ZyXEL Communications IES-1248-51 User`s guide

IES-1248-51V
Default Login Details
IP Address
http://192.168.1.1
User Name
admin
Password
1234
Versionwww.zyxel.com
3.53
Edition 3, 06/2010
www.zyxel.com
Copyright © 2010
ZyXEL Communications Corporation
About This User's Guide
About This User's Guide
Intended Audience
This manual is intended for people who want to configure the IES-1248-51V using
the web configurator. You should have at least a basic knowledge of TCP/IP
networking concepts and topology.
Related Documentation
Note: It is recommended you use the web configurator to configure the IES-124851V.
• Supporting Disc
Refer to the included CD for support documents.
Documentation Feedback
Send your comments, questions or suggestions to: techwriters@zyxel.com.tw
Thank you!
The Technical Writing Team, ZyXEL Communications Corp.,
6 Innovation Road II, Science-Based Industrial Park, Hsinchu, 30099, Taiwan.
Need More Help?
More help is available at www.zyxel.com.
• Download Library
Search for the latest product updates and documentation from this link. Read
the Tech Doc Overview to find out how to efficiently use the documentation in
order to better understand how to use your product.
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
3
About This User's Guide
• Knowledge Base
If you have a specific question about your product, the answer may be here.
This is a collection of answers to previously asked questions about ZyXEL
products.
• Forum
This contains discussions on ZyXEL products. Learn from others who use ZyXEL
products and share your experiences as well.
Customer Support
Should problems arise that cannot be solved by the methods listed above, you
should contact your vendor. If you cannot contact your vendor, then contact a
ZyXEL office for the region in which you bought the device.
See http://www.zyxel.com/web/contact_us.php for contact information. Please
have the following information ready when you contact an office.
• Product model and serial number.
• Warranty Information.
• Date that you received your device.
• Brief description of the problem and the steps you took to solve it.
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IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Document Conventions
Document Conventions
Warnings and Notes
These are how warnings and notes are shown in this User’s Guide.
Warnings tell you about things that could harm you or your IES1248-51V.
Note: Notes tell you other important information (for example, other things you may
need to configure or helpful tips) or recommendations.
Syntax Conventions
• The IES-1248-51V may be referred to as the “IES-1248-51V”, the “device”, the
“system” or the “product” in this User’s Guide.
• Product labels, screen names, field labels and field choices are all in bold font.
• A key stroke is denoted by square brackets and uppercase text, for example,
[ENTER] means the “enter” or “return” key on your keyboard.
• “Enter” means for you to type one or more characters and then press the
[ENTER] key. “Select” or “choose” means for you to use one of the predefined
choices.
• A right angle bracket ( > ) within a screen name denotes a mouse click. For
example, Maintenance > Log > Log Setting means you first click
Maintenance in the navigation panel, then the Log sub menu and finally the
Log Setting tab to get to that screen.
• Units of measurement may denote the “metric” value or the “scientific” value.
For example, “k” for kilo may denote “1000” or “1024”, “M” for mega may
denote “1000000” or “1048576” and so on.
• “e.g.,” is a shorthand for “for instance”, and “i.e.,” means “that is” or “in other
words”.
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
5
Document Conventions
Icons Used in Figures
Figures in this User’s Guide may use the following generic icons. The IES-124851V icon is not an exact representation of your IES-1248-51V.
IES-1248-51V
Computer
Fiber Connection
Server
OLT
ADSL CPE
Telephone
Switch
Router
MDF
Splliter
Trunking Gateway
Internet
A Network
Optical Splitter
Internet
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IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Safety Warnings
Safety Warnings
• Do NOT use this product near water, for example, in a wet basement or near a swimming
pool.
• Do NOT expose your device to dampness, dust or corrosive liquids.
• Do NOT store things on the device.
• Do NOT install, use, or service this device during a thunderstorm. There is a remote risk
of electric shock from lightning.
• Connect ONLY suitable accessories to the device.
• ONLY qualified service personnel should service or disassemble this device.
• Make sure to connect the cables to the correct ports.
• Place connecting cables carefully so that no one will step on them or stumble over them.
• Always disconnect all cables from this device before servicing or disassembling.
• Use ONLY power wires of the appropriate wire gauge (see Chapter 71 on page 579 for
details) for your device. Connect it to a power supply of the correct voltage (see Chapter
71 on page 579 for details). .
• Do NOT allow anything to rest on the power adaptor or cord and do NOT place the
product where anyone can walk on the power adaptor or cord.
• Do NOT use the device if the power adaptor or cord is damaged as it might cause
electrocution.
• If the power adaptor or cord is damaged, remove it from the device and the power
source.
• Do NOT attempt to repair the power adaptor or cord. Contact your local vendor to order a
new one.
• Do not use the device outside, and make sure all the connections are indoors. There is a
remote risk of electric shock from lightning.
• Do NOT obstruct the device ventilation slots, as insufficient airflow may harm your
device.
• Ensure that the fan filter is in place before switching on the IES-1248-51V.
• Use only No. 26 AWG (American Wire Gauge) or larger telecommunication line cord.
• Fuse Warning! Replace a fuse only with a fuse of the same type and rating.
• Fan Module Warning! Use the fan module handle when pulling out or pushing in the fan
module. Be careful not to put fingers or objects inside the fan module.
• Warnings for the optical transceivers:
PRODUCT COMPLIES WITH 21 CFR 1040.10 AND 1040.11
PRODUIT CONFORME SELON 21CFR 1040.10 ET 1040.11
CLASS 1 LASER PRODUCT APPAREIL À LASER DE CLASSE 1
This product is recyclable. Dispose of it properly.
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
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Safety Warnings
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IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Contents Overview
Contents Overview
Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 33
Introducing the IES-1248-51V ................................................................................................... 35
Hardware Installation ................................................................................................................. 47
Front Panel Connections ........................................................................................................... 53
MDF Connections ...................................................................................................................... 61
Power Connections ................................................................................................................... 65
Fan Maintenance ....................................................................................................................... 67
Basic Settings ........................................................................................................................ 69
Introducing the Web Configurator .............................................................................................. 71
Tutorials ..................................................................................................................................... 79
Home and Port Statistics Screens ............................................................................................. 89
System Information .................................................................................................................... 97
General Setup ......................................................................................................................... 101
User Account ........................................................................................................................... 103
Switch Setup ............................................................................................................................ 107
IP Setup ....................................................................................................................................113
ENET Port Setup ......................................................................................................................117
xDSL Port Setup .......................................................................................................................119
xDSL Profiles Setup ................................................................................................................ 139
xDSL Line Data ....................................................................................................................... 151
Advanced Application ......................................................................................................... 161
VLAN ....................................................................................................................................... 163
IGMP ....................................................................................................................................... 171
Static Multicast ......................................................................................................................... 187
Multicast VLAN ........................................................................................................................ 189
Packet Filtering ........................................................................................................................ 195
MAC Filter ................................................................................................................................ 199
Spanning Tree Protocol ........................................................................................................... 201
Port Authentication .................................................................................................................. 209
Port Security ............................................................................................................................ 215
DHCP Relay ............................................................................................................................ 217
DHCP Snoop ........................................................................................................................... 223
2684 Routed Mode .................................................................................................................. 229
PPPoA to PPPoE .................................................................................................................... 237
DSCP ....................................................................................................................................... 243
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Contents Overview
TLS PVC .................................................................................................................................. 247
ACL .......................................................................................................................................... 251
Downstream Broadcast ........................................................................................................... 259
Syslog ...................................................................................................................................... 261
Access Control ........................................................................................................................ 263
IP Bridge .................................................................................................................................. 273
PPPoE Intermediate Agent ...................................................................................................... 295
Maximum MTU Size ................................................................................................................ 299
PVC Upstream Limit ................................................................................................................ 301
OUI Filter ................................................................................................................................. 303
Routing Protocol, Alarm, VoIP and Management ............................................................. 305
Static Routing .......................................................................................................................... 307
Alarm ....................................................................................................................................... 309
VoIP ......................................................................................................................................... 317
Maintenance ............................................................................................................................ 343
Diagnostic ................................................................................................................................ 347
MAC Table ............................................................................................................................... 355
ARP Table ................................................................................................................................ 359
Commands, Troubleshooting and Specifications ............................................................ 361
How to Access and Use the CLI .............................................................................................. 363
Common Commands ............................................................................................................... 369
System Commands ................................................................................................................. 377
Alarm Commands .................................................................................................................... 385
DHCP Commands ................................................................................................................... 393
OUI Filter ................................................................................................................................. 405
IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN and Isolation Commands ............................................................ 409
MAC Commands ..................................................................................................................... 419
IGMP Commands .................................................................................................................... 425
Packet Filter Commands ......................................................................................................... 437
Switch and Statistics Commands ............................................................................................ 441
IP Commands .......................................................................................................................... 447
IP Bridge Commands .............................................................................................................. 451
SNMP Commands ................................................................................................................... 467
ADSL Commands .................................................................................................................... 469
G.Bond ......................................................................................................................................511
Virtual Channel Commands ..................................................................................................... 515
ACL Commands ...................................................................................................................... 535
VoIP Commands ...................................................................................................................... 541
Firmware and Configuration File Maintenance ........................................................................ 561
Troubleshooting ....................................................................................................................... 567
Product Specifications ............................................................................................................. 579
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IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Contents Overview
Appendices and Index ......................................................................................................... 593
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
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Contents Overview
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IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
About This User's Guide .......................................................................................................... 3
Document Conventions............................................................................................................ 5
Safety Warnings........................................................................................................................ 7
Contents Overview ................................................................................................................... 9
Table of Contents.................................................................................................................... 13
Part I: Introduction................................................................................. 33
Chapter 1
Introducing the IES-1248-51V ................................................................................................ 35
1.1 Overview .............................................................................................................................. 35
1.1.1 Voice Features ........................................................................................................... 35
1.2 MDU Application .................................................................................................................. 36
1.3 System Description .............................................................................................................. 37
1.4 VoIP Features ...................................................................................................................... 41
1.5 Technical Reference ............................................................................................................ 45
Chapter 2
Hardware Installation.............................................................................................................. 47
2.1 General Installation Instructions .......................................................................................... 47
2.2 Dust Filter Installation .......................................................................................................... 47
2.3 Installation Scenarios .......................................................................................................... 49
2.3.1 Desktop Installation Procedure .................................................................................. 49
2.3.2 Rack-Mounted Installation .......................................................................................... 50
Chapter 3
Front Panel Connections ....................................................................................................... 53
3.1 Front Panel .......................................................................................................................... 53
3.1.1 Front Panel Ports ....................................................................................................... 53
3.1.2 Front Panel LEDs ....................................................................................................... 54
3.2 1000/100M Auto-Sensing Ethernet ..................................................................................... 55
3.2.1 Ethernet Default Settings ........................................................................................... 55
3.3 SFP Mini GBIC Slots ........................................................................................................... 55
3.3.1 Transceiver Installation ............................................................................................. 56
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3.3.2 Transceiver Removal ................................................................................................. 57
3.4 Console Port Connection ..................................................................................................... 58
3.5 ALARM Connections ........................................................................................................... 58
3.6 ADSL Connections .............................................................................................................. 58
Chapter 4
MDF Connections ................................................................................................................... 61
4.1 MDF Connections Overview ................................................................................................ 61
4.2 MDF (Main Distribution Frame) ........................................................................................... 62
4.3 Telco-50 Cables ................................................................................................................... 62
Chapter 5
Power Connections ................................................................................................................ 65
5.1 Power Connections Overview ............................................................................................. 65
5.2 Power Connection ............................................................................................................... 65
Chapter 6
Fan Maintenance..................................................................................................................... 67
6.1 Fan Maintenance Introduction ............................................................................................. 67
6.2 Removing and Installing the Fan Module ............................................................................ 67
Part II: Basic Settings ............................................................................ 69
Chapter 7
Introducing the Web Configurator ........................................................................................ 71
7.1 Web Configurator Overview ................................................................................................. 71
7.2 Screen Privilege Levels ....................................................................................................... 71
7.3 Accessing the Web Configurator ......................................................................................... 71
7.4 Navigation Panel ................................................................................................................. 73
7.5 Changing Your Password .................................................................................................... 76
7.6 Saving Your Configuration ................................................................................................... 77
7.7 Logging Out of the Web Configurator .................................................................................. 77
Chapter 8
Tutorials ................................................................................................................................... 79
8.1 Initial Configuration Overview .............................................................................................. 79
8.2 Initial Configuration .............................................................................................................. 79
8.3 H.248 Configuration Example .............................................................................................. 85
Chapter 9
Home and Port Statistics Screens......................................................................................... 89
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Table of Contents
9.1 Home Screen ....................................................................................................................... 89
9.1.1 Ethernet Port Statistics Screen .................................................................................. 91
9.1.2 ADSL Port Statistics Screen ....................................................................................... 94
Chapter 10
System Information ................................................................................................................ 97
Chapter 11
General Setup........................................................................................................................ 101
Chapter 12
User Account......................................................................................................................... 103
12.1 User Account Screen ....................................................................................................... 103
12.2 Authentication Screen ..................................................................................................... 105
Chapter 13
Switch Setup ......................................................................................................................... 107
13.1 GARP Timer Setup .......................................................................................................... 107
13.2 Switch Modes .................................................................................................................. 107
13.2.1 Standalone Switch Mode ........................................................................................ 107
13.2.2 Port Isolation with Standalone Switch Mode Example ........................................... 108
13.2.3 Daisychain Switch Mode ........................................................................................ 108
13.2.4 Port Isolation with Daisychain Switch Mode Example ............................................ 109
13.3 Switch Setup Screen ........................................................................................................110
Chapter 14
IP Setup.................................................................................................................................. 113
Chapter 15
ENET Port Setup ................................................................................................................... 117
Chapter 16
xDSL Port Setup.................................................................................................................... 119
16.1 ADSL Standards Overview ...............................................................................................119
16.2 Downstream and Upstream ..............................................................................................119
16.3 Profiles ..............................................................................................................................119
16.4 Interleave Delay ............................................................................................................... 120
16.4.1 Fast Mode .............................................................................................................. 120
16.5 Configured Versus Actual Rate ....................................................................................... 120
16.6 Default Settings ............................................................................................................... 121
16.7 xDSL Port Setup Screen ................................................................................................. 121
16.7.1 xDSL Port Setting Screen ...................................................................................... 124
16.8 Virtual Channels .............................................................................................................. 128
16.8.1 Super Channel ....................................................................................................... 128
16.8.2 LLC ......................................................................................................................... 128
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Table of Contents
16.8.3 VC Mux .................................................................................................................. 128
16.8.4 Virtual Channel Profile ........................................................................................... 129
16.9 VC Setup Screen ............................................................................................................. 129
16.10 Priority-based PVCs ...................................................................................................... 133
16.11 PPVC Setup Screen ...................................................................................................... 134
16.11.1 PPVC Setup Members Screen ............................................................................. 136
Chapter 17
xDSL Profiles Setup.............................................................................................................. 139
17.1 Port Profile Screen .......................................................................................................... 139
17.2 ATM QoS ......................................................................................................................... 142
17.3 Traffic Shaping ................................................................................................................. 142
17.3.1 ATM Traffic Classes ............................................................................................... 142
17.3.2 Traffic Parameters .................................................................................................. 143
17.4 Upstream Policing ........................................................................................................... 145
17.5 VC Profile Screen ............................................................................................................ 146
17.6 Alarm Profile Screen ........................................................................................................ 148
Chapter 18
xDSL Line Data...................................................................................................................... 151
18.1 xDSL Line Rate Info Screen ............................................................................................ 151
18.2 xDSL Line Data Screen ................................................................................................... 153
18.3 xDSL Performance Screen .............................................................................................. 155
18.4 G.Bond Screen ................................................................................................................ 158
Part III: Advanced Application ............................................................ 161
Chapter 19
VLAN ...................................................................................................................................... 163
19.1 Introduction to VLANs ...................................................................................................... 163
19.2 Introduction to IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN ..................................................................... 163
19.2.1 Forwarding Tagged and Untagged Frames ............................................................ 164
19.3 VLAN Status Screen ........................................................................................................ 165
19.4 Static VLAN Setting Screen ............................................................................................. 167
19.5 VLAN Port Setting Screen ............................................................................................... 169
Chapter 20
IGMP....................................................................................................................................... 171
20.1 IGMP ............................................................................................................................... 171
20.2 IP Multicast Addresses .................................................................................................... 171
20.2.1 IGMP Snooping ...................................................................................................... 171
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Table of Contents
20.2.2 IGMP Proxy ............................................................................................................ 172
20.3 IGMP Status Screen ........................................................................................................ 174
20.4 IGMP Bandwidth Screen ................................................................................................. 176
20.5 Bandwidth Port Setup Screen ......................................................................................... 177
20.6 Config Screen .................................................................................................................. 179
20.7 IGMP Filter Screen .......................................................................................................... 180
20.8 IGMP Port Group Screen ................................................................................................ 182
20.9 IGMP Port Info Screen .................................................................................................... 183
20.10 IGMP Count Screen ...................................................................................................... 184
Chapter 21
Static Multicast...................................................................................................................... 187
21.1 Static Multicast ................................................................................................................. 187
21.2 Static Multicast Screen .................................................................................................... 187
Chapter 22
Multicast VLAN...................................................................................................................... 189
22.1 Multicast VLAN Overview ................................................................................................ 189
22.2 MVLAN Status Screen ..................................................................................................... 190
22.3 MVLAN Setup Screen ..................................................................................................... 191
22.4 MVLAN Group Screen ..................................................................................................... 193
Chapter 23
Packet Filtering ..................................................................................................................... 195
23.1 Packet Filter Screen ........................................................................................................ 195
Chapter 24
MAC Filter .............................................................................................................................. 199
24.1 MAC Filter Introduction .................................................................................................... 199
24.2 MAC Filter Screen ........................................................................................................... 199
Chapter 25
Spanning Tree Protocol........................................................................................................ 201
25.1 RSTP and STP ................................................................................................................ 201
25.2 Spanning Tree Protocol Status Screen ............................................................................ 204
25.3 Spanning Tree Protocol Screen ....................................................................................... 206
Chapter 26
Port Authentication............................................................................................................... 209
26.1 Introduction to Authentication .......................................................................................... 209
26.1.1 RADIUS .................................................................................................................. 209
26.1.2 Introduction to Local User Database ...................................................................... 209
26.2 RADIUS Screen ............................................................................................................... 210
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Table of Contents
26.3 802.1x Screen ................................................................................................................. 212
Chapter 27
Port Security.......................................................................................................................... 215
27.1 Port Security Overview .................................................................................................... 215
27.2 Port Security Screen ........................................................................................................ 215
Chapter 28
DHCP Relay ........................................................................................................................... 217
28.1 DHCP Relay .................................................................................................................... 217
28.2 DHCP Relay Agent Information Option (Option 82) ........................................................ 217
28.2.1 Private Format ........................................................................................................ 217
28.2.2 TR-101 Format ....................................................................................................... 218
28.3 DHCP Relay Screen ........................................................................................................ 219
Chapter 29
DHCP Snoop.......................................................................................................................... 223
29.1 DHCP Snoop Overview ................................................................................................... 223
29.2 DHCP Snoop Screen ....................................................................................................... 224
29.3 DHCP Snoop Status Screen ............................................................................................ 225
29.4 DHCP Counter Screen .................................................................................................... 227
Chapter 30
2684 Routed Mode ................................................................................................................ 229
30.1 2684 Routed Mode .......................................................................................................... 229
30.1.1 2684 Routed Mode Example .................................................................................. 229
30.2 2684 Routed PVC Screen ............................................................................................... 230
30.3 2684 Routed Domain Screen .......................................................................................... 232
30.4 RPVC Arp Proxy Screen ................................................................................................. 234
30.5 2684 Routed Gateway Screen ........................................................................................ 235
Chapter 31
PPPoA to PPPoE................................................................................................................... 237
31.1 PPPoA to PPPoE Overview ............................................................................................ 237
31.2 PPPoA to PPPoE Screen ................................................................................................ 238
31.3 PPPoA to PPPoE Status Screen ..................................................................................... 241
Chapter 32
DSCP ...................................................................................................................................... 243
32.1 DSCP Overview ............................................................................................................... 243
32.2 DSCP Setup Screen ........................................................................................................ 243
32.3 DSCP Map Screen .......................................................................................................... 244
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IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Table of Contents
Chapter 33
TLS PVC................................................................................................................................. 247
33.1 Transparent LAN Service (TLS) Overview ...................................................................... 247
33.1.1 TLS Network Example ........................................................................................... 248
33.2 TLS PVC Screen ............................................................................................................. 248
Chapter 34
ACL......................................................................................................................................... 251
34.1 Access Control List (ACL) Overview ............................................................................... 251
34.1.1 ACL Profile Rules ................................................................................................... 251
34.1.2 ACL Profile Actions ................................................................................................ 252
34.2 ACL Setup Screen ........................................................................................................... 253
34.3 ACL Profile Screen .......................................................................................................... 255
34.4 ACL Profile Map Screen .................................................................................................. 257
Chapter 35
Downstream Broadcast........................................................................................................ 259
35.1 Downstream Broadcast ................................................................................................... 259
35.2 Downstream Broadcast Screen ....................................................................................... 259
Chapter 36
Syslog .................................................................................................................................... 261
36.1 Syslog .............................................................................................................................. 261
36.2 SysLog Screen ................................................................................................................ 261
Chapter 37
Access Control...................................................................................................................... 263
37.1 Access Control Screen .................................................................................................... 263
37.2 Access Control Overview ................................................................................................ 263
37.3 SNMP .............................................................................................................................. 264
37.3.1 Supported MIBs ..................................................................................................... 265
37.3.2 SNMP Traps ........................................................................................................... 266
37.4 SNMP Screen .................................................................................................................. 268
37.5 Service Access Control Screen ....................................................................................... 269
37.6 Remote Management Screen .......................................................................................... 270
Chapter 38
IP Bridge ................................................................................................................................ 273
38.1 IP Bridge Overview .......................................................................................................... 273
38.1.1 Upstream and Downstream Traffic ......................................................................... 274
38.1.2 IP Bridge Settings .................................................................................................. 275
38.1.3 IP Bridge Configuration .......................................................................................... 277
38.2 IPB PVC Screen .............................................................................................................. 278
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Table of Contents
38.3 IPB Domain Screen ......................................................................................................... 280
38.3.1 Configure IPB Domain Screen ............................................................................... 282
38.4 IPB Edge Router Screen ................................................................................................. 284
38.5 IPB Downlink Interface Screen ........................................................................................ 285
38.5.1 Current Interfaces Screen ...................................................................................... 288
38.6 IPB Routing Table Screen ............................................................................................... 289
38.6.1 Current Routes Screen .......................................................................................... 291
38.7 IPB ARP Proxy Screen .................................................................................................... 293
Chapter 39
PPPoE Intermediate Agent................................................................................................... 295
39.1 PPPoE Intermediate Agent Tag Formate ........................................................................ 295
39.2 PPPoE Intermediate Agent Screen ................................................................................. 297
Chapter 40
Maximum MTU Size .............................................................................................................. 299
40.1 Maximum MTU Size Screen ............................................................................................ 299
Chapter 41
PVC Upstream Limit.............................................................................................................. 301
41.1 PVC Upstream Limit Screen ............................................................................................ 301
Chapter 42
OUI Filter................................................................................................................................ 303
42.1 OUI Filter Screen ............................................................................................................. 303
Part IV: Routing Protocol, Alarm, VoIP and Management ................ 305
Chapter 43
Static Routing........................................................................................................................ 307
Chapter 44
Alarm...................................................................................................................................... 309
44.1 Alarm ............................................................................................................................... 309
44.2 Alarm Status Screen ........................................................................................................ 309
44.3 Alarm Descriptions .......................................................................................................... 310
44.4 Alarm Event Setup Screen .............................................................................................. 313
44.4.1 Edit Alarm Event Setup Screen .............................................................................. 314
44.5 Alarm Port Setup Screen ................................................................................................. 316
Chapter 45
VoIP ........................................................................................................................................ 317
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IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Table of Contents
45.1 VoIP Overview ................................................................................................................. 317
45.1.1 Introduction to H.248 .............................................................................................. 317
45.1.2 Termination ............................................................................................................. 318
45.1.3 H.248 Commands .................................................................................................. 319
45.1.4 H.248/MEGACO Call Progression Example ......................................................... 319
45.1.5 RTP ........................................................................................................................ 321
45.1.6 Voice Coding .......................................................................................................... 321
45.1.7 PSTN Call Setup Signaling .................................................................................... 322
45.1.8 VoIP and VoiceBand Data (VBD) ........................................................................... 323
45.2 VoIP Port Setup Screens ................................................................................................. 323
45.2.1 Port View Screen ................................................................................................... 324
45.2.2 Port Edit Screen ..................................................................................................... 326
45.2.3 General Screen ...................................................................................................... 328
45.3 H.248 Profile Screen ....................................................................................................... 331
45.4 DSP Profile Screen .......................................................................................................... 333
45.5 Media Gateway Screen ................................................................................................... 335
45.6 VoIP Line Status and Info Screen .................................................................................... 336
45.7 Diagnostic Screens .......................................................................................................... 339
45.7.1 MLT Test Screen .................................................................................................... 339
45.7.2 MLT Relay .............................................................................................................. 342
Chapter 46
Maintenance .......................................................................................................................... 343
46.1 Maintenance Screen ........................................................................................................ 343
46.2 Firmware Upgrade Screen .............................................................................................. 343
46.3 Restore Configuration Screen ......................................................................................... 344
46.4 Backing Up a Configuration File ...................................................................................... 345
46.5 Load Factory Defaults ..................................................................................................... 345
46.6 Reboot System ................................................................................................................ 346
46.7 Command Line FTP ........................................................................................................ 346
Chapter 47
Diagnostic.............................................................................................................................. 347
47.1 Diagnostic Screen ........................................................................................................... 347
47.2 Log Format ...................................................................................................................... 350
47.2.1 Log Messages ........................................................................................................ 350
47.3 LDM Test Parameters ...................................................................................................... 352
47.4 ToneDiag Parameters ...................................................................................................... 353
Chapter 48
MAC Table.............................................................................................................................. 355
48.1 Introduction to MAC Table ............................................................................................... 355
48.2 MAC Table Screen ........................................................................................................... 356
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Table of Contents
Chapter 49
ARP Table .............................................................................................................................. 359
49.1 Introduction to ARP Table ................................................................................................ 359
49.1.1 How ARP Works .................................................................................................... 359
49.2 ARP Table Screen ........................................................................................................... 360
Part V: Commands, Troubleshooting and Specifications ................ 361
Chapter 50
How to Access and Use the CLI .......................................................................................... 363
50.1 Accessing the CLI ............................................................................................................ 363
50.1.1 Console Port .......................................................................................................... 363
50.1.2 Telnet ...................................................................................................................... 363
50.1.3 SSH ........................................................................................................................ 364
50.2 Logging in ........................................................................................................................ 364
50.3 Command Conventions ................................................................................................... 365
50.4 Using Shortcuts and Getting Help ................................................................................... 367
50.5 Command Privilege Levels .............................................................................................. 367
50.6 Saving Your Configuration ............................................................................................... 368
50.7 Logging Out ..................................................................................................................... 368
Chapter 51
Common Commands............................................................................................................ 369
51.1 Port Selection .................................................................................................................. 369
51.2 IP Status .......................................................................................................................... 370
51.3 Configuration Status ........................................................................................................ 371
51.4 Reset to Defaults ............................................................................................................. 371
51.5 Port and VLAN Isolation .................................................................................................. 372
51.5.1 Isolation Show Command ...................................................................................... 372
51.5.2 Port Isolation Enable Command ............................................................................ 372
51.5.3 Port Isolation Disable Command ............................................................................ 373
51.5.4 VLAN Isolation Set Command ............................................................................... 373
51.5.5 VLAN Isolation Delete Command .......................................................................... 373
51.6 Statistics Monitor Command ............................................................................................ 374
51.7 Statistics Port Command ................................................................................................. 375
Chapter 52
System Commands............................................................................................................... 377
52.1 System Commands ......................................................................................................... 377
52.1.1 Idle Timeout Set Command Example ..................................................................... 379
52.1.2 Basic System Information Command Examples .................................................... 380
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52.1.3 Logs Command Examples ..................................................................................... 381
52.1.4 Clearing the Log ..................................................................................................... 384
Chapter 53
Alarm Commands ................................................................................................................. 385
53.1 General Alarm Command Parameters ............................................................................ 385
53.2 Alarm Commands ............................................................................................................ 386
53.2.1 Alarm Show Command Example ........................................................................... 387
53.2.2 Alarm Port Show Command Example .................................................................... 388
53.2.3 Alarm Port Set Command Example ....................................................................... 389
53.2.4 Alarm Tablelist Command Example ....................................................................... 389
53.2.5 Log Format ............................................................................................................. 389
53.2.6 Alarm History Show Command Example ............................................................... 390
53.2.7 Alarm History Clear Command Example ............................................................... 390
53.2.8 Alarm XEdit Command Example ............................................................................ 391
Chapter 54
DHCP Commands ................................................................................................................. 393
54.1 General DHCP Command Parameters ........................................................................... 393
54.2 DHCP Relay Commands ................................................................................................. 393
54.2.1 Show Command Example ...................................................................................... 395
54.3 DHCP Relay Option 82 Sub-option 1 Commands ........................................................... 396
54.4 DHCP Relay Option 82 Sub-option 2 Commands ........................................................... 396
54.5 PPPoE Intermediate Agent Information Commands ....................................................... 397
54.5.1 PPPoE Intermediate Agent Enable Command Example ....................................... 398
54.5.2 PPPoE Intermediate Agent Info Command Example ............................................. 399
54.5.3 PPPoE Intermediate Agent Set Command Example ............................................. 399
54.5.4 PPPoE Intermediate Agent Show Command Example .......................................... 399
54.6 DHCP Snoop Commands ................................................................................................ 400
54.6.1 DHCP Snoop Enable Command Example ............................................................. 401
54.6.2 DHCP Snoop Set Static IP Command Example .................................................... 401
54.6.3 DHCP Snoop Delete Static IP Command Example ............................................... 402
54.6.4 DHCP Snoop Show Command Example ............................................................... 402
54.6.5 DHCP Counter Statistics Command Example ....................................................... 402
54.6.6 DHCP Snoop Statistics Command Example .......................................................... 403
Chapter 55
OUI Filter................................................................................................................................ 405
55.1 OUI Filtering .................................................................................................................... 405
55.1.1 OUI Set and Delete Command Examples .............................................................. 406
55.1.2 OUI Enable and Disable Command Examples ...................................................... 406
55.1.3 OUI Mode Command Example .............................................................................. 407
55.1.4 OUI Show Command Example .............................................................................. 407
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Chapter 56
IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN and Isolation Commands....................................................... 409
56.1 IEEE 802.1Q Tagging Types ........................................................................................... 409
56.2 Filtering Databases .......................................................................................................... 409
56.2.1 Static Entries (SVLAN Table) ................................................................................. 410
56.3 IEEE VLAN1Q Tagged VLAN Configuration Commands ............................................... 410
56.3.1 VLAN Port Show Command Example .................................................................... 412
56.3.2 VLAN PVID Command Example ............................................................................ 412
56.3.3 VLAN Priority Command Example ......................................................................... 412
56.3.4 VLAN Set Command Examples ............................................................................. 413
56.3.5 VLAN Frame Type Command Example ................................................................. 414
56.3.6 VLAN CPU Show Command Example ................................................................... 414
56.3.7 VLAN CPU Set Command Example ...................................................................... 414
56.3.8 Configuring Management VLAN Example ............................................................. 414
56.3.9 VLAN Delete Command Example .......................................................................... 415
56.3.10 VLAN Show Command Example ......................................................................... 415
56.4 VLAN Statistics Commands ............................................................................................ 415
56.5 GARP Timer Commands ................................................................................................ 416
56.6 Isolation Commands ....................................................................................................... 416
Chapter 57
MAC Commands ................................................................................................................... 419
57.1 MAC Filter Commands .................................................................................................... 419
57.1.1 MAC Filter Show Command Example .................................................................... 420
57.1.2 MAC Filter Enable Command Example ................................................................. 420
57.1.3 MAC Filter Disable Command Example ................................................................ 420
57.1.4 MAC Filter Mode Command Example .................................................................... 420
57.1.5 MAC Filter Set Command Example ....................................................................... 420
57.1.6 MAC Filter Delete Command Example .................................................................. 421
57.2 MAC Count Commands ................................................................................................... 421
57.2.1 MAC Count Show Command Example .................................................................. 422
57.2.2 MAC Count Enable Command Example ................................................................ 422
57.2.3 MAC Count Disable Command Example ............................................................... 422
57.2.4 MAC Count Set Command Example ...................................................................... 422
57.3 MAC Anti-Spoofing Commands ....................................................................................... 422
Chapter 58
IGMP Commands ..................................................................................................................425
58.1 IGMP Snooping Commands ............................................................................................ 425
58.1.1 IGMP Snoop Show Example .................................................................................. 425
58.1.2 IGMP Snoop Enable Example ............................................................................... 425
58.1.3 IGMP Snoop Disable Command Example ............................................................. 426
58.2 IGMP Filter Commands ................................................................................................... 426
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58.2.1 IGMP Filter Show Command Example .................................................................. 427
58.2.2 IGMP Filter Set Command Example ...................................................................... 427
58.2.3 IGMP Filter Profile Set Command Example ........................................................... 427
58.2.4 IGMP Filter Profile Delete Command Example ...................................................... 427
58.2.5 IGMP Filter Profile Show Command Example ....................................................... 428
58.3 IGMP Bandwidth Commands .......................................................................................... 428
58.4 IGMP Bandwidth Port Commands ................................................................................... 429
58.4.1 IGMP Bandwidth Port Show Command Example .................................................. 430
58.5 IGMP Count Limit Commands ......................................................................................... 430
58.5.1 IGMP Count Disable Command Example .............................................................. 430
58.5.2 IGMP Count Enable Command Example ............................................................... 431
58.5.3 IGMP Count Set Command Example .................................................................... 431
58.5.4 IGMP Count Show Command Example ................................................................. 431
58.6 IGMP Snoop Statistics Commands ................................................................................. 431
58.6.1 IGMP Snoop Info Statistics Command Example .................................................... 432
58.6.2 IGMP Group Statistics Command Example ........................................................... 432
58.6.3 IGMP Port Info Statistics Command Example ....................................................... 432
58.6.4 IGMP Port Group Statistics Command Example ................................................... 432
58.7 IGMP Query VLAN Commands ....................................................................................... 433
58.8 Multicast VLAN Commands ............................................................................................. 433
58.8.1 Multicast VLAN Disable Command Example ......................................................... 435
58.8.2 Multicast VLAN Show Command Example ............................................................ 435
58.8.3 Multicast VLAN Group Set Command Example ..................................................... 435
Chapter 59
Packet Filter Commands ...................................................................................................... 437
59.1 Command Summary ........................................................................................................ 437
59.1.1 Packet Filter Show Command Example ................................................................. 438
59.1.2 Packet Filter Set Command Example .................................................................... 439
59.1.3 Packet Filter PPPoE Only Command Example ...................................................... 439
Chapter 60
Switch and Statistics Commands........................................................................................ 441
60.1 IEEE 802.1x Commands ................................................................................................. 441
60.2 DSCP Commands ........................................................................................................... 442
60.3 Ethernet Commands ........................................................................................................ 442
60.4 Queuemap Commands ................................................................................................... 443
60.5 RSTP Commands ............................................................................................................ 443
60.6 Static Multicast Commands ............................................................................................. 444
60.7 RMON Command ............................................................................................................ 445
Chapter 61
IP Commands ........................................................................................................................ 447
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61.1 General IP Commands .................................................................................................... 447
61.1.1 IP Settings and Default Gateway Example ............................................................ 449
61.1.2 Route Show Command Example ........................................................................... 449
61.1.3 ARP Show Command Example ............................................................................. 449
61.2 Statistics IP Command Example ..................................................................................... 450
Chapter 62
IP Bridge Commands............................................................................................................ 451
62.1 IP Bridge Command Input Values .................................................................................... 451
62.2 IP Bridge Domain Commands ......................................................................................... 452
62.2.1 IP Bridge Domain Show Command Example ........................................................ 454
62.2.2 IP Bridge Domain DHCP VLAN Enable Command Example ................................. 454
62.2.3 IP Bridge Domain VLAN Registration Command Example .................................... 455
62.3 IP Bridge Edge Router Commands ................................................................................. 455
62.3.1 IP Bridge Edge Router Set Command Example .................................................... 455
62.3.2 IP Bridge Edge Router Show Command Example ................................................. 456
62.3.3 IP Bridge Edge Router Delete Command Example ............................................... 456
62.4 IP Bridge Routing Table Commands ............................................................................... 456
62.4.1 IP Bridge Route Set Command Example ............................................................... 457
62.4.2 IP Bridge Route Show Command Example ........................................................... 458
62.4.3 IP Bridge Route Runtime Command Example ....................................................... 458
62.4.4 IP Bridge Route Delete Command Example .......................................................... 459
62.5 IP Bridge Downlink Interface Commands ........................................................................ 459
62.5.1 IP Bridge Downlink Interface Set Command Example ........................................... 460
62.5.2 IP Bridge Downlink Interface Show Command Example ....................................... 461
62.5.3 IP Bridge Downlink Interface Runtime Command Example ................................... 461
62.5.4 IP Bridge Downlink Interface Delete Command Example ...................................... 462
62.6 IP Bridge PVC Commands .............................................................................................. 462
62.6.1 IP Bridge PVC Show Command Example ............................................................. 463
62.6.2 IP Bridge PVC Set Command Example ................................................................. 463
62.6.3 IP Bridge PVC Delete Command Example ............................................................ 464
62.7 IP Bridge ARP Proxy Commands .................................................................................... 464
62.7.1 IP Bridge ARP Proxy Agingtime Show Command Example .................................. 465
62.7.2 IP Bridge ARP Proxy Show Command Example ................................................... 465
Chapter 63
SNMP Commands ................................................................................................................. 467
63.1 SNMP Commands ........................................................................................................... 467
Chapter 64
ADSL Commands..................................................................................................................469
64.1 ADSL Command Input Values ......................................................................................... 469
64.2 ADSL Commands ............................................................................................................ 470
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64.2.1 ADSL Show Command Example ........................................................................... 476
64.2.2 ADSL Name Command Example ........................................................................... 476
64.2.3 ADSL Tel Command Example ................................................................................ 477
64.2.4 ADSL Loopback Command Example ..................................................................... 477
64.2.5 ADSL Upstream PSD Command Example ............................................................ 477
64.2.6 ADSL Downstream PSD Command Example ........................................................ 477
64.2.7 ADSL Upstream Carrier Command Example ......................................................... 477
64.2.8 ADSL Downstream Carrier0 Command Example .................................................. 478
64.2.9 ADSL Downstream Carrier1 Command Example .................................................. 479
64.2.10 PMM Parameters Command Example ................................................................. 479
64.2.11 Impulse Noise Protection Command Example ..................................................... 480
64.3 ADSL Profile Commands ................................................................................................. 481
64.3.1 ADSL Profile Show Command Example ................................................................ 484
64.3.2 ADSL Profile Set Command Example .................................................................... 484
64.3.3 ADSL Profile Delete Command Example ............................................................... 485
64.3.4 ADSL Profile Map Command Example .................................................................. 485
64.4 Statistics ADSL Commands ............................................................................................. 486
64.4.1 ADSL Show Command Example ........................................................................... 489
64.4.2 Linedata Command Example ................................................................................. 490
64.4.3 ADSL Lineinfo Command Example ........................................................................ 491
64.4.4 Lineperf Command Example .................................................................................. 492
64.4.5 15 Minute Performance Command Example ......................................................... 493
64.4.6 1 Day Performance Command Example ................................................................ 495
64.4.7 Line Diagnostics Set Command Example .............................................................. 495
64.4.8 Line Diagnostics Get Command Example ............................................................. 496
64.4.9 Line Diagnostics Get 992.3 Command Example ................................................... 498
64.4.10 SELT Diagnostic Set Command Example ............................................................ 500
64.4.11 SELT Diagnostic Get Command Example ............................................................ 500
64.4.12 Tone Diagnostics 992.3 Command Example ....................................................... 501
64.5 Alarm Profile Commands ................................................................................................. 503
64.5.1 Alarm Profile Show Command Example ................................................................ 508
64.5.2 Alarm Profile Set Command Example .................................................................... 508
64.5.3 Alarm Profile Delete Command Example ............................................................... 508
64.5.4 Alarm Profile Map Command Example .................................................................. 509
64.5.5 Alarm Profile Showmap Command Example ......................................................... 509
Chapter 65
G.Bond ................................................................................................................................... 511
65.1 ADSL Port Bonding ..........................................................................................................511
65.1.1 G.Bond Set and Delete Command Examples ........................................................ 512
65.1.2 G.Bond Show Example .......................................................................................... 512
65.1.3 Statistics ADSL G.Bond Command Example ......................................................... 512
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Chapter 66
Virtual Channel Commands ................................................................................................. 515
66.1 Virtual Channel Command Input Values .......................................................................... 515
66.2 Virtual Channel Profile Commands .................................................................................. 516
66.2.1 Set Virtual Channel Profile Command .................................................................. 517
66.2.2 Delete Virtual Channel Profile Command ............................................................. 518
66.3 PVC Channels ................................................................................................................. 518
66.3.1 PVC Set Command ................................................................................................ 519
66.4 Priority-based PVCs ........................................................................................................ 519
66.4.1 PPVC Set Command Example .............................................................................. 520
66.4.2 PPVC Member Set Command Example ................................................................ 520
66.4.3 PPVC Member Delete Command Example ........................................................... 521
66.4.4 PPVC Member Show Command Example ............................................................. 521
66.4.5 PPVC Show Command Example ........................................................................... 521
66.4.6 PPVC Delete Command Example ......................................................................... 521
66.5 2684 Routed Mode Commands ....................................................................................... 521
66.5.1 2684 Routed Mode Example .................................................................................. 523
66.5.2 RPVC Gateway Set Command Example ............................................................... 525
66.5.3 RPVC Gateway Show Command Example ........................................................... 525
66.5.4 RPVC Gateway Delete Command Example .......................................................... 525
66.5.5 RPVC Set Command Example .............................................................................. 525
66.5.6 RPVC Show Command Example ........................................................................... 526
66.5.7 RPVC Delete Command Example ......................................................................... 526
66.5.8 RPVC Route Set Command Example .................................................................... 526
66.5.9 RPVC Route Show Command Example ................................................................ 526
66.5.10 RPVC Route Delete Command Example ............................................................. 527
66.5.11 RPVC ARP Agingtime Set Command Example ................................................... 527
66.5.12 RPVC ARP Agingtime Show Command Example ............................................... 527
66.5.13 RPVC ARP Show Command Example ................................................................ 527
66.6 PPPoA to PPPoE (PAE) Translation .............................................................................. 528
66.6.1 PAE PVC Set Command Example ......................................................................... 529
66.6.2 PAE PVC Show Command Example ..................................................................... 529
66.6.3 PAE PVC Session Command Example ................................................................. 530
66.6.4 PAE PVC Counter Command Example ................................................................. 530
66.7 Transparent LAN Service (TLS) ..................................................................................... 531
66.7.1 TLS PVC Set Command Example ......................................................................... 532
66.7.2 TLS PVC Show Command Example ..................................................................... 532
66.8 IP Bridge PVC Commands .............................................................................................. 533
66.9 PVC Upstream Limit Commands ..................................................................................... 533
66.9.1 Show PVC Upstream Limit Command Example .................................................... 533
66.9.2 Enable PVC Upstream Limit Command Example .................................................. 534
66.9.3 Disable PVC Upstream Limit Command Example ................................................. 534
66.9.4 Set PVC Upstream Limit Command Example ........................................................ 534
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Chapter 67
ACL Commands .................................................................................................................... 535
67.1 ACL Profile Commands ................................................................................................... 535
67.1.1 ACL Profile Set Command Example ...................................................................... 538
67.1.2 ACL Profile Show Map Command Example .......................................................... 538
67.1.3 ACL Profile Show Command Example .................................................................. 538
67.2 ACL Assignment Commands .......................................................................................... 539
67.2.1 ACL Assignment Set Command Example ............................................................. 539
67.2.2 ACL Assignment Show Command Example .......................................................... 539
Chapter 68
VoIP Commands.................................................................................................................... 541
68.1 General VoIP Command Parameters .............................................................................. 541
68.2 VoIP Show Commands .................................................................................................... 541
68.2.1 voip show voip h248 mg Command Example ........................................................ 542
68.3 voip countrycode Commands .......................................................................................... 542
68.3.1 voip countrycode set Command Example .............................................................. 543
68.3.2 voip countrycode show Command Example .......................................................... 544
68.4 voip diagnostic Commands ............................................................................................. 545
68.4.1 voip diagnostic mlt test Command Example .......................................................... 546
68.4.2 diagnostic mlt show Command Example ............................................................... 547
68.4.3 voip diagnostic mlt relay set Command Example .................................................. 547
68.5 voip ip Commands ........................................................................................................... 548
68.5.1 voip ip set Command Example .............................................................................. 548
68.5.2 voip ip dns Command Example ............................................................................. 548
68.6 voip port Commands ....................................................................................................... 549
68.6.1 voip port pots gain command Example .................................................................. 550
68.6.2 voip port pots impedance command Example ....................................................... 550
68.6.3 voip port show command Example ........................................................................ 550
68.6.4 voip port h248 set Command ................................................................................. 550
68.7 voip profile dsp Commands ............................................................................................. 551
68.7.1 voip profile dsp delete Command Example ............................................................ 553
68.7.2 voip profile dsp map Command Example .............................................................. 553
68.7.3 voip profile dsp show Command Example ............................................................. 553
68.7.4 voip profile dsp set Command Example ................................................................. 553
68.8 voip profile h248 Commands ........................................................................................... 554
68.8.1 voip profile h248 delete Command Example ......................................................... 558
68.8.2 voip profile h248 set Command Example .............................................................. 558
68.8.3 voip profile h248 show Command .......................................................................... 559
68.9 voip h248 mg Commands ................................................................................................ 559
68.9.1 voip h248 mg enable Command Example ............................................................. 559
68.9.2 voip h248 mg set Command Example ................................................................... 559
68.9.3 voip h248 mg show Command ............................................................................... 560
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Chapter 69
Firmware and Configuration File Maintenance .................................................................. 561
69.1 Firmware and Configuration File Maintenance Overview ................................................ 561
69.2 Filename Conventions ..................................................................................................... 561
69.3 Editable Configuration File .............................................................................................. 562
69.3.1 Editable Configuration File Backup ....................................................................... 563
69.3.2 Edit Configuration File ........................................................................................... 563
69.3.3 Editable Configuration File Upload ......................................................................... 564
69.4 Firmware File Upgrade ................................................................................................... 565
Chapter 70
Troubleshooting.................................................................................................................... 567
70.1 The SYS or PWR LED Does Not Turn On ....................................................................... 567
70.2 The ALM LED Is On ........................................................................................................ 567
70.3 SFP LNK LEDs Do Not Turn On ...................................................................................... 568
70.4 100/1000 LEDs Do Not Turn On ...................................................................................... 568
70.5 100/1000 Ethernet Port Data Transmission ..................................................................... 569
70.6 DSL Data Transmission ................................................................................................... 569
70.7 There Is No Voice on an ADSL Connection .................................................................... 570
70.8 I cannot make or receive phone calls. ............................................................................. 570
70.9 Local Server .................................................................................................................... 571
70.10 Data Rate ..................................................................................................................... 572
70.11 Configured Settings ....................................................................................................... 572
70.12 Password ....................................................................................................................... 572
70.13 System Lockout ............................................................................................................. 572
70.14 SNMP ............................................................................................................................ 573
70.15 Telnet ............................................................................................................................. 573
70.16 Resetting the Defaults ................................................................................................... 574
70.16.1 Resetting the Defaults Via Command .................................................................. 574
70.16.2 Uploading the Default Configuration File ............................................................. 574
70.17 Recovering the Firmware .............................................................................................. 575
Chapter 71
Product Specifications ......................................................................................................... 579
71.1 Physical Specifications ................................................................................................... 579
71.2 VoIP Features ................................................................................................................. 582
71.3 Default Settings ............................................................................................................... 583
71.4 Limitations ....................................................................................................................... 585
71.5 Pin Assignments .............................................................................................................. 587
71.5.1 Hardware Telco-50 Connector Pin Assignments .................................................... 587
71.5.2 Telco-50 Cables ..................................................................................................... 589
71.5.3 Console Cable Pin Assignments ............................................................................ 591
71.5.4 ALARM Connector Pin Assignments ..................................................................... 591
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Part VI: Appendices and Index ........................................................... 593
Appendix A Changing a Fuse .............................................................................................. 595
Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country .......................................................................... 597
Index....................................................................................................................................... 645
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P ART I
Introduction
Introducing the IES-1248-51V (35)
Hardware Installation (47)
Front Panel Connections (53)
MDF Connections (61)
Power Connections (65)
Fan Maintenance (67)
33
34
CHAPTER
1
Introducing the IES-1248-51V
1.1 Overview
The IES-1248-51V is an IP-based DSLAM (Internet Protocol Digital Subscriber Line
Access Multiplexer) that connects ADSL and voice subscribers to the Internet. As a
high-performance but yet compact platform, it can conveniently deliver broadband
Internet access and VoIP telephony service (over existing POTS telephone wiring)
to multi-tenant units (MTUs), hospitals, hotels, schools, university campuses and
ISPs. The IES-1248-51V’s low cost and easy management make it a perfect DSLprovider solution.
The IES-1248-51V platform allows for convenient management and support of
ADSL technology. Up to 48 ADSL subscribers can simultaneously utilize a wide
range of powerful broadband services.
The IES-1248-51V can also act as an Optical Network Unit (ONU) which supports
a fiber connection to the building (FTTB). Install a GEPON SPF ONU transceiver in
an SPF slot and then connect the transceiver to a fiber connection. The distance
between the IES-1248-51V and an Optical Line Terminal (OLT) can be up to 20
kilometers. See Section 1.5 on page 45 for more information about PON.
1.1.1 Voice Features
The IES-1248-51V provides 48 aggregated lines of POTS connectivity, designed to
connect the subscriber with the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN)
through service provider’s softswitch or Media Gateway Access Controller (MGAC).
Each telephone line interface is a Foreign Exchange Subscriber (FXS) port
connecting to the subscriber's telephone via copper wire. The analog voice signal
from the subscriber is converted to voice data packets and transmitted towards
the callee across the IP packet-switched network.
The IES-1248-51V uses H.248 for network signaling to establish or tear down a
voice call. Dual-Tone Multi-Frequency (DTMF) signals are also translated into
H.248 signals (or transmitted in the voice band).
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Chapter 1 Introducing the IES-1248-51V
Advanced call features such as call forwarding and call waiting are integrated to
ease next-generation network migration and access network deployment. To
further simplify migration towards an all-IP network, the IES-1248-51V's FXS line
interface can co-exist with ADSL service on the same copper wire. Metallic Line
Testing (MLT) is also available for copper loop diagnostics.
1.2 MDU Application
The following diagram depicts a typical application of the IES-1248-51V with ADSL
modems and/or analog phones, in a large residential building, or multiple-dwelling
unit (MDU), that leverages existing phone line wiring to provide Internet access
and voice service to all tenants. A tenant can connect his phone line to an analog
phone, an ADSL CPE or a splitter (SP) which then connects to both a telephone
and a CPE device. Note that ADSL service can coexist with voice service on the
same line. For connecting to the ISP, you can use Gigabit or Fast Ethernet cable to
connect to a switch (S), router (R), and then an Media Gateway Controller (MGC)
or a softswitch (SSW) before connecting to the Internet. The Trunking Gateway
(TG) seperates voice and data traffic.
Figure 1 MDU Application (Using Gigabit or Fast Ethernet for Uplink Connection)
TG
CPE
Internet
PSTN
MGC/SSW
CPE
SP
MDF
Building A
IES
S
R
Building B
IES
You can also connect a GEPON SFP Optical Network Unit (ONU) tranceiver which
allows the IES-1248-51V to act as a GEPON ONU. The fiber connection to the
36
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Chapter 1 Introducing the IES-1248-51V
optical splitter (OSP) (if there are multiple buildings sharing the same fiber link)
to the OLT at your ISP can be up to 20 km.
Figure 2 MDU Application (Using Fiber for Uplink Connection)
TG
CPE
Internet
PSTN
MGC/SSW
CPE
SP
MDF
Optical
SP
Building A
IES
OLT
R
Building B
IES
1.3 System Description
Two Telco-50 Connectors
There are two Telco-50 connectors for ADSL and analog phone connections.
1000/100 Mbps Ethernet Ports
The IES-1248-51V has two 1000/100Mbps auto-sensing Ethernet ports.
They allow you to:
• Connect the IES-1248-51V to a second-level switch
• Daisy-chain other IES-1248-51V
Two Slots for Mini GBIC Modules
The mini GBIC (Gigabit Interface Converter) module transceivers allow flexibility
in connection options. You can use mini GBIC transceivers for fiber connections to
backbone Ethernet switches.
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Chapter 1 Introducing the IES-1248-51V
Stacking
Daisy-chain up to three IES-1248-51V (or other Ethernet devices).
Integrated Splitters
The integrated DSL splitter eliminates the need to use external splitters that
separate the voice-band and ADSL signals.
Console Port
Use the console port for local management of the IES-1248-51V.
Fans
The fans cool the IES-1248-51V sufficiently to allow reliable operation of the IES1248-51V in even poorly ventilated rooms or basements. To conserve energy and
reduce noise, the fan speed depends on the temperature.
IP Protocols
• IP Host (No routing)
• Telnet for configuration and monitoring
• SNMP for management
• ADSL-LINE-EXT-MIB.mib
• ADSL-LINE-MIB.mib
• ADSL-TC-MIB.mib
• BRIDGE-MIB.mib
• IANAifType-MIB.mib
• IF-MIB.mib
• PerfHist-TC-MIB.mib
• RFC-1212.mib
• RFC-1215.mib
• RFC1155-SMI.mib
• RFC1213-MIB.mib
• RMON-MIB.mib
• SNMP-FRAMEWORK-MIB.mib
• SNMPv2-CONF.mib
• SNMPv2-MIB.mib
• SNMPv2-SMI.mib
• SNMPv2-TC.mib
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Chapter 1 Introducing the IES-1248-51V
• vendor-IES1248.mib
• Private mib
ADSL Encapsulation
Multiple Protocols over AAL5 (RFC 1483)
ADSL Compliance
• Multi-Mode ADSL standard
• G.dmt (ITU-T G.992.1)
• G.lite (ITU-T G.992.2)
• G.hs (ITU-T G.994.1)
• ANSI T1.413 issue 2
• ADSL2: G.992.3, G.992.4
• ADSL2+: G.992.5
• Rate adaptation support
IEEE 802.1p Priority
Your IES-1248-51V uses IEEE 802.1p Priority to assign priority levels to individual
PVCs.
Multiple PVC and ATM QoS
The IES-1248-51V allows you to use different channels (also called Permanent
Virtual Circuits or PVCs) for different services or subscribers. Define channels on
each DSL port for different services or levels of service and assign each channel a
priority. ATM Quality of Service (QoS) allows you to regulate the average rate and
fluctuations of data transmission. This helps eliminate congestion to allow the
transmission of real time data (such as audio and video).
IEEE 802.1x Port-based Authentication
The IES-1248-51V supports the IEEE 802.1x standard for centralized user
authentication and accounting management through an optional network
authentication (RADIUS) server.
2684 Routed Mode
The IES-1248-51V can handle 2684 routed mode traffic.
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Chapter 1 Introducing the IES-1248-51V
Downstream Broadcast
The IES-1248-51V can block downstream broadcast packets from being sent to
specified VLANs on specified ports.
Management
• Remote configuration backup/restore and firmware upgrade
• SNMP manageable
• Text-based management locally via console port and remotely via telnet
• Editable plain text based configuration file
Security
• Password protection for system management
• VLAN
MAC (Media Access Control) Filter
Use the MAC filter to accept or deny incoming frames based on MAC (Media Access
Control) address(es) that you specify. You may enable/disable the MAC filter on
specific ports. You may specify up to ten MAC addresses per port.
MAC (Media Access Control) Count Filter
You can limit the number of MAC addresses that may be dynamically learned on a
port. You may enable/disable the MAC count filter on individual ports.
Static Multicast
Use static multicast to allow incoming frames based on multicast MAC address(es)
that you specify. This feature can be used in conjunction with IGMP snooping and
IGMP proxy to allow multicast MAC address(es) that are not learned by IGMP
snooping or IGMP proxy.
IGMP Proxy
In a simple tree network, the system can proxy multicast traffic in order to
improve network performance.
IGMP Snooping
With IGMP snooping, group multicast traffic is only forwarded to ports that are
members of that group. IGMP Snooping generates no additional network traffic,
allowing you to significantly reduce multicast traffic passing through your IES1248-51V.
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Chapter 1 Introducing the IES-1248-51V
System Monitoring
• System status (link status, rates, statistics counters)
• Temperatures, voltage reports and alarms.
System Error Logging
The IES-1248-51V’s system error log will record error logs locally. These logs may
be viewed again after a warm restart.
Alarm LED
An ALM (alarm) LED lights when the IES-1248-51V is overheated, the fans are
not working properly, the voltage readings are outside the tolerance levels or an
alarm has been detected on the ALARM input pins.
Bandwidth Control
The IES-1248-51V supports rate limiting in 32 Kbps increments allowing you to
create different service plans
Quality of Service
• Four priority queues for ENET and eight priority queues for downstream PVC so
you can ensure mission-critical data gets delivered on time.
• Follows the IEEE 802.1p priority setting standard.
STP (Spanning Tree Protocol) / RSTP (Rapid STP)
(R)STP detects and breaks network loops and provides backup links between
switches, bridges or routers. It allows a switch to interact with other (R)STP compliant switches in your network to ensure that only one path exists between
any two stations on the network.
1.4 VoIP Features
IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN
Your IES-1248-51V uses the IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN (Virtual Local Area
Network), which allows it to deliver tagged/untagged frames. The IES-1248-51V
supports up to 4094 individual VLANs.
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Chapter 1 Introducing the IES-1248-51V
Quality of Service (QoS)
The IES-1248-51V supports IEEE 802.1p QoS (Quality of Service) network traffic
prioritization for H.248 and RTP traffic, as well as DSCP (Differentiated Services
Code Point) and ToS (Type of Service) tagging.
Voice Compression and Decompression
The IES-1248-51V supports the following voice codecs.
• G.711 A-law
• G.711 µ-law
• G.723.1
• G.726 (40, 32, 24 and 16 kbps)
• G.729AB
Out-of-Band POTS Signaling
As well as transmitting and receiving voice band data, FXS and FXO can
communicate using out-of-band signals.
Table 1 Out-of-Band POTS Signaling
SIGNAL
DESCRIPTION
Off Hook
FXO intends to start a call
On Hook
FXO terminates the call
Flash
Short on-hook “tap” for special call functions.
Pulse Dial
Dialing method using an interrupted signal.
Ring
AC power signal from FXS port indicating a phone call attempt
from remote party.
Tip/Ring Reversal
FXS port reverses the voltage between the tip and the ring
Metering Tone
FXS port sends a 12 /16kHz out-of-band sine wave for payphone
use.
Call Progress Tones
The IES-1248-51V can provide the following tones to connected telephones:
Table 2 Supported Tones
42
TONE
INDICATION
Dial tone
A line is available for use.
Busy tone
The dialed number is unreachable.
Congestion tone
There are not enough resources to handle a call.
Ringback tone
The remote party’s phone is ringing.
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Chapter 1 Introducing the IES-1248-51V
Table 2 Supported Tones
TONE
INDICATION
Waiting tone
The other party’s line is engaged.
Howler tone
The handset has been left off-hook too long.
Analog Modem Pass-through
The IES-1248-51V supports analog modem service over the voice channel.
Fax Pass-through
The IES-1248-51V supports fax service over the voice channel.
DTMF Relay
DTMF (Dual-Tone Multi-Frequency) relay detects DTMF signals and sends them
out-of-band (via H.248 or RTP) to the remote party. DTMF relay is used when a
low-bitrate voice codec might distort DTMF signals sent over the voice channel.
Country Code
Many settings governing call functions differ from one region to another. The IES1248-51V allows you to set these by entering a preconfigured country code. The
following variables are affected when you set the country code.
• AC impedance
• PCM companding law
• Cadence ring
• Flash time
• Pulse dial interval
• Pay-signal type
Metallic Line Test
The IES-1248-51V provides the following metallic line test (MLT) measurements.
• Foreign AC voltage (50Hz ~ 500Hz)
• Foreign DC voltage
• Hazardous potential test
• Three-element capacitance test
• Three-element resistance test
• Ringing equivalency number test (REN measurement)
• Metering
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Chapter 1 Introducing the IES-1248-51V
Test In/Out
The IES-1248-51V supports the connection of external testing devices. The TEST
IN port is used for testing internal POTS circuits, and the TEST OUT port is used
for testing external wire loop to the customer’s phone.
RTP Statistics
The IES-1248-51V provides the following RTP statistics.
• RTP TX codec
• RTP RX codec
• RTP TX payload type
• RTP RX payload type
• RTP local IP/port
• RTP remote IP/port
Echo Cancellation
The device supports G.168, an ITU-T standard for eliminating the echo caused by
the sound of your voice reverberating in the telephone receiver while you talk.
Voice Activity Detection
Voice Activity Detection (VAD) reduces the bandwidth that a call uses by not
transmitting when you are not speaking.
Comfort Noise Generation
Your device generates background noise to fill moments of silence when the other
device in a call stops transmitting because the other party is not speaking (as total
silence could easily be mistaken for a lost connection).
Dynamic Jitter Buffer
The built-in adaptive buffer helps to smooth out the variations in delay (jitter) for
voice traffic. This helps ensure good voice quality for your conversations.
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Chapter 1 Introducing the IES-1248-51V
1.5 Technical Reference
PON
A Passive Optical Network (PON) sends data through fiber optical cables from a
service provider to the premises. “Passive” means that no power is required once
the data, which is transmitted as light, enters the cables.
GEPON
GEPON also called EPON (Ethernet PON) is a PON compliant to the IEEE 802.3ah
standard. The fiber transmission speed can reach up to 1.25 Gbps. Up to 32 split
ratio simplifies network installation and maintenance.
ONU
In a PON, an Optical Network Unit (ONU) is a fiber optical modem that allows a
subscriber or client to receive very high-speed Internet access over an optical
network. It extends fiber optic cables from the service provider to the premises,
such as an office building or residence.
OLT
In a PON, an Optical Line Terminal (OLT) is placed at broadband service provider’s
central office, where it receives voice, video, and other data from the service provider’s networking servers. It then converts and transmits this data as light across
a fiber optical network, where it is received and translated on the opposite end by
one or more Optical Network Units (ONUs).
FTTx
Fiber-To-The-x (FTTx) refers to networking infrastructure that extends from a
service provider to the x, where x can one of many locations: Office (FTTO), Home
(FTTH), Desk (FTTD), Building (FTTB) or even Curb (FTTC), to name a few. In an
FTTO connection, the Optical Network Unit (ONU) is often placed inside the
building, whereas in FTTH or FTTC the fiber ends at an end-user’s house (or
somewhere nearby), or at a curb-side unit.
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Chapter 1 Introducing the IES-1248-51V
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CHAPTER
2
Hardware Installation
This chapter explains how to install the IES-1248-51V.
2.1 General Installation Instructions
Before you begin, read all the safety warnings in Safety Warnings on page 7, and
make sure you follow them.
Perform the installation as follows:
1
Make sure the IES-1248-51V power switch is in the off position.
2
Attach the dust filter. See Section 2.2 on page 47.
3
Install the hardware. See Section 2.3 on page 49.
4
See Chapter 3 on page 53 for instructions on making front panel connections.
5
See Chapter 4 on page 61 for instructions on connecting the Telco-50 connectors.
6
See Chapter 5 on page 65 for instructions on making power connections and
turning on the IES-1248-51V.
2.2 Dust Filter Installation
Before you mount the IES-1248-51V, take the following steps to install the duat
filter.
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Chapter 2 Hardware Installation
1
Ensure that the side of the dust filter with the magnets is facing the IES-124851V.
Figure 3 Dust Filter Magnets
2
Slide the dust filter underneath the dust filter retainer and between the side rails
until it is securely fitted on the side of the IES-1248-51V.
Figure 4 Dust Filter Installation
3
Flip the dust filter handle around so it is flush with the rear of the IES-1248-51V.
Figure 5 Dust Filter Handle
Use the dust filter to prevent dust from getting into the device and
prossibly damaging it. Clean the dust filter regularly (at least once
every two to three months) in order to have sufficient airflow
through the device to avoid over-heating.
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Chapter 2 Hardware Installation
2.3 Installation Scenarios
The IES-1248-51V can be placed on a desktop or rack-mounted on a standard EIA
rack. Use the rubber feet in a desktop installation and the brackets in a rackmounted installation.
For proper ventilation, allow at least 4 inches (10 cm) of clearance at the left and
right of the IES-1248-51V. This is especially important for enclosed rack
installations.
2.3.1 Desktop Installation Procedure
1
Make sure the IES-1248-51V is clean and dry.
2
Set the IES-1248-51V on a smooth, level surface strong enough to support the
weight of the IES-1248-51V and the connected cables. Make sure there is a power
outlet nearby.
3
Make sure there is enough clearance around the IES-1248-51V to allow air
circulation and the attachment of cables and the power cord.
4
Remove the adhesive backing from the rubber feet.
5
Attach the rubber feet to each corner on the bottom of the IES-1248-51V. These
rubber feet help protect the IES-1248-51V from shock or vibration and ensure
space between IES-1248-51V when stacking.
Figure 6 Attaching Rubber Feet
Do not block the ventilation holes. Leave space between IES-124851Vs when stacking.
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Chapter 2 Hardware Installation
2.3.2 Rack-Mounted Installation
2.3.2.1 Rack-mounted Installation Requirements
The IES-1248-51V can be mounted on an EIA standard size, 21-inch rack or in a
wiring closet with other equipment. Follow the steps below to mount your IES1248-51V on a standard EIA rack using a rack-mounting kit.
Make sure the rack will safely support the combined weight of all
the equipment it contains.
Make sure the position of the IES-1248-51V does not make the rack
unstable or top-heavy. Take all necessary precautions to anchor
the rack securely before installing the unit.
• Use a #2 Phillips screwdriver to install the screws.
• See Chapter 71 on page 579 for the gauge of wire to use for the frame ground
connections.
• See Chapter 71 on page 579 for the hardware that is required to mount the IES1248-51V.
Failure to use the proper screws may damage the unit.
Do not block the ventilation holes. Leave space between IES-124851V when stacking.
2.3.2.2 Rack-Mounted Installation Procedure
1
50
Align one bracket with the holes on one side of the IES-1248-51V and secure it
with the bracket screws smaller than the rack-mounting screws.
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Chapter 2 Hardware Installation
2
Attach the other bracket in a similar fashion.
Figure 7 Attaching Mounting Brackets and Screws
3
After attaching both mounting brackets, position the IES-1248-51V in the rack by
lining up the holes in the brackets with the appropriate holes on the rack. Secure
the IES-1248-51V to the rack with the rack-mounting screws.
Figure 8 Rack Mounting
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CHAPTER
3
Front Panel Connections
This chapter describes the ports on the front panel, and how to make connections
to the ports.
3.1 Front Panel
The following figure shows the front panel of the IES-1248-51V.
Figure 9 IES-1248-51V Front Panel
3.1.1 Front Panel Ports
The following table describes the ports on the front panel of the IES-1248-51V.
Table 3 IES-1248-51V Front Panel Ports
CONNECTOR
DESCRIPTION
CONSOLE
Connect this mini-RJ-11 port to a computer for local management.
1000/100 1/2
Use these RJ-45 ports for subtending. You can daisy chain more IES1248-51Vs or other Ethernet switches.
This is an electrical Ethernet interface for use with the following
copper Ethernet cables:
•
•
ALARM
100Base-Tx 2 pair UTP Cat. 5, up to 100m
1000Base-T 4-pair UTP Cat. 5e or Cat. 6, up to 100m
For better performance and lower radiation noise, use shielded
Ethernet cables.
This DB9 connector has alarm input pins and alarm output pins.
Connect the alarm input pins to alarm output terminals on other
pieces of equipment.
Connect the alarm output pins to an alarm input terminal on another
piece of equipment.
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Chapter 3 Front Panel Connections
Table 3 IES-1248-51V Front Panel Ports (continued)
CONNECTOR
DESCRIPTION
SFP 1, 2
Each of these Small Form-factor Pluggable (SFP) slots can house a
mini GBIC (Gigabit Interface Converter) transceiver.
TEST IN, TEST
OUT
Use these RJ-45 ports to connect external equipment for conducting
metallic line tests on the IES-1248-51V’s ADSL ports.
Use the TEST IN port for testing internal POTS circuits, and the TEST
OUT port for testing the external wire loop to the customer’s phone.
ADSL 1-24, 25-48 Connect these Telco-50 connectors to subscribers 1-24 and 25-48
respectively.
3.1.2 Front Panel LEDs
The following table describes the LED indicators on the front panel of the IES1248-51V.
Table 4 LED Descriptions
LED
COLOR
STATUS
DESCRIPTION
PWR
Green
On
The power is turned on.
Off
The power is off.
Blinking
The system is rebooting and performing selfdiagnostic tests.
On
The system is on and functioning properly.
Off
The system is not ready/malfunctioning.
On
There is a hardware failure, or there is ALM input.
Off
The system is functioning normally.
On
The link to a 100 Mbps Ethernet network is up.
Blinking
The link is transmitting/receiving 100 Mbps Ethernet
traffic.
Off
The link to a 100 Mbps Ethernet network is down.
On
The link to a 1000 Mbps (1Gbps) Ethernet network is
up.
Blinking
The link is transmitting/receiving 1000 Mbps (1Gbps)
Ethernet traffic.
Off
The link to a 1000 Mbps (1Gbps) Ethernet network is
down.
On
The link to a 1000 Mbps (1 Gbps) Ethernet network is
up.
Off
There is not a link to a 1000 Mbps (1 Gbps) Ethernet
network or the 1000 Mbps network link is down.
Blinking
The system is transmitting/receiving Ethernet traffic.
Off
The system is not transmitting/receiving Ethernet
traffic.
SYS
ALM
1000/100 1,2
Green
Red
Yellow
Green
SFP 1,2 LNK
SFP 1,2 ACT
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Green
Green
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Chapter 3 Front Panel Connections
3.2 1000/100M Auto-Sensing Ethernet
The IES-1248-51V has two 1000/100Mbps auto-sensing Ethernet ports. There are
two factors related to Ethernet: speed and duplex mode. In 1000/100Mbps Fast
Ethernet, the speed can be 100Mbps or 1000Mbps and the duplex mode can be
half duplex or full duplex. The auto-negotiation capability makes one Ethernet port
able to negotiate with a peer automatically to obtain the connection speed and
duplex mode that both ends support.
When auto-negotiation is turned on, an Ethernet port on the IES-1248-51V
negotiates with the peer automatically to determine the connection speed and
duplex mode. If the peer Ethernet port does not support auto-negotiation or turns
off this feature, the IES-1248-51V determines the connection speed by detecting
the signal on the cable and using half duplex mode. When the IES-1248-51V’s
auto-negotiation is turned off, an Ethernet port uses the pre-configured speed and
duplex mode when making a connection, thus requiring you to make sure that the
settings of the peer Ethernet port are the same in order to connect.
Use the Ethernet ports for subtending. You can daisy chain more IES-1248-51V or
other Ethernet switches.
Use with the following copper Ethernet cables: 1000Base-T 4-pair UTP Cat. 5e or
Cat.6, up to 100m.
Note: For better performance and lower radiation noise, use shielded Ethernet cables.
Each 1000/100M port is paired with a mini GBIC slot. The IES-1248-51V uses up
to one connection for each pair for a total of two possible gigabit connections (one
from each of the two pairs). The IES-1248-51V uses the mini GBIC transceiver
whenever it has a connection.
3.2.1 Ethernet Default Settings
• Speed: Auto
• Duplex: Auto
3.3 SFP Mini GBIC Slots
The SFP slots can each house a mini GBIC (Gigabit Interface Converter)
transceiver. A transceiver is a single unit that houses a transmitter and a receiver.
The IES-1248-51V does not come with a transceiver. You must use a transceiver
that complies with the Small Form-factor Pluggable (SFP) Transceiver MultiSource
Agreement (MSA). See the SFF committee’s INF-8074i specification Rev 1.0 for
details.
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Chapter 3 Front Panel Connections
You can change transceivers while the IES-1248-51V is operating. You can use
different transceivers to connect to Ethernet switches with different types of fiberoptic connectors.
To avoid possible eye injury, do not look directly into an operating
fiber-optic module’s connectors.
Figure 10 SFP Mini GBIC Slots
• Type: SFP connection interface
• Connection speed: 1 Gigabit per second (Gbps)
3.3.1 Transceiver Installation
Use the following steps to install a mini GBIC transceiver (SFP module) in the SFP
slot.
1
Remove the dust cover from the transceiver.
2
For transceivers with a flip-up or flip-down latch, close the latch.
3
Insert the fiber-optic cables into the transceiver (you may need to remove cable
dust covers).
4
Insert the transceiver into the IES-1248-51V’s SFP slot.
5
Press the transceiver firmly until it clicks into place.
Figure 11 Transceiver Installation
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Chapter 3 Front Panel Connections
Figure 12 Installed Transceiver
3.3.2 Transceiver Removal
Use the following steps to remove a mini GBIC transceiver (SFP module) from the
IES-1248-51V.
1
Remove the fiber-optic cables from the transceiver.
2
Unlock the transceiver’s latch (latch styles vary).
3
Pull the transceiver out of the slot.
4
Put the transceiver’s dust cover on the transceiver.
Figure 13 Opening the Transceiver Latch
Figure 14 Removing the Transceiver
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Chapter 3 Front Panel Connections
3.4 Console Port Connection
For local management, you can use a computer with terminal emulation software
configured to the following parameters:
• VT100 terminal emulation
• 9600 bps
• No parity, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit
• No flow control
Connect the mini-RJ-11 male end of the console cable to the console port of the
IES-1248-51V. Connect the female end to a serial port (COM1, COM2 or other
COM port) of your computer.
3.5 ALARM Connections
A closed circuit on the ALARM input pins indicates an alarm. Pins 7 and 3 are
alarm input one. Pins 8 and 4 are alarm input two. Pins 9 and 5 are alarm input 3.
The IES-1248-51V signals an alarm when it detects an alarm on the ALARM input
pins or the IES-1248-51V.
To signal an alarm, the IES-1248-51V opens the circuit for pins 1 and 6 (the
common pin) and closes the circuit for pins 2 and 6.
Examples of an alarm on the IES-1248-51V are when the IES-1248-51V’s voltage
or temperature is outside of the normal range.
Figure 15 ALARM Pins Layout
Pin 5
Pin 1
Pin 9
Pin 6
3.6 ADSL Connections
Connect the lines from the user equipment (ADSL modems) to the
50 connectors.
58
ADSL Telco-
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Chapter 3 Front Panel Connections
The line from the user carries both the ADSL and the voice signals. For each line,
the IES-1248-51V has a built-in splitter that separates the high frequency ADSL
signal from the voice band signal. See Chapter 4 on page 61 for more information
on the Telco-50 connections.
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Chapter 3 Front Panel Connections
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CHAPTER
4
MDF Connections
This chapter shows you how to connect the Telco-50 connectors to an MDF.
4.1 MDF Connections Overview
Observe the following before you start:
• See Chapter 71 on page 579 for the gauge of telephone wire to use.
• Follow the pin assignments shown in Chapter 71 on page 579 to wire Telco-50
cables to Telco-50 connectors.
• See Chapter 71 on page 579 for details on how to make the management
connections.
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Chapter 4 MDF Connections
4.2 MDF (Main Distribution Frame)
An MDF is usually installed between subscribers’ equipment and the telephone
company (CO) in a basement or telephone room. The MDF is the point of
termination for the outside telephone company lines coming into a building and
the telephone wiring in the building.
Figure 16 MDF (Main Distribution Frame) Wiring
• Connect wiring to end-user equipment to the lower ports of an MDF and connect
wiring from the telephone company to the upper ports of an MDF (see the
previous figure).
• Some MDFs have surge protection circuitry built in between the two banks;
thus, do not connect telephone wires from the telephone company directly to
your IES-1248-51V.
• Use a punch-down tool to seat telephone lines into MDF blocks.
• Multiple upper and lower MDF port connections are shown as one line in the
following figures.
4.3 Telco-50 Cables
Telco-50 cables are used for data and voice applications with MDFs (Main
Distribution Frame), patch panels and distribution boxes. They can also be used as
extension cables. Telco-50 cables are made up of 25 twisted-pair copper wires.
Connect a Telco-50 connector to one end of the cable (see Chapter 71 on page
579 for pin assignments) and connect the other end directly to an MDF;
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Chapter 4 MDF Connections
alternatively attach RJ-11 connectors and connect directly to DSL modem(s) and/
or analog phone(s).
Figure 17 Telco-50 Cable with RJ-11 Connectors
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Chapter 4 MDF Connections
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CHAPTER
5
Power Connections
This chapter shows you how to connect the IES-1248-51V to a power source.
5.1 Power Connections Overview
Use the following procedures to connect the IES-1248-51V to a power source after
you have installed it in a rack.
Note: Check the power supply requirements in Chapter 71 on page 579, and make
sure you are using an appropriate power source.
Observe the following before you start:
• Keep the IES-1248-51V power switch in the off position until you come to the
procedure for turning on the power.
5.2 Power Connection
The IES-1248-51V power connections are at the top-left corner of the front panel.
1
Insert the female end of the supplied power cord to the AC power receptacle.
2
Connect the other end of the power cord to a power outlet. Make sure that no
objects obstruct the airflow of the fans (located on the side of the unit).
3
Move the IES-1248-51V power switch to the on position.
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Chapter 5 Power Connections
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CHAPTER
6
Fan Maintenance
This chapter describes how to change a fan module.
6.1 Fan Maintenance Introduction
The IES-1248-51V has a hot-swappable fan module. Use the following procedures
to remove the fan module. Replace the entire fan module. Return any
malfunctioning fan modules to the manufacturer.
6.2 Removing and Installing the Fan Module
The IES-1248-51V fan module is at the left on the front panel. Perform the
following procedure to remove the fan module.
1
Loosen the thumbscrew on the front of the fan module.
2
Slide out the fan module.
3
Use a different fan module from the manufacturer.
4
Slide the fan module into the fan module slot.
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Chapter 6 Fan Maintenance
5
Tighten the thumbscrew.
Figure 18 Fan Module Thumbscrews
Figure 19 Removing the Fan Module
Figure 20 Fan Module Removed
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P ART II
Basic Settings
Introducing the Web Configurator (71)
Tutorials (79)
Home and Port Statistics Screens (89)
System Information (97)
General Setup (101)
User Account (103)
Switch Setup (107)
IP Setup (113)
ENET Port Setup (117)
xDSL Port Setup (119)
xDSL Profiles Setup (139)
xDSL Line Data (151)
69
70
CHAPTER
7
Introducing the Web
Configurator
7.1 Web Configurator Overview
This chapter tells how to access and navigate the web configurator. The web
configurator allows you to use a web browser to manage the IES-1248-51V.
7.2 Screen Privilege Levels
There is a high or low privilege level for each screen.
High privilege screens are only available to administrators with high privilege
access. High privilege screens include things like creating administrator accounts,
restarting the system, saving changes to the nonvolatile memory and resetting to
factory defaults. Nonvolatile memory refers to the IES-1248-51V’s storage that
remains even if the IES-1248-51V’s power is turned off. Administrators with high
privilege access can use all screens including the lower privilege screens.
Administrators with the low privilege level are restricted to using only low privilege
screens. Low privilege screens are read only.
7.3 Accessing the Web Configurator
Use Internet Explorer 6 and later versions with JavaScript enabled.
Use the following instructions to log on to the web configurator.
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Chapter 7 Introducing the Web Configurator
1
Launch your web browser, and enter the IP address of the IES-1248-51V (default:
192.168.1.1 is the factory default) in the Location or Address field. Press
Enter. The Login screen appears.
Figure 21 Login
2
Type admin in the User Name field and your password (default: 1234) in the
Password field. Click OK. The main screen appears.
This is the web configurator’s main screen.
Figure 22 Home
B
C
A
A - Click the menu items to open submenu links, and then click on a submenu link
to open the screen in the main window. See Section 7.4 on page 73 for more
information.
B - Click this to open the Home screen. (This is the same screen that is displayed
above.) See Chapter 9 on page 89 for more information.
C - Click this to log out of the web configurator.
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7.4 Navigation Panel
In the navigation panel, click a menu item to reveal a list of submenu links. Click a
submenu link to go to the corresponding screen.
Table 5 Navigation Panel Submenu Links
BASIC SETTING
ADVANCED APPLICATION
ROUTING PROTOCOL
ALARM
VOIP
MANAGEMENT
CONFIG SAVE
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The following table briefly describes the functions of the screens that you open by
clicking the navigation panel’s sub-links.
Table 6 Web Configurator Screens
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Basic Setting
System
Information
Use this screen to display general system and hardware monitoring
information.
General Setup
Use this screen to configure general identification information about
the device and the time and date settings.
User Account
Use this screen to configure system administrator accounts.
Switch Setup
Use this screen to set up system-wide parameters such as MAC
address learning and priority queues.
IP Setup
Use this screen to configure the system and management IP
addresses and subnet masks.
ENET Port Setup
Use this screen to configure settings for the Ethernet ports.
xDSL Port Setup
Use these screens for configuring settings for individual DSL ports.
xDSL Profiles
Setup
Use these screens for configuring profiles for the DSL ports.
xDSL Line Data
Use these screens for viewing DSL line operating values, bit
allocation and performance counters.
G.bond
Use this screen to configure ADSL port bonding on your device.
Advanced
Application
74
VLAN
Use these screens for viewing and configuring the VLAN settings.
IGMP
Use these screens to view IGMP status information and configure
IGMP settings and IGMP filters.
Static Multicast
Use this screen to configure static multicast entries.
Multicast VLAN
Use these screens to set up multicast VLANs that can be shared
among different subscriber VLANs on the network.
Filtering
Use this screen to configure packet filtering.
MAC Filter
Use this screen to configure MAC filtering for each port.
Spanning Tree
Protocol
Use this submenu to go to screens for displaying Rapid Spanning
Tree Protocol (RSTP) information and configuring RSTP settings.
Port
Authentication
Use this submenu to go to screens for configuring RADIUS and IEEE
802.1x security settings.
Port Security
Use this screen to limit the number of MAC address that can be
learned on a port.
DHCP Relay
Use this screen to configure the DHCP relay settings.
DHCP Snoop
Use these screens to drop traffic from IP addresses not assigned by
the DHCP server and to look at a summary of the DHCP packets on
each port.
2684 Routed
Mode
Use this screen to configure the IES-1248-51V to handle 2684
routed mode traffic.
PPPoA to PPPoE
Use this screen to enable PPPoA-to-PPPoE conversions on each port.
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Chapter 7 Introducing the Web Configurator
Table 6 Web Configurator Screens (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
DSCP
Use this screen to set up DSCP on each port and to convert DSCP
values to IEEE 802.1p values.
TLS PVC
Use this screen to set up Transparent LAN Service (VLAN stacking,
Q-in-Q) on each port.
ACL
Use this screen to set up Access Control Logic profiles and to assign
them to each PVC.
Downstream
Broadcast
Use this screen to block downstream broadcast packets from being
sent to specified VLANs on specified ports.
SysLog
Use this screen to configure the syslog settings.
Access Control
Use this screen to configure service access control and configure
SNMP and remote management.
IP Bridge
Use these screens to configure IP-aware bridging, where the IES1248-51V forwards packets based on destination IP address instead
of destination MAC address.
PPPoE
Intermediate
Agent
Use this screen to insert line information into client PPPoE Discover
Initialization (PODI) packets
Maximum MTU
Size
Use this screen to configure the Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU)
for the Ethernet interfaces. The Ethernet interfaces discard any
packets larger than this.
PVC Upstream
Limit
Use this screen to limit the transmission rate for upstream traffic by
PVC.
OUI Filter
Use this screen to specify specific MAC address octets to filter.
Routing Protocol
Static Routing
Use this screen to configure static routes. A static route defines
how the IES-1248-51V should forward traffic by configuring the
TCP/IP parameters manually.
Alarm
Alarm Status
Use these screens to view the alarms that are currently in the
system.
Alarm Event
Setup
Use these screens to view and set the severity levels of the alarms
and where the system is to send them.
Alarm Port Setup
Use this screen to set the alarm severity threshold for recording
alarms on an individual port(s).
VoIP
VoIP Port Setup
Use these screens to configure the Voice over IP (VoIP) settings of
each of the IES-1248-51V’s subscriber ports.
H.248 Profile
Use this screen to configure VoIP H.248 profiles.
DSP Profile
Use this screen to configure information about the Digital Signal
Processing (DSP) profiles used by the IES-1248-51V.
Media Gateway
Use this screen to configure the system’s H.248 interface.
VoIP Line Status
and Info
Use this screen to see detailed information about the VoIP
configuration currently active on each of the IES-1248-51V’s analog
phone ports.
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Table 6 Web Configurator Screens (continued)
LABEL
Diagnostic
DESCRIPTION
Use these screens to perform analog line tests on the lines
connected to the IES-1248-51V.
Management
Maintenance
Use this screen to perform firmware and configuration file
maintenance as well as restart the system.
Diagnostic
Use this screen to view system logs and test port(s).
MAC Table
Use this screen to view the MAC addresses of devices attached to
what ports.
ARP Table
Use this screen to view the MAC address to IP address resolution
table.
Config Save
Config Save
Use this screen to save the device’s configuration into the
nonvolatile memory (the IES-1248-51V’s storage that remains even
if the IES-1248-51V’s power is turned off).
7.5 Changing Your Password
After you log in for the first time, it is recommended you change the default
administrator password. Click Basic Setting and then User Account to display
the User Account screen.
Figure 23 User Account
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Click the index number 1 to edit the default administrator account settings.
Figure 24 User Account
Enter the new password in the Password and Retype Password to confirm
fields, and click Modify. Do not forget to click Config Save before you exit the
web configurator. See Section 7.6 on page 77.
7.6 Saving Your Configuration
Click Apply in a configuration screen when you are done modifying the settings in
that screen to save your changes back to the run-time memory. Settings in the
run-time memory are lost when the IES-1248-51V’s power is turned off.
Click Config Save in the navigation panel to save your configuration to
nonvolatile memory. Nonvolatile memory refers to the IES-1248-51V’s storage
that remains even if the IES-1248-51V’s power is turned off.
Note: Use Config Save when you are done with a configuration session.
7.7 Logging Out of the Web Configurator
Click Logout in any screen to exit the web configurator. You have to log in with
your password again after you log out. This is recommended after you finish a
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management session both for security reasons and so you do not lock out other
device administrators.
Figure 25 Logout
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CHAPTER
8
Tutorials
This chapter contains instructions to quickly set up features on the system.
• Initial Configuration Overview on page 79
• H.248 Configuration Example on page 85
8.1 Initial Configuration Overview
This chapter shows what you first need to do to provide service to ADSL
subscribers.
8.2 Initial Configuration
This chapter uses the web configurator for initial configuration. See chapters 50 ~
68 for information on the commands. Use Internet Explorer 6 and later versions
with JavaScript enabled.
1
Log in to the web configurator. See Section 7.3 on page 71 for instructions.
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2
In the navigation panel, click Basic Setting, IP Setup. The IP Setup screen
appears.
Figure 26 IP Setup
3
Use this screen to change the IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway IP
address for your network. Apply the settings.
Note: If you change the IP address of the IES-1248-51V, after you click Apply IP
setting, you have to use the new IP address to log into the web configurator
again.
