Emerson Mynah SLC-500 User`s guide

User’s Guide
AB1746-C
Network Master
(Version 5.21)
For
Allen-Bradley Series SLC-500 Programmable Controllers
(Date:
2004-11-18)
Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
User’s Guide
Controlinc Network Master … AB1746-C (Version 5.21)
For
Allen-Bradley Series SLC-500 Programmable Controllers
Table of Contents
0. Quick Start Information...............................................................................1
1. Introduction...................................................................................................2
1.1. Overview of 1746-C System ................................................................................... 2
1.2. Overview of Changes in Version 5.21 ................................................................... 4
1.3. Reference Manuals ................................................................................................. 5
1.4. EIM Equipment Compatibility ............................................................................. 6
1.5. Firmware ................................................................................................................. 6
2. 1746-C Hardware..........................................................................................7
2.1. Hardware Setup ...................................................................................................... 7
2.2. LED Utilization ....................................................................................................... 8
2.2.1. Green (PRT1 & PRT2) and Yellow (LED1 & LED2) LED Usage ........................... 8
2.2.2. Red “BA LOW” LED Usage ................................................................................. 10
3. Network Setup and Connecting to the NIU ..............................................11
3.1. Field Connections at the Actuator....................................................................... 13
3.1.1. Step 1.
3.1.2. Step 2.
3.1.3. Step 3.
3.1.4. Step 4.
3.1.5. Step 5.
3.1.6. Step 6.
Plan the Network Topology ................................................................... 13
Select Network Cable............................................................................ 13
Route Cable away from Electrical Interference ..................................... 14
Observe Polarity and Network Grounding ............................................. 14
Wire Preparation and Connections........................................................ 14
Test Network ......................................................................................... 14
3.2. Field Network Cable Connection to the NIU ..................................................... 15
3.3. Cable Connection Between the NIU and the Network Master ........................ 15
4. 1746-C General Theory of Operation .......................................................16
4.1. Operational Overview .......................................................................................... 16
4.1.1. Diagram Describing Relationship Between Process Time Slices ........................ 16
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4.1.2. Diagram Describing Network Scanning & Actuator Writing Logic........................ 17
4.1.3. Diagram Demonstrating Adding Additional Valves in Valve Scan Time-Slice...... 18
4.1.4. Diagram Describing Relationship Between Scan Period & Diagnostic Scan ....... 19
4.1.5. 1746-C System Operations at Power Up............................................................. 20
4.2. Network Interface (Scan) Time-Slice (1746-C ↔ Network Communication) 21
4.2.1. Operation: Network Scanning to Gather Valve Actuator Data ............................ 21
4.2.2. Operation: The Network Communication Diagnostic Scan ................................. 22
4.3. PLC Interface Time-Slice (1746-C ↔ PLC Communication).......................... 24
4.3.1. Operation: PLC (Write Data Tables To) or (Read Tables From) the 1746-C ...... 26
4.3.2. Operation: PLC Commands to Write Data to the Actuators................................ 29
4.3.3. RLL Example … Manually Send New Table … Auto Read Response ................ 31
5. System Tables ..............................................................................................33
5.1. Table Arrangement............................................................................................... 35
5.2. Standard Header Format (All Tables) … Words [0 3] ................................ 37
5.2.1. Word [0]:
5.2.2. Word [1]:
5.2.3. Word [2]:
5.2.4. Word [3]:
Table ID ............................................................................................. 37
Read / Write Command Indicator ...................................................... 37
Reserved / Firmware ID..................................................................... 37
Emergency Shut Down (ESD) Command Word & Indication ............ 38
5.3. Table [0] … System Information Table .............................................................. 39
5.3.1. Table [0] Overview............................................................................................... 39
5.3.2. Table [0] Configuration Words … Words [4 17]................................................ 42
5.3.3. Table [0] Run-Time Information Words … Words [47 63] ................................ 47
5.3.4. Table [0] … RSLOGIX-500 Examples ................................................................. 48
5.3.4.1. Example RSLOGIX-500 Screen: ..........................................................................48
5.3.4.2. Table [0] … The Configuration Values (RSLOGIX-500). .....................................49
5.3.4.3. Table [0] … The Configuration Values – Writing Table [0] (RSLOGIX-500) ........50
5.3.4.4. Table [0] … The Run-Time Feedback Values From 1746-C (RSLOGIX-500).....51
5.4. Tables [1
20] … Actuator Information Tables.............................................. 52
5.4.1. Table [1]: Communication Error Status............................................................... 52
5.4.2. Table [2]: Actuator Operational Status................................................................ 54
5.4.3. Table [3]: Discrete Control Mode (Open/Close/Stop) ......................................... 56
5.4.4. Table [4]: Valve Position Indication … 0 – 100.0% ............................................. 58
5.4.5. Table [5]: Valve Position Setpoint … 0 – 4095 ................................................... 59
5.4.6. Tables [6 & 7]: User Analog Inputs #1 & 2.......................................................... 61
5.4.7. Table [8]: Analog Output #1................................................................................ 62
5.4.8. Tables [9 & 10]: Digital Input Accumulators (Totalizers) #1 & 2.......................... 64
5.4.9. Table [11]: Valve Position Indication … 0 – 4095 ............................................... 66
5.4.10. Table [12]: Discrete Input Statuses................................................................... 67
5.4.11. Table [13]: Solid State Relay (SSR) Configuration Table ................................. 69
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
5.4.12. Table [14]: Additional Register Being Polled From Entire Network................... 71
5.4.13. Table [15]: Additional Block of Registers Being Polled From 1 Actuator........... 73
5.4.14. Tables [16 & 17]: Monitor & Control Discrete Digital Outputs ........................... 76
5.4.15. Table [18]: Actuator System Type ID ................................................................ 81
5.4.16. Table [19]: Actuator Firmware Version ID......................................................... 83
5.4.17. Table [20]: Modbus Exception Message Response.......................................... 84
5.4.18. Tables [21-24]: TEC2000 Status Inputs............................................................ 86
6. Application Notes ........................................................................................88
6.1. App Note: Performance Tuning ......................................................................... 88
6.1.1. General Practices to Ensure Better Performance................................................ 88
6.1.2. Reading Run-Time Information from Table [0]..................................................... 88
6.1.3. Loading Table [0] with Configuration Information ................................................ 89
6.1.4. Behavior if a Delay in Loading Table [0] Configuration Information ..................... 90
6.1.5. Using the “Scan Period” Value ............................................................................ 91
6.2. App Note: 1746-C Operation – Additional Detailed Information .................. 92
6.2.1. Scan Operation: Determining & Exiting “Network Down” Condition.................... 92
6.2.2. Detailed Description of 1746-C Operation ........................................................... 93
6.2.3. Time Allocated Process Control (Allocated Time Slices) ..................................... 94
6.2.4. Preferred Communication Port Operation............................................................ 96
6.2.5. Communication Failure Indications (Low-Level & High-Level)............................. 97
6.2.6. Bringing Units On-Line After a Power Cycle ...................................................... 100
6.2.7. Toggling the Preferred Port to Assist Diagnostics ............................................. 101
6.3. App Note: For Diagnostics - Know the Physical Network Wiring ............... 102
6.4. App Note: Memory Maps ................................................................................. 103
6.4.1. Specific Holding Registers Referenced by the Network Master......................... 103
6.4.2. Specific Coils & Inputs Referenced by the Network Master............................... 104
6.4.3. 320A Memory Map … Table for Coils & Inputs (Version 2.0) ............................ 105
6.4.4. 320A Memory Map … Addressable Holding Registers (Version 2.0) ................ 106
6.4.5. 320B Memory Map … Table for Coils & Inputs.................................................. 108
6.4.6. 320B Memory Map … Addressable Holding Registers...................................... 109
6.4.7. TEC2000 Memory Map … Table for Coils & Inputs........................................... 111
6.4.8. TEC2000 Memory Map … Table for Holding Registers..................................... 112
6.5. App Note: Modbus Message Formats.............................................................. 117
6.5.1. Modbus RTU Functions (Command Codes) Implemented ................................ 117
6.5.2. Modbus Function (Command) Code Descriptions ............................................. 118
6.5.2.1. Modbus Function Code 01 … Read Coil Status .................................................118
6.5.2.2. Modbus Function Code 03 … Read Holding Register ........................................119
6.5.2.3. Modbus Function Code 05 … Set (Force) Single Coil ........................................120
6.5.2.4. Modbus Function Code 06 … Set Single Register .............................................121
6.5.2.5. Modbus Function Code 15 (0x0F) … Set (Force) Multiple Coils ........................122
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6.5.3. Modbus Exception Messages Supported .......................................................... 123
6.6. App Note: Install the 1746-C Network Master Firmware............................. 124
6.6.1. Configure the Module for a Firmware Upload .................................................... 124
6.6.2. Upload the 1746-C Firmware............................................................................. 125
6.6.3. Reset the 1746-C Module for Normal Operations.............................................. 126
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
0. Quick Start Information
1. As a minimum, you should have access to the following reference documents:
•
This manual (1746-C User’s Guide)
•
Allen-Bradley SLC-500 BASIC User's Manual (1746-BAS & 1746-BAS-T)
Publication No. 1746-UM004A-US-P 2000
•
•
EIM Controlinc 320A Quick Startup Guide, Rev. F or later
EIM Controlinc 320B Quick Startup Guide, Rev. A or later
2. Refer to Section 2 of this manual on how the jumpers should be set on the BASIC module.
3. The 1746-C module comes from EIM pre-programmed with the network master program in it. However, if
for some reason the module needs to be flashed again (ex: a field upgrade) then refer to Section 5 on
installing the firmware in the module.
Note: Remember, you will need to connect a serial cable between the 1746-C and the computer. The
correct cable is a Null Modem Cable connected between the PRT1 port (top DB9 connector on
the module) and the serial communications port on the computer used for the upload.
4. Ensure the PLC rack power is turned off.
Install the module in the correct slot in the PLC rack. Connect all cables and power the system up.
5. The PLC-RLL will start interfacing with the 1746-C after the 1746-C performs initial scans of the network
on power up.
NOTES: To ensure optimal performance, some things the PLC should do …
1. Ensure table [0] is set correctly and repeated in a timely manner.
Allow for frequent table [0] read backs.
2. Restrict the rate of data writes to the actuators … only write as fast as required to adequately control the
valve.
(cuts down on the interruptions to scanning the network … gathering data)
3. Expedite responses to M1 transfer requests made by the 1746-C. Delaying them can slow 1746-C
operations.
4. Only activate writing to or reading from tables if actually in use (or when needed).
(ex: do not write to the analog output table if analog outputs are not used)
(ex: do not read totalizer data if its not being used)
(ex: only poll for “static” [non-changing] data one time and stop)
(prevents unnecessary delays to gathering the more important data from the network)
Remember:
The 1746-C uses explicit read/write commanding of the tables such that if word [1] in any table is
zero (0) then it is a table read request by the PLC. Otherwise, the command is a table write
command.
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
1. Introduction
1.1. Overview of 1746-C System
This document is intended for end users as a Guide in applying an EIM
AB 1746-C Network Master.
The software that enables network operation is called a communication
driver. It is used in conjunction with an Allen-Bradley 1746-BAS
module thereby creating the 1746-C network master module. The
1746-C allows an AB SLC-500 controller to acquire data from and send
information to an EIM Controlinc Actuator Network.
GENERAL SYSTEM PURPOSE:
The EIM 1746-C network master serves as a data concentrator for
applications that use an AB SLC-500 Programmable Logic Controller
(PLC). The 1746-C module must be located in a slot in the local
chassis (it cannot be mounted in a chassis that is remote from the SLC CPU).
In general, the network master off-loads
network communication and management
tasks from the actual controlling equipment.
The main function of the 1746-C is to provide
the interface between a PLC and its network of
valve actuators. Acting as a Host, the PLC
controls the network by sending data to the
1746-C for routing to a particular actuator.
The 1746-C network master polls the individual
actuators for information and makes it available
to the PLC when requested.
SLC-500 with
1746-C installed
1746-C
A typical ring topology network and network
master are illustrated in Figure 1. The 1746-C
module serves as a master within this Modbus
(Modbus RTU) master/slave network.
The
module will manage network operation by
keeping an orderly cycle of data transfers
between itself and each slave (valve actuator).
Figure 1
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
The 1746-C master will handle network communication, error detection, alarming, and network
recovery.
Other features include:
• Reporting of inaccessible actuators
• Reporting of network faults
• Emergency shutdown broadcasting
• Minimal Interfacing with the Relay Ladder Logic (RLL) program in the PLC CPU module
Each 1746-C module can support a single network of up to 60 valve actuators. Multiple modules can
be installed in an SLC-500 system rack to provide support for multiple networks (up to 60 actuators
each).
Note 1: It is important to note that the 1746-C Network Master may be used in any slot of the 1746
rack, not just slot 1 next to the SLC-500 CPU.
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
1.2. Overview of Changes in Version 5.21
For the 1746-C system, there is no previous version of the product to reflect functional changes to.
However, any later releases of this document for this version of the product (5.21) are to only correct
entries in this document … primarily grammatical or “typos” that are discovered in the future. Major
ideas will be documented with a separate “line entry”.
Major document changes:
1. This document:
2004-11-18
Previous document: 2004-08-17
Major Change:
Memory Maps adjusted.
2. New document:
2004-08-17
Previous document: 2004-08-06
Major Changes:
Memory Maps adjusted and this section added.
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
1.3. Reference Manuals
• Allen-Bradley SLC-500 BASIC User's Manual (1746-BAS & 1746-BAS-T)
Publication No. 1746-UM004A-US-P 2000
This manual is required for installing the module and for proper uploading of this driver into the
hardware.
• EIM … Controlinc 320A Quick Startup Guide, Rev. F or later
Publication No. ECL-4004-0102
This manual is used for specific information on the Controlinc 320A Controller card located in
the valve actuator. This includes networking, setup and available options.
• EIM … Controlinc 320B Quick Startup Guide
Publication No. ECL-4005-0404
This manual is used for specific information on the Controlinc 320B Controller card located in
the valve actuator. This includes networking, setup and available options.
• EIM … TEC2000 “Document … TBD”
Publication No. ?????????
At the time of this printing, this TEC2000 publication had not been made available.
• Other Allen-Bradley manuals specific to the SLC-500 being applied. These may be required to
implement the necessary Relay Ladder Logic (RLL) for application of the driver. For instance,
this may include:
o
Allen Bradley SLC-500 Instruction Set Reference,
Publication 1747-RM001D-EN-P (November-2003)
This reference includes information in Appendix E on the M0 & M1 File Data Transfer
handling.
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
1.4. EIM Equipment Compatibility
The 1746-C is compatible with the following EIM equipment:
• 320A …
version 1.17 and later.
• 320B …
all
• TEC2000 … all
Other points:
• The 1746-C derives the system type of each actuator during the diagnostic scan and stores the
results in table [18].
•
The 1746-C derives the firmware Version ID for the 320A & 320B systems during the diagnostic
scan and stores the results in table [19].
•
Since the TEC2000 system has several micro-controllers with firmware, a special request must
be made to them to derive the firmware version ID for each controller in the unit.
•
The SSR bit is only checked and set on 320A actuators.
Note:
For maximum compatibility with the TEC2000 systems, it is recommended that you enable
monitoring the TEC2000 Status Inputs (tables [21-24]). This way, you can ensure you have all
critical status information for any TEC2000 system on the network. For more information,
refer to the section on Tables [21-24].
Note:
This document references the addressable memory ranges (“Memory Maps”) of several EIM
actuators (ex: M2CP–320B, TEC2000). This is only for the reader’s convenience. The
specific details in the memory maps are only correct as of the date this manual was published.
Therefore, to ensure you have the most current memory information, please refer to the
technical information for that particular actuator.
1.5. Firmware
The firmware is a “driver program” which is a compiled application program (not an interpreted one). It
is loaded and stored in the module's 32K EEPROM (A-B P/N 1747-M2). The user is required to
provide configuration information from the PLC Relay Ladder Logic (RLL) for each specific application
(the RLL must load table [0] with appropriate configuration information).
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
2. 1746-C Hardware
2.1. Hardware Setup
Refer to Chapter 1 of the 1746-BAS manual. The following hardware jumper settings are required. If the
1746-BAS module was supplied by EIM, jumpers are already set and no other settings are required.
For the 1746-C to run, the jumper
settings should be set as follows:
•
•
•
JW1 - enable RS232
JW2 - enable RS232
JW3 - M2 EEPROM
•
JW4 - PRT1 = ASCII
- PRT2 = ASCII
- DH485 = PGM
JW2
JW1
This jumper configuration is
normally performed by EIM before
shipping the 1746-C.
JW3
JW4
JW4
JW1
JW2
JW3
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
2.2. LED Utilization
2.2.1. Green (PRT1 & PRT2) and Yellow (LED1 & LED2) LED Usage
There are 2 “Yellow” LED lights on the front of the 1746-C module
• LED1.
• LED2.
There are currently 3 general functions operating these LEDs:
1. After CPU restart, both LED1 & LED2 are ON until the 1746-C finishes initialization and starts
polling the network.
2. After initialization, LED1 is used as a “starting a new scan” indicator by toggling on/off at the
start of each scan. Ex:
Starting scan 1:
LED1 is ON.
Starting scan 2:
LED1 toggles to the OFF state.
Starting scan 3:
LED1 toggles to the ON state.
3. After initialization, LED2 is used as an “entire network is down” indicator. If the 1746-C ever
detects zero (0) actuators on the network, it will turn LED2 on and immediately enter a
diagnostic scan and remain there until an actuator is found to be on-line and communicating.
There are 2 communication LED lights (green LED lights) on the 1746-C module:
• PRT1: Port 1 Transmit … lights up when transmissions are going out port 1.
• PRT2: Port 2 Transmit … lights up when transmissions are going out port 2.
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
PRT1 & PRT2 (Green) LED App Note: Green LED Lights & System Initialization with Table [0]
After startup, if table [0] is not initialized shortly after the 1746-C finishes its initial diagnostic
scan, the program starts running with factory default settings. This means that unless the
network actually has 60 actuators on it, the 1746-C will believe the “other valves” are just off
line.
Plus, an operator can often determine when the PLC-RLL actually writes to table [0] (configures
the system) by watching the green LED lights.
For instance …
• On a network that actually has 25 valves on it (addressed 1-25), until table [0] – word [4]
gets initialized with 25, the program thinks that there are still supposed to be 60
actuators on the network … only the last 35 happen to be “off line”.
•
Then (if viewing the green LED lights) when a scan starts (LED1 changes state), you will
see the green LEDs “flash” while the 1746-C communicates with valves 1-25.
Then you will observe a “dead space” in time when the program is trying to determine if
any of the final 35 valves “it believes to be connected” are available (and of course none
are because the network only has 25 valves on it).
•
As soon as a new scan starts (all “60” valves have been checked and ready to scan the
network again … LED1 changes state) then the green LEDs will start flickering again
while the 1746-C communicates with valves 1-25.
Then the “dead space” time will be observed again.
This sequence will repeat until the PLC program initializes the 1746-C by writing to table
[0].
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
2.2.2. Red “BA LOW” LED Usage
The red “BA LOW” LED indicates low battery status. The purpose of the battery in the BASIC module
is to back up portions of RAM and other resources. For guaranteed long-term repeatability of
operations, the EIM 1746-C program does not utilize any of these resources. Therefore, it doesn’t
matter what state the battery is in (installed and fully charged, inline and dead or totally removed from
the unit), the EIM network master program will always run the same.
This also means that a new 1746-C module might run with the BA LOW LED off for a while and then
turn on when the battery dies. This is normal and has NO effect on the system. However, if for
some reason you want to replace the battery, you can order it directly from Allen-Bradley.
“BA LOW”
LED
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
3. Network Setup and Connecting to the NIU
In general, the EIM NIU (“Network Interface Unit”) is a “beefed up” and configurable RS232
converter.
The ports on the 1746-C, Port1 (PRT1) and
Port 2 (PRT2), are configured for serial
communication using RS-232.
SLC-500 with
1746-C installed
RS485
1746-C
The network communication parameters are
pre-configured and fixed at 9600 baud – 8 bit
– no parity – 1 stop bit.
The NIU isolates and protects the 1746-C
and the PLC from the network and is
powered by its own 120 AC circuit. Its
primary function is to convert RS232
communications to RS485 communications.
The RS485 connection then communicates
to a ring or ring network.
Note: To help with isolation, there are two
(2) entirely separate boards in the NIU.
However, because of this, there are two (2)
120 VAC connections to the NIU. Ensure
that both are connected (you can jumper the
circuits together).
Figure 1
The Controlinc network is connected to the 1746-C module via the Network Interface Unit (NIU). It
doesn’t matter if you connect:
• Port 2 (PRT2) (bottom DB9 connector):
connects to the NIU at the port labeled “HOST A”.
• Port 1 (PRT1) (top DB9 connector):
connects to the NIU at the port labeled “HOST B”.
or
• Port 1 (PRT1) (top DB9 connector):
connects to the NIU at the port labeled “HOST A”.
• Port 2 (PRT2) (bottom DB9 connector):
connects to the NIU at the port labeled “HOST B”.
However, it is recommended that you remain consistent.
NOTE: You can always connect a PC to the network at the NIU if you …
• Disconnect the cable connecting the 1746-C and NIU.
• Connect the PC using a (serial cable + NULL modem) to the DB9 connector on the NIU.
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
A typical E>Net network connection format is in a ring …
•
It starts from Port 1 (PRT1) (the top DB9 connector) on the 1746-C as RS232 and connects to
the NIU at the port labeled “Host A”.
•
It exits the NIU at the port labeled “Port A” as an RS485 circuit and proceeds to the first valve
actuator, normally addressed as #1, in port A.
•
It exits the actuator from Port B and proceeds to the port A next actuator (address #2) and on
until the last actuator on the network is connected.
•
The RS485 network then exits port B on the last actuator returns to the NIU at the port labeled
“Port B”.
•
The network connection is then transformed back to an RS232 format and exits the NIU via the
port labeled “Host B”
•
It connects to the 1746-C via port2 (PRT2) (the bottom DB9 connector).
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
3.1. Field Connections at the Actuator
Communication connections and wiring are important for the network and the master.
(The following information was primarily derived from the Controlinc Quick Startup Guide)
3.1.1. Step 1. Plan the Network Topology
Before connecting actuators, the entire network layout should be planned. Topologies may be bus,
redundant bus, E>Net, redundant E>Net, E>Net ring, and redundant E>Net rings. Planning should
include node addressing, wire routing, terminations, and grounding.
3.1.2. Step 2. Select Network Cable
Ensure correct cable is being used.
• Networks require twisted pair and shielded cable with characteristic impedance between 50 and
120 Ohms.
• Capacitance between conductors must be less that 30 pF/Ft (98 pF/M); 10-15pF/Ft is ideal.
• Shielding maybe aluminum foil with drain wire.
• If cable has multiple pairs, then individual pair shielding is required.
• Only cables with stranded conductors are recommended.
• Insulating and outer jacket materials must be selected for the application environment.
The following are acceptable Belden or equivalent cables for most network applications.
AWG
Beldon #
Rating
20
8762
12.8 Pf/fT
18
8760
12.8 Pf/fT
16
8719
12.8 Pf/fT
14
8720
12.8 Pf/fT
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
3.1.3. Step 3. Route Cable away from Electrical Interference
Network cables should enter the electrical enclosures and the
bottom or lowest point (on 320A systems, this is near the
transformer end and normally in a counter clockwise direction
to the topside of the TBM). Never install network cable in the
same conduit with power conductors. Never route the network
cable through the high voltage contactor area. On 320A
systems, the cable should never lie across the TBM or hinder
the protective cover of the TBM. Always use the shortest
distance and keep access cable to a minimum.
See Figure 3-1
3.1.4. Step 4. Observe Polarity and Network
Grounding
Each network connection is polarized + and - on wiring
diagrams. Always use consistency in wiring and the use of
wire colors to track polarity. The cable shield (or “drain wire”)
must be connected to the designated “shield” terminal at each
Figure 3-1
port of each actuator. The shield must be connected to earth
ground at only one point. Some networks require a jumper
Correct termination of the Network
between the shield connections on ports A & B of the actuator
to a Controlinc 320A Actuator
to carry the shielding through the network. The shield
connection of each actuator is isolated from earth ground.
Do not allow the shield to touch other circuits or the metal enclosure.
3.1.5. Step 5. Wire Preparation and Connections
Screw terminal connections on the TBM and in the TEC2000 terminal chamber have wire clamps,
which will accept conductors with out terminals. Wire terminals may be applied if desired but are not
required. Strip conductor insulation back 3/8” when connecting directly to the TBM screw terminals. Do
not allow wire clippings to fall on the TBM or into the enclosure.
Protect the conductors and shield to prevent them from contacting any other circuits or earth ground.
Use plastic electrical tape or heat shrink tubing to prevent bare conductors from contacting other
circuits or earth ground. See Figure 3-1
3.1.6. Step 6. Test Network
Use EIM’s Configuration and Control Utility (CCU) to test the network prior to connecting to the host or
network master. The CCU is a Windows application, which will run on a laptop. Use a RS232 to RS485
adapter or EIM’s Network Interface Unit (NIU) to connect the laptop to the network. Test each actuator,
one at a time, to determine that all network connections are good and each actuator is functional via the
network in remote.
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3.2. Field Network Cable Connection to the NIU
Refer to Figure 3-2 for terminals on the EIM
Network Interface Unit (NIU). The NIU is a dual port
RS232 to RS485 converter specifically designed for
ring networks.
Connect the twisted shielded pair cable of the field
network to NIU Terminals 1 (-), 2 (Shield), 3 (+) of
J1 of Port A.
R S -2 3 2
Por t
PW R
J3
Network
Port
+
sh
-
1
12VAC/DC
PWR
J2
PWR
J1
TxD
+
Shield
-
RxD
1
N IU 8 4 3 2 0
SW1
The network shield must be connected to a good
earth ground at only one shield terminal point on the
NIU.
The network cabling should use recommended
cabling for an RS-485 network able to handle the
distance desired.
There should be little, if any, electrical noise on the
network for the entire length of the network.
RS232 Cable
(#37121)
1
Chassis
RXD
2
2
RXD
TXD
3
3
TXD
Ground
5
7
Ground
DB-9 Female
Connector
(1746-C Side)
Shield
DB-9 Male
Connector
(NIU Side)
Figure 3-2
3.3. Cable Connection Between the NIU and the Network Master
Refer to the “Allen-Bradley SLC-500 BASIC User's Manual (1746-BAS & 1746-BAS-T) Publication
No. 1746-UM004A-US-P 2000” for additional information on the pin-out of the male DB9 connections
used for network ports one and two.
