FCC INFORMATION (U.S.A.)
1. IMPORTANT NOTICE: DO NOT MODIFY THIS UNIT!
This product, when installed as indicated in the instructions contained in this manual, meets FCC requirements. Modifications not expressly approved
by Yamaha may void your authority, granted by the FCC, to use the product.
2. IMPORTANT: When connecting this product to accessories and/or another product use only high quality shielded cables. Cable/s supplied with this
product MUST be used. Follow all installation instructions. Failure to follow instructions could void your FCC authorization to use this product in the
USA.
3. NOTE: This product has been tested and found to comply with the requirements listed in FCC Regulations, Part 15 for Class ”B” digital devices.
Compliance with these requirements provides a reasonable level of assurance that your use of this product in a residential environment will not
result in harmful interference with other electronic devices. This equipment generates/uses radio frequencies and, if not installed and used according
to the instructions found in the users manual, may cause interference harmful to the operation of other electronic devices. Compliance with FCC
regulations does not guarantee that interference will not occur in all installations. If this product is found to be the source of interference, which can
be determined by turning the unit ”OFF” and ”ON”, please try to eliminate the problem by using one of the following measures:
Relocate either this product or the device that is being affected by the interference.
Utilize power outlets that are on different branch (circuit breaker or fuse) circuits or install AC line filter/s.
In the case of radio or TV interference, relocate/reorient the antenna. If the antenna lead-in is 300 ohm ribbon lead, change the lead-in to co-axial type
cable.
If these corrective measures do not produce satisfactory results, please contact the local retailer authorized to distribute this type of product. If you
can not locate the appropriate retailer, please contact Yamaha Corporation of America, Electronic Service Division, 6600 Orangethorpe Ave, Buena
Park, CA 90620
The above statements apply ONLY to those products distributed by Yamaha Corporation of America or its subsidiaries.
* This applies only to products distributed by YAMAHA CORPORATION OF AMERICA.
Dette apparat overholder det gaeldende EF-direktiv
vedrørende radiostøj.
Cet appareil est conforme aux prescriptions de la
directive communautaire 87/308/CEE.
Diese Geräte entsprechen der EG-Richtlinie 82/
499/EWG und/oder 87/308/EWG.
This product complies with the radio frequency
interference requirements of the Council Directive 82/499/EEC and/or 87/308/EEC.
Questo apparecchio è conforme al D.M.13 aprile
1989 (Direttiva CEE/87/308) sulla soppressione
dei radiodisturbi.
Este producto está de acuerdo con los requisitos
sobre interferencias de radio frequencia fijados
por el Consejo Directivo 87/308/CEE.
YAMAHA CORPORATION
IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
Connecting the Plug and Cord
IMPORTANT: The wires in this mains lead are coloured in accordance with the following code:
GREEN-AND-YELLOW
BLUE
BROWN
:
:
:
EARTH
NEUTRAL
LIVE
As the colours of the wires in the mains lead of this apparatus may not correspond with the coloured
markings identifying the terminals in your plug, proceed as follows:
The wire which is coloured GREEN and YELLOW must be connected to the terminal in the plug
which is marked by the letter E or by the safety earth symbol or coloured GREEN and YELLOW.
The wire which is coloured BLUE must be connected to the terminal which is marked with the letter
N or coloured BLACK.
The wire which is coloured BROWN must be connected to the terminal which is marked with the
letter L or coloured RED.
* This applies only to products distributed by YAMAHA - KEMBLE MUSIC (U.K.) LTD.
Bescheinigung des Importeurs
Litiumbatteri!
Bör endast bytas av servicepersonal.
Explosionsfara vid felaktig hantering.
Hiermit wird bescheinigt, daß der/die/das
Virtual Acoustic Synthesizer Typ : VL7
(Gerät, Typ, Bezeichnung)
VAROITUS!
Lithiumparisto, Räjähdysvaara.
Pariston saa vaihtaa ainoastaan alan
ammattimies.
in Übereinstimmung mit den Bestimmungen der
VERFÜGUNG 1046/84
(Amtsblattverfügung)
funk-entstört ist.
ADVARSEL!
Lithiumbatteri!
Eksplosionsfare. Udskiftning må kun foretages
af en sagkyndig, – og som beskrevet i
servicemanualen.
Der Deutschen Bundespost wurde das Inverkehrbringen dieses
Gerätes angezeigt und die Berechtigung zur Überprüfung der Serie
auf Einhaltung der Bestimmungen eingeräumt.
Yamaha Europa GmbH
Name des Importeurs
* Dies bezieht sich nur auf die von der Yamaha Europa GmbH vertriebenen Produkte.
SPECIAL MESSAGE SECTION
PRODUCT SAFETY MARKINGS: Yamaha electronic products may have either labels similar to the graphics shown
below or molded/stamped facsimiles of these graphics on the
enclosure. The explanation of these graphics appears on this
page. Please observe all cautions indicated on this page and
those indicated in the safety instruction section.
CAUTION
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT OPEN
CAUTION: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF
ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT REMOVE
COVER (OR BACK). NO USER-SERVICEABLE
PARTS INSIDE. REFER SERVICING TO
QUALIFIED SERVICE PERSONNEL
● Explanation of Graphical Symbols
The exclamation point within the equilateral
triangle is intended to alert the user to the
presence of important operating and maintenance (servicing) instructions in the literature accompanying the product.
The lightning flash with arrowhead symbol
within the equilateral triangle is intended to
alert the user to the presence of uninsulated
“dangerous voltage” within the product’s
enclosure that may be of sufficient magnitude to constitute a risk of electrical shock.
methods used to produce them, meet these goals. In keeping
with both the letter and the spirit of the law, we want you to
be aware of the following:
Battery Notice: This product MAY contain a small nonrechargeable battery which (if applicable) is soldered in place.
The average life span of this type of battery is approximately
five years. When replacement becomes neccessary, contact a
qualified service representative to perform the replacement.
Warning: Do not attempt to recharge, disassemble, or incinerate this type of battery. Keep all batteries away from
children. Dispose of used batteries promptly and as regulated
by applicable laws. Note: In some areas, the servicer is
required by law to return the defective parts. However, you
do have the option of having the servicer dispose of these
parts for you.
Disposal Notice: Should this product become damaged beyond repair, or for some reason its useful life is considered
to be at an end, please observe all local, state, and federal
regulations that relate to the disposal of products that contain
lead, batteries, plastics, etc.
NOTICE: Service charges incurred due to lack of knowledge
relating to how a function or effect works (when the unit is
operating as designed) are not covered by the manufacturer’s
warranty, and are therefore the owners responsibility. Please
study this manual carefully and consult your dealer before
requesting service.
NAME PLATE LOCATION: The graphic below indicates
the location of the name plate. The model number, serial
number, power requirements, etc., are located on this plate.
You should record the model number, serial nunber, and the
date of purchase in the spaces provided below and retain this
manual as a permanent record of your purchase.
IMPORTANT NOTICE: All Yamaha electronic products are
tested and approvend by an independent safety testing laboratory in order that you may be sure that when it is properly
installed and used in its normal and customary manner, all
foreseeable risks have been eliminated. DO NOT modify this
unit or commission others to do so unless specifically authorized by Yamaha. Product performance and/or safety standards
may be diminished. Claims filed under the expressed warranty
may be denied if the unit is/has been modified. Implied
warranties may also be affected.
SPECFICATIONS SUBJECT TO CHANGE: The information contained in this manual is believed to be correct at the
time of printing. However, Yamaha reserves the right to
change or modify any of the specifications without notice or
obligation to update existing units.
YAMAHAMODELVL7
ACINLET
92-469 q
OUT
IN
2
1
FOOT CONTROLLER
2
1
CAUTION
ATTENTION
WARNING
Model
Serial No.
ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES: Yamaha strives to produce
products that are both user safe and environmentally friendly.
We sincerely believe that our products and the production
FOOT SWITCH
MIDI
THRU
POWER
ON /
OFF
Purchase Date
OUTPUT
R
L
IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
INFORMATION RELATING TO PERSONAL INJURY, ELECTRICAL SHOCK,
AND FIER HAZARD POSSIBILITIES HAS BEEN INCLUDED IN THIS LIST.
WARNING — When using any electrical or electronic product, basic precautions should always be followed. These
precautions include, but are not limited to, the following:
1.
2.
3.
Read all Safety Instructions, Installation Instructions, Special Message Section items, and any Assembly Instructions found in this manual BEFORE making any connections, including connection to the main supply.
Main Power Suplly Verifications: Yamaha products are
manufactured specifically for the supply voltage in the
area where they are to be sold. If you should move, or if
any doubt exists about the supply voltage in your area,
please contact your dealer for supply voltage verification
and (if applicable) instructions. The required supply voltage is printed on the name plate. For name plate location,
please refer to the graphic found in the Special Message
Section of this manual.
This product may be equipped with a polarized plug (one
blade wider than the other). If you are unable to insert the
plug into the outlet, turn the plug over and try again. If the
problem persists, contact electrician to have the obsolete
outlet replaced. Do NOT defeat the safety purpose of the
plug.
4.
Some electronic products utilize external power supplies
or adapters. DO NOT connect this type of product to any
power supply or adapter other than one described in the
owners manual, on the name plate, or specifically recommended by Yamaha.
5.
WARNING: Do not place this product or any other objects
on the power cord or place it in a position where anyone
could walk on, trip over, or roll anything over power or
connecting cords of any kind. The use of an extension cord
is not recommended! If you must use an extension cord,
the minimume wire size for a 25' cord (or less) is 18 AWG.
NOTE: The smaller the AWG number, the larger the
current handling capacity. For longer extension cords,
consult a local electrician.
6.
7.
Ventilation: Electronic products, unless specifically designed for enclosed installations, should be placed in
locations that do not interfere with proper ventilation. If
instructions for enclosed installations are not provided, it
must be assumed that unobstructed ventilation is required.
Temperature considerations: Electronic products should be
installed in locations that do not significantly contribute to
their operating temperature. Placement of this product
close to heat sources such as; radiators, heat registers and
other devices that produce heat should be avoided.
8.
This product was NOT designed for use in wet/damp
locations and should not be used near water or exposed to
rain. Examples of wet/damp locations are; near a swimming pool, spa, tub, sink, or wet basement.
9.
This product should be used only with the components
supplied or; a cart, rack, or stand that is recommended by
the manufacturer. If a cart, rack, or stand is used, please
observe all safety markings and instructions that accompany the accessory product.
10.The
power supply cord (plug) should be disconnected
from the outlet when electronic products are to be left
unused for extended periods of time. Cords should also be
disconnected when there is a high probability of lightening
and/or electrical storm activity.
11.Care
should be taken that objects do not fall and liquids
are not spilled into the enclosure through any openings
that may exist.
12.Electrical/electronic
products should be serviced by a
qualified service person when:
a. The power supply cord has been damaged; or
b. Objects have fallen, been inserted, or liquids have been
spilled into the enclosure through openings; or
c. The product has been exposed to rain; or
d. The product does not operate, exhibits a marked change
in performance; or
e. The product has been dropped, or the enclosure of the
product has been damaged.
13.Do
not attempt to service this product beyond that described in the user-maintenance instructions. All other
servicing should be referred to qualified service personnel.
14.This
product, either alone or in combination with an
amplifier and headphones or speaker/s, may be capable of
producing sound levels that could cause permanent hearing loss. DO NOT operate for a long period of time at a
high volume level or at a level that is uncomfortable. If
you experience any hearing loss or ringing in the cars, you
should cousult an audiologist. IMPORTANT: The louder
the sound, the shorter the time period before damage
occurs.
15.Some
Yamaha products may have benches and/or accessory mounting fixtures that are either supplied as a part of
the product or as optional accessories. Some of these items
are designed to be dealer assembled or installed. Please
make sure that benches are stable and any optional fixtures
(where applicable) are well secured BEFORE using. Benches
supplied by Yamaha are designed for seating only. No
other uses are recommended.
PLEASE KEEP THIS MANUAL
92-469-3
Feature Reference
Owner’s Manual 2
Feature Reference
Contents
About the Manuals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ The Getting Started Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ The Feature Reference Manual (this manual) .
■ Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
4
5
5
3: Feedback Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Mono Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• L,R Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• L,C,R Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 4:Reverberation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Hall1, Hall2, Room1, Room2, Studio,
Plate, Space, Reverse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Element Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 1: Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 2: Embouchure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 3: Pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 4: Vibrato . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 5: Tonguing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 6: Amplitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 7: Scream . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 8: Breath Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 9: Growl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 10: Throat Formant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 11: Dynamic Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 12; Harmonic Enhancer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 13: Damping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 14: Absorption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ Controller Search & Replace . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Element Miscellaneous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 1: Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 2: Breath Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• 2-1: Breath Noise Level Key Scaling . .
• 2-2: Breath Noise HPF Key Scaling . . .
• 2-3: Breath Noise LPF Key Scaling . . . .
■ 3: Throat Formant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• 3-1: Throat Formant Pitch Key Scaling .
• 3-2: Throat Formant Amount Key
Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• 3-3: Throat Formant Intensity Key
Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• 3-4: Throat Formant HPF Key Scaling .
• 3-5: Throat Formant LPF Key Scaling .
■
General Operation
■
■
■
■
The Three Main Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Finding Functions & Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Other Navigation Aids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Selecting & Editing Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Play Mode
■
■
■
■
The Main Play Mode Display . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Voice Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controller Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Quick Editing In the Play Mode . . . . . . . . . . .
14
15
17
19
Edit Mode
The Voice Number Buttons In the Edit Mode
The Edit Compare Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ The Copy Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ Storing Edited Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Initial Edit Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Common Miscellanous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 1: Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 2: Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 3: Element Pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 4: Element Level & Pan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 5: Portamento . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 6: Micro Tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 7: Continuous Slider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Common Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 1: Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 2: Modulation Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Flanger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Pitch Change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Distortion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■
■
22
23
24
27
30
32
33
34
35
36
38
39
40
42
43
44
45
47
49
2
51
51
53
55
58
59
62
63
64
65
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
75
76
78
79
80
82
83
84
86
87
88
89
91
92
93
94
95
Feature Reference
4: Mixing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
• 4-1: Mixing Driver Output Key Scaling 98
• 4-2: Mixing Pipe/String Output Key
Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
• 4-3: Mixing Tap Output Key Scaling . 100
• 4-4: Mixing Tap Location Key Scaling 101
■ 5: Amplitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
• 5-1: Amplitude Level Key Scaling . . . . 102
Element Modifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
■ 1: Harmonic Enhancer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
•1-1: Harmonic Enhancer HPF Key
Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
•1-2: Harmonic Enhancer Overdrive Key
Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
• 1-3: Harmonic Enhancer Carrier Level
Key Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
• 1-4: Harmonic Enhancer Modulator
Index Key Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
• 1-5: Harmonic Enhancer Balance Key
Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
■ 2: Dynamic Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
• 2-1: Dynamic Filter Cutoff Key Scaling 115
• 2-2: Dynamic Filter Resonance Key
Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
■ 3: Equalizer Auxiliary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
• 3-1: Equalizer Auxiliary HPF Key
Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
• 3-2: Equalizer Auxiliary LPF Key
Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
■ 4: Equlizer Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
■ 5: Impulse Expander & Resonator Setting . . 121
■ 6: Impulse Expander . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
■ 7: Resonator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Element Envelope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
■ 1: Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
■ 2: Embouchure & Pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
• 2-1: Embouchure & Pitch Hold Time
Key Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
• 2-2: Embouchure & Pitch Initial Level
Key Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
• 2-3: Embouchure & Pitch Decay Rate
Key Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
■ 3: Vibrato . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
• 3-1: Vibrato Delay Time Key Scaling . 135
• 3-2: Vibrato Attack Rate Key Scaling . 136
• 3-3: Vibrato Depth Key Scaling . . . . . . 137
• 3-4: Vibrato Speed Key Scaling . . . . . . 138
■
■
■
4: Growl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• 4-1: Growl Speed Key Scaling . . . . . . .
5: Amplitude & Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• 5-1: Amplitude & Filter Attack Rate
Key Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• 5-2: Amplitude & Filter Attack 1 Level
Key Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• 5-3: Amplitude & Filter Decay Rate
Key Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• 5-4: Amplitude & Filter Sustain Level
Key Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• 5-5: Amplitude & Filter Release Rate
Key Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
139
140
141
144
145
146
147
148
Utility Mode
System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
■ 1: KBD Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
■ 2: TG Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
■ 3: MIDI Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
■ 4: Assignable Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
■ 5: Curve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
■ 6: Miscellaneous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
MIDI Bulk Dump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
■ 1: Disk Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
■ 2: Load From Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
■ 3: Save To Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
■ 4: Rename File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
■ 5: Delete File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
■ 6: Format Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Edit Recall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Demo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Appendix
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
178
182
184
186
Feature Reference
About the Manuals
The VL7 comes with two manuals — Getting Started and Feature
Reference. If you’re just starting out with the VL7 we urge you to begin
with the Getting Started manual since it describes basic concepts and
procedures that are essential to proper operation of the VL7.
The Getting Started Manual
The Getting Started manual contains seven chapters that take you through
essential information and procedures you will need to know to become familiar
with your VL7:
1. VL7 Basics [≥
Page 8]
Basic concepts you’ll need to understand in order to get the
most out of the VL7.
Page 16]
2. The Controls & Connectors [≥
Brief descriptions of the VL7 controls and connectors, and their
functions.
3. Setting Up [≥
Page 22]
System connections, powering up, playing the demo, calibrating
the Breath Controller, and loading the pre-programmed voices.
4. Voice Selection [≥
Page 34]
Several ways to select and play the VL7’s 64 voices.
5. The Controllers [≥
Page 38]
The VL7 controllers and how they can be assigned and edited
for optimum control.
6. Mixing & The Modifiers [≥
Page 48]
Customizing the sound to suit your own personal needs.
7. Effects [≥
Page 58]
An overview of the built-in digital effects that you can use to
add depth and ambience to the VL7 sound.
We recommend that you go through the chapters in sequence and actually
try out the various operations described. Once you’ve gone through the entire
Getting Started manual in this way, you should be familiar enough with the VL7
to need only the VL7 Feature Reference manual in future.
4
Feature Reference
The Feature Reference Manual
(this manual)
The Feature Reference manual is the “nuts and bolts” reference for
the VL7, individually describing its many functions in detail. The Feature
Reference manual is divided into five main sections, each describing the
various functions within a particular VL7 edit or utility mode.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Page 7]
General Operation [≥
Play Mode [≥
Page 13]
Edit Mode [≥
Page 21]
Page 149]
Utility Mode [≥
Appendix [≥
Page 177]
Once you have become familiar with the way the VL7 works by
going through the Getting Started manual, you should only need to refer
to the Feature Reference manual from time to time to get details on functions you’ve never used before, or refresh your memory about functions
that you don’t use very often.
Each section of the Feature Reference manual has its own table of
contents, so you should be able to locate any particular function quickly
and easily. Functions and references can also be located by referring to the
index at the back of the manual.
Conventions
The following conventions are used through the VL7 manuals to
avoid confusion and make the text easier to read.
Buttons & Controls
Button and control names used on the VL7 panel appear in the text
in capital letters within a border: “the [ button”, for example.
Parameter Names
Parameter names and other labels which appear on the VL7 display
are printed in the courier typeface for easier identification: for
example, “adjust the “Balance” parameter as required”.
Parameter Ranges
An ellipsis is used to indicate a range of parameter values: e.g. “0
… 127”. This minimizes the confusion sometimes caused by the use
of a hyphen or dash for this purpose.
5
Feature Reference
6
General Operation
The VL7 makes operation as easy as possible
by providing a consistent, logical control interface via
which its many functions and parameters can be
accessed and edited. Once you become familiar with
the system, operation should be smooth, efficient, and
easy.
●
●
●
●
The Three Main Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Finding Functions & Parameters . . . . . 9
Other Navigation Aids . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Selecting & Editing Parameters . . . . . 12
Feature Reference
●
General Operation
The Three Main Modes
The VL7 has three main modes: PLAY, EDIT, and UTILITY. Each of these modes
can be directly accessed by pressing the P, E, or U button, respectively.
PLAY
The PLAY mode is the one you use to select and play the VL7 voices.
The PLAY mode also includes several “Controller Views” that allow you
to check controller assignments, the status of several important
performance parameters, and the continuous slider assignments.
≥
Pages 13 through 19.
EDIT
All voice editing functions are accessed via the EDIT mode: controller
assignments, mixing, modifiers, effects, and more.
≥
Pages 21 through 148.
UTILITY
The UTILITY mode includes a range of functions that affect overall
operation of the VL7 rather than individual voices. For example: master
tuning, MIDI settings, disk operations, etc.
≥
Pages 149 through 176.
8
Feature Reference
●
General Operation
Finding Functions & Parameters
To facilitate access to the many functions provided, the EDIT and UTILITY mode
functions are organized into logical groups arranged in a hierarchical structure (the PLAY
mode is simple enough that it doesn’t require this type of structure). The basic structure
of the EDIT mode, for example, looks like this:
EDIT MODE
COMMON
MISCELLANEOUS
EFFECT
ELEMENT
CONTROLLER
MISCELLANEOUS
MODIFIER
ENVELOPE
Here you can see that the EDIT mode functions are divided into two main groups:
COMMON and ELEMENT, and that these are further sub-divided into related groups of
functions. The COMMON EFFECT group, for example, includes all the effect parameters
(flange, reverb, etc.) that apply to the entire voice. Here’s how you would access the
reverb parameters, starting from the PLAY mode:
● Example: Locate the Effect Reverb Parameters
1. Press E
Pressing the E button from the PLAY or UTILITY mode will normally take
you to the initial EDIT display page (if the current voice has already been edited but not
stored, you will automatically return to the last EDIT mode page that was selected).
2. Press ¡ (“COM”)
Since you want the effect functions, which are in the common group, press the ¡
function button (immediately below “COM” on the display).
9
Feature Reference
●
General Operation
3. If Necessary, Press ™ (“Efct”)
If the miscellaneous directory is showing (in this case “Misc” above the ¡ button
will be highlighted), press the ™ button below “Efct” on the display to select the
effect directory.
4. Move the Cursor To “4:Reverberation” and Press [
Use the cursor buttons (or the - and = buttons, or the data dial)
to move the cursor to “4:Reverberation” and press the [ button. This will
take you to the first page of reverb parameters.
NOTES ■ Notice that the top line of the display shows the “path” to the current
level or function: “EDIT/COM/EFFECT/REVERBERATION”.
This example illustrates the two methods used to move downward through the EDIT
mode levels: 1) press the appropriate function button and 2) move the cursor to the
desired selection and press [.
From any point within the structure you can move upward toward the topmost level
(in this case the initial EDIT mode display) by pressing the ] button. You move up
one level each time the ] button is pressed, until the topmost level is reached.
To exit from the EDIT mode itself you must press either the P or U
button, depending on the mode you want to switch to. You can exit from the EDIT mode
at any level by doing this, and you will be returned automatically to the same display
page the next time you press the E button as long as the voice being edited is not
stored or a new voices is not selected.
10
Feature Reference
●
General Operation
Other Navigation Aids
In addition to the standard procedures described in the previous section, the VL7
sometimes provides additional help in moving between related functions via the function
buttons.
In this example display page from the ELEMENT CONTROLLER group, “Bpag”
(back page) and “Fpag” (forward page) appear above the § and ¶ function buttons.
In this case these buttons can be used to move forward and backward through the entire
list of controller functions so you don’t have to move up to the function directory and
then down to the next function every time you want to select a different element controller page.
Also note the “Para” (Parameter) abbreviation above the • button. This enables
you to go directly to the parameters related to the current page: in this case the vibrato
parameters.
From here you can go back to the vibrato controller page by pressing the •
function button again (note that it is now labelled “Ctrl”), or to the vibrato key scaling
parameters by pressing ¶, below “KSC” on the display.
Another variation appears in the COMMON EFFECT parameter displays. In most
cases the number of parameters available for each effect exceeds the capacity of the
display, so the ¡ and ™ function buttons are used to scroll up and down the parameter
list — note the “>” and “<” arrows above the buttons in the display.
11
Feature Reference
●
General Operation
Selecting & Editing Parameters
Once you’ve locate the display page that contains the parameter(s) you want to edit,
simply use the cursor buttons to move the cursor to the parameter, and then use the data
dial or the = and - buttons to set the parameter as required. The data dial is ideal
for quickly covering a large range of settings, while the = and - buttons are best
for small stepwise changes.
12
Play Mode
The primary function of the PLAY mode is to
allow you to select and play voices. The VL7 play
mode additionally offers a range of controller views
that let you check controller assignments, and simple
“quick edit” capability. Select the PLAY mode from
either the EDIT or UTILITY mode by pressing the
P button.
●
●
●
●
The Main Play Mode Display . . . . . . .
Voice Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controller Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Quick Editing In the Play Mode . . . . .
14
15
17
19
Feature Reference
●
Play Mode
The Main Play Mode Display
When you select the PLAY mode by pressing the P button, the main PLAY
mode display will appear. This display includes a considerable amount of information in
addition to the name of the currently selected voice.
■ The Normal Voice Display
Voice name.
Voice number.
Play mode.
Reverb on or off.
Stereo output mode.
Element name.
Effects in use.
Assign mode.
The abbreviations in the section separated by a line at the bottom of the display
(“Cnt1”, “Cnt2”, etc) indicate the functions of the corresponding function buttons
below the display (described below).
14
Feature Reference
●
Play Mode
Voice Selection
The VL7’s 64 voices are organized into 4 banks of 16 voices each (4 x 16 = 64).
Any voice can be selected by specifying its bank using the bank buttons (a through
d), and its number using the voice number buttons (1 through ^).
To select voice “A7”, for example, first press the bank a button and then the
voice number 7 button. The bank a button indicator will flash until the voice number
7 button is pressed and the A7 voice is actually engaged.