4
If your subscribers use VPI 0 and VCI 33 (the default for all of the ADSL ports), go
to step 13. Otherwise, use the following steps to change the VPI and VCI settings
for all of the ADSL ports.
First, you will delete the default virtual channel from all of the ADSL ports. (You
cannot edit it). Then, you will configure a new virtual channel for a port and copy
it to the other ADSL ports.
Adding another virtual channel without deleting the default virtual channel is not
recommended since you cannot set the new channel to be the port’s super
channel. The super channel can forward frames belonging to multiple VLAN groups
(that are not assigned to other channels). A channel that is not the super channel
can only forward frames with a single VLAN ID (that is configured on that
channel). In this case, the IES-1248-51V drops any frames received from the
subscriber that are tagged with another VLAN ID.
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5
In the navigation panel, click Basic Setting, xDSL Port Setup. The xDSL Port
Setup screen appears.
Figure 27 xDSL Port Setup
6
Click VC Setup. The following screen appears.
Figure 28 VC Setup
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7
Select any virtual channel’s Select radio button, and click Delete. The following
screen appears.
Figure 29 VC Setup, Delete
8
Click OK. The following screen appears.
Figure 30 Select Ports
9
Click All, and then click Apply. The VC Setup screen is updated.
Figure 31 VC Setup
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10 Select Super Channel to allow the channel to forward frames belonging to
multiple VLAN groups (that are not assigned to other channels). Then, enter the
VPI and VCI that you use. Leave the other default settings, and click Add. The VC
Setup screen is updated.
Figure 32 VC Setup
11 Select the new channel’s Select radio button. Click Copy, and then click Paste.
The following screen appears. The following screen appears.
Figure 33 Select Ports
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Chapter 8 Tutorials
12 Click All, and then click Apply. The VC Setup screen is updated.
Figure 34 VC Setup
13 Click Config Save, Config Save. The Config Save screen appears.
Figure 35 Config Save
14 Click Save. The following screen should appear.
Figure 36 Config Save, Save Successful
You can now use the device (with the other settings set to the defaults) to provide
service to ADSL subscribers. See Chapter 71 on page 579 for information on other
default settings.
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8.3 H.248 Configuration Example
This section provides an example of using configuring the IES-1248-51V to
communicate with an H.248 MGC (Media Gateway Controller). You should already
have information about the MGC’s configuration.
Take the following steps to configure H.248 on the IES-1248-51V.
1
Create an H.248 profile.
Use the VoIP > H.248 Profile screen (see Section 45.3 on page 331).
• Give the profile a name and enter the configuration information about the MGC.
This example creates a profile named MEGACO for an MGC with an IP address
172.16.19.24 using port 2944, the UDP transport method and the LONG
encoding format. If you were not provided with information for any of the fields
in this screen, leave them at their defaults.
Figure 37 H.248 Profile Example
• Click Add. The new profile displays at the top of the screen with the other H.248
profiles.
2
Configure the H.248 media gateway settings.
Use the VoIP > Media Gateway screen (see Section 45.5 on page 335).
• Enter the H.248 media gateway.
• Enter the MG Name (MG1 in this example). This must correspond with the
information on the MGC.
• Enter the port number the IES-1248-51V uses to send and receive H.248
packets (2944 in this example).
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• Select the H.248 Profile this H.248 interface uses (MEGACO in this example).
• Click Apply.
Figure 38 Media Gateway Example
3
Set up termination names for ADSL ports.
Use the VoIP > VoIP Port Setup > Port Edit screen (see Section 45.2.2 on
page 326).
• Select a port to configure (1 in this example).
• Select Enable.
• Enter the Termination Name (A301 in this example). This must correspond
with the information on the MGC.
• Select a DSP Profile and configure Tx Gain, Rx Gain and Impedance
(DEFVAL, 11, 12, 220ohm_680ohm_100nf in this example).
• Click Apply.
Figure 39 VoIP Port Setup Example
Use the VoIP > VoIP Port Setup > Port View screen (see Section 45.2.1 on
page 324).
• Select Copy From of port 1.
• Click Copy.
• Select ports that you want to apply the same H.248 settings as port 1 (2 and 3
in this example).
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• Then ports 2 and 3 copy the same DSP Profile, TX/RX Gain and Impedance
settings from port 1.
Figure 40 VoIP Port Setup Example
4
Lastly, test your configuration by making a call from a phone connected to one of
the ports you configured. Alternatively, use the voip show linestat <portlist> command to check whether the relevant port is successfully registered with
the MGC (the state should be “idle”).
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CHAPTER
9
Home and Port Statistics
Screens
This chapter describes the Home (status) and Port Statistics screens.
9.1 Home Screen
The Home screen of the web configurator displays a port statistical summary with
links to each port showing statistical details.
To open this screen, click Home in any web configurator screen.
Figure 41 Home
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 7 Home
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
System up Time
This field shows how long the system has been running since the last
time it was started.
The following fields are related to the Ethernet ports.
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Chapter 9 Home and Port Statistics Screens
Table 7 Home (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
ENET
This field displays the number of the Ethernet port. Click a port
number to display that port’s statistics screen. The Ethernet Port
Statistics Screen appears. See Section 9.1.1 on page 91.
Status
This field displays whether the Ethernet port is connected (Up) or not
(Down).
Port Name
This field displays the name of the Ethernet port.
Media
This field displays the type of media that this Ethernet port is using
for a connection (Copper or Fiber). “-“ displays when the port is
disabled or not connected.
Duplex
This field displays whether the port is using half or full-duplex
communication. “-“ displays when the port is disabled or not
connected.
Up Time
This field shows the total amount of time in hours, minutes and
seconds the port’s connection has been up. “--:--:--“ displays when
the port is disabled or not connected.
The following fields are related to the ADSL ports.
xDSL
This identifies the ADSL port. Click a port number to display that
port’s statistics screen. The ADSL Port Statistics Screen appears. See
Section 9.1.2 on page 94.
Status
This field shows whether the port is connected (Up) or not (Down).
Mode
This field shows which ADSL operational mode the port is set to use.
“-“ displays when the port is not connected.
Up/Down stream
This field shows the number of kilobits per second that a port is set to
transmit and receive.
Interleave/Fast
This field shows the port’s ADSL latency mode (fast or interleave).
Up Time
This field shows the total amount of time in hours, minutes and
seconds the port’s connection has been up. “-“ displays when the port
is not connected.
The following fields and buttons apply to the whole screen.
Poll Interval(s)
Set Interval
The text box displays how often (in seconds) this screen refreshes.
You may change the refresh interval by typing a new number in the
text box and then clicking Set Interval.
Stop
Click Stop to halt system statistic polling.
Port
Select a port from the Port drop-down list box and then click Clear
Counter to erase the recorded statistical information for that port.
Clear Counter
Reset
90
Click this to set the Poll Interval(s) and Port fields to their default
values and to refresh the screen.
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Chapter 9 Home and Port Statistics Screens
9.1.1 Ethernet Port Statistics Screen
Use this screen to display statistics about an Ethernet port. To open this screen,
click an Ethernet port’s number in the Home screen.
Figure 42 Port Statistics (Ethernet)
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 8 Port Statistics (Ethernet)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Return
Click this to go back to the Home screen.
Port
Use this drop-down list box to select a port for which you wish to view
statistics. This field identifies the port described in this screen.
Port Name
This field displays the name that you have configured for the port.
Rx bytes
This field shows the number of octets of Ethernet frames received
that are from 0 to 1518 octets in size, counting the ones in bad
packets, not counting framing bits but counting FCS (Frame Check
Sequence) octets. An octet is an 8-bit binary digit (byte).
Rx packets
This field shows the number of packets received on this port
(including multicast, unicast, broadcast and bad packets).
Rx error fcs
This field shows the number of frames received with an integral
length of 64 to 1518 octets and containing a Frame Check Sequence
error.
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Table 8 Port Statistics (Ethernet) (continued)
92
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Rx multicast
This field shows the number of good multicast frames received of 64
to 1518 octets in length (for non VLAN) or 1522 octets (for VLAN),
not including Broadcast frames. Frames with range or length errors
are also not taken into account.
Rx broadcast
This field shows the number of good broadcast frames received of 64
to 1518 octets in length (for non VLAN) or 1522 octets (for VLAN),
not including multicast frames. Frames with range or length errors
are also not taken into account.
Rx mac pause
This field shows the number of valid IEEE 802.3x Pause frames
received on this port.
Rx fragments
This field shows the number of frames received that were less than 64
octets long, and contained an invalid FCS, including non-integral and
integral lengths.
Rx error overrun
This field shows how many times an Ethernet transmitter overrun
occurred.
Rx error mru
This field shows the number of received frames that were dropped
due to exceeding the Maximum Receive Unit frame size.
Rx dropped
This field shows the number of received frames that were received
into the IES-1248-51V, but later dropped because of a lack of system
resources.
Rx jabber
This field shows the number of frames received that were longer than
1518 octets (non VLAN) or 1522 octets (VLAN) and contained an
invalid FCS, including alignment errors.
Rx error
alignment
This field shows the number of frames received that were 64 to 1518
(non VLAN) or 1522 (VLAN) octets long but contained an invalid FCS
and a non-integral number of octets.
Rx oversize
This field shows the number of frames received that were bigger than
1518 (non VLAN) or 1522 (VLAN) octets and contained a valid FCS.
Rx undersize
This field shows the number of frames received that were less than 64
octets long and contained a valid FCS.
Tx bytes
This field shows the number of bytes that have been transmitted on
this port. This includes collisions but not jam signal or preamble/SFD
(Start of Frame Delimiter) bytes.
Tx packets
This field shows the number of packets transmitted on this port.
Tx multicast
This field shows the number of good multicast frames transmitted on
this port (not including broadcast frames).
Tx broadcast
This field shows the number of broadcast frames transmitted on this
port (not including multicast frames).
Tx mac_pause
This field shows the number of valid IEEE 802.3x Pause frames
transmitted on this port.
Tx fragments
This field shows the number of transmitted frames that were less than
64 octets long, and with an incorrect FCS value.
Tx frames
This field shows the number of complete good frames transmitted on
this port.
Tx error underrun
This field shows the number of outgoing frames that were less than
64 octets long.
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Chapter 9 Home and Port Statistics Screens
Table 8 Port Statistics (Ethernet) (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Tx undersize
This field shows the number of frames transmitted that were less than
64 octets long and contained a valid FCS.
Tx jabber
This field shows the number of frames transmitted that were longer
than 1518 octets (non VLAN) or 1522 octets (VLAN) and contained an
incorrect FCS value.
Tx oversize
This field shows the number of frames transmitted that were bigger
than 1518 octets (non VLAN) or 1522 (VLAN) and contained a valid
FCS.
packet(<=64)
This field shows the number of frames received and transmitted
(including bad frames) that were 64 octets or less in length (this
includes FCS octets but excludes framing bits).
packet(65-127)
This field shows the number of frames received and transmitted
(including bad frames) that were 65 to 127 octets in length (this
includes FCS octets but excludes framing bits).
packet(128-255)
This field shows the number of frames received and transmitted
(including bad frames) that were 128 to 255 octets in length (this
includes FCS octets but excludes framing bits).
packet(256-511)
This field shows the number of frames received and transmitted
(including bad frames) that were 256 to 511 octets in length (this
includes FCS octets but excludes framing bits).
packet(5121023)
This field shows the number of frames received and transmitted
(including bad frames) that were 512 to 1023 octets in length (this
includes FCS octets but excludes framing bits).
packet(10241518)
This field shows the number of frames received and transmitted
(including bad frames) that were 1024 to 1518 octets in length (this
includes FCS octets but excludes framing bits).
packet(1522)
This field shows the number of frames received and transmitted
(including bad frames) that were 1519 to 1522 octets in length (this
includes FCS octets but excludes framing bits).
packet(total)
This field shows the total number of received and transmitted
packets.
broadcast(total)
This field shows the total number of received and transmitted
broadcast frames.
multicast(total)
This field shows the total number of received and transmitted
multicast frames.
octet(total)
This field shows the total number of received and transmitted octets
(unicast, multicast and broadcast).
Poll Interval(s)
Set Interval
The text box displays how often (in seconds) this screen refreshes.
You may change the refresh interval by typing a new number in the
text box and then clicking Set Interval.
Stop
Click Stop to halt system statistic polling.
Port
Select a port from the Port drop-down list box and then click Clear
Counter to erase the recorded statistical information for that port.
Clear Counter
Reset
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Click this to set the Poll Interval(s) and Port fields to their default
values and to refresh the screen.
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Chapter 9 Home and Port Statistics Screens
9.1.2 ADSL Port Statistics Screen
Use this screen to display statistics about an ADSL port. To open this screen, click
an ADSL port’s number in the Home screen.
Figure 43 Port Statistics (ADSL)
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 9 Port Statistics (ADSL)
94
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Return
Click this to go back to the Home screen.
xDSL Port
Use this drop-down list box to select a port for which you wish to view
statistics. This field identifies the port described in this screen.
Port Name
This field displays the name that you have configured for the port. If
you have not configured a name, it is blank.
Tx packets
This field shows the number of packets transmitted on this port.
Rx packets
This field shows the number of packets received on this port.
Tx broadcast
packets
This field shows the number of broadcast packets transmitted on this
port.
Rx broadcast
packets
This field shows the number of broadcast packets received on this
port.
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Chapter 9 Home and Port Statistics Screens
Table 9 Port Statistics (ADSL) (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Tx discard
packets
This field shows the number of outgoing packets that were dropped
on this port. The “Tx discard packets” counter always displays “0”
because the IES-1248-51V does not discard packets that it sends.
Rx discard
packets
This field shows the number of received packets that were dropped on
this port. Some of the possible reasons for the discarding of received
(rx) packets are:
•
•
•
The packet filter is enabled and the packets matched a packet
filter.
The MAC filter is enabled and the IES-1248-51V dropped the
packets according to the MAC filter’s configuration.
The packets contained frames with an invalid VLAN ID.
Errors
This field shows the number of AAL5 frames received with CRC errors.
Tx rate
This field shows the number of kilobytes per second transmitted on
this port.
Rx rate
This field shows the number of kilobytes per second received on this
port.
Tx bytes
This field shows the number of bytes that have been transmitted on
this port.
Rx bytes
This field shows the number of bytes that have been received on this
port.
VPI/VCI
This field displays the Virtual Path Identifier (VPI) and Virtual Circuit
Identifier (VCI) of channels on this port.
Tx Packets
This field shows the number of packets transmitted on each channel.
Rx Packets
This field shows the number of packets received on each channel.
Tx rate
This field shows the number of bytes per second transmitted on each
channel.
Rx rate
This field shows the number of bytes per second received on each
channel.
Tx cells
This field shows the number of ATM cells transmitted on each channel.
Rx cells
This field shows the number of ATM cells received on each channel.
Errors
This field shows the number of error packets on each channel.
Poll Interval(s)
Set Interval
The text box displays how often (in seconds) this screen refreshes.
You may change the refresh interval by typing a new number in the
text box and then clicking Set Interval.
Stop
Click Stop to halt system statistic polling.
Port
Select a port from the Port drop-down list box and then click Clear
Counter to erase the recorded statistical information for that port.
Clear Counter
Reset
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Click this to set the Poll Interval(s) and Port fields to their default
values and to refresh the screen.
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CHAPTER
10
System Information
The System Information screen displays general device information (such as
firmware version number) and hardware polling information (such as fan status).
You can check the firmware version number and monitor the hardware status in
this screen.
To open this screen, click Basic Setting > System Information.
Figure 44 System Info
The following table describes the labels in these screens.
Table 10 System Info
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
System Name
This field displays the device’s model name.
Software F/W
Version
This field displays the version number of the device’s current firmware
including the date created.
DSP Code Version
This field displays the current Digital Signal Processor firmware
version number. This is the modem code firmware.
Hardware Version
This is the version of the physical device hardware.
Serial Number
This is the individual identification number assigned to the device at
the factory.
Ethernet Address
This field displays the MAC (Media Access Control) address of the
Ethernet interface on the IES-1248-51V.
VoIP MAC Address This field displays the MAC address of the VoIP interface on the IES1248-51V.
VoIP DSP Version
This field displays the current Voice over IP Digital Signal Processor
firmware version number.
Codec F/W
Version
This field displays the current audio coder / decoder firmware version
number
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Chapter 10 System Information
Figure 45 System Info
The following table describes the labels in these screens.
Table 11 System Info
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Hardware Monitor
98
Enable
Select this check box to turn the hardware monitor on or clear it to
turn the hardware monitor off.
Temperature Unit
Select C to display all temperature measurements in degrees Celsius.
Select F to display all temperature measurements in degrees
Fahrenheit.
Temperature
Each temperature sensor can detect and report the temperature.
Temperature sensor 1 is near the ADSL chipset. Temperature sensor 2
is near the central processing unit. Temperature sensor 3 is at the
hardware monitor chip.
Current
This shows the current temperature at this sensor.
MAX
This field displays the maximum temperature measured at this
sensor.
MIN
This field displays the minimum temperature measured at this sensor.
Average
This field displays the average temperature measured at this sensor.
Threshold (Low)
This field displays the lowest temperature limit at this sensor.
Threshold (Hi)
This field displays the highest temperature limit at this sensor.
Status
This field displays Normal for temperatures below the threshold and
Over for those above.
Voltage(V)
The power supply for each voltage has a sensor that can detect and
report the voltage.
Current
This is the current voltage reading.
MAX
This field displays the maximum voltage measured at this point.
MIN
This field displays the minimum voltage measured at this point.
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Table 11 System Info (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Average
This field displays the average voltage measured at this sensor.
Threshold (Low)
This field displays the lowest voltage limit at this sensor.
Threshold (Hi)
This field displays the highest voltage limit at this sensor.
Status
Normal indicates that the voltage is within an acceptable operating
range at this point; otherwise Abnormal is displayed.
Fan Speed (RPM)
A properly functioning fan is an essential component (along with a
sufficiently ventilated, cool operating environment) in order for the
device to stay within the temperature threshold. Each fan has a
sensor that can detect and report the fan’s RPM (Revolutions Per
Minute).
Current
This is the current RPM reading.
MAX
This field displays the maximum RPM measured at this point.
MIN
This field displays the minimum RPM measured at this point.
Average
This field displays the average RPM measured at this sensor.
Threshold (Low)
This field displays the lowest RPM limit at this sensor.
Threshold (Hi)
This field displays the highest RPM limit at this sensor.
Status
Normal indicates that the RPM is within an acceptable operating
range at this point; otherwise Abnormal is displayed.
Figure 46 System Info
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Chapter 10 System Information
The following table describes the labels in these screens.
Table 12 System Info
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
External Alarm
The IES-1248-51V is able to detect alarm input from other equipment
connected to the ALARM connector.
Status
Name
Apply
The Status column displays Normal when no alarm input has been
detected from other equipment. It displays Abnormal when alarm
input has been detected from other equipment.
Use the Name column to configure a title for each external alarm for
identification purposes. Use up to 31 characters.
Click Apply to save the name changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
External Relay
Status
The IES-1248-51V is able to send alarm output to another piece of
equipment connected to the ALARM connector.
The Status column displays Normal when the IES-1248-51V is not
sending alarm output to another piece of equipment. It displays
Abnormal when the IES-1248-51V is sending alarm output to
another piece of equipment.
Fan Trap Mode
Select the device’s fan trap mode.
Use this section of the screen to configure the hardware monitor
threshold settings.
New threshold
Apply
100
Configure new threshold settings in the fields below and click Apply
to use them.
Index
This field is a sequential value.
Temperature (Hi)
Use these fields to configure the highest temperature limit at each
sensor.
Temperature (Lo)
Use these fields to configure the lowest temperature limit at each
sensor.
Volt. (Hi)
Use these fields to configure the highest voltage limit at each sensor.
Volt. (Lo)
Use these fields to configure the lowest voltage limit at each sensor.
Fan (Hi)
Use these fields to configure the highest RPM limit at each sensor.
Fan (Low)
Use these fields to configure the lowest RPM limit at each sensor.
Poll Interval(s)
Set Interval
The text box displays how often (in seconds) this screen refreshes.
You may change the refresh interval by typing a new number in the
text box and then clicking Set Interval.
Stop
Click Stop to halt statistic polling.
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11
General Setup
The General Setup screen allows you to configure general device identification
information. It also allows you to set the system time manually or get the current
time and date from an external server when you turn on your device. The real
time is then displayed in the logs.
To open this screen, click Basic Setting > General Setup.
Figure 47 General Setup
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Chapter 11 General Setup
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 13 General Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Host Name
Choose a descriptive name for identification purposes. This name
consists of up to 31 ASCII characters; spaces are not allowed.
Location
Enter the geographic location of your device. You can use up to 31
ASCII characters; spaces are not allowed.
Contact Person's
Name
Enter the name of the person in charge of this device. You can use up
to 31 ASCII characters; spaces are not allowed.
Model
This field displays your device type.
Stdio Timeout
Set the inactivity timeout value (in seconds) for the HTTP (Web
Configurator), console, and telnet sessions to the IES-1248-51V. The
IES-1248-51V automatically disconnects a session if the management
session remains idle for more than the seconds you enter here.
Use Time Server
When Bootup
Select the time service protocol that the timeserver uses. Not all time
servers support all protocols, so you may have to use trial and error
to find a protocol that works. The main differences between them are
the time format.
When you select the Daytime (RFC 867) format, the switch displays
the day, month, year and time with no time zone adjustment. When
you use this format it is recommended that you use a Daytime
timeserver within your geographical time zone.
Time (RFC-868) format displays a 4-byte integer giving the total
number of seconds since 1970/1/1 at 0:0:0.
NTP (RFC-1305) is similar to Time (RFC-868).
None is the default value. Enter the time manually. Each time you
turn on the device, the time and date will be reset to 2000-1-1 0:0.
102
Time Server IP
Address
Enter the IP address of your timeserver. The device searches for the
timeserver for up to 60 seconds.
Current Time
This field displays the time you open this menu (or refresh the menu).
New Time
(hh:min:ss)
Enter the new time in hour, minute and second format. The new time
then appears in the Current Time field after you click Apply.
Current Date
This field displays the date you open this menu.
New Date (yyyymm-dd)
Enter the new date in year, month and day format. The new date then
appears in the Current Date field after you click Apply.
Time Zone
Select the time difference between UTC (Universal Time Coordinated,
formerly known as GMT, Greenwich Mean Time) and your time zone
from the drop-down list box.
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
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12
User Account
The User Account screens allows you to set up and configure system
administrator accounts for the IES-1248-51V. You can also configure the
authentication policy for IES-1248-51V administrators. This is different than port
authentication in Chapter 26 on page 209.
See Chapter 26 on page 209 for background information on authentication.
12.1 User Account Screen
To open this screen, click Basic Setting > User Account.
Figure 48 User Account
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 14 User Account
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Authentication
Click this to open the Authentication screen. See Section 12.2 on
page 105.
Enable
Select this check box to turn on the administrator account.
Name
Enter a user name for the administrator account.
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Table 14 User Account (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Password
Enter a password for the administrator account.
Retype Password
to Confirm
Re-enter the administrator account’s password to verify that you have
entered it correctly.
Privilege
Select a privilege level to determine which screens the administrator
can use. There is a high, medium or low privilege level for each
command.
Select high to allow the administrator to use all commands including
the lower privilege commands. High privilege commands include
things like creating administrator accounts, restarting the system and
resetting the factory defaults.
Select middle to allow the administrator to use middle or low
privilege commands.
Select low to allow the administrator to use only low privilege
commands. Low privilege commands are read only.
104
Add
Click Add to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring the fields again.
Index
This field displays the number of the user account. Click an account’s
index number to use the top of the screen to edit it.
Enable
This field displays a “V “ if you have the administrator account turned
on. It displays a “-“ if the administrator account is turned off.
Name
This field displays the administrator account’s user name.
Privilege
This field displays the administrator account’s access level (high,
middle or low).
Select
Select this check box and click the Delete button to remove an
administrator account.
Delete
Select an administrator account’s check box and click this button to
remove the administrator account.
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen afresh.
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Chapter 12 User Account
12.2 Authentication Screen
Use this screen to set up the authentication policies and settings by which
administrators can access the IES-1248-51V.
To open this screen, click Basic Setting > User Account > Authentication.
Figure 49 Authentication
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 15 User Account
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
User account
Click this to open the User Account screen. See Section 12.1 on
page 103.
Authentication
Mode
Select the process by which the IES-1248-51V authenticates
administrators.
local - Search the local database. You maintain this database in the
User Account screen.
radius - Check an external RADIUS database using the settings
below.
local then radius - Search the local database; if the user name is
not found, check an external RADIUS database using the settings
below.
IP
Enter the IP address of the external RADIUS server in dotted decimal
notation.
Port
The default UDP port of the RADIUS server for authentication is
1812. You need not change this value unless your network
administrator instructs you to do so.
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Table 15 User Account (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Secret
Specify a password (up to 31 alphanumeric characters) as the key to
be shared between the external RADIUS server and the switch. This
key is not sent over the network. This key must be the same on the
external RADIUS server and the switch.
Default Privilege
Level
Select the privilege level assigned to administrators in case the
external RADIUS database does not provide one. The privilege level
determines which screens the administrator can use. There is a high,
medium or low privilege level for each command. You can also choose
to deny access to the IES-1248-51V.
Select high to allow the administrator to use all commands including
the lower privilege commands. High privilege commands include
things like creating administrator accounts, restarting the system and
resetting the factory defaults.
Select middle to allow the administrator to use middle or low
privilege commands.
Select low to allow the administrator to use only low privilege
commands. Low privilege commands are read only.
Select deny to prevent the administrator from accessing the IES1248-51V.
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13
Switch Setup
The Switch Setup screen allows you to set up and configure global device
features.
13.1 GARP Timer Setup
GARP (Generic Attribute Registration Protocol) allows network devices to register
and de-register attribute values with other GARP participants within a bridged
LAN. GARP is a protocol that provides a generic mechanism for protocols that
serve a more specific application, for example, GVRP (GARP VLAN Registration
Protocol). GARP and GVRP are the protocols used to automatically register VLAN
membership across switches.
Switches join VLANs by making a declaration. A declaration is made by issuing a
Join message using GARP. Declarations are withdrawn by issuing a Leave
message. A Leave All message terminates all registrations. GARP timers set
declaration timeout values.
13.2 Switch Modes
The IES-1248-51V supports standalone and daisychain switch modes.
13.2.1 Standalone Switch Mode
“Standalone switch mode” relates to the IES-1248-51V’s operational behavior, not
a standalone network topology. The standalone switch mode allows either or both
of the IES-1248-51V’s Ethernet ports to connect to the backbone Ethernet
network. You can also connect one of the IES-1248-51V’s Ethernet ports to the
Ethernet network and the other to another IES-1248-51V (see Figure 50 on page
108 for an example). When the IES-1248-51V is in standalone mode, you can use
it in a network topology that uses loops (you should also enable RSTP). You can
have multiple IES-1248-51V connected on the same network and set both of them
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to use standalone mode in order to use them with a network topology that uses
loops.
Standalone switch mode with port isolation enabled blocks communications
between subscriber ports on an individual IES-1248-51V. However, one IES-124851V’s subscribers can communicate with another IES-1248-51V’s subscribers if
the two IES-1248-51V’s Ethernet ports are connected to each other (see Figure 50
on page 108 for an example). If you have multiple IES-1248-51V connected on
the same network and set to standalone mode, they do not all need to have the
same port isolation setting.
13.2.2 Port Isolation with Standalone Switch Mode Example
The following graphic shows IES-1248-51V 1 and 2 connected to each other and
the Ethernet backbone switch (3) in a network topology that creates a loop. The
IES-1248-51V are using the standalone switch mode and have RSTP enabled.
In this example, both IES-1248-51V have port isolation turned on.
Communications between A and B must first go through another switch (3 in the
figure). However, A and B can communicate with C without their communications
going through another switch or router.
Figure 50 Port Isolation with Standalone Switch Mode Example
13.2.3 Daisychain Switch Mode
Daisychain switch mode sets the IES-1248-51V to use Ethernet port one (ENET 1)
as an uplink port to connect to the Ethernet backbone and Ethernet port two
(ENET 2) to connect to another (daisychained or subtending) IES-1248-51V. The
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daisychain switch mode is recommended for use in a network topology that does
not have loops. When you daisychain multiple IES-1248-51V they must all be set
to daisychain mode.
Daisychain switch mode with port isolation enabled blocks communications
between subscriber ports on an individual IES-1248-51V and between the
subscribers of any daisychained IES-1248-51V (see Figure 51 on page 109 for an
example). Use the same port isolation setting on all IES-1248-51V that you set up
in a daisychain.
13.2.4 Port Isolation with Daisychain Switch Mode Example
In the example below, the IES-1248-51V 1 has its Ethernet port one (ENET 1)
connected to the Ethernet backbone switch (3) and it’s Ethernet port two (ENET2)
connected to Ethernet port one (ENET 1) of the daisychained IES-1248-51V (2).
With port isolation turned on, communications between A and B must first go
through another switch or router (3 in the figure). A and B also cannot
communicate with C without their communications going through another switch
or router.
Figure 51 Port Isolation with Daisychain Switch Mode Example
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Chapter 13 Switch Setup
13.3 Switch Setup Screen
To open this screen, click Basic Setting > Switch Setup.
Figure 52 Switch Setup
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 16 Switch Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
MAC Address
Learning
Enter a time from 10 to 10,000 seconds. This is how long all
dynamically learned MAC addresses remain in the MAC address table
before they age out (and must be relearned). Enter 0 to disable the
aging out of MAC addresses.
Aging Time
GARP Timer
110
Switches join VLANs by making a declaration. A declaration is made
by issuing a Join message using GARP. Declarations are withdrawn by
issuing a Leave message. A Leave All message terminates all
registrations. GARP timers set declaration timeout values. Click here
for more information on VLANs.
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Chapter 13 Switch Setup
Table 16 Switch Setup (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Join Timer
Join Timer sets the duration of the Join Period timer for GVRP in
milliseconds. Each port has a Join Period timer. The allowed Join Time
range is between 100 and 65535 milliseconds; the default is 200
milliseconds.
Leave Timer
Leave Timer sets the duration of the Leave Period timer for GVRP in
milliseconds. Each port has a single Leave Period timer. Leave Time
must be two times larger than Join Timer; the default is 600
milliseconds.
Leave All Timer
Leave All Timer sets the duration of the Leave All Period timer for
GVRP in milliseconds. Each port has a single Leave All Period timer.
Leave All Timer must be larger than Leave Timer.
Port Isolation
Active
Turn on port isolation to block communications between subscriber
ports. When you enable port isolation you do not need to configure
the VLAN to isolate subscribers.
MAC AntiSpoofing
Turn on MAC anti-spoofing to monitor for and prevent MAC address
“spoofing” by malicious parties.
Active
Switch Mode
Select Standalone to use both of the IES-1248-51V’s Ethernet ports
(ENET 1 and ENET 2) as uplink ports.
Note: Standalone mode is recommended for network topologies
that use loops.
Use Daisychain mode to cascade (daisychain) multiple IES-124851V. The IES-1248-51V uses Ethernet port one (ENET 1) as an uplink
port to connect to the Ethernet backbone and uses Ethernet port two
(ENET 2) to connect to another (daisychained or subtending) IES1248-51V.
Note: Daisychain mode is recommended for network topologies
that do not use loops.
Priority Queue
Assignment
IEEE 802.1p defines up to 8 separate traffic types by inserting a tag
into a MAC-layer frame that contains bits to define class of service.
Frames without an explicit priority tag are given the default priority of
the ingress port. Use the next two fields to configure the priority
level-to-physical queue mapping.
The device has 4 physical queues that you can map to the 8 priority
levels for outgoing Ethernet traffic. The device has 8 physical queues
that you can map to the 8 priority levels for outgoing ADSL traffic.
Traffic assigned to higher index queues gets through the device faster
while traffic in lower index queues is dropped if the network is
congested.
Priority Level
The following descriptions are based on the traffic types defined in the
IEEE 802.1d standard (which incorporates IEEE 802.1p).
Priority 7
Typically used for network control traffic such as router configuration
messages.
Priority 6
Typically used for voice traffic that is especially sensitive to jitter
(jitter is the variations in delay).
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Table 16 Switch Setup (continued)
112
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Priority 5
Typically used for video that consumes high bandwidth and is
sensitive to jitter.
Priority 4
Typically used for controlled load, latency-sensitive traffic such as
SNA (Systems Network Architecture) transactions.
Priority 3
Typically used for “excellent effort” or better than best effort and
would include important business traffic that can tolerate some delay.
Priority 2
This is for “spare bandwidth”.
Priority 1
This is typically used for non-critical “background” traffic such as bulk
transfers that are allowed but that should not affect other applications
and users.
Priority 0
Typically used for best-effort traffic.
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
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CHAPTER
14
IP Setup
The IP Setup screen allows you to configure a device IP address, subnet mask
and DNS (domain name server) for management purposes (through the Ethernet
or SFP ports). This screen also allow you to set up an IP address for ADSL
subscribers’ VoIP services (through the ADSL connections).
To open this screen, click Basic Setting > IP Setup.
Figure 53 IP Setup
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 17 IP Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Ethernet
This section allows you to configure the IP setup for management of
the IES-1248-51V. The settings in this section only work when the
VOIP Management Enable field is not selected.
IP
Enter the IP address for management of your IES-1248-51V in dotted
decimal notation for example 1.2.3.4.
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Table 17 IP Setup (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
IP Mask
Enter the IP subnet mask for management of your IES-1248-51V in
dotted decimal notation (for example, 255.255.255.0).
Default
Management
Gateway
Enter the IP address of the default outgoing gateway for management
(in dotted decimal notation).
VLAN ID
This is the VLAN ID for IES-1248-51V management. See Chapter 19
on page 163 for more information on configuring VLANs on the IES1248-51V.
DHCP
Operation
When you select the DHCP Client Mode field in the Ethernet
section, the Renew and Release buttons will be available after the
IES-1248-51V gets a dynamic IP address for management.
Click Release to remove the current assigned dynamic IP address or
Renew to have the DHCP server reassign an IP address.
DHCP Client
Mode
VoIP
Select this to use a dynamic IP address for management assigned by
a DHCP server in the network. Clear this to use the set static IP
address.
This section allows you to configure IP setup for VoIP services.
IP address
Enter the IES-1248-51V’s VoIP service IP address, in dotted decimal
notation.
IP Mask
Enter the subnet mask for the IES-1248-51V’s VoIP IP address, in
dotted decimal notation.
Default VoIP
Gateway
Enter the IP address of the default outgoing gateway for VoIP service
(in dotted decimal notation).
DNS
Enter the IP address of the Domain Name System server for VoIP
service, in dotted decimal format.
Note: You do not need to enter this if your H.248 MGC server
uses IP addresses in H.248 messages (not domain
names).
VLAN ID
Enter the VLAN ID for VoIP service. See Chapter 19 on page 163 for
more information on configuring VLANs on the IES-1248-51V.
DHCP Client
Mode
This field is available if you select the VOIP Management Enable
field.
Select this to use a dynamic IP address for VoIP services and
management purpose assigned by a DHCP server in the network.
Clear this to use the set static IP address.
DHCP
Operation
After you enable the DHCP Client Mode in the VoIP section, the
Renew and Release buttons are available (you have to click Apply
first).
Click Release to release the current assigned dynamic IP address.
Click Renew to have the DHCP server reassign an IP address.
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Table 17 IP Setup (continued)
LABEL
VOIP
Management
Enable
DESCRIPTION
Select this to also allow the administrator to access the IES-1248-51V
using the VoIP IP address for management purpose. When this field is
selected, the VoIP IP address is the only one IP address on the IES1248-51V for both VoIP services and device management.
That is, the IP address configured in the Ethernet section of the
screen will not accessible.
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring the fields again.
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CHAPTER
15
ENET Port Setup
The ENET Port Setup screen allows you to configure settings for the Ethernet
ports.
To open this screen, click Basic Setting > ENET Port Setup.
Figure 54 ENET Port Setup
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 18 ENET Port Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
This is the port index number.
Active
Select the check box to turn on the port. Clear it to disable the port.
Name
Enter a descriptive name that identifies this port. You can use up to
31 ASCII characters; spaces are not allowed.
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Table 18 ENET Port Setup (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Speed Mode
Select the type of Ethernet connection for this port. When you don’t
use auto-negotiation, you must make sure that the settings of the
peer Ethernet port are the same in order to connect.
Select Auto (auto-negotiation) to have the IES-1248-51V
automatically determine the type of connection that the Ethernet port
has. When the peer Ethernet device has auto-negotiation turned on,
the IES-1248-51V negotiates with the peer to determine the
connection speed. If the peer Ethernet port does not have autonegotiation turned on, the IES-1248-51V determines the connection
speed by detecting the signal on the cable and using full duplex.
When an Ethernet port is set to Auto, the IES-1248-51V tries to
make a fiber connection first and does not attempt to use the RJ-45
port if the fiber connection is successful.
Select 100 Copper if the Ethernet port has a 100 MB electrical
connection.
Select 1000 Copper if the Ethernet port has a 1000 MB (1 gigabit)
electrical connection.
Select 1000 Fiber if the Ethernet port has a 1000 MB (1 gigabit) fiber
optic connection.
118
Duplex
The IES-1248-51V uses full duplex Ethernet connections.
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
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CHAPTER
16
xDSL Port Setup
This chapter explains how to configure settings for profiles and individual ADSL
ports. It also covers how to configure virtual channels and virtual channel profiles.
16.1 ADSL Standards Overview
These are the ADSL standards and rates that the IES-1248-51V supports at the
time of writing. The actual transfer rates will vary depending on what the
subscriber’s device supports, the line conditions and the connection distance.
Table 19 ADSL Standards Maximum Transfer Rates
STANDARD
MAXIMUM DOWNSTREAM MAXIMUM UPSTREAM
G.dmt
8160 Kbps
1024 Kbps
ANSI T1.413 issue 2
8160 Kbps
1024 Kbps
ADSL2
12000 Kbps
1200 Kbps
ADSL2 Annex M
12000 Kbps
2400 Kbps
ADSL2+
25000 Kbps
1200 Kbps
ADSL2+ Annex M
25000 Kbps
2400 Kbps
16.2 Downstream and Upstream
Downstream refers to traffic going out from the IES-1248-51V to the subscriber’s
ADSL modem or router. Upstream refers to traffic coming into the IES-1248-51V
from the subscriber’s ADSL modem or router.
16.3 Profiles
A profile is a table that contains a list of pre-configured ADSL settings. Each ADSL
port has one (and only one) profile assigned to it at any given time. You can
configure multiple profiles, including profiles for troubleshooting. Profiles allow you
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to configure ADSL ports efficiently. You can configure all of the ADSL ports with
the same profile, thus removing the need to configure the ADSL ports one-by-one.
You can also change an individual ADSL port by assigning it a different profile.
For example, you could set up different profiles for different kinds of accounts (for
example, economy, standard and premium). Assign the appropriate profile to an
ADSL port and it takes care of a large part of the port’s configuration maximum
and minimum transfer rates. You still get to individually enable or disable each
port, as well as configure its channels and operational mode.
16.4 Interleave Delay
Interleave delay is the wait (in milliseconds) that determines the size of a single
block of data to be interleaved (assembled) and then transmitted. Interleave delay
is used when transmission error correction (Reed- Solomon) is necessary due to a
less than ideal telephone line. The bigger the delay, the bigger the data block size,
allowing better error correction to be performed.
Reed-Solomon codes are block-based error correcting codes with a wide range of
applications. The Reed-Solomon encoder takes a block of digital data and adds
extra "redundant" bits. The Reed-Solomon decoder processes each block and
attempts to correct errors and recover the original data.
16.4.1 Fast Mode
Fast mode means no interleaving takes place and transmission is faster (a “fast
channel”). This would be suitable if you have a good line where little error
correction is necessary.
16.5 Configured Versus Actual Rate
You configure the maximum rate of an individual ADSL port by modifying its
profile (see Chapter 17 on page 139) or assigning the port to a different profile
(see Section 16.7.1 on page 124). However, due to noise and other factors on the
line, the actual rate may not reach the maximum that you specify.
Even though you can specify arbitrary numbers using the Edit Profile screen, the
actual rate is always a multiple of 32 Kbps. If you enter a rate that is not a
multiple of 32 Kbps, the actual rate will be the next lower multiple of 32Kbps. For
instance, if you specify 60 Kbps for a port, the actual rate for that port will not
exceed 32 Kbps, and if you specify 66 Kbps, the actual rate will not be over
64Kbps.
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Regardless of a profile’s configured upstream and downstream rates, the IES1248-51V automatically limits the actual rates for each individual port to the
maximum speeds supported by the port’s ADSL operational mode. For example, if
you configure a profile with a maximum downstream rate of 25000 Kbps, and
apply it to a port set to use G.dmt, the IES-1248-51V automatically uses a
maximum downstream rate of 8160 Kbps. This means that if you configure a
profile with very high rates, you can still use it with any port. See Table 19 on page
119 for a list of the maximum rates supported by the different ADSL standards.
16.6 Default Settings
The default profile always exists and all of the ADSL ports use the default profile
settings when the IES-1248-51V is shipped. The default profile's name is set to
DEFVAL_MAX.
See Chapter 71 on page 579 for the settings of the default profile and ADSL port
default settings.
16.7 xDSL Port Setup Screen
To open this screen, click Basic Setting > xDSL Port Setup.
Figure 55 xDSL Port Setup
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Chapter 16 xDSL Port Setup
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 20 xDSL Port Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
VC Setup
Click VC Setup to open the VC Setup screen where you can
configure VC settings for the DSL ports (see Section 16.9 on page
129).
PPVC Setup
Click PPVC Setup to open the PPVC Setup screen where you can
configure priority PVC settings for the DSL ports (see Section 16.11
on page 134).
Copy Port
Do the following to copy settings from one DSL port to another DSL
port or ports.
Paste
1. Select the number of the DSL port from which you want to copy
settings.
2. Select the settings that you want to copy.
3. Click Paste and the following screen appears.
4. Select to which ports you want to copy the settings. Use All to
select every port. Use None to clear all of the check boxes.
5. Click Apply to paste the settings.
Figure 56 Select Ports
122
Active
Select this check box to copy this port’s active setting. This is
configured in the xDSL Port Setting screen (see Section 16.7.1 on
page 124).
Customer Info
Select this check box to copy this port’s subscriber information. This
is configured in the xDSL Port Setting screen (see Section 16.7.1 on
page 124).
Customer Tel
Select this check box to copy this port’s subscriber’s telephone
number. This is configured in the xDSL Port Setting screen (see
Section 16.7.1 on page 124).
2+ Features
Select this check box to copy this port’s ADSL2+ feature settings.
These are configured in the xDSL Port Setting screen (see Section
16.7.1 on page 124).
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Chapter 16 xDSL Port Setup
Table 20 xDSL Port Setup (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Profile & Mode
Select this check box to copy this port’s port profile settings and ADSL
operational mode. The port profile settings are configured in the
xDSL Profiles Setup screens (see Chapter 17 on page 139). The
ADSL operational mode is configured in the xDSL Port Setting
screen (see Section 16.7.1 on page 124).
IGMP Filter
Select this check box to copy this port’s IGMP filter settings. These
are configured in the IGMP Filter Profile screen (see Section 20.7
on page 180).
Security
Select this check box to copy this port’s security settings. This is
configured in the Port Security screen (see Chapter 27 on page
215).
Frame Type
Select this check box to copy this port’s allowed frame type. This is
configured in the Static VLAN Setting screen (see Chapter 25 on
page 201).
Virtual Channels
Select this check box to copy this port’s virtual channel settings.
These are configured in the VC Setup screen (see Section 16.9 on
page 129).
Alarm Profile
Select this check box to copy this port’s alarm profile. This is
configured in the Alarm Profile Setup screen (see Section 17.6 on
page 148).
PVID & Priority
Select this check box to copy this port’s PVID and priority settings.
These are configured in the VLAN Port Setting screen (see Chapter
19 on page 163).
Packet Filter
Select this check box to copy this port’s packet filter settings. These
are configured in the Packet Filtering screen (see Chapter 23 on
page 195).
Paste
See Copy Port.
Port
This field shows each ADSL port number.
Active
This field shows the active status of this port. The port may be
enabled or disabled. This is configured in the xDSL Port Setting
screen (see Section 16.7.1 on page 124).
Customer Info
This field shows the customer information provided for this port. This
is configured in the xDSL Port Setting screen (see Section 16.7.1 on
page 124).
Customer Tel
This field shows the customer telephone number provided for this
port. This is configured in the xDSL Port Setting screen (see Section
16.7.1 on page 124).
Profile
This field shows which profile is assigned to this port. This is
configured in the xDSL Port Setting screen (see Section 16.7.1 on
page 124).
Mode
This field shows which ADSL operational mode the port is set to use.
This is configured in the xDSL Port Setting screen (see Section
16.7.1 on page 124).
Channels
This field displays the number of PVCs (Permanent Virtual Circuits)
that are configured for this port. This is configured in the VC Setup
screen (see Section 16.9 on page 129).
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16.7.1 xDSL Port Setting Screen
To open this screen, click Basic Setting > xDSL Port Setup, and then click a
port’s index number.
Figure 57 xDSL Port Setting
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 21 xDSL Port Setting
124
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Last Page
Click this to return to the previous screen.
Active
Select this check box to turn on this ADSL port.
Customer Info
Enter information to identify the subscriber connected to this ADSL
port. You can use up to 31 printable ASCII characters (including
spaces and hyphens).
Customer Tel
Enter information to identify the telephone number of the subscriber
connected to this ADSL port. You can use up to 15 ASCII characters
(including spaces and hyphens).
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Chapter 16 xDSL Port Setup
Table 21 xDSL Port Setting (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Profile
Select a profile of ADSL settings (such as the transfer rate, interleave
delay and signal to noise ratio settings) to assign to this port. Use the
Port Profile screen to configure port profiles (see Chapter 17 on
page 139).
Mode
Select the port’s ADSL operational mode. Select the mode that the
subscriber’s device uses or auto to have the IES-1248-51V
automatically determine the mode to use. See Table 19 on page 119
for information on the individual ADSL modes.
Alarm Profile
Select the port’s alarm profile. The alarm profile defines alarm
thresholds for the ADSL port. The IES-1248-51V sends an alarm trap
and generates a syslog entry when the thresholds of the alarm profile
are exceeded (see Section 17.6 on page 148).
IGMP Filter Profile The IGMP filter profile defines which multicast groups a port can join.
Select a profile of IGMP filter settings to assign to this port. Use the
IGMP Filter Profile screen to configure IGMP filter profiles (see
Section 20.7 on page 180).
ADSL2/2+
feature
These are features available with ADSL2/2+. The subscriber’s ADSL
device must also support the individual features in order to use them.
At the time of writing these features have not been fully tested and
their performance and interoperability cannot be guaranteed.
Annex L
Enable Annex L to use reach extended ADSL2. This allows increased
connection distances.
Annex M
Enable Annex M to use double upstream mode. This has the upstream
connection use tones 6 to 63.
Annex I
Enable Annex I to use all digital mode. With Annex I, the ADSL
connection uses the full spectrum of the physical line and the user can
not use POTS or ISDN service. This increases the upstream data rate.
Note: The subscriber cannot use POTS or ISDN services when
you enable Annex I.
PMM
Enable the Power ManageMent (PMM) feature to reduce the amount of
power used overall and reduce the instances of the connection going
down. PMM increases or decreases the transmission power based on
line conditions. PMM also decreases the number of service
interruptions.
Select L2 to have the ADSL connection use power saving mode and
reduce the rate when there is no traffic. The rate comes back up when
there is traffic.
Select L3 to use both power management modes L2 and L3. L3 puts
the ADSL connection to sleep mode.
L0 power mode uses no power reduction. See the ITU-T G.992.3
standard for more on PMM and the power modes (states).
SRA
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Enable Seamless Rate Adaptation (SRA) to have the IES-1248-51V
automatically adjust the connection’s data rate according to line
conditions without interrupting service.
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Chapter 16 xDSL Port Setup
Table 21 xDSL Port Setting (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Sudden spikes in the line’s noise level (impulse noise) can cause
errors and result in lost packets. Set the impulse noise protection
minimum to have a buffer to protect the ADSL physical layer
connection against impulse noise. This buffering causes a delay that
reduces transfer speeds. It is recommended that you use a non-zero
setting for real time traffic that has no error correction (like
videoconferencing).
126
US INP
Set the minimum upstream (US) impulse noise protection setting.
DS INP
Set the minimum downstream (DS) impulse noise protection setting.
Max US TX PSD
Specify the maximum upstream transmit power (-256 ~ 255 in
0.1dBs).
Max DS TX PSD
Specify the maximum downstream transmit power (-256 ~ 255 in
0.1dBs).
L0 Time
Set the minimum time (in seconds) that the ADSL line must stay in L0
power mode before changing to the L2 power mode.
L2 Time
Set minimum time (in seconds) that the ADSL line must stay in the L2
power mode before reducing the power again in the L2 power mode.
L2 ATPR
Set the maximum Aggregate Transmit Power Reduction (ATPR) in
decibels (dB) that is permitted in a L2 power reduction. The system
can gradually decrease the ADSL line transmission power while it is in
the L2 power mode. This is the largest individual power reduction
allowed in the L2 power mode.
L2 ATPRT
Set the maximum Aggregate Transmit Power Reduction Total (ATPRT)
in decibels (dB) that is permitted in the L2 power mode. This is the
total transmit power decrease that is allowed to occur in the L2 power
mode.
Max L2 Rate
Set the maximum transfer rate (in Kilobits per second) that is
permitted while the port is in the L2 power mode. The supported
range is 32~4096 Kbps in 4 Kbps increments. If you enter a number
that is not a multiple of 4, the system uses the next lower multiple of
4. If you enter 39 for example, the system will use 36. Set this to 0 to
have the system automatically assign a value.
Min L2 Rate
Set the minimum transfer rate (in Kilobits per second) that is
permitted while the port is in the L2 power mode. The supported
range is 32~4096 Kbps in 4 Kbps increments. If you enter a number
that is not a multiple of 4, the system uses the next lower multiple of
4. If you enter 39 for example, the system will use 36. Set this to 0 to
have the system automatically assign a value.
L0 to L2 Rate
Set the down stream transfer rate (in Kilobits per second) that serves
as the threshold for whether the port is to use the L0 or the L2 power
mode. The system changes from L0 mode to L2 mode when the
downstream transfer rate stays below this threshold for L0 Time. The
system changes back from L2 mode to L0 mode when the
downstream transfer rate goes above this threshold. This rate must
be less than or equal to one half of the Min L2 Rate and at least 16
Kbps. Set this to 0 to have the system automatically assign a value.
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Chapter 16 xDSL Port Setup
Table 21 xDSL Port Setting (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Use this part of the screen to mask carrier tones. Masking a carrier tone disables the use
of that tone on the ADSL port. Do this to have the system not use an ADSL line’s tones
that are known to have a high noise level. Each mask can use up to 8 hexadecimal digits
(00000000~ffffffff). Each hexadecimal digit represents 4 tones. The hexadecimal digit is
converted to binary and a '1' masks (disables) the corresponding tone. The most
significant bit defines the lowest tone number in a mask.
USCarrier (0~63)
Mask0 represents tones 0~31.
Mask1 represents tones 32~63.
The most significant bit defines Tone 0. In other words, 0x00000001
means tone 31. For example, you could use 0xfffff000 to disable
upstream carrier tones 0~19 and leave tones 20 ~ 31 enabled.
DSCarrier(32~25
5)
Mask1 represents tones 32~63
Mask2 represents tones 64~95
Mask3 represents tones 96~127
Mask4 represents tones 128~159
Mask5 represents tones 160~191
Mask6 represents tones 192~223
Mask7 represents tones 224~255
For example, use 0x01000000 in Mask2 to disable downstream
carrier tone 71. Use 0x03000000 in Mask2 to disable downstream
carrier tones 70 and 71.
DSCarrier
(256~511)
Mask0 represents tones 256~287
Mask1 represents tones 288~319
Mask2 represents tones 320~351
Mask3 represents tones 352~383
Mask4 represents tones 384~415
Mask5 represents tones 416~447
Mask6 represents tones 448~479
Mask7 represents tones 480~511
For example, use 0x00001000 in Mask1 to disable downstream
carrier tone 307. Use 0x0000f000 in Mask1 to disable downstream
carrier tones 304 to 307.
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring the fields again.
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Chapter 16 xDSL Port Setup
16.8 Virtual Channels
Defining virtual channels (also called Permanent Virtual Circuits or PVCs) allows
you to set priorities for different services or subscribers. You can define up to eight
channels on each DSL port and use them for different services or levels of service.
You set the PVID that is assigned to untagged frames received on each channel.
You also set an IEEE 802.1p priority for each of the PVIDs. In this way you can
assign different priorities to different channels (and consequently the services that
get carried on them or the subscribers that use them).
For example, you want to give high priority to voice service on one of the ADSL
ports.
Use the Edit Static VLAN screen to configure a static VLAN on the IES-1248-51V
for voice on the port.
Use the ADSL Edit Port Channel Setup screen to:
• Configure a channel on the port for voice service.
• Set the channel to use the PVID of the static VLAN you configured.
• Assign the channel a high priority.
16.8.1 Super Channel
The IES-1248-51V forwards frames belonging to VLAN groups that are not
assigned to specific channels to the super channel. Enable the super channel
option to allow a channel forward frames belonging to multiple VLAN groups (that
are not assigned to other channels). The super channel functions in the same way
as the channel in a single channel environment. One port can have only one super
channel.
16.8.2 LLC
LLC is a type of encapsulation where one VC (Virtual Circuit) carries multiple
protocols with each packet header containing protocol identifying information.
Despite the extra bandwidth and processing overhead, this method may be
advantageous if it is not practical to have a separate VC for each carried protocol,
for example, if charging heavily depends on the number of simultaneous VCs.
16.8.3 VC Mux
VC Mux is a type of encapsulation where, by prior mutual agreement, each
protocol is assigned to a specific virtual circuit, for example, VC1 carries IP, VC2
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carries IPX, and so on. VC-based multiplexing may be dominant in environments
where dynamic creation of large numbers of ATM VCs is fast and economical.
16.8.4 Virtual Channel Profile
Virtual channel profiles allow you to configure the virtual channels efficiently. You
can configure all of the virtual channels with the same profile, thus removing the
need to configure the virtual channels one-by-one. You can also change an
individual virtual channel by assigning it a different profile.
The IES-1248-51V provides two default virtual channel profiles: DEFVAL (for LLC
encapsulation) and DEFVAL_VC (for VC encapsulation). By default, all virtual
channels are associated to DEFVAL.
16.9 VC Setup Screen
Use this screen to view and configure a port’s channel (PVC) settings.
To open this screen, click Basic Setting > xDSL Port Setup > VC Setup.
Figure 58 VC Setup
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Chapter 16 xDSL Port Setup
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 22 VC Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
xDSL Port Setup
Click xDSL Port Setup to go to the screen where you can configure
DSL port settings (see Section 16.7 on page 121).
PPVC Setup
Click PPVC Setup to open the PPVC Setup screen where you can
configure priority PVC settings for the DSL ports (see Section 16.11
on page 134).
Port
Use this drop-down list box to select a port for which you wish to view
or configure settings. This field is read-only once you click on a port
number below.
Super Channel
The IES-1248-51V forwards frames belonging to VLAN groups that
are not assigned to specific channels to the super channel.
Enable the super channel option to have this channel forward frames
belonging to multiple VLAN groups (that are not assigned to other
channels).
The super channel functions in the same way as the channel in a
single channel environment.
VPI
Type the Virtual Path Identifier for a channel on this port.
VCI
Type the Virtual Circuit Identifier for a channel on this port.
DS VC Profile
Use the drop-down list box to select a VC profile to use for this
channel’s downstream traffic shaping.
US VC Profile
Use the drop-down list box to select a VC profile to use for this
channel’s upstream traffic. The IES-1248-51V does not perform
upstream traffic policing if you do not specify an upstream VC profile.
Note: Upstream traffic policing should be used in conjunction with
the ATM shaping feature on the subscriber’s device. If the
subscriber’s device does not apply the appropriate ATM
shaping, all upstream traffic will be discarded due to
upstream traffic policing.
PVID
Type a PVID (Port VLAN ID) to assign to untagged frames received on
this channel.
Priority
Use the drop-down list box to select the priority value (0 to 7) to add
to incoming frames without a (IEEE 802.1p) priority tag. An asterisk
(*) denotes a super channel.
Add
Click this to add or save channel settings on the selected port. (The
name of the button depends on whether or not you have clicked on a
PVC number in the Index column.)
Apply
This saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile memory. The
IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or loses power, so
use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to save your
changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done configuring.
130
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
Show Port
Select the number of an ADSL port for which to display VC settings
(or display all of them).
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Chapter 16 xDSL Port Setup
Table 22 VC Setup (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Index
This field displays the number of the PVC. Click a PVC’s index number
to use the top of the screen to edit the PVC.
Note: At the time of writing, you cannot edit the VPI and VCI. If
you want to change them, add a new PVC with the desired
settings. Then you can delete any unwanted PVCs.
Port
This field displays the number of the ADSL port on which the PVC is
configured.
VPI/VCI
This field displays the Virtual Path Identifier (VPI) and Virtual Circuit
Identifier (VCI). The VPI and VCI identify a channel on this port.
US / DS VC Profile This shows which VC profile this channel uses for downstream traffic
shaping. The VC profile for upstream policing also displays if the
channel is configured to use one.
PVID
This is the PVID (Port VLAN ID) assigned to untagged frames or
priority frames (0 VID) received on this channel. An asterisk (*)
denotes a super channel.
Priority
This is the priority value (0 to 7) added to incoming frames without a
(IEEE 802.1p) priority tag. An asterisk (*) denotes a super channel.
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Table 22 VC Setup (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Select
Do the following to remove one or more PVCs.
Delete
1. Select a PVC’s Select radio button.
2. Click Delete.
3. Click OK if you want to remove the PVC from other ports. Click
Cancel to only remove the one you selected.
Figure 59 Basic Setting > xDSL Port Setup > VC Setup >
Delete
4. If you clicked OK, the following screen appears.
5. Select to which ports you want to copy the settings. Use All to
select every port. Use None to clear all of the check boxes.
6. Click Apply to delete the channels.
Figure 60 Select Ports
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Table 22 VC Setup (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Select
Do the following to copy settings from one PVC to another port or
ports.
Copy
Paste
1. Click the Select radio button of the PVC from which you want to
copy settings.
2. Click Paste.
3. The following screen appears.
4. Select to which ports you want to copy the settings. Use All to
select every port. Use None to clear all of the check boxes.
5. Click Apply to copy the settings.
Figure 61 Select Ports
16.10 Priority-based PVCs
A PPVC (Priority-based PVC) allows you to give different priorities to PVCs that are
members of the same VLAN.
The IES-1248-51V uses eight priority queues (also called levels) for the member
PVCs. The system maps frames with certain IEEE 802.1p priorities to a PVC with a
particular priority queue. The following table gives the factory default mapping.
Table 23 IEEE 802.1p Priority to PPVC Mapping
IEEE 802.1 PRIORITY
MAPS TO:
PPVC 0/33, PRIORITY QUEUE
7
->
level 7
6
->
level 6
5
->
level 5
4
->
level 4
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Table 23 IEEE 802.1p Priority to PPVC Mapping (continued)
IEEE 802.1 PRIORITY
MAPS TO:
PPVC 0/33, PRIORITY QUEUE
3
->
level 3
2
->
level 2
1
->
level 1
0
>
level 0
16.11 PPVC Setup Screen
Use this screen to view and configure PPVCs.
To open this screen, click Basic Setting > xDSL Port Setup > PPVC Setup.
Figure 62 PPVC Setup
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 24 PPVC Setup
134
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
xDSL Port Setup
Click xDSL Port Setup to go to the screen where you can configure
DSL port settings (see Section 16.7 on page 121).
VC Setup
Click VC Setup to open the VC Setup screen where you can
configure VC settings for the DSL ports (see Section 16.9 on page
129).
Port
Use this drop-down list box to select a port for which you wish to
configure settings.
Encap.
Select the encapsulation type (LLC or VC) for this PPVC.
VPI
Type the Virtual Path Identifier for this PPVC.
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Table 24 PPVC Setup (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
VCI
Type the Virtual Circuit Identifier for this PPVC. The IES-1248-51V
uses this PVC channel internally. This PVC is not needed on the
subscriber’s device. This PVC cannot overlap with any existing PVC’s
on this port.
PVID
Type a PVID (Port VLAN ID) to assign to untagged frames received on
this PPVC.
Priority
Use the drop-down list box to select the priority value (0 to 7) to add
to incoming frames without a (IEEE 802.1p) priority tag.
Add / Modify
Click Add / Modify to save PPVC settings for a port.
In order to change a port’s PPVC settings, just select the port from
the Port drop-down list box and then configure the settings you want.
These settings replace the port’s old settings when you click Add /
Modify.
Clicking Add / Modify saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s
volatile memory.
The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or loses
power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to save
your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
Show Port
Select the number of an ADSL port for which to display PPVC settings
(or display all of them).
Index
This field displays the number of the PPVC.
Port
This field displays the number of the ADSL port on which the PPVC is
configured.
VPI/VCI
This field displays the Virtual Path Identifier (VPI) and Virtual Circuit
Identifier (VCI). The VPI and VCI identify a channel on this port. The
IES-1248-51V uses this PVC channel internally. This PVC is not
needed on the subscriber’s device.
Encap
This field displays the PPVC’s type of encapsulation (LLC or VC).
PVID
This is the PVID (Port VLAN ID) assigned to untagged frames or
priority frames (0 VID) received on this channel.
Priority
This is the priority value (0 to 7) added to incoming frames without a
(IEEE 802.1p) priority tag.
Members
This field displays how many PVCs belong to this PPVC has. Click the
number to open a screen where you can configure the PPVC’s
member PVCs.
Delete
Click Delete to remove a PPVC.
Clicking Delete saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory.
The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or loses
power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to save
your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
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Chapter 16 xDSL Port Setup
16.11.1 PPVC Setup Members Screen
Use this screen to add and remove member PVCs.
Note: The member PVCs must be created on the subscriber’s device.
To open this screen, click Basic Setting > xDSL Port Setup > PPVC Setup.
Then, click a PPVC’s member number to open the PPVC Setup Members screen.
Figure 63 PPVC Setup, Edit
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 25 PPVC Setup, Edit
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
This is the port for which you are viewing or configuring settings.
Index
This field displays the number of the member PVC.
VPI/VCI
This field displays the Virtual Path Identifier (VPI) and Virtual Circuit
Identifier (VCI). The VPI and VCI identify a channel on this port. The
subscriber’s device must create this PVC.
VC Profile
This shows which VC profile this channel uses for downstream traffic
shaping. The VC profile for upstream policing also displays if the
channel is configured to use one.
Level
This field displays the number of the member PVC’s priority queue.
Delete
Click Delete to remove a member PVC from the PPVC.
Clicking Delete saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory.
The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or loses
power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to save
your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
136
Add
Use this section of the screen to add or modify a member PVC.
VPI
Type the Virtual Path Identifier for this member PVC.
VCI
Type the Virtual Circuit Identifier for this member PPVC. This PVC
cannot overlap with any existing PVC’s on this port.
DS VC Profile
Use the drop-down list box to select a VC profile to use for this
channel’s downstream traffic shaping.
US VC Profile
Use the drop-down list box to select a VC profile to use for this
channel’s upstream traffic. The IES-1248-51V does not perform
upstream traffic policing if you do not specify an upstream VC profile.
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Chapter 16 xDSL Port Setup
Table 25 PPVC Setup, Edit (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Level
Use the drop-down list box to select the priority queue (0 to 7) to add
to use for the PVC. 7 is the highest level.
Add / Modify
Click Add / Modify to save member PVC settings for a PPVC.
In order to change a member PVC ‘s settings, just enter the PVC’s VPI
and VCI, and configure the settings you want. These settings replace
the PVC’s old settings when you click Add / Modify.
Clicking Add / Modify saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s
volatile memory.
The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or loses
power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to save
your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Close
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Click Close to exit the screen without saving your changes.
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CHAPTER
17
xDSL Profiles Setup
A profile is a list of settings that you define. Then you can assign them to one or
more individual ports. For background information about many of these settings,
see Chapter 16 on page 119.
17.1 Port Profile Screen
To open this screen, click Basic Setting > xDSL Profiles Setup.
Figure 64 Port Profile
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Chapter 17 xDSL Profiles Setup
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 26 Port Profile
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
VC Profile
Click VC Profile to open the VC Profile screen where you can
configure virtual channel profiles (see Section 17.5 on page 146).
Alarm Profile
Click Alarm Profile to open the Alarm Profile screen where you can
configure limits that trigger an alarm when exceeded (see Section
17.6 on page 148)
IGMP Filter Profile
Click IGMP Filter Profile to open the IGMP Filter Profile screen
where you can configure IGMP multicast filter profiles (see Section
20.7 on page 180).
Index
This is the port profile index number.
Name
These are the names of individual profiles. The DEFVAL profile always
exists and all of the DSL ports have it assigned to them by default.
You can use up to 31 ASCII characters; spaces are not allowed.
Latency Mode
This is the ADSL latency mode (Fast or Interleave) for the ports that
belong to this profile.
Down/Up Stream
Rate (kbps)
These are the maximum downstream and upstream transfer rates for
the ports that belong to this profile.
Select
Select a profile’s Select radio button and click Modify to edit the
profile.
Modify
Select
Delete
Select a profile’s Select radio button and click Delete to remove the
profile.
The rest of the screen is for profile configuration.
Name
When editing a profile, this is the name of this profile. When adding a
profile, type a name (up to 31 characters) for the profile.
Latency Mode
This field sets the ADSL latency mode for the ports that belong to this
profile.
Select Fast mode to use no interleaving and have faster transmission
(a “fast channel”). This would be suitable if you have a good line
where little error correction is necessary.
Select Interleave mode to use interleave delay when transmission
error correction (Reed- Solomon) is necessary due to a less than ideal
telephone line.
See Section 16.4 on page 120 for more on interleave delay.
140
Up Stream
The following parameters relate to upstream transmissions.
Max Rate
Type a maximum upstream transfer rate (64 to 4096 Kbps) for this
profile. Configure the maximum upstream transfer rate to be less
than the maximum downstream transfer rate.
Min Rate
Type the minimum upstream transfer rate (32 to 3000 Kbps) for this
port. Configure the minimum upstream transfer rate to be less than
the maximum upstream transfer rate.
Interleave Delay
Configure this field when you set the Latency Mode field to
Interleave. Type the number of milliseconds (1-255) of interleave
delay to use for upstream transfers. It is recommended that you
configure the same latency delay for both upstream and downstream.
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Chapter 17 xDSL Profiles Setup
Table 26 Port Profile (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Max SNR
Type the maximum upstream signal to noise margin (0-31 dB).
Min SNR
Type the minimum upstream signal to noise margin (0-31 dB).
Configure the minimum upstream signal to noise margin to be less
than or equal to the maximum upstream signal to noise margin.
Target SNR
Type the target upstream signal to noise margin (0-31 dB). Configure
the target upstream signal to noise margin to be greater than or
equal to the minimum upstream signal to noise margin and less than
or equal to the maximum upstream signal to noise margin.
Up Shift SNR
The upstream up shift signal to noise margin (0-31 dB). When the
channel’s signal to noise margin goes above this number, the device
can attempt to use a higher transfer rate. Configure the upstream up
shift signal to noise margin to be greater than or equal to the target
upstream signal to noise margin and less than or equal to the
maximum upstream signal to noise margin.
Down Shift SNR
The upstream down shift signal to noise margin (0-31 dB). When the
channel’s signal to noise margin goes below this number, the device
shifts to a lower transfer rate. Configure the upstream down shift
signal to noise margin to be less than or equal to the target upstream
signal to noise margin and greater than or equal to the minimum
upstream signal to noise margin.
Down Stream
The following parameters relate to downstream transmissions.
Max Rate
Type a maximum downstream transfer rate (64 to 32000 Kbps) bps
for this port. Configure the maximum downstream transfer rate to be
greater than the maximum upstream transfer rate.
Min Rate
Type the minimum downstream transfer rate (32 to 32000 Kbps) for
this port. Configure the minimum downstream transfer rate to be less
than the maximum downstream transfer rate.
Interleave Delay
Configure this field when you set the Latency Mode field to
interleave. Type the number of milliseconds (1-255) of interleave
delay to use for upstream transfers. It is recommended that you
configure the same latency delay for both upstream and downstream.
Max SNR
Type the maximum downstream signal to noise margin (0-31 dB).
Min SNR
Type the minimum downstream signal to noise margin (0-31 dB).
Configure the minimum downstream signal to noise margin to be less
than or equal to the maximum downstream signal to noise margin.
Target SNR
Type the target downstream signal to noise margin (0-31 dB).
Configure the target downstream signal to noise margin to be greater
than or equal to the minimum downstream signal to noise margin and
less than or equal to the maximum downstream signal to noise
margin.
Up Shift SNR
The downstream up shift signal to noise margin (0-31 dB). When the
channel’s signal to noise margin goes above this number, the device
can attempt to use a higher transfer rate. Configure the downstream
up shift signal to noise margin to be greater than or equal to the
target downstream signal to noise margin and less than or equal to
the maximum downstream signal to noise margin.
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Table 26 Port Profile (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Down Shift SNR
The downstream down shift signal to noise margin (0-31 dB). When
the channel’s signal to noise margin goes below this number, the
device shifts to a lower transfer rate. Configure the downstream down
shift signal to noise margin to be less than or equal to the target
downstream signal to noise margin and greater than or equal to the
minimum downstream signal to noise margin.
Add
Click Add to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
17.2 ATM QoS
ATM Quality of Service (QoS) mechanisms provide the best service on a per-flow
guarantee. ATM network infrastructure was designed to provide QoS. It uses fixed
cell sizes and built-in traffic management (see Section 17.3 on page 142). This
allows you to fine-tune the levels of services on the priority of the traffic flow.
17.3 Traffic Shaping
Traffic shaping is an agreement between the carrier and the subscriber to regulate
the average rate and fluctuations of data transmission over an ATM network. This
agreement helps eliminate congestion, which is important for transmission of real
time data such as audio and video connections.
Note: Traffic shaping controls outgoing (downstream) traffic, not incoming (upstream).
17.3.1 ATM Traffic Classes
These are the basic ATM traffic classes defined by the ATM Forum Traffic
Management 4.0 Specification.
17.3.1.1 Constant Bit Rate (CBR)
Constant Bit Rate (CBR) is an ATM traffic class that provides fixed bandwidth. CBR
traffic is generally time-sensitive (doesn’t tolerate delay). CBR is used for
connections that continuously require a specific amount of bandwidth. Examples
of connections that need CBR would be high-resolution video and voice.
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17.3.1.2 Variable Bit Rate (VBR)
The Variable Bit Rate (VBR) ATM traffic class is used with bursty connections.
Connections that use the Variable Bit Rate (VBR) traffic class can be grouped into
real time (rt-VBR) or non-real time (nrt-VBR) connections.
The rt-VBR (real-time Variable Bit Rate) type is used with bursty connections that
require closely controlled delay and delay variation. An example of an rt-VBR
connection would be video conferencing. Video conferencing requires real-time
data transfers and the bandwidth requirement varies in proportion to the video
image’s changing dynamics.
The nrt-VBR (non real-time Variable Bit Rate) type is used with bursty connections
that do not require closely controlled delay and delay variation. An example of an
nrt-VBR connection would be non-time sensitive data file transfers.
17.3.1.3 Unspecified Bit Rate (UBR)
The Unspecified Bit Rate (UBR) ATM traffic class is similar to the ABR traffic class
for bursty data transfers. However, while ABR gives subscribers a set amount of
bandwidth, UBR doesn’t guarantee any bandwidth and only delivers traffic when
the network has spare bandwidth.
17.3.2 Traffic Parameters
These are the parameters that control the flow of ATM traffic.
17.3.2.1 Peak Cell Rate (PCR)
Peak Cell Rate (PCR) is the maximum rate at which the sender can send cells. This
parameter may be lower (but not higher) than the maximum line speed. 1 ATM
cell is 53 bytes (424 bits), so a maximum speed of 832Kbps gives a maximum
PCR of 1962 cells/sec. This rate is not guaranteed because it is dependent on the
line speed.
17.3.2.2 Sustained Cell Rate (SCR)
Sustained Cell Rate (SCR) is the mean cell rate of each bursty traffic source. It
specifies the maximum average rate at which cells can be sent over the virtual
connection. SCR may not be greater than the PCR.
17.3.2.3 Maximum Burst Size (MBS)
Maximum Burst Size (MBS) is the maximum number of cells that can be sent at
the PCR. After MBS is reached, cell rates fall below SCR until cell rate averages to
the SCR again. At this time, more cells (up to the MBS) can be sent at the PCR
again.
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Chapter 17 xDSL Profiles Setup
Note: If the PCR, SCR or MBS is set to the default of “0”, the system will assign a
maximum value that correlates to your upstream line rate.
The following figure illustrates the relationship between PCR, SCR and MBS.
Figure 65 PCR, SCR and MBS in Traffic Shaping
17.3.2.4 Cell Delay Variation Tolerance (CDVT)
Cell Delay Variation Tolerance (CDVT) is the accepted tolerance of the difference
between a cell’s transfer delay and the expected transfer delay. CDVT controls the
time scale over which the PCR is enforced. CDVT is used to determine if a cell
arrived too early in relation to PCR.
17.3.2.5 Burst Tolerance (BT)
Burst Tolerance (BT) is the maximum number of cells that the port is guaranteed
to handle without any discards. BT controls the time scale over which the SCR is
enforced. BT is used to determine if a cell arrived too early in relation to SCR. Use
this formula to calculate BT: (MBS – 1) x (1 / SCR – 1 / PCR) = BT.
17.3.2.6 Theoretical Arrival Time (TAT)
The Theoretical Arrival Time (TAT) is when the next cell (in an ATM connection’s
stream of cells) is expected to arrive. TAT is calculated based on the PCR or SCR.
The following figure illustrates the relationship between TAT, CDVT and BT. If a cell
arrives at time A, then according to PCR or SCR, the next cell is expected to arrive
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Chapter 17 xDSL Profiles Setup
at time B. If the next cell arrives earlier than time C, it is discarded or tagged for
not complying with the TAT. Time C is calculated based on the CDVT or BT.
Figure 66 TAT, CDVT and BT in Traffic Shaping
17.4 Upstream Policing
Upstream policing is an agreement between the carrier and the subscriber to
regulate the average rate and fluctuations of data transmission coming from the
subscriber's device to the IES-1248-51V.
Note: Upstream policing controls incoming (upstream) traffic, not outgoing
(downstream).
The ATM traffic classes and parameters are identical with downstream shaping.
Upstream policing can control the upstream incoming traffic rate on specific PVCs.
Upstream ATM cell traffic that violates the policing profile will be discarded. Traffic
shaping must also be enabled on the subscriber's device in order to use upstream
policing. If a subscriber attempts to enlarge his device's PVC shaping parameters
in order to get more upstream traffic bandwidth, it will violate the IES-1248-51V's
upstream policing profile and the traffic will be discarded. Operators can use this
feature to prevent subscribers from changing their device settings.
Note: Traffic shaping must also be enabled on the subscriber's device in order to use
upstream policing.
Note that since the IES-1248-51V uses ATM QoS, if the subscriber device's
upstream shaping rate is larger than the IES-1248-51V's upstream policing rate,
some ATM cells will be discarded. In the worst case, none of the Ethernet packets
from the CPE will be able to be reassembled from AAL5, so no packets from the
subscriber's device can be received by the IES-1248-51V.
The upstream policing feature can be enabled/disabled per PVC. No matter which
ATM traffic class is used for the PVC's upstream traffic (CBR, VBR, or UBR), the
IES-1248-51V will drop any upstream traffic that violates the specified ATM VC
profile.
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Chapter 17 xDSL Profiles Setup
17.5 VC Profile Screen
To open this screen, click Basic Setting > xDSL Profiles Setup > VC Profile.
Figure 67 VC Profile
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 27 VC Profile
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
xDSL Profile
Click xDSL Profile to configure port profiles and assign them to
individual ports (see Section 17.1 on page 139).
Alarm Profile
Click Alarm Profile to open the Alarm Profile screen where you can
configure limits that trigger an alarm when exceeded (see Section
17.6 on page 148)
IGMP Filter Profile Click IGMP Filter Profile to open the IGMP Filter Profile screen
where you can configure IGMP multicast filter profiles (see Section
20.7 on page 180).
Index
This is the number of the VC profile.
Name
This name identifies the VC profile.
Encap
This field displays the profile’s type of encapsulation (LLC or VC).
AAL
This field displays the ATM adaptation layer used by the VC profile.
aal5 - The VC profile uses ATM adaptation layer 5.
146
Class
This field displays the type of ATM traffic class: cbr (constant bit
rate), vbr (real-time variable bit rate), nrt-vbr (non-real time
variable bit rate) or ubr (unspecified bit rate).
PCR
This is the Peak Cell Rate (PCR), the maximum number of cells that
the sender can send per second.
CDVT
This field displays the accepted tolerance of the difference between a
cell’s transfer delay and the expected transfer delay.
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Chapter 17 xDSL Profiles Setup
Table 27 VC Profile (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
SCR
The Sustained Cell Rate (SCR) sets the average cell rate (long-term)
in cells per second that can be transmitted. SCR applies with the vbr
traffic class.
BT
Burst Tolerance (BT) is the maximum number of cells that the port is
guaranteed to handle without any discards. BT applies with the vbr
traffic class.
Select
Select a VC profile’s Select radio button and click Modify to edit the
VC profile
Modify
Delete
Select a VC profile’s Select radio button and click Delete to remove
the VC profile
The rest of the screen is for PVC configuration.
Name
When editing a profile, this is the name of this profile. When adding a
profile, type a name for the profile. You can use up to 31 ASCII
characters; spaces are not allowed.
Encap
Select the encapsulation type (LLC or VC) for this port.
Class
Select CBR (constant bit rate) to specify fixed (always-on) bandwidth
for voice or data traffic. Select UBR (unspecified bit rate) for
applications that are non-time sensitive, such as e-mail. Select VBR
(real time variable bit rate) or NRT-VBR (non real time variable bit
rate) for bursty traffic and bandwidth sharing with other applications.
PCR
The Peak Cell Rate (PCR) is the maximum rate at which the sender
can send cells. PCR applies with all of the ATM traffic classes. You can
type a number of (ATM) cells per second in the first field or type a
number of kilobytes per second in the second field to have the system
automatically compute the number of ATM cells per second.
CDVT
Cell Delay Variation Tolerance (CDVT) is the accepted tolerance of the
difference between a cell’s transfer delay and the expected transfer
delay. CDVT applies with all of the ATM traffic classes. Type the CDVT
here.
SCR
The Sustained Cell Rate (SCR) sets the average cell rate (long-term)
that can be transmitted. Type the SCR, which must be less than the
PCR. SCR applies with the VBR traffic classes. You can type a number
of (ATM) cells per second in the first field or type a number of
kilobytes per second in the second field to have the system
automatically compute the number of ATM cells per second.
BT
Burst Tolerance (BT) sets a maximum number of cells that the port is
guaranteed to handle without any discards. Type the BT here. BT
applies with the VBR traffic classes.
Add
Click Add to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
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Chapter 17 xDSL Profiles Setup
17.6 Alarm Profile Screen
Alarm profiles define ADSL port alarm thresholds. The IES-1248-51V sends an
alarm trap and generates a syslog entry when the thresholds of the alarm profile
are exceeded.
To open this screen, click Basic Setting > xDSL Profiles Setup > Alarm
Profile.
Use the top part of the screen (with the Add and Cancel buttons) to add or edit
alarm profiles. The rest of the screen displays the configured alarm profiles.
Figure 68 Alarm Profile
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The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 28 Alarm Profile
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
xDSL Profile
Click xDSL Profile to open the Port Profile screen (see Section 17.1
on page 139). Use the Port Profile screen to configure profiles of
ADSL port settings (such as the transfer rate, interleave delay and
signal to noise ratio settings).
VC Profile
Click VC Profile to open the VC Profile screen where you can
configure virtual channel profiles (see Section 17.5 on page 146).
Name
This field is read-only if you click Modify to edit a port profile. Type a
name to identify the alarm profile (you cannot change the name of
the DEFVAL profile). You can use up to 31 ASCII characters; spaces
are not allowed.
Add
Click Add to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
Threshold
Specify limits for the individual performance counters. The IES-124851V sends an alarm trap and generates a syslog entry when one of
these thresholds is exceeded. A value of 0 disables the alarm
threshold.
ATU-C
These fields are for traffic coming from the subscriber’s device to the
IES-1248-51V.
ATU-R
These fields are for traffic going from the IES-1248-51V to the
subscriber’s device.
15 Min LOF
This field sets the limit for the number of Loss Of Frame seconds that
are permitted to occur within 15 minutes.
15 Min LOS
This field sets the limit for the number of Loss Of Signal seconds that
are permitted to occur within 15 minutes.
15 Min LOL
This field sets limit for the number of Loss Of Link seconds that are
permitted to occur within 15 minutes.
15 Min LPR
This field sets the limit for the number of Loss of Power (on the ATUR)
seconds that are permitted to occur within 15 minutes.
15 Min ES
(seconds)
This field sets the limit for the number of Errored Seconds that are
permitted to occur within 15 minutes.
15 Min SES
(seconds)
This field sets the limit for the number of Severely Errored seconds
that are permitted to occur within 15 minutes.
15 Min UAS
(seconds)
This field sets the limit for the number of UnAvailable seconds that
are permitted to occur within 15 minutes.
15 Min Failed Fast
Retrain
This field sets the limit for the number of failed fast retrains that are
permitted within 15 minutes.
Init Failure Trap
Select Active to trigger an alarm for an initialization failure trap.
Fast Rate Up
(bps)
Specify a rate in kilobits per second (kbps). If a fast mode
connection’s upstream transmission rate increases by more than this
number, then a trap is sent.
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Chapter 17 xDSL Profiles Setup
Table 28 Alarm Profile (continued)
150
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Fast Rate Down
(bps)
Specify a rate in kilobits per second (kbps). If a fast mode
connection’s downstream transmission rate decreases by more than
this number, then a trap is sent.
Interleave Rate
Up (bps)
Specify a rate in kilobits per second (kbps). If an interleave mode
connection’s upstream transmission rate increases by more than this
number, then a trap is sent.
Interleave Rate
Down (bps)
Specify a rate in kilobits per second (kbps). If an interleave mode
connection’s upstream transmission rate decreases by more than this
number, then a trap is sent.
Alarm profiles
with xDSL port
mapping
After you add an alarm profile, you can click a port number’s “-“
symbol to map the xDSL port to that alarm profile. The port’s “V”
symbol in the alarm profile where it was previously mapped changes
to “-“.
Modify
Click Modify to edit a profile.
Delete
Click Delete to remove a profile.
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
CHAPTER
18
xDSL Line Data
18.1 xDSL Line Rate Info Screen
This screen displays an ADSL port’s line operating values. Information obtained
prior to training to steady state transition will not be valid or will be old
information.
To open this screen, click Basic Setting > xDSL Line Data.
Figure 69 xDSL Line Rate Info
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Chapter 18 xDSL Line Data
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 29 xDSL Line Rate Info
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Line Performance
Click Line Performance to display an ADSL port’s line performance
counters (see Section 18.3 on page 155).
Line Data
Click Line Data to display an ADSL port’s line bit allocation (see
Section 18.2 on page 153).
Port
Use this drop-down list box to select a port for which you wish to view
information.
Refresh
Click Refresh to display updated information.
Port Name
This section displays the name of the ADSL port.
The rate fields display the transmission rates. “Line Down” indicates
that the ADSL port is not connected to a subscriber.
152
Down/up Stream
Rate
These are the rates (in Kbps) at which the port has been sending and
receiving data.
Down/up Stream
Noise Margin
These are the DSL line’s downstream and upstream noise margins.
Measured in decibels (dB).
Down/up Stream
Attenuation
These are the reductions in amplitude of the downstream and
upstream DSL signals. Measured in decibels (dB).
Down/up Stream
Attainable Rate
These are the highest theoretically possible transfer rates (in Kbps) at
which the port could send and receive data.
Service Mode
This field displays the ADSL standard that the port is using: G.dmt, or
ANSI T1.413 issue 2.
Trellis Encoding
This field displays whether Trellis encoding is turned on or off. Trellis
encoding helps to reduce the noise in ADSL transmissions. Trellis may
reduce throughput but it makes the connection more stable.A
Down Stream
Interleave Delay
This field displays the number of milliseconds of interleave delay for
downstream transmissions.
Up Stream
Interleave Delay
This field displays the number of milliseconds of interleave delay for
upstream transmissions.
Down Stream
Output Power
This field displays the amount of power that this port is using to
transmit to the subscriber’s ADSL modem or router. The total output
power of the transceiver varies with the length and line quality. The
farther away the subscriber’s ADSL modem or router is or the more
interference there is on the line, the more power is needed.
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Chapter 18 xDSL Line Data
Table 29 xDSL Line Rate Info (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Up Stream Output
Power
This field displays the amount of power that the subscriber’s ADSL
modem or router is using to transmit to this port. The total output
power of the transceiver varies with the length and line quality. The
farther away the subscriber’s ADSL modem or router is or the more
interference there is on the line, the more power is needed.
Info Atur
The Info Atur fields show data acquired from the ATUR (ADSL
Termination Unit – Remote), in this case the subscriber’s ADSL
modem or router, during negotiation/provisioning message
interchanges. This information can help in identifying the subscriber’s
ADSL modem or router.
Info Atuc
The Info Atuc fields show data acquired from the ATUC (ADSL
Termination Unit – Central), in this case IES-1248-51V, during
negotiation/provisioning message interchanges.
The vendor ID, vendor version number and product serial number are
obtained from vendor ID fields (see ITU-T G.994.1) or R-MSGS1 (see
T1.413).
A.
At the time of writing, the IES-1248-51V always uses Trellis coding.
18.2 xDSL Line Data Screen
This screen displays an ADSL port’s line bit allocation.
Discrete Multi-Tone (DMT) modulation divides up a line’s bandwidth into tones.
This screen displays the number of bits transmitted for each tone. This can be
used to determine the quality of the connection, whether a given sub-carrier loop
has sufficient margins to support ADSL transmission rates, and possibly to
determine whether certain specific types of interference or line attenuation exist.
See the ITU-T G.992.1 recommendation for more information on DMT.
The better (or shorter) the line, the higher the number of bits transmitted for a
DMT tone. The maximum number of bits that can be transmitted per DMT tone is
15.
The bit allocation contents are only valid when the link is up.
To open this screen, click Basic Setting > xDSL Line Data > Line Data.
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Chapter 18 xDSL Line Data
In the screen shown, the downstream channel is carried on tones 48 to 255 and
the upstream channel is carried on tones 16 to 31 (space is left between the
channels to avoid interference).
Figure 70 xDSL Line Data
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 30 xDSL Line Data
154
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Line Rate
Click Line Rate to display an ADSL port’s line operating values (see
Section 18.1 on page 151).
Line Performance
Click Line Performance to display an ADSL port’s line performance
counters (see Section 18.3 on page 155).
Port
Use this drop-down list box to select a port for which you wish to view
information.
Refresh
Click Refresh to display updated information.
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Chapter 18 xDSL Line Data
Table 30 xDSL Line Data (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port Name
This section displays the name of the ADSL port.
Bit Allocation
“DS carrier load” displays the number of bits transmitted per DMT
tone for the downstream channel (from the IES-1248-51V to the
subscriber’s DSL modem or router).
“US carrier load” displays the number of bits received per DMT tone
for the upstream channel (from the subscriber’s DSL modem or router
to the IES-1248-51V).
18.3 xDSL Performance Screen
These counters display line performance data that has been accumulated since the
system started. The definitions of near end/far end are always relative to the ATUC (ADSL Termination Unit-Central Office). ATU-C refers to downstream traffic from
the IES-1248-51V. ATU-R (ADSL Termination Unit-Remote) refers to upstream
traffic from the subscriber.
