AGA 6-4 Series Instruction manual

Part Number D301217X012
July 2014
ROC800-Series Remote Operations Controller
Instruction Manual
ROC809
ROC827
Remote Automation Solutions
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Revision Tracking Sheet
July 2014
This manual may be revised periodically to incorporate new or updated information. The revision date
of each page appears at the bottom of the page opposite the page number. A change in revision date
to any page also changes the date of the manual that appears on the front cover. Listed below is the
revision date of each page (if applicable):
ii
Page
All pages
Revision
Jun-14
All pages
May-13
All pages
Nov-10
All pages
Jun-09
Initial issue
Mar-06
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Contents
Chapter 1 – General Information
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.9
1.10
1.11
Scope of Manual ........................................................................................................................... 1-2
Series 1 versus Series 2 Architecture ........................................................................................... 1-3
Hardware....................................................................................................................................... 1-5
1.3.1 Central Processor Unit (CPU) .......................................................................................... 1-9
1.3.2 Real-Time Clock (RTC).................................................................................................... 1-9
1.3.3 Diagnostic Monitoring ...................................................................................................... 1-9
1.3.4 Options ........................................................................................................................... 1-10
FCC Information .......................................................................................................................... 1-11
Firmware ..................................................................................................................................... 1-11
1.5.1 Historical Database and Event & Alarm Log ................................................................. 1-15
1.5.2 Meter Runs and Stations ............................................................................................... 1-16
1.5.3 ROC800 Flow Calculations ............................................................................................ 1-16
1.5.4 ROC800L Flow Calculations .......................................................................................... 1-17
1.5.5 Automatic Self Tests ...................................................................................................... 1-17
1.5.6 Low Power Modes ......................................................................................................... 1-18
1.5.7 Proportional, Integral, and Derivative (PID) ................................................................... 1-19
1.5.8 Function Sequence Table (FST).................................................................................... 1-19
ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software ....................................................................................... 1-20
ROC800L Software ..................................................................................................................... 1-22
DS800 Development Suite Software .......................................................................................... 1-23
Expansion Backplane ................................................................................................................. 1-24
FOUNDATION™ Fieldbus Interface ............................................................................................... 1-24
Additional Technical Information ................................................................................................. 1-24
Chapter 2 – Installation and Use
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
1-1
2-1
Installation Requirements ................................................................................................................. 2-1
2.1.1 Environmental Requirements ............................................................................................... 2-2
2.1.2 Site Requirements ................................................................................................................ 2-2
2.1.3 Compliance with Hazardous Area Standards ...................................................................... 2-3
2.1.4 Power Installation Requirements ......................................................................................... 2-4
2.1.5 Grounding Installation Requirements ................................................................................... 2-4
2.1.6 I/O Wiring Requirements ...................................................................................................... 2-5
Required Tools ................................................................................................................................. 2-5
Housing ............................................................................................................................................ 2-5
2.3.1 Removing and Replacing End Caps .................................................................................... 2-6
2.3.2 Removing and Installing Wire Channel Covers ................................................................... 2-6
2.3.3 Removing and Installing Module Covers ............................................................................. 2-7
Mounting the ROC800 on a DIN Rail ............................................................................................... 2-7
2.4.1 Installing the DIN Rail ........................................................................................................... 2-9
2.4.2 Securing the ROC800 to the DIN Rail ................................................................................. 2-9
2.4.3 Removing the ROC800 from the DIN Rail ......................................................................... 2-10
ROC800-Series Expansion Backplane (EXP) ............................................................................... 2-10
2.5.1 Attaching an Expansion Backplane ................................................................................... 2-11
2.5.2 Removing an Expansion Backplane .................................................................................. 2-12
Central Processing Unit (CPU) ...................................................................................................... 2-13
2.6.1 Removing the CPU Module................................................................................................ 2-17
2.6.2 Installing the CPU Module.................................................................................................. 2-17
License Keys .................................................................................................................................. 2-18
Revised Jul-14
iii
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
2.8
2.7.1 Installing a License Key ..................................................................................................... 2-19
2.7.2 Removing a License Key ................................................................................................... 2-19
Startup and Operation .................................................................................................................... 2-20
2.8.1 Startup ................................................................................................................................ 2-20
2.8.2 Operation ........................................................................................................................... 2-21
Chapter 3 – Power Connections
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
Power Input Module Descriptions .................................................................................................... 3-1
3.1.1 12-Volt DC Power Input Module (PM-12) ............................................................................ 3-1
3.1.2 24-Volt DC Power Input Module (PM-24) ............................................................................ 3-3
3.1.3 30-Volt DC Power Input Module (PM-30) ............................................................................ 3-4
3.1.4 Auxiliary Output (AUX+ and AUX–) ..................................................................................... 3-8
3.1.5 Switched Auxiliary Output (AUX SW + and AUX SW –) ........................................................... 3-10
Determining Power Consumption .................................................................................................. 3-11
3.2.1 Tuning the Configuration .................................................................................................... 3-15
Removing a Power Input Module ................................................................................................... 3-25
Installing a Power Input Module ..................................................................................................... 3-26
Connecting the ROC800 to Wiring................................................................................................. 3-27
3.5.1 Wiring the DC Power Input Module.................................................................................... 3-27
3.5.2 Wiring the External Batteries ............................................................................................. 3-29
3.5.3 Replacing the Internal Battery............................................................................................ 3-30
Additional Technical Information .................................................................................................... 3-32
Chapter 4 – Input/Output Modules
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
4.9
4.10
4.11
4.12
4.13
4.14
4.15
4.16
4.17
iv
4-1
I/O Module Overview ...................................................................................................................... 4-1
Installation ...................................................................................................................................... 4-4
4.2.1 Removing and Installing Wire Channel Covers ................................................................... 4-4
4.2.2 Removing and Installing Module Slot Covers ...................................................................... 4-5
4.2.3 Installing an I/O Module ....................................................................................................... 4-5
4.2.4 Removing an I/O Module ..................................................................................................... 4-7
4.2.5 Wiring I/O Modules............................................................................................................... 4-7
Analog Input (AI) Modules .............................................................................................................. 4-7
Analog Output (AO) Modules ......................................................................................................... 4-9
Discrete Input (DI) Modules .......................................................................................................... 4-10
Pulse Input (PI) Modules .............................................................................................................. 4-12
Discrete Output (DO) Modules ..................................................................................................... 4-13
Discrete Output Relay (DOR) Modules ........................................................................................ 4-15
Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD) Input Modules ............................................................. 4-16
Advanced Pulse Module (APM) ................................................................................................... 4-18
Multi-Variable Sensor Input/Output (MVS I/O)............................................................................. 4-21
Alternating Current Input/Output (AC I/O) Module ....................................................................... 4-25
Thermocouple (TC) Input Module ................................................................................................ 4-27
®
Highway Addressable Remote Transducer (HART ) Module ..................................................... 4-31
IEC 62591 Module ....................................................................................................................... 4-33
APP 485 Module .......................................................................................................................... 4-35
Additional Technical Information .................................................................................................. 4-36
Chapter 5 – Communications
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
3-1
5-1
Communication Ports and Modules Overview .......................................................................... 5-1
Installing Communication Modules ............................................................................................ 5-3
Removing a Communication Module ........................................................................................ 5-5
Wiring Communication Modules ................................................................................................ 5-5
Local Operator Interface (LOI)................................................................................................... 5-5
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
5.5.1 Using the LOI ....................................................................................................................... 5-7
Ethernet Communication .............................................................................................................. 5-7
EIA-232 (RS-232) Serial Communication ..................................................................................... 5-9
EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) Serial Communications Module ...................................................... 5-10
5.8.1 EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) Jumpers & Termination Resistors .......................................... 5-11
5.9 Dial-up Modem Communication Module ........................................................................................ 5-13
5.10 Multi-Variable Sensor (MVS) Interface Module ........................................................................... 5-14
5.11 Network Radio Module (NRM) ..................................................................................................... 5-14
5.12 Additional Technical Information .................................................................................................. 5-16
5.6
5.7
5.8
Chapter 6 – Troubleshooting
6.1
6.2
6.3
Guidelines ........................................................................................................................................ 6-1
Checklists ......................................................................................................................................... 6-2
6.2.1 Serial Communications ........................................................................................................ 6-2
6.2.2 I/O Point ............................................................................................................................... 6-3
6.2.3 Software ............................................................................................................................... 6-3
6.2.4 Powering Up ......................................................................................................................... 6-4
6.2.5 MVS or MVS I/O Module ...................................................................................................... 6-4
6.2.6 IEC 62591 Module ............................................................................................................... 6-5
Procedures ....................................................................................................................................... 6-5
6.3.1
Preserving Configuration and Log Data ............................................................................ 6-5
6.3.2
Restarting the ROC800 ..................................................................................................... 6-5
6.3.3
Troubleshooting Analog Input Modules ............................................................................. 6-6
6.3.4
Troubleshooting Analog Output Modules .......................................................................... 6-8
6.3.5
Troubleshooting Discrete Input Modules ........................................................................... 6-9
6.3.6
Troubleshooting Discrete Output Modules ........................................................................ 6-9
6.3.7
Troubleshooting Discrete Output Relay Modules ............................................................ 6-10
6.3.8
Troubleshooting Pulse Input Modules ............................................................................. 6-10
6.3.9
Troubleshooting RTD Input Modules ............................................................................... 6-11
6.3.10 Troubleshooting Thermocouple Input (T/C) Modules ...................................................... 6-12
6.3.11 Troubleshooting Advanced Pulse Modules...................................................................... 6-14
6.3.12 Network Radio Modules ................................................................................................... 6-14
Chapter 7 – Calibration
7.1
7.2
7.3
6-1
7-1
Calibration Overview ........................................................................................................................ 7-1
Calibration Frequency ...................................................................................................................... 7-1
Preparing for Calibration .................................................................................................................. 7-2
Appendix A – Glossary
A-1
Appendix B – Wiring Diagrams
B-1
B.1
B.2
B.3
B.4
B.5
B.6
B.7
B.8
B.9
Daniel Senior Sonic Meter to PI Module .......................................................................................... B-1
Daniel 1818A and 1838 Turbine Pre-Amp to PI Module .................................................................. B-2
Micro Motion RFT9739 & 2400S Transmitters to PI Module ........................................................... B-3
Micro Motion RFT9739 & 2400S Transmitters to APM Module ....................................................... B-4
3- and 4-Wire RTD to RTD Module .................................................................................................. B-5
Daniel Senior Sonic Meter to APM Module ...................................................................................... B-6
Daniel 1818A and 1838 Dual Turbine Pre-Amp to APM Module ..................................................... B-7
Daniel 1818A and 1838 Turbine Pre-Amp to APM Module ............................................................. B-8
Two-Stage Valve with Two Limit Switches to ACIO Module ............................................................ B-9
Index
Revised Jul-14
I-1
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ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
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vi
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Chapter 1 – General Information
This manual focuses on the hardware aspects of the ROC809 and
ROC827 Remote Operations Controllers – also known as the ROC800Series controllers (“ROC800”) – and the ROC800-Series expansion
backplanes (“EXPs”), that attach only to the ROC827 and provide
increased I/O capabilities.
For technical information on the ROC800s, refer to the technical
specifications ROC800:800, and ROC800:FW1 (available at
www.EmersonProcess.com/Remote). For information about the software
you use to configure the ROC800-Series, refer to the ROCLINK™ 800
Configuration Software User Manual (for ROC800-Series) (Part
Number D301250X012).
ROC800L
This manual also discusses the hardware for the ROC800L, a
ROC800-Series device that is factory-loaded with specific firmware
and software designed to measure and manage the flow of liquid
hydrocarbons.
For technical information on the ROC800L, refer to the technical
specifications ROC800:800L, and ROC800:SW1. For information about
the software you use to configure the ROC800L, refer to the ROCLINK
800 Configuration Software User Manual (for ROC800L) (Part Number
D301246X012).
ROC800 or
ROC800L?
The ROC800-Series are principally designed to measure the flow of
natural gas in accordance with AGA and other standards. Firmware
and user programs enhance that functionality.
To meet market demands, Remote Automation Solutions initially
developed user programs to perform flow calculations for certain
liquids. These programs grew to encompass flow and volume
corrections for most liquid hydrocarbons (as defined by the API in the
Manual for Petroleum Measurement Systems, or MPMS). Finally, to
modularize these capabilities and ensure the integrity of the AGA
calculations, we developed a suite of user programs enabled by a license
key.
This chapter details the structure of this manual and provides an
overview of the ROC800 and its components.
In This Chapter
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
Revised Jul-14
Scope of Manual .................................................................................................1-2
Series 1 versus Series 2 Architecture .................................................................1-3
Hardware .............................................................................................................1-5
1.3.1 Central Processor Unit (CPU) .................................................................1-9
1.3.2 Real-Time Clock (RTC) ...........................................................................1-9
1.3.3 Diagnostic Monitoring ..............................................................................1-9
1.3.4 Options ..................................................................................................1-10
FCC Information ................................................................................................1-11
Firmware ...........................................................................................................1-11
1.5.1 Historical Database and Event & Alarm Log..........................................1-15
General Information
1-1
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
1.5.2 Meter Runs and Stations ...................................................................... 1-16
1.5.3 ROC800 Flow Calculations ................................................................... 1-16
1.5.4 ROC800L Flow Calculations ................................................................. 1-17
1.5.5 Automatic Self Tests ............................................................................. 1-17
1.5.6 Low Power Modes ................................................................................ 1-18
1.5.7 Proportional, Integral, and Derivative (PID) .......................................... 1-19
1.5.8 Function Sequence Table (FST) ........................................................... 1-19
1.6 ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software ............................................................. 1-20
1.7 ROC800L Software .......................................................................................... 1-22
1.8 DS800 Development Suite Software ................................................................ 1-23
1.9 Expansion Backplane ....................................................................................... 1-24
1.10 FOUNDATION™ Fieldbus Interface ..................................................................... 1-24
1.11 Additional Technical Information....................................................................... 1-24
The ROC800 is a microprocessor-based controller that provides the
functions required for a variety of field automation applications. It is
ideal for applications requiring general logic and sequencing control;
historical data archiving; multiple communication ports; Proportional,
Integral, and Derivative (PID) control; and flow measurement on up to
twelve meter runs.
1.1
Scope of Manual
This manual contains the following chapters:
Chapter 1
General Information
Provides an overview of the hardware and
specifications for the ROC800 and the ROC800Series expansion backplanes (EXPs).
Chapter 2
Installation and Use
Provides information on installation, tools, wiring,
mounting the ROC800, and other essential elements
of the ROC800 and EXPs.
Chapter 3
Power Connections
Provides information on the Power Input modules
available for the ROC800 base unit and provides
worksheets to help determine power requirements for
the ROC800 configurations.
Chapter 4
Input/Output (I/O)
Modules
1-2
Provides information for the Input/Output (I/O)
modules available for the ROC800 and EXPs.
Chapter 5
Communications
Provides information for the built-in communication
capabilities and the optional communication modules
available for the ROC800.
Chapter 6
Troubleshooting
Provides information on diagnosing and correcting
problems with the ROC800.
Chapter 7
Calibration
Provides information for calibrating Analog Inputs,
®
HART Inputs, RTD Inputs, and MVS Inputs for the
ROC800.
Glossary
Provides generalized definitions of acronyms and
terms.
Wiring Diagrams
Provides diagrams that show how to wire the
modules to various industry-standard devices.
Index
Provides an alphabetic listing of items and topics
contained in this manual.
General Information
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
1.2
Series 1 versus Series 2 Architecture
The Series 2 ROC800 architecture incorporates a redesigned CPU
module and redesigned expansion I/O backplanes to provide major
system advancements. These include an increase in processor speed
(from 50MHz to 65MHz), an increase in SRAM for User C programs
(20K to 100K), an increase in flash memory (4Mb to 16Mb), an
increase in DRAM (8Mb to 16Mb), and greater general flexibility in
module placement. For easy visual identification, the printed circuit
board (PCB) for the Series 2 CPU module, the PCB for the Series 2 base
unit and expansion backplanes, and the Series 2 ROC800 ABS plastic
housing are all black. Additionally, the Series 2 CPU module is labeled
CPU Series 2 (see Figure 1-1).
Note: In the Series 1 ROC800, the PCBs for the CPU module, the base
unit, and the backplanes are green; the ABS plastic housing is
gray.
What’s
Compatible?
In the Series 2 ROC827, you cannot insert a Series 1 CPU module
into a Series 2 base unit or attach Series 1 expansion backplanes to
Series 2 base units or expansion backplanes. Firmware is not available
to upgrade a Series 1 CPU module to the new functionally. To obtain
the Series 2 enhancements, you must obtain and use a Series 2 CPU
module.
The architecture of the ROC809’s fixed backplane allows you to insert a
black Series 2 CPU module into a Series 1 (green) backplane. However,
firmware is not available to upgrade a Series 1 CPU module to the new
functionality. To obtain the Series 2 enhancements, you must obtain and
use a Series 2 CPU module.
Note: The ROC800L functions only on the Series 2 hardware
platform.
Module Placement
Table 1-1 compares module placement in the ROC809, based on the
installation of a Series 1 or Series 2 CPU. Table 1-2 compares module
placement in the ROC827, based on the installation of a Series 1 or
Series 2 CPU.
Table 1-1. ROC809 Module Placement (Series 1 CPU vs. Series 2 CPU)
Module
AI-12
AI-16
AO
APM
RS-485
RS-232
Dial-up Modem
3
MVS
3
MVS I/O
Revised Jul-14
ROC809 Series 1 CPU
Any
1
Any
Any
2
Any
1st three slots
1st three slots
1st three slots
1st three slots
1st three slots
ROC809 Series 2 CPU
Any
Any
Any
Any
1st three slots
1st three slots
1st three slots
1st three slots
Any
General Information
Module Color
Grey
Black
Grey
Grey
Grey
Grey
Grey
Grey
Black
1-3
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Module
DI
HART
HART-2
DO
DOR
RTD
TC
TC2
PI
IEC 62591
NRM
AC I/O
APP485
ROC809 Series 1 CPU
Any
Any
None
Any
Any
Any
Any
None
Any
None
None
Any
Any
ROC809 Series 2 CPU
Any
Any
4
Any
Any
Any
Any
None
5
Any
Any
Any
1st three slots
Any
Any
Module Color
Grey
Grey
Black
Grey
Grey
Grey
Grey
Black
Grey
Black
Black
Grey
Black
1
With firmware version 2.13 or greater
With firmware version 2.10 or greater
3
The ROC809 supports a maximum of two MVS modules
4
With firmware version 3.10 or greater
5
With firmware version 3.20 or greater
2
Table 1-2. ROC827 Module Placement (Series 1 CPU vs. Series 2 CPU)
Module
AI-12
AI-16
AO
APM
RS-485
RS-232
Dial-up Modem
3
MVS
3
MVS I/O
DI
HART
HART-2
DO
DOR
RTD
TC
TC2
PI
IEC 62591
NRM
AC I/O
APP485
ROC827 Series 1 CPU
Any
Any
Any
2
1st three slots
1st three slots
1st three slots
1st three slots
1st three slots
1st three slots
Any
1st three slots
None
Any
Any
Any
Any
None
Any
None
None
1st three slots
Any
ROC827 Series 2 CPU
Any
Any
Any
Any
1st three slots
1st three slots
1st three slots
1st three slots
Any
Any
Any
Any
4
Any
Any
Any
None
5
Any
Any
Any
1st three slots
Any
Any
Module Color
Grey
Black
Grey
Grey
Grey
Grey
Grey
Grey
Black
Grey
Black
Black
Grey
Grey
Grey
Grey
Black
Grey
Black
Black
Grey
Black
1
With firmware version 2.13 or greater
With firmware version 2.10 or greater
3
The ROC827 supports a maximum of two MVS modules
4
With firmware version 3.10 or greater
5
With firmware version 3.20 or greater
2
1-4
General Information
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Note: For further information, refer to the technical specification
ROC800. For further information on compatibility and migration
issues, refer to the Remote Automation Solutions Technical
Support White Paper WP0800004R1.
1.3
Hardware
The ROC809 and ROC827 are highly innovative and versatile units
with an integrated backplane to which the central processor unit (CPU),
power input module, communication modules, and I/O modules
connect. The ROC809 (see Figure 1-1) has nine module slots, of which
three can house communication modules. The ROC827 base unit
(shown on the left-hand side of Figure 1-2) has three I/O module slots.
The ROC800-Series expansion backplanes (EXPs) attach to the
ROC827 base unit (see Figure 1-2). Each EXP provides six additional
I/O module slots. The ROC827 can support up to four EXPs, for a total
of 27 I/O module slots (six slots per EXP plus the three I/O slots on the
ROC827 base unit).
The ROC800s use a Power Input module to convert external input
power to the voltage levels required by the electronics and to monitor
voltage levels to ensure proper operation. Three Power Input modules—
12 Volts dc (PM-12), 24 Volts dc (PM-24), and 30 Volts dc (PM-30)—
are available. For more information on the Power Input modules, refer
to Chapter 3, Power Connections.
The ROC800s support a variety of communication protocols: ROC Plus,
Modbus, Modbus TCP/IP, Modbus encapsulated in TCP/IP, and
Modbus with Electronic Flow Measurement (EFM) extensions.
Figure 1-1 shows the housing, typical I/O modules, and communication
modules installed in a ROC809. The patented ABS (Acrylonitrile
Butadiene Styrene) plastic housing has wire covers to protect the wiring
terminals. The housing includes DIN rail mounts for mounting the unit
on a panel or in a user-supplied enclosure. Patent 6,771,513 covers the
ROC800 enclosure (refer to www.uspto.gov).
Revised Jul-14
General Information
1-5
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
A
F
B
G
C
H
D
E
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
Power Supply Module
CPU
LOI (Local Port) EIA-232 (RS-232D)
Built-in Ethernet (Comm1)
Built-in EIA-232 (RS-232C) (Comm2)
Module (1 of 9 max)
Wire Channel Cover
Right End Cap
Figure 1-1. ROC809
Module Placement
The left-most slots in the ROC809 (Figure 1-1) accommodate the
Power Input module and the CPU module. The remaining nine slots
can accommodate either communication modules or I/O modules (see
Table 1-1).
Note: If you use the optional communications modules, you can only
place those modules in the three slots (1, 2, or 3) immediately to
the right of the Power Input and CPU modules. Place I/O
modules in any available slot.
Figure 1-2 shows a ROC827 base unit (left) and a typical expansion
backplane (EXP) (right) populated with a full complement of six I/O
modules. Each EXP is composed of the same plastic housing as the
ROC827, contains six I/O slots, and has a powered backplane that easily
attaches to the ROC827 and other EXPs.
1-6
General Information
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
A
F
B
G
C
H
D
E
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
Power Supply Module
CPU
LOI (Local Port) EIA-232 (RS-232D)
Built-in Ethernet (Comm1)
Built-in EIA-232 (RS-232C) (Comm2)
Module (1 of 27 max)
Wire Channel Cover
Right End Cap
Figure 1-2. ROC827 Base Unit with One Expansion Backplane (separated for clarity)
I/O Modules
The ROC800 and EXPs support various types of Input/Output (I/O)
modules, which can satisfy a wide variety of field I/O requirements
(refer to Chapter 4, Input/Output Modules). You can place I/O
modules in any available slot. I/O modules include:














Revised Jul-14
Analog Inputs (AI).
Analog Outputs (AO).
Discrete Inputs (DI).
Discrete Outputs (DO).
Digital Relay Outputs (DOR).
Advance Pulse Module (APM).
Alternating Current I/O (ACIO).
Multi-variable Sensor (MVS I/O).
Highway Addressable Remote Transducer (HART®) Module.
Pulse Inputs (PI) – High/Low Speed.
Resistance Temperature Detector Inputs (RTD).
Thermocouple (TC) Inputs.
IEC 62591.
APP 485.
General Information
1-7
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Communication Ports
and Modules
The ROC800 provides up to six communication ports (refer to
Chapter 5, Communications). Three communication ports are built-in:



Local Operator Interface (LOI) – Local Port EIA-232 (RS-232D).
Ethernet – Comm1 Port for use with the DS800 Development Suite
Software.
EIA-232 (RS-232C) – Comm2 Port for point-to-point asynchronous
serial communications.
Communication modules (which you install only in slots 1 [Comm3], 2
[Comm4], or 3 [Comm5] in the ROC800) provide additional ports for
communicating with a host computer or other devices. Modules include:





Caution
FOUNDATION™ Fieldbus
Interface
EIA-232 (RS-232C) – Point-to-point asynchronous serial
communications include Data Terminal Ready (DTR) support,
Ready To Send (RTS) support, and radio power control.
EIA-422/EIA-485 (RS-422/RS-485) – Point-to-point (EIA-422) or
multiple-point (EIA-485) asynchronous serial communications.
Multi-Variable Sensor (MVS) – Interfaces with MVS Sensors (up
to two modules per ROC800).
Dial-up modem – Communications over a telephone network
(14.4K V.42 bis with throughput up to 57.6K bps).
NRM – Network Radio Module
The design of ROC800-Series communications and I/O modules
supports “hot-swapping” (replacing similar modules in the same slot)
and “hot-plugging” (inserting modules into an empty slot) while the
ROC800 is powered. However, it is a good safety practice with any
electrical device to first remove power before you make internal
connections. If you find it necessary to hot-swap or hot-plug a module,
first review the most current specification sheet for that module to
ensure both your safety and the integrity of data that module may
provide.
The FOUNDATION Fieldbus Interface (FFI) is a ROC800-based
solution that enables a ROC800 to support bi-directional multi-drop
digital communications between fieldbus devices.
While you can implement the FFI as a stand-alone device, you can also
install it as an integral part of the ROC827 housing, since the FFI is
based on a standard Series 2 EXP. However, the FFI does not expand
the I/O capability of the ROC827 beyond the 27 module-limit.
For technical information on the FFI, refer to the technical
specifications ROC800:FFI or the FOUNDATION Fieldbus Interface
Instruction Manual (Part Number D301461X012). For information
about the software you use to configure the FFI, refer to the Field
Interface Configurator User Manual (Part Number D301575X012).
1-8
General Information
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
1.3.1 Central Processor Unit (CPU)
The CPU contains the microprocessor, the firmware, connectors to the
backplane, the three built-in communication ports (two with LEDs), a
LED low power wakeup button, a RESET button, the application
license key connectors, a STATUS LED indicating system integrity, and
the main processor.
CPU components include:










32-bit Motorola MPC862 Quad Integrated Communications
Controller (PowerQUICC) PowerPC processor. Bus clock frequency
at 65 MHz with a watchdog timer.
Flash ROM (Read-Only Memory).
SDRAM (Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory).
Diagnostic monitoring.
Real-Time Clock.
Automatic self-tests.
Power saving modes.
Local Operator Interface (LOI) EIA-232 (RS-232D) Local Port.
EIA-232 (RS-232C) serial Comm2 port.
Ethernet Comm1 port.
1.3.2 Real-Time Clock (RTC)
You can set the ROC800’s real-time clock (RTC) for year, month, day,
hour, minute, and second. The clock provides time stamping of the
database values. The battery-backed clock firmware tracks the day of
the week and corrects for leap year. The time chip automatically
switches to backup power when the ROC800 loses primary input power.
The internal Sanyo 3-volt CR2430 lithium battery provides backup for
the data and the RTC when the main power is not connected. The
battery has a one-year minimum backup life with the battery installed,
the jumper disengaged, and no power applied to the ROC800. The
battery has a ten-year backup life with the backup battery installed and
power applied to the ROC800 or when the battery is removed from the
ROC800.
Note: If the real-time clock does not keep the current time when you
remove power, replace the lithium battery.
1.3.3 Diagnostic Monitoring
The ROC800 has diagnostic inputs incorporated into the circuitry for
monitoring system integrity. Use ROCLINK 800 software to access the
System Analog Inputs (on the directory tree, double-click I/O, System
Analog Input, and #1, Battery to open the System Analog Input
screen). Refer to Table 1-3.
Revised Jul-14
General Information
1-9
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Table 1-3. System Analog Inputs
System AI
Point
Number
PM-12
Function
PM-24
Function
PM-30
Function
1
Battery Input Voltage
Module Voltage
Module Voltage
2
Charge in Voltage
Module Voltage
Voltage In
3
Module Voltage
Module Voltage
Module Voltage
4
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
5
On Board Temperature
On Board Temperature
On Board Temperature
Note: The PM-24 module’s DC-to-DC converter supplies
approximately 12 volts to the backplane, which is reflected in
the on-screen values for points 1 through 3.
1.3.4 Options
The ROC800 allows you to choose from a wide variety of options to
suit many applications.
Optional communication modules include EIA-232 (RS-232) serial
communications, EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) serial communications,
Multi-Variable Sensor (MVS), dial-up modem communications, and the
HART module (refer to Chapter 5, Communications).
The ROC800 can handle up to two MVS interface modules. Each
module can provide power and communications for up to six MVS
sensors, for a total of up to 12 MVS sensors per ROC800 (refer to
Chapter 5, Communications).
Optional I/O modules include Analog Inputs (AI), Analog Outputs
(AO), Discrete Inputs (DI), Discrete Outputs (DO), Discrete Output
Relays (DOR), Pulse Inputs (PI), Resistance Temperature Detector
(RTD) Inputs, Thermocouple (T/C) Inputs, Advanced Pulse (APM), and
Alternating Current I/O (ACIO) (refer to Chapter 4, Input/Output
Modules).
The optional application license keys provide extended functionality,
such as the use of the DS800 Development Suite Software (the IEC
61131-3 compliant programming environment) and various user
programs, and enable embedded meter runs. For example, you need to
install a license key with the proper license in the ROC800 to perform
AGA calculations. Refer to Section 1.6, DS800 Development Suite
Software.
The Local Operator Interface (LOI local port) communications terminal
requires the installation of an LOI cable between the ROC800 and your
PC. The LOI port uses an RJ-45 connector with a standard EIA-232
(RS-232D) pin out.
1-10
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Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
1.4
FCC Information
This equipment complies with Part 68 of the FCC rules. Etched on the
modem assembly is, among other information, the FCC certification
number and Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) for this equipment. If
requested, this information must be provided to the telephone company.
This module has an FCC-compliant telephone modular plug. The
module is designed to be connected to the telephone network or
premises’ wiring using a compatible modular jack that is Part 68compliant.
The REN is used to determine the quantity of devices that may be
connected to the telephone line. Excessive RENs on the telephone line
may result in the devices not ringing in response to an incoming call.
Typically, the sum of the RENs should not exceed five (5.0). Contact
the local telephone company to determine the total number of devices
that may be connected to a line (as determined by the total RENs).
If this equipment and its dial-up modem causes harm to the telephone
network, the telephone company will notify you in advance that
temporary discontinuance of service may be required. However, if
advance notice is not practical, the telephone company will notify the
customer as soon as possible. In addition, you will be advised of your
right to file a complaint with the FCC if you believe it necessary.
The telephone company may make changes to its facilities, equipment,
operations, or procedures that could affect the operation of the
equipment. If this happens, the telephone company will provide advance
notice so you can make the necessary modifications to maintain
uninterrupted service.
If you experience trouble with this equipment or the dial-up modem,
contact Emerson Process Management’s Remote Automation Solutions
(at 1-800-537-9313) for repair or warranty information. If the
equipment harms the telephone network, the telephone company may
request that you disconnect the equipment until the problem is resolved.
1.5
Firmware
The firmware that resides in Flash Read-Only Memory (ROM) contains
the operating system, ROC Plus communications protocol, and
application software. The CPU module provides battery-backed Static
Random Access Memory (SRAM) for saving configurations, storing
events, alarms, and the historical logs.
ROC800 or ROC800L
Revised Jul-14
The ROC800-Series supports either of two sets of firmware. The
original ROC800 firmware is designed primarily to support gas flow
measurements. The ROC800L firmware is designed to support both
liquids and gas flow measurements.
General Information
1-11
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Note: To convert a ROC800 to a ROC800L, refer to the ROC800L
Field Conversion Guide (Part Number D301683X012 ).
The ROC800-Series Operating System firmware provides a complete
operating system for the ROC800. The firmware in the ROC800 is
field-upgradeable using a serial connection or the Local Operator
Interface (LOI) local port. For more information, refer to the ROCLINK
800 Configuration Software User Manual (for ROC800-Series) (Part
Number D301250X012) or ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software User
Manual (for ROC800L) (Part Number D301246X012)
The firmware supports:
 Input/Output Database.
 Historical Database.
 Event and Alarm Log Databases.
 Applications (PID, AGA, FST, and such).
 Measurement Station Support.
 Determining Task Execution.
 Real-Time Clock.
 Establishing and Managing Communications.
 Self-Test Capability.
The firmware makes extensive use of configuration parameters, which
you configure using ROCLINK 800 software.
RTOS
The ROC800-Series firmware uses a pre-emptive, multi-tasking,
message-based Real-Time Operating System (RTOS) with hardwaresupported memory protection. Tasks are assigned priorities and, at any
given time, the operating system determines which task will run. For
instance, if a lower priority task is executing and a higher priority task
needs to run, the operating system suspends the lower priority task,
allows the higher priority task to run to completion, then resumes the
lower priority task’s execution. This is more efficient than a “time
sliced” architecture type.
TLP
The ROC800 reads data from and writes data to data structures called
“points.” A “point” is a ROC Plus Protocol term for a grouping of
individual parameters (such as information about an I/O channel) or
some other function (such as a flow calculation). Points are defined by
a collection of parameters and have a numerical designation that
defines the type of point (for example, point type 101 refers to a
Discrete Input and point type 103 refers to an Analog Input).
The logical number indicates the physical location for the I/O or the
logical instance for non-I/O points within the ROC800. Parameters are
individual pieces of data that relate to the point type. For instance, the
raw A/D value and the low scaling value are parameters associated with
the Analog Input point type, 103. The point type attributes define the
1-12
General Information
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
database point to be one of the possible types of points available to the
system.
Together, these three components—the type (T), the logical (L), and the
parameters (P)—can be used to identify specific pieces of data that
reside in a ROC800’s data base. Collectively, this three-component
address is often called a “TLP.”
I/O Database
SRBX
Protocols
The Input/Output database contains the input and output points the
operating system firmware supports, including the System Analog
Inputs, Multi-Variable Sensor (MVS) inputs, and Input/Output (I/O)
modules. The firmware automatically determines the point type and
point number location of each installed I/O module. It then assigns
each input and output to a point in the database and includes userdefined configuration parameters for assigning values, statuses, or
identifiers. The firmware scans each input, placing the values into the
respective database point. These values are available for display and
historical archiving.
Spontaneous-Report-by-Exception (SRBX or RBX) communication
allows the ROC800 to monitor for alarm conditions and, upon
detecting an alarm, automatically reports the alarm to a host computer.
Any kind of communications link—dial-up modem or serial line—can
perform SRBX as long as the host is set up to receive field-initiated
calls.
The firmware supports both the ROC Plus protocol and the Modbus
master and slave protocol. ROC Plus protocol can support serial
communications and radio or telephone modem communications to
local or remote devices, such as a host computer.
The firmware also supports the ROC Plus protocol over TCP/IP on the
Ethernet port. The ROC Plus protocol is similar to the ROC
300/400/500 protocol, since it used many of the same opcodes.
For more specific information refer to the ROC Plus Protocol
Specifications Manual (Part Number D301180X012) or the ROC800L
Protocol Specifications Manual (Part Number D301659X012), or
contact your local sales representative.
The ROC800-Series firmware also supports Modbus protocol as either
master or slave device using Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) or American
Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) modes. This allows
you to easily integrate the ROC800 into other systems. Extensions to the
Modbus protocol allow the retrieval of history, event, and alarm data in
Electronic Flow Metering (EFM) Measurement applications.
Note: In Ethernet mode, the firmware supports Modbus both in master
and slave mode.
Security
Revised Jul-14
The ROCLINK 800 software also secures access to the ROC800. You
can define and store a maximum of 16 case-sensitive user identifiers
(User IDs). In order for the ROC800 to communicate, a case sensitive
General Information
1-13
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
log-on ID supplied to the ROCLINK 800 software must match one of
the IDs stored in the ROC800.
The operating system firmware supports the application-specific
firmware supplied in the Flash ROM. The application firmware includes
Proportional, Integral, and Derivative (PID) Control; FSTs;
Spontaneous-Report-By-Exception (SRBX) Communications
Enhancement; optional American Gas Association (AGA) Flow
calculations with station support; and optional IEC 61131-3 language
programs (using DS800 Development Suite software). Applications
reside in the firmware, so you do not need to re-build and download the
firmware for changes in calculation method.
Input Module
Addressing
The Series 1 ROC800 defaults to 16-point addressing, but
automatically switches to 8-point addressing if you add a fourth or
fifth expansion backplane.
The Series 2 ROC800 defaults to 8-point addressing. To switch to 16point addressing, you must manually select this option.
Note: To change input module addressing, select ROC > Device
Information in ROCLINK 800. On the Device Information
screen’s General tab, select either 8-Points Per Module or 16Points Per Module in the Logical Compatibility Mode frame
and click Apply.
The difference between 16-point and 8-point addressing becomes
critical when you have a host device reading data from specific TLPs.
For example, under 16-point addressing, channel 2 for a DI module in
slot 2 is referenced by TLP 101,33,3. Under 8-point addressing, channel
2 for a DI module in slot 2 is referenced by TLP 101,17,23. Table 1-4
illustrates the difference between 8-point and 16-point addressing.
Table 1-4. 16-Point vs. 8-Point Addressing
Slot Number
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
1-14
Logicals (16 pt)
0–15
16–31
32–47
48–63
64–79
80–95
96–111
112–127
128–143
144–159
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
General Information
Logicals (8 pt)
0–7
8–15
16–23
24–31
32–39
40–47
48–55
56–63
64–71
72–79
80–87
88–95
96–103
104–111
112–119
120–127
128–135
136–143
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Slot Number
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
ROC800L
Logicals (16 pt)
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Logicals (8 pt)
144–151
152–159
160–167
168–175
176–183
184–191
192–199
200–207
208–215
216–223
The ROC800L firmware provides many of the same capabilities as the
ROC800 firmware. We recommend, however, that the ROC800L
supports only six gas runs (using a single AGA key). History stored in
firmware is limited to measurements from gas meter runs, rather than
liquids. Software supports most liquid-related capabilities; other
firmware functions remain the same.
1.5.1 Historical Database and Event & Alarm Log
The historical database provides archiving of measured and calculated
values for either on-demand viewing or saving to a file. It provides an
historical record in accordance with API Chapter 21.1. You can
configure each of up to 240 points in the historical database to archive
values under various schemes, such as averaging or accumulating, as
appropriate for the type of database point.
The historical database is maintained in 13 segments (0-12). You can
configure each segment in the database to archive selected points at
specified time intervals. The segments can continuously archive or can
be turned on and off.
Note: Configure gas meter history in segments 1-12, where a segment
number corresponds to a station number (meter history for
station 1 in segment 1, and so on). This allows configuration
changes to trigger archive records in accordance with API 2.1
guidelines.
You can distribute history points among history segments 1 through 12
and the general history segment. For each history segment, you can
configure the number of periodic history values archived, the frequency
of archiving periodic values, the number of daily values archived, and
the contract hour. The number of minute values is fixed at 60. The 240
points provide a total of over 224,000 entries (equal to more than 35
days of 24-hour data for 240 points).
The Event Log records the last 450 parameter changes, power on and
off cycles, calibration information, and other system events. The event
is recorded along with a date and time stamp. The Alarm Log records
the last 450 configured occurrences of alarms (set and clear). You can
Revised Jul-14
General Information
1-15
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
view the logs, save them to a disk file, or print them using ROCLINK
800 software.
ROC800L
To accommodate NIST Handbook 44 (HB 44) requirements, the
firmware in the ROC800L tracks up to 1000 weights and measures
(W&M) events.
1.5.2 Meter Runs and Stations
You can group similarly configured meter runs into stations, which
provide great benefits during configuration and reporting. You can also
configure each meter run, which eliminates redundant meter run data
within a station and enables faster data processing.
You can group meter runs among the maximum of twelve stations in
any combination. Meter runs belong in the same station when they have
the same gas composition data and calculation methods. Stations allow
you to:



Set contract hours differently for each station.
Designate several individual meter runs as part of a station.
Configure one to twelve meter runs for each station.
Note: For the ROC800L, you configure runs and stations using the
individual user programs.
1.5.3 ROC800 Flow Calculations
For the ROC800, gas and liquid calculation methods include:






AGA and API Chapter 21 compliant for AGA linear and differential
meter types.
AGA 3 – Orifice Plates for gas.
AGA 7 – Turbine Meters (ISO 9951) for gas.
AGA 8 – Compressibility for Detailed (ISO 12213-2), Gross I (ISO
12213-3), and Gross II for gas.
ISO 5167 – Orifice Plates for liquid.
API 12 – Turbine Meters for liquid.
ROC800 firmware completes full calculations every second on all
configured runs (up to 12) for AGA 3, AGA 7, AGA 8, ISO 5167, and
ISO 9951.
AGA 3 calculations conform to the methods described in American Gas
Association Report No. 3, Orifice Metering of Natural Gas and Other
Related Hydrocarbon Fluids. Based on the second and third editions, the
calculation method is 1992 AGA 3.
The AGA 7 calculations conform to methods described in American
Gas Association Report No. 7, Measurement of Gas by Turbine Meters,
and use the AGA 8 method for determining the compressibility factor.
1-16
General Information
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
The AGA 8 method calculates the compressibility factor based on the
physical chemistry of the component gasses at specified temperatures
and pressures.
The firmware supports liquid calculation methods ISO 5167 and API
12. You must supply factors for API 12 correction through a Function
Sequence Table (FST) or user program. For more information, refer to
the Function Sequence Table (FST) User Manual (Part Number
D301058X012).
Note: For a complete and current listing of all supported liquid and/gas
calculations on the ROC800, refer to the technical specifications
ROC800-Series Operating System Firmware (ROC800:FW1).
1.5.4 ROC800L Flow Calculations
For the ROC800L, liquid calculation methods include:







API 2450 (1980)
ASTM-D1250-04, IP200/04 (same as MPMS Chapter 11)
API Manual of Petroleum Measurement Standards (MPMS):
o Chapter 4.6 Pulse Interpolation (small volume proving)
o Chapter 5.5 Double Pulse Integrity (ISO 6551, IP252)
o Chapter 11.1 Volume Correction for Temperature and Pressure
o Chapter 11.2.1, 11.2.1M Pressure Correction (M is for metrics)
o Chapter 11.2.4 Light Hydrocarbons – GPA TP-27 (2007)
o Chapter 12.2 Resolution for Displays and Printed Reports
o Chapter 21.2 Electronic Flow Measurement for Liquids
NIST Handbook 44
IP-2 (now EI) (1980) Pressure Effects on Density
IP-3 (now EI) (1988) Corrects Temp to 20°C
IEEE Standard 754 (1985) and API 11.1 (2004) Double Precision
Floating Point Math (64 Bit)
Note: For a complete and current listing of the supported liquid
calculations on the ROC800L, refer to the technical
specifications ROC800L Liquid Application Software
(ROC800:SW1).
1.5.5 Automatic Self Tests
The operating system firmware supports diagnostic tests on the ROC800
hardware, such as RAM integrity, Real-Time Clock operation, input
power voltage, board temperature, and watchdog timer.
The ROC800 periodically performs the following self-tests:
Revised Jul-14
General Information
1-17
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual




Voltage tests (battery low and battery high) ensure the ROC800 has
enough power to run. The ROC800 operates with 12 Volts dc
(nominal) power provided either through a PM-12 or PM-24 power
input module (see Figures 3-1 or 3-2). The LED at the top of each
module lights when you apply input power with the proper polarity
and startup voltage. For the PM-12 module, apply 9.00 to 11.25
volts DC to the BAT+/BAT- connectors; for the PM-24 module,
apply 20 to 30 volts DC to the POWER INPUT +/POWER INPUT –
connectors; and for the PM-30 module, apply 10.5 to 30.0 volts DC
to the POWER INPUT +/POWER INPUT – connectors.
The CPU controls the software “watchdog.” This watchdog checks
the software for validity every 2.7 seconds. If necessary, the
processor automatically resets.
The ROC800 monitors Multi-Variable Sensor(s), if applicable, for
accurate and continuous operation.
A memory validity self-test is performed to ensure the integrity of
memory.
1.5.6 Low Power Modes
The ROC800 uses low power operation under predetermined conditions
and supports two low power modes, Standby and Sleep.


Standby
The ROC800 uses this mode during periods of inactivity. When the
operating system cannot find a task to run, the ROC800 enters
Standby mode. This mode keeps all peripherals running and is
transparent to the user. The ROC800 wakes from Standby mode
when it needs to perform a task.
Sleep
The ROC800 uses this mode if it detects a low battery voltage. The
System AI Battery Point Number 1 measures the battery voltage and
compares it to the LoLo Alarm limit associated with this point. (The
default value for the LoLo Alarm limit is 10.6 Volts dc.) When in
Sleep mode, AUX sw is turned off. For information on configuring
alarms and System AI points, refer to the ROCLINK 800
Configuration Software User Manual (for ROC800-Series) (Part
Number D301250X012) or the ROCLINK 800 Configuration
Software User Manual (for ROC800L) (Part Number
D301246X012).
Notes:
1-18

Sleep mode applies only to ROC800s using the 12 V dc Power
Input module (PM-12).

The design of the PM-30 and PM-24 power modules does not
include the low voltage cutoff feature present in the PM-12
module: should power fall below the set LoLo alarm (a default
General Information
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
of 10.1V), the PM-12 module ceases to provide power to the
backplane. Thus, the module shuts down CPU operations. For
the PM-24 and PM-30 modules, when power falls below the
LoLo alarm point, the CPU goes into sleep mode. In sleep mode,
the backplane still receives power, the DO modules continue to
hold their logic, but nothing controls I/O at this point. If you
need both the increased power capacity offered by the PM-30
and low voltage cutoff, refer to the options provided in the
description of the PM-30 module in Chapter 3 of this manual.
1.5.7 Proportional, Integral, and Derivative (PID)
The PID Control applications firmware provides Proportional, Integral,
and Derivative (PID) gain control for the ROC800 and enables the
stable operation of 16 PID loops that employ a regulating device, such
as a control valve.
The firmware sets up an independent PID algorithm (loop) in the
ROC800. The PID loop has its own user-defined input, output, and
override capability.
The typical use for PID control is to maintain a Process Variable at a
setpoint. If you configure PID override control, the primary loop is
normally in control of the regulating device. When the change in output
for the primary loop becomes less or greater (user-definable) than the
change in output calculated for the secondary (override) loop, the
override loop takes control of the regulating device. When the
switchover conditions are no longer met, the primary loop regains
control of the device. Parameters are also available to force the PID into
either loop or force it to stay in one loop.
1.5.8 Function Sequence Table (FST)
The Function Sequence Table (FST) applications firmware gives analog
and discrete sequencing control capability to the ROC800. This
programmable control is implemented in an FST, which defines the
actions the ROC800 performs using a series of functions. You use the
FST Editor in ROCLINK 800 software to develop FSTs
The function is the basic building block of an FST. You organize
functions in a sequence of steps to form a control algorithm. Each
function step can consist of a label, a command, and associated
arguments. Use labels to identify functions and allow branching to
specific steps within an FST. You select commands from a library of
mathematical, logical, and other command options. Command names
consist of up to three characters or symbols. Finally, arguments provide
access to process I/O points and retrieve real-time values. A function
may have zero, one, or two arguments.
The FST Editor provides a workspace into which you can enter—for
each FST—either a maximum of 500 lines or a maximum of 3000
Revised Jul-14
General Information
1-19
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
bytes. Since the total amount of memory each FST uses is based on the
number of steps and the commands used in each step and since different
commands consume different amounts of memory, estimating the
memory usage of an FST is difficult. Only after compiling an individual
FST can you conclusively know its memory usage.
For further information on FSTs, refer to the Function Sequence Table
(FST) User Manual (Part Number D301058X012).
1.6
ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software
ROCLINK 800 Configuration software (“ROCLINK 800”) is a
Microsoft® Windows-based program that runs on a personal computer
and enables you to monitor, configure, and calibrate the ROC800.
ROCLINK 800 has a standard, easy-to-use Windows interface. Treebased navigation makes accessing features quick and easy.
Many of the configuration screens, such as stations, meters, I/O, and
PIDs, are available while ROCLINK 800 is off-line. This enables you to
configure the system while either on-line or off-line with the ROC800.
The Local Operator Interface (LOI local port) provides a direct link
between the ROC800 unit and a personal computer (PC). The LOI port
uses an RJ-45 connector with standard EIA-232 (RS-232D) pinout.
With a personal computer running ROCLINK 800, you can locally
configure the ROC800, extract data, and monitor its operation.
Remote configuration is possible from a host computer using a serial or
dial-up modem communications line. Configurations can be duplicated
and saved to a disk. In addition to creating a backup, this feature is
useful when you are similarly configuring multiple ROC800s for the
first time, or when you need to make configuration changes off-line.
Once you create a backup configuration file, you can load it into a
ROC800 by using the Download function.
Access to the ROC800 is restricted to authorized users with correct User
ID and password.
Graphical
Interface
1-20
ROCLINK 800’s graphic interface dynamically represents the
modules currently installed in your ROC800 and simplifies the
configuration process. Move the mouse over a module to highlight it,
and click to access the configuration parameter screen for that module
(see Figure 1-3).
General Information
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Figure 1-3. ROCLINK 800 Dynamic Graphical Interface
You can build custom displays for the ROC800 that combine both
graphic and dynamic data elements. The displays can monitor the
operation of the ROC800 either locally or remotely.
You can archive historical values for any numeric parameter in the
ROC800. For each parameter configured for historical archiving, the
system keeps time-stamped minute, periodic, and daily data values as
well as yesterday’s and today’s daily minimum and maximum values.
You can collect history values from the ROC800 using ROCLINK 800
or another third-party host system. You can view history directly from
the ROC800 or from a previously saved disk file. For each history
segment, you can configure the number of periodic history values
archived, the frequency of archiving the periodic values, the number of
daily values archived, and the contract hour.
ROCLINK 800 can create an EFM (Electronic Flow Measurement)
report file that contains all the configuration, alarms, events, periodic
and daily history logs, and other history logs associated with the stations
and meter runs in the ROC800. This file then becomes the custody
transfer audit trail.
The SRBX (Spontaneous-Report-By-Exception) alarming feature is
available for the host communication ports (Local and dial-up modem
ports). SRBX allows the ROC800 to contact the host to report an alarm
condition.
Revised Jul-14
General Information
1-21
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Use ROCLINK 800 to:











1.7
Configure and view Input/Output (I/O) points, flow calculations,
meter runs, PID control loops, system parameters, and power
management features.
Retrieve, save, and report historical data.
Retrieve, save, and report events and alarms.
Perform five-point calibration on AI, RTD, and Multi-Variable
Sensor MVS) inputs.
Implement user security.
Create, save, and edit graphical displays.
Create, save, edit, and debug Function Sequence Tables (FSTs) of
up to 500 lines each.
Set up communication parameters for direct connection, telephone
modems, and other communications methods.
Configure Modbus parameters.
Set up radio power control.
Update the firmware.
ROC800L Software
The ROC800L (available in either a ROC809L or ROC827L
configuration) manages and measures the flow of liquid hydrocarbons
through meters using a suite of factory-installed software programs:




1-22
Liquid Calculations:
Configures liquid preferences, products, stations, meters, and
density derivation to accurately measure the liquid flow through a
meter and perform density, temperature, and pressure corrections.
Batching:
Configures and schedules multiple batches to record and control the
flow of a liquid. Batching provides user-defined variables for both
re-calculation and retroactive calculation to improve batch accuracy.
Proving:
Controls meter proving by operating a four-way control valve,
calculating a new meter factor, and storing meter factor information
on up to 24 products for each of up to six meters. The program
supports uni-directional, bi-directional, large volume, small volume,
and master meter proving.
Reporting:
Generates printable reports in compliance with API, MPMS Chapter
12.2.2 and 12.2.3. You can create customized reports using
ROCLINK 800 Configuration software.
General Information
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual

Batch Queuing:
Sequences future batches, if appropriate for your organization. Used
in conjunction with the batching program.
Note: The integrity of metrology results is critical to the measurement
aspects of the ROC800L. You can lock certain configuration
parameters to ensure the accuracy of liquid hydrocarbon
calculations.
1.8
DS800 Development Suite Software
DS800 Development Suite software allows you to program in any one
of the five IEC 61131-3 languages. You can download DS800
applications to a ROC800 over a serial or Ethernet port, independently
of the ROCLINK 800 software.
DS800 Development Suite software allows you to program in all five of
the IEC 61131-3 languages:





Ladder Logic Diagrams (LD).
Sequential Function Chart (SFC).
Function Block Diagram (FBD).
Structured Text (ST).
Instruction List (IL).
A Flow Chart language provides a sixth programming language. With
these six languages, FSTs, and built-in functionality, you can configure
and program the ROC800 in an environment in which you are
comfortable.
You can download and implement programs developed in the DS800
Development Suite software in the ROC800 in addition to—or as an
alternative to—FST programs. DS800 software has definite benefits for
programmers who prefer to use the IEC 61131-3 languages, who desire
to multi-drop units in a distributed architecture, or who desire enhanced
program diagnostics capabilities.
Additional DS800 Development Suite software features include:








Revised Jul-14
Cross-reference (bindings) between variables in separate ROC800
units.
Variable Dictionary.
Off-line simulation for diagnostics and testing.
On-line modification of programs.
On-line debugging of programs.
User developed functions and function blocks.
User defined templates.
Creation and support of user defined libraries.
General Information
1-23
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
1.9
Expansion Backplane
The expansion backplane is a key component to the ability of the
ROC827 to expand its I/O capabilities to meet your needs. The ROC827
base unit can accommodate up to four additional expansion backplanes,
which easily snap together. This increases the total number of available
I/O slots to 27. Refer to Chapter 2, Installation and Use, for instructions
on adding backplanes to the ROC827 base unit. Refer to Chapter 3,
Power Connections, to assess the power requirements for any particular
I/O configuration.
1.10 FOUNDATION™ Fieldbus Interface
The FOUNDATION Fieldbus (“FFbus”) Interface is a microprocessorbased solution that, when connected to a ROC800-Series controller,
enables you to configure and manage up to four H1 interface modules.
You can house the FFbus Interface either as a stand-alone unit or as part
of a Series 2 ROC800 assembly.
Each H1 module can communication with up to 16 remote fieldbuscompliant devices, enabling you to manage up to 64 remote fieldbus
devices for each FFbus Interface.
Additionally, the Interface is designed to share fieldbus device data with
one or more ROC800s, creating a broad network of device information.
For detailed information on how to install and use the FFbus Interface
with the ROC800, refer to the FOUNDATION Fieldbus Interface
Instruction Manual (Part Number D301461X012) and the Field
Interface Configurator User Manual (Part Number D301575X012).
1.11 Additional Technical Information
Refer to the following technical documentation (available at
www.EmersonProcess.com/Remote) for additional and most-current
information.
Table 1-5. Additional Technical Information
Name
ROC800-Series Remote Operations Controller
ROC800L Remote Operations Controller
ROC800-Series Operating System Firmware
ROC800L Liquid Application Software
FOUNDATION™ Fieldbus Interface (ROC800-Series)
FOUNDATION™ Fieldbus Interface Instruction Manual
Field Interface Configurator User Manual
ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software User Manual (for ROC800-Series)
ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software User Manual (for ROC800L)
ROC800-Series Alternating Current I/O Module
1-24
General Information
Form Number
ROC800
ROC800:800L
ROC800:FW1
ROC800:SW1
ROC800:FFI
A6259
A6250
A6218
A6214
ROC800:ACIO
Part Number
D301155X012
D301678X012
D301156X012
D301576X012
D301650X012
D301461X012
D301575X012
D301250X012
D301246X012
D301243X012
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Chapter 2 – Installation and Use
This chapter describes the ROC800-Series housing (case), backplane
(electronic connection board at the back of the housing), CPU (central
processing unit), and the expansion backplane (EXP). This chapter
provides a description and specifications of these hardware items and
explains installation and startup of the ROC800-Series.
In This Chapter
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.1
Installation Requirements ....................................................................................2-1
2.1.1 Environmental Requirements ..................................................................2-2
2.1.2 Site Requirements ...................................................................................2-2
2.1.3 Compliance with Hazardous Area Standards ..........................................2-3
2.1.4 Power Installation Requirements .............................................................2-4
2.1.5 Grounding Installation Requirements ......................................................2-4
2.1.6 I/O Wiring Requirements .........................................................................2-5
Required Tools ....................................................................................................2-5
Housing ...............................................................................................................2-5
2.3.1 Removing and Replacing End Caps ........................................................2-6
2.3.2 Removing and Installing Wire Channel Covers .......................................2-6
2.3.3 Removing and Installing Module Covers .................................................2-7
Mounting the ROC800 on a DIN Rail ..................................................................2-7
2.4.1 Installing the DIN Rail ..............................................................................2-9
2.4.2 Securing the ROC800 to the DIN Rail .....................................................2-9
2.4.3 Removing the ROC800 from the DIN Rail .............................................2-10
ROC800-Series Expansion Backplane (EXP) ...................................................2-10
2.5.1 Attaching an Expansion Backplane .......................................................2-11
2.5.2 Removing an Expansion Backplane ......................................................2-12
Central Processing Unit (CPU) ..........................................................................2-13
2.6.1 Removing the CPU Module ...................................................................2-17
2.6.2 Installing the CPU Module .....................................................................2-17
License Keys .....................................................................................................2-18
2.7.1 Installing a License Key .........................................................................2-19
2.7.2 Removing a License Key .......................................................................2-19
Startup and Operation .......................................................................................2-20
2.8.1 Startup ...................................................................................................2-20
2.8.2 Operation...............................................................................................2-21
Installation Requirements
The ROC800’s design makes it highly adaptable to a wide variety of
installations. Consequently, this manual cannot cover all possible
installation scenarios. Contact your local sales representative if you
require information concerning a specific installation not described in
this manual.
Planning is essential to a good installation. Because installation
requirements depend on many factors (such as the application, location,
ground conditions, climate, and accessibility), this document only
provides generalized guidelines.
Revised Jul-14
Installation and Use
2-1
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
2.1.1 Environmental Requirements
Always install the ROC800 in a user-supplied building or enclosure to
protect it from direct exposure to rain, snow, ice, blowing dust or debris,
and corrosive atmospheres. If you install the ROC800 outside of a
building, it must be placed in a National Electrical Manufacturer’s
Association (NEMA) 3 or higher rated enclosure to ensure the necessary
level of protection.
Note: In salt spray environments, it is especially important to ensure
that the enclosure—including all entry and exit points—is sealed
properly.
The ROC800 operates over a wide range of temperatures. However, in
extreme climates it may be necessary to provide temperature-controlling
devices to maintain stable operating conditions. In extremely hot
climates, a filtered ventilation system or air conditioning may be
required. In extremely cold climates, it may be necessary to provide a
thermostatically controlled heater in the same enclosure as the ROC800.
To maintain a non-condensing atmosphere inside the ROC800 enclosure
in areas of high humidity, it may be necessary to add heat or
dehumidification.
2.1.2 Site Requirements
When locating the ROC800 on the site, careful consideration can help
reduce future operational problems. Consider the following items when
choosing a location:
2-2

Local, state, and federal codes often place restrictions on locations
and dictate site requirements. Examples of these restrictions are fall
distance from a meter run, distance from pipe flanges, and
hazardous area classifications. Ensure that all code requirements are
met.

Choose a location for the ROC800 to minimize the length of signal
and power wiring.

Locate ROC800s equipped for radio communications so the antenna
has an unobstructed signal path. Antennas should not be aimed into
storage tanks, buildings, or other tall structures. If possible, antennas
should be located at the highest point on the site. Overhead
clearance should be sufficient to allow the antenna to be raised to a
height of at least twenty feet.

To minimize interference with radio communications, choose a
location for the ROC800 away from electrical noise sources, such as
engines, large electric motors, and utility line transformers.

Choose a location for the ROC800 away from heavy traffic areas to
reduce the risk of being damaged by vehicles. However, provide
adequate vehicle access to aid monitoring and maintenance.
Installation and Use
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual

The site must comply with class limits of Part 15 of the FCC rules.
Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) The device
may not cause harmful interference, and (2) the device must accept
any interference received, including interference that may cause
undesired operation.
2.1.3 Compliance with Hazardous Area Standards
The ROC hazardous location approval is for Class I, Division 2, Groups
A, B, C, and D. The Class, Division, and Group terms include:

Class defines the general nature of the hazardous material in the
surrounding atmosphere. Class I is for locations where flammable
gases or vapors may be present in the air in quantities sufficient to
produce explosive or ignitable mixtures.

Division defines the probability of hazardous material being present
in an ignitable concentration in the surrounding atmosphere.
Division 2 locations are locations that are presumed to be hazardous
only in an abnormal situation.

Group defines the hazardous material in the surrounding
atmosphere. Groups A to D are:
o Group A: Atmosphere containing acetylene.
o Group B: Atmosphere containing hydrogen, gases, or vapors of
equivalent nature.
o Group C: Atmosphere containing ethylene, gases, or vapors of
equivalent nature.
o Group D: Atmosphere containing propane, gases, or vapors of
equivalent nature.
For the ROC800 to be approved for hazardous locations, it must be
installed in accordance with the National Electrical Code (NEC)
guidelines or other applicable codes.
Caution
Revised Jul-14
When working on units located in a hazardous area (where explosive
gases may be present), make sure the area is in a non-hazardous state
before performing procedures. Performing these procedures in a
hazardous area could result in personal injury or property damage.
Installation and Use
2-3
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
2.1.4 Power Installation Requirements
Be sure to route power away from hazardous areas, as well as sensitive
monitoring and radio equipment. Local and company codes generally
provide guidelines for installations. Adhere rigorously to all local and
National Electrical Code (NEC) requirements.
The removable terminal blocks accept 12 to 22 American Wire Gauge
(AWG) wiring.
Although the ROC800 can operate on different DC voltages based on
the installed Power Input module, it is good practice when using a
battery-backed system to install a low-voltage cutoff device to help
protect batteries and other devices the ROC800 does not power.
Similarly, when the ROC800 uses a PM-24 Power Input module with a
24 V dc battery-backed system, it is a good practice to install an
appropriate low voltage cutoff device to protect the battery back-up.
2.1.5 Grounding Installation Requirements
If your company has no specific grounding requirements, install the
ROC800 as a floating system (unconnected to ground). Otherwise,
follow your company’s specific grounding practices. However, if you
are making a connection between a grounded device and the ROC800
EIA-232 (RS-232) port, ground the ROC800 Power Input module either
by connecting the PM-12’s BAT– to ground or by connecting either of
the PM-24 or PM-30 module’s negative Power Inputs to ground.
The National Electrical Code (NEC) governs the ground wiring
requirements. When the equipment uses a DC voltage source, the
grounding system must terminate at the service disconnect. All
equipment grounding conductors must provide an uninterrupted
electrical path to the service disconnect. This includes wire or conduit
carrying the power supply conductors.

The National Electrical Code Article 250-83 (1993), paragraph c,
defines the material and installation requirements for grounding
electrodes.

The National Electrical Code Article 250-91 (1993), paragraph a,
defines the material requirements for grounding electrode
conductors.

The National Electrical Code Article 250-92 (1993), paragraph a,
provides installation requirements for grounding electrode
conductors.

The National Electrical Code Article 250-95 (1993) defines the size
requirements for equipment grounding conductors.
Improper grounding or poor grounding practice can often cause
problems, such as the introduction of ground loops into your system.
2-4
Installation and Use
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Proper grounding of the ROC800 helps to reduce the effects of electrical
noise on the ROC800’s operation and protects against lightning.
Install a surge protection device at the service disconnect on DC voltage
source systems to protect against lightning and power surges for the
installed equipment. All earth grounds must have an earth to ground rod
or grid impedance of 25 ohms or less as measured with a ground system
tester. You may also consider a telephone surge protector for the dial-up
modem communications module.
A pipeline with cathodic protection is not a good ground. Do not tie
common to the cathodic part of the pipeline.
When connecting shielded cable, be sure to tie the shielded cable to
earth ground at the end of the cable attached to the ROC800 only. Leave
the other end of the shielded cable open to avoid ground loops.
2.1.6 I/O Wiring Requirements
I/O wiring requirements are site- and application-dependent. Local,
state, and NEC requirements determine the I/O wiring installation
methods. Direct buried cable, conduit and cable, or overhead cable are
all options for I/O wiring installations.
Shielded, twisted-pair cable is recommended for I/O signal wiring. The
twisted-pair minimizes signal errors caused by Electro-Magnetic
Interference (EMI), Radio Frequency Interference (RFI), and transients.
Use insulated, shielded, twisted-pair wiring when using MVS signal
lines. The removable terminal blocks accept 12 to 24 AWG wire.
2.2
Required Tools
Use the following tools to perform installation and maintenance
procedures on the ROC800.
2.3

Phillips screwdriver, size 0.

Flat blade screwdriver, size 2.5 mm (0.1 inch).

Flat blade screwdriver, large, or other prying instrument.
Housing
The housing case is made of a patented Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene
(ABS) plastic (U.S. Patent 6,771,513) and the wire channel covers are
made of polypropylene plastic.
Revised Jul-14
Installation and Use
2-5
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
2.3.1 Removing and Replacing End Caps
Normal use and maintenance of the ROC800 does not typically require
you to remove the end caps on the housing. Follow these procedures in
case removal is necessary.
To remove the end caps:
1. Place the tip of a flat-blade screwdriver into the top pry hole of the
end cap and loosen the end cap by pulling the handle of the
screwdriver away from the backplane.
Note: The pry holes are located on the sides of the end caps.
2. Place the tip of a flat-blade screwdriver into the bottom pry hole of
the end cap and loosen the end cap by pulling the handle of the
screwdriver away from the backplane.
3. Pivot the front end cap away from the back edge of the housing.
To replace the end caps:
1. Align the back edge of the end cap on the housing.
2. Rotate the end cap towards the housing and snap the end cap into
place.
2.3.2 Removing and Installing Wire Channel Covers
Install the wire channel covers over the wiring channels once the wiring
of the terminal blocks is complete. Wire channel covers are located on
the front of the ROC800 housing.
To remove a wire channel cover:
1. Grasp the wire channel cover at both the top and bottom.
2. Start at the top or bottom and pull the wire channel cover out of the
wire channel.
To replace a wire channel cover:
1. Align the wire channel cover over the wire channel, allowing
unobstructed wire access.
2. Press the wire channel cover into place until it snaps.
Note: The tabs on the left side of the wire channel cover should rest in
the slots on the left edge of the channel.
2-6
Installation and Use
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
2.3.3 Removing and Installing Module Covers
Before you insert an I/O or communications module, remove the
module cover over the empty module slots in which you intend to install
the modules. Although you are not required to remove the power to the
ROC800 to perform this procedure, caution is always advisable when
working with a powered ROC800.
Caution
To avoid circuit damage when working inside the unit, use appropriate
electrostatic discharge precautions (such as wearing a grounded wrist
strap).
When working on units located in a hazardous area (where explosive
gases may be present), make sure the area is in a non-hazardous state
before performing procedures. Performing these procedures in a
hazardous area could result in personal injury or property damage.
To remove a module cover:
1. Remove the wire channel cover.
2. Unscrew the two captive screws on the face of the cover.
3. Using the tab at the left side of the removable terminal block, pull
the module cover straight out from the ROC800 housing.
Note: If you remove a module for an extended period, install a module
cover plate over the empty module slot to keep dust and other
matter from getting into the ROC800.
To install a module cover:
1. Place the module cover over the module slot.
2. Screw the two captive screws on the module cover plate.
3. Replace the wire channel cover.
2.4
Mounting the ROC800 on a DIN Rail
When choosing an installation site, be sure to check all clearances.
Provide adequate clearance for wiring and service. The ROC800 mounts
on Type 35 DIN rails and requires two strips of DIN rail. Refer to
Figures 2-1, 2-2, and 2-3.
Note: English measurement units (inches) appear in brackets in the
following figures.
Revised Jul-14
Installation and Use
2-7
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Figure 2-1. Side View of the ROC800
Figure 2-2. Bottom View of the ROC800
Note: The distance from the mounting panel to the front of the
ROC800 is 174mm (6.85”). If you mount the ROC800 inside an
enclosure and want to connect a cable to the LOI or Ethernet
port, ensure adequate clearance for the cable and the enclosure
door. For example, a molded RJ-45 CAT 5 cable can increase
the clearance requirement for the enclosure by 25mm (1”).
2-8
Installation and Use
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
A
B
B
A
B
DIN Rail Catch
DIN Rail Mount
Figure 2-3. Back View of the ROC800
2.4.1 Installing the DIN Rail
To install the ROC800 using the 35 x 7.5 mm DIN rails:
1. Mount the lower DIN rail onto the enclosure panel.
2. Snap the upper DIN rail into the ROC800 upper DIN rail mounting
blocks.
3. Place the ROC800 onto the lower rail that is mounted to the plane
and ensure that the ROC800 (with the second strip of DIN rail still
in its upper mounting blocks) is seated against the panel.
4. Fasten the upper strip of DIN rail to the panel.
Note: Following this procedure (which uses the ROC800 to provide
the correct DIN rail spacing) ensures that the ROC800 is held
securely in place.
2.4.2 Securing the ROC800 to the DIN Rail
When placed correctly, the DIN rail catches (see Figure 2-3) secure the
ROC to the DIN rail. Place the catches according to the following
configuration:
Revised Jul-14
Installation and Use
2-9
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual

ROC809: Two catches.