A
B
C
D
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
ALL
MOD
FBD
REV
EFFECT ON / OFF
9
10
ALL
HE
11
12
13
14
DF
EQ
IE
RSN
15
16
MODIFIER ON / OFF
Note that when you select a different bank (or press the same bank button)
the voice directory for the selected bank will appear on the display, showing the names
of all voices in that bank with the cursor located at the currently selected voice number.
The VL7 returns to the normal voice display as soon as you specify the voice number.
You can also press the [ button if you want to stay with the same voice number.
To select a different voice within the same bank it is only necessary to press the
appropriate voice number button. To select a different bank, however, you’ll always have
to press both a bank button and a voice number button (or the [ button). This
prevents unwanted voices from being selected until you’ve actually specified both the
bank and number of the voice you want to use.
15
Feature Reference
●
Play Mode
Alternate Voice Selection Methods
● = and - Buttons
DEC
These are best for small, step-wise changes —
e.g. selecting adjacent voice numbers, or
numbers that are only a few steps away. Press
the = or - button briefly to decrement
or increment the voice number by one, or hold
either button for continuous decrementing or
incrementing in the corresponding direction.
Extra-fast increment or decrement operation
can be achieved by pressing the opposite
button while holding either the - or =
button. The bank will switch automatically if
you cross a bank voice-number boundary.
INC
● Data Dial
The data dial provides a fast, efficient way to
cover a broad range of voice numbers when,
for example, you’re looking for a voice but
don’t know the voice number. Simply rotate
the data dial clockwise for higher voice
numbers or counter-clockwise for lower voice
numbers while watching the display. The
banks are automatically switched when necessary as the voice numbers are changed.
● Using the Voice Directory
Although the voice directory appears automatically any time you select a bank, you
can have the directory displayed continuously if you find it more convenient than the
normal voice display. To switch to the voice directory display, press the • button —
located directly below “Dir” on the display. Voices are selected using the same methods
described above, and the cursor will move to the selected voice.
To return to the normal voice display press the ] or P button.
16
Feature Reference
●
Play Mode
Controller Views
In the PLAY mode, function buttons ¡ (“Cnt1”) through § (“CS”) are used to
select “controller view” displays that list all controller assignments for the currently
selected voice. You can press the ] or P button from any controller view to
return to the normal play-mode display.
● ¡ (“Cnt1”) through ¢ (“Cnt4”): Main Controllers
¡ through ¢ display the assignments for the controller parameters.
¡
(“Cnt1”)
Pressure
≥
Page 63.
Embouchure
≥
Page 64.
Pitch
≥
Page 65.
Vibrato
≥
Page 67.
Tounguing
≥
Page 68.
Amplitude
≥
Page 69.
Scream
≥
Page 70.
Breath Noise
≥
Page 71.
Growl
≥
Page 72.
Throat Formant
≥
Page 73.
Dynamic Filter
≥
Page 75.
Harmonic Enhancer ≥
Page 76.
™
(“Cnt2”)
£
(“Cnt3”)
17
Feature Reference
●
Play Mode
¢
(“Cnt4”)
Damping
≥
Page 78.
Absorption
≥
Page 79.
The controller parameters are listed in the left column of the controller view display, and the controllers assigned to them are listed in the right column.
●∞
(“Cnt5”): Other Controller Settings
If you press the ∞
controller view:
function button from the play mode you’ll see the following
Sustain
≥
Page 33.
Portamento
≥
Page 38.
Effect Control
≥
Page 42.
The controller parameters listed in this screen are not in the same category as those
discussed in the preceding section, and therefore need to be introduced separately. All of
the related parameters will be discussed in detail in the Feature Reference manual (pages
listed below displays, above).
18
Feature Reference
●
Play Mode
● § (“CS”): Continuous Sliders
The § function button calls the Continuous Slider (“CS”) controller view, which
will look something like this:
The continuous sliders — – and ≠
— can be independently assigned to
several parameters that you can control in real time while playing (also see “Quick
Editing In the Play Mode”, below). The parameters available for editing via the continuous sliders are individually preset for each voice. You can select from the available range
by using the “Continuous Slider” assignment function (≥
Page 40).
The continuous slider view shows you which parameters are assigned to which
controller as well as the current positions of the controllers and parameter values.
Quick Editing In the Play Mode
Although detailed voice editing is carried out in the EDIT mode, the – and ≠
sliders on the VL7 panel can be used to change the assigned parameters in real time
while playing in the PLAY mode. This can be used simply an expressive tool, or as a
way to actually change the sound of the voice to suit your individual musical requirements. Since the – and ≠
sliders actually edit the parameters to which they are
assigned, the “new” voice created by using the sliders can be stored to one of the VL7’s
voice memory locations and used just as if it had been edited in the EDIT mode (≥
the
STORE operation is described on page 27). The parameters available for editing via the
– and ≠
sliders are individually preset for each voice. You can select from the
available range by using the “Continuous Slider” assignment function (≥
Page 40).
19
Feature Reference
20
●
Play Mode
Edit Mode
All voice editing functions are accessed via the
EDIT mode: controller assignments, mixing, modifiers, effects, and more.
The Voice Number Buttons
In the Edit Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
● The Edit Compare Function . . . . . 23
● The Copy Function . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
● Storing Edited Data . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Initial Edit Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Common Miscellanous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Common Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Element Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Element Miscellaneous . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Element Modifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Element Envelope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
●
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
The Voice Number Buttons In the Edit Mode
In the EDIT mode, the voice number buttons assume the functions listed in purple
below the buttons.
● Effect On/Off
5
6
7
8
ALL
MOD
FBD
REV
EFFECT ON / OFF
The VL7’s internal digital signal processor provides three effect stages: Modulation,
Feedback Delay, and Reverb. Each stage includes a number of effects. The Modulation,
Feedback Delay, and Reverb stages can be used simultaneously, but only one of the
effects available in each stage can be used at a time.The EXTERNAL EFFECT ON/OFF
buttons can be used to individually or simultaneously turn these effects on of off. The
current status of the effect stages is shown by the indicators above the MOD, FBD, and
REV buttons.
ALL
Alternately turns all three effect stages on or off.
MOD
Alternately turns the Modulation effect stage on or off.
≥
Page 44.
FBD
Alternately turns the Feedback Delay effect stage on or off.
≥
Page 51.
REV
Alternately turns the Reverb effect stage on or off.
≥
Page 58.
● Modifier On/Off
9
10
ALL
HE
11
12
13
14
DF
EQ
IE
RSN
MODIFIER ON / OFF
These buttons independently or simultaneously turn the VL7’s modifier stages on or
off. This allows fast on/off comparisons that make it easy to hear even subtle changes
produced by editing the modifier parameters.
ALL
Alternately turns all five modifier stages on or off.
HE
Alternately turns the Harmonic Enhancer stage on or off.
≥
Page 105.
DF
Alternately turns the Dynamic Filter stage on or off.
≥
Page 113.
EQ
Alternately turns the Frequency Equalizer stage on or off.
≥
Page 117.
IE
Alternately turns the Impulse Expander stage on or off.
≥
Page 121.
RSN
Alternately turns the Resonator stage on or off.
≥
Page 124.
22
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
The Edit Compare Function
When editing a voice in the EDIT mode, a copy of the original voice is retained in
the VL7 “edit buffer”, allowing the edited voice to be compared with the edited version
by using the “Edit Compare” function.
The Edit Compare function is engaged by pressing the E button while in the
EDIT mode (after making at least one change to the voice data). When the Edit Compare
mode is engaged the E indicator will flash, the inverse “E”(´) before the voice
number will disappear, and the sound of the original (pre-edit) voice can be monitored.
Press the E button again to return to the EDIT mode and the edited version of the
voice. You can toggle back and forth between the edited and original voices while editing
to monitor the effect of changes you make to the voices parameters.
NOTES ■ Editing can not be carried out while the Edit Compare function is
engaged.
23
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
The Copy Function
The copy function makes it possible to copy common or element data from any
specified voice to the current voice. You can copy all common or element data, or only
the data from a specified group of functions or a single function. It is also possible to
copy the original (pre-edit) data from the voice being edited to restore the specified data
to its original values.
● Procedure
1.
Specify the Data You Want To Copy
In the EDIT mode select the display page and function corresponding to the data
you want to copy:
•
To copy all common data, go to the initial EDIT mode display and move the
cursor to the “Voice Name” parameter.
■
•
Example: Copy all common data.
To copy all common miscellaneous data select the miscellaneous directory, or
to copy all common effect data select the Effect directory.
■
•
Example: Copy all common miscellaneous data.
To copy the data from a single common miscellaneous or common effect
function select the display page for that function.
■
Example: Copy the common miscellaneous element pitch data.
24
Feature Reference
•
●
Edit Mode
To copy all element data, go to the initial EDIT mode display and move the
cursor to the “Element Name” parameter.
■
•
Example: Copy all element data.
To copy the element controller, miscellaneous, modifier, or envelope data,
select the corresponding directory display page.
■
•
Example: Copy all element modifier data.
To copy the data from a single element function select the display page for
that function.
■
Example: Copy the harmonic enhancer data.
2. Press C
Press the C button to call the COPY display.
3. Select the Voice You Want To Copy From
Use the cursor buttons, data dial, or = and - buttons to select the voice you
want to copy the data from.
•
At this point you can play the keyboard to hear how the voice will sound after
the specified data is copied before actually copying the data.
25
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
•
The voice/element preceded by an asterisk (*) in the copy window is the
current voice/element. If you select this voice/element as the copy source the
pre-edit data will be copied, thus restoring the specified data to its original
values.
•
Press § under “123…” to display the voices in numerical order, or ¶
under “ABC…” to display the voices in alphabetical order. Sometimes it may
take a few seconds to sort the data as specified — the “Now sorting!”
message will appear during the sort operation.
•
Pressing a voice bank button — a through d — instantly moves the cursor
to the first voice in that bank.
4. Press [ and Confirm To Copy
Press the [ button once you’ve selected the copy source (at this point you can
also press the ] button to cancel the copy function).
26
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
Storing Edited Data
Once you’ve created a new voice in the edit mode, it’s necessary to store the voice
to one of the VL7’s internal memory locations otherwise the edited data will be lost when
a new voice is selected.
NOTES ■ Any previous data in the memory location to which the new voice is
stored will be erased. If you want to keep the previous data, save it to floppy
Page 166).
disk (≥
■ Edited voice data can only be saved to floppy disk after it has been stored to
an internal memory location.
■ The STORE function can be accessed from the EDIT or PLAY mode.
■ If you have accidentally lost an edited voice by selecting a different voice after
returning to the PLAY mode, the RECALL function can be used to restore the
Page
edited data as long as no other data has been edited in the meantime (≥
172).
● Procedure
1. Make Sure Memory Protection Is Off
Make sure that the UTILITY mode Memory Protect function is turned off: press
U to select the UTILITY mode; make sure the “Sys” page is selected; select
“6:Miscellaneous” and press [; move the cursor to “Memory Protect”
and press = to turn it “off”.
2. Press S In the EDIT or PLAY Mode
If you had to go to the UTILITY mode to turn memory protection off, return to
either the EDIT or PLAY mode and press S. At this point you will get a “Memory
Protected” error message if memory protection is turned on — go back and turn
Memory Protect “off”.
3. Select the Destination Memory Location
Use the cursor buttons, data dial, or = and - buttons to select the memory
location you want to store the edited voice to.
NOTES ■ Press § under “123…” to display the voices in numerical order, or
¶ under “ABC…” to display the voices in alphabetical order. Sometimes it may
take a few seconds to sort the data as specified — the “Now sorting!”
message will appear during the sort operation.
■ Pressing a voice bank button — a through d — instantly moves the cursor
to the first voice in that bank.
27
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
4. Press [ and Confirm To Store
Press the [ button once you’ve selected the store destination (at this point you
can also press the ] button to cancel the store function). If you press [ the
confirmation display will appear.
Press the - button to actually store the data (or = to cancel).
“Completed!” will appear on the display when the data has been successfully stored.
5. Press ]
Press the ] button to clear the STORE display and return to the previous mode.
28
Feature Reference
29
●
Edit Mode
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
Initial Edit Page
EDIT MODE
COMMON
MISCELLANEOUS
EFFECT
ELEMENT
CONTROLLER
MISCELLANEOUS
MODIFIER
ENVELOPE
Select the EDIT mode from either the PLAY or UTILITY mode by
pressing the E button. The initial EDIT display will appear.
NOTES ■ If you are re-entering the EDIT mode while editing a voice (i.e. you
have edited but not yet stored the current voice), the last selected EDIT display
page will appear.
30
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
≤
A name of up to 10 characters.
To enter a new voice name position the cursor at the “Voice Name” parameter
and press [ or • (“Name”). The VOICE NAME display will appear.
•
•
•
•
•
Use the cursor , and . buttons to move the cursor to the character in the
voice name at the top of the display that you want to change.
Use the = and - buttons or data dial to select a new character by
moving through the character list row by row.
Press the ™ button (“Spc”) to enter a space at the current cursor position.
Press the £ button (“Clr”) to clear the entire voice name.
Press ] or [ when the voice name is complete.
● Element Name
≤
A name of up to 10 characters.
This parameter allows a name to be entered for the element of the current voice. To
enter a new element name position the cursor at the “Element Name” parameter and
press [ or • (“Name”). The ELEMENT NAME display will appear. Procedure is
the same as for the Voice Name parameter, above, except for the function of the ¢
button, below.
•
Press the ¢ button (“Auto”) to copy the voice name to the element name.
31
Initial Edit Page
● Voice Name
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
Common Miscellaneous
EDIT MODE
COMMON
MISCELLANEOUS
EFFECT
ELEMENT
CONTROLLER
MISCELLANEOUS
MODIFIER
ENVELOPE
The COMMON MISCELLANEOUS group includes a miscellaneous
range of functions which affect the entire voice.
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
1:
2:
3:
4:
5:
6:
7:
Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Element Pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Element Level & Pan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Portamento . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Micro Tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Continuous Slider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
32
33
34
35
36
38
39
40
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
1: Setting
Common Miscellaneous
● Assign Mode
≤
Bottom Note, Top Note, Last Note.
Determines which note will be played when more than one note is played at a time.
This parameter also affects how the VL7 responds to external MIDI control.
Bottom Note
The lowest note played sounds.
Top Note
The highest note played sounds.
Last Note
The last note played sounds.
● Sustain
≤
off, on.
Turns the VL7 sustain function on or off. When “off” the sustain function will not
work even if sustain is assigned to a footswitch (≥
Page 154) and a footswitch is
plugged into the appropriate FOOT SWITCH jack or a MIDI sustain message is received.
On
Sustain can be applied via footswitch or MIDI.
Off
Sustain can not be applied via footswitch or MIDI.
33
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
2: Controller
● Breath Attack Time
≤
5.00msec … 1.24 sec.
Determines how quickly the VL7 responds to changes in breath pressure applied to
the breath controller. A setting of “5.00msec” produces the fastest response; “1.24
sec” produces the slowest response. This parameter should be used with the “Breath
Attack Gain” parameter, below, to determine overall breath controller response.
● Breath Attack Gain
≤
0 … 127.
Determines the amount of audible change produced by a changes in breath pressure
applied to the breath controller. A setting of “0” results in no change; “127” produces
maximum change. “127” is the normal setting for this parameter.
● Touch EG Time
≤
5.00msec … 1.24 sec.
Sets the response time of the VL7 Touch Envelope Generator. The Touch Envelope
Generator controls the transition from the initial key velocity to aftertouch pressure when
a key is played. A setting of “5.00msec” produces the fastest response; “1.24 sec”
produces the slowest response.
34
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
3: Element Pitch
Common Miscellaneous
● Element Tune
≤
-7 … 7.
Produces a slight upward or downward shift in the pitch of the voice element.
Minus values lower the pitch while positive values raise the pitch. The change in pitch
produced by each increment is very slight (on the order of a few cents per increment).
● Element Note Shift
≤
-64 … 63.
Shifts the pitch of the voice element up or down in semitone increments. Minus
values lower the pitch while positive values raise the pitch.
● Element Random Pitch
≤
0 … 7.
Produces a slight random variation in the pitch of the voice element, simulating the
effect of acoustic instruments in which perfectly stable effect is rarely achieved. A setting
of “0” produces no random pitch variation; “7” produces maximum random pitch variation.
35
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
4: Element Level & Pan
● Element Level
≤
0 … 127.
Sets the level (volume) of the output from the voice element. A setting of “0”
produces no output; “127” produces maximum output. The graphic bar to the right of the
numeric parameter provides a visual indication of the level setting: higher settings move
the graphic “slider” to the right.
● Element Pan L
● Element Pan R
≤
-64 … 63.
Determines the position of the voice element in the stereo sound field. Normally
there would be only one pan parameter, placing the sound of the element anywhere from
full left to right in the stereo sound field. The output from the VL7 element and modifier
stages is already in stereo, so two pan parameters (L and R) and provided, offering
maximum panning versatility. The “Pan L” parameter determines the position of the
left-channel output signal from the element, while the “Pan R” parameter determines the
position of the right-channel output from the element. The graphic bar to the right of the
numeric parameters provides a visual indication of the pan settings: the “L” slider extends
above the bar and the “R” slider extends below the bar. Higher settings move the corresponding slider to the right.
•
To reproduce the original stereo
sound of the element, set the
“Pan L” parameter to “-64”
and the “Pan R” parameter to
“63”.
-64
0
Left
Right
Sound
36
63
Feature Reference
•
●
Edit Mode
-64
0
Left
63
Right
Sound
•
•
If both the “L” and “R” parameters are set to the same value,
the sound of the element will
appear as a mono source at the
appropriate position in the stereo
sound field. If both parameters
are set to “0”, for example, the
sound of the element will be
heard only in the center of the
sound field.
-64
0
Left
63
Right
Sound
The pan parameters have no effect if the UTILITY mode “Output” parameter is set to “Monaural”.
37
Common Miscellaneous
To limit the sound of the element
to the left half of the sound field,
for example, set “Pan L” to
“-64” and “Pan R” to “0”.
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
5: Portamento
● Portamento Mode
≤
Full Time, Fingered.
Portamento produces a “slide” effect between subsequently played notes. The
“Portamento Mode” parameter determines how the portamento slide is produced.
Full Time
The portamento slide will occur between any two subsequent notes
when the portamento switch is on, even if the first note is released
before the second is played.
Fingered
The portamento slide will only occur if the first note is still held when
the second note is played.
•
If a footswitch is assigned to portamento on/off switching but no footswitch is
connected, portamento will be on.
● Time MIDI Control
≤
off, on.
The portamento time (the length of the slide between notes) can be controlled in
realtime via a foot controller connected to the FOOT CONTROLLER 2 jack, the MODULATION 2 wheel, or MIDI portamento time messages from an external device. This
parameter turns realtime portamento time control off or on.
•
In order to use the foot controller or modulation wheel for portamento time
control, use the UTILITY mode “Assignable Controller” page (≥
Page 154) to assign the foot controller or modulation wheel to “Porta
Time” (MIDI control number 005).
● Time
≤
0 … 127.
This parameter becomes active only when the “Time MIDI Control” parameter, above, is turned “off”. The “Time” parameter sets the portamento time. A setting
of “0” produces the fastest portamento time; “127” produces the longest portamento
slide effect.
● Element On/Off
≤
off, on.
Turns portamento off or on.
38
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
6: Micro Tuning
Common Miscellaneous
● Table
≤
off, I-1 … I-2, P-1 … P-54.
Selects the micro-tuning table.
Off
Equal Temperament: The standard modern keyboard tuning with
perfectly even intervals between all 12 notes of the scale. This tuning
allows transposition to any key without modification.
I-1, I-2
Internal Microtuning: These tuning are included in the system data on
the VL7 voice disk.
P-1 … P-12
Pure Major C … Pure Major B: A brass-instrument tuning based on
their natural harmonic series. Produces a beautiful beat-free sound in
ensemble, but the tuning must be changed to match the key of the
music.
P-13 … P-24
Pure Minor A … Pure Minor Ab: Same as the Pure Major scales
above, but for minor keys.
P-25 … P-36
Mean Tone C … Mean Tone B: This tuning was originally devised to
eliminate the conflict caused by the third degree of the Pythagorean
tuning (below). The tuning must be matched to the key of the music.
P-37 … P-48
Pythagorean C … B: A classic tuning from ancient Greece — with a
few rough spots that were fixed in later improvements. The tuning must
be matched to the key of the music.
P-49
Werckmeister: This and the following two tunings were created to
allow transposition to any key without the need for re-tuning. They have
the curious characteristic, however, that the “tension” of the sound
increases in proportion to the number of sharps or flats in the key
being played. Many of the classics were created using these tunings.
P-50
Kirnberger: See “Werckmeister”.
P-51
Vallotti & Young: See “Werckmeister”.
P-52
1/4 Shifted Equal: This is an equal temperament tuning with the
overall pitch raised 1/4 tone. It can be used with other instruments in
standard equal temperament tuning for some unusual and very “tense”
effects.
P-53
1/4 Tone: All semitones on the keyboard become 1/4-tone intervals.
P-54
1/8 Tone: All semitones on the keyboard become 1/8-tone intervals.
•
The I-1 and I-2 tunings (Internal Microtuning) cannot be edited or modified
using the VL7. Microtuning data from the Yamaha SY99 or SY77 synthesizer,
however, can be loaded into the VL7 via a MIDI bulk dump or parameter
change operation.
•
Microtuning can cause slight pitch instabilities.
39
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
7: Continuous Slider
● CS1
● CS2
≤
off, COM, EL — plus the parameters available for the current voice.
Assigns the available common or element edit parameters to the – or ≠
continuous slider. The continuous sliders can then be used in the PLAY mode to edit the
assigned parameters in real time while playing (the same applies to the EDIT and UTILITY modes). The parameter consists of two parts which can be selected independently by
moving the cursor horizontally. The first (leftmost) part determines what type of parameter will be controlled.
off
Continuous slider not assigned. Choose this setting if you don’t want
the continuous slider to affect any edit parameters.
COM
Selects the common edit parameters.
EL
Selects the element edit parameters.
The second (rightmost) is the actual parameter which will be controlled. The parameters available for editing via the continuous sliders are individually preset for each voice.
•
Since the continuous sliders actually edit the parameters to which they are
assigned, the “new” voice created by using the sliders can be stored to one of
the VL7’s voice memory locations and used just as if it had been edited in the
EDIT mode (≥
the STORE operation is described on page 27).
•
The continuous slider view function, available in the PLAY mode (≥
Page
13), shows you which parameters are assigned to which controller as well as
the current positions of the controllers and their corresponding values.
40
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
Common Miscellaneous
41
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
Common Effect
EDIT MODE
COMMON
MISCELLANEOUS
EFFECT
ELEMENT
CONTROLLER
MISCELLANEOUS
MODIFIER
ENVELOPE
The COMMON EFFECT parameters provide access to the VL7’s
sophisticated three-stage digital signal processing system.
■ 1: Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 2: Modulation Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
● Flanger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
● Pitch Change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
● Distortion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 3: Feedback Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
● Mono Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
43
44
● L,R Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
45
47
49
■ 4: Reverberation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
● Hall1, Hall2, Room1, Room2, Studio, Plate,
Space, Reverse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
● L,C,R Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
51
51
42
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
1: Setting
Common Effect
● Feedback Delay/Reverb Mode
≤
Serial, Parallel.
Determines whether the Feedback Delay and Reverb effect stages are connected in
series (Serial) or in parallel, as shown in the illustration.
Serial Mode
From
Element
Modulation
Feedback
Delay
Reverb
To
Output
Parallel Mode
From
Element
Modulation
Feedback
Delay
To
Output
Reverb
● Effect Control — Destination Effect
≤
off, Flanger Freq., Pitch Change Wet/Dry, Distortion Presence, FB Delay Send Level,
Reverb Send Level.
This and the following parameter make it possible to control certain effect parameters in real time via any physical controller. Use this parameter to select the effect
parameter you want to control (only settings corresponding to the currently selected
effects will be available). If the currently selected effect stage is turned off, “isn’t
used” will appear on the display and selection will not be possible.
● Effect Control — Controller
≤
off, Modulation Wheel … Velocity.
Selects the controller which will be used to control the parameter selected via the
“Destination Effect” parameter. All MIDI control numbers and keyboard velocity are available. Be sure to turn this parameter “off” if you don’t require realtime effect
control.
43
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
2: Modulation Effect
● Modulation Effect Type
≤
off, Flanger, Pitch Change, Distortion.
Selects the type of effect to be produced by the modulation effect stage. The effect
types and their parameters are individually described on the following pages. No effect
parameters appear when the modulation effect stage is turned “off”.
Flanger
This type of effect is created by slightly delaying the sound and
periodically varying the delay time. The delayed signal is then added to
the direct signal causing a variable comb-filter effect which results in
the familiar “swishing” flanger sound.
Pitch Change
A dual pitch change effect which can be used in the Mono mode, in
which both pitch-shifted notes appear on both channels, or the Stereo
mode in which one pitch-shifted note appears on the left channel and
the other on the right. The pitch of the two pitch-shifted notes can be
set over a two-octave range — from one octave below to one octave
above the input note.
Distortion
An extremely versatile distortion effect which offers transistor, vintage
tube, fuzz and other distortion types, a variety of speaker types, and a
comprehensive range of other parameters that can be used to refine
the distortion sound.
44
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
Flanger
Common Effect
•
Use the ¡ (“>”) and ™ (“<”) buttons to switch between the two pages
of effect parameters.
● Wave
≤
Triangle, Sine, Random.
Selects the waveform which will be used to modulate the flanger effect.
Triangle
Sine
Random
● Freq.
≤
0.057 … 40.0 Hz when Triangle or Sine Wave selected,
≤
0.229 … 160.0 Hz when Random Wave selected.
Sets the speed of modulation and therefore the rate of flanger effect variation.
