Service
Instructions
SSX & ASX Condensing Units and
SSZ & ASZ Split System Heat Pumps
with R-410A Refrigerant
Blowers, Coils, & Accessories
This manual is to be used by qualified, professionally trained HVAC technicians
only. Goodman does not assume any responsibility for property damage or
personal injury due to improper service procedures or services performed by an
unqualified person.
Copyright © 2006 Goodman Manufacturing Company, L.P.
RS6200006
November 2006
IMPORTANT INFORMATION
IMPORTANT INFORMATION ..................................... 2 - 3
TROUBLESHOOTING CHART ....................................... 24
PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION ...................................... 4 - 8
SERVICE TABLE OF CONTENTS ................................. 25
ACCESSORIES ........................................................ 9 - 16
SERVICING ............................................................ 26 - 61
PRODUCT DESIGN ................................................ 17 - 18
ACCESSORIES WIRING DIAGRAMS .................... 62 - 66
SYSTEM OPERATION ........................................... 19 - 23
Pride and workmanship go into every product to provide our customers with quality products. It is possible, however, that
during its lifetime a product may require service. Products should be serviced only by a qualified service technician who is
familiar with the safety procedures required in the repair and who is equipped with the proper tools, parts, testing instruments
and the appropriate service manual. REVIEW ALL SERVICE INFORMATION IN THE APPROPRIATE SERVICE MANUAL BEFORE
BEGINNING REPAIRS.
IMPORTANT NOTICES FOR CONSUMERS AND SERVICERS
RECOGNIZE SAFETY SYMBOLS, WORDS AND LABELS
WARNING
THIS UNIT SHOULD NOT BE CONNECTED TO. OR USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH, ANY DEVICES THAT ARE NOT DESIGN CERTIFIED FOR USE WITH THIS UNIT OR HAVE NOT BEEN
TESTED AND APPROVED BY GOODMAN. SERIOUS PROPERTY DAMAGE OR PERSONAL INJURY, REDUCED UNIT PERFORMANCE AND/OR HAZARDOUS CONDITIONS MAY RESULT
FROM THE USE OF DEVICES THAT HAVE NOT BEEN APPROVED OR CERTIFED BY GOODMAN.
WARNING
TO PREVENT THE RISK OF PROPERTY DAMAGE, PERSONAL
INJURY, OR DEATH,
DO NOT STORE COMBUSTIBLE MATERIALS OR USE GASOLINE OR OTHER
FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS OR VAPORS IN THE VICINITY OF THIS APPLIANCE.
W ARNING
G OODMAN W ILL NOT BE R ESPONSIBLE FOR ANY INJURY OR PROPERTY DAMAGE ARISING FROM IMPROPER SERVICE OR SERVICE PROCEDURES.
I F YOU INSTALL OR PERFORM SERVICE ON THIS UNIT, YOU ASSUME RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY PERSONAL INJURY OR PROPERTY DAMA GE WHICH
MAY RESULT. M ANY JU RISDICTIONS REQU IRE A LICENSE TO INSTALL OR SERVICE HEATING AN D AIR CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT.
To locate an authorized servicer, please consult your telephone book or the dealer from whom you purchased this product.
For further assistance, please contact:
CONSUMER INFORMATION LINE
GOODMAN® BRAND PRODUCTS
TOLL FREE
1-877-254-4729 (U.S. only)
email us at: customerservice@goodmanmfg.com
fax us at: (731) 856-1821
AMANA® BRAND PRODUCTS
TOLL FREE
1-877-254-4729 (U.S. only)
email us at: hac.consumer.affairs@amanahvac.com
fax us at: (931) 438- 4362
(Not a technical assistance line for dealers.)
(Not a technical assistance line for dealers.)
Outside the U.S., call 1-713-861-2500.
Outside the U.S., call 1-931-433-6101.
(Not a technical assistance line for dealers.)
Your telephone company will bill you for the call.
(Not a technical assistance line for dealers.)
Your telephone company will bill you for the call.
IMPORTANT INFORMATION
SAFE REFRIGERANT HANDLING
While these items will not cover every conceivable situation, they should serve as a useful guide.
WARNING
WARNING
REFRIGERANTS ARE HEAVIER THAN AIR. THEY CAN "PUSH OUT" THE
TO AVOID
TO AVOID POSSIBLE EXPLOSION:
• NEVER APPLY FLAME OR STEAM TO A REFRIGERANT CYLINDER. IF YOU
OXYGEN IN YOUR LUNGS OR IN ANY ENCLOSED SPACE.
POSSIBLE DIFFICULTY IN BREATHING OR DEATH:
•NEVER PURGE REFRIGERANT INTO AN ENCLOSED ROOM OR SPACE.
MUST HEAT A CYLINDER FOR FASTER CHARGING, PARTIALLY IMMERSE
BY
LAW, ALL REFRIGERANTS MUST BE RECLAIMED.
•IF AN INDOOR LEAK IS SUSPECTED, THOROUGHLY VENTILATE THE AREA
BEFORE BEGINNING WORK.
•LIQUID REFRIGERANT CAN BE VERY COLD.
IT IN WARM WATER.
NEVER FILL A CYLINDER MORE THAN 80% FULL OF LIQUID REFRIGERANT.
• NEVER ADD ANYTHING OTHER THAN R-22 TO AN R-22 CYLINDER OR
R-410 A TO AN R-410A CYLINDER. THE SERVICE EQUIPMENT USED MUST
•
TO AVOID POSSIBLE FROST-
BITE OR BLINDNESS, AVOID CONTACT WITH REFRIGERANT AND WEAR
BE LISTED OR CERTIFIED FOR THE TYPE OF REFRIGERANT USED.
•
GLOVES AND GOGGLES. IF LIQUID REFRIGERANT DOES CONTACT YOUR
STORE
CYLINDERS IN A COOL, DRY PLACE.
NEVER
USE A CYLINDER
AS A PLATFORM OR A ROLLER.
SKIN OR EYES, SEEK MEDICAL HELP IMMEDIATELY.
•ALWAYS FOLLOW
EPA REGULATIONS. NEVER BURN REFRIGERANT,
AS POISONOUS GAS WILL BE PRODUCED.
WARNING
TO AVOID POSSIBLE EXPLOSION, USE ONLY RETURNABLE (NOT DISPOSABLE)
SERVICE CYLINDERS WHEN REMOVING REFRIGERANT FROM A SYSTEM.
•
ENSURE THE CYLINDER IS FREE OF DAMAGE WHICH COULD LEAD TO A
LEAK OR EXPLOSION.
ENSURE THE HYDROSTATIC TEST DATE DOES NOT EXCEED 5 YEARS.
• ENSURE THE PRESSURE RATING MEETS OR EXCEEDS 400 LBS.
•
WHEN IN DOUBT, DO NOT USE CYLINDER.
WARNING
TO
AVOID POSSIBLE INJURY, EXPLOSION OR DEATH, PRACTICE SAFE
HANDLING OF REFRIGERANTS.
WARNING
SYSTEM CONTAMINANTS, IMPROPER SERVICE PROCEDURE AND/OR PHYSICAL
ABUSE AFFECTING HERMETIC COMPRESSOR ELECTRICAL TERMINALS MAY
CAUSE DANGEROUS SYSTEM VENTING.
The successful development of hermetically sealed refrigeration compressors has completely sealed the compressor's
moving parts and electric motor inside a common housing,
minimizing refrigerant leaks and the hazards sometimes
associated with moving belts, pulleys or couplings.
Fundamental to the design of hermetic compressors is a
method whereby electrical current is transmitted to the
compressor motor through terminal conductors which pass
through the compressor housing wall. These terminals are
sealed in a dielectric material which insulates them from the
housing and maintains the pressure tight integrity of the
hermetic compressor. The terminals and their dielectric
embedment are strongly constructed, but are vulnerable to
careless compressor installation or maintenance procedures and equally vulnerable to internal electrical short
circuits caused by excessive system contaminants.
In either of these instances, an electrical short between the
terminal and the compressor housing may result in the loss
of integrity between the terminal and its dielectric embedment. This loss may cause the terminals to be expelled,
thereby venting the vaporous and liquid contents of the
compressor housing and system.
A venting compressor terminal normally presents no danger
to anyone, providing the terminal protective cover is properly
in place.
If, however, the terminal protective cover is not properly in
place, a venting terminal may discharge a combination of
(a) hot lubricating oil and refrigerant
(b) flammable mixture (if system is contaminated
with air)
in a stream of spray which may be dangerous to anyone in the
vicinity. Death or serious bodily injury could occur.
Under no circumstances is a hermetic compressor to be
electrically energized and/or operated without having the
terminal protective cover properly in place.
See Service Section S-17 for proper servicing.
PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION
S
S
Z
14
036
1
A
A
Minor Revision
Brand Name
A: Initial Release
S: Goodman
(High Feature Set Models)
A: Amana Deluxe
Major Revision
A: Initial Release
Product Family
S: Split System
Electrical
1: 208/230V/60Hz/1ph
3: 208/230V/60Hz/3ph
4: 460V/60Hz/3ph
Product Type
X: Condenser R-410A
Z: Heat Pump R-410A
Nominal Capacity
SEER
SEER Rating
4
018:
024:
036:
042:
048:
060:
090:
120:
1.5 tons
2 tons
3 tons
3.5 tons
4 tons
5 tons
7.5 tons
10 tons
PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION
MB
E
8
00
A
A
1
Design Series
Voltage/Hz/Phase
MB: Modular Blower
1: 208-230/60/1
Motor Types
Design Series
E: Variable-speed
R: Constant-speed
A: First Series
Air Flow Delivered
Circuit Breaker
08: 800 CFM
12: 1,200 CFM
16: 1,600 CFM
20: 2,000 CFM
2: 208/230-60-1
Factory-installed
Electric Heat
00: No Heat
MODEL
MBR0800
MBR1200
MBR1600
MBR2000
MODEL
MBE1200
MBE1600
MBE2000
MFG. #
MBR0800
MBR1200
MBR1600
MBR2000
CA
U
F
18
A
4
A
Revision
Product Type
CA: A Coil, Upflow/Downflow
CH: Horizontal A Coil, Cased
Refrigerant
System Type
Expansion Device
F: Flowrator Coil
Nominal Capacity
MFG. #
CA*F030B4*
CA*F036B4*
CA*F042C4*
CA*F048C4*
CA*F057D4*
CA*F060D4*
A: First Revision
B: Second Revision
C: Third Revision
4: R-410A
U: Uncased Coil
P: Painted Case Coil
MODEL
CA*F030B4*
CA*F036B4*
CA*F042C4*
CA*F048C4*
CA*F057D4*
CA*F060D4*
MFG. #
MBE1200
MBE1600
MBE2000
18: 18,000 BTUH
24: 24,000 BTUH
25: 25,000 BTUH
30: 30,000 BTUH
32: 32,000 BTUH
36: 36,000 BTUH
37: 37,000 BTUH
48: 48,000 BTUH
49: 49,000 BTUH
60: 60,000 BTUH
61: 61,000 BTUH
62: 62,000 BTUH
Cabinet Description
CA Models
A: 14"
B: 17 1/2"
C: 21"
D: 24 1/2"
MODEL
CHPF030A4*
CHPF036B4*
CHPF042A4*
CHPF048D4*
CHPF060D4*
CH36FCB
CH48FCB
CH60FCB
Cabinet Description
CH Models
(Cabinet Height)
A: 14"
B: 17 1/2"
C: 21"
D: 24 1/2"
MFG. #
CHPF030A4*
CHPF036B4*
CHPF042A4*
CHPF048D4*
CHPF060D4*
CH36FCB
CH48FCB
CH60FCB
5
PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION
C
A
P
F
1824
A
6
A
Product Type
Revision
C: Indoor Coil
A: Revision
Applicaton
Refrigerant
A: Upflow/Downflow Coil
H: Horizontal A Coil
S: Horizontal Slab Coil
6: R-22 or R-41A
4: R-410A
Cabinet Finish
Nominal Width for Gas Furnace
U: Unpainted
P: Painted
C: Unpainted Case
A:
B:
C:
D:
N:
Expansion Device
F: Flowrator
Nominal Capacity Range
@ 13 SEER
6
1824:
1 1/2 - 2 Tons
3030:
2 1/2 Tons
3642:
3 - 3 1/2 Tons
Fits 14" Furnace Cabinet
Fits 17 1/2" Furnace Cabinet
Fits 21" Furnace Cabinet
Fits 24 1/2" Furnace Cabinet
Does Not Apply (Horizontal Slab Coils)
PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION
THIS NOMENCLATURE IS TO BE USED AFTER JULY 2006
A
R
U
F
3642
1
6
Product Type
A
Minor Revision
A: Single Piece
Air Handler
Application
C: Ceiling Mount PSC Motor
D: Downflow PSC Motor
E: Multi-Position
Variable Speed Motor
R: Multi-Position PSC Motor
W:Wall Mount PSC Motor
Refrigerant
Cabinet Finish
Electrical Supply
U: Unpainted
P: Painted
N: Uncased
1: 208-230V/60Hz/1ph
Expansion Device
F: Flowrator
Multi-Position & Downflow Applications
Nominal Capacity Range @ 13 SEER
3642:
3 - 3 1/2 Tons
1830:
1 1/2 - 3 1/2 Tons
Nominal Capacity Range @ 10 SEER
1729:
1 1/2 - 2 1/2 Tons (For Export Systems)
Ceiling Mount & Wall Mount Applications
Nominal Cooling Capacity/Electric Heat kw
1805:
1 1/2 Tons Cooling/5kw Electric Heat
2405:
2 Tons Cooling/5kw Electric Heat
3608:
3 Tons Cooling/8kw Electric Heat
7
PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION
Model No.
8
Description
SSX14****1*
{S} Goodman - High feature set model {S} Split System {X} Condenser R-410A {**} SEER {****} Nominal Capacity {1} Voltage {*} Revision
ASX14****1*
{A} Amana® Brand Deluxel {S} Split System {X} Condenser R-410A {**} SEER {****} Nominal Capacity {1} Voltage {*} Revision
SSZ14****1*
{S} Goodman - High feature set model {S} Split System {X} Heat Pump R-410A {**} SEER {****} Nominal Capacity {1} Voltage {*} Revision
ASZ14****1*
{A} Amana® Brand Deluxel {S} Split System {X} Heat Pump R-410A {**} SEER {****} Nominal Capacity {1} Voltage {*} Revision
MBE****AA1
{MB} Modular Blower {E} Varialble Spd. {**} Airflow {**} Heat {A} Circuit Breaker {A} Series {1} Voltage
MBR****AA1
{MB} Modular Blower {R} Constant Spd. {**} Airflow {**} Heat {A} Circuit Breaker {A} Series {1} Voltage
CAUF****4*
{CA} A Coil {U} Uncased {F} Flowrator {***} BTU {*} Cabinet Size {4} Ultron {*} Revision
CAUX****4*
{CA} A Coil {U} Uncased {X} TXV {***} BTU {*} Cabinet Size {4} Ultron {*} Revision
CAPF****4*
{CA} A Coil {P} Painted {F} Flowrator {***} BTU {*} Cabinet Size {4} Ultron {*} Revision
CAPX****4*
{CA} A Coil {P} Painted {X} TXV {***} BTU {*} Cabinet Size {4} Ultron {*} Revision
CHPF****4*
{CH} Horizontal {P} Painted {F} Flowrator {***} BTU {*} Cabinet Size {4} Ultron {*} Revision
CHPX****4*
{CH} Horizontal {P} Painted {X} TXV {***} BTU {*} Cabinet Size {4} Ultron {*} Revision
CH**FCB
{CH} Horizontal {**} Capacity {F} Flowrator {C} Cased Coil {B} Series
CAUF****6*
{CA} A Coil {U} Uncased {F} Flowrator {***} BTU {*} Cabinet Size {6} Ultron or R-22 {*} Revision
CAPF****6*
{CA} A Coil {P} Painted {F} Flowrator {***} BTU {*} Cabinet Size {6} Ultron or R-22 {*} Revision
CHPF****6*
{CH} Horizontal {P} Painted {F} Flowrator {***} BTU {*} Cabinet Size {6} Ultron or R-22 {*} Revision
CSPF****6*
{CH} Horizontal {P} Painted {F} Flowrator {***} BTU {*} Cabinet Size {6} Ultron or R-22 {*} Revision
ACCESSORIES
SSX14
Model
Description
SSX14
018
SSX14
024
SSX14
030
SSX14
036
SSX14
042
SSX14
048
SSX14
060
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
ASC01
Anti-Short Cycle Kit
X
X
X
X
CSR-U-1
Hard-start Kit
X
X
X
X
CSR-U-2
Hard-start Kit
CSR-U-3
Hard-start Kit
1
X
FSK01A
Freeze Protection Kit
X
TX2N4³
TXV Kit
X
2
TXV Kit
2
TXV Kit
TX3N4
TX5N4
1
X
X
X
X
X
X
Installed on indoor coil
2
Required for heat pump applications where ambient temperatures fall below 0°F with 50% or higher relative humidy.
³ Field-installed, non-bleed, expansion valve kit — Condensing units and heat pumps with reciprocating compressors require the use of
start-assist components when used in conjunction with an indoor coil using a non-bleed thermal expansion valve refrigerant metering
device.
ASX14
ASX14
018
ASX14
024
ASX14
030
ASX14
036
ASX14
042
ASX14
048
ASX14
060
Anti-Short Cycle Kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
CSR-U-1
Hard-start Kit
X
X
X
X
CSR-U-2
Hard-start Kit
CSR-U-3
Hard-start Kit
Model
Description
ASC01
1
FSK01A
Freeze Protection Kit
X
X
TX2N4³
TXV Kit
TX3N4³
TXV Kit
TX5N4³
TXV Kit
1
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
x
X
X
X
X
X
X
Installed on indoor coil
2
Required for heat pump applications where ambient temperatures fall below 0°F with 50% or higher relative humidy.
³ Field-installed, non-bleed, expansion valve kit — Condensing units and heat pumps with reciprocating compressors require the use of
start-assist components when used in conjunction with an indoor coil using a non-bleed thermal expansion valve refrigerant metering
device.
9
ACCESSORIES
SSX16
SSX16
024
SSX16
030
SSX16
036
SSX16
042
SSX16
048
SSX16
060
Anti-Short Cycle Kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
Hard-start Kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Model
Description
ASC01
CSR-U-1
CSR-U-2
Hard-start Kit
CSR-U-3
Hard-start Kit
1
FSK01A
Freeze Protection Kit
X
TX2N4³
TXV Kit
X
TX3N4³
TXV Kit
TX5N4³
TXV Kit
1
X
X
X
X
X
X
Installed on indoor coil
2
Required for heat pump applications where ambient temperatures fall below 0°F with 50% or higher relative humidy.
³ Field-installed, non-bleed, expansion valve kit — Condensing units and heat pumps with reciprocating compressors require the use of
start-assist components when used in conjunction with an indoor coil using a non-bleed thermal expansion valve refrigerant metering
device.
ASX16
ASX16
024
ASX16
030
ASX16
036
ASX16
042
ASX16
048
ASX16
060
Anti-Short Cycle Kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
CSR-U-1
Hard-start Kit
X
X
X
CSR-U-2
Hard-start Kit
CSR-U-3
Hard-start Kit
FSK01A1
Freeze Protection Kit
X
TX2N4³
TXV Kit
X
TX3N4³
TXV Kit
TX5N4³
TXV Kit
Model
Description
ASC01
1
2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Installed on indoor coil
Required for heat pump applications where ambient temperatures fall below 0°F with 50% or higher relative humidy.
³ Field-installed, non-bleed, expansion valve kit — Condensing units and heat pumps with reciprocating compressors require the use of
start-assist components when used in conjunction with an indoor coil using a non-bleed thermal expansion valve refrigerant metering
device.
10
ACCESSORIES
SSZ14
SSZ14
018
SSZ14
024
SSZ14
030
SSZ14
036
SSZ14
042
SSZ14
048
SSZ14
060
Model
Description
AFE18-60A
All-Fuel Kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
ASC01
Anti-Short Cycle Kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
CSR-U-1
Hard-start Kit
X
X
X
X
CSR-U-2
Hard-start Kit
CSR-U-3
Hard-start Kit
1
X
X
X
X
X
X
FSK01A
Freeze Protection Kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
OT/EHR18-60
Emergency Heat Relay kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
OT18-60A²
Outdoor Thermostat w/ Lockout Stat
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
TX2N4³
TXV Kit
X
TX3N4³
TXV Kit
X
X
X
TX5N4³
TXV Kit
X
X
X
1
Installed on indoor coil
2
Required for heat pump applications where ambient temperatures fall below 0°F with 50% or higher relative humidy.
3
Condensing units and heatp pumps with reciprocating compressors require the use of start-assist components when used in conjunction with an indoor coil using a
non-bleed expansion valve refrigerant metering device.
ASZ14
ASZ14
018
ASZ14
024
ASZ14
030
ASZ14
036
ASZ14
042
ASZ14
048
ASZ14
060
Model
Description
AFE18-60A
All-Fuel Kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
ASC01
Anti-Short Cycle Kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
CSR-U-1
Hard-start Kit
X
X
X
X
CSR-U-2
Hard-start Kit
CSR-U-3
Hard-start Kit
1
X
X
X
X
X
X
Freeze Protection Kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
OT18-60A
Outdoor Thermostat
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
OY-EHR18-60
Emergency Heat Relat Kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
TX2N4³
TXV Kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
FSK01A
2
TX3N4³
TXV Kit
TX5N4³
TXV Kit
1
Installed on indoor coil
2
Required for heat pump applications where ambient temperatures fall below 0°F with 50% or higher relative humidy.
3
Condensing units and heatp pumps with reciprocating compressors require the use of start-assist components when used in conjunction with an indoor coil using a
non-bleed expansion valve refrigerant metering device.
11
ACCESSORIES
SSZ16
Model
Description
SSZ16
024
SSZ16
030
SSZ16
036
SSZ16
042
SSZ16
048
SSZ16
060
AFE18-60A
All-Fuel Kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
ASC01
Anti-Short Cycle Kit
X
X
X
CSR-U-1
Hard-start Kit
X
X
X
CSR-U-2
Hard-start Kit
CSR-U-3
Hard-start Kit
1
X
Freeze Protection Kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
OT/EHR18-60
Emergency Heat Relay Kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
OY/EH R18-60
Emergency Heat Relay Kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
OT18-60A²
Outdoor Thermostat w/ Lockout Stat
X
X
X
X
X
X
TX2N4³
TXV Kit
X
TX3N4³
TXV Kit
X
X
TX5N4³
TXV Kit
X
X
X
FSK01A
1
Installed on indoor coil
2
Required for heat pump applications where ambient temperatures fall below 0°F with 50% or higher relative humidy.
3
Field-installed, non-bleed, expansion valve kit — Condensing units and heat pumps with reciprocating compressors require the use of start-assist
components when used in conjunction with an indoor coil using a non-bleed thermal expansion valve refrigerant metering device.
