Console House CSK 2 Mode Installation manual

2–1
Hardware installation
Section 2 – Hardware Installation
Video and Audio
Transmitter
16
T
Internal Matrix option
Video Processing Unit
Figure 2–1. Basic Saturn Stand–alone system.
MPK bus
T
Refer to text for complete
wiring instructions.
Audio Processing Unit
Audio Processing Unit
Audio Meter cable
Machine control
MI 3040
T
T
Media
converter
or hub
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
Jupiter
10/100BaseT
LAN
Jupiter file
server
Saturn control console
Jupiter 10Base2 LAN
2–2
Hardware installation
Transmitter
Figure 2–2. Expanded Saturn Stand–alone system with Saturn–controlled UMDs
Video
and
Audio
T
Refer to text for complete
wiring instructions.
Internal Matrix option
Video
and
Audio
Video Processing Unit
T
Video
Audio Processing Unit
Audio Processing Unit
VTRs
Machine control
Audio Meter cable
T
“Saturn Controlled”
Under–monitor
displays
PRESET
PROGRAM
AIR
MPK bus
VM/SI 3000 Control System
T
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
Î ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Jupiter file
server
Jupiter
10/100BaseT
LAN
Media
converter
or hub
Saturn control console
Jupiter 10Base2 LAN
2–3
Hardware installation
Figure 2–3. Expanded Saturn Stand–alone
system with tally and backup options.
MI 3040
Tally
Refer to text for complete
wiring instructions.
MPK bus
Machine control
MI 3040
Video and Audio
Internal
Matrix
option
16
T
Video Processing Unit
On Air Output
T
Audio Processing Unit
On Air Outputs
Audio Processing Unit
Redundant Power
Supply
Backup
sources
Audio Meter cable
Backup Switcher
Transmitter
CE 300
MPK bus
T
Serial line
T
Media
converter
or hub
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
Jupiter
10/100BaseT
LAN
Jupiter file
server
Saturn control console
Jupiter 10Base2 LAN
2–4
Hardware installation
Crosspoint Bus
router
Refer to text for complete
wiring instructions.
Crosspoint bus
Video and Audio
MC 3020D Delegation Panel
VTRs
CP 3000/E Switcher Control
MC 3000/E Machine Control
MPK bus
Video
and
Audio
T
ESbus
VM 3000
Control
System
HD Video
Processing Unit
Transmitter
On Air Output
Party Line
Video
and
Audio
MI 3040
Jupiter
10Base2
LAN
T
Video Processing Unit
On Air Output
T
40
Tally
Audio Processing Unit
On Air Outputs
Audio Processing Unit
Redundant Power
Supply
Backup
sources
Audio Meter cable
3 video outputs
Backup Switcher
Transmitter
SI 3000
Control
System
CE 300
MPK bus
MPK
bus
T
Serial line
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
Î
Jupiter file
server
PRESET
PROGRAM
AIR
Saturn control console
“Saturn Controlled” Under–monitor displays
Jupiter
10/100BaseT
LAN
Media
converter
or hub
Jupiter 10Base2 LAN
Figure 2–4. Saturn MCS with Thomson Crosspoint Bus router and Jupiter control system.
2–5
Hardware installation
Summary of Installation Procedure
The following is a summary of the steps needed for installation of the Saturn Master Control Switcher. Additional details
may be found elsewhere in this manual as indicated.
1.
Before unpacking the equipment, inspect the shipping carton for evidence of freight damage. After unpacking carefully inspect all equipment for freight damage.
If the contents have been damaged, notify the carrier and Thomson. Retain all shipping cartons and padding material for inspection by the carrier.
Do not return damaged merchandise to Thomson until an appropriate claim has been filed with the carrier
and a Material Return Authorization number has been received from Thomson.
2.
If the Saturn Master Control Switcher is associated with a Trinix or Venus routing switcher / Jupiter Facility Control
System, those systems should first be installed and checked out (see Trinix/Venus and Jupiter manuals).
3.
The Saturn line voltage settings should be checked before the equipment is rack mounted.
a.
If the processing unit is analog video, analog audio, or digital audio, open the top cover and check that the
internal rotary voltage selection switch is set to the proper line voltage. See “Voltage Selector Switch” on page
2–12. (The digital video and HD video processing units are auto–sensing and do not require a voltage selector
switch.)
b.
All processing units include a CPU DIP switch ‘S1.’ While checking voltage settings, confirm that S1 is set
with switches 1, 2, and 3 ‘ON’ and all others ‘OFF.’ See page 2–23.
c.
If the Saturn installation includes a RPP 3500 Redundant Processing Power Supply, the RPP 3500 must be
fully connected to all Processing Units and powered on in order to properly check the line voltage settings.
See page 2–14. (The HD video processing unit has its own redundant power supply.)
4.
If the processing unit is digital audio, refer to “Special Instructions for Digital Audio Processors,” page 2–25.
5.
If the processing unit is HD video, it must be set for the appropriate high definition standard. This can be done using
software (as described on page 3–38) or by using DIP switch S–4 (as described on page 2–24).
2–6
6.
Hardware installation
The switcher Processing Units (and redundant power supply) should be mounted in a rack or other suitable enclosure that provides power and cooling facilities for the equipment.
The Processing Units are designed for mounting in a standard 19–inch wide equipment rack having a depth of 24
–30 inches. Rear support is recommended, especially in a remote equipment truck or in other locations subject to
vibration and stress. When the Saturn is installed with a Thomson Crosspoint Bus* routing switcher, the Processing
Units should be mounted near the router because of the number of cables interconnecting the two units.
A Saturn “system” consists of one video channel and its associated audio channels.§ Installations can include multiple systems, multiple consoles, or both. See Figures 2–6 and 2–7.
Proper attention should also be given to ventilation and cooling of the Processing Units. See Figure 2–5. For corresponding illustrations of the console, see pages 2–62 and 2–59.
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉ
É
ÉÉ
É
ÉÉ
É
ÉÉ
É
ÉÉ
É
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
É
ÉÉ
É
22 inches
= area to keep clear of obstructions to airflow
Figure 2–5. Typical air flow pattern for Saturn rack mount equipment.
Front
7.
Connect the required video and audio cables:
a.
For video processing units, see page 2–71.
b.
For audio processing units, see page 2–76.
The “Config” connector on the rear of the Audio Processing Unit(s) can be used to activate a stereo synthesizer
if desired. See page 2–77.
During operation, any input feeding the external matrix, the Direct Input connectors, or the internal matrix can be
assigned to any of the sixteen Program/Preset buttons.
* Terms marked with an asterisk are defined in Glossary at the back of the manual.
§ The term “channel” is sometimes used in the Saturn user interface in place of the word “system.”)
2–7
Hardware installation
Video
Video
System
(Channel)
A
Audio Channels 1/2
Audio Channels 1/2
System
(Channel)
B
Audio Channels 3/4
MPK bus
Multiple audio
channels
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
“SATCON”
Figure 2–6. Multi–system application.
Video
Video
System
(Channel)
A
Audio Channels 1/2
Audio Channels 1/2
System
(Channel)
B
Audio Channels 3/4
MPK bus
ÎÎÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
MPK bus
“SATCON1”
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ Î Î Î Î
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
Î
“SATCON2”
Figure 2–7. Multi–console / multi–system application.
2–8
8.
Hardware installation
Install Backup Switcher, if one has been supplied. Installation of the AAB 3500/4000 or DAB 3500/4000 backup
switcher involves two main steps:
a.
Hardware installation.
The AAB 3500/4000 or DAB 3500/4000 is usually controlled by a CE 300 Control Board mounted inside
the AAB or DAB chassis. The CE 300 is connected via an independent MPK* bus to a control panel. The
chassis with the CE 300A card can be connected to another backup chassis and connected with a crosspoint.
— If the Saturn installation consists of a single system (see Figure 2–3), the backup control panel will consist of the “Select” push buttons on the right side of the Saturn control console.
—If the Saturn installation is multi–system (see Figure 2–6), the Select push buttons on the control console
will not be available (they must be used for channel selection). In this case, the backup control panel will
most often be a CP 300, 310, 320, or 330.
For detailed AAB installation information, see page 2–33.
For detailed DAB installation information, see page 2–40.
b.
CE 300 Software configuration.
This step is required if alphanumeric mnemonics are desired for display on the “Select” or CP 320 backup
control panel. If this step is not performed, the backup switcher will still operate but the backup control panel
window will display numerics only.
The CE 300 is configured using an application completely outside the normal Saturn/Jupiter menu structure.
This editor, referred to as the “BTS Configuration Editor,” is described in a separate manual entitled CP 300
Series Control Panels / CE 300 Control Board, Thomson part no. 04-045227-002.
For detailed installation information, see page 2–55.
9.
Install MCC 3500 / MCS 4000 Control Console(s).
a.
Mechanical installation
Cutout dimensions are shown on page 2–61 (MCS 4000) and page 2–62 (MCC 3500).
The control console should be mounted in a desk or table top at the actual master control location. The console
should be angled toward the operator to provide better readability of the displays and front panel markings.
The control console should not be mounted in such a way as to block the ventilation holes on the sides, bottom,
and rear of the chassis.
b.
Cabling—see page 2–59.
c.
Switch settings
* Terms marked with an asterisk are defined in Glossary at the back of the manual.
2–9
Hardware installation
If the “Select” button group will be used for system selection (delegation):
(1) Lift up the console top (see Figure 2–8). With power off, locate MPK (Select) panel DIP switch package
S1. This is an 8–position switch on the right–hand edge of the console.
(2) Set for “non–CE 300/SC 400 Control” (switch 8 OFF). (If switch 8 is OFF, all other switches are
ignored.) See Figure 2–37 on page 2–52.
If the “Select” button group will be used to operate a backup switcher, the DIP switch should have already
been set according to Step 8 above.
open
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
Î
open
Figure 2–8. Turn screws clockwise to lift console top.
2–10
10.
Hardware installation
Install MCM 3500/4000 External Meter Bridges (if supplied).
Each MCM 3500/4000 should be installed and set to monitor the audio levels of a particular system.
a.
Cabling—all MCM 3500s are connected to the audio metering bus. See page 2–68.
b.
Switch settings (beneath rear panel access cover). See Figure 2–9.
Note 1: The rear–panel switch is wired in parallel with internal DIP switch S1; S1 is factory set with all
switches OFF.
Note 2: To monitor system 1, switches 1–4 are set to binary zero; to monitor system 2, the switches are set
to binary one, etc.
PPM/VU SELECTABLE VIA FRONT
PANEL SWITCH
MONITOR
8 7 6
1 0 1
1 1 0
1 1 1
0 0 0
PPM ONLY
1
SYSTEM NUMBER
5 4 3 2 1
0 1 0 1 0
0 1 1 0 0
1 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0
NOT USED
NOT USED
1
0
0
ALWAYS SET TO 1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Figure 2–9. MCM 3500 rear panel DIP switch settings.
11.
Connect the system control LAN.
See page 2–63.
12.
Install file server (configuration PC) on the LAN.
In most cases, the file server will be the same PC used for a Jupiter control system. See page 2–4 or 2–3.
13.
Install the VM/SI 3000 Control Systems on the LAN, if they are supplied. See page 2–4.
Stand–alone systems do not include a VM 3000. See page 2–3.
14.
Connect the required sync reference cables. See page 2–70.
2–11
15.
Hardware installation
Connect the MPK cables.
a.
MPK connection to the control console’s Select button group will depend on whether the buttons are used for
delegation or to operate a Saturn Backup Switcher (AAB 3500/4000). If the Select button group will be used
for system selection (delegation), connect the console’s MPK line to the video processor (see page 2–7). If
there is a backup switcher, please refer to “Backup Switcher (AAB 3500/4000) Hardware Installation” on
page 2–33.
b.
Install MI 3040 General Purpose/Tally Interface, if one has been supplied. The MI 3040 can be connected
to the MPK port of a Video Processing Unit (Figure 2–1) or to a VM/SI 3000 (Figure 2–4).
For details concerning hardware connection of machines to the MI 3040, refer to “Connection to Parallel–
Control Machines Using MI 3040” in Section 2 of the Jupiter Installation and Operating Manual.
Thomson offers several tally systems, including Jupiter Tally, Saturn Tally, and Andromeda. Details concerning the Saturn Tally system can be found on page 2–80 of this manual.
MI 3040 software configuration varies greatly depending on the application. Discussion of configuration begins in Section 3 of this manual.
c.
Thomson Under Monitor Displays (SD 3x or RP 1/2/3) can be used to indicate status of the Preview, Program, and Air outputs (as shown on page 2–2). They are also connected to an MPK bus, but the bus source
must be a VM 3000 or SI 3000. The UMDs will display mnemonics for all inputs—whether the input is connected to an internal matrix or to an external (e.g., Venus) matrix. In this application RP 1/2/3 tally lights are
not used.
UMDs should be configured to operate under “Saturn Control” (as opposed to Jupiter Control). For more information, see page 3–45.
d.
16.
For MPK cable pinouts, see page 2–67.
Power up the system.
a.
The power switches for the Processing Units are located on the rear panels.
b.
The console may be equipped with one power supply or two power supplies operating in redundant mode.
The power switches for these supplies are inside the console, in the rear, on top of the AC input connector
shields.
c.
The file server should automatically download to the Saturn system, after which the “Alarm” LEDs on the
Processing Units should go from red to green.
17.
Configure the system using the file server (as described in Section 3). For operating procedures, see Section 4.
18.
For information about the DVE option, see page 2–86.
19.
Thomson or third–party automation systems should be connected only after the Saturn system is operational. See
page 2–87.
2–12
Hardware installation
Voltage Selector Switch
(Analog video / analog audio / digital audio)
A six–position switch is located near the front panel of the analog video, analog audio, and digital audio processing units.
A typical selector switch (for the DAP 3500/4000) is shown on page 2–13. (The digital video processing unit does not
have a voltage selector switch.)
Note 1: Power must be removed from the processing unit before the voltage selector switch is changed. We
recommend that the power cord be removed from the rear panel connector as well as the rear panel power
switch be set to off before any adjustments are made.
The correct setting for this switch must be determined in your installation. The switch is set to the 120 volt setting or
to the 220 setting from the factory. The power supply has a range of minus 10% to plus 15% of the indicated setting.
For example, when set to the 120 volt setting, the processing unit will operate properly from 108 volts to 130. The switch
setting should correspond to the average or normal line voltage in your facility. If your normal live voltage is not exactly
the same as one on the switch positions, then set the switch so that your normal voltage is in the lower part of the minus
10% to plus 15% range for minimum heat. For example if your normal line voltage is 113 volts, use the 120 volt setting
rather than the 100 volt setting even though 113 volts is within both ranges. The settings are as follows:
Switch Setting
Operational Voltage Range
100
90 to 115 volts
120
108 to 138 volts
140
126 to 161 volts
200
180 to 230 volts
220
198 to 253 volts
240
216 to 276 volts
Figure 2–10.
Setting the switch to a lower setting than required will cause excessive heat to be dissipated which may result in early
equipment or component failure.
Note 2: When changing from 120 to 220 volt system, be sure to use the correct fuse as supplied. A separate
fuse and fuse holder is provided for each voltage range. The larger size fuse is for the 100 to 140 volt ranges
and the smaller for the 200 to 240 volt ranges.
2–13
Hardware installation
VOLTAGE
SELECTOR
SWITCH
DMX 3500
DIGITAL AUDIO CONVERTER
(ANALOG AUDIO OUTPUT)
OPTION
DAX 3500A DIGITAL AUDIO MATRIX OPTION
Figure 2–11. DAP 3500/4000 chassis.
2–14
Hardware installation
Redundant Processing Power Supply (RPP 3500/4000)
Please refer to the drawing on page 2–17.
If the system includes an RPP 3500/4000 Redundant Processing Power Supply, the RPP must be fully connected to all
Processing Units and powered on in order to properly check the line voltage settings. Proceed as follows:
1.
Remove power.
2.
Using 16 gauge wire (untinned), connect the RPP to the Processing Units.
a.
AVP 3500/4000 Analog Video Processing Unit—see page 2–73 for an illustration of the AVP 3500/4000 rear
panel connections and labelling.
Note 1: Connect the RPP “AGND” (Analog Ground) terminal to the right–hand AVP “GND” connection. Connect the RPP “GND” terminal to the left–hand AVP “GND” connection. If you want
the alarm circuit to check for the presence of RPP voltage, move the AVP alarm LED jumper JN1
to the Redundant position (pin 2 connected to pin 3—see page 2–18 for jumper labelling).
Note 2: For AVP units only, the RPP 3500 power cables must be threaded through a ferrite bead
in order for the unit to comply with current EMI standards. The ferrite bead (part no.
29–002052–15) is supplied with the Saturn system. The bead should be located as close to the processing unit as possible and the power wires passed through it twice.
b.
AAP 3500/4000 Analog Audio Processing Unit—see page 2a–1 for an illustration of the AAP rear panel connections and labelling.