ROC827: One catch.

ROC827 and one EXP: Place catches on ROC827 and EXP.

ROC827 and two EXPs: Place catches on ROC827 and second EXP.

ROC827 and three EXPs: Place catches on ROC827 and third EXP.

ROC827 and four EXPs: Place catches on ROC827 and second and
fourth EXP.
2.4.3 Removing the ROC800 from the DIN Rail
To remove the ROC800 from DIN rails, gently lever the DIN rail
catches (located on the top of the housing) up approximately 3-4mm
(1/8”). Then tilt the top of the ROC800 away from the DIN rail.
2.5
ROC800-Series Expansion Backplane (EXP)
The expansion backplane has connectors for the central processing unit
(CPU), the power input module, and all the I/O and communication
modules. Once a module is completely inserted into the module slot, the
connector on the module fits into one of the connectors on the
backplane. The backplane does not require any wiring, so no jumpers
are associated with the backplane.
Figure 2-4. ROC827 and Expansion Backplane
2-10
Installation and Use
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Removing the backplane from the housing is not recommended, as there
are no field serviceable parts. If the backplane requires maintenance,
please contact your local sales representative.
2.5.1 Attaching an Expansion Backplane
To attach an EXP to an existing ROC827 base unit or to another EXP:
1. Remove power from the ROC827.
2. Remove the right-hand end cap from the ROC827 as described in
Section 2.3.1, Removing and Replacing End Caps.
Note: The EXP may not have attached end caps. If it does, remove
the left-hand end cap.
3. Remove the wire channel covers from the ROC827 as described in
Section 2.3.2, Removing and Installing Wire Channel Covers.
4. Align and gently press together the front right edge of the EXP
against the front left edge of the ROC827. This aligns the power
connectors on the EXP’s backplane with the socket on the
ROC827’s backplane (see Figure 2-5).
Figure 2-5. Power Connectors on the EXP Backplane
5. Pivot the back edges of the ROC827 and the EXP toward each other
until they click together.
Note: The plastic locking clips at the back of the EXP click when
the two units securely fasten together.
6. Attach an end cap to the right side of the EXP (if it does not have
one). Do not replace the wire channel covers until you finish
installing and wiring the modules in the EXP.
Note: Adding an EXP–and the modules it will hold–may require you
to adjust your ROC827’s power consumption requirements.
Refer to Section 3.2, Determining Power Consumption.
Revised Jul-14
Installation and Use
2-11
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
2.5.2 Removing an Expansion Backplane
Note: Before you remove an EXP, you must power down the ROC827,
disconnect all wiring from all modules, and remove the entire
unit from the DIN rail. Once the entire ROC827 is free of the
DIN rail, you can detach an individual EXP.
To remove an EXP from an existing ROC827 base unit:
1. Remove the right-hand end cap from the EXP as described in
Section 2.3.1, Removing and Replacing End Caps.
2. Remove the wire channel covers on either side of the EXP you want
to detach, as described in Section 2.3.2, Removing and Installing
Wire Channel Covers.
3. Turn the ROC827 around so that the back of the unit faces you (as
shown in Figure 2-6).
Note: It may be useful to place the ROC827 face-down on a flat
surface with the EXP you want to detach hanging free of the
surface’s edge.
A
A
Locking clips and tabs
Figure 2-6. Plastic Snaps on the Back of the EXP
2-12
Installation and Use
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
4. Using a flat-bladed screwdriver, gently pry the plastic locking clips
at the upper and lower back edge of the EXP housing away from
their securing tabs.
Note: Applying too much pressure breaks the plastic hooks.
5. Once you free the plastic locking clips from their securing tabs,
gently pivot the back of the EXP away from the ROC827.
Note: The EXP detaches quickly. Hold it securely to prevent it
from falling.
6. Place the detached EXP in a secure location.
7. Replace the right-hand end cap.
8. Replace the ROC827 on the DIN rail.
9. Reattach all wiring.
10. Replace the wire channel covers.
2.6
Central Processing Unit (CPU)
The ROC800 uses a standard ROC800-Series central processing unit
(CPU) containing the microprocessor, the firmware, connectors to the
backplane, three built-in communication ports (two with LEDs), a LED
low power wakeup button, a RESET button, the application license key
connectors, a STATUS LED indicating system integrity, and the main
processor (refer to Figures 2-7 and 2-8 and Tables 2-1 and 2-2).
ROC800L
The ROC800L functions only with a Series 2 CPU.
The 32-bit microprocessor is based on a Motorola MPC862 Quad
Integrated Communications Controller (PowerQUICC) PowerPC
processor running at 65 MHz.
The internal Sanyo 3-volt CR2430 lithium backup battery provides
backup of the data and the Real-Time Clock when the main power is not
connected.
To disable the battery backup:
1. Remove power from the ROC800.
2. Remove the CPU module from the ROC800.
3. Move the J3 jumper (see Figure 2-8) on the CPU module to the two
upper pins.
4. Reinstall the CPU module.
5. Power up the unit for 20 seconds and then power down. This
activates the “sleep” mode for the backup battery.
To enable the battery backup:
Revised Jul-14
Installation and Use
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ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
1. Remove power from the ROC800.
2. Remove the CPU module from the ROC800.
3. Move the J3 jumper on the CPU module to the two lower pins.
4. Reinstall the CPU module.
5. Power up the ROC800; the backup battery is fully functional.
You can disable this battery backup on the Series 2 CPU module by
moving the J3 jumper (located on the CPU module) to the two upper
pins (see Figure 2-8).
Series 1 CPU Faceplate
(Gray)
Series 2 CPU Faceplate
(Black)
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
Securing Screw
LED Button
LOI – EIA-232 (RS-232D)
Status LED
Ethernet
EIA-232 (RS-232C)
Securing Screw
Figure 2-7. CPU Front View (Series 1 and Series 2 CPU Modules)
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Installation and Use
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Series 1 CPU (Green)
Series 2 CPU (Black)
A
B
C
D
H
H
E
F
I
G
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
Battery
LED Button
RJ-45 Port
License Keys
RESET Button
RJ-45 Port
RS-232 Port
Microprocessor
Battery backup jumper
Figure 2-8. CPU Connectors (Series 1 and Series 2 CPU Modules)
Table 2-1. CPU Connector Locations
CPU Number
J1
J2
J3
J4
P2
P3
P4
P5
P6
SW1
SW2
Series 1
Backplane connector
Backplane connector
Not Used
Battery Backup
LOI Port RJ-45
Ethernet RJ-45
License Key Terminal
Not Used
License Key Terminal
LED Button
RESET Button
Series 2
Backplane connector
Backplane connector
Battery Backup
Not Used
License Key Terminal
License Key Terminal
RS-232
LOI Port RJ-45
Ethernet RJ-45
RESET Button
LED Button
The CPU contains a microprocessor supervisory circuit. This device
monitors the battery voltage, resets the processor, and disables the
SRAM chip if the voltage goes out of tolerance. The CPU has an
Revised Jul-14
Installation and Use
2-15
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
internal Analog to Digital Converter (A/D). The A/D monitors the
supply voltage and board temperature (refer to “Automatic Self-Tests”
in Chapter 1, General Information).
The CPU has two buttons, LED and Reset (see Figures 2-7 or 2-8):

RESET:
o To reset all comm ports, stop user programs, stop FSTs, and stop
DS800 programs, press and hold in the Reset button for
approximately 10 seconds while the ROC800 is powered.
Note: This feature is not available on the DL8000.
o To reset the ROC800 configuration to system defaults, remove
power, press and hold in the Reset button as you re-apply power
to the ROC800. This reset clears all user programs, FSTs, and
DS800 programs but retains history, alarms, and events.
Note: The Reset button is recessed to prevent accidental resets. Use
the end of a paper clip to access this button.
Caution
For ROC800 configuration system defaults, when you reset, the
ROC800 loses configuration. BEFORE you attempt ANY type of reset,
back up your configuration and log data and ensure that you have
current versions of user programs and DS800 programs to reload.
Refer to “Preserving Configuration and Log Data” in Chapter 6,
Troubleshooting.

LED: Press to turn on the LEDs on the CPU module, I/O modules,
and communication modules when the ROC800 has timed out.
The STATUS LED helps indicate the integrity of the ROC800 (refer to
Table 2-2).
Table 2-2. STATUS LED Functions
Status LED
Continually
Lit
Continually
Lit
Flashing
Flashing
Flashing
Color
Definitions
Solution
Green

ROC800 functioning normally.

N/A


Low Battery Voltage alert.
System AI (Point number 1) LoLo
Alarm.
Firmware invalid.
Firmware update in
decompression.
Firmware update is flashing image.

Charge battery.
Red

Apply DC voltage source.

Update firmware.

Do not restart the ROC800.

Do not restart the ROC800.
Green
Green-Green
to Red-Red
Green to Red



To save power, you can enable or disable the LEDs on the ROC800
(with the exception of the LED on the power module). Using
ROCLINK 800 (from the ROCLINK 800 menu, select ROC > Flags
and the Advanced tab), you can define how long the LEDs remains on
after you press the LED button on the CPU module. For instance, with
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Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
the default setting of five minutes, all LEDs turn off after five minutes.
If you press the LED button, LEDs light and stay lit again for five
minutes. By entering a 0 (zero), the LED always stays lit.
2.6.1 Removing the CPU Module
Caution
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions (such as
wearing a grounded wrist strap) may reset the processor or damage
electronic components, resulting in interrupted operations.
When working on units located in a hazardous area (where explosive
gases may be present), make sure the area is in a non-hazardous state
before performing procedures. Performing these procedures in a
hazardous area could result in personal injury or property damage.
To remove the CPU module:
1. Perform the backup procedure described in Preserving
Configuration and Log Data in Chapter 6, Troubleshooting.
2. Remove power from the ROC800.
3. Remove the wire channel cover.
4. Unscrew the two small screws on the front of the CPU module and
remove the faceplate.
5. Place a small screwdriver under the ejector clip at the top or bottom
of the CPU module and lightly pry the CPU module out of its
socket. You may find it easiest to carefully pry on the top ejector
clip a little, then carefully pry the bottom ejector. You will feel and
hear the CPU as it detaches from the backplane.
6. Remove the CPU module carefully. Do not scrape either side of the
module against the ROC800. Make sure not to pull on any cables
attached to the CPU module.
2.6.2 Installing the CPU Module
Caution
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions (such as
wearing a grounded wrist strap) may reset the processor or damage
electronic components, resulting in interrupted operations.
When working on units located in a hazardous area (where explosive
gases may be present), make sure the area is in a non-hazardous state
before performing procedures. Performing these procedures in a
hazardous area could result in personal injury or property damage.
To install the CPU module:
1. Remove power from the ROC800.
2. Slide the CPU module into the slot.
Revised Jul-14
Installation and Use
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ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
2. Press the CPU firmly into the slot, ensuring the ejector clips rest on
the module rail guides. The connectors at the back of the CPU
module fit securely into the connectors on the backplane.
3. Place the CPU faceplate on the CPU.
4. Tighten the two screws on the faceplate of the CPU module firmly
(see Figure 2-7).
5. Replace the wire channel cover.
6. Review Restarting the ROC800 in Chapter 6, Troubleshooting.
7. Return power to the ROC800 unit.
2.7
License Keys
License keys with valid license codes grant access to applications or, in
some cases, allow optional firmware functionality to execute. In some
situations, a license key may also be required before you can run the
application. Examples of licensed applications include DS800
Development Suite software, meter run calculations, and various user
programs. You can then configure these applications using ROCLINK
800 or the DS800 Development Suite software.
The term “license key” refers to the physical piece of hardware (refer to
Figure 2-9) that can contain up to seven different licenses. Each
ROC800 can have none, one, or two installed license keys. If you
remove a license key after enabling an application, the firmware
disables the task from running. This prevents unauthorized execution of
protected applications in a ROC800.
Figure 2-9. License Key
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Installation and Use
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ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
2.7.1 Installing a License Key
Caution
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions (such as
wearing a grounded wrist strap) may reset the processor or damage
electronic components, resulting in interrupted operations.
When working on units located in a hazardous area (where explosive
gases may be present), make sure the area is in a non-hazardous state
before performing procedures. Performing these procedures in a
hazardous area could result in personal injury or property damage.
To install a license key:
1. Perform the backup procedure described in Preserving
Configuration and Log Data in Chapter 6, Troubleshooting.
2. Remove power from the ROC800.
3. Remove the wire channel cover.
4. Unscrew the captive screws from the CPU faceplate and remove it.
5. Place the license key in the appropriate terminal slot in the CPU
(refer to Figure 2-8).
Figure 2-10. License Key Installation
Note: If you are installing a single license key, place it the
uppermost slot (closest to the LOI port).
6. Press the license key into the terminal until it is firmly seated. Refer
to Figure 2-10.
7. Replace the CPU faceplate and tighten the two captive screws.
8. Replace the wire channel cover.
9. Review Restarting the ROC800 in Chapter 6, Troubleshooting.
10. Restore power to the ROC800.
2.7.2 Removing a License Key
Caution
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions (such as
wearing a grounded wrist strap) may reset the processor or damage
electronic components, resulting in interrupted operations.
When working on units located in a hazardous area (where explosive
gases may be present), make sure the area is in a non-hazardous state
before performing procedures. Performing these procedures in a
hazardous area could result in personal injury or property damage.
Revised Jul-14
Installation and Use
2-19
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
To remove a license key:
1. Perform the backup procedure described in Preserving
Configuration and Log Data in Chapter 6, Troubleshooting.
2. Remove power from the ROC800.
3. Remove the wire channel cover.
4. Unscrew the captive screws from the CPU faceplate and remove it.
5. Remove the license key from the appropriate terminal slot (P2 or
P3) in the CPU (refer to Figure 2-8).
6. Replace the CPU faceplate and tighten the two captive screws..
7. Replace the wire channel cover.
8. Review Restarting the ROC800 in Chapter 6, Troubleshooting.
9. Restore power to the ROC800.
2.8
Startup and Operation
Before starting the ROC800, perform the following checks to ensure the
unit components are properly installed.
Caution

Make sure the power input module is properly seated in the
backplane.

Make sure I/O and communication modules are seated in the
backplane.

Check the field wiring for proper installation.

Make sure the input power has the correct polarity.

Make sure the input power is fused at the power source.
Check the input power polarity before connecting power to the ROC800.
Incorrect polarity can damage the ROC800.
When working on units located in a hazardous area (where explosive
gases may be present), make sure the area is in a non-hazardous state
before performing procedures. Performing these procedures in a
hazardous area could result in personal injury or property damage.
2.8.1 Startup
Before you apply power to the ROC800, assess the power requirements
(including the base unit, EXPs, and any installed modules and
peripheral devices) that comprise the total configuration for your
ROC800. Refer to Determining Power Consumption in Chapter 3,
Power Connections.
Apply power to the ROC800 (refer to Installing a Power Input Module
in Chapter 3, Power Connections). The power input module’s LED
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Installation and Use
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
indicator should light green to indicate that the applied voltage is
correct. Then, the STATUS indicator on the CPU should light to
indicate a valid operation. Depending on the Power Saving Mode
setting, the STATUS indicator may not remain lit during operation
(refer to Table 2-2).
2.8.2 Operation
Once startup is successful, configure the ROC800 to meet the
requirements of the application. Once it is configured and you have
calibrated the I/O and any associated Multi-Variable Sensors (MVS,
MVSS, MVSI, and so on), place the ROC800 into operation.
Caution
Revised Jul-14
When working on units located in a hazardous area (where explosive
gases may be present), make sure the area is in a non-hazardous state
before performing procedures. Performing these procedures in a
hazardous area could result in personal injury or property damage.
Installation and Use
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[This page is intentionally left blank.]
2-22
Installation and Use
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ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Chapter 3 – Power Connections
This chapter discusses the Power Input modules. It describes the
modules, explains how to install and wire them, and provides
worksheets to help you determine—and tune—the power requirements
for the I/O and communications modules you can install in the ROC800
and the EXPs.
In This Chapter
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.1
Power Input Module Descriptions ........................................................................3-1
3.1.1 12-Volt DC Power Input Module (PM-12) ................................................3-1
3.1.2 24-Volt DC Power Input Module (PM-24) ................................................3-3
3.1.3 30-Volt DC Power Input Module (PM-30) ................................................3-4
3.1.4 Auxiliary Output (AUX+ and AUX–) .........................................................3-8
3.1.5 Switched Auxiliary Output (AUXSW+ and AUXSW–) ............................3-10
Determining Power Consumption ......................................................................3-11
3.2.1 Tuning the Configuration .......................................................................3-15
Removing a Power Input Module ......................................................................3-25
Installing a Power Input Module ........................................................................3-26
Connecting the ROC800 to Wiring ....................................................................3-27
3.5.1 Wiring the DC Power Input Module .......................................................3-27
3.5.2 Wiring the External Batteries .................................................................3-29
3.5.3 Replacing the Internal Battery ...............................................................3-30
Additional Technical Information .......................................................................3-32
Power Input Module Descriptions
The ROC800 uses a Power Input module to convert external input
power to the voltage levels the electronics require. The module also
monitors voltage levels to ensure proper operation. Three Power Input
modules—12 Vdc (PM-12), 24 Vdc (PM-24) and 30 Vdc (PM-30)—are
available for the ROC800.
The power consumption of a ROC800 and any attached expandable
backplanes determines the current requirements for the external power
supply. Refer to Section 3.2, Determining Power Consumption for a
discussion and worksheets on assessing power requirements.
The Power Input module has removable terminal blocks for wiring and
servicing. The terminal blocks can accept sizes 12 to 22 AWG
(American Wire Gauge) wiring.
3.1.1 12-Volt DC Power Input Module (PM-12)
Using the PM-12, the ROC800 can accept 12 Volts dc (nominal) input
power from an AC/DC converter or other 12-volt dc supply. The input
source should be fused and connected to the BAT+ and BAT– terminals
(see Figure 3-1). The Power Input module uses 3.3 Volts dc switching
power to provide power to the ROC800-Series modules via the
backplane. The ROC800 requires 11.5 to 14.5 Volts dc for proper
operation.
Revised Jul-14
Power Connections
3-1
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
E
A
B
C
F
D
G
H
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
BAT+ / BAT–
CHG+ / CHG–
AUX+ / AUX–
AUX SW + / AUX SW –
V OK LED
V OFF LED
V OVER LED
TEMP LED
Figure 3-1. 12 Volt dc Power Input Module
The CHG+ and CHG– terminals comprise an Analog Input channel that
allows you to monitor an external voltage between 0 to 18 Volts dc. For
example, you can connect a solar panel upstream of the solar regulator
to monitor the output of the solar panel. This allows you to compare the
System AI Point Number 2 for the charging voltage (CHG+) to the
actual battery voltage (BAT+) System AI Point Number 1 and take
action as required. The module has a low-voltage cut-off circuit built-in
to guard against draining power supply batteries. Refer to Automatic
Self Tests in Chapter 1, General Information.
Use the AUX+ / AUX– terminals to supply reverse polarity protected
source voltage to external devices, such as a radio or solenoid. Use the
AUX SW + / AUX SW – terminals to provide switched power for external
devices. The AUX SW + is turned off when the ROC800 detects a
software configurable voltage at the BAT+ / BAT– terminals.
Table 3-1 details the specific connection information for the 12 volt dc
(PM-12) Power Input module. Table 3-2 indicates the LED fault
indicators.
3-2
Power Connections
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Table 3-1. 12 Volt dc Power Input Terminal Block Connections
Terminal Blocks
BAT+ and BAT–
CHG+ and CHG–
AUX+ and AUX–
AUX SW + and
AUX SW –
Definition
Volts DC
Accepts 12 Volts dc nominal from an
AC/DC converter or other 12 Volts dc
supply.

Maximum Range: 11.5 to 16 Volts dc

Recommended Operating Range: 11.5
to 14.5 Volts dc
Analog Input used to monitor an external
charging source.
Supplies reverse polarity protected source
voltage to external devices. Fused.
Supplies switched power for external
devices.

0 to 18 Volts dc

0 to 14.25 Volts dc

0 to 14.25 Volts dc
Table 3-2. 12 Volt DC Power Input LED Indicators
Signal
LED
V OK
V OFF
Green LED on when voltage is in tolerance on BAT+ and BAT–.
Fault – Red LED on when the AUX SW + output are disabled by
the CPU control line.
Fault – Red LED on when AUX SW + is disabled due to excess
voltage on BAT+.
Fault – Red LED on when AUX SW + output are disabled due to
the excess temperature of the Power Input module.
V OVER
TEMP
3.1.2 24-Volt DC Power Input Module (PM-24)
Using the PM-24, the ROC800 can accept 24 Volts dc (nominal) input
power from an AC/DC converter or other 24 Volts dc supply connected
to the + and – terminals. Connect the input power to either or both of
the + and – channels. The 24 V dc Power Input module (PM-24) does
not have CHG terminals for monitoring a charging voltage, and does
not monitor the input voltage for alarming, sleep mode, or other
monitoring purposes. The module has two LEDs that indicate voltage is
received at the backplane and the CPU (see Figure 3-2 and Tables 3-3
and 3-4).
The Power Input module uses 3.3 Volts dc switching power to provide
power to the I/O and communications modules installed in the ROC800
and any expanded backplanes. With this Power Input module installed,
the ROC800 requires 20 to 30 Volts dc for proper operation.
Use the AUX+ and AUX– terminals to supply reverse polarity protected
source voltage to external devices, such as a radio or solenoid.
Revised Jul-14
Power Connections
3-3
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
C
A
D
B
A
B
C
D
+/–
AUX+ / AUX–
V 12 LED
V 3.3 LED
Figure 3-2. 24 Volt dc Power Input Module
Table 3-3. 24 Volt dc Power Input Terminal Block Connections
Terminal Blocks
+ and –
AUX+ and AUX–
Definition
Volts DC
Accepts 24 Volts dc nominal from an AC/DC converter
or other 24 Volts dc supply.
Supplies reverse polarity protected source voltage to
external devices. Circuit limited.
20 to 30 Volts dc
+12 Volts dc minus ∼0.7 Volts
dc
Table 3-4. 24 Volt dc Power Input LED Indicators
Signal
V 12
V 3.3
LED
Green LED on when voltage is provided to backplane.
Green LED on when voltage is provided to CPU.
3.1.3 30-Volt DC Power Input Module (PM-30)
Using the PM-30, the ROC800 can accept up to 30 Volts dc (nominal)
input power from an AC/DC converter or other 30 Volts dc supply
connected to the + and – terminals. Connect the input power to either or
both of the + and – channels. The PM-30 module does not have CHG
terminals for monitoring a charging voltage, and does not monitor the
input voltage for alarming, sleep mode, or other monitoring purposes.
The module has two LEDs that indicate voltage is received at the
backplane and the CPU (see Figure 3-3 and Tables 3-3 and 3-4).
The module uses 3.3 Volts dc switching power to provide power to the
I/O and communications modules installed in the ROC800 and any
3-4
Power Connections
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
expanded backplanes. With this module installed, the ROC800 requires
10.5 to 30 Volts dc for proper operation.
Use the AUX+ and AUX– terminals to supply reverse polarity protected
source voltage to external devices, such as a radio or solenoid.
D
A
E
B
F
C
G
H
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
Power Input Voltage + / –
AUX+ / AUX–
AUX SW + / AUX SW –
Voltage present at Power Input
AUX Output enabled
Switched AUX Output enabled
12v power to backplane
3.3v power to backplane
Figure 3-3. PM-30 module
Table 3-5. 30 Volt dc Power Input Terminal Block Connections
Terminal Blocks
Power input +/+/Aux +/Aux
SW
+/-
Definition
Accepts 11-30Vdc nominal from an AC/DC converter or
other dc voltage supply
Supplies reverse polarity protected source voltage to
external devices. Circuit limited (.9A +/- 10%)
Supplies reverse polarity protected source voltage to
external devices. Circuit limited (.9A +/- 10%)
Volts DC
11 to 30 Volts dc
Input Voltage minus .7Vdc
Input Voltage minus .7Vdc
Table 3-6. 30 Volt dc Power Input LED Indicators
Signal
V ok
V 12
V 3.3
Aux
Aux SW
Revised Jul-14
LED
Indicates voltage is in tolerance on BAT+ and BATIndicates the module is providing voltage to backplane
Indicates the module is providing voltage to backplane
Indicates the Auxiliary Output Power is enabled
Indicates the Switched Auxiliary Output Power is enabled
Power Connections
3-5
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Low Voltage
Cutoff
The design of the PM-30 power module (like the PM-24 power
module it replaces) does not include the low voltage cutoff feature
present in the PM-12 power module. In the PM-12 module, when
power falls below the set LoLo alarm (a default of 10.1V), the module
ceases to provide power to the backplane. Thus, the module shuts
down CPU operations.
Remote Automation Solutions continues to offer the PM-12 for
installations requiring low voltage cutoff. Neither the PM-24 or the PM30 has the low voltage cutoff feature. However, if you need low voltage
cutoff, we suggest one of the following solutions:

Place a low voltage disconnect device between the ROC800 and
power source. Placing a commercially available low voltage
disconnect device between the power source and the ROC800
provides the low voltage cutoff protection. Many low voltage
disconnect devices have user-selectable disconnect values for a
variety of voltages.
LOW
VOLTAGE
DISCONNECT
POWER
SUPPLY
Figure 3-4. Low voltage disconnect device between the ROC800 and
power source

3-6
Place a low voltage disconnect device between the solar
regulatory circuitry and the ROC800. Placing a low voltage
disconnect device between the solar regulatory circuit and the
ROC800 provides the low voltage cutoff protection. Many low
voltage disconnect devices have user-selectable disconnect values
for a variety of voltages.
Power Connections
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
SOLAR
PANEL
LOW
VOLTAGE
DISCONNECT
SOLAR
POWER
REGULATOR
Figure 3-5. Low voltage disconnect device between the solar regulatory
circuitry and the ROC800

Use the Auxiliary Switch (AUX SW) output terminals on the
PM-30. If shutting down power to an external device is sufficient,
then connecting to the Auxiliary Switch (AUX SW) terminals on the
PM-30 power module ensures power is cut off when the LoLo alarm
is triggered. This may be the preferred solution if the ROC800
provides critical controls. When the LoLo alarm is triggered and the
ROC800 CPU goes into sleep mode, it cuts power to the Auxiliary
Switch (AUX SW) terminals.
POWER
SUPPLY
EXTERNAL
DEVICE
Figure 3-6. Auxiliary Switch (AUX SW) output terminals on the PM-30
Revised Jul-14
Power Connections
3-7
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
3.1.4 Auxiliary Output (AUX+ and AUX–)
You can use the AUX+ and AUX–terminals to supply reverse polarity
protected source voltage to external devices, such as a radio or a
solenoid. All module terminal blocks accept 12 to 22 AWG wiring.
Refer to Figures 3-3 and 3-4.
PM-12
For the 12-volt dc Power Input module (PM-12), the auxiliary output
follows the voltage located at BAT+ minus ~0.7 Volts dc, which is the
protection diode voltage drop. For example, if the BAT+ voltage is 13
volts dc, then AUX+ is ~12.3 Volts dc.
For the 12-volt dc Power Input module, AUX+ / AUX– is always on
and is current-limited by a fast-acting glass 2.5 Amp x 20 mm fuse. In
the event that the fuse blows, CSA requires that you replace the 2.5
Amp fast-acting fuse with a Little Fuse 217.025 or equivalent. Refer to
Automatic Self Tests in Chapter 1, General Information.
Figure 3-7. Auxiliary Power Wiring for PM-12 Module
PM-24
3-8
For the 24 volt dc Power Input module (PM-24), the AUX voltage is
always 12 Volts dc minus ~0.7 Volts. AUX+ / AUX– is internally
current-limited by a 0.5 Amp Positive Temperature Coefficient (PTC).
Power Connections
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Figure 3-8. Auxiliary Power Wiring for PM-24 Module
PM-30
For the 30 volt dc Power Input module (PM-30), the auxiliary output
follows the voltage located at BAT+ minus ~1.0 Volts dc, which is the
protection diode voltage drop. For example, if the BAT+ voltage is 13
volts dc, then AUX+ is ~12.3 Volts dc.
For the PM-30 Power Input module, AUX+ / AUX– is always on and is
internally current-limited by a .9 Amp Positive Temperature Coefficient
(PTC).
If you need to cycle power to the radio or other device to reduce the
load on the power source (a recommended practice when using
batteries), use a Discrete Output (DO) module to switch power on and
off. (The PM-12 and PM-30’s on-board AUX SW+ and AUX SW–
terminals perform this function.) Refer to the ROCLINK 800
Configuration Software User Manual (for ROC800-Series) (Part
Number D301250X012) or the ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software
User Manual (for ROC800L) (Part Number D301246X012).
Figure 3-9. Auxiliary Power Wiring for PM-30 Module
Revised Jul-14
Power Connections
3-9
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Removing the
Auxiliary Output Fuse
To remove the auxiliary output fuse:
1. Perform the procedure described in Section 3.3, Removing a Power
Input Module.
2. Remove the fuse located at F1 on the Power Input module.
Installing the Auxiliary
Output Fuse
To re-install the auxiliary output fuse:
1. Replace the fuse located at F1 on the Power Input module.
2. Perform the procedure described in Section 3.4, Installing a Power
Input Module.
3.1.5 Switched Auxiliary Output (AUXSW+ and AUXSW–)
PM-12
The AUX SW + and AUX SW –terminals on the 12 volt dc Power Input
module (PM-12) provide switched power for external devices, such as
radios. AUX SW + is current-limited for protection of the power input
and the external device via a 0.5 Amp nominal Positive Temperature
Coefficient (PTC). The AUX SW + and AUX SW – terminals provide
voltages from 0 to 14.25 Volts dc. AUX SW + turns off when the
voltage at the BAT terminals falls to a software-configurable voltage
(LoLo Alarm). All module terminal blocks accept 12 to 22 AWG
wiring. Refer to Figure 3-1.
If the source voltage falls to a level below which reliable operation
cannot be ensured, the hardware circuitry on the PM-12 module
automatically disables the AUX SW + outputs. This activity is based on
the LoLo Alarm limit (which defaults to 10.6 Volts dc) set for the
System Battery Analog Input Point Number 1. The low input voltage
detect circuit includes approximately 0.75 Volts dc of hysteresis
between turn-off and turn-on levels.
PM-30
The AUX SW + and AUX SW –terminals on the PM-30 (11-30 Volts dc)
Power Input module provides switched power for external devices,
such as radios. AUX SW + is current-limited for protection of the power
input and the external device via a .800 mA +/- 10% Positive
Temperature Coefficient (PTC). The AUX SW + and AUX SW –
terminals on the PM-30 module provide voltages from 10.3 to 29.3
Volts dc which follow the input voltage. AUX SW + turns off when the
voltage at the BAT terminals falls to a software-configurable voltage
(LoLo Alarm). All module terminal blocks accept 12 to 22 AWG
wiring. Refer to Figure 3-3.
If the source voltage falls to a level below which reliable operation
cannot be ensured, the hardware circuitry on the Power Input module
automatically disables the AUX SW + outputs. This activity is based on
the LoLo Alarm limit (which defaults to 10.1 Volts dc) set for the
System Battery Analog Input Point Number 1. The low input voltage
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detect circuit includes approximately 0.75 Volts dc of hysteresis
between turn-off and turn-on levels.
For further information on the STATUS LED functions, refer to Table
2-2 in Chapter 2, Installation and Use.
3.2
Determining Power Consumption
Determining the power consumption requirements for a ROC800
configuration involves the following steps:
1. Determine your ideal ROC800 configuration, which includes
identifying all modules, device relays, meters, solenoids, radios,
transmitters, and other devices that may receive DC power from the
complete ROC800 configuration (base unit and EXPs).
Note: You should also identify any devices (such as a touch screen
panel) that may be powered by the same system but not
necessarily by the ROC800.
2. Calculate the “worst-case” DC power consumption for that
configuration by totaling the combined power draw required for all
installed modules, as well as accounting for the power any modules
provide to external devices (through the use of +T).
Note: “+T” describes the isolated power some modules (such as
AI, AO, PI, and HART) may supply to external devices,
such as 4–20 mA pressure and temperature transducers.
3. Verify that the power input module you intend to use can meet the
power requirements calculated in the first step.
This verification helps you identify and anticipate power demands
from +T external devices that exceed the capabilities of the PM-12
or PM-24 Power Input modules. In this case, you can then make
arrangements to externally power these field devices.
4. “Tune” (if necessary) the configuration by providing external power
or re-assessing the configuration to lessen the power requirements
from the ROC800.
To assist you in this process, this chapter contains a series of worksheets
(Tables 3-5 through 3-18) that help you to identify and assess the power
requirements for each component of your ROC800 system. Table 3-5
identifies the power requirements related to the ROC800 and
summarizes the power requirements you identify on Tables 3-6 through
3-18. (Complete Tables 3-6 through 3-17 to calculate the power
consumption for each of the I/O modules, and then transfer those results
to Table 3-5.) Completing Table 3-5 enables you to quickly determine
whether the power input module you intend to use is sufficient for your
configuration. If the power module is not sufficient, you can then review
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ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
individual worksheets to determine how to best “tune” your
configuration and lessen power demands.
General Calculation
Process
To calculate the power requirements of a ROC800 configuration
requires:
1. Determine the kind and number of communication modules and the
kind and number of expanded backplanes you are implementing.
Enter those values in the Quantity Used column of Table 3-5.
2. Multiply the P Typical value by the Quantity Used. Enter the values in
the Sub-Total column of Table 3-5. Perform this calculation for
both the communications module and the LED.
3. Determine the kind and number of I/O modules you are
implementing and complete Tables 3-6 through 3-20 for those
modules. For each applicable I/O module:
a. Calculate the P Typical values and enter them in the P Typical
columns of each table. Perform this calculation for the I/O
modules, LEDs (if applicable), channels (if applicable), and any
other devices.
b. Calculate the Duty Cycle value for each I/O module and each
I/O channel (as applicable). Enter those values in the Duty Cycle
column of Tables 3-6 through 3-20.
c. Multiply the P Typical values by the Quantity Used by the Duty
Cycle on each applicable table. Enter those individual sub-totals
in the Sub-Total column on each table and add the sub-totals to
calculate the Total for the table.
4. Transfer the totals from Tables 3-6 through 3-20 to their respective
lines in the Sub-Total column on Table 3-5.
5. Add the Sub-Total values for Tables 3-6 through 3-20. Enter that
value in the Total for All Modules line on Table 3-5.
6. Add the value from the Total for ROC800 Base Unit to the Total for
All Modules. Enter that result in the Total for ROC800 Base Unit
and All Modules line.
7. Transfer the Other Devices total from Table 3-20 to its respective
line in the Sub-Total column on Table 3-5.
8. Add the values from Total for ROC800 Base Unit, Total for All
Modules, and the total for Other Devices. Enter that value in the
Total for ROC800 Base Unit, All Modules, and Other Devices line.
9. Multiply the value in the Total for ROC800 Base Unit, Total for All
Modules, and Other Devices by 0.25. Enter the result in the Power
System Safety Factor (0.25) line.
Note: This value represents a safety factor to the power system to
account for losses and other variables not factored into the
power consumption calculations. This safety factor may vary
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depending on external influences. Adjust the factor value up
or down accordingly.
10. Add the value for the Power System Safety Factor (0.25) to the
value for Total for ROC800 Base Unit, All Modules, and Other
Devices to determine the total estimated power consumption for the
configured ROC800 system.
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Table 3-7. Estimated Power Consumption
Power Consumption (mW)
Device
Description
P TYPICAL
Quantity
Used
Sub-Total
(mW)
CPU and ROC809 Backplane
Power Input Module PM-12 (60W max)
87.5 mA @ 12 volts dc
1050 mW
Power Input Module PM-24 (24W max)
102.1 mA @ 24 volts dc
2450 mW
Power Input Module PM-30 (70W max)
115 mA @ 11 volts dc
1265 mW
Power Input Module PM-30 (80W max)
102 mA @ 30volts dc
3060 mW
1.5 mA
18 mW
Power Input Module PM-12
104.2 mA @ 12 volts dc
1250 mW
Power Input Module PM-24
110.4 mA @ 24 volts dc
2650 mW
Power Input Module PM-30 (70W max)
99 mA @ 11 volts dc
1089 mW
Power Input Module PM-30 (80W max)
90 mA @ 30 volts dc
2700 mW
1.5 mA
18 mW
4 mA @ 12 volts dc
48 mW
Per Active LED – Maximum 13
CPU and ROC827 Backplane
Per Active LED – Maximum 13
EIA-232 (RS-232) Module
Per Active LED – Maximum 4
1.5 mA
18 mW
EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) Module
112 mA @ 12 volts
1344 mW
Per Active LED – Maximum 2
1.5 mA
18 mW
95 mA @ 12 volts dc
1140 mW
1.5 mA
18 mW
25 mA @ 12 volts dc
300 mW
Dial-up Modem Module
Per Active LED – Maximum 4
Expanded Backplane (ROC827 only)
Total for ROC800 Base Unit
AI Modules
Total (from Table 3-8)
AO Modules
Total (from Table 3-9)
DI Modules
Total (from Table 3-10)
DO Modules
Total (from Table 3-11)
DOR Modules
Total (from Table 3-12)
PI Modules
Total (from Table 3-13)
MVS Module
Total (from Table 3-14)
MVS I/O Module
Total (from Table 3-15)
APM Modules
Total (from Table 3-16)
RTD Modules
Total (from Table 3-17)
Thermocouple Modules
Total (from Table 3-18)
HART-2 Modules
Total (from Table 3-19)
IEC 62591
Total (from Table 3-20)
NRM
Total (from Table 3-21)
Total for All Modules
mW
Total for ROC800 Base Unit and All Modules
mW
Total (from Table 3-22)
mW
Total for ROC800 Base Unit, All Modules, and Other
Devices
mW
Power System Safety Factor (0.25)
mW
Total for Configured ROC800
mW
Other Devices
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3.2.1 Tuning the Configuration
The PM-12 Power Input module can supply a maximum of 60 W
(60,000 mW) to the backplane. The PM-24, when operating between
–40°C to 55°C, can supply a maximum of 30 W (30000 mW) to the
backplane. Across its entire operating range (–40°C to 85°C) the PM-24
can supply 24 W (24000 mW). The PM-30 Power Input module can
supply a maximum of 70 W( at 11 volts dc ) (70,000 mW) to 80W(at 30
volts dc) (80,000mW) at -40°C to 75°C to the backplane.
Refer to Table 3-5 and the value you entered in the Total for ROC800
Base Unit and All Modules line. That is the value against which you
“tune” your configuration to accommodate your Power Input module. If
your configuration requires more power than the Power Input module
you intend to use, you need to modify your I/O module configuration to
reduce your power requirements.
Tuning Hints
Review the content of Tables 3-6 through 3-20. Suggestions to help
you better align the configuration of your ROC800 with the capability
of the Power Input module you intend to use include:

Reduce the +T usage by providing an external power supply for as
many transmitters or field devices needed to reduce the value in the
Total for ROC800 Base Unit and All Modules line on Table 3-5 to
below the capability of the Power Input module you intend to use.

