Clarke 90EN Specifications

GAS/NO-GAS MIG WELDER
Models
90EN, 100EN, 105EN & 151EN
OPERATING & MAINTENANCE
INSTRUCTIONS
0502
Thank you for purchasing this CLARKE MIG Welder, designed to operate with or
without gas....so-called GAS/NO-GAS welders. This is explained in greater detail
within the manual.
Before attempting to operate the machine, it is essential that you read this manual
thoroughly and carefully follow all instructions given. In doing so you will ensure
the safety of yourself and that of others around you, and you can also look forward
to the welder giving you long and satisfactory service.
GUARANTEE
This CLARKE product is guaranteed against faulty manufacture for a
period of 12 months from the date of purchase. Please keep your receipt
as proof of purchase.
This guarantee is invalid if the product is found to have been abused or
tampered with in any way, or not used for the purpose for which it was
intended.
Faulty goods should be returned to their place of purchase, no product
can be returned to us without prior permission.
This guarantee does not effect your statutory rights.
2
CONTENTS
PAGE
Guarantee .............................................................................................. 3
Parts & Service Contacts ....................................................................... 3
Electromagnetic Interference (EMC) .................................................. 4
Safety Precautions ................................................................................. 6
Additional Safety Precautions for MIG Welding ............................... 11
Principles of Operation ........................................................................ 12
Electrical Connections ........................................................................ 13
Unpacking and Parts Identification ................................................... 14
Assembly ....................... Loose Components .................................... 15
Welding Shield ........................................... 15
Installing the Welding Wire ....................... 16
Selecting the Drive Roller Groove ............ 18
Converting to Gas Supply ........................ 18
Preparation for Use ....... Preparing the Work .................................... 20
Setting the Controls .................................... 20
Welding Wire Preparation .......................... 21
Attaching the Earth Lead & Clamp .......... 21
MIG Welding Operation ...................................................................... 22
Thermal Overload ...................................... 22
Welding Tips .......................................................................................... 23
Maintenance ........................................................................................ 23
Renewing the Wire Liner ............................ 24
Troubleshooting .................................................................................... 25
Control Settings Reference Tables ............................................... 26-28
Wiring Diagrams ............................................................................. 29-31
Parts Lists and Diagrams ............................................................... 32-37
Accessories .......................................................................................... 38
Parts & Service Contacts ..................................................................... 38
Welder Specifications .......................................................................... 39
3
ELECTROMAGNETIC INTERFERENCE (EMC)
Whilst this unit complies with EMC regulations, the user is responsible for installing
and using the welding equipment according to the manufacturers instructions. If
electromagnetic disturbances are detected then it shall be the responsibility of
the user of the welding equipment to resolve the situation. In some cases this
remedial action may be as simple as earthing the welding circuit, see ‘Note’. In
other cases it could involve constructing an electromagnetic screen enclosing
the power source and the work complete with associated input filters. In all cases
electromagnetic disturbances must be reduced to the point where they are no
longer troublesome.
Note - The welding circuit may or may not be earthed for safety reasons. Changing
the earthing arrangements should only be authorised by a person who is
competent to assess whether the changes will increase the risk of injury, e.g. by
allowing parallel welding current return paths which may damage the earth circuits
of other equipment.
1.ASSESSMENT OF AREA
Before installing welding equipment the user shall make an assessment of potential
electromagnetic problems in the surrounding area. Avoid using your welder in the
vicinity of:
a) other supply cables, control cables, signalling and telephone cables;
above, below and adjacent to the welding equipment;
b) radio and television transmitters and receivers;
c) computer and other control equipment;
d) safety critical equipment, e.g. guarding of industrial equipment;
e) pacemakers and hearing aids etc.;
f)
equipment used for calibration or measurement;
g) other equipment in the environment. The user shall ensure that other
equipment being used in the environment is compatible. This may
require additional protection measures;
It may be possible to avoid the above by changing the time of day that welding
or other activities are to be carried out.
The size of the surrounding area to be considered will depend on the structure of
the building and other activities that are taking place. The surrounding area may
extend beyond the boundaries of the premises.
2. METHODS OF REDUCING EMISSIONS
2.1 Mains supply
Welding equipment should be connected to the mains supply according to the
manufacturers recommendations. If interference occurs, it may be necessary to
4
take additional precautions such as filtering of the mains supply. Consideration
should be given to shielding the supply cable of permanently installed welding
equipment, in metallic conduit or equivalent. Shielding should be electrically
continuous throughout its length. The shielding should be connected to the welding
power source so that good electrical contact is maintained between the conduit
and the welding power source enclosure.
2.2 Maintenance of the welding equipment
The welding equipment should be routinely maintained according to the
manufacturers recommendations. All access and service doors and covers should
be closed and properly fastened when the welding equipment is in operation.
The welding equipment should not be modified in any way except for those
changes and adjustments covered in the manufacturers instructions. In particular,
the spark gaps of arc striking and stabilizing devices should be adjusted and
maintained according to the manufacturers recommendations.
2.3 Welding cables
The welding cables should be kept as short as possible and should be positioned
close together, running at or close to the floor level.
2.4 Equipotential bonding
Bonding of all metallic components in the welding installation and adjacent to it
should be considered. However, metallic components bonded to the work piece
will increase the risk that the operator could receive a shock by touching these
metallic components and the electrodes at the same time. The operator should
be insulated from all such bonded metallic components.
2.5 Earthing of the workpiece
Where the workpiece is not bonded to earth for electrical safety, nor connected
to earth because of its size and position, e.g. ships hull or building steelwork, a
connection bonding the workpiece to earth may reduce emissions in some, but
not all instances.
Care should be taken to prevent the earthing of the workpiece increasing the risk
of injury to users, or damage to other electrical equipment.
Where necessary, the connection of the workpiece to earth should be made by
a direct connection to the workpiece, but in some countries where direct
connection is not permitted, the bonding should be achieved by suitable
capacitance, selected according to national regulations.
2.6 Screening and shielding
Selective screening and shielding of other cables and equipment in the surrounding
area may alleviate problems of interference. Screening of the entire welding
installation may be considered for special applications.
5
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS FOR ALL TYPES OF WELDING
1. WARNING:
As with all machinery, there are certain hazards involved with their operation
and use. Exercising respect and caution will considerably lessen the risk of
personal injury. However, if normal safety precautions are overlooked, or
ignored, personal injury to the operator may result.