Note 3: Connect the RPP “GND” terminal to the AAP “DGND” connection. Using a separate wire,
connect the RPP “AGND” to the AAP “AGND” connection. If you want the alarm circuit to check
for the presence of RPP voltage, move the AAP alarm LED jumper JN1 to the Redundant position
(pin 2 connected to pin 3—see page 2–19 for jumper labelling).
c.
DVP 3500A/4000 Digital Video Processing Unit—see page 2–74 for an illustration of the DVP rear panel
connections and labelling. The DVP uses an XLR connector.
Note 4: An inset in the illustration shows the barrier–strip connector used on the earlier DVP
3500. For this model, connect the RPP terminal marked “DVP 3500 minus 21 V” to one of the DVP
3500 terminals marked “minus 40–60 V.” Connect the RPP terminal marked “DVP 3500 plus 21
V” to one of the DVP 3500 terminals marked “plus 40–60 V.” Do not connect the RPP terminal
marked “AGND.”
Note 5: If you want the alarm circuit to check for the presence of RPP voltage, move the DVP alarm
LED jumper JN1 to the Redundant position (pin 2 connected to pin 3—see page 2–20 for jumper
labelling.)
d.
DAP 3500/4000 Digital Audio Processing Unit—see page 2a–5 for an illustration of the DAP rear panel connections and labelling.
2–15
Hardware installation
Note 6: Connect the RPP“GND” (Digital Ground) terminal to the DAP “DGND” connection. If
you want the alarm circuit to check for the presence of RPP voltage, move the DAP alarm LED
jumper JN1 to the Redundant position (pin 2 connected to pin 3—see page 2–21 for typical jumper
labelling).
3.
Open the MCC 3500/4000 Control Console. On the power distribution printed circuit board, check alarm LED
jumpers JN1 and JN2; both should be in the Redundant position (pin 2 connected to pin 3).
4.
Remove the RPP 3500/4000 top cover and locate the rotary line voltage selector switch. This six–position switch
is marked “220 / 100 / 240 / 120 / 200 / 140.” Use the following rules to establish an initial setting:
Important: Do not change the rotary line voltage selector switch with power applied. Doing so will damage
the unit.
Important: Do not touch any part of the RPP interior while power is applied!
a.
Measure the power line voltage that will be feeding your system.
b.
Estimate the load level of your system. For example, one AVP plus one AAP is considered to be a “lightly
loaded” system. On the other hand, one AVP, one DVP, and three DAPs would be a “fully loaded” system.
c.
For a lightly loaded system, use Column B of Table 2–12. Find the number that is less than, and closest to,
the power line voltage. Look in Column A to find the initial setting and for the rotary switch and set the switch
accordingly.
Column A
Column B
Column C
Column D
Voltage selector switch
setting
Lowest voltage supported
(lightly loaded)
Lowest voltage supported
(fully loaded)
Highest voltage supported
(no load)
100
85
90
104
120
100
108
126
140
115
125
147
200
170
180
209
220
195
210
230
240
215
230
252
Table 2–12. RPP 3500/4000 initial voltage settings.
d.
For a fully loaded system, use column C of Table 2–12. Find the number that is less than, and closest to, the
power line voltage. Look in Column A to find the initial setting for the rotary switch and set the switch accordingly.
5.
Apply power to the RPP. Make sure all Processing units are now being powered entirely by the RPP.
6.
Observe the row of voltage LEDs on the rear panel of the RPP. Allow 5–10 seconds for the monitoring circuitry
to stabilize. All LEDs should now be green. If so, remove power and replace the top cover.
2–16
Hardware installation
The voltage LEDs (marked +8 V, –11 V, +11 V, –21 V, and +21 V) can be green, red, or orange. Green means the
input line voltage is adjusted properly for that output. Red means the input line voltage is too low for that output,
so the rotary line voltage selector switch needs to be lowered. Orange means the input line voltage is too high for
that output, so the rotary line voltage selector switch needs to be increased.
7.
a.
If any of the voltage LEDs are red, remove power, select the next lower voltage on the selector switch, and
try again. Remember: do not change the rotary line voltage selector switch with power applied.
b.
If any of the LEDs are orange, remove power, select the next higher voltage on the selector switch, and try
again. Remember: do not change the rotary line voltage selector switch with power applied.
The “FAN” LED is designed to monitor cooling and output voltage ripple of the unit. Under normal conditions
it should be green.
If the FAN LED turns red, the unit is overheating; this can be caused by a failed fan, a dirty air filter, or restricted
air flow to the unit. The most likely cause is a dirty air filter. Allowing the unit to run prolonged at a high temperature
will shorten its life expectancy.
If the FAN LED turns orange, one or more of the output voltages has excessive ripple. This implies that the filter
capacitors need to be replaced.
8.
When green, the “CPU” LED indicates that the central processor is running.
9.
The Power/Alarm LED on the front panel should turn green after startup.
Any alarm condition on the rear panel will cause the Power/Alarm LED to show red.
10.
The rear panel power switch is also a circuit breaker. If the circuit breaker trips, the power switch will switch itself
to OFF.
O
I
POWER
PE
–21V
TE
47–63HZ
100/120/200/220/240V
10/5A
ALARM
SEE INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE CONNECTING TO THE SUPPLY.
VOIR LA NOTICE D INSTALLATION AVANT DE RACCORDER AU RESEAU.
VOR DER INBETRIEBNAHME INSTALLATIONSHINWEISE BEACHTEN.
3A
3A
AVP–3500
3A
3A
3A
3A
3A
3A
AAP–3500/DAP–3500
3A
POWER/ALARM
3A
3A
3A
3A
DVP–3500
3A
FOR CONTINUED PROTECTION
AGAINST RISK OF FIRE,
REPLACE ONLY WITH SAME
TYPE AND RATING OF FUSE.
WARNING:
2–17
Hardware installation
+21V
AGND
–21V
+21V
AGND
–21V
GND
+8V
+21V
AGND
–21V
GND
+8V
+21V
AGND
–21V
GND
+8V
+11V
AGND
–11V
GND
+8V
+21V
+11V
–11V
+8V
FAN
CPU
Figure 2–13. RPP 3500/4000
Redundant Processing Power
Supply. For discussion see
page 2–14.
2–18
Hardware installation
JN
1401
1
2
3
JUMPER PINS 1–2 = NO REDUNDANT POWER SUPPLY INSTALLED
JUMPER PINS 2–3 = REDUNDANT POWER SUPPLY INSTALLED
Figure 2–14. AVP 3500/4000 jumpers and switches.
CPU DIP switch S1.
See page 2–23 for settings
2–19
Hardware installation
JN 1
1
2
3
JUMPER PINS 1–2 = NO REDUNDANT POWER SUPPLY INSTALLED
JUMPER PINS 2–3 = REDUNDANT POWER SUPPLY INSTALLED
Figure 2–15. AAP 3500/4000 jumpers and switches.
CPU DIP switch S1.
See page 2–23 for settings
2–20
Hardware installation
JN 1
3
2
1
JUMPER PINS 1–2 = NO REDUNDANT POWER SUPPLY INSTALLED
JUMPER PINS 2–3 = REDUNDANT POWER SUPPLY INSTALLED
Figure 2–16. DVP 3500/4000 jumpers and switches.
CPU DIP switch S1.
See page 2–23 for settings
2–21
Hardware installation
JN 1
CPU DIP switch S1.
See page 2–23 for settings
JUMPER PINS 1–2 = NO REDUNDANT
POWER SUPPLY INSTALLED
JUMPER PINS 2–3 = REDUNDANT
POWER SUPPLY INSTALLED
1
2
3
REFERENCE
MODE
FACTORY
SETTING = F
METER
SEL
FACTORY
SETTING = 0
(BOTH
SWITCHES)
PST
PGM
OFF AIR
MONITOR INPUTS
MON B
MON A
EXT 2
EXT 1
OFF AIR
EXT 3
CH 5/6
CH 3/4
SPARE
DELAY OFFSET
ADJUSTMENT
See page 2–29
for discussion.
11.2850 CAL
12.288 CAL
IN 17
AES OUT
ON AIR
PGM
6.144 CAL
PST
MONO
ON AIR
MONO
PGM
IN 16
IN 19
IN 18
DIRECT INPUTS
MAIN DIGITAL OUTPUTS
BYPASS
MAIN B
MAIN A
REF IN
MIX 2
MIX 1
BUS INPUTS
5 volts
5 volts
1 volt
Output sensitivity jumpers
See page 2–25 for discussion.
Figure 2–17. DAP 3500/4000 jumpers and switches.
1 volt
CONsumer
Input sensitivity jumpers
See page 2–25 for discussion.
2–22
Hardware installation
CPU DIP switch S1.
See page 2–23 for settings
Video Standard switch S4.
See page 2–24 for settings..
Xilinx configuration switches
(factory use only). See page
2–21 for default settings
Figure 2–18. HDVP 3500/4000 DIP switches.
2–23
Hardware installation
Operational DIP Switch (S1) Settings
The CPU DIP switch S1 is normally used for factory test and setup only. Normal operation is for switch positions 1,
2, and 3 to be ‘ON’ with all other positions ‘OFF.’
1
0
Watchdog reset enable (default)
Watchdog off
Version 1.xx software
(psos)
1
0
Version 2.xx and later software
(vx)
pROBE on
pROBE off (default)
Normal (default)
Clear flash
XRAY on
XRAY off (default)
Autostart on (default)
Autostart off
1
0
1
0
not used
not used
not used
Figure 2–19. DIP switch S1 settings. See previous pages for location of this switch.
2–24
Hardware installation
HDVP Video Standard DIP Switch (S4) Settings
S4 is always effective when S14–6 is ON (as shown in Figure 2–21). It may or may not be effective when S14–6 is OFF,
depending on a table setting (as described on page 3–38).
Leave OFF
Divide frame/field rate by 1.001
Do NOT divide frame/field rate by 1.001
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
1080i 60, 16x9, SMPTE 274M, ATSC Table 3 @ 1.5 Gb/s
1035i 60, 16x9, SMPTE 260M @ 1.5 Gb/s
1080i 50, SMPTE 274M
270 Mb/s 625/50 (Mode 5)
270 Mb/s SMPTE 125M/259M (Mode 7)
720p 60, 16x9, SMPTE 296M, ATSC Table 3 @ 1.5 Gb/s
Figure 2–20. DIP switch S4 settings. See page 2–22 for location of this switch.
HDVP S4 Enable / Xilinx Configuration / JTAG DIP Switch Settings
Switches other than S14–6 are used for factory test and setup only. Default positions are shown in Figure 2–21.
S7
S8
S10
S11
S12
S13
S14
1
0
Allow video standard
selection via software
or S4 (see page 3–38)
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
Figure 2–21. HDVP Xilinx configuration DIP switch default settings. See page 2–22 for
location of these switches.
Allow video standard
selection via S4 only
2–25
Hardware installation
Special Installation Instructions for Digital Audio Processors
Input Sensitivity Jumpers
These jumpers are provided on the DAP 3500/4000 main board and the DAX 3500 optional matrix.
The DAP 3500/4000 is designed to receive standard AES/EBU twisted pair signals with 110 ohm impedances. The unit
is shipped from the factory with these settings. In addition, input jumpers are provided that allow signals of different
levels to be accommodated. These jumpers do not change the input impedance of 110 ohms. They only provide for different input signals levels that may come from other versions of the AES/EBU standard. The input jumpers are required
in order to allow the adaptive equalizers that follow to properly compensate for input cable losses.
Each input section of the DAP has three jumpers: 5 V, 1 V, and CON, representing 5 volt P–P, 1 volt P–P, and CONsumer
reference levels (see page 2–21). These jumpers refer to the sending end or the equipment driving the DAP inputs. Standard AES/EBU devices should use the 5 V position.
Devices running on 75 ohm coax generally conform to SMPTE proposed standard SMPTE 276M which calls for 1V
P–P signals. Placing the jumper in the 1V position provides correct interface for the 75 ohm coax levels only. A matching
transformer with a ratio of 1:1.2 is required to provide proper impedance matching.
Many consumer devices such as CD players or DAT machines provide direct digital outputs conforming to the SPDIF
standard. The DAP can accept inputs from these signals by using the CON jumper setting. The SPDIF standard calls for
signal levels of 0.5 V P–P and an impedance of 75 ohms. A matching transformer with a ratio of 1:1.2 is required to provide proper impedance matching.
The input decoders of the DAP will decode a SPDIF type signal but will not recover any of the channel status bits as
they differ greatly from a standard AES/EBU coded signal.
Output Sensitivity Jumpers (On All AES/EBU Outputs on Main Board)
As above, the AES/EBU output drivers have jumpers that allow the DAP to drive different signal levels. These jumpers
do not change the output impedance of 110 ohms. They only provide for different output signals levels that may be required.
Each output section of the DAP has two jumpers: 5 V and 1 V, representing 5 volt P–P and 1 volt P–P reference levels
(see page 2–21). These jumpers refer to output signal levels from the DAP outputs. Standard AES/EBU devices should
use the 5 V position. The factory ships the units set for the standard AES/EBU level of 5 volts P–P.
Devices running on 75 ohm coax generally conform to SMPTE proposed standard SMPTE 276M which calls for 1 V
P–P signals. Placing the jumper in the 1 V position provides correct interface for the 75 ohm coax levels only. A matching
transformer with a ratio of 1.2:1 is required to provide proper impedance matching to the 110 ohm output impedance
of the DAP.
2–26
Hardware installation
Reference Modes
The DAP must have an external reference signal to provide synchronous operation. The DAP can operate in many different modes. Normally these modes are selected from the Jupiter file server as part of configuration. However for convenience of factory test procedures, a 16 position rotary DIP switch is provided to select these modes (see page 2–21). The
very same selections are provided in the configuration software that are available using this DIP switch.
Note: It is imperative that the rotary DIP switch be placed in the “F” position so that the Digital Audio
Setup table (page 3–41) can be used to make the desired selection. If it is left in any other position, then
erratic operation will result. The DAP is shipped from the factory with the switch in the “F” position.
Two basic external reference modes are provided. They are AES/EBU reference or an NTSC or PAL video reference.
The standard and preferred method is an AES/EBU reference signal. The DAP can provide precise locking and time
alignment to an AES/EBU reference that is not possible with a video reference. To provide for maximum flexibility, the
DAP can also act as a master reference generator by locking to a video input, and providing an AES/EBU reference output
that can then be used to synchronize other AES/EBU devices.
The choices for reference modes are as follows:
1.
48 kHz narrow
2.
48 kHz NTSC video
3.
48 kHz PAL video
4.
48 kHz internal
5.
48 kHz AES auto (recommended setting)
6.
44.1 kHz narrow
7.
44.1 kHz internal
8.
44.1 kHz AES auto
9.
AES automatic
10. AES vari speed
11. Manual selection (Using internal rotary DIP switch).
The following section describes each of the options in detail:
1.
48 kHz Narrow. This mode provides an ultra stable low–jitter reference at a sample rate of 48 kHz. The lock range
of the internal PLL is approximately + or – 200 ppm. When unlocked, the internal frequency defaults to 48 kHz.
This mode is normally used only for testing in the factory but could be used when an ultra stable reference is available.
2–27
Hardware installation
2.
48 kHz NTSC Video. This mode utilizes a local video PLL locking to Horizontal sync which is then compared to
a divided down version of the internal 12.288 MHz clock. The 12.288 MHz clock is generated by a low–jitter secondary PLL which provides approximately equivalent performance to the AES low–jitter PLL. This is a frequency
lock only and does not attempt to define a specific relationship between video frames and audio frames (there is
currently no industry standard defining this relationship). As such this mode should only be used when the DAP
is acting as a master sync generator. If multiple DAP processors are used in an installation, only one should lock
to video reference and the rest should be locked to the master DAP 3500 using the AES/EBU reference output.
When unlocked, the internal frequency defaults to 48 kHz.
3.
48 kHz PAL Video. This mode utilizes a local video PLL locking to Horizontal sync which is then compared to
a divided down version of the internal 12.288 MHz clock. The 12.288 MHz clock is generated by a low–jitter secondary PLL which provides approximately equivalent performance to the AES low–jitter PLL. This is a frequency
lock only and does not attempt to define a specific relationship between video frames and audio frames (there is
currently no industry standard defining this relationship). As such this mode should only be used when the DAP
is acting as a master sync generator. If multiple DAP processors are used in an installation, only one should lock
to video reference and the rest should be locked to the master DAP using the AES/EBU reference output. When
unlocked, the internal frequency defaults to 48 kHz. See notes in Step 11 below.
4.
48 kHz Internal. This allows the internal low–jitter PLL to run without external reference. A trimmer is set at the
factory for correct center frequency. Normally this mode is used only for factory testing. (This mode forces all inputs to be asynchronous to the internal reference.)
5.
48 kHz AES AUTO. This is the factory default setting and the preferred mode. This mode provides the same ultra
stable low–jitter reference at a sample rate of 48 kHz as selection #1, but has a much larger lock range of approximately + or – 4%. When the reference is within approx. + or – 200 ppm of 48 kHz, then the DAP automatically
selects the super low–jitter secondary PLL. Otherwise, when outside the limits of + or – 200 ppm, the DAP remains
locked up to a range of + or – 4 % using only the primary PLL. When using the primary PLL the resulting internal
clocks are not as low in jitter performance as when the secondary PLL is used, but the DAP will continue to operate
correctly. When unlocked, the internal frequency defaults to 48 kHz.
