Cube Road bike Owner`s manual

MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
Handbook
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
English
|1
Company details
Manufacturer: Pending System GmbH & Co. KG Ludwig-Hüttner-Straße 5-7
95679 Waldershof
Germany
www.cube.eu
Info@cube.eu
Consultancy:
Andreas Zauhar, Dipl.-Ing. FH
von der IHK für München und Obb. öffentlich bestellter und vereidigter Sachverständiger für Fahrradschäden und -bewertungen.
Officially approved for Munich and Upper Bavaria Chamber of Trade and Industry and Official expert in matters of bicycle damage and evalution
Horner Straße 12d
D-83329 Waging-Tettenhausen
Tel.: +49 8681 477 9284
Fax: +49 8681 477 9285
mob.: +49 160 979 17438
www.andreas-zauhar.de
andreas.zauhar@t-online.de
Sticker frame serial number (attached on top tube)
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
19
8
9
20
21
13
23
22
23
14
15b
15
10
10c
18
16
10
24
4
7
6
11
15a
12
3
2
5
1
In the following image you will find a bike which shows all necessary parts, listed in the manual.
We choosed an example of the wide range of bikes on the market.
01
chain rings
13
seat post
02crankset
14
seat clamp
03pedals
15frame
04
15 a chain stay
front derailleur
05chain
15 b seat stay
06
rear derailleur
15 c linkage
07
sprocket cluster
16fork
08shifter
17
09
18wheels
brake levers
rear shock
10brakes
19bar
10 a brake disc
20stem
10 b brake caliper
21
head set
10 c brakebooster
22
rear carrier
11
23
light system
24
mud guard
quick-release axles
12hubs
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MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
19
20
9
13
21
15
14
21
18
15 c
17
15b
10
4
10b
7
12
10a
15 a
5
11
3
2
6
1
20
19
21
13
15
14
8
9
15b
17
10
10
18
16
4
5
7
12
12
11
15 a
6
2
1
3
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
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Content
1
About this Owner’s Manual ............... 07
4.2.2 Hardtails ..................................................................16
1.1
Conventions ..........................................................07
4.3
Crossbike .................................................................16
1.1.1 Symbol....................................................................07
4.4
Racing bike / Triathlon ........................................17
1.1.2 Location indications ........................................... 07
4.5
Cyclo-cross ..............................................................17
1.1.3 List of abbreviations............................................ 07
4.6
Fitness bikes / Urban bikes ................................17
1.1.4 Definition of Terms ....................................... 07-08
4.7
Trekking bike .........................................................18
4.8
General information ............................................18
1.2
Owner’s Manual ............................................. 08-09
1.2.1 Scope of Application ......................................... 09
4.8.1 Brakes .......................................................................18
1.2.2 Accompanying documentation ......................09
4.8.2 Gear shift .................................................................18
1.2.3 Pictures ...................................................................09
4.8.3 Frame and fork ......................................................18
2
For your safety .....................................09
2.1
Use your bicycle as intended ............................09
4.9
2.1.1 Who may use your bicycle? ............................... 10
2.1.2 How may you ride your bicycle? ......................10
2.1.3 Where may you ride your bicycle? .............10-11
2.1.4 In what condition must your bike be
when you ride it? ..................................................11
2.1.5 Accessories and modification ......................11-12
2.1.6 Transport of children, baggage,
bicycle trailers ........................................................12
2.1.7 Roller training ........................................................13
2.2
Other hazards ....................................................... 13
2.2.1 Hazards caused by faulty
final assembly ......................................................13
Frame material / information
on carbon material ...............................................19
4.9.1 Information on the frame construction ........ 19
4.9.2 How to use your carbon
parts correctly ..................................................19-20
5
Bicycle frame/
Bicycle frame set ................................. 20
6
Before using for the first time ............21
7
Before every trip ............................21-22
7.1
Check the road wheels ...................................... 22
7.1.1 Check fitting ......................................................... 23
7.1.2 Check the rims ......................................................23
7.1.3 Check tyres ......................................................24-25
7.1.4 Other checks .........................................................25
7.2
Check saddle and seat post ..............................26
7.3
Handlebars, check stem ................................ 26-27
7.4
Check handlebar-mounted parts ................... 27
7.5
Check the fork bearing .................................27-28
3Included with your bike and
Technical Details ..................................14
7.6
Check suspension fork ...................................... 28
7.7
Check the rear wheel suspension ...................28
3.1
Scorpe of supply ...................................................14
7.8
Check the brakes ............................................ 2
8-29
3.2
Technical data .......................................................14
3.3
Torques of screw connections ......................... 15
7.8.1 Check rim brakes and cable
(racing bike version) ......................................29-30
4
Assembly and function .......................15
7.8.2 Check rim brakes and cable
(mountain bike version) .....................................30
4.1
Categories ..............................................................15
7.8.3 Check hydraulic rim brakes ...............................31
4.2
Mountain bike .......................................................16
7.8.4 Check hydraulic disc brake ..........................31-32
4.2.1 Fully ..........................................................................16
7.8.5 Check back-pedal brake .....................................32
2.2.2 Hazards caused by improper use ....................13
2.2.3 Risk of burns ..........................................................13
2.2.4 Other hazards and safety notes ................. 13-14
2.3
Disposal ..................................................................14
7.9
Check drive train and chain ...............................32
7.10
Check lighting set ................................................33
7.11
Check carrier ..........................................................33
7.12
Check splash guards (mudguards) ..................33
7.13
Other checks ...................................................33-34
8
Adjusting and Using your bike ...........34
8.1
Adjusting the adjustable
stem (optional) .....................................................34
8.2
Adjust saddle position .................................34-35
8.3
Adjust saddle height ............................................35
8.4
Adjust suspension fork .......................................35
8.5
Adjust rear suspension ......................................36
8.6
Service the gear .............................................36-37
8.6.1 Shimano Rapidfire/ Shimano Rapidfire
2-Way-Release/Shimano EZ Fire .....................38
8.6.2 SRAM gear shift ....................................................39
8.6.3 Twist grip shift .......................................................39
8.6.4 Shimano STI .......................................................... 40
8.6.5 Sram Force / Rival / Red .....................................40
8.7
Service the brakes ................................................41
8.8
Operate the quick-release action ..............41-44
8.9
Using click-in pedals (optional) .................44-45
8.10 Loading the carrier ..............................................46
9
During riding (Troubleshooting) ..........46
9.1
Gears and drive train .......................................... 47
9.1.2 Brake ........................................................................48
9.3
Frame and suspension .................................48-49
9.4
Splash guard,
carrier and lighting set .......................................49
9.5
Road wheels and tryes .......................................50
10
After falls or accidents ........................51
11
Transporting your bike .......................51
11.1
Fit and remove road wheels .............................52
11.1.1 All categories/series except the
category racing bike/triathlon ................ 52-56
11.1.2 Race/ Triathlon ............................................... 56-59
11.2 Remove and replace saddle post
and saddle .......................................................59-60
12
Cleaning and caring
for your bike ....................................61-63
13
Storing your bike for a
lengthy period .....................................64
14Guarantee and Warranty ....................64
14.1
Warranty ................................................................ 64
14.2 Frame Guarantee .................................................64
14.3 Frame Guarantee conditions ........................... 64
15 Handover inspection checklist ........... 65
Hand over certificate ..........................66
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
Handbook
Mountain-, Cross- and Fitness bikes
Trekking- and City bike, Road Bike
English
|7
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
8|
Dear Customer
We would like to thank you for your choice of a
bike from our Company and thank you for your
trust. With this purchase you have a high-quality,
environmentally friendly means of travel which
will give you a lot of pleasure and at the same
time promote your health.
Your cycle dealer is also very important to you for
advice and final assembly.
He is your point of contact for servicing, inspections, modifications and all types of repairs.
Should you have any questions regarding our
product please contact your cycle dealer.
1 About thisOwner‘s Manual
1.1
Conventions
1.1.1 Symbol
Bar
conventional unit for air pressure.
Torque
Also called tightening torque.
Indicates how “tight” a screw has
been tightened.
DIN
German Institute for Standardization.
EN
European standard (often related
to DIN).
Specialist
dealer /specialist workshop
Note!
Draws your attention to items requiring
your particular attention.
Warning!
Points out to you the possibility of slight
personal injury and possible material
damage.
Danger!
Points out to you the possibility of grave
personal injury even leading to death.
Risk of burns!
Temperature exceeds 45°C (temperature at
which egg white sets) and can cause burns
on humans.
Handforce
1.1.3List of abbreviations
1.1.4
Definition of Terms
Run-out
A radial lack of true on the rim is
colloquially known as a „run-out“.
The force an average adult human
can exert with his hand using low
to medium effort.
IHK
In Germany: Chamber of Industry
and Commerce
MTB
Mountainbike
Nm
Newton meter; unit for torque
Pedelec
psi
1.1.2Location indications
If this Owner‘s Manual states „right“, „left“, „front“ or
„back“ this always means as seen when looking „in
the direction of travel“.
In Germany: In this Owner’s Manual the term “specialist dealer” and/
or “specialist workshop” indicates a dealer trained as a bicycle
mechanic and/or cycle mechanic
authorised by the competent
Chamber of Trade to operate a
specialist workshop.
Similarly the latter must be authorised by the manufacturer of this
cycle to check and confirm correct
assembly and roadworthiness of
this cycle.
Pedal Electric Cycle
pounds per square inch; American
unit for pressure;
1 psi = 0.06897 bar
StVO
German Highway Code
StVZO
German Road Traffic Licensing
Regulations
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
Correct tightening
Incorrect
tightening
The term “correct tightening„
indicates the state in which screw
heads fit tight to the component
over their entire surface.
A loose screw can often be recognised by a projecting screw head.
You find the used technical terms for bicycle parts in the plate in the cuff sheets
or at the individual pictures
Laws:
StVO (German Road Traffic Act)
and StVZO (German Roas Licensing
Regulation) are laws that are only applicable in Germany.
Before using your bicycle for the first
time, please inform yourself about the
laws applying to the use of your bicycle in your home country. Contact the
relevant authorities and your specialist
dealer on this matter.
|9
10 |
•
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
If you encounter phrases such as “...have all
...”, “... have your bicycle ...” or the like, please
note that they always address and refer to
the child or the juvenile and his/her bicycle.
•
Go through this Owner’s Manual together
and explain all chapters to your child, especially regarding the hazard warnings.
•
As legal guardian it is your responsibility to
ensure the safety of this bicycle and its safe use.
1.2.1
This operating manual is only valid if it was with
the bicycle at the time of purchase.• Please observe
separate information, if available.
Their instructions basically take precedence over any contrary instructions in
the following text.
•
Please consult your specialist retailer as to
the accuracy and validity of this operating
manual.
•
For more information, please consult your
specialist retailer.
1.2.3
Pictures
The pictures related to the descriptions
can be found right before or after the
respective texts.
2
For your safety
Damage!
2.1
Use your bicycle as intended
Please take information specific to your
bicycle from the Owner‘s Manual for
your bicycle model.
2.1.1 Who may use your bicycle?
This Owner‘s Manual is not suitable for learning
to ride a bicycle.
•
This Owner‘s Manual is not suitable for learning
riding techniques.
Accompanying documentation
Owner‘s Manual specific to your bicycle
model. Parts Instructions.
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
Due to the large number of existing
bicycle parts it is impossible to provide
a totally exhaustive set of instructions
valid for all.
For our Pedelec/E-bikes it’s very important to read the additional separate
instruction manual for the Cube EPO
Pedelec as well as this general Cube
instruction manual.
•
•
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
•
•
Please therefore always observe the
accompanying parts instructions.
Scope of Application
This Owner‘s Manual applies to: Please take information
specific to your bicycle from the Owner‘s Manual for
your bicycle model 2012. Please read Chapters 4 for
information.
1.2.2
•
It is possible that components mounted to
this bicycle have not been described in this
operating manual.
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
•
The rider must be able to ride a bicycle, i.e.
he must possess a basic knowledge of the
use of a bicycle and have the necessary
sense of balance required to control and
steer a bicycle.
•
The rider must have be of the correct physical size for this bicycle (please consult your
dealer).
•
Children and teenagers must be able to operate the bicycle for certain.
The operating equipments (e.g. brake levers)
must be suitable for child‘s hands
You driving technique courses are offered by different facilities or coaches and
it helps to improve your driving technique and the operation of your bicycle.
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
2.1.2
How may you ride your bicycle?
Downhill:
Sports park/ bikepark
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Road Racing: Paths, no jumps
Bikes of every
category with
racing wheel or
tyres simil ar to
racing wheel:
Roads, no jumps
Damage!
•
Sit with your bottom on the saddle or
ride out of the saddle, i.e. pedalling in a
standing position.