Jumpers JW1 & JW2 must be set for RS-232 when connecting with EIM's Network Interface Unit (NIU)
P/N 84320 or a user-supplied modem.
Refer to Figure 3-2 for the pin-out of the DB-9 female connector.
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4. 1746-C General Theory of Operation
4.1. Operational Overview
The interface for the PLC with the actuators (through the 1746-C module) is with an array of 25 tables
… 64 words per table with the table number (command) in Word # [0] of each. This is based on the
M0/M1 interface protocol established by Allen-Bradley for the SLC-500 systems.
The 1746-C operates using a “Non-Interruptible Time-Slice Process Allocation” communication
methodology. This means that it must finish executing the process that is executing in its allocated
time-slice before another process can operate. The two processes being scheduled are:
• Scanning the network for data.
• Interfacing with the PLC.
This means that the 1746-C will ignore any new commands from the PLC while scanning the network
(during the network scan time-slice) and no network scanning will take place while processing a
command from the PLC (during the PLC interface time-slice).
4.1.1. Diagram Describing Relationship Between Process Time Slices
Process time slicing is how the 1746-C divides its time when performing its 2 primary communication
tasks … communicating with the PLC and communicating with the actuator network.
This diagram helps demonstrate the relationship between the two communication processes.
PLC
PLC Backplane
PLC
1746-C
Communications
(PLC Interface Time Slice)
1746-C
1746-C
Actuators on
Network Communications
(Network Scan Time Slice)
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4.1.2. Diagram Describing Network Scanning & Actuator Writing Logic
This example demonstrates how a normal scan cycle gets elongated with data writes to the actuators.
The more writes being performed the longer it will take to complete data scans.
This is where the
PLC/HMI must make a value decision for the best fit for their application:
• Fast enough repetitive writes to control the system
• Slow enough repetitive to ensure effective feedback to control the system.
Polling
for data
Polling data …
“Network Scan
Time-Slice”
Writing
data
Time to poll 30
actuators for
data … without
any writing to
actuators
Polling
for data
Writing data to
the network …
“PLC Interface
Time-Slice”
Time to poll 25
actuators for data …
Performing 3 sets of
data writes
interspaced within
the single scan loop
Writing
data
Polling
for data
Writing
data
Polling
for data
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4.1.3. Diagram Demonstrating Adding Additional Valves in Valve Scan
Time-Slice
This example demonstrates how increasing the additional number of valves to be scanned before
servicing the PLC communication task decreases the total network scan time.
This is where the PLC/HMI must make a value decision for the best fit for their application:
• Increasing the number: Speeds up data collection
Lowers PLC control capabilities.
• Decreasing the number: Slows down data collection Increases PLC control capabilities.
Example of scale for time to scan network … different values for Additional valves in scan time slice:
Network size:
Additional valves:
8
0
Network size:
Additional valves:
8
3
Poll 1 valve for data
Service PLC cmd
Poll 1 valve for data
Service PLC cmd
Poll 4 valves for data
Service PLC cmd
Poll 4 valves for data
Poll 1 valve for data
Service PLC cmd
Service PLC cmd
Poll 1 valve for data
Service PLC cmd
Poll 1 valve for data
Service PLC cmd
Poll 1 valve for data
Service PLC cmd
Poll 1 valve for data
Service PLC cmd
Poll 1 valve for data
Service PLC cmd
(Note the relative time differences are for illustration purposes only … not to any exact scale.)
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4.1.4. Diagram Describing Relationship Between Scan Period & Diagnostic
Scan
This example demonstrates the relationship between the diagnostic scans, scan periods, the current
scan period, the previous scan period.
This example: a scan period value of 10 and 25 valves on the network. This means that all the valves
on the network will be scanned 10 times before the scan period is over … and before the next
diagnostic scan is performed.
Previous
Scan Period
Current
Scan Period
(all 10 network scans of 25
valves completed)
(so far, 5 network scans
completed)
History
Current time
Diagnostic
scan
Individual
network scans
Diagnostic
scan
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4.1.5. 1746-C System Operations at Power Up
The 1746-C software boots up on a power up of the 1746-C module. The general sequence is:
1. Illuminate LED1 & LED2 as an indication that the software is initializing itself and the network.
2. Perform basic internal initializations.
3. Perform the initial diagnostic scan of the network and identify all actuators on the network.
4. Finish internal initializations.
5. Turn off LED1 & LED2.
6. Start standard scanning of the network. Initialization is finished. Normal operations
(scanning) have commenced and are allowing PLC communications.
(LED1 toggles ON during the start of this first scan)
Note 1: Remember that the PLC cannot perform any block transfers until after the network master has
finished polling the network for status information and LED2 has been turned off and the
1746-C starts indicating that it is ready for data (after scanning starts).
Note 2: Even though LED1 turns off immediately after the initial scan after power up and then toggles
back on after normal operations start, the user will not normally see this … at the most it
would be a small flicker. Therefore, to the user that is observing the LED behavior after
restart on a system that has actuators communicating, it will appear that …
During the initial scan when the PLC cannot talk to the 1746-C …
LED1 == ON
LED2 == ON.
Immediately after the initial scan when normal operations start (start of 1st normal scan):
LED1 == ON
LED2 == OFF.
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
4.2. Network Interface (Scan) Time-Slice (1746-C ↔ Network
Communication)
4.2.1. Operation: Network Scanning to Gather Valve Actuator Data
The Network Master polls and controls up to 60 valves on the network by sequentially polling
(scanning) each device in sequence from slave actuator address #1 to the last slave address (#n) on its
network.
This polling gathers information from the actuators (including alarms, discrete information and actuator
position) and places it in tables that can be transmitted to the PLC.
The scan operation cannot stop in the middle of a request for data from a particular actuator.
Therefore, the 1746-C can only interface with the PLC once it has finished all required communications
with the actuator it is currently getting data from. Network scanning resumes with the next actuator
after interfacing with the PLC and processing any requests made by the PLC (writes to tables, writes to
actuators, table reads, …).
For example, if the 1746-C is currently scanning actuator [5] and the PLC wants to write a new valve
position setpoint to 22 actuators then the 1746-C will …
1. Finish getting data from actuator [5]
2. Get the new command table from the PLC.
3. Write the new valve position setpoint to all 22 actuators.
4. Restart network scanning where it left off … the next actuator [6] after the last one polled [5].
Standard data is gathered from the actuators by a single Modbus 03 command.
However, a 2nd Modbus 03 command is generated if any of the following are true …
• If requesting totalizer data
• If requesting a specific holding register
• If requesting a block of holding registers from this actuator
• If requesting to monitor the discrete outputs on this actuator
• If requesting TEC2000 input data.
This is one reason why additional data should only be requested when needed … it will slow the entire
scan time of the system (by a minimum of 30-50 ms each time an actuator is polled for this data).
For instance, if all 5 of the above are requested for each actuator, an extra 30-50 ms is required for
EACH … meaning that the scan time could be increased by almost a factor of 5! … dramatically
slowing down the system!
A typical scan time (time to scan all the actuators on the network) to gather “standard” information on
60 actuators is less than 10 seconds … depending upon the 1746-C configuration.
When gathering data, the data is stored in the appropriate tables in the 1746-C. Values in the table
for a particular actuator will not be overwritten if there is an error communicating (on both ports) with the
actuator.
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4.2.2. Operation: The Network Communication Diagnostic Scan
After a predetermined number of loops through the network scanning the actuators (the “scan period”),
the 1746-C performs a communication diagnostic scan to determine if any “off-line” actuators can come
back on line. If there are any that are ready, the 1746-C will bring them back on line without human
intervention. This is the only time an off-line system can come back on-line.
The number of loops around the network is determined by the “scan period” value.
this value to accommodate site requirements and current operating environments.
The PLC adjusts
Unlike the other operations that access the actuators on the network, the diagnostic scan checks both
ports when communicating with the actuators. Because of this, it also always takes longer to execute
than standard data gathering scans. However, normal data is still gathered during a diagnostic scan.
The only major difference in data gathering between a standard scan and a diagnostic scan is
• In the diagnostic scan, the 1746-C determines actuator system type and actuator firmware
version ID (tables [18 & 19]).
• Both ports are explicitly tested when getting the system type information.
• The diagnostic scan ensures that the hardware ports are set correctly … 9600 - 8N1.
Otherwise, all other data gathering activities are the same as in a normal network scan.
Communication error indications may only be cleared during this scan.
The “scan loop counter” is always zero (0) during a diagnostic scan … the diagnostic scan does not
count as part of the scans in the scan period. This is the only time the loop counter is zero … during
the diagnostic scan.
The diagnostic scan time increases as you increase the discrepancy between the
(number of valves actually on line and talking) VS (the number of valves configured to be on line)
Below shows a sample of diagnostic scan times empirically taken on a network when there was no
network “writes to the actuators” (Table [0] was configured for 60 valves). As you can see, as you
increase the number of “off line” units, you increase the diagnostic scan time.
# Nodes “Talking” … On-Line
60 of 60
54 of 60
48 of 60
42 of 60
36 of 60
30 of 60
24 of 60
12 of 60
6 of 60
3 of 60
2 of 60
1 of 60
(#1 – 60)
(#7 – 60)
(#13 – 60)
(#19 – 60)
(#25 – 60)
(#31 – 60)
(#37 – 60)
(#49 – 60)
(#55 – 60)
(#58 – 60)
(#59 – 60)
(#60)
Version 5.21
Diagnostic Scan Times (secs)
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
23
23
24
25
25
The values in this table
“rounded values” and
have a precision of (+/-) 1
second.
Because of this, these
numbers are only
appropriate for estimates
and trend analysis.
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Notes:
• Though not much, the diagnostic scan time can also vary with the number of valves in the valve
scan time slice.
•
The greater the number of valves configured to be on line, the longer the diagnostic scan time
… more valves to check.
•
During normal operations, an operator can use the HMI to force the system into a diagnostic
scan by temporarily changing the “scan period” value in table [0] to a value lower than the
current scan loop counter. This will cause the program to enter a diagnostic scan as soon as
this scan loop has finished.
•
Because the diagnostic scan detects faulty communication ports and flags them, there can be a
perceived increased performance in the normal network scans because “off-line” actuators have
already been flagged and will be skipped.
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
4.3. PLC Interface Time-Slice (1746-C ↔ PLC Communication)
The primary interface for the PLC with the 1746-C module is with an array of 25 tables (labeled 0
24)
stored in the 1746-C RAM. Each table is 64-words long and each word is 16-bits. From the
perspective of the PLC interfacing with the network, some of the tables are “read only” and some are
“read/write” (depending upon a command word).
Relative to M0/M1 transfers, from the 1746-C perspective, there is no difference in handling “table
reads” or “table writes” … they both require a M0/M1 file transfer command.
The Relay Ladder Logic (RLL) in the PLC CPU interfaces with the 1746-C module with the M0/M1 file
transfer mechanism and transferring fixed blocks of 64 words (a table) with the table number
(command) in Word # [0] of each transfer.
• To send a table to the 1746-C (either as a write table command or to indicate a particular table
to read back), the PLC must send the desired table in the data portion of the M0 file.
•
To read back a table, the PLC must read the M1 file sent from the 1746-C.
Note: Since the 1746-C must be mounted in the local chassis (in the same chassis as the CPU), the
RLL cannot use the BTR/BTW block transfer command set (BTR/BTW commands cannot be
used over the back plane in the SLC systems). Therefore, the RLL must implement the
transfer using the “copy file” command … copying the M0/M1 files back and forth.
Note: Refer to the following Allen Bradley Documents:
•
Allen Bradley SLC-500 Instruction Set Reference,
Publication 1747-RM001D-EN-P (November-2003)
•
Allen-Bradley SLC-500 BASIC User's Manual (1746-BAS & 1746-BAS-T)
Publication No. 1746-UM004A-US-P 2000
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The interfacing between the PLC and the 1746-C is performed in the 1746-C module in a section of
RAM that is used as an exchange buffer area. To prevent potential overwriting problems when
performing transfers, there are two separate buffers in this exchange area:
•
M0 file … Basic Input Buffer (BIB):
PLC fills to send 64 words to the 1746-C.
•
M1 file … Basic Output Buffer (BOB):
1746-C fills to send 64 words to the PLC.
This is the only address accessed by the PLC when executing the M0/M1 transfer commands (meaning
that all reads & writes by the PLC are to and from these buffers).
1746-C
PLC must read the
M1 file in timely
manner as to not
slow down network
scanning
M1 File Transfer
commands
executed by the
1746-C
PLC
64-Word M1 File Transfer
Buffer (BOB)
1746-C driver
operations
MODBUS RTU
commands
executed by the
1746-C and
actuators
Standard RAM
(Tables)
M0 File Transfer
commands
executed by the
PLC
The 1746-C looks
for an M0 file
transfer at the start
of the PLC Interface
time slice
PLC
64-Word M0 File Transfer
Buffer (BIB)
ACTUATOR
The PLC must ensure
the M0 file is there for
the 1746-C to read in
a timely enough
manner as to not
slow down network
scanning
Figure 3-1 Concept Diagram of Command Operations
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
4.3.1. Operation: PLC (Write Data Tables To) or (Read Tables From) the
1746-C
Relative to M0/M1 transfers, from the 1746-C perspective, there is no difference in handling
• Writing a value to any table in the 1746-C memory.
• Writing a value to a table in the 1746-C memory that is also passed on to the specified actuator
on the network.
They both require a M0 file transfer command. The only difference is in the 2nd word in the block being
transferred (word [1]).
• If word [1] == 0, then this M0 transfer is a command to read a table from the 1746-C.
• If word [1] =/= 0, then this M0 transfer is a command to write data to a table in the 1746-C.
To perform a transfer of table data:
1. The PLC interface time-slice has now started.
2. The 1746-C looks to see if a new M0 file has arrived from the PLC. If not, this operation
terminates and must be restarted on the next PLC interface time slice. Otherwise, continue.
3. Since a new M0 file is here, the 1746-C copies the table into its own memory.
4. If word [3] indicates an ESD command sequence (start or stop the ESD condition) then that is
outputted to the entire network of actuators on both ports.
5. If word [1] == 0, then a read-only request command was made and the appropriate table is
copied into the M1 exchange buffer.
If word [1] =/= 0, then this was a write command and this table is copied into 1746-C memory.
A final “resultant” table (what will be stored in the 1746-C and potentially sent out onto the
network) is then copied into the exchange buffer to be fed back to the PLC.
6. The new M1 file is prepared to be transferred to the PLC such that if the received M0 file
indicated
• A read command – the data the PLC requested in a read table command.
• A write command – the immediate feedback of the command structure the 1746-C is
about to execute.
7. The 1746-C looks to see if the last M1 file was already read.
8. The new M1 file is transferred after the PLC indicates that the previous M1 file was read or the
1746-C system times waiting for the previous M1 to be read. Note that if the 1746-C times out
waiting, the previous M1 file will be overwritten.
9. After the M1 file is sent, if the command was to write data to the actuators, the 1746-C will now
loop through and write to all “appropriate” actuators on the network.
10. The PLC interface time-slice is now finished.
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As per affecting network performance, unless the command is to write data to the actuators, the
PLC does not have to limit the rate in which these commands are sent to the 1746-C because the
1746-C only sends back the table information it already has stored in memory. Conceptually, these
do delay the overall scan time. However, the amount of delay is very minor from a global perspective.
(Obviously, the PLC must still ensure all appropriate M0/M1 TRANSFER handshaking is performed)
As per writes that send data to the actuators, the rate should be limited. Please refer to the section
that discusses writing data to the actuators on the network.
Note 1: All tables can be read by the PLC. To ensure you only read from a read/write table, access it
with the command word set to “0” (zero).
Note 2: An invalid table ID sent to the 1746-C will default to a read request for table [0] data.
Note 3: If the 1746-C times out waiting for the previous M1 file to be read by the PLC, the previous M1
file will be over-written.
Note 4: On write commands from the PLC, reading the immediate feedback is optional for the PLC. In
other words, if the PLC has no need to inspect this table, then it can read it back but just throw
it out. However, servicing the M1 transfer request is important to overall system throughput.
For instance, the PLC program might be architected such that it treats an output pipe
(“command”) as just that … a one-way pipe that has no feedback. In this case, the PLC would
use other mechanisms for feedback (ex: other tables) and does not require the redundant
feedback on write commands.
Note 5: When a request for an M1 transfer is made by the 1746-C, the 1746-C program waits (in the
respective request function) until either the transfer completes or until a timeout is triggered
(currently set at 2 seconds).
This extended timeout time is to assist a PLC program that is having other (hopefully
temporary) difficulties and might take a while to return to normal behavior.
Therefore, to not slow down 1746-C network scanning activities, the PLC-RLL needs to service
these requests as soon as possible … even if it is to only throw away the table read back.
Servicing the request for an M1 transfer made by the 1746-C is critical for overall timing
efficiency.
Note 6: One main point to remember on M0/M1 transfer timing is that once the 1746-C responds to an
M0 transfer, the 1746-C will not return to process (setup for) another M0 file from the PLC until
it:
• responds with an immediate feedback M1 file transfer request containing the table being
addressed.
• finishes writing the entire table of values to the valves (if a write command).
• completes the set of scans in the next network scan time slice
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
Note 7: Once the 1746-C reads in a table from the M0 file, the 1746-C will always deliver the
feedback table almost immediately … whether or not it was a read or write table command.
Therefore, the best practice to maintain synchronization between the PLC and 1746-C is for the
PLC to “conceptually” wait for a feedback response from the 1746-C before continuing … even
if only to throw away the table.
This will also increase the 1746-C overall speed because it waits for an acknowledgement of
the feedback before continuing with command execution.
REMEMBER … Speed in servicing of the M1 transfer requests expedites system throughput.
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
4.3.2. Operation: PLC Commands to Write Data to the Actuators
When valve control commands (change setpoint, open, stop or close) are generated by the PLC, the
Network Master sends the appropriate command(s) over the network to the addressed slave device
(actuator).
However, if the command for a particular valve has not changed (value in the table is the same as
before), then nothing is sent to the particular valve (it is skipped). Basically, when the 1746-C starts
acting on a command to write data to the actuators, it compares the current value in the table with the
new one. If the values are different, then the actuator is flagged as one to write information to.
When writing discrete output control commands (directly controlling coils [3-5] or [100-1011]),
the 1746-C does NOT compare the value to the last one. When commanded to write to the
coils, it is performed ONE TIME and then turned off for that actuator (however, monitoring the
status of those outputs is left on for that actuator).
When the 1746-C starts writing data to the actuators, is starts with the lowest address number and
proceeds through to the highest address number. This write operation is completed after all
“appropriate” actuators have been written to.
In general, there is one Modbus command/response set issued for EACH PLC command to write data
to a particular actuator (ex: writing analog output data).
However, as per the specification, when a position control command is issued, the 1746-C is required
to ensure that a “SSR” contactor configuration bit is set on any 320A system prior to receiving a control
command. Therefore, there are up to 3 Modbus command/response sets issued for EACH PLC
command to write position data in any particular 320A actuator:
If the actuator is configured to have an SSR in it (table [13]):
1. A Modbus command is sent to the actuator requesting status information to verify the SSR
configuration coil is set.
2. If the coil is not set, a Modbus command is sent to set it.
3. The Modbus command is sent to indicate the new setpoint.
Note 1: Discrete OPEN / CLOSE / STOP commands.
The discrete OPEN / CLOSE / STOP commands (in table 3) are handled exactly the same as if
a setpoint was sent.
• OPEN
(send a 100% open setpoint)
• CLOSE
(send a 0% open setpoint)
• STOP
(send a setpoint matching the last position read)
(For more information on how this works, refer to the actuator’s operation manual)
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Note 2: If writing to a valve and the write fails, then the internal flag to write the value REMAINS
ACTIVE. This means that even though the communication process will prevent the program
from trying to transmit when there is an error, the program will keep this value identified as one
to send out until it is actually sent out or cleared by the PLC.
This also means that the write to this particular actuator will be attempted the next time the PLC
sends this table in with a “write table” command associated with it.
For example … If this was a value in table [5], the 1746-C will retry writing the value to the
actuator the next time the PLC sends table [5] in as a write command.
The 1746-C cannot “cancel” this command because it is not in its scope of responsibility to
directly change process control commands.
Therefore, it is the PLC’s responsibility to write whatever “safe” value is appropriate for the
particular actuator/application at any time in case the actuator “comes back online”.
Note 3: The PLC should limit the rate in which these commands are sent to the 1746-C … only write
as fast as required to adequately control the valve. The faster the PLC requests changes to
valve setpoint positions in the valves, the longer it takes the 1746-C to complete the write
operation and continue scanning the network for data … decreasing the overall performance
concerning updating status information for all actuators on the network.
For example: Sending write commands once per second might still afford good control and still
update all status information. However, sending write commands 4 times a second might write
the information out faster but delay the response (status) information for the entire network to a
point where it is too difficult to control.
Warning: If the valve has been moved while the PLC is down or the valve was moved while in local
mode, then as soon as the valve is communicating and accepting remote commands, it will
move according to values in tables [3] and [5]. Please adjust the PLC RLL accordingly.
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4.3.3. RLL Example … Manually Send New Table … Auto Read Response
Below is a simple example of an RLL that will manually send a table in a BTW and read back the
resulting feedback table using a BTR.
On the next page is an example of the M0 & M1 files (tables) sent and received.
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Control & Feedback via the N10 & N11 files … (table [19] requested … only 3 actuators on network)
Table Number
Sent in
Table
sent in
with the
M0 file
Table
read back
with the
M1 file
4-word
header
3 Nodes on
Network
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5. System Tables
From the perspective of the PLC, all tables can be read but only some can be written to. If the PLC
attempts to perform a write to a “read-only” table, the 1746-C ignores it and treats it as a read
command/request.
In general, when writing data to be transmitted to the actuators over the network, the Network Master
will differentiate which values change in tables being received from the PLC and will only send new
command information to the actuators that require a change.
The tables have the following PLC (“user”) access:
• Table [0]:
read / write
•
Table [1]:
•
Table [2]:
• Table [3]:
read / write
•
Table [4]:
• Table [5]:
read / write
•
Table [6]:
•
Table [7]:
• Table [8]:
read / write
• Table [9]:
read / write
• Table [10]:
read / write
•
Table [11]:
•
Table [12]:
• Table [13]:
read / write
• Table [14]:
read / write
• Table [15]:
read / write
• Table [16]:
read / write
• Table [17]:
read / write
•
Table [18]:
•
Table [19]:
• Table [20]:
read / write
• Table [21]:
read / write
• Table [22]:
read / write
• Table [23]:
read / write
• Table [24]:
read / write
read only
read only
read only
read only
read only
read only
read only
read only
read only
Table [0] is a “system focused” table. It is focused on information about the network system and
network master. All the rest of the tables are focused on information about individual actuator “units”.
NOTE:
In tables [1
24 … except 15], the last 60 words hold information for particular actuators.
63] are in sequence with valve actuator network node addresses. A particular
Words [4
actuator is represented by its POSITION in the table as an offset starting from word [3] (the
end of the header). For instance, Word [7] in all tables will always have valve #4
information.
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
There are two parts to a table:
• General Header Information:
• Table Specific Information:
Words [0
Words [4
3]
63]
In table [0], words [4
63] are divided into three parts:
• Words [4
17]:
System Configuration Information
• Words [18
46]:
-reserved- … currently not used.
• Words [47
63]:
Run-time information inserted by the 1746-C.
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
5.1. Table Arrangement
Word
offset
into
table
Table [0]
---System
Info Table
----
Table [1]
---Comm.
