Channel Plus 8052 Specifications

MicroConverter® Multichannel
24-/16-Bit ADCs with Embedded 62 kB
Flash and Single-Cycle MCU
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
FEATURES
High resolution Σ-Δ ADCs
2 independent 24-bit ADCs on the ADuC845
Single 24-bit ADC on the ADuC847 and
single 16-bit ADC on the ADuC848
Up to 10 ADC input channels on all parts
24-bit no missing codes
22-bit rms (19.5 bit p-p) effective resolution
Offset drift 10 nV/°C, gain drift 0.5 ppm/°C chop enabled
Memory
62-kbyte on-chip Flash/EE program memory
4-kbyte on-chip Flash/EE data memory
Flash/EE, 100-year retention, 100 kcycle endurance
3 levels of Flash/EE program memory security
In-circuit serial download (no external hardware)
High speed user download (5 sec)
2304 bytes on-chip data RAM
8051-based core
8051-compatible instruction set
High performance single-cycle core
32 kHz external crystal
On-chip programmable PLL (12.58 MHz max)
3 × 16-bit timer/counter
24 programmable I/O lines, plus 8 analog or
digital input lines
11 interrupt sources, two priority levels
Dual data pointer, extended 11-bit stack pointer
Power
Normal: 4.8 mA max @ 3.6 V (core CLK = 1.57 MHz)
Power-down: 20 µA max with wake-up timer running
Specified for 3 V and 5 V operation
Package and temperature range:
52-lead MQFP (14 mm × 14 mm), −40°C to +125°C
56-lead LFCSP (8 mm × 8 mm), −40°C to +85°C
APPLICATIONS
Multichannel sensor monitoring
Industrial/environmental instrumentation
Weigh scales, pressure sensors, temperature monitoring
Portable instrumentation, battery-powered systems
Data logging, precision system monitoring
FUNCTIONAL BLOCK DIAGRAM
AVDD
ADuC845
AVCO
CURRENT
SOURCE
IEXC1
IEXC2
AIN1
BUF
PGA
PRIMARY
24-BIT S-D ADC
12-BIT
DAC
BUF
DAC
MUX
AGND
AIN10
AINCOM
AUXILIARY
24-BIT S-D ADC
TEMP
SENSOR
REFIN2+
DUAL 16-BIT
S-D DAC
PWM0
MUX
DUAL 16-BIT
PWM
PWM1
REFIN2–
REFIN–
REFIN+
EXTERNAL
VREF
DETECT
INTERNAL
BAND GAP
VREF
SINGLE-CYCLE 8061-BASED MCU
RESET
Rev. C
DVDD
POR
DGND
PLL AND PRG
CLOCK DIV
OSC
XTAL1
WAKE-UP/
RTC TIMER
3 × 16 BIT TIMERS
BAUD RATE TIMER
4 × PARALLEL
PORTS
POWER SUPPLY MON
WATCHDOG TIMER
UART, SPI, AND I 2C
SERIAL I/O
04741-001
On-chip peripherals
Internal power-on reset circuit
12-bit voltage output DAC
Dual 16-bit Σ-Δ DACs
On-chip temperature sensor (ADuC845 only)
Dual excitation current sources (200 µA)
Time interval counter (wake-up/RTC timer)
UART, SPI®, and I2C® serial I/O
High speed dedicated baud rate generator (incl. 115,200)
Watchdog timer (WDT)
Power supply monitor (PSM)
62 kBYTES FLASH/EE PROGRAM MEMORY
4 kBYTES FLASH/EE DATA MEMORY
2304 BYTES USER RAM
XTAL2
Figure 1. ADuC845 Functional Block Diagram
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ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Specifications..................................................................................... 4
ADC SFR Interface..................................................................... 39
Abosolute Maximum Ratings ....................................................... 10
ADCSTAT (ADC Status Register) ........................................... 40
ESD Caution ................................................................................ 10
ADCMODE (ADC Mode Register)......................................... 41
Pin Configurations and Function Descriptions ......................... 11
ADC0CON1 (Primary ADC Control Register) ..................... 43
General Description ....................................................................... 15
ADC0CON2 (Primary ADC Channel Select Register) ........ 44
8052 Instruction Set ................................................................... 18
SF (ADC Sinc Filter Control Register) .................................... 46
Timer Operation ......................................................................... 18
ICON (Excitation Current Sources Control Register) .......... 47
ALE ............................................................................................... 18
Nonvolatile Flash/EE Memory Overview ............................... 48
External Memory Access ........................................................... 18
Flash/EE Program Memory ...................................................... 49
Complete SFR Map .................................................................... 19
User Download Mode (ULOAD)............................................. 50
Functional Description .................................................................. 20
Using Flash/EE Data Memory .................................................. 51
8051 Instruction Set ................................................................... 20
Flash/EE Memory Timing ........................................................ 52
Memory Organization ............................................................... 22
DAC Circuit Information .......................................................... 53
Special Function Registers (SFRs) ............................................ 24
Pulse-Width Modulator (PWM) .............................................. 55
ADC Circuit Information.......................................................... 26
On-Chip PLL (PLLCON) .......................................................... 60
Auxiliary ADC (ADuC845 Only) ............................................ 32
I2C Serial Interface ..................................................................... 61
Reference Inputs ......................................................................... 32
SPI Serial Interface ..................................................................... 64
Burnout Current Sources .......................................................... 32
Using the SPI Interface .............................................................. 66
Reference Detect Circuit ........................................................... 33
Dual Data Pointers ..................................................................... 67
Sinc Filter Register (SF) ............................................................. 33
Power Supply Monitor ............................................................... 68
Σ-∆ Modulator ............................................................................ 33
Watchdog Timer ......................................................................... 69
Digital Filter ................................................................................ 33
Time Interval Counter (TIC) .................................................... 70
ADC Chopping ........................................................................... 34
8052-Compatible On-Chip Peripherals .................................. 73
Calibration ................................................................................... 34
Timers/Counters ........................................................................ 75
Programmable Gain Amplifier ................................................. 35
UART Serial Interface ................................................................ 80
Bipolar/Unipolar Configuration .............................................. 35
Interrupt System ......................................................................... 85
Data Output Coding .................................................................. 36
Interrupt Priority ........................................................................ 86
Excitation Currents .................................................................... 36
Interrupt Vectors ........................................................................ 86
ADC Power-On .......................................................................... 36
Hardware Design Considerations ................................................ 87
Typical Performance Characteristics ........................................... 37
External Memory Interface ....................................................... 87
Functional Description .................................................................. 39
Power Supplies ............................................................................ 87
Rev. C | Page 2 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Power-On Reset Operation........................................................88
QuickStart-PLUS Development System .................................. 94
Power Consumption ...................................................................88
Timing Specifications ..................................................................... 95
Power-Saving Modes ..................................................................88
Outline Dimensions ......................................................................104
Grounding and Board Layout Recommendations .................89
Ordering Guide .........................................................................105
Other Hardware Considerations ...............................................90
QuickStart Development System ..................................................94
REVISION HISTORY
12/12—Rev. B to Rev. C
Changes to Figure 3 and Table 3 ...................................................11
Changes to Burnout Current Sources Section.............................32
Change to ADCMODE (ADC Mode Register) Section.............42
Changes to Mode 4 (Dual NRZ 16-Bit Σ-∆ DAC) Section ............58
Change to Hardware Slave Mode Section ....................................63
Updated Outline Dimensions ......................................................104
Changes to Ordering Guide .........................................................105
2/05—Rev. A to Rev. B
Changes to Figure 1........................................................................... 1
Changes to the Burnout Current Sources Section ......................32
Changes to the Excitation Currents Section ................................36
Changes to Table 30 ........................................................................47
Changes to the Flash/EE Memory on the ADuC845, ADuC847,
ADuC848 Section......................................................................48
Changes to Figure 39 ......................................................................57
Changes to On-Chip PLL (PLLCON) Section ............................60
Added 3 V Part Section Heading ..................................................88
Added 5 V Part Section ..................................................................88
Changes to Figure 70 ......................................................................91
Changes to Figure 71 ......................................................................93
Changes to Table 25 ........................................................................ 43
Changes to Table 26 ........................................................................ 44
Changes to Table 27 ........................................................................ 45
Changes to User Download Mode Section .................................. 50
Added Figure 51 and Renumbered Subsequent Figures ............ 50
Edits to the DACH/DACL Data Registers Section ..................... 53
Changes to Table 34 ........................................................................ 56
Added SPIDAT: SPI Data Register Section ................................. 65
Changes to Table 42 ........................................................................ 67
Changes to Table 43 ........................................................................ 68
Changes to Table 44 ........................................................................ 69
Changes to Table 45 ........................................................................ 71
Changes to Table 50 ........................................................................ 75
Changes to Timer/Counter 0 and 1 Data Registers Section...... 76
Changes to Table 54 ........................................................................ 80
Added the SBUF—UART Serial Port Data Register Section..... 80
Addition to the Timer 3 Generated Baud Rates Section ........... 83
Added Table 57 and Renumbered Subsequent Tables ............... 84
Changes to Table 61 ........................................................................ 86
4/04—Revision 0: Initial Version
6/04—Rev. 0 to Rev. A
Changes to Figure 5.........................................................................17
Changes to Figure 6.........................................................................18
Changes to Figure 7.........................................................................19
Changes to Table 5 ..........................................................................24
Changes to Table 24 ........................................................................41
Rev. C | Page 3 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
SPECIFICATIONS1
AVDD = 2.7 V to 3.6 V or 4.75 V to 5.25 V, DVDD = 2.7 V to 3.6 V or 4.75 V to 5.25 V, REFIN(+) = 2.5 V, REFIN(–) = AGND; AGND =
DGND = 0 V; XTAL1/XTAL2 = 32.768 kHz crystal; all specifications TMIN to TMAX, unless otherwise noted. Input buffer on for primary
ADC, unless otherwise noted. Core speed = 1.57 MHz (default CD = 3), unless otherwise noted.
Table 1.
Parameter
PRIMARY ADC
Conversion Rate
Unit
Conditions
Hz
Hz
Bits
Bits
Chop on (ADCMODE.3 = 0)
Chop off (ADCMODE.3 = 1)
≤26.7 Hz update rate with chop enabled
≤80.3 Hz update rate with chop disabled
Resolution (ADuC845/ADuC847)
Resolution (ADuC848)
Output Noise (ADuC845/ADuC847)
5.4
105
16.06
1365
24
24
See Table 11 and Table 15
See Table 13 and Table 17
See Table 10 and Table 14
μV (rms)
Output Noise (ADuC848)
See Table 12 and Table 16
μV (rms)
Output noise varies with selected update rates,
gain range, and chop status.
Output noise varies with selected update rates,
gain range, and chop status.
1 LSB16
Chop on
Chop off, offset error is in the order of the noise
for the programmed gain and update rate
following a calibration.
Chop on (ADCMODE.3 = 0)
Chop off (ADCMODE.3 = 1)
No Missing Codes2
Min
Integral Nonlinearity
Offset Error3
Typ
Max
±15
Offset Error Drift vs. Temperature2
Full-Scale Error4
ADuC845/ADuC847
ADuC848
Gain Error Drift vs. Temperature4
Power Supply Rejection
±3
ppm of FSR
μV
±10
±200
nV/°C
nV/°C
±10
±10
±0.5
±0.5
μV
μV
LSB16
ppm/°C
±20 mV to ±2.56 V
±20 mV to ±640 mV
±1.28 V to ±2.56 V
113
80
dB
dB
dB
AIN = 1 V, ±2.56 V, chop enabled
AIN = 7.8 mV, ±20 mV, chop enabled
AIN = 1 V, ±2.56 V, chop disabled2
80
PRIMARY ADC ANALOG INPUTS
Differential Input Voltage Ranges 5, 6
Bipolar Mode (ADC0CON1.5 = 0)
Unipolar Mode (ADC0CON1.5 = 1)
ADC Range Matching
Common-Mode Rejection DC
On AIN
Common-Mode Rejection
50 Hz/60 Hz2
On AIN
μV
113
dB
dB
95
95
90
V
±1.024 ×
VREF/GAIN
0 – 1.024 ×
VREF/GAIN
±2
V
dB
dB
Footnotes at end of table.
Rev. C | Page 4 of 108
Gain = 1 to 128
VREF = REFIN(+) − REFIN(−) or
REFIN2(+) − REFIN2(−) (or Int 1.25 VREF)
VREF = REFIN(+) − REFIN(−) or
REFIN2(+) − REFIN2(−) (or Int 1.25 VREF)
AIN = 18 mV, chop enabled
Chop enabled, chop disabled
AIN = 7.8 mV, range = ±20 mV
AIN = 1 V, range = ±2.56 V
50 Hz/60 Hz ± 1 Hz, 16.6 Hz and 50 Hz update
rate, chop enabled, REJ60 enabled
AIN = 7.8 mV, range = ±20 mV
AIN = 1 V, range = ±2.56 V
Data Sheet
Parameter
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
Conditions
75
dB
100
67
dB
dB
dB
nA
nA
pA/°C
pA/°C
nA/V
pA/V/°C
V
50 Hz/60 Hz ± 1 Hz, 16.6 Hz Fadc, SF = 52H,
chop on, REJ60 on
50 Hz ± 1 Hz, 16.6 Hz Fadc, SF = 52H, chop on
50 Hz/60 Hz ± 1 Hz, 50 Hz Fadc, SF = 52H,
chop off, REJ60 on
50 Hz ± 1 Hz, 50 Hz Fadc, SF = 52H, chop off
TMAX = 85°C, buffer on
TMAX = 125°C, buffer on
TMAX = 85°C, buffer on
TMAX = 125°C, buffer on
±2.56 V range, buffer bypassed
Buffer bypassed
AIN1…AIN10 and AINCOM with buffer enabled
V
AIN1…AIN10 and AINCOM with buffer bypassed
V
V
µA/V
REFIN refers to both REFIN and REFIN2
REFIN refers to both REFIN and REFIN2
Both ADCs enabled
Normal Mode Rejection 50 Hz/60 Hz2
On AIN
100
Analog Input Current2
±1
±5
Analog Input Current Drift
Average Input Current
Average Input Current Drift
Absolute AIN Voltage Limits2
Absolute AIN Voltage Limits2
EXTERNAL REFERENCE INPUTS
REFIN(+) to REFIN(–) Voltage
REFIN(+) to REFIN(–) Range2
Average Reference Input Current
Average Reference Input Current
Drift
NOXREF Trigger Voltage
±5
±15
±125
±2
AGND +
0.1
AGND −
0.03
AVDD −
0.1
AVDD +
0.03
2.5
1
AVDD
±1
±0.1
0.3
0.65
nA/V/°C
V
Common-Mode Rejection
DC Rejection
50 Hz/60 Hz Rejection2
90
dB
dB
Normal Mode Rejection 50 Hz/60 Hz2
75
dB
100
dB
67
dB
100
dB
5.4
105
16.06
1365
24
24
See Table 19 and Table 21
See Table 18 and Table 20
±15
±3
±0.25
10
200
±0.5
±0.5
80
80
Hz
Hz
Bits
Bits
AUXILIARY ADC (ADuC845 Only)
Conversion Rate
No Missing Codes2
Resolution
Output Noise
Integral Nonlinearity
Offset Error3
Offset Error Drift2
Full-Scale Error4
Gain Error Drift4
Power Supply Rejection
125
ppm of FSR
µV
LSB16
nV/°C
nV/°C
LSB16
ppm/°C
dB
dB
Footnotes at end of table.
Rev. C | Page 5 of 108
NOXREF (ADCSTAT.4) bit active if VREF > 0.3 V, and
inactive if VREF > 0.65 V
AIN = 1 V, range = ±2.56 V
50 Hz/60 Hz ± 1 Hz, AIN = 1 V,
range = ±2.56 V, SF = 82
50 Hz/60 Hz ±1 Hz, AIN = 1 V, range = ±2.56 V,
SF = 52H, chop on, REJ60 on
50 Hz ± 1 Hz, AIN = 1 V, range = ±2.56 V,
SF = 52H, chop on
50 Hz/60 Hz ± 1 Hz, AIN = 1 V, range = ±2.56 V,
SF = 52H, chop off, REJ60 on
50 Hz ± 1 Hz, AIN = 1 V, range = ±2.56 V,
SF = 52H, chop off
Chop on
Chop off
≤26.7 Hz update rate, chop enabled
80.3 Hz update rate, chop disabled
Output noise varies with selected update rates.
1 LSB16
Chop on
Chop off
Chop on
Chop off
AIN = 1 V, range = ±2.56 V, chop enabled
AIN = 1 V, range = ±2.56 V, chop disabled
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Parameter
AUXILIARY ADC ANALOG INPUTS
(ADuC845 Only)
Differential Input Voltage Ranges5, 6
Bipolar Mode (ADC1CON.5 = 0)
Unipolar Mode (ADC1CON.5 = 1)
Average Analog Input Current
Analog Input Current Drift
Absolute AIN/AINCOM Voltage
Limits2, 7
Min
Data Sheet
Typ
Max
Unit
Conditions
V
V
nA/V
pA/V/°C
V
REFIN = REFIN(+) − REFIN(−) (or Int 1.25 VREF)
REFIN = REFIN(+) − REFIN(−) (or Int 1.25 VREF)
75
dB
100
67
dB
dB
100
dB
50 Hz/60 Hz ± 1 Hz, 16.6 Hz Fadc, SF = 52H,
chop on, REJ60 on
50 Hz ± 1 Hz, 16.6 Hz Fadc, SF = 52H, chop on
50 Hz/60 Hz ± 1 Hz, 50 Hz Fadc, SF = 52H,
chop off, REJ60 on
50 Hz ± 1 Hz, 50 Hz Fadc, SF = 52H, chop off
±VREF
0 – VREF
125
±2
AGND −
0.03
AVDD +
0.03
Normal Mode Rejection 50 Hz/60 Hz2
On AIN and REFIN
ADC SYSTEM CALIBRATION
Full-Scale Calibration Limit
Zero-Scale Calibration Limit
Input Span
DAC
Voltage Range
Resistive Load
Capactive Load
Output Impedance
ISINK
DC Specifications 8
Resolution
Relative Accuracy
Differential Nonlinearity
Offset Error
Gain Error
AC Specifications2, 8
Voltage Output Settling Time
Digital-to-Analog Glitch Energy
INTERNAL REFERENCE
ADC Reference
Reference Voltage
Power Supply Rejection
Reference Tempco
DAC Reference
Reference Voltage
Power Supply Rejection
Reference Tempco
TEMPERATURE SENSOR
(ADuC845 Only)
Accuracy
Thermal Impedance
+1.05 × FS
−1.05 × FS
0.8 × FS
2.1 × FS
0 – VREF
0 – AVDD
10
100
0.5
50
V
V
V
V
V
kΩ
pF
Ω
µA
12
DACCON.2 = 0
DACCON.2 = 1
From DAC output to AGND
From DAC output to AGND
±1
Bits
LSB
LSB
mV
%
%
AVDD range
VREF range
15
10
µs
nVs
Settling time to 1 LSB of final value
1 LSB change at major carry
±3
−1
±50
±1
1.25 − 1%
1.25
45
100
1.25 + 1%
V
dB
ppm/°C
2.5 – 1%
2.5
50
±100
2.5 + 1%
±1% V
dB
ppm/°C
±2
90
52
°C
°C/W
°C/W
Footnotes at end of table.
Rev. C | Page 6 of 108
Guaranteed 12-bit monotonic
Chop enabled
Initial tolerance @ 25°C, VDD = 5 V
Initial tolerance @ 25°C, VDD = 5 V
MQFP
LFCSP
Data Sheet
Parameter
TRANSDUCER BURNOUT CURRENT
SOURCES
AIN+ Current
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Min
AIN− Current
Initial Tolerance at 25°C
Drift
EXCITATION CURRENT SOURCES
Output Current
Initial Tolerance at 25°C
Drift
Initial Current Matching at 25°C
Drift Matching
Line Regulation (AVDD)
Load Regulation
Output Compliance2
POWER SUPPLY MONITOR (PSM)
AVDD Trip Point Selection Range
AVDD Trip Point Accuracy
DVDD Trip Point Selection Range
DVDD Trip Point Accuracy
Typ
Unit
Conditions
−100
nA
100
nA
AIN+ is the selected positive input (AIN4 or AIN6
only) to the primary ADC
AIN− is the selected negative input (AIN5 or AIN7
only) to the primary ADC
±10
0.03
%
%/°C
200
±10
200
±1
20
1
0.1
µA
%
ppm/°C
%
ppm/°C
µA/V
µA/V
V
AGND
AVDD − 0.6
2.63
2.63
CRYSTAL OSCILLATOR
(XTAL1 AND XTAL2)
Logic Inputs, XTAL1 Only2
VINL, Input Low Voltage
VINH, Input Low Voltage
VT−
VT+ − VT−
Input Currents
Port 0, P1.0 to P1.7, EA
RESET
35
−180
−20
Input Capacitance
10
AVDD = 5 V ± 5%
Four trip points selectable in this range
TMAX = 85°C
TMAX = 125°C
Four trip points selectable in this range
TMAX = 85°C
TMAX = 125°C
0.8
0.4
V
V
V
V
pF
pF
DVDD = 5 V
DVDD = 3 V
DVDD = 5 V
DVDD = 3 V
0.8
0.4
V
V
V
DVDD = 5 V
DVDD = 3 V
3.0
2.5
1.4
1.1
0.85
V
V
V
V
V
DVDD = 5 V
DVDD = 3 V
DVDD = 5 V
DVDD = 3 V
DVDD = 5 V or 3 V
±10
±10
105
±10
−660
−75
µA
µA
µA
µA
µA
µA
pF
VIN = 0 V or VDD
VIN = 0 V, DVDD = 5 V
VIN = DVDD, DVDD = 5 V, internal pull-down
VIN = DVDD, DVDD = 5 V
VIN = 2 V, DVDD = 5 V
VIN = 0.45 V, DVDD = 5 V
All digital inputs
2.0
Port 2, Port 3
Matching between both current sources
V
%
%
V
%
%
18
18
1.3
0.95
0.8
0.4
0.3
Available from each current source
4.63
±3.0
±4.0
4.63
±3.0
±4.0
3.5
2.5
XTAL1 Input Capacitance
XTAL2 Output Capacitance
LOGIC INPUTS
All inputs except SCLOCK, RESET,
and XTAL12
VINL, Input Low Voltage
VINH, Input Low Voltage
SCLOCK and RESET Only
(Schmidt Triggered Inputs)2
VT+
Max
Rev. C | Page 7 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Parameter
LOGIC OUTPUTS
(All Digital Outputs except XTAL2)
VOH, Output High Voltage2
Min
Data Sheet
Typ
Unit
Conditions
DVDD = 5 V, ISOURCE = 80 µA
DVDD = 3 V, ISOURCE = 20 µA
ISINK = 8 mA, SCLOCK, SDATA
ISINK = 1.6 mA on P0, P1, P2
10
V
V
V
V
µA
pF
600
3
2
ms
ms
ms
20
20
20
µs
µs
µs
30
30
µs
µs
2.4
2.4
VOL, Output Low Voltage
0.4
0.4
±10
Floating State Leakage Current2
Floating State Output Capacitance
START-UP TIME
At Power-On
After Ext RESET in Normal Mode
After WDT RESET in Normal Mode
From Power-Down Mode
Oscillator Running
Wake-Up with INT0 Interrupt
Wake-Up with SPI Interrupt
Wake-Up with TIC Interrupt
Oscillator Powered Down
Wake-Up with INT0 Interrupt
Wake-Up with SPI Interrupt
FLASH/EE MEMORY RELIABILITY
CHARACTERISTICS
Endurance 9
Data Retention 10
POWER REQUIREMENTS
Power Supply Voltages
AVDD 3 V Nominal
AVDD 5 V Nominal
DVDD 3 V Nominal
DVDD 5 V Nominal
5 V Power Consumption
Normal Mode 11, 12
DVDD Current
PLLCON.7 = 1
100,000
100
Cycles
Years
2.7
4.75
2.7
4.75
3.6
5.25
3.6
5.25
ALE Off
WDT
V
V
V
V
4.75 V < DVDD < 5.25 V, AVDD = 5.25 V
40
50
20
30
AVDD Current
Typical Additional Peripheral
Currents (AIDD and DIDD)
Primary ADC
Auxiliary ADC (ADuC845 Only)
Power Supply Monitor
DAC
Dual Excitation Current Sources
Controlled via WDCON SFR
PLLCON.7 = 0
25
AVDD Current
Power-Down Mode11, 12
DVDD Current
Max
10
31
180
mA
mA
µA
Core clock = 1.57 MHz
Core clock = 12.58 MHz
53
µA
µA
µA
µA
µA
µA
TMAX = 85°C; OSC on; TIC on
TMAX = 125°C; OSC on; TIC on
TMAX = 85°C; OSC off
TMAX = 125°C; OSC off
TMAX = 85°C; OSC on or off
TMAX = 125°C; OSC on or off
5 V VDD, CD = 3
33
1
3
1
0.5
30
60
200
mA
mA
µA
µA
µA
−20
10
µA
µA
Footnotes at end of table.
Rev. C | Page 8 of 108
DACH/L = 000H
200 µA each. Can be combined to give 400 µA on
a single output.
PCON.4 = 1 (see Table 6)
Data Sheet
Parameter
PWM
−Fxtal
−Fvco
TIC
3 V Power Consumption
Normal Mode11, 12
DVDD Current
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Min
Typ
Max
3
0.5
1
Conditions
µA
mA
µA
2.7 V < DVDD < 3.6 V, AVDD = 3.6 V
9
AVDD Current
Power-Down Mode11, 12
DVDD Current
Unit
20
29
14
21
4.8
11
180
mA
mA
µA
Core clock = 1.57 MHz
Core clock = 6.29 MHz (CD = 1)
ADC not enabled
26
µA
µA
µA
µA
µA
µA
TMAX = 85°C; OSC on; TIC on
TMAX = 125°C; OSC on; TIC on
TMAX = 85°C; OSC off
TMAX = 125°C; OSC off
TMAX = 85°C; OSC on or off
TMAX = 125°C; OSC on or off
20
AVDD Current
1
3
Temperature range is for ADuC845BS; for the ADuC847BS and ADuC848BS (MQFP package), the range is –40°C to +125°C.
Temperature range for ADuC845BCP, ADuC847BCP, and ADuC848BCP (LFCSP package) is –40°C to +85°C.
2
These numbers are not production tested but are guaranteed by design and/or characterization data on production release.
3
System zero-scale calibration can remove this error.
4
Gain error drift is a span drift. To calculate full-scale error drift, add the offset error drift to the gain error drift times the full-scale input.
5
In general terms, the bipolar input voltage range to the primary ADC is given by the ADC range = ±(VREF 2RN )/1.25, where:
VREF = REFIN(+) to REFIN(–) voltage and VREF = 1.25 V when internal ADC VREF is selected. RN = decimal equivalent of RN2, RN1, RN0. For example, if VREF = 2.5 V and RN2,
RN1, RN0 = 1, 1, 0, respectively, then the ADC range = ±1.28 V. In unipolar mode, the effective range is 0 V to 1.28 V in this example.
6
1.25 V is used as the reference voltage to the ADC when internal VREF is selected via XREF0/XREF1 or AXREF bits in ADC0CON2 and ADC1CON, respectively.
(AXREF is available only on the ADuC845.)
7
In bipolar mode, the auxiliary ADC can be driven only to a minimum of AGND – 30 mV as indicated by the auxiliary ADC absolute AIN voltage limits. The bipolar range
is still –VREF to +VREF.
8
DAC linearity and ac specifications are calculated using a reduced code range of 48 to 4095, 0 V to VREF, reduced code range of 100 to 3950, 0 V to VDD.
9
Endurance is qualified to 100 kcycle per JEDEC Std. 22 method A117 and measured at –40°C, +25°C, +85°C, and +125°C. Typical endurance at 25°C is 700 kcycles.
10
Retention lifetime equivalent at junction temperature (TJ) = 55°C per JEDEC Std. 22, Method A117. Retention lifetime based on an activation energy of 0.6 eV derates
with junction temperature.
11
Power supply current consumption is measured in normal mode following the power-on sequence, and in power-down modes under the following conditions:
Normal mode: reset = 0.4 V, digital I/O pins = open circuit, Core Clk changed via CD bits in PLLCON, core executing internal software loop.
Power-down mode: reset = 0.4 V, all P0 pins and P1.2 to P1.7 pins = 0.4 V. All other digital I/O pins are open circuit, core Clk changed via CD bits in PLLCON, PCON.1 = 1,
core execution suspended in power-down mode, OSC turned on or off via OSC_PD bit (PLLCON.7) in PLLCON SFR.
12
DVDD power supply current increases typically by 3 mA (3 V operation) and 10 mA (5 V operation) during a Flash/EE memory program or erase cycle.
1
General Notes about Specifications
•
DAC gain error is a measure of the span error of the DAC.
•
The ADuC845BCP, ADuC847BCP, and ADuC848BCP (LFCSP package) have been qualified and tested with the base of the LFCSP
package floating. The base of the LFCSP package should be soldered to the board, but left floating electrically, to ensure good
mechanical stability.
•
Flash/EE memory reliability characteristics apply to both the Flash/EE program memory and Flash/EE data memory.
Rev. C | Page 9 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
ABOSOLUTE MAXIMUM RATINGS
TA = 25°C, unless otherwise noted.
Table 2.
Parameter
AVDD to AGND
AVDD to DGND
DVDD to DGND
DVDD to DGND
AGND to DGND1
AVDD to DVDD
Analog Input Voltage to AGND2
Reference Input Voltage to AGND
AIN/REFIN Current (Indefinite)
Digital Input Voltage to DGND
Digital Output Voltage to DGND
Operating Temperature Range
Storage Temperature Range
Junction Temperature
θJA Thermal Impedance (MQFP)
θJA Thermal Impedance (LFCSP)
Lead Temperature, Soldering
Vapor Phase (60 sec)
Infrared (15 sec)
________________________
1
2
Rating
–0.3 V to +7 V
–0.3 V to +7 V
–0.3 V to +7 V
–0.3 V to +7 V
–0.3 V to +0.3 V
–2 V to +5 V
–0.3 V to AVDD + 0.3 V
–0.3 V to AVDD + 0.3 V
30 mA
–0.3 V to DVDD + 0.3 V
–0.3 V to DVDD + 0.3 V
–40°C to +125°C
–65°C to +150°C
150°C
90°C/W
52°C/W
Stresses above those listed under Absolute Maximum Ratings
may cause permanent damage to the device. This is a stress
rating only; functional operation of the device at these or any
other conditions above those listed in the operational sections
of this specification is not implied. Exposure to absolute
maximum rating conditions for extended periods may affect
device reliability.
215°C
220°C
AGND and DGND are shorted internally on the ADuC845, ADuC847, and ADuC848.
Applies to the P1.0 to P1.7 pins operating in analog or digital input modes.
ESD CAUTION
ESD (electrostatic discharge) sensitive device. Electrostatic charges as high as 4000 V readily accumulate on
the human body and test equipment and can discharge without detection. Although this product features
proprietary ESD protection circuitry, permanent damage may occur on devices subjected to high energy
electrostatic discharges. Therefore, proper ESD precautions are recommended to avoid performance
degradation or loss of functionality.
Rev. C | Page 10 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
P0.1/AD1
P0.0/AD0
ALE
PSEN
46
45
44
43
EA
P0.2/AD2
52
47
53
48
P0.5/AD5
P0.4/AD4
DVDD
54
DGND
P0.3/AD3
P0.6/AD6
55
50
P1.0/AIN1
P0.7/AD7
56
EA
ALE
PSEN
P0.0/AD0
P0.1/AD1
P0.2/AD2
P0.3/AD3
DVDD
DGND
P0.4/AD4
P0.5/AD5
P0.6/AD6
P0.7/AD7
PIN CONFIGURATIONS AND FUNCTION DESCRIPTIONS
P1.1/AIN2
P1.2/AIN3/REFIN2+
1
38 P2.6/PWM1
2
42
41
P1.2/AIN3/REFIN2+ 3
37 P2.5/PWM0
P1.3/AIN4/REFIN2–
3
40
P2.5/PWM0
P1.3/AIN4/REFIN2– 4
AVDD 5
36 P2.4/T2EX
AVDD
AGND
4
39
P2.4/T2EX
DGND
AGND
REFIN–
6
REFIN+
P1.4/AIN5
8
P1.5/AIN6
35 DGND
Figure 2. 52-Lead MQFP Pin Configuration
DGND
DVDD
P2.1/MOSI
P2.0/SCLOCK (SPI)
SDATA
28
21
27
20
P3.3/INT1
DVDD
04741-002
SCLOCK (I2C)
P3.5/T1
P3.6/WR
P3.7/RD
DGND
P3.4/T0
P3.3/INT1
DVDD
P3.2/INT0
P3.1/TxD
P3.0/RxD
DAC
RESET
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
14
P3.7/RD
SCLK (I2C)
13
26
AINCOM/DAC
DAC
P3.2/INT0
27 SDATA
P3.6/WR
12
19
28 P2.0/SCLOCK (SPI)
P3.1/TxD
P1.7/AIN8/IEXC2 12
AINCOM/DAC 13
25
P2.2/MISO
P1.7/AIN8/IEXC2
32
31
30
29
P3.5/T1
P2.3/SS/T2
11
24
33
P1.6/AIN7/IEXC1
18
29 P2.1/MOSI
17
P1.6/AIN7/IEXC1 11
9
23
10
30 P2.2/MISO
RESET
31 P2.3/SS/T2
P3.0/RxD
P1.4/AIN5 9
P1.5/AIN6 10
DGND
XTAL2
XTAL1
P3.4/T0
35
34
22
TOP VIEW
(Not to Scale)
32 XTAL1
7
16
TOP VIEW
(Not to Scale)
P2.6/PWM1
38
37
36
33 XTAL2
REFIN+ 8
5
P2.7/PWMCLK
ADuC845/ADuC847/
ADuC848
34 DVDD
15
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
AIN9
AGND 6
REFIN– 7
AIN10
PIN 1
IDENTIFIER
P1.1/AIN2 2
NOTES
1. THE EXPOSED PADDLE MUST BE LEFT UNCONNECTED.
04741-003
49
39 P2.7/PWMCLK
51
52 51 50 49 48 47 46 45 44 43 42 41 40
P1.0/AIN1 1
Figure 3. 56-Lead LFCSP Pin Configuration
Table 3. Pin Function Descriptions
Pin No:
52-MQFP
1
Pin No:
56-LFCSP
56
Mnemonic
P1.0/AIN1
Type 1
I
2
1
P1.1/AIN2
I
3
2
P1.2/AIN3/REFIN2+
I
4
3
P1.3/AIN4/REFIN2−
I
5
6
--7
8
4
5
6
7
8
AVDD
AGND
AGND
REFIN−
REFIN+
S
S
S
I
I
Description
By power-on default, P1.0/AIN1 is configured as the AIN1 analog input.
AIN1 can be used as a pseudo differential input when used with AINCOM or as
the positive input of a fully differential pair when used with AIN2.
P1.0 has no digital output driver. It can function as a digital input for which 0
must be written to the port bit. As a digital input, this pin must be driven high
or low externally.
On power-on default, P1.1/AIN2 is configured as the AIN2 analog input.
AIN2 can be used as a pseudo differential input when used with AINCOM or as
the negative input of a fully differential pair when used with AIN1.
P1.1 has no digital output driver. It can function as a digital input for which 0
must be written to the port bit. As a digital input, this pin must be driven high
or low externally.
On power-on default, P1.2/AIN3 is configured as the AIN3 analog input.
AIN3 can be used as a pseudo differential input when used with AINCOM or as
the positive input of a fully differential pair when used with AIN4.
P1.2 has no digital output driver. It can function as a digital input for which 0
must be written to the port bit. As a digital input, this pin must be driven high
or low externally. This pin also functions as a second external differential
reference input, positive terminal.
On power-on default, P1.3/AIN4 is configured as the AIN4 analog input.
AIN4 can be used as a pseudo differential input when used with AINCOM or as
the negative input of a fully differential pair when used with AIN3.
P1.3 has no digital output driver. It can function as a digital input for which 0
must be written to the port bit. As a digital input, this pin must be driven high
or low externally. This pin also functions as a second external differential
reference input, negative terminal.
Analog Supply Voltage.
Analog Ground.
A second analog ground is provided with the LFCSP version only.
External Differential Reference Input, Negative Terminal.
External Differential Reference Input, Positive Terminal.
Footnotes at end of table.
Rev. C | Page 11 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
Pin No:
52-MQFP
9
Pin No:
56-LFCSP
9
Mnemonic
P1.4/AIN5
Type 1
I
10
10
P1.5/AIN6
I
11
11
P1.6/AIN7/IEXC1
I/O
12
12
P1.7/AIN8/IEXC2
I/O
13
13
AINCOM/DAC
I/O
14
----
14
15
DAC
AIN9
O
I
----
16
AIN10
I
15
17
RESET
I
16–19
22–25
18–21
24–27
P3.0–P3.7
I/O
16
17
18
19
22
23
24
18
19
20
21
24
25
26
P3.0/RxD
P3.1/TxD
P3.2/INT0
P3.3/INT1
P3.4/T0
P3.5/T1
P3.6/WR
25
27
P3.7/RD
Description
On power-on default, P1.4/AIN5 is configured as the AIN5 analog input.
AIN5 can be used as a pseudo differential input when used with AINCOM or as
the positive input of a fully differential pair when used with AIN6.
P1.0 has no digital output driver. It can function as a digital input for which 0
must be written to the port bit. As a digital input, this pin must be driven high
or low externally.
On power-on default, P1.5/AIN6 is configured as the AIN6 analog input.
AIN6 can be used as a pseudo differential input when used with AINCOM or as
the negative input of a fully differential pair when used with AIN5.
P1.1 has no digital output driver. It can function as a digital input for which 0
must be written to the port bit. As a digital input, this pin must be driven high
or low externally.
On power-on default, P1.6/AIN7 is configured as the AIN7 analog input.
AIN7 can be used as a pseudo differential input when used with AINCOM or as
the positive input of a fully differential pair when used with AIN8. One or both
current sources can also be configured at this pin.
P1.6 has no digital output driver. It can, however, function as a digital input for
which 0 must be written to the port bit. As a digital input, this pin must be
driven high or low externally.
On power-on default, P1.7/AIN8 is configured as the AIN8 analog input.
AIN8 can be used as a pseudo differential input when used with AINCOM or as
the negative input of a fully differential pair when used with AIN7. One or
both current sources can also be configured at this pin.
P1.7 has no digital output driver. It can, however, function as a digital input for
which 0 must be written to the port bit. As a digital input, this pin must be
driven high or low externally.
All analog inputs can be referred to this pin, provided that a relevant pseudo
differential input mode is selected. This pin also functions as an alternative pin
out for the DAC.
The voltage output from the DAC, if enabled, appears at this pin.
AIN9 can be used as a pseudo differential analog input when used with
AINCOM or as the positive input of a fully differential pair when used with
AIN10 (LFCSP version only).
AIN10 can be used as a pseudo differential analog input when used with
AINCOM or as the negative input of a fully differential pair when used with
AIN9 (LFCSP version only).
Reset Input. A high level on this pin for 16 core clock cycles while the
oscillator is running resets the device. This pin has an internal weak pull-down
and a Schmitt trigger input stage.
P3.0 to P3.7 are bidirectional port pins with internal pull-up resistors. Port 3
pins that have 1s written to them are pulled high by the internal pull-up
resistors, and in that state can be used as inputs. As inputs, Port 3 pins being
pulled externally low source current because of the internal pull-up resistors.
When driving a 0-to-1 output transition, a strong pull-up is active for one core
clock period of the instruction cycle.
Port 3 pins also have the various secondary functions described below.
Receiver Data for UART Serial Port.
Transmitter Data for UART Serial Port.
External Interrupt 0. This pin can also be used as a gate control input to Timer 0.
External Interrupt 1. This pin can also be used as a gate control input to Timer 1.
Timer/Counter 0 External Input.
Timer/Counter 1 External Input.
External Data Memory Write Strobe. This pin latches the data byte from Port 0
into an external data memory.
External Data Memory Read Strobe. This pin enables the data from an external
data memory to Port 0.
Rev. C | Page 12 of 108
Data Sheet
Pin No:
52-MQFP
20, 34, 48
21, 35, 47
26
Pin No:
56-LFCSP
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
28
Mnemonic
DVDD
DGND
SCLK (I2C)
Type 1
S
S
I/O
27
29
SDATA
I/O
28–31,
36–39
30–33, 39–
42
P2.0–P2.7
I/O
28
30
P2.0/SCLOCK (SPI)
29
31
P2.1/MOSI
30
32
P2.2/MISO
31
33
P2.3/SS/T2
36
39
P2.4/T2EX
37
38
39
32
33
40
41
42
34
35
P2.5/PWM0
P2.6/PWM1
P2.7/PWMCLK
XTAL1
XTAL2
40
43
EA
41
44
PSEN
O
42
45
ALE
O
22, 36, 51
23, 37, 38, 50
I
O
Description
Digital Supply Voltage.
Digital Ground.
Serial Interface Clock for the I2C Interface. As an input, this pin is a Schmitttriggered input. A weak internal pull-up is present on this pin unless it is
outputting logic low. This pin can also be controlled in software as a digital
output pin.
Serial Data Pin for the I2C Interface. As an input, this pin has a weak internal
pull-up present unless it is outputting logic low.
Port 2 is a bidirectional port with internal pull-up resistors. Port 2 pins that
have 1s written to them are pulled high by the internal pull-up resistors, and
in that state can be used as inputs. As inputs, Port 2 pins being pulled
externally low source current because of the internal pull-up resistors. Port 2
emits the middle and high-order address bytes during accesses to the 24-bit
external data memory space.
Port 2 pins also have the various secondary functions described below.
