Technical Reference Guide
HP Compaq dc5850 Series
Business Desktop Computers
Document Part Number: 512751-001
October 2008
This document provides information on the design, architecture, function,
and capabilities of the HP Compaq dc5850 Series Business Desktop
Computers. This information may be used by engineers, technicians,
administrators, or anyone needing detailed information on the products
covered.
© Copyright 2008 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
Microsoft, MS-DOS, Windows, and Windows NT are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the U.S. and other
countries.
AMD, AMD Sempron, AMD Athlon, AMD Phenom, are trademarks of AMD Corporation in the U.S. and other
countries.
Adobe, Acrobat, and Acrobat Reader are trademarks or registered trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated.
The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying
such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty. HP shall
not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.
This document contains proprietary information that is protected by copyright. No part of this document may be
photocopied, reproduced, or translated to another language without the prior written consent of Hewlett-Packard
Company.
Technical Reference Guide
HP Compaq dc5850 Series Business Desktop Computers
First Edition (October 2008)
Document Part Number: 512751-001
Contents
1 Introduction
1.1 About this Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.1.1 Online Viewing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.1.2 Hardcopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.2 Additional Information Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3 Serial Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.4 Notational Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.5.1 Special Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.5.2 Values. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.5.2 Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.5 Common Acronyms and Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1–1
1–1
1–1
1–1
1–2
1–2
1–2
1–2
1–2
1–3
2 System Overview
2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–1
2.2 Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–2
2.3 System Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–4
2.3.1 AMD Processor Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–6
2.3.2 Chipset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–6
2.3.3 Support Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–7
2.3.4 System Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–7
2.3.5 Mass Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–8
2.3.6 Serial Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–8
2.3.7 Universal Serial Bus Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–8
2.3.8 Network Interface Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–8
2.3.9 Integrated Graphics Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–9
2.3.10 Audio Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–9
2.4 Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–10
3 Processor/Memory Subsystem
3.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2 AMD Processors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.1 AMD Processor Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.2 Processor Changing/Upgrading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3 Memory Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.1 Memory Upgrading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.2 Memory Mapping and Pre-allocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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4 System Support
4.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–1
4.2 PCI Bus Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–1
4.2.1 PCI 2.3 Bus Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–1
4.2.2 PCI Express Bus Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–2
4.2.3 Option ROM Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–3
4.2.4 PCI Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–3
4.2.5 PCI Power Management Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–3
4.2.6 PCI Connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–4
4.3 System Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–6
4.3.1 Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–6
4.3.2 Direct Memory Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–7
4.4 Real-Time Clock and Configuration Memory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–8
4.4.1 Clearing CMOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–8
4.4.2 Standard CMOS Locations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–9
4.5 System Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–9
4.5.1 Security Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–9
4.5.2 Power Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–11
4.5.3 System Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–12
4.5.4 Thermal Sensing and Cooling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–12
4.6 Register Map and Miscellaneous Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–13
4.6.1 System I/O Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–14
4.6.2 GPIO Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–15
5 Input/Output Interfaces
5.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–1
5.2 SATA Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–2
5.2.1 SATA Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–2
5.2.2 AHCI/RAID Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–2
5.3 Diskette Drive Interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–3
5.4 Serial Interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–6
5.5 Parallel Interface Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–7
5.5.1 Standard Parallel Port Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–7
5.5.2 Enhanced Parallel Port Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–7
5.5.3 Extended Capabilities Port Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–7
5.5.4 Parallel Interface Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–8
5.6 Keyboard/Pointing Device Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–9
5.6.1 Keyboard Interface Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–9
5.6.2 Pointing Device Interface Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–10
5.6.3 Keyboard/Pointing Device Interface Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–10
5.7 Universal Serial Bus Interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–11
5.7.1 USB Connector. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–11
5.7.2 USB Cable Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–12
5.8 Audio Subsystem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–13
5.8.1 HD Audio Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–14
5.8.2 HD Audio Link Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–14
5.8.3 Audio Multistreaming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–14
5.8.4 Audio Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–15
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5.9 Network Interface Controller. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.9.1 Wake-On-LAN Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.9.2 Alert Standard Format Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.9.3 Power Management Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.9.4 NIC Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.9.5 NIC Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5–16
5–17
5–17
5–17
5–18
5–18
6 Integrated Graphics Subsystem
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Functional Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Upgrading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitor Connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.1 Analog Monitor Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.2 DVI-D Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6–1
6–2
6–3
6–4
6–4
6–5
7 Power and Signal Distribution
7.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2 Power Distribution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2.1 SFF Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2.2 MT Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2.3 Optional Energy Star Compliant PSUs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.3 Power Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.3.1 Power Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.3.2 Wake Up Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.3.3 Power Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.4 Signal Distribution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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8 SYSTEM BIOS
8.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2 ROM Flashing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2.1 Upgrading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2.2 Changeable Splash Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.3 Boot Functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.3.1 Boot Device Order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.3.2 Network Boot (F12) Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.3.3 Memory Detection and Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.3.4 Boot Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.4 Client Management Functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.4.1 System ID and ROM Type. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.4.2 Temperature Status. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.5 SMBIOS support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.6 USB Legacy Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7 Management Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8–1
8–2
8–2
8–2
8–3
8–3
8–3
8–3
8–4
8–5
8–6
8–6
8–7
8–8
8–8
A Error Messages and Codes
Index
vi
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Technical Reference Guide
1
Introduction
1.1
About this Guide
This guide provides technical information about HP Compaq dc5850 Business PC personal
computers that feature AMD processors and the AMD 780V chipset. This document describes in
detail the system's design and operation for programmers, engineers, technicians, and system
administrators, as well as end-users wanting detailed information.
The chapters of this guide primarily describe the hardware and firmware elements and primarily
deal with the system board and the power supply assembly. The appendices contain general data
such as error codes and information about standard peripheral devices such as keyboards,
graphics cards, and communications adapters.
This guide can be used either as an online document or in hardcopy form.
1.1.1 Online Viewing
Online viewing allows for quick navigating and convenient searching through the document. A
color monitor will also allow the user to view the color shading used to highlight differential
data. A softcopy of the latest edition of this guide is available for downloading in .pdf file format
at the following URL: www.hp.com
Viewing the file requires a copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader available at no charge from Adobe
Systems, Inc. at the following URL: www.adobe.com
1.1.2 Hardcopy
A hardcopy of this guide may be obtained by printing from the .pdf file. The document is
designed for printing in an 8 ½ x 11-inch format.
1.2
Additional Information Sources
For more information on components mentioned in this guide refer to the indicated
manufacturers' documentation, which may be available at the following online sources:
■
HP Corporation: www.hp.com
■
AMD Corporation: www.amd.com
■
Serial ATA International Organization (SATA-IO): www.serialATA.org.
■
USB user group: www.usb.org
Technical Reference Guide
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1-1
Introduction
1.3
Serial Number
The serial number is located on a sticker placed on the exterior cabinet. The serial number is also
written into firmware and may be read with HP Diagnostics or Insight Manager utilities.
1.4
Notational Conventions
The notational guidelines used in this guide are described in the following subsections.
1.4.1 Special Notices
The usage of warnings, cautions, and notes is described as follows:
!
WARNING: Text set off in this manner indicates that failure to follow directions could result in bodily
harm or loss of life.
CAUTION: Text set off in this manner indicates that failure to follow directions could result in damage to
equipment or loss of information.
✎ Text set off in this manner provides information that may be helpful.
1.4.2 Values
Differences between bytes and bits are indicated as follows:
MB = megabytes
Mb = megabits
1.4.3 Ranges
Ranges or limits for a parameter are shown using the following methods:
1-2
Example A:
Bits <7..4> = bits 7, 6, 5, and 4.
Example B:
IRQ3-7, 9 = IRQ signals 3 through 7, and IRQ signal 9
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Technical Reference Guide
Introduction
1.5
Common Acronyms and Abbreviations
Table 1-1 lists the acronyms and abbreviations used in this guide.
Table 1-1
Acronyms and Abbreviations
Acronym or
Abbreviation
Description
A
ampere
AC
alternating current
ACPI
Advanced Configuration and Power Interface
A/D
analog-to-digital
ADC
Analog-to-digital converter
ADD or ADD2
Advanced digital display (card)
AGP
Accelerated graphics port
AHCI
Advanced Host Controller Interface (SATA)
AMT
Active Management Technology
API
application programming interface
APIC
Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controller
APM
advanced power management
AOL
Alert-On-LAN™
ASIC
application-specific integrated circuit
ASF
Alert Standard Format
AT
1. attention (modem commands) 2. 286-based PC architecture
ATA
AT attachment (IDE protocol)
ATAPI
ATA w/packet interface extensions
AVI
audio-video interleaved
AVGA
Advanced VGA
AWG
American Wire Gauge (specification)
BAT
Basic assurance test
BCD
binary-coded decimal
BIOS
basic input/output system
bis
second/new revision
BNC
Bayonet Neill-Concelman (connector type)
bps or b/s
bits per second
BSP
Bootstrap processor
BTO
Built to order
CAS
column address strobe
CD
compact disk
CD-ROM
compact disk read-only memory
Technical Reference Guide
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1-3
Introduction
Table 1-1 (Continued)
Acronyms and Abbreviations
1-4
Acronym or
Abbreviation
Description
CDS
compact disk system
CGA
color graphics adapter
Ch
Channel, chapter
cm
centimeter
CMC
cache/memory controller
CMOS
complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor (configuration memory)
Cntlr
controller
Cntrl
control
codec
1. coder/decoder 2. compressor/decompressor
CPQ
Compaq
CPU
central processing unit
CRIMM
Continuity (blank) RIMM
CRT
cathode ray tube
CSM
1. Compaq system management 2. Compaq server management
DAC
digital-to-analog converter
DC
direct current
DCH
DOS compatibility hole
DDC
Display Data Channel
DDR
Double data rate (memory)
DIMM
dual inline memory module
DIN
Deutche IndustriNorm (connector type)
DIP
dual inline package
DMA
direct memory access
DMI
Desktop management interface
dpi
dots per inch
DRAM
dynamic random access memory
DRQ
data request
DVI
Digital video interface
dword
Double word (32 bits)
EDID
extended display identification data
EDO
extended data out (RAM type)
EEPROM
electrically erasable PROM
EGA
enhanced graphics adapter
EIA
Electronic Industry Association
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Technical Reference Guide
Introduction
Table 1-1 (Continued)
Acronyms and Abbreviations
Acronym or
Abbreviation
Description
EISA
extended ISA
EPP
enhanced parallel port
EIDE
enhanced IDE
ESCD
Extended System Configuration Data (format)
EV
Environmental Variable (data)
ExCA
Exchangeable Card Architecture
FIFO
first in/first out
FL
flag (register)
FM
frequency modulation
FPM
fast page mode (RAM type)
FPU
Floating point unit (numeric or math coprocessor)
FPS
Frames per second
ft
Foot/feet
GB
gigabyte
GND
ground
GPIO
general purpose I/O
GPOC
general purpose open-collector
GART
Graphics address re-mapping table
GUI
graphic user interface
h
hexadecimal
HDD
hard disk drive
HW
hardware
hex
hexadecimal
Hz
Hertz (cycles-per-second)
IDE
integrated drive element
IEEE
Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers
IF
interrupt flag
I/F
interface
IGC
integrated graphics controller
in
inch
INT
interrupt
I/O
input/output
IPL
initial program loader
IrDA
Infrared Data Association
IRQ
interrupt request
Technical Reference Guide
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1-5
Introduction
Table 1-1 (Continued)
Acronyms and Abbreviations
1-6
Acronym or
Abbreviation
Description
ISA
industry standard architecture
Kb/KB
kilobits/kilobytes (x 1024 bits/x 1024 bytes)
Kb/s
kilobits per second
kg
kilogram
KHz
kilohertz
kV
kilovolt
lb
pound
LAN
local area network
LCD
liquid crystal display
LED
light-emitting diode
LPC
Low pin count
LSI
large scale integration
LSb/LSB
least significant bit/least significant byte
LUN
logical unit (SCSI)
m
Meter
MCH
Memory controller hub
MMX
multimedia extensions
MPEG
Motion Picture Experts Group
ms
millisecond
MSb/MSB
most significant bit/most significant byte
mux
multiplex
MVA
motion video acceleration
MVW
motion video window
n
variable parameter/value
NIC
network interface card/controller
NiMH
nickel-metal hydride
NMI
non-maskable interrupt
NRZI
Non-return-to-zero inverted
ns
nanosecond
NT
nested task flag
NTSC
National Television Standards Committee
NVRAM
non-volatile random access memory
ODD
optical disk drive
OS
operating system
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Technical Reference Guide
Introduction
Table 1-1 (Continued)
Acronyms and Abbreviations
Acronym or
Abbreviation
Description
PAL
1. programmable array logic 2. phase alternating line
PATA
Parallel ATA
PC
Personal computer
PCA
Printed circuit assembly
PCI
peripheral component interconnect
PCI-E
PCI Express
PCM
pulse code modulation
PCMCIA
Personal Computer Memory Card International Association
PEG
PCI express graphics
PFC
Power factor correction
PIN
personal identification number
PIO
Programmed I/O
PN
Part number
POST
power-on self test
PROM
programmable read-only memory
PTR
pointer
PWM
pulse width modulation
RAID
Redundant array of inexpensive disks (drives)
RAM
random access memory
RAS
row address strobe
RBSU
ROM-Based Setup Utility
rcvr
receiver
RDRAM
(Direct) Rambus DRAM
RGB
red/green/blue (monitor input)
RH
Relative humidity
RMS
root mean square
ROM
read-only memory
RPM
revolutions per minute
RTC
real time clock
R/W
Read/Write
SATA
Serial ATA
SCSI
small computer system interface
SDR
Singles data rate (memory)
SDRAM
Synchronous Dynamic RAM
Technical Reference Guide
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1-7
Introduction
Table 1-1 (Continued)
Acronyms and Abbreviations
1-8
Acronym or
Abbreviation
Description
SDVO
Serial digital video output
SEC
Single Edge-Connector
SECAM
sequential colour avec memoire (sequential color with memory)
SF
sign flag
SGRAM
Synchronous Graphics RAM
SIMD
Single instruction multiple data
SIMM
single in-line memory module
SMART
Self Monitor Analysis Report Technology
SMI
system management interrupt
SMM
system management mode
SMRAM
system management RAM
SPD
serial presence detect
SPDIF
Sony/Philips Digital Interface (IEC-958 specification)
SPN
Spare part number
SPP
standard parallel port
SRAM
static RAM
SSD
solid state disk (drive)
SSE
Streaming SIMD extensions
STN
super twist pneumatic
SVGA
super VGA
SW
software
TAD
telephone answering device
TAFI
Temperature-sensing And Fan control Integrated circuit
TCP
tape carrier package, transmission control protocol
TF
trap flag
TFT
thin-film transistor
TIA
Telecommunications Information Administration
TPE
twisted pair ethernet
TPI
track per inch
TTL
transistor-transistor logic
TV
television
TX
transmit
UART
universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter
UDMA
Ultra DMA
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Technical Reference Guide
Introduction
Table 1-1 (Continued)
Acronyms and Abbreviations
Acronym or
Abbreviation
Description
URL
Uniform resource locator
us/µs
microsecond
USB
Universal Serial Bus
UTP
unshielded twisted pair
V
volt
VAC
Volts alternating current
VDC
Volts direct current
VESA
Video Electronic Standards Association
VGA
video graphics adapter
VLSI
very large scale integration
VRAM
Video RAM
W
watt
WOL
Wake-On-LAN
WRAM
Windows RAM
ZF
zero flag
ZIF
zero insertion force (socket)
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1-9
Introduction
1-10
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Technical Reference Guide
2
System Overview
2.1
Introduction
The HP Compaq dc5850 Business PC personal computers (Figure 2-1) deliver an outstanding
combination of manageability, serviceability, and compatibility for enterprise environments.
Based on an AMD processor with the AMD 780V chipset, these systems emphasize performance
along with industry compatibility. These models feature a similar architecture incorporating both
PCI 2.3 and PCIe 1.1 buses. All models are easily upgradeable and expandable to keep pace with
the needs of the office enterprise.
HP dc5850 Small Form Factor
HP dc5850 MiniTower
Figure 2-1. HP Compaq dc5850 Business PCs
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
Features (2.2)
■
System architecture (2.3)
■
Specifications (2.4)
Technical Reference Guide
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2-1
System Overview
2.2 Features
The following standard features are included on all models unless otherwise indicated:
■
❏
AMD Phenom™ Quad-Core with HyperTransport Technology
❏
AMD Phenom Triple-Core with HyperTransport Technology
❏
AMD Athlon™ Dual-Core with HyperTransport Technology
❏
AMD Athlon Single-Core with HyperTransport Technology
❏
AMD Sempron™ with HyperTransport Technology
■
AMD 780V chipset
■
ATI Radeon 3100 integrated graphics processor with dual monitor support:
❏
One VGA connector
❏
One DVI-D connector
■
667-, 800-, or 1066-MHz (DDR2) DIMM support
■
Eight externally-accessible USB 2.0-compliant ports
■
High definition (HD) audio processor with one headphone output, one microphone input,
one line output, and one line input
■
Network interface controller providing 10/100/1000Base T support
■
Plug 'n Play compatible (with ESCD support)
■
Intelligent Manageability support
■
Management/security features including:
■
2-2
Supports one of the following AMD processors installed in an AM2+ socket:
❏
Flash ROM Boot Block
❏
Diskette drive disable, boot disable, write protect
❏
Power-on and Administrator passwords
❏
Serial and USB port disable
❏
HP Virtual Safe Browser
PS/2 enhanced keyboard and optical scroll mouse
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Technical Reference Guide
System Overview
Table 2-1 shows the differences in features between the different PC series based on form factor:
Table 2-1
Feature Difference Matrix by Form Factor
SFF
MT
Drive bays:
Externally accessible 3.5-inch bay
Externally accessible 5.25-inch bay
Internal 3.5-inch bay
1
1
1
1
2
2
Drive types supported:
HDD
ODD
2
1
4
1
PCIe slots:
x16 graphics (PCIe 2.0)
x1 connector
1 low-profile [1]
2 low-profile [1]
1 full-height
2 full-hieght
PCI 2.3 32-bit 5-V slots
1 low-profile [1]
1 full-height
240-watt
active PFC [2]
300-watt
passive PFC [2]
Power Supply Unit (standard)
NOTES:
[1] Low-profile card dimensions: height = 2.5 in., length = 6.6 in.
[2] Energy-Star 80-Plus Bronze-level compliant active-PFC unit of same wattage available as an
option.
Technical Reference Guide
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2-3
System Overview
2.3
System Architecture
The systems covered in this guide feature an architecture based on an AMD processor and
chipset (Figure 2-2). All systems covered in this guide include the following key components:
■
AMD Phenom, Athlon, or Sempron processor.
■
AMD 780V chipset (includes RS780 north bridge and SB700 south bridge)
■
SCH5327 Super I/O (SIO) controller supporting PS/2 keyboard and mouse peripherals
■
AD1884A audio controller supporting line in, line out, microphone in, and headphones out
■
Broadcom BMC5754 GbE network interface controller
The AMD 780V chipset, consisting of the RS780C north bridge and the SB700 south bridge, is
designed to complement the latest AMD processors. The RS780 north bridge communicates with
the processor through a Hypertransport bus and with the SB700 south bridge component. The
integrated graphics controller of the RS780 north bridge can be upgraded through a PCI Express
(PCIe) x16 graphics slot. All systems include a serial ATA (SATA) hard drive in the standard
configuration.
2-4
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Technical Reference Guide
System Overview
Ch A DDR2
SDRAM
AMD
Processor
Ch B DDR2
SDRAM
HyperTransport bus
Analog Mon.
Digital Mon.