Error
Status
----
Table [2]
---Interpreted
Valve
Status Bits
Reg [06]
----
Table [3]
Table [4] Table [5]
---------Valve
Valve
Valve
Control
Position
Control
---Feedback
---Discrete
---Valve
Control
0 – 100% Setpoint
in 0.1%
------(O / C / S) increments 0 - 4095
----------
Table
[6]
---Analog
Input #1
----
Table
Table [8] Table [9] Table [10] Table [11] Table [12] Table [13] Table [14]
Table [15]
[7]
------------------------Valve
---Analog
Totalizer Totalizer
Status Bits
SSR
Additional
Block of
Analog Output #1
#1
#2
Position
for
Config
Register to Registers
Input #2
---------Discrete
---Poll from polled from a
---0 – 4095
Digital
All Valves
particular
Input s
on Network
valve.
reg [14]
----
reg [05]
----
Read
Only
Read
Only
Read /
Write
Read
Only
Read /
Write
Read
Only
Read
Only
Read /
Write
Read /
Write
Read /
Write
Read
Only
Read
Only
Read /
Write
Read /
Write
Read /
Write
0
Table #
0x00
Table #
0x01
Table #
0x02
Table #
0x03
Table #
0x04
Table #
0x05
Table #
0x06
Table #
0x07
Table #
0x08
Table #
0x09
Table #
0x0A
Table #
0x0B
Table #
0x0C
Table #
0x0D
Table #
0x0E
Table #
0x0F
1
R/W
Command
0
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
0
R/W
R/W
R/W
0
0
R/W
R/W
R/W
2
Reserved
(F/W ID
Reserved
(F/W ID)
Reserved
(F/W ID)
3
ESD
ESD
ESD
ESD
4
# Valves
on
Network
Valve #1
Comm
Status
Valve #1
Status
Valve #1
AOCS
5
Scan
Period
Size
Valve #2
Comm
Status
Valve #2
Status
6
Poll
Totalizers
Valve #3
Comm
Status
7
~
63
See table [0]
Configuration &
Run-Time
Information
Read /
Write
Reserved Reserved
(F/W ID)
(F/W ID)
Reserved
(F/W ID)
ESD
ESD
ESD
ESD
ESD
ESD
ESD
ESD
ESD
ESD
Valve #1
Valve #1
POS
STPT
0 – 100.0%
Valve #1
AIN-1
Valve #1
AIN-2
Valve #1
AOUT
Valve #1
TTL - 1
Valve #1
TTL - 2
Valve #1
POS
0 – 4095
Valve #1
Status
Valve #1
SSR
Valve #1
Add Reg
Value
Valve #
Valve #2
AOCS
Valve #2
Valve #2
POS
STPT
0 – 100.0%
Valve #2
AIN-1
Valve #2
AIN-2
Valve #2
AOUT
Valve #2
TTL - 1
Valve #2
TTL - 2
Valve #2
POS
0 – 4095
Valve #2
Status
Valve #2
SSR
Valve #2
Add Reg
Value
Valve
(Actuator)
Type
Valve #3
Status
Valve #3
AOCS
Valve #3
Valve #3
POS
STPT
0 – 100.0%
Valve #3
AIN-1
Valve #3
AIN-2
Valve #3
AOUT
Valve #3
TTL – 1
Valve #3
TTL - 2
Valve #3
POS
0 – 4095
Valve #3
Status
Valve #3
SSR
Valve #3
Add Reg
Value
Starting
Register
Number
Valve #4
Comm
Status
Valve #4
Status
Valve #4
AOCS
Valve #4
Valve #7
POS
STPT
0 – 100.0%
Valve #4
AIN-1
Valve #4
AIN-2
Valve #4
AOUT
Valve #4
TTL - 1
Valve #4
TTL - 2
Valve #4
POS
0 – 4095
Valve #4
Status
Valve #4
SSR
Valve #4
Add Reg
Value
Number of
Registers
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
Valve
#60
AOCS
Valve
#60
POS
0 – 100.0%
Valve
#60
TTL - 2
Valve
#60
POS
0 – 4095
Valve
#60
SSR
Valve
#60
Add Reg
Value
Valve #60
Comm
Status
Valve
#60
Status
Table [16]
Table [17]
------Command to Monitor Status of Discrete
Word
&/or Control Discrete
Digital Outputs
offset into
Digital Outputs
…
table
0
Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved
(F/W ID)
(F/W ID)
(F/W ID) (F/W ID) (F/W ID) (F/W ID) (F/W ID) (F/W ID) (F/W ID)
(F/W ID)
ESD
ESD
~
Table [18]
---System Type
Valve
#60
STPT
Valve
#60
AIN-1
Table [19]
---Firmware
Version ID
Valve
#60
AIN-2
Valve
#60
AOUT
Table [20]
---Modbus Exception
Response
Indications
Valve
#60
TTL - 1
Valve
#60
Status
See
Table [15]
Description
Table [21]
---TEC2000 Inputs
[1000 – 1015]
Table [22]
---TEC2000 Inputs
[1016 – 1031]
Table [23]
---TEC2000 Inputs
[1032 – 1047]
Table [24]
---TEC2000 Inputs
[1048 – 1063]
Reg [1001]
…
Read / Write
Reg [1002]
…
Read / Write
Reg [1003]
…
Read / Write
Table #
0x16
Table #
0x17
Table #
0x18
Read / Write
Read / Write
Read Only
Read Only
Read / Write
Reg [1000]
…
Read / Write
Table #
0x10
Table #
0x11
Table #
0x12
Table #
0x13
Table #
0x14
Table #
0x15
1
R/W
0
0
0
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
2
Reserved
(F/W ID)
Reserved
(F/W ID)
Reserved
(F/W ID)
Reserved
(F/W ID)
Reserved
(F/W ID)
Reserved
(F/W ID)
Reserved
(F/W ID)
Reserved
(F/W ID)
Reserved
(F/W ID)
3
ESD
ESD
ESD
ESD
ESD
ESD
ESD
ESD
ESD
4
Valve #1
Valve #1
Discrete Output Cmd Discrete Out Status
Valve #1
System Type
Valve #1
Firmware ID
Valve #1
Exception Code
Valve #1
Inputs [1000-1015]
Valve #1
Inputs [1016-1031]
Valve #1
Inputs [1032-1047]
Valve #1
Inputs [1048-1063]
5
Valve #2
Valve #2
Discrete Output Cmd Discrete Out Status
Valve #2
System Type
Valve #2
Firmware ID
Valve #2
Exception Code
Valve #2
Inputs [1000-1015]
Valve #2
Inputs [1016-1031]
Valve #2
Inputs [1032-1047]
Valve #2
Inputs [1048-1063]
6
Valve #3
Valve #3
Discrete Output Cmd Discrete Out Status
Valve #3
System Type
Valve #3
Firmware ID
Valve #3
Exception Code
Valve #3
Inputs [1000-1015]
Valve #3
Inputs [1016-1031]
Valve #3
Inputs [1032-1047]
Valve #3
Inputs [1048-1063]
7
Valve #4
Valve #4
Discrete Output Cmd Discrete Out Status
Valve #4
System Type
Valve #4
Firmware ID
Valve #4
Exception Code
Valve #4
Inputs [1000-1015]
Valve #4
Inputs [1016-1031]
Valve #4
Inputs [1032-1047]
Valve #4
Inputs [1048-1063]
~
63
~
~
Valve #60
Valve #60
Discrete Output Cmd Discrete Out Status
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
Valve #60
System Type
Valve #60
Firmware ID
Valve #60
Exception Code
Valve #60
Inputs [1000-1015]
Valve #60
Inputs [1016-1031]
Valve #60
Inputs [1032-1047]
Valve #60
Inputs [1048-1063]
Figure 5-1 Table Arrangement
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
EXAMPLE OF GENERAL TABLE FORMAT …
Characteristics:
• 48 node network
• Table [1] feedback from the 1746-C (what is given to the PLC)
Shaded area …
Standard 4-word
header in front of
any table
1st actual data
word in table
… for valve #1
Shaded area … Unused
part of 60-word data-table
because only 48 nodes on
network
st
1 word in
buffer …
Table ID
(unused network locations
marked with a “-99”)
Last data word
used in this datatable …
for valve #48
Last data word
possible in any
data-table …
for valve #60 …
not used here.
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5.2. Standard Header Format (All Tables) … Words [0
3]
The header is the first four (4) words in the data block.
Please refer to the list of tables in Figure 3-2.
5.2.1. Word [0]: Table ID
As in the first word in the block data transfers, this first word is the Table ID. This can also be
considered the “Command ID”.
5.2.2. Word [1]: Read / Write Command Indicator
(If a Read/Write Table):
If word [1] == 0
this is a command from the PLC to the 1746-C to read the specified table
from 1746-C memory and place it into the exchange buffer so the PLC can read it out
63].
… words [0
If this is table [0], then this read back will include all current configuration information
(at the front of the table) and current system run-time information (at the back of the
table).
If word [1] =/= 0
(any non-zero value) … this is a command from the PLC to the 1746-C to
remove the supplied table of data from the exchange buffer and place it into the 1746C standard memory (tables).
- If this is table [0], then the configuration information is written.
- Otherwise, the table information is written to the 1746-C.
- If this is the type of table that actually writes data to the actuators, then that data
is outputted to the actuators.
(If a Read Only Table):
This word is ignored and the table is only read.
5.2.3. Word [2]: Reserved / Firmware ID
When received by the 1746-C from the PLC, this word is ignored (reserved for future use).
When transmitted from the 1746-C to the PLC, this word contains the firmware ID. This is a decimal
number representing the 1746-C firmware ID. For instance, if the value in table [0] … word [2] is 400,
the firmware version number is 4.00
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5.2.4. Word [3]: Emergency Shut Down (ESD) Command Word & Indication
The ESD command is a command broadcasted to all actuators connected to the network that an
emergency is in effect and the actuator should start performing the ESD actions its pre-configured for.
The 1746-C broadcasts an ESD on both channels with a 200-millisecond delay between them.
If the PLC wishes to engage the ESD for the network, it writes a 255 (0x00FF) to this word location
(Word [3]) using a write to any table. The Network Master then broadcasts the appropriate ESD
command to all valves on the network (on both channels with about a 200ms delay between each).
When the PLC wants to end the ESD, it writes a 170 (0x00AA) into this word into any table.
The
Network Master will then broadcast the appropriate “Stand-Down from ESD” command to all valves on
the network on both channels with about a 200ms delay between each.
Later, after the PLC is satisfied that the ESD is over and normal operations have resumed (stand down
from ESD has completed), it is recommended that the PLC clear this stand-down value (and all aspects
of ESD) by resetting it to zero (again, in any table).
Summary:
• 255
• 170
•
0
The appropriate values for the ESD command word from the PLC are:
(0x00FF)
= Engage ESD
(0x00AA)
= Stand down from ESD
= Emergency shut-down (ESD) control is not active
Once any ESD command is written to any table, the value is propagated throughout all tables.
Therefore, the RLL does not have to remember which one it wrote to.
Warning: Since the ESD is actually a function of the actuator control cards; if an actuator is reset then
that actuator will probably not be in ESD. This also means that if the 1746-C loses power or is
reset, it has no prior knowledge of any valves in ESD. It can turn off ESD once initialization of
the software has occurred.
It is the responsibility of the RLL to repeat the ESD broadcast
under the possibility of these circumstances.
Warning: If any or some of the actuators are configured to move on ESD, consider the electrical
power required in performing a network ESD. A large electrical power drop can possibly create a
reset in the actuator by affecting the control voltage.
Note 1: Remember, an ESD command from the PLC will inform the actuators to do what ever they
were configured to do during an ESD condition. Therefore, this could easily override any other
control commands already sent to them or about to be sent (ex: commands placed in any write
Tables [3, 5, 8,] might be rejected by the actuator because of the ESD condition).
Note 2: If monitoring the network, the values of 0xAA & 0xFF are not the values transmitted to the
actuators. The program actually uses a Modbus command 05 to set/clear a bit (coil) in the
register map in the actuators. From then on, the actuators do what ever they are configured to
do when ESD is either started or ended.
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5.3. Table [0] … System Information Table
5.3.1. Table [0] Overview
This table is a read/write table in that is used for “system level” configuration and run-time
status/diagnostic information. Basically, it is not “actuator” focused but more focused on the entire
network of actuators.
When told to write this table, the information is not sent out onto the network. Also, only the
configuration words are written into the table. The run-time status information is supplied by the 1746C.
Table [0] has 4 parts to it:
3]:
1. Words [0
2. Words [4
17]:
Standard header information … common in all tables.
System Configuration/Control words (set by the PLC)
3. Words [18
46]:
Not currently used … Reserved for future use … zeroed out.
4. Words [47
63]:
Run-time feedback of real-time values (set by the 1746-C).
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
Words [4
1.
2.
3.
4.
Word [4]:
Word [5]:
Word [6]:
Word [7]:
17]
(control/configuration parameters set by the PLC)
Set the Number of Valves on the Network.
Set the Scan Period value (# scans before a communication diagnostic scan)
Set the T/F control flag whether or not to poll for totalizers on network scans.
Set the additional number of valves to poll in the network-scan time slice.
5. Word [8]: Set the Additional Message response delay to expect from actuators
(10ms increments)
(FUNCTION: Poll specified additional register from all actuators on network)
6. Word [9]: Set the specified additional register to poll from all actuators on the network.
7. Word [10]: Set the T/F control flag whether or not to start polling all actuators for the additional
register.
8. Word [11]:
9. Word [12]:
10. Word [13]:
11. Word [14]:
(FUNCTION: Poll block of registers from one specific actuator on the network)
Set the specific actuator to get the block of holding registers from
Set the starting register number in the block of holding registers to be requested
Set the total number of holding registers being requested
Set the T/F control flag whether or not to start polling the specific actuator for the
block of registers.
(FUNCTION: Reset Scan Period Counter/Accumulator)
12. Word [15]: Set the T/F control flag whether or not to manually reset the Scan Period Counter.
13. Word [16]: Value that will always reset the scan period counter.
(FUNCTION: Poll TEC2000 Input Registers 1000 – 1003)
14. Word [17]: Set the T/F control flag whether or not to poll the input registers if the system is
determined to be a TEC2000 system.
Remember …
Currently, Words [18
46] in table [0] are unused and
should be considered “reserved” for future use.
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
Words [47
63]
(Run-time feedback of real-time values set by the 1746-C)
1. Word [47]:
Rollover Counter for Scan Period Counter (Accumulator).
2. Word [48]:
Scan Period Counter (Accumulator).
------------------------------------------3. Word [49]:
The port number for the currently “preferred port”.
4. Word [50]:
Total number of valves polled during last network-scan time slice
(before servicing the PLC communications).
------------------------------------------5. Word [51]:
This scan period: Last Network Scan Time
(0.1 sec increments).
6. Word [52]:
This scan period: Total elapsed time
(0.1 sec increments).
7. Word [53]:
This scan period: Average scan time
(0.1 sec increments).
8. Word [54]:
This scan period: Shortest scan time
(0.1 sec increments).
9. Word [55]:
This scan period: Longest scan time
(0.1 sec increments).
------------------------------------------10. Word [56]:
Last scan period: Average scan time last period
(0.1 sec increments).
11. Word [57]:
Last scan period: Total scan time last period
(0.1 sec increments).
12. Word [58]:
Last scan period: Shortest scan time last period
(0.1 sec increments).
13. Word [59]:
Last scan period: Longest scan time last period
(0.1 sec increments).
------------------------------------------14. Word [60]:
Duration of last diagnostic scan.
(0.1 sec increments).
15. Word [61]:
Duration of previous diagnostic scan
(0.1 sec increments).
------------------------------------------16. Word [62]:
Current period scan loop counter.
17. Word [63]:
Current number of actuators “online” and communicating.
Note: All real-time timing information reported (reported back by the 1746-C module) has an accuracy
of (+/-) 50ms.
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
5.3.2. Table [0] Configuration Words … Words [4
17]
The following words in table [0] are a configuration and control parameters set by the PLC for the 1746C to run as expected.
Word [4]:
Number of Actuators on the network.
This is value indicates of the number of actuators on the network. If this number ever changes,
all tables [1-20 … except for 15] are reset to ensure valid values get filled for each valve on the
network.
The minimum number of actuators is one (1).
The maximum is 60 (which is also the default).
Note to Remember with PLC Interfacing:
The 1746-C only fills in tables with data from the actuators during the “network scan time
slice”.
If the PLC changes the Number of Actuators on the Network at some point in time
after initial power up, the 1746-C will only be filling in the new data “X” actuators at a
time (where “X” is the number of valves scanned per network scan time slide … see
word [7] for more information on this). This means that it can take several network
scan time slices for the 1746-C to fill in new data for all actuators on the network.
The 1746-C will not attempt to fill in all data before interfacing with the PLC again
because of the time it takes to poll the entire network … this could lead to “starving the
PLC” with a lack of communication.
The PLC RLL needs to be constructed to take this into consideration.
Word [5]:
Number of Scans in Scan Period … Scan Period “Size”.
The scan period is the number of network scans before the network is retested for network
failures (before the next diagnostic scan).
The default is 50 scans.
If there is a communication error, such as a broken communication
cable, then the system will look for a change (such as a repair to the cable) every 50 scans.
The diagnostic scan resets all communication error indicators so that both ports can be checked
The minimum scan period number is five (5). The maximum number is 200.
Note: If your system requires highest performance and speed, then you may want to raise this
value (200 is max). If the system does not require performance but requires high
reliability and early communication fault detection, you might want to lower this number (5
is minimum).
Note: For more information on using the scan period value and the diagnostic scan; refer to
the Application Note at the end of this document.
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Word [6]:
FUNCTION:
Poll for Accumulator (Totalizer) Data
This is a flag that indicates whether or not the 1746-C should request accumulator (totalizer)
data from the actuators when scanning. The totalizer values are stored in tables [9 & 10].
This data is retrieved with a separate Modbus read command when the particular actuator is
being polled (scanned).
If word [6] == 0
If word [6] =/= 0
do not poll for totalizer data.
(any non-zero value) … poll for totalizer data.
By default, word [6] == 0 … do not poll for totalizer data.
Word [7]:
Additional Valves to Poll in the scan time-slice.
The process scheduler has 2 primary processes to monitor:
1. Scanning the network (polling valves)
2. PLC communication & service.
Each process is given a particular time slice to operate in/with.
By program architecture, it is guaranteed that after servicing a PLC request, one valve (the next
on the network after the previous one polled) will be polled for data. The number in word [7]
allows the operator to allocate additional valves to be polled before servicing the PLC again.
The larger this number is, the shorter the network scan time but the fewer interactions with the
PLC. The lower the number, the more service given to the PLC (for control and feedback) but
the slower the network scan time (because we are servicing the PLC commands to read/write
tables).
This number should be adjusted for the most optimal fit for the application.
The default value is 2.
The minimum value is zero (0).
The maximum value is the lesser of
• 9
• 1 less than the number of valves on the network.
Word [8]:
Additional Message Response Delay
Word [8] offers the operator the chance to enter a desired ADDITIONAL expected delay when
receiving messages from the network. The value is in 10 ms increments and can have a range
of 0-30 (0 – 300 ms).
The default value is 0.
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Words [9 & 10]:
FUNCTION:
Poll Additional Holding Register From Entire Network
This operation allows the operator the chance to poll the entire network for any particular
holding register. The register values polled are stored in table [14]. This data is retrieved with
a separate Modbus read command when the particular actuator is being polled (scanned).
This data is retrieved with a separate Modbus read command each time an actuator is polled
(scanned).
FORMAT:
Word [9] … The holding register desired.
Word [10] … This is a flag that indicates whether or not to start requesting that register
from the actuators when scanning.
•
•
If Word [10] == 0
If Word [10] =/= 0
do not poll for the register.
(any non-zero value) … poll for the register specified in word [9].
By default, Words [9 & 10] == 0 … do not poll.
Words [11
14]:
FUNCTION:
Poll Additional Block of Registers From Single (Specified) Actuator
This operation allows the operator the chance to poll a single actuator for a block of registers.
The register values returned are stored in table [15] such that …
• Table [15] – words [4-7] … header information about information returned.
• Table [15] – words [8-13] … not used … reserved.
• Table [15] – words [14 - 63] …
register information returned.
This data is retrieved with a separate Modbus read command when the particular actuator is
being polled (scanned).
FORMAT:
Word [11] …
Word [12] …
Word [13] …
Word [14] …
•
•
The actuator address to get the block of registers from.
The register number for the 1st holding register in the block to retrieve.
The total number of registers to retrieve.
This is a flag that indicates whether or not to start requesting that block
of registers from that actuator when polling it.
If Word [14] == 0
If Word [14] =/= 0
By default, Words [11
do not poll for the block of registers.
(any non-zero value) … poll for the block of registers.
14] == 0 … do not poll.
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
16]:
Words [15
FUNCTION:
Reset Scan Period Counter (Accumulator)
This operation allows the operator the chance to reset the scan period counter/accumulator
• When desired …
word [15] =/= 0.
• With the value desired …
word [16] value.
The scan period counter is located in table [0] – words [47 & 48] such that
• Word [47] … Rollover counter for the Scan Period Counter.
• Word [48] … Scan Period Counter
Both have a high end max value of 32,000.
Word [48] is incremented at the start of scan #1(after the previous diagnostic scan).
Whenever word [48] rolls over,
• Word [48] is automatically filled with the value in word [16].
• Word [47] is incremented
If the counter is reset in the middle of a scan period (which is most likely), it must wait until after
that scan period is finished (and the accompanying diagnostic scan) before it starts counting
again.
Note: that to determine the time for the rollover counter to rollover one time …
Rollover increment time = (time for the scan period) + (diagnostic scan time)
FORMAT:
Word [15] … This is a flag that indicates whether or not to reset the Scan Period Counter.
Word [16] … The value used to reset the Scan Period Counter.
•
•
If Word [15] == 0
If Word [15] =/= 0
•
•
Word [47] = 0
Word [48]
do not reset the counter.
(any non-zero value) …
Word [16]
By default, Words [15 & 16] == 0 … do not reset the counter.
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
Word [17]:
FUNCTION:
Poll for Input Registers [1000-1003] on TEC2000 Systems
This is a flag that indicates whether or not the 1746-C should request the input registers on any
TEC2000 system detected when scanning. The input register values are stored in tables [21 24] such that …
• Table [21] contains register [1000] status bits.
• Table [22] contains register [1001] status bits.
• Table [23] contains register [1002] status bits.
• Table [24] contains register [1003] status bits.
This data is retrieved with a separate Modbus read command when the particular actuator is
being polled (scanned).
If word [17] == 0
If word [17] =/= 0
do not poll for input registers.
(any non-zero value) … poll for input registers.
By default, word [17] == 0 … do not poll.
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5.3.3. Table [0] Run-Time Information Words … Words [47
63]
The following words in table [0] are a run-time feedback of real-time values set by the 1746-C.
1. Word [47]:
Rollover Counter for Scan Period Counter (Accumulator).
2. Word [48]:
Scan Period Counter (Accumulator).
------------------------------------------3. Word [49]:
The port number for the currently “preferred port”.
4. Word [50]:
Total number of valves polled during last network-scan time slice
(before servicing the PLC communications).
------------------------------------------5. Word [51]:
This scan period: Last Network Scan Time
(0.1 sec increments).
6. Word [52]:
This scan period: Total elapsed time
(0.1 sec increments).
7. Word [53]:
This scan period: Average scan time
(0.1 sec increments).
8. Word [54]:
This scan period: Shortest scan time
(0.1 sec increments).
9. Word [55]:
This scan period: Longest scan time
(0.1 sec increments).
------------------------------------------10. Word [56]:
Last scan period: Average scan time last period
(0.1 sec increments).
11. Word [57]:
Last scan period: Total scan time last period
(0.1 sec increments).
12. Word [58]:
Last scan period: Shortest scan time last period
(0.1 sec increments).
13. Word [59]:
Last scan period: Longest scan time last period
(0.1 sec increments).
------------------------------------------14. Word [60]:
Duration of last diagnostic scan.
(0.1 sec increments).
15. Word [61]:
Duration of previous diagnostic scan
(0.1 sec increments).
------------------------------------------16. Word [62]:
Current period scan loop counter.
17. Word [63]:
Current number of actuators “online” and communicating.
This information is updated at the end of each scan. If the information is scan-period based, then the
information is updated only at the end of the last scan for the particular scan period.
Note: All real-time timing information reported (reported back by the 1746-C module) has an accuracy
of (+/-) 50ms.
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5.3.4. Table [0] … RSLOGIX-500 Examples
5.3.4.1. Example RSLOGIX-500 Screen:
In this example, memory locations N10 & N11 show the entire data exchange area for M0/M1 transfer
commands …
Table sent
out with the
M0 file
Table read
back with
the M1 file
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5.3.4.2. Table [0] … The Configuration Values (RSLOGIX-500).
In this example, the memory areas:
• N10:0
N10:63:
Indicates the 64-word table the PLC sends to the 1746-C.
• N11:0
N11:63:
Indicates the 64-word table the 1746-C sends back to the PLC.
Interesting & Important Note in this example:
In this example, the configuration the PLC would like to have (N10:0
N10:16) does NOT
agree with the configuration information the 1746-C actually has and is being read back (N11:0
N11:16).
Also notice the configuration values being reflected back by the 1746-C … they
are all factory default values.
This screen reflects a state in which the PLC has not sent a “write table [0]” command to the
1746-C to set configuration values. Therefore, this 1746-C is currently running and “thinking”
that
• There are 60 actuators on the network.
• The scan period should be 50 scans long
However, the PLC actually “wants”
• 48 actuators on the network.
• A scan period 10 scans long
To remedy this disparity of operation … the PLC needs to send the “write table [0]” command to
the 1746-C to set configuration values (word [1] =/= 0).
Table
ID
Table sent
out with the
M0 file
Table read
back with
the M1 file
Read/Write
Command
Flag to Start
Polling
Additional
Register from
all Network
Devices
Table ID
Reserved
Actuator
Address to
Poll Block of
Registers
Read/Write
Command
ESD
Command
Starting
Register in
Block of
Registers
Firmware
ID (5.02)
Specified #
actuators on
Network
Scan Period
Value
Total Number Flag to Start
of Registers in Polling for
Block of
Block of
Registers
Registers
Current ESD
Command
State
Specified #
actuators on
Network
Flag to Poll
Totalizers
Additional
Valves in
Network Scan
time-slice
Flag to Value to
Reset
Reset
the Scan the Scan
Period
Period
Counter Counter
Scan
Period
Value
Flag to Poll
Totalizers
Additional
Message
Response
Delay from
Actuators
Flag to
Poll
TEC2000
Inputs
Additional
Valves in
Network Scan
time-slice
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Additional
Register to Poll
from All Network
Devices
Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
5.3.4.3. Table [0] … The Configuration Values – Writing Table [0] (RSLOGIX-500)
State prior to writing table [0] configuration values …
Table sent
out with the
M0 file
Table read
back with
the M1 file
State after writing table [0] configuration values …
Table read
back with
the M1 file
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
5.3.4.4. Table [0] … The Run-Time Feedback Values From 1746-C (RSLOGIX-500)
This screen demonstrates examples of the run-time information that the 1746-C reports back to the
PLC.
Last Network Last Network
Scan:
Scan:
Total number of
Time
valves polled
(4.3 sec)
during
Valve Scan
time slice (2)
This Scan
This Scan This Scan This Scan
Period:
Period:
Period:
Period:
Total Elapsed Average
Shortest
Longest
time
Scan Time Scan Time Scan Time
(427 sec)
(4.3 sec)
(4.2 sec)
(4.3 sec)
Rollover
Counter
for Scan
Period
Counter
Scan
Period
Counter
This Scan
Period:
Current
“Preferred”
Port
Table read
back with
the M1 file
Duration of
Last
Diagnostic
Scan
(17.3 sec)
Duration of
Previous
Diagnostic
Scan
(17.3 sec)
Current
scan loop
counter (0)
…
Diagnostic
Scan
Current
Number of
Valves
Online (48)
Last Scan
Period:
Average
Scan Time
(4.2 sec)
Last Scan
Period:
Total Elapsed
time
(41.9 sec)
Last Scan
Period:
Shortest
Scan Time
(4.2 sec)
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Last Scan
Period:
Longest Scan
Time
(4.2 sec)
Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
5.4. Tables [1
20] … Actuator Information Tables
5.4.1. Table [1]: Communication Error Status
Words [4
63]
PLC access: Read Only.
The “Communication Error Status Table” is used by the network master to track communication faults
with each actuator. This data is totally derived by the 1746-C. These are considered “Low-Level”
communication errors.
The value of the word gives the following status:
• 0=
good communication through both ports
• 1=
error communicating through Port 1 … but success on Port 2
• 2=
error communicating through Port 2 … but success on Port 1
• 3=
No communication to the valve actuator at all. In this case, bit-14 in Table [2] will also
be set.
This table can be used by the PLC system to diagnose valve actuators that are not communicating. If
a network requires maintenance, then information in this table can help trace the problem. During a
network fault, this information can help point to the section that’s in fault.
During communication with the actuators, a time-out value is implemented to flag network errors. The
network master will try to communicate with the valve from the currently “preferred port” three (3) times.
If the valve does not respond within those three times, the valve is flagged to communicate on the
current “backup port” and the 1st port is identified as having a problem with that valve (in table [1]).