Serial Interface Clock for the SPI Interface. As an input this pin is a Schmitttriggered input. A weak internal pull-up is present on this pin unless it is
outputting logic low.
Serial Master Output/Slave Input Data for the SPI Interface. A strong internal
pull-up is present on this pin when the SPI interface outputs a logic high. A
strong internal pull-down is present on this pin when the SPI interface
outputs a logic low.
Master Input/Slave Output for the SPI Interface. A weak pull-up is present on
this input pin.
Slave Select Input for the SPI Interface. A weak pull-up is present on this pin.
For both package options, this pin can also be used to provide a clock input to
Timer 2. When enabled, Counter 2 is incremented in response to a negative
transition on the T2 input pin.
Control Input to Timer 2. When enabled, a negative transition on the T2EX
input pin causes a Timer 2 capture or reload event.
If the PWM is enabled, the PWM0 output appears at this pin.
If the PWM is enabled, the PWM1 output appears at this pin.
If the PWM is enabled, an external PWM clock can be provided at this pin.
Input to the Crystal Oscillator Inverter.
Output from the Crystal Oscillator Inverter. See the Hardware Design
Considerations section for a description.
External Access Enable, Logic Input. When held high, this input enables the
device to fetch code from internal program memory locations 0000H to
F7FFH. No external program memory access is available on the ADuC845,
ADuC847, or ADuC848. To determine the mode of code execution, the EA pin
is sampled at the end of an external RESET assertion or as part of a device
power cycle. EA can also be used as an external emulation I/O pin, and
therefore the voltage level at this pin must not be changed during normal
operation because this might cause an emulation interrupt that halts code
execution.
Program Store Enable, Logic Output. This function is not used on the
ADuC845, ADuC847, or ADuC848. This pin remains high during internal
program execution.
PSEN can also be used to enable serial download mode when pulled low
through a resistor at the end of an external RESET assertion or as part of a
device power cycle.
Address Latch Enable, Logic Output. This output is used to latch the low byte
(and page byte for 24-bit data address space accesses) of the address to
external memory during external data memory access cycles. It can be
disabled by setting the PCON.4 bit in the PCON SFR.
Rev. C | Page 13 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Pin No:
52-MQFP
43–46,
49–52
1
Pin No:
56-LFCSP
46–49, 52–
55
Mnemonic
P0.0–P0.7
EP
EPAD
Data Sheet
Type 1
I/O
Description
These pins are part of Port 0, which is an 8-bit open-drain bidirectional I/O
port. Port 0 pins that have 1s written to them float, and, in that state, can be
used as high impedance inputs. An external pull-up resistor is required on P0
outputs to force a valid logic high level externally. Port 0 is also the
multiplexed low-order address and data bus during accesses to external data
memory. In this application, Port 0 uses strong internal pull-ups when
emitting 1s.
Exposed Pad. For the LFCSP, the exposed paddle must be left unconnected.
I = input, O = output, S = supply.
Rev. C | Page 14 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
The ADuC845, ADuC847, and ADuC848 are single-cycle,
12.58 MIPs, 8052 core upgrades to the ADuC834 and
ADuC836. They include additional analog inputs for
applications requiring more ADC channels.
The ADuC845, ADuC847, and ADuC848 are complete smart
transducer front ends. The family integrates high resolution
Σ-Δ ADCs with flexible, up to 10-channel, input multiplexing, a
fast 8-bit MCU, and program and data Flash/EE memory on a
single chip.
The ADuC845 includes two (primary and auxiliary) 24-bit Σ-Δ
ADCs with internal buffering and PGA on the primary ADC.
The ADuC847 includes the same primary ADC as the ADuC845
(auxiliary ADC removed). The ADuC848 is a 16-bit ADC
version of the ADuC847.
The ADCs incorporate flexible input multiplexing, a temperature
sensor (ADuC845 only), and a PGA (primary ADC only)
allowing direct measurement of low-level signals. The ADCs
include on-chip digital filtering and programmable output data
rates that are intended for measuring wide dynamic range and
low frequency signals, such as those in weigh scale, strain gage,
pressure transducer, or temperature measurement applications.
The devices operate from a 32 kHz crystal with an on-chip PLL
generating a high frequency clock of 12.58 MHz. This clock is
routed through a programmable clock divider from which the
MCU core clock operating frequency is generated. The microcontroller core is an optimized single-cycle 8052 offering up to
12.58 MIPs performance while maintaining 8051 instruction set
compatibility.
The available nonvolatile Flash/EE program memory options
are 62 kbytes, 32 kbytes, and 8 kbytes. 4 kbytes of nonvolatile
Flash/EE data memory and 2304 bytes of data RAM are also
provided on-chip. The program memory can be configured as
data memory to give up to 60 kbytes of NV data memory in
data logging applications.
On-chip factory firmware supports in-circuit serial download
and debug modes (via UART), as well as single-pin emulation
mode via the EA pin. The ADuC845, ADuC847, and ADuC848
are supported by the QuickStart™ development system featuring
low cost software and hardware development tools.
Rev. C | Page 15 of 108
P0.1 (AD1)
P0.2 (AD2)
P0.3 (AD3)
P0.4 (AD4)
P0.5 (AD5)
P0.6 (AD6)
P0.7 (AD7)
P1.0/AIN1
P1.1/AIN2
P1.2/AIN3/REFIN2+
P1.3/AIN4/REFIN2–
P1.4/AIN5
P1.5/AIN6
P1.6/AIN7/IEXC1
P1.7/AIN8/IEXC2
P2.0/SCLK (A8/A16)
P2.1/MOSI (A9/A17)
P2.2/MISO (A10/A18)
P2.3/SS/T2 (A11/A19)
P2.4/T2EX (A12/A20)
P2.5/PWM0 (A13/A21)
P2.6/PWM1 (A14/A22)
P2.7/PWMCLK (A15/A23)
P3.0 (RxD)
P3.1 (TxD)
P3.2 (INT0)
P3.3 (INT1)
P3.4 (T0)
P3.5 (T1)
P3.6 (WR)
P3.7 (RD)
Data Sheet
P0.0 (AD0)
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
46
47
48
49
52
53
54
55
56
1
2
3
9
10
11 12
30
31
32
33
39
40
41
42
18
19
20
21
24
25
26
27
AIN1 56
1
AIN3
2
AIN4
3
AIN5
9
ADuC845
BUF
PRIMARY ADC
24-BIT
- ADC
PGA
ADC
CONTROL
AND
CALIBRATION
12-BIT
VOLTAGE
OUTPUT DAC
DAC
CONTROL
AIN
MUX
AIN6 10
AIN7 11
ADC
CONTROL
AND
CALIBRATION
AUXILIARY ADC
24-BIT
- ADC
AIN8 12
AIN9 15
DUAL
16-BIT
- DAC
PWM
CONTROL
62 kBYTES PROGRAM/
FLASH/EE
BAND GAP
REFERENCE
TEMP
SENSOR
2  DATA POINTERS
11-BIT STACK POINTER
41 PWM1
39 T2EX
DOWNLOADER
DEBUGGER
19
44 43
45
30
31
32
33
28
29
34
35
SS
SCLK
SDATA
XTAL1
XTAL2
OSC
MISO
I2C SERIAL
INTERFACE
MOSI
18
SPI SERIAL
INTERFACE
SCLK
17
21 INT1
ALE
23 37 38 50
UART
TIMER
EA
51
RxD
22 36
20 INT0
WAKE-UP/
RTC TIMER
SINGLE-PIN
EMULATOR
UART
SERIAL PORT
RESET
6
AGND
AVDD
5
POWER SUPPLY
MONITOR
33 T2
PLL WITH PROG.
CLOCK DIVIDER
POR
4
MCU
CORE
25 T1
PSEN
IEXC2 12
WATCHDOG
TIMER
200A
CURRENT
SOURCE
MIX
IEXC1 11
24 T0
16-BIT
COUNTER
TIMERS
SINGLECYCLE
8052
TxD
200A
DGND
7
2304 BYTES
USER RAM
4 kBYTES DATA/
FLASH/EE
VREF
DETECT
DVDD
REFIN–
40 PWM0
MUX
42 PWMCLK
AINCOM/DAC 13
8
14 DAC
DUAL
16-BIT
PWM
AIN10 16
REFIN+
BUF
NOTES
1. THE PIN NUMBERS REFER TO THE LFCSP PACKAGE ONLY.
Figure 4. Detailed Block Diagram of the ADuC845
Rev. C | Page 16 of 108
04741-004
AIN2
P0.1 (AD1)
P0.2 (AD2)
P0.3 (AD3)
P0.4 (AD4)
P0.5 (AD5)
P0.6 (AD6)
P0.7 (AD7)
P1.0/AIN1
P1.1/AIN2
P1.2/AIN3/REFIN2+
P1.3/AIN4/REFIN2–
P1.4/AIN5
P1.5/AIN6
P1.6/AIN7/IEXC1
P1.7/AIN8/IEXC2
P2.0/SCLK (A8/A16)
P2.1/MOSI (A9/A17)
P2.2/MISO (A10/A18)
P2.3/SS/T2 (A11/A19)
P2.4/T2EX (A12/A20)
P2.5/PWM0 (A13/A21)
P2.6/PWM1 (A14/A22)
P2.7/PWMCLK (A15/A23)
P3.0 (RxD)
P3.1 (TxD)
P3.2 (INT0)
P3.3 (INT1)
P3.4 (T0)
P3.5 (T1)
P3.6 (WR)
P3.7 (RD)
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
P0.0 (AD0)
Data Sheet
46
47
48
49
52
53
54
55
56
1
2
3
9
10
11 12
30
31
32
33
39
40
41
42
18
19
20
21
24
25
26
27
AIN1 56
1
AIN3
2
AIN4
3
AIN5
9
ADuC847
BUF
PRIMARY ADC
24-BIT
- ADC
PGA
ADC
CONTROL
AND
CALIBRATION
12-BIT
VOLTAGE
OUTPUT DAC
DAC
CONTROL
AIN
MUX
AIN6 10
DUAL
16-BIT
- DAC
AIN7 11
PWM
CONTROL
AIN8 12
AIN10 16
62 kBYTES PROGRAM/
FLASH/EE
BAND GAP
REFERENCE
2  DATA POINTERS
11-BIT STACK POINTER
41 PWM1
POWER SUPPLY
MONITOR
19
44 43
45
30
31
32
33
28
29
34
35
SS
SCLK
SDATA
XTAL1
XTAL2
OSC
MISO
18
I2C SERIAL
INTERFACE
MOSI
17
SPI SERIAL
INTERFACE
SCLK
23 37 38 50
21 INT1
ALE
51
UART
TIMER
EA
22 36
20 INT0
WAKE-UP/
RTC TIMER
SINGLE-PIN
EMULATOR
UART
SERIAL PORT
RxD
6
33 T2
39 T2EX
DOWNLOADER
DEBUGGER
RESET
5
AGND
AVDD
MCU
CORE
25 T1
PLL WITH PROG.
CLOCK DIVIDER
POR
4
WATCHDOG
TIMER
PSEN
IEXC2 12
24 T0
16-BIT
COUNTER
TIMERS
SINGLECYCLE
8052
200A
CURRENT
SOURCE
MIX
IEXC1 11
2304 BYTES
USER RAM
TxD
200A
DGND
7
4 kBYTES DATA/
FLASH/EE
VREF
DETECT
DVDD
REFIN–
40 PWM0
MUX
42 PWMCLK
AINCOM/DAC 13
8
14 DAC
DUAL
16-BIT
PWM
AIN9 15
REFIN+
BUF
NOTES
1. THE PIN NUMBERS REFER TO THE LFCSP PACKAGE ONLY.
Figure 5. Detailed Block Diagram of the ADuC847
Rev. C | Page 17 of 108
04741-070
AIN2
P2.6/PWM1 (A14/A22)
P2.7/PWMCLK (A15/A23)
P3.0 (RxD)
P3.1 (TxD)
P3.2 (INT0)
P3.3 (INT1)
P3.4 (T0)
P3.5 (T1)
P3.6 (WR)
P3.7 (RD)
3
P2.5/PWM0 (A13/A21)
2
P2.4/T2EX (A12/A20)
1
P2.3/SS/T2 (A11/A19)
56
P2.2/MISO (A10/A18)
P1.1/AIN2
55
P2.1/MOSI (A9/A17)
P1.0/AIN1
54
P2.0/SCLK (A8/A16)
P0.7 (AD7)
53
P1.6/AIN7/IEXC1
P0.6 (AD6)
52
P1.7/AIN8/IEXC2
P0.5 (AD5)
49
P1.4/AIN5
P0.4 (AD4)
48
P1.5/AIN6
P0.3 (AD3)
47
P1.2/AIN3/REFIN2+
P0.2 (AD2)
46
P1.3/AIN4/REFIN2–
P0.1 (AD1)
Data Sheet
P0.0 (AD0)
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
9
10
11 12
30
31
32
33
39
40
41
42
18
19
20
21
24
25
26
27
AIN1 56
AIN2
1
AIN3
2
AIN4
3
AIN5
9
ADuC848
BUF
PRIMARY ADC
16-BIT
S-D ADC
PGA
ADC
CONTROL
AND
CALIBRATION
12-BIT
VOLTAGE
OUTPUT DAC
DAC
CONTROL
AIN
MUX
AIN6 10
DUAL
16-BIT
S-D DAC
AIN7 11
PWM
CONTROL
AIN8 12
AIN10 16
62 kBYTES PROGRAM/
FLASH/EE
BAND GAP
REFERENCE
PLL WITH PROG.
CLOCK DIVIDER
200µA
DOWNLOADER
DEBUGGER
RxD
TxD
44 43
45
30
31
32
33
28
29
34
35
XTAL2
19
PWM0
41
PWM1
42
PWMCLK
24
T0
25
T1
33
T2
39
T2EX
20
INT0
21
INT1
OSC
XTAL1
18
I2C SERIAL
INTERFACE
SDATA
17
SPI SERIAL
INTERFACE
SCLK
23 37 38 50
RESET
51
DGND
22 36
DVDD
6
AGND
5
AVDD
4
UART
TIMER
SS
UART
SERIAL PORT
POR
MISO
IEXC2 12
40
WAKE-UP/
RTC TIMER
MOSI
CURRENT
SOURCE
MIX
IEXC1 11
DAC
POWER SUPPLY
MONITOR
SCLK
200µA
WATCHDOG
TIMER
MCU
CORE
2 × DATA POINTERS
11-BIT STACK POINTER
16-BIT
COUNTER
TIMERS
ALE
7
VREF
DETECT
SINGLE-PIN
EMULATOR
REFIN–
4 kBYTES DATA/
FLASH/EE
EA
8
SINGLECYCLE
8052
PSEN
REFIN+
2304 BYTES
USER RAM
14
MUX
DUAL
16-BIT
PWM
AIN9 15
AINCOM/DAC 13
BUF
04741-072
NOTES
1. THE PIN NUMBERS REFER TO THE LFCSP PACKAGE ONLY.
Figure 6. Detailed Block Diagram of the ADuC848
8052 INSTRUCTION SET
ALE
Table 4 documents the number of clock cycles required for each
instruction. Most instructions are executed in one or two clock
cycles resulting in 12.58 MIPs peak performance when operating
at PLLCON = 00H.
On the ADuC834, the output on the ALE pin is a clock at 1/6th
of the core operating frequency. On the ADuC845, ADuC847,
and ADuC848, the ALE pin operates as follows. For a single
machine cycle instruction, ALE is high for the entire machine
cycle. For a two or more machine cycle instruction, ALE is high
for the first machine cycle and then low for the remainder of the
machine cycles.
TIMER OPERATION
Timers on a standard 8052 increment by one with each machine
cycle. On the ADuC845, ADuC847, and ADuC848, one
machine cycle is equal to one clock cycle; therefore, the timers
increment at the same rate as the core clock.
EXTERNAL MEMORY ACCESS
The ADuC845, ADuC847, and ADuC848 do not support
external program memory access, but the parts can access up to
16 MB (24 address bits) of external data memory. When
accessing external RAM, the EWAIT register might need to be
programmed in order to give extra machine cycles to MOVX
commands to allow for differing external RAM access speeds.
Rev. C | Page 18 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
COMPLETE SFR MAP
WCOL
SPE
SPIM
CPOL
CPHA
SPR1
SPR0
0 FEH
0 FDH
0 FCH
0 FBH
0 FAH
1 F9H
0 F8H
0
F7H
0 F6H
0 F5H
0 F4H
0 F3H
0 F2H
0 F1H
0 F0H
0
MDO
EFH
E7H
0 EEH
D7H
CFH
RD
B7H
EA
AFH
A7H
0 CEH
SM0
9FH
0 BEH
1 B5H
EADC
0 C4H
PS
0 BCH
0 AEH
0 ADH
1
SM1
0 9EH
T0
1 B4H
ET2
A5H
ES
0
0 9DH
ACH
1 A4H
SM2
RS0
0 D3H
TCLK
PRE0
T1
1 B6H
REN
0 9CH
OV
EXEN2
0 CBH
0 BBH
0 ABH
1 A3H
CNT2
WDE
PT0
0 AAH
0 9AH
TF1
1 96H
TR1
1 95H
1 94H
TF0
TR0
1 93H
1 92H
IE1
IT1
1
EX0
0 A8H
1 A0H
TI
0
1
RI
0 99H
IE0
0
1 B0H
1 A1H
1 91H
RESERVED
00H
00H
0 98H
0
T2
1 90H
1
IT0
8FH
0 8EH
0 8DH
0 8CH
0 8BH
0 8AH
0 89H
0 88H
0
87H
1 86H
1 85H
1 84H
1 83H
1 82H
1 81H
1 80H
1
E9H
xxH
EAH
xxH
OF0M
OF0L
00H
NOT USED
DACH
FCH
00H
RESERVED
00H
BITS
D8H
00H
xxH E2H
ADC0L
GN0H2
EBH
xxH
OF0H
00H
xxH E3H
ADC0M
NOT AVAILABLE
ON ADuC848
D9H
GN1L2
00H
ADuC845 ONLY
EDH
xxH
OF1L
xxH E4H
ADC0H
DBH
00H
GN1H2
ECH
00H
D1H
T2CON
BITS
C8H
RESERVED
00H
C0H
B8H
00H
B9H
BITS
B0H
FFH
B1H
IE
BITS
00H
A9H
P2
BITS
ADC1M
DCH
00H
SF
FFH
98H
00H
BITS
90H
ADC1H
ADuC845 ONLY
DDH
00H
ICON
88H
80H
00H
00H
RESERVED
00H
RESERVED
45H
TL2
CCH
D5H
RESERVED
CDH
PWM0H
PWM1L
EDATA1
BCH
00H
ADC1L
EDATA2
00H
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
HTHSEC1
MIN1
HOUR1
EDARL
9AH
00H
RESERVED
00H
I2CADD
9BH
A4H
BEH
00H
RESERVED
00H
EDARH
C7H
A5H
00H
T3FD
00H
EDATA4
BFH
00H
SPH
00H
PWMCON CFG845/7/8
00H AFH
INTVAL
A6H
00H A7H
T3CON
00H
DPCON
00H
EWAIT
RESERVED
55H
RESERVED
00H
EDATA3
AEH
A3H
53H
RESERVED
B7H
SEC1
00H
DEH
PLLCON
D7H
00H
RESERVED
I2CDAT
PSMCON
DFH
00H
RESERVED
A2H
00H
PWM1H
00H B4H
00H B3H
RESERVED
ADuC845 ONLY
DEH
RESERVED
RESERVED
BDH
00H
RESERVED
00H
00H
TH2
00H
ADC0CON2
C6H
RESERVED
TMOD
00H
89H
FFH
81H
TL0
00H
8AH
07H
82H
SP
P0
BITS
CBH
D4H
A0H
B2H
SPIDAT
9DH
RESERVED
00H 9EH
00H 9FH
00H
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
TH1
RESERVED
RESERVED
FFH
TCON
BITS
A1H
99H
P1
RCAP2H
RESERVED
SBUF
SCON
00H
RESERVED
xxH E6H
A 0H
TIMECON
A0H
BITS
00H
IEIP2
A8H
D3H
00H
PWM0L
P3
00H
CHIPID
C2H
ECON
07H
RCAP2L
RESERVED
10H
IP
BITS
D2H
CAH
WDCON
BITS
08H
RESERVED
ADuC845 ONLY
ADuC845 ONLY
D0H
RESERVED
xxH
OF1H
xxH E5H
ADuC845 ONLY
DAH
RESERVED
ADuC845 ONLY
ADCMODE ADC0CON1 ADC1CON
PSW
BITS
E1H
RESERVED
00H
F7H
ADuC845 ONLY
E0H
DACCON
FDH
7FH
GN0M2
GN0L2
ACC
BITS
I2CADD1
F2H
I2CCON
E8H
DACL
FBH
RESERVED
F0H
BITS
RESERVED
05H
B
BITS
0
RxD
ET0
RB8
WDWR
0 B8H
TxD
0 A9H
1 A2H
0
PX0
1 B1H
EX1
CAP2
0 C0H
0 B9H
1 B2H
0
0 C8H
0 C1H
INT0
TB8
0 9BH
WDS
0 BAH
ET1
0 D0H
0 C9H
PX1
INT1
1 B3H
TR2
0 C2H
PT1
P
0 D1H
0 CAH
WDIR
1 C3H
FI
0 D2H
F8H
ADCSTAT
T2EX
97H
0
0
0 CCH
0 E2H
0 E8H
0 D8H
PT2
0 BDH
WR
0 E9H
I2CI
ERR0
ERR1
NOXREF
0 DCH 0 DBH 0 DAH 0 D9H
PRE1
0 C5H
0 EAH
I2CTX
0
0 D4H
0 CDH
0 C6H
0 E3H
I2CRS
0 E0H
RCLK
PRE2
0 EBH
RS1
0 D5H
EXF2
1 A6H
CAL
I2CM
0 E1H
F0
PADC
BFH
0 E4H
0 DDH
0 D6H
PRE3
C7H
RDY1
AC
TF2
0 ECH
0 E5H
0 DEH
CY
MDI
0 EDH
0 E6H
RDY0
DFH
MCO
MDE
SPICON
BITS
1 THESE SFRs MAINTAIN THEIR PRE-RESET VALUES AFTER A RESET IF TIMECON.0 = 1.
2 CALIBRATION COEFFICIENTS ARE PRECONFIGURED ON POWER-UP TO FACTORY CALIBRATED
00H
DPL
00H
TL1
8BH
00H
DPH
83H
00H
TH0
8CH
00H
DPP
84H
00H
8DH
00H
RESERVED
RESERVED
PCON
87H
00H
VALUES.
SFR MAP KEY:
THESE BITS ARE CONTAINED IN THIS BYTE.
BIT MNEMONIC
BIT ADDRESS
IE0
89H
TCON
IT0
0 88H
0
88H
RESET DEFAULT BIT VALUE
00H
MNEMONIC
RESET DEFAULT VALUE
SFR ADDRESS
SFR NOTE:
SFRs WHOSE ADDRESSES END IN 0H OR 8H ARE BIT ADDRESSABLE.
Figure 7. Complete SFR Map for the ADuC845, ADuC847, and ADuC848
Rev. C | Page 19 of 108
04741-073
ISPI
FFH
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION
8051 INSTRUCTION SET
Table 4. Optimized Single-Cycle 8051 Instruction Set
Mnemonic
Arithmetic
A A,Rn
ADD A,@Ri
ADD A,dir
ADD A,#data
ADDC A,Rn
ADDC A,@Ri
ADDC A,dir
ADD A,#data
SUBB A,Rn
SUBB A,@Ri
SUBB A,dir
SUBB A,#data
INC A
INC Rn
INC @Ri
INC dir
INC DPTR
DEC A
DEC Rn
DEC @Ri
DEC dir
MUL AB
DIV AB
DA A
Logic
ANL A,Rn
ANL A,@Ri
ANL A,dir
ANL A,#data
ANL dir,A
ANL dir,#data
ORL A,Rn
ORL A,@Ri
ORL A,dir
ORL A,#data
ORL dir,A
ORL dir,#data
XRL A,Rn
XRL A,@Ri
XRL A,#data
XRL dir,A
XRL A,dir
XRL dir,#data
CLR A
CPL A
SWAP A
RL A
Description
Bytes
Cycles 1
Add register to A
Add indirect memory to A
Add direct byte to A
Add immediate to A
Add register to A with carry
Add indirect memory to A with carry
Add direct byte to A with carry
Add immediate to A with carry
Subtract register from A with borrow
Subtract indirect memory from A with borrow
Subtract direct from A with borrow
Subtract immediate from A with borrow
Increment A
Increment register
Increment indirect memory
Increment direct byte
Increment data pointer
Decrement A
Decrement register
Decrement indirect memory
Decrement direct byte
Multiply A by B
Divide A by B
Decimal adjust A
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
2
3
1
1
2
2
4
9
2
AND register to A
AND indirect memory to A
AND direct byte to A
AND immediate to A
AND A to direct byte
AND immediate data to direct byte
OR register to A
OR indirect memory to A
OR direct byte to A
OR immediate to A
OR A to direct byte
OR immediate data to direct byte
Exclusive-OR register to A
Exclusive-OR indirect memory to A
Exclusive-OR immediate to A
Exclusive-OR A to direct byte
Exclusive-OR indirect memory to A
Exclusive-OR immediate data to direct
Clear A
Complement A
Swap nibbles of A
Rotate A left
1
1
2
2
2
3
1
1
2
2
2
3
1
2
2
2
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
1
2
2
2
2
3
1
2
2
2
2
3
1
1
1
1
Rev. C | Page 20 of 108
Data Sheet
Mnemonic
RLC A
RR A
RRC A
Data Transfer
MOV A,Rn
MOV A,@Ri
MOV Rn,A
MOV @Ri,A
MOV A,dir
MOV A,#data
MOV Rn,#data
MOV dir,A
MOV Rn, dir
MOV dir, Rn
MOV @Ri,#data
MOV dir,@Ri
MOV @Ri,dir
MOV dir,dir
MOV dir,#data
MOV DPTR,#data
MOVC A,@A+DPTR
MOVC A,@A+PC
MOVX 2 A,@Ri
MOVX2 A,@DPTR
MOVX2 @Ri,A
MOVX2 @DPTR,A
PUSH dir
POP dir
XCH A,Rn
XCH A,@Ri
XCHD A,@Ri
XCH A,dir
Boolean
CLR C
CLR bit
SETB C
SETB bit
CPL C
CPL bit
ANL C,bit
ANL C,/bit
ORL C,bit
ORL C,/bit
MOV C,bit
MOV bit,C
Branching
JMP @A+DPTR
RET
RETI
ACALL addr11
AJMP addr11
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Description
Rotate A left through carry
Rotate A right
Rotate A right through carry
Bytes
1
1
1
Cycles 1
1
1
1
Move register to A
Move indirect memory to A
Move A to register
Move A to indirect memory
Move direct byte to A
Move immediate to A
Move register to immediate
Move A to direct byte
Move register to direct byte
Move direct to register
Move immediate to indirect memory
Move indirect to direct memory
Move direct to indirect memory
Move direct byte to direct byte
Move immediate to direct byte
Move immediate to data pointer
Move code byte relative DPTR to A
Move code byte relative PC to A
Move external (A8) data to A
Move external (A16) data to A
Move A to external data (A8)
Move A to external data (A16)
Push direct byte onto stack
Pop direct byte from stack
Exchange A and register
Exchange A and indirect memory
Exchange A and indirect memory nibble
Exchange A and direct byte
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
2
2
1
2
2
2
Clear carry
Clear direct bit
Set carry
Set direct bit
Complement carry
Complement direct bit
AND direct bit and carry
AND direct bit inverse to carry
OR direct bit and carry
OR direct bit inverse to carry
Move direct bit to carry
Move carry to direct bit
1
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
Jump indirect relative to DPTR
Return from subroutine
Return from interrupt
Absolute jump to subroutine
Absolute jump unconditional
1
1
1
2
2
3
4
4
3
3
Footnotes at end of table.
Rev. C | Page 21 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Mnemonic
SJMP rel
JC rel
JNC rel
JZ rel
JNZ rel
DJNZ Rn,rel
LJMP
LCALL 3 addr16
JB bit,rel
JNB bit,rel
JBC bit,rel
CJNE A,dir,rel
CJNE A,#data,rel
CJNE Rn,#data,rel
CJNE @Ri,#data,rel
DJNZ dir,rel
Miscellaneous
NOP
Data Sheet
Description
Short jump (relative address)
Jump on carry = 1
Jump on carry = 0
Jump on accumulator = 0
Jump on accumulator ! = 0
Decrement register, JNZ relative
Long jump unconditional
Long jump to subroutine
Jump on direct bit = 1
Jump on direct bit = 0
Jump on direct bit = 1 and clear
Compare A, direct JNE relative
Compare A, immediate JNE relative
Compare register, immediate JNE relative
Compare indirect, immediate JNE relative
Decrement direct byte, JNZ relative
Bytes
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Cycles 1
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
No operation
1
1
One cycle is one clock.
MOVX instructions are four cycles when they have 0 wait state. Cycles of MOVX instructions are 4 + n cycles when they have n wait states as programmed via EWAIT.
3
LCALL instructions are three cycles when the LCALL instruction comes from an interrupt.
1
2
Flash/EE Data Memory
MEMORY ORGANIZATION
The ADuC845, ADuC847, and ADuC848 contain four memory
blocks:
•
62 kbytes/32 kbytes/8 kbytes of on-chip Flash/EE program
memory
•
4 kbytes of on-chip Flash/EE data memory
•
256 bytes of general-purpose RAM
•
2 kbytes of internal XRAM
Flash/EE Program Memory
The parts provide up to 62 kbytes of Flash/EE program memory
to run user code. All further references to Flash/EE program
memory assume the 62-kbyte option.
When EA is pulled high externally during a power cycle or a
hardware reset, the parts default to code execution from their
internal 62 kbytes of Flash/EE program memory. The parts do
not support the rollover from internal code space to external
code space. No external code space is available on the parts.
Permanently embedded firmware allows code to be serially
downloaded to the 62 kbytes of internal code space via the
UART serial port while the device is in-circuit. No external
hardware is required.
During run time, 56 kbytes of the 62-kbyte program memory
can be reprogrammed. This means that the code space can be
upgraded in the field by using a user-defined protocol running
on the parts, or it can be used as a data memory. For details, see
the Nonvolatile Flash/EE Memory Overview section.
The user has 4 kbytes of Flash/EE data memory available that
can be accessed indirectly by using a group of registers mapped
into the special function register (SFR) space. For details, see
the Nonvolatile Flash/EE Memory Overview section.
General-Purpose RAM
The general-purpose RAM is divided into two separate
memories, the upper and the lower 128 bytes of RAM. The
lower 128 bytes of RAM can be accessed through direct or
indirect addressing. The upper 128 bytes of RAM can be
accessed only through indirect addressing because it shares the
same address space as the SFR space, which must be accessed
through direct addressing.
The lower 128 bytes of internal data memory are mapped as
shown in Figure 8. The lowest 32 bytes are grouped into four
banks of eight registers addressed as R0 to R7. The next 16 bytes
(128 bits), locations 20H to 2FH above the register banks, form
a block of directly addressable bit locations at Bit Addresses
00H to 7FH. The stack can be located anywhere in the internal
memory address space, and the stack depth can be expanded up
to 2048 bytes.
Reset initializes the stack pointer to location 07H. Any call or
push pre-increments the SP before loading the stack. Therefore,
loading the stack starts from location 08H, which is also the
first register (R0) of Register Bank 1. Thus, if one is going to use
more than one register bank, the stack pointer should be
initialized to an area of RAM not used for data storage.
Rev. C | Page 22 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
7FH
is possible (by setting CFG845.7/ADuC847.7/ADuC848.7) to
enable the 11-bit extended stack pointer. In this case, the stack
rolls over from FFH in RAM to 0100H in XRAM.
GENERAL-PURPOSE
AREA
30H
2FH
The 11-bit stack pointer is visible in the SPH and SP SFRs. The
SP SFR is located at 81H as with a standard 8052. The SPH SFR
is located at B7H. The 3 LSBs of the SPH SFR contain the 3
extra bits necessary to extend the 8-bit stack pointer in the SP
SFR into an 11-bit stack pointer.
BIT-ADDRESSABLE
(BIT ADDRESSES)
BANKS
SELECTED
VIA
BITS IN PSW
20H
1FH
11
18H
17H
07FFH
10
10H
0FH
FOUR BANKS OF EIGHT
REGISTERS
R0 TO R7
07H
RESET VALUE OF
STACK POINTER
01
08H
Figure 8. Lower 128 Bytes of Internal Data Memory
Internal XRAM
CFG845/7/8.7 = 0
The ADuC845, ADuC847, and ADuC848 contain 2 kbytes of
on-chip extended data memory. This memory, although onchip, is accessed via the MOVX instruction. The 2 kbytes of
internal XRAM are mapped into the bottom 2 kbytes of the
external address space if the CFG84x.0 (Table 7) bit is set;
otherwise, access to the external data memory occurs just like a
standard 8051.
Even with the CFG84x.0 bit set, access to the external (off chip),
XRAM occurs once the 24-bit DPTR is greater than 0007FFH.
FFFFFFH
FFFFFFH
EXTERNAL
DATA
MEMORY
SPACE
(24-BIT
ADDRESS
SPACE)
EXTERNAL
DATA
MEMORY
SPACE
(24-BIT
ADDRESS
SPACE)
000000H
CFG845/7/8.0 = 0
CFG845/7/8.0 = 1
04741-009
000000H
2 kBYTES
ON-CHIP
XRAM
100H
FFH
00H
256 BYTES OF
ON-CHIP DATA
RAM
(DATA +
STACK)
LOWER 256
BYTES OF
ON-CHIP XRAM
(DATA ONLY)
00H
Figure 10. Extended Stack Pointer Operation
External Data Memory (External XRAM)
There is no support for external program memory access to the
parts. However, just like a standard 8051-compatible core, the
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 can access external data
memory using a MOVX instruction. The MOVX instruction
automatically outputs the various control strobes required to
access the data memory. The parts, however, can access up to
16 Mbytes of external data memory. This is an enhancement of
the 64 kbytes of external data memory space available on a
standard 8051-compatible core. See the Hardware Design
Considerations section for details.
When accessing external RAM, the EWAIT register might need
to be programmed to give extra machine cycles to the MOVX
operation. This is to account for differing external RAM access
speeds.
000800H
0007FFH
CFG845/7/8.7 = 1
04741-010
00H
UPPER 1792
BYTES OF
ON-CHIP XRAM
(DATA + STACK
FOR EXSP = 1,
DATA ONLY
FOR EXSP = 0)
04741-008
00
EWAIT SFR
Figure 9. Internal and External XRAM
When enabled and when accessing the internal XRAM, the P0
and P2 port pin operations, as well as the RD and WR strobes,
do not operate as a standard 8051 MOVX instruction. This
allows the user to use these port pins as standard I/O. The
internal XRAM can be configured as part of the extended 11-bit
stack pointer. By default, the stack operates exactly like an 8052
in that it rolls over from FFH to 00H in the general-purpose
RAM. On the ADuC845, ADuC847, and ADuC848, however, it
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
9FH
00H
No
This special function register (SFR), when programmed,
dictates the number of wait states for the MOVX instruction.
The value can vary between 0H and 7H. The MOVX instruction increases by one machine cycle (4 + n, where n = EWAIT
number in decimal) for every increase in the EWAIT value.
Rev. C | Page 23 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
Data Pointer (DPTR)
SPECIAL FUNCTION REGISTERS (SFRs)
The SFR space is mapped into the upper 128 bytes of internal
data memory space and accessed by direct addressing only. It
provides an interface between the CPU and all on-chip peripherals. A block diagram showing the programming model of the
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 via the SFR area is shown in
Figure 11.
All registers except the program counter (PC) and the four
general-purpose register banks reside in the SFR area. The SFR
registers include control, configuration, and data registers that
provide an interface between the CPU and all on-chip peripherals.
62-kBYTE
ELECTRICALLY
REPROGRAMMABLE
NONVOLATILE
FLASH/EE PROGRAM
MEMORY
Stack Pointer (SP and SPH)
As mentioned earlier, the parts offer an extended 11-bit stack
pointer. The three extra bits needed to make up the 11-bit stack
pointer are the three LSBs of the SPH byte located at B7H. To
enable the SPH SFR, the EXSP (CFG84x.7) bit must be set;
otherwise, the SPH SFR can be neither written to nor read from.
S-D ADC
Program Status Word (PSW)
04741-011
OTHER ON-CHIP
PERIPHERALS
TEMPERATURE
SENSOR
CURRENT SOURCES
12-BIT DAC
SERIAL I/O
WDT
PSM
TIC
PWM
256 BYTES RAM
2kBYTES XRAM
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 support dual data
pointers. See the Dual Data Pointers section.
The SP SFR is the stack pointer, which is used to hold an
internal RAM address called the top of the stack. The SP register
is incremented before data is stored during PUSH and CALL
executions. Although the stack can reside anywhere in on-chip
RAM, the SP register is initialized to 07H after a reset. This
causes the stack to begin at location 08H.
4-kBYTE
ELECTRICALLY
REPROGRAMMABLE
NONVOLATILE
FLASH/EE DATA
MEMORY
128-BYTE
SPECIAL
FUNCTION
REGISTER
AREA
8051COMPATIBLE
CORE
The data pointer is made up of three 8-bit registers: DPP (page
byte), DPH (high byte), and DPL (low byte). These provide
memory addresses for internal code and data memory access.
The DPTR can be manipulated as a 16-bit register (DPTR =
DPH, DPL), although INC DPTR instructions automatically
carry over to DPP, or as three independent 8-bit registers (DPP,
DPH, DPL).
Figure 11. Programming Model
Accumulator SFR (ACC)
ACC is the accumulator register, which is used for math operations including addition, subtraction, integer multiplication and
division, and Boolean bit manipulations. The mnemonics for
accumulator-specific instructions usually refer to the
accumulator as A.
B SFR (B)
The B register is used with the accumulator for multiplication
and division operations. For other instructions, it can be treated
as a general-purpose scratch pad register.
The PSW SFR contains several bits that reflect the current
status of the CPU as listed in Table 5.
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
D0H
00H
Yes
Table 5. PSW SFR Bit Designations
Bit No.
7
6
5
4, 3
Name
CY
AC
F0
RS1, RS0
2
1
0
OV
F1
P
Rev. C | Page 24 of 108
Description
Carry Flag.
Auxiliary Carry Flag.
General-Purpose Flag.
Register Bank Select Bits.
RS1 RS0
Selected Bank
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
2
1
1
3
Overflow Flag.
General-Purpose Flag.
Parity Bit.
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 Configuration Register
(CFG845/CFG847/CFG848)
Power Control Register (PCON)
The PCON SFR contains bits for power-saving options and
general-purpose status flags as listed in Table 6.
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
The CFG845/CFG847/CFG848 SFR contains the bits necessary
to configure the internal XRAM and the extended SP. By default,
it configures the user into 8051 mode, that is, extended SP, and
the internal XRAM are disabled. When using in a program, use
the part name only, that is, CFG845, CFG847, or CFG848.
87H
00H
No
Table 6. PCON SFR Bit Designations
Bit No.
7
Name
SMOD
6
SERIPD
5
INT0PD
4
3
2
1
ALEOFF
GF1
GF0
PD
0
-----
Description
Double UART Baud Rate.
0 = Normal, 1 = Double Baud Rate.
Serial Power-Down Interrupt Enable. If this
bit is set, a serial interrupt from either SPI
or I2C can terminate the power-down
mode.
INT0 Power-Down Interrupt Enable.
If this bit is set, either a level (IT0 = 0) or a
negative-going transition (IT0 = 1) on the
INT0 pin terminates power-down mode.
If set to 1, the ALE output is disabled.
General-Purpose Flag Bit.
General-Purpose Flag Bit.
Power-Down Mode Enable. If set to 1, the
part enters power-down mode.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
AFH
00H
No
Table 7. CFG845/CFG847/CFG848 SFR Bit Designations
Bit No.
7
Name
EXSP
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
------------------XRAMEN
Rev. C | Page 25 of 108
Description
Extended SP Enable.
If this bit is set to 1, the stack rolls over
from SPH/SP = 00FFH to 0100H.
If this bit is cleared to 0, SPH SFR is
disabled and the stack rolls over from
SP = FFH to SP = 00H.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
If this bit is set to 1, the internal XRAM is
mapped into the lower 2 kbytes of the
external address space.
If this bit is cleared to 0, the internal XRAM
is accessible and up to 16 MB of external
data memory become available. See
Figure 8.
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
ADC CIRCUIT INFORMATION
The ADuC845 incorporates two 10-channel (8-channel on the
MQFP package) 24-bit Σ-∆ ADCs, while the ADuC847 and
ADuC848 each incorporate a single 10-channel (8-channel on
the MQFP package) 24-bit and 16-bit Σ-∆ ADC.
Each part also includes an on-chip programmable gain
amplifier and configurable buffering (neither is available on the
auxiliary ADC on the ADuC845). The parts also incorporate
digital filtering intended for measuring wide dynamic range and
low frequency signals such as those in weigh-scale, strain-gage,
pressure transducer, or temperature measurement applications.
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 can be configured as four
or five (MQFP/LFCSP package) fully-differential input channels
or as eight or ten (MQFP/LFCSP package) pseudo differential
input channels referenced to AINCOM. The ADC on each part
(primary only on the ADuC845) can be fully buffered internally,
and can be programmed for one of eight input ranges from
±20 mV to ±2.56 V (VREF × 1.024). Buffering the input channel
means that the part can handle significant source impedances
on the selected analog input and that RC filtering (for noise
rejection or RFI reduction) can be placed on the analog inputs.
If the ADC is used with internal buffering disabled
(ADC0CON1.7 = 1, ADC0CON1.6 = 0), these unbuffered
inputs provide a dynamic load to the driving source. Therefore,
resistor/capacitor combinations on the inputs can cause dc gain
errors, depending on the output impedance of the source that is
driving the ADC inputs.
Table 8 and Table 9 show the allowable external resistance/
capacitance values for unbuffered mode such that no gain error
at the 16-bit and 20-bit levels, respectively, is introduced. When
used with internal buffering enabled, it is recommended that a
capacitor (10 nF to 100 nF) be placed on the input to the ADC
(usually as part of an antialiasing filter) to aid in noise
performance.
The input channels are intended to convert signals directly from
sensors without the need for external signal conditioning. With
internal buffering disabled (relevant bits set/cleared in
ADC0CON1), external buffering might be required.
When the internal buffer is enabled, it might be necessary to
offset the negative input channel by +100 mV and to offset the
positive channel by −100 mV if the reference range is AVDD.
This accounts for the restricted common-mode input range in
the buffer. Some circuits, for example, bridge circuits, are
inherently suitable to use without having to offset where the
output voltage is balanced around VREF/2 and is not sufficiently
large to encroach on the supply rails. Internal buffering is not
available on the auxiliary ADC (ADuC845 only). The auxiliary
ADC (ADuC845 only) is fixed at a gain range of ±2.50 V.
The ADCs use a Σ-Δ conversion technique to realize up to
24 bits on the ADuC845 and the ADuC847, and up to 16 bits on
the ADuC848 of no missing codes performance (20 Hz update
rate, chop enabled). The Σ-Δ modulator converts the sampled
input signal into a digital pulse train whose duty cycle contains
the digital information. A sinc3 programmable low-pass filter
(see Table 28) is then used to decimate the modulator output
data stream to give a valid data conversion result at programmable output rates. The signal chain has two modes of operation,
chop enabled and chop disabled. The CHOP bit in the
ADCMODE register enables or disables the chopping scheme.
Table 8. Maximum Resistance for No 16-Bit Gain Error (Unbuffered Mode)
Gain
1
2
4
8–128
0 pF
111.3 kΩ
53.7 kΩ
25.4 kΩ
10.7 kΩ
50 pF
27.8 kΩ
13.5 kΩ
6.4 kΩ
2.9 kΩ
100 pF
16.7 kΩ
8.1 kΩ
3.9 kΩ
1.7 kΩ
External Capacitance
500 pF
4.5 kΩ
2.2 kΩ
1.0 kΩ
480 Ω
1000 pF
2.58 kΩ
1.26 kΩ
600 Ω
270 Ω
5000 pF
700 Ω
360 Ω
170 Ω
75 Ω
1000 pF
1.77 kΩ
880 Ω
430 Ω
195 Ω
5000 pF
440 Ω
220 Ω
110 Ω
50 Ω
Table 9. Maximum Resistance for No 20-Bit Gain Error (Unbuffered Mode)
Gain
1
2
4
8–128
0 pF
84.9 kΩ
42.0 kΩ
20.5 kΩ
8.8 kΩ
50 pF
21.1 kΩ
10.4 kΩ
5.0 kΩ
2.3 k Ω
External Capacitance
100 pF
500 pF
12.5 kΩ
3.2 kΩ
6.1 kΩ
1.6 kΩ
2.9 kΩ
790 Ω
1.3 k Ω
370 Ω
Rev. C | Page 26 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Signal Chain Overview (Chop Enabled, CHOP = 0)
With chop enabled, the ADC repeatedly reverses its inputs. The
decimated digital output words from the Sinc3 filter, therefore,
have a positive offset and a negative offset term included. As a
result, a final summing stage is included so that each output
word from the filter is summed and averaged with the previous
filter output to produce a new valid output result to be written
to the ADC data register. Programming the Sinc3 decimation
factor is restricted to an 8-bit register called SF (see Table 28),
the actual decimation factor is the register value times 8.
Therefore, the decimated output rate from the Sinc3 filter (and
the ADC conversion rate) is
With the CHOP bit = 0 (see the ADCMODE SFR bit designations in Table 24), the chopping scheme is enabled. This is the
default condition and gives optimum performance in terms of
offset errors and drift performance. With chop enabled, the
available output rates vary from 5.35 Hz to 105 Hz (SF = 255
and 13, respectively). A typical block diagram of the ADC input
channel with chop enabled is shown in Figure 12.
The sampling frequency of the modulator loop is many times
higher than the bandwidth of the input signal. The integrator in
the modulator shapes the quantization noise (which results
from the analog-to-digital conversion) so that the noise is pushed
toward one-half of the modulator frequency. The output of the
Σ-Δ modulator feeds directly into the digital filter. The digital
filter then band-limits the response to a frequency significantly
lower than one-half of the modulator frequency. In this manner,
the 1-bit output of the comparator is translated into a band
limited, low noise output from the ADCs.
1
1
f ADC = ×
× f MOD
3 8 × SF
where:
fADC is the ADC conversion rate.
SF is the decimal equivalent of the word loaded to the filter
register.
fMOD is the modulator sampling rate of 32.768 kHz.
The ADC filter is a low-pass Sinc3 or (sinx/x)3 filter whose
primary function is to remove the quantization noise introduced
at the modulator. The cutoff frequency and decimated output
data rate of the filter are programmable via the Sinc filter word