ASZ16
ASZ16
024
ASZ16
030
ASZ16
036
ASZ16
042
ASZ16
048
ASZ16
060
Model
Description
AFE18-60A
All-Fuel Kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
ASC01
Anti-Short Cycle Kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
CSR-U-1
Hard-start Kit
X
X
CSR-U-2
Hard-start Kit
X
X
X
X
CSR-U-3
Hard-start Kit
X
X
X
Freeze Protection Kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
OT/EHR18-60
Emergency Heat Relay Kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
OY/EH R18-60
Emergency Heat Relay Kit
X
X
X
X
X
X
OT18-60A²
Outdoor Thermostat w/ Lockout Stat
X
X
X
X
X
X
TX2N4³
TXV Kit
X
TX3N4³
TXV Kit
X
X
TX5N4³
TXV Kit
X
X
X
FSK01A
1
1
Installed on indoor coil
2
Required for heat pump applications where ambient temperatures fall below 0°F with 50% or higher relative humidy.
3
Field-installed, non-bleed, expansion valve kit — Condensing units and heat pumps with reciprocating compressors require the use of start-assist
components when used in conjunction with an indoor coil using a non-bleed thermal expansion valve refrigerant metering device.
12
ACCESSORIES
EXPANSION VALVE KITS
For Applications requiring
1/4 FLARE CONNECTION
BULB TO BE LOCATED
AT 10 OR 2 O'CLOCK
a field installed access fitting
BULB
SUCTION LINE
EVAPORATOR COIL
PISTON
SEAL SUPPLIED W/ KIT
SEAL SUPPLIED W/ KIT
SEAL
DISTRIBUTOR
BODY
EXPANSION VALVE
TAILPIECE
REMOVE BEFORE INSTALLING EXPANSION VALVE
3/8"SWEAT
7/8" NUT
For Applications not requiring
1/4' FLARE
CONNECTION
a field installed access fitting
BULB TO BE LOCATED
AT 10 OR 2 O'CLOCK
BULB
SUCTION LINE
PISTON
EXPANSION VALVE
EVAPORATOR COIL
DISTRIBUTOR
BODY
TAILPIECE
SEAL
3/8"SWEAT
SEAL SUPPLIED W/ KIT
SEAL SUPPLIED W/ KIT
REMOVE BEFORE
INSTALLING
EXPANSION VALVE
7/8" NUT
OT/EHR18-60
OUTDOOR THERMOSTAT &
EMERGENCY HEAT RELAY
OT18-60
Thermostat
Dial
315º
COLD
WARM
(Turn Clockwise)
DEAD
DIAL
Set Point
Adjustment
Screw
(Turn Counterclockwise)
45º
Set Point
Indicator
Mark
(Shown @ Oº F)
13
ACCESSORIES
FSK01A
FREEZE THERMOSTAT
KIT
Wire Nut
Y
Bl
ac
k
Y
k
ac
Bl
Wire Nut
Install Line
Thermostat
Here
Install Line
Thermostat
Here
Wire Nut
Bla
ck
Y
Bla
ck
Wire Nut
Y
ASC01A
ANTI-SHORT -CYCLE CONTROL KIT
SHORT CYCLE
PROTECTOR
Y1 R1
Y2 R2
YELLOW 1
CONTACTOR
T2 T1
Y
BLACK 1
THERMOSTAT
WIRE
L2 L1
C
BLACK 1
14
UNIT
TERMINAL
BOARD
ACCESSORIES
COIL ACCESSORIES
COIL MODEL
TX2N4 TXV KIT
TX3N4 TXV KIT
CA*F030B4*
X
CA*F036B4*
X
TX5N4 TXV KIT
FSK01A FREEZE PROTECTION KIT
X
X
CA*F042C4*
X
X
CA*F048C4*
X
X
CA*F057D4*
X
X
CA*F060D4*
X
CHPF030A4*
X
CHPF036B4*
X
X
X
X
CHPF042A4*
X
X
CHPF048D4*
X
X
CHPF060D4*
X
X
X
X
CH36FCB
X
X
CH48FCB
CH60FCB
X
CA*F18246*
X
X
X
CA*F30306*
X
CA*F36426*
X
X
X
X
X
CHPF18246*
X
X
CHPF30306*
X
X
CHPF36426*
X
CSCF1824N6*
X
X
X
CSCF303N6*
X
CSCF3642N6*
X
X
X
X
HKR SERIES ELECTRIC HEAT KITS
ELECTRIC HEAT KIT APPLICATIONS - MBR & MBE
ELECTRIC HEAT KIT
BLOWER
HKR-03A
HKR-05(C)A
HKR-06A
MBR0800AA-1
X
X
X
X
X
MBR1200AA-1
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
MBR1600AA-1
X
X
X
X
X
X
MBR2000AA-1
X
X
X
X
X
X
MBE1200AA-1
-
-
-
X
X
X
MBE1600AA-1
-
-
-
-
X
MBE2000AA-1
-
-
-
-
X
X = Allowable combinations
HKR-08(C)A HKR-10(C)A HKR-15(C)A HKR-20(C)A HKR-21(C)A
HKR3-15A
HKR3-20A
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
-
-
-
-
X
-
-
-
-
X
X
-
-
-
- = Indicate restricted combinations
ELECTRIC HEAT KIT APPLICATIONS - ARPF
HKR-03*
HKR-05*, HKR-05C*
HKR-06*
HKR-08*, HKR-08C*
HKR-10*, HKR-10C*
HKR-15C*
HKR-20C*
HKR-21C*
^ HKR3-15*
^ HKR3-20*
ARPF1824
1/16
X
X
X
X1
X1
X2
ARPF1931
1/16
X
X
X
X1
X1
X2
* Revision level that may or may not be designated
C Circuit breaker option
^ Heat kit requires three-phase power supply
ARPF3030
1/16
X
X
X
X
X1
X2
X2
X2
X2
X2
ARPF3642
1/16
X
X
X
X
X
X3
X3
X3
X3
X3
ARPF3743
1/16
X
X
X
X
X
X3
X3
X3
X3
X3
ARPF4860
1/16
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
¹ Air handler must either be on medium or high speed
² Air handler must be on high speed
³ For static pressure of 0.6 or higher, air handler must be on
medium or high speed
15
ACCESSORIES
ELECTRIC HEAT KIT APPLICATIONS - ARUF
ARUF1729
1/16
ARUF1824
1/16
ARUF1931
1/16
ARUF3030
1/16
ARUF3642
1/16
ARUF3743
1/16
ARUF4860
1/16
HKR-03*
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
HKR-05*, HKR-05C*
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
HKR-06*
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
HKR-08*, HKR-08C*
X1
X1
X1
X
X
X
X
HKR-10*, HKR-10C*
X1
X1
X1
X1
X
X
X
HKR-15C*
X2
X2
X2
X2
X3
X3
X
HKR-20C*
X2
X3
X3
X
HKR-21C*
X2
X3
X3
X
^ HKR3-15*
X2
X3
X3
X
^ HKR3-20*
X2
X3
X3
X
* Revision level that may or may not be designated
C Circuit breaker option
^ Heat kit requires three-phase power supply
1
Air handler must either be on medium or high speed
2
Air handler must be on high speed
3
For static pressure of 0.6 or higher, air handler must be on medium or high speed
ARUF02400A1A
ARUF03200A1B
ARUF04200A1B
ARUF04900A1B
ARUF06100A1B
HKR-03*
X
X
X
X
X
HKR-05*, HKR-05C*
X
X
X
X
X
HKR-06*
X
X
X
X
X
HKR-08*, HKR-08C*
X
X1
X
X
X
HKR-10*, HKR-10C*
X1
X1
X1
X
X
X2
X2
X3
X
HKR-20C*
X2
X3
X
HKR-21C*
X2
X3
X
^ HKR3-15*
X2
X3
X
^ HKR3-20*
X2
X3
X
HKR-15C*
* Revision level that may or may not be designated
C Circuit breaker option
^ Heat kit requires three-phase power supply
1
Air handler must either be on medium or high speed
2
Air handler must be on high speed
3
For static pressure of 0.6 or higher, air handler must be on medium or high speed
16
PRODUCT DESIGN
This section gives a basic description of cooling unit operation, its various components and their basic operation.
Ensure your system is properly sized for heat gain and loss
according to methods of the Air Conditioning Contractors
Association (ACCA) or equivalent.
CONDENSING UNIT
The condenser air is pulled through the condenser coil by a
direct drive propeller fan. This condenser air is then discharged out of the top of the cabinet. These units are
designed for free air discharge, so no additional resistance,
like duct work, shall be attached.
The suction and liquid line connections on present models
are of the sweat type for field piping with refrigerant type
copper. Front seating valves are factory installed to accept
the field run copper. The total refrigerant charge for a normal
installation is factory installed in the condensing unit.
ASX, SSX, ASZ and SSZ models are available in 1 1/2 through
5 ton sizes and use R-410A refrigerant. They are designed for
208/230 volt single phase applications.
ASX and ASZ R-410A model units use the Copeland Scroll
"Ultratech" Series compressors which are specifically designed for R-410A refrigerant. These units also have Copeland®
ComfortAlert diagnostics.
SSX and SSZ R-410A model units use the Copeland Scroll
"Ultratech" Series compressors which are specifically designed for R-410A refrigerant.
There are a number of design characteristics which are
different from the traditional reciprocating and/or scroll compressors.
COILS AND BLOWER COILS
MBR/MBE blower cabinets are designed to be used as a twopiece blower and coil combination. MBR/MBE blower sections can be attached to cased evaporator coil. This twopiece arrangement allows for a variety of mix-matching
possibilities providing greater flexibility. The MBE blower
cabinet uses a variable speed motor that maintains a constant airflow with a higher duct static.
It is approved for applications with cooling coils of up to 0.8
inches W.C. external static pressure and includes a feature
that allows airflow to be changed by +15%. The MBR blower
cabinet uses a PSC motor. It is approved for applications with
cooling coils of up to 0.5 inches W.C. external static pressure.
The MBR/MBE blower cabinets with proper coil matches can
be positioned for upflow, counterflow, horizontal right or
horizontal left operation. All units are constructed with R-4.2
insulation. In areas of extreme humidity (greater than 80%
consistently), insulate the exterior of the blower with insulation having a vapor barrier equivalent to ductwork insulation,
providing local codes permit.
The CAPX/CHPX coils are equipped with a thermostatic
expansion valve that has a built-in internal check valve for
refrigerant metering. The CACF/CAPF/CHPF coils are
equipped with a fixed restrictor orifice.
The coils are designed for upflow, counterflow or horizontal
application, using two-speed direct drive motors on the
CACF/CAPF/CHPX models and BPM (Brushless Permanent
Magnet) or ECM motors on the MBE models.
"Ultractech" Series scroll compressors will not have a discharge thermostat. Some of the early model scroll compressors required discharge thermostat.
"Ultratech" Series scroll compressors use "POE" or
polyolester oil which is NOT compatible with mineral oil
based lubricants like 3GS. "POE" oil must be used if
additional oil is required.
17
PRODUCT DESIGN
The ASX [16 & 18] and ASZ [16 & 18] series split system
units use a two-stage scroll compressor. The two-step
modulator has an internal unloading mechanism that opens
a bypass port in the first compression pocket, effectively
reducing the displacement of the scroll. The opening and
closing of the bypass port is controlled by an internal
electrically operated solenoid.
As this motion occurs, the pockets between the two forms
are slowly pushed to the center of the two scrolls while
simultaneously being reduced in volume. When the pocket
reaches the center of the scroll form, the gas, which is now
at a high pressure, is discharged out of a port located at the
center.
During compression, several pockets are being compressed
simultaneously, resulting in a very smooth process. Both the
suction process (outer portion of the scroll members) and the
discharge process (inner portion) are continuous.
The ZPS/ZRS two-step modulated scroll uses a single step
of unloading to go from full capacity to approximately 67%
capacity. A single speed, high efficiency motor continues to
run while the scroll modulates between the two capacity
steps.
A scroll is an involute spiral which, when matched with a
mating scroll form as shown, generates a series of crescent
shaped gas pockets between the two members.
During compression, one scroll remains stationary (fixed
scroll) while the other form (orbiting scroll) is allowed to orbit
(but not rotate) around the first form.
18
Some design characteristics of the Compliant Scroll compressor are:
•
Compliant Scroll compressors are more tolerant of liquid
refrigerant.
NOTE: Even though the compressor section of a Scroll
compressor is more tolerant of liquid refrigerant, continued floodback or flooded start conditions may wash oil
from the bearing surfaces causing premature bearing
failure.
•
Compliant Scroll compressors use white oil which is
compatible with 3GS. 3GS oil may be used if additional
oil is required.
•
Compliant scroll compressors perform "quiet" shutdowns
that allow the compressor to restart immediately without
the need for a time delay. This compressor will restart
even if the system has not equalized.
NOTE: Operating pressures and amp draws may differ
from standard reciprocating compressors. This information can be found in the unit's Technical Information
Manual.
SYSTEM OPERATION
COOLING
HEATING
The refrigerant used in the system is R-410A. It is a clear,
colorless, non-toxic and non-irritating liquid. R-410A is a
50:50 blend of R-32 and R-125. The boiling point at atmospheric pressure is -62.9°F.
The heating portion of the refrigeration cycle is similar to the
cooling cycle. By energizing the reversing valve solenoid coil,
the flow of the refrigerant is reversed. The indoor coil now
becomes the condenser coil, and the outdoor coil becomes
the evaporator coil.
A few of the important principles that make the refrigeration
cycle possible are: heat always flows from a warmer to a
cooler body. Under lower pressure, a refrigerant will absorb
heat and vaporize at a low temperature. The vapors may be
drawn off and condensed at a higher pressure and temperature to be used again.
The indoor evaporator coil functions to cool and dehumidify
the air conditioned spaces through the evaporative process
taking place within the coil tubes.
NOTE: The pressures and temperatures shown in the
refrigerant cycle illustrations on the following pages are for
demonstration purposes only. Actual temperatures and pressures are to be obtained from the "Expanded Performance
Chart".
Liquid refrigerant at condensing pressure and temperatures,
(270 psig and 122°F), leaves the outdoor condensing coil
through the drier and is metered into the indoor coil through
the metering device. As the cool, low pressure, saturated
refrigerant enters the tubes of the indoor coil, a portion of the
liquid immediately vaporizes. It continues to soak up heat and
vaporizes as it proceeds through the coil, cooling the indoor
coil down to about 48°F.
The check valve at the indoor coil will open by the flow of
refrigerant letting the now condensed liquid refrigerant bypass the indoor expansion device. The check valve at the
outdoor coil will be forced closed by the refrigerant flow,
thereby utilizing the outdoor expansion device.
The restrictor orifice used with the CA*F, CHPF and CH**FCB
coils will be forced onto a seat when running in the cooling
cycle, only allowing liquid refrigerant to pass through the
orifice opening. In the heating cycle, it will be forced off the
seat allowing liquid to flow around the restrictor. A check valve
is not required in this circuit.
COOLING CYCLE
When the contacts of the room thermostat close making
terminals R to Y & G, the low voltage circuit of the transformer
is completed. Current now flows through the magnetic holding coils of the compressor contactor (CC) and fan relay
(RFC).
This draws in the normally open contact CC, starting the
compressor and condenser fan motors. At the same time,
contacts RFC close, starting the indoor fan motor.
Heat is continually being transferred to the cool fins and tubes
of the indoor evaporator coil by the warm system air. This
warming process causes the refrigerant to boil. The heat
removed from the air is carried off by the vapor.
When the thermostat is satisfied, it opens its contacts,
breaking the low voltage circuit, causing the compressor
contactor and indoor fan relay to open, shutting down the
system.
As the vapor passes through the last tubes of the coil, it
becomes superheated. That is, it absorbs more heat than is
necessary to vaporize it. This is assurance that only dry gas
will reach the compressor. Liquid reaching the compressor
can weaken or break compressor valves.
If the room thermostat fan selector switch should be set on
the "on" position, then the indoor blower would run continuous
rather than cycling with the compressor.
The compressor increases the pressure of the gas, thus
adding more heat, and discharges hot, high pressure superheated gas into the outdoor condenser coil.
ASZ and SSZ models energize the reversing valve thorough
the "O" circuit in the room thermostat. Therefore, the reversing valve remains energized as long as the thermostat
subbase is in the cooling position. The only exception to this
is during defrost.
In the condenser coil, the hot refrigerant gas, being warmer
than the outdoor air, first loses its superheat by heat transferred from the gas through the tubes and fins of the coil. The
refrigerant now becomes saturated, part liquid, part vapor and
then continues to give up heat until it condenses to a liquid
alone. Once the vapor is fully liquefied, it continues to give up
heat which subcools the liquid, and it is ready to repeat the
cycle.
19
SYSTEM OPERATION
DEFROST CYCLE
HEATING CYCLE
The defrosting of the outdoor coil is jointly controlled by the
defrost control board and the defrost thermostat.
The ASZ and SSZ model heat pumps use a different control
circuit than preceding heat pump models. These models do
not use a reversing relay to energize the reversing valve. Also,
many previous models energized the reversing valve off the
"B" terminal on the thermostat, and all previous models
energized the reversing valve in the heating cycle.
Solid State Defrost Control
During operation the power to the circuit board is controlled
by a temperature sensor, which is clamped to a feeder tube
entering the outdoor coil. Defrost timing periods of 30, 60, or
90 minutes may be selected by connecting the circuit board
jumper to 30, 60, or 90 respectively. Accumulation of time for
the timing period selected starts when the sensor closes
(approximately 31° F), and when the room thermostat calls
for heat. At the end of the timing period, the unit’s defrost
cycle will be initiated provided the sensor remains closed.
When the sensor opens (approximately 75° F), the defrost
cycle is terminated and the timing period is reset. If the
defrost cycle is not terminated due to the sensor temperature, a ten minute override interrupts the unit’s defrost period.
DF2
TEST
JUMPER WIRE
90
60
30
20
A
DF1
C
Y
W2 R
R DFT
The reversing valve on the SSZ and ASZ models is energized
in the cooling cycle through the "O" terminal on the room
thermostat.
These models have a 24 volt reversing valve coil. When the
thermostat selector switch is set in the cooling position, the
"O" terminal on the thermostat is energized all the time.
Care must be taken when selecting a room thermostat. Refer
to the installation instructions shipped with the product for
approved thermostats.
SYSTEM OPERATION
COOLING CYCLE
Reversing Valve
(Energized)
Indoor
Coil
Outdoor
Coil
Accumulator
Thermostatic
Expansion
Valve
Bi-Flow
Filter Dryer
Check Valve
HEATING CYCLE
Reversing Valve
(De-Energized)
Indoor
Coil
Outdoor
Coil
Accumulator
Thermostatic
Expansion
Valve
Bi-Flow
Filter Dryer
Check Valve
21
SYSTEM OPERATION
EXPANSION VALVE/CHECK VALVE ASSEMBLY
IN COOLING OPERATION
EXPANSION VALVE/CHECK VALVE ASSEMBLY
IN HEATING OPERATION
Most expansion valves used in current Amana® Brand Heat Pump products
use an internally checked expansion valve.
This type of expansion valve does not require an external check valve as shown above.
However, the principle of operation is the same.
22
RESTRICTOR ORIFICE ASSEMBLY
IN COOLING OPERATION
RESTRICTOR ORIFICE ASSEMBLY
IN HEATING OPERATION
In the cooling mode, the orifice is pushed into its
seat, forcing refrigerant to flow through the metered
hole in the center of the orifice.
In the heating mode, the orifice moves back off its
seat, allowing refrigerant to flow unmetered around
the outside of the orifice.
SYSTEM OPERATION
AFE18-60A CONTROL BOARD
DESCRIPTION
The AFE18 control is designed for use in heat pump applications where the indoor coil is located above/downstream of a
gas or fossil fuel furnace. It will operate with single and two
stage heat pumps and single and two stage furnaces. The
AFE18 control will turn the heat pump unit off when the
furnace is turned on. An anti-short cycle feature is also
incorporated which initiates a 3 minute timed off delay when
the compressor goes off. On initial power up or loss and
restoration of power, this 3 minute timed off delay will be
initiated. The compressor won’t be allowed to restart until the
3 minute off delay has expired. Also included is a 5 second
de-bounce feature on the “Y, E, W1 and O” thermostat inputs.
These thermostat inputs must be present for 5 seconds
before the AFE18 control will respond to it.
An optional outdoor thermostat, OT18-60A, can be used with
the AFE18 to switch from heat pump operation to furnace
operation below a specific ambient temperature setting, i.e.
break even temperature during heating. When used in this
manner, the “Y” heat demand is switched to the “W1” input
to the furnace by the outdoor thermostat and the furnace is
used to satisfy the first stage “Y” heat demand. On some
controls, if the outdoor thermostat fails closed in this position
during the heating season, it will turn on the furnace during
the cooling season on a “Y” cooling demand. In this
situation, the furnace produces heat and increases the
indoor temperature thereby never satisfying the cooling
demand. The furnace will continue to operate and can only
be stopped by switching the thermostat to the off position or
removing power to the unit and then replacing the outdoor
thermostat. When the AFE18 receives a “Y” and “O”
input from the indoor thermostat, it recognizes this as a
cooling demand in the cooling mode. If the outdoor thermostat is stuck in the closed position switching the “Y” demand
to the “W1” furnace input during the cooling mode as
described above, the AFE18 won’t allow the furnace to
operate. The outdoor thermostat will have to be replaced to
restore the unit to normal operation.
HIGH VOLTAGE!
Disconnect ALL power before servicing
or installing. Multiple power sources
may be present. Failure to do so may
cause property damage, personal injury
or death.
23
TROUBLESHOOTING CHART
COOLING/H P ANALYSIS CHART
Pow er Failure
Blow n Fus e
Unbalanced Pow er, 3PH
Loose Connec tion
Shorted or Broken Wires
Open Fan Ov erload
Faulty Thermos tat
Faulty Transf ormer
Shorted or Open Capacitor
Internal Compres s or Overload Open
Shorted or Grounded Compress or
Compress or Stuc k
Faulty Compress or Contactor
Faulty Fan Relay
Open Control Circ uit
Low V oltage
Faulty Evap. Fan Motor
Shorted or Grounded Fan Motor
Improper Cooling A ntic ipator
Shortage of Ref rigerant
Res tric ted Liquid Line
Open Element or Limit on Elec . Heater
Dirty A ir Filter
Dirty Indoor Coil
Not enough air ac ros s Indoor Coil
Too much air across Indoor Coil
Ov erc harge of Ref rigerant
Dirty Outdoor Coil
Noncondensibles
Rec irc ulation of Condens ing A ir
Inf iltration of Outdoor A ir
Improperly Loc ated Thermos tat
A ir Flow Unbalanc ed
Sy s tem Unders iz ed
Broken Internal Parts
Broken V alves
Inef f ic ient Compress or
Wrong Ty pe Ex pans ion V alv e
Ex pans ion Dev ice Res tric ted
Ov ers iz ed Ex pans ion V alve
Unders ized Ex pansion V alv e
Ex pans ion V alve Bulb Loos e
Inoperativ e Ex pansion V alve
Loose Hold-dow n Bolts
Faulty Rev ers ing V alv e
Faulty Def ros t Control
Faulty Def ros t Thermostat
Flow rator Not Seating Properly
• •
•
• •
•
♦
♦
•
•
•
• •
• •
♦
•
• •
•
• •
•
• •
• •
•
• •
•
•
•
•
•
•
• •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
• • •
•
• • •
•
•
• • •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Cooling or He ating Cycle (He at Pum p)
• •
• •
•
•
•
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
•
♦
♦
♦
•
• •
•
•
•
• •
• •
♦
• •
• •
•
•
•
•
•
♦
♦
♦
♦
•
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
• •
♦
♦
♦
See Service Procedure Ref.
