Apple Power Macintosh G3 Specifications

K Service Source
Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh
Server G3 (Blue and White)
Power Macintosh G3 (Blue and White),
Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and White),
Macintosh Server G3 with Mac OS X Server
K Service Source
Hot Issues
Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh
Server G3 (Blue and White)
Hot Issues
Introduction - 1
Introduction
This chapter is designed to highlight unique or high-priority
product issues that you should be aware of before servicing
the Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and
White) computer. Note: To avoid confusion with other
products called “G3,” Service Source and Price Pages
documentation added the words “Blue and White” after the
product name.
This chapter alerts you to important issues and provides
pointers to other areas in the manual where more complete
information can be found.
To familiarize yourself with a new product family, always
read the Basics chapter in its entirety. You should also refer
to the Troubleshooting chapter for basic theory of
operations information.
Hot Issues
Processor Module vs. Card - 2
Processor Module vs. Card
Whereas previous Power Macintosh computers featured a
user-installable processor card, this logic board uses a
processor module that must not be removed by the customer
(see “Processor Module” in the Take Apart chapter).
Processor Module Jumper
The Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 logic board
has a processor module jumper installed at J25. The
processor jumper is color coded for the speed of processor
module used (yellow jumper for 450 MHz, white jumper
for 400 MHz, blue jumper for 350 MHz, and black jumper
for 300 MHz). Failure to install the correct jumper may
result in a computer that won’t boot up. (See “Jumper
Location”) in the Troubleshooting chapter.
Hot Issues
Warranty Sticker - 3
Warranty Sticker
There is a warranty sticker that covers the processor
module jumper. The customer’s warranty is void if this
sticker is tampered with. Apple-authorized service
providers must replace this sticker if they have removed it
during servicing to protect the customer’s warranty. (See
“Processor Module” in the Take Apart chapter.)
Power Supply Voltage Setting
There is a switch on the back of the power supply that
controls the voltage setting. The voltage switch must be set
correctly to avoid damaging the computer. (See “Voltage
Switch” in the Basics chapter for more information,
including an international voltage chart.)
Hot Issues
I/O Card - 4
I/O Card
Some I/O functions on the Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh
Server G3 logic board are handled through a removable I/O
card that must be installed for the computer to operate
properly.
SDRAM DIMMS
The DIMM modules used in any previous Power Macintosh or
Power Macintosh G3 computer model are not compatible
with the Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 (Blue
and White) computers described in this manual. The SDRAM
DIMM modules for these computers must be PC-100
compliant,168-pin, 3.3-volt, unbuffered, and rated at 125
MHz (8 ns) or faster.
Hot Issues
SDRAM DIMMS - 5
Characteristics of the memory to be used in Power Macintosh
G3/Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and White) are:
• PC-100 SDRAM
• 3.3 Volt unbuffered only
• 168-pin module
• Data width = 64 bits wide
• Contains a correctly programmed Serial Presence Detect
ROM (256 bytes)
• Sizes of 32 MB, 64 MB, 128 MB in 64 Mbit technology are
qualified.
• Sizes of 128 MB and 256 MB in 128 Mbit technology are
qualified.
• Maximum DIMM height £ 2.0"
• PC-100 SDRAM includes a sticker that clearly shows “PC100”
Hot Issues
SDRAM DIMMS - 6
Do not use:
• parity SDRAM DIMMs.
• ECC (error correcting) SDRAM DIMMs.
• registered or buffered SDRAM
• DIMMs with fewer than 4 or more than 16 devices
(irrespective of any PC-100 sticker or claims)
(For more information see “SDRAM DIMMs” in the Basics
chapter or refer to the Memory Guide.)
“PC-100” is an Intel-driven standard for DIMMs compatible
with Intel 100 MHz systems. Intel requires prominent
marking of the DIMM as PC-100, and requires the speed
code to be listed as well. Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh
Server G3 (Blue and White) is compatible with 3-2-3
(slowest), 3-2-2, and 2-2-2 (fastest) speed codes. Power
Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and White) will
read the presence detect ROM for information about all the
Hot Issues
SDRAM DIMMS - 7
DIMMs installed in the machine, and set memory timing
equal to the slowest DIMM.
Therefore, for maximum performance use only 2-2-2 speed
codes. However, the difference in application performance
between the speed codes is small. Power Macintosh G3/
Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and White) typically ships with
a single 3-2-2 DIMM. This may change over time.
Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and
White) is not compatible with all defined PC-100 DIMM
sizes and organizations. In particular, do not use DIMMs
using 256 Mbit SDRAMs; also, do not use DIMMs employing
32-bit-wide SDRAMs.
Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and
White) cannot use the older EDO or Fast Page Mode DRAMs.
In general, you will not be able to re-use DRAM from past
Macintosh computers (8500, 8600, PM G3, iMac) in your
Hot Issues
SDRAM DIMMS - 8
Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and
White). However, there have been some recent efforts to
qualify PC100 SDRAM for later versions of G3.
Zero MB of memory is soldered to the Power Macintosh G3/
Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and White) main logic board. If
the all four of the DIMM slots are empty, the machine will
not operate. A single-frequency tone will be generated
indicating that no memory is installed.
The DRAM DIMMs can be installed one or more at a time.
There are no performance gains when two DIMMs of the
same size are installed. Any supported size DIMM can be
installed in any DIMM slot, and the combined memory of all
of the DIMMs installed will be configured as a contiguous
array of memory.
Using all four of the Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server
G3 (Blue and White) DRAM DIMM slots, the maximum
Hot Issues
SGRAM Video Memory - 9
memory configuration will be 1024 Mbytes (1.0 gigabyte).
When using 256 MB DIMMs in a Power Macintosh G3/
Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and White), be sure that the
device technology that comprises the DIMM is 128 Mbit and
not 64 Mbit or 256 Mbit.
SGRAM Video Memory
The Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and
White) computer does not include built-in video RAM nor a
slot for video RAM expansion on the main logic board. The
accelerated graphics card installed in the computer includes
16 MB of SDRAM video memory and does not support video
RAM expansion.
K Service Source
Basics
Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh
Server G3 (Blue and White)
Basics
Overview - 1
Overview
The Power Macintosh G3
computer is Apple’s leading
performance and multiple
configuration system for
creative content customers.
This Power Macintosh G3
provides a fast system
architecture supported by
improved and faster
microprocessors, memory
access, PCI bus, and I/O.
Click the movie icon at the
left to view a QuickTime VR
movie of the Power
Macintosh G3.
Basics
Features - 2
Features
There are standard features available with every Power
Macintosh G3 computer, as well as configure-to-order
features that are optional. The standard and optional features
are listed below:
• Microprocessor : PowerPC G3 microprocessor running at
a clock frequency of 300 MHz, 350 MHz, 400 MHz, or
450 MHz depending on model and configuration.
• Cache: 512K or 1 MB of backside second-level (L2)
cache on processor module. The cache runs at half the
clock frequency of the microprocessor.
• Processor system bus:
64-bit-wide data and 32-bitwide address, 100 MHz clock, supporting split address
and data tenures.
Basics
Features - 3
• RAM: Four DIMM slots for 168-pin industry standard
SDRAM (synchronous dynamic access memory) DIMMs
(dual inline memory modules). Maximum memory with
all four slots occupied is 1024 MB.
• ROM: New World ROM-in-RAM implementation with 1
MB of BootROM.
• Graphics acceleration:
2D and 3D hardware graphics
acceleration using the ATI RAGE 128 GL graphics
controller on the 66 MHz 2D/3D accelerated graphics
card. Software support through Macintosh QuickDraw 3D
and QuickDraw 3D RAVE (rendering acceleration virtual
engine) APIs.
• Sound: Supports 16 bits/channel stereo input and
output on built-in 3.5mm line-level stereo input and
output jacks, one built-in speaker.
Basics
Features - 4
• Hard drives: Standard Macintosh configurations include one
internal Ultra ATA hard drive, or one, two, or three internal
Ultra2 LVD SCSI drives.
• Expansion bays:
Three expansion bays, one of which is
occupied by an Ultra DMA/33 hard drive or one Ultra2 LVD
SCSI drive. Two bays are available for adding other devices
connected to a PCI controller card.
• CD-ROM drive: Internal 24x or 32x ATAPI CD-ROM drive.
• DVD-ROM drive:
Optional ATAPI DVD-ROM drive providing
support for 32x-speed CD-ROM and 5x-speed DVD-ROM
media, as well as DVD-Video playback with DVD MPEG2 decode
module. The DVD MPEG2 decode module is connected to the PCI
graphics card in DVD configurations.
Basics
Features - 5
• Zip drive: Optional 100 MB ATAPI Zip drive. If the Zip
drive option is not installed at the time of purchase, data
and power connectors are provided to add an ATAPI Zip
drive to the system. A bezel for the Zip configuration will
need to be installed. The Zip device should be deviceselect jumpered as Device 1.
• USB ports: The computer comes with two USB ports, a
USB mouse, and a USB keyboard that has two additional
USB ports.
• ADB port: One ADB port for ADB devices or ColorSync
control of Apple monitors.
• Ethernet: Built-in Ethernet port for a 10Base-T and
100Base-TX operation with an RJ-45 connector.
• FireWire ports:
Two IEEE-1394 high-speed serial
FireWire ports, which support transfer rates of 100,
200, and 400 Mbps.
• Modem: Optional Apple 56Kbps modem. The modem
supports K56flex and V.90 modem standards.
Basics
Features - 6
• Keyboard: Apple USB keyboard with function keys and
inverted-T cursor motion keys. It is also a bus-powered
USB hub with two USB ports.
• Mouse: Apple USB mouse operating as a low-speed (1.5
Mbps) USB device.
• PCI card expansion slots:
Three slots for 33 MHz,
32-bit or 64-bit, up to a 12-inch PCI card; one slot for
a 66 MHz 32-bit PCI card, normally occupied by the
accelerated graphics card.
• Power switch: Soft power controlled from the Apple
USB keyboard and front power button.
• Voltage switch:
Can be set to either 115 for voltages of
100–130 V or 230 for voltages of 200–250 V,
depending on the voltage where the computer is installed.
The voltage selection must be set manually.
Basics
Features - 7
• Fan speed control:
The speed of the fan is thermally
controlled and is automatically set to the lowest possible
speed to minimize noise. The fan speed varies according
to the temperature inside the enclosure. This is a
function provided by the fan, and is not under software
control.
• Energy saving: Sleep, startup, and shutdown scheduling
can be controlled with an Energy Saver control panel.
Basics
Configure-to-Order - 8
Configure-to-Order
The build-to-order options that follow are available from
the Apple Store. For more information view the build-toorder options online at the following address: http://
store.apple.com.
• internal 56K modem
• Ultra SCSI PCI card that comes with a 50-pin-to-25pin SCSI adapter
• Ultra2 LVD SCSI PCI card, single channel
• Ultra2 LVD SCSI PCI card, dual channel
• DVD-RAM (ATAPI) drive
• Gigabit Ethernet PCI card
• 36 GB Ultra2 LVD SCSI hard drive
Basics
Front and Rear View - 9
Front and Rear View
Basics
Right Side View - 10
Right Side View
Basics
Left Side View - 11
Left Side View
Basics
Internal Locator - 12
Internal Locator
Power Supply
CD-ROM/DVD-ROM
Drive Bay
Zip Drive (optional)
Fan
Drive Bay 1
Drive Bay 2
Drive Bay 3
Monitor Card
Logic Board
Basics
I/O Panel/Rear View - 13
I/O Panel/Rear View
FireWire Ports (2)
Lockable Cover Latch
(ADB) Port
Ethernet Port
(10/100
Twisted-pair)
Internal Modem Card
(optional)
USB Ports (2)
Monitor Port
(PCI Slot 1 or 2)
Sound Input Port
Expansion Slots
(PCI slots 2-4)
Sound Output Port
Lock Down Location
Basics
Logic Board Diagram - 14
Logic Board Diagram
Monitor Card Slot
Sound In &
Sound Out
Ports
USB
Ports
A&B
PCI Slots
Ethernet Connector
ADB
Firewire Ports (2)
J1 IDE
Modem
Connector
J15
Ultra2 ATA
J23 Power
S5 Power Button
S4 Cuda Button
SDRAM
DIMM Slots
VOID Warrenty
Seal if Broken
Battery
J8 CD Audio
J31 Processor J34
J25
Front Panel
Plug-In Speaker Jumper Block
Board
Slot
(w/sticker)
J2 Firewire
Power
Basics
RAM Expansion - 15
RAM Expansion
The Power Macintosh G3 logic board provides four PC-100 DIMM
slots, supporting a maximum of 256 MB per DIMM, for a total of
1 GB.
Compatible DRAM DIMMs must meet all the following
specifications:
• PC-100 Synchronous DRAM (SDRAM)
• 3.3 volt
• 64-bit wide, 168-pin module
• maximum of 16 memory devices on the DIMM
• unbuffered; do not use registered or buffered Synchronous
DRAM (SDRAM)
• maximum height of 2.0 inches
DIMMs from older Macintosh computers may physically fit in the
slots, but they are not compatible and should not be used.
Basics
RAM Expansion - 16
Note: Zero MB of memory is soldered to the Power Macintosh
G3 logic board. If all four of the DIMM slots are empty, the
machine will not operate. A single-frequency tone will be
generated indicating that no memory is installed.
No Video RAM Expansion
The Power Macintosh G3 computer does not include built-in
video RAM nor a slot for video RAM expansion on the main logic
board. The accelerated graphics card that will be installed in the
computer includes 16 MB of SDRAM video memory and does not
support video RAM expansion.
Basics
RAM Expansion - 17
No L2 Cache Expansion
The back-side L2 cache is integrated into the design of the
microprocessor module. No cache expansion is possible
without replacing the entire module.
Basics
DVD-ROM and DVD MPEG2 Decode Card Module - 18
DVD-ROM and DVD MPEG2 Decode
Card Module
The DVD-ROM drive configuration includes an DVD MPEG2
decode card module. The DVD MPEG2 decode card module
supports viewing DVD video movies on a monitor connected
to the 15-pin video output port on the PCI 2D/3D
accelerated graphics card. DVD digital audio from the DVD
media is sent to a DAC (digital-to-analog converter) and
then to the Burgundy IC for analog stereo sound output to the
currently selected sound output port.
Basics
Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) - 19
Peripheral Component Interconnect
(PCI)
The Power Macintosh G3 computer includes four PCI
expansion slots. Three of the slots are 5V, 64-bit, 33 MHz
slots that support both 32-bit and 64-bit PCI cards that are
compliant with the PCI V2.1 specification. The other slot, is a
3.3V, 32-bit, 66 MHz slot dedicated to a 2D/3D accelerated
graphics card.
The 66 MHz PCI slot conforms to the PCI V2.1 specification
with the exception that its clock speed is fixed at 66 MHz so it
does not accept 33 MHz cards. The 66 MHz PCI slot is keyed
for 3.3 V only operation. Older 5 V cards cannot be installed in
the 66 MHz PCI slot.
The 3.3 V 66 MHz PCI graphics card that comes installed in
the 66 MHz PCI slot cannot be used in a 33 MHz PCI slot.
Basics
Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) - 20
Expansion Card Power Requirements
The combined power consumption of expansion cards must
not exceed the limits specified for the Macintosh model. To
avoid damaging the computer and expansion card, do not
install any expansion card without first checking the
documentation for that card.
You can use the three 33 MHz expansion slots to install:
• three 15 W cards
• one 15 W or 25 W card
• two 15 W or 25 W cards
• one 15 W card and one 25 W card
Basics
Drives Installed - 21
Drives Installed
There are five internal drive bays. Three are in the lower part of
the computer and two are in front on top. In many configurations, a
single hard drive is installed in the lower part of the computer,
and a CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, or DVD-RAM drive and Zip drive fill
the upper bays.
The computer supports additional drives, which fit in the lower
part of the computer. Depending on the configuration purchased,
one or two additional SCSI drives or an additional ATA drive can go
in the unoccupied lower drive bays. (Some drives also require a
PCI card to function.) Note that the Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh
Server G3 (Blue and White) supports a maximum of three internal
hard drives.
