Microwave Data Systems MDS 1710 A Specifications

MDS 1710 A/C
MDS 2710A/C/D
Data Transceiver
MDS 05-3447A01, REV. F
SEPTEMBER 2004
Installation & Operation Guide
Microwave Data Systems Inc.
QUICK START GUIDE
Below are the basic steps for installing the transceiver. Detailed instructions are provided in “Installation
Steps” on Page 9 of this manual.
1.
Install and connect the antenna system to the radio
• Use good quality, low loss coaxial cable. Keep the feedline as short as possible.
• Preset directional antennas in the direction of desired transmission/reception.
2.
Connect the data equipment to the radio’s INTERFACE connector
• Connection to the radio must be made with a DB-25 Male connector. Connections for typical systems are shown below.
• Connect only the required pins. Do not use a straight-through RS-232 cable with all pins wired.
• Verify the data equipment is configured as DTE. (By default, the radio is configured as DCE.)
GND
1
1
GND
TXD
2
2
TXD
RXD
3
3
RXD
RTS
4
4
RTS
CTS
5
5
CTS
DSR
6
6
DSR
GND
20
7
7
GND
DCD
8
8
DCD
DB-9 to DB-25 Example
DB-9
DB-25
DCD
1
8
RXD
2
3
RXD
TXD
3
2
TXD
GND
5
75
GND
DSR
6
20
6
DSR
RTS
7
4
RTS
CTS
8
5
CTS
DCD
TRANSCEIVER
(DCE)
DB-25
RTU
(DTE)
DB-25
TRANSCEIVER
(DCE)
RTU
(DTE)
DB-25 to DB-25 Example
As required for application
As required for application
3.
Apply DC power to the radio (10.5–16 Vdc @ 2.5 A minimum)
• Observe proper polarity. The red wire is the positive lead; the black is negative.
4.
Set the radio’s basic configuration with a Hand-Held Terminal (HHT)
• Set the transmit frequency (TX xxx.xxxxx).
• Set the receive frequency (RX xxx.xxxxx).
• Set/verify the data rate using the BAUD command. The default setting is BAUD 4800 8N1. (Refer to
“TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING” on Page 17 for command details.)
5.
Verify proper operation by observing the LED display
• Refer to Table 5 on Page 16 for a description of the status LEDs.
• Refine directional antenna headings for maximum receive signal strength using the RSSI command.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.0 GENERAL.................................................................................... 1
1.1 Introduction ...................................................................................... 1
1.2 Differences Between Models ........................................................... 2
1.3 Applications ...................................................................................... 2
Point-to-Multipoint, Multiple Address Systems (MAS) .................... 2
Point-to-Point System ..................................................................... 3
Continuously Keyed versus Switched Carrier Operation ................ 4
Single Frequency (Simplex) Operation ........................................... 4
1.4 Product Configurator Codes ............................................................. 4
1.5 Accessories ...................................................................................... 5
2.0 GLOSSARY OF TERMS.............................................................. 5
3.0 INSTALLATION ............................................................................ 8
3.1 Installation Steps .............................................................................. 9
3.2 Transceiver Mounting ..................................................................... 11
3.3 Antennas and Feedlines ................................................................ 11
Feedlines ...................................................................................... 12
3.4 Power Connection .......................................................................... 12
3.5 Data Interface Connections ............................................................ 13
3.6 Using the Radio’s Sleep Mode ....................................................... 13
Sleep Mode Example ................................................................... 13
4.0 OPERATION .............................................................................. 15
4.1 LED Indicators ................................................................................ 16
4.2 RSSI Measurement ........................................................................ 16
5.0 TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING ............................................ 17
5.1 Hand-Held Terminal Connection & Startup .................................... 17
5.2 Hand-Held Terminal Setup ............................................................. 18
5.3 Keyboard Commands ..................................................................... 19
Entering Commands..................................................................... 19
Error Messages ............................................................................ 19
5.4 Detailed Command Descriptions ................................................... 22
AMASK [0000 0000–FFFF FFFF] ................................................ 22
ASENSE [HI/LO]........................................................................... 23
BAUD [xxxxx abc] ......................................................................... 23
BUFF [ON, OFF]........................................................................... 23
CKEY [ON–OFF] .......................................................................... 24
CTS [0–255] ................................................................................. 24
DATAKEY [ON, OFF] .................................................................... 24
DEVICE [DCE, CTS KEY] ............................................................ 24
DKEY ............................................................................................ 25
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
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DLINK [ON/OFF/xxxx] .................................................................. 25
DMGAP [xx] .................................................................................. 25
DTYPE [NODE/ROOT] ................................................................. 25
DUMP ........................................................................................... 26
HREV............................................................................................ 26
INIT ............................................................................................... 26
INIT [2710] .................................................................................... 26
INIT [2720] .................................................................................... 26
KEY .............................................................................................. 27
MODEL ......................................................................................... 27
MODEM [xxxx, NONE] ................................................................. 27
OWM [XXX...] ............................................................................... 27
OWN [XXX...]................................................................................ 27
PTT [0–255] .................................................................................. 27
PWR [20–37] ................................................................................ 27
RSSI ............................................................................................. 28
RTU [ON/OFF/0-80]...................................................................... 28
RX [xxx.xxxxx] .............................................................................. 28
RXTOT [NONE, 1-255] ................................................................. 28
SCD [0-255] .................................................................................. 28
SER .............................................................................................. 28
SHOW [DC, PORT, PWR]............................................................. 29
SNR .............................................................................................. 29
SREV ............................................................................................ 29
STAT ............................................................................................. 29
TEMP............................................................................................ 29
TOT [1-255, ON, OFF] .................................................................. 30
TX [xxx.xxxxx]............................................................................... 30
UNIT [10000...65000] ................................................................... 30
6.0 TROUBLESHOOTING ............................................................... 30
6.1 LED Indicators ................................................................................ 31
6.2 Event Codes ................................................................................... 31
Checking for Alarms—STAT command......................................... 31
Major Alarms vs. Minor Alarms..................................................... 31
Event Code Definitions ................................................................. 32
7.0 TECHNICAL REFERENCE ....................................................... 33
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
Transceiver Specifications .............................................................. 33
Performing Network-Wide Remote Diagnostics ............................. 34
Bench Testing Setup ...................................................................... 36
Helical Filter Adjustment ................................................................ 37
Upgrading the Radio’s Software ..................................................... 38
Using Radio Software Upgrade Diskette ...................................... 38
Using Radio Configuration Software............................................. 39
7.6 dBm-Watts-Volts Conversion Chart ................................................ 40
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MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
Copyright Notice
This Installation and Operation Guide and all software described herein
are protected by copyright: © 2004 Microwave Data Systems Inc. All
rights reserved. MDS reserves its right to correct errors and omissions.
To Our Customers
We appreciate your patronage. You are our business. We promise to
serve and anticipate your needs. We will strive to give you solutions
that are cost effective, innovative, reliable and of the highest quality
possible. We promise to build a relationship that is forthright and ethical, one that builds confidence and trust.
RF Safety Notices
RF Exposure
MDS 1710, 5 Watts
The radio equipment described in this guide emits radio frequency
energy. Although the power level is low, the concentrated energy from a
directional antenna may pose a health hazard. Do not allow people to
come closer than 1.80 meters to the front of the antenna when the transmitter is operating with a 7 dBd (9.15 dBi) gain antenna. Use of higher
gain antennas means increasing the distance accordingly.
This manual is intended to guide a professional installer to install,
operate and perform basic system maintenance on the described radio.
MDS 2710A/C, 2 Watts
The radio equipment described in this guide emits radio frequency
energy. Although the power level is low, the concentrated energy from a
directional antenna may pose a health hazard. Do not allow people to
come closer than 0.425 meters to the front of the antenna when the
transmitter is operating with a 0 dBd (2.15 dBi) gain antenna. Use of
higher gain antennas means increasing the distance accordingly.
This manual is intended to guide a professional installer to install,
operate and perform basic system maintenance on the described radio.
MDS 2710D, 5 Watts
The radio equipment described in this guide emits radio frequency
energy. Although the power level is low, the concentrated energy from a
directional antenna may pose a health hazard. Do not allow people to
come closer than 1.50 meters to the front of the antenna when the transmitter is operating with a 7 dBd (9.15 dBi) gain antenna. Use of higher
gain antennas means increasing the distance accordingly.
This manual is intended to guide a professional installer to install,
operate and perform basic system maintenance on the described radio.
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
iii
ISO 9001 Registration
Microwave Data Systems’ adheres to this internationally accepted quality system standard.
FCC Approval Notice
At the printing date, MDS 1710 models are approved for operation in the
USA from150 to 174 MHz. MDS 2710 models are approved for operation in the USA from 216 to 222 MHz. Contact MDS for current
approval status.
CSA/US Notice
This product is available for use in Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B, C
& D Hazardous Locations. Such locations are defined in Article 500 of
the National Fire Protection Association publication NFPA 70, otherwise known as the National Electrical Code.
The product has been recognized for use in hazardous locations by the
Canadian Standards Association (CSA), which also issues the US mark
of approval (CSA/US). The CSA Certification is in accordance with
CSA STD C22.2 No. 213-M1987. The product has been evaluated in
accordance with the following standards:
•
CSA Std C22.2 No. 142-M1987 - Process Control Equipment
•
CSA Std C22.2 No. 213-M1987 - Non-Incendive Electrical Equipment for
Use in Class I, Division 2 Hazardous Locations
•
ANSI/UL Std No. 508 - Industrial Control Equipment
•
UL Std No. 1604 - Electrical Equipment for Use in Class I and II, Division
2; Class III Hazardous (Classified) Locations
FCC Part 15 Notice
The transceiver complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is
subject to the following two conditions: (1) this device may not cause
harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference
received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.
This device is specifically designed to be used under Section 15.247 of
the FCC Rules and Regulations. Any unauthorized modification or
changes to this device without the express approval of Microwave Data
Systems may void the user’s authority to operate this device. Furthermore, this device is intended to be used only when installed in accordance with the instructions outlined in this manual. Failure to comply
with these instructions may also void the user’s authority to operate this
device.
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MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
Manual Revision and Accuracy
While every reasonable effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of
this manual, product improvements may result in minor differences
between the manual and the product shipped to you. If you have additional questions or need an exact specification for a product, please contact our Customer Service Team using the information at the back of this
guide. In addition, manual updates can often be found on the MDS Web
site at www.microwavedata.com. Microwave Data Systems Inc.
reserves the right to correct all errors or omissions in this document
without obligation to any party.
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
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MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
1.0 GENERAL
1.1 Introduction
This guide presents installation and operating instructions for
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710 A/C/D series digital radio transceivers.
These transceivers (Figure 1) are data telemetry radios designed to
operate in a point-to-multipoint environment, such as electric utility
Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) and distribution
automation, gas field automation, water and wastewater SCADA, and
on-line transaction processing applications. They use microprocessor
control and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) technology to provide
highly reliable communications even under adverse conditions.
MDS 1710/2710 Series radios use continuous-phase frequency shift
keying (CPFSK) modulation with root duo-binary filtering (the sum of
two Nyquist-shaped, root-raised cosine responses). Demodulation uses
a Virterbi decoder and equalization with soft decision decoding.
Modulation and demodulation is accomplished using Digital Signal Processing (DSP). DSP adapts to differences between components from
unit to unit, and ensures consistent and repeatable performance in
ambient temperatures from –30 to +60 degrees Celsius. The use of Digital Signal Processing eliminates the fluctuations and variations in
modem operation that can degrade the operation of analog circuits.
SERIAL NUMBER
LABEL
LED INDICATORS (4)
EXTERNAL
INTERFACE
CONNECTOR
(DB-25)
DIAGNOSTICS
CONNECTOR (RJ-11)
13.8 VDC POWER
CONNECTOR
ANTENNA CONNECTOR
(TYPE “N”)
Figure 1. Transceiver Connectors and Indicators
The transceiver is designed for trouble-free operation with data equipment provided by many other manufacturers, including Remote Terminal Units (RTUs), programmable logic controllers (PLCs), flow
computers, lottery terminals, automatic teller machines, and others.
