printed information about the particular loudspeaker model including power rating,
impedances, frequency response, and connector wiring.
5.5
Internal Crossover
Each SLS series loudspeaker has an internal crossover constructed of high quality components such as
250 Volt film capacitors, precision wound inductors, high current resistors and high grade circuit
boards. The characteristics of the crossover and physical alignments of the drivers within the
enclosure ensures that the outputs of the drivers are seamlessly integrated into a coherent acoustic
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
wavefront, as if from a single source. The SBS subwoofers do not have internal crossovers.
function must be supplied by external electronic devices.
5.6
This
Operating Modes: PASSIVE and BIAMPLIFIED
A switch on the SLS input panels selects between either of two operating modes: PASSIVE mode (single
amplifier) or BIAMPLIFIED mode (separate low and high frequency amplifiers). In PASSIVE mode, the
internal crossovers of the SLS loudspeakers divide the audio signal into the separate frequency ranges
for each driver. In BIAMPLIFIED mode one amplifier is used to power the low frequency driver(s) and
another is used for the mid-high frequency section.
5.7
PowerSense™ DDP Circuit
Each SLS crossover has PowerSense DDP (Dynamic Driver Protection) circuitry that automatically
provides thermal and over-current protection for the individual drivers. This circuitry senses the
power delivered to each driver and, if it exceeds a level that could damage the driver, PowerSense
automatically reduces the power to the driver. Assuming an amplifier of appropriate size is used, the
PowerSense DDP circuit provides a high degree of protection against loudspeaker damage. This
proprietary circuitry helps ensure that your SLS loudspeakers will keep on performing at their best.
The SBS subwoofers do not have PowerSense DDP protection. Protection must be supplied by external
electronic devices.
5.8
Electronic Control
The Community Solutions loudspeaker systems are specifically designed to be electronically-controlled
using an electronic loudspeaker controller or processor.
5.9
Power Handling Specifications
The published power handling specifications, RMS and Program Power, for the SLS and SBS
loudspeakers are ONLY applicable when electronic system controllers are used.
5.10
Enclosures
The SLS and SBS enclosures are constructed of 13-ply, void free, Baltic Birch plywood with extensive
bracing, making an extremely strong enclosure that will not resonate or flex, even at maximum bass
output. Except for the rectangular SBS45 subwoofer, all SLS and SBS enclosures are trapezoidal. The
trapezoidal shape facilitates arraying of multiple enclosures. This shape also allows installation in
tight spaces often encountered in both permanent installations and portable applications.
5.11
Mounting And Rigging
Each Community Solutions loudspeaker enclosure has eight 3/8”-16 threaded nut suspension points –
four in the top and four in the bottom. These points are connected top to bottom inside the enclosure
with steel bracing. They are designed to be used with Community’s optional eyebolt and washer kit –
EYBLTKIT. When used with a rated shoulder eyebolt, 3/8”-16 thread T-nuts on the rear panel can be
used as a convenient pull-back point to set the enclosure down-angle for proper coverage. The SBS45
has no pull-back point.
5.12
Handles
5.13
Feet and Stand Mounts
The handles on the SLS and SBS loudspeakers are of high strength, all steel construction. They are
placed in relation to the center of gravities for easy lifting when used in portable applications. Multiple
handles are used on the largest enclosures where the weight requires more than one person for lifting.
White (-WHT) models come standard without handles.
The loudspeaker is provided with four rubber feet for floor or shelf installation. The feet also provide a
means to stabilize stacked enclosures. Additionally, the SLS915, SLS918, SLS920 and SBS12 have
threaded inserts in the bottom that mate to appropriate Omnimount™ brackets or Ultimate Support™
stand sockets.
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
5.14
Front Grille
The front grille is powder paint coated, 16 gauge perforated steel, retained by screws in each corner.
3M™ dual-lock fasteners are used elsewhere on the grille face to provide additional support and to
damp any resonances. The grille has an edge gasket that allows easy installation of a custom grille
cloth for matching the surrounding decor.
5.15
Enclosure Finish
The enclosures, except weather resistant FE models, are finished with a black or white (model number
suffix = WHT) water-based acrylic that can be field painted. Optional factory painted, custom color
finishes (model number suffix = SPL) are also available.
Weather-resistant models (model number suffix = FE) are finished with a black, hand-laminated
fiberglass coating with hardware and other features incorporated to make them resistant to the effects
of weather.
5.16
Optional Accessories
Accessories are available from Community and 3rd party sources for the Community Solutions
loudspeakers.
5.16.1 Community Accessories
EYBLTKIT – Eyebolt suspension kit with 4 load-rated, forged 3/8” eyebolts and cup lock
washers)
SB5 – Mounting Pole for pole mounting an SLS915, SLS918, or SLS920 on top of an SBS25
subwoofer.
5.16.2 3rd Party Accessories
The following are companies that make accessories that may be used with Community Products.
Mounting Brackets
Omnimount™ Systems
1501 West 17th Street
Tempe, AZ 85281
Tel: 602-829-8000 Fax: 602-796-5000
PAGE 15
Stands and Stand Sockets
Ultimate Support™ Systems, Inc.
2506 Zurich Drive
Ft. Collins, CO 80524
Tel: 303-493-4488 Fax: 303-221-2274
Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
6 OPERATING MODES
Your SLS and SBS loudspeaker systems are designed to be used with an electronic controller.
6.1
Electronic Controller Options
Community Solutions loudspeakers are specifically designed to be electronically-controlled by a device
that directly precedes the power amplifier in the signal chain. The controller processes the audio
signal to provide an optimized signal to the loudspeaker under all operating conditions. This results in
improved frequency response, maximized power handling, lower distortion and increased protection
for the loudspeaker components. OPERATION WITHOUT THE USE OF AN APPROPRIATE SYSTEM
CONTROLLER IS CONSIDERED ABUSE AND WILL VOID THE WARRANTY.
6.1.3 Radio Design Labs ST-CX1F and ST-CX1W Crossovers
These products, manufactured and sold by RDL, are suitable for use in place of equalizers / high-pass
filters for the SLS915, SLS918, SLS920 full-range (ST-CX1F) and SBS12, SBS22 subwoofers (ST-CX1W).
Because they afford no electronic protection, these products are intended for less demanding
applications where these products will be used at less than maximum output capabilities. A technical
note is available from Community about their proper settings for use with loudspeakers listed.
6.2.3 PASSIVE versus BIAMPLIFIED Mode
In BIAMPLIFIED mode the internal passive crossover of SLS models is still used to divide the frequencies
between the MF and HF drivers that make up the high frequency section. The 2-way SLS915 only has
an LF and HF driver so there is no internal frequency division in BIAMPLIFIED mode. When in
BIAMPLIFIED mode, the PowerSense DDP is NOT bypassed for the SLS models. Therefore all drivers are
still protected by this circuitry. The only exception to this is the SLS918 LF driver which is NOT
protected in BIAMPLIFIED mode.
In BIAMPLIFIED mode There are no performance advantages in the form of more “effective” or higher
“equivalent” power from your amplifiers over PASSIVE mode. While an analysis of this statement is
beyond the scope of this manual, the simple fact is that if you power a loudspeaker with 200 watts,
that is what you have. For example, if the system is BIAMPLIFIED with the woofer powered by a 150
watt amplifier and the high frequency section powered by a 50 watt amplifier, or if the system is in
PASSIVE mode powered by a single 200 watt amplifier, the total power available is 200 watts either
way.
In terms of loudspeaker performance, the advantages of using one mode over the other (PASSIVE or
BIAMPLIFED) are relatively small. However for BIAMPLIFIED mode there are disadvantages of the higher
complexity of the wiring and the additional costs of amplification and electronic crossover. For this
reason we recommend using PASSIVE mode unless there is some other overriding reason to use
BIAMPLIFIED mode.
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
7 SYSTEM CONFIGURATIONS
FIGURES 2 and 3 show the possible configurations for the SLS and SBS loudspeakers. (Note: Refer to
the SECTION 10.5 “Connecting the Loudspeakers” herein and to the specific controller’s Owner’s
Manual for exact connection details and operation.)
FIGURE 2: Configurations Using A System Controller
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
PAGE 18
Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
8 CHOOSING POWER AMPLIFICATION
It is important to select the proper power amplifier output for the loudspeaker. To avoid the potential
for damage and/or less than optimum performance you need to have enough amplifier power but not
too much.
The published power ratings for Community Solutions loudspeakers, as listed in the Technical
Specifications in CHAPTER 16, are only applicable when the loudspeakers are used with an electronic
system controller or processor. COMMUNITY’S WARRANTY CLEARLY STATES THAT “USE WITHOUT THE
APPROPRIATE SYSTEM CONTROLLER IS CONSIDERED ABUSE AND VOIDS THE WARRANTY”.
8.1
General Considerations
There are several things that must be considered when selecting an amplifier for a loudspeaker
system. An obvious but misleading consideration is how loud the system needs to be. This should be
determined, not by amplifier power, but by the correct choice of the loudspeaker or number of
loudspeakers based on their maximum usable acoustic output ratings. Note that maximum ratings for
many loudspeakers do not take distortion into account. Community’s maximum output ratings are
realistically usable because the distortion is well within acceptable levels. In this regard, be
conservative. A loudspeaker system that is more capable than needed will always perform well. A
system that is not capable enough will likely need to be pushed hard enough to distort and may fail.
8.2
Amplifier Power For Use with An Electronic Controller
Assuming the correct loudspeakers have been chosen for the application, the best choice of power
amplifier is a simple consideration when using a dynamic electronic controller for Community
Solutions SLS and SBS. To take full advantage of the electronic loudspeaker controller, a certain
minimum power is required. Too little power will essentially bypass the protection function of the
controller by allowing the amplifier to clip before the controller’s protection circuits are activated. This
can result in damaged loudspeakers, in spite of the sophisticated electronic protection. (Refer to
SECTION 13.3 “Using Lower Power Amplifiers”.)
Based on these considerations, the choice of power amplifier size should be based on the power rating
of the loudspeaker. The nominal impedance of the loudspeaker (e.g. 8 Ohm or 4 Ohm) must be used
in determining an amplifier’s output specification from its manufacturer. Community specifies two
power ratings: “RMS” and “Program”. The “RMS” rating is a measure of the thermal limitations of the
loudspeaker, while the “Program” rating is a measure of the loudspeaker’s capability to reproduce
speech and music.
THE RECOMMENDED POWER AMPLIFIER IS ONE WHOSE RATED POWER APPROXIMATELY MATCHES THE
“PROGRAM” POWER RATING OF THE LOUDSPEAKER. This will provide two important benefits:
1. The controller and PowerSense circuitry will operate properly to protect the loudspeaker.
2. With average power inputs near the loudspeaker’s RMS rating, peak power outputs of 7 dB to
10 dB will be available for the dynamic (peak) content of audio signals.
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
9 OPERATING REQUIREMENTS
These sections define the operating requirements for the various controllers and modes of operation
for both the SLS full-range loudspeakers and SBS subwoofers.