Basics
Drives Installed - 22
The computer provides support for the following types of internal
hard drives:
• ATA devices (includes ATA, ATA-2, and ATA-3 devices, which
are also called IDE or EIDE devices)
• Ultra ATA devices (sometimes called ATA-4 devices)
• Fast SCSI (with the PCI card)
• Ultra SCSI (with the PCI card)
• Standard SCSI (with the PCI card)
• Wide Ultra SCSI devices (with the PCI card included in some
configurations)
• Ultra2 LVD SCSI devices (with the PCI card included in some
configurations)
• ATAPI drives, including CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, DVD-RAM, and
Zip drives
Standard Macintosh configurations include one internal Ultra ATA
hard drive, or one, two, or three internal Ultra2 LVD SCSI
drives.
Basics
Drives Installed - 23
Ultra ATA Drives
The Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and White)
can accommodate either one or two internal Ultra ATA drives in
the lower part of the computer, drive bay 3. (The U-shaped
carrier, available for version 2 enclosures, allows installation of
two ATA drives, stacked vertically.)
Ultra2 LVD SCSI Drives
If the computer has at least one internal Ultra2 LVD SCSI drive, a
PCI card and cable inside the computer, it is possible to connect
additional internal and external Ultra2 LVD SCSI devices. You can
connect up to three internal SCSI drives or connect additional
SCSI devices to the port the card provides on the rear of the
computer.
If the computer came with one Ultra2 LVD SCSI drive, it is
Basics
Drives Installed - 24
installed in the lower part of the computer in drive bay 1,
near the front of the computer. If it came with two drives, the
second one is installed in drive bay 2. If a third drive is
installed, it’s in drive bay 3. The factory sets the drive in
bay 1 to start up. The startup drive can be changed in the
control panel.
Additional internal Ultra2 LVD SCSI devices connect to the
data cable supporting the drive that came with the computer.
This cable has a built-in terminator so you don’t need to add
one.
You must assign a SCSI ID number to every additional device
and the number must not conflict with the ID number already
assigned to a drive on the SCSI chain. If the computer came
with one Ultra2 LVD SCSI drive, it has ID 0. If the Macintosh
came with two drives, they have ID 0 and 1. A third factoryinstalled drive has ID 2. The SCSI PCI card has ID 7.
Basics
Drives Installed - 25
Other Types of SCSI Drives
The SCSI card inside the Power Macintosh G3 supports other
types of Wide Ultra SCSI drives, as well as Ultra2 LVD SCSI
devices. However, if you mix the different kinds, the system
will operate at the speed of the slowest device. If you want
optimal performance using the card, use only Ultra2 LVD
SCSI devices. To maintain optimal performance using
another kind of SCSI device, add a PCI card that supports the
device.
Basics
Drives Installed - 26
ATAPI CD-ROM Drive
The Power Macintosh G3 computer has a 24x- or 32x-speed
internal ATAPI CD-ROM drive. The CD-ROM drive supports
the worldwide standards and specifications for CD-ROM and
CD-digital audio discs described in the Sony/Philips Yellow
Book and Red Book. The drive can read CD-ROM, CD-ROM
XA, CD-I, and PhotoCD discs as well as play audio discs.
The CD-ROM drive has a sliding tray to hold the disc. The
drive features a mechanism that supports 4x, 8x, 12x, and
24x data transfer rates and a data buffer that further
enhances performance. The CD is configured as device 0
(master) in an ATA Device 0/1 (master/slave)
configuration.
0=master
1=slave
Basics
Drives Installed - 27
Optional ATAPI Zip Drive
The Zip drive is an ATAPI drive and is connected as device 1
(slave) in an ATA Device 0/1 (master/slave) configuration
on the ATA-3 channel of the main logic board.
Optional DVD-ROM Drive
The optional DVD-ROM drive is fully compatible with existing
CD-ROM media. The drive supports CD-ROM at 32x speed
maximum and DVD at 5x constant linear velocity (CLV). The
DVD-ROM drive supports the following disc formats:
• DVD-ROM (one- or two-layer, one- or two-sided)
• CD-ROM (modes 1 and 2), CD-ROM XA (mode 2, forms 1
and 2)
• CD-Audio, Photo CD, CD-RW, CD-R, CD-Extra
• CD-I (mode 2, forms 1 and 2), CD-I Ready, CD-I Bridge
• Video CD
Basics
I/O Ports - 28
I/O Ports
ADB Port
The Power Macintosh G3 computer has an Apple Desktop Bus
(ADB) port for ADB devices and ColorSync control of Apple
monitors. The ADB port is functionally the same as on other
Macintosh computers.
USB Ports
The Power Macintosh G3 computer has two Universal Serial
Bus (USB) ports that are used to connect the keyboard and
mouse as well as additional I/O devices such as printers,
scanners, and low-speed storage devices. The USB ports take
the place of the serial I/O ports found on earlier Macintosh
computers. The Power Macintosh G3 uses a USB keyboard and
Basics
I/O Ports - 29
mouse similar to the USB keyboard and mouse introduced
with the iMac computer.
Keyboard
The computer comes with an Apple USB keyboard. An
extension cable is provided for installations where the
computer is located on the floor or away from the
immediate desktop area.
Mouse
The Apple USB mouse is designed to work with the
computer by way of the USB ports. The mouse case is round
and has the same two-tone color design as the case of the
computer.
Basics
I/O Ports - 30
FireWire Ports
The computer includes two external FireWire IEEE 1394
ports on the rear panel of the enclosure. The features of the
FireWire ports are:
• high-speed serial I/O supports 100, 200, and 400 Mbps
(megabits per second)
• provide 15 watts of power when the computer system is
on
• accepts external power input on FireWire bus when
system is off
No SCSI Ports
The Power Macintosh G3 computer does not include built-in
internal or external SCSI device connectors. Adding an
internal or external SCSI device requires the use of a SCSI PCI
card.
Basics
I/O Ports - 31
Ethernet Port
The Power Macintosh G3 computer has a built-in 10/100
Mbps Ethernet port. The user can connect it to either a
10Base-T or a 100Base-TX hub; the port will automatically
recognize which type of hub is connected.
The connector for the Ethernet port is a an RJ-45 connector
on the back of the computer.
The Ethernet interface in the Power Macintosh G3 computer
conforms to the ISO/IEC 802.3 specification, where
applicable.
Basics
Internal Modem - 32
Internal Modem
The Power Macintosh G3 computer includes an option for an
internal modem. The modem interface to the main logic
board is a 70-pin connector. The external I/O connector for
the modem is an RJ-11 connector located on the rear of the
computer. The modem has the following features:
• modem bit rates up to 56 Kbps (supports K56flex and
V.90 modem standards)
• fax modem bit rates up to 14.4 Kbps
The modem appears to the system as a serial port that
responds to the typical AT commands. The modem provides
a sound output for monitoring the progress of the modem
connection.
Basics
Sound - 33
Sound
The Power Macintosh G3 is not configured as a typical AVstyle Power Macintosh in that it does not have RCA jacks for
sound in and out, nor additional video in and out ports.
Instead is relies on external FireWire devices for providing
advanced audio/video capabilities.
Sound System
The sound system for the Power Macintosh G3 computer
supports 44.1 kHz 16-bit stereo sound output and input,
available simultaneously.
Like other AV-class Macintosh computers, the sound
circuitry and system software can create sounds digitally
and either play the sounds through speaker inside the
enclosure or send the sound signals out through the sound
Basics
Sound - 34
output jack. The Power Macintosh G3 computer also records
sound from several sources: an analog sound source
connected to the line-level sound input jack, analog sound
from the modem card connected to the internal modem
connector, or a compact disc in the CD-ROM player. With
each sound input source, sound playthrough can be enabled
or disabled.
Sound Output
The Power Macintosh G3 computer provides one 3.5-mm
mini jack for sound output on the back of the enclosure. The
output jack is connected to the sound amplifier; the mini
jack is intended for connecting a pair of headphones or
amplified external speakers. Inserting a plug into the sound
output mini jack disconnects the internal speaker. The
enclosure has one built-in speaker.
Basics
Sound - 35
The Burgundy IC provides the stereo sound output to both
the internal speakers and the sound output jack. The sound
output jack has the following electrical characteristics:
• output sound signal to noise ratio (SNR) <90 dB
unweighted (typical) when sound playback is from
system hard disk drive or main memory
• output sound SNR <80 dB unweighted (nominal) when
playback is from CD
• overall output sound SNR <90 dB unweighted (typical)
Sound Input
The Power Macintosh G3 computer provides a stereo sound
input jack on the back of the enclosure for connecting an
external PlainTalk microphone or other sound source. The
sound input jack accepts a standard 3.5-mm stereophonic
phone plug (two signals plus ground).
Basics
Sound - 36
Note: The Apple PlainTalk microphone requires power from
the main computer, which it obtains by way of an extra-long,
4-conductor plug that makes contact with a 5-volt pin inside
the sound input jack.
The sound input jack has the following electrical
characteristics:
• input impedance: 20 kW
• maximum input level without distortion: 2.5 V peak to
peak (Vpp) maximum
• line-level microphone voltage range of 0.28 V to 2.1 V
peak to peak
• input SNR <90 dB unweighted (typical) for recording to
system hard disk drive or system main memory
Basics
Sound - 37
Digitizing Sound
The sound circuitry digitizes and records sound as 44.1 kHz
16-bit samples. If a sound sampled at a lower rate on
another computer is played as output, the Sound Manager
transparently upsamples the sound to 44.1 kHz prior to
outputting the audio to the Burgundy sound IC.
The preferred sound sampling rate for output is specified in
the Monitors and Sound control panel when the sound input
is not in use. The preferred output sampling rate is
overridden by the setting of the input sampling rate,
because the input and output sampling rates are physically
locked together. The sound output sampling rate is always
44.1 kHz.
When recording sound from a microphone, applications that
are concerned about feedback should disable sound
playthrough by calling the Sound Manager APIs.
Basics
- 38
The Burgundy IC provides separate sound buffers for input
and for stereo output so that the computer can record and
send digitized sound to the sound outputs simultaneously.
Basics
The Cuda Chip - 39
The Cuda Chip
The Cuda is a microcontroller chip. Its function is to:
• Turn system power on and off.
• Manage system resets from various commands.
• Maintain parameter RAM (PRAM).
• Manage the Apple Desktop Bus (ADB).
• Manage the real-time clock.
Many system problems can be resolved by resetting the Cuda
chip (see Symptom Charts for examples). Press the Cuda
reset button on the logic board to reset the Cuda chip. (The
Cuda reset button (S4) is near the battery. See “Logic Board
Diagram” earlier in this chapter.) If you continue to
experience system problems, refer to “Resetting the Logic
Board” in the Troubleshooting chapter.
Basics
Resetting the Logic Board - 40
Resetting the Logic Board
Resetting the logic board can resolve many system problems
(refer to “Symptom Charts” for examples). Whenever you
have a unit that fails to power up, you should follow this
procedure before replacing any modules.
1
Unplug the computer.
3
Disconnect the power supply cable from the logic board
and then press the Power On button. (See “Logic Board
Diagram” later in this chapter to locate the Power On
button.)
2
4
5
Remove the battery from the logic board.
Wait at least 10 minutes before replacing the battery.
Make sure the battery is installed in the correct +/direction.
Basics
Resetting the Logic Board - 41
6
Reassemble the computer and test the unit.
Note: This procedure resets the computer’s PRAM. Be sure
to check the computer’s time/date and other system
parameter settings afterwards.
Basics
Voltage Switch - 42
Voltage Switch
The power supply is not self-configuring for different input
voltages. The voltage switch is delivered preconfigured for
the input voltage of the region in which the unit is originally
purchased. If the computer is moved to another location
where the input voltage is different, a voltage switch must
be adjusted to accommodate the voltage change. The switch
has two positions that support voltage ranges of 100 to 130
V or 220 to 270 V.
Basics
Repair Strategy - 43
Repair Strategy
Service the Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3
(Blue and White) computers through module exchange and
parts replacement. Customers can request on-site service
from an Apple Authorized Service Provider Plus (AASP+)
Apple Assurance (US only), or Apple Canada Technical
Answerline (Cananda only). They can also choose carry-in
service from an AASP.
Ordering
Apple service providers planning to support the computer
systems covered in this manual may purchase service
modules and parts to develop servicing capability. To order
parts, use the AppleOrder (US only) or ARIS (Canada only)
system and refer to the Power Macintosh G3 (Blue and
Basics
Repair Strategy - 44
White) and Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and White) “Service
Price Pages.”
Large businesses, universities, and K-12 accounts must
provide a purchase order on all transactions, including
orders placed through the AppleOrder (US only) or ARIS
(Canada only) system.
USA Ordering
US service providers not enrolled in AppleOrder may fax
their orders to Service Provider Support (512-9088125) or mail them to:
Apple Computer, Inc.
Service Provider Support
MS 212-SPS
Austin, TX 78714-9125
Basics
Repair Strategy - 45
For US inquiries, please call Service Provider Support at
800-919-2775 and select option #1.
Canadian Ordering
Canadian Service providers not enrolled in ARIS may fax
their orders to Service Provider Support in Canada
(800-903-5284). For Canadian inquiries, please call
Service Provider Support at 905-513-5782 and select
option #3.
Basics
Warranty/AppleCare/ARIS - 46
Warranty/AppleCare/ARIS
US Only
Power Macintosh G3 computers are covered under the Apple
One-Year Limited Warranty. The AppleCare Service Plan is
also available for these products. Service Providers are
reimbursed for warranty and AppleCare repairs made to
these computers. For pricing information, refer to “Service
Price Pages.”
Canada Only
Power Macintosh G3 computers are covered under
AppleCare. The Extended AppleCare Service Plan is also
available for these products. Service Providers are
reimbursed for warranty and AppleCare repairs made to
these computers. For pricing information, refer to “Service
Price Pages.”
K Service Source
Specifications
Power Macintosh G3 /
Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and White)
Specifications
Introduction - 1
Introduction
Specifications information for this product can be found in the Spec Database, which you can
access at Service Source Online (http://service.info.apple.com) or on Service Source CD.
Spec Database at Service Source Online
From the Service Source Online home page, click Troubleshoot and Repair to access the main
repair procedures page. Then click either Apple Spec in the navigation table in the upper
right corner of the page, or click Apple Spec Database from the list of reference tools below.
Spec Database on Service Source CD
Open the CD and double-click the Apple Spec Database alias located at the top level of the CD.
Note: Specifications for the hard drives available for the Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh
Server G3 (Blue and White) are on the following pages.
Specifications
Hard Drive Specifications
6 GB - 5400 rpm drive
Typical Seek Times: 2 ms
Average: <10 ms
Track-to-Track: 2 ms
Full Stroke: 20 ms
Average Rotational Latency: 5.56 ms
Rotational Speed: 5400 rpm
Internal Data Rate: up to 132 MB/s
Data Transfer Rates (Buffer-to-Host)
ATA
PIO Mode 4: 16.6 MB/sec
DMA Mode 2: 16.6 MB/sec
Ultra DMA/33: 33.3 MB/s
Hard Drive Specifications - 2
Specifications
Ultra SCSI-3: 20 MB/s
Buffer Size: 128 KB
Typical Power On to Drive Ready: 15 s
12G - 5400 rpm drive
Typical Seek Times: 2 ms
Average: 9.5 ms
Track-to-Track: 2 ms
Full Stroke: 18 ms
Average Rotational Latency: 5.56 ms
Rotational Speed: 5400 rpm
Internal Data Rate
Fireball EX: Up to 187 MB/s
Fireball EL: Up to 162 MB/s
Hard Drive Specifications - 3
Specifications
Hard Drive Specifications - 4
Data Transfer Rates (Buffer-to-Host)
ATA
Ultra DMA/33: 33.3 MB/s
PIO Mode 4: 16.6 MB/s
DMA Mode 2: 16.6 MB/s
Buffer Size (Ultra ATA): 512 MB
Typical Power On to Drive Ready: 9.5 s
9 GB SCSI Drives
IBM Hard Drives - DDRS - 34560 / 39130 DDRS - 34560 / 39130
7200 rpm drive
Data buffer (read, look ahead buffer, write cache): 512 KB (see note 2)
Rotational speed: 7200 RPM
Latency (average): 4.17 ms
Media transfer rate: 108.6 to 171.1 Mbps
Specifications
Hard Drive Specifications - 5
Interface transfer rate (SCSI max): 20 MB/s, 40 MB/s, and 80 MB/s (see note 3)
Minimum sustained data rate: 8.3 to 13.3 MB/s and 8.4 to 13.4 MB/s
Seek time (typical read)
Average: 7.5 ms
Track-to-track: 0.8 ms
Full track: 15.0 ms
10,000 rpm drive
Media data rate (banded): 187.2 to 243.7 Mbps
Internal formatted transfer rate 17.5 to 23.3 MB/s
Interface transfer rate (max): 80 MB/s, 160 MB/s, 200 MB/s
Access times (pop. avg.)