DVI-D
PCI Express
x16 slot (PEG)
SATA
Hard Drive
Additional
SATA
Devices
BMC5754
NIC
VGA
ATI
RS780C
Radeon
North
3100
Bridge
IGP
PCIe x1 slots (2)
SATA 0
USB
I/F
SATA
I/F (4)
SATA 1-3
AD1884A
Audio
Subsystem
SB700
South
Bridge
USB 2.0
Ports (10) [1]
Serial I/F [2]
SIO Controller
Kybd-Mouse I/F Diskette I/F
Audio I/F
Keyboard
BIOS
ROM
Parallel I/F [3]
PCI 2.3 slot
Diskette
Mouse
Power Supply
Notes:
[1] 2 front ports, 6 rear ports, 2 internal ports
[2] 2nd serial port requires optional bracket/cable assembly
[3] Parallel port functionality requires optional bracket/cable assembly
Figure 2-2. HP Compaq dc5850 Business PC Architecture, Block diagram
Technical Reference Guide
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2-5
System Overview
2.3.1 AMD Processor Support
The models covered in this guide are designed to support the following processor types:
■
AMD Phenom X4 Quad-Core with HyperTransport Technology
■
AMD Phenom X3 Triple-Core with HyperTransport Technology
■
AMD Athlon X2 Dual-Core with HyperTransport Technology
■
AMD Athlon 64 Single-Core with HyperTransport Technology
■
AMD Sempron with HyperTransport Technology
All processors include an integrated DDR2 memory controller and support up to eight gigabytes
of memory. AMD processors are backward-compatible with software written for earlier x86
microprocessors. The processor mounts in a zero-insertion-force (ZIF) AMD AM2+ socket.
CAUTION: These systems can support a processor rated up to 95 watts. Exceeding this limit can result
in system damage and loss of data.
of the processor heatsink is critical in these systems. Refer to the applicable Service
✎ Installation
Reference Guide for detailed removal and replacement procedures of the heatsink/fan assembly
and the processor
2.3.2 Chipset
The AMD 780V chipset consists of a RS780C north bridge and an SB700 south bridge. Table 2-2
compares the functions provided by the chipsets.
Table 2-2
Chipset Components and Functionality
2-6
Components
Function
RS780C
Integrated ATI Radeon 3100 graphics controller
PCIe 2.0 x16 graphics interface
HyperTransport bus operating at 800-, 1066-, or 1333-MHz
PCI Express x1
SB700
PCI 2.3 bus I/F
SMBus I/F
SATA I/F
HD audio interface
RTC/CMOS
IRQ controller
Power management logic
USB 1.1/2.0 controllers supporting 12 ports
(these systems provide 8 external, 2 internal)
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System Overview
2.3.3 Support Components
Input/output functions not provided by the chipset are handled by other support components.
Some of these components also provide “housekeeping” and various other functions as well.
Table 2-3 shows the functions provided by the support components.
Table 2-3
Support Component Functions
Component Name
Function
SCH5327 SIO Controller
Keyboard and pointing device I/F
Diskette I/F
Serial I/F (COM1and COM2) [1]
Parallel I/F (LPT1, LPT2, or LPT3) [2]
PCI reset generation
Interrupt (IRQ) serializer
Power button and front panel LED logic
GPIO ports
Processor over temperature monitoring
Fan control and monitoring
Power supply voltage monitoring
SMBus and Low Pin Count (LPC) bus I/F
Broadcom BMC5754
Network Interface Controller
10/100/1000 Fast Ethernet network interface controller.
AD1884A HD Audio Codec
Audio mixer
Two digital-to-analog stereo converters
Two analog-to-digital stereo converters
Analog I/O
Supports stereo (two-channel) audio streams
NOTE:
[1] COM2 requires optional bracket/cable assembly.
[2] LPTn support requires optional bracket/cable assembly.
2.3.4 System Memory
These systems implement a dual-channel non-ECC Double Data Rate (DDR2) memory
architecture. All models support DDR2 800- and 667-MHz DIMMs, and are shipped with DDR2
800-MHz (PC2-6400) DIMMs. These systems provide four DIMM sockets and support a total of
8 gigabytes of memory.
✎ DDR and DDR2 DIMMs are NOT interchangeable.
Technical Reference Guide
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2-7
System Overview
2.3.5 Mass Storage
These systems provide four SATA interfaces for mass storage devices. The SFF supports up to
two removeable media devices and one internal hard drive. The MT supports up to three
removeable media devices and two hard drives, and is available in factory-preconfigured RAID
configurations.
Supported SATA hard drives:
■
SMART IV, 3.0 Gb/s, 7200 RPM drive sizes (GB): 80, 160, 250, 500
■
SMART III, 3.0 Gb/s, 10000 RPM drive sizes (GB): 80, 160
Supported SATA removeable media drives:
■
DVD-ROM drive
■
SuperMulti LightScribe DVD Writer Drive (requires special label-etchable media)
2.3.6 Serial Interface
These systems include a serial port accessible at the rear of the chassis and support a second
serial port option. The serial interface is RS-232-C/16550-compatible and supports standard
baud rates up to 115,200 as well as two high-speed baud rates of 230K and 460K.
2.3.7 Universal Serial Bus Interface
All models provide ten Universal Serial Bus (USB) ports. Two ports are accessible at the front of
the unit, six ports are accessible on the rear panel, and two ports are accessible through a header
on the system board. These systems support a media card reader module that connects to the
internal header. These systems support USB 1.1 and 2.0 functionality on all ports.
BIOS Setup allows for the disabling of USB ports individually or in groups. In order to secure
the system against a physical attack, ports may be disabled even if there is nothing physically
connected to them, such as the two front ports for the media card reader module when the
module is not present.
2.3.8 Network Interface Controller
All models feature a Broadcom gigabit Network Interface Controller (NIC) integrated on the
system board. The controller provides automatic selection of 10BASE-T, 100BASE-TX, or
1000BASE-T operation with a local area network and includes power-down, wake-up,
Alert-On-LAN (AOL), Alert Standard Format (ASF), and AMT features. An RJ-45 connector
with status LEDs is provided on the rear panel.
2-8
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System Overview
2.3.9 Integrated Graphics Processor
These systems use the AMD RS780 component, which uses an ATI Radeon 3100 integrated
graphics processor featuring DirectX 10 technology that can drive an analog VGA monitor and a
DVI-D monitor. Table 2-4 lists the key features of the integrated graphics processor.
Table 2-4
Integrated Graphics Subsystem Statistics
Integrated Graphics Controller
Recommended for
Hi 2D, Entry 3D
Bus Type
Int. PCI Express
Memory Amount
128 or 256 MB pre-allocated
Memory Type
DVMT 3.0
DAC Speed
300 MHz
Maximum 2D Resolution
2048x1536 @ 85 Hz
Hardware function
DirectX 10,
Shader Model 4.0 geometry and pixel support
Anti-Alias filtering
Anisotropic filtering
Advanced texture compression
64b and 128b texture/surface support
Multi-level texture cache
Outputs
1 VGA, 1 DVI-D [see text]
These systems also include a PCIe x16 graphics slot to ensure full graphics upgrade capabilities.
2.3.10 Audio Subsystem
These systems use the integrated High Definition audio controller of the chipset and the ADI
AD1884A High Definition audio codec. HD audio provides enhanced audio performance with
higher sampling rates, refined signal interfaces, and audio processors with increased
signal-to-noise ratio. The audio line input jack can be re-configured as a microphone input, and
multi-streaming is supported. These systems include a 1.5-watt output amplifier driving an
internal speaker, which can be muted with the F10 BIOS control. All models include front
panel-accessible stereo microphone input and headphone output audio jacks.
Technical Reference Guide
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2-9
System Overview
2.4 Specifications
This section includes the environmental, electrical, and physical specifications for the systems
covered in this guide. Where provided, metric statistics are given in parenthesis. Specifications
are subject to change without notice.
Table 2-5
Environmental Specifications (Factory Configuration)
Parameter
Operating
Non-operating
Ambient Air Temperature
50o to 95o F (10o to 35o C, max.
rate of change < 10°C/Hr)
-22o to 140o F (-30o to 60o C, max.
rate of change < 20°C/Hr)
Shock (w/o damage)
5 Gs [1]
20 Gs [1]
Vibration
0.000215 G2/Hz, 10-300 Hz
0.0005 G2/Hz, 10-500 Hz
Humidity
10-90% Rh @ 28o C max.
wet bulb temperature
5-95% Rh @ 38.7o C max.
wet bulb temperature
Maximum Altitude
10,000 ft (3048 m) [2]
30,000 ft (9144 m) [2]
NOTE:
[1]
[2]
Peak input acceleration during an 11 ms half-sine shock pulse.
Maximum rate of change: 1500 ft/min.
Table 2-6
Power Supply Electrical Specifications
Parameter
Value
Input Line Voltage:
Nominal:
Maximum
100–240 VAC
90–264 VAC
Input Line Frequency Range:
Nominal
Maximum
50–60 Hz
47–63 Hz
Energy Star 4.0 with 80Plus Bronze-level compliancy
SFF
MT
Optional
Optional
Maximum Continuous Power:
SFF
MT
240 watts
300 watts
NOTE:
Optional Energy Star 4.0 with 80-Plus Bronze-level compliant power supply unit available for both form factors.
2-10
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Technical Reference Guide
System Overview
Table 2-7
Physical Specifications
Parameter
SFF [2]
MT [3]
Height
3.95 in
(10.03 cm)
14.85 in
(37.72 cm)
Width
13.3 in
(33.78 cm)
6.95 in
(17.65 cm)
Depth
14.9 in
(37.85 cm)
16.85 in
(42.80 cm)
17.86 lb
(8.10 kg)
23.44 lb
(10.63 kg)
77.1 lb
(35 kg)
77.1 lb
(35 kg)
Weight [1]
Load-bearing ability of
chassis [3]
NOTES:
[1]
[2]
[3]
Technical Reference Guide
System configured with 1 hard drive, 1 diskette drive, and no PCI cards.
Desktop (horizontal) configuration.
Applicable to unit in desktop orientation only and assumes reasonable type of load such as a monitor.
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2-11
System Overview
2-12
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Technical Reference Guide
3
Processor/Memory Subsystem
3.1
Introduction
This chapter describes the processor/memory subsystem. This systems support the AMD
Phenom, Athlon, and Sempron processor families. As shown in Figure 3-1, these processors use
an integrated DDR2 memory controller and communicate with the chipset through the
HyperTranport interface (I/F).
XMM1
XMM3
DIMM
DIMM
DIMM
DIMM
XMM2
XMM4
AMD Processor
Core(s)
L2 Cache
DDR2
Controller
Channel A
Channel B
HyperTransport I/F
North Bridge
Figure 3-1. Processor/Memory Subsystem Architecture
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
AMD processors (3.2)
■
Memory subsystem (3.3)
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3-1
Processor/Memory Subsystem
3.2
AMD Processors
These systems feature an AMD processor mounted with a heat sink in an AM2+ socket. The
mounting socket allows the processor to be easily changed for upgrading.
3.2.1 AMD Processor Overview
The systems covered in this guide support AMD Phenom, Athlon, and Sempron processors.
Key features of these AMD processors include:
■
Single-, dual-, triple-, or quad-core architecture
■
Dedicated L2 cache for each core
■
Integrated DDR2 memory controller
■
Direct-connect archtitecture for improved performance between the CPU, memory, and I/O
■
HyperTransport™ technology providing up to 4 GB/s (each direction) in mode 1.0 and up to
7.2 GB/s in mode 3.0
Table 3-1 provides a sample listing of processors supported by these systems.
Table 3-1
Supported Processors (partial listing)
AMD
Processor
Phenom X4
Core
design
quad
Core
Speed
2.30 GHz
HT bus
mode
3.0
L2
Cache
512 KB x4
L3
Cache
2048 KB
Phenom X3
triple
2.40 GHz
3.0
512 KB x3
2048 KB
Athlon 64 X2
Athlon 64 X2
Athlon 64
Sempron
dual
dual
single
single
2.80 GHz
2.70 GHz
2.40 GHz
2.30 GHz
2.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
1024 KB x2
1024 KB x2
1024 KB
512 KB
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Instruction set
support (see note)
Std. set + SSE4a,
Enhanced 3DNow!
Std. set + SSE4a,
Enhanced 3DNow!
Std. set + AMD-V
Std. set + AMD-V
Std. set
Std. set
NOTE: Standard (std.) instruction set support includes AMD64, MMX, SSE, SSE2, SSE3, 3DNow!, NX bit,
Cool’n’Quiet
3.2.2 Processor Changing/Upgrading
These systems use the AM2+ zero-insertion-force mounting socket. These systems require that
the processor use an integrated heatsink/fan assembly.
CAUTION: Attachment of the heatsink to the processor is critical on these systems. Improper attachment
of the heatsink will likely result in a thermal condition. Although the system is designed to detect thermal
conditions and automatically shut down, such conditions could still result in damage to the processor
component. Refer to the applicable Service Reference Guide for processor installation instructions.
CAUTION: These systems can only support a processor with a maximum power consumption (also
known as thermal design power (TDP)) of 95 watts. Exceeding this limit can result in system damage and
lost data.
3-2
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Processor/Memory Subsystem
3.3
Memory Subsystem
All models support up to 8 gigabytes of non-ECC PC2-6400 and PC2-5300 DDR2 memory.
DDR2 SDRAM “PCxxxx” reference designates bus bandwidth (i.e., a PC2-6400 module
✎ The
can, operating at a 800-MHz effective speed, provide a throughput of 6400 MBps (8 bytes × 800
MHz)). Memory speed types may be mixed within a system, but the memory controller will
operate at speed of the slowest memory module detected.
The actual clock rate used by the memory will be determined by the processor installed. Memory
in Sempron and Athlon-based systems use a derivative of the CPU clock rate. Memory in
Phenom-based systems run at the specified frequency.
The system board provides four DIMM sockets
■
XMM1, channel A (white)
■
XMM2, channel B(white)
■
XMM3, channel A(black)
■
XMM4, channel B (black)
Memory modules do not need to be installed in pairs although installation of pairs (especially
matched sets) provides the best performance. The BIOS will detect the module population and
set the system accordingly as follows:
■
Single-channel mode: memory installed for one channel only
■
Dual-channel asymetric mode: memory installed for both channels but of unequal channel
capacities.
■
Dual-channel interleaved mode (recommended): memory installed for both channels and
offering equal channel capacities, proving the highest performance.
These systems support memory modules with the following parameters:
■
Unbuffered, non-ECC 1.8-volt DDR2 DIMMs
■
256-Mb, 512-Mb, and 1-Gb memory technologies for x8 and x16 devices
■
CAS latency (CL) of 5 for 667- or 800-MHz DDR2, or CL of6 for 800-MHz DDR2
■
Single or double-sided DIMMs
An installed mix of memory module types is acceptable but operation will be constrained to the
level of the module with the lowest (slowest) performance.
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3-3
Processor/Memory Subsystem
3.3.1 Memory Loading/Upgrading
Table 3-2 shows suggested memory configurations for these systems.
CAUTION: Always power down the system and disconnect the power cord from the AC outlet before
adding or replacing memory modules. Changing memory modules while the unit is plugged into an
active AC outlet could result in equipment damage.
✎ Table 3-2 does not list all possible configurations.
Table 3-2.
Memory Socket Loading
Channel A
Socket
Socket
XMM 1
XMM 3
none
none
none
512 MB
none
none
none
1 GB
1 GB
1 GB
none
2 GB
2 GB
2 GB
Channel B
Socket
Socket
XMM 2
XMM 4
none
512 MB
none
512 MB
none
1 GB
none
1 GB
1 GB
1 GB
none
2 GB
2 GB
2 GB
Total
512 MB (single channel loading)
1 GB (dual-channel loading)
1 GB (single chanel loading)
2 GB (dual-channel loading)
4 GB (dual-channel loading)
4 GB (dual-channel loading)
8 GB (dual-channel loading)
✎ If only one DIMM is installed, it MUST be installed in socket 4.
HP recommends using dual-channel loading (symmetrical, same-capacity, same-speed modules
across both channels) to achieve the best performance. The system automatically selects singleor dual-channel operation depending on how DIMMs are installed. For dual-channel operation,
the loading priority is to populate socket XMM4 before XMM2 for channel B, and socket
XMM3 before XMM1 for channel A.
amounts over 3 GB may not be fully accessible with 32-bit operating systems due to
✎ Memory
system resource requirements. Addressing memory above 4 GB requires a 64-bit operating
system.
3.3.2 Memory Mapping and Pre-allocation
Figure 3-2 shows the system memory map. The RS780C North Bridge pre-allocates a portion of
system memory for video use (refer to chapter 6). Pre-allocated memory is not available to the
operating system. The amount of system memory reported by the OS will be the total amount
installed less the pre-allocated amount.
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Processor/Memory Subsystem
8 GB
1 FFFF FFFEh
FFE0 0000h
High BIOS Area
F000 0000h
4.2 GB
4 GB
PCI
Memory
Area
256 MB
Main
Memory
Area
IGP
32 MB
Main
Memory
0100 0000h
16 MB
00FF FFFFh
Main
Memory
0010 0000h
000F FFFFh
BIOS
Extended BIOS
Expansion Area
Legacy Video
DOS
Compatibilty
Area
1 MB
640 KB
Base Memory
0000 0000h
Figure 3-2. System Memory Map (for maximum of 8 gigabytes)
locations in memory are cacheable. Base memory is always mapped to DRAM. The next 128
✎ All
KB fixed memory area can, through the north bridge, be mapped to DRAM or to PCI space.
Graphics RAM areas are mapped to PCI locations.
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3-5
Processor/Memory Subsystem
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Technical Reference Guide
4
System Support
4.1
Introduction
This chapter covers subjects dealing with basic system architecture and covers the following
topics:
■
PCI bus overview (4.2)
■
System resources (4.3)
■
Real-time clock and configuration memory (4.4)
■
System management (4.5)
■
Register map and miscellaneous functions (4.6)
This chapter covers functions provided by off-the-shelf chipsets and therefore describes only
basic aspects of these functions as well as information unique to the systems covered in this
guide. For detailed information on specific components, refer to the applicable manufacturer's
documentation.
4.2 PCI Bus Overview
section describes the PCI bus in general and highlights bus implementation for systems
✎ This
covered in this guide. For detailed information regarding PCI bus operation, refer to the
appropriate PCI specification or the PCI web site: www.pcisig.com.
These systems implement the following types of PCI buses:
■
PCI 2.3 - Legacy parallel interface operating at 33-MHz
■
PCI Express - High-performance interface capable of using multiple TX/RX high-speed
lanes of serial data streams
4.2.1 PCI 2.3 Bus Operation
The PCI 2.3 bus consists of a 32-bit path (AD31-00 lines) that uses a multiplexed scheme for
handling both address and data transfers. A bus transaction consists of an address cycle and one
or more data cycles, with each cycle requiring a clock (PCICLK) cycle. High performance is
achieved during burst modes in which a transaction with contiguous memory locations requires
that only one address cycle be conducted and subsequent data cycles are completed using
auto-incremented addressing.
Devices on the PCI bus must comply with PCI protocol that allows configuration of that device
by software. In this system, configuration mechanism #1 (as described in the PCI Local Bus
specification Rev. 2.3) is employed.
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System Support
The PCI bus supports a bus master/target arbitration scheme. A bus master is a device that has
been granted control of the bus for the purpose of initiating a transaction. A target is a device that
is the recipient of a transaction. The Request (REQ), Grant (GNT), and FRAME signals are used
by PCI bus masters for gaining access to the PCI bus. When a PCI device needs access to the PCI
bus (and does not already own it), the PCI device asserts its REQn signal to the PCI bus arbiter (a
function of the system controller component). If the bus is available, the arbiter asserts the GNTn
signal to the requesting device, which then asserts FRAME and conducts the address phase of the
transaction with a target. If the PCI device already owns the bus, a request is not needed and the
device can simply assert FRAME and conduct the transaction. Table 4-1 shows the grant and
request signals assignments for the devices on the PCI bus.