9.1
Operating Requirements Using Electronic Controllers
Refer to FIGURES 2 and 3 for block diagrams of the acceptable configurations.
9.1.1 SLS PASSIVE Mode with AN Electronic Controller
In PASSIVE mode one amplifier channel is required along with a high-pass filter to prevent frequencies
below the operating ranges from overdriving and possibly damaging the LF drivers.
TABLE 2 shows the recommended amplifier sizes for the SLS loudspeakers used in PASSIVE mode.
MODEL
IMPEDANCE
SLS915
SLS918
SLS920
SLS960
SLS980
8
8
8
8
8
Ohm
Ohm
Ohm
Ohm
Ohm
LOUDSPEAKER
PROGRAM
RATING
300W
500W
500W
1000W
1000W
REC. POWER
AMP RANGE
250W to 400W
400W to 600W
400W to 600W
800W to 1250W
800W to 1250W
Table 2: Amplifier Power for SLS in PASSIVE Mode with
Electronic Controllers
9.1.2 SLS BIAMPLIFIED Mode with Electronic System Controller
In BIAMPLIFIED mode two amplifier channels are required: one for the low frequency (LF) section and
one for the high frequency (HF) section of the loudspeaker. An electronic crossover is required to
divide the input signal to the amplifiers into low frequency and high frequency ranges for the LF and
HF sections of the loudspeaker. Also required is a high-pass filter for the LF section to prevent
frequencies below its operating range from overdriving and possibly damaging the LF drivers.
TABLE 3 shows the recommended amplifier sizes for each section (LF and HF) of the SLS loudspeakers
used in BIAMPLIFIED mode.
MODEL
SLS915
SLS918
SLS920
SLS960
SLS980
LF
IMPEDANC
E
8
8
8
8
8
Ohm
Ohm
Ohm
Ohm
Ohm
LF
PROGRAM
RATING
300W
500W
500W
1000W
1000W
REC. LF POWER
AMP RANGE
250W to 400W
400W to 600W
400W to 600W
800W to 1250W
800W to 1250W
HF
IMPEDANC
E
8
8
8
8
8
Ohm
Ohm
Ohm
Ohm
Ohm
HF
PROGRAM
RATING
50W
300W
200W
200W
200W
REC. HF
POWER AMP
RANGE
40W
250W
150W
150W
150W
to
to
to
to
to
75W
400W
250W
250W
250W
Table 3: Amplifier Power for SLS in BIAMPLIFIED Mode with Controller
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
9.1.3 SBS Subwoofer with An Electronic Controller
The SBS subwoofer requires a single amplifier channel amplifier. Also required is an electronic
crossover to limit the high frequencies from being reproduced by the subwoofer and a high-pass filter
to prevent subsonic frequencies from overdriving and possibly damaging the loudspeaker.
TABLE 4 shows the recommended amplifier sizes for the SBS subwoofers.
MODEL
IMPEDANCE
SBS12
SBS22
SBS25
SBS45
8
4
4
8
Ohm
Ohm
Ohm
Ohm
SUBWOOFER
PROGRAM
RATING
500W
1000W
1000W
2000W
REC. POWER
AMP RANGE
400W to 600W
800W to 1250W
800W to 1250W
1600W to 2500W
Table 4: Amplifier Power for SBS with Electronic Controller
9.1.4 SLS Full-Range and SBS Subwoofer with An Electronic Controller
When using an SLS loudspeaker with an SBS subwoofer, two amplifier channels are required. Also
required is an electronic crossover to separate the audio signal into different frequency ranges for the
SLS amplifier and SBS amplifier and a high-pass filter to prevent subsonic frequencies from overdriving
and possibly damaging the SBS loudspeaker.
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
10
ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION
10.1
Loudspeaker Cable / Wiring
To get the maximum performance from your loudspeaker, proper 2 conductor wire and good quality
connectors must be used. The most important factor in selecting wire is its resistance which is
primarily a function of wire gauge and length. It is desirable to keep the total resistance under 0.2
Ohm for any wire run to the speaker to maximize electro-mechanical damping and minimize power
losses. However, for lengths over 100 feet the wire gauges needed to meet this requirement are
usually not practical to use for both physical and cost reasons. Therefore #10 AWG is recommended
as the most practical gauge for those situations. TABLE 5 shows the minimum wire gauges to use for
various wire lengths for 4 Ohm or 8 Ohm loudspeakers. For each run length both conductors has been
figured into the total resistance. Note that the lower the gauge number the larger the wire size.
Run Length
10 ft (3
25 ft (8
50 ft (15
75 ft (25
100 ft (30
200 ft (60
300 ft (90
400 ft (120
500 ft (150
m)
m)
m)
m)
m)
m)
m)
m)
m)
Minimum
Gauge (AWG)
#16
#14
#12
#10
#10
#10
#10
#10
#10
Total
Resistance
0.08 Ohm
0.13 Ohm
0.16 Ohm
0.15 Ohm
0.20 Ohm
0.40 Ohm
0.60 Ohm
0.80 Ohm
1.00 Ohm
Note – Metric length conversions are approximate
Table 5: Loudspeaker Wire Selection
In permanent installations, speaker wire is usually permanently fixed in place. Therefore it is not
necessary nor economical to use cable intended to be flexed such as for portable use. PVC jacketed or
similar, multi-conductor cable is easy to work with and more economical. Among the best and most
economical wire is standard copper electrical wire such as stranded or solid THHN or THWN. The only
difference between these two types is the voltage rating of the insulation. THHN is rated for 300 volts
and THWN is 600 volts. Both ratings far exceed the voltage output of even the most powerful audio
amplifiers. These are also among the most familiar wire types for electricians to pull in conduit.
For portable applications use stranded copper cable designed for flexing with a tough overall
insulation. For good flexing, the conductors should each have a minimum of 19 strands for #14 or
#16 AWG and 65 strands for #10 or #12 AWG. Hypalon™, and polyethylene insulations can provide a
complete combination of good electrical properties, abrasion resistance, low temperature flexibility, as
well as water, sun, oil, and chemical resistance. Other insulations such as rubber, neoprene, and
polypropylene are lacking in one of more of these qualities and should be selected based on the
intended environment and use.
In environments that have extremely high amounts of radio frequency (RF) energy, such as near radio
transmitting towers, it may be necessary to use shielded speaker cable to reduce interference.
Normally the shield is connected only at the amplifier end to the chassis of the amplifier or other
suitable system grounding point. The wire gauge recommendations in the above chart should still be
followed.
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
10.2
Input Connectors
10.3
Paralleling or Daisy-chaining Two Loudspeakers
The SLS and SBS loudspeakers have jacks that accept two types of connectors: Neutrik Speakons and
dual banana type plugs. Both are high current connectors and neither requires soldering to make the
connection from the wire to the connector. For permanent installations, either the banana plugs or
Neutrik Speakons make excellent connections that easily detach for service. For portable use or when
the loudspeaker is located where the wiring might be accidentally disturbed, always use the locking
Speakon connector. A Neutrik Speakon in-line connector is provided with the loudspeaker and is the
recommended connector. (Refer to the SECTION 10.5 “Connecting the Loudspeakers” for proper wiring
of the connectors).
The pair of Neutrik Speakon input jacks for the SLS models are internally wired in parallel. This means
that a second loudspeaker can be paralleled or “daisy-chained” from the first using a jumper cable. In
this way both loudspeakers will operate off the same amplifier channel. The jumper cable should be
wired at both ends for the appropriate operating mode according to SECTION 10.5 “Connecting the
Loudspeakers”. This capability functions for both the PASSIVE and BIAMPLIFIED modes. Note that
when using this function in BIAMPLIFIED mode, all 4 pins of the Speakon connector must be used for
the jumper.
The pairs of dual banana jacks for the SLS models are NOT wired in parallel with each other. However,
they are wired in parallel with the functionally corresponding +/– signal pins of the Neutrik Speakon
jacks. The banana jacks can also be used in lieu of the second Neutrik Speakon for paralleling another
loudspeaker off the first one. In this case a jumper cable with banana plugs wired identically at each
end can be used and plugged into a banana jack on each loudspeaker. Note that when using this
function in BIAMPLIFIED mode, two banana jumpers will be needed – one for the LF signal and one for
the HF signal.
10.4
Test Points
When using the Speakon connectors for the loudspeaker’s signal input, the banana jacks make
convenient test points for system set-up and servicing. Test instrument leads can be outfitted with a
banana plug connector making it easy to monitor and test the signal applied to the loudspeaker.
10.5
Connecting The Loudspeakers
The following diagrams show the wiring connections for the SLS and SBS loudspeakers. In all cases be
sure to observe proper polarity when making the connections. (Refer to CHAPTER 9 “Operating
Requirements” for amplifier and crossover requirements and CHAPTER 7 “System Configurations” for
controller/loudspeaker combinations.)
10.5.1 SLS PASSIVE Mode Operation (See FIGURE 4)
Operation of the SLS loudspeakers in PASSIVE mode requires putting the slide switch on the input
panel in the “Passive” (down) position. The input connections are made either to the right pair of
banana jacks or to either of the Neutrik Speakon connectors. Observe proper polarity when making
the connections.
FIGURE 4: Wiring for SLS in PASSIVE Mode
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
10.5.2 SLS BIAMPLIFIED Mode Operation (See FIGURE 5)
Operation of the SLS loudspeakers in BIAMPLIFIED mode requires putting the slide switch on the input
panel in the “Biamplified” (up) position. In this mode the LF and HF connections can be made using
either of the Neutrik Speakon connectors. Note that each Speakon connector can accept both the LF
and HF inputs. Alternately, the banana jacks can be used where the LF (low frequency) input
connections are made to the right dual banana jack and the HF (high frequency) input connections to
the left dual banana jack. In all cases, observe proper polarity when making the connections.
FIGURE 5: Wiring for SLS in BIAMPLIFIED Mode
10.5.3 SBS Subwoofer (See FIGURE 6)
The wiring connections for the SBS subwoofer are the same whether it is used in a stand-alone fashion
or configured with an SLS model in either PASSIVE or BIAMPLIFIED mode.
Make connections to the SBS subwoofer as shown in FIGURE 6 observing proper polarity.
FIGURE 6: Wiring for SBS Subwoofers
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
11
PHYSICAL INSTALLATION
11.1
IMPORTANT NOTE: Mounting/rigging Point Holes
The mounting/rigging points of the SLS and SBS loudspeakers must either be used for mounting
hardware or “plugged” with the hex-socket screws provided. There are two reasons for this. When
suspending the loudspeaker from one end, the screws in the mounting/rigging points on the other
end transfer the load through the internal steel bracing to the bottom surface of the enclosure for
better support. Also if they are not plugged up, the holes can create air leaks in the enclosure that will
compromise the LF performance with reduced output and/or distortion.