● Depth
≤
0 … 100 %.
Sets the depth of modulation. Higher values produce deeper modulation and therefore a more pronounced flanger effect.
45
Feature Reference
Flanger
●
Edit Mode
● Delay
≤
0.33 … 32.87 ms.
Sets the flanger delay time (the flanger effect is basically produced by modulating
the delay time of one signal in relation to another). Shorter delay times produce the
greatest effect in the high-frequency range, while longer delay times extend the effect to
the middle and lower frequencies. Delays longer than about 5 milliseconds produce a
more chorus-like effect.
● Phase
≤
-180.0 … 180.0 deg.
Sets the phase different between the left and right channel flanger signals. The
larger the value, the greater the “spread” in the sound. A setting of “0” produces a
centered effect.
● FB Gain
≤
-100 … 100 %.
Determines the amount of effect-sound feedback returned to the input of the flanger
stage. Higher negative or positve values produce a more pronounced effect.
● High
≤
0.1 … 1.0.
Determines the amount of high-frequency effect-sound feedback returned to the
input of the flanger stage. Lower values produce more cut in the high-frequency range.
● Analog Feel
≤
0 … 10.
This parameters simulates the sound of traditional analog flanger devices. The
higher the value the stronger the “analog feel”.
● Wet/Dry Balance
≤
0 … 100 %.
Sets the balance between the direct (“dry”) and effect (“wet”) sound. Higher values
produce a greater proportion of effect sound in relation to direct sound.
■
Flanger Effect Block Diagram
R In
R Out
Flanger
Flanger
L In
L Out
46
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
Pitch Change
Common Effect
Use the ¡ (“>”) and ™ (“<”) buttons to switch between the two pages
of effect parameters.
•
● Mode
≤
Monaural, Stereo.
Selects the monaural or stereo pitch change effect mode. In the monaural mode both
pitch-shifted notes appear on both channels. In the stereo mode one pitch-shifted note
appears on the left channel and the other on the right.
■
Monaural Mode Block Diagram
R In
R Out
Pitch Change 1
Pitch Change 2
L In
■
L Out
Stereo Mode Block Diagram
R In
R Out
Pitch Change R
Pitch Change L
L In
L Out
47
Feature Reference
Pitch Change
●
Edit Mode
● 1 Pitch (L Pitch)
● 2 Pitch (R Pitch)
≤
-12 … 12.
These two parameters individually set the pitch of the first and second pitchchanged note between one octave below (“-12”) and one octave above (“+12”) the input
note. When the “Stereo” mode is selected, the “1 Pitch” parameter applies to the
left channel and the “2 Pitch” parameter to the right.
● 1 Fine (L Fine)
● 2 Fine (R Fine)
≤
-100 … 100.
Permit fine tuning of the first and second pitch-changed note in 1-cent steps (1 cent
is 1/100th of a semitone). When the “Stereo” mode is selected, the “L Fine” parameter applies to the left channel and the “R Fine” parameter to the right.
● 1 Output (L Output)
● 2 Output (R Output)
≤
0 … 100 %.
Set the output level of the corresponding pitch-changed note. The higher the value
the higher the output level. When the “Stereo” mode is selected, the “1 Output”
parameter applies to the left channel and the “2 Output” parameter to the right.
● Wet/Dry Balance
≤
0 … 100 %.
Sets the balance between the direct (“dry”) and effect (“wet”) sound. Higher values
produce a greater proportion of effect sound in relation to direct sound. When set to “0”
no pitch change effect is produced.
48
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
Distortion
Common Effect
•
Use the ¡ (“>”) and ™ (“<”) buttons to switch between the two pages
of effect parameters.
● Overdrive
≤
0 … 100 %.
Sets the intensity of the overdrive or distortion effect. Higher values produce more
distortion.
● Device
≤
Transistor, Vintage Tube, Distortion 1, Distortion 2, Fuzz.
Determines the basic sound of the distortion effect.
Transistor
The crisp, tight distortion of an overdriven transistor amplifier.
Vintage Tube
Simulates the warm, relatively “soft” distortion produced by vacuum
tube amplifiers.
Distortion 1
A traditional “stomp-box” type distortion unit, type 1.
Distortion 2
A traditional “stomp-box” type distortion unit, type 2.
Fuzz
Early “fuzz boxes” produced this type of distortion — rough and
somewhat rude.
49
Feature Reference
Distortion
●
Edit Mode
● Output Level
≤
0 … 100 %.
Sets the output level of the distortion sound. Higher values produce higher level.
● Speaker
≤
Flat, Stack, Combo, Twin, Radio, Megaphone.
Simulates a variety of speaker types and configurations via which the distortion
sound might be reproduced.
Flat
No speaker — the sound of a “direct feed” to a recording or sound
reinforcement console.
Stack
The powerful, expansive sound of stacked speaker cabinets.
Combo
A single 12" speaker unit in an open-backed enclosure.
Twin
Two 12" speaker units in a relatively small open-backed enclosure.
Radio
The small, compressed, but pleasant tone of a radio receiver.
Megaphone
Constricted tone with emphasis on the middle frequencies.
● Presence
≤
-10 … 10.
Varies the “presence” or “brilliance” of the sound. Higher values produce more
presence and “punch”.
■
Distortion Effect Block Diagram
R In
R Out
Distortion
L In
L Out
50
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
3: Feedback Delay
Common Effect
● Delay Type
≤
off, Mono, L,R, L,C,R.
Selects the type of effect to be produced by the Feedback Delay effect stage. The
effect types and their parameters are individually described on the following pages. No
effect parameters appear when the Feedback Delay effect stage is turned “off”.
Mono
The Mono delay effect produces a single delay sound which appears in
the center of the stereo sound field.
L,R
This variation provides independently programmable delays for the left
and right stereo channels.
L, C, R
Independent delays are provided for the left and right channels, plus a
center delay.
Mono Delay
•
Use the ¡ (“>”) and ™ (“<”) buttons to switch between the two pages
of effect parameters.
● Return
≤
0 … 100 %.
Determines how much of the delayed sound is mixed with the direct sound. Higher
values produce higher delay sound levels.
51
Feature Reference
Edit Mode
● FB Delay Time
≤
0 … 1024 ms.
Sets the delay time between repeats. The higher the value the longer the delay.
•
Use the VL7 “Time Calculation” function (≥
based on musical tempo and note lengths.
Page 57) to enter delay times
● FB Gain
≤
0 … 100 %.
Determines the amount of effect-sound feedback returned to the input of the delay
stage. Higher values produce a greater number of repeats.
● High
≤
0.1 … 1.0.
Produces a natural decay in the high-frequency components of subsequent repeats.
The lower the value the faster and more pronounced the drop-off in high-frequencies.
● Delay Time
≤
0 … 1024 ms.
Sets the delay time between the direct sound and the first repeat.
•
Use the VL7 “Time Calculation” function (≥
based on musical tempo and note lengths.
Page 57) to enter delay times
● Level
≤
0 … 100 %.
Sets the overall level of the delay sound. Higher values produce higher delay level.
Direct Sound
Volume
Mono Delay
●
FB Gain
Level
Delay Time
■
Time
FB Delay Time
Mono Delay Effect Block Diagram
R In
R Out
Delay
L In
L Out
52
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
L,R Delay
Common Effect
•
Use the ¡ (“>”) and ™ (“<”) buttons to switch between the two pages
of effect parameters.
● Return
≤
0 … 100 %.
Determines how much of the delayed sound is mixed with the direct sound. Higher
values produce higher delay sound levels.
● Lch Delay Time
● Rch Delay Time
≤
0 … 512 ms.
Set the delay time between repeats. Independent parameters are provided for the left
(“Lch”) and right (“Rch”) channels.
•
Use the VL7 “Time Calculation” function (≥
based on musical tempo and note lengths.
Page 57) to enter delay times
● Lch Level
● Rch Level
≤
0 … 100 %.
Set the overall level of the delay sound. Higher values produce higher delay level.
Independent parameters are provided for the left (“Lch”) and right (“Rch”) channels.
● Lch FB Gain
● Rch FB Gain
≤
0 … 100 %.
Determine the amount of effect-sound feedback returned to the input of the delay
stage. Higher values produce a greater number of repeats. Independent parameters are
provided for the left (“Lch”) and right (“Rch”) channels.
53
Feature Reference
L,R Delay
●
Edit Mode
● Lch High
● Rch High
≤
0.1 … 1.0.
Produces a natural decay in the high-frequency components of subsequent repeats.
The lower the value the faster and more pronounced the drop-off in high-frequencies.
Independent parameters are provided for the left (“Lch”) and right (“Rch”) channels.
■
L,R Delay Effect Block Diagram
R In
R Out
Delay
Delay
L In
L Out
54
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
L,C,R Delay
Common Effect
•
Use the ¡ (“>”) and ™ (“<”) buttons to switch between the two pages
of effect parameters.
● Return
≤
0 … 100 %.
Determines how much of the delayed sound is mixed with the direct sound. Higher
values produce higher delay sound levels.
● FB Delay Time
≤
0 … 1024 ms.
Sets the delay time between repeats. The higher the value the longer the delay.
•
Use the VL7 “Time Calculation” function (≥
based on musical tempo and note lengths.
Page 57) to enter delay times
● FB Gain
≤
0 … 100 %.
Determines the amount of effect-sound feedback returned to the input of the delay
stage. Higher values produce a greater number of repeats.
● High
≤
0.1 … 1.0.
Produces a natural decay in the high-frequency components of subsequent repeats.
The lower the value the faster and more pronounced the drop-off in high-frequencies.
55
Feature Reference
L,C,R Delay
●
Edit Mode
● Lch Delay Time
● Cch Delay Time
● Rch Delay Time
≤
0 … 1024 ms.
Set the delay time between the direct sound and the first repeat. Independent parameters are provided for the left (“Lch”), center (“Cch”), and right (“Rch”) channels.
•
Use the VL7 “Time Calculation” function (≥
based on musical tempo and note lengths.
Page 57) to enter delay times
● Lch Level
● Cch Level
● Rch Level
≤
0 … 100 %.
Set the overall level of the delay sound. Higher values produce higher delay level.
Independent parameters are provided for the left (“Lch”), center (“Cch”), and right
(“Rch”) channels.
■
L,C,R Delay Effect Block Diagram
R In
R Out
R
C
Delay
L
L In
L Out
56
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
Musical Time Calculation
1. Select a Delay Time Parameter
Position the cursor at the delay time parameter you want to edit — “Calc” will
appear above the • button.
2. Press •
Press the • function button (“Calc”). The “TIME CALCULATION” window
will appear.
3. Set the Required Tempo
Use the data dial or = and - buttons to specify the tempo you will be
playing at (quarter-note beats per minute). The delay time corresponding to one quarter
note at the specified tempo will appear, in milliseconds, below the selected tempo.
4. Select the Required Note Length
Use the £ through ¶ buttons to select the note length to which you want to
match the delay time. The corresponding delay time will appear, as in the preceding step.
5.
Press [
Press the [ button. The “TIME CALCULATION” window will disappear and
the calculated delay time will automatically be entered for the delay time parameter (you
can also press ] to cancel this operation).
57
Common Effect
Since the goal in producing a delay effect is often to match the delay time to a
musical time value, the VL7 includes a “time calculation” function that makes it easy to
convert standard note values to their corresponding delay times in milliseconds.
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
4: Reverberation
● Reverb Type
≤
off, Hall1, Hall2, Room1, Room2, Studio, Plate, Space, Reverse.
Selects the type of effect to be produced by the Reverb effect stage. Unlike the
preceding effect stages, the parameters are the same for all Reverb effect types. No effect
parameters appear when the Reverb effect stage is turned “off”.
Hall 1
A simulation of the reverbation characteristics of a fairly standard
concert hall.
Hall 2
This hall simulation produces a richer low-frequency reverb sound than
the Hall 1 program.
Room 1
The ambience of a small room rather than a large hall. This effect is
ideal when you just want a subtle touch of ambience.
Room 2
A larger room than the Room 1 simulation, with a correspondingly
“bigger” reverb sound.
Studio
In recording studios it is generally desirable to suppress low-frequency
reverberation without entirely losing the “live” sound of the room. The
Studio program simulates this type of environment.
Plate
The plate reverb unit is a classic tool of the recording trade — it was
the first mechanical method of creating artificial reverberation that
capable of producing satisfactory results in the studio. This is a very
realistic simulation.
Space
A diffuse reverberation of the type you might experience in an extremely large space.
Reverse
In this effect the reverb sound plays in reverse, building up to
maximum level rather than decaying as normal.
58
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
Hall1, Hall2, Room1, Room2, Studio, Plate, Space, Reverse
Common Effect
•
Use the ¡ (“>”) and ™ (“<”) buttons to switch between the two pages
of effect parameters.
● Return
≤
0 … 100 %.
Determines how much of the reverb sound is mixed with the direct sound. Higher
values produce higher reverb sound levels.
● Reverb Time
≤
0.05 … 100.0 sec.
Sets the amount of time it takes for the reverb sound to decay by 60 dB (virtually to
silence).
● Reverb Time Boost
≤
0 … 10.
Level
This parameter can be used to extend the tail end of the reverb sound. The higher
the value the greater the “boost”.
Boost
Reverb
Time
59
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
● High Control
≤
0.1 … 1.0.
Sets the reverb time of the high frequencies in relation to the overall reverb time.
Higher values produce longer high-frequency reverb times, gradually approaching the
overall reverb time.
● Diffusion
≤
0 … 10.
Adjusts the left-right “spread” of the reverb sound. The higher the value the greater
the spread.
● Initial Delay
≤
0 … 405 ms.
Sets the delay time before the reverb sound begins.
Direct Sound
Level
Initial
Delay
Reverb
Time
● Feel
≤
0 … 3.
Selects one of four variations in density or overall sound available for each of the
VL7’s reverb types.
● Bass
≤
-21 … 12.
Emphasizes the bass frequencies. The higher the value the greater the bass emphasis.
● Treble
≤
-21 … 12.
Emphasizes the treble frequencies. The higher the value the greater the treble
emphasis.
60
Feature Reference
■
●
Edit Mode
Reverb Effect Block Diagram
R In
R Out
L In
L Out
61
Common Effect
Reverb
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
Element Controller
EDIT MODE
COMMON
MISCELLANEOUS
EFFECT
ELEMENT
CONTROLLER
MISCELLANEOUS
MODIFIER
ENVELOPE
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
1:
2:
3:
4:
5:
6:
7:
Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Embouchure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vibrato . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tonguing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Amplitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scream . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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65
67
68
69
70
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
8: Breath Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9: Growl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10: Throat Formant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11: Dynamic Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12; Harmonic Enhancer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13: Damping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14: Absorption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pressing the • button (“S&R”) from this page will take you to the
“CONTROLLER SEARCH & REPLACE” window, allowing you to see
which controllers are assigned to which parameters, and to modify the
assignments as required (≥
Page 80).
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71
72
73
75
76
78
80
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
1: Pressure
The ¶ button (“Fpag”) can be used to go directly the next Element Controller page without having to return to the directory.
● Controller
≤
off, Modulation Wheel … Touch EG (124 settings).
The “Pressure” parameter corresponds to the amount of breath pressure applied to a
reed or mouthpiece, or the speed of the bow applied to a string. Pressure variations affect
both volume and timbre. The “Controller” parameter specifies the controller to be
used for pressure control. When set to “off” maximum pressure is applied at all times.
•
Please note that accurate keyboard pitch is produced only at maximum pressure.
•
The actual pressure value applied to the VL7 tone generator is the product of
the pressure from the controller and that from the pressure envelope (≥
Page 127).
● Depth
≤
-127 … 127.
Sets the amount of variation produced by the controller assigned to pressure. The
higher the value the greater the variation. Positive values cause an increase in pressure in
response to higher controller values (e.g. increased breath pressure or higher modulation
wheel position), while minus values cause a decrease in pressure in response to higher
controller values. The “Depth” setting is reflected in the graph to the right of the parameters — the horizontal axis represents the controller value and the vertical axis represents
pressure.
● Curve
≤
-16 … 16.
Determines the relationship between the controller value and pressure. When set to
“0” the relationship is linear. That is, a change in the controller value produces a corresponding change in pressure. As the curve value increases the lower end of the controller
range has relatively little effect on the sound while higher controller values produce more
dramatic changes. Negative curve values have the opposite effect: the sound changes
dramatically at low controller values while higher values produce relatively little effect.
The “Curve” setting is reflected in the graph to the right of the parameters — the
horizontal axis represents the controller value and the vertical axis represents pressure.
63
Element Controller
•
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
2: Embouchure
•
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next Element Controller page without having to
return to the directory.
● Controller
≤
off, Modulation Wheel … Touch EG (124 settings).
The “Embouchure” parameter corresponds to the tightness of the lips against the
reed or against each other. In a string instrument voice Embouchure corresponds to how
strongly the bow is pressed against the string. Affects both pitch and timbre. The “Controller” parameter specifies the controller to be used for embouchure control. When
set to “off” medium embouchure is applied at all times.
•
Please note that accurate keyboard pitch is produced only at medium embouchure.
•
The actual embouchure value applied to the VL7 tone generator is a mix of
the embouchure from the controller and that from the embouchure and pitch
envelopes (≥
Page 128).
● Upper Depth
≤
-127 … 127.
Sets the amount of variation produced by the controller assigned to embouchure
when the controller is set to its maximum position (e.g. a modulation wheel rolled all the
way up). The higher the value the greater the variation. Positive values cause an increase
in embouchure in response to higher controller values, while minus values cause a
decrease in embouchure in response to higher controller values. The value of the “Lower
Depth” parameter, below, is automatically changed in response to changes in the “Upper Depth” value (the “Lower Depth” value is always negative when “Upper
Depth” is positive, and vice versa).
● Lower Depth
≤
-127 … 127.
Sets the amount of variation produced by the controller assigned to embouchure
when the controller is set to it minimum position (e.g. a modulation wheel rolled all the
way down). The higher the value the greater the variation. Positive values cause an
increase in embouchure in response to lower controller values, while minus values cause
a decrease in embouchure in response to lower controller values. Changing the value of
the “Lower Depth” parameter has no effect on the “Upper Depth” value. The
64
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
“Lower Depth” parameter is not available when the “Mode” parameter, below, is set
to “Minimum Base”.
● Mode
≤
Center Base, Minimum Base.
3: Pitch
•
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next Element Controller page without having to
return to the directory.
● Controller
≤
off, Modulation Wheel … Touch EG (124 settings).
The “Pitch” parameter changes the length of the air column or string, and thereby
the pitch of the sound. The “Controller” parameter specifies the controller to be used
for pitch control (normally this is “Pitch Bend — the VL7 PITCH wheel). When set
to “off” no pitch variation is produced.
•
The actual pitch value applied to the VL7 tone generator is a mix of the pitch
value from the controller and that from the embouchure and pitch envelopes
(≥
Page 128).
•
For the same type of simple pitch control available in conventional synthesizers, assign only the Pitch parameter to controller you intend to use for pitch
control (normally the pitch bend wheel). For more natural, realistic pitch bend
effects, it is sometimes effective to assign both the Pitch and Embouchure
parameters to the same controller.
65
Element Controller
Selects the controller value (position) which will produce “normal” embouchure.
When set to “Center Base” a central controller position will produce normal embouchure, allowing both downward and upward variation. A setting of “Minimum Base”
will produce normal embouchure when the controller is set to its minimum position,
allowing only upward variation.
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
● Upper Depth
≤
-12 … 12
Sets the amount of variation produced by the controller assigned to pitch when the
controller is set to its maximum position (e.g. a modulation wheel rolled all the way up).
The higher the value the greater the variation. Positive values cause an increase in pitch
in response to higher controller values, while minus values cause a decrease in pitch in
response to higher controller values. The value of the “Lower Depth” parameter,
below, is automatically changed in response to changes in the “Upper Depth” value
(the “Lower Depth” value is always negative when “Upper Depth” is positive, and
vice versa).
● Lower Depth
≤
-12 … 12
Sets the amount of variation produced by the controller assigned to pitch when the
controller is set to it minimum position (e.g. a modulation wheel rolled all the way
down). The higher the value the greater the variation. Positive values cause an increase in
pitch in response to lower controller values, while minus values cause a decrease in pitch
in response to lower controller values. Changing the value of the “Lower Depth”
parameter has no effect on the “Upper Depth” value. The “Lower Depth” parameter is not available when the “Mode” parameter, below, is set to “Minimum Base”.
● Mode
≤
Center Base, Minimum Base.
Selects the controller value (position) which will produce normal pitch. When set to
“Center Base” a central controller position will produce normal pitch, allowing both
downward and upward variation. A setting of “Minimum Base” will produce normal
pitch when the controller is set to its minimum position, allowing only upward variation.
•
Please note that accurate keyboard pitch is produced only when the “Mode”
parameter is set to “Center Base”.
66
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
4: Vibrato
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next Element Controller page without having to
return to the directory.
•
The • button (“Para”) can be used to go directly to the Vibrato parameter
page (≥
Page 133), also available from the ELEMENT ENVELOPE directory. You can then return to the controller vibrato page by pressing •
(“Ctrl”) again.
● Controller
≤
off, Modulation Wheel … Touch EG (124 settings).
This is essentially a standard vibrato (pitch modulation) effect. An extensive range
of parameters makes it possible to achieve extremely natural vibrato effects. The amounts
of vibrato applied via pitch and embouchure, for example, are independently programmable. The “Controller” parameter specifies the controller to be used for vibrato depth
control. When set to “off” no vibrato can be applied.
● Depth
≤
-127 … 127.
Sets the amount of variation produced by the controller assigned to vibrato. The
higher the value the greater the variation. Positive values cause an increase in vibrato
depth in response to higher controller values (e.g. increased breath pressure or higher
modulation wheel position), while minus values cause a decrease in vibrato depth in
response to higher controller values.
•
No vibrato effect can be applied via any controller if the ELEMENT ENVELOPE “Vibrato Depth”, “Depth to Embouchure”, or “Depth to
Pitch” parameters are set to “0” (≥
Page 133, 134).
67
Element Controller
•
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
5: Tonguing
•
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next Element Controller page without having to
return to the directory.
● Controller
≤
off, Modulation Wheel … Touch EG (124 settings).
The “Tonguing” parameter simulates the half-tonguing technique used by saxophone players by changing the “slit” of the reed. The slit is the space between the tip of
the reed and the mouthpiece. The “Controller” parameter specifies the controller to
be used for tonguing control. When set to “off” no tonguing is applied.
•
Please note that accurate keyboard pitch is produced only when maximum
tonguing is applied or the tonguing controller is turned off.
● Depth
≤
-127 … 127.
Sets the amount of variation produced by the controller assigned to tonguing. The
higher the value the greater the variation. Positive values cause an decrease in tonguing in
response to higher controller values (e.g. increased breath pressure or higher modulation
wheel position), while minus values cause an increase in tonguing in response to higher
controller values. The “Depth” setting is reflected in the graph to the right of the parameters — the horizontal axis represents the controller value and the vertical axis represents
tonguing.
● Curve
≤
-16 … 16.
Determines the relationship between the controller value and tonguing. When set to
“0” the relationship is linear. That is, a change in the controller value produces a corresponding change in tonguing. As the curve value increases the lower end of the controller
range has relatively little effect on the sound while higher controller values produce more
dramatic changes. Negative curve values have the opposite effect: the sound changes
dramatically at low controller values while higher values produce relatively little effect.
The “Curve” setting is reflected in the graph to the right of the parameters — the
horizontal axis represents the controller value and the vertical axis represents tonguing.
68
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
6: Amplitude
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next Element Controller page without having to
return to the directory.
● Controller
≤
off, Modulation Wheel … Touch EG (124 settings).
Unlike pressure, the “Amplitude” parameter controls the volume of the sound
without varying timbre. The “Controller” parameter specifies the controller to be
used for amplitude control. When set to “off” no amplitude control can be applied.
•
Amplitude control via this parameter actually occurs between the modifier
Dynamic Filter and Equalizer stages, the effect of the subsequent Impulse
Expander and Resonator stages is therefore not affected by the amplitude
setting. In contrast, amplitude control applied via MIDI volume control change
number (007) affects the sound level at the instrument’s output, and therefore
the total output from all modifier and effect stages.
•
The Amplitude parameter affects the level of the sound prior to the VL7 effect
stages, so it can be used to vary the amount of overdrive produced by the
distortion effect, for example (≥
Page 49).
● Depth
≤
-127 … 127.
Sets the amount of variation produced by the controller assigned to amplitude. The
higher the value the greater the variation. Positive values cause an increase in amplitude
in response to higher controller values (e.g. increased breath pressure or higher modulation wheel position), while minus values cause a decrease in amplitude in response to
higher controller values. The “Depth” setting is reflected in the graph to the right of the
parameters — the horizontal axis represents the controller value and the vertical axis
represents amplitude.
● Curve
≤
-16 … 16.
Determines the relationship between the controller value and amplitude. When set to
“0” the relationship is linear. That is, a change in the controller value produces a corresponding change in amplitude. As the curve value increases the lower end of the controller range has relatively little effect on the sound while higher controller values produce
more dramatic changes. Negative curve values have the opposite effect: the sound
changes dramatically at low controller values while higher values produce relatively little
effect. The “Curve” setting is reflected in the graph to the right of the parameters — the
horizontal axis represents the controller value and the vertical axis represents amplitude.
69
Element Controller
•
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
7: Scream
•
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next Element Controller page without having to
return to the directory.
● Controller
≤
off, Modulation Wheel … Touch EG (124 settings).
The “Scream” parameter drives the entire system into chaotic oscillation, creating
effects that can only be achieved with physical modeling technology. The “Controller” parameter specifies the controller to be used for scream control. When set to “off”
no scream effect variation can be produced, but an absolute scream value can be set via
the “Value” parameter, below.