•
Hold the left handlebar grip with our left
hand and the right hand handlebar grip
with your right hand. Place your left foot
on the left pedal and your right foot on the
right pedal.
| 11
Roads and paths are classified
as follows:
•
Road: Asphalted
•
Place your left foot on the left pedal and
your right foot on the right pedal.
•
Path: Sand, gravel or similar subsurface (e.g.
forest pathway, field track)
•
Only use the bicycle as a pure means of
travel.
•
Prepared hiking trail: No or not many roots,
sleepers, stones, ledges etc.
Where may you ride your bicycle?
•
Unprepared hiking trail: Roots, sleepers,
stones, ledges etc.
•
Sports park: Area specially designed for
free riding, downhill, 4X and dirt bikes
Free riding: Artistic and athletic use, rapid
descents in open terrain.
•
2.1.3
All bicycles by this manufacturer are
classified into Categories. You will find
your bicycle‘s Category in your Service
Card. (Last Page)
This is entered by your dealer on
purchase (see also Chapter 4).
Touring: Paths, no jumps
Cross-country: Paths, no jumps
Downhill: Descents on tracks specifically
designed for this purpose at high to very
high speeds.4X and dirt bikes: similar tracks
for BMX bikes.
Urban: Paths, no jumps
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Marathon:
All Mountain: Unprepared paths,
no jumps
Unprepared paths,
jumps up to 0.5 metres
in height
Enduro: Unprepared paths at high speed, jumps up to 1 m in height
Freeride:
Sports park/ bikepark
Dirt bike/BMX: Sports park/ bikepark
Kids: Paths, no jumps
Traveller: Paths, no jumps
Countrylite:
Paths, no jumps
Damage!
Your safety on these roads and tracks
depends on your speed.
In the case of jumps and high speed there is basically a risk of falling. Only jump
and ride at high speed when you have
firmly mastered this riding technique.
The higher your speed, the bigger is the
risk you take!
Please note that all roads and paths
may be damaged and/or have obstacles
which may adversely affect your riding
safety and damage your bicycle.
In such locations ride particularly slowly
and carefully. Push or carry your bicycle
over such subsurface if necessary.
12 |
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
•
When riding your bicycle at high speed,
with a sporty riding style (e.g. riding
fast over edges, speed reduction ramps,
bumps, etc.), or in the bike park, there is
always an increased risk of falls.
•
Only ride at high speeds if you can control
your bicycle in every situation.
•
Adjust the use of your bicycle to your
riding skills
•
Adjust your bike to for the required use
and your riding ability, and use the appropriate protective equipment.
For the duration of participating in
races racing bikes are exempt from this
regulation.
•
White front reflector (often integrated into
the front headlight) and a red reflector at
the rear
•
Two yellow reflectors each for the front
and rear whhels; alternatively Tyres with
reflective stripes on both sides
•
Two yellow reflectors for both right and
left pedals
All lighting components and reflectors
must be officially approved.
2.1.4In what condition must your bike be when you ride it?
Your new bike is an item of sports
equipment and may not be used on
public roads unless equipped to StVZO
specification. In order to meet current
StVZO requirements your bike must
have the following equipment fit listed
here in extract form.
Approval can be recognised by a „K“,
marking, a wavy line and a multi-digit
number.
For regulation fitting of these parts
please consult your dealer.
2.1.5 Accessories and modification
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Please take the full wording of the regulations for trips in Germany from the
StVZO or consult your dealer.
Damage!
Many cyclists like to modify their bikes
and to custom them to their particular wishes. Saddles, handlebars, pedals, brakes,
tyres and suspension elements -there are
may possibilities for changing your bike
subsequently.
You will find the exact legal guidelines
with detailed information online under
the following address:
http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/stvzo/
When using outside Germany please observe the traffic regulations prevailing
in your country. For this please consult
your dealer or the competent authority.
•
Two independently operating brakes
•
•
A bell
Dynamo-powered lighting for front (whitel
light) and rear (red light)
Racing bikes under 11 kg are exempt
from the dynamo regulation.
Racing bikes exempt from the dynamo
regulation must carry battery-powered
lighting in the daytime.
Working on bikes, including work which
is assumed to be very simple, requires
sound training, sound knowledge and a
great deal of experience.
Unprofessional work on your bike can
lead to dangerous riding situations, falling, accidents and material damage.
•
Only use accessories that have been certified according to EN standards. Bike computers and bottle holders are an exception,
provided they were selected and fitted by a
specialist dealer.
•
Consult your specialist dealer when choosing accessories for your bicycle.
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
•
Our company prohibits replacing the front
fork for modification purposes. If replacing
the fork becomes necessary during repairs,
only a fork may be used that is identical in
construction and has been approved by our
company for your bicycle model.
Consult our authorized specialist dealer.
•
The retrofitting of electrical drives to any of
our bicycles is not allowed.
•
Any part of your bicycle must not be changed with regard to its condition.
•
Have all fitting of parts, modifications, servicing and any other work carried out only by
your specialist workshop.
•
Please note that the person who carries out
the changes on the bicycle is also liable for
them.
2.1.6 Transport of children, baggage,
•
Some bicycle racks have a lower admissible additional load.
Please refer to the specifications provided by the manufacturer of the bicycle
rack.
•
admissible total weight even with your
children and/or baggage (see chart in
chapter 3.2).
•
Ensure a safe loading. No item of the baggage may come in touch with the moving
bicycle parts (running wheel, drive, chain,
brakes) or may interfere with the functions
or the handling of your bicycle.
•
Do not exceed the admissible total weight,
see chapter 3.2.
•
Determine the admissible total weight by
lifting your bicycle up, including the entire
additional load (not including your children)
and the weight of y Make sure that you do
not reach the our bicycle clothing, and by
standing on an officially calibrated scale
while lifting your bicycle up.
•
Please determine the weight of the children
by using bathroom scales and add their
weights to the total weight.
•
Additional loads will affect the bicycle’s riding behaviour.
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
Only transport your baggage in/on
suitable carrying systems. These can be
bicycle backpacks or bicycle racks that
have been approved by the manufacturer. Please consult your specialist dealer
on this matter.
Bicycle racks may only be fitted to mounting elements intended for this purpose
(see picture below) of the following
series/models.
–Cross
–Trekking/City
– MTB with mounting option intended
for this purpose
•
Child seats may only be fitted to suitable
bicycle racks. Please consult your specialist
dealer on this matter.
The maximum additional load amounts to 25 kg.
WARNING:
bicycle trailers
The transport of children and baggage is
accompanied by certain risks. Many bicycle frames are not suited for the fitting
of bicycle racks and child seats.
| 13
•
•
•
Additional loads will result in a longer braking distance.
Adjust your riding style accordingly!
The fitting and use of bicycle trailers on
our bicycles is not allowed, provided they have not been specifically approved for the respective bicycle model.
14 |
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
2.1.7 Roller training
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
Damage!
Roller training:
The use of roller trainers that are fixed
tightly to the frame, the handlebar or the
fork can damage your bicycle.
Risk of burns!
The use of roller trainers which are fixed
tightly to the bicycle’s fork, handlebar or
frame is not allowed.
Carbon frames are generally only suitable for the use on a free roller trainer
(no fixation).
2.2
2.2.3 Risk of burns
After long descents, the bicycle rims and
brake disks can get very hot.
•
Do not touch the rims or brake disks immediately after a descent.
•
Let the rims and brake disks cool down before you touch them.
In order to check the temperature, touch
the rims and brake disks very briefly with
your bare finger. If they are hot, wait a few
minutes and repeat the test until the rims
and brake disks have cooled down.
•
Other hazards
2.2.1 Hazards caused by faulty final
assembly
2.2.4
Other hazards and safety notes
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
Damage!
Failure to observe the instructions contained in this Owner‘s Manual may result
in dangerous riding situations, falls,
accidents and material damage.
Unprofessional final assembly of this
bike can lead to dangerous riding situations, falling, accidents and material
damage.
Have correct final assembly and adjustment of the right seat position for you
confirmed by your dealer. Use the printed
form in this Owner‘s manual on.
2.2.2 Hazards caused by improper use
•
Comply with the applicable traffic regulations of your country.
•
•
•
•
Wear a helmet when cycling.
•
When cycling make sure that you wear suitable clothing that does not restrict the operation of the bicycle or impair your vision.
•
Wetness can affect the efficiency of the brakes. The braking distance is increased.
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
Unprofessional final assembly of this
bike can lead to dangerous riding situations, falling, accidents and material
damage.
Cycle defensively and with foresight.
Do not cycle under the influence of alcohol.
Cycle in a manner that ensures you have
control of the bicycle at all times and that
you will not get into difficulty in sudden
dangerous situations.
•
Please observe the instructions set out in
chapter 2.1.3
•
•
Always check if your bicycle meets the
requirements of the intended use (see
chapters 2.1, 4.1.
Only cycle wearing tight-fitting leg wear.
Baggy clothing can get caught in the bicycle
and lead to serious accidents.
•
Do not exceed the admissible total weight,
see chapter 3.2.
•
Please refer to the care and maintenance
information in sections 12 and 13.
| 15
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
Spinning running wheels can injure your
hands and other body parts.
•
Keep your hands and other body parts away
from spinning running wheels!
•
Keep your hands and other body parts away
from moving parts (e.g. suspension, steering
lever, brakes, ...)!
•
Make sure that children on possibly fitted
child seats can not touch any spinning
running wheel or moving parts.
2.3
Permissible
total weight
115 kg
MTB:
115 kg
Trekking bicycle:
115 kg +
25 kg
equipped
Trekking bicycle fully
equipped
115 kg +
25 kg
equipped
Child‘s bike up to 16“ (*)
30 kg
Child‘s bike up to 20“ (*)
105 kg
BMX
105 kg
Disposal
Dispose of your bike properly at the end
of its life.
(*): 16“ or 20“ indicates the wheel size.
This is indicated on the tyre Please consult your dealer.
Ask your dealer or contact to a recycling
center.
Please note that the use of light-weight
components, e.g. special running wheels,
will reduce the load carrying capacity of
the whole bicycle.
3Included with your bike and Technical Details
For further information, please refer to
the parts instructions provided by the
respective manufacturer.
3.1 Scope of supply
•
Complete bicycle, partially without
pedals or
•
Frame set
including the Owner’s Manual and delivery
certificate as well as all other relevant instructions of manufacturers whose parts were
used for the bicycle.
Example 1:
Wheel sets for a racing bike with an admissible total weight of 90 kg will decrease the admissible total weight of the racing bike from 115 kg to 90 kg.
Example 2:
Bicycle racks with an admissible total weight of 20 kg will decrease the admissible weight
of the trekking bike from 140 kg to 135 kg.
In case of carbon frames or pedelecs, please
observe the instructions set out in the additional Owner’s Manual.
3.2
Racing bicycle
Technical data
Admissible total weight
=
Bicycle including entire additional load
and attachment parts
+
Body weight incl. clothing and baggage
(backpag)
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
New technical findings can result in changes to the models, their technical data
and even in entirely new models.
•
Please observe the separate instructions,
if available.
•
Please consult your specialist dealer
regarding the actuality and validity of this
Owner’s Manual.
16 |
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
3.3 Torques of screw connections
Part
seat post
Manufacturer
Model/Type
Type of
Connection
P6
2 screws
6-8
Easton
EA30
2 screws
8
1 screw
+ 1 putting
wheel
8-10
RFR
clamping
saddle
2 screws
8-10
SL-280
1 screw
16,5
Triathlon
aluminium
2 screws
8-10
Ritchey
TT Stubby
1 screw
12
2 screws
5-6
FSA
Triathlon
carbon
clamping
saddle sledge
aluminium
1 screw
5-8
titanium
1 screw
5-8
carbon frame
1 screw
5-6
1 screw
5-6
please also refer to
seat post manual
2 screws
4-5
2 screws
specification
1 screw
2-3
2-3
2 screws
3
each screw
3
each screw
6
carbon seat
post
seat post clamp / frame
clamping seat
post
Tria aluminium
Tria carbon
bottlecage / frame
any
any
cable guide clamp
any
any
rear carrier
any
any
4 Assembly and function
4.1 Categories
We divide our bicycles into the following
categories. Within these categories,
there are different series.
•
Torque (Nm)
Syntace
Scape
seat post
Connection
Mountain bike
- Fully (= front and rear wheel suspension,
see also chapter 4.2.1)
- Hardtail (= front wheel suspension, no rear
wheel suspension, see also chapter 4.2.2)
screw joint
bottle cage
screw joint
rear carrier
•
•
•
Cross bike
Racing bike
Trekking bike
•
•
•
Cyclocross
Fitnessbikes/ Urban
Pedelec
You will find the category and model further
information of your bicycle in delivery certificate, last page of this maunal.
During the purchase, please check if everything has been filled out completely and
correctly with the help of your bicycle dealer.