11.2
Feet
The SLS and SBS loudspeakers are supplied with 4 rubber feet for use when mounted as free-standing
such as in portable applications. The feet have a cupped shape with a steel washer molded inside the
cup. This washer is necessary for the mounting screw to butt against when installed to help provide
structural rigidity to the feet.
To install the feet use the supplied 3/8”-16 thread, slotted head, filister head screws to mount the feet
on the enclosure to the mounting/rigging points. Sandwich one of the supplied 1-1/4” washers
between each foot and the enclosure surface to prevent the bottom of the foot from “dishing” into the
countersink. Tighten the screws snugly but do not over-tighten as this will pinch the rubber causing
stress and weakening the feet.
The feet are also used when stacking enclosures of the same size, such as an SLS960 full-range
loudspeaker on top of an SBS22. Four filister-head screws are screwed into the top of the bottom
enclosure. The cups in the feet of the top enclosure fit over the heads of these screws in the bottom
enclosure to help stabilize the top enclosure. This both aligns the enclosures and helps prevent the
top enclosure from “walking” because of bass vibrations or sliding from being accidentally bumped.
FIGURE 7 show how this works.
FIGURE 7: Feet Installation & Stacking Enclosures
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
11.3
Front Grille
All SLS and SBS loudspeakers have a 16 gauge perforated steel grille on the face of the enclosures to
provide a finished appearance and to protect the drivers. The grille is essentially acoustically
transparent with a TI (Transparency Index) rating of over 13,700, where 10,000 is considered
essentially transparent.
The grille is painted using a powder coating process that bonds the paint to the steel. This prevents
the paint from easily chipping and the resulting matte finish reduces reflection of ambient light
sources. If desired for cosmetic purposes, the grille may be painted another color using standard,
non-bridging enamel paint. Spray painting is recommended.
The grille is a pan shape with a soft, PVC gasket fitted around its edge that serves several purposes. It
provides a snug fit for the grille into the front recess of the enclosure. This light clamping action has
the added effect of helping damp the grille to keep it from resonating. The gasket is also used to
retain the grille cloth on the -WHT models or a custom grille cloth.
11.3.1 Removing/Installing the Grille
Removal of the grille is accomplished by unscrewing the 4 #6 x 1-1/2” retainer screws in each corner
then pulling the grille away from the face of the enclosure to release the Quick-lock pads that help
support it (Refer to FIGURE 8). A small Allen wrench or similar tool can be used to hook the grille
through one of the perforations to aid in pulling it away from the enclosure. In the case of the -WHT
models with a grille cloth, carefully pull on the grille near a corner by sliding an Allen wrench or similar
tool in the gap between the enclosure and grille. Turn the wrench to hook the grille from behind and
pull it away from the enclosure.
To reinstall the grille make sure that the grille is correctly oriented so the Quick-lock pads on the grille
and enclosure will mate. Press the grille in place applying firm pressure on each of the pads to firmly
interlock them and replace the 4 corner retainer screws.
CAUTION:
When the loudspeaker is suspended or mounted overhead the grille must remain permanently
fastened in place so that it does not become detached. Make sure all corner retainer screws are
properly installed and tightened.
11.3.2 Custom Grille Cloth
To avoid high frequency loses, grille cloth must be made of inorganic (man-made) materials. It should
have at least a 50% open weave. A simple test is to hold the cloth about 4 inches (10 cm) in front of
your eyes. If you can easily identify objects 3 feet (1 m) or more away when looking through the cloth,
it is probably OK to use. Because of the tight fit of the retainer gasket, a thin cloth must be used.
The edge gasket is designed to retain a custom grille cloth should this be desired for cosmetic
purposes. Small teeth molded into the inside of the gasket help retain the cloth and gasket to the
edge of the grille. FIGURE 8 shows how to install a custom grille cloth.
FIGURE 8: Installing A Custom Grille Cloth
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
11.4
Enclosure Finish
The enclosures are finished with a water-based acrylic paint (trade-named Polene™). If desired, this
finish can be painted over with a custom color using any standard, water-based, DTM acrylic paint
without the need for any special surface preparation.
FE models are finished in black, hand-laminated fiberglass. If it is desired to paint these enclosures
with a custom color, they must be sanded and then washed with a solvent (such as turpentine or
denatured alcohol) prior to painting. A spray-on acrylic paint will yield the best results but even then,
results may be unpredictable in terms of the quality, durability and longevity of the new finish.
11.5
Mounting and Rigging
WARNING:
Mounting or rigging loudspeakers is a serious endeavor and requires an experienced
professional. Improper installations may result in damage, injury or death. For this reason, no
loudspeaker should be mounted or suspended overhead unless the method has been approved
by a registered Professional Structural Engineer.
WARNING:
NEVER USE THE HANDLES FOR SUSPENDING THE LOUDSPEAKER. They are neither designed nor
rated for this purpose.
CAUTION:
All fixed hardware used for overhead mounting or suspension should be designed, tested, and
certified for its intended use with a minimum design factor or 5:1. A minimum design factor or
8:1 should be employed for any component which may be subject to continuous wear or
friction, such as moving wire rope. A design factor is the ratio between the structural failure
point and the loading to be applied to the component.
CAUTION:
Routine inspections and maintenance should be performed on any mounting or rigging system.
Any parts found to have deterioration, excessive fatigue, or excessive wear should be removed
from service immediately.
11.5.1 Design Factor for Working Load Limits (WLL))
The WLL limits listed for SLS and SBS mounting/rigging points and pull-back points have a design
factor of 20:1.
11.5.2 Mounting/Rigging Points
All SLS and SBS loudspeakers have internal, captive 3/8”-16 threaded nuts for suspending or
permanent mounting. Four are located on the enclosure top and four on the bottom. Each of the 8
mounting/rigging points has a Working Load Limit (WLL rated for 300 lb. (136.1 kg) vertical pull and
75 lb. (34 kg) horizontal pull. Refer to FIGURE 9 for pull directions. Community’s WLL ratings include
a 20:1 safety factor.
PAGE 27
Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
WARNING:
Never exceed the working load limits (WLL) specified in FIGURE 9.
FIGURE 9: Working Load Limits (WLL) for
Mounting/Rigging Points
The top and bottom mounting/rigging points are connected to each other through the enclosure with
internal steel bracing. Thus the bracing in the enclosure, rather than the wood, carries the weight of
any under-hung load attached to the bottom mounting/rigging points.
The mounting/rigging points can be used with a variety of hardware including shoulder eyebolts, or
standard bolts. Hardware must be load rated for the intended use. Always use at least two
mounting/rigging points. Using four is recommended for maximum strength. Locations for these
points are shown in FIGURE 10.
C
ANGLE
B
A
D
E
F
G
TOP / BOTTOM VIEW
A
B
G
ANGLE
SLS915
8.1 in. (205 mm)
5.3 in. (132 mm)
2.1 in. (53 mm)
C
7.1 in. (181 mm)
D
1.1 in. (27 mm)
E
1.1 in. (27 mm)
F
7.2 in. (183 mm)
101
SLS918
15.1 in. (383 mm)
10.9 in. (277 mm)
2.3 in. (58 mm)
10.5 in. (268 mm)
1.3 in. (32 mm)
1.3 in. (32 mm)
10.8 in. (273 mm)
101
SLS920 / SBS12
10.9 in. (277 mm)
7.1 in. (181 mm)
2.3 in. (58 mm)
9.5 in. (242 mm)
1.3 in. (32 mm)
1.3 in. (32 mm)
9.7 in. (246 mm)
101
SLS960 / SBS22
16.7 in. (425 mm)
9.2 in. (234 mm)
2.1 in. (53 mm)
15.2 in. (386 mm)
1.8 in. (45 mm)
1.1 in. (27 mm)
15.7 In. (398 mm)
104
SLS980
20.3 in. (516 mm)
18.3 in. (464 mm)
2.1 in. (53 mm)
18.1 in. (459 mm)
1.8 in. (45 mm)
4.3 in. (109 mm)
18.1 in. (460 mm)
93
SBS25
21.7 in. (552 mm)
13.2 in. (336 mm)
2.1 in. (53 mm)
17.7 in. (450 mm)
1.8 in. (45 mm)
1.1 in. (27 mm)
18.2 in. (462 mm)
104
SBS45
31.3 in. (795 mm)
31.3 in. (795 mm)
1.1 in. (27 mm)
26.5 in. (673 mm)
1.1 in. (27 mm)
1.1 in. (27 mm)
26.5 in. (673 mm)
90
Figure 10: Mounting/Rigging Point Locations
PAGE 28
Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
11.5.3 Using Only Two Mounting/Rigging Points
If only the two rear mounting/rigging points are used, the loudspeaker will hang with a down-angle of
approximately 30 degrees. This may be ideal for many situations. If less down-angle is needed, four
mounting/rigging points should be used with the front mounting/rigging points used to pull up the
front of the enclosure to the desired down-angle.
Alternately you can use the front two
mounting/rigging points and use a pull-back to set the desired down-angle. (Refer to “Pull-back
Capability”.)
When using two mounting/rigging points, be sure the rated loads for the mounting rigging points are
not exceeded. Refer to SECTION 11.5.4 for de-rating the mounting/rigging points when using them at
an angle.
11.5.4 De-Rating the Mounting/Rigging Points
Using the mounting/rigging points at an angle will de-rate the WLL for each point according to the
following formula:
WLL = Cosine (Angle) x 300. The Angle is in degrees from vertical pull.
NOTE: This formula is only valid for pull angles up to 75 degrees. From 75 degrees to 90
degrees the WLL remains as 75 lb. (34 kg).
11.5.5 Pull-Back Capability
To position the loudspeaker at the proper down-angle required for proper coverage, a pull or tie-back
is usually needed. A pull-back can be accomplished using the two bottom rear mounting/rigging
points for attachment of pull-back rigging.
The rear panel of the SLS enclosures is held in place by 3/8”-16 machine screws. On the SBS
enclosures, except for the SBS45, a dedicated 3/8”-16 pull-back point is provided. Instead of using
the two bottom mounting/rigging points as the pull-back points, a rear panel screw can be removed
and replaced by a rated eyebolt or other rated rigging hardware. This point can then be used as a
pull-back point to provide the correct down-angle needed. Use only hardware that is rated for the
intended use and load. The WLL for the rear panel mounting point is 60 lb. (27.2 kg) for any direction
of pull from 0 through 90 degrees.
WARNING:
Never exceed the working load limits (WLL) specified in FIGURE 11.
FIGURE 11: Working Load Limits (WLL) for Pullback Points
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
11.5.6 Stand and Mounting Bracket Inserts
The SLS915, SLS918 and SLS920 loudspeakers and the SBS12 subwoofer have 5/16-18 threaded T-nut
inserts on the bottom of the enclosures for mounting the loudspeakers on stands and for securing a
bracket to the enclosure for installation to a wall surface. The T-nut inserts are positioned and sized
to mate with an Ultimate Support stand mount (model MB-200), Omnimount brackets (see TABLE 6) or
similar hardware.