loaded into the filter (SF) register (see Table 28). The complete
signal chain is chopped, resulting in excellent dc offset and
offset drift specifications and is extremely beneficial in applications where drift, noise rejection, and optimum EMI rejection
are important.
ANALOG
INPUT
MUX
BUF
f CHOP =
1
2 × f ADC
As shown in the block diagram (Figure 12), the Sinc3 filter
outputs alternately contain +VOS and −VOS, where VOS is the
respective channel offset.
FIN
FMO∆
FCHOP
PGA
S-∆
MO∆
XOR
FA∆C
SINC3 FILTER
3 × (8 × SF)
AIN + VOS
AIN – VOS
Figure 12. Block Diagram of the ADC Input Channel with Chop Enabled
Rev. C | Page 27 of 108
S-∆
2
∆IGITAL
OUTPUT
04741-013
FCHOP
The chop rate of the channel is half the output data rate:
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
This offset is removed by performing a running average of 2.
This average by 2 means that the settling time to any change in
programming of the ADC is twice the normal conversion time,
while an asynchronous step change on the analog input is not
fully reflected until the third subsequent output. See Figure 13.
2
 2  t ADC
f ADC
SYNCHRONOUS CHANGE
(I.E. CHANNEL CHANGE)
SAMPLE 1
SAMPLE 2
SAMPLE 3
NO/INVALID
OUTPUT
SAMPLE 1 + SAMPLE 2
2
SAMPLE 4
SAMPLE 5
SAMPLE 6
SAMPLE 3 + SAMPLE 4
2
NO OUTPUT
VALID OUTPUT
SAMPLE 2 + SAMPLE 3
2
SAMPLE 4 + SAMPLE 5
2
VALID OUTPUT
VALID OUTPUT
VALID OUTPUT
04741-012
SAMPLE 5 + SAMPLE 6
2
Figure 13. ADC Settling Time Following a Synchronous Change with
Chop Enabled
ASYNCHRONOUS CHANGE
(I.E. DISCONTINUOUS INPUT CHANGE)
SAMPLE 1
SAMPLE 2
SAMPLE 3
SAMPLE 4
SAMPLE 5
SAMPLE 6
NO OUTPUT
SAMPLE 1 + SAMPLE 2
2
SAMPLE 3 + SAMPLE 4
2
UNSETTLED OUTPUT
VALID OUTPUT
SAMPLE 2 + SAMPLE 3
2
SAMPLE 4 + SAMPLE 5
2
VALID OUTPUT
UNSETTLED OUTPUT
SAMPLE 5 + SAMPLE 6
2
VALID OUTPUT
Figure 14. ADC Settling Time Following an Asynchronous Change with
Chop Enabled
Rev. C | Page 28 of 108
04741-014
t SETTLE 
The allowable range for SF (chop enabled) is 13 to 255 with
a default of 69 (45H). The corresponding conversion rates,
rms and peak-to-peak noise performances are shown in
Table 10, Table 11, Table 12, and Table 13. The numbers are
typical and generated at a differential input voltage of 0 V
and a common-mode voltage of 2.5 V. Note that the conversion time increases by 0.732 ms for each increment in SF.
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
ADC Noise Performance with Chop Enabled (CHOP = 0)
used in the implementation of the modulator. The second
source is quantization noise, which is added when the analog
input is converted to the digital domain. The device noise is at a
low level and is independent of frequency. The quantization
noise starts at an even lower level but rises rapidly with increasing
frequency to become the dominant noise source.
Table 10, Table 11, Table 12, and Table 13 show the output rms
noise and output peak-to-peak resolution in bits (rounded to
the nearest 0.5 LSB) for some typical output update rates for the
ADuC845, ADuC847, and ADuC848. The numbers are typical
and are generated at a differential input voltage of 0 V and a
common-mode voltage of 2.5 V. The output update rate is
selected via the SF7 to SF0 bits in the SF filter register. It is
important to note that the peak-to-peak resolution figures
represent the resolution for which there is no code flicker
within a 6-sigma limit.
The numbers in the tables are given for the bipolar input ranges.
For the unipolar ranges, the rms noise numbers are in the same
range as the bipolar figures, but the peak-to-peak resolution is
based on half the signal range, which effectively means losing
1 bit of resolution.
The output noise comes from two sources. The first source is
the electrical noise in the semiconductor devices (device noise)
Table 10. ADuC845 and ADuC847 Typical Output RMS Noise (µV) vs. Input Range and Update Rate with Chop Enabled
SF Word
13
23
27
69
255
Data Update Rate (Hz)
105.03
59.36
50.56
19.79
5.35
±20 mV
1.75
1.25
1.0
0.63
0.31
±40 mV
1.30
0.95
1.0
0.68
0.38
±80 mV
1.65
1.08
0.85
0.52
0.34
Input Range
±160 mV
±320 mV
1.5
2.1
0.94
1.0
0.85
1.13
0.7
0.61
0.32
0.4
±640 mV
3.1
1.87
1.56
1.1
0.45
±1.28 V
7.15
3.24
2.9
1.3
0.68
±2.56 V
13.3
7.1
3.6
2.75
1.22
Table 11. ADuC845 and ADuC847 Typical Peak-to-Peak Resolution (Bits) vs. Input Range and Update Rate with Chop Enabled
SF Word
13
23
27
69
255
Data Update Rate (Hz)
105.03
59.36
50.56
19.79
5.35
±20 mV
12
12
12.5
13
14.5
±40 mV
13
13.5
13.5
14
15
±80 mV
14
14.5
15
15.5
16
Input Range
±160 mV
±320 mV
15
15.5
15.5
16.5
16
16.5
16
17.5
17
18
±640 mV
16
16.5
17
17.5
18.5
±1.28 V
16
17
17
18
19
±2.56 V
16
16.5
17.5
18
19.5
±1.28 V
7.15
3.24
2.9
1.3
0.68
±2.56 V
13.3
7.1
3.6
2.75
1.22
±1.28 V
16
17
16
16
16
±2.56 V
16
16
16
16
16
Table 12. ADuC848 Typical Output Noise (µV) vs. Input Range and Update Rate with Chop Enabled
SF Word
13
23
27
69
255
Data Update Rate (Hz)
105.03
59.36
50.56
19.79
5.35
±20 mV
1.75
1.25
1.0
0.63
0.31
±40 mV
1.30
0.95
1.0
0.68
0.38
±80 mV
1.65
1.08
0.85
0.52
0.34
Input Range
±160 mV
±320 mV
1.5
2.1
0.94
1.0
0.85
1.13
0.7
0.61
0.32
0.4
±640 mV
3.1
1.87
1.56
1.1
0.45
Table 13. ADuC848 Typical Peak-to-Peak Resolution (Bits) vs. Input Range and Update Rate with Chop Enabled
SF Word
13
23
27
69
255
Data Update Rate (Hz)
105.03
59.36
50.56
19.79
5.35
±20 mV
12
12
12.5
13
14.5
±40 mV
13
13.5
13.5
14
15
±80 mV
14
14.5
15
15.5
16
Input Range
±160 mV
±320 mV
15
15.5
15.5
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
Rev. C | Page 29 of 108
±640 mV
16
16
16
16
16
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
Signal Chain Overview with Chop Disabled (CHOP = 1)
The settling time to a step input is governed by the digital filter.
A synchronized step change requires a settling time of three
times the programmed update rate; a channel change can be
treated as a synchronized step change. This is one conversion
longer than the case for chop enabled. However, because the
ADC throughput is three times faster with chop disabled than it
is with chop enabled, the actual time to a settled ADC output is
significantly less also. This means that following a synchronized
step change, the ADC requires three conversions (note: data is
not output following a synchronized ADC change until data has
settled) before the result accurately reflects the new input
voltage.
With CHOP = 1, chop is disabled and the available output rates
vary from 16.06 Hz to 1.365 kHz. The range of applicable SF
words is from 3 to 255. When switching between channels with
chop disabled, the channel throughput rate is higher than when
chop is enabled. The drawback with chop disabled is that the
drift performance is degraded and offset calibration is required
following a gain range change or significant temperature
change. A block diagram of the ADC input channel with chop
disabled is shown in Figure 15.
The signal chain includes a multiplex or buffer, PGA, Σ-Δ
modulator, and digital filter. The modulator bit stream is
applied to a Sinc3 filter. Programming the Sinc3 decimation
factor is restricted to an 8-bit register SF; the actual decimation
factor is the register value times 8. The decimated output rate
from the Sinc3 filter (and the ADC conversion rate) is therefore
An unsynchronized step change requires four conversions to
accurately reflect the new analog input at its output. Note that
with an unsynchronized change the ADC continues to output
data and so the user must take unsettled outputs into account.
Again, this is one conversion longer than with chop enabled, but
because the ADC throughput with chop disabled is faster than
with chop enabled, the actual time taken to obtain a settled
ADC output is less.
1
× f MOD
8 × SF
where:
fADC is the ADC conversion rate.
SF is the decimal equivalent of the word loaded to the filter
register, valid range is from 3 to 255.
fMOD is the modulator sampling rate of 32.768 kHz.
ANALOG
INPUT
MUX
BUF
3
= 3 × t ADC
f ADC
The allowable range for SF is 3 to 255 with a default of 69 (45H).
The corresponding conversion rates, rms, and peak-to-peak
noise performances are shown in Table 14, Table 15, Table 16,
and Table 17. Note that the conversion time increases by 0.244 ms
for each increment in SF.
FIN
FMO∆
PGA
S-∆
MO∆
FA∆C
SINC3 FILTER
8 × SF
Figure 15. Block Diagram of ADC Input Channel with Chop Disabled
Rev. C | Page 30 of 108
∆IGITAL
OUTPUT
04741-015
f ADC =
t SETTLE =
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
ADC Noise Performance with Chop Disabled (CHOP = 1)
Table 14, Table 15, Table 16, and Table 17 show the output rms
noise and output peak-to-peak resolution in bits (rounded to
the nearest 0.5 LSB) for some typical output update rates. The
numbers are typical and are generated at a differential input
voltage of 0 V and a common-mode voltage of 2.5 V. The output
update rate is selected via the SF7 to SF0 bits in the SF filter
register. Note that the peak-to-peak resolution figures represent
the resolution for which there is no code flicker within a 6-sigma
limit.
The output noise comes from two sources. The first source is
the electrical noise in the semiconductor devices (device noise)
used in the implementation of the modulator. The second
source is quantization noise, which is added when the analog
input is converted to the digital domain. The device noise is at a
low level and is independent of frequency. The quantization
noise starts at an even lower level but rises rapidly with increasing
frequency to become the dominant noise source.
The numbers in the tables are given for the bipolar input ranges.
For the unipolar ranges, the rms noise numbers are the same as
the bipolar range, but the peak-to-peak resolution is based on
half the signal range, which effectively means losing 1 bit of
resolution. Typically, the performance of the ADC with chop
disabled shows a 0.5 LSB degradation over the performance
with chop enabled.
Table 14. ADuC845 and ADuC847 Typical Output RMS Noise (µV) vs. Input Range and Update Rate with Chop Disabled
SF Word
3
13
68
82
255
Data Update
Rate (Hz)
1365.33
315.08
59.36
49.95
16.06
Input Range
±20 mV
30.64
2.07
0.85
0.83
0.52
±40 mV
24.5
1.95
0.79
0.77
0.58
±80 mV
56.18
2.28
1.01
0.85
0.59
±160 mV
100.47
3.24
0.99
0.77
0.48
±320 mV
248.39
8.22
0.79
0.91
0.52
±640 mV
468.65
13.9
1.29
1.12
0.57
±1.28 V
774.36
20.98
2.3
1.59
1.16
±2.56 V
1739.5
49.26
3.7
3.2
1.68
Table 15. ADuC845 and ADuC847 Typical Peak-to-Peak Resolution (Bits) vs. Input Range and Update Rate with Chop Disabled
SF Word
3
13
68
82
255
Data Update
Rate (Hz)
1365.33
315.08
59.36
49.95
16.06
Input Range
±20 mV
7.5
11.5
13
13
13.5
±40 mV
9
12.5
14
14
14.5
±80 mV
9
13.5
14.5
15
15.5
±160 mV
9
14
15.5
16
16.5
±320 mV
9
13.5
17
16.5
17.5
±640 mV
9
14
17
17.5
18.5
±1.28 V
9
14
17.5
18
18.5
±2.56 V
9
14
18
18
19
±1.28 V
774.36
20.98
2.3
1.59
1.16
±2.56 V
1739.5
49.26
3.7
3.2
1.68
Table 16. ADuC848 Typical Output RMS Noise (µV) vs. Input Range and Update Rate with Chop Disabled
SF Word
3
13
69
82
255
Data Update
Rate (Hz)
1365.33
315.08
59.36
49.95
16.06
Input Range
±20 mV
30.64
2.07
0.85
0.83
0.52
±40 mV
24.5
1.95
0.79
0.77
0.58
±80 mV
56.18
2.28
1.01
0.85
0.59
±160 mV
100.47
3.24
0.99
0.77
0.48
±320 mV
248.39
8.22
0.79
0.91
0.52
±640 mV
468.65
13.9
1.29
1.12
0.57
Table 17. ADuC848 Typical Peak-to-Peak Resolution (Bits) vs. Input Range and Update Rate with Chop Disabled
SF Word
3
13
68
82
255
Data Update
Rate (Hz)
1365.33
315.08
59.36
49.95
16.06
±20 mV
7.5
11.5
13
13
13.5
±40 mV
9
12.5
14
14
14.5
±80 mV
9
13.5
14.5
15
15.5
Input Range
±160 mV
±320mV
9
9
14
13.5
15.5
16
16
16
16
16
Rev. C | Page 31 of 108
±640mV
9
14
16
16
16
±1.28 V
9
14
16
16
16
±2.56 V
9
14
16
16
16
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
When an external reference voltage is used, the primary ADC
sees this internally as a 2.56 V reference (VREF × 1.024).
Therefore, any calculations of LSB size should account for this.
For instance, with a 2.5 V external reference connected and
using a gain of 1 on a unipolar range (2.56 V), the LSB size is
(2.56/224) = 152.6 nV (if using the 24-bit ADC on the ADuC845
or ADuC847). If a bipolar gain of 4 is used (±640 mV), the LSB
size is (±640 mV)/224) = 76.3 nV (again using the 24-bit ADC
on the ADuC845 or ADuC847).
AUXILIARY ADC (ADUC845 ONLY)
Table 18. ADuC845 Typical Output RMS Noise (µV) vs.
Update Rate with Chop Enabled
SF Word
13
23
27
69
255
Data Update Rate (Hz)
105.03
59.36
50.56
19.79
5.35
µV
17.46
3.13
4.56
2.66
1.13
Table 19. ADuC845 Typical Peak-to-Peak Resolution (Bits) vs.
Update Rate1 with Chop Enabled
SF Word
13
23
27
69
255
1
Data Update Rate (Hz)
105.03
59.36
50.56
19.79
5.35
Bits
15.5
18
17.5
18
19.5
In applications where the excitation (voltage or current) for the
transducer on the analog input also drives the reference inputs
for the part, the effect of any low frequency noise in the
excitation source is removed because the application is ratiometric. If the parts are not used in a ratiometric configuration, a
low noise reference should be used. Recommended reference
voltage sources for the ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 include
ADR421, REF43, and REF192.
ADC converting in bipolar mode.
Table 20. ADuC845 Typical Output RMS Noise (µV) vs.
Update Rate with Chop Disabled
SF Word
3
13
66
69
81
255
Data Update Rate (Hz)
1365.33
315.08
62.06
59.36
50.57
16.06
µV
1386.58
34.94
3.2
3.19
3.14
1.71
The reference inputs provide a high impedance, dynamic load
to external connections. Because the impedance of each reference
input is dynamic, resistor/capacitor combinations on these pins
can cause dc gain errors, depending on the output impedance of
the source that is driving the reference inputs. Reference voltage
sources, such as those mentioned above, for example, the ADR421,
typically have low output impedances, and, therefore, decoupling
capacitors on the REFIN± or REFIN2± inputs would be recommended (typically 0.1 µF). Deriving the reference voltage from
an external resistor configuration means that the reference input
sees a significant external source impedance. External decoupling
of the REFIN± and/or REFIN2± inputs is not recommended in
this type of configuration.
Table 21. ADuC845 Peak-to-Peak Resolution (Bits) vs.
Update Rate with Chop Disabled
SF Word
3
13
66
69
81
255
Data Update Rate (Hz)
1365.33
315.08
62.06
59.36
50.57
16.06
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 can also be configured to
use the on-chip band gap reference via the XREF0/1 bits in the
ADC0CON2 SFR (for primary ADC) or the AXREF bit in
ADC1CON (for auxiliary ADC (ADuC845 only)). In this mode
of operation, the ADC sees the internal reference of 1.25 V,
thereby halving all the input ranges. A consequence of using the
internal band gap reference is a noticeable degradation in peakto-peak resolution. For this reason, operation with an external
reference is recommended.
Bits
9
14.5
18
18
18
19
BURNOUT CURRENT SOURCES
REFERENCE INPUTS
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 each have two separate
differential reference inputs, REFIN± and REFIN2±. While
both references are available for use with the primary ADC,
only REFIN± is available for the auxiliary ADC (ADuC845 only).
The common-mode range for these differential references is
from AGND to AVDD. The nominal external reference voltage is
2.5 V, with the primary and auxiliary (ADuC845 only) reference
select bits configured from the ADC0CON2 and ADC1CON
(ADuC845 only), respectively.
The primary ADC on the ADuC845 and the ADC on the
ADuC847 and ADuC848 incorporate two 100 nA constant
current generators that are used to detect a failure in a connected
sensor. One sources current from the AVDD to AIN(+), and one
sinks current from AIN(−) to AGND. These currents are only
configurable for use on AIN5/AIN6 and/or AIN7/AIN8 in
differential mode only, from the ICON.6 bit in the ICON SFR
(see Table 30). These burnout current sources are also available
only with buffering enabled via the BUF0/BUF1 bits in the
ADC0CON1 SFR. Once the burnout currents are turned on, a
current flows in the external transducer circuit, and a measurement
Rev. C | Page 32 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
REFERENCE DETECT CIRCUIT
The main and auxiliary (ADuC845 only) ADCs can be configured to allow the use of the internal band gap reference or an
external reference that is applied to the REFIN± pins by means
of the XREF0/1 bit in the Control Registers AD0CON2 and
AD1CON (ADuC845 only). A reference detection circuit is
provided to detect whether a valid voltage is applied to the
REFIN± pins. This feature arose in connection with strain-gage
sensors in weigh scales where the reference and signal are
provided via a cable from the remote sensor. It is desirable to
detect whether the cable is disconnected. If either of the pins is
floating or if the applied voltage is below a specified threshold, a
flag (NOXREF) is set in the ADC status register (ADCSTAT),
conversion results are clamped, and calibration registers are not
updated if a calibration is in progress.
Note that the reference detect does not look at REFIN2± pins.
If, during either an offset or gain calibration, the NOEXREF bit
becomes active, indicating an incorrect VREF, updating the relevant
calibration register is inhibited to avoid loading incorrect data
into these registers, and the appropriate bits in ADCSTAT (ERR0
or ERR1) are set. If the user needs to verify that a valid reference
is in place every time a calibration is performed, the status of
the ERR0 and ERR1 bits should be checked at the end of every
calibration cycle.
SINC FILTER REGISTER (SF)
The number entered into the SF register sets the decimation
factor of the Sinc3 filter for the ADC. See Table 28 and Table 29.
The range of operation of the SF word depends on whether
ADC chop is on or off. With chop disabled, the minimum SF
word is 3 and the maximum is 255. This gives an ADC throughput rate from 16.06 Hz to 1.365 kHz. With chop enabled, the
minimum SF word is 13 (all values lower than 13 are clamped
to 13) and the maximum is 255. This gives an ADC throughput
rate of 5.4 Hz to 105 Hz. See the fADC equation in the ADC
description preceding section.
An additional feature of the Sinc3 filter is a second notch filter
positioned in the frequency response at 60 Hz. This gives
simultaneous 60 Hz rejection to whatever notch is defined by
the SF filter. This 60 Hz filter is enabled via the REJ60 bit in the
ADCMODE register (ADCMODE.6). The notch is valid only
for SF words ≥ 68; otherwise, ADC errors occur, and, the notch
is best used with an SF word of 82d giving simultaneous 50 Hz
and 60 Hz rejection. This function is useful only with an ADC
clock (modulator rate) of 32.768 kHz. During calibration, the
current (user-written) value of the SF register is used.
Σ-∆ MODULATOR
A Σ-∆ ADC usually consists of two main blocks, an analog
modulator, and a digital filter. For the ADuC845/ADuC847/
ADuC848, the analog modulator consists of a difference
amplifier, an integrator block, a comparator, and a feedback
DAC as shown in Figure 16.
ANALOG
INPUT
DIFFERENCE
AMP
COMPARATOR
INTEGRATOR
HIGH
FREQUENCY
BIT STREAM
TO DIGITAL
FILTER
DAC
04741-016
of the input voltage on the analog input channel can be taken.
When the resulting voltage measured is full scale, the transducer
has gone open circuit. When the voltage measured is 0 V, this
indicates that the transducer has gone short circuit. The current
sources work over the normal absolute input voltage range
specifications.
Figure 16. Σ-∆ Modulator Simplified Block Diagram
In operation, the analog signal is fed to the difference amplifier
along with the output from the feedback DAC. The difference
between these two signals is integrated and fed to the comparator.
The output from the comparator provides the input to the feedback DAC so the system functions as a negative feedback loop
that tries to minimize the difference signal. The digital data that
represents the analog input voltage is contained in the duty cycle of
the pulse train appearing at the output of the comparator. This duty
cycle data can be recovered as a data-word by using a subsequent
digital filter stage. The sampling frequency of the modulator
loop is many times higher than the bandwidth of the input signal.
The integrator in the modulator shapes the quantization noise
(that results from the analog-to-digital conversion) so that the
noise is pushed toward one-half of the modulator frequency.
DIGITAL FILTER
The output of the ∑-∆ modulator feeds directly into the digital
filter. The digital filter then band-limits the response to a
frequency significantly lower than one-half of the modulator
frequency. In this manner, the 1-bit output of the comparator is
translated into a band-limited, low noise output from the part.
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 filter is a low-pass, Sinc3
or [(SINx)/x]3 filter whose primary function is to remove the
quantization noise introduced at the modulator. The cutoff
frequency and decimated output data rate of the filter are
programmable via the SF (Sinc filter) SFR as listed in Table 28
and Table 29.
Figure 22, Figure 23, Figure 24, and Figure 25 show the frequency
response of the ADC, yielding an overall output rate of 16.6 Hz
with chop enabled and 50 Hz with chop disabled. Also detailed
in these plots is the effect of the fixed 60 Hz drop-in notch filter
(REJ60 bit, ADCMODE.6). This fixed filter can be enabled or
disabled by setting or clearing the REJ60 bit in the ADCMODE
register (ADCMODE.6). This 60 Hz drop-in notch filter can be
Rev. C | Page 33 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
enabled for any SF word that yields an ADC throughput that is
less than 20 Hz with chop enabled (SF ≥ 68 decimal).
ADC CHOPPING
The ADCs on the ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 implement a
chopping scheme whereby the ADC repeatedly reverses its
inputs. The decimated digital output words from the Sinc3 filter,
therefore, have a positive and negative offset term included. As
a result, a final summing stage is included in each ADC so that
each output word from the filter is summed and averaged with
the previous filter output to produce a new valid output result
to be written to the ADC data SFRs. The ADC throughput or
update rate is listed in Table 29. The chopping scheme incorporated into the parts results in excellent dc offset and offset
drift specifications, and is extremely beneficial in applications
where drift, noise rejection, and optimum EMI performance are
important. ADC chop can be disabled via the chop bit in the
ADCMODE SFR (ADCMODE.3). Setting this bit to 1 (logic
high) disables chop mode.
CALIBRATION
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 incorporate four calibration
modes that can be programmed via the mode bits in the
ADCMODE SFR detailed in Table 24. Every part is calibrated
before it leaves the factory. The resulting offset and gain
calibration coefficients for both the primary and auxiliary
(ADuC845 only) ADCs are stored on-chip in manufacturingspecific Flash/EE memory locations. At power-on or after a
reset, these factory calibration registers are automatically
downloaded to the ADC calibration registers in the part’s SFR
space. To facilitate user calibration, each of the primary and
auxiliary (ADuC845 only) ADCs have dedicated calibration
control SFRs, which are described in the ADC SFR Interface
section. Once a user initiates a calibration procedure, the factory
calibration values that were initially downloaded during the
power-on sequence to the ADC calibration SFRs are overwritten.
The ADC to be calibrated must be enabled via the ADC enable
bits in the ADCMODE register.
Even though an internal offset calibration mode is described in
this section, note that the ADCs can be chopped. This chopping
scheme inherently minimizes offset errors and means that an
offset calibration should never be required. Also, because
factory 5 V/25°C gain calibration coefficients are automatically
present at power-on, an internal full-scale calibration is required
only if the part is operated at 3 V or at temperatures significantly
different from 25°C.
If the part is operated in chop disabled mode, a calibration may
need to be done with every gain range change that occurs via
the PGA.
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 each offer internal or
system calibration facilities. For full calibration to occur on the
selected ADC, the calibration logic must record the modulator
output for two input conditions: zero-scale and full-scale points.
These points are derived by performing a conversion on the
different input voltages (zero-scale and full-scale) provided to the
input of the modulator during calibration. The result of the
zero-scale calibration conversion is stored in the offset
calibration registers for the appropriate ADC. The result of the
full-scale calibration conversion is stored in the gain calibration
registers for the appropriate ADC. With these readings, the
calibration logic can calculate the offset and the gain slope for
the input-to-output transfer function of the converter.
During an internal zero-scale or full-scale calibration, the
respective zero-scale input or full-scale input is automatically
connected to the ADC inputs internally. A system calibration,
however, expects the system zero-scale and system full-scale
voltages to be applied externally to the ADC pins by the user
before the calibration mode is initiated. In this way, external
errors are taken into account and minimized. Note that all
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 ADC calibrations are carried
out at the user-selected SF word update rate. To optimize
calibration accuracy, it is recommended that the slowest possible
update rate be used.
Internally in the parts, the coefficients are normalized before
being used to scale the words coming out of the digital filter.
The offset calibration coefficient is subtracted from the result
prior to the multiplication by the gain coefficient.
From an operational point of view, a calibration should be
treated just like an ordinary ADC conversion. A zero-scale
calibration (if required) should always be carried out before a
full-scale calibration. System software should monitor the
relevant ADC RDY0/1 bit in the ADCSTAT SFR to determine
the end of calibration by using a polling sequence or an interrupt
driven routine. If required, the NOEXREF0/1 bits can be monitored to detect unconnected or low voltage errors in the reference
during conversion. In the event of the reference becoming
disconnected, causing a NOXREF flag during a calibration, the
calibration is immediately halted and no write to the calibration
SFRs takes place.
Internal Calibration Example
With chop enabled, a zero-scale or offset calibration should
never be required, although a full-scale or gain calibration may
be required. However, if a full internal calibration is required,
the procedure should be to select a PGA gain of 1 (±2.56 V) and
perform a zero-scale calibration (MD2...0 = 100B in the
ADCMODE register). Next, select and perform full-scale
calibration by setting MD2...0 = 101B in the ADCMODE SFR.
Now select the desired PGA range and perform a zero-scale
calibration again (MD2..0 = 100B in ADCMODE) at the new
PGA range. The reason for the double zero-scale calibration is
that the internal calibration procedure for full-scale calibration
automatically selects the reference in voltage at PGA = 1.
Rev. C | Page 34 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
The primary ADC incorporates an on-chip programmable gain
amplifier (PGA). The PGA can be programmed through eight
different ranges, which are programmed via the range bits (RN0
to RN2) in the ADC0CON1 register. With an external 2.5 V
reference applied, the unipolar ranges are 0 mV to 20 mV, 0 mV
to 40 mV, 0 mV to 80 mV, 0 mV to 160 mV, 0 mV to 320 mV,
0 mV to 640 mV, 0 V to 1.28 V and 0 V to 2.56 V, while in
bipolar mode the ranges are ±20 mV, ±40 mV, ±80 mV, ±160 mV,
±320 mV, ±64 0 mV, ±1.28 V, and ±2.56 V. These ranges should
appear on the input to the on-chip PGA. The ADC rangematching specification of 2 µV (typical with chop enabled)
means that calibration need only be carried out on a single
range and need not be repeated when the ADC range is
changed. This is a significant advantage compared to similar
The configuration of the inputs (unipolar vs. bipolar) is shown
in Figure 17.
AIN1
AIN1
FULLY DIFFERENTIAL
AIN2
AIN2
Rev. C | Page 35 of 108
AIN3
AIN4
AIN5
AIN6
AIN7
AIN8
AIN9
AIN10
AIN3
FULLY DIFFERENTIAL
AIN4
AIN5
FULLY DIFFERENTIAL
AIN6
AIN7
FULLY DIFFERENTIAL
AIN8
AIN9
FULLY DIFFERENTIAL
AINCOM
Figure 17. Unipolar and Bipolar Channel Pairs
AIN10
AINCOM
04741-017
PROGRAMMABLE GAIN AMPLIFIER
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
CSP PACKAGE
In bipolar mode, the zero-scale calibration determines the midscale point of the ADC (800000H) or 0 V.
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
CSP PACKAGE
Perform a system calibration at the required PGA range to be
used since the ADC scales to the differential voltages that are
applied to the ADC during the calibration routines.
INPUT 9
Perform a system full-scale or gain calibration by setting
the MD2...0 bits in the ADCMODE register to 111B.
INPUT 10
Apply a full-scale differential voltage across the ADC
inputs again at the same common-mode voltage.
INPUT 7
2.
The modes of operation for the ADC are fully differential mode
or pseudo differential mode. In fully differential mode, AIN1 to
AIN2 are one differential pair, and AIN3 to AIN4 are another
pair (AIN5 to AIN6, AIN7 to AIN8, and AIN9 to AIN10 are the
others). In differential mode, all AIN(−) pin names imply the
negative analog input of the selected differential pair, that is,
AIN2, AIN4, AIN6, AIN8, AIN10. The term AIN(+) implies
the positive input of the selected differential pair, that is, AIN1,
AIN3, AIN5, AIN7, AIN9. In pseudo differential mode, each
analog input is paired with the AINCOM pin, which can be
biased up or tied to AGND. In this mode, the AIN(−) implies
AINCOM, and AIN(+) implies any one of the ten analog input
channels.
INPUT 8
Perform a system zero-scale or offset calibration by setting
the MD2...0 bits in the ADCMODE register to 110B.
INPUT 5
Apply a differential voltage of 0 V to the selected analog
inputs (AIN+ to AIN−) that are held at a common-mode
voltage.
INPUT 6
1.
For example, if AIN(−) is biased to 2.5 V (tied to the external
reference voltage) and the ADC is configured for a unipolar
analog input range of 0 mV to >20 mV, the input voltage range
on AIN(+) is 2.5 V to 2.52 V. On the other hand, if AIN(−) is
biased to 2.5 V (again the external reference voltage) and the
ADC is configured for a bipolar analog input range of ±1.28 V,
the analog input range on the AIN(+) is 1.22 V to 3.78 V, that is,
2.5 V ± 1.28 V.
INPUT 3
System Calibration Example
With chop enabled, a system zero-scale or offset calibration
should never be required. However, if a full-scale or gain
calibration is required for any reason, use the following typical
procedure for doing so.
The analog inputs of the ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 can
accept either unipolar or bipolar input voltage ranges. Bipolar
input ranges do not imply that the part can handle negative
voltages with respect to system AGND, but rather with respect
to the negative reference input. Unipolar and bipolar signals on
the AIN(+) input on the ADC are referenced to the voltage on
the respective AIN(−) input. AIN(+) and AIN(−) refer to the
signals seen by the ADC.
INPUT 4
Note that for internal calibration to be effective, the AIN− pin
should be held at a steady voltage, within the allowable commonmode range to keep it from floating during calibration.
BIPOLAR/UNIPOLAR CONFIGURATION
INPUT 1
This procedure also applies when chop is disabled.
mixed-signal solutions available on the market. The auxiliary
(ADuC845 only) ADC does not incorporate a PGA, and the
gain is fixed at 0 V to 2.50 V in unipolar mode, and ±2.50 V in
bipolar mode.
INPUT 2
Therefore, the full-scale endpoint calibration automatically
subtracts the offset calibration error, it is advisable to perform
an offset calibration at the same gain range as that used for fullscale calibration. There is no penalty to the full-scale calibration
in redoing the zero-scale calibration at the required PGA range
because the full-scale calibration has very good matching at all
the PGA ranges.
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
DATA OUTPUT CODING
EXCITATION CURRENTS
When the primary ADC is configured for unipolar operation,
the output coding is natural (straight) binary with a zero differential input voltage resulting in a code of 000...000, a midscale
voltage resulting in a code of 100...000, and a full-scale voltage
resulting in a code of 111...111. The output code for any analog
input voltage on the main ADC can be represented as follows:
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 contain two matched,
software-configurable 200 µA current sources. Both source
current from AVDD, which is directed to either or both of the
IEXC1 (Pin 11 whose alternate functions are P1.6/AIN7) or
IEXC2 (Pin 12, whose alternate functions are P1.7/AIN8) pins
on the device. These currents are controlled via the lower four
bits in the ICON register (Table 30). These bits not only enable
the current sources but also allow the configuration of the
currents such that 200 µA can be sourced individually from
both pins or can be combined to give a 400 µA source from one
or the other of the outputs. These sources can be used to excite
external resistive bridge or RTD sensors (see Figure 71).
Code – (AIN × GAIN × 2N)/(1.024 × VREF)
where:
AIN is the analog input voltage.
GAIN is the PGA gain setting, that is, 1 on the 2.56 V range and
128 on the 20 mV range, and N = 24 (16 on the ADuC848).
The output code for any analog input voltage on the auxiliary
ADC can be represented as follows:
ADC POWER-ON
The ADC typically takes 0.5 ms to power up from an initial
start-up sequence or following a power-down event.
Code = (AIN × 2N)/(VREF)
with the same definitions as used for the primary ADC above.
When the primary ADC is configured for bipolar operation, the
coding is offset binary with negative full-scale voltage resulting
in a code of 000...000, a zero differential voltage resulting in a
code of 800…000, and a positive full-scale voltage resulting in a
code of 111...111. The output from the primary ADC for any
analog input voltage can be represented as follows:
Code = 2N−1[(AIN × GAIN)/(1.024 ×VREF) + 1]
where:
AIN is the analog input voltage.
GAIN is the PGA gain, that is, 1 on the ±2.56 V range and
128 on the ±20 mV range.
N = 24 (16 on the ADuC848).
The output from the auxiliary ADC in bipolar mode can be
represented as follows:
Code = 2N−1 [(AIN/VREF) + 1]
Rev. C | Page 36 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
0
–10
–20
–20
–30
–30
–40
–40
–50
–60
–70
–50
–60
–70
–80
–80
–90
–90
–100
–100
–110
–110
–120
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
FREQUENCY (Hz)
80
90
100
110
–120
10
Figure 18. Filter Response, Chop On, SF = 69 Decimal
30
50
70
90
110 130 150 170 190 210 230 250
SF (Decimal)
04741-021
GAIN (dB)
0
–10
04741-018
GAIN (dB)
TYPICAL PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS
Figure 21. 60 Hz Normal Mode Rejection vs. SF, Chop On
10
–10
–10
–30
AMPLITUDE (dB)
–70
–90
–110
–70
–90
–110
–130
160.1
170.1
04741-022
170.1
04741-023
150.1
160.1
140.1
130.1
120.1
110.1
90.1
–150
100.1
100
80.1
90
70.1
80
60.1
40
50
60
70
FREQUENCY (Hz)
50.1
30
40.1
20
30.1
10
20.1
0
0.1
–130
04741-019
–150
–50
10.1
AMPLITUDE (dB)
–30
–50
FREQUENCY (Hz)
Figure 19. Filter Response, Chop On, SF = 255 Decimal
Figure 22. Chop Off, Fadc = 50 Hz, SF = 52H
0
10
–10
–10
–20
–30
–30
AMPLITUDE (dB)
–50
–60
–70
–80
–90
–50
–70
–190
–110
–100
150.1
140.1
130.1
120.1
110.1
100.1
90.1
80.1
70.1
–150
60.1
110 130 150 170 190 210 230 250
SF (Decimal)
50.1
90
40.1
70
30.1
50
20.1
30
0.1
–120
10
10.1
–130
–110
04741-020
GAIN (dB)
–40
FREQUENCY (Hz)
Figure 20. 50 Hz Normal Mode Rejection vs. SF Word, Chop On
Figure 23. Chop Off, SF = 52H, REJ60 Enabled
Rev. C | Page 37 of 108
Data Sheet
0
–20
–20
–40
–40
–120
04741-024
–120
95
100
–100
50
55
60
65
70
75
80
85
90
–100
FREQUENCY (Hz)
FREQUENCY (Hz)
Figure 24. Chop On, Fadc = 16.6 Hz, SF = 52H
Figure 25. Chop On, Fadc = 16.6 Hz, SF = 52H, REJ60 Enabled
Rev. C | Page 38 of 108
04741-025
–80
95
100
–80
–60
50
55
60
65
70
75
80
85
90
–60
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
AMPLITUDE (dB)
0
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
AMPLITUDE (dB)
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION
ADC SFR INTERFACE
The ADCs are controlled and configured via a number of SFRs that are mentioned here and described in more detail in the following
sections.
Table 22. ADC SFR Interface
Name
ADCSTAT
ADCMODE
ADC0CON1
ADC0CON2
ADC1CON
SF
ICON
ADC0L/M/H
ADC1L/M/H
OF0L/M/H
OF1L/H
GN0L/M/H
GN1L/H
Description
ADC Status Register. Holds the general status of the primary and auxiliary (ADuC845 only) ADCs.
ADC Mode Register. Controls the general modes of operation for primary and auxiliary (ADuC845 only) ADCs.
Primary ADC Control Register 1. Controls the specific configuration of the primary ADC.
Primary ADC Control Register 2. Controls the specific configuration of the primary ADC.
Auxiliary ADC Control Register. Controls the specific configuration of the auxiliary ADC. ADuC845 only.
Sinc Filter Register. Configures the decimation factor for the Sinc3 filter and, therefore, the primary and auxiliary (ADuC845
only) ADC update rates.
Current Source Control Register. Allows user control of the various on-chip current source options.
Primary ADC 24-bit (16-bit on the ADuC848) conversion result is held in these three 8-bit registers. ADC0L is not available on
the ADuC848.
Auxiliary ADC 24-bit conversion result is held in these two 8-bit registers. ADuC845 only.
Primary ADC 24-bit offset calibration coefficient is held in these three 8-bit registers. OF0L is not available on the ADuC848.
Auxiliary ADC 16-bit offset calibration coefficient is held in these two 8-bit registers. ADuC845 only.