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
| 17
4.2 Mountain bike
Not equipped in accordance with StVZO, derailleur gear, rim or disk brakes, running wheels with rim dia
meter of 26 inches (559 mm) or 29 inches (622 mm).
4.2.1Fully
Fully refers to mountain bikes with front and rear wheel suspension whose range of application is defined by the spring travel and the equipment. The range of application (see chapter 2.1.3) must be defined together with your specialist dealer.
4.2.2Hardtails
Hardtails refers to mountain bikes with front suspension whose range of application is defined by the spring travel and equipment. The range of application (see chapter 2.1.3) must be defined with your
specialist dealer.
4.3Crossbike
Has the same equipment characteristics as mountain bikes, running wheels with a rim diameter of
28 inches (622mm) and a tyre width of up to 42 mm.
18 |
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
4.4
Racing bike / Triathlon
Not equipped in accordance with StVZO, derailleur gear, rim breaks, running wheels with rim diameter of 28 inches (662 mm).
4.5
Cyclo-cross
Not equipped in accordance with StVZO, derailleur gear, running wheels with rim diameter of 28 inches (662mm).
Additional features:
- lug tyres
- cantilever or disk brake
4.6
Fitness bikes / Urban bikes
Not equipped in accordance with StVZO, derailleur or hub gear, running wheels with rim diameter of 28 inches (662 mm).
- straight handlebar or handlebar similar to mountain bike
- tyre with 25 mm to 42 mm
- rim or disk brakes
Additional features:
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
4.7
Trekking bike
Equipment in accordance with StVZO,
equipped with derailleur or hub gear, rim brakes, backpedal brakes or disk brakes, bicycle rack, splashguard (“mudguards”),
running wheels with rim diameter of 28 inches (662mm).
speed and will, for example, enable you to
ride uphill more easily.
•
This is how you can determine the number
of gears: Derailleur gear: Multiply the
number of the front chainwheels with the
number of sprocket wheels in the back,
e. g. 2 chainwheels x 10 sprocket wheels =
20 gears.
•
Hub gear: Please take the indication on
the hub shell or on the gearshift lever into
account.
Additional features
| 19
– tyre width of up to 42mm
– lighting equipment, reflectors and bell
4.8.3 Frame and fork
4.8 General information
4.8.1 Brakes
Your bicycle is equipped with one or two
in dependently operated rim or disk brakes
(see chapter 4.1 - 4.7).
Bicycle frames are available in the
following versions:
•
without suspension: rigid fork and rigid frame, available for the following series
- Racing bike
- Cyclo-cross
- Fitness / Urban
- Trekking (not all models)
•
semi-suspended (“hardtail”): with suspension fork und rigid frame, available for the
following series
Damage!
– Mountain bike
– Cross
– Trekking (not all models)
Incorrect operation of the brakes can
lead to hazardous riding situations, falls,
accidents and material damage.
• fully suspended (“Fully” or “Full Suspension”): with suspension fork and rear wheel
suspension.
•
Familiarise yourself with the operation of
the brakes.
•
Determine which brake lever operates the
front brake and which one operates the
back brake.
There are different suspension systems with
different numbers of joints for bicycles with full
suspension.
•
Operate the respective brake lever several
times in the static position. You can observe
opening and closing action of the brake
blocks or brake calipers on the respective
disk or rim.
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
4.8.2 Gear shift
•
Your bicycle is equipped with
a derailleur gear and a crank set with one,
two or three chainwheels. This gear shift
will provide you with the optimal gear for
every.
four-joint frame
You can easily count the number of joints. The support
for the spring element is not considered a join.
20 |
4.9
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
frame material / information
on carbon material
Modern bicycle frames consist of aluminium alloys,
carbon, steel or titanium.
You can find your frame material under
point 16, in the handover certificate, or
by consulting your specialist retailer.
Gefahr von Personen- und
Sachschäden!
Carbon is a modern material used in bicycle and vehicle construction. However,
carbon components are highly sensitive.
Errors in its assembly or use could lead
to breakages and therefore hazardous
driving conditions, falls, accidents and
material damage.
Carbon is a more commonly used term for carbonfibre reinforced plastic. This describes a fibre-plastic
composite material in which the carbon fibres are
embedded in several layers in a plastic matrix.
4.9.1 Information on frame
construction
These high-end products are produced by hand.
Deviations in finish may therefore occur, however,
this represents no grounds for complaints.
4.9.2 How to use your carbon
parts correctly
1.
Do not, under any circumstances, mount
brackets, screws, clamps or other elements which exert mechanical pressure
on the carbon tube.
2.
Clamping onto bike stands or other wall
brackets:
•
It is imperative that you observe all of the
following information regarding the use of
carbon parts.
•
Should you have any questions relating to
the use of carbon parts, please consult your
specialist retailer.
•
Never clamp your bicycle around the carbon
tube or carbon seatpost in the clamping
jaws of a bike stand.
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
3.
Please take care when using shackle
locks! These may, under certain circumstances, cause damage to your frame.
•
When using shackle locks, please ensure
that these only touch the respective carbon
tube at the most, and are not exerting
pressure.
4.
Saddle clamp / seatpost:
•
The prescribed tightening torque of the
saddle clamp bolt is 5-6 Nm.
•
The seat tube must not be scoured or mechanically processed in any other way.
•
Please consult your authorised specialist
retailer immediately after a fall.
Damage!
Shock and impact loads which may occur
as a result of unintended use (see chapters 2.1.3 and 4.1) or stone-chipping, may
lead to inconspicuous damage in the
carbon fibres and/or delamination (= a
dissolution of the bonded carbon layers).
Such damage, combined with the forces
arising from the operation of the bicycle
can suddenly break carbon parts and
therefore lead to dangerous driving
conditions, falls, accidents and material
damage
•
Your bicycle must solely be used for the intended purpose (see chapters 2.1.3 and 4.1)
•
•
After falls or other large mechanical stresses
which are not prescribed under the normal
biking operations, carbon frames and components should no longer be used.
The seatposts and seat tubes must not be
lubricated. Only a carbon assembly paste
may be used.
•
Aluminium seatposts may only be mounted
using a carbon assembly paste.
•
The seat clamp may not be closed if the seat
post has been removed.
•
Please consult your authorised specialist
retailer immediately after a fall.
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
| 21
5.
Bottle holder:
•
•
The thread sets are provided for attaching
standard bottle holders. The maximum tightening torque of the screws for attaching the
bottle holder to the frame is 4 Nm.
The person assembling the frame into a
complete bicycle is considered to be the
manufacturer and is liable for any possible
assembly faults and defects.
•
This Owner’s Manual is not an assembly
instruction for your bicycle frame.
•
Only use trademarked equipment that has
been certified according to EN standards and
is suitable for this frame for the assembly. You
can recognize the right equipment with the
help of the included documentation containing the following information:
6.
Bicycle rollers
•
The use of bicycle rollers with fixed clamps is
not permitted. By firmly restricting the dropouts and quick-release hub axles, mechanical
stresses occur which strongly exceed those
permitted for normal cycling operations. This
may result in damage to the bicycle frame.
7.
Transport:
•
Due care must be taken when transporting
wheels with carbon frames.
- information regarding conducted inspec-
•
The frame should particularly be protected
against contact with other parts using a
cover for example.
- detailed and clear product information and
- manufacturer information with complete
address.
tions and inspection guidelines with EN
number.
assembly notes in your national language.
•
No carrier or other such systems which use
clamping elements for fixing and mounting
may be used. These clamping forces may
lead to damage of the tubes or dropouts.
•
Do not place any objects on the frame.
•
Please ensure that the bicycle is in a fixed and
stable position during transport.
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Bicycle frame /
Bicycle frame set
Only rigid and unsprung front forks that
have been approved by our company
may be built into the frame. Please consult your authorized specialist dealer.
5
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
•
If you have questions regarding suitable
accessories, please consult your specialist
dealer.
Please consider the information regarding
front forks in chapter 2.1.5
Damage!
Damage!
- Racing bike, all models
An incorrect mounting of the frame may
result in severe injuries caused by falling!
- Fitness / Urban, all models
You can purchase some of our bicycle
frames separately and can have them
assembled according to your individual
wishes. Please make sure to consider the
following important notes.
•
•
The assembly of our frames may only be carried out by specialist dealers that have beeb
authorized by us.
- Cyclo-cross, all models
- Trekking with rigid fork geometry,
all models
22 |
6
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
Before using for the first time
You can make fine adjustments and
minor changes yourself as described in
Chapter 8.2-8.3 „Adjusting the saddle
position“.
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
An unroadworthy bike can lead to dangerous riding situations, falling, accidents
and material damage this same danger
exists if you are not yet familiar with your
new bike and its controls.
•
Make a check of your bike after item 7
•
Familiarise yourself with this bicycle before
you first ride it. In particular check with brake lever operates the front brake and which
the rear – see Section 4.8.1
2.
Only use this bike when your dealer has
familiarised you with your bike‘s technical features in a briefing.
3.
Seal you bike with aerosol wax polish,
see Chapter 11.
4.
Before using read Chapter 8.
7
Before every trip
Modern brakes have a very powerful
braking effect. Excessively strong operation
of the brake levers can cause the respective
wheel to lock and can therefore lead to a fall.
Familiarise yourself slowly with the braking
effect on your bike in a safe area of land.
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
•
In a safe location, slowly test and become
accustomed to your bicycle’s braking
response
•
With new rim brakes and after replacing
brake blocks the full braking effect only
develops after a certain run-in period. Please
note therefore your initially greater braking
distances.
Also consider the possibility that your
bike may have fallen over when unattended or that someone might have tampered with it.
•
•
•
Disk brakes need to be initially run in.
Full braking efficiency only develops after
the running-in process. Please note the
enclosed brake manufacturer‘s running-in
instructions.
If your bike is fitted with optional click-in
pedals which firmly connect the shoe with
the pedal: Practice using them by mounting
and dismounting. Click-in pedals are not
safety pedals.
•
If after purchasing you remove the saddle
support and front and/or rear wheel for
transportation please follow the appropriate
instructions in Chapter 11.
1.
Have your dealer confirm proper final
assembly and the roadworthiness of your
bike. Have your dealer adjust the correct
saddle position.
Damage!
An unroadworthy bike can lead to dangerous riding situations, falling, accidents
and material damage
•
Check that your bike is roadworthy before
every trip.
•
Memorise your bike‘s correct condition
when new so that you will later be able to
recognise deviations from the correct condition (photos you take yourself can be
a valuable aid).
•
Immediately contact your specialist dealer
if you discover that the actual state of the
bicycle deviates from its specified condition.
•
Only ride your bicycle again, if it has been
properly repaired by the specialist dealer.
The parts described in the next subchapters are not built into all bicycles. Some
parts may also have been retrofitted.
Determine the equipment of your bike
with the help of the information in chapter 4 and the following pictures. Carry
out the corresponding inspections.
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
If you are unsure or in case you have
questions, please consult your specialist
dealer. Only ride the bike again after
it has been properly readjusted by the
dealer.
1.
Visually inspect the whole bike:
•
Check all fixing screws for correct tightness
(see Chapter 3.3)
•
Check the entire bike for dents, ruptures,
deep scratches and other forms of mechanical damage.
2.
Contact your dealer if visual inspections
shows defects of any description.
7.1
Check the road wheels
Front and rear wheels are both called
road wheels.
A road wheel consists of :
•
•
the hub,
•
•
•
Brake disk, if fitted,
On the rear wheel hub only Sprocket or
sprocket cassette,
Spokes
Rim and the Tyre equipment, which in turn
consists of
- Tyre casings,
- Tube and
- Rim tape insert
Currently, there are three different types
of tyre:
Wired-on tyres or folding tyres: This most
common type of tyre consists of the following components:
•
tyre
- If there are any loose parts:
- rim tape (only for rims with spoke holes)
Inside the tyre, there is a wire or a pad
that attaches itself to the rim flange
when the tyre is inflated.
| 23
Field of application: All categories.
•
Tubeless tyres:
Special rims (with or without hermetically
sealed spoke holes) and tyres form an
airtight seal and make the use of a tube unnecessary. However, a tube can still be fitted
in case of a breakdown.
•
Field of application:
Mountain bikes, cross bikes, racing bike/
street.
Tubed tyres:
The tube is sewed into the tyre. During
assembly, the tyre including the tube is
glued to a rim specifically designed for this
purpose. The assembly instructions of the
tyre, glue and rim manufacturers must be
observed in this context. Please also consider the notes in chapter 7.1.3.
Field of application: Racing bike/street
Information on the type of tyre and the tyre
size are provided in chapter 16, delivery
certificate, or can be obtained by consulting
your specialist dealer on this matter.
Bicycles which are equipped according to StVZO
may be fitted with rim reflectors.
24 |
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
7.1.1 Check fitting
1.
