Airmar LB150 Technical information

WeatherStation Instrument
®
Owner’s Guide
Models: LB100, LB150
Record the serial number found on the
WeatherStation® instrument.
Serial No._________________________
Date of Purchase___________________
17-457-01 r02
04/07/08
Copyright © 2007, 2008 Airmar Technology Corp. All rights reserved.
Table of Contents
Introduction......................................................................................4
Safety Instructions........................................................................... 5
Adding External Sensors................................................................. 6
Choosing the Mounting Location.................................................... 7
Mounts............................................................................................. 8
Installing.......................................................................................... 9
Cable Routing & Connecting.........................................................12
Connecting to a Converter............................................................. 12
Maintenance & Updates................................................................ 15
Where to Purchase Parts................................................................ 16
Troubleshooting............................................................................. 16
Appendix A—How the WeatherStation Instrument Works........... 17
Appendix B—Technical Information............................................ 22
Acronyms & Glossary................................................................... 23
3
IMPORTANT: Please read the Owner’s Guide completely
before proceeding with the installation.
Introduction
Thank you for purchasing Airmar’s ultrasonic WeatherStation® instrument. This
product is actually six different sensors in a single unit—without any moving parts.
The compact housing is waterproof with a single removable cable. Data is output
in digital RS485 format using the NMEA 0183 sentence structure.
Functions of the WeatherStation Instrument
• Apparent wind speed (moving sensor only)
• Apparent wind direction (moving sensor only)
• True wind speed
• True wind direction
• Magnetic compass heading
• Air temperature
• Relative humidity
• Dew point temperature
• Wind chill temperature
• Heat index temperature
• Barometric pressure
• Global positioning system (GPS)
• Vehicle speed over ground (SOG)
• Vehicle course over ground (COG)
• Heading relative to true north
• True wind chill temperature
4
Safety Instructions
WARNING: Correct Installation Important
The WeatherStation instrument must be installed and operated according to the
instructions in this owners guide. Failure to do so could result in poor product
performance, personal injury, and/or damage to the vehicle.
WARNING: Electrical Safety
The power supply voltage must be 12VDC (±3VDC). Any other voltage may
damage the WeatherStation instrument and/or result in fire, causing personal
injury and/or damage to the vehicle.
WARNING: Installation Safety
Always wear safety goggles and a dust mask when installing to avoid personal
injury.
CAUTION: Disassembly
Do not disassemble the sensor. Removing the screws from the WeatherStation
instrument will damage the waterproof seal, thus voiding the warranty.
IMPORTANT: Compass Safe Distance
The compass safe distance for standard and steering compasses is 0.30m (1').
Observe this distance to prevent interference to a magnetic compass.
IMPORTANT: Battery
Use a separate battery from the engine-start battery to supply power to the
WeatherStation instrument. Voltage drops may cause the unit to lose information
and/or change operating mode.
5
Adding External Sensors
Some WeatherStation instruments can receive data from an external relativehumidity and/or air-temperature sensor(s). The instrument automatically detects if
a sensor is internal, external, or not available at all. Simply connect the external
sensor(s) to the WeatherStation instrument.
• GPS—An external GPS can be connected instead of or in addition to the
internal GPS. The WeatherStation instrument gives priority to valid external
GPS data when available.
• Compass—If an external electronic compass is installed and working, this
external compass data will override the WeatherStation instrument compass.
The Importance of Understanding True Wind Direction
When the WeatherStation instrument is stationary, the direction from which the
wind is blowing is known as the true wind. The WeatherStation instrument is
programed to measure the direction based upon the specific orientation of the
sensor. For the WeatherStation instrument to accurately calculate the true
direction of the wind, it must be installed and oriented correctly. (To learn more
about true and apparent wind direction, see Appendix A.)