The backup port immediately tries to communicate with the valve three more times. If the valve still
fails to respond, the particular actuator is flagged as having a general communication error by having
• Its table [1] entry set = “3”.
• Its bit-14 in table [2] set = “1”.
The data in this table is always updated … any time the 1746-C tries to communicate with the network.
However, this table is only reset (errors cleared) during a diagnostic scan.
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Example Table [1] Feedback (48-node network) …
Characteristics:
• Total COM faults on units [1-4] … they have a value of 3 … an error communicating on both
ports.
•
No COM faults on any other units (5 – 48 have a value of 0 … no problems communicating).
•
Note that this would happen if units [1-4] were turned off.
First Node
on Network
Last Node
on 48 Node
Network
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5.4.2. Table [2]: Actuator Operational Status
Words [4
63]
PLC access: Read Only.
This data is primarily derived from holding register [6] in the actuator. It is retrieved with the “standard
data request” - Modbus read command when the particular actuator is being polled (scanned).
However, bit-14 is adjusted by the 1746-C.
This status word can be “bit parsed” to give:
• Bit-0:
LSO is tripped (valve is at the end of its OPEN travel limits)
• Bit-1:
LSC is tripped (valve is at the end of its CLOSE travel limits)
• Bit-2:
Valve is moving in the OPENING direction
• Bit-3:
Valve is moving in the CLOSING direction
•
•
•
•
Bit-4:
Bit-5:
Bit-6:
Bit-7:
Selector Switch is in the Local position
Selector Switch is in the Remote position
Open Torque ALARM is active.
Close Torque ALARM is active.
•
•
•
•
Bit-8:
Bit-9:
Bit-10:
Bit-11:
Valve Stall Alarm is active (valve not moving on command)
Power Monitor Alarm is active (loss of control voltage alarm)
Motor Overload Alarm is active
Phase Monitor Alarm is active (only if Phase Sentry is Installed)
•
•
•
Bit-12:
Bit-13:
Bit-14:
Local (Hardwired) Alarm is active.
Fail Alarm Self-diagnostics Alarm is active.
Comm Alarm … Valve not communicating with the network
(Same as the value “3” in Table [1])
•
Bit-15:
Unit Alarm … Set when any actuator alarm is set.
Note: Bit-0 is the LSB in the word. Bit-15 is the MSB in the word.
Some of these bit indications are repeats of those in table [12]. However, not all.
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Example Table [2] Feedback (48-node network) …
Characteristics:
• The format is displayed in HEX because HEX is easier to interpret “bit indicator” data.
•
Units [1, 3, 4] …
o Communication Alarm exists … bit [14] = 1
•
Unit [2] …
o Selector switch in the remote position … bit [5] = 1
•
The rest of the network is all the same …
o LSO is tripped … bit [0] = 1
First Node
on Network
Table [2] in HEX
because this
table represents
bit indications
Last Node
on 48 Node
Network
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5.4.3. Table [3]: Discrete Control Mode (Open/Close/Stop)
Words [4
63]
PLC access: Read / Write
This table commands the actuator to move the valve either OPEN / CLOSED / STOP.
There are three discrete valve control commands available:
1. 1 (0x0001)
for Open
2. 2 (0x0002)
for Close
3. 3 (0x0003)
for Stop now at the current location.
The 1746-C will only react to these values.
The mechanism used to execute these commands is:
• If (OPEN) command:
a setpoint of 4095 is transmitted to the actuator.
•
If (CLOSE) command:
•
If (STOP) command:
o A Modbus command is sent to the actuator to read the current position.
o That “current” position is sent to the actuator as the setpoint to go to.
a setpoint of
0 is transmitted to the actuator.
A read back of Table [3] will
• If a write command issued: reflect the write command accepted by the 1746-C
• If a read command issued: reflect the last status of the discrete commands (unless changed by
a new table [5] entry).
Note 1: While the table will accept any value, any illegal data will be ignored.
Note 2: Any NEW discrete control command in this table will change the corresponding setpoint
control value in Table [5] to either 0 / 4095 / or “current position”.
Note 3: If a NEW change setpoint command is issued in Table [5] for a particular valve, then the
corresponding discrete control command in this table (Table [3]) will be zeroed out.
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Example Table [3] Feedback (48-node network) …
Characteristics:
• There are no discrete commands waiting for execution.
First Node
on Network
Last Node
on 48 Node
Network
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5.4.4. Table [4]: Valve Position Indication … 0 – 100.0%
Words [4
63]
PLC access: Read Only.
The Network Master receives the valve position from the actuator as an integer representing 0
100%
open in 0.1% increments. In other words, it receives a value from 0 – 1000 and each increment
indicates a 0.1%
•
0
Full Closed ( 0.0% open)
• 1000
Full Open
(100.0 % open)
This data is derived from holding register [13] in the actuator. It is retrieved with the “standard data
request” - Modbus read command when the particular actuator is being polled (scanned).
Example Table [4] Feedback (48-node network) …
Characteristics:
• Units [1, 3, 4] indicated position is 0% open … probably not operating.
• Unit [2] indicated position is 70.6% open
• The rest of the network’s indicated position is fully open at 100.0% open
First Node
on Network
Last Node
on 48 Node
Network
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
5.4.5. Table [5]: Valve Position Setpoint … 0 – 4095
Words [4
63]
PLC access: Read / Write
This table commands the actuators to move to a setpoint position designated by the PLC. When the
1746-C sends the new value to the actuators (telling them to move), it uses the Modbus function 6
command to write to holding register [11] in the actuator.
By sending a numeric value from 0
4095, the actuator will be commanded to move to a position
based on:
•
0 (0x0000)
= 0% Open (closed)
• 4095 (0x0FFF)
= 100% Open
A read back of Table [5] will
• If a write command issued: reflect the write command accepted by the 1746-C
• If a read command issued: reflect the current value of the setpoint register in the actuators.
Notes:
• Only values 0
4095 are allowed to be written by the PLC … all others are ignored.
•
Any EIM actuator may use position control via setpoint values. For the tightest position
possible with minimal overshoot or undershoot, the actuator must have the solid-state or VFD
control option. Please read the Controlinc Quick Startup Guide for more information.
•
If the actuator position has been moved while the PLC is down or the valve was moved while in
local control, then as soon as the PLC and actuators are communicating and accepting remote
commands, it will move according to the existing value in this Table.
•
Issuing a command in Table [5] will “zero out” any discrete (block) mode command issued on
Table [3] for the particular valve.
•
Any NEW discrete control command in table [3] will change the corresponding setpoint control
value in Table [5] to either 0 / 4095 / or “current position”
•
If the 1746-C ever returns a value of 0xFFFF for a setpoint indication in this table, it means that
the particular actuator is returning the standard “invalid setpoint” and is currently stopped and
waiting for a new command to move the valve.
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Example Table [5] Feedback (48-node network) …
Characteristics:
• Units [1, 3, 4] setpoint position is 0 (out of 4095) … 0% open … either fully closed or not
operating.
•
•
Unit [2] setpoint position is 2892 (out of 4095) … ~~ 70.6% open
The rest of the network’s setpoint position is fully open … 4095 out of 4095
First Node
on Network
Last Node
on 48 Node
Network
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5.4.6. Tables [6 & 7]: User Analog Inputs #1 & 2
Words [4
63]
PLC access: Read Only.
These tables contain 12-bit numbers (0
4095) representing the current value for analog input
channels. This data is derived from holding registers [16 & 17] in the actuators and is retrieved with the
“standard data request” - Modbus read command when the particular actuator is being polled
(scanned).
• Table [6]:
Value for User Analog Input #1 (holding register [16] in the actuators)
• Table [7]:
Value for User Analog Input #2 (holding register [17] in the actuators)
Example Table [6] Feedback (48-node network) …
Characteristics:
• There are no values on User Analog Input #1 on any unit on the network … all zero.
First Node
on Network
Last Node
on 48 Node
Network
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5.4.7. Table [8]: Analog Output #1
Words [4
63]
PLC access: Read / Write
This table/command tells the actuator to place an appropriate 4-20 mA signal on its analog output
channel. This data is derived from holding register [10] in the actuators and is retrieved with the
“standard data request” - Modbus read command when the particular actuator is being polled
(scanned).
When the 1746-C sends a new value to the actuators, it uses the Modbus function 6 command to write
to holding register [10] in the actuators.
The output is a linear scaling based on:
•
0 (0x0000)
= 4 mA
• 4095 (0x0FFF)
= 20 mA
Note: Only values 0
4095 are allowed … all others are ignored.
A read back of Table [8] will
• If a write command issued: reflect the write command accepted by the 1746-C
• If a read command issued: reflect the current value of the analog output register in the
actuators.
Note: Please read the Operators Manual the particular actuator for more information.
Note: This is an option that must be installed on the actuator.
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Example Table [8] Feedback (48-node network) …
Characteristics:
• On this network, none of the analog output values have been activated … a “-1” value recorded
there (valid values are 0 – 4095).
First Node
on Network
Last Node
on 48 Node
Network
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5.4.8. Tables [9 & 10]: Digital Input Accumulators (Totalizers) #1 & 2
Words [4
63]
PLC access: Read / Write
These tables contain 16-bit accumulator (totalizer) numbers stored in holding registers [66 & 67] in the
actuators. This data is retrieved with a separate Modbus read command when the particular actuator
is being polled (scanned).
• Table [9]:
Value for Accumulator (Totalizer) #1
• Table [10]:
Value for Accumulator (Totalizer) #2
These tables are not polled for unless the 1746-C is configured to allow it …
•
if Table [0] – Word [7] == 0: The accumulator/totalizer information is NOT requested when
actuators are polled (the default).
•
if Table [0] – Word [7] =/= 0: The accumulator/totalizer information is requested when
actuators are polled.
The PLC may reset these tables (and the counters in the actuators) with any value is prefers. All it
needs to do is insert the new value in the table and send it to the 1746-C as a write command. The
1746-C will then send the value to the actuator.
A read back of Tables [9 & 10] will
• If a write command issued: reflect the write command accepted by the 1746-C
• If a read command issued: reflect the last known values of the totalizer registers in the
actuators.
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Example Table [9] Feedback (48-node network) …
Characteristics:
• Totalizer #1 has not engaged for any unit on the network. This means that the digital input(s)
assigned to this totalizer/accumulator have not toggled low/high since the last power up on any
unit on the network.
o On 320A/B systems … user input #1.
o On TEC2000 systems … it depends upon the configuration.
•
This also means that the feature is probably not implemented on the actuators.
First Node
on Network
Last Node
on 48 Node
Network
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5.4.9. Table [11]: Valve Position Indication … 0 – 4095
Words [4
63]
PLC access: Read Only.
This table contains the 0-4095 representation of the valve position for the actuators. This data is
derived from holding register [14] in the actuators and is retrieved with the “standard data request” Modbus read command when the particular actuator is being polled (scanned).
Example Table [11] Feedback (48-node network) …
Characteristics:
• Units [1, 3, 4] position indication is 0 (out of 4095) … 0% open … either fully closed or not
operating.
•
Unit [2] position indication is 2892 (out of 4095) … ~~ 70.6% open
•
The rest of the network’s position indication is fully open … 4095 out of 4095
First Node
on Network
Last Node
on 48 Node
Network
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5.4.10. Table [12]: Discrete Input Statuses
Words [4
63]
PLC access: Read Only.
This table contains the status indications of the discrete inputs on 320A/B systems. Each bit in each
word in the table indicates the status of a particular discrete (hardwired) digital input for a particular
actuator. This data is derived from holding register [05] in the actuators and is retrieved with the
“standard data request” - Modbus read command when the particular actuator is being polled
(scanned).
If a TEC2000 was polled, the TEC2000 system correlates appropriate values to the bits being returned.
This status word can be “bit parsed” to give:
• Bit-0:
LSO (Limit Switch – Open) switch input is active (is tripped)
• Bit-1:
LSC (Limit Switch – Close) switch input is active (is tripped)
• Bit-2:
AUX Open Contactor input is active (is engaged)
• Bit-3:
AUX Close Contactor input is active (is engaged)
•
•
•
•
Bit-4:
Bit-5:
Bit-6:
Bit-7:
SS in Local Position input is active (is tripped)
SS in Remote Position input is active (is tripped)
TSO (Torque Switch – Open) input is active (is tripped) … not the alarm!
TSC (Torque Switch – Close) input is active (is tripped) … not the alarm!
•
•
•
•
Bit-8:
Bit-9:
Bit-10:
Bit-11:
Power Monitor Alarm input is active.
Thermal Overload Alarm input is active
Phase Monitor Alarm input is active (only if Phase Sentry is Installed)
Local (Hardwired) Alarm input is active
•
•
•
Bit-12:
Bit-13:
Bit-14:
AUX Alarm input is active
User Input #1 is active
User Input #2 is active
•
Bit-15:
Reserved … no operation.
Note: Bit-0 is the LSB in the word. Bit-15 is the MSB in the word.
Some of these bit indications are repeats of those in table [2]. However, not all.
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Example Table [12] Feedback (48-node network) …
“C” HEX …
12 Decimal
First Node
on Network
Table [12]
because this
table represents
bit indications
Last Node
on 48 Node
Network
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5.4.11. Table [13]: Solid State Relay (SSR) Configuration Table
Words [4
63]
PLC access: Read / Write
This is a read/write table that is used to help configure the actuators on the network. It is intended to
work with actuators that are setup for modulating control mode. If a 320A actuator has an OPTIONAL
SSR installed the network master must ensure the actuator knows it is configured with an SSR.
By writing a non-zero POSITIVE value to these positions in table [13], tells the network master to tell
the particular 320A actuator to configure itself to use an SSR … set coil [37] = 1 on the actuator. If not
a 320A actuator, this table value has no purpose.
SUMMARY:
• If word [n] == 0
• If word [n] > 0
(where “n” is 4
63) … this actuator does not have a SSR.
(any non-zero POSITIVE value) … this actuator has a SSR.
An example would be a network of actuators in which 3 are 320A systems that have SSCs … lets say
on valves 2, 4 and 10 by Modbus address. The corresponding words for these actuators are:
• Valve 2:
Word [5] … ( 2 + 3)
• Valve 4:
Word [7] … ( 4 + 3)
• Valve 10:
Word [13] … (10 + 3)
A read back of Table [13] will verify the write command being accepted by the 1746-C.
Note: If an actuator
• has an SSR installed
AND
• it is NOT configured for SSR control AND
• it is placed in modulating mode
then the remote host will be unable to control the valve via setpoint control. The actuator will read the
desired setpoint positions but will not be able to send the valve to the position and effectively stop it
there.
Note: Remember, setting this configuration bit is only necessary if the unit is a 320A system … 320B
and TEC2000 systems do not need this configuration assistance.
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Example Table [13] Feedback (48-node network) …
Characteristics:
• None of the units are configured for an SSR … probably either because they just don’t have one
or because they are not 320A systems.
First Node
on Network
Last Node
on 48 Node
Network
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5.4.12. Table [14]: Additional Register Being Polled From Entire Network
Words [4
63]
PLC access: Read / Write
This operation allows the operator the chance to poll the entire network for any particular holding
register. The register values polled are stored in this table. This data is retrieved with a separate
Modbus read command when the particular actuator is being polled (scanned).
This table is not polled for unless the 1746-C is configured to allow it …
•
Table [0] – Word [10] … contains the register number to poll for.
•
Table [0] – Word [10] … is a flag that indicates whether or not to start requesting that register
from the actuators when scanning such that …
o
if Table [0] – Word [11] == 0: The register is not polled (the default).
o
if Table [0] – Word [11] =/= 0: The register information is requested when actuators are
polled.
The PLC may reset this table with any value is prefers. To do this, the PLC must insert the new value
into the table and send it to the 1746-C as a write command. The values in this table are not sent out
to the actuators on the network.
A read back of Table [14] will
• If a write command issued: reflect the write command accepted by the 1746-C
• If a read command issued: reflect the last known values of the specified register polled in the
actuators.
If the PLC is utilizing table [14], it is recommended that the PLC also poll table [20]. If an exception
message is returned, then the value won’t be inserted into table [14] but the exception message
indicator will be inserted into table [20].
If detected, and the PLC wants to try again, it should initialize table [14] to some known value and either
explicitly clear table [20] or wait until after the next diagnostic scan (which automatically clears table
[20]) before trying again.
Example Scenario: If there are multiple types of EIM equipment on the network and the table [14]
command requests data from an actuator that is “not supported by that type of actuator” (but is on the
others), the actuator will return a Modbus Exception for that message and the values will NOT be
loaded into tables [14 or 15]. However, the exception codes will be loaded into table [20].
For example, if requesting register [1010] from a
• 320A system …
an exception code is returned.
• TEC2000 system …
the register containing coils [1069 – 1111] is returned.
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Example Table [14] Feedback (48-node network) …
Characteristics:
• (register [00] read back from the entire network … cannot tell from here … in table [0])
•
To make it more meaningful, table [14] is in hex because register [00] is bit indications.
•
•
•
Units [1,3,4]
Unit [2]
Units [5-48]
have a value of 0 … coils [0-15] all off … units probably off line.
has a value of 0x10C4 …
Coils set: [12, 7, 6, 2]
have a value of 0x10C4 … Coils set: [12, 7, 6, 2]
“E” HEX …
14 Decimal
First Node
on Network
Table [14] in
HEX because
register
requested (00) is
in bit indications
Last Node
on 48 Node
Network
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5.4.13. Table [15]: Additional Block of Registers Being Polled From 1
Actuator
Words [4
63]
PLC access: Read / Write
TABLE FORMAT:
This operation allows the operator the chance to poll a single actuator for a block of registers.
The register values returned are stored in table [15] such that …
• Words [4 - 7] …
header information about information returned …
Word [4] … Valve address where block of data came from.
Word [5] … Valve (actuator) type id.
Word [6] … Starting holding register number.
Word [7] … Total Number of registers in block.
•
•
Words [8 - 13] …
Words [14 - 63] …
not used … reserved.
register information returned.
TABLE CONTROL:
Control of this operation is via 4 words in table [0] such that …
• Table [0] – Word [11] … The actuator address to get the block of registers from.
• Table [0] – Word [12] … The register number for the 1st holding register in the block to retrieve.
• Table [0] – Word [13] … The total number of registers to retrieve.
• Table [0] – Word [14] … This is a flag that indicates whether or not to start requesting that block
of registers from that actuator when polling it.
If Table [0] – Word [14] == 0 do not poll for the block of registers.
If Table [0] – Word [14] =/= 0 (any non-zero value) … poll for the block of registers.
By default, Table [0] – Words [11
14] == 0 … do not poll.
OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW:
This data is retrieved with a separate Modbus read command when the particular actuator is being
polled (scanned).
The PLC may reset this table with any value is prefers. To do this, the PLC must insert the new value
into the table and send it to the 1746-C as a write command. The values in this table are not sent out
to the actuators on the network.
A read back of Table [15] will
• If a write command issued: reflect the write command accepted by the 1746-C except words [4
– 13] are zeroed out.
•
If a read command issued: reflect the last known values in the table.
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Words [4 – 7] are only filled with non-zero values if the block of data in words [14 – 63] table are
actually values retrieved from the actuator at the address specified in word [4].
Therefore, if a read of table [15] indicates that
• Word [4] == 0, then the data is not valid (there are not valves with address 0 that can respond
with data).
• Word [4] =/= 0, then the data in the table came from a valve.
If the PLC is utilizing table [15], it is recommended that the PLC also poll table [20]. If an exception
message is returned, then the block of data won’t be inserted into table [15] but the exception message
indicator will be inserted into table [20].
If detected, and the PLC wants to try again, it should initialize table [15] to some known value and either
explicitly clear table [20] or wait until after the next diagnostic scan (which automatically clears table
[20]) before trying again.
Example Scenario: If there are multiple types of EIM equipment on the network and the table [15]
command requests a block of data from an actuator that is “not supported by that type of actuator” (but
is on the others), the particular actuator will return a Modbus Exception for that message and the block
of data will NOT be loaded into tables [15]. However, the exception codes will be loaded into table
[20].
For example, if requesting a block of registers [15 - 30] from unit #5 and it is a
• 320A system …
the block of registers is returned.
• TEC2000 system …
an exception code is returned.
Notes on table [15] use:
• It is recommended that the PLC only keep this operation active until the data is received and
then deactivate it (setting table [0] – word [14] = 0).
•
When the PLC writes data to this table, the 1746-C only overwrites the last 50 words with the
data sent in. The rest of the table is zeroed out.
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Example Table [15] Feedback (48-node network) …
Characteristics …
• From actuator node #5
• Which happens to be 320B EIM equipment … type 2
• Starting from register [00] and
• 50 registers were read back.
From
actuator
node #5
Which happens
to be 320B EIM
equipment …
type 2
Starting
from
register
[00]
50
registers
were read
back
1st data
byte read
back …
register
[00]
Last data
byte read
back …
register
[49]
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5.4.14. Tables [16 & 17]: Monitor & Control Discrete Digital Outputs
Words [4
63]
PLC access: Read / Write
The entire operation to monitor and control the discrete outputs requires 2 tables ...
• Table [16] ... CONTROL --- store commands (desired states) for discrete outputs (coils).
• Table [17] ... MONITORING --- feedback (actual states) of discrete outputs (coils).
Table [16] allows the operator the ability to monitor (poll) and control the discrete outputs on an
actuator. All discrete output control is performed via this table (no table [0] entries are required).
Table [17] is the feedback information for polling the discrete outputs.
• This data is retrieved with a separate Modbus read command when the particular actuator is
being polled (scanned).
•
This data is only polled for when the matching valve entry in table [16] indicates that the 1746-C
should start monitoring these coils. Once polling (monitoring) has started, it must be explicitly
turned off.
•
This table will only reflect the status of bits representing coils. All others are either ignored or
zeroed out.
•
The PLC may reset this table with any value is prefers. All it needs to do is insert the new
value in the table and send it to the 1746-C as a write command. The table will be reset even
though nothing will be sent out to any actuator.
TEC2000 DISCRETE OUTPUTS (COILS)
On a TEC2000 system, there are 12 outputs and they are addressed as coils [1000 - 1011] in register
[1004] such that …
• Coil [1000] … RO1 …
Relay Output # 1
• Coil [1001] … RO2 …
Relay Output # 2
• Coil [1002] … RO3 …
Relay Output # 3
• Coil [1003] … RO4 …
Relay Output # 4
• Coil [1004] … RO9 …
Relay Output # 9
• Coil [1005] … RO10 …
Relay Output # 10.
• Coil [1006] … RO11 …
Relay Output # 11
• Coil [1007] … RO12 …
Relay Output # 12.
• Coil [1008] … SO6 …
Solid State Output # 6
• Coil [1009] … SO7 …
Solid State Output # 7
• Coil [1010] … SO8 …
Solid State Output # 8
• Coil [1011] … RO9 …
Relay Output # 9
Ordering is such that
• Coil [1000] is the LSB and located in the “bit-0” position … the right most position.
• Coil [1011] is the MSB and located in the “bit-11” position.
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320A/B DISCRETE OUTPUTS (COILS)
On a the other system types (320A and 320B), there are 3 outputs and they are addressed as coils [35] in register [00] such that …
• Coil [3] … ESD / monitor relay.
• Coil [4] … User Output Relay #1
• Coil [5] … User Output Relay #2
Ordering is such that
• Coil [3] is the “bit-3” position … the 4th position in from the right.
• Coil [4] is the “bit-4” position … the 5th position in from the right.
• Coil [5] is the “bit-5” position … the 6th position in from the right.
FORMAT
There are 2 distinct areas in each word in table [16] …
• Command / Control bits … bits [15-13] in the upper most nibble.
• Desired coil (output) states …
o Bits [11 – 0] for TEC2000 systems
o Bits [5-3] in other systems.
Only these bits are set in this table. All others are zeroed out.
COMMAND / CONTROL
There are only 3 valid control values (upper nibble in the word) the PLC can send to the 1746-C
concerning this operation …
Setting the upper nibble = 1000 … (top 1 bit set) tells the 1746-C to start
1. 1000 (binary):
monitoring the status of the output coils and recording them in table [17]. The 1746-C will also
clear the desired state bits … set table [16] – bits [3-5] = 000.
Setting the upper nibble = 1110 … (top 3 bits set) tells the 1746-C to
2. 1110 (binary):
• Start monitoring the status of the output coils and recording their states in table [17].
•
ONE TIME … write the desired states of the output coils to the particular actuator.
Once successful, bit [13] is set = 0 to prevent further (excess) writes.
3. 0xxx (binary):
Setting the bit = 0 … (bit [15] = 0 and don’t care about the others) tells
the 1746-C to terminate monitoring and writing. Essentially, clear the command. The 1746-C
will also clear the bits representing the desired state of all output coils in table [16].
The 1746-C will only react to these values from the PLC in the upper nibble.
All others are ignored.
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DESIRED STATES
The desired states of the digital outputs are directly reflected in the bits in the table … which directly
reflect the coils (bits) in the holding registers in the actuator. This means that the bits still maintain
their original position in all the registers …
For example,
• Coil [3] … is in register [00] – bit [3] … and in tables [16 & 17] in bit position [3]
• Coil [4] … is in register [00] – bit [4] … and in tables [16 & 17] in bit position [4]
• Coil [5] … is in register [00] – bit [5] … and in tables [16 & 17] in bit position [5]
Therefore, the PLC must set/clear bits [3-5] to control the outputs.
For example,
• Coil [1000] … is in register [1004] – bit [0] … and in tables [16 & 17] in bit position [0]
• Coil [1005] … is in register [1004] – bit [5] … and in tables [16 & 17] in bit position [5]
Therefore, the PLC must set/clear bits [0,1,5] to control these outputs.
IMPORTANT NOTE
Since a single command is sent to the actuator that affects all discrete outputs on a
system at one time, it is important that the PLC be aware of the “state” of all coils on
the particular valve before sending a command because ALL OUTPUTS ON THE
VALVE will be affected EVERYTIME one of these commands is sent. This is why
• Monitoring can be activated without writing values.
• Monitoring remains active after a write until explicitly turned off.
By monitoring table [17], the PLC can ensure correct behavior.
A read back of Table [16] will
• If a write command issued: reflect the status of the network write & network monitor commands
accepted by the 1746-C.
•
If a read command issued: reflect the last status of the network write & network monitor
commands issued out to the network.
Notes on table [16] use:
1. The PLC can monitor when a write happened by viewing the upper nibble of the word for the
particular valve. When it changes from (1110 … 0xE)
(1100 … 0xC) the write has
happened and the system is still monitoring the states of the relays.