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Chapter 18 xDSL Line Data
To open this screen, click Basic Setting > xDSL Line Data > Line
Performance.
Figure 71 xDSL Performance
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 31 xDSL Performance
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Line Rate
Click Line Rate to display an ADSL port’s line operating values (see
Section 18.1 on page 151).
Line Data
Click Line Data to display an ADSL port’s line bit allocation (see
Section 18.2 on page 153).
Port
Use this drop-down list box to select a port for which you wish to view
information.
Refresh
Click Refresh to display updated information.
Port Name
This section displays the name of the ADSL port.
Performance
(since last linkup)
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Table 31 xDSL Performance (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Line Type
“Fast” stands for non-interleaved (fast mode) and “Interleaved”
stands for interleaved mode.
Init
This field displays the number of link-ups and link-downs.
ATUC/ATUR ES
The Number of Errored Seconds transmitted (downstream) or
received (upstream) on this ADSL port.
ATUC/ATUR SES
The Number of Severely Errored Seconds transmitted (downstream)
or received (upstream) on this ADSL port. Severely errored seconds
contained 30% or more errored blocks or at least one defect. This is a
subset of the Down/Up Stream ES.
ATUC/ATUR UAS
The downstream or upstream number of UnAvailable Seconds.
Fast FEBE
In fast mode, the number of Far End Block Errors (Far End Cyclic
Redundancy Checks).
Fast NEBE
In fast mode, the number of Near End Block Errors (Near End Cyclic
Redundancy Checks).
Fast FEFEC
In fast mode, the Far End number of ADSL frames repaired by
Forward Error Correction.
Fast NEFEC
In fast mode, the Near End number of ADSL frames repaired by
Forward Error Correction.
Interleaved FEBE
In interleaved mode, the number of Far End Block Errors (Far End
Cyclic Redundancy Checks).
Interleaved NEBE
In interleaved mode, the number of Near End Block Errors (Near End
Cyclic Redundancy Checks).
Interleaved
FEFEC
In interleaved mode, the Far End number of ADSL frames repaired by
Forward Error Correction.
Interleaved
NEFEC
In interleaved mode, the Near End number of ADSL frames repaired
by Forward Error Correction.
LPR
This is the number of times that the subscriber’s ADSL device has
experienced a Loss of Power (been off).
15 min, 1day
history
This section of the screen displays line performance statistics for the
current and previous 15-minute periods, as well as for the current
and previous 24 hours.
lofs
The number of Loss Of Frame Seconds that have occurred within the
period.
loss
The number of Loss Of Signal Seconds that have occurred within the
period.
lols
The number of Loss Of Link Seconds that have occurred within the
period.
lprs
The number of Loss of Power Seconds that have occurred within the
period.
es
The number of Errored Seconds that have occurred within the period.
init
The number of successful initializations that have occurred within the
period.
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Table 31 xDSL Performance (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
ses
The number of Severely Errored Seconds that have occurred within
the period.
uas
The number of UnAvailable Seconds that have occurred within the
period.
18.4 G.Bond Screen
G.bond (also known as port bonding) allows subscribers to connect to an ISP
using data streams spread over multiple DSL lines. The total available bandwidth
for the subscriber then becomes the sum of the bandwidth available for each of
the subscriber’s line connections. As well as extra bandwidth, additional DSL lines
also provide backup support.
At the time of writing, the system only supports ADSL port bonding using ZyXEL’s
P-663H-51. See the User’s Guides of these CPE devices for information on their
port bonding specifications.
The next figure shows a subscriber using port bonding on two DSL lines between a
P-663H-51 (A) (using a Y-connector) and the IES-1248-51V (B) to connect to the
Internet.
Figure 72 ADSL Pair Bonding Example
A
B
Internet
The following shows how to use the G.bond Setup screen to configure port
bonding settings. Before you begin you need to activate ADSL ports and connect
them to multiple DSL lines.
158
1
Click Basic Setting > G.bond to open the G.bond screen.
2
To create a new paired group, enter a Name then select a pair bond from the
Member Port list and click Add. The new pair bond is added to the list below.
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Chapter 18 xDSL Line Data
3
To edit an existing group, select its Index number from the list. You can change
the pair bond by selecting a new pair from the Member Port list. Click Modify to
save your changes.
Figure 73 Basic Setting > G.bond
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 32 Port > G.bond
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Name
Enter a descriptive name for a group of DSL lines.
Member Port
Select a pair of ports to bond from this menu.
Add
Click the Add button to save your changes to the list below as a new
pair bond.
Clicking Add saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring this section of the screen again.
Index
This field indicates the item’s position on the list. It has no actual
bearing on the pair bond in question.
Click the Index number to load the pair bond port numbers into the
Member Port list for editing. To save any changes, click the Modify
button that appears in place of the Apply button.
Name
This field displays the descriptive name that you associated with the
pair bond.
Member Ports
This field indicates which ports are pair bonded.
Us Rate (kbps)
This field indicates the upstream data rate in kilobits per second for
the pair bonded ports.
Ds Rate (kbps)
This field indicates the downstream data rate in kilobits per second for
the pair bonded ports.
Select
Use these check boxes in this column to select items you want to
delete.
Delete
Click this button to delete any items in the listed that have been
selected.
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Chapter 18 xDSL Line Data
Table 32 Port > G.bond
160
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
All
Click this button to select all the items in the list.
None
Click this button to deselect any currently selected items in the list.
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P ART III
Advanced
Application
VLAN (163)
ACL (251)
IGMP (171)
Downstream Broadcast (259)
Static Multicast (187)
Syslog (261)
Multicast VLAN (189)
Access Control (263)
Packet Filtering (195)
IP Bridge (273)
MAC Filter (199)
PPPoE Intermediate Agent (295)
Spanning Tree Protocol (201)
Maximum MTU Size (299)
Port Authentication (209)
PVC Upstream Limit (301)
Port Security (215)
OUI Filter (303)
DHCP Relay (217)
DHCP Snoop (223)
2684 Routed Mode (229)
PPPoA to PPPoE (237)
DSCP (243)
TLS PVC (247)
161
162
CHAPTER
19
VLAN
This chapter shows you how to configure IEEE 802.1Q tagged VLANs.
19.1 Introduction to VLANs
A VLAN (Virtual Local Area Network) allows a physical network to be partitioned
into multiple logical networks. Devices on a logical network belong to one group. A
device can belong to more than one group. With VLAN, a device cannot directly
talk to or hear from devices that are not in the same group(s); the traffic must
first go through a router.
In MTU (Multi-Tenant Unit) applications, VLAN is vital in providing isolation and
security among the subscribers. When properly configured, VLAN prevents one
subscriber from accessing the network resources of another on the same LAN,
thus a user will not see the printers and hard disks of another user in the same
building.
VLAN also increases network performance by limiting broadcasts to a smaller and
more manageable logical broadcast domain. In traditional switched environments,
all broadcast packets go to each and every individual port. With VLAN, all
broadcasts are confined to a specific broadcast domain.
Note that a VLAN is unidirectional, it only governs outgoing traffic.
19.2 Introduction to IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN
Tagged VLAN uses an explicit tag (VLAN ID) in the MAC header to identify the
VLAN membership of a frame across bridges - they are not confined to the device
on which they were created. The VLANs can be created statically by hand or
configured dynamically using GVRP.1 The VLAN ID associates a frame with a
specific VLAN and provides the information that devices need to process the frame
1.
GVRP (GARP VLAN Registration Protocol) defines a way for switches to automatically configure switches in a
VLAN network.
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Chapter 19 VLAN
across the network. A tagged frame is four bytes longer than an untagged frame
and contains two bytes of TPID (Tag Protocol Identifier, residing within the type/
length field of the Ethernet frame) and two bytes of TCI (Tag Control Information,
starts after the source address field of the Ethernet frame).
The CFI (Canonical Format Indicator) is a single-bit flag, always set to zero for
Ethernet switches. If a frame received at an Ethernet port has a CFI set to 1, then
that frame should not be forwarded as it is to an untagged port. The remaining
twelve bits define the VLAN ID, giving a possible maximum number of 4,096 (212)
VLANs. Note that user priority and VLAN ID are independent of each other. A
frame with VID (VLAN Identifier) of null (0) is called a priority frame, meaning that
only the priority level is significant and the default VID of the ingress port is given
as the VID of the frame. Of the 4096 possible VIDs, a VID of 0 is used to identify
priority frames and value 4095 (FFF) is reserved, so the maximum possible VLAN
configurations are 4,094.
TPID
2
Bytes
User Priority
3 Bits
CFI
1 Bit
VLAN ID
12 bits
The IES-1248-51V handles up to 4094 VLANs (VIDs 1-4094). The device accepts
incoming frames with VIDs 1-4094.
19.2.1 Forwarding Tagged and Untagged Frames
Each port on the device is capable of passing tagged or untagged frames. To
forward a frame from an 802.1Q VLAN-aware switch to an 802.1Q VLAN-unaware
switch, the IES-1248-51V first decides where to forward the frame and then strips
off the VLAN tag. To forward a frame from an 802.1Q VLAN-unaware switch to an
802.1Q VLAN-aware switch, the IES-1248-51V first decides where to forward the
frame, and then inserts a VLAN tag reflecting the ingress port's default VID. The
default PVID is VLAN 1 for all ports, but this can be changed.
The egress (outgoing) port(s) of a frame is determined on the combination of the
destination MAC address and the VID of the frame. For a unicast frame, the egress
port (based on the destination MAC address) must be a member of the VID, also;
otherwise, the frame is blocked. For a broadcast frame, it is duplicated only on
ports (except the ingress port itself) that are members of the VID, thus confining
the broadcast to a specific domain.
Whether to tag an outgoing frame depends on the setting of the egress port on a
per-VLAN, per-port basis (recall that a port can belong to multiple VLANs). If the
tagging on the egress port is enabled for the VID of a frame, then the frame is
transmitted as a tagged frame; otherwise, it is transmitted as an untagged frame.
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19.3 VLAN Status Screen
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > VLAN.
Figure 74 VLAN Status
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 33 VLAN Status
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Static VLAN
Setting
Click Static VLAN Setting to configure ports to dynamically join a
VLAN group or permanently assign ports to a VLAN group or prohibit
ports from joining a VLAN group (see Section 19.4 on page 167).
VLAN Port Setting
Click VLAN Port Setting to specify Port VLAN IDs (PVIDs). See
Section 19.5 on page 169.
The Number of
VLAN
This is the number of VLANs configured on the IES-1248-51V.
Page X of Y
This identifies which page of VLAN status information is displayed and
how many total pages of VLAN status information there are.
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Table 33 VLAN Status (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
The first table displays the names of the fields. The subsequent tables
show the settings of the VLANs.
Index
This is the VLAN index number.
Name / VID
The name identifies an individual VLAN. The vid is the PVID, the Port
VLAN ID assigned to untagged frames or priority-tagged frames
received on this port.
1~48, enet1,
enet2
These columns display the VLAN’s settings for each port. A tagged
port is marked as T, an untagged port is marked as U and ports not
participating in a VLAN are marked as “–“.
Elapsed Time
This field shows how long it has been since a normal VLAN was
registered or a static VLAN was set up.
Status
This field shows that this VLAN was added to the IES-1248-51V
statically, that is, added as a permanent entry.
Poll Interval(s)
Set Interval
The text box displays how often (in seconds) this screen refreshes.
You may change the refresh interval by typing a new number in the
text box and then clicking Set Interval.
Stop
Click Stop to halt polling statistics.
Previous Page
Click one of these buttons to show the preceding/following screen if
the information cannot be displayed in one screen.
Next Page
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Chapter 19 VLAN
19.4 Static VLAN Setting Screen
You can assign a port to be a member of a VLAN group or prohibit a port from
joining a VLAN group in this screen. This is an IEEE 802.1Q VLAN.
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > VLAN > Static VLAN
Setting.
Figure 75 Static VLAN Setting
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 34 Static VLAN Setting
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
VID
This field displays the ID number of the VLAN group. Click the number
to edit the VLAN settings.
Active
This field indicates whether the VLAN settings are enabled (Yes) or
disabled (No).
Name
This field displays the descriptive name for this VLAN group.
Delete
Select the check boxes of the rule(s) that you want to remove in the
Delete column and then click the Delete button.
You cannot delete a VLAN if any PVIDs are set to use the VLAN or the
VLAN is the CPU (management) VLAN.
Cancel
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Click Cancel to clear the Delete check boxes.
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Chapter 19 VLAN
Table 34 Static VLAN Setting (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Active
Select this check box to enable the VLAN.
You cannot disable a VLAN if any PVIDs are set to use the VLAN or the
VLAN is the CPU (management) VLAN.
Name
Enter a descriptive name for this VLAN group for identification
purposes. Spaces are not allowed.
VLAN ID
Enter the VLAN ID for this static VLAN entry; the valid range is
between 1 and 4094.
Port
The port numbers identify the IES-1248-51V’s ports.
Control
Select Fixed for the port to be a permanent member of this VLAN
group. Use the Select All button to include every port.
Select Forbidden if you want to prohibit the port from joining this
VLAN group. Use the Select All button to include every port.
Tagging
Select TX Tagging if you want the port to tag all outgoing frames
transmitted with this VLAN ID. Use the All button to include every
port. Use the None button to clear all of the ports check boxes.
Add
Click Add to save your settings. The VLAN then displays in the
summary table at the top of the screen.
Clicking Add saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
168
Click Cancel to begin configuring the fields afresh.
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Chapter 19 VLAN
19.5 VLAN Port Setting Screen
Use this screen to specify port VLAN IDs and to set whether or not Ethernet ports
propagate VLAN information to other devices.
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > VLAN > VLAN Port Setting.
Figure 76 VLAN Port Setting
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 35 VLAN Port Setting
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
The port numbers identify the IES-1248-51V’s ports.
PVID
Type the Port VLAN ID (PVID) from 1 to 4094. The IES-1248-51V
assigns the PVID to untagged frames or priority frames (0 VID)
received on this port.
Priority
Select an IEEE 802.1p priority to assign to untagged frames or
priority frames (0 VID) received on this port.
GVRP
Select this check box if the IES-1248-51V should use GVRP to
automatically register and configure VLAN membership.
Acceptable Frame
Type
Select All to have the port accept both tagged and untagged
incoming frames. A
Select Tag Only to have the port only accept incoming frames that
have a VLAN tag.
Apply
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
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Chapter 19 VLAN
Table 35 VLAN Port Setting (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
Copy port
Do the following to copy settings from one port to another port or
ports.
Paste
1. Select the number of the port from which you want to copy
settings.
2. Click Paste and the following screen appears.
3. Select to which ports you want to copy the settings. Use All to
select every port. Use None to clear all of the check boxes.
4. Click Apply to paste the settings.
Figure 77 Select Ports
A.
170
At the time of writing, the VLAN Acceptable Frame Type field is read-only for the Ethernet ports. The
IES-1248-51V accepts both tagged and untagged incoming frames on the Ethernet ports.
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
CHAPTER
20
IGMP
This chapter describes the IGMP screens.
20.1 IGMP
Traditionally, IP packets are transmitted in one of either two ways - Unicast (1
sender to 1 recipient) or Broadcast (1 sender to everybody on the network).
Multicast delivers IP packets to just a group of hosts on the network.
IGMP (Internet Group Multicast Protocol) is a network-layer protocol used to
establish membership in a multicast group - it is not used to carry user data. See
RFC 1112, RFC 2236, and RFC 3376 for information on IGMP versions 1, 2, and 3,
respectively.
20.2 IP Multicast Addresses
In IPv4, a multicast address allows a device to send packets to a specific group of
hosts (multicast group) in a different sub-network. A multicast IP address
represents a traffic receiving group, not individual receiving devices. IP addresses
in the Class D range (224.0.0.0 to 239.255.255.255) are used for IP multicasting.
Certain IP multicast numbers are reserved by IANA for special purposes (see the
IANA web site for more information).
20.2.1 IGMP Snooping
A layer-2 switch can passively snoop on IGMP Query, Report and Leave (IGMP
version 2 or 3) packets transferred between IP multicast routers/switches and IP
multicast hosts to learn the IP multicast group membership. It checks IGMP
packets passing through it, picks out the group registration information, and
configures multicasting accordingly. IGMP snooping allows the IES-1248-51V to
learn multicast groups without you having to manually configure them.
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The IES-1248-51V forwards multicast traffic destined for multicast groups (that it
has learned from IGMP snooping or that you have manually configured) to ports
that are members of that group. The IES-1248-51V discards multicast traffic
destined for multicast groups that it does not know. IGMP snooping generates no
additional network traffic, allowing you to significantly reduce multicast traffic
passing through your device.
20.2.2 IGMP Proxy
IGMP Proxy is a feature in the IES-1248-51V that allows for the reduction of
multicast traffic from an ‘upstream’ multicast server to ‘downstream’ host devices.
In IGMP proxy, an upstream interface is the port that is closer to the source (or
the multicast server) and is able to receive multicast traffic. A downstream
interface is a port that connects to a host (such as a computer).
The following figure shows a network example where A is the multicast server
while the computers labled 1, 2 and 3 are the receiving hosts. In the figure, A is
connected to the upstream interface (B) and 1, 2 and 3 are connected to the
downstream interface (C).
Note: In daisychain mode, Ethernet interface 1 is set as the upstream interface and
Ethernet interface 2 and the DSL ports are set as downstream interfaces.
Figure 78 IGMP Proxy Message Flow Example
A
B
C
1
2
3
The IES-1248-51V functions as a middle manager. The communication sequence
is:
1
172
Host 1 joins a multicast and the IES-1248-51V sends a message upstream letting
the multicast server know.
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Chapter 20 IGMP
2
The multicast server sends traffic to the IES-1248-51V.
3
The IES-1248-51V manages all Join and Leave requests from Hosts 1, 2, and 3
downstream.
4
When the last leave request is received, the IES-1248-51V sends a Leave request
upstream to the multicast server to discontinue the traffic.
By managing multicast queries in this manner, the IES-1248-51V can present
itself as a single recipient to the multicast server. All downstream host traffic is
contained at the IES-1248-51V layer, thus freeing the multicast server for other
tasks.
20.2.2.1 VLAN Queries and IGMP Proxy
If you are using IGMP Proxy, you can use VLAN ID queries to direct multicast
traffic to specific downstream hosts. This allows you to limit which hosts receive a
multicast stream by directing a multicast stream to a specific VLAN group
For example, in the figure below the multicast server (MS) tags stream A with
VID= 1; that stream then only goes to the hosts in VLAN 1. Stream B is tagged
with VID 2 and so that stream only goes to the hosts in VLAN 2. This keeps the
multicast traffic segrated from the hosts that do not want it, thus reducing their
bandwidth overhead.
Figure 79 Example of Using Multicast with VLAN ID Queries
MS
VID=1
VLAN 1
VID=2
VLAN 2
Note: See Section 20.6 on page 179 for details on configuring VLAN queries with
IGMP.
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Chapter 20 IGMP
20.3 IGMP Status Screen
Use this screen to view current IGMP information.
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > IGMP.
Figure 80 IGMP (Status)
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 36 IGMP (Status)
174
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Bandwidth
Click Bandwidth to open the IGMP Bandwidth screen where you
can set up bandwidth requirements for multicast channels (see
Section 20.4 on page 176).
Bandwidth Port
Click Bandwidth Port to open the Bandwidth Port Setup screen
where you can set up multicast bandwidth requirements for selected
ports (see Section 20.5 on page 177).
Config
Click Config to open the Config screen where you can configure IGMP
settings (see Section 20.6 on page 179).
Filter
Click Filter to open the IGMP Filter Profile screen where you can
configure IGMP multicast filter profiles (see Section 20.7 on page
180).
Port Group
Click Port Group to open the IGMP Port Group screen where you
can look at the current list of multicast groups each port has joined
(see Section 20.8 on page 182).
Port Info
Click Port Info to open the IGMP Port Info screen where you can
look at the current number of IGMP-related packets received on each
port (see Section 20.9 on page 183).
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Chapter 20 IGMP
Table 36 IGMP (Status) (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Count Setup
Click Count Setup to open the IGMP Count screen where you can
limit the number of IGMP groups a subscriber on a port can join (see
Section 20.10 on page 184).
Clear
Click Clear to delete the information the IES-1248-51V has learned
about multicast groups. This resets every counter in this screen.
Query
This is the total number of Query packets received.
Report
This is the total number of Report packets received.
Leave
This is the total number of Leave packets received.
Number of IGMP
Groups
This is how many IGMP groups the IES-1248-51V has identified on the
local network.
Previous
Click one of these buttons to show the previous/next screen if all of
the information cannot be seen in one screen.
Next
Reload
Click this button to refresh the screen.
Page X of X
This identifies which page of information is displayed and the total
number of pages of information.
The first table displays the names of the fields. The subsequent tables
show the settings of the IGMP groups.
Index
This is the IGMP group index number.
VID
The VID is the VLAN ID on which the IGMP group is created.
IP Address
This is the IP address of an IGMP multicast group member.
1~48, enet1,
enet2
These columns display the ports that are members of the IGMP
snooping group.
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Chapter 20 IGMP
20.4 IGMP Bandwidth Screen
Use this screen to set up bandwidth requirements for multicast channels. To open
this screen, click Advanced Application > IGMP > Bandwidth.
Figure 81 IGMP Bandwidth
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 37 IGMP Bandwidth
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Default Bandwidth Enter the default bandwidth for multicast channels for which you have
not configured bandwidth requirements.
176
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Index
Select a unique number for this setting. If you select a number that is
already used, the new setting overwrites the old one when you click
Apply.
Start Multicast IP
Enter the beginning of the multicast range.
End Multicast IP
Enter the end of the multicast range. For one multicast address, enter
the start of the multicast range again.
Bandwidth
Enter the bandwidth requirement for the specified multicast range.
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Chapter 20 IGMP
Table 37 IGMP Bandwidth (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Apply
Click Apply to save the filter settings. The settings then display in the
summary table at the bottom of the screen.
Clicking Apply saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring the fields afresh.
This table shows the multicast range settings.
Index
This field displays the number that identifies this setting.
Start Multicast IP
This field displays the beginning of the multicast range.
End Multicast IP
This field displays the end of the multicast range.
Bandwidth
This field displays the allowed bandwidth for the specified multicast
range.
Select
Select this, and click Delete to remove the setting.
Delete
Click this to remove the selected settings.
Select All
Click this to select all entries in the table.
Select None
Click this to un-select all entries in the table.
20.5 Bandwidth Port Setup Screen
Use this screen to set up multicast bandwidth requirements for specific ports. To
open this screen, click Advanced Application > IGMP > Bandwidth Port.
Figure 82 Bandwidth Port Setup
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The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 38 Bandwidth Port Setup
178
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
This field shows each ADSL port number.
Active
This field shows whether or not multicast bandwidth requirements are
enabled on this port. “V” displays if it is enabled and “-“ displays if it is
disabled.
Bandwidth
Enter the maximum acceptable multicast bandwidth for this port. This
has no effect if bandwidth requirements are disabled.
Select
Select this, and click Active or Inactive to enable or disable the
specified multicast bandwidth requirements on this port.
Active
Click this to enable the specified multicast bandwidth requirements on
the selected port.
Inactive
Click this to disable the specified multicast bandwidth requirements on
the selected port.
Select All
Click this to select all entries in the table.
Select None
Click this to un-select all entries in the table.
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20.6 Config Screen
Use this screen to configure your IGMP settings.
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > IGMP > Config.
Figure 83 Config
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 39 Config
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
IGMP Mode
Select Proxy to have the device use IGMP proxy.
Select Snooping to have the device passively learn multicast groups.
Select Disable to have the device not use either IGMP proxy or
snooping.
IGMP Version
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Select which version of IGMP you want the device to support. Select
IGMPv2 (V2) or IGMPv3 (V3). If you select IGMPv2, the device
discards IGMPv3 packets. This provides better security if none of the
devices in the network use IGMPv3. If you select IGMPv3, the device
recognizes both IGMPv2 and IGMPv3.
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Table 39 Config (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Apply
Click Apply to save your IGMP mode settings.
Clicking Apply saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Add Static Query
VLAN
Apply
When the IES-1248-51V has IGMP Proxy enabled, it does not
forward query messages from multicast source devices as they are
received. Instead, the IES-1248-51V determines whether and how
often to send a query message to downstream hosts.
Type the number of a VLAN to which you want the IES-1248-51V
sends query messages on behalf of a multicast server then click
Apply to add it. The VLAN ID appears in the Static Query VID
Table.
You must configure the system's VLAN settings before you can set
static query VIDs.
Note: If you use Static Query VLAN, then the IES-1248-51V will
send query messages and monitor for join or leave
messages indefinitely.
Static Query VID
Table
This table lists the manually added VLANs to which the system sends
IGMP query messages. These are multicast service subscriber VLANs.
Click Delete to remove the selected entry.
Dynamic Query
VID Table
This table lists the IGMP query VLANs that the system has dynamically
learned via IGMP snooping or IGMP proxy. These are VLANs on which
the system sends IGMP query messages. They are multicast service
subscriber VLANs.
Note: If the IES-1248-51V receives no response to its query
messages or the hosts do not send join or leave messages
after a certain time, then the query function will cease until
renewed later by the multicast server.
20.7 IGMP Filter Screen
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > IGMP > Filter.
You can use the IGMP filter profiles to control access to a service that uses a
specific multicast group. Configure an IGMP filter profile that allows access to that
multicast group. Then assign the IGMP filter profile to ADSL ports that are allowed
to use the service.
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The DEFVAL IGMP filter profile is assigned to all of the ADSL ports by default. It
allows a port to join all multicast IP addresses (224.0.0.0~239.255.255.255). If
you want to allow an ADSL subscriber access to only specific IGMP multicast
groups, use the IGMP Filter Profile screen to configure a different profile and
then assign it to the subscriber’s ADSL port in the XDSL Port Setting screen (see
Section 16.7.1 on page 124).
To open this screen, click Basic Setting, xDSL Profiles Setup, IGMP Filter
Profile.
The top of the screen displays the configured IGMP filter profiles. Use the bottom
part of the screen (with the Add and Cancel buttons) to add or edit alarm
profiles.
Figure 84 IGMP Filter Profile
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The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 40 IGMP Filter Profile
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Index
This is the number of the IGMP filter profile. Click a profile’s index
number to edit the profile. You cannot edit the DEFVAL profile.
Name
This name identifies the IGMP filter profile.
Delete
Select the Delete check box and click Delete to remove an IGMP
filter profile. You cannot delete the DEFVAL profile.
Name
Type a name to identify the IGMP filter profile (you cannot change the
name of the DEFVAL profile). You can use up to 31 ASCII characters;
spaces are not allowed.
Start IP
Enter the starting multicast IP address for a range of multicast IP
addresses to which you want this IGMP filter profile to allow access.
End IP
Enter the ending multicast IP address for a range of IP addresses to
which you want this IGMP filter profile to allow access.
If you want to add a single multicast IP address, enter it in both the
Start IP and End IP fields.
Add
Click Add to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
20.8 IGMP Port Group Screen
Use this screen to display the current list of multicast groups each port joins. To
open this screen, click Advanced Application > IGMP > Port Group.
Figure 85 IGMP Port Group
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The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 41 IGMP Port Group
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Show Port
Select a port for which you wish to view information.
Port
This field shows each port number.
VID
This field shows the associated VLAN ID.
Multicast IP
This field shows the IP address of the multicast group joined by this
port.
Source IP
This field shows the IP address of the client that joined the multicast
group on this port.
Refresh
Click Refresh to display updated information.
20.9 IGMP Port Info Screen
Use this screen to display the current number of IGMP-related packets received on
each port. To open this screen, click Advanced Application > IGMP > Port
Info.
Figure 86 IGMP Port Info
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The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 42 IGMP Port Info
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Show Port
Select a port for which you wish to view information.
Port
This field shows each port number.
Group Count
This is the total number of Group packets received on this port.
Query Count
This is the total number of Query packets received on this port.
Join Count
This is the total number of Join packets received on this port.
Leave Count
This is the total number of Leave packets received on this port.
Clear
Click Clear to delete the information the IES-1248-51V has learned
about multicast groups. This resets every counter in this screen.
20.10 IGMP Count Screen
Use this screen to limit the number of IGMP groups a subscriber on a port can join.
This allows you to control the distribution of multicast services (such as content
information distribution) based on service plans and types of subscription.
IGMP count is useful for ensuring the service quality of high bandwidth services
like video or Internet Protocol television (IPTV). IGMP count can limit how many
channels (IGMP groups) the subscriber connected to a DSL port can use at a time.
If each channel requires 4~5 Mbps of download bandwidth, and the subscriber’s
connection supports 11 Mbps, you can use IGMP count to limit the subscriber to
using just 2 channels at a time. This also effectively limits the subscriber to using
only two IPTVs with the DSL connection.
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To open this screen, click Advanced Application > IGMP > Count Setup.
Figure 87 IGMP Count
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 43 IGMP Count
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
This field shows each ADSL port number.
Active
This field shows whether or not the IGMP count limit is enabled on this
port. “V” displays if it is enabled and “-“ displays if it is disabled.
Count
Enter the maximum number of IGMP groups a subscriber on this port
can join. This has no effect if the IGMP count limit is disabled.
Select
Select this, and click Active or Inactive to enable or disable the
specified IGMP count limit on this port.
Active
Click this to enable the specified IGMP count limits on the selected
ports.
Inactive
Click this to disable the specified IGMP count limits on the selected
ports.
Select All
Click this to select all entries in the table.
Select None
Click this to un-select all entries in the table.
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CHAPTER
21
Static Multicast
This chapter describes the Static Multicast screen.
21.1 Static Multicast
Use static multicast to allow incoming frames based on multicast MAC address(es)
that you specify. This feature can be used in conjunction with IGMP snooping/
proxy to allow multicast MAC address(es) that are not learned by IGMP snooping
or IGMP proxy. Use static multicast to pass routing protocols, such as RIP and
OSPF.
21.2 Static Multicast Screen
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > Static Multicast.
Figure 88 Static Multicast
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Chapter 21 Static Multicast
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 44 Static Multicast
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
The Number of
Static Multicast
This is the number of static multicast entries configured on the IES1248-51V.
Page X of X
This identifies which page of information is displayed and the total
number of pages of information.
Previous
Click one of these buttons to show the previous/next screen if all
status information cannot be seen in one screen.
Next
Reload
Click this button to refresh the screen.
The first table displays the names of the fields. The subsequent tables
show the settings of the IGMP groups.
Index
This is the static multicast group index number.
MAC Address
This is the multicast MAC address.
1~48
These fields display the static multicast group membership status of
the ADSL ports.
“V” displays for members and “-“ displays for non-members.
Click an ADSL port’s status to change it (clicking a “V” changes it to ““ and vise versa).
Join All
Click Join All to make all of the ADSL ports members of the static
multicast group.
Leave All
Click Leave All to remove all of the ADSL ports from the static
multicast group.
Delete
Click Delete to remove a static multicast group.
Adding new entry
Type a multicast MAC address in the field, and click the Add button to
create a new static multicast entry. Multicast MAC addresses must be
01:00:5E:xx:xx:xx, where x is a “don’t care” value. For example,
01:00:5E:10:10:10 is a valid multicast MAC address.
Add
Clicking Add saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
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CHAPTER
22
Multicast VLAN
This chapter describes the Multicast VLAN screens.
22.1 Multicast VLAN Overview
Multicast VLAN allows one single multicast VLAN to be shared among different
subscriber VLANs on the network. This improves bandwidth utilization by reducing
multicast traffic in the subscriber VLANs and simplifies multicast group
management.
When the IES-1248-51V forwards traffic to a subscriber port, it tries to forward
traffic to a normal PVC with the same VLAN ID. If this PVC does not exist, the IES1248-51V uses the super channel instead. This applies to all downstream traffic,
not just multicast traffic.
It is suggested to use a super channel for multicast VLAN. If a normal PVC is used
and the multicast VLAN ID is not the same as the PVC’s VID, the IES-1248-51V
does not forward traffic to this PVC even if the subscriber’s port has joined the
multicast VLAN.
Since the IES-1248-51V might change the subscriber’s VLAN ID to the multicast
VLAN ID, both the subscriber’s port and the Ethernet port should join the multicast
VLAN.
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Chapter 22 Multicast VLAN
22.2 MVLAN Status Screen
Use this screen to look at a summary of all multicast VLAN on the IES-1248-51V.
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > Multicast VLAN.
Figure 89 MVLAN Status
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 45 MVLAN Status
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
MVLAN Setup
Click MVLAN Setup to open the MVLAN Setup screen where you can
configure basic settings and port members for each multicast VLAN
(see Section 22.3 on page 191).
MVLAN Group
Click MVLAN Group to open the MVLAN Group screen where you
can configure ranges of multicast IP addresses for each multicast
VLAN (see Section 22.4 on page 193).
The Number of
MVLAN
This is the number of multicast VLAN configured on the IES-124851V.
The first table displays the names of the fields. The subsequent tables
show the settings for each multicast VLAN.
Index
This is a sequential value and is not associated with this multicast
VLAN.
Name / VID
This field shows the name and VLAN ID of this multicast VLAN.
1~48
These fields display whether or not each port is a member of this
multicast VLAN. “V” displays for members and “-“ displays for nonmembers. You can change these settings in the MVLAN Setup
screen.
ENET1-2
Status
190
This field shows whether this multicast VLAN is active (Enable) or
inactive (Disable).
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Chapter 22 Multicast VLAN
22.3 MVLAN Setup Screen
Use this screen to configure basic settings and port members for each multicast
VLAN. To open this screen, click Advanced Application > Multicast VLAN >
MVLAN Setup.
Figure 90 MVLAN Setup
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 46 MVLAN Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
MVLAN Status
Click MVLAN Status to open the MVLAN Status screen where you
can view a summary of all multicast VLAN on the IES-1248-51V (see
Section 22.2 on page 190).
MVLAN Group
Click MVLAN Group to open the MVLAN Group screen where you
can configure ranges of multicast IP addresses for each multicast
VLAN (see Section 22.4 on page 193).
VID
This field shows the VLAN ID of each multicast VLAN. Click it to edit its
basic settings and port members in the fields below.
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Table 46 MVLAN Setup (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Active
This field shows whether this multicast VLAN is active (Yes) or
inactive (No).
Name
This field shows the name of this multicast VLAN.
Delete
Select the check boxes of the rule(s) that you want to remove in the
Delete column and then click the Delete button.
You cannot delete a VLAN if any PVIDs are set to use the VLAN or the
VLAN is the CPU (management) VLAN.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring the fields afresh.
Active
Select this if you want the multicast VLAN to be active. Clear this if
you want the multicast VLAN to be inactive.
Name
Enter a descriptive name for the multicast VLAN. The name can be 131 printable ASCII characters long. Spaces are not allowed.
VLAN ID
Enter the VLAN ID of the multicast VLAN; the valid range is between 1
and 4094.
Port
This field displays each port number.
Control
Select Fixed for the port to be a permanent member of this multicast
VLAN. Use the Select All button to include every port.
Select Forbidden if you want to prohibit the port from joining this
multicast VLAN. Use the Select All button to include every port.
192
Tagging
Select TX Tagging if you want the port to tag all outgoing frames
transmitted with this VLAN ID. Use the All button to include every
port. Use the None button to clear all of the ports check boxes.
Add
Click Add to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring the fields afresh.
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Chapter 22 Multicast VLAN
22.4 MVLAN Group Screen
Use this screen to configure ranges of multicast IP addresses for each multicast
VLAN. To open this screen, click Advanced Application > Multicast VLAN >
MVLAN Group.
Figure 91 MVLAN Group
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 47 MVLAN Group
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
MVLAN Status
Click MVLAN Status to open the MVLAN Status screen where you
can view a summary of all multicast VLAN on the IES-1248-51V (see
Section 22.2 on page 190).
MVLAN Setup
Click MVLAN Setup to open the MVLAN Setup screen where you can
configure basic settings and port members for each multicast VLAN
(see Section 22.3 on page 191).
MVLAN ID
Select the VLAN ID of the multicast VLAN for which you want to
configure a range of multicast IP addresses.
Index
Select the index number of the multicast VLAN group (the range of
multicast IP addresses) you want to configure for this multicast VLAN.
If you want to change the current settings, select an index number
that already exists. If you want to add a new multicast VLAN group,
select an index number that does not exist.
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Table 47 MVLAN Group (continued)
194
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Start Multicast IP
Enter the beginning of the range of multicast IP addresses. The IP
address must be a valid multicast IP address, between 224.0.0.0 and
239.255.255.255.
End Multicast IP
Enter the end of the range of multicast IP addresses. The IP address
must be a valid multicast IP address, between 224.0.0.0 and
239.255.255.255.
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring the fields afresh.
MVLAN ID
Select the VLAN ID of the multicast VLAN for which you want to look
at or remove the multicast IP addresses currently added to it.
Name
This field displays the name of this multicast VLAN.
State
This field shows whether this multicast VLAN is active (Enable) or
inactive (Disable).
Entry Index
This field displays the index number of each multicast VLAN group
(the range of multicast IP addresses) configured for this multicast
VLAN.
Start Multicast IP
This field displays the beginning of this range of multicast IP
addresses.
End Multicast IP
This field displays the end of this range of multicast IP addresses.
Select
Select this, and click Delete to remove the multicast VLAN group.
Delete
Click this to remove the selected multicast VLAN groups.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring the fields afresh.
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CHAPTER
23
Packet Filtering
This chapter describes how to configure the Packet Filter screen.
23.1 Packet Filter Screen
Use this screen to set which types of packets the IES-1248-51V accepts on
individual ADSL ports.
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > Filtering.
Figure 92 Packet Filter
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Chapter 23 Packet Filtering
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 48 Packet Filter
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
Use this drop-down list box to select an ADSL port for which you wish
to configure packet type filtering. This box is read-only after you click
on one of the port numbers in the table below.
PPPoE Only
Select this to allow only PPPoE traffic. This will gray out the check
boxes for other packet types and the system will drop any non-PPPoE
packets.
Select the check boxes of the types of packets to accept on the ADSL
port. When you clear one of these check boxes, the field label
changes to Filter Out and the system drops the corresponding type
of packets
PPPoE Pass
through
Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet relies on PPP and Ethernet. It is
a specification for connecting the users on an Ethernet to the Internet
through a common broadband medium, such as a single DSL line,
wireless device or cable modem.
IP Pass through
Internet Protocol. The underlying protocol for routing packets on the
Internet and other TCP/IP-based networks.
ARP Pass through
Address Resolution Protocol is a protocol for mapping an Internet
Protocol address (IP address) to a physical computer address that is
recognized in the local network.
NetBios Pass
through
NetBIOS (Network Basic Input/Output System) are TCP or UDP
packets that enable a computer to find other computers.
DHCP Pass
through
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol automatically assigns IP
addresses to clients when they log on. DHCP centralizes IP address
management on central computers that run the DHCP server
program. DHCP leases addresses, for a period of time, which means
that past addresses are “recycled” and made available for future
reassignment to other systems.
EAPOL Pass
through
EAP (Extensible Authentication Protocol, RFC 2486) over LAN. EAP is
used with IEEE 802.1x to allow additional authentication methods
(besides RADIUS) to be deployed with no changes to the access point
or the wireless clients.
IGMP Pass
through
Internet Group Multicast Protocol is used when sending packets to a
specific group of hosts.
Apply
Click Apply to save the filter settings. The settings then display in the
summary table at the bottom of the screen.
Clicking Apply saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring the fields afresh.
This table shows the ADSL port packet filter settings.
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Table 48 Packet Filter (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
These are the numbers of the ADSL ports. Click this number to edit
the port’s filter settings in the section at the top.
PPPoE, IP, ARP,
NetBios, DHCP,
EAPOL, IGMP,
PPPoE Only
These are the packet filter settings for each port.
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“V” displays for the packet types that the IES-1248-51V is to accept
on the port. “-“ displays for packet types that the IES-1248-51V is to
reject on the port (packet types that are not listed are accepted).
When you select PPPoE Only,”#” appears for all of the packet types.
With PPPoE Only, the IES-1248-51V rejects all packet types except
for PPPoE (packet types that are not listed are also rejected).
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CHAPTER
24
MAC Filter
This chapter introduces the MAC filter.
24.1 MAC Filter Introduction
Use the MAC filter to control from which MAC (Media Access Control) addresses
frames can (or cannot) come in through a port.
24.2 MAC Filter Screen
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > MAC Filter.
Figure 93 MAC Filter
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Chapter 24 MAC Filter
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 49 MAC Filter
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
Use this drop-down list box to select an ADSL port for which you wish
to configure MAC filtering.
MAC
Type a device’s MAC address in hexadecimal notation
(xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx, where x is a number from 0 to 9 or a letter from
a to f) in this field. The MAC address must be a valid MAC address.
Add
Click Add to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
Port
These are the numbers of the ADSL ports.
Mode
Select Accept to only allow frames from MAC addresses that you
specify and block frames from other MAC addresses.
Select Deny to block frames from MAC addresses that you specify
and allow frames from other MAC addresses.
Active
200
Select this check box to turn on MAC filtering for a port.
MAC
This field lists the MAC addresses that are set for this port.
Delete
Click Delete to remove a MAC address from the list.
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
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CHAPTER
25
Spanning Tree Protocol
This chapter introduces the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Rapid Spanning Tree
Protocol (RSTP).
25.1 RSTP and STP
RSTP adds rapid reconfiguration capability to STP. The IES-1248-51V supports
RSTP and the earlier STP. RSTP and STP detect and break network loops and
provide backup links between switches, bridges or routers. They allow a device to
interact with other RSTP or STP-aware devices in your network to ensure that only
one path exists between any two stations on the network. The Integrated Ethernet
Switch uses RSTP by default but can still operate with STP switches (although
without RSTP’s benefits).
The root bridge is the base of the spanning tree. Path cost is the cost of
transmitting a frame onto a LAN through that port. It is assigned according to the
speed of the link to which a port is attached. The slower the media, the higher the
cost, as illustrated in the following table.
Table 50 Path Cost
LINK SPEED
RECOMMENDED
VALUE
RECOMMENDED
RANGE
ALLOWED
RANGE
Path Cost
4Mbps
250
100 to 1000
1 to 65535
Path Cost
10Mbps
100
50 to 600
1 to 65535
Path Cost
16Mbps
62
40 to 400
1 to 65535
Path Cost
100Mbps
19
10 to 60
1 to 65535
Path Cost
1Gbps
4
3 to 10
1 to 65535
Path Cost
10Gbps
2
1 to 5
1 to 65535
On each bridge, the root port is the port through which this bridge communicates
with the root. It is the port on this Integrated Ethernet Switch with the lowest path
cost to the root (the root path cost). If there is no root port, then this Integrated
Ethernet Switch has been accepted as the root bridge of the spanning tree
network.
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Chapter 25 Spanning Tree Protocol
For each LAN segment, a designated bridge is selected. This bridge has the lowest
cost to the root among the bridges connected to the LAN.
After a bridge determines the lowest cost-spanning tree with RSTP, it enables the
root port and the ports that are the designated ports for the connected LANs, and
disables all other ports that participate in RSTP. Network packets are therefore
only forwarded between enabled ports, eliminating any possible network loops.
Figure 94 STP Root Ports and Designated Ports
Root Bridge
Designated Port
for Bridge 1
Designated Port
for Bridge 2
Root Port
Root Port
Bridge 1
Designated Port
for Bridge 3
Root Port
Bridge 3
Bridge 2
Discarding
Designated Port
for Bridge 4
Designated Port
for Bridge 5
Root Port
Root Port
Bridge 4
Bridge 5
RSTP-aware devices exchange Bridge Protocol Data Units (BPDUs) periodically.
When the bridged LAN topology changes, a new spanning tree is constructed.
In RSTP, the devices send BPDUs every Hello Time. If an RSTP-aware device does
not get a Hello BPDU after three Hello Times pass (or the Max Age), the device
assumes that the link to the neighboring bridge is down. This device then initiates
negotiations with other devices to reconfigure the network to re-establish a valid
network topology.
In STP, once a stable network topology has been established, all devices listen for
Hello BPDUs transmitted from the root bridge. If an STP-aware device does not
get a Hello BPDU after a predefined interval (Max Age), the device assumes that
the link to the root bridge is down. This device then initiates negotiations with
other devices to reconfigure the network to re-establish a valid network topology.
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RSTP assigns three port states to eliminate packet looping while STP assigns five
(see Table 51 on page 203). A device port is not allowed to go directly from
blocking state to forwarding state so as to eliminate transient loops.
Table 51 RSTP Port States
RSTP PORT STATE
STP PORT STATE
DESCRIPTION
Discarding
Disabled
RSTP or STP is disabled (default).
Discarding
Blocking
In RSTP, BPDUs are discarded.
In STP, only configuration and
management BPDUs are received and
processed.
Discarding
Listening
In RSTP, BPDUs are discarded.
In STP, all BPDUs are received and
processed.
Learning
Learning
All BPDUs are received and processed.
Information frames are submitted to the
learning process but not forwarded.
Forwarding
Forwarding
All BPDUs are received and processed. All
information frames are received and
forwarded.
See the IEEE 802.1w standard for more information on RSTP. See the IEEE 802.1D
standard for more information on STP.
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25.2 Spanning Tree Protocol Status Screen
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > Spanning Tree Protocol.
Figure 95 Spanning Tree Protocol Status
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 52 Spanning Tree Protocol Status
204
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
STP Config
Click STP Config to modify the IES-1248-51V’s STP settings (see
Section 25.3 on page 206).
Spanning Tree
Protocol
This field displays On if STP is activated. Otherwise, it displays Off.
Bridge Status
If STP is activated, the following fields appear. If STP is not activated,
Disabled appears.
Our bridge ID
This is the unique identifier for this bridge, consisting of bridge
priority plus MAC address. This ID is the same in Designated root
ID if the IES-1248-51V is the root switch.
Designated root
ID
This is the unique identifier for the root bridge, consisting of bridge
priority plus MAC address. This ID is the same in Our bridge ID if the
IES-1248-51V is the root switch.
Topology change
times
This is the number of times the spanning tree has been reconfigured.
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Table 52 Spanning Tree Protocol Status (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Time since
change
This is the time since the spanning tree was last reconfigured.
Cost to root
This is the path cost from the root port on this switch to the root
switch.
Root port ID
This is the priority and number of the port on the switch through
which this switch must communicate with the root of the Spanning
Tree. “0x0000” displays when this device is the root switch.
Root max age
(second)
This is the maximum time (in seconds) the root switch can wait
without receiving a configuration message before attempting to
reconfigure.
Root hello time
(second)
This is the time interval (in seconds) at which the root switch
transmits a configuration message. The root bridge determines Hello
Time, Max Age and Forwarding Delay.
Root forward
delay (second)
This is the time (in seconds) the root switch will wait before changing
states (that is, listening to learning to forwarding).
Max age (second)
This is the maximum time (in seconds) the IES-1248-51V can wait
without receiving a configuration message before attempting to
reconfigure.
Hello time
(second)
This is the time interval (in seconds) at which the IES-1248-51V
transmits a configuration message. The root bridge determines Hello
Time, Max Age and Forwarding Delay.
Forward delay
(second)
This is the time (in seconds) the IES-1248-51V will wait before
changing states (that is, listening to learning to forwarding).
Port Status
This identifies the IES-1248-51V’s ports that support the use of STP.
If STP is activated, the following fields appear. If STP is not activated,
Disabled appears.
State
This field displays the port’s RSTP (or STP) state. With RSTP, the state
can be discarding, learning or forwarding. With STP, the state can
be disabled, blocking, listening, learning, or forwarding.
Disabled appears when RSTP has not been turned on for the
individual port or the whole device.
Port ID
This is the priority and number of the port on the switch through
which this switch must communicate with the root of the Spanning
Tree. “0x0000” displays when this device is the root switch.
Path cost
This is the path cost from this port to the root switch.
Cost to root
This is the path cost from the root port on this switch to the root
switch.
Designated bridge This is the unique identifier for the bridge that has the lowest path
cost to reach the root bridge, consisting of bridge priority plus MAC
address.
Designated port
This is the port on the designated bridge that has the lowest path cost
to reach the root bridge, consisting of bridge priority.
Poll Interval(s)
Set Interval
The text box displays how often (in seconds) this screen refreshes.
You may change the refresh interval by typing a new number in the
text box and then clicking Set Interval.
Stop
Click Stop to halt STP statistic polling.
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25.3 Spanning Tree Protocol Screen
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > Spanning Tree Protocol >
STP Config.
Figure 96 Spanning Tree Protocol
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 53 Spanning Tree Protocol
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Active
Select this check box to turn on RSTP.
Note: It is recommended that you only use STP when you use the
IES-1248-51V in standalone mode with a network topology
that has loops.
Bridge Priority
Bridge priority is used in determining the root switch, root port and
designated port. The switch with the highest priority (lowest numeric
value) becomes the STP root switch. If all switches have the same
priority, the switch with the lowest MAC address will then become the
root switch. The allowed range is 0 to 61440.
The lower the numeric value you assign, the higher the priority for
this bridge.
Bridge Priority determines the root bridge, which in turn determines
Hello Time, Max Age and Forwarding Delay.
Hello Time
206
This is the time interval in seconds between BPDU (Bridge Protocol
Data Units) configuration message generations by the root switch.
The allowed range is 1 to 10 seconds.
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Table 53 Spanning Tree Protocol (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
MAX Age
This is the maximum time (in seconds) a switch can wait without
receiving a BPDU before attempting to reconfigure. All switch ports
(except for designated ports) should receive BPDUs at regular
intervals. Any port that ages out STP information (provided in the last
BPDU) becomes the designated port for the attached LAN. If it is a
root port, a new root port is selected from among the switch ports
attached to the network. The allowed range is 6 to 40 seconds.
Forwarding Delay
This is the maximum time (in seconds) a switch will wait before
changing states. This delay is required because every switch must
receive information about topology changes before it starts to forward
frames. In addition, each port needs time to listen for conflicting
information that would make it return to a blocking state; otherwise,
temporary data loops might result. The allowed range is 4 to 30
seconds.
As a general rule:
2 * (Forward Delay - 1) >= Max Age >= 2 * (Hello Time + 1)
Port
This field identifies the Ethernet port.
Active
Select this check box to activate STP on this port.
Priority
Configure the priority for each port here.
Priority decides which port should be disabled when more than one
port forms a loop in a switch. Ports with a higher priority numeric
value are disabled first. The allowed range is between 0 and 255 and
default value is 128.
Path Cost
Path cost is the cost of transmitting a frame on to a LAN through that
port. It is assigned according to the speed of the bridge. The slower
the media, the higher the cost.
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
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CHAPTER
26
Port Authentication
This chapter describes the 802.1x authentication method and RADIUS server
connection setup.
26.1 Introduction to Authentication
IEEE 802.1x is an extended authentication protocol2 that allows support of
RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial In User Service, RFC 2138, 2139) for
centralized user profile management on a network RADIUS server.
26.1.1 RADIUS
RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service) authentication is a popular
protocol used to authenticate users by means of an external server instead of (or
in addition to) an internal device user database that is limited to the memory
capacity of the device. In essence, RADIUS authentication allows you to validate
an unlimited number of users from a central location.
Figure 97 RADIUS Server
Client
RADIUS
Server
26.1.2 Introduction to Local User Database
By storing user profiles locally on the IES-1248-51V, your IES-1248-51V is able to
authenticate users without interacting
2.
At the time of writing, Windows XP of the Microsoft operating systems supports 802.1x. See the Microsoft web
site for information on other Windows operating system support. For other operating systems, see its
documentation. If your operating system does not support 802.1x, then you may need to install 802.1x client
software.
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Chapter 26 Port Authentication
26.2 RADIUS Screen
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > Port Authentication.
Figure 98 RADIUS
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 54 RADIUS
210
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
802.1x
Click 802.1x to configure individual port authentication settings (see
Section 26.3 on page 212).
Enable
Authentication
Server
Select this check box to have the IES-1248-51V use an external
RADIUS server to authenticate users.
IP Address
Enter the IP address of the external RADIUS server in dotted decimal
notation.
UDP Port
The default port of the RADIUS server for authentication is 1812. You
need not change this value unless your network administrator
instructs you to do so.
Shared Secret
Specify a password (up to 31 alphanumeric characters) as the key to
be shared between the external RADIUS server and the switch. This
key is not sent over the network. This key must be the same on the
external RADIUS server and the switch.
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Chapter 26 Port Authentication
Table 54 RADIUS (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Enable Local
Profile Setting
Select this check box to have the IES-1248-51V use its internal
database of user names and passwords to authenticate users.
Name
Type the user name of the user profile.
Password
Type a password up to 31 characters long for this user profile.
Retype Password
to confirm
Type the password again to make sure you have entered it properly.
Add
Click Add to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
This table displays the configured user profiles.
Index
These are the numbers of the user profiles. Click this number to edit
the user profile.
Name
This is the user name of the user profile.
Delete
Select a user profile’s Delete check box and click Delete to remove
the user profile.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh and clear any
selected Delete check boxes.
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26.3 802.1x Screen
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > Port Authentication >
802.1x.
Figure 99 802.1x
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 55 802.1x
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Enable
Select this check box to turn on IEEE 802.1x authentication on the
switch.
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
Port
This field displays a port number.
Enable
Select this check box to turn on IEEE 802.1x authentication on this
port.
Control
Select Auto to authenticate all subscribers before they can access the
network through this port.
Select Force Authorized to allow all connected users to access the
network through this port without authentication.
Select Force Unauthorized to deny all subscribers access to the
network through this port.
Reauthentication
212
Specify if a subscriber has to periodically re-enter his or her
username and password to stay connected to the port.
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Chapter 26 Port Authentication
Table 55 802.1x (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Reauthentication
Period(s)
Specify how often a client has to re-enter his or her username and
password to stay connected to the port.
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
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CHAPTER
27
Port Security
This chapter shows you how to set up port security.
27.1 Port Security Overview
Port security allows you to restrict the number of MAC addresses that can be
learned on a port. The IES-1248-51V can learn up to 4K MAC addresses in total.
27.2 Port Security Screen
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > Port Security.
Figure 100 Port Security
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 56 Port Security
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
This field displays a port number.
Enable
Select this check box to restrict the number of MAC addresses that
can be learned on the port. Clear this check box to not limit the
number of MAC addresses that can be learned on the port.
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Chapter 27 Port Security
Table 56 Port Security (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Limited Number
of Learned MAC
Address
Specify how many MAC addresses the IES-1248-51V can learn on this
port. The range is 1~128.
Note: If you also use MAC filtering on a port, it is recommended
that you set this limit to be equal to or greater than the
number of MAC filter entries you configure.
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
Copy port
Do the following to copy settings from one port to another port or
ports.
Paste
1. Select the number of the port from which you want to copy
settings.
2. Click Paste and the following screen appears.
3. Select to which ports you want to copy the settings. Use All to
select every port. Use None to clear all of the check boxes.
4. Click Apply to paste the settings.
Figure 101 Select Ports
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CHAPTER
28
DHCP Relay
This chapter shows you how to set up DHCP relays for each VLAN.
28.1 DHCP Relay
DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol, RFC 2131 and RFC 2132) allows
individual clients to obtain TCP/IP configuration at start-up from a DHCP server.
You can configure the IES-1248-51V to relay DHCP requests to one or more DHCP
servers and the server’s responses back to the clients.You can configure the
system to forward client DHCP requests from different VLANs to specific DHCP
servers.
28.2 DHCP Relay Agent Information Option
(Option 82)
The IES-1248-51V can add information to DHCP requests that it relays to a DHCP
server. This helps provide authentication about the source of the requests. You can
also specify additional information for the IES-1248-51V to add to the DHCP
requests that it relays to the DHCP server. Please see RFC 3046 for more details.
The DHCP relay agent information feature adds an Agent Information field to the
option 82 field of the DHCP headers of client TCP/IP configuration request frames
that the IES-1248-51V relays to a DHCP server. The IES-1248-51V supports two
formats for the DHCP relay agent information: Private and TR-101.
28.2.1 Private Format
The DHCP relay agent information feature adds an Agent Information field to the
option 82 field of the DHCP headers of DHCP request frames that the device relays
to a DHCP server. The Agent Information field that the device adds contains an
“Agent Circuit-ID sub-option” that includes the slot and port numbers, VLAN ID
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Chapter 28 DHCP Relay
and optional information about the slot and port on which the DHCP request was
received.
The following table shows the format of the private Agent Circuit ID sub-option.
The (binary) “1” in the first field identifies this as an Agent Circuit ID sub-option.
The length N gives the total number of octets in the Agent Information Field. If
the configuration request was received on a DSL port, a 1-byte Slot No field
specifies the ingress slot number, and a 1-byte Port No field specifies the ingress
port number (both in hexadecimal format). The next field is 2 bytes and displays
the DHCP request packet’s VLAN ID. The last field (A) can range from 1 to 24
bytes (including a one-byte termination character) and is optional information
(that you specify) about this relay agent.
Table 57 DHCP Relay Agent Circuit ID Sub-option Format: Private
1
N
Slot No
Port No
VLAN ID
A
The Agent Information field that the device adds also contains an “Agent RemoteID sub-option” of information that you specify.
The following table shows the format of the private Agent Remote ID sub-option.
The “2” in the first field identifies this as an Agent Remote ID sub-option. The
length N gives the total number of octets in the Agent Information Field. Next, the
extra information field (A in the table) contains from 0 to 23 bytes of optional
information (that you specify) with no spaces and no termination character (if you
do not specify any information, this field contains no data). Next, there is a space
and the letters “eth” followed by another space. Then there is the slot number and
port number (in plain text format) upon which the DHCP client request was
received. This is followed by a colon (:), the VLAN ID (VID) number, a period (.)
and the MAC address (in hexadecimal format).
Table 58 DHCP Relay Agent Remote ID Sub-option Format: Private
2
N
A
“ eth
“
Slot No.
/
Port No.
:
VLAN ID
.
MAC
28.2.2 TR-101 Format
The Agent Information field that the IES-1248-51V adds contains an “Agent
Circuit-ID sub-option” that includes the system name or IP address, slot ID, port
number, VPI, and VCI on which the TCP/IP configuration request was received.
The following figure shows the format of the TR-101 Agent Circuit ID sub-option.
The 1 in the first field identifies this as an Agent Circuit ID sub-option. The next
field specifies the length of the field. The hostname field displays the system
name, if it has been configured, the extra information field (A) if the hostname
was not configured, or the IP address in dotted decimal notation (w.x.y.z), if
neither the system name nor the extra information field was been configured. In
either case, the hostname is truncated to 23 characters, and trailing spaces are
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discarded. The hostname field is followed by a space, the string “atm”, and
another space. Then, a 1-byte Slot ID field specifies the ingress slot number, and a
1-byte Port No field specifies the ingress port number. Next, the VPI and VCI
denote the virtual circuit that received the DHCP request message from the
subscriber. If the VID is turned on, there is a colon and then the VLAN ID (1 ~
4094). If the VID is turned off, there is neither colon nor VID.
The slot ID, port number, VPI, VCI and MAC are separated from each other by a
forward slash (/) colon (:) or period (.). An example is “SYSNAME atm 3/
10:0.33:12”.
Table 59 DHCP Relay Agent Circuit ID Sub-option Format: TR-101 (VID on)
1
N
hostname / A /
IP
“ atm
“
Slot ID
/
Port No.
: VPI
. VCI :
VLAN ID
Table 60 DHCP Relay Agent Circuit ID Sub-option Format: TR-101 (VID off)
1
N
hostname / A /
IP
“ atm
“
Slot ID
/
Port No.
: VPI
. VCI
TR-101 uses the same remote ID sub-option format as the Private format.
28.3 DHCP Relay Screen
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > DHCP Relay.
Figure 102 DHCP Relay
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Chapter 28 DHCP Relay
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 61 DHCP Relay
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
VLAN ID
Enter the ID of the VLAN served by the specified DHCP relay(s). Enter
0 to set up the default DHCP relay(s).
Enable DHCP
Relay:
Select this to have the IES-1248-51V relay DHCP requests in the
selected VLAN to a DHCP server and the server’s responses back to
the clients.
Enable Option82
Sub-option1
(Circuit ID)
Select this to have the IES-1248-51V add the originating port
numbers to DHCP requests in the selected VLAN regardless of
whether the DHCP relay is on or off. In the field next to the check box,
you can also specify up to 23 ASCII characters of additional
information for the IES-1248-51V to add to the DHCP requests that it
relays to a DHCP server. Examples of information you could add would
be the chassis number of the IES-1248-51V or the ISP’s name.
Enable Option82
Sub-option2
(Remote ID)
Enable DHCP relay info to have the IES-1248-51V add the sub-option
2 (Remote ID) to DHCP requests in the selected VLAN regardless of
whether the DHCP relay is on or off. In the field next to the check box,
you can also specify up to 23 ASCII characters of additional
information for the IES-1248-51V to add to the DHCP requests that it
relays to a DHCP server.
Primary Server IP
Enter the IP address of one DHCP server to which the switch should
relay DHCP requests for the selected VLAN.
Secondary Server
IP
Enter the IP address of a second DHCP server to which the switch
should relay DHCP requests for the selected VLAN. Enter 0.0.0.0 if
there is only one DHCP relay for the selected VLAN.
Relay Mode
Specify how the IES-1248-51V relays DHCP requests for the selected
VLAN.
Auto - The IES-1248-51V routes DHCP requests to the active server
for the VLAN.
Both - The IES-1248-51V routes DHCP requests to the primary and
secondary server for the VLAN, regardless of which one is active.
220
Option Mode
Specify the DHCP option 82 format, either private or TR-101 format.
See Section 28.2 on page 217 for more information.
Active Server
This field has no effect if the Relay Mode is Both. If the Relay Mode
is Auto, select which DHCP server (the primary one or the secondary
one) to which the IES-1248-51V should relay DHCP requests for the
selected VLAN.
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
Server List
This section lists the current DHCP relay settings for each VLAN. An
asterisk in parentheses (*) indicates which DHCP server is active for
each VLAN.
VID
This field displays the ID of the VLAN served by the specified DHCP
relay(s).
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Chapter 28 DHCP Relay
Table 61 DHCP Relay (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Active
This field displays whether or not the IES-1248-51V relays DHCP
requests in the selected VLAN to a DHCP server and the server’s
responses back to the clients.
Primary Server IP
This field displays the IP address of one DHCP server to which the
IES-1248-51V should relay DHCP requests. If this is the active server
for the selected VLAN, it is marked with an asterisk (*).
Secondary Server
IP
This field displays the IP address of a second DHCP server to which
the IES-1248-51V should relay DHCP requests. This field is 0.0.0.0 if
the primary server is the only DHCP relay. If this is the active server
for the selected VLAN, it is marked with an asterisk (*).
Relay Mode
This field displays how the IES-1248-51V relays DHCP requests for
the selected VLAN.
Auto - The IES-1248-51V routes DHCP requests to the active server
for the VLAN.
Both - The IES-1248-51V routes DHCP requests to the primary and
secondary server for the VLAN, regardless of which one is active.
Option Mode
This field displays the DHCP relay option 82 format (Private or TR101 mode) the IES-1248-51V uses to relay DHCP requests for the
selected VLAN. See Section 28.2 on page 217 for more information.
Option82 Suboption1
This field displays whether or not the IES-1248-51V adds the
originating port numbers (and any additional information) to DHCP
requests in the selected VLAN.
Option82 Suboption2
This field displays whether or not the IES-1248-51V adds the suboption 2 (and any additional information) to DHCP requests in the
selected VLAN.
Delete
Select the check box next to the VLAN ID, and click Delete to remove
the entry.
Select All
Click this to select all entries in the Server List.
Select None
Click this to un-select all entries in the Server List.
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CHAPTER
29
DHCP Snoop
This chapter shows you how to set up DHCP snooping settings on the subscriber
ports.
29.1 DHCP Snoop Overview
DHCP snooping prevents clients from assigning their own IP addresses. The IES1248-51V can store every (ADSL port, MAC address, IP address) tuple offered by
the DHCP server. Then, it only forwards packets from clients whose MAC address
and IP address are recorded. Packets from unknown IP addresses are dropped.
In some cases, you might want to allow packets from an IP address not offered by
the DHCP server. This might apply, for example, when a device uses a static IP
address. In this case, you can specify the IP address whose packets are allowed,
and the IES-1248-51V forwards these packets as well.
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Chapter 29 DHCP Snoop
29.2 DHCP Snoop Screen
Use this screen to activate or deactivate DHCP snooping on each port. To open this
screen, click Advanced Application > DHCP Snoop.
Figure 103 DHCP Snoop
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 62 DHCP Snoop
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
DHCP Snoop
Status
Click DHCP Snoop Status to open the screen where you can look at
or clear the current DHCP snooping table on each port (see Section
29.3 on page 225).
DHCP Counter
Click DHCP Counter to open the screen where you can look at a
summary of the DHCP packets on each port (see Section 29.4 on page
227).
Port
This field displays each ADSL port number.
Active
Specify whether DHCP snooping is active (“V”) or inactive (“-”) on this
port.
Static IP 1~3
These fields are only effective when DHCP snooping is active.
Enter up to three IP addresses for which the IES-1248-51V should
forward packets, even if the IP address is not assigned by the DHCP
server. The IES-1248-51V drops packets from other unknown IP
addresses on this port. To delete an existing IP address, enter
0.0.0.0.
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Table 62 DHCP Snoop (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
Port
This field displays each ADSL port number. Click a port number to edit
it in the section above.
Active
This field displays whether DHCP snooping is active (“V”) or inactive
(“-”) on this port.
Static IP Pool
These fields display IP addresses for which the IES-1248-51V should
forward packets, even if the IP address is not assigned by the DHCP
server. 0.0.0.0 is a blank value.
29.3 DHCP Snoop Status Screen
Use this screen to look at or to clear the DHCP snooping table on each port. To
open this screen, click Advanced Application > DHCP Snoop > DHCP Snoop
Status.
Figure 104 DHCP Snoop Status
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The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 63 DHCP Snoop Status
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
DHCP Snoop
Click DHCP Snoop to open the screen where you can activate or
deactivate DHCP snooping on each port (see Section 29.2 on page
224).
DHCP Counter
Click DHCP Counter to open the screen where you can look at a
summary of the DHCP packets on each port (see Section 29.4 on page
227).
Show Port
Select a port for which you wish to view information.
Port
This field displays the selected ADSL port number(s).
Overflow
There is a limit to the number of IP addresses the DHCP server can
assign at one time to each port. This field displays the number of
requests from DHCP clients above this limit.
Overflow requests are dropped by the IES-1248-51V.
226
IP
This field displays the IP address assigned to a client on this port.
MAC
This field displays the MAC address of a client on this port to which the
DHCP server assigned an IP address.
VID
This field displays the VLAN ID, if any, on the DHCP Request packet.
Flush
Click Flush to remove all of the entries from the DHCP snooping table
for the selected port(s).
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Chapter 29 DHCP Snoop
29.4 DHCP Counter Screen
Use this screen to look at a summary of the DHCP packets on each port. To open
this screen, click Advanced Application > DHCP Snoop > DHCP Counter.
Figure 105 DHCP Counter
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 64 DHCP Counter
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
DHCP Snoop
Click DHCP Snoop to open the screen where you can activate or
deactivate DHCP snooping on each port (see Section 29.2 on page
224).
DHCP Snoop
Status
Click DHCP Snoop Status to open the screen where you can look at
or clear the current DHCP snooping table on each port (see Section
29.3 on page 225).
Show Port
Select a port for which you wish to view information.
Port
This field displays the selected ADSL port number(s).
Discover
This field displays the number of DHCP Discover packets on this port.
Offer
This field displays the number of DHCP Offer packets on this port.
Request
This field displays the number of DHCP Request packets on this port.
Ack
This field displays the number of DHCP Acknowledge packets on this
port.
Overflow
There is a limit to the number of IP addresses the DHCP server can
assign at one time to each port. This field displays the number of
requests from DHCP clients above this limit.
Overflow requests are dropped by the IES-1248-51V.
Clear
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Click Clear to delete the information the IES-1248-51V has learned
about DHCP packets. This resets every counter in this screen.
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CHAPTER
30
2684 Routed Mode
This chapter shows you how to set up 2684 routed mode service.
30.1 2684 Routed Mode
Use the 2684 (formerly 1483) routed mode to have the IES-1248-51V add MAC
address headers to 2684 routed mode traffic from a PVC that connects to a
subscriber device that uses 2684 routed mode. You also specify the gateway to
which the IES-1248-51V sends the traffic and the VLAN ID tag to add. See RFC2684 for details on routed mode traffic carried over AAL type 5 over ATM.
• Use the 2684 Routed PVC Screen to configure PVCs for 2684 routed mode
traffic.
• Use the 2684 Routed Domain Screen to configure domains for 2684 routed
mode traffic. The domain is the range of IP addresses behind the subscriber’s
device (the CPE or Customer Premises Equipment). This includes the CPE
device’s LAN IP addresses and the IP addresses of the LAN computers.
• Use the RPVC Arp Proxy Screen to view the Address Resolution Protocol table of
IP addresses of CPE devices using 2684 routed mode and configure how long
the device is to store them.
• Use the 2684 Routed Gateway Screen to configure gateway settings.
• For upstream traffic: Since the subscriber's device will not send out a MAC
address, after the IES-1248-51V reassembles the Ethernet packets from the
AAL5 ATM cells, the IES-1248-51V will append the routed mode gateway's MAC
address and the IES-1248-51V's MAC address as the destination/source MAC
address.
• For downstream traffic: When the IES-1248-51V sees the destination IP address
is specified in the RPVC (or RPVC domain), the IES-1248-51V will strip out the
MAC header and send them to the corresponding RPVC.
30.1.1 2684 Routed Mode Example
The following figure shows an example 2684 routed mode set up. The gateway
server uses IP address 192.168.10.102 and is in VLAN 1. The IES-1248-51V uses
IP address 192.168.10.101. The subscriber’s device (the CPE) is connected to DSL
port 1 on the IES-1248-51V and the 2684 routed mode traffic is to use the PVC
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identified by VPI 8 and VCI 35. The CPE device’s WAN IP address is
192.168.10.200. The routed domain is the LAN IP addresses behind the CPE
device. The CPE device’s LAN IP address is 10.10.10.10 and the LAN computer’s IP
address is 10.10.10.1. This includes the CPE device’s LAN IP addresses and the IP
addresses of the LAN computers.
Figure 106 2684 Routed Mode Example
Note the following.
• The CPE device’s WAN IP (192.168.10.200 in this example) must be in the same
subnet as the gateway’s IP address (192.168.10.102 in this example).
• The IES-1248-51V's management IP address can be any IP address, it doesn't
have any relationship to the WAN IP address or routed gateway IP address.
• The IES-1248-51V’s management IP address should not be in the same subnet
as the one defined by the WAN IP address and netmask of the subscriber’s
device. It is suggested that you set the netmask of the subscriber’s WAN IP
address to 32 to avoid this problem.
• The IES-1248-51V's management IP address should not be in the same subnet
range of any RPVC and RPVC domain. It will make the IES-1248-51V confused if
the IES-1248-51V0 receives a packet with this IP as destination IP.
• The IES-1248-51V’s management IP address also should not be in the same
subnet as the one defined by the LAN IP address and netmask of the
subscriber’s device. Make sure you assign the IP addresses properly.
• In general deployment, the computer must set the CPE device’s LAN IP address
(10.10.10.10 in this example) as its default gateway.
• The subnet range of any RPVC and RPVC domain must be unique.
30.2 2684 Routed PVC Screen
Use this screen to configure PVCs for 2684 routed mode traffic.
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To open this screen, click Advanced Application > 2684 Routed Mode.
Figure 107 2684 Routed PVC
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 65 2684 Routed PVC
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Routed Domain
Click Routed Domain to open this screen where you can configure
domains for 2684 routed mode traffic (see Section 30.3 on page
232).
RPVC ARP Proxy
Click RPVC ARP Proxy to go to the screen where you can view the
Address Resolution Protocol table of IP addresses of CPE devices
using 2684 routed mode and configure how long the device is to store
them (see Section 30.4 on page 234).
Routed Gateway
Click Routed Gateway to go to the screen where you can configure
gateway settings (see Section 30.5 on page 235).
Port
Use this drop-down list box to select a port for which you wish to
configure settings.
Gateway IP
Enter the IP address of the gateway to which you want to send the
traffic that the system receives from this PVC. Enter the IP address in
dotted decimal notation.
VPI
Type the Virtual Path Identifier for this routed PVC.
VCI
Type the Virtual Circuit Identifier for this routed PVC.
IP
Enter the subscriber’s CPE WAN IP address in dotted decimal
notation.
NetMask
The bit number of the subnet mask of the subscriber’s WAN IP
address. To find the bit number, convert the subnet mask to binary
and add all of the 1’s together. Take “255.255.255.0” for example.
255 converts to eight 1’s in binary. There are three 255’s, so add
three eights together and you get the bit number (24).
Make sure that the routed PVC’s subnet does not include the IES1248-51V’s IP address.
DS VC Profile
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Use the drop-down list box to select a VC profile to use for this
channel’s downstream traffic shaping.
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Table 65 2684 Routed PVC (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
US VC Profile
Use the drop-down list box to select a VC profile to use for this
channel’s upstream traffic. The IES-1248-51V does not perform
upstream traffic policing if you do not specify an upstream VC profile.
Add
Click Add to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory.
The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or loses
power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to save
your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
Index
This field displays the number of the routed PVC.
Port
This field displays the number of the ADSL port on which the routed
PVC is configured.
VPI
This field displays the Virtual Path Identifier (VPI) The VPI and VCI
identify a channel on this port.
VCI
This field displays the Virtual Circuit Identifier (VCI). The VPI and VCI
identify a channel on this port.
IP
This field displays the subscriber’s IP address.
DS / US VC Profile This shows which VC profile this channel uses for downstream traffic
shaping. The VC profile for upstream policing also displays if the
channel is configured to use one.
NetMask
This field displays the bit number of the subnet mask of the
subscriber’s IP address.
Gateway IP
This field displays the IP address of the gateway to which you want to
send the traffic that the system receives from this PVC.
Delete
Select an entry’s Delete check box and click Delete to remove the
entry.
Clicking Delete saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory.
The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or loses
power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to save
your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
30.3 2684 Routed Domain Screen
Use this screen to configure domains for 2684 routed mode traffic. The domain is
the range of IP addresses behind the subscriber’s device (the CPE). This includes
the CPE device’s LAN IP addresses and the IP addresses of the LAN computers.
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To open this screen, click Advanced Application > 2684 Routed Mode >
Routed Domain.
Figure 108 2684 Routed Domain
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 66 2684 Routed Domain
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
Use this drop-down list box to select a port for which you wish to
configure settings.
VPI
Type the Virtual Path Identifier for this routed PVC.
VCI
Type the Virtual Circuit Identifier for this routed PVC.
IP
Enter the subscriber’s CPE LAN IP address in dotted decimal notation.
NetMask
The bit number of the subnet mask of the subscriber’s IP address. To
find the bit number, convert the subnet mask to binary and add all of
the 1’s together. Take “255.255.255.0” for example. 255 converts to
eight 1’s in binary. There are three 255’s, so add three eights together
and you get the bit number (24).
Add
Click Add to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory.
The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or loses
power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to save
your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
Index
This field displays the number of the routed PVC.
Port
This field displays the number of the ADSL port on which the routed
PVC is configured.
VPI
This field displays the Virtual Path Identifier (VPI) The VPI and VCI
identify a channel on this port.
VCI
This field displays the Virtual Circuit Identifier (VCI). The VPI and VCI
identify a channel on this port.
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Table 66 2684 Routed Domain (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
IP
This field displays the subscriber’s IP address.
NetMask
This field displays the bit number of the subnet mask of the
subscriber’s LAN IP address.
Delete
Select an entry’s Delete check box and click Delete to remove the
entry.
Clicking Delete saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory.
The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or loses
power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to save
your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
30.4 RPVC Arp Proxy Screen
Use this screen to view the Address Resolution Protocol table of IP addresses of
CPE devices using 2684 routed mode and configure how long the device is to store
them.
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > 2684 Routed Mode > RPVC
ARP Proxy.
Figure 109 RPVC Arp Proxy
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The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 67 RPVC Arp Proxy
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Aging Time
Enter a number of seconds (10~10000) to set how long the device
keeps the Address Resolution Protocol table’s entries of IP addresses
of CPE devices using 2684 routed mode. Enter 0 to disable the aging
time.
Apply Setting
Click Apply Setting to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s
volatile memory.
The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or loses
power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to save
your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Index
This field displays the number of the IP address entry.
Gateway IP
This field displays the IP address of the gateway to which the device
sends the traffic that it receives from this entry’s IP address.
VID
This field displays the VLAN Identifier that the device adds to Ethernet
frames that it sends to this gateway.
MAC
This field displays the subscriber’s MAC (Media Access Control)
address.
Flush
Click Flush to remove all of the entries from the ARP table.
30.5 2684 Routed Gateway Screen
Use this screen to configure gateway settings.
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > 2684 Routed Mode >
Routed Gateway.
Figure 110 2684 Routed Gateway
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The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 68 2684 Routed Gateway
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Gateway IP
Enter the IP address of the gateway to which you want to send the
traffic that the system receives from this PVC. Enter the IP address in
dotted decimal notation.
VID
Specify a VLAN Identifier to add to Ethernet frames that the system
routes to this gateway.
Priority
Select the IEEE 802.1p priority (0~7) to add to the traffic that you
send to this gateway.
Add
Click Add to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory.
The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or loses
power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to save
your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Index
This field displays the number of the gateway entry.
Gateway IP
This field displays the IP address of the gateway.
VID
This field displays the VLAN Identifier that the system adds to
Ethernet frames that it sends to this gateway.
Priority
This field displays the IEEE 802.1p priority (0~7) that is added to
traffic sent to this gateway.
Delete
Select an entry’s Delete check box and click Delete to remove the
entry.
Clicking Delete saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory.
The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or loses
power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to save
your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
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Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
CHAPTER
31
PPPoA to PPPoE
This chapter shows you how to set up the IES-1248-51V to convert PPPoA frames
to PPPoE traffic and vice versa.
31.1 PPPoA to PPPoE Overview
Before migrating to an Ethernet infrastructure, a broadband network might consist
of PPPoA connections between the CPE devices and the DSLAM and PPPoE
connections from the DSLAM to the Broadband Remote Access Server (BRAS). The
following figure shows a network example.
Figure 111 Mixed PPPoA-to-PPPoE Broadband Network Example
Client
DSLAM
PPPoA
PPPoE
BRAS
In order to allow communication between the end points (the CPE devices and the
BRAS), you need to configure the DSLAM (the IES-1248-51V) to translate PPPoA
frames to PPPoE packets and vise versa.
When PPPoA packets are received from the CPE, the ATM headers are removed
and the IES-1248-51V adds PPPoE and Ethernet headers before sending the
packets to the BRAS. When the IES-1248-51V receives PPPoE packets from the
BRAS, PPPoE and Ethernet headers are stripped and necessary PVC information
(such as encapsulation type) is added before forwarding to the designated CPE.
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Chapter 31 PPPoA to PPPoE
31.2 PPPoA to PPPoE Screen
Use this screen to set up PPPoA to PPPoE conversions on each port. This
conversion is set up by creating a PAE PVC. See Chapter 16 on page 119 for
background information about creating PVCs. To open this screen, click Advanced
Application > PPPoA to PPPoE.
Figure 112 PPPoA to PPPoE
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 69 PPPoA to PPPoE
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
Use this drop-down list box to select a port for which you wish to set
up PPPoA to PPPoE conversions. This field is read-only once you click
on a port number below.
VPI
Type the Virtual Path Identifier for a channel on this port.
VCI
Type the Virtual Circuit Identifier for a channel on this port.
DS VC Profile
Use the drop-down list box to select a VC profile to use for this
channel’s downstream traffic shaping.
US VC Profile
Use the drop-down list box to select a VC profile to use for this
channel’s upstream traffic. The IES-1248-51V does not perform
upstream traffic policing if you do not specify an upstream VC profile.
Note: Upstream traffic policing should be used in conjunction with
the ATM shaping feature on the subscriber’s device. If the
subscriber’s device does not apply the appropriate ATM
shaping, all upstream traffic will be discarded due to
upstream traffic policing.
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Chapter 31 PPPoA to PPPoE
Table 69 PPPoA to PPPoE (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
PVID
Type a PVID (Port VLAN ID) to assign to untagged frames received on
this channel.
Note: Make sure the VID is not already used for multicast VLAN
or TLS PVC.
Priority
Use the drop-down list box to select the priority value (0 to 7) to add
to incoming frames without a (IEEE 802.1p) priority tag.
AC Name
This field is optional. Specify the hostname of a remote access
concentrator if there are two access concentrators (or BRAS) on the
network or if you want to allow PAE translation to the specified access
concentrator. In this case, the IES-1248-51V checks the AC name field
in the BRAS's reply PDU. If there is a mismatch, the IES-1248-51V
drops this PDU. (This is not recorded as an PPPoE AC System Error
in the PPPoA to PPPoE Status screen, however.)
Service Name
This field is optional. Specify the name of the service that uses this
PVC. This must be a service name that you configure on the remote
access concentrator.
Hellotime
Specify the timeout, in seconds, for the PPPoE session. Enter 0 if there
is no timeout.
Apply
Click this to add or save channel settings on the selected port.
This saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile memory. The
IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or loses power, so
use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to save your
changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
Show Port
Select which ADSL port(s) for which to display PPPoA to PPPoE
conversion settings.
Index
This field displays the number of the PVC. Click a PVC’s index number
to open the screen where you can look at the current status of this
PPPoA-to-PPPoE conversion. (See Section 31.3 on page 241.)
Note: At the time of writing, you cannot edit the VPI and VCI. If
you want to change them, add a new PVC with the desired
settings. Then, delete any unwanted PVCs.
Port
This field displays the number of the ADSL port on which the PVC is
configured.
VPI/VCI
This field displays the Virtual Path Identifier (VPI) and Virtual Circuit
Identifier (VCI). The VPI and VCI identify a channel on this port.
PVID
This is the PVID (Port VLAN ID) assigned to untagged frames or
priority frames (0 VID) received on this channel.
Priority
This is the priority value (0 to 7) added to incoming frames without a
(IEEE 802.1p) priority tag.
Hellotime
This field displays the timeout for the PPPoE session, in seconds.
DS / US VC Profile This shows which VC profile this channel uses for downstream traffic
shaping. The VC profile for upstream policing also displays if the
channel is configured to use one.
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Table 69 PPPoA to PPPoE (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Access
Concentrator
Name
This field displays the name of the specified remote access
concentrator, if any.
Service Name
This field displays the name of the service that uses this PVC on the
remote access concentrator.
Select
Select the check box in the Select column for an entry, and click
Delete to remove the entry.
Delete
240
Select All
Click this to select all entries in the table.
Select None
Click this to un-select all entries in the table.
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Chapter 31 PPPoA to PPPoE
31.3 PPPoA to PPPoE Status Screen
Use this screen to look at the current status of each PPPoA to PPPoE conversion. To
open this screen, click Advanced Application > PPPoA to PPPoE, and then
click an index number.
Figure 113 PPPoA to PPPoE Status
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 70 PPPoA to PPPoE Status
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
PPPoA to PPPoE
Click PPPoA to PPPoE to open the screen where you can set up
PPPoA-to-PPPoE conversions on each port (see Section 31.2 on page
238).
PVC
This field displays the port number, VPI, and VCI of the PVC.
Session Status
Session State
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This field displays whether or not the current session is Up or Down.
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Table 70 PPPoA to PPPoE Status (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Session ID
This field displays the ID of the current session. It displays 0 if there is
no current session.
Session
Uptime
This field displays how long the current session has been up.
AC Name
This field displays the hostname of the remote access concentrator if
there are two access concentrators (or BRAS) on the network or if you
want to allow PAE translation to the specified access concentrator.
Service Name
This field specifies the name of the service that uses this PVC.
Counter Status
Tx/Rx
The values in these columns are for packets transmitted (tx) or
received (rx) by the IES-1248-51V.
PPP LCP
This field displays the number of config-request PDUs received by the
Config-Request IES-1248-51V from the CPE (client) device.
242
PPP LCP EchoRequest
This field displays the number of echo-request PDUs received by the
IES-1248-51V from the CPE (client) device.
PPP LCP EchoReply
This field displays the number of echo-reply PDUs received by the IES1248-51V from the CPE (client) device.
PPPoE PADI
This field displays the number of padi PDUs sent by the IES-1248-51V
to the BRAS.
PPPoE PADO
This field displays the number of pado PDUs sent by the BRAS to the
IES-1248-51V.
PPPoE PADR
This field displays the number of padr PDUs sent by the IES-1248-51V
to the BRAS.
PPPoE PADS
This field displays the number of pads PDUs sent by the BRAS to the
IES-1248-51V.
PPPoE PADT
This field displays the number of padt PDUs sent and received by the
IES-1248-51V.
PPPoE Service
Name Error
This field displays the number of service name errors; for example,
the IES-1248-51V’s specified service is different than the BRAS’s
setting.
PPPoE AC
System Error
This field displays the number of times the access concentrator
experienced an error while performing the Host request; for example,
when resources are exhausted in the access concentrator. This value
does not include the number of times the IES-1248-51V checks the
AC name field in the BRAS's reply PDU and finds a mismatch,
however.
PPPoE Generic
Error
This field displays the number of other types of errors that occur in the
PPPoE session between the IES-1248-51V and the BRAS.
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
CHAPTER
32
DSCP
This chapter shows you how to set up DSCP on each port and how to convert
DSCP values to IEEE 802.1p values.
32.1 DSCP Overview
DiffServ Code Point (DSCP) is a field used for packet classification on DiffServ
networks. The higher the value, the higher the priority. Lower-priority packets
may be dropped if the total traffic exceeds the capacity of the network.
32.2 DSCP Setup Screen
Use this screen to activate or deactivate DSCP on each port. To open this screen,
click Advanced Application > DSCP.
Figure 114 DSCP Setup
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Chapter 32 DSCP
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 71 DSCP Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
DSCP Map
Click DSCP Map to open the screen where you can set up the
mapping between source DSCP priority and IEEE 802.1p priority (see
Section 32.3 on page 244).
Port
This field displays each port number.
Active
This field displays whether DSCP is active (“V”) or inactive (“-”) on this
port.
Select
Select this, and click Active or Inactive to enable or disable the
DSCP on this port.
Active
Click this to enable DSCP on the selected ports.
Inactive
Click this to disable DSCP on the selected ports.
All
Click this to select all entries in the table.
None
Click this to un-select all entries in the table.
32.3 DSCP Map Screen
Use this screen to convert DSCP priority to IEEE 802.1p priority. To open this
screen, click Advanced Application > DSCP > DSCP Map.
Figure 115 DSCP Map
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The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 72 DSCP Map
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
DSCP Map
Click DSCP Setup to open the screen where you can activate or
deactivate DSCP on each port (see Section 32.2 on page 243).
Source DSCP
This field displays each DSCP value.
802.1P Priority
Enter the IEEE 802.1p priority to which you would like to map this
DSCP value.
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
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CHAPTER
33
TLS PVC
This chapter shows you how to set up Transparent LAN Service (VLAN stacking, Qin-Q) on each port.
33.1 Transparent LAN Service (TLS) Overview
Transparent LAN Service (also known as VLAN stacking or Q-in-Q) allows a service
provider to distinguish multiple customers VLANs, even those with the same
(customer-assigned) VLAN ID, within its network.
Use TLS to add an outer VLAN tag to the inner IEEE 802.1Q tagged frames that
enter the network. By tagging the tagged frames (“double-tagged” frames), the
service provider can manage up to 4,094 VLAN groups with each group containing
up to 4,094 customer VLANs. This allows a service provider to provide different
services, based on specific VLANs, for many different customers.
A service provider’s customers may require a range of VLANs to handle multiple
applications. A service provider’s customers can assign their own inner VLAN tags
to traffic. The service provider can assign an outer VLAN tag for each customer.
Therefore, there is no VLAN tag overlap among customers, so traffic from different
customers is kept separate.