● Depth
≤
-127 … 127.
Sets the amount of variation produced by the controller assigned to scream. The
higher the value the greater the variation. Positive values cause an increase in scream
effect in response to higher controller values (e.g. increased breath pressure or higher
modulation wheel position), while minus values cause a decrease in scream effect in
response to higher controller values. The “Depth” setting is reflected in the graph to the
right of the parameters — the horizontal axis represents the controller value and the
vertical axis represents scream.
● Curve
≤
-16 … 16.
Determines the relationship between the controller value and scream. When set to
“0” the relationship is linear. That is, a change in the controller value produces a corresponding change in scream effect. As the curve value increases the lower end of the
controller range has relatively little effect on the sound while higher controller values
produce more dramatic changes. Negative curve values have the opposite effect: the
sound changes dramatically at low controller values while higher values produce relatively little effect. The “Curve” setting is reflected in the graph to the right of the
parameters — the horizontal axis represents the controller value and the vertical axis
represents scream.
● Value
≤
0 … 127.
Determines the amount of scream effect produced when the “Controller”
parameter is set to “off”. The higher the value the greater the effect.
70
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
8: Breath Noise
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next Element Controller page without having to
return to the directory.
•
The • button (“Para”) can be used to go directly to the Breath Noise
parameter page (≥
Page 84), also available from the ELEMENT MISCELLANEOUS directory. You can then return to the controller Breath Noise page
by pressing • (“Ctrl”) again.
● Controller
≤
off, Modulation Wheel … Touch EG (124 settings).
The “Breath Noise” parameter can be used to add the required amount of breath
noise to a voice. The sound of the breath noise itself can be varied over a wide range
using the Breath Noise parameters — accessible from this page by pressing the •
button, or from the ELEMENT MISCELLANEOUS directory. The “Controller”
parameter specifies the controller to be used for breath noise control. When set to “off”
no breath noise variation can be produced, but an absolute breath noise value can be set
via the “Value” parameter, below.
● Depth
≤
-127 … 127.
Sets the amount of variation produced by the controller assigned to breath noise.
The higher the value the greater the variation. Positive values cause an increase in breath
noise in response to higher controller values (e.g. increased breath pressure or higher
modulation wheel position), while minus values cause a decrease in breath noise in
response to higher controller values. The “Depth” setting is reflected in the graph to the
right of the parameters — the horizontal axis represents the controller value and the
vertical axis represents breath noise.
● Curve
≤
-16 … 16.
Determines the relationship between the controller value and breath noise. When set
to “0” the relationship is linear. That is, a change in the controller value produces a
corresponding change in breath noise. As the curve value increases the lower end of the
controller range has relatively little effect on the sound while higher controller values
produce more dramatic changes. Negative curve values have the opposite effect: the
sound changes dramatically at low controller values while higher values produce rela-
71
Element Controller
•
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
tively little effect. The “Curve” setting is reflected in the graph to the right of the
parameters — the horizontal axis represents the controller value and the vertical axis
represents breath noise.
● Value
≤
0 … 127.
Determines the amount of breath noise produced when the “Controller” parameter is set to “off”. The higher the value the greater the effect.
•
No breath noise can be applied via any controller if the ELEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Breath Noise page “Level” parameter is set to “0” or the “Control Balance” parameter is set to “63” (≥
Page 84).
9: Growl
•
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next Element Controller page without having to
return to the directory.
•
The • button (“Para”) can be used to go directly to the Growl parameter
page (≥
Page 139), also available from the ELEMENT ENVELOPE directory. You can then return to the controller Growl page by pressing •
(“Ctrl”) again.
● Controller
≤
off, Modulation Wheel … Touch EG (124 settings).
The “Growl” parameter produces a periodic pressure modulation which produces
the “growl” effect often heard in wind instruments. An extensive range of parameters
allow remarkably realistic effects. The “Controller” parameter specifies the controller
to be used for growl control. When set to “off” no growl variation can be produced, but
an absolute growl value can be set via the “Value” parameter, below.
● Depth
≤
-127 … 127.
Sets the amount of variation produced by the controller assigned to growl. The
higher the value the greater the variation. Positive values cause an increase in growl
72
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
effect in response to higher controller values (e.g. increased breath pressure or higher
modulation wheel position), while minus values cause a decrease in growl effect in
response to higher controller values. The “Depth” setting is reflected in the graph to the
right of the parameters — the horizontal axis represents the controller value and the
vertical axis represents growl.
● Curve
-16 … 16.
Determines the relationship between the controller value and growl. When set to
“0” the relationship is linear. That is, a change in the controller value produces a corresponding change in growl. As the curve value increases the lower end of the controller
range has relatively little effect on the sound while higher controller values produce more
dramatic changes. Negative curve values have the opposite effect: the sound changes
dramatically at low controller values while higher values produce relatively little effect.
The “Curve” setting is reflected in the graph to the right of the parameters — the
horizontal axis represents the controller value and the vertical axis represents growl.
● Value
≤
0 … 127.
Determines the amount of growl effect produced when the “Controller” parameter is set to “off”. The higher the value the greater the effect.
•
No growl effect can be applied via any controller if the ELEMENT ENVELOPE Growl page “Depth to Pres” and “Depth to BNois” parameters are set to “0”, or the ELEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Breath Noise page
“Level” parameter is set to “0” or the “Control Balance” parameter is
set to “63”. (≥
Page 139, 84).
10: Throat Formant
•
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next Element Controller page without having to
return to the directory.
•
The • button (“Para”) can be used to go directly to the Throat Formant
parameter page (≥
Page 89), also available from the ELEMENT MISCELLANEOUS directory. You can then return to the controller Throat Formant
page by pressing • (“Ctrl”) again.
73
Element Controller
≤
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
● Controller
≤
off, Modulation Wheel … Touch EG (124 settings).
The “Throat Formant” parameter controls the characteristics of the simulated
player’s lungs, trachea, and oral cavity. Can add a realistic “roughness” to the sound.
The “Controller” parameter specifies the controller to be used for throat formant
control. When set to “off” no throat formant variation can be produced, but an absolute
throat formant value can be set via the “Value” parameter, below.
● Depth
≤
-127 … 127.
Sets the amount of variation produced by the controller assigned to throat formant.
The higher the value the greater the variation. Positive values cause an increase in throat
formant effect in response to higher controller values (e.g. increased breath pressure or
higher modulation wheel position), while minus values cause a decrease in throat formant
effect in response to higher controller values. The “Depth” setting is reflected in the
graph to the right of the parameters — the horizontal axis represents the controller value
and the vertical axis represents throat formant depth.
● Curve
≤
-16 … 16.
Determines the relationship between the controller value and throat formant depth.
When set to “0” the relationship is linear. That is, a change in the controller value
produces a corresponding change in throat formant depth. As the curve value increases
the lower end of the controller range has relatively little effect on the sound while higher
controller values produce more dramatic changes. Negative curve values have the opposite effect: the sound changes dramatically at low controller values while higher values
produce relatively little effect. The “Curve” setting is reflected in the graph to the right
of the parameters — the horizontal axis represents the controller value and the vertical
axis represents throat formant depth.
● Value
≤
0 … 127.
Determines the amount of throat formant effect produced when the “Controller” parameter is set to “off”. The higher the value the greater the effect.
•
No throat formant effect can be applied via any controller if the ELEMENT
MISCELLANEOUS Throat Formant page “Amount” or “Intensity”
parameters are set to “0” (≥
Page 89, 90).
74
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
11: Dynamic Filter
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next Element Controller page without having to
return to the directory.
•
The • button (“Para”) can be used to go directly to the Dynamic Filter
parameter page (≥
Page 113), also available from the ELEMENT MODIFIER directory. You can then return to the controller Dynamic Filter page by
pressing • (“Ctrl”) again.
● Controller
≤
off, Modulation Wheel … Touch EG (124 settings).
The VL7 dynamic filter has selectable high-pass, bandpass, band elimnination, and
low-pass modes. The “Controller” parameter specifies the controller to be used for
filter cutoff frequency control. When set to “off” no filter frequency variation can be
applied via a controller.
•
The actual dynamic filter frequency value applied to the VL7 tone generator is
a mix of the value from the controller, the value from the Dynamic Filter
parameter page, and that from the amplitude & filter envelope (≥
Page 113,
141).
● Depth
≤
-127 … 127.
Sets the amount of variation produced by the controller assigned to dynamic filter.
The higher the value the greater the variation. Positive values cause an increase in filter
cutoff frequency in response to higher controller values (e.g. increased breath pressure or
higher modulation wheel position), while minus values cause a decrease in filter cutoff
frequency in response to higher controller values. The “Depth” setting is reflected in the
graph to the right of the parameters — the horizontal axis represents the controller value
and the vertical axis represents filter cutoff frequency.
● Curve
≤
-16 … 16.
Determines the relationship between the controller value and dynamic filter cutoff
frequency. When set to “0” the relationship is linear. That is, a change in the controller
value produces a corresponding change in frequency. As the curve value increases the
lower end of the controller range has relatively little effect on the sound while higher
controller values produce more dramatic changes. Negative curve values have the oppo-
75
Element Controller
•
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
site effect: the sound changes dramatically at low controller values while higher values
produce relatively little effect. The “Curve” setting is reflected in the graph to the right
of the parameters — the horizontal axis represents the controller value and the vertical
axis represents filter cutoff frequency.
•
No dynamic filter frequency variation can be applied via any controller if the
ELEMENT MODIFIER Dynamic Filter page “Balance” parameter is set to
“-64” (≥
Page 114).
12: Harmonic Enhancer
•
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next Element Controller page without having to
return to the directory.
•
The • button (“Para”) can be used to go directly to the Harmonic Enhancer parameter page (≥
Page 105), also available from the ELEMENT
MODIFIER directory. You can then return to the controller Harmonic Enhancer page by pressing • (“Ctrl”) again.
● Controller
≤
off, Modulation Wheel … Touch EG (124 settings).
The Harmonic Enhancer can vary the harmonic structure of the sound over a wide
range. The “Controller” parameter specifies the controller to be used for harmonic
enhancer depth (wet/dry balance) control. When set to “off” no harmonic enhancer
depth variation can be applied via a controller.
● Depth
≤
-127 … 127.
Sets the amount of variation produced by the controller assigned to the harmonic
enhancer. The higher the value the greater the variation. Positive values cause an increase
in harmonic enhancer depth in response to higher controller values (e.g. increased breath
pressure or higher modulation wheel position), while minus values cause a decrease in
harmonic enhancer depth in response to higher controller values. The “Depth” setting is
reflected in the graph to the right of the parameters — the horizontal axis represents the
controller value and the vertical axis represents harmonic enhancer depth.
76
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
● Curve
≤
-16 … 16.
•
No harmonic enhancer variation can be applied via any controller if the
ELEMENT MODIFIER Harmonic Enhancer page “Balance” parameter is
set to “-64” (≥
Page 106).
77
Element Controller
Determines the relationship between the controller value and harmonic enhancer
depth. When set to “0” the relationship is linear. That is, a change in the controller value
produces a corresponding change in harmonic enhancer depth. As the curve value increases the lower end of the controller range has relatively little effect on the sound while
higher controller values produce more dramatic changes. Negative curve values have the
opposite effect: the sound changes dramatically at low controller values while higher
values produce relatively little effect. The “Curve” setting is reflected in the graph to
the right of the parameters — the horizontal axis represents the controller value and the
vertical axis represents harmonic enhancer depth.
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
13: Damping
•
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next Element Controller page without having to
return to the directory.
● Controller
≤
off, Modulation Wheel … Touch EG (124 settings).
Simulates the effect of damping due to losses within the body of a wind instrument
or in a string due to air friction. Affects both pitch and timbre. The “Controller”
parameter specifies the controller to be used for damping control. When set to “off” no
damping variation can be applied via a controller.
•
Please note that accurate keyboard pitch is produced only when damping is
maximum.
● Depth
≤
-127 … 127.
Sets the amount of variation produced by the controller assigned to damping. The
higher the value the greater the variation. Positive values cause a decrease in damping in
response to higher controller values (e.g. increased breath pressure or higher modulation
wheel position), while minus values cause an increase in damping in response to higher
controller values. The “Depth” setting is reflected in the graph to the right of the parameters — the horizontal axis represents the controller value and the vertical axis represents
damping.
● Curve
≤
-16 … 16.
Determines the relationship between the controller value and damping. When set to
“0” the relationship is linear. That is, a change in the controller value produces a corresponding change in damping. As the curve value increases the lower end of the controller
range has relatively little effect on the sound while higher controller values produce more
dramatic changes. Negative curve values have the opposite effect: the sound changes
dramatically at low controller values while higher values produce relatively little effect.
The “Curve” setting is reflected in the graph to the right of the parameters — the
horizontal axis represents the controller value and the vertical axis represents damping.
78
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
14: Absorption
The § button (“Bpag”) can be used to go directly back to the next Element
Controller page without having to return to the directory.
● Controller
≤
off, Modulation Wheel … Touch EG (124 settings).
The absorption parameter simulates the effect of high-frequency loss at the end of
the air column or string. The “Controller” parameter specifies the controller to be
used for absorption control. When set to “off” no absorption variation can be applied
via a controller.
•
Please note that accurate keyboard pitch is produced only at when absorption
is maximum.
● Depth
≤
-127 … 127.
Sets the amount of variation produced by the controller assigned to absorption. The
higher the value the greater the variation. Positive values cause a decrease in absorption
in response to higher controller values (e.g. increased breath pressure or higher modulation wheel position), while minus values cause an increase in absorption in response to
higher controller values. The “Depth” setting is reflected in the graph to the right of the
parameters — the horizontal axis represents the controller value and the vertical axis
represents absorption.
● Curve
≤
-16 … 16.
Determines the relationship between the controller value and absorption. When set
to “0” the relationship is linear. That is, a change in the controller value produces a
corresponding change in absorption. As the curve value increases the lower end of the
controller range has relatively little effect on the sound while higher controller values
produce more dramatic changes. Negative curve values have the opposite effect: the
sound changes dramatically at low controller values while higher values produce relatively little effect. The “Curve” setting is reflected in the graph to the right of the
parameters — the horizontal axis represents the controller value and the vertical axis
represents absorption.
79
Element Controller
•
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
Controller Search & Replace
This function is accessed by pressing the • button (“S&R”) from the element
controller directory page. It provides a fast, convenient way to see which controllers are
assigned to which parameters, and to modify the assignments as required.
1. Select the Controller Search & Replace Window
From the element controller directory page, press •.
2. Select a Controller
When the “CONTROLLER SEARCH & REPLACE” window appears, use the §
and ¶ buttons (“Prev” and “Next”) to search through the assigned controllers (unassigned controllers are not displayed). All parameters assigned to the selected controller
are displayed below the controller name (or number).
•
In this example, only the Harmonic Enhancer parameter is assigned to the
Foot Controller:
•
In the following example both Pitch and Scream are assigned to the Pitch bend
wheel.
3. Make a New Assignment As Required
You can assign a different controller to the parameters shown by using the data dial
or = and - buttons — without cancelling the original assignments. When a
different controller is selected the controller name will flash and any other parameters
assigned to that controller will appear in non-highlighted text.
•
Here, for example, the Pitch Bend controller shown in the previous example
has been replaced with the Breath Attack controller, which is currently assigned to the Breath Noise.
80
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
When you’re satisfied with the new assignment press the [ button. The
controller name will stop flashing and all assigned parameters will appear in highlighted
text (or you can press the ] button to cancel the operation and return to the element
controller directory).
5. Exit When Done
Press the ] button when you’re ready to return to the element controller directory.
81
Element Controller
4. Press [ to Confirm the new Assignment
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
Element Miscellaneous
EDIT MODE
COMMON
MISCELLANEOUS
EFFECT
ELEMENT
CONTROLLER
MISCELLANEOUS
MODIFIER
ENVELOPE
■ 1: Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 2: Breath Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
● 2-1: Breath Noise Level Key Scaling . . . . . . . .
● 2-2: Breath Noise HPF Key Scaling . . . . . . . . .
● 2-3: Breath Noise LPF Key Scaling . . . . . . . . . .
■ 3: Throat Formant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
● 3-1: Throat Formant Pitch Key Scaling . . . . . .
● 3-2: Throat Formant Amount Key Scaling . . . .
● 3-3: Throat Formant Intensity Key Scaling . . . .
● 3-4: Throat Formant HPF Key Scaling . . . . . . .
● 3-5: Throat Formant LPF Key Scaling . . . . . . .
83
84
86
87
88
89
91
92
93
94
95
■ 4: Mixing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
● 4-1: Mixing Driver Output Key Scaling . . . . . . . 98
● 4-2: Mixing Pipe/String Output Key Scaling . . . 99
● 4-3: Mixing Tap Output Key Scaling . . . . . . . . 100
● 4-4: Mixing Tap Location Key Scaling . . . . . . 101
■ 5: Amplitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
● 5-1: Amplitude Level Key Scaling . . . . . . . . . . 102
82
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
1: Setting
≤
Single, Multi.
Determines how the attack portion of the sound will be triggered.
Single
If a note is played on the keyboard, then a subsequent note or notes
are played while the first key is still held, no attack is produced.
Multi
The attack is always reproduced regardless of whether a previous key
is held or not.
•
The “Single” setting makes it easy to produce the “hammering on” and “pulling off” type effects used by guitar players, for example.
● Xfade Speed
≤
Fastest, 0.09msec … 390msec.
Simulates the naturally slow note-to-note transitions of acoustic instruments. The
slight “slur” that occurs between notes on wind instruments with tone holes is one example. The “Fastest” setting produces the fastest, most synthesizer-like transition between subsequently-played notes. The higher the value, the longer the transition. Normally, as setting somewhere between 1 and 2 milliseconds produces the most natural
sound.
● Interpolate Speed
≤
Fastest, 0.09msec … 6.35msec.
Determines the response time of the VL7 to control changes — Pressure, Amplitude, etc. The higher the value the faster the response (e.g. the slower the attack when
pressure is applied). Normally, as setting somewhere between 1 and 2 milliseconds
produces the most natural sound. Decay-type voices sound best a somewhat shorter value.
83
Element Miscellaneous
● Trigger Mode
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
2: Breath Noise
•
The • button (“Ctrl”) can be used to go directly to the breath noise
controller page (≥
Page 71), also available from the ELEMENT CONTROLLER directory. You can then return to the miscellaneous breath noise
page by pressing • (“Para”) again.
•
An inverse “K”(˚) next to a value means that key scaling can be applied to
that parameter. Position the cursor at the appropriate parameter and then press
the ¶ button (“KSC”) to go directly to the key scaling page for that parameter. You can return to the breath noise parameter page by pressing the ]
button.
● Level
≤
0 … 127.
Sets the level (volume) of the breath noise sound. The higher the value the higher
the level.
•
If this parameter is set to “0”, no breath noise can be applied via a controller.
● Slit Drive
≤
0 … 32.
Breath noise is produced at the “slit” portion of the VL7’s physical model (in a reed
instrument, the space between the reed and the mouthpiece). This parameter determines
the intensity of the breath noise. The smaller the value the more intense and rough the
breath noise.
● Ctrl Balance
≤
-64 … 63.
Sets the balance between two factors that determine the overall level of the breath
noise: “Ctrl” is the amount of control applied via the controller assigned to breath noise,
and “Slit” is the amount of breath noise produced by the slit. The graphic slider to the
right of the parameter provides a visual indication of the current balance.
•
If this parameter is set to “63”, no breath noise can be applied via a controller.
84
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
● HPF Cutoff Frq
≤
31.1 Hz … 21.6 kHz.
Sets the cutoff frequency of the breath noise high-pass filter. Noise components
below the specified frequency are cut off.
● LPF Cutoff Frq
≤
31.1 Hz … 24.0 kHz.
•
Virtually no breath noise sound will be produced if the high-pass filter is set
to a higher cutoff frequency than the low-pass filter.
● Key On Reset
≤
off, on.
Determines the feel of the breath noise attack.
on
The noise generator is reset for each note, resulting in the same breath
noise attack feel for each note played.
off
The noise generator is not reset for each note, result in a different, and
therefore natural, attack feel for each note played.
85
Element Miscellaneous
Sets the cutoff frequency of the breath noise low-pass filter. Noise components
above the specified frequency are cut off.
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
2-1: Breath Noise Level Key Scalling
Breath noise level key scaling produces natural breath noise level variations across
the range of the keyboard by allowing different level offset values to be applied to each
of six breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
The ¶ button (“Fpag”) can be used to go directly the next breath noise key
scaling page without having to return to the main parameter page.
● Level
≤
0 … 127.
The “Level” parameter is linked to the main breath noise “Level” parameter, and
sets the level (volume) of the breath noise sound. The higher the value the higher the
level. This value also determines the main level on which all key-scaled variations are
based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 … 6 Key
NOTES
≤
BP4
BP2
BP5
BP1
BP3
C2
C3
C4
■ If two breakpoints are
set to the same note, the
lower one functions as the
end of the key scaling
segment connecting to the
next lowest breakpoint
while the higher one
functions as the end of the
segment connecting to the
next highest breakpoint.
Further, the higher
breakpoint applies to the
specified note while the
lower one actually applies
to the next note to its left.
If more than two breakpoints are set to the same
note, only the lowest and
highest of these will
function as ends of the
corresponding key scaling
segments while the rest
are ignored.
C-2 … G8.
Allows six separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 … 6 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of level offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the breakpoint
key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the level, and positive values increase the
level at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset value is chosen, the actual
level will never exceed its minimum or maximum absolute value. When different offset
values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the level varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
86
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
2-2: Breath Noise HPF Key Scalling
Breath noise HPF key scaling produces natural breath noise tone variations across
the range of the keyboard by allowing different cutoff frequency offset values to be
applied to each of two breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next breath noise key scaling page without having
to return to the main parameter page.
● HPF
≤
31.1 Hz … 21.6 kHz.
The “HPF” parameter is linked to the main breath noise “HPF Cutoff Frq”
parameter, and sets the cutoff frequency of the breath noise high-pass filter. Noise components below the specified frequency are cut off. This value also determines the main
cutoff frequency on which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line
on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows two separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of cutoff frequency offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values lower the cutoff frequency, and
positive values raise the cutoff frequency at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter
what offset value is chosen, the actual cutoff frequency will never exceed its minimum or
maximum absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the cutoff frequency varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
87
Element Miscellaneous
•
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
2-3: Breath Noise LPF Key Scalling
Breath noise LPF key scaling produces natural breath noise tone variations across
the range of the keyboard by allowing different cutoff frequency offset values to be
applied to each of two breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
The § button (“Bpag”) can be used to go directly back to the next breath
noise key scaling page without having to return to the main parameter page.
● LPF
≤
31.1 Hz … 24.0 kHz.
The “LPF” parameter is linked to the main breath noise “LPF Cutoff Frq”
parameter, and sets the cutoff frequency of the breath noise low-pass filter. Noise components above the specified frequency are cut off. This value also determines the main
cutoff frequency on which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line
on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows two separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of cutoff frequency offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values lower the cutoff frequency, and
positive values raise the cutoff frequency at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter
what offset value is chosen, the actual cutoff frequency will never exceed its minimum or
maximum absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the cutoff frequency varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
88
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
3: Throat Formant
The • button (“Ctrl”) can be used to go directly to the throat formant
controller page (≥
Page 73), also available from the ELEMENT CONTROLLER directory. You can then return to the miscellaneous throat formant
page by pressing • (“Para”) again.
•
An inverse “K”(˚) next to a value means that key scaling can be applied to
that parameter. Position the cursor at the appropriate parameter and then press
the ¶ button (“KSC”) to go directly to the key scaling page for that parameter. You can return to the throat formant parameter page by pressing the
] button.
● Pitch Tracking
≤
Fixed, KeyTrack.
Determines whether the throat formant pitch is fixed or tracks the keyboard.
Fixed
The throat formant is fixed at the pitch specified by the “Pitch”
parameter, below.
KeyTrack
The pitch of the throat formant tracks the note(s) played on the
keyboard, offset by the amount specified by the “Pitch” parameter,
below.
● Pitch
≤
23.1 Hz … 48.0 kHz (when "Fixed" and "Intens" ≥ 0).
≤
11.4 Hz … 24.0 kHz (when "Fixed" and "Intens" < 0).
≤
-2.00oct … 1.98oct (when "KeyTrack").
When the “Pitch Tracking” parameter is set to “Fixed”, this parameter sets
the throat formant pitch to a specific frequency. When “Pitch Tracking” is set to
“KeyTrack”, however, this parameter determines how much the throat formant pitch is
offset from the pitch of the key played in octave units. In the latter case negative values
offset the throat formant pitch below the pitch of the key played, while positive values
offset the throat formant pitch above that of the key played.
● Amount
≤
-64 … 63.
Determines the amount of effect the throat formant sound has on the air velocity
within the instrument. Positive values increase the air velocity, thereby increasing the
throat formant effect. Minus values decrease the air velocity, producing a more subtle
throat formant effect.
89
Element Miscellaneous
•
Feature Reference
•
●
Edit Mode
If this parameter is set to “0”, no throat formant effect can be applied via a
controller.
● Intens
≤
-127 … 127.
Sets the intensity of the throat formant effect. Higher values in both the positive and
negative ranges increase the intensity of the throat formant effect.
•
If this parameter is set to “0”, no throat formant effect can be applied via a
controller.
● HPF Cutoff Frq
≤
31.1 Hz … 21.6 kHz.
Sets the cutoff frequency of the throat formant high-pass filter. Noise components
below the specified frequency are cut off.
● LPF Cutoff Frq
≤
31.1 Hz … 24.0 kHz.
Sets the cutoff frequency of the throat formant low-pass filter. Noise components
above the specified frequency are cut off.
