Aircraft Modelers Research Giant Stick 85 Specifications

Wingspan: 85 in [2159mm]
Wing Area: 1327 sq in [85.6 sq dm]
Weight: 20-22 lbs [9-10kg]
Wing Loading: 34.7-38.2 oz/sq ft
[106-117 g/sq dm]
Length: 75.5 in [1918mm]
DE
MA
IN
A
US
™
WARRANTY.....Top Flite Models guarantees this kit to be free of defects in both material and workmanship at the date of purchase.
This warranty
does not cover any component parts damaged by use or modification. In no case shall Top Flite‘s liability exceed the original cost of the purchased kit. Further, Top Flite
reserves the right to change or modify this warranty without notice. In that Top Flite has no control over the final assembly or material used for final assembly, no liability shall
be assumed nor accepted for any damage resulting from the use by the user of the final user-assembled product. By the act of using the user-assembled product the user
accepts all resulting liability. If the buyer is not prepared to accept the liability associated with the use of this product, the buyer is advised to immediately return this kit in
new and unused condition to the place of purchase.
Top Flite Models P.O. Box 788 Urbana, Il 61803
Technical Assistance Call (217)398-8970 productsupport@top-flite.com
READ THROUGH THIS INSTRUCTION BOOK FIRST. IT CONTAINS IMPORTANT INSTRUCTIONS AND WARNINGS CONCERNING THE ASSEMBLY AND USE OF THIS MODEL.
Entire Contents © Copyright 2000
P47GP03
V1.0
TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
PRECAUTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
DECISIONS YOU MUST MAKE . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Engine selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Radio system requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Landing gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Cockpit & pilot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Trim scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Razorback or bubble canopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
COMPETITION-MINDED MODELERS . . . . . . . .4
Scale documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
OTHER ITEMS REQUIRED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
BUILDING SUPPLIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Adhesives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
COVERING TOOLS & ACCESSORIES . . . . . . . .6
METRIC CONVERSIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
IMPORTANT BUILDING NOTES . . . . . . . . . . . .7
COMMON ABBREVIATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
TYPES OF WOOD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
DIE-CUT PATTERNS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 & 9
GET READY TO BUILD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
BUILD THE TAIL SURFACES . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Build the stabilizer and elevators . . . . . . . . . .10
Build the fin and rudder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
Hinge the elevators and rudder . . . . . . . . . . .15
BUILD THE FUSELAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Build the fuse top . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Sheet the fuse top . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Build the fuse bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
Sheet the fuse bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
Build the dorsal fin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Intercooler doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
Mount the engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
Hook up the controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
Finish the cockpit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
BUILD THE WING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
Make the wing skins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
Build the wing panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
Sheet the top of the wing panels . . . . . . . . . .34
Mount the landing gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
Join the wing panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
Sheet the bottom of the wing . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
Build the ailerons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
Build the flaps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
Make the servo hatches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Hook up the controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Finish the wheel wells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
FINAL CONSTRUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Mount the wing to the fuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Build the wing fillets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Build the belly pan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
Assemble the cowl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Balance the airplane laterally . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
FINISHING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
Final preparations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
Painting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Covering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Cover the fuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Cover the wing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
Apply the decals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
Apply panel lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
FINAL ASSEMBLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
Join the control surfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
Hook up the controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
Scale details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
Mount the canopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
Static display propeller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
GET YOUR MODEL READY TO FLY . . . . . . . .58
Balance your model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
Set the control surface throws . . . . . . . . . . . .59
PREFLIGHT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Identify your model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Charge your batteries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Balance your propellers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Ground check your model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Range check your radio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
ENGINE SAFETY PRECAUTIONS . . . . . . . . . .60
AMA SAFETY CODE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
IMAA SAFETY CODE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
CHECK LIST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
FLYING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
Takeoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
Flight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
Landing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
3-VIEW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .BACK COVER
-2-
INTRODUCTION
Congratulations and thank you for purchasing the
Top Flite Giant Scale Gold Edition P-47
Thunderbolt. We are pleased to bring you this 1/5th
scale P-47, an enlarged version of our highly
successful 1/8th scale P-47. Due to the popularity
and success of the smaller P-47, this may be our
most anticipated project yet. The P-47 has long been
recognized as an excellent modeling subject. The
large wing and tail area and long tail moment make
it an ideal flying airplane—especially for a warbird! In
addition to the favorable proportions of the P-47, the
kit's custom airfoils, built-in washout and right engine
thrust make this model a sweet flying plane.
Advanced 3-D computer engineering and
interlocking construction techniques combined with
wing sheeting jigs help you build a straight,
lightweight model.
With this kit you can achieve whatever level of detail
you like. Just by following the instructions and
finishing the plane in a scale-looking trim scheme,
beginning scale modelers will end up with a model
that very much represents a full-size P-47.
Experienced builders will find ways to add even more
detail, making the Top Flite Giant Scale Gold Edition
P-47 competitive in scale contests.
PROTECT YOUR MODEL,
YOURSELF & OTHERS
FOLLOW THESE IMPORTANT
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
Your P-47 is not a toy, but a sophisticated working
model that functions very much like an actual
airplane. Because of its realistic performance, if you
do not assemble and operate your P-47 correctly,
you could possibly injure yourself or spectators and
damage property.
If this is your first giant scale project, get
assistance with assembly and your first flights
from an experienced, knowledgeable modeler.
You’ll avoid risking your model before you’re ready to
fly it for the first time. Your local hobby shop has
information about flying clubs in your area whose
membership includes qualified instructors.
You can also contact the Academy of Model
Aeronautics (AMA), which has more than 2,500
chartered clubs across the country. We recommend
you join the AMA which will insure you at AMA club
sites and events. AMA Membership is required at
chartered club fields where qualified flight instructors
are available. Contact the AMA at the address or tollfree phone number below.
Academy of Model Aeronautics
5151 East Memorial Drive
Muncie, IN 47302
(800) 435-9262
Fax (765) 741-0057
or via the Internet at: http://www.modelaircraft.org
1. You must build the plane according to the plan and
instructions. Do not alter or modify the model, as
doing so may result in an unsafe or unflyable model. In
a few cases the plan and instructions may differ
slightly from the photos. In those instances the
plan and written instructions are correct.