Average read: 5.3/6.5 ms
Track-to-track read: 0.7 ms
Rotational speed: 10 020 rpm
Latency (average): 2.99 ms
Buffer size: 4.0 MB
Specifications
Hard Drive Specifications - 6
Configuration
Interface Fast, Fast Wide, SCA-2, SCSI-3 (ULTRA) Fast & Wide, SCA-2, ULTRA-2 SCSI
Formatted capacity (512 bytes): 9.1 GB
Number of disks: 5
Number of heads: 10
Areal density (maximum): 1.56 Gbit/sq. inch
Recording density (maximum): 156 KB/sq. inch
Recording zones: 8
User cylinders: 8420
Track density
Sector size: 512 Bytes
Channel: PRML
Encoding method: RLL (17)
Head type: Magnetoresistive Extended (MRX)
Performance
Data buffer (read, look ahead buffer, write cache): 512 KB (see note 2)
Rotational speed: 7200 rpm
Specifications
Hard Drive Specifications - 7
Latency (average): 4.17 ms
Media transfer rate: 108.6 to 171.1 Mbps
Interface transfer rate (SCSI max) 20 MB/s, 40 MB/s, 80 MB/s (see note 3)
Minimum sustained data rate: 8.3 to 13.3 MB/s, 8.4 to 13.4 MB/s
Seek time (typical read)
Average: 7.5 ms
Track-to-track: 0.8 ms
Full track: 15.0 ms
Reliability
Non recoverable read errors: < 10 in 10E14 bits read
PFA/S.M.A.R.T.: Yes
Power
Startup current (average) 0.27 A (5 V), 2.00 A (12 V)
Idle (average) 5.3 to 7.1 W
Specifications
Power consumption
Efficiency index 0.0012 to 0.0008 W/MB (see note 4)
Physical dimensions
Height: 25.4 mm
Width: 101.6 mm
Depth: 146.0 mm
Mass (max.): 630 g
Environmental characteristics
Operating
Temperature: 5° to 55° C
Relative humidity (non condensing): 8 to 90 percent
Shock (half-sine wave): 10 G (11 ms), 65 G (2 ms)
Vibration (random) horizontal: 0.67 G (5 to 500 Hz)
Vibration (random) vertical: 0.56 G (5 to 500 Hz)
Hard Drive Specifications - 8
Specifications
Hard Drive Specifications - 9
Non-Operating
Temperature: 0° to 65° C
Relative humidity (non condensing): 5 to 95 percent
Shock (half-sine wave): 75 G (11 ms), 175 G (2 ms)
Vibration (random) horizontal: 1.04 G (2 to 200 Hz)
Vibration (random) vertical: 1.04 G (2 to 200 Hz)
Notes
1. MB = 1,000,000 Bytes; 1 GB = 1,000,000,000 Bytes
2. Upper 128 KB used for firmware
3. 40 MB/s represents SCSI-3 Fast-20 and Wide
4. Idle power dissipation/formatted capacity
K Service Source
Take Apart
Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh
Server G3 (Blue and White)
Take Apart
- 1
Tools
• Flatblade screwdriver
• Phillips screwdriver
• Allen wrench (2.5 mm), to remove the power supply,
side panels, top and rear handles, and front and rear
supports
• Jeweler’s screwdriver, to remove the I/O panel cover
• Needlenose pliers, to remove the right and left side
panels
• ESD Mat
Take Apart
Opening the Computer - 2
Opening the
Computer
No preliminary steps are
required before you begin
this procedure.
Take Apart
Opening the Computer - 3
1
2
Lift the latch to unlock
the right side panel.
Note: Make sure
security bar is in the
unlock position.
Gently lower the side
panel onto a clean, ESDsafe mat, to avoid
scratching the case.
Lower the side panel
until it lies flat.
Take Apart
Logic Board - 4
Logic Board
Before you begin, open the
side access panel and remove
the following:
• PCI cards (if present)
• video card
• FireWire board (if
present)
• modem (if present)
Take Apart
Logic Board - 5
1
2
Disconnect all the cables
from the logic board.
Using a Phillips
screwdriver, remove
the logic board mounting
screws and standoff that
attaches to the FireWire
board (if present).
Take Apart
Logic Board - 6
3
4
Tilt the logic board so
that the ports clear the
openings in the I/O
panel.
Lift the board out of the
computer.
Important: If you are
replacing the logic board,
you must transfer the
processor module,
processor jumper, and
DRAM from the original
logic board to the
replacement board. See the
Take Apart instructions for
the “Processor Module” for
more information. You must
Take Apart
Logic Board - 7
also cover the processor
jumper with a new
warranty sticker, which
comes with the replacement
logic board. This sticker
must be in place to protect
the customer’s product
warranty.
Note: Before returning the
logic board to Apple, remove
the processor module,
processor jumper block and
warranty sticker, DRAM,
the Video I/O card, and any
PCI cards (if present).
Take Apart
Hard Drive, IDE /ATA - 8
Hard Drive, IDE /
ATA
Before you begin, open the
side access panel.
Note: This computer can
accommodate either one or
two internal Ultra ATA
drives in the lower part of
the computer, drive bay 3.
(The U-shaped carrier,
available for version 2
enclosures, allows
installation of two ATA
drives, stacked vertically.)
Take Apart
Hard Drive, IDE /ATA - 9
Hard Drive Carriers: Version 1 and Version 2
(Flat and U-shaped)
Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 computers use
three different hard drive carriers for installing drives in
the lower part of the unit. The version 1 carrier extends the
width of the computer and holds up to three drives. The
version 2 flat carrier is the width of a single drive; up to
three carriers can be installed in the computer. The version
2 U-shaped carrier is also the width of a single drive but
can carry up to two drives, vertically stacked. The U-shaped
carrier can be installed only in drive bay 3 and only in a
version 2 enclosure with a revision 2 logic board.
Version 1 and 2 carriers require unique Take Apart
procedures. Before beginning a drive procedure, check the
type of carrier installed. Then proceed to the corresponding
version 1 or 2 steps included on the following pages.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, IDE /ATA - 10
Version 1
1
l
2
3
4
Disconnect the main
power cable and the
Ultra ATA hard drive
data cable from the logic
board.
Disconnect the hard
drive power cable (P3)
from the back of the hard
drive in bay 3.
Remove the screw
securing the retainer to
the hard drive carrier.
Remove the hard drive
retainer.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, IDE /ATA - 11
5
Slide the carrier toward
the rear of the computer
to unhook the carrier
tabs from the chassis
slots. Lift the carrier
and drive out of the
chassis.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, IDE /ATA - 12
6
7
Remove the four screws
from the underside of the
hard drive carrier.
Lift the hard drive off
the carrier.
Note: Return drives
without cables or carriers.
Exchange Apple hard drive
modules in Apple packaging.
Failure to comply with this
requirement may result in a
packaging noncompliance
charge. Refer to the parts
database for more
information.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, IDE /ATA - 13
Version 2
Note: The procedure illustrated here shows a drive
attached to the version 2 flat
carrier. The procedure is
similar for removing drives
attached to a version 2 Ushaped carrier. See the
Replacement Notes at the end
of this topic for additional
steps related to the Ushaped carrier.
1
Disconnect the Ultra ATA
hard drive data cable and
the hard drive power
cable (P3) from the
hard drive.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, IDE /ATA - 14
2
Remove the hard drive
carrier mounting screw.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, IDE /ATA - 15
3
4
Pull the drive carrier
back and lift up at an
angle to release the
carrier tabs from the
slots in the chassis.
Remove the carrier and
drive from the
computer.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, IDE /ATA - 16
5
6
If you’re returning the
drive to Apple, remove
the screws that mount
the hard drive to the
carrier.
Lift the hard drive from
the carrier.
Note: Return drives without
cables or carriers. Exchange
Apple hard drive modules in
Apple packaging. Failure to
comply with this requirement may result in a packaging noncompliance charge.
Refer to the service parts
database for more
information.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, IDE /ATA - 17
Replacement Note: To install
two drives in the version 2
U-shaped carrier, install
the first drive in the bottom
of the carrier. Then place
the second drive in the
carrier’s upper bay and
attach screws through the
sides of the carrier into the
sides of the drive. Note that
tightening screws on the left
side of the carrier bends the
arms of the carrier into the
drive, holding it securely.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, IDE /ATA - 18
Replacement Note: When
reconnecting a dual-drive
ATA cable to drives installed
in a U-shaped carrier, be
sure to attach the end
connector to the drive in the
bottom of the carrier.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, Ultra2 LVD SCSI - 19
Hard Drive, Ultra2
LVD SCSI
Before you begin, open the
right side access panel.
Note: If the unit has at least
one internal Ultra2 LVD
SCSI drive, an Ultra2 LVD
SCSI PCI card, and a data
cable inside the computer,
you can connect additional
internal and external Ultra2
LVD SCSI devices. The data
cable that came with the
computer supports up to
three internal SCSI drives;
this cable has a built-in
Take Apart
Hard Drive, Ultra2 LVD SCSI - 20
terminator so you don’t need
to add one. You can connect
external Ultra2 LVD SCSI
devices to the port on the
rear of the computer.
If the computer came with
one Ultra2 LVD SCSI drive,
it is installed in the lower
part of the computer in
drive bay 1, near the front
of the computer. If it came
with two drives, the second
one is installed in bay 2. If a
third drive is installed, it’s
in bay 3. Usually the
computer uses the drive in
bay 1 to start up.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, Ultra2 LVD SCSI - 21
Drive
Front
Pin 1
Jumper
SCSI ID = 0
SCSI ID = 1
SCSI ID = 2
SCSI ID = 3
SCSI ID = 4
You must assign a SCSI ID
number to every additional
device and the number must
not conflict with the ID
number already assigned to a
drive on the SCSI chain. One
factory-installed drive has
ID 0; a second factoryinstalled drive has ID 1; a
third drive has ID 2. The
SCSI PCI card has ID 7. See
the illustration for placing
the jumper for ID 1 and 2.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, Ultra2 LVD SCSI - 22
Hard Drive Carriers: Version 1 and Version 2
(Flat and U-shaped)
Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 computers use
three different hard drive carriers for installing drives in
the lower part of the unit. The version 1 carrier extends the
width of the computer and holds up to three drives. The
version 2 flat carrier is the width of a single drive; up to
three carriers can be installed in the computer. The version
2 U-shaped carrier is also the width of a single drive but
can carry up to two drives, vertically stacked. The U-shaped
carrier can be installed only in drive bay 3 and only in a
version 2 enclosure with a revision 2 logic board.
Version 1 and 2 carriers require unique Take Apart
procedures. Before beginning a drive procedure, check the
type of carrier installed. Then proceed to the corresponding
version 1 or 2 steps included on the following pages.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, Ultra2 LVD SCSI - 23
Version 1
1
Disconnect the Ultra2
SCSI data cable from the
Ultra2 SCSI card.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, Ultra2 LVD SCSI - 24
2
3
4
Disconnect the main
power cable and the SCSI
hard drive power cable
(P5).
Replacement Note:
The power cables attach
to drives as follows:
P5 attaches to bay 1
P2 attaches to bay 2
P3 attaches to bay 3
Remove the screw on the
hard drive retainer.
Remove the hard drive
retainer.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, Ultra2 LVD SCSI - 25
5
Pull the hard drive
carrier toward the rear
of the computer to
unhook the carrier from
the chassis.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, Ultra2 LVD SCSI - 26
6
7
8
Lift the carrier and
drive out of the chassis.
Remove the SCSI data
cable and terminator
(black plastic housing)
from the top of the SCSI
drive in bay 1. The SCSI
cable and terminator are
attached to the top of the
drive with double-stick
foam tape.
Disconnect the SCSI
cable from the back of
the SCSI drive(s).
Take Apart
Hard Drive, Ultra2 LVD SCSI - 27
9
If you’re returning the
drive to Apple, remove
the four screws from the
hard drive carrier.
10 Lift the hard drive from
the carrier.
Note: Return drives
without cables or carriers.
Exchange Apple hard drive
modules in Apple packaging.
Failure to comply with this
requirement may result in a
packaging noncompliance
charge. Refer to the service
parts database for more
information.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, Ultra2 LVD SCSI - 28
Version 1 Carrier
Replacement
1
2
3
Make sure any cables
underneath the hard
drive carrier are lying
flat in place.
Install the drive carrier
in the computer.
Align the carrier tabs on
the front of the carrier
with the chassis slots.
Push down and forward
on the carrier as you
slide it into the slots
until the pin locks into
position.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, Ultra2 LVD SCSI - 29
4
5
Install the hard drive
retainer and screw into
place.
Connect all cables to the
hard drive(s).
P5 attaches to bay 1
P2 attaches to bay 2
P3 attaches to bay 3
Take Apart
Hard Drive, Ultra2 LVD SCSI - 30
Version 2
Note: The procedure illustrated here shows a drive
attached to the version 2 flat
carrier. The procedure is
similar for removing drives
attached to a version 2 Ushaped carrier, except that
the U-shaped carrier is
installed only in drive bay
3. See the Replacement Note
at the end of this topic for
additional steps related to
the U-shaped carrier.
1
Disconnect the Ultra2
LVD SCSI cable from the
Ultra2 LVD SCSI card.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, Ultra2 LVD SCSI - 31
2
Disconnect the SCSI hard
drive power cable (P5).
Caution: Pull the SCSI
power cable straight out
of the connector on the
drive. Any up or down
motion to the connector
could damage the drive.
3
Replacement Note:
The power cables attach
to drives as follows:
P5 attaches to bay 1
P2 attaches to bay 2
P3 attaches to bay 3
Disconnect the Ultra2
LVD SCSI data cable from
the hard drive.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, Ultra2 LVD SCSI - 32
4
Remove the hard drive
carrier mounting screw.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, Ultra2 LVD SCSI - 33
5
6
Pull the drive carrier
back and lift up at an
angle to release the
carrier tabs from the
slots in the chassis.
Remove the carrier and
drive from the
computer.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, Ultra2 LVD SCSI - 34
7
If you’re returning the
drive to Apple, remove
the SCSI data cable and
terminator (black
plastic housing) from
the top of the drive. The
cable and terminator are
attached to the drive
with double-stick foam
tape.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, Ultra2 LVD SCSI - 35
8
9
If you’re returning the
drive to Apple, remove
the four screws from the
hard drive carrier.
Lift the hard drive from
the carrier.
Note: Return drives
without cables or carriers.
Exchange Apple hard drive
modules in Apple packaging.
Failure to comply with this
requirement may reslut in a
packaging noncompliance
charge. Refer to the service
parts database for more
information.
Take Apart
Hard Drive, Ultra2 LVD SCSI - 36
10 If you’re replacing the
thermal pad on the
drive, remove the old
pad and apply the new
pad to the same area on
the drive.
Important: Before
installing a new 36 GB
Ultra2 LVD SCSI IBM
drive, you must apply a
thermal pad in the area
illustrated.