6.
44.1 kHz Narrow. This mode provides an ultra stable low–jitter reference at a sample rate of 48 kHz. The lock range
of the internal PLL is approximately + or – 200 ppm. This mode is normally used only for testing in the factory.
When unlocked, the internal frequency defaults to 44.1 kHz.
7.
44.1 kHz Internal. This allows the internal low–jitter PLL to run without external reference. A trimmer is set at the
factory for correct center frequency. Normally this mode is used only for factory testing. When unlocked, the internal frequency defaults to 44.1 kHz. (This mode forces all inputs to be asynchronous to the internal reference.)
8.
44.1 kHz AES AUTO. This mode provides the same ultra stable low–jitter reference at a sample rate of 44.1 kHz
as selection #1, but has a much larger lock range of approximately + or – 4%. When the reference is within approx.
+ or – 200 ppm of 44.1 kHz, then the DAP automatically selects the super low–jitter secondary PLL. Otherwise,
when outside the limits of + or – 200 ppm, the DAP remains locked up to a range of + or – 4 % using only the primary
PLL. The internal clocks are not as low jitter as when using the secondary PLL, but the DAP will continue to operate
correctly. When unlocked, the internal frequency defaults to 44.1 kHz.
9.
AES Automatic. This mode provides operation at all sample rate frequencies between 30 and 50 kHz. If the reference is within approximately + or – 200 ppm of either 48 or 44.1 kHz, the DAP will automatically turn on the secondary low–jitter PLL circuits and lock. This provides the best operation for those conditions that may have widely
varying AES/EBU references. The only problem is that when unlocked, the internal frequency defaults to something less than 30 kHz.
2–28
Hardware installation
All VU and PPM meter outputs require frequency information for the filtering functions. This information is obtained from the reference section of the DAP. If operating at frequencies other than + or – 4% of 32 kHz, 44.1 kHz,
or 48 kHz, the meters will show incorrect ballistics.
10.
AES vari speed. This mode is the same as the AES Automatic mode mentioned above except that the low–jitter
PLL circuits are never enabled. This mode is mainly provided for factory test to confirm correct operation of the
primary PLL circuitry.
The same problem with frequency filter information applies as mentioned in 11 above, but an additional problem
may occur due to the absence of low–jitter internal clocks. The DMX 3500 digital–to–analog convertor board requires low–jitter reference clocks to provide the lowest distortion for D–to–A conversion. In this reference mode,
any incoming jitter is not attenuated. Increased jitter on conversion clocks has been shown to cause distortion on
analog converted outputs. In order to provide the highest quality monitor outputs either mode 1 or 4 should be used.
11.
Manual override. When configuration software is set to this position, then the internal rotary DIP switch can be
used to set reference modes.
Manual override can be useful when it is desired to use one DAP in a system as a master Sync generator locking
to a video reference. When using software configuration, the reference section will not function correctly during
a download from the Jupiter file server. This could cause an interruption of sync reference for those devices locking
to the DAP master.
We recommend that when using the DAP as the master sync generator, that the reference mode be set to manual
selection in the Jupiter configuration tables, and that the manual rotary DIP switch be used to set reference modes.
This will allow the reference section of the DAP hardware to continue to provide correct reference signals even
during a download from the Jupiter file server.
The options that can be selected form the rotary DIP switch are the same as those from the File Server configuration
tables. They are as follows:
0.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
48 kHz narrow
48 kHz NTSC video
48 kHz PAL video
48 kHz internal
48 kHz AES auto
44.1 kHz narrow
Not used
Not used
44.1 kHz internal
44.1 kHz AES auto
AES automatic
AES vari speed
Not used
Not used
Not used
Software Configuration (Using File Server information, Factory Default)
To use internal DIP switch, set software to Manual Override.
2–29
Hardware installation
To use configuration software, set internal DIP switch to position “F”.
Reference Delay/Advance Adjustment
Two rotary DIP switches (see page 2–21) are provided that allow the user to move the AES/EBU frame relationship of
the DAP outputs with respect to the AES/EBU reference inputs. Normally the AES11 synchronization standard requires
that all outputs be within 5% of the reference input. When both DIP switches are set to the “0” position, the AES/EBU
frames will be essentially identical in timing with the reference input. Changing the DIP switches allows the user to make
the AES/EBU outputs either advance or delay from the reference input in 1/4 bit increments.
In normal use, these adjustments are not needed. In fact, the user could actually cause the DAP to violate the AES11
synchronization standard by introducing excessive delay.
Note: This reference delay adjustment can only be made from the internal rotary DIP switches and cannot be applied from the configuration menus on the file server. Make adjustments here only if absolutely
needed. Normal operations will not need these adjustments.
Input Resolution
Input resolution refers to how many bits of sample data are used in processing the audio signals. The AES/EBU standard
allows for two basic operations. Standard 20 bit samples or 24 bit samples using the auxiliary data bits. The DAP can
automatically sense which is in use based upon a status bit sent along in the AES/EBU bit stream. Unfortunately many
manufacturers do not correctly set this bit. As a result, two additional options are available so the user may specify which
to accept. The DAP can be set to always use all 24 bits or to use only the most significant 20 bits. The Digital Audio Setup
table (page 3–41) provides the following settings:
1.
24 bit auto
2.
Force 20 bit
3.
Force 24 bit
24 Bit Auto
This setting allows each input section of the DAP to pass either 20 or 24 bits of sample based upon bit x of byte
x of the AES/EBU status block. When the bit indicates 20 bit data, whether or not the type of the four bits of auxiliary
data is specified, the DAP input stages will substitute “0s” for the bottom four LSBs (least significant bits). The
resulting 20 bit word is then passed onto the digital signal processing stages for mixing and fading. When the AES/
EBU status bit indicates 24 bit data, all 24 bits of the input sample data will be passed.
Force 20 Bit
This setting automatically truncates any auxiliary data bits by substituting “0s” for them before any digital signal
processing occurs. If any data or intercom type signals are present in these bits, they will be truncated. In addition,
if 24 bit significant data is presented, the four LSBs will be lost. This may result in increased distortion due to truncation instead of correct rounding and dithering.
This setting should be used when it is known that all data presented to the DAP will have 20 or less significant bits
of audio sample data.
2–30
Hardware installation
Note: The DAP does not pass auxiliary data bits separately under any condition. If these bits are being
used in your facility for intercom or other data the “Force 20 bit” mode should be used to prevent any data
or noise in the auxiliary bits from causing increased distortion or noise in the main audio channel.
Force 24 Bit
This setting forces all 24 bits of input sample data to be passed to the digital signal processing stages that follow.
This setting should be used when all data presented to the DAP has between 16 and 24 bits of significant information
and there are no auxiliary data or intercom channels used in the AES/EBU bit stream.
Note: If auxiliary data is present it will cause increased noise or distortion in the audio data as the DAP
cannot differentiate between auxiliary data and actual audio sample data.
V Bit Enable
The AES/EBU data stream contains a bit called the data “Valid” bit for each audio sample. This bit can be used to show
a damaged sample, or that the data is invalid for one reason or another. Normal operation for the DAP is to ignore this
bit and use any audio sample data that is present. However, the DAP can be configured to use the “V” bit to mute all audio
samples that arrive; this is done using the Digital Audio Setup table (page 3–41). When set for “Enable,” normal audio
will pass unless the “V” bit is set. If the V bit indicates invalid audio sample data, all bits in the data will be set to “0’s”
before being passed to the digital signal processing sections. The factory default is to ignore the “V” bit.
Rate Conversion
In order to provide the maximum flexibility in your installation, the DAP incorporates integral sample–rate convertors.
The rate convertors are primarily used to provide a solution for asynchronous input signals. If an input signal to the DAP
is synchronous, all data is passed directly to the digital signal processing stages. If an incoming signal is asynchronous
with the reference provided to the DAP, then an input detector senses the condition and switches the signal to sample
rate convertor. The rate convertor then provides a new signal to the digital signal processing stages that is “re–synchronized” to the reference signal.
Sample rate conversion is not exact, even in the digital domain, and therefore introduces some distortion. This distortion
is very small, and in many cases is less than would be introduced by using a digital–to–analog and analog–to–digital
convertor to re–synchronize the signal. Because of this small distortion, it was felt that the rate–convertors should be
bypassed when not needed to preserve the original signal integrity. The rate convertors are also only good to 20 bit resolution and therefore would greatly reduce the accuracy and dynamic range of a 24 bit input signal.
Each input stage in the DAP has a lock detector that determines if the incoming signal is locked to the reference. If it
is locked, then the signal is passed untouched to the digital signal processors. If it is not locked, then the signal is routed
to the sample rate convertors. Since the rate convertor has a small amount of time delay to accomplish its task, the signal
that comes out is slightly delayed from the original. Therefore, the switch between the input and the output of the rate
convertor is not silent but may have a slight glitch if it occurs during a signal.
Normally the DAP is operated by switching a signal on the “preset” bus and placing it on the “program” bus by initiating
a transition. This is the desired mode of operation because the sample rate convertor requires a finite time before it produces a good output signal, and also a time required for the lock detectors to determine a locked condition. If sources
are selected on preset, there will usually be enough time for this settling to occur before the signal is placed on program
by making a transition.
2–31
Hardware installation
As a result, even with asynchronous sources, crossfades, mixes, and other audio transitions can be made without any
audible noises or clicks when all takes are made on the preset bus and transitions made to place the signals on program.
Hot “takes” made on the program bus may have these audible switching artifacts. The rate convertors allow completely
asynchronous signals to be used on–the–air without any audible consequences except for the slightly increased distortion
due to the rate convertors themselves.
The Digital Audio Setup table (page 3–41) provides the following settings:
1.
Auto rate convert. This setting uses the lock detectors on each input to determine if the signal is locked to the internal
reference. The rate convertors are used only when an incoming signal is asynchronous. This is the preferred setting.
2.
Force rate convert. This setting forces full–time use of the rate convertors. This setting would be used if your plant
has a large number of asynchronous sources or if these sources are so near synchronous that the lock detectors in
the DAP cannot determine a lock condition (This might occur, for example, if a source is within 0.1 Hz of the reference long–term.) The disadvantage is that increased distortion will result on all incoming signals due to imperfections in the sample rate process.
Output Resolution
The DAP always generates 24 bit data internally. Because all internal signals are gain scaled as part of normal operation,
24 bit data will be generated regardless of the number of significant bits that are input to the DAP. The AES/EBU standard
specifies that either 20 or 24 bit sample data can be transmitted.
In addition, the DAP provides high quality dithering and rounding of the output signals to provide maximum signal performance and recovery of low level information in the digital audio signals. Correct dithering and rounding of a digital
audio signal allows information to be recovered in a signal that is lower in level than the least significant bit represents.
For example, a 16 bit sampled signal can still contain information from the 18th or even the 20th bit that would be lost
with simple truncation. (For a more detailed explanation of this see the references mentioned at the end of this section)
The Digital Audio Setup table (page 3–41) allows the user to select both the number of significant bits (what the signal
is dithered and rounded to) and the number of bits sent in the AES/EBU data stream. For example, if the transmission
path is 16 bit, you might choose to use the setting that rounds and dithers to 16 bits (16 significant) but sends 20 bits in
the AES/EBU data stream. Or if the transmission path is a 20 bit, you might set the DAP to 20 bit significant, with 20
or 24 bits sent.
The dither and rounding function can also be defeated by selecting the “dither off, 20 bits sent” or “dither off, 24 bits
sent” settings.
One of the great advantages of using correct dither and rounding, is that you will deliver a quality signal to your transmission path regardless of the number of significant bits in the incoming signals to the DAP 3500. A system set to 16 bits
output resolution will still recover low level information in an 18 or 20 bit incoming signal as well as lowering distortion
for all incoming signals.
Note: For best performance and minimum distortion to your end user, you should determine the number
of significant bits in your transmission path to your customer and set the DAP to match. This will allow
you to deliver the best possible quality digital audio signal to your end user.
2–32
Hardware installation
DMX 3500 Digital to Analog Converter
Analog Meter Output Gain
When a DMX 3500 D to A convertor board is installed, the Analog Left/Right Meter Outputs of the DAP 3500/4000
can be used to drive analog meter circuitry such as a mechanical VU meter or equivalent. (A drawing of the DAP rear
panel is shown on page 2a–5). These meter outputs use a simple consumer quality D to A convertor and are not intended
for monitoring signal quality. They have good frequency response and correct gain, but suffer from more noise and distortion than is acceptable for high quality speaker feeds.
The conversion to analog signal levels provides a further problem: “What voltage level will be represented by this –20
dB full scale signal used in the digital domain?” The DAP provides the following four settings:
1.
2.
3.
4.
+8 dBu
+4 dBu
0 dBu
–3 dBu
These settings are provided by the Audio Meter Gain menu on the Saturn System Control Defaults menu (page 3–38).
The Analog MONA and MONB outputs are intended to drive monitor speaker amplifiers and therefore have a fixed maximum level. This will correspond to the 0 dBu setting above. As such when the monitor pots on the control panel are set
at maximum, and a –20 dB full scale signal is present on the digital outputs, the analog MONA and MONB outputs will
be 0 dB u. These outputs use high quality 20 bit convertors with carefully designed anti–imaging filters that provide for
minimum group–delay and phase shift in the audio bandwidth. These analog outputs will compare favorably with those
from high quality outboard audiophile D–to–A convertors. In addition, they benefit from the very low jitter internal
clocks providing maximum signal performance.
Output Level Controls
The DMX 3500 has trimmer pots on each analog output. These are designed to compensate for small gain variations in
the circuitry as well as to compensate for different loading conditions. The DMX 3500 is calibrated at the factory for
a high impedance load. The DMX 3500 can drive any load impedance from infinite to 600 ohms. Due to the approximately 66 ohm output impedance of the output drivers used for MONA and MONB, a 600 ohm load will cause approximately
a 0.93 dB level drop. Adjusting the output trimming pots can correct for this level loss. The analog meter outputs have
approximately a 50 ohm impedance and therefore will have a smaller loss of approximately 0.75 dB. Adjusting the output
trimmers can also compensate for this level loss.
2–33
Hardware installation
Analog Audio Backup Switcher (AAB 3500/4000) hardware installation
The AAB 3500/4000 is usually controlled by a CE 300 Control Board mounted inside the AAB chassis. The CE 300 is
connected via an independent MPK bus to a control panel:
— if the Saturn system is single channel (e.g., one video processor and associated audio processors), the
backup switcher will be controlled by the “Select” button group on the Saturn control console. Please
refer to the drawing on page 2–53.
— if the Saturn system is multi–channel, the Select push buttons on the control console will not be available
(they must be used for channel selection, delegation, etc.). In this case, the backup control panel will most
often be a CP 300, 310, 320, or 330 panel. Please refer to the drawing on page 2–54.
Installation procedure
1.
Check voltage settings as follows:
Important: Do not change the switch setting with power applied.
Important: Do not touch any part of the AAB interior while power is applied!
a.
With power OFF, remove the top cover and locate the two rotary line voltage selector switches (see page
2–34). Note the six position switches marked “220/100/240/120/200/140.” Use the guidelines shown below
for setting the voltage selector switches.
Redundant Supplies
AC input Range
Single Supply
AC Input Range
Switch Voltage
Setting
80–100
85–105
100
95–120
103–125
120
115–135
120–140
140
165–205
175–215
200
180–225
190–235
220
195–245
205–255
240
Figure 2–22. Analog audio backup switcher line voltage settings.
b.
If the unit is equipped with the internal redundant power supply (the usual case) jumper JN1 should be in the
“Redundant” position (pins 1 and 2 connected). This enables the alarm circuitry on the second (lower) supply.
If only the lower connector is powered, a continuous alarm condition will exist.
Note the two AC power cord receptacles on the rear panel. The top receptacle connects to the main supply;
the lower receptacle connects to the internal redundant power supply. When installed, the redundant power
supply is diode–connected to the main supply; in case of supply failure, switch–over to to the good supply
is automatic.
2–34
Hardware installation
Level
(bits 1–4)
Level
(bits 5–7)
Output
Output (bits 4–7)
(bits 8–9)
Figure 2–23. AAB 3500/4000 jumpers and switches.
Output
(bits 0–3)
Voltage select switches
Level and Output rotary switches.
SW2 = normally 1; all others = 0
READ INSTRUCTIONS ON PAGE
2–33 CAREFULLY BEFORE
SETTING THESE SWITCHES!
SW1 SW2 SW3 SW4 SW5
T1/1
T1/2
J2/P2
J1/P1
J3/P3
J6/P6
J4/P4
J5/P5
JN 1
J8
OPTIONAL
CONTROL BOARD
CE 300
J9
J10
J11
J13
J14
J15
J16
J25 J26 J28
J17/P17
J27
Internal Redundant power
supply jumper
3
2
1
JUMPER PINS 1–2 = REDUNDANT POWER SUPPLY INSTALLED
JUMPER PINS 2–3 = NO REDUNDANT POWER SUPPLY INSTALLED
2–35
2.