2. You must take time to build straight, true and strong.
3. You must use a proper R/C radio that is in first
class condition, the correct sized engine and correct
components (fuel tank, wheels, etc.) throughout
your building process.
4. You must properly install all R/C and other
components so that the model operates properly on
the ground and in the air.
5. You must test the operation of the model before
every flight to insure that all equipment is operating
and you must make certain that the model has
remained structurally sound.
6. If you are not already an experienced R/C pilot,
you must fly the model only with the help of a
competent, experienced R/C pilot.
Please inspect all parts carefully before you start
to build! If any parts are missing, broken or
defective, or if you have any questions about
building or flying this model, please call us at:
(217) 398-8970 or e-mail us at
productsupport@top-flite.com
If you are calling for replacement parts, please
look up the part numbers and the kit
identification number (stamped on the end of the
carton) and have them ready when you call.
NOTE: We, as the kit manufacturer, provide you
with a top quality kit and great instructions, but
ultimately the quality and flyability of your finished
model depends on how you build it; therefore, we
cannot in any way guarantee the performance of
your completed model, and no representations
are expressed or implied as to the performance or
safety of your completed model.
DECISIONS YOU MUST MAKE
ENGINE SELECTION
Recommended engine size:
34.5 - 45cc (2.1 - 2.8 cu. in.) displacement
Glow Engine
41 - 70cc (2.5 - 4.2 cu. in.) displacement
Gasoline Engine
We strongly recommend the use of a soft engine
mount to relieve the stresses on the airframe and
radio system and to make your aircraft quieter. The
-3-
instructions show a Great Planes® Isolation Mount
(GPMG2000) with the U.S. Engines™ 41cc engine.
J-Tec, Soundmaster and others produce soft mounts
for large engines as well.
RADIO SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS
For operations other than flight-critical control surfaces
(such as the tail wheel steering, throttle, air control
valve, flaps and optional onboard ignition kill switch for
gas engines), you may use standard servos.
Frequently, we even use a micro servo for the air
control valve. For flight-critical control surfaces
(ailerons, elevators, rudder), this model requires five
“high-torque” servos. IMAA recommendations specify
servos with a minimum of 45 inch-ounces of torque.
However, some standard servos supply nearly that
much, so for the giant P-47 we suggest servos with at
least 50 inch-ounces of torque. Another reason to use
servos with a higher torque rating is that they have
stronger centering capabilities with less free-play. A
servo that holds strongly when centered is necessary
to prevent flutter on giant models. Futaba 9001’s are
shown in the model in this manual.We use them in our
giant warbird flying prototypes. 9001’s put out
approximately 54 inch-ounces of torque and are
suitable for your P-47 if it is powered by most of the
engines within the recommended range (such as the
US Engines 41cc). If you are using a more powerful
engine and plan to fly your model at high speeds,
servos closer to 70 inch-ounces of torque are
recommended. There are many high torque, standard
size servos available, but larger 1/4-scale servos may
be used in this model too. The servo tray in the
fuselage and the servo hatches in the wing are
designed to fit standard size servos. If you choose to
use large 1/4-scale servos, you will have to modify the
servo trays or make your own to accommodate
the servos.
The minimum capacity of a receiver battery pack
required for this model is 1000 mAh. Receiver packs
having 1200 to 1400 mAh are preferable. Some
modelers use 6-volt (five cell) 1200 to 1500 mAh packs.
Be certain your servos, receiver, on/off switch
and charging system are compatible with your battery
pack. Use servo extension cords and Y-connectors
where required. It is likely that you will need these for
flaps and ailerons. Connections between servo cords
and extension cords or Y-connectors should be
secured with heat shrink tubing, vinyl tape or special
clips intended for this purpose.
LANDING GEAR
The Top Flite Giant P-47 uses Robart #622
retractable main landing gear which are designed
specifically for this model and a #160LWC
retractable tail gear. Other systems may work, but
it will be up to you to make the modifications
required to fit them. Following is a list of items
required for the retracts.
Robart # 622 Top Flite Giant P-47 main landing
gear retracts (ROBQ1636)
Robart #160LWC Retractable tail gear (Robart direct)
Robart #157VR Air Control Kit w/ variable rate
valve (ROBQ2301)
Robart #192 Large Pressure Tank (ROBQ2392)
Robart #164G 100 PSI Pump w/gauge
(ROBQ2363)
Robart # 190 Quick disconnects (ROBQ2395)
Pull-Pull cable kit for tail wheel steering (SULQ3120)
(16) #6 x 1/2" screws for mounting main and tail
gear (GPMQ3160, 4 per pack)
COCKPIT & PILOT
Your Thunderbolt won’t be complete without the Top
Flite Giant P-47 Cockpit Kit (TOPQ8410). It includes
the floor, side panels, instrument panel, seat,
headrest and hardware. The cockpit kit can be
installed after the fuselage is completed, but is easier
to install if you have it on hand during construction.
Top Flite offers two 1/5 scale WW II Military Pilots
specially made for the Giant Scale Gold Edition
kits. One is a full body pilot (TOPQ9030) and the
other is a bust only (TOPQ9032).
TRIM SCHEME
COMPETITION-MINDED MODELERS
The colorful “Tarheel Hal” trim scheme on the kit
box cover is rather bold and ambitious, but can be
accomplished by modelers who have experience
with iron-on coverings. Top Flite MonoKote® was
used for the covering and LustreKote® was used
for the paint. Refer to the back of this manual for
more information about painting and covering (and
for more details that may help you to decide
whether or not to attempt this scheme).
The outline of the Top Flite Gold Edition P-47 was
derived from three-view drawings and photos. The
elevator and rudder hinge lines have been modified
to simplify assembly and to use standard model
hinging techniques. The landing gear has been
slightly relocated to improve handling and durability
and the wheels are smaller than scale to fit in the
space available. The landing gear does not retract
fully into the wheel wells, but protrudes below the
wing by approximately 3/16".