Table 4-1.
PCI Bus Mastering Devices
Device
PCI Connector Slot 1
REQ/GNT Line
REQ0/GNT0
PCI bus arbitration is based on a round-robin scheme that complies with the fairness algorithm
specified by the PCI specification. The bus parking policy allows for the current PCI bus owner
(excepting the PCI/ISA bridge) to maintain ownership of the bus as long as no request is asserted
by another agent. Note that most CPU-to-DRAM accesses can occur concurrently with PCI
traffic, therefore reducing the need for the Host/PCI bridge to compete for PCI bus ownership.
4.2.2 PCI Express Bus Operation
The PCI Express (PCIe) v1.1 bus is a high-performace extension of the legacy PCI bus
specification. The PCI Express bus uses the following layers:
■
Software/driver layer
■
Transaction protocol layer
■
Link layer
■
Physical layer
Software/Driver Layer
The PCI Express bus maintains software compatibility with PCI 2.3 and earlier versions so that
there is no impact on existing operating systems and drivers. During system intialization, the PCI
Express bus uses the same methods of device discovery and resource allocation that legacy
PCI-based operating systems and drivers are designed to use.
Transaction Protocol Layer
The transaction protocol layer processes read and write requests from the software/driver layer
and generates request packets for the link layer. Each packet includes an identifier allowing any
required responcse packets to be directed to the originator.
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Link Layer
The link layer provides data integrity by adding a sequence information prefix and a CRC suffix
to the packet created by the transaction layer. Flow-control methods ensure that a packet will
only be transferred if the receiving device is ready to accomodate it. A corrupted packet will be
automatically re-sent.
Physical Layer
The PCI Express bus uses a point-to-point, high-speed TX/RX serial lane topology. One or more
full-duplex lanes transfer data serially, and the design allows for scalability depending on
end-point capabilities. Each lane consists of two differential pairs of signal paths; one for
transmit, one for receive (Figure 4-1).
System Board
PCI Express Card
TX
Device B
Device A
RX
Figure 4-1. PCI Express Bus Lane
Each byte is transferred using 8b/10b encoding. which embeds the clock signal with the data.
Operating at a 2.5 Gigabit transfer rate, a single lane can provide a data flow of 200 MBps. The
bandwidth is increased if additional lanes are available for use. During the initialization process,
two PCI Express devices will negotiate for the number of lanes available and the speed the link
can operate at. In a x1 (single lane) interface, all data bytes are transferred serially over the lane.
In a multi-lane interface, data bytes are distributed across the lanes using a multiplex scheme.
4.2.3 Option ROM Mapping
During POST, the PCI bus is scanned for devices that contain their own specific firmware in
ROM. Such option ROM data, if detected, is loaded into system memory's DOS compatibility
area (refer to the system memory map shown in chapter 3).
4.2.4 PCI Interrupts
Eight interrupt signals (INTA- thru INTH-) are available for use by PCI devices. These signals
may be generated by on-board PCI devices or by devices installed in the PCI slots. For more
information on interrupts including PCI interrupt mapping refer to the “System Resources”
section 4.3.
4.2.5 PCI Power Management Support
This system complies with the PCI Power Management Interface Specification (rev 1.0). The
PCI Power Management Enable (PME-) signal is supported by the chipset and allows compliant
PCI peripherals to initiate the power management routine.
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System Support
4.2.6 PCI Connectors
PCI 2.3 Connector
A1
B2
A49
A52
A62
B49
B52
B62
Figure 4-2. 32-bit, 5.0-volt PCI 2.3 Bus Connector
Table 4-2.
PCI 2.3 Bus Connector Pinout
4-4
Pin
B Signal
A Signal
Pin
B Signal
A Signal
Pin
B Signal
A Signal
01
-12 VDC
TRST-
22
GND
AD28
43
+3.3 VDC
PAR
02
TCK
+12 VDC
23
AD27
AD26
44
C/BE1-
AD15
03
GND
TMS
24
AD25
GND
45
AD14
+3.3 VDC
04
TDO
TDI
25
+3.3 VDC
AD24
46
GND
AD13
05
+5 VDC
+5 VDC
26
C/BE3-
IDSEL
47
AD12
AD11
06
+5 VDC
INTA-
27
AD23
+3.3 VDC
48
AD10
GND
07
INTB-
INTC-
28
GND
AD22
49
GND
AD09
08
INTD-
+5 VDC
29
AD21
AD20
50
Key
Key
09
PRSNT1-
Reserved
30
AD19
GND
51
Key
Key
10
RSVD
+5 VDC
31
+3.3 VDC
AD18
52
AD08
C/BE0-
11
PRSNT2-
Reserved
32
AD17
AD16
53
AD07
+3.3 VDC
12
GND
GND
33
C/BE2-
+3.3 VDC
54
+3.3 VDC
AD06
13
GND
GND
34
GND
FRAME-
55
AD05
AD04
14
RSVD
+3.3 AUX
35
IRDY-
GND
56
AD03
GND
15
GND
RST-
36
+3.3 VDC
TRDY-
57
GND
AD02
16
CLK
+5 VDC
37
DEVSEL-
GND
58
AD01
AD00
17
GND
GNT-
38
GND
STOP-
59
+5 VDC
+5 VDC
18
REQ-
GND
39
LOCK-
+3.3 VDC
60
ACK64-
REQ64-
19
+5 VDC
PME-
40
PERR-
SDONE n
61
+5 VDC
+5 VDC
20
AD31
AD30
41
+3.3 VDC
SBO-
62
+5 VDC
+5 VDC
21
AD29
+3.3 VDC
42
SERR-
GND
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PCI Express Connectors
A1
A11
A12
A18
x1 Connector
A82
x16 Connector
B1
B11
B82
B12
Figure 4-3. PCI Express Bus Connectors
Table 4-3.
PCI Express Bus Connector Pinout
Pin
B Signal
A Signal
Pin
B Signal
A Signal
Pin
B Signal
A Signal
01
+12 VDC
PRSNT1#
29
GND
PERp3
57
GND
PERn9
02
+12 VDC
+12 VDC
30
RSVD
PERn3
58
PETp10
GND
03
RSVD
+12 VDC
31
PRSNT2#
GND
59
PETn10
GND
04
GND
GND
32
GND
RSVD
60
GND
PERp10
05
SMCLK
+5 VDC
33
PETp4
RSVD
61
GND
PERn10
06
+5 VDC
JTAG2
34
PETn4
GND
62
PETp11
GND
07
GND
JTAG4
35
GND
PERp4
63
PETn11
GND
08
+3.3 VDC
JTAG5
36
GND
PERn4
64
GND
PERp11
09
JTAG1
+3.3 VDC
37
PETp5
GND
65
GND
PERn11
10
3.3 Vaux
+3.3 VDC
38
PETn5
GND
66
PETp12
GND
11
WAKE
PERST#
39
GND
PERp5
67
PETn12
GND
12
RSVD
GND
40
GND
PERn5
68
GND
PERp12
13
GND
REFCLK+
41
PETp6
GND
69
GND
PERn12
14
PETp0
REFCLK-
42
PETn6
GND
70
PETp13
GND
15
PETn0
GND
43
GND
PERp6
71
PETn13
GND
16
GND
PERp0
44
GND
PERn6
72
GND
PERp13
17
PRSNT2#
PERn0
45
PETp7
GND
73
GND
PERn13
18
GND
GND
46
PETn7
GND
74
PETp14
GND
19
PETp1
RSVD
47
GND
PERp7
75
PETn14
GND
20
PETn1
GND
48
PRSNT2#
PERn7
76
GND
PERp14
21
GND
PERp1
49
GND
GND
77
GND
PERn14
22
GND
PERn1
50
PETp8
RSVD
78
PETp15
GND
23
PETp2
GND
51
PETn8
GND
79
PETn15
GND
24
PETn2
GND
52
GND
PERp8
80
GND
PERp15
25
GND
PERp2
53
GND
PERn8
81
PRSNT2#
PERn15
82
RSVD
GND
26
GND
PERn2
54
PETp9
GND
27
PETp3
GND
55
PETn9
GND
28
PETn3
GND
56
GND
PERp9
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4-5
System Support
4.3 System Resources
This section describes the availability and basic control of major subsystems, otherwise known
as resource allocation or simply “system resources.” System resources are provided on a priority
basis through hardware interrupts and DMA requests and grants.
4.3.1 Interrupts
The microprocessor uses two types of hardware interrupts; maskable and nonmaskable. A
maskable interrupt can be enabled or disabled within the microprocessor by the use of the STI
and CLI instructions. A nonmaskable interrupt cannot be masked off within the microprocessor,
but may be inhibited by legacy hardware or software means external to the microprocessor.
The maskable interrupt is a hardware-generated signal used by peripheral functions within the
system to get the attention of the microprocessor. Peripheral functions produce a unique INTA-H
(PCI) or IRQ0-15 (ISA) signal that is routed to interrupt processing logic that asserts the
interrupt (INTR-) input to the microprocessor. The microprocessor halts execution to determine
the source of the interrupt and then services the peripheral as appropriate.
Most IRQs are routed through the I/O controller of the super I/O component, which provides the
serializing function. A serialized interrupt stream is then routed to the ICH component.
Interrupts may be processed in one of two modes (selectable through the F10 Setup utility):
■
8259 mode
■
APIC mode
These modes are described in the following subsections.
8259 Mode
The 8259 mode handles interrupts IRQ0-IRQ15 in the legacy (AT-system) method using
8259-equivalent logic. If more than one interrupt is pending, the highest priority (lowest number)
is processed first.
APIC Mode
The Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controller (APIC) mode provides enhanced interrupt
processing with the following advantages:
■
Eliminates the processor's interrupt acknowledge cycle by using a separate (APIC) bus
■
Programmable interrupt priority
■
Additional interrupts (total of 24)
The APIC mode accommodates eight PCI interrupt signals (PIRQA-..PIRQH-) for use by PCI
devices. The PCI interrupts are evenly distributed to minimize latency and wired as shown in
Table 4-4.
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Table 4-4.
PCI Interrupt Distribution
System Interrupts
System Board
Connector
PIRQ
A
PIRQ
B
PIRQ
C
PIRQ
D
PCI slot 1 (J20)
PIRQ
E
PIRQ
F
PIRQ
G
PIRQ
H
A
B
C
D
The PCI interrupts can be configured by PCI Configuration Registers 60h..63h to share the
standard ISA interrupts (IRQn).
APIC mode is supported by Windows NT, Windows 2000, and Windows XP, and Windows
✎ The
Vista operating systems.
4.3.2 Direct Memory Access
Direct Memory Access (DMA) is a method by which a device accesses system memory without
involving the microprocessor. Although the DMA method has been traditionally used to transfer
blocks of data to or from an ISA I/O device, PCI devices may also use DMA operation as well.
The DMA method reduces the amount of CPU interactions with memory, freeing the CPU for
other processing tasks. For detailed information regarding DMA operation, refer to the data
manual for the AMD SB700 South Bridge.
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4-7
System Support
4.4 Real-Time Clock and Configuration Memory
The Real-time clock (RTC) and configuration memory (also referred to as “CMOS”) functions
are provided by the SB700 component and is MC146818-compatible. As shown in the following
figure, the SB700 component provides 256 bytes of battery-backed RAM divided into two
128-byte configuration memory areas. The RTC uses the first 14 bytes (00-0Dh) of the standard
memory area. All locations of the standard memory area (00-7Fh) can be directly accessed using
conventional OUT and IN assembly language instructions through I/O ports 70h/71h, although
the suggested method is to use the INT15 AX=E823h BIOS call.
0Dh
0Ch
0Bh
0Ah
09h
08h
07h
06h
05h
04h
03h
02h
01h
00h
82801
Register D
Register C
Register B
Register A
Year
Month
Date of Month
Day of Week
Hours (Alarm)
Hours (Timer)
Minutes (Alarm)
Minutes (Timer)
Seconds (Alarm)
Seconds (Timer)
FFh
Extended Config.
Memory Area
(128 bytes)
80h
7Fh
Standard Config.
Memory Area
(114 bytes)
RTC Area
(14 bytes)
0Eh
0Dh
00h
CMOS
Figure 4 4. Configuration Memory Map
A lithium 3-VDC battery is used for maintaining the RTC and configuration memory while the
system is powered down. During system operation the RTC and configuration memory to draw
power from the power supply. The battery is located in a battery holder on the system board and
has a life expectancy of three or more years. When the battery has expired it is replaced with a
CR2032 or equivalent 3-VDC lithium battery.
4.4.1 Clearing CMOS
The contents of configuration memory can be cleared by the following procedure:
1. Turn off the unit.
2. Disconnect the AC power cord from the outlet and/or system unit.
3. Remove the chassis hood (cover) and insure that no LEDs on the system board are
illuminated.
4. On the system board, slide the CMOS clear button (switch SW1) for at least 5 seconds.
5. Replace the chassis hood (cover).
6. Reconnect the AC power cord to the outlet and/or system unit.
7. Turn the unit on.
the CMOS memory has no effect on the Power-on and Setup passwords. Passwords
✎ Clearing
must be cleard using the password-clear jumper as described in section 4.5.1
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4.4.2 Standard CMOS Locations
Table 4-5 describes standard configuration memory locations 0Ah-3Fh. These locations are
accessible through using OUT/IN assembly language instructions using port 70/71h or BIOS
function INT15, AX=E823h.
Table 4-5.
Configuration Memory (CMOS) Map
Location
00-0Dh
0Eh
0Fh
10h
11h
12h
13h
14h
15h
16h
17h
18h
19h
1Ah
1Bh
1Ch
1Dh
1Eh
1Fh
Function
Real-time clock
Diagnostic status
System reset code
Diskette drive type
Reserved
Hard drive type
Security functions
Equipment installed
Base memory size, low byte/KB
Base memory size, high byte/KB
Extended memory, low byte/KB
Extended memory, high byte/KB
Hard drive 1, primary controller
Hard drive 2, primary controller
Hard drive 1, secondary controller
Hard drive 2, secondary controller
Enhanced hard drive support
Reserved
Power management functions
Location
24h
25h
26h
27h
28h
29h
2Ah
2Bh
2Ch
2Dh
2Eh-2Fh
30h-31h
32h
33h
34h
35h
36h
37h-3Fh
40-FFh
Function
System board ID
System architecture data
Auxiliary peripheral configuration
Speed control external drive
Expanded/base mem. size, IRQ12
Miscellaneous configuration
Hard drive timeout
System inactivity timeout
Monitor timeout, Num Lock Cntrl
Additional flags
Checksum of locations 10h-2Dh
Total extended memory tested
Century
Miscellaneous flags set by BIOS
International language
APM status flags
ECC POST test single bit
Power-on password
Feature Control/Status
NOTES:
Assume unmarked gaps are reserved.
Higher locations (>3Fh) contain information that should be accessed using the INT15, AX=E845h
BIOS function (refer to Chapter 8 for BIOS function descriptions).
4.5 System Management
This section describes functions having to do with security, power management, temperature,
and overall status. These functions are handled by hardware and firmware (BIOS) and generally
configured through the Setup utility.
4.5.1 Security Functions
These systems include various features that provide different levels of security. Note that this
subsection describes only the hardware functionality (including that supported by Setup) and
does not describe security features that may be provided by the operating system and application
software.
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System Support
Power-On / Setup Password
These systems include a power-on and setup passwords, which may be enabled or disabled
(cleared) through a jumper on the system board. The jumper controls a GPIO input to the SB700
that is checked during POST.
To clear the Power-On and/or Setup password, use the following procedure:
1. Turn off the system and disconnect the AC power cord from the outlet and/or system unit.
2. Remove the cover (hood) as described in the appropriate User Guide or Maintainance And
Service Reference Guide. Insure that all system board LEDs are off (not illuminated).
3. Locate the password clear jumper (header is colored green and labeled E49 on these systems)
and move the jumper from pins 1 and 2 and place on (just) pin 2 (for safekeeping).
4. Replace the cover.
5. Re-connect the AC power cord to the AC outlet and/or system unit.
6. Turn on the system. The POST routine will clear and disable the password.
7. To re-enable the password feature, repeat steps 1-6, replacing the jumper on pins 1 and 2 of
header E49.
The Setup utility may be configured to be always changeable or changeable only by entering a
password. Refer to the previous procedure (Power On / Setup Password) for clearing the Setup
password.
Cable Lock Provision
These systems include a chassis cutout (on the rear panel) for the attachment of an optional cable
lock mechanism.
I/O Interface Security
The SATA, serial, parallel, USB, and diskette interfaces may be disabled individually through
the Setup utility to guard against unauthorized access to a system. In addition, the ability to write
to or boot from a removable media drive (such as the diskette drive) may be enabled through the
Setup utility. The disabling of the serial, parallel, and diskette interfaces are a function of the SIO
controller. The USB ports are controlled through the SB700.
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4.5.2 Power Management
These systems provide baseline hardware support of ACPI-compliant firmware and software.
Key power-consuming components (processor, chipset, I/O controller, and fan) can be placed
into a reduced power mode either automatically or by user control. The system can then be
brought back up (“wake-up”) by events defined by the ACPI 2.0 specification. The ACPI
wake-up events supported by this system are listed as follows:
Table 4-6.
ACPI Wake-Up Events
ACPI Wake-Up Event
System Wakes From
Power Button
Suspend or soft-off
RTC Alarm
Suspend or soft-off
Wake On LAN (w/NIC)
Suspend or soft-off
PME
Suspend or soft-off
Serial Port Ring
Suspend or soft-off
USB
Suspend only
Keyboard
Suspend only
Mouse
Suspend only
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4.5.3 System Status
These systems provide a visual indication of system boot, ROM flash, and operational status
through the power LED and internal speaker, as described in Table 4-7.
.
Table 4-7.
System Operational Status LED Indications
System Status
S0: System on (normal
operation)
S1: Suspend
S3: Suspend to RAM
S4: Suspend to disk
S5: Soft off
Processor thermal shutdown
PowerLED
Steady green
Beeps [2]
None
Action Required
None
Blinks green @ .5 Hz
Blinks green @ .5 Hz
Off – clear
Off – clear
Blinks red 2 times @ 1 Hz [1]
None
None
None
None
2
Processor not seated / installed
Blinks red 3 times @ 1 Hz [1]
3
Power supply overload failure
Blinks red 4 times @ 1 Hz [1]
4
Memory error (pre-video)
Video error
Blinks red 5 times @ 1 Hz [1]
Blinks red 6 times @ 1 Hz [1]
5
6
PCA failure detected by BIOS
(pre-video)
Invalid ROM checksum error
Boot failure (after power on)
Blinks red 7 times @ 1 Hz [1]
7
None
None
None
None
Check air flow, fans,
heatsink
Check processor
presence/seating
Check system board problem
[3],
Check DIMMs, system board
Check graphics card or
system board
Replace system board
Blinks red 8 times @ 1 Hz [1]
Blinks red 9 times @ 1 Hz [1]
8
9
Bad option card
Blinks red 10 times @ 1 Hz [1]
None
Reflash BIOS ROM
Check power supply,
processor, sys. bd
Replace option card
NOTES:
Beeps are repeated for 5 cycles, after which only blinking LED indication continues.
[1] Repeated after 2 second pause.
[2] Beeps are produced by the internal chassis speaker.
[3] Check that CPU power connector P3 is plugged in.
4.5.4 Thermal Sensing and Cooling
All systems feature a variable-speed fan mounted as part of the processor heatsink assembly. All
systems also provide or support an auxiliary chassis fan. All fans are controlled through
temperature sensing logic on the system board and/or in the power supply. There are some
electrical differences between form factors and between some models, although the overall
functionally is the same. Typical cooling conditions include the following:
1. Normal—Low fan speed.
2. Hot processor—ASIC directs Speed Control logic to increase speed of fan(s).
3. Hot power supply—Power supply increases speed of fan(s).
4. Sleep state—Fan(s) turned off. Hot processor or power supply will result in starting fan(s).
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The RPM (speed) of all fans is the result of the temperature of the CPU as sensed by speed
control circuitry. The fans are controlled to run at the slowest (quietest) speed that will maintain
proper cooling.