MODEL
OMNIMOUN
T
SLS915
Use Series
100
SLS918
Use Series
300
SLS920
Use Series
300
SBS12
Use Series
300
Table 6: Omnimount Bracket Selection
CAUTION: The T-nut mounting points should be used ONLY for supporting the loudspeaker from
the bottom. Do not use for suspending the loudspeaker.
Because of their size and weight, all other Community Solutions models are not recommended for this
type of installation hardware and therefore they do not have provisions for them. Community cannot
provide specific technical support about the use of Ultimate Support or Omnimount Systems products.
For further information about their products see contact information in SECTION 5.16 “Optional
Accessories”.
FIGURE 12: Stand and Bracket Mounting Points
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
11.5.7 SBS25 Pole Socket
The 1-3/8 in. (35 mm) diameter pole socket on the top of the SBS25 subwoofer accepts the
Community SB5 Mounting Pole accessory. This allows an SLS915, SLS918, or SLS920 fitted with a 13/8” (35 mm) stand socket, such as an Ultimate Support SM200, to be pole mounted on top of the
SBS25. The SB5 is a 5 ft. (1524 mm) long x 1-3/8 in. (35 mm) diameter steel pole finished with black
paint. When inserted the pole goes to the bottom of the enclosure. The exposed portion can be cut to
any desired length to adjust the height of the full-range loudspeaker as needed.
FIGURE 13: SBS25 Pole Socket
11.5.8 SLS920H Horizontal Mounting
The SLS920H is supplied with the HF horn rotated 90 degrees to allow horizontal mounting of the
loudspeaker. In this position the HF coverage is 65º H x 50º V. A standard SLS920 can be field
modified to make an SLS920H. This requires replacing the HF horn/driver assembly with the ‘H’
version obtainable from the factory.
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
12
ACOUSTICAL ADJUSTMENTS
Once the loudspeaker has been set-up or installed and connected according to the configuration you
need, it is ready for acoustical adjustments.
12.1
Initial Testing
The following procedures are designed to prevent damage to the loudspeaker during initial testing of
the system.
1.
Before powering up any equipment, turn down the input level controls on the power
amplifiers and set other level controls to nominal operating positions. If you don’t know
what those positions are, setting sliders about half-way up and rotary controls to their 12
o’clock or half-way position is usually a safe bet.
2.
Turn on all the electronics for the system by following the proper sequence for power up
that is universally accepted for professional audio systems. This means turn on the system
in “signal chain order” starting with the input equipment and continuing in order along the
chain with the power amplifiers being the last items to be powered up. This avoids
electronic start-up transients or spikes that some equipment generates. These spikes
generally consist of a DC (direct current) pulse that can be intense enough to overload
subsequent equipment, including the loudspeaker, and cause instantaneous and permanent
damage to that equipment. This procedure should be followed EVERY TIME a system is
turned on.
NOTE: When turning off a system, do it in the reverse order, beginning with the power
amplifiers first and the input equipment last.
3.
Apply an input signal to the system. This could be a test signal or program material from a
tape, CD, or tuner. Using equipment level indicators, a voltmeter, and/or a test headset
verify that the signal chain is operating properly up to the input of the power amplifier(s).
You may have to re-adjust controls as set in step 2 to get normal signal levels through to
the amplifier input(s).
4.
If the signal chain tests OK, turn up the input levels to the amplifier(s) and you should hear
your input signal reproduced through the loudspeaker. It should be clean and clear. If
using biamplification and/or subwoofers the sound may not be balanced between the high
and low frequencies, but this is corrected in final tuning.
5.
If all is well you are ready for the final adjustments to the system.
12.2
Final Adjustments
There are two primary things to consider when making final adjustments on a system: electronic gain
structure and loudspeaker level balancing. The gain structure of a system will determine the dynamic
range of a system or the ratio of the softest to loudest usable sounds. The softest sounds will be
limited by the amount of system noise and the loudest sounds by noticeable distortion or clipping.
Loudspeaker level balancing includes only those systems where there is more than one loudspeaker.
This includes systems where loudspeakers reproduce different frequency ranges (e.g. biamplified
loudspeakers or a full-range loudspeaker with a subwoofer) or systems where multiple loudspeakers
reproduce the same frequency range, (e.g. arrays of multiple loudspeakers or main and delayed
loudspeakers).
12.3
Electronic Gain Structure
Detailed information on how to set electronic gain structure is beyond the scope of this manual.
However the following are VERY general guidelines that may be helpful.
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
1.
As a minimum, you need to use at least a voltmeter along with the maximum output voltage
specification for each piece of electronics. The preferable tool is an oscilloscope that can be
used to observe the signal directly. If neither of these are available, you can use the level or
clipping indicators on each piece of equipment in the signal chain. Without some method of
determining the clipping point for each piece of equipment, you cannot expect to optimize
the gain structure.
2.
Before setting gain structure disconnect the loudspeaker(s) from the amplifiers.
disconnect the sense lines for any electronic controllers in the system.
3.
The basic procedure is to use a test signal (a sine wave signal is ideal) and set the first piece
of equipment in the signal chain (usually the mixer) so it is just below maximum voltage
output as read on the voltmeter or on equipment’s output meter or just below clipping as
observed on the oscilloscope. Without changing this signal level adjust the level controls on
each piece of equipment following, including the power amplifiers, so it is just below its
maximum output. You will find that the input level controls on the power amplifier will end
up being set anywhere from 10 dB to over 20 dB of attenuation.
Do not
NOTES:
a. Due to differences in the capabilities of devices in the signal chain, it may not be
possible to achieve the results exactly as stated.
b. Gain structure should be set after any equalization is set for the system so that any
boosts (which reduce headroom in the equalizer) are taken into account.
c. For each device, make sure it is the output and not the input that is clipping.
d. Always make sure that the electronic controllers go into limiting prior to anything else in
the system going into clipping. In this way the controller’s limiter, rather than a clipped
signal somewhere else in the signal chain, will control the system’s maximum output.
4. Remove the test signal, turn off all equipment and reconnect the loudspeaker(s) and the
system is ready for level balancing, assuming you have more than one loudspeaker. If you
have only one loudspeaker the system should be ready for use.
12.3.1 Residual Noise
The SLS and SBS loudspeakers have high sensitivities which mean that they produce a relatively high
output for a given electrical input. This includes the residual electronic noise of an audio system. By
setting gain structure properly and using high quality professional electronics, this noise should be at
or near inaudibility. Among the noisier electronic devices are 16 bit digital devices such as some
signal delays. They have signal to noise ratios that are only 90 dB. However, if the gain structure is
set correctly this means that, for example, if the system can produce 120 dB SPL at maximum output,
the residual noise should be about 30 dB SPL. This would be acceptable for a quiet recording studio.
If residual noise is a problem, gain structure is usually the culprit – it is never the loudspeakers.
12.4
Level Balancing
Once the system gain structure is set, the level balances can be adjusted. This may mean the levels
between HF and LF sections of a biamplified loudspeaker, a full-range loudspeaker to subwoofer level,
levels between multiple loudspeakers, or between main and delayed loudspeaker array. The idea is to
make the system sound the best it can without using any equalization. This may be done using
acoustic test equipment such as an RTA (real-time analyzer), TEF™ analyzer or similar. You must
always determine the final level balance by listening to a variety of known program material. Level
balancing can also be done entirely by ear if acoustic test equipment is not available. In any case, the
preferred method of adjusting levels for balancing is to use the amplifier input level controls.
IMPORTANT: In order to maintain the system’s dynamic range that was maximized by setting the
proper gain structure, DO NOT TURN UP THE INPUT LEVEL CONTROLS OF ANY OF THE AMPLIFIERS. For
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
example, if you decide that a subwoofer is not loud enough, do not turn up the input level control of
its amplifier. Instead, turn down the input level of the full-range loudspeaker’s amplifier.
12.5
Equalization
Once level balances are set, you can then equalize the loudspeaker(s), if necessary. Community
loudspeakers, used with an electronic controller, are optimized for highly accurate and well balanced
reproduction “out-of-the-box”. Generally, equalization should only be needed to eliminate difficult
feedback frequencies or to adapt the system to a difficult acoustic environment. You should not need
more than a few dB of boost or cut equalization for any particular range of frequencies. The best
equalization techniques involve cutting rather than boosting frequencies. Refer to the SECTION 13.5
“External Equalization” for more information.
12.6
Final Results
Once the above procedures are followed, your loudspeaker should reproduce audio cleanly, clearly and
with all frequencies in good balance. Noise should not be audible and you should be able to drive at
least one amplifier/controller in the system to its maximum output on normal program material with
no significant distortion or other undesirable sound.
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
13
OPERATING PRECAUTIONS
The following sections detail certain operating precautions for the loudspeaker which will aid in
achieving and maintaining its maximum performance and reliability. They also include important
information for situations and usage outside the basic set-up and operation described in the previous
sections.
13.1
PowerSense DDP Cautions
The crossovers for the SLS models incorporate PowerSense DDP (Dynamic Driver Protection) circuitry
that automatically provides thermal and over-current protection for the individual drivers. The SBS
subwoofers do NOT have PowerSense circuitry. The PowerSense circuits are designed to work in
conjunction with an electronic controller, or some other type of electronic limiter. Without the
combination of passive and electronic protection, the loudspeaker system is more susceptible to
damage and outright failure. This combination provides significant but not absolute protection from
damage. For example, neither the PowerSense circuitry nor electronic limiting can provide protection
from continual overdriving or from too small an amplifier being driven into heavy clipping. (Refer to
FIGURE 14: “Effects of Amplifier Clipping” and to SECTION 13.3 “Using Low Power Amplifiers”.)
13.1.1 Operating Modes and PowerSense DDP
The PowerSense DDP circuits function in both the PASSIVE and BIAMPLIFIED modes for all SLS models.
This means that in BIAMPLIFIED mode, both the HF and LF sections have their own PowerSense
protection. The only exception to this is the 12” (305 mm) LF driver in the SLS918.
The SBS subwoofers do NOT have PowerSense circuitry because they do not have an internal crossover.
Protection, as well as the required crossover function, must be supplied by external electronics.
CAUTION:
Do not operate the SBS subwoofers without an appropriate high-pass filter. The high-pass
filter attenuates low frequencies that are below the useful frequency range of the subwoofer.
Such frequencies can cause excessive cone excursion and possible driver damage.
13.1.2 PowerSense DDP Circuit Operation (SBS subwoofers do not have this circuit)
This proprietary circuitry can help ensure that your SLS loudspeakers will perform at their best and
keep performing year after year. It provides not only a measure of protection but gives clear visual and
audible indications to the operator of excessive power input. The PowerSense circuit actually has three
levels of protection (See note below For SLS915 and SLS918).
For short term excessive power inputs occurring at high frequencies, the excess power to the HF driver
is absorbed by HPCCRs (High Positive Current Coefficient Resistors). These are wired in series with the
high frequency driver and convert excessive power to light and heat. When these HPCCRs emit light,
their impedance goes up and thus reduces the power input to the HF driver.