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
1
NOTE: Some features may not be available, based on the options
purchased and the applicable regulations for the region in
which the radio will operate.
1.2 Differences Between Models
All models of the MDS 1710/2710 Series are very similar in appearance
and functionality. The major differences are in frequency coverage,
channel bandwidth and data speed. Table 1 summarizes the available
models and identifies the characteristics of each.
To determine the specific settings for your radio (as originally shipped
from the factory), please refer to the Product Configurator chart shown
in Figure 4.
Table 1. MDS 1710/2710 Series Characteristics
Radio
Model No.
Operating
Frequency
Channel
Bandwidth
Over-the-Air
Data Speed
Output
Power (W)
MDS 1710A
130–174 MHz
12.5 kHz
9600 bps
5
MDS 1710C
130–174 MHz
25 kHz
19200 bps
5
MDS 2710A
216–220 MHz
12.5 kHz
9600 bps
2
MDS 2710A
220–240 MHz
12.5 kHz
9600 bps
5
MDS 2710C
216–220 MHz
25 kHz
19200 bps
2
MDS 2710C
220-240 MHz
25 kHz
19200 bps
5
MDS 2710D
220–222 MHz
5 kHz
3200 bps
5
Consult factory for current regulatory approvals on these products.
NOTE: The operating software for A, C, and D models is not interchangeable.
NOTE: The narrow bandwidth of the MDS 2710D transceiver is not
compatible with standard analog modems, including the
widely used Bell 202T. The MDS 2710D is intended for digital
RS-232 data only.
1.3 Applications
Point-to-Multipoint, Multiple Address Systems (MAS)
This is the most common application of the transceiver. It consists of a
central master station and several associated remote units as shown in
Figure 2. An MAS network provides communications between a central
host computer and remote terminal units (RTUs) or other data collection
devices. The operation of the radio system is transparent to the computer
equipment.
2
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
Often, a radio system consists of many widely separated remote radios.
A point-to-multipoint or SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) system may be a new installation for automatic, remote monitoring of gas wells, water tank levels, electric power distribution system
control and measurement, etc.
The radio system may replace a network of remote monitors currently
linked to a central location via leased telephone line. At the central
office of such a system, there is usually a large mainframe computer and
some means of switching between individual lines coming from each
remote monitor. In this type of system, there is a modulator/demodulator
(modem) at the main computer, and at each remote site, usually built
into the remote monitor itself. Since the cost of leasing a dedicated-pair
phone line is quite high, radio is often used as an alternative communication medium.
Invisible place holder
RTU
RTU
REMOTE RADIO
REMOTE RADIO
RTU
RTU
REMOTE RADIO
REMOTE RADIO
RTU
REMOTE RADIO
HOSTSYSTEM
MASTER RADIO
Figure 2. Typical MAS Point-to-Multipoint Network
Point-to-Point System
Where permitted, the transceiver may also be used in a point-to-point
arrangement. A point-to-point system consists of just two radios—one
serving as a master and the other as a remote—as shown in Figure 3. It
provides a simplex or half-duplex communications link for the transfer
of data between two locations.
HOST
COMPUTER
MASTER
RTU
REMOTE
Figure 3. Typical Point-to-Point Link
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
3
Continuously Keyed vs. Switched Carrier Operation
The keying behavior of the master station can be used to describe an
MAS system.
Continuously Keyed operation means the master station transmitter is
always transmitting a carrier, even when there is no data to send. The
master station is always simultaneously transmitting and continuously
listening. Different frequencies must be used for transmit and receive.
Switched Carrier operation is a half-duplex mode of operation where
the master station transmitter is keyed to send data and unkeyed to
receive.
Single Frequency (Simplex) Operation
Single frequency operation (also known as simplex) is a special case of
switched carrier operation. Single frequency operation is automatically
selected whenever the transmit and receive frequencies are set to the
same value. Note that data turn-around times are increased when a
single frequency configuration is used.
1.4 Product Configurator Codes
The full radio model number is printed on the radio enclosure. It provides key information about how the radio was configured when it was
originally shipped from the factory. See Figure 4 for an explanation of
the configurator codes.
Invisible place holder
INPUT VOLTAGE
1= 10.5 to 16 VDC
THIS INFORMATION IS
SUBJECT TO
CHANGE.
DO NOT USE FOR
PRODUCT ORDERING.
OPERATION
X= Base/Remote
RX FRQ. (MHz)
A= 130-140
A= 220-222*
DIAGNOSTICS A= 220-240**
B=140-150
0= None
1= Network-wide D= 150-165
E= 165-175
AGENCY
N= N/A
C= China
Mtg. Brackets.
F= FCC
A= Std.
I= Ind. Canada B= None
1710A/C,
2710A/C/D
MODE
N= Non-redundant
MODEM
B= 9600 bps
C= 19200 bps
D= 3200 bps
0= None
BANDWIDTH
1= 12.5 kHz
3= 25 kHz
5= 5 kHz
(6.25 kHz @130-174)
SAFETY
N= N/A
TX FRQ. (MHz)
FEATURES
1= 130-140
0=
Full
1= 220-222*
D= Demo
1= 220-240**
2= 140-150
3= 150-165 * MDS 2710D Models
4= 165-174 ** MDS 2710A/C Models
Figure 4. MDS 1710x/2710x Product Configurator Codes
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MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
1.5 Accessories
The transceiver can be used with one or more of the accessories listed in
Table 2. Contact Microwave Data Systems for ordering information.
Table 2. MDS 1710/2710 Series Optional Accessories
Accessory
Description
MDS P/N
Hand-Held Terminal
Kit (HHT)
Terminal that plugs into the radio for
programming, diagnostics & control.
Includes carrying case, instructions and
cable set.
02-1501A01
RTU Simulator
Test module that simulates data from a
remote terminal unit. Comes with MDS
polling software (02-2093Axx) that runs
on a PC. Useful for testing radio
operation.
03-2512A01
Order Wire Module
External device that allows temporary
voice communication. Useful during
setup & testing of the radio system.
02-1297A01
Power Supply Kit
AC adaptor that converts 110/220 Vac to
12 Vdc at 30 watts.
01-3682A01
Order Wire Handset
Used with Order Wire Module (above).
12-1307A01
RJ-11 to DB-9 Adapter
Used to connect a PC to the radio’s
DIAG. port
03-3246A01
EIA-232 to EIA-422
Converter Assembly
External adapter plug that converts the
radio’s DATA INTERFACE connector to
EIA-422 compatible signaling.
03-2358A01
TTL Converter
Assembly
External adapter plug that converts the
radio’s DATA INTERFACE connector to
TTL compatible signaling.
03-2223A01
Radio Configuration
Software
Provides diagnostics of the transceiver
(Windows-based PC required.)
03-3156A01
VOX Assembly
External unit used to key the radio when
audio input is present.
03-1098A02
19-inch Rack Mounting
Kit
Allows mounting the transceiver in a
standard 19 inch rack cabinet. (Power
supply and Interface Board not included.)
02-1983A02
Brown-Out Protection
Board
PCB that protects against low voltage
conditions.
03-2567A01
2.0 GLOSSARY OF TERMS
If you are new to digital radio systems, some of the terms used in this
guide may be unfamiliar. The following glossary explains many of these
terms and will prove helpful in understanding the operation of the transceiver.
Active Messaging—This is a mode of diagnostic gathering that may
interrupt SCADA system polling communications (contrast with passive messaging). Active (or intrusive) messaging is much faster than
passive messaging because it is not dependent upon the RTU polling
cycle.
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
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Antenna System Gain—A figure, normally expressed in dB, representing the power increase resulting from the use of a gain-type antenna.
System losses (from the feedline and coaxial connectors, for example)
are subtracted from this figure to calculate the total antenna system gain.
Bit—The smallest unit of digital data, often represented by a one or a
zero. Eight bits (plus start, stop, and parity bits) usually comprise a byte.
Bits-per-second—See BPS.
BPS—Bits-per-second. A measure of the information transfer rate of
digital data across a communication channel.
Byte—A string of digital data usually made up of eight data bits and
start, stop and parity bits.
Decibel (dB)—A measure computed from the ratio between two signal
levels. Frequently used to express the gain (or loss) of a system.
Data Circuit-terminating Equipment—See DCE.
Data Communications Equipment—See DCE.
Data Terminal Equipment—See DTE.
dBi—Decibels referenced to an “ideal” isotropic radiator in free space.
Frequently used to express antenna gain.
dBm—Decibels referenced to one milliwatt. An absolute unit used to
measure signal power, as in transmitter power output, or received signal
strength.
DCE—Data Circuit-terminating Equipment (or Data Communications
Equipment). In data communications terminology, this is the “modem”
side of a computer-to-modem connection. The transceiver described in
this guide is a DCE device.
Digital Signal Processing—See DSP.
DSP—Digital Signal Processing. In the transceiver, the DSP circuitry is
responsible for the most critical real-time tasks; primarily modulation,
demodulation, and servicing of the data port.
DTE—Data Terminal Equipment. A device that provides data in the
form of digital signals at its output. Connects to the DCE device.
Equalization—The process of reducing the effects of amplitude, frequency or phase distortion with compensating networks.
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MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
Fade Margin—The greatest tolerable reduction in average received
signal strength that will be anticipated under most conditions. Provides
an allowance for reduced signal strength due to multipath, slight antenna
movement or changing atmospheric losses. A fade margin of 20 to 30
dB is usually sufficient in most systems.
Frame—A segment of data that adheres to a specific data protocol and
contains definite start and end points. It provides a method of synchronizing transmissions.
Hardware Flow Control—A transceiver feature used to prevent data
buffer overruns when handling high-speed data from the RTU or PLC.
When the buffer approaches overflow, the radio drops the clear-to-send
(CTS) line, which instructs the RTU or PLC to delay further transmission until CTS again returns to the high state.
Host Computer—The computer installed at the master station site,
which controls the collection of data from one or more remote sites.
Intrusive Diagnostics—A mode of remote diagnostics that queries and
commands radios in a network with an impact on the delivery of the
system “payload” data. See Active messaging.
Latency—The delay (usually expressed in milliseconds) between when
data is applied to TXD (Pin 2) at one radio, until it appears at RXD
(Pin 3) at the other radio.
MAS—Multiple Address System. A radio system where a central
master station communicates with several remote stations for the purpose of gathering telemetry data.
Master (Station)—Radio which is connected to the host computer. It is
the point at which polling enters the network.
MCU—Microcontroller Unit. This is the processor responsible for controlling system start-up, synthesizer loading, and key-up control.
Microcontroller Unit—See MCU.
Multiple Address System—See MAS.
Network-Wide Diagnostics—An advanced method of controlling and
interrogating MDS radios in a radio network.
Non-intrusive diagnostics—See Passive messaging.
Passive messaging—This is a mode of diagnostic gathering that does
not interrupt SCADA system polling communications. Diagnostic data
is collected non-intrusively over a period of time; polling messages are
carried with SCADA system data (contrast with active messaging).
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
7
Payload data—This is the application’s user communication data
which is sent over the radio network. It is the transfer of payload data
that is the primary purpose of the radio communications network.
Point-Multipoint System—A radio communications network or
system designed with a central control station that exchanges data with
a number of remote locations equipped with terminal equipment.
Poll—A request for data issued from the host computer (or master PLC)
to a remote radio.
PLC—Programmable Logic Controller. A dedicated microprocessor
configured for a specific application with discrete inputs and outputs. It
can serve as a host or as an RTU.
Programmable Logic Controller—See PLC.
Remote (Station)—A radio in a network that communicates with an
associated master station.
Remote Terminal Unit—See RTU.
Redundant Operation—A station arrangement where two transceivers
and two power supplies are available for operation, with automatic
switchover in case of a failure.