•
Virtually no throat formant sound will be produced if the high-pass filter is set
to a higher cutoff frequency than the low-pass filter.
90
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
3-1: Throat Formant Pitch Key Scalling
Throat formant pitch key scaling produces natural throat formant pitch variations
across the range of the keyboard by allowing different pitch offset values to be applied to
each of four breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
The ¶ button (“Fpag”) can be used to go directly the next throat formant
key scaling page without having to return to the main parameter page.
● Pitch
≤
23.1 Hz … 48.0 kHz (when “Fixed” and “Intens” ≥ 0).
≤
11.4 Hz … 24.0 kHz (when “Fixed” and “Intens” < 0).
≤
-2.00oct … 1.98oct (when “KeyTrack”).
The “Pitch” parameter is linked to the main throat formant “Pitch” parameter,
and has the same effect. When the “Pitch Tracking” parameter is set to “Fixed”,
this parameter sets the throat formant pitch to a specific frequency. When “Pitch
Tracking” is set to “KeyTrack”, however, this parameter determines how much the
throat formant pitch is offset from the pitch of the key played in octave units. In the latter
case negative values offset the throat formant pitch below the pitch of the key played,
while positive values offset the throat formant pitch above that of the key played. This
value also determines the main pitch on which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 … 4 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows four separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 … 4 Offset
≤
-127 … 127.
Set the amount of pitch offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the breakpoint
key parameters, above. Negative values lower the pitch, and positive values raise the
pitch at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset value is chosen, the actual
pitch will never exceed its minimum or maximum absolute value. When different offset
values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the pitch varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
91
Element Miscellaneous
•
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
3-2: Throat Formant Amount Key Scalling
Throat formant amount key scaling produces natural throat formant variations across
the range of the keyboard by allowing different amount offset values to be applied to
each of four breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next throat formant key scaling page without
having to return to the main parameter page.
● Amount
≤
-64 … 63.
The “Amount” parameter is linked to the main throat formant “Amount” parameter, and determines the amount of effect the throat formant sound has on the air velocity
within the instrument. Positive values increase the air velocity, thereby increasing the
throat formant effect. Minus values decrease the air velocity, producing a more subtle
throat formant effect.
This value also determines the main amount value on which all key-scaled variations are
based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 … 4 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows four separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 … 4 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the breakpoint key
parameters, above. Negative values reduce the amount, and positive values increase the
amount at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset value is chosen, the actual
amount will never exceed its minimum or maximum absolute value. When different
offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the amount varies smoothly between the
breakpoints.
92
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
3-3: Throat Formant Intensity Key Scalling
Throat formant intensity key scaling produces natural throat formant intensity
variations across the range of the keyboard by allowing different intensity offset values to
be applied to each of four breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next throat formant key scaling page without
having to return to the main parameter page.
● Intens
≤
-127 … 127.
The “Intens” parameter is linked to the main throat formant “Intens” parameter, and sets the intensity of the throat formant effect. Higher values in both the positive
and negative ranges increase the intensity of the throat formant effect. This value also
determines the main intensity value on which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 … 4 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows four separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 … 4 Offset
≤
-127 … 127.
Set the amount of intensity offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the intensity, and positive values
increase the intensity at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset value is
chosen, the actual intensity will never exceed its minimum or maximum absolute value.
When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the intensity varies
smoothly between the breakpoints.
93
Element Miscellaneous
•
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
3-4: Throat Formant HPF Key Scalling
Throat formant HPF key scaling produces natural throat formant tone variations
across the range of the keyboard by allowing different cutoff frequency offset values to
be applied to each of three breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next throat formant key scaling page without
having to return to the main parameter page.
● HPF
≤
31.1 Hz … 21.6 kHz.
The “HPF” parameter is linked to the main throat formant “HPF Cutoff Freq”
parameter, and sets the cutoff frequency of the throat formant high-pass filter. Components above the specified frequency are cut off. This value also determines the main
cutoff frequency on which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line
on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 … 3 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows three separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2
and G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use
any of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for
breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press
the • button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint
while “Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 … 3 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of cutoff frequency offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values lower the cutoff frequency, and
positive values raise the cutoff frequency at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter
what offset value is chosen, the actual cutoff frequency will never exceed its minimum or
maximum absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the cutoff frequency varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
94
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
3-5: Throat Formant LPF Key Scalling
Throat formant LPF key scaling produces natural throat formant tone variations
across the range of the keyboard by allowing different cutoff frequency offset values to
be applied to each of three breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
The § button (“Bpag”) can be used to go directly back to the next throat
formant key scaling page without having to return to the main parameter page.
● LPF
≤
31.1 Hz … 24.0 kHz.
The “LPF” parameter is linked to the main throat formant “LPF Cutoff Freq”
parameter, and sets the cutoff frequency of the throat formant low-pass filter. Components above the specified frequency are cut off. This value also determines the main
cutoff frequency on which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line
on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 … 3 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows three separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2
and G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use
any of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for
breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press
the • button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint
while “Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 … 3 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of cutoff frequency offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values lower the cutoff frequency, and
positive values raise the cutoff frequency at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter
what offset value is chosen, the actual cutoff frequency will never exceed its minimum or
maximum absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the cutoff frequency varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
95
Element Miscellaneous
•
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
4: Mixing
•
An inverse “K”(˚) next to a value means that key scaling can be applied to
that parameter. Position the cursor at the appropriate parameter and then press
the ¶ button (“KSC”) to go directly to the key scaling page for that parameter. You can return to the mixing parameter page by pressing the ]
button.
● Driver Output
≤
0 … 127.
Adjusts the level of the instrument’s “driver” output. The “Driver” signal is the
direct output from the mouthpiece (or bow/string interface) without the resonance of the
instrument’s body. The higher the value the higher the output.
● Pipe/String Output
≤
0 … 127.
Adjusts the main output from the instrument’s pipe or string. The higher the value
the higher the output.
● Tap Output
≤
0 … 127.
By “tapping” the output from a specific point along the instrument’s pipe or string
and mixing that signal with the Driver and Pipe/String signals, a range of variations can
be produced. This parameter adjusts the tap output. The higher the value the higher the
output.
● Tap Sign
≤
-, +.
Sets the phase of the tap signal: “+” for positive or normal phase, “-” for negative
or inverse phase.
● Tap Setting
≤
Variable, Driving Point.
When set to “Driving Point” the tap location is fixed at the instrument’s
driving point (mouthpiece or bow/string interface). When set to “Variable” the tap
location is determined by the “Tap Location” parameter, below.
96
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
● Tap Location
≤
0 … 99.2 %.
This parameter only appears when the “Tap Setting” parameter is set to
“Variable”, and is used to set the location of the tap at an appropriate point along the
instrument’s pipe or string.
Driver Signal
Pipe/String
Tap
Signal
Pipe/Strings Signal
Modifiers
Driver signal to
Harmonic Enhancer
Mixed
Output
Output
97
Mixing
Element Miscellaneous
Driver
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
4-1: Mixing Driver Output Key Scalling
Mixing driver output key scaling produces natural timbre variations across the range
of the keyboard by allowing different driver output offset values to be applied to each of
six breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
The ¶ button (“Fpag”) can be used to go directly the next throat formant
key scaling page without having to return to the main parameter page.
● DrivOut
≤
0 … 127.
The “DrivOut” parameter is linked to the main mixing “Driver Output”
parameter, and has the same effect. This value also determines the main output level on
which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 … 6 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows six separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 … 6 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of output offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the output, and positive values
increase the output at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset value is
chosen, the actual output level will never exceed its minimum or maximum absolute
value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the output varies
smoothly between the breakpoints.
98
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
4-2: Mixing Pipe/String Output Key Scalling
Mixing pipe/string output key scaling produces natural timbre variations across the
range of the keyboard by allowing different pipe/string output offset values to be applied
to each of six breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next mixing key scaling page without having to
return to the main parameter page.
● P/S Out
≤
0 … 127.
The “P/S Out” parameter is linked to the main mixing “Pipe/String Output” parameter, and has the same effect. This value also determines the main output
level on which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on the
graph).
● Breakpoint 1 … 6 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows six separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 … 6 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of output offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the output, and positive values
increase the output at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset value is
chosen, the actual output level will never exceed its minimum or maximum absolute
value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the output varies
smoothly between the breakpoints.
99
Element Miscellaneous
•
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
4-3: Mixing Tap Output Key Scalling
Mixing tap output key scaling produces natural timbre variations across the range of
the keyboard by allowing different tap output offset values to be applied to each of six
breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next mixing key scaling page without having to
return to the main parameter page.
•
Tap Output Key Scaling has no effect when the main Mixing page “Tap
Setting” parameter is set to “Driving Point”.
● TapOut
≤
0 … 127.
The “TapOut” parameter is linked to the main mixing “Tap Output” parameter,
and has the same effect. This value also determines the main output level on which all
key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 … 6 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows six separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 … 6 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of output offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the output, and positive values
increase the output at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset value is
chosen, the actual output level will never exceed its minimum or maximum absolute
value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the output varies
smoothly between the breakpoints.
100
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
4-4: Mixing Tap Location Key Scalling
Mixing tap location key scaling produces natural timbre variations across the range
of the keyboard by allowing different tap location offset values to be applied to each of
six breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
The § button (“Bpag”) can be used to go directly back to the next mixing
key scaling page without having to return to the main parameter page.
•
Tap Location Key Scaling has no effect when the main Mixing page “Tap
Setting” parameter is set to “Driving Point”.
● TapLoc
≤
0 … 99.2%.
The “TapLoc” parameter is linked to the main mixing “Tap Location” parameter, and has the same effect. This value also determines the main tap location on which
all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 … 6 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows six separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 … 6 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of tap location offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the tap location value, and
positive values increase the tap location value at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter
what offset value is chosen, the actual tap location will never exceed its minimum or
maximum absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the tap location varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
101
Element Miscellaneous
•
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
5: Amplitude
•
Key scaling can be applied to the Amplitude Level parameter. Press the ¶
button (“KSC”) to go directly to the key scaling page. You can return to the
amplitude parameter page by pressing the ] button.
● Amplitude Level
≤
0 … 127.
Sets the final output level after mixing. The higher the value the higher the level.
5-1: Amplitude Level Key Scaling
Amplitude level key scaling produces natural level variations across the range of the
keyboard by allowing different level offset values to be applied to each of eight breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
● Level
≤
0 … 127.
The “Level” parameter is linked to the main amplitude “Amplitude Level”
parameter, and sets the final output level after mixing. The higher the value the higher the
level. This value also determines the main level on which all key-scaled variations are
based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
102
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
● Breakpoint 1 … 8 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows eight separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2
and G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use
any of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for
breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press
the • button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint
(indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of level offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the breakpoint
key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the level, and positive values increase the
level at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset value is chosen, the actual
level will never exceed its minimum or maximum absolute value. When different offset
values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the level varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
103
Element Miscellaneous
● Breakpoint 1 … 8 Offset
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
Element Modifier
EDIT MODE
COMMON
MISCELLANEOUS
EFFECT
ELEMENT
CONTROLLER
MISCELLANEOUS
MODIFIER
ENVELOPE
■ 1: Harmonic Enhancer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
● 1-1: Harmonic Enhancer HPF Key Scaling . . .
● 1-2: Harmonic Enhancer Overdrive Key Scaling
● 1-3: Harmonic Enhancer Carrier Level Key
Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
● 1-4: Harmonic Enhancer Modulator Index Key
Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
● 1-5: Harmonic Enhancer Balance Key Scaling
■ 2: Dynamic Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
● 2-1: Dynamic Filter Cutoff Key Scaling . . . . . .
● 2-2: Dynamic Filter Resonance Key Scaling . .
105
108
109
110
111
112
■ 3: Equalizer Auxiliary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
● 3-1: Equalizer Auxiliary HPF Key Scaling . . . .
● 3-2: Equalizer Auxiliary LPF Key Scaling . . . .
■ 4: Equlizer Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 5: Impulse Expander & Resonator Setting . . .
■ 6: Impulse Expander . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
■ 7: Resonator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
113
115
116
104
117
118
119
120
121
123
124
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
1: Harmonic Enhancer
■
Carrier Parameters
■
Modulator Parameters
Element Modifier
•
The Harmonic Enhancer has both a “Carrier” and “Modulator” block, as
shown in the block diagram below. Each has its own parameters and therefore
two separate parameter pages are provided. Press the ¡ button (“Crr”) to
select the carrier parameter page or ™ (“Mod”) to select the modulator
parameter page.
Modulator
Source.
Modulator
Carrier
Source.
Carrier
Driver,
pipe/string,
and tap sound.
Wet/Dry
Balance
Out
(to Dynamic Filter.)
•
The • button (“Ctrl”) can be used to go directly to the harmonic enhancer
controller page (≥
Page 76), also available from the ELEMENT CONTROLLER directory. You can then return to the modifier harmonic enhancer
page by pressing • (“Para”) again.
•
An inverse “K”(˚) next to a value means that key scaling can be applied to
that parameter. Position the cursor at the appropriate parameter and then press
the ¶ button (“KSC”) to go directly to the key scaling page for that parameter. You can return to the harmonic enhancer parameter page by pressing the
] button.
105
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
● Signal Select
≤
Normal, Breath Noise Amp., Flow Rate Saturation, Beat, Slit/Friction, Reed.
Selects the signal to be used by the carrier or modulator.
Normal
This is the total output of the instrument model: a mix of the driver,
pipe/string, and tap signals.
Breath Noise
Amplitude
This signal represents the instantaneous amplitude of the breath noise
produced at the driver. It is basically a highly distorted version of the
Slit/Friction signal described below.
Flow Rate Saturation
When the pressures on either side of an aperture (e.g. a mouthpiece/
reed assembly) differ, a corresponding flow of air is produced. There is,
however, a limit to the speed of the airflow which can be produced
(saturation). The relationship between the pressure difference and
resulting airflow is derived as the Flow Rate Saturation signal.
Beat
The beat signal represents contact between the vibrating reed and the
mouthpiece.
Slit/Friction
As the reed vibrates, the area of gap (slit) between it and the mouthpiece varies accordingly. The Slit/Friction signal corresponds to the
varying are of the reed/mouthpiece slit.
Reed
This signal is derived directly from the flexing of the reed.
● HPF Cutoff
≤
17.0 Hz … 11.2 kHz.
Both the modulator and carrier blocks have high-pass filters that can be used to roll
off the low frequencies of the corresponding signal. This parameter sets the cutoff frequency of the carrier or modulator high-pass filter.
● Over Drive
≤
0.063 … 15.31.
This parameter boosts the corresponding modulator or carrier signal, forcing it into
distortion and thereby drastically changing its harmonic structure. The higher the value
the greater the distortion. No distortion is produced below a setting of “1.0”.
● Level (Carrier only)
≤
0 … 127.
Sets the output level of the carrier. The higher the value the greater the output level.
● Balance
≤
-64 … 63.
Sets the balance between the “wet” (the output of the harmonic enhancer) and “dry”
(the direct signal) signals. The higher the value the more “wet” the signal, and therefore
the more pronounced the harmonic enhancer effect. The carrier and modulator page
“Balance” parameters are linked.
106
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
● Phase (Modulator only)
≤
0deg … 360deg.
This parameter is provided for the modulator block only. It allows a degree of
timbral variation by varying the phase of the modulator signal through 360 degrees in 2or 3-degree increments.
● Index (Modulator only)
≤
0 … 127.
Notes On Using the Harmonic Enhancer
Although any modulator source signal can be applied to any carrier
source signal, two approaches are recommended when attempting to create
an acoustic instrument simulation.
The first is to set the carrier signal to “Normal” and the modulator
signal to any setting other than normal, set the dry/wet “Balance” to 63
(all wet), and set a relatively high “Index” value. In this case the total
output of the instrument model (“Normal” signal) will by modulated by
one of the component signals, so the dry/wet “Balance” can be set to
fully wet (carrier output only) since the carrier source and dry signals are
essentially the same. The Index parameter determines how much modulation is applied, so a higher value is generally required to create sufficient
variation.
The second approach is to set the carrier signal to any setting other
than normal and the modulator signal to any of the six possibilities, set the
dry/wet “Balance” to a more central value, and set a relatively low
“Index” value. In this situation it is necessary to set the “Balance”
more toward the “Dry” side since the carrier source signal is not the
normal signal and at least some of the dry signal is necessary to provide the
basic sound of the instrument model. In other words, the sound produced by
the Harmonic Enhancer is simply added to the basic sound of the
instrument, in contrast with the first approach in which the basic sound of
the instrument is modulated directly.
Please note that these are only guidelines, and are by no means the
only way to work with the Harmonic Enhancer. Since the Harmonic Enhancer tends to respond differently with different instrument models,
experimentation and experience are your most valuable tools.
107
Element Modifier
Determines how much modulation is applied to the carrier signal (i.e. the level of
the modulator signal applied to the carrier). The higher the value the greater the modulation.
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
1-1: Harmonic Enhancer HPF Key Scaling
Harmonic Enhancer HPF key scaling produces natural timbral variations across the
range of the keyboard by allowing different cutoff frequency offset values to be applied
to each of two breakpoints set at appropriate keys. Key scaling can be applied independently to the carrier and modulator high-pass filters.
■
Carrier Parameters
■
Modulator Parameters
•
Separate key scaling parameter pages are provided for the carrier and modulator high-pass filters. The appropriate key scaling page will be selected when
you press ¶ (“KSC”) from the main carrier or modulator parameter page.
•
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next harmonic enhancer key scaling page without
having to return to the main parameter page.
● CrrHPF, ModHPF
≤
17.0 Hz … 11.2 kHz.
The “CrrHPF” and “ModHPF” parameters are linked to the main harmonic enhancer “HPF Cutoff” parameters, and set the cutoff frequency of the carrier or modulator high-pass filter. Frequency components below the specified frequency are cut off.
This value also determines the main cutoff frequency on which all key-scaled variations
are based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows two separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
108
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of cutoff frequency offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values lower the cutoff frequency, and
positive values raise the cutoff frequency at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter
what offset value is chosen, the actual cutoff frequency will never exceed its minimum or
maximum absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the cutoff frequency varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
1-2: Harmonic Enhancer Overdrive Key Scaling
■
Carrier Parameters
■
Modulator Parameters
•
Separate key scaling parameter pages are provided for the carrier and modulator overdrive parameters. The appropriate key scaling page will be selected
when you press ¶ (“KSC”) from the main carrier or modulator parameter
page.
•
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next harmonic enhancer key scaling page without
having to return to the main parameter page.
● CrrOvr, ModOvr
≤
0.063 … 15.31 kHz.
The “CrrOvr” and “ModOvr” parameters are linked to the main harmonic enhancer “Over Drive” parameters, and set the amount of distortion produced by the
carrier or modulator. This value also determines the main overdrive level on which all
key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
109
Element Modifier
Harmonic Enhancer overdrive key scaling produces natural timbral variations across
the range of the keyboard by allowing different overdrive offset values to be applied to
each of two breakpoints set at appropriate keys. Key scaling can be applied independently
to the carrier and modulator overdrive parameters.
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows two separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of overdrive offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the overdrive level, and
positive values increase the overdrive level at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter
what offset value is chosen, the actual overdrive level will never exceed its minimum or
maximum absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the overdrive level varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
1-3: Harmonic Enhancer Carrier Level Key Scaling
Harmonic Enhancer carrier level key scaling produces natural timbral variations
across the range of the keyboard by allowing different carrier level offset values to be
applied to each of four breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next harmonic enhancer key scaling page without
having to return to the main parameter page.
● CrrLvl
≤
0 … 127.
The “CrrLvl” parameter is linked to the main harmonic enhancer carrier “Level”
parameter, and sets the output level of the carrier block. This value also determines the
main carrier level on which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line
on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 … 4 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows four separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
110
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 … 4 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
1-4: Harmonic Enhancer Modulator Index Key Scaling
Harmonic Enhancer modulator index key scaling produces natural timbral variations
across the range of the keyboard by allowing different modulator index offset values to
be applied to each of four breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next harmonic enhancer key scaling page without
having to return to the main parameter page.
● ModIdx
≤
0 … 127.
The “ModIdx” parameter is linked to the main harmonic enhancer modulator
“Index” parameter, and sets the amount of modulation applied to the carrier. This value
also determines the main modulator index on which all key-scaled variations are based
(indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 … 4 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows four separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
111
Element Modifier
Set the amount of level offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the breakpoint
key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the carrier level, and positive values
increase the carrier level at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset value is
chosen, the actual carrier level will never exceed its minimum or maximum absolute
value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the carrier level
varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
● Breakpoint 1 … 4 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of modulator index offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the modulator index, and
positive values increase the modulator index at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter
what offset value is chosen, the actual modulator index will never exceed its minimum or
maximum absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the modulator index varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
1-5: Harmonic Enhancer Balance Key Scaling
Harmonic Enhancer balance key scaling produces natural timbral variations across
the range of the keyboard by allowing different balance offset values to be applied to
each of two breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
The § button (“Bpag”) can be used to go directly backward to the next
harmonic enhancer key scaling page without having to return to the main
parameter page.
● Balance
≤
-64 … 63.
The “Balance” parameter is linked to the main harmonic enhancer “Balance”
parameter, and sets the balance between the wet and dry sound. This value also determines the main balance value on which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a
dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows two separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of balance offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the balance value (toward “dry”),
112
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
and positive values increase the balance value (toward “wet”) at the corresponding
breakpoint. No matter what offset value is chosen, the actual balance setting will never
exceed its minimum or maximum absolute value. When different offset values are applied
to adjacent breakpoints, the balance varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
2: Dynamic Filter
Element Modifier
•
The • button (“Ctrl”) can be used to go directly to the dynamic filter
controller page (≥
Page 75), also available from the ELEMENT CONTROLLER directory. You can then return to the modifier dynamic filter page
by pressing • (“Para”) again.
•
An inverse “K”(˚) next to a value means that key scaling can be applied to
that parameter. Position the cursor at the appropriate parameter and then press
the ¶ button (“KSC”) to go directly to the key scaling page for that parameter. You can return to the dynamic filter parameter page by pressing the
] button.
Dynamic
Filter
In
(from Harmonic
Enhancer)
Wet/Dry
Balance
Out
(to Frequency
Equalizer)
● Filter Mode
≤
LPF, BPF, HPF, BEF.
Selects the filter mode.
LPF
Low-pass filter. Frequencies below the cutoff frequency are passed
while those above are cut off. The cutoff slope is -12 dB/octave.
BPF
Band-pass filter. In this case the “cutoff frequency” is actually the
center frequency of a narrow band of frequencies which will be passed.
The cutoff slope is -6 dB/octave.
HPF
High-pass filter. Frequencies above the cutoff frequency are passed
while those below are cut off. The cutoff slope is -12 dB/octave.
BEF
Band-eliminaton filter. The cutoff frequency is the center frequency of a
narrow band of frequencies which will be cut off. The cutoff slope is -6
dB/octave.
113
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
● Input Gain
≤
0 … 127.
Adjusts the level of the input signal to the dynamic filter stage. The higher the value
the higher the input level.
● Balance
≤
-64 … 63.
Sets the balance between the “wet” (the output of the dynamic filter) and “dry”
(direct) signals. The higher the value the more “wet” the signal, and therefore the more
pronounced the dynamic filter effect.
● Cutoff Tracking
≤
Fixed, KeyTrack.
Determines whether the dynamic filter cutoff frequency is fixed or tracks the
keyboard.
Fixed
The dynamic filter is fixed at the frequency specified by the “Cutoff
Freq.” parameter, below.
KeyTrack
The cutoff frequency of the dynamic filter tracks the note(s) played on
the keyboard, offset by the amount specified by the “Cutoff Freq.”
parameter, below.
● Cutoff Freq.
≤
26.9 Hz … 11.9 kHz (when “Fixed”).
≤
-4.00oct … 3.94oct (when “KeyTrack”).
When the “Cutoff Tracking” parameter is set to “Fixed”, this parameter sets
the dynamic filter cutoff frequency to a specific frequency between 26.9 hertz and 11.9
kilohertz. When “Cutoff Tracking” is set to “KeyTrack”, however, this parameter
determines how much the cutoff frequency is offset from the frequency of the key played
in octave units. In the latter case negative values offset the cutoff frequency below the
frequency of the key played, while positive values offset the cutoff frequency above that
of the key played.
● Resonance
≤
1.00 … 15.67.
This parameter produces a “peaking” effect at the filter’s cutoff frequency, further
emphasizing the frequencies at that point. This higher the value the higher the resonant
peak.
114
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
2-1: Dynamic Filter Cutoff Key Scaling
Dynamic filter cutoff frequency key scaling produces natural timbral variations
across the range of the keyboard by allowing different cutoff frequency offset values to
be applied to each of three breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
● Cutoff
≤
26.9 Hz … 11.9 kHz (when “Fixed”).
≤
-4.0oct … 3.94oct (when “KeyTrack”).
The “Cutoff” parameter is linked to the main dynamic filter “Cutoff Freq.”
parameter, and has the same effect. This value also determines the main cutoff frequency
on which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 … 3 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows three separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2
and G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use
any of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for
breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press
the • button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint
while “Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 … 3 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of cutoff frequency offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values lower the cutoff frequency, and
positive values raise the cutoff frequency at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter
what offset value is chosen, the actual cutoff frequency will never exceed its minimum or
maximum absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the cutoff frequency varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
115
Element Modifier
•
The ¶ button (“Fpag”) can be used to go directly forward to the next dynamic
filter key scaling page without having to return to the main parameter page.