When activated, flashes of light from the HPCCRs can be seen through the bass ports of the
loudspeaker alerting the operator of the excessive power input. Very occasional flashing (once in
several seconds) is OK. If flashing occurs more often than this, it indicates that the volume should be
immediately reduced. This level of protection has little effect on the system output as these HPCCRs
are always in circuit and gradually absorb excessive power in a way that is audibly similar to a
compressor circuit with a “soft” knee.
For longer term or more excessive input, the power to the mid frequency driver or to the entire system
will be reduced by current sensitive relays. These make up two additional levels of protection. One
relay, when opened, puts a set of HPCCRs in series with the mid frequency driver and the other, when
opened, puts a different set of HPCCRs in series with the entire system. These sets of HPCCRs are only
put in series with the signal as a result of excessive current causing its associated relay to open. When
the signal is switched to pass through the HPCCRs, the loudspeaker’s output volume will be reduced
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
by several dB, quickly and noticeably. How much reduction will depend on the amount and frequency
range of the excessive power.
As a further indication of the operation of either of these circuits, a brighter, steadier light will be seen
through the bass ports than for the HF driver protection. The open relay will then reset itself after
several seconds, depending on the amount of excessive power, and the loudspeaker’s output volume
will return to normal. However, if the excessive power condition continues, the relay will re-open and
reduce the power and volume again. This will have the effect of the system volume cutting in and out
and is a clear warning of excessive power and the need to reduce the input level to the system.
Note: The SLS915 and SLS918 have only two sets of HPCCRs, one for the high frequency driver and one
for the dual 6.5” (165 mm) drivers. The set for the dual 6.5” drivers is relay activated. There is no
PowerSense DDP protection for the SLS918 12” (305 mm) driver.
WARNING:
Continued cycling of the relays can result in their failure. This will either lock the system up in
the reduced volume mode or, if the contacts fuse, bypass the HPCCR protection. Either
condition can result in damage to the loudspeakers or crossover components. When either the
HPCCRs for the HF driver flash, or the mid frequency or overall system protection relay is
activated, it means the loudspeaker is being protected, but only to a point. Therefore, any of
these conditions should be considered an immediate warning that the power input is excessive.
The volume level of the sound system should be reduced to a point where the HF driver
protection is activated only once every several seconds at the most.
13.2
Use Without Electronic Controller
All SLS and SBS loudspeakers will function without electronic control. However, this will provide
neither optimum performance from, nor any protection for the loudspeakers as Community’s
published specifications are established using electronic control. Bear in mind that Community’s
warranty provides insurance against manufacturing defects but does not cover loudspeakers that have
been damaged by excessive power input or other abuse – THIS INCLUDES OPERATION WITHOUT
ELECTRONIC CONTROL.
13.3
Using Lower Power Amplifiers
(Refer to the CHAPTER 8 “Choosing Power Amplification”)
When using an amplifier whose rated power output is below that recommended for the loudspeaker
listed in CHAPTER 9 “Operating Requirements”, the following precautions should be observed.
Driver damage and failure occurs most often when a loudspeaker is used with too small an amplifier.
The amplifier itself will be overdriven before the loudspeaker is or before the protection circuitry in the
controller is activated. The result is that the loudspeaker receives a badly distorted signal known as
amplifier clipping (refer to FIGURE 14). The characteristics of a clipped signal are such that it easily
can damage any speaker component even if the power output is below the power rating of the
loudspeaker. NEITHER THE POWERSENSE DDP NOR THE CONTROLLER CIRCUITRY CAN PROTECT THE
LOUDSPEAKER FROM DAMAGE DUE TO POWER AMPLIFIER CLIPPING.
When operating an SLS loudspeaker with a lower power amplifier and without any sort of electronic
limiting protection, ensure that the amplifier’s limits are not exceeded. Most amplifiers have some
type of indicator that shows when it is clipping. Keeping the signal level below this point will usually
prevent loudspeaker damage or failure. High frequency drivers are very intolerant of clipping.
The SBS models contain no driver protection and must rely on external protection circuitry provided by
an external limiter. If no limiter is present, use an amplifier that is matched to the loudspeaker’s
Program power rating. For the reasons stated above, do not allow the amplifier to be driven into
clipping. FIGURE 14 describes and depicts clipping.
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
FIGURE 14: Effects of Amplifier Clipping
13.4
Generic Electronic Control (Non-Community)
It is technically possible to use generic signal processing equipment such as DSP signal processors,
analog EQs, and limiters to set up workable and reasonable operating parameters for the SLS and SBS
loudspeakers. Bear in mind that dynamic equalization, IntelliSense™ protection and certain other
parameters built into Community’s controllers are virtually impossible to mimic using generic devices.
Also Community cannot provide specific advice or details about the proper settings for generic
devices.
13.5
External Equalization
Equalizers are used to increase or decrease the audio level in particular frequency ranges. The
following points about using an equalizer to boost frequencies should be kept in mind. Our hearing is
much more tolerant of dips or holes in the frequency response of an audio system than it is of peaks in
the response. Therefore, reducing a peak is more important than “filling” a hole in the frequency
response. Equalization boosts can easily cause overloads and clipping in the electronic portion of the
signal chain and will reduce gain before feedback when using microphones. The power handling of LF
and HF drivers is the lowest at the extreme low and high frequencies. This is where they are also
producing less output leading to a temptation to apply boosts at that point. Lastly, it does little good
for the performance or the reliability of a loudspeaker to boost any frequencies that are beyond the
specified operating range of the loudspeaker.
For the reasons stated above, it is recommended that only minimal amounts of equalization boost be
used and only for more subtle improvements in the frequency response or to adapt the system to
difficult acoustic environments.
13.6
Acoustic Level Precautions
Various studies have shown that acoustic levels in excess of 100 dB SPL can be damaging to human
hearing. The higher the level above this point the shorter the time the human ear can tolerate it.
Levels near or above 120 dB SPL are physically painful and will, after a very short exposure time
measured in minutes, permanently damage hearing. FIGURE 15 shows the maximum exposure times at
levels from 90 to 115 dBA SPL from two different authorities. Although they differ at lower levels, at
110 dBA they (and others) agree that the maximum acceptable exposure time is only a few minutes.
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
Community loudspeakers are capable of producing levels in excess of potentially dangerous levels
close to the enclosure. In normal operation it is intended that the listener will at a distance from the
enclosure where SPL levels will be within tolerable limits.
Avoid operating the loudspeaker systems at levels that exceed 100 dB SPL in the listening area for
more than short periods. One way to do this for musical performances is to provide some moderate
boost at the very low and to a lesser extent, at the very high frequencies. Judicious applications of this
type of equalization can make a loudspeaker sound significantly louder than it actually is. Both your
listeners and your loudspeakers will thank you.
It is recommended that a sound level meter be used to verify listening levels. Relatively inexpensive
meters are available that provide adequate accuracy for this purpose.
FIGURE 15: Sound Exposure Limits
13.7
Testing And Test Signals
(Refer to the CHAPTER 17 “In Case Of Difficulty” for troubleshooting methods)
To test an SLS or SBS loudspeaker or to reproduce test signals or tones through it for other purposes,
certain precautions must be followed to avoid damage to the loudspeakers. Generally sine wave,
swept tones, pink noise, white noise and other constant level test signals are much harder on a
loudspeaker than normal program material and therefore the potential for damage is much greater.
Also keep in mind that the parameters of the limiting circuitry in the generic limiters are set for the
characteristics of speech and music program – not test signals. Their capability to protect the
loudspeaker is considerably reduced using test signals.
When using noise-type signals, never use power inputs that exceed 50% (-3 dB) of the loudspeaker’s
RMS rating and do not test at this level for more than a few moments. For sine waves and for any
other test signals that must be used for extended periods of time, the power input to the loudspeaker
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
should be kept below 10% (-10 dB) of the loudspeaker’s RMS rating to ensure the loudspeaker will not
be damaged.
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
13.8
Microphone Feedback
One of the more potentially damaging signals in an audio system is microphone feedback. This
usually results in a high volume level, single-tone signal (essentially a sine wave) being reproduced
through the loudspeakers. This kind of signal can quickly damage the drivers and therefore the
situation should be corrected as quickly as possible.
To avoid this situation the following approaches can be tried. It will be necessary to increase the gain
for the system in order to “test” if there is any improvement in the gain-before-feedback margin as
adjustments are made. During a performance the main recourse to stop feedback or ringing is to
reduce the volume for the offending microphone or, if this cannot be quickly determined, reduce the
volume of the entire system. The following list is in the general order of preference of what to do first.
Note that using equalization is the last thing to do.
1. Use directional microphones (cardiod-types) that have well controlled pick-up patterns.
2. Keep microphones close to the sound sources. The further away they are the more gain that is
needed.
3. Use similar quality microphones. Major problems can be caused by just one poor microphone
that is sensitive to feedback.
4. Use as few microphones as possible. The amount of gain-before-feedback decreases as the
number of “open” microphones increases.
5. When possible, use direct inputs, such as direct boxes, contact pickups, and line feeds from
instrument amplifiers. This will reduce the number of live microphones.
6. Always keep the microphones behind the plane of the loudspeakers and/or aimed away from
them.
7. Reposition the microphone to provide better feedback rejection. Sometimes moving it only a
few inches or re-orienting it will suffice.
8. Mute any microphones when they are not being used.
9. Reverse the polarity of a microphone that is feedback sensitive.
10. Try a different type of microphone in place of one that is feedback sensitive.
11. Use sound absorbing materials like rugs, packing blankets, or sound isolating panels to reduce
sound reflections in hard surfaced stage environments.
12. Use a graphic equalizer, parametric equalizer, or notch filter to reduce the level of frequencies
that are prone to feedback. For best results, it is recommended that a graphic equalizer used
for controlling feedback have filter bandwidths of 1/3 octave or narrower.
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
14
OPERATING PRECAUTIONS FOR THE SLS918
The SLS918 is essentially an SLS915 combined with an SBS12 subwoofer into one enclosure. When
used in PASSIVE mode it has similar performance to an SLS915/SBS12 combination but does not
require an electronic crossover.
It is important to note that the PowerSense DDP protection circuit for the SLS918 LF driver is bypassed
in BIAMPLIFIED mode. When using an electronic controller in this mode electronic protection is
provided by the controller. If these controllers are not used, it is recommended that an external limiter
be used to provide electronic protection to help prevent possible damage from excess power. Set the
limiter to provide at least a 10:1 compression ratio and set its threshold to below amplifier clipping.
The amplifier power output rating should be within the range recommended in SECTION 9.1.2
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
15
SERVICING
15.1
Servicing SLS Drivers
To service an SLS driver it must be removed from the enclosure. Refer to FIGURE 16 for details of notso-obvious procedures for the M200 and bottom bolts for the lower LF driver. Details will vary slightly
from model to model.