Shake both road wheels vigorously at
right angles to the direction of travel.
-
The road wheels must not move in the forks.
-
The quick release must be closed (see
Chapter 8.8).
-
There must be no audible creaking or
rattling sounds.
2.
wear indicators
Contact your dealer if this check shows
defects of any description
7.1.2 Check the rims
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
Worn rims and/or substantial warping or
run-outs may lead to hazardous riding
situations, falling, accidents and material
damage.
•
Worn rims must be replaced and warping or
run-outs repaired!
Rims without wear indicators:
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Visual check
Damage!
With rim brakes: Dirty rims may reduce
braking efficiency.
•
Dirty rims must be cleaned immediately.
1.
Check rims for wear:
Rims with wear indicators:
Visual check
•
Fingernail check: Run your fingernail
across the rim shoulder. No scoring
should be felt.
•
If the wear indicator is no longer visible
or if the rim has discernible scoring the
rim must be replaced.
2.
Check rims for run-out:
•
Lift the bike up and spin first the front
and then the rear wheel.
•
Note the distance between the rim and
the brake shoes and on disk brakes the
distance between the rim and the frame
strut or fork leg.
3.
Check your rims for dirt, especially oil
and grease.
Dirty rims must be cleaned immediately (see Chapter 12).
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
7.1.3
Check tyres
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
Does not apply to tubeless tyres.
In the event of angled valve the base of
the valve can rip off when riding which
causes sudden loss of tyre pressure.
This can lead to hazardous riding situations, falling, accidents and material
damage.
•
•
•
Have the tyre seating corrected by a specialist workshop.
You can undertake this job yourself if you
are familiar with fitting and removing the
road wheels (see Chapter 11.1) and replacing
the tyre and tube
Remove the valve nut.
Check the valve position:
The valves must point directly towards the
centre axis of the road wheel.
| 25
Check the tyre pressure:
1.
Determine your tyre type
Mountain bikes can be fitted with racing bike type
tyres and racing bikes with trekking tyres.
Rule of thumb:
Mountain bike tyres: Tyre width greater than 40 mm Trekking / Cross-country and Fitness bike tires: Tyre width from
28 mm – 40 mm Racing bike style tyres: Tyre width less than 28 m Consult your dealer to determine your tyre type.
Pressures:
• Mountain bike tyres: 2.5 – 3.5 barr
•
Trekking bike tyres: 3,5 - 5,0 bar
•
Racing bike tyre: 6,0 - 10,0 bar
•
For the correct air pressure for categories not listed here, please refer to the infor-
mation on the tire or consult your dealer.
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
Too low a tyre pressure leads to increased likelihood of punctures but mostly
dangerous handling.
The tyre can come off the rim on bends
and cause wandering of the tyre on the
rim.
This can lead to hazardous riding situations, falling, accidents and material
damage.
The valves must point directly towards the centre
axis of the road wheel.
•
Valve does not point to the traversing wheel
centre
Inflate your tyres to the correct pressure.
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
26 |
Many tyre pressures are given in „psi“. Convert the pressure using the following table.
psi
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
110
120
130
140
bar
2,1
2,8
3,5
4,1
4,8
5,5
6,2
6,9
7,6
8,3
9,0
9,7
The actual permissible tyre pressure can be found in the tyre and rim manufacturer‘s instructions. The permissible tyre pressure is mostly embossed on the tyre wall. Please consult your dealer.
The higher your body weight the higher the tyre pressure needs to be.
•
Check the tyre pressure with a tyre pressure gauge. Simple gauges are often included with bicycle tubes and higher quality gauges are available from your dealer.
How to use them is either in the instruc
tions for used or you can have your dealer demonstrate this.
- If pressure is too low: Increase the pressure by inflating with a suitable pump.
- If pressure is too high: Release sufficient air via the valve and check the pressure again afterwards with a gauge.
Using a bicycle pump with a pressure gauge you can check the pressure whils
inflating the tyre.
Let some air out of the tyre first and then
increase the pressure to the desired level.
There are various types of valve. All
valves can be fitted with a dust cap.
After removing the cap you can place the
pump head directly on the valve in the
case of either a Schrader valve or the socalled Presta valve. On a racing bike valve
you must first screw the little locking
screw out of the valve until the stop and
tighten it again after inflating the tyre.
•
Get your dealer to demonstrate operation of
the valves to you.
2.
Checking your tyres for external damage
and wear:
•
The tyre rubber must have the same pattern
as the original over its entire surface.
•
The tyre canvas beneath the layer of rubber
must not be visible.
•
There must be no bulges or tears.
3.
Checking the fit of your tyres:
•
Lift the front or rear road wheel and turn it
by hand
•
The tyre must be round when running.
There must be no highs or lows.
7.1.4 Other checks
1.
Check your road wheels for loose items
such as, for example, pieces of branches,
residues, loose spoke reflectors etc.
If loose parts are available:
•
Remove these if this is possible without
applying any great force.
•
Check if your road wheels have been damaged by these loose items.
•
Tighten loose bicycle parts such as spoke
reflectors, for example. If you find this is not
possible contact your dealer immediately.
•
Please note that all reflectors are present
as per StVZO (see Chapter 2.1.4), correctly
secured and not obscured or dirty.
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
7.2
•
Check saddle and saddle post
7.3
| 27
Handlebars, check stem
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
Damage!
If the saddle post is not inserted far
enough the saddle post can come loose.
Handlebars and stem are very important
components in terms of your riding safety.
This can lead to hazardous riding situations, falling, accidents and material
damage.
Note the correct saddle post insertion
distance. Please read Chapter 8.3 for information.
If you have the correct technical knowledge you can tighten this yourself.
Damage to them and mistakes during
assembly can lead to very severe falls.
•
If you discover any faults with these parts or
have doubts about them you must under no
circumstances continue to use your bike.
•
Contact a specialist workshop immediately.
•
1.
Check the handlebar and stem assembly.
Please read Chapters 8.2, 8.3 and 11.2 for
information.
•
1.
Check the saddle and saddle post for
tightness:
The stem must be parallel to the front wheel
rim,
•
and the handlebars must be at right angles
to it.
Try to twist the saddle and seat post by
hand. It should not be possible to twist the
saddle and/or seat post.
•
In the case of a shaft stem the „Max“ or
„Stop“ or similar marking must not be
visible.
•
Grip the front wheel between your legs.
•
Grip the handlebars at both ends.
•
Try to twist the handlebars in either direction by hand.
•
Try to twist the handlebars in the stem by
hand
Try to move the saddle in its clamp with
alternate up and down movements.
It should not be possible to move the
saddle.
If either the saddle and/or the saddle post
can be moved tighten them (see Chapters
8.2, 8.3, and 11.2.
28 |
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
Triathlon essay
•
It must not be possible to twist or slide
any of the parts.
•
There must be no audible creaking or
rattling sounds.
7.4
1.
•
Grip the front wheel between your legs.
•
Try to twist the gearshift/brake levers out
of position by hand.
•
Try to pull the handgrips from the handlebars (straight handlebars only).
•
It must not be possible to twist or slide
any of the parts.
•
There must be no audible creaking or
rattling sounds.
•
In case a bell has been fitted to the
handlebar, it must easily be reached with
a finger or a thumb and it must not be
possible to move it.
Check handlebar-mounted parts
Check the gearshift/brake levers,
grips (straight handlebars only) and
triathlon rest (triathlon bikes only) for
correct fit:
•
Grip the front wheel between your legs.
•
Try to twist the brake levers by hand.
7.5
Check the forks bearing
The forks bearing is the forks bearing
in the fork stem.
1.
Check your forks bearing. The front
wheel must swivel easily in both directions with no play:
•
Stand beside your bike and hold it with
both hands by the handlebar grips.
•
Pull the front brake lever and keep the
brake applied.
•
Push your bike forward and backward in
short, jerky movements.
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
•
There should be no play in the forks bearing: No clicking should be hear or felt.
Creaking noises are also impermissible.
•
Lift the hold bike up so that the rear
wheel is higher than the front wheel.
•
| 29
•
There must be no audible creaking or
rattling sounds.
•
Stick the front wheel between your
legs and try to pull up the bicycle at the
handlebar.
•
The standpipes mustn´t break loose from
the diving pipes or from the fork bridge.
•
Please regard the hints in the separate
instruction manual for your fork.
7.7
Check the rear wheel suspension
1.
Check your rear wheel suspension:
•
Sit on your bike and activate the suspension in a standing position using
vigorous up and down movements.
•
The rear of the bike must spring easily up
and down.
•
There must be no audible creaking or
rattling sounds
Move the front wheel by steering to the
side and let it go again.
7.8 Check the brakes
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
Brake malfunctioning is a danger to life.
•
•
The front wheel must automatically
return to its original position.
•
The front wheel must not lock in any
position.
7.6
Check suspension forks
1.
Check your suspension forks:
•
Pull the front brake lever and keep the
brake applied.
•
Press with your body weight on the
handlebars so that the suspension forks
deflect.
•
The forks must spring easily up and
down
Check your brake system particularly
carefully.
When touring for several days brake disk,
brake blocks and brake pads can wear a
lot.
When touring like this carry spare brake
blocks and replacement pads with you.
Only replace them yourself if you are
familiar with this job. Please consult your
dealer.
30 |
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
If you cannot replace them yourself have
them done by a trained specialist.
1.
•
•
Checking the function of your brake
system:
In a static position operate both brake levers
until the brakes make firm contact.
Please note that in this position the minimum distance between the brake lever and
the handlebar grip must be at least 35 mm
2.
Check correct fixing and screw connections of the entire brake system:
•
Try to pull the brakes from the forks (front)
and from the frame (rear) by hand.
•
It must not be possible to pull the brakes off
and there must be no play in the fixing bolts.
3.
Check operation of the brake shoes.
•
With the brake applied the brake shoes must
be in contact with the rim shoulder along
their entire length.
•
Under no circumstances must the brake
shoes touch the tyre even when the brake is
not applied.
35mm
•
Try to push the bike with the brakes applied
in this way.
Both wheels must remain locked.
7.8.1 Check rim brakes and cable (racing
bike version).
1.
Check the brake cables and their clips:
Racing bike rimbrake
•
The brake cables must not be damaged or
corroded.
•
On cable brakes the brake cables must be
securely clipped along their entire length.
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
4.
Check the brake block wear.
•
The brake blocks must not be worn down
beyond the wear indicator.
| 31
•
It should not be possible to loosen the
brakes from the sockets by hand. A small
amount of play is normal.
5.
Check centring of the brake shoes.
3.
Check operation of the brake shoes.
•
The brake shoes must be equidistant from
the rim on both sides
•
With the brake applied the brake shoes must
be in contact with the rim shoulder along
their entire length.
4.
Check the brake block wear.
•
Under no circumstances must the brake
shoes touch the tyre even when the brake
is not applied. Unhinge the brakes (see
Chapter 11.1)
•
The brake blocks must not be worn down
beyond the wear indicator
5.
Check centring of the brake shoes.
•
The brake shoes must be equidistant from
the rim on both sides.
7.8.2 Check rim brakes and cable
(mountain bike version).
1.
Check the brake cables and their clips:
•
The brake cables must not be damaged or
corroded.
On cable brakes the brake cables must be
securely clipped along their entire length.
•
2.
•
Check correct fixing and screw connections of the entire brake system:
Try to pull the brakes out of the sockets by
hand.
32 |
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
7.8.3 Check hydraulic rim brakes
4.
Check the brake block wear.
•
The brake blocks must not be worn down
beyond the wear indicator.
7.8.4 Check hydraulic disk brakes
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
Dirty brake disks may reduce braking
efficiency.
•
Dirty brake disks may reduce braking
efficiency.
1.
Check correct fixing and screw connections of the entire brake system:
•
Try to pull the brakes out of the sockets by
hand.
•
It should not be possible to loosen the
brakes from the sockets by hand.
A small amount of play is normal.
2.
Check your brake system seals:
•
Operate each brake lever in a static position
and hold the brake lever in that position.
•
Check the brake system from the brake lever
along the lines to the brakes.
1.
Pull the brake calliper alternately in all
directions.
•
There must be no egress of hydraulic fluid at
any point
•
It should not be possible to move the
caliper.
3.
Check operation of the brake shoes:
2.
Check your brake system seals:
•
With the brake applied the brake shoes must
be in contact with the rim shoulder along
their entire length.
•
Operate each brake lever in a static position
and hold it,
•
•
The brake shoe must never touch the tyre –
even if the brake is not applied.
Check the brake system from the brake lever
along the lines to the brakes.
•
There must be no egress of hydraulic fluid at
any point.
3.
Check brake disk for damage:
•
There must be no grooves, ruptures, deep
scratches or other mechanical damage.
4.
