iMovie `09 & iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide

ONLINE ADDENDUM:
iDVD
Part of
iMovie ’09 & iDVD for Mac OS X:
Visual QuickStart Guide
Jeff Carlson
http://jeffcarlson.com/imovievqs/
Peachpit Press
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Visual QuickStart Guide
iMovie ’09 & iDVD for Mac OS X
Jeff Carlson
Peachpit Press
1249 Eighth Street
Berkeley, CA 94710
(510) 524-2178
(510) 524-2221 (fax)
Find us on the Web at: www.peachpit.com
To report errors, please send a note to errata@peachpit.com
Peachpit Press is a division of Pearson Education
Copyright © 2009 by Jeff Carlson
Editor: Valerie Witte
Production Editor: Cory Borman
Composition: Jeff Carlson
Copyediting: Liane Thomas
Proofreading: Valerie Witte
Illustrations and photos: Jeff Carlson
Indexer: Ann Rogers
Notice of rights
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form by any means, electronic,
mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. For
information on getting permission for reprints and excerpts, contact permissions@peachpit.com.
Notice of liability
The information in this book is distributed on an “As Is” basis, without warranty. While every precaution has
been taken in the preparation of the book, neither the author nor Peachpit Press shall have any liability to any
person or entity with respect to any loss or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly by the
instructions contained in this book or by the computer software and hardware products described in it.
Trademarks
Visual QuickStart Guide is a registered trademark of Peachpit Press, a division of Pearson Education. iPhoto,
iTunes, iDVD, iWeb, and iMovie are registered trademarks and/or registered service marks of Apple Computer,
Inc. Many of the designations used by manufacturers and sellers to distinguish their products are claimed as
trademarks. Where those designations appear in this book, and Peachpit was aware of a trademark claim, the
designations appear as requested by the owner of the trademark. All other product names and services identified
throughout this book are used in editorial fashion only and for the benefit of such companies with no intention
of infringement of the trademark. No such use, or the use of any trade name, is intended to convey endorsement
or other affiliation with this book.
ISBN-13: 978-0-321-60132-2
ISBN-10: 0-321-60132-7
9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Printed and bound in the United States of America
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
About This Addendum
When Apple released iLife ’09, the company
added a lot of new features to iMovie but
barely touched iDVD. To keep this book from
becoming a 500-page behemoth, I decided to
pull the bulk of the iDVD section and offer it
as a free download.
If you downloaded this file and do not own
the print version of my iMovie ’09 book, I
hope this gives you an idea of how easy to
read and information-packed the book is. I
encourage you to buy a copy at your favorite
local bookstore or online. (If you buy it from
jeffcarlson.com/imovievqs/, I get a small
percentage of the sale.)
About iDVD
The biggest change in iDVD between iLife ’08
and iLife ’09 is that Apple removed the year
from the product name—it’s now known just
as “iDVD”. If you want to get specific, the
version number changed from iDVD 7.0.2 to
iDVD 7.0.3. Apple has lost interest in DVDs,
and views online delivery—such as via a
MobileMe Gallery or the Apple TV—as the
way of the future.
That said, iDVD still works just fine, and is a
great way to create and customize DVDs that
can be played in any DVD player. Not everyone has broadband Internet access that’s fast
enough to realistically watch high-resolution
movies online, and the medium is still fairly
brittle for long movies or DVD projects for
most people.
The chapters in this addendum were taken
from the last edition of this book, iMovie ’08
& iDVD ’08: Visual QuickStart Guide, and
have been updated where necessary.
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Table of Contents
Chapter 1: iDVD Overview
3
Chapter 2: iDVD Themes
Applying a Theme. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Motion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Drop Zones. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 3: Customizing iDVD Themes
Editing Text Formatting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing Text Alignment and Position. . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing Buttons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Background. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Background Audio. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Looping Movie Playback. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving a Favorite Theme. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting a Favorite Theme. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 4: Slideshows
Creating a Slideshow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Slideshow Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Photos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Background Audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19
20
22
25
30
33
34
36
38
40
42
44
45
46
47
48
50
53
54
v
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Table of Contents
About DVDs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Working with iDVD Projects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Using OneStep DVD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Using Magic iDVD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
iDVD’s Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Creating a New Project. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Creating an iDVD Project from Final Cut. . . . . . . . 11
Creating a Submenu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Setting an Autoplay Movie. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Previewing the DVD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Adding DVD-ROM Data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Table of Contents
Chapter 5: Archiving, Encoding, and Burning
Creating a Project Archive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choosing an Encoding Setting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Burning the DVD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving as a Disc Image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
After the Burn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table of Contents
Index
vi
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
55
56
58
60
63
64
65
Addendum:
iDVD
Chapter 1 iDVD Overview.................................. 3
Chapter 2 iDVD Themes...................................19
Chapter 3 Customizing iDVD Themes.............. 33
Chapter 4 Slideshows..................................... 47
Chapter 5 Archiving, Encoding, and
Burning.......................................... 55
1
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
1
iDVD Overview
iDVD Overview
iMovie took a technology dominated by
professionals—movie editing—and made it
easy for normal people to use. In some ways,
though, iDVD is even more impressive.
iMovie can create HD movies, but don’t
expect to create a high-definition DVD for
now. Blu-ray may have won the HD format war, but currently no Macs support
burning to Blu-ray discs. (Software such
as Roxio Toast can do so, with the addition of an external Blu-ray disc burner.)
As such, iDVD does not support Blu-ray
either.
In the meantime, iDVD imports HD
projects with ease and converts them into
widescreen DV format. True, it’s not the
same as seeing the picture at high-definition quality, but it’s a start.
iDVD also does something that no other
program can do: It gives you style. Apple has
clearly put a lot of thought into the DVD
themes that ship with iDVD, making each
one something you’d actually want to show
off to people. An iDVD project, whether you
like it or not, is polished, which goes a long
way toward making people think, “Wow, I
had no idea he was so talented.”
This chapter offers a look at iDVD’s interface
and major functions in order to give you the
foundation you’ll need for the next chapters
that deal with building projects and customizing them.
3
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
iDVD Overview
HD and iDVD
Quite a lot of highly technical work goes into
creating a DVD—in the background. While
you’re focused on choosing which photo
should appear on the title page of your DVD,
iDVD handles the specifics of building the
structure necessary for most consumer DVD
players to play back your masterpiece. More
importantly, it manages the MPEG-2 compression needed to cram multiple gigabytes’
worth of data onto a shiny platter the size
and shape of a regular audio CD.
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 1
About DVDs
The Digital Versatile Disc is quite a wonder:
it’s physically small, like a CD, but packs
nearly seven times the data into the same
space: a CD stores roughly 700 MB, while a
DVD holds approximately 4.7 GB. In addition
to storing all this data, DVDs can be set up
so they automatically play movie files and
include a menu system to give you control
over how the content plays.
DVD physical formats
Before you rush out and buy a mega-pack of
blank DVDs, take a few minutes to acquaint
yourself with the different formats that are
out there.
About DVDs
u
u
DVD-R. DVD-Recordable discs can be
burned once, and then played back in
nearly any consumer DVD player and
DVD-capable computer. When purchasing DVD-R media, be sure to get
DVD-R (General); the other type, DVD-R
(Authoring), is used in professional DVD
writers and is not supported by iDVD.
The discs Apple sells are DVD-R format.
DVD-RW. DVD-Rewritable discs can
be erased and burned hundreds of times,
which make them great for testing
purposes (you can burn iterations of your
project onto one DVD-RW disc, instead
of making lots of DVD-R coasters).
u
DVD+R, DVD+RW. These two formats
use a different method of recording data
than DVD-R and DVD-RW. They don’t
offer more storage or features, and cost
about the same as the -R and -RW discs.
u
DVD-ROM. DVD-Read-Only-Media
discs cannot be burned because their
data has already been written to disc. The
iLife installation disc is an example of
DVD-ROM.
4x DVD Media Alert!
Before you burn any DVD disc, make
sure your SuperDrive’s firmware has been
updated. All SuperDrives can burn 1xand 2x-speed DVD-R media. When using
4x-speed media, however, some older
mechanisms can not only fail to write
the disc, but they can also be permanently damaged! Fixes are available—see
http://docs.info.apple.com/article.
html?artnum=86130 for more information.
DVD Logical Structure
A blank DVD contains no information or
directory structure. The way a DVD’s data
is stored on the disc depends on how the
disc will be used.
u
DVD-Video. A DVD that contains
just a movie (and its associated menus
and extras) is in DVD-Video format.
The folders and filenames are specific:
a folder called VIDEO_TS stores all
of the movie’s video and audio files.
iDVD typically creates DVD-Video
discs.
u
DVD-ROM. When you store just data
on the disc, without the need to play
back automatically in DVD players,
the disc is in DVD-ROM format. This
is just like using a CD-ROM, only with
more storage capacity. The Finder can
create DVD-ROM discs when you’re
backing up data, for example.
u
Hybrid DVD. You can store a DVDVideo project on a disc that also contains DVD-ROM data, which makes
the disc a Hybrid DVD. iDVD can
create Hybrid DVDs.
4
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
iDVD Overview
Working with iDVD Projects
If iDVD is currently running because you
shared a movie from GarageBand, you don’t
need to open, create, or save your project—
it’s all done for you. If you just launched iDVD
independently, you can create a new project
or open an existing project from the File
menu; doing so closes the current ­project
(only one project can be open at a time).
Figure 1.1 If iDVD cannot locate the media files used
in your project, it displays this dialog.
Switch Between NTSC and PAL
DVD Disc Speeds
DVD discs are marked as being 1x, 2x, 4x,
or 8x speed. The SuperDrive that comes
in the current iMac, for example, writes
data at 8x speed, which means the laser
that carves into the disc’s surface is fast
enough to keep up with a faster-spinning
disc. All recent SuperDrives can write to
higher-speed media, even if they’re not
4x- or 8x-speed drives, at 1x or 2x speed.
Using iDVD on
Non-SuperDrive Macs
You can run iDVD on a Mac that does not
include a SuperDrive, then archive your
project or save it to a disc image for burning on another computer (see Chapter 5).
The iDVD project file appears by default in
your Docu­ments folder (within your Home
folder), and ends in the extension “.dvdproj”.
iDVD stores all of its related files in the
­project file itself, which is a package.
4Tips
n
Many of the newest Mac models sport
Super­Drives that burn dual-layer DVD
media, which can store up to 8.5 GB of
data and hold around three hours of
video footage.
n
Make sure you have plenty of free hard
disk space available—at least 10 to 20 GB.
n
Storing the project file in the Documents
folder may be fine for casual use, but
an iDVD project may not fit on your
startup disk. When traveling, I move the
project file to another partition of my
PowerBook’s hard disk, or offload everything to a speedy external drive.
n
If you do move your iDVD project, make
sure it can still locate your original iMovie
project and its media files. If iDVD gets
confused, it warns you with a dialog
(Figure 1.1). Select a file from the list and
click Find File if the file is actually available somewhere else, or click Cancel to
proceed. You can still work on the project
if you cancel, but you’ll get a broken link
warning if you play any of the footage.
5
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Working with iDVD Projects
Choose Project Info from the Project
menu, and change the Video Mode setting
at any time. Also, in iDVD’s preferences
you’ll find a Video Mode setting in the
Projects area that applies to new projects.
The iDVD project file
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 1
Using OneStep DVD
Sometimes you may want to just burn some
footage to a disc, without dealing with pretty
graphics or navigation. Film productions
frequently create DVD “dailies” of each day’s
footage for the director or producers to
review; wedding videographers sometimes
offer the raw footage to the married couple,
handed over at the end of the day. iDVD’s
OneStep DVD feature simply grabs video
from your camcorder and burns it to disc,
with no menu navigation or frills. When you
play it in a DVD player, the movie starts playing right away.
Figure 1.2 If no iDVD project is currently open, start a
OneStep DVD project from the title screen.
To create a OneStep DVD:
Using OneStep DVD
1. Connect your camcorder to your Mac
and make sure it’s loaded with the tape
containing your footage.
2. Choose OneStep DVD from the File
menu, or press the OneStep DVD button
on iDVD’s title screen (Figure 1.2).
3. Insert a recordable DVD disc into your
computer.
4. Sit back and wait. iDVD rewinds the
tape, imports the footage, encodes it, and
burns it to the disc (Figure 1.3).
5. If you want another copy made after
iDVD finishes, insert another disc.
Otherwise, click Done.
4Tips
n
OneStep DVD imports footage until it
reaches the end of the tape or the end of
the footage. If you want just a portion of
the tape recorded, press the Stop button
in iDVD or on the camcorder.
n
You can’t start importing footage in the
middle of a tape using OneStep DVD. If
you want to burn just a portion of your
video, import it into iMovie first.
Figure 1.3 OneStep DVD automatically rewinds the
camera’s tape, imports the footage (top), and burns
a DVD disc (bottom).