RTU—Remote Terminal Unit. A data collection device installed at a
remote radio site. An internal RTU simulator is provided with the transceiver to isolate faults to either the external RTU or the radio.
SCADA—Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition. An overall term
for the functions commonly provided through an MAS radio system.
Standing Wave Ratio—See SWR.
Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition—See SCADA.
SWR—Standing Wave Ratio. A parameter related to the ratio between
forward transmitter power and the reflected power from the antenna
system. As a general rule, reflected power should not exceed 10% of the
forward power (≈ 2:1 SWR).
3.0 INSTALLATION
There are three main requirements for installing the transceiver—adequate and stable primary power, a good antenna system, and the correct
data connections between the transceiver and the data device. Figure 5
shows a typical remote station arrangement.
8
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
Invisible place holder
REMOTE TERMINAL
UNIT
ANTENNA SYSTEM
RADIO
TRANSCEIVER
13.8 VDC
POWER
CABLE
LOW-LOSS FEEDLINE
13.8 VDC
2.5 A (Minimum)
POWER SUPPLY
Figure 5. Typical Remote Station Arrangement
3.1 Installation Steps
Below are the basic steps for installing the transceiver. In most cases,
these steps alone are sufficient to complete the installation. More
detailed explanations appear at the end of these steps.
1. Mount the transceiver to a stable surface using the brackets supplied
with the radio.
2. Install the antenna and antenna feedline for the station. Preset directional antennas in the desired direction.
3. Connect the data equipment to the transceiver’s DATA INTERFACE
connector. Use only the required pins for the application—Do not
use a fully pinned (25 conductor) cable. Basic applications may
require only the use of Pin 2 (transmit data—TXD), Pin 3 (Received
Data—RXD) and Pin 7 (signal ground). The radio can be keyed
with the use of the DATAKEY command.
Additional connections may be required for some installations.
Refer to the complete list of pin functions provided in Table 4 on
page 14.
4. Measure and install the primary power for the radio. The red wire on
the power cable is the positive lead; the black is negative.
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
9
NOTE: Use the radio in negative ground systems only.
5. Set the radio configuration. The transceiver is designed for quick
installation with a minimum of software configuration required in
most cases. The selections that must be made or verified for new
installations are:
• Transmit frequency
• Receive frequency
The operating frequencies are not set at the factory unless they were
specified at the time of order. Determine the transmit and receive
frequencies to be used, and follow the steps below to program them.
6. Connect a hand-held terminal (HHT) to the DIAG. connector. When
the HHT beeps, press ENTER to receive the ready “>” prompt.
• Set the operating frequencies using the TX xxx.xxxxx (transmit) and
RX xxx.xxxxx (receive) commands.
• Press ENTER after each command. After programming, the HHT
reads PROGRAMMED OK to indicate successful entry.
• Set other transceiver parameters as required. A complete list of
transceiver commands is provided in Section 5.0, TRANSCEIVER
PROGRAMMING.
10
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
3.2 Transceiver Mounting
Figure 6 shows the mounting dimensions of the transceiver.
Invisible place holder
7.25"
184 mm
1 .7 5 "
4 .4 4 C M
2.75"
70 mm
ALTERNATE
POSITION
6.63"
168 mm
8.5"
216 mm
2.25"
57 mm
2.0"
50 mm
5.625"
143 mm
Figure 6. Transceiver Mounting Dimensions
3.3 Antennas and Feedlines
Antennas
The transceiver can be used with a number of antennas. The exact style
depends on the physical size and layout of the radio system. A directional Yagi (Figure 7) or corner reflector antenna is generally recommended at remote sites to minimize interference to and from other users.
Antennas of this type are available from several manufacturers.
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
11
Invisible place holder
Figure 7. Typical Yagi Antenna (mounted to mast)
Feedlines
The selection of antenna feedline is very important. Poor quality cables
should be avoided as they will result in power losses that may reduce the
range and reliability of the radio system.
Table 3 shows the losses that will occur when using various lengths and
types of cable at 200 MHz. Losses at 130-174 MHz will be slightly
lower. Regardless of the type of cable used, it should be kept as short as
possible to minimize signal loss
Table 3. Length vs. Loss in Coaxial Cables at 200 MHz†
3 Meters
15 Meters
30 Meters
150 Meters
Cable Type
(10 Feet)
(46 Feet)
(91 Feet)
(525 Feet)
RG-8A/U
0.32 dB
1.6 dB
3.2 dB
16 dB
1/2 inch HELIAX
0.10 dB
0.49 dB
0.98 dB
4.9 dB
7/8 inch HELIAX
0.05 dB
0.27 dB
0.54 dB
2.7 dB
1-1/4 inch HELIAX
0.04 dB
0.20 dB
0.40 dB
2.0 dB
1-5/8 inch HELIAX
0.03 dB
0.17 dB
0.33 dB
1.65 dB
† Cable loss slightly lower at 130-174 MHz.
3.4 Power Connection
The transceiver can be operated from any well-filtered 10.5 to 16 Vdc
power source. The power supply should be capable of providing at least
2.5 amperes of continuous current.
The red wire on the power cable is the positive lead; the black is negative.
NOTE: The radio is designed for use only in negative ground systems.
12
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
3.5 Data Interface Connections
The transceiver’s DATA INTERFACE connector is used to connect the
transceiver to an external DTE data terminal that supports the EIA-232
(formally RS-232) format. The transceiver supports asynchronous data
rates of up to 38400 bps. The data rate at the DATA INTERFACE connector
may differ from the data rate used over the air.
Table 4 lists each pin on the DATA INTERFACE connector and describes
its function.
CAUTION
USE
ONLY REQUIRED
PINS
Do not use a 25 wire (fully pinned) cable for connection to the DATA
INTERFACE connector. Use only the required pins for the application.
Damage may result if improper connections are made. Typical applications require the use of only Pins 1 through 8 for EIA-232 signaling.
3.6 Using the Radio’s Sleep Mode
In some installations, such as at solar-powered sites, it may be necessary
to keep the transceiver’s power consumption to an absolute minimum.
This can be accomplished using the Sleep Mode. In this mode, power
consumption is reduced to less than 16 milliamperes (nominal).
Sleep mode can be enabled under RTU control by asserting a ground (or
EIA-232 low) on Pin 12 of the radio’s DATA INTERFACE connector.
When Pin 12 is opened (or an EIA-232 high is asserted), the radio will
be ready to receive data within 75 milliseconds.
All normal functions are suspended while the radio is in sleep mode. The
PWR LED will be off, except for a quick flash every 5 seconds.
Sleep Mode Example
The following example describes Sleep Mode implementation in a typical system. Using this information, you should be able to configure a
system that will meet your own particular needs.
Example:
Suppose you need communications to each remote site only
once per hour. Program the RTU to raise an EIA-232 line once
each hour (DTR for example) and wait for a poll and response
before lowering it again. Connect this line to Pin 12 of the
radio’s DATA INTERFACE connector. This will allow each RTU to
be polled once per hour with a significant savings in power consumption.
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
13
Table 4. DATA INTERFACE Connector Pinouts
14
Pin
Number
Input/
Output
1
--
Protective Ground. Connects to ground (negative supply
potential) on the radio’s PC board and chassis.
2
IN
TXD—Transmitted Data. Accepts TX data from the
connected device.
3
OUT
RXD—Received Data. Outputs received data to the
connected device.
4
IN
RTS—Request-to-Send Input. Keys the transmitter when
RTS is at logic high.
5
OUT
CTS—Clear-to-Send Output. Goes “high” after the
programmed CTS delay time has elapsed (DCE) or keys
an attached radio when RF data arrives (CTS KEY).
6
OUT
DSR—Data Set Ready. Provides a +6 Vdc DSR signal
through a 2.5 kΩ resistor.
7
--
Signal Ground. Connects to ground (negative supply
potential) at radio’s PC board.
8
OUT
DCD—Data Carrier Detect. Goes “high” when the modem
detects a data carrier from the master station.
9
IN
Transmit Audio Input. Connects to the audio output of an
external (AFSK) modem. The input impedance is 600 Ω.
Use Pin 7 for the modem’s return lead.
10
OUT
RUS—Receiver Unsquelched Sensor. Not used in most
installations, but is available as a convenience. Provides
+8 Vdc through a 1 kΩ resistor whenever the receiver
squelch is open, and drops to less than 1 Vdc when the
squelch is closed.
11
OUT
Receive Audio Output. Connects to the audio input of an
external (AFSK) modem. The output impedance is 600 Ω,
and the level is factory set to suit most installations. Use
Pin 7 for the modem’s return lead.
12
IN
Radio Inhibit (Sleep). A ground on this pin places the
radio into the “sleep” mode. It turns off most circuits in the
radio, including transmit, receive, modem and diagnostic
functions. This allows for greatly reduced power
consumption, yet preserves the radio’s ability to be quickly
brought online.
13
--
Do not connect—Reserved for future use.
14
IN
PTT—Push to Talk. This line is used to key the radio with
an active-high signal of +5 Vdc.
15
OUT
Remote RTU Reset. Do not connect—Reserved for future
use.
16
IN
PTT—Push to Talk. This line is used to key the radio with
an active-low signal of 0 Vdc.
17
--
Do not connect—Reserved for future use.
18
IN/OUT
Accessory Power. Unregulated Input/Output. Provides a
source of input power for low current accessories.
Excessive drain on this connection will trip self-resetting
fuse F1 on the transceiver PC board. The voltage at this
pin will match the input voltage to the transceiver.
Pin Description
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
Table 4. DATA INTERFACE Connector Pinouts (Continued)
Pin
Number
Input/
Output
19
OUT
9.9 Vdc Regulated Output. Provides a source of
regulated voltage at 100 mA for low power accessories.
20
--
Do not connect—Reserved for future use.
21
OUT
RSSI—Received Signal Strength Indication. A DC
voltmeter may be connected to this pin to read the relative
strength of the incoming signal. Figure 8 is a chart showing
RSSI vs. DC voltage.
22
--
Do not connect—Reserved for future use.
23
IN
Diagnostic Channel Enable. A ground on this pin causes
the radio’s microcontroller to open the DB-25 DATA
INTERFACE for diagnostics and control instead of the
normal RJ-11 DIAG. connection.
24
--
Do not connect—Reserved for future use.
25
OUT
Alarm. A logic low (less than 0.5 volts) on this pin indicates
normal operation. A logic high (greater than 4 volts)
indicates that some alarm condition is present. This pin
can be used as an alarm output, provided the internal
series resistance of 1 kΩ is considered.
Pin Description
Invisible place holder
4.0 OPERATION
In-service operation of the transceiver is completely automatic. Once
the unit has been properly installed and configured, operator actions are
limited to observing the front panel LED status indicators for proper
operation.
If all parameters are correctly set, operation of the radio can be started
by following these steps:
1. Apply DC power to the transceiver.
2. Observe the LED status panel for the proper indications (Table 5).
3. If not done earlier, refine the antenna heading of the station to maximize the received signal strength (RSSI) from the master station.
Use the RSSI command from an HHT connected to the radio’s DIAG.
connector.—See Section 5.0, TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING.
This can also be done with a DC voltmeter as described in
Section 4.2, RSSI Measurement.
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
15
4.1 LED Indicators
Table 5 describes the function of each status LED.
PWR
DCD
TXD
RXD
Table 5. LED Status Indicators
LED Name
PWR
Description
• Continuous—Power is applied to the radio, no problems detected.
• Rapid flash (five times-per-second)—Fault indication.
• Flashing once every 5 seconds—Radio is in Sleep mode.
DCD
• Flashing—Indicates the radio is receiving intermittent data frames.
• Continuous—Radio is receiving a data signal from a continuously
keyed radio.
TXD
An EIA-232 mark signal is being received at the DATA INTERFACE
connector.
RXD
An EIA-232 mark signal is being sent out from the DATA INTERFACE
connector.