Primary ADC 24-bit gain calibration coefficient is held in these three 8-bit registers. GN0L is not available on the ADuC848.
Auxiliary ADC 16-bit gain calibration coefficient is held in these two 8-bit registers. ADuC845 only.
Rev. C | Page 39 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
ADCSTAT (ADC STATUS REGISTER)
This SFR reflects the status of both ADCs including data ready, calibration, and various (ADC-related) error and warning conditions
including REFIN± reference detect and conversion overflow/underflow flags.
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
D8H
00H
Yes
Table 23. ADCSTAT SFR Bit Designation
Bit No.
7
Name
RDY0
6
RDY1
5
CAL
4
NOXREF
3
ERR0
2
1
0
ERR1
–––
–––
Description
Ready Bit for the Primary ADC.
Set by hardware on completion of conversion or calibration.
Cleared directly by the user, or indirectly by a write to the mode bits, to start calibration. The primary ADC is
inhibited from writing further results to its data or calibration registers until the RDY0 bit is cleared.
Ready Bit for Auxiliary (ADuC845 only) ADC.
Same definition as RDY0 referred to the auxiliary ADC. Valid on the ADuC845 only.
Calibration Status Bit.
Set by hardware on completion of calibration.
Cleared indirectly by a write to the mode bits to start another ADC conversion or calibration.
Note that calibration with the temperature sensor selected (auxiliary ADC on the ADuC845 only) fails to complete.
No External Reference Bit (only active if primary or auxiliary (ADuC845 only) ADC is active).
Set to indicate that one or both of the REFIN pins is floating or the applied voltage is below a specified threshold.
When set, conversion results are clamped to all 1s. Only detects invalid REFIN±, does not check REFIN2±.
Cleared to indicate valid VREF.
Primary ADC Error Bit.
Set by hardware to indicate that the result written to the primary ADC data registers has been clamped to all 0s or
all 1s. After a calibration, this bit also flags error conditions that caused the calibration registers not to be written.
Cleared by a write to the mode bits to initiate a conversion or calibration.
Auxiliary ADC Error Bit. Same definition as ERR0 referred to the auxiliary ADC. Valid on the ADuC845 only.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Rev. C | Page 40 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
ADCMODE (ADC MODE REGISTER)
Used to control the operational mode of both ADCs.
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
D1H
08H
No
Table 24. ADCMODE SFR Bit Designations
Bit No.
7
6
Name
–––
REJ60
5
ADC0EN
4
ADC1EN
(ADuC845 only)
3
CHOP
2, 1, 0
MD2, MD1, MD0
Description
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Automatic 60 Hz Notch Select Bit.
Setting this bit places a notch in the frequency response at 60 Hz, allowing simultaneous 50 Hz and 60 Hz
rejection at an SF word of 82 decimal. This 60 Hz notch can be set only if SF ≥68 decimal, that is, the regular
filter notch must be ≤60 Hz. This second notch is placed at 60 Hz only if the device clock is at 32.768 kHz.
Primary ADC Enable.
Set by the user to enable the primary ADC and place it in the mode selected in MD2–MD0 below.
Cleared by the user to place the primary ADC into power-down mode.
Auxiliary (ADuC845 only) ADC Enable.
Set by the user to enable the auxiliary (ADuC845 only) ADC and place it in the mode selected in MD2–MD0
below.
Cleared by the user to place the auxiliary (ADuC845 only) ADC in power-down mode.
Chop Mode Disable.
Set by the user to disable chop mode on both the primary and auxiliary (ADuC845 only) ADC allowing a
three times higher ADC data throughput. SF values as low as 3 are allowed with this bit set, giving up to
1.3 kHz ADC update rates.
Cleared by the user to enable chop mode on both the primary and auxiliary (ADuC845 only) ADC.
Primary and Auxiliary (ADuC845 only) ADC Mode Bits.
These bits select the operational mode of the enabled ADC as follows:
MD2 MD1 MD0
0
0
0
ADC Power-Down Mode (Power-On Default).
0
0
1
Idle Mode. In idle mode, the ADC filter and modulator are held in a reset state
although the modulator clocks are still provided.
0
1
0
Single Conversion Mode. In single conversion mode, a single conversion is performed
on the enabled ADC. Upon completion of a conversion, the ADC data registers
(ADC0H/M/L and/or ADC1H/M/L (ADuC845 only)) are updated. The relevant flags in
the ADCSTAT SFR are written, and power-down is re-entered with the MD2−MD0
accordingly being written to 000.
Note that ADC0L is not available on the ADuC848.
0
1
1
Continuous Conversion. In continuous conversion mode, the ADC data registers are
regularly updated at the selected update rate (see the Sinc Filter SFR Bit Designations
in Table 28).
1
0
0
Internal Zero-Scale Calibration. Internal short automatically connected to the
enabled ADC input(s).
1
0
1
Internal Full-Scale Calibration. Internal or external REFIN± or REFIN2± VREF (as
determined by XREF bits in ADC0CON2 and/or AXREF (ADuC845 only) in ADC1CON
(ADuC845 only) is automatically connected to the enabled ADC input(s) for this
calibration.
1
1
0
System Zero-Scale Calibration. User should connect system zero-scale input to the
enabled ADC input(s) as selected by CH3–CH0 and ACH3–ACH0 bits in the
ADC0CON2 and ADC1CON (ADuC845 only) registers.
1
1
1
System Full-Scale Calibration. User should connect system full-scale input to the
enabled ADC input(s) as selected by CH3–CH0 and ACH3–ACH0 bits in the
ADC0CON2 and ADC1CON (ADuC845 only) registers.
Rev. C | Page 41 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
Notes on the ADCMODE Register
•
Any change to the MD bits immediately resets both ADCs
(auxiliary ADC only applicable to the ADuC845). A write
to the MD2–MD0 bits with no change in contents is also
treated as a reset. (See the exception to this in the third
note of this section.)
•
If the parts are powered down via the PD bit in the PCON
register, the current ADCMODE bits are preserved, that is,
they are not reset to default state. Upon a subsequent
resumption of normal operating mode, the ADCs restarts
the selected operation defined by the ADCMODE register.
•
If ADC1CON1 and ADC1CON2 are written when
ADC0EN = 1, or if ADC0EN is changed from 0 to 1, both
ADCs are also immediately reset. In other words, the
primary ADC is given priority over the auxiliary ADC and
any change requested on the primary ADC is immediately
responded to. Only applicable to the ADuC845.
•
•
On the other hand, if ADC1CON is written to or if
ADC1EN is changed from 0 to 1, only the auxiliary ADC
is reset. For example, if the primary ADC is continuously
converting when the auxiliary ADC change or enable
occurs, the primary ADC continues undisturbed. Rather
than allow the auxiliary ADC to operate with a phase
difference from the primary ADC, the auxiliary ADC falls
into step with the outputs of the primary ADC. The result
is that the first conversion time for the auxiliary ADC is
delayed by up to three outputs while the auxiliary ADC
update rate is synchronized to the primary ADC. Only
applicable to ADuC845. If the ADC1CON write occurs
after the primary ADC has completed its operation, the
auxiliary ADC can respond immediately without having to
fall into step with the primary ADCs output cycle.
Once ADCMODE has been written with a calibration
mode, the RDY0/1 (ADuC845 only) bits (ADCSTAT) are
reset and the calibration commences. On completion, the
appropriate calibration registers are written, the relevant
bits in ADCSTAT are written, and the MD2–MD0 bits are
reset to 000B to indicate that the ADC is back in powerdown mode.
•
Any calibration request of the auxiliary ADC while the
temperature sensor is selected fails to complete. Although
the RDY1 bit is set at the end of the calibration cycle, no
update of the calibration SFRs takes place, and the ERR1
bit is set. ADuC845 only.
•
Calibrations performed at maximum SF (see Table 28)
value (slowest ADC throughput rate) help to ensure
optimum calibration.
•
The duration of a calibration cycle is 2/Fadc for chop-on
mode and 4/Fadc for chop-off mode.
Rev. C | Page 42 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
ADC0CON1 (PRIMARY ADC CONTROL REGISTER)
ADC0CON1 is used to configure the primary ADC for buffer, unipolar, or bipolar coding, and ADC range configuration.
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
D2H
07H
No
Table 25. ADC0CON1 SFR Bit Designations
Bit No.
7, 6
Name
BUF1, BUF0
5
UNI
4
3
2, 1, 0
–––
–––
RN2, RN1, RN0
Description
Buffer Configuration Bits.
BUF1 BUF0
Buffer Configuration
0
0
ADC0+ and ADC0− are buffered
0
1
Reserved
1
0
Buffer Bypass
1
1
Reserved
Primary ADC Unipolar Bit.
Set by the user to enable unipolar coding; zero differential input results in 000000H output.
Cleared by the user to enable bipolar coding; zero differential input results in 800000H output.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Primary ADC Range Bits. Written by the user to select the primary ADC input range as follows:
RN2
RN1
RN0
Selected primary ADC input range (VREF = 2.5 V)
0
0
0
±20 mV (0 mV–20 mV in unipolar mode)
0
0
1
±40 mV (0 mV–40 mV in unipolar mode)
0
1
0
±80 mV (0 mV–80 mV in unipolar mode)
0
1
1
±160 mV (0 mV–160 mV in unipolar mode)
1
0
0
±320 mV (0 mV–320 mV in unipolar mode)
1
0
1
±640 mV (0 mV–640 mV in unipolar mode)
1
1
0
±1.28 V (0 V–1.28 V in unipolar mode)
1
1
1
±2.56 V (0 V–2.56 V in unipolar mode)
Rev. C | Page 43 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
ADC0CON2 (PRIMARY ADC CHANNEL SELECT REGISTER)
ADC0CON2 is used to select a reference source and channel for the primary ADC.
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
E6H
00H
No
Table 26. ADC0CON2 SFR Bit Designations
Bit No.
7, 6
Name
XREF1, XREF0
5
4
3, 2, 1, 0
–––
–––
CH3, CH2, CH1, CH0
Description
Primary ADC External Reference Select Bit.
Set by the user to enable the primary ADC to use the external reference via REFIN± or REFIN2±.
Cleared by the user to enable the primary ADC to use the internal band gap reference (VREF = 1.25 V).
XREF1 XREF0
0
0
Internal 1.25 V Reference.
0
1
REFIN± Selected.
1
0
REFIN2± (AIN3/AIN4) Selected.
1
1
Reserved.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Primary ADC Channel Select Bits. Written by the user to select the primary ADC channel as follows:
CH3 CH2
CH1
CH0 Selected Primary ADC Input Channel.
0
0
0
0
AIN1–AINCOM
0
0
0
1
AIN2–AINCOM
0
0
1
0
AIN3–AINCOM
0
0
1
1
AIN4–AINCOM
0
1
0
0
AIN5–AINCOM
0
1
0
1
AIN6–AINCOM
0
1
1
0
AIN7–AINCOM
0
1
1
1
AIN8–AINCOM
1
0
0
0
AIN9–AINCOM (LFCSP package only; not a valid selection on the MQFP
package)
1
0
0
1
AIN10–AINCOM (LFCSP package only; not a valid selection on the MQFP
package)
1
0
1
0
AIN1–AIN2
1
0
1
1
AIN3–AIN4
1
1
0
0
AIN5–AIN6
1
1
0
1
AIN7–AIN8
1
1
1
0
AIN9–AIN10 (LFCSP package only; not a valid selection on the MQFP
package)
1
1
1
1
AINCOM–AINCOM
Note that because the reference-detect does not operate on the REFIN2± pair, the REFIN2± pins can go below 1 V.
Rev. C | Page 44 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
ADC1CON (AUXILIARY ADC CONTROL REGISTER) (ADuC845 ONLY)
ADC1CON is used to configure the auxiliary ADC for reference, channel selection, and unipolar or bipolar coding. The auxiliary ADC is
available only on the ADuC845.
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
D3H
00H
No
Table 27. ADC1CON SFR Bit Designations
Bit No.
7
6
Name
–––
AXREF
5
AUNI
4
3, 2, 1, 0
–––
ACH3, ACH2, ACH1, ACH0
1
Description
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Auxiliary (ADuC845 only) ADC External Reference Bit.
Set by the user to enable the auxiliary ADC to use the external reference via REFIN±.
Cleared by the user to enable the auxiliary ADC to use the internal band gap reference.
Auxiliary ADC cannot use the REFIN2± reference inputs.
Auxiliary (ADuC845 only) ADC Unipolar Bit.
Set by the user to enable unipolar coding, that is, zero input results in 000000H output.
Cleared by the user to enable bipolar coding, zero input results in 800000H output.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Auxiliary ADC Channel Select Bits. Written by the user to select the auxiliary ADC channel.
ACH3 ACH2 ACH1 ACH0 Selected Auxiliary ADC Input Range (VREF = 2.5 V).
0
0
0
0
AIN1–AINCOM
0
0
0
1
AIN2–AINCOM
0
0
1
0
AIN3–AINCOM
0
0
1
1
AIN4–AINCOM
0
1
0
0
AIN5–AINCOM
0
1
0
1
AIN6–AINCOM
0
1
1
0
AIN7–AINCOM
0
1
1
1
AIN8–AINCOM
1
0
0
0
AIN9–AINCOM (not a valid selection on the MQFP package)
1
0
0
1
AIN10–AINCOM (not a valid selection on the MQFP package)
1
0
1
0
AIN1–AIN2
1
0
1
1
AIN3–AIN4
1
1
0
0
AIN5–AIN6
1
1
0
1
AIN7–AIN8
1
1
1
0
Temperature Sensor 1
1
1
1
1
AINCOM–AINCOM
Note the following about the temperature sensor:
When the temperature sensor is selected, user code must select the internal reference via the AXREF bit and clear the AUNI bit (ADC1CON.5) to select bipolar coding.
Chop mode must be enabled for correct temperature sensor operation.
The temperature sensor is factory calibrated to yield conversion results 800000H at 0°C (ADC chop on).
A +1°C change in temperature results in a +1 LSB change in the ADC1H register ADC conversion result.
The temperature sensor is not available on the ADuC847 or ADuC848.
Rev. C | Page 45 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
SF (ADC SINC FILTER CONTROL REGISTER)
The SF register is used to configure the decimation factor for the ADC, and therefore, has a direct influence on the ADC throughput rate.
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
D4H
45H
No
Table 28. Sinc Filter SFR Bit Designations
SF.7
0
SF.6
1
SF.5
0
SF.4
0
SF.3
0
SF.2
1
SF.1
0
SF.0
1
The bits in this register set the decimation factor of the ADC. This has a direct bearing on the throughput rate of the ADC along with the
chop setting. The equations used to determine the ADC throughput rate are
Fadc (Chop On) =
1
× 32.768 kHz
3 × 8 × SFword
where SFword is in decimal.
Fadc (Chop Off) =
1
× 32.768 kHz
8 × SFword
where SFword is in decimal.
Table 29. SF SFR Bit Examples
Chop Enabled (ADCMODE.3 = 0)
SF (Decimal) SF (Hexadecimal)
13 1
0D
69
45
82
52
255
FF
Fadc (Hz)
105.3
19.79
16.65
5.35
Tadc (ms)
9.52
50.53
60.06
186.77
Tsettle (ms)
19.04
101.1
120.1
373.54
Chop Disabled (ADCMODE.3 = 1)
SF (Decimal) SF (Hexadecimal)
3
03
69
45
82
52
255
FF
Fadc (Hz)
1365.3
59.36
49.95
16.06
Tadc (ms)
0.73
16.84
20.02
62.25
Tsettle (ms)
2.2
50.52
60.06
186.8
1
With chop enabled, if an SF word smaller than 13 is written to this SF register, the filter automatically defaults to 13.
During ADC calibration, the user-programmed value of SF word is used. The SF word does not default to the maximum setting (255) as it
did on previous MicroConverter® products. However, for optimum calibration results, it is recommended that the maximum SF word be set.
Rev. C | Page 46 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
ICON (EXCITATION CURRENT SOURCES CONTROL REGISTER)
The ICON register is used to configure the current sources and the burnout detection source.
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
D5H
00H
No
Table 30. Excitation Current Source SFR Bit Designations
Bit No.
7
6
Name
–––
ICON.6
5
4
3
2
1
0
ICON.5
ICON.4
ICON.3
ICON.2
ICON.1
ICON.0
Description
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Burnout Current Enable Bit.
When set, this bit enables the sensor burnout current sources on primary ADC channels AIN5/AIN6 or
AIN7/AIN8. Not available on any other ADC input pins or on the auxiliary ADC (ADuC845 only).
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
IEXC2 Pin Select. 0 selects AIN8, 1 selects AIN7
IEXC1 Pin Select. 0 selects AIN7, 1 selects AIN8
IEXC2 Enable Bit (0 = disable).
IEXC1 Enable Bit (0 = disable).
A write to the ICON register has an immediate effect but does not reset the ADCs. Therefore, if a current source is changed while an ADC
is already converting, the user must wait until the third or fourth output at least (depending on the status of the chop mode) to see a fully
settled new output.
Both IEXC1 and IEXC2 can be configured to operate on the same output pin thereby increasing the current source capability to 400 µA.
Rev. C | Page 47 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
NONVOLATILE FLASH/EE MEMORY OVERVIEW
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 incorporate Flash/EE
memory technology on-chip to provide the user with nonvolatile,
in-circuit reprogrammable code and data memory space.
Like EEPROM, flash memory can be programmed in-system at
the byte level, although it must first be erased, in page blocks.
Thus, flash memory is often and more correctly referred to as
Flash/EE memory.
EPROM
TECHNOLOGY
Flash/EE Memory Reliability
The Flash/EE program and data memory arrays on the
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 are fully qualified for two key
Flash/EE memory characteristics: Flash/EE memory cycling
endurance and Flash/EE memory data retention.
IN-CIRCUIT
REPROGRAMMABLE
FLASH/EE MEMORY
TECHNOLOGY
04741-026
SPACE EFFICIENT/
DENSITY
EEPROM
TECHNOLOGY
All the following sections use the 62-kbyte program space as an
example when referring to program and ULOAD mode. For the
64-kbyte part, the ULOAD area takes up the top 6 kbytes of the
program space, that is, from 56 kbytes to 62 kbytes. For the
32-kbyte part, the ULOAD space moves to the top 8 kbytes of the
on-chip program memory, that is., from 24 kbytes to 32 kbytes.
No ULOAD mode is available on the 8-kbyte part since the
bootload area on the 8-kbyte part is 8 kbytes long, so no usable
user program space remains. The kernel still resides in the
protected area from 62 kbytes to 64 kbytes.
Figure 26. Flash/EE Memory Development
Overall, Flash/EE memory represents a step closer to the ideal
memory device that includes nonvolatility, in-circuit programmability, high density, and low cost. The Flash/EE memory
technology allows the user to update program code space incircuit, without needing to replace onetime programmable
(OTP) devices at remote operating nodes.
Flash/EE Memory on the ADuC845, ADuC847, ADuC848
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 provide two arrays of
Flash/EE memory for user applications—up to 62 kbytes of
Flash/EE program space and 4 kbytes of Flash/EE data memory
space. Also, 8-kbyte and 32-kbyte program memory options are
available. All examples and references in this datasheet use the
62-kbyte option; however, similar protocols and procedures are
applicable to the 32-kbyte and 8-kbyte options unless otherwise
noted, provided that the difference in memory size is taken into
account.
The 62 kbytes Flash/EE code space are provided on-chip to
facilitate code execution without any external discrete ROM
device requirements. The program memory can be programmed
in-circuit, using the serial download mode provided, using
conventional third party memory programmers, or via any
user-defined protocol in user download (ULOAD) mode.
The 4-kbyte Flash/EE data memory space can be used as a
general-purpose, nonvolatile scratchpad area. User access to
this area is via a group of seven SFRs. This space can be
programmed at a byte level, although it must first be erased in
4-byte pages.
Endurance quantifies the ability of the Flash/EE memory to be
cycled through many program, read, and erase cycles. In real
terms, a single endurance cycle is composed of four independent,
sequential events:
1.
Initial page erase sequence
2.
Read/verify sequence
3.
Byte program sequence
4.
Second read/verify sequence
In reliability qualification, every byte in both the program and
data Flash/EE memory is cycled from 00H to FFH until a first
fail is recorded, signifying the endurance limit of the on-chip
Flash/EE memory.
As indicated in the Specifications table, the ADuC845/ADuC847/
ADuC848 Flash/EE memory endurance qualification has been
carried out in accordance with JEDEC Specification A117 over
the industrial temperature range of –40°C, +25°C, +85°C, and
+125°C. (The LFCSP package is qualified to +85°C only.) The
results allow the specification of a minimum endurance figure
over supply and temperature of 100,000 cycles, with an endurance
figure of 700,000 cycles being typical of operation at 25°C.
Retention is the ability of the Flash/EE memory to retain its
programmed data over time. Again, the parts have been qualified
in accordance with the formal JEDEC Retention Lifetime Specification (A117) at a specific junction temperature (TJ = 55°C). As
part of this qualification procedure, the Flash/EE memory is
cycled to its specified endurance limit described previously,
before data retention is characterized. This means that the
Flash/EE memory is guaranteed to retain its data for its full
specified retention lifetime every time the Flash/EE memory is
reprogrammed. It should also be noted that retention lifetime,
based on an activation energy of 0.6 eV, derates with TJ as shown
in Figure 27.
Rev. C | Page 48 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Serial Downloading (In-Circuit Programming)
300
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 facilitate code download
via the standard UART serial port. The parts enter serial download mode after a reset or a power cycle if the PSEN pin is pulled
low through an external 1 kΩ resistor. Once in serial download
mode, the hidden embedded download kernel executes. This
allows the user to download code to the full 62 kbytes of Flash/EE
program memory while the device is in circuit in its target
application hardware.
RETENTION (Years)
250
200
ADI SPECIFICATION
100 YEARS MIN.
AT TJ = 55C
150
100
50
60
70
90
80
TJ JUNCTION TEMPERATURE (C)
100
110
Figure 27. Flash/EE Memory Data Retention
FLASH/EE PROGRAM MEMORY
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 contain a 64-kbyte array of
Flash/EE program memory. The lower 62 kbytes of this program
memory are available to the user for program storage or as
additional NV data memory.
The upper 2 kbytes of this Flash/EE program memory array
contain permanently embedded firmware, allowing in-circuit
serial download, serial debug, and nonintrusive single-pin
emulation. These 2 kbytes of embedded firmware also contain
a power-on configuration routine that downloads factory calibrated coefficients to the various calibrated peripherals such
as ADC, temperature sensor, current sources, band gap, and
references.
These 2 kbytes of embedded firmware are hidden from the user
code. Attempts to read this space read 0s; therefore, the embedded firmware appears as NOP instructions to user code.
A PC serial download executable (WSD.EXE) is provided as
part of the ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 Quick Start
development system. Application Note uC004 fully describes
the serial download protocol that is used by the embedded
download kernel. This application note is available at
www.analog.com/microconverter.
Parallel Programming
The parallel programming mode is fully compatible with
conventional third-party flash or EEPROM device programmers.
A block diagram of the external pin configuration required to
support parallel programming is shown in Figure 29. In this
mode, Ports 0 and 2 operate as the external address bus interface,
P3 operates as the external data bus interface, and P1.0 operates
as the write enable strobe. P1.1, P1.2, P1.3, and P1.4 are used as
general configuration ports that configure the device for various
program and erase operations during parallel programming.
+5V
ADuC845/
ADuC847/
ADuC848
COMMAND
P1.4–P1.1
TIMING
P1.7–P1.5
In normal operating mode (power-on default), the 62 kbytes of
user Flash/EE program memory appear as a single block. This
block is used to store the user code as shown in Figure 28.
EMBEDDED DOWNLOAD/DEBUG KERNEL
PERMANENTLY EMBEDDED FIRMWARE ALLOWS
CODE TO BE DOWNLOADED TO ANY OF THE
62 kBYTES OF ON-CHIP PROGRAM MEMORY.
THE KERNEL PROGRAM APPEARS AS NOP
INSTRUCTIONS TO USER CODE.
P3.7–P3.0
EA
ENABLE
P1.0
RESET
DATA
GND
VDD
04741-030
0
40
04741-028
50
Figure 29. Flash/EE Memory Parallel Programming
FFFFH
2kBYTE
F800H
The command words that are assigned to P1.1, P1.2, P1.3, and
P1.4 are described in Table 31.
Table 31. Flash/EE Memory Parallel Programming Modes
USER PROGRAM MEMORY
P1.4
0
F7FFH
62kBYTE
0000H
04741-029
62 kBYTES OF FLASH/EE PROGRAM MEMORY
ARE AVAILABLE TO THE USER. ALL OF THIS
SPACE CAN BE PROGRAMMED FROM THE
PERMANENTLY EMBEDDED DOWNLOAD/DEBUG
KERNEL OR IN PARALLEL PROGRAMMING MODE.
Figure 28. Flash/EE Program Memory Map in Normal Mode
In normal mode, the 62 kbytes of Flash/EE program memory
can be programmed by serial downloading and by parallel
programming.
Port 1 Pins
P1.3 P1.2
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
0
All other codes
Rev. C | Page 49 of 108
P1.1
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
Programming Mode
Erase Flash/EE Program, Data, and
Security Mode
Program Code Byte
Program Data Byte
Read Code Byte
Read Data Byte
Program Security Modes
Read/Verify Security Modes
Redundant
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
USER DOWNLOAD MODE (ULOAD)
However, most of the Flash/EE program memory can also be
written to during run time simply by entering ULOAD mode.
In ULOAD mode, the lower 56 kbytes of program memory can
be erased and reprogrammed by the user software as shown in
Figure 30. ULOAD mode can be used to upgrade the code in
the field via any user-defined download protocol. By configuring
the SPI port on the ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 as a slave, it
is possible to completely reprogram the 56 kbytes of Flash/EE
program memory in under 5 s (see Application Note uC007,
“User Download Mode” at www.analog.com/microconverter).
Alternatively, ULOAD mode can be used to save data to the
56 kbytes of Flash/EE memory. This can be extremely useful in
data logging applications where the parts can provide up to
60 kbytes of data memory on-chip (4 kbytes of dedicated
Flash/EE data memory also exist).
The upper 6 kbytes of the 62 kbytes of Flash/EE program
memory (8 kbytes on the 32-kbyte parts) are programmable
only via serial download or parallel programming. This means
that this space appears as read-only to user code; therefore, it
cannot be accidentally erased or reprogrammed by erroneous
code execution, making it very suitable to use the 6 kbytes as a
bootloader. A bootload enable option exists in the Windows®
serial downloader (WSD) to “Always RUN from E000H after
Reset.” If using a bootloader, this option is recommended to
ensure that the bootloader always executes correct code after
reset.
Programming the Flash/EE program memory via ULOAD
mode is described in the Flash/EE Memory Control SFR
section of ECON and also in Application Note uC007
(www.analog.com/microconverter).
62 kBYTES
OF USER
CODE
MEMORY
USER BOOTLOADER SPACE
THE USER BOOTLOADER
SPACE CAN BE PROGRAMMED IN
DOWNLOAD/DEBUG MODE VIA THE
KERNEL BUT IS READ ONLY WHEN
EXECUTING USER CODE
USER DOWNLOADER SPACE
EITHER THE DOWNLOAD/DEBUG
KERNEL OR USER CODE (IN
ULOAD MODE) CAN PROGRAM
THIS SPACE
EMBEDDED DOWNLOAD/DEBUG KERNEL
PERMANENTLY EMBEDDED FIRMWARE ALLOWS
CODE TO BE DOWNLOADED TO ANY OF THE
32 kBYTES OF ON-CHIP PROGRAM MEMORY.
THE KERNEL PROGRAM APPEARS AS NOP
INSTRUCTIONS TO USER CODE.
FFFFH
2kBYTE
F800H
NOT AVAILABLE TO USER
USER BOOTLOADER SPACE
32 kBYTES
OF USER
CODE
MEMORY
THE USER BOOTLOADER
SPACE CAN BE PROGRAMMED IN
DOWNLOAD/DEBUG MODE VIA THE
KERNEL BUT IS READ ONLY WHEN
EXECUTING USER CODE
USER DOWNLOADER SPACE
EITHER THE DOWNLOAD/DEBUG
KERNEL OR USER CODE (IN ULOAD
MODE) CAN PROGRAM THIS SPACE
8000H
8kBYTE
6000H
5FFFH
24kBYTE
0000H
Figure 31. Flash/EE Program Memory Map in ULOAD Mode (32-kbyte Part)
ULOAD mode is not available on the 8-kbyte Flash/EE program
memory parts.
Flash/EE Program Memory Security
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 facilitate three modes of
Flash/EE program memory security: the lock, secure, and serial
safe modes. These modes can be independently activated,
restricting access to the internal code space. They can be
enabled as part of serial download protocol, as described in
Application Note uC004, or via parallel programming.
Lock Mode
This mode locks the code memory, disabling parallel programming of the program memory. However, reading the memory in
parallel mode and reading the memory via a MOVC command
from external memory are still allowed. This mode is deactivated
by initiating an ERASE CODE AND DATA command in serial
download or parallel programming modes.
Secure Mode
This mode locks the code memory, disabling parallel programming of the program memory. Reading/verifying the memory
in parallel mode and reading the internal memory via a MOVC
command from external memory are also disabled. This mode
is deactivated by initiating an ERASE CODE AND DATA
command in serial download or parallel programming modes.
FFFFH
2kBYTE
F800H
F7FFH
6kBYTE
E000H
Serial Safe Mode
dFFFH
56kBYTE
0000H
04741-031
EMBEDDED DOWNLOAD/DEBUG KERNEL
PERMANENTLY EMBEDDED FIRMWARE ALLOWS
CODE TO BE DOWNLOADED TO ANY OF THE
62 kBYTES OF ON-CHIP PROGRAM MEMORY.
THE KERNEL PROGRAM APPEARS AS NOP
INSTRUCTIONS TO USER CODE.
The 32-kbyte memory parts have the user bootload space
starting at 6000H. The memory mapping is shown in Figure 31.
04741-074
Figure 28 shows that it is possible to use the 62 kbytes of
Flash/EE program memory available to the user as one single
block of memory. In this mode, all the Flash/EE memory is
read-only to user code.
Figure 30. Flash/EE Program Memory Map in ULOAD Mode (62-kbyte Part)
This mode disables serial download capability on the device. If
serial safe mode is activated and an attempt is made to reset the
part into serial download mode, that is, RESET asserted (pulled
high) and de-asserted (pulled low) with PSEN low, the part
interprets the serial download reset as a normal reset only. It
therefore does not enter serial download mode, but executes only
a normal reset sequence. Serial safe mode can be disabled only
by initiating an ERASE CODE AND DATA command in
parallel programming mode.
Rev. C | Page 50 of 108
BYTE 3
(0FFEH)
BYTE 4
(0FFFH)
3FEH
BYTE 1
(0FF8H)
BYTE 2
(0FF9H)
BYTE 3
(0FFAH)
BYTE 4
(0FFBH)
03H
BYTE 1
(000CH)
BYTE 2
(000DH)
BYTE 3
(000EH)
BYTE 4
(000FH)
02H
BYTE 1
(0008H)
BYTE 2
(0009H)
BYTE 3
(000AH)
BYTE 4
(000BH)
01H
BYTE 1
(0004H)
BYTE 2
(0005H)
BYTE 3
(0006H)
BYTE 4
(0007H)
00H
BYTE 1
(0000H)
BYTE 2
(0001H)
BYTE 3
(0002H)
BYTE 4
(0003H)
BYTE
ADDRESSES
ARE GIVEN IN
BRACKETS
Programming either Flash/EE data memory or Flash/EE
program memory is done through the Flash/EE memory
control SFR (ECON). This SFR allows the user to read, write,
erase, or verify the 4 kbytes of Flash/EE data memory or the
56 kbytes of Flash/EE program memory.
04741-032
BYTE 2
(0FFDH)
EDATA4 SFR
ECON—Flash/EE Memory Control SFR
BYTE 1
(0FFCH)
EDATA3 SFR
The 4 kbytes of Flash/EE data memory are configured as 1024
pages, each of 4 bytes. As with the other ADuC845/ADuC847/
ADuC848 peripherals, the interface to this memory space is via
a group of registers mapped in the SFR space. A group of four
data registers (EDATA1–4) holds the 4 bytes of data at each
page. The page is addressed via the EADRH and EADRL
registers. Finally, ECON is an 8-bit control register that can be
written to with one of nine Flash/EE memory access commands
to trigger various read, write, erase, and verify functions. A
block diagram of the SFR interface to the Flash/EE data memory
array is shown in Figure 32.
3FFH
PAGE ADDRESS
(EADRH/L)
USING FLASH/EE DATA MEMORY
EDATA2 SFR
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
EDATA1 SFR
Data Sheet
Figure 32. Flash/EE Data Memory Control and Configuration
Table 32. ECON—Flash/EE Memory Commands
ECON Value
01H Read
02H Write
03H
04H Verify
05H Erase Page
06H Erase All
81H ReadByte
82H WriteByte
0FH EXULOAD
F0H ULOAD
Command Description
(Normal Mode, Power-On Default)
4 bytes in the Flash/EE data memory, addressed by the
page address EADRH/L, are read into EDATA1–4.
Results in 4 bytes in EDATA1–4 being written to the
Flash/EE data memory, at the page address given by
EADRH (0 ≤ EADRH < 0400H). Note that the 4 bytes in the
page being addressed must be pre-erased.
Reserved.
Verifies that the data in EDATA1–4 is contained in the
page address given by EADRH/L. A subsequent read of
the ECON SFR results in a 0 being read if the verification
is valid, or a nonzero value being read to indicate an
invalid verification.
4-byte page of Flash/EE data memory address is erased
by the page address EADRH/L.
4 kbytes of Flash/EE data memory are erased.
The byte in the Flash/EE data memory, addressed by the
byte address EADRH/L, is read into EDATA1 (0 ≤ EADRH/L
≤ 0FFFH).
The byte in EDATA1 is written into Flash/EE data memory
at the byte address EADRH/L.
Configures the ECON instructions (above) to operate on
Flash/EE data memory.
Enters ULOAD mode; subsequent ECON instructions
operate on Flash/EE program memory.
Command Description
(ULOAD Mode)
Not implemented. Use the MOVC instruction.
Bytes 0 to 255 of internal XRAM are written to the 256 bytes of
Flash/EE program memory at the page address given by
EADRH/L (0 ≤ EADRH/L < E0H).
Note that the 256 bytes in the page being addressed must be
pre-erased.
Reserved.
Not implemented. Use the MOVC and MOVX instructions to
verify the Write in software.
64-byte page of FLASH/EE program memory addressed by the
byte address EADRH/L is erased. A new page starts when EADRL
is equal to 00H, 80H, or C0H.
The entire 56 kbytes of ULOAD are erased.
Not implemented. Use the MOVC command.
The byte in EDATA1 is written into Flash/EE program memory at
the byte address EADRH/L (0 ≤ EADRH/L ≤ DFFFH).
Enters normal mode, directing subsequent ECON instructions to
operate on the Flash/EE data memory.
Enables the ECON instructions to operate on the Flash/EE
program memory. ULOAD entry mode.
Rev. C | Page 51 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
Example: Programming the Flash/EE Data Memory
A user wants to program F3H into the second byte on Page 03H
of the Flash/EE data memory space while preserving the other
3 bytes already in this page. A typical program of the Flash/EE
data array involves
1.
Setting EADRH/L with the page address.
2.
Writing the data to be programmed to the EDATA1–4.
3.
Writing the ECON SFR with the appropriate command.
Step 1: Set Up the Page Address
Address registers EADRH and EADRL hold the high byte
address and the low byte address of the page to be addressed.
The assembly language to set up the address may appear as
MOV EADRH, #0
MOV EADRL, #03H
;Set Page Address Pointer
Step 2: Set Up the EDATA Registers
Write the four values to be written into the page into the four
SFRs EDATA1–4. Unfortunately, the user does not know three
of them. Thus, the user must read the current page and overwrite
the second byte.
MOV ECON,
#1
;Read Page into EDATA1-4
MOV EDATA2, #0F3H ;Overwrite Byte 2
Step 3: Program Page
A byte in the Flash/EE array can be programmed only if it has
previously been erased. Specifically, a byte can be programmed
only if it already holds the value FFH. Because of the Flash/EE
architecture, this erasure must happen at a page level; therefore,
a minimum of 4 bytes (1 page) are erased when an erase
command is initiated. Once the page is erased, the user can
program the 4 bytes in-page and then perform a verification of
the data.
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
ECON, #5
ECON, #2
ECON, #4
A, ECON
FLASH/EE MEMORY TIMING
Typical program and erase times for the parts are as follows:
Normal Mode (Operating on Flash/EE Data Memory)
Command
Bytes Affected
READPAGE
4 bytes
25 machine cycles
WRITEPAGE
4 bytes
380 µs
VERIFYPAGE
4 bytes
25 machine cycles
ERASEPAGE
4 bytes
2 ms
ERASEALL
4 kbytes
2 ms
READBYTE
1 byte
10 machine cycles
WRITEBYTE
1 byte
200 µs
ULOAD Mode (Operating on Flash/EE Program Memory)
WRITEPAGE
256 bytes
15 ms
ERASEPAGE
64 bytes
2 ms
ERASEALL
56 kbytes
2 ms
WRITEBYTE
1 byte
200 µs
A given mode of operation is initiated as soon as the command
word is written to the ECON SFR. The core microcontroller
operation is idled until the requested program/read or erase
mode is completed. In practice, this means that even though the
Flash/EE memory mode of operation is typically initiated with a
two-machine-cycle MOV instruction (to write to the ECON
SFR), the next instruction is not executed until the Flash/EE
operation is complete. This means that the core cannot respond
to interrupt requests until the Flash/EE operation is complete,
although the core peripheral functions such as counter/timers
continue to count as configured throughout this period.
;ERASE Page
;WRITE Page
;VERIFY Page
;Check if ECON = 0 (OK!)
Although the 4 kbytes of Flash/EE data memory are factory preerased, that is, byte locations set to FFH, it is good
programming practice to include an ERASEALL routine as part
of any configuration/set-up code running on the parts. An
ERASEALL command consists of writing 06H to the ECON
SFR, which initiates an erase of the 4-kbyte Flash/EE array. This
command coded in 8051 assembly language would appear as
MOV ECON, #06H
;ERASE all Command
;2ms duration
Rev. C | Page 52 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
DAC CIRCUIT INFORMATION
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 incorporate a 12-bit,
voltage output DAC on-chip. It has a rail-to-rail voltage output
buffer capable of driving 10 kΩ/100 pF, and has two selectable
ranges, 0 V to VREF and 0 V to AVDD. It can operate in 12-bit or
8-bit mode. The DAC has a control register, DACCON, and two
data registers, DACH/L. The DAC output can be programmed
to appear at Pin 14 (DAC) or Pin 13 (AINCOM).
In 12-bit mode, the DAC voltage output is updated as soon as
the DACL data SFR is written; therefore, the DAC data registers
should be updated as DACH first, followed by DACL. The 12bit DAC data should be written into DACH/L right-justified
such that DACL contains the lower 8 bits, and the lower nibble
of DACH contains the upper 4 bits.
DACCON Control Register
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
FDH
00H
No
Table 33. DACCON—DAC Configuration Commands
Bit No.
7
6
5
4
Name
–––
–––
–––
DACPIN
3
DAC8
2
DACRN
1
DACCLR
0
DACEN
Description
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
DAC Output Pin Select.
Set to 1 by the user to direct the DAC output to Pin 13 (AINCOM).