Hardware installation
Check the level and output rotary hexadecimal switches S–1 through S–5. In most cases, the level will be “01” (for
video) and the output number will be “000.”
The backup switcher control system only responds to one switcher level, and video–audio breakaway is not supported.
The input range is fixed at 0–15 (000–00F hex).
3.
If an internal CE 300 Controller card is used (the usual case), remove the paper between the coin battery and the
battery clip on the CE 300. (The paper insulator preserves battery life during shipment and installation.)
4.
Set the DIP switches on the ABX 3500 (analog video) or DBX 3500 (digital video) board to select the correct reference signal type (Figure 2–24) and desired switch point (Figures 2–25 and 2–26). The switch point is adjustable
in 1/2 line increments from minus 1 line to +2.5 lines from “nominal.”
Reference signal
S3
S2
S1
NTSC
OFF
OFF
OFF
PAL
OFF
OFF
ON
Sony HDTV
ON
OFF
OFF
EUREKA HDTV
ON
OFF
ON
Figure 2–24. Settings for S1 through S3.
Field Select
S5
S4
Field 1 only
OFF
ON
Field 2 only
ON
OFF
Either field
ON
ON
Don’t care
OFF
OFF
Figure 2–25. Settings for S4 and S5.
2–36
Hardware installation
Switch Point
S8
S7
S6
minus 1.0 line
OFF
OFF
OFF
minus 0.5 line
OFF
OFF
ON
Nominal†
OFF
ON
OFF
+ 0.5 line
OFF
ON
ON
+ 1.0 line
ON
OFF
OFF
+ 1.5 line
ON
OFF
ON
+ 2.0 line
ON
ON
OFF
+ 2.5 line
ON
ON
ON
† “Nominal”
NTSC
PAL
Sony
EUREKA
is defined as follows:
32 microseconds into line #10 either/both fields
32 microseconds into line #6 and/or line #319
16 microseconds into line #5 either/both fields
16 microseconds into line #5 and/or line #630
Figure 2–26. Settings for S6 through S8.
5.
Replace the cover. Mount the unit in an equipment rack near the Saturn Processing Units.
6.
Connect a video reference signal to the REF input. This is a terminating input.
7.
Connect the Air output of each Processing Unit to the appropriate Zero input of the AAB Backup Switcher. Connect
the desired Emergency Backup sources to the remaining inputs. See pages 2–53 and 2–54.
a.
Video Processors—amplified instructions.
If this is an analog video system, connect one of the Air outputs of the AVP 3500/4000 to IN 0 of the ABX
3500. Connect additional sources of your choosing to inputs 1 through 15 of the ABX 3500. Connect one of
the outputs of the ABX 3500 to your transmitter path. The other output might be used for an on–air monitor.
If this is a digital video system, connect one of the Air outputs of the DVP 3500/4000 to IN 0 of the DBX 3500.
Connect additional sources of your choosing to inputs 1 through 15 of the DBX 3500. Connect one of the
outputs of the DBX 3500 to your transmitter path. The other output might be used for an on–air monitor.
The rear panel connectors will correspond to the Select panel buttons as shown on page 2–39.
Note: Early versions of CE 300 software will cause the button sequence to run from the top down
rather than from left to right. Contact Thomson for information about updating this software to a
newer version.
On CP 300/310/320/330 panels, the AAB rear panel connectors will correspond to the first 16 input buttons,
in sequential order.
b.
Audio Processors—amplified instructions.
Connect the AAP 3500/4000 left On Air output to the AAB 3500/4000 left IN 0 using shielded twisted pair
cable. Similarly, connect the AAP right On Air output to the AAB right IN 0. Connect additional sources of
your choosing to left inputs 1 through 15 and right inputs 1 through 15.
2–37
Hardware installation
Note: Be sure the audio sources match connectors numbers with the corresponding video sources.
For example, if VTR1 video is connected to video IN 1, then the audio from VTR1 must be connected to audio IN 1.There is no provision for split switching.
If a second or third AAP processor is used, connect the left and right outputs of the second processor to CH3
IN 0 and CH4 IN 0. A third AAP would connect to CH5 IN 0 and CH6 IN 0. Connect additional sources of
your choosing to CH3, CH4, CH5, and CH6 inputs 1 through 15 if applicable.
8.
When an internal CE 300 Controller card is used (the usual case), connect the MPK port on the back of the AAB
to the desired control panel(s):
— If this is a single channel Saturn MCS system, this will probably be the built in “Select” button group on
the MCC 3500/4000 console.
— In a multi–channel system, the “Select” panel is used for delegation of the MCC, and other control panels
will be required to operate the Backup Switcher. A CP 300/310/320/330 control panel may be used for
this purpose.
9.
Set the DIP switch for the “Select” button group on the MCC as follows:
a.
Lift up the console top. With power off, locate MPK (Select) panel DIP switch package S1. This is an 8–position switch on the right–hand edge of the console.
b.
If the Select button group will be used to operate the backup switcher:
(1) Set for “CE 300/SC 400 Control” (switch 8 ON). See Figure 2–37 on page 2–52.
(2) Set the panel type for type “3” (switch 6 and 7 both ON).
(3) Set the output number (usually zero, as described in Step 2 above; in which case switches 1 through 5 are
all OFF).
10.
c.
If the Select button group will be used for delegation, set for “non–CE 300 Control” (switch 8 OFF). (If
switch 8 is OFF, all other switches are ignored.) See Figure 2–37 on page 2–52.
d.
Close console and re–power.
If a CP 300/310/320/330 control panel is being used to operate the backup switcher, check the control panel DIP
switches (beneath an access cover on the rear of the panel):
a.
Set for “CE 300 Control” (switch 8 ON).
b.
Set the panel type:
—
—
—
CP 300 and CP 330 (type “0”); switches 6 and 7 both OFF.
CP 310 (type “1”); panel; switch 6 ON, switch 7 OFF.
CP 320 (type “2”); switch 6 OFF, switch 7 ON.
2–38
Hardware installation
c.
Set the output number (usually zero, as described in Step 2 above; in which case switches 1 through 5 are all
OFF).
Note: if multiple 300 series panels are being used, the DIP switches must be set to a different output
number on each panel, and special software configuration methods may be needed. For more information, see Appendix E.
d.
At this point the backup switcher should be operational.
For complete charts of settings for these switches, see CP 300 Series Control Panels / CE 300 Control Board
Installation manual, part no. 04-045227-002.
11.
Configuration of the CE 300 is optional, but recommended. If a configuration set is not downloaded, the Select (or
CP 320) panel display will show numbers (000–014) instead of mnemonics. Refer to “Configuration of CE 300”
on page 2–55 of this manual, and to CP 300 Series Control Panels / CE 300 Control Board manual.
12.
Optionally, connect the Alarm BNC (floating, normally open contact) to your station alarm system.
13.
Optionally, wire the tally outputs to an external tally system. Each output is an opto–isolated solid state relay contact. The pinout for each tally is shown in Figure 2–27 below.
Tally #
‘D’ Connector Pins
Tally #
‘D’ Connector Pins
0
1, 20
8
9, 28
1
2, 21
9
10, 29
2
3, 22
10
11, 30
3
4, 23
11
12, 31
4
5, 24
12
13, 32
5
6, 25
13
14, 33
6
7, 26
14
15, 34
7
8, 27
15
16, 35
Figure 2–27.
1.0A SLOW BLOW
T0.5A
47–63HZ
P
E
T
E
CONFIG
MPK
IN 0
IN 5
IN 3
IN 4
IN 10 IN 11
RIGHT OUTPUT
+ –G
GAIN
RIGHT MATRIX INPUTS
IN 12 IN 13 IN 14 IN 15
IN 6
IN 7
RIGHT MATRIX INPUTS
IN 2
IN 3
IN 8
IN 9
IN 5
IN 1
IN 5
IN 9
IN 10
IN 15
IN 11
CH4 OUTPUT
GAIN
+ –G
CH4 MATRIX INPUTS
IN 6
IN 7
IN 12 IN 13 IN 14
IN 10
IN 15
CH3 MATRIX INPUTS
IN 7
IN 12 IN 13 IN 14
IN 6
CH4 MATRIX INPUTS
IN 2
IN 3
IN 8 IN 9
IN 11
IN 10
IN 11
Note: Early versions of CE 300
software will cause the button
sequence to run from the top
down rather than from left to
right. Contact Thomson for
information about updating this
software to a newer version.
IN 5
IN 1
IN 5
IN 1
IN 14
IN 15
IN 10
IN 10
Transmitter
IN 15
IN 11
IN 15
CH6 OUTPUT
+ –G
GAIN
CH6 MATRIX INPUTS
IN 6
IN 7
IN 12 IN 13 IN 14
CH6 MATRIX INPUTS
IN 8
IN 2
IN 3
IN 9
AIR
OUTPUT
IN 11
OUTPUT
CH5 MATRIX INPUTS
IN 6
IN 7
IN 12 IN 13 IN 14
CH5 MATRIX INPUTS
IN 2
IN 3
IN 8
IN 9
IN 13
CH5 OUTPUT
GAIN
+ –G
IN 4
IN 0
IN 4
IN 0
IN 12
“Select” button group key positions
CH3 MATRIX INPUTS
IN 3
IN 8 IN 9
IN 2
IN 8
CH3 OUTPUT
GAIN
+– G
IN 4
IN 0
IN 4
IN 1
IN 7
IN 14
IN 13
IN 12
LEFT MATRIX INPUTS
IN 12 IN 13 IN 14 IN 15
IN 6
IN 7
IN 6
IN 11
IN 10
IN 8
IN 7
IN 6
IN 9
IN 5
IN 0
IN 5
IN 2
IN 4
IN 1
IN 3
IN 10 IN 11
LEFT MATRIX INPUTS
IN 2
IN 3
IN 8
IN 9
IN 2
LEFT OUTPUT
GAIN
+– G
IN 4
IN 1
IN 5
IN 4
IN 0
IN 1
IN 0
IN 1
MPK Serial Cable
Connected to Saturn
Control Console or CP
3
300/10/20/30 control panel
Optional serial cable
connected to serial port
of Jupiter File Server 2
XPT BUS
TALLY
100/120/140/200/220/240V
1A/0.5A
115V: 250V 1.0A SLOW BLOW
230V: 250V
T0.5A
ALARM
REF
Emergency inputs
from On–Air
output of audio
processor
IN 0
Select
MSTR
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
WARNING: FOR
CONTINUEED PROTECTION
AGAINST RISK OF FIRE 100/120/140/200/220/240V
REPLACE ONLY WITH SAME
1A/0.5A
TYPE AND RATING OF FUSE.
115V: 250V
230V: 250V
Input to
redundant
power supply
Input to main
power supply
Sync reference1
from On–Air
output of Video
Processor
2–39
Hardware installation
Figure 2–28. AAB 3500/4000 Backup
Switcher, showing basic installation.
1See
page 2–70.
2See
page 2–55.
3See
page 2–57.
2–40
Hardware installation
Digital Audio Backup Switcher (DAB 3500/4000) hardware installation
The DAB 3500/4000 is usually controlled by a CE 300 Control Board mounted inside the DAB chassis. The CE 300 is
connected via an independent MPK bus to a control panel:
— If the Saturn system is single channel (e.g., one video processor and associated audio processors), the
backup switcher will be controlled by the “Select” button group on the Saturn control console. Please
refer to the drawing on page 2–53.
— If the Saturn system is multi–channel, the Select push buttons on the control console will not be available
(they must be used for channel selection, delegation, etc.). In this case, the backup control panel will most
often be a CP 300, 310, 320, or 330 panel. Please refer to the drawing on page 2–54.
Installation procedure
1.
Base board and DEX 3500 Digital Audio Mezzanine board(s) (see Figure 2–29). With power OFF, remove the top
cover and check the following items:
a.
Input / output level setting jumpers. The 16 inputs and two outputs are individually set at the factory for 5 volt
operation.
Since these jumpers are located along the back edge of these boards, changing them will usually require the
video mezzanine board, and possibly one or two audio mezzanine board(s), to be removed. If a video mezzanine board is installed (the usual case), you must remove the board’s two mounting screws and the nuts on
all 20 BNC connectors. Likewise the audio mezzanine board(s) may have to be removed; each of these is fastened with six nuts and five screws.
For additional information about the input and output sensitivity jumpers, see page 2–48.
b.
c.
Check jumpers JN600 through JN604. The functions of these jumpers are as follows:
JN–600
Spare
JN–601
20/24 bit select. Factory setting is “24,” meaning that all 24 bits will be treated as data.
When “20” is selected (by removing the jumper), the first 20 bits of audio will be treated
as data and the following four bits will be passed through. For additional information,
see “Input Resolution” on page 2–50.
JN–602
Internal sine generator. Used for factory test. See page 2–51.
JN–603
Spare
JH–604
Watchdog. Used for product development.
Check Valid Bit jumpers JN605 and 606.
With JN606 installed, the system will respond to a “data not valid” bit by muting the audio. With JN605 instatalled (the factory setting), the Valid Bit will be ignored. For additional information, see “V Bit Ignore/Enable” on page 2–51.
2–41
Hardware installation
Output
(bits 4–7)
Output
(bits 8–9)
Output
(bits 0–3)
Figure 2–29. DAB 3500/4000 jumpers and switches.
Level
(bits 1–4)
SW1 SW2 SW3 SW4 SW5
Level
(bits 5–7)
VOLTAGE SELECT SWITCHES
LEVEL AND OUTPUT ROTARY
SWITCHES
SW4 = normally 1; all others = 0
Read instructions on page 2–42
carefully before setting these
switches!
MAIN
DEX 3500
DIGITAL
AUDIO
MEZZANINE
BOARD(S)
BASE
BOARD
REDUNDANT
OPTIONAL
CONTROLLER
CARD
REFERENCE
MODE
SWITCH
CE 300
See page
2–49 for
discussion
DBX 3500
(DIGITAL) OR
ABX 3500
(ANALOG)
VIDEO
MEZZANINE
BOARD
DIP
SWITCH
S1
See Step 6
on page
2–43 for
settings
OUTPUT
LEVEL
JUMPERS
See Step 1 on
page 2–40 for
discussion
5 V (Factory setting)
INTERNAL
REDUNDANT
POWER SUPPLY
JUMPERS
1V
INPUT
LEVEL
JUMPERS
5 V (Factory setting)
1V
Redundant power
supply installed
VALID BIT
JUMPERS
No Redundant power supply
installed
JN600–604.
2–42
2.
Hardware installation
On the base board, check voltage settings as follows:
Important: Do not change the switch setting with power applied.
Important: Do not touch any part of the DAB interior while power is applied!
a.
With power OFF, locate the two rotary line voltage selector switches (see page 2–41). These six position
switches are marked “220/100/240/120/200/140.” Both switches are normally set to the same position. Use
the following guidelines for setting the voltage selector switches:
Redundant Supplies
AC input Range
Single Supply
AC Input Range
Switch Voltage
Setting
85–100
90–110
100
100–120
108–130
120
115–135
120–150
140
170–205
180–220
200
185–225
200–235
220
205–245
210–255
240
Figure 2–30. Digital audio backup switcher line voltage settings.
b.
If the unit is equipped with the internal redundant power supply (the usual case) PWR_ALARM jumpers
JN200/201 should be in the “Redundant” position. This enables the alarm circuitry on the second (lower rear
panel connector) supply. If only the lower connector is powered, the unit will operate but a continuous alarm
condition will exist.
When installed, the redundant power supply is diode–connected to the main supply; in case of supply failure,
switch–over to to the good supply is automatic.
3.
Check the level and output rotary hexadecimal switches S–1 through S–5. In most cases, the level will be “01” (for
video) and the output number will be “000.”
The backup switcher control system only responds to one switcher level, and video–audio breakaway is not supported.
The input range is fixed at 0–15 (000–00F hex).
4.
If an internal CE 300 Controller card is used (the usual case), remove the paper between the coin battery and the
battery clip on the CE 300. (The paper insulator preserves battery life during shipment and installation.)
5.
Check audio Reference Mode rotary DIP switch S400.
The recommended source for audio sync is an AES/EBU audio reference signal. The recommended (and factory)
setting for this switch is “4–48KHZ AUTO(REC).”
\For a discussion of other sync methods, see “Reference Modes” on page 2–49.
2–43
6.
Hardware installation
Set the S–1 DIP switches on the DBX 3500 Digital Video Mezanine board (or ABX 3500 Analog Video Mezanine
Board) to select the correct reference signal type (Figure 2–31) and desired switch point (Figures 2–32 and 2–33).
The switch point is adjustable in 1/2 line increments from minus 1 line to +2.5 lines from “nominal.”
Reference signal
S1–3
S1–2
S1–1
NTSC
OFF
OFF
OFF
PAL
OFF
OFF
ON
Sony HDTV
ON
OFF
OFF
EUREKA HDTV
ON
OFF
ON
Figure 2–31. DBX 3500 reference signal settings.
Field Select
S1–5
S1–4
Field 1 only
OFF
ON
Field 2 only
ON
OFF
Either field
ON
ON
Don’t care
OFF
OFF
Figure 2–32. DBX 3500 switch point settings.