Before the IES-1248-51V sends the frames from the customers, the VLAN ID is
added to the frames. When packets intended for specific customers are received
on the IES-1248-51V, the outer VLAN tag is removed before the traffic is sent.
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33.1.1 TLS Network Example
In the following example figure, both A and B are Service Provider’s Network
(SPN) customers with VPN tunnels between their head offices and branch offices,
respectively. Both have an identical VLAN tag for their VLAN group. The service
provider can separate these two VLANs within its network by adding tag 37 to
distinguish customer A and tag 48 to distinguish customer B at edge device 1 and
then stripping those tags at edge device 2 as the data frames leave the network.
Figure 116 Transparent LAN Service Network Example
33.2 TLS PVC Screen
Use this screen to set up Transparent LAN Services on each port. This is set up by
creating a TLS PVC. See Chapter 16 on page 119 for background information
about creating PVCs. To open this screen, click Advanced Application > TLS
PVC.
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Note: You can NOT configure PPPoA-to-PPPoE and TLS settings on the same PVC.
Figure 117 TLS PVC
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 73 TLS PVC
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
Use this drop-down list box to select a port for which you wish to set
up a TLS PVC. This field is read-only once you click on a port number
below.
VPI
Type the Virtual Path Identifier for a channel on this port.
VCI
Type the Virtual Circuit Identifier for a channel on this port.
DS VC Profile
Use the drop-down list box to select a VC profile to use for this
channel’s downstream traffic shaping.
US VC Profile
Use the drop-down list box to select a VC profile to use for this
channel’s upstream traffic. The IES-1248-51V does not perform
upstream traffic policing if you do not specify an upstream VC profile.
Note: Upstream traffic policing should be used in conjunction with
the ATM shaping feature on the subscriber’s device. If the
subscriber’s device does not apply the appropriate ATM
shaping, all upstream traffic will be discarded due to
upstream traffic policing.
VID
Type a VLAN ID to assign to frames received on this channel.
Note: Make sure the VID is not already used for PPPoA-toPPPoE conversions.
Priority
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Use the drop-down list box to select the priority value (0 to 7) to add
to incoming frames without a (IEEE 802.1p) priority tag.
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Table 73 TLS PVC (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Apply
Click this to add or save channel settings on the selected port.
This saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile memory. The
IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or loses power, so
use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to save your
changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
Show Port
Select which ADSL port(s) for which to display TLS PVC settings.
Index
This field displays the number of the PVC. Click a PVC’s index number
to use the top of the screen to edit the PVC.
Note: At the time of writing, you cannot edit the VPI and VCI. If
you want to change them, add a new PVC with the desired
settings. Then you can delete any unwanted PVCs.
Port
This field displays the number of the ADSL port on which the PVC is
configured.
VPI/VCI
This field displays the Virtual Path Identifier (VPI) and Virtual Circuit
Identifier (VCI). The VPI and VCI identify a channel on this port.
VID
This is the VLAN ID assigned to frames received on this channel.
Priority
This is the priority value (0 to 7) added to incoming frames without a
(IEEE 802.1p) priority tag.
DS/US VC Profile
This shows which VC profile this channel uses for downstream traffic
shaping. The VC profile for upstream policing also displays if the
channel is configured to use one.
Select
Select the check box in the Select column for an entry, and click
Delete to remove the entry.
Delete
250
Select All
Click this to select all entries in the table.
Select None
Click this to un-select all entries in the table.
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CHAPTER
34
ACL
This chapter shows you how to set up ACL profiles on each port.
34.1 Access Control List (ACL) Overview
An ACL (Access Control List) profile allows the IES-1248-51V to classify and
perform actions on the upstream traffic. Each ACL profile consists of a rule and an
action, and you assign ACL profiles to PVCs.
34.1.1 ACL Profile Rules
Each ACL profile uses one of 14 rules to classify upstream traffic. These rules are
listed below by rule number.
1
etype <etype> vlan <vid>
2
etype <etype> smac <mac>
3
etype <etype> dmac <mac>
4
vlan <vid> smac <mac>
5
vlan <vid> dmac <mac>
6
smac <mac> dmac <mac>
7
vlan <vid> priority <priority>
8
etype <etype>
9
vlan <vid>
10 smac <mac>
11 dmac <mac>
12 priority <priority>
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13 protocol <protocol>
14 {srcip <ip>/<mask>{|dstip <ip>/<mask>{|tos <stos> <etos> {|srcport
<sport> <eport> {|dstport <sport> <eport>}}}}}
The input values for these values have the following ranges.
• <vid>: 1~4094
• <priority>: 1~7
• <etype>: 0~65535
• <protocol>: tcp|udp|ospf|igmp|ip|gre|icmp|<ptype>
• <ptype>: 0~255
• <mask>: 0~32
• <tos>: 0~255
• <port>: 0~65535
If you apply multiple profiles to a PVC, the IES-1248-51V checks the profiles by
rule number. The lower the rule number, the higher the priority the rule (and
profile) has. For example, there are two ACL profiles assigned to a PVC. Profile1 is
for VLAN ID 100 (rule number 9) traffic, and Profile2 is for IEEE 802.1p priority 0
traffic (rule number 12). The IES-1248-51V checks Profile1 first. If the traffic is
VLAN ID 100, the IES-1248-51V follows the action in Profile1 and does not check
Profile2. You cannot assign profiles that have the same rule numbers to the same
PVC.
34.1.2 ACL Profile Actions
The IES-1248-51V can perform the following actions after it classifies upstream
traffic.
• rate <rate>: change the rate to the specified value (1~65535 kbps)
• rvlan <rvlan>: change the VLAN ID to the specified value (1~4094)
• rpri <rpri>: change the IEEE 802.1p priority to the specified value (0~7)
• deny: do not forward the packet
The IES-1248-51V can apply more than one action to a packet, unless you select
deny.
If you select the rvlan action, the IES-1248-51V replaces the VLAN ID before it
compares the VLAN ID of the packet to the VID of the PVC. As a result, it is
suggested that you replace VLAN ID on super channels, not normal PVC, since
super channels accept any tagged traffic. If you replace the VLAN ID for a normal
PVC, the IES-1248-51V drops the traffic because the new VLAN ID does not match
the VID of the PVC. This is illustrated in the following scenario.
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There is a normal PVC, and its PVID is 900. You create an ACL rule to replace the
VLAN ID with 901. Initially, the traffic for the PVC belongs to VLAN 900. Then, the
IES-1248-51V checks the ACL rule and changes the traffic to VLAN 901. When the
IES-1248-51V finally compares the VLAN ID of the traffic (901) to the VID of the
PVC (900), the IES-1248-51V drops the packets because they do not match.
34.2 ACL Setup Screen
Use this screen to assign ACL profiles to each PVC. To open this screen, click
Advanced Application > ACL.
Figure 118 ACL Setup
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 74 ACL Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
ACL Profile
Click ACL Profile to open the screen where you can set up ACL
profiles (see Section 34.3 on page 255).
ACL Profile Map
Click ACL Profile Map to open the screen where you can look at
which ACL profiles are assigned to which PVCs (see Section 34.4 on
page 257).
Port
Use this drop-down list box to select a port to which you wish to
assign an ACL profile. This field is read-only once you click on a port
number below.
VPI
Type the Virtual Path Identifier for a channel on this port.
VCI
Type the Virtual Circuit Identifier for a channel on this port.
ACL Profile
Use the drop-down list box to select the ACL profile you want to assign
to this PVC.
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Table 74 ACL Setup (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Apply
Click this to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
Show Port
Select which ADSL port(s) for which to display ACL profile settings.
Index
This field displays the number of the PVC. Click a PVC’s index number
to use the top of the screen to edit the PVC.
Note: At the time of writing, you cannot edit the VPI and VCI. If
you want to change them, add a new PVC with the desired
settings. Then you can delete any unwanted PVCs.
Port
This field displays the number of the ADSL port on which the PVC is
configured.
VPI/VCI
This field displays the Virtual Path Identifier (VPI) and Virtual Circuit
Identifier (VCI). The VPI and VCI identify a channel on this port.
ACL Profile
This field shows the ACL profile assigned to this PVC.
Select
Select the check box in the Select column for an entry, and click
Delete to remove the entry.
Delete
254
Select All
Click this to select all entries in the table.
Select None
Click this to un-select all entries in the table.
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34.3 ACL Profile Screen
Use this screen to set up ACL profiles. To open this screen, click Advanced
Application > ACL, ACL Profile.
Figure 119 ACL Profile
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Chapter 34 ACL
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 75 ACL Profile
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Profile Name
Enter a descriptive name for the ACL profile. The name can be 1-31
printable ASCII characters long. Spaces are not allowed.
Rule
Select which type of rule to use.
Note: The lower the number (1-14), the higher the priority the rule
has.
Provide additional information required for the selected rule.
Additional rules consist of one or more of the following criteria.
ethernet type
Enter the 16-bit EtherType value between 0 and 65535.
vlan
Enter a VLAN ID between 1 and 4094.
source mac
Enter the source MAC address.
dest mac
Enter the destination MAC address.
priority
Select the IEEE 802.1p priority.
protocol
Select the IP protocol used.
protocol type
Enter the IP protocol number (between 0 and 255) used.
source ip
Enter the source IP address and subnet mask in dotted decimal
notation.
dest ip
Enter the source IP address and subnet mask in dotted decimal
notation.
tos
Enter the start and end Type of Service between 0 and 255.
source port
Enter the source port or range of source ports.
dest port
Enter the destination port or range of destination ports.
Action
Select which action(s) the IES-1248-51V should follow when the
criteria are satisfied.
rate
Enter the maximum bandwidth this traffic is allowed to have.
replaced vlan
Enter the VLAN ID that this traffic should use.
replaced
priority
Select the IEEE 802.1p priority that this traffic should have.
deny
Select this if you want the IES-1248-51V to reject this kind of traffic.
ACL Profile List
Index
This field displays a sequential value. The sequence in this table is not
important. Click this to edit the associated ACL profile in the section
above.
ACL Profile
This field displays the name of this ACL profile.
Select
Select the check box in the Select column for an entry, and click
Delete to remove the entry.
Delete
256
Select All
Click this to select all entries in the table.
Select None
Click this to un-select all entries in the table.
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Chapter 34 ACL
34.4 ACL Profile Map Screen
Use this screen to look at all the ACL profiles and the PVCs to which each one is
assigned. To open this screen, click Advanced Application > ACL > ACL Profile
Map.
Figure 120 ACL Profile Map
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 76 ACL Profile Map
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
ACL Profile
Select the ACL profile(s) for which you want to see which PVCs are
assigned to it.
Index
This field displays the number of an entry.
Profile
This field shows the ACL profile assigned to this PVC.
Port
This field displays the ADSL port number on which the PVC is
configured.
VPI/VCI
This field displays the Virtual Path Identifier (VPI) and Virtual Circuit
Identifier (VCI). The VPI and VCI identify a channel on this port.
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CHAPTER
35
Downstream Broadcast
This chapter shows you how to allow or block downstream broadcast traffic.
35.1 Downstream Broadcast
Downstream broadcast allows you to block downstream broadcast packets from
being sent to specified VLANs on specified ports.
35.2 Downstream Broadcast Screen
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > Downstream Broadcast.
Figure 121 Downstream Broadcast
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 77 Downstream Broadcast
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
Use this drop-down list box to select a port for which you wish to
configure settings.
VLAN
Specify the number of a VLAN (on this entry’s port) to which you do
not want to send broadcast traffic. The VLAN must already be
configured in the system.
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Table 77 Downstream Broadcast (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Add
Click Add to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory.
The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or loses
power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to save
your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Blocking Table
Port
Use this drop-down list box to select a port for which you wish to
display settings.
Index
This field displays the number of the downstream broadcast blocking
entry.
Port
This is the number of a DSL port through which you will block
downstream broadcast traffic (on a specific VLAN).
VLAN
This field displays the number of a VLAN to which you do not want to
send broadcast traffic (on the entry’s port).
Select
Select an entry’s Select check box and click Delete to remove the
entry.
Clicking Delete saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory.
The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or loses
power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to save
your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
260
Select All
Click All to mark all of the check boxes.
Select None
Click None to un-mark all of the check boxes.
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CHAPTER
36
Syslog
This chapter explains how to set the syslog parameters.
36.1 Syslog
The syslog feature sends logs to an external syslog server.
36.2 SysLog Screen
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > SysLog.
Figure 122 SysLog
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 78 SysLog
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Enable Unix
Syslog
Select this check box to activate syslog (system logging) and then
configure the syslog parameters described in the following fields.
Syslog Server IP
Enter the IP address of the syslog server.
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
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CHAPTER
37
Access Control
This chapter describes how to configure access control.
37.1 Access Control Screen
Use this screen to configure SNMP and enable/disable remote service access.
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > Access Control.
Figure 123 Access Control
37.2 Access Control Overview
A console port or Telnet session can coexist with one FTP session, a web
configurator session and/or limitless SNMP access control sessions.
Table 79 Access Control Summary
Number of sessions allowed
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CONSOL
E PORT
TELNET
FTP
WEB
SNMP
1
5
1
No limit
No limit
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37.3 SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol is a protocol used for exchanging
management information between network devices. SNMP is a member of TCP/IP
protocol suite. A manager station can manage and monitor the IES-1248-51V
through the network via SNMP version one (SNMPv1) and/or SNMP version 2c.
The next figure illustrates an SNMP management operation. SNMP is only available
if TCP/IP is configured.
Figure 124 SNMP Management Model
An SNMP managed network consists of two main components: agents and a
manager.
An agent is a management software module that resides in a managed device (the
IES-1248-51V). An agent translates the local management information from the
managed device into a form compatible with SNMP. The manager is the console
through which network administrators perform network management functions. It
executes applications that control and monitor managed devices.
The managed devices contain object variables/managed objects that define each
piece of information to be collected about a device. Examples of variables include
such as number of packets received, node port status etc. A Management
Information Base (MIB) is a collection of managed objects. SNMP allows a
manager and agents to communicate for the purpose of accessing these objects.
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SNMP itself is a simple request/response protocol based on the manager/agent
model. The manager issues a request and the agent returns responses using the
following protocol operations:
Table 80 SNMP Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
Get
Allows the manager to retrieve an object variable from the agent.
GetNext
Allows the manager to retrieve the next object variable from a table
or list within an agent. In SNMPv1, when a manager wants to retrieve
all elements of a table from an agent, it initiates a Get operation,
followed by a series of GetNext operations.
Set
Allows the manager to set values for object variables within an
agent.
Trap
Used by the agent to inform the manager of some events.
37.3.1 Supported MIBs
MIBs let administrators collect statistics and monitor status and performance. The
IES-1248-51V supports the following MIBs:
• ADSL-LINE-EXT-MIB.mib
• ADSL-LINE-MIB.mib
• ADSL-TC-MIB.mib
• BRIDGE-MIB.mib
• IANAifType-MIB.mib
• IF-MIB.mib
• PerfHist-TC-MIB.mib
• RFC-1212.mib
• RFC-1215.mib
• RFC1155-SMI.mib
• RFC1213-MIB.mib
• RMON-MIB.mib
• SNMP-FRAMEWORK-MIB.mib
• SNMPv2-CONF.mib
• SNMPv2-MIB.mib
• SNMPv2-SMI.mib
• SNMPv2-TC.mib
• vendor-IES1248.mib
The IES-1248-51V can also respond with specific data from the DSLAM private
MIBs:
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• vendor-mib.mib
• vendor-AS-ATM.mib
• vendor-AS.mib
• vendor-AESCommon.mib
• vendor-iesCommon.mib
37.3.2 SNMP Traps
The IES-1248-51V can send the following SNMP traps to an SNMP manager when
an event occurs. ATUC refers to the downstream channel (for traffic going from
the IES-1248-51V to the subscriber). ATUR refers to the upstream channel (for
traffic coming from the subscriber to the IES-1248-51V).
Table 81 SNMPv2 Traps
266
TRAP NAME
DESCRIPTION
coldStart
This trap is sent when the IES-1248-51V is turned on.
warmStart
This trap is sent when the IES-1248-51V restarts.
linkDown
This trap is sent when the Ethernet link is down. Enterprise
specific (adsl_atuc_los) traps are sent when an ADSL link is
down.
linkUp
This trap is sent when the Ethernet or ADSL link comes up.
authenticationFailure
This trap is sent when the SNMP community check fails.
reboot
This trap is sent when the system is going to reboot. The
variable is the reason for the system reboot.
overheat
This trap is sent when the system is overheated. The variable
is the current system temperature in Celsius.
overheatOver
This trap is sent when the system is no longer overheated.
The variable is the current system temperature in Celsius.
fanRpmLow
This trap is sent when the RPM of the fan is too low. The
variable is the current RPM of the fan.
fanRpmNormal
This trap is sent when the RPM of the fan is back within the
normal range. The variable is the current RPM of the fan.
voltageOutOfRange
This trap is sent when the voltage of the system is out of the
normal range. The variable is the current voltage of the
system in volts.
voltageNormal
This trap is sent when the voltage of the system is back within
the normal range. The variable is the current voltage of the
system in volts.
extAlarmInputTrigger
This trap is sent when there is an external alarm input.
extAlarmInputRelease
This trap is sent when the external alarm input stops.
thermalSensorFailure
This trap is sent when the thermal sensor fails.
adslAtucLof
This trap is sent when a Loss Of Frame is detected on the
ATUC.
adslAturLof
This trap is sent when a Loss Of Frame is detected on the
ATUR.
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Table 81 SNMPv2 Traps (continued)
TRAP NAME
DESCRIPTION
adslAtucLos
This trap is sent when a Loss Of Signal is detected on the
ATUC.
adslAturLos
This trap is sent when a Loss Of Signal is detected on the
ATUR.
adslAturLpr
This trap is sent when a Loss Of Power is detected on the
ATUR.
adslAtucLofClear
This trap is sent when the Loss Of Frame detected on the
ATUC is over.
adslAturLofClear
This trap is sent when the Loss Of Frame detected on the
ATUR is over.
adslAtucLosClear
This trap is sent when the Loss Of Signal detected on the
ATUC is over.
adslAturLosClear
This trap is sent when the Loss Of Signal detected on the
ATUR is over.
adslAturLprClear
This trap is sent when the Loss Of Power detected on the
ATUR is over.
adslAtucPerfLofsThreshTr
ap
The number of times a Loss Of Frame has occurred within 15
minutes for the ATUC has reached the threshold. currValue is
the number of times a Loss Of Frame has occurred within the
15-minute interval.
adslAtucPerfLossThreshTr
ap
The number of times a Loss Of Signal has occurred within 15
minutes for the ATUC has reached the threshold. currValue is
the number of times a Loss Of Signal has occurred within the
15 minute interval.
adslAtucPerfLprsThreshTr
ap
The number of times a Loss Of Power has occurred within 15
minutes for the ATUC has reached the threshold. currValue is
the number of times a Loss Of Power has occurred within the
15-minute interval.
adslAtucPerfESsThreshTra
p
The number of error seconds within 15 minutes for the ATUC
has reached the threshold. currValue is the number of error
seconds that have occurred within the 15-minute interval.
adslAtucPerfLolsThreshTra The number of times a Loss Of Link has occurred within 15
p
minutes for the ATUC has reached the threshold. currValue is
the number of times a Loss Of Link has occurred within the
15-minute interval.
adslAturPerfLofsThreshTra The number of times a Loss Of Frame has occurred within 15
p
minutes for the ATUR has reached the threshold. currValue is
the number of times a Loss Of Frame has occurred within the
15-minute interval.
adslAturPerfLossThreshTr
ap
The number of times a Loss Of Signal has occurred within 15
minutes for the ATUR has reached the threshold. currValue is
the number of times a Loss Of Signal has occurred within the
15-minute interval.
adslAturPerfLprsThreshTr
ap
The number of times a Loss Of Power has occurred within 15
minutes for the ATUR has reached the threshold. currValue is
the number of times a Loss Of Power has occurred within the
15-minute interval.
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Table 81 SNMPv2 Traps (continued)
TRAP NAME
DESCRIPTION
adslAturPerfESsThreshTra
p
The number of error seconds within 15 minutes for the ATUR
has reached the threshold. currValue is the number of error
seconds that have occurred within the 15-minute interval.
adslAtucSesLThreshTrap
The number of severely errored seconds within 15 minutes
for the ATUC has reached the threshold. currValue is the
number of severely errored seconds that have occurred within
the 15-minute interval.
adslAtucUasLThreshTrap
The number of Unavailable seconds within 15 minutes for the
ATUC has reached the threshold. currValue is the number of
Unavailable seconds that have occurred within the 15-minute
interval.
adslAturSesLThreshTrap
The number of severely errored seconds within 15 minutes
for the ATUR has reached the threshold. currValue is the
number of severely errored seconds that have occurred within
the 15-minute interval.
adslAturUasLThreshTrap
The number of Unavailable seconds within 15 minutes for the
ATUR has reached the threshold. currValue is the number of
Unavailable seconds that have occurred within the 15-minute
interval.
alarmRisingThreshold
An observed RMON statistics counter is greater than or equal
to its configured ringing threshold.
alarmFallingThreshold
An observed RMON statistics counter is less than or equal to
its configured falling threshold.
sysMacAntiSpoofing
A spoofing MAC address was found.
37.4 SNMP Screen
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > Access Control > SNMP.
Figure 125 SNMP
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The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 82 SNMP
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Return
Click Return to go back to the previous screen.
Get Community
Enter the get community, which is the password for the incoming Getand GetNext- requests from the management station.
Set Community
Enter the set community, which is the password for incoming Setrequests from the management station.
Trap Community
Enter the trap community, which is the password sent with each trap
to the SNMP manager.
Trap Destination
1~4
Enter the IP address of a station to send your SNMP traps to.
Enter the port number upon which the station listens for SNMP traps.
Port
Trusted Host
A “trusted host” is a computer that is allowed to use SNMP with the
IES-1248-51V.
0.0.0.0 allows any computer to use SNMP to access the IES-124851V.
Specify an IP address to allow only the computer with that IP address
to use SNMP to access the IES-1248-51V.
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
37.5 Service Access Control Screen
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > Access Control > Service
Access Control.
Figure 126 Service Access Control
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The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 83 Service Access Control
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Return
Click Return to go back to the previous screen.
Services
Services you may use to access the IES-1248-51V are listed here.
Active
Select the Active check boxes for the corresponding services that you
want to allow to access the IES-1248-51V.
Server Port
For Telnet, FTP or web services, you may change the default service
port by typing the new port number in the Server Port field. If you
change the default port number then you will have to let people (who
wish to use the service) know the new port number for that service.
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
37.6 Remote Management Screen
Use this screen to configure the IP address ranges of trusted computers that may
manage the IES-1248-51V.
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > Access Control > Secured
Client.
Figure 127 Remote Management (Secured Client Setup)
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The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 84 Remote Management (Secured Client Setup)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Up
Click Up to go back to the previous screen.
Index
This is the client set index number. A “client set” is a group of one or
more “trusted computers” from which an administrator may use a
service to manage the IES-1248-51V.
Enable
Select this check box to activate this secured client set. Clear the
check box if you wish to temporarily disable the set without deleting
it.
Start IP Address
Configure the IP address range of trusted computers from which you
can manage the IES-1248-51V.
End IP Address
The IES-1248-51V checks if the client IP address of a computer
requesting a service or protocol matches the range set here. The IES1248-51V immediately disconnects the session if it does not match.
Telnet/FTP/Web/
ICMP/SNMP
Select services that may be used for managing the IES-1248-51V
from the specified trusted computers.
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring this screen afresh.
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CHAPTER
38
IP Bridge
This chapter explains how to set up the IP bridge function in the IES-1248-51V.
38.1 IP Bridge Overview
The IP bridge function is designed for large-scale, flat, access networks, and it is
ideal when the network is based on Ethernet. When the IP bridge is enabled, the
IES-1248-51V forwards frames based on the destination IP address, instead of the
destination MAC address, and it replaces the source MAC address with its own
MAC address.
Figure 128 IP Bridge: Traditional vs. IP-aware DSLAM
Traditional
Forward by
destination MAC
IP Aware
Forward by
destination IP
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The IP-aware IES-1248-51V does not modify the IP packet header, but it uses the
destination IP address to modify the layer-2 header, in particular the source MAC
address, destination MAC address, and VLAN tag. As a result, the IES-1248-51V
prevents the MAC addresses and VLAN ID downstream of the IES-1248-51V (in
other words, the subscribers’ MAC addresses and VLAN ID) from propagating into
the network upstream of the IES-1248-51V, and vice versa.
In the end, the IP-aware IES-1248-51V makes the network more secure and more
scalable, as explained below.
• User-to-user security. The IES-1248-51V does not forward subscribers’ MAC
addresses upstream of the IES-1248-51V, so there is no way for subscribers to
know each other’s MAC addresses. This prevents the spoofing of MAC addresses
and IP addresses upstream of the IES-1248-51V.
• Scalability. The scale of access networks is typically limited by the number of
MAC addresses in the network. Since the IES-1248-51V does not forward
subscribers’ MAC addresses or VLAN ID upstream, the upstream network is
more scalable, and it is simpler to use the same VLAN ID upstream of several
IES-1248-51V. In addition, the IES-1248-51V drastically reduces the scale of
ARP traffic storms.
The IES-1248-51V itself is transparent in the network.
38.1.1 Upstream and Downstream Traffic
When the IES-1248-51V forwards upstream traffic, it makes the following changes
in the layer-2 header.
Table 85 IP Bridge: Layer-2 Header for Upstream Traffic
ORIGINAL
UPDATED
Source MAC address
Subscriber’s MAC address
IES-1248-51V’s MAC address
Destination MAC address
IES-1248-51V’s MAC address
Destination IP’s MAC address
VLAN ID
Subscriber’s VLAN ID
Destination IP’s VLAN ID
The original frame has the IES-1248-51V’s MAC address as the destination MAC
address because the IES-1248-51V, not the device that really has the destination
IP, responded to the ARP request for the destination IP. (This is part of the ARP
proxy feature for IP bridges.) Once the IES-1248-51V receives the frame, it
updates the MAC addresses and VLAN ID and forwards it to the device that really
has the destination IP.
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This is illustrated in the following example.
Figure 129 IP Bridge: Upstream Traffic Example
MAC x
MAC g
IP 192.168.10.5
VLAN: 200
MAC a
IP: 192.168.1.1
VLAN: 100
Source IP: 192.168.1.1
Source MAC: a
Destination IP: 192.168.10.5
Destination MAC: x
VLAN: 100
Source IP: 192.168.1.1
Source MAC: x
Destination IP: 192.168.10.5
Destination MAC: g
VLAN: 200
Notice that the IES-1248-51V does not change the IP packet header.
The process is reversed but otherwise similar for downstream traffic. The IES1248-51V learns how to forward frames to the appropriate subscriber from one of
the following sources.
• DHCP snooping. The IP-aware IES-1248-51V snoops DHCP packets, so it knows
what IP addresses have been assigned to subscribers.
• ARP. The IES-1248-51V uses ARP to find out which subscriber has a particular IP
address.
• Static information. You should provide forwarding information manually for
subscribers that have static IP addresses and do not respond to ARP queries.
38.1.2 IP Bridge Settings
The IP bridge function consists of the following settings.
• Domains and VLANs
• Edge routers
• Downlink interfaces
• Routing tables
• PVCs
• ARP proxy settings
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Each set of settings is discussed in more detail in the following sections.
38.1.2.1 Domains and VLAN
A domain represents an ISP. Each domain is defined by (and dominates) the VLAN
that are in it and has its own routing table and ARP table. As a result, two or more
VLANs in different domains can use the same IP subnet, and one network can
support multiple ISPs.
VLANs in IP bridges are exclusive. They can be in at most one domain. In addition,
VLANs in IP bridges share the same VLAN space as regular VLANs, so VLANs in IP
bridges must have different VLAN IDs than regular VLANs.
38.1.2.1.1 Configuring VLANs for Domains
To add a VLAN to a domain,
1
Add (Join) a new (undefined) VLAN ID to the domain.
2
Create the VLAN in the system using the regular screens or commands for VLANs.
To remove a VLAN from a domain,
1
Delete the VLAN from the system using the regular screens or commands for
VLANs.
2
Remove (Leave) the VLAN ID from the domain.
38.1.2.2 Edge Routers
Edge routers are usually the gateways that are provided to the subscribers. They
can also be gateways that are specified in static routing table entries. Each edge
router, in addition to its IP address, has an associated VLAN ID. When the IES1248-51V forwards a frame to an edge router, it uses this VLAN ID to replace
whatever VLAN ID the subscriber specified. The IES-1248-51V also uses the VLAN
ID to identify the domain the edge router is in.
If two edge routers are in different domains, it is possible for them to have the
same IP address.
38.1.2.3 Downlink Interfaces
Downlink interfaces provide forwarding information for downstream traffic. The
IES-1248-51V learns some of this information by snooping DHCP packets. For
static IP addresses, you should provide this information manually. In this case,
specify the VLAN ID and, optionally, the PVC for a range of IP addresses. The IES-
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1248-51V uses the VLAN ID to identify the domain the downlink interface is in.
Downlink interfaces in the same domain cannot have overlapping IP addresses.
38.1.2.4 Routing Tables
Each domain has its own routing table. Each routing table contains entries that,
based on the destination IP address, control where the IES-1248-51V forwards
packets (for upstream and downstream traffic). The IES-1248-51V automatically
creates routing table entries for each downlink interface and for each edge router
in the domain. You can create additional entries by specifying the edge router to
which the IES-1248-51V should forward traffic for a particular destination IP
address or IP subnet.
38.1.2.5 PVCs
IP bridge PVCs are similar to regular PVCs and are endpoints of the IP bridge. In
addition, IP bridge PVCs are one of two types, IP over Ethernet or IP over ATM,
depending on the underlying network.
The PVID is used to identify the domain the PVC is in, so the PVID must be in a
domain.
38.1.2.6 ARP Proxy Settings
The IES-1248-51V is an ARP proxy for edge routers and subscribers in an IP
bridge. You can configure basic settings for this, and you can look at (and flush, in
some cases) the (PVC, MAC, IP, VID) information the IES-1248-51V has learned
using DHCP snooping and ARP.
38.1.3 IP Bridge Configuration
Follow these steps to set up a simple IP bridge.
1
Create a domain. (Each domain is an ISP.)
2
Create one or more VLANs in the domain. (For example, one VLAN is for highspeed Internet, and another VLAN is for VoIP.)
3
Create the VLAN in the system using the regular screens or commands for VLANs.
4
Specify one or more edge routers for the domain.
5
Create routing table entries, so the IES-1248-51V forwards frames to the
appropriate edge router.
6
Create downlink interfaces, so the IES-1248-51V forwards frames to the
appropriate subscribers.
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7
Create PVCs for the subscribers.
38.2 IPB PVC Screen
Use this screen to set up and maintain PVCs for subscribers in an IP bridge.
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > IP Bridge > IPB PVC.
Figure 130 IPB PVC
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 86 IPB PVC
278
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Domain
Click Domain to open the screen where you can set up and maintain
domains in an IP bridge (see Section 38.3 on page 280).
Edge Router
Click Edge Router to open the screen where you can set up and
maintain edge routers in an IP bridge (see Section 38.4 on page 284).
Downlink
Interface
Click Downlink Interface to open the screen where you can set up
and maintain forwarding information for downstream traffic (see
Section 38.5 on page 285).
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Table 86 IPB PVC (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Routing Table
Click Routing Table to open the screen where you can set up and
maintain the routing table for each domain (see Section 38.6 on page
289).
IPB ARP Proxy
Click IPB ARP Proxy to open the screen where you can look at and
flush the ARP table for each domain (see Section 38.7 on page 293).
Port
Use this drop-down list box to select a port for which you wish to set
up an IP bridge PVC.
Super Channel
The IES-1248-51V forwards frames belonging to VLAN groups that are
not assigned to specific channels to the super channel.
Enable the super channel option to have this channel forward frames
belonging to multiple VLAN groups (that are not assigned to other
channels).
The super channel functions in the same way as the channel in a
single channel environment.
VPI
Type the Virtual Path Identifier for a channel on this port.
VCI
Type the Virtual Circuit Identifier for a channel on this port.
DS VC Profile
Use the drop-down list box to select a VC profile to use for this
channel’s downstream traffic shaping.
US VC Profile
Use the drop-down list box to select a VC profile to use for this
channel’s upstream traffic. The IES-1248-51V does not perform
upstream traffic policing if you do not specify an upstream VC profile.
Note: Upstream traffic policing should be used in conjunction with
the ATM shaping feature on the subscriber’s device. If the
subscriber’s device does not apply the appropriate ATM
shaping, all upstream traffic will be discarded due to
upstream traffic policing.
PVID
Type the VLAN ID to assign to frames received on this channel. This
VLAN ID must be in an IP bridge domain.
Priority
Use the drop-down list box to select the priority value (0 to 7) to add
to incoming frames without a (IEEE 802.1p) priority tag.
Type
Use the drop-down list box to specify whether the PVC is running on
Ethernet (IPoE) or on ATM (IPoA).
Add
Click this to add or save channel settings on the selected port.
Apply
Clicking Add saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
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Table 86 IPB PVC (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Index
This field displays the number of the PVC. Click a PVC’s index number
to use the top of the screen to edit the PVC.
Note: At the time of writing, you cannot edit the VPI and VCI. If
you want to change them, add a new PVC with the desired
settings. Then you can delete any unwanted PVCs.
Port
This field displays the number of the ADSL port on which the PVC is
configured.
VPI/VCI
This field displays the Virtual Path Identifier (VPI) and Virtual Circuit
Identifier (VCI). The VPI and VCI identify a channel on this port.
DS/US VC Profile
This shows which VC profile this channel uses for downstream traffic
shaping. The VC profile for upstream policing also displays if the
channel is configured to use one.
PVID
This is the VLAN ID assigned to frames received on this channel.
Priority
This is the priority value (0 to 7) added to incoming frames without a
(IEEE 802.1p) priority tag.
Type
This specifies whether the PVC is running on Ethernet (ipoe) or on
ATM (ipoa).
Select
Select the check box in the Select column for an entry, and click
Delete to remove the entry.
Delete
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
Select All
Click this to select all entries in the table.
Select None
Click this to un-select all entries in the table.
38.3 IPB Domain Screen
Use this screen to set up and maintain domains in an IP bridge. A domain
represents an ISP. Each domain is defined by (and dominates) the VLAN that are
in it and has its own routing table and ARP table.
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To open this screen, click Advanced Application > IP Bridge > Domain.
Figure 131 IPB Domain
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 87 IPB Domain
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Domain Name
Enter the name of the domain you want to create. You can use 1-31
printable ASCII characters, except for right angle brackets (>).
Spaces are allowed.
Add
Click Add to create the domain. It is then displayed in the summary
table at the bottom of the screen.
Clicking Add saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Index
This field displays the number of the domain. Click a domain’s index
number to edit the VLAN that are in it. (See Section 38.3.1 on page
282.)
Domain Name
This field displays the name of each domain.
Select
Select the check box in the Select column for an entry, and click
Delete to remove the entry.
Delete
Cancel
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38.3.1 Configure IPB Domain Screen
Use this screen to edit the VLAN that are in a domain.
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > IP Bridge > Domain, and
click on the index (Index) number of the domain.
Figure 132 IPB Domain (Edit)
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 88 IPB Domain (Edit)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Return
Click this to return to the previous screen without saving changes.
Domain Name
This field displays the name of the domain.
VLAN ID
Enter the ID of the VLAN you want to add to the domain. Use the
regular VLAN screens to configure this VLAN (see Chapter 19 on page
163).
Add
Click Add to add the VLAN to the domain. It is then displayed in the
summary table at the bottom of the screen.
Clicking Add saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
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Table 88 IPB Domain (Edit) (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
DHCP VLAN
This setting has no effect on DHCP packets that come from VLANs
where the IES-1248-51V’s DHCP relay settings are active. (See
Chapter 28 on page 217. The DHCP relay settings take precedence
over the IP bridge DHCP VLAN setting.)
Select the VLAN where the domain’s DHCP server is located. If you
select a specific VLAN, the IES-1248-51V forwards subscribers’ DHCP
packets to the selected VLAN and changes the source MAC address to
the IES-1248-51V’s MAC address. Select Disabled if there is no DHCP
server for the domain, in which case the IES-1248-51V does not
change the source MAC address in DHCP packets.
Regardless of this setting, the IES-1248-51V still adds whatever
Option 82 information is specified for the VLAN in the DHCP relay
settings. (See Chapter 28 on page 217.)
Apply
Click Apply to save the domain settings.
Clicking Apply saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
Index
This field displays the index number of the VLAN in the domain.
VLAN ID
This field displays the ID of each VLAN in the domain.
Leave
Select the check box in the Leave column for an entry, and click
Delete to remove the entry.
Delete
Note: You have to delete every IP bridge setting (including DHCP
VLAN) that uses the selected VLAN before you can remove
it from the domain.
Select All
Click this to select all entries in the table.
Select None
Click this to deselect all entries in the table.
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38.4 IPB Edge Router Screen
Use this screen to set up and maintain edge routers in an IP bridge. Edge routers
are usually the gateways that are provided to the subscribers. They can also be
the gateways that are specified in static routing table entries. If two edge routers
are in different domains, it is possible for them to have the same IP address.
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > IP Bridge > Edge Router.
Figure 133 IPB Edge Router
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 89 IPB Edge Router
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Edge Router IP
Enter the IP address of the edge router.
NetMask
Enter the number of bits in the subnet mask of the edge router.
VID
Enter the ID of the VLAN of which the edge router is a member. The
IES-1248-51V uses this VLAN ID when it forwards frames to the edge
router. It also uses the VLAN ID to identify the domain the edge router
is in. You have to add the VLAN ID to an IP bridge domain before you
can enter it here.
Add
Click Add to create the edge router. It is then displayed in the
summary table at the bottom of the screen.
Clicking Add saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
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Table 89 IPB Edge Router (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Index
This field displays the number of the edge router.
Edge Router IP
This field displays the IP address of the edge router.
NetMask
This field displays the number of bits in the subnet mask of the edge
router.
VID
This field displays the VLAN ID of the edge router.
Select
Select the check box in the Select column for an entry, and click
Delete to remove the entry.
Delete
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
Select All
Click this to select all entries in the table.
Select None
Click this to un-select all entries in the table.
38.5 IPB Downlink Interface Screen
Use this screen to set up and maintain forwarding information for downstream
traffic. The IES-1248-51V learns some of this information by snooping DHCP
packets. For static IP addresses, you should provide this information manually.
Downlink interfaces in the same domain cannot have overlapping IP addresses.
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To open this screen, click Advanced Application > IP Bridge > Downlink
Interface.
Figure 134 IPB Downlink Interface
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 90 IPB Downlink Interface
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Use the top section to create downlink interfaces manually.
Interface IP
NetMask
VID
286
Enter the IP address and the number of bits in the subnet mask that
define the range of IP addresses to which this downlink interface
applies. If the destination IP address of a packet is in this range, the
IES-1248-51V tries to forward the frame to a subscriber in the
specified VLAN or PVC. Downlink interfaces in the same domain
cannot have overlapping IP addresses.
Enter the VLAN ID the subscriber is in. The IES-1248-51V uses this
VLAN ID when it forwards frames to the subscriber. It also uses the
VLAN ID to identify the domain the downlink interface is in. You have
to add the VLAN ID to an IP bridge domain before you can enter it
here.
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Table 90 IPB Downlink Interface (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
Select the check box next to this field if you want the IES-1248-51V to
forward frames to a specific channel in the specified VLAN. Use this
drop-down list box to select the port for the channel.
Note: Make sure you specify a valid IP bridge PVC. Do not
specify PVCs that are not defined in the IPB PVC screen in
Section 38.2 on page 278.
VPI
This field is enabled if the check box next to Port is selected. Type the
Virtual Path Identifier for a channel on this port.
VCI
This field is enabled if the check box next to Port is selected. Type the
Virtual Circuit Identifier for a channel on this port.
Add
Click Add to create the downlink interface. It is then displayed in the
summary table at the bottom of the screen.
Clicking Add saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Show Current
Interfaces
Click this to look at all the forwarding information for downstream
traffic, whether learned by snooping DHCP packets or provided
manually. (See Section 38.5.1 on page 288.)
The bottom section displays downlink interfaces created manually. It
does not show forwarding information learned by snooping DHCP
packets.
Index
This field displays the index number of the downlink interface.
Interface IP
NetMask
This field displays the IP address and the number of bits in the subnet
mask that define the range of IP addresses to which this downlink
interface applies. If the destination IP address of a packet is in this
range, the IES-1248-51V tries to forward the frame to a subscriber in
the specified VLAN and PVC, if any.
VID
This field displays the VLAN ID the subscriber is in.
Port
This field displays the number of the ADSL port to which the IES1248-51V forwards frames. It displays “-” if the IES-1248-51V looks
for the subscriber in the whole VLAN and not a specific PVC.
VPI/VCI
This field displays the Virtual Path Identifier (VPI) and Virtual Circuit
Identifier (VCI), if any. The VPI and VCI identify a channel on this
port.
Select
Select the check box in the Select column for an entry, and click
Delete to remove the entry.
Delete
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
Select All
Click this to select all entries in the table.
Select None
Click this to un-select all entries in the table.
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38.5.1 Current Interfaces Screen
Use this screen to look at all the forwarding information for downstream traffic,
whether learned by snooping DHCP packets or provided manually.
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > IP Bridge > Downlink
Interface > Show Current Interfaces.
Figure 135 Current Interfaces
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 91 Current Interfaces
288
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Refresh
Click this to update the information in this screen.
Close
Click this to close this window.
Index
This field displays the index number of the downlink interface.
Interface IP
NetMask
This field displays the IP address and the number of bits in the subnet
mask that define the range of IP addresses to which this downlink
interface applies. If the destination IP address of a packet is in this
range, the IES-1248-51V tries to forward the frame to a subscriber in
the specified VLAN and PVC, if any.
VID
This field displays the VLAN ID the subscriber is in.
Port
This field displays the number of the ADSL port to which the IES1248-51V forwards frames. It displays “-” if the IES-1248-51V looks
for the subscriber in the whole VLAN and not a specific PVC.
VPI/VCI
This field displays the Virtual Path Identifier (VPI) and Virtual Circuit
Identifier (VCI), if any. The VPI and VCI identify a channel on this
port.
Type
This field specifies whether the downlink interface is running on
Ethernet (ipoe) or on ATM (ipoa).
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Chapter 38 IP Bridge
38.6 IPB Routing Table Screen
Use this screen to set up and maintain the routing table for each domain. Each
routing table contains entries that, based on the destination IP address, control
where the IES-1248-51V forwards packets. The IES-1248-51V automatically
creates routing table entries for each downlink interface and for each edge router
in the domain that the associated VLAN is in. You can create additional entries by
specifying the edge router to which the IES-1248-51V should forward traffic for a
particular destination IP address or IP subnet.
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > IP Bridge > Routing Table.
Figure 136 IPB Routing Table
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 92 IPB Routing Table
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Use the top section to create routing table entries manually.
Domain Name
Select the domain whose routing table you want to add this entry.
IP
Enter the IP address and the number of bits in the subnet mask that
define the range of IP addresses to which this entry applies. If the
destination IP address of a packet is in this range, the IES-1248-51V
forwards the frame to the specified edge router.
NetMask
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Chapter 38 IP Bridge
Table 92 IPB Routing Table (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Edge Router IP
Enter the IP address to which the IES-1248-51V forwards frames if
the destination IP address of a packet is in the specified range.
If this IP address corresponds to an edge router in the edge router
screen (see Section 38.4 on page 284), the IES-1248-51V uses the
associated VLAN ID. In addition,
•
•
If the edge router is in the same domain as the entry, the entry is used for upstream
traffic.
If the edge router is in a different domain than the entry, the entry is used for
downstream traffic.
If the specified edge router is not set up in the edge router screen, the
IES-1248-51V uses the entry for downstream traffic and does not
change the VLAN ID.
Priority
Use the drop-down list box to select the priority value (0 to 7) to add
to incoming frames without a (IEEE 802.1p) priority tag.
Metric
The metric represents the “cost” of transmission for routing purposes.
IP routing uses hop count as the measurement of cost, with a
minimum of 1 for directly-connected networks. Select the number that
approximates the cost for this link The number need not be precise,
but it must be between 1 and 15. In practice, 2 or 3 is usually a good
number.
If two entries have the same metric, the IES-1248-51V uses the one
with the lower IP address.
Add
Click Add to create the routing table entry. It is then displayed in the
summary table at the bottom of the screen.
Clicking Add saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
Show Domain
Select a domain for which you wish to view information.
Show Current
Routes
Click this to look at the routing table(s) for the selected domain(s).
This table includes all the entries, whether added automatically by the
IES-1248-51V or provided manually. (See Section 38.6.1 on page
291.)
The bottom section displays routing table entries created manually. It
does not show entries added automatically by the IES-1248-51V.
Index
This field displays the number of the entry.
IP
This field displays the IP address and the number of bits in the subnet
mask that define the range of IP addresses to which this entry applies.
If the destination IP address of a packet is in this range, the IES1248-51V forwards the frame to the specified edge router.
NetMask
290
Edge Router IP
This field displays the IP address to which the IES-1248-51V forwards
frames if the destination IP address of a packet is in the specified
range.
Metric
This field displays the “cost” of transmission for routing purposes.
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Chapter 38 IP Bridge
Table 92 IPB Routing Table (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Priority
This field displays the priority value (0 to 7) to add to incoming frames
without a (IEEE 802.1p) priority tag.
Select
Select the check box in the Select column for an entry, and click
Delete to remove the entry.
Delete
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
Select All
Click this to select all entries in the table.
Select None
Click this to un-select all entries in the table.
38.6.1 Current Routes Screen
Use this screen to look at the routing table for a domain. This table includes all the
entries, whether added automatically by the IES-1248-51V or provided manually.
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > IP Bridge > Routing Table
> Show Current Routes.
Figure 137 Current Routes
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 93 Current Routes
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Show Domain
Select a domain for which you wish to view information.
Refresh
Click this to update the information in the screen.
Close
Click this to close this window.
Index
This field displays the number of the entry.
Domain Name
This field displays the name of the domain to which this entry applies.
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Chapter 38 IP Bridge
Table 93 Current Routes (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
IP
This field displays the IP address and the number of bits in the subnet
mask that define the range of IP addresses to which this entry applies.
If the destination IP address of a packet is in this range, the IES1248-51V forwards the frame to the specified edge router.
NetMask
292
Edge Router IP
This field displays the IP address to which the IES-1248-51V forwards
frames if the destination IP address of a packet is in the specified
range. It displays “-” if the field does not apply to the entry (for
example, in entries created automatically by the IES-1248-51V).
Metric
This field displays the “cost” of transmission for routing purposes. It
displays “-” if the field does not apply to the entry (for example, in
entries created automatically by the IES-1248-51V).
Priority
This field displays the priority value (0 to 7) to add to incoming frames
without a (IEEE 802.1p) priority tag. It displays “-” if the field does
not apply to the entry (for example, in entries created automatically
by the IES-1248-51V).
Type
This field indicates whether this entry is used for upstream traffic (U,
or uplink interface) or downstream traffic (D, or downlink interface).
By default, all entries are for downstream traffic, unless the edge
router is configured in the edge router screen (see Section 38.4 on
page 284).
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Chapter 38 IP Bridge
38.7 IPB ARP Proxy Screen
Use this screen to look at and flush the Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) table for
each domain. You can also configure how long the IES-1248-51V keeps entries in
the ARP table.
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > IP Bridge > IPB ARP
Proxy.
Figure 138 IPB ARP Proxy
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 94 IPB ARP Proxy
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Aging Time
Enter a number of seconds (10~10000) to set how long the IES-124851V keeps ARP table entries for IP bridge domains. Enter 0 to disable
the aging time.
Apply Setting
Click Apply Setting to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s
volatile memory.
The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or loses
power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to save
your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Show
Select the domain at whose ARP table you want to look. You can also
look at the ARP table entries for a specific type of interface or a
specific interface in the domain. Click Show to display the requested
entries below.
Index
This field displays the number of the IP address entry.
IP
This field displays the IP address assigned to the specific device.
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Chapter 38 IP Bridge
Table 94 IPB ARP Proxy (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
MAC
This field displays the MAC (Media Access Control) address of the
device.
Port
This field displays the port number to which the device is connected.
VPI/VCI
This field displays the Virtual Path Identifier (VPI) and Virtual Circuit
Identifier (VCI) the device is using. The VPI and VCI identify a channel
on this port.
Interface
This field displays the name of the interface the device is using.
VID
This field displays the ID of the VLAN to which the device belongs.
Type
This field indicates whether this entry is used for upstream traffic (U,
or uplink interface) or downstream traffic (D, or downlink interface).
By default, all entries are for downstream traffic, unless the Edge
Router IP is configured in the edge router screen (see Section 38.4
on page 284).
Select
Select the check box in the Select column for an entry, and click
Flush to remove the entry from the ARP table.
Flush
294
Select Uplink
Click Uplink to mark all of the check boxes for entries using uplink
interfaces.
Select Downlink
Click Downlink to mark all of the check boxes for entries using
downlink interfaces.
Select None
Click None to deselect all check boxes.
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
CHAPTER
39
PPPoE Intermediate Agent
This chapter describes how the IES-1248-51V gives a PPPoE termination server
additional information that the server can use to identify and authenticate a PPPoE
client.
39.1 PPPoE Intermediate Agent Tag Formate
If the PPPoE Intermediate Agent is enabled, the IES-1248-51V adds a vendorspecific tag to PADI (PPPoE Active Discovery Initialization) and PADR (PPPoE Active
Discovery Request) packets from PPPoE clients. This tag is defined in RFC 2516
and has the following format for this feature.
Table 95 PPPoE Intermediate Agent Vendor-specific Tag Format
Tag_Type
Tag_Len
Value
i1
i2
(0x0105)
The Tag_Type is 0x0105 for vendor-specific tags, as defined in RFC 2516. The
Tag_Len indicates the length of Value, i1 and i2. The Value is the 32-bit number
0x00000DE9, which stands for the “ADSL Forum” IANA entry. i1 and i2 are PPPoE
intermediate agent sub-options, which contain additional information about the
PPPoE client. The IES-1248-51V supports two formats for the PPPoE intermediate
agent sub-options: private and TR-101.
39.1.0.1 Private Format
There are two types of sub-option: “Agent Circuit ID Sub-option” and “Agent
Remote ID Sub-option”. They have the following formats.
Table 96 PPPoE Intermediate Agent Vendor-specific Tag Format
SubOpt
Length
(0x01)
Slot ID
Port No
VLAN ID
Extra Information
(1 byte)
(1 byte)
(2 bytes)
(0~23 bytes)
Table 97 PPPoE Intermediate Agent Remote ID Sub-option Format
SubOpt
Length
(0x02)
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MAC
(6 bytes)
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Chapter 39 PPPoE Intermediate Agent
The IES-1248-51V adds the slot ID of the PPPoE client, the port number of the
PPPoE client, the VLAN ID on the PPPoE packet, and any extra information (for
example, the device name) into the Agent Circuit ID Sub-option. In addition, the
IES-1248-51V puts the PPPoE client’s MAC address into the Agent Remote ID Suboption. The slot ID is zero, if this value is not applicable. If the IES-1248-51V adds
extra information, it does not append a trailing 0x00 (00h).
39.1.0.2 TR-101 Format
The PPPoE Intermediate Agent sub-option includes the system name or IP
address, slot ID, port number, VPI, and VCI on which the TCP/IP configuration
request was received.
The following figure shows the format of the TR-101 PPPoE Intermediate Agent
sub-option. The 1 in the first field identifies this as an Agent Circuit ID sub-option.
The next field specifies the length of the field. The hostname field displays the
system name, if it has been configured, the extra information field (A) if the
hostname was not configured, or the IP address in dotted decimal notation
(w.x.y.z), if neither the system name nor the extra information field was been
configured. In either case, the hostname is truncated to 23 characters, and
trailing spaces are discarded. The hostname field is followed by a space, the string
“atm”, and another space. Then, a 1-byte Slot ID field specifies the ingress slot
number, and a 1-byte Port No field specifies the ingress port number. Next, the
VPI and VCI denote the virtual circuit that received the DHCP request message
from the subscriber. If the VID is turned on, there is a colon and then the VLAN ID
(1 ~ 4094). If the VID is turned off, there is neither colon nor VID.
The slot ID, port number, VPI, VCI and MAC are separated from each other by a
forward slash (/) colon (:) or period (.). An example is “SYSNAME atm 3/
10:0.33:12”.
Table 98 PPPoE Intermediate Agent Sub-option Format: TR-101 (VID on)
1
N
hostname / A /
IP
“ atm
“
Slot ID
/
Port No.
: VPI
. VCI :
VLAN ID
Table 99 PPPoE Intermediate Agent Sub-option Format: TR-101 (VID off)
1
N
hostname / A /
IP
“ atm
“
Slot ID
/
Port No.
: VPI
. VCI
Unlike the private format for PPPoE intermediate agent, the TR-101 format for
PPPoE intermediate agent does not include the Remote ID Sub-option.
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Chapter 39 PPPoE Intermediate Agent
39.2 PPPoE Intermediate Agent Screen
Use this screen to configure the IES-1248-51V to give a PPPoE termination server
additional information that the server can use to identify and authenticate a PPPoE
client.
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > PPPoE Intermediate
Agent.
Figure 139 PPPoE Intermediate Agent
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 100 PPPoE Intermediate Agent
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Enable Agent
Select this if you want the IES-1248-51V to add a vendor-specific tag
to PADI (PPPoE Active Discovery Initiation) and PADR (PPPoE Active
Discovery Request) packets from PPPoE clients in the specified VLAN.
This tag contains information that a PPPoE termination server can use
to identify and authenticate a PPPoE client. This information includes
the slot ID, port number, VLAN ID, and MAC address of the PPPoE
client, as well as any additional information specified in the Info field.
Clear this if you do not want the IES-1248-51V to add a vendorspecific tag to PADI and PADR packets from PPPoE clients in the
specified VLAN.
VLAN ID
Enter the source VLAN ID for which the PPPoE intermediate agent
settings apply. Enter 0 if you want to configure the default settings for
all VLAN.
Option Mode
Select either Private or TR-101 PPPoE Intermediate Agent suboption.
Info (Circuit ID)
Enter any extra information the IES-1248-51V adds to PADI and PADR
packets in the specified VLAN. You can enter up to 23 printable ASCII
characters or spaces.
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Chapter 39 PPPoE Intermediate Agent
Table 100 PPPoE Intermediate Agent (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Add
Click Add to save the settings. The settings then display in the
summary table at the bottom of the screen.
Clicking Add saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring the fields afresh.
Index
This field displays the index number of the entry.
VLAN ID
This field displays the source VLAN ID for which the PPPoE
intermediate agent settings apply.
Enable
This field displays whether or not the IES-1248-51V adds a vendorspecific tag to PADI (PPPoE Active Discovery Initiation) and PADR
(PPPoE Active Discovery Request) packets from PPPoE clients in the
specified VLAN.
Info (Circuit ID)
This field displays any extra information the IES-1248-51V adds to
PADI and PADR packets in the specified VLAN, if the PPPoE
intermediate agent is turned on.
Select
Select the check box in the Select column for an entry, and click
Enable to add a vendor-specific tag to PADI and PADR packets for
PPPoE clients in the selected VLAN(s).
Enable
Select
Disable
Select
298
Select the check box in the Select column for an entry, and click
Disable to not add a vendor-specific tag to PADI and PADR packets
for PPPoE clients in the selected VLAN(s).
Delete
Select the check box in the Select column for an entry, and click
Delete to delete the PPPoE intermediate agent settings for
subscribers in the selected VLAN(s). This also disables this feature for
PPPoE clients in the selected VLAN(s).
Select All
Click All to mark all of the check boxes.
Select None
Click None to deselect all of the check boxes.
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
CHAPTER
40
Maximum MTU Size
This chapter describes how to configure the Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) for
the Ethernet interfaces. The Ethernet interfaces discard any packets larger than
this.
40.1 Maximum MTU Size Screen
Use this screen to configure the Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) for the
Ethernet interfaces. The Ethernet interfaces discard any packets larger than this.
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > Maximum MTU Size.
Figure 140 Maximum MTU
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 101 Maximum MTU
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Maximum MTU
Size
Enter the size, in bytes, of the Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) for
the Ethernet interfaces. The Ethernet interfaces discard any packets
larger than this.
Apply Setting
Click Apply Setting to save your MTU settings.
Clicking Apply Setting saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s
volatile memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned
off or loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation
panel to save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are
done configuring.
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Chapter 40 Maximum MTU Size
300
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
CHAPTER
41
PVC Upstream Limit
This chapter describes how to limit the transmission rate for upstream traffic by
PVC.
Note: You can set this limit for regular PVCs, priority PVCs, TLS PVCs, and IP bridge
PVCs.
41.1 PVC Upstream Limit Screen
Use this screen to limit the transmission rate for upstream traffic by PVC.
To open this screen, click Advanced Application > PVC Upstream Limit.
Figure 141 PVC Upstream Limit
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Chapter 41 PVC Upstream Limit
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 102 PVC Upstream Limit
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Enable Rate Limit
Select this to set a limit on the upstream transmission rate for the
specified PVC. Clear this if there is no limit.
Rate
This field has no effect unless Enable Rate Limit is selected.
Enter the maximum upstream transmission rate, in kbps, for the
specified PVC.
Port
Use this drop-down list box to select the port for the PVC for which
you wish to configure the maximum upstream transmission rate.
VPI
Type the Virtual Path Identifier for the PVC for which you wish to
configure the maximum upstream transmission rate.
VCI
Type the Virtual Circuit Identifier for the PVC for which you wish to
configure the maximum upstream transmission rate.
Apply
Click Apply to save the settings. The settings then display in the
summary table at the bottom of the screen.
Clicking Apply saves your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to begin configuring the fields afresh.
Show Port
Select a port for which you wish to view information.
Index
This field displays the index number for each PVC. Click it to edit the
settings for the maximum upstream transmission rate.
Type
This field displays what type of PVC the specified PVC is.
Port
This field displays the port number for the specified PVC.
VPI
This field displays the Virtual Path Identifier for the specified PVC.
VCI
This field displays the Virtual Circuit Identifier for the specified PVC.
Rate
This field displays the maximum upstream transmission rate for the
specified PVC. This has no effect, however, unless Enable Rate Limit
is enabled.
Select
Select the check box in the Select column for an entry, and click
Enable to activate the limit on the upstream transmission rate for the
select PVC(s).
Enable
Select
302
Disable
Select the check box in the Select column for an entry, and click
Disable to deactivate the limit on the upstream transmission rate for
the select PVC(s).
Select All
Click All to mark all of the check boxes.
Select None
Click None to deselect all of the check boxes.
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
CHAPTER
42
OUI Filter
This chapter describes how to configure an OUI (Organizationally Unique
Identifier) filter to block or forward packets from other devices with the specified
OUI in the MAC address.
The OUI field is the first three octets in a MAC address. An OUI uniquely identifies
the manufacturer of a network device and allows you to identify from which device
brands the switch will accept traffic or send traffic to. The OUI value is assigned by
the Internet Assign Numbers Authority (IANA).
42.1 OUI Filter Screen
Click Advanced Application > OUI Filter to display the configuration screen.
Note: You cannot enable both MAC filtering and OUI filtering at the same time.
Figure 142 The OUI Filter Screen
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Chapter 42 OUI Filter
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 103 OUI Filter
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
Select a Port number and enter the OUI for the device that you want to
filter on that port.
OUI
Add
Click this button to add the Port/OUI filter pair to the list below.
Cancel
Click the button to configure the Port/OUI filter pair anew.
Port
This indicates a port number.
Mode
Select a filtering mode for the port.
•
•
304
Accept - Allows devices that match the OUI associated with this port.
Deny - Denies devices that match the OUI associated with this port.
Active
Select this option to turn a filtering rule on, or deselect it to turn it off.
OUI
This indicates the OUI associated with this port.
Delete
Click this hyperlink to remove the filtering parameters from this port.
Apply
Click this button to save your changes.
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
P ART IV
Routing Protocol,
Alarm, VoIP and
Management
Static Routing (307)
Alarm (309)
VoIP (317)
Maintenance (343)
Diagnostic (347)
MAC Table (355)
ARP Table (359)
305
306
CHAPTER
43
Static Routing
This chapter shows you how to configure the static routing function.
Static routes tell the IES-1248-51V how to forward the IES-1248-51V’s own IP
traffic when you configure the TCP/IP parameters manually. This is generally
useful for allowing management of the device from a device with an IP address on
a different subnet from that of the device’s IP address (remote management).
To open this screen, click Routing Protocol > Static Routing.
Figure 143 Static Routing
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 104 Static Routing
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Use this section to create a new static route.
Name
Type a name to identify this static route. Use up to 31 ASCII
characters. Spaces and tabs are not allowed.
Destination IP
Address
This parameter specifies the IP network address of the final
destination. Routing is always based on network number. If you need
to specify a route to a single host, use a subnet mask of
255.255.255.255 in the subnet mask field to force the network
number to be identical to the host ID.
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Chapter 43 Static Routing
Table 104 Static Routing (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
IP Subnet Mask
Enter the subnet mask for this destination.
Gateway IP
Address
Enter the IP address of the gateway. The gateway is an immediate
neighbor of your device that will forward the packet to the
destination. The gateway must be a router on the same segment as
your device.
Metric
The metric represents the “cost” of transmission for routing purposes.
IP routing uses hop count as the measurement of cost, with a
minimum of 1 for directly connected networks. Enter a number that
approximates the cost for this link. The number need not be precise,
but it must be between 1 and 15. In practice, 2 or 3 is usually a good
number.
Add
Click Add to save the new rule to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. It then displays in the summary table at the bottom of the
screen. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to reset the fields to your previous configuration.
Use this section to look at a summary of all static routes in the IES1248-51V.
308
Previous Page
Click this to display the preceding page of static route entries.
Next Page
Click this to display the following page of static route entries.
Index
This field displays the index number of the route.
Name
This field displays the name of this static route.
Destination
Address
This field displays the IP network address of the final destination.
Subnet Mask
This field displays the subnet mask for this destination.
Gateway Address
This field displays the IP address of the gateway. The gateway is an
immediate neighbor of your device that will forward the packet to the
destination.
Metric
This field displays the cost of transmission for routing purposes.
Delete
Select the rule(s) that you want to remove in the Delete column, and
then click the Delete button.
Cancel
Click Cancel to clear the selected check boxes in the Delete column.
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
CHAPTER
44
Alarm
This chapter shows you how to display the alarms, sets the severity level of an
alarm(s) and where the system is to send the alarm(s) and set port alarm severity
level threshold settings.
44.1 Alarm
The IES-1248-51V monitors for equipment, DSL and system alarms and can
report them via SNMP or syslog. You can specify the severity level of an alarm(s)
and where the system is to send the alarm(s). You can also set the alarm severity
threshold for recording alarms on an individual port(s). The system reports an
alarm on a port if the alarm has a severity equal to or higher than the port’s
threshold.
44.2 Alarm Status Screen
This screen displays the alarms that are currently in the system.
To open this screen, click Alarm > Alarm Status.
Figure 144 Alarm Status
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Chapter 44 Alarm
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 105 Alarm Status
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Alarm Type
Select which type of alarms to display by Severity, or select All to
look at all the alarms.
Refresh
Click this button to update this screen.
Clear
Click this button to erase the clearable alarm entries.
No
This field displays the index number of the alarm entry in the system.
Alarm
This field displays the alarm category to which the alarm belongs.
Condition
This field displays a text description for the condition under which the
alarm applies.
Severity
This field displays the alarm severity level (critical, major, minor or
info).
Timestamp
This field displays the month, day, hour, minute and second that the
system created the log.
Source
This field displays where the alarm originated. This is either a DSL
port number, one of the Ethernet ports (enet 1 or 2), or “eqpt” for the
system itself.
Page X of X
This identifies which page of information is displayed and the total
number of pages of information.
Previous Page
Click this to display the preceding page of entries.
Next Page
Click this to display the following page of entries.
44.3 Alarm Descriptions
This table describes alarms that the system can send.
ATUC refers to the downstream channel (for traffic going from the IES-1248-51V
to the subscriber). ATUR refers to the upstream channel (for traffic coming from
the subscriber to the IES-1248-51V). A “V” in the CLEARABLE column indicates
that an administrator can remove the alarm.
Table 106 Alarm Descriptions
ALAR
M
CONDITION
SEVERIT
Y
dsl
(5000)line_up
info
dsl
(5001)line_down
minor
V
The DSL link is down.
dsl
(5002)ad_perf_lol_thresh
info
V
The number of times a Loss Of Link
has occurred within 15 minutes (for
the ATUC) has reached the
threshold.
310
CLEAR DESCRIPTION
ABLE
The DSL link is up.
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Table 106 Alarm Descriptions (continued)
ALAR
M
CONDITION
SEVERIT
Y
CLEAR
DESCRIPTION
ABLE
dsl
(5003)ad_perf_lof_thresh
info
V
The number of times a Loss Of
Frame has occurred within 15
minutes for the ATU (C or R) has
reached the threshold.
dsl
(5004)ad_perf_los_thresh
info
V
The number of times a Loss Of
Signal has occurred within 15
minutes for the ATU (C or R) has
reached the threshold.
dsl
(5005)ad_perf_lop_thresh
info
V
The number of times a Loss Of
Power has occurred within 15
minutes for the ATU (C or R) has
reached the threshold.
dsl
(5006)ad_perf_es_thresh
info
V
The number of error seconds within
15 minutes for the ATU (C or R) has
reached the threshold.
dsl
(5007)ad_perf_ses_thresh
info
V
The number of severely errored
seconds within 15 minutes for the
ATU (C or R) has reached the
threshold.
dsl
(5008)ad_perf_uas_thresh
info
V
The number of unavailable error
seconds within 15 minutes for the
ATU (C or R) has reached the
threshold.
dsl
(5009)ad_atuc_loftrap
minor
A Loss Of Frame was detected on
the ATUC.
dsl
(5010)ad_atuc_lostrap
minor
A Loss Of Signal was detected on
the ATUC.
dsl
(5011)ad_atur_loftrap
minor
A Loss Of Frame was detected on
the ATUR.
dsl
(5012)ad_atur_lostrap
minor
A Loss Of Signal was detected on
the ATUR.
dsl
(5013)ad_atur_lprtrap
minor
A Loss of Power was detected on the
ATUR.
eqpt
(10000)vol_err
critical
The input voltage (Vn) is lower than
the low-threshold or higher than the
high-threshold.
eqpt
(10001)temp_err
critical
The temperature (Tn) is higher than
the high-threshold or lower than the
low-threshold.
eqpt
(10002)fan_err
critical
The fan RPM ‘n’ is over the highthreshold or lower than the lowthreshold.
eqpt
(10003)hw_rtc_fail
critical
The Real Time Chip diagnosis test
failed.
eqpt
(10004)hw_mon_fail
critical
The hardware monitor diagnosis
test failed.
eqpt
(10005)cold_start
info
System cold-start.
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Table 106 Alarm Descriptions (continued)
ALAR
M
CONDITION
SEVERIT
Y
CLEAR
DESCRIPTION
ABLE
eqpt
(10006)warm_start
info
System warm-start.
eqpt
(10007)alm_input
critical
There is an external alarm input.
eqpt
(10008)voip_battery_fail
critical
There is a VoIP battery fault.
eqpt
(10009)voip_clocl_fail
critical
There is a VoIP clock fault.
eqpt
(10010)voip_ringer_fault
critical
The IES-1248-51V cannot ring due
to a hardware fault on the ringer
chip.??
sys
(15000)reboot
info
The system restarted.
sys
(15001)aco
info
An administrator cutoff (canceled)
an alarm.
sys
(15002)alm_clear
info
An administrator cleared the
alarms.
sys
(15003)login_fail
minor
sys
(15004)anti_spoofing
minor
The IES-1248-51V has detected the
same MAC address on more than
one subscriber port.
enet
(20000)up
info
A Gigabit Ethernet interface is up.
enet
(20001)down
major
voip
(25000)voip_temp_error
critical
The temperature of VoIP module
has reached 165 °C. The IES-124851V releases this alarm when the
temperature goes down to 150 °C.
voip
(25001)voip_dc_power_fail
critical
A DC power fault.
voip
(25002)voip_ac_power_fail
critical
An AC power fault.
voip
(25003)voip_ring_timer_fail
info
A firmware fault occurs when the
IES-1248-51V fails to start in SIP
mode.
voip
(25004)voip_ring_rsrce_fail
info
The number of current incoming
VoIP calls has exceeded the total
RENs (ringer equivalency numbers)
the IES-1248-51V can support.
V
V
Someone used the wrong name or
password and failed to log in.
A Gigabit Ethernet interface is
down.
The IES-1248-51V only supports 1
REN for each subscriber port at the
time.
voip
312
(25505)voip_ring_chd_fail
info
This alarm is no longer used.
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Chapter 44 Alarm
44.4 Alarm Event Setup Screen
This screen lists the alarms that the system can generate along with the severity
levels of the alarms and where the system is to send them.
To open this screen, click Alarm > Alarm Event Setup.
Figure 145 Alarm Event Setup
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Chapter 44 Alarm
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 107 Alarm Event Setup
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Index
This field displays the index number of the alarm in the list. Click this
to specify the severity level of an alarm(s) and where the system is to
send the alarm(s). See Section 44.4.1 on page 314.
Alarm
This field displays the alarm category to which the alarm belongs.
eqpt represents equipment alarms.
dsl represents Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) alarms.
enet represents Ethernet alarms.
sys represents system alarms.
voip represents Voice over IP alarms.
Condition Code
This field displays the condition code number for the specific alarm
message.
Condition
This field displays a text description for the condition under which the
alarm applies.
Facility
This field displays the log facility (Local 1~ Local 7) on the syslog
server where the system is to log this alarm. This is for alarms that
send alarms to a syslog server.
SNMP
This field displays “V” if the system is to send this alarm to an SNMP
server. It displays “-“ if the system does not send this alarm to an
SNMP server.
Syslog
This field displays “V” if the system is to send this alarm to a syslog
server. It displays “-“ if the system does not send this alarm to a
syslog server.
Severity
This field displays the alarm severity level (critical, major, minor or
info).
Clearable
This displays “V” if the alarm clear command removes the alarm from
the system. It displays “-“if the alarm clear command does not
remove the alarm from the system.
44.4.1 Edit Alarm Event Setup Screen
Use this screen to specify the severity level of an alarm(s) and where the system
is to send the alarm(s).
To open this screen, click Alarm > Alarm Status. Then, click an alarm’s index
number.
Figure 146 Alarm Event Setup Edit
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The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 108 Alarm Event Setup Edit
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Alarm
This field displays the alarm category to which the alarm belongs.
eqpt represents equipment alarms.
dsl represents Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) alarms.
enet represents Ethernet alarms.
sys represents system alarms.
Condition Code
This field displays the condition code number for the specific alarm
message.
Condition
This field displays a text description for the condition under which the
alarm applies.
Facility
The log facility (Local 1 ~ Local 7) has the device log the syslog
messages to a particular file in the syslog server. Select a log facility
(Local 1 ~ Local 7) from the drop-down list box if this entry is for
sending alarms to a syslog server. See your syslog program’s
documentation for details.
SNMP
Select this check box to have the system send this alarm to an SNMP
server.
Syslog
Select this check box to have the system send this alarm to a syslog
server.
Severity
Select an alarm severity level (critical, major, minor or info) for this
alarm. Critical alarms are the most severe, major alarms are the
second most severe, minor alarms are the third most severe and info
alarms are the least severe.
Clearable
Select this check box to allow administrators to use the management
interface to remove an alarm report generated by this alarm event
entry.
Select this check box to keep an alarm report generated by this alarm
event in the system until the conditions that caused the alarm report
are no longer present.
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Close
Click Close to exit the screen without saving your changes.
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Chapter 44 Alarm
44.5 Alarm Port Setup Screen
Use this screen to set the alarm severity threshold for recording alarms on an
individual port(s). The system reports an alarm on a port if the alarm has a
severity equal to or higher than the port’s threshold.
To open this screen, click Alarm > Alarm Port Setup.
Figure 147 Alarm Port Setup
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 109 Alarm Port Setup
316
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
This column lists the device’s individual DSL and Ethernet interfaces.
Severity
Select an alarm severity level (critical, major, minor or info) as the
threshold for recording alarms on this port. Critical alarms are the
most severe, major alarms are the second most severe, minor alarms
are the third most severe and info alarms are the least severe.
Apply
Click Apply to save your changes to the IES-1248-51V’s volatile
memory. The IES-1248-51V loses these changes if it is turned off or
loses power, so use the Config Save link on the navigation panel to
save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
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CHAPTER
45
VoIP
This chapter shows you how to configure the Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP)
features on your IES-1248-51V.
45.1 VoIP Overview
VoIP (Voice over IP) is the sending of voice signals over the Internet Protocol. This
allows you to make phone calls and send faxes over the Internet at a fraction of
the cost of using the traditional circuit-switched telephone network. You can also
use servers to run telephone service applications like PBX services and voice mail.
Internet Telephony Service Provider (ITSP) companies provide VoIP service.
Circuit-switched telephone networks require 64 kilobits per second (kbps) in each
direction to handle a telephone call. VoIP can use advanced voice coding
techniques with compression to reduce the required bandwidth.
The IES-1248-51V connects POTS (Plain Old Telephone System) end-user
telephone subscribers to the IP network by converting the analog voice signal into
data packets and transmitting them over the network.
45.1.1 Introduction to H.248
The H.248 protocol, also known as MEGACO (MEdia GAteway COntrol) or the
Gateway Control Protocol, defines a VoIP network in which basic functions (such
as voice coding and decoding) are performed by one device, and higher functions
(such as setting up and managing calls) are performed by another.
The H.248 protocol was developed jointly by the IETF (Internet Engineering Task
Force) and the ITU (International Telecommunication Union). It is defined by the
IETF in RFC 3525, and by the ITU in ITU-T H.248-1.
An H.248 VoIP network has a single intelligent control unit, which manages a
network of dumb endpoint devices.
An H.248 VoIP network consists of one or more media gateways and a media
gateway controller.
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Chapter 45 VoIP
• Media gateways (MGs) encode and decode voice data, transmitting it from one
network to another (for example, from the PSTN to an IP network, and vice
versa). The H.248-enabled VoIP line cards are MGs.
• Media gateway controllers (MGCs) are intelligent devices that manage the
media gateways. They set up, manage and tear down calls by providing
instructions to the MGs.
In the following example, the MG allows the users of analog telephone C and IP
telephone D to communicate by reporting events to the MGC 1 (for example, if
the user of phone C dials a sequence of numbers). The MGC 1 interprets the
information according to its programming and issues the relevant commands to
the MG (for example, telling the MG how to connect phones C and D in a call, or
telling the MG to play a busy tone to phone C). See Section 45.1.4 on page 319
for a detailed example of H.248 call progression. For increased reliability, the MG
can use a second MGC 2 if it cannot reach the MGC 1.
Figure 148 H.248 Network Example
MGC 1
MGC 2
MG
ANALOG
C
IP NETWORK
D
45.1.2 Termination
A Termination is a logical entity representing a connection to a media stream. A
Termination sources and/or sinks connections to the media stream. Every
connection to the MG is uniquely represented by a Termination.
A Termination may represent either a physical connections (such as an analog
phone connection) or an ephemeral connection (such as an RTP stream).
Generally, ephemeral Terminations exist for only as long as they are in use. In
contrast, physical Terminations exist for as long as they are provisioned in the
gateway.
Each Termination is assigned a unique identity at the moment of its creation by
the MG.
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45.1.3 H.248 Commands
In an H.248 network, the MGC controls calls by issuing commands to the Media
Gateways. In turn, the media gateways can issue reports to the MGC. The
commands allow control of Terminations and Contexts. For example, the MGC can
specify what events a Termination should log and report, which Terminations
should exist in which Contexts, and which signals the MG should apply to a
Termination.
Commands and reports are grouped into Transactions. Each Transaction consists
of a number of actions, which must all refer to the same Context. To verify that
Transactions have been correctly sent and received, each Transaction must be
preceded by a TransactionRequest message and concluded with a
TransactionReply message. In addition, a TransactionPending message indicates
that a Transaction has been initiated, and is being processed, but is not complete.
The following table lists the H.248 commands.
Table 110 H.248/MEGACO Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
Add
Adds a Termination to a Context. If a Termination does not
already exist, it is created by this command.
Modify
Alters a Termination’s events, properties and signals.
Subtract
Removes a Termination from a Context and sends statistics to the
MGC on the Termination’s activities in the Context. Ephemeral
Terminations are destroyed by this command.
Move
Moves a Termination from one Context to another.
AuditValue
Sends information on a Termination’s current events, properties
and signals.
AuditCapabilities
Sends information on all possible properties, events and signals
permitted by the MG.
Notify
Sent by the MG to the MGC to inform the MGC of events.
ServiceChange
Sent by the MG to the MGC, or vice versa, indicating that one or
more Terminations is about to be removed from service, or has
been returned to service.
45.1.4 H.248/MEGACO Call Progression Example
The following figure shows two analog telephones (A and B) connected to two
media gateways (MG1 and MG2). MG1 and MG2 are connected to one another
via an IP network. MG1 and MG2 are controlled by the media gateway controller
MGC.
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Chapter 45 VoIP
Figure 149 H.248/MEGACO Call Procedure Example
MGC
MG1
MG2
IP Network
ANALOG
ANALOG
PHONE A
PHONE B
The user of phone A wants to call the user of phone B. The following table shows
the series of actions necessary to set up the network and make the call
(TransactionRequests and TransactionReplies are not shown).
Note: This table illustrates the actions taken in setting up, conducting, and tearing
down a call. However, some of the actions may take place simultaneously (for
instance, when the MGC instructs MG1 and MG2 to switch to Listening mode).
Also, the commands necessary to perform some series of actions may be sent
in the same Transaction.
Table 111 H.248/MEGACO Call Procedure Example
320
DIRECTION
ACTION
COMMAND
MG1 --> MGC
MG1 registers with MGC and reports its
capabilities to the MGC.
ServiceChange
MG2 --> MGC
MG2 registers with MGC and reports its
capabilities to the MGC.
ServiceChange
MGC --> MG1
MGC sets MG1 to listening mode.
Modify
MGC --> MG2
MGC sets MG2 to listening mode.
Modify
Phone A --> MG1
User of phone A lifts the receiver off-hook. MG1
detects off-hook.
N/A
MG1 --> MGC
MG1 reports phone A off-hook to MGC.
Notify
MGC --> MG1
MGC instructs MG1 to play the relevant dial tone
to Phone A.
Modify
Phone A --> MG1
User of phone A dials phone B’s number.
N/A
MG1 --> MGC
MG1 informs MGC of the dialed number. MGC
examines dialed number, which correlates with
phone connected to MG2.
Notify
MGC --> MG1
MGC creates RTP Termination in MG1 (in the
same Context as Phone A’s existing analog
Termination).
Add
MGC --> MG2
MGC creates RTP Termination in MG2 (in the
Add
same Context as Phone B’s analog Termination).
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Chapter 45 VoIP
Table 111 H.248/MEGACO Call Procedure Example
DIRECTION
ACTION
COMMAND
MGC --> MG1
MGC modifies RTP Termination, providing
Modify
information on how to send RTP stream to MG2.
MGC --> MG1
MGC modifies Analog Termination on MG1 to
send ringing tone to phone A.
Modify
MG1 --> Phone A
MG1 send ringing tone to phone A.
N/A
MG2 --> Phone B
MG2 rings phone B.
N/A
Phone B --> MG2
User of phone B picks up. MG2 detects off-hook. N/A
MG2 --> MGC
MG2 reports to MGC that phone B is off-hook.
Notify
MGC --> MG1
MGC modifies analog Termination on MG1 to
stop playing ringing tone to phone A.
Modify
MGC --> MG2
MGC modifies analog Termination on MG2 to
stop ringing phone B.
Modify
MGC --> MG1
MGC modifies RTP Termination on MG1 to
transfer media with RTP Termination on MG2.
Modify
MGC --> MG2
MGC modifies RTP Termination on MG2 to
transfer media with RTP Termination on MG1.
Modify
Phone A --> MG1
User of phone A finishes call and replaces
receiver on hook.
N/A
MG1 --> MGC
MG1 reports on-hook to MGC.
Notify
MGC --> MG1
MGC removes MG1’s RTP Termination from its
Context. The RTP Termination is ephemeral and
is destroyed.
Subtract
MGC --> MG1
MGC removes phone A’s analog Termination
from its Context. The Context is destroyed. The
analog Termination is physical and returns to
the Null Context.
Subtract
MGC --> MG2
MGC removes MG2’s RTP Termination from its
Context. The RTP Termination is ephemeral and
is destroyed.
Subtract
MGC --> MG2
MGC removes phone B’s analog Termination
from its Context. The Context is destroyed. The
analog Termination is physical and returns to
the Null Context.
Subtract
45.1.5 RTP
When you make a VoIP call using H.248, the RTP (Real time Transport Protocol) is
used to handle voice data transfer. See RFC 1889 for details on RTP.
45.1.6 Voice Coding
A codec (coder/decoder) codes analog voice signals into digital signals and
decodes the digital signals back into voice signals. The IES-1248-51V supports the
following codecs.
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Chapter 45 VoIP
• G.711 is a Pulse Code Modulation (PCM) waveform codec. PCM measures
analog signal amplitudes at regular time intervals (sampling) and converts them
into digital bits (quantization). Quantization “reads” the analog signal and then
“writes” it to the nearest digital value. For this reason, a digital sample is usually
slightly different from its analog original (this difference is known as
“quantization noise”).
G.711 provides very good sound quality but requires 64kbps of bandwidth.
• G.723.1 uses Low-Delay Code-Excited Linear Prediction (LD-CELP) to code
audio in 30-millisecond frames. The standard supports two bitrates, 6.3 kbps
and 5.3 kbps.3 G.723.1 provides toll-quality sound and requires very little
bandwidth.
• G.726 is an Adaptive Differential Pulse Code Modulation (ADPCM) waveform
codec that uses a lower bitrate than standard PCM conversion.
Differential (or Delta) PCM is similar to PCM, but encodes the audio signal based
on the difference between one sample and a prediction based on previous
samples, rather than encoding the sample’s actual quantized value. Many
thousands of samples are taken each second, and the differences between
consecutive samples are usually quite small, so this saves space and reduces
the bandwidth necessary.
However, DPCM produces a high quality signal (high signal-to-noise ratio or
SNR) for high difference signals (where the actual signal is very different from
what was predicted) but a poor quality signal (low SNR) for low difference
signals (where the actual signal is very similar to what was predicted). This is
because the level of quantization noise is the same at all signal levels. Adaptive
DPCM solves this problem by adapting the difference signal’s level of
quantization according to the audio signal’s difference level. A low difference
signal is given a higher quantization level, increasing its signal-to-noise ratio.
This provides a similar sound quality at all signal levels.
G.726 operates at 16, 24, 32 or 40 kbps.
• G.729 is an Analysis-by-Synthesis (AbS) hybrid waveform codec. It uses a filter
based on information about how the human vocal tract produces sounds. The
codec analyzes the incoming voice signal and attempts to synthesize it using its
list of voice elements. It tests the synthesized signal against the original and, if
it is acceptable, transmits details of the voice elements it used to make the
synthesis. Because the codec at the receiving end has the same list, it can
exactly recreate the synthesized audio signal.
G.729 provides good sound quality and reduces the required bandwidth to
8kbps.
45.1.7 PSTN Call Setup Signaling
PSTNs (Public Switched Telephone Networks) use DTMF or pulse dialing to set up
telephone calls.
Dual-Tone Multi-Frequency (DTMF) signaling uses pairs of frequencies (one lower
frequency and one higher frequency) to set up calls. It is also known as Touch
3.
322
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Chapter 45 VoIP
Tone®. Each of the keys on a DTMF telephone corresponds to a different pair of
frequencies.
Pulse dialing sends a series of clicks to the local phone office in order to dial
numbers.4
45.1.7.1 VoIP VLAN
Virtual Local Area Network (VLAN) allows a physical network to be partitioned into
multiple logical networks. Only stations within the same VLAN can communicate
with each other.
Your IES-1248-51V can add IEEE 802.1Q VLAN ID tags to voice frames that it
sends to the network. This allows the IES-1248-51V to communicate with an MGC
server that is a member of the same VLAN group. Some ISPs use the VLAN tag to
identify voice traffic and give it priority over other traffic.
45.1.8 VoIP and VoiceBand Data (VBD)
VoIP converts analog voice signal to IP packets using an audio codec. This allows
voice transmission over an IP network.
VoiceBand data (VBD) converts fax and modem signals to IP packets also using an
audio codec.
45.2 VoIP Port Setup Screens
Use these screens to configure the Voice over IP (VoIP) settings of each of the
IES-1248-51V’s ports. You can activate ports, assign H.248, call service and DSP
profiles to each, configure customer information and set the region in which the
IES-1248-51V is to operate.
4.
The IES-1248-51V supports DTMF at the time of writing.
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45.2.1 Port View Screen
Use this screen to see details of the VoIP settings configured on all of the IES1248-51V’s ports. You can also change the H.248 profile, DSP profile and call
service profile each port uses, and copy the VoIP settings from one port to all the
other ports. Click VoIP > VoIP Port Setup > Port View. The following screen
displays.
Figure 150 VoIP > VoIP Port Setup > Port View
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 112 VoIP > VoIP Port Setup > Port View
324
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
This is the port number. Click a number to go to that port’s
Port Edit screen, where you can configure customer and
profile information.
Active
Select this to activate VoIP on the port.
Customer Name
If you configured a name in the Basic Setting > xDSL Port
Setup > xDSL Port Setting screen’s Customer Info field,
it displays here.
MG Name
This field displays the H.248 media gateway name which you
can configure in the VoIP > Media Gateway screen.
Termination Name
This field displays the port’s H.248 Termination. By default,
the port’s Termination name is “termX”, where X is the port
number. You can edit the name by entering up to 31
alphanumeric characters here or in the VoIP > VoIP Port
Setup > Port Edit screen. Spaces are not allowed.
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Chapter 45 VoIP
Table 112 VoIP > VoIP Port Setup > Port View
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
DSP Profile
This field displays the name of the Digital Signal Processing
(DSP) profile currently used on the port for voice calls. You
can also select another DSP profile for this port. Configure
DSP profiles in the VoIP > DSP Profile screen.
Data Profile
This field displays the name of the Digital Signal Processing
(DSP) profile currently used on the port for voiceband data
(fax or modem) calls. See Section 45.1.8 on page 323.
If this field is blank, the IES-1248-51V uses the set DSP
Profile for the calls. You can also select another DSP profile.
Configure DSP profiles in the VoIP > DSP Profile screen.
Impedance
This field displays the default voice band AC impedance
currently used on the port.
If you do not want to use the default impedance, select the
required AC impedance of the DSL port in the VoIP > VoIP
Port Setup > Port Edit screen.
Voice TX Gain
Voice RX Gain
Tx: This is the amount of gain (increase in signal power/
volume) applied on the voice signal received from the
subscriber and transmitted to the MGC.
Rx: This is the amount of gain (increase in signal power/
volume) applied on the voice signal received from the MGC
and transmitted to the subscriber.
These are measured in decibel and the range can be from -20
to 20.
A negative value decreases the signal power/volume.
Data TX Gain
Data RX Gain
Tx: This is the amount of gain (increase in signal power)
applied on the voiceband data (fax or modem) signal received
from the subscriber and transmitted to the MGC.
Rx: This is the amount of gain (increase in signal power)
applied on the voiceband data (fax or modem) signal received
from the MGC and transmitted to the subscriber.
These are measured in decibel and the range can be from -20
to 20.
A negative value decreases the signal power.
Copy From
Select this to prepare to copy the specified port’s DSP
Profile, Tx/Rx Gain and Impedance settings to one or
more ports. Click the Copy button to complete the procedure.
Apply
Click this to save your changes.