Replacement Note: To install
two drives in the version 2
U-shaped carrier, install
the first drive in the bottom
of the carrier. Then place
Take Apart
Hard Drive, Ultra2 LVD SCSI - 37
the second drive in the
carrier’s upper bay and
attach screws through the
sides of the carrier into the
sides of the drive. Note that
tightening screws on the left
side of the carrier bends the
arms of the carrier into the
drive, holding it securely.
Take Apart
Carrier Support Plate - 38
Carrier Support
Plate
Note: Perform this
procedure only on units with
a version 2 chassis and only
if you must replace the
support plate or the cables
below the plate.
Before you begin, do the
following:
• Open the side access panel
• Remove the hard drive in
drive bay 1
Take Apart
Carrier Support Plate - 39
1
Remove the two support
plate mounting screws
from the bottom of the
unit.
Take Apart
Carrier Support Plate - 40
2
Lift the plate at an angle
and remove it from the
computer.
Take Apart
Video Card and DVD Decoder Module - 41
Video Card and
DVD Decoder
Module
Before you begin, do the
following:
• Open the side access
panel.
• Remove the external video
cable.
Note: The video card is
always installed in the short
PCI slot, slot 1. The slot
numbers are stamped on the
rear access I/O panel.
Take Apart
Video Card and DVD Decoder Module - 42
1
If a DVD decoder module
is installed and you are
replacing it, remove the
module by pulling it
straight off the card.
Take Apart
Video Card and DVD Decoder Module - 43
2
3
Remove the video card
mounting screw.
Gently lift up on the
video card to remove it
from the PCI slot.
Take Apart
Ultra2 LVD SCSI Card - 44
Ultra2 LVD SCSI
Card
Before you begin, open the
side access panel.
Take Apart
Ultra2 LVD SCSI Card - 45
1
2
3
Remove the Ultra2 LVD
SCSI card mounting
screw.
Disconnect the Ultra2
LVD SCSI cable from the
PCI card.
Note: Make sure no
other cable is attached
(externally, or on the
second internal
connector if using the
dual channel SCSI PCI
card).
Gently lift up on the
Ultra2 LVD SCSI card to
remove it from the PCI
slot.
Take Apart
FireWire Board - 46
FireWire Board
Before you begin, open the
side access panel.
Take Apart
FireWire Board - 47
1
2
3
4
Remove the screw
securing the FireWire
board to the I/O panel.
Remove the screw that
secures the FireWire
board to the metal
standoff.
Disconnect the FireWire
cable, the short 3-pin
cable from the back of
the FireWire board or
logic board.
Gently lift up the
FireWire board to
remove it from the logic
board connector.
Take Apart
Modem - 48
Modem
Before you begin, open the
side access panel.
Note: The modem is a buildto-order option or upgrade
kit. If you’re installing a
modem upgrade kit, refer to
the “Modem Installation”
section in the Upgrades
chapter. If you are
removing or replacing a
faulty modem, continue with
these procedures.
Take Apart
Modem - 49
1
2
Remove the screw (located
next to the modem port)
that secures the modem to
the I/O panel.
Remove the screw that
secures the modem leg
standoff to the logic board.
Take Apart
Modem - 50
3
4
Carefully disconnect the
flexible modem cable
from the logic board.
Important: The modem
cable is very fragile.
Gently lift up the
modem, to remove it
from the logic board.
Note: If the modem is
being replaced, continue
with the Take Apart
procedures to remove
the modem from the
bottom modem shield.
Take Apart
Modem - 51
5
6
With a jeweler’s
screwdriver, pry the
metal tabs up on the top
shield.
Carefully disconnect the
flexible modem cable
from the modem board.
Take Apart
Modem - 52
7
Remove the screw
securing the modem to the
bottom shield.
Take Apart
Modem - 53
8
Note: There are two tiny
metal tabs on the inside of
the bottom shield. The
modem rests on these tabs
so the modem does not
make contact with the
bottom shield.
With a needlenose pliers,
pinch the tiny metal tabs
flat so the modem board
can be removed from the
bottom shield.
Take Apart
Modem - 54
9. Carefully spread the
sides of the bottom shield
out just enough so the
modem clears the tabs,
and starts to fall out of
the bottom shield.
10. Carefully remove the
modem from the bottom
shield.
Replacement Note: After
replacing an international
modem, use the Modem
Country Selector utility to
set the modem to the correct
country.
Take Apart
Processor Module - 55
Processor Module
Before you begin, open the
side access panel.
Take Apart
Processor Module - 56
1
Remove the screw that
attaches the heatsink
ground cable to the logic
board.
Replacement Note: If
the heatsink has a
braided cable, before
reattaching it, push the
two ends together to flex
it. Then arrange the
cable so that the crimps
in each end are at right
angles to each other,
with the crimp in the
chassis end of the cable
pointing at the I/O end of
the logic board.
Take Apart
Processor Module - 57
The heatsink
may be hot to the touch.
±Warning:
2
3
While pressing down on
the top of the heatsink
clip, use a small
flatblade screwdriver to
lift up and out on the
front tab of the clip to
release the heatsink clip.
Remove heatsink clip.
Take Apart
Processor Module - 58
4
Lift the heatsink off of
the processor module.
Take Apart
Processor Module - 59
5
Lift the lever to release
the processor module.
Take Apart
Processor Module - 60
6
Handle the processor by
the edges and gently lift
it straight up to remove.
Be careful not to bend
the pins underneath the
module.
Important: If you are only
replacing the processor
module, stop here. If,
however, you are removing
the processor module in
order to replace the logic
board, continue on to the
next page.
Take Apart
Processor Module - 61
7
Remove the warranty
sticker and jumper
block if replacing the
logic board only.
yellow jumper:450 MHz
white jumper: 400 MHz
blue jumper: 350 MHz
black jumper: 300 MHz
Caution: When removing
the jumper, be sure not to
leave its inner metal clips
on the old jumper connector.
If the clips are left behind,
install a new jumper on the
new board. If you use a
jumper without clips, the
unit could fail to start up.
Take Apart
Processor Module - 62
Important: When replacing
the processor module, you
must change the processor
jumper block and warranty
sticker to be compatible
with the new processor
module. Failure to install
the jumper block properly
will result in a unit that
does not power on. See the
instructions on the following
page.
Take Apart
Processor Module - 63
8
Processor
Jumper
Block
350MHz
MHz 400
400MHz
MHz 450 MHz
300
300MHz
MHz 350
Blue
Blue
White
White Yellow
Black
Black
Install the jumper as
shown. Be sure to cover
the pins as shown and to
install the jumper block
with the gold connector
pins facing toward the
board.
Replacement Note: Position
the processor module over
the slot, seat it evenly, and
press down gently on the
module to install it. Never
use force or you may damage
the connector pins on the
underside. Flip down the
lever to secure the module.
Take Apart
Processor Module - 64
Install a gap filler on a new
processor.
Caution: On modules with
capacitors, make sure all
capacitors show through the
opening in the gap filler.
Replace the heatsink, insert
the clip onto the tab at the
rear of the module, swing
the clip over the heatsink,
and secure the front latch.
Take Apart
SDRAM DIMM - 65
SDRAM DIMM
Before you begin, open the
side access panel.
Take Apart
SDRAM DIMM - 66
1
2
Push down on the
connector clips to unlock
the DIMM.
Lift the memory module
out of the slot.
Take Apart
CD-ROM/DVD-ROM/DVD-RAM/Zip Drive Bezel - 67
CD-ROM/DVDROM/DVD-RAM/
Zip Drive Bezel
Before you begin, open the
side access panel.
Take Apart
CD-ROM/DVD-ROM/DVD-RAM/Zip Drive Bezel - 68
1
2
From inside of the
chassis, behind the front
panel, push the two bezel
tabs forward to release
the drive bezel from the
front panel.
Disconnect the bezel
from the hinge on the
front left side to remove
the bezel from the
computer.
Take Apart
CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, or DVD-RAM Drive - 69
CD-ROM, DVDROM, or DVDRAM Drive
Before you begin, do the
following:
• Open the side access
panel.
• Remove the CD-ROM/
DVD-ROM/DVD-RAM/Zip
drive bezel.
Take Apart
CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, or DVD-RAM Drive - 70
1
Remove the two screws
on the drive carrier. The
drive carrier is removed
from the computer as a
unit. The drives are
attached to the carrier.
Take Apart
CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, or DVD-RAM Drive - 71
2
3
4
From inside the chassis,
push the drive carrier
forward about one inch.
Disconnect the following
cables from the back of
the CD-ROM, DVD-ROM,
or DVD-RAM drive:
• power cable (P7)
• IDE data cable
• audio cable
Disconnect the following
cables from the back of
the Zip drive (if
present):
• power cable (P6)
• IDE data cable
Take Apart
CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, or DVD-RAM Drive - 72
5
6
Continue sliding the
drive carrier out of the
computer. Important:
The drive carrier may
be difficult to push
forward due to the EMI
gasket and tape located on
the underside of the
carrier (directly below
the Zip drive).
When the carrier is out
of the computer, remove
the EMI shield from the
back of the CD-ROM,
DVD-ROM, or DVD-RAM
drive.
Take Apart
CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, or DVD-RAM Drive - 73
Note: Perform the
following procedure if you
are replacing the CD-ROM,
DVD-ROM, DVD-RAM, or
Zip drive.
7
8
Using a Phillips
screwdriver, remove
the four drive carrier
mounting screws.
Slide the drive(s) out of
the carrier.
Replacement Note: The
DVD-RAM drive is not as
tall as the CD-ROM and
DVD-ROM drives. Before
screwing the DVD-RAM
Take Apart
CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, or DVD-RAM Drive - 74
drive back into the carrier,
lift the back of the drive
slightly so that the drive is
flush against the carrier.
Replacement Note: When
inserting the drive carrier
into the computer, make
sure the carrier tab slides
into the hole on the
stationary drive shelf.
Take Apart
Zip Drive - 75
Zip Drive
If removing the Zip drive,
follow the procedures for
removing the CD-ROM or
DVD-ROM Drive.
Important: The Zip/CD-ROM
drive carrier may be difficult to push forward after
removing the screws on the
bezel. The EMI gasket/tape
on the underside of the drive
carrier (directly below the
ZIP drive), holds the
carrier securely in place.
Continue pushing forward
until the carrier is released.
Take Apart
Fan - 76
Fan
Before you begin, open the
side access panel.
Take Apart
Fan - 77
1
2
3
Remove the two screws
on the fan bracket.
Pull the fan bracket
down to access the
power-to-fan connector.
Disconnect the powerto-fan connector.
Take Apart
Fan - 78
4
Lift fan bracket out of
the computer.
Replacement Note: The
fan bracket has two holes
(on the top) that join with
two tabs on the chassis. If
the tabs aren’t inserted in
the holes, the screws that
secure the fan bracket to the
chassis won’t align
properly.
Take Apart
Fan - 79
Perform the following
procedure only if you are
replacing the fan.
5
6
Using a Phillips
screwdriver, remove
the four screws securing
the fan to the fan
bracket.
Lift the fan from the fan
bracket.
Take Apart
Power Supply - 80
Power Supply
Before you begin, do the
following:
• Open the side access
panel.
• Remove the CD/DVDROM/Zip bezel.
• Move the CD/DVD-ROM/
Zip drive carrier forward
1 inch.
Take Apart
Power Supply - 81
1
Disconnect the following
power cables:
• cables P6 and P7,
going to the CD-ROM/
Zip drive
• cable P4 going to the
front panel board
• main power cable
going to the logic board
• cable(s) to other hard
drives (if present)
Take Apart
Power Supply - 82
2
Using a 2.5 mm allen
wrench, remove the
three screws on the rear
vented panel.
Take Apart
Power Supply - 83
3
4
On the inside of the
chassis, remove the
screw that attaches the
power supply to the
power supply shelf.
Slide the power supply
forward, towards the
front of the computer.
Manuever the power
supply (clearing the
security bar on the
inside and upper
chassis) and its cables
out of the chassis.
Note: If you are replacing
the power supply, remove
the power supply bracket
Take Apart
Power Supply - 84
and reattach it to the new
power supply.
Replacement Note: You must
set the power supply voltage
switch to the correct setting
(115V in the U.S.) to avoid
damaging the computer.
Take Apart
Handle, Top Front - 85
Handle, Top Front
No preliminary steps are
required before you begin
this procedure.
Take Apart
Handle, Top Front - 86
1
2
Using a 2.5 mm allen
wrench, remove the two
allen screws.
Lift the handle from the
computer.
Take Apart
Handle, Top Front - 87
Replacement Note: When
installing the handles (top
front and top rear) orient
them so that the three tiny
bumps on the handle are in
the orientation shown in the
photo. The handle won’t fit
if it’s turned upside down.
The top front and top rear
handles are interchangeable.
Take Apart
Handle, Top Rear - 88
Handle, Top Rear
No preliminary steps are
required before you begin
this procedure.
Take Apart
Handle, Top Rear - 89
1
2
Using a 2.5 mm allen
wrench, remove the two
allen screws.
Lift the handle from the
computer.
Replacement Note:
See prededing
replacement note for
orientation of the
handles under “Handle,
Top Front.”
Take Apart
Panel, Top - 90
Panel, Top
Before you begin, remove
the following:
• top front handle
• top rear handle
Take Apart
Panel, Top - 91
1
2
Slide the top panel back,
towards the power
supply, to unhook the
tabs.
Lift the top panel from
the chassis.
Take Apart
Panel, Front - 92
Panel, Front
Before you begin, remove
the following:
• top front handle
• lower front support
• lower front panel
• CD-ROM/DVD-ROM/Zip
drive bezel
When the
lower support is removed,
the computer can be
unstable.
±Warning:
Take Apart
Panel, Front - 93
1
Open the side access
panel. Locate the front
panel tabs.
Take Apart
Panel, Front - 94
2
3
Using a screwdriver,
carefully push the tabs
inward to release them
from the chassis.
Pull the front panel off
the chassis.
Take Apart
Panel, Rear, Vented - 95
Panel, Rear,
Vented
Before you begin, remove
the following:
• top rear handle
• lower rear support
When the
lower support is removed,
the computer can be
unstable.
±Warning:
Take Apart
Panel, Rear, Vented - 96
1
2
3
Open the side access
panel.
Remove the three 2.5
mm allen screws.
Push in on the six tabs to
release the panel from
the chassis.
Take Apart
Panel, Rear, Vented - 97
4
Once the tabs are
released, carefully pull
the rear panel forward
to remove.
Take Apart
Panel, Side, Right - 98
Panel, Side, Right
Before you begin, remove
the following:
• PCI cards (if present)
• video card
• FireWire board (if
present)
• modem (if present)
• logic board
Take Apart
Panel, Side, Right - 99
1
Remove the four 2.5 mm
allen screws on the side
panel.
Take Apart
Panel, Side, Right - 100
2
3
Open the side access
panel.
Remove the two Phillips
screws attaching the side
chassis frame to the
panel latch.
Take Apart
Panel, Side, Right - 101
4
5
Using a flatblade
screwdriver or
needlenose pliers, push
or squeeze the plastic
tabs (protruding
through the side chassis
panel), to release the
right panel from the
metal chassis.
Remove the right side
panel off the chassis.
Take Apart
Panel, Side, Left - 102
Panel, Side, Left
No preliminary steps are
required before you begin
this procedure.
Take Apart
Panel, Side, Left - 103
1
Remove the four 2.5 mm
allen screws on the side
panel.
Take Apart
Panel, Side, Left - 104
2
3
Open the side access
panel.
Remove the fan screws
and drop the fan bracket
down to access the
plastic panel tabs
(protruding through the
side chassis) on the left
side panel.
Take Apart
Panel, Side, Left - 105
4
5
Using a needlenose
pliers, squeeze the tabs
(located behind the fan
bracket) to release the
left side panel from the
metal chassis.
Lift the left side panel
off the chassis.