Switch Point
S1–8
S1–7
S1–6
minus 1.0 line
OFF
OFF
OFF
minus 0.5 line
OFF
OFF
ON
Nominal†
OFF
ON
OFF
+ 0.5 line
OFF
ON
ON
+ 1.0 line
ON
OFF
OFF
+ 1.5 line
ON
OFF
ON
+ 2.0 line
ON
ON
OFF
+ 2.5 line
ON
ON
ON
† “Nominal”
NTSC
PAL
Sony
EUREKA
is defined as follows:
32 microseconds into line #10 either/both fields
32 microseconds into line #6 and/or line #319
16 microseconds into line #5 either/both fields
16 microseconds into line #5 and/or line #630
Figure 2–33. DBX 3500 switch point settings.
7.
Replace the cover. Mount the unit in an equipment rack near the Saturn Processing Units.
8.
Connect the audio reference signal (as determined during Step 5 above) to the appropriate connectors. If the recommended AES/EBU reference is used, it will be connected to the 3–pin “AES REF IN” connector. For a drawing
of the rear panel, see page 2–47.
For a discussion of alternative reference methods, see page 2–49.
9.
Connect a video reference signal to the video “REF” input (the REF connector along the top edge of the rear panel).
Although any constant APL color test signal may be used for video reference, the preferred reference signal is analog black burst.
2–44
Hardware installation
If this video reference is also used for audio sync, then video reference must also be looped through the audio “REF”
connectors (for more information, see page 2–49).
10.
Connect the AIR output of each Processing Unit to the appropriate Zero input of the DAB Backup Switcher. Connect the desired Emergency Backup sources to the remaining inputs. See pages 2–53 and 2–54.
a.
Video Processors—amplified instructions.
If this is a digital video system, connect one of the AIR outputs of the DVP 3500/4000 to input 0 of the DBX
3500. See page 2–47. Connect additional sources of your choosing to inputs 1 through 15 of the DBX 3500.
Connect one of the outputs of the DBX 3500 to your transmitter path. The other output might be used for an
on–air monitor.
If this is an analog video system, connect one of the AIR outputs of the AVP 3500/4000 to input 0 of the ABX
3500. See page 2–47. Connect additional sources of your choosing to inputs 1 through 15 of the ABX 3500.
Connect one of the outputs of the ABX 3500 to your transmitter path. The other output might be used for an
on–air monitor.
The rear panel connectors will correspond to the Select panel buttons as shown on page 2–47.
Note: Early versions of CE 300 software will cause the button sequence to run from the top down
rather than from left to right. Contact Thomson for information about updating this software to a
newer version.
On CP 300/10/20/30 panels, the DAB rear panel connectors will correspond to the first 16 input buttons, in
sequential order.
b.
Audio Processors—amplified instructions.
The DAB 3500/4000 Digital Audio Backup Switcher and DEX 3500 Digital Audio Mezzanine boards are
each shipped with five ferrite cores. For CE certification these cores aid in EMI reduction. Each green plug–on
terminal connector (Phoenix “Combicon” connector) should have a ferrite core clipped around the audio
cables (4 audio cables per ferrite) at the time of installation (see Figure 2–34). Ferrite cores work best when
they are near the connector. Care should be taken in handling not to drop breakable ferrite materials. For an
illustration of the Combicon connector, see page 2–76.
Figure 2–34. Ferrite core installation.
Connect the DAP ON AIR output to the DAB AES matrix inputs CH1/2 IN 0 using shielded twisted pair cable.
Connect additional sources of your choosing to IN 1 through 15.
Note: Be sure the audio sources match connectors numbers with the corresponding video sources.
For example, if VTR1 video is connected to video Input 1, then the audio from VTR1 must be connected to audio Input 1.There is no provision for split switching.
2–45
Hardware installation
If a second or third DAP processor is used, connect the outputs of the second processor to AES matrix inputs
CH3/4 input 00. A third DAP would connect to AES matrix inputs CH5/6 IN. Connect additional sources of
your choosing to CH3/4, and CH5/6 IN 1 through 15 if applicable.
11.
When an internal CE 300 Controller card is used (the usual case), connect the MPK port on the back of the DAB
to the desired control panel(s):
— If this is a single channel Saturn MCS system, this will probably be the built in “Select” button group on
the MCC 3500/4000 console.
— In a multi–channel system, the “Select” panel is used for delegation of the MCC, and other control panels
will be required to operate the Backup Switcher. A CP 300/10/20/30 (“Mars type”) control panel may be
used for this purpose.
12.
Set the DIP switch for the “Select” button group on the MCC as follows:
a.
Lift up the console top. With power off, locate MPK (Select) panel DIP switch package S1. This is an 8–position switch on the right–hand edge of the console.
b.
If the Select button group will be used to operate the backup switcher:
(1) Set for “CE 300 Control” (switch 8 ON). For a drawing of this switch, see page 2–52.
(2) Set the panel type for type “3” (switch 6 and 7 both ON).
(3) Set the output number (usually zero, as described in Step 2 above; in which case switches 1 through 5 are
all OFF).
13.
c.
If the Select button group will be used for delegation, set for “non–CE 300 Control” (switch 8 OFF). (If
switch 8 is OFF, all other switches are ignored.) For an illustration, see page 2–52.
d.
Close the console and re–power.
If a CP 300/10/20/30 control panel is being used to operate the backup switcher, check the control panel DIP
switches (beneath an access cover on the rear of the panel):
a.
Set for “CE 300 Control” (switch 8 ON).
b.
Set the panel type:
—
—
—
c.
CP 300 and CP 330 (type “0”); switches 6 and 7 both OFF.
CP 310 (type “1”); panel; switch 6 ON, switch 7 OFF.
CP 320 (type “2”); switch 6 OFF, switch 7 ON.
Set the output number (usually zero, as described in Step 2 above; in which case switches 1 through 5 are all
OFF).
Note: if multiple 300 series panels are being used, the DIP switches must be set to a different output
number on each panel, and special software configuration methods may be needed. For more information, see Appendix E.
2–46
Hardware installation
d.
At this point the backup switcher should be operational.
For complete charts of settings for these switches, see the CP 300 Series Control Panels / CE 300 Control
Board manual, part no. 04-045227-002.
14.
Configuration of the CE 300 is optional, but recommended. If a configuration set is not downloaded, the Select (or
CP 320) panel display will show numbers (000–014) instead of mnemonics. Refer to “Configuration of CE 300”
on page 2–55 of this manual, and to the CP 300 Series Control Panels / CE 300 Control Board manual.
15.
Optionally, connect the DAB Alarm BNC (floating, normally open contact) to your station alarm system.
16.
Optionally, wire the Tally outputs to an external tally system. Each output is an opto–isolated solid state relay contact. The pinout for each tally is shown in Figure 2–35 below.
Tally #
‘D’ Connector Pins
Tally #
‘D’ Connector Pins
0
1, 20
8
9, 28
1
2, 21
9
10, 29
2
3, 22
10
11, 30
3
4, 23
11
12, 31
4
5, 24
12
13, 32
5
6, 25
13
14, 33
6
7, 26
14
15, 34
7
8, 27
15
16, 35
Figure 2–35. Tally connector pinouts.
1.0A SLOW BLOW
T0.5A
47–63HZ
1A/0.5A
XPT BUS
TALLY
MPK
Optional serial cable
connected to serial port
of Jupiter File Server. 5
CONFIG
1.0A SLOW BLOW
T0.5A
100/120/140/200/220/240V
Alternate audio sync ref.,
using video signal. Note
looping cable leading to
video ref. connector. 2
P
E
T
E
115V: 250V
230V: 250V
ALARM
REF
IN 1
AES
REF IN
IN 3
Recommended
audio sync ref.
input. 3
INPUT
SYNC
INPUT
SYNC
INPUT
SYNC
IN 2
MPK Serial Cable
Connected to Saturn
Control Console or CP
300/10/20/30 control
panel. 6
REF
LOCK FAN
REF
IN 0
OUTPUTS
A
B
OUTPUTS
A
B
OUTPUTS
A
B
IN 4
Emergency inputs
IN 0
IN 0
IN 0
IN 1
IN 1
IN 1
IN 6
IN 2
IN 2
IN 2
IN 7
IN 2
IN 5
IN 8
IN 11
IN 14
IN 1
IN 4
IN 7
IN 10
IN 0
IN 3
IN 6
IN 9
IN 12 IN 13
IN 3
IN 3
IN 3
IN 8
IN 5
IN 5
IN 5
IN 4
IN 4
IN 4
IN 9
VIDEO MATRIX INPUTS
Ferrite cores must be installed
on audio connectors to meet CE
EMI standards.4
IN 5
Select
MSTR
IN 10 IN 11
AES MATRIX INPUTS CH 1/2
IN 6 IN 7
IN 8
IN 9
IN 14
Transmitter
IN 10 IN 11
AES MATRIX INPUTS CH 3/4
IN 6 IN 7
IN 8
IN 9
IN 13
IN 10 IN 11
IN 12
AES MATRIX INPUTS CH 5/6
IN 6 IN 7
IN 8
IN 9
IN 10
IN 11
Note: Early versions of CE 300
software will cause the button
sequence to run from the top
down rather than from left to
right. Contact Thomson for
information about updating this
software to a newer version.
“Select” button group key positions
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
WARNING: FOR
CONTINUED PROTECTION
AGAINST RISK OF FIRE, 100/120/140/200/220/240V
1A/0.5A
TYPE AND RATING OF FUSE.
REPLACE ONLY WITH SAME
115V: 250V
230V: 250V
Input to
redundant
power supply
Input to main
power supply
Video matrix
reference input 1
from On–Air CH 1/2
output of audio
processor
from On–Air
output of Video
Processor
OUTPUTS
IN 12 IN 13 IN 14 IN 15
IN 12 IN 13 IN 14 IN 15
IN 12 IN 13 IN 14 IN 15
IN 15
AIR
2–47
Hardware installation
Figure 2–36.
DAB 3500/4000 Backup
Switcher, showing basic
installation.
1See
page 2–49.
2See
page 2–49.
3See
page 2–49.
4See
page 2–44.
5See
page 2–55.
6See
page 2–57.
2–48
Hardware installation
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FOR DIGITAL AUDIO BACKUP SWITCHERS
Input sensitivity Jumpers
These jumpers are provided on the DAB 3500/4000 base board and the optional DEX 3500 matrix board(s).
The DAB 3500/4000 is designed to receive standard AES/EBU twisted pair signals with 110 ohm impedances. The unit
is shipped from the factory with these settings. In addition, input jumpers are provided that allow signals of different
levels to be accommodated. These jumpers do not change the input impedance of 110 ohms. They only provide for different input signals levels that may come from other versions of the AES/EBU standard. The input jumpers are required
in order to allow the adaptive equalizers that follow to properly compensate for input cable losses.
Each input section of the DAB has a jumper marked “5 V” and “1 V,” representing 5 volt P–P and 1 volt P–P reference
levels (see page 2–41). These jumpers refer to the sending end or the equipment driving the DAB inputs. Standard AES/
EBU devices should use the 5 V position.
Devices running on 75 ohm coax generally conform to SMPTE proposed standard SMPTE 276M which calls for 1V
P–P signals. Placing the jumper in the 1V position provides correct interface for the 75 ohm coax levels only. A matching
transformer with a ratio of 1:1.2 is required to provide proper impedance matching.
Many consumer devices such as CD players or DAT machines provide direct digital outputs conforming to the SPDIF
standard. The automatic input equalizer allows the DAB 3500 to accept inputs from these signals by using the 1 V jumper
setting. The SPDIF standard calls for signal levels of 0.5 V P–P and an impedance of 75 ohms. A matching transformer
with a ratio of 1:1.2 is required to provide proper impedance matching.
The input decoders of the DAB will decode a SPDIF type signal but will not recover any of the channel status bits as
they differ greatly from a standard AES/EBU coded signal.
Output Sensitivity Jumpers (On all AES/EBU outputs on main board)
As above, the AES/EBU output drivers have jumpers that allow the DAB to drive different signal levels. These jumpers
do not change the output impedance of 110 ohms. They only provide for different output signals levels that may be required.
Each output section of the DAB has a jumper marked “5 V” and “1 V,” representing 5 volt P–P and 1 volt P–P reference
levels (see page 2–41). These jumpers refer to output signal levels from the DAB outputs. Standard AES/EBU devices
should use the 5 V position. The factory ships the units set for the standard AES/EBU level of 5 volts P–P.
Devices running on 75 ohm coax generally conform to SMPTE proposed standard SMPTE 276M which calls for 1V
P–P signals. Placing the jumper in the 1V position provides correct interface for the 75 ohm coax levels only. A matching
transformer with a ratio of 1.2:1 is required to provide proper impedance matching to the 110 ohm output impedance
of the DAB.
2–49
Hardware installation
Reference Modes
The DAB must have an external reference signal to provide synchronous operation. A rotary DIP switch is provided to
select one of seven possible sync modes (for the location of this switch, see page 2–41).
The audio matrix can be synchronized using an AES/EBU reference signal, or, an NTSC or PAL video reference signal.
The standard and preferred method is to use an AES/EBU audio reference signal, because the DAB can provide precise
locking and time alignment to an AES/EBU reference that is not possible with a video reference. If the AES/EBU reference is used, it must be connected to the three pin “AES REF IN” connector (as shown on page 2–47). For the video matrix
(ABX 3500 or DBX 3500), a video reference would be connected to the “REF” BNC connector (above the “Alarm”
BNC).†
If a video reference is to be used for the digital audio sync reference, this signal should be looped through the two “REF”
BNCs and connected to the video “REF” BNC (terminating).
The choices for reference modes are as follows:
S
48 kHz narrow
S
48 kHz NTSC video
S
48 kHz PAL video
S
48 kHz internal
S
48 kHz AES auto (recommended setting) (factory set and shipped in this position)
S
AES automatic
S
AES vari speed
The following section describes each of the options in detail:
48 kHz Narrow. This mode provides an ultra stable low–jitter reference at a sample rate of 48 kHz. The lock range of
the internal PLL is approximately + or – 200 ppm. When unlocked, the internal frequency defaults to 48 kHz. This mode
is normally used only for testing in the factory but could be used when an ultra stable reference is available.
48 kHz NTSC Video. This mode utilizes a local video PLL locking to Horizontal sync which is then compared to a divided down version of the internal 12.288 MHz clock. The 12.288 MHz clock is generated by a low–jitter secondary
PLL which provides approximately equivalent performance to the AES low–jitter PLL. This is a frequency lock only
and does not attempt to define a specific relationship between video frames and audio frames. When unlocked, the internal frequency defaults to 48 kHz.
48 kHz PAL Video. This mode utilizes a local video PLL locking to Horizontal sync which is then compared to a divided
down version of the internal 12.288 MHz clock. The 12.288 MHz clock is generated by a low–jitter secondary PLL which
provides approximately equivalent performance to the AES low–jitter PLL. This is a frequency lock only and does not
attempt to define a specific relationship between video frames and audio frames.
48 kHz Internal. This allows the internal low–jitter PLL to run without external reference. A trimmer is set at the factory
for correct center frequency. Normally this mode is used only for factory testing. (This mode forces all inputs to be
asynchronous to the internal reference.)
†Although
any constant APL color test signal may be used for sync, the preferred video reference signal is analog black burst.
2–50
Hardware installation
48 kHz AES AUTO. This is the factory default setting and the preferred mode. This mode provides the same ultra stable
low–jitter reference at a sample rate of 48 kHz as selection #1, but has a much larger lock range of approximately + or
– 4%. When the reference is within approx. + or – 200 ppm of 48 kHz, then the DAB automatically selects the super
low–jitter secondary PLL. Otherwise, when outside the limits of + or – 200 ppm, the DAB remains locked up to a range
of + or – 4 % using only the primary PLL. When using the primary PLL, the resulting internal clocks are not as low in
jitter performance as when the secondary PLL is used, but the DAB will continue to operate correctly. When unlocked,
the internal frequency defaults to 48 kHz.
AES Automatic. This mode provides operation at all sample rate frequencies between 30 and 50 kHz. If the reference
is within approx. + or – 200 ppm of either 48 or 44.1 kHz, the DAB will automatically turn on the secondary low–jitter
PLL circuits and lock. This provides the best operation for those conditions that may have widely varying AES/EBU
references. The only problem is that when unlocked, the internal frequency defaults to something less than 30 kHz.
AES vari speed. This mode is the same as the AES Automatic mode mentioned above except that the low–jitter PLL
circuits are never enabled. This mode is mainly provided for factory test to confirm correct operation of the primary PLL
circuitry.
The options that can be selected form the rotary DIP switch are as follows:
0.
1.
2.
3.
4.
6.
7.
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
48 kHz narrow
48 kHz NTSC video
48 kHz PAL video
48 kHz internal
48 kHz AES auto
Not used
Not used
AES automatic
AES vari speed
Not used
Not used
Not used
Input Resolution
Input resolution refers to how many bits of sample data are used in processing the audio signals. The DAB has two options
so the user may specify which to accept. They are set with a jumper on the DAB 3500/4000 and DEX 3500 boards as
follows:
1.