Cleared to 0 by the user to direct the DAC output to Pin 14 (DAC).
DAC 8-Bit Mode Bit.
Set to 1 by the user to enable 8-bit DAC operation. In this mode, the 8 bits in DACL SFR are routed to the 8 MSBs
of the DAC, and the 4 LSBs of the DAC are set to 0.
Cleared to 0 by the user to enable 12-bit DAC operation. In this mode, the 8 LSBs of the result are routed to
DACL, and the upper 4 MSB bits are routed to the lower 4 bits of DACH.
DAC Output Range Bit.
Set to 1 by the user to configure the DAC range of 0 V to AVDD.
Cleared to 0 by the user to configure the DAC range of 0 V to 2.5 V (VREF).
DAC Clear Bit.
Set to 1 by the user to enable normal DAC operation.
Cleared to 0 by the user to reset the DAC data registers DACL/H to 0.
DAC Enable Bit.
Set to 1 by the user to enable normal DAC operation.
Cleared to 0 by the user to power down the DAC.
DACH/DACL Data Registers
These DAC data registers are written to by the user to update
the DAC output.
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
DACL (DAC data low byte)—FBH
DACH (DAC data high byte)—FCH
00H (both registers)
No (both registers)
Rev. C | Page 53 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
Using the DAC
VDD
The on-chip DAC architecture consists of a resistor string DAC
followed by an output buffer amplifier, the functional equivalent
of which is shown in Figure 33.
VDD–50mV
VDD–100mV
AVDD
VREF
R
OUTPUT
BUFFER
100mV
R
14
0mV
FFFH
000H
HIGH-Z
DISABLE
(FROM MCU)
04741-034
50mV
R
Figure 34. Endpoint Nonlinearities Due to Amplifier Saturation
Figure 33. Resistor String DAC Functional Equivalent
Features of this architecture include inherent guaranteed
monotonicity and excellent differential linearity. As shown in
Figure 33, the reference source for the DAC is user-selectable in
software. It can be either AVDD or VREF. In 0 V-to-AVDD mode,
the DAC output transfer function spans from 0 V to the voltage
at the AVDD pin. In 0 V-to-VREF mode, the DAC output transfer
function spans from 0 V to the internal VREF (2.5 V). The DAC
output buffer amplifier features a true rail-to-rail output stage
implementation. This means that, unloaded, each output is
capable of swinging to within less than 100 mV of both AVDD
and ground. Moreover, the DAC’s linearity specification (when
driving a 10 kΩ resistive load to ground) is guaranteed through
the full transfer function except Codes 0 to 48 in 0 V-to-VREF
mode; Codes 0 to 100; and Codes 3950 to 4095 in 0 V-to-VDD
mode.
5
DAC LOADED WITH 0FFFH
4
Linearity degradation near ground and VDD is caused by saturation of the output amplifier; a general representation of its effects
(neglecting offset and gain error) is shown in Figure 34. The
dotted line indicates the ideal transfer function, and the solid
line represents what the transfer function might look like with
endpoint nonlinearities due to saturation of the output amplifier.
Note that Figure 34 represents a transfer function in 0-to-VDD
mode only. In 0 V-to-VREF mode (with VREF < VDD), the lower
nonlinearity would be similar, but the upper portion of the
transfer function would follow the ideal line to the end,
showing no signs of the high-end endpoint linearity error.
3
2
1
DAC LOADED WITH 0000H
0
0
5
10
SOURCE/SINK CURRENT (mA)
15
04741-035
04741-033
R
The endpoint nonlinearities shown in Figure 34 become worse
as a function of output loading. Most data sheet specifications
assume a 10 kΩ resistive load to ground at the DAC output. As
the output is forced to source or sink more current, the nonlinear
regions at the top or bottom, respectively, of Figure 34 become
larger. With larger current demands, this can significantly limit
output voltage swing. Figure 35 and Figure 36 illustrate this
behavior. Note that the upper trace in each of these figures is
valid only for an output range selection of 0 V to AVDD. In 0 Vto-VREF mode, DAC loading does not cause high-side voltage
nonlinearities while the reference voltage remains below the
upper trace in the corresponding figure. For example, if AVDD =
3 V and VREF = 2.5 V, the high-side voltage is not affected by
loads of less than 5 mA. But around 7 mA, the upper curve in
Figure 36 drops below 2.5 V (VREF), indicating that at these
higher currents, the output is not capable of reaching VREF.
OUTPUT VOLTAGE (V)
R
Figure 35. Source and Sink Current Capability with VREF = AVDD = 5 V
Rev. C | Page 54 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
3
PULSE-WIDTH MODULATOR (PWM)
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 has a highly flexible PWM
offering programmable resolution and an input clock. The
PWM can be configured in six different modes of operation.
Two of these modes allow the PWM to be configured as a Σ-Δ
DAC with up to 16 bits of resolution. A block diagram of the
PWM is shown in Figure 38.
OUTPUT VOLTAGE (V)
DAC LOADED WITH 0FFFH
2
1
12.583MHz (FVCO)
EXTERNAL CLOCK ON P2.7
32.768kHz (FXTAL)
DAC LOADED WITH 0000H
CLOCK
SELECT
PROGRAMMABLE
DIVIDER
0
0
5
10
SOURCE/SINK CURRENT (mA)
15
04741-036
32.768kHz/15
16-BIT PWM COUNTER
Figure 36. Source and Sink Current Capability with VREF = AVDD = 3 V
P2.5
COMPARE
MODE
PWM0H/L
P2.6
PWM1H/L
04741-038
For larger loads, the current drive capability may not be sufficient. To increase the source and sink current capability of the
DAC, an external buffer should be added as shown in Figure 37.
Figure 38. PWM Block Diagram
The PWM uses control SFR, PWMCON, and four data SFRs:
PWM0H, PWM0L, PWM1H, and PWM1L.
14
PWMCON (as described in Table 34) controls the different
modes of operation of the PWM as well as the PWM clock
frequency. PWM0H/L and PWM1H/L are the data registers that
determine the duty cycles of the PWM outputs at P2.5 and P2.6.
04741-037
ADuC845/
ADuC847/ DAC
ADuC848
Figure 37. Buffering the DAC Output
The internal DAC output buffer also features a high impedance
disable function. In the chip’s default power-on state, the DAC
is disabled and its output is in a high impedance state (or threestate) where it remains inactive until enabled in software. This
means that if a zero output is desired during power-on or
power-down transient conditions, a pull-down resistor must be
added to each DAC output. Assuming that this resistor is in
place, the DAC output remains at ground potential whenever
the DAC is disabled.
To use the PWM user software, first write to PWMCON to
select the PWM mode of operation and the PWM input clock.
Writing to PWMCON also resets the PWM counter. In any of
the 16-bit modes of operation (Modes 1, 3, 4, 6), user software
should write to the PWM0L or PWM1L SFRs first. This value is
written to a hidden SFR. Writing to the PWM0H or PWM1H
SFRs updates both the PWMxH and the PWMxL SFRs but does
not change the outputs until the end of the PWM cycle in
progress. The values written to these 16-bit registers are then
used in the next PWM cycle.
Rev. C | Page 55 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
PWMCON PWM Control SFR
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
AEH
00H
No
Table 34. PWMCON PWM Control SFR
Bit No.
7
6, 5, 4
Name
–––
PWM2, PWM1, PWM0
3, 2
PWS1, PWS0
1, 0
PWC1, PWC0
Description
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
PMW Mode Selection.
PWM2 PWM1 PWM0
0
0
0
Mode 0: PWM disabled.
0
0
1
Mode 1: Single 16-bit output with programmable pulse and cycle time.
0
1
0
Mode 2: Twin 8-bit outputs.
0
1
1
Mode 3: Twin 16-bit outputs.
1
0
0
Mode 4: Dual 16-bit pulse density outputs.
1
0
1
Mode 5: Dual 8-bit outputs.
1
1
0
Mode 6: Dual 16-bit pulse density RZ outputs.
1
1
1
Mode 7: PWM counter reset with outputs not used.
PWM Clock Source Divider.
PWS1
PWS0
0
0
Selected clock.
0
1
Selected clock divided by 4.
1
0
Selected clock divided by 16.
1
1
Selected clock divided by 64.
PWM Clock Source Selection.
PWC1 PWC0
0
0
FXTAL/15 (2.184 kHz).
0
1
FXTAL (32.768 kHz).
1
0
External input on P2.7.
1
1
FVCO (12.58 MHz).
PWM Pulse Width High Byte (PWM0H)
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
B2H
00H
No
Table 35. PWM0H: PWM Pulse Width High Byte
PWM0H.7
0
R/W
PWM0H.6
0
R/W
PWM0H.5
0
R/W
PWM0H.4
0
R/W
PWM0H.3
0
R/W
PWM0H.2
0
R/W
PWM0H.1
0
R/W
PWM0H.0
0
R/W
PWM0L.4
0
R/W
PWM0L.3
0
R/W
PWM0L.2
0
R/W
PWM0L.1
0
R/W
PWM0L.0
0
R/W
PWM Pulse Width Low Byte (PWM0L)
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
B1H
00H
No
Table 36. PWM0L: PWM Pulse Width Low Byte
PWM0L.7
0
R/W
PWM0L.6
0
R/W
PWM0L.5
0
R/W
Rev. C | Page 56 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
PWM Cycle Width High Byte (PWM1H)
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
B4H
00H
No
Table 37. PWM1H: PWM Cycle Width High Byte
PWM1H.7
0
R/W
PWM1H.6
0
R/W
PWM1H.5
0
R/W
PWM1H.4
0
R/W
PWM1H.3
0
R/W
PWM1H.2
0
R/W
PWM1H.1
0
R/W
PWM1H.0
0
R/W
PWM Cycle Width Low Byte (PWM1L)
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
B3H
00H
No
Table 38. PWM1L: PWM Cycle Width Low Byte
PWM1L.7
PWM1L.6
PWM1L.5
PWM1L.4
PWM1L.3
PWM1L.2
PWM1L.1
PWM1L.0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Mode 0
Mode 2 (Twin 8-Bit PWM)
In Mode 0, the PWM is disabled, allowing P2.5 and P2.6 to be
used as normal digital I/Os.
In Mode 2, the duty cycle and the resolution of the PWM
outputs are programmable. The maximum resolution of the
PWM output is 8 bits.
Mode 1 (Single-Variable Resolution PWM)
In Mode 1, both the pulse length and the cycle time (period) are
programmable in user code, allowing the resolution of the PWM
to be variable. PWM1H/L sets the period of the output waveform.
Reducing PWM1H/L reduces the resolution of the PWM output
but increases the maximum output rate of the PWM. For
example, setting PWM1H/L to 65536 gives a 16-bit PWM with
a maximum output rate of 192 Hz (12.583 MHz/65536). Setting
PWM1H/L to 4096 gives a 12-bit PWM with a maximum
output rate of 3072 Hz (12.583 MHz/4096).
PWM0H/L sets the duty cycle of the PWM output waveform as
shown in Figure 39.
PWM1L sets the period for both PWM outputs. Typically, this
is set to 255 (FFH) to give an 8-bit PWM, although it is possible
to reduce this as necessary. A value of 100 could be loaded here
to give a percentage PWM, that is, the PWM is accurate to 1%.
The outputs of the PWM at P2.5 and P2.6 are shown in Figure 40.
As can be seen, the output of PWM0 (P2.5) goes low when the
PWM counter equals PWM0L. The output of PWM1 (P2.6) goes
high when the PWM counter equals PWM1H and goes low
again when the PWM counter equals PWM0H. Setting PWM1H
to 0 ensures that both PWM outputs start simultaneously.
PWM1L
PWM COUNTER
PWM1H/L
PWM COUNTER
PWM0H
PWM0L
PWM0H/L
PWM1H
P2.5
P2.6
Figure 39. PWM in Mode 1
Figure 40. PWM Mode 2
Rev. C | Page 57 of 108
04741-040
P2.5
04741-039
0
0
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
Mode 3 (Twin 16-Bit PWM)
Mode 4 (Dual NRZ 16-Bit Σ-∆ DAC)
In Mode 3, the PWM counter is fixed to count from 0 to 65536,
giving a fixed 16-bit PWM. Operating from the 12.58 MHz core
clock results in a PWM output rate of 192 Hz. The duty cycle of
the PWM outputs at P2.5 and P2.6 are independently
programmable.
Mode 4 provides a high speed PWM output similar to that of a
Σ-Δ DAC. Typically, this mode is used with the PWM clock
equal to 12.58 MHz.
As shown in Figure 41, while the PWM counter is less than
PWM0H/L, the output of PWM0 (P2.5) is high. Once the
PWM counter equals PWM0H/L, PWM0 (P2.5) goes low and
remains low until the PWM counter rolls over.
Similarly, while the PWM counter is less than PWM1H/L, the
output of PWM1 (P2.6) is high. Once the PWM counter equals
PWM1H/L, PWM1 (P2.6) goes low and remains low until the
PWM counter rolls over.
In this mode, both PWM outputs are synchronized, that is, once
the PWM counter rolls over to 0, both PWM0 (P2.5) and PWM1
(P2.6) go high.
In this mode, P2.5 and P2.6 are updated every PWM clock
(80 ns in the case of 12.58 MHz). Over any 65536 cycles (16-bit
PWM), PWM0 (P2.5) is high for PWM0H/L cycles and low for
(65536 – PWM0H/L) cycles. Similarly, PWM1 (P2.6) is high for
PWM1H/L cycles and low for (65536 – PWM1H/L) cycles.
If PWM1H is set to 4010H (slightly above one-quarter of FS),
typically P2.6 is low for three clocks and high for one clock
(each clock is approximately 80 ns). Over every 65536 clocks,
the PWM compromises for the fact that the output should be
slightly above one-quarter of full scale, by having a high cycle
followed by only two low cycles.
PWM0H/L = C000H
CARRY OUT AT P2.5
16-BIT
0
1
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
65536
PWM COUNTER
PWM1H/L
80µs
16-BIT
16-BIT
PWM0H/L
12.583MHz
LATCH
0
P2.5
16-BIT
0
CARRY OUT AT P2.6
16-BIT
80µs
PWM1H/L = 4000H
04741-042
Figure 41. PWM Mode 3
04741-041
P2.6
16-BIT
Figure 42. PWM Mode 4
For faster DAC outputs (at lower resolution), write 0s to the
LSBs that are not required with a 1 in the LSB position. If, for
example, only 12-bit performance is required, write 0001 to the
4 LSBs. This means that a 12-bit accurate Σ-Δ DAC output can
occur at 3 kHz. Similarly, writing 00000001 to the 8 LSBs gives
an 8-bit accurate Σ-Δ DAC output at 49 kHz.
Rev. C | Page 58 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Mode 5 (Dual 8-Bit PWM)
In Mode 5, the duty cycle and the resolution of the PWM outputs
are individually programmable. The maximum resolution of the
PWM output is 8 bits.
PWM1L
The output resolution is set by the PWM1L and PWM1H SFRs
for the P2.5 and P2.6 outputs, respectively. PWM0L and PWM0H
set the duty cycles of the PWM outputs at P2.5 and P2.6,
respectively. Both PWMs have the same clock source and clock
divider.
PWM COUNTERS
PWM0H/L = C000H
PWM1H
CARRY OUT AT P2.5
PWM0L
0 1
16-BIT
1
1
0 1
1
PWM0H
0
318µs
04741-043
P2.6
16-BIT
16-BIT
P2.5
3.146MHz
Figure 43. PWM Mode 5
16-BIT
LATCH
16-BIT
Mode 6 (Dual RZ 16-Bit Σ-∆ DAC)
If PWM1H is set to 4010H (slightly above one-quarter of FS),
typically P2.6 is low for three full clocks (3 × 80 ns), high for
one-half a clock (40 ns), and then low again for one-half a clock
(40 ns) before repeating itself. Over every 65536 clocks, the
PWM compromises for the fact that the output should be
slightly above one-quarter of full scale by leaving the output
high for two half clocks in four every so often.
0
0, 3/4, 1/2, 1/4, 0
0
0 1
0
0
0
CARRY OUT AT P2.6
16-BIT
318µs
PWM1H/L = 4000H
Figure 44. PWM Mode 6
Mode 7
In Mode 7, the PWM is disabled, allowing P2.5 and P2.6 to be
used as normal.
For faster DAC outputs (at lower resolution), write 0s to the
LSBs that are not required with a 1 in the LSB position. If, for
example, only 12-bit performance is required, write 0001 to the
4 LSBs. This means that a 12-bit accurate Σ-Δ DAC output can
occur at 3 kHz. Similarly, writing 00000001 to the 8 LSBs gives
an 8-bit accurate Σ-Δ DAC output at 49 kHz.
Rev. C | Page 59 of 108
04741-044
Mode 6 provides a high speed PWM output similar to that of a
Σ-Δ DAC. Mode 6 operates very similarly to Mode 4; however,
the key difference is that Mode 6 provides return to zero (RZ)
Σ-Δ DAC output. Mode 4 provides non-return-to-zero Σ-Δ
DAC outputs. RZ mode ensures that any difference in the rise
and fall times does not affect the Σ-Δ DAC INL. However, RZ
mode halves the dynamic range of the Σ-Δ DAC outputs from
0 V− to AVDD down to 0 V to AVDD/2. For best results, this
mode should be used with a PWM clock divider of 4.
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
ON-CHIP PLL (PLLCON)
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 are intended for use with a
32.768 kHz watch crystal. A PLL locks onto a multiple (384) of
this to provide a stable 12.582912 MHz clock for the system.
The core can operate at this frequency or at binary submultiples
of it to allow power saving when maximum core performance is
not required. The default core clock is the PLL clock divided by
8 or 1.572864 MHz. The ADC clocks are also derived from the
PLL clock, with the modulator rate being the same as the crystal
oscillator frequency. The control register for the PLL is called
PLLCON and is described as follows.
The 5 V parts can be set to a maximum core frequency of
12.58 MHz (CD2...0 = 000) while at 3 V, the maximum core
clock rate is 6.29 MHz (CD2...0 = 001). The CD bits should not
be set to 000b on the 3 V parts.
The 3 V parts are limited to a core clock speed of 6.29 MHz
(CD = 1).
PLLCON PLL Control Register
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
D7H
53H
No
Table 39. PLLCON PLL Control Register
Bit No.
7
Name
OSC_PD
6
LOCK
5
4
3
–––
LTEA
FINT
2, 1, 0
CD2, CD1, CD0
Description
Oscillator Power-Down Bit.
If low, the 32 kHz crystal oscillator continues running in power-down mode.
If high, the 32.768 kHz oscillator is powered down.
When this bit is low, the seconds counter continues to count in power-down mode and can interrupt the CPU
to exit power-down. The oscillator is always enabled in normal mode.
PLL Lock Bit. This is a read-only bit.
Set automatically at power-on to indicate that the PLL loop is correctly tracking the crystal clock. After powerdown, this bit can be polled to wait for the PLL to lock.
Cleared automatically at power-on to indicate that the PLL is not correctly tracking the crystal clock. This
might be due to the absence of a crystal clock or an external crystal at power-on. In this mode, the PLL output
can be 12.58 MHz ± 20%. After the part wakes up from power-down, user code can poll this bit to wait for the
PLL to lock. If LOCK = 0, the PLL is not locked.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
EA Status. Read-only bit. Reading this bit returns the state of the external EA pin latched at reset or power-on.
Fast Interrupt Response Bit.
Set by the user to enable the response to any interrupt to be executed at the fastest core clock frequency.
Cleared by the user to disable the fast interrupt response feature.
This function must not be used on 3 V parts.
CPU (Core Clock) Divider Bits. This number determines the frequency at which the core operates.
CD2
CD1
CD0
Core Clock Frequency (MHz)
0
0
0
12.582912. Not a valid selection on 3 V parts.
0
0
1
6.291456 (Maximum core clock rate allowed on the 3 V parts)
0
1
0
3.145728
0
1
1
1.572864 (Default core frequency)
1
0
0
0.786432
1
0
1
0.393216
1
1
0
0.196608
1
1
1
0.098304
On 3 V parts (ADuC84xBCPxx-3 or ADuC84xBSxx-3), the CD settings can be only CD = 1; CD = 0 is not a valid
selection. If CD = 0 is selected on a 3 V part by writing to PLLCON, the instruction is ignored, and the previous
CD value is retained.
The Fast Interrupt bit (FINT) must not be used on 3 V parts since it automatically sets the CD bits to 0, which is
not a valid setting.
Rev. C | Page 60 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
I2C SERIAL INTERFACE
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 support a fully licensed
I2C serial interface. The I2C interface is implemented as a full
hardware slave and software master. SDATA (Pin 27 on the
MQFP package and Pin 29 on the LFCSP package) is the data
I/O pin. SCLK (Pin 26 on the MQFP package and Pin 28 on the
LFCSP package) is the serial interface clock for the SPI interface.
The I2C interface on the parts is fully independent of all other
pin/function multiplexing. The I2C interface incorporated on
the ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 also includes a second
address register (I2CADD1) at SFR Address F2H with a default
power-on value of 7FH. The I2C interface is always available to
the user and is not multiplexed with any other I/O functionality
on the chip. This means that the I2C and SPI interfaces can be
used at the same time.
Note that when using the I2C and SPI interfaces simultaneously,
they both use the same interrupt routine (Vector Address 3BH).
When an interrupt occurs from one of these, it is necessary to
interrogate each interface to see which one has triggered the ISR
request.
The four SFRs that are used to control the I2C interface are
described next.
I2CCON—I2C Control Register
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
E8H
00H
Yes
Table 40. I2CCON SFR Bit Designations
Bit No.
7
Name
MDO
6
MDE
5
MCO
4
MDI
3
I2CM
2
I2CRS
1
I2CTX
0
I2CI
Description
I2C Software Master Data Output Bit (master mode only).
This data bit is used to implement a master I2C transmitter interface in software. Data written to this bit is output on
the SDATA pin if the data output enable bit (MDE) is set.
I2C Software Output Enable Bit (master mode only).
Set by the user to enable the SDATA pin as an output (Tx).
Cleared by the user to enable the SDATA pin as an input (Rx).
I2C Software Master Clock Output Bit (master mode only).
This bit is used to implement the SCLK for a master I2C transmitter in software. Data written to this bit is output on
the SCLK pin.
I2C Software Master Data Input Bit (master mode only).
This data bit is used to implement a master I2C receiver interface in software. Data on the SDATA pin is latched into
this bit on an SCLK transition if the data output enable (MDE) bit is 0.
I2C Master/Slave Mode Bit.
Set by the user to enable I2C software master mode.
Cleared by the user to enable I2C hardware slave mode.
I2C Reset Bit (slave mode only).
Set by the user to reset the I2C interface.
Cleared by the user code for normal I2C operation.
I2C Direction Transfer Bit (slave mode only).
Set by the MicroConverter if the I2C interface is transmitting.
Cleared by the MicroConverter if the I2C interface is receiving.
I2C Interrupt Bit (slave mode only).
Set by the MicroConverter after a byte has been transmitted or received.
Cleared by the MicroConverter when the user code reads the I2CDAT SFR. I2CI should not be cleared by user code.
Rev. C | Page 61 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
I2CADD—I2C Address Register 1
Function:
Holds one of the I2C peripheral addresses for the part. It may be overwritten by user code. Application
Note uC001 at http://www.analog.com/microconverter describes the format of the I2C standard 7-bit address.
9BH
55H
No
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
I2CADD1—I2C Address Register 2
Function:
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
Same as the I2CADD.
F2H
7FH
No
I2CDAT—I2C Data Register
Function:
The I2CDAT SFR is written to by user code to transmit data, or read by user code to read data just received by
the I2C interface. Accessing I2CDAT automatically clears any pending I2C interrupt and the I2CI bit in the
I2CCON SFR. User code should access I2CDAT only once per interrupt cycle.
9AH
00H
No
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
Software Master Mode
The main features of the MicroConverter I2C interface are
•
Only two bus lines are required: a serial data line (SDATA)
and a serial clock line (SCLOCK).
•
An I2C master can communicate with multiple slave
devices. Because each slave device has a unique 7-bit
address, single master/slave relationships can exist at all
times even in a multislave environment.
•
The ability to respond to two separate addresses when
operating in slave mode.
•
On-chip filtering rejects <50 ns spikes on the SDATA and
the SCLOCK lines to preserve data integrity.
DVDD
I2C
SLAVE 1
I2C
SLAVE 2
Figure 45. Typical I2C System
04741-045
I2C
MASTER
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 can be used as an I2C
master device by configuring the I2C peripheral in master mode
and writing software to output the data bit-by-bit. This is
referred to as a software master. Master mode is enabled by
setting the I2CM bit in the I2CCON register.
To transmit data on the SDATA line, MDE must be set to enable
the output driver on the SDATA pin. If MDE is set, the SDATA
pin is pulled high or low depending on whether the MDO bit is
set or cleared. MCO controls the SCLOCK pin and is always
configured as an output in master mode. In master mode, the
SCLOCK pin is pulled high or low depending on the whether
MCO is set or cleared.
To receive data, MDE must be cleared to disable the output
driver on SDATA. Software must provide the clocks by toggling
the MCO bit and reading the SDATA pin via the MDI bit. If
MDE is cleared, MDI can be used to read the SDATA pin. The
value of the SDATA pin is latched into MDI on a rising edge of
SCLOCK. MDI is set if the SDATA pin is high on the last rising
edge of SCLOCK. MDI is cleared if the SDATA pin is low on the
last rising edge of SCLOCK.
Software must control MDO, MCO, and MDE appropriately to
generate the start condition, slave address, acknowledge bits,
data bytes, and stop conditions. These functions are described
in Application Note uC001.
Rev. C | Page 62 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Hardware Slave Mode
After reset, the ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 default to
hardware slave mode. Slave mode is enabled by clearing the
I2CM bit in I2CCON. The parts have a full hardware slave. In
slave mode, the I2C address is stored in the I2CADD register.
Data received or to be transmitted is stored in the I2CDAT
register.
Once enabled in I2C slave mode, the slave controller waits for
a start condition. If the parts detect a valid start condition,
followed by a valid address, followed by the R/W bit, then the
I2CI interrupt bit is automatically set by hardware. The I2C
peripheral generates a core interrupt only if the user has preconfigured the I2C interrupt enable bit in the IEIP2 SFR as well
as the global interrupt bit, EA, in the IE SFR. Therefore,
MOV IEIP2, #01h
SETB EA
;Enable I2C Interrupt
An autoclear of the I2CI bit is implemented on the parts so that
this bit is cleared automatically upon read or write access to the
I2CDAT SFR.
MOV I2CDAT, A
MOV A, I2CDAT
;I2CI auto-cleared
;I2CI auto-cleared
If for any reason the user tries to clear the interrupt more than
once, that is, access the data SFR more than once per interrupt,
the I2C controller stops. The interface then must be reset by
using the I2CRS bit.
The I2CTX bit contains the R/W bit sent from the master. If
I2CTX is set, the master is ready to receive a byte; therefore the
slave transmits data by writing to the I2CDAT register. If I2CTX
is cleared, the master is ready to transmit a byte; therefore the
slave receives a serial byte. Software can interrogate the state of
I2CTX to determine whether it should write to or read from
I2CDAT.
Once the part has received a valid address, hardware holds
SCLOCK low until the I2CI bit is cleared by software. This
allows the master to wait for the slave to be ready before
transmitting the clocks for the next byte.
The I2CI interrupt bit is set every time a complete data byte is
received or transmitted, provided that it is followed by a valid
ACK. If the byte is followed by a NACK, an interrupt is not
generated.
The part continues to issue interrupts for each complete data
byte transferred until a stop condition is received or the interface
is reset.
When a stop condition is received, the interface resets to a state
in which it is waiting to be addressed (idle). Similarly, if the
interface receives a NACK at the end of a sequence, it also
returns to the default idle state. The I2CRS bit can be used to
reset the I2C interface. This bit can be used to force the interface
back to the default idle state.
The user can choose to poll the I2CI bit or to enable the
interrupt. In the case of the interrupt, the PC counter vectors to
003BH at the end of each complete byte. For the first byte, when
the user gets to the I2CI ISR, the 7-bit address and the R/W bit
appear in the I2CDAT SFR.
Rev. C | Page 63 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
SPI SERIAL INTERFACE
MISO (Master In, Slave Out Pin)
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 integrate a complete
hardware serial peripheral interface (SPI) interface on-chip. SPI
is an industry-standard synchronous serial interface that allows
8 bits of data to be synchronously transmitted and received
simultaneously, that is, full duplex. Note that the SPI pins are
multiplexed with the Port 2 pins, P2.0, P2.1, P2.2, and P2.3. These
pins have SPI functionality only if SPE is set. Otherwise, with
SPE cleared, standard Port 2 functionality is maintained. SPI
can be configured for master or slave operation and typically
consists of Pins SCLOCK, MISO, MOSI, and SS.
SCLOCK (Serial Clock I/O Pin)
Pin 28 (MQFP Package), Pin 30 (LFCSP Package)
The master clock (SCLOCK) is used to synchronize the data
transmitted and received through the MOSI and MISO data
lines.
A single data bit is transmitted and received in each SCLOCK
period. Therefore, a byte is transmitted/received after eight
SCLOCK periods. The SCLOCK pin is configured as an output
in master mode and as an input in slave mode. In master mode,
the bit rate, polarity, and phase of the clock are controlled by the
CPOL, CPHA, SPR0, and SPR1 bits in the SPICON SFR (see
Table 41). In slave mode, the SPICON register must be configured with the same phase and polarity (CPHA and CPOL) as the
master. The data is transmitted on one edge of the SCLOCK
signal and sampled on the other.
Pin 30 (MQFP Package), Pin 32 (LFCSP Package)
The MISO pin is configured as an input line in master mode
and an output line in slave mode. The MISO line on the master
(data in) should be connected to the MISO line in the slave
device (data out). The data is transferred as byte-wide (8-bit)
serial data, MSB first.
MOSI (Master Out, Slave In Pin)
Pin 29 (MQFP Package), Pin31 (LFCSP Package)
The MOSI pin is configured as an output line in master mode
and an input line in slave mode. The MOSI line on the master
(data out) should be connected to the MOSI line in the slave
device (data in). The data is transferred as byte-wide (8-bit)
serial data, MSB first.
SS (Slave Select Input Pin)
Pin 31 (MQFP Package), Pin 33 (LFCSP Package)
The SS pin is used only when the ADuC845/ADuC847/
ADuC848 are configured in SPI slave mode. This line is active
low. Data is received or transmitted in slave mode only when
the SS pin is low, allowing the parts to be used in single-master,
multislave SPI configurations. If CPHA = 1, the SS input can be
pulled low permanently. If CPHA = 0, the SS input must be
driven low before the first bit in a byte-wide transmission or
reception and must return high again after the last bit in that
byte-wide transmission or reception. In SPI slave mode, the
logic level on the external SS pin (Pin 31/Pin 33) can be read via
the SPR0 bit in the SPICON SFR.
The SFR register in Table 41 is used to control the SPI interface.
Rev. C | Page 64 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
SPICON—SPI Control Register
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
F8H
05H
Yes
Table 41. SPICON SFR Bit Designations
Bit No.
7
Name
ISPI
6
WCOL
5
SPE
4
SPIM
3
CPOL 1
2
CPHA1
1, 0
SPR1, SPR0
1
Description
SPI Interrupt Bit.
Set by the MicroConverter at the end of each SPI transfer.
Cleared directly by user code or indirectly by reading the SPIDAT SFR.
Write Collision Error Bit.
Set by the MicroConverter if SPIDAT is written to while an SPI transfer is in progress.
Cleared by user code.
SPI Interface Enable Bit.
Set by user code to enable SPI functionality.
Cleared by user code to enable standard Port 2 functionality.
SPI Master/Slave Mode Select Bit.
Set by user code to enable master mode operation (SCLOCK is an output).
Cleared by user code to enable slave mode operation (SCLOCK is an input).
Clock Polarity Bit.
Set by user code to enable SCLOCK idle high.
Cleared by user code to enable SCLOCK idle low.
Clock Phase Select Bit.
Set by user code if the leading SCLOCK edge is to transmit data.
Cleared by user code if the trailing SCLOCK edge is to transmit data.
SPI Bit-Rate Bits.
SPR1
SPR0
Selected Bit Rate
0
0
fcore/2
0
1
fcore/4
1
0
fcore/8
1
1
fcore/16
The CPOL and CPHA bits should both contain the same values for master and slave devices.
Note that both SPI and I2C use the same ISR (Vector Address 3BH); therefore, when using SPI and I2C simultaneously, it is necessary to
check the interfaces following an interrupt to determine which one caused the interrupt.
SPIDAT: SPI Data Register
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
7FH
00H
No
Rev. C | Page 65 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
SPI Interface—Master Mode
USING THE SPI INTERFACE
In master mode, the SCLOCK pin is always an output and
generates a burst of eight clocks whenever user code writes to
the SPIDAT register. The SCLOCK bit rate is determined by
SPR0 and SPR1 in SPICON. Also note that the SS pin is not
used in master mode. If the parts need to assert the SS pin on an
external slave device, a port digital output pin should be used.
Depending on the configuration of the bits in the SPICON
SFR shown in Table 41, the SPI interface transmits or receives
data in a number of possible modes. Figure 46 shows all
possible ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 SPI configurations
and the timing relationships and synchronization among the
signals involved. Also shown in this figure is the SPI interrupt
bit (ISPI) and how it is triggered at the end of each byte-wide
communication.
In master mode, a byte transmission or reception is initiated by
a byte write to SPIDAT. The hardware automatically generates
eight clock periods via the SCLOCK pin, and the data is
transmitted via MOSI. With each SCLOCK period, a data bit is
also sampled via MISO. After eight clocks, the transmitted byte
is completely transmitted (via MOSI), and the input byte (if
required) is waiting in the input shift register (after being
received via MISO). The ISPI flag is set automatically, and an
interrupt occurs if enabled. The value in the input shift register
is latched into SPIDAT.
SCLOCK
(CPOL = 1)
SCLOCK
(CPOL = 0)
SS
SAMPLE INPUT
(CPHA = 1)
DATA OUTPUT
? MSB BIT 6 BIT 5 BIT 4 BIT 3 BIT 2 BIT 1 LSB
SPI Interface—Slave Mode
ISPI FLAG
SAMPLE INPUT
DATA OUTPUT
MSB BIT 6 BIT 5 BIT 4 BIT 3 BIT 2 BIT 1 LSB
ISPI FLAG
Figure 46. SPI Timing, All Modes
04741-046
(CPHA = 0)
In slave mode, the SCLOCK is an input. The SS pin must also
be driven low externally during the byte communication. Transmission is also initiated by a write to SPIDAT. In slave mode, a
data bit is transmitted via MISO, and a data bit is received via
MOSI through each input SCLOCK period. After eight clocks,
the transmitted byte is completely transmitted, and the input
byte is waiting in the input shift register. The ISPI flag is set
automatically, and an interrupt occurs, if enabled. The value in
the shift register is latched into SPIDAT only when the transmission/reception of a byte has been completed. The end of
transmission occurs after the eighth clock has been received if
CPHA = 1, or when SS returns high if CPHA = 0.
Rev. C | Page 66 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
DUAL DATA POINTERS
DPCON—Data Pointer Control SFR
The parts incorporate two data pointers. The second data
pointer is a shadow data pointer and is selected via the data
pointer control SFR (DPCON). DPCON features automatic
hardware post-increment and post-decrement as well as an
automatic data pointer toggle.
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
A7H
00H
No
Table 42. DPCON SFR Bit Designations
Bit No.
7
6
Name
---DPT
5, 4
DP1m1, DP1m0
3, 2
DP0m1, DP0m0
Description
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Data Pointer Automatic Toggle Enable.
Cleared by the user to disable autoswapping of the DPTR.
Set in user software to enable automatic toggling of the DPTR after each MOVX or MOVC instruction.
Shadow Data Pointer Mode. These bits enable extra modes of the shadow data pointer operation, allowing
more compact and more efficient code size and execution.
DP1m1 DP1m0 Behavior of the Shadow Data Pointer
0
0
8052 behavior.
0
1
DPTR is post-incremented after a MOVX or a MOVC instruction.
1
0
DPTR is post-decremented after a MOVX or MOVC instruction.
1
1
DPTR LSB is toggled after a MOVX or MOVC instruction. (This instruction can be useful for
moving 8-bit blocks to/from 16-bit devices.)
Main Data Pointer Mode. These bits enable extra modes of the main data pointer operation, allowing more
compact and more efficient code size and execution.
DP0m1
0
0
1
1
1
0
---DPSEL
DP0m0
0
1
0
1
Behavior of the Main Data Pointer
8052 behavior.
DPTR is post-incremented after a MOVX or a MOVC instruction.
DPTR is post-decremented after a MOVX or MOVC instruction.
DPTR LSB is toggled after a MOVX or MOVC instruction. (This instruction is useful for
moving 8-bit blocks to/from 16-bit devices.)
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Data Pointer Select.
Cleared by the user to select the main data pointer. This means that the contents of this 24-bit register are
placed into the DPL, DPH, and DPP SFRs.
Set by the user to select the shadow data pointer. This means that the contents of a separate 24-bit register
appear in the DPL, DPH, and DPP SFRs.
Note the following:
•
The Dual Data Pointer section is the only place in which
main and shadow data pointers are distinguished.
Whenever the DPTR is mentioned elsewhere in this data
sheet, active DPTR is implied.
MOV DPTR,#0
;Main DPTR = 0
MOV DPCON,#55H
;Select shadow DPTR
;DPTR1 increment mode
;DPTR0 increment mode
;DPTR auto toggling ON
•
Only the MOVC/MOVX @DPTR instructions
automatically post-increment and post-decrement the
DPTR. Other MOVC/MOVX instructions, such as MOVC
PC or MOVC @Ri, do not cause the DPTR to automatically
post-increment and post-decrement.
MOV DPTR,#0D000H ;DPTR = D000H
MOVELOOP: CLR A
To illustrate the operation of DPCON, the following code copies
256 bytes of code memory at Address D000H into XRAM,
starting from Address 0000H.
MOVC A,@A+DPTR
;Post Inc DPTR
;Swap to Main DPTR(Data)
MOVX @DPTR,A
;Put ACC in XRAM
;Increment main DPTR
;Swap Shadow DPTR(Code)
MOV A, DPL
JNZ MOVELOOP
Rev. C | Page 67 of 108
;Get data
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
POWER SUPPLY MONITOR
The power supply monitor, once enabled, monitors the DVDD
and AVDD supplies on the parts. It indicates when any of the
supply pins drop below one of four user-selectable voltage trip
points from 2.63 V to 4.63 V. For correct operation of the power
supply monitor function, AVDD must be equal to or greater than
2.63 V. Monitor function is controlled via the PSMCON SFR. If
enabled via the IEIP2 SFR, the monitor interrupts the core by
using the PSMI bit in the PSMCON SFR. This bit is not cleared
until the failing power supply returns above the trip point for at