High head pressure
High suction pressure
Low head pressure
♦
• •
•
Te st Me thod
Re m e dy
•
• • •
•
• •
• •
•
Low suction pressure
Unit will not defrost
Unit will not terminate defrost
System runs - blows cold air in heating
Compressor is noisy
Certain areas too cool, others too warm
Not cool enough on warm days
Too cool and then too warm
System runs continuously - little cooling/htg
Compressor cycles on overload
Compressor runs - goes off on overload
Condenser fan will not start
Evaporator fan will not start
Comp. and Cond. Fan will not start
•
•
• •
•
•
•
• • • •
•
•
• •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
24
Compressor will not start - fan runs
DOTS IN ANALYSIS
GUIDE INDICATE
"P OS SIBLE CAUSE"
SYMPTOM
P OS SIBLE CAUSE
Sys te m
Ope r ating
Pr e s s ur e s
Uns atis factor y
Cooling/He ating
No Cooling
System will not start
Com plaint
Test V oltage
S-1
Ins pec t Fuse Siz e & Ty pe
S-1
Test V oltage
S-1
Ins pec t Connec tion - Tighten
S-2, S-3
Test Circ uits With Ohmmeter
S-2, S-3
Test Continuity of Ov erload
S-17A
Test Continuity of Thermos tat & Wiring
S-3
Chec k Control Circuit w ith V oltmeter
S-4
Test Capacitor
S-15
Test Continuity of Ov erload
S-17A
Test Motor Windings
S-17B
Us e Test Cord
S-17D
Test Continuity of Coil & Contac ts
S-7, S-8
Test Continuity of Coil A nd Contac ts
S-7
Test Control Circ uit w ith V oltmeter
S-4
Test V oltage
S-1
Repair or Replac e
S-16
Test Motor Windings
S-16
Chec k Resis tanc e of A ntic ipator
S-3B
Test For Leaks, A dd Ref rigerant
S-101,103
Remov e Res tric tion, Replac e Restricted Part
S-112
Test Heater Element and Controls
S-26,S-27
Ins pec t Filter-Clean or Replace
Ins pec t Coil - Clean
Chec k Blow er Speed, Duc t Static Pres s, Filter
S-200
Reduc e Blow er Speed
S-200
Recov er Part of Charge
S-113
Ins pec t Coil - Clean
Recov er Charge, Ev ac uate, Recharge
S-114
Remov e Obs truc tion to A ir Flow
Chec k Window s , Doors , V ent Fans , Etc.
Reloc ate Thermostat
Readjust A ir V olume Dampers
Ref igure Cooling Load
Replac e Compres sor
S-115
Test Compres sor Ef f icienc y
S-104
Test Compres sor Ef f icienc y
S-104
Replac e V alv e
S-110
Remov e Res tric tion or Replace Ex pans ion Devic e
S-110
Replac e V alv e
Replac e V alv e
Tighten Bulb Brac ket
S-105
Chec k V alve Operation
S-110
Tighten Bolts
Replac e V alv e or Solenoid
S-21, 122
Test Control
S-24
Test Def rost Thermostat
S-25
Chec k Flow rator & Seat or Replac e Flow rator
S-111
♦ He ating Cycle Only (He at Pum p)
SERVICING
Table of Contents
S-1
S-2
S-3
S-3A
S-3B
S-3C
S-3D
S-4
S-5
S-6
S-7
S-8
S-9
S-12
S-13
S-15
S-15A
S-15B
S-16A
S-16B
S-16C
S-16D
S-16E
S-17
S-17A
S-17B
S-17C
S-17D
S-18
S-21
S-24
Checking Voltage .......................................... 26
Checking Wiring ............................................ 26
Checking Thermostat, Wiring & Anticipator .. 26
Thermostat & Wiring ..................................... 26
Cooling Anticipator ........................................ 27
Heating Anticipator ........................................ 27
Checking Encoded Thermostats ................... 27
Checking Transformer & Control Circuit ....... 28
Checking Cycle Protector ............................. 28
Checking Time Delay Relay .......................... 28
Checking Contactor and/or Relays ................ 29
Checking Contactor Contacts ....................... 29
Checking Fan Relay Contact ........................ 29
Checking High Pressure Control ................... 30
Checking Low Pressure Control .................... 30
Checking Capacitor ....................................... 30
Resistance Check ......................................... 31
Capacitance Check ....................................... 32
Checking Fan & Blower Motor
Windings (PSC Motors) ............................... 32
Checking Fan & Blower Motor (ECM Motors) 32
Checking ECM Motor Windings .................... 32
ECM CFM Adjustments ................................ 36
Blower Performance Data .............................. 36
Checking Compressor Windings ................... 38
Resistance Test ............................................ 38
Ground Test .................................................. 38
Unloader Test ................................................ 39
Operation Test .............................................. 39
Testing Crankcase Heater (optional item) ..... 40
Checking Reversing Valve and Solenoid ........ 40
Testing Defrost Control .................................. 40
S-25
S-26
S-27
S-40
S-41
S-60
S-61A
S-61B
S-62
S-100
S-101
S-102
S-103
Testing Defrost Thermostat ........................... 40
Checking Heater Limit Control(s) .................. 41
Checking Heater Elements ........................... 41
MBR/ARUF Electronic Blower Time Delay .... 41
MBE/AEPF With SSX and ASX units ........... 43
Electric Heater (optional item) ....................... 47
Checking Heater Limit Control(S) .................. 48
Checking Heater Fuse Line ........................... 49
Checking Heater Elements ........................... 49
Refrigeration Repair Practice ......................... 49
Leak Testing ................................................. 50
Evacuation .................................................... 50
Charging ........................................................ 50
S-104
S-105A
S-105B
S-106
S-107
S-108
S-109
S-109A
S-109B
S-110
S-111
S-112
S-113
S-114
S-115
S-120
S-202
Checking Compressor Efficiency .................. 51
Piston Chart for SSX14 and ASX14 Units ...... 51
Thermostatic Expansion Valve ...................... 51
Overfeeding ................................................... 52
Underfeeding ................................................. 52
Superheat ..................................................... 52
Checking Subcooling .................................... 55
Two Speed Application .................................. 55
Heat Pump Heating Mode ............................. 56
Checking Expansion Valve Operation ........... 56
Fixed Orifice Restriction Devices .................. 56
Checking Restricted Liquid Line .................... 57
Refrigerant Overcharge .................................. 57
Non-condensables ........................................ 57
Compressor Burnout ..................................... 57
Refrigerant Piping .......................................... 58
Duct Static Pressure
& Static Pressure Drop Across Coils ............ 60
Air Handler External Static ........................... 60
Coil Static Pressure Drop ............................. 61
S-203
S-204
HIGH VOLTAGE!
Disconnect ALL power before servicing or installing. Multiple power sources may be present. Failure to
do so may cause property damage, personal injury or death.
25
SERVICING
S-2 CHECKING WIRING
S-1 CHECKING VOLTAGE
1. Remove outer case, control panel cover, etc., from unit
being tested.
With power ON:
HIGH VOLTAGE!
Disconnect ALL power before servicing
or installing. Multiple power sources
may be present. Failure to do so may
cause property damage, personal injury
or death.
WARNING
Line Voltage now present.
2. Using a voltmeter, measure the voltage across terminals
L1 and L2 of the contactor for the condensing unit or at the
field connections for the air handler or heaters.
3. No reading - indicates open wiring, open fuse(s) no power
or etc., from unit to fused disconnect service. Repair as
needed.
4. With ample voltage at line voltage connectors, energize
the unit.
5. Measure the voltage with the unit starting and operating,
and determine the unit Locked Rotor Voltage. NOTE: If
checking heaters, be sure all heating elements are
energized.
Locked Rotor Voltage is the actual voltage available at
the compressor during starting, locked rotor, or a stalled
condition. Measured voltage should be above minimum
listed in chart below.
To measure Locked Rotor Voltage attach a voltmeter to
the run "R" and common "C" terminals of the compressor,
or to the T1 and T2 terminals of the contactor. Start the unit
and allow the compressor to run for several seconds, then
shut down the unit. Immediately attempt to restart the
unit while measuring the Locked Rotor Voltage.
6. Lock rotor voltage should read within the voltage tabulation as shown. If the voltage falls below the minimum
voltage, check the line wire size. Long runs of undersized
wire can cause low voltage. If wire size is adequate, notify
the local power company in regard to either low or high
voltage.
UNIT SUPPLY VOLTAGE
VOLTAGE
MIN.
MAX.
460
437
506
208/230
198
253
NOTE: When operating electric heaters on voltages other
than 240 volts, refer to the System Operation section on
electric heaters to calculate temperature rise and air flow.
Low voltage may cause insufficient heating.
1. Check wiring visually for signs of overheating, damaged
insulation and loose connections.
2. Use an ohmmeter to check continuity of any suspected
open wires.
3. If any wires must be replaced, replace with comparable
gauge and insulation thickness.
S-3 CHECKING THERMOSTAT, WIRING, AND
ANTICIPATOR
THERMOSTAT WIRE SIZING CHART
LENGTH OF RUN
25 feet
50 feet
75 feet
100 feet
125 feet
150 feet
MIN. COPPER WIRE
GAUGE (AWG)
18
16
14
14
12
12
S-3A THERMOSTAT AND WIRING
WARNING
Line Voltage now present.
With power ON, thermostat calling for cooling
1. Use a voltmeter to check for 24 volts at thermostat wires
C and Y in the condensing unit control panel.
2. No voltage indicates trouble in the thermostat, wiring or
external transformer source.
3. Check the continuity of the thermostat and wiring. Repair
or replace as necessary.
Indoor Blower Motor
With power ON:
WARNING
Line Voltage now present.
1. Set fan selector switch at thermostat to "ON" position.
2. With voltmeter, check for 24 volts at wires C and G.
3. No voltage indicates the trouble is in the thermostat or
wiring.
26
SERVICING
4. Check the continuity of the thermostat and wiring. Repair
or replace as necessary.
Resistance Heaters
1. Set room thermostat to a higher setting than room
temperature so both stages call for heat.
element helping the thermostat call for the next cooling cycle.
This prevents the room temperature from rising too high
before the system is restarted. A properly sized anticipator
should maintain room temperature within 1 1/2 to 2 degree
range.
2. With voltmeter, check for 24 volts at each heater relay.
Note: BBA/BBC heater relays are DC voltage.
The anticipator is supplied in the thermostat and is not to be
replaced. If the anticipator should fail for any reason, the
thermostat must be changed.
3. No voltage indicates the trouble is in the thermostat or
wiring.
S-3C HEATING ANTICIPATOR
4. Check the continuity of the thermostat and wiring. Repair
or replace as necessary.
The heating anticipator is a wire wound adjustable heater
which is energized during the "ON" cycle to help prevent
overheating of the conditioned space.
NOTE: Consideration must be given to how the heaters are
wired (O.D.T. and etc.). Also safety devices must be checked
for continuity.
S-3B COOLING ANTICIPATOR
The anticipator is a part of the thermostat and if it should fail
for any reason, the thermostat must be replaced. See the
following tables for recommended heater anticipator setting
in accordance to the number of electric heaters installed.
The cooling anticipator is a small heater (resistor) in the
thermostat. During the "off" cycle, it heats the bimetal
S-3D TROUBLESHOOTING ENCODED TWO STAGE COOLING THERMOSTATS OPTIONS
Troubleshooting Encoded Two Stage Cooling Thermostats Options
T
E
S
T
TEST
INDICATION
INPUT
FROM
THERMOSTAT
POWER
TO
THERMOSTAT
FUNCTION
SIGNAL OUT
SIGNAL FAN
S1 +
LOW SPEED COOL
YCON +
Y1
* S1 - *
* LO SPEED COOL *
* YCON - *
* Y / Y2 HI *
S1 + -
HI SPEED COOL
YCON + -
Y / Y2
S2 +
LO SPEED HEAT
W1 HEATER
W / W1
S2 -
O
ED -
O
S2 + -
LO SPEED HEAT
W1 HEATER
W / W1
HI SPEED HEAT
W2 HEATER
EM / W2
* ERROR CONDITION ( DIODE ON THERMOSTAT BACKWARDS )
SEE NOTE 3
( FUTURE USE )
SEE NOTE 3
S3 +
G
NONE
G
* S3 - *
N/A
N/A
N/A
* ERROR CONDITION ( S3 CAN ONLY READ + )
* S3 + - *
N/A
N/A
N/A
* ERROR CONDITION ( S3 CAN ONLY READ + )
R+-
24 VAC
R TO T'STAT
R
COM
GND
COM TO T'STAT
C1 , C2
NOTES:
1.) THE TEST SPADE CAN BE CONNECTED TO ANY OTHER TEST SPADE ON EITHER BOARD.
2.) THE + LED WILL BE RED AND WILL LIGHT TO INDICATE + HALF CYCLES.
THE - LED WILL BE GREEN AND WILL LIGHT TO INDICATE - HALF CYCLES.
BOTH RED AND GREEN ILLUMINATED WILL INDICATE FULL CYCLES DENOTED BY + - .
3.) SIGNAL OUT CONDITION FOR W1 , W2 HEATER WILL BE AFFECTED BY OT1 PJ4 AND OT2 PJ2
JUMPERS AND OUTDOOR THERMOSTATS ATTACHED. THE TABLE ABOVE ASSUMES OT1 PJ4 IS
REMOVED AND OT2 PJ2 IS MADE WITH NO OUTDOOR THERMOSTATS ATTACHED.
The chart above provides troubleshooting for either version of the encoded thermostat option. This provides diagnostic
information for the GMC CHET18-60 or a conventional two cool / two stage heat thermostat with IN4005 diodes added as called
out in the above section.
A test lead or jumper wire can be added from the test terminal to any terminal on the B13682-74 or B13682-71 variable speed
terminal board and provide information through the use of the LED lights on the B13682-71 VSTB control. Using this chart,
a technician can determine if the proper input signal is being received by the encoded VSTB control and diagnose any
problems that may be relayed to the output response of the B13682-74 VSTM control.
27
SERVICING
S-4 CHECKING TRANSFORMER
AND CONTROL CIRCUIT
With power ON:
WARNING
Line Voltage now present.
HIGH VOLTAGE!
Disconnect ALL power before servicing
or installing. Multiple power sources
may be present. Failure to do so may
cause property damage, personal injury
or death.
A step-down transformer (208/240 volt primary to 24 volt secondary) is provided with each indoor unit. This allows ample
capacity for use with resistance heaters. The outdoor sections do not contain a transformer.
WARNING
Disconnect ALL power before servicing.
1. Remove control panel cover, or etc., to gain access to
transformer.
With power ON:
WARNING
Line Voltage now present.
1. Apply 24 VAC to terminals R1 and R2.
2. Should read 24 VAC at terminals Y1 and Y2.
3. Remove 24 VAC at terminals R1 and R2.
4. Should read 0 VAC at Y1 and Y2.
5. Reapply 24 VAC to R1 and R2 - within approximately
three (3) to four (4) minutes should read 24 VAC at Y1 and
Y 2.
If not as above - replace relay.
S-6 CHECKING TIME DELAY RELAY
Time delay relays are used in some of the blower cabinets to
improve efficiency by delaying the blower off time. Time
delays are also used in electric heaters to sequence in
multiple electric heaters.
WARNING
Disconnect ALL power before servicing.
1. Tag and disconnect all wires from male spade connections of relay.
2. Using a voltmeter, check voltage across secondary voltage side of transformer (R to C).
2. Using an ohmmeter, measure the resistance across
terminals H1 and H2. Should read approximately 150
ohms.
3. No voltage indicates faulty transformer, bad wiring, or bad
splices.
3. Using an ohmmeter, check for continuity across terminals 3 and 1, and 4 and 5.
4. Check transformer primary voltage at incoming line voltage connections and/or splices.
4. Apply 24 volts to terminals H1 and H2. Check for
continuity across other terminals - should test continuous. If not as above - replace.
5
If line voltage available at primary voltage side of transformer and wiring and splices good, transformer is inoperative. Replace.
NOTE: The time delay for the contacts to make will be
approximately 20 to 50 seconds and to open after the coil is
de-energized is approximately 40 to 90 seconds.
S-5 CHECKING CYCLE PROTECTOR
Some models feature a solid state, delay-on make after break
time delay relay installed in the low voltage circuit. This
control is used to prevent short cycling of the compressor
under certain operating conditions.
The component is normally closed (R1 to Y1). A power
interruption will break circuit (R1 to Y1) for approximately three
minutes before resetting.
OHMMETER
TESTING COIL CIRCUIT
1. Remove wire from Y1 terminal.
2. Wait for approximately four (4) minutes if machine was
running.
28
SERVICING
S-7 CHECKING CONTACTOR AND/OR RELAYS
T2
HIGH VOLTAGE!
Disconnect ALL power before servicing
or installing. Multiple power sources
may be present. Failure to do so may
cause property damage, personal injury
or death.
The compressor contactor and other relay holding coils are
wired into the low or line voltage circuits. When the control
circuit is energized, the coil pulls in the normally open
contacts or opens the normally closed contacts. When the
coil is de-energized, springs return the contacts to their
normal position.
T1
CC
VOLT/OHM
METER
L2
L1
Ohmmeter for testing holding coil
Voltmeter for testing contacts
TESTING COMPRESSOR CONTACTOR
(Single Phase)
THREE PHASE
Using a voltmeter, test across terminals:
NOTE: Most single phase contactors break only one side of
the line (L1), leaving 115 volts to ground present at most
internal components.
A.
L1-L2, L1-L3, and L2-L3 - If voltage is present,
proceed to B. If voltage is not present, check breaker
or fuses on main power supply..
1. Remove the leads from the holding coil.
B.
T1-T2, T1-T3, and T2-T3 - If voltage readings are not
the same as in "A", replace contactor.
2. Using an ohmmeter, test across the coil terminals.
If the coil does not test continuous, replace the relay or
contactor.
T3
T2
T1
L3
L2
L1
S-8 CHECKING CONTACTOR CONTACTS
CC
WARNING
Disconnect ALL power before servicing.
VOLT/OHM
METER
SINGLE PHASE:
1. Disconnect the wire leads from the terminal (T) side of the
contactor.
2. With power ON, energize the contactor.
WARNING
Line Voltage now present.
Ohmmeter for testing holding coil
Voltmeter for testing contacts
TESTING COMPRESSOR CONTACTOR
(Three-phase)
S-9 CHECKING FAN RELAY CONTACTS
3. Using a voltmeter, test across terminals.
A. L2 - T1 - No voltage indicates CC1 contacts open.
If a no voltage reading is obtained - replace the contactor.
HIGH VOLTAGE!
Disconnect ALL power before servicing
or installing. Multiple power sources
may be present. Failure to do so may
cause property damage, personal injury
or death.
1. Disconnect wires leads from terminals 2 and 4 of Fan
Relay Cooling and 2 and 4, 5 and 6 of Fan Relay Heating.
2. Using an ohmmeter, test between 2 and 4 - should read
open. Test between 5 and 6 - should read continuous.
3. With power ON, energize the relays.
29
SERVICING
WARNING
Line Voltage now present.
4
3
OHMMETER
2
5
1
TESTING FAN RELAY
4. Using an ohmmeter, test between 2 and 4 - should read
continuous . Test between 5 and 6 - should read open.
5. If not as above, replace the relay.
S-12 CHECKING HIGH PRESSURE CONTROL
If it cuts-out at 610 PSIG ± 10 PSIG, it is operating normally
(See causes for high head pressure in Service Problem
Analysis Guide). If it cuts out below this pressure range,
replace the control.
S-13 CHECKING LOW PRESSURE CONTROL
HIGH VOLTAGE!
Disconnect ALL power before servicing
or installing. Multiple power sources
may be present. Failure to do so may
cause property damage, personal injury
or death.
The high pressure control capillary senses the pressure in the
compressor discharge line. If abnormally high condensing
pressures develop, the contacts of the control open, breaking
the control circuit before the compressor motor overloads.
This control is automatically reset.
1. Using an ohmmeter, check across terminals of high
pressure control, with wire removed. If not continuous,
the contacts are open.
3. Attach a gauge to the dill valve port on the base valve.
With power ON:
WARNING
Line Voltage now present.
4. Start the system and place a piece of cardboard in front
of the condenser coil, raising the condensing pressure.
5. Check pressure at which the high pressure control cutsout.
30
The low pressure control senses the pressure in the suction
line and will open its contacts on a drop in pressure. The low
pressure control will automatically reset itself with a rise in
pressure.
The low pressure control is designed to cut-out (open) at
approximately 50 PSIG. It will automatically cut-in (close) at
approximately 85 PSIG.
Test for continuity using a VOM and if not as above, replace
the control.
S-15 CHECKING CAPACITOR
CAPACITOR, RUN
A run capacitor is wired across the auxiliary and main
windings of a single phase permanent split capacitor motor.
The capacitors primary function is to reduce the line current
while greatly improving the torque characteristics of a motor.
This is accomplished by using the 90° phase relationship
between the capacitor current and voltage in conjunction with
the motor windings, so that the motor will give two phase
operation when connected to a single phase circuit. The
capacitor also reduces the line current to the motor by
improving the power factor.
The line side of this capacitor is marked with "COM" and is
wired to the line side of the circuit.
CAPACITOR, START
SERVICING
SCROLL COMPRESSOR MODELS
S-15A RESISTANCE CHECK
In most cases hard start components are not required on
Scroll compressor equipped units due to a non-replaceable
check valve located in the discharge line of the compressor.
However, in installations that encounter low lock rotor voltage, a hard start kit can improve starting characteristics and
reduce light dimming within the home. Only hard start kits
approved by Amana® brand or Copeland should be used.
"Kick Start" and/or "Super Boost" kits are not approved start
assist devices.
The discharge check valve closes off high side pressure to the
compressor after shut down allowing equalization through the
scroll flanks. Equalization requires only about ½ second.
To prevent the compressor from short cycling, a Time Delay
Relay (Cycle Protector) has been added to the low voltage
circuit.
WARNING
HIGH VOLTAGE!
Disconnect ALL power before servicing or installing.
Multiple power sources may be present. Failure to do
so may cause property damage, personal injury
or death.
1. Discharge capacitor and remove wire leads.
WARNING
Discharge capacitor through a 20 to 30 OHM
resistor before handling.
RELAY, START
A potential or voltage type relay is used to take the start
capacitor out of the circuit once the motor comes up to speed.
This type of relay is position sensitive. The normally closed
contacts are wired in series with the start capacitor and the
relay holding coil is wired parallel with the start winding. As
the motor starts and comes up to speed, the increase in
voltage across the start winding will energize the start relay
holding coil and open the contacts to the start capacitor.
Two quick ways to test a capacitor are a resistance and a
capacitance check.
A. Good Condition - indicator swings to zero and slowly
returns to infinity. (Start capacitor with bleed resistor will
not return to infinity. It will still read the resistance of the
resistor).
RED 10
VIOLET 20
B. Shorted - indicator swings to zero and stops there replace.
YELLOW 12
START
RELAY
C. Open - no reading - replace. (Start capacitor would
read resistor resistance.)