OneStep DVD Data Location
When you use the OneStep DVD feature,
iDVD doesn’t create a project that you can
go edit later. All OneStep DVD files are
stored in a temporary, invisible directory
on your startup drive. But you can change
the location: open iDVD’s preferences,
click the Advanced icon, and choose a new
temporary folder location (say, a larger
hard disk) at the bottom of the window.
6
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
iDVD Overview
Using Magic iDVD
To get more of iDVD’s style without spending a lot of time building a full project, drag
movies, music, and photos from your hard
disk onto the Magic iDVD interface and
let iDVD do the work. You can then burn
it straight to disc, or use the project as the
jumping-off point for your own customizing.
Figure 1.4 Think of Magic iDVD as the parent who
gave you a helpful push when you first learned to ride
a bicycle (without crashing into the neighbor’s tree,
in my case).
To create a Magic iDVD project:
1. Choose Magic iDVD from the File menu,
or press the Magic iDVD button on
iDVD’s title screen.
2. In the Magic iDVD window, type a name
for your DVD in the DVD Title field
(Figure 1.4).
3. Choose a theme from the scrolling list.
Figure 1.5 After you choose Create Project, edit the
project as described in the upcoming chapters.
5. To include slideshows, click the Photos
button and drag photos from your iPhoto
library to the Drop Photos Here area.
Each slot represents a different slideshow
that can include several photos.
6. If you want music with your slideshow,
click the Audio button and drag songs
from your iTunes library to a slideshow.
7. Click the Preview button at any time to
see what the project looks like.
8. Click the Create Project button to create
a new project (Figure 1.5), or click the
Burn button to write directly to a DVD.
4Tips
n
You can also drag media content from
the Finder to the Magic iDVD areas.
n
To preview a song or movie, double-click
it, or select it and press the Play button.
7
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Using Magic iDVD
4. Click the Movies button to view ­movies
(including iMovie projects) on your computer, and drag the ones you want to the
Drop Movies Here area.
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 1
iDVD’s Interface
4Tips
Some software is deep, with lots of hidden,
out-of-the-way features. iDVD is not one
of those programs. That’s not to say it isn’t
deep in what it can do—rather, it’s easy to
find what you need, quickly.
n
The term “menu” is confusing in iDVD.
Normally, a menu is a list of commands
that you access from the menu bar at the
top of the screen. In DVD parlance, however, a menu is the screen you’re looking
at. Think of it like a restaurant menu: the
main window is a space to list the items
(movies, etc.) you can select.
n
The widescreen format is designed to
play on widescreen televisions without
letterboxing the picture. All themes can
be made widescreen (even old ones).
n
Switch between standard and widescreen
layout at any time; you’re not locked into
one or the other.
n
Motion-enabled menus are generally
processor-intensive, so I rarely leave the
Motion button enabled while I edit.
Menu/main window
iDVD’s main window, referred to as the
menu, displays the first set of options that
your viewers will encounter (Figure 1.6).
Choose between standard or widescreen
modes, depending on the aspect ratio of
your movie.
To switch format modes:
iDVD’s Interface
u
From the Project menu, choose Switch to
Standard (4:3) or Switch to Widescreen
(16:9), or press Command-Option-A
(Figure 1.7).
Preview window
Controls
Themes pane
Figure 1.6 iDVD’s main window contains all of the controls you need to build a professional-looking DVD.
8
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
iDVD Overview
Standard (4:3)
Controls
The program’s main controls run below the
preview window:
Add button. Click this button to display
a pop-up menu that lets you add a submenu, movie, or slideshow.
u
Inspector button. Click to display the
floating Inspector window.
u
Map button. Click to see the Map view,
which displays the project’s content
structure. You can organize the project’s
structure, assign themes to menus, and
specify media that will start playing
when a disc is begun, even before the
first menu screen.
u
Motion button. Click to toggle animation and movie previews, available for
most iDVD themes. The Motion button
turns them on or off while you’re editing.
u
Edit Drop Zones button. Click this
button to display the Drop Zone editing
interface in the main window.
u
Volume slider. Set the volume of the
theme elements (such as background
music) while you’re working; it doesn’t
affect the project’s volume level.
u
Preview button. Switch into preview
mode to get a sense of how the DVD’s
menus and content will run.
u
Burn button. Start the encoding and
burning process to create a final disc.
u
Editing panes. Clicking one of these
buttons displays panes for editing the
project’s content.
Widescreen (16:9)
Figure 1.7 Work in standard or widescreen mode.
Important iDVD Interface Terms
u
u
u
Button. Any interactive element in
the DVD workspace is a button, even
if it doesn’t always look like a button.
New movies, slideshows, and chapters
are all buttons, because they require
some sort of action on the part of the
user to activate them.
Submenu. The exception to buttons
are submenus, which are ­containers
that hold more stuff. An example
of a submenu would be the “Scene
Selection” option that appears when
you import a movie with chapter
markers. The item is a control that
takes you to another menu screen,
which includes buttons for each chapter that you’ve set up.
Theme. A theme is the overall look
of a menu screen, including the visual
presentation (fonts, colors, etc.) as well
as the way it interacts (with motion
menus, etc.).
iDVD’s Interface
u
4Tip
n
The iDVD window is also resizable.
Choose Actual Size from the Window
menu to go back to the native resolution.
9
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 1
Creating a New Project
Bringing in a movie from iMovie via Garage­
Band isn’t the only entryway to iDVD. You
can start by creating a new empty project.
To create a new project in iDVD:
1. Choose New from the File menu, or click
the Create a New Project button from
iDVD’s title screen. The Save As dialog
appears.
2. Give the project a name and choose where
to save it.
Figure 1.8 When you create a new project from
scratch, choose a starting aspect ratio.
3. Choose an aspect ratio, and then click the
Create button (Figure 1.8).
To import video footage:
Creating a New Project
1. Click the Media button and then the
Movies button to display the Movies list.
2. Drag a movie to the menu to add it
(Figure 1.9).
Or
1. From the File menu, go to the Import
submenu and choose Video.
2. Locate a video source, such as a Quick­
Time movie, and click Import. A new
­button or submenu (depending on the
movie) appears in the preview window for
that video (Figure 1.10).
Figure 1.9 Drag items you’ve previously shared with
the Media Browser.
New movie added
4Tip
n
You can also drag a QuickTime movie
from the Finder to the iDVD window, but
make sure you don’t release it over a drop
zone (see Chapter 2).
Figure 1.10 When you import a video to an iDVD
­project, it appears as a new menu item.
10
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
iDVD Overview
Creating an iDVD Project
from Final Cut
Video editors working in Final Cut Express
or Final Cut Pro often bring their work into
iDVD to create their DVDs.
To export from Final Cut:
1. If you want to use Final Cut markers as
iDVD chapter markers, be sure they’re set
up as such: Locate a marker and press M
to bring up the Edit Marker dialog.
Figure 1.11 In Final Cut Express or Final Cut Pro, click
the Add Chapter Marker button to ensure that iDVD
will import the chapters correctly.
2. Click the Add Chapter Marker button (Figure 1.11). The text <CHAPTER>
appears in the Comment field. Click OK.
How to Add Chapters to
an Existing iDVD Project
You can add chapter markers in iDVD
if you didn’t bother to do so in iMovie.
Unfortunately, the feature is annoyingly
limited. Instead of placing markers where
you want them, iDVD can only create new
chapter breaks every few minutes. Here’s
how:
4. In the Save dialog, make sure Audio and
Video is chosen from the Include pop-up
menu.
5. Choose Chapter Markers from the
Markers pop-up menu.
6. Click Save to save the file.
7. In iDVD, import the file as described on
the opposite page.
To create chapter markers in iDVD:
1. Select a movie you’ve imported into
your iDVD project.
2. Choose Create Chapter Markers for
Movie from the Advanced menu.
3. In the dialog that appears, enter the
number of minutes that pass between
markers (such as “Create marker every
5 minutes”).
4. Click OK. When you click the movie, it
takes you to a submenu with options
to play the full movie or jump to individual chapters.
11
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Creating an iDVD Project from Final Cut
3. From the File menu, choose QuickTime
Movie from the Export submenu.
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 1
Creating a Submenu
If you used GarageBand to set up chapter
markers and create your iDVD project, your
menu contains a Play Movie button that
plays back the entire movie, and a button
labeled Scene Selection. That second button is actually a submenu that branches off
from the main menu. Double-clicking Scene
Selection takes you to another menu screen
that includes buttons to play chapters of
your movie.
You can create new submenus that lead to
other media—more movies or photos, for
example.
Creating a Submenu
To create a submenu:
1. Click the Add button and choose
Add Submenu from the pop-up menu
that appears. A new item named “My
Submenu” appears (Figure 1.12).
2. Double-click the submenu name. The
current theme is used for the new submenu, and includes a back arrow icon
that, when clicked, leads to the main
menu (Figure 1.13).
New submenu created
Figure 1.12 A new submenu looks like any other
­button in themes that use text buttons, but doubleclicking it leads to a submenu.
Back button
Figure 1.13 The newly created submenu shares the
previous menu’s theme and is blank, except for a back
arrow icon.
View top-down
or left-to-right.
View icons smaller or larger
using the size slider.
3. If you want, choose a different theme for
the submenu.
To create a submenu in the Map view:
1. Click the Map button to switch to the
Map view (Figure 1.14).
2. Select an icon for the menu where you
want to add a submenu.
3. Click the Add button and choose Add
Submenu. The new item appears in the
project hierarchy attached to the menu
(Figure 1.15).
Figure 1.14 The Map view, once just a helpful
­snapshot, is now a useful tool in iDVD.
12
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
iDVD Overview
Submenu added
to main menu
Submenus hidden
by clicking triangle
To move objects to another submenu:
u
Select an icon for a submenu, movie, or
slideshow and drag it onto the icon for
the submenu where the object will appear
(Figure 1.16).
To delete a submenu:
1. Select a submenu’s button (in the DVD
menu) or icon (in the Map view).
Figure 1.15 You can add submenus in the Map view.
2. Press the Delete key, or choose Delete
from the Edit menu. The submenu
disappears in a puff of smoke, as do any
submenus, movies, or slideshows that it
contained (but see the tip below).
4Tips
To delete a submenu but keep the
objects that it contained, Control-click
the submenu icon in the Map view and
choose Smart Delete. Only the submenu is
removed, leaving the other elements intact.
n
Want to move some menu items into
their own submenu without creating the
submenu separately? Select them and
choose New Menu from Selection from
the Project menu. A new submenu is
created that contains the items. However,
except for using Undo, note that you can’t
move them back to the main menu later
if you decide they should have been there
all along.
n
Click the small triangle to the right of a
menu icon to hide or show lower-level
items in the hierarchy (which is especially
helpful when working on large, complicated projects).
n
Double-click an icon on the map to display the menu or play back the movie or
slideshow. Clicking the movie or slideshow while it’s playing takes you back to
the Map view.
13
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Creating a Submenu
Figure 1.16 One of my favorite features in iDVD is the
ability to drag objects from page to page, or change
the structure by dragging submenus to other menus.
n
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 1
To use a transition between menus:
1. If you’re currently within the submenu,
click the back arrow icon to return to the
previous menu. Transitions are applied to
the menu that leads to the submenu.
2. Click the submenu’s name or button to
select it.
3. Click the Inspector button to display the
floating Inspector.
4. Choose an effect from the Transition
pop-up menu (Figure 1.17).
Creating a Submenu
5. For transitions that move in more than
one direction, such as Cube, choose a
direction from the second pop-up menu
under Transition.
Figure 1.17 Choose a type of transition to play when
switching between menus.
6. Click the Preview button to see how your
transition plays when you move between
menus (Figure 1.18). (See “Previewing
the DVD,” later in this chapter.)
4Tips
n
Transitions can occur when switching
between submenus, slideshows, and movies, but not when returning up through
the hierarchy to the previous menu.
n
You can easily tell which menus include
transitions: look for a small blue circle to
the left of their icons in the Map view.
n
Complex transitions can add to the time
it takes to burn the disc.
Figure 1.18 Use the Preview mode to see how the transition plays (Mosaic Flip Small shown here).
14
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
iDVD Overview
Autoplay movie included
Figure 1.19 An icon in the upper-left
corner of a theme’s thumbnail image
indicates an Autoplay movie.
Autoplay well
Setting an Autoplay Movie
Nearly all of the commercial movie DVDs
I’ve watched lately begin with either several
screens of threatening information from
various governmental agencies, or with
some snazzy video animation or montage
that plays before the main menu appears. In
iDVD, this introductory material is known
as an Autoplay movie, and is something
you can create for your own projects. The
Autoplay movie can be either a QuickTime
movie or a slideshow. Themes with Autoplay
movies include a special icon in their thumbnails (Figure 1.19).
To set an Autoplay movie:
Figure 1.20 Drag a movie or photos to the Autoplay
well to play them before the main menu appears.