Take Apart
Panel, Latch - 106
Panel, Latch
Before you begin, open the
side access panel and remove
the following:
• PCI cards (if present)
• video card
• FireWire board (if
present)
• modem (if present)
• logic board
• I/O panel
Take Apart
Panel, Latch - 107
1
2
3
Remove the four Phillips
screws holding the panel
to the chassis.
Note: Yellow arrows
indicate tab locations.
Slide the panel toward
the hard drives, freeing
the latch panel from the
tabs on the chassis.
Remove the latch panel.
Take Apart
Panels, Lower Front and Lower Rear - 108
Panels, Lower
Front and Lower
Rear
Before you begin, do the
following:
• Place the computer on its
side.
• Remove the front and/or
rear support.
When the
lower support is removed,
the computer can be
unstable.
±Warning:
Take Apart
Panels, Lower Front and Lower Rear - 109
Note: The computer is
shown upside down.
1
Lift the lower front
panel or the lower rear
panel from the chassis.
There are no screws
holding these panels to
the chassis. The front
and rear supports (legs)
hold them in place.
Important: These
panels are keyed. The
notch goes on the access
panel side.
Take Apart
Supports, Front and Rear - 110
Supports, Front
and Rear
Before you begin, place the
computer on an ESD mat and
turn the unit upside down.
When the
lower supports are
removed, the computer can
be unstable.
±Warning:
Take Apart
Supports, Front and Rear - 111
1
Using a 2.5 mm allen
wrench, remove the four
allen screws, two screws
for each support.
Take Apart
Supports, Front and Rear - 112
2
Lift the support off the
computer.
Take Apart
Panel, I/O Cover - 113
Panel, I/O Cover
Before you begin, do the
following:
• Open the side access
panel.
• Remove the logic board.
Take Apart
Panel, I/O Cover - 114
1
2
Remove the two screws
on the I/O panel.
Push the I/O panel
inward to remove it
from the chassis frame.
Take Apart
Panel, I/O Cover - 115
Note: The I/O cover is
difficult to remove, take
your time prying the plastic
tabs.
3
Using a jeweler’s
screwdriver, working
from right to left,
carefully pry the
plastic tabs away from
the metal frame. As each
tab is released, pull the
I/O cover away from the
frame.
Take Apart
Speaker - 116
Speaker
Before you begin, do the
following:
• Open the side access
panel.
• Remove the hard drive
carrier.
• Disconnect the main
power cable from the
logic board.
Take Apart
Speaker - 117
1
Open the cable clamps.
3
Free the cable from the
cable clamps and the fan
bracket.
2
Disconnect the speaker
cable from the logic
board at J34.
Take Apart
Speaker - 118
4
5
6
Push the speaker tab in
and pull the speaker
housing back to release.
Remove the speaker
housing from the
computer.
Remove the speaker
from the speaker
housing. Note: The
speaker and speaker
housing are separate
parts.
Take Apart
Front Panel Board - 119
Front Panel Board
Before you begin, do the
following:
• Open the side access
panel.
• Remove the hard drive
carrier to access the
front panel cable.
• Disconnect the main
power cable from the
logic board.
Take Apart
Front Panel Board - 120
1
Disconnect the front
panel cable, J2 cable
(FireWire), and open
the cable clamps.
Take Apart
Front Panel Board - 121
2
3
4
Using a screwdriver,
press tabs in on the
front panel shield.
Pull the front panel
shield away from the
chassis.
Disconnect the three
cables attaching to the
front panel board.
Replacement Note:
Power cable P4 connects
to the front panel board.
Take Apart
Front Panel Board - 122
5
Push in and pry up on
the three tiny metal tabs
to release the front panel
board from the front
panel shield.
Take Apart
I/O Panel - 123
I/O Panel
Before you begin, do the
following:
• Open the side access
panel.
• Remove the logic board.
Take Apart
I/O Panel - 124
1
Remove the two screws
on the I/O panel.
Take Apart
I/O Panel - 125
2
Tilt the I/O panel
forward and remove.
K Service Source
Troubleshooting
Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh
Server G3 (Blue and White)
Troubleshooting
General/Block Diagram - 1
General
Block Diagram
Troubleshooting
General/Architecture of the Main Logic Board - 2
Architecture of the Main Logic Board
The architecture of the main logic board is based on the PowerPC
G3 microprocessor and these buses: the processor bus, two PCI
buses, a primary 32-bit 66 MHz bus, and a secondary 64-bit 33
MHz bus. The processor bus connects the microprocessor, cache,
and main memory; the primary PCI bus is for an Apple graphics
card solution; the secondary PCI bus connects the I/O devices. The
I/O devices on the secondary PCI bus are:
• Ultra DMA/33 (ATA-4) disk interface
• USB interface
• FireWire interface
• Paddington I/O controller IC
• PCI 33.33 MHz 64-bit slots #2, #3, and #4
• DEC/Intel 21154 PCI-PCI bridge IC
Troubleshooting
General/Logic Board Diagram - 3
Logic Board Diagram
Monitor Card Slot
PCI Slots
Sound In &
Sound Out
Ports
USB
Ports
A&B
Ethernet Connector
ADB
Firewire Ports (2)
J1 IDE
J15
Ultra2 ATA
Modem
Connector
J23 Power
S5 Power Button
S4 Cuda Button
SDRAM
DIMM Slots
Battery
J8 CD Audio
J31 Processor J34 J25
J2 Firewire
Front Panel Plug-In Speaker Jumper Block Power
Board
Slot
(w/sticker)
Troubleshooting
General/Logic Board Troubleshooting - 4
Logic Board Troubleshooting
Power-On Self Test
There is a power-on self test that resides in the ROM of the Power
Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and White). This test
automatically runs whenever the Power Macintosh G3 is powered
on after being fully shut down (the power-on self test does not run
if the machine is only restarted). If a problem is detected during
the test, you will not hear a normal startup chime. Instead, the
system will beep as explained below.
• 1 Beep: No RAM is installed or detected.
• 2 Beeps: Incompatible RAM types are installed (for example,
both SDRAM and EDO installed).
• 3 Beeps: No RAM banks passed memory testing.
• 4 or 5 Beeps: Bad checksum for the remainder of the boot ROM
block. The ROM is bad and probably cannot be fixed.
Troubleshooting
General/Logic Board Troubleshooting - 5
Resetting the Cuda Chip
The Cuda is a microcontroller chip. Its function is to
• Turn system power on and off.
• Manage system resets from various commands.
• Maintain parameter RAM (PRAM).
• Manage the real-time clock.
Many system problems can be resolved by resetting the Cuda chip
(see the Symptom/Cure tables for examples). Press the Cuda
reset button on the logic board to reset the Cuda chip. The Cuda
reset button is located on the logic board to the right of the
battery. Refer to the Logic Board Diagram earlier in this chapter
for location information. If you continue to experience system
problems, refer to “Resetting the Logic Board” in this chapter.
Troubleshooting
General/Logic Board Troubleshooting - 6
Resetting the Logic Board
Resetting the logic board can resolve many system problems (see
the Symptom/Cure tables for examples). Whenever you have a
unit that fails to power up, you should follow this procedure
before replacing any modules.
1. Unplug the computer.
2. Press the Power On button on the front of the unit.
3. Open the side access panel.
4. Remove the battery from the logic board.
5. Wait at least 10 minutes before replacing the battery.
6. Make sure the battery is installed in the correct +/direction.
7. Reassemble the computer and test the unit.
Troubleshooting
General/Logic Board Troubleshooting - 7
Note: This procedure resets the computer’s PRAM. Be sure to
check the computer’s time/date and other system parameter
settings afterwards.
Logic Board Battery
The battery on the logic board controls the stored system settings,
such as date and time. It is important to note that the battery does
not affect power at startup.
The battery should be replaced if your system loses date and time
settings.
Note: The Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and
White) uses a lithium battery that must be disposed of in
accordance with hazardous waste regulations.
Troubleshooting
General/Logic Board LEDs - 8
Logic Board LEDs
There are seven LEDs on the Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh
Server G3 (Blue and White) computer. A graphic follows that
identifies their logic board location.
DS1 = ATA drive activity
If a CD and/or Zip are attached to the ATA bus, this LED will
illuminate at power/on restart time for a few seconds. After that,
it is unlikely it will illuminate again in a trouble-free system. If
this light stays on for a prolonged period, this is a sign of trouble
on the ATA bus. If devices are connected to the ATA bus and this LED
is dark at boot time, that is also likely a sign of trouble. If a hard
disk drive were attached to this bus, the LED would flicker
regularly indicating drive activity (reads/writes).
Note: There is no DS2 or DS3 on the board
Troubleshooting
General/Logic Board LEDs - 9
DS4 and DS5 = USB power for downstream devices
DS5 = USB port 1- lower
DS4 = USB port 2- upper
When illuminated, these LEDs indicate that the computer is
providing power (+5 V) to downstream USB ports. USB devices do
not need to be connected in order for these LEDs to illuminate.
However, if one or both of the LEDs is not illuminated and a USB
device is/was attached (and the system has completed its boot
process), then the logic board has removed downstream power
because of a trouble condition.
Since the downstream power is controlled individually for each
port, it is possible to have these LEDs in a different state: one off
and one on. This way if one port has troubled USB devices, the
other port can still be functional. These LEDs are not immediately
illuminated at the beginning of a restart or cold power-on. During
Troubleshooting
General/Logic Board LEDs - 10
a successful/normal boot, the sequence will look like:
1. Unit is powered on and other LEDs will illuminate while DS4
and DS5 are off.
2. Then DS4 and DS5 on for a second or two
3. Then off very briefly (1 sec)
4. Then back on (confirms secondary PCI bus is initialized and
power now available)
These two LEDs are often useful when troubleshooting an
unpredictable system. If they stay on (step 4) then the secondary
PCI bus has been initialized which happens relatively late in the
boot/hardware initializing process.
DS6 = Ultra ATA bus activity
DS6 indicates Ultra ATA bus activity.
Troubleshooting
General/Logic Board LEDs - 11
DS7 & DS8 = Power Indication
In a working unit, these LEDs should be in sync with each other:
both on or both off. If one LED is on and the other is off, there is a
problem.
DS9 = CPU Bus Request
When illuminated, this LED indicates that the CPU is requesting
the bus. This LED will rarely glow as brightly as the others (like
the Ultra ATA LED) given that the CPU is not always requesting the
bus, and when it does, the period of time is short. As a result, you
may need to watch this LED much more carefully than the others to
tell if there is activity. If this LED is ever on continuously and
bright, then the system is troubled and likely hung.
Troubleshooting
General/Logic Board LEDs - 12
Logic Board LEDs Locator
DS1
DS4
DS6
DS7
DS8
DS9
DS5
Troubleshooting
General/Processor and Jumper Block - 13
Processor and Jumper Block
The logic board comes with a removable processor module. The
processor should rarely fail and should be replaced only as a last
resort. Processor modules can be ordered from Service.
The jumper block you place at location J25 configures the board
to work with different processor modules. Use the appropriate
jumper block, identified by color, for each processor module.
Yellow jumper: 450 MHz
White jumper: 400 MHz
Blue jumper: 350 MHz
Black jumper: 300 MHz
Note that when you replace the logic board on a Power Macintosh
G3 (Blue and White), you must also change the processor jumper
block and warranty sticker to be compatible with the processor
Troubleshooting
General/Processor and Jumper Block - 14
module. Failure to install the jumper block properly will result
in a unit that does not boot up.
Refer to “Processor Module” in Take Apart for processor and
jumper installation instructions.
Note: The jumper block is protected by a void-warranty sticker.
End users are not allowed to remove this jumper block. If the
sticker has been tampered with on a unit you receive for repair,
do not honor the service warranty on the system.
Troubleshooting
General/PCI Expansion Slots - 15
PCI Expansion Slots
The logic board uses the industry-standard peripheral component
interconnect (PCI) bus for an I/O expansion bus. The Power
Macintosh G3 has a primary 66 MHz bus and a secondary 33 MHz
PCI bus. The 66 MHz bus is a 32-bit multiplexed address and data
bus. The 33 MHz bus is a 64-bit multiplexed address and data bus.
The primary PCI bus, includes slot #1 (see graphic below),
which accommodates only 32-bit 66 MHz +3.3V PCI cards.
However, the Power Macintosh G3 computer is always configured
with an Apple 2D/3D accelerated graphics card installed in slot
#1, therefore it is not available for PCI card expansion unless the
card is removed.
The secondary PCI bus includes slots #2, #3, and #4 (see
graphic below), which accommodate both 32-bit and 64-bit 33
MHz +5V or 3.3V PCI cards. The logic board accepts standard
Troubleshooting
General/PCI Expansion Slots - 16
6.88-inch and 12.283-inch PCI cards as defined by the PCI Local
Bus Specification, Revision 2.1. PCI cards are required to use the
standard ISA fence described in the specification.
The PCI slots support all the required PCI signals and certain
optional PCI signals. The three 33 MHz PCI slots on the logic board
support the optional 64-bit bus extension signals and cache
support signals.
A total of 15 watts of power is provided for each of the PCI
expansion slots. Both 5 volts and 3.3 volts are supplied; the total
power consumed by both voltages must not exceed the 15-watt
maximum.
Video I/O Card
Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and White)
computers require an I/O card that moves video from the main
logic board. These cards are placed in slot #1 on the main logic
Troubleshooting
General/PCI Expansion Slots - 17
board. (The slots are labeled on the back of the I/O panel cover.) If
the card is not seated correctly, different symptoms appear. Look
in the Symptom Charts for details on troubleshooting these cards.
Note: The computer will boot up without the video I/O card
installed, but they will not operate properly.
Cleaning Procedure for Card Connectors
It is possible for residue to build up on the gold edge connector
pins on some PCI cards, which could cause a variety of symptoms.
If you are having problems with a PCI card, inspect the connector
pins with a magnifying glass. If you find residue, use a pencil
eraser to gently clean the pins. Remember, never handle the PCI
cards by the gold connectors.
Troubleshooting
General/SDRAM Do’s and Don’ts - 18
SDRAM Do’s and Don’ts
Note: The Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and
White) can only use PC-100 SDRAMs, which include a sticker
that clearly shows “PC-100.” Sizes of 32 MB, 64 MB, 128 MB
in 64 Mbit technology are qualified; sizes of 128 MB and 256 MB
in 128 Mbit technology are qualified.
Make sure the SDRAMs are
• PC-100 SDRAM
• 3.3 Volt unbuffered only
• 168 pin modules
• maximum DIMM height ≤ 2.0 inches
• data width = 64 bits wide
The SDRAMs must also contain a correctly programmed Serial
Presence Detect ROM (256 bytes).
Troubleshooting
General/SDRAM Do’s and Don’ts - 19
Do not use:
• parity SDRAM DIMMs
• ECC (error correcting) SDRAM DIMMs
• registered or buffered SDRAM
• DIMMs with fewer than 4 or more than 16 devices
(irrespective of any PC-100 sticker or claims)
The Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and White)
is not compatible with all defined PC-100 DIMM sizes and
organizations. In particular, do not use DIMMs using 256 Mbit
SDRAMs; also, do not use DIMMs employing 32-bit wide SDRAMs.
The Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and White)
cannot use the older EDO or Fast Page Mode DRAMs. In general, you
will not be able to re-use DRAM from past Macintoshes (8500,
8600, PM G3, iMac) in your Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh
Server G3 (Blue and White). However, there have been some
Troubleshooting
General/SDRAM Do’s and Don’ts - 20
recent efforts to qualify PC100 SDRAM for earlier versions of G3.
Zero MB of memory is soldered to the Power Macintosh G3/
Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and White) main logic board. If all
four of the DIMM slots are empty, the machine will not operate. A
single-frequency tone will be generated indicating that no
memory is installed.
The DRAM DIMMs can be installed one or more at a time. There are
no performance gains when two DIMMs of the same size are
installed. Any supported size DIMM can be installed in any DIMM
slot, and the combined memory of all of the DIMMs installed will
be configured as a contiguous array of memory.
Troubleshooting
General/Power Supply Verification - 21
Power Supply Verification
The Power Macintosh G3 (Blue and White) logic board requires a
“trickle” power of +5V to start up. If the system fails to start up,
follow the procedure outlined below to determine whether the
problem is related to the power supply.