ORANGE 5
COM
HERM
FAN
CAPACITOR
TESTING CAPACITOR RESISTANCE
2. Set an ohmmeter on its highest ohm scale and connect
the leads to the capacitor -
START
CAPACITOR
RUN
CAPACITOR
OHMMETER
T2 T1
L2 L1
CONTACTOR
HARD START KIT WIRING
31
SERVICING
S-15B CAPACITANCE CHECK
Using a hookup as shown below, take the amperage and
voltage readings and use them in the formula:
1. Remove the motor leads from its respective connection
points and capacitor (if applicable).
2. Check the continuity between each of the motor leads.
3. Touch one probe of the ohmmeter to the motor frame
(ground) and the other probe in turn to each lead.
If the windings do not test continuous or a reading is obtained
from lead to ground, replace the motor.
S-16B CHECKING FAN AND BLOWER MOTOR
(ECM MOTORS)
VOLTMETER
15 AMP
FUSE
AMMETER
CAPACITOR
TESTING CAPACITANCE
WARNING
An ECM is an Electronically Commutated Motor which offers
many significant advantages over PSC motors. The ECM has
near zero rotor loss, synchronous machine operation, variable speed, low noise, and programmable air flow. Because
of the sophisticated electronics within the ECM motor, some
technicians are intimated by the ECM motor; however, these
fears are unfounded. GE offers two ECM motor testers, and
with a VOM meter, one can easily perform basic troubleshooting on ECM motors. An ECM motor requires power (line
voltage) and a signal (24 volts) to operate. The ECM motor
stator contains permanent magnet. As a result, the shaft
feels "rough" when turned by hand. This is a characteristic of
the motor, not an indication of defective bearings.
WARNING
Line Voltage now present.
Discharge capacitor through a 20 to 30 OHM
resistor before handling.
1. Disconnect the 5-pin connector from the motor.
2. Using a volt meter, check for line voltage at terminals #4
& #5 at the power connector. If no voltage is present:
Capacitance (MFD) = 2650 X Amperage
Voltage
S-16A CHECKING FAN AND BLOWER MOTOR
WINDINGS (PSC MOTORS)
The auto reset fan motor overload is designed to protect the
motor against high temperature and high amperage conditions by breaking the common circuit within the motor, similar
to the compressor internal overload. However, heat generated within the motor is faster to dissipate than the compressor, allow at least 45 minutes for the overload to reset, then
retest.
3. Check the unit for incoming power See section S-1.
4. Check the control board, See section S-40.
5. If line voltage is present, reinsert the 5-pin connector and
remove the 16-pin connector.
6. Check for signal (24 volts) at the transformer.
7. Check for signal (24 volts) from the thermostat to the "G"
terminal at the 16-pin connector.
8. Using an ohmmeter, check for continuity from the #1 & #3
(common pins) to the transformer neutral or "C" thermostat terminal. If you do not have continuity, the motor may
function erratically. Trace the common circuits, locate
and repair the open neutral.
9. Set the thermostat to "Fan-On". Using a voltmeter, check
for 24 volts between pin # 15 (G) and common.
HIGH VOLTAGE!
Disconnect ALL power before servicing
or installing. Multiple power sources
may be present. Failure to do so may
cause property damage, personal injury
or death.
32
10. Disconnect power to compressor. Set thermostat to call
for cooling. Using a voltmeter, check for 24 volts at pin #
6 and/or #14.
11. Set the thermostat to a call for heating. Using a voltmeter,
check for 24 volts at pin #2 and/or #11.
SERVICING
1
2
}
Lines 1 and 2 will be connected
for 12OVAC Power Connector
applications only
3
Gnd
4
AC Line Connection
5
AC Line Connection
OUT -
8
16
OUT +
ADJUST +/-
7
15
G (FAN)
Y1
6
14
Y/Y2
COOL
5
13
EM Ht/W2
DELAY
4
12
24 Vac (R)
COMMON2
3
11
HEAT
W/W1
2
10
BK/PWM (SPEED)
COMMON1
1
9
O (REV VALVE)
16-PIN ECM HARNESS CONNECTOR
If you do not read voltage and continuity as described, the
problem is in the control or interface board, but not the motor.
If you register voltage as described , the ECM power head is
defective and must be replaced.
33
34
- Check line voltage for variation or "sag".
- Check low voltage connections
(G, Y, W, R, C) at
motor, unseated pins in motor
harness connectors.
- Check-out system controls - Thermostat.
- Perform Moisture Check.*
- Does removing panel or filter
reduce "puffing"?
- Check/replace filter.
- Check/correct duct restrictions.
- Adjust to correct blower speed setting.
- Incorrect or dirty filter(s).
- Incorrect supply or return ductwork.
- Incorrect blower speed setting.
- Varies up and down
or intermittent.
- "Hunts" or "puffs" at
high CFM (speed).
----
- Variation in 230 Vac to motor.
- Unseated pins in wiring harness
connectors.
- Erratic CFM command from
"BK" terminal.
- Improper thermostat connection or setting.
- Moisture present in motor/control module.
----
- Turn power OFF prior to repair.
- Turn power OFF prior to repair.
----
- Motor rocks,
but won't start.
- It is normal for motor to
oscillate with
no load on shaft.
- Turn power OFF prior to repair.
Wait 5 minutes after
disconnecting power before
opening motor.
- Handle electronic motor/control with care.
- Check for loose motor mount.
- Make sure blower wheel is tight on shaft.
- Perform motor/control replacement check,
ECM motors only.
- Loose motor mount.
- Blower wheel not tight on motor shaft.
- Bad motor/control module.
CHART CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
*Moisture Check
- Connectors are oriented "down" (or as recommended by equipment manufacturer).
- Arrange harnesses with "drip loop" under motor.
- Check for low airflow (too much latent capacity).
- Is condensate drain plugged?
- Check and plug leaks in return ducts, cabinet.
- Check for undercharged condition.
Note: You must use the correct replacement control/motor module since they are factory programmed for specific operating modes. Even though they look alike, different modules may have completely different
functionality. The ECM variable speed motors are c
Important Note: Using the wrong motor/control module voids all product warranties and may produce unexpected results.
- Motor starts,
but runs
erratically.
- Motor
oscillates up &
down while
being tested
off of blower.
- Motor won't
start.
- No movement.
----
- Turn power OFF prior to repair.
Wait 5 minutes after
disconnecting power before
opening motor.
- Handle electronic motor/control with care.
----
Cautions and Notes
- Check 230 Vac power at motor.
- Check low voltage (24 Vac R to C) at motor.
- Check low voltage connections
(G, Y, W, R, C) at motor.
- Check for unseated pins in connectors
on motor harness.
- Test with a temporary jumper between R - G.
- Check m
----
Corrective Action
- Manual disconnect switch off or
door switch open.
- Blown fuse or circuit breaker.
- 24 Vac wires miswired.
- Unseated pins in wiring
harness connectors.
- Bad motor/control module.
- Moisture present in motor or control module.
- This is normal start-up for
variable speed motor.
- Motor rocks
slightly
when starting.
Possible Causes
Troubleshooting Chart for ECM Variable Speed Air Circulator Blower Motors
Fault Description(s)
Symptom
SERVICING
- Turn power OFF prior to repair.
- Turn power OFF prior to repair.
- Check for loose blower housing,
panels, etc.
- Check for air whistling thru seams in
ducts, cabinets or panels.
- Check for cabinet/duct deformation.
- Does removing panel or filter
reduce "puffing"?
- Check/replace filter.
- Check/correct duct restrictions.
- Adjust to correct blower speed setting.
- Loose blower housing, panels, etc.
- High static creating high blower
speed.
- Air leaks in ductwork, cabinets,
or panels.
- High static creating high blower speed.
- Incorrect or dirty filter(s).
- Incorrect supply or return ductwork.
- Incorrect blower speed setting.
- Moisture in motor/control module.
- Noisy blower or cabinet.
- "Hunts" or "puffs" at
high CFM (speed).
- Motor failure or
malfunction has
occurred and moisture
is present.
- Replace motor and perform
Moisture Check.*
- Turn power OFF prior to repair.
- Check/replace filter.
- Check/correct duct restrictions.
- Adjust to correct blower speed setting.
- High static creating high blower speed.
- Incorrect supply or return ductwork.
- Incorrect or dirty filter(s).
- Incorrect blower speed setting.
- Air noise.
- Turn power OFF prior to repair.
Wait 5 minutes after
disconnecting power before
opening motor.
- Handle electronic motor/control
with care.
- Turn power OFF prior to repair.
- Check for Triac switched t'stat
or solid state relay.
- Current leakage from controls
into G, Y, or W.
- Blower won't shut off.
- Turn power OFF prior to repair.
Wait 5 minutes after
disconnecting power before
opening motor.
- Handle electronic motor/control
with care.
- Turn power OFF prior to repair.
Wait 5 minutes after
disconnecting power before
opening motor.
- Handle electronic motor/control
with care.
- "R" missing/not connected at motor.
- Fan in delay mode.
- Check low voltage (Thermostat)
wires and connections.
- Verify fan is not in delay mode wait until delay complete.
- Perform motor/control replacement
check, ECM motors only.
Cautions and Notes
- Stays at high CFM.
- 24 Vac wires miswired or loose.
- "R" missing/not connected at motor.
- Fan in delay mode.
Corrective Action
- Is fan in delay mode? - wait until delay time complete.
- Perform motor/control replacement check, ECM
motors only.
- Stays at low CFM despite
system call for cool
or heat CFM.
Possible Causes
Troubleshooting Chart for ECM Variable Speed Air Circulator Blower Motors
Fault Description(s)
*Moisture Check
- Connectors are oriented "down" (or as recommended by equipment manufacturer).
- Arrange harnesses with "drip loop" under motor.
- Check for low airflow (too much latent capacity).
- Is condensate drain plugged?
- Check and plug leaks in return ducts, cabinet.
- Check for undercharged condition.
Note: You must use the correct replacement control/motor module since they are factory programmed for specific operating modes. Even though they look alike, different modules may have completely different
functionality. The ECM variable speed motors are c
Important Note: Using the wrong motor/control module voids all product warranties and may produce unexpected results.
- Evidence of
Moisture.
- Excessive
noise.
- Motor starts,
but runs
erratically.
Symptom
CHART CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE.
SERVICING
35
SERVICING
S-16C CHECKING ECM MOTOR WINDINGS
HIGH VOLTAGE!
Disconnect ALL power before servicing
or installing. Multiple power sources
may be present. Failure to do so may
cause property damage, personal injury
or death.
1. Disconnect the 5-pin and the 16-pin connectors from the
ECM power head.
2. Remove the 2 screws securing the ECM power head and
separate it from the motor.
3. Disconnect the 3-pin motor connector from the power
head and lay it aside.
4. Using an ohmmeter, check the motor windings for continuity to ground (pins to motor shell). If the ohmmeter
indicates continuity to ground, the motor is defective and
must be replaced.
5. Using an ohmmeter, check the windings for continuity
(pin to pin). If no continuity is indicated, the thermal limit
(over load) device may be open. Allow motor to cool and
retest.
3-pin motor
connector
MOTOR SPEED ADJUSTMENT
Each ECM™ blower motor has been preprogrammed for
operation at 4 distinct airflow levels when operating in Cooling/Heat Pump mode or Electric Heat mode. These 4 distinct
levels may also be adjusted slightly lower or higher if desired.
The adjustment between levels and the trim adjustments are
made by changing the dipswitch(s) either to an "OFF" or "ON"
position.
DIPSWITCH FUNCTIONS
The MBE / AEPF air handler motors have an electronic
control that contains an eight (8) position dip switch. The
function of these dipswitches are shown in Table 1.
Dipsw itch Num ber
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
MBE2000
S-16D ECM CFM ADJUSTMENTS MBE / AEPF
MBE MOTOR
36
Improved Efficiency
Constant CFM
Soft Start and Stop
Improved Humidity Control
CFM Trim Adjust
Electric Heat Operation
Model
5-pin
connector
•
•
•
•
Cooling & Heat Pum p CFM
Tables 2, 3, 5 and 6 show the CFM output for dipswitch
combinations 1-2, and 5-6.
MBE1600
The MBE/AEPF products use a General Electric ECMTM
motor. This motor provides many features not available on
the traditional PSC motor. These features include:
N/A
Indoor Therm ostat
CFM DELIVERY
16-pin
connector
For most applications, the settings are to be changed
according to the electric heat size and the outdoor unit
selection.
Electric Heat
Table 1
MBE1200
This section references the operation characteristics of the
MBE/AEPF models motor only. The ECM control board is
factory set with the dipswitch #4 in the “ON” position and all
other dipswitches are factory set in the “OFF” position. When
MBE/AEPF are used with 2-stage cooling units, dipswitch
#4 should be in the "OFF" position.
Function
Switch 1
Switch 2
CFM
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
1,200
1,000
800
600
1,600
1,400
1,200
1,000
2,000
1,800
1,600
1,200
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
Table 2
Cooling/Heat Pump Operation
Model
MBE1200
MBE1600
MBE2000
Switch 5
Switch 6
CFM
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
1,200
1,000
800
600
1,600
1,400
1,200
1,000
2,000
1,800
1,600
1,200
Table 3
SERVICING
THERMOSTAT “FAN ONLY” MODE
AEPF DIPSWITCH FUNCTIONS
During Fan Only Operations, the CFM output is 30% of the
cooling setting.
Model
Switch 1
Switch 2
OFF
ON
OFF1
OFF
OFF
ON
CFM TRIM ADJUST
AEPF1830
Minor adjustments can be made through the dip switch
combination of 7-8. Table 4 shows the switch position for this
feature.
NOTE: The airflow will not make the decreasing adjustment
in Electric Heat mode.
C FM
+10%
-1 5 %
S w itc h 7
ON
OFF
AEPF3036/4260
S w itc h 8
OFF
ON
EMERGENCY
BACKUP CFM
1100
HEAT PUMP CFM
WITH BACKUP
1210
850
935
700
770
OFF
OFF
2050
2150
ON
OFF
1750
1835
OFF
ON
1600
1680
ON
ON
1200
1260
ON
ON
1020
1020
HEAT PUMP CFM
WITH BACKUP
850
600
Table 5
Model
AEPF1830
Table 4
HUMIDITY CONTROL
When using a Humidstat (normally closed), cut jumper PJ6
on the control board. The Humidstat will only affect cooling
airflow by adjusting the Airflow to 85%.
AEPF3036/4260
OFF
ON
OFF
850
OFF
ON
700
Switch 6
1100
OFF
OFF
1800
1800
ON
OFF
1580
1580
OFF
ON
1480
1480
ON
ON
1200
1200
ON
ON
1020
1020
Table 6
1
TWO STAGE HEATING
OFF
EMERGENCY
BACKUP CFM
1100
Switch 5
7 - 8 shall be OFF-ON for 2.5 ton applications
When using staged electric heat, cut jumper PJ4 on the
control board.
S-16E BLOWER PERFORMANCE DATA
SPEED
HIGH
MEDIUM
LOW
STATIC
MBR800**-*
SCFM
MBR1200**-*
SCFM
MBR1600**-*
SCFM
MBR2000**-*
SCFM
0.1
1,240
1,500
1,800
2,160
0.2
1,170
1,460
1,740
2,080
0.3
1,120
1,360
1,680
1,990
0.4
1,060
1,280
1,610
1,890
0.5
980
1,200
1,520
1,790
0.6
900
1,110
1,430
1,690
0.1
900
1,380
1,540
1,730
0.2
850
1,320
1,490
1,670
0.3
790
1,270
1,450
1,590
0.4
740
1,200
1,400
1,520
0.5
680
1,140
13,560
1,420
0.6
605
1,040
1,280
1,320
0.1
650
1,170
1,130
1,520
0.2
590
1,130
1,100
1,450
0.3
540
1,080
1,070
1,360
0.4
500
1,020
1,030
1,290
0.5
430
950
990
1,200
0.6
330
830
930
1,090
NOTE: External static is for blower @ 230 Volts. It does not include Coil, Air Filter or Electric Heaters.
37
SERVICING
S-17 CHECKING COMPRESSOR
WARNING
Hermetic compressor electrical terminal venting can
be dangerous. When insulating material which
supports a hermetic compressor or electrical terminal
suddenly disintegrates due to physical abuse or as a
result of an electrical short between the terminal and
the compressor housing, the terminal may be
expelled, venting the vapor and liquid contents of the
compressor housing and system.
If the compressor terminal PROTECTIVE COVER and gasket
(if required) are not properly in place and secured, there is a
remote possibility if a terminal vents, that the vaporous and
liquid discharge can be ignited, spouting flames several feet,
causing potentially severe or fatal injury to anyone in its path.
This discharge can be ignited external to the compressor if
the terminal cover is not properly in place and if the discharge
impinges on a sufficient heat source.
Ignition of the discharge can also occur at the venting terminal
or inside the compressor, if there is sufficient contaminant air
present in the system and an electrical arc occurs as the
terminal vents.
Ignition cannot occur at the venting terminal without the
presence of contaminant air, and cannot occur externally
from the venting terminal without the presence of an external
ignition source.
Therefore, proper evacuation of a hermetic system is essential at the time of manufacture and during servicing.
To reduce the possibility of external ignition, all open flame,
electrical power, and other heat sources should be extinguished or turned off prior to servicing a system.
If the following test indicates shorted, grounded or open
windings, see procedures S-19 for the next steps to be taken.
S-17A RESISTANCE TEST
Each compressor is equipped with an internal overload.
The line break internal overload senses both motor amperage
and winding temperature. High motor temperature or amperage heats the disc causing it to open, breaking the common
circuit within the compressor on single phase units.
Heat generated within the compressor shell, usually due to
recycling of the motor, high amperage or insufficient gas to
cool the motor, is slow to dissipate. Allow at least three to
four hours for it to cool and reset, then retest.
Fuse, circuit breaker, ground fault protective device, etc. has
not tripped -
38
HIGH VOLTAGE!
Disconnect ALL power before servicing
or installing. Multiple power sources
may be present. Failure to do so may
cause property damage, personal injury
or death.
1. Remove the leads from the compressor terminals.
See warnings S-17 before removing compressor
terminal cover.
2. Using an ohmmeter, test continuity between terminals
S-R, C-R, and C-S, on single phase units or terminals T2,
T2 and T3, on 3 phase units.
C
OHMMETER
R
S
COMP
TESTING COMPRESSOR WINDINGS
If either winding does not test continuous, replace the
compressor.
NOTE: If an open compressor is indicated, allow ample time
for the internal overload to reset before replacing compressor.
S-17B GROUND TEST
If fuse, circuit breaker, ground fault protective device, etc.,
has tripped, this is a strong indication that an electrical
problem exists and must be found and corrected. The circuit
protective device rating must be checked, and its maximum
rating should coincide with that marked on the equipment
nameplate.
With the terminal protective cover in place, it is acceptable
to replace the fuse or reset the circuit breaker ONE TIME
ONLY to see if it was just a nuisance opening. If it opens
again, DO NOT continue to reset.
Disconnect all power to unit, making sure that all power
legs are open.
1. DO NOT remove protective terminal cover. Disconnect
the three leads going to the compressor terminals at the
nearest point to the compressor.
SERVICING
2. Identify the leads and using a Megger, Hi-Potential
Ground Tester, or other suitable instrument which puts
out a voltage between 300 and 1500 volts, check for a
ground separately between each of the three leads and
ground (such as an unpainted tube on the compressor).
Do not use a low voltage output instrument such as a voltohmmeter.
Unloader Test Procedure
If it is suspected that the unloader is not working, the
following methods may be used to verify operation.
1. Operate the system and measure compressor current.
Cycle the unloader ON and OFF at 10 second intervals.
The compressor amperage should go up or down at least
25 percent.
2. If step one does not give the expected results, shut unit
off. Apply 18 to 28 volt ac to the unloader molded plug
leads and listen for a click as the solenoid pulls in.
Remove power and listen for another click as the unloader
returns to its original position.
HI-POT
COMPRESSOR GROUND TEST
3. If a ground is indicated, then carefully remove the compressor terminal protective cover and inspect for loose
leads or insulation breaks in the lead wires.
3. If clicks can’t be heard, shut off power and remove the
control circuit molded plug from the compressor and
measure the unloader coil resistance. The resistance
should be 32 to 60 ohms, depending on compressor
temperature.
4. Next check the molded plug.
A.
Voltage check: Apply control voltage to the plug
wires (18 to 28 volt ac). The measured dc voltage
at the female connectors in the plug should be
around 15 to 27 vdc.
B.
Resistance check: Measure the resistance from
the end of one molded plug lead to either of the two
female connectors in the plug. One of the connectors should read close to zero ohms while the
other should read infinity. Repeat with other wire.
The same female connector as before should read
zero while the other connector again reads infinity.
Reverse polarity on the ohmmeter leads and
repeat. The female connector that read infinity
previously should now read close to zero ohms.
C.
Replace plug if either of these test methods
doesn’t show the desired results.
4. If no visual problems indicated, carefully remove the leads
at the compressor terminals.
WARNING
Damage can occur to the glass embedded terminals if
the leads are not properly removed. This can result in
terminal and hot oil discharging.
Carefully retest for ground, directly between compressor
terminals and ground.
5. If ground is indicated, replace the compressor.
S-17C UNLOADER TEST PROCEDURE
A nominal 24-volt direct current coil activates the internal
unloader solenoid. The input control circuit voltage must be
18 to 28 volt ac. The coil power requirement is 20 VA. The
external electrical connection is made with a molded plug
assembly. This plug contains a full wave rectifier to supply
direct current to the unloader coil.
S-17D OPERATION TEST
If the voltage, capacitor, overload and motor winding test fail
to show the cause for failure:
HIGH VOLTAGE!
Disconnect ALL power before servicing
or installing. Multiple power sources
may be present. Failure to do so may
cause property damage, personal injury
or death.
1. Remove unit wiring from disconnect switch and wire a
test cord to the disconnect switch.
NOTE: The wire size of the test cord must equal the line wire
size and the fuse must be of the proper size and type.
UNLOADER SOLENOID
(Molded Plug)
39
SERVICING
2. With the protective terminal cover in place, use the three
leads to the compressor terminals that were disconnected at the nearest point to the compressor and
connect the common, start and run clips to the respective
leads.
3. Connect good capacitors of the right MFD and voltage
rating into the circuit as shown.
When stuck in the mid-position, part of the discharge gas
from the compressor is directed back to the suction side,
resulting in excessively high suction pressure. An increase
in the suction line temperature through the reversing valve can
also be measured. Check operation of the valve by starting
the system and switching the operation from COOLING to
HEATING cycle.
If the valve fails to change its position, test the voltage (24V)
at the valve coil terminals, while the system is on the
COOLING cycle.
4. With power ON, close the switch.
WARNING
If no voltage is registered at the coil terminals, check the
operation of the thermostat and the continuity of the connecting wiring from the "O" terminal of the thermostat to the unit.
Line Voltage now present.
A. If the compressor starts and continues to run, the cause
for failure is somewhere else in the system.
B. If the compressor fails to start - replace.
COPELAND COMPRESSOR
03
A
12345
L
YEAR
MONTH
SER IAL
NUMBER
PLANT
S-18 TESTING CRANKCASE HEATER
(OPTIONAL ITEM)
The crankcase heater must be energized a minimum of four
(4) hours before the condensing unit is operated.