2. Drag a movie file to the Autoplay well
to set it as the Autoplay movie (Figure
1.20).
You can also drag one or more photos,
or an iPhoto album of photos, to the
well, which turns them into a slideshow.
To edit the contents of the slideshow,
double-click the well (see Chapter 4).
To delete an Autoplay movie:
u
Autoplay from iMovie ’09
The version of iDVD that ships with
iLife ’09 does have one noticeable change.
When you share a movie from iMovie ’09,
an Autoplay movie is automatically created for the project. Apple reasoned that
most people would want to make a DVD
but not edit its contents, and therefore
would rather just watch the movie right
away. You can easily remove the movie
from the Autoplay well after bringing your
iMovie project into iDVD.
Drag the contents of the Autoplay well
outside the well. The media disappears
with a poof.
4Tip
n
If you want to use an iMovie movie as the
Autoplay movie, export it as Full Quality
for the best image quality.
15
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Setting an Autoplay Movie
1. Click the Map button to switch to the
Map view. The icon in the upper-left
corner is the Autoplay well.
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 1
Previewing the DVD
Button highlight
Remote control
The menu screen provides a good represen­
tation of what your viewers will see, but some
aspects of a DVD—the way items are highlighted, for example—appear only when you
preview the DVD. Obviously, you don’t want to
have to burn a new disc to see each iteration,
which is why iDVD offers a preview mode.
Previewing the DVD
To preview the DVD:
1. Click the Preview button to enter preview
mode (Figure 1.21). A virtual DVD
remote control appears.
Using the remote, test the following
features:
s Use the arrow keys, mouse pointer,
or the arrow navigation buttons on
the virtual remote control to move
the button highlight between items
(Figure 1.22).
s Use the forward and back buttons on
the remote control to switch between
chapters while watching the video.
s Click the Menu button to exit a movie
and return to the movie’s submenu, or
click Title to return to the main menu.
2. Click the Exit button or the Stop button
(with the square icon) to leave Preview
mode.
4Tip
n
Figure 1.21 Preview mode approximates what your
viewer will see when the DVD is played.
Previous
chapter
Navigation buttons
Next
chapter
Figure 1.22 Even Apple’s virtual remote controls are
designed better than most real-world remotes.
As you’re previewing the project, pay
attention to the order in which items are
highlighted as you move the focus around
the menu. Does it act the way a viewer
would expect? Seeing the highlighting in
action reminds me to rearrange the order
of my items. This is more important when
your buttons don’t align with the theme’s
invisible grid (see Chapter 3 for more on
positioning items).
16
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
iDVD Overview
Adding DVD-ROM Data
Earlier in this chapter I mentioned that
it’s possible to create a hybrid DVD, which
contains a DVD project as well as DVD-ROM
files that can be read and copied using a
Mac or PC. iDVD provides a straightforward
(though slightly tucked away) method of
adding files and folders to the disc.
To add files and folders to the
DVD-ROM:
1. From the Advanced menu, choose Edit
DVD-ROM Contents. The DVD-ROM
Contents window appears (Figure 1.23).
Figure 1.23 The DVD-ROM Contents window is a blank
canvas where you can add files that can be accessed
by people viewing your DVD on a computer.
3. Close the window when you’re finished
adding files and folders.
To remove DVD-ROM files and folders:
1. In the DVD-ROM Contents window,
select one or more files.
2. Press the Delete key, or choose Delete
from the Edit menu.
Figure 1.24 I find it easiest to just drag files and
folders from the Finder to the DVD-ROM Contents
window.
17
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Adding DVD-ROM Data
2. Choose from the following options:
s Click the New Folder button to create
a new untitled folder.
s Click the Add Files button to bring up
an Open dialog where you can choose
files to add.
s Drag files or folders from the Finder
onto the DVD-ROM Contents window
(Figure 1.24).
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 1
Adding DVD-ROM Data
4Tips
n
When you create an iDVD slideshow,
you can choose to store copies of those
photos on the DVD-ROM ­portion of the
disc. If this option is enabled, the files
will appear in the DVD-ROM Contents
window, but they will be grayed-out and
inaccessible. You’ll need to turn off the
option labeled Add image files to DVDROM to remove the files. See Chapter 4
for more information.
n
Click and drag the files and folders in
the window to change their order in the
list. You can also move files into different
folders, nest folders, or move everything
to the same hierarchy.
n
iDVD creates links to the files you’ve
added to the DVD-ROM Contents window; it doesn’t copy the files themselves
until it’s time to burn your disc. If you add
a file or folder and then move its location on your hard disk, the item’s name
appears in red and you get a “File not
found” message when you burn the DVD.
Either move the file back to its original
location (if you know it), or delete the
reference in the DVD-ROM Contents
window and add the file again.
n
Apple recommends that you not use the
DVD-ROM feature in iDVD to create system backups of your hard disk, because
saving “more than a few thousand files
may not work.” Instead, use the disc
burning features in the Finder, or better
yet, create a backup system.
18
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
2
iDVD Themes
iDVD Themes
My wife is moderately addicted to several
home decorating shows on TV, the ones
where a designer takes over a room and the
homeowners marvel at the transformation
(okay, so maybe I’ve watched a few, too). It’s
amazing what a new window treatment and
a fresh coat of paint can do to a room.
In this chapter, I’ll cover the basics of choosing one of iDVD’s pre-made themes and
working with its integrated elements, such as
drop zones, motion menus, and editing text.
In the next chapter, I’ll get into the specifics
of customizing a theme and tailoring it to
your own tastes. Like decorating an otherwise functional room, working with iDVD
themes can add some flair to the presentation of your movie.
19
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
iDVD Themes
You might think that iDVD themes are nothing more than curtains to dress up your movies, but that would diminish the possibilities
that a DVD theme offers. A theme gives your
movie character, but more importantly, it
provides a framework for the movie and
other related media. Your DVD can contain
several movies, slideshows of digital still
photos, music, and animation.
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 2
Applying a Theme
Expansion triangle
Theme family
Theme
When you start iDVD, a theme is already
selected for you—either the first one in
iDVD’s list, or the one that was active the last
time you used the program. Applying a different theme is simply a matter of clicking on
a new one in the Themes pane. Your buttons
and submenus are retained with the look of
the new theme applied.
Themes are organized in families, so your
project can share a consistent look while
also providing variation among the menus
(Figure 2.1).
To apply a theme family:
Applying a Theme
1. Click the Themes button to display the
Themes pane, if it’s not already visible.
2. Click a theme family icon to apply the
theme to the current menu and any submenus based on it.
s If you’re working in the Standard
(4:3) aspect ratio, iDVD offers to
switch to Widescreen (16:9) mode
(Figure 2.2). Click Keep to leave the
mode unchanged (unless you want to
switch, of course).
s You may also see an Apply Theme
Family dialog confirming that you
want the theme to apply to all of the
submenus attached to the current
menu. Click OK.
After a few seconds, the theme changes in
the main window.
Figure 2.1 Click a theme in the Themes pane to apply
it to your menu.
To apply an individual theme:
1. Click the Themes button to display the
Themes pane, if it’s not already visible.
Figure 2.2 This dialog appears whenever you switch
standard aspect ratio themes. Click the Do not ask me
again checkbox to avoid it in the future.
2. Choose a theme from the list by clicking
its thumbnail image. After a few seconds,
the new theme is applied.
20
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
iDVD Themes
To apply a theme in the Map view:
1. With the Themes pane visible, click the
Map button.
2. Click the icon of the menu whose theme
you want to change.
3. Click a theme from the Themes pane to
apply the change (Figure 2.3).
Figure 2.3 Select an icon in the Map view and then
click a theme to apply it to that menu.
4. Click the Return button to exit Map view.
Before using Apply Theme to Submenus
To apply a theme to every menu in
your project:
u
In any menu screen, choose Apply Theme
to Project from the Advanced menu. Every
menu in your project now has the same
theme.
To apply a theme to submenus:
1. Navigate to a submenu that you wish to
change (the Map is a good place to do
this; click the Map button, then click the
menu you wish to view).
4Tips
Figure 2.4 When you use the Apply Theme to Sub­
menus command, all submenus are given the same
theme. Looking at the Map view, you can see how the
menus at the top use different themes. Afterwards,
they all share the same theme.
n
Click the pop-up menu in the Themes
pane to select themes from other versions
of iDVD (or choose All to view them all in
the list).
n
Feel free to mix and match themes within
a family; for example, you can use the
Extras theme in place of Chapters if you
prefer.
n
You can purchase more custom themes
from third party developers such as iDVD
ThemePAK.
21
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Applying a Theme
After using Apply Theme to Submenus
2. Choose Apply Theme to Submenus from
the Advanced menu. The theme of every
submenu in the current hierarchy is
changed (Figure 2.4).
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 2
Using Motion
Menu items are designed to do more than
display a text title or static image. DVDs
typically convey video, so why not add some
motion to the menus as well?
iDVD uses two types of motion: motion
menus, which incorporate animated backgrounds, and motion buttons, which play
movies or abbreviated photo slideshows in
place of a generic button icon or still image.
(Actually, there’s also a third type of motion,
audio, which is covered in the next chapter.)
Most of iDVD’s recent themes incorporate
motion because it brings life to menus and
makes them more than just pretty pictures.
In this section I cover motion buttons; see
“Changing the Background” in Chapter 3 for
details on using motion menus.
To activate motion:
Using Motion
u
Click the Motion button, choose Motion
from the Advanced menu, or press
­Com­mand-J. The Motion button becomes
highlighted in blue (Figure 2.5), and any
animated elements within the theme,
such as the background, drop zone, or
submenu icons, start to play.
Perform any of the above actions to turn
motion off.
4Tip
n
Turn off Motion when you’re done editing
the motion properties of your menu to
improve performance while editing other
aspects of your project.
Figure 2.5 Click the Motion button to activate the
motion elements within the menu.
The Introductory Animation
Many themes include an introductory
animation before the menu elements
appear, indicated by a shaded section
of the Motion Playhead scrubber bar
(Figure 2.6). When the total animation
finishes playing, it starts over where the
vertical bar bisects the scrubber bar. To
skip this first animation, deselect the
checkbox to the left of the scrubber bar.
Some themes also have a concluding
animation, too.
Figure 2.6 The first section of the scrubber bar is
the introductory animation, and isn’t repeated.
Controls for these animations can also be
found on the Menu Info window, marked
Intro and Outro (Figure 2.7).
Figure 2.7 The Menu Info inspector also contains
controls to enable the motion animations.
22
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
iDVD Themes
Motion buttons
Figure 2.8 The Movie slider lets you choose a s­ tarting
frame for your movie’s button icon.
Any QuickTime movie you add to your
menu is a motion button—when motion is
turned on, the movie plays within its button
icon (except for themes that use only text as
buttons, of course). Normally, the first frame
of the movie button is the first frame of the
movie itself; if you specified a poster frame
for the movie file using QuickTime Pro, that
frame is automatically set as the beginning.
You can specify a new first frame, or choose
not to play the movie at all and just use a
frame of it as a still image.
To set the starting frame:
1. Click a motion button to select it, then
click again or click and hold to display a
Movie slider above it. (Be careful not to
double-click the button, which plays the
movie.) This works whether motion is
activated or not.
To turn off movie playback for a button:
1. Click a motion button and bring up the
Movie slider.
2. Mark the Still Image checkbox.
3. Drag the slider to the frame you want to
use as the thumbnail image.
Figure 2.9 These two chapters appear in the same
movie, so I can set the top chapter’s button icon to
match the bottom one (not that I’d want to, but you
get the idea).
4Tip
n
The chapters from a GarageBandgenerated iDVD project all belong to the
full movie, so when you’re changing the
starting frame of the motion button, the
slider represents the entire movie, not
just that chapter (Figure 2.9).
23
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Using Motion
2. Drag the Movie slider to locate the frame
you wish to use as the starting point
(Figure 2.8). Click outside the button to
deselect it.
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 2
Motion duration
The Loop Duration slider in the Menu Info
window controls how long your motion
elements play before they are reset to their
starting points.
To set motion duration:
1. Click the Inspector button to view the
Menu Info window.
2. Drag the Loop Duration slider to change
the duration of the motion menu (Figure
2.10). The number to the right of the
slider represents the total time required
to play all motion elements on the menu.
4Tips
Using Motion
n
What if you don’t want any motion
when you burn your project to disc? Set
the Loop Duration to 00:00, and disable
any motion button movies, and turn off
any of a theme’s introductory or ending
animations.
n
The maximum menu duration was 30
seconds in previous versions of iDVD.
Now, it’s limited by the length of the
menu’s background movie or audio,
whichever is longest, up to 15 minutes. If
one ends before the other, it loops to keep
the motion effect going.
n
One of my biggest gripes about DVDs
is that they don’t loop cleanly, either on
my projects or commercial DVDs. The
motion menu reaches the end and pauses
briefly before starting over. However, one
feature can help: In iDVD’s preferences,
click the General icon and enable the
option labeled Fade volume out at end of
menu loop (Figure 2.11).