Copy
Click this to copy the DSP Profile, Tx/Rx Gain and
Impedance settings from the selected port to one or more
ports. You must first select a port’s Copy From field.
Cancel
Click this to return the fields in this screen to their last-saved
values.
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45.2.2 Port Edit Screen
Use this screen to configure the VoIP settings of each of the IES-1248-51V’s ports.
Click VoIP > VoIP Port Setup > Port Edit. The following screen displays.
Figure 151 VoIP > VoIP Port Setup > Port Edit
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 113 VoIP > VoIP Port Setup > Port Edit
326
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
Select the port you want to configure.
Active
Select this to enable VoIP on the selected port.
Customer Name
If you configured a name in the Basic Setting > xDSL Port Setup
> xDSL Port Setting screen’s Customer Info field, it displays
here.
Termination Name
Enter up to 31 alphanumeric characters for the name of this port’s
H.248 Termination. Spaces are not allowed. By default, the port’s
Termination name is “termX”, where X is the port number.
MG Name
This field displays the H.248 media gateway name which you can
configure in the VoIP > Media Gateway screen.
DSP Profile
Select the Digital Signal Processing (DSP) profile the port uses for
voice calls. If you have not configured any profiles, only the default
profile DEFVAL can be selected. Configure DSP profiles in the VoIP
> DSP Profile screen.
Data Profile
Select the Digital Signal Processing (DSP) profile the port uses for
fax or modem calls. If you leave this field blank, the IES-1248-51V
uses the DSP profile you set in the previous field for the calls.
Configure DSP profiles in the VoIP > DSP Profile screen.
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Table 113 VoIP > VoIP Port Setup > Port Edit
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Voice TX Gain
Tx: Enter the amount of gain (increase in signal power/volume)
you want to apply to the voice signal received from the subscriber
and transmitted to the MGC.
Voice RX Gain
Rx: Enter the amount of gain (increase in signal power/volume)
you want to apply to the voice signal received from the MGC and
transmitted to the subscriber.
These are measured in decibel and the range can be from -20 to
20.
A negative value decreases the signal power/volume.
Data TX Gain
Data RX Gain
Tx: Enter the amount of gain (increase in signal power) you want
to apply to the voiceband data (fax or modem) signal received from
the subscriber and transmitted to the MGC.
Rx: Enter the amount of gain (increase in signal power) you want
to apply to the voiceband data (fax or modem) signal received from
the MGC and transmitted to the subscriber.
These are measured in decibel and the range can be from -20 to
20.
A negative value decreases the signal power.
Impedance
Select the required voice band AC impedance of the DSL port for
your country. See Appendix B on page 597.
Apply
Click this to save your changes.
Cancel
Click this to return the fields in this screen to their last-saved
values.
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45.2.3 General Screen
Use this screen to configure the regional VoIP settings of the IES-1248-51V, and
to see details of the VoIP settings affected by the country of operation you select.
Click VoIP > VoIP Port Setup > General. The following screen displays.
Figure 152 VoIP > VoIP Port Setup > General
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 114 VoIP > VoIP Port Setup > General
328
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Country
Select the country in which the IES-1248-51V will be used.
Update
Click this to save your changes and display the region-specific
VoIP settings below.
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Table 114 VoIP > VoIP Port Setup > General
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Cancel
Click this to return this screen to its last-saved values.
Country
This field displays the country you select from the Country
drop-down list box.
Law
This displays either alaw or ulaw. The a-law companding
algorithm is commonly used in Europe, while the u-law (mulaw or µ-law) algorithm is commonly used in the USA and
Japan.
Impedance
Displays the line impedance or impedance range in ohms.
Loop Current (mA)
Displays the supplied line current in milliamps.
Tax Type
Displays the payphone charging signal type; metering (12/
16 Hz signal) or reversebattery (polarity reversal signal).
Ring Parameters
This section displays region-specific information about the
phone’s ring.
Frequency (Hz)
This displays the frequency of the phone ring in Hertz.
On Time 1 (second)
This displays the duration of the first ring (in seconds).
Off Time 1 (second)
This displays the length of time between the first and second
ring (in seconds).
On Time 2 (second)
This displays the duration of the second ring (in seconds).
Off Time 2 (second)
This displays the wait time after the second ring before the
first ring is sent again (in seconds).
Pulse Parameter
This section displays region-specific information about pulse
dialling.
Flash Min / Max (ms)
These display the minimum and maximum hook flash times.
Break Min / Max (ms)
These display the minimum and maximum times for ending a
pulse.
Make Min / Max (ms)
These display the minimum and maximum times for
beginning a pulse.
Inter-Digit Min (ms)
This displays the minimum waiting time between pulsed
digits.
Meter Parameter
This section displays region-specific information about call
metering.
Frequency (kHz)
This displays the frequency of the call-metering tone (in
kilohertz).
On Time (ms)
This displays the duration of the call-metering tone (in
milliseconds).
Off Time (ms)
This displays the time between call-metering tones (in
milliseconds).
Caller ID Parameters
CID Type
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This section displays region-specific information about caller
ID
This displays whether the caller ID information is sent before
the ring (prior ring displays) or at the same time as the ring
(during ring displays).
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Table 114 VoIP > VoIP Port Setup > General
LABEL
Payload Type
DESCRIPTION
This displays the caller ID payload type.
SDMF displays if caller ID uses the Single Data Message
Format (which transmits caller number, date and time).
MDMF displays if caller ID uses the Multiple Data Message
Format (which transmits caller name, number, date and
time).
First TAS Type
TAS (Telephone equipment Alerting Signal) is a tone sent by
prior to the transmission of caller ID information. This is the
primary TAS signal type.
The possible values are:
NULL: No TAS signal is sent.
DT_AS: Dual Tone Alerting Signal.
RP_AS: Ringing Pulse Alerting Signal.
Line_Reversal: Simple line polarity inversion.
First TAS Interval (ms) This is the first TAS timeout period in milliseconds.
Second TAS Type
This is the secondary TAS signal type.
NULL: No TAS signal is sent.
DT_AS: Dual Tone Alerting Signal.
RP_AS: Ringing Pulse Alerting Signal.
Second TAS Interval
(ms)
This is the second TAS timeout period in milliseconds.
Start To Ring (ms)
This is the wait time between the caller ID information being
sent and the ring signal being sent (available for the prior ring
type only).
Tones Parameters
330
This section displays region-specific information about call
progress tones.
Dial Tone
This is the tone sent to indicate that a call can be dialled.
Ring Back Tone
This is the tone sent to indicate that the callee’s phone is
ringing.
Busy Tone
This is the tone sent to indicate that the callee’s line is busy.
Reorder Tone
This is the tone sent to indicate that an invalid number has
been dialled.
Congestion Tone
This is the tone sent to indicate that the network is busy.
Special Dial Tone
This is the tone sent to indicate that certain three-way calling,
conference and call transfer services are available.
Call Waiting Tone #1
This is the tone sent to indicate that a second call is incoming
while the first is still in progress.
Call Waiting Tone #2
This is reserved for future use.
MWI Tone
This is reserved for future use.
ROH Tone
This is the tone sent at the end of a call to indicate that the
other party has hung up.
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Table 114 VoIP > VoIP Port Setup > General
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Warning Tone
This is the tone sent to indicate that the telephone circuit is
operating abnormally.
Confirmation Tone
This is the tone sent to indicate that user-entered information
has been successfully received.
Holding Tone
This is the tone sent to indicate that a call is on hold.
45.3 H.248 Profile Screen
Use this screen to configure information about the Media Gateway Controller
(MGC) that the system uses for call control (and a backup controller, if required).
Click VoIP > H.248 Profile. The following screen displays.
Figure 153 VoIP > H.248 Profile
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 115 VoIP > H.248 Profile
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Index
This is the index number of an H.248 profile.
Name
This is the name of the H.248 profile.
Select
Select the H.248 profile you wish to load or delete.
Load
Select an H.248 profile and click this in order to edit its configuration in the
lower portion of this screen.
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Table 115 VoIP > H.248 Profile
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Delete
Select an H.248 profile and click this to delete the profile. Once deleted,
information cannot be retrieved.
Name
Enter a name for this H.248 profile.
MGC IP /
Domain
Name
Enter the IP address or domain name of the H.248 media gateway
controller.
Port
Enter the listening port number of the H.248 media gateway controller, if
supplied by your VoIP provider. Otherwise, keep the default value.
MGC2
If your VoIP service provider gave you details of a backup H.248 media
gateway controller (MGC)H.248, select On and enter the details in the
MGC2 IP / Domain Name and Port fields. The IES-1248-51V uses this
backup MGC when the primary MGC is not available.
Otherwise, select Off.
MGC2 IP /
Domain
Name
If you selected On in the MGC2 field, enter the IP address or domain name
of the backup H.248 media gateway controller.
Port
If you selected On in the MGC2 field, enter the listening port number of
the backup H.248 media gateway controller, if supplied by your VoIP
provider. Otherwise, keep the default value.
Transport
Choose the data transport method the IES-1248-51V uses to send H.248
packets to the media gateway controller.
Select UDP to send data to the media gateway controller via User
Datagram Protocol.
Select TCP to send data to the media gateway controller via Transmission
Control Protocol.
Encoding
Choose the text encoding method the IES-1248-51V uses to send H.248
packets to the media gateway controller.
Select Long to use long form text encoding.
Select Short to use short form text encoding.
802.1p
Priority
Set the IEEE 802.1p priority value for traffic using this H.248 profile.
DSCP
Set the DiffServ Code Point (DSCP) value for traffic using this H.248
profile.
Inactivity
Timer
Enter the inactivity timer (0~65535) in units of 10 milliseconds the IES1248-51V waits for the MGC's response before disconnecting the
connection with the MGC.
Ephemeral
Termination
Prefix
In H.248, each Terminiation has an ephemeral termination ID during
communication with other terminations for identification purpose (see
Section 45.1.2 on page 318). For example, RTP/0. The IES-1248-51V
allows you to customize the prefix string (“RTP/” in this example).
Enter up to 31 characters for the ephemeral termination prefix. You must
configure the same prefix string as the setting on the MGC.
Softswitch
332
Select zxss10-ss if the IES-1248-51V's MGC is a ZTE ZXSS10 softswitch.
Otherwise, set this to DEFVAL.
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Table 115 VoIP > H.248 Profile
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
VBD
Select ON or OFF to enable or disable Voice Band Data support on the IES1248-51V. See Section 45.1.8 on page 323 and ITU-T V.152 for more
information.
Force
Version
Set to use H.248 version 2 (OFF) or version 1 (ON). Refer to the ITU-T
H.248 standard for more information.
Add
Click Add to save the changes in this screen to the system’s volatile
memory. The system loses these changes if it is turned off or loses power,
so use the Config Save on the navigation panel and then the Save button
to save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are done
configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
45.4 DSP Profile Screen
Use this screen to configure information about the Digital Signal Processing (DSP)
profiles used by the IES-1248-51V. Click VoIP > DSP Profile. The following
screen displays.
Figure 154 VoIP > DSP Profile
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The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 116 VoIP > DSP Profile
334
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Index
This is an incremental number indicating the order in which the DSP
profiles were created.
Name
This is the name of the DSP profile.
Select
Select the DSP profile you wish to load or delete.
Load
Select a DSP profile and click this in order to edit its configuration in the
lower portion of this screen.
Delete
Select a DSP profile and click this to delete the profile. Once deleted,
information cannot be retrieved.
Name
Enter a name for this DSP profile.
Allowed
This is the list of codecs to use in negotiation for this DSP profile. The
codecs are listed by priority: the system tries to use the codec at the top
of the list first and, if that is not possible, tries the second, and so on.
Not Allowed
This is the list of codecs supported by the system but not used in this
DSP profile.
<-
Use this to move the selected codec from the Not Allowed list to the
Allowed list.
->
Use this to move the selected codec from the Allowed list to the Not
Allowed list.
Priority +
Use this to increase the priority of the selected codec by moving it up
one place in the list.
Priority -
Use this to decrease the priority of the selected codec by moving it down
one place in the list.
Min Play Buffer
Delay
This is the minimum time delay of the play buffer (10 ~ 500
milliseconds, must be less than or equal to the Max Play Buffer
Delay).
Max Play
Buffer Delay
This is the maximum time delay of the play buffer (10 ~ 500
milliseconds, must be greater than or equal to the Min Play Buffer
Delay).
Echo Tail
This is the echo-cancellation echo tail period (8/16/32/128
milliseconds).
Echocancel
Select this to enable echo cancellation.
Vad
Select this to enable Voice Activity Detection (VAD).
G711 VPI
Set the Voice Packetization Interval for G.711.
G723 VPI
Set the Voice Packetization Interval for G.723.
G726 VPI
Set the Voice Packetization Interval for G.726.
G729 VPI
Set the Voice Packetization Interval for G.729.
802.1p Priority
Set the IEEE 802.1p priority value for traffic using this DSP profile.
DSCP
Set the DiffServ Code Point (DSCP) value for traffic using this DSP
profile.
Add
This button appears when you are configuring a new profile. Click this to
save the profile and add it to the list.
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Table 116 VoIP > DSP Profile
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Modify
This button appears when you are editing an existing profile. Click this to
save your changes.
Cancel
Click this to set all fields in this screen to their last-saved values.
45.5 Media Gateway Screen
Use this screen to configure the system’s H.248 media gateway (MG). Click VoIP
> Media Gateway. The following screen displays.
Figure 155 VoIP > Media Gateway
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 117 VoIP > Media Gateway
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Enable
Select this to activate the media gateway on the IES-1248-51V.
MG Name
Enter a name for the media gateway (up to 31 ASCII printable characters;
spaces are not allowed).
Port
Enter the service port number the IES-1248-51V uses to transmit and
listen to H.248 packets. The default is port 2944.
H.248 Profile
Select the H.248 profile this media gateway is to use. The H.248 profile
defines the media gateway controller(s) associated with this media
gateway. Configure H.248 profiles in the Profile > VoIP H248 screen.
Status
This field displays the current H.248 media gateway status.
Disable: This media gateway feature is disabled.
Registering: The IES-1248-51V is trying to register itself with the MGC.
Registered: The IES-1248-51V is registered with the MGC.
Unregistering: The IES-1248-51V is trying to cancel the registeration
with the MGC.
Unregistered: The media gateway is unregistered with the MGC.
Disconnected: The IES-1248-51V is unable to connect to the MGC.
Disabled by MGC: The IES-1248-51V has stopped the media gateway
service according to the MGC’s instruction.
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Table 117 VoIP > Media Gateway
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Apply
Click Apply to save the changes in this screen to the system’s volatile
memory. The system loses these changes if it is turned off or loses power,
so use the Config Save on the navigation panel and then the Save
button to save your changes to the non-volatile memory when you are
done configuring.
Cancel
Click Cancel to start configuring the screen again.
45.6 VoIP Line Status and Info Screen
Use this screen to see detailed information about the VoIP configuration currently
active on each of the IES-1248-51V’s analog phone ports. Click VoIP > VoIP
Line Status and Info. The following screen displays.
Figure 156 VoIP > VoIP Line Status and Info
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 118 VoIP > VoIP Line Status and Info
336
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
Select the number of the analog phone port you want to view
from the list.
Refresh
Click this to update the information in this screen.
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Table 118 VoIP > VoIP Line Status and Info
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Service Status
This field displays the current state of the analog port.
Possible values are:
Disabled
Out-of-service
Idle
Waiting-for-dialing
Dialing-out
Ringing
Conversation-caller
Conversation-callee
Fax/Modem-caller
Fax/Modem-callee
Waiting-for-on-hook
Alerting-off-hook
Power-cut-down
Phone Status
This displays the state of the analog phone connected to the
port.
The possible values are:
Disabled
On-hook
Off-hook
Ringing
Testing
Power-cut-down
Fault
Bad
Uninitialized
Customer Name
If you configured a name in the Basic Setting > xDSL Port
Setup > xDSL Port Setting screen’s Customer Info field,
it displays here.
RTP Tx Codec
This shows the voice codec used for transmitting data.
RTP Rx Codec
This shows the voice codec used for receiving data.
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Table 118 VoIP > VoIP Line Status and Info
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
RTP Tx Payload Type
This shows the voice codec currently used for transmitting
voice on this port. The supported codecs can be configured in
each DSP profile (in the VoIP > DSP Profile screen). The
value displayed here depends on the result of the codec
negotiation between the IES-1248-51V and the remote VoIP
device.
Possible values are:
G711a: 0
G711µ: 8
G723: 4
G729: 18
T.38: 32
G726-16: 96
G726-24: 97
G726-32: 98
G726-40: 99
RTP Rx Payload Type
This shows the voice codec currently used for receiving voice
on this port. The supported codecs can be configured in each
DSP profile (in the VoIP > DSP Profile screen). The value
displayed here depends on the result of the codec negotiation
between the IES-1248-51V and the remote VoIP device.
Possible values are:
G711a: 0
G711mu: 8
G723: 4
G729: 18
T.38: 32
G726-16: 96
G726-24: 97
G726-32: 98
G726-40: 99
338
RTP Local IP
This is the local IP address.
RTP Remote IP
This is the remote IP address.
RTP Local Port
This is the local port used for H.248.
RTP Remote Port
This is the port on the remote device used for H.248.
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45.7 Diagnostic Screens
Use these screens to perform analog line tests on the lines connected to the IES1248-51V.
45.7.1 MLT Test Screen
Use this screen to perform a variety of standard Metallic Line Tests on the lines
connected to IES-1248-51V’s ports. Click VoIP > Diagnostic > MLT Test. The
following screen displays.
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Figure 157 VoIP > Diagnostic > MLT Test
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 119 VoIP > Diagnostic > MLT Test
340
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Port
Select the analog port on the IES-1248-51V you want to test
from the list.
Options
Select the tests you want to perform in this section.
Forced
Perform the test(s) immediately, even if the specified port is
in use.
All
Perform all the MLT tests.
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Table 119 VoIP > Diagnostic > MLT Test
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
AC Voltage
Test the line’s AC voltage only.
DC Voltage
Test the line’s DC voltage only.
Loop Resistance
Test the line’s load resistance only.
Isolation Resistance
Test the line’s isolation resistance only.
Capacitor
Test the line’s capacitance only.
Ring Voltage
Test the line’s ring voltage only.
Metering Voltage
Test the line’s metering voltage only.
REN Value
Test the line’s ringer equivalent number only.
Dial Tone
Test the line’s dial tone only.
Digit
Test the line’s digit tones only.
Roh
Test the line’s roh only
MLT Test
Click this to perform the specified test or tests.
Port
Select the port whose MLT statistics you wish to see from the
list. Ensure that this Port number matches the Port number
in the upper part of this screen to view the results of a test
you just performed. When you switch between ports, click the
Refresh button to update the information to that of the new
port.
Test Item
This section shows the statistics derived from the last test
performed on this port.
AC Voltage (Vrms)
This is the port’s alternating current shown in volts root mean
square (Vrms)
DC Voltage (Volts)
This is the port’s direct current voltage shown in volts.
Loop Resistance (Ohms)
This is the port’s load resistance (between TIP and RING)
shown in Ohms.
Isolation Resistance
(Ohms)
This is the port’s isolation resistance shown in Ohms.
Capacitor (µF)
This is the port’s capacitance shown in millifarads.
Ring Voltage (Vrms)
This is the port’s ring voltage shown in volts root mean
square.
Metering Voltage (Vpeak)
This is the port’s metering peak voltage.
REN Value
This is the port’s ringer equivalent number.
Test Result
This section shows the result of the test or tests you
performed.
Refresh
Click this to reload the information in the Test Result
section. Do this when you change the Port number to see the
statistics for the new port.
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45.7.2 MLT Relay
Use this screen to allow or prohibit line tests using diagnostic equipment
connected via the Test In and Test Out ports on the IES-1248-51V. Click VoIP
> Diagnostic > MLT Relay. The following screen displays.
Figure 158 VoIP > Diagnostic > MLT Relay
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 120 VoIP > Diagnostic > MLT Relay
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Mode
Select the MLT test relay mode:
OFF: forbid MLT relay testing.
Test In: allow diagnostic inner loop tests to be initiated by an
external device.
Test Out: allow diagnostic outer loop tests to be initiated by
an external device.
Both: allow both inner and outer loop diagnostic tests to be
initiated by an external device.
342
Port
Select the port on which you want the test to be made.
Timeout
Enter the number of minutes and seconds that passes before
the device stops testing if it gets no diagnostic response.
Forced
Select this to force the diagnostic test.
Apply
Click this to save your changes.
Cancel
Click this to return this screen to its last saved settings.
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CHAPTER
46
Maintenance
This chapter explains how to use the maintenance screens.
46.1 Maintenance Screen
To open this screen, click Management > Maintenance.
Figure 159 Maintenance
46.2 Firmware Upgrade Screen
Use this screen to upgrade your device firmware. See the System Info screen to
verify your current firmware version number. Make sure you have downloaded
(and unzipped) the correct model firmware and version to your computer before
uploading to the device.
Be sure to upload the correct model firmware as uploading the
wrong model firmware may damage your device.
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To open this screen, click Management > Maintenance > Click here (Firmware
Upgrade).
Figure 160 Firmware Upgrade
Type the path and file name of the firmware file you wish to upload to the device
in the File Path text box or click Browse to locate it. After you have specified the
file, click Upgrade.
46.3 Restore Configuration Screen
Use this screen to load a configuration file from your computer to the device.
To open this screen, click Management > Maintenance > Click here (Restore
Text Configuration).
Figure 161 Restore Configuration
Type the path and file name of the configuration file you wish to restore in the File
Path text box or click Browse to display a Choose File screen from which you
can locate it. After you have specified the file, click Restore. "conf-0" is the name
of the configuration file on the device, so your backup configuration file is
automatically renamed when you restore using this screen.
If you load an invalid configuration file, it may corrupt the settings,
and you might have to use the console to reconfigure the system.
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46.4 Backing Up a Configuration File
Backing up your device configurations allows you to create various “snap shots” of
your device from which you may restore at a later date.
Click Management > Maintenance, and do the following to save your device’s
configuration to your computer.
1
Right-click the Click here (Backup Text Configuration) link and click Save Target
As.
Or:
Click the Click here (Backup Text Configuration) link and then click File, Save
As.
2
In the Save As screen, choose a location to save the file on your computer from
the Save in drop-down list box and type a descriptive name for it in the File
name list box. Click Save to save the configuration file to your computer.
Note: See the chapters on commands to edit the configuration text file.
Note: You can change the “.dat” file to a “.txt” file and still upload it back to the IES1248-51V.
46.5 Load Factory Defaults
Use this function to clear all device configuration information you configured and
return to the factory defaults.
Note: Restoring the default configuration deletes all the current settings. It is
recommended to back up the configuration file before restoring the default
configuration.
To do this, click Management > Maintenance, Click here (Restore Default
Configuration).
Figure 162 Restore Default Configuration
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Click OK to begin resetting all device configurations to the factory defaults and
then wait for the device to restart. This takes up to two minutes. If you want to
access the device web configurator again, you may need to change the IP address
of your computer to be in the same subnet as that of the default device IP address
(192.168.1.1).
Figure 163 Restore Factory Default Settings, Reboot
46.6 Reboot System
Use this function to restart the device without physically turning the power off.
To open this screen, click Management > Maintenance > Click here (Reboot
System).
Figure 164 Reboot System
Click OK. You then see the screen as shown in Figure 163 on page 346. Click OK
again and wait for the device to restart. This takes up to two minutes. This does
not affect the device’s configuration.
46.7 Command Line FTP
See Chapter 69 on page 561 for how to upload or download files to or from the
device using FTP commands.
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CHAPTER
47
Diagnostic
This chapter explains the Diagnostic screens.
47.1 Diagnostic Screen
Use this screen to check system logs, ping IP addresses or perform loopback tests.
To open this screen, click Management > Diagnostic.
Figure 165 Diagnostic
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The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 121 Diagnostic
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Syslog/ Event Log
Click Display to display a log of events in the multi-line text box.
Click Clear to empty the text box and reset the log.
IP Ping
Type the IP Address of a device that you want to ping in order to
test a connection.
In the Times field specify how often you want to ping the IP address.
Select the Interface from which you want to ping the IP address
(Ethernet or VoIP).
Click Ping to have the device ping the IP address (in the field to the
left).
Loopback Test
Select a port number from the Port drop-down list box and enter a
VPI/VCI to specify a PVC. Click OAM F5 Loopback to perform an
OAMF5 loopback test on the specified DSL port. An Operational,
Administration and Maintenance Function 5 test is used to test the
connection between two DSL devices. First, the DSL devices establish
a virtual circuit. Then the local device sends an ATM F5 cell to be
returned by the remote DSL device (both DSL devices must support
ATM F5 in order to use this test). The results (“Passed” or “Failed”)
display in the multi-line text box.
LDM Test
Select a port number from the Port drop-down list box and click Set
LDM Port to have the IES-1248-51V perform line diagnostics on the
specified port. The ADSL port must be set to ADSL2 or ADSL2+ ADSL
operational mode and have a connection. It takes about one minute
for the line diagnostics to finish. The screen displays a message
confirming upon which ADSL port line diagnostics will be performed.
Click Get LDM Data to display the line diagnostics results after using
the Set LDM Port button on an ADSL port. Use the line diagnostics
results to analyze problems with the physical ADSL line.
Click Get LDM Data(raw) to display the unformatted line diagnostics
results.
Click Get LDM Data(992.3) to display the line diagnostics results in
the format defined in the ITU-T G.992.3 standard.
Note: Wait at least one minute after using Set LDM Port before
using Get LDM Data.
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Table 121 Diagnostic (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
SELT
Select a port number from the Port drop-down list box and click Set
SELT Port to perform a Single End Loop Test (SELT) on the specified
port. This test checks the distance to the subscriber’s location.
Note: The port must have an open loop. There cannot be a DSL
device, phone, fax machine or other device connected to
the subscriber’s end of the telephone line.
The SELT takes at least fifteen seconds. To check the status of the
SELT or to look at the results when the SELT is complete, select a port
number from the Port drop-down list box and click Get SELT Data.
The results tell you what gauge of telephone wire is connected to the
port and the approximate length of the line.
PMM
Select a port number from the Port drop-down list box and a power
management mode from the Mode drop-down list box and click Set
PMM Mode to have the specified port use the specified power
management mode.
Select L0 to turn off power management on the port.
Select L2 to scale back the power usage to just support the
transmission rate that the subscriber is using.
Select L2 to have the ADSL connection use power saving mode and
reduce the rate when there is no traffic. The rate comes back up when
there is traffic.
The ADSL port must be set to ADSL2 or ADSL2+ ADSL operational
mode.
Click Get PMM Mode to display which power mode the ADSL port is
currently set to use.
ToneDiag
Select a port number from the Port drop-down list box. The ADSL
port must be set to ADSL2 or ADSL2+ ADSL operational mode and
have a connection. Click Get ToneDiag data to display the ADSL
port’s tone diagnostics. The tone diagnostic information displays in
the format defined in the ITU-T G.992.3 standard. Use the
information to analyze problems with the physical ADSL line.
Note: ToneDiag is faster than the LDM test but displays less
information.
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47.2 Log Format
The common format of the system logs is: <item no> <time> <process> <type>
<log message>.
Table 122 Log Format
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
<item no>
This is the index number of the log entry.
<time>
This is the time and date when the log was created.
<process>
This is the process that created the log.
<type>
This identifies what kind of log it is. "INFO" identifies an information
log. "WARN" identifies a warning log.
<log message>
This is the log’s detailed information (see Table 123 on page 350).
47.2.1 Log Messages
The following table lists and describes the system log messages.
Table 123 Log Messages
LOG MESSAGE
TYPE DESCRIPTION
ADSL <port> Link
Up(SN=<seq no>): <ds
rate>/<us rate>!
or
ADSL Link Info: NM:<ds
NM>/<us NM>!
INFO
An ADSL port established a connection.
<port> - port number
<seq no> - sequence number of the connection
<ds rate> - downstream rate
<us rate> - upstream rate
<us NM> - upstream noise margin
<ds NM> - downstream noise margin
ADSL <port> Link
Down(SN=<seq no>)!
WARN
An ADSL port lost its connection.
<port> - port number
<seq no> - sequence number of the connection
350
Session Begin!
INFO
A console, telnet or FTP session has begun (see the
<process> field for the type of session).
Session End!
INFO
A console telnet or FTP session has terminated (see
the <process> field for the type of session).
Incorrect Password!
WARN
Someone attempted to use the wrong password to
start a console, telnet or FTP session (see the
<process> field for the type of session).
Received Firmware
Checksum Error!
WARN
A checksum error was detected during an attempted
FTP firmware upload.
Received Firmware Size
too large!
WARN
The file size was too large with an attempted FTP
firmware upload.
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Table 123 Log Messages (continued)
LOG MESSAGE
TYPE DESCRIPTION
Received Firmware
Invalid!
WARN
Someone attempted to upload a firmware file with a
wrong identity via FTP.
Received File <file>!
INFO
A file was uploaded to the IES-1248-51V by FTP.
<file> - received file’s name
THERMO OVER
TEMPERATURE: dev:<id>
threshold:<threshold>
(degree C)
value:<temp>(degree
C)!
WARN
The temperature was too high at one of the
temperature sensors.
<id> 0: sensor near the ADSL chipset
1: sensor near the CPU
2: thermal sensor chip itself
<threshold> - threshold temperature
<temp> - temperature when the entry was logged
THERMO OVER
TEMPERATURE released:
dev:<id>
threshold:<threshold>
(degree C)
value:<temp>(degree
C)!
INFO
The temperature at one of the temperature sensors
has come back to normal.
<id>
0: sensor near the ADSL chipset
1: sensor near the CPU
2: thermal sensor chip itself
<threshold> - threshold temperature
<temp> - temperature when the entry was logged
THERMO OVER VOLTAGE:
nominal:<nominal>(mV)
value:<voltage> mV)!
WARN
The voltage went outside of the accepted operating
range.
<nominal> - nominal voltage of the DC power
<voltage> - voltage of the DC power when logged
THERMO OVER VOLTAGE
released:
nominal:<nominal>(mV)
value:<voltage> (mV)!
INFO
The voltage is back inside the accepted operating
range.
<nominal> - nominal voltage of the DC power
<voltage> - voltage of the DC power when logged
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47.3 LDM Test Parameters
The following table lists the line diagnostics test parameters that display, see the
ITU-T’s G.992.3 for more information.
Table 124 LDM Test Parameters
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
number_of_
subcarries
Discrete Multi-Tone (DMT) modulation divides up a line’s bandwidth
into sub-carriers (sub-channels) of 4.3125 KHz each.
The first number is the total number of DMT sub-carriers the ADSL
connection is using. The second number indicates how many
upstream DMT sub-carriers the ADSL connection is using.
352
hlinScale:
The channel characteristics function is represented in linear format by
a scale factor and a complex number. These are the maximum
upstream and downstream scale factors used in producing the
channel characteristics function.
latn:
This is the upstream and downstream Line Attenuation (in dB).
satn:
This is the upstream and downstream Signal Attenuation (in dB).
snrm:
This is the upstream and downstream Signal-to-Noise Ratio Margin
(in dB). A DMT sub-carrier’s SNR is the ratio between the received
signal power and the received noise power. The signal-to-noise ratio
margin is the maximum that the received noise power could increase
with the IES-1248-51V still being able to meet its transmission
targets.
attndr:
This is the upstream and downstream Attainable Net Data Rate (in
bit/s).
farEndActatp:
This is the upstream and downstream Far End Actual Aggregate
Transmit Power (in dBm)
i
This is the index number of the DMT sub-carrier.
li.rl
The channel characteristics function is represented in linear format by
a scale factor and a complex number. This is the real part of the
complex number used in producing the channel characteristics
function for this sub-carrier.
li.im
The channel characteristics function is represented in linear format by
a scale factor and a complex number. This is the imaginary part of the
complex number used in producing the channel characteristics
function for this sub-carrier
log
This is a format for providing channel characteristics. It provides
magnitude values in a logarithmic scale. This can be used in analyzing
the physical condition of the ADSL line.
QLN
The Quiet Line Noise for a DMT sub-carrier is the rms (root mean
square) level of the noise present on the line, when no ADSL signals
are present. It is measured in dBm/Hz. The QLN can be used in
analyzing crosstalk.
SNR
This is the upstream and downstream Signal-to-Noise Ratio (in dB). A
DMT sub-carrier’s SNR is the ratio between the received signal power
and the received noise power. The SNR can be used in analyzing time
dependent changes in crosstalk levels and line attenuation (such as
those caused by temperature variations and moisture).
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47.4 ToneDiag Parameters
The following table lists the tone diagnostic parameters that display, see the ITUT’s G.992.3 for more information.
Table 125 ToneDiag Parameters
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
number_of_
subcarries
Discrete Multi-Tone (DMT) modulation divides up a line’s bandwidth
into sub-carriers (sub-channels) of 4.3125 KHz each.
This number indicates how many upstream and downstream DMT
sub-carriers the ADSL connection is using.
hlinScale:
The channel characteristics function is represented in linear format by
a scale factor and a complex number. This is the maximum upstream
and downstream scale factor used in producing the channel
characteristics function.
latn:
This is the upstream and downstream Line Attenuation (in dB).
satn:
This is the upstream and downstream Signal Attenuation (in dB).
snrm:
This is the upstream and downstream Signal-to-Noise Ratio Margin
(in dB). A DMT sub-carrier’s SNR is the ratio between the received
signal power and the received noise power. The signal-to-noise ratio
margin is the maximum that the received noise power could increase
with the IES-1248-51V still being able to meet its transmission
targets.
attndr:
This is the upstream and downstream Attainable Net Data Rate (in
bit/s).
farEndActatp:
This is the upstream and downstream Far End Actual Aggregate
Transmit Power (in dBm)
i
This is the index number of the DMT sub-carrier.
logdB)
This is a format for providing channel characteristics. It provides
magnitude values in a logarithmic scale. This can be used in analyzing
the physical condition of the ADSL line.
QLN(dBm)
The Quiet Line Noise for a DMT sub-carrier is the rms (root mean
square) level of the noise present on the line, when no ADSL signals
are present. It is measured in dBm/Hz. The QLN can be used in
analyzing crosstalk.
SNR(dB)
This is the upstream and downstream Signal-to-Noise Ratio (in dB). A
DMT sub-carrier’s SNR is the ratio between the received signal power
and the received noise power. The SNR can be used in analyzing time
dependent changes in crosstalk levels and line attenuation (such as
those caused by temperature variations and moisture).
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CHAPTER
48
MAC Table
This chapter introduces the MAC Table.
48.1 Introduction to MAC Table
The MAC table lists device MAC addresses that are dynamically learned by the
IES-1248-51V. The table shows the following for each MAC address: the port upon
which Ethernet frames were received from the device, to which VLAN groups the
device belongs (if any) and to which channel it is connected (for devices
connected to DSL ports).
The device uses the MAC table to determine how to forward frames. See the
following figure.
Figure 166 MAC Table Filtering Flowchart
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Chapter 48 MAC Table
1
The device examines a received frame and learns the port on which this source
MAC address came.
2
The device checks to see if the frame's destination MAC address matches a source
MAC address already learned in the MAC table.
• If the device has already learned the port for this MAC address, then it forwards
the frame to that port.
• If the device has not already learned the port for this MAC address, then the
frame is flooded to all ports. Too much port flooding leads to network
congestion.
• If the device has already learned the port for this MAC address, but the
destination port is the same as the port it came in on, then it filters the frame.
48.2 MAC Table Screen
To open this screen, click Management > MAC Table.
Figure 167 MAC Table
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 126 MAC Table
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Show port
Select a port for which to display learned MAC addresses (or display
all of them).
Index
This is the number of the MAC table entry.
Port
This is the port to which the MAC address is associated.
MAC
This is the MAC address of the device from which this incoming frame
came.
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Table 126 MAC Table (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Refresh
Click Refresh to update the list of dynamically learned MAC
addresses.
Flush
Click Flush to remove all of the dynamically learned MAC address
entries from the MAC table.
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CHAPTER
49
ARP Table
This chapter describes the ARP Table.
49.1 Introduction to ARP Table
Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) is a protocol for mapping an Internet Protocol
address (IP address) to a physical machine address, also known as a Media Access
Control or MAC address, on the local area network.
An IP (version 4) address is 32 bits long. In an Ethernet LAN, MAC addresses are
48 bits long. The ARP Table maintains an association between each MAC address
and its corresponding IP address.
49.1.1 How ARP Works
When an incoming packet destined for a host device on a local area network
arrives at the device, the device's ARP program looks in the ARP Table and, if it
finds the address, sends it to the device.
If no entry is found for the IP address, ARP broadcasts the request to all the
devices on the LAN. The device fills in its own MAC and IP address in the sender
address fields, and puts the known IP address of the target in the target IP
address field. In addition, the device puts all ones in the target MAC field
(FF.FF.FF.FF.FF.FF is the Ethernet broadcast address). The replying device (which is
either the IP address of the device being sought or the router that knows the way)
replaces the broadcast address with the target's MAC address, swaps the sender
and target pairs, and unicasts the answer directly back to the requesting machine.
ARP updates the ARP Table for future reference and then sends the packet to the
MAC address that replied.
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49.2 ARP Table Screen
The ARP table can hold up to 500 entries.
To open this screen, click Management > ARP Table.
Figure 168 ARP Table
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 127 ARP Table
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Flush
Click Flush to remove all of the entries from the ARP table.
Total X ARP
Entries
This displays the number of entries in the ARP table.
Index
This is the ARP table entry number.
IP Address
This is the learned IP address of a device connected to a port.
MAC Address
This is the MAC address of the device with the listed IP address.
Interface
This is the type of interface used by the device.
Previous Page
Click one of these buttons to show the preceding or following screen if
the information cannot be displayed in one screen.
Next Page
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P ART V
Commands,
Troubleshooting
and Specifications
How to Access and Use the CLI (363)
SNMP Commands (467)
Common Commands (369)
ADSL Commands (469)
System Commands (377)
G.Bond (511)
Alarm Commands (385)
Virtual Channel Commands (515)
DHCP Commands (393)
ACL Commands (535)
OUI Filter (405)
VoIP Commands (541)
IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN and Isolation
Commands (409)
Firmware and Configuration File
Maintenance (561)
MAC Commands (419)
Troubleshooting (567)
IGMP Commands (425)
Product Specifications (579)
Packet Filter Commands (437)
Switch and Statistics Commands (441)
IP Commands (447)
IP Bridge Commands (451)
361
362
CHAPTER
50
How to Access and Use the CLI
This chapter introduces the command line interface (CLI).
50.1 Accessing the CLI
Use any of the following methods to access the CLI.
50.1.1 Console Port
You can use this method if your IES-1248-51V has a console port.
1
Connect your computer to the console port on the IES-1248-51V using the
appropriate cable.
2
Use terminal emulation software with the following settings:
Table 128 Default Settings for the Console Port
SETTING
DEFAULT
VALUE
Terminal Emulation
VT100
Baud Rate
9600 bps
Parity
None
Number of Data Bits
8
Number of Stop Bits
1
Flow Control
None
3
Press [ENTER] to open the login screen.
50.1.2 Telnet
1
Connect your computer to one of the Ethernet ports.
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2
Open a Telnet session to the IES-1248-51V’s IP address. If this is your first login,
use the default values.
Table 129 Default Management IP Address
SETTING
DEFAULT
VALUE
IP Address
192.168.1.1
Subnet Mask
255.255.255.0
Make sure your computer IP address is in the same subnet, unless you are
accessing the IES-1248-51V through one or more routers. In the latter case,
make sure remote management of the IES-1248-51V is allowed via Telnet.
50.1.3 SSH
You can use this method if your IES-1248-51V supports SSH connections.
1
Connect your computer to one of the Ethernet ports.
2
Use a SSH client program to access the IES-1248-51V. If this is your first login,
use the default values in Table 129 on page 364 and Table 130 on page 364. Make
sure your computer IP address is in the same subnet, unless you are accessing the
IES-1248-51V through one or more routers.
50.2 Logging in
Use the administrator username and password. If this is your first login, use the
default values. in some IES-1248-51V models you may not need to enter the user
name.
Table 130 Default User Name and Password
SETTING
DEFAULT
VALUE
User Name
admin
Password
1234
The IES-1248-51V automatically logs you out of the management interface after
five minutes of inactivity. If this happens, simply log back in again. Use the sys
stdio set command to extend the idle timeout. For example, the IES-1248-51V
automatically logs you out of the management interface after 60 minutes of
inactivity after you use the sys stdio set 60 command. Use the sys stdio
show command to display the current idle timeout setting.
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50.3 Command Conventions
Command descriptions follow these conventions:
• Commands are in courier new font.
• Required input values are in angle brackets <>; for example, ping <ipaddress> means that you must specify an IP address for this command.
• Optional fields are in square brackets []; for instance in the show logins
[name]command, the name field is optional.
The following is an example of a required field within an optional field: snmpserver [contact <system contact>], the contact field is optional. However,
if you use contact, then you must provide the system contact information.
• The | (bar) symbol means “or”.
• italic terms represent user-defined input values; for example, in sys
datetime date [year month date], year month date can be replaced by the
actual year month and date that you want to set, for example, 2007 08 15.
• A key stroke is denoted by square brackets and uppercase text, for example,
[ENTER] means the “Enter” or “Return” key on your keyboard.
• <cr> means press the [ENTER] key.
• An arrow (-->) indicates that this line is a continuation of the previous line.
Command summary tables are organized as follows:
Table 131 Table Title
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch dhcpsnoop show
<port-list>
Use this command to display the current DHCP snooping
settings of the specified port(s).
L/L
statistics dhcp counter
[<port-list> [clear]]
Use this command to display or clear the summary of DHCP
packets on the specified port(s).
L/L
statistics dhcp snoop
<port-list>
Use this command to look at the DHCP snooping table on the
specified port(s).
L/L
The Table title identifies commands or the specific feature that the commands
configure.
The COMMAND column shows the syntax of the command.
The DESCRIPTION column explains what the command does. It may also
identify legal input values.
The P column identifies the privilege level needed to run the command (see
Section 50.5 on page 367). The first letter identifies the privilege level needed to
use the command (L = low, M = medium or H = high) and the second letter
indicates the privilege level need to perform the function in the web configurator
(L = low or H = high).
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A long list of pre-defined values may be replaced by a command input value
‘variable’ so as to avoid a very long command in the description table. Refer to the
command input values table if you are unsure of what to enter.
Table 132 Common Command Input Values
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
description
Used when a command has a description field in order to add more
detail.
ip-address
An IP address in dotted decimal notation. For example, 192.168.1.3.
mask
The subnet mask in dotted decimal notation, for example,
255.255.255.0.
mask-bits
The number of bits in an address’s subnet mask. For example type /24
for a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0.
port
An xDSL port number.
hostname
The hostname can be an IP address or domain name.
name
Used for the name of a rule, policy, set, group and so on.
number
Used for a number, for example 10, that you have to enter.
Note: Commands are case sensitive! Enter commands exactly as seen in the
command interface. Remember to also include underscores if required.
Copy and Paste Commands
You can copy and paste commands directly from this document into your terminal
emulation console window (such as HyperTerminal). Use right-click (not [CTRL][V]) to paste your command into the console window as shown next.
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50.4 Using Shortcuts and Getting Help
This table identifies some shortcuts in the CLI, as well as how to get help.
Table 133 CLI Shortcuts and Help
COMMAND / KEY(S)
DESCRIPTION
yz (up/down arrow keys)
Scrolls through the list of recently-used commands. You
can edit any command or press [ENTER] to run it again.
?
Displays the keywords and/or input values that are
allowed in place of the ?.
help
Displays the (full) commands that are allowed in place of
help.
Use the help command to view the executable commands on the IES-1248-51V.
Follow these steps to create a list of supported commands:
1
Log into the CLI.
2
Type help and press [ENTER]. A list comes up which shows all the commands
available for this device.
ras> help
adsl
ip
voip
ras>
alarm
statistics
config
switch
exit
sys
50.5 Command Privilege Levels
There is a high, middle or low privilege level for each command.
High privilege commands are only available to administrators with high privilege
access. High privilege commands include things like creating administrator
accounts, restarting the system and resetting the system to its factory defaults.
Administrators with high privilege access can use all commands including the
lower privilege commands.
Administrators with middle privilege access can use middle or low privilege
commands.
Administrators with the low privilege level are restricted to using only low privilege
commands. Low privilege commands are read only.
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50.6 Saving Your Configuration
In the IES-1248-51V some commands are saved as you run them and others
require you to run a save command. See the related section of this guide to see if
a save command is required.
Note: Unsaved configuration changes are lost once you restart the IES-1248-51V
50.7 Logging Out
Use the exit command to log out of the CLI.
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CHAPTER
51
Common Commands
This chapter introduces some of the more commonly-used commands in the IES1248-51V. For more detailed usage, see the corresponding feature chapter in this
guide.
In the following examples, ras is the default command prompt. If you configure a
system name, then the configured system name displays as the command
prompt. For example, change the system name to abc using the sys info
hostname abc command; the command prompt will then display as abc>.
51.1 Port Selection
Subscriber xDSL ports are identified in a command by either a port number, or by
a port list. Where a port list is specified, you can enter a single port number, a list
of xDSL ports (for example 1,3,5), a range of ports (for example 6~10) a list and
a range (for example 1,2,3,6~10), or use an asterisk (*) to indicate all ports.
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For example, the following command displays the ADSL status of ports 2, 8 and 15
to 19.
ras> adsl show 2,8,15~19
port enable mode
up/downstream
---- ------ -------- ------------2
V
auto
512/ 9088
8
V
auto
512/ 9088
15
V
auto
512/ 9088
16
V
auto
512/ 9088
17
V
auto
512/ 9088
18
V
auto
512/ 9088
19
V
auto
512/ 9088
profile
-------------------------DEFVAL_MAX
DEFVAL_MAX
DEFVAL_MAX
DEFVAL_MAX
DEFVAL_MAX
DEFVAL_MAX
DEFVAL_MAX
Subscriber Info:
port name
---- -------------------------------2 8 15 16 17 18 19 ras>
tel
----------------
51.2 IP Status
Use the following command to view IP statistics.
ras> ip show
interface ip
netmask
--------- --------------- --------------Ethernet 192.168.3.206
255.255.255.0
VoIP
192.168.2.1
255.255.255.0
default management gateway: 192.168.3.254
default VoIP gateway: 192.168.2.254
ras>
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51.3 Configuration Status
Use the config show <sys|sw|adsl|ip|stat|all> [nopause] command to
view the IES-1248-51V’s current configuration.
sys - view system configuration information.
sw - view switch configuration information.
adsl - view ADSL port configuration information.
ip - view IP configuration information.
stat - view statistics.
all - view all the above information.
nopause - view the information without being prompted to continue after each
section.
ras> config show adsl
================= adsl ====================================
================= adsl/show ==================
port enable mode
up/downstream profile
---- ------ -------- ------------- ------------------------------1
V
auto
512/ 9088 DEFVAL_MAX
2
V
auto
512/ 9088 DEFVAL_MAX
3
V
auto
512/ 9088 DEFVAL_MAX
4
V
auto
512/ 9088 DEFVAL_MAX
5
V
auto
512/ 9088 DEFVAL_MAX
6
V
auto
512/ 9088 DEFVAL_MAX
7
V
auto
512/ 9088 DEFVAL_MAX
8
V
auto
512/ 9088 DEFVAL_MAX
9
V
auto
512/ 9088 DEFVAL_MAX
10
V
auto
512/ 9088 DEFVAL_MAX
----------------------Snip------------------------
51.4 Reset to Defaults
Use the following command to reset the IES-1248-51V to the factory defaults.
Make sure you back up your current configuration first (using the web configurator
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or SMT). The IES-1248-51V will restart and the console port speed will also reset
to 9,600 bps.
ras> config restore
System will reboot automatically after restoring default configuration.
Do you want to proceed(y/n)? >
restoring configuration...
saving configuration to flash...
51.5 Port and VLAN Isolation
Turn on port isolation to block communications between subscriber ports. When
you enable port isolation, you do not need to configure the VLAN to isolate
subscribers.
Turn on VLAN isolation to block communications between subscribers in different
VLAN if you do not block communications between subscriber ports. For example,
you might want to isolate some VLAN (for example, high-speed Internet) and not
isolate other VLAN (for example, VoIP).
51.5.1 Isolation Show Command
Use this command to display the current setting of the subscriber isolation
feature.
ras> switch isolation show
system isolation: disabled
system switch mode : stand alone
isolated vlan list
---33
51.5.2 Port Isolation Enable Command
Use this command to turn on the port isolation feature.
ras> switch isolation enable
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51.5.3 Port Isolation Disable Command
Use this command to turn off the port isolation feature.
ras> switch isolation disable
51.5.4 VLAN Isolation Set Command
Use this command to turn on VLAN isolation for the specified VLAN (100 in this
example). Note that you must disable VLAN isolation first before configuring the
isolated VLAN list.
ras> switch isolation disable
ras> switch isolation vlan set 100
ras> switch isolation show
system isolation: disabled
system switch mode : stand alone
isolated vlan list
---33
100
51.5.5 VLAN Isolation Delete Command
Use this command to turn off VLAN isolation for the specified VLAN (100 in this
example).
ras> switch isolation vlan delete 100
ras> switch isolation show
system isolation: disabled
system switch mode : stand alone
isolated vlan list
---33
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51.6 Statistics Monitor Command
Use this command to show the current hardware status (voltage, temperature, fan
speed and alarm status).
ras> statistics monitor show
Hardware monitor status: enabled
nominal limit(hi) limit(lo)
current
min
max
avg status
------- --------- --------- --------- -------- -------- -------- ------v1(v)
1.200
1.284
1.116
1.191
1.191
1.191
1.191 Normal
v2(v)
1.800
1.944
1.656
1.736
1.736
1.736
1.736 Normal
v3(v)
3.300
3.564
3.036
3.196
3.196
3.196
3.196 Normal
v4(v) 20.500
22.140
18.860
20.429
20.429
20.429
20.429 Normal
v5(v)
1.400
1.512
1.288
1.438
1.425
1.438
1.435 Normal
v6(v)
3.300
3.564
3.036
3.264
3.264
3.264
3.264 Normal
v7(v)
5.000
5.400
4.600
4.782
4.782
4.782
4.782 Normal
t1(c)
t2(c)
t3(c)
t4(c)
t5(c)
t6(c)
limit(hi) limit(lo)
current
min
max
avg status
--------- --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -------97.000
-55.000
36.000
32.000
37.000
34.000 Normal
97.000
-55.000
35.000
33.000
35.000
33.000 Normal
97.000
-55.000
33.000
32.000
33.000
32.000 Normal
97.000
-55.000
30.000
29.000
31.000
29.000 Normal
97.000
-55.000
33.000
31.000
33.000
31.000 Normal
120.000
-55.000
29.000
28.000
30.000
28.000 Normal
MAINBOARD: v1~v4, t1~t3
VOIPBOARD: v5~v7, t4~t6
limit(hi) limit(lo)
current
min
max
avg status
--------- --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- ------fan1(rpm)
8000
2000
3708
3686
5373
3708 Normal
fan2(rpm)
8000
2000
3693
3675
5283
3694 Normal
fan3(rpm)
8000
2000
3765
3724
5378
3761 Normal
ext alm1
ext alm2
ext alm3
ext relay
374
status
-----Normal
Normal
Normal
name
------------------------------extalm1
extalm2
extalm3
status
--------Normal
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51.7 Statistics Port Command
Use this command to display or erase port statistics. The following example
displays port statistics for ADSL port 1.
ras> statistics port 1
[adsl port 1]: G.bond group: test, master port 1
tx packets
: 20
rx packets
: 0
tx uni-packets
: 1
rx uni-packets
: 0
tx nonuni-packets : 19
rx nonuni-packets : 0
tx discard packets: 0
rx discard packets: 0
errors
: 0
tx rate (bytes/s): 0
rx rate (bytes/s): 128
tx bytes
: 5904
rx bytes
: 0
See Chapter 9 on page 89 for details on the port statistics fields.
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CHAPTER
52
System Commands
This chapter describes the system commands. Use the system commands to view
and change basic information about your IES-1248-51V.
52.1 System Commands
The following table describes the sys commands not described elsewhere in this
guide (see Chapter 63 on page 467 for information on the sys snmp commands).
Table 134 System Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
sys client disable <index>
Turns off a secure client.
H/H
sys client enable <index>
Turns on a secure client.
H/H
sys client set <index> <startip> <end-ip> [[telnet] [ftp]
[web] [icmp] [snmp]]
Sets a secured client set: a range of IP
addresses from which you can manage the
device and the protocols that can be used.
H/H
sys client show
Displays the device’s secured client settings.
M/L
sys date set <yyyy mm dd>
Sets the system’s date.
H/H
sys date show
Displays the system’s current date.
L/L
sys info contact <contact>
Sets contact person information.
M/
H
sys info hostname <hostname>
Sets the system name.
M/
H
sys info location <location>
Sets location information.
M/
H
sys info show
Displays general system information.
L/L
sys log clear
Clears the device’s logs.
H/H
sys log show
Displays the device’s logs.
M/L
sys monitor disable
Turns the hardware monitor off.
H/H
sys monitor enable
Turns the hardware monitor on.
H/H
sys monitor extalm <index>
<name>
Set external alarm name.
H/H
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Table 134 System Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
sys monitor flimit <index>
<high> <low>
Sets the maximum (high) or minimum (low)
fan revs per minute (RPM) at the specified fan
(index).
H/H
index: 1=Fan 1, 2=Fan 2, 3=Fan 3.
sys monitor show
Displays the hardware monitor’s statistics.
L/L
sys monitor tlimit <index>
<high> <low>
Sets the maximum (high) or minimum (low)
temperature at the specified temperature
sensor. You can specify a temperature with up
to three digits after a decimal point (-50.025
for example).
H/H
Temperature sensor locations:
index: 1=DSL, 2=CPU, 3=HW monitor
sys monitor vlimit <index>
<high> <low>
Sets the maximum (<high>) or minimum
(<low>) voltage at the specified voltage
sensor. You can specify a voltage with up to
three digits after a decimal point (0.941 for
example). Normal voltage at each sensor:
H/H
index: 1=1.2v, 2=1.8v, 3=3.3v, 4=24v
sys monitor ftrapmode
[normal\two]
Display or configure FAN trap operation mode
normal: FAN trap is issued if just one of the
three FAN’s revolutions per minute (RPM) is
lower than the FAN speed threshold.
M/
H
two: FAN trap is issued if two of the three
FAN’s RPMs are lower than the FAN speed
threshold
sys reboot [show|sec|cancel]
Sets the reboot timer or displays the timer
and remaining time for reboot. If a reboot has
been scheduled, use this command to prevent
a reboot.
H/H
sys server disable
<telnet|ftp|web|icmp>
Turns a service off.
H/H
sys server enable
<telnet|ftp|web|icmp>
Turns a service on.
H/H
sys server port
<telnet|ftp|web> <port>
Sets a port for a service.
H/H
sys server show
Displays the device’s service status and port
numbers.
M/L
sys stdio set <minute>
Sets the current stdio timeout. Enter 0 to
have no timeout.
H/H
minute: 0~999
378
sys stdio show
Displays the current stdio timeout.
L/L
sys syslog disable
Turns off the syslog logging.
H/H
sys syslog enable
Turns on the syslog logging.
H/H
sys syslog server <ip-address>
Sets the IP address of the syslog server.
H/H
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Chapter 52 System Commands
Table 134 System Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
sys syslog show
Displays the syslog settings.
M/L
sys time set <hh> [<mm> [ss]]
Sets the system’s time.
H/H
sys time show
Displays the system’s current time.
L/L
sys timeserver set <daytime>
<ip-address> [nosync]
Sets the time service protocol and the time
server’s IP address.
H/H
sys timeserver set <none>
Sets the system to not use a time server.
H/H
sys timeserver set <time|ntp>
<ip> <utc[<+|->0100~1200]>
[nosync]
Sets the time service protocol, time server’s
IP address and the device’s time zone.
H/H
sys timeserver show
Displays the system’s time server.
M/L
sys timeserver sync
Retrieves the date and time from the time
server.
H/H
sys user auth
<local|radius|landr>
Sets the authentication method.
H/H
sys user delete <name>
Removes the specified user name of multilogin.
H/H
sys user disable <name>
Turns off the specified user name of multilogin.
H/H
sys user enable <name>
Turns on the specified user name of multilogin.
H/H
sys user online
Displays online user info.
M/
~
sys user server <ip-address>
<port> <secret>
[high|middle|low|deny]
Set remote authentication server’s IP address
and secret.
H/H
sys user set <username>
<password> <high|middle|low>
Creates or edits the password and privilege
level of the specified user name.
H/H
sys user show
Displays the authentication mode, RADIUS
server settings and user info.
M/L
sys wdog set <msec>
Sets the watchdog count. 0 turns the
watchdog off.
H/
~
sys wdog show
Displays the current watchdog firmware
protection feature status and timer.
H/
~
52.1.1 Idle Timeout Set Command Example
By default, the IES-1248-51V automatically logs you out of the management
interface after five minutes of inactivity. Use the sys stdio set command to
extend the idle timeout. The following example extends the idle timeout to 120
minutes.
ras> sys stdio set 120
ras>
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52.1.2 Basic System Information Command Examples
Use the following command to view the firmware and bootbase version.
ras> sys info show
Hostname:
Location:
Contact:
Model:
RAS version:
F/W size:
MAC address:
VOIP MAC address:
System up time:
Bootbase version:
F/W build date:
DSP code version:
Hardware version:
Serial number:
VOIP DSP version:
Codec F/W version:
ras
3.53(BVL.0) | 03/29/2010
4780672
00:23:F8:00:00:01
00:23:F8:00:00:02
1(days) :
1:43:23
V1.01 | 04/01/2010
Apr 1 2010 15:34:48
6.05.17
12.02.10.007 EGW
1.99
Use the following commands to view the IES-1248-51V’s time and date.
ras> sys time show
current time is 16:46:45
ras> sys date show
current date is Tue 2007/09/04
ras>
Use the following command to restart your IES-1248-51V right away.
ras> sys reboot
reboot system now(y/n)? >
telnet-1(172.16.11.33) reboot system now!
Connection to host lost.
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52.1.3 Logs Command Examples
Use the following commands to display all logs or just error logs. Logs are very
useful for troubleshooting. If you are having problems with your IES-1248-51V,
customer support may request that you send them the logs.
ras>
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
sys
Tue
Tue
Tue
Tue
Tue
Tue
Tue
Tue
log show
Sep 04 16:17:19 2007 1_Tell_P INFO Session Begin!
Sep 04 14:22:39 2007 Console
INFO Session End!
Sep 04 14:22:39 2007 Console
INFO Last errorlog repeat 1 Times
Sep 04 14:17:37 2007 Console
INFO Session Begin!
Sep 04 14:17:33 2007 Console
WARN Incorrect Password!
Sep 04 14:17:10 2007 PSSV
INFO System Cold Start!
Sep 04 14:17:02 2007 iw_app
INFO Ether 1 Link Up(SN=2): 100/100!
Sep 04 14:16:59 2007 PINI
INFO Change time server to none.
52.1.3.1 Log Format
The common format of the system logs is: <item no> <time> <process> <type>
<log message>.
Table 135 Log Format
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
<item no>
This is the index number of the log entry.
<time>
This is the time and date when the log was created.
<process>
This is the process that created the log.
<type>
This identifies what kind of log it is. "INFO" identifies an information
log. "WARN" identifies a warning log.
<log message>
This is the log’s detailed information (see Table 136 on page 382)
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52.1.3.2 Log Messages
The following table lists and describes the system log messages.
Table 136 Log Messages
LOG MESSAGE
TYPE DESCRIPTION
ADSL <port> Link
Up(SN=<seq no>): <ds
rate>/<us rate>!
or
ADSL Link Info: NM:<ds
NM>/<us NM>!
INFO
An ADSL port established a connection.
port - port number
seq no - sequence number of the connection
ds rate - downstream rate
us rate - upstream rate
us NM - upstream noise margin
ds NM - downstream noise margin
ADSL <port> Link
Down(SN=<seq no>)!
WARN
An ADSL port lost its connection.
port - port number
seq no - sequence number of the connection
ADSL <port> Link Loss
of Power Dying-Gasp
Event!
WARN
Change time server to
none.
INFO
The subscriber device connected to an ADSL port experienced a
loss of power (Dying-Gasp).
port - port number
The time server setting was changed to none.
Change time server to INFO
TIME. IP:<ip>
Timezone: <time zone>.
The time server protocol setting was changed to TIME. The time
server’s IP address and time zone are displayed.
Change time server to
DAYTIME. IP: <ip>
INFO
The time server protocol setting was changed to DAYTIME. The
time server’s IP address and time zone are displayed.
Change time server to
NTP. IP: <ip>
Timezone: <time zone>
INFO
The time server protocol setting was changed to NTP. The time
server’s IP address and time zone are displayed.
External alarm is
triggered!
WARN
External alarm input was detected.
Ether <port> Link
Down(SN=N)!
WARN
An Ethernet link is down.
port - 1 is ENET1, 2 is ENET2
SN - an internal sequencer number
Ether N Link Up(SN=N):
<speed>!
INFO
An Ethernet link is up.
port - 1 is ENET1, 2 is ENET2
SN - an internal sequencer number
speed - Ethernet connection speed, for example 1000M or 100M
External alarm is
released.
382
INFO
An external alarm is over and the input has returned to a normal
state.
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Chapter 52 System Commands
Table 136 Log Messages (continued)
LOG MESSAGE
TYPE DESCRIPTION
FAN RPM DOWN: dev:
<id> Limit:N value:N!
WARN
A fan’s RPM went too low.
id - 1=Fan 1, 2=Fan 2, 3=Fan
Limit - minimum (low) fan (RPM)
value - the measured fan RPM
FAN RPM OK: dev: <id>
Limit:N value:N!
INFO
A fan’s RPM returned to the normal range.
id - 1=Fan 1, 2=Fan 2, 3=Fan 3
Limit - maximum (high) or minimum fan (RPM) that had been
breached
value - the measured fan RPM
FAN RPM OVER: dev:
WARN
<id> Limit:N value:N!
A fan’s RPM went too high.
id - 1=Fan 1, 2=Fan 2, 3=Fan 3
Limit - maximum (high) fan (RPM)
value - the measured fan RPM
Incorrect Password!
WARN
Someone attempted to use the wrong password to start a console,
telnet or FTP session (see the <process> field for the type of
session).
Session Begin!
INFO
A console, telnet or FTP session has begun (see the <process>
field for the type of session).
Session End!
INFO
A console telnet or FTP session has terminated (see the
<process> field for the type of session).
Sync with timeserver
<ip> failed!
WARN
The device was not able to synchronize the time with the time
server at the listed IP address.
Sync with timeserver
<ip> successful!
INFO
The device synchronized the time with the time server at the
listed IP address.
Received File <file>!
INFO
A file was uploaded to the IES-1248-51V by FTP.
file - received file’s name
Received Firmware
Checksum Error!
WARN
A checksum error was detected during an attempted FTP firmware
upload.
Received Firmware
Invalid!
WARN
Someone attempted to upload a firmware file with a wrong
identity via FTP.
Received Firmware Size
too large!
WARN
The file size was too large with an attempted FTP firmware upload.
THERMO LOW VOLTAGE:
dev: <id> limit:
<threshold> value:
<voltage>!
WARN
The device’s voltage went above the accepted operating range.
id - 1=1.2v, 2=1.8v, 3=3.3v, 4=24v
threshold - voltage limit
voltage - voltage of the DC power when logged
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Table 136 Log Messages (continued)
LOG MESSAGE
TYPE DESCRIPTION
THERMO LOW
WARN
TEMPERATURE: dev:<id>
threshold:<threshold>(
degree C)
value:<temp>(degree
C)!
The temperature was too low at one of the temperature sensors.
id - 0: sensor near the ADSL chipset, 1: sensor near the CPU, 2:
thermal sensor chip
threshold - temperature limit
temp - temperature when the entry was logged
THERMO OVER
WARN
TEMPERATURE: dev:<id>
threshold:<threshold>(
degree C)
value:<temp>(degree
C)!
The temperature was too high at one of the temperature sensors.
id - 0: sensor near the ADSL chipset, 1: sensor near the CPU, 2:
thermal sensor chip
threshold - temperature limit
temp - temperature when the entry was logged
THERMO OVER
INFO
TEMPERATURE released:
dev:<id>
threshold:<threshold>(
degree C)
value:<temp>(degree
C)!
The temperature at one of the temperature sensors has come
back to normal.
id - 0: sensor near the ADSL chipset, 1: sensor near the CPU, 2:
thermal sensor chip
threshold - temperature limit
temp - temperature when the entry was logged
THERMO OVER VOLTAGE:
dev: <id> limit:
<threshold> value:
<voltage>!
WARN
The voltage at one of the voltage sensors went above the
accepted operating range.
id - 1=1.2v, 2=1.8v, 3=3.3v, 4=24v
threshold - voltage limit
voltage - voltage of the DC power when logged
THERMO OVER VOLTAGE
released:
nominal:<nominal>(mV)
value:<voltage> (mV)!
INFO
The device’s voltage is back inside the accepted operating range.
nominal - nominal voltage of the DC power
voltage - voltage of the DC power when logged
52.1.4 Clearing the Log
Syntax:
ras> sys log clear
This command clears the system error log.
Note: If you clear a log (using the sys log clear command), you cannot view it
again.
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CHAPTER
53
Alarm Commands
This chapter describes the alarm management commands. Use these commands
to view, customize and clear alarms. You can also set the device to report alarms
to an SNMP or syslog server that you specify.
53.1 General Alarm Command Parameters
The following table describes commonly used alarm command parameter
notation.
Table 137 General Alarm Command Parameters
NOTATION
DESCRIPTION
alarm
Specify a category of alarms.
eqpt represents equipment alarms.
dsl represents Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) alarms.
enet represents Ethernet alarms.
sys represents system alarms.
all specifies every alarm category.
severity
Specify an alarm severity level (critical, major, minor, info or all).
Critical alarms are the most severe, major alarms are the second most
severe, minor alarms are the third most severe and info alarms are
the least severe.
condition
This is the text description for the condition under which the alarm
applies. Use the alarm tablelist to find alarm conditions.
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53.2 Alarm Commands
The following table describes the alarm commands.
Table 138 alarm Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
alarm show [<severity>|all]
[<alarm>|all]
[<condition>|all] [detail]
This command displays the current alarms by
severity, alarm category or alarm condition.
L/L
alarm port show
[<severity>|all]
This command displays port alarm severity
level thresholds. The system reports an alarm
on a port if the alarm has a severity equal to
or higher than the port’s threshold.
L/L
alarm port set
<all|enet1|enet2|<port>>
<severity>
This command sets the alarm severity
threshold for recording alarms on an
individual port(s). The system reports an
alarm on a port if the alarm has a severity
equal to or higher than the port’s threshold.
M/
H
detail: Display in-depth alarm information.
all|enet1|enet2|port: Ports on the IES1248-51V.
alarm tablelist [<alarm>|all]
[<severity>|all]
[<fac>|all][<target>[,<target>
] [<condition>|all]
This command lists alarm settings.
L/L
fac: The log facility (local1~local7) that
has the device log the syslog messages to
different files in the syslog server. See your
syslog program’s documentation for details.
target: snmp|syslog|all The type of alarm
messages that the device is to send (SNMP,
syslog or all).
alarm history show
[<severity>|all] [<alarm>|all]
[<condition>|all]
[<sdate>|all] [<edate>|all]
[for|rev] [detail]
This command displays historic alarms by
L/~
severity, alarm category, alarm condition and/
or dates.
sdate: The start date, in yyyy/mm/dd format.
edate: The end date, in yyyy/mm/dd format.
for|rev: The displaying order. Use for to
display in chronological order starting from
the oldest alarm. Use rev to display in
reverse chronological order starting from the
most recent alarm.
detail: Display in-depth alarm information.
alarm history clear
[<alarm>|all <condition>|all]
<severity>
386
This command removes historic alarm entries
by alarm category, alarm condition or
severity.
M/
~
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Chapter 53 Alarm Commands
Table 138 alarm Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
alarm xedit <<alarm>|all>
<<condition>|<condcode>>
<severity> <fac>
<target>[,<target>]
[clearable|unclearable]
This command sets the severity level of an
alarm(s) and where the system is to send the
alarm(s).
M/
H
Use the alarm tablelist command to
display alarm setting details.
cond: all|condition This is the text
description for the condition under which the
alarm applies. Use the alarm tablelist to
find alarm conditions.
condcode: The condition code is the number
of a specific alarm message. Use the alarm
tablelist to find alarm condition codes.
severity: Specify an alarm severity level
(critical, major, minor or info) for this
alarm. Critical alarms are the most severe,
major alarms are the second most severe,
minor alarms are the third most severe and
info alarms are the least severe.
fac: The log facility (local1~local7) has
the device log the syslog messages to a
particular file in the syslog server. Set this if
this entry is for sending alarms to a syslog
server. See your syslog program’s
documentation for details.
target: snmp|syslog|all The type of alarm
messages that the device is to send (SNMP,
syslog or all). You can specify more than one,
separated by commas.
clearable|unclearable This sets whether or
not the alarm clear command removes the
alarm from the system.
alarm cutoff
This command cancels an alarm. This stops
the sending of the alarm signal current. This
is useful in stopping an alarm if you have the
alarm output connector pins connected to a
visible or audible alarm. The alarm entry
remains in the system.
M/
~
alarm clear
This command erases the clearable alarm
entries.
M/
H
53.2.1 Alarm Show Command Example
The following example shows the results of using this command.
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Chapter 53 Alarm Commands
The source is where the alarm originated. This is either a DSL port number, one of
the Ethernet ports (enet 1 or 2), or “eqpt” for the system itself.
ras> alarm show
[current alarm list]
no alarm
condition
------ ------ -------------------1 eqpt
+fan_err
2 eqpt
+fan_err
3 eqpt
+fan_err
severity
-------critical
critical
critical
timestamp
-------------09/19 12:49:10
09/19 12:49:10
09/19 12:49:10
source
------eqpt 1
eqpt 3
eqpt 2
53.2.2 Alarm Port Show Command Example
This example shows the results of using this command.
ras> alarm port show
Press any key to continue, 'e' to exit, 'n' for nopause
no
----01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
ifindex
---------01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
severity
----------minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
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53.2.3 Alarm Port Set Command Example
The following example has the IES-1248-51V record only critical alarms on DSL
port 7.
ras> alarm port set 7 critical
53.2.4 Alarm Tablelist Command Example
The following example displays the supported minor level alarms for all alarm
categories, facilities, types of alarm messages and conditions.
ras> alarm
no alarm
--- -----1
dsl
2
dsl
3
dsl
4
dsl
5
dsl
6
dsl
7
dsl
8
dsl
9
dsl
10
dsl
11
dsl
12
dsl
13
dsl
14
dsl
15 eqpt
16 eqpt
17 eqpt
18 eqpt
19 eqpt
tablelist
condition
facility snmp syslog severity clearable
-------------------------------- ---- ------ -------- ------( 5000)line_up
( 5001)line_down
( 5002)ad_perf_lol_thresh
( 5003)ad_perf_lof_thresh
( 5004)ad_perf_los_thresh
( 5005)ad_perf_lop_thresh
( 5006)ad_perf_es_thresh
( 5007)ad_perf_ses_thresh
( 5008)ad_perf_uas_thresh
( 5009)ad_atuc_loftrap
( 5010)ad_atuc_lostrap
( 5011)ad_atur_loftrap
( 5012)ad_atur_lostrap
( 5013)ad_atur_lprtrap
(10000)vol_err
(10001)temp_err
(10002)fan_err
(10003)hw_rtc_fail
(10004)hw_mon_fail
local1
local1
local1
local1
local1
local1
local1
local1
local1
local1
local1
local1
local1
local1
local1
local1
local1
local1
local1
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
info
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
minor
critical
critical
critical
critical
critical
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
-
Press any key to continue, 'e' to exit, 'n' for nopause
53.2.5 Log Format
The following table describes the columns in the list.
Table 139 Log Format
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
no
This is the index number of the alarm entry in this list display.
alarm
This is the category of alarms. eqpt represents equipment alarms. dsl
represents Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) alarms. enet represents
Ethernet alarms. sys represents system alarms.
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Table 139 Log Format (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
condition
There is a condition code number for the specific alarm message and a
text description for the condition under which the alarm applies.
facility
This is the log facility (local1~local7) on the syslog server where the
system is to log this alarm. This is for alarms that send alarms to a
syslog server.
snmp
This displays “V” if the system is to send this alarm to an SNMP server.
It displays a dash (-) if the system does not send this alarm to an
SNMP server.
syslog
This displays “V” if the system is to send this alarm to a syslog server.
It displays a dash (-) if the system does not send this alarm to a
syslog server.
severity
This is the alarm severity level (critical, major, minor or info).
clearable
This displays “V” if the alarm clear command removes the alarm from
the system. It displays a dash (-)if the alarm clear command does not
remove the alarm from the system.
53.2.6 Alarm History Show Command Example
The following example displays the historic critical level alarms for all alarm
categories, and all conditions.
ras> alarm history show critical all all all all rev detail
no alarm
condition
severity timestamp
source
------ ------ ------------------------ -------- -------------- ------1 eqpt
+fan_err
critical 01/01 03:32:21 eqpt 2
* DSLAM:Fan 2 speed 0, low 2000, high 8000
2 eqpt
+fan_err
critical 01/01 03:32:21 eqpt 3
* DSLAM:Fan 3 speed 0, low 2000, high 8000
3 eqpt
+fan_err
critical 01/01 03:32:21 eqpt 1
* DSLAM:Fan 1 speed 0, low 2000, high 8000
53.2.7 Alarm History Clear Command Example
The following example removes the historic minor level alarms for all alarm
categories, and all conditions.
ras> alarm history clear minor
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53.2.8 Alarm XEdit Command Example
The following example creates an alarm report entry that sets all system alarms to
the major severity level and sends them to an SNMP server at the local 3 log
facility.
ras> alarm xedit sys all major local3 syslog
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CHAPTER
54
DHCP Commands
This chapter describes how to use the DHCP Relay and DHCP Snoop commands.
Use these commands to configure the DHCP relay feature. See Chapter 29 on
page 223 for background information on DHCP relay.
54.1 General DHCP Command Parameters
The following table describes commonly used DHCP command parameter notation.
Table 140 General DHCP Command Parameters
NOTATION
DESCRIPTION
vid|all
The ID of the VLAN to which to apply the setting. Type all to apply
the setting to all VLANs.
vid: 1-4094
port-list
You can specify a single port (1), all ports (*) or a list of ports (1,3).
You can also include a range of ports (1,5,6~10).
54.2 DHCP Relay Commands
Table 141 DHCP Relay Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch dhcprelay show
This command displays the DHCP relay
settings for each VLAN. These settings
include whether or not this feature is
activated for each VLAN, the relay mode, the
current list of DHCP servers, the status of the
DHCP relay agent info option 82 feature and
the information configured for it.
L/L
switch dhcprelay enable
<vid|all>
This command turns on the DHCP relay for
the specified VLAN or for all VLANs.
M/H
switch dhcprelay disable
<vid|all>
This command turns off the DHCP relay for
the specified VLAN or for all VLANs.
M/H
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Table 141 DHCP Relay Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch dhcprelay optionmode
<vid|all> <private|tr101>
Sets the IES-1248-51V to use the Private or
TR-101 mode to add the DHCP relay option
82 information to packets being transmitted
for the specified VLAN. See Section 28.2 on
page 217 for more information.
M/H
switch dhcprelay server set
<vid> <primary-server>
[secondary-server]
This command specifies the DHCP server(s)
that serve the specified VLAN. The primary
server is required; the secondary server is
optional. The IES-1248-51V routes DHCP
requests to the specified DHCP server(s)
according to the relaymode.
M/H
Use VLAN ID 0 to set up the default DHCP
server(s) for all non-listed VLAN.
vid: The ID of the VLAN to which to apply
the setting.
primary-server: The IP address of one
DHCP server.
secondary-server: The IP address of a
second DHCP server.
switch dhcprelay server delete
<vid|all> [primary-server]
This command deletes all information about
DHCP servers for the specified VLAN or for all
VLANs. Afterwards, the specified VLAN can
uses the default DHCP server(s) set up for
VLAN ID 0, if any.
M/H
primary-server: The IP address of one
DHCP server.
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Table 141 DHCP Relay Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch dhcprelay server active
<vid> <active-server>
If the relaymode is auto, this command
specifies to which DHCP server (the primary
one or the secondary one) the IES-1248-51V
should relay DHCP requests for the selected
VLAN. This command has no effect if the
relaymode is both.
M/H
active-server:
1: The primary DHCP server is active.
2: The secondary DHCP server is active.
switch dhcprelay relaymode
<vid|all> <mode>
This command controls how the IES-124851V routes DHCP requests. The IES-124851V can route DHCP requests to the active
DHCP server for the selected VLAN, or it can
route DHCP requests to all DHCP servers set
up for the selected VLAN.
M/H
mode: Relay process mode; it controls to
which DHCP server(s) the IES-1248-51V
relays DHCP requests for the specified VLAN
or for all VLANs.
auto - the IES-1248-51V relays DHCP
requests to the active server for the
specified VLAN or for all VLANs.
both - the IES-1248-51V relays DHCP
requests to the primary and secondary
server for the specified VLAN or for all
VLANs, regardless of which server is
active.
54.2.1 Show Command Example
This example shows the current DHCP configuration of the IES-1248-51V.
ras> switch dhcprelay show
vid enable relay mode primary-server
secondary-server
---- ------ ---------- ------------------ -----------------0
auto
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
option82
option82
vid optmode sub-opt1 info (Circuit ID)
sub-opt2 info (Remote ID)
---- ------- -------- ----------------------- -------- ---------------------0 private
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54.3 DHCP Relay Option 82 Sub-option 1
Commands
Use the following commands to configure the DHCP relay Option 82 (agent
information) feature, sub-option 1 (circuit ID). This feature applies regardless of
whether or not the DHCP relay is on.
Table 142 DHCP Relay Option 82 Sub-option 1 Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch dhcprelay option82
enable <vid|all>
This command turns on the DHCP relay agent
information (Option 82 Sub-option 1) for the
specified VLAN or for all VLANs.
M/
H
switch dhcprelay option82
disable <vid|all>
This command turns off the DHCP relay agent
information (Option 82, Sub-option 1) for the
specified VLAN or for all VLANs.
M/
H
switch dhcprelay option82 set
<vid|all> <relay-info>
This command adds the specified information
for the relay agent for the specified VLAN or
for all VLANs.
M/
H
relay-info: Up to 23 ASCII characters of
additional information for the IES-1248-51V
to add to the DHCP requests that it relays to
a DHCP server. Examples of information you
could add would be the name of the IES1248-51V or the ISP. To clear this field, type
a pair of double quotation marks with no
space between them (““).
54.4 DHCP Relay Option 82 Sub-option 2
Commands
Use the following commands to configure the DHCP relay Option 82 (agent
information) feature, sub-option 2 (remote ID). This feature applies regardless of
whether or not the DHCP relay is on.
Table 143 DHCP Relay Option 82 Sub-option 2 Commands
396
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch dhcprelay opt82sub2
enable <vid|all>
This command turns on the DHCP relay agent
information (Option 82, Sub-option 2) for the
specified VLAN or for all VLANs.
M/H
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Table 143 DHCP Relay Option 82 Sub-option 2 Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch dhcprelay opt82sub2
disable <vid|all>
This command turns off the DHCP relay agent
information (Option 82, Sub-option 2) for the
specified VLAN or for all VLANs.
M/H
switch dhcprelay opt82sub2 set
<vid|all> <relay-info>
This command adds the specified information
for the relay agent (Option 82, Sub-option 2)
for the specified VLAN or for all VLANs.
M/H
relay-info: Up to 23 ASCII characters of
additional information for the IES-1248-51V
to add to the DHCP requests that it relays to
a DHCP server. Examples of information you
could add would be the name of the IES1248-51V or the ISP. To clear this field, type
a pair of double quotation marks with no
space between them (““).
54.5 PPPoE Intermediate Agent Information
Commands
Use these commands if you want the IES-1248-51V to add a vendor-specific tag
to PADI (PPPoE Active Discovery Initiation) and PADR (PPPoE Active Discovery
Request) packets from PPPoE clients. This tag gives a PPPoE termination server
additional information (such as the port number, VLAN ID, and MAC address) that
the server can use to identify and authenticate a PPPoE client. See Chapter 39 on
page 295 for background information.
Table 144 PPPoE Intermediate Agent Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch poeagent clearinfo
<vid|all>
This command clears any extra information
the IES-1248-51V adds to PADI and PADR
packets in the specified VLAN or for all
VLANs.
H/H
switch poeagent enable
<vid|all>
This command adds a vendor-specific tag to
PADI and PADR packets for PPPoE clients in
the selected VLAN(s) or for all VLANs. This
tag contains information that a PPPoE
termination server can use to identify and
authenticate a PPPoE client.
H/H
switch poeagent optionmode
<vid|all> <private|tr101>
Sets the IES-1248-51V to use the TR-101
format for the PPPoE Sub-option 1 (Circuit
ID) or private mode for the packets it
transmits for the specified VLAN.
H/H
switch poeagent delete
<vid|all>
This command deletes the PPPoE
intermediate agent settings for the specified
VLAN or for all VLANs. You cannot delete the
setting for VLAN 0.
H/H
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Table 144 PPPoE Intermediate Agent Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch poeagent disable
<vid|all>
This command removes the vendor-specific
tag from PADI and PADR packets for PPPoE
clients in the selected VLAN(s) or for all
VLANs.
H/H
switch poeagent info <vid|all>
<description>
This command specifies the extra information
the IES-1248-51V adds to PADI and PADR
packets in the specified VLAN or in all VLANs,
if the PPPoE intermediate agent is enabled.
H/H
Note: Before you can configure PPPoE
intermediate agent information, you
must first create a entry using the
poeagent set command.
description: The PPPoE line information
the switch is to add to PPPoE discover
packets from the specified VLAN or from all
VLANs. Enter a description (up to 23
alphanumerical characters).
switch poeagent set <vid>
This command creates a PPPoE agent
information entry for the VLAN. After you
have created an entry for a VLAN, you can
configure the line information settings.
H/H
vid: VLAN ID.
switch poeagent show
[vlanlist]
This command displays PPPoE intermediate
agent settings for the specified VLAN or for
all VLANs.
M/L
vlanlist: You can specify a single VID (1),
all VIDs (*), a list of VIDs (1,3), or you can
also include a range of VIDs (1,5,6~10).
54.5.1 PPPoE Intermediate Agent Enable Command Example
The following example activates the PPPoE agent setting for VLAN 100.
ras> switch poeagent enable 100
ras> switch poeagent show
vid enable optionmode info
---- ------ ---------- ----------------------------0
V
private
100
V
private
Note: vid 0 is the default agent.
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54.5.2 PPPoE Intermediate Agent Info Command Example
The following example sets the switch to add “testing” to PADI and PADR packets
on VLAN 100.
ras> switch poeagent info 100 testing
ras> switch poeagent show
vid enable optionmode info
---- ------ ---------- ----------------------------0
private
100
V
private
testing
Note: vid 0 is the default agent.
54.5.3 PPPoE Intermediate Agent Set Command Example
The following example creates an entry for VLAN 10.
ras> switch poeagent set 10
ras> switch poeagent show
vid enable info
---- ------ ----------------------------0
10
100
V
testing
101
102
Note: vid 0 is the default agent.
54.5.4 PPPoE Intermediate Agent Show Command Example
The following example shows the PPPoE intermediate agent settings for all VLANs.
ras> switch poeagent show
vid enable info
---- ------ ----------------------------0
10
100
V
testing
101
102
Note: vid 0 is the default agent.
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54.6 DHCP Snoop Commands
Use these commands to configure or show DHCP snooping settings on the
subscriber ports. The system gets the client MAC-IP address information (in the
reply from a DHCP server) and stores it in the DHCP snooping table. The system
forwards packets from only the clients whose MAC-IP address is in the DHCP
snooping table. Packets from unknown IP address(es) are not forwarded
(dropped). This feature prevents clients from assigning their own static IP
addresses.
In some cases, you might want to allow packets from an IP address not offered by
the DHCP server. This might apply, for example, to static IP addresses. In this
case, you can specify the IP address whose packets are allowed, and the IES1248-51V forwards these packets as well.
Table 145 DHCP Snoop Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch dhcpsnoop enable <portlist>
This command activates the DHCP snooping
feature on the specified port(s).
M/
H
switch dhcpsnoop disable
<port-list>
This command disables the DHCP snooping
feature on the specified port(s).
M/
H
switch dhcpsnoop flush <portlist>
This command clears the DHCP snooping
binding table on the specified port(s). The
system also automatically clears the binding
table when you disable DHCP snooping.
M/
H
switch dhcpsnoop lan2lan
disable
This command disables LAN to LAN DHCP
services.
M/
H
switch dhcpsnoop lan2lan
enable
This command enables LAN to LAN DHCP
services.
M/
H
switch dhcpsnoop lan2lan show
This command displays whether LAN to LAN
DHCP services are currently enabled or
disabled.
M/
H
switch dhcpsnoop pool set
<port> <ip-address>
This command adds the specified IP address
to the static IP pool for the specified port.
The IES-1248-51V forwards packets from IP
addresses in this pool, as well as packets
from IP addresses learned through DHCP
snooping. You can set up to three IP
addresses for each port, but you have to set
each IP address for each port one at a time.
You cannot add IP addresses to a static IP
pool if the pool already has three IP
addresses in it. You have to delete one of the
existing IP addresses first.
M/
H
port: The selected ADSL port number(s).
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Table 145 DHCP Snoop Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch dhcpsnoop pool delete
<port> <ip-address>
This command removes the specified IP
address from the static IP pool for the
specified port. The IES-1248-51V forwards
packets from IP addresses in this pool, as
well as packets from IP addresses learned
through DHCP snooping. You cannot delete
an IP address that is not in the pool.
M/
H
port: The selected ADSL port number(s).
switch dhcpsnoop show <portlist>
Use this command to display the current
DHCP snooping settings of the specified
port(s).
L/L
statistics dhcp counter
[<port-list> [clear]]
Use this command to display or clear the
summary of DHCP packets on the specified
port(s).
L/L
statistics dhcp snoop <portlist>
Use this command to look at the DHCP
snooping table on the specified port(s).
L/L
54.6.1 DHCP Snoop Enable Command Example
The following example enables DHCP snooping on port 1.
ras> switch dhcpsnoop enable 1
54.6.2 DHCP Snoop Set Static IP Command Example
The following example adds 1.2.3.7 to the static IP pool for port 1.
ras>
ras>
port
---1
2
3
4
5
switch
switch
enable
------
dhcpsnoop pool set 1 1.2.3.7
dhcpsnoop show 1~5
static IP pool
--------------------------------------------------1.2.3.7
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54.6.3 DHCP Snoop Delete Static IP Command Example
The following example removes 1.2.3.7 from the static IP pool for port 1.
ras>
ras>
port
---1
2
3
4
5
switch
switch
enable
------
dhcpsnoop pool delete 1 1.2.3.7
dhcpsnoop show 1~5
static IP pool
---------------------------------------------------
1.2.3.4
1.2.3.5
1.2.3.6
54.6.4 DHCP Snoop Show Command Example
The following example displays the settings of ports 1-5.
ras> switch dhcpsnoop show 1~5
port enable static IP pool
---- ------ --------------------------------------------------1
2
3
4
5
1.2.3.4
1.2.3.5
1.2.3.6
54.6.5 DHCP Counter Statistics Command Example
The following example displays the settings of port 1.
ras> statistics dhcp counter 1
port discover offer
request
ack
overflow
----- -------- -------- -------- -------- -------1
0
0
0
0
0
Each field is described in the following table.
402
port
=
The selected ADSL port number(s).
discover
=
The number of DHCP Discover packets on this port.
offer
=
The number of DHCP Offer packets on this port.
request
=
The number of DHCP Request packets on this port.
ack
=
The number of DHCP Ack packets on this port.
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overflow
=
There is a limit to the number of IP addresses the DHCP
server can assign at one time to each port. This field
displays the number of requests from DHCP clients
above this limit. Overflow requests are dropped by the
IES-1248-51V.