Force 20 bit
2.
Force 24 bit (factory set – default)
20 bit
This setting uses the 20 MSB as audio data bits, and the four LSB as auxiliary data or intercom type signals. The
20 audio data bits are processed in the DSP while the 4 auxiliary bits are passed without modification.
This setting should be used when it is known that all data presented to the DAB will have 20 or less significant bits
of audio sample data.
2–51
Hardware installation
24 bit (factory set – default)
This setting, which is the default, passes all 24 bits of input sample data to the digital signal processing stages that
follow. This setting should be used when all data presented to the DAB has between 16 and 24 bits of significant
information and there are no auxiliary data or intercom channels used in the AES/EBU bit stream.
Note: If auxiliary data is present, it will cause increased noise or distortion in the audio data as the DAB
cannot differentiate between auxiliary data and actual audio sample data.
V Bit Ignore/Enable
The AES/EBU data stream contains a bit called the data “Valid” bit for each audio sample. This bit can be used to show
a damaged sample, or that the data is invalid for one reason or another. Normal operation for the DAB is to ignore this
bit and use any audio sample data that is present. However, the DAB can be configured to use the “V” bit to mute all
audio samples that arrive. When set for “Enable,” normal audio will pass unless the “V” bit is set. If the V bit indicates
invalid audio sample data, all bits in the data will be set to zeros before being passed to the digital signal processing sections. The factory default is to ignore the “V” bit.
Internal Sine Generator
The DAB 3500/4000 and DEX 3500 have a test jumper that puts the DSP in a debug mode. This mode puts a 1 kHz tone
on the outputs regardless of the data that is on the inputs. This is used for factory test.
2–52
Hardware installation
1
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
0
–––––OPEN–––––
Output to be controlled:
Standard setting
1
CE 300/SC–400 control
0
non CE 300/SC–400 control
Backup setting
Delegation setting
Equivalent polling name:
0
0 0 0 0 0 1 1
60
1
1 0 0 0 0 1 1
61
2
0 1 0 0 0 1 1
62
3
1 1 0 0 0 1 1
63
4
0 0 1 0 0 1 1
64
5
1 0 1 0 0 1 1
65
6
0 1 1 0 0 1 1
66
7
1 1 1 0 0 1 1
67
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
68
69
6A
6B
6C
6D
6E
6F
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
78
79
7A
7B
7C
7D
7E
7F
Figure 2−37. Select" panel
DIP switch settings.
2–53
Hardware installation
Distribution
switcher
Video and Audio.See
pages 2–71 and 2–76
for details
Audio Processing Unit
On Air Outputs
Audio Processing Unit
On Air Output
Video Processing Unit
Emergency inputs
Sync
reference
For AAB wiring details see page 2–39.
For DAB wiring details see page 2–36.
0
Download cable required
only if mnemonics are
desired; see page 2–55.
For cable details, see
page 2–57.
1
2
3
4
15
Backup
switcher
CE–300
T
Media
converter
or hub
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎÎ
10/100BaseT
LAN
Jupiter file
server
Backup control
MPK bus cable
(see page 2–67)
Transmitter
Video
and
Audio
“Select”
buttons
ÎÎ
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Saturn control console
10Base2 LAN
Figure 2–38. Backup Switcher installation using Select button group for control.
T
2–54
Hardware installation
Distribution
switcher
To
additional
systems
Video and Audio.See
pages 2–71 and 2–76
for details
Audio Processing Unit
On Air Outputs
Audio Processing Unit
On Air Output
Video Processing Unit
Emergency inputs
Sync
reference
Download cable required
only if mnemonics are
desired; see page 2–55.
For cable details, see
page 2–57.
For AAB wiring details see page 2–39.
For DAB wiring details see page 2–36.
0
1
2
3
4
Backup
switcher
CE–300
T
Media
converter
or hub
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
10/100BaseT
LAN
15
Transmitter
Video
and
Audio
Delegation
MPK bus
cable (see
page 2–67)
Jupiter file
server
Backup control
MPK bus cable
(see page 2–67)
“Select”
buttons
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
Alternate control panel
when “Select” buttons are
used for system selection
(CP 300 shown)
Saturn control console
10Base2 LAN
Figure 2–39. Backup Switcher installation using CP 300/10/20/30 Control Panel
T
2–55
Hardware installation
Configuration of CE 300
This step is required if alphanumeric mnemonics are desired for display on the “Select” button group or on a CP 320
backup control panel. If this step is not performed, the AAB/DAB 3500/4000 Backup Switcher will still operate but the
backup control panel window will display numerics only.
The CE 300 is configured using an editor that is completely outside the normal Saturn/Jupiter menu structure. This editor,
referred to as the “Configuration Editor,” is described in a separate manual entitled CP 300 Series Control Panels / CE
300 Control Boards, part no. 04-045227-002.
Proceed as follows:
1.
Connect the backup switcher Config port to the COM1 (preferred) or COM2 serial port of the PC download computer (as shown on pages 2–53 and 2–54). For cable details, see page 2–56.
2.
Install Configuration Editor software on the file server (as described in Section 3 of the CP 300 Series Control Panels manual).
3.
Build a configuration set with mnemonics, then compile and download it to the CE 300.
Special guidelines for this configuration (not discussed in the CP 300 Series Control Panels manual):
a.
For “Select Switcher Type,” specify binary protocol.
b.
Only the first level in the Switcher Levels table, which is defined as VID, needs to be defined. The hardware
does not allow splitting the video and audio levels.
c.
Although the backup switcher has 16 inputs, the “Select” button group on the Saturn console only has 15 buttons, allowing no access to the 16th input. With the CP 300/10/20/30 panels, all 16 inputs are available.
d.
When defining the Switcher Input table, the 8 character name defined in the NAME field will be the name
that will be displayed on the Select button group’s display.
e.
The Switcher Output table must be defined, even though only one output exists.
f.
The Select button group will control the output that is set on its internal DIP switch, which is normally output
zero (Step 9 on page 2–37 of this manual). The CP 300/10/20/30 panel is similar (Step 10 on page 2–37).
g.
On the CP Button Groups table, make sure all inputs are assigned to Group Zero.
Since the Select button group has only 15 buttons, a CP Button Group table for this panel will need only 15
input sources.
h.
On the CP Button Assignment table, if the Select button group is being defined, use “CP 300/330” as the panel
type. Regardless of panel type, assign the panel to Button Group Zero.
2–56
Hardware installation
i.
The Panel Assignments tables will normally be left blank (i.e., so that the panel will control the output assigned via the panel’s DIP switch).
However, if for some reason one of these tables needs to be used (to override the DIP switch setting), please
note that the CP 300/330 table will be used by the Select button group; in which case “Poll 0” on this table
will actually correspond to Polling Number 60, “Poll 1” will correspond to Polling Number 61, etc. See Figure
2–37 on page 2–52.
Select Button Group Diagnostics
To enter the diagnostic mode for the panel, while holding the first button (button 1) down, also push the last button (button
15) down. Button 1 and Button 11 will light so that the desired diagnostic can be selected. Button 1 will perform the
button/lamp Test. Press any button twice to exit this test. Button 11 will perform the VF Display Self–test. Pressing any
button twice will exit this test. To perform the lamp self test, disconnect the panel from the MPK bus.
PC to Backup Switcher Configuration port cable
As shown on pages 2–53 and 2–54, a PC computer can be connected to the control board to download mnemonics.
Figure 2–40 shows the pin assignments for the configuration cable used with the AAB 3500/4000 or DAB 3500/4000
Configuration port.
Figure 2–41 shows the cable requirements for connection to a 25–pin PC serial port.
The computer’s COM1 port should be used if available. Otherwise, connect to COM2 and use the Configuration Editor
software to change the default port.
Configuration Editor Software installation and download instructions begin on page 2–55.
2–57
Hardware installation
to AAB–3500/4000
Configuration Port
1
LG
to AT–type Computer
Serial Port
1
Shield
6
CD
6
G
DSR
2
2
Rx
Rx
7
7
3
3
Tx
8
8
Tx
CTS
4
4
G
DTR
9
9
G
RI
5
5
LG
P1
DB9P
(male)
Rx
Receive
Tx
Transmit
4–6–9 Jumpered together;
internally grounded
50 ft ( 15.2 m) maximum
= twisted , shielded pair
P2
DB9S
(female)
CD
DSR
Rx
Tx
CTS
DTR
RI
LG
Carrier detect
Data set ready
Receive
Transmit
Clear to send
Data terminal ready
Ring indicator
Logic ground
1–4–6–8–9 Jumpered together
Figure 2–40. Switcher to AT–type computer cable. Reference: part no. 01–044827–001.
2–58
Hardware installation
To PC–type computer serial port
To AAB 3500/4000 or DAB 3500/4000
Configuration Port
1
LG
6
G
14
2
Rx
7
1
Shield
2
Orange/white
Tx
15
3
3
Rx
8
16
Blue/white
Tx
4
4
G
9
G
17
5
5
CTS
18
6
DSR
19
DB9P
(male)
7
Rx
Tx
LG
Receive
Transmit
20
DTR
8
4–6–9
Jumpered together;
internally grounded
CD
21
9
= twisted pair
22
RI
10
23
11
50 ft ( 15.2 m) max.
24
12
25
13
Figure 2–41. Wiring for connecting AAB–3500/4000
or DAB–3500/4000 to 25–pin PC–type serial port.
DB25P
(male)
Tx
Rx
CTS
DSR
LG
DTR
CD
RI
Transmit
Receive
Clear to send
Data set ready
Logic ground
Data terminal ready
Carrier detect
Ring indicator
5–6–8–20–22
Jumpered together
2–59
Hardware installation
Console Installation
Cabling
MPK DC Power
Sync ref. See
page 2–70.
Redundant
MPK DC
Power
MPK
(looping)
Redundant power connector
Main power connector
Meter
(looping)
Probe
LAN
Alarm
(optional)
Figure 2–42. Console rear panel connections.
Minimum cabling for the console would include AC power (to the main power connector), a house reference input, an
audio meter connection to the Audio Processor, and a LAN connection.
MPK Connections
The MPK connection is used for backup switcher source selection (see page 2–53), or for control panel delegation (see
page 2–54).
The MPK portion of the control panel requires connection to a separate power source. A wall plug–in power supply is
supplied with each console that will be used with 110 VAC 60 Hz power. Panels that are to be used in areas where 220
VAC 50 Hz power is the norm are not shipped with any power supply; the user in these areas must provide a source of
regulated 5 VDC power to each panel. The MPK power requirements are as follows: 5 VDC plus/minus 0.25 V at 1.5
A; connector must be a miniature power plug, Switchcraft S–760 or LZR HP114A or equivalent (5.5 mm outside diameter, 2.1 mm inside diameter, 10 mm length), with positive voltage on outer conductor.
Meter Connection
The audio meter cable is similar to the MPK cable except that it must be terminated on both ends. See page 2–68.
Probe Connection
The Probe port is for diagnostic purposes.
2–60
Hardware installation
Preparing and Installing Button Labels
A sheet of general purpose button labels printed on transparent film (part no. 32–047294–001) is included with each Saturn console. The category names (CAM, NET, etc) are offset to allow numbers to appear below the category name. (Facsimile pages of the label set are found in Appendix C of this manual.)
These labels are designed for installation in the Source Assign & Memory button group, which includes the eight Quick
Pick keys and the 20 category/number selection keys. Software configuration for these buttons is discussed in Section
3 of this manual (pages 3–46 and 3–62). It is suggested that you complete the software configuration process before
installing the labels.
The button caps are removed using a small screwdriver (or a fingernail). Use the small slot between the clear cap and
the black portion of the button; the slot can be found along the top or bottom of the button housing.
Note: A good technique is to use a corner of the tip of the screwdriver and a fingernail in the same slot. Be
prepared for the cap to come off suddenly!
The diffusing screen inside can be used as a size guide when creating custom labels. For best results, the labels should
be prepared as transparencies (such as those used for overhead projectors). Because of its opacity, bond paper for the
labels is not recommended.
Cleaning the Console
To avoid scratching the surface, the top of the console should be cleaned only with 91% isopropyl alcohol and a very
soft cloth.
CUTOUT SIZE
29.38 +/–0.06 X 15.00 +/–0.06 INCHES
(746.25 +/–1.52 X 381 +/–1.52 MM)
2–61
Hardware installation
Figure 2–43.
MCS 4000 Console Dimensions
0.70
0.25
0.60
3.30
7.00
14.80
23.60
4.12
0.20 DIA CSK 82 DEGS X 0.29 DIA [ 10 PLACES ]
0.25
12.56
1.60
3.00
2.65
OUTLINE OF CONTROL
PANEL TOP PLATE
VENTILATION
HOLES
– DO NOT BLOCK
16.00
3.73
6.20
16.00
14.80
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES EXCEPT WHERE NOTED
11.80
30.40
30.20
28.80
15.00 X 29.20 in. (381 x 741.68 mm)
REFERENCE CUTOFF
2–62
Hardware installation
Figure 2–44.
MCC 3500 Console Dimensions
2–63
Hardware installation
LAN Cabling
The local area network (LAN) used in the Saturn system consists of a 10/100BaseT section, which connects to the Jupiter
file server, and a coax 10Base2 section, also referred to as Ethernet thin cable or “thin net.” LAN cabling guidelines are
shown in Figures 2–45 and 2–46.
Please note the following additional restrictions that apply to the 10Base2 section of the LAN:
S
50–ohm, RG–58 type coaxial cable and BNC connectors must be used for the 10Base2 cabling. 75–ohm
RG–59 cable cannot be used. Furthermore, cable crimpers designed for RG–59 cable may not do a good
job with the smaller RG–58 cable. Factory–made cable is available (see below).
S
A 10Base2 LAN cannot be used outdoors between unconnected buildings. An Ethernet thick–cable segment, connected to thin cable segments with repeaters, would be required for this purpose.
S
Local building codes must be checked before LAN installation, especially with regard to grounding requirements and installation of cable in air return plenums. It is recommended that the LAN not be
grounded; but if grounding is required by local code it should be grounded on one end only. Generally, the
national electrical codes restrict the use of LAN cabling in air ducts and plenums. If PVC–jacketed cable is
permitted in such spaces it typically must be run in metal conduit; FEP–jacketed cable is typically permitted without conduit.
S
Due to possible speed loss, use of non–Thomson equipment on the LAN is not recommended.
The following 10Base2 cables, with installed BNC connectors, are available from Thomson:
Length
1
2
4
8
16
32
meter (3.3 ft)
meters (6.6 ft)
meters (13.1 ft)
meters (26.2 ft)
meters (52.5 ft)
meters (105 ft)
Part no.
01–039805–001
01–039805–002
01–039805–004
01–039805–008
01–039805–016
01–039805–032
The jacket material for these cables is fluoropolymer (FEP).
A termination kit, consisting of a pair of 50–ohm terminators (without ground wire connections) is also available. The
part number is 44–039807–001.
2–64
Hardware installation
10/100BaseT
LAN
T
Media
converter
or hub
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Jupiter file
server
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
T
=
Ungrounded
50–ohm terminator
10Base2 LAN
= BNC T
R
= Repeater/bridge
Video Processing Unit
See notes
Audio Processing Unit
Audio Processing Unit
All BNC Ts must be
directly on panels
Note 1: The individual sections that make up
the 10Base2 cable (those pieces of cable that
run between adjacent nodes) must be at least
1 m (40 inches) long.
Note 2: Hewlett–Packard recommends avoiding 10Base2 cable sections that are multiples
of 5 meters. Especially avoid sections with a
length of:
One 10Base2 segment:
185 m (607 ft) max.
30 nodes max
10Base2 LAN
Meters
Feet
5
10
15
20
25
16.4
32.8
49.2
65.6
82
Note 3: All BNC Tees must be equipped with
insulating covers. See Figure 2–47.
See page 2–63 for additional guidelines.
T
Additional
10Base2 segment
Figure 2–45. LAN cable lengths
R
T
10Base2 LAN
T
2–65
Hardware installation
Figure 2–46. 10Base2 LAN cable linearity
T
T
=
Ungrounded
50–ohm terminator
T
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
OK
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
T
T
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Branching not permitted
T
T
NO
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
T
NO
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
Closed loop not permitted
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
Î
BNC T must be directly on panel
NO
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
2–66
Hardware installation
Figure 2–47. 10Base2 insulating cover for tee connector.
Velcro
Thomson part no: 05–042549–001.
Amphenol part no: 31–5271.
HP part no: 92227R.
2–67
Hardware installation
Serial Data Cabling (MPK Cables)
The RS–422 cables used to connect the console and other devices to the video processor (or other MPK device) may be
known by various names (“MPK bus,” “serial cable,” etc.) In spite of the different terminology, each of these buses consist of a 4–conductor (plus ground) cable.
Maximum length per bus is 1220 meters (4003 ft).
The back panel serial data cable connectors on the console, video processor, and backup switcher are 9–pin D, female.
The console, MI 3040, and SD 3x connectors are arranged for loop–through wiring. No termination is required. While
these connectors are ESbus compatible, it should be noted that the Thomson serial data cables use only 5 of the 9 pins
described in the ESbus specification (see Jupiter Install/Operate manual Appendix).