The primary colors of MonoKote film required for
“Tarheel Hal” are aluminum (main portions of fuse
and wing), orange (tail) and royal blue (front of
fuse). Additionally, you will need small amounts of
insignia blue, cub yellow and missile red (for the
flag on the rudder), black and jet white (for the
invasion stripes) and flat black (for the anti-glare
panels on the top of the fuse).
The colors of LustreKote paint required are two
cans of white primer and one can each of
aluminum, royal blue, missile red, cub yellow, flat
black, crystal clear and gloss black. If you’ll be
painting the intercooler doors to match the stars
and bars on the side of the fuse, you’ll also need a
small amount of insignia blue.
RAZORBACK OR BUBBLE CANOPY
The Giant P-47 may be constructed as either a
D-23 Razorback or a D-25 Bubble Canopy (it
should be noted that not all bubble canopy P-47’s
featured a dorsal fin). This kit includes all the wood
parts and complete instructions to build either
version, but includes the bubble canopy only. The
razor back canopy is available separately if you
wish to build the D-23 version (order number
TOPQ8042). You don’t have to decide which one
to build until you get to the turtle deck when you’re
building the fuse.
-4-
The approximate scale of this model is 1:5.6.
If you plan to enter your P-47 in scale competition (it’s
lots of fun and the runways are usually paved!), this kit
may be entered in Fun Scale, Sportsman Scale and
Expert Scale classes in AMA competition. All classes
have the same flight requirements in which you must
perform ten maneuvers, five of which are mandatory.
The other five are up to you—“easy” stuff like a slow, low
“inspection pass” with flaps extended, or maybe a touchand-go. If you have never competed in a scale contest,
you could start out in Fun Scale. In Fun Scale, the only
documentation required for static judging is any proof
that a full-size aircraft of this type, in the paint/markings
scheme on your model, did exist. A single photo, a kit
box cover from a plastic model, or even a painting is
sufficient proof! If you’re interested, contact the AMA for
a rule book that will tell you everything you need to know.
You can find a contest schedule in the back of the AMA
magazine (Model Aviation).
One last note for those who are interested in scale
competition: Strive to build your model to reflect your
documentation. Whatever lines and features appear
on the full size plane should also appear on your
model. Refer to the photos and documentation of the
P-47 you are using for your model.
Your Top Flite Gold Edition Giant P-47 is intended
for scale and general sport flying, including mild
aerobatics such as loops, stall turns, rolls, etc. Its
structure is designed to withstand such stresses.
If you intend to use your P-47 for more rigorous
types of flying such as aggressive aerobatics or
racing, it is your responsibility to reinforce areas
of the model that will be subjected to the resulting
unusually high stresses.
SCALE DOCUMENTATION
Three-view drawings and photo packs of full size
P-47’s are available from:
Scale Model Research
3114 Yukon Ave, Costa Mesa, CA 92626
(714) 979-8058
Fax: (714) 979-7279
Even if you’re not intending to build your P-47 for
competition, photos and color drawings of P-47s are
extremely useful for completing much of the detail
work such as the intercooler doors, turbosupercharger exhaust, oil cooler shutters, antenna
mast, panel lines, etc. Squadron/Signal Publications
has a series of books with dozens of close-up photos
and highly accurate color drawings featuring trim
schemes that may help you decide how to finish your
model. Two of the P-47 books are listed below and
are available from most hobby shops.
P-47 Thunderbolt in action, No.1067 (order
number SSPZ1067)
-andThunderbolt, The Republic P-47 Thunderbolt
in the European Theater, No. 6076 (order
number SSPZ6076)
OTHER ITEMS REQUIRED
These are the additional items you will need to
complete your P-47 that have not already been
mentioned and are not included with the kit. Order
numbers are in parentheses (HCAM2200). TOP is the
Top Flite brand, GPM is the Great Planes brand and
HCA is the Hobbico® brand.
❏ 6 - 7 Channel radio with 10 servos and a high
capacity receiver battery pack, see RADIO
SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS
❏ (2) 24" Aileron servo extension cords
(HCAM2200 - Futaba J)
❏ Y-Connector harness for flap servos
(HCAM2500 - Futaba J)
❏ Switch/charging jack mount kit (GPMM1000)
❏ Gasoline or glow engine (see Engine Selection)
❏ Propellers (refer to the instructions that come
with your engine)
❏ Great Planes 32 oz. fuel tank (this tank is
suitable for gas and glow fuel, GPMQ4115)
❏ Fuel line for gas engines (Du-Bro Tygon, 1/8"
ID, 3’ DUBQ0493)
-orFuel line for glow engines (Large silicone
tubing, 2’ GPMQ4133)
❏ Fuel filler valve for glow fuel (GPMQ4160)
-orFuel filler valve for gas (GPMQ4161)
❏ (2) 5" dia. Main wheels (DUBQ0847)
❏ 1-3/4" Tailwheel (GPMQ4220)
❏ 2 pkgs #310 Robart Super Hinge Points
(ROBQ2510)
❏ R/C Foam padding (1/4", HCAQ1000, or 1/2",
HCAQ1050)
❏ Top Flite 1/5th Scale Replica Radial Engine
(TOPQ7903)
❏ Top Flite MonoKote covering (see Finishing
section)
❏ Paint (see Finishing section)
❏ 3 pkgs #366 Du-Bro Large Control Horns (DUBQ1985)
❏ 4 pkgs #4 x 1/2" Screws (GPMQ3154)
-5-
BUILDING SUPPLIES
Here’s a list of supplies you should have on hand
while you’re building. Some of these are optional.
Use your own experience to decide what you need.
We recommend Great Planes Pro CA and Epoxy.