54.6.6 DHCP Snoop Statistics Command Example
The following example displays the settings of port 1.
Figure 169 DHCP Snoop Statistics Command Example
ras> statistics dhcp snoop 1
port overflow
mac
ip
---- -------- ----------------- ---------------
Each field is described in the following table.
port
=
The selected ADSL port number(s).
overflow
=
There is a limit to the number of IP addresses the DHCP
server can assign at one time to each port. This field
displays the number of requests from DHCP clients
above this limit. Overflow requests are dropped by the
IES-1248-51V.
mac
=
The MAC address of a client on this port to which the
DHCP server assigned an IP address.
ip
=
The IP address assigned to a client on this port.
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CHAPTER
55
OUI Filter
These commands let you configure an OUI (Organizationally Unique Identifier)
filter to block or forward packets from other devices with the specified OUI in the
MAC address. The OUI field is the first three octets in a MAC address. An OUI
uniquely identifies the manufacturer of a network device and allows you to identify
from which device brands the switch will accept traffic or send traffic to. The OUI
value is assigned by the Internet Assign Numbers Authority (IANA).
These commands correspond to the Web Configurator’s OUI Filter settings
described in Chapter 42 on page 303.
55.1 OUI Filtering
The following table describes common required values in OUI filter commands.
Other values are discussed with the corresponding commands.
Table 146 OUI Filter Commands Input Values
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
port
Enter an ADSL port number, 1~48.
oui-mac
Enter the first three octets of the MAC address you want to filter.
port-list
Enter a series of port numbers, separated by commas, a range
separated by a tilde (~), or a combination of the two separated by a
comma. For example: 1,2 or 5~10 or 1,2,5~10.
Use these commands to configure the OUI filter settings.
Table 147 OUI Filter Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch oui set <port> <ouimac> [<oui-mac> <oui-mac>
...]
Creates a filter for the specified OUI octets on an ADSL
port(s).
H/H
switch oui delete <port>
<oui-mac> [<oui-mac> <ouimac> ...]
Removes a filter for the specified OUI octets on an ADSL
port(s).
H/H
switch oui disable [portlist]
Turns off the OUI filter for the specified port(s).
H/H
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Table 147 OUI Filter Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch oui enable [port-list]
Turns on the OUI for the specified port(s).
H/H
switch oui mode <port-list>
<accept|deny>
Flags the OUI filter for the specified port(s) to either
accept or deny incoming connections based on the OUI
octet.
H/H
switch oui show [port-list]
Displays the OUI filter settings for the specified port(s).
M/L
55.1.1 OUI Set and Delete Command Examples
The following example creates a filter two separate MAC octects (01:23:45 and
67:89:ab) on port number 2.
Figure 170 OUI Set Command Example
ras> switch oui set 2 01:23:45 67:89:ab
The following shows you how to remove the two MAC octets from the filter list for
port number 2.
Figure 171 OUI Delete Command Example
ras> switch oui delete 2 01:23:45 67:89:ab
55.1.2 OUI Enable and Disable Command Examples
The following is an example of enabling an OUI filter on port 7.
Figure 172 OUI Enable Command Example
ras> switch oui enable 7
The following is an example of disabling an OUI filter on port 1.
Figure 173 OUI Disable Command Example
ras> switch oui disable 1
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55.1.3 OUI Mode Command Example
The following is an example of flagging port 3 to accept any devices with MAC
address that match the octets in the OUI filter list.
Figure 174 OUI Mode Command Example
ras> switch oui mode 3 accept
The following is an example of flagging port 5 to deny any devices with MAC
address that match the octets in the OUI filter list.
Figure 175 OUI Enable Command Example
ras> switch oui mode 5 deny
55.1.4 OUI Show Command Example
The following shows you how to display the OUI filtering for a specific port.
Figure 176 OUI Show Command Example
ras> switch oui show 1
status:V, enable oui filter function.
status:-, disable oui filter function.
port mode status oui
---- ------ ------ ----------------1 accept
00:11:00
Each field is described in the following table.
port
=
The selected ADSL port number(s).
mode
=
The port mode and whether it accepts connections from
devices with the specified OUI octet or denies them.
status
=
The port status and whether the OUI function is enabled
or disabled on the specified port.
V: The OUI filter function is enabled for the port.
-: The OUI filter function is disabled for the port.
oui
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=
The three OUI octets used to filter the specified port.
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CHAPTER
56
IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN and
Isolation Commands
This chapter describes the IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN commands as well as
command used to configure the isolation feature on the IES-1248-51V.
56.1 IEEE 802.1Q Tagging Types
There are two kinds of tagging:
• Explicit Tagging
A VLAN identifier is added to the frame header that identifies the source VLAN.
• Implicit Tagging
The MAC (Media Access Control) number, the port or other information is used to
identify the source of a VLAN frame.
The IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN uses both explicit and implicit tagging.
It is important for the IES-1248-51V to determine what devices are VLAN-aware
and VLAN-unaware so that it can decide whether to forward a tagged frame (to a
VLAN-aware device) or first strip the tag from a frame and then forward it (to a
VLAN-unaware device).
56.2 Filtering Databases
A filtering database stores and organizes VLAN registration information useful for
switching frames to and from the IES-1248-51V. A filtering database consists of
static entries (Static VLAN or SVLAN table).
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56.2.1 Static Entries (SVLAN Table)
Static entry registration information is added, modified and removed by
administrators only.
56.3 IEEE VLAN1Q Tagged VLAN Configuration
Commands
These switch commands allow you to configure and monitor the IEEE 802.1Q
Tagged VLAN.
Table 148 IEEE VLAN1Q Tagged VLAN Configuration Command Summary
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch vlan portshow [portlist]
Displays the port’s IEEE 802.1Q
VLAN tag settings.
M/L
switch vlan pvid <portlist> <pvid>
Sets a default VLAN ID for all
untagged packets that come in
through the specified port.
H/H
portlist: You can specify a single
port <1>, all ports <*> or a list of
ports <1,3,enet1>. You can also
include a range of ports
<1,5,6~10,enet1,enet2>.
pvid: The VLAN ID. Valid parameter
range = [1 – 4094].
switch vlan priority <portlist>
<priority>
Sets the priority of incoming frames
with an IEEE 802.1Q VLAN tag.
H/H
priority: This is the priority value
(0 to 7) to use for incoming frames
with an IEEE 802.1Q VLAN tag.
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Table 148 IEEE VLAN1Q Tagged VLAN Configuration Command Summary
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch vlan set <vid>
<portlist>:<F<T|U>|X|N>
[<portlist>:<F<T|U>|X> ...][name]
Adds or modifies an entry in the
static VLAN table.
H/H
vid: The VLAN ID [1 – 4094].
portlist: You can specify a single
port: <1>, all ports: <*>, a list of
ports: <1,3,enet1>, you can also
include a range of ports:
<1,5,6~10,enet1,enet2>.
F<T|U>: The <F> stands for a fixed
registrar administration control flag
and registers a <portlist> to the
static VLAN table with <vid>. For a
fixed port, you also have to specify
<T|U>, the tag control flag.
T: has the device add an IEEE
802.1Q tag to frames going out
through this port(s).
U: has the device send frames
out through this port(s) without
an IEEE 802.1Q tag.
X: This is the registrar
administration control flag. X
stands for forbidden and blocks a
<portlist> from joining the
static VLAN table with <vid>.
N: stands for normal and
confirms registration of the
<portlist> to the static VLAN
table with <vid>. This is used in
GVRP applications.
name: A name to identify the SVLAN
entry.
switch vlan frametype <portlist>
<all|tag>
Sets the specified xDSL ports to
accept VLAN tagged Ethernet
frames, or both tagged and
untagged Ethernet frames.
H/H
switch vlan cpu show
Displays the management VLAN
(CPU). You can only use ports that
are members of this management
VLAN in order to manage the IES1248-51V.
M/
~
switch vlan cpu set <vid>
Sets the management VLAN (CPU).
You can only use ports that are
members of this management VLAN
in order to manage the IES-124851V.
H/
~
switch vlan delete <vlan-list>
Deletes the specified VLAN ID entry
from the static VLAN table.
H/H
vlan-list: You can specify a single
VID: <1>, all VIDs: <*>, a list of
VIDs: <1,3>, you can also include a
range of VIDs: <1,5,6~10>.
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Table 148 IEEE VLAN1Q Tagged VLAN Configuration Command Summary
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch vlan enable <vid>
This command enables the specified
VLAN ID in the SVLAN (Static VLAN)
table.
H/H
switch vlan disable <vid>
This command disables the
specified VLAN ID in the SVLAN
(Static VLAN) table.
H/H
switch vlan show <vlanlist>
This command shows information
about the specified port’s VLAN
settings.
M/L
switch vlan gvrp <portlist>
<enable|disable>
Set the port(s) to enable or disable
GVRP.
H/H
56.3.1 VLAN Port Show Command Example
The following example shows the settings for xDSL port 1.
ras> switch vlan portshow 3
port pvid priority frametype
----- ---- -------- --------3
1
0
all
56.3.2 VLAN PVID Command Example
The following example sets the default VID of port 1 to 200.
ras> switch vlan pvid 1 200
56.3.3 VLAN Priority Command Example
The following example sets a priority of three for frames (with an IEEE 802.1Q
VLAN tag) that come in on xDSL port 2.
ras> switch vlan priority 2 3
56.3.4 VLAN Set Command Examples
This command adds or modifies an entry in the static VLAN table. Use the switch
vlan show command to display your configuration. An example of a configuration
is shown next.
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56.3.4.1 Modify a Static VLAN Table Example
The following is an example of how to modify a static VLAN table.
ras> switch vlan set 2000 1:FU
ras> switch vlan set 2001 2:FU
56.3.4.2 Forwarding Process Example
Tagged Frames
1
First the IES-1248-51V checks the VLAN ID (VID) of tagged frames or assigns
temporary VIDs to untagged frames (see Section 56.3.2 on page 412).
2
The IES-1248-51V checks the frame’s source MAC address against the MAC filter.
3
The IES-1248-51V then checks the VID in a frame’s tag against the SVLAN table.
4
The IES-1248-51V notes what the SVLAN table says (that is, the SVLAN tells the
IES-1248-51V whether or not to forward a frame and if the forwarded frames
should have a tag).
5
Frames might be dropped if they are sent to a CPE (customer premises
equipment) xDSL device that does not accept tagged frames.
Untagged Frames
1
An untagged frame comes in from the LAN.
2
The IES-1248-51V checks the frame’s source MAC address against the MAC filter.
3
The IES-1248-51V checks the PVID table and assigns a VID and IEEE 802.1Q
priority.
4
The IES-1248-51V ignores the port from which the frame came, because the IES1248-51V does not send a frame to the port from which it came. The IES-124851V also does not forward frames to “forbidden” ports.
5
If after looking at the SVLAN, the IES-1248-51V does not have any ports to which
it will send the frame, it drops the frame.
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56.3.5 VLAN Frame Type Command Example
The following example sets the IES-1248-51V to accept only VLAN tagged
Ethernet frames on xDSL port 3.
ras> switch vlan frametype 3 tag
56.3.6 VLAN CPU Show Command Example
The following example sets VLAN ID 2 to be the CPU (management) VLAN.
ras> switch vlan cpu set 2
56.3.7 VLAN CPU Set Command Example
The following example sets VLAN ID 2 to be the CPU (management) VLAN.
ras> switch vlan cpu set 2
56.3.8 Configuring Management VLAN Example
Note: After the following example configuration, you must connect to the first Ethernet
port through a VLAN aware device that is using the proper VLAN ID in order to
perform management.
By default, the IES-1248-51V’s xDSL ports are members of the management
VLAN (VID 1). The following procedure shows you how to configure a tagged VLAN
that limits management access to just one Ethernet port.
Note: Use the console port to configure the IES-1248-51V if you misconfigure the
management VLAN and lock yourself out.
1
Use the switch vlan set command to configure a VLAN ID (VID 3 in this
example) for managing the IES-1248-51V (the “management” or “CPU” VLAN).
ras> switch vlan set 3 enet1:FT
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2
Use the switch vlan1q vlan cpu command to set VID 3 as the management
VLAN.
ras> switch vlan cpu set 3
56.3.9 VLAN Delete Command Example
The following example deletes entry 2 in the static VLAN table.
ras> switch vlan delete 2
56.3.10 VLAN Show Command Example
The following example shows the settings for all VIDs.
ras>
vid
---1
switch vlan show
name
---------------enabled
2 disabled
2000 enabled
*
F:fixed X:forbidden N:normal
U:untag T:tag
--------------------------------------------------123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678 12
FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF FF
UUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU UU
123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678 12
FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF FF
UUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU UU
123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678 12
FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF FF
UUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU UU
56.4 VLAN Statistics Commands
VLAN statistics provide information about VLANs configured on the IES-1248-51V.
Table 149 Statistics VLAN Command Summary
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
statistics vlan
Displays current VLAN settings.
M/L
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56.5 GARP Timer Commands
These switch commands allow you to configure GARP (Generic Attribute
Registration Protocol) Timer settings. GARP Timers set declaration (Join, Leave
and Leave All) timeout values with respect to GVRP (GARP VLAN Registration
Protocol).
Table 150 GARP Timer Command Summary
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch garptimer join <milliseconds>
Sets the system’s garp join
time.
H/H
switch garptimer leave <milliseconds>
Sets the system’s garp leave
time.
H/H
switch garptimer leaveall <milliseconds>
Sets the system’s garp leaveall
time.
H/H
switch garptimer show <milliseconds>
Displays the system’s garp
settings.
M/L
56.6 Isolation Commands
Use the switch isolation commands to configure the subscriber isolation
feature. Use subscriber isolation to block communications between subscriber
ports. When you enable subscriber isolation you do not need to configure the
VLAN to isolate subscribers.
Turn on VLAN isolation to block communications between subscribers in different
VLANs if you do not block communications between subscriber ports. For example,
you might want to isolate some VLANs (for example, high-speed Internet) and not
isolate other VLANs (for example, VoIP). See Chapter 51 on page 369 for
examples.
Table 151 Isolation Command Summary
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch isolation daisychain
Sets switch mode to daisychain
mode.
H/H
switch isolation disable
Turns the subscriber isolation feature
off.
H/H
switch isolation enable
Turns the subscriber isolation feature
on.
H/H
switch isolation show
Displays the subscriber isolation
feature’s current settings.
M/L
switch isolation standalone
Sets switch mode to standalone
mode.
H/H
switch isolation vlan delete <vlan-id> Deletes an isolated VLAN.
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Table 151 Isolation Command Summary (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch isolation vlan set <vlan-id>
Creates an isolated VLAN.
H/H
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CHAPTER
57
MAC Commands
This chapter describes how to configure the IES-1248-51V’s MAC commands.
57.1 MAC Filter Commands
Use the MAC filter to control from which MAC (Media Access Control) addresses
frames can (or cannot) come in through a port.
Table 152 MAC Filter Command Summary
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch mac filter show [portlist]
Displays the MAC filtering status (V
for enabled, - for disabled) and the
fixed source MAC addresses on the
specified xDSL port(s) or on all
xDSL ports if no port is specified.
M/L
switch mac filter enable [portlist]
Turns on the MAC filtering feature
on the specified xDSL port(s) or on
all xDSL ports if no port is specified.
H/
H
switch mac filter disable [portlist]
Turns off the MAC filtering feature
on the specified xDSL port(s) or on
all xDSL ports if no port is specified.
H/
H
switch mac filter mode <port>
<accept|deny>
Sets whether the IES-1248-51V
allows or blocks access for the MAC
addresses you specify.
H/
H
switch mac filter set <port> <mac>
[mac] [mac]...
Adds an allowed source MAC
address on the specified xDSL port.
H/
H
mac: The source MAC address in
"00:a0:c5:12:34:56" format.
switch mac filter delete <port> <mac>
[mac] [mac] ...
Removes a configured source MAC
address from the xDSL port that you
specify.
H/
H
mac: The source MAC address in
"00:a0:c5:12:34:56" format.
statistics mac
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Displays current MAC address
forwarding table.
M/L
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57.1.1 MAC Filter Show Command Example
The following example displays the MAC filtering mode, status and the fixed
source MAC addresses on xDSL port 5.
ras> sw mac filter show 5
status:V, enable mac filter function.
status:-, disable mac filter function.
port mode status mac
---- ------ ------ ----------------5 accept
00:a0:c5:12:34:56
57.1.2 MAC Filter Enable Command Example
The following example turns on the MAC filtering feature on xDSL port 5.
ras> switch mac filter enable 5
57.1.3 MAC Filter Disable Command Example
The following example turns off the MAC filtering feature on xDSL port 5.
ras> switch mac filter disable 5
57.1.4 MAC Filter Mode Command Example
The following example sets xDSL port 5 to allow frames from the MAC addresses
specified for xDSL port 5.
ras> switch mac filter mode 5 accept
57.1.5 MAC Filter Set Command Example
The following example adds source MAC address 00:a0:c5:12:34:56 for xDSL port
5.
ras> switch mac filter set 5 00:a0:c5:12:34:56
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57.1.6 MAC Filter Delete Command Example
The following example removes the source MAC address of 00:a0:c5:12:34:56
from the MAC filter for xDSL port 5.
ras> switch mac filter delete 5 00:a0:c5:12:34:56
57.2 MAC Count Commands
Use MAC count commands to limit how many MAC addresses may be dynamically
learned. MAC count commands are listed next. When the MAC filter accept mode
is enabled (see Section 57.1 on page 419), the IES-1248-51V ignores the MAC
count setting and accepts all of the MAC addresses listed for the port in the MAC
filter settings.
Table 153 MAC Count Command Summary
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch mac count show [portlist]
Displays the MAC count settings on
the specified xDSL port(s) or on all
xDSL ports if no port is specified.
M/L
switch mac count enable <portlist>
Enables the MAC count filter on the
specified xDSL port(s). When the
MAC filter accept mode is enabled
(see Section 57.1 on page 419), the
IES-1248-51V ignores the MAC
count setting and accepts all of the
MAC addresses listed for the port in
the MAC filter settings.
H/
H
switch mac count disable <portlist>
Disables the MAC filtering feature on
the specified xDSL port(s).
H/
H
switch mac count set <portlist> <count> Sets the limit for how many MAC
addresses may be dynamically
learned on the specified xDSL
port(s).
H/
H
count: The valid range is from “1”
to “128”.
mac flush
Clears learned MAC addresses from
the forwarding table.
switch mac agingtime set
<10~10000|0:disabled>
Sets the MAC aging out time period. H/
H
switch mac agingtime show
Displays the MAC aging out time
period.
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H/
H
M/L
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57.2.1 MAC Count Show Command Example
The following example displays the MAC count settings for xDSL port 4.
ras> switch mac count show 4
port status count
---- ------ ----4
V
128
57.2.2 MAC Count Enable Command Example
The following example turns on the MAC count filter on xDSL port 4.
ras> switch mac count enable 4
57.2.3 MAC Count Disable Command Example
The following example turns off the MAC count filter on xDSL port 4.
ras> switch mac count disable 4
57.2.4 MAC Count Set Command Example
The following example sets the MAC count filter to allow up to 50 MAC addresses
to be dynamically learned on xDSL port 7.
ras> switch mac count set 7 50
57.3 MAC Anti-Spoofing Commands
Use MAC anti-spoofing commands to configure checking for authorized MAC to IP
address bindings for incoming packets on the IES-1248-51V.
Table 154 MAC Anti-Spoofing Command Summary
422
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch mac antispoofing disable
Turns off the MAC antispoofing.
H/
H
switch mac antispoofing enable
Turns on the MAC antispoofing.
H/
H
switch mac antispoofing show
Shows the MAC antispoofing status.
M/
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CHAPTER
58
IGMP Commands
This chapter describes the IGMP snooping and filtering commands.
58.1 IGMP Snooping Commands
Use the IGMP snoop commands to enable or disable IGMP proxy or IGMP
snooping.
Table 155 igmpsnoop Command Summary
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch igmpsnoop show
Displays the IGMP mode (proxy, snooping or disabled).
M/L
switch igmpsnoop enable
<proxy|snooping> [v2|v3]
Turns on IGMP proxy or snooping and, optionally,
specifies the IGMP version.
H/H
Use proxy to have the device use IGMP proxy. Use
snooping to have the device passively learn multicast
groups.
If you select IGMPv2 (v2), the device discards IGMPv3
packets. This provides better security if none of the
devices in the network use IGMPv3. If you select
IGMPv3 (v3), the device recognizes both IGMPv2 and
IGMPv3.
switch igmpsnoop disable
Turns off IGMP proxy or snooping.
H/H
58.1.1 IGMP Snoop Show Example
The following example displays the IGMP mode (proxy, snooping or disabled).
ras> switch igmpsnoop show
IGMP Snooping/Proxy is Disable
58.1.2 IGMP Snoop Enable Example
The following example sets the device to use IGMP proxy.
ras> switch igmpsnoop enable proxy
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58.1.3 IGMP Snoop Disable Command Example
The following example sets the device to not use IGMP proxy or snooping.
ras> switch igmpsnoop disable
58.2 IGMP Filter Commands
Use the IGMP filter commands to define IGMP filter profiles and assign them to
xDSL ports.
IGMP filter profiles allow you to control access to IGMP multicast groups. You can
have a service available to a specific IGMP multicast group. You can configure an
IGMP filter profile for an IGMP multicast group that has access to a service (like an
H.248 media gateway controller for example). Then you can assign the IGMP filter
profile to xDSL ports that are allowed to use the service.
Table 156 igmpfilter Command Summary
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch igmpfilter show
[portlist]
Displays which IGMP filter profile an xDSL port(s) is
using.
M/L
portlist: You can specify a single xDSL port <1>, all
xDSL ports <*> or a list of xDSL ports <1,3,5>. You
can also include a range of ports <1,5,6~10>.
switch igmpfilter set [<port>|*]
<name>
Sets an xDSL port(s) to use an IGMP filter profile.
H/H
port|*: You can specify a single xDSL port, for
example 1 or all xDSL ports *.
name: The name of an IGMP filter profile.
switch igmpfilter profile set
Configures an IGMP filter profile.
<name> <index> <startip> <endip>
name: Specify a name to identify the IGMP filter profile
(you cannot change the name of the DEFVAL profile).
You can use up to 31 ASCII characters; spaces are not
allowed.
H/H
index: The number (1~16) to identify a multicast IP
address range.
startip: Type the starting multicast IP address for a
range of multicast IP addresses that you want to
belong to the IGMP filter profile.
endip: Type the ending multicast IP address for a
range of IP addresses that you want to belong to the
IGMP filter profile.
If you want to add a single multicast IP address, enter
it in both the startip and endip fields.
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Table 156 igmpfilter Command Summary (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch igmpfilter profile delete
<name>
Removes the specified IGMP filter profile.
H/H
switch igmpfilter profile show
[<name>|*]
Displays an IGMP filter profile’s settings.
M/L
58.2.1 IGMP Filter Show Command Example
The following example displays which IGMP filter profile xDSL port 9 is using.
ras> switch igmpfilter show 9
port
profile
-------------------------------------9
DEFVAL
58.2.2 IGMP Filter Set Command Example
The following example sets xDSL port 9 to use the voice IGMP filter profile.
ras> switch igmpfilter set 9 voice
58.2.3 IGMP Filter Profile Set Command Example
The following example configures an IGMP filter profile named voice with a range
of multicast IP addresses (index 1) from 224.1.1.10 to 224.1.1.44.
ras> switch igmpfilter profile set voice 1 224.1.1.10 224.1.1.44
58.2.4 IGMP Filter Profile Delete Command Example
The following example removes the voice IGMP filter profile.
ras> switch igmpfilter profile delete voice
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58.2.5 IGMP Filter Profile Show Command Example
The following example displays the voice IGMP filter profile’s settings.
ras> switch igmpfilter profile show voice
profile index
startip
endip
------------------------------------------------------------------------voice
1
224.1.1.10
224.1.1.44
voice
2
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
voice
3
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
voice
4
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
voice
5
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
voice
6
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
voice
7
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
voice
8
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
voice
9
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
voice
10
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
voice
11
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
voice
12
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
voice
13
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
voice
14
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
voice
15
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
voice
16
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
58.3 IGMP Bandwidth Commands
Use the IGMP bandwidth commands to set up bandwidth budgets for specific
multicast channels.
Table 157 IGMP Bandwidth Command Summary
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch igmpsnoop bandwidth
default <rate>
Sets the default bandwidth for multicast channels for
which you have not configured bandwidth
requirements yet. Multicast bandwidth settings on
channels (using the switch igmpsnoop bandwidth
set command) have higher priority over this default
setting.
H/H
rate: Allowed bandwidth between 1 and 1000 000
kbps (kilo bits per second).
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Table 157 IGMP Bandwidth Command Summary (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch igmpsnoop bandwidth set
<index> <start-mcast-ip> <endmcast-ip> <rate>
Configures bandwidth allocation for the multicast
channel(s). For multicast channel(s) for which you
have not configured bandwidth settings, the default
multicast bandwidth setting applies (see the switch
igmpsnoop bandwidth default command).
H/H
index: 1~96; a unique number for this setting.
start-mcast-ip: 224.0.0.0~239.255.255.255; the
beginning of the multicast range.
end-mcast-ip: 224.0.0.0~239.255.255.255; the end
of the multicast range. It must be greater than <startmcast-ip>.
rate: 1~100000, in units of kbps
switch igmpsnoop bandwidth
delete <index>
Removes the specified multicast bandwidth
configuration profile.
H/H
switch igmpsnoop bandwidth show
Displays bandwidth budget for multicast IP channels
configured on the IES-1248-51V.
M/L
58.4 IGMP Bandwidth Port Commands
Use the IGMP bandwidth port commands to set up bandwidth budgets for
multicast traffic on specific ports.
Table 158 IGMP Bandwidth Port Command Summary
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch igmpsnoop bandwidth port
disable <portlist>
Deactivates multicast bandwidth settings of the
specified port.
H/H
portlist: You can specify a single xDSL port <1>, all
xDSL ports <*> or a list of xDSL ports <1,3,5>. You
can also include a range of ports <1,5,6~10>.
switch igmpsnoop bandwidth port
enable <portlist>
Activates multicast bandwidth setting on the specified
port.
H/H
switch igmpsnoop bandwidth port
set <portlist> <rate>
Sets the bandwidth allowed for multicast traffic on the
specified port(s). It does not automatically enable it,
however.
H/H
rate:
switch igmpsnoop bandwidth port
show <portlist>
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1~100000, in units of kbps
Displays the multicast bandwidth setting on the
specified port(s) and whether or not this setting is
active. The following example displays the bandwidth
budget for port 1.
M/L
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58.4.1 IGMP Bandwidth Port Show Command Example
The following example displays the bandwidth budget for port 1.
ras> switch igmpsnoop bandwidth port show 1
port enable
bandwidth
------ ------ ----------1
4096
58.5 IGMP Count Limit Commands
Use these commands to limit the number of IGMP groups a subscriber on a port
can join. This allows you to control the distribution of multicast services (such as
content information distribution) based on service plans and types of subscription.
IGMP count is useful for ensuring the service quality of high bandwidth services
like video or Internet Protocol television (IPTV). IGMP count can limit how many
channels (IGMP groups) the subscriber connected to an xDSL port can use at a
time. If each channel requires 4~5 Mbps of download bandwidth, and the
subscriber’s connection supports 11 Mbps, you can use IGMP count to limit the
subscriber to using just 2 channels at a time. This also effectively limits the
subscriber to using only two IPTVs with the xDSL connection.
Table 159 IGMP Count Limit Command Summary
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch igmpsnoop igmpcount
disable <portlist>
Turns off the IGMP count limit for the specified xDSL
port(s).
H/H
switch igmpsnoop igmpcount
enable <portlist>
Turns on the IGMP count limit for the specified xDSL
port(s).
H/H
switch igmpsnoop igmpcount set
<portlist> <count>
Sets the IGMP count limit for the specified xDSL
port(s).
H/H
count: 0~16; the maximum number of IGMP groups
subscribers on the specified port(s) can join.
switch igmpsnoop igmpcount show
[portlist]
Displays the IGMP count limit setting status for the
specified xDSL port(s).
M/L
58.5.1 IGMP Count Disable Command Example
The following command turns off the IGMP count limit for port 4.
ras> switch igmpsnoop igmpcount disable 4
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58.5.2 IGMP Count Enable Command Example
The following command turns on the IGMP count limit for port 4.
ras> switch igmpsnoop igmpcount enable 4
58.5.3 IGMP Count Set Command Example
The following command sets a IGMP count limit of 2 for port 4.
ras> switch igmpsnoop igmpcount set 4 2
58.5.4 IGMP Count Show Command Example
The following example displays the IGMP count limit settings for ports 1-5.
ras> switch igmpsnoop igmpcount show 1~5
port enable count
---- ------ ----1
5
2
5
3
5
4
5
5
5
58.6 IGMP Snoop Statistics Commands
Use the IGMP Snoop Statistics commands to display current IGMP settings and
statistics.
Table 160 IGMP Snooping Statistics Command Summary
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
statistics igmpsnoop info [clear]
Displays the current IGMP settings and the
number of IGMP-related packets received.
Optionally, clears the statistics.
L/L
statistics igmpsnoop group [<vid>
[<mcast_ip>]]
Displays the information about IGMP groups
learned on the system, specified VLAN, or
specified multicast address on the specified
VLAN(s).
L/L
vid: The VLAN ID [1 – 4094].
mcast-ip: The multicast IP address.
statistics igmpsnoop port info
<portlist>
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Displays the number of IGMP-related packets
received on the specified port(s).
L/L
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Table 160 IGMP Snooping Statistics Command Summary (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
statistics igmpsnoop port group
<portlist>
Displays the IGMP groups a port joins.
M/L
58.6.1 IGMP Snoop Info Statistics Command Example
This command displays the current IGMP settings and the number of IGMP-related
packets received.
ras> statistics igmpsnoop info
IGMP Snooping/Proxy is Disable
number of query
= 0
number of report
= 0
number of leave
= 0
number of groups
= 0
58.6.2 IGMP Group Statistics Command Example
This command displays the information about IGMP groups learned on the system,
specified VLAN, or specified multicast address on the specified VLAN(s).
ras> statistics igmpsnoop group
[group info]
group
vid port
--------------- ---- ------------------------------------------------ --
58.6.3 IGMP Port Info Statistics Command Example
The following figure shows the number of IGMP packets for port 1.
ras> statistics igmpsnoop port info 1
port group_cnt query_cnt join_cnt leave_cnt
----- --------- --------- --------- --------1
0
0
0
0
58.6.4 IGMP Port Group Statistics Command Example
The following figure shows an example for port 1.
ras> statistics igmpsnoop port group 1
port
vid mcast_ip
source ip
----- ---- --------------- ---------------
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58.7 IGMP Query VLAN Commands
Use the IGMP query VLAN commands to configure the IES-1248-51V to query
VLANs as multicast group members.
Table 161 igmpsnoop Command Summary
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch igmpsnoop qryvid delete
<vid>
Deletes the specified IGMP query VLAN ID while the
IES-1248-51V is in IGMP proxy mode.
H/H
switch igmpsnoop qryvid set
<vid>
Creates the specified IGMP query VLAN ID while the
IES-1248-51V is in IGMP proxy mode.
H/H
switch igmpsnoop qryvid show
Displays the IGMP query VLAN ID setting of the IES1248-51V.
M/L
58.8 Multicast VLAN Commands
Use these commands to configure VLAN multicast settings and set multicast port
members.
Multicast VLAN allows one single multicast VLAN to be shared among different
subscriber VLANs on the network. This improves bandwidth utilization by reducing
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multicast traffic in the subscriber VLANs and simplifies multicast group
management.
Table 162 Multicast VLAN Command Summary
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch igmpsnoop mvlan set <vid>
<portlist>:<F<T|U>|X>
[<portlist>:<F<T|U>|X> ...] [name]
Creates a multicast VLAN and sets the allowed/ H/H
blocked port member(s). This command is
similar to the command to create a regular
VLAN. See Section 56.3.4 on page 413 for
examples and more information.
portlist: You can specify a single port (“1”),
all ports (“*”), a list of ports (“1,3,enet1”), you
can also include a range of ports
(“1,5,6~10,enet1,enet2”).
F<T|U>: Stands for a fixed registrar
administration control flag and registers a
<portlist> to the static VLAN table with
<vid>. For a fixed port, you also have to
specify <T|U>, the tag control flag.
T: has the device add an IEEE 802.1Q tag to
frames going out through this port(s).
U: has the device send frames out through
this port(s) without an IEEE 802.1Q tag.
X: This is the registrar administration control
flag. It stands for forbidden and blocks a
<portlist> from joining the static VLAN table
with <vid>.
name: A name to identify the SVLAN entry.
switch igmpsnoop mvlan delete <vlanlist>
Removes the specified multicast VLAN
configuration(s).
H/H
vlan-list: You can specify a single VLAN:
<1>, all VLAN: <*>, a list of VLAN: <1,3>,
you can also include a range of VLAN:
<1,5,6~10>.
switch igmpsnoop mvlan disable <vid>
Deactivates the specified multicast VLAN.
H/H
switch igmpsnoop mvlan enable <vid>
Activates the specified multicast VLAN.
H/H
switch igmpsnoop mvlan show <vlan-list> Displays the current multicast VLAN settings.
switch igmpsnoop mvlan group set <vid>
<index> <start-mcast-ip> <end-mcastip>
Creates a multicast VLAN group.
H/H
H/H
index: 1~16; a unique number for this setting.
start-mcast-ip: Start of the multicast IP
address range.
end-mcast-ip: End of the multicast IP address
range.
switch igmpsnoop mvlan group delete
<vid> <index>
Removes the specified multicast VLAN group
setting.
H/H
index: 1~16; a unique number for this setting.
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Table 162 Multicast VLAN Command Summary (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch igmpsnoop mvlan group show
[<vid>]
Displays a multicast to VLAN translation entry.
H/H
58.8.1 Multicast VLAN Disable Command Example
The following example disables multicast VLAN 12.
ras> switch igmpsnoop mvlan disable 12
58.8.2 Multicast VLAN Show Command Example
This command displays the current multicast VLAN settings for VLAN 1. In the
state column, “-” indicates the multicast VLAN is not active while “V” indicates the
multicast VLAN is active.
ras> switch igmpsnoop mvlan show 1
vid name
F:fixed X:forbidden
U:untag T:tag
---- ---------------- ----------------------------------------
58.8.3 Multicast VLAN Group Set Command Example
The following example creates a multicast VLAN with VID 10 and group index 1.
The multicast address range is 224.224.224.1 ~ 224.224.224.10.
ras> switch igmpsnoop mvlan group set 10 1 224.224.224.1
224.224.224.10
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CHAPTER
59
Packet Filter Commands
Use the following packet filter commands to filter out specific types of packets on
specific ports.
59.1 Command Summary
The following section lists the commands for this feature.
Table 163 pktfilter Command Summary
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch pktfilter show [portlist] Displays the packet type filter settings on the specified M/L
xDSL port(s) or on all xDSL ports if no port is specified.
portlist: You can specify a single xDSL port <1>, all
xDSL ports <*> or a list of xDSL ports <1,3,5>. You
can also include a range of ports <1,5,6~10>.
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Table 163 pktfilter Command Summary (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch pktfilter set <portlist>
[filter]
Sets the packet type filter for the specified xDSL
port(s).
H/H
filter: Select the filter(s) separated by a space from
the following choices:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
switch pktfilter pppoeonly
<portlist>
pppoe: Reject PPPoE packets. (Point-to-Point
Protocol over Ethernet) relies on PPP and Ethernet.
PPPoE is a specification for connecting the users on
an Ethernet to the Internet through a common
broadband medium, such as a single xDSL line,
wireless device or cable modem.
ip: Reject IP packets. Internet Protocol. The
underlying protocol for routing packets on the
Internet and other TCP/IP-based networks.
arp: Reject ARP packets. Address Resolution
Protocol is a protocol for mapping an Internet
Protocol address (IP address) to a physical
computer address that is recognized in the local
network.
netbios: Reject NetBIOS packets. (Network Basic
Input/Output System) are TCP or UDP packets that
enable a computer to connect to and communicate
with a LAN.
dhcp: Reject DHCP packets. Dynamic Host
Configuration Protocol automatically assigns IP
addresses to clients when they log on. DHCP
centralizes IP address management on central
computers that run the DHCP server program.
DHCP leases addresses, for a period of time, which
means that past addresses are “recycled” and made
available for future reassignment to other systems.
eapol: Reject EAPoL packets. EAP (Extensible
Authentication Protocol, RFC 2486) over LAN. EAP is
used with IEEE 802.1x to allow additional
authentication methods (besides RADIUS) to be
deployed with no changes to the access point or the
wireless clients.
igmp: Reject IGMP packets. Internet Group
Multicast Protocol is used when sending packets to a
specific group of hosts.
none: Accept all packets.
Sets the IES-1248-51V to allow only PPPoE traffic on
the specified xDSL port(s). The system will drop any
non-PPPoE packets.
H/H
59.1.1 Packet Filter Show Command Example
The following example displays the packet type filter settings for xDSL ports 1 and
2. “V” displays for the packet types that the IES-1248-51V is to accept on the
port. “-” displays for packet types that the IES-1248-51V is to reject on the port
(packet types that are not listed are accepted). When you use PPPoE only,”#”
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appears for all of the packet types. With PPPoE only, the IES-1248-51V rejects all
packet types except for PPPoE (packet types that are not listed are also rejected).
ras> switch pktfilter show 9
V: pass through, -: filter out, #:Don't care
E: Enable, D: Disable
port pppoe ip arp netbios dhcp eapol igmp | PPPoE-Only
1
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
|
E
2
V
V
V
V
V
|
D
59.1.2 Packet Filter Set Command Example
The following example sets xDSL port 9 to reject ARP, PPPoE and IGMP packets.
ras> switch pktfilter set 9 arp pppoe igmp
59.1.3 Packet Filter PPPoE Only Command Example
The following example sets xDSL port 1 to accept only PPPoE packets.
ras> switch pktfilter pppoeonly 1
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CHAPTER
60
Switch and Statistics
Commands
This chapter describes the switch and statistics commands not discussed
elsewhere in this guide.
60.1 IEEE 802.1x Commands
The following table describes the dot1x commands. Use these commands to
configure port authentication on the IES-1248-51V.
Table 164 IEEE 802.1x Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch dot1x auth
<profile|radius>
Sets the authentication method to profile or
radius.
H/H
switch dot1x disable
Turns IEEE 802.1x off.
H/H
switch dot1x enable
Turns IEEE 802.1x on.
H/H
switch dot1x port control
<portlist> <auto|auth|unauth>
Sets the port authentication status.
H/H
switch dot1x port disable
<portlist>
Turns IEEE 802.1x off on the specified
port(s).
H/H
switch dot1x port enable
<portlist>
Turns on IEEE 802.1x on the specified port(s). H/H
switch dot1x port period
<portlist> <period>
Set the reauthentication period of the
specified port(s).
H/H
switch dot1x port reauth
<portlist> <on|off>
Turns reauthentication on or off on the
specified port(s).
H/H
switch dot1x profile delete
<name>
Removes the specified account for profile
mode.
H/H
switch dot1x profile set
<name> <password>
Sets the account and password for profile
mode.
H/H
switch dot1x profile show
Displays the accounts for profile mode.
M/L
switch dot1x radius ip <ipaddress>
Sets the RADIUS server IP address.
H/H
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Table 164 IEEE 802.1x Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch dot1x radius port
<port>
Sets the RADIUS server port.
H/H
switch dot1x radius secret
<secret>
Sets the RADIUS server secret.
H/H
switch dot1x radius show
Displays RADIUS server settings.
M/L
switch dot1x show [portlist]
Displays IEEE 802.1x settings.
M/L
statistics dot1x [portlist]
Displays the IEEE 802.1x information for the
specified port(s).
M/L
60.2 DSCP Commands
The following table describes the dscp commands. Use these commands to
configure the DiffServ Code Point settings of the IES-1248-51V’s ports.
Table 165 DSCP Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch dscp disable <portlist>
Disables DSCP mapping on the specified xDSL
or Ethernet port(s).
M/
H
switch dscp enable <portlist>
Enables DSCP mapping on the specified xDSL
or Ethernet port(s).
M/
H
switch dscp map set <srccp>
<mappri>
Configures the DSCP-to-802.1p mapping
table.
M/
H
srccp: source code point (0~63). For
example, 1,3~5,10~15).
mappri: mapping priority (0~7).
switch dscp map show
Displays the DSCP-to-802.1p mapping table.
L/L
switch dscp show [portlist]
Displays the DSCP setting for the specified
port(s).
L/L
60.3 Ethernet Commands
The following table describes the enet commands. Use these commands to
configure the settings of the IES-1248-51V’s Ethernet ports.
Table 166 Enet Commands
442
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch enet disable <portlist>
Turns off the specified Ethernet port(s).
H/H
switch enet enable <portlist>
Turns on the specified Ethernet port(s).
H/H
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Table 166 Enet Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch enet maxmtu set <size>
Sets the MTU (Maximum Transmission Unit)
size for layer 2 frames.
H/H
size: 1526 ~ 1532; the default value is
1526.
switch enet maxmtu show
Displays the current MTU size.
M/L
switch enet name <portlist>
<name>
Sets the name of the specified Ethernet
port(s).
H/H
switch enet reset <portlist>
Resets the Ethernet interface.
H/H
switch enet show
Displays the Ethernet port settings.
M/L
switch enet speed <portlist>
<1000fiber|1000copper|100coppe
r|auto>
Sets the connection speed of the specified
Ethernet port(s).
H/H
statistics enet
Displays Ethernet port settings and statistics.
M/L
60.4 Queuemap Commands
The following table describes the queuemap commands. Use these commands to
configure priority levels and physical queues on the IES-1248-51V.
Table 167 Queuemap Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch queuemap set <priority>
<queue level>
Maps a priority level to a physical queue.
H/H
switch queuemap show
Displays the system’s priority level to physical
queue mapping.
M/L
60.5 RSTP Commands
The following table describes the rstp commands. Use these commands to
configure Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol on the IES-1248-51V.
Table 168 RSTP Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch rstp disable
Turns the IES-1248-51V’s RSTP off.
H/H
switch rstp enable
Turns the IES-1248-51V’s RSTP on.
H/H
switch rstp fwdelay <seconds>
Sets the IES-1248-51V’s RSTP forward delay
time in seconds.
H/H
switch rstp hellotime
<seconds>
Sets the IES-1248-51V’s RSTP hello time in
seconds.
H/H
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Table 168 RSTP Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch rstp maxage <seconds>
Sets the IES-1248-51V’s RSTP max age in
seconds.
H/H
switch rstp port disable
<portlist>
Disables RSTP on the specified Ethernet
port(s).
H/H
switch rstp port enable
<portlist>
Enables RSTP on the specified Ethernet
port(s).
H/H
switch rstp port pathcost
<portlist> <pathcost>
Sets the RSTP pathcost of the specified
Ethernet port(s).
H/H
switch rstp port priority
<portlist> <priority>
Sets the RSTP priority of the specified
Ethernet port(s).
H/H
switch rstp port show
Displays the RSTP status of the specified
Ethernet port(s).
M/L
switch rstp priority
<priority>
Sets the IES-1248-51V’s RSTP priority.
H/H
switch rstp show
Display the system’s rstp settings.
M/L
statistics rstp
Displays rstp information.
M/L
60.6 Static Multicast Commands
The following table describes the smcast commands. Use these commands to
configure static multicasting on the IES-1248-51V.
Table 169 Static Multicast Commands
444
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch smcast delete <macaddress>
Removes a static multicast filter entry by
deleting the associated MAC address.
H/H
switch smcast set <xdsl-port>
<mac-address> <join|leave>
Use join/leave to add/ remove multicast
MAC addresses on specified ADSL ports, a
range of ADSL ports or all ADSL ports.
H/H
switch smcast show
Displays all MAC addresses linked to ADSL
ports.
M/L
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60.7 RMON Command
Use this command to view details of remote monitoring on the IES-1248-51V’s
Ethernet ports.
Table 170 RMON Command
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
statistics rmon Stats|history
<enet-port>
Displays uplink/subtending link RMON
information
M/L
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CHAPTER
61
IP Commands
This chapter shows you how to use the IP commands to configure the IP (Internet
Protocol) parameters.
61.1 General IP Commands
Use the IES-1248-51V’s management IP addresses to manage it through the
network.
The following table describes the values required for many ip commands. Other
values are discussed with the corresponding commands.
Table 171 General IP Commands Input Values
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
ip-address
An IP address in dotted decimal notation. For example, 192.168.1.3.
mask-bits
The number of bits in an address’s subnet mask. To find the bit number,
convert the subnet mask to binary and add all of the 1’s together. Take
“255.255.255.0” for example. 255 converts to eight 1’s in binary. There
are three 255’s, so add three eights together and you get the bit
number (24).
dest-ip
The destination IP address of packets that this static route is to route.
gateway-ip
The IP address of the gateway that you want to send the packets
through.
metric
The metric (hop count) of a static route.
name
A name to identify this static route. Up to 31 ASCII characters. Spaces
and tabs are not allowed.
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The following is a list of general IP commands that help with the management of
the IP parameters.
Table 172 General IP Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
ip set <ip-address> [/maskbits]
Configures a static IP address for the IES-1248-51V
management through Ethernet and SFP ports. If you
don’t enter the subnet mask, the system automatically
computes one.
H/H
ip set dhcp
<enable|renew|release>
Enables DHCP client, has the DHCP server reassign a
new IP address or removes the current dynamic IP
address on the IES-1248-51V’s Ethernet and SFP ports
for management.
H/H
ip gateway <ip-address>
Changes the default gateway (next hop). This tells the
IES-1248-51V where to send packets that have a
destination IP address that is not on the same subnet as
the IES-1248-51V’s IP address.
H/H
ip show
Displays the current management IP settings.
M/L
ip showall
Displays the current management IP settings, the IES1248-51V’s routing table, and the IP Address Resolution
Protocol (ARP) table.
M/L
ip ping <ip-address> [count]
[voip]
Checks for network functionality by sending an echo
request to another IP host and waiting for the reply.
M/L
voip: use the VoIP interface.
ip route set <dest-ip>[/maskbits] <gateway-ip> [metric]
<name>
Defines a new, static IP forwarding route or edits an
existing one.
H/H
ip route set default
<gateway-ip> <metric> [voip]
Configures the default static IP forwarding route.
H/H
ip route delete <dest-ip>[/
mask-bits]
Removes a static IP forwarding route.
H/H
ip route show
Displays the IES-1248-51V’s routing table.
M/L
ip route flush
Clears the routing table.
H/~
ip arp show
Displays the IES-1248-51V’s IP Address Resolution
Protocol (ARP) table. This is the list of IP addresses and
matching MAC addresses that the IES-1248-51V has
resolved.
M/L
ip arp flush
Clears the IES-1248-51V’s IP Address Resolution
Protocol table.
H/H
statistics ip
Shows the statistics for the CPU IP traffic.
M/~
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61.1.1 IP Settings and Default Gateway Example
The following command sequence sets the IES-1248-51V to have 192.168.1.3 as
the IP address, 255.255.255.0 for the subnet mask and 192.168.1.233 for the
default gateway.
ras> ip set 192.168.1.3/24
ras> ip gateway 192.168.1.233
ras> config save
The IES-1248-51V leaves the factory with a default management IP address of
192.168.1.1 and a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0, (ff:ff:ff:00 in hexadecimal
notation), and the default gateway set at 192.168.1.254. Make sure that you
configure the IP parameters correctly before you connect a IES-1248-51V to the
network, otherwise, you may interrupt services already running.
61.1.2 Route Show Command Example
This example displays the IES-1248-51V’s routing table.
ras> ip route show
index dest
----- -----------------1
192.168.1.0/24
2
default voip
3
192.168.2.0/24
4
default management
interface
--------Ethernet
VoIP
VoIP
Ethernet
gateway
metric name
--------------- ------ -----------------192.168.1.1
1
192.168.2.254
1
192.168.2.1
1
192.168.1.254
1
61.1.3 ARP Show Command Example
Here is an example of the IES-1248-51V’s IP ARP table.
ras> ip arp show
ip
mac address
--------------- ----------------192.168.2.254 00:0c:db:30:ac:00
192.168.15.254 00:0c:db:30:ac:00
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61.2 Statistics IP Command Example
This example shows the statistics for the CPU IP traffic.
ras> statistics ip
[Ethernet]
inet
: 192.168.2.253
netmask: 0.0.0.0
broadcast: 192.168.255.255
mtu: 1500
in octet
:
10728504 in unicast :
738 in multicast
:
in discard :
0 in error
:
0 in unknown proto:
out octet :
41361 out unicast:
861 out multicast
:
out discard:
0 out error :
0
450
232488
0
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62
IP Bridge Commands
The IP bridge function is designed for large-scale, flat, access networks, and it is
ideal when the network is based on Ethernet. When the IP bridge is enabled, the
IES-1248-51V forwards frames based on the destination IP address, instead of the
destination MAC address, and it replaces the source MAC address with its own
MAC address.
You can follow these steps to set up a simple IP bridge.
1
Create a domain. (Each domain is an ISP.)
2
Create one or more VLANs in the domain. (For example, one VLAN is for highspeed Internet, and another VLAN is for VoIP.)
3
Specify one or more edge routers for the domain.
4
Create routing table entries, so the IES-1248-51V forwards frames to the
appropriate edge router.
5
Create downlink interfaces, so the IES-1248-51V forwards frames to the
appropriate subscribers.
6
Create PVCs for the subscribers.
62.1 IP Bridge Command Input Values
The following table describes the values required in IP bridge commands. Other
values are discussed with the corresponding commands.
Table 173 IP Bridge Command Input Values
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
domain-name
The name of the domain. You can use 1-31 printable ASCII characters.
Spaces are allowed, but you must use double quotation marks (“) to
enclose the name. (You must use a back slash (\) before double
quotation marks in the name itself.)
vlan-id
The ID <1~4094> of the VLAN.
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Table 173 IP Bridge Command Input Values (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
join|leave
Specifies whether you want to add the specified VLAN to (join) or
remove the specified VLAN from (leave) the domain.
ip-address
IP address, in dotted decimal notation.
mask-bits
Number of bits <1~32> in the subnet mask.
nexthop
IP address, in dotted decimal notation.
metric
The metric <1~15> represents the “cost” of transmission for routing
purposes. IP routing uses hop count as the measurement of cost, with
a minimum of 1 for directly-connected networks. Select the number
that approximates the cost for this link The number need not be
precise, but it must be between 1 and 15. In practice, 2 or 3 is usually
a good number.
If two entries have the same metric, the IES-1248-51V uses the one
with the lower IP address.
priority
The IEEE 802.1p priority value <0~7>.
port
The port number of the PVC.
vpi
The VPI of the PVC.
vci
The VCI of the PVC.
port-list
You can specify a single ADSL port <1>, all ADSL ports <*> or a list of
ADSL ports <1,3,5>. You can also include a range of ports
<1,5,6~10>.
DS vcprofile
Assign a VC profile to use for this channel’s downstream traffic shaping.
[,US
vcprofile]
Assign a VC profile to use for policing this channel’s upstream traffic.
The IES-1248-51V does not perform upstream traffic policing if you do
not specify an upstream VC profile.
super|<vlanid>
Enable the super channel option to allow a channel forward frames
belonging to multiple VLAN groups (that are not assigned to other
channels). The IES-1248-51V forwards frames belonging to VLAN
groups that are not assigned to specific channels to the super channel.
The super channel functions in the same way as the channel in a single
channel environment. One port can have only one super channel.
The default VID (1 to 4094). Each PVC must have a unique VID since
the IES-1248-51V forwards traffic back to the subscribers based on the
VLAN ID.
You must assign a default VID (1 to 4094) and IEEE 802.1p default
priority (0 to 7) to normal channels. Each PVC must have a unique VID
(since the IES-1248-51V forwards traffic back to the subscribers based
on the VLAN ID).
ipoa|ipoe
Specifies whether the PVC is running on Ethernet (ipoe) or on ATM
(ipoa).
62.2 IP Bridge Domain Commands
Use these commands to set up and maintain domains in IP bridges.
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A domain represents an ISP. Each domain is defined by (and dominates) the VLAN
that are in it and has its own routing table and ARP table. As a result, two or more
VLANs in different domains can use the same IP subnet, and one network can
support multiple ISPs.
VLANs in IP bridges are exclusive. They can be in at most one domain. In addition,
VLANs in IP bridges share the same VLAN space as regular VLANs, so VLANs in IP
bridges must have different VLAN IDs than regular VLANs.
Table 174 IP Bridge Domain Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl ipbpvc domain set
<domain-name>
Creates the domain with the specified name.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain show
[<domain-name>]
Displays the settings for the specified domain and the
VLAN that are in the domain.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc domain delete
<domain-name>
Deletes the specified domain. You have to remove the
VLAN that are in the domain first.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain dhcpvlan
enable <domain-name> <vlanid>
This setting has no effect on DHCP packets that come from
VLANs where the IES-1248-51V’s DHCP relay settings are
active. (See Chapter 54 on page 393. The DHCP relay
settings take precedence over the IP bridge DHCP VLAN
setting.)
H/H
This command specifies the VLAN where the domain’s
DHCP server is located. The VLAN must already be in the
domain. The IES-1248-51V forwards subscribers’ DHCP
packets to the selected VLAN and changes the source MAC
address to the IES-1248-51V’s MAC address.
The IES-1248-51V still adds whatever Option 82
information is specified for the VLAN in the DHCP relay
settings. (See Chapter 54 on page 393.)
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Table 174 IP Bridge Domain Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl ipbpvc domain dhcpvlan
disable <domain-name>
This setting has no effect on DHCP packets that come from
VLANs where the IES-1248-51V’s DHCP relay settings are
active. (See Chapter 54 on page 393. The DHCP relay
settings take precedence over the IP bridge DHCP VLAN
setting.)
H/H
This command specifies that there is no DHCP server for
the domain, in which case the IES-1248-51V does not
change the source MAC address in DHCP packets.
The IES-1248-51V still adds whatever Option 82
information is specified for the VLAN in the DHCP relay
settings. (See Chapter 54 on page 393.)
adsl ipbpvc domain vlan
<domain-name> <vlan-id>
join|leave
This command adds the specified VLAN to (join) or
removes the specified VLAN (leave) from the specified
domain. VLANs in IP bridges share the same VLAN space
as regular VLANs, so VLANs in IP bridges must have
different VLAN IDs than regular VLANs. Use the regular
VLAN commands to configure the VLAN (see Chapter 54
on page 403).
H/H
You have to delete every IP bridge setting (including DHCP
VLAN) that uses the selected VLAN before you can remove
it from the domain.
62.2.1 IP Bridge Domain Show Command Example
An example is shown next.
ras> adsl ipbpvc domain show example1
Domain Name:example1
DHCP VLAN: 200
VLAN
----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+
200 210 220 240 502
The output values correspond to the input values of other IP bridge domain
commands.
62.2.2 IP Bridge Domain DHCP VLAN Enable Command
Example
In the following example, domain “example3” has its DHCP server in VLAN 401.
ras> adsl ipbpvc domain dhcpvlan enable example3 401
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62.2.3 IP Bridge Domain VLAN Registration Command
Example
In the following example, VLAN 402 is added to domain “example3”.
ras> adsl ipbpvc domain vlan example3 402 join
62.3 IP Bridge Edge Router Commands
Use these commands to set up and maintain edge routers in an IP bridge.
Edge routers are usually the gateways that are provided to the subscribers. They
can also be gateways that are specified in static routing table entries. Each edge
router, in addition to its IP address, has an associated VLAN ID. When the IES1248-51V forwards a frame to an edge router, it uses this VLAN ID to replace
whatever VLAN ID the subscriber specified.
Table 175 IP Bridge Edge Router Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl ipbpvc edgerouter set
<ip-address>/<mask-bits>
<vlan-id>
This command creates an edge router with the specified IP
address, subnet mask, and VID. The IES-1248-51V uses
the VLAN ID when it forwards frames to the edge router. It
also uses the VLAN ID to identify the domain the edge
router is in.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc edgerouter show
[<vlan-id>]
Displays the edge routers for the specified VLAN or for all
VLAN.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc edgerouter delete
<ip-address> <vlan-id>
Deletes the edge router with the specified IP address and
VLAN ID.
H/H
62.3.1 IP Bridge Edge Router Set Command Example
The following example creates edge router 192.168.1.244 with subnet mask
255.255.255.0 and VID 401.
ras> adsl ipbpvc edgerouter set 192.168.1.244/24 401
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62.3.2 IP Bridge Edge Router Show Command Example
This example displays the edge routers for VLAN 401.
ras> adsl ipbpvc edgerouter show 401
ip/netmask
vid
------------------ ---192.168.1.244/24
401
The output values correspond to the input values of other IP bridge edge router
commands.
62.3.3 IP Bridge Edge Router Delete Command Example
The following example deletes edge router 192.168.1.244 with VID 401.
ras> adsl ipbpvc edgerouter delete 192.168.1.244 401
62.4 IP Bridge Routing Table Commands
Use these commands to set up and maintain the routing table for each domain.
Each domain has its own routing table. Each routing table contains entries that,
based on the destination IP address, control where the IES-1248-51V forwards
packets (for upstream and downstream traffic). The IES-1248-51V automatically
creates routing table entries for each downlink interface and for each edge router
in the domain. You can create additional entries by specifying the edge router to
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which the IES-1248-51V should forward traffic for a particular destination IP
address or IP subnet.
Table 176 IP Bridge Routing Table Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl ipbpvc route set
<domain-name> <ip-address>/
<mask-bits> <nexthop>
<metric> [<priority>]
This command creates the specified entry in the routing
table of the specified domain.
H/H
The <ip-address>/<mask-bits> specifies the range of IP
addresses to which this entry applies. If the destination IP
address of a packet is in this range, the IES-1248-51V
forwards the frame to the specified IP address <nexthop>.
If <nexthop> corresponds to an edge router configured
using the edge router commands (see Section 62.3 on
page 455), the IES-1248-51V uses the associated VLAN
ID. In addition,
If the edge router is in the same domain as the entry, the
entry is used for upstream traffic.
If the edge router is in a different domain than the entry,
the entry is used for downstream traffic.
If <nexthop> is not set up in the edge router screen, the
IES-1248-51V uses the entry for downstream traffic and
does not change the VLAN ID.
If the <priority> is not specified, the default value is
zero. This is applied to incoming frames without a
<priority> tag.
adsl ipbpvc route show
[<domain name> | <ipaddress>/<mask-bits> |
<domain-name> <ip-address>/
<mask-bits>]
This command displays routing table entries created
manually for the specified domain and/or range of IP
addresses. It does not show entries added automatically
by the IES-1248-51V.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc route runtime
[<domain-name> | <ipaddress>/<mask-bits> |
<domain-name> <ip-address>/
<mask-bits>]
This command displays the (run-time) routing table(s) for
the selected domain or range of IP addresses. This table
includes all the entries, whether added automatically by
the IES-1248-51V or provided manually.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc route delete
<domain-name> <ip-address>/
<mask-bits> <nexthop>
This command deletes the specified entry from the routing
table of the specified domain. You can only remove entries
that were added manually.
H/H
62.4.1 IP Bridge Route Set Command Example
The following example creates an entry in the routing table for domain
“example3”. This entry forwards traffic for IP addresses
192.168.4.0~192.168.4.255 to edge router 192.168.1.244.
ras> adsl ipbpvc route set example3 192.168.4.0/24 192.168.1.244 1
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62.4.2 IP Bridge Route Show Command Example
Here is an example of manually created routing table entries.
ras> adsl ipbpvc route show example1
domain name
ip/netmask
-------------------- ------------------example1
0.0.0.0/0
example1
4.4.4.0/24
example1
7.7.7.0/24
example1
192.168.37.0/24
gateway ip
metric pri
--------------- ------ --192.168.1.250
1
0
5.6.7.8
2
1
192.168.1.253
1
0
192.168.1.251
1
0
The output values correspond to the input values of other IP bridge routing table
commands.
62.4.3 IP Bridge Route Runtime Command Example
This example displays the (run-time) routing table(s) for the “example2” domain.
ras> adsl ipbpvc route runtime example2
domain name
ip/netmask
-------------------- ------------------example2
192.168.1.253/32
example2
192.168.1.35/32
example2
2.2.2.0/24
example2
192.168.37.0/24
example2
192.168.2.0/24
example2
0.0.0.0/0
gateway ip
metric pri type
--------------- ------ --- ----U
D
D
192.168.1.250
1
0
D
192.168.1.249
1
0
D
192.168.1.252
1
0
D
The type field indicates whether this entry is used for upstream traffic (U, or
uplink interface) or downstream traffic (D, or downlink interface). By default, all
entries are for downstream traffic, unless the Edge Router IP is configured in the
edge router commands (see Section 62.3 on page 455).
The other output values correspond to the input values of other IP bridge routing
table commands.
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62.4.4 IP Bridge Route Delete Command Example
This example removes the entry for 172.32.37.0~172.32.37.255 for domain
“example2”.
ras> adsl ipbpvc route show example2
domain name
ip/netmask
gateway ip
metric pri
-------------------- ------------------- --------------- ------ --example2
0.0.0.0/0
192.168.1.252
1
0
example2
192.168.37.0/24
192.168.1.250
1
0
example2
192.168.2.0/24
192.168.1.249
1
0
ras> adsl ipbpvc route delete example2 192.168.37.0/24 192.168.1.250
ras> adsl ipbpvc route show example2
domain name
ip/netmask
gateway ip
metric pri
-------------------- ------------------- --------------- ------ --example2
0.0.0.0/0
192.168.1.252
1
0
example2
192.168.2.0/24
192.168.1.249
1
0
62.5 IP Bridge Downlink Interface Commands
Use these commands to set up and maintain forwarding information for
downstream traffic.
Downlink interfaces provide forwarding information for downstream traffic. The
IES-1248-51V learns some of this information by snooping DHCP packets. For
static IP addresses, you should provide this information manually. In this case,
specify the VLAN ID and, optionally, the PVC for a range of IP addresses. The IES-
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1248-51V uses the VLAN ID to identify the domain the downlink interface is in.
Downlink interfaces in the same domain cannot have overlapping IP addresses.
Table 177 IP Bridge Downlink Interface Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl ipbpvc interface set
<ip-address>/<mask-bits>
<vlan-id> [<port> <vpi>
<vci>]
Creates the specified downlink interface. The <ipaddress>/<mask-bits> specifies the IP address and
subnet mask of the VLAN or subscriber. If the destination
IP address of a packet is in this range, the IES-1248-51V
forwards the frame to the specified VLAN and PVC, if any.
H/H
The IES-1248-51V uses the specified VLAN ID when it
forwards frames to the VLAN or subscriber. It also uses the
VLAN ID to identify the domain the downlink interface is
in.
Make sure you specify a valid IP bridge PVC. Do not
specify PVCs that are not defined in the IPB PVC screen in
Section 62.6 on page 462.
adsl ipbpvc interface show
[<ip-address>/<mask-bits> |
<vlan-id> | <ip-address>/
<mask-bits> <vlan-id>]
This command displays downlink interfaces created
manually. It does not show forwarding information learned
by snooping DHCP packets.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc interface runtime
[<ip-address>/<mask-bits> |
<vlan-id> | <ip-address>/
<mask-bits> <vlan-id>]
Displays the (run-time) downlink interfaces for the
selected range of IP addresses and/or VLAN. This table
includes all the forwarding information for downstream
traffic, whether learned by snooping DHCP packets or
provided manually.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc interface delete
<ip-address>/<mask-bits>
<vlan-id>
Deletes the specified downlink interface. You can only
remove downlink interfaces that were added manually.
H/H
62.5.1 IP Bridge Downlink Interface Set Command Example
The following example creates a downlink interface that forwards frames for IP
addresses 192.168.3.0~192.168.3.255 to VLAN 402.
ras> adsl ipbpvc interface set 192.168.3.0/24 402
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62.5.2 IP Bridge Downlink Interface Show Command Example
This example displays the downlink interfaces created manually.
ras> adsl ipbpvc interface show 200
ip/netmask
vid port vpi
vci
------------------ ---- ---- --- ----1.2.3.0/24
200
20 200
200
3.3.3.3/32
200
1
6
6
192.168.1.33/32
200
192.168.1.64/28
200
2
0
35
The output values correspond to the input values of other IP bridge downlink
interface commands.
62.5.3 IP Bridge Downlink Interface Runtime Command
Example
This example displays the (run-time) downlink interfaces for VID 210.
ras> adsl ipbpvc interface runtime 210
ip/netmask
vid port vpi
vci
------------------ ---- ---- --- ----192.168.1.34/32
210
1 31
64
192.168.1.37/32
210
1 20
53
type
---ipoa
ipoe
The type field specifies whether the downlink interface is running on Ethernet
(IPoE) or on ATM (IPoA). The other output values correspond to the input values
of other IP bridge downlink interface commands.
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62.5.4 IP Bridge Downlink Interface Delete Command
Example
This example removes the downlink interface for 192.168.1.33 in VLAN 200.
ras> adsl ipbpvc interface show 200
ip/netmask
vid port vpi
vci
------------------ ---- ---- --- ----1.2.3.0/24
200
20 200
200
3.3.3.3/32
200
1
6
6
192.168.1.33/32
200
192.168.1.64/28
200
2
0
35
ras> adsl ipbpvc interface delete 192.168.1.33/32 200
ras> adsl ipbpvc interface show 200
ip/netmask
vid port vpi
vci
------------------ ---- ---- --- ----1.2.3.0/24
200
20 200
200
3.3.3.3/32
200
1
6
6
192.168.1.64/28
200
2
0
35
62.6 IP Bridge PVC Commands
Use these commands to set up and maintain PVCs for subscribers in an IP bridge.
IP bridge PVCs are similar to regular PVCs and are endpoints of the IP bridge. In
addition, IP bridge PVCs are one of two types, IP over Ethernet or IP over ATM,
depending on the underlying network.
The PVID is used to identify the domain the PVC is in, so the PVID must be in a
domain.
Table 178 IP Bridge PVC Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl ipbpvc show [<port-list>
[<vpi> <vci>]]
Displays the PVCs for subscribers in an IP bridge.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc set <port-list>
<vpi> <vci> <DS vcprofile[,US
vcprofile]> super|<vlan-id>
<priority> ipoa|ipoe
Allows the configuration of a PVC (permanent virtual
circuit) for one or a range of ADSL ports in an IP bridge.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc delete <portlist> <vpi> <vci>
Deletes the specified PVC channel in an IP bridge.
H/H
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62.6.1 IP Bridge PVC Show Command Example
This example displays the PVCs for subscribers in an IP bridge.
Figure 177 IP Bridge PVC Show Command Example
ras>
port
---1
1
2
20
48
adsl ipbpvc show
vpi
vci pvid pri
--- ----- ----- --30
63
200
0
31
64
210
0
10
43
200
0
200
200
230
1
8
35
2
0
Type
----ipoe
ipoa
ipoe
ipoe
ipoe
DS/US vcprofile
-------------------------------DEFVAL/DEFVAL/DEFVAL/DEFVAL/DEFVAL/-
The output values correspond to the input values of other IP bridge PVC
commands.
62.6.2 IP Bridge PVC Set Command Example
The following example sets a PVC on ADSL port 10 with VPI 40, VCI 73, default
VID 402 priority 2. It sets the DEFVAL profile for downstream traffic shaping and
runs on Ethernet.
ras>
port
---1
1
2
20
48
ras>
ras>
port
---1
1
2
10
20
48
adsl ipbpvc show
vpi
vci pvid pri Type DS/US vcprofile
--- ----- ----- --- ----- -------------------------------30
63
200
0 ipoe DEFVAL/31
64
210
0 ipoa DEFVAL/10
43
200
0 ipoe DEFVAL/200
200
230
1 ipoe DEFVAL/8
35
2
0 ipoe DEFVAL/adsl ipbpvc set 10 40 73 DEFVAL 402 2 ipoe
adsl ipbpvc show
vpi
vci pvid pri Type DS/US vcprofile
--- ----- ----- --- ----- -------------------------------30
63
200
0 ipoe DEFVAL/31
64
210
0 ipoa DEFVAL/10
43
200
0 ipoe DEFVAL/40
73
402
2 ipoe DEFVAL/200
200
230
1 ipoe DEFVAL/8
35
2
0 ipoe DEFVAL/-
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62.6.3 IP Bridge PVC Delete Command Example
The following example deletes the IP bridge PVC on ADSL port 10 with VPI 40, VCI
73.
ras>
port
---1
1
2
10
20
48
ras>
ras>
port
---1
1
2
20
48
adsl ipbpvc show
vpi
vci pvid pri Type DS/US vcprofile
--- ----- ----- --- ----- -------------------------------30
63
200
0 ipoe DEFVAL/31
64
210
0 ipoa DEFVAL/10
43
200
0 ipoe DEFVAL/40
73
402
2 ipoe DEFVAL/200
200
230
1 ipoe DEFVAL/8
35
2
0 ipoe DEFVAL/adsl ipbpvc delete 10 40 73
adsl ipbpvc show
vpi
vci pvid pri Type DS/US vcprofile
--- ----- ----- --- ----- -------------------------------30
63
200
0 ipoe DEFVAL/31
64
210
0 ipoa DEFVAL/10
43
200
0 ipoe DEFVAL/200
200
230
1 ipoe DEFVAL/8
35
2
0 ipoe DEFVAL/-
62.7 IP Bridge ARP Proxy Commands
Use these commands to look at and flush the Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)
table for each domain. You can also configure how long the IES-1248-51V keeps
entries in the ARP table.
The IES-1248-51V is an ARP proxy for edge routers and subscribers in an IP
bridge. You can configure basic settings for this, and you can look at (and flush, in
some cases) the (PVC, MAC, IP, VLAN ID) information the IES-1248-51V has
learned using DHCP snooping and ARP.
Table 179 IP Bridge ARP Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl ipbpvc arpproxy
agingtime set <seconds>
Configures how long the device stores the IP addresses of
CPE devices in IP bridges in the Address Resolution
Protocol (ARP) table.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc arpproxy
agingtime show
Displays how long the device stores the IP addresses of IP
bridge devices in the Address Resolution Protocol table.
M/L
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Table 179 IP Bridge ARP Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl ipbpvc arpproxy show
[domain <domain-name>
[edgerouter <ip-address>
<vlan-id>|interface <ipaddress>/<mask-bits> <vlanid>]]
Displays the specified ARP table entries.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc arpproxy flush
<all|edgerouter> [<ipaddress> <vlan-id>]
|interface [<ip-address>/
<mask-bits> <vlan-id>]
Clears the specified entries in the ARP table(s).
H/H
62.7.1 IP Bridge ARP Proxy Agingtime Show Command
Example
This example displays how long the IES-1248-51V stores the IP addresses of IP
bridge devices in the ARP table.
ras> adsl ipbpvc arpproxy agingtime show
ipbpvc aging time (sec): 300
62.7.2 IP Bridge ARP Proxy Show Command Example
This example displays the ARP table entries.
ras> adsl ipbpvc arpproxy show
Domain Name: d01
ip
mac
port vpi
vci interface
vid type
--------------- ----------------- ---- --- ----- ------------------ ---- --192.168.2.2
00:05:5d:03:99:3a
22
0
33 192.168.2.0/24
3
D
192.168.2.254
00:13:49:95:03:07
50
- 192.168.2.254
2
U
*: the ARP is learned from DHCP and can't be flushed.
The following table describes the labels in this screen.
Table 180 IPB ARP Proxy Show Command Output
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
Domain Name
This field displays the name of the domain which has this ARP table.
ip
This field displays the IP address assigned to the specific device.
mac
This field displays the MAC (Media Access Control) address of the
device.
port
This field displays the port number to which the device is connected.
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Table 180 IPB ARP Proxy Show Command Output (continued)
466
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
vpi/vci
This field displays the Virtual Path Identifier (VPI) and Virtual Circuit
Identifier (VCI) the device is using. The VPI and VCI identify a channel
on this port.
interface
This field displays the name of the interface the device is using.
vid
This field displays the VLAN ID the device is using.
type
This field indicates whether this entry is used for upstream traffic (U,
or uplink interface) or downstream traffic (D, or downlink interface).
By default, all entries are for downstream traffic, unless the edge
router is configured using the edge router commands (see Section
62.3 on page 455).
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
CHAPTER
63
SNMP Commands
This chapter covers commands for configuring the IES-1248-51V’s Simple
Network Management Protocol (SNMP) settings.
63.1 SNMP Commands
The following table describes common required values in SNMP commands. Other
values are discussed with the corresponding commands.
Table 181 SNMP Commands Input Values
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
community
A password.
The following is a list of the SNMP commands.
Table 182 SNMP Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
sys snmp getcommunity
<community>
Sets the password for the incoming Get- and GetNextrequests from the management station.
H/H
sys snmp setcommunity
<community>
Sets the password for the incoming Set- requests from the
management station.
H/H
sys snmp trusthost <ipaddress>
Specifies the IP address a trusted host.
H/H
If you enter a specific IP address, the IES-1248-51V will
only respond to SNMP messages from this address. You
can use the sys client set command to specify
additional IP addresses, if necessary. See Table 134 on
page 377 for more information about this command.
If you specify 0.0.0.0, the IES-1248-51V responds to all
SNMP messages it receives, regardless of the settings for
the sys client set command.
sys snmp trapcommunity
<community>
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Sets the password sent with each trap to the SNMP
manager.
H/H
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Chapter 63 SNMP Commands
Table 182 SNMP Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
sys snmp trapdst set <index>
<ip-address> [<port>]
Specifies the IP address (and port number) of a trap
server to which the IES-1248-51V sends SNMP traps. If
you leave the trap destination set to 0.0.0.0 (default), the
IES-1248-51V will not send any SNMP traps.
H/H
index: The number of the trap server (1~4).
port: The port number upon which the trap server listens
for SNMP traps. The IES-1248-51V uses the default of 162
if you do not specify a trap port.
sys snmp trapdst del <index>
Removes the specified SNMP trap server setting.
H/H
sys snmp show
Displays the current SNMP get community, set community,
trap community, trusted hosts and trap destination
settings.
M/L
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64
ADSL Commands
This chapter describes some of the ADSL commands that allow you to configure
and monitor the ADSL ports.
64.1 ADSL Command Input Values
The following table describes the values required in ADSL commands. Other
values are discussed with the corresponding commands.
Table 183 ADSL Command Input Values
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
downdownshiftmargin
The downstream down shift noise margin (0~31 dB).
down-maxmargin
The maximum acceptable ADSL downstream signal/noise margin
(0~31db).
down-max-rate
The maximum ADSL downstream transmission rate (32~25000
Kbps).
down-minmargin
The minimum acceptable ADSL downstream signal/noise margin
(0~31db).
down-min-rate
The minimum ADSL downstream transmission rate (32~25000 Kbps).
down-targetmargin
The target ADSL downstream signal/noise margin (0~31db).
fast|interlea
ve[=<updelay>,<downdelay>]
The latency mode. With interleave, you must also define the upstream
and downstream delay (1~255 ms). It is recommended that you
configure the same delay for both upstream and downstream.
max-nominalpsd
Maximum nominal transmit PSD (Power Spectral Density) measured
in 0.1dBm/Hz.
mx
The downstream carrier tones to be masked (disabled). Each <mx>
can use up to 8 hexadecimal digits (00000000~ffffffff). Each <mx>
represents 32 carrier tones (each hexadecimal digit represents 4
tones).
The hexadecimal digit is converted to binary and a '1' disables the
corresponding tone. Disabling a carrier tone turns it off so the system
does not send data on it.
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Table 183 ADSL Command Input Values
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
portlist
You can specify a single ADSL port <1>, all ADSL ports <*> or a list
of ADSL ports <1,3,5>. You can also include a range of ports
<1,5,6~10>.
profile
A descriptive name for the profile that will define the settings of this
port.
up-downshiftmargin
The upstream down shift noise margin (0~31 dB).
up-max-rate
The maximum ADSL upstream transmission rate (32~3000 Kbps).
up-min-margin
The minimum acceptable ADSL upstream signal/noise margin
(0~31db).
up-max-margin: The maximum acceptable ADSL upstream signal/
noise margin (0~31db).
up-min-rate
The minimum ADSL upstream transmission rate (32~3000 Kbps).
up-targetmargin
The target ADSL upstream signal/noise margin (0~31db).
up-upshiftmargin
The upstream up shift noise margin (0~31 dB).
vlanlist
You can specify a single VLAN <1>, all VLANs <*> or a list of VLANs
<1,3,5>. You can also include a range of VLANs <1,5,6~10>.
64.2 ADSL Commands
Use these commands to configure the ADSL ports. See Chapter 16 on page 119
for background information on ADSL..
Table 184 ADSL Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl show <portlist>
Shows the activation status, ADSL mode, maximum
upstream and downstream rate settings, profile and
name of each ADSL port.
L/L
adsl enable <portlist>
Enables the specified ADSL port(s).
M/
H
adsl disable <portlist>
Disables the specified ADSL port(s).
M/
H
adsl name <portlist><name>
Sets the name of an ADSL port(s).
M/
H
name: A descriptive name for the port. You can use up
to 31 printable ASCII characters (including spaces and
hyphens).
adsl reset <portlist>
470
Resets the specified xDSL ports to their defaults.
H/H
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Chapter 64 ADSL Commands
Table 184 ADSL Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl tel <portlist><tel>
Records the telephone number of an ADSL subscriber
telephone number.
M/
H
tel: An ADSL subscriber’s telephone number. You can
use up to 15 ASCII characters (including spaces and
hyphens).
adsl loopback
<portlist><f5><vpi><vci>
Performs an OAMF5 loopback test on the specified
ADSL port(s).
H/H
f5: Use f5 to perform an OAMF5 loopback test on the
specified DSL port. An Operational, Administration and
Maintenance Function 5 test is used to test the
connection between two DSL devices. First, the DSL
devices establish a virtual circuit. Then the local device
sends an ATM F5 cell to be returned by the remote DSL
device (both DSL devices must support ATM F5 in
order to use this test).
vpi, vci: The Virtual Path Identifier (VPI) and Virtual
Circuit Identifier (VCI) identify a channel on this port.
Possible values for the VPI are 0~255.
Possible values for the VCI are 32~65535 if the VPI is
0. If the VPI is not 0, possible values for the VCI are
1~65535.
adsl usnompsd <port>[<maxnominal-psd>]
Displays or sets the upstream maximum nominal
transmit PSD (Power Spectral Density).
H/H
max-nominal-psd: -400 ~ 40 (unit of measure is
0.1dBm/Hz)
adsl dsnompsd <port>[<maxnominal-psd>]
Displays or sets the downstream maximum nominal
transmit PSD (Power Spectral Density).
H/H
adsl uscarrier <port>[<m0><m1>]
Displays or sets masks for upstream carrier tones from
0 to 63. Masking a carrier tone disables the use of that
tone on the specified ADSL port. Use this command to
have the system not use an ADSL line’s tones that are
known to have a high noise level. The most significant
bit defines the lowest tone number in a mask.
H/H
The hexadecimal digit is converted to binary and a '1'
masks (disables) the corresponding tone. Disabling a
carrier tone turns it off so the system does not send
data on it.
The most significant bit defines the first tone
sequentially. For example, in <m0>, 0x00000001
means tone 31. For example, you could use 0xffff0000
for <m0> to disable upstream carrier tones 0~15 and
leave tones 16 ~ 31 enabled.
m0:tones 0~31
m1:tones 32~63
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Table 184 ADSL Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl dscarrier0 <port>[<m1>
<m2><m3><m4><m5><m6><m7>]
Displays or sets masks for downstream carrier tones
from 33 to 255. Masking a carrier tone disables the use
of that tone on the specified ADSL port. The most
significant bit defines the lowest tone number in a
mask.
H/H
m1:tones 32~63
m2:tones 64~95
m3:tones 96~127
m4:tones 128~159
m5:tones 160~191
m6:tones 192~223
m7:tones 224~255
adsl dscarrier1 <port>[<m0><m1>
<m2><m3><m4><m5><m6><m7>
Displays or sets masks for downstream carrier tones
from 256 to 511 on the specified ADSL2+ port(s). Use
this command to have the system not use an ADSL
line’s tones that are known to have a high noise level.
H/H
m0: tones 256~287
m1:tones 288~319
m2:tones 320~351
m3:tones 352~383
m4:tones 384~415
m5:tones 416~447
m6:tones 448~479
m7:tones 480~511
adsl pmm enable <portlist>
<L2|L3>
Enables Power ManageMent (PMM) to reduce the
amount of power used overall and reduce the
instances of the connection going down. PMM
increases or decreases the transmission power based
on line conditions. PMM also reduces the number of
service interruptions.
H/H
L2: Low Power. Sets the power management feature to
scale back line usage to the minimum level sufficient to
maintain an active connection when there is low level
of traffic.
L3: Idle. Sets the power management feature to
reduce the power consumption when there is no traffic.
Ports may be disabled or go into monitor mode in this
state.The power level comes back up when there is
traffic.
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Table 184 ADSL Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl pmm set <portlist> <L0|L2>
Sets the power management mode.
H/H
L0: Turns off power management on a port.
L2: Low Power. Sets the power management feature to
scale back line usage to the minimum level sufficient to
maintain an active connection when there is low level
of traffic.
adsl pmm param
<portlist>[<l0time><l2time><l2at
pr><l2atprt>][<max-l2rate><minl2rate><l0tol2-rate>]
Displays or sets PMM parameters for the specified
ADSL port(s).
H/H
l0time: Set the minimum time in seconds (10~65535)
that the ADSL line must stay in L0 power mode before
changing to the L2 power mode.
l2time: Set minimum time in seconds (10~65535)
that the ADSL line must stay in the L2 power mode
before reducing the power again in the L2 power
mode.
l2atpr: Set the maximum Aggregate Transmit Power
Reduction (ATPR) in decibels (dB) that is permitted in a
L2 power reduction. The system can gradually
decrease the ADSL line transmission power while it is
in the L2 power mode. This is the largest individual
power reduction allowed in the L2 power mode. The
range is 0~15(dB).
max-l2rate: Set the maximum transfer rate (in
Kilobits per second) that is permitted while the port is
in the L2 power mode. The supported range is
32~4096 Kbps in 4 Kbps increments. If you enter a
number that is not a multiple of 4, the system uses the
next lower multiple of 4. If you enter 39 for example,
the system will use 36.
min-l2rate: Set the minimum transfer rate (in
Kilobits per second) that is permitted while the port is
in the L2 power mode. The supported range is
32~4096 Kbps in 4 Kbps increments. If you enter a
number that is not a multiple of 4, the system uses the
next lower multiple of 4. If you enter 39 for example,
the system will use 36.
l0tol2-rate: Set the down stream transfer rate (in
Kilobits per second) that serves as the threshold for
whether the port is to use the L0 or the L2 power
mode. The system changes from L0 mode to L2 mode
when the downstream transfer rate stays below this
threshold for L0 Time. The system changes back from
L2 mode to L0 mode when the downstream transfer
rate goes above this threshold. This rate must be less
than or equal to one half of the Min L2 Rate and at
least 16 Kbps.
adsl pmm show <portlist>
Displays the PMM settings for the specified port(s).
M/L
adsl pmm disable <portlist>
Turns off PMM on the specified port(s).
H/H
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Table 184 ADSL Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl inp
<portlist>[<usinp>[,<dsinp>]]
Sets the upstream (us) and downstream (ds) impulse
noise protection minimum setting on the specified
ADSL port(s). Sudden spikes in the line’s noise level
(impulse noise) can cause errors and result in lost
packets. Set the impulse noise protection minimum to
have a buffer to protect the ADSL physical layer
connection against impulse noise. This buffering
causes a delay that reduces transfer speeds. It is
recommended that you use a non-zero setting for real
time traffic that has no error correction (like
videoconferencing).
H/H
usinp: Sets the minimum upstream (us) impulse noise
protection setting. Use 0~3 to define a number of DMT
symbols. 0 = 0 DMT symbols, 1 = 0.5 DMT symbols, 2
= 1 DMT symbols, 3 = 2 DMT symbols.
dsinp: Sets the minimum downstream (ds) impulse
noise protection setting. Use 0~3 to define a number
of DMT symbols. 0 = 0 DMT symbols, 1 = 0.5 DMT
symbols, 2 = 1 DMT symbols, 3 = 2 DMT symbols.
adsl annexm show <portlist>
Displays the Annex M feature setting for the specified
port(s).
M/L
adsl annexm enable <portlist>
This command turns on the Annex M double upstream
feature on the specified ADSL2/2+ port(s). This has
the upstream connection use tones 6 to 63.
H/H
adsl annexm disable <portlist>
This command turns off the Annex M double upstream
feature on the specified ADSL2/2+ port(s).
H/H
adsl queuemap set <priority>
<queue-level>
IEEE 802.1p defines up to 8 separate traffic types by
inserting a tag into a MAC-layer frame that contains
bits to define class of service. Frames without an
explicit priority tag are given the default priority of the
ingress port. Use this command to configure the
priority level-to-physical queue mapping.
H/H
queue-level: The device has 4 physical queues that
you can map to the 8 priority levels for outgoing
Ethernet traffic. The device has 8 physical queues that
you can map to the 8 priority levels for outgoing DSL
traffic. Traffic assigned to higher index queues gets
through the device faster while traffic in lower index
queues is dropped if the network is congested.
adsl queuemap show
Displays the xDSL priority level to physical queue
mapping.
M/L
adsl dsbcast enable <portlist>
<vlanlist>
Enables downstream broadcast packets sent to
specified VLANs on specified ports.
M/
H
adsl dsbcast show <portlist>
Shows downstream broadcast settings on specified
xDSL port(s).
L/L
adsl dsbcast disable <portlist>
<vlanlist>
Disables downstream broadcast packets sent to
specified VLANs on specified ports.
M/
H
adsl sra enable <portlist>
Turns on Seamless Rate Adaptation (SRA) ADSL2+ on
the specified port(s).
H/H
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Table 184 ADSL Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl sra show <portlist>
Displays the SRA ADSL2+ setting for the specified
port(s).
M/L
adsl sra disable <portlist>
Turns off SRA ADSL2+ on the specified port(s)
H/H
adsl ipbpvc arpproxy agingtime
set <sec>
Sets the valid time interval of a learned MAC address
(10~10000 seconds).
H/H
adsl ipbpvc arpproxy agingtime
show
Display the current time interval of a learned MAC
address.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc arpproxy flush all |
edgerouter [<ip><vid>]|interface
[<ip>/<mask><vid>]
Flush the learned MAC addresses manually.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc arpproxy show
[domain <domain> [edgerouter
[<ip><vid>]]|[interface[<ip>/
<mask><vid>]]]
Displays learnt MAC table for a domain Displays learnt
MAC table for all/an edge router in a domain Displays
learnt MAC table for all/an interface in a domain.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc delete <portlist>
<vpi><vci>
Remove IP aware Bridge PVC.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain delete
<domain-name>
Delete a domain, have to delete all VLANs belonging to
this domain first.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain dhcpvlan
disable <domain-name>
Disable DHCP VLAN in a domain.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain dhcpvlan
enable <domain-name> <vid>
Enable DHCP VLAN in a domain.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain set <domainname>
Create domain, maximum 8 domains in the system.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain show
[<domain-name>]
Display domain setting.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc domain vlan <domainname><vid><registration>
Set vlan to join or leave specified domain, maximum 8
VLANs in one domain.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc edgerouter delete
<ip><vid>
Delete specified edge router setting.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc edgerouter set <ip>/
<mask><vid>
Sets the edge router.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc edgerouter show
[<vid>]
Displays the edge router setting.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc interface delete
<ip>/<mask><vid>
Delete an IP interface.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc interface runtime
[<ip>/<mask>|<vid>|<ip>/<mask>
<vid>]
Display runtime interfaces by optional <ip>/<mask>
and vlan id parameter.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc interface set <ip>/
<mask><vid>[<port><vpi><vci>]
Sets the interface.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc interface show
[<ip>/<mask>|<vid>|<ip>/<mask>
<vid>]
Displays the interface setting by optional <ip>/
<mask> and vlan id parameter.