6
Min. 1m
Figure 1. Antennas
Courtesy of Northstar BNT, Acton, MA
Choosing the Mounting Location
For accurate readings and a reliable GPS signal, selecting the best location for
the WeatherStation instrument is very important. Easy access and appearance
should be secondary considerations. Since each installation is unique, the best
separation distances from other equipment will vary depending on the particular
equipment and how it is configured. Choose a location that balances the
requirements below (see Figure 1).
• The WeatherStation instrument must be mounted in “clear air”—away from
obstructions in any direction that will interfere with air flowing through the unit. If
there is an obstruction such as a roof top, chimney, or tree, be sure to mount
the WeatherStation instrument at least 2m (6') away.
• If possible, mount the WeatherStation instrument higher than any other object.
Mount it a minimum of 500mm (20") above the surrounding surfaces.
• If the WeatherStation instrument has an electronic compass, it should be
installed at least 1 m (3') away from any equipment creating a strong magnetic
field such as a radio transmitter, engine, generator, etc.
• Because the WeatherStation instrument has a GPS, be sure it has a clear view
of the sky. That is, away from any obstructions that will interfere with the GPS
signals that the WeatherStation instrument must receive.
• Because the WeatherStation instrument has a GPS, be sure it is as far as
possible from high-powered transmitting antennas to avoid mutual interference.
7
Mounts
The WeatherStation nut has standard 1"-14 UNS or 3/4" NPT threads.
deck mount
center pass-through
deck mount
side pass-through
ratchet mount
with extension
extension
with cable
pass-through
cable
passthrough
cable
passes
through
center
of mount
Figure 3. Antenna mounts (not supplied)
Copyright © 2007 Airmar Technology Corp.
Where to Purchase
Gemeco (USA)
Tel: 843.394.3565
Fax: 843.394.3736
email: sales@gemeco.com
Airmar EMEA
(Europe, Middle East, Africa)
Tel: 33.(0)2.23.52.06.48
Fax: 33.(0)2.23.52.06.49
Email: sales@airmar-emea.com
8
Installing
WARNING: Always wear safety goggles and a dust mask.
CAUTION: The silver metal plate and the blue film found in the wind channel of
the WeatherStation instrument are essential to its operation (see Figure 4). Be
careful not to scratch the plate, puncture the film, or damage them in any way.
CAUTION: Do not remove the waterproof connector(s) to ease cable routing. If
the cable must be cut and spliced, use Airmar’s splash-proof Junction Box No.
33-035 and follow the instructions provided. Cutting the cable or removing the
waterproof connector, except when using Airmar’s junction box, will void the
sensor warranty.
CAUTION: The WeatherStation instrument must be installed vertically—NOT
tilted to one side. If it is tilted from the horizontal plane, there will be an error in the
compass reading.
CAUTION: Do not tighten or align the WeatherStation instrument by rotating the
upper cap (see Figure 3). Turning may sever internal connections and void the
warranty. Grasp the lower housing below the silver metal plate. Hand-tighten only.
upper cap
waterproof film
wind channel
silver metal plate
lower housing
Figure 4. Wind channel
Copyright © 2007 Airmar Technology Corp.
9
Permanent Mounting
1. Place the mount at the selected location. Orient any cable exit in the direction
that you want the cable to travel (see Figure 5).
2. Position the mount at a 90° angle to the mounting surface. If necessary, use
shims to make it level.
3. Mark the holes for the screws. If the cable will pass through the center of the
mount, also mark that hole.
Note: If you are using a ratchet mount, be sure you have purchased an
extension with a cable pass-through.
WARNING: Always wear safety goggles and a dust mask.
4. Drill any holes for the mounting screws and the cable exit.
5. Fasten the mount in place.
6. Screw an extension pole onto the mount if desired.
WeatherStation
alignment tabs
wind channel
where air travels
through the sensor
nut assembly
extension tube
(some installations)
cable exit
(some installations)
antenna mount
(some installations)
Figure 5. Permanent installation with antenna mount
Copyright © 2007 Airmar Technology Corp.