ADHESIVES
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
4 oz. Thin CA (GPMR6004)
4 oz. Medium CA+ (GPMR6010)
2 oz. Thick CA- (GPMR6015)
CA Accelerator (GPMR6035)
CA Debonder (GMPR6039)
CA Applicator Tips (HCAR3780)
30-minute Epoxy (GPMR6047)
or
45-minute Epoxy (GPMR6048)
❏ 6-minute Epoxy (GPMR6045)
❏ Pro Wood Glue (GPMR6161)
❏ J & Z Products Z RC/56 canopy glue (JOZR5007)
❏ Microballoons (TOPR1090)
❏ Milled Fiberglass (GPMR6165)
❏ Lightweight Hobby Filler (Balsa Color, HCAR3401)
❏ Auto body filler (Bondo® or similar)
❏ Isopropyl Alcohol (to clean up excess epoxy)
❏ 3M 75 Repositionable spray adhesive (MMMR1900)
TOOLS
❏ #11 Blades (HCAR0311, 100 qty.)
❏ Single-Edge Razor Blades (HCAR0312, 100 qty.)
❏ Razor Plane (MASR1510)
❏ 1/4-20 Tap & drill (GPMR8105)
❏ Hobbico Builder’s Triangle (HCAR0480)
❏ T-Pins (HCAR5100 (S), HCAR5150 (M),
HCAR5200 (L)
❏ Drill Bits: 1/16", 3/32", 7/64", 5/32", 3/16", #7 or
13/64" (not required if you have a 1/4-20 tap
and drill set), #9 or 13/64" (for enlarging hole in
tail wheel to fit on tail axle), 17/64", 19/64" (or
5/16"), 1/4", size “F” (or 1/4"— for enlarging hole
in main wheels to fit landing gear axles), 1/2"
(optional for landing gear cover mounts—see
page 44),
❏ Curved-Tip Scissors (HCAR0667)
❏ Long handle 7/64" ball end hex wrench
(GPMR8003)
❏ Silver Solder w/flux (GPMR8070)
❏ Great Planes Plan Protector (GPMR6167) or
wax paper
❏ Masking Tape (TOPR8018)
❏ Dremel® #178 cutting bit (for countersinking
screws in the servo hatch covers)
❏ Robart® Super Stand II (ROBP1402)
Note: In several instances the manual suggests
using K & S brass tubing sharpened at one end to
cut accurate, clean holes in balsa. Use a rotary tool
with a cut-off wheel to sharpen the outside edge of
the tube and a hobby knife to sharpen the inside
edge of the tube. The sizes of tubing used are 5/32",
3/16", 7/32", 1/4" and 9/32".
COVERING TOOLS AND
ACCESSORIES
❏ Top Flite Heat Gun (TOPR2000)
❏ Top Flite Trim Seal Tool (TOPR2200)
-and❏ Top Flite Sealing Iron (TOPR2100)
❏ Top Flite Hot Sock (TOPR2175)
EASY-TOUCH BAR SANDER
™
A flat, durable, easy to handle sanding tool is a necessity
for building a well finished model. Great Planes makes a
complete range of patented Easy-Touch Bar Sanders
and replaceable Easy-Touch Adhesive-backed
Sandpaper.While building the Thunderbolt we used two
5-1/2" Bar Sanders and two 11" Bar Sanders equipped
with 80-grit and 150-grit Adhesive-backed Sandpaper.
Here’s the complete list of Easy-Touch Bar Sanders
and Adhesive Backed Sandpaper:
5-1/2" Bar Sander (GPMR6169)
11" Bar Sander (GPMR6170)
22" Bar Sander (GPMR6172)
33" Bar Sander (GPMR6174)
44" Bar Sander (GPMR6176)
11" Contour Multi-Sander (GPMR6190)
22" Contour Multi-Sander (GPMR6191)
METRIC CONVERSION
1" = 25.4mm (conversion factor)
12’ roll of Adhesive-backed sandpaper
80-grit
150-grit
180-grit
220-grit
(GPMR6180)
(GPMR6183)
(GPMR6184)
(GPMR6185)
-or❏ 21st Century® Sealing Iron (COVR2700)
❏ 21st Century Cover Sock (COVR2702)
We recommend using plastic bags filled with lead
shot for building weights. They assume the shape
of the curved surfaces to apply uniform pressure
without making dents in the balsa. You can
purchase shot at sporting goods stores where
hunting supplies are sold. We use #6 lead shot.
One 25 lb. bag costs about fifteen to twenty dollars.
You can use small sealable food storage bags to
hold the shot. Tape them shut for security. Each bag
holds about two to three pounds. Fifteen to twenty
bags may be required for a giant scale project.
Assortment pack of 5-1/2" strips (GPMR6189)
We also use Top Flite 320-grit (TOPR8030, 4 sheets)
and 400-grit (TOPR8032, 4 sheets) wet-or-dry
sandpaper for finish sanding.
-6-
1/64"
1/32"
1/16"
3/32"
1/8"
5/32"
3/16"
1/4"
3/8"
1/2"
5/8"
3/4"
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
.4mm
.8mm
1.6mm
2.4mm
3.2mm
4mm
4.8mm
6.4mm
9.5mm
12.7mm
15.9mm
19mm
1"
2"
3"
6"
12"
15"
18"
21"
24"
30"
36"
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
25.4mm
50.8mm
76.2mm
152.4mm
304.8mm
381mm
457.2mm
533.4mm
609.6mm
762mm
914.4mm
IMPORTANT BUILDING NOTES
There are two types of screws used in this kit:
Sheet metal screws are designated by a number
and a length.
For example #6 x 3/4" [1.91mm]
Machine screws are designated by a number,
threads per inch, and a length.
For example 4-40 x 3/4" [1.91mm]
• When you see the term test fit in the instructions,
it means that you should first position the part on
the assembly without using any glue, then
slightly modify or custom fit the part as necessary
for the best fit.
• Whenever the term glue is used you should rely
upon your experience to decide what type of glue to
use. When a specific type of adhesive works best
for that step we will tell you what type of glue to use.
you are working on it. Similarly, move the former
up means move the former toward the top of the
fuselage even if the fuselage is upside-down when
you are working on it.
• When you get to each step, read that step
completely through to the end before you begin.
Frequently there is important information or a note
at the end of the step that you need to know before
you start.
• Photos and sketches are placed before the step
they refer to. Frequently you can study photos in
following steps to get another view of the same parts.