Crankcase heaters are used to prevent migration or accumulation of refrigerant in the compressor crankcase during the
off cycles and prevents liquid slugging or oil pumping on start
up.
A crankcase heater will not prevent compressor damage due
to a floodback or over charge condition.
WARNING
Disconnect ALL power before servicing.
If voltage is registered at the coil, tap the valve body lightly
while switching the system from HEATING to COOLING, etc.
If this fails to cause the valve to switch positions, remove the
coil connector cap and test the continuity of the reversing
valve solenoid coil. If the coil does not test continuous replace it.
If the coil test continuous and 24 volts is present at the coil
terminals, the valve is inoperative - replace it.
S-24 TESTING DEFROST CONTROL
To check the defrost control for proper sequencing, proceed
as follows: With power ON; unit not running.
1. Jumper defrost thermostat by placing a jumper wire
across the terminals "DFT" and "R" at defrost control
board.
2. Connect jumper across test pins on defrost control board.
3. Set thermostat to call for heating. System should go into
defrost within 21 seconds.
4. Immediately remove jumper from test pins.
5. Using VOM check for voltage across terminals "C & O".
Meter should read 24 volts.
6. Using VOM check for voltage across fan terminals DF1
and DF2 on the board. You should read line voltage (208230 VAC) indicating the relay is open in the defrost mode.
7. Using VOM check for voltage across "W2 & C" terminals
on the board. You should read 24 volts.
1. Disconnect the heater lead in wires.
8. If not as above, replace control board.
2. Using an ohmmeter, check heater continuity - should test
continuous. If not, replace.
9. Set thermostat to off position and disconnect power
before removing any jumpers or wires.
NOTE: The positive temperature coefficient crankcase heater
is a 40 watt 265 voltage heater. The cool resistance of the
heater will be approximately 1800 ohms. The resistance will
become greater as the temperature of the compressor shell
increases.
NOTE: Remove jumper across defrost thermostat before
returning system to service.
S-21 CHECKING REVERSING VALVE AND
SOLENOID
Occasionally the reversing valve may stick in the heating or
cooling position or in the mid-position.
40
S-25 TESTING DEFROST THERMOSTAT
1. Install a thermocouple type temperature test lead on the
tube adjacent to the defrost control. Insulate the lead
point of contact.
2. Check the temperature at which the control closes its
contacts by lowering the temperature of the control. Part
# 0130M00009P which is used on 2 and 2.5 ton units
should close at 34°F ± 5°F. Part # 0130M00001P which
is used on 3 thru 5 ton units should close at 31°F ± 3°F.
SERVICING
3. Check the temperature at which the control opens its
contacts by raising the temperature of the control. Part #
0130M00009P which is used on 2 and 2.5 ton units
should open at 60°F ± 5°F. Part # 0130M00001P which
is used on 3 thru 5 ton units should open at 75°F ± 6°F.
4. If not as above, replace control.
S-26 CHECKING HEATER LIMIT CONTROL(S)
(OPTIONAL ELECTRIC HEATERS)
Each individual heater element is protected with an automatic rest limit control connected in series with each element
to prevent overheating of components in case of low airflow.
This limit control will open its circuit at approximately 150°F.
to 160°F and close at approximately 110°F.
WARNING
DISCONNECT ELECTRICAL POWER SUPPLY.
1. Remove the wiring from the control terminals.
2. Using an ohmmeter test for continuity across the normally closed contacts. No reading indicates the control
is open - replace if necessary. Make sure the limits are
cool before testing.
IF FOUND OPEN - REPLACE - DO NOT WIRE AROUND.
S-27 CHECKING HEATER ELEMENTS
Optional electric heaters may be added, in the quantities
shown in the spec sheet for each model unit, to provide
electric resistance heating. Under no condition shall more
heaters than the quantity shown be installed.
HIGH VOLTAGE!
Disconnect ALL power before servicing
or installing. Multiple power sources
may be present. Failure to do so may
cause property damage, personal injury
or death.
During a cooling or heat pump heating demand, 24Vac is
supplied to terminal “G” of the EBTDR to turn on the blower
motor. The EBTDR initiates a 7 second delay on and then
energizes it’s onboard relay. The relay on the EBTDR board
closes it’s normally open contacts and supplies power to the
blower motor. When the “G” input is removed, the EBTDR
initiates a 65 second delay off. When the 65 seconds delay
expires the onboard relay is de-energized and it’s contacts
open and remove power from the blower motor.
During an electric heat only demand, “W1” is energized but
“G” is not. The blower motor is connected to the normally
closed contacts of the relay on the EBTDR board. The other
side of this set of contacts is connected to the heat sequencer on the heater assembly that provides power to the
first heater element. When “W1” is energized, the sequencer
will close it’s contacts within 10 to 20 seconds to supply
power to the first heater element and to the blower motor
through the normally closed contacts on the relay on the
EBTDR. When the “W1” demand is removed, the sequencer
opens it contacts within 30 to 70 seconds and removes power
from the heater element and the blower motor.
The EBTDR also contains a speedup terminal to reduce the
delays during troubleshooting of the unit. When this terminal
is shorted to the common terminal, “C”, on the EBTDR board,
the delay ON time is reduced to 3 seconds and the delay OFF
time is reduced to 5 second.
Two additional terminals, M1 and M2, are on the EBTDR
board. These terminals are used to connect the unused leads
from the blower motor and have no affect on the board’s
operation.
SEQUENCE OF OPERATION
This document covers the basic sequence of operation for a
typical application with a mercury bulb thermostat. When a
digital/electronic thermostat is used, the on/off staging of the
auxiliary heat will vary. Refer to the installation instructions and wiring diagrams provided with the MBR/AR*F
for specific wiring connections and system configuration.
MBR/AR*F WITH SINGLE STAGE CONDENSERS
1. Disassemble and remove the heating element(s).
1.0 Cooling Operation
2. Visually inspect the heater assembly for any breaks in
the wire or broken insulators.
1.1 On a demand for cooling, the room thermostat energizes
“G” and “Y” and 24Vac is supplied to “Y” at the condensing unit and the “G” terminal on the EBTDR board.
3. Using an ohmmeter, test the element for continuity - no
reading indicates the element is open. Replace as
necessary.
1.2 The compressor and condenser fan are turned on and
after a 7 second on delay, the relay on the EBTDR board
is energized and the blower motor starts.
S-40 MBR/AR*F ELECTRONIC BLOWER
TIME DELAY RELAY
The MBR/AR*F contains an Electronic Blower Time Delay
Relay board, B1370735. This board provides on/off time
delays for the blower motor in cooling and heat pump heating
demands when “G” is energized.
1.3 When the cooling demand “Y” is satisfied, the room
thermostat removes the 24Vac from “G” and “Y”.
1.4 The compressor and condenser fan are turned off and
after a 65 second delay off, the relay on the EBTDR board
is de-energized and the blower is turned off.
41
SERVICING
2.0 Heating Operation
2.1 On a demand for heat, the room thermostat energizes
“W1” and 24Vac is supplied to heat sequencer, HR1, on
the heater assembly.
2.2 The contacts M1 and M2 will close within 10 to 20
seconds and turn on heater element #1. The normally
closed contacts on the EBTDR are also connected to
terminal M1. When M1 and M2 close, the blower motor
will be energized thru the normally closed contacts on
the EBTDR board. At the same time, if the heater
assembly contains a second heater element, HR1 will
contain a second set of contacts, M3 and M4, which will
close to turn on heater element #2.
Note: If more than two heater elements are on the heater
assembly, it will contain a second heat sequencer, HR2,
which will control the 3rd and 4th heater elements if available.
If the first stage heat demand, “W1” cannot be satisfied by the
heat pump, the temperature indoors will continue to drop.
The room thermostat will then energize “W2” and 24Vac will
be supplied to HR2 on the heater assembly. When the “W2”
demand is satisfied, the room thermostat will remove the
24Vac from HR2. The contacts on HR2 will open between 30
to 70 seconds and heater elements #3 and #4 will be turned
off. On most digital/electronic thermostats, “W2” will
remain energized until the first stage demand “W1” is
satisfied and then the “W1” and “W2” demands will be
removed.
2.3 When the “W1” heat demand is satisfied, the room
thermostat will remove the 24Vac from HR1. Both set of
contacts on the relay opens within 30 to 70 seconds and
turn off the heater element(s) and the blower motor.
MBR/AR*F WITH SINGLE STAGE HEAT PUMPS
3.0 Cooling Operation
On heat pump units, when the room thermostat set to the
cooling mode, 24Vac is supplied to “O” which energizes the
reversing valve. As long as the thermostat is set for cooling,
the reversing valve will be in the energized position for
cooling.
3.1 On a demand for cooling, the room thermostat energizes
“G” and “Y” and 24Vac is supplied to “Y” at the heat pump
and the “G” terminal on the EBTDR board.
3.2 The heat pump turned on in the cooling mode and after
a 7 second on delay, the relay on the EBTDR board is
energized and the blower motor starts.
3.3 When the cooling demand is satisfied, the room thermostat removes the 24Vac from “G” and “Y”.
3.4 The heat pump is turned off and after a 65 second delay
off, the relay on the EBTDR board is de-energized and
the blower motor is turned off.
4.0 Heating Operation
42
On heat pump units, when the room thermostat set to the
heating mode, the reversing valve is not energized. As long
as the thermostat is set for heating, the reversing valve will
be in the de-energized position for heating except during a
defrost cycle. Some installations may use one or more
outdoor thermostats to restrict the amount of electric heat
that is available above a preset ambient temperature. Use
of optional controls such as these can change the operation
of the electric heaters during the heating mode. This
sequence of operation does not cover those applications.
4.1 On a demand for first stage heat with heat pump units,
the room thermostat energizes “G” and “Y” and 24Vac
is supplied to “Y” at the heat pump unit and the “G”
terminal on the EBTDR board. The heat pump is turned
on in the heating mode and the blower motor starts after
a 7 second on delay.
4.2 If the first stage heat demand cannot be satisfied by the
heat pump, the temperature indoors will continue to
drop. The room thermostat will then energize terminal
“W2’ for second stage heat and 24Vac will be supplied
to heat sequencer HR1 on the heater assembly.
4.3 HR1 contacts M1 and M2 will close will close within 10
to 20 seconds and turn on heater element #1. At the
same time, if the heater assembly contains a second
heater element, HR1 will contain a second set of
contacts, M3 and M4, which will close and turn on
heater element #2. The blower motor is already on as
a result of terminal “G” on the EBTDR board being
energized for the first stage heat demand.
Note: If more than two heater elements are on the heater
assembly, it will contain a second heat sequencer, HR2,
which will control the 3rd and 4th heater elements if available.
If the second stage heat demand, “W2” cannot be satisfied
by the heat pump, the temperature indoors will continue to
drop. The room thermostat will then energize “W3” and
24Vac will be supplied to HR2 on the heater assembly.
When the “W3” demand is satisfied, the room thermostat will
remove the 24Vac from HR2. The contacts on HR2 will open
between 30 to 70 seconds and heater elements #3 and #4
will be turned off. On most digital/electronic thermostats,
“W3” will remain energized until the first stage heat
demand “Y” is satisfied and then the “G”, “Y”, “W2”
and “W3” demands will be removed.
4.4 As the temperature indoors increase, it will reach a point
where the second stage heat demand, “W2”, is satisfied. When this happens, the room thermostat will
remove the 24Vac from the coil of HR1. The contacts on
HR1 will open between 30 to 70 seconds and turn off
both heater element(s). The heat pump remains on
along with the blower motor because the “Y” demand for
first stage heat will still be present.
4.5 When the first stage heat demand “Y” is satisfied, the
room thermostat will remove the 24Vac from “G” and “Y”.
The heat pump is turned off and the blower motor turns
off after a 65 second off delay.
SERVICING
5.0 Defrost Operation
On heat pump units, when the room thermostat is set to the
heating mode, the reversing valve is not energized. As long
as the thermostat is set for heating, the reversing valve will be
in the de-energized position for heating except during a
defrost cycle.
5.1 The heat pump will be on and operating in the heating
mode as described the Heating Operation in section 4.
5.2 The defrost control in the heat pump unit checks to see
if a defrost is needed every 30, 60 or 90 minutes of heat
pump operation depending on the selectable setting by
monitoring the state of the defrost thermostat attached
to the outdoor coil.
5.3 If the temperature of the outdoor coil is low enough to
cause the defrost thermostat to be closed when the
defrost board checks it, the board will initiate a defrost
cycle.
5.4 When a defrost cycle is initiated, the contacts of the
HVDR relay on the defrost board open and turns off the
outdoor fan. The contacts of the LVDR relay on the
defrost board closes and supplies 24Vac to “O” and
“W2”. The reversing valve is energized and the contacts
on HR1 close and turns on the electric heater(s). The
unit will continue to run in this mode until the defrost
cycle is completed.
5.5 When the temperature of the outdoor coil rises high
enough to causes the defrost thermostat to open, the
defrost cycle will be terminated. If at the end of the
programmed 10 minute override time the defrost thermostat is still closed, the defrost board will automatically
terminate the defrost cycle.
5.6 When the defrost cycle is terminated, the contacts of the
HVDR relay will close to start the outdoor fan and the
contacts of the LVDR relay will open and turn off the
reversing valve and electric heater(s). The unit will now
be back in a normal heating mode with a heat pump
demand for heating as described in the Heating Operation in section 4.
S-41 MBE/AEPF WITH SSX AND ASX
MBE ELECTRONIC BLOWER TIME DELAY RELAY
AEPF AIR HANDLER
SEQUENCE OF OPERATION
This document covers the basic sequence of operation for a
typical application with a mercury bulb thermostat. When a
digital/electronic thermostat is used, the on/off staging of the
auxiliary heat will vary. Refer to the installation instructions and wiring diagrams provided with the MBE/AEPF
for specific wiring connections, dip switch settings and
system configuration.
MBE/AEPF WITH SINGLE STAGE ASX AND SSX
CONDENSERS
When used with a single stage SSX and ASX condensers,
dip switch #4 must be set to the on position on the VSTB
inside the MBE/AEPF. The “Y” output from the indoor
thermostat must be connected to the yellow wire labeled “Y/
Y2” inside the wire bundle marked “Thermostat” and the
yellow wire labeled “Y/Y2” inside the wire bundle marked
“Outdoor Unit” must be connected to “Y” at the condenser.
The orange jumper wire from terminal “Y1” to terminal
“O” on the VSTB inside the MBE/AEPF must remain
connected.
1.0 Cooling Operation
1.1 On a demand for cooling, the room thermostat energizes
“G” and “Y” and 24Vac is supplied to “G” and “Y/Y2” of
the MBE/AEPF unit. The VSTB inside the MBE/AEPF
will turn on the blower motor and the motor will ramp up
to the speed programmed in the motor based on the
settings for dip switch 5 and 6. The VSTB will supply
24Vac to “Y” at the condenser and the compressor and
condenser are turned on.
1.2 When the cooling demand is satisfied, the room thermostat removes the 24Vac from “G” and “Y”. The MBE/
AEPF removes the 24Vac from “Y’ at the condenser and
the compressor and condenser fan are turned off. The
blower motor will ramp down to a complete stop based on
the time and rate programmed in the motor.
2.0 Heating Operation
2.1 On a demand for heat, the room thermostat energizes
“W1” and 24Vac is supplied to terminal “E/W1” of the
VSTB inside the MBE/AEPF unit. The VSTB will turn on
the blower motor and the motor will ramp up to the speed
programmed in the motor based on the settings for dip
switch 1 and 2. The VSTB will supply 24Vac to heat
sequencer HR1 on the electric heater assembly.
2.2 HR1 contacts M1 and M2 will close within 10 to 20
seconds and turn on heater element #1. At the same
time, if the heater assembly contains a second heater
element, HR1 will contain a second set of contacts, M3
and M4, which will close and turn on heater element #2.
Note: If more than two heater elements are on the heater
assembly, it will contain a second heat sequencer, HR2,
which will control the 3rd and 4th heater elements if available.
For the 3rd and 4th heater elements to operate on a
second stage heat demand, the PJ4 jumper on the
VSTB inside the MBE/AEPF must be cut. With the PJ4
jumper cut, the VSTB will run the blower motor on low speed
on a “W1” only demand. If the first stage heat demand, “W1”
cannot be satisfied by the heat pump, the temperature
indoors will continue to drop. The room thermostat will then
energize “W2” and 24Vac will be supplied to HR2 on the
heater assembly and the blower motor will change to high
speed. When the “W2” demand is satisfied, the room
43
SERVICING
thermostat will remove the 24Vac from “W2” and the VSTB
will remove the 24Vac from HR2. The contacts on HR2 will
open between 30 to 70 seconds and heater elements #3 and
#4 will be turned off and the blower motor will change to low
speed. On most digital/electronic thermostats, “W2”
will remain energized until the first stage demand
“W1” is satisfied and then the “W1” and “W2” demands
will be removed.
2.3 When the “W1” heat demand is satisfied, the room
thermostat will remove the 24Vac from “E/W1” and the
VSTB removes the 24Vac from HR1. The contacts on
HR1 will open between 30 to 70 seconds and turn off the
heater element(s) and the blower motor ramps down to
a complete stop.
MBE/AEPF WITH SINGLE STAGE SSZ & ASZ HEAT
PUMPS
When used with a single stage SSZ or ASZ heat pumps, dip
switch #4 must be set to the ON position on the VSTB inside
the MBE. The “Y” output from the indoor thermostat must be
connected to the yellow wire labeled “Y/Y2” inside the wire
bundle marked “Thermostat” and the yellow wire labeled “Y/
Y2” inside the wire bundle marked “Outdoor Unit” must be
connected to “Y” at the heat pump. The orange jumper
wire from terminal “Y1” to terminal “O” on the VSTB
inside the MBE/AEPF must be removed.
3.0 COOLING OPERATION
On heat pump units, when the room thermostat is set to the
cooling mode, 24Vac is supplied to terminal “O” of the VSTB
inside the MBE/AEPF unit. The VSTB will supply 24Vac to
“O” at the heat pump to energize the reversing valve. As long
as the thermostat is set for cooling, the reversing valve will be
in the energized position for cooling.
3.1 On a demand for cooling, the room thermostat energizes
“G” and “Y” and 24Vac is supplied to terminals “G” and
“Y/Y2” of the MBE/AEPF unit. The VSTB will turn on the
blower motor and the motor will ramp up to the speed
programmed in the motor based on the settings of dip
switch 5 and 6. The VSTB will supply 24Vac to “Y” at the
heat pump.
3.2 The heat pump is turned on in the cooling mode.
3.3 When the cooling demand is satisfied, the room thermostat removes the 24Vac from “G” and “Y/Y2” of the MBE/
AEPF and the VSTB removes the 24Vac from “Y” at the
heat pump. The heat pump is turned off and the blower
motor will ramp down to a complete stop based on the
time and rate programmed in the motor.
4.0 HEATING OPERATION
On heat pump units, when the room thermostat is set to
the heating mode, the reversing valve is not energized.
As long as the thermostat is set for heating, the reversing
valve will be in the de-energized position for heating
except during a defrost cycle. Some installations may
use one or more outdoor thermostats to restrict the
amount of electric heat that is available above a preset
ambient temperature. Use of optional controls such as
44
these can change the operation of the electric heaters
during the heating mode. This sequence of operation
does not cover those applications.
4.1 On a demand for first stage heat with heat pump units,
the room thermostat energizes “Y” and “G” and 24Vac
is supplied to “G” and “Y/Y2” of the MBE/AEPF. The
VSTB will turn on the blower motor and the motor will
ramp up to the speed programmed in the motor based
on the settings of dip switch 1 and 2. The VSTB will
supply 24Vac to “Y” at the heat pump and the heat pump
is turned on in the heating mode.
4.2 If the first stage heat demand cannot be satisfied by the
heat pump, the temperature indoors will continue to
drop. The room thermostat will then energize terminal
“W2” for second stage heat and 24Vac will be supplied
to “E/W1” of the MBE/AEPF. The VSTB will supply
24Vac to heat sequencer, HR1, on the electric heater
assembly.
4.3 HR1 contacts M1 and M2 will close within 10 to 20
seconds and turn on heater element #1. At the same
time, if the heater assembly contains a second heater
element, HR1 will contain a second set of contacts, M3
and M4, which will close to turn on heater element #2.
Note: If more than two heater elements are on the heater
assembly, it will contain a second heat sequencer, HR2,
which will control the 3rd and 4th heater elements if available.
For the 3rd and 4th heater elements to operate on a third
stage heat demand, the PJ4 jumper on the VSTB inside
the MBE/AEPF must be cut. If the second stage heat
demand, “W2”, cannot be satisfied by the heat pump, the
temperature indoors will continue to drop. The room thermostat will then energize “W3” and 24Vac will be supplied to
“W/W2” of the MBE/AEPF. The VSTB will supply 24Vac to
HR2 on the electric heater assembly. When the “W3”
demand is satisfied, the room thermostat will remove the
24Vac from “W/W2” of the MBE/AEPF. The contacts on
HR2 will open between 30 to 70 seconds and heater
elements #3 and #4 will be turned off. On most digital/
electronic thermostats, “W3” will remain energized
until the first stage demand “Y” is satisfied and then
the “G”, “Y”, “W2” and “W3” demands will be removed.
4.4 As the temperature indoors increase, it will reach a point
where the second stage heat demand, “W2”, is satisfied. When this happens, the room thermostat will
remove the 24Vac from “E/W1” of the MBE/AEPF. The
contacts on HR1 will open between 30 to 70 seconds
and turn off both heater element(s). The heat pump
remains on along with the blower motor because the “Y”
demand for first stage heat will still be present.
4.5 When the first stage heat demand “Y” is satisfied, the
room thermostat will remove the 24Vac from “G” and “Y/
Y2” of the MBE/AEPF. The VSTB removes the 24Vac
from “Y” at the heat pump and the heat pump is turned
off. The blower motor will ramp down to a complete stop
based on the time and rate programmed in the motor
control.
SERVICING
5.0 DEFROST OPERATION
On heat pump units, when the room thermostat is set to the
heating mode, the reversing valve is not energized. As long
as the thermostat is set for heating, the reversing valve will be
in the de-energized position for heating except during a
defrost cycle.
5.1 The heat pump will be on and operating in the heating
mode as described the Heating Operation in section 4.
5.2 The defrost control in the heat pump unit checks to see
if a defrost is needed every 30, 60 or 90 minutes of heat
pump operation depending on the selectable setting by
monitoring the state of the defrost thermostat attached to
the outdoor coil.
5.3 If the temperature of the outdoor coil is low enough to
cause the defrost thermostat to be closed when the
defrost board checks it, the board will initiate a defrost
cycle.
5.4 When a defrost cycle is initiated, the contacts of the
HVDR relay on the defrost board open and turns off the
outdoor fan. The contacts of the LVDR relay on the
defrost board closes and supplies 24Vac to “O” and
“W2”. The reversing valve is energized and the contacts
on HR1 close and turns on the electric heater(s). The unit
will continue to run in this mode until the defrost cycle is
completed.