Reduce the +T usage by reducing the number of transmitters or field
devices.

Reduce the total number of I/O modules by consolidating
transmitters or field devices onto as few I/O modules as possible.
Note: Tuning your I/O module configuration may require several
iterations to rework the content of Tables 3-6 through 3-18 until
your power requirements match the capability of the Power
Input module you intend to use.
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Table 3-8. Power Consumption of the Analog Input Module
I/O Module
Power Consumption (mW)
Description
Analog Input
AI Module Base
84 mA @ 12 volts dc
Jumper set for +T @ 12 volts dc
Channel’s mA current
Channel 1
draw from +T * 1.25 * 12
Channel’s mA current
Channel 2
draw from +T * 1.25 * 12
Channel’s mA current
Channel 3
draw from +T * 1.25 * 12
Channel’s mA current
Channel 4
draw from +T * 1.25 * 12
P TYPICAL
Quantity
Used
Duty
Cycle
Sub-Total
(mW)
1008 mW
Jumper set for +T @ 24 volts dc
Channel’s mA current
Channel 1
draw from +T * 2.50 * 12
Channel’s mA current
Channel 2
draw from +T * 2.50 * 12
Channel 3
Channel’s mA current
draw from +T * 2.50 * 12
Channel 4
Channel’s mA current
draw from +T * 2.50 * 12
Table Total
Duty Cycle
The duty cycle is based on the average current flow compared to the
full-scale current flow value. To approximate the duty cycle, estimate
the average current consumption in relation to its maximum range. For
example, if an AI channel’s current averages 16 mA:
Duty Cycle = Average mA output ÷ Maximum mA Output = (16 ÷ 20) = 0.80
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Table 3-9. Power Consumption of the Analog Output Module
Power Consumption (mW)
I/O Module
Description
AO Module Base
100 mA @ 12 volts dc
Jumper set for +T @ 12 volts dc
Channel’s mA current
Channel 1
draw from +T * 1.25 * 12
Channel’s mA current
Channel 2
draw from +T * 1.25 * 12
Channel’s mA current
Channel 3
draw from +T * 1.25 * 12
P TYPICAL
Quantity
Used
Duty
Cycle
Sub-Total
(mW)
1200 mW
Channel’s mA current
draw from +T * 1.25 * 12
Channel 4
Jumper set for +T @ 24 volts dc
Channel 1
Channel’s mA current
draw from +T * 2.50 * 12
Channel 2
Channel’s mA current
draw from +T * 2.50 * 12
Channel 3
Channel’s mA current
draw from +T * 2.50 * 12
Channel 4
Channel’s mA current
draw from +T * 2.50 * 12
Table Total
Duty Cycle
The duty cycle is based on the average current flow compared to the
full-scale current flow value. To approximate the duty cycle, estimate
the average current consumption in relation to its maximum range. For
example, if an AO channel’s current averages 12 mA:
Duty Cycle = Average mA output ÷ Maximum mA Output = (12 ÷ 20) = 0.60
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ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Table 3-10. Power Consumption of the Discrete Input Module
Power Consumption (mW)
I/O Module
Description
19 mA @ 12 volts dc No
Channels Active
3.2 mA @ 12 volts dc
3.2 mA @ 12 volts dc
3.2 mA @ 12 volts dc
3.2 mA @ 12 volts dc
3.2 mA @ 12 volts dc
3.2 mA @ 12 volts dc
3.2 mA @ 12 volts dc
3.2 mA @ 12 volts dc
DI Module Base
Channel 1
Channel 2
Channel 3
Channel 4
Channel 5
Channel 6
Channel 7
Channel 8
Per Active LED –
Maximum 8
1.5 mA
P TYPICAL
Quantity
Used
Duty
Cycle
Sub-Total
(mW)
228 mW
38.4 mW
38.4 mW
38.4 mW
38.4 mW
38.4 mW
38.4 mW
38.4 mW
38.4 mW
18 mW
Table Total
Duty Cycle
The duty cycle is the time on divided by the total time, and is
essentially the percent of time that the I/O channel is active
(maximum power consumption).
Duty Cycle = Active time ÷ (Active time + Inactive time)
For example, if a Discrete Input is active for 15 seconds out of every 60
seconds:
Duty Cycle = 15 seconds ÷ (15 seconds + 45 seconds) = 15 seconds ÷ 60 seconds = 0.25
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Table 3-11. Power Consumption of the Discrete Output Module
Power Consumption (mW)
I/O Module
Description
20 mA @ 12 volts dc No
Channels Active
1.5 mA
1.5 mA
1.5 mA
1.5 mA
1.5 mA
DO Module
Channel 1
Channel 2
Channel 3
Channel 4
Channel 5
Per Active LED –
Maximum 5
1.5 mA
P TYPICAL
Quantity
Used
Duty
Cycle
Sub-Total
(mW)
240 mW
18 mW
18 mW
18 mW
18 mW
18 mW
18 mW
Table Total
Duty Cycle
The duty cycle is the time on divided by the total time, and is
essentially the percent of time that the I/O channel is active
(maximum power consumption).
Duty Cycle = Active time ÷ (Active time + Inactive time)
For example, if a Discrete Output is active for 15 seconds out of every
60 seconds:
Duty Cycle = 15 seconds ÷ (15 seconds + 45 seconds) = 15 seconds ÷ 60 seconds = 0.25
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ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Table 3-12. Power Consumption of the Discrete Output Relay Module
I/O Module
Power Consumption (mW)
Description
DOR Module
Channel 1
Channel 2
Channel 3
Channel 4
Channel 5
Per Active LED –
Maximum 5
6.8 mA @ 12 volts dc
No Channels Active
150 mA for 10 mSec
during transition
150 mA for 10 mSec
during transition
150 mA for 10 mSec
during transition
150 mA for 10 mSec
during transition
150 mA for 10 mSec
during transition
1.5 mA
P TYPICAL
Quantity
Used
Duty
Cycle
Sub-Total
(mW)
81.6 mW
1800 mW
for 10 mSec
1800 mW
for 10 mSec
1800 mW
for 10 mSec
1800 mW
for 10 mSec
1800 mW
for 10 mSec
18 mW for
10 mSec
Table Total
Duty Cycle
The duty cycle is:
[((Number of Transitions in some time period) * 0.01 sec)] ÷ (Seconds in the period) = Duty Cycle
For example, if a DOR channel changes state 80 times per hour:
 80 = Number of transitions.
 Hour is the time period.
 An hour contains 3600 seconds.
Calculate the duty cycle as:
Duty Cycle = [(80 * 0.01) ÷ 3600] = 0.0002
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Table 3-13. Power Consumption of the High and Low Speed Pulse Input Module
Power Consumption (mW)
I/O Module
Description
PI Module
Channel 1
Channel 2
Per Active LED –
Maximum 4
Jumper set to +T @ 12
volts dc
Jumper set to +T @ 24
volts dc
P TYPICAL
21 mA @ 12 volts dc No
Channels Active
7.4 mA
7.4 mA
88.8 mW
88.8 mW
1.5 mA
18 mW
Quantity
Used
Duty
Cycle
Sub-Total
(mW)
252 mW
1.25 * Measured Current
Draw at +T Terminal
2.5 * Measured Current
Draw at +T Terminal
Table Total
Duty Cycle
The duty cycle is the time on divided by the total time, and is
essentially the percent of time that the I/O channel is active
(maximum power consumption).
Duty Cycle = [Active Time * (Signals Duty Cycle)] ÷ (Total Time Period)
For example, if a Pulse Input receives a signal for 6 hours over a 24hour time period and the signal’s wave form is on time for 1/3 of the
signal’s period:
Duty Cycle = [6 hours * (1 ÷ 3)] ÷ (24 hours) = 0.0825
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ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Table 3-14. Power Consumption of the MVS Module
Power Consumption (mW)
I/O Module
Description
P TYPICAL
112 mA @ 12 volts dc
1344 mW
Per Active LED – Maximum 2
1.5 mA
18 mW
Power provided by the module
for the MVS sensors
1.25 * Measured
Current Draw at +
Terminal
MVS Module
Quantity
Used
Duty
Cycle
Sub-Total
(mW)
1
Table Total
Note: For an MVS sensor, the typical mW per MVS is about 300 mW.
Duty Cycle
The duty cycle is the time on divided by the total time. For an MVS,
the sensor is always drawing power, so enter the duty cycle as “1” for
the MVS power calculations. The LEDs can also have an associated
duty cycle, which is essentially the percent of time that the LEDs are
active.
Duty Cycle = Active time ÷ (Active time + Inactive time)
For example, if the LEDs are on approximately 20 minutes a day:
Duty Cycle = 20 minutes ÷ (24 * 60 minutes in a day) = 20 ÷ 1440 = 0.014
Table 3-15. Power Consumption of the MVS I/O Module
I/O Module
MVS Module
Power provided by the module
for the MVS sensors
Power Consumption (mW)
Quantity
Used
Duty
Cycle
Description
P TYPICAL
27 mA @ 12 volts dc
325 mW
0 ,1, 2
1
300 mW
1 – 12
1
Sub-Total
(mW)
Table Total
Note: For an MVS sensor, the typical mW per MVS is about 300 mW.
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Table 3-16. Power Consumption of the APM Module
Power Consumption (mW)
I/O Module
APM Module
Power provided by the
module’s +T port
Description
P TYPICAL
110 mA @ 12 volts dc
1.25 * Measured
Current Draw (from +T
port in mA) * 24
1300 mW
Quantity
Used
Duty
Cycle
Sub-Total
(mW)
1
1
Table Total
Table 3-17. Power Consumption of the RTD Module
Power Consumption (mW)
I/O Module
Description
RTD Module
P TYPICAL
65 mA @ 13.25 volts dc
Duty Cycle
Quantity
Used
Duty
Cycle
Sub-Total
(mW)
1
Table Total
An RTD has no associated duty cycle. Consequently, always set “1”
as the duty cycle value.
Table 3-18. Power Consumption of the Thermocouple Module
I/O Module
Thermocouple Module
Power Consumption (mW)
Description
P TYPICAL
84 mA @ 12 volts dc
1008 mW
Quantity
Used
Duty
Cycle
Sub-Total
(mW)
1
Table Total
Note: The Series 1 CPU does not support the TC2 module.
Duty Cycle
Revised Jul-14
A thermocouple has no associated duty cycle. Consequently, always
set “1” as the duty cycle value.
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Table 3-19. Power Consumption of the HART-2 Module
Power Consumption (mW)
Other Device
HART-2 Module Base
Each Channel
Description
P TYPICAL
110 mA @ 12 volts dc
Channel’s mA current
draw from +T * 2.50 * 12
1320 mW
Quantity
Used
Duty
Cycle
Sub-Total
(mW)
Table Total
Table 3-20. Power Consumption of the IEC 62591 Module
Power Consumption (mW)
I/O Module
Description
P TYPICAL
Quantity
Used
Duty
Cycle
IEC 62591 Module
Sub-Total
(mW)
1
Pm-12 (12V) WiHart card
only
Pm-24 (24V) WiHart card
only
Pm-12 (12V) WiHart w/
Transmitter
Pm-24 (24V) WiHart w/
Transmitter
552 mW
1
720 mW
1
1080 mW
1
1200 mW
1
Table Total
Duty Cycle
An IEC 62591 has no associated duty cycle. Consequently, always set
“1” as the duty cycle value.
Table 3-21. Power Consumption of the NRM Module
I/O Module
Power Consumption (mW)
Description
P TYPICAL
NRM Module
Quantity
Used
Duty
Cycle
Sub-Total
(mW)
1
Pm-12 (12V) Joining
Network
Pm-24 (24V) Joining
Network
Pm-12 (12V) linked to
Network
Pm-24 (24V) linked to
Network
780 mW
1
720 mW
1
240 mW
1
240 mW
1
Table Total
Duty Cycle
3-24
An NRM has no associated duty cycle. Consequently, always set “1”
as the duty cycle value.
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ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Table 3-22. Power Consumption of Other Devices
Other Device
Power Consumption (mW)
Description
P TYPICAL
Quantity
Used
Duty
Cycle
Sub-Total
(mW)
Total
Although Table 3-5 and Tables 3-6 through 3-20 take into account the
power the ROC800 supplies to its connected devices, be sure to add the
power consumption (in mW) of any other devices (such as radios or
solenoids) used with the ROC800 in the same power system, but which
are not accounted for in Tables 3-6 through 3-18.
Enter that Total value in the Other Devices line of Table 3-5.
3.3
Removing a Power Input Module
To remove the Power Input module:
Caution
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions, such as
wearing a grounded wrist strap may reset the processor or damage
electronic components, resulting in interrupted operations.
When working on units located in a hazardous area (where explosive
gases may be present), make sure the area is in a non-hazardous state
before performing procedures. Performing these procedures in a
hazardous area could result in personal injury or property damage.
1. Perform the backup procedure described in Preserving
Configuration and Log Data in Chapter 6, Troubleshooting.
2. Remove the wire channel cover.
3. Remove power from the ROC800.
4. Unscrew the two captive screws on the front of the Power Input
module.
5. Remove the Power Input module.
Note: If you intend to store the ROC800 for an extended period, also
remove the internal backup battery located on the CPU module
(see Figure 3-9 or Figure 3-10).
Revised Jul-14
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ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
A
A
Battery
Figure 3-9. Backup Battery on Series 2 CPU Module
3.4
Installing a Power Input Module
To install the Power Input module:
Caution
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions, such as
wearing a grounded wrist strap may reset the processor or damage
electronic components, resulting in interrupted operations.
When working on units located in a hazardous area (where explosive
gases may be present), make sure the area is in a non-hazardous state
before performing procedures. Performing these procedures in a
hazardous area could result in personal injury or property damage.
Note: Remove the plastic module cover and wire channel cover, if
present.
1. Slide the Power Input module into the slot.
2. Press the module firmly into the slot. Make sure the connectors at
the back of the Power Input module fit into the connectors on the
backplane.
3. Tighten the two captive screws on the front of the Power Input
module firmly (refer to Figures 3-1 and 3-2).
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4. Return power to the ROC800.
5. Replace the wire channel cover.
6. Review Restarting the ROC800 in Chapter 6, Troubleshooting.
3.5
Connecting the ROC800 to Wiring
The following paragraphs describe how to connect the ROC800 to
power. Use the recommendations and procedures described in the
following paragraphs to avoid damage to equipment.
Use 12 to 22 American Wire Gauge (AWG) wire for all power wiring.
Caution
Always turn off the power to the ROC800 before you attempt any type
of wiring. Wiring of powered equipment could result in personal injury
or property damage.
To avoid circuit damage when working with the unit, use appropriate
electrostatic discharge precautions, such as wearing a grounded wrist
strap.
To connect the wire to the removable block compression terminals:
1. Bare the end (¼ inch maximum) of the wire.
2. Insert the bared end into the clamp beneath the termination screw.
3. Tighten the screw.
The ROC800 should have a minimum of bare wire exposed to prevent
short circuits. Allow some slack when making connections to prevent
strain.
3.5.1 Wiring the DC Power Input Module
Use 12 to 22 American Wire Gauge (AWG) wire for all power wiring.
It is important to use good wiring practice when sizing, routing, and
connecting power wiring. All wiring must conform to state, local, and
NEC codes. Verify that the hook-up polarity is correct.
To make DC power supply connections:
1. Install a surge protection device at the service disconnect.
2. Remove all other power sources from the ROC800.
3. Install a fuse at the input power source (see Figure 3-5).
4. Remove the terminal block connector from the socket.
5. Insert each bared wire end into the appropriate power module
connectors:

Revised Jul-14
For PM-12 (12 Volts dc source): into the clamp beneath the
appropriate BAT+ and BAT– termination screws.
Power Connections
3-27
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual

For PM-24 (24 Volts dc source): into the clamp beneath the
appropriate POWER INPUT+ and POWER INPUT– termination
screws.

For PM-30 (30 Volts dc source): into the clamp beneath the
appropriate POWER INPUT+ and POWER INPUT– termination
screws.
Figure 3-11. 12 Volts dc Power Supply and BAT+ / BAT- Wiring
6. Screw each wire into the terminal block.
7. Plug the terminal block connector back into the socket.
8. If you are monitoring an external charge voltage (12 Volts dc Power
Input Module only), wire the CHG+ and CHG– terminal block
connector. Refer to Figure 3-12.
3-28
Power Connections
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Figure 3-12. 12 Volt dc Power Supply and CHG+ / CHG– Wiring
9.
Replace all other power sources (if necessary) to the ROC800.
10. Review Restarting the ROC800 in Chapter 6, Troubleshooting.
Note: Refer to Table 3-2 concerning LEDs.
3.5.2 Wiring the External Batteries
You can use external batteries as the main source of power for the
ROC800 with the 12 volts dc Power Input module (PM-12). The
maximum voltage that can be applied to the BAT+ / BAT– terminals is
16 volts dc before damage may occur. The recommended maximum
voltage is 14.5 volts dc (refer to Table 3-2 concerning LEDs).
It is important that you use good wiring practices when sizing, routing,
and connecting power wiring. All wiring must conform to state, local,
and NEC codes. Use 12 to 22 American Wire Gauge (AWG) wire for
all power wiring.
Batteries should be rechargeable, sealed, gel-cell, lead-acid batteries.
Connect batteries in parallel to achieve the required capacity (refer to
Figure 3-6). The amount of battery capacity required for a particular
installation depends upon the power requirements of the equipment and
days of reserve (autonomy) desired. Calculate battery requirements
based on power consumption of the ROC800 and all devices powered
by the batteries.
Revised Jul-14
Power Connections
3-29
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Battery Reserve
Battery reserve is the amount of time that the batteries can provide
power without discharging below 20% of their total output capacity.
The battery reserve should be a minimum of five days, with ten days
of reserve preferred. Add 24 hours of reserve capacity to allow for
overnight discharge. Space limitations, cost, and output are all factors
that determine the actual amount of battery capacity available.
To determine the system capacity requirements, multiply the system
current load on the batteries by the amount of reserve time required, as
shown in the following equation:
System Requirement = Current Load in Amps * Reserve Hours = _____ Amp Hours
Caution
When using batteries, apply in-line fusing to avoid damaging the
ROC800.
To make battery connections:
1. Perform the backup procedure described in Preserving
Configuration and Log Data in Chapter 6, Troubleshooting.
2. Remove the BAT+ and BAT– terminal block connector from the
socket.
3. Install a fuse at the input power source.
4. Insert each bared wire end into the clamp beneath the BAT+ and
BAT– termination screws (refer to Figure 3-5).
5. Screw each wire into the terminal block.
6. Review Restarting the ROC800 in Chapter 6, Troubleshooting.
7. Re-apply power to the ROC800.
Note: Refer to Table 3-2 concerning LEDs.
3.5.3 Replacing the Internal Battery
The internal Sanyo 3 volt CR2430 lithium backup battery located on the
CPU provides backup of the data and the Real-Time Clock when the
main power is not connected. The battery has a one-year minimum
backup life while the battery is installed and no power is applied to the
ROC800. The battery has a ten-year backup life while the backup
battery is installed and power is applied to ROC800 or when the battery
is removed from the ROC800.
Recommended replacement lithium/manganese dioxide batteries
include:
Table 3-23. Replacement Battery Types
3-30
Part
Battery, Lithium, 3V
Size
24 mm (0.94 in) diameter x 3 mm (0.12 in) height
Power Connections
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Type
Coin Type
Capacity
280 mAh minimum
Acceptable Types




Duracell DL2430
Eveready CR2430
Sanyo CR2430
Varta CR2430
Note: Remove the internal backup battery if you intend to store the
ROC800 for an extended period.
Caution
When working on units located in a hazardous area (where explosive
gases may be present), make sure the area is in a non-hazardous state
before performing these procedures. Performing these procedures in a
hazardous area could result in personal injury or property damage.
To avoid circuit damage when working inside the unit, use appropriate
electrostatic discharge precautions, such as wearing a grounded wrist
strap.
1. Perform the backup procedure described in Preserving
Configuration and Log Data in Chapter 6, Troubleshooting.
Note: Removing the battery erases the contents of the ROC800’s
RAM.
2. Remove all power from the ROC800.
3. Remove the wire channel cover.
4. Remove the two screws on the CPU faceplate.
5. Remove the CPU faceplate.
6. Remove the CPU (as described in Removing the CPU Module in
Chapter 2, Installation and Use).
7. Insert a plastic screwdriver behind the battery and gently push the
battery out of the battery holder. Note how the battery is oriented:
the negative side of the battery (–) is placed against the CPU and the
positive (+) towards the + label on the battery holder.
8. Insert the new battery in the battery holder paying close attention to
install the battery with the correct orientation.
9. Reinstall the CPU (as described in Installing the CPU Module in
Chapter 2, Installation and Use).
10. Replace the CPU faceplate.
11. Replace the two screws to secure the CPU faceplate.
12. Replace the wire channel cover.
13. Review Restarting the ROC800 in Chapter 6, Troubleshooting.
14. Apply power to the ROC800.
Revised Jul-14
Power Connections
3-31
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
3.6
Additional Technical Information
Refer to the following technical documentation (available at
www.EmersonProcess.com/Remote) for additional and most-current
information.
Table 3-24. Power Input Modules Technical Specifications
Name
ROC800-Series Power Input Modules
3-32
Form Number
ROC800:PWR
Power Connections
Part Number
D301192X012
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
[This page is intentionally left blank.]
Revised Jul-14
Power Connections
3-33
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Chapter 4 – Input/Output Modules
This chapter describes the Input/Output (I/O) modules used with the
ROC800 and expansion backplanes and contains information on
installing, wiring, and removing those modules.
In This Chapter
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
4.9
4.10
4.11
4.12
4.13
4.14
4.15
4.16
4.17
I/O Module Overview.............................................................................. 4-1
Installation .............................................................................................. 4-4
4.2.1 Removing and Installing Wire Channel Covers .......................... 4-4
4.2.2 Removing and Installing Module Slot Covers ............................. 4-5
4.2.3 Installing an I/O Module .............................................................. 4-5
4.2.4 Removing an I/O Module ............................................................ 4-7
4.2.5 Wiring I/O Modules ..................................................................... 4-7
Analog Input (AI) Modules...................................................................... 4-7
Analog Output (AO) Modules ................................................................. 4-9
Discrete Input (DI) Modules ................................................................. 4-10
Pulse Input (PI) Modules ...................................................................... 4-12
Discrete Output (DO) Modules ............................................................. 4-13
Discrete Output Relay (DOR) Modules ................................................ 4-15
Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD) Input Modules .................... 4-16
Advanced Pulse Module (APM) ........................................................... 4-18
Multi-Variable Sensor Input/Output (MVS I/O) ..................................... 4-21
Alternating Current Input/Output (AC I/O) Module ............................... 4-25
Thermocouple (TC) Input Module ........................................................ 4-27
®
Highway Addressable Remote Transducer (HART ) Module ............. 4-31
IEC 62591 ............................................................................................ 4-33
APP 485 Module .................................................................................. 4-35
Additional Technical Information .......................................................... 4-36
4.1 I/O Module Overview
The I/O modules typically consist of a terminal block for field wiring
and connectors to the backplane. Each I/O module uses a removable
terminal block to electrically connect to field wiring. Refer to Figures
4-1 and 4-2.
Note: Figure 4-2 represents a ROC827 with one EXP.
Revised Jul-14
Input/Output Modules
4-1
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
A
DOC0513A
Front View
Side View
A
Terminal Blocks
Figure 4-1. Typical I/O Module
E
A
F
G
B
H
I
C
J
K
D
A
B
C
D
E
F
I/O Slot #1 (Comm 3)
I/O Slot #2 (Comm 4)
I/O Slot #3 (Comm 5)
Wire Channel Cover
I/O Slot #4
I/O Slot #7
G
H
I
J
K
I/O Slot #5
I/O Slot #8
I/O Slot #6
I/O Slot #9
Module Slot Cover
Figure 4-2. Optional I/O Module Locations (ROC827 with one EXP)
4-2
Input/Output Modules
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
I/O modules for the ROC800 include:

Analog Input (AI) modules that provide the ability to monitor
various analog field values.

Discrete Input (DI) and Pulse Input (PI) modules that provide the
ability to monitor various discrete and pulse input field values.

Analog Output (AO), Discrete Output (DO), and Discrete Output
Relay (DOR) modules that provide the ability to manage various
control devices.

Advance Pulse modules (APM) that provide advanced functionality
(such as densitometer support) commonly found in liquids and gas
measurement applications.

Alternating Current I/O (ACIO) modules that control various AC
output field devices and monitor various AC input field values.

Multiple Variable Sensor I/O (MVS I/O) modules that provide
differential pressure, static pressure, and temperature inputs for
orifice flow calculation.

Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD) and Thermocouple (TC)
modules that provide the ability to monitor various analog
temperature field values.

HART module that receives and sends I/O from HART devices via a
4-20 mA analog signal.
Each module rests in a module slot at the front of the ROC800 or EXP
housing. All modules have removable terminal blocks to make servicing
easy. You can insert I/O modules in any module slot; modules are selfidentifying in the software.
Caution
The design of ROC800-Series communications and I/O modules
supports “hot-swapping” (replacing similar modules in the same slot)
and “hot-plugging” (inserting modules into an empty slot) while the
ROC800 is powered. However, it is a good safety practice with any
electrical device to first remove power before you make internal
connections. If you find it necessary to hot-swap or hot-plug a module,
first review the most current specification sheet for that module to
ensure both your safety and the integrity of data that module may
provide.
The I/O modules acquire power from the backplane. Each module has
an isolated DC/DC converter that provides logic, control, and field
power as required. The ROC800 has eliminated the need for fuses on
the I/O modules through the extensive use of current-limited shortcircuit protection and over voltage circuitry. Isolation is provided from
other modules and the backplane, power, and signal isolation. The I/O
modules are self-resetting after a fault clears.
Revised Jul-14
Input/Output Modules
4-3
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
4.2
Installation
Caution
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions, such as
wearing a grounded wrist strap may reset the processor or damage
electronic components, resulting in interrupted operations.
When installing units in a hazardous area, make sure all installation
components selected are labeled for use in such areas. Installation and
maintenance must be performed only when the area is known to be nonhazardous. Installation in a hazardous area could result in personal
injury or property damage.
Each I/O module installs in the ROC800 in the same manner. You can
install any I/O module into any module socket, whether empty or in
place of another module.
Caution
The design of ROC800-Series communications and I/O modules
supports “hot-swapping” (replacing similar modules in the same slot)
and “hot-plugging” (inserting modules into an empty slot) while the
ROC800 is powered. However, it is a good safety practice with any
electrical device to first remove power before you make internal
connections. If you find it necessary to hot-swap or hot-plug a module,
first review the most current specification sheet for that module to
ensure both your safety and the integrity of data that module may
provide.
Note: After you install a new I/O module or replace an existing I/O
module, it may be necessary to reconfigure the ROC800. To
change configuration parameters, use ROCLINK 800 software
to make changes to the new module. Any added modules (new
I/O points) start up with default configurations. Refer to the
ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software User Manual (for
ROC800-Series) (Part Number D301250X012) or the ROCLINK
800 Configuration Software User Manual (for ROC800L) (Part
Number D301246X012).
4.2.1 Removing and Installing Wire Channel Covers
The ROC800 includes wire channel covers (see Figure 4-2) you install
over the wiring channels once you complete wiring the terminal blocks
on the modules.
To remove a wire channel cover:
1. Grasp the wire channel cover at both the left and right ends.
2. Start at the left or right and pull the wire channel cover out of the
wire channel.
To install a wire channel cover:
1. Align the wire channel cover over the wire channel, allowing
unobstructed wire access.
2. Press the wire channel cover into place until it snaps.
4-4
Input/Output Modules
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Note: The tabs on the top side of the wire channel cover should rest in
the slots on the top edge of the channel.
4.2.2 Removing and Installing Module Slot Covers
Before you insert an I/O or communications module, remove the
module cover (see Figure 4-2) over the empty module slots in which
you intend to install the modules. Although you are not required to
remove the power to the ROC800 to perform this procedure, caution is
always advisable when working with a powered ROC800.
Caution
To avoid circuit damage when working inside the unit, use appropriate
electrostatic discharge precautions (such as wearing a grounded wrist
strap).
When working on units located in a hazardous area (where explosive
gases may be present), make sure the area is in a non-hazardous state
before performing procedures. Performing these procedures in a
hazardous area could result in personal injury or property damage.
To remove a module cover:
1. Remove the wire channel cover.
2. Unscrew the two captive screws on the face of the cover.
3. Using the tab at the top side of the module cover, lift the module
cover from the ROC800.
Note: If you remove a module for an extended period, install a module
slot cover over the empty module slot to keep dust and other
matter from getting into the ROC800.
To install a module cover:
1. Place the module cover over the module slot.
2. Tighten the two captive screws on the face of the cover.
3. Replace the wire channel cover.
4.2.3 Installing an I/O Module
To install an I/O module in either the ROC800 or the EXP:
1. Remove the wire channel cover.
Note: Leaving the wire channel cover in place can prevent the
module from correctly connecting to the socket on the
backplane.
2. Perform one of the following:

Revised Jul-14
If there is a module currently in the slot, unscrew the captive
screws and remove that module (refer to Removing an I/O
Module).
Input/Output Modules
4-5
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual

If the slot is currently empty, remove the module cover.
3. Insert the new I/O module through the module slot on the front of
the ROC800 or EXP housing. Make sure the label on the front of the
module faces right side up (refer to Figure 4-3). Gently slide the
module in place until it contacts properly with the connectors on the
backplane.
Note: If the module stops and will not go any further, do not force
the module. Remove the module and see if the pins are bent.
If the pins are bent, gently straighten the pins and re-insert
the module. The back of the module must connect fully with
the connectors on the backplane.
Figure 4-3. Installing an I/O Module
4. Tighten the captive screws on the front of the module.
5. Wire the I/O module (refer to Wiring I/O Modules).
6. Replace the wire channel cover.
Caution
Never connect the sheath surrounding shielded wiring to a signal
ground terminal or to the common terminal of an I/O module. Doing so
makes the I/O module susceptible to static discharge, which can
permanently damage the module. Connect the shielded wiring sheath
only to a suitable earth ground.
7. Connect to ROCLINK 800 software and login. The I/O modules are
self-identifying after re-connecting to ROCLINK 800 software.
8. Configure the I/O point.
4-6
Input/Output Modules
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
4.2.4 Removing an I/O Module
To remove an I/O module:
1. Remove the wire channel cover.
2. Disconnect the field wiring.
3. Unscrew the two captive screws holding the module in place.
4. Gently pull the module’s lip out and remove the module from the
slot. You may need to gently wiggle the module.
5. Install a new module or install the module cover.
6. Screw the two captive screws to hold the module or cover in place.
7. Replace the wire channel cover.
4.2.5 Wiring I/O Modules
All modules have removable terminal blocks for convenient wiring and
servicing. The terminal blocks can accommodate 12 to 22 AWG for
wiring.
Caution
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions, such as
wearing a grounded wrist strap may reset the processor or damage
electronic components, resulting in interrupted operations.
To connect the wire to the removable block compression terminals:
1. Bare the end (¼ inch maximum) of the wire.
2. Insert the bared end into the clamp beneath the termination screw.
3. Tighten the screw.
The ROC800 should have a minimum of bare wire exposed to prevent
short circuits. Allow some slack when making connections to prevent
strain.
Note: All modules have removable terminal blocks for convenient
wiring and servicing. Twisted-pair cable is recommended for I/O
signal wiring. The removable terminal blocks accept 12 to 22
AWG wiring.
4.3
Analog Input (AI) Modules
The Analog Input (AI) modules (both AI-12 and AI-16) have four
scalable channels which typically measure either:

4–20 mA analog signal, with the use of a precision resistor
(supplied).