10
Attaching the WeatherStation Instrument
CAUTION: If you use a thread lock, use plumber’s tape. Do not use a liquid thread
lock as it may weaken the plastic, causing it to swell and crack.
CAUTION: It is necessary to accurately measure the wind direction.
If mounting on a stationary surface, be sure the alignment tabs face north.
If mounting on a vehicle, be sure the alignment tabs face forward and parallel to
the centerline of the vehicle.
WeatherStation
connector
alignment
key
nut
assembly
mount
captive
nut
Figure 6. Attaching
Copyright © 2007 Airmar Technology Corp.
1. With the nut assembly on the cable near the WeatherStation connector, thread
the cable through the extension pole (if used), antenna mount, and the cable exit.
Be sure to leave several inches of cable extending beyond the nut assembly (see
Figure 6).
2. Screw the nut assembly onto the top of the antenna mount/extension tube.
Hand-tighten only. Do not over tighten.
3. Remove the caution label from the WeatherStation instrument’s socket.
Remove the protective cover from the connector. (Save the cap to protect the
connector, when the WeatherStation instrument is removed.) Plug the 7-pin
connector into the WeatherStation instrument. The alignment key on the
connector fits into a notch in the base of the WeatherStation instrument.
4. Being sure the alignment tabs are facing properly, slide the captive nut upward
and screw it onto the base of the WeatherStation instrument (see Figures 5
and 6). Hand-tighten only. Do not over tighten. Be careful not to rotate the
WeatherStation instrument or loosen the nut assembly from the antenna mount/
extension tube. Double check to be sure the alignment tabs are still facing
properly.
11
Cable Routing & Connecting
Depending upon your application, route the WeatherStation cable to a Converter,
PDA, laptop computer, or other device.
WARNING: Always wear safety goggles and a dust mask.
WARNING: The power supply voltage must be 12 VDC (±3VDC).
WARNING: The power panel must have a 1 amp fast-blow fuse or circuit breaker.
CAUTION: Do not remove the waterproof connector(s) to ease cable routing. If
the cable must be cut and spliced, use Airmar’s splash-proof Junction Box No.
33-035 and follow the instructions provided. Cutting the cable or removing the
waterproof connector, except when using Airmar’s junction box, will void the
sensor warranty.
CAUTION: To reduce electrical interference, separate the cables from other
electrical wiring and sources of electronic noise.
CAUTION: Be careful not to tear the cable jacket.
CAUTION: Use a multimeter to check the polarity and the connections to the
12VDC power supply before applying power to the sensor.
CAUTION: Coil any excess cable(s) and secure it with a zip-tie to prevent damage.
Connecting to a Converter
The Converter allows the WeatherStation measurements to be displayed on a PC
by converting the data from NMEA 0183/RS485 to USB.
power
supply
PC
Figure 7. Converter installation
Copyright © 2007 Airmar Technology Corp.
12
Mounting Location of the Converter
1. Select a convenient, dry, mounting location for the water-resistant Converter, a
minimum of 1m (3') from the PC (see Figure 7).
2. Hold the Converter at the selected location and mark the position of the screw
holes. If the Converter will be mounted on a vertical surface, face the cables
downward to avoid water seeping into the box.
WARNING: Always wear safety goggles and a dust mask.
3. At the marked locations, drill the holes for the screws. Do not fasten the
Converter in place at this time.
WeatherStation Cable
Route the WeatherStation cable to the Converter. Do not connect the
WeatherStation cable or fasten it in place at this time.
USB Cable
Route the USB cable coming from the Converter into the USB port on the PC.
Do not connect the cable or fasten it in place at this time.
Power Cable
1. Route the power cable from the Converter to the power supply. Do not fasten
the power cable in place at this time.
2. Allowing an extra 25cm (10") for wiring ease, cut the cable to length.
3. Strip 60mm (2-1/2") of the outer jacket and foil shielding from the cut end of the
cable.