Lift the front or rear road wheel and turn
it by hand:
•
The brake disk must only have a slight axial
run-out.
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
5.
Have the brake pad and brake disk wear
checked at a specialist workshop (see
here also Chapter 11):
•
The brake pads must not be worn down
beyond the wear indicator.
•
The brake disk must not be below the minimum thickness.
•
You can find the minimum thickness in
the accompanying component operating
instructions.
6.
Check your brake disks for dirt, especially
oil and grease.
•
Dirty brake disks must be cleaned immediately (see Chapter 11)
7.9
| 33
Check drive train and chain
1.
Turn the right hand crank counter clockwise and note the chain rings and the
pinion cassette.
•
The chain rings and pinions must have no
axial run-out.
•
There must be no debris present. Remove
the latter if this is easily possible.
2.
Press the left crank in the position shown
against the chain stay.
•
You should feel no play.
•
There must be no audible creaking or rattling sounds.
3.
Check the chain for damage.
•
At no point on the chain should there be, for
example, any damaged chain side fishplates,
protruding rivet pins or seized and immobile
chain links.
4.
In a static position turn the right crank
counter to the direction of drive and
observe running of the chain at the gear
change rollers on the change mechanism.
5.
The chain must run smoothly over the
change rollers and must not jump.
When touring for several days brake disk,
brake blocks and brake pads can wear a
lot.
When touring like this carry spare brake
blocks and replacement pads with you.
Only replace them yourself if you are
familiar with this job. Please consult your
dealer.
If you cannot replace them yourself have
them done by a trained specialist.
7.8.5 Check back-pedal brake
1.
Ride at walking pace.
2.
Tread „backwards“ against the direction
of drive.
3.
The rear wheel must be able to be braked
sharply in this way.
34 |
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
7.10 Check lighting set
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
Failure of the front headlight and the rear
light can lead to dangerous road situations in darkness and/or bad visibility.
•
The mudguard and its fixing struts must not
be broken or damaged.
•
In a standing position move the front wheel
vigorously from side to side using the
handlebars.
•
Tilt the whole bike from side to side a few
times.
•
The fixing struts must not loosen.
•
No part of the mudguards must touch the
wheels.
•
Only use your bike under such condtions if
your lighting set is fully functional.
1.
Check your lighting system:
•
If applicable, please observe the on/off
switch on the headlamp.
•
•
•
Raise the front wheel.
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Turn the front wheel vigourously by hand.
Damage!
•
If applicable, please check that the rear light
is functioning correctly.
7.11
Front headlight and rear light must operate.
An extended side stand can cause heavy
falls. Always retract the side stand before
riding.
Check carrier
•
Always retract the side stand before riding.
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
1.
Check your side stand, if fitted.
•
Visually check screws and bolt fixture.
Always retract the side stand before riding. The
side stand must be securely fixed to the frame.
•
Always fold the side stand upwards before
riding. The stand must also remain in this
position during jolting.
Damage!
Loose or untightened carrier parts can
block the wheel and lead to serious falls.
•
Only use your bike again when the splash
guard has been attached by a specialist
workshop.
1.
Shake the carrier from side to side by
hand. The carrier fixings must not come
loose.
The carrier must not touch the tyre.
•
7.13 Other checks
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
A side stand that is bent, too short or too
long does not provide a secure stand for
your bicycle.
Checking sidelights for function behind if
available.
Your bicycle could fall over and cause
injuries to you or other persons.
7.12 Check splash guards (mudguards)
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
In addition, your bicycle and surrounding
objects such as other bicycles, cars, etc.
may get damaged.
Damage!
Loose or untightened splash guard parts
can block the wheel and lead to serious
falls.
•
Only use your bike again when the splash
guard has been attached by a specialist
workshop.
1.
Check your „mudguard“ fixings.
•
Have the bent side stand be repaired or
replaced by a specialist workshop.
•
As for side stands with adjustable lengths:
Have the correct length be adjusted by a
specialist workshop.
1.
Check your side stand, if existent.
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
•
| 35
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Visually inspect the screw connection. The
side stand must be mounted tightly to the
frame.
Damage!
•
Fold the side stand up before every ride. The
side stand must not unfold by itself.
•
Damaged bicycle parts can have be sharpedges and injure you.
•
As for side stands with adjustable lengths:
Check if the extendable part can be moved
by exerting hand force on
•
Check all the bike parts that you may have
contact with during use
2.
Check the secure stand of your bicycle.
•
Have damaged parts repaired or replaced
immediately by an authorized repair shop.
•
Lean or place your bicycle in the direction in
which the side stand is unfolded.
•
•
Your bicycle must stand by itself.
8
Adjusting and servicing
your bike
When pushed slightly in any direction, your
bicycle must remain standing and not fall
over.
You can perform some adjustments to
your bike yourself.
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Only do these jobs yourself if you have
the appropriate technical knowledge and
experience and the right tools for the job.
Damage!
Accessories that have not been fitted
correctly or that have become loose, can
affect your riding safety.
•
Check any accessory that is not explicitly
listed herein for its proper fixation.
•
Immediately contact a specialist workshop
in case one of the following requirements is
not met.
3.
Check any accessories that have been
retrofitted.
•
Visually inspect the screw connections.
•
Try to twist or move the accessories out of
position by exerting hand force on them.
•
Tilt the whole bicycle transversely to the
direction of travel and move it back and
forth a few times.
•
Lift your bicycle up (one or two centimetres)
and put it down again.
•
The accessories must not be loose, move or
twist.
•
No part of the accessories should touch the
wheels.
•
A bicycle stand If fitted should not be
unfolded.
•
There should be no noticeable noise.
8.1
Adjusting the adjustable stem
(optional)
•
8.2
Many bikes are fitted with an adjustable
stem, the height and angle of which can be
adjusted. Only have adjustment carried out
in a specialist workshop!
Adjust saddle position
Your saddle will be secured with one or two
clamping bolts.
To adjust it you need a hexagonal socket of
the right size and a torque wrench.
1.
To adjust the horizontal position or inclination of your saddle:
•
Loosen the clamping bolt(s) a few turns until
the saddle can be easily turned and/or in
inclination angle adjusted.
36 |
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
8.4
Adjust suspension forks
1. Please read the instructions for adjusting
your suspension forks from the suspension fork manufacturer‘s component
instructions.
•
•
Move the saddle to the desired position.
•
For seat clamps with two fixing screws:
Tighten one screw just for a quarter or a half
turn then continue with the other screw
in the same way. Do this as long as you´ve
reached the right torque (see Chapter 3.3.).
•
Please notice specified tightening torques
from the table in 3.3.
8.3
For seat clamps with only one fixing screw:
Always tighten the seat clamp with the
right, prescribed torque. Make sure that
all loosened parts join together in correct
alignment (see Chapter 3.3.).
Adjust saddle height
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
A saddle set too high for children who are
not yet able to cycle safely without assistance, could cause accidents, injuries
and/or property damage.
•
Adjust the seats height in a way that the
soles of the riders feet can touch the ground
even with slightly bent legs when riding.
•
On a gripper clamp with bolt you need a
hexagonal socket and a torque wrench of
the correct size. For a quick-release clamp
please see Chapter 7.8.
1.
Loosen the clamp as described in
Chapter 11.2.
2.
Move the saddle and saddle stem to the
desired position. Please note the instructions regarding saddle stem insertion
distance in Chapter 11.2.
3.
Clamp the saddle stem as described in
Chapter 11.2.
2. If your forks have a fixed adjustment
mechanism as shown in the illustration,
please read its instructions in the suspension fork manufacturer‘s component
instructions.
Suspension forks with elastomers and/
or steel springs are only suitable for one
overall weight range (= weight of rider +
any luggage). This weight range is usually
within 20 kg.
Only the forks pre-tensioning can be
adjusted by compressing the springs by
means of an adjuster screw. This merely
changes the initial breakaway torque of
the forks.
That is, with greater pre-tensioning the
forks only deflect at higher operating
forces.
If the forks are pre-tensioned too much
suspension travel is accordingly less.
The weight range for which the suspension elements in your forks are suited
can be found in the fork manufacturer‘s
instructions and/or you can consult your
dealer.
If your total weight is outside this range
have your dealer fit suspension elements
matching your weight.
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
8.5 Adjust rear suspension
(on full suspension bikes)
1.
2.
8.6
Please read the instructions for adjusting your suspension/damper elements
in the suspension fork manufacturer‘s
component instructions. Please consult
your dealer.
Adjust your suspension/damper element
so that the bike when carrying the rider‘s
weight deflects equally at the front and
rear wheels.
Service the gears
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
Incorrect operation of the gear shift
levers can damage your gears.
Shimano Dual Control
Shimano Rapidfire 2-Way-Release_Deore
Shimano Rapidfire 2-Way-Release_XT
Twist Grip Shift
| 37
•
Never operate both levers or both gear shift
switches at the same time!
•
Please note that for the crank set (left-hand
lever) and hub gears: Never shift under load!
1.
Please determine on the basis of the illustrations, which gear shift system your
bike has. If you are not sure which one it
is please consult your dealer.
2.
If your gear shift lever is not shown in
the illustrations please take this from
the accompanying gear shift lever
manufacturer‘s instructions and/or consult your dealer.
38 |
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
When using an electronic derailleur
gear (called Di2 by Shimano), the shifting is done by pressing buttons.
The Di2 connection is analog.
For further information, please refer
to the specific operating instructions
provided by the manufacturer.
Shimano EZ Fire
Shimano Rapidfire
Shimano Di2
On derailleur systems the gear is shifted
by switching the chain to another sprocket
Sram Force / Rival / Red
Shimano STI
The STI connection is mechanical.
The left-hand lever operates the chain
ring derailleur and the right-hand lever
operates the gear shift.
On the crank set these sprockets are called
„chain rings“ and on the rear sprocket
cassette they are called „pinions“.
3.
Please observe the chain position
prescribed as shown above.
•
To be avoided:
Largest chain ring + largest pinion.
•
Smallest chain ring + smallest pinion.
| 39
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
8.6.1 Shimano Rapidfire/ Shimano
Rapidfire 2-Way-Release/
Shimano EZ Fire
•
For rapid shifting through several
sprockets press the lever right down and
keep it depressed until the desired gear is
selected.
2.
Here is how you shift to a smaller
sprocket:
•
In order to shift you must be pedalling.
•
Depress (2-Way-Release only) or pull Lever
B until you feel it engage and then release
it again straight away.
On your gear-shift there are two levers.
Lever A is for shifting to a larger chain ring or
sprocket and Lever B for shifting to a smaller
one.
Hebel A
Hebel B
1.
Here is how you shift to a larger sprocket:
•
In order to shift you must be pedalling.
•
Press the lever down with your thumb
beyond the first stop and keep it depressed until the desired gear is selected.
40 |
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
8.6.2 SRAM gear shift
8.6.3 Twist grip shift
On your gear-shift there are two levers.
Lever A is for shifting to a larger chain ring or
sprocket and Lever B for shifting to a smaller
one.
1.
Here is how you shift to a larger sprocket:
•
In order to shift you must be pedalling.
•
Press the lever down with your thumb
beyond the first stop and keep it depressed
until the desired gear is selected.
On your shift grip there is a ring which can
be rotated in either direction. By turning this
ring you shift into the next gear.
Depending on the manufacturer you shift
into a higher or lower gear in the one direction of rotation. You can find the precise
functioning in the accompanying component instructions and/or consult your dealer.
A
•
For rapid shifting through several sprockets
press the lever right down and keep it depressed until the desired gear is selected.
2.
Here is how you shift to a smaller sprocket:
•
•
In order to shift you must be pedalling.
Depress Lever B until you feel it engage and
then let it go again straight away.
1.
Here is how you shift with hub gears:
•
pedalling in order to shift.
•
Turn the rotating ring in the desired direction until the gear is selected.
2.
Here is how you shift with derailleur
gears: to a larger sprocket
•
In order to shift you must be pedalling.
•
Turn the rotating ring until the desired gear
is selected.
•
For rapid shifting over several sprockets turn
the rotating ring until the desired gear is
selected.
3.
Here is how you shift to a smaller sprocket:
In order to shift you must be pedalling.
•
B
•
Turn the rotating ring until the desired gear
is selected.
•
For rapid shifting over several sprockets turn
the rotating ring until the desired gear is
selected.
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
8.6.4 Shimano STI
2.
On your gear-shift there are two levers.
Lever A – this is also the brake lever - is for
shifting to a larger chain ring or sprocket
and Lever B for shifting to a smaller one.
•
•
| 41
Here is how you shift to a smaller sprocket:
In order to shift you must be pedalling.
Depress Lever B until you feel it engage and
then let it go again straight away.
8.6.5 Sram Force / Rival / Red
On your gear shifter/brake lever you will find
a lever which can be used to switch to both
a lower and higher gear.
B
A
1.