5.5 When the temperature of the outdoor coil rises high
enough to causes the defrost thermostat to open, the
defrost cycle will be terminated. If at the end of the
programmed 10 minute override time the defrost thermostat is still closed, the defrost board will automatically
terminate the defrost cycle.
5.6 When the defrost cycle is terminated, the contacts of the
HVDR relay on the defrost board will close to start the
outdoor fan and the contacts of the LVDR relay will open
and turn off the reversing valve and electric heater(s). The
unit will now be back in a normal heating mode with a heat
pump demand for heating as described in the Heating
Operation in section 4.
SEQUENCE OF OPERATION
This document covers the basic sequence of operation for a
typical application with a mercury bulb thermostat. When a
digital/electronic thermostat is used, the on/off staging of the
outdoor unit and auxiliary heat will vary. Refer to the
installation instructions and wiring diagrams provided with the
MBE for specific wiring connections, dip switch settings and
system configuration.
MBE/AEPF WITH TWO STAGE ASX CONDENSERS
1.0 COOLING OPERATION
When used with the ASX two stage condensers, dip
switch #4 must be set to the OFF position on the
VSTB inside the MBE/AEPF. The “Y1” output from
the indoor thermostat must be connected to the purple
wire labeled “Ylow/Y1” inside the wire bundle marked
“Thermostat” and the purple wire labeled “Ylow/Y1”
inside the wire bundle marked “Outdoor Unit” must be
connected to “Ylow/Y1” at the condenser. The “Y2”
output from the indoor thermostat must be connected to
the yellow wire labeled “Y/Y2” inside the wire bundle
marked “Thermostat” and the yellow wire labeled “Y/Y2”
inside the wire bundle marked “Outdoor Unit” must be
connected to “Y/Y2” at the condenser. The orange
jumper wire from terminal “Y1” to terminal “O” on
the VSTB inside the MBE/AEPF must remain connected.
1.1 On a demand for cooling, the room thermostat energizes
“G” and “Y1” and 24Vac is supplied to “G” and “Ylow/Y1”
of the MBE/AEPF unit. The VSTB inside the MBE/
AEPF will turn on the blower motor and the motor will
ramp up to 60% of the speed programmed in the motor
based on the settings for dip switch 5 and 6. The VSTB
will supply 24Vac to “Ylow/Y1” at the condenser and the
compressor and condenser fan starts in low speed
operation.
1.2 If first stage cooling cannot satisfy the demand, the room
thermostat will energize “Y2” and supply 24Vac to the
MBE/AEPF unit. The blower motor will change to the
cfm for high speed operation and the VSTB will supply
24Vac to “Y/Y2” at the condenser and the compressor
and condenser fan will change to high speed operation.
When the “Y2” demand is satisfied, the thermostat will
remove the “Y2” demand and the VSTB will remove the
24Vac from “Y/Y2” at the condenser. The blower will
drop to 60% of the programmed cfm and the compressor
and condenser fan will change to low speed. On most
digital/electronic thermostats, “Y2” will remain
energized until the first stage cooling demand “Y1”
is satisfied and then the “G”, “Y1” and “Y2” demands will be removed.
1.3 When the first stage cooling demand, “Y1”, is satisfied,
the room thermostat removes the 24Vac from “G” and
“Y1”. The MBE/AEPF removes the 24Vac from “Ylow/
Y1’ at the condenser and the compressor and condenser
fan are turned off. The blower motor will ramp down to a
complete stop based on the time and rate programmed
in the motor.
2.0 Heating Operation
2.1 On a demand for heat, the room thermostat energizes
“W1” and 24Vac is supplied to terminal “E/W1” of the
VSTB inside the MBE/AEPF unit. The VSTB will turn on
the blower motor and the motor will ramp up to the speed
programmed in the motor based on the settings for dip
switch 1 and 2. The VSTB will supply 24Vac to heat
sequencer HR1 on the electric heater assembly.
45
SERVICING
2.2 HR1 contacts M1 and M2 will close within 10 to 20
seconds and turn on heater element #1. At the same
time, if the heater assembly contains a second heater
element, HR1 will contain a second set of contacts, M3
and M4, which will close and turn on heater element #2.
Note: If more than two heater elements are on the heater
assembly, it will contain a second heat sequencer, HR2,
which will control the 3rd and 4th heater elements if available.
For the 3rd and 4th heater elements to operate on a
second stage heat demand, the PJ4 jumper on the VSTB
inside the MBE/AEPF must be cut. With the PJ4 jumper
cut, the VSTB will run the blower motor on low speed on a
“W1” only demand. If the first stage heat demand, “W1”
cannot be satisfied by the heat pump, the temperature
indoors will continue to drop. The room thermostat will then
energize “W2” and 24Vac will be supplied to HR2 on the
heater assembly and the blower motor will change to high
speed. When the “W2” demand is satisfied, the room
thermostat will remove the 24Vac from “W2” and the VSTB
will remove the 24Vac from HR2. The contacts on HR2 will
open between 30 to 70 seconds and heater elements #3 and
#4 will be turned off and the blower motor will change to low
speed. On most digital/electronic thermostats, “W2”
will remain energized until the first stage demand “W1”
is satisfied and then the “W1” and “W2” demands will
be removed.
2.3 When the “W1” heat demand is satisfied, the room
thermostat will remove the 24Vac from “E/W1” and the
VSTB removes the 24Vac from HR1. The contacts on
HR1 will open between 30 to 70 seconds and turn off the
heater element(s) and the blower motor ramps down to a
complete stop.
MBE/AEPF WITH TWO STAGE ASZ HEAT PUMP UNITS
3.0 Cooling Operation
When used with the ASZ two stage heat pump, dip
switch #4 must be set to the OFF position on the
VSTB inside the MBE/AEPF. The “Y1” output from the
indoor thermostat must be connected to the purple wire
labeled “Ylow/Y1” inside the wire bundle marked “Thermostat” and the purple wire labeled “Ylow/Y1” inside the
wire bundle marked “Outdoor Unit” must be connected to
“Y” at the heat pump. The “Y2” output from the indoor
thermostat must be connected to the yellow wire labeled
“Y/Y2” inside the wire bundle marked “Thermostat” and
the yellow wire labeled “Y/Y2” inside the wire bundle
marked “Outdoor Unit” must be connected to “Y/Y2” at
the heat pump. The orange jumper wire from terminal “Y1” to terminal “O” on the VSTB inside the
MBE/AEPF must be removed.
On heat pump units, when the room thermostat is set to the
cooling mode, 24Vac is supplied to terminal “O” of the
VSTB inside the MBE unit. The VSTB will supply 24Vac
to “O” at the heat pump to energize the reversing valve. As
long as the thermostat is set for cooling, the reversing
valve will be in the energized position for cooling.
46
3.1 On a demand for cooling, the room thermostat energizes
“G” and “Y1” and 24Vac is supplied to “G” and “Ylow/Y1”
of the MBE unit. The VSTB inside the MBE will turn on
the blower motor and the motor will ramp up to 60% of the
speed programmed in the motor based on the settings for
dip switch 5 and 6. The VSTB will supply 24Vac to “Y”
at the heat pump and the compressor and outdoor fan
starts in low speed operation.
3.2 If first stage cooling cannot satisfy the demand, the room
thermostat will energize “Y2” and supply 24Vac to “Y/
Y2”of the MBE unit. The blower motor will change to the
cfm for high speed operation and the VSTB will supply
24Vac to “Y2” at the heat pump. The compressor and
outdoor fan will change to high speed operation. When
the “Y2” demand is satisfied, the thermostat will remove
the “Y2” demand and the VSTB will remove the 24Vac
from “Y2” at the heat pump. The blower will drop to 60%
of the programmed cfm and the compressor and outdoor
fan will change to low speed operation. On most digital/
electronic thermostats, “Y2” will remain energized
until the first stage cooling demand “Y1” is satisfied
and then the “G”, “Y1” and “Y2” demands will be
removed.
3.3 When the first stage cooling demand, “Y1”, is satisfied,
the room thermostat removes the 24Vac from “G” and
“Y1”. The VSTB removes the 24Vac from “Y’ at the heat
pump and the compressor and outdoor fan are turned off.
The blower motor will ramp down to a complete stop
based on the time and rate programmed in the motor.
4.0 Heating Operation
On heat pump units, when the room thermostat is set to
the heating mode, the reversing valve is not energized.
As long as the thermostat is set for heating, the reversing
valve will be in the de-energized position for heating
except during a defrost cycle. Some installations may
use one or more outdoor thermostats to restrict the
amount of electric heat that is available above a preset
ambient temperature. Use of optional controls such as
these can change the operation of the electric heaters
during the heating mode. This sequence of operation
does not cover those applications.
4.1 On a demand for first stage heat with heat pump units, the
room thermostat energizes “G” and “Y1” and 24Vac is
supplied to “G” and “Ylo/Y1” of the MBE/AEPF. The
VSTB will turn on the blower motor and the motor will
ramp up to 60% of the speed programmed in the motor
based on the settings of dip switch 1 and 2. The VSTB
will supply 24Vac to “Y” at the heat pump. The
compressor will start on high speed and outdoor fan
will start on low speed on a “Y1” heating demand
but the blower motor will deliver only 60% of the
programmed cfm for high speed heating operation.
SERVICING
4.2 If a thermostat that provides a “Y2” demand in heating is
used and first stage heating cannot satisfy the demand,
the room thermostat will energize “Y2” and supply 24Vac
to “Y/Y2” of the MBE unit. The blower motor will change
to the cfm for high speed heating operation and the VSTB
will supply 24Vac to “Y/Y2” at the heat pump. The outdoor
fan will change to high speed operation. If the “Y2”
demand is present and becomes satisfied, the thermostat will remove the “Y2” demand and the VSTB will
remove the 24Vac from “Y/Y2” at the heat pump. The
blower will drop to 60% of the programmed cfm and the
outdoor fan will change to low speed. On most digital/
electronic thermostats, “Y2” will remain energized until
the first stage heating demand “Y1” is satisfied and then
the “G”, “Y1” and “Y2” demands will be removed.
4.3 If the heat pump operation cannot satisfy the demand, the
room thermostat energizes “W2/W3” and 24Vac is supplied to terminal “E/W1” of the VSTB inside the MBE/
AEPF unit. The VSTB will supply 24Vac to heat sequencer HR1 on the electric heater assembly.
4.4 HR1 contacts M1 and M2 will close within 10 to 20
seconds and turn on heater element #1. At the same
time, if the heater assembly contains a second heater
element, HR1 will contain a second set of contacts, M3
and M4, which will close and turn on heater element #2.
Note: If more than two heater elements are on the heater
assembly, it will contain a second heat sequencer, HR2,
which will control the 3rd and 4th heater elements if available.
For the 3rd and 4th heater elements to operate on a
second stage auxiliary heat demand, the PJ4 jumper on
the VSTB inside the MBE/AEPF must be cut. If the “W2/
W3” demand cannot be satisfied by the heat pump, the
temperature indoors will continue to drop. The room thermostat will then energize “W3/W4” and 24Vac will be supplied to
“W/W2” of the MBE. The VSTB will supply 24Vac to HR2 on
the electric heater assembly. When the “W3/W4” demand is
satisfied, the room thermostat will remove the 24Vac from “W/
W2” of the MBE/AEPF. The contacts on HR2 will open
between 30 to 70 seconds and heater elements #3 and #4 will
be turned off. On most digital/electronic thermostats,
“W3/W4” will remain energized until the first stage
demand “Y1” is satisfied and then the “G”, “Y1”, “Y2”
“W2/W3” and “W3/W4” demands will be removed.
4.5 As the temperature indoors increase, it will reach a point
where the “W2/W3” demand is satisfied. When this
happens, the room thermostat will remove the 24Vac from
“E/W1” of the MBE/AEPF. The contacts on HR1 will open
between 30 to 70 seconds and turn off the 1st and 2nd
heater elements. If the “Y2” demand is present and
becomes satisfied the room thermostat will remove the
24Vac from “Y/Y2” of the MBE and the blower motor will
change to 60% of the programmed cfm. The VSTB will
remove the 24Vac from “Y/Y2” at the heat pump and the
outdoor fan will change to low speed operation. The heat
pump remains on along with the blower motor because
the “Y1” demand for first stage heat will still be present.
4.6 When the first stage heat demand “Y1” is satisfied, the
room thermostat will remove the 24Vac from “G” and
“Ylo/Y1” of the MBE/AEPF. The VSTB removes the
24Vac from “Ylo/Y1” at the heat pump and the compressor and outdoor fan are turned off. The blower motor will
ramp down to a complete stop based on the time and
rate programmed in the motor control.
5.0 Defrost Operation
On heat pump units, when the room thermostat is set to
the heating mode, the reversing valve is not energized.
As long as the thermostat is set for heating, the reversing
valve will be in the de-energized position for heating
except during a defrost cycle.
5.1 The heat pump will be on and operating in the heating
mode as described the Heating Operation in section 4.
5.2 The defrost control in the heat pump unit checks to see
if a defrost is needed every 30, 60 or 90 minutes of heat
pump operation depending on the selectable setting by
monitoring the state of the defrost thermostat attached
to the outdoor coil.
5.3 If the temperature of the outdoor coil is low enough to
cause the defrost thermostat to be closed when the
defrost board checks it, the board will initiate a defrost
cycle.
5.4 When a defrost cycle is initiated, the contacts of the
HVDR relay on the defrost board open and turns off the
outdoor fan. The contacts of the LVDR relay on the
defrost board closes and supplies 24Vac to “O” and
“W2”. The reversing valve is energized and the contacts
on HR1 close and turns on the electric heater(s). The
unit will continue to run in this mode until the defrost
cycle is completed.
5.5 When the temperature of the outdoor coil rises high
enough to causes the defrost thermostat to open, the
defrost cycle will be terminated. If at the end of the
programmed 10 minute override time the defrost thermostat is still closed, the defrost board will automatically
terminate the defrost cycle.
5.6 When the defrost cycle is terminated, the contacts of the
HVDR relay on the defrost board will close to start the
outdoor fan and the contacts of the LVDR relay will open
and turn off the reversing valve and electric heater(s). The
unit will now be back in a normal heating mode with a
heat pump demand for heating as described in the
Heating Operation in section 4.
S-60 ELECTRIC HEATER (OPTIONAL ITEM)
Optional electric heaters may be added, in the quantities
shown in the specifications section, to provide electric
resistance heating. Under no condition shall more heaters
than the quantity shown be installed.
The low voltage circuit in the air handler is factory wired and
terminates at the location provided for the electric heater(s).
A minimum of field wiring is required to complete the
installation.
47
SERVICING
Other components such as a Heating/Cooling Thermostat
and Outdoor Thermostats are available to complete the
installation.
The system CFM can be determined by measuring the static
pressure external to the unit. The installation manual
supplied with the blower coil, or the blower performance table
in the service manual, shows the CFM for the static measured.
Alternately, the system CFM can be determined by operating
the electric heaters and indoor blower WITHOUT having the
compressor in operation. Measure the temperature rise as
close to the blower inlet and outlet as possible.
If other than a 240V power supply is used, refer to the BTUH
CAPACITY CORRECTION FACTOR chart below.
BTUH CAPACITY CORRECTION FACTOR
SUPPLY VOLTAGE
250
230
220
208
MULTIPLICATION FACTOR
1.08
.92
.84
.75
EXAMPLE: Five (5) heaters provide 24.0 KW at the rated
240V. Our actual measured voltage is 220V, and our
measured temperature rise is 42°F. Find the actual CFM:
Answer: 24.0KW, 42°F Rise, 240 V = 1800 CFM from the
TEMPERATURE RISE chart on the right.
Heating output at 220 V = 24.0KW x 3.413 x .84 = 68.8
MBH.
ELECTRIC HEATER CAPACITY BTUH
HTR
KW
3.0
KW
4.7
KW
6.0
KW
7.0
KW
9.5
KW
14.2
KW
19.5
KW
21.0
KW
BTUH 10200 16200 20400 23800 32400 48600 66500 71600
FORMULAS:
Heating Output = KW x 3413 x Corr. Factor
Actual CFM = CFM (from table) x Corr. Factor
BTUH = KW x 3413
BTUH = CFM x 1.08 x Temperature Rise (T)
CFM = KW x 3413
1.08 x T
T = BTUH
CFM x 1.08
S-61A CHECKING HEATER LIMIT CONTROL(S)
Each individual heater element is protected with a limit control
device connected in series with each element to prevent
overheating of components in case of low airflow. This limit
control will open its circuit at approximately 150°F.
Actual CFM = 1800 x .84 Corr. Factor = 1400 CFM.
NOTE: The temperature rise table is for sea level installations. The temperature rise at a particular KW and CFM will
be greater at high altitudes, while the external static pressure
at a particular CFM will be less.
TEMPERATURE RISE (F°) @ 240V
HIGH VOLTAGE!
Disconnect ALL power before servicing
or installing. Multiple power sources
may be present. Failure to do so may
cause property damage, personal injury
or death.
CFM
4.8
KW
7.2
KW
9.6
KW
14.4
KW
19.2
KW
24.0
KW
28.8
KW
600
25
38
51
-
-
-
-
700
22
33
43
-
-
-
-
800
19
29
38
57
-
-
-
900
17
26
34
51
-
-
-
2. Using an ohmmeter, test for continuity across the normally closed contacts. No reading indicates the control
is open - replace if necessary.
1000
15
23
30
46
-
-
-
IF FOUND OPEN - REPLACE - DO NOT WIRE AROUND.
1100
14
21
27
41
55
-
-
1200
13
19
25
38
50
-
-
1300
12
18
23
35
46
-
-
1400
11
16
22
32
43
54
65
1500
10
15
20
30
40
50
60
1600
9
14
19
28
38
47
57
1700
9
14
18
27
36
44
53
1800
8
13
17
25
34
42
50
1900
8
12
16
24
32
40
48
2000
8
12
15
23
30
38
45
2100
7
11
14
22
29
36
43
2200
7
11
14
21
27
34
41
2300
7
10
13
20
26
33
39
48
1. Remove the wiring from the control terminals.
S-61B CHECKING HEATER FUSE LINK
(OPTIONAL ELECTRIC HEATERS)
Each individual heater element is protected with a one time
fuse link which is connected in series with the element. The
fuse link will open at approximately 333°.
WARNING
Disconnect ALL power before servicing.
1. Remove heater element assembly so as to expose fuse
link.
SERVICING
2. Using an ohmmeter, test across the fuse link for continuity - no reading indicates the link is open. Replace as
necessary.
NOTE: The link is designed to open at approximately 333°F.
DO NOT WIRE AROUND - determine reason for failure.
S-62 CHECKING HEATER ELEMENTS
WARNING
Disconnect ALL power before servicing.
1. Disassemble and remove the heating element.
2. Visually inspect the heater assembly for any breaks in the
wire or broken insulators.
3. Using an ohmmeter, test the element for continuity - no
reading indicates the element is open. Replace as
necessary.
S-100 REFRIGERATION REPAIR PRACTICE
DANGER
Always remove the refrigerant charge in a proper
manner before applying heat to the system.
When repairing the refrigeration system:
HIGH VOLTAGE!
Disconnect ALL power before servicing
or installing. Multiple power sources
may be present. Failure to do so may
cause property damage, personal injury
or death.
1. Never open a system that is under vacuum. Air and
moisture will be drawn in.
2. Plug or cap all openings.
3. Remove all burrs and clean the brazing surfaces of the
tubing with sand cloth or paper. Brazing materials do not
flow well on oxidized or oily surfaces.
4. Clean the inside of all new tubing to remove oils and pipe
chips.
5. When brazing, sweep the tubing with dry nitrogen to
prevent the formation of oxides on the inside surfaces.
6. Complete any repair by replacing the liquid line drier in the
system, evacuate and charge.
BRAZING MATERIALS
Copper to Copper Joints - Sil-Fos used without flux (alloy
of 15% silver, 80% copper, and 5% phosphorous). Recommended heat 1400°F.
Copper to Steel Joints - Silver Solder used without a flux
(alloy of 30% silver, 38% copper, 32% zinc). Recommended
heat - 1200°F.
S-101 LEAK TESTING
(NITROGEN OR NITROGEN-TRACED)
WARNING
To avoid the risk of fire or explosion, never use
oxygen, high pressure air or flammable gases for leak
testing of a refrigeration system.
WARNING
To avoid possible explosion, the line from the
nitrogen cylinder must include a pressure regulator
and a pressure relief valve. The pressure relief valve
must be set to open at no more than 150 psig.
Pressure test the system using dry nitrogen and soapy water
to locate leaks. If you wish to use a leak detector, charge the
system to 10 psi using the appropriate refrigerant then use
nitrogen to finish charging the system to working pressure,
then apply the detector to suspect areas. If leaks are found,
repair them. After repair, repeat the pressure test. If no leaks
exist, proceed to system evacuation.
S-102 EVACUATION
WARNING
REFRIGERANT UNDER PRESSURE!
Failure to follow proper procedures may cause
property damage, personal injury or death.
This is the most important part of the entire service procedure.
The life and efficiency of the equipment is dependent upon the
thoroughness exercised by the serviceman when evacuating
air (non-condensables) and moisture from the system.
Air in a system causes high condensing temperature and
pressure, resulting in increased power input and reduced
performance.
Moisture chemically reacts with the refrigerant oil to form
corrosive acids. These acids attack motor windings and
parts, causing breakdown.
49
SERVICING
The equipment required to thoroughly evacuate the system
is a high vacuum pump, capable of producing a vacuum
equivalent to 25 microns absolute and a thermocouple
vacuum gauge to give a true reading of the vacuum in the
system
NOTE: Never use the system compressor as a vacuum
pump or run when under a high vacuum. Motor damage could
occur.
WARNING
Do not front seat the service valve(s) with the
compressor open, with the suction line of the
comprssor closed or severely restricted.
1. Connect the vacuum pump, vacuum tight manifold set
with high vacuum hoses, thermocouple vacuum gauge
and charging cylinder as shown.
2. Start the vacuum pump and open the shut off valve to the
high vacuum gauge manifold only. After the compound
gauge (low side) has dropped to approximately 29 inches
of vacuum, open the valve to the vacuum thermocouple
gauge. See that the vacuum pump will blank-off to a
maximum of 25 microns. A high vacuum pump can only
produce a good vacuum if its oil is non-contaminated.
5. Continue to evacuate to a maximum of 250 microns.
Close valve to vacuum pump and watch rate of rise. If
vacuum does not rise above 1500 microns in three to five
minutes, system can be considered properly evacuated.
6. If thermocouple vacuum gauge continues to rise and
levels off at about 5000 microns, moisture and noncondensables are still present. If gauge continues to rise
a leak is present. Repair and re-evacuate.
7. Close valve to thermocouple vacuum gauge and vacuum
pump. Shut off pump and prepare to charge.
S-103 CHARGING
WARNING
REFRIGERANT UNDER PRESSURE!
* Do not overcharge system with refrigerant.
* Do not operate unit in a vacuum or at negative
pressure.
Failure to follow proper procedures may cause
property damage, personal injury or death.
CAUTION
R-22
MANIFOLD
LOW SIDE
GAUGE
AND VALVE
4. Evacuate the system to at least 29 inches gauge before
opening valve to thermocouple vacuum gauge.
Use refrigerant certified to ARI standards. Used
refrigerant may cause compressor damage and will
void the warranty. Most portable machines cannot
clean used refrigerant to meet ARI standards.