Figure 2.10 The Loop Duration slider controls the
amount of animation that plays before starting over.
Figure 2.11 Tired of music getting chopped off at the
end of a menu’s animation? This preference will help.
24
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
iDVD Themes
Black and yellow border appears
when media is over the drop zone.
Using Drop Zones
To add a bit of visual interest and a personal
touch to your menu, add a movie, photo,
or collection of photos to the drop zones
included with some themes.
To add a movie or photo to a drop zone:
1. Click the Media button to display the
Media pane.
2. Click the Photos or Movies button at the
top of the pane.
Figure 2.12 Drag a photo or movie from the Media
pane to a menu’s drop zone.
3. Drag a movie, a photo, or multiple
selected photos to a drop zone, indicated
by a yellow border (Figure 2.12). iDVD
adds the media to that zone.
Or
u
Drop Zone Movie Start/End
Drag to set start and end points in the drop zone.
Or
1. Click the Drop Zones Editor button to
display the editor in the preview area.
2. Drag a movie, photo, or multiple selected
photos to a drop zone placeholder.
Or
1. Control-click the drop zone and choose
Import from the contextual menu.
2. In the Open dialog that appears, locate
a movie or photo file on your hard disk,
then click the Import button.
To remove media from a drop zone:
u
Control-click the zone and choose Clear
Drop Zone Contents from the contextual
menu.
u
Drag the photo or movie out of the drop
zone and release the mouse button.
Figure 2.13 Choose which section of a drop zone
movie plays in a menu’s animation.
25
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Using Drop Zones
When you place a custom movie into a
drop zone, you can control which portion
of it plays during the menu’s animation,
just like editing the clip in iMovie. Click
the movie in the drop zone to display the
Movie Start/End control, and then drag
the markers (Figure 2.13).
Drag a movie or a photo file(s) from the
Finder to the drop zone.
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 2
Working with dynamic
drop zones
Some of the latest themes feature dynamic
drop zones: one or more drop zones animated within the theme. Individually, they
operate as normal drop zones, but you can
also control them as a group.
Figure 2.14 The Drop Zones Editor is an easier way to
add movies and photos to multiple drop zones.
To add movies or photos to dynamic
drop zones:
1. Click the Edit Drop Zones button to view
the Drop Zones editor (Figure 2.14).
2. Drag movies or photos to each drop zone.
3. Click the close button at the upper-left
corner to go back to the menu.
Or
Using Drop Zones
1. Turn off Motion, if it’s currently active,
by clicking the Motion button. (You can
leave it on if you want, but that makes it
difficult to add each media item.)
2. Drag a movie or photo to a drop zone;
each zone is numbered.
3. Advance the Motion Playhead by dragging it to the right (Figure 2.15). (If
you don’t see it, choose Show Motion
Playhead from the View menu.) The
­animation pro­gresses, revealing more
drop zones.
Figure 2.15 Drag the Motion Playhead to the right to
advance through the dynamic drop zone animation.
4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 until you’ve populated the drop zones.
26
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
iDVD Themes
To autofill drop zones:
1. Choose Autofill Drop Zones from the
Project menu, or press Command-Shift-F.
2. Click the Autofill button. iDVD collects
media that you’ve already used in the
project (such as movies added) and fills
the drop zones.
To fill a drop zone with content from
your project:
Figure 2.16 Let iDVD randomly choose content for
your drop zones.
u
If you want to let iDVD do the choosing
for you, Control-click a drop zone and
choose Fill with content (Figure 2.16).
iDVD fills it with a movie or photo from
your project.
4Tips
Consider waiting until you’ve added more
content to your project before using the
autofill feature, so that iDVD will have
plenty of media to choose from.
n
The drag-and-drop approach can be
problematic if your aim is poor: a few
pixels off and you could find yourself
replacing the menu’s background image
(see “Changing the Background” in
­Chap­ter 3). To ensure that you’re performing the action you want, press the
Command or Option key when dragging
to view a contextual menu with options
for placing the media (Figure 2.17).
n
You can opt to turn off the “Drop Zone”
text in iDVD’s General preferences by
disabling the Show drop zone labels
checkbox. If you turn it off, the words
reappear when you drag media onto the
menu area.
27
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Using Drop Zones
Figure 2.17 Press the Command or Option key before
you drop a media file to direct how it will be added.
n
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 2
Working with multiple photos
in a drop zone
When you drag multiple photos to a drop
zone, they act as a slideshow within the
zone. You can change the order in which they
appear, or add and delete photos using the
Drop Zones Editor.
To set which photo displays first:
1. Click the zone to make it editable
(Figure 2.18).
2. Drag the Photos slider that appears above
the drop zone to choose a photo. That
picture will appear first when the menu
plays with motion.
Figure 2.18 Choose a different photo to appear in the
drop zone by moving the Photos slider.
To change the order of the photos:
1. Click the zone to make it editable.
Using Drop Zones
2. Click the Edit Order button, or doubleclick the drop zone. The Drop Zone
Photos editor appears (Figure 2.19).
3. Drag the photos to change their order.
iDVD numbers each icon to indicate the
playback order.
4. Click the Return button to go back to
the menu.
To add more photos:
1. Double-click the drop zone to display the
Drop Zone Photos editor.
2. Drag more images from the Media pane
or from the Finder.
Figure 2.19 The Drop Zone Photos editor displays the
photos you’ve added to the zone and their playback
order.
3. Click the Return button to go back to
the menu.
4Tip
n
Click the view preference buttons in the
upper-right corner of the Drop Zone
Photos editor to display the photos either
as thumbnails or as a list (with filenames).
28
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
iDVD Themes
To delete photos from the drop zone:
1. In the Drop Zone Photos editor, select the
photos you wish to remove. Shift-click to
select a range of photos, or Commandclick to select non-contiguous photos
(Figure 2.20).
2. Press the Delete key or choose Delete
from the Edit menu. The pictures are
removed.
3. Click the Return button to go back to the
menu (or the drop zone list).
Figure 2.20 Images 21, 27, and 32 are selected and
ready to be deleted (or moved; see Chapter 4).
To turn off drop zones entirely:
1. Click the Inspector button to display the
Menu Info window.
2. Uncheck the option labeled Show drop
zones and related graphics (Figure 2.21).
4Tips
iDVD determines the amount of time a
photo appears depending on the number of photos you’ve included. The more
photos you add, the less time they stay
onscreen. The overall time is based on the
Loop Duration setting in the Menu Info
window (see “Using Motion,” earlier in
this chapter).
n
If you’ve already added photos in the
menu, dragging more to the drop zone
replaces the ones you have; it doesn’t add
them to the existing lineup. Use the Drop
Zone Photos editor to add more pictures.
n
It’s not possible to resize or crop photos
in a drop zone within iDVD, unfortunately. Some themes determine the size
of the media by fitting the width of the
photo or movie; others base the size on
the height.
Figure 2.21 If you’d prefer not to include any drop
zone content, disable the drop zones in the Menu Info
window.
29
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Using Drop Zones
n
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 2
Editing Text
Not all text needs to be in service of buttons
or submenus—edit and add your own text
boxes. The following steps apply to changing
the contents of text blocks; in the next chapter, I’ll cover more settings such as changing
the font and style.
To edit text:
1. Click once to select a button or title, and
then click again to select the text (Figure
2.22). Don’t double-click the button,
however, because that will either play its
movie or take you to a submenu.
Figure 2.22 Click a button twice (but don’t doubleclick) to edit its text.
2. Type your text. Hit Return or Enter to
break the line (Figure 2.23).
3. Click outside the text field to deselect it
and accept your changes.
To add new text:
Editing Text
1. Choose Add Text from the Project menu,
or press Command-K. A new text block
appears (Figure 2.24).
2. Edit the text as described above.
3. Position the text by dragging it where
you want it; unlike the default behavior
of buttons and menu titles, which snap
to an invisible grid, a new text block can
be placed anywhere on the screen. (See
the next chapter for more on positioning
buttons.)
Figure 2.23 Create multi-line text boxes by pressing
Return or Enter.
4Tip
n
If the Inspector window is visible, the
font formatting controls do not appear
beneath the text.
To delete text:
1. Click a text block once to select it.
Figure 2.24 Add text blocks that aren’t buttons or
submenus.
2. Press the Delete key, or choose Delete
from the Edit menu. The text vanishes.
30
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
iDVD Themes
TV Safe Area
Area likely to be cut off
To insert special characters:
1. Click a text block once to select it, then
click again to edit it.
2. Choose Special Characters from the Edit
menu. The Character Palette appears.
3. Select the character you want to use in
the palette.
4. Click the Insert button to add the character to your text.
4Tips
Some televisions don’t display everything
that you see in iDVD’s screen. To make
sure your text will appear, choose Show
TV Safe Area from the View menu, or
press Command-T, and position the text
and buttons within the area that’s not
shaded (Figure 2.25).
n
If you’re working in widescreen mode,
choose Show Standard Crop Area from the
View menu, or press Command-Option-T,
to see where a standard-definition television showing a full-screen image will crop
your menu (Figure 2.26).
Figure 2.25 Items placed outside the safe area may
get cropped out when played back on a television.
Standard Crop Area
Figure 2.26 The edges of widescreen projects can get
hacked off by standard-definition TVs, but it won’t
matter if you use the Standard Crop Area indicator to
position your text.
31
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Editing Text
n
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
3
Customizing iDVD Themes
Customizing
iDVD Themes
The benefit of iDVD’s approach to creating
DVD menus is that everything is already in
place; the background imagery, animation,
typefaces, and navigation structure are all
prefab. Your job is to fill in the content.
33
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Customizing iDVD Themes
While that may sound nicely organized to
some people, others see it as a collection of
limitations. Where’s the fun if everything is
spelled out for you already? This is where
iDVD’s theme customization comes into
play. It may not be as open-ended as Apple’s
professional-caliber DVD Studio Pro, but
there’s enough flexibility built in to let you
make your own personal stamp on the
menu design.
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 3
Editing Text Formatting
A hallmark of the Macintosh has been the
capability to change the appearance of text
onscreen. Sure, every computer now offers
dozens of fonts and styles, but in 1984 that
capability was a big deal. So it’s sensible that
you can change the font, alignment, and color
of your menu titles, buttons, and text blocks.
Family
Typeface
Size
Figure 3.1 Change the formatting of the menu title
or stand-alone text blocks in the Preview window.
To edit text formatting:
Editing Text Formatting
1. Click the text block you want to edit. If
the Inspector window is not visible, a set
of pop-up menus appears below the text
(Figure 3.1). If the Inspector is visible, it
becomes either the Text Info window or
the Button Info window, depending on
the text that’s selected (Figure 3.2).
Color
Shadow
2. To change the text’s font and size, use the
following pop-up menus.
s Family. Choose a font family from
this pop-up menu to change the font.
s Typeface. Choose the style of font
from this pop-up menu.
s Size. Choose a font size from this
pop-up menu.
3. With the Inspector window visible, you
can also edit the following ­attributes:
s Color. Click the Color field to display
the Colors palette and choose a new
color (Figure 3.3).
s Shadow. Drop shadows are often
overused in design, but in DVD
menus they often make the text more
readable. Click this checkbox to add a
subtle drop shadow behind the text.
Figure 3.2 The Inspector window includes font
­formatting settings, but changes depending on what’s
selected: a button (top) or a text block, such as the
menu’s title (bottom).
34
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Customizing iDVD Themes
To reset text to the theme’s default
formatting:
1. Select the text block you want to change
back to the theme’s formatting.
2. Choose Reset Object to Theme Settings
from the Advanced menu. Or, Controlclick the block and choose Reset to
Theme from the contextual menu.
4Tips
Figure 3.3 iDVD uses the Mac OS X Colors palette to
choose from the full spectrum of colors.
If you want to change the appearance of a
menu’s title, you don’t need to select anything first; the text controls in the Menu
pane apply to the title by default.
n
Hooray! In previous editions of this book,
I’ve complained that you couldn’t simply
choose a standard font size (such as 12
point), but had to rely on an inaccurate
slider. Now…you can.
n
More good news! iDVD lets you apply
formatting changes to each text block or
button label independently (Figure 3.4).
The old restrictions of applying one font
for all button labels is gone, gone, gone.
However, remember that just because you
can use all sorts of crazy fonts on your
menu doesn’t mean you should.
Figure 3.4 Could and should are two very different
terms. Restraint is an even better word.
35
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Editing Text Formatting
n
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 3
Editing Text Alignment
and Position
iDVD uses two terms for aligning text: alignment and position. Alignment refers to how
the text lines up within its allotted space, or
how button labels appear in relation to each
other. Position describes where a button’s
label appears in relation to the button’s icon
(if it’s visible).
Left
Center
Right
Figure 3.5 Choose an alignment button to specify text
alignment.