least 250 ms.
The monitor function allows the user to save working registers
to avoid possible data loss due to the low supply condition, and
also ensures that normal code execution does not resume until a
safe supply level is well established. The supply monitor is also
protected against spurious glitches triggering the interrupt
circuit.
The 5 V part has an internal POR trip level of 4.63 V, which
means that there are no usable DVDD PSM trip levels on the 5 V
part. The 3 V part has a POR trip level of 2.63 V following a
reset and initialization sequence, allowing all relevant PSM trip
points to be used.
PSMCON—Power Supply Monitor Control Register
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
DFH
DEH
No
Table 43. PSMCON SFR Bit Designations
Bit No.
7
Name
CMPD
6
CMPA
5
PSMI
4, 3
TPD1, TPD0
2, 1
TPA1, TPA0
0
PSMEN
Description
DVDD Comparator Bit.
This read-only bit directly reflects the state of the DVDD comparator.
Read 1 indicates that the DVDD supply is above its selected trip point.
Read 0 indicates that the DVDD supply is below its selected trip point.
AVDD Comparator Bit.
This read-only bit directly reflects the state of the AVDD comparator.
Read 1 indicates that the AVDD supply is above its selected trip point.
Read 0 indicates that the AVDD supply is below its selected trip point.
Power Supply Monitor Interrupt Bit.
Set high by the MicroConverter if either CMPA or CMPD is low, indicating low analog or digital supply. The PSMI
bit can be used to interrupt the processor. Once CMPD and/or CMPA returns (and remains) high, a 250 ms
counter is started. When this counter times out, the PSMI interrupt is cleared. PSMI can also be written by the
user. However, if either comparator output is low, it is not possible for the user to clear PSMI.
DVDD Trip Point Selection Bits.
A 5 V part has no valid PSM trip points. If the DVDD supply falls below the 4.63 V point, the part resets (POR). For a
3 V part, all relevant PSM trip points are valid. The 3 V POR trip point is 2.63 V (fixed).
These bits select the DVDD trip point voltage as follows:
TPD1 TPD0
Selected DVDD Trip Point (V)
0
0
4.63
0
1
3.08
1
0
2.93
1
1
2.63
AVDD Trip Point Selection Bits. These bits select the AVDD trip point voltage as follows:
TPA1 TPA0
Selected AVDD Trip Point (V)
0
0
4.63
0
1
3.08
1
0
2.93
1
1
2.63
Power Supply Monitor Enable Bit.
Set to 1 by the user to enable the power supply monitor circuit.
Cleared to 0 by the user to disable the power supply monitor circuit.
Rev. C | Page 68 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
WATCHDOG TIMER
The watchdog timer generates a device reset or interrupt within a
reasonable amount of time if the ADuC845/ADuC847/
ADuC848 enters an erroneous state, possibly due to a programming error or electrical noise. The watchdog function can be
disabled by clearing the WDE (watchdog enable) bit in the
watchdog control (WDCON) SFR. When enabled, the
watchdog circuit generates a system reset or interrupt (WDS) if
the user program fails to set the WDE bit within a predetermined
amount of time (see the PRE3…0 bits in Table 44). The
watchdog timer is clocked from the 32 kHz external crystal
connected between the XTAL1 and XTAL2 pins. The WDCOM
SFR can be written only by user software if the double write
sequence described in WDWR is initiated on every write access
to the WDCON SFR.
WDCON—Watchdog Control Register
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
C0H
10H
Yes
Table 44. WDCON SFR Bit Designations
Bit No.
7, 6, 5, 4
Name
PRE3, PRE2, PRE1, PRE0
3
WDIR
2
WDS
1
WDE
0
WDWR
Description
Watchdog Timer Prescale Bits.
The watchdog timeout period is given by the equation
tWD = (2PRE × (29/ fXTAL)) (0 ≤ PRE ≤ 7; fXTAL = 32.768 kHz)
PRE3
PRE2
PRE1
PRE0
Timeout Period (ms)
Action
0
0
0
0
15.6
Reset or interrupt
0
0
0
1
31.2
Reset or interrupt
0
0
1
0
62.5
Reset or interrupt
0
0
1
1
125
Reset or interrupt
0
1
0
0
250
Reset or interrupt
0
1
0
1
500
Reset or interrupt
0
1
1
0
1000
Reset or interrupt
0
1
1
1
2000
Reset or interrupt
1
0
0
0
0.0
Immediate reset
PRE3–PRE0 > 1000b
Reserved. Not a valid selection.
Watchdog Interrupt Response Enable Bit.
If this bit is set by the user, the watchdog generates an interrupt response instead of a system reset
when the watchdog timeout period expires. This interrupt is not disabled by the CLR EA instruction,
and it is also a fixed, high priority interrupt. If the watchdog timer is not being used to monitor the
system, it can be used alternatively as a timer. The prescaler is used to set the timeout period in
which an interrupt is generated.
Watchdog Status Bit.
Set by the watchdog controller to indicate that a watchdog timeout has occurred.
Cleared by writing a 0 or by an external hardware reset. It is not cleared by a watchdog reset.
Watchdog Enable Bit.
Set by the user to enable the watchdog and clear its counters. If this bit is not set by the user within
the watchdog timeout period, the watchdog timer generates a reset or interrupt, depending on
WDIR.
Cleared under the following conditions: user writes 0; watchdog reset (WDIR = 0); hardware reset;
PSM interrupt.
Watchdog Write Enable Bit.
Writing data to the WDCON SFR involves a double instruction sequence. Global interrupts must first
be disabled. The WDWR bit is set with the very next instruction, a write to the WDCON SFR. For
example:
CLR EA
;Disable Interrupts while configuring to WDT
SETB WDWR
;Allow Write to WDCON
MOV WDCON, #72H ;Enable WDT for 2.0s timeout
SETB EA
;Enable Interrupts again (if required)
Rev. C | Page 69 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
A TIC is provided on-chip for counting longer intervals than
the standard 8051-compatible timers can count. The TIC is
capable of timeout intervals ranging from 1/128 second to 255
hours. Also, this counter is clocked by the external 32.768 kHz
crystal rather than by the core clock, and it can remain active in
power-down mode and time long power-down intervals. This
has obvious applications for remote battery-powered sensors
where regular widely spaced readings are required. Note that
instructions to the TIC SFRs are also clocked at 32.768 kHz, so
sufficient time must be allowed in user code for these instructions
to execute.
Six SFRs are associated with the time interval counter,
TIMECON being its control register. Depending on the
configuration of the IT0 and IT1 bits in TIMECON, the selected
time counter register overflow clocks the interval counter. When
this counter is equal to the time interval value loaded in the
INTVAL SFR, the TII bit (TIMECON.2) is set and generates an
interrupt, if enabled. If the part is in power-down mode, again
with TIC interrupt enabled, the TII bit wakes up the device and
resumes code execution by vectoring directly to the TIC
interrupt service vector address at 0053H. The TIC-related SFRs
are described in Table 45. Note also that the time based SFRs
can be written initially with the current time; the TIC can then
be controlled and accessed by user software. In effect, this
facilitates the implementation of a real-time clock. A basic block
diagram of the TIC is shown in Figure 47.
Because the TIC is clocked directly from a 32 kHz external
crystal on the parts, instructions that access the TIC registers
are also clocked at 32 kHz (not at the core frequency). The user
must ensure that sufficient time is given for these instructions
to execute.
TCEN
32.768kHz EXTERNAL CRYSTAL
ITS0 ITS1
8-BIT
PRESCALER
HUNDREDTHS COUNTER
HTHSEC
SECOND COUNTER
SEC
INTERVAL
TIMEBASE
SELECTION
MUX
TIEN
MINUTE COUNTER
MIN
HOUR COUNTER
HOUR
INTERVAL TIMEOUT
TIME INTERVAL COUNTER INTERRUPT
Rev. C | Page 70 of 108
8-BIT
INTERVAL COUNTER
EQUAL?
INTVAL SFR
Figure 47. TIC Simplified Block Diagram
04741-047
TIME INTERVAL COUNTER (TIC)
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
TIMECON—TIC Control Register
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
A1H
00H
No
Table 45. TIMECON SFR Bit Designations
Bit No.
7
6
Name
---TFH
5, 4
ITS1, ITS0
3
ST1
2
TII
1
TIEN
0
TCEN
Description
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Twenty-Four Hour Select Bit.
Set by the user to enable the hour counter to count from 0 to 23.
Cleared by the user to enable the hour counter to count from 0 to 255.
Interval Timebase Selection Bits.
ITS1 ITS0
Interval Timebase
0
0
1/128 Second
0
1
Seconds
1
0
Minutes
1
1
Hours
Single Time Interval Bit.
Set by the user to generate a single interval timeout. If set, a timeout clears the TIEN bit.
Cleared by the user to allow the interval counter to be automatically reloaded and start counting again at each
interval timeout.
TIC Interrupt Bit.
Set when the 8-bit interval counter matches the value in the INTVAL SFR.
Cleared by user software.
Time Interval Enable Bit.
Set by the user to enable the 8-bit time interval counter.
Cleared by the user to disable the interval counter.
Time Clock Enable Bit.
Set by the user to enable the time clock to the time interval counters.
Cleared by the user to disable the clock to the time interval counters and reset the time interval SFRs to the last
value written to them by the user. The time registers (HTHSEC, SEC, MIN, and HOUR) can be written while TCEN is
low.
Rev. C | Page 71 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
INTVAL—User Timer Interval Select Register
Function:
User code writes the required time interval to this register. When the 8-bit interval counter is equal to the time interval
value loaded in the INTVAL SFR, the TII bit (TIMECON.2) is set and generates an interrupt, if enabled.
SFR Address:
A6H
Power-On Default:
00H
Bit Addressable:
No
Valid Value:
0 to 255 decimal
HTHSEC—Hundredths of Seconds Time Register
Function:
This register is incremented in 1/128-second intervals once TCEN in TIMECON is active. The HTHSEC SFR counts
from 0 to 127 before rolling over to increment the SEC time register.
SFR Address:
A2H
Power-On Default:
00H
Bit Addressable:
No
Valid Value:
0 to 127 decimal
SEC—Seconds Time Register
Function:
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
Valid Value:
This register is incremented in 1-second intervals once TCEN in TIMECON is active. The SEC SFR counts from 0 to 59
before rolling over to increment the MIN time register.
A3H
00H
No
0 to 59 decimal
MIN—Minutes Time Register
Function
This register is incremented in 1-minute intervals once TCEN in TIMECON is active. The MIN SFR counts from 0 to 59
before rolling over to increment the HOUR time register.
SFR Address:
A4H
Power-On Default:
00H
Bit Addressable:
No
Valid Value:
0 to 59 decimal
HOUR—Hours Time Register
Function:
This register is incremented in 1-hour intervals once TCEN in TIMECON is active. The HOUR SFR counts from 0 to 23
before rolling over to 0.
SFR Address:
A5H
Power-On Default:
00H
Bit Addressable:
No
Valid Value:
0 to 23 decimal
To enable the TIC as a real-time clock, the HOUR, MIN, SEC, and HTHSEC registers can be loaded with the current time. Once the
TCEN bit is high, the TIC starts. To use the TIC as a time interval counter, select the count interval—hundredths of seconds, seconds,
minutes, and hours via the ITS0 and ITS1 bits in the TIMECON SFR. Load the count required into the INTVAL SFR.
Note that INTVAL is only an 8-bit register, so user software must take into account any intervals longer than are possible with 8 bits.
Therefore, to count an interval of 20 seconds, use the following procedure:
MOV TIMECON, #0D0H ;Enable 24Hour mode, count seconds, Clear TCEN.
MOV INTVAL, #14H ;Load INTVAL with required count interval...in this case 14H = 20
MOV TIMECON, #0D3H ;Start TIC counting and enable the 8bit INTVAL counter.
Rev. C | Page 72 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
This section gives a brief overview of the various secondary
peripheral circuits that are available to the user on-chip. These
features are mostly 8052-compatible (with a few additional
features) and are controlled via standard 8052 SFR bit definitions.
Parallel I/O
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 use four input/output
ports to exchange data with external devices. In addition to
performing general-purpose I/O, some are capable of external
memory operations, while others are multiplexed with alternate
functions for the peripheral functions available on-chip. In
general, when a peripheral is enabled, that pin cannot be used
as a general-purpose I/O pin.
Port 0
Port 0 is an 8-bit open-drain bidirectional I/O port that is
directly controlled via the Port 0 SFR (80H). Port 0 is also the
multiplexed low-order address and data bus during accesses to
external data memory.
Figure 48 shows a typical bit latch and I/O buffer for a Port 0
pin. The bit latch (one bit in the port’s SFR) is represented as a
Type D flip-flop, which clocks in a value from the internal bus
in response to a write to latch signal from the CPU. The
Q output of the flip-flop is placed on the internal bus in
response to a read latch signal from the CPU. The level of the
port pin itself is placed on the internal bus in response to a read
pin signal from the CPU. Some instructions that read a port
activate the read latch signal, and others activate the read pin
signal. See the Read-Modify-Write Instructions section for
details.
ADDR/DATA
Port 1 is also an 8-bit port directly controlled via the P1 SFR
(90H). Port 1 digital output capability is not supported on this
device. Port 1 pins can be configured as digital inputs or analog
inputs. By (power-on) default, these pins are configured as
analog inputs, that is, 1 is written to the corresponding Port 1
register bit. To configure any of these pins as digital inputs, the
user should write a 0 to these port bits to configure the corresponding pin as a high impedance digital input. These pins also
have various secondary functions aside from their analog input
capability, as described in Table 46.
Table 46. Port 1 Alternate Functions
Pin No.
P1.2
P1.3
P1.6
P1.7
Alternate Function
REFIN2+ (second reference input, +’ve)
REFIN2− (second reference input, –‘ve)
IEXC1 (200 µA excitation current source)
IEXC2 (200 µA excitation current source)
READ
LATCH
INTERNAL
BUS
DVDD
WRITE
TO LATCH
D
Q
CL
Q
LATCH
READ
PIN
P0.x
PIN
D
TO ADC
P1.x
PIN
Q
Figure 49. Port 1 Bit Latch and I/O Buffer
CL Q
LATCH
Port 2
04741-048
WRITE
TO LATCH
Port 1
CONTROL
READ
LATCH
INTERNAL
BUS
In general-purpose I/O port mode, Port 0 pins that have 1s
written to them via the Port 0 SFR are configured as open-drain
and, therefore, float. In this state, Port 0 pins can be used as
high impedance inputs. This is represented in Figure 48 by the
NAND gate whose output remains high as long as the control
signal is low, thereby disabling the top FET. External pull-up
resistors are, therefore, required when Port 0 pins are used as
general-purpose outputs. Port 0 pins with 0s written to them
drive a logic low output voltage (VOL) and are capable of sinking
1.6 mA.
04741-068
8052-COMPATIBLE ON-CHIP PERIPHERALS
READ
PIN
Figure 48. Port 0 Bit Latch and I/O Buffer
As shown in Figure 48, the output drivers of Port 0 pins are
switchable to an internal ADDR and ADDR/DATA bus by an
internal control signal for use in external memory accesses.
During external memory accesses, the P0 SFR has 1s written to
it; therefore, all its bit latches become 1. When accessing
external memory, the control signal in Figure 48 goes high,
enabling push-pull operation of the output pin from the internal
address or data bus (ADDR/DATA line). Therefore, no external
pull-ups are required on Port 0 for it to access external memory.
Port 2 is a bidirectional port with internal pull-up resistors
directly controlled via the P2 SFR. Port 2 also emits the middleand high-order address bytes during accesses to the 24-bit
external data memory space.
In general-purpose I/O port mode, Port 2 pins that have 1s
written to them are pulled high by the internal pull-ups as
shown in Figure 50 and, in that state, can be used as inputs. As
inputs, Port 2 pins pulled externally low source current because
of the internal pull-up resistors. Port 2 pins with 0s written to
them drive a logic low output voltage (VOL) and are capable of
sinking 1.6 mA.
Rev. C | Page 73 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
DVDD
P2.5 and P2.6 can also be used as PWM outputs, while P2.7 can
act as an alternate PWM clock source. When selected as the
PWM outputs, they overwrite anything written to P2.5 or P2.6.
READ
LATCH
Table 47. Port 2 Alternate Functions
Alternate Function
SCLOCK for SPI
MOSI for SPI
MISO for SPI
SS and T2 clock input
T2EX alternate control for T2
PWM0 output
PWM1 output
PWMCLK
ADDR
CONTROL
READ
LATCH
INTERNAL
BUS
WRITE
TO LATCH
INTERNAL
BUS
WRITE
TO LATCH
P3.x
PIN
Q
CL Q
ALTERNATE
INPUT
FUNCTION
04741-071
READ
PIN
Figure 51. Port 3 Bit Latch and I/O Buffer
Read-Modify-Write Instructions
Some 8051 instructions read the latch while others read the pin.
The instructions that read the latch rather than the pins are the
ones that read a value, possibly change it, and rewrite it to the
latch. These are called read-modify-write instructions, which
are listed in Table 49. When the destination operand is a port or
a port bit, these instructions read the latch rather than the pin.
DVDD DVDD
INTERNAL
PULL-UP
D
D
INTERNAL
PULL-UP
LATCH
Q
CL Q
LATCH
READ
PIN
P2.x
PIN
Table 49. Read-Modify-Write Instructions
04741-069
Pin No.
P2.0
P2.1
P2.2
P2.3
P2.4
P2.5
P2.6
P2.7
ALTERNATE
OUTPUT
FUNCTION
Figure 50. Port 2 Bit Latch and I/O Buffer
Port 3
Port 3 is a bidirectional port with internal pull-ups directly
controlled via the P3 SFR (B0H). Port 3 pins that have 1s
written to them are pulled high by the internal pull-ups and, in
that state, can be used as inputs. As inputs, Port 3 pins pulled
externally low source current because of the internal pull-ups.
Instruction
ANL
ORL
XRL
JBC
CPL
INC
DEC
DJNZ
Description
Logical AND, for example, ANL P1, A
Logical OR, for example, ORL P2, A
Logical EX-OR, for example, XRL P3, A
Jump if Bit = 1 and clear bit, for example, JBC
P1.1, LABEL
Complement bit, for example, CPL P3.0
Increment, for example, INC P2
Decrement, for example, DEC P2
Decrement and jump if not zero, for example,
DJNZ P3, LABEL
Move Carry to Bit Y of Port X
Clear Bit Y of Port X
Set Bit Y of Port X
Port 3 pins with 0s written to them drive a logic low output
voltage (VOL) and are capable of sinking 4 mA. Port 3 pins also
have various secondary functions as described in Table 48. The
alternate functions of Port 3 pins can be activated only if the
corresponding bit latch in the P3 SFR contains a 1. Otherwise,
the port pin remains at 0.
MOV PX.Y, C1
CLR PX.Y1
SETB PX.Y1
Table 48. Port 3 Alternate Functions
Read-modify-write instructions are directed to the latch rather
than to the pin to avoid a possible misinterpretation of the
voltage level of a pin. For example, a port pin might be used to
drive the base of a transistor. When 1 is written to the bit, the
transistor is turned on. If the CPU reads the same port bit at the
pin rather than the latch, it reads the base voltage of the
transistor and interprets it as Logic 0. Reading the latch rather
than the pin returns the correct value of 1.
Pin No.
P3.0
P3.1
P3.2
P3.3
P3.4
P3.5
P3.6
P3.7
Alternate Function
RxD (UART input pin, or serial data I/O in Mode 0)
TxD (UART output pin, or serial clock output in Mode 0)
INT0 (External Interrupt 0)
INT1 (External Interrupt 1)
T0 (Timer/Counter 0 external input)
T1 (Timer/Counter 1 external input)
WR (external data memory write strobe)
RD (external data memory read strobe)
___________________________________________
1
These instructions read the port byte (all 8 bits), modify the addressed bit,
and write the new byte back to the latch.
Rev. C | Page 74 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
TIMERS/COUNTERS
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 have three 16-bit timer/
counters: Timer 0, Timer 1, and Timer 2. The timer/counter
hardware is included on-chip to relieve the processor core of the
overhead inherent in implementing timer/counter functionality
in software. Each timer/counter consists of two 8-bit registers:
THx and TLx (x = 0, 1, or 2). All three can be configured to
operate either as timers or as event counters.
When functioning as a timer, the TLx register is incremented
every machine cycle. Thus, one can think of it as counting
machine cycles. Because a machine cycle on a single-cycle core
consists of one core clock period, the maximum count rate is
the core clock frequency.
When functioning as a counter, the TLx register is incremented
by a 1-to-0 transition at its corresponding external input pin:
T0, T1, or T2. When the samples show a high in one cycle and a
low in the next cycle, the count is incremented. Because it takes
two machine cycles (two core clock periods) to recognize a
1-to-0 transition, the maximum count rate is half the core clock
frequency.
There are no restrictions on the duty cycle of the external input
signal, but, to ensure that a given level is sampled at least once
before it changes, it must be held for a minimum of one full
machine cycle. User configuration and control of all timer
operating modes is achieved via three SFRs:
TMOD, TCON—Control and Configuration for Timers 0 and 1.
T2CON—Control and Configuration for Timer 2.
TMOD—Timer/Counter 0 and 1 Mode Register
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
89H
00H
No
Table 50. TMOD SFR Bit Designation
Bit No.
7
Name
Gate
6
C/T
5, 4
M1, M0
Description
Timer 1 Gating Control.
Set by software to enable Timer/Counter 1 only while the INT1 pin is high and the TR1 control is set.
Cleared by software to enable Timer 1 whenever the TR1control bit is set.
Timer 1 Timer or Counter Select Bit.
Set by software to select counter operation (input from T1 pin).
Cleared by software to select the timer operation (input from internal system clock).
Timer 1 Mode Select Bits.
M1
M0
Description
0
0
1
3
Gate
2
C/T
1, 0
M1, M0
0
1
0
TH1 operates as an 8-bit timer/counter. TL1 serves as 5-bit prescaler.
16-Bit Timer/Counter. TH1 and TL1 are cascaded; there is no prescaler.
8-Bit Autoreload Timer/Counter. TH1 holds a value that is to be reloaded into TL1 each time it
overflows.
1
1
Timer/Counter 1 Stopped.
Timer 0 Gating Control.
Set by software to enable Timer/Counter 0 only while the INT0 pin is high and the TR0 control bit is set.
Cleared by software to enable Timer 0 whenever the TR0 control bit is set.
Timer 0 Timer or Counter Select Bit.
Set by software to the select counter operation (input from T0 pin).
Cleared by software to the select timer operation (input from internal system clock).
Timer 0 Mode Select Bits.
M1
M0
Description
0
0
TH0 operates as an 8-bit timer/counter. TL0 serves as a 5-bit prescaler.
0
1
16-Bit Timer/Counter. TH0 and TL0 are cascaded; there is no prescaler.
1
0
8-Bit Autoreload Timer/Counter. TH0 holds a value that is to be reloaded into TL0 each time it
overflows.
1
1
TL0 is an 8-bit timer/counter controlled by the standard Timer 0 control bits.
TH0 is an 8-bit timer only, controlled by Timer 1 control bits.
Rev. C | Page 75 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
TCON—Timer/Counter 0 and 1 Control Register
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
88H
00H
Yes
Table 51. TCON SFR Bit Designations
Bit No.
7
Name
TF1
6
TR1
5
TF0
4
TR0
3
IE11
2
IT11
1
IE01
0
IT01
Description
Timer 1 Overflow Flag.
Set by hardware on a Timer/Counter 1 overflow.
Cleared by hardware when the program counter (PC) vectors to the interrupt service routine.
Timer 1 Run Control Bit.
Set by the user to turn on Timer/Counter 1.
Cleared by the user to turn off Timer/Counter 1.
Timer 0 Overflow Flag.
Set by hardware on a Timer/Counter 0 overflow.
Cleared by hardware when the PC vectors to the interrupt service routine.
Timer 0 Run Control Bit.
Set by the user to turn on Timer/Counter 0.
Cleared by the user to turn off Timer/Counter 0.
External Interrupt 1 (INT1) Flag.
Set by hardware by a falling edge or by a zero level applied to the external interrupt pin, INT1, depending on the
state of Bit IT1.
Cleared by hardware when the PC vectors to the interrupt service routine only if the interrupt was transitionactivated. If level-activated, the external requesting source controls the request flag rather than the on-chip
hardware.
External Interrupt 1 (IE1) Trigger Type.
Set by software to specify edge-sensitive detection, that is, 1-to-0 transition.
Cleared by software to specify level-sensitive detection, that is, zero level.
External Interrupt 0 (INT0) Flag.
Set by hardware by a falling edge or by a zero level being applied to the external interrupt pin, INT0, depending on
the statue of Bit IT0.
Cleared by hardware when the PC vectors to the interrupt service routine only if the interrupt was transitionactivated. If level-activated, the external requesting source controls the request flag rather than the on-chip
hardware.
External Interrupt 0 (IE0) Trigger Type.
Set by software to specify edge-sensitive detection, that is, 1-to-0 transition.
Cleared by software to specify level-sensitive detection, that is, zero level.
___________________________________________
1
These bits are not used to control Timer/Counters 0 and 1, but are used instead to control and monitor the external INT0 and INT1 interrupt pins.
Timer/Counter 0 and 1 Data Registers
Each timer consists of two 8-bit registers. These can be used as independent registers or combined into a single 16-bit register, depending
on the timers’ mode configuration.
TH0 and TL0—Timer 0 high and low bytes.
SFR Address:
8CH and 8AH, respectively.
Power-On Default:
00H and 00H, respectively.
TH1 and TL1—Timer 1 high and low bytes.
SFR Address:
8DH and 8BH, respectively.
Power-On Default:
00H and 00H, respectively.
Rev. C | Page 76 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Timer/Counter 0 and 1 Operating Modes
Mode 2 (8-Bit Timer/Counter with Autoreload)
This section describes the operating modes for Timer/Counters
0 and 1. Unless otherwise noted, these modes of operation are
the same for both Timer 0 and Timer 1.
Mode 2 configures the timer register as an 8-bit counter (TL0)
with automatic reload as shown in Figure 54. Overflow from TL0
not only sets TF0, but also reloads TL0 with the contents of TH0,
which is preset by software. The reload leaves TH0 unchanged.
Mode 0 (13-Bit Timer/Counter)
Mode 0 configures an 8-bit timer/counter. Figure 52 shows
Mode 0 operation. Note that the divide-by-12 prescaler is not
present on the single-cycle core.
CORE
CLK1
C/T = 0
INTERRUPT
TL0
(8 BITS)
TF0
C/T = 1
CORE
CLK1
P3.4/T0
CONTROL
C/T = 0
TF0
RELOAD
TH0
(8 BITS)
GATE
C/T = 1
P3.4/T0
P3.2/INT0
CONTROL
04741-051
TL0
TH0
(5 BITS) (8 BITS)
TR0
INTERRUPT
NOTES
1. THE CORE CLOCK IS THE OUTPUT OF THE PLL (SEE THE ON-CHIP PLL SECTION)
TR0
Figure 54. Timer/Counter 0, Mode 2
GATE
NOTES
1. THE CORE CLOCK IS THE OUTPUT OF THE PLL (SEE THE ON-CHIP PLL SECTION)
04741-049
P3.2/INT0
Figure 52. Timer/Counter 0, Mode 0
In this mode, the timer register is configured as a 13-bit register.
As the count rolls over from all 1s to all 0s, it sets the timer
overflow flag, TF0. TF0 can then be used to request an
interrupt. The counted input is enabled to the timer when TR0
= 1 and either Gate = 0 or INT0 = 1. Setting Gate = 1 allows the
timer to be controlled by external input INT0 to facilitate pulsewidth measurements. TR0 is a control bit in the special function
register TCON; Gate is in TMOD. The 13-bit register consists of
all 8 bits of TH0 and the lower 5 bits of TL0. The upper 3 bits of
TL0 are indeterminate and should be ignored. Setting the run
flag (TR0) does not clear the registers.
Mode 1 (16-Bit Timer/Counter)
Mode 1 is the same as Mode 0 except that the Mode 1 timer
register runs with all 16 bits. Mode 1 is shown in Figure 53.
Mode 3 (Two 8-Bit Timer/Counters)
Mode 3 has different effects on Timer 0 and Timer 1. Timer 1 in
Mode 3 simply holds its count. The effect is the same as setting
TR1 = 0. Timer 0 in Mode 3 establishes TL0 and TH0 as two
separate counters. This configuration is shown in Figure 55.
TL0 uses the Timer 0 Control Bits C/T, Gate, TR0, INT0, and
TF0. TH0 is locked into a timer function (counting machine
cycles) and takes over the use of TR1 and TF1 from Timer 1.
Therefore, TH0 then controls the Timer 1 interrupt. Mode 3
is provided for applications requiring an extra 8-bit timer or
counter.
When Timer 0 is in Mode 3, Timer 1 can be turned on and off
by switching it out of and into its own Mode 3, or it can still be
used by the serial interface as a baud rate generator. In fact, it
can be used in any application not requiring an interrupt from
Timer 1 itself.
CORE
CLK/12
CORE
CLK1
C/T = 0
TL0
(8 BITS)
CORE
CLK1
INTERRUPT
TF0
C/T = 1
P3.4/T0
C/T = 0
TL0
TH0
(8 BITS) (8 BITS)
INTERRUPT
CONTROL
TF0
TR0
C/T = 1
P3.4/T0
GATE
P3.2/INT0
CONTROL
TR0
CORE
CLK/12
GATE
TH0
(8 BITS)
INTERRUPT
TF1
TR1
NOTES
1. THE CORE CLOCK IS THE OUTPUT OF THE PLL (SEE THE ON-CHIP PLL SECTION)
Figure 53. Timer/Counter 0, Mode 1
Figure 55. Timer/Counter 0, Mode 3
Rev. C | Page 77 of 108
04741-052
NOTES
1. THE CORE CLOCK IS THE OUTPUT OF THE PLL (SEE THE ON-CHIP PLL SECTION)
04741-050
P3.2/INT0
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
T2CON—Timer/Counter 2 Control Register
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
C8H
00H
Yes
Table 52. T2CON SFR Bit Designations
Bit No.
7
Name
TF2
6
EXF2
5
RCLK
4
TCLK
3
EXEN2
2
TR2
1
CNT2
0
CAP2
Description
Timer 2 Overflow Flag.
Set by hardware on a Timer 2 overflow. TF2 cannot be set when either RCLK = 1 or TCLK = 1.
Cleared by user software.
Timer 2 External Flag.
Set by hardware when either a capture or reload is caused by a negative transition on T2EX and EXEN2 = 1.
Cleared by user software.
Receive Clock Enable Bit.
Set by the user to enable the serial port to use Timer 2 overflow pulses for its receive clock in serial port Modes 1 and 3.
Cleared by the user to enable Timer 1 overflow to be used for the receive clock.
Transmit Clock Enable Bit.
Set by the user to enable the serial port to use Timer 2 overflow pulses for its transmit clock in serial port Modes 1 and 3.
Cleared by the user to enable Timer 1 overflow to be used for the transmit clock.
Timer 2 External Enable Flag.
Set by the user to enable a capture or reload to occur as a result of a negative transition on T2EX if Timer 2 is not being
used to clock the serial port.
Cleared by the user for Timer 2 to ignore events at T2EX.
Timer 2 Start/Stop Control Bit.
Set by the user to start Timer 2.
Cleared by the user to stop Timer 2.
Timer 2 Timer or Counter Function Select Bit.
Set by the user to select the counter function (input from external T2 pin).
Cleared by the user to select the timer function (input from on-chip core clock).
Timer 2 Capture/Reload Select Bit.
Set by the user to enable captures on negative transitions at T2EX if EXEN2 = 1.
Cleared by the user to enable autoreloads with Timer 2 overflows or negative transitions at T2EX when EXEN2 = 1.
When either RCLK = 1 or TCLK = 1, this bit is ignored and the timer is forced to autoreload on Timer 2 overflow.
Timer/Counter 2 Data Registers
Timer/Counter 2 also has two pairs of 8-bit data registers
associated with it. These are used as both timer data registers
and as timer capture/reload registers.
TH2 and TL2—Timer 2 data high byte and low byte.
SFR Address:
CDH and CCH respectively.
Power-On Default:
00H and 00H, respectively.
RCAP2H and RCAP2L—Timer 2 capture/reload byte and low
byte.
SFR Address:
CBH and CAH, respectively.
Power-On Default:
00H and 00H, respectively.
Rev. C | Page 78 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Timer/Counter 2 Operating Modes
16-Bit Capture Mode
The following sections describe the operating modes for
Timer/Counter 2. The operating modes are selected by bits in
the T2CON SFR as shown in Table 53.
Capture mode has two options that are selected by Bit EXEN2
in T2CON. If EXEN2 = 0, Timer 2 is a 16-bit timer or counter
that, upon overflowing, sets bit TF2, the Timer 2 overflow bit,
which can be used to generate an interrupt. If EXEN2 = 1,
Timer 2 still performs the above, but a l-to-0 transition on
external input T2EX causes the current value in the Timer 2
registers, TL2 and TH2, to be captured into Registers RCAP2L
and RCAP2H, respectively. In addition, the transition at T2EX
causes Bit EXF2 in T2CON to be set, and EXF2, like TF2, can
generate an interrupt. Capture mode is shown in Figure 57. The
baud rate generator mode is selected by RCLK = 1 and/or
TCLK = 1.
Table 53. T2CON Operating Modes
CAP2
0
1
X
X
TR2
1
1
1
0
Mode
16-Bit Autoreload
16-Bit Capture
Baud Rate
Off
16-Bit Autoreload Mode
Autoreload mode has two options that are selected by bit
EXEN2 in T2CON. If EXEN2 = 0, when Timer 2 rolls over, it
not only sets TF2 but also causes the Timer 2 registers to be
reloaded with the 16-bit value in registers RCAP2L and
RCAP2H, which are preset by software. If EXEN2 = 1, Timer 2
still performs the above, but with the added feature that a 1-to-0
transition at external input T2EX also triggers the 16-bit reload
and sets EXF2. Autoreload mode is shown in Figure 56.
CORE
CLK1
In either case, if Timer 2 is used to generate the baud rate, the
TF2 interrupt flag does not occur. Therefore, Timer 2 interrupts
do not occur, so they do not have to be disabled. In this mode,
the EXF2 flag can, however, still cause interrupts, which can be
used as a third external interrupt. Baud rate generation is
described as part of the UART serial port operation in the
following section.
C/ T2 = 0
TL2
(8 BITS)
TH2
(8 BITS)
RCAP2L
RCAP2H
C/ T2 = 1
T2
PIN
CONTROL
TR2
RELOAD
TRANSITION
DETECTOR
TF2
TIMER
INTERRUPT
T2EX
PIN
EXF2
CONTROL
04741-053
EXEN2
*NOTES
1. THE CORE CLOCK IS THE OUTPUT OF THE PLL (SEE THE ON-CHIP PLL SECTION)
Figure 56. Timer/Counter 2, 16-Bit Autoreload Mode
CORE
CLK1
C/ T2 = 0
TL2
(8 BITS)
TH2
(8 BITS)
TF2
C/ T2 = 1
T2
PIN
CONTROL
TR2
TIMER
INTERRUPT
CAPTURE
TRANSITION
DETECTOR
RCAP2L
RCAP2H
T2EX
PIN
EXF2
CONTROL
EXEN2
*NOTES
1. THE CORE CLOCK IS THE OUTPUT OF THE PLL (SEE THE ON-CHIP PLL SECTION)
Figure 57. Timer/Counter 2, 16-Bit Capture Mode
Rev. C | Page 79 of 108
04741-054
RCLK (or) TCLK
0
0
1
X
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
UART SERIAL INTERFACE
SBUF SFR
The serial port is full duplex, meaning that it can transmit and
receive simultaneously. It is also receive buffered, meaning that
it can begin receiving a second byte before a previously received
byte is read from the receive register. However, if the first byte is
still not read by the time reception of the second byte is complete,
the first byte is lost. The physical interface to the serial data
network is via Pins RxD(P3.0) and TxD(P3.1), while the SFR
interface to the UART comprises SBUF and SCON, as described
below.
SCON UART—Serial Port Control Register
Both the serial port receive and transmit registers are accessed
through the SBUF SFR (SFR address = 99H). Writing to SBUF
loads the transmit register, and reading SBUF accesses a
physically separate receive register.
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
98H
00H
Yes
Table 54. SCON SFR Bit Designations
Bit No.
7, 6
Name
SM0, SM1
5
SM2
4
REN
3
TB8
2
RB8
1
TI
0
RI
Description
UART Serial Mode Select Bits. These bits select the serial port operating mode as follows:
SM0
SM1
Selected Operating Mode.
0
0
Mode 0: Shift register, fixed baud rate (Core_Clk/2).
0
1
Mode 1: 8-bit UART, variable baud rate.
1
0
Mode 2: 9-bit UART, fixed baud rate (Core_Clk/32) or (Core_Clk/16).
1
1
Mode 3: 9-bit UART, variable baud rate.
Multiprocessor Communication Enable Bit.
Enables multiprocessor communication in Modes 2 and 3.
In Mode 0, SM2 should be cleared.
In Mode 1, if SM2 is set, RI is not activated if a valid stop bit was not received. If SM2 is cleared, RI is set as soon as
the byte of data is received.
In Modes 2 or 3, if SM2 is set, RI is not activated if the received ninth data bit in RB8 is 0.
If SM2 is cleared, RI is set as soon as the byte of data is received.
Serial Port Receive Enable Bit.
Set by user software to enable serial port reception.
Serial Port Transmit (Bit 9).
The data loaded into TB8 is the ninth data bit transmitted in Modes 2 and 3. Cleared by user software to disable
serial port reception.
Serial Port Receiver Bit 9.
The ninth data bit received in Modes 2 and 3 is latched into RB8. For Mode 1, the stop bit is latched into RB8.
Serial Port Transmit Interrupt Flag.
Set by hardware at the end of the eighth bit in Mode 0, or at the beginning of the stop bit in Modes 1, 2, and 3.
TI must be cleared by user software.
Serial Port Receive Interrupt Flag.
Set by hardware at the end of the eighth bit in Mode 0, or halfway through the stop bit in Modes 1, 2, and 3.
RI must be cleared by software.
SBUF—UART Serial Port Data Register
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
99H
00H
No
Rev. C | Page 80 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Mode 0 (8-Bit Shift Register Mode)
Mode 0 is selected by clearing both the SM0 and SM1 bits in
the SFR SCON. Serial data enters and exits through RxD. TxD
outputs the shift clock. Eight data bits are transmitted or
received. Transmission is initiated by any instruction that writes
to SBUF. The data is shifted out of the RxD line. The 8 bits are
transmitted with the least significant bit (LSB) first.
DATA BIT 1
DATA BIT 6
DATA BIT 7
Figure 58. 8-Bit Shift Register Mode
Mode 1 (8-Bit UART, Variable Baud Rate)
Mode 1 is selected by clearing SM0 and setting SM1. Each data
byte (LSB first) is preceded by a start bit (0) and followed by a
stop bit (1). Therefore, 10 bits are transmitted on TxD or are
received on RxD. The baud rate is set by the Timer 1 or Timer 2
overflow rate, or a combination of the two (one for transmission
and the other for reception).
Transmission is initiated by writing to SBUF. The write to SBUF
signal also loads a 1 (stop bit) into the 9th bit position of the
transmit shift register. The data is output bit-by-bit until the
stop bit appears on TxD and the transmit interrupt flag (TI) is
automatically set as shown in Figure 59.
TxD
STOP BIT
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
TI
(SCON.1)
SET INTERRUPT
I.E., READY FOR MORE DATA
04741-056
START
BIT
RI = 0