4.2 RSSI Measurement
As an alternative to using an HHT, the radio’s received signal strength
(RSSI) may be read with a DC voltmeter connected to Pin 21 of the DATA
INTERFACE connector. Figure 8 shows the relationship between
received signal level and the DC voltage on Pin 21 of the DATA INTERFACE connector. (Note: Readings are not accurate for signals stronger
than –50 dBm.)
5.0
4.5
4
3.5
3
2.5
–5
0
–7
0
–9
0
2
–1
10
+ DC VOLTS (PIN 21)
Invisible place holder
SIGNAL LEVEL (dBm)
Figure 8. RSSI vs. Vdc (Typical)
16
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
5.0 TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING
Programming and control of the transceiver is performed through the
radio’s RJ-11 DIAG. (Diagnostics) connector with an MDS Hand-Held
Terminal (MDS P/N 02-1501A01). This section contains a reference
chart (Table 7) followed by detailed descriptions for each user command.
NOTE: In addition to HHT control, Windows-based software is available (MDS P/N 03-3156A01) to allow diagnostics and
programming using a personal computer. An installation
booklet and on-line instructions are included with the software. Contact MDS for ordering information.
5.1 Hand-Held Terminal Connection & Startup
This section gives basic information for connecting and using the MDS
Hand-Held Terminal. For more information about the terminal, refer
also to the instructions included with each HHT kit.
The steps below assume that the HHT has been configured for use with
the transceiver (80 character screen display). If the HHT was previously
used with a different model transceiver, or if its default settings have
been changed, refer to Section 5.2, Hand-Held Terminal Setup for setup
details.
Follow these steps to connect the HHT:
1. Connect the HHT’s coiled cord to the DIAG. (RJ-11) jack on the
radio as shown in Figure 9. This automatically places the radio into
the control and programming mode.
As an alternative, the DATA INTERFACE (DB-25) connector may be
used for programming instead of the DIAG. jack. With this arrangement, Pin 23 of the HHT cable must be grounded to enable the diagnostic channel. (See Table 4.)
2. When the HHT is connected, it runs through a brief self-check,
ending with a beep. After the beep, press ENTER to obtain the ready
“>” prompt.
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
17
Invisible place holder
13.8
+
VDC
–
ANTE
NNA
F5
F4
F3
F2
F1
/
F
–
P
+
V
U
L
CTR
0
=
,
T
SHIF
T
S
R
Q
9
8
7
#
O
N
M
L
K
6
5
4
)
*
J
I
H
G
3
2
1
(
E
D
C
B
A
Y
X
R
ENTE
ACE
ESC SP
SP
BK
W
Z
Figure 9. Hand-Held Terminal Connected to the Transceiver
5.2 Hand-Held Terminal Setup
The following is a set of instructions for re-initializing an HHT for use
with the transceiver. These steps may be required if the HHT was previously used with a different radio, or if the HHT default settings have
been inadvertently altered.
1. Plug the HHT into the DIAG. connector. Enable the setup mode by
pressing the SHIFT , CTRL and SPACE keys in sequence. The display
shown in Figure 10 appears.
Invisible place holder
F
F
F
F
F
A B C D E
1
Figure 10. HHT Setup Display
2. The first of 15 menu items is displayed. Settings are reviewed by
pressing the NEXT function controlled by the E key. Parameter settings are changed by pressing the ROLL function controlled by the
A key.
18
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
3. Set up the HHT as listed in Table 6.
Table 6. HHT Operational Settings
Parameter
Setting
Parameter
Setting
Re-init HT
NO
Scroll On
33rd
Baud Rate
9600
Cursor
ON
Comm bits
8,1,n
CRLF for CR
OFF
Parity Error
OFF
Self Test
FAST
Key Repeat
OFF
Key Beep
ON
Echo
OFF
Screen Size
80
Shift Keys
YES
Menu Mode
LONG
Ctl Chars
PROCS
5.3 Keyboard Commands
Table 7 is a reference chart of software commands for the transceiver.
Programmable information is shown in brackets [ ] following the command name. See Section 5.4, Detailed Command Descriptions for
detailed command descriptions.
Entering Commands
To enter a command, type the command, followed by an ENTER keystroke. For programming commands, the command is followed by
SPACE and the appropriate information or values, then ENTER .
Here are some additional points to remember when using the HHT:
• Use the SHIFT key to access numbers; press again to return to letter
mode.
• Use the ESC/BKSP key to edit information or commands entries.
• The flashing square cursor ( ) indicates that letter mode is
selected.
• The flashing superscript rectangular cursor ( ) indicates that
number mode is selected.
Error Messages
Listed below are some possible error messages that may be encountered
when using the HHT:
UNKNOWN COMMAND—The
command was not recognized. Refer to the
command description for command usage information.
INCORRECT ENTRY—The command format or its associated values were
not valid. Refer to the command description for command usage information.
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
19
COMMAND FAILED—The command was unable to successfully complete.
This may indicate an internal software problem.
NOT PROGRAMMED—Software
was unable to program the internal radio
memory or the requested item was not programmed.This is a serious
internal radio error. Contact MDS for assistance.
TEXT TOO LONG—Response
to OWN or OWM command when too many
characters have been entered. Refer to the command description for
command usage information.
NOT AVAILABLE—The
entered command or parameter was valid, but it
referred to a currently unavailable choice. Refer to the command
description for command usage information.
ACCESS DENIED—The
command is unavailable to the user. Refer to the
command descriptions for command information.
EEPROM FAILURE— The INIT command was unable to write to EEPROM.
This is a serious internal radio error. Contact MDS for assistance.
Table 7. Command summary
Command name
20
Function
AMASK [0000
0000–FFFF FFFF]
Details page 22
Set or display hex code identifying which events
trigger an alarm.
ASENSE [HI/LO]
Details page 23
Set or display the state of the alarm output signal
to ACTIVE HI or ACTIVE LO.
BAUD [xxxxx abc]
Details page 23
Set or display the DATA INTERFACE data rate
and control bits.
BUFF [ON, OFF]
Details page 23
Enables or disables the internal radio data buffer.
CTS [0–255]
Details page 24
Set or display the Clear-to-Send delay in seconds.
CKEY [ON–OFF]
Details page 24
Enables or disables the continuously keyed
mode. Note: Remotes cannot receive when
keyed.
DATAKEY [ON, OFF]
Details page 24
Toggles between key-on-data and key-on-RTS.
DKEY
Details page 25
Dekey the radio (transmitter OFF). This is
generally a radio test command.
DLINK [ON/OFF/xxxx]
Details page 25
Configures local diagnostic link protocol.
DMGAP [xx]
Details page 25
(Diagnostics) Sets the amount of time to wait after
the receipt of a character before interpreting the
next received character as the start of a new
message.
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
Table 7. Command summary (Continued)
Command name
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
Function
DTYPE [NODE/ROOT]
Details page 25
(Diagnostics) Sets up a radio as a Root or Node
radio. Associated commands are GATE and
PEER. (See MDS’ Network-Wide Diagnostics
System Handbook (MDS P/N 05-3467A01) for
details.)
DUMP
Details page 26
Display all programmable settings.
HREV
Details page 26
Display the Hardware Revision level, if
programmed.
INIT
Details page 26
Set radio parameters to factory defaults.
INIT [2710]
Details page 26
Restores certain transceiver defaults before using
the INIT xx20 command.
INIT [2720]
Details page 26
Configure radio for use with an MDS model P-20
chassis.
KEY
Details page 27
Key the radio (transmitter ON). This is generally
used for radio testing.
MODEL
Details page 27
Display the model number of the radio.
MODEM [xxxx, NONE]
Details page 27
Set the modem characteristics of the radio.
OWM [XXX...]
Details page 27
Set or display the owner’s message.
OWN [XXX...]
Details page 27
Set or display the owner’s name.
PTT [0–255]
Details page 27
Set or display the Push-to-Talk delay in
milliseconds.
PWR [20–37]
Details page 27
Set or display the transmit power setting.
RSSI
Details page 28
Display the Received Signal Strength Indication.
RTU [ON/OFF/0-80]
Details page 28
Enables or disables the radio’s internal RTU
simulator and sets the RTU address.
RX [xxx.xxxxx]
Details page 28
Set or display receiver frequency.
RXTOT [NONE, 1-255]
Details page 28
Set or display the value of the receive time-out
timer.
SCD [0-255]
Details page 28
Set or display the Soft-carrier Dekey delay in
milliseconds.
SER
Details page 28
Display the radio serial number.
SHOW [DC, PORT, PWR]
Details page 29
Display the DC voltages, diagnostics port, and
transmit power level.
SREV
Details page 29
Display the Software Revision Level.
STAT
Details page 29
Display radio status and alarms.
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
21
Table 7. Command summary (Continued)
Command name
Function
TEMP
Details page 29
Display the internal temperature of the radio in
degrees Celsius.
TOT [1-255, ON, OFF]
Details page 30
Set or display the Time-out Timer delay in
seconds.
TX [xxx.xxxxx]
Details page 30
Set or display the transmit frequency.
UNIT [10000...65000]
Details page 30
Set or display the transceiver’s unit address.
5.4 Detailed Command Descriptions
The only critical commands for most applications are transmit and
receive frequencies (RX xxx.xxxxx, TX xxx.xxxxx). However, proper use of
the additional commands allows you to tailor the transceiver for a specific use, or conduct basic diagnostics on the radio. This section gives
more detailed information for the user commands previously listed in
Table 7.
In many cases, the commands shown here can be used in two ways.
First, you can type only the command name to view the currently programmed data. Secondly, you can set or change the existing data by
typing the command, followed by a space, and then the desired entry. In
the list below, allowable programming variables, if any, are shown in
brackets following the command name.
AMASK [0000 0000–FFFF FFFF]
The AMASK (alarm mask) command displays or sets which events cause
the alarm output signal to be active. Normally, the mask is FFFF FFFF,
meaning that any of the 32 possible events will activate the alarm output
signal. No special configuration is required for typical applications.
Entering the AMASK command alone displays the current setting of
alarm events in hexadecimal format.
Entering the AMASK command followed by an eight-digit hexadecimal
number reprograms the specified events to trigger an alarm.
The eight-digit hexadecimal number used as the command parameter is
used to classify up to 32 events as alarm triggers for the alarm output
status line. (See Table 8 on page 32 for a list of event codes.) The hex
value for the mask corresponds to the hex value for the STAT command
(see the STAT command description).
22
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
Each bit that is a ‘1’ identifies an associated alarm condition that can
trigger the alarm output status line. Each bit that is a ‘0’ treats the associated alarm as irrelevant when deciding whether or not to assert the
alarm output status line. For more information on tailoring the alarm
response, contact the MDS Technical Services Department.
ASENSE [HI/LO]
The ASENSE command sets or displays the sense of the alarm output at
Pin 25 of the DATA INTERFACE connector.
Entering the ASENSE command alone shows whether the alarm output is
active high or low. Entering the ASENSE command followed by HI or LO
resets the alarm output to active high or low.
BAUD [xxxxx abc]
This command sets (or displays) the communication attributes for the
It has no effect on the RJ-11 DIAG. port.
DATA INTERFACE port.
The first parameter (xxxxx) is baud rate. Baud rate is specified in
bits-per-second (bps) and must be one of the following speeds: 110, 300,
1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200, or 38400.
The second parameter of the BAUD command (abc) is a three-character
block indicating how the data is encoded:
a = Data bits (7 or 8)
b = Parity (N for None,
c = Stop bits (1 or 2)
O for Odd, E for Even)
The factory default setting is 4800 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, 1 stop bit
(Example: 4800 8N1).
NOTE: 7N1, 8O2, and 8E2 are invalid communication settings and are
not supported by the transceiver.
BUFF [ON, OFF]
This command sets or displays the received data handling mode of the
radio. The command parameter is either ON or OFF. The default is ON.
The setting of this parameter affects the timing of how received RF data
is sent out the INTERFACE connector. Outgoing (transmitted) data is not
affected by this setting.