• Note that there are four plan sheets. Two of them
must be cut along the dashed lines and joined with
tape. The other two plans are used separately.
COMMON ABBREVIATIONS
Deg
Fuse
LE
Stab
LG
=
=
=
=
=
• Whenever just epoxy is specified you may use either
30-minute epoxy or 6-minute epoxy. When 30-minute
epoxy is specified it is highly recommended that
you use only 30-minute (or 45-minute) epoxy
because you will need the working time and/or the
additional strength.
• Occasionally we refer to the top or bottom of the
model or up or down. To avoid confusion, the top
or bottom of the model is as it would be when the
airplane is right side up and will be referred to as
the top even if the model is upside-down during
that step, i.e. the top main spar is always the top
main spar even if the wing is upside-down when
degrees
fuselage
leading edge
stabilizer
landing gear
Elev
"
Ply
TE
mm
=
=
=
=
=
elevator
inches
plywood
trailing edge
millimeters
TYPES OF WOOD
BALSA
BASSWOOD
-7-
PLYWOOD
DIE-CUT PATTERNS
-8-
DIE-CUT PATTERNS
-9-
GET READY TO BUILD
1. If you’ve already purchased your retractable
landing gear, or as soon as you do, take the air lines
out of the package, unravel them and hang them
somewhere in your shop. By the time you are ready
to install the air lines, all the kinks will be out and
they’ll be easier to work with.
2. Unroll the plan sheets. Roll them inside out so
they lie flat. Cut one of the fuse plan sheets along
the dashed lines. Align the plan that you cut with the
dashed lines on the other fuse plan and tape them
together. Do the same thing with the wing plan when
you are ready to build the wing.
3. Remove all the parts from the box. IMPORTANT:
Use a ballpoint pen (not a felt tip pen) to write the
name or size on each piece so you can identify it
later. Use the die-cut patterns on pages 8 & 9 to
identify and mark the die-cut and laser-cut parts
before you remove them from their die sheets. Many
of the parts already have numbers stamped on them,
but in some cases the numbers are located alongside
the parts or only on the die drawings in the
manual. You may remove all the die-cut parts from
their die sheets now, or wait until you need them. If a
part is difficult to remove, don’t force it out, but cut
around it with a hobby knife and a #11 blade. After you
remove the parts from their die sheets, lightly sand
the edges to remove slivers or die-cutting
irregularities. Save some of the larger pieces of wood.
because the ribs rest on jig tabs and do not contact the
building board), cover the plan with film such as wax
paper or Great Planes Plan Protector.
❏ 5. After all the ribs are in position, use a small
builder’s square to align the stab TE and the elevator
LE spar over their locations on the plan by sliding the
ribs forward or aft between the rib jigs.
❏ 2. Make a left (as shown in the photo), then a
right stab TE by gluing a die-cut 1/8" balsa stab TE
doubler to the front of a die-cut 1/8" balsa stab TE
so the notches align.
❏ 3. Fit both sets of die-cut 3/32" balsa stab ribs S2
❏ 7. Glue together both die-cut 1/8" balsa stab
TE joiners.
Refer to this photo for the following three steps.
❏ 8. Make certain the jig tabs of all the ribs are
contacting the building board, that the stab TE’s are
all the way down in the notches of the ribs and that
the ribs are accurately aligned over their locations on
the plan. Glue the stab TE joiner to both stab TE’s.
❏ 9. Join both sets of die-cut 3/32" balsa ribs S6 and
BUILD THE TAIL SURFACES
S1 to the assembly using rib jigs cut from another 1/4"
x 1/4" x 30" balsa stick to hold them in place.
Build the stabilizer and elevators
may cut it from the fuse plan). If you wish to protect the
plan from glue (though this is not absolutely necessary
❏ 6. Cut rib jigs from the 1/4" x 1/4" stick leftover
from the previous step and a second 1/4" x 1/4" x 30"
balsa stick, then pin the right side of the stab to the
plan the same way.
through S5 to the left and right stab TE’s, then fit both
die-cut 1/8" balsa elevator LE spars to the stab
halves. Position the assemblies over the plan.
4. Separate the parts into groups such as stab, fin,
wing and fuse. Store smaller parts in zipper-top
food storage bags.
❏ 1. Place the stab plan over your building board (you
jigs should be the same length as the jig tab on each
rib. Hold the ribs down using the rib jigs pinned to the
plan on both sides of each rib.
❏ 4. Cut rib jigs for ribs 2 through 5 on the left stab
half from two 1/4" x 1/4" x 30" balsa sticks. The rib
- 10 -
❏ 10. Glue all the ribs to the TE and both elevator
LE spars to the ribs. Join the die-cut 1/8" plywood
stab brace to the assembly and glue it into position.
Refer to this photo for the following four steps.
HOW TO GLUE BALSA SHEETING TOGETHER
TO MAKE SKINS
A. Use a straightedge to true the joining edges of
the balsa sheets.
❏ 11. Use a bar sander and 80-grit sandpaper to
bevel the LE of the ribs to match the aft sweeping
angle of the LE.
❏ 12. Bevel the ends of both 3/8" x 1/2" x 18" stab
LE’s where they meet in the center of the stab, then
cut them to the correct length (slightly oversize is
okay so the ends extend past ribs S6) and glue
them, centered height-wise, to the front of the ribs.
B. Tightly tape one side of the pieces together with
masking tape.
❏ 13. Sheet the center of the stab between both S1
ribs using a 3/32" x 4" x 30" balsa sheet. Note that the
sheeting is between the ribs, not on top of the ribs.
This has the same reinforcing effect as wrapping the
center section with glass cloth and epoxy, but is
easier, neater and faster!
❏ 14. Use a razor plane followed by sanding to trim
the top of the LE and TE even with and at the same
angle as the top of the ribs.
Top Flite selects balsa that is intended for sheeting,
though occasionally a few of these sheets may
have a small nick or split near the ends. If your kit
contains a few of these sheets, arrange them and
glue them together so the defects will not interfere
with the final shape of the skin.