FAILURE TO FOLLOW THESE RULES MAY RESULT IN SERIOUS PERSONAL INJURY
2. GENERAL PRECAUTIONS
A) Burn prevention
Wear protective clothing - gauntlet gloves designed for use in welding, apron, and
protective shoes. Button shirt collar and pocket flaps, and wear cuffless trousers to
avoid entry of sparks and slag. Wear helmet with safety goggles or glasses with side
shields underneath, appropriate filter lenses or plates (protected by clear cover
glass). This is a MUST for welding or cutting, (and chipping) to protect the eyes from
radiant energy and spatter. Replace cover glass when broken, pitted, or spattered.
Avoid oily greasy clothing. A spark may ignite them. Hot metal such as electrode
stubs and workpieces should never be handled without gloves. First aid facilities
and a qualified first aid person should be available unless medical facilities are close
by for immediate treatment of flash burns of the eyes and skin burns. Ear plugs
should be worn when working overhead or in a confined space. A hard hat should
be worn when others work overhead. Flammable hair preparations should not be
used by persons intending to weld or cut.
B) Toxic fume prevention
Severe discomfort, illness or death can result from fumes, vapours, heat, or oxygen
enrichment or depletion that welding (or cutting) may produce. Prevent them
with adequate ventilation. NEVER ventilate with oxygen. Lead-, cadmium-, zinc-,
mercury- and beryllium-, bearing materials, when welded (or cut) may produce
harmful concentrations of toxic fumes. Adequate local exhaust ventilation must
be used, or each person in the area as well as the operator must wear an airsupplied respirator. For beryllium, both must be used. Metals coated with or
containing materials that emit toxic fumes should not be heated unless coating is
removed from the work surface, the area is well ventilated, or the operator wears
an air-supplied respirator. Work in a confined space only while it is being ventilated
and, if necessary, while wearing an air-supplied respirator. Vapours from
chlorinated solvents can be decomposed by the heat of the arc (or flame) to
form PHOSGENE, a highly toxic gas, and other lung and eye irritating products.
The ultraviolet (radiant) energy of the arc can also decompose trichloroethylene
and perchloroethylene vapours to form phosgene. DO NOT WELD or cut where
solvent vapours can be drawn into the welding or cutting atmosphere or where
the radiant energy can penetrate to atmospheres containing even minute
amounts of trichloroethylene or perchloroethylene.
6
C) Fire and explosion prevention
Causes of fire and explosion are:
1) combustibles reached by the arc, flame, flying sparks, hot slag or heated
material;
2) misuse of compressed gases and cylinders;
3) short circuits.
BE AWARE THAT flying sparks or falling slag can pass through cracks, along pipes,
through windows or doors, and through wall or floor openings, out of sight of the
goggled operator. Sparks and slag can fly 10M.
To prevent fires and explosion: keep equipment clean and operable, free of oil,
grease, and (in electrical parts) of metallic particles that can cause short circuits.
If combustibles are in area, do NOT weld or cut. Move the work if practicable, to
an area free of combustibles.
Avoid paint spray rooms, dip tanks, storage areas, ventilators. If the work cannot
be moved, move combustibles at least 10M, away out of reach of sparks and
heat; or protect against ignition with suitable and snug fitting, fire- resistant covers
or shields.
Walls, ceilings, and floor near work should be protected by heat resistant covers
or shields. Fire watcher must be standing by with suitable fire extinguishing
equipment during and for some time after welding or cutting if:
a) appreciable combustibles (including building construction) are within 10m.
b) appreciable combustibles are further than 10m but can be ignited by sparks.
c) openings (concealed or visible) in floors or walls within 10m can expose
combustibles to sparks.
d) combustibles adjacent to walls, ceilings, roofs or metal partitions can be
ignited by radiant or conducted heat.
After work is done, check that area is free of sparks, glowing embers, and flames.
An empty container that held combustibles, or that can produce flammable or
toxic vapours when heated, must never be welded on or cut, unless container
has first been cleaned. This includes.......a thorough steam or caustic cleaning (or
a solvent or water washing, depending on the combustible’s solubility) followed
by purging and inerting with nitrogen or carbon dioxide, and using protective
equipment.
Water filling just below working level may substitute for inerting.
A container with unknown contents should be cleaned (see paragraph above),
do NOT depend on sense of smell or sight to determine if it is safe to weld or cut.
Hollow castings or containers must be vented before welding or cutting - they
can explode.
In explosive atmospheres, never weld or cut where the air may contain flammable
dust, gas, or liquid vapours.
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3. ELECTRIC ARC (MIG, TIG) WELDING
Comply with precautions in 1 above, and this section. Arc welding, properly done,
is a safe process, but a careless operator invites trouble. The equipment carries
high currents at significant voltages. The arc is very bright and hot. Sparks fly, fumes
rise, ultraviolet and infrared energy radiates, weldments are hot. The wise operator
avoids unnecessary risks and protects himself and others from accidents.
3A) BURN PROTECTION
Comply with precautions in 2. The welding arc is intense and visibly bright. Its
radiation can damage eyes, penetrate lightweight clothing, reflect from light
coloured surfaces, and burn the skin and eyes. Skin burns resemble acute sunburn,
those from gas - shielded arcs are more severe and painful.
DON’T GET BURNED! COMPLY WITH PRECAUTIONS!
1) Protective clothing
Wear long sleeved clothing (particularly for gas shielded arc) in addition to such as
leather jacket or sleeves, flameproof apron, and fire-resistant leggings. Avoid outer
garments of untreated cotton. Bare skin protection: Wear dark substantial clothing,
Button collar to protect chest and neck. Button pockets to prevent entry of sparks.
2) Eye and head protection
Protect eyes from exposure to arc. NEVER look at an electric arc without protection.
Welding helmet or shield containing a filter plate shade no. 12 or denser must be
used when welding. Place over face before striking arc. Protect filter plate with a
clear cover plate. Cracked or broken helmet or shield should NOT be worn; radiation
can pass through to cause burns. Cracked, broken, or loose filter plates must be
replaced IMMEDIATELY. Replace clear cover plate when broken, pitted, or spattered.
WE SUGGEST you wear flash goggles with side shields under the helmet, to give
some protection to the eyes should the helmet not be lowered over the face before
an arc is struck. Looking at an arc momentarily with unprotected eyes (particularly
a high intensity gas-shielded arc) can cause a retinal burn that may leave a
permanent dark area in the field of vision. Before welding whilst wearing contact
lenses, seek advice from your optician.
3) Protection of nearby personnel
For production welding, a separate room or enclosed bay is best. In open areas,
surround the operation with low reflective, non- combustible screens or panels. Allow
for free air circulation, particularly at floor level. Provide face shields for all persons
who will be looking directly at the weld. Others working in the area should wear flash
goggles. Before starting to weld, make sure that screen or bay doors are closed.