4. Cut off the bare wire flush with the cable jacket.
5. Strip 10mm (3/8") of conductor insulation from the end of each colored wire.
6. Protect the cable’s foil shielding from causing a short by wrapping electrical
tape around the jacket where the wires emerge from the cable. The tape must
overlap the wires a minimum of 6mm (1/4").
7. Connect the wires to the power supply [12VDC (±3VDC) @ 0.5 amp required].
See the color code below.
Red
12 VDC +
Black
12 VDC –/ground
Note: the Converter is powered by the USB port and the WeatherStation
instrument is powered by the power cable.
13
Completing the Installation
1. Fasten the Converter in place with the screws supplied.
2. Plug the WeatherStation cable into the Converter.
3. Plug the USB cable into the PC.
4. Fasten all the cables in place.
LED Indicator Light
The green LED indicator light will flash when the Converter is operating.
Installing the Software
Follow the instructions in the WeatherCaster™ Software Guide.
14
Maintenance & Updates
Software Updates
Periodically, Airmar will release updated versions of both the WeatherStation
firmware and the WeatherCaster software. Updates can be downloaded from
Airmar’s web site, www.airmar.com, or contact Airmar’s technical support
personnel for a CD.
Calibration
The WeatherStation instrument is calibrated at the factory and does not require
any calibration after purchase.
Maintenance
Since the WeatherStation instrument has no moving parts, it requires minimal
maintenance.
CAUTION: The silver metal plate and the blue waterproof film found in the wind
channel of the WeatherStation instrument are essential to its operation (see
Figure 8). The blue waterproof film protects the transducers, so be careful to keep
it intact. Do not to scratch the metal plate or damage it in any way.
IMPORTANT: Keep the wind channel free of SPIDER WEBS, insects, dirt, and
other debris.
waterproof film
wind channel
silver metal plate
Figure 8. Wind channel
Copyright © 2007 Airmar Technology Corp.
15
Where to Purchase
Gemeco (USA)
Tel: 843.394.3565
Fax: 843.394.3736
email: sales@gemeco.com
Airmar EMEA
(Europe, Middle East, Africa)
Tel: 33.(0)2.23.52.06.48
Fax: 33.(0)2.23.52.06.49
Email: sales@airmar-emea.com
Troubleshooting
• Is there power to the WeatherStation instrument?
• Are all the connections tight?
• Is the cable-run free of kinks?
• Is the wiring correct?
• Are there any obstructions in the wind channel of the WeatherStation
instrument? Keep it free of spider webs, insects, dirt, and other debris. Be
careful not to puncture the blue waterproof film or scratch the silver plate.
• Is there ice on the WeatherStation instrument?
• For a GPS fix, does the WeatherStation instrument have a clear view of the sky?
16
Appendix A—How the WeatherStation Instrument Works
About the Ultrasonic Wind Sensor
The ultrasonic wind sensor (an ultrasonic anemometer) measures apparent wind
speed and direction. The WeatherStation instrument contains four ultrasonic
transducers, visible through the four holes in the top of the sensor’s wind channel
(see Figure 9). These transducers operate in pairs—one transducer injects a
pulse into the air. The pulse bounces off the metal plate at the bottom of the wind
channel and is carried by the wind to arrive at the listening transducer a short time
later.
4 transducers
behind waterproof film
wind channel
metal plate
Figure 9. WeatherStation instrument ultrasonic wind sensor
Copyright © 2007 Airmar Technology Corp.
When there is no wind, the pulse travels at the speed of sound from the sender to
the receiver. Whenever the wind is blowing in that direction, the pulse will arrive
sooner than if the air is still. Similarly, whenever the wind is blowing in the
opposite direction, the pulse will arrive later than if the air is still. The four
transducers take turns in sending and receiving pulses.
A microprocessor within the WeatherStation instrument then combines the
measurements from all four transducers to calculate the resultant wind speed and
direction. Throughout this process, the sensor monitors the air temperature, to
compensate for the fact that the speed of sound in air changes with temperature.