2. The PLC can activate/deactivate monitoring these relays any time by setting/clearing bit [15]
(see the “Command / Control” section above).
However, anytime the PLC writes a value to the coils in an actuator, monitoring is automatically
started … and will not terminate until the PLC terminates it.
Therefore, the PLC needs to monitor this and deactivate the operation when not needed
anymore … otherwise, the additional polling will slow (lengthen) network scan times.
3. The 1746-C uses a Modbus Command 05 to write multiple coils when writing values to the
actuators.
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Example Tables [16 & 17] Feedback (48-node network) …
Characteristics:
• To make it more meaningful, tables [16 & 17] are in hex because of bit indications.
•
Monitoring is being performed on unit [1]
(bit [15] = 1 in table [16])
•
The PLC commanded the 1746-C to set all the coils on units [2 – 6]
(bits [15-13] = 111 … 0xE0xx in table [16] … the value prior to the 1746-C acting upon
the command)
(bits [5-3] = 111 in table [16])
•
The 1746-C processed the command and wrote the new coil states to actuators [2-6].
(bits [15-13] = 110 … 0xC0xx in table [16])
•
Units [2-6] all have all 3 discrete outputs on.
(bits [5-3] = 111 … 0x0038 in table [17])
TABLE EXAMPLES ARE ON NEXT PAGE …
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Tables [16 & 17] … with
commands loaded but not sent
Tables [16 & 17] … after
commands sent
Table
[16]
Sent
out
Table
[16]
Feed
back
Table
[17]
Feed
back
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5.4.15. Table [18]: Actuator System Type ID
Words [4
63]
PLC access: Read Only.
This data is primarily derived from holding registers [44] & [100] in the actuator. These registers are
retrieved with 2 separate Modbus read commands when the particular actuator is being polled
(scanned) during a diagnostic scan.
There are currently 4 types of EIM equipment identified. There are 6 system type values that can be
entered into table [18]:
• If EIM equipment type = 320A …
value in table [18] = “1”
• If EIM equipment type = 320B …
value in table [18] = “2”
• If EIM equipment type = TEC2000 …
value in table [18] = “3”
•
If non-EIM equipment type …
value in table [18] = “0” or “255”
NOTE: There are 2 possible values if the unit is identified as non-EIM:
•
0 … If failed identification … method 1.
• 255 … If failed identification … method 2.
The 1746-C uses these values internally.
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Example Table [18] Feedback (48-node network) …
Characteristics:
• Unit [1] is an EIM TEC2000 system …
• Units [2 – 48] are EIM 320B systems ...
type 3
type 2
First Node
on
Network
Last Node
on 48 Node
Network
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5.4.16. Table [19]: Actuator Firmware Version ID
Words [4
63]
PLC access: Read Only.
This data is derived from holding register [44] in the actuator. It is retrieved during a diagnostic scan
when the system type ID is being determined. This table is filled the same time table [18] is filled. For
more information, see table [18].
Example Table [19] Feedback (48-node network) …
Characteristics:
• Unit [1] is an EIM 320A system …
• Units [2 – 48] are EIM 320B systems …
firmware version: 2.00
firmware version: 3.02
First Node
on
Network
Last Node on
48 Node
Network
Note: TEC2000 systems do not store their version ID in register [44]. What you will see from a
TEC2000 system is the upper bit set to “1” and the rest zero … 0x8000 hex (-32768 decimal).
For more information relating to TEC2000 version identification, see the TEC2000 manual.
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5.4.17. Table [20]: Modbus Exception Message Response
Words [4
63]
PLC access: Read / Write
This data is filled anytime a communication error is detected due to the remote system sending a 5-byte
Modbus Exception Response message. These are “High-Level” Communication Errors … Application
Level. This table is cleared at the start of a diagnostic scan.
Format:
• Table [20] - Hi-byte: Error’d function code as returned by the remote system.
• Table [20] - Lo-byte: Modbus Exception Type (1
3)
The PLC may reset this table with any value is prefers. To do this, the PLC must insert the new value
into the table and send it to the 1746-C as a write command. The values in this table are not sent out
to the actuators on the network.
A read back of Table [20] will
• If a write command issued: reflect the write command accepted by the 1746-C
• If a read command issued: reflect the current values in the table.
If the PLC is utilizing tables [14 or 15], it should also poll this table. There are many reasons for this.
For example … if there are multiple types of EIM equipment on the network and the PLC requests data
from an actuator that is “not supported by that type of actuator” (but is on the others), the actuator will
return a Modbus Exception for that message and the values will NOT be loaded into tables [14 or 15].
However, the exception codes will be loaded into table [20].
Note: The intention of this table is not to identify (and maintain) this status in “real-time”. It is to only
serve as a general flag to the PLC/operator that an exception has occurred with this actuator
and that the PLC/operator might want to investigate more thoroughly later.
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Example Table [20] Feedback (48-node network) …
Characteristics:
• Table [20] is displayed hex to make it easier to interpret Modbus Exception messages returned
from the actuators.
•
No actuators have responded with a Modbus Exception message so far this scan period.
“14” HEX …
20 Decimal
First Node
on Network
Table [20] in HEX
because it is easier
to read exception
messages returned
by the actuators
Last Node
on 48 Node
Network
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5.4.18. Tables [21-24]: TEC2000 Status Inputs
Words [4
63]
PLC access: Read / Write
The purpose of these tables is to afford the end user all critical status information from TEC2000
systems. TEC2000 systems are backwards compatible with the 320A/B systems. However, there
are more “things that can be checked” in the TEC2000. For instance, in the TEC2000, the Unit Alarm
is also tripped by a “Valve Drift” Alarm. The “Valve Drift” alarm is not available in the 320A/B systems.
Therefore:
For maximum compatibility with the TEC2000 systems, it is recommended that you
enable monitoring the TEC2000 Status Inputs (tables [21-24]). This way, you can ensure you
have all critical status information for any TEC2000 system on the network.
This data is derived from holding registers [1000 - 1003] in the TEC2000 actuator.
entries are only filled in if
• The particular valve is a TEC2000 system.
• The 1746-C is configured to poll these additional registers.
These table
This data is retrieved with a separate Modbus read command when the particular actuator is being
polled (scanned).
These tables are not polled for unless the 1746-C is configured to allow it …
•
if Table [0] – Word [17] == 0: The TEC2000 status input information is NOT requested when
actuators are polled (the default).
•
if Table [0] – Word [17] =/= 0: The TEC2000 status input information is requested when
actuators are polled.
The PLC may reset these tables with any value is prefers. All it needs to do is insert the new value in
the table and send it to the 1746-C as a write command. The table will be reset even though nothing
will be sent out to any actuator.
A read back of Tables [21 - 24] will
• If a write command issued: reflect the table write command accepted by the 1746-C
• If a read command issued: reflect the last known values of the status input registers in the
TED2000 actuators.
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Example Tables [21-24] Feedback (48-node network) …
Characteristics:
• Only 1 TEC2000 system on the network … unit address #1
•
Tables [21 - 24] are displayed hex because they represent bit indications … easier to read.
Table ID is 15 hex …
21 Decimal
Node #1 is only TEC2000 …
This is register [1000]
Table ID is 16 hex …
22 Decimal
Register [1001]
Last node on
48-node
Table ID is 17 hex …
23 Decimal
Register [1002]
Table ID is 18 hex …
24 Decimal
Register [1003]
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6. Application Notes
6.1. App Note: Performance Tuning
6.1.1. General Practices to Ensure Better Performance
To ensure optimal performance, the PLC should at least:
1. Ensure quick responses to the 1746-C requests for an M1 transfer.
(cuts down 1746-C delaying other operations while waiting for the PLC)
2. Ensure table [0] is set correctly and repeated in a timely manner.
reads.
Allow for frequent table [0]
3. Only control & monitor discrete outputs (tables [16 & 17]) if and when needed.
(cuts down on the time to gather data from each actuator)
4. Only read additional registers if and when the application program requires them.
(cuts down on the time to gather data from each actuator)
5. Restrict the rate of data writes to the actuators … only write as fast as required to adequately
control the valve.
(cuts down on the interruptions to scanning the network … gathering data)
6. Only write to or read tables if actually in use.
(ex: do not write to the analog output table if analog outputs are not used)
(prevents unnecessary delays to gathering the more important data from the network)
6.1.2. Reading Run-Time Information from Table [0]
The PLC should perform a read of table [0] in a timely enough manner so that an operator can “view”
the run-time changes in a manner that makes sense. For example, the operator should be able to
watch the scan counter increment by 1 or 2 … if it appears to “jump” by 15 or so (because the PLC is
not reading table [0] enough) then it is a lot more difficult to use the information.
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6.1.3. Loading Table [0] with Configuration Information
To maximize system performance, the RLL must load configuration information that includes:
• The Number of Actuators on the network
• The Scan Period (number of network scans before a diagnostic scan).
• Whether or not to poll actuator totalizers.
• The number of additional valves to scan in the scan time-slice (before servicing the PLC).
• Table [13] … Which 320A actuators have Solid State Contactors for modulating control
•
•
•
•
•
•
Any additional response delay for messages returning from actuators.
Any specific register to poll from all nodes on the network.
Any block of registers to get from a specified actuator (node) on the network.
The value to reset the scan period counter.
Any direct monitoring and control of discrete outputs on specific actuators on the network …
- coils [1000 – 1011] on TEC2000 systems.
- coils [3-5] on the other systems.
Whether or not to poll input registers on TEC2000 systems.
The RLL is responsible for all configuration each time the system is reset. Except for 2 circumstances,
all configuration is performed in table [0]. Exceptions:
1. The RLL must identify which 320A actuators require SSR control and load table [13] with the
data. The optional “Solid State Relay” (SSR) is required to be in an actuator if the actuator is
to receive modulating control commands from any controller. If an actuator is supposed to
have an SSR installed, the network master will check, and if necessary, set the actuator internal
configuration bit (indicating an SSR is installed) before sending it a modulation command.
2. The RLL must identify which actuators (if any) the network master will poll and control the
discrete outputs on the actuator. This configuration information is loaded into table [16].
Upon reset, the 1746-C default configuration will assume:
• That there are 60 actuators on the network
• A Scan Period of 50 scans before a diagnostic scan.
• Do not poll the actuator totalizers.
• 2 additional valves to scan (making a total of 3 valves scanned) in the scan time-slice before
servicing the PLC.
• No 320A solid-state relays contactors installed in any actuators.
•
•
•
•
•
•
No additional response delay for messages returning from actuators.
No specific register to poll from all nodes on the network.
No block of registers to get from a specified actuator (node) on the network.
The scan period reset value is zero but do not reset the counter now.
No direct monitoring or control of discrete outputs on specific actuators on the network.
Do not poll TEC2000 input registers.
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6.1.4. Behavior if a Delay in Loading Table [0] Configuration Information
The 1746-C does not store configuration information if power is cycled. When the 1746-C restarts, it
reverts to factory default values (60 actuators, 50-Scan Period, …).
It is the responsibility of the PLC to ensure that system configuration information is written to the 1746C. The PLC should periodically read the configuration back to ensure that the 1746-C still has the
correct configuration in it (the 1746-C module was not reset).
Example:
Assume a network of 25 actuators.
If power is cycled on the PLC, the 1746-C will revert to factory default values (60 actuators, …).
The sooner the PLC can reload the correct Table [0] configuration, the sooner the 1746-C will
start polling the correct number of units.
Until this happens, the operator will see what appears to be a “dead space” in the transmitting
and receiving of data when watching the tx/rx LEDs on the 1746-C module. What happens is
that:
1. A diagnostic scan has determined that only 25 of 60 actuators are on line.
2. A new scan starts.
3. 25 actuators are communicated with.
4. The 1746-C steps through the next 35 actuators … preventing communication to them
because they are “off line”. This is the “dead space” when watching the LEDs.
5. The scan ends … go back to step #2 if not at the end of the scan period.
In this situation, the operator will see a very regular pattern of “dead space” on each scan (each
time LED1 changes state).
Solution: Ensure the PLC writes the configuration information and periodically ensures it stays correct.
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6.1.5. Using the “Scan Period” Value
The “Scan Period” value is placed in table [0] for the end user (HMI) to dynamically adjust the network
behavior to the needs of the application.
This value indicates the size of the “Scan Period” … the
number of network scans before the 1746-C performs a diagnostic scan to try and “bring back on-line"
any units that had stopped communicating.
During normal operations, the 1746-C will skip any actuator that it has already determined is "off line"
(this is to save time when trying to gather data from the other actuators that are running). The only
time it will bring any "off line" systems back on-line is
• During the diagnostic scan
• After reset.
If the end-user (application, HMI, ...) believes that allowing off-line units to come back on-line it is less
important than normal data gathering (or just not something to be concerned with), then it should
increase the scan period size (200 is the maximum ... indicating that a diagnostic scan will happen after
every 200 network scans for data).
If however, the speed of units coming back on line is more critical than the increased interruption due to
increasing the rate of diagnostic scans, then the HMI should lower the scan period number (5 is the
minimum ... indicating that a diagnostic scan will happen after every 5 network scans for data).
In other words, recovery time to get an actuator back on line increases as the scan period value
increases. Therefore, to speed up the recovery time, make the scan period value low. To lengthen
the recovery time, make the scan period value high.
RECOMMENDATIONS:
Typically, EIM will not recommend any particular value for the scan period value … EIM cannot make
that type of decision for any end user. However, EIM will work with a user to explain what happens if a
value is chosen. The user must then make the choice of value that best suits their application.
Basically, they need to evaluate the priority levels (and effects of) the time period of having an actuator
off-line vs. the interruptions in the normal data gathering to perform system diagnostics (allowing off-line
systems the chance of coming back on-line).
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6.2. App Note: 1746-C Operation – Additional Detailed
Information
6.2.1. Scan Operation: Determining & Exiting “Network Down” Condition
If the 1746-C ever detects “network down” (no actuators communicating) then LED2 will come on and
the program enters the diagnostic scan mode and remains there until at least one actuator responds.
After scanning the “down” network, if any actuator responds and the number of actuators that
responded is not the same as the number configured in table [0], then the 1746-C will perform one
more network scan in the diagnostic mode to afford the opportunity to “simultaneously” bring as many
actuators on line as possible – as soon as possible – within the same scan and not have to wait an
entire scan period.
This scenario happens when “total power on a network is restored at once and the network master
happened to be in the middle of a scan period when power was restored” … which is the most common
scenario. In this case, the repeat diagnostic scan allows the network master the opportunity to bring
“as many systems as possible on line at one time as soon as possible” and not have to wait until the
end of the scan period for the next diagnostic scan.
In other words, without this feature of repeating the diagnostic scan, if the network went down and
came back up in the middle of a diagnostic scan (which was most probable), then the program would
usually detect only a portion of the network and would wait until the end of the scan period to check for
the rest. This is a relatively long time if we are considering the network "going up/down" due network
wiring and not actual powering of actuators (which was most common).
Therefore, to speed up getting most of the network on-line early, if the entire network goes down, the
program repeats the diagnostic scan one more time in an attempt to get more units "on-line".
LED2 will remain on until the diagnostic scan finishes and normal scan operations resume.
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6.2.2. Detailed Description of 1746-C Operation
1.
2.
3.
4.
Power up and self-initialization … LED1 & LED2 both on.
Perform the initial diagnostic scan to determine which actuators are actually on the network.
Turn LED1 & LED2 off.
Stay in a loop performing the following activities:
I. Setup to start new scan of network.
• If diagnostic scan:
- Ensure the communication ports are setup correctly.
- The previous scan period (group of scans) has finished.
- Toggle the preferred communication port.
• Toggle the state of LED1 … on or off.
II. Perform the Network Scan: Using a time-slice time sharing methodology, loop through all the
actuators on the network (starting from #1 and going through #n [the highest number on the
network]) such that:
--- (the valve scan time-slice) ----------a. If a diagnostic scan …
- Clear any communication failure indications for the particular valve to be polled.
- Get system type ID … try on both ports.
- If an EIM system, get the firmware version ID.
b. If supposed to get totalizer data for the valve, do it.
c. If supposed to request a specific holding register, do it. If supposed to request a block of
holding registers from this actuator, do it.
d. If supposed to monitor or control the discrete user relay outputs on this actuator, do it.
e. If supposed to get TEC2000 input data, do it.
f. Get the rest of the “standard data” from the valve.
Note: If the 1746-C can’t communicate with this particular actuator that is supposed to be
on-line, it marks that actuator as “off-line” … to skip on the next scan cycle. If there are
problems communicating on any particular channel to the actuator, this is also recorded.
--- (the PLC interface time-slice) ----------g. If ready to interface with the PLC (ready for the PLC time-slice) then do it. When
finished with this PLC interface time-slice, if the number of valves changed in table [0],
end this loop, reset the rest of the tables and setup to enter a diagnostic scan … restart
with new data.
Otherwise still in the valve scan time-slice … If not at the last valve on the network, loop
back (to step “a” above) and get data from the next actuator.
III. Network Scan cleanup
• Label Non-Used Actuator Operation. Mark all “non-used” actuator entries in the tables with
an invalid value (“-99”).
•
Determine if the network is “down” by counting the number of actuators that did not
communicate with the 1746-C.
If the network is down, then turn LED2 on and force the next scan to be a diagnostic scan.
Otherwise ensure LED2 is off.
•
Account for network scan timings to be displayed in table [0].
IV. Loop back to the top and start another network scan.
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6.2.3. Time Allocated Process Control (Allocated Time Slices)
The “Time Allocation Process Control” operation acts as a process scheduler. There are two primary
processes (scanning the network and servicing the PLC) and each one gets a dedicated “time slice”.
The 1746-C uses this to ensure the primary processes are serviced in a deterministic and controllable
manner.
The user adjustable configuration parameter in table [0] – word [7] determines the number of
”Additional Valves to Scan in the Network Scan Time-Slice” before starting the PLC process time slice
(before interfacing with the PLC … servicing the PLC interface process).
Values for the parameter …
• The default value is 2.
This means 2 additional valves (3 total) will be scanned in the scan time slice before the
PLC process is serviced in its time slice (when a M0/M1 transfer sequence from the PLC
can be handled).
• The minimum number is 0 (maximize the amount of PLC interfacing time).
• The maximum number is the lesser of
o 9
o 1 less than the max number of valves on the network
(can’t scan more valves than are on the network)
The larger the number, the faster the scan period but the fewer interfaces with the PLC.
The smaller the number, the scan period is slower but there are more frequent interfaces with the PLC.
If the number is too large, it will take too long to service the PLC and control capabilities by the HMI
may fall off (ex: they could generate a “control/placement” error in which the process control can’t
move a modulating valve to a specified position within a specified time frame).
In other words, if too much time is allocated for scanning valves before servicing the PLC, then the PLC
might not be serviced often enough for adequate control. However, servicing the PLC too often is a
waste of time if it can’t adequately process any differences between the services. That waste of time
could be better spent polling more valves for data.
This parameter is end-user adjustable in Table [0] and is 100% dependent upon the application.
Therefore, the operator must adjust (tune) this parameter to the specific application to get the best fit of
• best scan rate
• best service rate for the PLC block transfers
• control via the PLC
• the PLC getting table information (not skipping tables)
NOTE: To help prevent accidental delays to servicing the PLC due to taking too long to scan the
desired number of valves in the valve-scan time slice, a 650ms timer is in place. This timer is
reset every time the 1746-C finishes servicing the PLC process. In between polling individual
actuators during the valve scan time slice, if the 650ms timer ever expires then the PLC
process will get serviced. In other words, there is a time-based limit to how long the network
can be scanned before servicing the PLC.
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Below is a table of empirical values demonstrating the difference in network performance when
changing the number of additional valves to scan in the scan time slice.
This network scan scenario is for base readings with
• No Network Writes – Only Polling
• Zero M0/M1 transfer delays waiting for the RLL to interface with the 1746-C.
•
•
•
•
60 … Number of nodes configured to be on network
25 … Scan Period
Polling base scan data … no additional registers.
No additional delay time for Modbus response messages from the actuators.
# Nodes “Talking”
… On-Line
Average Network Scan Time (seconds) after changing the
number of
“Additional Valves to Scan in the Network Scan Time Slice”
0
1
2
3
5
7
9
1 of 60
2 of 60
3 of 60
6 of 60
12 of 60
24 of 60
(#60)
(#59 – 60)
(#58 – 60)
(#55 – 60)
(#49 – 60)
(#37 – 60)
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.7
1.3
2.6
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.6
1.2
2.4
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.6
1.1
2.2
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.6
1.1
2.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.6
1.0
2.0
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.6
1.0
2.0
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.6
1.0
2.0
30 of 60
36 of 60
42 of 60
48 of 60
54 of 60
60 of 60
(#31 – 60)
(#25 – 60)
(#19 – 60)
(#13 – 60)
(#7 – 60)
(#1 – 60)
3.2
3.8
4.4
5.1
5.7
6.3
3.0
3.5
4.1
4.7
5.3
5.6
2.7
3.2
3.8
4.4
4.9
5.4
2.7
3.1
3.7
4.2
4.7
5.2
2.6
3.0
3.6
4.4
4.5
4.9
2.5
2.9
3.5
3.9
4.4
4.8
2.5
2.9
3.4
3.9
4.3
4.8
The values in this table
“rounded values” and
have a precision of
(+/-) 0.2 seconds.
Because of this, these
numbers are only
appropriate for estimates
and trend analysis.
Note: For the most accurate scan period timing, do not use the 1st scan period after a power cycle (or
environment change) … wait until the 2nd scan period or beyond.
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6.2.4. Preferred Communication Port Operation
The 1746-C operates on both communication ports. In a standard E>Net Ring topology, the
• Port 1 (top port)
on the 1746-C goes to Port A on the EIM NIU.
• Port 2 (bottom port) on the 1746-C goes to Port B on the EIM NIU.
The implementation of this communication scheme works in conjunction with the aspect of
“Communication Failure Indications” such that if a failure is detected on a particular port for a particular
actuator, it will remain “actively announced” to assist in the diagnostics and troubleshooting required by
a service technician.
The 1746-C tries to utilize both communication ports evenly. It has a “preferred port” and a
“backup port” such that the program will try to communicate over the preferred port to a particular
actuator. However, if there is a problem communicating with the preferred port, the program will
automatically try the backup port.
The 1746-C alternates port 1 & 2 as being the preferred port after every scan period. That is, at the
start of every diagnostic scan, the preferred port is changed. Example scenario:
1. Scan period n:
• Preferred Port:
Port 1
• Backup Port:
Port 2
2. Scan period n+1:
• Preferred Port:
Port 2
• Backup Port:
Port 1
3. Scan period n+2:
• Preferred Port:
Port 1
• Backup Port:
Port 2
4. ………..
If a problem is detected on the preferred port for an actuator, it will remain using the backup port until
the next diagnostic scan is made to retest the port.
During restart, after the initial diagnostic scan completes, Port 2 is initially the preferred port.
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6.2.5. Communication Failure Indications (Low-Level & High-Level)
Only low-level communication problems flagged as errors in tables [1 & 2].
“Modbus exception messages” are high-level (application level) communication errors. These are
logged in table [20].
Both types of communication errors are cleared only at the beginning of a diagnostic scan.
The 1746-C has 3 mechanisms for reporting communication problems:
1. Table [1]:
(low level) The values 0- 3 such that:
• 0
No problems on any port
(same as table [2] – bit-14 = 0)
•
1
Problems on Port 1
(may be used to assist diagnostics)
•
2
Problems on Port 2
(may be used to assist diagnostics)
•
3
Problems on both ports … general communication fault.
(same as table [2] – bit-14 = 1)
2. Table [2]:
(low level) Bit 14 such that:
• Bit-14 = 0: Communication OK
(same as table [1] = 0)
• Bit-14 = 1: General communication fault (same as table [1] = 3)
3. Table [20]:
(high level) Modbus Exception Indicators sent from the actuators.
Notes:
• Diagnostic communication error indications for problems on port 1 or port 2 are flagged anytime
a transmission is attempted and fails on a particular port.
If an actuator is already flagged as having a problem on one port, then the program will only try
using the other port (until the next diagnostic scan). If a problem also exists on the 2nd port,
then a general communication fault exists.
•
General communication faults (Table [1] == 3) and (Table [1] – bit-14 == 1) are flagged when a
message fails to successfully transmit.
•
If an actuator is already flagged as having a general communication fault (can’t communicate on
either port) then the program will not attempt to transmit on either port (until the next diagnostic
scan).
To truly understand the meaning of the values in Table [1] and the 1746-C’s behavior on the network,
you must know the physical layout of the network and exactly how it was wired.
For instance, at the actuators, you must know if the wiring is actually coming in from NIU-port A into
port A in the actuator and out port B … (and into the next actuator in port A and out port B … … …).
Actual “as built” diagrams from the electrical contractors often help here.
Copyright © 2004 EIM COMPANY, INC. • 13840 PIKE ROAD • MISSOURI CITY, TX. 77489
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
SAMPLE NETWORK (physical wiring):
2
A
A
1
B
A
2
B
A
3
B
A
4
B
1746-C
NIU
A
1
Scenario 1:
B
B
8
A
B
7
A
B
6
A
B
5
Break network at Actuator [4] – port A (between actuators 3 & 4)
In this case, the 1746-C must communicate with
• actuators 1 – 3 via port 2
and
• actuators 8 – 4 via port 1.
This means that there would be problems communicating on
• port 2 with actuators 8 – 4 and
• port 1 with actuators 1 – 3.
This means that in table [1], there would be the following values:
• “2” in the locations for actuators 8 – 4
• “1” in the locations for actuators 1 – 3.
Since all actuators could communicate, Bit-14 in table [2] would be clear for all actuators.
Scenario 2:
Break network at (Actuator [4] – port A.) & (Actuator [6] – port B)
In this case, the 1746-C must communicate with
• actuators 1 – 3 via port 2
and
• actuators 8 – 7 via port 1
and
• actuators 6 – 4 cannot communicate.
This means that there would be problems communicating on
• port 2 with actuators 8 – 7 and
• port 1 with actuators 1 – 3 and
• both ports with actuators 6 – 4.
This means that in table [1], there would be the following values:
• “2” in the locations for actuators 8 – 7
• “1” in the locations for actuators 1 – 3.
• “3” in the locations for actuators 6 – 4.
Bit-14 in table [2] would be set = “1” for actuators 6 – 4. It would be clear for the rest of
them.