M/L
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Chapter 64 ADSL Commands
Table 184 ADSL Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl ipbpvc route delete
<domain-name><ip>/<mask>
<nexthop>
Deletes route entry from specified domain.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc route runtime
[<domain-name>|<ip>/
<mask>|<domain><ip>/<mask>]
Displays the runtime route information.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc route set <domainname><ip>/<mask><nexthop>
<metric> [<priority>]
Sets a new route to specified edgerouter for a given
domain. Maximum 16 routes in a domain.
H/H
nexthop:
metric:
priority:
adsl ipbpvc route show [<domainname>|<ip>/<mask>|<domain><ip>/
<mask>]
Displays current routing table for specific domain.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc set <portlist><vpi>
<vci><ds-vcprofile[,usvcprofile]> <pvid> <priority>
<ipab_type>
Sets IP aware Bridge PVC.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc show [<portlist>
[<vpi><vci>]]
Displays IP aware Bridge PVC setting.
pvid:
ipab_type:
M/L
64.2.1 ADSL Show Command Example
The following example displays information on ADSL port 5.
Figure 178 ADSL Show Command Example
ras> adsl show 5
port enable mode
up/downstream profile
name
---- ------ -------- ------------- ---------------- ---------------5
auto
512/ 2048 DEFVAL
-
64.2.2 ADSL Name Command Example
The following example sets ADSL port 5 to have the name super.
Figure 179 ADSL Name Command Example
ras> adsl name 5 super
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64.2.3 ADSL Tel Command Example
The following example records the telephone number 12345678 for ADSL port 5.
Figure 180 ADSL Tel Command Example
ras> adsl tel 5 12345678
64.2.4 ADSL Loopback Command Example
The following example has the IES-1248-51V perform an OAMF5 loopback test on
ADSL port 1’s PVC at VPI 0 and VCI 33.
Figure 181 ADSL Loopback Command Example
ras> adsl loopback 1 f5 0 33
port[1] OAM F5 loopback test: failed
64.2.5 ADSL Upstream PSD Command Example
The following example sets the upstream maximum nominal transmit PSD for port
7 to -10 dBm/Hz.
Figure 182 ADSL Upstream PSD Command Example
ras> adsl usnompsd 7 -100
64.2.6 ADSL Downstream PSD Command Example
The following example sets the downstream maximum nominal transmit PSD for
port 7 to -10 dBm/Hz.
Figure 183 ADSL Downstream PSD Command Example
ras> adsl dsnompsd 7 -10
64.2.7 ADSL Upstream Carrier Command Example
The following example disables upstream carrier tones 0~15 for ADSL port 5.
Figure 184 ADSL Upstream Carrier Command Example
ras> adsl uscarrier 5 ffff0000 00000000
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Chapter 64 ADSL Commands
The following example displays the results.
Figure 185 ADSL Upstream Carrier Command Display Example
ras> adsl uscarrier 5
us carrier
port
m0
m1
---- |--------|--------|
5
FFFF0000 00000000
Tone:
m0:0-31, m1:32-63
64.2.8 ADSL Downstream Carrier0 Command Example
The following example disables downstream carrier tone 71 for ADSL port 5.
Figure 186 ADSL Downstream Carrier0 Command Example 1
ras> adsl dscarrier0 5 0 01000000 0 0 0 0 0
The following example displays the results.
Figure 187 ADSL Downstream Carrier0 Command Display Example
ras> adsl dscarrier0 5
ds carrier
port
m1
m2
m3
m4
m5
m6
m7
---- |--------|--------|--------|--------|--------|--------|--------|
5
00000000 01000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
Tone:
m1:32-63, m2:64-95, m3:96-127, m4:128-159
m5:160-191, m6:192-223, m7:224-255
This example disables downstream carrier tones 70 and 71 for ADSL port 5.
Figure 188 ADSL Downstream Carrier0 Command Example 2
ras> adsl dscarrier0 5 0 03000000 0 0 0 0 0
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64.2.9 ADSL Downstream Carrier1 Command Example
The following example disables downstream carrier tone 307 for ADSL2+ port 5.
Figure 189 ADSL Downstream Carrier1 Command Example 1
ras> adsl dscarrier1 5 0 00001000 0 0 0 0 0 0
The following example disables downstream carrier tones 304 to 307 for ADSL2+
port 5.
Figure 190 ADSL Downstream Carrier1 Command Example 2
ras> adsl dscarrier1 5 0 0000f000 0 0 0 0 0 0
The following example displays the results.
Figure 191 ADSL Downstream Carrier1 Command Display Example
ras> adsl dscarrier1 5
ds carrier
port
m0
m1
m2
m3
m4
m5
m6
m7
---- |--------|--------|--------|--------|--------|--------|--------|-------|
5
00000000 000F0000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
00000000
Tone:
m0:256-287, m1:288-319, m2:320-351, m3:352-383
m4:384-415, m5:416-447, m6:448-479, m7:480-511
64.2.10 PMM Parameters Command Example
The following example sets ADSL port 5 to use the following PMM settings.
• Stay in the L0 power mode for 180 seconds before a change to the L2 power
mode is permitted.
• Once in L2 power mode, wait for 90 seconds before further reducing the
transmission power.
• Each L2 power mode power reduction can only be 2 dB or less.
• The total power reduction allowed in the L2 power mode is 15 dB.
Figure 192 PMM Parameters Command Example
ras> adsl pmm param 5 180 90 2 15
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64.2.11 Impulse Noise Protection Command Example
The following example sets the impulse noise protection minimum to 1 DMT
symbols for upstream and 0.5 DMT symbols for downstream for ADSL port 5.
Figure 193 Impulse Noise Protection Command Example
ras> adsl inp 5 2 1
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64.3 ADSL Profile Commands
Table 185 ADSL Profile Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl profile show [profile]
Displays the specified ADSL profile or all ADSL profiles
if you do not specify one.
L/L
adsl profile set <profile>
<fast|interleave[=<updelay>,<down-delay>]><up-maxrate><down-max-rate>[<up-targetmargin><up-min-margin><up-maxmargin><up-min-rate><downtarget-margin><down-minmargin><down-max-margin><downmin-rate><up-downshiftmargin><up-up-shiftmargin><down-downshiftmargin><down-upshift-margin>]
The profile is a table that contains information on ADSL
line configuration. Each entry in this table reflects a
parameter defined by a manager, which can be used to
configure the ADSL line.
H/H
Note that the default value will be used for any of the
above fields that are omitted.
The upstream rate must be less than or equal to the
downstream rate.
Even though you can specify arbitrary numbers in the
profile set command, the actual rate is always a
multiple of 32 Kbps. If you enter a rate that is not a
multiple of 32 Kbps, the actual rate will be the next
lower multiple of 32 Kbps. For instance, if you specify
60 Kbps for a port, the actual rate for that port will not
exceed 32 Kbps, and if you specify 66 Kbps, the actual
rate will not be over 64 Kbps.
The ADSL up/down shift noise margins define the
threshold that triggers rate adaptation. For example:
The target SNR is 6, and the up/down shift noise
margins are 9/3.
If the signal becomes better and the SNR is higher
than 9, rate adaptation is triggered and the line rate
becomes higher
If the signal becomes bad and the SNR is lower than 3,
rate adaptation is triggered and the line rate becomes
lower.
After you create an ADSL profile, you can assign it to
any of the ADSL ports on any of the ADSL IES-124851V in the IES-1248-51V.
adsl profile delete <profile>
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Allows you to delete an individual ADSL profile by its
name. You cannot delete a profile that is assigned to
any of the DSL ports in the IES-1248-51V. Assign a
different profile to any DSL ports that are using the
profile that you want to delete, and then you can
delete the profile.
H/H
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Table 185 ADSL Profile Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl profile map <portlist>
<profile>
<glite|gdmt|t1413|auto|adsl2|ads
l2+>
Assigns a specific profile to an individual port and sets
the port’s ADSL mode (or standard). The profile
defines the maximum and minimum upstream/
downstream rates, the target upstream/downstream
signal noise margins, and the maximum and minimum
upstream/downstream acceptable noise margins of all
the ADSL ports to which you assign the profile.
H/H
glite|gdmt|t1413|auto|adsl2|adsl2+: The ADSL
operational mode.
When set to auto, the port follows whatever mode is
set on the other end of the line.
Note: When the mode is set to auto, the
connection rates are governed by the
negotiated ADSL mode regardless of the
rates configured in the profile. For example, if
the profile is set to use a rate of 18000 Kbps,
that speed is only supported if the negotiated
ADSL mode is ADSL 2+. Any other ADSL
mode will limit the rate to what is supported
by the specific ADSL standard.
adsl ipbpvc arpproxy agingtime
set <sec>
Sets the valid time interval of a learned MAC address
(10~10000 seconds).
H/H
adsl ipbpvc arpproxy agingtime
show
Display the current time interval of a learned MAC
address.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc arpproxy flush all |
edgerouter [<ip><vid>]|interface
[<ip>/<mask><vid>]
Flush the learned MAC addresses manually.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc arpproxy show
[domain <domain> [edgerouter
[<ip><vid>]]|[interface[<ip>/
<mask><vid>]]]
Displays learnt MAC table for a domain Displays learnt
MAC table for all/an edge router in a domain Displays
learnt MAC table for all/an interface in a domain.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc delete <portlist>
<vpi><vci>
Remove IP aware Bridge PVC.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain delete
<domain-name>
Delete a domain, have to delete all VLANs belonging to
this domain first.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain dhcpvlan
disable <domain-name>
Disable DHCP VLAN in a domain.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain dhcpvlan
enable <domain-name> <vid>
Enable DHCP VLAN in a domain.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain set <domainname>
Create domain, maximum 8 domains in the system.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain show
[<domain-name>]
Display domain setting.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc domain vlan <domainname><vid><registration>
Set vlan to join or leave specified domain, maximum 8
VLANs in one domain.
H/H
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Table 185 ADSL Profile Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl ipbpvc edgerouter delete
<ip><vid>
Delete specified edge router setting.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc edgerouter set <ip>/
<mask><vid>
Sets the edge router.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc edgerouter show
[<vid>]
Displays the edge router setting.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc interface delete
<ip>/<mask><vid>
Delete an IP interface.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc interface runtime
[<ip>/<mask>|<vid>|<ip>/<mask>
<vid>]
Display runtime interfaces by optional <ip>/<mask>
and vlan id parameter.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc interface set <ip>/
<mask><vid>[<port><vpi><vci>]
Sets the interface.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc interface show
[<ip>/<mask>|<vid>|<ip>/<mask>
<vid>]
Displays the interface setting by optional <ip>/
<mask> and vlan id parameter.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc route delete
<domain-name><ip>/<mask>
<nexthop>
Deletes route entry from specified domain.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc route runtime
[<domain-name>|<ip>/
<mask>|<domain><ip>/<mask>]
Displays the runtime route information.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc route set <domainname><ip>/<mask><nexthop>
<metric> [<priority>]
Sets a new route to specified edgerouter for a given
domain. Maximum 16 routes in a domain.
H/H
nexthop:
metric:
priority:
adsl ipbpvc route show [<domainname>|<ip>/<mask>|<domain><ip>/
<mask>]
Displays current routing table for specific domain.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc set <portlist><vpi>
<vci><ds-vcprofile[,usvcprofile]> <pvid> <priority>
<ipab_type>
Sets IP aware Bridge PVC.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc show [<portlist>
[<vpi><vci>]]
Displays IP aware Bridge PVC setting.
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pvid:
ipab_type:
M/L
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64.3.1 ADSL Profile Show Command Example
The following example displays the ADSL DEFVAL profile.
Figure 194 ADSL Profile Show Command Example
ras> adsl profile show DEFVAL
01. DEFVAL
latency mode: interleave
up stream down stream
--------- ----------max rate
(kbps):
512
2048
min rate
(kbps):
32
32
latency delay (ms):
4
4
max margin
(db):
31
31
min margin
(db):
0
0
target margin (db):
6
6
up shift margin(db):
9
9
down shift margin(db):
3
3
64.3.2 ADSL Profile Set Command Example
The following example creates a premium profile (named “gold”) for providing
subscribers with very high connection speeds and no interleave delay. It also sets
the upstream target signal/noise margin to 5 db, the upstream minimum
acceptable signal/noise margin to 0 db, the upstream maximum acceptable
signal/noise margin to 30 db, the upstream minimum ADSL transmission rate to
128 Kbps, the downstream target signal/noise margin to 5 db, the downstream
minimum acceptable signal/noise margin to 0 db, the downstream maximum
acceptable signal/noise margin to 30 db and the downstream minimum ADSL
transmission rate to 256Kbps.
The upstream down shift noise margin is 0 dB. The upstream up shift noise margin
is 6 dB. The downstream down shift noise margin is 0 dB. The downstream up
shift noise margin is 6 dB.
Figure 195 ADSL Profile Set Command Example 1
ras> adsl profile set gold fast 1200 24000 5 0 30 128 5 0 30 256 0 6 0 6
This next example creates a similar premium profile (named goldi), except it sets
an interleave delay of 16 ms for both upstream and downstream traffic.
Figure 196 ADSL Profile Set Command Example 2
ras> adsl profile set goldi interleave=16,16 1200 24000 5 0 30 128 5 0 30 256
0 6 0 6
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After you create an ADSL profile, you can assign it to any of the ADSL ports in the
IES-1248-51V.
64.3.3 ADSL Profile Delete Command Example
The following example deletes the gold ADSL profile.
Figure 197 ADSL Profile Delete Command Example
ras> adsl profile delete gold
64.3.4 ADSL Profile Map Command Example
The following example sets ADSL port 1 to have the gold profile in G.dmt mode.
Figure 198 ADSL Profile Delete Command Example
ras> adsl profile map 1 gold gdmt
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64.4 Statistics ADSL Commands
Use these commands to display ADSL port statistics.
Table 186 ADSL Statistics Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
statistics adsl show [portlist]
Displays ADSL port connection statistics including the
status (V for enabled, - for disabled), ADSL operational
mode, upstream and downstream maximum rates, up
time and the number of errored seconds.
M/L
statistics adsl linedata
<portlist>
Shows the line bit allocation of an ADSL port.
M/L
Discrete Multi-Tone (DMT) modulation divides up a
line’s bandwidth into tones. This command displays the
number of bits transmitted for each tone. This can be
used to determine the quality of the connection,
whether a given sub-carrier loop has sufficient margins
to support ADSL transmission rates, and possibly to
determine whether certain specific types of
interference or line attenuation exist. See the ITU-T
G.992.1 recommendation for more information on
DMT.
The better (or shorter) the line, the higher the number
of bits transmitted for a DMT tone. The maximum
number of bits that can be transmitted per DMT tone is
15.
“upstream carrier load” displays the number of bits
transmitted per DMT tone for the upstream channel
(from the subscriber’s DSL modem or router to the
IES-1248-51V).
“downstream carrier load” displays the number of bits
received per DMT tone for the downstream channel
(from the IES-1248-51V to the subscriber’s DSL
modem or router).
The bit allocation contents are only valid when the link
is up.
statistics adsl lineinfo
<portlist>
Shows the line operating values of an ADSL port.
M/L
statistics adsl lineperf
<portlist>
Shows the line performance counters of an ADSL port.
M/L
statistics adsl linerate
<portlist>
Displays the line rate for the specified port(s).
M/L
statistics adsl 15mperf
<portlist>[count <0~96>]
Displays line performance statistics for the current and
previous 15-minute periods.
M/L
count <0~96>: Specify for which 15-minute interval
(0~96) you want to display performance statistics. 0 is
the current 15 minutes.
statistics adsl 1dayperf
<portlist>
486
Displays line performance statistics for the current and
previous 24 hours.
M/L
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Table 186 ADSL Statistics Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl linediag setld <port>
Performs line diagnostics on the specified port. The
ADSL port must be set to ADSL2 or ADSL2+ ADSL
operational mode and have a connection. It takes
about one minute for the line diagnostics to finish.
H/H
adsl linediag getld <port>
Displays the line diagnostics results after using the line
diagnostics set command on an ADSL port. Use the
line diagnostics results to analyze problems with the
physical ADSL line.
L/L
Note: Wait at least one minute after using the line
diagnostic set command before using this
command.
adsl linediag getld992-3 <port>
Displays the line diagnostics results in the format
defined in the ITU-T G.992.3 standard after using the
line diagnostics set command on an ADSL port. Use
the line diagnostics results to analyze problems with
the physical ADSL line.
L/L
Note: Wait at least one minute after using the line
diagnostic set command before using this
command.
adsl linediag setselt <port>
Performs a single end line test on the specified port.
This test checks the distance to the subscriber’s
location.
H/H
Note: The port must have an open loop. There
cannot be a DSL device, phone, fax machine
or other device connected to the subscriber’s
end of the telephone line.
adsl linediag getselt <port>
Displays the status and the results of the SELT test on
the specified port. The report tells you what gauge of
telephone wire is connected to the port and the
approximate length of the line measured both in
meters and thousands of feet.
L/L
adsl linediag toneDiag <port>
Displays the tone diagnostics for a port in the format
defined in the ITU-T G.992.3 standard. You do not
need to use the line diagnostics set command first. Use
the tone diagnostics to analyze problems with the
physical ADSL line.
L/L
adsl ipbpvc arpproxy agingtime
set <sec>
Sets the valid time interval of a learned MAC address.
10~10000 seconds.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc arpproxy agingtime
show
Display the current time interval of a learned MAC
address.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc arpproxy flush all |
edgerouter [<ip><vid>]|interface
[<ip>/<mask><vid>]
Flush the learned MAC addresses manually.
H/H
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Table 186 ADSL Statistics Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl ipbpvc arpproxy show
[domain <domain> [edgerouter
[<ip><vid>]]|[interface[<ip>/
<mask><vid>]]]
Displays learnt MAC table for a domain Displays learnt
MAC table for all/an edge router in a domain Displays
learnt MAC table for all/an interface in a domain.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc delete <portlist>
<vpi><vci>
Remove IP aware Bridge PVC.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain delete
<domain-name>
Delete a domain, have to delete all VLANs belonging to
this domain first.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain dhcpvlan
disable <domain-name>
Disable DHCP VLAN in a domain.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain dhcpvlan
enable <domain-name> <vid>
Enable DHCP VLAN in a domain.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain set <domainname>
Create domain, maximum 8 domains in the system.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain show
[<domain-name>]
Display domain setting.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc domain vlan <domainname><vid><registration>
Set vlan to join or leave specified domain, maximum 8
VLANs in one domain.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc edgerouter delete
<ip><vid>
Delete specified edge router setting.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc edgerouter set <ip>/
<mask><vid>
Sets the edge router.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc edgerouter show
[<vid>]
Displays the edge router setting.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc interface delete
<ip>/<mask><vid>
Delete an IP interface.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc interface runtime
[<ip>/<mask>|<vid>|<ip>/<mask>
<vid>]
Display runtime interfaces by optional <ip>/<mask>
and vlan id parameter.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc interface set <ip>/
<mask><vid>[<port><vpi><vci>]
Sets the interface.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc interface show
[<ip>/<mask>|<vid>|<ip>/<mask>
<vid>]
Displays the interface setting by optional <ip>/
<mask> and vlan id parameter.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc route delete
<domain-name><ip>/<mask>
<nexthop>
Deletes route entry from specified domain.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc route runtime
[<domain-name>|<ip>/
<mask>|<domain><ip>/<mask>]
Displays the runtime route information.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc route set <domainname><ip>/<mask><nexthop>
<metric> [<priority>]
Sets a new route to specified edgerouter for a given
domain. Maximum 16 routes in a domain.
H/H
nexthop:
metric:
priority:
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Table 186 ADSL Statistics Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl ipbpvc route show [<domainname>|<ip>/<mask>|<domain><ip>/
<mask>]
Displays current routing table for specific domain.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc set <portlist><vpi>
<vci><ds-vcprofile[,usvcprofile]> <pvid> <priority>
<ipab_type>
Sets IP aware Bridge PVC.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc show [<portlist>
[<vpi><vci>]]
Displays IP aware Bridge PVC setting.
pvid:
ipab_type:
M/L
64.4.1 ADSL Show Command Example
The following example displays connection statistics for ADSL port 1.
Figure 199 ADSL Show Command Example
ras> statistics adsl show 1
port status mode
up/downstream
up time error second(15M/24H)
---- ------ -------- ------------- -------------- --------------------1
V
adsl2
512/ 9089 00000:00:04:59
15/15
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64.4.2 Linedata Command Example
In the following example, the upstream channel is carried on tones 7 to 39 and
the downstream channel is carried on tones 53 to 259 (space is left between the
channels to avoid interference).
Figure 200 Linedata Command Example
ras> statistics adsl linedata 1
[port 1]
up stream carrier load: number of bits per symbol(tone):
tone
0- 19: 00 00 00 00 00 00 02 03 04 05 - 06 07 07 07 07 07 07 07 08 08
tone
20- 39: 08 08 07 08 08 07 07 06 06 05 - 04 03
down stream carrier load: number of bits per symbol(tone):
tone
0- 19: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 - 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
tone
20- 39: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 - 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
tone
40- 59: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 - 00 00 00 01 01 01 01
tone
60- 79: 02 02 02 02 00 02 02 02 02 02 - 02 02 02 02 02 02 02
tone
80- 99: 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 - 02 02 02 02 02 02 02
tone 100- 119: 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 - 02 02 02 02 02 02 02
tone 120- 139: 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 - 02 02 02 02 02 02 02
tone 140- 159: 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 - 02 02 02 02 02 02 02
tone 160- 179: 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 - 02 02 02 02 02 02 02
tone 180- 199: 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 - 02 02 02 02 02 02 02
tone 200- 219: 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 - 02 02 02 02 02 02 02
tone 220- 239: 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 - 02 02 02 02 02 02 02
tone 240- 259: 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 - 02 02 02 02 02 02
490
00
00
01
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
00
00
01
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
00
00
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
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64.4.3 ADSL Lineinfo Command Example
An example is shown next.
Figure 201 ADSL Lineinfo Command Example
ras> statistics adsl lineinfo 8
[port 8]
operating modes:
- service type in operation: adsl2+
- TRELLIS operation mode
: on
connection detail:
- down/up stream interleaved delay (ms): 3/ 2
- total transceiver DS output power (dbm): -2.5
- total transceiver US output power (dbm): 11.5
atuc information:
- vendor id:
30304235303035300000000000000000
- version number: 66323330323030300000000000000000
- serial number :
30323030306530336539303030370000000000000000000000000000000000
00
atur information:
- vendor id:
b5004244434d00000000000000000000
- version number: 41327042303139610000000000000000
- serial number :
0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
The service type in operation is the ADSL standard that the port is using: G.dmt or
ANSI T1.413 issue 2.
Trellis coding helps to reduce the noise in ADSL transmissions. Trellis may reduce
throughput but it makes the connection more stable.5
The numbers of milliseconds of interleave delay for downstream and upstream
transmissions are listed. The total output power of the transceiver varies with the
length and line quality. The farther away the subscriber’s ADSL modem or router is
or the more interference there is on the line, the higher the power will be. “DS”
refers to the power output of the IES-1248-51V “US” refers to the power output of
the subscriber’s ADSL modem or router.
Information obtained prior to training to steady state transition will not be valid or
will be old information.
The atuc information fields show data acquired from the ATUC (ADSL
Termination Unit – Central), in this case IES-1248-51V, during negotiation/
provisioning message interchanges.
5.
At the time of writing, the IES-1248-51V always uses Trellis coding.
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The atur information fields show data acquired from the ATUR (ADSL
Termination Unit – Remote), in this case the subscriber’s ADSL modem or router,
during negotiation/provisioning message interchanges. This information can help
in identifying the subscriber’s ADSL modem or router.
The vendor ID, vendor version number and product serial number are obtained
from vendor ID fields (see ITU-T G.994.1) or R-MSGS1 (see T1.413).
64.4.4 Lineperf Command Example
An example is shown next.
Figure 202 Lineperf Command Example
ras> statistics adsl lineperf 1
[port 1] Perf since boot up
nfebe-I/nfebe-ni
:
46/
ncrc-I/ncrc-ni
:
5/
nfecc-I/nfecc-ni
:
0/
nfec-I/nfec-ni
:
28/
init-atuc/init-atur:
23/
es-atuc /es-atur
:
27/
ses-atuc /ses-atur :
26/
uas-atuc /uas-atur :
1515/
lpr-atuc /lpr-atur :
-/
0
0
0
0
92
60
1515
2
(Far End CRC)
(Near End CRC)
(Far End Corrected FEC)
(Near End Corrected FEC)
These counters display line performance data that has been accumulated since the
system started. In the list above the definitions of near end/far end will always be
relative to the ATU-C (ADSL Termination Unit-Central Office). Downstream (ds)
refers to data from the ATU-C and upstream (us) refers to data from the ATU-R.
“I” stands for interleaved and “ni” stands for non-interleaved (fast mode).
A block is a set of consecutive bits associated with the path; each bit belongs to
one and only one block. Consecutive bits may not be contiguous in time.
Table 187 Line Performance Counters
492
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
nfebe
The Number of Far End Block Errors (Cyclic Redundancy Check).
ncrc
Near end Cyclic Redundancy Check errors.
nfecc
The Far End blocks repaired by Forward Error Correction.
nfec
The Near End blocks repaired by Forward Error Correction.
init
The number of link ups and link downs.
es
The Number of Errored Seconds. This is how many seconds contained
at least one errored block or at least one defect.
ses
The Number of Severely Errored Seconds. This is how many seconds
contained 30% or more errored blocks. This is a subset of n-es.
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Table 187 Line Performance Counters (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
uas
The Number of Unavailable Seconds.
lpr
The Number of Loss of Power Seconds (on the ATUR) that have
occurred.
64.4.5 15 Minute Performance Command Example
An example is shown next.
Figure 203 15 Minute Performance Command Example
ras> statistics adsl 15mperf 10
Port 10 Current 15 Min elapsed time:833 sec (Link UP)
Current 15 Min PM:
ATUC
ATUR
lofs:
0
0
loss:
0
0
lols:
0
lprs:
0
eSs:
0
0
inits:
0
sesl:
0
0
uasl:
0
0
History 15 Min PM-1:
ATUC
ATUR
lofs:
0
0
loss:
0
0
lols:
0
lprs:
0
eSs:
0
0
inits:
1
sesl:
0
0
uasl:
0
0
History 15 Min PM-2:
ATUC
ATUR
lofs:
0
0
loss:
0
0
lols:
0
lprs:
0
eSs:
0
0
inits:
0
sesl:
0
0
uasl:
0
0
The following table explains these counters.
Table 188 15 Minute Performance Counters
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
atuc
Upstream. These statistics are for the connection (or traffic) coming
from the subscriber’s device to the IES-1248-51V.
atur
Downstream. These statistics are for the connection (or traffic) going
from the IES-1248-51V to the subscriber’s device.
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Table 188 15 Minute Performance Counters (continued)
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
lofs
The number of Loss Of Frame seconds that have occurred within the
15-minute period.
loss
The number of Loss Of Signal seconds that have occurred within the
15-minute period.
lols
The number of Loss Of Link seconds that have occurred within the 15minute period.
lprs
The number of Loss of Power seconds (on the ATUR) that have
occurred within the 15-minute period.
eSs
The number of Errored Seconds that have occurred within the 15minute period.
inits
The number of link ups and link downs that have occurred within the
15-minute period.
sesl
The number of Severely Errored Seconds that have occurred within
the 15-minute period.
uasl
The number of UnAvailable Seconds that have occurred within the 15minute period.
These counters are also used in the alarm profiles (see Section 53.1 on page 385).
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64.4.6 1 Day Performance Command Example
An example is shown next.
Figure 204 1Day Performance Command Example
ras> statistics adsl 1dayperf 10
Port 10 current 1 day elapsed time:7827 sec (Link UP)
Current 1 Day Perf
ATUC
ATUR
lofs
0
0
loss
0
0
lols
0
lprs
0
eSs
0
0
inits
1
sesl
1
0
uasl
0
0
Port 10 previous 1 day elapsed time:0 sec
Previous 1 Day Perf
ATUC
ATUR
lofs
0
0
loss
0
0
lols
0
lprs
0
eSs
0
0
inits
0
sesl
0
0
uasl
0
0
See Table 188 on page 493 for details about these counters.
64.4.7 Line Diagnostics Set Command Example
The following example performs line diagnostics on ADSL port 1. The screen
displays a message confirming upon which ADSL port line diagnostics will be
performed.
Figure 205 Line Diagnostics Set Command Example
ras> adsl linediag setld 1
Line- 1 set to Line Diagnostic Mode
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Chapter 64 ADSL Commands
64.4.8 Line Diagnostics Get Command Example
The following example displays the line diagnostics results for ADSL port 1.
Figure 206 Line Diagnostics Get Command Example
ras> adsl linediag getld 1
Line_Diagnostics_Parameter,_channel: 0
number_of_subcarries: 256
hlinScale: 19625
32767
latn: 54
0
satn: 52
8
snrm: 60
60
attndr: 12140000
1120000
farEndActatp: 75
125
i
li.rl
li.im
log
0
32768
32768
1023
1
32768
32768
1023
2
32768
32768
1023
3
32768
32768
1023
4
32768
32768
1023
5
32768
32768
1023
6
11604
4752
83
7
17794
5598
48
8
22385
5567
30
9
24903
5163
21
10
26768
5013
15
11
29179
5494
8
12
31605
6574
1
13
32766
8020
1023
14
32159
9597
1023
15
30990
11350
1023
16
30432
13730
1023
17
30259
16694
1023
18
29137
19570
1023
19
26499
21554
1023
20
23288
22973
0
496
32
QLN
255
255
255
255
255
255
191
190
184
163
185
175
172
186
183
182
186
182
171
186
173
SNR
255
255
255
255
255
255
132
139
147
152
159
165
168
170
173
173
172
170
170
172
174
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Chapter 64 ADSL Commands
The following table lists the line diagnostics test parameters that display, see the
ITU-T’s G.992.3 for more information.
Table 189 Line Diagnostics Get Command
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
number_of_
subcarries
Discrete Multi-Tone (DMT) modulation divides up a line’s bandwidth
into sub-carriers (sub-channels) of 4.3125 kHz each.
The first number is the total number of DMT sub-carriers the ADSL
connection is using. The second number indicates how many
upstream DMT sub-carriers the ADSL connection is using.
hlinScale:
The channel characteristics function is represented in linear format by
a scale factor and a complex number. These are the maximum
upstream and downstream scale factors used in producing the channel
characteristics function.
latn:
This is the upstream and downstream Line Attenuation (in .1 dB).
satn:
This is the upstream and downstream Signal Attenuation (in .1 dB).
snrm:
This is the upstream and downstream Signal-to-Noise Ratio Margin (in
.1 dB). A DMT sub-carrier’s SNR is the ratio between the received
signal power and the received noise power. The signal-to-noise ratio
margin is the maximum that the received noise power could increase
with the IES-1248-51V still being able to meet its transmission
targets.
attndr:
This is the upstream and downstream Attainable Net Data Rate (in bit/
s).
farEndActatp:
This is the upstream and downstream Far End Actual Aggregate
Transmit Power (in .1 dBm)
i
This is the index number of the DMT sub-carrier.
li.rl
The channel characteristics function is represented in linear format by
a scale factor and a complex number. This is the real part of the
complex number used in producing the channel characteristics
function for this sub-carrier.
li.im
The channel characteristics function is represented in linear format by
a scale factor and a complex number. This is the imaginary part of the
complex number used in producing the channel characteristics
function for this sub-carrier
log
This is a format for providing channel characteristics. It provides
magnitude values in a logarithmic scale. This can be used in analyzing
the physical condition of the ADSL line.
QLN
The Quiet Line Noise for a DMT sub-carrier is the rms (root mean
square) level of the noise present on the line, when no ADSL signals
are present. It is measured in dBm/Hz. The QLN can be used in
analyzing crosstalk.
SNR
This is the upstream and downstream Signal-to-Noise Ratio (in .1 dB).
A DMT sub-carrier’s SNR is the ratio between the received signal
power and the received noise power. The SNR can be used in
analyzing time dependent changes in crosstalk levels and line
attenuation (such as those caused by temperature variations and
moisture).
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Chapter 64 ADSL Commands
64.4.9 Line Diagnostics Get 992.3 Command Example
The following example displays the line diagnostics results for ADSL port 1.
Figure 207 Line Diagnostics Get 992.3 Command Example
ras> adsl linediag getld992_3 1
port: 1
number_of_subcarries:
256
32
hlinScale:
17024
32767
latn:
2.0
0.2
satn:
2.0
0.0
snrm:
-0.0
6.0
attndr:
10398468
1152000
farEndActatp:
20.4
12.4
i
li.rl
li.im
log(dB) QLN(dBm)
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
1
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
2
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
3
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
4
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
5
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
6
0.31557
0.00796
-9.9
-120.5
7
0.43477 -0.31599
-5.3
-120.0
8
0.28313 -0.67576
-2.6
-119.5
9 -0.01016 -0.86645
-1.1
-119.0
10 -0.28423 -0.89969
-0.4
-118.5
11 -0.48750 -0.85403
-0.1
-118.0
12 -0.63495 -0.79630
0.2
-118.0
13 -0.75373 -0.75644
0.6
-117.5
14 -0.84457 -0.72510
1.0
-117.0
15 -0.89389 -0.68549
1.1
-116.5
16 -0.90713 -0.64631
1.0
-114.5
17 -0.91955 -0.63196
1.0
-116.0
18 -0.95053 -0.64860
1.3
-116.0
19 -0.97781 -0.67563
1.6
-115.5
20 -0.97161 -0.69211
1.6
-115.5
498
SNR(dB)
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
8.5
42.0
44.5
46.5
51.5
52.0
54.5
56.5
56.5
56.5
56.5
57.0
57.0
57.0
57.5
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Chapter 64 ADSL Commands
The following table lists the line diagnostics test parameters that display, see the
ITU-T’s G.992.3 for more information.
Table 190 Line Diagnostics Get 992.3 Command
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
number_of_
subcarries
Discrete Multi-Tone (DMT) modulation divides up a line’s bandwidth
into sub-carriers (sub-channels) of 4.3125 KHz each.
The first number is the total number of DMT sub-carriers the ADSL
connection is using. The second number indicates how many
upstream DMT sub-carriers the ADSL connection is using.
hlinScale:
The channel characteristics function is represented in linear format by
a scale factor and a complex number. These are the maximum
upstream and downstream scale factors used in producing the channel
characteristics function.
latn:
This is the upstream and downstream Line Attenuation (in dB).
satn:
This is the upstream and downstream Signal Attenuation (in dB).
snrm:
This is the upstream and downstream Signal-to-Noise Ratio Margin (in
dB). A DMT sub-carrier’s SNR is the ratio between the received signal
power and the received noise power. The signal-to-noise ratio margin
is the maximum that the received noise power could increase with the
IES-1248-51V still being able to meet its transmission targets.
attndr:
This is the upstream and downstream Attainable Net Data Rate (in bit/
s).
farEndActatp:
This is the upstream and downstream Far End Actual Aggregate
Transmit Power (in dBm)
i
This is the index number of the DMT sub-carrier.
li.rl
The channel characteristics function is represented in linear format by
a scale factor and a complex number. This is the real part of the
complex number used in producing the channel characteristics
function for this sub-carrier.
li.im
The channel characteristics function is represented in linear format by
a scale factor and a complex number. This is the imaginary part of the
complex number used in producing the channel characteristics
function for this sub-carrier
log
This is a format for providing channel characteristics. It provides
magnitude values in a logarithmic scale. It is measured in dB. This can
be used in analyzing the physical condition of the ADSL line.
QLN
The Quiet Line Noise for a DMT sub-carrier is the rms (root mean
square) level of the noise present on the line, when no ADSL signals
are present. It is measured in dBm. The QLN can be used in analyzing
crosstalk.
SNR
This is the upstream and downstream Signal-to-Noise Ratio (in dB). A
DMT sub-carrier’s SNR is the ratio between the received signal power
and the received noise power. The SNR can be used in analyzing time
dependent changes in crosstalk levels and line attenuation (such as
those caused by temperature variations and moisture).
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Chapter 64 ADSL Commands
64.4.10 SELT Diagnostic Set Command Example
The following example starts a SELT test on ADSL port 1.
Figure 208 SELT Diagnostic Set Command Example
ras> adsl linediag setselt 1
64.4.11 SELT Diagnostic Get Command Example
The following example displays the status and results SELT diagnostic results for
ADSL port 1.
Figure 209 Line Diagnostics Get Command Example
ras>
port
---1
ras>
port
---1
500
adsl linediag getselt 1
inprogress
cableType
-------------------- --------INPROGRESS
24AWG
adsl linediag getselt 1
inprogress
cableType
-------------------- --------DONE
24AWG
loopEstimateLength
-----------------0 m(0.00 kFt)
loopEstimateLength
-----------------0 m(0.00 kFt)
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Chapter 64 ADSL Commands
64.4.12 Tone Diagnostics 992.3 Command Example
The following example displays the tone diagnostics results for ADSL port 8.
Figure 210 Tone Diagnostics Command Example
ras> ad lined toneD 1
port: 1
number_of_subcarries:
512
32
latn:
24.1
2.7
satn:
24.1
61.3
snrm:
30.2
25.0
attndr:
28008000
1248000
farEndActatp:
-31.0
11.9
i
log(dB) QLN(dBm)
SNR(dB)
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
1
N/A
N/A
N/A
2
N/A
N/A
N/A
3
N/A
N/A
N/A
4
N/A
N/A
N/A
5
N/A
N/A
N/A
6
-21.1
-125.5
17.5
7
-15.3
-124.0
26.0
8
-9.9
-123.0
31.0
9
-5.7
-120.5
38.0
----------------------Snip-----------------------509
510
511
6.0
6.0
6.0
-124.0
-124.0
-123.0
29.0
29.0
26.5
The following table lists the tone diagnostic parameters. See the ITU-T’s G.992.3
for more information.
Table 191 ToneDiag Command
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
number_of_
subcarries
Discrete Multi-Tone (DMT) modulation divides up a line’s bandwidth
into sub-carriers (sub-channels) of 4.3125 KHz each.
This number indicates how many upstream and downstream DMT subcarriers the ADSL connection is using.
hlinScale:
The channel characteristics function is represented in linear format by
a scale factor and a complex number. This is the maximum upstream
and downstream scale factor used in producing the channel
characteristics function.
latn:
This is the upstream and downstream Line Attenuation (in dB).
satn:
This is the upstream and downstream Signal Attenuation (in dB).
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Chapter 64 ADSL Commands
Table 191 ToneDiag Command (continued)
502
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
snrm:
This is the upstream and downstream Signal-to-Noise Ratio Margin (in
dB). A DMT sub-carrier’s SNR is the ratio between the received signal
power and the received noise power. The signal-to-noise ratio margin
is the maximum that the received noise power could increase with the
IES-1248-51V still being able to meet its transmission targets.
attndr:
This is the upstream and downstream Attainable Net Data Rate (in bit/
s).
farEndActatp:
This is the upstream and downstream Far End Actual Aggregate
Transmit Power (in dBm)
i
This is the index number of the DMT sub-carrier.
log(dB)
This is a format for providing channel characteristics. It provides
magnitude values in a logarithmic scale. This can be used in analyzing
the physical condition of the ADSL line.
QLN(dBm)
The Quiet Line Noise for a DMT sub-carrier is the rms (root mean
square) level of the noise present on the line, when no ADSL signals
are present. It is measured in dBm/Hz. The QLN can be used in
analyzing crosstalk.
SNR(dB)
This is the upstream and downstream Signal-to-Noise Ratio (in dB). A
DMT sub-carrier’s SNR is the ratio between the received signal power
and the received noise power. The SNR can be used in analyzing time
dependent changes in crosstalk levels and line attenuation (such as
those caused by temperature variations and moisture).
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Chapter 64 ADSL Commands
64.5 Alarm Profile Commands
Configure alarm profiles to set alarm settings and thresholds for the ADSL ports.
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Table 192 Alarm Profile Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl alarmprofile show [profile]
Displays the settings of the specified alarm profile (or
all of them if you do not specify one).
L/L
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Chapter 64 ADSL Commands
Table 192 Alarm Profile Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl alarmprofile set <profile>
[<atuc lofs><atur lofs><atuc
loss><atur loss><atuc lols>
<atuc lprs><atur lprs><atuc ess>
<atur ess><atuc fast rateup>
<atur fast rateup><atuc
interleave rateup><atur
interleave rateup><atuc fast
ratedown><atur fast ratedown>
<atuc interleave ratedown><atur
interleave ratedown><init fail
enable><atuc fail fast><atuc
ses><atur ses><atuc uas><atur
uas>]
This command configures settings and thresholds that
define when the IES-1248-51V is to send an alarm trap
and generate a syslog entry.
H/H
Configure alarm profiles first and then use the
alarmprofile map command to set the IES-1248-51V
to use them with specific ADSL ports.
atuc: Upstream. These parameters are for the
connection (or traffic) coming from the subscriber’s
device to the IES-1248-51V.
atur: Downstream. These parameters are for the
connection (or traffic) going from the IES-1248-51V to
the subscriber’s device.
atuc lofs, atur lofs: The number of Loss Of
Frame seconds that are permitted to occur within 15
minutes.
atuc loss, atur loss: The number of Loss Of Signal
seconds that are permitted to occur within 15 minutes.
atuc lols: The number of Loss Of Link seconds that
are permitted to occur within 15 minutes.
atuc lprs, atur lprs: The number of Loss of Power
seconds that are permitted to occur (on the ATUR)
within 15 minutes.
atuc ess, atur ess: The number of Errored Seconds
that are permitted to occur within 15 minutes.
atuc fast rateup, atur fast rateup: A rate in
kilobits per second (kbps). If a fast mode connection’s
upstream transmission rate increases by more than
this number, then a trap is sent.
atuc interleave rateup, atur interleave
rateup: A rate in kilobits per second (kbps). If an
interleave mode connection’s upstream transmission
rate increases by more than this number, then a trap is
sent.
atuc fast ratedown, atur fast ratedown: A rate
in kilobits per second (kbps). If a fast mode
connection’s downstream transmission rate decreases
by more than this number, then a trap is sent.
atuc interleave ratedown, atur interleave
ratedown: A rate in kilobits per second (kbps). If an
interleave mode connection’s upstream transmission
rate decreases by more than this number, then a trap
is sent.
init fail enable: “1” sets the profile to trigger an
alarm for an initialization failures trap. “2” sets the
profile to not trigger an alarm for an initialization
failures trap.
atuc fail fast: The number of failed fast retrains
that are permitted to occur within 15 minutes.
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
atuc ses, atur ses: The number of Severely Errored
Seconds that are permitted to occur within 15 minutes.
atuc uas, atur uas: The number of UnAvailable
505
Chapter 64 ADSL Commands
Table 192 Alarm Profile Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
adsl alarmprofile delete
<profile>
This command allows you to delete an individual ADSL
alarm profile by its name. You cannot delete the
DEFVAL alarm profile.
adsl alarmprofile map <portlist>
<profile>
Sets the IES-1248-51V to use an (already-configured)
alarm profile with the specified ADSL ports.
H/H
adsl alarmprofile showmap [port]
Displays the alarm profile(s) mapped to the specified
port(s).
L/L
adsl alarmprofile showport
<port>
Displays the alarm profile settings for the specified
port.
L/~
adsl ipbpvc arpproxy agingtime
set <sec>
Sets the valid time interval of a learned MAC address.
10~10000 seconds.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc arpproxy agingtime
show
Display the current time interval of a learned MAC
address.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc arpproxy flush all |
edgerouter [<ip><vid>]|interface
[<ip>/<mask><vid>]
Flush the learned MAC addresses manually.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc arpproxy show
[domain <domain> [edgerouter
[<ip><vid>]]|[interface[<ip>/
<mask><vid>]]]
Displays learnt MAC table for a domain Displays learnt
MAC table for all/an edge router in a domain Displays
learnt MAC table for all/an interface in a domain.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc delete <portlist>
<vpi><vci>
Remove IP aware Bridge PVC.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain delete
<domain-name>
Delete a domain, have to delete all VLANs belonging to
this domain first.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain dhcpvlan
disable <domain-name>
Disable DHCP VLAN in a domain.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain dhcpvlan
enable <domain-name> <vid>
Enable DHCP VLAN in a domain.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain set <domainname>
Create domain, maximum 8 domains in the system.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc domain show
[<domain-name>]
Display domain setting.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc domain vlan <domainname><vid><registration>
Set vlan to join or leave specified domain, maximum 8
VLANs in one domain.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc edgerouter delete
<ip><vid>
Delete specified edge router setting.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc edgerouter set <ip>/
<mask><vid>
Sets the edge router.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc edgerouter show
[<vid>]
Displays the edge router setting.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc interface delete
<ip>/<mask><vid>
Delete an IP interface.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc interface runtime
[<ip>/<mask>|<vid>|<ip>/<mask>
<vid>]
Display runtime interfaces by optional <ip>/<mask>
and vlan id parameter.
M/L
506
P
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Chapter 64 ADSL Commands
Table 192 Alarm Profile Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl ipbpvc interface set <ip>/
<mask><vid>[<port><vpi><vci>]
Sets the interface.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc interface show
[<ip>/<mask>|<vid>|<ip>/<mask>
<vid>]
Displays the interface setting by optional <ip>/
<mask> and vlan id parameter.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc route delete
<domain-name><ip>/<mask>
<nexthop>
Deletes route entry from specified domain.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc route runtime
[<domain-name>|<ip>/
<mask>|<domain><ip>/<mask>]
Displays the runtime route information.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc route set <domainname><ip>/<mask><nexthop>
<metric> [<priority>]
Sets a new route to specified edgerouter for a given
domain. Maximum 16 routes in a domain.
H/H
nexthop:
metric:
priority:
adsl ipbpvc route show [<domainname>|<ip>/<mask>|<domain><ip>/
<mask>]
Displays current routing table for specific domain.
M/L
adsl ipbpvc set <portlist><vpi>
<vci><ds-vcprofile[,usvcprofile]> <pvid> <priority>
<ipab_type>
Sets IP aware Bridge PVC.
H/H
adsl ipbpvc show [<portlist>
[<vpi><vci>]]
Displays IP aware Bridge PVC setting.
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
pvid:
ipab_type:
M/L
507
Chapter 64 ADSL Commands
64.5.1 Alarm Profile Show Command Example
The following example displays the default alarm profile (DEFVAL).
Figure 211 Alarm Profile Show Command Example
ras> adsl alarmprofile show DEFVAL
01. DEFVAL
Thresh15MinLofs
(sec):
Thresh15MinLoss
(sec):
Thresh15MinLols
(sec):
Thresh15MinLprs
Thresh15MinESs
(sec):
ThreshFastRateUp
(bps):
ThreshInterleaveRateUp
(bps):
ThreshFastRateDown
(bps):
ThreshInterleaveRateDown
(bps):
InitFailureTrap(1-enable, 2-disable):
Thresh15MinFailedFast
:
Thresh15MinSes
(sec):
Thresh15MinUas
(sec):
ATU-C
ATU-R
---------- ---------0
0
0
0
0
--:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
--0
--0
0
0
0
64.5.2 Alarm Profile Set Command Example
The following example sets an alarm profile named SESalarm that has the IES1248-51V send an alarm trap and generate a syslog whenever the upstream
connection’s number of severely errored seconds exceeds three within a 15
minute period.
Figure 212 Alarm Profile Set Command Example
ras> adsl alarmprofile set SESalarm 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 3
0 0 0
64.5.3 Alarm Profile Delete Command Example
The following example deletes the SESalarm alarm profile.
Figure 213 Alarm Profile Delete Command Example
ras> adsl alarm profile delete SESalarm
508
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Chapter 64 ADSL Commands
64.5.4 Alarm Profile Map Command Example
The following example sets the IES-1248-51V to use the SESalarm alarm profile
with ADSL port 5.
Figure 214 Alarm Profile Map Command Example
ras> adsl alarmprofile map SESalarm 5
64.5.5 Alarm Profile Showmap Command Example
The following example displays which alarm profile the IES-1248-51V is set to use
for ADSL port 5.
Figure 215 Alarm Profile Showmap Command Example
ras> adsl alarmprofile showmap 5
ADSL alarm profile mapping:
Port 5: Alarm Profile = DEFVAL
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CHAPTER
65
G.Bond
G.bond allows subscribers to connect to an ISP using data streams spread over
multiple DSL lines. The total available bandwidth for the subscriber then becomes
the sum of the bandwidth available for each of the subscriber’s line connections.
As well as extra bandwidth, additional DSL lines also provide backup support.
The system only supports ADSL port bonding using ZyXEL’s P-663H-51. See the
User’s Guide of this CPE device for information on its port bonding specifications.
These commands correspond to the Web Configurator’s G.bond settings described
in Section 18.4 on page 158.
65.1 ADSL Port Bonding
Use these commands to configure ADSL port bonding settings.
Table 193 G.Bond Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl gbond set <bond-name>
<port-list>
Creates a pair bond using the specified name and ports.
H/H
bond-name: Enter a descriptive name for this pair bond.
You can use up to 31 characters.
port-list: Enter the two port numbers to be bonded,
separated by commas, a range separated by a tilde (~), or
a combination of the two separated by a comma. For
example: 1,2 or 5~10 or 1,2,5~10.
adsl gbond delete <bond-name>
Removes the specified pair bonding.
H/H
adsl gbond show [bond-name]
Displays the settings for the specified pair bond.
L/L
statistics adsl gbond [bondname]
Displays the upstream and downstream link statistics for
the specified pair bond.
M/L
Note: G.Bond only works with two adjacent ports, such as ports 1 and 2.
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Chapter 65 G.Bond
65.1.1 G.Bond Set and Delete Command Examples
The following example creates a pair bond between ports and 2 and 3 using the
descriptive name ‘gbond1’.
Figure 216 OUI Set Command Example
ras> adsl gbond set gbond1 2,3
The following example deletes the pair bond with the descriptive name ‘Westlake’.
Figure 217 OUI Set Command Example
ras> adsl gbond delete gbond1
65.1.2 G.Bond Show Example
The following shows you how to display information for a specified pair bond.
Figure 218 G.Bond Show Command Example
ras> adsl gbond show gbond1
name
port list
------------------------------- --------gbond1
1,2
Each field is described in the following table.
name
=
The name of the specified pair bond.
port list
=
The two ADSL ports that are bonded.
65.1.3 Statistics ADSL G.Bond Command Example
The following shows you how to display statistics for a specified pair bond.
Figure 219 Statistics ADSL G.Bond Command Example
ras> statistics adsl gbond
name
port list us rate(kbps) ds rate(kbps)
--------------------------- --------- ------------- ------------gbond1
1,2
0
0
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Each field is described in the following table.
name
=
The name(s) of the current pair bond(s).
port list
=
The two ports associated with the pair bond.
us rate (kbps)
=
The pair bond’s upstream data rate.
ds rate (kbps)
=
The pair bond’s downstream data rate.
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CHAPTER
66
Virtual Channel Commands
This chapter shows you how to use commands to configure virtual channels.
See Chapter 16 on page 119 for background information on virtual channels and
ATM QoS.
66.1 Virtual Channel Command Input Values
The following table describes the values required in Virtual Channel commands.
Other values are discussed with the corresponding commands.
Table 194 Virtual Channel Command Input Values
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
cdvt
Cell Delay Variation Tolerance (CDVT) is the accepted tolerance of the
difference between a cell’s transfer delay and the expected transfer
delay (measured in number of cells). Possible values are 0~255 or *
(means 0).
member-vci
The VCI of the individual PVC that you are adding to a Permanent
Virtual Circuit (PVC). The subscriber’s device must create this PVC.
member-vpi
The VPI of the individual PVC that you are adding to a PPVC. The
subscriber’s device must create this PVC.
pcr
The Peak Cell Rate (150~300 000) is the maximum rate (measured in
cells per second) at which the sender can send cells.
portlist
You can specify a single ADSL port <1>, all ADSL ports <*> or a list
of ADSL ports <1,3,5>. You can also include a range of ports
<1,5,6~10>.
priority
The priority level (0~7) assigned to PVC traffic. 7 is the highest
priority.
vc|llc
The type of encapsulation.
VC Mux is a type of encapsulation where, by prior agreement, each
protocol is assigned to a specific virtual circuit, for example, VC1
carries IP and VC2 carries IPX.
LLC is a type of encapsulation where one VC carries multiple protocols
with each packet header containing protocol identifying information.
vcprofile, ds- The name of the virtual channel profile (up to 31 ASCII characters).
vcprofile, us- You can assign profiles for downstream and upstream virtual
vcprofile
channels. You cannot change the DEFVAL or DEFVAL_VC profiles.
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Table 194 Virtual Channel Command Input Values
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
vlan-id
This is the VLAN Identifier (1 – 4094) added to routed Ethernet
frames. Each PVC must have a unique vlan-id since the IES-124851V forwards traffic back to the subscribers based on the VLAN ID.
vpi, vci
The Virtual Path Identifier (VPI) and Virtual Circuit Identifier (VCI)
identify a channel on this port.
Possible values for the VPI are 0~255. This PVC channel is for internal
use. The subscriber does not need to create this PVC.
Possible values for the VCI are 32~65535 if the VPI is 0. If the VPI is
not 0, possible values for the VCI are 1~65535. This PVC channel is
for internal use. The subscriber does not need to create this PVC.
66.2 Virtual Channel Profile Commands
Use the following commands to configure virtual channel profiles.
Table 195 Virtual Channel Profile Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl vcprofile show
[vcprofile]
Displays the settings of the specified virtual channel profile (or all
of them if you do not specify one).
L/L
adsl vcprofile set
<vcprofile>
<vc|llc><ubr|cbr><pcr>
<cdvt>
Creates a virtual channel profile.
H/H
516
ubr|cbr: Specify either a unspecified bit rate (UBR) or constant
bit rate (CBR).
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Table 195 Virtual Channel Profile Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl vcprofile set
<vcprofile>
<vc|llc><vbr(rtvbr)|nrt-vbr>
<pcr><cdvt><scr><bt>
Creates a virtual channel profile. After you create a virtual channel
profile, you can assign it to any of the ADSL ports on any of the
ADSL IES-1248-51V in the IES-1248-51V.
H/H
vbr(rt-vbr)|nrt-vbr: The Real-Time Variable Bit Rate (RT-VBR)
or Non Real-Time (NRT-VBR) Variable Bit Rate ATM traffic class.
pcr: Peak Cell Rate (PCR) is the maximum rate (150 to 300000
cells per second) at which the sender can send cells.
cdvt: Cell Delay Variation Tolerance (CDVT) is the accepted
tolerance of the difference between a cell’s transfer delay and the
expected transfer delay measured in number of cells. Enter from 0
to 255 or * (means 0).
scr: The Sustained Cell Rate (SCR) sets the average cell rate
(long-term) that can be transmitted (measured in cells per
second). SCR applies to the VBR traffic class.
bt: Burst Tolerance (BT) is the maximum number of cells that the
port is guaranteed to handle without any discards (number of
cells). BT applies to the VBR traffic class.
adsl vcprofile delete
<vcprofile>
You cannot delete a virtual channel profile that is assigned to any
of the ADSL ports. Assign a different profile to any ADSL ports
that are using the profile that you want to delete, and then you
can delete the profile.
H/H
66.2.1 Set Virtual Channel Profile Command
The following example creates a virtual channel profile named gold that uses LLC
encapsulation. It uses constant bit rate and has the maximum rate (peak cell rate)
set to 300,000 cells per second. The acceptable tolerance of the difference
between a cell’s transfer delay and the expected transfer delay (CDVT) is set to 5
cells.
Figure 220 Set Virtual Channel Profile Command Example 1
ras> adsl vcprofile set gold llc cbr 300000 5
The following example creates a virtual channel profile named silver that uses VC
encapsulation. It uses real-time variable bit rate and has the maximum rate (peak
cell rate) set to 250,000 cells per second. The acceptable tolerance of the
difference between a cell’s transfer delay and the expected transfer delay (CDVT)
is set to 5 cells. The average cell rate that can be transmitted (SCR) is set to
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100,000 cells per second. The maximum number of cells that the port is
guaranteed to handle without any discards (BT) is set to 200.
Figure 221 Set Virtual Channel Profile Command Example 2
ras> adsl vcprofile set silver vc vbr 250000 5 100000 200
The following example creates a virtual channel profile named economy that uses
LLC encapsulation. It uses unspecified bit rate and has the maximum rate (peak
cell rate) set to 50,000 cells per second. The acceptable tolerance of the difference
between a cell’s transfer delay and the expected transfer delay (CDVT) is set to
100 cells.
Figure 222 Set Virtual Channel Profile Command Example 3
ras> adsl vcprofile set gold llc cbr 50000 100
66.2.2 Delete Virtual Channel Profile Command
The following example deletes the silver virtual channel profile.
Figure 223 Delete Virtual Channel Profile Command Example
ras> adsl vcprofile delete silver
66.3 PVC Channels
Channels (also called Permanent Virtual Circuits or PVCs) let you set priorities for
different services or subscribers. You can define up to eight channels on each DSL
port and use them for different services or levels of service. You set the PVID that
is assigned to untagged frames received on each channel. You also set an IEEE
802.1p priority for each of the PVIDs. In this way you can assign different
priorities to different channels (and consequently the services that get carried on
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them or the subscribers that use them). Use the following commands to define
channels.
Table 196 PVC Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl pvc show
[<portlist>[<vpi><vci>]]
Displays the Permanent Virtual Circuit (PVC) parameters of
the specified ADSL port(s) or all of the ADSL ports if you do
not specify any.
M/L
adsl pvc set
<portlist><vpi><vci><super|
vlanid<priority>><dsvcprofile[,us-vcprofile]>
Allows the configuration of a PVC (permanent virtual circuit)
for one or a range of ADSL ports.
H/H
adsl pvc delete
[<portlist>[<vpi><vci>]]
Deletes the specified PVC channel.
super: Enable the super channel option to allow a channel
to forward frames belonging to multiple VLAN groups (that
are not assigned to other channels). The IES-1248-51V
forwards frames belonging to VLAN groups that are not
assigned to specific channels to the super channel. The
super channel functions in the same way as the channel in a
single channel environment. One port can have only one
super channel.
H/H
66.3.1 PVC Set Command
The following example sets a PVC on ADSL port 1 with VPI 1, VCI 34, default VID
100 and priority 3. It sets the “platinum” profile for downstream traffic shaping
and a VC profile named “plus” for upstream traffic policing.
Figure 224 PVC Set Command Example
ras> adsl pvc set 1 1 34 100 3 platinum,plus
66.4 Priority-based PVCs
A PPVC (Priority-based PVC) allows you to give different priorities to PVCs that are
members of the same VLAN.
The IES-1248-51V uses eight priority queues (also called levels) for the member
PVCs. The system maps frames with certain IEEE 802.1p priorities to a PVC with a
particular priority queue. See Chapter 16 on page 119 for the factory default
mapping.
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Use these commands to configure PPVCs and add and remove member PVCs..
Table 197 PPVC Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl ppvc set
<portlist><vpi>
<vci><llc|vc><pvid><priorit
y>
Creates a Priority PVC (PPVC). This allows you to give
different priorities to PVCs that are members of the same
VLAN.
H/H
adsl ppvc member set
<portlist>
<vpi><vci><membervpi><member-vci><dsvcprofile[,usvcprofile]><priority>
Adds a member PVC to a PPVC. You must create the PPVC
before you use this command to add a member.
H/H
adsl ppvc member delete
<portlist><vpi><vci><member
-vpi><member-vci>
Removes a PVC from a PPVC.
H/H
adsl ppvc member show
[portlist][<vpi><vci>]
Displays the PVCs that are members of a PPVC.
M/L
adsl ppvc show [<portlist>
[<vpi><vci>]]
Displays the runtime configured PPVCs.
M/L
adsl ppvc delete <portlist>
<vpi><vci>
Removes a PPVC. Removing a PPVC also deletes all of the
member PVCs.
H/H
Note: Only the member PVCs need to be created on the
subscriber’s device.
66.4.1 PPVC Set Command Example
The following example creates a PPVC with VPI 8 and VCI 35 for port 5. The PPVC
uses llc encapsulation and default VID 25. Any frames received without an IEEE
802.1p priority tag will be assigned a priority of 3. The IES-1248-51V uses this
PVC channel internally. This PVC is not needed on the subscriber’s device.
Figure 225 PPVC Set Command Example
ras> adsl ppvc set 5 8 35 llc 25 3
66.4.2 PPVC Member Set Command Example
The following example adds a PVC to a PPVC with VPI 8 and VCI 35 for port 5. The
PVC uses VPI 8 and VCI 36. It sets the DEFVAL profile for downstream traffic
shaping and for upstream traffic policing. It uses priority queue 2.
Figure 226 PPVC Member Set Command Example
ras> adsl ppvc member set 5 8 35 8 36 DEFVAL,DEFVAL 2
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66.4.3 PPVC Member Delete Command Example
The following example removes a PVC that uses VPI 8 and VCI 36 from a PPVC
with VPI 8 and VCI 35 for port 5.
Figure 227 PPVC Member Delete Command Example
ras> adsl ppvc member delete 5 8 35 8 36
66.4.4 PPVC Member Show Command Example
The following example displays the PVCs that are members of a PPVC for port 5.
Figure 228 PPVC Member Show Command Example
ras> adsl ppvc member show 5
port vpi
vci mvpi mvci level DS/US vcprofile
---- --- ----- ---- ----- ------ -------------------5
8
35
8
36
2 DEFVAL/DEFVAL
66.4.5 PPVC Show Command Example
The following example displays the PPVCs configured on DSL port 5.
Figure 229 PPVC Show Command Example
ras> adsl ppvc show 5
port vpi
vci encap pvid pri
================================
5
8
35
llc
25 6
66.4.6 PPVC Delete Command Example
The following example removes a PPVC with VPI 8 and VCI 35 for port 5.
Figure 230 PPVC Delete Command Example
ras> adsl ppvc delete 5 8 35
66.5 2684 Routed Mode Commands
Use the 2684 routed mode to have the IES-1248-51V add MAC address headers to
2684 routed mode traffic from a PVC that connects to a subscriber device that
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uses 2684 routed mode. You can also specify the gateway to which the IES-124851V sends the traffic and the VLAN ID tag to add. See RFC-2684 for details on
routed mode traffic carried over AAL type 5 over ATM.
Use the commands in the following order to set up a 2684 routed mode PVC.
1
Use the adsl rpvc gateway commands to configure gateway settings.
2
Use the adsl rpvc set command to configure RPVCs (2684 routed mode PVCs)
for 2684 routed mode traffic.
3
Use the adsl rpvc route set command to configure domains for 2684 routed
mode traffic. The domain is the range of IP addresses behind the subscriber’s
device (the CPE or Customer Premises Equipment). This includes the CPE device’s
LAN IP addresses and the IP addresses of the LAN computers.
4
Use the adsl rpvc arp commands to view the Address Resolution Protocol table
of IP addresses of CPE devices using 2684 routed mode and configure how long
the device is to store them.
5
For upstream traffic: Since the subscriber's device will not send out a MAC
address, after the IES-1248-51V reassembles the Ethernet packets from the AAL5
ATM cells, the IES-1248-51V will append the routed mode gateway's MAC address
and the IES-1248-51V's MAC address as the destination/source MAC address.
For downstream traffic: When the IES-1248-51V sees the destination IP address is
specified in the RPVC (or RPVC domain), the IES-1248-51V will strip out the MAC
header and send them to the corresponding RPVC.
Table 198 RPVC Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl rpvc gateway set
<gateway-ip><vlanid>[<priority>]
Adds a gateway IP address to use for 2684 routed mode
traffic.
H/H
adsl rpvc gateway show
Displays the gateway IP addresses that are configured for
use with 2684 routed mode traffic.
M/L
adsl rpvc gateway delete
<gateway-ip>
Removes the gateway IP address that the device was set to
use for 2684 routed mode traffic.
H/H
adsl rpvc set
<portlist><vpi> <vci><dsvcprofile[,us-vcprofile]>
<ip>/<mask> <gateway-ip>
This command adds a PVC to handle 2684 routed mode
traffic.
H/H
Make sure that the routed PVC’s subnet does not include
the IES-1248-51V’s IP address.
Note: You must use the rpvc gateway set command
to configure the gateway’s settings before you
use the rpvc set command.
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Table 198 RPVC Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl rpvc show <portlist>
This command lists the PVCs for handling 2684 routed
mode traffic (RPVCs).
M/L
adsl rpvc delete
<portlist><vpi><vci>
Removes the specified PVC for 2684 routed mode traffic.
H/H
adsl rpvc route set
<port><vpi> <vci><ip>/
<mask>
Sets RPVC route on a port.
H/H
adsl rpvc route show
<portlist>
This command lists the domains for 2684 routed mode
traffic.
M/L
adsl rpvc route delete
<port> <vpi><vci><ip>/
<mask>
Removes the specified domain for 2684 routed mode traffic.
The domain includes the subscriber’s LAN IP addresses.
H/H
adsl rpvc arp agingtime set
<sec>
Configures how long the device stores the IP addresses of
CPE devices using 2684 routed mode in the Address
Resolution Protocol table.
H/H
sec: The number of seconds (10~10000) the device is to
keep the Address Resolution Protocol table’s entries of IP
addresses of 2684 routed mode gateways. Use 0 to disable
the aging time.
adsl rpvc arp agingtime
show
Displays how long the device stores the IP addresses of
2684 routed mode gateways in the Address Resolution
Protocol table.
M/L
adsl rpvc arp show
Displays how long the device stores the IP addresses of
2684 routed mode gateways in the Address Resolution
Protocol table.
M/L
adsl rpvc arp flush
Clears the IP addresses of 2684 routed mode gateways
from the Address Resolution Protocol table.
H/H
66.5.1 2684 Routed Mode Example
The following figure shows an example RFC 2684 (formerly RFC 1483) routed
mode set up. The gateway server uses IP address 192.168.10.102 and is in VLAN
1. The IES-1248-51V uses IP address 192.168.20.101. The subscriber’s device
(the CPE) is connected to DSL port 1 on the IES-1248-51V and the 2684 routed
mode traffic is to use the PVC identified by VPI 8 and VCI 35. The CPE device’s
WAN IP address is 192.168.10.200. The routed domain is the LAN IP addresses
behind the CPE device. The CPE device’s LAN IP address is 10.10.10.10 and the
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LAN computer’s IP address is 10.10.10.1. This includes the CPE device’s LAN IP
addresses and the IP addresses of the LAN computers.
Figure 231 2684 Routed Mode Example
Note the following.
• The CPE device’s WAN IP (192.168.10.200 in this example) must be in the same
subnet as the gateway’s IP address (192.168.10.102 in this example).
• The IES-1248-51V's management IP address can be any IP address, it doesn't
have any relationship to the WAN IP address or routed gateway IP address.
• The IES-1248-51V’s management IP address should not be in the same subnet
as the one defined by the WAN IP address and netmask of the subscriber’s
device. It is suggested that you set the netmask of the subscriber’s WAN IP
address to 32 to avoid this problem.
• The IES-1248-51V's management IP address should not be in the same subnet
range of any RPVC and RPVC domain. It will make the IES-1248-51V confused if
the IES-1248-51V receives a packet with this IP as destination IP.
• The IES-1248-51V’s management IP address also should not be in the same
subnet as the one defined by the LAN IP address and netmask of the
subscriber’s device. Make sure you assign the IP addresses properly.
• In general deployment, the computer must set the CPE device’s LAN IP address
(10.10.10.10 in this example) as its default gateway.
• The subnet range of any RPVC and RPVC domain must be unique.
Use the following command sequence to configure the IES-1248-51V for this
example set up.
Figure 232 2684 Routed Mode Commands Example
ras> adsl rpvc gateway set 192.168.10.102 1
ras> adsl rpvc set 1 8 35 DEFVAL 192.168.10.200/32 192.168.10.102
ras> adsl rpvc route set 1 8 35 10.10.10.1/24
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66.5.2 RPVC Gateway Set Command Example
The following example has the device use a VLAN ID of 1 and IEEE 802.1p priority
of 3 when sending 2684 routed mode traffic to a gateway at IP address
192.168.10.102.
Figure 233 RPVC Gateway Set Command Example
ras> adsl rpvc gateway set 192.168.10.102 1 3
66.5.3 RPVC Gateway Show Command Example
The following is an example.
Figure 234 RPVC Gateway Show Command Example
ras> adsl rpvc gateway show
gateway ip
vid
--------------- ---192.168.10.102 1
66.5.4 RPVC Gateway Delete Command Example
The following example has the device remove a 2684 routed mode traffic gateway
entry for IP address 192.168.10.102.
Figure 235 RPVC Gateway Delete Command Example
ras> adsl rpvc gateway delete 192.168.10.102
66.5.5 RPVC Set Command Example
The following example adds a PVC for 2684 routed mode traffic. It is for DSL port
1, VPI 8, VCI 35. It sets the DEFVAL profile for downstream traffic shaping and for
upstream traffic policing. The CPE device’s WAN IP address is 192.168.10.200 with
a netmask of 32 and the gateway’s IP address is 192.168.10.102.
Figure 236 RPVC Set Command Example
ras> adsl rpvc set 1 8 35 DEFVAL,DEFVAL 192.168.10.200/32 192.168.10.102
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66.5.6 RPVC Show Command Example
The following example displays the RPVCs for DSL port 1.
Figure 237 RPVC Show Command Example
ras> adsl rpvc show 1
port vpi vci ip/netmask
gateway ip
DS/US vcprofile
---- --- ---- ------------------ --------------- ----------------------------1
8
35 192.168.10.200/32 192.168.10.102 DEFVAL/DEFVAL
66.5.7 RPVC Delete Command Example
The following example removes a PVC for 2684 routed mode traffic. It is for DSL
port 1, VPI 8, VCI 35.
Figure 238 RPVC Delete Command Example
ras> adsl rpvc delete 1 8 35
66.5.8 RPVC Route Set Command Example
The following example adds a domain for a CPE device is connected to DSL port 1
on the IES-1248-51V and the 2684 routed mode traffic is to use the PVC identified
by VPI 8 and VCI 35. The CPE device’s LAN IP address is 10.10.10.10 and uses a
subnet mask of 255.255.255.0. This includes the CPE device’s LAN IP addresses
and the IP addresses of the LAN computers.
Figure 239 RPVC Route Set Command Example
ras> adsl rpvc route set 1 8 35 10.10.10.1/24
66.5.9 RPVC Route Show Command Example
The following example displays the domains for 2684 routed mode traffic for
devices connected to DSL ports 1 and 2.
Figure 240 RPVC Route Show Command Example
ras> adsl rpvc route show 1,2
port vpi vci ip/netmask
---- --- --- -----------------1
8 35 10.10.10.0/24
2
8 35 10.10.11.0/24
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66.5.10 RPVC Route Delete Command Example
The following example removes a domain for a CPE device is connected to DSL
port 1 on the IES-1248-51V and the 2684 routed mode traffic is to use the PVC
identified by VPI 8 and VCI 35. The CPE device’s LAN IP address is 10.10.10.10
and uses a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0. This includes the CPE device’s LAN IP
addresses and the IP addresses of the LAN computers.
Figure 241 RPVC Route Delete Command Example
ras> adsl rpvc route delete 1 8 35 10.10.10.1/24
66.5.11 RPVC ARP Agingtime Set Command Example
The following example sets the device to store the IP addresses 2684 routed mode
gateways in the Address Resolution Protocol table for 500 seconds.
Figure 242 RPVC ARP Agingtime Command Example
ras> adsl rpvc arp agingtime set 500
66.5.12 RPVC ARP Agingtime Show Command Example
The following is an example.
Figure 243 RPVC ARP Agingtime Show Command Example
ras> adsl rpvc arp agingtime show
rpvc aging time (sec): 500
66.5.13 RPVC ARP Show Command Example
The following is an example.
Figure 244 RPVC ARP Agingtime Show Command Example
ras> adsl rpvc arp show
gateway ip
vid mac
--------------- ---- ----------------192.168.10.102
1 00:0d:9d:d9:43:3b
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66.6 PPPoA to PPPoE (PAE) Translation
Before migrating to an Ethernet infrastructure, a broadband network might consist
of PPPoA connections between the CPE devices and the DSLAM and PPPoE
connections from the DSLAM to the BRAS (Broadband Remote Access Server). The
following figure shows a network example.
Figure 245 Mixed PPPoA-to-PPPoE Broadband Network Example
Client
DSLAM
PPPoA
PPPoE
BRAS
In order to allow communication between the end points (the CPE clients and the
BRAS), you need to configure the DSLAM (the IES-1248-51V) to translate PPPoA
frames to PPPoE packets and vice versa.
When PPPoA packets are received from the CPE, the ATM headers are removed
and the IES-1248-51V adds PPPoE and Ethernet headers before sending the
packets to the BRAS. When the IES-1248-51V receives PPPoE packets from the
BRAS, PPPoE and Ethernet headers are stripped and necessary PVC information
(such as encapsulation type) is added before forwarding to the designated CPE.
You can use these commands to create PVCs for PAE translation.
Table 199 PAEPVC Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl paepvc delete
<portlist> <vpi><vci>
This command removes a PPPoA-to-PPPoE (PAE) PVC.
M/
H
adsl paepvc set
<portlist><vpi> <vci><dsvcprofile[,usvcprofile]><pvid><priority>
[acname][srvcname][hellotim
e]
Creates a PAE PVC to allow communication between the
ATM (CPE) and Ethernet network (BRAS) segments. The
PVC is mapped to a PPPoE session that connects to the
specified BRAS (Broadband Remote Access Server).
M/
H
acname: Specifies the hostname of a remote access
concentrator if there are two access concentrators (or
BRAS) on the network or that you want to allow PAE
translation to the specified access concentrator.
srvcname: Specifies the name of the service that uses this
PVC. This must be a service name that you configure on the
remote access concentrator.
hellotime: Specifies the timeout, (0~600 seconds) for the
PPPoE session. Enter 0 if there is no timeout.
adsl paepvc show
[<portlist>[<vpi><vci>]]
528
Displays the PAE PVC settings for the specified port(s) or
PVCs.
L/L
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Table 199 PAEPVC Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl paepvc session
<portlist> [<vpi><vci>]
This command displays the status of PAE PVC sessions on
the specified port(s) or PVCs.
L/L
adsl paepvc counter
<portlist> [<vpi><vci>]
This command displays statistics about PAE PVC activity.
L/L
66.6.1 PAE PVC Set Command Example
The following example creates a PPPoA-to-PPPoE PVC (1/33) for port 1. The VLAN
ID is 1, and the IEEE 802.1p priority is 0. This configuration is for the video
service on the vom access concentrator. The switch waits 10 seconds before
terminating the PPPoE session.
Figure 246 PAE PVC Set Command Example
ras> adsl paepvc set 1 1 33 DEFVAL 1 0 acname vom srvcname video hellotime 10
66.6.2 PAE PVC Show Command Example
The following example displays the settings for port 1.
Figure 247 PAE PVC Show Command Example
ras> adsl paepvc show 1
port vpi
vci pvid pri htime US/DS vcprofile/acname/srvcname
---- --- ----- ---- --- ----- ----------------------------------1
1
33
1
0
10 dsprofile: DEFVAL
usprofile:
acname
: vom
srvcname : video
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66.6.3 PAE PVC Session Command Example
The following example displays the settings for port 1.
Figure 248 PAE PVC Session Command Example
ras> adsl paepvc session 1
pvc 1-1/33
session state : down
session id
: 0
session uptime: 0 secs
acname
:
srvcname
:
66.6.4 PAE PVC Counter Command Example
The following example displays the statistics for port 1.
Figure 249 PAE PVC Counter Command Example
ras> adsl paepvc counter 1
pvc 1-1/33
ppp lcp config-request
ppp lcp echo-request
ppp lcp echo-reply
pppoe padi
pppoe pado
pppoe padr
pppoe pads
pppoe padt
pppoe srvcname error
pppoe ac system error
pppoe generic error
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
tx
rx
---------------- ---------------0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Each value is described below.
530
tx/rx
=
The values in these columns are for packets transmitted
(tx) or received (rx) by the IES-1248-51V.
ppp lcp configrequest
=
The number of config-request PDUs received by the
IES-1248-51V from the CPE (client) device.
ppp lcp echorequest
=
The number of echo-request PDUs received by the IES1248-51V from the CPE (client) device.
ppp lcp echoreply
=
The number of echo-reply PDUs received by the IES1248-51V from the CPE (client) device.
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pppoe padi
=
The number of padi PDUs sent by the IES-1248-51V to
the BRAS.
pppoe pado
=
The number of pado PDUs sent by the BRAS to the IES1248-51V.
pppoe padr
=
The number of padr PDUs sent by the IES-1248-51V to
the BRAS.
pppoe pads
=
The number of pads PDUs sent by the BRAS to the IES1248-51V.
pppoe padt
=
The number of padt PDUs sent and received by the IES1248-51V.
pppoe srvcname
error
=
The number of service name errors; for example, the
IES-1248-51V’s specified service is different than the
BRAS’s setting.
pppoe ac system
error
=
The number of times the access concentrator
experienced an error while performing the Host
request; for example, when resources are exhausted in
the access concentrator. This value does not include the
number of times the IES-1248-51V checks the AC name
field in the BRAS's reply PDU and finds a mismatch,
however.
pppoe generic
error
=
The number of other types of errors that occur in the
PPPoE session between the IES-1248-51V and the
BRAS.
66.7 Transparent LAN Service (TLS)
Transparent LAN Services (also known as VLAN stacking or Q-in-Q) allows a
service provider to distinguish multiple customers VLANs, even those with the
same (customer-assigned) VLAN ID, within its network.
Use TLS to add an outer VLAN tag to the inner IEEE 802.1Q tagged frames that
enter the network. By tagging the tagged frames (“double-tagged” frames), the
service provider can manage up to 4,094 VLAN groups with each group containing
up to 4,094 customer VLANs. This allows a service provider to provide different
services, based on specific VLANs, for many different customers.
A service provider’s customers may require a range of VLANs to handle multiple
applications. A service provider’s customers can assign their own inner VLAN tags
to traffic. The service provider can assign an outer VLAN tag for each customer.
Therefore, there is no VLAN tag overlap among customers, so traffic from different
customers is kept separate.
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Before the IES-1248-51V sends the frames from the customers, the VLAN ID is
added to the frames. When packets intended for specific customers are received
on the IES-1248-51V, the outer VLAN tag is removed before the traffic is sent.
See Section 33.1.1 on page 248 for an example.
Note: You can NOT configure PPPoA-to-PPPoE and TLS settings on the same PVC.
Table 200 TLS Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl tlspvc delete
<portlist><vpi><vci>
Clears Transparent LAN Services (TLS) settings for the PVC. M/
H
adsl tlspvc set
<portlist><vpi><vci><dsvcprofile[,usvcprofile]><pvid><priority>
Uses TLS to add an outer VLAN tag to the inner IEEE
802.1Q tagged frames that enter the network. By tagging
the tagged frames (“double-tagged” frames) the service
provider can manage up to 4094 VLANs groups with each
group containing up to 4094 customer VLANs. This allows a
service provider to provide different services, based on
specific VLANs, for many different customers.
M/
H
Sets untagged traffic with a tag including the specified
VLAN ID and priority. It traffic is already tagged, this
command adds a tag with the specified VLAN ID and the
original priority setting for the traffic, not the priority
setting specified in the command.
adsl tlspvc show
[<portlist>[<vpi><vci>]]
Displays the TLS settings for the specified port(s) or PVC(s).
L/L
66.7.1 TLS PVC Set Command Example
The following example adds VLAN tag 100 to traffic using the DEFVAL ATM profile
on PVC (1/33) on port 2.
Figure 250 TLS PVC Set Command Example
ras> adsl tlspvc set 2 1 33 DEFVAL 100 0
66.7.2 TLS PVC Show Command Example
Figure 251 TLS PVC Show Command Example
ras> adsl tlspvc show 2
port vpi
vci pvid pri DS/US vcprofile
---- --- ----- ----- --- ---------------------------------2
1
33
100
0 DEFVAL
532
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66.8 IP Bridge PVC Commands
Use the commands in Section 62.6 on page 462 to set up and maintain PVCs for
subscribers in an IP bridge.
66.9 PVC Upstream Limit Commands
Use these commands to limit the transmission rate for upstream traffic by PVC.
Table 201 PVC Upstream Limit Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
adsl uslimit enable
[<portlist>[<vpi><vci>]]
Turns on the limit on the transmission rate for upstream
traffic for the specified PVC.
H/H
adsl uslimit set
<portlist><vpi><vci><rate>
Sets the limit on the transmission rate for upstream traffic
for the specified PVC. (A PVC could be PVC, PPVC, IPBPVC
or TLSPVC). Enable the upstream limit before using this
command.
H/H
rate: The limit on the transmission rate (1~65535 kbps)
for upstream traffic.
adsl uslimit show
[<portlist>[<vpi><vci>]]
Displays the limit(s) on the transmission rate for upstream
traffic for the specified port(s) or PVC(s).
M/L
adsl uslimit disable
[<portlist>[<vpi><vci>]]
Turns off the limit on the transmission rate for upstream
traffic for the specified PVC.
H/H
Note: You can set this limit for regular PVCs, priority PVCs, TLS PVCs, and IP bridge
PVCs.
66.9.1 Show PVC Upstream Limit Command Example
The following example shows the limits for port 1.
Figure 252 Show PVC Upstream Limit Command Example
ras> adsl uslimit show 1
port vpi
vci
rate enable
---- --- ----- ------- -----1
0
33
65535
1 30
63
65535
1 31
64
65535
-
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type
------pvc
ipbpvc
ipbpvc
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66.9.2 Enable PVC Upstream Limit Command Example
The following example turns on the limit for the default PVC on port 1 (VPI 0, VCI
33).
Figure 253 Enable PVC Upstream Limit Command Example
ras>
ras>
port
---1
1
1
adsl uslimit enable 1 0 33
adsl uslimit show 1
vpi
vci
rate enable type
--- ----- ------- ------ ------0
33
65535
V
pvc
30
63
65535
ipbpvc
31
64
65535
ipbpvc
66.9.3 Disable PVC Upstream Limit Command Example
The following example turns off the limit for the default PVC on port 1 (VPI 0, VCI
33).
Figure 254 Disable PVC Upstream Limit Command Example
ras>
ras>
port
---1
1
1
adsl uslimit disable 1 0
adsl uslimit show 1
vpi
vci
rate enable
--- ----- ------- -----0
33
65535
30
63
65535
31
64
65535
-
33
type
------pvc
ipbpvc
ipbpvc
66.9.4 Set PVC Upstream Limit Command Example
The following example sets the limit for the default PVC on port 1 (VPI 0, VCI 33).
Figure 255 Set PVC Upstream Limit Command Example
ras>
ras>
port
---1
1
1
534
adsl uslimit set 1 0 33 10000
adsl uslimit show 1
vpi
vci
rate enable type
--- ----- ------- ------ ------0
33
10000
pvc
30
63
65535
ipbpvc
31
64
65535
ipbpvc
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CHAPTER
67
ACL Commands
An ACL (Access Control Logic) profile allows the system to classify and perform
actions on the upstream traffic. Use the ACL Profile commands to set up ACL
profiles and the ACL Assignment commands to apply them to PVCs.
67.1 ACL Profile Commands
Use these commands to set up ACL profiles.
The following table describes common required values in ACL commands. Other
values are discussed with the corresponding commands.
Table 202 ACL Command Input Values
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
name
The name of the ACL profile.
rule
The rule that classifies traffic flows.
action
One or more actions to perform on the classified packets. You can
select one or more of the following actions.
rate <rate> = Sets the transmission rate (1~65535 in kbps) for the
matched traffic.
rvlan <rvlan> = Replaces the VLAN ID with this VLAN ID (1~4094).
rpri <rpri> = Replaces the priority with this priority (0 ~7) of the
matched packets.
deny = Drops the packets.
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The following is a list of the ACL commands.
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Table 203 ACL Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch acl profile set <name>
<rule> <action>
Configures an ACL rule to classify the upstream traffic and
perform action(s) on the classified traffic.
M/H
Here are the criteria you can configure for rules in ACL
profiles. The rules are listed in sequence from highest
priority to lowest priority. The criteria within a rule are
position-independent.
etype <etype> vlan <vlan-id>
etype <etype> smac <mac-address>
etype <etype> dmac <mac-address>
vlan <vlan-id> smac <mac-address>
vlan <vlan-id> dmac <mac-address>
smac <mac-address> dmac <mac-address>
vlan <vlan-id> priority <priority>
etype <etype>
vlan <vlan-id>
smac <mac-address>
dmac <mac-address>
priority <priority>
protocol <protocol>
srcip <ip-address>/<mask-bits> [dstip <ipaddress>/<mask-bits> [tos <tos> [srcport <sport>
<eport> [dstport <sport> <eport>]]]]
where
etype <etype> = Ethernet type (0~65535).
vlan <vlan-id> = VLAN ID (1~4094).
smac <mac-address> = Source MAC address.
dmac <mac-address> = Destination MAC address.
priority <priority> = Priority (0 ~ 7)
protocol <protocol> = Protocol type: tcp, udp, ospf,
igmp, ip, gre, icmp or user specified IP protocol number
<0 ~ 255>.
srcip <ip-address>/<mask-bits> = Source IP address
and subnet mask (0~32).
dstip <ip-address>/<mask-bits> = Destination IP
address and subnet mask (0~32).
tos <stos> <etos> = Sets the ToS (Type of Service)
range between 0 and 255.
srcport <sport> <eport> = Source port range
(0~65535).
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dstport <sport> <eport> = Destination port range
(0~65535).
The following guidelines apply to classifiers.
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Chapter 67 ACL Commands
Table 203 ACL Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch acl profile delete
<name>
This command removes the specified ACL profile. You
cannot remove an ACL profile that is currently in use.
M/H
switch acl profile showmap
<name>
Displays the DSL port(s) to which the specified ACL profile
is applied.
L/L
switch acl profile show
[<name>]
Lists the names of every ACL profile or displays the
detailed settings of the specified ACL profile.
L/L
67.1.1 ACL Profile Set Command Example
This example creates an ACL rule example named test for traffic from VLAN 10
with a priority level of 2. This rule limits the rate on the classified traffic to 1000
kbps and changes the priority level to 7.
ras> switch acl profile set test vlan 10 priority 2 rate 1000 rpri 7
67.1.2 ACL Profile Show Map Command Example
This example displays the port mapping table for the “test” ACL profile.
ras> switch acl profile showmap test
profile: test
port type
vpi
vci
---- ------ --- -----
67.1.3 ACL Profile Show Command Example
This example displays the detailed settings of the “test” ACL profile.
ras> switch acl profile show test
profile test:
rule:
vlan
:10
priority:2
action:
rpri
rate
538
:7
:1000
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67.2 ACL Assignment Commands
Use these commands to apply ACL profiles to PVCs.
The following table describes common required values in ACL assignment
commands. Other values are discussed with the corresponding commands.
Table 204 ACL Assignment Command Input Values
LABEL
DESCRIPTION
<port-list>
The port number of the PVC. You can specify a single ADSL port <1>,
all ADSL ports <*> or a list of ADSL ports <1,3,5>. You can also
include a range of ports <1,5,6~10>.
<vpi>
The VPI of the PVC.
<vci>
The VCI of the PVC.
<profile>
The name of the ACL profile.
The following is a list of the ACL assignment commands.
Table 205 ACL Assignment Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
switch acl set <port-list>
<vpi> <vci> <profile>
Applies an ACL profile to the specified port(s). You can
apply up to eight profiles to a subscriber port.
M/H
switch acl delete <port-list>
<vpi> <vci> <profile>
Removes an ACL profile from the specified PVC.
M/H
switch acl show [<port-list>]
[<vpi> <vci>]
Displays the ACL profiles currently applied to the specified
PVC(s).