8
3C) FIRE AND EXPLOSION PREVENTION
Comply with precautions in 2C. Equipment’s rated capacity. Do not overload arc
welding equipment. It may overheat cables and cause a fire. Loose cable
connections may overheat or flash and cause a fire. Never strike an arc on a cylinder
or other pressure vessel. It creates a brittle area that can cause a violent rupture or
lead to such a rupture later under rough handling.
3D) SHOCK PREVENTION
Exposed live conductors or other bare metal in the welding circuit, or in
unearthed, electrically-LIVE equipment can fatally shock a person whose
body becomes a conductor. DO NOT STAND, SIT, LIE, LEAN ON, OR TOUCH a
wet surface when welding, without suitable protection.
3E) PROTECTION FOR WEARERS OF ELECTRONIC LIFE SUPPT DEVICES (PACEMAKERS)
Magnetic fields from high currents can affect pacemaker operation. Persons wearing
electronic life support equipment (pacemaker) should consult with their doctor
before going near arc welding, gouging, or spot welding operations.
3F) TO PROTECT AGAINST SHOCK:
Keep body and clothing dry. Never work in damp area without adequate
insulation against electrical shock. Stay on a dry duckboard, or rubber mat
when dampness or sweat can not be avoided. Sweat, sea water, or moisture
between body and an electrically LIVE part - or earthed metal - reduces the
body surface electrical resistance, enabling dangerous and possibly lethal
currents to flow through the body.
1) Earthing the equipment
When arc welding equipment is earthed according to the National
Electrical Code, and the workpiece is earthed, a voltage may exist
between the electrode and any conducting object.
Examples of conducting objects include, but are not limited to, buildings,
electrical tools, work benches, welding power source cases, workpieces, etc.
Never touch the electrode and any metal object unless the welding power
source is off. When installing, connect the frames of each unit such as welding
power source, control, work table, and water circulator to the building earth.
Conductors must be adequate to carry earth currents safely. Equipment made
electrically LIVE by stray current may shock, possibly fatally. Do NOT EARTH to
electrical conduit, or to a pipe carrying ANY gas or a flammable liquid such as
oil or fuel.
2) Electrode holders
Fully insulated electrode holders should be used. Do NOT use holders
with protruding screws or with any form of damage.
3) Connectors
Fully insulated lock-type connectors should be used to join welding
cable.
9
4) Cables
Frequently inspect cables for wear, cracks and damage. IMMEDIATELY
REPLACE those with excessively worn or damaged insulation to avoid
possibly lethal shock from bared cable. Cables with damaged areas may
be taped to give resistance equivalent to original cable. Keep cable dry,
free of oil and grease, and protected from hot metal and sparks.
5) Terminals and other exposed parts
Terminals and other exposed parts of electrical units should have insulating
covers secured before operation.
6) Electrode
a) Equipment with output on/off control (contactor)
Welding power sources for use with the gas metal arc welding, gas
tungsten arc welding and similar processes normally are equipped with
devices that permit on/off control of the welding power output. When
so equipped the electrode wire becomes electrically LIVE when the
power source switch is ON and welding gun switch is closed. Never
touch the electrode wire or any conducting object in contact with
the electrode circuit unless the welding power source is off.
b) Equipment without output on/off control (no contactor)
Welding power sources used with shielded metal arc welding and similar
processes may not be equipped with welding power output on/off
control devices. With such equipment the electrode is electrically LIVE
when the power switch is turned ON. Never touch the electrode unless
the welding power source is off.
7) Safety devices
Safety devices such as interlocks and circuit breakers should not be
disconnected or shunted out. Before installation, inspection, or service of
equipment, shut OFF all power and remove line fuses (or lock or red-tag
switches) to prevent accidental turning ON of power. Do not open power
circuit or change polarity while welding. If, in an emergency, it must be
disconnected, guard against shock burns, or flash from switch arcing.
Always shut OFF and disconnect all power to equipment. Power disconnect
switch must be available near the welding power source.
PREPARATION OF THE WORKING AREA
The working area must be sufficiently spacious, not humid, and well-ventilated as
to avoid any fumes which develop from the welding process and from incidental
material adhering to the pieces to be welded (oils, paints, tars...) which may cause
annoyance to the operator.
Avoid welding by contact with humid parts nearby combustible liquids. Least of
all, do not weld upon tanks which may contain flammable residuals.
10
ADDITIONAL SAFETY PRECAUTIONS for MIG WELDING
ensure that there is full free air circulating around the outer casing of
✔ ALWAYS
the machine, and that the louvres are unobstructed.
arc can seriously damage your eyes. Both operator and spectators
✔ Welding
must ALWAYS use a proper welding face shield or helmet, with suitable filter
lenses. Proper gloves and working clothes should be worn at all times.
✔ ALWAYS inspect the hose before use to ensure it is in good condition.
✔ ALWAYS keep the free length of gas hose outside the work area.
✔ ALWAYS remove all flammable materials from the welding area.
✔ ALWAYS Keep fire extinguisher handy....’Dry Powder, C0 or BCF, NOT Water
✗ NEVER remove any of the panels unless the machine is disconnected from
the supply, AND never use the machine with any of the panels removed.
2
✗
✗
✗
✗
✗
✗
✗
NEVER attempt any electrical or mechanical repair unless your are a qualified
technician. If you have a problem with the machine contact your local
CLARKE dealer.
NEVER use or store in a wet/damp environment. DO NOT EXPOSE TO RAIN.
NEVER continue to weld, if, at any time, you feel even the smallest electric shock.
Stop welding IMMEDIATELY, and DO NOT attempt to use the machine until the fault
is diagnosed and corrected.
NEVER point the MIG torch at any person or animal.
NEVER touch the MIG torch nozzle until the welder is switched OFF
and the nozzle has been allowed to cool off.
NEVER connect, disconnect, or attempt to service the MIG torch,
until the machine is switched OFF and disconnected from the mains
supply.
NEVER allow the cables to become wrapped around the operator or
any person in the vicinity.
If you convert your welder to operate with gas, observe the following
precautions
✗
✗
NEVER expose the gas cylinder to high temperatures
NEVER strike an arc near the gas cylinder
11
SAFETY EQUIPMENT
A comprehensive range of CLARKE safety equipment for use when
welding is available from your local dealer.
NO-GAS MIG WELDING - PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
MIG (Metal Inert Gas) welding is a process in which a power wire electrode
is fed continuously into the weld pool at a controlled, constant rate.
The wire is connected to the positive side of a rectified voltage supply. The
workpiece is connected to the negative side of the supply (NO-GAS Welding).