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
2-2: Dynamic Filter Resonance Key Scaling
Dynamic filter resonance key scaling produces natural timbral variations across the
range of the keyboard by allowing different resonance offset values to be applied to each
of three breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
The § button (“Bpag”) can be used to go directly backward to the next
dynamic filter key scaling page without having to return to the main parameter
page.
● Rez
≤
1.00 … 15.67.
The “Rez” parameter is linked to the main dynamic filter “Resonance” parameter, and has the same effect. This value also determines the main resonance value on
which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 … 3 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows three separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2
and G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use
any of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for
breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press
the • button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint
while “Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 … 3 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of resonance offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the resonance, and positive
values increase the resonance at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset
value is chosen, the actual resonance setting will never exceed its minimum or maximum
absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the
resonance varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
116
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
3: Equalizer Auxiliary
•
● Input Gain
≤
0 … 127.
Adjusts the level of the input signal to the equalizer stage. The higher the value the
higher the input level.
● HPF Cutoff Freq.
≤
17.0 Hz … 11.2 kHz.
Sets the cutoff frequency of the high-pass filter. Frequency components below the
specified frequency are cut off.
● LPF Cutoff Freq.
≤
31.1 Hz … 24.0 kHz.
Sets the cutoff frequency of the low-pass filter. Frequency components above the
specified frequency are cut off. The low-pass filter is completely bypassed when set to
“off”.
117
Element Modifier
An inverse “K”(˚) next to a value means that key scaling can be applied to
that parameter. Position the cursor at the appropriate parameter and then press
the ¶ button (“KSC”) to go directly to the key scaling page for that parameter. You can return to the equalizer auxiliary parameter page by pressing the
] button.
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
3-1: Equalizer Auxiliary HPF Key Scaling
Equalizer HPF key scaling produces natural tone variations across the range of the
keyboard by allowing different cutoff frequency offset values to be applied to each of
three breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
The ¶ button (“Fpag”) can be used to go directly forward to the next
equalizer auxiliary key scaling page without having to return to the main
parameter page.
● HPF
≤
17.0 Hz … 11.2 kHz.
The “HPF” parameter is linked to the main equalizer auxiliary “HPF Cutoff
Freq.” parameter, and sets the cutoff frequency of the high-pass filter. Frequency
components below the specified frequency are cut off. This value also determines the
main cutoff frequency on which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted
line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 … 3 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows three separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2
and G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use
any of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for
breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press
the • button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint
while “Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 … 3 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of cutoff frequency offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values lower the cutoff frequency, and
positive values raise the cutoff frequency at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter
what offset value is chosen, the actual cutoff frequency will never exceed its minimum or
maximum absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the cutoff frequency varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
118
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
3-2: Equalizer Auxiliary LPF Key Scaling
Equalizer LPF key scaling produces natural tone variations across the range of the
keyboard by allowing different cutoff frequency offset values to be applied to each of
three breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
The § button (“Bpag”) can be used to go directly backward to the next
equalizer auxiliary key scaling page without having to return to the main
parameter page.
● LPF
≤
31.1 Hz … 24.0 kHz.
The “LPF” parameter is linked to the main equalizer auxiliary “LPF Cutoff
Freq.” parameter, and sets the cutoff frequency of the low-pass filter. Frequency
components above the specified frequency are cut off. This value also determines the
main cutoff frequency on which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted
line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 … 3 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows three separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2
and G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use
any of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for
breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press
the • button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint
while “Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 … 3 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of cutoff frequency offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values lower the cutoff frequency, and
positive values raise the cutoff frequency at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter
what offset value is chosen, the actual cutoff frequency will never exceed its minimum or
maximum absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the cutoff frequency varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
119
Element Modifier
•
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
4: Equalizer Band
•
The Equalizer Band block is a 5-band parametric equalizer with frequency, Q
(bandwidth), and level control. The Band block functions in the same way as
any standard parametric equalizer, allowing flexible response control over a
wide range.
● Bnd1 Freq
≤
40.0 Hz … 321.0 Hz.
● Bnd2 Freq
≤
104.0 Hz … 838.0 Hz.
● Bnd3 Freq
≤
248.0 Hz … 2.00 kHz.
● Bnd4 Freq
≤
646.0 Hz … 5.21 kHz.
● Bnd5 Freq
≤
1.54 kHz … 10.0 kHz.
These parameters individually set the center frequencies of the equalizer stage’s five
bands. Note that the bands overlap somewhat for smooth, seamless control.
● Bnd1 … Bnd5 Q
≤
0.5 … 20.0.
Individually set the Q (bandwidth) for each of the equalizer’s five bands. The higher
the value the narrower the bandwidth.
● Bnd1 … Bnd5 Level
≤
-24.0 … 23.6.
Individually set the level of the equalizer’s five bands. Negative values produce a
cut at the frequency of the corresponding band while positive values produce a boost.
120
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
5: Impulse Expander & Resonator Setting
•
Ipulse
Impulse
Expander
On/Off
Dry
Level
•
Resonator
Input Gain
Impulse
Expander
Wet Level
Resonator
On/Off
Resonator
Wet Level
Resonator
Level
Balance
Impulse
Expander
Level
Balance
When the cursor is positioned at the “IE on/off” or “RSN on/off”
block, “Para” will appear above the • button. Press this button to go
directly to the main Impulse Expander (≥
Page 123) or Resonator (≥
Page 124) parameter page, respectively.
● IE
≤
off, on.
Turns the Impulse Expander stage off or on. When off (and the Resonator, below, is
on) the display will appear as shown below. Only parameters which appear in the diagram are available for editing.
121
Element Modifier
This page provide access to a range of parameters which affect operation of
the Impulse Expander and Resonator stages (described later) and how they
interact. It contains a number of parameters which are accessed by moving the
cursor to the appropriate block within the diagram. The corresponding parameter will appear in the upper right area of the display.
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
● RSN
≤
off, on.
Turns the Resonator stage off or on. When off (and the Impulse Expander, above, is
on) the display will appear as shown below. Only parameters which appear in the diagram are available for editing.
● Dry Level
≤
0 … 127.
Sets the level of the dry signal (i.e. the direct signal which does not pass through
either the Impulse Expander or the Resonator.
● IE Wet Level
≤
0 … 127.
Sets the “wet” output level from the Impulse Expander. The higher the value the
higher the Impulse Expander level.
● IE Level Bal
≤
-64 … 63.
Adjusts the left-right balance of the wet Impulse Expander signal returned to the
stereo signal path. Positive values route more signal to the right channel while negative
values route more signal to the left channel.
● RSN Inp Gain
≤
0 … 127.
Sets the level of the Impulse Expander output signal received at the input of the
Resonator stage. The higher the value the higher the input level.
● RSN Wet Level
≤
0 … 127.
Sets the “wet” output level from the Resonator. The higher the value the higher the
Resonator level.
● RSN Level Bal
≤
-64 … 63.
Adjusts the left-right balance of the wet Resonator signal returned to the stereo
signal path. Positive values route more signal to the right channel while negative values
route more signal to the left channel.
122
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
6: Impulse Expander
This display will not appear — “Impulse Expander is not used”
will appear — if the “IE on/off” block in the “Impulse Expander &
Resonator Setting” page is turned “off” (≥
Page 123). All level and
balance settings relating to the Impulse Expander are also available in that
display page.
•
Press the • button (“Set”) to go directly to the “Impulse Expander & Resonator Setting” page.
The Impulse Expander works in conjunction with the Resonator, described below, to
simulate the effect of an instrument’s resonant cavity or sound box. It can also be used to
simulate the acoustic environment in which the instrument is played.
In
(from Frequency
Equalizer)
Frequency-dependent Delay
Mix
•
Out
(to Resonator)
If the IE & RSN SETTING page “Dry Level” parameter is set to a high
level, phase cancellation between the dry and wet signals can change the
sound of the Impulse Expander effect.
● Density
≤
0.146 msec … 20.77 msec.
Adjusts the density of the sound, and therefore its texture. Higher values produce
greater density.
● Dispersion
≤
4.028 msec … 4.000 sec.
Determines the resonance time. The higher the value the longer the resonance.
•
A high dispersion setting produces an early-reflections type reverberation effect.
● Roughness
≤
0 … 16.
This parameter imparts a “roughness” to the overall frequency response in the form
of steep peaks and dips in the response. The higher the value the greater the roughness.
123
Element Modifier
•
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
7: Resonator
•
This display will not appear — “Resonator is not used” will appear
— if the “RES on/off” block in the “Impulse Expander & Resonator
Setting” page is turned “off” (≥
Page 121, 122). All level and balance
settings relating to the Resonator are also available in that display page.
•
Press the • button (“Set”) to go directly to the “Impulse Expander & Resonator Setting” page.
While the Impulse Expander tends to give the sound a metallic quality, the Resonator produces a more woody resonance effect. Careful adjustment of the resonator’s
parameters can often bring a not-quite-right voice to life.
Delay
Delay
Delay
In
(from Resonator)
Delay
Right Channel
Out (to Effects)
Left Channel
Delay
● DL1 … DL5
≤
0.29 msec … 41.54 msec.
These parameters independently set the delay times for the Resonator’s five delay
lines.
Delay times for “natural” effects can be calculated by dividing the instrument’s
body dimensions by the speed of sound (34 centimeters per millisecond). For example, an
instrument with a body which measures 68 cm x 34 cm would naturally include delay
times of 2 msec (68/34 = 2 msec) and 1 msec (34/34 = 1 msec. These values can then be
fine-adjusted to achieve the desired results.
124
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
● Decay Time
≤
4,028 msec … 4.000 sec.
Determines the length of decay of the sound. The higher the value the longer the
decay.
● LPF Cutoff Freq.
≤
31.1 Hz … 24.0 kHz.
Sets the cutoff frequency of the low-pass filter. Produces a natural decay in the
high-frequency components of the delay sound.
≤
0 … 16.
Determines how the resonance sound “spreads” in the stereo sound field. The higher
the value the wider the sound.
● Phase
≤
-16 … 16.
Sets the phase of the resonance signal, changing its position in the stereo sound
field. Positive values move the resonance sound to the left while negative values move it
to the right.
125
Element Modifier
● Diffusion
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
Element Envelope
EDIT MODE
COMMON
MISCELLANEOUS
EFFECT
ELEMENT
CONTROLLER
MISCELLANEOUS
MODIFIER
ENVELOPE
■ 1: Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
■ 2: Embouchure & Pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
● 2-1: Embouchure & Pitch Hold Time Key Scaling 130
● 2-2: Embouchure & Pitch Initial Level Key Scaling 131
● 2-3: Embouchure & Pitch Decay Rate Key Scaling 132
■ 3: Vibrato . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
● 3-1: Vibrato Delay Time Key Scaling . . . . . . . 135
● 3-2: Vibrato Attack Rate Key Scaling . . . . . . . 136
● 3-3: Vibrato Depth Key Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . 137
● 3-4: Vibrato Speed Key Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . 138
■ 4: Growl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
● 4-1: Growl Speed Key Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
■ 5: Amplitude & Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
● 5-1: Amplitude & Filter Attack Rate Key Scaling . . 144
● 5-2: Amplitude & Filter Attack 1 Level Key Scaling 145
● 5-3: Amplitude & Filter Decay Rate Key Scaling . 146
● 5-4: Amplitude & Filter Sustain Level Key Scaling 147
● 5-5: Amplitude & Filter Release Rate Key Scaling 148
126
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
1: Pressure
•
Each VL7 voice has its own pressure envelope which determines how it
responds to pressure changes. The parameters in this display page determine
how the pressure envelope is used and how it will respond to keyboard velocity.
≤
Disable, ADSR, AR.
This parameter determines whether or how the pressure envelope will be used.
Disable
The voice’s pressure envelope is not used, and pressure always
corresponds exactly to the position or value of the controller assigned
to pressure. If no controller is assigned the pressure is always maximum. In this case the “Attack Rate Offset”, “Release Rate
Offset”, “Velocity Sens To Level”, and “Velocity Sens To
Rate” parameters have no effect.
ADSR
Pressure responds according to the attack, decay, sustain, and release
settings of the voice’s pressure envelope.
AR
Pressure responds according to the attack and release settings of the
voice’s pressure envelope. The decay and sustain settings are ignored.
● Attack Rate Offset
≤
-16 … 16.
Adjusts the attack rate of the voice’s pressure envelope. Positive values produce a
faster attack while negative values produce a slower attack.
● Release Rate Offset
≤
-16 … 16.
Adjusts the release rate of the voice’s pressure envelope. Positive values produce a
faster release while negative values produce a slower release.
● Velocity Sens To Level
≤
0 … 16.
Determines the relationship between pressure and keyboard velocity. When set to
“0”, keyboard velocity (i.e. how fast or hard the keyboard is played) has no effect on
pressure. At values higher than “1”, however, high keyboard velocities will increase the
pressure and low keyboard velocities will decrease the pressure. The higher the value the
greater the effect of keyboard velocity on pressure.
127
Element Envelope
● EG Mode
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
● Velocity Sens To Rate
≤
0 … 16.
Determines the relationship between the voice’s pressure envelope rates (attack,
decay, and release) and keyboard velocity. When set to “0”, keyboard velocity (i.e. how
fast or hard the keyboard is played) has no effect on the envelope rates. At values higher
than “1”, however, high keyboard velocities will increase the rates and low keyboard
velocities will decrease the rates. The higher the value the greater the effect of keyboard
velocity on the pressure envelope rates.
2: Embouchure & Pitch
•
Each VL7 voice has its own embouchure & pitch envelope which determines
how it responds to embouchure and pitch changes. The parameters in this
display page determine how the embouchure & pitch envelope is used and
how it will respond to keyboard velocity.
•
An inverse “K”(˚) next to a value means that key scaling can be applied to
that parameter. Position the cursor at the appropriate parameter and then press
the ¶ button (“KSC”) to go directly to the key scaling page for that parameter. You can return to the embouchure & pitch envelope parameter page by
pressing the ] button.
● VlSns To Lvl
≤
0 … 16.
Determines the relationship between embouchure/pitch and keyboard velocity.
When set to “0”, keyboard velocity (i.e. how fast or hard the keyboard is played) has no
effect on embouchure or pitch. At values higher than “1”, however, high keyboard
velocities produce a higher embouchure and pitch variation while low keyboard velocities
produce a smaller variation. The higher the value the greater the effect of keyboard
velocity on embouchure & pitch.
● VlSns To Rate
≤
-16 … 16.
Determines the relationship between the voice’s embouchure & pitch envelope
decay rate and keyboard velocity. When set to “0”, keyboard velocity (i.e. how fast or
hard the keyboard is played) has no effect on the decay rate. At values higher than “1”,
128
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
however, high keyboard velocities will increase the decay rate and low keyboard velocities will decrease the decay rate. Negative values have the opposite effect. The higher the
value the greater the effect of keyboard velocity on the embouchure & pitch envelope
decay rate.
● Dpth To Emb
≤
0 … 64.
This parameter determines how deeply the settings in this display page affect
embouchure. The higher the value the greater the effect.
● Dpth To Ptch
≤
0 … 64.
● Hold Time
≤
0 … 127.
Sets the hold time of the embouchure & pitch envelope. That is, the length of time
the initial envelope level is held before the decay portion of the envelope begins (see
“Initial Lvl”, below). The higher the value the longer the hold time.
Level
63
Time
0
Initial Lvl
Decay Rate
Hold Time
-64
● Initial Lvl
≤
-64 … 63.
Sets the initial level of the embouchure & pitch envelope. That is, the level of the
envelope (pitch in the case of the pitch parameter) at the instant a key is played. The
higher the value the higher the initial level.
•
If the “Initial Lvl” parameter is set to “0” the embouchure & pitch
envelope has no effect.
● Decay Rate
≤
0 … 127.
Sets the decay rate of the embouchure & pitch envelope. That is, the rate at which
the envelope level (pitch in the case of the pitch parameter) changes from the initial level
to “0” after the hold time has elapsed. The higher the value the faster the decay rate.
129
Element Envelope
This parameter determines how deeply the settings in this display page affect pitch.
The higher the value the greater the effect.
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
2-1: Embouchure & Pitch Hold Time Key Scaling
Embouchure & pitch hold time key scaling produces natural hold time variations
across the range of the keyboard by allowing different hold time offset values to be
applied to each of two breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
The ¶ button (“Fpag”) can be used to go directly forward to the next
Embouchure & Pitch key scaling page without having to return to the main
parameter page.
● HdTime
≤
0 … 127.
The “HdTime” parameter is linked to the main Embouchure & Pitch “Hold
Time” parameter, and has the same effect. This value also determines the hold time on
which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows two separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of hold time offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the hold time, and positive
values increase the hold time at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset
value is chosen, the actual hold time will never exceed its minimum or maximum absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the hold time
varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
130
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
2-2: Embouchure & Pitch Initial Level Key Scaling
Embouchure & pitch initial level key scaling produces natural initial level variations
across the range of the keyboard by allowing different level offset values to be applied to
each of two breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
● IntLvl
≤
-64 … 63.
The “IntLvl” parameter is linked to the main Embouchure & Pitch “Initial
Level” parameter, and has the same effect. This value also determines the main initial
level on which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on the
graph).
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows two separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of initial level offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the initial level, and positive
values increase the initial level at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset
value is chosen, the actual initial level will never exceed its minimum or maximum
absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the
initial level varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
131
Element Envelope
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next Embouchure & Pitch key scaling page
without having to return to the main parameter page.
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
2-3: Embouchure & Pitch Decay Rate Key Scaling
Embouchure & pitch decay rate key scaling produces natural decay rate variations
across the range of the keyboard by allowing different rate offset values to be applied to
each of two breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
The § button (“Bpag”) can be used to go directly backward to the next
Embouchure & Pitch key scaling page without having to return to the main
parameter page.
● DcRate
≤
0 … 127.
The “DcRate” parameter is linked to the main Embouchure & Pitch “Decay
Rate” parameter, and has the same effect. This value also determines the main decay
rate on which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows two separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of decay rate offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the decay rate, and positive
values increase the decay rate at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset
value is chosen, the actual decay rate will never exceed its minimum or maximum absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the decay
rate varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
132
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
3: Vibrato
An inverse “K”(˚) next to a value means that key scaling can be applied to
that parameter. Position the cursor at the appropriate parameter and then press
the ¶ button (“KSC”) to go directly to the key scaling page for that parameter. You can return to the vibrato parameter page by pressing the ]
button.
•
The • button (“Ctrl”) can be used to go directly to the vibrato controller
page (≥
Page 67), also available from the ELEMENT CONTROLLER
directory. You can then return to the vibrato parameter page by pressing •
(“Para”) again.
•
The “Delay Time”, “Attack Rate”, and “Sustain Lvl” parameters
define the vibrato effect at all times, and do not affect vibrato as controlled via
a controller.
● Delay Time
≤
0 … 127.
Sets the delay time between the instant a note is played and the beginning of the
vibrato effect. The higher the value the longer the delay.
● Attack Rate
≤
0 … 127.
This parameter produces a gradual increase in vibrato depth when the vibrato effect
begins. The higher the value the faster the attack rate and therefore the faster the vibrato
“fade in”.
● Sustain Lvl
≤
0 … 127.
Sets the final vibrato depth after the delay time and attack have passed. The higher
the value the greater the vibrato depth. This parameter sets the vibrato depth independently of the depth applied by the controller assigned to vibrato. If you want to apply
vibrato via a controller only, set this parameter to “0”.
● Vibrato Dpth
≤
0 … 127.
Sets the vibrato depth as applied by the controller assigned to vibrato (≥
Page
67) and the vibrato envelope generator controlled by the “Delay Time”, “Attack
Rate”, and “Sustain Lvl” parameters. The higher the value the greater the vibrato
depth. When set to “0” no vibrato can be applied via a controller or the vibrato envelope
generator.
133
Element Envelope
•
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
● Dpth to Emb
≤
0 … 127.
Determines how deeply the settings in this display page affect embouchure. The
higher the value the greater the effect. When set to “0” no embouchure vibrato can be
applied.
● Dpth to Ptch
≤
0 … 127.
Determines how deeply the settings in this display page affect pitch. The higher the
value the greater the effect. When set to “0” no pitch vibrato can be applied.
● Offset
≤
-127 … 127.
Sets the central value around which the vibrato variation occurs. For example, if the
“Dpth to Ptch” parameter is set to a high value and “Offset” is set to “0”, then
the vibrato will swing equally above and below the actual pitch of the note played.
Higher offset values shift the central vibrato pitch upward while lower values shift the
pitch downward.
● Randomness
≤
0 … 10.
The “Randomness” parameter can be used to introduce random variations in the
depth and speed of the vibrato effect. The higher the value the greater the random variation.
● Speed
≤
0 … 127.
Sets the speed of the vibrato effect. The higher the value the faster the vibrato.
● Speed Shift
≤
0 … 8.
Determines the amount of speed variation which can be applied via the controller
assigned to vibrato. The higher the value the greater the increase in speed. At the maximum setting of “8” the speed can be increased to a maximum of 6 times its normal
setting via the controller.
134
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
3-1: Vibrato Delay Time Key Scaling
Vibrato delay time key scaling produces natural delay time variations across the
range of the keyboard by allowing different delay time offset values to be applied to each
of two breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
The ¶ button (“Fpag”) can be used to go directly forward to the next
Vibrato key scaling page without having to return to the main parameter page.
≤
0 … 127.
The “DlTime” parameter is linked to the main Vibrato “Delay Time” parameter, and has the same effect. This value also determines the main delay time on which all
key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows two separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of delay time offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the delay time, and positive
values increase the delay time at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset
value is chosen, the actual delay time will never exceed its minimum or maximum
absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the delay
time varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
135
Element Envelope
● DlTime
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
3-2: Vibrato Attack Rate Key Scaling
Vibrato attack rate key scaling produces natural attack rate variations across the
range of the keyboard by allowing different rate offset values to be applied to each of two
breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next Vibrato key scaling page without having to
return to the main parameter page.
● AtRate
≤
0 … 127.
The “AtRate” parameter is linked to the main Vibrato “Attack Rate” parameter, and has the same effect. This value also determines the main attack rate on which all
key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows two separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of attack rate offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the attack rate, and positive
values increase the attack rate at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset
value is chosen, the actual attack rate will never exceed its minimum or maximum
absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the
attack rate varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
136
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
3-3: Vibrato Depth Key Scaling
Vibrato depth key scaling produces natural vibrato depth variations across the range
of the keyboard by allowing different depth offset values to be applied to each of two
breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
● Depth
≤
0 … 127.
The “Depth” parameter is linked to the main Vibrato “Vibrato Dpth” parameter, and has the same effect. This value also determines the main depth on which all
key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows two separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of depth offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the breakpoint
key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the vibrato depth, and positive values
increase the vibrato depth at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset value is
chosen, the actual depth will never exceed its minimum or maximum absolute value.
When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the vibrato depth varies
smoothly between the breakpoints.
137
Element Envelope
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next Vibrato key scaling page without having to
return to the main parameter page.
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
3-4: Vibrato Speed Key Scaling
Vibrato speed key scaling produces natural vibrato speed variations across the range
of the keyboard by allowing different speed offset values to be applied to each of two
breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
The § button (“Bpag” ) can be used to go directly backward to the next
Vibrato key scaling page without having to return to the main parameter page.
● Speed
≤
0 … 127.
The “Speed” parameter is linked to the main Vibrato “Speed” parameter, and has
the same effect. This value also determines the main speed setting on which all keyscaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows two separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of speed offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the breakpoint
key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the vibrato speed, and positive values
increase the vibrato speed at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset value is
chosen, the actual speed will never exceed its minimum or maximum absolute value.
When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the vibrato speed varies
smoothly between the breakpoints.
138
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
4: Growl
An inverse “K”(˚) next to a value means that key scaling can be applied to
that parameter. Position the cursor at the appropriate parameter and then press
the ¶ button (“KSC”) to go directly to the key scaling page for that parameter. You can return to the growl parameter page by pressing the ] button.
•
The • button (“Ctrl”) can be used to go directly to the growl controller
page (≥
Page 72), also available from the ELEMENT CONTROLLER
directory. You can then return to the growl parameter page by pressing •
(“Para”) again.
● Dpth to Pres
≤
0 … 127.
Determines how deeply the settings in this display page affect pressure. The higher
the value the greater the effect. No growl effect will be produced if this and the “Dpth
to BNois” parameter, below, are set to “0”.
● Dpth to BNois
≤
0 … 127.
Determines how deeply the settings in this display page affect breath noise. The
higher the value the greater the effect. No growl effect will be produced if this and the
“Dpth to Pres” parameter, above, are set to “0”.
● Offset
≤
-127 … 127.
Sets the central value around which the growl variation occurs. For example, if the
“Dpth to Pres” parameter is set to a high value and “Offset” is set to “0”, then
the growl variation will swing equally above and below the the actual pressure of the
note played. Higher offset values shift the central pressure value upward while lower
values shift the pressure downward. No growl effect will be produced when this parameter is set to “127”.
● Vibrato Sync
≤
off, on.
Allows the growl variation to be synchronized to vibrato.
off
The growl variation is independent from the vibrato variation.
on
Growl speed and randomness are synchronized to the same vibrato
parameters. In this case the speed and randomness parameters, listed
below, will not appear.
139
Element Envelope
•
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
● Speed
≤
0 … 127.
Sets the speed of the growl effect. The higher the value the faster the growl.
● Randomness
≤
0 … 10.
The “Randomness” parameter can be used to introduce random variations in the
speed of the growl effect. The higher the value the greater the random variation.
4-1: Growl Speed Key Scaling
Growl speed key scaling produces natural growl speed variations across the range of
the keyboard by allowing different speed offset values to be applied to each of two
breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
● Speed
≤
0 … 127.