Here is how you shift to a larger sprocket:
•
In order to shift you must be pedalling.
•
Press Lever A down with your thumb
beyond the first stop and keep it depressed
until the desired gear is engaged.
•
For rapid shifting through several sprockets
press Lever A right down and keep it depressed until the desired gear is engaged.
A
B
1.
In order to switch to a higher gear, please
do the following:
•
To switch gears you must pedal.
•
Press the gear shifter inwards and hold down
until the desired gear has been selected.
•
To switch through several gears, press the
lever down fully and hold down until the
desired gear has been selected.
2.
In order to switch to a lower gear, please
do the following:
•
To switch gears you must pedal.
•
Press the lever until you feel it coming to a
stop and then let it go again.
42 |
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
8.7 Service the brakes
•
Read the following description regarding
the handling of your quick-release hub axle
and follow the instructions accordingly.
Damage!
•
Incorrect operation of the brakes can
lead to hazardous riding situations, falling, accidents and material damage.
Familiarize yourself with the handling of the
quick-release hub axle.
•
Familiarise yourself with operation of the
brakes.
Ascertain which brake lever operates the front
and which one operates the back brake
Repeatedly exercise mounting and demounting your running wheels to and from the
quick-release hub axle.
•
Check the running wheel every time after it
has been mounted to the axle according to
chapter 7.1.1.
Operate the respective brake lever several
times in the static position.
•
In case you are unsure if your running
wheels have been mounted correctly, do
not ride your bicycle and consult your
specialist dealer.
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
•
•
•
You can observe opening and closing action of the brake blocks or brake calipers
on the respective disk or rim.
1.
Risk of burns!
To operate the brake pull the lever in the
direction of the handlebars.
Quick-release levers on disk brakes can
become hot during riding.
•
Touch the quick-release lever very briefly
with the bare finger.
If it feels hot let it cool down.
Our bike hubs and possibly also your saddle stem
may be have quick-releases fittings (often also referred to as „quick-release clamps“ or simply „quick
releases“).
4
4
You will obtain the best braking effect if
you operate both brake levers in a coordinated and balanced manner.
1
2
Legende:
1:Axle
2:Nut
3
3:Lever
4:Spring
These quick-release fittings make possible rapid
disassembly and assembly of these components
without any tools.
8.8
Operate the quick-release action
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
An incorrect mounting of the running
wheels to a quick-release hub axle may
lead to dangerous riding situations, falls,
accidents and material damage.
Construction and function.
•
Long threaded axis with a nut on one side
and an eccentrically-mounted lever on the
other
•
There is a little spring between the nut and
hub and between the hub and the lever.
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
•
The ends of the springs with the smaller
diameter always face the hub.
•
On saddle stem locking quick-releases
instead of the nut there is a bolt head with
an Allen key hexagon insert head.
Special types:
Some running wheels are fixed with floating axles or a combination of floating axle and quickrelease lever or are equipped with other axle
clamping systems. Please refer to the accompanying instructions on the handling of these parts
provided by the suspension fork manufacturer
and/or consult your specialist dealer.
| 43
2. Turn the nut counter-clockwise until the
wheel can be removed from the frame or
front forks without any great effort.
Should the nut come right off the screw
please ensure that the little springs do
not get lost.
To open the quick release a
1. Push the eccentric lever away from the
hub. It an now be rotated 180° around
its axis.
3. On saddle stem quick release levers: To
loosen instead of the nut turn the bolt
with the Allen key head itself counterclockwise.
Tightening: Reverse the procedure
1. If the quick release lever was completely
removed then push it from the left (in the
direction of travel) through the hub.
2. Place the springs and the nuts on the
bolt. Turn the right end now protruding
from the hub and the nut clockwise.
44 |
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
3. On saddle stem quick release levers:
Instead of the nut turn the bolt with the
Allen key head itself clockwise.
4. Tilt the eccentric lever so that it approximately forms the extension of the hub
axis Hold the lever in this position.
5. Now turn the nut or the Allen key bolt
head until the eccentric lever, when
turned around its bearing more than 90°
to meet slight resistance (it now forms an
approximately straight line extension of
the hub axis.
6. Now press the level through a further 90°
until it reaches its end stop.
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
Incorrect operation of the brakes can
lead to hazardous riding situations, falling, accidents and material damage.
If the lever is pressed into its stop position the wheel is not secured tightly
enough and can become displaced during riding or loosen.
There is a danger of falling.
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
•
Open the lever again and turn the nut
counter-clockwise again as necessary.
•
Check that the wheels are seated firmly as
described in Chapter 7.1
8.9
| 45
Using click-in pedals (optional)
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
Click-in pedals are not safety pedals.
If an excessive release force is set it is
possible not to be able to twist the shoes
out of the pedal quick enough in an
emergency situation.
If too soft a release force is set the shoe
may possibly release from the pedal
unintentionally when riding.
In either case there is an increased danger of falling and injury
•
•
Familiarise yourself with use of the click-in
pedals.
Practice mounting and dismounting with
the pedals when not moving.
Sit on the saddle and hold tight onto a stable object with one hand.
Click both shoes alternately in and out.
Please consult your dealer.
•
Familiarise yourself with the release on
careful practice rides.
•
Discover for yourself the optimum tightness
setting.
•
Practice mounting and dismounting at
various release settings.
•
You can find adjustment of the release
setting in the accompanying component
instructions and/or consult your dealer.
In unpredictable traffic situations and on
difficult terrain it is often necessary to
„click out“ with one or even both shoes.
•
Practice this with both feet alternately.
•
When pedalling place your shoe centrally on
the pedal so that you don‘t click in.
If need be you can then support yourself
with one or both legs on the ground.
Road Bike
MTB
With click-in pedals the shoe and pedal
are firmly connected in a vertical direction. When pedalling you can not only
push the pedal down but also pull it
upwards.
To be able to use a click-in pedal to the
full you need shoes specially designed
for the pedal system concerned and to
which the pedal hooks supplied with the
pedal can be affixed.
The following description is purely exemplary
Please refer to the instructions for your
pedal/shoe combination provided by the
manufacturer and/or consult your specialist dealer in order to ensure a correct
assembly and use of your click-in pedal
system.
Road Bike
MTB
46 |
1.
2.
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
Have this fitting work done by your
dealer.
To step into the pedal:
a) Bring the pedal to its lowest position.
b) Position yourself with the toe of the
shoe pointing downwards and with the
tip of the hook on the shoe in the front
pedal insertion point.
c) When the tip of the hook is positioned
correctly in the pedal push the whole
surface of the foot sharply downwards
until the clamping mechanism clearly
and audibly engages.
•
The shoe is now firmly vertically connected
with the pedal.
•
Depending on the pedal system the shoe
has sideward freedom of movement.
3.
To loosen your shoe from the pedal:
•
Twist your heel sharply away from the bike.
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
8.10 Loading the carrier
9
| 47
During riding
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
(Troubleshooting)
Damage!
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
A carrier is not intended for transportation of bulky items or persons.
If you carry out maintenance procedures
for which you are not authorised this may
result in dangerous riding situations,
falls, accidents and material damage.
Misuse of the carrier can lead to dangerous riding situations, falls, accidents and
material damage.
Only carry compact items of luggage with
a maximum weight of 20 kg and using a
suitable restraint system.
•
Place your items of luggage centrally on
your carrier.
•
If using panniers please also ensure that
these are suitable for your carrier.
Fit them in accordance with this Owner‘s
manual.
Please observe the relevant Instructions for
Use and/or consult your dealer.
•
Attach your luggage item using a tension
clip or specially suited elasticated bungee
cords.
•
„Shake“ your bike to and fro after loading it.
•
The luggage or your panniers must not work
loose.
•
Your luggage or your panniers must not
hinder your freedom of movement when
riding.
•
Neither your luggage nor your panniers
must touch the wheels.
•
Neither your luggage nor your panniers
must cover your lights or reflectors.
Have all maintenance procedures not
listed in the table below carried out only
by the dealer.
Risk of Personal Injury and Material
Damage!
If you notice any unusual handling,
unusual noises or faults no listed in this
Chapter this can lease to dangerous
riding situations, falls, accidents and
material damage.
•
Have anything you notice which is not listed
in the following table checked immediately
by your dealer and if necessary rectified.
•
If the measures listed herein do not provide
a remedy, please consult your specialist
dealer immediately.
48 |
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
9.1Gears and drive train
Problem
Possible causes
Corrective action
Gear does not shift or
not cleanly
Shift lever not operated
correctly
Gear out of adjustment
Operate again
On steep incline too great a
pressure on the pedal and/or
pedalling too slowly
Repeat gear shift on flat terrain;
Shift when static: Hinterrad anheben, Kurbel in
Antriebsrichtung betätigen, bis der gewünschten
Gang eingelegt ist.
Drive train blocked after Chain jammed
or during shifting
Adjust in specialist workshop
Stop, operate gear shift in reverse, lift rear wheel
and turn crank against direction of drive.
If crank cannot be moved, under no circumstances use force. Contact a specialist workshop
immediately.
Unusual noises such
as clicking or cracking
noises, loud grinding
and/or knocking
Damaged drive train/gear
components.
Contact a specialist workshop immediately.
Uneven resistance when Damaged drive train/gear
pedalling
components.
Contact a specialist workshop immediately.
Chain off
Incorrect shift operation (see
Chapter 8.6)
Gear out of adjustment or
damaged
Possible under unfavourable
conditions
Stop,
Lift the chain by hand onto the next sprocket,
lift the rear wheel,
operate the crank in the direction of drive (only if
possible with ease).
Chain comes off after or Incorrect shift operation
during shifting
(see Chapter 8.6)
Gear out of adjustment or
damaged
Possible under unfavourable
conditions
Stop,
Operate the shift lever in the opposite direction,
Lift the chain by hand onto the next sprocket,
lift the rear wheel,
operate the crank in the direction of drive (only if
possible with ease).
If repair is not possible in this way contact a specialist workshop immediately.
If repair is not possible in this way contact a specialist workshop immediately.
Chain jumps off permanently.
Permanent incorrect operation
of gear shift
Gear out of adjustment or
damaged.
Only operate the gear shift as per instructions in
Chapter 8.6
If operation is correct contact a specialist workshop immediately.
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
| 49
9.2Brake
Risk of Personal Injury and
Material Damage!
The brakes on your bike are amongst the most important components when it comes to your
safety.
Incorrectly functioning brakes can lead to dangerous riding situations, falling, accidents and
material damage.
•
At the slightest problem and if the braking effect falls off contact your dealer immediately.
•
Only ride the bike again after it has been properly readjusted by the dealer.
Problem
Brakes do not function
Reduced braking effect, brake
levers have to be pulled too far.
9.3
Possible causes
Corrective action
Brake not correctly assembled
Correct assembly as per Chapter 11.1
Brake damaged
Contact a specialist workshop immediately.
Worn brake blocks or brake pads
Have brake blocks or brake pads
replaced immediately in a specialist
workshop.
Brake cable stretched, worn or
clamp/s damaged
Contact a specialist workshop immediately.
On hydraulic brakes Brake system
leaking
Contact a specialist workshop immediately
Frame and suspension
Risk of Personal Injury and
Material Damage!
Frame and suspension faults may lead to hazardous riding situations, falling, accidents and material damage.
•
At the slightest malfunction contact your dealer immediately.
•
Only ride the bike again after it has been properly readjusted by the dealer.
Problem
Possible causes
Corrective action
Noises: Creaking, knocking,
grinding or other.
Frame and/or suspension
damaged
Contact a specialist workshop
immediately.
Tightening torque too low
Check and correct the tightening
torque (see chapter 3.3).
at frame and/or saddle post
from Carbon
Contact a specialist workshop immediately.
The saddle post slips into the
frame or twists out of position.
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
50 |
Problem
The saddle post slips into
the frame or twists out of
position.
Possible causes
Corrective action
incorrect according
Dismantle and assemble correctly according
to point 11.2
The diameter of the seatpost is
too small
Assemble a seatpost with the correct
diameter
Poor suspension response
Suspension has been set
incorrect
Adjustment according to the accompanying
component operating manual
Poor suspension response
despite being adjusted
correctly
suspension
damaged
Contact a specialist workshop immediately.
9.4
Splash guard, carrier and lighting set
Risk of Personal Injury and
Material Damage!
Splash guard, carrier and lighting set faults may lead to hazardous riding situations, falling, accidents and material damage.
•
At the slightest malfunction contact your dealer immediately.
•
Only ride the bike again after it has been properly readjusted by the dealer.
Problem
Possible causes
Noises: Creaking, knocking,
grinding or other.
Splash guard or carrier parts loose Contact a specialist workshop immediately.
Lighting elements („bulbs“)
burnt out
Lighting set partly or totally
dysfunctional
Corrective action
Replace lighting elements. Please consult
your dealer.