Left alignment
Title alignment
The title in each theme is bound to a specific
area by default, but you can opt to place it
anywhere within the menu. You can also
make it disappear if a title isn’t needed.
To set the title alignment:
Editing Text Alignment and Position
1. Select the menu title, or make sure nothing is selected (the settings apply to the
title if nothing else is selected).
2. In the Inspector window, click one of
the Align options: Left, Center, or Right
(Figure 3.5). The text is moved relative to the area designated for the title.
For example, choosing Center in the
Reflection White theme shifts the text to
the right of the default position; it doesn’t
move it to the center of the screen as you
might expect (Figure 3.6).
To position the text anywhere you want,
simply drag the title elsewhere on the
screen; doing so unlocks the title from
the theme’s placement grid and enables
you to drag the title anywhere onscreen
(Figure 3.7).
Center alignment
Figure 3.6 A title’s position is relative to the area
allotted by the theme, not by the overall screen.
Custom positioning
To remove the menu title:
u
Select the title and press the Delete key,
or choose Delete from the Edit menu.
Note that once a title has been deleted,
you can’t add it back to your page without using the Undo command.
Figure 3.7 You have the freedom to place the title
anywhere.
36
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Customizing iDVD Themes
Button label position
In themes where buttons include an icon,
instead of just text, the Label pop-up menu
determines where the text appears in relation
to the icon.
To set the position of button text:
1. Select a button in the menu.
Below
Center
2. In the Button Info window, choose a
­button label location from the Label
­pop-up menu (Figure 3.8).
To remove button text:
1. Click the button to select it, then click it
again to select the label’s text.
2. Press the Delete key or choose Delete
from the Edit menu.
Figure 3.8 When a button includes an icon, the
Position pop-up menu includes more options.
In themes that use only text for buttons, the
Align controls specify the text alignment of
the buttons relative to each other. (You can
also switch normal buttons to text buttons
on any theme; see “Editing Buttons” on the
next page.)
To set the alignment of button text:
1. Select a text button in the menu.
Aligned right
2. In the Button Info window, click the Left,
Center, or Right buttons to align the text
of the labels to each other (Figure 3.9).
4Tip
n
Figure 3.9 You can choose the alignment of text-only
buttons.
Some label position settings don’t work
well in some themes. For example, using
a Left Side position in some themes can
make the text run off the screen or onto
other buttons. You can move the buttons
around, however; see “Editing Buttons”
on the next page.
37
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Editing Text Alignment and Position
Aligned left
Button text alignment
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 3
Editing Buttons
Buttons are the mechanism by which your
viewers interact with the DVD. In addition to
changing the buttons’ text, you can change
their shape, location, and size, plus the highlight color.
To change the button style:
1. Select one or more buttons in the menu.
2. Click the Buttons button to view the
Buttons pane. (By the way, now I can’t
stop saying “Buttons button!”)
Figure 3.10 Change the appearance of button icons by
choosing a new style in the Buttons pane.
3. Choose a button type from the pop-up
menu (Figure 3.10).
4. Click a button style to apply it to the
selected button in the Preview window.
Editing Buttons
To reposition buttons:
u
Drag a button onto another button to
swap their locations on the grid. The
­others move out of your way as you drag.
u
Drag the button to a new location within
the menu (Figure 3.11). As you drag,
iDVD displays alignment guides to help
you line up objects.
Figure 3.11 You’re free, to do what you want, any ol’
time, by free positioning buttons.
Or
1. Select two or more buttons.
2. Control-click to bring up the contextual
menu, and choose the options on the
Align Objects and Distribute Objects
submenus (Figure 3.12).
To re-align buttons:
1. With nothing selected in the Preview
window, click the Inspector button to
bring up the Menu Info window.
2. In the Buttons area, click Snap to grid
(Figure 3.13). The menu’s buttons return
to the layout grid.
Figure 3.12 Easily align and distribute buttons from
the contextual menu.
38
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Customizing iDVD Themes
To change the button highlight color:
u
In the Buttons area of the Menu Info
­ indow, click the Highlight field and
w
choose a color from the Colors palette.
To resize buttons:
Figure 3.13 When it’s time to crack down and restore
order, click the Snap to grid button.
1. Select one or more buttons in the menu.
2. In the Button Info window, drag the
Size slider. This feature becomes useful
if you’ve added lots of buttons to your
menu and you want to prevent overlap
(Figure 3.14).
To change the appearance of
a button icon:
u
Figure 3.14 The Size slider makes button icons
smaller or larger (but not the button text).
In themes with button icons, drag a
photo or movie from the Media pane or
the Finder onto the Button info window’s
Custom thumbnail field (Figure 3.15).
You can switch back to the generic sub­
menu icon, if you want, by clicking the
icon and moving the Thumbnail slider to
the left. Or, drag the image out of the field
to remove it. Only one photo or movie can
be applied to a submenu icon—­dragging
others just replaces the previous image.
1. Select the button you want to change
back to the theme’s formatting.
2. Choose Reset Object to Theme Settings
from the Advanced menu. Or, Controlclick the block and choose Reset to
Theme from the contextual menu.
4Tip
Figure 3.15 Drag a photo or movie from the Media
pane to the Custom thumbnail field to change its icon
(this works only in themes that use icons, naturally).
n
If you decide to position your buttons
freely (without the grid), turn on the TV
Safe Area (press Command-T or choose it
from the Advanced menu) to make sure
the buttons won’t get cut off when viewed
on some television screens.
39
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Editing Buttons
To reset a button to the theme default:
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 3
Changing the Background
Menu icon
To alter a theme’s appearance dramatically,
swap the existing background image with
your own photo or movie.
To use a photo or movie
as the back­ground:
1. Click either the Inspector button to bring
up the Menu Info window or the Edit
Drop Zones button.
2. Drag a photo or movie from the Media
pane or the Finder and drop it onto the
Menu icon in either location. The background image is replaced, but the drop
zones remain (Figure 3.16).
Or
1. From the File menu, go to the Import
submenu and choose Background Video.
2. Locate a movie on your hard disk, and
click Import.
Changing the Background
Or
1. Drag a photo or movie file from the Media
pane or the Finder to the menu, but don’t
release the mouse button; be sure to
avoid stopping on a drop zone.
2. Press the Command or Option key to
bring up a contextual menu with choices
(Figure 3.17).
Figure 3.16 Adding a photo or movie to the Menu
icon in the Menu Info window (top) or the Drop Zones
Editor (bottom) makes it the theme’s background.
Figure 3.17 Press Command or Option before releasing the mouse button to choose an action.
3. Choose Replace background to use your
file as the background.
To use a photo or movie as the back­
ground with no drop zones:
1. Follow the steps above to change the
background image.
2. In the Menu Info window, deselect
Show drop zones and related graphics
(Figure 3.18).
Figure 3.18 Turn off the option to show drop zones to
use only your image or movie as the background.
40
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Customizing iDVD Themes
Click this triangle to view the Start/ End control.
To set the beginning and ending of a
background video:
1. With a video set as the background, make
the Menu Info window visible.
2. Click the small triangle above the Loop
Duration slider to display the Background
Movie Start/End control (Figure 3.19).
The triangle appears only when a video is
used as the background.
3. Drag the ends of the control to set the
start and end of the video.
To remove your background photo
or movie:
Figure 3.19 Use the almost-secret control in the Loop
Duration slider to set the start and end of your background video.
1. Switch to the Menu pane.
2. Drag the photo or movie out of the
Background well (Figure 3.20). The
theme’s default background reappears.
4Tips
For best image quality, share your background movie from iMovie at the large
setting.
n
If the movie is meant as a visual item
only, export it from iMovie with the
sound disabled, or set at a low volume.
n
If you switch to a different theme, your
background image or movie is deleted
from the project; you’ll need to re-import
it under the new theme.
n
Remember that you won’t see your movie
in action unless Motion is enabled.
n
If you remove a video from the background well, also be sure to remove the
audio that the video may have added
(see the next page).
n
Import video files you shot with a digital
still camera by locating them in the
Media pane’s Photos list.
41
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Changing the Background
Figure 3.20 Drag a photo or movie file out of the
Background well to revert to the theme’s original
background image. The image disappears in a poof of
smoke. (I’m sure the more appropriate term is “puff ”
of smoke, but this seems more like a “poof.”)
n
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 3
Setting Background Audio
Being a more visual person, I tend to forget
about audio unless it’s either (a) highly
annoying, or (b) eerily nonexistent. Some
themes include background audio, others
don’t, but you can add an audio file to any of
them to customize your menu’s sound.
To choose an audio file:
1. Switch to the Media pane, and click the
Audio button (if it’s not already active).
Your GarageBand songs and iTunes
music appear (Figure 3.21).
2. Locate the audio file you wish to use.
To help narrow your search, click one of
the playlists in the upper portion of the
window, or type a name (song or artist)
in the search box at the bottom.
3. Click the Play button if you want to preview the file. Otherwise, click the file to
select it.
Setting Background Audio
To add background audio:
u
Drag an audio file from the Media pane or
the Finder to the Audio well in the Menu
Info window (Figure 3.22).
u
Drag an audio file from the Media pane or
the Finder to the Menu icon in the Drop
Zones Editor.
u
Drag an audio file from the Media pane or
the Finder to the menu.
Figure 3.21 The Audio list in the Media pane displays
your iTunes and GarageBand songs.
Or
1. From the File menu, choose Audio from
the Import submenu.
2. Locate an audio file on your hard disk,
and click Import.
Figure 3.22 Drop a song file onto the Audio well to
use that as your background sound.
To change audio’s volume:
u
Drag the Menu Volume slider in the
Menu Info window.
42
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Customizing iDVD Themes
Protected audio file
To remove background audio:
1. Bring up the Menu Info window or the
Drop Zones Editor.
2. Drag the sound file out of the Audio well
(or Menu well in the Drop Zones Editor).
The well’s icon changes to a generic
speaker icon.
4Tips
Figure 3.23 The icon in the Audio well can tell you if
you’re using protected audio content.
To play more than one song in the background, select multiple audio files and
drag them to the Audio well together.
n
If you want the background audio turned
down, not off, use the Volume slider at
the bottom of the iDVD window. This
setting only affects the volume while you
work, not the volume of the audio when
the project is burned to disc.
n
Background audio doesn’t need to be
music. Spoken-word content or other
sound effects work just as well.
n
You can drag a QuickTime movie to the
Audio well and use only its audio track.
n
GarageBand songs need to be saved with
an iTunes preview before you can add
them to iDVD.
n
Speaking of GarageBand, that type of
audio is great for a DVD menu: you have
control over the duration of the song, and
it can loop in the background.
n
If you add a background movie, then
delete the movie from the Background
well, the audio stays. You also need to
delete the music from the Audio well.
n
iDVD recognizes when it’s using ­protected
audio files, such as older songs you bought
from the iTunes Music Store, and displays
the file’s icon (which includes a small lock
image, Figure 3.23).
43
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Setting Background Audio
n
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 3
Looping Movie Playback
Loop icon
Normally, a movie or scene plays its frames
and finishes, moving on to the next scene or
returning to the menu. However, you can opt
to loop a movie so that once started it will
replay until you intervene.
To loop a movie:
1. Click the Map button to switch to the
Map view.
2. Select a movie file.
3. Choose Loop Movie from the Advanced
menu. A loop icon appears on the movie
clip (Figure 3.24).
Figure 3.24 A loop icon in the Map view indicates that
a movie will replay once it reaches its end.
Looping Movie Playback
4Tips
n
When you loop a movie chapter that’s
part of a larger movie, all of its chapters
include the loop icon and the entire
movie loops, not an individual chapter.
n
This may be too obvious, but never loop
an AutoPlay movie. If you do, the DVD
will never proceed to the main menu.
n
Did I say never? Looping the AutoPlay
movie might be what you want if you’re
creating a video that needs to keep playing in a kiosk mode (such as for a convention booth, art installation, or other
presentation).
44
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Customizing iDVD Themes
Saving a Favorite Theme
You’ve added a new background, new music,
and tweaked the buttons and text to your
liking. If you want to keep this setting for
future projects, save it as a favorite.
To save a favorite theme:
1. Choose Save Theme as Favorite from the
File menu (Figure 3.25).
2. In the dialog that appears, type a name
for the theme (Figure 3.26).
Figure 3.25 When you’re ready to
save your theme, choose the Save
Theme as Favorite option.
3. To make the theme available for all users
on your computer, enable the Shared for
all users option.
4. If you’re changing a favorite that you’ve
already created and want to save over it,
mark the Replace existing checkbox.
5. After the theme is saved, it becomes
available in the Themes pane. Choose
Favorites or All from the pop-up menu
to view your theme (Figure 3.27).
4Tips
n
If you’ve arranged your buttons with the
Free Positioning option selected in the
Button pane, those positions become the
basis for the grid when you apply your
favorite theme to a new project.
n
If you placed a photo or movie in a
drop zone before saving the theme as a
favorite, that media becomes part of the
background image, but leaves the drop
zone open for new media.