Copyright © 2004 EIM COMPANY, INC. • 13840 PIKE ROAD • MISSOURI CITY, TX. 77489
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
Scenario 3:
Actuator powered down.
If the actuator is just powered down and nothing else is physically wrong with the
network, the network communication is supposed to pass through to the next unit.
In this case, the 1746-C should be able to communicate with the entire network except
for the system that is powered down.
This means that in table [1], there would be the following values:
• “3” in the locations for actuator that is powered down.
• “0” in the locations for the rest of the actuators.
Bit-14 in table [2] would be set = “1” for the actuator that is powered down. It would be
clear for the rest of them.
Scenario 4:
Actuator is having “problems” communicating on a particular channel (particular side …
“A/B” or “Left/Right” or “In/Out” …).
In this scenario, the problems could be reflected in many ways by the 1746-C …
depending upon the type of problem at the actuator. However, the highest probability is
that the problem would be reflected on the appropriate 1746-C port for that actuator and
any actuator that is physically located between the 1746-C and the specific actuator
having problems.
For example, assume port A on actuator [4] was having a problem communicating. In
this case …
Via Port 2, the 1746-C …
• can communicate with actuators 1 – 3
and
• cannot communicate with actuator 4
(by definition)
• actuators 5 – 8: depends upon the hardware problem at the actuator.
Via Port 1, the 1746-C …
• can communicate with actuators 8 – 4
and
• actuators 3 – 1: depends upon the hardware problem at the actuator.
In summary for table [1] possibilities:
• All actuators can communicate over at least one port (so no total COM faults).
(no “3” entries in table [1] )
• There is a possibility that all actuators could communicate on both channels
except #4.
(many “0” entries and possibly one “2” entry in table [1] )
• There is a possibility that none of the actuators could communicate on both
channels.
(many “1” and “2” entries in table [1] )
Since all actuators could communicate, Bit-14 in table [2] would be clear for all actuators.
Copyright © 2004 EIM COMPANY, INC. • 13840 PIKE ROAD • MISSOURI CITY, TX. 77489
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
6.2.6. Bringing Units On-Line After a Power Cycle
ACTUATOR POWER CYCLE
If you cycle power on the actuators, the 1746-C will indicate that the actuators are off line and it will only
bring them back on line during the next diagnostic scan.
COMPLETE POWER CYCLE
When there is a complete power failure to the actuators and Master Station at same time (if power
cycles on the entire system – actuators, PLC & 1746-C), “what happens when” depends upon what
system comes back on line first.
If an actuator comes on line before the 1746-C is out of reset, then the 1746-C will see it when it
performs its network check as it comes out of reset (it will be "on-line"). If the 1746-C comes up
before an actuator, then that actuator will not get "on-line with the 1746-C" until the next diagnostic
scan is performed.
GENERAL
Usually, if any actuators do not start communicating with the 1746-C after it performs its diagnostic
scan, the places to look are outside the 1746-C (the actuators, the interconnecting network, …).
Copyright © 2004 EIM COMPANY, INC. • 13840 PIKE ROAD • MISSOURI CITY, TX. 77489
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
6.2.7. Toggling the Preferred Port to Assist Diagnostics
The "preferred port" toggles between PORT1 & PORT2 every time a system diagnostic scan is
performed.
This timing has been shown to be long enough to give good deterministic information about
communicating on any particular port and still be short enough to flag a problem that is developing on
the network.
Also, since the intention behind this toggling is only to help out diagnostics (to flag an actuator when a
port is starting to go bad), the relative time reference here is the time to get a technician to see and
service the actuator & network.
Therefore, the scan period between diagnostic scans is more than fast enough for this (several scaling
magnitudes difference ... seconds for detection as compared to minutes or hours or even days for the
service technician to respond).
Copyright © 2004 EIM COMPANY, INC. • 13840 PIKE ROAD • MISSOURI CITY, TX. 77489
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
6.3. App Note: For Diagnostics - Know the Physical Network
Wiring
When diagnosing a troublesome network, it can become impossible to solve some problems without
knowing the physical layout of the network (also called “as built” by contractors). If not known, it is
possible that the physical layout will have to be “traced out”.
For instance, if you are having “COM1 or COM2” problems in which you are having problems
communicating in one direction and not the other (table [1] values are 1 or 2) then if you know the
physical wiring of the network, it will make sense as to which ones are having problems and why.
Without knowing the physical layout of the network, the information in this table can be meaningless.
Another scenario … if an E>Net ring, if the contractor accidentally swapped the Port A & B wires at one
actuator, normal communications will still work fine. However, “COM1 or COM2” errors in table [1] will
give incorrect indications as to where the problem lies.
Copyright © 2004 EIM COMPANY, INC. • 13840 PIKE ROAD • MISSOURI CITY, TX. 77489
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
6.4. App Note: Memory Maps
All references to memory maps in EIM actuators reflects the “description of the memory” as of the date
of the document. To ensure correctness in the future, refer to “current” descriptions of the memory for
the particular EIM product.
6.4.1. Specific Holding Registers Referenced by the Network Master
Holding
Register #
00
Description
Coils [00 – 15]
01
02
Not explicitly accessed by the Network Master.
Coils [32 – 47]
03 – 04
Not explicitly accessed by the Network Master.
05
Discrete Inputs … inputs [00 – 15]
06
Valve Status Information … inputs [16 – 31]
07
Valve Position … 0 – 100% in 1% increments
(Received in poll but not used)
08
Inputs [32 – 47]
(Received in poll but not used)
09
Duplicate of register [06] … inputs [16 – 31]
(Received in poll but not used)
10
Analog Output Register
11
Valve Postion Setpoint
12
320A (reserved) … 320B (inputs 48 – 63)
13
Valve Position … 0 – 100.0% in 0.1% increments
14
(AIN0) Valve Position … 0 – 4095
15
(AIN1) … Torque Pot input
16
(AIN2) … User Analog Input #1
17
(AIN3) … User Analog Input #2
18 - 43
44
45 – 65
Not explicitly accessed by the Network Master.
Not explicitly accessed by the Network Master.
Totalizer (Accumulator) 1
67
Totalizer (Accumulator) 2
100
101 - 999
(Received in poll but not used)
Software Version ID
66
68 - 99
(Received in poll but not used)
Not explicitly accessed by the Network Master.
MFG ID + Network Address
Not explicitly accessed by the Network Master.
1000
TEC2000 – Inputs [1000 – 1015]
1001
TEC2000 – Inputs [1016 – 1031]
1002
TEC2000 – Inputs [1032 – 1047]
1003
TEC2000 – Inputs [1048 – 1063]
1004
TEC2000 – Coils [1000 – 1011]
Copyright © 2004 EIM COMPANY, INC. • 13840 PIKE ROAD • MISSOURI CITY, TX. 77489
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
6.4.2. Specific Coils & Inputs Referenced by the Network Master
320A & 320B … (CPU reset in 320A version 1.30 & later)
Register
BIT 15
BIT 14
BIT 13
BIT 12
BIT 11
BIT 10
BIT 9
BIT 8
BIT 7
BIT 6
0
(coils)
BIT 5
BIT 4
BIT 3
User Output
Relay 2
User Output
Relay 1
ESD /
Monitor
Relay
RO
4
BIT 0
Contactor
Aux Close
is Made
Contactor
Aux Open
is Made
LSC is
Tripped
LSO is
Tripped
RO
RO
RO
3
R/W
37
CPU has
Reset
4
(coils)
6
(inputs)
RO
BIT 1
Enable
SSR Starter
2
(coils)
5
(inputs)
5
BIT 2
RW
78
Reserved
0
no-op
User Input
#2 Status
User Input
#1 Status
Aux Alarm
Input
Local ESD
Alarm
RO
RO
RO
RO
RO
15
Unit
Alarm
RO
31
14
0
RO
13
Actuator
Self-Test
Alarm
30
RO
29
12
Local
ESD
Alarm
RO
28
11
Phase
Monitor
Alarm
RO
27
Phase
Monitor
Alarm
RO
10
Thermal
Overload
Alarm
RO
Thermal
Overload
Alarm
RO
26
9
Power
Monitor
Alarm
RO
25
Power
Monitor
Alarm
RO
8
Valve Stall
Alarm
RO
24
TSC
Status
Indicator
RO
7
TSC
Alarm
RO
23
TSO
Status
Indicator
RO
6
TSO
Alarm
RO
22
SS in
Remote
Position
RO
5
SS in
Remote
Position
RO
21
SS in Local
Position
RO
4
SS in Local
Position
RO
20
3
Valve is
Closing
RO
19
2
Valve is
Opening
RO
18
RO
1
LSC
Tripped
RO
17
RO
0
LSO
Tripped
RO
16
TEC2000 …
Register
BIT 15
BIT 14
BIT 13
BIT 12
BIT 11
BIT 10
BIT 9
BIT 8
BIT 7
BIT 6
BIT 5
BIT 4
BIT 3
BIT 2
BIT 1
BIT 0
1000
(inputs)
Alarm …
Unit
STOP
Command
Active
CLOSE
Command
Active
Open
Command
Active
SETUP
Mode
Selected
REMOTE
Mode
Selected
STOP
Mode
Selected
LOCAL Mode
Selected
TSC is
Tripped
TSO is
Tripped
Valve is
Closing
Valve is
Opening
LSB is
Tripped
LSA is
Tripped
LSC is
Tripped
LSO is
Tripped
RO
RO
RO
1001
(inputs)
1002
(inputs)
1003
(inputs)
1004
(coils)
RO
1015
Alarm …
Low
Battery
RO
1031
1014
Alarm …
Valve
Stalled
RO
1030
Limits are
Set
Indicator
APD
Status bit
RO
RO
1047
1046
1013
Alarm …
Over Torque
RO
1029
EFM Status
(bit -2 of 2)
RO
1045
1012
Valve is
Moving
RO
1028
EFM Status
(bit-1 of 2)
RO
1044
RO
1011
Alarm …
EFM
RO
1027
ACM-Digital
Net Status
(bit-2 of 2)
RO
1043
RO
1010
Alarm …
Config
Error
RO
1026
ACM-Digital
Net Status
(bit-1 of 2)
RO
1042
Reserved
NO-OP
Reserved
NO-OP
Reserved
NO-OP
Reserved
NO-OP
Reserved
NO-OP
Reserved
NO-OP
RO
RO
RO
RO
RO
RO
1036
1062
1061
1060
1059
1058
RO
1009
Alarm …
Actuator
Failed
RO
1025
ACM-Analog
Status
(bit-2 of 2)
RO
1041
COM 2
Alarm
RO
1057
RO
1008
Alarm …
Lost Analog
Signal
RO
1024
RO
1007
Alarm …
ANY
ESD
RO
1023
RO
1006
Alarm …
Hardwired
ESD
RO
1022
ACM-Analog
Status
(bit-1 of 2)
AUX Close
Contact
Engaged
AUX Open
Contact
Engaged
RO
RO
RO
1040
COM 1
Alarm
RO
1056
1039
1038
RO
1005
Alarm …
Close
Inhibit
RO
1021
Digital Input
#6 State
RO
1037
RO
1004
Alarm …
Open
Inhibit
RO
1020
Digital Input
#5 State
RO
1036
RDM-2
Status
(bit-2 of 2)
RDM-2
Status
(bit-1 of 2)
RDM-1
Status
(bit-2 of 2)
RDM-1
Status
(bit-1 of 2)
RO
RO
RO
RO
1055
1054
1053
1052
RO
1003
RO
1002
Alarm …
Motor
Overload
Alarm …
Lost
Phase
RO
RO
1019
Digital Input
#4 State
RO
1035
LDM Status
(bit-2 of 2)
RO
1051
1018
Digital Input
#3 State
RO
1034
LDM Status
(bit-1 of 2)
RO
1050
RO
1001
Alarm …
Lost
Ctl Voltage
RO
1017
Digital Input
#2 State
RO
1033
CCM Status
(bit-2 of 2)
RO
1049
RO
1000
Alarm …
Valve
Drift
RO
1016
Digital Input
#1 State
RO
1032
CCM Status
(bit-2 of 2)
RO
1048
RO5 CMD
&
RO5 Status
SO8 CMD
&
SO8 Status
SO7 CMD
&
SO7 Status
SO6 CMD
&
SO6 Status
RO12 CMD
&
Status
RO11 CMD
&
Status
RO10 CMD
&
Status
RO9 CMD
&
Status
RO4 CMD
&
Status
RO3 CMD
&
Status
RO2 CMD
&
Status
RO1 CMD
&
Status
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
1011
1010
1009
1008
1007
1006
1005
Copyright © 2004 EIM COMPANY, INC. • 13840 PIKE ROAD • MISSOURI CITY, TX. 77489
Page 104
1004
1003
1002
1001
1000
Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
6.4.3. 320A Memory Map … Table for Coils & Inputs (Version 2.0)
Register
BIT 15
BIT 14
BIT 13
BIT 12
BIT 11
BIT 10
BIT 9
BIT 8
BIT 7
BIT 6
0
(coils)
Pulsed
Control
Mode
VFD Starter
(Precision
Ctl Mode)
Reserved
0
no-op
Modulating
Control
Mode
Cmd to
Enter ESD
Mode
Cmd to
CLOSE
Valve
Cmd to
STOP
Valve
Cmd to
OPEN
Valve
COM 2
Enable
Relay
COM 1
Enable
Relay
R/W
1
(coils)
2
(coils)
RO
6
(inputs)
63
Cmd to
Load
Factory
Defaults
R/W
5
(inputs)
47
Relay #2
override –
work with
ESD
R/W
4
(coils)
31
Config
Conflict
Error
R/W
3
(coils)
15
R/W
Unit
Alarm
79
0
RO
13
RO
RO
29
R/W
R/W
Relay #2
NC
R/W
62
CPU has
Reset
R/W
78
12
Local ESD
Alarm
Trigger
ESD on
Local ESD
46
R/W
Actuator
Self-Test
Alarm
45
Relay #1
active at
LSA
R/W
61
Cmd to
Save
Torque
Profile
R/W
77
28
Trigger
ESD on
Network
Command
R/W
44
R/W
11
Phase
Monitor
Alarm
RO
27
ESD –
Relay Only
R/W
43
Relay #1
active at SS
in Local
Relay #1
active at SS
in Remote
R/W
R/W
60
59
RO
RO
0
RO
30
RO
29
58
41
Relay #1
NC
R/W
57
R/W
RO
31
R/W
R/W
R/W
75
RO
RO
42
Relay#1
override –
work with
ESD
25
ESD –
CLOSE
with relay
R/W
76
RO
13
R/W
RO
R/W
Local ESD
Alarm
Actuator
Self-Test
Alarm
26
ESD –
OPEN
with relay
9
Power
Monitor
Alarm
Enable Back
Seating
Aux Alarm
Input
14
RO
R/W
Reserved
0
no-op
User Input
#1 Status
15
10
Thermal
Overload
Alarm
Reserved
0
no-op
User Input
#2 Status
Unit
Alarm
R/W
Reserved
0
no-op
Reserved
0
no-op
12
Local ESD
Alarm
RO
28
11
Phase
Monitor
Alarm
RO
27
74
Phase
Monitor
Alarm
RO
10
Thermal
Overload
Alarm
RO
73
Thermal
Overload
Alarm
26
RO
9
Power
Monitor
Alarm
RO
25
R/W
8
Valve Stall
Alarm
RO
24
ESD –
OPEN
No relay
R/W
40
RO
7
RO
TSC
Alarm
RO
23
RO
47
Local ESD
Input Alarm
RO
46
TSC
Alarm
RO
45
TSO
Alarm
RO
44
COM 2
Alarm
RO
43
Power
Monitor
Alarm
COM 1
Alarm
RO
42
RO
41
6
RO
39
5
SS in
Remote
Position
22
RO
21
Reserved
0
no-op
Enable
SSR Starter
R/W
R/W
ESD –
CLOSE
No relay
R/W
User Output
Relay 2
TSO
Alarm
38
37
BIT 4
BIT 3
BIT 2
BIT 1
BIT 0
User Output
Relay 1
ESD /
Monitor
Relay
SSR/VFD
Relay
Open Valve
Relay
Close Valve
Relay
RO
4
SS in Local
Position
RO
20
Disable
Passcode
R/W
36
RO
3
Valve is
Closing
RO
19
Enable
Monitor
Relay
R/W
35
Reserved
0
no-op
Reserved
0
no-op
Analog
Output is
Calibrated
AIN 3
is
Calibrated
AIN 2
is
Calibrated
AIN 1
is
Calibrated
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
56
COM 2
Alarm
Enable
R/W
72
Power
Monitor
Alarm
RO
8
Valve Stall
Alarm
RO
24
55
COM 1
Alarm
Enable
R/W
71
Thermal
Overload
Alarm
RO
40
RO
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
70
TSO
Status
Indicator
RO
6
TSO
Alarm
23
39
51
COM 1
Odd Parity
7
Unit
Alarm
52
COM 1
Even Parity
TSC
Alarm
RO
53
COM 2
Odd Parity
TSC
Status
Indicator
RO
54
COM 2
Even Parity
RO
(NOT BIT ADDRESSABLE … VALVE POSITION INDICATOR … 0
Phase
Monitor
Alarm
RO
9
30
R/W
Trigger
ESD on
Lost Comm
7
8
(inputs)
14
BIT 5
22
69
SS in
Remote
Position
RO
5
SS in
Remote
Position
RO
21
68
SS in Local
Position
RO
4
SS in Local
Position
RO
20
67
RO
2
RO
18
4-20mA
position
feedback on
AO1
R/W
34
Setpoint
Source –
AIN3
R/W
50
Relay #2
active at
LSB
R/W
66
Contactor
Aux Close
is Made
Contactor
Aux Open
is Made
RO
RO
3
Valve is
Closing
RO
19
RO
Valve is
Opening
2
Valve is
Opening
RO
18
1
LSC is
tripped
RO
17
Enable
Log Jam
R/W
33
Setpoint
Source –
AIN2
R/W
49
RO
0
LSO is
tripped
RO
16
Enable
Torque
Seating
R/W
32
Setpoint
Source –
AIN1
R/W
48
Relay #2
active at SS
in Local
Relay #2
active at SS
in Remote
R/W
R/W
65
LSC is
Tripped
RO
1
LSC
Tripped
RO
17
64
LSO is
Tripped
RO
0
LSO
Tripped
RO
16
100% IN 1% INCREMENTS) (Read Only)
SS in
Local or Off
Position
RO
38
Valve Stall
Alarm
RO
37
Valve is
Closing
RO
START OF NON-BIT ADDRESSABLE MEMORY
Copyright © 2004 EIM COMPANY, INC. • 13840 PIKE ROAD • MISSOURI CITY, TX. 77489
Page 105
36
Valve is
Opening
RO
35
Valve
Stopped
RO
34
LSC is
Tripped
RO
33
LSO is
Tripped
RO
32
Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
6.4.4. 320A Memory Map … Addressable Holding Registers (Version 2.0)
320A
Holding
Register
#
Description
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
(coils 0
(coils 16
(coils 32
(coils 48
(coils 64
(inputs 0
(inputs 16
13
Valve position … 0
100% in 0.1% increments
AIN0 … Analog input #0 … position indicator
This value indicates the actual position of the actuator.
AIN1 … Analog input #1 … Torque indicator pot
AIN2 … Analog input #2 … User analog input #1
AIN3 … Analog input #3 … User analog input #2
Water hammer setpoint
Modulation delay time
ESD delay timer
Position bandwidth
Speed bandwidth
RESERVED
AIN1 (Torque Pot) ZERO calibration scaling factor
AIN1 (Torque Pot) SPAN calibration scaling factor
AIN2 (User AIN #1) ZERO calibration scaling factor
AIN2 (User AIN #1) SPAN calibration scaling factor
AIN3 (User AIN #2) ZERO calibration scaling factor
AIN3 (User AIN #2) SPAN calibration scaling factor
Analog output ZERO calibration scaling factor
Analog output SPAN calibration scaling factor
LSA setpoint
LSB setpoint
Valve CLOSE Duty Cycle Timer – ON Time
Valve CLOSE Duty Cycle Timer – OFF Time
Valve OPEN Duty Cycle Timer – ON Time
Valve OPEN Duty Cycle Timer – OFF Time
COM1 baud rate
COM1 response delay
COM2 baud rate
COM2 response delay
Passcode characters 1&2 … (1
LSB) (2
MSB)
Passcode characters 3&4 … (3
LSB) (4
MSB)
Software Version ID
RESERVED
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
15) … Mode / Command / Output Coils
31) … Valve status coils
47) … Configuration coils
63) … Configuration coils
79) … Configuration coils
15) … Discrete inputs
31) … Valve Status inputs
Valve Position
(inputs 32
47) … Valve Status inputs
Valve status (inputs 16
31) … identical to register [6]
Analog output register (DAC)
Valve position setpoint
RESERVED
Copyright © 2004 EIM COMPANY, INC. • 13840 PIKE ROAD • MISSOURI CITY, TX. 77489
Page 106
Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
320A
Holding
Register
#
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
Description
RESERVED
RESERVED
Current torque at 10% open while opening valve
Current torque at 20% open while opening valve
Current torque at 30% open while opening valve
Current torque at 40% open while opening valve
Current torque at 50% open while opening valve
Current torque at 60% open while opening valve
Current torque at 70% open while opening valve
Current torque at 80% open while opening valve
Current torque at 90% open while opening valve
Archived torque at 10% open while opening valve … EEPROM
Archived torque at 20% open while opening valve … EEPROM
Archived torque at 30% open while opening valve … EEPROM
Archived torque at 44% open while opening valve … EEPROM
Archived torque at 50% open while opening valve … EEPROM
Archived torque at 60% open while opening valve … EEPROM
Archived torque at 70% open while opening valve … EEPROM
Archived torque at 80% open while opening valve … EEPROM
Archived torque at 90% open while opening valve … EEPROM
User Digital Input #1 Totalizer (accumulator)
User Digital Input #2 Totalizer (accumulator)
Loss-of-COM alarm delay time.
Valve Stall delay time
RESERVED
71 – 99 Not used … returns an error if accessed.
100
MFG ID + Network Address
Copyright © 2004 EIM COMPANY, INC. • 13840 PIKE ROAD • MISSOURI CITY, TX. 77489
Page 107
Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
6.4.5. 320B Memory Map … Table for Coils & Inputs
Register
0
(coils)
BIT 15
Pulsed
Control
Mode
R/W
1
(coils)
2
(coils)
15
BIT 14
VFD Starter
(Precision
Ctl Mode)
R/W
Unit
Alarm
RO
31
Config
Conflict
Error
R/W
47
14
BIT 12
BIT 11
BIT 10
BIT 9
BIT 8
BIT 7
BIT 6
BIT 5
BIT 4
BIT 3
BIT 2
BIT 1
BIT 0
Reserved
0
no-op
Modulating
Control
indicator
(CAM08)
Cmd to
Enter ESD
Mode
Cmd to
CLOSE
Valve
Cmd to
STOP
Valve
Cmd to
OPEN
Valve
COM 2
Enable
Relay
COM 1
Enable
Relay
User Output
Relay 2
User Output
Relay 1
ESD /
Monitor
Relay
SSR/VFD
Relay
Open Valve
Relay
Close Valve
Relay
R/W
13
Actuator
Self-Test
Alarm
0
RO
BIT 13
30
RO
29
Trigger
ESD on
Lost Comm
Trigger
ESD on
Local ESD
R/W
R/W
46
45
R/W
12
Local ESD
Alarm
RO
28
Trigger
ESD on
Network
Command
R/W
44
R/W
11
Phase
Monitor
Alarm
RO
27
R/W
5
(inputs)
User Input
#2 Status
User Input
#1 Status
Aux Alarm
Input
Local ESD
Alarm
RO
RO
RO
RO
RO
6
(inputs)
79
15
R/W
Unit
Alarm
RO
31
62
CPU has
Reset
78
14
61
30
Relay #1
active at SS
in Remote
R/W
R/W
60
59
42
Relay#1
override –
work with
ESD
R/W
58
Relay #1
NC
R/W
Reserved
0
no-op
Reserved
0
no-op
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
77
13
RO
29
76
12
Local
ESD
Alarm
RO
28
75
11
Phase
Monitor
Alarm
RO
27
74
Phase
Monitor
Alarm
RO
10
Thermal
Overload
Alarm
RO
26
73
Thermal
Overload
Alarm
RO
9
Power
Monitor
Alarm
RO
25
R/W
8
Valve Stall
Alarm
RO
24
ESD –
OPEN
No relay
R/W
40
RO
7
RO
TSC
Alarm
RO
23
ESD –
CLOSE
No relay
R/W
47
Local ESD
Input Alarm
RO
46
TSC
Alarm
RO
45
TSO
Alarm
RO
44
COM 2
Alarm
RO
43
COM 1
Alarm
RO
42
Power
Monitor
Alarm
RO
41
6
39
RO
22
Reserved
0
no-op
R/W
RO
5
SS in
Remote
Position
TSO
Alarm
38
RO
21
Enable
SSR Starter
R/W
37
RO
4
SS in Local
Position
RO
20
Passcode
Enabled
R/W
36
RO
3
Valve is
Closing
RO
19
AIN 2 Fault
Move to
Default
AIN 1 Fault
Move to
Default
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
72
Power
Monitor
Alarm
RO
8
Valve Stall
Alarm
RO
24
55
R/W
71
7
23
Thermal
Overload
Alarm
RO
40
Unit
Alarm
RO
39
52
51
COM 2
Odd Parity
COM 1
Even Parity
COM 1
Odd Parity
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
70
TSO
Status
Indicator
RO
TSC
Alarm
RO
53
COM 2
Even Parity
TSC
Status
Indicator
RO
54
6
TSO
Alarm
RO
22
69
SS in
Remote
Position
RO
5
SS in
Remote
Position
RO
21
68
SS in Local
Position
RO
4
SS in Local
Position
RO
20
18
R/W
35
AIN 3 Fault
Move to
Default
COM 1
Alarm
Enable
RO
R/W
Reserved
0
no-op
56
2
Valve is
Opening
4-20mA
position
feedback on
AO1
Reserved
0
no-op
COM 2
Alarm
Enable
RO
Enable
Monitor
Relay
Operations
Reserved
0
no-op
(NOT BIT ADDRESSABLE … VALVE POSITION INDICATOR … 0
Phase
Monitor
Alarm
RO
13
57
Enable
MRTU
Operations
9 – 11
12
(inputs)
41
Enable Back
Seating
7
8
(inputs)
Relay #1
active at SS
in Local
Cmd - Save
Torque
Profile
Actuator
Self-Test
Alarm
0
RO
R/W
25
R/W
43
Reserved
0
no-op
R/W
R/W
RO
R/W
4
(coils)
63
26
9
Power
Monitor
Alarm
ESD –
CLOSE
with Relay
Cmd - Load
Factory
Defaults
R/W
RO
R/W
ESD –
OPEN
with Relay
3
(coils)
Relay #2
NC
10
Thermal
Overload
Alarm
ESD –
STOP
with Relay
Relay #2
override –
work with
ESD
Relay #1
active at
LSA
R/W
67
34
Setpoint
Source –
AIN3
R/W
50
Relay #2
active at
LSB
R/W
66
Contactor
Aux Close
is Made
Contactor
Aux Open
is Made
RO
RO
3
Valve is
Closing
RO
19
2
Valve is
Opening
RO
18
RO
1
LSC is
tripped
RO
17
Enable
Log Jam
R/W
33
Setpoint
Source –
AIN2
R/W
49
RO
0
LSO is
tripped
RO
16
Enable
Torque
Seating
R/W
32
Setpoint
Source –
AIN1
R/W
48
Relay #2
active at SS
in Local
Relay #2
active at SS
in Remote
R/W
R/W
65
LSC is
Tripped
RO
1
LSC
Tripped
RO
17
64
LSO is
Tripped
RO
0
LSO
Tripped
RO
16
100% IN 1% INCREMENTS) (Read Only)
SS in
Local or Off
Position
RO
38
Valve Stall
Alarm
RO
37
Valve is
Closing
RO
36
Valve is
Opening
RO
35
Valve
Stopped
RO
34
LSC is
Tripped
RO
33
LSO is
Tripped
RO
32
NON-BIT ADDRESSABLE MEMORY
Reserved
no-op
Reserved
no-op
Reserved
no-op
RO
RO
RO
63
62
61
Reserved
no-op
RO
60
Reserved
no-op
Reserved
no-op
Reserved
no-op
Reserved
no-op
Reserved
no-op
Reserved
no-op
Reserved
no-op
RO
RO
RO
RO
RO
RO
RO
59
58
57
56
55
54
53
Software
Based ESD
is Active
RO
END OF BIT ADDRESSABLE MEMORY
Copyright © 2004 EIM COMPANY, INC. • 13840 PIKE ROAD • MISSOURI CITY, TX. 77489
Page 108
52
AIN 3
Signal
Fault
RO
51
AIN 2
Signal
Fault
RO
50
AIN1
Signal
Fault
RO
49
SETUP
Mode
Indicator
RO
48
Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
6.4.6. 320B Memory Map … Addressable Holding Registers
320B
Holding
Register
#
Description
Range
Increment
(Remote
Interface)
(Remote
Interface)
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
(coils 0
(coils 16
(coils 32
(coils 48
(coils 64
(inputs 0
(inputs 16
15) … Mode / Command / Output Coils
31) … Valve status coils
47) … Configuration coils
63) … Configuration coils
79) … Configuration coils
15) … Discrete inputs
31) … Valve Status inputs
Valve Position
(inputs 32
47) … Valve Status inputs
Valve status (inputs 16
31) … identical to register [6]
Analog output register (DAC)
Valve position setpoint
(Inputs 48
63)
----------------------------------------------------------------------0 – 100
--------------------0 – 4095
0 – 4095
-----------
---------------------------------------------------------------1%
------------------Analog counts
Analog counts
----------
13
Valve position … 0
100% in 0.1% increments
AIN0 … Analog input #0 … position indicator.