FIGURE 16: Servicing SLS Drivers
(Side view cut-away of SLS loudspeaker)
15.2
Servicing SBS Drivers
15.3
Servicing an SLS Input Panel and Crossover
15.1
Servicing an SBS Input Panel
To service an SBS driver it must be removed from the enclosure. To do this, remove the grille (see
SECTION 11.3.1 “Removing/Installing the Grille”) and remove the retaining bolts around the
circumference of the driver. The driver can then be dismounted and serviced.
To service an SLS crossover it must be removed from the enclosure. To do this, remove the 3/8” x 16
hex-socket screws from the rear panel. Disconnect the Molex connector that connects the driver
wiring harness to the crossover. The crossover may then be removed from the rear panel for service.
If for any reason an SBS input panel requires service, it must be accessed from the front of the
enclosure as the rear of the enclosure is NOT removable. To do this, remove the grille and one of the
drivers from the subwoofer. The input panel can then be removed as needed through the driver
mounting hole.
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Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
16
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
16.1
SLS Full-Range Loudspeaker Specifications
SLS915
Frequency Response
Sensitivity (1W / 1m
SPL)
250 Hz - 4 kHz
Over Entire
Bandwidth
Max. Power (RMS /
Program)
Passive Mode
Biamp Mode:
LF
HF
Max. Voltage (RMS /
Peak)
Passive Mode
Biamp Mode:
LF
HF
Nominal Impedance
Passive or Biamp
Nominal Dispersion H x
V
Crossover
Passive/Biamp
Switch
Crossover Frequency
Drivers
HF
MF
LF
Driver Loading
MF
LF
HF
PowerSense™ DDP 2
Input Connectors
Neutrik NL4MP
Dual Banana
SLS918
SLS920
SLS960
SLS980
95 - 18000 Hz
55 - 18000 Hz
95 - 18000 Hz
75 - 18000 Hz
50 - 18000 Hz
104 dB
103 dB
101 dB
99 dB
108 dB
107 dB
109 dB
108 dB
109 dB
108 dB
120W / 300W
120W / 300W
20W / 50W
200W / 500W
200W / 500W
120W / 300W
200W / 500W
200W / 500W
80W / 200W
400W / 1000W
400W / 1000W
80W / 200W
400W / 1000W
400W / 1000W
80W / 200W
31V / 69V
31V / 69V
13V / 28V
28V / 63V
28V / 63V
31V / 69V
40V / 89V
40V / 89V
25V / 57V
57V / 126V
57V / 126V
25V / 57V
57V / 126V
57V / 126V
25V / 57V
8 Ohm
80 x 50
4 Ohm Passive
8 ohm Biamp
80 x 50
8 Ohm
65 x 50 1
8 Ohm
65 x 50
8 Ohm
65 x 45
12 dB/octave
Yes
12 dB/octave
Yes
12 dB/octave
Yes
12 dB/octave
Yes
12 dB/octave
Yes
1.8 kHz
(1) 1” (25
mm)VHF100
n/a
(2) 6.5” (165 mm)
1” exit horn
n/a
Horn / vented
Yes
200 Hz / 1.8 kHz
(1) 1” (25
mm)VHF100
(2) 6.5” (165 mm)
(1) 12” (305 mm)
1” exit horn
Horn
Horn / vented
Yes
(2) In parallel
(2) Passive/LF, HF
13-ply Baltic Birch
(8) 3/8”-16
(2) In parallel
(2) Passive/LF, HF
13-ply Baltic Birch
(8) 3/8”-16
800 Hz / 3 kHz
650 Hz / 3 kHz
450 Hz / 3 kHz
(1) 1” (25
(1) 1” (25
(1) 1” (25
mm)VHF100
mm)VHF100
mm)VHF100
(1) 2” (51 mm)M200 (1) 2” (51 mm)M200 (1) 2” (51 mm) M200
(2) 15” (381 mm)
(2) 10” (254 mm)
(2) 8” (203 mm)
1” exit horn
1” exit horn
1” exit horn
2” exit horn
2” exit horn
2” exit horn
Horn / vented
Horn / vented
Horn / vented
Yes
Yes
Yes
(2) In parallel
(2) Passive/LF, HF
13-ply Baltic Birch
(8) 3/8”-16
(2) In parallel
(2) Passive/LF, HF
13-ply Baltic Birch
(8) 3/8”-16
(2) In parallel
(2) Passive, LF/HF
13-ply Baltic Birch
(8) 3/8”-16
Enclosure Material
Mounting/Rigging
Points
Mounting/Rigging
300 lb. / 75 lb.
300 lb. / 75 lb.
300 lb. / 75 lb.
300 lb. / 75 lb.
300 lb. / 75 lb.
Points WLL (Vert Pull / (136.1 kg / 34 kg) (136.1 kg / 34 kg) (136.1 kg / 34 kg) (136.1 kg / 34 kg) (136.1 kg / 34 kg)
Horz Pull)
Pull-Back Points WLL 3
60 lb. (27.2 kg)
60 lb. (27.2 kg)
60 lb. (27.2 kg)
60 lb. (27.2 kg)
60 lb. (27.2 kg)
Finish
Standard
Black paint
Black paint
Black paint
Black paint
Black paint
-WHT
White paint
White paint
White paint
White paint
White paint
-SPL
Custom color
Custom color
Custom color
Custom color
Custom color
-FE
Black fiberglass
Black fiberglass
Black fiberglass
Black fiberglass
Black fiberglass
Dimensions H
49.4” (1255 mm)
33.4” (849 mm)
25.9” (659 mm)
25.9” (659 mm)
20.4” (519 mm)
W (front)
19.9”
(504 mm) 29.9” (758 mm)
14.4” (365 mm)
18.1” (460 mm)
10.8”
(275 mm)
W (back)
21.1” (536 mm)
12.2”
(309 mm)
8.9” (227 mm)
12.7” (322 mm)
6.7” (171 mm)
D
22.75” (578 mm)
20.25” (514 mm)
14.6” (372 mm)
14.6” (372 mm)
11.2” (286 mm)
Grille
Material
Perforated Steel
Perforated Steel
Perforated Steel
Perforated Steel
Perforated Steel
Covering
White Stretch Fabric White Stretch Fabric White Stretch Fabric White Stretch Fabric White Stretch Fabric
(WHT)
Pitch between sides
22.5 degrees
22.5 degrees
22.5 degrees
22.5 degrees
22.5 degrees
Weight
Net
45 lb. (20.4 kg)
87.5 lb. (39 .7 kg)
70 lb. (31.8 kg)
133.5 lb. (60.6 kg) 243 lb. (110.2 kg)
Shipping
53 lb. (24 kg)
116 lb. (52.6 kg)
87 lb. (39.5 kg)
151.5 lb. (68.7 kg) 290 lb. (131.5 kg)
SLS920H has the HF section rotated so when mounted horizontally coverage is 65 horizontal by 50
degrees vertical.
2. DDP = Dynamic Driver Protection.
3. In any pull direction from 0 to 90 degrees.
1.
PAGE 43
Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
16.2
SBS Subwoofer Specifications
5
SBS12
SBS22
SBS25
SBS45
Frequency Response
45 - 250 Hz
35 - 250 Hz
35 - 150 Hz
27 - 150 Hz
Sensitivity (1W / 1m
SPL)
94 dB
96 dB
98 dB
100 dB
Over Entire
Bandwidth
Max. Power (RMS /
200W / 500W
400W / 1000W
400W / 1000W
800W / 2000W
Program)
Max. Voltage (RMS /
40V / 89V
40V / 89V
40V / 89V
80V / 179V
Peak)
Nominal Impedance
8 Ohm
4 Ohm
4 Ohm
8 Ohm
Nominal Dispersion
Omni @ 100 Hz
Omni @ 100 Hz
Omni @ 100 Hz
230 @ 100 Hz
Crossover
None
None
None
None
Max. Recommended
Crossover Frequency
150 Hz
150 Hz
150 Hz
150 Hz
Drivers
(1) 12” (305 mm)
(2) 12” (305 mm)
(2) 15” (381 mm)
(4) 15” (381 mm)
Driver Loading
Vented enclosure
Vented enclosure
Vented enclosure
Vented enclosure
PowerSense™ DDP 1
No
No
No
No
Input Connectors
All in parallel:
All in parallel:
All in parallel:
All in parallel:
Neutrik
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
NL4MP
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
Dual Banana
Enclosure Material
13-ply Baltic Birch 13-ply Baltic Birch 13-ply Baltic Birch 13-ply Baltic Birch
Mounting/Rigging Points
(8) 3/8”-16
(8) 3/8”-16
(8) 3/8”-16
(8) 3/8”-16
Mounting/Rigging Points
300 lb. / 75 lb.
300 lb. / 75 lb.
300 lb. / 75 lb.
300 lb. / 75 lb.
WLL (Vert / Horz)
(136.1 kg / 34 kg) (136.1 kg / 34 kg) (136.1 kg / 34 kg) (136.1 kg / 34 kg)
Pull-Back Points WLL 2
60 lb. (27.2 kg)
60 lb. (27.2 kg)
60 lb. (27.2 kg)
n/a
Finish
Standard
Black paint
Black paint
Black paint
Black paint
-WHT
White paint
White paint
White paint
White paint
-SPL
Custom color
Custom color
Custom color
Custom color
-FE
Black fiberglass
Black fiberglass
Black fiberglass
Black fiberglass
Dimensions H
33.4” (849 mm)
33.4” (849 mm)
33.4” (849 mm)
25.9” (659 mm)
W (front)
33.4” (849 mm)
24.8” (631 mm)
19.8” (505 mm)
14.4” (365 mm)
W (back)
33.4” (849 mm)
16.2” (410 mm)
12.2” (309 mm)
8.9” (227 mm)
D
30” (762 mm)
22.75” (578 mm)
20.25” (514 mm)
14.6” (372 mm)
Grille
Material
Perforated Steel
Perforated Steel
Perforated Steel
Perforated Steel
Covering
White Stretch
White Stretch
White Stretch
White Stretch
(WHT)
Fabric
Fabric
Fabric
Fabric
Pitch Between Sides
22.5 degrees
22.5 degrees
22.5 degrees
n/a
Weight
Net
56.5 lb. (25.6 kg)
113 lb. (51.3 kg)
128 lb. (58.1 kg)
220 lb. (99.8 kg)
Shipping
72 lb. (32.7 kg)
155 lb. (70.3 kg)
178 lb. (80.7 kg) 250 lb. (113.4 kg)
1
2
16.3
DDP = Dynamic Driver Protection
In any pull direction from 0 to 90 degrees.
Performance Data
Please visit www.communitypro.com for all performance data or contact the Technical Applications
Group (TAG) at tagteam@communitypro.com or 610-876-3400.
PAGE 44
Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
17
IN CASE OF DIFFICULTY
Should you have a problem with your Community Solutions loudspeaker, find the symptom and follow
the associated “What To Do” instructions. Be aware that a particular symptom may have several
possible causes. Please refer to appropriate sections in this manual if you need more detailed
information.