If data buffering is OFF, the radio operates with the lowest possible
average latency. Data bytes are thus sent out the INTERFACE port as soon
as an incoming RF data frame is disassembled. Average and typical
latency will both be below 10 ms, but idle character gaps may be introduced into the outgoing data flow.
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
23
If data buffering is ON, the radio operates in seamless mode. Data bytes
will be sent over the air as quickly as possible, but the receiver buffers
(stores) the data until enough bytes have arrived to cover worst-case
gaps in transmission. This mode of operation is required for protocols
such as MODBUS™ that do not allow gaps in their data transmission.
Note that seamless mode (BUFF ON) is intended only for applications
where the transmitter’s baud rate is greater than or equal to the
receiver’s baud rate. Adherence to this rule is left up to the user.
CKEY [ON–OFF]
The CKEY command enables or disables the continuously-keyed function of the radio. When CKEY is set to ON, the radio is continuously
keyed.
CTS [0–255]
The CTS (clear-to-send) command selects or displays the timer value
associated with the CTS line response. The command parameter ranges
from 0 to 255 milliseconds.
For DCE operation, the timer specifies how long to wait after the RTS
line goes high, before the radio asserts CTS and the DTE can transmit
the data. A CTS value of zero keys the radio and asserts the CTS line
immediately after the RTS line goes high.
For CTS Key operation (see DEVICE command), the timer specifies how
long to wait after asserting the CTS, before sending data out the DATA
INTERFACE port. A timer value of zero means that data will be sent out
the data port without imposing a key-up delay. (Other delays may be
present based on selected radio operating parameters.)
DATAKEY [ON, OFF]
The DATAKEY command sets or displays the ability of the radio to key the
transmitter as data is received at the DATA INTERFACE connector.
Asserting RTS keys the radio regardless of this command setting.
If DATAKEY is set to ON, the radio will key when a full data-character is
received at the transceiver’s DATA INTERFACE connector. If DATAKEY is
set to OFF, the radio needs to be keyed by asserting either the RTS or
PTT signal or with the CKEY or KEY command.
DEVICE [DCE, CTS KEY]
The DEVICE command sets or displays the device behavior of the radio.
The command parameter is either DCE or CTS KEY.
24
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
The default selection is DCE. In this mode, CTS will go high following
RTS, subject to the CTS programmable delay time. If the DATAKEY command is set to ON, keying can be stimulated by the input of characters at
the data port. Hardware flow control is implemented by signaling the
CTS line if data arrives faster than it can be buffered and transmitted.
If CTS KEY is selected, the radio is assumed to be controlling another
radio. The RTS line is ignored and the CTS line is used as a keyline control for the other radio. CTS is asserted immediately following the
receipt of RF data, but data will not be sent out the DATA INTERFACE port
until after the CTS programmable delay time has expired. (This gives
the other radio time to key.)
DKEY
This command deactivates the transmitter after it has been keyed with
the KEY command.
DLINK [ON/OFF/xxxx]
This command is used to configure the local diagnostic link protocol
used in network-wide diagnostics.
Entering DLINK ON enables the diagnostic link. Entering DLINK OFF disables the diagnostic link.
To change the diagnostic link, enter DLINK followed by one of the following baud rates: 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200 (default).
DMGAP [xx]
The DMGAP command sets the amount of time in milliseconds to wait
after the receipt of a character before interpreting the next received character as the start of a new message. When data port baud rates are slow,
the gap between characters within a poll may be so long that the radio
interprets the next character as the start of a new poll. When diagnostics
is being performed using passive messaging (see Performing Network-Wide Remote Diagnostics on page 34), this command may be used
to change this behavior.
DTYPE [NODE/ROOT]
This command establishes the local radio as a root radio or node radio
for network-wide diagnostics. Entering DTYPE NODE configures the
radio as a node radio. Entering DTYPE ROOT configures the radio as a root
radio. Entering the DTYPE command alone displays the current setting.
See “Performing Network-Wide Remote Diagnostics” on page 34. Two
associated commands are GATE and PEER. See MDS’ Network-Wide
Diagnostics System Handbook (MDS P/N 05-3467A01) for details.
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
25
DUMP
This command displays all the programmed settings of the radio. The
HHT display is too small to list all the command settings at one time.
Therefore, this command is most useful if the command is issued from
a computer or full-screen terminal.
HREV
This command displays the transceiver’s hardware revision level if it
has been programmed at the factory.
INIT
The INIT command is used to re-initialize the radio’s operating parameters to the factory defaults. This may be helpful when trying to resolve
configuration problems that may have resulted from the entry of one or
more improper command settings. Entry of this command allows you to
get back to a known working state. The following changes to the radio
are made when INIT is entered:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
is set to 0
DATAKEY is set to ON
DEVICE is set to DCE
PTT is set to 0
SCD is set to 0
TOT is set to 30 seconds and set to ON
PWR is set to +37 dBm (5 watts)
CTS
All other commands stay at their previously established settings.
INIT [2710]
This command sets the transceiver for operation outside the MDS model
P-20 chassis by setting the following parameters as shown.
ASENSE
ACTIVE HI
AMASK
FFFF FFFF
RXTOT
(assert alarm output on all alarms)
NONE (receive time-out timer disabled)
This command can be used subsequent to using the INIT 2720 command
to restore the standard transceiver defaults.
INIT [2720]
This command sets the transceiver for operation inside the model P-20
chassis by setting the following parameters as shown.
ASENSE
ACTIVE LO
AMASK
FFFF 0000
RXTOT
26
(trigger on major alarms)
20 (20 minute time-out timer)
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
KEY
This command activates the transmitter. See also the DKEY command.
MODEL
This command displays the radio’s model number code.
MODEM [xxxx, NONE]
This command selects the radio’s modem characteristics. Enter 9600 or
3200 for digital operation, or enter NONE to select analog operation.
For MDS 1710 digital operation the proper settings are 9600 for the MDS
2710A, 19200 for the MDS 1710C.
For MDS 2710 operation, the proper settings are 3200 for the MDS
2710D, 9600 for the MDS 2710A, and 19200 for the MDS 2710C.
OWM [XXX...]
This is a command to display or program an owner’s message. To program the owner’s message, type OWM then the message, followed by
ENTER .
To display the owner’s message, type OWM then
message appears on the display.
ENTER
. The owner’s
OWN [XXX...]
This is a command to display or program an owner’s name. To program
the owner’s name, type OWN then the name, followed by ENTER .
To display the owner’s name, type OWN then
name appears on the display.
ENTER
. The owner’s
PTT [0–255]
This command sets or displays the key-up delay in milliseconds.
This timer specifies how long to wait after the radio receives a key signal
from either the PTT or RTS lines (on the DATA INTERFACE), before actually keying the radio.
PWR [20–37]
NOTE: This function may not be available, depending on certification
requirements in a particular country.
This command displays or sets the desired RF forward output power setting of the radio. The PWR command parameter is specified in dBm and
can range from 20 through 37. The default setting is 37 dBm (5 watts).
To read the actual (measured) power output of the radio, use the SHOW
PWR command. A dBm-to-watts conversion chart is provided in
Section 7.6.
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
27
RSSI
This command continuously displays the radio’s Received Signal
Strength Indication (RSSI) in dBm units, until you press the Enter key.
Incoming signal strengths from –50 dBm to –120 dBm can be read.
RTU [ON/OFF/0-80]
This command re-enables or disables the radio’s internal RTU simulator, which runs with MDS’ proprietary polling programs (poll.exe and
rsim.exe). The internal RTU simulator is available whenever a radio has
diagnostics enabled. This command also sets the RTU address that the
radio will respond to.
The internal RTU can be used for testing system payload data or pseudo
bit error rate testing. It can also be helpful in isolating a problem to either
the external RTU or the radio.
RX [xxx.xxxxx]
This command selects or displays the radio’s receive frequency in MHz.
The frequency step size is 6.25 kHz for the MDS 2710A/C and 5.0 kHz
for the MDS 2710D.
If the customer frequency has not been programmed at the factory, a
default frequency will be programmed in the radio near the center of the
frequency band.
RXTOT [NONE, 1-255]
The RXTOT command selects or displays the receive time-out timer value
in minutes. This timer triggers an alarm (event 12) if data is not detected
within the specified time.
Entering the RXTOT command without a parameter displays the timer
value in minutes. Entering the RXTOT command with a parameter
ranging from 0 to 255 resets the timer in minutes. Entering the RXTOT
command with the parameter NONE disables the timer.
SCD [0-255]
This command displays or changes the soft-carrier dekey delay in milliseconds.
This timer specifies how long to wait after the removal of the keying
signal before actually releasing the transmitter. A value of 0 milliseconds will unkey the transmitter immediately after the removal of the
keying signal.
SER
This command displays the radio’s serial number as recorded at the factory.
28
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
SHOW [DC, PORT, PWR]
The SHOW command displays different types of information based on
the command variables. The different parameters are:
•
•
DC—Display
DC input/output voltages
PORT—Display the connector port (RJ-11 or DB-25) that is active
for diagnostics and control.
• PWR—Display RF power output
SNR
This command continuously displays the signal-to-noise ratio of the
received signal expressed in dB, until you press the Enter key. As used
in this guide, the signal-to-noise measurement is based upon the signal
level following equalization, for received frames.
The SNR is an indication of the received signal quality. The SNR indication ranges from 10 dB to 33 dB. A value of 10 dB represents a very
poor signal. A value of 24 dB represents a very good signal.
When the SNR command is used, it causes the DIAG. port to enter an
update mode, and the signal-to-noise ratio is updated and redisplayed
every 2 seconds. The SNR continuously updates until the ENTER key is
pressed.
SREV
This command displays the software revision level of the transceiver
firmware.
STAT
This command displays the current alarm status of the transceiver.
If no alarms exist, the message NO ALARMS PRESENT appears at the top
of the HHT display.
If an alarm does exist, a two-digit code (00–31) is displayed and the
alarm is identified as “Major” or “Minor.” A brief description of the
alarm code is also given.
If more than one alarm exists, the word MORE appears at the bottom of
the screen and additional alarms are viewed by pressing the ENTER
key. Detailed descriptions of event codes are provided in Table 8 on
page 32.
TEMP
This command displays the internal temperature of the transceiver in
degrees Celsius.
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
29
TOT [1-255, ON, OFF]
This command sets or displays the transmitter Time-out Timer value
(1–255 seconds), as well as the timer status (ON or OFF). If the timer is
on, and the radio remains keyed for a longer duration than the TOT value,
the transmitter is automatically unkeyed.
When this happens, the radio must be commanded back to an unkeyed
state before a new keying command is accepted. The default timer value
is 30 seconds.
TX [xxx.xxxxx]
This command selects or displays the radio’s transmit frequency in
MHz. The frequency step size is 6.25 kHz for the MDS 2710A/C and
5.0 kHz for the MDS 2710D.
If the customer frequency has not been programmed at the factory, a
default frequency will be programmed in the radio near the center of the
frequency band.
UNIT [10000...65000]
This command selects or displays the radio’s unit address. The factory
default setting is the last four digits of the transceiver’s serial number.
The unit address is used in network diagnostics. See MDS’ Network-Wide Diagnostics System Handbook (MDS P/N 05-3467A01) for
more information.
6.0 TROUBLESHOOTING
Successful troubleshooting of the radio system is not difficult, but it
requires a logical approach. It is best to begin troubleshooting at the
master station, as the rest of the system depends on the master for
polling commands. If the master station has problems, the operation of
the entire network can be compromised.
It is good practice to start by checking the simple things. For proper
operation, all radios in the network must meet these basic requirements:
• Adequate and stable primary power. The radio contains an internal self-resetting fuse (4A). Remove and re-apply primary power
to reset.
• Secure connections (RF, data and power)
• An efficient and properly aligned antenna system with a good
received signal strength (at least –90 dBm). It is possible for a
system to operate with weaker signals, but reliability will be
degraded.
• Proper programming of the transceiver’s operating parameters
(see Section 5.0, TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING).