Favorite icon
Figure 3.27 Saved themes appear in the Themes
pane’s Favorites list, and include a custom icon.
45
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Saving a Favorite Theme
Figure 3.26 Type a name for your new favorite theme,
and decide if all users of your Mac can use it.
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 3
Deleting a Favorite Theme
Creating a favorite theme is a simple operation, but iDVD offers no similarly direct
method of removing a favorite. However,
you can do it with a little poking around in
the Finder.
To delete a favorite theme:
1. Quit iDVD if it is running.
Deleting a Favorite Theme
2. In the Finder, locate iDVD’s Favorites
folder. There are two; the location of
the one you want to delete depends on
whether the theme was made available
to all users or not.
s If you enabled the Shared for all
users option, go to [Computer] >
Users > Shared > iDVD > Favorites
(Figure 3.28).
s If you did not enable Shared for
all users, go to Home > Library >
Application Support > iDVD >
Favorites (Figure 3.29).
Figure 3.28 A favorite theme shared by all users
appears in Mac OS X’s Users directory.
Figure 3.29 If the theme will be used only by you, it’s
stored within your user Library folder.
3. Select the file corresponding to the
theme you wish to delete, and drag it to
the Trash.
4. Re-launch iDVD to see that the favorite
theme is now no longer available.
46
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
4
Slideshows
Slideshows
Most of this book centers on video and all of
the wonderful things you can do with it. But
your digital lifestyle probably includes a lot
of still photos, too (either taken with a digital
still camera or your camcorder, or scanned
from paper originals).
In addition to providing a venue for your
movies, iDVD can build slideshows from
your photos, including transitions and audio,
which can be played back on DVD players.
Slideshows
47
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 4
Creating a Slideshow
The ingredients for a successful slideshow
are photos, photos, and more photos (with
perhaps a dash of audio thrown in, which I’ll
address later in the chapter).
To create a slideshow:
u
Click the Add button and choose Add
Slideshow, or choose Add Slideshow from
the Project menu (or press Command-L).
A new empty slideshow appears in the
menu (Figure 4.1).
u
Drag two or more pictures from the
Media pane or the Finder to the main
window (if you drag only one, then the
photo is used as the background image).
A new slideshow titled “My Slideshow”
is created containing those pictures.
u
Drag an iPhoto album from the Media
pane to the main window (Figure 4.2).
The slideshow that is created takes the
name of the album.
Figure 4.1 When you create an empty slideshow,
it appears as a new ­button in the menu.
Creating a Slideshow
To set the slideshow icon:
1. Click a slideshow to select it. A Thumb­
nail slider appears. If the Inspector is
visible, the slider is located in the Button
Info window. (This feature works only in
themes where buttons include icons.)
Figure 4.2 Drag an iPhoto album from the Media
pane to the menu to create a slideshow containing
all of the album’s pictures.
2. Drag the Thumbnail slider to choose one
of the slideshow’s photos (Figure 4.3).
3. Click outside the icon to deselect it and
apply the change.
To delete a slideshow:
u
If you want to remove a slideshow, click
its button in the main window and
press Delete or choose Delete from the
Edit menu.
Figure 4.3 The Thumbnail slider lets you pick
a photo to use as the button’s icon.
48
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Slideshows
4Tips
Figure 4.4 When you add photos to the AutoPlay well,
the slideshow begins when the disc starts playing.
iDVD now has the capability to include
movies in a slideshow. Simply drag one to
the Slideshow Editor (see the next page).
n
You can also drag photos or albums
directly from the iPhoto application to
iDVD’s menu to create a new slideshow.
That applies to folders containing images
in the Finder, too.
n
Use the left or right arrow key to view
the slideshow icon photos one by one, or
if you don’t want to drag the slider with
the mouse.
n
If you want a slideshow to start as soon
as you insert a DVD into a player, switch
to the Map view and drag your photos to
the AutoPlay well (Figure 4.4). Doubleclicking the well with photos added brings
up the AutoPlay Slideshow editor, which
features the same options described
throughout the rest of this chapter.
n
To ensure that your photos display correctly in iDVD, crop them first in iPhoto.
Select the photo and click the Edit button
to enter Edit mode, then click the Crop
button. Choose 4 x 3 (DVD) from the
Constrain pop-up menu (Figure 4.5). If
your project is widescreen, choose 16 x 9
(HD). Move or resize the selection box so
that the image appears as you’d like it to,
then click the Apply button. When you
bring it into iDVD, it will have the proper
size ratio.
n
An iDVD slideshow displays its photos
as static images. If you want to add some
movement to them, use the Ken Burns
Effect in iMovie or iPhoto and create a
movie that contains just the photos you’d
use in a slideshow. Then, import that
movie file as a regular movie. (It’s not
actually a slideshow in iDVD’s eyes, but
you get the same overall effect.)
Figure 4.5 Crop photos in iPhoto to the 4 x 3 (DVD)
constraint before importing them into iDVD.
iDVD as Presenter
You can use an iDVD slideshow as a
presentation tool. Create your presentation in Keynote or PowerPoint, then save
each slide as a PDF file. Import those files
into iDVD as a slideshow. This puts your
presentation on the same disc as other
multimedia materials (videos, etc.), which
can be played back on any DVD player, not
just a computer. At the very least, you’ll
have a backup of your presentation in case
your original file is lost or damaged.
49
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Creating a Slideshow
n
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 4
Setting Slideshow Options
Now that you’ve created a slideshow, use the
Slideshow editor to change several settings
that pertain to how long each photo appears,
whether the slideshow repeats, and more.
To enter the Slideshow editor:
u
Double-click a slideshow in the menu
(or in the Map view) to bring up the
Slideshow editor (Figure 4.6).
To set the slide duration:
Setting Slideshow Options
u
Choose a time from the Slide Duration
pop-up menu to specify how long each
photo remains onscreen before loading
the next one (Figure 4.7).
If you’ve included background audio in
your slideshow (see “Adding Background
Audio,” later in this chapter), you can also
choose Fit To Audio, which divides the
total audio playing time by the number of photos to come up with an equal
display time for each photo (for example,
a slideshow of five photos that contains
60 seconds of audio would display each
picture for 12 seconds).
The last option, Manual, requires the
viewer to advance the frames using the
DVD player’s controls. Manual is not
available if you add background audio.
Figure 4.6 The Slideshow editor contains the options
you need to control your slideshow.
Figure 4.7 The Slide Duration pop-up
menu controls how long a photo appears
onscreen before advancing.
To set the transition style:
u
Choose a transition type from the Tran­
sition pop-up menu (Figure 4.8). As
with transitions between menus (see
Chapter 1), this setting applies only when
you’re advancing to the next slide; if you
switch to the previous image, no transition occurs.
For transitions that can operate in different directions, such as Cube, click
a directional arrow to the right of the
­pop-up menu.
Figure 4.8 Click the Transition pop-up
menu to choose an effect that plays each
time the slide advances.
50
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Slideshows
If you don’t
see titles and
comments,
enable them in
iDVD’s Slideshow
preferences.
To edit titles and comments:
u
iDVD copies each photo’s title and comments from iPhoto. If you plan to make
these visible, click the title or comment
area below a photo and type your title
and comments (Figure 4.9).
To apply miscellaneous settings:
Figure 4.9 Click to type a title
and comment for the slide.
Figure 4.10 The Settings dialog provides a few
­miscellaneous options.
2. Enable or disable the following options:
s Loop slideshow makes the show
repeat once it reaches the last photo.
Your viewers will need to return to the
menu using their player’s controls.
s Display navigation arrows shows a
pair of arrows onscreen that indicate
more photos are available before and
after the current one (Figure 4.11).
These arrows are just decoration; they
aren’t buttons that can be clicked to
advance the slideshow.
s Add image files to DVD-ROM
includes copies of the image files on
the disc so that anyone with a computer can access them (see “Adding
DVD-ROM Data” in Chapter 1).
s Show titles and comments displays
the photos’ text in the Slideshow editor and during the slideshow.
s Duck audio while playing movies
reduces the volume of background
music. If your slideshow contains a
movie file, the last option reduces the
volume of background music so it
doesn’t compete with the audio from
the movie.
51
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Setting Slideshow Options
Figure 4.11 The navigation arrows that appear are
strictly visual aids. Clicking them serves only to make
your index finger sore.
1. Click the Settings button to display the
Settings dialog (Figure 4.10).
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 4
To preview the slideshow:
u
With the Slideshow editor open, click the
Preview button. You can also go back to
the menu, preview the project from there,
and then click the slideshow’s icon, but
previewing from within the Slideshow
editor is easier.
To remove photos from a slideshow:
1. Select one or more photos in the
Slideshow editor.
2. Press Delete, or choose Delete from the
Edit menu.
Figure 4.12 Images are usually scaled to fit within the
TV Safe Area, but you can turn off this option. Compare
this example with the same slide on the previous page.
To exit the Slideshow editor:
u
Click the Return button to go back to
the menu.
List style buttons
4Tips
n
Setting Slideshow Options
n
n
You can choose to always include highresolution slideshow photos on the DVDROM portion of your disc. Open iDVD’s
preferences, click the Slideshow icon, and
enable Always add original slideshow
photos to DVD-ROM contents.
Does a thick black band appear around
your photos when you preview the slide­
show? iDVD shrinks the images to fit
within the TV Safe Area. To turn off this
feature (if you’re going to view the DVD
on a computer, for example), open iDVD’s
preferences and click the Slideshow icon.
Then, disable the option marked Always
scale slides to TV Safe Area (Figure 4.12).
Click the list style buttons at the upperright corner of the Slideshow editor to
switch between viewing just thumbnails
of your images and viewing them in a list
with filenames and comments displayed
(Figure 4.13).
Figure 4.13 Photos can be viewed in a list, too.
A Pointer about Pointers
When you add a photo from the Media
pane, iDVD creates a pointer to the photo’s
original image file; it doesn’t store a new
copy. So, if you add a photo to your slideshow, and then edit it in iPhoto later (such
as cropping it or converting it to black and
white), the edited version appears in your
slideshow.
This also explains why, if you edit a photo
in iPhoto, that picture’s thumbnail image
isn’t updated in your slideshow, even if the
correct version appears when you preview
the slideshow. iDVD creates a thumbnail
image of the photo when it’s added to the
slideshow.
52
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Slideshows
Adding Photos
I never seem to hit upon the right combination of photos when I create a slideshow—
there’s always one (or two, or twenty) more
that really must go in. iDVD has a limit of
9,801 photos—but it’s hard to really call that
a limit.
To add photos to the slideshow:
1. Double-click a slideshow to enter the
Slideshow editor (if it’s not already open).
Figure 4.14 Add one or more photos from the Media
pane by dragging them to the Slideshow editor.
2. Drag one or more image files from
the Media pane or the Finder to the
Slideshow editor (Figure 4.14).
To rearrange photos:
u
Figure 4.15 Drag one or more photos to a new
­location in the Slideshow editor to rearrange them.
Before slides arranged
4Tips
Don’t drag new photos to the slideshow’s
icon in the menu—they’ll change the
icon, but won’t be added to the slideshow. (See “Using Motion” in Chapter 2.)
Make sure you’re adding them to the
Slideshow editor.
n
Rearranging the order of the photos
changes the preview icon for your slideshow in the menu (Figure 4.16). For
example, if the icon is photo number 2
and you move another picture into the
number 2 position in the Slideshow editor, the latter photo appears as the icon
when you return to the menu.
n
You can add multiple copies of the same
photo to a slideshow, in the event that
you want an image to repeat later.
53
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Adding Photos
n
After slides arranged
Figure 4.16 The slideshow icon is based on the photo
positions within the slideshow. If you’ve chosen the
photo in the number 2 position as the icon (left), and
then move a different photo to that position, the new
photo becomes the icon (right).
Drag one or more images to a new location within the Slideshow editor. The
other images are re-ordered to accommodate the change (Figure 4.15).
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 4
Adding Background Audio
Just as audio can play in the background of a
menu, slideshows can include audio, too.
To add background audio:
1. Double-click a slideshow to enter the
Slideshow editor (if it’s not already open).
2. Drag one or more audio files, or an iTunes
playlist, from the Media pane to the
Audio well (Figure 4.17). You can also
drag audio files from the Finder.
When you add audio to the well, the Slide
Duration pop-up menu automatically
switches to Fit To Audio, which divides
the total audio playing time by the number of photos to come up with an equal
display time for each photo.
Figure 4.17 Drag one or more songs from the Media
pane to the Audio well to add background audio.
To set the audio volume:
u
Drag the Slideshow volume slider to
control how loud or soft your background
music plays (Figure 4.18).
To remove background audio:
Adding Background Audio
u
In the Slideshow editor, drag the music
file out of the Audio well. A gray speaker
icon indicates that no audio is set.