SYMPTOM – SLS
LOUDSPEAKERS
Distortion, low volume, or no
volume from any or all drivers.
PROBABLE CAUSE
WHAT TO DO
Cold/open solder joint on the Using an ohmmeter, check the continuity of the crimp
connectors, all solder joints on the crossover and the wiring
crossover or faulty wiring
to the drivers. Also visually inspect solder joints as cold
connection.
joints may only malfunction with higher current than the
ohmmeter supplies. Repair as needed.
Distortion from the loudspeaker
Too little amplifier power.
If the power rating of the amplifier(s) being used is too low,
at higher volume levels.
it will clip at higher volume levels before the controller
limiting is active. Reduce the volume level or use a more
powerful amplifier.
Distortion from the loudspeaker
Driver is malfunctioning.
Using a sine wave oscillator or wide range program at
at higher volume levels.
moderate levels, listen to each driver to isolate the problem.
Replace as needed.
This usually means that the loudspeaker was continually
During high output operation the The crossover protection
overdriven for an extended period and the protection relays
volume drops suddenly and does circuits have “given up”.
have “fused” in their protect mode. The crossover must be
not come back.
repaired.
Wiring for LF and HF sections Check wiring from crossover to amplifier and amplifier to
Full-range sound in BIAMPLIFIED
loudspeaker and make sure the HF is going to the HF and the
mode but bass is weak and highs is reversed from electronic
LF to the LF loudspeakers sections.
crossover or amplifier.
sound "muffled".
The lights are part of the crossover protection circuitry.
Lights flash on and off inside the The crossover PowerSense
loudspeaker.
protection circuits have been Flashing means that there are excessive power peaks to the
loudspeaker and is also a warning to reduce the power.
activated.
Low frequency driver or
While right in front of the loudspeaker, listen at low levels, to
Low or no volume for the low
frequencies. (Note: on the SLS918 crossover is malfunctioning. the each low frequency driver. One is located at the bottom
and one in the middle of the enclosure. If some sound is
there is only one low frequency
heard from each and it is not distorted, it is probably a
driver located in the bottom of
crossover problem. If distorted or no sound is heard from
the enclosure.)
either or both drivers, the driver may not be working
properly. Replace as needed.
Mid frequency driver or
While right in front of the loudspeaker, listen at low level to
Low or no volume for the midcrossover is malfunctioning. the mid-range driver located at the top of the enclosure. If
frequencies. (Note: on the
some sound is heard from this area and it is not distorted, it
SLS918 there are two midis probably a crossover problem. If distorted sound or no
frequency drivers located in the
sound is heard, the driver may not be working properly.
upper left of the enclosure.)
Replace as needed.
Low volume level.
System electronic gain is too Check to make sure that the audio signal to the amplifier is
low.
high enough to drive it properly. Check all volume/level
controls and gain switches in the system including the
amplifier input attenuator.
Low volume level.
Signal or speaker wire
Make sure the signal and input wire connections inside all
connection is shorted.
system connectors are not shorted. Even one small wire
strand shorting the +/– signal terminals either before or
after the amplifier can cause this problem.
PASSIVE / BIAMPLIFIED switch Switch on the input panel should be in the BIAMP MODE (up)
Mid and high frequencies in
in the wrong position.
position.
BIAMPLIFIED mode sound
“muffled”.
Mid and high frequencies sound
PASSIVE / BIAMPLIFIED switch Switch on the input panel should be in the PASSIVE mode
"muffled" in PASSIVE mode.
in the wrong position.
(down) position.
High frequency driver or
While right in front of the loudspeaker, listen at low levels, to
No high frequencies. (Note: on
crossover is malfunctioning. the high frequency driver located in the middle of the
the SLS918 the high frequency
cabinet. If some sound is heard from this area and it is not
driver is located at the upper right
distorted, it is probably a crossover problem. If distorted
of the enclosure.)
sound or no sound is heard, the driver may not be working
properly. Replace as needed.
No low frequencies in BIAMPLIFIED LF driver is not functioning.
Disconnect the amplifier and, using an ohmmeter, measure
mode – SLS918.
the resistance at the dual banana LF input jack. If it reads
“open”, the LF driver may not be working. Replace as needed.
No low frequencies in Biamplified LF driver is not functioning.
Disconnect the amplifier and, using an ohmmeter, measure
PAGE 45
Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
mode – SLS915/920/960/980.
(Note: LF drivers are wired in
series.)
No low frequencies in Biamplified
mode.
No low frequencies in BIAMPLIFIED
mode.
No low frequencies in Passive
mode.
(Note: SLS915/920/960/980 LF
drivers are wired in series.)
No low frequencies in PASSIVE
mode.
No mid or high frequencies in
Biamplified mode.
No mid or high frequencies in
Biamplified mode.
No sound.
No sound in Passive mode.
No sound or very low volume.
LF amplifier is not on or
loudspeaker disconnected.
LF section of electronic
crossover is not functioning
or is disconnected.
LF driver is not functioning.
PASSIVE / BIAMP switch is in
the wrong position or the
wrong connector pins are
used.
HF amplifier is not on or
loudspeaker disconnected.
HF section of electronic
crossover is not functioning
or is disconnected.
Amplifier is not on or
loudspeaker disconnected.
Either wrong Neutrik pins or
wrong banana jack is being
used.
No audio signal.
Noises from the loudspeaker
(buzzes or rattles).
Grille or Hardware is loose.
Noises from the loudspeaker
(buzzes or rattles).
Driver is malfunctioning.
Poor sound quality in Biamp
Mode.
Incorrect polarity
connections.
Sound cuts in and out.
The crossover protection
circuits have been activated.
Sound cuts in and out.
Bad connection.
SYMPTOM – SBS
LOUDSPEAKERS
Distortion, low volume, or no
volume from any or all drivers.
PROBABLE CAUSE
No bass or bass is weak.
Bass is weak.
Bass is weak.
the resistance at the dual banana LF input jack. If the meter
reads “open”, one or both LF drivers may not be working.
Replace as needed.
Check that the LF amplifier is turned on and that
loudspeaker is properly connected to the amplifier.
Check that electronic crossover has LF output and that it is
properly connected to the amplifier.
Disconnect the amplifier, switch the loudspeaker to
BIAMPLIFIED mode and, using an ohmmeter, measure the
resistance at the dual banana LF input jack. If the meter
reads an “open”, one or both LF drivers may not be working.
Replace as needed.
Check that the switch is in the PASSIVE (down) position and
that you are using connector pins #1 +/–.
Check that the HF amplifier is turned on and that
loudspeaker is properly connected to the amplifier.
Check that electronic crossover has HF output and that it is
properly connected to the amplifier.
Check that amplifier is turned on and that loudspeaker is
properly connected to the amplifier.
Make sure you are using connector pins #1 + / – or the right
banana jack (as seen from the rear of the enclosure).
Check that all the audio equipment in the signal chain is
powered on and that all volume controls are turned up at
least somewhat.
Make sure the front grille screws and quick-lock pads are
securely seated; that any external mounting hardware is
tightened or secured from vibrating (esp. if chains are used
for suspension).
Using a sine wave oscillator or wide range program at
moderate levels, listen to each driver to isolate the problem.
Replace as needed.
Check the connections to the LF and HF sections. Verify the
polarity is correct (+ and – amplifier outputs go to + and – on
loudspeaker).
This usually means that the loudspeaker is being constantly
overdriven and the crossover protection circuits are reducing
the power to the loudspeaker as a protective measure.
Reduce the volume level to the loudspeaker.
Check all connections and cabling for shorts or loose
connections. Even one small wire strand shorting the +/–
signal terminals either before or after the amplifier can cause
this problem.
WHAT TO DO
Cold/open solder joint on the Using an ohmmeter, check the continuity of the crimp
connectors, all solder joints on the input panel and the
input panel or faulty wiring
wiring to the drivers. Also visually inspect solder joints as
connection.
cold joints may only malfunction with higher current than the
ohmmeter supplies. Repair as needed.
No signal to the subwoofer. Check that electronic crossover has subwoofer output, that
it is properly connected to the amplifier, that amplifier is
properly connected to the subwoofer and that there is
sufficient gain to drive the subwoofer in relation to the fullrange loudspeakers.
Incorrect subwoofer polarity. Verify polarity is wired as shown in the section for the
connecting the loudspeakers. Note that in some cases, due
to physical loudspeaker placement, a reversed polarity
connection will provide better coupling to the full-range
loudspeaker.
Poor physical placement.
PAGE 46
Note that in some cases, the physical placement a
subwoofer can have a significant effect on the bass energy
Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
Bass is weak from SBS22 or
SBS25.
(Note: SBS22 and SBS25 drivers
are wired in parallel.)
Bass is weak from SBS45.
(Note: SBS45 drivers are wired
with 2 series pairs in parallel.)
One driver not functioning.
No bass SBS12.
Driver is not functioning.
No bass from SBS22 or SBS25.
(Note: SBS22 drivers are wired in
parallel.)
Driver is not functioning.
No bass from SBS45.
Driver is not functioning.
No bass or bass is weak.
Subwoofer is not
functioning.
One or more drivers not
functioning.
PAGE 47
in the listening area. If possible move the subwoofer at
least 10 feet from its present location to see if the bass
energy changes. If it does than you should change the
subwoofer location.
Disconnect the amplifier and, using an ohmmeter, measure
the resistance at the dual banana input jack. If the meter
reads ~4 Ohms one driver may not be working. Replace as
needed.
Disconnect the amplifier and, using an ohmmeter, measure
the resistance at the dual banana input jack. If the meter
reads ~ 9 Ohms at least one LF driver may not be working.
Replace as needed.
Disconnect the amplifier and, using an ohmmeter, measure
the resistance at the dual banana input jack. If the meter
reads an “open”, the LF driver may not be working. Replace as
needed.
Disconnect the amplifier and, using an ohmmeter, measure
the resistance at the dual banana input jack. If the meter
reads an “open”, both drivers may not be working. Replace
as needed.
Disconnect the amplifier and, using an ohmmeter, measure
the resistance at the dual banana input jack. If the meter
reads an “open”, two or more LF drivers may not be working.
Replace as needed.
Assuming all cabling and connections for the electronic
crossover and amplifier are OK, while right in front of the
subwoofer, listen at moderate levels for output from the
driver(s).
If there is none the driver(s) may be
malfunctioning and need repair.
Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
18
WARRANTY INFORMATION AND SERVICE FOR THE USA
Transferable Warranty (Limited) – valid in the USA only
T R A N S F E R A B L E WA R R A N T Y " ( L I M I T E D ) ”
VA L I D I N T H E U S A O N LY
Community loudspeaker systems are warranted in the USA to be free from manufacturing defects in
materials and workmanship for a period of five years, as determined by one of the following two
methods, whichever is longer:
Starting from the date of retail purchase, as noted on the sales receipt from an authorized
Community dealer,
OR
Starting from the date of manufacture, determined by the serial number, if the sales receipt is
not available.