When the wire is fed, it comes into contact with the workpiece and an arc
is struck. The arc melts the wire and the material, fusing it together.
The wire, which is fed by the wire feed motor is fed into the weld pool,
burning itself off at a rate dependent upon the selected wire feed speed.
To protect the weld pool from oxidation and impurities during the welding
process, a shielding gas flows over and around the weld pool. This gas flow
is provided by a flux core within the welding wire electrode. The flux melts
due to the heat produced, giving off a gas. This gas prevents oxygen, in
the surrounding air, from coming into contact with the molten pool at a
critical time. Solidification takes place, creating a much stronger, cleaner
weld, free of impurities.
This range of welders may be converted to use gas bottles, essential when
welding aluminium, stainless steel etc. Please refer to the note on page 19.
BENEFITS OF MIG WELDING
•
Better outdoor use as wind has less chance of disturbing the gas shroud.
•
50% faster welding time.
•
There is no slag removal, thus eliminating almost all post-welding
cleaning operations.
•
Overall, a faster more efficient way of getting the job done.
•
Less heat - less distortion.
•
Ability to weld thin material.
NO-GAS welding additionally allows for :
•
Operator training time kept to a minimum
•
No need for short life gas bottles
•
Outdoor use is easier as wind or breeze has less chance of blowing
away the gas cloud.
12
ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS
WARNING! THIS APPLIANCE MUST BE EARTHED.
These welders are fitted with a standard 13 amp BS 1363 plug, fitted with a 13 amp
fuse. Connect to a 230 volt (50Hz) domestic electrical supply and we strongly
recommend that this be done via a Residual Current Device (RCD).
IMPORTANT: If the welder is fitted with a plug which is moulded onto the electric
cable (i.e. non- re-wirable) please note:
1. The plug must be thrown away if it is cut from the electric cable. There is a danger of
electric shock if it is subsequently inserted into a socket outlet.
2. Never use the plug without the fuse cover fitted.
3. Should you wish to replace a detachable fuse carrier, ensure that the correct
replacement is used (as indicated by marking or colour code). Replacement fuse
covers can be obtained from your local dealer or most electrical stockists.
Fuse Rating
The fuse in the plug must be replaced with one of the same rating (13 amps) and
this replacement must be ASTA approved to BS1362.
IMPORTANT: The wires in the mains lead are coloured in accordance with the
following code:
Green & Yellow .......... Earth
Blue .......... Neutral
Brown .......... Live
As the colours of the flexible cord of this appliance may not correspond with the
coloured markings identifying terminals in your plug, proceed as follows:
•
Connect GREEN & YELLOW cord to plug terminal marked with a letter “E” or
Earth symbol “ ”, or coloured GREEN or GREEN & YELLOW.
•
•
Connect BROWN cord to plug terminal marked letter “L” or coloured RED.
Connect BLUE cord to plug terminal marked letter “N” or coloured BLACK.
Extension Cable
If an extension cable is fitted, ensure the minimum cross section of the conductor
is 1.5mm2 for up to 15 metres in length, and 2.5mm2 for up to 25 metres.
13
UNPACKING & PARTS IDENTIFICATION
Unpack and lay out the components, checking against the following list. Any
damage or deficiency should be reported to your CLARKE dealer immediately.
Most of the components are stored within the side compartment. To open the
compartment, pull the side panel up sharply.
The cover may be quite tight when new, so exercise a little care.
MIG151EN
MIG 90EN,105EN & 110EN
1.
Rubber Feet with washers and
screws (4 pcs)
2.
2-Piece Welding Mask
3.
Welding Mask handle, complete
with plastic nut and 2xplastic screws.
4.
Package containing 1x Clear
Glass and 1x Dark Glass Lens
5.
Flux cored Wire Spool
6.
Spare welding tip (1 pc)
14
1.
Foot with screw and washer
2.
Wheels with retaining clips (2 pcs)
3.
Axle
4.
Spare welding tips (2 pcs)
5.
2-Piece Welding Mask
6.
Welding Mask handle, complete
with plastic nut and 2xplastic screws.
7.
1xPackage containing 1x Clear
Glass and 1x Dark Glass Lens
8.
Flux cored Wire Spool
ASSEMBLY & INSTALLATION
A. LOOSE COMPONENTS
MIG’s, 90EN, 100EN & 105EN
Lay the welder gently on its side and attach the four feet using the screws and flat
washers provided.
MIG 151EN only
Insert the axle through the holes in the rear base of the machine, then attach the
wheels, securing them by pushing the star locking washers provided, on to the
axle, using a piece of tube or an old socket, ensuring the centre tines of the washer
face outwards.
Lay the machine gently on its side and attach the foot to the front base using the
screw and washer provided.
Attach the handle to the top of the machine by slotting it into place and securing with
the screws provided. Slide the handle extension into the handle and secure with the
screw provided.
The gas bottle is secured to the machine using the large worm drive fastening band
which is threaded through the opening provided on the rear panel of the machine.
B. THE WELDING SHIELD
To assemble the welding shield, (Fig.2),
insert the clear glass panel first, followed
by the dark glass panel into the recess in
the shield, i.e. the clear glass MUST be on
the outside of the shield. Securing them
with the plastic screws provided.
Fig.2
Slot the two pieces together as shown, and
enter the threaded end of the handle
through the holes provided. Thread on the
plastic nut and tighten.
It is important to pay attention to the notes
on welding shield maintenance, given on page 23. When replacing the glass
panels, use ONLY those parts supplied by Clarke International. The dark panel is a
certified, specific optical class, and should not be exchanged for any other type.
The clear glass panel should be replaced when it becomes badly pitted.
WARNING:
NEVER look at an electric arc without eye protection as this can injure the
eyes permanently. ALWAYS use a protection mask or welding helmet.
15
C. INSTALLING THE WELDING WIRE
NOTE: These machines are supplied with a Clarke ‘Mini’ spool of mild steel flux cored
welding wire. A 5kg spool is available from your Clarke dealer. See ‘Accessories’ for
full details.
1.
IMPORTANT: Ensure that theelectrical supply is disconnected.
2.
Firstly remove the side cover, on the left hand side of the unit, by pulling it sharply
upwards.
(1) Removing/Replacing the Wire Spool
If the wire spool is mounted on the spool
holder, it needs to be removed in order
to remove the plastic wrapper. To do this,
proceed as follows:
Fig.3
Unscrew and remove the plastic knob (A),
followed by the spring and collar (B) from
the hub.