Figure 4.18 iDVD assumes you want softer music
behind your slideshow, and sets the Slideshow
­volume slider to half the maximum volume.
4Tips
n
n
You can also drag QuickTime movies to
the Audio well; iDVD ignores the video
track and plays the audio.
Need some visual entertainment in the
background at your next party (gotta
use that obnoxiously huge widescreen
television for something, right)? Load up
a slideshow with your favorite images and
drag an iTunes playlist to the Audio well.
If it’s an exceptionally long party, enable
the Loop slideshow option. Burn the disc,
pop it into your DVD player, and then go
mix some martinis!
Keep ’Em Entertained
Remember when I advised you to trim
your footage in iMovie so that your audience wouldn’t get bored? The same applies
to slideshows. I know, it’s so easy to just
drag virtual stacks of photos to iDVD—
there’s plenty of space on the disc, and it’s
quicker than sorting through them. Resist
that urge: Add only the good shots and
don’t flirt with the limits of your viewers’
attentions.
54
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
5
Archiving, Encoding, and Burning
Archiving,
Encoding,
and Burning
True to form, the process of burning a disc is
simple: click the glowing Burn button, insert
a recordable DVD disc (DVD-R, DVD-RW,
DVD+R, or DVD+RW), and go outside to
enjoy the sunshine for a few hours. But getting to that point, while not difficult, involves
a few choices that determine the amount of
data that can be stored on the disc and the
quality of the finished project.
Déja Vu
This chapter is identical to Chapter 20
in the iMovie ’09 & iDVD for Mac OS X:
Visual QuickStart Guide print book.
Although that book doesn’t go into as
much detail about iDVD as this addendum, I wanted the information available
for people who just want to burn a DVD
after editing a movie in iMovie.
55
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Archiving, Encoding, and Burning
iMovie’s purpose is to create a movie, which
can be published to a Web page, sent to an
iPod or Apple TV, or distributed in other
ways. iDVD’s purpose, however, is to create a
project that can be burned to a DVD disc. It
contains high-quality video and audio that
will play on a consumer DVD player. Without
the disc-burning step, iDVD is pretty much
just an interesting exercise in customizing a
user interface.
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 5
Creating a Project Archive
Creating a Project Archive
Burning a DVD takes a lot of hard disk space
and processing power. Some people choose
to build a project using one Mac (such as a
laptop), and then burn the DVD on another
computer (such as a desktop Mac, which
boasts a faster processor). Or, perhaps your
Mac doesn’t include a SuperDrive. In these
situations, create an archive of your project
that can be copied to another machine.
If you’re planning to burn a disc on your
computer but don’t need an archive, skip
ahead to “Choosing an Encoding Setting.”
Figure 5.1 When you save your project as an archive,
the Save As dialog contains archive-specific options.
To create a project archive:
1. Choose Archive Project from the File
menu. If your project isn’t saved, iDVD
asks you to save it. To continue, click
OK in the dialog that appears; otherwise,
click Cancel.
2. In the Save As dialog that appears, choose
a location for the archive and, optionally,
change its name (Figure 5.1).
3. Enable or disable the following options.
The estimated size of the archive appears
to the right and changes based on your
choices.
s Include themes. If your project
uses themes that aren’t likely to
be on another computer (such as
third-party themes you purchased, or
favorite themes you designed), enable
this option to copy the necessary
information to the archive. If you leave
this disabled, but your project contains custom elements, an error dialog
appears on the other computer when
you open the archive (Figure 5.2).
Figure 5.2 Choose Include themes when saving an
archive to avoid an error dialog like this one.
External Burners
For most of iDVD’s existence, the only
official way to burn a DVD was to do it on
a Mac that contained an Apple-supplied
internal SuperDrive. Now, at long last,
that restriction is history: you can burn to
external DVD burners directly from iDVD.
56
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Archiving, Encoding, and Burning
s
Figure 5.3 If you have protected audio files in your
project, you need to authorize the computer with
your iTunes Music Store ID and password.
Include encoded files. iDVD can
encode material in the background,
which reduces the time it takes to
burn the disc (see “Choosing an
Encoding Setting” on the next page).
Including these files means it will
take less time to burn the project on
another machine, but it also makes
the archive size larger.
4. Click Save. After a few minutes, depending on the size of your project, a new
archive file is created.
n
An archive contains all the data your
project needs—except fonts. If your
project contains a font that may not be
on the computer to which you’re sending
the archive, be sure to also send a copy of
the font.
n
If you’ve included any protected audio
files (such as older songs purchased from
the iTunes Music Store) in your archive,
you won’t be able to open the project on
another computer unless that machine
is authorized by you. A warning dialog
appears (Figure 5.3), and then opens
iTunes so you can input your iTunes
Music Store identification and password.
n
So why not just copy the project file? To
save disk space while you’re working,
iDVD includes pointers to the media
and other data in your project, not the
data itself. Copying just the project file to
another machine wouldn’t include that
information. An archive packs it all into
a nice tidy package (Figure 5.4).
57
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Creating a Project Archive
4Tips
Figure 5.4 An archive is significantly larger than an
iDVD project file because it stores all of the media,
rather than including just pointers to the data.
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 5
Choosing an
Encoding Setting
iDVD employs three encoding methods: Best
Performance, High Quality, and Professional
Quality.
To choose an encoding setting for the
current project:
Choosing an Encoding Setting
1. Choose Project Info from the Project
menu or press Command-I.
Figure 5.5 The encoding options are located in the
Project Info window, as well as in iDVD’s preferences.
2. Choose an option from the Encoding
pop-up menu (Figure 5.5).
To choose an encoding setting for new
projects:
1. Open iDVD’s preferences and click the
Projects icon.
2. For the Encoding setting, click the radio
button beside the type of encoding you
wish to use.
Best Performance
Best Performance provides up to 60 minutes
of video and shorter burn times than High
Quality. iDVD encodes the video while it’s
running, whether you’re doing something
else in iDVD or working in another program
(Figure 5.6).
High Quality
If your project exceeds 60 minutes, or you
want to make sure you’re getting a higher
quality encoding than Best Performance, use
the High Quality mode. After you start the
burn process, iDVD examines the video to
determine where it can apply different levels
of compression (a process called Variable
Bitrate, or VBR, encoding).
Figure 5.6 With the Best Performance setting
enabled, iDVD encodes movies in the background.
The Project Info window reports on the progress.
High Quality
Professional Quality
Figure 5.7 Professional Quality projects tend to
­produce richer color fidelity.
Encoding and Burn Times
To give you a rough idea of how long
it takes for iDVD to encode projects
using the encoding settings, here are the
results of burning a two-hour project on a
2.4 GHz iMac.
High Quality: 1 hour 15 minutes.
Professional Quality: 3 hours 52 minutes.
58
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Archiving, Encoding, and Burning
High Quality
Best Performance
Professional Quality
Professional Quality uses the same encoding algorithms found in Apple’s pro-level
applications. Like High Quality, it uses VBR,
but it takes two passes through the footage
to optimize the compression. Professional
Quality projects tend to feature richer colors
and better reproduction than High Quality
projects (Figure 5.7).
4Tips
If you’re using Best Performance, wait
until the assets are finished encoding in
the Project Info window before you burn.
n
High and Professional Quality do not
encode video in the background the way
Best Performance does. Instead, they
perform calculations during the burning
phase. So, don’t stare at the Encoding
area waiting for the encoding to finish,
because it hasn’t started.
n
As projects get longer than 60 minutes,
their image quality is more likely to
decrease due to the additional compression that needs to be applied. If higher
image quality is important to you, try not
to skirt that two-hour border with your
project sizes (Figure 5.8).
n
After you burn a project using High or
Professional Quality, iDVD holds onto the
files it encoded. However, if you remove
any assets from the project and want to
burn it again, be sure to first choose Delete
Encoded Assets from the Advanced menu
to force iDVD to re-scan the footage and
choose the best compression settings.
n
The Capacity figure in the Project Info
window is based on the type of encoding
you’ve specified. If iDVD is set to use Best
Performance but the capacity exceeds
4.2 GB, switch to High or Professional
Quality—iDVD changes its estimate.
Best Performance
Figure 5.8 These examples come from a 118-minute
project (High Quality) and the same footage in a
48-minute project (Best Performance). More motion
and noise gets more compression (top), resulting in
pixelation around the trees (detail). However, when
there is less motion, the two encoding styles look
very much alike (bottom, with detail).
59
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Choosing an Encoding Setting
High Quality
n
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 5
Burning the DVD
Before you click the Burn button, make sure
you have enough hard disk space available: at
least twice the amount the project occupies.
You can view your project’s size and the free
space on the hard disk that contains your
project by choosing Project Info from the
Project menu.
Figure 5.9 In the Project Info window, change the name
of the disc when it’s inserted in a computer.
To change the name of the burned disc:
Burning the DVD
1. Choose Project Info from the Project
menu, or press Command-I. The Project
Info window appears (Figure 5.9).
2. Type a new name in the Disc Name field.
After the disc is burned, this name is
used when the DVD is mounted on a
­computer’s desktop.
Figure 5.10 Use the Project Info window to locate
­missing assets.
3. Close the window to apply the change.
To locate a missing asset:
1. Choose Project Info from the Project
menu, or press Command-I to display the
Project Info window.
2. Scroll through the asset list to find entries
with a zero (0) in the Status column
(Figure 5.10).
3. Double-click the missing asset to bring
up the Missing Files dialog.
4. Select a file in the dialog and click the
Find File button.
5. Locate the file and press OK. The Status
column displays a checkmark. Note that
for missing imported videos, you need to
re-link the video and audio portions (just
point to the same file).
6. Click OK to exit the dialog.
How to Fix Missing Assets
The Project Info dialog tracks everything
you’ve added to the project, even assets
that you’ve deleted. If the file cannot be
found, iDVD will not proceed when the
time comes to burn.
I learned this the hard way when I drag­
ged a JPEG image file to a menu background, decided it didn’t look good, and
then deleted it from the Background well
in the Menu pane. Since the image no
longer appeared in the project, I deleted
it from my hard disk.
There are two solutions:
u
Double-click the item in the Project
Info window and choose another
image.
u
Go to the Map view and delete the
asset entirely.
60
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Archiving, Encoding, and Burning
Normal
Activated
Figure 5.11 You need to click the Burn
button only once to start the process
(some earlier versions required two
clicks). So, really, there’s no good
reason to hide the button behind the
safety iris—except that it’s cool.
Figure 5.12 If errors are found before burning, iDVD
gives you the opportunity to fix or ignore them.
Figure 5.13 The disc burning process goes through
five stages of encoding and writing data to disc. The
small preview helps you determine how far along the
process has advanced.
1. Click the Burn button; the iris reveals the
glowing Burn button that’s been hiding
under iDVD’s interface (Figure 5.11).
If any assets are missing, iDVD displays
a warning dialog (Figure 5.12). The
Map view also displays potential burn
problems.
(The “closed” Burn button is like the
bright red safety cover that’s always
mounted over The Big Important
Button—the one that launches the missiles, opens the airlocks, or initiates the
self-destruct sequence that destroys the
villian’s secret underground lair in all
those movies.)
Otherwise, the program asks you to insert
a blank recordable DVD.
2. A progress dialog appears that identifies
the stages of the process (Figure 5.13):
s Stage 1: Prepare. iDVD ensures that
it has everything it needs to continue
burning.
s Stage 2: Process Menus. Buttons,
motion menus, and other menu
interface elements are rendered and
encoded.
s Stage 3: Process Slideshows.
Slideshow photos are resized and
compressed as needed. If you’ve specified slideshow transitions, they are
rendered separately during this stage.
s Stage 4: Process Movies. Depending
on which encoding method you’ve
chosen, this stage usually takes the
longest.
s Stage 5: Burn. The footage is multiplexed, which combines the audio and
video data into a single stream that
can be read by DVD players. Burning
is when the laser actually etches your
data into the surface of the disc.
61
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Burning the DVD
In the Map view, ­position
your mouse pointer over
a warning icon to locate
potential burn problems.
To burn the DVD:
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 5
Burning the DVD
4Tips
n
If you’ve specified Best Performance, wait
for asset encoding to finish before starting the burn process.
n
Remember that the total space occupied
on the disc includes motion menus, slideshows, etc. So if your movie is 56 minutes
long, you may still get an error message
that the project is too big.
n
Earlier versions of iDVD required you
to enable the Motion button to include
motion on the disc, but iDVD now renders the motion elements whether the
Motion button is highlighted or not. To
burn a project with no motion, set the
Loop Duration slider in the Menu Info
window to zero (00:00).
n
I frequently burn test copies of a project
to a rewriteable DVD-RW disc, so I’m not
throwing away a bunch of shiny platters.