The “Speed” parameter is linked to the main Growl “Speed” parameter, and has
the same effect. This value also determines the main speed setting on which all keyscaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows two separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of speed offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the breakpoint
key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the growl speed, and positive values
increase the growl speed at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset value is
chosen, the actual speed will never exceed its minimum or maximum absolute value.
When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the growl speed varies
smoothly between the breakpoints.
140
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
5: Amplitude & Filter
Two display pages are provided for Amplitude & Filter control. One contains
parameters pertaining to keyboard velocity sensitivity (“Sens”), while the
other contains the envelope generator parameters (“EG”). The ¡ and ™
buttons select these two display pages, respectively.
•
An inverse “K”(˚) next to a value in the “EG” page means that key scaling
can be applied to that parameter. Position the cursor at the appropriate parameter and then press the ¶ button (“KSC”) to go directly to the key scaling
page for that parameter. You can return to the growl parameter page by
pressing the ] button.
The Sensitivity Parameters
The parameters in the “Sens” page determine how the envelope settings in the
“Env” are affected by keyboard velocity.
● Velocity Sens To Level
≤
0 … 16.
Determines the relationship between the Amplitude & Filter envelope level and
keyboard velocity. When set to “0”, keyboard velocity (i.e. how fast or hard the keyboard
is played) has no effect on the envelope level. At values higher than “1”, however, high
keyboard velocities will increase the envelope level and low keyboard velocities will
decrease the envelope level. The higher the value the greater the effect of keyboard
velocity on the envelope level.
● Velocity Sens To Rate
≤
0 … 16.
Determines the relationship between the Amplitude & Filter envelope rates and
keyboard velocity. When set to “0”, keyboard velocity (i.e. how fast or hard the keyboard
is played) has no effect on the envelope rates. At values higher than “1”, however, high
keyboard velocities will increase the envelope rates and low keyboard velocities will
141
Element Envelope
•
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
decrease the rates. The higher the value the greater the effect of keyboard velocity on the
envelope rates.
● Depth To Amplitude
≤
0 … 127.
Determines how deeply the Amplitude & Filter envelope will affect amplitude. The
higher the value the greater the effect.
● Depth To Filter
≤
-127 … 127.
Determines how deeply the Amplitude & Filter envelope will affect the cutoff
frequency of the Dynamic Filter. The higher the value the greater the effect. Negative
values invert the effect of the envelope on the filter.
The Envelope Parameters
The parameters in this page set the actual “shape” of the envelope used for amplitude and filter control. The parameters correspond to the envelope as shown in the
diagram below.
Max.Level
(fixed:127)
Level
Rate:
Decay
Rate:
Attack2
Level:
Attack1
Rate:
Release
Level:
Sustain
Rate:
Attack1
Time
Key on
Key off
● Rate: Attack1
≤
0 … 127.
Determines the rate at which the envelope level goes from “0” to the level set by
the “Level: Attack1” parameter. The higher the value the faster the attack.
● Rate: Attack2
≤
0 … 127.
Determines the rate at which the envelope level goes from the level set by the
“Level: Attack1” parameter to maximum level. The higher the value the faster the
attack.
142
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
● Rate: Decay
≤
0 … 127.
Determines the rate at which the envelope level goes from maximum level to the
sustain level set by the “Level: Sustain” parameter. The higher the value the faster
the decay.
● Rate: Release
≤
0 … 127.
Determines the rate at which the envelope level goes from the sustain level to “0”
when the key is released. The higher the value the faster the release.
● Level: Attack1
0 … 127.
Sets the envelope level reached by the first portion of the attack, as determined by
the “Rate: Attack1” parameter. The higher the value the higher the level. When set
to “127” the attack 1 level becomes the same as the maximum level, therefore the
second portion of the attack (“Rate: Attack2” parameter) will not be produced.
● Level: Sustain
≤
0 … 127.
Sets the envelope sustain level. The higher the value the higher the level. When set
to “127” the sustain level becomes the same as the maximum level, therefore the decay
portion of the envelope (“Rate: Decay” parameter) will not be produced.
143
Element Envelope
≤
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
5-1: Amplitude & Filter Attack Rate Key Scaling
Amplitude & Filter attack rate key scaling produces natural attack rate variations
across the range of the keyboard by allowing different rate offset values to be applied to
each of two breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next Amplitude & Filter key scaling page without
having to return to the main parameter page.
● A1Rate, A2Rate
≤
0 … 127.
The “A1Rate” and “A2Rate” parameters are linked to the main Amplitude &
Filter “Rate: Attack1” and “Rate: Attack2” parameters, and have the same
effect. These values also determine the main attack rates on which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows two separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of attack rate offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the attack rate, and positive
values increase the attack rate at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset
value is chosen, the actual attack rate will never exceed its minimum or maximum
absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the
attack rate varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
144
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
5-2: Amplitude & Filter Attack 1 Level Key Scaling
Amplitude & Filter attack level key scaling produces natural attack level variations
across the range of the keyboard by allowing different level offset values to be applied to
each of two breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
● A1Lvl
≤
0 … 127.
The “A1Lvl” parameter is linked to the main Amplitude & Filter “Level: Attack1” parameter, and has the same effect. This value also determines the main attack 1
level on which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on the
graph).
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows two separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of attack 1 level offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the attack 1 level, and positive
values increase the attack 1 level at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset
value is chosen, the actual attack 1 level will never exceed its minimum or maximum
absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the
attack 1 level varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
145
Element Envelope
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next Amplitude & Filter key scaling page without
having to return to the main parameter page.
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
5-3: Amplitude & Filter Decay Rate Key Scaling
Amplitude & Filter decay rate key scaling produces natural decay rate variations
across the range of the keyboard by allowing different rate offset values to be applied to
each of two breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next Amplitude & Filter key scaling page without
having to return to the main parameter page.
● DcRate
≤
0 … 127.
The “DcRate” parameter is linked to the main Amplitude & Filter “Rate: Decay” parameter, and has the same effect. This value also determines the main decay rate
on which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows two separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of decay rate offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the decay rate, and positive
values increase the decay rate at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset
value is chosen, the actual decay rate will never exceed its minimum or maximum absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the decay
rate varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
146
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
5-4: Amplitude & Filter Sustain Level Key Scaling
Amplitude & Filter sustain level key scaling produces natural sustain level variations across the range of the keyboard by allowing different level offset values to be
applied to each of two breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
● SusLvl
≤
0 … 127.
The “SusLvl” parameter is linked to the main Amplitude & Filter “Level:
Sustain” parameter, and has the same effect. This value also determines the main
sustain level on which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on
the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows two separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of sustain level offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the sustain level, and positive
values increase the sustain level at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset
value is chosen, the actual sustain level will never exceed its minimum or maximum
absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the
sustain level varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
147
Element Envelope
The § and ¶ buttons (“Bpag” and “Fpag”) can be used to go directly
backward or forward to the next Amplitude & Filter key scaling page without
having to return to the main parameter page.
Feature Reference
●
Edit Mode
5-5: Amplitude & Filter Release Rate Key Scaling
Amplitude & Filter release rate key scaling produces natural release rate variations
across the range of the keyboard by allowing different rate offset values to be applied to
each of two breakpoints set at appropriate keys.
•
The § button (“Bpag”) can be used to go directly backward to the next
Amplitude & Filter key scaling page without having to return to the main
parameter page.
● RlRate
≤
0 … 127.
The “RlRate” parameter is linked to the main Amplitude & Filter “Rate: Release” parameter, and has the same effect. This value also determines the main release
rate on which all key-scaled variations are based (indicated by a dotted line on the graph).
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Key
≤
C-2 … G8.
Allows two separate key scaling breakpoints to be set at any notes between C-2 and
G8. You can position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter and use any
of the normal data entry procedures, or use the keyboard. To use the keyboard for breakpoint entry, position the cursor at the appropriate breakpoint key parameter, press the •
button (“Kbd”), and then press the key at which you want to set the breakpoint while
“Kbd” appears in inverse characters.
No breakpoint can be set to a key lower than the breakpoint to its left.
● Breakpoint 1 & 2 Offset
≤
-64 … 63.
Set the amount of release rate offset for each of the breakpoints defined by the
breakpoint key parameters, above. Negative values reduce the release rate, and positive
values increase the release rate at the corresponding breakpoint. No matter what offset
value is chosen, the actual release rate will never exceed its minimum or maximum
absolute value. When different offset values are applied to adjacent breakpoints, the
release rate varies smoothly between the breakpoints.
148
Utility Mode
The UTILITY mode provides access to a range
of functions that do not necessarity affect the instrument’s sound or how it plays. Select the UTILITY
mode from either the EDIT or PLAY mode by pressing the U button.
System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
MIDI Bulk Dump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Edit Recall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Demo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
System
SYSTEM
UTILITY MODE
MIDI BULK DUMP
DISK
EDIT RECALL
DEMO
■
■
■
■
■
■
1: KBD Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2: TG Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3: MIDI Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4: Assignable Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5: Curve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6: Miscellaneous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
System
1: KBD Setting
● Keyboard Transpose
≤
-12 … 12.
Shifts the overall pitch of the VL7 up or down in semitone steps. A setting of “12”, for example, shifts the pitch down by one octave; a setting of “+4” shifts the pitch
up by a major third.
•
This setting also affects MIDI note numbers transmitted via the MIDI OUT
connector.
● Octave SW Hold
≤
off, on.
Normally (when this parameter is “off”) the OCTAVE buttons to the left of the
keyboard only shift the pitch of the keyboard as long as they are held. When this parameter is turned “on”, however, you press an OCTAVE button once to shift the pitch and
then again to return.
151
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
2: TG Setting
● Master Tuning
≤
-64 … 63.
Fine tunes the overall pitch of the VL7 in approximately 1.17-cent steps (a “cent” is
1/100th of a semitone). The maximum minus setting of “-64” produces a downward
pitch shift of almost three-quarters of a semitone, and the maximum plus setting of “63”
produces an upward pitch shift of the same amount. A setting of “0” produces no pitch
change.
● Reverb
≤
off, on.
Turns the VL7’s internal reverb system off or on. This can be handy if you want to
use an external signal processor for reverberation.
● Output
≤
Monaural, Stereo.
Determines whether the VL7 output is delivered in mono or stereo. When the
“Monaural” setting is selected the same signal is output via the both the L and R OUTPUT jacks. Also, in the mono mode all parameters relating to panning or positioning in
the stereo sound field have no effect.
152
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
System
3: MIDI Setting
● Transmit Channel
≤
1 … 16.
Selects the MIDI channel via which all VL7 data will be transmitted.
● Receive Channel
≤
1 … 16, Omni.
Sets the MIDI receive channel to any channel between 1 and 16, or the “Omni”
mode for reception on all channels. Make sure that the VL7 MIDI receive channel is
either set to the channel that your external controller is transmitting on, or the omni
mode.
● Local on/off
≤
off, on.
“Local control” refers to the fact that, normally, the VL7 keyboard controls its
internal tone generator, allowing the internal voices to be played directly from the keyboard. This situation is “local control on” since the internal tone generator is controlled
locally by its own keyboard. Local control can be turned off, however, so that the keyboard does not play the internal voices, but the appropriate MIDI information is still
transmitted via the MIDI OUT connector when notes are played on the keyboard. At the
same time, the internal tone generator responds to MIDI information received via the
MIDI IN connector.
● Device Number
≤
off, 1 … 16, All.
Sets the MIDI device number — i.e. the MIDI channel on which all system exclusive data (included in MIDI bulk dump data) will be received and transmitted. When
“All” is selected reception occurs on all channels and transmission occurs via Device
Number 1.
The device number is important for transfer of voice data and other system exclusive data between the VL7 and other MIDI devices — e.g. another VL7, a computer, or a
MIDI data recorder. Make sure that the VL7 device number is matched to that of other
devices in your system with which such data transfers will take place.
153
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
4: Assignable Controllers
● Modulation Wheel 2
≤
off, Modulation Wheel … 119.
Sets the MIDI control number for Modulation Wheel 2. All MIDI control numbers
are available. Modulation Wheel 2 will not function when this parameter is turned “off”.
•
Modulation Wheel 1 is fixed at MIDI control number 001.
● Foot Controller 2
≤
off, Modulation Wheel … 119.
Sets the MIDI control number for Foot Controller 2. All MIDI control numbers are
available. Foot Controller 2 will not function when this parameter is turned “off”.
•
Foot Controller 1 is fixed and MIDI control number 004.
● Foot Switch 1 & 2
≤
off, Modulation Wheel … 119, Program Inc.
Sets the MIDI control number for Foot Switches 1 & 2. All MIDI control numbers
are available. When “Program Inc” is selected the VL7 voice number will increase by 1
each time the foot switch is pressed (the corresponding MIDI program change numbers
are also transmitted). When voice number “64” is reached, the next voice selected will be
“1”. Foot Switch 1 or 2 will not function when this parameter is turned “off”.
•
The initial factory settings for the assignable controllers are as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
Modulation Wheel 2 ......
Foot Controller 2 ........
Foot Switch 1 ...........
Foot Switch 2 ...........
013
Breath Controller
Sustain
Portamento Switch
If a Foot Controller 2 or Footswitch 1/2 are assigned but not connected, the
maximum foot controller value and footswitch “on” status are assumed.
(except Sustain)
154
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
System
5: Curve
Three curve display pages are provided: one for the velocity curve (“Velo”), one for the
aftertouch curve (“Aftr”), and one for the breath controller curve (“Brth”). Press the §,
¶, and • buttons to select these pages, respectively.
● Velocity Curve
≤
Normal, Soft, Wide, Hard.
● After Touch Curve
≤
Normal, Soft, Wide, Hard.
● Breath Control Curve
≤
Normal, Soft, Wide, Hard.
Determine the relationship between controller input — keyboard velocity, keyboard
aftertouch, and breath controller — and output. For example, a player who generally uses
a light keyboard touch will get maximum dynamic range from the VL7 keyboard if the
“Velocity Curve” parameter is set to “Soft”. Try out the various settings while
playing the respective controllers in order to find the curves that work best for you.
Normal
The relationship between input and output is linear.
Soft
This curve makes it easy to cover a wide dynamic range with a light
keyboard touch.
Wide
Subjectively, this curve produces the widest dynamic range.
Hard
Best for players who use a relatively heavy touch.
•
If you play the keyboard or breath controller while viewing the appropriate
curve display, the instantaneous velocity, aftertouch, or breath pressure input
and output values will appear on the display both numerically and graphically
in the form of markers surrounding the curve graph.
155
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
6: Miscellaneous
● Display
≤
Reverse, Normal.
Determines whether the VL7 display appears in the normal way (black characters
on a white background) or reverse (white characters on a black background).
● Confirm
≤
off, on.
Determines whether the “Are You Sure?” confirmation message will appear
during the following operations:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Voice store.
Disk save, load, rename, delete, format.
Bulk data transmit.
Edit recall.
Demo mode entry.
Turning the confirmation function off can make operation faster and more
efficient by reducing the number of steps required for some operations, but it
also increases the danger of accidentally erasing important data. Use with
caution.
● Memory Protect
≤
off, on.
Turns internal RAM memory protection on or off. When “on” no operations that
alter the contents of the internal memory can be performed. Be sure to turn memory
protection “off” before loading data, storing voices, receiving bulk data from external
equipment, etc.
•
The default Memory Protect setting is “off”.
•
Memory protect is automatically turned “on” when data that was saved with
Memory Protect “on” is reloaded.
156
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
≤
Up to 20 characters.
Allows you to enter an original greeting message which will be displayed by the
VL7 when the power is initially turned on. Position the cursor at the “Greeting Message”
parameter and press the • button (“Name”). Then use the name entry procedure described on page 31.
•
Voice data can be loaded into the VL7 edit buffer from an external device
even when Memory Protect is “on”.
157
System
● Greeting Message
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
MIDI Bulk Dump
SYSTEM
UTILITY MODE
MIDI BULK DUMP
DISK
EDIT RECALL
DEMO
158
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
VL7/VL1 Bulk Data Compatibility
● Bulk Data Dump from VL1 to VL7
•
•
•
VL1 Element 2 data and all settings pertaining to Element 2 are ignored
(The Modulation Effect Element on/off setting is “on”).
System data is fully compatible.
If an “All Voice” dump is performed from the VL1, voices 65 through
128 remain in the VL7 voice memory locations 1 through 64. If the VL1
] button is pressed after voice 64 has been transmitted, however,
voice numbers 1 through 64 will remain in VL7 memory locations 1
through 64.
● Bulk Data Dump from VL7 to VL1
•
•
Common and Element 1 data will be transmitted. The VL1 Element 2 data
will remain intact.
System data is fully compatible.
MIDI “bulk dump” transmission makes it possible to transfer system and voice data
between the VL7 and other MIDI equipment. The VL7 is capable transmitting three types
of data:
1: System
All VL7 system Data: the settings in the Utility System page and the 2
internal Micro Tuning data.
2: All Voice
All 64 voices in the VL7 memory.
3: Current Voice
The currently selected voice only.
● Bulk Data Transmission Procedure
1. Preparation
Make sure the VL1 is properly connected to a device which is capable of receiving
its bulk data: another VL7, a computer, a MIDI data recorder, etc. The VL7 MIDI OUT
connector should be connected to the MIDI IN connector of the receiving device via a
high-quality MIDI cable. Also make sure that the VL7 and receiving device are set to the
same MIDI Device Number.
2. Select a Data Type
Position the cursor at the type of bulk data you want to send — “System”, “All
Voice”, or “Current Voice”.
159
MIDI Bulk Dump
Data can be transferred between the VL7 and the VL1 Virtual Acoustic
Syntesizer via bulk dump opertations, as listed below.
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
3. Press [
Press the [ button. The “Are You Sure?” confirmation display will
appear.
4. Press - to Transmit
Press the - button to transmit the selected data (or = to cancel the operation). The progress of the transmission will be indicated in bar-graph form on the display,
and “Completed!” will appear when all the data has been transmitted.
•
“All Voice” transmissions can be cancelled between blocks by pressing the
] button. All data up to the point at which the ] button is pressed
will be properly transmitted.
5. Press ]
Press the ] button to clear the “Completed!” display and return to the main
bulk transmit display.
● Bulk Data Reception
In order for the VL7 to receive a bulk transmission from another VL7 or other
device, the MIDI OUT of the transmitting device must be connected to the MIDI IN of
the VL7 via a MIDI cable. The VL7 will then automatically receive and load the data as
long as it is set to the same device number as the transmitting device and its Memory
Protect function is turned “off”. Memory Protect does not need to be turned off in order
to receive a single voice (the current voice).
160
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
MIDI Bulk Dump
161
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
Disk
SYSTEM
UTILITY MODE
MIDI BULK DUMP
DISK
EDIT RECALL
DEMO
■
■
■
■
■
■
1: Disk Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2: Load From Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3: Save To Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4: Rename File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5: Delete File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6: Format Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
163
164
166
168
170
171
CAUTION! ■ Never attempt to remove a disk from the disk drive while the disk
drive indicator is lit. Doing so can damage the data on the disk.
CAUTION!
■ The disk write protect tab must be set to the “off” or “write enable” position
in order to save data to the disk, rename a file, delete a file, or format the disk.
162
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
1: Disk Status
Disk
This function displays a range of information about the currently loaded floppy
disk.
Total
The total number of files on the disk.
Used
The amount of disk space currently used, in kilobytes.
Free
The amount of disk space currently free, in kilobytes.
System
The number of “System” files on the disk.
All Voice
The number of “All Voice” files on the disk.
1 Bank
The number of “1 Bank” files on the disk.
1 Voice
The number of “1 Voice” files on the disk.
Others
The number of files on the disk that do not match any of the above
categories.
All
The number of “All” files on the disk.
163
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
2: Load From Disk
This function loads a specified data file from a floppy disk inserted in the VL7
floppy disk drive. Five types of data files can be selected.
All
All system and voice data.
System
All Utility System page settings and internal Microtuning data.
All Voice
All 64 voices in the VL7 memory.
1 Bank
16 voices from 1 VL7 memory bank (A … D).
1 Voice
1 voice.
● Disk Load Procedure
1. Insert the Floppy Disk
Make sure the floppy disk containing the data you want to load is properly inserted
in the VL7 floppy disk drive.
•
Also make sure that the VL7 Memory Protect function is turned “off” (≥
Page 156).
2. Select a File Type and press [
Position the cursor at the type of file you want to load, then press the [
button.
3. Select a File and Press [
When the file window appears, select the file you want to load and press [
again.
Depending on the type of data you have selected, an additional selection window
may appear after you have selected the file you want to load. You may have to select an
individual bank or voice, or specify a destination for the data to be loaded (“SRC” in the
selection window title indicates that you are selecting a source file, while “DST” indicates
that you are selecting a destination). Continue making the required selections and pressing [ until the confirmation prompt appears.
•
When selecting a voice to load from a long list, you can use the § (“123”)
and ¶ (“ABC”) buttons to display the voices in numeric or alphabetic order,
as required. Sometimes it may take a few seconds to sort the data as specified
— the “Now sorting!” message will appear during the sort operation.
164
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
If you select the “1 Voice” file type when loading from a VL1 disk, you
can select any of the 8 available banks (A through H) by using the voice bank
buttons: the a through d buttons alternately select banks A … D and E …
H.
•
If you select the “1 Voice” file type, “E2” will appear above the ∞
function button in the file selection window. Press this button (“E2” will be
highlighted) if you want to load the element-2 data from a 2-element voice
originally used by the VL1 Virtual Acoustic Synthesizer. The element-2 data
loaded will include the voice name, element-2 name, common data, and all
element-2 data. The ∞ button alternately turns the “E2” option on and off.
•
If you select the “All” or “All Voice” file type when loading from a VL1
disk, the first 64 voices of the 128 included in the file will be loaded into the
VL7 memory. Only the element-1 data will be loaded.
•
If you select the “1 Bank” file type when loading from a VL1 disk, you can
select any of the 8 available banks (A through H). Only the element-1 data
will be loaded.
•
When loading VL1 voice data the modulation effect Element on/off setting
will be “on”.
4. Press - to Load
When the “Are You Sure?” confirmation prompt appears, press the button to load the selected data (or = to cancel the operation). The progress of the
load operation will be indicated in bar-graph form on the display, and “Completed!”
will appear when all the data has been loaded.
•
A load operation in progress cannot be cancelled.
5. Press ]
Press the ] button to clear the “Completed!” display.
CAUTION!
CAUTION! ■ Whenever a load operation is performed any previous data in the
memory location to which the new data is loaded to will be erased and replaced
by the new data! Be sure to save important data to disk to minimize the possibility of accidental erasure.
165
Disk
•
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
3: Save To Disk
This function saves a specified data file from the VL7 memory to a floppy disk
inserted in the VL7 floppy disk drive. Five types of data files can be selected.
All
All system and voice data.
System
All Utility System page settings and internal Microtuning data.
All Voice
All 64 voices in the VL7 memory.
1 Bank
16 voices from 1 VL7 memory bank (A … D).
1 Voice
1 voice.
● Disk Save Procedure
1. Insert the Floppy Disk
Make sure the floppy disk to which you want to save the data is properly inserted in
the VL7 floppy disk drive.
•
Also make sure that the floppy disk’s write protect tab is set to the “off” or
“write enable” position.
•
Only floppy disks which have been formatted using the “Format Disk” function (≥
Page 171) can be used to save VL7 data.
2. Select a File Type and press [
Position the cursor at the type of file you want to save, then press the [
button.
If you select “All”, “System” or “All Voice” a list of the files on disk will
appear. In this case skip step 3, below, and go directly to step 4. If you select “1 Bank”
or “1 Voice” continue with step 3.
3. Select a Bank or Voice and Press [
When the source window appears, select the bank or voice you want to save and
press [.
4. Select the Destination File
If you want to save the selected data to a new file, position the cursor at a file name
with the “NewFile” extension. To save the data to an existing file, position the cursor at
the appropriate file name. In the latter case there is no need to enter a new file name, so
you can skip ahead top step 7.
166
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
5. Enter a File Name
Press ∞ (“Name”) and enter a name (maximum 8 characters) for the file to be
saved (≥
Page 27).
•
File names which begin with or contain a space are not allowed.
Disk
6. Press [
Press the [ button to close the name window.
7. Press [ and Confirm
Press the [ button. When the “Are You Sure?” confirmation prompt
appears, press the - button to save the selected data (or = to cancel the operation). The progress of the save operation will be indicated in bar-graph form on the
display, and “Completed!” will appear when all the data has been saved.
•
A save operation in progress cannot be cancelled.
•
Files are automatically saved with an extension (a period followed by three
characters) which indicates the file type: .ALL = All Data; .SYS = System;
.AVC = All Voice; .1BK = 1 Bank; .1VC = 1 Voice.
8. Press ]
Press the ] button to clear the “Completed!” display.
167
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
4: Rename File
This function can be used to rename a specified data file on a floppy disk inserted
in the VL7 floppy disk drive. Five types of data files can be selected.
All
All system and voice data.
System
All Utility System page settings and internal Microtuning data.
All Voice
All 64 voices in the VL7 memory.
1 Bank
16 voices from 1 VL7 memory bank (A … D).
1 Voice
1 voice.
● File Rename Procedure
1. Insert the Floppy Disk
Make sure the floppy disk containing the file you want to rename is properly
inserted in the VL7 floppy disk drive.
•
Also make sure that the floppy disk’s write protect tab is set to the “off” or
“write enable” position.
2. Select a File Type and press [
Position the cursor at the type of file you want to rename, then press the [
button.
3. Select a File and Press ∞
When the file window appears, select the file you want to rename and press the ∞
button (“Rnam”).
4. Enter a File Name
Enter a new name (maximum 8 characters) for the selected file (≥
•
Page 31).
File names which begin with or contain a space are not allowed.
5. Press [
Press the [ button to close the name window.