L/L
67.2.1 ACL Assignment Set Command Example
This example applies the ACL profile “test” to a PVC.
ras> switch acl set 1 0 33 test
67.2.2 ACL Assignment Show Command Example
This example displays the ACL profiles applied to the ACL profile “test”.
ras> switch acl show
port vpi
vci type profile
---- --- ----- ---- -------------------------------1
0
33 PVC test
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CHAPTER
68
VoIP Commands
This chapter describes the Voice over IP management commands.
68.1 General VoIP Command Parameters
The following table describes commonly used VoIP command parameter notation.
Table 206 General VoIP Command Parameters
NOTATION
DESCRIPTION
h248-profile
The name of the H.248 profile (up to 31 characters).
dsp-profile
The name of the DSP profile (up to 31 characters).
port-list
You can specify a single port (1), all ports (*) or a list of ports (1,3).
You can also include a range of ports (1,5,6~10).
68.2 VoIP Show Commands
The following table describes the voip show commands.
Table 207 General VoIP Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
voip show lineinfo <portrange>
Displays VoIP line information about the
specified range of ports.
L/L
voip show linestat <portrange>
Displays the service state and phone state of
the specified range of ports.
L/L
voip show voip h248 mg
Displays the H.248 media server name and
state.
L/L
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68.2.1 voip show voip h248 mg Command Example
The following example shows the H.248 media gateway name and state.
ras> voip show voip h248 mg
MG Name
State
------------------------------- -------------------DEFVAL
disable
68.3 voip countrycode Commands
Use these commands to set the country of operation, or the country with the same
configuration as the country of operation. The following lists the variables affected
by the selected countrycode.
• AC impedance
• PCM companding law
• Cadence ring
• Flash time
• Pulse dial interval
• Pay-signal type
The following table lists the accepted country and countrycode values.
542
country
countrycode
USA
0
Japan
1
Taiwan
2
Austria
3
Belgium
4
Czech
5
Denmark
7
Finland
8
Italy
12
Netherlands
14
Norway
15
Spain
19
Sweden
20
Switzerland
21
UK
22
Germany
23
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Australia
25
New_zealand
26
Ireland
30
Russia
32
China
36
Vietnam
43
Brazil
44
The following table lists the countrycode commands.
Table 208 voip countrycode Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
voip countrycode set
<country>|<countrycode>
Use this command to configure regional
settings for VoIP parameters. By default the
IES-1248-51V is configured for use in the
USA (countrycode 0).
M/
H
voip countrycode show
This command displays the region for which
the IES-1248-51V is currently configured,
and provides details of the specific settings.
L/L
68.3.1 voip countrycode set Command Example
The following example configures the IES-1248-51V for use in the Czech Republic.
ras> voip countrycode set 5
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68.3.2 voip countrycode show Command Example
An example of using this command is shown next.
ras> voip countrycode
Country Code
:
law
:
impedance
:
loop current
:
tax type
:
show
25,Australia
alaw
220ohm_820ohm_120nf
25 mA
metering
Ring parameters:
frequency
amplitude
onTime1
offTime1
onTime2
offTime2
:
:
:
:
:
:
25.0
53.0
0.40
0.20
0.40
2.00
Pulse parameters:
flashMin
flashMax
breakMin
breakMax
makeMin
makeMax
interDigitMin
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
90 ms
500 ms
47 ms
80 ms
30 ms
55 ms
250 ms
Meter parameters:
frequency
onTime
offTime
: 12 kHz
: 200 ms
: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type
:
payload type
:
first TAS type
:
second TAS type
:
first TAS interval :
second TAS interval :
start to ring
:
Tones parameters:
dial tone
ring back tone
busy tone
reorder tone
congestion tone
special dial tone
call waiting tone #1
call waiting tone #2
MWI tone
ROH tone
warning tone
confirmation tone
544
Hz
Vrms
seconds
seconds
seconds
seconds
prior ring
ETSI-MDMF
DT-AS
NULL
300 ms
0 ms
400 ms (prior ring only)
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
425Hz -18.0dB continuous
400+450Hz -18.0dB on 0.400s off 0.200s
425Hz -18.0dB on 0.380s off 0.380s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
425Hz -18.0dB on 0.380s off 0.380s
350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 0.200s
425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 4.400s
350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
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68.4 voip diagnostic Commands
Use these commands to perform a variety of standard Metallic Line Tests on the
subscriber ports.
Table 209 voip diagnostic Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
voip diagnostic mlt test
<port> <option> [force]
This command performs a variety of standard M/
Metallic Line Tests on the specified connection. H
Perform specified MLT test item in specified
subscriber(s)
port: Port number, 1~48
option: The type or types of test to be run.
Allowed values are:
all: Perform all tests on the line connected
to the specified port.
vac: Test the line’s AC voltage only.
vdc: Test the line’s DC voltage only.
rload: Test the line’s load resistance only.
riso: Test the line’s isolation resistance
only.
cap: Test the line’s capacitance only.
ren: Test the line’s ringer equivalent
number only.
ring: Test the line’s ring voltage only.
metering: Test the line’s metering voltage
only.
dialtone: Test dialtone
digit: Test digit
roh: Test ROH which is a tone sent at the
end of a call to indicate that the other party
has hung up.
user: User input DTMF tone
force: Perform the test(s) immediately,
even if the specified port is in use.
voip diagnostic mlt show
<port>
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This command displays the results of the last
Metallic Line Test that was run on the specified
port.
L/L
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Chapter 68 VoIP Commands
Table 209 voip diagnostic Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
voip diagnostic mlt relay set
<port> in|out|both [<timeout>
[force]]
This command turns the test relay function on
on the specified port. When the test relay
function is on, you can run tests using
diagnostic equipment connected to the TEST
IN and TEST OUT ports.
M/
H
port: Port number, 1~48
in: Turn on test-in relay
out: Turn on test-out relay
both: Turn on test-in and test-out relay
timeout: Relays will be turned off
automatically while the specified timer is
timeout, 1~65535 minutes
force: Force to set relays even the port is in
use
voip diagnostic mlt relay set
<port> off [force]
This command turns the test relay function off
on the specified port. When the test relay
function is off, you cannot run line tests. Test
relay functions are off by default.
M/
H
voip diagnostic mlt relay show
This command shows the test relay condition
of the IES-1248-51V. Test relay functions are
off by default.
L/L
68.4.1 voip diagnostic mlt test Command Example
The following example tests the REN of the line connected to port 8.
ras> voip diagnostic mlt test 8 ren
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68.4.2 diagnostic mlt show Command Example
The following example shows the result of the last test conducted on the line
connected to port 8.
ras> voip diagnostic mlt show 8
Port 8: testing
Foreign AC Voltage Test Results
vTip
= 0.0 Vrms
vRing
= 0.0 Vrms
vDiff
= 0.0 Vrms
Foreign DC Voltage Test Results
vTip
= 0.0 Volts
vRing
= 0.0 Volts
vDiff
= 0.0 Volts
DC Loop Resistance Test Results
rLoop
= 4390.2 Ohms
Three-Element Resistance Test Results
rTG
= OPEN
rRG
= OPEN
rTR
= OPEN
No Three-Element Capacitance Test Results
Ringer Equivalence Numer Test Results
REN
= 2147483647.2147483647
No Ringing Voltage Test Results
No Metering Voltage Test Results
ras>
68.4.3 voip diagnostic mlt relay set Command Example
The following example allows diagnostic testing (both directions) on port 8.
ras> voip diagnostic mlt relay set 8 both
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68.5 voip ip Commands
Use these commands to manage the IP address, VLAN and DNS details for VoIP
services.
Table 210 voip ip Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
voip ip set <ip-address>[/
<mask-bits>] <vid>
Use this command to configure the IP
address, subnet mask (mask-bits) and VLAN
ID (vid) of the IES-1248-51V used for VoIP
communications.
M/
H
voip ip dns [ip-address]
This command sets the DNS (Domain Name
Service) server IP address for VoIP
communications.
M/
H
ip-address: The IP address of the DNS
server. When you do not specify a DNS server
IP address, the IES-1248-51V displays the IP
address of the currently-configured DNS
server.
voip ip gateway <ip-address>
This command sets the IP address of the
default outbound gateway for VoIP
communications.
M/
H
68.5.1 voip ip set Command Example
The following example sets the IES-1248-51V to use the IP address 111.11.11.1
with a 24-bit subnet mask (255.255.255.0) and VLAN ID 22 for VoIP
communications.
ras> voip ip set 111.11.11.1/24 22
68.5.2 voip ip dns Command Example
The following example sets the IES-1248-51V to use the DNS server at
123.44.55.66.
ras> voip ip dns 123.44.55.66
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68.6 voip port Commands
Use these commands to manage which of the IES-1248-51V’s ports are used for
VoIP services, and specify which DSP profile each port uses.
Table 211 voip port Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
voip port disable
<port-list>
Use this command to turn the specified subscriber
port(s) off. The subscriber port(s) cannot be used for
VoIP services. Subscriber ports are disabled by default.
M/H
voip port enable
<port-list>
Use this command to turn the specified subscriber
port(s) on. The subscriber port(s) can be used for VoIP
services.
M/H
voip port pots gain
<port-list> <voicetx-gain> <voice-rxgain> [<data-tx-gain>
<data-rx-gain>]
Sets the transmission and receiving gain values of the
specified DSL lines.
M/H
voice-tx-gain, data-tx-gain: This is the amount of
gain (increase in signal power) applied on the voice or
voiceband data (fax or modem) signal received from the
subscriber and transmitted to the MGC server. The range
is between -20 dB and 20 dB.
voice-rx-gain, data-rx-gain: This is the amount of
gain (increase in signal power) applied on the voice or
voiceband data (fax or modem) signal received from the
MGC server and transmitted to the subscriber. The range
is between -20 dB and 20 dB.
voip port pots
impedance <port-list>
<impedance>
Sets the required AC impedance of the specified DSL
ports.
voip port show <portlist>
Use this command to see whether or not the specified
port(s) are active, and the DSP profile the specified
port(s) uses.
L/L
voip port h248 set
<port> <dsp-profile>
[data-profile]
Use this command to specify a Digital Signal Processing
(DSP) profile the specified subscriber port uses.
M/H
M/H
impedance: 200ohm_680ohm_100nf,
220ohm_680ohm_100nf, 220ohm_820ohm_115nf,
220ohm_820ohm_120nf, 270ohm_750ohm_150nf,
300ohm_1000ohm_220nf,
370ohm_620ohm_310nf, 600ohm, 600ohm_1000nf,
900ohm, 900ohm_2160nf and DEFVAL
port: port number, 1~48
dsp-profile: the DSP profile name used for voice calls,
up to 31 characters
data-profile: the DSP profile name used for fax and
modem calls, up to 31 characters. The IES-1248-51V
uses the specified DSP profile for the calls if no dataprofile is specified.
voip port h248
termination <port>
<termination-name>
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Use this command to specify the termination name (up
to 31 characters) the specified subscriber port uses.
M/H
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68.6.1 voip port pots gain command Example
The following example shows how to set ports 1 and 2 to use transmission and
receiving gain values as 10 and 8 for voice signal and 5 and 2 for fax and modem
signals.
ras> voip port pots gain 1~2 10 8 5 2
68.6.2 voip port pots impedance command Example
The following example shows how to set ports 1 and 2 to use
220ohm_680ohm_100nf impedance.
ras> voip port pots impedance 1~2 220ohm_680ohm_100nf
68.6.3 voip port show command Example
The following example shows the current VoIP status of ports 1 and 2.
ras> voip port show 1~2
port 1:
state
: disabled
MG name
: MGexample
termination name: term1
dsp profile
: asdf
impedance
: 220ohm_680ohm_100nf
tx/rx gain
: 11/12 in 0.1 dB
port 2:
state
: disabled
MG name
: MGexample
termination name: ABC
dsp profile
: asdf
impedance
: 220ohm_680ohm_100nf
tx/rx gain
: 11/12 in 0.1 dB
68.6.4 voip port h248 set Command
The following example sets port 14 to use the DSP_PROFILE_1 profile for voice
calls and DATA_PROFILE_1 for fax and modem calls.
ras> voip port h248 set 14 DSP_PROFILE_1 DATA_PROFILE_1
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68.7 voip profile dsp Commands
Use these commands to set up and manage Digital Signal Processing for the IES1248-51V’s VoIP functions. Each DSP profile specifies VoIP-related attributes, such
as the voice codecs to use in a given session.
Table 212 voip dsp Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
voip profile dsp delete <dspprofile>
This command removes the specified DSP
profile.
M/
H
voip profile dsp map <dspprofile>
This command displays which subscribers use
the specified DSP profile.
L/L
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Table 212 voip dsp Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
voip profile dsp set <dspprofile>
[codec <codec>[,<codec> ...]]
[echotail <echo-tail>]
[playbuffer <min-delay> <maxdelay>]
[echocancel off|on]
[vad off|on]
[g711vpi <g711-vpi>]
[g723vpi <g723-vpi>]
[g726vpi <g726-vpi>]
[g729vpi <g729-vpi>]
This command creates and configures a DSP
(Digital Signal Processing) profile.
M/
H
codec: Available codecs are:
G.711a: g711a
G.711mµ: g711mu
G.723: g723
G.726
16 kbps: g726-16
24 kbps: g726-24
32 kbps: g726-32
40 kbps: g726-40
G.729a & b: g729ab
echo-tail: The echo cancellation echo tail
period in milliseconds (8, 16, 32 or 128).
min-delay: The play buffer minimum delay
in milliseconds (10 ~ 500). This value should
be less than or equal to the max-delay.
max-delay: The play buffer maximum delay
in milliseconds (10 ~ 500). This value should
be greater than or equal to the min-delay.
echocancel off|on: Disable or enable echo
cancellation.
vad off|on: Disable or enable Voice Activity
Detection (VAD).
g711-vpi: G.711 voice package interval, 10,
20, 30 or 40 ms.
g723-vpi: G.723 voice package interval, 30
or 60 ms.
g726-vpi: G.726 voice package interval, 10,
20, 30 or 40 ms.
g729-vpi: G.729 voice package interval, 10,
20, 30, 40, 50 or 60 ms.
The default profile “DEFVAL” has the following
settings:
Codec: G.711a, G.711mµ
Min-delay: 30ms
Max-delay: 120ms
Echo tail: 32ms
Echo cancellation: on
vad: off
G.711 VPI: 20 ms
G.723 VPI: 30 ms
G.726 VPI: 20 ms
G.729 VPI: 20 ms
voip profile dsp show [name]
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This command displays the settings of the
specified DSP profile, or displays the names of
all DSP profiles if none is specified.
L/L
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68.7.1 voip profile dsp delete Command Example
An example is shown to delete a DSP profile named “digsig1”.
ras> voip profile dsp delete digsig1
68.7.2 voip profile dsp map Command Example
The following example displays the subscribers that use a DSP profile named
“digsig3”.
ras> voip profile dsp map digsig3
1
2
3
4
123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678
-----------------------------------------------VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV
ras>
68.7.3 voip profile dsp show Command Example
The following example shows the use of this command.
ras> voip profile dsp show
dsp profile(s)
------------------------1. DEFVAL
2. digsig4
ras> voip profile
name
:
codec
:
min. playbuffer :
max. playbuffer :
echotail
:
echocancel
:
vad
:
g711vpi
:
g723vpi
:
g726vpi
:
g729vpi
:
pbit
:
dscp
:
dsp show digsig4
digsig4
g726-40 g726-32
30 ms
90 ms
64 ms
on
off
20 ms
30 ms
20 ms
20 ms
7
48
g726-16
68.7.4 voip profile dsp set Command Example
The following example shows a command configuring a DSP profile named
“digsig4” with the following settings:
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• Codec: G.726 (40 bits), G.726 (32 bits), G.726 (16 bits).
• Min-delay: 30 ms
• Max-delay: 90 ms
• Echo tail: 32ms
ras> voip profile dsp set digsig4 codec g726-40,g726-32,g726-16 playbuffer
30 90 echotail 32
68.8 voip profile h248 Commands
Use these commands to set up and manage H.248 profiles. H.248 profiles map to
ports on the IES-1248-51V, and contain the connection details between the IES1248-51V and up to two Media Gateway Controllers (MGCs).
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Table 213 voip profile h248 Commands
556
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
voip profile h248 delete
<h248-profile>
This command removes the specified H.248 profile.
M/H
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Table 213 voip profile h248 Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
voip profile h248 set
<h248-profile> <mgcip|mgc-dn> [mgcport
<mgc-port>] [mgc2
off|{on <mgc2-ip|mgc2dn>}]
[mgc2port <mgc2-port>]
[transport udp|tcp]
[encode long|short]
[pbit <pbit>] [dscp
<dscp>] [it <it>]
[prefix <prefix>]
[softswitch
DEFVAL|zxss10-ss]
[vbd off|on]
[forcever off|on]
This command creates and configures an H.248
profile.
M/H
h248-profile: This H.248 profile name (up to 31
characters).
mgc-ip, mgc2-ip: The IP address of the primary or
secondary media gateway controller.
mgc-dn, mgc2-dn: The domain name (up to 63
characters) of the primary or secondary media
gateway controller.
mgc-port, mgc2-por: This is a port number
(1025~65535) the primary or secondary media
gateway controller uses to send and receive H.248
packets.
transport udp|tcp: send H.248 packets to the
media gateway controller via User Datagram Protocol
or Transmission Control Protocol.
encode long|short: send H.248 packets to the
media gateway controller using long or short form
text encoding.
pbit: The IEEE 802.1p priority tag for H.248 and RTP
packets (0 ~ 7).
dscp: The DiffServ Code Point for H.248 and RTP
packets (0 ~ 63).
it: Set the inactivity timer (0~65535) in units of 10
milliseconds the IES-1248-51V waits for the MGC's
response before disconnecting the connection with
the MGC.
prefix: the ephemeral termination prefix, up to 31
characters. In H.248, each Terminiation has an
ephemeral termination ID during communication with
other terminations for identification purpose (see
Section 45.1.2 on page 318). For example, RTP/0.
The IES-1248-51V allows you to customize the prefix
string (“RTP/” in this example). You must configure
the same prefix string as the setting on the MGC.
softswitch DEFVAL|zxss10-ss: set this to zxss10ss if the IES-1248-51V's MGC is a ZTE ZXSS10
softswitch. Otherwise, set this to DEFVAL.
vbd off|on: disables or enables Voice Band Data
(VBD) support. See Section 45.1.8 on page 323 and
ITU-T V.152 for more information.
forcever off|on: uses h.248 version 2 (off) or
version 1 (on).
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Table 213 voip profile h248 Commands (continued)
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
voip profile h248 show
[h248-profile]
This command displays the settings of the specified
H.248 profile, or displays the settings of all H.248
profiles if none is specified.
L/L
68.8.1 voip profile h248 delete Command Example
An example is shown to delete an H.248 profile named “bar”.
ras> voip profile h248 delete bar
68.8.2 voip profile h248 set Command Example
The following example shows a command configuring an H.248 profile named
“h248example” with the following settings:
• Primary media gateway controller domain name: host1.domain1
• Primary media gateway controller port number: 2944
• Secondary media gateway controller domain name: host2.domain2
• Secondary media gateway controller port number: 2943
• Transport: TCP
• Encoding: short
• IEEE 802.1p tag: 5
• DSCP tag: 36
• Inactivity timer: 1000 ms
• Ephemeral termination prefix: TP/
• Softswitch: DEFVAL
• Voiceband Data (VBD) support: off
• Force version: H.248 version 2 (off)
ras> voip profile h248 set h248example host1.domain1 mgcport 2944 mgc2 on
host2.domain2 mgc2port 2943 transport tcp encode short pbit 5 dscp 36 it 100
prefix TP/ softswitch DEFVAL vbd off forcever off
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68.8.3 voip profile h248 show Command
An example of using this command is shown next.
ras> voip profile h248 show
name
: DEFVAL
mgc-ip/dn : 0.0.0.0
mgc-port
: 2944
mgc2
: off
mgc2-ip/dn : mgc2-port : transport : udp
encode
: long
pbit
: 7
dscp
: 48
68.9 voip h248 mg Commands
Use these commands to configure the H.248 media gateway settings.
Table 214 voip h248 mg Commands
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
P
voip h248 mg
<disable|enable>
Disables or enables the H.248 media gateway feature
on the IES-1248-51V.
M/H
voip h248 mg show
Displays the media gateway settings.
L/L
68.9.1 voip h248 mg enable Command Example
This example shows how to enable the H.248 media gateway feature on the IES1248-51V.
ras> voip h248 mg enable
68.9.2 voip h248 mg set Command Example
The example shows how to configure the media gateway on the IES-1248-51V
with the following settings:
• Media gateway name: MGexample
• H.248 profile name: h248example
• Media gateway port: 2944
ras> voip h248 mg set MGexample h248example 2944
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68.9.3 voip h248 mg show Command
An example of using this command is shown next.
ras> voip h248 mg show
MG Name
: MGexample
State
: enabled
H248 Profile: h248example
MG Port
: 2944
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CHAPTER
69
Firmware and Configuration File
Maintenance
This chapter tells you how to upload a new firmware and/or configuration file for
the IES-1248-51V.
69.1 Firmware and Configuration File
Maintenance Overview
The IES-1248-51V’s built-in FTP server allows you to use any FTP client (for
example, ftp.exe in Windows) to upgrade IES-1248-51V firmware or configuration
files. The firmware or configuration file upgrade is done during operation (runtime).
Note: Do not turn off the power to the IES-1248-51V during the file transfer process,
as it may permanently damage your IES-1248-51V.
Note: The IES-1248-51V automatically restarts when the upgrade process is
complete.
69.2 Filename Conventions
The configuration file (called config-0) contains the factory default settings in the
menus such as password, IP address, VLANs and so on. The configuration file
arrives with a “rom” filename extension.
The OS (Operating System) firmware (sometimes referred to as the “ras” file) has
a “bin” filename extension. With many FTP and clients, the filenames are similar to
those shown next.
Figure 256 FTP Put Configuration File Example
ftp> put firmware.bin ras
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This is a sample from a FTP session to transfer the computer file firmware.bin to
the IES-1248-51V.
Figure 257 FTP Get Configuration File Example
ftp> get config-0 config.txt
This is a sample from a FTP session to transfer the IES-1248-51V’s current
configuration file (including the configuration files of all the IES-1248-51V) to the
computer file config.txt.
If your FTP client does not allow you to have a destination filename different than
the source, you will need to rename them as the IES-1248-51V only recognizes
“config-0” and “ras”. Be sure you keep unaltered copies of the files for later use.
The following table is a summary. Please note that the internal filename refers to
the filename on the IES-1248-51V and the external filename refers to the
filename not on the IES-1248-51V, that is, on your computer, local network or FTP
site and so the name (but not the extension) may vary. After uploading new
firmware, use the sys version command on the IES-1248-51V to confirm that you
have uploaded the correct firmware version.
Table 215 Filename Conventions
FILE TYPE
INTERNAL
NAME
EXTERNAL
NAME
DESCRIPTION
Configuration File
config-0
*.dat
This is the configuration filename for
the IES-1248-51V.
Firmware
ras
*.bin
This is the Operating System firmware
on the IES-1248-51V.
69.3 Editable Configuration File
The configuration file can be downloaded as a plain-text (ASCII) file. Edits to the
configuration can be made to this file before it is uploaded again to the IES-124851V.
Note: You can change the “.dat” file to a “.txt” file and still upload it back to the IES1248-51V.
Note: Do not upload any invalid files to the IES-1248-51V’s configuration file, as it
may permanently damage your IES-1248-51V.
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69.3.1 Editable Configuration File Backup
Configure your system, and then use FTP to backup the plain-text configuration
file onto your computer. Do the following to backup the configuration file:
Use an FTP client to connect to the IES-1248-51V.
Figure 258 Example: Use an FTP Client to Connect to the IES-1248-51V
C:\> ftp <IES-1248-51V IP address>
Type your user name and press [ENTER].
User (172.16.11.86:(none)): admin
Enter the management password (1234 by default).
Figure 259 Example: Enter the Management Password
Password: 1234
230 Logged in
Use get to transfer the configuration file to the computer. The configuration file on
the system (that you want to backup to the computer) is named config-0.
Figure 260 Example: Get the Configuration File config-0
ftp> get config-0
Quit FTP.
Figure 261 Example: Close FTP Client
ftp> quit
69.3.2 Edit Configuration File
Open the config-0 file via Notepad (see the following example) and edit to a
desired configuration.
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Note: Ensure that any changes you make to the commands in the configuration file
correspond to the commands documented in this User’s Guide. The wrong
configuration file or an incorrectly configured configuration file can render the
device inoperable.
Figure 262 Configuration File Example
#### sysinfo
sys info hostname ""
sys info location ""
sys info contact ""
#### snmp
sys snmp getcommunity public
sys snmp setcommunity public
sys snmp trapcommunity public
sys snmp trustedhost 0.0.0.0
sys snmp trapdst set 1 0.0.0.0 162
sys snmp trapdst set 2 0.0.0.0 162
sys snmp trapdst set 3 0.0.0.0 162
sys snmp trapdst set 4 0.0.0.0 162
#### server
sys server enable telnet
sys server enable ftp
sys server enable web
sys server enable icmp
sys server port telnet 23
sys server port ftp 21
--------------- Snip ------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: The sys user set admin command is encrypted and you cannot edit it in a
text editor. Attempting to edit it and upload it to the IES-1248-51V will lock you
out after the system restarts. If this happens you will have to use the console
port to restore the default configuration file, and all of your configuration
changes will be lost.
69.3.3 Editable Configuration File Upload
You can upload the configuration file by following the steps below.
Use an FTP client to connect to the IES-1248-51V.
Figure 263 Example: Use an FTP Client to Connect to the IES-1248-51V
C:\> ftp <IES-1248-51V IP address>
Type your user name and press [ENTER].
User (172.16.11.86:(none)): admin
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Enter the management password (1234 by default).
Figure 264 Example: Enter the Management Password
Password: 1234
230 Logged in
Use put to transfer the configuration file from the computer. The configuration file
on the system is named config-0.
Figure 265 Example: Upload the Configuration File config-0
ftp> put xxx.dat config-0
Quit FTP.
Figure 266 Example: Close FTP Client
ftp> quit
Wait for the update to finish. The system restarts automatically.
69.4 Firmware File Upgrade
Use the following procedure to upload firmware to the IES-1248-51V.
Use an FTP client to connect to the IES-1248-51V.
Figure 267 Example: Use an FTP Client to Connect to the IES-1248-51V
C:\> ftp <IES-1248-51V IP address>
Type your user name and press [ENTER].
User (172.16.11.86:(none)): admin
Enter the management password (1234 by default).
Figure 268 Example: Enter the Management Password
Password: 1234
230 Logged in
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Transfer the firmware file to the IES-1248-51V. The firmware file on your
computer (that you want to put onto the IES-1248-51V is named firmware.bin.
The internal firmware file on the IES-1248-51V is named ras.
Figure 269 Example: Transfer the Firmware File
ftp> put firmware.bin ras
Quit FTP.
Figure 270 Example: Close FTP Client
ftp> quit
Wait for the update to finish. The IES-1248-51V restarts automatically.
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CHAPTER
70
Troubleshooting
This chapter covers potential problems and possible remedies. After each problem
description, some steps are provided to help you to diagnose and solve the
problem.
70.1 The SYS or PWR LED Does Not Turn On
The SYS/PWR LED does not turn on.
Table 216 SYS LED Troubleshooting
STEP
CORRECTIVE ACTION
1
Make sure the power wires are properly connected to the power supply and
the power supply is operating normally. Make sure you are using the correct
power source (see Chapter 71 on page 579).
2
Make sure the power wires are connected properly.
3
Make sure a fuse is not burnt-out. Replace a fuse if it is burnt-out. See
Appendix A on page 595 for instructions.
4
The LED itself or the unit may be faulty; contact your vendor.
70.2 The ALM LED Is On
The ALM (alarm) LED lights when the IES-1248-51V is overheated, the fans are
not working properly, the voltage readings are outside the tolerance levels or an
alarm has been detected on the ALARM input pins.
Table 217 ALM LED Troubleshooting
STEP
CORRECTIVE ACTION
1
Use the statistics monitor command to verify the cause of the alarm. See step
2 if the unit is overheated, step 3 if the problem is with the fans and step 4 if
the voltages are out of the allowed ranges.
2
Ensure that the IES-1248-51V is installed in a well-ventilated area and that
normal operation of the fans is not inhibited. Keep the bottom, top and all
sides clear of obstructions and away from the exhaust of other equipment.
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Table 217 ALM LED Troubleshooting (continued)
STEP
CORRECTIVE ACTION
3
Make sure you can feel and/or hear the fans working - working fans emit a
low buzz and blow air.
4
If the voltage levels are outside the allowed range, take a screen shot of the
statistics monitor command display and contact your vendor.
70.3 SFP LNK LEDs Do Not Turn On
The LEDs for one of the SFP slots do not turn on.
Table 218 SFP LNK LED Troubleshooting
STEPS
CORRECTIVE ACTION
1
Make sure that the Ethernet port’s mode is set to match that of the peer
Ethernet device.
2
Check the cable and connections between the SFP slot and the peer Ethernet
device.
3
Check the mini GBIC transceiver.
4
Make sure that the peer Ethernet device is functioning properly.
If the cable, transceiver and peer Ethernet device are all OK and the LEDs
stay off, there may be a problem with the SFP slot. Contact the distributor.
70.4 100/1000 LEDs Do Not Turn On
A 100/1000 Ethernet port’s LEDs do not turn on.
Table 219 100/1000 LED Troubleshooting
STEPS
CORRECTIVE ACTION
1
Each 100/1000M RJ-45 Ethernet port is paired with a mini GBIC slot. The IES1248-51V uses one connection per pair.
2
Check the Speed Mode settings in the ENET Port Setup screen. Make sure
that the 100/1000 Ethernet port’s connection speed is set to match that of
the port on the peer Ethernet device. When an Ethernet port is set to Auto,
the IES-1248-51V tries to make a fiber connection first and does not attempt
to use the RJ-45 port if the fiber connection is successful.
3
Check the Ethernet cable and connections between the 100/1000 Ethernet
port and the peer Ethernet device.
Use 1000Base-T 4-pair (8 wire) UTP Cat. 5 Ethernet cables with the RJ-45
interface.
4
Make sure that the peer Ethernet device is functioning properly.
If the Ethernet cable and peer Ethernet device are both OK and the LEDs still
stay off, there may be a problem with the port. Contact the distributor.
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70.5 100/1000 Ethernet Port Data Transmission
The Ethernet port’s LED is on, but data cannot be transmitted.
Table 220 Troubleshooting Data Transmission
STEPS
CORRECTIVE ACTION
1
Make sure that the Ethernet port has the appropriate mode setting.
2
Make sure that the IES-1248-51V’s IP settings are properly configured.
3
Check the VLAN configuration.
4
Ping the IES-1248-51V from a computer behind the peer Ethernet device.
5
If you cannot ping, check the Ethernet cable and connections between the
Ethernet port and the Ethernet switch or router.
6
Check the switch mode. In daisychain mode, if you have a loop topology and
enable RSTP, it is possible for RSTP to disable Ethernet port 1 (the uplink
port).
Note: It is not recommended to use daisychain mode in a loop topology.
70.6 DSL Data Transmission
The DSL link is up, but data cannot be transmitted.
Table 221 DSL Data Transmission Troubleshooting
STEPS
CORRECTIVE ACTION
1
Check the switch mode and port isolation settings.
Check to see that the VPI/VCI and multiplexing mode (LLC/VC) settings in the
subscriber’s ADSL modem or router match those of the ADSL port.
If the subscriber is having problems with a video or other high-bandwidth
services, make sure the IES-1248-51V’s ADSL port’s data rates are set high
enough.
2
Check the VLAN configuration.
3
Ping the IES-1248-51V from the computer behind the ADSL modem or router.
4
If you cannot ping, connect a DSL modem to an ADSL port (that is known to
work).
If the ADSL modem or router works with a different ADSL port, there may be
a problem with the original port. Contact the distributor.
5
If using a different port does not work, try a different ADSL modem or router
with the original port.
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70.7 There Is No Voice on an ADSL Connection
The IES-1248-51V has internal POTS (Plain Old Telephone Service) splitters and
VoIP capabilities that allow the telephone wiring used for ADSL connections to also
simultaneously carry normal voice conversations.
Table 222 ADSL Voice Troubleshooting
STEP
CORRECTIVE ACTION
1
Ensure that the subscriber’s ADSL is working normally.
2
Make sure the subscriber has a POTS splitter properly installed.
3
Check the ADSL line pin assignments shown in Chapter 71 on page 579.
4
Check the telephone wire connections between the subscriber and the
MDF(s).
5
Check the telephone wire and connections between the MDF(s) and ADSL
port(s).
6
Check the telephone wire mapping on the MDF(s).
7
Make sure the in-house wiring works and is connected properly.
8
Repeat the steps above using a different ADSL port.
70.8 I cannot make or receive phone calls.
ADSL is working, but VoIP calls cannot be made.
Table 223 Phonecall Troubleshooting
STEPS
CORRECTIVE ACTION
1
Ensure that the hardware is correctly installed. Ping the MGC from the IES1248-51V to ensure that it is reachable.
2
The MG function may be use misconfigured or the MG function may be
disabled.
•
•
•
3
The H248 profile may be misconfigured.
•
4
Use the voip profile h248 show [name] command to check the H248
profile.
The port may be disabled.
•
•
570
Use the voip h248 mg show command to check the MG configuration
Use the voip h248 mg set <mg-name> <h248-profile> [mg-port]
command to configure the MG function.
Use the voip h248 mg enable command to activate MG function.
Use the voip port show <port> command to check the port status.
Use the voip port enable <port> command to activate a port.
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Table 223 Phonecall Troubleshooting
STEPS
CORRECTIVE ACTION
5
The port may be set to use the wrong DSP profile or Termination name.
•
•
•
6
The DSP profile may be misconfigured.
•
7
Use the voip port show <port> command to check the port configuration.
Use the voip port h248 set <port> <dsp-profile> command to set the
port to use the correct DSP profile.
Use the voip port h248 termination <port> <name> command to set the
port the use the correct Termination name.
Use the voip profile dsp show [name] command to check the DSP
profile.
Check any hardware between the phone and the IES-1248-51V. Try using
another telephone, another port on the IES-1248-51V, or both. Run the MLT
(Metallic Line Test) on the relevant port (use the diagnostic mlt test
commands).
70.9 Local Server
The computer behind a DSL modem or router cannot access a local server
connected to the IES-1248-51V.
Table 224 Troubleshooting a Local Server
STEPS
CORRECTIVE ACTION
1
See Section 70.6 on page 569 to make sure that the subscriber is able to
transmit to the IES-1248-51V.
2
Make sure the computer behind the DSL device has the correct gateway IP
address configured.
3
Check the VLAN configuration (see Chapter 19 on page 163).
4
Check the cable and connections between the IES-1248-51V and the local
server.
5
Try to access another local server.
If data can be transmitted to a different local server, the local server that
could not be accessed may have a problem.
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70.10 Data Rate
The SYNC-rate is not the same as the configured rate.
Table 225 Troubleshooting the SYNC-rate
STEPS
CORRECTIVE ACTION
1
Connect the ADSL modem or router directly to the ADSL port using a different
telephone wire.
2
If the rates match, the quality of the telephone wiring that connects the
subscriber to the ADSL port may be limiting the speed to a certain rate.
If they do not match when a good wire is used, contact the distributor.
70.11 Configured Settings
The configured settings do not take effect.
Table 226 Troubleshooting the IES-1248-51V’s Configured Settings
CORRECTIVE ACTION
Use the “config save” command after you finish configuring to save the IES-1248-51V’s
settings.
70.12 Password
If you forget your password, you will need to use the console port to reload the
factory-default configuration file (see Section 70.16 on page 574).
70.13 System Lockout
Any of the following could also lock you and others out from using in-band
management (managing through the data ports).
572
1
Deleting the management VLAN (default is VLAN 1).
2
Incorrectly configuring the CPU VLAN.
3
Incorrectly configuring the access control settings.
4
Disabling all ports.
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Note: Be careful not to lock yourself and others out of the system.
If you lock yourself (and others) out of the system, you can try using the console
port to reconfigure the system. See Section 70.16 on page 574.
70.14 SNMP
The SNMP manager server cannot get information from the IES-1248-51V.
Table 227 Troubleshooting the SNMP Server
STEPS
CORRECTIVE ACTION
1
Ping the IES-1248-51V from the SNMP server. If you cannot, check the cable,
connections and IP configuration.
2
Check to see that the community (or trusted host) in the IES-1248-51V
matches the SNMP server’s community.
3
Make sure that your computer’s IP address matches a configured trusted host
IP address (if configured).
70.15 Telnet
I cannot telnet into the IES-1248-51V.
Table 228 Troubleshooting Telnet
STEPS
CORRECTIVE ACTION
1
Make sure that the number maximum allowed number of telnet sessions has
not already reached. The IES-1248-51V only accepts up to five telnet
sessions at a time.
Make sure that a telnet session is not already operating. The IES-1248-51V
only accepts one telnet session at a time.
2
Make sure that your computer’s IP address matches a configured secured
client IP address (if configured). The IES-1248-51V immediately disconnects
the telnet session if secured host IP addresses are configured and your
computer’s IP address does not match one of them.
3
Make sure that you have not disabled the Telnet service or changed the server
port number that the IES-1248-51V uses for Telnet.
5
Ping the IES-1248-51V from your computer.
If you are able to ping the IES-1248-51V but are still unable to telnet, contact
the distributor.
If you cannot ping the IES-1248-51V, check the cable, connections and IP
configuration.
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70.16 Resetting the Defaults
If you lock yourself (and others) from the IES-1248-51V, you will need to reload
the factory-default configuration file. Uploading the factory-default configuration
file replaces the current configuration file with the factory-default configuration
file. This means that you will lose all previous configurations and the speed of the
console port will be reset to the default of 9600bps with 8 data bit, no parity, one
stop bit and flow control set to none. The user name will be reset to “admin” and
the password will be reset to “1234” and the IP address to 192.168.1.1.
70.16.1 Resetting the Defaults Via Command
If you know the password, you can reload the factory-default configuration file via
Command Line Interface (CLI) command. Use the following procedure.
1
Connect to the console port using a computer with terminal emulation software.
See chapters 2-6 for details.
2
Enter your password.
3
Type config restore.
4
Type y at the question “Do you want to restore default ROM file(y/n)?”
5
The IES-1248-51V restarts.
Figure 271 Resetting the Switch Via Command
ras> config restore
System will reboot automatically after restoring default configuration.
Do you want to proceed(y/n)? >
restoring configuration...
saving configuration to flash...
The IES-1248-51V is now reinitialized with a default configuration file including
the default user name of “admin” and the default password of “1234”.
70.16.2 Uploading the Default Configuration File
If you forget your password or cannot access the IES-1248-51V, you will need to
reload the factory-default configuration file. Uploading the factory-default
configuration file replaces the current configuration file with the factory-default
configuration file. This means that you will lose all previous configurations and the
speed of the console port will be reset to the default of 9600bps with 8 data bit, no
parity, one stop bit and flow control set to none. The password will also be reset to
“1234” and the IP address to 192.168.1.1.
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Note: Uploading the factory default configuration file erases the IES-1248-51V’s entire
configuration.
Obtain the default configuration file, unzip it and save it in a folder. Use a console
cable to connect a computer with terminal emulation software to the IES-124851V’s console port. Turn the IES-1248-51V off and then on to begin a session.
When you turn on the IES-1248-51V again you will see the initial screen. When
you see the message Press any key to enter Debug Mode within 3 seconds
press any key to enter debug mode.
To upload the configuration file, do the following:
1
Type atlc after the Enter Debug Mode message.
2
Wait for the Starting XMODEM upload message before activating XMODEM upload
on your terminal.
3
This is an example Xmodem configuration upload using HyperTerminal. Click
Transfer, then Send File to display the following screen.
Figure 272 Example Xmodem Upload
Type the configuration file's location, or click Browse to search for it. Choose the
1K Xmodem protocol. Then click Send.
4
After a successful configuration file upload, type atgo to restart the IES-124851V.
The IES-1248-51V is now reinitialized with a default configuration file including
the default password of “1234”.
70.17 Recovering the Firmware
Usually you should use FTP or the web configurator to upload the IES-1248-51V’s
firmware. If the IES-1248-51V will not start up, the firmware may be lost or
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corrupted. Use the following procedure to upload firmware to the IES-1248-51V
only when you are unable to upload firmware through FTP.
Note: This procedure is for emergency situations only.
1
Obtain the firmware file, unzip it and save it in a folder on your computer.
2
Connect your computer to the console port and use terminal emulation software
configured to the following parameters:
• VT100 terminal emulation
• 9600 bps
• No parity, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit
• No flow control
3
Turn off the IES-1248-51V and turn it back on to restart it and begin a session.
4
When you see the message Press any key to enter Debug Mode within 3
seconds, press a key to enter debug mode.
5
Type atba5 after the Enter Debug Mode message (this changes the console port
speed to 115200 bps).
6
Change the configuration of your terminal emulation software to use 115200 bps
and reconnect to the IES-1248-51V.
7
Type atur after the Enter Debug Mode message.
8
Wait for the Starting XMODEM upload message before activating XMODEM upload
on your terminal.
9
This is an example Xmodem configuration upload using HyperTerminal. Click
Transfer, then Send File to display the following screen.
Figure 273 Example Xmodem Upload
Type the firmware file's location, or click Browse to search for it. Choose the 1K
Xmodem protocol. Then click Send.
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10 After a successful firmware upload, type atgo to restart the IES-1248-51V. The
console port speed automatically changes back to 9600 bps when the IES-124851V restarts.
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CHAPTER
71
Product Specifications
This chapter provides the specifications for the IES-1248-51V.
71.1 Physical Specifications
The IES-1248-51V is 21 inch (533.4 mm) rack-mountable.
Telco-50 Connectors
The IES-1248-51V has 2 Telco-50 connectors. Connect the two ADSL Telco-50
connectors to the subscribers.
Dimensions
Device: 440 mm (W) x 330 mm (D) x 66 mm (H)
Whole package: 580 mm (W) x 466 mm (D) x 176 mm (H)
Weight
Device: 6.8 kg
Whole package: 9 kg
Wire Gauge Specifications
The following table shows the specifications for wire gauge.
Table 229 Wire Gauge Specifications
WIRE TYPE
REQUIRED AWG NO. (DIAMETER)
Telephone Wire
26 or larger
The IES-1248-51V Power
Wire
18 or larger
AWG (American Wire Gauge) is a measurement system for wire that specifies its
thickness. As the thickness of the wire increases, the AWG number decreases.
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Power Input
90 ~ 264 VAC, 50 Hz/60 Hz +/- 5%, with waveform distortion less than 5%.
Power Consumption
187 W maximum
The closer the subscribers to the IES-1248-51V, the lower the power
consumption. The fewer subscribers to the IES-1248-51V, the lower the power
consumption. For example, power consumption could be reduced to about 122 W
in the following situations:
• 100% ADSL data usage and up to 50% of subscribers within the same building
(short loop) as the IES-1248-51V are making VoIP calls .
• 100% ADSL data usage and up to 10% of subscribers within 3 Km (8,000 feet)
of the IES-1248-51V are making VoIP calls.
Fuse Rating
Changing the IES-1248-51V’s fuses requires partial disassembly of
the device. Only a qualified technician should perform this
process.
The following table describes the location and specification of the IES-1248-51V’s
fuses.
Table 230 Fuse Specifications
FUSE LOCATION
FUSE RATING
AC sub board (near the power inlet)
250 VAC T10A
ASP-150-24 AC power module (near the AC
sub board)
250 VAC T4A
LPP-100-48 AC power module (near the
battery power board)
250 VAC T4A
On the VoIP Board (near the VoIP board’s
power connection)
250 VAC T8.0A
ALARM Port Power
The maximum power rating for the ALARM port is as follows:
• Input: 20 V, 500 mA
• Output: 20 V, 500 mA
Operating Environment
• Temperature: -10°C - 55°C
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• Humidity: 10% - 95% (non-condensing)
• Noise: less than 55 dBA in a temperature range of 23 +/- 2°C
• Atmospheric Pressure: 86 kPa - 106 kPa
Storage Environment
• Temperature: -40 - 70°C
• Humidity: 5% - 95% (non-condensing)
Certification
• RoHS & WEEE Compliant
• ETSI300-019
• K.21 and YD/T 993-2006 Technical requirments and test methods of lightning
resistibility for telecommunication terminal equipments
• EMC
FCC Part 15 Class A
EN55022 Class A
EN55024 Class A
ETSI 300 386
Environmental Specifications
• 2002/95/EC (RoHS) Restriction of Hazardous Substances Directive
• 2002/96/EC (WEEE) Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive
• European Parliament and Council Directive 94/62/EC of 20 December 1994 on
packaging and packaging waste
Reliability and High Availability
10K *BHCA (could be adjusted due to performance limitation)
*: BHCA (Busy Hour Call Attempt): the number of calls the IES-1248-51V can set up in an hour.
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71.2 VoIP Features
This section lists the IES-1248-51V’s additional VoIP features.
Table 231 VoIP Features
Media Gateway
Signaling Protocols
ITU-T H.248 version 2
SDP (RFC 2327)
Support up to two media gateway controllers
Media Gateway
Protocols
IP/UDP/RTP encapsulation for IPV4
RTP (RFC 1889)
RTCP (RFC 1890)
Session Timer Protocol (RFC 4028)
DTMF detection and generation (bi-directional)
In-Band and Out-of-Band (RFC 2833)
FAX/Modem pass through (T.38 via RTP) or transparent (G.711)
Supplementary
Features
Caller ID display enabled and disabled
Do not disturb within a specified time period
Call waiting
Call hold
Call transfer (blind and consultative)
Call transfer while busy
Call return and call back when busy
Incoming call filtering
Outgoing call filtering
Three-way calling
Loop diagnostics
•
•
•
•
582
Metallic Loop Test (MLT) for subscriber lines:
Foreign AC/DC voltage test
Three-element capacitance test
Three-element resistance test
Ringing equivalency number test (REN measurement)
Loop resistance test
Ring voltage test
Metering voltage test
GR-909 loop diagnostics
Configurable loop impedance
Test in/out ports.
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71.3 Default Settings
This section lists the default configuration of the IES-1248-51V.
Table 232 Default Settings
VLAN Default Settings
One VLAN is created (this is
also the management VLAN).
VID
1
Registration
Fixed for the Ethernet and
ADSL ports
Tagging
Untagged for all ports
ADSL Default Settings
Enable/Disable State
Enabled
Operational Mode
auto
(ADSL) Port Profile
Default Settings
Name
DEFVAL
Profile Status
Active
Latency Mode
Interleave
Upstream ADSL Settings:
Downstream ADSL Settings:
Max Rate
512 Kbps
2048 Kbps
Min Rate
64 Kbps
64 Kbps
Latency Delay
4 ms
4 ms
Max SNR
31 db
31 db
Min SNR
0 db
0 db
Target SNR
6 db
6 db
Up Shift Margin
9 db
9 db
Down Shift Margin
3 db
3 db
Name
DEFVAL_MAX (Factory
Default)
Profile Status
Active
Latency Mode
Interleave
Upstream ADSL Settings:
Downstream ADSL Settings:
Max Rate
512 Kbps
9088 Kbps
Min Rate
64 Kbps
64 Kbps
Latency Delay
4 ms
4 ms
Max Margin
31 db
31 db
Min Margin
0 db
0 db
Target Margin
6 db
6 db
Up Shift Margin
9 db
9 db
Down Shift Margin
3 db
3 db
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Table 232 Default Settings (continued)
Virtual Channel Default
SettingsA.
Super channel
Enabled
VPI
0
VCI
33
VC Profile
DEFVAL (factory default)
Default VC Profile
Settings
DEFVAL Profile Settings
Encapsulation
RFC 1483, RFC 2684
Traffic Class
UBR
PCR
300000 cells/second
CDVT
0
DEFVAL_VC Profile
Settings
Encapsulation
RFC 1483, RFC 2684
Multiplexing
VC-based
Traffic Class
UBR
PCR
300000 cells/second
CDVT
0
Default IGMP Filter Profile
Settings
The DEFVAL IGMP filter
profile is assigned to all of the
ADSL ports by default. It
allows a port to join all
multicast IP addresses
(224.0.0.0~239.255.255.255
).
Multiplexing
LLC-based
VoIP H.248 Profile Default Settings
Name
DEFVAL
MAC Table
The MAC address table can
hold up to 14K entries (128
per ADSL port, 4K per
Ethernet port)
A.
584
The IES-1248-51V ADSL ports’ PVCs use ATM Adaptation Layer (AAL) 5.
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71.4 Limitations
The following table lists the limitations of the IES-1248-51V.
Table 233 Limitations
Number of IGMP host IP addresses per
Ethernet port
1024
Number of IGMP host IP addresses per
ADSL port
Number of Mac Filter Entries
10
Number of PVCs
8
Number of PPVCs
2
Number of PPVC members
8
Number of RPVCs
8
Number of TLSPVCs
8
Number of PAEPVCs
8
Number of VLAN Groups
16
Number of IGMP Groups
16
Number of IGMP Host IP Addresses
16
Number of DHCP Snooping Entries
32
Number of Joined MVLAN
4
Number of ACL Profile Mappings
8
Number of VLAN
1024 (including static VLAN, dynamic VLAN
and GVRP VLAN)
Number of ADSL Profiles
96
Number of ATM Profiles
96
MAC Table
The MAC address table can hold up to 14K
entries (128 per ADSL port, up to 4K per
Ethernet port)
Number of IGMP Filter Profiles
128
Number of IGMP Query VLAN Groups
64 (up to 16 for IGMP static query VLAN
groups)
Number of ADSL Alarm Profiles
8
Number of Dot1x Profiles
64
Number of DHCP Relay Servers
32
Number of IP Routing Entries
128
Number of Static Multicast Addresses
32
Number of IGMP Groups
512
Number of RPVC Gateway IP Addresses
96
Number of RPVC Routing Entries
96
Number of ACL Profiles
128
IP Bridging:
Number of Domains
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Table 233 Limitations
586
Number of VLAN groups per Domain
8
Number of Edge Routers
64
Number of Interfaces
384
Number of Routes per Domain
16
Number of Routes
128
Number of ARP entries per Ethernet
port
64
Number of ARP entries per DSL port
32
Number of PPPoE Intermediate Agents
48
Number of VLAN Isolations
16
Number of MVLAN numbers
16 (up to 4 per ADSL port)
Number of System Trusted Clients (for
Remote Management)
16
Number of H.248 Profiles
128
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71.5 Pin Assignments
71.5.1 Hardware Telco-50 Connector Pin Assignments
The following diagram shows the pin assignments of the ADSL Telco-50
connectors.
Figure 274 ADSL 1~24 Port Telco-50 Pin Assignments
Figure 275 ADSL 25~48 Telco-50 Pin Assignments
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This table lists the ports and matching pin numbers for the hardware Telco-50
connectors.
Table 234 Hardware Telco-50 Connector Port and Pin Numbers
588
PORT NUMBER
PIN NUMBER
1
2, 27
2
3, 28
3
4, 29
4
5, 30
5
6, 31
6
7, 32
7
8, 33
8
9, 34
9
10, 35
10
11, 36
11
12, 37
12
13, 38
13
14, 39
14
15, 40
15
16, 41
16
17, 42
17
18, 43
18
19, 44
19
20, 45
20
21, 46
21
22, 47
22
23, 48
23
24, 49
24
25, 50
25
2, 27
26
3, 28
27
4, 29
28
5, 30
29
6, 31
30
7, 32
31
8, 33
32
9, 34
33
10, 35
34
11, 36
35
12, 37
36
13, 38
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Table 234 Hardware Telco-50 Connector Port and Pin Numbers (continued)
PORT NUMBER
PIN NUMBER
37
14, 39
38
15, 40
39
16, 41
40
17, 42
41
18, 43
42
19, 44
43
20, 45
44
21, 46
45
22, 47
46
23, 48
47
24, 49
48
25, 50
71.5.2 Telco-50 Cables
Connect to the IES-1248-51V’s ADSL 1 ~ 24 and 25 ~ 48 ports using cables that
have Telco-50 connectors with the following pin assignments. The diagrams show
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the Telco-50 connector as seen when looking at the face that couples with the
VOP.
Figure 276 1 ~ 24 Cable Telco-50 Pin Assignments
Figure 277 25 ~ 48 Cable Telco-50 Pin Assignments
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71.5.3 Console Cable Pin Assignments
The following diagrams and chart show the pin assignments of the console cable.
Figure 278 Console Cable RJ-11 Male Connector
Figure 279 Console Cable DB-9 Female Connector
Table 235 Console Cable Connector Pin Assignments
RJ-11 MALE
DB-9 FEMALE
Pin 2: TXD
Pin 2
Pin 3: RXD
Pin 3
Pin 4: GND
Pin 5
71.5.4 ALARM Connector Pin Assignments
The following diagram shows the alarm connector pin layout.
Figure 280 ALARM Connector Pin Layout
Pin 5
Pin 1
Pin 9
Pin 6
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Table 236 ALARM Connector Pin Assignments
PIN
DESCRIPTION
1, 2, 6 Open the circuit of pins 1 and 6 and close the circuit of pins
2 and 6 to signal an alarm.
3, 7
Pins for alarm input 1.
4, 8
Pins for alarm input 2.
5, 9
Pins for alarm input 3.
Alarm input is only for dry contact without any power. Open or
short circuit is recommended.
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P ART VI
Appendices and
Index
Changing a Fuse (595)
Index (645)
593
594
APPENDIX
A
Changing a Fuse
This appendix shows you how to remove and install fuses for the IES-1248-51V.
If you use a fuse other than an included fuse, make sure it
matches the fuse specifications in the chapter on product
specifications.
Removing a Fuse
Disconnect all power from the IES-1248-51V before you begin this
procedure.
This process requires partial disassembly of the IES-1248-51V.
Only a qualified technician should perform this process.
1
Remove the power wires from the IES-1248-51V.
2
Remove the IES-1248-51V’s top cover.
3
See the product specifications for the location of the fuse. A burnt-out fuse is
blackened, darkened or cloudy inside its glass casing. A working fuse has a
completely clear glass casing.
Use a small flat-head screwdriver to carefully pry out the fuse from the fuse clip.
4
Dispose of the burnt-out fuse properly.
Installing a Fuse
1
Gently press the replacement fuse into the fuse clip until you hear a click.
2
Replace the IES-1248-51V’s cover.
3
Reconnect the power wires to the unit.
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APPENDIX
B
PSTN Parameters by Country
USA
country code: 0,USA
law: ulaw
impedance: 600ohm
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 20.0 Hz
amplitude: 53.0 Vrms
onTime1: 2.00 seconds
offTime1: 4.00 seconds
onTime2: 2.00 seconds
offTime2: 4.00 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 500 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
interDigitMin: 250 ms
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: during ring
payload type: SDMF
first TAS type: NULL
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 0 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 500 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 350+440Hz -18.0dB continuous
ring back tone: 440+480Hz -18.0dB on 2.000s off 4.000s
busy tone: 480+620Hz -18.0dB on 0.500s off 0.500s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -18.0dB on 0.300s off 0.200s
congestion tone: 440+620Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 0.300s
special dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
call waiting tone #1: 440Hz -18.0dB on 0.300s off 10.000s
call waiting tone #2: 440Hz -13.0dB on 0.300s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
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480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
Japan
country code: 1, Japan
law: ulaw
impedance: 600ohm_1000nf
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 20.0 Hz
amplitude: 53.0 Vrms
onTime1: 1.00 seconds
offTime1: 2.00 seconds
onTime2: 1.00 seconds
offTime2: 2.00 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 620 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
interDigitMin: 250 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: during ring
payload type: SDMF
first TAS type: NULL
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 0 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 500 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 400+435Hz -18.0dB continuous
ring back tone: 400Hz -18.0dB on 1.000s off 2.000s
busy tone: 400Hz -18.0dB on 0.500s off 0.500s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
congestion tone: 400Hz -18.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
special dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
call waiting tone #1: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 0.200s
call waiting tone #2: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 4.000s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
Taiwan
country code: 2, Taiwan
law: ulaw
impedance: 600ohm
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 20.0 Hz
amplitude: 53.0 Vrms
onTime1: 1.00 seconds
offTime1: 2.00 seconds
onTime2: 1.00 seconds
offTime2: 2.00 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 500 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
interDigitMin: 250 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: during ring
payload type: SDMF
first TAS type: NULL
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 0 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 500 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
ring back tone: 440+480Hz -19.0dB on 1.000s off 2.000s
busy tone: 440+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.500s off 0.500s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
congestion tone: 440+480Hz -18.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
special dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
call waiting tone #1: 440+480Hz -13.0dB on 1.500s
call waiting tone #2: 350Hz -13.0dB on 0.250s off 5.250s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
ROH tone: 480Hz -3.0dB on 60.000s
warning tone: 392Hz -17.0dB on 0.500s
494Hz -17.0dB on 0.500s
587Hz -17.0dB on 1.500s
confirmation tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.300s
Austria
country code: 3, Austria
law: alaw
impedance: 220ohm_820ohm_120nf
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 50.0 Hz
amplitude: 53.0 Vrms
onTime1: 1.00 seconds
offTime1: 5.00 seconds
onTime2: 1.00 seconds
offTime2: 5.00 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 500 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
interDigitMin: 250 ms
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: prior ring
payload type: ETSI-MDMF
first TAS type: DT-AS
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 300 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 400 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 420Hz -18.0dB continuous
ring back tone: 420Hz -18.0dB on 1.000s off 5.000s
busy tone: 420Hz -18.0dB on 0.400s off 0.400s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
congestion tone: 420Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 0.200s
special dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
call waiting tone #1: 420Hz -18.0dB on 0.040s off 1.950s
call waiting tone #2: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 4.000s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
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ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
Belgium
country code: 4, Belgium
law: alaw
impedance: 270ohm_750ohm_150nf
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 25.0 Hz
amplitude: 53.0 Vrms
onTime1: 1.00 seconds
offTime1: 3.00 seconds
onTime2: 1.00 seconds
offTime2: 3.00 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 500 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
makeMax: 55 ms
interDigitMin: 250 ms
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: prior ring
payload type: ETSI-MDMF
first TAS type: DT-AS
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 300 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 400 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 425Hz -18.0dB continuous
ring back tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 1.000s off 3.000s
busy tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.500s off 0.500s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
congestion tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.170s off 0.170s
special dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
call waiting tone #1: 1400Hz -18.0dB on 0.180s off 0.180s
call waiting tone #2: 1400Hz -18.0dB on 0.180s off 3.500s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
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warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
Czech Republic
country code: 6, Czech
law: alaw
impedance: 270ohm_750ohm_150nf
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 25.0 Hz
amplitude: 53.0 Vrms
onTime1: 1.00 seconds
offTime1: 4.00 seconds
onTime2: 1.00 seconds
offTime2: 4.00 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 500 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
interDigitMin: 250 ms
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: prior ring
payload type: ETSI-MDMF
first TAS type: DT-AS
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 300 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 400 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.330s off 0.330s
ring back tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 1.000s off 4.000s
busy tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.330s off 0.330s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
congestion tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.165s off 0.165s
special dial tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.660s off 0.660s
call waiting tone #1: 425Hz -18.0dB on 1.000s off 0.170s
call waiting tone #2: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.330s off 3.500s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
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480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
Denmark
country code: 7, Denmark
law: alaw
impedance: 300ohm_1000ohm_220nf
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 25.0 Hz
amplitude: 53.0 Vrms
onTime1: 0.75 seconds
offTime1: 7.50 seconds
onTime2: 0.75 seconds
offTime2: 7.50 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 500 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
interDigitMin: 250 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: prior ring
payload type: DTMF
first TAS type: line reversal
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 300 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 400 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 425Hz -18.0dB continuous
ring back tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 1.000s off 4.000s
busy tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
congestion tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
special dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
call waiting tone #1: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 0.200s
call waiting tone #2: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 3.600s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
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confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
Finland
country code: 8, Finland
law: alaw
impedance: 270ohm_750ohm_150nf
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 25.0 Hz
amplitude: 53.0 Vrms
onTime1: 1.00 seconds
offTime1: 4.00 seconds
onTime2: 1.00 seconds
offTime2: 4.00 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 500 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
interDigitMin: 250 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: prior ring
payload type: ETSI-MDMF
first TAS type: DT-AS
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 300 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 400 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 425Hz -18.0dB continuous
ring back tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 1.000s off 4.000s
busy tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.300s off 0.300s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
congestion tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 0.200s
special dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
call waiting tone #1: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.150s off 0.150s
call waiting tone #2: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.150s off 8.000s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
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confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
Italy
country code: 12, Italy
law: alaw
impedance: 270ohm_750ohm_150nf
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 25.0 Hz
amplitude: 53.0 Vrms
onTime1: 1.00 seconds
offTime1: 4.00 seconds
onTime2: 1.00 seconds
offTime2: 4.00 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 500 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
interDigitMin: 250 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: prior ring
payload type: ETSI-MDMF
first TAS type: DT-AS
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 300 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 400 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 0.200s
ring back tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 1.000s off 4.000s
busy tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.500s off 0.500s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
congestion tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 0.200s
special dial tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.600s off 1.000s
call waiting tone #1: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.400s off 0.100s
call waiting tone #2: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.250s off 0.100s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
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confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
The Netherlands
country code: 14, Netherlands
law: alaw
impedance: 270ohm_750ohm_150nf
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 25.0 Hz
amplitude: 53.0 Vrms
onTime1: 1.00 seconds
offTime1: 4.00 seconds
onTime2: 1.00 seconds
offTime2: 4.00 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 500 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
interDigitMin: 250 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: prior ring
payload type: ETSI-MDMF
first TAS type: DT-AS
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 300 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 400 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 425Hz -18.0dB continuous
ring back tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 1.000s off 4.000s
busy tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.500s off 0.500s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
congestion tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
special dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
call waiting tone #1: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.500s off 9.500s
call waiting tone #2: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.500s off 0.500s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
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confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
Norway
country code: 15, Norway
law: alaw
impedance: 270ohm_750ohm_150nf
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 25.0 Hz
amplitude: 35.0 Vrms
onTime1: 0.20 seconds
offTime1: 0.20 seconds
onTime2: 0.40 seconds
offTime2: 0.20 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 500 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
interDigitMin: 250 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: prior ring
payload type: ETSI-MDMF
first TAS type: DT-AS
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 300 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 400 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 425Hz -18.0dB continuous
ring back tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 1.000s off 4.000s
busy tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.500s off 0.500s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
congestion tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 0.200s
special dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
call waiting tone #1: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 0.600s
call waiting tone #2: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 0.600s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
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confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
Spain
country code: 19, Spain
law: alaw
impedance: 270ohm_750ohm_150nf
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 25.0 Hz
amplitude: 57.0 Vrms
onTime1: 1.50 seconds
offTime1: 3.00 seconds
onTime2: 1.50 seconds
offTime2: 3.00 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 500 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
interDigitMin: 250 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: prior ring
payload type: ETSI-MDMF
first TAS type: DT-AS
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 300 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 400 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 425Hz -18.0dB continuous
ring back tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 1.500s off 3.000s
busy tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 0.200s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
congestion tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 0.200s
special dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
call waiting tone #1: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.175s off 0.175s
call waiting tone #2: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.175s off 3.500s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
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confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
Sweden
country code: 20, Sweden
law: alaw
impedance: 270ohm_750ohm_150nf
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 25.0 Hz
amplitude: 53.0 Vrms
onTime1: 1.00 seconds
offTime1: 5.00 seconds
onTime2: 1.00 seconds
offTime2: 5.00 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 200 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
interDigitMin: 250 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: prior ring
payload type: DTMF
first TAS type: line reversal
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 300 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 400 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 425Hz -18.0dB continuous
ring back tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 1.000s off 5.000s
busy tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.500s off 0.500s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
congestion tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.250s off 0.750s
special dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
call waiting tone #1: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 0.500s
call waiting tone #2: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
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confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
Switzerland
country code: 21, Switzerland
law: alaw
impedance: 220ohm_820ohm_115nf
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 25.0 Hz
amplitude: 53.0 Vrms
onTime1: 1.00 seconds
offTime1: 4.00 seconds
onTime2: 1.00 seconds
offTime2: 4.00 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 500 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
interDigitMin: 250 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: prior ring
payload type: ETSI-MDMF
first TAS type: DT-AS
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 300 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 400 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 425Hz -18.0dB continuous
ring back tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 1.000s off 4.000s
busy tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.500s off 0.500s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
congestion tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 0.200s
special dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
call waiting tone #1: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 0.200s
call waiting tone #2: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 4.000s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
624
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
United Kingdom
country code: 22,UK
law: alaw
impedance: 300ohm_1000ohm_220nf
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 25.0 Hz
amplitude: 53.0 Vrms
onTime1: 0.40 seconds
offTime1: 0.20 seconds
onTime2: 0.40 seconds
offTime2: 2.00 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 500 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
interDigitMin: 250 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: prior ring
payload type: UK
first TAS type: line reversal
second TAS type: DT-AS
first TAS interval: 300 ms
second TAS interval: 150 ms
start to ring: 400 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 350Hz -22.0dB + 440Hz -18.0dB continuous
ring back tone: 400+450Hz -18.0dB on 0.400s off 0.200s
busy tone: 400Hz -18.0dB on 0.375s off 0.375s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
congestion tone: 400Hz -25.0dB on 0.400s off 0.350s
special dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
call waiting tone #1: 400Hz -18.0dB on 0.100s off 3.000s
call waiting tone #2: 400Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 4.000s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
626
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
Germany
country code: 23,Germany
law: alaw
impedance: 220ohm_820ohm_120nf
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 25.0 Hz
amplitude: 53.0 Vrms
onTime1: 1.00 seconds
offTime1: 4.00 seconds
onTime2: 1.00 seconds
offTime2: 4.00 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 500 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
interDigitMin: 250 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: prior ring
payload type: ETSI-MDMF
first TAS type: DT-AS
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 300 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 400 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 425Hz -18.0dB continuous
ring back tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 1.000s off 4.000s
busy tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.480s off 0.480s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
congestion tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.240s off 0.240s
special dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
call waiting tone #1: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 0.200s
call waiting tone #2: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 5.000s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
628
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
Australia
country code: 25, Australia
law: alaw
impedance: 220ohm_820ohm_120nf
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 25.0 Hz
amplitude: 53.0 Vrms
onTime1: 0.40 seconds
offTime1: 0.20 seconds
onTime2: 0.40 seconds
offTime2: 2.00 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 500 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
interDigitMin: 250 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: prior ring
payload type: ETSI-MDMF
first TAS type: DT-AS
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 300 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 400 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 425Hz -18.0dB continuous
ring back tone: 400+450Hz -18.0dB on 0.400s off 0.200s
busy tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.380s off 0.380s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
congestion tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.380s off 0.380s
special dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
call waiting tone #1: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 0.200s
call waiting tone #2: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 4.400s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
630
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
New Zealand
country code: 26,New_zealand
law: alaw
impedance: 370ohm_620ohm_310nf
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 25.0 Hz
amplitude: 53.0 Vrms
onTime1: 0.40 seconds
offTime1: 0.20 seconds
onTime2: 0.40 seconds
offTime2: 2.00 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 500 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
interDigitMin: 250 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: prior ring
payload type: ETSI-MDMF
first TAS type: DT-AS
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 300 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 400 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 400Hz -18.0dB continuous
ring back tone: 400+450Hz -18.0dB on 0.400s off 0.200s
busy tone: 400Hz -18.0dB on 0.500s off 0.500s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
congestion tone: 400Hz -18.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
special dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
call waiting tone #1: 400Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 3.000s
call waiting tone #2: 400Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 3.000s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
632
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
Ireland
country code: 30, Ireland
law: alaw
impedance: 270ohm_750ohm_150nf
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 25.0 Hz
amplitude: 53.0 Vrms
onTime1: 0.40 seconds
offTime1: 0.20 seconds
onTime2: 0.40 seconds
offTime2: 2.00 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 500 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
interDigitMin: 250 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: prior ring
payload type: ETSI-MDMF
first TAS type: RP-AS
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 600 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 400 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 425Hz -18.0dB continuous
ring back tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.400s off 0.200s
busy tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.500s off 0.500s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
congestion tone: 480+620Hz -18.0dB on 0.500s off 0.500s
special dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
call waiting tone #1: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.180s off 0.200s
call waiting tone #2: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 4.500s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
634
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
Russia
country code: 32, Russia
law: alaw
impedance: 600ohm
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 20.0 Hz
amplitude: 53.0 Vrms
onTime1: 2.00 seconds
offTime1: 4.00 seconds
onTime2: 2.00 seconds
offTime2: 4.00 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 500 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
interDigitMin: 250 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: prior ring
payload type: ETSI-MDMF
first TAS type: DT-AS
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 300 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 400 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 425Hz -18.0dB continuous
ring back tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.800s off 3.200s
busy tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.400s off 0.400s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
congestion tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.500s off 0.250s
special dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
call waiting tone #1: 350Hz -13.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
440Hz -13.0dB on 0.250s
call waiting tone #2: 440Hz -13.0dB on 0.300s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
636
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
China
country code: 36, China
law: alaw
impedance: 220ohm_680ohm_100nf
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 20.0 Hz
amplitude: 53.0 Vrms
onTime1: 1.00 seconds
offTime1: 4.00 seconds
onTime2: 1.00 seconds
offTime2: 4.00 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 500 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
interDigitMin: 250 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: prior ring
payload type: ETSI-MDMF
first TAS type: DT-AS
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 300 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 400 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 450Hz -18.0dB continuous
ring back tone: 450Hz -18.0dB on 1.000s off 4.000s
busy tone: 450Hz -18.0dB on 0.350s off 0.350s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
congestion tone: 400Hz -18.0dB on 0.700s off 0.700s
special dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
call waiting tone #1: 400Hz -18.0dB on 0.500s off 10.000s
call waiting tone #2: 400Hz -18.0dB continuous
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
638
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
Vietnam
country code: 43, Vietnam
law: alaw
impedance: 600ohm
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 20.0 Hz
amplitude: 53.0 Vrms
onTime1: 2.00 seconds
offTime1: 4.00 seconds
onTime2: 2.00 seconds
offTime2: 4.00 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 500 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
interDigitMin: 250 ms
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639
Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: prior ring
payload type: ETSI-MDMF
first TAS type: DT-AS
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 300 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 400 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 350+440Hz -18.0dB continuous
ring back tone: 440+480Hz -18.0dB on 2.000s off 4.000s
busy tone: 480+620Hz -18.0dB on 0.500s off 0.500s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -18.0dB on 0.300s off 0.200s
congestion tone: 440+620Hz -18.0dB on 0.200s off 0.300s
special dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
call waiting tone #1: 440Hz -18.0dB on 0.300s off 10.000s
call waiting tone #2: 440Hz -13.0dB on 0.300s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
640
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
Brazil
country code: 44, Brazil
law: alaw
impedance: 900ohm
loop current: 25 mA
tax type: metering
Ring parameters:
frequency: 25.0 Hz
amplitude: 53.0 Vrms
onTime1: 1.00 seconds
offTime1: 4.00 seconds
onTime2: 1.00 seconds
offTime2: 4.00 seconds
Pulse parameters:
flashMin: 90 ms
flashMax: 500 ms
breakMin: 47 ms
breakMax: 80 ms
makeMin: 30 ms
makeMax: 55 ms
interDigitMin: 250 ms
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
Meter parameters:
frequency: 12 kHz
onTime: 200 ms
offTime: 200 ms
Caller ID parameters:
CID type: prior ring
payload type: ETSI-MDMF
first TAS type: DT-AS
second TAS type: NULL
first TAS interval: 300 ms
second TAS interval: 0 ms
start to ring: 400 ms (prior ring only)
Tones parameters:
dial tone: 425Hz -18.0dB continuous
ring back tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 1.000s off 4.000s
busy tone: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
reorder tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
congestion tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
special dial tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB continuous
call waiting tone #1: 425Hz -18.0dB on 0.050s off 1.000s
call waiting tone #2: 440Hz -13.0dB on 0.300s
MWI tone: 350+440Hz -13.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
ROH tone: 1400+2060+2450+2600Hz 3.0dB on 0.100s off 0.100s
warning tone: 480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s off 0.250s
480+620Hz -24.0dB on 0.250s
642
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
confirmation tone: 600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s off 0.125s
600Hz -24.0dB on 0.125s
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Appendix B PSTN Parameters by Country
644
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Index
Index
Numerics
1 Day Performance Command 495, 500
100/1000 LED Troubleshooting 568
15 Minute Performance Command 493
19 Inch Rack 579
ATM Forum Traffic Management 4.0
Specification 142
ATM QoS 142
ATM Traffic Class 146, 147
ATM Traffic Classes 142
Attainable Net Data Rate 352, 353, 502
A
authentication 105
administrator 105
default privilege level for administrators 106
modes for administrators 105
AbS 322
authentication modes
administrator 105
AC impedance 43
AWG 579
Access Control 263
accessing the CLI 363
Actual Rate 120
Address Resolution Protocol 196, 359
B
ADSL 579
Backup Configuration 345
ADSL Compliance 39
Bit Allocation 155
ADSL Port Setup 119, 139
Bridge ID 204
ADSL Profile Delete Command 485
Bridge Priority 206
ADSL Profile Map Command 485
BT 144, 147
ADSL Profile Set Command 484
Burst Tolerance 144, 147
ADSL Profile Show Command 484
ADSL Tel Command 477
aggregated lines of POTS 35
Aging Time 110
C
ALARM connector pin assignments 591
cable connector pin assignment 589
Alarm Profile Screen 148
cadence ring 43
All Digital Mode 125
call progress tones 42
ALM LED 41, 567
call progression using H.248 319
ALM LED Troubleshooting 567
Canonical Format Indicator 164
American Wire Gauge 579
CBR 142, 146, 147
analysis-by-synthesis 322
CDVT 144, 146, 147
ARP 196
Cell Delay Variation Tolerance 144, 147
ARP Show Command 449
CFI See Canonical Format Indicator
ARP Table 359
Channel Characteristics Function 352, 353, 501
ATM F5 348
Channel Setup 129, 134, 136
Channels 123
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
645
Index
circuit-switched telephone networks 317
CLI Command 574
Configure tagged VLAN example 414
Static VLAN Table example 413
clicks 323
CNG 44
CO port 58
codec 321
codecs 42
coder/decoder 321
Comfort Noise Generation 44
Command
Forwarding Process Example 413
Command Line Interface 574
Commands 469, 515
multicast mvlan disable 435
multicast mvlan group set 435
multicast mvlan show 435
port tlspvc show 532
show igmp port group 432
show igmp port info 432
commands
diagnostic mlt relay set 547
diagnostic mlt show 546
diagnostic mlt test 547
profile voip dsp delete 553
profile voip dsp map 553
profile voip dsp set 552
profile voip dsp show 553
profile voip sip delete 558, 559
profile voip sip set 557
voip countrycode set 543
voip countrycode show 548
voip ip dns 548
compression 42
D
decoder 321
decompression 42
Default Gateway 114
Default IP Address 449
default privilege level 106
Default Profile Settings 121
DEFVAL 129
DEFVAL Profile Settings 583
DEFVAL_VC 129
Delete PVC Command 464
Delete Virtual Channel Profile Command 518
DHCP 196, 217
DHCP option 82 mode 220
DHCP Relay 220
DHCP Relay Agent Information Option 217
Diagnostic 347
Discrete Multi-Tone 153
DMT Sub-carriers 352
Double Upstream Mode 125
Double-tagged Frames 247, 531
Down Stream Interval Delay 152
Down Stream Output Power 152, 153
Downstream 119
Downstream (ds) 492
DTMF 43, 322
dual-tone multi-frequency
see DTMF
Duplex 118
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol 196
dynamic jitter buffer 44
Configured Rate 120
Connections 58
Console Port 58, 576
E
console port (accessing the CLI) 363
Constant Bit Rate 142, 146, 147
EAPOL 196
Contact Person's Name 102
echo cancellation 44
Contexts in H.248 319
ephemeral termination ID 332
Control 212
ephemeral termination prefix 332
country code 43
Errors 95
Crosstalk 352, 353, 502
Ethernet Address 97
Ethernet Port Statistics 91
646
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Index
Extensible Authentication Protocol, 196
GARP Timer 110
external testing 44
GARP Timer Setup 107
General IP Commands 447
General Setup 101, 102
F
Generic Attribute Registration Protocol 107
Factory Defaults 345
Get Community 269
Fan Maintenance 67
GetNext 265
Fan Module 67
Gigabit-capable PON, see GPON
Fan Speed 99
GPON 45
GEPON SPF ONU transceiver 35
Far End Actual Aggregate Transmit Power 352,
353, 502
Far End Block Errors 157
Far End Forward Error Count 157
H
Fast Channel 120
H.248 317
Fast Mode 120, 140
H.248 call progression example 319
fax pass-through 43
H.248 commands 319
features 41
H.248 network example 318
File Transfer using FTP 346
H.248 version 333
Filtering Databases 409
Hello Time 206
Firmware Upgrade 343
help (in the CLI) 367
Firmware version 97
Home 89
flash time 43
Home Screen 72
Force Authorized 212
Home screen 89
Force Unauthorized 212
Host Name 102, 103, 104
foreign voltage 43
Humidity 581
Forwarding Delay 207
General Rule 207
hybrid waveform codec 322
frequency pairs 322
Front Panel 53
FTP 346
Full Duplex 118
fuse 595
replacement 595
I
IEEE 802.1Q See Tagged VLAN
IEEE 802.1Q Tagged VLAN 41, 409
IEEE 802.1Q VLAN 323
IEEE 802.1x 209
G
G.168 44
G.711 322
G.723 322
G.726 322
G.729 322
G.984 45
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
IEEE 802.1x Port-based Authentication 39
IEEE802.1x 212
IGMP 196
IGMP Count 430
IGMP Filter Profile Delete Command 427
IGMP Filter Profile Set Command 427
IGMP Filter Profile Show Command 428
IGMP Filter Set Command 427
647
Index
IGMP Filter Show Command 427, 430
limitations per ADSL port 585
IGMP snooping 171, 172
Line Attenuation 352, 353, 501
Initial Configuration 79
line bit allocation 486
install
fuse 595
Line Data 153
Installation
Rack-Mounted 50
Line Performance 155
Line Type 157
Installation Requirements 50
Linedata Command 490, 495
Installing the Fan Module 67
Lineperf Command 492
Interleave Delay 120, 140, 491
LLC 128
Interleave Mode 140
Location 102, 103, 104
internal testing 44
Log Format 350, 389
Internet Explorer 71, 79
Log Messages 350
Internet Group Multicast Protocol 196
login 364
Line Operating Values 151, 154, 156
Internet Protocol 196
Login screen 72
Internet telephony service provider 317
loop resistance 43
IP 196
loop tests 582
IP Commands 447
Loopback Test 348
IP DSLAM 35
IP Settings 449
IP Setup 113
Isolation Disable Command 373
Isolation Enable Command 372, 373
M
Isolation Show Command 372
MAC 97
filter 303
ITSP 317
MAC (Media Access Control) Filter 40
ITU-T H.248-1 317
MAC Address 188
MAC address 97
MAC Address Learning 110
J
MAC Commands 419
MAC Count 421, 422
jitter 44
MAC Count Disable Command 422
Join Timer 111
MAC Count Enable Command 422
MAC Count Filter 40
MAC Count Set Command 422
648
L
MAC Count Show Command 422
Latency Mode 140
MAC Filter
Filter 199, 200, 419
Leave 175
MAC Filter Delete Command 421
Leave All Timer 111
MAC Filter Disable Command 420
Leave Timer 111
MAC Filter Enable Command 420
LED
DSL 570
MAC Filter Set Command 420
limitations of the system 585
Main Distribution Frame 62
MAC Filter Show Command 420
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Index
Maintenance 343
NTP (RFC-1305) 102
Management 40
Number of Errored Seconds 157
management
Ethernet 113
VoIP 114
Number of Severely Errored Seconds 157
Management Information Base (MIB) 264
Max Age 207
Max Rate 140
Max SNR (db) 141
Maximum Burst Size 143
MBS 143
MDF 62
MDF Connections 61
Media Access Control 97
O
OAM F5 Loopback 348
Operating Environment 580
Operational Mode 348, 349, 487
Option 82 217
option mode of DHCP relay 220
out-of-band signals 42
media gateway (MG) 318
Media Gateway Access Controller (MGAC) 35
media gateway controller (MGC) 318
MEGACO (MEdia GAteway COntrol) 317
Metallic Line Test 43
metering 43
Metric 308
Min Rate 140
Min SNR (db) 141
Mini GBIC Modules 37
MLT 43
Mode 123, 125
Model 102, 104
modem pass-through 43
Mounting Brackets 51
Multicast MAC Address 188
multicast mvlan Commands 433
Multicast VLAN 189, 433
Multicast VLAN. See MVLAN.
MVLAN 189, 433
P
Packet Filter 195
Packet Filter PPPoE Only Command 439
Packet Filter Set Command 439
Packet Filter Show Command 438
PAE 528
pass-through 43
Password 76
Path Cost 207
PBX services 317
PCM 322
PCM companding law 43
PCR 143, 146, 147
Peak Cell Rate 143, 146, 147
Permanent Virtual Circuit 128
Philips Screwdriver, #2 50
Physical Specifications 579
Ping 348
Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet 196
Port Security 215
N
Near End Block Errors 157
Port Setup 117
Port Statistics 375
NetBios 196
Port VID
Default for all ports 164
Network Basic Input/Output System 196
POTS connectivity 35
Non real-time Variable Bit Rate 143
Power Connections 65
nrt-VBR) 143
PPPoA to PPPoE (PAE) 528
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
649
Index
PPPoE 196
Recovering the Firmware 575
Priority 111, 130, 131, 135, 137, 207, 239, 249, 250
Reed- Solomon 120, 140
Priority Level 111
related documentation 3
Priority Queue Assignment 111
removing fuses 595
Profile 119, 123, 125
Removing the Fan Module 67
Profiles 119
REN 43
PSTN 322
Report 175
Public Switched Telephone Network 322
required bandwidth 322
Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) 35
Resetting 574
pulse code modulation 322
Resetting the Defaults 574
pulse dial 43
Restart System 346
pulse dialing 323
Restore Configuration 344
Punch-down Tool 62
reverberation 44
PVC 128
RFC 1483 39
PVC Channels 518
RFC 1889 321
PVID 130, 131, 135, 239
RFC 2486 196
PWR LED 567
RFC 3525 317
PWR LED Does Not Turn On 567
ring test 43
RJ-11 Connectors 63
Route Show Command 449
Q
RSTP (Rapid STP) 41
RTP 321
Q-in-Q 247, 531
rt-VBR 143
quality of service 42
Rx Broadcast Packets 94
Quality of Service (QOS) 142
Rx Bytes 95
Query 175, 179
Rx Discard Packets 95
Quiet Line Noise 352, 353, 502
Rx Packets 94, 95
Rx Rate 95
R
S
Rack 50
650
Rack 19 Inch 579
safety warnings 7
Rack 482.6mm 579
Saving Configuration 77
Rack-mounted Installation Requirements 50
saving configuration 368
RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial-In User
Service) 209
SCR 143, 147
RADIUS Setup 210
Secured Client 270
Reach Extended ADSL2 125
Security 40
Screwdriver 50
real-time transport protocol 321
Server Port 270
Real-time Variable Bit Rate 143
Service Access Control 269
Reauthentication 212, 213
Service Mode 152
Reboot System 346
Service Provider’s Network 248
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Index
Set Community 269
syntax conventions 5
Set PVC Command 463, 519
SYS LED 567
Set Virtual Channel Profile Command 517
SYS LED Does Not Turn On 567
SFP LNK LED Troubleshooting 568
SYS LED Troubleshooting 567
Shared Secret 106, 210
Syslog 261
shortcuts 367
System Information 97
Show PVC Command 463
system limitations 585
Signal Attenuation 352, 353, 501
System Log 348
Signal-to-Noise Ratio 352, 353, 502
System Monitoring 41
Signal-to-Noise Ratio Margin 352, 353, 502
System up Time 89
Simple Network Management Protocol 264
SNMP 264
Configuring 268, 467
Trap 269
Get 265
Manager 264
MIBs 265
supported versions 264
Trap 265
T
Tag Control Information 164
Tag Protocol Identifier 164
Tagged VLAN 163
tagged VLAN 41
SNMP Commands 265
Target SNR (db) 141
SNMP Traps 266
TAT 144
SNR (db) 141
TCI See Tag Control Information
softswitch 35
Telco-50 Cables 62
sound quality 322
Telco-50 Connector Pin Assignments 591
Speed Mode 118
telephone keys 323
SPN 248
Telephone Wire 579
SSH (accessing the CLI) 364
Telnet (accessing the CLI) 363
Stacking 38
Temperature 98, 580
Static Multicast Filter 40, 187
Temperature Unit 98
Static Route
Setup 307
Terminal Emulation 58
Static VLAN
Control 168
Tagging 168
Termination 318
ephemeral connection 318
physical connection 318
Statistics IP Command 450
testing 44
Statistics Port 375
Theoretical Arrival Time 144
Storage Environment 581, 584, 585
Threshold 98
STP (Spanning Tree Protocol) 41
Time (RFC-868) 102
Terminal emulation 576
Sub-carrier 352
Time server protocol supported 102
Super Channel 128, 130
Time Zone 102
Surge Protection Circuitry 62
TLS 247, 531
Sustained Cell Rate 143, 147
Tones 153
SVLAN Table 409
tones 42
Switch Setup 110
Touch Tone® 322
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
651
Index
TPID See Tag Protocol Identifier
Traffic Parameters 143
VCI 95, 130, 131, 135, 136, 231, 232, 233, 238, 239,
249, 250, 253, 254, 257
Traffic Shaping 142
Vendor Info 153
Transmission Error Correction 120, 140
ventilation holes 50
Transparent LAN Service (TLS) 247, 531
VID 249, 250
Trap 269
VID See VLAN Identifier
Trellis Encoding 152
Virtual Channel Profile 129
Troubleshooting 567
Virtual Channel Profile Commands 516
Tx Broadcast Packets 94
Virtual Channels 128
Tx Bytes 95
Virtual Circuit 128
Tx Discard Packets 95
Virtual Circuit Identifier 95, 130, 131, 135, 136,
231, 232, 233, 238, 239, 249, 250, 253, 254, 257
Tx KB/s 90
Tx Packets 94, 95
Tx Rate 95
virtual local area network
see VLAN
Virtual Path Identifier 130, 134, 136, 231, 233, 238,
249, 253
Unix Syslog 261
VLAN 41, 323, 569
Explicit Tagging 409
Forwarding 164
Implicit Tagging 409
Introduction 163
Priority frame 164
Registration Information 409
Unspecified Bit Rate 143, 146, 147
VLAN Acceptable Frame Type 169
Up Stream Interval Delay 152
VLAN Delete Command 415
Up Time 90
VLAN Group 168
Upstream 119, 140
VLAN group 323
Upstream (us) 492
User Account 103
VLAN ID 163, 323
Maximum Number of 164
USER port 58
VLAN ID tags 323
USER Telco-50 Connectors 587, 591
VLAN Identifier 164
U
UBR 143, 146, 147
UnAvailable Seconds 157
VLAN Stacking 247, 531
VLAN stacking 247, 531
V
VLAN tags 323
vlan1q port default VID 412
V.152 333
vlan1q port status 415
VAD 44
vlan1q svlan setentry 413
Variable Bit Rate 143, 146
Voice Activity Detection 44
VBD 323
voice activity detection 44
VBR 143, 146
voice coding 321
VC 128
voice mail 317
VC Mux 128
Voice over IP
commands 541
VC Profile 130, 131, 136, 231, 232, 238, 239, 249,
250
VC Profile Screen 146
652
voice over IP
see VoIP
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
Index
VoiceBand Data 323
VoIP 317
VoIP and voiceband data 323
Voltage 98
VPI 95, 130, 131, 134, 135, 136, 231, 232, 233, 238,
239, 249, 250, 253, 254, 257
W
waveform codec 322
Web Configurator
Logging out 77
Wire Gauge 579
X
XMODEM upload 575, 576
Z
ZTE ZXSS10 softswitch 332
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide
653
Index
654
IES-1248-51V User’s Guide