When you insert such a disc that already
has data on it, iDVD gives you the option
to erase it before continuing with the
burn process (Figure 5.14).
n
Including transitions between menus or
within slideshows adds time to the burning process.
n
Did you create a widescreen movie in
iMovie, but it’s not appearing as widescreen in your DVD player? Check to
see if the player has a 16:9 or letterbox
feature. Some models (such as mine
at home) play the movie full frame if it
doesn’t detect a flag on the disc instructing it to letterbox the picture.
n
Wondering at what speed your Super­
Drive is burning the disc? The answer is
found in Mac OS X’s console.log file. After
you burn a project, open the file, located
at [Computer]/Library/Logs/Console/.
Figure 5.14 If you insert a rewriteable disc that ­contains
data, iDVD can erase it during the burn stage.
62
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Archiving, Encoding, and Burning
Saving as a Disc Image
Until iDVD 5, you needed to own a Mac with
an Apple-supplied SuperDrive to burn iDVD
projects. It wouldn’t work with third-party
external burners.
Figure 5.15 “Burn” a disc image to
your hard drive.
To save as a disc image:
1. Instead of clicking the Burn button,
choose Save As Disc Image from the
File menu, or press Command-Shift-R
(Figure 5.15).
2. Choose a location on your hard disk to
save the disc image; make sure you have
plenty of free space.
3. Click the Save button. iDVD follows the
same procedure as when it burns a disc.
To burn a DVD from a disc image:
Figure 5.16 Drag a disc image to Disk Utility to burn its
contents to a DVD.
Save as VIDEO_TS Folder
If you just want to test the quality of the
encoded material on the same machine,
choose Save as VIDEO_TS folder from
the File menu. This option does the same
work as creating a disc image, but the files
are just stored in a folder (and therefore
are not as transportable). Point DVD
Player at that folder to watch the “disc.”
1. Launch Disk Utility (located in Applica­
tions > Utilities).
2. Drag the disc image from the Finder to
the left-hand column (Figure 5.16); or,
choose Open from the Images menu.
3. Select the disc image in Disk Utility and
click the Burn button.
4. Insert a recordable disc.
To play a disc image using DVD Player:
1. Double-click the disc image to mount the
disc as if it were a physical DVD.
2. Launch the DVD Player application.
63
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Saving as a Disc Image
Now, that restriction is gone. However, there
are still occasions when you want to save
the project as a disc image, which effectively
“burns” your project to the hard drive. For
example, you may want to burn a DVD from
that disc image on another computer, or
mount the image on your desktop and preview the final project using the DVD Player
application.
iDVD Addendum—Chapter 5
After the Burn
When the burning process is complete, iDVD
spits out the DVD disc and asks if you’d like
to make another copy (Figure 5.17). If so,
insert a new disc; otherwise, click Done.
Here are a few other suggested things to do
while you’re in your cooling down period.
Figure 5.17 If you’re creating multiple copies of the
same disc, burn them in succession so you don’t have
to go through the encoding stage each time.
After the Burn
Test your project
Just because you have a shiny disc in hand
doesn’t guarantee that it works. Test it on
your own machine using DVD Player. Test it
on friends’ Macs and PCs, and insert it into
your consumer DVD player. Test, test, test,
or you may find yourself singing, “To every
season, burn, burn, burn…”
Delete encoded assets
If you don’t need to burn another disc, you
can free up some hard disk space by deleting the project’s encoded assets, which are
stored in the project file.
Create an archive of the project for offline
storage to make sure you have all of the
original footage.
To delete encoded assets:
u
From the Advanced menu, choose Delete
Encoded Assets.
Make duplicates
If you want to make copies of the DVD without going through the iDVD burning process,
use Disk Utility or other software such as
Roxio’s Toast (www.roxio.com).
64
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
i
Index
Index
A
B
background
audio, adding, 42
changing, 40–41
backups, 18
Best Performance encoding, 58, 62
65
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Index
Add Chapter Marker button, 11
alignment
of buttons, 38
of text, 36–37
of titles, setting, 36
animation, 9, 15, 22, 24
Apple, virtual remote controls, 16
Apply Theme Family dialog, 20
archiving projects, 56–57
aspect ratios, applying themes and, 20
assets, missing, 60
audio backgrounds
setting, 42–43
in slideshows, 54
autofilling drop zones, 27
autoplay
Autoplay movies, setting, 15
of slideshows, 49
Index
Index
Blu-ray, 3
Burn button, 9, 55, 61
burning DVDs
basics of, 55, 60–62
burn times when encoding, 58
from disc images, 63
disc name, changing, 60
duplicating, 64
encoded assets and, 64
to hard drives (saving as disc
images), 63
missing assets, fixing, 60
on other computers, 5
saving as VIDEO_TS folders, 63
testing of, 64
buttons
alignment, 38
color, 39
basics of, 9
editing, 37, 38–39
editing text and, 30
icons, changing appearance, 39
label position, 37
position, 38
resetting to theme default, 39
size, 39
style, 38
text, 37
Buttons button, 38
C
CDs vs. DVDs, 4
chapter markers, 11
characters, special, 31
color
button highlight color, 39
Mac OS X Colors palette, 35
compression
encoding settings and, 58, 59
MPEG-2 compression, 3
controls
main controls, 9
virtual remote controls, 16
Create New Project button, 10
cropping, widescreen mode, 31
D
data, OneStep DVD data location, 6
defaults
buttons, resetting, 39
changing text formatting, 35
deleting
accidentally from hard disk, 60
Autoplay movies, 15
background audio, 49, 54
background photos or movies, 41
button text, 37
DVD-ROM files and folders, 17
encoded assets, 64
favorite themes, 46
media from drop zones, 25
menu titles, 36
photos from drop zones, 29
photos from slideshows, 52
slideshows, 48
submenus, 13
text blocks, 30
direction of transitions, 50
Disk Utility, 64
Drop Zones Editor, 25, 28, 40, 43
Drop Zone Photos editor, 28, 29
drop zones, 25–29
autofill, 27
dynamic, 26
media, removing from, 25
66
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Index
E
Edit Drop Zones button, 9, 26, 40
editing audio, volume, 42, 54
editing background video, setting
beginning and end, 41
encoding
Best Performance encoding, 58, 62
burn times when encoding, 58
encoded assets, 64
High Quality encoding, 58, 59
Professional Quality encoding, 58, 59
projects, 58–59
settings, 58, 59
external drives, as storage, 5
F
favorites (themes)
deleting, 46
saving, 45
files
deleting DVD-ROM files, 17
project files, 5
protected audio files, 43, 56, 57
Final Cut, creating projects from, 11
Find File, 5
fonts, changing, 34
footage, importing to projects, 10
formats modes, switching, 8
Index
movies or photos, adding to, 25, 26
multiple photos in, 28
photos, deleting from, 29
photos and movies as background
and, 40
saving favorites and, 45
duplicating DVDs, 64
duration
of motion, 24
of slides in slideshows, 50
DVD players
playing disc image on, 63
testing projects on, 64
widescreen movies not playing on, 62
DVD+R, 4, 55
DVD+RW, 4, 55
DVD-R, 4, 55
DVD-ROM, 4, 17–18, 51, 52
DVD-RW, 4, 55, 62
DVDs
Autoplay movies, 15
vs. CDs, 4
changing names on, 60
creating multiple, 64
formats of, 4
logical structure of, 4
OneStep DVD, 6
overview of, 4
previewing, 16
saving as disc images, 63
DVD-Video, 4
dynamic drop zones, 26
G
GarageBand, DVD menus and, 43
H
hard disk space
amount needed for projects, 5
archiving and, 56
freeing up, 64
requirements for iDVD, 56
HD (high definition) format, 3
High Quality encoding, 58, 59
Hybrid DVDs, 4, 17
67
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Index
I
icons
button icons, changing, 39
slideshow icons, 48, 53
iDVD
vs. iMovie, purposes of, 55
overview, 3
iDVD ThemePAK, 21
iMovie vs. iDVD, purposes of, 55
Inspector button, 9, 14
interface, 8–9
iPhoto, photos for slideshows
from, 48, 49, 52
iTunes, protected audio files and, 57
K
Index
Ken Burns effect for slideshows, 49
L
Loop Duration setting, 24, 29
looping
DVDs, 24
movies, 44
slideshows, 51
menus,
applying themes to, 21
motion menus, 9, 22, 24
processing, 61
text, editing, 34–36
transitions between, 14
use of term, 8
missing assets, fixing, 60
motion
duration of, 24
in themes, 22–24
Motion button, 9, 22, 26
motion buttons, 22
motion menus, 22
movies
adding to drop zones, 25
adding to dynamic drop zones, 26
in slideshows, 49
using as background, 40
MPEG-2 compression, 3
music for slideshows, 7
N
naming themes, 45
NTSC, switching with PAL, 5
M
O
Mac
burning DVDs and, 56
iDVD on non-SuperDrive Macs, 5
project files and, 5
Mac OS X, Colors palette, 35
Magic iDVD, 7
Map button, 9, 12, 15
Map view, 12, 13, 21, 44
media files
dropping, 27
moving projects and, 5
OneStep DVD, 6
P
PAL, switching with NTSC, 5
photos
drop zones and, 25–26, 28
slideshows and, 49, 52, 53
using as background, 40
Photos button, 7
Play Movie button, 12
68
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Index
Q
QuickTime, importing movies and, 10
R
recording formats
DVDs, 4
NTSC vs. PAL, 5
Roxio’s Toast, 64
S
Save dialog, 56
saving
DVDs as disc images, 63
DVDs as VIDEO_TS folders, 63
favorites (themes), 45
Settings dialog, 51
shadows, drop shadows, 34
size
of buttons, 39
of fonts (themes), 34
slideshows, 47–54
background audio, 54
creating, 18, 48–49
miscellaneous settings, 51
photos, adding, 53
photos, removing from, 52
pointers, 52
previewing, 52
slide duration, 50
Slideshow Editor, 50, 52
titles and comments, editing, 51
transition style, 50
using Magic iDVD, 7
special characters, 31
speed
of disc burning, 62
of DVD discs, 5
Standard Crop area, 31
submenus, 9, 12–14, 21
SuperDrives, 4, 5, 62
Index
position of buttons (themes), 38
position of text (themes), 36–37
presentations, 49
Preview button, 9, 14, 16
previewing
DVDs, 16
slideshows, 52
Professional Quality encoding, 58, 59
Project Info dialog, 60
projects,
archiving, 56–57
basics of, 5
creating new, 10–11
encoding, 58–59
hard drive space needed for, 5
Magic iDVD, 7
OneStep DVD, 7
projects, testing DVD burning, 64
protected audio files
archiving projects and, 56
themes and, 43
iTunes and, 57
T
text (themes)
alignment and position,
editing, 36–37
boxes, adding/deleting/editing, 30–31
text formatting, editing, 34–35
Theme button, 20
themes
applying, 20–21
archiving projects and, 56
background, changing, 40–41
69
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Index
Index
themes (continued)
background audio, setting, 42–43
buttons, editing, 38–39
defined, 9
deleting favorites, 46
drop zones, 25–29
iDVD ThemePAK, 21
looping playback, 44
motion, 22–24
saving favorites, 45
text, editing, 30–31
text alignment and position,
editing, 36–37
text formatting, editing, 34–35
times, encoding and burn times, 58
titles
alignment of, setting, 36
in slideshows, 51
Toast, 64
transitions
between menus, 14
transition style (slideshows), 50
troubleshooting widescreen, 62
TV Safe Area, 52
V
video clips, setting beginning
and end, 41
VIDEO_TS folders, 63
virtual remote controls, 16
volume
background volume (themes) 42, 43
background volume (slideshows), 54
Volume slider, 9
W
widescreen
iDVD format, 8
troubleshooting, 62
widescreen mode, 31
70
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.
Peachpit
iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X:
Visual QuickStart Guide
This full-color, amply illustrated, accessible book
teaches readers the essential skills necessary for
creating compelling movies with iMovie ‘09 and iDVD,
Apple’s consumer-friendly digital movie and DVDburning software applications. Readers can follow
the step-by-step instructions from the beginning
to get a tour of the applications or look up specific
tasks to learn just what they need to know. Longtime
Macintosh and technology writer Jeff Carlson takes
extra steps to ensure that readers understand all of
the key aspects of digital movie making.
• Easy visual approach uses pictures to guide you
through iMovie ‘09 and iDVD (and how they
interact with the other iLife ’09 applications) and
show you what to do.
• Concise steps and explanations let you get up
and running in no time.
• Page for page, the best content and value
around.
Save 35%
iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X:
Visual QuickStart Guide
Jeff Carlson
ISBN: 9780321601322, $24.99
264 pages, May 2009
Save 35% off the list price, plus enjoy free domestic
U.S. Shipping. Visit peachpit.com and enter
coupon code IMOVIEVQS when you reach the
checkout page. Offer expires 12/31/2010
Supplement for iMovie 09 and iDVD for Mac OS X: Visual QuickStart Guide by Jeff Carlson.
Copyright © 2009. Pearson Education, Inc. and Peachpit Press.