❏ 15. From the 3/32" sheet you used for the center
section and three more 3/32" x 4" x 30" balsa sheets,
cut the eight pieces that make up the four stab skins
as shown in the sketch. Note that one sheet of balsa
yields two smaller “aft parts” and one “front part.”
Save the leftover balsa sheeting for use later.
Note: The sketch is used to show the positioning and
shape of the parts only. Determine the actual sizes of
the parts by positioning the sheets over the stab and
making marks with a ballpoint pen. Make the parts
oversize to allow for trimming and positioning.
❏ 16. Refer to the Hot Tip that follows, then glue the
sheets together to make four stab skins.
-11-
C. Turn the sheets over and apply glue to the
joining edges. Slow drying glue like Great Planes
Pro Aliphatic resin is recommended because this
provides working time for alignment, because the
excess can easily be wiped away and because it
sands well. You may use CA if you prefer.
G. After the glue dries, sand the skins flat and
even. Little sanding should be required.
D. Cover your workbench with wax paper and lay
the skin on it. Use a credit card or something
similar as a squeegee to simultaneously press the
sheets flat as you wipe the glue from the seam.
Note: Some modelers tend to sand the sheeting
too much after it is applied to the structure,
making thin spots where fingers can easily go
through. By following the procedure above
(specifically, by aligning the skins as shown in
step E), little sanding should be required. Most of
the sanding that is required should be done
before the sheeting is glued in place. The only
sanding that should be required after the skin is
glued to the structure is final sanding with 320-or
400-grit sandpaper.
❏ 19. Make the bevel gauge from the die-cut 1/8"
plywood pieces, then drill a hole at the punch mark
just large enough to fit the tip of a ballpoint pen. Use
the bevel gauge to mark the bevel lines on the inside
of the TE of all four elevator skins with a ball-point pen.
❏ 20. Using the line as a guide, bevel the elevator
skins down to approximately 1/32" at the trailing edge.
E. Press the edges down so they are even.
❏ 17. Glue two stab skins to the top of the stab using
aliphatic resin or medium or thick CA. Our preferred
method is to apply aliphatic resin to the tops of the
ribs and the TE, then position the skin and hold it
down with weights and T-pins where necessary.
Before the glue dries, use thin or medium CA to glue
the front of the skin to the LE.
❏ 18. Use the template on the plan to make the
F. Place a weight on top of the skin to hold it flat
while the glue dries.
elevator skins from two 3/32" x 4" x 24" balsa sheets.
Hint: Use 3M 75 Repositionable Spray Adhesive to
stick the paper template to the balsa sheet, then cut
it out. If you have a band saw or a scroll saw, stack
all four sheets together with 3M 75 and cut them out
all at once.
-12-
The P-47 had many attributes that led to its
reputation. One of the most important was its
durability in combat. Oftentimes the P-47 would
bring pilots home with missing cylinders, blown-off
wing tips and large portions of tail surfaces missing.
The P-47’s internal systems were also durable and
well protected.
plan are intended to accommodate Robart large
hinge points. If you plan to use flat hinges, the hinge
blocks may need to be longer.
❏ 25. If necessary, trim the bottom of the elevator LE
spar even with the bottom of the ribs. Glue the
bottom elevator skins to the elevators. Be certain the
TE of the top and bottom skins align and are
thoroughly bonded together.
❏ 21. If you haven’t done so already, trim the top
❏ 26. Use leftover 3/32" sheeting to sheet the
bottom of the stab between ribs S1 just the same as
you did on the top of the stab.
edge of the elevator LE spars even with the top of the
ribs. Glue the top elevator skins to the top of the
elevators. As shown on the cross section on the plan,
the beveled edges are on the inside.
❏ 30. After the glue from the previous step has
dried, remove the stab from the cradles. Use a bar
sander with 80-grit sandpaper to remove excessive
glue. Sand the ends of the stab and elevator
sheeting even with the tips.
❏ 31. Cut both elevators from the stab. Sand the LE
of the elevators and the TE of the stab to remove the
protruding portions of the ribs.
❏ 22. Remove the stab and elevators from your
building board. Save the jig sticks for use on the fin.
❏ 23. Use a hobby knife to trim the jig tabs from the
bottom of the ribs, finishing with a bar sander and
80-grit sandpaper so the ribs appear as though the
jig tabs were never there. While you’re at it, trim the
bottom of the LE so it matches the ribs.
❏ 27. Build the six stab cradles (three for each side
of the stab) from the die-cut 1/8" plywood pieces
as shown.
❏ 32. From the 3/8" x 1-1/4" x 36" balsa stick, cut two
❏ 28. With the stab plan positioned over your flat
building board, place the stab cradles over their
respective locations on the plan. Note that the front
of the cradles is the end with the embossed lettering.
Hint: Hold the cradles to the plan with 3M 75
Repositionable Spray Adhesive.
❏ 24. Cut eighteen 1-1/2" long hinge blocks from a
1/4" x 1/2" x 30" balsa stick. Glue the hinge blocks to
the stab TE and elevator LE spar where shown on
the plan. NOTE: The hinge block sizes shown on the
❏ 29. Place the stab on the cradles aligned with the
plan. Glue the bottom skins into position. A slow
drying glue such as aliphatic resin is preferred. Place
weights on top of the stab to hold the skins down.
-13-
elevator LE’s to the length shown on the plan. Use
a couple drops of thick or medium CA to temporarily
tack glue the elevator LE’s to the stab.
❏ 33. Use a razor plane followed by a bar sander to
trim the elevator LE’s to match the top and bottom of
the stab. Permanently glue the elevators to the
elevator LE’s. Be certain the tip of the elevators align
with the tip of the stab.
❏ 34. Cut the stab and elevator tips from the plan and
use them as patterns to make both stab and elevator
tips from two 7/8" x 2-1/4" x 5-5/8" balsa blocks.
Build the fin and rudder
❏ 1. Place the fin and rudder plan over your building
board. You may cut them from the fuse plan if
you prefer.
❏ 2. Glue together both die-cut 1/8" balsa fin TE’s
with the notches in alignment.
length shown on the plan, then glue it into position on
the front of the ribs.