Units using chassis and CPU fans must have both fans connected to their corresponding headers
to ensure proper cooling of the system.
4.6 Register Map and Miscellaneous Functions
This section contains the system I/O map and information on general-purpose functions of the
SB700 South Bridge and SIO controller.
4.6.1 System I/O Map
Table 4-8 lists the fixed addresses of the input/output (I/O) ports.
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System Support
Table 4-8
System I/O Map
I/O Port
Function
0000..001Fh
DMA Controller 1
0020..002Dh
Interrupt Controller 1
002E, 002Fh
Index, Data Ports to SIO Controller (primary)
0030..003Dh
Interrupt Controller
0040..0042h
Timer 1
004E, 004Fh
Index, Data Ports to SIO Controller (secondary)
0050..0052h
Timer / Counter
0060..0067h
Microcontroller, NMI Controller (alternating addresses)
0070..0077h
RTC Controller
0080..0091h
DMA Controller
0092h
Port A, Fast A20/Reset Generator
0093..009Fh
DMA Controller
00A0..00B1h
Interrupt Controller 2
00B2h, 00B3h
APM Control/Status Ports
00B4..00BDh
Interrupt Controller
00C0..00DFh
DMA Controller 2
00F0h
Coprocessor error register
0170..0177h
IDE Controller 2 (active only if standard I/O space is enabled for secondary controller)
01F0..01F7h
IDE Controller 1 (active only if standard I/O space is enabled for primary controller)
0278..027Fh
Parallel Port (LPT2)
02E8..02EFh
Serial Port (COM4)
02F8..02FFh
Serial Port (COM2)
0370..0377h
Diskette Drive Controller Secondary Address
0376h
IDE Controller 2 (active only if standard I/O space is enabled for primary drive)
0378..037Fh
Parallel Port (LPT1)
03B0..03DFh
Graphics Controller
03BC..03BEh
Parallel Port (LPT3)
03E8..03EFh
Serial Port (COM3)
03F0..03F5h
Diskette Drive Controller Primary Addresses
03F6h
IDE Controller 1 (active only if standard I/O space is enabled for sec. drive)
03F8..03FFh
Serial Port (COM1)
04D0, 04D1h
Interrupt Controller
0678..067Fh
Parallel Port (LPT2)
0778..077Fh
Parallel Port (LPT1)
07BC..07BEh
Parallel Port (LPT3)
0CF8h
PCI Configuration Address (dword access only )
0CF9h
Reset Control Register
0CFCh
PCI Configuration Data (byte, word, or dword access)
NOTE:
Assume unmarked gaps are unused, reserved, or used by functions that employ variable I/O
address mapping. Some ranges may include reserved addresses.
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4.6.2 GPIO Functions
SB700 Functions
The SB700 South Bridge provides various functions through the use of programmable general
purpose input/output (GPIO) ports. These systems use GPIO ports and associated registers of the
for the following functions:
■
Chassis and board ID
■
Front audio/USB detect
■
SPI data I/O
■
SATA hard drive LED
■
Flash security override
■
Serial port (COM 2) detect
SIO Controller Functions
In addition to the serial and parallel port functions, the SIO controller provides the following
specialized functions through GPIO ports:
■
Power/hard drive LED control for indicating system events (refer to Table 4-8)
■
Chassis and CPU fan control (PWM)
■
PCI Wake control
■
Power On/Power Good control
■
Power supply fan control
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Technical Reference Guide
5
Input/Output Interfaces
5.1
Introduction
This chapter describes the standard interfaces that provide input and output (I/O) porting of data
and that are controlled through I/O-mapped registers. The following I/O interfaces are covered in
this chapter:
■
SATA interfaces (5.2)
■
Diskette drive interface (5.3)
■
Serial interfaces (5.4)
■
Parallel interface support (5.5)
■
Keyboard/pointing device interface (5.6)
■
Universal serial bus interface (5.7)
■
Audio subsystem (5.8)
■
Network interface controller (5.9)
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5-1
Input/Output Interfaces
5.2
SATA Interfaces
These systems provide four serial ATA (SATA) interfaces that support tranfer rates up to 3.0
Gb/s and offer RAID data protection functionality. The SATA interface duplicates most of the
functionality of the EIDE interface through a register interface that is equivalent to that of the
legacy IDE host adapter.
5.2.1 SATA Connector
The standard 7-pin SATA connector is shown in the figure below.
Pin 1
Pin 7
A
Figure 5-1. 7-Pin SATA Connector (P60-P63 on system board).
B
Table 5-1.
7-Pin SATA Connector Pinout
Pin
Description
Pin
Description
1
Ground
6
RX positive
2
TX positive
7
Ground
3
TX negative
A
Holding clip
4
Ground
B
Holding clip
5
RX negative
--
--
5.2.2 AHCI/RAID Support
The SATA controller of the SB700 South Bridge can be set operate in either an IDE or AHCI
RAID configuration. The AHCI RAID configuration supports RAID 0 and RAID 1 for
improving performance and/or reliability. Applied to systems with only one hard drive, AHCI
RAID can improve system performance somewhat through use of native command queuing
(NCQ). True fault tolerance requires the use of two or more hard drives to allow mirroring,
parity, and/or striping.
CAUTION: Changing the storage mode should always be preceded by backing up all hard
rive data onto secondary media.
RAID 0—Striping with Two Hard Drives
RAID 0 uses striping to improve performance but does not provide any fault tolerance. The lack
of redundancy (a failed drive ruins the whole array) results in less than half the reliability of a
single hard drive. Although these systems support RAID 0, it is not the recommended
configuration.
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RAID 1—Mirroring with Two Hard Drives
RAID 1 uses to mirroring to increase storage reliability with minimal impact on performance.
Reliability of the storage system is calculated bythe MTBF of an individual drive multiplied by
the total number of drives.
Factory Configuration for RAID 1
These systems may be ordered preconfigured from the factory for RAID 1 as follows:
■
Two identical SATA hard drives installed
■
System BIOS ROM and option ROM preconfigured
■
Windows operating system and drivers preloaded and set to mirrored mode
Implementing AHCI RAID for Non-Factory Configurations
CAUTION: Changing the system BIOS ROM SATA Emulation setting from IDE to AHCI RAID is
equivalent to re-connecting the hard drive(s) to a new add-on RAID storage controller. If the
original (factory) software image has been replaced and the appropriate RAID driver is not
installed, the system will not boot. The RAID driver is available from http://www.hp.com.
the default system BIOS ROM settings DOES NOT change the SATA Emulation
✎ Applying
setting. The SATA Emulation setting can only be changed manually.
Configuring a system for AHCI RAID operation requires the following:
For single-drive systems:
In the system ROM (accessed by F10 during boot) set the SATA Emulation mode to AHCI RAID.
For multiple-drive systems:
a. In the system ROM (accessed by F10 during boot) set the SATA Emulation mode to AHCI
RAID.
b. In the option ROM (accessed by Ctrl + F during boot) configure the hard drives as necessary.
drives in a RAID array must match as to size, speed, technology (1.5 GB or 3.0 GB and
✎ Hard
NCQ or non-NCQ), and cache size.
Detailed information on configuring these systems for RAID operations is contained in the white
paper “AHCI and RAID on HP Compaq dc5850 Business PCs and Using AMD Array
Management Software (RAIDXpert)” available at http://www.hp.com.
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5-3
Input/Output Interfaces
5.3
Diskette Drive Interface
These systems support a diskette drive through a standard 34-pin diskette drive connector.
The diskette drive interface function is integrated into the super I/O (SIO) component. The
internal logic of the SIO controller is software-compatible with standard 82077-type logic. The
diskette drive controller has three operational phases in the following order:
■
Command phase—The controller receives the command from the system.
■
Execution phase—The controller carries out the command.
■
Results phase—Status and results data is read back from the controller to the system.
The Command phase consists of several bytes written in series from the CPU to the data register
(3F5h/375h). The first byte identifies the command and the remaining bytes define the
parameters of the command. The Main Status register (3F4h/374h) provides data flow control
for the diskette drive controller and must be polled between each byte transfer during the
Command phase.
The Execution phase starts as soon as the last byte of the Command phase is received. An
Execution phase may involve the transfer of data to and from the diskette drive, a mechnical
control function of the drive, or an operation that remains internal to the diskette drive controller.
Data transfers (writes or reads) with the diskette drive controller are by DMA, using the DRQ2
and DACK2- signals for control.
The Results phase consists of the CPU reading a series of status bytes (from the data register
(3F5h/375h)) that indicate the results of the command. Note that some commands do not have a
Result phase, in which case the Execution phase can be followed by a Command phase.
During periods of inactivity, the diskette drive controller is in a non-operation mode known as the
Idle phase.
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These systems use a standard 34-pin connector for diskette drives (refer to Figure 5-2 and Table
5-2 for the pinout). Drive power is supplied through a separate connector.
2
1
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27
29
31
33
Figure 5-2. 34-Pin Diskette Drive Connector (P10 on system board).
Table 5-2.
34-Pin Diskette Drive Connector Pinout
Pin
Signal
Description
Pin
Signal
Description
1
GND
Ground
18
DIR-
Drive head direction control
2
LOW DEN-
Low density select
19
GND
Ground
3
---
(KEY)
20
STEP-
Drive head track step cntrl.
4
MEDIA ID-
Media identification
21
GND
Ground
5
GND
Ground
22
WR DATA-
Write data
6
DRV 4 SEL-
Drive 4 select
23
GND
Ground
7
GND
Ground
24
WR ENABLE-
Enable for WR DATA-
8
INDEX-
Media index is detected
25
GND
Ground
9
GND
Ground
26
TRK 00-
Heads at track 00 indicator
10
MTR 1 ON-
Activates drive motor
27
GND
Ground
11
GND
Ground
28
WR PRTK-
Media write protect status
12
DRV 2 SEL-
Drive 2 select
29
GND
Ground
13
GND
Ground
30
RD DATA-
Data and clock read off disk
14
DRV 1 SEL-
Drive 1 select
31
GND
Ground
15
GND
Ground
32
SIDE SEL-
Head select (side 0 or 1)
16
MTR 2 ON-
Activates drive motor
33
GND
Ground
17
GND
Ground
34
DSK CHG-
Drive door opened indicator
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5-5
Input/Output Interfaces
5.4
Serial Interface
Systems covered in this guide may include one RS-232-C type serial interface to transmit and
receive asynchronous serial data with external devices. Some systems may allow the installation
of a second serial interface through an optional bracket/cable assembly that attaches to header
P52 on the system board. The serial interface function is provided by the super I/O controller
component that includes two NS16C550-compatible UARTs.
The UART supports the standard baud rates up through 115200, and also special high speed rates
of 239400 and 460800 baud. The baud rate of the UART is typically set to match the capability
of the connected device. While most baud rates may be set at runtime, baud rates 230400 and
460800 must be set during the configuration phase.
The serial interface uses a DB-9 connector as shown in the following figure with the pinout listed
in Table 5-3.
Figure 5-3. DB-9 Serial Interface Connector (as viewed from rear of chassis)
Table 5-3.
DB-9 Serial Connector Pinout
Pin
Signal
Description
Pin
Signal
Description
1
CD
Carrier Detect
6
DSR
Data Set Ready
2
RX Data
Receive Data
7
RTS
Request To Send
3
TX Data
Transmit Data
8
CTS
Clear To Send
4
DTR
Data Terminal Ready
9
RI
Ring Indicator
5
GND
Ground
--
--
--
The standard RS-232-C limitation of 50 feet (or less) of cable between the DTE (computer) and
DCE (modem) should be followed to minimize transmission errors. Higher baud rates may
require shorter cables.
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5.5
Parallel Interface Support
These systems include a system board header (P125) that supports an optional parallel
bracket/cable assembly that provides a parallel interface for a peripheral device such as a printer.
The parallel interface supports bi-directional 8-bit parallel data transfers with a peripheral device.
The parallel interface supports three main modes of operation:
■
Standard Parallel Port (SPP) mode
■
Enhanced Parallel Port (EPP) mode
■
Extended Capabilities Port (ECP) mode
These three modes (and their submodes) provide complete support as specified for an IEEE 1284
parallel port.
5.5.1 Standard Parallel Port Mode
The Standard Parallel Port (SPP) mode uses software-based protocol and includes two
sub-modes of operation, compatible and extended, both of which can provide data transfers up to
150 KB/s. In the compatible mode, CPU write data is simply presented on the eight data lines. A
CPU read of the parallel port yields the last data byte that was written.
5.5.2 Enhanced Parallel Port Mode
In Enhanced Parallel Port (EPP) mode, increased data transfers are possible (up to 2 MB/s) due
to a hardware protocol that provides automatic address and strobe generation. EPP revisions 1.7
and 1.9 are both supported. For the parallel interface to be initialized for EPP mode, a negotiation
phase is entered to detect whether or not the connected peripheral is compatible with EPP mode.
If compatible, then EPP mode can be used. In EPP mode, system timing is closely coupled to
EPP timing. A watchdog timer is used to prevent system lockup.
5.5.3 Extended Capabilities Port Mode
The Extended Capabilities Port (ECP) mode, like EPP, also uses a hardware protocol-based
design that supports transfers up to 2 MB/s. Automatic generation of addresses and strobes as
well as Run Length Encoding (RLE) decompression is supported by ECP mode. The ECP mode
includes a bi-directional FIFO buffer that can be accessed by the CPU using DMA or
programmed I/O. For the parallel interface to be initialized for ECP mode, a negotiation phase is
entered to detect whether or not the connected peripheral is compatible with ECP mode. If
compatible, then ECP mode can be used.
The ECP mode includes several sub-modes as determined by the Extended Control register. Two
submodes of ECP allow the parallel port to be controlled by software. In these modes, the FIFO
is cleared and not used, and DMA and RLE are inhibited.
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Input/Output Interfaces
5.5.4 Parallel Interface Connector
Figure 5-4 and Table 5-4 show the connector and pinout of the parallel connector provided on the
optional parallel bracket/cable assembly. Note that some signals are redefined depending on the
port's operational mode.
Figure 5-4. DB-25 Parallel Interface Connector (provided on the optional bracket/cable assembly)
Table 5-4.
DB-25 Parallel Connector Pinout
Pin
Signal
Function
Pin
Signal
Function
1
STB-
Strobe / Write [1]
14
LF-
Line Feed [2]
2
D0
Data 0
15
ERR-
Error [3]
3
D1
Data 1
16
INIT-
Initialize Paper [4]
4
D2
Data 2
17
SLCTIN-
Select In / Address. Strobe [1]
5
D3
Data 3
18
GND
Ground
6
D4
Data 4
19
GND
Ground
7
D5
Data 5
20
GND
Ground
8
D6
Data 6
21
GND
Ground
9
D7
Data 7
22
GND
Ground
10
ACK-
Acknowledge / Interrupt [1]
23
GND
Ground
11
BSY
Busy / Wait [1]
24
GND
Ground
12
PE
Paper End / User defined [1]
25
GND
Ground
13
SLCT
Select / User defined [1]
--
--
--
NOTES:
[1] Standard and ECP mode function / EPP mode function
[2] EPP mode function: Data Strobe
ECP modes: Auto Feed or Host Acknowledge
[3] EPP mode: user defined
ECP modes:Fault or Peripheral Req.
[4] EPP mode: Reset
ECP modes: Initialize or Reverse Req.
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Input/Output Interfaces
5.6
Keyboard/Pointing Device Interface
The keyboard/pointing device interface function is provided by the SIO controller component,
which integrates 8042-compatible keyboard controller logic (hereafter referred to as simply the
“8042”) to communicate with the keyboard and pointing device using bi-directional serial data
transfers. The 8042 handles scan code translation and password lock protection for the keyboard
as well as communications with the pointing device.
5.6.1 Keyboard Interface Operation
The data/clock link between the 8042 and the keyboard is uni-directional for Keyboard Mode 1
and bi-directional for Keyboard Modes 2 and 3. (These modes are discussed in detail in
Appendix C). This section describes Mode 2 (the default) mode of operation.
Communication between the keyboard and the 8042 consists of commands (originated by either
the keyboard or the 8042) and scan codes from the keyboard. A command can request an action
or indicate status. The keyboard interface uses IRQ1 to get the attention of the CPU.
The 8042 can send a command to the keyboard at any time. When the 8042 wants to send a
command, the 8042 clamps the clock signal from the keyboard for a minimum of 60 us. If the
keyboard is transmitting data at that time, the transmission is allowed to finish. When the 8042 is
ready to transmit to the keyboard, the 8042 pulls the data line low, causing the keyboard to
respond by pulling the clock line low as well, allowing the start bit to be clocked out of the 8042.
The data is then transferred serially, LSb first, to the keyboard (Figure 5-5). An odd parity bit is
sent following the eighth data bit. After the parity bit is received, the keyboard pulls the data line
low and clocks this condition to the 8042. When the keyboard receives the stop bit, the clock line
is pulled low to inhibit the keyboard and allow it to process the data.
Start
Bit
0
D0
(LSb)
1
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
0
1
1
0
1
1
Parity
D7
(MSb)
1
1
Stop
Bit
0
Data
Clock
Th
Tcy
Tcl Tch
Parameter
Minimum
Tcy (Cycle Time)
0 us
Tcl (Clock Low)
25 us
Tch (Clock High)
25 us
Th (Data Hold)
0 us
Tss (Stop Bit Setup) 8 us
Tsh (Stop Bit Hold) 15 us
Tss
Tsh
Maximum
80 us
35 us
45 us
25 us
20 us
25 us
Figure 5-5. 8042-To-Keyboard Transmission of Code EDh, Timing Diagram
Control of the data and clock signals is shared by the 8042 and the keyboard depending on the
originator of the transferred data. Note that the clock signal is always generated by the keyboard.
After the keyboard receives a command from the 8042, the keyboard returns an ACK code. If a
parity error or timeout occurs, a Resend command is sent to the 8042.
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5-9
Input/Output Interfaces
5.6.2 Pointing Device Interface Operation
The pointing device (typically a mouse) connects to a 6-pin DIN-type connector that is identical
to the keyboard connector both physically and electrically. The operation of the interface (clock
and data signal control) is the same as for the keyboard. The pointing device interface uses the
IRQ12 interrupt.
5.6.3 Keyboard/Pointing Device Interface Connector
The legacy-light model provides separate PS/2 connectors for the keyboard and pointing device.
Both connectors are identical both physically and electrically. Figure 5-6 and Table 5-5 show the
connector and pinout of the keyboard/pointing device interface connectors.
Figure 5-6. PS/2 Keyboard or Pointing Device Interface Connector (as viewed from rear of chassis)
Table 5-5.
Keyboard/Pointing Device Connector Pinout
5-10
Pin
Signal
Description
Pin
Signal
Description
1
DATA
Data
4
+ 5 VDC
Power
2
NC
Not Connected
5
CLK
Clock
3
GND
Ground
6
NC
Not Connected
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5.7
Universal Serial Bus Interface
The Universal Serial Bus (USB) interface provides asynchronous/isochronous data transfers with
compatible peripherals such as keyboards, printers, or modems. This high-speed interface
supports hot-plugging of compatible devices, making possible system configuration changes
without powering down or even rebooting systems.
These systems provide eight externally-accessible USB ports, two front panel USB ports (which
may be disabled) and six USB ports on the rear panel. In addition, twe USB ports are available
through an internal header (The USB ports are dynamically configured to either a USB 1.1
controller or the USB 2.0 controller depending on the capability of the peripheral device. The
1.1 controllers provide a maximum transfer rate of 12 Mb/s while the 2.0 controller provides a
maximum transfer rate of 480 Mb/s. Table 5-6 shows the mapping of the USB ports.