30
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
• The correct interface between the transceiver and the connected
data equipment (correct cable wiring, proper data format, timing,
etc.)
6.1 LED Indicators
The LED status indicators are an important troubleshooting tool and
should be checked whenever a problem is suspected. Table 5 on page 16
describes the function of each status LED.
6.2 Event Codes
When an alarm condition exists, the transceiver creates a code that can
be read on an HHT connected to the DIAG. port. These codes can be very
helpful in resolving many system difficulties. Refer to Table 8 for a definition of the event codes.
Checking for Alarms—STAT command
To check for alarms, enter STAT on the HHT. If no alarms exist, the message NO ALARMS PRESENT appears at the top of the display (Figure 11).
Invisible place holder
Figure 11. HHT Display in Response to STAT Command
If an alarm does exist, a two-digit alarm code (00–31) is displayed and
the event is identified as a Major or Minor Alarm. A brief description of
the alarm is also given.
If more than one alarm exists, the word MORE appears at the bottom of
the screen. To view additional alarms, press ENTER .
Major Alarms vs. Minor Alarms
Major Alarms—report serious conditions that generally indicate a hardware failure, or other abnormal condition that will prevent (or seriously
degrade) further operation of the transceiver. Major alarms generally
indicate the need for factory repair. Contact MDS for further assistance.
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
31
Minor Alarms—report conditions that, under most circumstances will
not prevent transceiver operation. This includes out-of-tolerance conditions, baud rate mismatches, etc. The cause of these alarms should be
investigated and corrected to prevent eventual system failure.
Event Code Definitions
Table 8 contains a listing of all event codes that may be reported by the
transceiver.
Table 8. Event Codes
Event
Code
32
Event
Class
Description
01
Major
Improper software detected for this radio model.
02
Major
The model number of the transceiver is unprogrammed.
04
Major
One or both of the internal programmable synthesizer loops is
reporting an out-of-lock condition.
06
Major
An unrecoverable fault was detected on the A-to-D chip. The
radio will not receive data.
07
Major
One or more of the radio’s internal voltage regulators is
reporting a failure. The radio will not operate.
08
Major
The system is reporting that it has not been calibrated. Factory
calibration is required for proper radio operation.
09
--
10
Major
11
--
12
Major
Receiver time-out. No data received within the specified
receiver time-out time.
13
Major
Transmitter time-out. The radio was keyed for a duration
exceeding the time-out timer setting. (This alarm clears the
next time the radio keys.)
14–15
--
Not used.
16
Minor
Not used.
17
Minor
A data parity fault has been detected on the DATA
INTERFACE connector. This usually indicates a parity setting
mismatch between the radio and the RTU.
18
Minor
A data framing error has been detected on the DATA
INTERFACE connector. This may indicate a baud rate
mismatch between the radio and the RTU.
19–24
--
25
Minor
The 5.6 volt power regulator is out-of-tolerance. If the error is
excessive, operation may fail.
26
Minor
The DC input voltage is out-of-tolerance. If the voltage is too
far out of tolerance, operation may fail.
27, 28
--
31
Minor
Not used.
The internal microcontroller was unable to properly program
the system to the appropriate EEPROM defaults. A hardware
problem may exist.
Not used.
Not used.
Not used
The transceiver’s internal temperature is approaching an
out-of-tolerance condition. If the temperature drifts outside of
the recommended operating range, system operation may fail.
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
7.0 TECHNICAL REFERENCE
7.1 Transceiver Specifications
TRANSMITTER SYSTEM SPECIFICATION
Operating Frequency:
See Transmitter Specifications
Frequency Stability:
±1.5 ppm
Adjacent Channel Power:
–65 dBc (MDS 1710A/2710A)
–60 dBc (MDS 1710C/2710C)
–55 dBc (MDS 2710D)
Carrier Power Accuracy:
±2 dB
RECEIVER SYSTEM SPECIFICATION
Operating Frequency:
See Receiver Specifications
Maximum Usable Sensitivity:
–111 dBm for 1 x 10-6 BER
Co-Channel Rejection:
–12 dB
DATA CHARACTERISTICS
Signaling Standard:
EIA-232
Connector:
DB-25 Female
Data Interface Rates:
110 bps to 38.4 kbps1200, 2400, 4800, 9600,
19200, 38400 bps—asynchronous
Data Latency:
10 ms maximum, including RTS/CTS delay
Byte Length:
10 or 11 bits
TRANSMITTER
Frequency Range:
130-174 MHz (MDS 1710A/C)
216-220 MHz (MDS 2710 A/C) FCC
220-240 MHz (MDS 2710A/C)
220-222 MHz (MDS 2710D) FCC
See Figure 4 on Page 4 for detailed listing
Modulation Type:
Binary CPFSK
Carrier Power:
0.1 Watts to 5 Watts @13.8 Vdc
Duty Cycle:
Continuous
Output Impedance:
50 ohms
Frequency Stability:
MDS 1710 ±1.0 ppm
MDS 2710 ±1.5 ppm
Channel Spacing:
6.25 kHz steps (MDS 1710A/C and 2710A/C)
5.0 kHz steps (MDS 2710D)
6.25 kHz (MDS 1710A/C @ 130-174 MHz)
Transmitter Spurious
Radiated Emissions:
–57 dBm, 30 MHz to 1 GHz
–47 dBm, 1 GHz to 12.5 GHz
Harmonics:
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
2nd harmonic:
57 dBc
3rd harmonic & higher:
57 dBc
Time-out Timer:
30 seconds (default). Selectable with TOT
command
Transmitter Keying:
Data activated or RTS
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
33
RECEIVER
Frequency Range:
130-174 MHz (MDS 1710A/C)
216-220 MHz (MDS 2710 A/C)
220-240 MHz (MDS 2710A/C)
220-222 MHz (MDS 2710D)
See Figure 4 on Page 4 for detailed listing
Type:
Double conversion superheterodyne
Frequency Stability:
±1.5 ppm
Maximum Usable Sensitivity:
–111 dBm for 1 x 10-6 BER
Spurious
Response Rejection:
70 dB
Intermodulation
Response Rejection:
65 dB
Receiver Spurious
Conducted Emissions:
Receiver Spurious
Radiated Emissions:
Bandwidth:
–57 dBm, 9 kHz to 1 GHz
–47 dBm, 1 GHz to 12.5 GHz
–57 dBm, 30 MHz to 1 GHz
–47 dBm, 1 GHz to 12.5 GHz
5 kHz (MDS 2710D)
12.5 kHz (MDS 1710A, 2710A)
25 kHz (MDS 1710C, 2710C)
PRIMARY POWER
Voltage:
13.8 Vdc Nominal (10.5 to 16 Vdc)
TX Supply Current:
2.5 amps max
RX Supply Current:
Operational—150 mA (nominal)
Standby (sleep)—Less than 16 mA (nominal)
Fuse:
4 Amp Polyfuse, Self-Resetting, Internal
(Remove Primary Power to Reset)
Reverse Polarity Protection:
Diode across primary input
ENVIRONMENTAL
Humidity:
95% at 40 degrees C
Temperature Range:
–30 to 60 degrees C (full performance)
–40 to 70 degrees C (operational)
Weight:
1.6 kilograms
Case:
Die-cast Aluminum
DIAGNOSTICS INTERFACE
Signaling Standard:
EIA-232
Connector:
RJ-11 (may use radio’s DB-25 instead if Pin 23 is
grounded to enable diagnostics channel)
I/O Devices:
MDS Hand Held Terminal or PC with MDS software
7.2 Performing Network-Wide Remote Diagnostics
Diagnostics data from a remote radio can be obtained by connecting a
laptop or personal computer running MDS InSite diagnostics software
to any radio in the network.
34
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
Figure 12 shows an example of a setup for performing network-wide
remote diagnostics from both a Root (master station) location, and a
Node (remote station) location.
Invisible place holder
DIAGNOSTICS COMPUTER
RUNNING InSite
RTU
NODE
(Supports Intrusive
Diagnostics Only)
RTU
RTU
MASTER RADIO
DIAGNOSTIC DATA
(To InSite)
ROOT
(Supports Intrusive or
Non-Intrusive Diagnostics)
PAYLOAD DATA
(To SCADA Application)
HOST
COMPUTER
Figure 12. Network-Wide Remote Diagnostics Setup
If a PC is connected to any radio in the network, intrusive polling
(polling which briefly interrupts payload data transmission) can be performed. To perform diagnostics without interrupting payload data transmission, connect the PC to a radio defined as the “root” radio. A radio
is defined as a root radio using the DTYPE ROOT command locally, at the
radio.
A complete explanation of remote diagnostics can be found in MDS’
Network-Wide Diagnostics System Handbook (MDS P/N
05-3467A01). See the Handbook for more information about the basic
diagnostic procedures outlined below.
1. Program one radio in the network as the root radio by entering the
DTYPE ROOT command at the radio.
2. At the root radio, use the DLINK ON and DLINK [baud rate] commands
to configure the diagnostic link protocol on the RJ-11 port.
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
35
3. Program all other radios in the network as nodes by entering the
DTYPE NODE command at each radio.
4. Use the DLINK ON and DLINK [baud rate] commands to configure the
diagnostic link protocol on the RJ-11 port of each node radio.
5. Connect same-site radios using a null-modem cable at the radios’
diagnostic ports.
6. Connect a PC on which MDS InSite software is installed to the root
radio, or to one of the nodes, at the radio’s diagnostic port. (This PC
may be the PC being used to collect payload data, as shown in
Figure 12.)
To connect a PC to the radio’s DIAG. port, an RJ-11 to DB-9 adapter
(MDS P/N 03-3246A01) is required. If desired, an adapter cable
may be constructed from scratch using the information shown in
Figure 13.
Invisible place holder
RJ-11 PLUG
(TO RADIO)
1
6
RJ-11 PIN LAYOUT
DB-9 FEMALE
(TO COMPUTER)
4 TXD
RXD 2
5 RXD
TXD 3
6 GND
GND 5
Figure 13. RJ-11 to DB-9 Adapter Cable
7. Launch the MDS InSite application at the PC. (See the MDS InSite
User’s Guide for instructions.)
7.3 Bench Testing Setup
Figure 14 shows a sample test setup that can be used to verify the basic
operation of transceivers in a shop setting. The test can be performed
with any number of remote radios by using a power divider with the
required number of output connections.
The RTU simulator shown in the test setup (MDS Part No. 03-2512A01)
is a microcontroller that emulates a remote terminal unit operating at
1200, 2400, 4800, or 9600 bps. Custom software is supplied with the
RTU simulator that allows continuous polling of remote radios using an
IBM-compatible personal computer. The software reports the number of
polls sent, polls received, and the number of errors detected.
As an alternative to using an external RTU simulator, the transceiver’s
internal RTU simulator may be used (see RTU command in Table 7 on
page 20). (This will not provide as conclusive a test as an external simulator because it does not utilize the transceiver’s data connector.)
36
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
NOTE: It is very important to use attenuation between all units in the
test setup. The amount of attenuation required will depend on
the number of units being tested and the desired signal strength
(RSSI) at each transceiver during the test. In no case should a
signal greater than –50 dBm be applied to any transceiver in
the test setup.
Invisible place holder
RTU SIMULATORS
MDS P/N 03-2512A01*
COMPUTER RUNNING MDS
"POLL.EXE" PROGRAM
REMOTE
8. 3
1
VDC
REMOTE
ANNETN
A
+
–
REMOTE
8. 3
1
ANNETN
A
VDC–
+
REMOTE
ANNETN
A
8. 3
1
C–
VD
+
ANNETNA
8. 3
1
C
VD
+–
MASTER STATION
POWER DIVIDER
POWER ATTENUATORS
• Fixed or adjustable
• 5W Minimum Rating
NON-RADIATING ATTENUATOR
• Install on any unused divider ports
• 5W Minimum Rating
* Transceiver's internal RTU Simulator may be used if
external simulator is unavailable. See text.