This warranty applies to the product; therefore, the remainder of the warranty period will be
automatically transferred to any subsequent owner.
This warranty applies only to failure of a Community loudspeaker caused by defects in materials and
workmanship during the stated warranty period. It does not apply to a unit that has been subjected to
abuse, accident, modification, improper handling/installation, or repairs made without factory
authorization or by anyone other than authorized Community Field Service Stations. This warranty is
void if the serial number has been defaced, altered or removed.
Products covered by this warranty will be repaired or replaced at the option of Community, without
charge for materials or labor, provided all the terms of this warranty have been met.
O B TA I N I N G WA R R A N T Y S E R V I C E
Warranty service may be obtained from the factory, or from an authorized Field Service Station.
To obtain factory or field warranty service for products purchased in the United States, return the
product for inspection to the address below, freight prepaid, in the original packaging. If the original
packaging is not available, call or write Community Warranty Service to obtain proper packaging
materials or hand carry the product to the nearest Field Service Station.
Factory Service Center:
Community Warranty Service
333 East Fifth Street
Chester, PA 19013-4511 USA
Field Service Station:
Call (610) 876-3400 for the nearest Authorized Field Service Station
For factory service, please call (610) 876-3400 for a Return Authorization (R/A) number before
shipping. The following information must be included in the package:
PAGE 48
Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
Owner’s complete name, daytime phone number, return street address and return
authorization number.
The serial number of the product being returned and a copy of the retail sales receipt, if
possible.
A complete description of the problem(s) experienced, including a brief description of how the
equipment is being used and with what brand, model and output power of amplifier.
Upon receipt, the service center will determine if the problem is covered under warranty. If covered
under this warranty, the product will be repaired or replaced, at Community’s option, and returned to
the owner freight prepaid. If the problem is not covered under this warranty, the owner will be notified
of the problem with an estimate of the repair costs.
Consequential and Incidental Damages: Community shall not be liable for any consequential or
incidental damages including, without limitation, injury to persons, property, or loss of use. Some
states do not allow the exclusion or limitations of consequential or incidental damages, so the above
limitations and exclusions may not apply.
This Community warranty is not extended by the length of time which an owner is deprived of the use
of the product. Repairs and replacement parts provided under the terms of this warranty shall carry
only the remaining portion of the warranty.
Community reserves the right to change the design of any product from time to time, without notice
and with no obligation to make corresponding changes in products previously manufactured.
While this warranty gives specific legal rights, there may also be other rights that vary from state to
state. No action to enforce this warranty shall be permitted ninety days after expiration of the
warranty period.
WA R R A N T Y I N F O R M AT I O N A N D S E R V I C E F O R
COUNTRIES OTHER THAN THE USA
To obtain specific warranty information and available service locations for countries other than the
United States of America, contact the authorized Community Distributor for your specific country or
region.
PAGE 49
Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
19
BASIC REPLACEMENT PARTS LIST
The following replacement parts may be ordered through authorized Community Service Stations.
Please contact Community for your nearest Service Station.
MODEL(S)
SLS915 & SLS918
SLS920
SLS960
SLS980
SBS12 & SBS22
SBS25 & SBS45
SLS920, SLS960 &
SLS980
SLS920, SLS960 &
SLS980
All SLS
All SLS
SLS920, SLS960 &
SLS980
All SLS
All SLS & SBS
All SLS
All SLS & SBS
All SLS & SBS
All SLS & SBS
All SLS & SBS
All SLS & SBS
1
REPLACEMENT PART
1
6.5” LF Driver
8” LF Driver
10” LF Driver
15” LF Driver
12” LF Driver
15” LF Driver
M200 MF Driver
M200 Replacement Diaphragm
VHF100 HF Driver
VHF100 Replacement
Diaphragm
Flare Plug Assemblies
Internal Crossovers
Input Panel Assemblies
Wire Harnesses
Handle Kits
Grilles (black)
Grilles (white)
Grille Cloths (white)
Rubber Feet Kit
Note the specific replacement part will vary depending on the SLS/SBS model.
PAGE 50
Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
INDEX
Grille ......................................................................... 15, 26
Grille Cloth ..................................................................... 26
A
Accessories ..................................................................... 15
Acoustic Level Precautions ............................................ 37
Acoustical Adjustments .................................................. 32
Amplifier Clipping.......................................................... 36
Amplifier Power - General Considerations .................... 19
Amplifiers ................................................................. 19, 36
B
Banana Input Jacks ......................................................... 23
Biamplified Mode ......................................... 14, 16, 20, 35
Biamplified Mode Operation .................................... 16, 24
C
Choosing Power Amplification ...................................... 19
Clipping .......................................................................... 36
Connecting the Loudspeakers ......................................... 23
Controller Options .......................................................... 16
Controller Selection ........................................................ 16
Crossover ...................................................... 13, 16, 17, 41
Custom Grille Cloth ........................................................ 26
D
Daisy-chaining Two Loudspeakers ................................ 23
De-Rating the Mounting/Rigging Points ........................ 29
Description...................................................................... 12
Design Factor .................................................................. 27
Drivers ............................................................................ 12
Dynamic Driver Protection ............................................. 14
Dynamic Range .............................................................. 32
H
Handles ........................................................................... 14
Horizontal Mounting - SLS920H ................................... 31
I
Initial Testing.................................................................. 32
Input Connectors ............................................................ 23
Input Panel ...................................................................... 41
Input Panels .................................................................... 13
Internal Crossover .......................................................... 13
Introduction ...................................................................... 5
Introduction to Electronically-Controlled Loudspeaker
Systems ......................................................................... 6
L
Level Balancing .............................................................. 33
Level Precautions ........................................................... 37
Low Power Amplifiers ................................................... 36
M
Microphone Feedback .................................................... 39
Mounting and Rigging .............................................. 14, 29
Mounting Brackets ......................................................... 30
Mounting Point Holes..................................................... 27
Mounting Points ............................................................. 29
N
Neutrik Speakon Input Jacks .......................................... 24
E
O
Electrical Installation ...................................................... 22
Electronic Control....................................................... 6, 14
Electronic Control (Non-Community) ............................ 37
Electronic Controller Options ......................................... 16
Enclosure Finish ....................................................... 15, 28
Enclosures....................................................................... 14
Equalization .............................................................. 34, 37
External Equalization...................................................... 37
EYBLTKIT ..................................................................... 15
Eyebolt Suspension Kit .................................................. 15
Omnimount™ Brackets .................................................. 30
Operating Modes ............................................................ 14
Operating Modes and PowerSense DDP ........................ 35
Operating Precautions .................................................... 35
Operating Precautions for the SLS918 ........................... 40
Operating Requirements ................................................. 20
Optional Accessories ...................................................... 15
F
Feedback ......................................................................... 39
Feet ........................................................................... 14, 25
Feet and Stand Mounts ................................................... 14
Ferrofluid ........................................................................ 13
Final Adjustments ........................................................... 32
Final Results ................................................................... 34
Front Grille ............................................................... 15, 26
G
Gain Structure ................................................................. 32
General Description ........................................................ 12
Generic Electronic Control ............................................. 37
PAGE 51
P
Painting ........................................................................... 26
Paralleling Two Loudspeakers ....................................... 23
Passive Crossover ........................................................... 16
PASSIVE Mode ........................................... 14, 16, 20, 35
PASSIVE Mode Operation....................................... 16, 23
Pattern Control Horns ..................................................... 13
Physical Features ............................................................ 11
Physical Installation........................................................ 25
Pole Socket -- SBS25 ..................................................... 31
Power Amplification ...................................................... 19
Power Handling Specifications ...................................... 14
PowerSense DDP Cautions ............................................ 35
PowerSense DDP Circuit ............................................... 14
PowerSense DDP Circuit Operation............................... 35
Product listing................................................................. 12
Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
Pull-Back Capability ....................................................... 29
Pull-Back Points ............................................................. 29
Q
Quick Start-Up Diagram ............................................... 8, 9
R
Radio Design Labs.......................................................... 16
Recommended Amplifier Power .................................... 19
Replacement Parts .......................................................... 49
Residual Noise ................................................................ 33
Rigging Hardware........................................................... 27
Rigging Points .................................................... 27, 28, 29
S
Safety Information ............................................................ 5
SB5 Mounting Pole ........................................................ 31
SBS Amplifier Power ..................................................... 21
SBS Drivers .................................................................... 41
SBS Input Panel .............................................................. 41
SBS Subwoofer with Electronic Controller .................... 21
SBS Technical Specifications ......................................... 43
SBS Wiring ..................................................................... 24
SBS25 Pole Socket ......................................................... 31
Electronic Controller ...................................................... 20
Electronic System Controller .......................................... 16
Servicing an SBS Input Panel ......................................... 41
Servicing an SLS Input Panel and Crossover ................. 41
Servicing SBS Drivers .................................................... 41
Servicing SLS Drivers .................................................... 41
Setup and Operation ....................................................... 16
Shielded Speaker Cable .................................................. 22
SLS Amplifier Power Biamplified Mode ....................... 21
SLS Amplifier Power Passive Mode .............................. 21
SLS Biamplified Mode Operation .................................. 24
SLS Crossover ................................................................ 41
SLS Drivers .................................................................... 41
SLS Input Panel .............................................................. 41
SLS Passive Mode Operation ......................................... 23
PAGE 52
SLS Passive Mode Wiring.............................................. 24
SLS Technical Specifications ......................................... 42
SLS918 Operating Precautions....................................... 40
SLS920H ........................................................................ 31
Speaker Cable ................................................................. 22
SPL Precautions.............................................................. 37
Stacking Enclosures........................................................ 25
Stand and Mounting Bracket Inserts .............................. 30
Stand Mounts .................................................................. 14
Stands ............................................................................. 30
ST-CX1F and ST-CX1W Crossovers ............................ 16
System Configurations ................................................... 17
T
Technical Specifications ........................................... 42, 43
Test Points ...................................................................... 23
Test Signals .................................................................... 38
Testing ............................................................................ 38
Tie-Back ......................................................................... 29
Tie-Back Points .............................................................. 29
Transferable Warranty .................................................... 47
U
Ultimate Support™................................................... 15, 30
Unpacking and Inspection ................................................ 7
Use without Electronic Controller .................................. 36
Using Low Power Amplifiers ......................................... 36
Using Only Two Rigging Points .................................... 29
W
Warranty Information / Service for Outside USA .......... 48
Warranty Information / Service for the USA ................. 47
Warranty Service ............................................................ 47
Wavefront Coherent Design ........................................... 13
Weather-Resistant........................................................... 15
Wire Selection ................................................................ 22
Wiring ............................................................................. 22
WLL ............................................................................... 28
Working Load Limits ..................................................... 28
Community Solutions™ Owner’s Manual
Community Professional Loudspeakers
333 East Fifth Street
Chester, PA 19013-4511 USA
TEL: 1-(610) 876-3400 FAX: 1-(610) 874-0190
www.communitypro.com
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12JULY2010