Table 5-6.
USB Port Mapping
SB700 signals
USB Connector Location
Data 0P, 0N
Rear panel quad stack
Data 1P, 1N
Rear panel quad stack
Data 2P, 2N
Rear panel quad stack
Data 3P, 3N
Rear panel quad stack
Data 4P, 4N
Rear panel dual w/RJ-45
Data 5P, 5N
Rear panel dual w/RJ-45
Data 6P, 6N
System board header P150
Data 7P, 7N
System board header P150
Data 8P, 8N
Front panel thru P24
Data 9P, 9N
Front panel thru P24
5.7.1 USB Connector
These systems provide type-A USB ports as shown in Figure 5-7.
1
3
2
4
Figure 5-7 Universal Serial Bus Connector (as viewed from rear of chassis)
Table 5-7.
USB Connector Pinout
Pin
Signal
Description
Pin
Signal
Description
1
Vcc
+5 VDC
3
USB+
Data (plus)
2
USB-
Data (minus)
4
GND
Ground
Technical Reference Guide
www.hp.com
5-11
Input/Output Interfaces
5.7.2 USB Cable Data
The recommended cable length between the host and the USB device should be no longer than
sixteen feet for full-channel (12 MB/s) operation, depending on cable specification (see
following table).
Table 5-8.
USB Cable Length Data
Conductor Size
Resistance
Maximum Length
20 AWG
0.036 Ω
16.4 ft (5.00 m)
22 AWG
0.057 Ω
9.94 ft (3.03 m)
24 AWG
0.091 Ω
6.82 ft (2.08 m)
26 AWG
0.145 Ω
4.30 ft (1.31 m)
28 AWG
0.232 Ω
2.66 ft (0.81 m)
NOTE:
For sub-channel (1.5 MB/s) operation and/or when using sub-standard cable shorter lengths may be
allowable and/or necessary.
The shield, chassis ground, and power ground should be tied together at the host end but left
unconnected at the device end to avoid ground loops.
Table 5-9.
USB Color Code
5-12
Signal
Insulation color
Data +
Green
Data -
White
Vcc
Red
Ground
Black
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Technical Reference Guide
Input/Output Interfaces
5.8
Audio Subsystem
These systems use the HD audio controller of the SB700 component to access and control an
Analog Devices AD1884A HD Audio Codec, which provides 2-channel high definition
analog-to-digital (ADC) and digital-to-analog (DAC) conversions. A block diagram of the audio
subsystem is shown in Figure 5-8. All control functions such as volume, audio source selection,
and sampling rate are controlled through software through the HD Audio Interface of the SB700
component. Control data and digital audio streams (record and playback) are transferred between
the SB700 and the Audio Codec over the HD Audio Interface. The codec’s speaker output is
applied to a 1.5-watt amplifier that drives the internal speaker. A device plugged into the
Headphone jack or the line input jack is sensed by the system, which will inhibit the Speaker
Audio signal.
These systems provide the following analog interfaces for external audio devices:
Microphone In—This input uses a three-conductor 1/8-inch mini-jack that accepts a stereo
microphone.
Line In—This input uses a three-conductor (stereo) 1/8-inch mini-jack designed for connection
of a high-impedance audio source such as a tape deck. This jack can be re-tasked to a
Microphone In function.
Headphones Out—This input uses a three-conductor (stereo) 1/8-inch mini-jack that is
designed for connecting a set of 32-ohm (nom.) stereo headphones. Plugging into the
Headphones jack mutes the signal to the internal speaker and the Line Out jack as well.
Line Out—This output uses a three-conductor (stereo) 1/8-inch mini-jack for connecting left
and right channel line-level signals. Typical connections include a tape recorder's Line In
(Record In) jacks, an amplifier's Line In jacks, or to powered speakers that contain amplifiers.
PC Beep
SB700
HD Audio
Interface
HD Audio I/F
Speaker
Audio (mono)
Header
P23
Front Panel
Mic In
Mic Audio (L/R)
AD1884A
HD Audio
Rear Panel
Line In [1]
Header
P6
Audio
Amp
Line Audio (L/R)
Headphone
Audio (L/R)
Header
P23
Front Panel
Headphones Out
Codec
Line Audio
Out (L/R)
Rear Panel
Line Out
NOTES:
L/R = Separate left and right channels (stereo). L+R = Combined left and right channels (mono).
[1] Can be re-configured as Microphone In
Figure 5-8. Audio Subsystem Functional Block Diagram
Technical Reference Guide
www.hp.com
5-13
Input/Output Interfaces
5.8.1 HD Audio Controller
The HD Audio Controller is a PCI Express device that is integrated into the SB700 component
and supports the following functions:
■
Read/write access to audio codec registers
■
Support for greater than 48-KHz sampling
■
HD audio interface
5.8.2 HD Audio Link Bus
The HD audio controller and the HD audio codec communicate over a five-signal HD Audio
Link Bus (Figure 5-9). The HD Audio Interface includes two serial data lines; serial data out
(SDO, from the controller) and serial data in (SDI, from the audio codec) that transfer control
and PCM audio data serially to and from the audio codec using a time-division multiplexed
(TDM) protocol. The data lines are qualified by the 24-MHz BCLK signal driven by the audio
controller. Data is transferred in frames synchronized by the 48-KHz SYNC signal, which is
derived from the clock signal and driven by the audio controller. When asserted (typically during
a power cycle), the RESET- signal (not shown) will reset all audio registers to their default
values.
Frame
BCLK
Frame
Start
Tag A
Tag B
Frame
Start
SYNC
SDO
SDI
Command Stream
Response Stream
Stream A
Tag C
Stream B
Stream C
RST#
NOTE: Clock not drawn to scale.
Figure 5-9. HD Audio Link Bus Protocol
5.8.3 Audio Multistreaming
The audio subsystem can be configured (through the ADI control panel) for processing audio for
multiple applications. The Headphone Out jack can provide audio for one application while the
Line Out jack can provide external speaker audio from another application.
5-14
www.hp.com
Technical Reference Guide
Input/Output Interfaces
5.8.4 Audio Specifications
The specifications for the HD Audio subsystem are listed in Table 5-10.
Table 5-10.
HD Audio Subsystem Specifications
Parameter
Measurement
Sampling Rates:
DAC
ADC
44.1-, 48-, 96-, & 192-KHz
44.1-, 48-, 96-, & 192KHz
Resolution:
DAC
ADC
24-bit
24-bit
Nominal Input Voltage:
Mic In (w/+20 db gain)
Line In
.283 Vp-p
2.83 Vp-p
Subsystem Impedance:
Mic In
Line In
Line Out (minimum expected load)
Headphones Out (minimum expected load)
20K ohms
20K ohms
10K ohms
32 ohms
Signal-to-Noise Ratio
Line out
Headphone out
Microphone / line in
90 db (nom)
90 db (nom)
85 db (nom)
Total Harmonic Distortion (THD)
Line out
Headphone out
Microphone / line in
-84 db
-80 db
-78 db
Max. Subsystem Power Output to 4-ohm Internal
Speaker (with 10% THD):
Gain Step
1.5 watts
1.5 db
Master Volume Range
-58.5 db
Frequency Response:
ADC/DAC
Internal Speaker
20– 20000 Hz
450–20000 Hz
Technical Reference Guide
www.hp.com
5-15
Input/Output Interfaces
5.9
Network Interface Controller
These systems provide 10/100/1000 Mbps network support through a Broadcom BMC5754
network interface controller (NIC), a PHY component, and a RJ-45 jack with integral status
LEDs (Figure 5-10). The support firmware is contained in the system (BIOS) ROM. The NIC
can operate in half- or full-duplex modes, and provides auto-negotiation of both mode and speed.
Half-duplex operation features an Intel-proprietary collision reduction mechanism while
full-duplex operation follows the IEEE 802.3x flow control specification.
Green LED
Broadcom
BMC5754
NIC
Tx/Rx Data
LAN I/F
RJ-45
Connector
Tx/Rx Data
Yellow LED
LED
Green
Yellow
Function
Activity/Link. Indicates network activity and link pulse reception.
Speed: Off = 10 Mb/s, yellow = 100Mb/s, green = 1 Gb/s.
Figure 5-10. Network Interface Controller Block Diagram
The Network Interface Controller includes the following features:
■
VLAN tagging with Windows XP and Linux
■
Multiple VLAN support with Windows XP
■
Power management support for ACPI 1.1, PXE 2.0, WOL, ASF 1.0, and IPMI
■
Cisco Etherchannel support
■
Link and Activity LED indicator drivers
The controller features high and low priority queues and provides priority-packet processing for
networks that can support that feature. The controller's micro-machine processes transmit and
receive frames independently and concurrently. Receive runt (under-sized) frames are not passed
on as faulty data but discarded by the controller, which also directly handles such errors as
collision detection or data under-run.
The NIC uses 3.3 VDC auxiliary power, which allows the controller to support Wake-On-LAN
(WOL) and Alert-On-LAN (AOL) functions while the main system is powered down.
the features in the following paragraphs to function as described, the system unit must be
✎ For
plugged into a live AC outlet. Controlling unit power through a switchable power strip will, with
the strip turned off, disable any wake, alert, or power mangement functionality.
5-16
www.hp.com
Technical Reference Guide
Input/Output Interfaces
5.9.1 Wake-On-LAN Support
The NIC supports the Wired-for-Management (WfM) standard of Wake-On-LAN (WOL) that
allows the system to be booted up from a powered-down or low-power condition upon the
detection of special packets received over a network. The NIC receives 3.3 VDC auxiliary power
while the system unit is powered down in order to process special packets. The detection of a
Magic Packet by the NIC results in the PME- signal on the PCI bus to be asserted, initiating
system wake-up from an ACPI S1 or S3 state.
5.9.2 Alert Standard Format Support
Alert Standard Format (ASF) support allows the NIC to communicate the occurrence of certain
events over a network to an ASF 1.0-compliant management console and, if necessary, take
action that may be required. The ASF communications can involve the following:
■
Alert messages sent by the client to the management console.
■
Maintenance requests sent by the management console to the client.
■
Description of client's ASF capabilities and characteristics.
The activation of ASF functionality requires minimal intervention of the user, typically requiring
only booting a client system that is connected to a network with an ASF-compliant management
console.
5.9.3 Power Management Support
The NIC features Wired-for-Management (WfM) support providing system wake up from
network events (WOL) as well as generating system status messages (AOL) and supports ACPI
power management environments. The controller receives 3.3 VDC (auxiliary) power as long as
the system is plugged into a live AC receptacle, allowing support of wake-up events occurring
over a network while the system is powered down or in a low-power state.
The Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) functionality of system wake up is
implemented through an ACPI-compliant OS and is the default power management mode. The
following wakeup events may be individually enabled/disabled through the supplied software
driver:
■
Magic Packet—Packet with node address repeated 16 times in data portion
following functions are supported in NDIS5 drivers but implemented through remote
✎ The
management software applications (such as LanDesk).
■
Individual address match—Packet with matching user-defined byte mask
■
Multicast address match—Packet with matching user-defined sample frame
■
ARP (address resolution protocol) packet
■
Flexible packet filtering—Packets that match defined CRC signature
The PROSet Application software (pre-installed and accessed through the System Tray or
Windows Control Panel) allows configuration of operational parameters such as WOL and
duplex mode.
Technical Reference Guide
www.hp.com
5-17
Input/Output Interfaces
5.9.4 NIC Connector
Figure 5-11 shows the RJ-45 connector used for the NIC interface. This connector includes the
two status LEDs as part of the connector assembly.
Activity LED
Speed LED
Pin
1
2
3
6
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Description
Transmit+
TransmitReceive+
Receive-
Pins 4, 5, 7, 8 not used
Figure 5-11. RJ-45 Ethernet TPE Connector (as viewed from rear of chassis)
5.9.5 NIC Specifications
Table 5-11.
NIC Specifications
5-18
Parameter
Compatibility standard orprotocol
Modes Supported
10BASE-T half duplex @ 10 Mb/s
10Base-T full duplex @ 20 Mb/s
100BASE-TX half duplex @ 100 Mb/s
100Base-TX full duplex @ 200 Mb/s
1000BASE-T half duplex @ 1 Gb/s
1000BASE-TX full duplex @ 2 Gb/s
Standards Compliance
IEEE 802.1P, 802.1Q
IEEE 802.2
IEEE 802.3, 802.3ab, 802.3ad, 802.3u, 802.3x,
802.3z
OS Driver Support
MS-DOS
MS Windows 3.1
MS Windows 95 (pre-OSR2), 98, and 2000
Professional, XP Home, XP Pro, Vista Home, Vista Pro
MS Windows NT 3.51 & 4.0
Novell Netware 3.x, 4.x, 5x
Novell Netware/IntraNetWare
SCO UnixWare 7
Linux 2.2, 2.4
PXE 2.0
Boot ROM Support
Intel PRO/100 Boot Agent (PXE 3.0, RPL)
F12 BIOS Support
Yes
Bus Inteface
PCI Express x1
Power Management Support
ACPI, PCI Power Management Spec.
www.hp.com
Technical Reference Guide
6
Integrated Graphics Processor
6.1
Introduction
This chapter describes the integrated graphics processor (IGP) of the HP dc5850 Personal
Computer. This graphics subsystem employs the use of system memory to provide efficient,
economical 2D and 3D performance.
These systems provide dual-monitor support in the standard configuration and allow two
methods for upgrading the IGP:
■
Installing a PCIe x16 graphics card in the PCIe x16 graphics slot, which disables the IGP
■
Installing a PCIe x1 graphics card in a PCIe x1 slot, in which the IGP can be re-enabled
through the BIOS settings
This chapter covers the following subjects:
■
Functional description (6.2)
■
Upgrading (6.3)
■
Monitor connectors (6.4)
Technical Reference Guide
www.hp.com
6-1
Integrated Graphics Processor
6.2 Functional Description
These systems include a graphics subsystem based on the ATI Radeon 3100 controller integrated
into the AMD RS780 North Bridge (Figure 6-1). The ATI Radeon 3100 operates off the internal
PCIe x16 bus and can directly drive an analog multi-scan monitor or a DVI-D-compatible digital
monitor. The ATI Radeon 3100 includes a memory management feature that allocates portions
of system memory for use as the frame buffer and for storing textures and 3D effects.
Processor
DDR2 Controller
DDR2
SDRAM
(System
Memory)
RS780
North Bridge
Analog
Monitor
Digital
Monitor
PCIe x16 Graphics Slot
RGB
ATI
Radeon
3100
Controller
DVI-D
PCIe
PEG data
PCIe
data
PCIe I/F
PCIe x1 Slot
Figure 6-1. Integrated Graphics Processor, Block diagram
The IGP provides the following features:
■
Fully DirectX 10-compliant 32-bit floating point
■
Shader Model 4.0 geometry and pixel support
■
Anti-aliasing filter 11
■
Aniosotropic filtering
■
Advanced texture compression
■
3D resources virtualized to a 32b addressing space
■
Vertex cache/fetch design
■
Full 64b and 132b support for tectures and surfaces
■
Up to 8K x 8K texture support (including 128b/pixel texture)
■
Multi-level texture cache
■
Upgradeable through the PCIe x16 graphics slot
■
Multi-monitor support with SurroundView™ technology
The IGP uses a portion of system memory for the frame buffer. The amount of memory used by
the IGP may by user-configured (in BIOS) to 32, 64, 128, or 256 megabytes, or set to Automatic.
In Automatic mode, the BIOS will select the optimum amount of memory.
6-2
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Technical Reference Guide
Integrated Graphics Processor
6.3
Upgrading
All systems provide direct, dual-monitor support; a VGA montor and a DVI monitor can be
connected and driven simultaneously. These systems also include a PCIe x16 graphics slot that
specifically supports a PCIe x16 graphics card.
The normal upgrade procedure for these systems is as follows:
1. Shut down the system through the operating system.
2. Unplug the power cord from the rear of the system unit.
3. Remove the chassis cover.
4. Install the graphics card into the PCIe x16 graphics slot.
5. Replace the chassis cover.
6. Reconnect the power cord to the system unit.
7. Power up the system unit:
an ATI graphics card with SurroundView enabled is installed in the PCIe x16 graphics slot, the
✎ IfROM-Based
Setup Utility (RBSU) allows the user the choice of leaving the IGP enabled to drive
multiple video monitors or disable the IGP and using only the discrete graphics card. If the IGP
is enabled, the user also has the choice of selecting which graphics controller is the prime (boot)
device.
card is installed in the PCIe x1 slot, the BIOS will disable the IGP by default, but
✎ Ifcana graphics
be re-enabled through the RBSU to allow an alternate method of multi-monitor operation.
Press the F10 key during the boot process to enter the ROM-based Setup utility and re-enable the
IGP for multi-monitor operation.
Technical Reference Guide
www.hp.com
6-3
Integrated Graphics Processor
6.4 Monitor Connectors
These systems provide an analog VGA connector and a DVI-D connector and can drive both
types of monitors simultaneously.
6.4.1 Analog Monitor Connector
Figure 6-2 shows the analog VGA connector for attaching an analog video monitor:
Figure 6-2. Male DB-15 Analog VGA Monitor Connector, (as viewed from rear of chassis).
Table 6-1.
DB-15 Monitor Connector Pinout
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Signal
R
G
B
NC
GND
R GND
G GND
B GND
Description
Red Analog
Blue Analog
Green Analog
Not Connected
Ground
Red Analog Ground
Blue Analog Ground
Green Analog Ground
Pin
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
--
Signal
PWR
GND
NC
SDA
HSync
VSync
SCL
--
Description
+5 VDC (fused) [1]
Ground
Not Connected
DDC Data
Horizontal Sync
Vertical Sync
DDC Clock
--
NOTE:
[1] Fuse automatically resets when excessive load is removed.
6-4
www.hp.com
Technical Reference Guide
Integrated Graphics Processor
6.4.2 DVI-D Connector
Figure 6-3 shows the DVI-D connector for attaching a digital monitor.
Figure 6-3. Female DVI-D Connector, (as viewed from rear of chassis).
Table 6-2.
DVI-D Monitor Connector Pinout
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Signal
TMDS Data 2TMDS Data 2+
TMDS Dara 2 & 4 shield
TMDS Data 4TMDS Data 4+
DDV Clock
DDC Data
not used
TMDS Data 1TMDS Data 1+
TMDS Data 1 & 3 shield
TMDS Data 3-
Technical Reference Guide
Pin
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Signal
TMDS Data 3+
5 VDC
Ground
Hot Plug Detect
TMDS Data 0TMDS Data 0+
TMDS Data 0 & 5 shield
TMDS Data 5TMDS Data 5+
TMDS Clock shield
TMDS Clock +
TMDS Clock -
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6-5
Integrated Graphics Processor
6-6
www.hp.com
Technical Reference Guide
7
Power and Signal Distribution
7.1
Introduction
This chapter describes the power supplies and discusses the methods of general power and signal
distribution. Topics covered in this chapter include:
7.2
■
Power distribution (7.2)
■
Power Control (7.3)
■
Signal distribution (7.4)
Power Distribution
Each form factor uses a unique power supply unit (PSU). The PSUs are not interchangeable
between the SFF and MT form factors.
These systems use a power supply assembly contained within the system chassis. Figure 7-1
shows the block diagram for power generation.
System Board
Front Bezel
Power Button
CPU, slots, Chipsets, Logic,
& Voltage Regulators
Power On
POK
+3.3 VDC 5 AUX
+5 VDC +12 VDC +12 VccP
PS On
90 - 264 VAC
-12 VDC
+3.3 VDC
+5 VDC
+12 VDC
Drives
Power Supply
Unit
Figure 7-1. Power Generation Block Diagram
Technical Reference Guide
www.hp.com
7-1
Power and Signal Distribution
7.2.1 SFF Power Supply
The SFF form factor comes standard with a 240-watt, active-PFC power supply unit with the
specifications and cabling as indicated in the following table and figure.