168
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
6. Press [ and Confirm
Press the [ button. When the “Are You Sure?” confirmation prompt
appears, press the - button to rename the file (or = to cancel the operation). “Now
Executing” will appear while the file name is being rewritten, and “Completed!”
will appear when the rename operation is finished.
Disk
7. Press ]
Press the ] button to clear the “Completed!” display.
169
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
5: Delete File
This function can be used to delete a specified data file on a floppy disk inserted in
the VL7 floppy disk drive. Six types of data files can be selected.
All
All system and voice data.
System
All Utility System page settings and internal Microtuning data.
All Voice
All 64 voices in the VL7 memory.
1 Bank
16 voices from 1 VL7 memory bank (A … D).
1 Voice
1 voice.
Others
Any files not included in the above categories.
● File Delete Procedure
1. Insert the Floppy Disk
Make sure the floppy disk containing the file you want to delete is properly inserted
in the VL7 floppy disk drive.
•
Also make sure that the floppy disk’s write protect tab is set to the “off” or
“write enable” position.
2. Select a File Type and press [
Position the cursor at the type of file you want to delete, then press the [
button.
3. Select a File and Press [
When the file window appears, select the file you want to delete and press [.
4. Press - To Delete
When the “Are You Sure?” confirmation prompt appears, press the button to delete the file (or = to cancel the operation). “Now Executing” will
appear while the file is being deleted, and “Completed!” will appear when the delete
operation is finished.
5. Press ]
Press the ] button to clear the “Completed!” display.
170
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
6: Format Disk
Disk
This function formats new 2DD or 2HD type floppy disks for use with the VL7.
•
2DD type disks provide 720 kilobytes of storage capacity when formatted
(MS-DOS 9-sector format), and 2HD disks have 1.44 megabytes of storage
capacity when formatted (MS-DOS 18-sector format).
● Disk Format Procedure
1. Insert the Floppy Disk
Make sure the floppy disk you want to format is properly inserted in the VL7
floppy disk drive.
•
Also make sure that the floppy disk’s write protect tab is set to the “off” or
“write enable” position.
2. Press [ and Confirm
Press the [ button. When the “Are You Sure?” confirmation prompt
appears, press the - button to begin formatting the disk (or = to cancel the
operation). The progress of the format operation will be indicated on the display in bar
graph form, and “Completed!” will appear when the format operation is finished.
3. Press ]
Press the ] button to clear the “Completed!” display.
CAUTION! ■ Formatting a disk that contains data will erase all data on the
disk!
CAUTION!
171
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
Edit Recall
SYSTEM
UTILITY MODE
MIDI BULK DUMP
DISK
EDIT RECALL
DEMO
172
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
If you’ve accidentally “lost” an edited voice by selecting a different voice in the
PLAY mode before storing your edited data, the Edit Recall function can be used to
recall the edited data.
•
● Edit Recall Procedure
1. Press [ and Confirm
Press the [ button. When the “Are You Sure?” confirmation prompt
appears, press the - button to recall the edit data (or = to cancel the operation).
“Completed!” will appear when the recall operation is finished.
2. Press P
Press the P button to return to the PLAY mode. “E”(´) will appear to the left
of the voice name.
173
Edit Recall
If you’ve made no further edits to any other voice since losing the data, only
the name of the last voice edited (the “Recall Memory Voice”) will
appear on the display. If you’ve already made at least one edit to the newly
selected voice both the name of the recall memory voice and the current voice
will appear on the display — with the warning that the current voice will be
overwritten by the recall memory voice if you proceed with the recall operation!
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
Demo
SYSTEM
UTILITY MODE
MIDI BULK DUMP
DISK
EDIT RECALL
DEMO
174
Feature Reference
●
Utility Mode
The VL7 includes a built-in demonstration which can be played as follows.
● Demo Playback Procedure
1. Check Your Current Voice!
If the currently selected voice has been edited but not stored, the edited data will be
lost when the demo mode is engaged. Make sure the current voice has been stored before
entering the demo mode.
Press [, then press - in response to the “Are You Sure?” prompt.
The demo selection, start, and stop control display should appear.
3. Select a Demo
Select the demo you want to play (“Top Song” parameter).
4. Press • To Run
Press the • button to run the demo. The various demo songs will play in sequence
until stopped.
5. Press ¶ To Stop
Press the ¶ button to stop demo playback.
•
The demo uses some voices which are not provided on the VL7 data disk. To
store a demo voice for your own use, stop demo playback, exit from the demo
mode, then store the voice (it is still in the edit buffer) using the normal voice
store procedure.
•
16 demo pieces are provided. The last of these can be used with full accompaniment if the VL7 is connected to a GM (General MIDI) tone generator such
as the Yamaha TG300. Connect the VL7 MIDI OUT connector to the MIDI
IN connector of the GM tone generator module.
175
Demo
2. Press [
Feature Reference
176
●
Utility Mode
Appendix
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
178
182
184
186
Feature Reference
●
Appendix
Troubleshooting
The VL7 is a very versatile instrument with many features and functions that affect
operation. In many cases, what appears to be a fault with the VL7 can actually be traced
to an improperly set parameter or, at the most fundamental level, to something as simple
as a bad connection.
Here’s how to determine if the problem is internal (e.g. parameter settings) or
external (e.g. connections, amplifier, etc.):
● Listen via Headphones. Plug a pair of headphones into the VL7 and play.
If the headphone sound is OK, then the problem is most likely in the
amplifier or mixer you are using, or the audio connection cables.
● Try moving all controllers — modulation wheels, foot controlers, etc. In
some cases extreme controller settings can cause unexpected sound or
pitch … or even no sound at all.
● Try selecting different voices. If the problem occurs only on one voice
then the voice parameters are most likely at fault. If the problem occurs on
all voices then a utility parameter should be suspected.
The following are some common problems and probable causes:
178
Feature Reference
●
Appendix
Possible Cause
Symptom
No sound.
• Is the amplifier/mixer power turned on?
• Is the amplifier/mixer volume set to an appropriate level?
• Are the VL7 outputs properly connected to the amplifier/mixer
inputs?
• Are the connection cables shorted, open, or otherwise faulty?
Distorted sound.
• Is the VL7 connected to a high-sensitivity microphone or instrument input on your amplifier or mixer? Try turning the VL7
DOWN controls down to avoid overloading the amplifier/mixer
inputs.
Improper stereo positioning.
• Check the level and pan controls on the sound system/mixing
console being used with the VL7.
● Utility Setting Problems
Possible Cause
Symptom
No Sound
• Is the local off mode selected (page 153)?
• Are the MIDI transmit channel and receive channels matched to
those of the external MIDI device used (page 153)?
Wrong pitch.
• Is the master tune parameter set properly (page 152)?
• Is the keyboard transpose parameter set properly (page 151)?
• Is the “Octave SW Hold” parameter turned “on” (page 151)?
No reverb.
• Is the TG Setting Reverb parameter turned “on” (page 152)?
The mono output doesn’t
sound right.
• The VL7 is basically designed for stereo output, but it can be
used in mono if only the L or R OUTPUT jack is used and the
UTILITY mode TG Setting page Output parameter is set to
“Monaural”.
Improper controller operation.
• Are the Assignable Controllers parameters set properly (page
154)?
• When the VL7 is initially shipped, or when the “NOBREATH:All”
data file on the supplied disk is loaded, Foot Controller 2 are
assigned to breath control.
• When any file other than “EXAMPLE:All” file on the supplied disk
is loaded Modulation Wheel 2 is assigned to MIDI control change
number 013. In this case “normal” sound is produced with the
modulation wheel at its center position.
179
Troubleshooting
● Amplifier, Mixer, Connection Problems
Feature Reference
●
Appendix
● Voice Setting Problems
Possible Cause
Symptom
No sound.
• Make sure that the element level is not set to “0” (page 36)?
• Make sure that the total amplitude level is not set to “0” (page
102)?
• Make sure that the driver, pipe/strings, and tap output mixing
parameters are not all set to “0” (page 96)?
• Make sure that the amplitude & filter sustain level is not set to
“0” (page 143).
• Check the pressure controller (page 63)?
• Check the amplitude controller (page 69)?
• Check the embouchure controller (page 64)?
• Check the damping controller (page 78)?
• Check the absorption controller (page 79)?
• Some voices will not produce sound when played at extremely
high or low pitches.
Sound won’t stop.
• Make sure that the pressure EG mode parameters is not set to
“Disable” (page 127)?
Wrong pitch.
• Check the element tune, note shift, and random pitch parameters
(page 35)?
• Microtuning may be set to a tuning other than equal temperament (page 39)?
• Check the effect pitch change parameters (page 48)?
• Check the pitch controller (page 65)?
• Some voices will change pitch when pressure or embouchure
control is applied.
• The pitch of extremely high or low notes can sometimes be
unstable.
Distorted sound.
• Check the effect distortion settings (page 49)?
• Check the scream controller (page 70)?
• Check the growl controller (page 72)?
• Check the throat formant controller (page 73)?
Improper stereo positioning.
• Are the element pan L and R parameters set to values other
than “-64” and “63”, respectively (page 36)?
• Check the effect feedback delay settings (page 52)?
180
Feature Reference
●
Appendix
Troubleshooting
181
Feature Reference
●
Appendix
Error Messages
When an operational error or other problem occurs, the VL7 will display one of the
following error messages to inform you of the problem.
Comments
Display
Bad disk!
The loaded floppy disk is damaged. Try a different disk.
Change battery!
The voice backup battery needs to be replaced. Have the battery
replaced by qualified Yamaha service personnel.
Data not found!
The specified data cannot be found on the currently selected file.
Make sure the appropriate file is loaded.
Device number is off!
MIDI bulk data could not be transmitted or received because the
device number parameter is turned off. Check the device number
setting.
Device number mismatch!
MIDI bulk data could not be transmitted or received because the
device number of the VL7 is not matched to that of the second
device. Check the device number settings.
Disk full!
Data cannot be saved to floppy disk because the currently
loaded disk is full. Delete unwanted files to make more space on
the disk, or use a different disk.
Disk not formatted!
The currently loaded floppy disk has not been formatted for use
with the VL7. Format the disk before performing any disk operations.
Disk not ready!
You have attempted to perform a disk operation while no floppy
disk is loaded. Insert an appropriate floppy disk in the disk drive.
File not found!
The specified file cannot be found on the currently loaded floppy
disk. Check the file name or use the appropriate disk.
182
Feature Reference
The currently loaded disk has a non-VL7 format. Either use a
different disk or, if the data on the disk is not needed, re-format the
disk.
The specified file is not a VL7 file. Check the disk and files.
Memory protected!
You have attempted to perform a function which will change the
contents of the internal memory, but the memory protect function is
“on”. Turn memory protect “off” and try again.
MIDI buffer full!
The MIDI receive buffer is full. Reduce the amount of data being
transmitted to the VL7.
MIDI checksum error!
An error has been detected in the received MIDI data. Check the
transmitting device and MIDI cables, and try again.
MIDI data error!
An error has been detected in the received MIDI data. Check the
transmitting device and MIDI cables, and try again.
Same file name exists!
You have attempted to save a file with the same name as a file
that already exists on the disk. Change the file name and try again.
Write protected!
You have attempted a save, rename, or delete operation to a
disk which is write protected. Set the disk’s write protect tab to the
“off” or “enable” position and try again.
183
Error Messages
Illegal file!
Appendix
Comments
Display
Illegal disk!
●
Feature Reference
●
Appendix
Specifications
● Tone Generator
Type
S/VA (Self-oscillating Virtual Acoustic Synthesis), monophonic.
Modifiers
Harmonic Enhancer.
Dynamic Filter (LPF, HPF, BPF, BEF, with resonance).
Equalizer (5 bands with frequency, resonace, and boost/cut
control).
Impulse Expander.
Resonator.
Effects
32-bit digital signal processor, stereo in/stereo out.
Modulation effects (flanger, pitch change, distorion).
Feed back delay.
Reverberation.
Play Mode
Voice mode only.
Smallest tone generator unit: element. Voices use element.
Voices are composed on “common data” and “element data”.
Polyphony
1 note.
● Memory
Internal
64 voices.
Disk
3.5" 2DD or 2HD floppy disk.
● Keyboard
Keys
49 (C scale, FS type)
Sensitivity
Velocity.
Channel aftertouch.
● Controllers
Master volume slider.
Pitch bend wheel.
Data entry dial.
184
Continuous sliders x 2.
Modulation wheel x 2.
LCD contrast control.
Feature Reference
●
Appendix
● Panel Switches
Edit (with LED).
Octave x 2 (with LEDs).
Store.
Program change x 16 (with LEDs).
Cursor x 4.
Enter.
● Display
240 x 64 dot backlit liquid crystal display.
● Connectors
Front Panel
Stereo headphones.
Breath controller.
Rear Panel
Output x 2 (L and R).
Foot switch x 2.
MIDI OUT.
Foot controller x 2.
MIDI IN.
MIDI THRU.
● Output Level
Line
2.5 ±2 dBm into 10 kΩ.
Headphones
2.0 ±2 dBm into 33 Ω.
● Power Requirements
UL/CSA: 120V, 16W
Europe: 220-240V, 16W
● General
Dimensions
914 (W) x 380 (D) x 105 (H) mm.
Weight
12.3 kg
● Accessories
Power cable.
FC7 Foot Controller.
Owners manuals x 2.
BC2 Breath Controller.
Floppy disk.
Voice List & MIDI Data Format.
* Specifications subject to change without notice.
185
Specifications
Play (with LED).
Utility (with LED).
Copy.
Bank select x 4 (with LEDs).
Data entry x 2.
Function x 8.
Exit.
Feature Reference
●
Appendix
Index
This index covers both the VL7 Getting Started and Feature Reference manuals for
easy cross-referencing. Page numbers in the Getting Started manual are preceded by
“©”, and page numbers in the Feature Reference manual are preceded by “ƒ”.
Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©12, 38
Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©7
Copy button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©17
Copy function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ24
Cursor buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©18
A
Absorption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ79
Aftertouch curve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ155
Amplitude & filter envelope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ141
Amplitude & filter key scaling . . . . . . . . . ƒ144-148
Amplitude (Element Controller) . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ69
Amplitude level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ102
Assign mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ33
D
Backup battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©4
Bank buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©19, 34. ƒ15
Breath attack gain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ34
Breath attack time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ34
Breath control curve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ155
Breath controller calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©28
Breath controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©23
Breath controller jack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©19
Breath noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ71, 84
Breath noise key scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ86-88
Bulk dump, MIDI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ158
Damping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ78
Data dial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©18, 35. ƒ16
Decrement & increment buttons . . . ©18, 35. ƒ16
Demo playback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©26. ƒ174
Device number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ153
Disk format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ171
Disk status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ163
Disk, delete file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ170
Disk, load from . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ164
Disk, rename file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ168
Disk, save to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ166
Display mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ156
Distortion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ49
Dynamic filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©54. ƒ75, 113
Dynamic filter key scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ115-116
C
E
Common miscellaneous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ32
Confirm mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ156
Continuous slider assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ40
Continuous sliders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©18, 47. ƒ19
Controller envelopes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©46
Controller search & replace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ80
Controller parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©40
Controller views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©41, 47. ƒ17
Edit compare function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ23
Edit recall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ172
Effect control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ43
Effect on/off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ22
Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©58
Element level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ36
Element names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ31
B
186
Feature Reference
Element note shift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ35
Element pan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ36
Element pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ35
Element random pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ35
Element tune . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ35
Embouchure & pitch envelope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ128
Embouchure & pitch envelope key scaling ƒ130-132
Embouchure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ64
Enter button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©18
Equalizer auxiliary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ117
Equalizer auxiliary key scaling . . . . . . . . . ƒ118-119
Equalizer band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ120
Equalizer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©55
Error messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ182
Exit button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©18
●
Appendix
I
Impulse expander & resonator setting . . . . . . . . ƒ121
Impulse expander . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©56. ƒ123
Initial edit page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ30
Interpolate speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ83
Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©19
Keyboard transpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ151
L
L,C,R delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ55
L,R delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ53
LCD display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©18
Local on/off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ153
F
Feedback delay effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©59
Feedback delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ51
Feedback delay/reverb mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ43
Flanger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ45
Floppy disk drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©19
Floppy disks & drive, handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©5
Foot controller 2 assign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ154
Foot controller jacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©20
Foot controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©23
Foot switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©23
Foot switch assign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ154
Foot switch jacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©20
Function buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©18
Functions & parameters, finding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ9
M
Manuals, about the . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©6. ƒ4
Master tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ152
Memory protect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ156
Micro tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ39
MIDI connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©24
MIDI connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©20
MIDI settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ153
Mixing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©48. ƒ96
Mixing key scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ98-101
Mode buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©17
Modes, the 3 main . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ8
Modifier on/off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ22
Modifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©51
Modulation effect type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ44
Modulation effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©59
Modulation wheel 2 assign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ154
Modulation wheels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©19
Mono delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ51
G
Greeting message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ157
Growl envelope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ139
Growl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ72
Growl speed key scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ140
N
H
Navigation aids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ11
Harmonic enhancer . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©51. ƒ76, 105
Harmonic enhancer key scaling . . . . . . . . . ƒ108-112
Headphones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©23
O
Octave buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©19
Octave switch hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ151
Output jacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©20
187
Index
K
Feature Reference
●
Appendix
P
V
Phones jack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©19
Pitch change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ47
Pitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ65
Pitch wheel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©19
Play-mode display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©34. ƒ14
Portamento . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ38
Power cord socket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©20
Power supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©22
Power switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©20
Power-on procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©25
Pre-programmed voices, loading . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©31
Pressure envelope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ127
Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ63
Velocity curve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ155
Vibrato envelope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ133
Vibrato envelope key scaling . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ135-138
Vibrato . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ67
Voice directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©36
Voice name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ31
Voice number buttons . . . . . . . . . ©19, 35. ƒ15, 22
Voice selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©34. ƒ15
Volume control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©18
X
Xfade speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ83
Q
Quick editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ19
R
Receive channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ153
Resonator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©57. ƒ124
Reverb effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©60
Reverb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ58, 152
S
Scream . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ70
Selecting & editing parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ12
Sound system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©24
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ184
Store button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ©17
Store function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ27
Sustain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ33
T
Throat formant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ73, 89
Throat formant key scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ91-95
Time calculation, musical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ57
Tonguing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ68
Touch EG time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ34
Transmit channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ153
Trigger mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ83
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ƒ178
188
Feature Reference
●
Appendix
Index
189
For details of products, please contact your nearest Yamaha or the
authorized distributor listed below.
Pour plus de détails sur les produits, veuillez-vous adresser à Yamaha
ou au distributeur le plus proche de vous figurant dans la liste suivante.
NORTH AMERICA
CANADA
Yamaha Canada Music Ltd.
135 Milner Avenue, Scarborough, Ontario,
M1S 3R1, Canada
Tel: 416-298-1311
U.S.A.
Yamaha Corporation of America
6600 Orangethorpe Ave., Buena Park, Calif. 90620,
U.S.A.
Tel: 714-522-9011
MIDDLE & SOUTH AMERICA
MEXICO
Yamaha De Mexico S.A. De C.V.,
Departamento de ventas
Javier Rojo Gomez No.1149, Col. Gpe Del
Moral, Deleg. Iztapalapa, 09300 Mexico, D.F.
Tel: 686-00-33
Die Einzelheiten zu Produkten sind bei Ihrer unten aufgeführten
Niederlassung und bei Yamaha Vertragshändlern in den jeweiligen
Bestimmungsländern erhältlich.
Para detalles sobre productos, contacte su tienda Yamaha más cercana
o el distribuidor autorizado que se lista debajo.
FRANCE
ASIA
Yamaha Musique France,
Division Instruments Electroniques et de Scène
BP 70-77312 Marne-la-Valée Cedex 2, France
Tel: 01-64-61-4000
ITALY
Yamaha Musica Italia S.P.A.,
Combo Division
Viale Italia 88, 20020 Lainate (Milano), Italy
Tel: 02-935-771
SPAIN
Yamaha-Hazen Electronica Musical, S.A.
Jorge Juan 30, 28001, Madrid, Spain
Tel: 91-577-7270
PORTUGAL
Valentim de Carvalho CI SA
Estrada de Porto Salvo, Paço de Arcos 2780 Oeiras,
Portugal
Tel: 01-443-3398/4030/1823
GREECE
BRASIL
Yamaha Musical Do Brasil LTDA.
Ave. Reboucas 2636, São Paulo, Brasil
Tel: 55-11 853-1377
Philippe Nakas S.A.
Navarinou Street 13, P.Code 10680, Athens, Greece
Tel: 01-364-7111
SWEDEN
PANAMA
Yamaha De Panama S.A.
Edificio Interseco, Calle Elvira Mendez no.10,
Piso 3, Oficina #105, Ciudad de Panama, Panama
Tel: 507-69-5311
OTHER LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES
AND CARIBBEAN COUNTRIES
Yamaha Music Latin America Corp.
6101 Blue Lagoon Drive, Miami, Florida 33126,
U.S.A.
Tel: 305-261-4111
EUROPE
THE UNITED KINGDOM
Yamaha-Kemble Music (U.K.) Ltd.
Sherbourne Drive, Tilbrook, Milton Keynes,
MK7 8BL, England
Tel: 0908-366700
IRELAND
Danfay Limited
61D, Sallynoggin Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin
Tel: 01-2859177
GERMANY/SWITZERLAND
Yamaha Europa GmbH.
Siemensstraße 22-34, D-2084 Rellingen, F.R. of
Germany
Tel: 04101-3030
AUSTRIA/HUNGARY/SLOVENIA/
ROMANIA/BULGARIA
Yamaha Music Austria Ges mbH.
Schleiergasse 20, A-1100 Wien Austria
Tel: 0222-60203900
THE NETHERLANDS
Yamaha Music Benelux B.V.,
Verkoop Administratie
Kanaalweg 18G, 3526KL, Utrecht, The Netherlands
Tel: 030-828411
BELGIUM/LUXEMBOURG
Yamaha Music Benelux B.V.,
Brussels-office
Keiberg Imperiastraat 8, 1930 Zaventem, Belgium
Tel: 02-7258220
Yamaha Scandinavia AB
J.A. Wettergrens gata 1, Box 30053, 400 43
Göteborg, Sweden
Tel: 031-496090
DENMARK
Yamaha Scandinavia Filial Denmark
Generatorvej 8B 2730 Herlev, Denmark
Tel: 44 92 49 00
FINLAND
HONG KONG
Tom Lee Music Co., Ltd.
11/F., Silvercord Tower 1, 30 Canton Road,
Tsimshatsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Tel: 730-1098
INDONESIA
PT. Yamaha Music Indonesia(Distributor)
PT. Nusantik
Gedung Yamaha Music Center, Jalan Jend. Gatot
Subroto Kav. 4, Jakarta 12930, Indonesia
Tel: 21-520-2577
KOREA
Cosmos Corporation
#131-31, Neung-Dong, Sungdong-Ku, Seoul
Korea
Tel: 02-466-0021~5
MALAYSIA
Yamaha Music Malaysia, Sdn., Bhd.
16-28, Jalan SS 2/72, Petaling Jaya, Selangor,
Malaysia
Tel: 3-717-8977
PHILIPPINES
Yupangco Music Corporation
339 Gil J. Puyat Avenue, P.O. BOX 885 MCPO,
Makati, Metro Manila, Philippines
Tel: 819-7551
SINGAPORE
Yamaha Music Asia Pte., Ltd.
Blk 17A Toa Payoh #01-190 Lorong 7
Singapore 1231
Tel: 354-0133
TAIWAN
Fazer Music Inc.
Aleksanterinkatu 11, SF 00100 Helsinki, Finland
Tel: 0435 011
NORWAY
Kung Hsue She Trading Co., Ltd.
No. 322, Section 1, FuHsing S. Road,
Taipei 106, Taiwan. R.O.C.
Tel: 02-709-1266
THAILAND
Narud Yamaha AS
Østerndalen 29, 1345 Østerås
Tel: 02-24 47 90
ICELAND
Páll H. Pálsson
P.O. Box 85, 121 Reykjavik, Iceland
Tel: 01-19440
EAST EUROPEAN COUNTRIES
(Except HUNGARY)
Yamaha Europa GmbH.
Siemensstraße 22-34, D-2084 Rellingen, F.R. of
Germany
Tel: 04101-3030
Siam Music Yamaha Co., Ltd.
865 Phornprapha Building, Rama I Road,
Patumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
Tel: 2-215-3443
THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA
AND OTHER ASIAN COUNTRIES
Yamaha Corporation,
International Marketing Division
Nakazawa-cho 10-1, Hamamatsu, Japan 430
Tel: 053-460-2311
OCEANIA
AUSTRALIA
AFRICA
Yamaha Corporation,
International Marketing Division
Nakazawa-cho 10-1, Hamamatsu, Japan 430
Tel: 053-460-2311
MIDDLE EAST
TURKEY/CYPRUS
Yamaha Musique France, Division Export
BP 70-77312 Marne-la-Valée Cedex 2, France
Tel: 01-64-61-4000
OTHER COUNTRIES
Yamaha Corporation,
International Marketing Division
Nakazawa-cho 10-1, Hamamatsu, Japan 430
Tel: 053-460-2311
Yamaha Music Australia Pty. Ltd.
17-33 Market Street, South Melbourne, Vic. 3205,
Australia
Tel: 3-699-2388
NEW ZEALAND
Music Houses of N.Z. Ltd.
146/148 Captain Springs Road, Te Papapa, Auckland,
New Zealand
Tel: 9-634-0099
COUNTRIES AND TRUST
TERRITORIES IN PACIFIC OCEAN
Yamaha Corporation,
International Marketing Division
Nakazawa-cho 10-1, Hamamatsu, Japan 430
Tel: 053-460-2311
HEAD OFFICE Yamaha Corporation, Electronic Musical Instrument Division
SY05
Nakazawa-cho 10-1, Hamamatsu, Japan 430
Tel: 053-460-2445