Understanding True and Apparent Wind
The WeatherStation instrument has the unique ability to display both true and
apparent wind. True wind is the actual motion of the air relative to the earth. Apparent
wind is the wind which an observer experiences while moving. It is the result of two
motions—the actual motion of the air (the true wind) and the motion of the vehicle. If
the vehicle is not moving, then the true and apparent wind will be the same.
There are two components to any wind measurement: speed and direction. By
convention, the wind direction is an angle representing the direction from which
the wind is blowing. This angle can be referenced to true or magnetic north, the
front of the vehicle, or any point that is programed into the software. Both true and
apparent wind use these same references.
17
Consider the case of a vehicle proceeding at a speed of 15 MPH in calm air. An
observer on board would experience a wind of 15 MPH from dead ahead. This
apparent wind would be due solely to the motion of the vehicle. If a true wind of 15
MPH was blowing from the rear, an observer would experience dead calm—no
apparent wind. That is because the vehicle is moving at the same speed and in
the same direction as the surrounding air.
Now, consider the more complicated situation of a vehicle proceeding at 15 MPH
with a true wind of 15 MPH blowing from the side (see Figure10). To an observer on
board, the apparent wind would be 21.2 MPH blowing from an angle 45° off the front.
15 MPH
COG
21.2 MPH
apparent wind
15 MPH
true wind
Figure 10. Apparent wind
Copyright © 2007 Airmar Technology Corp.
In order to calculate the true wind speed and direction when on board a moving
vehicle, it is necessary to know the apparent wind speed and direction, the speed
and course over ground of the vehicle, the compass heading, and the local
magnetic variation. Note that heading and course are not the same thing. Heading
is the direction the vehicle is pointing, while course is the direction the vehicle is
traveling. On land, heading and course may differ only when the vehicle is
stationary. The WeatherStation instrument can provide true wind speed and
direction only if all of the data is available. The speed and course over ground
must be provided by a Global Positioning System receiver––either built-in or
networked. The heading may be provided by either the built-in electronic compass
or by an external networked compass.
Because true wind is calculated using the data from several sensors, its accuracy
depends on the accuracy of all the raw data used in the calculation. For instance,
if the electronic compass is located near iron or a similar magnetic disturbance,
the heading will be incorrect, and the true wind calculation will therefore be in
error, perhaps by quite a bit. In another example, the speed and course over
ground provided by the GPS receiver are averaged over time. If the vehicle is
performing maneuvers, changing speed and/or direction, then it will take a few
seconds for the SOG and COG values to "catch up". The reported true wind
values will therefore also be incorrect until the vehicle reaches a steady-state
condition, traveling in a straight line at a constant speed.
18
About the Electronic Compass
The WeatherStation instrument includes a pair of magnetoinductive sensors that
measure magnetic field strength in two axes on the horizontal plane of the
WeatherStation instrument. From these measurements, it calculates the resultant
magnetic heading angle, thereby providing a built-in electronic compass.
Like all magnetic compasses, the WeatherStation compass will be affected by any
ferrous or magnetic materials in the vicinity, such as metal structures, motors,
speakers, etc. It will also be affected by nearby electric fields, such as the wiring
for lights. These nearby sources of magnetic interference will distort the magnetic
field and produce errors in the compass heading. These errors are known as
magnetic deviation.
Although the WeatherStation compass is a 2-axis device, the earth's magnetic
field occurs in three dimensions. That is, part of the earth's magnetic field is
oriented in the vertical direction. The closer one's location is to the north or south
pole, the stronger this vertical component becomes in comparison to the
horizontal components. The effect this has on the WeatherStation instrument is to
introduce an error in the compass reading if the WeatherStation instrument is
tilted from the horizontal plane. Therefore, it is important when installing the
WeatherStation instrument to ensure the support pole is mounted vertically, and
not tilted to one side. Also, keep in mind that when your vehicle experiences pitch
and roll, the compass heading will be affected accordingly.