1–5 Volts dc signal.
If required, you can calibrate the low end of the analog signal to zero.
Refer to Chapter 7 in the ROC800-Series specific manual (Part Number
Revised Jul-14
Input/Output Modules
4-7
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
D301250X012) or the ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software User
Manual (for ROC800L) (Part Number D301246X012).
Note: The AI-16 module provides 16-bit resolution and uses a 24-bit
A/D converter. DIP switches on the AI-16 module (see Figure 46) allow you to select between current and voltage loop input.
You can configure the AI (+T) module as either 12 or 24 Volt dc using
jumper J4 on the AI-12 module (see Figure 4-4). The AI modules can
provide isolated +12 Volt dc or +24 Volt dc field transmitter power on a
per-module basis. For example, one module can provide +12 Volts dc
for powering low power analog transmitters, while another module in
the same ROC800 can provide +24 Volts dc for powering conventional
4–20-mA transmitters. Refer to Figure 4-5.
A
Precision
Resistor
A
12 / 24 V dc Jumper
Figure 4-4. AI-12 Jumper J4 (Shown Set to +12V)
+
OUT SIGNAL
COM
+
-
1-5 VOLT DEVICE
EXTERNALLY POWERED
+
-
250
OUT SIGNAL
1-5 VOLT DEVICE
ROC800 POWERED
IN
COM
250
+
-
1-5 VOLT DEVICE
EXTERNALLY POWERED
1-5 VOLT DEVICE
ROC800 POWERED
250
-
+
CURRENT LOOP DEVICE 4-20mA
ROC800 POWERED
+
250
CURRENT LOOP DEVICE 4-20mA
ROC800 POWERED
DOC0514B
DOC0506C
Figure 4-5. Analog Input Module Field Wiring (AI-12 and AI-16)
4-8
Input/Output Modules
Revised Jul-14
IN
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
On the AI-16 module, you use jumper J3 to configure the AI (+T) as 12
or 24 Volts dc. Additionally, two DIP switches on the module allow you
to select between current and voltage loop input.
A
A
I indicates current loop input; V indicates voltage
loop input
Figure 4-6. AI-16 DIP Switches
Caution
4.4
You can induce ground loops by tying commons from various modules
together.
Analog Output (AO) Modules
The 16-bit Analog Output (AO) module has four channels that provide a
current output for powering analog devices. Analog outputs are analog
signals the ROC800 generates to regulate equipment, such as control
valves or any device requiring analog control.
Each channel on this module provides a 4 to 20 mA current signal for
controlling analog current loop devices. The AO module isolation
includes the power supply connections.
Note: AO modules (Part Number W38199) labeled AO-16 are an
earlier version that controls the low side current. AO modules
(Part Number W38269) labeled AO are a newer version
(January 2005 and later) that provides and controls the high side
current.
The AO module includes a moveable jumper (see Figure 4-7). Set the
jumper to 12V if the transmitter load is 300Ω or less. Set the jumper to
24V if the transmitter load exceeds 300Ω.
Revised Jul-14
Input/Output Modules
4-9
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
A
A
12V / 24V dc Jumper
Figure 4-7. Analog Output Jumper J4 (Shown Set to +12V)
Representative
Internal Circuit
Field Wiring
CURRENT LOOP
CONTROL
+
-
I
CURRENT LOOP
CONTROL
CURRENT LOOP DEVICE 4-20mA
ROC800 POWERED
CURRENT LOOP
CONTROL
+V
CURRENT LOOP
CONTROL
250
+
-
1-5 VOLT CONTROL DEVICE
DOC0505A
Figure 4-8. Analog Output Module Field Wiring
Caution
4.5
You can induce ground loops by tying commons from various modules
together.
Discrete Input (DI) Modules
The eight-channel Discrete Input (DI) modules monitor the status of
relays, open collector/open drain type solid-state switches, and other
two-state devices. Discrete Inputs come from relays, switches, and other
devices, which generate an on/off, open/close, or high/low signal.
4-10
Input/Output Modules
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
The DI module provides a source voltage for dry relay contacts or for an
open-collector solid-state switch.
The DI module’s LEDs light when each input is active.
Each DI channel can be software-configured to function as a momentary
or latched DI (see the ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software User
Manual (for ROC800-Series), Part Number D301250X012 or the
ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software User Manual (for ROC800L),
Part Number D301246X012). A latched DI remains in the active state
until reset. Other parameters can invert the field signal and gather
statistical information on the number of transitions and the time
accumulated in the on- or off-state.
Caution
The Discrete Input module is designed for use with “dry” relay contacts
or solid-state switches. Applied voltage in excess of 24 Vdc may
damage the module.
The DI module senses the current flow, which signals the ROC800
electronics that the relay contacts have closed. The opening of the
contacts interrupts the current flow and the DI module signals the
ROC800 electronics that the relay contacts have opened. Using
ROCLINK 800, you can set the scan rate between 4 and 43200
milliseconds.
The left side of Figure 4-9 displays the internal circuitry while the right
side displays possible field wiring.
DI
+
1
+V
-
2
6.6KW
DRY CONTACT
ROC800 POWERED
3
4
5
6
7
+
8
C OM
-
OPEN COLLECTOR
OR
OPEN DRAIN TYPE DEVICE
EXTERNALLY POWERED
8 CHAN
DOC0507A
Figure 4-9. Discrete Input Module Field Wiring
Caution
Revised Jul-14
You can induce ground loops by tying commons from various modules
together.
Input/Output Modules
4-11
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
4.6
Pulse Input (PI) Modules
The Pulse Input (PI) module provides two channels for measuring either
a low speed or high speed pulse signal. The PI module processes
signals from pulse-generating devices and provides a calculated rate or
an accumulated total over a configured period. Supported functions are
slow-counter input, slow rate input, fast counter input, and fast rate
input.
The PI is most commonly used to interface to relays or open
collector/open drain type solid-state devices. The Pulse Input can be
used to interface to either self-powered or ROC800-powered devices.
The high speed input supports signals up to 12 kHz while the low speed
input is used on signals less than 125 Hz.
You can configure the PI module as either 12 or 24 Volts dc using
jumper J4 on the I/O module (see Figure 4-10). The PI modules can
provide isolated +12 Volt dc or +24 Volt dc field transmitter power on a
per-module basis. For example, one module can provide +12 Volt dc
power, while another module in the same ROC800 can provide +24
Volt dc power. Refer to Figures 4-11 and 4-12.
The PI module provides LEDs that light when each input is active.
Caution
The Pulse Input module is designed for use with “dry” relay contacts or
solid-state switches. Applied voltage in excess of 24 Vdc may damage
the module.
The PI modules draw power for the active circuitry from the backplane.
Input signals are optically isolated.
Note: Do not connect wiring to both the Low and High speed
selections for a given channel. This results in unpredictable
operation of the PI module.
A
A
+T 12 / 24 V dc Jumper
Figure 4-10. Pulse Input J4 Jumper (Set to +12 V)
4-12
Input/Output Modules
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Representative
Internal Circuit
Field Wiring
12KHz PI FILTER &
LEVEL DETECTION
125KHz PI FILTER &
LEVEL DETECTION
+
-
OPEN DRAIN TYPE
OR
OPEN COLLECTOR DEVICE
EXTERNALLY POWERED
+
-
CONTACT-CLOSURE DEVICE
EXTERNALLY POWERED
DOC0510B
Figure 4-11. Externally Powered Pulse Input Module Field Wiring
L
+
H
+T
L
OPEN COLLECTOR
OR
OPEN DRAIN TYPE DEVICE
ROC800 POWERED
-
H
+
METER COIL
+T
COM
CH 2
COM
12KHz PI FILTER &
LEVEL DETECTION
Field Wiring
PI
CH 1
Representative
Internal Circuit
2 CHAN
DOC0511A
Figure 4-12. ROC800-Powered Pulse Input Module Field Wiring
Caution
4.7
You can induce ground loops by tying commons from various modules
together.
Discrete Output (DO) Modules
The five-channel Discrete Output (DO) module provides two-state
outputs to energize solid-state relays and power small electrical loads.
These are solid-state relays. A Discrete Output may be set to send a
pulse to a specified device. Discrete Outputs are high and low outputs
used to turn equipment on and off.
DO modules can be software-configured as latched, toggled,
momentary, or Timed Duration Outputs (TDO). The DO can be
Revised Jul-14
Input/Output Modules
4-13
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
configured to either retain the last value on reset or use a user-specified
fail-safe value.
The DO module provides LEDs that light when each output is active.
When a request is made to change the state of a DO, the request is
immediately sent to the DO module. There is no scan time associated
with a DO. Under normal operating conditions, the DO channel
registers the change within 2 milliseconds.
If the DO is in momentary or toggle mode, you can enter a minimum
time-on of 4 milliseconds.
Figure 4-13 displays the field wiring connections to the output circuit of
the DO module.
Caution
The Discrete Output module is an open-drain type output. It is not
capable of sourcing current or voltage to a load. Do not directly connect
a power source to the terminal block.
DO modules draw power for the active circuitry from the backplane,
and are current-limited for protection against excessive current.
Note: When using the Discrete Output module to drive an inductive
load (such as a relay coil), place a suppression diode across the
input terminals to the load. This protects the module from the
reverse Electro-Motive Force (EMF) spike generated when the
inductive load is switched off.
Representative
Internal Circuit
Field Wiring
DO
1+
COM
+V
s
+
-
CONTROL
2+
COM
3+
DISCRETE DEVICE
- EXTERNALLY POWERED +
COM
4+
-
COM
5+
COM
5 CHAN
DOC0508A
Figure 4-13. Discrete Output Module Field Wiring
Caution
4-14
You can induce ground loops by tying commons from various modules
together.
Input/Output Modules
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Virtual DO
4.8
ROCLINK 800 provides a “virtual DO” software setting to support
fieldbus devices, which may require the toggle characteristics of DO.
For further information, see the ROCLINK 800 Configuration
Software User Manual (for ROC800-Series) (Part number
D301250X012) or the ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software User
Manual (for ROC800L) (Part Number D301246X012).
Discrete Output Relay (DOR) Modules
The five-channel DO Relay (DOR) module provides LEDs that light
when each output is active. DOR modules use dual-state latching relays
to provide a set of normally open, dry contacts capable of switching 2 A
at 32 Volts dc across the complete operating temperature. Using
ROCLINK 800, you can configure the module as latched, toggled,
momentary, or Timed Duration Outputs (TDO). The DOR can either
retain the last value on reset or use a user-specified fail-safe value.
Note: Since the DOR latches, a power failure does not change the
relay’s state. The relay retains the state (open or closed) it had
upon failure.
Figure 4-14 displays the field wiring connections to the output circuit of
the DOR module.
Caution
The Discrete Output module is designed as a “dry” relay contact.
Applied voltages in excess of 32 Vdc or any AC voltage may damage the
module.
When a request is made to change the state of a DOR, the request is
immediately sent to the DOR module. There is no scan time associated
with a DOR. Under normal operating conditions, the DOR channel
registers the change within 12 milliseconds. If the DOR is in momentary
or toggle mode, DOR channels register the change within 48
milliseconds.
The DOR modules draw power for the active circuitry from the
backplane.
Note: On power up or reset, the DO Relay module’s LEDs enter
indeterminate state for a few seconds as the module selfidentifies. The LEDs may flash, stay on, or stay off for a few
seconds.
Revised Jul-14
Input/Output Modules
4-15
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
DO RELAY
R
CONTROL
CH 3
LATCHING RELAY
NOTE: S = SET
R = RESET
CH 2
S
CH 1
Vs
S
R
CH 5
CONTROL
CH 4
Vs
+
+
-
-
DISCRETE DEVICE
SELF- POWERED
+
+
+
DISCRETE DEVICE
- EXTERNALLY POWERED +
-
-
-
+
-
5 CHAN
DOC0509A
Figure 4-14. Discrete Output Relay Module Field Wiring
4.9 Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD) Input Modules
The Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD) module monitors the
temperature signal from an RTD source. The module can accommodate
input from a two-, three-, or four-wire RTD source.
The active element of an RTD probe is a precision, temperaturedependent resistor made from a platinum alloy. The resistor has a
predictable positive temperature coefficient, meaning its resistance
increases with temperature. The RTD input module works by supplying
a small consistent current to the RTD probe and measuring the voltage
drop across it. Based on the voltage curve of the RTD, the ROC800
firmware converts the signal to temperature.
The RTD input module monitors the temperature signal from a
resistance temperature detector (RTD) sensor or probe. A two-channel
16-bit RTD module is available. The RTD module isolation includes the
power supply connections.
The RTD modules draw power for the active circuitry from lines on the
backplane.
It may be more convenient to perform calibration before connecting the
field wiring. However, if the field wiring between the ROC800 and the
RTD probe is long enough to add a significant resistance, then perform
calibration in a manner that considers this.
Connecting the RTD
Wiring
4-16
Temperature can be input through the Resistance Temperature
Detector (RTD) probe and circuitry. An RTD temperature probe
mounts directly to the piping using a thermowell. Protect RTD wires
either by a metal sheath or by conduit connected to a liquid-tight
conduit fitting. The RTD wires connect to the four screw terminals on
Input/Output Modules
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
the RTD module. See Table 4-1, Table 4-2, and Figure 4-15.
The ROC800 provides terminations for a four-wire 100-ohm platinum
RTD with a DIN 43760 curve. The RTD module supports RTDs with
alphas equal to 0.00385 or 0.00392 Ω/Ω/°C. You can use a two-wire or
three-wire RTD probe instead of a four-wire probe, but they may
produce measurement errors due to signal loss on the wiring.
Wiring between the RTD probe and the ROC800 must be shielded wire,
with the shield grounded only at one end to prevent ground loops.
Ground loops cause RTD input signal errors.
Table 4-1. RTD Signal Routing
Terminal
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
4-Wire RTD
Label
REF
+
–
RET
N/A
REF
+
–
RET
N/A
Definition
CH1 Constant Current +
CH1 Positive RTD
CH1 Negative RTD
CH1 Constant Current –
Not Used
CH2 Constant Current +
CH2 Positive RTD
CH2 Negative RTD
CH2 Constant Current –
Not Used
3-Wire RTD
2-Wire RTD
Jumper
Red
Jumper
Red
Red
White
Jumper
Red
Figure 4-15. RTD Sensor Wiring Terminal Connections
Figure 4-15 and Table 4-2 display the connections at the RTD terminals
for the various RTD probes.
Revised Jul-14
Input/Output Modules
4-17
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Table 4-2. RTD Wiring
Terminal
REF
+
–
RET
4-Wire RTD
Red
Red
White
White
3-Wire RTD
Jumper to +
Red, Jumper to REF
White
White
2-Wire RTD
Jumper to +
Red, Jumper to REF
White, Jumper to RET
Jumper to –
Note: The wire colors for the RTD being used may differ.
Caution
You can induce ground loops by tying commons from various modules
together.
4.10 Advanced Pulse Module (APM)
The APM provides advanced functionality commonly found in liquids
and gas measurement programs, including support for densitometer
inputs, detector inputs, pulse inputs, pulse frequencies, pulse outputs,
and proving. Field wiring (see Figures 4-16 through 4-24) and DIP
switch settings (see Figure 4-25 and Table 4-3) provide this flexibility.
Note: The ROC800 can support up to 27 APMs.
You can connect densitometer inputs to any channel. However, for
current-modulated densitometers (such as the Micro Motion – formerly
Solartron – 7835/7845 densitometer), you can designate channel 3 as a
pulse input using a frequency input channel with hardware filtering.
You can also designate channel 4 as a pulse input or a solid state pulse
output.
PI
+
-
PI
+
+T
EXTERNALLY POWERED DEVICE
OPEN COLLECTOR
OR
OPEN DRAIN TYPE
PI
PI
ROC800 POWERED DEVICE
OPEN COLLECTOR
OR
OPEN DRAIN TYPE
-
+
-
MICROMOTION
7835 / 7845
DENSITOMETER
+
METER
COIL
Figure 4-16. Pulse Input Wiring on APM
4-18
Figure 4-17. Micro Motion (Solartron) 7835/7845
Wiring on APM
Input/Output Modules
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
PI
PI
+
+T
GENERIC
DENSITOMETER
+
+
Figure 4-18. Generic Densitometer Wiring on APM
ROC800 POWERED
DRY CONTACT
EXTERNALLY POWERED DEVICE
OPEN COLLECTOR
OR
OPEN DRAIN TYPE
Figure 4-19. Input Detector Wiring on APM
DET SW 1
DET SW 1
DET SW 2
DET SW 2
Figure 4-20. Series Detector Switch (Normally
Open) Wiring on APM
Figure 4-21. Series Detector Switch Wiring
(Normally Closed) on APM
+
+T
EXTERNALLY POWERED
PREAMP
-
+
+T
DET SW 1
DET SW 2
EXTERNALLY
POWERED
PREAMP
-
+
METER
COIL 1
+
METER
METER
COIL 2
Figure 4-22. Independent Detector Wiring on APM
Revised Jul-14
Figure 4-23. Two-Pulse Turbine Pulse Input Wiring
on APM
Input/Output Modules
4-19
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
+12
10K
NO CONNECTION
EXTERNAL
DEVICE
CONTROL
Figure 4-24. Pulse Output Wiring on APM
DIP Switch
Settings
The APM card’s daughterboard contains several DIP switches which
you use to control the module’s activities. See Figure 4-25 for the
switch locations and labels; see Table 4-3 for the settings.
S4
S2
S1
S3
S5
Figure 4-25. DIP Switches on APM
Table 4-3. APM DIP Switch Settings
1
Switch
Channel
Side
S1
3
N/A
S2
1
2
4-20
Function
Switch Position
Standard PI
Up
Current Modulated Densitometer
Down
Left
10 kΩ Pullup to 12 V dc
Up
Left
No Pullup Resistor
Down
Right
10 kΩ Pullup to 12 V dc
Up
Input/Output Modules
1
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Switch
Channel
3
2
S3
4
Detector 2
S4
Detector 1
4
S5
N/A
1
Side
Function
Switch Position
Right
No Pullup Resistor
Down
Left
10 kΩ Pullup to 12 V dc
Up
Left
No Pullup Resistor
Down
Right
10 kΩ Pullup to 12 V dc
Up
Right
No Pullup Resistor
Down
Left
10 kΩ Pullup to 12 V dc
Up
Left
No Pullup Resistor
Down
Right
10 kΩ Pullup to 12 V dc
Up
Right
No Pullup Resistor
Down
Left
Pulse Output
Up
Left
Pulse Input
Down
Right
N/A
N/A
1
1
Descriptors (up/down/right/left) assume that module terminal blocks face upward and daughterboard is visible
(see Figure 4-25)
2
If S1 is down, the 3-channel of this switch is non-functional; the 4-channel still functions normally.
4.11 Multi-Variable Sensor Input/Output (MVS I/O)
The Multi-Variable Sensor Input/Output (MVS I/O) module provides an
interface to a sensor that provides differential pressure, static pressure,
and temperature inputs for the ROC800 for orifice flow calculation.
MVS I/O or
MVS Module?
Remote Automation Solutions offers both an MVS and an MVS I/O
module. These modules have identical functions and differ only by
where you can place them in the ROC800.
You can place the MVS module (shown on the left side of Figure 4-26)
only in the first three slots of a ROC800. The enhanced design of the
MVS I/O module (shown on the right side of Figure 4-26) enables you
to place it in any available slot on the ROC800. In most other ways the
two modules are identical.
Figure 4-26. MVS and MVS I/O Modules
Revised Jul-14
Input/Output Modules
4-21
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
The MVS I/O module consists of interface electronics that provide the
communications link between the ROC800 and the MVS devices. The
interface electronics controls communications with the sensor module,
provides scaling of process variables, aids calibration, stores operating
parameters, performs protocol conversion, and responds to requests
from the ROC800.
The ROC800 supports up to two MVS I/O modules. Each MVS I/O
module provides the communications interface and the isolated, shortcircuit current-limited power required to connect up to six MVS sensors.
Note: The ROC800 supports up to two MVS I/O modules, or two
MVS modules, or an MVS I/O module and an MVS module.
The MVS I/O module automatically creates six points, one for each of
the six possible MVS channels: 1 – 6 (for one MVS I/O) and 7 – 12 (for
a second MVS module). The system assigns points based on which
module is in the first slot. For example, if an MVS module is in slot 3,
the system automatically assigns it points 1 – 6. If you then install a
second MVS module into slot 1, the system re-assigns points so that slot
1 now holds points 1 – 6 and slot 3 holds points 7 – 12.
The ROC800 allows six MVS devices to be connected on its
communications bus in a multi-drop connection scheme. You must set
the address of each MVS device prior to final wiring of multiple MVS
devices. For proper operation of multiple MVS devices, each MVS
device must have a unique address. None of the addresses can be 240.
For details on MVS configuration, refer to the ROCLINK 800
Configuration Software User Manual (for ROC800-Series) (Part
Number D301250X012) or ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software User
Manual (for ROC800L) (Part Number D301246X012).
Once you set a unique address for each MVS, connect the MVS units in
a multi-drop arrangement. The only requirement for wiring multi-drop
devices is that you tie all like terminals together. This means all the “A”
terminals on the devices are electrically connected to the ROC800’s “A”
terminal and so on. Wire each remote MVS transmitter in parallel
(“daisy-chaining”), as shown in Figure 4-27.
MVS I/O
Module
MVS
transmitter
(up to 6 per
module)
120 Ohm
resistor at
end of line
A
B
1000+ meters
(4000+ feet)
Figure 4-27. MVS Wiring (with Terminators)
4-22
Input/Output Modules
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Figure 4-29 shows the field wiring diagram for the MVSI/O module.
Figure 4-28. MVS Field Wiring
Figure 4-29. MVS I/O Field Wiring
Note: A “star” configuration for transmitters may not be reliable.
Terminations are recommended for long distances (greater that 1000
meters) at the extreme ends of the circuit. Terminate the two outermost
devices to reduce signal reflection in the circuit. The MVS termination
jumper is located at J4 on the module. Refer to Table 4-4 and Figure 430.
Table 4-4. MVS Termination
Terminated
Not Terminated
Jumper
J4
Revised Jul-14
TER
x
OUT
Input/Output Modules
TER
OUT
x
4-23
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Figure 4-30. MVS Jumper J4 (Shown Not Terminated)
Four wires run from the MVS module terminal block and connect to the
sensor. The wires should be a minimum size of 22 AWG and a
maximum length of 1220 m (4000 ft).
Note: Insulated, shielded, twisted-pair wiring is required when using
MVS signal lines.
Two of the terminal blocks provide power and the other two terminals
provide a communication path. Table 4-5 identifies the terminals.
Table 4-4. MVS Signal Routing
Label
A
B
None
+
–
MVS
RX / TX +
RX / TX –
No Connect
Sensor Power
Common
LED
Lit green when receiving
N/A
Lit green when transmitting
N/A
N/A
Terminal
1
2
3
4
5
Note: Pay close attention to the connections; do not reverse the
power wires. Make these connections only after removing
power from the ROC800. Double-check connections for the
proper orientation before applying power. If the connections are
reversed and power is applied, you may damage both the MVS
module and the ROC800-Series processor board.
Caution
4-24
You can induce ground loops by tying commons from various modules
together.
Input/Output Modules
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
4.12 Alternating Current Input/Output (AC I/O) Module
EMC issues restrict the use of the AC I/O module only to devices using
Warning a PM-12 power module. You cannot use the AC I/O module in a device
that uses either a PM-24 or PM-30 power module.
Switchable I/O and
LEDs
The module has one bank of six DIP switches on its daughterboard
(see Figure 4-31), which controls the input/output status of each of the
six channels. Placing a switch in the ON position sets the
corresponding channel to output mode. Placing a switch in the OFF
position sets the channel to input mode. Dual-color light-emitting
diodes (LEDs) indicate the current status for each channel. Red means
AC source is being output. Green means the module has detected AC
on an input channel.
Figure 4-31. AC I/O DIP Switches
AC Discrete Outputs
Revised Jul-14
In output mode, the module provides up to six channels for switching
discrete AC. Each channel uses a solid-state normally open relay rated
at 1.5 Amps. Any AC switched out is directly related to the AC
switched in. Using ROCLINK 800, you can configure the module as
latched, toggled, momentary, or Timed Duration Outputs (TDOs).
Other parameters report the approximate load, over-current
conditions, and AC input status. Discrete outputs can be configured to
either retain the last value on reset or a user-specified fail-safe value.
See Figure 4-32.
Input/Output Modules
4-25
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
EXTERNAL AC
PWR/PERMISSIVE
SOURCE
Vs
CONTROL
SOLID-STATE
RELAY
AC CONTROLLED
DEVICE
Vs
CONTROL
SOLID-STATE
RELAY
AC CONTROLLED
DEVICE
Figure 4-32. AC I/O Module (Output Field Wiring)
Note: If the label on your AC I/O module does not indicate 120/240V,
your module is designed for use only with 120V. Additionally,
all AC wiring must be shielded.
AC Discrete Inputs You can configure each channel as an AC input/detector. Each
channel can detect the presence of an AC signal between 90 and 265
Vrms at 47 to 63 Hz. In discrete input mode the module monitors the
status of various AC sources.
You can also software-configure each channel to function as a latched
DI, which remains in active state until reset. Other parameters can invert
the field signal and gather statistical information on the number of
transitions and the time accumulated in the on or off state. The fastest
time that each channel within the module can be read is 20 times per
second. See Figure 4-33.
WAVE
RECTIFIER
AC FIELD
DEVICE
WAVE
RECTIFIER
AC FIELD
DEVICE
Figure 4-33. AC I/O Module (Input Field Wiring)
4-26
Input/Output Modules
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Note: If the label on your AC I/O module does not indicate 120/240V,
your module is designed for use only with 120V. Additionally,
all AC wiring must be shielded.
Table 4-5. Field Wiring Terminals
Terminal
Label
Definition
1
AC In
AC Input (Permissive Power)
2
N
AC Neutral
3
1
Channel 1
4
2
Channel 2
5
3
Channel 3
6
N
AC Neutral
7
4
Channel 4
8
5
Channel 5
9
6
Channel 6
10
N
AC Neutral
The field terminal wiring has the following definitions:
Term
AC Input
AC Neutral
Channels 1
through 6
Definition
The AC power applied to this terminal is the source for
any channel that is configured as an output. The input to
this terminal should be externally fused with a 10 to 15
amp fuse. The channel has a green LED associated with it
to indicate when power is applied. This terminal is typically
wired to the permissive/safety circuitry so that if this circuit
trips, all power is removed from the channels that are
configured as AC outputs.
This terminal is connected to the system AC neutral and is
used a reference for all AC power.
Depending upon the configuration of the DIP switch, each
channel can be configured as an input or an output.
4.13 Thermocouple (TC) Input Module
Caution
The TC2 module is NOT supported in the Series 1 CPU.
The four-channel Thermocouple Input module monitors types B, C, E,
J, K, N, R, S, or T thermocouples, based on how you configure the
module with ROCLINK 800 Configuration software. The type of
thermocouple refers to the material used to make a bimetallic junction.
Dissimilar materials in the junction generate different millivolt levels as
a function of the heat to which the materials are exposed.
The Thermocouple module measures the voltage of the thermocouple to
which it is connected. The TC voltage is measured and a Cold Junction
Revised Jul-14
Input/Output Modules
4-27
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Compensation (CJC) correction factor is applied to compensate for
errors due to any voltage inducted at the wiring terminals by the
junction between the different metal of the TC wiring and the TC
module’s terminal blocks.
Note: The use of dissimilar metals is not supported. It does not provide
the correct results, as CJC is applied at the module level.
Thermocouples are self-powered and require no excitation current. The
TC module uses integrated short-circuit protected isolated power
supplies and completely isolates the field wiring side of the module
from the backplane.
Caution
De-calibration
If using the Type J above 750°C (1382°F), abrupt magnetic
transformation causes permanent de-calibration of the TC wires.
De-calibration can occur in thermocouple wires. De-calibration is
the process of unintentionally altering the makeup of the
thermocouple, usually caused by the diffusion of atmospheric
particles into the metal at the extremes of the operating temperature
range. Impurities and chemicals can cause de-calibration from the
insulation diffusing into the thermocouple wire. If operating at high
temperatures, check the specification of the probe insulation. It is
advised to use thermocouples with insulated junctions to protect
against oxidation and contamination.
Thermocouples use thin wire (typically 32 AWG) to minimize thermal
shunting and increase response times. Wire size used in the
thermocouple depends upon the application. Typically, when longer life
is required for the higher temperatures, select the larger size wires.
When sensitivity is the prime concern, use smaller size wiring. Thin
wire causes the thermocouple to have a high resistance that can cause
errors due to the input impedance of the measuring instrument. If
thermocouples with thin leads or long cables are required, keep the
thermocouple leads short and use a thermocouple extension wire to run
between the thermocouple and measuring instrument.
The thermocouple connects directly to the module’s removable terminal
block (see Figure 4-34). No special terminal or isothermal block is
required.
4-28
Input/Output Modules
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Figure 4-34. Thermocouple Input Module Wiring
Be sure to use the correct type of thermocouple wire to connect the
thermocouple to the ROC800. Minimize connections and make sure
connections are tight. If you use any dissimilar metals (such as copper
wire) to connect a thermocouple to the ROC800, you can create the
junction of dissimilar metals that can generate millivolt signals and
increase reading errors.
Ensure any plugs, sockets, or terminal blocks used to connect the
extension wire are made from the same metals as the thermocouples and
observe correct polarity.
The thermocouple probe must have sufficient length to minimize the
effect of conduction of heat from the hot end of the thermocouple.
Unless there is insufficient immersion, readings will be low. It is
suggested the thermocouple be immersed for a minimum distance
equivalent to four times the outside diameter of a protection tube or
well.
Use only ungrounded thermocouple constructions. Grounded
thermocouples are susceptible to the creation of ground loops. In turn,
ground loops can cause interaction between thermocouple channels on
the thermocouple module.
Note: Use thermocouples as individual sensing devices. All modules
are isolated on the field side. Be aware that you can induce
ground loops by tying module-to-module commons together.
Noise Susceptibility
Revised Jul-14
Millivolt signals are very small and are very susceptible to noise.
Noise from stray electrical and magnetic fields can generate voltage
signals higher than the millivolt levels generated from a
thermocouple. The TC modules can reject common mode noise
(signals that are the same on both wires), but rejection is not perfect,
Input/Output Modules
4-29
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
so minimize noise where possible.
Take care to properly shield thermocouple wiring from noise by
separating the thermocouple wiring runs from signals that are switching
loads and AC signals. Route wires away from noisy areas and twist the
two insulated leads of the thermocouple cable together to help ensure
both wires pick up the same noise. When operating in an extremely
noisy environment, use a shielded extension cable.
Shielded wiring is highly recommended. Ground shields only on one
end, preferably at the end device unless you have an excellent ground
system installed at the ROC800-series controller. Do not tie the
thermocouple module to ground.
Caution
Sheathed thermocouple probes are available with one of three junction
types: grounded, ungrounded, or exposed.
Figure 4-35. Ungrounded –
Sheathed
Figure 4-36. Grounded
Figure 4-37. Exposed,
Ungrounded – Unsheathed
In an ungrounded probe, the thermocouple junction is detached from
the probe wall. Response time slows down from the grounded style, but
the ungrounded probe offers electrical isolation of 1.5 M Ω at 500 Volts
dc in all diameters. The wiring may or may not be sheathed.
Note: Only ungrounded probes are supported. It is highly
recommended that you use sheathed probes.
Use an ungrounded junction for measurements in corrosive
environments where it is desirable to have the thermocouple
electronically isolated from and shielded by the sheath. The welded wire
thermocouple is physically insulated from the thermocouple sheath by
MgO powder (soft).
At the tip of a grounded junction probe, the thermocouple wires
physically attach to the inside of the probe wall. This results in good
heat transfer from the outside, through the probe wall to the
thermocouple junction. Grounded wiring is not supported.
The thermocouple in the exposed junction protrudes out of the tip of the
sheath and is exposed to the surrounding environment. This type offers
the best response time, but is limited in use to non-corrosive and nonpressurized applications. Exposed junction thermocouples are not
supported.
Note: Avoid subjecting the thermocouple connections and
measurement instrument to sudden changes in temperature.
4-30
Input/Output Modules
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
4.14 Highway Addressable Remote Transducer (HART®) Module
Note: The HART-2 module (labeled HART-2 with black faceplate)
replaces the HART module (with gray faceplate).
The HART-2 module allows a ROC800 to communicate with HART
devices using the HART protocol. The HART-2 module receives
signals from and transmit signals to HART devices. LEDs provide a
visual indication of the status of each HART channel. Refer to Figure 438.
Note: HART Pass-Through requires you to use the HART Pass-
Through license key (FS8KY-6), which provides PlantWeb®
Smart Remote Automation functionality. This includes the
ability to pass HART data bi-directionally through the network
to AMS™ Device Manager software.
The module has four input/output channels. The HART-2 module uses
software-configurable switches, which allow you to set each channel as
input or output. When you set a channel as an input, you can configure
it for use in point-to-point or multi-drop mode (which typically connects
to some type of transmitter, such as a temperature reading). When you
configure a channel as an output, it reverts to point-to-point mode only.
The output supports a Digital Valve Controller (DVC). Each channel
has analog input capability intended for diagnostic and primary process
variable measurement.
Frequency
Shift Keying
HART superimposes Frequency Shift Keying (FSK) signals on an
analog signal. This technique allows digital information to be passed
to and from the HART device on a 4 to 20 mA analog signal.
Point-to-Point Mode
In point-to-point mode, the analog signal is still representative of the
measured variable. This mode allows communications with one
HART device per channel.
Multi-drop Mode
In multi-drop mode, you can connect up to five HART devices (in
parallel) to each channel. As with the point-to-point mode, digital
communications are superimposed on the analog signal used to power
the HART devices. Each HART device in multi-drop mode requires 4
mA and the current does not represent any measured variable value.
With all four channels in the multi-drop mode, the ROC800 can
support a maximum of twenty HART devices.
A ROC800 equipped with a HART-2 module is considered to be a
HART Host (primary master) interface with a Class 1 Conformance
classification. The HART-2 module can also be configured with
ROCLINK 800 Configuration software for use as a secondary master in
redundant applications.
Most Universal and some Common Practice commands are supported.
For a list of the commands, refer to the ROC800-Series HART Module
technical specification sheet (ROC800:HART2). The supported
Revised Jul-14
Input/Output Modules
4-31
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
commands conform to HART Universal Command Specification
Revision 5.1 and Common Practice Command Specification Revision 7,
(HCF SPEC 127 and 151). Refer to www.hartcomm.org for more
information on the specifications.
The HART-2 module polls the channels simultaneously. If more than
one device is connected to a channel in a multi-drop configuration, the
module polls one device per channel at a time. The HART protocol
allows one second per poll for each device, so with five devices per
channel the maximum poll time for the channel would be five seconds.
Note: The ROC800 does not support HART devices configured in
Burst mode (in which the device sends information without a
prior request). If you have a HART device configured in burst
mode, use a hand-held field communicator to turn off burst
mode before you connect the device to the ROC800.
The HART-2 module provides “loop source” power (+T) and four
channels (1+ through 4+) for communications. The +T power is currentlimited.
ROC-powered
HART Devices
When using the ROC800 to power HART devices, connect terminal
+T in parallel to the positive (+) terminal on all of the HART devices,
regardless of the channel to which they are connected.
Wire channel 1+ to the negative (–) terminal of a single HART device,
or in parallel to the negative terminals of the devices. Likewise, wire
channel 2+ to the negative (–) terminal of a single HART device, or in
parallel to the negative terminals of a second group of HART devices
(see Figure 4-40).
Externally powered
HART Devices
When powering HART devices by an external device, connect the
positive (+) terminal from the power source in parallel to the positive
(+) terminal on all of the HART devices, regardless of the channel to
which they are connected.
Wire channel 1+ on the HART-2 module to the positive (+) terminal of
the HART device. Connect the power source negative (–) terminal to
the channel’s COM terminal and to the negative (–) terminal of a single
HART device, or in parallel to the negative terminals of the HART
devices.
4-32
Input/Output Modules
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Figure 4-38. Input Point-to-Point Wiring on
HART-2 Module
Figure 4-39. Input Multi-Drop Wiring on HART2 Module
Figure 4-40. Output Wiring on HART-2 Module
4.15
IEC 62591 Module
The IEC 62591 Interface module allows a ROC800-Series Remote
Operations Controller (ROC800) to communicate with any mix of up to
60 WirelessHART™ field devices. The module supports monitoring of
both the process information contained in the remote terminal unit
(RTU) and the intelligent diagnostic information residing in the
WirelessHART field devices.
Revised Jul-14
Input/Output Modules
4-33
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
The IEC 62591 Interface consists of two parts: the Smart Wireless Field
Link that provides the radio link to the WirelessHART field devices,
and the IEC 62591 Interface Module that installs into the ROC800.
Installation and
Configuration
The IEC 62591 Interface module connects to the Smart Wireless Field
Link through a four-wire connection. This allows the Smart Wireless
Field Link to be strategically placed away from the controller in the
optimal location for best network performance. The module provides
12 Vdc loop-output to power the Smart Wireless Field Link.
You can install one IEC 62591 Interface module in any slot on a
ROC800. Modules can be easily installed or removed from the module
slots at any time by removing the two captive screws accessible from
the front of the unit.
IEC 62591 Interface modules are hot-swappable, meaning the module
can be removed and another module of the same kind can be installed.
IEC 62591 Interface modules are hot-pluggable, meaning they may be
installed directly into unused module slots under power.
The module has a removable terminal block for convenient wiring and
servicing. The terminal block can accommodate size 24 to 16 American
Wire Gauge (AWG). A USB port is provided on the module to perform
firmware updates and to provide debug information to support
personnel.
Figure 4-41. Wiring on IEC62591 Module
4-34
Input/Output Modules
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
4.16 APP 485 Module
The Application module (APP 485) provides a solution to add user
applications to the ROC800-Series (ROC800) by simply installing a
module. The APP 485 module streamlines the installation process by
including all point types and screens associated with the application, and
the module is automatically recognized by ROC800 firmware. In
addition to the user application, the APP 485 module provides an
onboard RS-485 communications port that enables communications
without utilizing one of the built-in communications ports on the
ROC800.
APP 485 modules can house a variety of applications including Modbus
express and more. For more information about available applications,
contact your sales representative.
The APP 485 module enables the ROC800 to communicate directly
with field devices using the EIA-485 (RS-485) communications port
included on the module. The module serves as an interface between the
field devices and the ROC800. Supported protocols include Modbus
host and slave (RTU or ASCII) and ROC. LEDs on terminals A and B
provide you with visual feedback on communication activity status.
Figure 4-42. APP 485 Module
Revised Jul-14
Input/Output Modules
4-35
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
4.17 Additional Technical Information
Refer to the following technical documentation (available at
www.EmersonProcess.com/Remote) for additional and most-current
information on each of the I/O modules.
Table 4-6. I/O Module Technical Specifications
Name
ROC800-Series Analog Input Modules
ROC800-Series Alternating Current I/O Module
ROC800-Series Analog Output Module
ROC800-Series Advance Pulse Module
ROC800-Series Discrete Input Module
ROC800-Series Discrete Output Module
ROC800-Series Discrete Output Relay Module
®
ROC800-Series HART Module
ROC800-Series MVS I/O Module
ROC800-Series Pulse Input Module
ROC800-Series Resistance Temperature Detector Module
ROC800-Series Thermocouple Module
ROC800-Series IEC 62591 Interface
ROC800-Series ROC800-Series Application Module
4-36
Input/Output Modules
Form Number
ROC800:AI
ROC800:ACIO
ROC800:AO
ROC800:APM
ROC800:DI
ROC800:DO
ROC800:DOR
ROC800:HART2
ROC800:MVS
ROC800:PI
ROC800:RTD
ROC800:TC2
ROC800:62591
ROC800:APP
Part Number
D301238X012
D301243X012
D301260X012
D201231X012
D301274X012
D301592X012
D301593X012
D301705X012
D301277X012
D301275X012
D301574X012
D301689X012
D301712X012
D301741X012
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Chapter 5 – Communications
This chapter describes the built-in communication ports and the optional
communication modules used with the ROC800.
In This Chapter
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
Communication Ports and Modules Overview ....................................... 5-1
Installing Communication Modules ........................................................ 5-3
Removing a Communication Module ..................................................... 5-5
Wiring Communication Modules ............................................................ 5-5
Local Operator Interface (LOI) ............................................................... 5-5
5.5.1 Using the LOI .............................................................................. 5-7
5.6 Ethernet Communication........................................................................ 5-7
5.7 EIA-232 (RS-232) Serial Communication .............................................. 5-9
5.8 EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) Serial Communications Module ............... 5-10
5.8.1 EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) Jumpers & Termination Resistors . 5-11
5.9 Dial-up Modem Communication Module .............................................. 5-13
5.10 Multi-Variable Sensor (MVS) Interface Module.................................... 5-14
5.11 Network Radio Module (NRM) ............................................................. 5-14
5.12 Additional Technical Information .......................................................... 5-16
Note: For information on removing or installing wire covers or module
slot covers, see Chapter 4.
5.1
Communication Ports and Modules Overview
The built-in communication ports and the optional communication
modules provide communications between the ROC800 and a host
system or external devices.
The ROC800 supports up to six communication ports. The CPU
provides three built-in communication ports. You can add up to three
additional ports with communication modules. Table 5-1 displays the
types of communication options available for the ROC800.
Table 5-1. Built-in Communication and Optional Communication Modules
Communications
Built-in on CPU
EIA-232 (RS-232D) Local Operator Interface (LOI)
Ethernet (use with DS800 Configuration Software)
EIA-232 (RS-232C) Serial Communication
EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) Serial Communication
Modem Communication
MVS Sensor Interface
Local Port
Comm1
Comm2
Optional Module
Comm3 to Comm5
Comm3 to Comm5
Comm3 to Comm5
Comm3 to Comm5
The communication modules consist of a printed circuit board, a
communication port, wiring terminal block, LEDs, and connectors to
Revised Jul-14
Communications
5-1
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
the backplane. The ROC800 can hold up to three communication
modules in the first three module slots. Refer to Figure 5-1.
D
E
A
B
F
C
A
B
C
D
E
F
LOI (Local Port) EIA-232 (RS-232D)
Built-in Ethernet (Comm1)
Built-in EIA-232 (RS-232) (Comm2)
Optional Comm 3 (Slot #1)
Optional Comm 3 or Comm 4 (Slot #2)
Optional Comm 3 to Comm 5 (Slot #3)
Figure 5-1. Communication Ports
Table 5-2. RS-232 Communication LED Indicator Definitions
Signals
CTS
CD
Action
Clear To Send indicates the modem is ready to send.
Data Carrier Detect (DCD) indicates a valid carrier signal tone detected.
DSR
Data Set Ready for ring indicator communication signal.
DTR
Data Terminal Ready to answer an incoming call. When off, a connection disconnects.
RTS
Ready To Send indicates ready to transmit.
RX
Receive Data (RD) signal is being received.
TX
Transmit Data (TD) signal is being transmitted.
Each communication module has surge protection in accordance with
the CE certification EN 61000. With the exception of the EIA-232 (RS232) module, every communication module is isolated from other
modules and the backplane, including power and signal isolation. The
5-2
Communications
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
field interface has been designed to protect the electronics in the
module. Filtering is provided on each module to reduce communication
errors.
5.2
Installing Communication Modules
All communication modules install into the ROC800 in the same way.
Caution
The design of ROC800-Series communication and I/O modules supports
“hot-swapping” (replacing similar modules in the same slot) and “hotplugging” (inserting modules into an empty slot) while the ROC800 is
powered. However, it is a good safety practice with any electrical device
to first remove power before you make internal connections. If you find
it necessary to hot-swap or hot-plug a module, first review the most
current specification sheet for that module to ensure both your safety
and the integrity of data that module may provide.
Modules are self-identifying in the software and all modules are selfresetting after a fault clears.
Note: The dial-up modem module is neither hot-swappable nor hot-
pluggable. When you install a dial-up modem module, you must
remove power from the ROC800.
Figure 5-2. RS-485 Communication Module
Caution
Revised Jul-14
When working on units located in a hazardous area (where explosive
gases may be present), make sure the area is in a non-hazardous state
before performing procedures. Performing these procedures in a
hazardous area could result in personal injury or property damage.
Communications
5-3
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Note: With the exception of the HART module, you can install
communication modules only in slots 1, 2, or 3 of the ROC800.
Refer to Figure 5-1 and Table 5-1.
1. Remove the wire channel cover.
Note: Leaving the wire channel cover in place can prevent the
module from correctly connecting to the socket on the
backplane.
2. Perform one of the following:


If there is a module currently in the slot, unscrew the captive
screws and remove that module (refer to Removing a
Communication Module).
If the slot is currently empty, remove the module cover.
3. Insert the new module through the module slot on the front of the
ROC800 or EXP housing. Make sure the label on the front of the
module is facing right side up. Gently slide the module in place until
it contacts properly with the connectors on the backplane.
Note: If the module stops and will not go any further, do not force
the module. Remove the module and see if the pins are bent.
If so, gently straighten the pins and re-insert the module. The
back of the module must connect fully with the connectors
on the backplane.
4. Gently press the module into its mating connectors on the backplane
until the connectors firmly seat.
5. Tighten the retaining captive screws on the front of the module.
6. Wire the module (refer to Wiring Communication Modules).
Note: All modules have removable terminal blocks for convenient
wiring and servicing. Twisted-pair cable is recommended for
I/O signal wiring. The removable terminal blocks accept 12
to 22 AWG wire.
7. For dial-up modem communication, connect the cable to the RJ-11
connector on the communication module.
Note: If you are installing a modem module, it is recommended
that you install a surge protector between the RJ-11 jack and
the outside line.
8. Replace the wire channel cover.
9. Connect to ROCLINK 800 software and login. The modules are
self-identifying after re-connecting to ROCLINK 800 software.
5-4
Communications
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
5.3
Removing a Communication Module
To remove a communication module:
1. Remove the wire channel cover.
2. Unscrew the two captive screws holding the module in place.
3. Gently pull the module’s lip out and remove the module from the
slot. You may need to gently wiggle the module.
4. Install a new module or install the module cover.
5. Screw the two captive screws to hold the module cover in place.
6. Replace the wire channel cover.
5.4
Wiring Communication Modules
You make signal wiring connections to communication through the
communication port’s removable terminal block connectors and through
RJ-11 and RJ-45 connectors. All modules have removable terminal
blocks for convenient wiring and servicing. The terminal blocks can
accept 12 to 22 AWG wire.
Caution
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions, such as
wearing a grounded wrist strap may reset the processor or damage
electronic components, resulting in interrupted operations.
To connect the wire to the removable block compression terminals:
1. Bare the end (¼ inch maximum) of the wire.
2. Insert the bared end into the clamp beneath the termination screw.
3. Tighten the screw.
The ROC800 should have a minimum of bare wire exposed to prevent
short circuits. Allow some slack when making connections to prevent
strain.
Note: All modules have removable terminal blocks for convenient
wiring and servicing. Twisted-pair cable is recommended for I/O
signal wiring. The removable terminal blocks accept 12 to 22
AWG wire.
5.5 Local Operator Interface (LOI)
The Local Operator Interface (LOI) port (see Figure 5-1) provides direct
communication between the ROC800 and the serial port of an operator
interface device, such as a personal computer running Microsoft®
Windows®. The interface allows you to access the ROC800 with a
Revised Jul-14
Communications
5-5
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
direct connection using ROCLINK 800 software to configure and
transfer stored data.
The LOI uses the Local Port in ROCLINK 800 software.
The LOI terminal (RJ-45) on the CPU provides wiring access to a builtin EIA-232 (RS-232) serial interface, which is capable of 57.6K baud
operation. The RJ-45 connector pin uses the data terminal equipment
(DTE) in the IEEE standard.
The LOI port supports ROC Plus and Modbus protocol communication.
The LOI also supports the log-on security feature of the ROC800 if you
have enabled the Security on LOI in the ROCLINK 800 software.
Table 5-3 shows the signal routing of the CPU connections. Figure 5-3
shows the RJ-45 pin out.
Table 5-3. Built-in LOI EIA-232 Signal Routing
Signal
LOI Function
RJ-45 Pins
on ROC800
DTR
Data Terminal
Ready
3
GND
RX
TX
RTS
Ground
(Common)
Receive
Transmit
Request to Send
Description
Originated by the ROC800 Data Terminal Equipment (DTE) to instruct
the Data Communication Equipment (DCE) to set up a connection.
DTE is running and ready to communicate.
Reference ground between a DTE and a DCE and has a value 0 Volts
dc.
Data received by the DTE.
Data sent by the DTE.
Originated by the DTE to initiate transmission by the DCE.
4
5
6
8
Figure 5-3. RJ-45 Pin Out
The LOI terminal requires you to install a D-Sub 9 pin (F) to RJ-45
modular converter between the ROC800 and PC. Refer to Table 5-4.
Table 5-4. RJ-45 to EIA-232 (RS-232) Null-modem Cable Signal Routing
EIA-232
(RS-232)
DTE
4
1
6
5
3
5-6
ROC800Series
–
–
DTR
GND
TX
RJ-45 Pins
on ROC800Series
1
2
3
4
5
Communications
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
EIA-232
(RS-232)
DTE
2
7
8
Adaptor Cable
ROC800Series
RX
–
RTS
RJ-45 Pins
on ROC800Series
6
7
8
Remote Automation Solutions offers an adaptor cable to resolve this
cabling issue. Order CBL8A from your Remote Automation Solutions
salesperson.
5.5.1 Using the LOI
1. Plug the LOI cable into the LOI RJ-45 connector of the ROC800.
2. Connect the LOI cable to the D-Sub 9 pin (F) to RJ-45 modular
converter.
3. Plug the modular converter into the COM port of the PC.
4. Launch ROCLINK 800 software.
5. Click the Direct Connect icon on the ROCLINK 800 tool bar.
6. Configure communication for the other built-in and modular
communications, I/O modules, AGA meter parameters, and other
configuration parameters.
5.6
Ethernet Communication
The Ethernet communication port in the ROC800 supports TCP/IP
protocol communication using the IEEE 802.3 10Base-T standard. One
application of this communication port is to download programs from
DS800 Development Suite Configuration Software.
Default TCP/IP
The ROC800 uses the following factory defaults:
 TCP/IP: 10.0.02
 Gateway: 10.0.0.1
 Subnet Mast: 255.255.255.0
The Ethernet communication port uses a 10BASE-T Ethernet interface
with an RJ-45 connector. Each Ethernet-equipped unit is called a
“station” and operates independently of all other stations on the network
without a central controller. All attached stations connect to a shared
media system. Signals are broadcast over the medium to every attached
station. To send an Ethernet packet, a station listens to the medium
(Carrier Sense) and when the medium is idle, the station transmits the
data. Each station has an equal chance to transmit (Multiple Access).
The Medium Access Control (MAC) mechanism embedded in each
station interface determines access to the shared medium. The MAC
Revised Jul-14
Communications
5-7
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
mechanism is based on Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision
Detection (CSMA/CD). If two stations begin to transmit a packet at the
same instant, the stations stop transmitting (Collision Detection).
Transmission is rescheduled at a random time interval to avoid the
collision.
You can link Ethernet networks together to form extended networks
using bridges and routers.
Table 5-5. Ethernet Signal LEDs
Series 1 CPU
Signal
RX
TX
COL
LNK
Function
Lit when currently receiving.
Lit when currently transmitting.
Lit when Ethernet Packet Collision detected.
Lit when Ethernet has linked.
Series 2 CPU
Signal
COL
ACT
Function
Lit when Ethernet Packet Collision detected.
Blinks when activity (TX, RX, or LNK) occurs.
Use a rugged industrial temperature HUB when connecting Ethernet
wiring in an environment that requires it.
The IEEE 802.3 10BASE-T standard requires that 10BASE-T
transceivers be able to transmit over a link using voice grade twistedpair telephone wiring that meets EIA/TIA Category four wire
specifications. Generally, links up to 100 meters (328 feet) long can be
achieved for unshielded twisted-pair cable.
For each connector or patch panel in the link, subtract 12 meters (39.4
feet) from the 100-meter limit. This allows for links of up to 88 meters
(288 feet) using standard 24 AWG UTP (Unshielded Twisted-Pair) wire
and two patch panels within the link. Higher quality, low attenuation
cables may be required when using links greater than 88 meters.
The maximum insertion loss allowed for a 10BASE-T link is 11.5 dB at
all frequencies between 5.0 and 10.0 MHz. This includes the attenuation
of the cables, connectors, patch panels, and reflection losses due to
impedance mismatches to the link segment.
Intersymbol interference and reflections can cause jitter in the bit cell
timing, resulting in data errors. A 10BASE-T link must not generate
more than 5.0 nanoseconds of jitter. If your cable meets the impedance
requirements for a 10BASE-T link, jitter should not be a concern.
The maximum propagation delay of a 10BASE-T link segment must not
exceed 1000 nanoseconds.
Signal coupling between the different cable pairs contained within a
multi-pair cable bundle causes “crosstalk.” 10BASE-T transceivers are
5-8
Communications
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
designed so that you do not need to be concerned about cable crosstalk,
provided the cable meets all other requirements.
Noise can be caused by crosstalk of externally induced impulses.
Impulse noise may cause data errors if the impulses occur at very
specific times during data transmission. Generally, do not be concerned
about noise. If you suspect noise related data errors, it may be necessary
to either reroute the cable or eliminate the source of the impulse noise.
Multi-pair, PVC 24 AWG telephone cables have an attenuation of
approximately 8 to 10 dB/100 m at 200°C (392°F). The attenuation of
PVC insulted cable varies significantly with temperature. At
temperatures greater than 400°C (752°F), use plenum-rated cables to
ensure that cable attenuation remains within specification.
When connecting two twisted-pair Medium Attachment Units (MAUs)
or repeaters together over a segment, wire the transmit data pins of one
eight-pin connector to the receive data pins of the other connector, and
vice versa. There are two methods for accomplishing 10BASE-T
crossover wiring:
 Using special cable.
 Wiring the 10BASE-T crossover inside the hub.
For a single segment connecting only two devices, provide the signal
crossover by building a special crossover cable, wire the transmit data
pins of one eight-pin connector to the receive data pins of the other
connector, and vice versa. Refer to Figure 5-4.
Signal
Pin 1 TD+
Pin 2 TD–
Pin 3 RD+
Pin 6 RD–
Signal
Pin 1 TD+
Pin 2 TD–
Pin 3 RD+
Pin 6 RD–
Figure 5-4. 10BASE-T Crossover Cable
5.7
EIA-232 (RS-232) Serial Communication
The built-in EIA-232 (RS-232), the LOI, and the communication
modules meet all EIA-232 (RS-232) specifications for single-ended,
asynchronous data transmission over distances of up to 15 meters (50
feet). EIA-232 (RS-232) communication provides transmit, receive, and
modem control signals. The LOI port also meets EIA-232D (RS-232D)
specifications.
EIA-232 (RS-232) communication has the following communication
port designations in ROCLINK 800.

Revised Jul-14
LOI – Local Port EIA-232 (RS-232D). Refer to Section 5.5, Local
Operator Interface.
Communications
5-9
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
 Built-in – Comm2 EIA-232 (RS-232C).
 Module – Comm3 to Comm5 EIA-232 (RS-232C).
EIA-232 (RS-232) uses point-to-point asynchronous serial
communication and is commonly used to provide the physical interface
for connecting serial devices, such as gas chromatographs and radios to
the ROC800-Series. EIA-232 (RS-232) communication provides
essential hand-shaking lines required for radio communication, such as
DTR and RTS.
EIA-232 (RS-232) communication includes LED indicators that display
the status of the Receive (RX), Transmit (TX), Data Terminal Ready
(DTR), and Ready To Send (RTS) control lines.
Table 5-6 defines the built-in EIA-232 (RS-232) terminals at the
Comm2 port and their function signals.
Table 5-6. Built-in EIA-232 (RS-232) Signal Routing – Comm2
Signal
RX
TX
RTS
DTR
GND
LED Function
Lit when Comm2 is currently receiving.
Lit when Comm2 is currently transmitting.
Lit when Comm2 request to send is active.
Lit when Comm2 data terminal ready is active.
Common.
Terminal
1
2
3
4
5
The EIA-232 (RS-232) communication module provides EIA-232 (RS232C) signals on the Comm3, Comm4, or Comm5 port depending on
where you have installed the module. Refer to Table 5-7.
Table 5-7. EIA-232 (RS-232) Communication Module Signal Routing – Comm3, Comm4, and
Comm5
Signal
RX
TX
RTS
DTR
GND
5.8
LED Function
Lit when module (Comm3, Comm4, or Comm5) is
currently receiving.
Lit when module (Comm3, Comm4, or Comm5) is
currently transmitting.
Lit when module (Comm3, Comm4, or Comm5)
request to send is active.
Lit when module (Comm3, Comm4, or Comm5)
data terminal ready is active.
Common.
Terminal
1
2
3
4
5
EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) Serial Communications Module
EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) communication modules meet all EIA422/485 (RS-422/485) specifications for differential, asynchronous
serial communication transmissions of data over distances of up to 1220
meters (4000 feet). EIA-485 (RS-485) communication is commonly
5-10
Communications
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
used to multi-drop units on a serial network over long distances using
inexpensive twisted-pair wiring.
EIA-422 (RS-422) drivers are designed for party-line applications
where one driver is connected to, and transmits on, a bus with up to ten
receivers. EIA-422 (RS-422) allows long distance point-to-point
communication and the drivers are designed for true multi-point
applications with up to 32 drivers and 32 receivers on a single bus.
The default values for EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) communication are
19200 baud rate, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, and no parity. The maximum
rate is 57.6 Kbps.
EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) communication modules include LED
indicators that display the status of receive and transmit activity. Refer
to Tables 5-8 and 5-9.
Table 5-8. EIA-422 (RS-422) Signal Routing – Comm3, Comm4, and Comm5
Signal
A
B
Y
Z
COM
RS-422
RX +
RX –
TX +
TX –
Common
Function
Lit when module (Comm3, Comm4, or Comm5) is currently receiving.
None.
Lit when module (Comm3, Comm4, or Comm5) is currently transmitting.
None.
Ground.
Terminal
1
2
3
4
5
Table 5-9. EIA-485 (RS-485) Signal Routing – Comm3, Comm4, and Comm5
Signal
RS-485
Function
A
RX / TX + Lit when module (Comm3, Comm4, or Comm5) is currently receiving.
B
RX / TX –
None.
Y
No Connect Lit when module (Comm3, Comm4, or Comm5) is currently transmitting.
Z
No Connect None.
COM
Common
Ground.
Caution
Terminal
1
2
3
4
5
You can induce ground loops by tying commons from various modules
together.
EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) communication provides EIA-422/485 (RS422/485) signals on the Comm3, Comm4, or Comm5 port, depending
on where you have installed the module. Wiring should be twisted-pair
cable, one pair for transmitting, and one pair for receiving. The EIA-422
(RS-422) module uses four wires and the EIA-485 (RS-485) uses two
wires for connectivity.
5.8.1 EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) Jumpers & Termination Resistors
Four jumpers—J3, J4, J5, and J6—are located on the EIA-422/485 (RS422/485) communication module (see Figure 5-5). These jumpers
determine the mode in which the module runs (RS-422 or RS-485) and
if the module is terminated.
Revised Jul-14
Communications
5-11
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Terminations are required on the two EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485)
communication modules located at the extremities of the circuit. That is
to say, the two outside modules require terminations in order to
complete the communication circuit.
Figure 5-5. EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) Jumpers
Table 5-10. EIA-422 (RS-422) Module
Terminated
Not Terminated
Jumper
TER
J3
J4
J5
J6
Out
Half
Full
x
TER
x
Out
Half
Full
x
x
x
x
x
x
Table 5-11. EIA-485 (RS-485) Module
Terminated
Not Terminated
Jumper
TER
J3
J4
J5
J6
5-12
OUT
Half
x
Full
TER
x
OUT
Half
x
Full
x
x
x
x
x
Communications
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
5.9
Dial-up Modem Communication Module
The dial-up modem module interfaces to a Public-Switched Telephone
Network (PSTN) line, and requires a telephone line connection. The
module provides a telephone interface on the host port that is capable of
both answering and originating telephone calls. The module also
provides electronics that conserve power when the phone line is not in
use.
Note: When installing a dial-up modem module, you must remove
power from the ROC800.
The dial-up modem provides communication with speeds up to 14.4
Kbps with V.42 bis and V.42, MNP2-4 and MNP10 error correction,
and is FCC Part 68 approved for use with PSTNs. The FCC label on the
module provides the FCC registration number and the ringer equivalent.
The module supports data compression, error correction, and
nonvolatile RAM for permanent storage of the modem configuration.
Using asynchronous operation, the module interfaces to two-wire, fullduplex telephone lines. It interfaces to a PSTN through an RJ-11 jack.
You control the modem using industry-standard AT command software.
A 40-character command line is provided for the AT command set,
which is compatible with EIA document TR302.2/88-08006.
The dial-up modem automatically hangs up after a user-configured
period of communication inactivity and provides automated dial-up
alarm reporting capabilities. Refer to the ROCLINK 800 Configuration
Software User Manual (for ROC800-Series) (Part Number
D301250X012) or the ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software User
Manual (for ROC800L) (Part Number D301246X012).
Table 5-12. RJ-11 Field Connections
Signal
Tip
Ring
Pin
3
4
LED indicators on the module show the status of the Receive (RX),
Transmit (TX), Ring (RI), and Carrier Detect (CD) control lines.
Table 5-14 displays connector signals and their functions.
Table 5-13. Modem Signal Routing – Comm3, Comm4, and Comm5
Signal
RX
TX
RI
CD
Revised Jul-14
Function
Lit when module (Comm3, Comm4, or Comm5) is currently receiving.
Lit when module (Comm3, Comm4, or Comm5) is currently transmitting.
Lit when module (Comm3, Comm4, or Comm5) detects a ring.
Lit when module (Comm3, Comm4, or Comm5) on carrier detect.
Communications
5-13
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Notes:

If you are installing a modem module, it is recommended that you
install a surge protector between the RJ-11 jack and the outside line.

The dial-up modem is not hot-swappable or hot-pluggable. When
installing a dial-up modem module, you must remove power from
the ROC800.
5.10 Multi-Variable Sensor (MVS) Interface Module
The Multi-Variable Sensor (MVS) module provides an interface to a
sensor that supplies differential pressure, static pressure, and
temperature inputs to the ROC827 for orifice flow calculation.
The enhanced design of the MVS I/O module (shown on the right side
of Figure 5-6) enables you to place it in any available slot on the
ROC800. In all other ways the two modules are identical.
Figure 5-6. MVS I/O Module
For further technical information about the MVS or MVS I/O modules,
see the description of the MVS I/O module in Chapter 4.
5.11 Network Radio Module (NRM)
The Network Radio Module (NRM) is an integral part of the Distributed
RTU Network and allows ROC800-Series (ROC800) to communicate
wirelessly. It has the ability to broadcast and detect information from
other RTUs for easier and faster interconnection and communication
setup.
5-14
Communications
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
The NRM provides a wireless solution of transferring data from RTU to
another RTU within the Distributed RTU Network (DRN). The data can
be any type of information that the RTU has in its database, such as I/O,
soft points, or other information.
The NRM includes a FreeWave radio to handle the wireless data
transmission. The radio utilizes TDMA technology, and allows for
multiple networks (with unique Network IDs and Frequency hop Keys)
to be located in close proximity to each other without experiencing
signal degradation.
The NRM is designed to be plug-and-play and requires no wiring. The
NRM can be installed in slot 1, 2, or 3 in the ROC800-Series 2 RTU.
Figure 5-7. Network Radio Module
Depending on the enclosure you choose to surround the node and
protect it from the environment, you may need additional cabling
between the antenna and the connection on the module itself. For
additional details on antenna, cabling, and enclosure installation
instructions, refer to the Distributed RTU™ Network Instruction
Manual (Part Number D301727X012).
Revised Jul-14
Communications
5-15
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
5.12 Additional Technical Information
Refer to the following technical documentation (available at
www.EmersonProcess.com/Remote) for additional and most-current
information.
Table 5-14. Communication Modules Technical Specifications
Name
ROC800-Series Communication Modules
ROC800-Series Network Radio Module
Distributed RTU™ Network Instruction Manual
5-16
Communications
Form Number
ROC800:COM
Part Number
D301171X012
ROC800:NRM
D301732X012
A6328
D301727X012
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Chapter 6 – Troubleshooting
This chapter provides generalized guidelines for troubleshooting the
ROC800-Series. Perform the procedures in this chapter before you
remove power from the ROC800 for any reason, after you restore power
to the ROC800, and if you disassemble the ROC800.
Use the following tools for troubleshooting:

Personal computer running a Microsoft® Windows® XP (Service Pack
3), Windows Vista (32-bit), or Windows 7 (32-bit) operating system.

ROCLINK 800 Configuration software (version 1.81 or greater)

Flat-head (size 1/10 inch) and Phillips (size 0) screwdrivers.
In This Chapter
6.1
6.2
6.3
Guidelines ................................................................................................. 6-1
Checklists ................................................................................................. 6-2
6.2.1 Serial Communications ................................................................. 6-2
6.2.2 I/O Point ........................................................................................ 6-3
6.2.3 Software ........................................................................................ 6-3
6.2.4 Powering Up.................................................................................. 6-4
6.2.5 MVS or MVS I/O Module ............................................................... 6-4
6.2.6 IEC 62591 Module ........................................................................ 6-5
Procedures ............................................................................................... 6-5
6.3.1 Preserving Configuration and Log Data ........................................ 6-5
6.3.2 Restarting the ROC800 ................................................................. 6-5
6.3.3 Troubleshooting Analog Input Modules ........................................ 6-6
6.3.4 Troubleshooting Analog Output Modules ..................................... 6-8
6.3.5 Troubleshooting Discrete Input Modules ...................................... 6-9
6.3.6 Troubleshooting Discrete Output Modules ................................... 6-9
6.3.7 Troubleshooting Discrete Output Relay Modules ....................... 6-10
6.3.8 Troubleshooting Pulse Input Modules ........................................ 6-10
6.3.9 Troubleshooting RTD Input Modules .......................................... 6-11
6.3.10 Troubleshooting Thermocouple Input (T/C) Modules ................. 6-12
6.3.11 Troubleshooting Advanced Pulse Modules ................................ 6-14
6.3.12 Network Radio Modules .............................................................. 6-14
6.1 Guidelines
When you are attempting to diagnose a problem with the ROC800:
Revised Jul-14

Remember to write down what steps you have taken.

Note the order in which you remove components.

Note the orientation of the components before you alter or remove
them.

Save the configuration and log data. Refer to Preserving
Configuration and Log Data in this chapter.

Read and follow all Cautions in this manual.
Inputs and Outputs
6-1
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
When you are done troubleshooting, perform the restart procedure as
described in Restarting the ROC800 in this chapter.
6.2
Checklists
If the LEDs do not display:

By default, LEDs on the communication modules and I/O modules
enter Sleep mode after five minutes.

To turn the LEDs on, press the LED button located on the CPU for
one second.
Note: Using the ROCKLINK 800 software, you can disable this feature
so that the LEDs always remain on.
6.2.1 Serial Communications
If you are experiencing troubles with a serial communications connection
(LOI, EIA-232, EIA-422, or EIA-485):

Check to make sure power is applied to the ROC800 unit. Check the
position of the J3 jumper on the CPU board (see Figure 2-8 in
Chapter 2), the wiring connections at CHG+ and CHG– (for the PM12 module), and the wiring at the power source.
Note: On a Series 1 CPU, check the position of the J4 jumper.

Check the wiring to the termination block or connector. Refer to
Chapter 5, Communications.

Check the communication port settings using ROCLINK 800
Configuration software. Refer to the ROCLINK 800 Configuration
Software User Manual (for ROC800-Series) (Part Number
D301250X012) or the ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software User
Manual (for ROC800L) (Part Number D301246X012).
Restore to To restore the COM ports to factory defaults (as they were delivered
Factory Defaults to you from the factory) use this procedure:
Caution
This procedure, valid on the ROC800 (at firmware version 3.1 or higher)
and the ROC800L (at firmware version 1.00 or higher) also stops any
FSTs, User C programs, and DS800 programs.
1. Press and hold the RESET button on the powered CPU for 5 to 10
seconds. The Status LED flashes when the process completes.
Note: Use a small screwdriver or a straightened paper clip to press the
RESET button.
2. Release the RESET button.
3. Reconfigure your COM ports.
6-2
Inputs and Outputs
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
6.2.2 I/O Point
If you are experiencing troubles with an I/O point (Analog Input, Analog
Output, Discrete Input, Discrete Output, Pulse Input, RTD Input, or
Thermocouple Input):

Check (using ROCLINK 800 software) to see how the channel is
configured.