Note: To verify the power supply, you will need a volt meter.
Verification Procedure
Follow the procedures in the Take Apart chapter to access the
power supply.
Important: For this verification procedure when connecting the
volt meter leads to specific pins, ensure the power supply cable
remains securely plugged into the power supply 20-pin
connector on the logic board.
Troubleshooting
General/Power Supply Verification - 22
1. Plug in a known-good power cord into the back of the
computer. Note: Do not turn on the computer.
Note: For the next steps, refer to Figure 1 to identify the pins
indicated.
2. Connect the black lead of the volt meter to pin 16 of the 20pin power supply connector. Connect the red lead of the volt
meter to pin 9 of the power supply connector. The volt meter
should measure approximately +5V.
If you do not get a reading of +5V, re-check the volt meter
connections and measure the voltage again. If voltage is still
not present, replace the power supply; otherwise, go to the
next step.
If you do measure +5V on pin 9, the power supply is likely OK.
Go to the next step for further verification.
+12VPin 10
Pin 20 +5V
POK Pin 8
Pin 18 GND
+5V TRKL Pin 9
GND Pin 7
+5V Pin 6
GND Pin 5
+5VPin 4
GND Pin 3
+3.3V Pin 2
+3.3VPin 1
Pin 19 +5V
Pin 17 GND
Pin 16 GND
Pin 15 GND
Pin 14 [Power On]
Pin 13 GND
Pin 12 -12V
Pin 11 +3.3V
Figure 1. Power Supply 20-Pin Connector
Troubleshooting
General/Power Supply Verification - 23
3. Start up the computer by pressing the power button on the
front of the computer. Note: Verify that the power cable is
securely plugged into the front panel board.
If the computer starts up normally, the power supply is OK. If
the power supply does not start up, go to the next step.
4. Check to see if the power supply fan is spinning.
If the power supply fan is not spinning, verify that the black
and yellow fan cable from the power supply is plugged
securely into the black and red fan cable connector; otherwise,
go to the next step.
5. Connect the black lead of the volt meter to pin 16 of the power
supply connector. Connect the red lead of the volt meter to pin
1 of the power supply connector. The volt meter should
measure approximately +3.3V.
If you do not get a reading of +3.3V, re-check the volt meter
connections and measure the voltage again. If voltage is still
Troubleshooting
General/Power Supply Verification - 24
not present, replace the power supply; otherwise, go to the
next step.
6. Connect the black lead of the volt meter to pin 16 of the power
supply connector. Connect the red lead of the volt meter to pin
4 of the power supply connector. The volt meter should
measure approximately +5V.
If you do not get a reading of +5V, re-check the volt meter
connections and measure the voltage again. If voltage is still
not present, replace the power supply; otherwise, go to the
next step.
7. Measure the voltage of pin 10 on the power supply connector.
The voltage should measure approximately +12V.
If you do not get a reading of +12V, re-check the volt meter
connections and measure the voltage again. If voltage is still
not present, replace the power supply; otherwise, go to the
next step.
Troubleshooting
General/Power Supply Verification - 25
8. The testing is complete. You have just verified that the power
supply is not the cause of the “System is completely dead”
symptom.
Troubleshooting
General/HFS Plus Formatted Drives - 26
HFS Plus Formatted Drives
Some Power Macintosh G3 computers ship with hard drives that
are formatted with HFS and some later models ship with hard
drives that are formatted with HFS Plus (also referred to as Mac
OS Extended format). The hard drives in the Power Macintosh G3
(Blue and White) and all Macintosh Server G3 computers are
formatted with HFS Plus.
Norton Utilities version 3.5 is not compatible with HFS Plus (or
Mac OS Extended format), and in fact, can destroy data on the hard
drive. Norton Utilities version 3.5.3 or 3.5.2 will not attempt to
repair a drive formatted with Mac OS Extended format and
versions 3.5.1 and earlier cannot recognize that a hard drive is in
Mac OS Extended format and can result in hard drive corruption
and loss of all data on the drive.
Note: When diagnosing hard drive problems, it is important to
Troubleshooting
General/HFS Plus Formatted Drives - 27
verify whether or not the customer may have used the wrong disk
repair software for their drive before assuming that the problem
is hardware related.
If you experience problems with a hard drive that has been
formatted with HFS Plus, Apple Computer recommends using the
version of Disk First Aid included on the system software CD that
shipped with the unit.
Some other disk utility and disk locking programs are
incompatible with Mac OS Extended format. Before you attempt to
use a disk utility or disk locking program, make sure the version
you have is compatible with Mac OS Extended format. Check the
documentation that came with the program or contact the
manufacturer or the vendor that supplied the program.
Use the Get Info command in Mac OS 8.5 to determine how a hard
drive has been formatted. Drives formatted with HFS will appear
as “Mac OS Standard”, while drives formatted with HFS Plus will
Troubleshooting
General/HFS Plus Formatted Drives - 28
appear as “Mac OS Extended.”
For more information on HFS Plus formatting of hard drives,
refer to TIL article #30344.
Troubleshooting
General/VGA-to-Macintosh Adapters - 29
VGA-to-Macintosh Adapters
To avoid symptoms, “No video” or “Black Screen” situations do
not use two VGA-to-Macintosh adapters (one on each end) on the
video cable that connects a Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server
G3 (Blue and White) to a monitor with a captive VGA connector.
If you need to connect a VGA monitor to the Power Macintosh G3/
Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and White) connect it in one of the
following ways:
• VGA monitor --> to a VGA cable with VGA connectors on both
ends --> to the video card on the Power Macintosh G3
• VGA monitor --> to a mixed cable, a cable that has a VGA
connector on one end and a Macintosh connector on the other end
--> to the video card on the Power Macintosh G3.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/How to Use the Symptom Charts - 30
Symptom Charts
How to Use the Symptom Charts
The Symptom Charts included in this chapter will help you
diagnose specific symptoms related to the product. Because cures
are listed on the charts in the order of most likely solution, try
the cures in the order presented. Verify whether or not the
product continues to exhibit the symptom. If the symptom
persists, try the next cure. Note: If you have replaced a module,
reinstall the original module before you proceed to the next cure.
For additional assistance, contact Apple Technical Support.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/System - 31
System
System is completely
dead
1
2
3
4
5
6
Check LEDS DS7 and DS8 on the logic board. In a working
unit, these LEDs should be in sync with each other: both on or
both off. If one LED is on and the other is off, there is a
problem.
Verify the power outlet is good. Try a known-good power
cord.
Make sure the voltage switch on the back of the power supply
is set to the correct voltage.
Check the power supply by following the procedures in
“Power Supply Verification” outlined earlier in this
chapter.
Disconnect the keyboard and power-on the system via the
reset button on the front of the computer. If the unit powers
on, replace the USB keyboard. If not, go to next step.
Reset the CUDA chip and try again. If the problem persists,
reset the logic board. (See “The CUDA Chip” and “Resetting
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/System - 32
7
Fan on power supply
is running, but no
startup tone, screen
is black, drive not
accessed at startup,
and no LED on front of
system
1
2
3
the Logic Board” earlier in this chapter for instructions.)
Replace the logic board if the problem persists.
Verify power supply voltage switch is set correctly for your
region (see “Voltage Switch” in Basics chapter for more
information).
Check jumper block configuration at J25. Make sure jumper
block is correct color for processor type installed (see
“Jumper Location J25” earlier in this chapter for more
information) and that it is installed in the correct direction.
Reseat processor module. Make sure locking arm is in down
position.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/System - 33
4
5
6
7
Fan is running, LED is
on, drive is accessed
at startup, no startup
chime, and screen is
black
1
2
Memory error dialog
box message appears
on the screen
1
3
Reseat DIMMS.
Reset the logic board. Refer to “Resetting the Logic Board”
mentioned earlier in this chapter.
Replace logic board.
Replace processor module.
Reseat SDRAM DIMMs.
Check jumper block configuration at J25. Make sure jumper
block is correct color for processor type installed (see
“Jumper Location J25” earlier in this chapter for more
information) and that it is installed in the correct direction.
Check cable connections to the monitor and to the speaker/
microphone ports on the rear of the unit. Are the cables
connected to the correct ports?
Reseat SDRAM DIMMs. (Note: The computer does not ship
with any on-board memory. You must have a DRAM DIMM
installed for the computer to boot properly.)
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/System - 34
2
3
Computer begins to
power up, the fan and
hard drive are
spinning, the power
LED is lit, but there
is no video.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Verify that only PC-100 SDRAM DIMMs are installed and not
EDO memory.
Run MacTest Pro to locate the bad SDRAM. Replace the SDRAM
with a known-good DIMM.
Reseat SDRAM DIMMs. Refer to the “Power-On Self Test”
section mentioned earlier in this chapter.
Test for a bad SDRAM DIMM by removing the DIMMs one at a
time (replacing each one afterwards). Replace any faulty
SDRAM DIMMs.
Check jumper block configuration at J25. Make sure jumper
block is correct color for processor type installed (see
“Jumper Location J25” earlier in this chapter for more
information) and that it is installed in the correct direction.
Reseat the processor card.
Verify internal SCSI cabling is secure.
Verify all cards are seated properly.
Remove all cards (except video card) and disconnect hard
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/System - 35
drives from the logic board. Do you have video?
8 Replace the video card.
9 Replace the logic board.
10 Replace the processor.
Clicking, chirping,
thumping, or rubbing
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Remove all PCI cards and test unit. If problem does not occur
with cards removed, begin replacing cards one at a time to
determine which card is causing problem. Replace problem
card with known-good card.
Reseat the CD-ROM/Zip drive carrier and cables.
Remove hard drive. If problem no longer occurs, replace hard
drive with a known-good drive.
Replace power supply.
Replace processor module.
Replace logic board.
Replace I/O card.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/System - 36
System shuts down
intermittently
1
Check that the fan cable is connected and the fan is
operational.
2 Make sure air vents are clear. Do not operate the computer
with the access panel open, the heatsink could overheat.
3 Make sure power cord is plugged in firmly.
4 Replace power cord.
5 Check battery.
6 Reset Cuda chip. (Refer to “The Cuda Chip” in this chapter
for instructions.)
7 Reset logic board. (Refer to “Resetting the Logic Board” in
this chapter for instructions.)
8 Replace power supply.
9 Replace logic board.
10 Replace processor module.
System
intermittently
crashes or hangs
1
2
Verify system software is Mac OS 8.5.1 with Mac OS ROM
1.2.
Verify software is known-good. Perform a clean install of
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/System - 37
system software with the CD that came with the unit.
3 Verify software is Power Macintosh compatible (contact
developer). Also, try booting with extensions off to determine
if there are system init problems.
4 Run Disk First Aid.
5 Test for bad memory. Run MacTest Pro in loop mode
overnight to test the memory. If MacTest Pro finds a bad
memory module, or other hardware, replace the hardware in
question with a known-good module.
6 Clear parameter RAM. Hold down Command-Option-P-R
during startup but before “Welcome to Macintosh” appears.
7 Remove all SDRAM DIMMs and try replacing them one at a
time to test. Replace any bad DIMMs.
8 Reset the logic board. Refer to “Resetting the Logic Board”
mentioned earlier in this chapter.
9 Replace logic board.
10 Replace processor module.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/System - 38
During startup,
following message is
displayed, “This
startup disk will not
work on this
Macintosh model....”
1
2
System freezes during
normal operation
1
3
2
3
Verify startup disk is good.
Verify system software is Mac OS 8.5.1 with Mac OS ROM
1.2.
Perform a clean install of system software with the CD that
came with the unit.
Use the Extension Manager in Controls Panels. Boot with
Extensions off by holding down the Shift key during startup.
Begin adding back the system Extensions one at a time and
starting up the system after each addition.
Perform a clean install of system software with the CD that
came with the unit.
Check for bad USB devices. Turn off the computer and
disconnect all USB devices. Next, power on the system using
the power button on the front of the unit, and begin adding
back the USB devices one at time, beginning with the
keyboard and then the mouse, and so on. If the system hangs
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/System - 39
4
5
6
7
only after you reconnect a particular USB device, replace
that USB device.
Test for bad memory. Run MacTest Pro in loop mode
overnight to test the memory. If MacTest Pro finds a bad
memory module, or other hardware, replace the hardware in
question with a known-good module.
Reset the logic board. Refer to “Resetting the Logic Board”
mentioned earlier in this chapter.
Replace the logic board.
Replace the processor module.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Error Beeps - 40
Error Beeps
Computer beeps once
at startup
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Computer beeps twice
at startup
1
2
One beep means that no RAM is installed or detected.
Reseat the SDRAM and try again.
If no SDRAM is present, install a known-good PC-100
SDRAM DIMM in the top slot and try again.
If DRAM is present, replace it (one DIMM at a time, starting
with the top DIMM slot) with a known-good PC-100 SDRAM
DIMMs.
Reseat processor module and try again.
Replace processor module and try again.
Replace logic board.
Two beeps means that incompatible RAM types may be
installed. Verify that only PC-100 SDRAM DIMMs are
installed and not EDO memory.
Replace the existing SDRAM one DIMM at a time with knowngood PC-100 SDRAM DIMMs.
Troubleshooting
Computer beeps three
times at startup
Symptom Charts/Error Beeps - 41
3
4
5
Reseat processor module and try again.
Replace processor module and try again.
Replace logic board.
1
2
Three beeps means that no RAM banks passed memory testing.
Replace the existing SDRAM one DIMM at a time with knowngood PC-100 SDRAM DIMMs.
Reseat processor module and try again.
Replace processor module and try again.
Replace logic board.
3
4
5
Computer beeps four
or five beeps at
startup
1
2
Four or five beeps means that beeps means that the ROM is
probably bad and cannot be fixed.
Replace logic board.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Video and Sound - 42
Video and Sound
Screen is black, but
boot tone is present,
drive operates, fan is
running, and LED is
lit
1
2
3
4
5
Check video cable/card connections. If using a VGA to
Macintosh adapter refer to “VGA-to-Macintosh Adapter”
earlier in this chapter.
Reseat SDRAM DIMMS. Make sure DIMMS are PC-100
DIMMS. Refer to “SDRAM DIMMS Do’s and Don’ts” in this
chapter.
Remove all SDRAM DIMMs and try replacing them one at a
time to test. Replace any bad DIMMs.
Check jumper block configuration at J25. Make sure jumper
block is correct color for processor type installed (see
“Jumper Location J25” earlier in this chapter for more
information). Also make sure the metal jumper pins are in
the correct position in the block and the block is installed in
the correct direction.
Clear parameter RAM. Hold down Command-Option-P-R
during startup but before “Welcome to Macintosh” appears.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Video and Sound - 43
6
Reset Cuda chip. (Refer to “The Cuda Chip” in this chapter
for instructions.)
7 Reset logic board. (Refer to “Resetting the Logic Board” in
this chapter for instructions.)
8 Replace monitor cable.
9 Test with known-good monitor. Replace monitor if necessary.
Refer to appropriate monitor manual to troubleshoot
defective monitor.
10 Replace video card.
11 Replace processor module.
12 Replace logic board.
Troubleshooting
Screen is black, there
is no boot tone, and
drive does not
operate, but fan is
running and LED is lit
Symptom Charts/Video and Sound - 44
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Check video cable/card connections. If using a VGA to
Macintosh adapter refer to “VGA-to-Macintosh Adapter”
earlier in this chapter.
Check jumper block configuration at J25. Make sure jumper
block is correct color for processor type installed (see
“Jumper Location J25” earlier in this chapter for more
information). Also make sure the metal jumper pins are in
the correct position in the block and the block is installed in
the correct direction.
Reset Cuda chip. (Refer to “The Cuda Chip” in this chapter
for instructions.)
Reset logic board. (Refer to “Resetting the Logic Board” in
this chapter for instructions.)
Reseat the video card.
Reseat the SDRAM DIMMs.
Reseat processor module.