The following ready–made cables, with installed 9–pin D male connectors, are available from Thomson (VDE* cables
include ferrite cores):
Length
1
2
4
8
16
32
meter (3.3 ft)
meters (6.6 ft)
meters (13.1 ft)
meters (26.2 ft)
meters (52.5 ft)
meters (105 ft)
Part no. for VDE cable
01–041600–001
01–041600–002
01–041600–004
01–041600–008
01–041600–016
01–041600–032
For those who wish to prepare their own cables, the pin–outs are shown in Figure 2–48. The cable itself should be
Belden 8723 or equivalent. Details concerning VDE ferrite cores are given in Figure 2–51.
Video Processor MPK,
Backup Switcher MPK,
and Audio Meter ports
(bus controller)
Frame ground
1
Receive A (–)
2
Receive B (+)
7
Transmit B (+)
3
Transmit A (–)
8
Ferrite core
Shield (drain)
Green
Green
White
White
Red
Red
Black
Black
Ferrite core
P1
DB9P
(male)
Console MPK and Audio
Meter ports or other
MPK control panel port
Individually shielded, twisted pairs
Figure 2–48. Serial data cable wiring. Reference: “Assembly, BCS 3000
Serial Data Cable,” drawing no. 01–039806–TAB.
*see Glossary.
1
Frame ground
2
Transmit A (–)
7
Transmit B (+)
3
8
P2
DB9P
(male)
Receive B (+)
Receive A (–)
2–68
Hardware installation
Audio Metering Cable
The Saturn Master Control Switcher system uses an enhanced high–speed RS–485 serial cable to distribute meter data
from the various system audio processors to one or more master control operator consoles and external meter bridges.
(See Figure 2–49).
CONTROL ROOM 1
CONTROL ROOM 2
MCC OPERATOR
CONTROL PANEL
MCC OPERATOR
CONTROL PANEL
METER
SYSTEM 1 ELECTRONICS
AAP/DAP
AAP/DAP
METER
METER
SYSTEM 2 ELECTRONICS
AAP/DAP
AAP/DAP
TRANSMISSION
METER
METER
SYSTEM 3 ELECTRONICS
AAP/DAP
MCC OPERATOR
CONTROL PANEL
METER
METER
SYSTEM 4 ELECTRONICS
AAP/DAP
METER
AAP/DAP
METER
MCM EXTERNAL
METER BRIDGE
SYSTEM 5 ELECTRONICS
AAP/DAP
AAP/DAP
METER
METER
MCM EXTERNAL
METER BRIDGE
SYSTEM 6 ELECTRONICS
AAP/DAP
METER
AAP/DAP
METER
TERMINATOR
AAP/DAP
METER
METER
TERMINATOR
EQUIPMENT RACK A
EQUIPMENT RACK B
Figure 2–49. Saturn audio metering cable (example).
The metering cable uses a standard SMPTE DB–9 pinout with male pins on the cable connectors. High quality dual
shielded–pair cable should be used throughout the system. (For a cable assembly drawing, see Figure 2–48 on page
2–67.)
The Saturn audio metering cable is based on the RS–485 data interconnection standard but must be terminated at each
end with externally powered ALT 3500 Audio LAN Terminators (part no. F7–020200–024). The ALT 3500s force the
noise margins to be higher, and “pull” the RS–485 network to known states when no transmitters are enabled on the LAN.
These terminators should be placed at the ends of the LAN and plugged into 110 volt 60 Hz power.
Users in countries utilizing different power systems may have to replace the wall–mount plug–in supplies with appropriate ones for their area. The power sources must provide well regulated 5 VDC output (100 mA minimum), two per LAN
system. These power supplies must be wired to the terminators as shown in Figure 2–50.
2–69
Hardware installation
Terminator
White wire connects to
+5 VDC. Black wire
connects to ground.
Customer–supplied power supply
may be required in some locations.
(For specifications, refer to the text).
Figure 2–50. Connection to customer–supplied power supply.
Note: Operation without the terminators or operation without power applied to the terminators will almost
certainly result in incorrect operation of the audio meter LAN.
VDE EMI/RFI Modifications to Serial Data Cables
User–supplied serial data cables for VDE installations require a ferrite core over each end of the cable, adjacent to the
connector.
Type 43 material sources
Type 43 material
0.250 inch (6.35 mm) inside diameter
0.95 inch (24.13 mm) length (or longer)
Fair–Rite, part no. 2643480002
Fair–Rite Products Corp., P.O.Box J, Commercial Row,
Wallkill, NY 12589, USA; Tel. (914) 895–2055.
Chomerics, part no. 83–10–A636–1000
Chomerics Inc., 77 Dragon Ct., Woburn, MA 01888
USA; Tel. (617) 935–4850.
Figure 2–51. Serial data cable VDE modifications.
2–70
Hardware installation
Sync Reference Cables
Sync reference signal requirements are as follows:
Unit
Sync required
Type
AVP 3500/4000 Analog Video Processor
none
DVP 3500/4000 Digital Video Processor
video†
HDVP 3500/4000 HD Video Processor
HD tri–level
looping
(recommended)
AAP 3500/4000 Analog Audio Processor
video†
looping
DAP 3500/4000 Digital Audio Processor
video† or audio
looping
AAB 3500/4000 Analog Audio Backup
Switcher
video†
terminating
DAB 3500/4000 Digital Audio Backup
Switcher.
video†
–or–
video† + audio
looping/terminating
MCC 3500/4000 Control Console
video†
looping
VM 3000 Control System
video†
looping
SI 3000 Control System
video†
looping
MI 3040 General Purpose / Tally Interface
none
RPP Redundant Processor Power Supply
none
SD–3X Status Displays
none
DVE Option
video†
†Although
Notes
terminating
looping
1. Must be compatible with input
HD signal type selected with
DIP switch S4 (see page 2–22).
2. Normal black burst may be used
in HD mode, but frame rate
must be exactly equal. “Timing
jitter” performance is not specified and not guaranteed when
using SD sync for HD operation.
See discussion on page 2–26.
See discussion on page 2–49.
VM–3000 not supplied with
stand–alone systems.
Y–cable supplied with system
any constant APL color test signal may be used for sync, the preferred video reference signal is analog black burst.
2–71
Hardware installation
Video Cabling
Systems Using External Matrix (Jupiter–Controlled Router)
For Analog video, please refer to page 2–73.
For Digital video, please refer to page 2–74.
For HD video, please refer to page 2–75.
The Saturn accepts video from a Jupiter–controlled routing switcher, processes it, and provides preset, program, and on–
air outputs. The Saturn uses five outputs of the routing switcher. These outputs should generally be successive to maintain
proper timing. On Venus switchers, the outputs must be from the same group (on a Venus switcher, a group usually consists of 32 outputs).
The five outputs of the routing switcher should be connected by equal length cables to:
BKGND INPUT A
BKGND INPUT B
KEY INPUT 1
KEY INPUT 2
BYPASS VIDEO INPUT
The Saturn outputs are generally connected to monitors, distribution amplifiers, or into the routing switcher to provide
for distribution to the rest of the system. The AIR 1 output should be fed to the transmitter chain.
The Digital Video and HD Video Processors can optionally include two identical “clean feed” outputs. These are always
the same signal as the PGM output, except that no key insert video is ever included. For installation diagrams, see pages
2–74, 2–75, and 2–86.
Systems Using Internal Matrix
In these systems, up to 16 inputs can be connected to the rear panel of Processing Unit on a permanent basis. These are
the connectors labelled “IN0” through “IN15.” See pages 2–73 (analog) and 2–74 (digital).
Systems Using Both External Router and Internal Matrix
Systems equipped with the internal matrix can also use the five router connections if desired.
ISO Inputs
The Saturn provides up to four external key hole cutter (“ISO”) inputs.
Systems with Jupiter–controlled router – These systems are capable of auto key routing. The first two ISO inputs can
be connected to the Jupiter–controlled routing switcher, either to the main video matrix, or to a separate key matrix. This
allows selection of an external key signal from any source feeding the router. When KEY 1 is in external key mode, it
always uses the hole cutter coming into the ISO 1 input; KEY 2 always uses ISO 2 input for external key mode. ISO 3
and ISO 4 inputs are not used for auto routing (but can be used for manual key routing as described below). When properly
configured, Saturn provides an automatic switch to the correct key hole signal for the selected key fill. For configuration
instructions, see page 3–58.
2–72
Hardware installation
Systems with non–Jupiter–controlled router (manual key routing). In stand–alone or internal matrix systems where
the key signals are not available through a Jupiter–controlled routing switcher, any of the four ISO inputs can be used.
However, in this case the fill and key signals must be manually switched to the appropriate connector (or they could be
hard–wired). For configuration information, see page 3–60.
Installations with Multiple Systems
Multiple system§ video wiring follows the guidelines already discussed. A special aspect is “Automatic Monitor Switching Using A Sequence Set.” described on page 3–11.
DVE Option
An overview of the DVE option can be found on page 2–86.
For complete installation and operating instructions, please refer to the DVE Option Installation and Operating Manual,
part no. 04–050183–002.
§
A Saturn “system” consists of one video channel and its associated audio channels.
+8V
TE
–11V
200/220/240V
0.5A
0
1
POWER
Video (key fill)
Still
store
Key (hole)
Video (key fill)
Effects
Jupiter–controlled
analog video router
ISO 4
IN 6
BKGND A BKGND B
IN 5
IN 8
KEY 2
IN 7
BUS INPUTS
KEY 1
BYPASS
IN 9
AIR 1
IN 10
Transmitter
AIR GAIN
Key (hole)
Key (hole)
ISO 3
ISO (key hole) inputs 1–4.2
ISO 2
IN 4
AIR EQ
Video (key fill)
CG1
ISO 1
IN 3
AIR
AIR 2
IN 11
IN 13
OUTPUTS
PGM 2
PROGRAM
to
Router
PGM 1
IN 12
PGM EQ
from
redundant
power supply 4
LAN
ALARM
IN 2
PVW GAIN
Ferrite
bead
LAN
to Saturn audio chassis and control panel(s),
Jupiter File Server, VM–3000 Control System.
PROBE
IN 1
ANALOG VIDEO
to
Router
PVW 1
IN 14
PVW EQ
See Note 3
MPK
IN 0
Internal matrix connectors are
covered when option is not installed
115V 1.25A 250V SLOW BLOW
47–63HZ
220V
0.63A 250V T
WARNING: FOR CONTINUED PROTECTION
AGAINST RISK OF FIRE, REPLACE ONLY
PE
WITH SAME TYPE AND RATING OF FUSE.
CONFIG
AUTO/LOG
100/120/140V
1.0A
Automation/log port.1
GND
+11V
+8V
GND
GND
–11V
AGND
+11V
PRESET
PVW 2
IN 15
2–73
Hardware installation
PGM GAIN
Figure 2–52. Analog video chassis,
showing installation with Jupiter–
controlled router.
1See
page 2–87.
2See
page 2–71.
3See
Step 15(a) on
page 2–11.
4See
page 2–14.
Pin 3
–21V
+ + – –
40–60 V
(NOM.=48V)
from redundant
power supply
Pin 2
+21V
NC
DC IN
40–60V 3A
PE
TE
Redundant power
supply connector
used on DVP 3500
PROBE
MPK
LAN
REF
LAN
ALARM
Key (hole)
Key (hole)
Key (hole)
Video (key fill)
Effects
CG1
Still
store
Video (key fill)
Video
(key fill)
See note 4
ISO 3
IN 3
ISO 4
IN 4
KEY 1
IN 5
Clean feed option. Both
outputs same as PGM
output but without Key
inserted in video
ISO (key hole) inputs 1–4.5
ISO 2
IN 2
Jupiter–controlled
digital video router
ISO 1
IN 1
2
To DVE
option 3
CLEAN FEED
IN 0
1
Sync
reference 2
to Saturn audio chassis and control panel(s),
Jupiter File Server, VM–3000 Control System.
CONFIG
0
1
POWER
Automation/
log port 1
AUTO/LOG
AUTO SELECT
100–130/200–250V
1.2/0.6A 47–63HZ
FUSE is located internally
on Digital Video Units
+21V
NC
NC
–21V
KEY 2
IN 6
IN 8
BUS INPUTS
BKGND A BKGND B
IN 7
BYPASS
IN 9
Transmitter
AIR 1
IN 10
AIR
AIR 2
IN 11
Internal matrix connectors are
covered when option is not installed
PVW 1
to Router
OUTPUTS
PGM 1
PGM 2
to Router
PROGRAM
IN 14
IN 13
IN 12
PRESET
PVW 2
IN 15
DIGITAL VIDEO
2–74
Hardware installation
Figure 2–53. Digital video chassis,
showing installation with Jupiter controlled router.
1See
page 2–87.
2See
page 2–70.
3See
page 2–86.
4See
Step 15(a) on page 2–11.
5See
page 2–71.
HD Still
store
HD CG
Key (hole)
Video (key fill)
HD
Effects
1See
3See
AC in
90–240 V
47–63 Hz
A
B
B
Front view
Transmitter
Clean feed outputs.
Both outputs same as
PGM output but without
Key inserted in video
Jupiter–controlled HD router
Ground
to Saturn
audio chassis Sync reference
and control
(looping).3
panel(s),
Jupiter File
Server,
VM 3000
Control
System
Key (hole)
Video (key fill)
Automation/log
port. 1
See Note 2
Key (hole)
Video (key fill)
A
AIR
PROGRAM
to Router
to Router
PRESET
HD VIDEO
2–75
Hardware installation
Figure 2–54. HD Video Processor,
showing installation with Crosspoint
Bus router and Jupiter control system.
2See
Step 15(a) on
page 2–11.
page 2–87.
page 2–70.
2–76
Hardware installation
Audio Cabling
All Saturn audio processors use a plug–in “terminal block” connector scheme (Phoenix Combicon). A mating
connector is supplied with the switcher chassis for each receptacle on the rear panel. (See Figure 2–55.) Each
channel is marked with +, – and G(round) on the plug for connection of balanced audio cables. Wires are connected
by stripping back the insulation 1/4 inch and sliding the bare wire into the connector. A small screwdriver is then
used to tighten the screw on top of the connector and clamp the wire. After the wires are attached, the connector is
plugged into the rear panel of the processor to complete the audio wiring connections.
If the processor must be removed from the rack after installation, the audio cable connector plugs can be pulled out
of the rear panel to free the chassis unit without disturbing the original connections.
2. SECURE WIRE WITH
SMALL SCREWDRIVER
1. INSERT WIRE
3.
INSERT
CONNECTOR
INTO REAR
PANEL
Figure 2–55. Removeable rear panel audio cable
connector detail.
Analog Audio
Systems with Internal Matrix
Please refer to page 2a–1.
In these systems, up to 16 inputs can be connected to the rear panel of Processing Unit on a permanent basis. These are
connected to the left and right matrix inputs IN0 – IN15.
Systems Using External Matrix (Jupiter–Controlled Router)
Please see page 2a–2.
Each analog audio level of the router that is used by the Saturn has five connections:
2–77
Hardware installation
BUS INPUT BYPASS
BUS INPUT MAIN A
BUS INPUT MAIN B
BUS INPUT MIX 1
BUS INPUT MIX 2
For example, a two–channel–system would require 10 connections: five from the left router level, and five from the right.
Direct inputs
Four audio inputs are available for connection to dedicated audio sources (such as an audio cart machine that is used only
with the master control switcher). These four inputs are available on all audio processors (they are separate from the 16
internal matrix inputs).
Systems Using Both External Router and Internal Matrix
Please see page 2a–1.
Systems equipped with the internal matrix can also use the five router connections if desired.
Installations with Multiple Audio Channels
Please see page 2a–3.
Each audio processor provides two channels of audio. The two channels in the main processor are normally operated
in stereo mode, which allows for stereo operations such as Balance, Left Mono, Right Mono, Reverse, and Invert. An
additional processor provides two more channels (channels 3 and 4), which are normally operated separately. A third
processor can be used for channels 5 and 6.
Installations with Multiple Systems
Multiple system§ audio wiring follows the guidelines already discussed. A special aspect is “Automatic Monitor Switching Using A Sequence Set.” described on page 3–11.
Stereo Synthesizer Control
Pins 6 and 7 of the 9–pin D connector labelled “Config” on the rear panel are shorted together internally whenever the
operator presses the LEFT MONO or RIGHT MONO buttons. This can be used to activate a stereo synthesizer (or other
device).
§ A Saturn “system” consists of one video channel and its associated audio channels.
2–78
Hardware installation
Digital Audio
All Saturn digital audio processors are manufactured with “terminal block” connectors, as shown on page 2–76. However, digital audio routing switchers, such as Venus, may be manufactured with barrier strip OR with BNC connectors.
Before preparing the interconnection cables, check to see which connector types will be required.
Systems with Internal Matrix
Please refer to page 2a–4.
In these systems, up to 16 inputs can be connected to the rear panel of the Processing Unit on a permanent basis. These
are connected to the left and right matrix inputs IN0 – IN15.