Figure 14. Typical setup for bench testing of radios
7.4 Helical Filter Adjustment
If the operating frequency of the radio is changed significantly, the
helical filters should be adjusted for maximum received signal strength
(RSSI). To adjust the filters, proceed as follows:
1. Remove the top cover from the transceiver by loosening the four
screws and lifting straight up.
2. Locate the helical filters on the PC board. See Figure 15.
3. Apply a steady signal to the radio at the programmed receive frequency (–80 dBm level recommended; no stronger than –60 dBm).
This can be done with a signal generator or an over-the-air signal.
4. Measure the radio’s RSSI using one of the following methods:
• With an HHT (See Section 5.0, TRANSCEIVER PROGRAMMING on page 17).
• With MDS Radio Configuration Software (See Section 7.5,
Upgrading the Radio’s Software on page 38).
• With a voltmeter connected to Pin 21 of the DATA INTERFACE
connector (See Section 4.2, RSSI Measurement on page 16).
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
37
5. With a small adjustment tool, adjust each section of the helical filter
for maximum RSSI. Re-install the cover to the transceiver.
Invisible place holder
U104
U202
U101
FRONT PANEL
OF RADIO
U203
HELICAL
ADJUSTMENTS
SHIELD
COVER
J301
Figure 15. Helical Filter Location
7.5 Upgrading the Radio’s Software
From time to time, new product features or software maintenance files
may become available from MDS. This section describes the steps necessary to install new software into the transceiver using a PC connected
to the radio’s DIAG. port.
Upgrade software can be obtained in a number of ways. The MDS Web
site at www.microwavedata.com contains an FTP area with software
files for several radio models. You can browse the listings to see if there
are files pertaining to your particular model. There is no charge for this
service.
In addition, you can also contact MDS to request radio software. Software files may be sent to you via e-mail, or on a 3.5” diskette. There may
be a nominal charge for the software depending on the nature of the
upgrade.
NOTE: Software upgrades are distributed as ASCII files with a “.S28”
extension. These files use the Motorola S-record format.
Using Radio Software Upgrade Diskette
A software upgrade diskette may be purchased from MDS to add new
product features to the radio such as Network-wide Diagnostics. The
upgrade kit includes a diskette (MDS P/N 06-3501A01) with the most
current radio software, authorization codes, and an instruction booklet.
Contact MDS for ordering information. When calling, please have the
serial number(s) available for the radio(s) that you wish to upgrade.
38
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
The upgrade software can be run on an IBM-compatible computer connected to the radio’s DIAG. port via an RJ-11 to DB-9 adapter (MDS P/N
03-3246A01). If desired, an adapter cable may be constructed from
scratch using the information shown in Figure 13.
To initiate the upgrade, insert the upgrade diskette in Drive A:. Set the
working directory to A: (example: from a DOS prompt type A:\). Next,
type UPGRADE and press the ENTER key. (If you have the radio connected
via the Com2 serial port, type UPGRADE-2 instead.) The upgrade software will normally run automatically without any further prompts.
The radio’s PWR LED will flash rapidly to confirm that a download is
in process. The download takes about two minutes.
NOTE: If a software download fails, the radio is left unprogrammed
and inoperative. This is indicated by the PWR LED flashing
slowly (1 second on, 1 second off). This condition is only
likely if a power failure occurred to the computer or radio
during the downloading process. The download can be
attempted again when the fault has been corrected.
Using Radio Configuration Software
If you already have software that you wish to download into the transceiver, Radio Configuration Software (MDS P/N 03-3156A01) may be
used to perform the installation. To use this method, proceed as follows:
Connect a PC to the radio’s DIAG. port via an RJ-11 to DB-9 adapter
(MDS P/N 03-3246A01). If desired, an adapter cable may be constructed from scratch using the information shown in Figure 13.
Run the Radio Configuration software. Under the SYSTEM menu, select
RADIO SOFTWARE UPGRADE. Follow the prompts and online instructions
to locate the desired software and complete the upgrade.
The radio’s PWR LED will flash rapidly to confirm that a download is
in process. The download takes about two minutes.
NOTE: If a software download fails, the radio is left unprogrammed
and inoperative. This is indicated by the PWR LED flashing
slowly (1 second on, 1 second off). This condition is only
likely if a power failure occurred to the computer or radio
during the downloading process. The download can be
attempted again when the fault has been corrected.
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
39
7.6 dBm-Watts-Volts Conversion Chart
Table 9 is provided as a convenience for determining the equivalent
wattage or voltage of an RF power expressed in dBm.
Table 9. dBm-Watts-Volts Conversion—for 50 Ohm Systems
40
dBm V
Po
dBm V
Po
dBm mV
+53
+50
+49
+48
+47
+46
+45
+44
+43
+42
+41
+40
+39
+38
+37
+36
+35
+34
+33
+32
+31
+30
+29
+28
+27
+26
+25
+24
+23
+22
+21
+20
+19
+18
+17
+16
+15
+14
+13
+12
+11
+10
+9
+8
+7
+6
+5
+4
+3
+2
+1
200W
100W
80W
64W
50W
40W
32W
25W
20W
16W
12.5W
10W
8W
6.4W
5W
4W
3.2W
2.5W
2W
1.6W
1.25W
1.0W
800mW
640mW
500mW
400mW
320mW
250mW
200mW
160mW
125mW
100mW
80mW
64mW
50mW
40mW
32mW
25mW
20mW
16mW
12.5mW
10mW
8mW
6.4mW
5mW
4mW
3.2mW
2.5mW
2.0mW
1.6mW
1.25mW
0
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
-9
-10
-11
-12
-13
-14
-15
-16
1.0mW
.80mW
.64mW
.50mW
.40mW
.32mW
.25mW
.20mW
.16mW
.125mW
.10mW
-49
-50
-51
-52
-53
-54
-55
-56
-57
-58
-59
-60
-61
-62
-63
-64
100.0
70.7
64.0
58.0
50.0
44.5
40.0
32.5
32.0
28.0
26.2
22.5
20.0
18.0
16.0
14.1
12.5
11.5
10.0
9.0
8.0
7.10
6.40
5.80
5.00
4.45
4.00
3.55
3.20
2.80
2.52
2.25
2.00
1.80
1.60
1.41
1.25
1.15
1.00
.90
.80
.71
.64
.58
.500
.445
.400
.355
.320
.280
.252
.225
.200
.180
.160
.141
.125
.115
.100
.090
.080
.071
.064
.058
.050
.045
.040
.0355
dBm µV
dBm mV
-17
-18
-19
-20
-21
-22
-23
-24
-25
-26
-27
-28
-29
-30
-31
-32
-33
-34
-35
-36
-37
-38
-39
-40
-41
-42
-43
-44
-45
-46
-47
-48
31.5
28.5
25.1
22.5
20.0
17.9
15.9
14.1
12.8
11.5
10.0
8.9
8.0
7.1
6.25
5.8
5.0
4.5
4.0
3.5
3.2
2.85
2.5
2.25
2.0
1.8
1.6
1.4
1.25
1.18
1.00
0.90
Po
.01mW
.001mW
.1µW
MDS 1710A/C and MDS 2710A/C/D
-65
-66
-67
-68
-69
-70
-71
-72
-73
-74
-75
-76
-77
-78
-79
-80
-81
-82
-83
-84
-85
-86
-87
-88
-89
-90
-91
-92
-93
-94
-95
-96
-97
Po
0.80
0.71 .01µW
0.64
0.57
0.50
0.45
0.40
0.351
0.32
0.286
0.251
0.225 .001µW
0.200
0.180
0.160
0.141
128
115
100
90
80
71
65
58
50
45
40
35
32
29
25
22.5
20.0
18.0
16.0
11.1
12.9
11.5
10.0
9.0
8.0
7.1
6.1
5.75
5.0
4.5
4.0
3.51
3.2
Po
.1nW
.01nW
.001nW
dBm µV
-98
-99
-100
-101
-102
-103
-104
-105
-106
2.9
2.51
2.25
2.0
1.8
1.6
1.41
1.27
1.18
dBm nV
-107
-108
-109
-110
-111
-112
-113
-114
-115
-116
-117
-118
-119
-120
-121
-122
-123
-124
-125
-126
-127
-128
-129
-130
-131
-132
-133
-134
-135
-136
-137
-138
-139
-140
1000
900
800
710
640
580
500
450
400
355
325
285
251
225
200
180
160
141
128
117
100
90
80
71
61
58
50
45
40
35
33
29
25
23
Po
.1pW
Po
.01pW
.001pW
.1ƒW
.01ƒW
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
INDEX
A
BAUD command 23
Baud rate
setting for RJ-11 DIAG port (DLINK command) 25, 35
Bench testing (radio performance), 36–37
Bit, defined 6
Bits-per-second. See BPS
BPS (bits-per-second), defined 6
BUFF command 23
Byte, defined 6
DATAKEY (enable/disable transmitter keying by radio) 24
DEVICE (set/display radio behavior) 24
DKEY (deactivate transmitter after KEY command) 25
DLINK (enable/disable network-wide diagnostics) 25
DMGAP (set time to wait between characters) 25
DTYPE (set radio to Root or Node for diagnostics) 25
DUMP (display all programmed settings) 26
entering on Hand-Held Terminal (HHT) 19
Hand-Held Terminal (HHT) 19
HREV (display hardware revision level) 26
INIT (reinitialize radio to factory defaults) 26
INIT xx10 (restore standard transceiver defaults) 26
INIT xx20 (configure radio for use with P-20 chassis) 26
KEY (activate transmitter) 27
MODEL (display radio model number code) 27
MODEM (set modem speed) 27
OWM (set/display owner’s message) 27
OWN (set/display owner’s name) 27
PTT (set/display key-up delay) 27
PWR (set/display RF forward output power) 27
RSSI (display RSSI) 28
RTU (enable/disable internal RTU) 28
RX (set/display receive frequency) 28
RXTOT (set/display receive time-out timer value) 28
SCD (set/display soft-carrier dekey delay) 28
SER (display radio serial number 28
SHOW (display DC voltage, data port, RF power) 29
SNR (display signal-to-noise ratio) 29
SREV (display software revision level) 29
STAT (display current alarm status) 29
TEMP (display internal temperature) 29
TOT (set/display time-out value and timer status) 30
TX (set/display transmit frequency) 30
Conversions, dBm-Watts-Volts 40
CTS command 24
CTS pinout (Pin 5) 14
C
D
Cable, loss due to length of coaxial 12
Cautions
use attenuation between all units in test setup 35
CKEY command 24
COMMAND FAILED error message 20
Command summary, table 20
Commands
AMASK (set/display alarm triggers) 22
ASENSE (set alarm output state) 23
BAUD (set/display rate, encoding) 23
BUFF (set/display data handling mode) 23
CKEY (enable/disable continuous keying) 24
CTS (set/display CTS line response timer) 24
Data interface
connector pinouts 14
display active connector port 29
installing connection 13
DATAKEY command 24
dB. See Decibel 6
dBi, defined 6
dBm, defined 6
DCD
LED 16
pinout (Pin 8) 14
DCE (Data Cirtuit-terminating Equipment), defined 6
Decibel (dB), defined 6
ACCESS DENIED error message 20
Accessories 5
Accessory Power pinout (Pin 18) 14
Active messaging (defined) 5
Alarms
alarm code definitions 32
major vs. minor 31
pinout (Pin 25) 15
using STAT command to display 29
AMASK command 22
Antenna
installation 9
RSSI command used to refine heading 15
system gain, defined 6
Yagi, illustrated 12
Antennas 11–12
Applications 2
Multiple Address Systems (MAS) 2
point-to-multipoint system 2
point-to-point system 3
ASENSE command 23
B
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MDS 1710A/C and MDS2710A/C/D
I-1
Description, product 1
Detailed 22
DEVICE command 24
Diagnostic Channel Enable, pinout (Pin 23) 15
Diagnostics
interface specifications 34
network-wide, performing 34
PC software used for 38
using InSite software for network-wide 34
Differences between models 2
Display
alarm status (STAT command) 29
alarm triggers (AMASK command) 22
all programmed settings (DUMP command) 26
baud rate and encoding (BAUD command) 23
connector port, active (SHOW command) 29
CTS line response timer (CTS command) 24
data handling mode (BUFF command) 23
DC voltage (SHOW command) 29
hardware revision leve (HREV command)l 26
key-up delay (PTT command) 27
model number code (MODEL command) 27
owner’s message (OWM command) 27
owner’s name (OWN command) 27
radio behavior (DEVICE command) 24
radio serial number (SER command) 28
receive frequency (RX command) 28