If the configuration looks correct, then follow the procedure for
troubleshooting that type of I/O (refer to Chapter 6).

If a module does not function correctly, determine if the problem is
with the field device or the module.

Check a module suspected of being faulty for a short circuit between
its input or output terminals. If a terminal not directly connected to
ground reads 0 (zero) when measured with an ohmmeter, the module
is defective and must be replaced.
Note: Return faulty modules to your local sales representative for
repair or replacement.
6.2.3 Software
If you are experiencing problems with the ROC800 that appear to be
software-related, try resetting the ROC800.
Caution
When you reset and subsequently re-start, the ROC800 loses
configuration and log data. BEFORE you attempt ANY type of reset,
back up your configuration and log data. Refer to Preserving
Configuration and Log Data in this chapter.
Warm Start Use a warm start to restart without losing configuration or log data.
To perform a warm start, open ROCLINK 800 software, connect to the
ROC800, and select ROC > Flags.
Refer to the ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software User Manual (for
ROC800-Series) (Part Number D301250X012) or the ROCLINK 800
Configuration Software User Manual (for ROC800L) (Part Number
D301246X012).
Cold Start Use a cold start to restart without a portion of the configuration, log
data, or programming that may be the trouble. To perform a cold start,
open ROCLINK 800 software, connect to the ROC800, and select
ROC > Flags.
Refer to the ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software User Manual (for
ROC800-Series) (Part Number D301250X012) or the ROCLINK 800
Configuration Software User Manual (for ROC800L) (Part Number
D301246X012).
Revised Jul-14
Inputs and Outputs
6-3
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Restore to To restore the ROC800 to factory defaults (that is, as the ROC800
Factory Defaults was delivered to you from the factory without installed user programs,
FLASH memory contents, FSTs, DS800 applications, or
configurations) without connecting to ROCLINK 800, use this
procedure:
1. Remove power from the ROC800.
2. Press and hold the RESET button on the CPU.
Note: Use a small screwdriver or a straightened paper clip to press
the RESET button.
3. While holding down the RESET button, restore power to the
ROC800.
4. Wait 3-5 seconds and release the RESET button.
Note: If none of these methods solves the problem, contact your local
sales representative.
6.2.4 Powering Up
If you are experiencing trouble with powering up the ROC800:

Check the wiring connections at terminations on the Power Input
module and the wiring at the power source.

Check the internal battery for voltage. Refer to Chapter 3, Power
Connections.

Check the external batteries, if applicable, for voltage.
Note: If none of these methods solves the problem, contact your local
sales representative.
6.2.5 MVS or MVS I/O Module
If you are experiencing trouble with the MVS or MVS I/O module:

If more than one module is connected to the ROC800, use the
ROCKLINK 800 Configuration software to ensure that each module
has a unique address.

Reset the module back to factory defaults. Refer to the ROCLINK 800
Configuration Software User Manual (for ROC800-Series) (Part
Number D301250X012) or the ROCLINK 800 Configuration
Software User Manual (for ROC800L) (Part Number D301246X012).
Note: If you believe an MVS or MVS I/O module is damaged or faulty,
contact your sales representative for repair or replacement.
6-4
Inputs and Outputs
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
6.2.6 IEC 62591 Module
If you are experiencing trouble with the IEC 62591 module:

6.3
If the IEC 62591module is already set up, a power cycle of the
devices will speed up the discovery of other devices.
Procedures
Use the following procedures to resolve various issues with the I/O
modules.
6.3.1 Preserving Configuration and Log Data
Perform this backup procedure before you remove power from the
ROC800 for repairs, troubleshooting, or upgrades, This procedure
preserves the current ROC800 configuration and log data held in
SDRAM.
Caution
When working on units located in a hazardous area (where explosive
gases may be present), make sure the area is in a non-hazardous state
before performing procedures. Performing these procedures in a
hazardous area could result in personal injury or property damage.
To avoid circuit damage when working inside the unit, use appropriate
electrostatic discharge precautions, such as wearing a grounded wrist
strap.
1. Launch ROCLINK 800 software.
2. Select from the ROC menu Flags > Save Configuration. This saves
all configuration settings, including the current states of the ROC800
Flags and calibration values. Click OK.
3. Select from the ROC menu > Collect Data. Select all check boxes
and click OK. This saves event logs, alarm logs, report data, hourly
logs, and daily logs (you can specify your own file name and path if
desired).
4. Select File > Save Configuration. The Save As dialog box appears.
5. Type the desired file name of the backup file.
6. Select the directory where you desire to store the configuration file.
7. Click Save.
6.3.2 Restarting the ROC800
After removing power to the ROC800 and installing components,
perform the following steps to start your ROC800 and reconfigure your
data.
Revised Jul-14
Inputs and Outputs
6-5
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Caution
Ensure all input devices, output devices, and processes remain in a
safe state upon restoring power. An unsafe state could result in
property damage.
When working on units located in a hazardous area (where explosive
gases may be present), make sure the area is in a non-hazardous state
before performing procedures. Performing these procedures in a
hazardous area could result in personal injury or property damage.
Note: The procedure assumes you are using ROCLINK 800 software.
1. Reconnect power to the ROC800.
2. Wait 30 seconds.
3. Launch ROCLINK 800 software, log in, and connect to the ROC800.
4. Verify that the configuration is correct. If major portions or the entire
configuration needs to be reloaded, perform the remaining steps.
5. Select File > Download.
6. Select the backup configuration file (with file extension *.800) from
the Open dialog box.
7. Select the portions of the configuration you desire to download
(restore).
8. Click Download to restore the configuration.
9. Configure other required parameters.
6.3.3 Troubleshooting Analog Input Modules
Before you can determine whether an Analog Input module is operating
properly, you must first know its configuration. Table 6-1 shows typical
configuration values for an analog input:
Table 6-1. Analog Input Module Typical Configuration Values
Parameter
Value (AI-12)
Value (AI-16)
Value Read
Adjusted A/D 0 %
819
XXX
1 Volt dc across the + and the COM terminal by a
multimeter
Adjusted A/D 100 %
4095
XXXX
5 Volts dc across the + and the COM terminal by a
multimeter
Low Reading EU
0.0000
X.XXXX
EU Value with 1 Volt dc
High Reading EU
100.0
XXX.X
EU value with 5 Volts dc
Value
xxxxx
xxxx
Value read by AI module
Equipment Required:
6-6

Multimeter

PC running ROCLINK 800 software
Inputs and Outputs
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Caution
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions, such as
wearing a grounded wrist strap may reset the processor or damage
electronic components, resulting in interrupted operations.
1. Connect a multimeter across the scaling resistor connected to the +
and COM terminals of the module and set the multimeter to measure
voltage.
2. Connect to ROCLINK 800 software.
3. Select Configure > I/O > AI Points. The Analog Input screen
displays.
4. Select the correct Analog Input Point number.
5. Verify the following readings:

When the Value is –25% of span as configured in Table 6-1, it is
an indication of no current flow (0 mA), which can result from
open field wiring or a faulty field device. The multimeter should
show 0 (zero) Volts dc.

When the Value is in excess of 100% of span as configured in
Table 6-1, it is an indication of maximum current flow, which can
result from shorted field wiring or a faulty field device. The
multimeter should show over 5 Volts dc.

When the Value is between the Low Reading EU and the High
Reading EU, verify the accuracy of the reading by measuring the
voltage across the terminals with the multimeter.
6. Convert this reading to the Value value:
Value = [((V multimeter – 1) ÷ 4) * Span] + Low Reading EU
where Span = High Reading EU – Low Reading EU.
Note: This calculated value should be within one-tenth of one
percent of the Filter value the ROC800 measures.
7. Verify the accuracy by reading the loop current with a multimeter,
setting the multimeter to measure current in mA, and connecting it in
series with current loop. Be sure to take into account that input values
can change rapidly, which can cause a greater error between the
measured value and the calculated value.
8. Calculate the Value from the mAmp reading of the multimeter:
Value = [((mAmpmultimeter* Rscaling resistor – 1) * 4) * Span] + Low
Reading EU
where Span = High Reading EU – Low Reading EU and Rscaling
resistor should be 250 ohms (factory installed scaling resistor value).
Note: If the calculated value and the measured value are the same,
the AI module is operating correctly.
Revised Jul-14
Inputs and Outputs
6-7
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
9. Remove the test equipment.
6.3.4 Troubleshooting Analog Output Modules
Equipment Required:
Caution

Multimeter.

PC running ROCLINK 800 software.
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions, such as
wearing a grounded wrist strap may reset the processor or damage
electronic components, resulting in interrupted operations.
To calibrate the module:
1. Connect a multimeter between the + and – channel terminals of the
module and set the multimeter to measure current in milliamps.
2. Connect to ROCLINK 800 software.
3. Select Configure > I/O > AO Points. The Analog Output screen
displays.
Note: You can also click the graphic image of the module to display
this screen.
4. Select the appropriate Analog Outputs Point mumber.
5. Select Auto as the Scanning Mode and click Apply.
6. Set the Auto Value field to either the value in the High Reading EU
field or 100 and click Apply. The multimeter should read 20 mA.
7. Select the Advanced tab on the Analog Output screen.
8. Record the displayed values in the Adjusted D/A 100% and Adjusted
D/A 0% fields.
9. Increase or decrease the value in the Adjusted D/A 100% field until
the multimeter reads 20 mA. (This calibrates the High Reading EU
value.) Click Apply.
Note: This step may require some experimentation.
10. Select the General tab on the Analog Output screen.
11. Set the Auto Value field to either the value in the Low Reading EU
field or 0 and click Apply. The multimeter should read 4 mA.
12. Select the Advanced tab on the Analog Output screen.
13. Increase or decrease the value in the Adjusted D/A 0% field until the
multimeter reads 4 mA. (This calibrates the Low Reading EU value.)
Click Apply.
Note: This step may require some experimentation.
6-8
Inputs and Outputs
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
14. Select the General tab on the Analog Output screen.
15. Remove the test equipment, and reconnect the field device.
16. If possible, verify the correct operation of the AO module by setting
the values in the High Reading EU and Low Reading EU fields to the
values you recorded in step 9 and observing the field device.
6.3.5 Troubleshooting Discrete Input Modules
Equipment Required:
Caution

Jumper wire

PC running ROCLINK 800 software
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions, such as
wearing a grounded wrist strap may reset the processor or damage
electronic components, resulting in interrupted operations.
1. Disconnect the field wiring at the DI module terminations.
2. Connect to ROCLINK 800 software.
3. Select Configure > I/O > DI Points. The Discrete Input screen
displays.
Note: You can also click the graphic image of the module to display
this screen.
4. Select the appropriate Discrete Input Point number.
5. Place a jumper across a channel input terminal (1-8) and COM. The
value in the Status field should change to On.
6. Remove the jumper between the channel terminal and COM. The
value in the Status field should change to Off.
7. Remove the test equipment, and reconnect the field device.
6.3.6 Troubleshooting Discrete Output Modules
Equipment Required:
Caution

Multimeter

PC running ROCLINK 800 software
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions, such as
wearing a grounded wrist strap may reset the processor or damage
electronic components, resulting in interrupted operations.
1. Verify the load current requirement does not exceed the current limit
value of the module.
2. Verify that you have correctly wired the module.
Revised Jul-14
Inputs and Outputs
6-9
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
3. Remove all wiring from the DO module.
4. Connect the multimeter set up to measure ohms to the channel that
you are testing.
5. Measure the resistance with the DO Status OFF. It should be over 2
megohms.
6. Measure the resistance with the DO Status ON. It should be
approximately 1 ohm.
6.3.7 Troubleshooting Discrete Output Relay Modules
Equipment Required:
Caution

Multimeter

PC running ROCLINK 800 software
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions, such as
wearing a grounded wrist strap may reset the processor or damage
electronic components, resulting in interrupted operations.
1. Connect the multimeter set up to measure ohms to the channel that
you are testing.
2. Set the Status to On and click Apply.
3. Measure the resistance across the + and – terminals. You should have
a reading of 0 (zero) ohms with an indication of continuity.
4. Measure the resistance across the + and – terminals. You should have
a reading of an open circuit with no continuity indicated.
6.3.8 Troubleshooting Pulse Input Modules
Equipment Required:
Caution

Pulse Generator

Voltage Generator

Frequency Counter

Jumper wire

PC running ROCLINK 800 software
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions, such as
wearing a grounded wrist strap may reset the processor or damage
electronic components, resulting in interrupted operations.
To verify high-speed operation:
6-10
1.
Disconnect the field wiring at the PI module terminations.
2.
Connect to ROCLINK 800 software.
Inputs and Outputs
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
3.
Select Configure > I/O > PI Points. The Pulse Input screen
displays.
4.
Select the correct Pulse Input Point number.
5.
Connect a pulse generator having sufficient output to drive the
module to terminals L+ or H+ and COM. The pulse generator must
synthesize a square wave signal of 50% for every cycle.
6.
Connect a frequency counter across terminals L+ or H+ and COM.
7.
Set the pulse generator to a value equal to or less than (<=) 10 KHz.
8.
Set the frequency counter to count pulses.
9.
Verify (using ROCLINK 800 software) that the count read by the
counter and the ROC800 are the same.
10. Remove the test equipment, and reconnect the field device.
6.3.9 Troubleshooting RTD Input Modules
The RTD module is similar in operation to an Analog Input module and
uses the same troubleshooting and repair procedures.
Equipment Required:
Caution

Multimeter

PC running ROCLINK 800 software
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions, such as
wearing a grounded wrist strap may reset the processor or damage
electronic components, resulting in interrupted operations.
1. Disconnect the field wiring at the RTD module terminations.
2. Connect to the ROCLINK 800 software.
3. Select Configure > I/O > RTD Points. The RTD Input screen
displays.
4. Select the correct RTD Input number.
5. If any of the input wires are broken or not connected, the ROCLINK
800 software indicates the Raw A/D Input value is either at minimum
(less than 47974) or maximum (greater than or equal to 61958) as
follows:

An open at the + terminal gives a maximum reading.

An open at the – terminal gives a minimum reading.

An open at the RET terminal gives a minimum reading.
To verify the operation of the RTD module:
6. Connect to the ROCLINK 800 software.
Revised Jul-14
Inputs and Outputs
6-11
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
7. Select Configure > I/O > RTD Points. The RTD Input screen
displays.
8. Disconnect the RTD and connect one jumper between the – terminal
and RET and another jumper between the + terminal and the REF of
the RTD module.
9. Connect either an accurate resistor or decade resistance box with a
value to give a low end reading across the + and – terminals.
Note: Use the temperature-to-resistance conversion chart to
determine the resistance value required for the type of RTD
being used.
10. Verify that the Raw A/D Input value changed and reflects the
Adjusted A/D 0% value.
11. Change the resistance to reflect a high temperature as determined by
the temperature-to-resistance conversion chart.
12. Verify that the Raw A/D Input value changed and reflects the
Adjusted A/D 100% value.
13. Remove the test equipment, and reconnect the field device.
6.3.10 Troubleshooting Thermocouple Input (T/C) Modules
Note: The TC2 module is not supported in the Series 1 ROC800 CPU.
Many digital multimeters can generate and measure thermocouple (T/C)
signals. Check the manufacturer’s documentation for your multimeter to
see if it supports thermocouples and how to correctly use the feature if so
equipped. You may require an optional T/C adaptor to use the multimeter.
To test a thermocouple, do not parallel the voltage meter on a
thermocouple that is connected to a ROC800, as it will distort the signal.
Do not try to verify a thermocouple that is connected and actively being
monitored by a ROC800 by measuring the voltage at the ROC800
terminal blocks.
It is suggested that you independently verify the process temperature, by
using a certified thermometer in an adjacent thermowell, and then
compare it to what the ROC800 is reading.
Equipment Required:
6-12

Multimeter

PC running ROCLINK 800 software
Inputs and Outputs
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Caution
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions, such as
wearing a grounded wrist strap may reset the processor or damage
electronic components, resulting in interrupted operations.
To test the thermocouple module:
1. Disconnect the thermocouple from the thermocouple module.
2. Generate the correct J or K signal using a multimeter and connect the
wiring from the multimeter to the T/C module.
3. Verify the ROC is reading the generated temperature from the
multimeter.
4. Remove the test equipment, and reconnect the field device.
To test the thermocouple:
1. Disconnect the thermocouple from the ROC800.
2. Connect the thermocouple directly to the multimeter and verify the
reading is correct by comparing it to a certified temperature
measurement device connected to the process temperature the T/C is
measuring.
3. Remove the test equipment, and reconnect the field device.
Unintentional thermocouple junctions cause many measurement errors.
Remember that any junction of two different metals will cause a
thermocouple junction. To increase the length of the leads from the
thermocouple, use the correct type of thermocouple extension wire. Any
connector must be made of the correct thermocouple material and correct
polarity must be observed.
If the reading is off:
1. The type J or K thermocouples are selected on a per channel basis on
the thermocouple module. Verify each channel on the ROC800 and
make sure it is set for the type of thermocouple that you are using.
2. Ensure any plugs, sockets, or terminal blocks used to connect the
extension wire are made from the same metals as the thermocouples
and correct polarity is observed.
3. Verify all connections are tight.
4. Verify the thermocouples have the correct construction (ungrounded)
and are not grounded by other means.
5. Verify you are using the correct thermocouple wire all the way from
the thermocouple to the ROC800 with minimal connections.
6. Verify the wiring run is adequately protected from noise.
7. Test the thermocouple reading from the thermocouple to a meter, and
then generate a signal into the ROC800 as described previously.
Revised Jul-14
Inputs and Outputs
6-13
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
8. Finally, connect a thermocouple of the same type directly to the
ROC800. If it reads correctly, the problem is likely to be in the wiring
to the field or may be related to a ground loop.
6.3.11 Troubleshooting Advanced Pulse Modules
Equipment Required:
Caution

Pulse Generator

Voltage Generator

Frequency Counter

Jumper wire

PC running ROCLINK 800 software
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions, such as
wearing a grounded wrist strap may reset the processor or damage
electronic components, resulting in interrupted operations.
To verify high-speed operation:
1.
Disconnect the field wiring at the APM module terminations.
2.
Connect to ROCLINK 800 software.
3.
Select Configure > I/O > Advanced Pulse Module. The Advanced
Pulse Module screen displays.
4.
Select the correct Pulse Input Point Number.
5.
Connect a pulse generator having sufficient output to drive the
module to terminals PI1 through PI4 and COM. The pulse generator
must synthesize a square wave signal of 50% for every cycle.
6.
Connect a frequency counter across terminals PI1 through PI4 and
COM.
7.
Set the pulse generator to a value equal to, or less than 10 kHz.
8.
Set the frequency counter to count pulses.
9.
Verify (using ROCLINK 800 software) that the count read by the
counter and the ROC800 are the same.
10. Remove the test equipment and reconnect the field device.
6.3.12 Network Radio Modules
To verify connectivity of the Network Radio Module:
1. Check the module status and LEDs if you are already configured and
joined to a network.
2. Verify COM status for the commissioned devices by looking at the
RL800 RTU commission list.
6-14
Inputs and Outputs
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
3. Verify that Access Points have unique settings for the Network ID
and Channel.

If a duplicate Network ID and Channel exists on the network, a
node may indicate connectivity to a Network but will not appear
in the Discovery list.

A node will not appear on the Access Points Discovery list if there
is a second unit setup as an access point.
4. If you are still experiencing trouble with a Network Radio Module,
check for any possible physical interference from the environment:
Revised Jul-14

Raise antennas above obstructions like trees or compressors. For
best communication, the antennas must have line of sight.

Mount antennas outside of metal enclosures. Antennas must have
at least 10 feet of vertical separation from other antennas.

Check for mismatched antennas. Avoid using the incorrect
antenna for the frequency of radio. Make sure that the antenna
used is for the frequency range of the radio.

Check if the cable runs are too long or if the cable is of the wrong
type. Less than 3 dB of loss for the entire cable run is
recommended. LMR-400 has 3.8dB of loss per 100 feet. The
recommended maximum is 75 feet.