❏ 6. Join the die-cut 1/8" balsa rudder LE spar to the
assembly and glue it into position. Fit the die-cut 3/32"
balsa fin rib R1 to the rudder LE spar. Make sure the tip
of R1 is in horizontal alignment with the tips of the other
ribs, then glue R1 to the rudder LE spar.
❏ 7. Bevel the upward facing edge of the fin LE to
match the ribs. Sand the upward facing surfaces of
all the parts, blending them together.
❏ 35. Glue the stab and elevator tips to the stab and
❏ 8. Make the fin skins for both sides of the fin from
elevator. Don’t accidentally glue the stab tip to the
elevator LE.
two 3/32" x 4" x 30" balsa sheets. Be certain the skins
extend below rib V1 by at least 5/8" for trimming later
to fit the stab.
❏ 9. Use the rudder skin template on the plan to
❏ 3. Fit the die-cut 3/32" balsa fin ribs V1 through make two rudder skins from two 3/32" x 3" x 24"
V4 on the fin TE. Hold the ribs over the plan using the
1/4" x 1/4" jig sticks left over from building the stab.
Add rib V5 to the assembly and hold it in place with
jig sticks.
balsa sheets.
❏ 10. Glue one of the fin skins to the right side of the fin.
❏ 4. Use a small builder’s square to align the fin TE
over the plan. Make sure the jig tabs of the ribs are
contacting the plan, then glue the ribs to the TE.
❏ 36. Use a razor plane and a sanding block to
shape and round the tips. Refer to the cross section
on the plans frequently during this process.
Refer to this photo for the following two steps.
❏ 37. The same way you did for the stab and
elevator tips, make the elevator root blocks from
two 1" x 2-1/2" x 3/4" balsa blocks and glue them to
the root of both elevators.
❏ 11. The same as you did for the elevator skins, use
the bevel gauge to mark the bevel line on the inside
of the rudder skins. Sand the bevel, then glue the
right rudder skin into position.
❏ 38. Break both elevators free from the stab. Round
the elevator root blocks by sanding.
That was fun, wasn’t it! Clean off your workbench,
set the stab aside (but not too far away, so your
friends can give you compliments when they see it)
and move on to the fin and rudder.
❏ 12. Remove the fin and rudder assembly from the
❏ 5. Bevel the front of the ribs to match the angle of
the LE. Cut the 3/8" x 1/2" x 18" balsa fin LE to the
-14-
plan. Use a hobby knife to trim the jig tabs from the left
side of the fin, finishing with a bar sander and 80-grit
sandpaper. Trim the left side of the LE so it matches
the ribs.
❏ 13. Cut eight 1-1/2" long hinge blocks from a 1/4" ❏ 21. Cut the fin tip and the rudder tip from the 3/4" Hinge the elevators and rudder
x 1/2" x 30" balsa stick. Glue the hinge blocks to the
fin TE and rudder LE spar where shown on the plan.
If you plan to use flat hinges, you may wish to make
the hinge blocks longer.
x 1-1/2" x 5" balsa block and glue them to the fin and
rudder. Be certain you don’t accidentally glue the fin
tip to the rudder LE. Hint: Use the drawings of the fin
and rudder tip as patterns to shape them.
❏ 1. Refer to the Hot Tip that follows, then mark the
locations of the hinges on the elevators and stab.
❏ 14. If necessary, trim the left side of the rudder LE
spar so it is even with the left side of the ribs.
❏ 15. Build the two fin jigs, similar to the stab jigs,
from the die-cut 1/8" plywood parts.
❏ 16. Position the fin on top of the jigs and align
them with ribs 1 and 4. Glue the left fin and rudder
skins into position.
HOW TO ACCURATELY MARK THE
CENTERLINES OF THE CONTROL
SURFACES FOR HINGING.
❏ 17. After the glue from the previous step has
dried, remove the fin from the jigs. Use a bar sander
with 80-grit sandpaper to roughly sand the leading
edge to remove excessive glue. Sand the ends of the
sheeting even with the tip of the fin and rudder.
❏ 18. Cut the rudder from the fin. Sand the LE of the
rudder and the TE of the fin to remove the remaining
unwanted portions of the ribs.
❏ 22. Use a razor plane and a sanding block to
shape and round the tips. Refer to the cross section
on the plans frequently during this process.
❏ 23. Glue the 1-3/8" x 1-3/4" x 4-1/2" balsa rudder
❏ 19. Cut the rudder LE to the length shown on the base block to the bottom of the rudder. Shape the
plan from the 3/8" x 1-1/2" x 18" balsa stick. Use thick
or medium CA to securely, but temporarily, tack glue
the rudder LE to the fin.
bottom of the block to match the rudder. Break the
rudder free from the fin.
A. Insert T-pins through the center of the elevator
LE near both ends. Position a straightedge along
the T-pins and mark a centerline with a fine point
ballpoint pen.
❏ 20. Use a razor plane followed by a bar sander to
trim the rudder LE to match the fin. Glue the rudder
to the rudder LE. Be certain the tip of the rudder
aligns with the tip of the fin.
The P-47 was manufactured by Republic Aircraft
Corporation, which at one time was named
Seversky Aircraft Corporation, started by two
fellow Russians, Alexander De Seversky and
Alexander Kartveli. For a great history of the early
development of the P-47, see:
home.att.net/-Historyzone/Seversky-Republic.html.
-15-
B. Do the same for the other elevator and the TE
of the stab.
C. Mark the locations of the hinges along the
centerlines you drew.
❏ 2. Use a 3/16" brass tube sharpened on the end
or a 3/16" drill bit to drill holes for your hinges (not
supplied) at the marks you made. We prefer Robart
Super Hinge Points.
❏ 3. Test fit the elevators to the stab with the hinges.
Adjust or relocate hinge slots or holes that don’t align.
BUILD THE FUSELAGE
Preparation
Note: The die-cut 1/8" plywood formers are
embossed only with the abbreviated portion of their
name. For example, former F-2B is embossed 2B.
All the formers are die-cut 1/8" plywood unless
otherwise noted.