Remove the plastic wrapper then slide the
spool back over the hub, ensuring that it sits
snugly, and replace the collar, spring and
plastic knob, tightening it sufficiently to allow
the spool to rotate smoothly but with a slight
amount of braking friction.
Do not over tighten as this will exert undue
pressure on the wire drive motor and may
cause serious damage.
(2) Threading the Welding Wire
Re: Fig.4
1.
Loosen the plastic knob (A) by turning it
anticlockwise, (this device maintains
pressure on the wire).
2.
Pull, on the plastic knob, so that
the screw rod hinges out of its slot.
This releases the pivoted pressure
roller bracket (C). Raise the bracket,
in the direction of the arrow, and pull
out any wire that has been left in the
wire liner (D), pulling it from the
nozzle end of the hose.
16
Fig.4
IMPORTANT!
If you are changing the size of wire, you must also select the appropriate
groove on the feed roller. See p. 19
3.
Fig.5
Re: Fig.5
Pull out the end of the wire
from the rim of the spool,
taking care NOT to release it.
The spool is wound firmly and
should remain this way.
Ensuring the wire is straight
and not kinked in any way,
clip off the end cleanly,
ensuring there are no burrs or
sharp edges.
Proceed to feed it through
the guide tube (E), over the
groove on the roller (B), and
into the wire liner (D), by
about 10 - 15 cm.
4.
Reposition the pressure roller bracket (C, FIG.4) and plastic knob (A, Fig.4) and
tighten slightly.
CAUTION:
Tightening the knob (A) too tightly will crush the wire and damage the
wire feed
5.
(Ref. Fig 6)
Unscrew and pull off the torch
shroud by twisting it anti clockwise,
then unscrew the contact tip.
6.
Close the side panel of the machine,
plug into a 230V, 50HZ outlet (or
switch on isolator), switch on the
machine and press the trigger.
Fig6
The wire will feed through the hose and when it appears at the torch end,
release the trigger, switch off the machine and disconnect the machine from
the mains supply. Replace the contact tip and the torch shroud.
IMPORTANT:
Ensure the hose is kept straight during this operation, to assist the wire as it
is fed through to the wire liner and contact tip.
17
(3) Selecting the Correct Drive Roller Groove
As previously mentioned, it is important that the correct groove in the drive roller is
selected for the particular wire being used. Two grooves, 7mm and 9mm are
provided.
The 7mm groove should be used with 6mm dia. wire and the 9mm groove for all
8mm wire and 9mm flux cored wire. The welder s factory set with the 9mm groove
in position.
To change to the other groove, proceed as follows:
1.
Fig.7
With the pressure roller bracket
raised, and the old wire removed, as
shown, turn the roller securing knob
(A), fully anticlockwise, as indicated
in Fig.7, and pull it from the shaft,
followed by the roller.
Turn the roller through 180O, replace
it on the shaft, followed by the
securing knob, which should then
be turned fully clockwise to lock the
roller securely in place.
D. CONVERTING TO GAS WELDING
For welding stainless steel or aluminium, it is necessary to convert your NO-GAS
machine to GAS operation. This is a simple process once you have purchased the
following parts, readily available from your
dealer.
1. Welding Wire
Either Mini or 5kg wire spools, at 0.6mm or 0.8mm diameter. (See Accesssories)
2. Contact Tips
The appropriate tip must be used to suit the thickness of wire being used. i.e.,
8mm wire requires a 0.8mm tip and 0.9mm wire requires a 1.0mm tip.
3. Gas Regulator
This is available from your
dealer.
NOTE: Decide in advance whether you are going to use disposable or
rechargable gas bottles as this will effect the type of regulator purchased. Consult
your
dealer
4. Gas
Disposable gas bottles are available from your
rechargeable bottles from your welding supply shop.
dealer, or
SEE ALSO THE NOTES ON PAGE 21 - ATTACH THE EARTH LEAD
18
Always use the appropriate gas for the material being welded. Three types are
provided by Clarke International, as follows:
Carbon Dioxide (CO2) ......... For Mild Steel .................... Part No. 6000642
Argon .................................... For Aluminium ................... Part No. 6000661
CO2/Argon Mix .................... For Thin Sheet metal
Mild Steel/ Stainless ......... Part No. 6000660
Additionally a larger CO2 bottle is available ............... Part No. 6000643
Replacement Gas Regulator ........................................... Part No. 8132000
Attaching Gas Bottle and Regulator
1. If using disposable gas bottles
remove the protective plastic cap
from the threaded top of the bottle
and screw the regulator (F) down
in a clockwise fashion until tight (be
careful not to put too much force
on the regulator when tightening).
2. Insert the plastic gas tube into the
regulator (push all the way in). Note:
when changing disposable bottles,
push in the outer flange of the
regulator orifice to allow easy
release of the plastic tube.
Fig.9
3. The operation of the pressure regulator, for use with disposable bottles, is based on
the action of a needle operated by a knob placed over a graduated dial plate
(from “0” to “6”), acting on the valve of the bottle. With the knob turned to position
“0” there is no gas flow; before starting to weld bring the knob to position “3” or “4”,
achieving a gas flow of 2/3 litres/minute. In order to obtain the maximum service
from each gas bottle, always maintain a minimum gas flow (2/3 litres per minute)
which is sufficient to obtain a good weld without porosity. The pressure regulator is
equipped with a safety valve which will automatically operate should the pressure
surge.
4. For safety and economy, ensure that the regulator is fully closed (turning fully anticlockwise) when not welding and/or before fitting or removing the gas bottle.
5. When using a rechargeable bottle insert the plastic gas tube into a
large gas bottle adaptor. Connect the tail end of the adaptor to a length
of 1/4" (6 mm.) dia. flexible gas pipe and connect this pipe to a gauged
pressure regulator which is screwed onto the rechargeable bottle. The
gauged pressure regulator is then used to control the flow of gas which
19
PREPARATION FOR USE
A. PREPARE THE WORK
MOST IMPORTANT!
It is VITAL that the workpiece is perfectly clean at the point of weld. Any coating,
plating or corrosion MUST be removed, otherwise a good weld will be impossible
to achieve.
B. SET THE CONTROLS
Fig.10
In order to produce a
satisfactory weld, the
controls must be fine tuned
whenever there is a material
change
in
weld
characteristics.
Three sets of controls
are provided....
(i) ON/OFF,
The ON/OFF switch is self explanatory, but serves a secondary function. You will note
that it is coloured amber. The switch doubles as a lamp, which will illuminate if the
Thermal Overload intervenes. (See Thermal Overload on page 23)
(ii) WIRE FEED SPEED CONTROL.
The WIRE FEED Rotary Control Knob, with graduations from 0 to 10, is used to
control the wire speed feed to the nozzle.