Table 7-1.
SFF 240-Watt Power Supply Unit Specifications
Range/
Tolerance
90–264 VAC
47–63 Hz
-+ 4%
+ 3.3 %
+ 3.3 %
+5%
+5%
+ 10 %
Input Line Voltage
Line Frequency
Input (AC) Current
+3.3 VDC Output
+5.08 VDC Output
+5.08 AUX Output
+12 VDC Output
+12 VDC Output (Vcpu)
--12 VDC Output
Min.
Current
Loading [1]
---0.1 A
0.3 A
0.0 A
0.1 A
0.1 A
0.0 A
Max.
Current
--5.0 A
15.0 A
17.0 A
3.0 A
7.5 A
11.0 A
0.15 A
Surge
Current
---15.0 A
17.0 A
3.5 A
9.0 A
14.5 A
0.15 A
Max.
Ripple
---50 mV
50 mV
50 mV
120 mV
120 mv
200 mV
NOTES:
Total continuous power should not exceed 240 watts. Total surge power (<10 seconds w/duty cycle < 5 %) should not exceed
260 watts.
[1] The minimum current loading figures apply to a PS On start up only.
P4
P7
P5
P2
P4, P5, P7
P3
P11
1 2345
P2
1
4 3 2 1
P1
13
P3
3
P11
2
4
24
P1
Power Supply
Unit
12
1
Conn
Pin 1
Pin 2
P1
+3.3
+3.3
RTN
+5
RTN
P1 [1]
+3.3
-12
RTN
PS On
RTN
P2
+5
RTN
RTN
+12
P3
RTN
RTN
VccP
VccP
P4, 5,
7
+12
RTN
+5
RTN
GND
nc
Ftach
Fcmd
P11
1
2
3
4
Pin 3
Pin 4
Pin 5
Pin 6
Pin
10
Pin
11
Pin
12
Pin 7
Pin 8
Pin 9
+5
RTN
POK
5AUX
+12
+12
3.3
RTN
RTN
nc
+5
+5
+5
RTN
+3.3
All + and - values are VDC.
RTN = Return (signal ground)
GND = Power ground
POK = Power OK (power good)
VccP = +12 for CPU
nc = not connected
Ftach = Fan speed
Fcmd = Fan command
[1] This row represents pins 13–24 of connector P1
Figure 7-2. SFF Power Cable Diagram
7-2
www.hp.com
Technical Reference Guide
Power and Signal Distribution
7.2.2 MT Power Supply
The MT form factor comes standard with a 300-watt, passive-PFC power supply unit with the
specifications and cabling as indicated in the following table and figure.
Table 7-2.
MT 300-Watt Power Supply Unit Specifications
Input Line Voltage:
115–230 VAC (auto-ranging)
Line Frequency
Input (AC) Current
+3.3 VDC Output
+5.08 VDC Output
+5.08 AUX Output
+12 VDC Output
+12 VDC Output (Vcpu)
-12 VDC Output
Range or
Tolerance
Min.
Current
Loading [1]
Max.
Current
Surge
Current [2]
Max.
Ripple
90–264 VAC
47–63 Hz
-+4%
+ 3.3 %
+ 3.3 %
+5%
+5%
+ 10 %
---0.10 A
0.30 A
0.00 A
0.10 A
0.10 A
0.00 A
--6.0 A
16.0 A
19.0 A
2.00 A
11.0 A
11.5 A
0.15 A
---16.0 A
19.0 A
2.00 A
11.0 A
11.5 A
0.15 A
---50 mV
50 mV
50 mV
120 mV
120 mv
200 mV
NOTES:
Total continuous output power should not exceed 300 watts. Maximum surge power (<10 seconds) should not exceed 320 watts.
[1] Minimum loading requirements must be met at all times to ensure normal operation and specification compliance.
[2] Maximum surge duration for +12Vcpu is 1 second with 12-volt tolerance +/- 10%.
P7
P8
P4
P9
P9
4 3 2 1
P5
P4, P5, P7, P8
P3
Power Supply
Unit
P1
P3
2 4
1 2345
3
1
P1
13
24
12
1
Conn
Pin 1
Pin 2
Pin 3
Pin 4
Pin 5
P1
+3.3
+3.3
P1 [1]
+3.3
-12
P3
RTN
P4, 5, 7, 8
P9
Pin 6
RTN
+5
RTN
+5
RTN
PS On
RTN
RTN
RTN
VccP
VccP
+12
RTN
+5.08
RTN
+5
RTN
RTN
+12
Pin 7
Pin
10
Pin
11
Pin
12
Pin 8
Pin 9
RTN
POK
5 aux
+12
+12
+3.3
RTN
nc
+5
+5
+5
RTN
+3.3
NOTES:
All + and - values are VDC.
RTN = Return (signal ground)
GND = Power ground
RS = Remote sense
POK = Power ok (power good)
[1] This row represents pins 13–24 of connector P1.
Figure 7-3. MT Power Cable Diagram
Technical Reference Guide
www.hp.com
7-3
Power and Signal Distribution
7.2.3 Optional Energy Star Compliant PSUs
Energy Star 4.0 (80-Plus, Bronze-compliant) active-PFC power supply units are available as an
option for these systems. The specifications of the high-efficiency power supplies match those of
the standard units except for the following aspects:
7.3
■
Efficiency: no less than 82 percent efficient at 20 or 100 percent of rated load and no less
than 85 percent efficient at 50 percent of rated load (at 115 VAC/60 Hz and at 230 VAC/60
Hz input.
■
Power factor of greater than 0.9 measured at full rated load at 115 VAC/60 Hz and at 230
VAC/60 Hz input
Power Control
The generation of +3, +5, and +12 VDC is controlled digitally with the PS On signal. When the
PS On signal is asserted, all DC voltages are produced. When PS On is de-asserted, only
auxiliary power (+5 AUX) is generated. The +5 AUX voltage is always produced as long as the
system is connected to a live AC source.
7.3.1 Power Button
The PS On signal is typically controlled through the Power Button which, when pressed and
released, applies a negative (grounding) pulse to the power control logic on the system board.
The resultant action of pressing the power button depends on the state and mode of the system at
that time and is described as follows:
System State
Off
On, ACPI Disabled
On, ACPI Enabled
7-4
Table 7-3.
Power Button Actions
Pressed Power Button Results In:
Negative pulse, of which the falling edge results in power control logic
asserting PS On signal to Power Supply Assembly, which then initializes. ACPI
four-second counter is not active.
Negative pulse, of which the falling edge causes power control logic to
de-assert the PS On signal. ACPI four-second counter is not active.
Pressed and Released Under Four Seconds:
Negative pulse, of which the falling edge causes power control logic to
generate SMI-, set a bit in the SMI source register, set a bit for button status,
and start four-second counter. Software should clear the button status bit within
four seconds and the Suspend state is entered. If the status bit is not cleared by
software in four seconds PS On is de-asserted and the power supply assembly
shuts down (this operation is meant as a guard if the OS is hung).
Pressed and Held At least Four Seconds Before Release:
If the button is held in for at least four seconds and then released, PS On is
negated, de-activating the power supply.
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Technical Reference Guide
Power and Signal Distribution
A dual-color LED located on the front panel (bezel) is used to indicate system power status. The
front panel (bezel) power LED provides a visual indication of key system conditions listed as
follows:
Power LED
Steady green
Blinks green @ 0.5 Hz
Blinks red 2 times @ 1 Hz [1]
Blinks red 3 times @ 1 Hz [1]
Blinks red 4 times @ 1 Hz [1]
Blinks red 5 times @ 1 Hz [1]
Blinks red 6 times @ 1 Hz [1]
Blinks red 7 times @ 1 Hz [1]
Blinks red 8 times @ 1 Hz [1]
Blinks red 9 times @ 1 Hz [1]
Blinks red 10 times @ 1 Hz [1]
No light
Table 7-4.
Power LED Indications
Condition
Normal full-on operation
Suspend state (S1) or suspend to RAM (S3)
Processor thermal shut down. Check air flow, fan
operation, and CPU heat sink.
Processor not installed. Install or reseat CPU.
Power failure (power supply is overloaded). Check storage
devices, expansion cards and/or system board (CPU
power connector P3).
Pre-video memory error. Incompatible or incorrectly seated
DIMM.
Pre-video graphics error. On system with integrated
graphics, check/replace system board. On system with
graphics card, check/replace graphics card.
PCA failure. Check/replace system board.
Invalid ROM (checksum error). Reflash ROM using CD or
replace system board.
System powers on but fails to boot. Check power supply,
CPU, system board.
Bad option card.
System dead. Press and hold power button for less than 4
seconds. If HD LED turns green then check voltage select
switch setting or expansion cards. If no LED light then check
power button/power supply cables to system board or
system board.
NOTE:
[1] Will be accompanied by the same number of beeps, with 2-second pause between cycles. Beeps
stop after 5 cycles.
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7-5
Power and Signal Distribution
7.3.2 Wake Up Events
The PS On signal can be activated with a power “wake-up” of the system due to the occurrence
of a magic packet, serial port ring, or PCI power management event (PME). These events can be
individually enabled through the Setup utility to wake up the system from a sleep (low power)
state.
Wake-up functionality requires that certain circuits receive auxiliary power while the system is
✎ turned
off. The system unit must be plugged into a live AC outlet for wake up events to function.
Using an AC power strip to control system unit power will disable wake-up event functionality.
The wake up sequence for each event occurs as follows:
Wake-On-LAN
The network interface controller (NIC) can be configured for detection of a “Magic Packet” and
wake the system up from sleep mode through the assertion of the PME- signal on the PCI bus.
Refer to Chapter 5, section 5.9 “Network Support” for more information.
Modem Ring
A ring condition on a serial port can be detected by the power control logic and, if so configured,
cause the PS On signal to be asserted.
Power Management Event
A power management event that asserts the PME- signal on the PCI bus can be enabled to cause
the power control logic to generate the PS On. Note that the PCI card must be PCI ver. 2.2 (or
later) compliant to support this function.
7-6
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Technical Reference Guide
Power and Signal Distribution
7.3.3 Power Management
These systems include power management functions designed to conserve energy. These
functions are provided by a combination of hardware, firmware (BIOS) and software. The
system provides the following power management support:
■
ACPI v2.0 compliant (ACPI modes C1, S1, and S3-S5)
■
U.S. EPA Energy Star 3.0 and 4.0 compliant
Table 7-5 shows the comparison in power states.
Table 7-5.
System Power States
Power
State
System Condition
G0, S0, D0
System fully on. OS and
application is running, all
components.
G1, S1, C1, D1 System on, CPU is executing and
data is held in memory. Some
peripheral subsystems may be on
low power. Monitor is blanked.
G1, S2/3, C2, System on, CPU not executing,
D2 (Standby/or cache data lost. Memory is
suspend)
holding data, display and I/O
subsystems on low power.
G1, S4, D3
System off. CPU, memory, and
(Hibernation)
most subsystems shut down.
Memory image saved to disk for
recall on power up.
G2, S5, D3cold System off. All components either
completely shut down or receiving
minimum power to perform system
wake-up.
G3
System off (mechanical). No power
to any internal components except
RTC circuit. [1]
Power
Consumption
Maximum
Transition
To S0 by [2]
N/A
OS Restart
Required
No
Low
< 2 sec after
keyboard or
pointing device
action
< 5 sec. after
keyboard, pointing
device, or power
button action
<25 sec. after
power button
action
No
Low
Low
No
Yes
Minimum
<35 sec. after
power button
action
Yes
None
—
—
NOTES:
Gn = Global state.
Sn = Sleep state.
Cn = ACPI state.
Dn = PCI state.
[1] Power cord is disconnected for this condition.
[2] Actual transition time dependent on OS and/or application software.
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7-7
Power and Signal Distribution
7.4
Signal Distribution
Table 7-6 lists key reference designators for LEDs, connectors, headers, and switches used on the
system boards for systems covered in this guide. Unless otherwise indicated, components are
used on all system boards.
Table 7-6.
System Board Component Designations
7-8
Designator
Component function
CR1
E1
E14
E49 / JP49
J9
J10
J20
J31
J32
J41
J68
J69
J70
J78
J103
P1
P3
P5
P6
P8
P9
P10
P23
P24
P52
P53
P54
P60
P61
P62
P63
P70
P126
P150
SW50
XMM1, 2
XMM3, 4
XU1
XB2
+5 VDC LED
Descriptor table override header
SPI ROM boot block header
Password clear header / jumper
Stacked RJ-45 & dual USB connectors
Quad-stacked USB connectors
PCI 2.3 connector
PCIe x1 connector
PCIe x1 connector
PCIe x16 graphics connector
Stacked keyboard, mouse PS/2 connectors
Analog VGA monitor DB-15 connector
Digital DVI-D connector
Stacked audio line-in, headphone/line-out 1/8” jacks
DC input
Power supply connector
Vccp (PWRCPU) header
Control panel (power button, power LED) header
Internal speaker header
System fan header
Chassis fan, primary, header
Diskette drive connector
Front panel audio header
Front panel USB header
Serial port, secondary, header
Serial port, primary connector
Serial port, primary header
SATA0 (controller 1, primary master) connector (dark blue)
SATA1 (controller 1, secondary master) connector (white)
SATA2 (controller 1, primary slave) connector (light blue)
SATA3 (controller 1, secondary slave) connector (orange)
Primary CPU (heatsink) fan header
Parallel port header
Media reader USB header
Clear CMOS switch
Memory slots, channel A (white)
Memory slots, channel B (black)
Processor socket
Battery socket
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Power and Signal Distribution
Figure 7-4 shows pinouts of headers used on the sytem boards.
Power Button/LED, HD LED
Header P5
HD LED + 1
HD LED - 3
GND5
Pwr Btn 7
Chassis ID0 9
Front I/O USB
Header P5
2 PS LED +
4 PS LED -
+5 V fused 1
USB port 8- 3
2 +5 V fused
4 USB port 9-
8 GND
USB port 8+ 5
GND 7
6 USB port 9+
8 GND
10 Chassis ID1
10 Front USB detect#
Serial Port B
Header P52
Media Card Reader USB I/F
Header P150
+5 V fused 1
USB port 7- 3
USB port 7+ 5
GND 7
UART2 DTR- 1
UART2 CTS- 3
2 +5 V fused
4 USB port 6-
UART2 TX DATA 5
GND 7
6 USB port 6+
8 GND
+5.0V 9
10 not connected
Front Panel Audio
Header P23
Mic In Left (Tip) 1
Mic In Right (Sleeve) 3
HP Out Right 5
UART2 RTS- 11
UART2 DCD- 13
+12V 15
6 UART2 RI8 GND
10 +3.3V aux
12 Comm B Detect
14 -12V
Fan Header
Header P8, P16
2 Analog GND
4 Front Audio Detect#
6 Sense_1 Return
Sense Send 7
HP Out Left 9
2 UART2 RX DATA
4 UART2 DSR-
10 Sense_2 Return
1 GND
2 +12 VDC
3 Fan tach
4 Fan PWM input
NOTE:
No polarity consideration required for connection to speaker header P6.
NC = Not connected
Figure 7-4. System Board Header Pinouts
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7-9
Power and Signal Distribution
7-10
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Technical Reference Guide
8
SYSTEM BIOS
8.1
Introduction
The System Basic Input/Output System (BIOS) of the computer is a collection of machine
language programs stored as firmware in read-only memory (ROM). The system BIOS includes
such functions as Power-On Self Test (POST), PCI device initialization, Plug 'n Play support,
power management activities, and the Setup utility. The firmware contained in the system BIOS
ROM supports the following operating systems and specifications:
■
DOS 6.2, Windows 2000, XP, and Vista (Home and Professional versions)
■
Windows NT 4.0 (SP6 required for PnP support)
■
OS/2 ver 2.1 and OS/2 Warp
■
SCO Unix
■
DMI 2.1
■
Alert Standard Format (ASF) 2.0
■
ACPI and OnNow
■
SMBIOS 2.5
■
BIOS Boot Specification 1.01
■
Enhanced Disk Drive Specification 3.0
■
“El Torito” Bootable CD-ROM Format Specification 1.0
■
ATAPI Removeable Media Device BIOS Specification 1.0
■
Serial ATA Advanced Host Controller Interface (AHCI) 1.2
The BIOS firmware is contained in a flash ROM component. The runtime portion of the BIOS
resides in a 128KB block from E0000h to FFFFFh.
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
ROM flashing (8.2)
■
Boot functions (8.3)
■
Client management functions (8.4)
■
SMBIOS support (8.5)
■
USB legacy support (8.6)
■
Management functions (8.7)
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8-1
SYSTEM BIOS
8.2 ROM Flashing
The system BIOS firmware is contained in a flash ROM device that can be re-written with new
BIOS code using a flash utility locally (with F10 setup), with the HPQFlash program in a
Windows environment, or with the FLASHBIN.EXE utility in a DOS or DOS-like environment.
8.2.1 Upgrading
Upgrading the BIOS is not normally required but may be necessary if changes are made to the
unit's operating system, hard drive, or processor. All System BIOS upgrades are available
directly from HP. Flashing is done either locally through F10 setup, the HPQFlash program in a
Windows environment, or with the FLASHBIN.EXE utility in a DOS or DOS-like environment.
Flashing may also be done by deploying either HPQFlash or FLASHBIN.EXE through the
network boot function.
This system includes 64 KB of write-protected boot block ROM that provides a way to recover
from a failed flashing of the system BIOS ROM. If the system BIOS ROM fails the flash check,
the boot block code provides the minimum amount of support necessary to allow booting the
system and re-flashing the system BIOS ROM with a CD or USB disk/thumb drive.
8.2.2 Changeable Splash Screen
corrupted splash screen may be restored by reflashing the BIOS image through F10 setup,
✎ Arunning
HPQFlash, or running FLASHBIN.EXE. Depending on the system, changing
(customizing) the splash screen may only be available with asistance from HP.
The splash screen (image displayed during POST) is stored in the system BIOS ROM and may
be replaced with another image of choice by using the Image Flash utility (Flashi.exe). The
Image Flash utility allows the user to browse directories for image searching and pre-viewing.
Background and foreground colors can be chosen from the selected image's palette.
The splash screen image requirements are as follows:
■
Format = Windows bitmap with 4-bit RLE encoding
■
Size = 424 (width) x 320 (height) pixels
■
Colors = 16 (4 bits per pixel)
■
File Size = < 64 KB
The Image Flash utility can be invoked at a command line for quickly flashing a known image as
follows:
>\Flashi.exe [Image_Filename] [Background_Color] [Foreground_Color]
The utility checks to insure that the specified image meets the splash screen requirements listed
above or it will not be loaded into the ROM.
8-2
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SYSTEM BIOS
8.3 Boot Functions
The BIOS supports various functions related to the boot process, including those that occur
during the Power On Self-Test (POST) routine.
8.3.1 Boot Device Order
The default boot device order is as follows:
1. CD-ROM drive (EL Torito CD images)
2. Diskette drive (A:)
3. USB device
4. Hard drive (C:)
5. Network interface controller (NIC)
above order assumes all devices are present in the initial configuration. If, for example, a
✎ The
diskette drive is not initially installed but added later, then drive A would be added to the end of
the order (after the NIC)
The order can be changed in the ROM-based Setup utility (accessed by pressing F10 when so
prompted during POST). The options are displayed only if the device is attached, except for USB
devices. The USB option is displayed even if no USB storage devices are present. The hot IPL
option is available through the F9 utility, which allows the user to select a hot IPL boot device.
8.3.2 Network Boot (F12) Support
The BIOS supports booting the system to a network server. The function is accessed by pressing
the F12 key when prompted at the lower right hand corner of the display during POST. Booting
to a network server allows for such functions as:
■
Flashing a ROM on a system without a functional operating system (OS).
■
Installing an OS.
■
Installing an application.