Either SM2 = 0 or SM2 = 1

Received stop bit = 1
Mode 2 (9-Bit UART with Fixed Baud Rate)
04741-055
DATA BIT 0
TxD
(SHIFT CLOCK)

If any of these conditions is not met, the received frame is
irretrievably lost, and RI is not set.
Reception is initiated when the receive enable bit (REN) is 1
and the receive interrupt bit (RI) is 0. When RI is cleared, the
data is clocked into the RxD line, and the clock pulses are
output from the TxD line as shown in Figure 58.
RxD
(DATA OUT)
All of the following conditions must be met at the time the final
shift pulse is generated:
Figure 59. 8-Bit Variable Baud Rate
Reception is initiated when a 1-to-0 transition is detected on
RxD. Assuming that a valid start bit is detected, character
reception continues. The start bit is skipped and the 8 data bits
are clocked into the serial port shift register. When all 8 bits
have been clocked in, the following events occur:

The 8 bits in the receive shift register are latched into SBUF.

The 9th bit (stop bit) is clocked into RB8 in SCON.

The receiver interrupt flag (RI) is set.
Mode 2 is selected by setting SM0 and clearing SM1. In this
mode, the UART operates in 9-bit mode with a fixed baud rate.
The baud rate is fixed at Core_Clk/64 by default, although by
setting the SMOD bit in PCON, the frequency can be doubled
to Core_Clk/32. Eleven bits are transmitted or received: a start
bit (0), 8 data bits, a programmable 9th bit, and a stop bit (1).
The 9th bit is most often used as a parity bit, although it can be
used for anything, including a ninth data bit if required.
To transmit, the 8 data bits must be written into SBUF. The
ninth bit must be written to TB8 in SCON. When transmission
is initiated, the 8 data bits (from SBUF) are loaded into the
transmit shift register (LSB first). The contents of TB8 are
loaded into the 9th bit position of the transmit shift register.
The transmission starts at the next valid baud rate clock. The
TI flag is set as soon as the stop bit appears on TxD.
Reception for Mode 2 is similar to that of Mode 1. The 8 data
bytes are input at RxD (LSB first) and loaded onto the receive
shift register. When all 8 bits have been clocked in, the
following events occur:

The 8 bits in the receive shift register are latched into SBUF.

The 9th data bit is latched into RB8 in SCON.

The receiver interrupt flag (RI) is set.
All of the following conditions must be met at the time the final
shift pulse is generated:

RI = 0

Either SM2 = 0 or SM2 = 1

Received stop bit = 1
If any of these conditions is not met, the received frame is
irretrievably lost, and RI is not set.
Rev. C | Page 81 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
Mode 3 (9-Bit UART with Variable Baud Rate)
The Timer 1 interrupt should be disabled in this application.
The timer itself can be configured for either timer or counter
operation, and in any of its three running modes. In the most
typical application, it is configured for timer operation in
autoreload mode (high nibble of TMOD = 0010 binary). In that
case, the baud rate is given by the formula
Mode 3 is selected by setting both SM0 and SM1. In this mode,
the 8051 UART serial port operates in 9-bit mode with a variable
baud rate determined by either Timer 1 or Timer 2. The operation of the 9-bit UART is the same as for Mode 2, but the baud
rate can be varied as for Mode 1.
Modes 1 and 3 Baud Rate =
In all four modes, transmission is initiated by any instruction
that uses SBUF as a destination register. Reception is initiated in
Mode 0 when RI = 0 and REN = 1. Reception is initiated in the
other modes by the incoming start bit if REN = 1.
Timer 2 Generated Baud Rates
Baud rates can also be generated by using Timer 2. Using Timer 2
is similar to using Timer 1 in that the timer must overflow 16
times before a bit is transmitted or received. Because Timer 2
has a 16-bit autoreload mode, a wider range of baud rates is
possible.
UART Serial Port Baud Rate Generation
Mode 0 Baud Rate Generation
The baud rate in Mode 0 is fixed:
 Core Clock Frequency 

12


Mode 0 Baud Rate = 
Therefore, when Timer 2 is used to generate baud rates, the
timer increments every two clock cycles rather than every core
machine cycle as before. It increments six times faster than
Timer 1, and, therefore, baud rates six times faster are possible.
Because Timer 2 has 16-bit autoreload capability, very low baud
rates are still possible.
The baud rate in Mode 2 depends on the value of the SMOD bit
in the PCON SFR. If SMOD = 0, the baud rate is 1/32 of the
core clock. If SMOD = 1, the baud rate is 1/16 of the core clock:
2 SMOD
× Core Clock Frequency
32
Timer 2 is selected as the baud rate generator by setting the
TCLK and/or RCLK in T2CON. The baud rates for transmit
and receive can be simultaneously different. Setting RCLK
and/or TCLK puts Timer 2 into its baud rate generator mode as
shown in Figure 60.
Modes 1 and 3 Baud Rate Generation
The baud rates in Modes 1 and 3 are determined by the overflow
rate in Timer 1 or Timer 2, or in both (one for transmit and the
other for receive).
Timer 1 Generated Baud Rates
In this case, the baud rate is given by the formula
When Timer 1 is used as the baud rate generator, the baud rates
in Modes 1 and 3 are determined by the Timer 1 overflow rate
and the value of SMOD as follows:
Modes 1 and 3 Baud Rate =
1
× Timer 2 Overflow Rate
16
Modes 1 and 3 Baud Rate =
Mode 2 Baud Rate Generation
Modes 1 and 3 Baud Rate =
Core Clock Frequency
(16 × [65536 − (RCAP 2 H : RCAP 2 L )])
2 SMOD
× Timer 1 Overflow Rate
32
TIMER 1
OVERFLOW
2
0
CORE
CLK1
SMOD
C/ T2 = 0
TL2
(8 BITS)
T2
PIN
1
CONTROL
TH2
(8 BITS)
TIMER 2
OVERFLOW
1
0
RCLK
C/ T2 = 1
16
1
TR2
TCLK
RELOAD
16
RCAP2L
T2EX
PIN
TRANSITION
DETECTOR
RX
CLOCK
0
EXF 2
TX
CLOCK
RCAP2H
TIMER 2
INTERRUPT
CONTROL
EXEN2
NOTES
1. THE CORE CLOCK IS THE OUTPUT OF THE PLL (SEE THE ON-CHIP PLL SECTION)
Figure 60. Timer 2, UART Baud Rates
Rev. C | Page 82 of 108
04741-057
Mode 2 Baud Rate =
2 SMOD Core Clock Frequency
×
32
(256 − TH1)
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Timer 3 Generated Baud Rates
The high integer dividers in a UART block mean that high
speed baud rates are not always possible. Also, generating baud
rates requires the exclusive use of a timer, rendering it unusable
for other applications when the UART is required. To address
this problem, the ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 have a
dedicated baud rate timer (Timer 3) specifically for generating
highly accurate baud rates. Timer 3 can be used instead of
Timer 1 or Timer 2 for generating very accurate high speed
UART baud rates including 115200 and 230400. Timer 3 also
allows a much wider range of baud rates to be obtained. In fact,
every desired bit rate from 12 bps to 393216 bps can be
generated to within an error of ±0.8%. Timer 3 also frees up the
other three timers, allowing them to be used for different
applications. A block diagram of Timer 3 is shown in Figure 61.
CORE
CLK
The appropriate value to write to the DIV2-1-0 bits can be
calculated using the following formula where fCORE is defined in
PLLCON SFR. Note that the DIV value must be rounded down.
 Core Clock Frequency 