Systems Using External Matrix (Jupiter–Controlled Router)
Please see page 2a–5.
Each pair of digital audio channels used by Saturn has five connections:
BUS INPUT BYPASS
BUS INPUT MAIN A
BUS INPUT MAIN B
BUS INPUT MIX 1
BUS INPUT MIX 2
Direct inputs
Four audio inputs are available for connection to dedicated audio sources (such as an audio cart machine that is used only
with the master control switcher). These four inputs are available on all audio processors (they are separate from the 16
internal matrix inputs).
Systems Using Both External Router and Internal Matrix
Please see page 2a–4.
Systems equipped with the internal matrix can also use the five router connections if desired.
Installations with Multiple Audio Channels
Please see page 2a–6.
Each audio processor provides two channels of audio. The two channels in the main processor are normally operated
in stereo mode, which allows for stereo operations such as Balance, Left Mono, Right Mono, Reverse, and Invert. An
additional processor provides two more channels (channels 3 and 4), which are normally operated separately. A third
processor can be used for channels 5 and 6.
2–79
Hardware installation
Installations with Multiple Systems
Multiple system§ audio wiring follows the guidelines already discussed. A special aspect is “Automatic Monitor Switching Using A Sequence Set.” described on page 3–11.
Stereo Synthesizer Control
Pins 6 and 7 of the 9–pin D connector labelled “Config” on the rear panel are shorted together internally whenever the
operator presses the LEFT MONO or RIGHT MONO buttons. This can be used to activate a stereo synthesizer (or other
device).
§ A Saturn “system” consists of one video channel and its associated audio channels.
2–80
Hardware installation
Saturn Tally
Feature Overview
Saturn supports tally in entry level systems through an MI 3040 connected to the MPK port on the video processor. This
feature is only intended for stand–alone system applications where one channel of Saturn is installed and switching is
performed by an internal matrix. See Figure 2–56.
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
AVP 3500 or DVP 3500
video processor
Transmitter
MPK bus
All sources must be connected
directly to internal matrix.
Sources
One connection per tally light.
100 V, 300 mA max.
+5 V utility
connection
Ground utility
connection
Serial data cable (see page 2–67)
Video and audio
Control lines
Tally light
MI 3040
General Purpose/
Tally Interface
40 relays. Wiring order is determined automatically. See
Hardware Installation on
page 2–81.
Figure 2–56. Saturn tally system.
Saturn Tally will tally up to 40 sources, switched on its own internal matrix. It will tally all sources on all levels that are
on–air, including audio/video inserts.
2–81
Hardware installation
Caveats
Saturn Tally will only tally sources switched on its own internal matrix. A multi–channel system is possible, but would
require an MI 3040 connected to each Saturn channel. Additionally, Saturn will not tally sources switched through an
external router.
Saturn Tally cannot be configured to recognize dependencies, i.e., it cannot track a source back through upstream
switchers.
This version of Saturn Tally software has no provisions for Under Monitor Display (UMD) support. UMDs (the RP versions of which include tally lights) are installed and configured using an entirely separate procedure, as described on page
3–45.
Note: The Jupiter Tally software cannot tally sources that are connected directly to the Saturn internal matrix.
For more information about Jupiter Tally systems, refer to the Jupiter installation/operating manual.
Hardware Installation
The MI 3040 used to control the tally lights must be connected to the MPK port on the Saturn video processor.
Relay outputs: The MI 3040 provides 40 electrically isolated output connections for operating tally lights, using solid–
state switches which are suitable for low–voltage (<100 V), low current (<300 milliamps) applications. The order in
which these connectors are wired to the individual tally lights is not determined by the Jupiter Tally Relay Description
table; rather, it is automatically chosen by the system—generally based on the order of sources defined in the Saturn Input
set. See Relay Assignments on page 3–8.
Opto inputs: these are not used in Saturn Tally.
Current Sources
In many cases, current sources will have to be found to operate the tally lamps. Although +5 V and ground utility connections are available on the back panel of the MI 3040, this supply may not be sufficient for the particular installation. Before attempting these connections, please refer to the hardware overview of the MI 3040 in Section 2 of the Jupiter Installation and Operating manual.
Software Configuration
An entry must be made in the MPK Device Table for the MI 3040 tally box and a special entry must be made for the Saturn
master control. See page 3–7.
2–82
Hardware installation
MI 3040 GPI/O Applications
Feature Overview
Saturn supports General Purpose In/Out applications through an MI 3040 connected to the MPK port on the video processor. See Figure 2–57.
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
AVP 3500/4000 or DVP 3500/4000
video processor
MPK bus
Figure 2–57. Media Pool GPI/O application.
Media Pool
(or other
controlling
device)
40 optocouplers. For
functions of optocoupler
inputs, see page 2–85.
VR 8000 GP Out
Status
Commands
Serial data cable (see page 2–67)
Video and audio
Control lines
MI 3040
General Purpose/
Tally Interface
40 relays. For functions of relay
outputs, see page 2–85.
In this example, a Media Pool VR Video Record/Play unit is used to send control signals to the Saturn. This would allow
the Media Pool to (for instance) play a commercial spot and then, at the end of the spot, send a “switch away from me”
(Take) command to the Saturn system. The transition would still need to be set up by the operator but the Take would
be executed automatically.
2–83
Hardware installation
Hardware Installation
With the MI 3040 General Purpose / Tally Interface, an external device can transmit commands to, and receive status
from, a Saturn Master Control Switcher. In this application, the MI 3040 is configured in software as an “MI 3040IO.”
It will be referred to as such for the balance of this discussion. (In terms of hardware, the MI 3040IO and MI 3040
are identical.)
Optocoupler inputs
Commands such as “Take” and “Key In 1” can be sent from the external control device to the optocoupler inputs; these
respond to a differential voltage between the two input pins. For hardware details, including a drawing of the rear panel,
please see “MI/MC 3040 Hardware Overview” in Section 2 of the Jupiter Installation and Operating manual. In the
Media Pool application shown in Figure 2–57, two of the “GP Out” connectors on the VR 8000 Video Record/Play unit
are connected to two of the MI 304IO optocoupler inputs. The functions of the GPI connectors are shown on page 2–85.
Relay outputs
Status information can be returned from the Saturn to the MI 3040IO relays, which are suitable for low–voltage (<100
V), low–current (<300 milliamps) applications. Each relay may be configured by slide switch for Normally–Open or
Normally–Closed operation. The functions of the GPO connectors are shown on page 2–85. This table assumes that the
slide switches for all relays are set to Normally Open.
MPK connection
The MI 3040IO must be connected to the MPK port on the Saturn video processor. There can be only on MI 3040IO per
system (channel) designated as a GPI/O interface.
Software Configuration
An entry must be made in the MPK Device Table for the MI 3040IO. For more information, see Step 7(d) on page 3–8.
For the Media Pool application shown in Figure 2–57, the function of each “GP Out” connector on the VR Video Record/
Play unit would be determined by the Media Pool software configuration. For more information, please refer to “Configuring Instances” in Section 3 of the Media Pool Installation and Operating manual.
An MI 3040IO can only be used for GPI/O applications. It cannot be used for other MI 3040 functions (such as tally or
machine control).
2–84
Hardware installation
Operation
Receiving commands through the optocoupler inputs
For a pulse–based command (such as “Take”), the MI 3040IO will be triggered on the leading edge of a pulse. The duration of the pulse can be nearly arbitrary since the falling edge is essentially ignored. However, there is a frequency limit
of 4 Hz; that is, pulses shorter than 125 msec. are not guaranteed to trigger Saturn events; and, each pulse must be followed by a silent duration of at least 125 msec.
For a level–based command (such as “GPI/O Disable”), both edges of the signal will trigger the action. A contact closure
on a particular port will turn on the event associated with that port; an open contact will turn off the event. Once again,
no more than four events (i.e., eight signal transitions) can occur in one second.
Reporting status through the relay outputs
For a pulse–based report (such as “Transition Completed”) a “pulse” generated by the MI 3040IO is approximately 1
second long (the pulse may last more than 1 second, but not less). If a second event occurs before the first event’s pulse
has expired, the relay will be pulsed briefly, then remain closed for 1 second after the start of the second event.
For a level–based report (such as “B Bus is on–air”) the MI 3040IO will generate a contact closure to indicate a status
of “ON” and an open contact to indicate “OFF.”
2–85
Hardware installation
Optocoupler (command input)
Event Type
Port
No.
Operation
Relay (status output)
Port
No.
Operation
A Bus on–air
0
Level–based. Closed = A is on–air
B Bus on–air
1
Level–based. Closed = B is on–air
Transition Completed
2
Pulse–based. Triggered = transition complete
Bypass
3
Level–based. Closed = in Bypass
Auto Defeat
4
Level–based. Closed = auto defeat is enabled
Segment Timer Reset
5
Pulse–based. Triggered = timer is reset
Key 1 In
6
Pulse–based. Trigger = Toggle Key 1
6
Level–based. Closed = Key 1 is on
Key 2 In
7
Pulse–based. Trigger = Toggle Key 2
7
Level–based. Closed = Key 2 is on
Key 1 Next
8
Pulse–based. Trigger = Toggle Key 1 Next
8
Level–based. Closed = Key 1 Next is on
Key 2 Next
9
Pulse–based. Trigger = Toggle Key 2 Next
9
Level–based. Closed = Key 2 Next is on
Mix 1 In
10
Pulse–based. Trigger = Toggle Mix 1 In
10
Level–based. Closed = Mix 1 is on
Mix 2 In
11
Pulse–based. Trigger = Toggle Mix 2 In
11
Level–based. Closed = Mix 2 is on
Mix 1 Next
12
Pulse–based. Trigger = Toggle Mix 1 Next
12
Level–based. Closed = Mix 1 Next is on
Mix 2 Next
13
Pulse–based. Trigger = Toggle Mix 2 Next
13
Level–based. Closed = Mix 2 Next is on
Same Background
14
Pulse–based. Trigger = Toggle Same Back.
14
Level–based. Closed = Same Backgrnd is on
Preroll
15
Pulse–based. Trigger = Preroll
Take
16
Pulse–based. Trigger = Take
Fade
17
Pulse–based. Trigger = Fade
Silent
18
Pulse–based. Trigger = Silent
Abort
19
Pulse–based. Trigger = Abort
GPI/O Disable
20
Level–based. Energized = Disable
Select System Disable
21
Level–based. Energized = Disable
Select System 1
25
Pulse–based. Trigger = Select System 1
Select System 2
26
Pulse–based. Trigger = Select System 2
Select System 3
27
Pulse–based. Trigger = Select System 3
Select System 4
28
Pulse–based. Trigger = Select System 4
Select System 5
29
Pulse–based. Trigger = Select System 5
Select System 6
30
Pulse–based. Trigger = Select System 6
Select System 7
31
Pulse–based. Trigger = Select System 7
Select System 8
32
Pulse–based. Trigger = Select System 8
Select System 9
33
Pulse–based. Trigger = Select System 9
Select System 10
34
Pulse–based. Trigger = Select System 10
Select System 11
35
Pulse–based. Trigger = Select System 11
Select System 12
36
Pulse–based. Trigger = Select System 12
Select System 13
37
Pulse–based. Trigger = Select System 13
Select System 14
38
Pulse–based. Trigger = Select System 14
Select System 15
39
Pulse–based. Trigger = Select System 15
Figure 2–58. MI 3040IO port assignments. For a discussion of Pulse–based vs. Level–based operation, see page 2–84.
2–86
Hardware installation
DVE OPTION
The DVE option is a serial digital video device and is intended for use with a DVP 3500/4000 Digital Video Processor.
See Figure 2–59.
CAM
VIDEO 1
(FORE
GROUND)
Figure 2–59.
VIDEO 2
(BACK
GROUND)
KEY
VIDEO
DVE computer
NET
BKGDA
DVE
KEY 1
DVE KEY
ISO1
Saturn digital video processor
CLEAN
FEED
PGM
ALTERNATE
FOREGROUND
SOURCE
The option consists of a Windows NT computer equipped with a single or dual channel digital effects module and
associated software manufactured by Pinnacle Systems, Inc. As supplied by Thomson for use with a Saturn system, the
DVE option includes a group of single channel pre–programmed effects that can be recalled and then controlled from
the Saturn console.
For details about hardware connections, software configuration, and operation, please refer to the DVE Option Installation and Operating Manual, part no. 04–050183–002.
2–87
Hardware installation
Automation Hardware Connection
Note 1: Before attempting to connect and configure the Automation system, the Jupiter Facility Control System and the Saturn Master Control Switcher should first be installed and checked out.
Note 2: Automation connections to the Jupiter control system, and configuration of Jupiter tables, are described in the Jupiter Installation and Operating manual.
Thomson Broadcast Automation Systems
The Thomson automation system can be used for simultaneous control of a Jupiter–controlled router and a Saturn master
control switcher. Two hardware arrangements are possible:
— Option 1: MC 2095 connected to the Jupiter LAN. See page 2–88.
— Option 2: MSL 4000 connected to the Jupiter LAN. See page 2–89.
In either case, the MC 2095 is connected to the MSL 4000 and the MSL 4000 is connected to a VM/SI serial port and
to the Saturn Auto/Log port.
Ready–made cables, with installed 9–pin D and RJ45 male connectors, are available from Thomson. For those who wish
to prepare their own cables, the pin–outs for the Saturn–to–Automation connection are shown in Figure 2–60. The cable
itself should be Belden 8723 or equivalent.
Automation requires no special entries in the Saturn configuration tables. However, a compiled (alphabetically sorted)
version of the Saturn Input set must be entered into the automation computer. For more information, see page 3–46.
to Saturn Video Processor
Auto/Log port
to MSL 4000
IFS 4
1
G
6
Tx+
1
Tx–
2
G
3
G
4
G
5
G
6
Rx–
7
Rx+
8
2
Tx–
7
Tx+
3
Rx+
8
Rx–
4
9
G
DB9P
(male)
5
Belden 8723 or equivalent
Figure 2–60. Cable for connecting
Saturn to MSL 4000.
= Shielded, twisted pair
RJ45P
(male)
Rx+
Rx–
Tx+
Tx–
G
Receive plus
Receive minus
Transmit plus
Transmit minus
Ground
2–88
Hardware installation
T
Media
converter
or hub
10/100BaseT
LAN
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Jupiter file
server
Thomson
Crossspoint Bus
router
Crosspoint bus
Video and Audio
Under–monitor
status display
MPK bus
See Figure 2–60 on
page 2–87 for a description of this cable
T
MSL 4000 Server
Video Processing Unit
T
VM 3000
Control
Processor
ESswitch protocol. For more information, see
Jupiter manual.
Audio Processing Unit
Audio Processing Unit
MPK bus
MC 2095
Automation
computer
Audio
Meter
cable
Automation LAN
MI 3040
Tally system or parallel
control machines
10Base2
LAN
VTRs
SI 3000
Control
Processor
T
Î ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
Saturn control console
10Base2 LAN
Figure 2–61. Thomson automation system with Saturn MCS, Crosspoint Bus router, and
Jupiter control system (MC 2095 connected to 10Base2 LAN).
2–89
Hardware installation
T
Media
converter
or hub
10/100BaseT
LAN
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
Jupiter file
server
Thomson
Crosspoint Bus
router
Crosspoint bus
Under–monitor
status display
Video and Audio
MPK bus
ESswitch protocol. For more information, see
Jupiter manual.
VM 3000
Control
Processor
See Figure 2–60 on
page 2–87 for a description of this cable
T
AUTO/LOG port
MSL 4000
Server
Video Processing Unit
Automation LAN
IFS 4 interface
board ports
T
Audio Processing Unit
Audio Processing Unit
MC 2095 Automation computer
MPK bus
10Base2
LAN
Audio
Meter
cable
MI 3040
VTRs
Tally system or
parallel control
machines
SI 3000
Control
Processor
T
Î ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
Saturn control console
10Base2 LAN
Figure 2–62. Thomson automation system with Saturn MCS, router, and Jupiter control
system (MSL 4000 connected to 10Base2 LAN).
2–90
Hardware installation
Third–party Automation Systems
The Saturn system can be controlled by a third–party automation computer, including those manufactured by Louth and
Columbine. Such control will require a hardware connection to the “Auto/Log” port on the rear of the video processing
unit. Either the port on the Analog Video Processor (page 2–73) or the Digital Video Processor (page 2–74) can be used.
The pin–out for this port is shown in Figure 2–63.
Ferrite core
Automation system
Saturn Video Processing
Unit Auto/Log Port
Shield (drain)
Green
Green
White
White
Red
Red
Black
Black
Ferrite core
Individually shielded, twisted pairs
1
Frame ground
2
Transmit A (–)
7
Transmit B (+)
3
8
Receive B (+)
Receive A (–)
DB9P
(male)
Figure 2–63. Saturn connection to automation system.
This port is configured as an ESbus tributary, 38.4 kbaud, even parity, eight data bits, with one stop bit. The default address is 8280, as entered on the Master Control Description table (see page 3–29).
The instruction set and implementation guidelines are detailed in the MCS-3500 Master Control Switcher Automation
Command Manual, part no. 04–046654–004.