Because the compass heading is used in the calculations for true wind, any errors
in the compass heading will also produce errors in the reported true wind speed
and direction. This is adjusted for in the WeatherStation instrument by using the
GPS-sourced course over ground when the vehicle is moving.
About Magnetic Variation and True Heading
The earth acts like a giant magnet, with a magnetic north pole and a magnetic
south pole. The axis of the magnetic poles is offset approximately 11.5° from the
axis of the earth's rotation. Therefore, the earth's magnetic north and south poles
are in different locations than the earth's geographic north and south poles. In
addition, the earth's magnetic field is non-uniform, and changes over time.
Magnetic variation, also known as magnetic declination, is the angle between
magnetic north and true (or geographic) north, at the observer's current location.
A magnetic compass measures heading with respect to magnetic north. To convert
this magnetic heading to true heading (that is, heading with respect to true north),
the magnetic variation must be added to the measured magnetic heading value.
Because magnetic variation changes with location and gradually over time, it is
necessary to calculate the magnetic variation using the user's present position
and the current date. Therefore it is necessary to have a GPS with a fix in order to
provide magnetic variation and heading with respect to true north.
About the Air Temperature Sensor
The WeatherStation instrument includes a built-in negative-temperaturecoefficient thermistor that measures the ambient air temperature. This NTC
thermistor is located in a thermally isolated region of the WeatherStation housing
that is open to the outside air.
19
About the Relative Humidity Sensor
The WeatherStation instrument contains a capacitive cell humidity sensor that
measures the relative humidity of the air. Humidity refers to the amount of water
vapor in the air. Relative humidity is the percentage of saturation of the water
vapor in the air. It is the ratio of the moisture content of the air to the saturated
moisture level at the same temperature and pressure.
About Dew Point
Dew point is the temperature at which the water vapor in the air begins to
condense into a liquid. If the air were gradually cooled while maintaining constant
moisture content, the relative humidity would rise until it reaches 100%. The air
temperature at this point of saturation is called the dew point.
If the air is dry enough, it is possible to have a dew point that is below freezing.
The dew point is then sometimes referred to as the frost point.
The WeatherStation instrument calculates dew point from the measured air
temperature and relative humidity sensor readings.
About Wind Chill Temperature
Wind Chill is a term that describes the heat loss on the human body resulting from
the combined effects of low temperature and wind. As wind speed increases, heat
is carried away from the body at a faster rate, causing a reduction in skin
temperature. Because the face is the part of the human body that is most likely to
be exposed, the wind-chill index is adjusted for the average adult face.
The concept of wind chill does not apply to inanimate objects, such as a building.
The only effect that wind chill has in this case is to shorten the time it takes the
object to cool to the actual air temperature––wind chill does not cause an object to
cool below that temperature. For example, fresh water freezes at 0°C (32°F)
regardless of what the wind chill is.
The WeatherStation instrument calculates two values for wind-chill temperature:
one using the apparent wind-speed, and one using the true wind-speed. The
apparent wind-chill temperature is relevant to what an observer is currently
experiencing on a moving vehicle. The true wind-chill temperature indicates what
the wind chill would be for a stationary individual.
Wind chill temperature is only defined for temperatures at or below 10°C (50°F)
and wind speeds above 3MPH.
By default, transmission of wind-chill data is disabled by the WeatherStation
instrument. When used with WeatherCaster, the wind-chill data will be
automatically enabled.
About the Barometric Pressure Sensor
The WeatherStation instrument contains a temperature-compensated, silicon,
piezoresistive, pressure sensor. It measures atmospheric pressure for use as a
digital barometer. While a single measurement of air pressure at a given location
has little value, the trend of changing pressure and wind over time can be a useful
tool in performing basic weather forecasting.