log
16 × Baud Rate


DIV =
log (2)
T3FD is the fractional divider ratio required to achieve the
required baud rate. The appropriate value for T3FD can be
calculated with the following formula:
T3FD =
÷ (1 + T3FD/64)
Actual Baud Rate =
TIMER 1/TIMER 2
Rx CLOCK
1
0
1
0
T3EN
Tx CLOCK
04741-058
Rx CLOCK
T3 Rx/Tx
CLOCK
− 64
2 × Core Clock Frequency
2 DIV −1 × (T3FD + 64)
For example, to get a baud rate of 9600 while operating at a core
clock frequency of 1.5725 MHz, that is, CD = 3,
÷ 2 DIV
÷ 16
2 DIV −1 × Baud Rate
Note that T3FD should be rounded to the nearest integer. Once
the values for DIV and T3FD are calculated, the actual baud
rate can be calculated with the following formula:
TIMER 1/TIMER 2
Tx CLOCK
FRACTIONAL
DIVIDER
2 × Core Clock Frequency
DIV = log(1572500/(16 × 9600))/log2 = 3.35 = 3
Note that the DIV result is rounded down.
T3FD = (2 × 1572500)/(23−1 × 9600) − 64 = 18 = 12H
Figure 61. Timer 3, UART Baud Rate
Two SFRs (T3CON and T3FD) are used to control Timer 3.
T3CON is the baud rate control SFR, allowing Timer 3 to be
used to set up the UART baud rate, and to set up the binary
divider (DIV).
Therefore, the actual baud rate is 9588 bps, which gives an error
of 0.12%.
The T3CON and T3FD registers are used to control Timer 3.
T3CON – Timer 3 Control Register
SFR Address:
9EH
Power-On Default:
00H
Bit Addressable:
No
Table 55. T3CON SFR Bit Designations
Bit No.
7
Name
T3BAUDEN
6
5
4
3
2, 1, 0
DIV2, DIV1, DIV0
Description
T3UARTBAUD Enable.
Set to enable Timer 3 to generate the baud rate. When set, PCON.7, T2CON.4, and T2CON.5 are
ignored. Cleared to let the baud rate be generated as per a standard 8052.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Binary Divider
DIV2 DIV1
DIV0
0
0
0
Binary Divider 0. See Table 57.
0
0
1
Binary Divider 1. See Table 57.
0
1
0
Binary Divider 2. See Table 57.
0
1
1
Binary Divider 3. See Table 57.
1
0
0
Binary Divider 4. See Table 57.
1
0
1
Binary Divider 5. See Table 57.
1
1
0
Binary Divider 6. See Table 57.
Rev. C | Page 83 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
T3FD—Timer 3 Fractional Divider Register
See Table 57 for values.
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
9DH
00H
No
Table 56. T3FD SFR Bit Designations
Bit No.
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Name
------T3FD.5
T3FD.4
T3FD.3
T3FD.2
T3FD.1
T3FD.0
Description
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Timer 3 Fractional Divider Bit 5.
Timer 3 Fractional Divider Bit 4.
Timer 3 Fractional Divider Bit 3.
Timer 3 Fractional Divider Bit 2.
Timer 3 Fractional Divider Bit 1.
Timer 3 Fractional Divider Bit 0.
Table 57. Common Baud Rates Using Timer 3 with a 12.58 MHz PLL Clock
Ideal Baud
230400
CD
0
DIV
1
T3CON
81H
T3FD
2DH
% Error
0.18
115200
115200
0
1
2
1
82H
81H
2DH
2DH
0.18
0.18
57600
57600
57600
0
1
2
3
2
1
83H
82H
81H
2DH
2DH
2DH
0.18
0.18
0.18
38400
38400
38400
38400
0
1
2
3
4
3
2
1
84H
83H
82H
81H
12H
12H
12H
12H
0.12
0.12
0.12
0.12
19200
19200
19200
19200
19200
0
1
2
3
4
5
4
3
2
1
85H
84H
83H
82H
81H
12H
12H
12H
12H
12H
0.12
0.12
0.12
0.12
0.12
9600
9600
9600
9600
9600
9600
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
5
4
3
2
1
86H
85H
84H
83H
82H
81H
12H
12H
12H
12H
12H
12H
0.12
0.12
0.12
0.12
0.12
0.12
Rev. C | Page 84 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
INTERRUPT SYSTEM
The ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 provide nine interrupt sources with two priority levels. The control and configuration of the
interrupt system is carried out through three interrupt-related SFRs:
IE
IP
IEIP2
Interrupt Enable Register
Interrupt Priority Register
Secondary Interrupt Enable Register
IE—Interrupt Enable Register
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
A8H
00H
Yes
Table 58. IE SFR Bit Designations
Bit No.
7
Name
EA
6
EADC
5
ET2
4
ES
3
ET1
2
EX1
1
ET0
0
EX0
Description
Set by the user to enable all interrupt sources.
Cleared by the user to disable all interrupt sources.
Set by the user to enable the ADC interrupt.
Cleared by the user to disable the ADC interrupt.
Set by the user to enable the Timer 2 interrupt.
Cleared by the user to disable the Timer 2 interrupt.
Set by the user to enable the UART serial port interrupt.
Cleared by the user to disable the UART serial port interrupt.
Set by the user to enable the Timer 1 interrupt.
Cleared by the user to disable the Timer 1 interrupt.
Set by the user to enable External Interrupt 1 (INT0).
Cleared by the user to disable External Interrupt 1 (INT0).
Set by the user to enable the Timer 0 interrupt.
Cleared by the user to disable the Timer 0 interrupt.
Set by the user to enable External Interrupt 0 (INT0).
Cleared by the user to disable External Interrupt 0 (INT0).
IP—Interrupt Priority Register
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
B8H
00H
Yes
Table 59. IP SFR Bit Designations
Bit No.
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Name
----PADC
PT2
PS
PT1
PX1
PT0
PX0
Description
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
ADC Interrupt Priority (1 = High; 0 = Low).
Timer 2 Interrupt Priority (1 = High; 0 = Low).
UART Serial Port Interrupt Priority (1 = High; 0 = Low).
Timer 1 Interrupt Priority (1 = High; 0 = Low).
INT0 (External Interrupt 1) priority (1 = High; 0 = Low).
Timer 0 Interrupt Priority (1 = High; 0 = Low).
INT0 (External Interrupt 0) Priority (1 = High; 0 = Low).
Rev. C | Page 85 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
IEIP2—Secondary Interrupt Enable Register
SFR Address:
Power-On Default:
Bit Addressable:
A9H
A0H
No
Table 60. IEIP2 Bit Designations
Bit No.
7
6
5
4
3
2
Name
---PTI
PPSM
PSI
---ETI
1
EPSMI
0
ESI
Description
Not Implemented. Write Don’t Care.
Time Interval Counter Interrupt Priority Setting (1 = High, 0 = Low).
Power Supply Monitor Interrupt Priority Setting (1 = High, 0 = Low).
SPI/I2C Interrupt Priority Setting (1 = High, 0 = Low).
This bit must contain 0.
Set by the user to enable the time interval counter interrupt.
Cleared by the user to disable the time interval counter interrupt.
Set by the user to enable the power supply monitor interrupt.
Cleared by the user to disable the power supply monitor interrupt.
Set by the user to enable the SPI/I2C serial port interrupt.
Cleared by the user to disable the SPI/I2C serial port interrupt.
INTERRUPT PRIORITY
INTERRUPT VECTORS
The interrupt enable registers are written by the user to enable
individual interrupt sources; the interrupt priority registers
allow the user to select one of two priority levels for each
interrupt. A high priority interrupt can interrupt the service
routine of a low priority interrupt, and if two interrupts of
different priorities occur at the same time, the higher level
interrupt is serviced first. An interrupt cannot be interrupted by
another interrupt of the same priority level. If two interrupts of
the same priority level occur simultaneously, the polling
sequence, as shown in Table 61, is observed.
When an interrupt occurs, the program counter is pushed onto
the stack, and the corresponding interrupt vector address is
loaded into the program counter. The interrupt vector addresses
are shown in Table 62.
Table 61. Priority within Interrupt Level
Source
PSMI
WDS
IE0
RDY0/RDY1
TF0
IE1
TF1
ISPI/I2CI
RI/TI
TF2/EXF2
TII
Priority
1 (Highest)
2
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
11 (Lowest)
Description
Power Supply Monitor Interrupt
Watchdog Timer Interrupt
External Interrupt 0
ADC Interrupt
Timer/Counter 0 Interrupt
External Interrupt 1
Timer/Counter 1 Interrupt
SPI/I2C Interrupt
UART Serial Port Interrupt
Timer/Counter 2 Interrupt
Timer Interval Counter Interrupt
Table 62. Interrupt Vector Addresses
Source
IE0
TF0
IE1
TF1
RI + TI
TF2 + EXF2
RDY0/RDY1 (ADuC845 only)
ISPI/I2CI
PSMI
TII
WDS
Rev. C | Page 86 of 108
Vector Address
0003H
000BH
0013H
001BH
0023H
002BH
0033H
003BH
0043H
0053H
005BH
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
HARDWARE DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
This section outlines some of the key hardware design
considerations that must be addressed when integrating the
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 into any hardware system.
EXTERNAL MEMORY INTERFACE
In addition to their internal program and data memories, the
parts can access up to 16 Mbytes of external data memory
(SRAM). No external program memory access is available.
To begin executing code, tie the EA (external access) pin high.
When EA is high (pulled up to VDD—see Figure 70), user
program execution starts at Address 0 in the internal 62-kbyte
Flash/EE code space. When executing from internal code space,
accesses to the program space above F7FFH (62 kbytes) are read
as NOP instructions.
Note that a second very important function of the EA pin is
described in the Single-Pin Emulation Mode section under the
Other Hardware Considerations section.
Figure 62 shows a hardware configuration for accessing up to
64 kbytes of external data memory. This interface is standard to
any 8051-compatible MCU.
SRAM
D0–D7
(DATA)
P0
LATCH
ALE
RD
OE
WR
WE
04741-059
A8–A15
MOV DPP, #10h ;Set addr to 100000h
MOV DPH, #00h
MOV DPL, #00h
MOV A,
#'B' ;Write Char ‘B’ (42h)
MOVX @DPTR,A ;Move to DPP:DPH:DPL addr
POWER SUPPLIES
The parts’ operational power supply voltage range is 2.7 V to
5.25 V. Although the guaranteed data sheet specifications are
given only for power supplies within 2.7 V to 3.6 V and 4.75 V
to 5.25 V (±5% of the nominal 5 V level), the chip functions
equally well at any power supply level between 2.7 V and 5.25 V.
Separate analog and digital power supply pins (AVDD and DVDD,
respectively) allow AVDD to be kept relatively free of the noisy
digital signals often present on a system DVDD line. In this mode,
the part can also operate with split supplies, that is, using different
voltage supply levels for each supply. For example, the system
can be designed to operate with a DVDD voltage level of 3 V and
the AVDD level can be at 5 V, or vice versa, if required. A typical
split-supply configuration is shown in Figure 64.
A0–A7
P2
The following example shows the code used to write data to
external data memory.
Figure 62. External Data Memory Interface (64-kbyte Address Space)
DIGITAL SUPPLY
If access to more than 64 kbytes of RAM is desired, a feature
unique to the MicroConverter allows addressing up to 16 Mbytes
of external RAM simply by adding another latch as shown in
Figure 63.
ANALOG SUPPLY
10µF
10µF
+
–
+
–
22
36
51
0.1µF
ADuC845/
ADuC847/
ADuC848
SRAM
23
D0–D7
(DATA)
P0
37
38
LATCH
A0–A7
50
ALE
A16–A23
RD
OE
WR
WE
04741-060
LATCH
AVDD 4
ADuC845/
ADuC847/
ADuC848
DGND
0.1µF
5
AGND
6
Figure 64. External Dual-Supply Connections
(56-Lead LFCSP Pin Numbering)
A8–A15
P2
DVDD
04741-061
ADuC845/
ADuC847/
ADuC848
In either implementation, Port 0 (P0) serves as a multiplexed
address/data bus. It emits the low byte of the data pointer (DPL)
as an address, which is latched by ALE prior to data being placed
on the bus by the parts (write operation) or the external data
memory (read operation). Port 2 (P2) provides the data pointer
page byte (DPP) to be latched by ALE, followed by the data
pointer high byte (DPH). If no latch is connected to P2, DPP is
ignored by the SRAM, and the 8051 standard of 64-kbyte external
data memory access is maintained.
Figure 63. External Data Memory Interface (16-Mbtye Address Space)
As an alternative to providing two separate power supplies,
AVDD can be kept quiet by placing a small series resistor and/or
ferrite bead between it and DVDD, and then decoupling AVDD
separately to ground. An example of this configuration is shown
in Figure 65. In this configuration, other analog circuitry (such
Rev. C | Page 87 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
5 V Part
as op amps and voltage reference) can be powered from the
AVDD supply line as well.
For DVDD below 4.5 V, the internal POR holds the part in reset.
As DVDD rises above 4.5 V, an internal timer times out for
approximately 128 ms before the part is released from reset. The
user must ensure that the power supply has reached a stable
4.75 V minimum level by this time. Likewise on power-down,
the internal POR holds the part in reset until the power supply
drops below 1 V. Figure 67 illustrates this operation.
DIGITAL SUPPLY
BEAD
1.6Ω
10µF
22
AVDD 4
36 DVDD
51
0.1µF
23
ADuC845/
ADuC847/
ADuC848
0.1µF
5
4.5V TYP
37 DGND
DVDD
AGND 6
1.0V TYP
128ms TYP
128ms TYP
1.0V TYP
04741-062
38
50
Figure 65. External Single-Supply Connections
(56-Lead LFCSP Pin Numbering)
04741-087
10µF
+
–
INTERNAL
CORE RESET
Notice that in both Figure 64 and Figure 65 a large value (10 µF)
reservoir capacitor sits on DVDD and a separate 10 µF capacitor
sits on AVDD. Also, local decoupling capacitors (0.1 µF) are
located at each VDD pin of the chip. As per standard design
practice, be sure to include all of these capacitors and ensure
that the smaller capacitors are closer than the 10 µF capacitors
to each VDD pin with lead lengths as short as possible. Connect
the ground terminal of each of these capacitors directly to the
underlying ground plane. Finally, note that, at all times, the
analog and digital ground pins on the part must be referenced
to the same system ground reference point. It is recommended
that the LFCSP paddle be soldered to ensure mechanical
stability but be floated with respect to system VDDs or grounds.
POWER-ON RESET OPERATION
An internal power-on reset (POR) is implemented on the
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848.
Figure 67. 5 V Part POR Operation
POWER CONSUMPTION
The DVDD power supply current consumption is specified in
normal and power-down modes. The AVDD power supply
current is specified with the analog peripherals disabled. The
normal mode power consumption represents the current drawn
from DVDD by the digital core. The other on-chip peripherals
(such as the watchdog timer and power supply monitor)
consume negligible current and are therefore included with the
normal operating current. The user must add any currents
sourced by the parallel and serial I/O pins, and those sourced by
the DAC to determine the total current needed at the ADuC845/
ADuC847/ADuC848 DVDD and AVDD supply pins. Also, current
drawn from the DVDD supply increases by approximately 5 mA
during Flash/EE erase and program cycles.
3 V Part
POWER-SAVING MODES
For DVDD below 2.63 V, the internal POR holds the part in reset.
As DVDD rises above 2.63 V, an internal timer times out for
typically 128 ms before the part is released from reset. The user
must ensure that the power supply has at least reached a stable
2.7 V minimum level by this time. Likewise on power-down,
the internal POR holds the part in reset until the power supply
drops below 1 V. Figure 66 illustrates the operation of the
internal POR.
Setting the power-down mode bit, PCON.1, in the PCON SFR
described in Table 6, allows the chip to be switched from
normal mode into full power-down mode.
2.63V TYP
1.0V TYP
128ms TYP
128ms TYP
1.0V TYP
04741-063
DVDD
INTERNAL
CORE RESET
In power-down mode, both the PLL and the clock to the core
are stopped. The on-chip oscillator can be halted or can
continue to oscillate, depending on the state of the oscillator
power-down bit (OSC_PD) in the PLLCON SFR. The TIC,
driven directly from the oscillator, can also be enabled during
power-down. However, all other on-chip peripherals are shut
down. Port pins retain their logic levels in this mode, but the
DAC output goes to a high impedance state (three-state) while
ALE and PSEN outputs are held low. There are five ways to
terminate power-down mode:
•
Figure 66. 3 V Part POR operation
Rev. C | Page 88 of 108
Asserting the RESET Pin
Returns to normal mode. All registers are set to their reset
default value and program execution starts at the reset
vector once the RESET pin is de-asserted.
Data Sheet
•
•
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Cycling Power
All registers are set to their default state and program execution starts at the reset vector approximately 128 ms later.
Time Interval Counter (TIC) Interrupt
If the OSC_PD bit in the PLLCON SFR is clear, the 32 kHz
oscillator remains powered up even in power-down mode.
If the time interval counter (wake-up/RTC timer) is
enabled, a TIC interrupt wakes the part from power-down
mode. The CPU services the TIC interrupt. The RETI at
the end of the TIC ISR returns the core to the next
instruction after that one the enabled power-down.
•
SPI Interrupt
If the SERIPD bit in the PCON SFR is set, an SPI interrupt,
if enabled, wakes up the part from power-down mode. The
CPU services the SPI interrupt. The RETI at the end of the
ISR returns the core to the next instruction after the one
that enabled power-down.
•
INT0 Interrupt
If the INT0PD bit in the PCON SFR is set, an external
interrupt 0, if enabled, wakes up the part from powerdown. The CPU services the interrupt. The RETI at the
end of the ISR returns the core to the next instruction after
the one that enabled power-down.
Wake-Up from Power-Down Latency
Even with the 32 kHz crystal enabled during power-down, the
PLL takes some time to lock after a wake-up from power-down.
Typically, the PLL takes about 1 ms to lock. During this time,
code executes, but not at the specified frequency. Some operations, for example, UART communications, require an accurate
clock to achieve the specified 50 Hz/60 Hz rejection from the
ADCs. Therefore, it is advisable to wait until the PLL has locked
before proceeding with normal code execution. The following
code can be used to wait for the PLL to lock:
WAITFORLOCK:
MOV A, PLLCON
JNB ACC.6, WAITFORLOCK
GROUNDING AND BOARD LAYOUT
RECOMMENDATIONS
As with all high resolution data converters, special attention
must be paid to grounding and PC board layout of ADuC845/
ADuC847/ADuC848-based designs in order to achieve
optimum performance from the ADCs and DAC.
Although the parts have separate pins for analog and digital
ground (AGND and DGND), the user must not tie these to
separate ground planes unless the two ground planes are
connected together very close to the part as shown in the
simplified example in Figure 68a. In systems where digital and
analog ground planes are connected together somewhere else
(at the system’s power supply, for example), they cannot be
connected again near the part since a ground loop would result.
In these cases, tie the AGND and DGND pins of the part to the
analog ground plane, as shown in Figure 68b. In systems with
only one ground plane, ensure that the digital and analog
components are physically separated onto separate halves of the
board such that digital return currents do not flow near analog
circuitry and vice versa. The parts can then be placed between
the digital and analog sections, as shown in Figure 68c.
In all of these scenarios, and in more complicated real-life
applications, keep in mind the flow of current from the supplies
and back to ground. Make sure that the return paths for all
currents are as close as possible to the paths the currents took to
reach their destinations. For example, do not power
components on the analog side of Figure 68b with DVDD since
that would force return currents from DVDD to flow through
AGND. Also, try to avoid digital currents flowing under analog
circuitry, which could happen if the user placed a noisy digital
chip on the left half of the board in Figure 68c. Whenever
possible, avoid large discontinuities in the ground plane(s)
(such as are formed by a long trace on the same layer), since
they force return signals to travel a longer path. Make all
connections directly to the ground plane, with little or no trace
separating the pin from its via to ground.
If the crystal is powered down during power-down, an additional
delay is associated with the startup of the crystal oscillator
before the PLL can lock. Typically taking about 150 ms, 32 kHz
crystals are inherently slow to oscillate. During this time before
lock, code executes, but the exact frequency of the clock cannot
be guaranteed. For any timing-sensitive operations, it is
recommended to wait for lock by using the lock bit in PLLCON
as previously shown.
An alternative way of saving power in power-down mode
is to slow down the core clock by using the CD bits in the
PLLCON register.
Rev. C | Page 89 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
Table 63. CHIPID Values for Σ-Δ MicroConverter Products
a.
PLACE ANALOG
COMPONENTS
HERE
Part
ADuC816
ADuC824
ADuC836
ADuC834
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
PLACE DIGITAL
COMPONENTS
HERE
AGND
DGND
CHIPID
1xH
0xH
3xH
2xH
AxH
Clock Oscillator
b.
PLACE ANALOG
COMPONENTS
HERE
As described earlier, the core clock frequency for the ADuC845/
ADuC847/ADuC848 is generated from an on-chip PLL that
locks onto a multiple (384 times) of 32.768 kHz. The latter is
generated from an internal clock oscillator. To use the internal
clock oscillator, connect a 32.768 kHz parallel resonant crystal
between XTAL1 and XTAL2 as shown in Figure 69.
PLACE DIGITAL
COMPONENTS
HERE
AGND
DGND
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
XTAL1
32
PLACE DIGITAL
COMPONENTS
HERE
GND
12pF
32.768kHz
TO INTERNAL PLL
33
XTAL2
12pF
Figure 68. System Grounding Schemes
04741-065
PLACE ANALOG
COMPONENTS
HERE
04741-064
c.
Figure 69. Crystal Connectivity to ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
If the user plans to connect fast logic signals (rise/fall time < 5 ns)
to any of the ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848’s digital inputs,
add a series resistor to each relevant line to keep rise and fall
times longer than 5 ns at the parts’ input pins. A value of 100 Ω
or 200 Ω is usually sufficient to prevent high speed signals from
coupling capacitively into the part and affecting the accuracy of
ADC conversions.
When using the LFCSP package, it is recommended that the
paddle underneath the chip be soldered to the board to provide
maximum mechanical stability. However, it is recommended
that this paddle not be grounded but left floating. All results
and specifications contained in this data sheet are taken or
recorded with the paddle floating.
System Self-Identification
In some hardware designs, it may be advantageous for the
software to be able to identify the host MicroConverter.
The CHIPID SFR is a read-only register located at SFR address
C2H. The upper nibble of this SFR designates the MicroConverter
within the Σ-Δ ADC family. User software can read this SFR to
identify the host MicroConverter and therefore execute slightly
different code if required. The CHIPID SFR reads as follows for
the Σ-Δ ADC family of MicroConverter products. Note that the
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 are treated as one part as far as
the CHIPID is concerned.
As shown in the typical external crystal connection diagram in
Figure 69, two internal 12 pF capacitors are provided on-chip.
These are connected internally, directly to the XTAL1 and XTAL2
pins. The total input capacitance at both pins is detailed in the
Specifications table. Note that the total capacitance required for
a particular crystal must be in accordance with the crystal
manufacturer. However, in most cases, no additional external
capacitance is required above that already supplied on-chip.
OTHER HARDWARE CONSIDERATIONS
In-Circuit Serial Download Access
Nearly all ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 designs can take
advantage of the in-circuit reprogrammability of the chip. This
is accomplished by a connection to the parts’ UART, which
requires an external RS-232 chip for level translation if downloading code from a PC. Basic configuration of an RS-232
connection is shown in Figure 70 with a simple ADM3202based circuit. If users would rather not include an RS-232 chip
on the target board, refer to Application Note uC006,
“A 4-Wire UART-to-PC Interface” available at
www.analog.com/microconverter, for a simple (and zero-costper-board) method of gaining in-circuit serial download access
to the part.
Rev. C | Page 90 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
DOΩNLOAD/DEBUG
ENABLE JUMPER
(NORMALLY OPEN)
1kΩ
DVDD
1kΩ
11
P1.6/IEXC1/AIN7
4
AVDD
5
AGND
6
AGND
XTAL2 35
7
REFIN–
XTAL1 34
8
REFIN+
56
P1.0/AIN1
1
P1.1/AIN2
AVDD
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
RTD
TxD
DVDD
32.768kHz
RxD
RESET
RREF
5.6kΩ
LFCSP PACKAGE
17 18
19
DGND
0.1µF
DVDD
200µA/400µA
EXCITATION
CURRENT
43
EA
PSEN
44
2-PIN HEADER FOR
EMULATION ACCESS
(NORMALLY OPEN)
22
36
RESET ACTIVE HIGH.
(NORMALLY OPEN)
DVDD
51
23 37
38
50
0.1µF
DVDD
RS-232 INTERFACE1
STANDARD D-TYPE
SERIAL COMMS
CONNECTOR TO
PC HOST
ADM3202
0.1µF
C1+
V+
0.1µF
VCC
GND
0.1µF
1
C1–
T1OUT
2
C2+
R1IN
3
C2–
R1OUT
4
V–
T1IN
5
T2OUT
T2IN
6
R2OUT
7
R2IN
8
NOTES
1. EXTERNAL UART TRANSCEIVER INTEGRATED IN SYSTEM OR AS PART
OF AN EXTERNAL DONGLE AS DESCRIBED IN APPLICATION NOTE uC006.
04741-088
9
Figure 70. UART Connectivity in Typical System
In addition to the basic UART connections, users also need a
way to trigger the chip into download mode. This is
accomplished via a 1 kΩ pull-down resistor that can be
jumpered onto the PSEN pin, as shown in Figure 70. To get the
parts into download mode, connect this jumper and powercycle the device (or manually reset the device, if a manual reset
button is available), and it is ready to receive a new program
serially. With the jumper removed, the device powers on in
normal mode (and runs the program) whenever power is cycled
or RESET is toggled. Note that PSEN is normally an output and
that it is sampled as an input only on the falling edge of RESET,
that is, at power-on or upon an external manual reset. Note also
that if any external circuitry unintentionally pulls PSEN low
during power-on or reset events, it could cause the chip to enter
download mode and fail to begin user code execution. To
prevent this, ensure that no external signals are capable of
pulling the PSEN pin low, except for the external PSEN jumper
itself or the method of download entry in use during a reset or
power-cycle condition.
Embedded Serial Port Debugger
From a hardware perspective, entry to serial port debug mode is
identical to the serial download entry sequence described
previously. In fact, both serial download and serial port debug
modes are essentially one mode of operation used in two
different ways.
Rev. C | Page 91 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
The serial port debugger is fully contained on the device, unlike
ROM monitor type debuggers, and, therefore, no external
memory is needed to enable in-system debug sessions.
Single-Pin Emulation Mode
Built into the ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 is a dedicated
controller for single-pin in-circuit emulation (ICE). In this mode,
emulation access is gained by connection to a single pin, the EA
pin. Normally on the 8051 standard, this pin is hardwired either
high or low to select execution from internal or external program
memory space. Note that external program memory or execution from external program memory is not allowed on the
devices. To enable single-pin emulation mode, users need to
pull the EA pin high through a 1 kΩ resistor as shown in
Figure 70. The emulator then connects to the 2-pin header also
shown in Figure 70. To be compatible with the standard connector that comes with the single-pin emulator available from
Accutron Limited (www.accutron.com), use a 2-pin 0.1-inch
pitch Friction Lock header from Molex (www.molex.com) such
as part number 22-27-2021. Be sure to observe the polarity of
this header. As shown in Figure 70, when the Friction Lock tab
is at the right, the ground pin should be the lower of the two
pins when viewed from the top.
Typical System Configuration
A typical ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 configuration is
shown in Figure 70. Figure 70 also includes connections for a
typical analog measurement application of the parts, namely an
interface to a resistive temperature device (RTD). The
arrangement shown is commonly referred to as a 4-wire RTD
configuration.
Here, the on-chip excitation current sources are enabled to
excite the sensor. The excitation current flows directly through
the RTD generating a voltage across the RTD proportional to its
resistance. This differential voltage is routed directly to one set
of the positive and negative inputs of the ADC (AIN1, AIN2,
respectively in this case). The same current that excited the
RTD also flows through a series resistance, RREF, generating a
ratiometric voltage reference, VREF. The ratiometric voltage
reference ensures that variations in the excitation current do not
affect the measurement system since the input voltage from the
RTD and reference voltage across RREF vary ratiometrically with
the excitation current. Resistor RREF must, however, have a low
temperature coefficient to avoid errors in the reference voltage
overtemperature. RREF must also be large enough to generate at
least a 1 V voltage reference.
The preceding example shows just a single differential ADC
connection using a single reference input pair. The ADuC845/
ADuC847/ADuC848 have the capability of connecting to five
differential inputs directly or ten single-ended inputs (LFCSP
package only) as well as having a second reference input. This
arrangement means that different sensors with different
reference ranges can be connected to the part with the need for
external multiplexing circuitry. This arrangement is shown in
Figure 71. The bridge sensor shown can be a load cell or a
pressure sensor. The RTD is shown using a reference voltage
derived from the RREF resistor via the REFIN± inputs, and the
bridge sensor is shown using a divided down AVDD reference via
the REFIN2± inputs.
Rev. C | Page 92 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
DOΩNLOAD/DEBUG
ENABLE JUMPER
(NORMALLY OPEN)
1kΩ
DVDD
1kΩ
11 P1.6/IEXC1/AIN7
200µA/400µA
EXCITATION
CURRENT
AVDD
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
4 AVDD
0.1µF
DGND
LFCSP PACKAGE
5 AGND
RTD
DVDD
6
AGND
XTAL2 35
7
REFIN–
XTAL1 34
8 REFIN+
RREF
5.6kΩ
56 P1.0/AIN1
1 P1.1/AIN2
R
2
P1.2/AIN3/REFIN2+
15 AIN9
R
16 AIN10
TxD
17 18
19
DVDD
RxD
DVDD
DGND
3 P1.3/AIN4/REFIN2–
RESET
22
36
RESET ACTIVE HIGH.
(NORMALLY OPEN)
DVDD
51
23 37
38
50
0.1µF
DVDD
RS232
CONNECTION
Figure 71. Dual Reference Typical Connectivity
Rev. C | Page 93 of 108
04741-067
AVDD
43
EA
PSEN
44
2-PIN HEADER FOR
EMULATION ACCESS
(NORMALLY OPEN)
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
QuickStart DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM
QuickStart-PLUS DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM
The QuickStart Development System is an entry-level, low cost
development tool suite supporting the ADuC8xx MicroConverter
product family. The system consists of the following PC-based
(Windows®-compatible) hardware and software development
tools:
The QuickStart-PLUS development system offers users
enhanced nonintrusive debug and emulation tools. The system
consists of the following PC-based (Windows-compatible)
hardware and software development tools:
Hardware:
Hardware:
Software:
Miscellaneous:
Evaluation board and serial port
programming cable.
Serial download software.
CD-ROM documentation and prototype
evaluation board.
Software:
A brief description of some of the software tools and
components in the QuickStart system follows.
Miscellaneous:
Download—In-Circuit Serial Downloader
The serial downloader is a Windows application that allows the
user to serially download an assembled program (Intel® hexadecimal format file) to the on-chip program flash memory via
the serial COM port on a standard PC. Application Note uC004
details this serial download protocol and is available from
www.analog.com/microconverter.
ASPIRE—IDE
The ASPIRE® integrated development environment is a
Windows application that allows the user to compile, edit, and
debug code in the same environment. The ASPIRE software
allows users to debug code execution on silicon using the
MicroConverter UART serial port. The debugger provides
access to all on-chip peripherals during a typical debug session
as well as single-step, animate (automatic single stepping), and
break-point code execution control.
Note that the ASPIRE IDE is also included as part of the
QuickStart-PLUS system. As part of the QuickStart-PLUS
system the ASPIRE IDE also supports mixed level and C source
debugging. This is not available in the QuickStart system where
the program is limited to assembly only.
Rev. C | Page 94 of 108
Prototype Board, Accutron NonIntrusive
Single-Pin Emulator.
ASPIRE Integrated Development
Environment. Features full C and Assembly
emulation using the Accutron single-pin
emulator.
CD-ROM documentation.
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
TIMING SPECIFICATIONS
AC inputs during testing are driven at DVDD – 0.5 V for Logic 1 and 0.45 V for Logic 0. Timing measurements are made at VIH min for
Logic 1 and VIL max for Logic 0 as shown in Figure 72.
For timing purposes, a port pin is no longer floating when a 100 mV change from load voltage occurs. A port pin begins to float when a
100 mV change from the loaded VOH/VOL level occurs as shown in Figure 72.
CLOAD for all outputs = 80 pF, unless otherwise noted.
AVDD = 2.7 V to 3.6 V or 4.75 V to 5.25 V, DVDD = 2.7 V to 3.6 V or 4.75 V to 5.25 V; all specifications TMIN to TMAX, unless otherwise
noted.
Table 64. CLOCK INPUT (External Clock Driven XTAL1) Parameter
32.768 kHz External Crystal
Typ
Max
30.52
6.26
6.26
9
9
0.098
1.57
12.58
0.636
10.2
0.636
0.08
Min
tCK
tCKL
tCKH
tCKR
tCKF
1/tCORE
tCORE
tCYC
XTAL1 Period
XTAL1 Width Low
XTAL1 Width High
XTAL1 Rise Time
XTAL1 Fall Time
Core Clock Frequency 1
Core Clock Period 2
Machine Cycle Time 3
Unit
µs
µs
µs
ns
ns
MHz
µs
µs
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 internal PLL locks onto a multiple (512 times) of the 32.768 kHz external crystal frequency to provide a stable 12.58 MHz internal clock
for the system. The core can operate at this frequency or at a binary submultiple called Core_Clk, selected via the PLLCON SFR.
2
This number is measured at the default Core_Clk operating frequency of 1.57 MHz.
3
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848 machine cycle time is nominally defined as 1/Core_Clk.
1
0.45V
0.2DVDD + 0.9V
TEST POINTS
0.2DVDD – 0.1V
VLOAD – 0.1V
VLOAD
VLOAD + 0.1V
TIMING
REFERENCE
POINTS
Figure 72. Timing Waveform Characteristics
Rev. C | Page 95 of 108
VLOAD – 0.1V
VLOAD
VLOAD – 0.1V
04741-077
DVDD – 0.5V
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
Table 65. EXTERNAL DATA MEMORY READ CYCLE Parameter
RD Pulse Width
Address Valid After ALE Low
Address Hold After ALE Low
RD Low to Valid Data In
Data and Address Hold After RD
Data Float After RD
ALE Low to Valid Data In
Address to Valid Data In
ALE Low to RD or WR Low
Address Valid to RD or WR Low
RD Low to Address Float
RD or WR High to ALE High
12.58 MHz Core Clock
Max
Min
125
120
290
6.29 MHz Core Clock
Max
48
100
0
0
150
170
230
625
350
470
130
190
255
375
15
35
60
120
ALE (O)
t WHLH
PSEN (O)
tLLDV
t RLRH
tLLWL
RD (O)
tAVWL
tRLDV
tAVLL
tRHDZ
tLLAX
tRHDX
tRLAZ
PORT 0 (I/O)
A0�A7 (OUT)
DATA (IN)
tAVDV
PORT 2 (O)
A16�A23
A8 A15
Figure 73. External Data Memory Read Cycle
Rev. C | Page 96 of 108
04741-078
tRLRH
tAVLL
tLLAX
tRLDV
tRHDX
tRHDZ
tLLDV
tAVDV
tLLWL
tAVWL
tRLAZ
tWHLH
Min
60
60
145
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Table 66. EXTERNAL DATA MEMORY WRITE CYCLE Parameter
tWLWH
tAVLL
tLLAX
tLLWL
tAVWL
tQVWX
tQVWH
tWHQX
tWHLH
12.58 MHz Core Clock
Min
Max
65
60
65
130
190
60
120
380
60
WR Pulse Width
Address Valid After ALE Low
Address Hold After ALE Low
ALE Low to RD or WR Low
Address Valid to RD or WR Low
Data Valid to WR Transition
Data Setup Before WR
Data and Address Hold After WR
RD or WR High to ALE High
Min
130
120
135
6.29 MHz Core Clock
Max
260
375
120
250
755
125
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ALE (O)
tWHLH
PSEN (O)
t LLWL
t WLWH
WR (O)
t AVWL
t QVWX
t LLAX
A0�A7
PORT 2 (O)
tWHQX
t QVWH
DATA
A16�A23
04741-079
tAVLL
V8 A15
Figure 74. External Data Memory Write Cycle
Table 67. I C-COMPATIBLE INTERFACE TIMING Parameter
2
Parameter
tL
tH
tSHD
tDSU
tDHD
tRSU
tPSU
tBUF
tR
tF
tSUP1
SCLCK Low Pulse Width
SCLCK High Pulse Width
Start Condition Hold Time
Data Setup Time
Data Hold Time
Setup Time for Repeated Start
Stop Condition Setup Time
Bus Free Time Between a Stop Condition and a Start Condition
Rise Time of Both SCLCK and SDATA
Fall Time of Both SCLCK and SDATA
Pulse Width of Spike Suppressed
____________________________________________
1
Input filtering on both the SCLOCK and SDATA inputs suppresses noise spikes less than 50 ns.
Rev. C | Page 97 of 108
Min
1.3
0.6
0.6
100
Max
0.9
0.6
0.6
1.3
300
300
50
Unit
µs
µs
µs
µs
µs
µs
µs
µs
ns
ns
ns
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
tSUP
SDATA (I/O)
LSB
MSB
tDSU
tPSU
MSB
tDSU
2-7
8
tL
tF
tDHD
tR
tRSU
tH
1
PS
ACK
tDHD
tSHD
SCLK (I)
tR
9
tSUP
STOP
START
CONDITION CONDITION
1
S(R)
REPEATED
START
Figure 75. I2C-Compatible Interface Timing
Rev. C | Page 98 of 108
tF
04741-080
tBUF
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Table 68. SPI MASTER MODE TIMING (CPHA = 1) Parameter
Min
tSL
tSH
tDAV
tDSU
tDHD
tDF
tDR
tSR
tSF
SCLOCK Low Pulse Width1
SCLOCK High Pulse Width1
Data Output Valid After SCLOCK Edge
Data Input Setup Time Before SCLOCK Edge
Data Input Hold Time After SCLOCK Edge
Data Output Fall Time
Data Output Rise Time
SCLOCK Rise Time
SCLOCK Fall Time
Typ
635
635
Max
50
100
100
10
10
10
10
25
25
25
25
____________________________________________
Characterized under the following conditions:
a. Core clock divider bits CD2, CD1, and CD0 in PLLCON SFR set to 0, 1, and 1, respectively, that is, core clock frequency = 1.57 MHz.
b. SPI bit-rate selection bits SPR1 and SPR0 in SPICON SFR set to 0 and 0, respectively.
SCLOCK
(CPOL = 0)
tSH
tSL
tSR
SCLOCK
(CPOL = 1)
tDAV
tDF
tSF
tDR
MOSI
MSB
MISO
MSB IN
tDSU
BITS 6–1
BITS 6–1
LSB
LSB IN
04741-081
1
tDHD
Figure 76. SPI Master Mode Timing (CHPA = 1)
Rev. C | Page 99 of 108
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
Table 69. SPI MASTER MODE TIMING (CPHA = 0) Parameter
Min
tSL
tSH
tDAV
tDOSU
tDSU
tDHD
tDF
tDR
tSR
tSF
Typ
635
635
Max
50
150
100
100
10
10
10
10
25
25
25
25
Characterized under the following conditions:
a. Core clock divider bits CD2, CD1, and CD0 in PLLCON SFR set to 0, 1, and 1, respectively, that is, core clock frequency = 1.57 MHz.
b. SPI bit-rate selection bits SPR1 and SPR0 in SPICON SFR set to 0 and 0, respectively.
SCLOCK
(CPOL = 0)
tSH
tSL
tSF
tSR
SCLOCK
(CPOL = 1)
tDAV
tDOSU
tDF
tDR
MOSI
MSB
MISO
MSB IN
tDSU
BITS 6–1
BITS 6–1
LSB
LSB IN
04741-082
1
SCLOCK Low Pulse Width1
SCLOCK High Pulse Width1
Data Output Valid After SCLOCK Edge
Data Output Setup Before SCLOCK Edge
Data Input Setup Time Before SCLOCK Edge
Data Input Hold Time After SCLOCK Edge
Data Output Fall Time
Data Output Rise Time
SCLOCK Rise Time
SCLOCK Fall Time
tDHD
Figure 77. SPI Master Mode Timing (CHPA = 0)
Rev. C | Page 100 of 108
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Table 70. SPI SLAVE MODE TIMING (CPHA = 1) Parameter
Min
0
SS to SCLOCK Edge
SCLOCK Low Pulse Width
SCLOCK High Pulse Width
Data Output Valid After SCLOCK Edge
Data Input Setup Time Before SCLOCK Edge
Data Input Hold Time After SCLOCK Edge
Data Output Fall Time
Data Output Rise Time
SCLOCK Rise Time
SCLOCK Fall Time
SS High After SCLOCK Edge
Typ
Max
330
330
50
100
100
10
10
10
10
25
25
25
25
0
SS
tSFS
tSS
SCLOCK
(CPOL = 0)
tSH
tSL
tSR
tSF
SCLOCK
(CPOL = 1)
tDAV
tDF
MISO
MOSI
MSB
BITS 6–1
BITS 6–1
MSB IN
tDSU
tDR
tDHD
Figure 78. SPI Slave Mode Timing (CHPA = 1)
Rev. C | Page 101 of 108
LSB
LSB IN
04741-083
tSS
tSL
tSH
tDAV
tDSU
tDHD
tDF
tDR
tSR
tSF
tSFS
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
Table 71. SPI SLAVE MODE TIMING (CPHA = 0) Parameter
Min
0
SS to SCLOCK Edge
SCLOCK Low Pulse Width
SCLOCK High Pulse Width
Data Output Valid After SCLOCK Edge
Data Input Setup Time Before SCLOCK Edge
Data Input Hold Time After SCLOCK Edge
Data Output Fall Time
Data Output Rise Time
SCLOCK Rise Time
SCLOCK Fall Time
Data Output Valid After SS Edge
SS High After SCLOCK Edge
Typ
Max
330
330
50
100
100
10
10
10
10
25
25
25
25
20
SS
tSFS
tSS
SCLOCK
(CPOL = 0)
tSH
tSL
tSF
tSR
SCLOCK
(CPOL = 1)
tDAV
tDOSS
tDF
MISO
MOSI
MSB
MSB IN
tDSU
tDR
BITS 6–1
BITS 6–1
LSB
LSB IN
04741-084
tSS
tSL
tSH
tDAV
tDSU
tDHD
tDF
tDR
tSR
tSF
tDOSS
tSFS
tDHD
Figure 79. SPI Slave Mode Timing (CHPA = 0)
Rev. C | Page 102 of 108
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Table 72. UART TIMING (SHIFT REGISTER MODE) Parameter
Min
Serial Port Clock Cycle Time
Output Data Setup to Clock
Input Data Setup to Clock
Input Data Hold After Clock
Output Data Hold After Clock
Min
Variable Core_Clk
Typ
Max
12tcore
662
292
0
22
tXLXL
TxD
(OUTPUT CLOCK)
SET RI
OR
SET TI
tQVXH
tXHQX
RxD
(OUTPUT DATA)
BIT 1
LSB
BIT 6
tDVXH
RxD
(INPUT DATA)
LSB
tXHDX
BIT 1
Figure 80. UART Timing in Shift Register Mode
Rev. C | Page 103 of 108
BIT 6
MSB
04741-086
TXLXL
TQVXH
TDVXH
TXHDX
TXHQX
12.58 MHz Core_Clk
Typ
Max
954
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
OUTLINE DIMENSIONS
14.15
13.90 SQ
13.65
2.45
MAX
1.03
0.88
0.73
27
39
26
40
SEATING
PLANE
7.80
REF
TOP VIEW
2.10
2.00
1.95
0.23
0.11
VIEW A
PIN 1
52
7°
0°
0.25
MIN
10.20
10.00 SQ
9.80
(PINS DOWN)
10°
6°
2°
14
13
1
0.10
COPLANARITY
0.38
0.22
LEAD WIDTH
0.65 BSC
LEAD PITCH
VIEW A
ROTATED 90° CCW
COMPLIANT TO JEDEC STANDARDS MO-112-AC-1
Figure 81. 52-Lead Metric Quad Flat Package [MQFP]
(S-52-2)
Dimensions shown in millimeters
0.30
0.23
0.18
0.60 MAX
0.60
MAX
43
PIN 1
INDICATOR
7.85
7.75 SQ
7.65
1
0.50
BSC
6.25
6.10 SQ
5.95
EXPOSED
PAD
29
TOP VIEW
1.00
0.85
0.80
SEATING
PLANE
0.80 MAX
0.65 TYP
12° MAX
SIDE VIEW
PIN 1
INDICATOR
56
42
0.50
0.40
0.30
14
28
15
BOTTOM VIEW
0.05 MAX
0.02 NOM
COPLANARITY
0.20 REF
0.08
FOR PROPER CONNECTION OF
THE EXPOSED PAD, REFER TO
THE PIN CONFIGURATION AND
FUNCTION DESCRIPTIONS
SECTION OF THIS DATA SHEET.
COMPLIANT TO JEDEC STANDARDS MO-220-VLLD-2
Figure 82. 56-Lead Lead Frame Chip Scale Package [LFCSP_VQ]
8 mm × 8 mm Body, Very Thin Quad
(CP-56-1)
Dimensions shown in millimeters
Rev. C | Page 104 of 108
0.25 MIN
6.50 REF
06-07-2012-A
8.10
8.00 SQ
7.90
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
ORDERING GUIDE
Model 1, 2, 3
ADuC845BSZ62-5
ADuC845BSZ62-5-RL
ADuC845BSZ62-3
ADuC845BSZ8-5
ADuC845BSZ8-5-RL
ADuC845BSZ8-3
ADuC845BCPZ62-5
ADuC845BCPZ62-3
ADuC845BCPZ8-5
ADuC845BCPZ8-3
ADuC847BSZ62-5
ADuC847BSZ62-3
ADuC847BSZ32-5
ADuC847BSZ32-3
ADuC847BSZ8-5
ADuC847BSZ8-3
ADuC847BCPZ62-5
ADuC847BCPZ62-3
ADuC847BCPZ8-5
ADuC847BCPZ8-3
ADuC848BSZ62-5
ADuC848BSZ62-3
ADuC848BSZ32-5
ADuC848BSZ32-3
ADuC848BSZ8-5
ADuC848BSZ8-3
ADuC848BCPZ62-5
ADuC848BCPZ62-3
ADuC848BCPZ8-5
ADuC848BCPZ8-3
EVAL-ADuC845QSZ
EVAL-ADuC845QSPZ
EVAL-ADuC847QSZ
EVAL-ADUC-CABLE1Z
Temperature Range
−40°C to +125°C
−40°C to +125°C
−40°C to +125°C
−40°C to +125°C
−40°C to +125°C
−40°C to +125°C
−40°C to +85°C
−40°C to +85°C
−40°C to +85°C
−40°C to +85°C
−40°C to +125°C
−40°C to +125°C
−40°C to +125°C
−40°C to +125°C
−40°C to +125°C
−40°C to +125°C
−40°C to +85°C
−40°C to +85°C
−40°C to +85°C
−40°C to +85°C
−40°C to +125°C
−40°C to +125°C
−40°C to +125°C
−40°C to +125°C
−40°C to +125°C
−40°C to +125°C
−40°C to +85°C
−40°C to +85°C
−40°C to +85°C
−40°C to +85°C
Package Description
52-Lead MQFP, Lead Free, 62-kbyte, 5 V
52-Lead MQFP, Lead Free, 62-kbyte, 5 V
52-Lead MQFP, Lead Free, 62-kbyte, 3 V
52-Lead MQFP, Lead Free, 8-kbyte, 5 V
52-Lead MQFP, Lead Free, 8-kbyte, 5 V
52-Lead MQFP, Lead Free, 8-kbyte, 3 V
56-Lead LFCSP_VQ, Lead Free, 62-kbyte, 5 V
56-Lead LFCSP_VQ, Lead Free, 62-kbyte, 3 V
56-Lead LFCSP_VQ, Lead Free, 8-kbyte, 5 V
56-Lead LFCSP_VQ, Lead Free, 8-kbyte, 3 V
52-Lead MQFP, Lead Free, 62-kbyte, 5 V
52-Lead MQFP, Lead Free, 62-kbyte, 3 V
52-Lead MQFP, Lead Free, 32-kbyte, 5 V
52-Lead MQFP, Lead Free, 32-kbyte, 3 V
52-Lead MQFP, Lead Free, 8-kbyte, 5 V
52-Lead MQFP, Lead Free, 8-kbyte, 3 V
56-Lead LFCSP_VQ, Lead Free, 62-kbyte, 5 V
56-Lead LFCSP_VQ, Lead Free, 62-kbyte, 3 V
56-Lead LFCSP_VQ, Lead Free, 8-kbyte, 5 V
56-Lead LFCSP_VQ, Lead Free, 8-kbyte, 3 V
52-Lead MQFP, Lead Free, 62-kbyte, 5 V
52-Lead MQFP, Lead Free, 62-kbyte, 3 V
52-Lead MQFP, Lead Free, 32-kbyte, 5 V
52-Lead MQFP, Lead Free, 32-kbyte, 3 V
52-Lead MQFP, Lead Free, 8-kbyte, 5 V
52-Lead MQFP, Lead Free, 8-kbyte, 3 V
56-Lead LFCSP_VQ, Lead Free, 62-kbyte, 5 V
56-Lead LFCSP_VQ, Lead Free, 62-kbyte, 3 V
56-Lead LFCSP_VQ, Lead Free, 8-kbyte, 5 V
56-Lead LFCSP_VQ, Lead Free, 8-kbyte, 3 V
QuickStart Development System
QuickStart-PLUS Development System
QuickStart Development System
ADuC Serial Downloader Cable for UART
The -3 and -5 in the Model column indicate the DVDD operating voltage.
Z = RoHS-Compliant Part.
3
The QuickStart Plus system can only be ordered directly from Accutron. It can be purchased from the website www.accutron.com.
1
2
Rev. C | Page 105 of 108
Package Option
S-52-2
S-52-2
S-52-2
S-52-2
S-52-2
S-52-2
CP-56-1
CP-56-1
CP-56-1
CP-56-1
S-52-2
S-52-2
S-52-2
S-52-2
S-52-2
S-52-2
CP-56-1
CP-56-1
CP-56-1
CP-56-1
S-52-2
S-52-2
S-52-2
S-52-2
S-52-2
S-52-2
CP-56-1
CP-56-1
CP-56-1
CP-56-1
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
NOTES
Rev. C | Page 106 of 108
Data Sheet
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
NOTES
Rev. C | Page 107 of 108
ADuC845/ADuC847/ADuC848
Data Sheet
NOTES
Purchase of licensed I2C components of Analog Devices or one of its sublicensed Associated Companies conveys a license for the purchaser under the Philips I2C Patent
Rights to use these components in an I2C system, provided that the system conforms to the I2C Standard Specification as defined by Philips.
©2004–2012 Analog Devices, Inc. All rights reserved. Trademarks and
registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
D04741-0-12/12(C)
Rev. C | Page 108 of 108