HIGH SIDE
GAUGE
AND VALVE
CAUTION
800 PSI
RATED
HOSES
{
CHARGING
CYLINDER
AND SCALE
TO
UNIT SERVICE
VALVE PORTS
Operating the compressor with the suction valve
closed will void the warranty and cause serious
compressor damage.
Charge the system with the exact amount of refrigerant.
VACUUM PUMP
ADAPTER
Refer to the specification section or check the unit nameplates for the correct refrigerant charge.
An inaccurately charged system will cause future problems.
VACUUM PUMP
1. When using an ambient compensated calibrated charging cylinder, allow liquid refrigerant only to enter the high
side.
2. After the system will take all it will take, close the valve
on the high side of the charging manifold.
EVACUATION
3. If the vacuum pump is working properly, close the valve
to the vacuum thermocouple gauge and open the high and
low side valves to the high vacuum manifold set. With the
valve on the charging cylinder closed, open the manifold
valve to the cylinder.
50
3. Start the system and charge the balance of the refrigerant
through the low side.
SERVICING
NOTE: R410A should be drawn out of the storage container
or drum in liquid form due to its fractionation properties, but
should be "Flashed" to its gas state before entering the
system. There are commercially available restriction devices
that fit into the system charging hose set to accomplish this.
DO NOT charge liquid R410A into the compressor.
4. With the system still running, close the valve on the
charging cylinder. At this time, you may still have some
liquid refrigerant in the charging cylinder hose and will
definitely have liquid in the liquid hose. Reseat the liquid
line core. Slowly open the high side manifold valve and
transfer the liquid refrigerant from the liquid line hose and
charging cylinder hose into the suction service valve port.
CAREFUL: Watch so that liquid refrigerant does not
enter the compressor.
If the test shows:
a. Below normal high side pressure.
b. Above normal low side pressure.
c. Low temperature difference across coil.
d. Low amp draw at compressor.
And the charge is correct. The compressor is faulty - replace
the compressor.
S-105A PISTON CHART FOR SSX14 & ASX14
UNITS
Remote
Condenser
Orifice Size
SSX140181
0.049
SSX140241
0.057
SSX140301
0.063
SSX140361
0.067
SSX140421
0.074
SSX140481
0.079
SSX140601
0.088
6. Check system for leaks.
ASX140181A
0.049
Do not charge a remote condensing unit with a non-matching
evaporator coil, or a system where the charge quantity is
unknown. Do not install or charge R410A condensers matched
with coils having capillary tubes or flow control restrictors.
ARI rated Coil combinations with thermostatic expansion
valves (TEV's) should be charged by subcooling. See
"Checking Subcooling and Superheat" sections in this manual.
Subcooling values for "Ultron" system are found in the
Technical Information manuals for "Ultron" outdoor units.
ASX140241A
0.057
ASX140301A
0.063
ASX140361A
0.067
ASX140421A
0.074
ASX140481A
0.079
ASX140601A
0.088
Final Charge Adjustment
The outdoor temperature must be 60°F or higher. Set the
room thermostat to COOL, fan switch to AUTO, and set the
temperature control well below room temperature.
After system has stabilized per startup instructions, compare the operating pressures and outdoor unit amp draw to
the numbers listed on the performance label on the outdoor
unit. If pressures and amp draw are too low, add charge. If
pressures and amp draw are too high, remove charge. Check
subcooling and superheat as detailed in the following section.
5. With the system still running, remove hose and reinstall
both valve caps.
Due to their design, Scroll compressors are inherently more
tolerant of liquid refrigerant.
NOTE: Even though the compressor section of a Scroll
compressor is more tolerant of liquid refrigerant, continued
floodback or flooded start conditions may wash oil from the
bearing surfaces causing premature bearing failure.
S-104 CHECKING COMPRESSOR EFFICIENCY
The reason for compressor inefficiency is broken or damaged
scroll flanks on Scroll compressors, reducing the ability of
the compressor to pump refrigerant vapor.
The condition of the scroll flanks is checked in the following
manner.
1. Attach gauges to the high and low side of the system.
S-105B THERMOSTATIC EXPANSION VALVE
The expansion valve is designed to control the rate of liquid
refrigerant flow into an evaporator coil in exact proportion to the
rate of evaporation of the refrigerant in the coil. The amount of
refrigerant entering the coil is regulated since the valve
responds to temperature of the refrigerant gas leaving the coil
(feeler bulb contact) and the pressure of the refrigerant in the
coil. This regulation of the flow prevents the return of liquid
refrigerant to the compressor.
The illustration below shows typical heatpump TXV/check
valve operation in the heating and cooling modes.
2. Start the system and run a "Cooling Performance Test.
51
SERVICING
S-107 UNDERFEEDING
Underfeeding by the expansion valve results in low system
capacity and low suction pressures.
If these symptoms are observed:
COOLING
HEATING
TXV VALVES
Some TXV valves contain an internal check valve thus
eliminating the need for an external check valve and bypass
loop. The three forces which govern the operation of the valve
are: (1) the pressure created in the power assembly by the
feeler bulb, (2) evaporator pressure, and (3) the equivalent
pressure of the superheat spring in the valve.
0% bleed type expansion valves are used on indoor and
outdoor coils. The 0% bleed valve will not allow the system
pressures (High and Low side) to equalize during the shut
down period. The valve will shut off completely at approximately 100 PSIG.
30% bleed valves used on some other models will continue
to allow some equalization even though the valve has shut-off
completely because of the bleed holes within the valve. This
type of valve should not be used as a replacement for a 0%
bleed valve, due to the resulting drop in performance.
The bulb must be securely fastened with two straps to a clean
straight section of the suction line. Application of the bulb to
a horizontal run of line is preferred. If a vertical installation
cannot be avoided, the bulb must be mounted so that the
capillary tubing comes out at the top.
THE VALVES PROVIDED BY GOODMAN ARE DESIGNED
TO MEET THE SPECIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR
OPTIMUM PRODUCT OPERATION. DO NOT USE SUBSTITUTES.
S-106 OVERFEEDING
Overfeeding by the expansion valve results in high suction
pressure, cold suction line, and possible liquid slugging of the
compressor.
If these symptoms are observed:
1. Check for an overcharged unit by referring to the cooling
performance charts in the servicing section.
2. Check the operation of the power element in the valve as
explained in S-110 Checking Expansion Valve Operation.
3. Check for restricted or plugged equalizer tube.
52
1. Check for a restricted liquid line or drier. A restriction will
be indicated by a temperature drop across the drier.
2. Check the operation of the power element of the valve as
described in S-110 Checking Expansion Valve Operation.
S-108 SUPERHEAT
The expansion valves are factory adjusted to maintain 8 to
12 degrees superheat of the suction gas. Before checking
the superheat or replacing the valve, perform all the procedures outlined under Air Flow, Refrigerant Charge, Expansion Valve - Overfeeding, Underfeeding. These are the most
common causes for evaporator malfunction.
CHECKING SUPERHEAT
Refrigerant gas is considered superheated when its temperature is higher than the saturation temperature corresponding to its pressure. The degree of superheat equals the
degrees of temperature increase above the saturation temperature at existing pressure. See Temperature - Pressure
Chart on following pages.
SERVICING
Pressure vs. Temperature Chart
R-410A
PSIG
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
42
44
46
48
50
52
54
56
58
60
62
64
66
68
70
72
74
76
78
80
82
84
86
88
90
92
94
96
98
100
102
104
106
108
110
112
°F
-37.7
-34.7
-32.0
-29.4
-36.9
-24.5
-22.2
-20.0
-17.9
-15.8
-13.8
-11.9
-10.1
-8.3
-6.5
-4.5
-3.2
-1.6
0.0
1.5
3.0
4.5
5.9
7.3
8.6
10.0
11.3
12.6
13.8
15.1
16.3
17.5
18.7
19.8
21.0
22.1
23.2
24.3
25.4
26.4
27.4
28.5
29.5
30.5
31.2
32.2
33.2
34.1
35.1
35.5
36.9
PSIG
114.0
116.0
118.0
120.0
122.0
124.0
126.0
128.0
130.0
132.0
134.0
136.0
138.0
140.0
142.0
144.0
146.0
148.0
150.0
152.0
154.0
156.0
158.0
160.0
162.0
164.0
166.0
168.0
170.0
172.0
174.0
176.0
178.0
180.0
182.0
184.0
186.0
188.0
190.0
192.0
194.0
196.0
198.0
200.0
202.0
204.0
206.0
208.0
210.0
212.0
214.0
°F
37.8
38.7
39.5
40.5
41.3
42.2
43.0
43.8
44.7
45.5
46.3
47.1
47.9
48.7
49.5
50.3
51.1
51.8
52.5
53.3
54.0
54.8
55.5
56.2
57.0
57.7
58.4
59.0
59.8
60.5
61.1
61.8
62.5
63.1
63.8
64.5
65.1
65.8
66.4
67.0
67.7
68.3
68.9
69.5
70.1
70.7
71.4
72.0
72.6
73.2
73.8
PSIG
216.0
218.0
220.0
222.0
224.0
226.0
228.0
230.0
232.0
234.0
236.0
238.0
240.0
242.0
244.0
246.0
248.0
250.0
252.0
254.0
256.0
258.0
260.0
262.0
264.0
266.0
268.0
270.0
272.0
274.0
276.0
278.0
280.0
282.0
284.0
286.0
288.0
290.0
292.0
294.0
296.0
298.0
300.0
302.0
304.0
306.0
308.0
310.0
312.0
314.0
316.0
°F
74.3
74.9
75.5
76.1
76.7
77.2
77.8
78.4
78.9
79.5
80.0
80.6
81.1
81.6
82.2
82.7
83.3
83.8
84.3
84.8
85.4
85.9
86.4
86.9
87.4
87.9
88.4
88.9
89.4
89.9
90.4
90.9
91.4
91.9
92.4
92.8
93.3
93.8
94.3
94.8
95.2
95.7
96.2
96.6
97.1
97.5
98.0
98.4
98.9
99.3
99.7
PSIG
318.0
320.0
322.0
324.0
326.0
328.0
330.0
332.0
334.0
336.0
338.0
340.0
342.0
344.0
346.0
348.0
350.0
352.0
354.0
356.0
358.0
360.0
362.0
364.0
366.0
368.0
370.0
372.0
374.0
376.0
378.0
380.0
382.0
384.0
386.0
388.0
390.0
392.0
394.0
396.0
398.0
400.0
402.0
404.0
406.0
408.0
410.0
412.0
414.0
416.0
418.0
°F
100.2
100.7
101.1
101.6
102.0
102.4
102.9
103.3
103.7
104.2
104.6
105.1
105.4
105.8
106.3
106.6
107.1
107.5
107.9
108.3
108.8
109.2
109.6
110.0
110.4
110.8
111.2
111.6
112.0
112.4
112.6
113.1
113.5
113.9
114.3
114.7
115.0
115.5
115.8
116.2
116.6
117.0
117.3
117.7
118.1
118.5
118.8
119.2
119.6
119.9
120.3
PSIG
420.0
422.0
424.0
426.0
428.0
430.0
432.0
434.0
436.0
438.0
440.0
442.0
444.0
446.0
448.0
450.0
452.0
454.0
456.0
458.0
460.0
462.0
464.0
466.0
468.0
470.0
472.0
474.0
476.0
478.0
480.0
482.0
484.0
486.0
488.0
490.0
492.0
494.0
496.0
498.0
500.0
502.0
504.0
506.0
508.0
510.0
512.0
514.0
516.0
518.0
520.0
°F
120.7
121.0
121.4
121.7
122.1
122.5
122.8
123.2
123.5
123.9
124.2
124.6
124.9
125.3
125.6
126.0
126.3
126.6
127.0
127.3
127.7
128.0
128.3
128.7
129.0
129.3
129.7
130.0
130.3
130.7
131.0
131.3
131.6
132.0
132.3
132.6
132.9
133.3
133.6
133.9
134.0
134.5
134.8
135.2
135.5
135.8
136.1
136.4
136.7
137.0
137.3
PSIG
522.0
524.0
526.0
528.0
530.0
532.0
534.0
536.0
538.0
540.0
544.0
548.0
552.0
556.0
560.0
564.0
568.0
572.0
576.0
580.0
584.0
588.0
592.0
596.0
600.0
604.0
608.0
612.0
616.0
620.0
624.0
628.0
632.0
636.0
640.0
644.0
648.0
652.0
656.0
660.0
664.0
668.0
672.0
676.0
680.0
684.0
688.0
692.0
696.0
°F
137.6
137.9
138.3
138.6
138.9
139.2
139.5
139.8
140.1
140.4
141.0
141.6
142.1
142.7
143.3
143.9
144.5
145.0
145.6
146.2
146.7
147.3
147.9
148.4
149.0
149.5
150.1
150.6
151.2
151.7
152.3
152.8
153.4
153.9
154.5
155.0
155.5
156.1
156.6
157.1
157.7
158.2
158.7
159.2
159.8
160.3
160.8
161.3
161.8
*Based on ALLIED SIGNAL Data
53
SERVICING
REQUIRED LIQUID LINE TEMPERATURE
LIQUID PRESSURE
AT SERVICE VALVE (PSIG)
189
195
202
208
215
222
229
236
243
251
259
266
274
283
291
299
308
317
326
335
345
354
364
374
384
395
406
416
427
439
450
462
474
486
499
511
8
58
60
62
64
66
68
70
72
74
76
78
80
82
84
86
88
90
92
94
96
98
100
102
104
106
108
110
112
114
116
118
120
122
124
126
128
REQUIRED SUBCOOLING TEMPERATURE (°F)
10
12
14
16
56
54
52
50
58
56
54
52
60
58
56
54
62
60
58
56
64
62
60
58
66
64
62
60
68
66
64
62
70
68
66
64
72
70
68
66
74
72
70
68
76
74
72
70
78
76
74
72
80
78
76
74
82
80
78
76
84
82
80
78
86
84
82
80
88
86
84
82
90
88
86
84
92
90
88
86
94
92
90
88
96
94
92
90
98
96
94
92
100
98
96
94
102
100
98
96
104
102
100
98
106
104
102
100
108
106
104
102
110
108
106
104
112
110
108
106
114
112
110
108
116
114
112
110
118
116
114
112
120
118
116
114
122
120
118
116
124
122
120
118
126
124
122
120
CAUTION
To prevent personal injury, carefully connect and
disconnect manifold gauge hoses. Escaping liquid
refrigerant can cause burns. Do not vent refrigerant
to atmosphere. Recover during system repair
or final unit disposal.
1. Run system at least 10 minutes to allow pressure to
stabilize.
54
18
48
50
52
54
56
58
60
62
64
66
68
70
72
74
76
78
80
82
84
86
88
90
92
94
96
98
100
102
104
106
108
110
112
114
116
118
2. Temporarily install thermometer on suction (large) line
near suction line service valve with adequate contact and
insulate for best possible reading.
3. Refer to the superheat table provided for proper system
superheat. Add charge to lower superheat or recover
charge to raise superheat.
SERVICING
EXAMPLE:
4. Review the technical information manual or specification
sheet for the model being serviced to obtain the design
subcooling.
a. Suction Pressure = 143
b. Corresponding Temp. °F. = 50
c. Thermometer on Suction Line = 61°F.
To obtain the degrees temperature of superheat, subtract
50.0 from 61.0°F.
5. Compare the hi-pressure reading to the "Required Liquid
Line Temperature" chart (page 43). Find the hi-pressure
value on the left column. Follow that line right to the
column under the design subcooling value. Where the
two intersect is the required liquid line temperature.
Superheat Formula = Suct. Line Temp. - Sat. Suct. Temp.
The difference is 11° Superheat. The 11° Superheat would fall
in the ± range of allowable superheat.
SUPERHEAT AND SUBCOOLING ADJUSTMENT ON TXV
APPLICATIONS
1. Run system at least 10 minutes to allow pressure to
stabilize.
2. Temporarily install thermometer on liquid (small) line
near liquid line service valve with adequate contact and
insulate for best possible reading.
3. Check subcooling and superheat. Systems with TXV
application should have a subcooling and superheat of
7 ± 2ºF.
Alternately you can convert the liquid line pressure gauge
reading to temperature by finding the gauge reading in
Temperature - Pressure Chart and reading to the left, find
the temperature in the °F. Column.
6. The difference between the thermometer reading and
pressure to temperature conversion is the amount of
subcooling.
Add charge to raise subcooling. Recover charge to lower
subcooling.
Subcooling Formula = Sat. Liquid Temp. - Liquid Line
Temp.
EXAMPLE:
a. Liquid Line Pressure = 417
b. Corresponding Temp. °F. = 120°
c. Thermometer on Liquid line = 109°F.
To obtain the amount of subcooling subtract 109°F from
120°F.
a.
If subcooling and superheat are low, adjust TXV
to 7 - 9ºF then check subcooling.
b.
If subcooling is low and superheat is high, add
charge to raise subcooling to 7 ± 2ºF then check
superheat.
c.
If subcooling and superheat are high, adjust TXV
valve to 7 ± 9ºF then check subcooling.
The difference is 11° subcooling. See the specification sheet
or technical information manual for the design subcooling
range for your unit.
d.
If subcooling is high and superheat is low, adjust
TXV valve to 7 to 9ºF superheat and remove
charge to lower the subcooling to 7 ± 2ºF.
S-109A TWO SPEED APPLICATION
The TXV should NOT be adjusted at light load conditions
55º to 60ºF, under such conditions only the subcooling
can be evaluated. This is because suction pressure is
dependent on the indoor coil match, indoor airflow, and
wet bulb temperature. NOTE: Do NOT adjust charge
based on suction pressure unless there is a gross
undercharge.
4. Disconnect manifold set. Installation is complete.
S-109 CHECKING SUBCOOLING
Refrigerant liquid is considered subcooled when its temperature is lower than the saturation temperature corresponding
to its pressure. The degree of subcooling equals the degrees
of temperature decrease below the saturation temperature at
the existing pressure.
1. Attach an accurate thermometer or preferably a thermocouple type temperature tester to the liquid line as it
leaves the condensing unit.
2. Install a high side pressure gauge on the high side (liquid)
service valve at the front of the unit.
Run the remote on low stage cooling for 10 minutes until
refrigerant pressures stabilize. Follow the guidelines and
methods below to check unit operation and ensure that the
refrigerant charge is within limits. Charge the unit on low
stage.
1. Purge gauge lines. Connect service gauge manifold to
base-valve service ports. Run system at least 10 minutes to allow pressure to stabilize.
2. Temporarily install thermometer on liquid (small) line
near liquid line service valve with adequate contact and
insulate for best possible reading.
3. Check subcooling and superheat. Systems with TXV
application should have a subcooling of 5 to 7 ºF and
superheat of 7 to 9 ºF.
a.
If subcooling and superheat are low, adjust TXV to
7 to 9 ºF superheat, then check subcooling.
NOTE: To adjust superheat, turn the valve stem
clockwise to increase and counter clockwise to
decrease.
3. Record the gauge pressure and the temperature of the
line.
55
SERVICING
b.
If subcooling is low and superheat is high, add
charge to raise subcooling to 5 to 7 ºF then check
superheat.
c.
If subcooling and superheat are high, adjust TXV
valve to 7 to 9 ºF superheat, then check subcooling.
d.
If subcooling is high and superheat is low, adjust
TXV valve to 7 to 9 ºF superheat and remove
charge to lower the subcooling to 5 to 7 ºF.
NOTE: Do NOT adjust the charge based on suction
pressure unless there is a gross undercharge.
4. Disconnect manifold set, installation is complete.
Subcooling Formula = Sat. Liquid Temp. - Liquid Line Temp.
S-109B HEAT PUMP HEATING MODE
Hot Gas Method
System charge can be checked in the heating mode by
measuring the hot discharge gas at the compressor.
1. Allow the system to operate at least 20 minutes.
2. Attach and insulate an electronic thermometer probe to
the vapor service valve (large line) at the base valve.
3. Operate the system for 10 minutes.
4. Using an accurate electronic thermometer, measure the
temperature of the discharge gas at the probe and the
outdoor ambient temperature.
5. The temperature measured on the vapor service valve line
should be equal to the outdoor ambient temperature plus
110°F (± 4°). For example, if the outdoor ambient temperature is 45°F, then the temperature measured by the
thermometer probe at the vapor service valve line should
be 155°F for a system that is properly charged. If the
temperature measured by the thermometer probe is
higher than the outdoor ambient plus 110°F, the system
charge should be adjusted by adding refrigerant to lower
the temperature. If the temperature measured is lower
than the outdoor ambient plus 110°F, the system charge
should be adjusted by recovering charge to raise the
temperature
NOTE: When adjusting the charge in this manner, allow
the system to operate for at least 10 minutes before
taking the next temperature reading.
S-110 CHECKING EXPANSION VALVE
OPERATION
1. Remove the remote bulb of the expansion valve from the
suction line.
2. Start the system and cool the bulb in a container of ice
water, closing the valve. As you cool the bulb, the suction
pressure should fall and the suction temperature will rise.
3. Next warm the bulb in your hand. As you warm the bulb,
the suction pressure should rise and the suction temperature will fall.
56
4. If a temperature or pressure change is noticed, the
expansion valve is operating. If no change is noticed, the
valve is restricted, the power element is faulty, or the
equalizer tube is plugged.
5. Capture the charge, replace the valve and drier, evacuate
and recharge.
S-111 FIXED ORIFICE RESTRICTOR DEVICES
The fixed orifice restrictor device (flowrator) used in conjunction with the indoor coil is a predetermined bore (I.D.).
It is designed to control the rate of liquid refrigerant flow into
an evaporator coil.
The amount of refrigerant that flows through the fixed orifice
restrictor device is regulated by the pressure difference
between the high and low sides of the system.
In the cooling cycle when the outdoor air temperature rises,
the high side condensing pressure rises. At the same time,
the cooling load on the indoor coil increases, causing the low
side pressure to rise, but at a slower rate.
Since the high side pressure rises faster when the temperature increases, more refrigerant flows to the evaporator,
increasing the cooling capacity of the system.
When the outdoor temperature falls, the reverse takes place.
The condensing pressure falls, and the cooling loads on the
indoor coil decreases, causing less refrigerant flow.
A strainer is placed on the entering side of the tube to prevent
any foreign material from becoming lodged inside the fixed
orifice restriction device.
If a restriction should become evident, proceed as follows:
1. Recover refrigerant charge.
2. Remove the orifice or tube strainer assembly and replace.
3. Replace liquid line drier, evacuate and recharge.
CHECKING EQUALIZATION TIME
During the "OFF" cycle, the high side pressure bleeds to the
low side through the fixed orifice restriction device. Check
equalization time as follows:
1. Attach a gauge manifold to the suction and liquid line dill
valves.
2. Start the system and allow the pressures to stabilize.
3. Stop the system and check the time it takes for the high
and low pressure gauge readings to equalize.
If it takes more than seven (7) minutes to equalize, the
restrictor device is inoperative. Replace, install a liquid line
drier, evacuate and recharge.
SERVICING
S-112 CHECKING RESTRICTED LIQUID LINE
S-115 COMPRESSOR BURNOUT
When the system is operating, the liquid line is warm to the
touch. If the liquid line is restricted, a definite temperature
drop will be noticed at the point of restriction. In severe
cases, frost will form at the restriction and extend down the
line in the direction of the flow.