This value indicates the actual position of the actuator.
AIN1 … Analog input #1 … Torque indicator pot
AIN2 … Analog input #2 … User analog input #1
AIN3 … Analog input #3 … User analog input #2
Water hammer setpoint
Modulation delay time
ESD delay timer
Position bandwidth
Speed bandwidth
Default Setpoint on Analog Input Fault Indication
AIN1 (Torque Pot) ZERO calibration scaling factor
AIN1 (Torque Pot) SPAN calibration scaling factor
AIN2 (User AIN #1) ZERO calibration scaling factor
AIN2 (User AIN #1) SPAN calibration scaling factor
AIN3 (User AIN #2) ZERO calibration scaling factor
AIN3 (User AIN #2) SPAN calibration scaling factor
Analog output ZERO calibration scaling factor
Analog output SPAN calibration scaling factor
LSA setpoint
LSB setpoint
Valve CLOSE Duty Cycle Timer – ON Time
Valve CLOSE Duty Cycle Timer – OFF Time
Valve OPEN Duty Cycle Timer – ON Time
Valve OPEN Duty Cycle Timer – OFF Time
COM1 baud rate
COM1 response delay
COM2 baud rate
COM2 response delay
Passcode characters 1&2 … (1
LSB) (2
MSB)
Passcode characters 3&4 … (3
LSB) (4
MSB)
Software Version ID
0 – 1000
0.1%
0 – 4095
Analog counts
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
100 – 25500
0 – 65535
4 – 205
12 – 410
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 65535
0 – 65535
0 – 65535
0 – 65535
1200 – 38400
8 – 60
1200 – 38400
8 – 60
ASCII
ASCII
---
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
0.001 second
0.001 second
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
0.001 second
0.001 second
0.001 second
0.001 second
Baud rate
0.001 second
Baud rate
0.001 second
ASCII
ASCII
---
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
Copyright © 2004 EIM COMPANY, INC. • 13840 PIKE ROAD • MISSOURI CITY, TX. 77489
Page 109
Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
320B
Holding
Register
#
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
Description
Open coast distance
Close coast distance
Reserved
Current torque at 10% open while opening valve
Current torque at 20% open while opening valve
Current torque at 30% open while opening valve
Current torque at 40% open while opening valve
Current torque at 50% open while opening valve
Current torque at 60% open while opening valve
Current torque at 70% open while opening valve
Current torque at 80% open while opening valve
Current torque at 90% open while opening valve
Archived torque at 10% open while opening valve … EEPROM
Archived torque at 20% open while opening valve … EEPROM
Archived torque at 30% open while opening valve … EEPROM
Archived torque at 44% open while opening valve … EEPROM
Archived torque at 50% open while opening valve … EEPROM
Archived torque at 60% open while opening valve … EEPROM
Archived torque at 70% open while opening valve … EEPROM
Archived torque at 80% open while opening valve … EEPROM
Archived torque at 90% open while opening valve … EEPROM
User Digital Input #1 Totalizer (accumulator)
User Digital Input #2 Totalizer (accumulator)
Loss-of-COM alarm delay time.
Valve Stall delay time
Travel time for 1% travel
Reserved
72 – 99 Not used … returns an error if accessed.
100
MFG ID + Network Address
Range
Increment
(Remote
Interface)
(Remote
Interface)
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
----------0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 4095
0 – 65535
0 – 65535
1000 – 65535
400 – 65535
100 – 36000
---
Analog counts
Analog counts
---------Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Analog counts
Input strobes
Input strobes
0.001 second
0.001 second
0.001 second
---
---
---
---
---
Copyright © 2004 EIM COMPANY, INC. • 13840 PIKE ROAD • MISSOURI CITY, TX. 77489
Page 110
Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
6.4.7. TEC2000 Memory Map … Table for Coils & Inputs
Register
1000
(inputs)
BIT 15
BIT 14
BIT 13
BIT 12
BIT 11
BIT 10
BIT 9
BIT 8
BIT 7
BIT 6
BIT 5
BIT 4
BIT 3
BIT 2
BIT 1
BIT 0
Alarm …
Unit
STOP
Command
Active
CLOSE
Command
Active
Open
Command
Active
SETUP
Mode
Selected
REMOTE
Mode
Selected
STOP
Mode
Selected
LOCAL
Mode
Selected
Alarm …
TSC (Close)
Alarm …
TSO (Open)
Valve is
Closing
Valve is
Opening
LSB is
Tripped
LSA is
Tripped
LSC is
Tripped
LSO is
Tripped
RO
RO
RO
RO
1001
(inputs)
Alarm …
Low
Battery
RO
1002
(inputs)
1004
(coils)
1031
Sleep
Mode
Active
RO
1003
(inputs)
1015
1047
RO
1046
RO
1063
1062
1013
Alarm …
Over
Torque
RO
1029
100% CW
Toque
Signal
Status
RO
1045
Alarm …
APD
Failed
RO
1061
1012
Valve is
Moving
RO
1028
100% CCW
Torque
Signal
Status
RO
1044
Alarm …
Actuator
Rotation
Fault
RO
1060
Rmt Cmd Enter
ESD
CCM CPU
Has reset
Reserved
NO-OP
Reserved
NO-OP
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
1015
1006
(coils)
R/W
R/W
1031
1047
Reserved
NO-OP
R/W
1063
Setpoint
Source
(if AIN control)
R/W
1079
Controlinc
ACM
Installed
R/W
1010
(coils)
1030
RO
CMD –
Clear
Alarm Log
1009
(coils)
RO
Emergency
STOP
Signal
Status
Alarm …
CCM Link
Lost to
APD
1005
(coils)
1008
(coils)
Alarm …
Valve
Stalled
Limits are
NOT Set
Indicator
CMD –
Load Field
Setup Defaults
1007
(coils)
1014
1095
Worm Gear is
LH
R/W
1111
1014
CMD –
STOP
Valve
R/W
1030
Reserved No write
Access
RO
1046
1013
CMD –
CLOSE
Valve
R/W
1029
CMD –
Archive
Torque
Profile
R/W
1045
1012
CMD –
OPEN
Valve
R/W
1028
Reserved No write
Access
RO
1044
RO
1011
COM 2
Alarm
RO
1027
Operating
Inhibit
Signal
Status
RO
1043
Alarm …
CCM Link
Lost to
ACM
RO
1059
1078
R/W
1094
R/W
1077
R/W
1076
R/W
1108
RO
RO
1056
1063
RO
1062
RO
1045
Alarm …
CCM Link
Lost to
RDM1
RO
1061
1028
Digital Input
#5 State
RO
1044
Alarm …
RDM1
Failed
RO
1060
RO
1010
RO
1009
Alarm …
Motor
Overload
Alarm …
Lost
Phase
Alarm …
Lost
Control
Voltage
Signal
RO
RO
RO
1027
Digital Input
#4 State
RO
1043
1026
Digital Input
#3 State
RO
1042
Alarm …
CCM Link
Lost to
LDM
Alarm …
LDM
Failed
RO
RO
1059
1058
1025
Digital Input
#2 State
RO
1041
CCM Status
(bit-2 of 2)
RO
1057
RO
1008
Alarm …
Valve
Drift
RO
1024
Digital Input
#1 State
RO
1040
CCM Status
(bit-1 of 2)
RO
1056
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
1027
Reserved No write
Access
RO
1043
1059
Enable
Remote
Seal-In
R/W
1075
R/W
1026
Reserved No write
Access
RO
1042
Alternate
Language
Selected
R/W
1058
Enable
Torque Retry
R/W
1074
R/W
1109
RO
1046
Alarm …
RDM2
Failed
Digital Input
#6 State
RO
1011
R/W
1010
COM2
Fault
Indicator
R/W
R/W
Alarm …
CCM Link
Lost to
RDM2
1029
Alarm …
Open
Inhibit
RO
R/W
1011
R/W
R/W
RO
1047
Alarm …
Config
Error
RO
1012
R/W
CMD - enter
SETUP
mode
R/W
Reserved
NO-OP
RO
Alarm …
EFM
Signal
Status
1057
1030
AUX Open
Contact
Engaged
Alarm …
Close
Inhibit
RO
RO1 CMD
&
Status
Multi-Port
Valve
Installation
1092
1040
RO
AUX Close
Contact
Engaged
1013
RO2 CMD
&
Status
AO1
Source
(bit 1 of 2)
Motor
Rotation is
Electrically
Reversed
RO
1031
Alarm …
Hardwired
ESD
RO
RO3 CMD
&
Status
AO1
Source
(bit 2 of 2)
1093
1041
RO
1014
RO4 CMD
&
Status
AO2
Source
(bit 1 of 2)
Set LED …
Open – RD
Close - GR
1110
1058
RO
1024
AIN1
Signal
Fault
RO
RO9 CMD
&
Status
R/W
Futronic
ACM
Installed
RO
RO
1025
AIN2
Signal
Fault
1015
Alarm …
Any NonHardwired
ESD
RO10 CMD
&
Status
R/W
R/W
1042
Alarm …
ACM
Failed
RO
RO
RO11 CMD
&
Status
R/W
Enable
Local
Seal-In
RO
1008
Alarm …
Lost
Control
Signal
RO12 CMD
&
Status
R/W
Enable
Close
Torque
Seating
1026
Torque
Inhibit
Signal
Status
RO
SO6 CMD
&
SO6 Status
Reserved
NO-OP
Enable
Open
Torque Back
Seating
RO
1009
Alarm …
System
Service
Required
SO7 CMD
&
SO7 Status
Reserved
NO-OP
1060
COM 1
Alarm
RO
SO8 CMD
&
SO8 Status
Reserved
NO-OP
1061
1010
RO5 CMD
&
RO5 Status
Reserved
NO-OP
1062
RO
1091
Enable
Battery
Alarm
R/W
1107
1090
1009
COM1
Fault
Indicator
R/W
1025
Reserved No write
Access
RO
1041
COM 2
Alarm
Enable
R/W
1057
RDM1
Installed
R/W
1073
Drive Sleeve
Closes in
CW direction
R/W
1089
1008
AIN2
Fault
Indicator
R/W
1024
Reserved No write
Access
RO
1040
COM1
Alarm
Enable
R/W
1056
RDM2
Installed
R/W
1072
Enable
Multi-Port
Synch
R/W
1088
AO2
Source
(bit 2 of 2)
Enable
AIN2 Alarm
on Lost
Signal
Enable
AIN1 Alarm
on Lost
Signal
R/W
R/W
R/W
1106
1105
1104
1015
AIN1
Fault
Indicator
R/W
1031
CMD –
Clear
Limits
R/W
1047
1014
1013
Reserved
NO-OP
Reserved
NO-OP
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
1030
CMD –
Save Travel
Limits
RO
1046
1029
CMD –
Accept
Port C Limit
R/W
1045
APD Type
R/W
R/W
R/W
1062
ESD
Override –
LOCAL
Mode Ctl
ESD
Override –
STOP
Mode Ctl
R/W
R/W
1078
Enable
Inhibit
Open Valve
Operations
Enable
Inhibit
Close Valve
Operations
R/W
R/W
1095
1094
Action if Lost Action if Lost
Control
Control
Signal
Signal
(bit 2 of 2)l
(bit 1 of 2)l
R/W
1111
1010
Reserved
NO-OP
Reserved
NO-OP
1079
1011
Reserved
NO-OP
Line (Motor)
Frequency
(bit 2 of 2)
1063
1012
Reserved
NO-OP
R/W
1110
1061
1028
RO
1044
Line (Motor)
Frequency
(bit 1 of 2)
R/W
1060
ESD
Override –
Torque
Alarm
R/W
R/W
1076
ESD Trigger ESD Trigger
on Hardwired on Remote
(LOCAL)
Host
ESD
Command
R/W
1093
Reserved
NO-OP
R/W
1109
1026
R/W
1025
1008
Reserved
NO-OP
R/W
1024
CMD –
CMD –
CMD – Clear CMD – Clear CMD – Load
Accept
Accept
All
All Logs &
Factory
OPEN Limit Close Limit
Archives
Profile
Defaults
Port B Limit Port A Limit
ESD
Override –
Inhibits
1077
1027
1009
Reserved
NO-OP
R/W
1092
Analog
Output
“Close”
Polarity
R/W
Copyright © 2004 EIM COMPANY, INC. • 13840 PIKE ROAD • MISSOURI CITY, TX. 77489
Page 111
1108
RO
1043
3-Phase
R/W
1059
ARM is
Installed
R/W
1075
ESD Trigger
on Loss of
Control
R/W
1091
Analog
Input
“Close”
Polarity
R/W
1107
RO
1042
RO
1041
RO
1040
Starter
Type
(bit 2 of 2)
Starter
Type
(bit 1 of 2)
Multi-Turn
Valve
Installation
R/W
R/W
R/W
1058
1057
Enable
Open Cycle
Timer
Enable
Close Cycle
Timer
R/W
R/W
1074
ESD
Action
(bit 2 of 2)
R/W
1090
1073
ESD
Action
(bit 1 of 2)
R/W
1089
Control
Mode
(bit 3 of 3)
Control
Mode
(bit 2 of 3)
R/W
R/W
1106
1105
1056
Enable
Anti-Water
Hammer
R/W
1072
ESD Override
– Thermal
Overload
Alarm
R/W
1088
Control
Mode
(bit 1 of 3)
R/W
1104
Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
6.4.8. TEC2000 Memory Map … Table for Holding Registers
Description
Reg[1000] ... Discrete Inputs 1000 – 1015
Reg[1001] ... Discrete Inputs 1016 – 1031
Reg[1002] ... Discrete Inputs 1032 – 1047
Reg[1003] ... Discrete Inputs 1048 – 1063
Reg[1004] ... Coils 1000-1015
Reg[1005] ... Coils 1016-1031
Reg[1006] ... Coils 1032-1047
Reg[1007] ... Coils 1048-1063
Reg[1008] ... Coils 1064-1079
Reg[1009] ... Coils 1080-1095
Reg[1010] ... Coils 1096-1111
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
HIGH BYTE
LOW BYTE
Reg[1011] – Factory Setup
Reg[1012] – Factory Setup
Reg[1013] – Factory Setup
Reg[1014] – Factory Setup
Reg[1015] – Factory Setup
Reg[1016] – Factory Setup
Reg[1017] – Factory Setup
Reg[1018] – Factory Setup
Reg[1019] – Factory Setup
Reg[1020] – Factory Setup
Reg[1021] – Factory Setup
Reg[1022] – Factory Setup
Reg[1023] – Factory Setup
Reg[1024] – Factory Setup
Reg[1025] – Factory Setup
Reg[1026] – Factory Setup
Reg[1027] – Factory Setup
Reg[1028] – Factory Setup
Reg[1029] – Factory Setup
Reg[1030] – Factory Setup
Reg[1031] – Factory Setup
Reg[1032] – Factory Setup
Reg[1033] – Factory Setup
Reg[1034] – Factory Setup
Reg[1035] – Factory Setup
Reg[1036] – Factory Setup
Model ID - Char 1
Model ID - Char 3
Model ID - Char 5
Serial Num - Char 0
Serial Num - Char 2
Serial Num - Char 4
Serial Num - Char 6
Serial Num - Char 8
MFG Date - Char 0
MFG Date - Char 2
Motor ID - Char 0
Motor ID - Char 2
Motor ID - Char 4
Motor ID - Char 6
Motor ID - Char 8
Motor HP - Char 0
Motor HP - Char 2
Motor HP - Char 4
Motor RPM - Char 1
Motor RPM - Char 3
Motor Run AMPS - Char 1
Motor Run AMPS - Char 3
Motor Stall AMPS - Char 1
Motor Stall AMPS - Char 3
Max Torque (0 – 100%)
Torque Spring Type
Model ID - Char 0
Model ID - Char 3
Model ID - Char 4
Model ID - Char 6
Serial Num – Char 1
Serial Num – Char 3
Serial Num – Char 5
Serial Num – Char 7
Serial Num – Char 9
MFG Date - Char 1
MFG Date - Char 3
Motor ID - Char 1
Motor ID - Char 3
Motor ID - Char 5
Motor ID - Char 7
Motor ID - Char 9
Motor HP - Char 1
Motor HP - Char 3
Motor RPM - Char 0
Motor RPM - Char 2
Motor Run AMPS - Char 0
Motor Run AMPS - Char 2
Motor Stall AMPS - Char 0
Motor Stall AMPS - Char 2
Motor Voltage
CAM Card Type (Network)
Reg[1037] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1038] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1039] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1040] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1041] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1042] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1043] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1044] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1045] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1046] – User (Field) Setup
RO2 Function
RO4 Function
RO9 Function
RO11 Function
Field Setup Pass Code – Char 0
Field Setup Pass Code – Char 2
Max Close Torque (0 – 100%)
Tag ID – Char 1
Tag ID – Char 3
Tag ID – Char 5
RO1 Function
RO3 Function
RO5 Function
RO10 Function
RO12 Function
Field Setup Pass Code – Char 1
Max Open Torque (0 – 100%)
Tag ID – Char 0
Tag ID – Char 2
Tag ID – Char 4
Copyright © 2004 EIM COMPANY, INC. • 13840 PIKE ROAD • MISSOURI CITY, TX. 77489
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
Reg[1047] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1048] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1049] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1050] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1051] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1052] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1053] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1054] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1055] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1056] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1057] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1058] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1059] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1060] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1061] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1062] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1063] – User (Field) Setup
Tag ID – Char 7
Tag ID – Char 9
Tag ID – Char 11
Tag ID – Char 13
Tag ID – Char 15
LSB Setting
Close Timer Start Position
Close Timer Pulse ON Time
Open Timer Start Position
Open Timer Pulse ON Time
Water Hammer Start Position
Water Hammer Pulse Off Time
Network Node Address
Speed Control Bandwidth
ESD Delay Time
Event Log Index
(RESERVED – NO-OP)
Tag ID – Char 6
Tag ID – Char 8
Tag ID – Char 10
Tag ID – Char 12
Tag ID – Char 14
LSA Setting
Close Timer Stop Position
Close Timer Pulse OFF Time
Open Timer Stop Position
Open Timer Pulse OFF Time
Water Hammer Pulse ON Time
Default Setpoint Position
Network Response Delay
Position Bandwidth
Modulation Delay Time
Discrete Input Inversion Bits
Loss-of-COM Alarm Delay Time
Reg[1064] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1065] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1066] – User (Field) Setup
Date/Time Clock – Minutes
Date/Time Clock – Day
Date/Time Clock – Year
Date/Time Clock – Seconds
Date/Time Clock – Hour
Date/Time Clock – Month
Reg[1067] – Real-Time Data
Reg[1068] – Real-Time Data
Reg[1069] – Real-Time Data
Reg[1070] – Real-Time Data
Reg[1071] – Real-Time Data
Reg[1072] – Real-Time Data
Reg[1073] – Real-Time Data
Reg[1074] – Real-Time Data
Reg[1075] – Real-Time Data
Reg[1076] – Real-Time Data
Reg[1077] – Real-Time Data
Reg[1078] – Real-Time Data
Reg[1079] – Real-Time Data
Current Torque (0-100%)
Last Open Torque at (3-10%)
Last Open Torque at (21-30%)
Last Open Torque at (41-50%)
Last Open Torque at (61-70%)
Last Open Torque at (81-90%)
Last Open Torque at (98-100%)
Last Close Torque at (3-10%)
Last Close Torque at (21-30%)
Last Close Torque at (41-50%)
Last Close Torque at (61-70%)
Last Close Torque at (81-90%)
Last Close Torque at (98-100%)
Current Position (0-100%)
Last Open Torque at (0-2%)
Last Open Torque at (11-20%)
Last Open Torque at (31-40%)
Last Open Torque at (51-60%)
Last Open Torque at (71-80%)
Last Open Torque at (91-97%)
Last Close Torque at (0-2%)
Last Close Torque at (11-20%)
Last Close Torque at (31-40%)
Last Close Torque at (51-60%)
Last Close Torque at (71-80%)
Last Close Torque at (91-97%)
Reg[1080] – Archived Torque
Reg[1081] – Archived Torque
Reg[1082] – Archived Torque
Reg[1083] – Archived Torque
Reg[1084] – Archived Torque
Reg[1085] – Archived Torque
Reg[1086] – Archived Torque
Reg[1087] – Archived Torque
Reg[1088] – Archived Torque
Reg[1089] – Archived Torque
Reg[1090] – Archived Torque
Reg[1091] – Archived Torque
Open Torque at
Open Torque at
Open Torque at
Open Torque at
Open Torque at
Open Torque at
Close Torque at
Close Torque at
Close Torque at
Close Torque at
Close Torque at
Close Torque at
Open Torque at
Open Torque at
Open Torque at
Open Torque at
Open Torque at
Open Torque at
Close Torque at
Close Torque at
Close Torque at
Close Torque at
Close Torque at
Close Torque at
Reg[1092] – Log
Reg[1093] – Log
Reg[1094] – Log
Reg[1095] – Log
Reg[1096] – Log
Reg[1097] – Log
Reg[1098] – Log
Reg[1099] – Log
Reg[1100] – Log Archive
Motor Run-time Log – Min
Motor Run-Time Log – Sec
(RESERVED – NO-OP)
Motor Run-Time Log – Hours
Motor Starts Log (Word 1)
Motor Starts Log (Word 2)
Motor Starts Log (Word 3)
Valve Strokes Log (Word 1)
Valve Strokes Log (Word 2)
Valve Strokes Log (Word 3)
Archive Motor Starts Log (Word 1)
(3-10%)
(21-30%)
(41-50%)
(61-70%)
(81-90%)
(98-100%)
(3-10%)
(21-30%)
(41-50%)
(61-70%)
(81-90%)
(98-100%)
(0-2%)
(11-20%)
(31-40%)
(51-60%)
(71-80%)
(91-97%)
(0-2%)
(11-20%)
(31-40%)
(51-60%)
(71-80%)
(91-97%)
Copyright © 2004 EIM COMPANY, INC. • 13840 PIKE ROAD • MISSOURI CITY, TX. 77489
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
Reg[1101] – Log Archive
Reg[1102] – Log Archive
Reg[1103] – Log Archive
Reg[1104] – Log Archive
Reg[1105] – Log Archive
Reg[1106] – Log Archive
Reg[1107] – Log Archive
Archive Motor Starts Log (Word 2)
Archive Motor Starts Log (Word 3)
Archive Valve Strokes Log (Word 1)
Archive Valve Strokes Log (Word 2)
Archive Valve Strokes Log (Word 3)
Archive Motor Run-time – Min
Archive Motor Run-Time – Sec
Archive Motor Run-time – Hours
Reg[1108] – Real-Time Data
Reg[1109] – Real-Time Data
Reg[1110] – Real-Time Data
Reg[1111] – Real-Time Data
Reg[1112] – Real-Time Data
Reg[1113] – Real-Time Data
Current Valve Position (0.0% -100.0% in 0.1% increments)
Current Valve Position (0 - 4095)
Current Torque (0.0% -100.0% in 0.1% increments)
Current Torque (0 - 4095)
Analog Input #1 (0 - 4095)
Analog Input #2 (0 - 4095)
Reg[1114] – Real-Time Data
Reg[1115] – Real-Time Data
Reg[1116] – Real-Time Data
Reg[1117] – Real-Time Data
Analog Output #1 (0 - 4095)
Analog Output #2 (0 - 4095)
Position Control Setpoint (0 - 4095)
Position Control Setpoint (0.0% -100.0% in 0.1% increments)
Reg[1118] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1119] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1120] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1121] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1122] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1123] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1124] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1125] – User (Field) Setup
Reg[1126] – Factory Setup
Reg[1127] -
Analog Input #1 ZERO Calibration Data
Analog Input #1 SPAN Calibration Data
Analog Input #2 ZERO Calibration Data
Analog Input #2 SPAN Calibration Data
Analog Output #1 ZERO Calibration Data
Analog Output #1 SPAN Calibration Data
Analog Output #2 ZERO Calibration Data
Analog Output #2 SPAN Calibration Data
Valve Travel Speed
(seconds if part-turn valve) or (RPM if multi-turn valve)
(RESERVED – NO-OP)
Reg[1128] – ID
Reg[1129] – ID
Reg[1130] – ID
Reg[1131] – ID
Reg[1132] – ID
Reg[1133] – ID
Reg[1134] – ID
Reg[1135] – ID
Reg[1136] – ID
Reg[1137] – ID
Reg[1138] – ID
Reg[1139] – ID
Reg[1140] – ID
Reg[1141] – ID
Reg[1142] – ID
Reg[1143] – ID
Reg[1144] – ID
Reg[1145] – ID
Reg[1146] – ID
Reg[1147] – ID
Reg[1148] – ID
Reg[1149] – ID
Reg[1150] – ID
Reg[1151] – ID
Reg[1152] – ID
CCM Version ID – Mid Num
CCM Version ID – High Num
CCM Compile Date – Char 0
CCM Version ID – Low Num
CCM Compile Date – Char 2
CCM Compile Date – Char 1
CCM Compile Date – Char 4
CCM Compile Date – Char 3
CCM Compile Date – Char 6
CCM Compile Date – Char 5
CCM Compile Date – Char 8
CCM Compile Date – Char 7
(RESERVED – NO-OP)
(RESERVED – NO-OP)
RDM1 Version ID – Mid Num
RDM1 Version ID – High Num
RDM1 Compile Date – Char 0
RDM1 Version ID – Low Num
RDM1 Compile Date – Char 2
RDM1 Compile Date – Char 1
RDM1 Compile Date – Char 4
RDM1 Compile Date – Char 3
RDM1 Compile Date – Char 6
RDM1 Compile Date – Char 5
RDM1 Compile Date – Char 8
RDM1 Compile Date – Char 7
(RESERVED – NO-OP)
(RESERVED – NO-OP)
RDM2 Version ID – Mid Num
RDM2 Version ID – High Num
RDM2 Compile Date – Char 0
RDM2 Version ID – Low Num
RDM2 Compile Date – Char 2
RDM2 Compile Date – Char 1
RDM2 Compile Date – Char 4
RDM2 Compile Date – Char 3
RDM2 Compile Date – Char 6
RDM2 Compile Date – Char 5
RDM2 Compile Date – Char 8
RDM2 Compile Date – Char 7
(RESERVED – NO-OP)
(RESERVED – NO-OP)
LDM Version ID – Mid Num
LDM Version ID – High Num
Copyright © 2004 EIM COMPANY, INC. • 13840 PIKE ROAD • MISSOURI CITY, TX. 77489
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
Reg[1153] – ID
Reg[1154] – ID
Reg[1155] – ID
Reg[1156] – ID
Reg[1157] – ID
Reg[1158] – ID
Reg[1159] – ID
Reg[1160] – ID
Reg[1161] – ID
Reg[1162] – ID
Reg[1163] – ID
Reg[1164] – ID
Reg[1165] – ID
Reg[1166] – ID
Reg[1167] – ID
Reg[1168] – ID