receive time-out timer value (RXTOT command) 28
RF forward output power (PWR command) 27
RF output (SHOW command) 29
RSSI (RSSI command) 28
signal-to-noise ratio (SNR command) 29
soft-carrier dekey delay (SCD command) 28
software revision level (SREV command) 29
temperature, internal (TEMP command) 29
time-out value and timer status (TOT command) 30
transmit frequency (TX command) 30
DKEY command 25
DLINK command 25
use of 35
DMGAP command 25
Downloading new software 38
DSP (Digital Signal Processing), defined 6
DSR pinout (Pin 6) 14
DTE (Data Terminal Equipment), defined 6
DTYPE command 25
use of 35
DUMP command 26
E
EEPROM FAILURE error message 20
Enable/disable
continuous keying (CKEY command) 24
diagnostic channel, pinout (Pin 23) 15
internal RTU (RTU command) 28
network-wide diagnostics (DLINK command) 25
network-wide diagnostics, procedures 35
Environment specifications 34
I-2
Equalization, defined 6
Error messages 19
access denied 20
command failed 20
EEPROM failure 20
incorrect entry 19
not available 20
not programmed 20
text too long 20
unknown command 19
F
Fade margin, defined 7
Feedlines 12
Filter, helical, adjustment 37
Frame, defined 7
Frequency
adjusting helical filter when changed 37
setting. See TX and RX commands
G
Glossary 5
Ground
on Pin 12 to enable Sleep mode 14
protective (Pin 1) 14
signal (Pin 7) 14
H
Half-duplex 3
switched carrier operation 4
Hand-Held Terminal (HHT) 5
connected to transceiver, illustrated 18
connection and startup 17
display in response to STAT command, illustrated 31
entering commands 19
error messages displayed on 19
keyboard commands 19
operational settings, table 19
reinitialization display, illustrated 18
reinitializing 18
Hardware flow control, defined 7
Helical filter
adjusting 37
illustration 38
Host computer, defined 7
HREV command 26
I
Illustrations
antenna, Yagi 12
Hand-Held Terminal (HHT) connected to transceiver 18
Hand-Held Terminal (HHT) reinitialization display 18
Hand-Held Terminal display in response to STAT command 31
helical filter locations 38
MDS 1710A/C and MDS2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
MAS network 3
MDS 2710A/D model number codes 4
network-wide diagnostics 35
point-to-point link 3
remote station arrangement 9
RJ-11 to DB-9 adapter cable 36
RSSI vs. Vdc 13, 16
transceiver connectors & indicators 1
transceiver mounting dimensions 11
INCORRECT ENTRY error message 19
INIT command 26
INIT xx10 command 26
INIT xx20 command 26
InSite software
using to perform remote diagnostics 34
Installation 8–15
antenna 9
configuring transceiver 10
DATA INTERFACE connection 9
data interface connections 13
power 9
power connection 12
steps 9
Intrusive diagnostics (defined) 7
displaying (MODEL command) 27
MDS 2710A/D, illustrated 4
MODEM command 27
Modem, set speed. See MODEM command
N
Network-wide diagnostics
active messaging, defined 5
defined 7
enable/disable (DLINK command) 25
enable/disable internal RTU (RTU command) 28
illustrated 35
intrusive diagnostics, defined 7
passive messaging (defined) 7
procedures 34
set radio to Root or Node (DTYPE command) 25
set time to wait between characters (DMGAP command) 25
NOT AVAILABLE error message 20
NOT PROGRAMMED error message 20
O
K
KEY command 27
Keying
continuously keyed versus switched carrier operation 4
continuously keyed, defined 4
on data (DKEY command) 25
switched carrier, defined 4
L
Latency, defined 7
LEDs
DCD 16
indicators, described 16
PWR 16
RXD 16
RXD, Pin 3 14
status indicators, illustrated 16
TXD 16
TXD, Pin 2 14
Loss. See Signal
M
MAS (Multiple Address System) 2
defined 7
illustration 3
Master Station
defined 7
keying behavior 4
MCU (Microcontroller Unit), defined 7
MODEL command 27
Model number codes
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
Operation 15–16
environment, specifications for 34
Output, 9.9 Vdc regulated, pinout (Pin 19) 15
OWM command 27
OWN command 27
Owner’s message, set/display. See OWM command
Owner’s name, set/display. See OWN command
P
Passive messaging (defined) 7
Payload data (defined) 8
Performance
testing, 36–37
Pinouts on data interface 14
PLC (Programmable Logic Controller), defined 8
Point-to-multipoint
defined 8
system 2
Point-to-point
link, illustrated 3
system 3
Poll, defined 8
Power
connection 12
display DC voltage (SHOW command) 29
display RF output (SHOW command) 29
installing 9
LED status indicator (PWR LED) 16
RF, chart for converting dBm-Watts-Volts 40
specifications 34
Power attenuators, use of in testing 37
Procedures
checking for alarms (STAT command) 31
connecting Hand-Held Terminal (HHT) 17
downloading new software 38
MDS 1710A/C and MDS2710A/C/D
I-3
entering commands using the Hand-Held Terminal (HHT) 19
helical filter adjustment 37
installation 9
measuring RSSI with DC voltmeter 16
network-wide diagnostics 34
operation 15, 16
performance optimization 15
reading LED status indicators 16
resetting Hand-Held Terminal (HHT) 18
troubleshooting 30–32
Product
accessories 5
description 1
display model number code (MODEL command) 27
display radio serial number (SER command) 28
Programming radio as root or node 35
Programming, transceiver 17–20
PTT
command 27
pinout (Pins 14, 16) 14
PWR
command 27
LED 16
R
Radio
Configuration Software 5, 38
Inhibit pinout (Pin 12) 14
serial number, displaying (SER command) 28
Receive Audio Output pinout (Pin 11) 14
Receiver
specifications 34
system specifications 33
unsquelched signal (Pin 10) 14
Redundant operation, defined 8
Remote
RTU reset (Pin 15) 14
Station, defined 8
Station, illustrated 9
Resetting
Hand-Held Terminal (HHT) (SHIFT,CTRL,SPACE keys) 18
remote RTU reset (Pin 15) 14
transceiver (INIT command) 26
Revision level
display hardware (HREV command) 26
display software (SREV command) 29
RSSI
adjusting helical filter for increased signal strength 37
command 28
command, used to refine antenna heading 15
measuring 16
pinout (Pin 21) 15
vs. Vdc, illustrated 13, 16
RTS pinout (Pin 4) 14
RTU
command 28
RTU (Remote Terminal Unit)
defined 8
remote reset (Pin 15) 14
I-4
RTU simulator, 36
RUS pinout (Pin10) 14
RX command 28
RXD LED
description 16
Pin 3 14
RXTOT command 28
S
SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition), defined 8
SCD command 28
SER command 28
Set
alarm output state (ASENSE command) 23
alarm triggers (AMASK command) 22
receive time-out timer value (RXTOT command) 28
SHOW command 29
Signal
ground (Pin 7) 14
loss due to coaxial cable length, table 12
Simplex 3
single-frequency operation 4
special case of switched carrier operation 4
Sleep mode
example implementation 13
ground on Radio Inhibit pin activates 14
Pin 12 14
shown by PWR LED status indicator 16
SNR command 29
Software
diagnostics and control used from PC 38
display revision level 29
upgrades (.S28 files) 38
upgrading 38
used for diagnostics and programming 17
Specifications
diagnostics interface 34
environment 34
power 34
receiver 34
receiver system 33
transceiver 33–34
transmitter 33
transmitter system 33
SREV command 29
STAT command 29
SWR (Standing Wave Radio), defined 8
T
Tables
accessories 5
alarm code definitions 32
command summary 20
conversions, dBm-Watts-Volts 40
data interface connector pinouts 14
Hand-Held Terminal (HHT) operational settings 19
LED status indicators 16
MDS 1710A/C and MDS2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
length vs. loss in coaxial cables 12
Technical reference 33–40
Technical reference,
bench test setup, 36–37
TEMP command 29
Temperature, displaying internal (TEMP command) 29
Testing. See bench testing
TEXT TOO LONG error message 20
Timer, set/display time-out value and status (TOT command) 30
TOT command 30
Transceiver
applications 2
configuring for operation 10
connectors and indicators, illustrated 1
diagnostics using PC software 38
dimensions, mounting 11
mounting 9, 11
programming 17–20
specifications 33–34
upgrading software 38
Transmit Audio Input pinout (Pin 9) 14
Transmitter
specifications 33
system specifications 33
Troubleshooting 30–32
connecting Hand-Held Terminal (HHT) for displaying alarm
codes 17
performing network-wide diagnostics 34
STAT command (Status) 31
using PC software for 38
TX command 30
TXD LED
description 16
Pin 2 14
U
UNKNOWN COMMAND error message 19
I-5
MDS 1710A/C and MDS2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
NOTES
I-6
MDS 1710A/C and MDS2710A/C/D
MDS 05-3447A01, Rev. F
IN CASE OF DIFFICULTY...
MDS products are designed for long life and
trouble-free operation. However, this equipment, as with all electronic equipment may
have an occasional component failure. The
following information will assist you in the
event that servicing becomes necessary.
FACTORY TECHNICAL
ASSISTANCE
Technical assistance for MDS products is
available from our Customer Support Team
during business hours (8:00 A.M.–5:30 P.M.
Eastern Time). When calling, please give the
complete model number of the radio, along
with a description of the trouble symptom(s)
that you are experiencing. In many cases, problems can be resolved over the telephone,
without the need for returning the unit to the
factory.
Please use one of the following means for
product assistance:
Phone: 585-241-5510
E-mail: techsupport@microwavedata.com
Web: www.microwavedata.com
FAX: 585-242-8369
FACTORY REPAIRS
Component-level repair of radio equipment is
not recommended in the field. Many components are installed using surface mount technology, which requires specialized training
and equipment for proper servicing. For this
reason, the equipment should be returned to
the factory for any PC board repairs. The
factory is best equipped to diagnose, repair and
align your radio to its proper operating specifications.
If return of the equipment is necessary, you
will be issued a Service Return Order (SRO)
number. The SRO number will help expedite
the repair so that the equipment can be repaired
and returned to you as quickly as possible.
Please be sure to include the SRO number on
the outside of the shipping box, and on any
correspondence relating to the repair. No
equipment will be accepted for repair without
an SRO number.
A statement should accompany the radio
describing, in detail, the trouble symptom(s),
and a description of any associated equipment
normally connected to the radio. It is also
important to include the name and telephone
number of a person in your organization who
can be contacted if additional information is
required.
The radio must be properly packed for return
to the factory. The original shipping container
and packaging materials should be used whenever possible. All factory returns should be
addressed to:
Microwave Data Systems Inc.
Product Service Department
(SRO No. XXXX)
175 Science Parkway
Rochester, NY 14620 USA
When repairs have been completed, the equipment will be returned to you by the same shipping method used to send it to the factory.
Please specify if you wish to make different
shipping arrangements. To inquire about an inprocess repair, you may contact our Product
Services Group at: 585-241-5540 (FAX: 585242-8400) or vie e-mail at:
ProductServices@microwavedata.com.
Microwave Data Systems Inc.
175 Science Parkway
Rochester, NY 14620
General Business: +1 585 242-9600
FAX: +1 585 242-9620
Web: www.microwavedata.com
A product of Microwave Data Systems Inc.