The knob should be set to position 6 to begin with for welding steel, and 8 for welding
aluminium, then adjusted as required. (See notes under ‘Operation’)
Note: This control is for fine tuning the wire speed. The speed of wire delivery will
increase automatically as the current is increased and vice versa. Therefore, once
the ideal speed is achieved by fine tuning, it should not be necessary to adjust
this control when the welding current is changed.
(iii) WELDING CURRENT CONTROLS
Controls differ from model to model and are described as follows:
20
Models 90EN, 1010EN and 105EN are provided with two, 2-position switches
marked 1- 2 and MAX - MIN respectively, as shown in Fig 10. Model 150EN is
provided with three 2-position switches, marked A-1, 2-3 and MAX-MIN.
These controls areused to control the welding current according to the type and
thickness ofmaterial to be welded, and in accordance with the charts shown in
the‘Reference Tables’ on pages 26-28. Set the switches accordingly, and fine tune
the controls as descriibed under ‘Operation’, to produce a satisfactory weld.
C. Trim the Welding Wire
Trim the welding wire so that it protrudes no more than 5mm from the end of the shroud.
D. Attach the Earth Lead & Clamp
1. NO-GAS WELDING
For NO-GAS welding to take place, the earth cable MUST be connected to the
POSITIVE terminal , and the torch lead to the NEGATIVE terminal, as shown in FIG. 11
Fig.11
2. GAS WELDING
For GAS welding to take place, the earth cable MUST be connected to the
NEGATIVE terminal , and the torch lead to the POSITIVE terminal, i.e. in reverse to
that shown in Fig.11 above.
Attach the earth lead to the workpiece with the earth clamp, as close to the
point of weld as possible, without it being intrusive.
Ensure there is good contact, if necessary, clean the area with a wire brush
beforehand....Remember, the contact MUST be on bare metal - thoroughly clean.
IMPORTANT
The machine is set up at the factory for use with Flux Cored Welding
Wire.... i.e. NO-GAS WELDING.
Your welder is now fully prepared for welding.
21
OPERATION
With the welding current set, and welding wire trimmed, set the wire feed control
to 6 , (8 for Aluminium). Plug the machine into the mains supply or switch on at the
isolator and ensuring all precautions have been taken and with the machine set
up correctly, lower the torch to the workpiece with one hand, whilst holding the
welding mask in the other.
Approach the work with the tip at an angle of approx. 45O and pull the torch
trigger fully. A welding current is now available at the tip.
As the electrode touches the workpiece, an arc will be struck......BEFORE it is struck,
cover the face with the face mask.
Maintain a gap of approx. 5 - 7mm from the workpiece to the tip, and feed the
wire into the molten pool at a steady rate, along the line of the proposed weld.
The speed of weld will depend upon the wire speed and welding current.
NOTES:
As MIG welding is an aquired skill, it is strongly advised that, if you are not fully
familiar with this type of welding, you practise on a piece of material with the
same characteristics as that of your workpiece until you are satisfied with the
result, and you have fine tuned your welder to produce a satisfactory weld.
One of the problems experienced with novice welders, is the welding wire sticking to the
contact tip. This is as a result of the wire feed speed being too slow. It is always better
therefore to start with too high a speed, and back off slightly, to avoid the possibility of the
wire welding itself to the tip. This is the reason position 6 is recommended for start up.
The Wire Feed control is for fine tuning the wire speed. The speed of wire delivery
will increase automatically as the current is increased from MIN to MAX, and vice
versa. Therefore, once the ideal speed is achieved, by fine tuning,it should not be
necessary to adjust this control when the welding current is changed.
Listen to the sound made. An irregular crackling sound denotes too high a wire
speed. Decrease the speed until a regular, strong buzzing sound is heard.
THERMAL OVERLOAD
Should the welder suddenly cut out during operation, it is possible that the thermal
overload has intervened.
The thermal overload is a safety device which shuts off the welder when the duty
cycle has been exceeded. This is to prevent damage to the machine caused by
overheating.
When this occurs, the ON/OFF switch will glow (amber). Allow the welder to cool,
until the amber light extinguishes before resuming.
For details of the duty cycle...i.e. the length of time the machine may be used
continuously, refer to the data and notes on page 29.
22
WELDING TIPS
•
•
•
•
•
•
Try to maintain the tip of the nozzle at an angle of approx. 45O and at a constant
distance of approx 5-7mm from the workpiece.
Try to maintain a constant speed of movement with the torch.
Do not weld in windy conditions or in an area where ventilation is a problem,
or where air flow fluctuates.
ALWAYS keep the wire and nozzle clean...NEVER use rusted wire.
Avoid sharp bends or kinks in the welding hose.
Periodically remove the dust, using LOW PRESSURE compressed air, within the
casing. Adequate heat dissipation is essential during the welders operation.
MAINTENANCE
Frequency of maintenance operations depends on the operating conditions, how
intensively the welder is used, and how clean or dirty the welding site is (aggressive
atmospheres, etc).
Always inspect the cables, both earth return and torch cable, before use to ensure
they are in perfect condition.
Ensure the earth clamp is clean and secured correctly to the cable.
Check the gas hose for security and serviceability.
As a general rule the power supply should be inspected internally at least annually.
Consult your CLARKE dealer
WARNING!
ELECTRICITY CAN KILL
NEVER TOUCH LIVE ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
DISCONNECT THE POWER SUPPLY BEFORE ALL INSPECTIONS AND
MAINTENANCE OPERATIONS
BEWARE HOT SURFACES.....ALWAYS LET THE POWER SUPPLY COOL DOWN
BEFORE ACCESSING INTERNAL COMPONENTS.
WELDING SHIELD
Always maintain the welding mask in good condition. If the clear glass protection
lens becomes badly pitted, sufficient to interfere with vision, or cracked, have it
replaced immediately.
Replacement clear and dark lenses are available from your Clarke dealer - see Parts Lists
for details. NEVER use any dark filter lens other than that provided by CLARKE International,
or one with the same certified ‘Optical class’ (degree of protection).
The shield should always be cleaned with a clean soft cloth after use, ensuring the
lenses are clean. Remove any dust that may have accumulated and store it in a
safe place where it cannot be damaged.
NEVER use a shield that is not in perfect condition.
23
RENEWING THE WIRE LINER
Fig.12
If the liner becomes damaged or kinked,
it will be necessary to replace it.
Before commencing work, ensure the
gas and electrical supplies are
disconnected.
1.
Open the side cover, and
remove the welding wire from
the hose and torch assembly.