These systems include, as standard, an integrated Intel 82562-equivalent NIC with Preboot
Execution Environment (PXE) ROM and can boot with a NetPC-compliant server.
8.3.3 Memory Detection and Configuration
This system uses the Serial Presence Detect (SPD) method of determining the installed DIMM
configuration. The BIOS communicates with an EEPROM on each DIMM through the SMBus
to obtain data on the following DIMM parameters:
■
Presence
■
Size
■
Type
■
Timing/CAS latency
to Chapter 3, “Processor/Memory Subsystem” for the SPD format and DIMM data specific
✎ Refer
to this system.
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8-3
SYSTEM BIOS
The BIOS performs memory detection and configuration with the following steps:
1. Program the buffer strength control registers based on SPD data and the DIMM slots that are
populated.
2. Determine the common CAS latency that can be supported by the DIMMs.
3. Determine the memory size for each DIMM and program the memory controller
accordingly.
4. Enable refresh.
8.3.4 Boot Error Codes
The BIOS provides visual and audible indications of a failed system boot by using the system’s
power LED and the system board speaker. The error conditions are listed in the following table.
Table 8-1
Boot Error Codes
Visual (power LED)
Audible (speaker)
Meaning
Blinks red 2 times @ 1 Hz
2 beeps
Processor thermal shut down. Check air flow, fan
operation, and CPU heat sink.
Blinks red 3 times @ 1 Hz
3 beeps
Processor not installed. Install or reseat CPU.
Blinks red 4 times @ 1 Hz
None
Power failure (power supply is overloaded). Check
storage devices, expansion cards and/or system
board (CPU power connector P3).
Blinks red 5 times @ 1 Hz
5 beeps
Pre-video memory error. Incompatible or
incorrectly seated DIMM.
Blinks red 6 times @ 1 Hz
6 beeps
Pre-video graphics error. On system with
integrated graphics, check/replace system board.
On system with graphics card, check/replace
graphics card.
Blinks red 7 times @ 1 Hz
7 beeps
PCA failure. Check/replace system board.
Blinks red 8 times @ 1 Hz
8 beeps
Invalid ROM (checksum error). Reflash ROM using
CD or replace system board.
Blinks red 9 times @ 1 Hz
9 beeps
System powers on but fails to boot. Check power
supply, CPU, system board.
Blinks red 10 times @ 1 Hz
10 beeps
Bad option card.
NOTE: Audible indications occur only for the five cycles of the error indication. Visual indications
occur indefinitely until power is removed or until error is corrected.
8-4
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SYSTEM BIOS
8.4 Client Management Functions
Table 8-2 provides a partial list of the client management BIOS functions supported by the
systems covered in this guide. These functions, designed to support intelligent manageability
applications, are HP-specific unless otherwise indicated.
Table 8-2.
Client Management Functions (INT15)
AX
Function
Mode
E800h
Get system ID
Real, 16-, & 32-bit Prot.
E813h
Get monitor data
Real, 16-, & 32-bit Prot.
E814h
Get system revision
Real, 16-, & 32-bit Prot.
E816h
Get temperature status
Real, 16-, & 32-bit Prot.
E819h
Get chassis serial number
Real, 16-, & 32-bit Prot.
E820h [1]
Get system memory map
Real
E81Ah
E827h
Write chassis serial number
DIMM EEPROM Access
Real
Real, 16-, & 32-bit Prot.
NOTE:
[1] Industry standard function.
All 32-bit protected-mode functions are accessed by using the industry-standard BIOS32 Service
Directory. Using the service directory involves three steps:
1. Locating the service directory.
2. Using the service directory to obtain the entry point for the client management functions.
3. Calling the client management service to perform the desired function.
The BIOS32 Service Directory is a 16-byte block that begins on a 16-byte boundary between the
physical address range of 0E0000h-0FFFFFh.
The following subsections provide a brief description of key Client Management functions.
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8-5
SYSTEM BIOS
8.4.1 System ID and ROM Type
Diagnostic applications can use the INT 15, AX=E800h BIOS function to identify the type of
system. This function will return the system ID in the BX register. Systems have the following
IDs and ROM family types:
Table 8-3
System ID Numbers
System
(Form Factor)
System ID/
Subsystem Device ID
SFF
3029h
MT
3029h
The ROM family and version numbers can be verified with the Setup utility or the System Insight
Manager or Diagnostics applications.
8.4.2 Temperature Status
The BIOS includes a function (INT15, AX=E816h) to retrieve the status of a system's interior
temperature. This function allows an application to check whether the temperature situation is at
a Normal, Caution, or Critical condition.
8-6
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SYSTEM BIOS
8.5 SMBIOS
In support of the DMI specification, PnP functions 50h and 51h are used to retrieve the SMBIOS
data. Function 50h retrieves the number of structures, size of the largest structure, and SMBIOS
version. Function 51h retrieves a specific structure. This system supports SMBIOS version 2.5
and the structure types listed in the following table:
Table 8-3
SMBIOS Functions
Type
Data
0
BIOS Information
1
System Information
2
Base board information
3
System Enclosure or Chassis
4
Processor Information
7
Cache Information
8
Port Connector Information
9
System Slots
13
BIOS Language Information
15
System Event Log Information
16
Physical Memory Array
17
Memory Devices
19
Memory Array Mapped Addresses
20
Memory Device Mapped Addresses
24
Cooling Device Structure
27
Hardware Security Structure
31
Boot Integrity Service Entry Point
32
System Boot Information
✎ System information on these systems is handled exclusively through the SMBIOS.
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8-7
SYSTEM BIOS
8.6 USB Legacy Support
The system BIOS ROM checks the USB port, during POST, for the presence of a USB keyboard.
This allows a system with only a USB keyboard to be used during ROM-based setup and also on
a system with an OS that does not include a USB driver.
On such a system a keystroke will generate an SMI and the SMI handler will retrieve the data
from the device and convert it to PS/2 data. The data will be passed to the keyboard controller
and processed as in the PS/2 interface. Changing the delay and/or typematic rate of a USB
keyboard though BIOS function INT 16 is not supported.
8.7 Management Functions
The management functions of the AMD 780V chipset allow a system unit to be managed
remotely over a network. The system BIOS can request the management engine to generate the
following alerts:
8-8
■
Temperature alert
■
Fan failure alert
■
Chassis intrusion alert
■
Watchdog timer alert
■
No memory installed alert
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A
Error Messages and Codes
A.1 Introduction
This appendix lists the error codes and a brief description of the probable cause of the error.
listed in this appendix are applicable only for systems running HP/Compaq BIOS.
✎ Errors
Not all errors listed in this appendix may be applicable to a particular system model and/or
configuration.
A.2 Beep/Power LED Codes
✎ Beep and Power LED indictions listed in Table A-1 apply only to HP-branded models.
Table A-1.
Beep/Power LED Codes
Beeps
Power LED
Probable Cause
2 beeps
Blinks red 2 times @ 1 Hz
Processor thermal shut down. Check air flow, fan operation,
and CPU heatsink
3 beeps
Blinks red 3 times @ 1 Hz
Processor not installed. Install or reseat CPU.
4 beeps
Blinks red 4 times @ 1 Hz
Power failure (power supply is overloaded). Check storage
devices, expansion cards and/or system board (CPU power
connector P3).
5 beeps
Blinks red 5 times @ 1 Hz
Pre-video memory error. Incompatible or incorrectly seated
DIMM.
6 beeps
Blinks red 6 times @ 1 Hz
Pre-video graphics error. On system with integrated graphics,
check/replace system board. On system with graphics card,
check/replace graphics card.
7 beeps
Blinks red 7 times @ 1 Hz
PCA failure. Check/replace system board.
8 beeps
Blinks red 8 times @ 1 Hz
Invalid ROM (checksum error). Reflash ROM using CD or
replace system board.
9 beeps
Blinks red 9 times @ 1 Hz
System powers on but fails to boot. Check power supply, CPU,
system board.
10 beeps
Blinks red 10 times @ 1 Hz
Bad option card.
NOTE: Audible indications occur only for the five cycles of the error indication. Visual indications
occur indefinitely until power is removed or until error is corrected.
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A-1
Error Messages and Codes
A.3 Power-On Self Test (POST) Messages
Table A-2.
Power-On Self Test (POST) Messages
A-2
Error Message
Probable Cause
Invalid Electronic Serial Number
Chassis serial number is corrupt. Use Setup to enter a valid number.
Network Server Mode Active (w/o
kybd)
System is in network mode.
101-Option ROM Checksum Error
A device’s option ROM has failed/is bad.
110-Out of Memory Space for
Option ROMs
Recently added PCI card contains and option ROM too large to
download during POST.
102-system Board Failure
Failed ESCD write, A20, timer, or DMA controller.
150-Safe POST Active
An option ROM failed to execute on a previous boot.
162-System Options Not Set
Invalid checksum, RTC lost power, or invalid configuration.
163-Time & Date Not Set
Date and time information in CMOS is not valid.
164-Memory Size Error
Memory has been added or removed.
201-Memory Error
Memory test failed.
213-Incompatible Memory Module
BIOS detected installed DIMM(s) as being not compatible.
214-DIMM Configuration Warning
A specific error has occurred in a memory device installed in the
identified socket.
216-Memory Size Exceeds Max
Installed memory exceeds the maximum supported by the system.
217-DIMM Configuration Warning
Unbalanced memory configuration.
219-ECC Memory Module
Detected ECC Modules not
supported on this platform
Recently added memory module(s) support ECC memory error
correction.
301-Keyboard Error
Keyboard interface test failed (improper connection or stuck key).
303-Keyboard Controller Error
Keyboard buffer failed empty (8042 failure or stuck key).
304-Keyboard/System Unit Error
Keyboard controller failed self-test.
404-Parallel Port Address Conflict
Current parallel port address is conflicting with another device.
417-Network Interface Card Failure
NIC BIOS could not read Device ID of embedded NIC.
501-Display Adapter Failure
Graphics display controller.
510-Splash Image Corrupt
Corrupted splash screen image. Restore default image w/flash utility.
511-CPU Fan Not Detected
Processor heat sink fan is not connected.
512-Chassis Fan Not Detected
Chassis fan is not connected.
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Error Messages and Codes
Table A-2. (Continued)
Power-On Self Test (POST) Messages
Error Message
Probable Cause
514-CPU or Chassis Fan not
detected.
CPU fan is not connected or may have malfunctioned.
601-Diskette Controller Error
Diskette drive removed since previous boot.
605-Diskette Drive Type Error
Mismatch in drive type.
912-Computer Cover Removed
Since Last System Start Up
Cover (hood) removal has been detected by the Smart Cover Sensor.
914-Hood Lock Coil is not
Connected
Smart Cover Lock mechanism is missing or not connected.
916-Power Button Not Connected
Power button harness has been detached or unseated from the system
board.
917-Expansion Riser Not Detected
Expansion (backplane) board not seated properly.
919-Front Panel, MultiPort, and/or
MultiBay Risers not Detected
Riser card has been removed or has not been reinstalled properly in
the system.
1156-Serial Port A Cable Not
Detected
Cable from serial port header to I/O connector is missing or not
connected properly.
1157-Front Cables Not Detected
Cable from front panel USB and audio connectors is missing or not
connected properly.
1720-SMART Hard Drive Detects
Imminent Failure
SMART circuitry on an IDE drive has detected possible equipment
failure.
1721-SMART SCSI Hard Drive
Detects Imminent Failure
SMART circuitry on a SCSI drive has detected possible equipment
failure.
1794--Inaccessible device attached
to SATA 1
(for systems with 2 SATA ports)
A device is attached to SATA 1. Any device attached to this connector
will be inaccessible while “SATA Emulation” is set to “Combined IDE
Controller” in Computer Setup.
1794-Inaccessible devices attached
to SATA 1 and/or SATA 5 (for
systems with 4 SATA ports)
A device is attached to SATA 1 and/or SATA 5.
Devices attached to these connectors will be inaccessible while “SATA
Emulation” is set to “Combined IDE Controller” in Computer Setup
1796-SATA Cabling Error
One or more SATA devices are improperly attached. For optimal
performance, the SATA 0 and SATA 1 connectors must be used before
SATA 2 and SATA 3.
1801-Microcode Patch Error
A processor is installed for which the BIOS ROM has no patch.
Check for ROM update.
Invalid Electronic Serial
Number
Electronic serial number has become corrupted.
Technical Reference Guide
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A-3
Error Messages and Codes
Table A-2. (Continued)
Power-On Self Test (POST) Messages
A-4
Error Message
Probable Cause
Network Server Mode Active
and No Keyboard Attached
Keyboard failure while Network Server Mode enabled.
Parity Check 2
Keyboard failure while Network Server Mode enabled.
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Technical Reference Guide
Error Messages and Codes
A.4 System Error Messages (1xx-xx)
Table A-3.
System Error Messages
Message
Probable Cause
Message
Probable Cause
101
Option ROM error
109-02
CMOS clock rollover test failed
102
System board failure
109-03
CMOS not properly initialized (clk test)
103
System board failure
110-01
Programmable timer load data test failed
104-01
Master int. cntlr. test failed
110-02
Programmable timer dynamic test failed
104-02
Slave int. cntlr. test failed
110-03
Program timer 2 load data test failed
104-03
Int. cntlr. SW RTC inoperative
111-01
Refresh detect test failed
105-01
Port 61 bit <6> not at zero
112-01
Speed test Slow mode out of range
105-02
Port 61 bit <5> not at zero
112-02
Speed test Mixed mode out of range
105-03
Port 61 bit <3> not at zero
112-03
Speed test Fast mode out of range
105-04
Port 61 bit <1> not at zero
112-04
Speed test unable to enter Slow mode
105-05
Port 61 bit <0> not at zero
112-05
Speed test unable to enter Mixed mode
105-06
Port 61 bit <5> not at one
112-06
Speed test unable to enter Fast mode
105-07
Port 61 bit <3> not at one
112-07
Speed test system error
105-08
Port 61 bit <1> not at one
112-08
Unable to enter Auto mode in speed test
105-09
Port 61 bit <0> not at one
112-09
Unable to enter High mode in speed test
105-10
Port 61 I/O test failed
112-10
Speed test High mode out of range
105-11
Port 61 bit <7> not at zero
112-11
Speed test Auto mode out of range
105-12
Port 61 bit <2> not at zero
112-12
Speed test variable speed mode inop.
105-13
No int. generated by failsafe timer 113-01
Protected mode test failed
105-14
NMI not triggered by timer
114-01
Speaker test failed
106-01
Keyboard controller test failed
116-xx
Way 0 read/write test failed
107-01
CMOS RAM test failed
162-xx
Options failed (mismatch in drive type)
108-02
CMOS interrupt test failed
163-xx
Time and date not set
108-03
CMOS not properly initialized
164-xx
Memory size
109-01
CMOS clock load data test failed
199-00
Installed devices test failed
[1]
NOTES:
[1] 102 message code may be caused by one of a variety of processor-related problems that may be solved by replacing the
processor, although system board replacement may be needed.
Technical Reference Guide
www.hp.com
A-5
Error Messages and Codes
A.5 Memory Error Messages (2xx-xx)
Table A-4.
Memory Error Messages
A-6
Message
Probable Cause
200-04
Real memory size changed
200-05
Extended memory size changed
200-06
Invalid memory configuration
200-07
Extended memory size changed
200-08
CLIM memory size changed
201-01
Memory machine ID test failed
202-01
Memory system ROM checksum failed
202-02
Failed RAM/ROM map test
202-03
Failed RAM/ROM protect test
203-01
Memory read/write test failed
203-02
Error while saving block in read/write test
203-03
Error while restoring block in read/write test
204-01
Memory address test failed
204-02
Error while saving block in address test
204-03
Error while restoring block in address test
204-04
A20 address test failed
204-05
Page hit address test failed
205-01
Walking I/O test failed
205-02
Error while saving block in walking I/O test
205-03
Error while restoring block in walking I/O test
206-xx
Increment pattern test failed
207-xx
ECC failure
210-01
Memory increment pattern test
210-02
Error while saving memory during increment pattern test
210-03
Error while restoring memory during increment pattern test
211-01
Memory random pattern test
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Technical Reference Guide
Error Messages and Codes
Table A-4. (Continued)
Memory Error Messages
Message
Probable Cause
211-02
Error while saving memory during random memory pattern test
211-03
Error while restoring memory during random memory pattern test
213-xx
Incompatible DIMM in slot x
214-xx
Noise test failed
215-xx
Random address test
A.6 Keyboard Error Messages (30x-xx)
Table A-5.
Keyboard Error Messages
Message
Probable Cause
Message
Probable Cause
300-xx
Failed ID test
303-05
LED test, LED command test failed
301-01
Kybd short test, 8042 self-test
failed
303-06
LED test, LED command test failed
301-02
Kybd short test, interface test
failed
303-07
LED test, LED command test failed
301-03
Kybd short test, echo test failed
303-08
LED test, command byte restore test failed
301-04
Kybd short test, kybd reset failed
303-09
LED test, LEDs failed to light
301-05
Kybd short test, kybd reset failed
304-01
Keyboard repeat key test failed
302-xx
Failed individual key test
304-02
Unable to enter mode 3
302-01
Kybd long test failed
304-03
Incorrect scan code from keyboard
303-01
LED test, 8042 self-test failed
304-04
No Make code observed
303-02
LED test, reset test failed
304-05
Cannot /disable repeat key feature
303-03
LED test, reset failed
304-06
Unable to return to Normal mode
303-04
LED test, LED command test failed
--
--
Technical Reference Guide
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A-7
Error Messages and Codes
A.7 Printer Error Messages (4xx-xx)
Table A-6
Printer Error Messages
Message
Probable Cause
Message
Probable Cause
401-01
Printer failed or not connected
402-11
Interrupt test, data/cntrl. reg. failed
402-01
Printer data register failed
402-12
Interrupt test and loopback test failed
402-02
Printer control register failed
402-13
Int. test, LpBk. test., and data register failed
402-03
Data and control registers failed
402-14
Int. test, LpBk. test., and cntrl. register failed
402-04
Loopback test failed
402-15
Int. test, LpBk. test., and data/cntrl. reg.
failed
402-05
Loopback test and data reg.
failed
402-16
Unexpected interrupt received
402-06
Loopback test and cntrl. reg.
failed
402-01
Printer pattern test failed
402-07
Loopback tst, data/cntrl. reg.
failed
403-xx
Printer pattern test failed
402-08
Interrupt test failed
404-xx
Parallel port address conflict
402-09
Interrupt test and data reg. failed
498-00
Printer failed or not connected
402-10
Interrupt test and control reg.
failed
--
--
A.8 Video (Graphics) Error Messages (5xx-xx)
Table A-7.
Video (Graphics) Error Messages
Message
Probable Cause
Message
Probable Cause
501-01
Video controller test failed
508-01
320x200 mode, color set 0 test failed
502-01
Video memory test failed
509-01
320x200 mode, color set 1 test failed
503-01
Video attribute test failed
510-01
640x200 mode test failed
504-01
Video character set test failed
511-01
Screen memory page test failed
505-01
80x25 mode, 9x14 cell test
failed
512-01
Gray scale test failed
506-01
80x25 mode, 8x8 cell test failed
514-01
White screen test failed
507-01
40x25 mode test failed
516-01
Noise pattern test failed
See Table A-14 for additional video (graphics) messages.
A-8
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Technical Reference Guide
Error Messages and Codes
A.9 Diskette Drive Error Messages (6xx-xx)
Table A-8.