Remove all SDRAM DIMMs and try replacing them one at a
time to test. Replace any bad DIMMs.
Troubleshooting
Boot tone is present
and screen lights up,
but nothing is
displayed on screen
Symptom Charts/Video and Sound - 45
9
10
11
12
13
Replace monitor cable.
Replace the video card.
Replace processor module.
Replace logic board.
Replace power supply.
1
Check video cable/card connections. If using a VGA to
Macintosh adapter refer to “VGA-to-Macintosh Adapter”
earlier in this chapter.
Reset Cuda chip. (Refer to “The Cuda Chip” in this chapter
for instructions.)
Reset logic board. (Refer to “Resetting the Logic Board” in
this chapter for instructions.)
Reseat all PCI cards and SDRAM.
Reseat processor module.
Replace monitor cable.
Test with known-good monitor. Replace monitor if necessary.
Refer to appropriate monitor manual to troubleshoot
2
3
4
5
6
7
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Video and Sound - 46
8
9
Distorted Video
1
2
3
4
5
defective monitor.
Replace processor module.
Replace logic board.
Adjust the focus using the Display Adjustment Utility on the
MacTest Pro CD.
Check the video cable.
Check the video adapter is using one. Refer to “VGA-toMacintosh Adapter” earlier in this chapter.
Adjust the screen geometry using the Display Adjustment
Utility on the MacTest Pro CD.
Adjust the cutoff or white balance using the Display
Adjustment and Display Service Utilities on the MacTest Pro
CD. Refer to the monitor’s owner’s manual for additional
information.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Video and Sound - 47
Erroneous text or
characters appear on
the screen
1
2
Check the keyboard and the keyboard connection.
The system software may be corrupted. Reinstall system
software. You must use the system software CD that came
with the unit.
Flashing question
mark
1
Boot from the system CD to verify the hard drive can be seen
on the desktop. If booting from a SCSI chain, make sure the
hard drive priority numbers are set properly.
Check for OS software on the boot drive.
Run Disk First Aid. Update the driver with drive setup 1.6.2.
If the symptom is on the external SCSI drive, disconnect the
external SCSI devices. Troubleshoot the SCSI chain if
necessary.
Reinstall system software. You must use the system software
CD that came with the unit.
Replace the hard drive/CD data cable.
Replace the hard drive.
2
3
4
5
6
7
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Video and Sound - 48
Screen jitter
1
2
Reseat the video card.
Replace the video card.
No sound from
computer’s speaker
1
2
3
4
Boot with a bootable CD and test.
Boot with Extensions off and try again.
Disconnect any microphones or external speakers.
Verify that volume setting in Control Panel is adequate and
mute is not checked.
Clear parameter RAM. Hold down Command-Option-P-R
during startup, until the Macintosh restarts.
Verify speaker cable (J34) is plugged into logic board.
Plug headphones or external speakers into the external jack.
If the external jack works, replace the internal speaker. If
the external jack doesn’t work, replace the logic board.
5
6
7
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Hard Drive - 49
Hard Drive
Single internal hard
drive does not
operate; drive doesn’t
spin
1
2
3
4
5
6
No internal SCSI
drives operate
1
2
3
Check if you can see the drive using Drive Setup from
MacTest Pro. Reinstall the software drivers for the hard
drive.
Check all cable connections to the hard drive.
Replace hard drive data cable.
Verify hard drive power cable is OK. Try another power
cable, such as P5, P2, or P3.
Replace hard drive. If problem resolved, reinstall IDE device
driver and system software.
Replace power supply.
Verify there are no duplicate SCSI device addresses on a
single SCSI bus.
Disconnect external SCSI devices and check for proper
termination.
Check internal SCSI devices for proper termination.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Hard Drive - 50
4
5
6
7
Works with internal
or external SCSI
devices but not with
both
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
If more than one SCSI device is on the SCSI chain, remove one
device at a time and retest. Replace the bad drive.
Replace internal SCSI data cable to which non-operational
devices are attached.
Reseat the SCSI PCI card. Replace the SCSI PCI card.
Replace power supply.
Verify there are no duplicate SCSI device addresses.
Reseat SCSI cable connections going to the SCSI card.
Replace terminator on external SCSI device.
Verify that SCSI device at end of internal SCSI data cable is
only device terminated.
If more than one SCSI device is on the SCSI chain, remove one
device at a time and retest. Replace the bad drive.
Reseat the SCCI card, then try a known-good SCSI card.
Replace SCSI drive cables one at a time.
Disconnect external SCSI chain. Refer to appropriate manual
to troubleshoot defective external device.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/CD-ROM and DVD-ROM Drives - 51
CD-ROM and DVD-ROM Drives
CD-ROM tray won’t
open
1
2
3
4
5
Verify CD-ROM software is good. Reinstall CD-ROM software.
Reseat cables on the back of the CD-ROM drive.
Reseat the CD-ROM data cable on the logic board.
Try using known-good compact disc.
Replace CD-ROM drive mechanism.
CD-ROM icon does not
appear on the desktop
1
2
3
4
5
6
Try using known-good compact disc.
Reinstall CD-ROM software.
Reseat CD-ROM data cable at the back of the CD-ROM.
Replace CD-ROM drive mechanism.
Replace CD-ROM data cable.
Replace the logic board only if other devices on the bus do not
work.
Troubleshooting
“Cannot open” error
message appears when
Apple DVD Player
launched
Symptom Charts/CD-ROM and DVD-ROM Drives - 52
1
2
3
4
5
Make sure DVD-ROM drive is installed. If CD-ROM rather
than DVD-ROM drive is installed, Apple DVD Player cannot
launch.
Quit all open applications and relaunch Apple DVD Player.
Restart computer and relaunch Apple DVD Player.
Turn off Chooser setting for automatically mounting servers
at startup. For more information, see TIL article 30970.
Refer to TIL article 30887 for further instructions.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Zip Drive - 53
Zip Drive
Zip drive does not
operate
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
During system
startup, Zip disk
ejects
1
2
3
4
5
6
Replace Zip disk with known-good disk.
Does the drive have power? Check that light blinks on front
of the Zip drive. Reseat cables on the back of the Zip drive.
Reinstall Zip software.
Check device settings; device 0 (master), device 1 (slave)
Replace IDE/ATA drive cable.
Replace Zip drive.
Replace logic board.
Replace Zip disk with known-good disk.
Reinstall Zip software. Reseat cables on the back of the Zip
drive.
Check device settings; device 0 (master), device 1 (slave)
Replace IDE/ATA cable.
Replace Zip drive.
Replace logic board.
Troubleshooting
Zip Disk does not eject
Symptom Charts/Zip Drive - 54
1
2
3
4
5
Switch off computer. Hold down mouse button while you
switch computer on.
Reinstall Zip software.
Replace Zip drive.
Replace IDE/ATA drive cable.
Replace logic board.
Zip drive attempts to
eject disk, but doesn’t
1
2
Reseat Zip drive bezel so bezel slot aligns correctly with
drive.
Replace Zip drive.
Zip drive runs
continuously
1
2
3
4
5
Replace Zip disk with known-good disk.
Reinstall Zip software.
Replace Zip drive.
Replace IDE/ATA drive cable.
Replace logic board.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Input Device Problems - 55
Input Device Problems
Cursor does not move
with the USB mouse
1
2
3
4
5
6
Disconnect and reconnect the mouse securely to the USB
keyboard.
Inspect inside of mouse for buildup of dirt or other
contaminants. Clean mouse if necessary. Note: The mouse
contains a ball and several rollers that must remain clean. If
either the ball or rollers are dirty, the mouse might not
track properly. Refer to Tech Info Library article 6491:
“How To Clean A Mouse.”
If mouse is connected to keyboard, connect the mouse to one of
the USB ports on the I/O panel instead. If the mouse works,
replace keyboard.
If the cursor doesn’t move, replace the USB mouse.
If the mouse is connected to one of the USB ports on the I/O
panel, switch to the other USB port.
If the cursor moves, replace logic board.
Troubleshooting
Cursor moves, but
clicking USB mouse
button has no effect
Symptom Charts/Input Device Problems - 56
1
2
3
4
5
Double-click doesn’t
open application,
disk, or server
No response to any
key on keyboard
1
2
3
Boot from bootable CD and test.
If mouse is connected to keyboard, connect the mouse to one of
the USB ports on the I/O panel instead. If the cursor moves,
replace keyboard.
If connected to I/O, try the other I/O connector. Does it
work? Replace logic board.
Replace USB mouse.
Replace logic board.
4
Boot with Extensions off.
Remove duplicate system folders and reboot.
Clear parameter RAM. Hold down Command-Option-P-R
during startup but before “Welcome to Macintosh” appears.
Boot from bootable CD and test.
1
2
3
Boot with Extensions off.
Check keyboard connection to USB port.
Boot from bootable CD and test.
Troubleshooting
Known-good USB
printer does not work
Symptom Charts/Input Device Problems - 57
4
5
Replace keyboard.
Replace logic board.
1
Verify you have correct version of system software and
printer driver installed.
Open the Chooser and verify that you have the correct printer
selected.
If the printer is connected to a third-party USB hub, switch
it to one of the USB ports on the I/O panel. If the printer
works now, you have a bad third-party USB hub.
Turn off unnecessary Extensions and try again.
Perform clean install of system software and print driver.
Replace printer interface cable.
Replace the printer.
2
3
4
5
6
7
Known-good network
printer does not print
1
2
Check network connections.
Verify you have correct version of system software and
printer driver installed.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Input Device Problems - 58
3
4
Cursor does not move
with the ADB mouse
1
2
3
4
Open the Chooser and verify that you have the correct printer
selected.
Does printer show up in Chooser? If so, perform clean install
of system software and/or network and printer software.
Verify that the mouse is connected securely to the ADB
keyboard, monitor, or I/O panel connector.
Inspect inside of mouse for buildup of dirt or other
contaminants. Clean mouse if necessary. Note: The mouse
contains a ball and several rollers that must remain clean. If
either the ball or rollers are dirty, the mouse might not
track properly. Refer to Tech Info Library article 6491:
“How To Clean A Mouse.”
If mouse is connected to an ADB keyboard, connect the mouse
to the ADB port on the I/O panel instead. If the cursor works,
replace ADB keyboard. Restart computer after changing
connections.
If the cursor doesn’t move, replace the ADB mouse.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Input Device Problems - 59
5
If a known-good keyboard and mouse don’t work when
connected to the I/O panel, replace logic board.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Network Problems - 60
Network Problems
Ethernet connection
drops off line by itself
1
2
3
Try another Ethernet cable.
Reinstall the Ethernet driver.
Possible network problem. Troubleshoot the network.
Unable to switch to
the Ethernet network
option in the control
panel
1
Use a known-good Ethernet cable and connect properly to an
known-good network.
Reset parameter RAM. Hold down Command-Option-P-R
during startup but before “Welcome to Macintosh” appears.
Boot from the system CD that came with the unit. Open the
Network control panel and switch to Ethernet. Are you able to
switch to Ethernet and see Ethernet devices on the network
now? If so, troubleshoot software Extensions or reinstall
system software.
2
3
Troubleshooting
Unable to see any
network devices
Symptom Charts/Network Problems - 61
1
2
3
4
5
6
Open the Network control panel and select the Ethernet
option. Verify that you can now see devices on the network.
Reset parameter RAM. Hold down Command-Option-P-R
during startup but before “Welcome to Macintosh” appears.
Boot from the system CD that came with the unit. Open the
Network control panel and switch to Ethernet. Are you able to
switch to Ethernet and see Ethernet devices on the network
now? If so, troubleshoot software Extensions or reinstall
system software.
Try connecting to a known-good Ethernet port at the wall or
external hub.
Verify that other users are experiencing the same problem.
If, so contact the network administrator. If not, go on to the
next step
Replace the logic board.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Modem - 62
Modem
The internal modem is
not recognized.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Modem reports an
error when dialing
out
1
2
3
4
Make sure the correct CCL and extension files installed.
Reseat the flexible modem cable on the logic board.
Reinstall the CCL and modem extension. If the problem
persists, reinstall the system software and try again.
Zap PRAM by holding down Command-Option-P-R.
Reseat the modem.
Replace the modem.
Replace the flexible modem cable.
Use the Modem Country Selector utility to make sure the
modem is set to the correct country.
Make sure the correct driver is installed and the correct CCL
is selected and that they are not corrupted. If necessary,
reinstall the driver and/or CCL.
Try another cable and phone jack.
If problem persists, reinstall system and modem software.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Modem - 63
Computer freezes
when modem dials
Extensions are in conflict or the Mac OS is corrupted. Enable only
the Mac OS files in the Extensions Manager and any modem drivers
needed. If the problem persists, reinstall the system software
Modem is having
trouble connecting to
Online site
1
2
3
4
Use the Modem Country Selector utility to make sure the
modem is set to the correct country.
The phone line may have too much noise. If the user has a
second line, try that one. The user should contact their local
phone company and request their line be checked.
Check to make sure the TCP/IP control panel is correctly
configured for the user's Internet Service Provider. If the
TCP/IP control panel is not configured correctly, it may
connect but won’t be able to access any sites.
Sometimes online services use different servers for dial-up/
authentication and for services. If one server is down, users
may be able to log in but not access any services. Contact the
online service for help.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Modem - 64
The system returns
an error message
when launching an
Internet browser
Browser software is not installed correctly. If necessary,
reinstall the browser software. Note: Internet Explorer 4 and
greater needs to be installed and not just drag copied.
The dialup software
will not initiate a
connection
1
Modem is dropping its
connection
1
2
2
3
Use the Modem Country Selector utility to make sure the
modem is set to the correct country.
Make sure dialup software is fully installed and all required
extensions are enabled. If necessary, reinstall the dialup
software and provide the necessary information for setup.
Use the Modem Country Selector utility to make sure the
modem is set to the correct country.
Try another cable and phone jack.
The phone line may be too noisy to handle the higher modem
speeds. Try connecting at a slower speed or use a generic CCL
file. (If you are familiar with the CCL script language, you
can edit the modem script to force a connection at a lower
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Modem - 65
4
5
6
7
Modem disconnects
after a period of time
speed.) If the problem continues, contact the phone company
to report the bad phone line.
Verify that the user has call waiting on that phone line. With
call waiting active, an incoming call can interrupt the
connection. Disable call waiting using AT commands placed in
the init string of the dialup application. Usually the string is
*70.
There may be a problem with the server to which you are
connecting. Servers sometimes develop problems that
disconnect users without explanation. Try calling back later
or use an alternate number if one is available.
Check with the Internet Service Provider.
Reseat modem. If the problem persists, replace modem.
Timed disconnect setting is causing the modem to disconnect. Some
services or software packages have a feature that will disconnect
the user after a set period of time. Either increase this time
setting or disable the feature if possible. Contact the ISP or
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Miscellaneous - 66
network administrator for more information.
Modem is slow
responding
1
2
Too many people are using the ISP's Internet services. When
using an ISP, users need to remember that the ISP only has a
limited amount of bandwidth to the Internet. If a large amount
of people are dialing in, individual's speeds will be affected
Check the phone line. The quality of the phone line can limit
modem performance.
Miscellaneous
Small pieces of metal
found loose in
computer
1
2
3
4
Remove any loose pieces of metal.
Remove and inspect logic board, cards, and power supply;
remove any loose pieces of metal found.
Remove hard drive carrier and inspect hard drives and
bottom of chassis; remove any loose pieces of metal found.
Run MacTest Pro to verify computer’s functionality.
K Service Source
Upgrades
Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh
Server G3 (Blue and White)
Upgrades
DRAM Upgrade - 1
DRAM Upgrade
DRAM-DIMM
Slots (4)
The Power Macintosh G3/
Macintosh Server G3 (Blue
and White) can be expanded
to a maximum of 1024 MB
by adding DIMMs to any of
the four DRAM DIMM slots
on the main logic board.
DIMMs from older
Macintosh computers may
physically fit in the slots,
but they are not compatible
and should not be used.