(Refer to ‘Installing Welding Wire’
on page 16).
2.
Slacken the three screws (W),
securing the Hose Support Bracket
Cover, slightly...do not remove.
Remove the Roller (D)
3.
Fig.10
Fig.13
4.
Holding the torch on its side on a flat
surface, carefully remove
the five securing screws,
and gently prise off the
uppermost cover, taking
care not to disturb the components within,
so that you can take note of the exact
manner in which they are located,
particularly the contact spring (E).
5.
Lift out the gas valve (F), and unscrew the liner (H) using a 5/16” spanner on nut (J).
6.
Straighten the hose assembly and pull the liner completely out of the hose.
7.
Thread the new liner into the hose from the torch end, so that it passes through the
Hose Support Bracket Assembly, then connect it to the gas valve and tighten.
8.
Reassemble the torch, taking care to ensure that the contact spring (E) and
the gas valve (F) are correctly seated. Note that a dowel is used to locate the
two halves of the handle. Ensure it is correctly lined up before tightening the
five securing screws.
9. Pull the hose so that it is as straight as possible, and leave in this position whilst you
retighten the Hose Support Bracket Cover screws (W).
10. Replace the roller on the shaft, where it will butt up against the wire liner. Very
carefully, snip off the end of the liner so that a gap of approximately 2-3mm
max. exists between the end of the wire liner and the roller. There must be no
burrs which could impede the progress of the welding wire. Ensure you use a
sharp pair of snips.
11. Push the Roller fully home and secure with the securing knob.
24
TROUBLESHOOTING
Your Clarke Mig Welder has been designed to give long and trouble free service. If,
however, having followed the instructions in this booklet carefully, you still encounter
problems, the following points should help identify and resolve them.
PROBLEM
CAUSE
1. No “life” from welder
Check fuses and mains lead
2. No wire feed
3. Feed motor operates
but wire will not feed
REMEDY
Motor malfunction
Return welder to your local dealer
a) Insufficient Feed Roller Pressure
b) Burr on end of wire
c) Liner blocked or damaged
d) Inferior wire
e) Roller worn out
4. Wire welds itself to tip
a) Wire feed speed too low
b) Wrong size tip
5. Wire feeds into ‘birds
nest’ tangle
a) Wire welded to tip
7. Erratic wire feed
Drum brake too slack
a) Drum brake too tight
b) Feed roller worn
c) Insufficient pressure on feed roller
d) Wire dirty, rusty, damp or bent
e) Liner partially blocked
8. Poor quality welds
a) Increase roller pressure
b) Re-cut wire square with no burr
c) Clean with compressed air or
replace liner.
d) Use only good “clean” wire
e) Replace roller
a) Unscrew tip, cut wire and fit new tip
Increase wire speed before
operating again
b) Fit correct size tip
a) As above plus reduce feed roller
pressure so that if blockage occurs
wire slips on roller i.e. no feed
b) Wire liner damaged preventing
smooth operation
6. Loose coils of wire
tangle around wire
drum inside machine
a) Replace fuses as necessary If
problem persists return welder to
your local dealer
b) Check fuse size
a) Insufficient gas at weld area
b) Incorrect gas/wire combination
c) Rusty, painted, damp, oil or
greasy workpiece
d) Rusty/dirty wire
e) Poor earth contact
b) Renew wire liner
Tighten drum brake
Caution: Do not over-tighten
a) Loosen drum brake slightly
b) Check and replace if necessary
c) Increase pressure on feed roller
Caution: Do not over-tighten
d) Re-cut wire and ensure it is clean
e) Clean with compressed air
a) Check that gas is not being blown
away by draughts and if so move
to more sheltered weld area. If not
increase gas supply
b) Consult your MIG welding manual
for correct set-up
c) Ensure workpiece is clean and dry
d) Ensure wire is clean and dry
e) Check earth clamp/workpiece conn
9. Wire jams in tip when
welding aluminium
Tip too small
Use slightly oversize tip ie., for .8mm
wire use 1mm tip. (Note: Applies to
aluminium only)
10. Welder cuts out
whilst in use
Duty cycle exceeded
(auto cut-out operates)
Allow welder to cool 15-30 mins
before continuing
Note: If duty cycle is continually
exceeded, damage to the welder
may result, and welder output is
probably too small for application
If you have any problems which cannot be resolved by reference to the above, or if you
require spare parts for your welder please contact your local Clarke dealer.
25
CONTROL SETTINGS - REFERENCE TABLES
A. MIG 90EN
STEEL
0.6 mm Gas Welding Wire
Workpiece
Thickness
(mm)
0.6 - 0.8
0.8 mm Gas Welding Wire
Welding
Wire Speed
Welding
Wire Speed
Position
Adjustment
Position
Adjustment
A
B
C
A
B
C
1
MIN
5
1
MIN
5
0.8 - 1.0
2
MIN
6
2
MIN
6
1.0 - 2.0
1
MAX
6
2
MAX
6
2.0 - 3.0
2
MAX
7-8
2
MAX
7-8
ALUMINIUM
Workpiece
Thickness
(mm)
0.8 mm Gas Welding Wire
Welding
Wire Speed
Position
Adjustment
A
B
C
0.8
1
MIN
7-8
1.0 -2.0
2
MIN
7-8
2.0 - 3.0
2
MAX
9
NO GAS
SOFT STEEL
Workpiece
Thickness
(mm)
0.9 mm Gas Welding Wire
Welding
Wire Speed
Position
Adjustment
A
B
C
0.6 - 0.8
1
MIN
5-6
0.8 - 1.0
2
MIN
5-6
1.0 - 1.2
2
MAX
6
1.2 - 2.0