Diskette Drive Error Messages
Message
Probable Cause
Message
Probable Cause
6xx-01
Exceeded maximum soft error limit
6xx-20
Failed to get drive type
6xx-02
Exceeded maximum hard error
limit
6xx-21
Failed to get change line status
6xx-03
Previously exceeded max soft limit
6xx-22
Failed to clear change line status
6xx-04
Previously exceeded max hard limit 6xx-23
Failed to set drive type in ID media
6xx-05
Failed to reset controller
6xx-24
Failed to read diskette media
6xx-06
Fatal error while reading
6xx-25
Failed to verify diskette media
6xx-07
Fatal error while writing
6xx-26
Failed to read media in speed test
6xx-08
Failed compare of R/W buffers
6xx-27
Failed speed limits
6xx-09
Failed to format a tract
6xx-28
Failed write-protect test
6xx-10
Failed sector wrap test
--
--
600-xx = Diskette drive ID test
609-xx = Diskette drive reset controller test
601-xx = Diskette drive format
610-xx = Diskette drive change line test
602-xx = Diskette read test
611-xx = Pri. diskette drive port addr. conflict
603-xx = Diskette drive R/W compare test
612-xx = Sec. diskette drive port addr. conflict
604-xx = Diskette drive random seek test
694-00 = Pin 34 not cut on 360-KB drive
605-xx = Diskette drive ID media
697-00 = Diskette type error
606-xx = Diskette drive speed test
698-00 = Drive speed not within limits
607-xx = Diskette drive wrap test
699-00 = Drive/media ID error (run Setup)
608-xx = Diskette drive write-protect test
Technical Reference Guide
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A-9
Error Messages and Codes
A.10 Serial Interface Error Messages (11xx-xx)
Table A-9.
Serial Interface Error Messages
Message
Probable Cause
Message
Probable Cause
1101-01
UART DLAB bit failure
1101-13
UART cntrl. signal interrupt failure
1101-02
Line input or UART fault
1101-14
DRVR/RCVR data failure
1101-03
Address line fault
1109-01
Clock register initialization failure
1101-04
Data line fault
1109-02
Clock register rollover failure
1101-05
UART cntrl. signal failure
1109-03
Clock reset failure
1101-06
UART THRE bit failure
1109-04
Input line or clock failure
1101-07
UART Data RDY bit failure
1109-05
Address line fault
1101-08
UART TX/RX buffer failure
1109-06
Data line fault
1101-09
Interrupt circuit failure
1150-xx
Comm port setup error (run Setup)
1101-10
COM1 set to invalid INT
1151-xx
COM1 address conflict
1101-11
COM2 set to invalid INT
1152-xx
COM2 address conflict
1101-12
DRVR/RCVR cntrl. signal failure
1155-xx
COM port address conflict
A-10
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Technical Reference Guide
Error Messages and Codes
A.11 Modem Communications Error Messages (12xx-xx)
Table A-10.
Modem Communications Error Messages
Message
Probable Cause
Message
Probable Cause
1201-XX
Modem internal loopback test
1204-03
Data block retry limit reached [4]
1201-01
UART DLAB bit failure
1204-04
RX exceeded carrier lost limit
1201-02
Line input or UART failure
1204-05
TX exceeded carrier lost limit
1201-03
Address line failure
1204-06
Time-out waiting for dial tone
1201-04
Data line fault
1204-07
Dial number string too long
1201-05
UART control signal failure
1204-08
Modem time-out waiting for remote
response
1201-06
UART THRE bit failure
1204-09
Modem exceeded maximum redial limit
1201-07
UART DATA READY bit failure
1204-10
Line quality prevented remote response
1201-08
UART TX/RX buffer failure
1204-11
Modem time-out waiting for remote
connection
1201-09
Interrupt circuit failure
1205-XX
Modem auto answer test
1201-10
COM1 set to invalid inturrupt
1205-01
Time-out waiting for SYNC [5]
1201-11
COM2 set to invalid
1205-02
Time-out waiting for response [5]
1201-12
DRVR/RCVR control signal failure 1205-03
Data block retry limit reached [5]
1201-13
UART control signal interrupt
failure
1205-04
RX exceeded carrier lost limit
1201-14
DRVR/RCVR data failure
1205-05
TX exceeded carrier lost limit
1201-15
Modem detection failure
1205-06
Time-out waiting for dial tone
1201-16
Modem ROM, checksum failure
1205-07
Dial number string too long
1201-17
Tone detect failure
1205-08
Modem time-out waiting for remote
response
1202-XX
Modem internal test
1205-09
Modem exceeded maximum redial limit
1202-01
Time-out waiting for SYNC [1]
1205-10
Line quality prevented remote response
1202-02
Time-out waiting for response [1]
1205-11
Modem time-out waiting for remote
connection
1202-03
Data block retry limit reached [1] 1206-XX
Dial multi-frequency tone test
1202-11
Time-out waiting for SYNC [2]
1206-17
Tone detection failure
1202-12
Time-out waiting for response [2]
1210-XX
Modem direct connect test
Technical Reference Guide
www.hp.com
A-11
Error Messages and Codes
Table A-10. (Continued)
Modem Communications Error Messages
Message
Probable Cause
Message
Probable Cause
1202-13
Data block retry limit reached [2] 1210-01
Time-out waiting for SYNC [6]
1202-21
Time-out waiting for SYNC [3]
1210-02
Time-out waiting for response [6]
1202-22
Time-out waiting for response [3]
1210-03
Data block retry limit reached [6]
1202-23
Data block retry limit reached [3] 1210-04
RX exceeded carrier lost limit
1203-XX
Modem external termination test
1210-05
TX exceeded carrier lost limit
1203-01
Modem external TIP/RING
failure
1210-06
Time-out waiting for dial tone
1203-02
Modem external data TIP/RING
fail
1210-07
Dial number string too long
1203-03
Modem line termination failure
1210-08
Modem time-out waiting for remote
response
1204-XX
Modem auto originate test
1210-09
Modem exceeded maximum redial limit
1204-01
Time-out waiting for SYNC [4]
1210-10
Line quality prevented remote response
1204-02
Time-out waiting for response [4]
1210-11
Modem time-out waiting for remote
connection
NOTES:
[1] Local loopback mode
[4] Modem auto originate test
[2] Analog loopback originate mode
[5] Modem auto answer test
[3] Analog loopback answer mode
[6] Modem direct connect test
A.12 System Status Error Messages (16xx-xx)
Table A-11
System Status Error Messages
A-12
Message
Probable Cause
1601-xx
Temperature violation
1611-xx
Fan failure
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Technical Reference Guide
Error Messages and Codes
A.13 Hard Drive Error Messages (17xx-xx)
Table A-12
Hard Drive Error Messages
Message
Probable Cause
Message
Probable Cause
17xx-01
Exceeded max. soft error limit
17xx-51
Failed I/O read test
17xx-02
Exceeded max. Hard error limit
17xx-52
Failed file I/O compare test
17xx-03
Previously exceeded max. soft error
limit
17xx-53
Failed drive/head register test
17xx-04
Previously exceeded max.hard error
limit
17xx-54
Failed digital input register test
17xx-05
Failed to reset controller
17xx-55
Cylinder 1 error
17xx-06
Fatal error while reading
17xx-56
Failed controller RAM diagnostics
17xx-07
Fatal error while writing
17xx-57
Failed controller-to-drive diagnostics
17xx-08
Failed compare of R/W buffers
17xx-58
Failed to write sector buffer
17xx-09
Failed to format a track
17xx-59
Failed to read sector buffer
17xx-10
Failed diskette sector wrap during
read
17xx-60
Failed uncorrectable ECC error
17xx-19
Cntlr. failed to deallocate bad sectors 17xx-62
Failed correctable ECC error
17xx-40
Cylinder 0 error
17xx-63
Failed soft error rate
17xx-41
Drive not ready
17xx-65
Exceeded max. bad sectors per track
17xx-42
Failed to recalibrate drive
17xx-66
Failed to initialize drive parameter
17xx-43
Failed to format a bad track
17xx-67
Failed to write long
17xx-44
Failed controller diagnostics
17xx-68
Failed to read long
17xx-45
Failed to get drive parameters from
ROM
17xx-69
Failed to read drive size
17xx-46
Invalid drive parameters from ROM
17xx-70
Failed translate mode
17xx-47
Failed to park heads
17xx-71
Failed non-translate mode
17xx-48
Failed to move hard drive table to
RAM
17xx-72
Bad track limit exceeded
17xx-49
Failed to read media in file write test
17xx-73
Previously exceeded bad track limit
17xx-50
Failed I/O write test
--
--
Technical Reference Guide
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A-13
Error Messages and Codes
NOTE:
xx = 00, Hard drive ID test
xx = 19, Hard drive power mode test
xx = 01, Hard drive format test
xx = 20, SMART drive detects imminent failure
xx = 02, Hard drive read test
xx = 21, SCSI hard drive imminent failure
xx = 03, Hard drive read/write compare test xx = 24, Network preparation test
xx = 04, Hard drive random seek test
xx = 36, Drive monitoring test
xx = 05, Hard drive controller test
xx = 71, Pri. IDE controller address conflict
xx = 06, Hard drive ready test
xx = 72, Sec. IDE controller address conflict
xx = 07, Hard drive recalibrate test
xx = 80, Disk 0 failure
xx = 08, Hard drive format bad track test xx = 81, Disk 1 failure
A-14
xx = 09, Hard drive reset controller test
xx = 82, Pri. IDE controller failure
xx = 10, Hard drive park head test
xx = 90, Disk 0 failure
xx = 14, Hard drive file write test
xx = 91, Disk 1 failure
xx = 15, Hard drive head select test
xx = 92, Sec. controller failure
xx = 16, Hard drive conditional format test
xx = 93, Sec. Controller or disk failure
xx = 17, Hard drive ECC test
xx = 99, Invalid hard drive type
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Technical Reference Guide
Error Messages and Codes
A.14 Hard Drive Error Messages (19xx-xx)
Table A-13
Hard Drive Error Messages
Message
Probable Cause
Message
Probable Cause
19xx-01
Drive not installed
19xx-21
Got servo pulses second time but not first
19xx-02
Cartridge not installed
19xx-22
Never got to EOT after servo check
19xx-03
Tape motion error
19xx-23
Change line unset
19xx-04
Drive busy error
19xx-24
Write-protect error
19xx-05
Track seek error
19xx-25
Unable to erase cartridge
19xx-06
Tape write-protect error
19xx-26
Cannot identify drive
19xx-07
Tape already Servo Written
19xx-27
Drive not compatible with controller
19xx-08
Unable to Servo Write
19xx-28
Format gap error
19xx-09
Unable to format
19xx-30
Exception bit not set
19xx-10
Format mode error
19xx-31
Unexpected drive status
19xx-11
Drive recalibration error
19xx-32
Device fault
19xx-12
Tape not Servo Written
19xx-33
Illegal command
19xx-13
Tape not formatted
19xx-34
No data detected
19xx-14
Drive time-out error
19xx-35
Power-on reset occurred
19xx-15
Sensor error flag
19xx-36
Failed to set FLEX format mode
19xx-16
Block locate (block ID) error
19xx-37
Failed to reset FLEX format mode
19xx-17
Soft error limit exceeded
19xx-38
Data mismatch on directory track
19xx-18
Hard error limit exceeded
19xx-39
Data mismatch on track 0
19xx-19
Write (probably ID ) error
19xx-40
Failed self-test
19xx-20
NEC fatal error
19xx-91
Power lost during test
1900-xx = Tape ID test failed
1904-xx = Tape BOT/EOT test failed
1901-xx = Tape servo write failed
1905-xx = Tape read test failed
1902-xx = Tape format failed
1906-xx = Tape R/W compare test failed
1903-xx = Tape drive sensor test failed
1907-xx = Tape write-protect failed
Technical Reference Guide
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A-15
Error Messages and Codes
A.15 Video (Graphics) Error Messages (24xx-xx)
Table A-14
Video (Graphics) Error Messages
Message
Probable Cause
Message
Probable Cause
2402-01
Video memory test failed
2418-02
EGA shadow RAM test failed
2403-01
Video attribute test failed
2419-01
EGA ROM checksum test failed
2404-01
Video character set test failed
2420-01
EGA attribute test failed
2405-01
80x25 mode, 9x14 cell test failed
2421-01
640x200 mode test failed
2406-01
80x25 mode, 8x8 cell test failed
2422-01
640x350 16-color set test failed
2407-01
40x25 mode test failed
2423-01
640x350 64-color set test failed
2408-01
320x200 mode color set 0 test failed
2424-01
EGA Mono. text mode test failed
2409-01
320x200 mode color set 1 test failed
2425-01
EGA Mono. graphics mode test failed
2410-01
640x200 mode test failed
2431-01
640x480 graphics mode test failed
2411-01
Screen memory page test failed
2432-01
320x200 256-color set test failed
2412-01
Gray scale test failed
2448-01
Advanced VGA controller test failed
2414-01
White screen test failed
2451-01
132-column AVGA test failed
2416-01
Noise pattern test failed
2456-01
AVGA 256-color test failed
2417-01
Lightpen text test failed, no response
2458-xx
AVGA BitBLT test failed
2417-02
Lightpen text test failed, invalid
response
2468-xx
AVGA DAC test failed
2417-03
Lightpen graphics test failed, no resp.
2477-xx
AVGA data path test failed
2417-04
Lightpen graphics tst failed, invalid
resp.
2478-xx
AVGA BitBLT test failed
2418-01
EGA memory test failed
2480-xx
AVGA linedraw test failed
A.16 Audio Error Messages (3206-xx)
Table A-15
Audio Error Messages
A-16
Message
Probable Cause
3206-xx
Audio subsystem internal error
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Technical Reference Guide
Error Messages and Codes
A.17 DVD/CD-ROM Error Messages (33xx-xx)
Table A-16
DVD/CD-ROM Error Messages
Message
Probable Cause
3301-xx
Drive test failed
3305-xx
Seek test failed
A.18 Network Interface Error Messages (60xx-xx)
Table A-17
Network Interface Error Messages
Message
Probable Cause
Message
Probable Cause
6000-xx
Pointing device interface error
6054-xx
Token ring configuration test failed
6014-xx
Ethernet configuration test failed
6056-xx
Token ring reset test failed
6016-xx
Ethernet reset test failed
6068-xx
Token ring int. loopback test failed
6028-xx
Ethernet int. loopback test failed
6069-xx
Token ring ext. loopback test failed
6029-xx
Ethernet ext. loopback test failed
6089-xx
Token ring open
Technical Reference Guide
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A-17
Error Messages and Codes
A.19 SCSI Interface Error Messages (65xx-xx, 66xx-xx,
67xx-xx)
Table A-18
SCSI Interface Error Messages
Message
Probable Cause
Message
Probable Cause
6nyy-02
Drive not installed
6nyy-33
Illegal controller command
6nyy-03
Media not installed
6nyy-34
Invalid SCSI bus phase
6nyy-05
Seek failure
6nyy-35
Invalid SCSI bus phase
6nyy-06
Drive timed out
6nyy-36
Invalid SCSI bus phase
6nyy-07
Drive busy
6nyy-39
Error status from drive
6nyy-08
Drive already reserved
6nyy-40
Drive timed out
6nyy-09
Reserved
6nyy-41
SSI bus stayed busy
6nyy-10
Reserved
6nyy-42
ACK/REQ lines bad
6nyy-11
Media soft error
6nyy-43
ACK did not deassert
6nyy-12
Drive not ready
6nyy-44
Parity error
6nyy-13
Media error
6nyy-50
Data pins bad
6nyy-14
Drive hardware error
6nyy-51
Data line 7 bad
6nyy-15
Illegal drive command
6nyy-52
MSG, C/D, or I/O lines bad
6nyy-16
Media was changed
6nyy-53
BSY never went busy
6nyy-17
Tape write-protected
6nyy-54
BSY stayed busy
6nyy-18
No data detected
6nyy-60
Controller CONFIG-1 register fault
6nyy-21
Drive command aborted
6nyy-61
Controller CONFIG-2 register fault
6nyy-24
Media hard error
6nyy-65
Media not unloaded
6nyy-25
Reserved
6nyy-90
Fan failure
6nyy-30
Controller timed out
6nyy-91
Over temperature condition
6nyy-31
Unrecoverable error
6nyy-92
Side panel not installed
6nyy-32
Controller/drive not connected
6nyy-99
Autoloader reported tape not loaded properly
n = 5, Hard drive
= 6, CD-ROM drive
= 7, Tape drive
yy = 00, ID
= 03, Power check
= 05, Read
= 06, SA/Media
= 08, Controller
= 23, Random read
= 28, Media load/unload
A-18
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Technical Reference Guide
Error Messages and Codes
A.20 Pointing Device Interface Error Messages
(8601-xx)
Table A-19
Pointing Device Interface Error Messages
Message
Probable Cause
Message
Probable Cause
8601-01
Mouse ID fails
8601-07
Right block not selected
8601-02
Left mouse button is inoperative
8601-08
Timeout occurred
8601-03
Left mouse button is stuck closed
8601-09
Mouse loopback test failed
8601-04
Right mouse button is inoperative
8601-10
Pointing device is inoperative
8601-05
Right mouse button is stuck closed 8602-xx
I/F test failed
8601-06
Left block not selected
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A-19
Error Messages and Codes
A-20
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Index
Numerics
8259 Mode 4-6
A
acronyms and abbreviations 1-3
AMD chipset 1-1, 2-1, 2-6
AMD processor(s) 1-1, 2-1, 2-6, 3-1, 3-2
APIC Mode 4-6
Audio codec 2-9, 5-13, 5-14
Audio Specifications 5-15
B
BIOS upgrading 8-2
boot device order 8-3
Boot error codes4-2, 8-4
bus master (PCI) 4-2
C
chipset 2-6
CMOS 4-8
CMOS, clearing 4-8
configuration memory 4-8
D
DB-25 connector 5-8
DB-9 connector 5-6
DDR2 SDRAM 3-3
DIMM socket 3-3
Direct Memory Access (DMA) 4-7
Diskette Drive Connector 5-5
diskette drive interface 5-4
DVI-D connector 5-9
E
Energy Star-compliant PSU 7-4
F
fan 4-12
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flashing, ROM 8-2
G
GPIO functions 4-15
graphics processor, integrated 6-1
graphics, upgrading 6-3
H
HD Audio Controller 5-14
header pinouts, system board 7-9
headphones out (audio interface) 5-13
I
I/O controller, super 2-4, 2-7
I/O map, system 4-14
integrated graphics processor (IGP) 6-1
interrupt handling, 8259 mode 4-6
interrupt handling, APIC mode 4-6
interrupts, hardware 4-6
interrupts, PCI 4-7
K
keyboard interface 5-9
L
LED (indications), boot error code 8-4
LED (indications), power button status 7-5
line in (audio interface) 5-13
line out (audio interface) 5-13
M
Management engine 8-8
mass storage 2-8
Memory, system 2-7, 3-3
memory allocation 3-4, 6-2
memory map 3-5
microphone in (audio interface) 5-13
mouse (pointing device) interface 5-10
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Index-1
Index
N
Network Boot 8-3
Network Interface Controller 5-16
P
parallel interface 5-7
Parallel Interface Connector 5-8
password, Setup 4-110
password, Power-On 4-10
PCI 2.3 4-1
PCI Express 4-2
pointing device interface, 5-10
power button 7-4
power LED indications 7-5
power management 4-11
power supply, MT 7-3
power supply, SFF 7-2
processor, AMD 3-2
Processor Upgrading 3-2
U
Universal Serial Bus (USB) interface 5-11
upgrading BIOS 8-2
upgrading graphics 6-3
USB connector 5-11
V
VGA connector 6-4
W
Web sites (for additional information 1-1
R
Real-time clock (RTC) 4-8
RJ-45 connector 5-18
ROM flashing 8-2
S
SATA 5-2
SATA Connector 5-3
serial interface 5-6
Serial Interface Connector 5-6
serial number (unit) 1-2
SMBIOS 8-7
specifications
environmental, 2-10
physical 2-11
power supply 2-10
socket, processor 3-2
status indications, system 4-12
stereo (audio) 5-12
system board component designators 7-8
system ID 8-6
T
Temperature Status 8-6
Index-2
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