Wiring damaged
Contact a specialist workshop immediately.
Dynamo defective
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
9.5
| 51
Road wheels and tyres
Risk of Personal Injury and
Material Damage!
Damage to road wheels and tyres may lead to hazardous riding situations, falling, accidents and
material damage.
•
At the slightest malfunction contact your dealer immediately.
•
Only ride the bike again after it has been properly readjusted by the dealer.
Problem
Possible causes
Corrective action
Road wheels „hopping“ up and
down
Tyre damage
Defective spokes
Contact a specialist workshop immediately.
Remove debris Afterwards use your bike
particularly carefully
Noises: Creaking, knocking,
grinding or other.
Schwammiges Fahrverhalten
Debris caught in wheel
Have your bike checked by a specialist workshop for any consequential damage.
Damage to road wheel
Contact a specialist workshop immediately.
Air pressure too low
Increase air pressure (see Chapter 7.1.3) If the
same handling occurs again shortly after
there is a slow puncture (see next line)
Replace tube and if necessary tyre and tape
on tubeless systems
Increasingly spongy handling
Very unusual rolling characteristics (you can feel every stone)
Replacing tyres
Contact a specialist workshop
(*) immediately. The bike must not be used
until then.
Flat tyre
(*): Changing the tube, tyre and rim tape
can only be undertaken given the required
experience.
Have your dealer demonstrate this procedure to you and practice this job until you are
familiar with it.
For removing and refitting road wheels see
Chapters 8.8 and 11.1.
52 |
10
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
After falls or accidents
Risk of Personal Injury and
Material Damage!
Damage after a fall or accident may lead
to hazardous riding situations, falling,
accidents and material damage.
•
After a fall or accident contact your dealer
immediately.
•
Only ride the bike again after it has been
properly readjusted by the dealer.
•
After damage and falls you must consult
your dealer.
•
Only use your bike again after he has replaced the damaged parts or assured you that
you can continue to use the bike without
any worries.
•
Please also refer to the information provided
in chapter 4.8
11
Risk of Personal Injury and
Material Damage!
After a fall basically you must renew all damaged
bike components such as
•
Handlebars
•
triathlon / time trial attachment
•
Bar ends
•
Handlebar stem
•
seat post (if made of carbon)
•
saddle (if saddle framework is made of carbon)
•
rims (if made of carbon)
•
and crank.
All other bike parts must be checked by your dealer
and if necessary replaced.
Risk of Personal Injury and
Material Damage!
More and more bikes are fitted with
carbon fibre components
Carbon fibre components are very sensitive and if incorrectly fitted and if slightly
damaged can lead to dangerous riding
situations, falling, accidents and material
damage.
•
•
An unsuitable transportation system
may damage parts of your bike which are
important for safety and lead to dangerous riding situations, falls, accidents and
material damage.
•
Only transport this bicycle inside your car.
•
Objects or items may not be placed on this
bicycle or its frame.
•
Any bike carrier (e.g. roof, rear end) that
requires the frame or bicycle to be mounted
or clamped is not suitable for this bicycle.
This bike may only be transported inside a vehicle.
Please note during transportation that the bike is
secured and is not damaged by other packaging
items for example.
For transportation you may remove the front and
rear wheels and the saddle stem with saddle if these
are fitted with quick releases. Only undertake this
disassembly if you are sure that you can reassemble
these parts correctly.
See Chapter 8.3, 8.8
If your road wheels are bolted to the frame (e.g. in
the case of hub gears) consult your dealer
Danger of material damage!
Please note all instructions regarding assembly, care, maintenance and checking these
parts in accordance with the accompanying
component servicing instructions.
Only have assembly work on or to carbon
fibre parts carried out in a specialist workshop.
Transporting your bike
If your bike is inside a vehicle solar radiation can cause the tyres to burst or come
away from the rim.
•
Let the air out of the tyres prior to transportation and fill them again after transportation (see Chapter 7.1.3)
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
11.1
| 53
Fit and remove road wheels
Risk of Personal Injury and
Risk of Personal Injury and
Material Damage!
Material Damage!
Rim brakes only:
When fitting and removing the brake
blocks can get twisted.
Incorrectly fitted road wheels can lead
to dangerous riding situations, falling,
accidents and material damage.
•
You must have your dealer demonstrate
fitting and removing your road wheels.
•
Practice this job at least once under his
supervision and control.
•
Only remove and fit the seat post and saddle
if you are sure you have mastered this job.
•
When fitting the road wheels please note
that the brake blocks are correctly positioned (see Chapter 7.8).
•
If these are not correctly positions please
contact a specialist workshop.
For transportation you may remove and
later replace the road wheels on your
bike if these are fitted with quick releases.
•
Do not touch the rims or brake disks immediately after a descent.
If your bike has rim brakes please note
that you do not change the position
of the brake blocks with the tyre.
This could happen especially in the case
of large-volume tyres. If the tyre do not
easily pass easily between the brake
caliper blocks let a sufficient amount of
air out of them.
•
Let the rims and brake disks cool down before you touch them.
Then inflate the tyres afterwards to the
correct pressure.
•
In order to check the temperature, touch
the rims and brake disks very briefly with
your bare finger. If they are hot, wait a few
minutes and repeat the test until the rims
and brake disks have cooled down.
Risk of burns!
After long descents, the bicycle rims and
brake disks can get very hot.
Danger of material damage!
•
Hydraulic brakes must under no circumstances be operated after removing the road
wheel!
•
If your bike has a disk brake use the mandatory transportation wedges supplied for
that purpose for transportation following
removal of the road wheel.
•
Remove these immediately prior to refitting
the road wheels.
Please comply with the accompanying
component instructions here.
11.1.1 All categories/series except the
category racing bike/triathlon
1. Remove the front wheel first
(continue with 3).
2. Switch to the smallest pinion of the rear
wheel’s sprocket cassette (see chapter 8.6).
54 |
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
Risk of Personal Injury and
Material Damage!
Spinning running wheels can cause injuries to your hands.
•
•
Never reach near a spinning running wheel.
•
In order to do this, lift the bicycle rear up,
actuate the corresponding shift lever and
turn the crank by hand in the riding direction until the chain is placed on the smallest
pinion.
•
Brake the running wheel until it comes to a
complete standstill (see chapter 8.7).
3.
Open the brake (only applies to rim brakes, not to disk brakes)
4.
a) As for rim brakes with cable control
(e.g. from Shimano):
•
Press the brake shoes together with one
hand and remove the cable guide from the
yoke.
5.
Loosen the wheel hubs.
•
Open the quick release on your road wheel
(see also Chapter 8.8 Quick Releases)
•
Raise the rear of the bike, operate the shift
lever concerned and turn the crank in the
drive direction until the chain lies correctly
on the smallest sprocket.
•
Turn the locknut enough to allow sufficient
room on the axle.
With other types of clamping.
•
Loosen the clamp as per the accompanying
component instruction
6.
Remove the road wheels from the frame
and forks.
•
Front wheel: Lift the bike up by the handlebars and withdraw the road wheel from the
front fork dropouts.
•
Rear wheel: Lift the bike up slightly at
the back and press the gear mechanism
backwards. In this position push the rear
wheel gently in the direction of the dropout
openings.
•
Come to a complete standstill before carrying out works on, or around, the wheels.
b) On Magura: hydraulic rim brakes:
•
Move the fixing lever over and remove the
entire brake assembly including brake booster from the brake sockets.
•
Please make sure not to lose any distance
washers that may come loose.
On front wheel with hub dynamo (if
fitted):
Remove the push-fit connector between the
dynamo and cable.
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
7.
After removing place the bike carefully
on its left hand side.
Danger of material damage!
With no rear wheel the frame and/or the
gear mechanism can become damaged.
•
After removing the rear wheel lie the bike on
its left side or use a suitable assembly stand.
To fit your road wheels. Fit the rear wheel
first.
1. a) Inserting the rear wheel
| 55
•
Lift up the bike rear,
placing the rear wheel under it so that the
chain is over the smallest sprocket.
•
Disk brakes: Insert the road wheel so that
the brake disk can be easily pushed between the brake pads.
•
Carefully lower the rear of the bike until the
axle is at the dropout stop on the right and
left sides.
56 |
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
1.
b) Inserting the front wheel:
•
Lift up the bike by the handlebars,
•
Placing the front wheel under the front forks
dropouts and
•
For disc brakes: Attach the wheel in such a
way that the disc brakes are able to move
freely between the brake pads.
•
Carefully lower the forks until the axle is
flush at the dropout stops on the right and
left sides.
2.
Tighten the wheel hubs.
•
When tightening with quick releases: see
Chapter 8.8.
•
With other types of clamping: Tighten the
hubs as per the accompanying component
instruction.
3.
a) Close rim brakes
3.
b) Hydraulic rim brakes:: Fitting is as
removal only in reverse sequence.
•
Place the brake booster on the lead screws
•
Insert any distance washers in the correct
position and place the brake on the brake
bosses.
•
Swivel the locking lever so that the brake is
fixed in place again.
4.
Please ensure that the brake blocks
correctly cover the rim shoulder when
operated.
on cable brakes:
•
•
Press the brake shoes together.
Insert the cable in the yoke.
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
5.
On front wheel with hub dynamo (if
fitted):
•
Refit the push connector between the hub
dynamo and the cable.
6.
Check installation:
•
•
Operate the brakes.
•
In that case release the quick release, check
and correct the hub seat and close the quick
release again.
•
| 57
If the brake block or brake touches the rim
or the brake disks this can indicate incorrect
seating of the hub in the dropouts.
The brake (on rim brakes) must not be
opened during this procedure. If there is no
improvement after this please contact your
dealer immediately.
11.1.2
Race/Triathlon
1.
Remove the front wheel first (continue
with 3.)
2.
Switch to the smallest pinion of the rear
wheel’s sprocket cassette (see chapter 8.6)
•
Check that the lighting (if fitted) is working.
Risk of Personal Injury and
•
Ensure that the road wheels do not come
into contact with either mudguards or
carrier (if fitted).
Material Damage!
Spinning running wheels can cause injuries to your hands.
•
•
Never reach near a spinning running wheel.
•
In order to do this, lift the bicycle rear up,
actuate the corresponding shift lever and
turn the crank by hand in the riding direction until the chain is placed on the smallest
pinion.
•
Brake the running wheel until it comes to a
complete standstill (see chapter 8.7).
3.
Open rim brake.
Brake the spinning running wheel by using
the corresponding brake lever until it comes
to a complete standstill before performing
any work near the running wheel.
58 |
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
•
a) On racing bike brakes:
Shimano und Sram:
•
Move the lever upwards.
4.
Loosen the wheel hubs.
•
Open the quick release on your road wheel
(see also Chapter 8.8 Quick Releases)
•
Turn the locknut enough to allow sufficient room on the axle. With other types of
clamping.
5.
Remove the road wheels from the frame
and forks.
•
Front wheel: Lift the bike up by the handlebars and withdraw the road wheel from the
front fork dropouts.
•
Rear wheel: Lift the bike up slightly at
the back and press the gear mechanism
backwards. In this position push the rear
wheel gently in the direction of the dropout
openings.
b) Campagnolo:
•
There is no lever on the brake:
•
To release press the pin on the brake lever
from inwards to outwards.
At the same time pull on the brake lever
slightly.
6. After removing place the bike carefully
on its left hand side
Danger of material damage!
With no rear wheel the frame and/or the
gear mechanism can become damaged.
•
After removing the rear wheel lie the bike on
its left side or use a suitable assembly stand.
To fit your road wheels.
Fit the rear wheel first.
1.
a) Inserting the rear wheel
•
Lift up the bike rear,
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
•
placing the rear wheel under it so that the
chain is over the smallest sprocket
3.
•
Carefully lower the rear of the bike until the
axle is at the dropout stop on the right and
left sides.
Close rim brakes
a) On racing bike brakes:
Shimano und Sram:
•
Move the lever downwards.
b) To assemble the front wheel
•
Lift up the bike by the handlebars,
•
Placing the front wheel under the front forks
dropouts and
•
Carefully lower the forks until the axle is
flush at the dropout stops on the right and
left sides.
2.
Tighten the wheel hubs.
•
When tightening with quick releases: see
Chapter 8.8
b) Campagnolo:
| 59
60 |
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
•
There is no lever on the brake:
•
Follow the reverse procedure to opening
and press the pin on the brake lever from
outwards to inwards.
•
At the same time pull the brake lever.
4.
Check installation:
•
Operate the brakes.
•
If the brake block or brake touches the rim
or the brake disks this can indicate incorrect
seating of the hub in the dropouts.
•
In that case release the quick release, check
and correct the hub seat and close the quick
release again.
•
The brake (on rim brakes) must not be
opened during this procedure. If there is no
improvement after this please contact your
dealer immediately.