20
About the Global Positioning System
Some WeatherStation instruments have a built-in GPS with their own antenna,
receiver, and position determining electronics. The GPS receiver receives radio
signals from a constellation of orbiting satellites maintained by the U.S.
government. By accurately measuring the time it takes for a transmission to travel
from each satellite to the receiver, the unit is able to determine the distance
between the satellite and the receiver. When the distance is known to three
satellites, the unit is able to calculate the latitude and longitude of the receiver.
This is known as a 2D (two dimensional) fix. If the distance is known to four or
more satellites, then the unit is additionally able to calculate the altitude of the
receiver. This is known as a 3D fix.
The GPS receiver in the WeatherStation instrument takes approximately one
minute on average to achieve a position fix after power is first applied. This is
known as the "time to first fix." The GPS receiver has 16 channels to track
satellites and will use up to 12 satellites in computing a position fix.
The GPS receiver synchronizes itself to the atomic clocks on board each satellite.
This allows the GPS receiver to accurately determine the date and time as well.
If the GPS receiver is mounted on a moving vehicle, its changing position over
time allows the speed and course over ground to be calculated. The course
reported by a GPS is always with respect to true north.
The ability of the WeatherStation instrument to calculate true wind speed and
direction depends on the presence of a GPS fix. If the GPS receiver is not tracking
at least three satellites, then the WeatherStation instrument will be unable to
provide true wind data. (Apparent wind data should always be available,
regardless of the status of the GPS receiver.)
21
Appendix B—Technical Information
NMEA 0183 Sentences
Datum Reference
GPS Fix Data
Geographic Position L/L
Standard GNSS DOP and Active Satellites
Standard GNSS Satellites in View
Heading, Deviation, Variation
Heading Relative to True North
Meteorological Composite
Wind Speed & Direction with respect to north
Apparent Wind Speed & Direction with respect to front of vehicle
True Wind Speed & Direction with respect to front of vehicle
Recommended Minimum GNSS
Course Over Ground (COG) & Speed Over Ground (SOG)
Apparent Wind Speed and Direction
Wind Chill & Heat Index Temperature
Pitch & Roll
Date & Time
Attitude
$GPDTM
$GPGGA *
$GPGLL
$GPGSA
$GPGSV
$HCHDG
$HCHDT *
$WIMDA *
$WIMWD
$WIMWV(R) *
$WIMWV(T)
$GPRMC
$GPVTG *
$WIVWR
$WIXDR(A) *
$WIXDR(B) *
$GPZDA *
PFEC
* These sentences are enabled by default.
Additional Data Available from the WeatherStation Instrument
There are parameters that the WeatherStation instrument can make available to
the user. Usually, more data is available from the WeatherStation instrument than
can be displayed in a reasonable format on a screen. Also, if all the data was
continuously transmitted to the display, the update rate would be too slow and
could not keep up with WeatherStation measurements. Consequently, some
parameters are transmitted while others are not, based on a pre-selected list (the
NMEA 0183 sentences with an asterisk). Note that those parameters not
transmitted are, nevertheless, retained in the WeatherStation instrument. For
more detailed information, see the “Technical Manual” on the WeatherStation CD.
22
Acronyms & Abbreviations
CD
COG
DOP
GNSS
GPS
PC
SOG
USB
WAAS
2D
3D
Compact Disk
Course Over Ground
Dilution Of Precision
Global Navigation Satellite System
Global Positioning System
Personal Computer
Speed Over Ground
Universal Serial Bus
Wide Area Augmentation System
Two Dimensional GPS Fix
Three dimensional GPS Fix
Glossary
Firmware
WeatherCaster
The software within the WeatherStation hardware
The PC application program
Trademarks
Airmar® is a registered trademark of Airmar Technology Corporation.
WeatherCaster™ is a trademark of Airmar Technology Corporation.
WeatherStation® is a trademark of Airmar Technology Corporation.
23
35 Meadowbrook Drive, Milford, New Hampshire 03055-4613, USA
www.airmar.com
24