Reg[1169] – ID
Reg[1170] – ID
Reg[1171] – ID
Reg[1172] – ID
Reg[1173] – ID
Reg[1174] – ID
Reg[1175] – ID
Reg[1176] – Alarm Log
Reg[1177] – Alarm Log
Reg[1178] – Alarm Log
Reg[1179] – Alarm Log
Reg[1180] – Alarm Log
Reg[1181] –
Reg[1182] –
Reg[1183] –
LDM Compile
LDM Compile
LDM Compile
LDM Compile
LDM Compile
Date – Char 0
LDM Version ID – Low Num
Date – Char 2
LDM Compile Date – Char 1
Date – Char 4
LDM Compile Date – Char 3
Date – Char 6
LDM Compile Date – Char 5
Date – Char 8
LDM Compile Date – Char 7
(RESERVED – NO-OP)
(RESERVED – NO-OP)
APD Version ID – Mid Num
APD Version ID – High Num
APD Compile Date – Char 0
APD Version ID – Low Num
APD Compile Date – Char 2
APD Compile Date – Char 1
APD Compile Date – Char 4
APD Compile Date – Char 3
APD Compile Date – Char 6
APD Compile Date – Char 5
APD Compile Date – Char 8
APD Compile Date – Char 7
(RESERVED – NO-OP)
(RESERVED – NO-OP)
ACM Version ID – Mid Num
ACM Version ID – High Num
ACM Compile Date – Char 0
ACM Version ID – Low Num
ACM Compile Date – Char 2
ACM Compile Date – Char 1
ACM Compile Date – Char 4
ACM Compile Date – Char 3
ACM Compile Date – Char 6
ACM Compile Date – Char 5
ACM Compile Date – Char 8
ACM Compile Date – Char 7
(RESERVED – NO-OP)
(RESERVED – NO-OP)
Alarm [1]
Alarm [3]
Alarm [5]
Alarm [7]
Alarm [9] … Oldest
Reserved – NO-OP
Reserved – NO-OP
Reserved – NO-OP
Alarm [0] … Newest
Alarm [2]
Alarm [4]
Alarm [6]
Alarm [8]
Reserved – NO-OP
Reserved – NO-OP
Reserved – NO-OP
Reg[1184] – Event Log – Record (1)
Reg[1185] – Event Log – Record (1)
Reg[1186] – Event Log – Record (1)
Reg[1187] – Event Log – Record (1)
Reg[1188] – Event Log – Record (1)
Reg[1189] – Event Log – Record (1)
Reg[1190] – Event Log – Record (1)
Reg[1191] – Event Log – Record (1)
Reg[1192] – Event Log – Record (1)
Log Entry Number
Register [1000] … Inputs [1000 – 1015]
Register [1001] … Inputs [1016 – 1031]
Register [1002] … Inputs [1032 – 1047]
Time – minutes
Time – seconds
Date – Day
Time – Hour
Date – Year
Date – Month
Torque – (0 – 100%)
Position (0 – 100%)
CRC – High byte
CRC – Low Byte
Reg[1193] – Event Log – Record (2)
Reg[1194] – Event Log – Record (2)
Reg[1195] – Event Log – Record (2)
Reg[1196] – Event Log – Record (2)
Reg[1197] – Event Log – Record (2)
Reg[1198] – Event Log – Record (2)
Reg[1199] – Event Log – Record (2)
Reg[1200] – Event Log – Record (2)
Reg[1201] – Event Log – Record (2)
Log Entry Number
Register [1000] … Inputs [1000 – 1015]
Register [1001] … Inputs [1016 – 1031]
Register [1002] … Inputs [1032 – 1047]
Time - minutes
Time – seconds
Date – Day
Time – Hour
Date – Year
Date – Month
Torque – (0 – 100%)
Position (0 – 100%)
CRC – High byte
CRC – Low Byte
Reg[1202] – Event Log – Record (3)
Reg[1203] – Event Log – Record (3)
Reg[1204] – Event Log – Record (3)
Reg[1205] – Event Log – Record (3)
Reg[1206] – Event Log – Record (3)
Log Entry Number
Register [1000] … Inputs [1000 – 1015]
Register [1001] … Inputs [1016 – 1031]
Register [1002] … Inputs [1032 – 1047]
Time - minutes
Time – seconds
Copyright © 2004 EIM COMPANY, INC. • 13840 PIKE ROAD • MISSOURI CITY, TX. 77489
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Controlinc 1746-C (Version 5.21) Network Master Users Guide (2004-11-18)
Reg[1207] – Event Log – Record (3)
Reg[1208] – Event Log – Record (3)
Reg[1209] – Event Log – Record (3)
Reg[1210] – Event Log – Record (3)
Date – Day
Date – Year
Torque – (0 – 100%)
CRC – High byte
Time – Hour
Date – Month
Position (0 – 100%)
CRC – Low Byte
Reg[1211] – Event Log – Record (4)
Reg[1212] – Event Log – Record (4)
Reg[1213] – Event Log – Record (4)
Reg[1214] – Event Log – Record (4)
Reg[1215] – Event Log – Record (4)
Reg[1216] – Event Log – Record (4)
Reg[1217] – Event Log – Record (4)
Reg[1218] – Event Log – Record (4)
Reg[1219] – Event Log – Record (4)
Log Entry Number
Register [1000] … Inputs [1000 – 1015]
Register [1001] … Inputs [1016 – 1031]
Register [1002] … Inputs [1032 – 1047]
Time - minutes
Time – seconds
Date – Day
Time – Hour
Date – Year
Date – Month
Torque – (0 – 100%)
Position (0 – 100%)
CRC – High byte
CRC – Low Byte
Reg[1220] – Event Log – Record (5)
Reg[1221] – Event Log – Record (5)
Reg[1222] – Event Log – Record (5)
Reg[1223] – Event Log – Record (5)
Reg[1224] – Event Log – Record (5)
Reg[1225] – Event Log – Record (5)
Reg[1226] – Event Log – Record (5)
Reg[1227] – Event Log – Record (5)
Reg[1228] – Event Log – Record (5)
Log Entry Number
Register [1000] … Inputs [1000 – 1015]
Register [1001] … Inputs [1016 – 1031]
Register [1002] … Inputs [1032 – 1047]
Time - minutes
Time – seconds
Date – Day
Time – Hour
Date – Year
Date – Month
Torque – (0 – 100%)
Position (0 – 100%)
CRC – High byte
CRC – Low Byte
Reg[1229] – Event Log – Record (6)
Reg[1230] – Event Log – Record (6)
Reg[1231] – Event Log – Record (6)
Reg[1232] – Event Log – Record (6)
Reg[1233] – Event Log – Record (6)
Reg[1234] – Event Log – Record (6)
Reg[1235] – Event Log – Record (6)
Reg[1236] – Event Log – Record (6)
Reg[1237] – Event Log – Record (6)
Log Entry Number
Register [1000] … Inputs [1000 – 1015]
Register [1001] … Inputs [1016 – 1031]
Register [1002] … Inputs [1032 – 1047]
Time - minutes
Time – seconds
Date – Day
Time – Hour
Date – Year
Date – Month
Torque – (0 – 100%)
Position (0 – 100%)
CRC – High byte
CRC – Low Byte
Reg[1238] – Event Log – Record (7)
Reg[1239] – Event Log – Record (7)
Reg[1240] – Event Log – Record (7)
Reg[1241] – Event Log – Record (7)
Reg[1242] – Event Log – Record (7)
Reg[1243] – Event Log – Record (7)
Reg[1244] – Event Log – Record (7)
Reg[1245] – Event Log – Record (7)
Reg[1246] – Event Log – Record (7)
Log Entry Number
Register [1000] … Inputs [1000 – 1015]
Register [1001] … Inputs [1016 – 1031]
Register [1002] … Inputs [1032 – 1047]
Time - minutes
Time – seconds
Date – Day
Time – Hour
Date – Year
Date – Month
Torque – (0 – 100%)
Position (0 – 100%)
CRC – High byte
CRC – Low Byte
Reg[1247] – Event Log – Record (8)
Reg[1248] – Event Log – Record (8)
Reg[1249] – Event Log – Record (8)
Reg[1250] – Event Log – Record (8)
Reg[1251] – Event Log – Record (8)
Reg[1252] – Event Log – Record (8)
Reg[1253] – Event Log – Record (8)
Reg[1254] – Event Log – Record (8)
Reg[1255] – Event Log – Record (8)
Log Entry Number
Register [1000] … Inputs [1000 – 1015]
Register [1001] … Inputs [1016 – 1031]
Register [1002] … Inputs [1032 – 1047]
Time - minutes
Time – seconds
Date – Day
Time – Hour
Date – Year
Date – Month
Torque – (0 – 100%)
Position (0 – 100%)
CRC – High byte
CRC – Low Byte
------------------------------------ END TEC2000 HOLDING REGISTERS -----------------------
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6.5. App Note: Modbus Message Formats
All Modbus communication timing estimates in this document are based on 9600 baud.
There is always a 10ms minimum “Command Message Turn Around Time” between when the last
message was received by the 1746-C and when it can transmit again … the physical network actually
requires 8ms but 10ms is what the 1746-C delivers.
There is always a 8ms minimum “Response Message Turn Around Time” between when the last
message was received by the actuator and when it can transmit again.
At 9600 baud, it takes about 1.145ms
transmitted.
/ character transmitted … per byte in the message being
(11 bits in each char) / ( 9600 baud)
DIAGRAM OF COMMUNICATION ON THE NETWORK
Command Message
Transmit
Turn Around Response Message
Time (8ms)
Transmit
Turn Around
Time (10ms)
Command Message
Transmit
Turn Around
Time (8ms)
6.5.1. Modbus RTU Functions (Command Codes) Implemented
1746-C system utilizes a subset of Modbus RTU protocol. The protocol is implemented in accordance
with Modicon Modbus Protocol Reference Guide PI-MBUS-300 Rev. J.
The following Modbus function codes are used:
Code
01
03
05
06
15
Meaning
Read Coil Status
Read Holding Register
Set (Force) Single Coil
Set Single Register
Set (Force) Multiple Coils
Action and Data Type
Read current status of a group of discrete output bits
Read binary value in one or more 16-bit registers
Write a single discrete output bit on or off
Write a binary value to a specific 16-bit register
Write on/off state to a group of coils
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6.5.2. Modbus Function (Command) Code Descriptions
Most of the rest of the information in this section came directly (or was paraphrased) from the Modbus
Specification.
6.5.2.1. Modbus Function Code 01 … Read Coil Status
Using function code 01, the Modbus master (host) may directly address and read bits that indicate the
live discrete outputs, software generated status bits and configuration bits.
Refer to the previous section that identifies “Standard Coils”
Example (in byte order) of a request to
read 37 coils … 20–56 (internal coil
addresses 19 – 55) from slave device 17:
Response example (in byte order):
1.
2.
Slave Address
Function
11
01
1.
2.
Slave Address
Function
11
01
3.
Byte Count
05
3.
4.
5.
6.
Starting Address Hi byte
Starting Address Lo byte
No. of Coils Hi byte
No. of Coils Lo byte
00
13
00
25
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Data (Coils 27–20)
Data (Coils 35–28)
Data (Coils 43–36)
Data (Coils 51–44)
Data (Coils 56–52)
CD
6B
B2
0E
1B
7.
8.
CRC Hi byte
CRC Lo byte
––
––
9. CRC Hi byte
10. CRC Lo byte
NOTE: 19 decimal is 0x13
37 decimal is 0x25
––
––
The status of coils 27–20 is shown as the byte value CD hex, or binary 1100
1101. Coil 27 is the MSB of this byte, and coil 20 is the LSB.
Left to right, the status of coils 27 through 20 is: ON–ON–OFF–OFF–ON–
ON–OFF–ON.
By convention, bits within a byte are shown with the MSB to the left, and the
LSB to the right. Thus the coils in the first byte are ‘27 through 20’, from left to
right.
The next byte has coils ‘35 through 28’, left to right. As the bits are
transmitted serially, they flow from LSB to MSB: 20 . . . 27, 28 . . . 35, and so
on.
In the last data byte, the status of coils 56–52 is shown as the byte value 1B
hex, or binary 0001 1011.
Coil 56 is in the fourth bit position from the left, and coil 52 is
the LSB of this byte.
The status of coils 56 through 52 is: ON–ON–OFF–ON–ON.
Note how the three remaining bits (toward the high order end) are zero–filled.
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6.5.2.2. Modbus Function Code 03 … Read Holding Register
Using function code 03, the Modbus master (host) may directly address and read any memory register in
the actuator. This includes all registers containing discrete values (inputs & coils).
Refer to the previous section that describes the “Addressable Holding Registers”.
Example (in byte order) of a request to read
registers 40108 – 40110 (internal holding
registers 107 – 109) from slave device 17:
1.
2.
Slave Address
Function
11
03
3.
4.
5.
6.
Starting Address Hi byte
Starting Address Lo byte
No. of Registers Hi byte
No. of Registers Lo byte
00
6B
00
03
7.
8.
CRC Hi byte
CRC Lo byte
––
––
Response example (in byte order):
1.
2.
Slave Address
Function
11
03
3.
Byte Count
06
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Data Hi (Register 40108)
Data Lo (Register 40108)
Data Hi (Register 40109)
Data Lo (Register 40109)
Data Hi (Register 40110)
Data Lo (Register 40110)
02
2B
00
00
00
64
10. CRC Hi byte
11. CRC Lo byte
––
––
NOTE: 107 decimal is 0x6B
The contents of register 40108 are shown as the two
byte values of 02 2B hex (or 555 decimal).
The contents of registers 40109–40110 are 00 00 and
00 64 hex, or 0 and 100 decimal.
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6.5.2.3. Modbus Function Code 05 … Set (Force) Single Coil
Using function code 05, the Modbus master (host) may directly address and write single bits that indicate
coils … to turn them ON or OFF.
Writing to a Read Only (RO) coil will
• Have no affect on valve operation
• Be ignored by the application software.
• Cause the actuator to return a response indicating “illegal function code”.
If a configuration coil is set which is dependent upon other configuration coils being set (and the other
coils are not set), a configuration error will be indicated that prevents valve actuator control.
When a valid configuration is written, the controller compares the state of the coil to the state stored in
EEPROM. If the state has changed, the new state is stored to EEPROM configuration.
Refer to the previous section that identifies “Standard Coils”
Example (in byte order) of a request to
force coil 173 (internal coil number 172)
“ON” in slave device 17:
1.
2.
Slave Address
Function
11
05
3.
4.
5.
6.
Coil Address Hi byte
Coil Address Lo byte
Force Data Hi byte
Force Data Lo byte
00
AC
FF
00
7.
8.
CRC Hi byte
CRC Lo byte
––
––
Response example (in byte order):
1.
2.
Slave Address
Function
11
05
3.
4.
5.
6.
Coil Address Hi
Coil Address Lo
Force Data Hi
Force Data Lo
00
AC
FF
00
7.
8.
CRC Hi byte
CRC Lo byte
––
––
NOTE: 172 decimal = 0xAC
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6.5.2.4. Modbus Function Code 06 … Set Single Register
Using function code 06, the Modbus master (host) may directly address and write any Read/Write (RW)
memory register in the actuator. This includes registers that hold discrete values (inputs & coils).
Writing to a Read Only (RO) register will
• Have no affect on valve operation
• Be ignored by the application software.
• Cause the actuator to return a response indicating “illegal function code”.
Writing to a configuration data register that is Read/Write (RW) will cause the controller to compare the
written valve to the value stored in the EEPROM. If the value is different, the new value will be stored to
EEPROM configuration.
If a configuration coil is set which is dependent upon other configuration coils being set (and the other
coils are not set), a configuration error will be indicated that prevents valve actuator control.
Refer to the previous section that describes the “Addressable Holding Registers”.
Example (in byte order) of a request to
preset register 40002 (internal holding
register 01) to 00 03 hex in slave device
17:
1.
2.
Slave Address
Function
11
06
3.
4.
5.
6.
Register Address Hi byte
Register Address Lo byte
Preset Data Hi byte
Preset Data Lo byte
00
01
00
03
7.
8.
CRC Hi byte
CRC Lo byte
––
––
Response example (in byte order):
1.
2.
Slave Address
Function
11
06
3.
4.
5.
6.
Register Address Hi
Register Address Lo
Preset Data Hi
Preset Data Lo
00
01
00
03
7.
8.
CRC Hi byte
CRC Lo byte
––
––
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6.5.2.5. Modbus Function Code 15 (0x0F) … Set (Force) Multiple Coils
Using function code 15, the Modbus master (host) may directly address and write a range of consecutive
bits that indicate coils … to turn them ON or OFF.
This is very similar to function code 05 that deals with single coils (register bits) except that function code
15 deals with a consecutive range of bits (coils).
For more information, refer to the previous section that identifies “Function code 05 … Set (Force) Single
Coil”
Also, refer to the previous section that identifies “Standard Coils”
Example (in byte order) of a request to force a series of ten coils …
starting at coil 20 (internal coil number 19 … 13 hex) in slave device
17.
1.
2.
Slave Address
Function
11
0F
3.
4.
5.
6.
Coil Address Hi byte
Coil Address Lo byte
Quantity of Coils Hi byte
Quantity of Coils Lo byte
00
13
00
0A
7.
Data Byte Count
02
8.
9.
1st Data byte
nd
2 Data byte
10. CRC Hi byte
11. CRC Lo byte
(Coils 27-20)
(Coils 29-28)
Response example (in byte order):
1.
2.
Slave Address
Function
11
0F
3.
4.
5.
6.
Coil Address Hi
Coil Address Lo
Quantity of Coils Hi
Quantity of Coils Lo
00
13
00
0A
7.
8.
CRC Hi byte
CRC Lo byte
––
––
CD
01
––
––
The query data contents are two bytes: CD 01 hex
(1100 1101 0000 0001 binary).
The binary bits correspond to the coils in the following way:
Bit:
1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Coil: 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20
– – – – – – 29 28
The first byte transmitted (CD hex) addresses coils 27-20, with the
least significant bit addressing the lowest coil (20) in this set.
The next byte transmitted (01 hex) addresses coils 29-28, with the
least significant bit addressing the lowest coil (28) in this set.
Unused bits in the last data byte should be zero–filled.
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6.5.3. Modbus Exception Messages Supported
There are 3 Modbus Exception Messages supported by the CPU (as responses back to the Modbus
master) for Modbus function calls to these registers:
• Exception 01
Illegal function code received. The query is not an allowable action for the
slave.
• Exception 02
Illegal data address received. The query is not an allowable address for
the slave.
• Exception 03
Illegal data value received. The value contained in the query field is not an
allowable value for the slave.
This is a 5 byte packet whose structure is always the same such that
• Byte 1:
The slave address responding
• Byte 2:
The function code that generated the error (+ 0x80)
• Byte 3:
The error exception type (01, 02 or 03)
• Byte 4:
The CRC high byte
• Byte 5:
The CRC low byte
For byte #2 (function code generating the error), the most significant bit of the original function code that
generated the error/exception response is set to “1” to indicate which code had an error. For example:
• If function 1 (0x01) was sent to the slave and the slave had an exception with that function, it
would return a 0x81 in byte #2.
•
If function 16 (0x10) was sent to the slave and the slave had an exception with that function, it
would return a 0x90 in byte #2.
Any “incorrectly formatted” message will return an Exception Code 02.
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6.6. App Note: Install the 1746-C Network Master Firmware
Unless the 1746-C Network Master module is supplied by EIM with software (driver) installed, it is
necessary to install it. Installation may also become necessary for software upgrades or in the case of a
failed 1746-C module being replaced in the field.
Follow the procedures in this section to install the software. The software for the 1746-C is supplied on a
Microsoft DOS compatible diskette in Intel hex format. If an Allen-Bradley compatible software package
is not available for downloading the program, any terminal program with the ability to upload ASCII text
files may be used (for instance … the terminal program, HyperTerminal, which is installed with
Windows95/98/NT, can be used).
The firmware is stored in the EEPROM as discussed in the previous section. Depending upon the
setup, the program is normally run from Random Access Memory (RAM) with Auto-start. Auto-start uses
a small script to automatically begin executing the machine code in the EEPROM. This is useful when
there has been a power outage to the PLC or the PLC requires maintenance.
6.6.1. Configure the Module for a Firmware Upload
1. Disconnect the PRT1 and PRT2 connections to the 1746-C module.
2. Power down the PLC and pull the 1746-C module from the PLC rack.
3. Set JW-4 for
• PRT1 = Default Program Mode (Default PGM).
• PRT2 = ASCII.
• DH485 = RUN.
4. Place the 1746-C module back in the rack.
5. Connect the serial communication cable between the 1746-C and the computer. The correct
cable is a Null Modem Cable connected between the PRT1 port (top DB9 connector on the
module) and the serial communications port on the computer used for the upload.
SLC-500 with
1746-C installed
1746-C
Top Port
is Port 1
Computer to
transfer the
new
program
from
Serial Cable with
Null Modem
Sample Connection Diagram
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6.6.2. Upload the 1746-C Firmware
Please refer to the Allen-Bradley SLC-500 BASIC User's Manual (1746-BAS & 1746-BAS-T)
Publication No. 1746-UM004A-US-P 2000
1. Make sure that the terminal program is running and that it is set for 1200 Baud, 8,N,1 and
Software Flow Control (XON/XOFF).
2. Power the PLC rack up.
3. While in the terminal program, the startup screen for the 1746-C will be transmitted on power up.
This also occurs on module reset as well.
4. Press <ENTER> several times to make sure that there is correct communication.
(The “>”, a line item caret, will appear every time you press it.)
If you want (and can) communicate at a 9600 baud rather than 1200 baud, perform
the following NOW:
1. Type in the command :
PUSH 9600
2. Type in the command:
CALL 78
3. Change your terminal program over to 9600 baud.
4. Continue with the standard procedure.
5. Type in the command “CALL 100”.
(The module then waits for an upload from the terminal program.)
------- --------6. Use the “Send Text File” command in your particular terminal program to send the file.
The appropriate file is in “Intel hex format” (which is an ASCII text file) … all other formats will
create an error.
------- --------7. After the file is finished being transmitted, the “>” will appear on the terminal screen to indicate
finished.
8. Type “PROG2” and press <ENTER>.
The module will respond back with a successful dialog. If it doesn’t, repeat the previous step.
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6.6.3. Reset the 1746-C Module for Normal Operations
1. Power down the PLC.
2. Pull the 1746-C module from the PLC rack.
3. Set JW-4 back to normal …
• PRT1 = ASCII.
• PRT2 = ASCII.
• DH485 = PGM.
4. Put the 1746-C module back into the desired slot.
5. Reconnect the PRT1 and PRT2 connections to the 1746-C Network Master.
6. Power the module up with the rack.
(LED1 & LED2 should light up and PRT1 & PRT2 should flicker)
7. Finished.
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