Different size DRAM DIMMs
can be installed in any order
in any DIMM slot. They do
Upgrades
DRAM Upgrade - 2
not need to be installed in pairs. It is recommended that
DIMMs be installed in the first slot available closest to the
center of the board (J-19), then adjacent slots J-20, J21, and J-22.
Compatible DRAM DIMMs must meet all the following
specifications:
• PC-100 Synchronous DRAM (SDRAM)
• 3.3 volt
• 64-bit wide, 168-pin module
• maximum of 16 memory devices on the DIMM
• unbuffered; do not use registered or buffered
Synchronous DRAM (SDRAM)
• maximum height of 2.0 inches.
To increase DRAM to the maximum of 1024 MB, fill all four
slots with 256 MB DIMMs. Any 256 MB DIMMs installed
must use 128 megabit (Mbit) device technology.
Upgrades
DRAM Upgrade - 3
DRAM DIMM
Installation
Latch
1
Access
Panel
Access
Panel
2
Lift the latch on the
right side of the
computer.
Lower the access panel
onto a clean, flat surface.
Upgrades
DRAM Upgrade - 4
3
Notches
DRAM Slot
(1 of 4)
4
DRAM DIMM
Connectors
Ejector
Ribs (inside slot)
Align a DRAM DIMM in
the DRAM slot so the
notches line up with the
ribs inside the slot.
Push the DIMM down
evenly until the ejectors
snap into place.
Note: To remove a DIMM,
push down on the slot’s
ejectors until they open and
release the DIMM. Some
DRAM slots may have only
one ejector.
Upgrades
Drive Upgrades - 5
Drive Upgrades
CD-ROM/DVD-ROM
Drive Bay
Zip Drive Bay
Drive Bay 1
Drive Bay 2
Drive Bay 3
The Power Macintosh G3/
Macintosh Server G3 (Blue
and White) has five internal
drive bays: three in the
lower part of the computer
and two in front on top.
Standard Macintosh
configurations include one
internal Ultra ATA hard
drive, or one, two, or three
internal Ultra2 LVD SCSI
drives.
Upgrades
Drive Upgrades - 6
Ultra ATA Drives
The Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and
White) can accommodate either one or two internal Ultra
ATA drives in the lower part of the computer, drive bay 3.
(The U-shaped carrier, available for version 2 enclosures,
allows installation of two ATA drives, stacked vertically.)
Ultra2 LVD SCSI Drives
Connect internal and external Ultra2 LVD SCSI devices using
an internal PCI card and cable. You can connect up to three
internal SCSI drives (all in the lower drive area), or
connect additional SCSI devices to the port the card provides
on the rear of the computer.
Other SCSI Drives
The Ultra2 LVD SCSI card supports other types of Wide
Ultra SCSI drives besides the Ultra2 LVD SCSI drive.
Upgrades
Drive Upgrades - 7
However, the system will operate at the speed of the slowest
device. For optimal performance using the Ultra2 LVD SCSI
card, use only Ultra2 LVD SCSI devices. To maintain optimal
performance using another kind of SCSI device, add a PCI
card that supports the device.
Supported Drives
The Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and
White) supports a maximum of three internal hard drives.
Supported drives include:
• ATA devices (includes ATA, ATA-2, and ATA-3 devices,
which are also called IDE or EIDE devices)
• Ultra ATA devices (sometimes called ATA-4 devices)
• Wide Ultra SCSI devices (with the PCI card included in
some configurations)
• Ultra2 LVD SCSI devices (with the PCI card included in
some configurations)
Upgrades
Drive Upgrades - 8
• ATAPI drives, including
CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, and
Zip drives.
Drive
Front
SCSI ID Numbers
Pin 1
Jumper
SCSI ID = 0
SCSI ID = 1
SCSI ID = 2
SCSI ID = 3
SCSI ID = 4
If the computer came with
one Ultra2 LVD SCSI drive,
it has SCSI ID 0. If you are
adding SCSI drives, the
second drive is ID 1 and the
third drive is ID 2. See the
illustration for placing the
jumper for ID 1 and 2.
Note: The SCSI PCI card is ID
7. The drive in position 1 is
the startup drive.
Upgrades
Drive Upgrades - 9
Power
Cable
Bundle
(Side
view)
Ribbon
Cable
Connector
SCSI Drive
Upgrade Procedure
Before you begin, open the
side access panel.
Note: This procedure is
based on computers using
version 1 hard drive
carriers. For version 2 hard
drive carriers, see the
version 2 instructions in
the Take Apart hard drive
topics.
1
Unplug the bundled
power cable and the
ribbon cable from the
logic board for any
Upgrades
Drive Upgrades - 10
2
Screw
Retainer
3
installed ATA drives.
Disconnect the ribbon
cable from the PCI card
for any installed SCSI
drives.
Remove the screw from
the rear of the drive
carrier and remove the
drive carrier retainer.
Upgrades
Drive Upgrades - 11
4
Power Cable
on Drive
5
6
Unplug the power cord
from any hard drives
attached to the drive
carrier.
Slide the drive carrier
assembly toward the
rear of the computer and
lift it out.
Assign a unique SCSI ID
number to the drive
being installed. See
“SCSI ID Numbers”
earlier in this chapter
for more information.
Upgrades
Drive Upgrades - 12
7
SCSI Hard Drive
ATA Hard Drive
8
Drive Carrier
9
Screw
Position the drive so that
the drive’s connectors
face away from the sheet
metal side of the drive
carrier.
Screw the drive to the
drive carrier with four
screws.
Connect the appropriate
cable to the drive.
Note: If you are installing a
third-party SCSI card and
cable, refer to the owner’s
manual that came with the
card.
Upgrades
Drive Upgrades - 13
Note: The SCSI cable
included with factoryinstalled SCSI drives has a
built-in terminator block,
so no terminator is needed.
10 Replace the drive
carrier and slide it
toward the front of the
computer until it locks
into position. Do not
crimp any wires that are
near or under the
assembly.
Power Cable P3
Power Cable P2
11 Replace the drive
carrier retainer and
screw it back in place.
Upgrades
Drive Upgrades - 14
12 Plug the power cables into the hard ddrives.
13 Reconnect the main power cable bundle and the drives’
ribbon cable.
Note: If you added a SCSI drive to a computer that came with
an ATA drive, attach the main power cable bundle and the
ATA ribbon cable to the main logic board and the SCSI ribbon
cable to the SCSI PCI card.
If you added a SCSI drive to a computer that came with one or
two SCSI drives, attach the main power cable bundle to the
main logic board and the SCSI ribbon cable to the SCSI PCI
card.
Upgrades
Drive Upgrades - 15
Sample SCSI Hard
Drive and Cable
Configurations
SCSI
Hard Drive
SCSI Card
Connector
SCSI
Hard Drive
SCSI
Terminator
Ribbon Cable Plug
Screw
To install a SCSI hard drive
in drive bay 3, attach the
ribbon cable plug to the
ribbon cable connector on
the drive.
To install a SCSI hard drive
in drive bay 2, put the
ribbon cable on top of the
drive and attach the ribbon
cable plug to the ribbon
cable connector on the drive.
You can tape the ribbon
cable to the top of the drive
Upgrades
Drive Upgrades - 16
with double-stick foam tape
to make it lie flat.
For maximum performance,
use Ultra2 devices on an
Ultra2 PCI card.
Upgrades
Drive Upgrades - 17
Zip Drive Upgrade
Before you begin, open the
side access panel.
The Zip drive upgrade kit
includes an internal Zip
drive, Zip drive bezel, and
mounting screws.
Install the Zip drive by
following the procedures
under “CD-ROM/DVDROM/DVD-RAM/Zip Drive
Bezel” and “Zip Drive” in
the Take Apart chapter.
Upgrades
PCI Expansion Cards - 18
PCI Slots 2-4
PCI Slot 1
PCI Expansion
Cards
The Power Macintosh G3/
Macintosh Server G3 (Blue
and White) has four
expansion slots that accept
PCI cards up to 12 inches
long. Install only expansion
cards that come with
Macintosh driver software
and that comply with the PCI
2.1 standard. NuBus cards
cannot be used in these
expansion slots.
In standard Macintosh
models, a graphics card that
Upgrades
PCI Expansion Cards - 19
supplies a monitor port occupies PCI slot 1. This slot can
accommodate 3.3 volt cards with 66 MHz frequency and 32bit data widths only.
PCI slots 2, 3, and 4 can accommodate mixed voltage (5.0 V
or 3.3 V) cards with a 33 MHz frequency and 32-bit or 64bit data widths. These slots will not accommodate 66 MHz
cards.
Upgrades
PCI Card Installation - 20
Screw
Port Access
Cover
PCI Card
Installation
Before you begin, open the
computer using the
procedures in the Take Apart
chapter of this manual.
1
2
Remove the port access
cover screw.
Remove the port access
cover.
Upgrades
PCI Card Installation - 21
Screw
3
Port Access
Opening
PCI Slot
Align the PCI card’s
connector with the
expansion slot and press
down firmly until the
card is seated in the slot.
Note: If the card is fulllength (12"), fit the end in
one of the four card guides at
the front of the computer.
4
Card
Guides (4)
5
Use the port access cover
screw to secure the PCI
card to the port access
opening.
If you removed a card
and are not replacing it,
replace the port access
Upgrades
PCI Card Installation - 22
cover and the port access cover screw.
Note: Do not leave an empty PCI slot uncovered. An
uncovered port can affect the air flow to the computer’s
components.
Replacement Note: If you are replacing an Xclaim VR PCI
card that includes an additional memory module with a new
Xclaim VR card, transfer the memory module from the
original card to the new card before installing it in the
computer. The memory module connector is keyed to ensure
correct orientation with the card’s memory slot; do not
force the module into the slot. Simply align the notch in the
connector with the small plastic tab in the slot; then push in
and down on the memory module until the two plastic latches
on the side of the slot lock into place.
Upgrades
Modem Installation - 23
Modem
Installation
Note: If you’re installing the
modem upgrade kit,
continue with these
procedures. If you are
removing or replacing a
faulty modem, refer to the
“Modem” section in the Take
Apart chapter.
Upgrades
Modem Installation - 24
1
Open the side access
panel.
Upgrades
Modem Installation - 25
2
3
4
Remove the screw that
secures the modem plug
on the I/O panel.
Remove the modem plug.
Position the modem so
the modem port
connector aligns with the
modem hole on the I/O
panel.
Upgrades
Modem Installation - 26
5
Secure the two modem
screws. One screw
attaches to the logic
board, and the other
attaches to the
I/O panel.
Upgrades
Modem Installation - 27
6
7
Carefully connect the
flexible modem cable to
the logic board.
Close the side access
panel.
K Service Source
Exploded View
Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh
Server G3 (Blue and White)
Exploded View
1
Ultra2 LVD SCSI, Single Channel
661-2148 Dual Channel 661-2171
Ethernet Gigabit Card
661-2172
Video Card, MPEG 2,
DVD, Decoder Module
661-2109
Standoffs, Plastic, Dual Locking
922-3738
Video Card, 16 MB, Rage 128
Rev. 1 661-2150 Rev. 2 661-2208
Modem Shield,Top
and Bottom Kit
076-0761
Flex Modem Cable
922-3737
CPU Heatsink Kit
Rev. 2 076-0769
Rev. 3 076-0785
Processor Module
300 MHz 661-2105
Jumper Block Kit
350 MHz 661-2106
300 MHz 076-0759
400 MHz 661-2103
350 MHz 076-0760
450 MHz 661-2204
400 MHz 076-0758
450 MHz 076-0788
DVD-ROM Drive
661-2163
DVD-RAM Drive
Zip & DVD
661-2162
Drive Carrier
CD-ROM Drive
922-3710
661-2164, 24x
661-2191, 32x
Board, FireWire
922-3672
Standoff Hex
922-3687
Logic Board Rev. 1 661-2104
Rev. 2 661-2194
Power
Supply
661-2107
Panel Latch
922-3701
Rear Drives
EMI Shield
922-3705
Power
Supply
Bracket
922-3766
PCI Slots
Fan Bracket
Shield
922-3704 922-3688 Ver. 1
922-3854 Ver. 2
Fan 922-3295
I/O
Bracket
Kit
076-0763
Zip Drive
661-2161
Chassis
922-3683
Speaker
Housing
922-3692
U-Shaped
Carrier,
Ver. 2
076-0778
Speaker
922-3712
Front Panel
Board
922-3673
Front
Panel Shield
922-3689
Hard
Drive IDE
6GB 661-2136
6GB 661-2137
12GB 661-2140
Hard Drive SCSI
36 GB Ultra2 LVD
7200rpm 1.6" High
661-2185
Hard Drive
Carrier
Retainer
922-3767
Thermal Pad
922-3863
Hard Drive Carrier, Ver. 2 076-0777
Carrier Support Plate
922-3871
Hard Drive
Carrier, Ver.1
922-3711
Hard Drive SCSI
9 GB Ultra2 LVD
10Krpm 661-2141
9 GB Ultra2 LVD
7200rpm 661-2142
Exploded View
2
COVERS
Allen Screws
Side Panels (typical)
922-3761
Left Side
Panel
922-3685
Front and Rear
Top Handle
922-3697
Top Panel
922-3691
Allen Screws Handles
& Supports (typical)
922-3759
Allen
Screws (3)
Vented 922-3760
Rear
Panel
922-3699
Latch
Gromet
922-3729
Zip Bezel
Kit
076-0762
Security
Bar Cover
922-3693
I/O Panel
Cover
922-3700
Right Side Panel
922-3686
Front Panel
922-3684
Front Support
922-3695
Enclosure with Chassis 922-3858
Note:
Logic Board, CD drive, Zip drive,
power supply and hard drives
not part of enclosure.
Lower
Front
Panel
922-3690
Lower Rear Panel
922-3698
Rear Support
922-3696
Exploded View
3
Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 (Blue and White) Screw Matrix
Hard drive carrier and (5) screws in 076-0777 or
(10) screws in 076-0778 (same as 922-3874)
(4) Hard drive carrier,Ver. 2, to hard drive,
(1) Hard drive carrier, Ver 2, to chassis
076-0777
076-0778
Ver. 2 only
922-3874
Ver. 2 only
(4) Hard drive carrier, Ver. 2, to hard drive,
(1) Hard drive carrier, Ver. 2, to chassis
076-0763
I/O panel kit and (4) screws (same screws as 922-1203)
922-1203
(34 total)
(1) Modem, (1) Modem plug, (2) Carrier support plate, (1) Power supply bracket,
(4) Latch panel, (12) Logic board, (2) Firewire board, (2) Fan guard, (3) Chassis,
(1) Hard drive carrier retainer, (4) PCI slot covers (same screw can be used
when cards installed)
922-2739
(4) CD/DVD drive to carrier, (4) Zip drive to carrier, (1) Bracket to power supply
922-3013
(1) FireWire board into hex standoff on logic board
922-3669
(4) Fan to fan bracket
922-3687
(1) Hex standoff (under FireWire board) to logic board
922-3759
(4) Handles and (4) supports
922-3760
(3) Vented rear panel
922-3761
(8) Right and left side panels
922-3762
(2) Latch to right side panel
922-3873
Ver. 2 only
(2) CD/DVD/ZIP drive carrier to chassis
Scale = 1 inch 0
1 1 3 1 5 3
8 4 8 2 8 4
1
Cables
FireWire Power
Cable Shielded
922-3709
AudioCable
922-3708
Ultra2 LVD
SCSI Cable
922-3717 Ver. 1
922-3861 Ver. 2
Front Panel
Cable
(Flat Gray)
922-3706
Phone Cable Ice
922-3763
Ultra ATA Cable
922-3714 Ver. 1
922-3860 Ver. 2
IDE / ATA Cable
922-3707
Ultra ATA Cable, Dual Drive
922-3862
Adapter
Mac to VGA
922-3764
FireWireCable Unshielded
922-3751
Apple USB Mouse
922-3727
Microphone
922-3680
Computer
Power Cord
Cable, Keyboard
Extension 922-3677
Apple USB Keyboard 922-3728