When a compressor burns out, high temperature develops
causing the refrigerant, oil and motor insulation to decompose forming acids and sludge.
Discharge and suction pressures will be low, giving the
appearance of an undercharged unit. However, the unit will
have normal to high subcooling.
If a compressor is suspected of being burned-out, attach a
refrigerant hose to the liquid line dill valve and properly remove
and dispose of the refrigerant.
NOTICE
Locate the restriction, replace the restricted part, replace
drier, evacuate and recharge.
S-113 OVERCHARGE OF REFRIGERANT
An overcharge of refrigerant is normally indicated by an
excessively high head pressure.
An evaporator coil, using an expansion valve metering
device, will basically modulate and control a flooded evaporator and prevent liquid return to the compressor.
An evaporator coil, using a capillary tube metering device,
could allow refrigerant to return to the compressor under
extreme overcharge conditions. Also with a capillary tube
metering device, extreme cases of insufficient indoor air can
cause icing of the indoor coil and liquid return to the
compressor, but the head pressure would be lower.
Violation of EPA regulations may result in fines
or other penalties.
Now determine if a burn out has actually occurred. Confirm
by analyzing an oil sample using a Sporlan Acid Test Kit, AK3 or its equivalent.
Remove the compressor and obtain an oil sample from the
suction stub. If the oil is not acidic, either a burnout has not
occurred or the burnout is so mild that a complete clean-up
is not necessary.
If acid level is unacceptable, the system must be cleaned by
using the clean-up drier method.
CAUTION
Do not allow the sludge or oil to contact the skin.
Severe burns may result.
There are other causes for high head pressure which may be
found in the "Service Problem Analysis Guide."
If other causes check out normal, an overcharge or a system
containing non-condensables would be indicated.
If this system is observed:
1. Start the system.
2. Remove and capture small quantities of gas from the
suction line dill valve until the head pressure is reduced
to normal.
3. Observe the system while running a cooling performance
test. If a shortage of refrigerant is indicated, then the
system contains non-condensables.
S-114 NON-CONDENSABLES
If non-condensables are suspected, shut down the system
and allow the pressures to equalize. Wait at least 15
minutes. Compare the pressure to the temperature of the
coldest coil since this is where most of the refrigerant will be.
If the pressure indicates a higher temperature than that of the
coil temperature, non-condensables are present.
Non-condensables are removed from the system by first
removing the refrigerant charge, replacing and/or installing
liquid line drier, evacuating and recharging.
NOTE: The Flushing Method using R-11 refrigerant is no
longer approved by Amana® Heating-Cooling.
Suction Line Drier Clean-Up Method
The POE oils used with R410A refrigerant is an excellent
solvent. In the case of a burnout, the POE oils will remove any
burnout residue left in the system. If not captured by the
refrigerant filter, they will collect in the compressor or other
system components, causing a failure of the replacement
compressor and/or spread contaminants throughout the
system, damaging additional components.
Use AMANA® brand part number RF000127 suction line filter
drier kit. This drier should be installed as close to the
compressor suction fitting as possible. The filter must be
accessible and be rechecked for a pressure drop after the
system has operated for a time. It may be necessary to use
new tubing and form as required.
NOTE: At least twelve (12) inches of the suction line
immediately out of the compressor stub must be discarded
due to burned residue and contaminates.
1. Remove compressor discharge line strainer.
2. Remove the liquid line drier and expansion valve.
3
Purge all remaining components with dry nitrogen or
carbon dioxide until clean.
4. Install new components including liquid line drier.
57
SERVICING
5. Braze all joints, leak test, evacuate, and recharge
system.
2. TXV Requirement: All line set applications over 50 ft will
require a TXV.
6. Start up the unit and record the pressure drop across the
drier.
3. Hard Start Assist- increased charge level in long line
applications can require extra work from the compressor
at start-up. A hard start assist device may be required to
overcome this.
7. Continue to run the system for a minimum of twelve (12)
hours and recheck the pressure drop across the drier.
Pressure drop should not exceed 6 PSIG.
8. Continue to run the system for several days, repeatedly
checking pressure drop across the suction line drier. If
the pressure drop never exceeds the 6 PSIG, the drier
has trapped the contaminants. Remove the suction line
drier from the system.
9. If the pressure drop becomes greater, then it must be
replaced and steps 5 through 9 repeated until it does not
exceed 6 PSIG.
NOTICE: Regardless, the cause for burnout must be determined and corrected before the new compressor is started.
S-120 REFRIGERANT PIPING
The piping of a refrigeration system is very important in
relation to system capacity, proper oil return to compressor,
pumping rate of compressor and cooling performance of the
evaporator.
POE oils maintain a consistent viscosity over a large
temperature range which aids in the oil return to the compressor; however, there will be some installations which
require oil return traps. These installations should be avoided
whenever possible, as adding oil traps to the refrigerant lines
also increases the opportunity for debris and moisture to be
introduced into the system. Avoid long running traps in
horizontal suction line.
LONG LINE SET APPLICATION R-410A
This long line set application guideline applies to all ARI
listed R-410A air conditioner and heat pump split system
matches of nominal capacity 18,000 to 60,000 Btuh. This
guideline will cover installation requirements and additional
accessories needed for split system installations where the
line set exceeds 50 feet in actual length.
Additional Accessories:
1. Crankcase Heater- a long line set application can
critically increase the charge level needed for a system.
As a result, the system is very prone to refrigerant
migration during its off-cycle and a crankcase heater will
help minimize this risk. A crankcase heater is recommended for any long line application (50 watt minimum).
58
4. Liquid Line Solenoid - A long line set application can
critically increase the charge level needed for a system.
As a result, the system is very prone to refrigerant
migration during its off-cycle and a liquid line solenoid will
help minimize this. A liquid line solenoid is recommended
for any long line application on straight cooling units.
Tube Sizing:
1. In long line applications, the “equivalent line length” is the
sum of the straight length portions of the suction line plus
losses (in equivalent length) from 45 and 90 degree
bends. Select the proper suction tube size based on
equivalent length of the suction line (see Tables 4
& 5) and recalculated system capacity.
Equivalent length =
Length horizontal
+ Length vertical
+ Losses from bends (see Tables 4 & 5)
2. For any residential split system installed with a long
line set, the liquid line size must never exceed 3/8".
Limiting the liquid line size to 3/8" is critical since an
increased refrigerant charge level from having a larger
liquid line could possibly shorten a compressor’s lifespan.
3. Single Stage Condensing Unit: The maximum length
of tubing must not exceed 150 feet.
•50 feet is the maximum recommended vertical difference between the condenser and evaporator when the
evaporator is above the condenser. Equivalent length is
not to exceed 150 feet.
•The vertical difference between the condenser and evaporator when the evaporator is below the condenser can
approach 150 feet, as long as the equivalent length does
not exceed 150 feet.
•The distance between the condenser and evaporator in a
completely horizontal installation in which the indoor and
outdoor unit do not differ more than 10 feet in vertical
distance from each other can approach 150 feet, as long
as the equivalent length does not exceed 150 feet.
SERVICING
4. Two-Stage Condensing Unit: The maximum length of
tubing must not exceed 75 feet where indoor coil is
located above the outdoor unit.
NOTE: When the outdoor unit is located above the
indoor coil, the maximum vertical rise must not exceed
25 feet. If the maximum vertical rise exceeds 25 feet,
premature compressor failure will occur due to inadequate oil return.
5. Vibration and Noise: In long line applications, refrigerant tubing is highly prone to transmit noise and vibration
to the structure it is fastened to. Use adequate vibrationisolating hardware when mounting line set to adjacent
structure.
Most refrigerant tubing kits are supplied with 3/8"-thick
insulation on the vapor line. For long line installations over 50
feet, especially if the line set passes through a high ambient
temperature, ½”-thick suction line insulation is recommended
to reduce loss of capacity. The liquid line should be insulated
if passing through an area of 120°F or greater. Do not attach
the liquid line to any non-insulated portion of the suction line.
Table 4 lists multiplier values to recalculate system-cooling
capacity as a function of a system’s equivalent line length (as
calculated from the suction line) and the selected suction
tube size. Table 5 lists the equivalent length gained from
adding bends to the suction line. Properly size the suction
line to minimize capacity loss.
TABLE 5. LOSSES FROM SUCTION LINE ELBOWS
(EQUIVALENT LENGTH, FT.)
Type of elbow fitting
90° short radius
90° long radius
45°
3/4
1.7
1.5
0.7
I.D. (in.)
7/8
2
1.7
0.8
1-1/8
2.3
1.6
1
Installation Requirements
1. In a completely horizontal installation with a long line
set where the evaporator is at the same altitude as
(or slightly below) the condenser, the line set should
be sloped towards the evaporator. This helps reduce
refrigerant migration to the condenser during a
system’s off-cycle.
2. For a system installation where the evaporator is
above the condenser, an inverted vapor line trap
should be installed on the suction line just before the
inlet to the evaporator (see Fig 6). The top of the
inverted loop must be slightly above the top of the
evaporator coil and can be created simply by brazing
two 90° long radius elbows together, if a bending tool
is unavailable. Properly support and secure the
inverted loop to the nearest point on the indoor unit or
adjacent structure.
TABLE 4. CAPACITY MULTIPLIERS AS A FUNCTION OF
SUCTION LINE SIZE & EQUIVALENT LENGTH
Nominal
capacity
Btuh
18,000
24,000
30,000
36,000
42,000
48,000
60,000
Vapor line
diameter
(in.)
3/4
3/4
3/4
3/4
7/8
3/4
7/8
1-1/8
3/4
7/8
1-1/8
7/8
1-1/8
EQUIVALENT LINE LENGTH (FT)
50
.99
1
.98
.93
.98
.93
.97
1
.90
.96
1
.93
.99
75
.97
.99
.97
.90
.96
.90
.96
1
.86
.94
1
.91
.98
100
.96
.99
.96
.86
.94
.87
.94
.99
.82
.93
.99
.89
.98
125
.95
.98
.95
.83
.92
.83
.93
.99
.78
.91
.99
.86
.97
150
.95
.97
.94
.79
.90
.80
.92
.98
N/R
.89
.98
.84
.97
NOTE: For a condenser with a liquid valve tube connection
less than 3/8" diameter, use 3/8" liquid line tubing for a line
set greater than 25 feet.
Fig 6. Evaporator unit with inverted vapor loop
3. An oil trap is required at the evaporator only if the
condenser is above the evaporator. Preformed oil
traps are available at most HVAC supply houses, or oil
traps may be created by brazing tubing elbows together
(see diagram below). Remember to add the equivalent
length from oil traps to the equivalent length calculation
of the suction line. For example, if you construct an oil
trap using two 45° elbows, one short and one long 90°
elbow in a ¾” diameter suction line, the additional
equivalent length would be 0.7+ 0.7+1.7+1.5, which
equals 4.6 feet (refer to table 2).
59
SERVICING
Oil Trap Construction
Long Radius Street Ell
45 °
Ell
45°
Street
Ell
Short Radius
Street Ell
S-202 DUCT STATIC PRESSURES AND/OR
STATIC PRESSURE DROP
ACROSS COILS
This minimum and maximum allowable duct static pressure
for the indoor sections are found in the specifications section.
Tables are also provided for each coil, listing quantity of air
(CFM) versus static pressure drop across the coil.
Too great an external static pressure will result in insufficient
air that can cause icing of the coil. Too much air can cause
poor humidity control and condensate to be pulled off the
evaporator coil causing condensate leakage. Too much air
can also cause motor overloading and in many cases this
constitutes a poorly designed system.
S-203 AIR HANDLER EXTERNAL STATIC
Fig 7. Oil Trap
4. Low voltage wiring. Verify low voltage wiring size
is adequate for the length used since it will be
increased in a long line application.
System Charging
To determine proper air movement, proceed as follows:
1. Using a draft gauge (inclined manometer), measure the
static pressure of the return duct at the inlet of the unit,
(Negative Pressure).
2. Measure the static pressure of the supply duct, (Positive
Pressure).
3. Add the two readings together.
R-410A condensers are factory charged for 15 feet of line set.
To calculate the amount of extra refrigerant (in ounces)
needed for a line set over 15 feet, multiply the additional
length of line set by 0.6 ounces. Note for the following
formula, the linear feet of line set is the actual length of liquid
line (or suction line, since both should be equal) used, not the
equivalent length calculated for the suction line.
Extra refrigerant needed =
(Linear feet of line set – 15 ft.) x X oz./ft.
TOTAL EXTERNAL STATIC
Where X = 0.6 for 3/8" liquid tubing
Remember, for condensers with a liquid valve connection
less than 3/8" diameter, 3/8" liquid tubing is required for a
line set longer than 25 feet.
NOTE: Both readings may be taken simultaneously and read
directly on the manometer if so desired.
Follow the charging procedures in the outdoor unit I/O
manual to ensure proper superheat and sub-cooling levels,
especially on a system with a TXV installed in the indoor unit.
Heat pumps should be checked in both heating and cooling
mode for proper charge level. This guideline is meant to
provide installation instructions based on most common long
line set applications. Installation variables may affect system operation.
If external static pressure is being measured on a furnace to
determine airflow, supply static must be taken between the
"A" coil and the furnace.
NO ADDITIONAL COMPRESSOR OIL IS NEEDED FOR
LONG LINE SET APPLICATIONS ON RESIDENTIAL SPLIT
SYSTEMS.
60
4. Consult proper table for quantity of air.
SERVICING
Air Flow
STATIC PRESSURE DROP
TOTAL EXTERNAL STATIC
S-204 COIL STATIC PRESSURE DROP
If the total external static pressure and/or static pressure drop
exceeds the maximum or minimum allowable statics, check
for closed dampers, dirty filters, undersized or poorly laid out
duct work.
1. Using a draft gauge (inclined manometer), connect the
positive probe underneath the coil and the negative probe
above the coil.
2. A direct reading can be taken of the static pressure drop
across the coil.
3. Consult proper table for quantity of air.
61
ACCESSORIES WIRING DIAGRAMS
HIGH VOLTAGE!
DISCONNECT ALL POWER BEFORE SERVICING OR INSTALLING THIS
UNIT. MULTIPLE POWER SOURCES MAY BE PRESENT. FAILURE TO
DO SO MAY CAUSE PROPERTY DAMAGE, PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH.
ALL FUEL SYSTEM AFE18-60A CONTROL BOARD
24VAC
F1
3A
P1-8
POWER SUPPLY
INPUT
FURNACE DEMAND
OUTPUT
BLOWER FAN DEMAND
OUTPUT
POWER SUPPLY INPUT
(COMMON)
SECOND STAGE FURNACE
DEMAND OUTPUT
COMPRESSOR OUTPUT
+VD C
R
POWER
SUPPLY
P1-7
F
U
R
N
A
C
E
SECOND STAGE
COMPRESSOR OUTPUT
REVERSING VALVE
OUTPUT
W1
P1-4
+5VDC
W1-FURN
W2-HP
+VD C
G
24VAC
P1-6
C
G-STAT
C
K1
P1-5
G-FURN
W2
P1-2
Y
P1-3
K2
Y2-HP
Y2
P1-1
+VD C
O
Y2-STAT
Y2-FURN
24VAC
P2-2
POWER SUPPLY OUT
TO THERMOSTAT
CALL FOR
REVERSING VALVE
CALL FOR
COMPRESSOR
CALL FOR
EMERGENCY HEAT
CALL FOR
BLOWER FAN
CALL FOR
FURNACE HEAT
POWER SUPPLY COMMON
OUT TO THERMOSTAT
CALL FOR 2ND STAGE
FURNACE HEAT
CALL FOR 2ND STAGE
COMPRESSOR
T
H
E
R
M
O
S
T
A
T
K4
R
Y-STAT
Y-FURN
Q1
P2-1
O
P2-7
Y-HP
Y
P2-8
K3
E
P2-5
G
Q2
+5VDC
P2-9
W1
P2-3
C
E/W1
C
P2-4
1.0K
W2
P2-6
Y2
24VAC
O
MICROPROCESSOR
P3-9
POWER SUPPLY OUT
TO HP CONTROL
HP CALL FOR FURNACE
(DURING DEFROST)
REVERSING
VALVE OUTPUT
COMPRESSOR
CONTACTOR OUTPUT
POWER SUPPLY COMMON
OUT TO HP CONTROL
R
6.8K
P3-8
H
E
A
T
W2
P3-7
Y
O
P3-2
Y
6.8K
P3-6
C
P
U
M
P
ODT (OUTDOOR
THERMOSTAT)
2ND STAGE COMPRESSOR
DEMAND OUTPUT
C
P3-3
OT-NO
P3-1
OT-NC
P3-4
OT-C
P3-5
2
Y2
1
BREAK FOR ODT
ALL FUEL CONTROL BOARD - AFE18-60A
This wiring diagram is for reference only. Not all wiring is as shown above.
Refer to the appropriate wiring diagram for the unit being serviced.
(For use with Heat Pumps in conjunction with 80% or 90% Single-Stage or Two-Stage Furnaces)
62
ACCESSORIES WIRING DIAGRAMS
HIGH VOLTAGE!
DISCONNECT ALL POWER BEFORE SERVICING OR INSTALLING THIS
UNIT. MULTIPLE POWER SOURCES MAY BE PRESENT. FAILURE TO
DO SO MAY CAUSE PROPERTY DAMAGE, PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH.
10kw and Below, One Stage Electric Heat
G
IT
E
RE
D
G
C
W
H
BL
RE
E
U
E
N
From Air Handler
W2
R
C
G
WHITE
W2
1
4
1
BROWN
BLACK
RED
EMERGENCY
HEAT
RELAY
THERMOSTAT
E
R
OT/EHR18-60
Indoor Thermostat
2
2
3
BLUE
O
Y
C
R
W2
O
Y
LO
NG
RA
E
W
E
E
IT
H
L
YE
O
W
D
RE
U
BL
From Outdoor Unit
15kw and Above, Two Stage Electric Heat
SEE NOTE
W2
W
R
ED
BR
O
G
H
IT
E
C
W
G
R
EE
N
BL
U
E
N
From Air Handler
W3
R
C
G
BROWN
W2
BLACK
RED
EMERGENCY
HEAT
RELAY
THERMOSTAT
E
R
OT/EHR18-60
Indoor Thermostat
2
WHITE
1
2
4
1
3
BLUE
O
Y
C
R
W2
O
Y
W
E
E
IT
O
LL
H
G
AN
R
YE
O
W
ED
R
E
U
BL
Note:
When using a Thermostat with only one
stage for electric heat (W2), tie white and
brown wires from air handler together.
From Outdoor Unit
Typical Wiring Schematics for OT/EHR18-60 (Outdoor Thermostat & Emergency Heat Relay).
This wiring diagram is for reference only. Not all wiring is as shown above.
Refer to the appropriate wiring diagram for the unit being serviced.
63
ACCESSORIES WIRING DIAGRAMS
HIGH VOLTAGE!
DISCONNECT ALL POWER BEFORE SERVICING OR INSTALLING THIS
UNIT. MULTIPLE POWER SOURCES MAY BE PRESENT. FAILURE TO
DO SO MAY CAUSE PROPERTY DAMAGE, PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH.
15kw and Above with Two OT/EHR18-60's, Two Stage Electric Heat and Two Stage Thermostat
W2
RE
D
O
W
BR
G
IT
E
G
RE
EN
C
W
H
BL
UE
N
From Air Handler
OT/EHR18-60 #1
W3
R
C
G
WHITE
W2
1
4
1
BROWN
BLACK
RED
EMERGENCY
HEAT
RELAY
W3
THERMOSTAT
E
R
OT/EHR18-60 #2
Indoor Thermostat
2
2
3
BLUE
O
Y
2
2
3
BLUE
WHITE
1
4
1
BROWN
BLACK
RED
EMERGENCY
HEAT
RELAY
THERMOSTAT
O
Y
E
G
AN
W
O
LL
YE
R
O
E
IT
W2
H
W
UE
BL
R
D
RE
C
From Outdoor Unit
Typical Wiring Schematics for OT/EHR18-60 (Outdoor Thermostat & Emergency Heat Relay).
This wiring diagram is for reference only. Not all wiring is as shown above.
Refer to the appropriate wiring diagram for the unit being serviced.
64
ACCESSORIES WIRING DIAGRAMS
HIGH VOLTAGE!
DISCONNECT ALL POWER BEFORE SERVICING OR INSTALLING THIS
UNIT. MULTIPLE POWER SOURCES MAY BE PRESENT. FAILURE TO
DO SO MAY CAUSE PROPERTY DAMAGE, PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH.
R
TR
R
R
1
4
208/240
HTR2
BK
24V
2
3
FL
5
BL
Y
HTR3
BL
TL
PU
BK
FL
HTR4
PC
BL
TL
BK
1
BL
EBTDR
2
R
3
PU
R
G
BL
BL
R
Y
M5
M7
M6
RS2
M8
BL
4
R
R
K1
XFMR-R
XFMR-C
BL
K1
NO
COM
C
BR
5
BR
6
W
NC
SPEEDUP
W
M1
7
Y
BL
8
BK
R
9
W BR G PK BL
L1
L2
L1
L2
SR
EQUIPMENT GROUND
USE COPPER OR ALUMINUM WIRE
Typical Wiring Schematic MBR/AR*F Air Handler with Electric Heat.
This wiring diagram is for reference only. Not all wiring is as shown above.
Refer to the appropriate wiring diagram for the unit being serviced.
65
ACCESSORIES WIRING DIAGRAMS
BL
5
208
2
3
COM
TR
8
240
1
9
9
8
R
G
24V
BL
L2
4
L1
R
HIGH VOLTAGE!
DISCONNECT ALL POWER BEFORE SERVICING OR INSTALLING THIS
UNIT. MULTIPLE POWER SOURCES MAY BE PRESENT. FAILURE TO
DO SO MAY CAUSE PROPERTY DAMAGE, PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH.
BK
R
BL
7
7
BK
BK
3
PU
3
BL
BK
EM
W
4
1
R
BR
6
R
8
BR
4
R
R
2
5
4
BK
6
W
5
0
6
R
1
PL2
O
PK
G
R
BL
BR
W
Y
R
BL
BR
W
BR
THERMOSTATS
OT1 OT2
C
W2
ED
PK
G
Y
O
24 VAC
HEATER
W1
C
W2
R
Y1
W2
OT1
PJ4
OT2
PJ2
HUM
PJ6
J1
VSTB
PN. B1368270 REV. A
Blower Section
Typical Wiring Schematic MBE/AEPF with Electric Heat.
This wiring diagram is for reference only.
Not all wiring is as shown above.
Refer to the appropriate wiring diagram for the unit being serviced.
66
DS1
J2 J3
W1
HUM
BL
R YCON COM O
G
Y1
Y/Y2
OUTDOOR
CONDENSER HEATPUMP
HUMIDISTAT
R
R
W/W2
OTC
BR
O
W
E\W1
R
BL
O
BR
W
BL
Y
BR
O
BL
TO
CONDENSER
HKR Heat Kit
Y
TL
R
HTR1
C
Y1 Y/Y2
W1
YCON O
O
R
G
R
C W2
W2
TL
TO
THERMOSTAT
R
HTR2
PL 1
BK
BK
1
2
2
R