Waterproof all cable connections. If water gets into the cable, it
can cause high VSWR/antenna reflect power.
Inputs and Outputs
6-15
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
[This page is intentionally left blank]
6-16
Inputs and Outputs
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Chapter 7 – Calibration
This chapter provides overview information about calibration
procedures for the Analog Input (AI) modules, HART module, RTD
Input module, and Multi-Variable Sensor modules (MVS and MVS
I/O).
For the full calibration procedure, refer Refer to the ROCLINK 800
Configuration Software User Manual (for ROC800-Series) (Part
Number D301250X012)or the ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software
User Manual (for ROC800L) (Part Number D301246X012).
In This Chapter
7.1
7.2
7.3
Caution
Calibration Overview ........................................................................ 7-1
Calibration Frequency ...................................................................... 7-1
Preparing for Calibration .................................................................. 7-2
Before beginning the calibration process, determine if the module is
used in a control application. If the module is part of a control
application, ensure the system is off-line before proceeding.
7.1 Calibration Overview
Use ROCLINK 800 Configuration software to perform initial
calibration or re-calibration of the inputs on the AI, HART, RTD, and
MVS modules. For example, you might re-calibrate after changing an
orifice plate in the meter run the ROC800 handles. You can perform
calibrations on sensor inputs from either orifice meter runs or turbine
meter runs.
The AI, MVS, and RTD calibration routines support five-point
calibration, with the three mid-points calibrated in any order. You
calibrate the low-end (zero reading) first, followed by the high-end
(full-scale) reading. You then calibrate up to three mid-points, if
necessary.
The HART calibration routine supports two-point calibration. You
calibrate the low-end or zero reading is calibrated first, followed by the
high-end or full-scale reading.
7.2 Calibration Frequency
Remote Automation Solutions recommends that your organization
establish a routine—quarterly, semi-annual, or annual—pattern of
verification and/or calibration for devices and software that meets or
exceeds the API 21.1 recommended practices.
Establishing verification and calibration routines ensures not only that
your devices and software are functioning optimally but that your
Revised Jul-14
Calibration
7-1
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
organization is in compliance with appropriate industry and
governmental requirements.
7.3 Preparing for Calibration
Before calibrating the inputs from a sensor, HART device, or other
device, you should prepare the ROC800.
1. Verify the inputs are correctly wired. For information on wiring the
inputs, refer to Chapter 4, Input/Output Modules.
2. If you are calibrating a pressure sensor input, be sure to remove the
sensor from the flow as directed in the calibration procedure in the
ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software User Manual (for ROC800Series) (Part Number D301250X012)or the ROCLINK 800
Configuration Software User Manual (for ROC800L) (Part Number
D301246X012).
3. Verify that you have connected any external monitoring devices
(such as multimeters) to the ROC800, if they are required for the
calibration.
7-2
Calibration
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Appendix A – Glossary
Note: This is a generalized glossary of terms. Not all the terms may
necessarily correspond to the particular device or software
described in this manual. For that reason, the term “ROC” is
used to identify all varieties of Remote Operations Controllers
(including ROC800-Series, ROC800L, DL8000, FloBoss™
107, and FloBoss™ 100-Series). Refer to Measurement Units,
Symbols, and Abbreviations (Form A6302) for additional
information.
A
A/D
Analog to Digital signal conversion.
ABS
Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene.
ADC
Analog to Digital Converter. Used to convert analog inputs (AI) to a format the flow
computer can use.
AGA
American Gas Association. A professional organization that oversees the AGA3
(orifice), AGA5 (heating value), AGA7 (turbine), AGA8 (compressibility), and AGA11
(ultrasonic) gas flow calculation standards. See http://www.aga.org.
AWG
American Wire Gauge.
AI
Analog Input.
AO
Analog Output.
Analog
Analog data is represented by a continuous variable, such as an electrical current
signal.
AP
Absolute Pressure.
API
American Petroleum Institute. See http://www.api.org.
Area
A user-defined grouping of database entities.
ASCII
American (National) Standard Code for Information Interchange.
Attribute
A parameter that provides information about an aspect of a database point. For
example, the alarm attribute is an attribute that uniquely identifies the configured value
of an alarm.
B
BMV
Base Multiplier Value, used in AGA7 (turbine) calculations.
BPS
Bits Per Second, associated with baud rate.
BTU
British Thermal Unit, a measure of heat energy.
Built-in I/O
I/O channels that are fabricated into the ROC and do not require a separate option.
Also called “on-board” I/O.
C1D2
Class 1, Division 2 hazardous area
CMOS
Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor, a type of microprocessor used in a ROC.
Coil
Digital output, a bit to be cleared or set.
COL
Ethernet Packet Collision.
COM
Communications port on a personal computer (PC).
C
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Glossary
A-1
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
C (continued)
COMM
Communications port on a ROC used for host communications. .
Note: On FloBoss 500-Series and FloBoss 407s, COMM1 is built-in for RS-232 serial
communications.
Comm Module
Module that plugs into a ROC to provide a channel for communications via a specified
communications protocol, such as EIA-422 (RS-422) or HART.
CF
Compare Flag; stores the Signal Value Discrete (SVD).
Configuration
Refers either to the process of setting up the software for a given system or the result
of performing this process. The configuration activity includes editing the database,
building schematic displays and reports, and defining user calculations. Typically, the
software setup of a device that can often be defined and changed. Can also mean the
hardware assembly scheme.
Configuration
Tree
In ROCLINK 800, the graphical display that appears when a configuration file opens. It
is a hierarchical branching (“tree-style”) method for navigating within the configuration
screens.
CPU
Central Processing Unit.
CRC
Cyclical Redundancy Check error checking.
Crosstalk
The amount of signal that crosses over between the receive and transmit pairs, and
signal attenuation, which is the amount of signal loss encountered on the Ethernet
segment.
CSA
Canadian Standards Association. See http://www.csa.ca.
CSMA/CD
Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection.
CTS
Clear to Send modem communications signal.
D/A
Digital to Analog signal conversion.
DB
Database.
dB
Decibel. A unit for expressing the ratio of the magnitudes of two electric signals on a
logarithmic scale.
dBm
Power ratio in decibels (dB), referenced to one milliwatt (mW), also known as dBmW.
DCD
Data Carrier Detect modem communications signal. In addition, Discrete Control
Device – A discrete control device energizes a set of discrete outputs for a given
setpoint and matches the desired result against a set of discrete inputs (DI).
DCE
Data Communication Equipment.
Deadband
A value that is an inactive zone above the low limits and below the high limits. The
purpose of the deadband is to prevent a value (such as an alarm) from being set and
cleared continuously when the input value is oscillating around the specified limit. This
also prevents the logs or data storage location from being over-filled with data.
Device
Directory
In ROCLINK 800, the graphical display that allows navigation through the PC Comm
Ports and ROC Comm Ports setup screen.
DI
Discrete Input.
Discrete
Input or output that is non-continuous, typically representing two levels (such as on/off).
DMM
Digital multimeter.
DO
Discrete Output.
Download
The process of sending data, a file, or a program from a PC to a ROC.
DP
Differential Pressure.
DRN
Distributed RTU Network, in which two or more remotely distributed RTU devices
(RRTUs) are wirelessly connected in a peer-to-peer network to share data.
D
A-2
Glossary
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
D (continued)
DRTU
A primary component of the Distributed RTU Network, consisting of a FB107 chassis
housing a focused functionality CPU and a Network Radio module (NRM). The DRTU
collects process variables from one or more wellheads and transmits the signals
throughout the designed network.
DSR
Data Set Ready modem communications signal.
DTE
Data Terminal Equipment.
DTR
Data Terminal Ready modem communications signal.
Duty Cycle
Proportion of time during a cycle that a device is activated. A short duty cycle
conserves power for I/O channels, radios, and so on.
DVM
Digital voltmeter.
DVS
Dual-Variable Sensor. A device that provides static and differential pressure inputs to a
ROC.
EDS
Electronic Static Discharge.
EEPROM
Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory, a form of permanent memory
on a ROC.
EFM
Electronic Flow Metering or Measurement.
EIA-232
(RS-232)
Serial Communications Protocol using three or more signal lines, intended for short
distances. Concerning RS232D and RS232C, the letters C or D refer to the physical
connector type. D specifies the RJ-11 connector where a C specifies a DB25 type
connector.
EIA-422
(RS-422)
Serial Communications Protocol using four signal lines.
EIA-485
(RS-485)
Serial Communications Protocol requiring only two signal lines. Can allow up to 32
devices to be connected together in a daisy-chained fashion.
EMF
Electro-Motive Force.
EMI
Electro-Magnetic Interference.
ESD
Electro-Static Discharge.
EU
Engineering Units. Units of measure, such as MCF/DAY.
FCC
Federal Communications Commission. See http://www.fcc.gov.
Firmware
Internal software that is factory-loaded into a form of ROM. In a ROC, the firmware
supplies the software used for gathering input data, converting raw input data values,
storing values, and providing control signals.
FlashPAC
module
ROM and RAM module for a ROC300-Series unit that contains the operating system,
applications firmware, and communications protocol.
Flash ROM
A type of read-only memory that can be electrically re-programmed. It is a form of
permanent memory (requires no backup power). Also called Flash memory.
FloBoss
A microprocess-based device that provides flow calculations, remote monitoring, and
remote control. A FloBoss is a type of ROC.
FM
Factory Mutual.
E
F
Force
Write an ON/OFF, True/False, or 1/0 value to a coil.
™
FOUNDATION
Fieldbus
An open architecture for information integration, managed by the Fieldbus Foundation
(www.fieldbus.org).
FPV
Compressibility Factor.
Revised Jul-14
Glossary
A-3
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
F (continued)
FSK
Frequency Shift Keypad.
FST
Function Sequence Table, a type of user-written program in a high-level language
designed by Emerson Process Management’s Flow Computer Division.
Ft
Foot or feet.
GFA
Ground Fault Analysis.
GHz
Gigahertz, 10 cycles per second
GND
Electrical ground, such as used by the ROC’s power supply.
GP
Gauge Pressure.
H1
A Foundation Fieldbus protocol operating at 31.25 kbit/s that interconnects field
devices (such as sensors or I/O devices).
HART
Highway Addressable Remote Transducer.
Holding
Register
Analog output number value to be read.
HSE Protocol
High Speed Ethernet protocol; a communications protocol operating at 100 Mbit/s used
to integrate high-speed controllers (or servers) connected via Ethernet.
Hw
Differential pressure.
Hz
Hertz.
G
9
H
I, J
IC
Integrated Circuit. Also, Industry Canada (more recently known as Measurement
Canada), an organization that grants custody transfer approvals on certain ROC units.
ID
Identification.
IEC
Industrial Electrical Code or International Electrotechnical Commission. See
http://www.iec.ch.
IEEE
Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers. A professional organization that, in
conjunction with the International Standards Organization (ISO), establishes and
maintains the Open System Interconnection (OSI) reference model and an international
standard for the organization of local area networks (LANs). Refer to
http://www.ieee.org.
IMV
Integral Multiplier Value, used in AGA3 (orifice) calculations.
Input
Digital input, a bit to be read.
Input Register
Input numeric value to be read.
Local Port
Also LOI; the serial EIA-232 (RS-232) port on the ROC through which local
communications are established, typically for configuration software running on a PC.
I/O
Input/Output.
I/O Module
Module that plugs into an I/O slot on a ROC to provide an I/O channel.
IRQ
Interrupt Request. Hardware address oriented.
ISO
International Standards Organization. See http://www.iso.ch.
IV
Integral Value.
A-4
Glossary
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
K
KB
Kilobytes.
kHz
KiloHertz.
LCD
Liquid Crystal Display.
LDP
Local Display Panel, a display-only device that plugs into ROC300-Series units (via a
parallel interface cable) used to access information stored in the ROC.
LED
Light-Emitting Diode.
Logical Number
The point number the ROC and ROC Plus protocols use for I/O point types are based
on a physical input or output with a terminal location; the point numbers for all other
point types are “logical” and are simply numbered in sequence.
LNK
Ethernet has linked.
LOI
Local Operator Interface (or Local Port). Refers to the serial EAI-232 (RS-232) port on
the ROC through which local communications are established, typically for
configuration software running on a PC.
LPM
Lightning Protection Module; a device that provides lightning and power surge
protection for ROCs.
LRC
Longitudinal Redundancy Checking error checking.
m
Meter.
mA
Milliamp(s); one thousandth of an ampere.
MAC Address
Media Access Control Address; a hardware address that uniquely identifies each node
of a network.
Manual mode
For a ROC, indicates that the I/O scanning has been disabled.
MAU
Medium Attachment Unit.
MCU
Master Controller Unit.
Modbus
A popular device communications protocol developed by Gould-Modicon.
MPU
Micro-Processor Unit.
mm
Millimeter.
L
M
MMBTU
Million British Thermal Units.
msec
Millisecond, or 0.001 second.
MVS
Multi-Variable Sensor. A device that provides differential pressure, static pressure, and
temperature inputs to a ROC for orifice flow calculations.
mV
Millivolts, or 0.001 volt.
mW
Milliwatts, or 0.001 watt.
NAP
Network Access Point; the point in the distributed RTU network at which ROCLINK 800
NEC
National Electrical Code.
NEMA
National Electrical Manufacturer’s Association. See http://www.nema.org.
N
Revised Jul-14
Glossary
A-5
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
N (continued)
Node
A basic structural component of the Distributed RTU Network. A node (usually a FB107
chassis housing a focused-functionality CPU and a Network Radio module) provides a
data collection point that wirelessly transmits data throughout the designed network.
NRM
Network Radio module; a module used in both the FloBoss 107 and ROC00-Series
based devices to wirelessly transmit information throughout the distributed RTU
network.
O
OH
Off-Hook modem communications signal.
Off-line
Accomplished while the target device is not connected (by a communications link). For
example, “off-line configuration” refers to configuring an electronic file that is later
loaded into a ROC.
Ohms
Units of electrical resistance.
On-line
Accomplished while connected (by a communications link) to the target device. For
example, “on-line configuration” refers to configuring a ROC800-Series unit while
connected to it, so that you can view the current parameter values and immediately
load new values.
Opcode
Type of message protocol the ROC uses to communicate with the configuration
software, as well as host computers with ROC driver software.
Operator
Interface
Also LOI or Local Port; the serial EIA-232 (RS-232) port on the ROC through which
local communications are established, typically for configuration software running on a
PC.
Orifice meter
A meter that records the flow rate of gas through a pipeline. The flow rate is calculated
from the pressure differential created by the fluid passing through an orifice of a
particular size and other parameters.
P, Q
Parameter
A property of a point that typically can be configured or set. For example, the Point Tag
ID is a parameter of an Analog Input point. Parameters are normally edited by using
configuration software running on a PC.
PC
Personal Computer.
Pf
Flowing pressure.
P/DP
Pressure/Differential Pressure.
PI
Pulse Input.
PID
Proportional, Integral, and Derivative control feedback action.
PIT
Periodic Timer Interrupt.
PLC
Programmable Logic Controller.
Point
Software-oriented term for an I/O channel or some other function, such as a flow
calculation. Points are defined by a collection of parameters.
Point Number
The physical location of an I/O point (module slot and channel) as installed in the ROC.
Point Type
Defines the database point to be a specific type of point available to the system. The
point type determines the basic functions of a point.
Preset
Number value previously determined for a register.
PRI
Primary PID control loop.
Protocol
A set of standards that enables communication or file transfers between two
computers. Protocol parameters include baud rate, parity, data bits, stop bit, and the
A-6
Glossary
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
type of duplex.
PSTN
Public Switched Telephone Network.
PT
Process Temperature.
PTT
Push-to-Talk signal.
Pulse
Transient variation of a signal whose value is normally constant.
Pulse Interface
module
A module that provides line pressure, auxiliary pressure, and pulse counts to a ROC.
PV
Process Variable or Process Value.
Rack
A row of slots on a ROC into which I/O modules can be plugged. Racks are given a
letter to physically identify the location of an I/O channel (such as “A” for the first rack).
Built-in I/O channels are assigned a rack identifier of “A” while diagnostic I/O channels
are considered to be in “E” rack.
RAM
Random Access Memory. RAM is used to store history, data, most user programs, and
additional configuration data.
RBX
Report-by-exception. RBX always refers to Spontaneous RBX in which the ROC
contacts the host to report an alarm condition.
RR
Results Register; stores the Signal Value Analog (SVA).
RFI
Radio Frequency Interference.
RI
Ring Indicator modem communications signal.
ROC
Remote Operations Controller microprocessor-based unit that provides remote
monitoring and control.
ROCLINK 800
Microsoft® Windows®-based software used to configure functionality in ROC units.
ROM
Read-only memory. Typically used to store firmware. Flash memory.
Rotary Meter
A positive displacement meter used to measure flow rate, also known as a Roots
meter.
RTC
Real-Time Clock.
RTD
Resistance Temperature Detector.
RTS
Ready to Send modem communications signal.
RTU
Remote Terminal Unit.
RTV
Room Temperature Vulcanizing, typically a sealant or caulk such as silicon rubber.
RS-232
Serial Communications Protocol using three or more signal lines, intended for short
distances. Also referred to as the EIA-232 standard.
RS-422
Serial Communications Protocol using four signal lines. Also referred to as the EIA-422
standard.
RS-485
Serial Communications Protocol requiring only two signal lines. Can allow up to 32
devices to be connected together in a daisy-chained fashion. Also referred to as the
EIA-485 standard.
RX or RXD
Received Data communications signal.
SAMA
Scientific Apparatus Maker’s Association.
SCADA
Supervisory control and data acquisition; referring to a computer system that monitors
and controls oil and gas pipeline systems.
R
S
Revised Jul-14
Glossary
A-7
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
S (continued)
Script
An uncompiled text file (such as keystrokes for a macro) that a program interprets in
order to perform certain functions. Typically, the end user can easily create or edit
scripts to customize the software.
Soft Points
A type of ROC point with generic parameters that can be configured to hold data as
desired by the user.
SP
Setpoint, or Static Pressure.
SPI
Slow Pulse Input.
SPK
Speaker.
SRAM
Static Random Access Memory. Stores data as long as power is applied; typically
backed up by a lithium battery or supercapacitor.
SRBX
Spontaneous Report-By-Exception. SRBX always refers to Spontaneous RBX in which
the ROC contacts the host to report an alarm condition.
SVA
Signal Value Analog. Stored in the Results Register, it is the analog value that is
passed between functions in an FST.
SVD
Signal Value Discrete. Stored in the Compare Flag, it is the discrete value that is
passed down the sequence of functions in an FST.
System
Variables
Configured parameters that describe the ROC; set using ROCLINK software.
T/C
Thermocouple Input.
TCP/IP
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol.
TDI
Time Duration Input.
TDO
Time Duration Output.
Tf
Flowing temperature.
T
TLP
Type (of point), Logical (or point) number, and Parameter number.
TX or TXD
Transmitted Data communications signal.
Turbine meter
A device used to measure flow rate and other parameters.
Upload
Send data, a file, or a program from the ROC to a PC or other host.
USB
Universal Serial Bus, a serial bus standard used to connect devices.
U
V-Z
V
A-8
Volts.
Glossary
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Appendix B – Wiring Diagrams
This appendix presents wiring examples for several standard Emerson
devices. For other devices, refer to the manufacturer’s specifications.
B.1
Daniel Senior Sonic Meter to PI Module
5
6
DANIEL
SENIOR SONIC
METER
4
12KHz PI FILTER &
LEVEL DETECTION
1
2
3
J4
12KHz PI FILTER &
LEVEL DETECTION
DOC0737A
Revised Jul-14
Wiring Diagrams
B-1
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
B.2
Daniel 1818A and 1838 Turbine Pre-Amp to PI Module
DANIEL PREAMP
1818A
12KHz PI FILTER &
LEVEL DETECTION
15-28 VDC
B
SQR. WAVE
A
COMMON
C
PICKUP
COIL
D
E
12KHz PI FILTER &
LEVEL DETECTION
PICKUP
COIL
15-28 VDC
B
SQR. WAVE
A
COMMON
C
TURBINE
METER
TURBINE
METER
D
E
DANIEL PREAMP
1818A
DOC0738A
DANIEL PREAMP
1838
PICKUP
COIL
TURBINE
METER
6
5
4
3
12KHz PI FILTER &
LEVEL DETECTION
2
1
12KHz PI FILTER &
LEVEL DETECTION
PICKUP
COIL
TURBINE
METER
6
5
4
3
2
DOC0739A
1
DANIEL PREAMP
1838
B-2
Wiring Diagrams
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
B.3
Micro Motion RFT9739 & 2400S Transmitters to PI Module
MICRO MOTION
RFT9739
TRANSMITTER
14
15
16
17
12KHz PI FILTER &
LEVEL DETECTION
12KHz PI FILTER &
LEVEL DETECTION
14
15
16
17
MICRO MOTION
RFT9739
TRANSMITTER
DOC0740A
MICRO MOTION
2400S
TRANSMITTER
3
4
1
2
12KHz PI FILTER &
LEVEL DETECTION
12KHz PI FILTER &
LEVEL DETECTION
3
4
1
2
MICRO MOTION
2400S
TRANSMITTER
DOC0741A
Revised Jul-14
Wiring Diagrams
B-3
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
B.4
Micro Motion RFT9739 & 2400S Transmitters to APM Module
MICRO MOTION
RFT9739
TRANSMITTER
14
15
16
17
14
15
16
17
MICRO MOTION
RFT9739
TRANSMITTER
MICRO MOTION
2400S
TRANSMITTER
3
4
1
2
3
4
1
2
MICRO MOTION
2400S
TRANSMITTER
B-4
Wiring Diagrams
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
B.5
3- and 4-Wire RTD to RTD Module
4 - WIRE RTD
3 - WIRE RTD
Revised Jul-14
Wiring Diagrams
B-5
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
B.6
Daniel Senior Sonic Meter to APM Module
4
5
6
DANIEL
SENIOR SONIC
METER
4
5
6
1
2
3
J4
1
2
3
J4
DANIEL
SENIOR SONIC
METER
B-6
Wiring Diagrams
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
B.7
Daniel 1818A and 1838 Dual Turbine Pre-Amp to APM Module
DANIEL PREAMP
1818A
15-28 VDC
B
SQR. WAVE
A
COMMON
C
PICKUP
COIL
D
E
PICKUP
COIL
15-28 VDC
B
SQR. WAVE
A
COMMON
C
TURBINE
METER
TURBINE
METER
D
E
DANIEL PREAMP
1818A
DANIEL PREAMP
1838
PICKUP
COIL
TURBINE
METER
6
5
4
3
2
1
PICKUP
COIL
TURBINE
METER
6
5
4
3
2
1
DANIEL PREAMP
1838
Revised Jul-14
Wiring Diagrams
B-7
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
B.8
Daniel 1818A and 1838 Turbine Pre-Amp to APM Module
DANIEL PREAMP
1818A
15-28 VDC
B
SQR. WAVE
A
COMMON
C
15-28 VDC
B
SQR. WAVE
A
COMMON
C
PICKUP
COIL
TURBINE
METER
D
E
PICKUP
COIL
D
E
DANIEL PREAMP
1818A
DANIEL PREAMP
1838
PICKUP
COIL
TURBINE
METER
6
5
4
3
2
PICKUP
COIL
1
6
5
4
3
2
1
DANIEL PREAMP
1838
B-8
Wiring Diagrams
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
B.9
Two-Stage Valve with Two Limit Switches to ACIO Module
PERMISSIVE POWER AC L1
PERMISSIVE
NEUTRAL
N.O. MICRO SWITCH
N.C. MICRO SWITCH
UPSTR
SOL DNSTR
SOL
UPSTREAM SOLENOID N.O.
DOWNSTREAM SOLENOID N.C.
Revised Jul-14
Wiring Diagrams
B-9
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
[This page is intentionally left blank.]
B-10
Wiring Diagrams
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Index
AUX Terminal ...................................................... 3-2
AUX+ and AUX– ................................... 3-2, 3-3, 3-8
LEDs ............................................................... 3-3
Auxiliary
Wiring.............................................................. 3-8
Auxiliary Output ................................................... 3-8
Auxiliary Output Fuse
Installing........................................................ 3-10
AUX SW Terminal ................................................. 3-2
AUX SW + and AUX SW –................................ 3-2, 3-10
Numerics
+12 V dc
Analog Input ................................................... 4-8
Pulse Input.................................................... 4-12
+24 V dc
Analog Input ................................................... 4-8
Pulse Input.................................................... 4-12
+T ........................................................................ 4-8
12 V dc
Power Input module ....................................... 3-1
16-Point Addressing ......................................... 1-14
24 V dc
Power Input module ....................................... 3-3
3- & 4-Wire RTD ................................................. B-5
30 V dc
Power Input module ....................................... 3-4
8-Point Addressing ........................................... 1-14
B
Backplane ......................................................... 2-10
Backplane, hardware .......................................... 1-5
BAT Terminal ...................................................... 3-2
BAT+ and BAT– .................................................. 3-2
Batteries
Replacing Internal ......................................... 3-30
Wiring External ............................................. 3-29
Battery
Backup ............................................................ 1-9
High .............................................................. 1-18
Low ............................................................... 1-18
Storage ......................................................... 3-25
Burst Mode ........................................................ 4-32
A
AC Discrete Inputs ............................................ 4-26
AC Discrete Outputs ......................................... 4-25
AC I/O Module
DIP switches ................................................. 4-25
ACIO Module to Two-stage Valve ...................... B-9
Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) ................ 1-5
Addressing
16-Point ........................................................ 1-14
Addressing Module Slots .................................. 1-14
AI modules
Troubleshooting .............................................. 6-6
Alarming
SRBX/RBX ................................................... 1-21
Analog Inputs ...................................................... 4-7
+12 and +24 V dc ........................................... 4-8
System ............................................................ 1-9
Analog Outputs ................................................... 4-9
AO modules
Troubleshooting .............................................. 6-8
APM Module
DIP switches ................................................. 4-20
APM Module to Daniel 1818A/1838 Dual Turbine
Pre-Amps .......................................................... B-7
APM Module to Daniel 1818A/1838 Turbine PreAmps ................................................................. B-8
APM Module to Daniel Senior Sonic Meter ........ B-6
APM Module to Micro Motion RFT9739/2400S
Transmitters ...................................................... B-4
APM modules
Troubleshooting ............................................ 6-14
APP 485 module ............................................... 4-35
AT Command .................................................... 5-13
Attaching an EXP .............................................. 2-11
Automatic Self Tests ......................................... 1-17
Revised Jul-14
C
Calculations
Liquid hydrocarbons ..................................... 1-17
Calibration ........................................................... 7-1
Central Processing Unit
See CPU ....................................................... 2-13
CHG+ and CHG– ................................................ 3-2
Clock ................................................................... 1-9
Cold Junction Compensation (CJC) ................. 4-28
Comm ports
Reset ............................................................ 2-16
Comm1 through Comm5..................................... 5-1
Communication
Built-in ............................................................. 5-1
Dial-up modem ............................................. 5-13
EIA-232 (RS-232) module .............................. 5-9
EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) modules ............ 5-10
Ethernet .......................................................... 5-7
Installing modules ........................................... 5-3
Local Port........................................................ 5-5
Modules .......................................................... 5-1
MVS I/O ........................................................ 5-14
Network Radio module ................................. 5-14
Removing a module ........................................ 5-5
Wiring.............................................................. 5-5
Communication modules
Specifications ............................................... 5-16
Communications
Index
I-1
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
HART Interface module ................................ 4-31
Port Locations .................................................5-1
Configuration Data
Preserving .......................................................6-5
Configuration, Tuning ....................................... 3-15
CPU .................................................................. 2-19
Connector Locations .................................... 2-15
Description ......................................................1-9
Installing ....................................................... 2-17
Removing ..................................................... 2-17
Series 1 and 2 .............................................. 2-13
Pulse Input .................................................... 3-21
RTD ..................................................... 3-23, 3-24
TC ................................................................. 3-23
E
EIA-232 (RS-232) Communication ..................... 5-9
Built-in Comm2 ............................................. 5-10
LEDs ............................................................. 5-10
Local Port ....................................................... 5-6
Module Comm3 to Comm5 .......................... 5-10
EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) Communication
Jumpers and Termination Resistors............. 5-11
LEDs ............................................................. 5-11
modules ........................................................ 5-10
Selecting 422 or 485 Mode .......................... 5-11
Termination ................................................... 5-11
Enclosure ............................................................ 2-2
End Caps ............................................................ 2-6
Environment ........................................................ 2-2
Ethernet Communications .................................. 5-7
Ethernet wiring .................................................... 5-8
EUs ..................................................................... 6-7
Event Log
ROC800 ........................................................ 1-15
ROC800L ...................................................... 1-16
EXP ..................................................... 1-5, 1-7, 2-10
Attaching ....................................................... 2-11
Detaching ..................................................... 2-12
D
Daniel 1818A Dual Turbine Pre-Amp ................. B-7
Daniel 1818A Turbine Pre-Amp.................. B-2, B-8
Daniel 1838 Dual Turbine Pre-Amp.................... B-7
Daniel 1838 Turbine Pre-Amp ............. B-2, B-8, B-9
Daniel Senior Sonic Meter .......................... B-1, B-6
Defaults
Gateway ..........................................................5-7
TCP/IP .............................................................5-7
Detaching an EXP ............................................ 2-12
Determining Power Consumption ..................... 3-11
Devices
Wiring ............................................................. B-1
DI modules
Troubleshooting ...............................................6-9
Diagnostic
Inputs ...............................................................1-9
Dial-up modem
Communication module................................ 5-13
LEDs ............................................................. 5-13
Wiring ........................................................... 5-13
DIN .......................................................................2-7
DIP switches
AC I/O ........................................................... 4-25
APM .............................................................. 4-20
Direct Connect .....................................................5-7
Discrete Inputs .................................................. 4-10
LEDs ............................................................. 4-11
Discrete Output Relay
LEDs ............................................................. 4-15
Discrete Outputs ............................................... 4-13
LEDs ............................................................. 4-14
Relay ............................................................ 4-15
DO modules
Troubleshooting ...............................................6-9
DOR modules
Troubleshooting ............................................ 6-10
Dry Relay Contacts ........................................... 4-11
DS800 Development Suite software.......... 1-23, 5-7
Duty Cycle ........................................................ 3-12
Analog Input ................................................. 3-16
Analog Output .............................................. 3-17
Discrete Input ............................................... 3-18
Discrete Output ............................................ 3-19
Discrete Output Relay .................................. 3-20
MVS .............................................................. 3-22
I-2
F
FCC Information................................................ 1-11
Field wiring
Analog Input modules ..................................... 4-8
Analog Output module .................................. 4-10
Discrete Input module .................................. 4-11
Discrete Output module ................................ 4-14
Discrete Output Relay module ..................... 4-16
Pulse Input module (externally powered) ..... 4-13
Pulse Input module (ROC800-powered) ...... 4-13
Field Wiring
AC I/O ........................................................... 4-27
APM .............................................................. 4-18
Figures
1-1. ROC827 .................................................. 1-6
1-2. ROC827 and Expansion Backplane ....... 1-7
1-3. ROCLINK 800 Dynamic Graphical Interface
.................................................................... 1-21
2-1. Side View, ROC827 ................................ 2-8
2-2. Bottom View, ROC827 ............................ 2-8
2-3. Back View, ROC827 ............................... 2-9
2-4. ROC827 and Expansion Backplane ..... 2-10
2-5. Power Connector on EXP ..................... 2-11
2-6. Plastic snaps on EXP ............................ 2-12
2-7. CPU Front View (Series 1 and Series 2
CPU Modules) ............................................ 2-14
2-8. CPU Connectors ................................... 2-15
2-9. License key ........................................... 2-18
Index
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
2-10. License Key Installation ...................... 2-19
3-1. 12 V dc Power Input module ................... 3-2
3-2. 24 Vdc Power Input module .................... 3-4
3-3. PM-30 module ......................................... 3-5
3-4. Low voltage disconnect device between
ROC800 and power source .......................... 3-6
3-5. Low voltage disconnect device between
solar regulatory circuitry and ROC800 ......... 3-7
3-6. Auxiliary Switch (AUX SW) output terminals
on the PM-30 ................................................ 3-7
3-7. Auxiliary Power Wiring for PM-12 Module
...................................................................... 3-8
3-8. Auxiliary Power Wiring for PM-24 Module
...................................................................... 3-9
3-9. Auxiliary Power Wiring for PM-30 Module
...................................................................... 3-9
3-9. Backup Battery on CPU Module ........... 3-26
3-11. 12 Volts dc Power Supply and BAT+ /
BAT- Wiring (PM-12 shown) ..................... 3-28
3-12. 12 Vdc Power Supply and CHG+ / CHG–
Wiring ......................................................... 3-29
4-1. Typical I/O Module .................................. 4-2
4-2. Optional I/O Module Locations ................ 4-2
4-3. Installing an I/O Module .......................... 4-6
4-4. AI-12 Jumper J4 (at +12V) ...................... 4-8
4-5. Analog Input Module Field Wiring ........... 4-8
4-6. AI-16 DIP Switches ................................. 4-9
4-7. Analog Output Jumper J4 (at +12 V) .... 4-10
4-8. Analog Output Module Field Wiring ...... 4-10
4-9. Discrete Input Module Field Wiring ....... 4-11
4-10. Pulse Input J4 Jumper (at +12V) ........ 4-12
4-11. Externally Powered Pulse Input Module
Field Wiring ................................................ 4-13
4-12. ROC800-Powered Pulse Input Module
Field Wiring ................................................ 4-13
4-13. Discrete Output Module Field Wiring .. 4-14
4-14. Discrete Output Relay Module Field Wiring
.................................................................... 4-16
4-15. RTD Sensor Wiring Terminal Connections
.................................................................... 4-17
4-16. Pulse Input Wiring on APM ................. 4-18
4-17. Solartron 7835/7845 Wiring on APM .. 4-18
4-18. Generic Densitometer Wiring on APM 4-19
4-19. Input Detector Wiring on APM............. 4-19
4-20. Series Detector Switch Wiring on APM4-19
4-21. Series Detector Switch Wiring on APM4-19
4-22. Independent Detector Wiring on APM 4-19
4-23. Two-Pulse Turbine Pulse Input Wiring on
APM ............................................................ 4-19
4-24. Pulse Output Wiring on APM .............. 4-20
4-25. DIP Switches on APM ......................... 4-20
4-26. MVS and MVS I/O Modules ................ 4-21
4-27. MVS Wiring (with Terminators) ........... 4-22
4-28. MVS Field Wiring ................................ 4-23
4-29. MVS I/O Field Wiring........................... 4-23
4-30. MVS Jumper J4 (shown not terminated) . 424
4-31. AC I/O DIP Switches ........................... 4-25
Revised Jul-14
4-32. AC I/O Module (Output Field Wiring) .. 4-26
4-33. AC I/O Module (Input Field Wiring) ..... 4-26
4-34. Thermocouple Input Module Wiring .... 4-29
4-35. Ungrounded – Sheathed ..................... 4-30
4-36. Grounded ............................................ 4-30
4-37. Exposed, Ungrounded – Unsheathed . 4-30
4-38. HART-2 Module Input Point-to-Point
Wiring ......................................................... 4-33
4-39. HART-2 Module Input Multi-Drop Wiring. 433
4-40. HART-2 Module Output Wiring ........... 4-33
5-1. Communication Ports .............................. 5-2
5-2. RS-485 Communication Module ............. 5-3
5-3. RJ-45 Pin Out .......................................... 5-6
5-4. 10BASE T-Crossover Cable ................... 5-9
5-5. EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) Jumpers ..... 5-12
5-6. MVS and MVS I/O Modules .................. 5-14
5-7. Network Radio Module .......................... 5-15
Firmware ........................................................... 1-11
ROC800L ...................................................... 1-15
Flow Calculations
Gas ............................................................... 1-16
Liquid ............................................................ 1-17
FOUNDATION Fieldbus Interface ........................... 1-8
Function Sequence Table (FST)....................... 1-19
Fuse
Installing........................................................ 3-10
G
Gas flow calculations ........................................ 1-16
Gateway defaults ................................................ 5-7
Gauges, wire ................................................ 4-7, 5-5
Graphical Interface............................................ 1-21
Ground ................................................................ 2-4
H
Hardware ............................................................ 1-5
Hardware Watchdog ......................................... 1-18
HART module ................................................... 4-31
HART Pass-Through license key...................... 4-31
Hazardous Area .................................................. 2-3
HB44 ................................................................. 1-16
Historical Database ........................................... 1-15
Hot-pluggable .................................1-8, 4-3, 4-4, 5-3
Hot-swappable ...............................1-8, 4-3, 4-4, 5-3
Housing ............................................................... 2-5
I
I/O modules ......................................................... 4-1
AC I/O ........................................................... 4-25
AI-12 ............................................................... 4-7
AI-16 ............................................................... 4-7
Analog Outputs ............................................... 4-9
APM .............................................................. 4-18
App 485 ........................................................ 4-35
Discrete Inputs .............................................. 4-11
Discrete Output Relay .................................. 4-15
Index
I-3
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Discrete Outputs ........................................... 4-13
HART2 .......................................................... 4-31
IEC 62591 .................................................... 4-33
Installation and Setup ......................................4-4
Installing ..........................................................4-5
Pulse Inputs .................................................. 4-12
Removing ........................................................4-7
RTD Inputs ................................................... 4-16
Specifications ............................................... 4-36
Thermocouple Inputs .................................... 4-27
Wiring ..............................................................4-7
I/O Wiring .............................................................2-5
Input Multi-drop wiring
HART-2 module ............................................ 4-33
Input Point to Point wiring
HART-2 module ............................................ 4-33
Input/Output .........................................................4-1
Installation .................................................... 2-1, 2-7
Installing
Auxiliary Output Fuse ................................... 3-10
Communication modules .................................5-3
Input/Output modules ......................................4-5
Power Input module ..................................... 3-26
Log Data
Preserving ...................................................... 6-5
Logical ............................................................... 1-12
LOI
See Local Port ................................................ 5-5
LOI Port
Using .............................................................. 5-7
Low Power Modes ............................................ 1-18
M
Meter Runs ....................................................... 1-16
Micro Motion 2400S Transmitter................. B-3, B-4
Micro Motion RFT9739 Transmitter ............ B-3, B-4
Module Cover...................................................... 2-7
Module Slot Addressing .................................... 1-14
Modules
Communication............................................... 5-1
Input/Output (I/O)............................................ 4-1
Power ............................................................. 3-1
Monitoring ........................................................... 1-9
Mounting ............................................................. 2-7
Multi-Variable Sensor
Jumper J4 ..................................................... 4-23
LEDs ............................................................. 4-24
MVS .............................................................. 5-14
MVS I/O ........................................................ 4-21
Termination ................................................... 4-23
Wiring ........................................................... 4-24
J
Jumpers
AI +T (+12 or +24) ...........................................4-8
AO +12 or +24 .................................................4-9
EIA-422 (RS-422) module ............................ 5-12
EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) Communication. 5-11
MVS J4 ......................................................... 4-23
Pulse Inputs J4 ............................................. 4-12
O
Operation .......................................................... 2-21
Operator Interface Port
See Local Port ................................................ 5-5
Output wiring
HART-2 module ............................................ 4-33
L
LED ................................................................... 2-16
AUX+ and AUX–..............................................3-3
Dial-up Modem ............................................. 5-13
Discrete Inputs ............................................. 4-11
Discrete Output Relay .................................. 4-15
Discrete Outputs ........................................... 4-14
EIA-232 (RS-232) Communication ............... 5-10
EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) Communications 5-11
Multi-Variable Sensor ................................... 4-24
Power Input Module ......................... 3-3, 3-4, 3-5
Pulse Inputs .................................................. 4-12
RS-232 Communications ................................5-2
STATUS ....................................................... 2-16
License key ....................................................... 2-18
License Key
Installing ....................................................... 2-19
Removing ..................................................... 2-20
Light-Emitting Diodes (LED) ................................1-9
Liquid hydrocarbon calculations ....................... 1-17
Local Operator Interface
See Local Port .................................................5-5
Local Port .............................................................5-1
Location ....................................................... 2-2, 2-3
I-4
P
Parameters ....................................................... 1-12
PI Module to Daniel 1818A/1838 Turbine Pre-Amps
.......................................................................... B-2
PI Module to Daniel Senior Sonic Meter ............. B-1
PI Module to Micro Motion RFT9739/2400S
Transmitters ...................................................... B-3
PI modules
Troubleshooting ............................................ 6-10
PID Control ....................................................... 1-19
Point .................................................................. 1-12
Point Type ......................................................... 1-12
Ports
Communication............................................... 5-1
Power .................................................................. 2-4
Connections .................................................... 3-1
Consumption ................................................ 3-11
Low Modes ................................................... 1-18
Operating ...................................................... 1-18
Requirements ............................................... 3-12
Sleep Mode .................................................. 1-18
Index
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Standby Mode .............................................. 1-18
Wiring ........................................................... 3-27
Power Input module ............................................ 3-1
12 Vdc ............................................................ 3-1
24 Vdc ............................................................ 3-3
30 Vdc ............................................................ 3-4
Installing ....................................................... 3-26
Removing ..................................................... 3-25
Power Input modules
Specifications ............................................... 3-32
Preserving Configuration and Log Data ............. 6-5
Proportional, Integral, and Derivative (PID)
See PID Control............................................ 1-19
Public Switched Telephone Networks
PSTNs .......................................................... 5-13
Pulse Inputs ...................................................... 4-12
+12 and +24 V dc ......................................... 4-12
J4 Jumper ..................................................... 4-12
LEDs ............................................................. 4-12
Power Input modules .................................... 3-32
Spontaneous-Report-By-Exception (SRBX) ..... 1-21
SRBX/RBX Alarming......................................... 1-21
Standby Mode ................................................... 1-18
Start................................................................... 2-20
Stations ............................................................. 1-16
STATUS LED .................................................... 2-16
Storage
Battery .......................................................... 3-25
Subnet defaults ................................................... 5-7
Switched Auxiliary Output ................................. 3-10
System Analog Inputs ......................................... 1-9
T
Tables
1-2. Module Placement (Series 1 CPU vs. Series
2 CPU) .......................................................... 1-4
1-3. System Analog Inputs ........................... 1-10
1-4. 16-point vs. 8-point addressing ............. 1-14
1-5. Additional Technical Information ........... 1-24
2-1. CPU Connector Locations ..................... 2-15
2-2. STATUS LED Functions........................ 2-16
3-1. 12 V dc Power Input Terminal Block
Connections.................................................. 3-3
3-2. 12 V dc Power Input LED Indicators ....... 3-3
3-3. 24 Vdc Power Input Terminal Block
Connections.................................................. 3-4
3-4. 24 Vdc Power Input LED Indicators ........ 3-4
3-5. 30 V dc Power Input Terminal Block
Connections.................................................. 3-5
3-6. 30 Vdc Power Input LED Indicators ........ 3-5
3-7. Estimated Power Consumption ............. 3-14
3-8. Power Consumption, Analog Input module316
3-9. Power Consumption, Analog Output module
.................................................................... 3-17
3-10. Power Consumption, Discrete Input
module ........................................................ 3-18
3-11. Power Consumption, Discrete Output
module ........................................................ 3-19
3-12. Power Consumption, Discrete Output
Relay module ............................................. 3-20
3-12. Power Consumption, MVS module ..... 3-22
3-13. Power Consumption, Pulse Input module 321
3-15. Power Consumption, MVS I/O module 3-22
3-16. Power Consumption, APM module ..... 3-23
3-17. Power Consumption, RTD module...... 3-23
3-18. Power Consumption, Thermocouple
module ........................................................ 3-23
3-19. Power Consumption, HART-2 module 3-24
3-20. Power Consumption of the IEC 62591
Module ........................................................ 3-24
3-21. Power Consumption of the NRM Module 324
3-22. Power Consumption, Other Devices ... 3-25
3-23. Replacement Battery Types ................ 3-30
R
Real-Time Clock ................................................. 1-9
Removing
Communication module .................................. 5-5
I/O modules .................................................... 4-7
Power Input module ..................................... 3-25
Removing an EXP ............................................ 2-12
Report-By-Exception (RBX) .............................. 1-21
Reset Comm ports ............................................ 2-16
Resistance Temperature Detector
See RTD Inputs ............................................ 4-16
Restarting the ROC800 ...................................... 6-5
ROC800L Firmware .......................................... 1-15
ROC809 .............................................................. 1-5
ROC827 .............................................................. 1-5
ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software ............. 1-20
RTD Input modules
Troubleshooting ............................................ 6-11
RTD Inputs ........................................................ 4-16
Wiring ........................................................... 4-16
RTD Module to 3-/4-Wire RTD ........................... B-5
S
Security ...................................................... 1-13, 5-6
Serial Communication
EIA-232 (RS-232) ........................................... 5-9
Serial Communications
EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) ........................... 5-10
Series 2 CPU ...................................................... 1-3
Setup
I/O Modules .................................................... 4-4
Site ...................................................................... 2-2
Sleep Mode ....................................................... 1-18
Software Watchdog .......................................... 1-18
Specifications
Communication modules .............................. 5-16
I/O modules .................................................. 4-36
Revised Jul-14
Index
I-5
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
3-24. Technical Specifications (Power Input
Modules)..................................................... 3-32
4-1. RTD Signal Routing .............................. 4-17
4-2. RTD Wiring ............................................ 4-18
4-3. APM DIP Switch Settings ...................... 4-20
4-4. MVS Termination .................................. 4-23
4-5. MVS Signal Routing .............................. 4-24
4-6. Field Wiring Terminals .......................... 4-27
4-7. I/O Module Technical Specification....... 4-36
5-1. Built-in Communication and Optional
Communication Modules ...............................5-1
5-2. RS-232 Communication LED Indicator
Definitions......................................................5-2
5- 3. Built-in LOI EIA-232 Signal Routing ........5-6
5- 4. RJ-45 to EIA-232 (RS-232) Null-modem
Cable Signal Routing ....................................5-6
5-5. Ethernet Signal LEDs ...............................5-8
5-6. Built-in EIA-232 (RS-232) Signal Routing –
Comm2 ....................................................... 5-10
5-7. EIA-232 (RS-232) Communication Module
Signal Routing – Comm3, Comm4, and
Comm5 ....................................................... 5-10
5-8. EIA-422 (RS-422) Signal Routing – Comm3,
Comm4, Comm5 ........................................ 5-11
5-9. EIA-485 (RS-485) Signal Routing – Comm3,
Comm4, Comm5 ........................................ 5-11
5-10. EIA-422 (RS-422) Module ................... 5-12
5-11. EIA-485 (RS-485) module ................... 5-12
5-12. RJ-11 Field Connections ..................... 5-13
5-13. Modem Signal Routing – Comm3, Comm4,
and Comm5 ................................................ 5-13
5-14. Technical Specifications (Communication
Modules)..................................................... 5-16
6-1. Analog Input Module Typical Configuration
Values ...........................................................6-6
TC modules
Troubleshooting ............................................ 6-12
TCP/IP defaults ....................................................5-7
Technical information
Configurator .................................................. 1-24
FFI ................................................................ 1-24
ROC800........................................................ 1-24
ROC809........................................................ 1-24
ROC829........................................................ 1-24
TEMP
LED..................................................................3-3
Temperature Detector
See Thermocouple Inputs ............................ 4-27
Termination
EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) Communication. 5-11
MVS .............................................................. 4-23
Tests
Automatic ..................................................... 1-17
Thermocouple Inputs ........................................ 4-27
TLP ................................................................... 1-13
I-6
Troubleshooting
AI modules ...................................................... 6-6
AO modules .................................................... 6-8
APM modules ............................................... 6-14
DI modules ..................................................... 6-9
DO modules .................................................... 6-9
DOR modules ............................................... 6-10
PI modules .................................................... 6-10
RTD Input modules....................................... 6-11
System Analog Inputs .................................... 1-9
TC modules .................................................. 6-12
Tuning the Configuration .................................. 3-15
Two-stage Valve ................................................. B-9
U
Using
LOI Port .......................................................... 5-7
UTP ..................................................................... 5-8
V
V 12
LED .......................................................... 3-4, 3-5
V 3.3
LED .......................................................... 3-4, 3-5
VOFF
LED ................................................... 3-3, 3-4, 3-5
VOK
LED ................................................................. 3-3
Voltage ................................................................ 3-1
VOVER
LED ................................................................. 3-3
W
Watchdog
Software and Hardware ................................ 1-18
Wire Channel Covers .......................................... 2-6
Wire gauges ................................................. 4-7, 5-5
Wiring .................................................................. B-1
3- and 4-Wire RTD ......................................... B-5
Auxiliary Power ............................................... 3-8
Communication............................................... 5-5
Daniel Dual Turbine Pre-Amp ........................ B-7
Daniel Senior Sonic Meter ...................... B-1, B-6
Daniel Turbine Pre-Amp ......................... B-2, B-8
Dial-up modem ............................................. 5-13
External Batteries ......................................... 3-29
I/O Modules .................................................... 4-7
I/O Requirements ........................................... 2-5
Micro Motion Transmitters ...................... B-3, B-4
Multi-Variable Sensor ................................... 4-24
RTD Input ..................................................... 4-16
Two-stage Valve ............................................. B-9
Index
Revised Jul-14
ROC800-Series Instruction Manual
Revised Jul-14
Index
I-7
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