11.2
On carbon fibre saddle posts special types may be
fitted with two screws.
For clamping without a quick release a hexagon
socket and a torque wrench of the appropriate size
are required. Please also consult your dealer.
To remove your saddle post:
1.
Release the saddle clamp at the quick release as per Chapter 8.8 or by loosening
the Allen screw with an Allen key.
2.
Withdraw the saddle with saddle post
from the frame.
Remove and replace saddle post
and saddle
Risk of Personal Injury and
Material Damage!
An incorrectly fitted saddle post can lead
to dangerous riding situations, falling,
accidents and material damage.
•
You must have your dealer demonstrate
fitting and removing your saddle post.
•
Practice this job at least once under his
supervision and control.
•
Only remove and fit the saddle post and
saddle if you are sure you have mastered
this job.
For transportation you can remove your bike‘s
saddle post complete with saddle and replace it
again afterwards.
The saddle post is held with a clamp in the frame seat tube and is tightened with either a quick release
or a hexagon socket.
To replace your saddle post:
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
1.
•
On carbon saddle post and/or saddle
stem
Apply assembly paste to the saddle post
and to the inside of the seat tube and only
use assembly paste for carbon parts for this
procedure.
•
Saddle post and seat tube must not be
greased. Only carbon assembly paste may
be used.
•
Saddle posts made of aluminium may only
be fitted using a carbon assembly paste.
2.
Push the saddle complete with saddle
post into the frame seat tube until the
desired saddle height is obtained. In this
position the lower end of the saddle post
must be a minimum of 10 cm below the
lower edge of the top tube.
| 61
3.
Turn the saddle so that the saddle points
in the direction of travel.
4.
Ensure that the clamp is flush in the
frame and that the seat tube slots and the
clamp are covered.
5.
Close the quick release as per Chapter 8.8
or tighten the Allen screw with a torque
wrench.
Please observe assembly instructions
and the specified torque in the accompanying component instructions indicated
in table 3.3.
Do not rely on the marking on the saddle
post.
To check the correct insertion distance:
Hold a finger tip against the saddle post
when fitted directly above the clamp.
Keep your finger tip in this position and
withdraw the saddle post from the seat
tube.
Risk of Personal Injury and
Material Damage!
Hold the saddle post laterally beside the
seat tube so that your finger is again level
and directly above the clamp.
In this position the lower end of the
saddle post must be a minimum of 10 cm
below the lower edge of the top tube.
An over-tightened carbon fibre saddle
post can break when riding and lead
to dangerous riding situations, falling,
accidents and material damage.
•
The seat tube clamp must be tightened firmly in order to prevent the saddle post from
lowering into the frame or laterally twisting
during the ride.
•
If the saddle post does not remain in the
desired position, even though you have
reached the maximum admissible tightening torque, please consult your specialist
dealer immediately.
Please observe assembly instructions
and the specified torque in the accompanying component instructions
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
62 |
12 Cleaning and caring for your bike
Danger of material damage!
Cleaning, lubrication and preserving
agents are chemical products.
Risk of Personal Injury and
Material Damage!
Corrosion can damage components of
your bike which are important for safety
so that they are no longer secure. These
components may then brake during
riding and thus lead to serious falls.
Corrosion is caused, amongst other
things, by
-
salt (e.g. due to salt spreading in winter)
-
salty air Luft (e.g in coastal or industrial
areas)
-
perspiration.
Danger of material damage!
Do not use steam washers. The high pressure water jet can damage your bike.
Good maintenance will increase the life of your bike
and its components. Clean and maintain your bike
regularly.
For wet cleaning use a gentle water jet or a bucket
of water and a sponge.
Only use clean fresh water or desalinated water.
Incorrect use can damage your bike.
•
Only use products expressly suitable for
bikes.
•
Ensure that these products do not attack
either paint, rubber, plastic or metal parts
etc. Consult your dealer.
•
Follow the respective manufacturer‘s
instructions.
4.
Rinse the entire bike with a gentle water
jet and allow it to dry.
5.
Clean the chain.
•
Drip a suitable chain cleaner into a clean,
spirit-free cotton cloth and wipe the chain
down. When doing so slowly operate the
crank against the direction of drive.
•
Repeat this process as often as possible with
a clean area of the cloth until the chain is
clean.
•
Drip a suitable chain cleaner into a clean,
spirit-free cotton cloth and wipe the chain
down.
If cleaner remains between the chain
links the new grease will be immediately
broken down and will be totally ineffective.
There are many ways of washing a bike. A proven
cleaning recommendation for a very dirty bike is as
follows:
1.
2.
3.
With a gentle water jet remove large
items of debris such as soil, stones and
sand etc.
Let the bike dry off somewhat.
•
Danger of material damage!
Spray your entire bike with a suitable
detergent.
With many detergents and given a low level of soiling simply spraying and rinsing
off after the specified time for them to
work is sufficient.
You can remove stubborn dirt after the
working time for example with a radiator
paintbrush before rinsing off.
Sparingly apply a lubricant suitable for
bicycle chains to the chain links.
Greases for motor cycle chains will gum
up your bike chain and the drive chain
components.
•
Only use lubricants expressly approved for
use with bike chains.
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
Clean and lubricate your chain as described after every ride in the wet and
Every prolonged ride on a sandy subsurface and at the latest every 200 km.
Risk of Personal Injury and
Material Damage!
If too much lubricant is used it can drip
onto the rim and brake disk and contaminate them.
Risk of Personal Injury and
This will reduce the effectiveness of the
brakes
•
Remove excessive lubricant on the chain
using a clean, dry and spirit-free cotton
cloth.
•
Clean the rim and brake disk with a suitable degreasing agent. Please consult your
dealer.
Material Damage!
Worn parts and unrepaired damage can
lead to dangerous riding situations, falls,
injuries and property damage.
•
Regularly maintain and service your bicycle.
•
Take your bicycle to a specialist workshop at
the compulsory maintenance intervals.
•
Only this way, worn parts and possible damages can be discovered and repaired.
Risk of Personal Injury and
Material Damage!
wax polish spray or a preserving agent
gets onto the rim or brake disks and/
or brake blocks the effectiveness of the
brakes will be reduced.
•
Clean these parts with a suitable degreasing
agent. Consult your specialist dealer.
6.
Clean any remaining very dirty parts
by hand using a clean spirit-free cotton
cloth using a suitable detergent.
7.
Spray the entire bike with a suitable wax
polish or similar preserving agent.
Exceptions:
•
Brake blocks or brake pads
•
Rims in the case of rim brakes
•
Brake disks
•
Handlebar grips/ brake lever/ shifter
•
Saddle
•
Tyre
8.
Polish your bike after the prescribed
working time using a clean, spirit-free
cotton cloth.
9.
Clean the brake blocks, brake pads, rims
(in the case of rim brakes) and brake disks
by hand using a clean, spirit-free cloth
using a suitable degreasing agent.
| 63
Risk of Personal Injury and
Material Damage!
Compared to adults, children and juveniles often use their bicycles in a way that
damages the material and parts more
quickly.
•
Take frequently used bicycles of children
and juveniles to a specialist workshop for
inspection every 6 months.
•
If you discover damages on your bicycle for
children or juveniles, immediately take it to
a specialist workshop for inspection.
64 |
MTB/ Road bike/ Trekking
Servicing schedule:
Have servicing carried out at intervals prescribed only in a specialist workshop authorised by
the manufacturer.
Nature of inspection
Normal use
Frequent sport, competition or use
of a competitive nature
1. Inspection
after 200 km or 2 months whichever
is sooner
after 100 km or 1 month whichever is
sooner
Subsequent inspections
every 2000 km or 1 x per annum
every 500 km or every 2 months
Check brake pads/brake blocks
every 400 km
every 100 km
Check brake disks
every 400 km
every 100 km
Check chain wear
every 500 km
every 250 km
Check the rear suspension bearing for full-suspension frames
incl. checks/relubricating the
roller bearing on the shock
absorber (if applicable)
Every 500 km or once a year
Every 250 km or every two months
Replace handlebars and stem
after a crash (see Chapter 10)
after a crash (see Chapter 10)
as indicated by component manuas indicated by component manu-facfacturer or every 5 years at the latest turer or every 2 years at the latest
Under unfavourable conditions your chain can wear rapidly. Changing it early will extend
the life of your sprockets.
MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
13 Storing your bike for a lengthy period
14 Warranty and Guarantee
14.1Warranty
For our bikes, the statutory warranty
regulations apply. Your contact for all
warranty claims is with the dealers where
the product was purchased.
Danger of material damage!
Incorrect storage of a bike can damage
bearings and tyres and promote corrosion.
•
Please observe the following instructions.
1.
Clean and maintain your bike as described in Chapter 12.
2.
Only store your bike in dry and dust-free
premises.
3.
Use suitable bike stands (e.g. tripod, wall
hooks). Please consult your dealer.
4.
Stand your bike with one or both wheels
on the floor
•
Lift your bike every 2-3 weeks and spin your
wheels a couple of turns.
•
Operate the handlebars back and forwards a
couple of times.
•
urn the crank by hand a couple of revolutions against the direction of drive.
•
When using again carry out a check as
described in Chapter 7.
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14.2 Frame Guarantee
To clarify the applicable warranty period
and the guarantee of our products,
please contact the dealer from whom you
purchased the product. This information
can also be found on our website (see
Contacts).
14.3 Frame Guarantee conditions
The claim relates only to the frame layout
and not to paint and decor.
The claim relates only to the frame structure and not to paint and decor.
•
when defects or damages result from the
fact that the requirements of this manual
have not been met or followed.
•
In case of defects and damage due to force
majeure, accident, improper use, incorrect
repairs, lack of maintenance / cleaning or
normal wear and tear.
•
for complaints that are attributed to the fact
that you have changed parts or other items
not specified in the instruction manual or
original spare parts approved by us.
•
changes to the bike without the prior consent of the manufacturer. If a frame of the
same type is no longer available, we reserve
the right to supply a replacement part,
which may differ in shape and color from the
original frame or part. A claim for delivery of
the goods of the same type of goods does
not exist.
15 Handover inspection
checklist
Inspecting the brake
Laying of brake cables/lines
Adjustment of the hand brake lever
Adjustment of the brake pads
Visual tightness test of the hydraulic brake systems
Checking all fastening screws in the brake
system
The functioning and response of the front and
rear wheel brakes
Inspecting the gearshift:
Laying the hub cable and shift cable
Adjustment of the gear lever or gearshifter
Adjustment of the end stops (derailleur/switchgear)
Adjustment of the cable tension
Functioning and freedom of movement of the
gearshift
Checking all fastening screws in the
gearshift system
Inspecting the chassis:
Basic functions and tightness of the front fork
Basic functions and tightness of the suspension
strut, adjustment/freedom of movement of the
steering head bearing, checking all fastening
screws of the chassis components
Inspecting all screw connections in the chainstays
Inspecting the wheels:
Concentricity and centring of the wheel rims,
concentricity and position of the cover
Testing the spoke tension / air and tyre pressure
Correct installation and fixed position of the
wheels
Other inspections:
Adjustment and fixed position of the handlebars
and handlebar stem, fixed position of the crank
arm an
Adjustment and fixed position of the saddle and
seatpost, fixed position of the handles
Fixed position of the assembly rivet of the chain
Functioning of lights for TK
Adjustment and fixed position of the carrier,
mudguards and kickstands for TK
Assembly and fixed position of other attachment parts
When handing over the bicycle:
The purchased object was handed over in a
complete and perfect condition including the
operating manual.
Verbal instructions were given on the safe use of
the bicycle, particularly operating guidelines for
the disc brakes – if applicable.
Reference was made to the respective instructions in the operating manual which are to be
observed.
Reference was made to the warranty obligations
in the CUBE operating manual.
After inspecting these items, please check off!
Comments:
Place, date:
Retailer signature:
Purchaser signature (legal guardian for children under 18 years of age)
Händler / Verkäufer:
Retailer/seller:
Telefon:
Telephone:
PLZ / Ort:
Post code/city:
Straße:
Street
Vorname:
Surname:
Nachname:
Name:
Kunde / Käufer:
Customer/purchaser
E-Mail:
Telefon / Fax:
Telephone/fax:
Land:
Country:
PLZ / Ort:
Post code/city:
Straße:
Street:
Firma:
Company:
Name Verkäufer:
Name of retailer:
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MTB/ ROAD bike/ Trekking
The Original should remain in the Handbook
Das Fahrrad wurde endmontiert von:
The bicycle is finally assembled by:
und wird in einem fahrbereiten Zustand übergeben.
and will be hand out in a roadworthy condition.
Ort
location
Datum
date
Stempel/ stamp
Unterschrift des Händlers/ Signature of the dealer
Das Original verbleibt in dieser Bedienungsanleitung