2
MAX
7-8
26
Connected for
GAS WELDING
CONTROL SETTINGS - REFERENCE TABLES
B. MIGs 100EN & 105EN
STEEL
Workpiece
Thickness
(mm)
0.6 mm Gas Welding Wire
0.8 mm Gas Welding Wire
Welding
Wire Speed
Welding
Wire Speed
Position
Adjustment
Position
Adjustment
A
B
C
A
B
C
0.6 - 0.8
1
MIN
5
1
MIN
5
0.8 - 1.0
1
MIN
6
2
MIN
6
6
1.0 - 2.0
2
MIN
6
2
MAX
2.0 - 3.0
2
MAX
7
2
MAX
7
>3.0
2
MAX
7-8
2
MAX
7-8
ALUMINIUM
Workpiece
Thickness
(mm)
0.8
1.0 - 2.0
2.0 - 3.0
0.8 mm Gas Welding Wire
Welding
Wire Speed
Position
Adjustment
A
1
2
2
B
MIN
MIN
MAX
C
6
6
7-8
NO GAS
SOFT STEEL
Workpiece
Thickness
(mm)
0.9 mm Gas Welding Wire
Welding
Wire Speed
Position
Adjustment
A
B
C
0.6 - 0.8
1
MIN
5
0.8 - 1.0
2
MIN
6
1.0 - 1.2
2
MAX
6
1.2 - 2.0
2
MAX
7-8
27
Connected for
GAS WELDING
CONTROL SETTINGS - REFERENCE TABLES
B. MIGs 151EN
STEEL
0.6 mm Gas Welding Wire
Workpiece
Thickness
(mm)
Welding
Position
0.8 mm Gas Welding Wire
Wire Speed
Welding
Wire Speed
Adjustment
Position
Adjustment
A
B
C
D
A
B
C
0.5 - 0.6
1
2/3
MIN
5
0.6 - 0.8
A
2
MIN
5
A
0.8- -1.0
1
2/3 MAX
6
1
2/3 MAX
D
2
MIN
6
2/3 MAX
6
1.0 - 1.2
A
3
MIN
6
1
1.2 - 2.0
A
2
MAX
6
A
2
MAX
6
2.0 - 3.0
A
3
MAX
7
A
3
MAX
7/8
3.0 - 6.0
A
3
MAX
8
A
3
MAX
8
ALUMINIUM
1
0.8 mm Gas Welding Wire
Workpiece
Thickness
(mm)
0.8
1.0 - 1.5
1.5 - 2.0
2.0 - 3.0
A
1
1
A
A
Welding
Wire Speed
Position
Adjustment
B
2/3
2/3
3
3
C
MIN
MAX
MAX
MIN
D
6
6
8
7/8
NO GAS
SOFT STEEL
0.9 mm Gas Welding Wire
Workpiece
Thickness
(mm)
Welding
Wire Speed
Position
Adjustment
A
B
C
D
0.6 - 0.8
A
2
MIN
5
0.8 - 1.0
A
3
MIN
6
1.0 - 1.2
1
1.2 - 2.0
A
2/3 MAX
2
MAX
6
6
2.0 - 3.0
A
3
MAX
8
28
Connected for
GAS WELDING
6
WIRING DIAGRAMS
MIG 100EN & 105EN
30
PARTS DIAGRAM - MIG 100EN & 105EN
34
PARTS LIST - MIG100EN & 105EN
Part No.
No. Description
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
P.C. Board
Handle
Wire Feeding Motor
Rectifier
Complete Fan
Cable Clamp
Front Panel
Welding Current Switch
Potentiometer Knob
Input Cable
Flux-cored Wire Spool
Spool Holder Retaining Ring
Fixed Spool Holder
Wire Feed Roll
Ball Bearing
Torch Grommet On Front Panel
Left-upper Panel
Female Dinse Plug
Right-upper Panel
Amber Pilot-light Switch
Dinse Plug
Plastic Foot
Choke
Dividing Panel
Transformer W/ Thermostat
Back Panel
Complete Torch
Earth Cable
Earth Clamp
Spool Holder Handwheel
Lower Panel
Plastic Wire Feeder
Welding Mask Wihandle
Transparent Glass
Dark Glass
35
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
I
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
EN22710043
EN21600003
EN22810001
EN22400001
EN04600055
EN21605010
EN33710056
EN22200006
EN21690018
EN20220068
See Accessories
EN21690012
EN21690011
EN33805074
EN21500001
EN21690001
EN33705032
EN22100002
EN33705031
EN22200022
EN22100001
EN21610001
EN44135001
EN33720115
EN44120068
EN33715015
EN23000014
EN43210006
EN22110005
EN21800036
EN33700044
EN44400017
EN21906018
EN21906020
EN21906021
ACCESSORIES
The following accessories are available from your Clarke dealer. Please quote the
part numbers shown below:
1.
Welding Wire Spools
Mild Steel
Stainless Steel
Aluminium
6000641
6000481
6000664
6000476
6000475
6000666
6000498
-
6000483
-
CO2 (250g)
6000642
For welding Mild Steel
CO2 (600g)
Argon
CO2/Argon Mix
6000643
6000661
6000660
For welding Mild Steel
For welding Aluminium
For welding Stainless/Thin Sheet MS
Mini - 0.6mm
Mini - 0.8mm
Mini - 9mm (FLUX Core)
5kg - 0.6mm
5kg - 0.8mm
4.5-5kg - 9mm (FLUX Core)
2. Welding Gas
3. Welding Tips
0.6mm (pack of 5)
0.8mm (pack of 5)
1.0mm (pack of 5)
8132260
8132270
8132040
4. Gas Regulator
8132000
In addition to the above, your Clarke dealer can provide you with a wide range
of welding accessories, safety equipment etc., to increase productivity where
necessary and to simplify and assist in the welding process.
PARTS AND SERVICE CONTACTS
For Spare Parts and Service, please contact your nearest dealer,
or CLARKE International, on one of the following numbers.
PARTS & SERVICE TEL: 020 8988 7400
PARTS & SERVICE FAX: 020 8558 3622
or e-mail as follows:
PARTS: Parts@clarkeinternational.com
SERVICE: Service@clarkeinternational.com
38
SPECIFICATIONS
Power Supply
90EN
100EN
105EN
151TE
230V 50Hz 1Ph
230V 50Hz 1Ph
230V 50Hz 1Ph
230V 50Hz 1Ph
Fuse Rating
13Amps
13Amps
13Amps
13Amps
Current Range
30-90A
30-100A
30-100A
30-150A
Max. Metal Thickness
3-4mm
4-5mm
4-5mm
5-6mm
0.6-0.9mm
0.6-0.9mm
0.6-0.9mm
0.6-0.9mm
Welding Wire Sizes
Duty Cycle* 8%
Dimensions
80A
-
-
-
15%
-
100A
90A
130A
60%
30A
55A
48A
62A
100%
24A
40A
37A
48A
430X250X370mm 430X250X370mm 430X250X370mm 700X320X580mm
Weight
23kg
28kg
22kg
25kg
Part No.
6010107
6010103
6014010
6014100
* Duty Cycle: Determines the machine ‘down time’.
eg MIG100-EN, operating at 55 Amps - Duty Cycle - 60%. This means that in ANY 10 minute
period, the machine may operate for 6 minutes and must have a down time of 4 minutes.
Please note that the details and specifications contained herein, are correct at the
time of going to print. However, CLARKE International reserve the right to change
specifications at any time without prior notice.
ALWAYS CONSULT THE MACHINE’S DATA PLATE
39