❏ 4. Bevel the LE of the elevators for control throw. A
razor plane makes this job fast and easy and yields a
clean, sharp bevel. Use the centerline on the elevators
as a guide to keep the bevel centered. Be certain you
can achieve 3/4" of up and 3/4" of down throw as
measured at the widest part of the elevators.
on this assembly will be referred to as F-2B. Sand
F-2B flat and even.
❏ 3. Glue together both former tops F-1.
❏ 4. Drill 3/16" holes through the punch marks in all
the formers to accommodate the outer pushrod
guide tubes. As you drill the holes, push down on the
formers to keep the wood from splitting when the drill
bit goes through.
In some of the following photos you will see
additional holes in a few of the formers. We’ve
simply estimated the locations and drilled holes
for routing the air lines and various wiring for the
radio system (servo cords, battery cords, etc.)
that will run through the fuse. If you can partially
visualize your radio installation and wire routing at
this time, it will be easier to drill these holes now.
❏ 5. Hinge the rudder and fin, then bevel the LE of the
rudder to achieve 1-3/4" of right and 1-3/4" of left control
throw as measured at the widest part of the rudder.
Build the fuse top
❏ 1. Glue together a former F-1BR and F-1BL. Sand
them flat and even. Make another assembly the
same way. Glue together both assemblies to make
what will now be called F-1B.
The Thunderbolt was a massive airplane, the biggest
and heaviest single engine, single-placed fighter
ever built. The engine, the Pratt & Whitney 18
cylinder twin-row radial, developed 2,000 H.P. and
was the most powerful engine at the time. However,
in turn, it needed a highly efficient duct system for its
super-charger. The designer, Alexander Kartveli
designed the duct system first, then built the
fuselage around it.
❏ 1. Cut the top view of the fuselage plan from the
rest of the plan, then place it over your building
board. Cover the top view of the fuse plan with wax
paper or Great Planes Plan Protector.
❏ 2. Glue together former bottoms F-2BR and F-2BL ❏ 2. Bevel one end of two 3/8" x 1/2" x 30" grooved
to make up the bottom half of former F-2. From now
-16-
balsa main stringers so you can splice them together
over the plan. An accurate way to do this is to place
one on top of the other with the grooves opposed,
then use a razor saw and a miter box (or a table belt
sander) to make the bevel.
❏ 3. Pin the main stringers over the plan, gluing the two
pieces together at the splice. The aft end of the stringer
should be even with the plan, but the front of the
stringer may extend beyond the plan by approximately
1/4" or so.
❏ 6. Use medium CA to glue TR, RUC and LUC to F-1
making certain F-1 is perpendicular to the building
board. Do not glue TR to the upper crutches forward
of F-1. Glue F-1 and F-2 to the side stringers and glue
F-2 to the crutches.
❏ 4. Splice and pin the main stringers over the other
side of the plan the same way.
Note: As you proceed, be certain the embossed
names of the formers are facing the front of
the fuselage.
❏ 7. Join former F-3 to the upper crutches and main
stringers, followed by formers 4 through 9, gluing
them into position as you proceed. Use a small
builder’s square to hold the formers vertical as you
glue them into position. Twisted formers will be
straightened when the stringers are added later.
❏ 9. Test fit both die-cut 1/8" plywood stab saddles
to F-9 and the main stringers as shown in the sketch.
Sand a slight bevel on the bottom edge of the
saddles to match the angle at which they contact the
main stringers. Glue the stab saddles into position.
❏ 5. Do not use any glue in this step. Fit the tank
roof (TR) followed by the right upper crutch (RUC)
and left upper crutch (LUC) into former F-1. Don’t
forget to make sure the embossed part names on the
formers are facing forward. Add former F-2 to the
crutches. Position the assembly over its location on
the plan between the main stringers. Note: The left
crutch is slightly longer than the right crutch to set
the right thrust angle.
MAIN
STRINGER
❏ 8. Edge glue both halves of the die-cut 1/8" balsa
cockpit deck together, then glue it to formers F-3
and F-5.
-17-
MAIN
SUB-STRINGER
❏ 10. Glue the four 1/8" x 1/4" x 30" balsa main sub
stringers into the groove in the main stringer on both
sides of the fuselage. Make certain none of the T-pins
already inserted into the main stringer interfere with
allowing the sub stringers to fit all the way into
the grooves.
Now is the time to decide whether you are going
to build the razorback or the bubble canopy
version. Steps beginning with a “B” are for the
“bubble canopy” and steps beginning with an “R”
are for the razorback. Steps with neither “B” nor
“R” apply to both versions.
❏ 15. Glue leftover 3/32" balsa to both sides of former
5 between the bottom two stringers to support the
sheeting where it will be spliced together.
❏ B11. Glue formers IP, CB and 5C to the cockpit
deck and former tops 6C and 7C to formers 6 & 7.
❏ 13. Fit eleven 1/4" x 1/4" x 30" balsa stringers into
the notches in the formers (if you’re building the
bubble canopy version, do not fit the top, middle
stringer into formers CB through 9 until instructed to
do so). Some of the stringers are not long enough and
will have to be spliced together. Note that the middle
stringer extends past former 9 by approximately 2".
❏ R12. Glue formers IP, CBX and 5X to the cockpit
deck and former tops 6X and 7X to formers 6 & 7.
❏ 14. Do not glue the top four stringers to former 9,
but glue the rest of the stringers to the formers. As
you glue the stringers into the notches, use a
builder’s square to align the tops of the formers with
the plan, thereby removing twists as you proceed.
Various prototypes and incarnations of the P-47
began to materialize at Republic Aircraft around
1940. One of the first designs recognizable as a
P-47 was the XP-44 Rocket. One of the engine
performance features carried over from Seversky
was the gear-driven supercharger and later a
turbo-supercharger.
-18-
❏ 16. Lightly sand all joints, blending the stringers to
the formers; and bevel the edges of the cockpit deck
to accommodate the sheeting.
Sheet the fuse top
❏ 1. Of the five 3/32" x 4" x 36" balsa sheets
supplied with this kit, select the hardest sheet, label
it as “shear webs,” and set it aside for use when
building the wing.
❏ 2. Refer to the following photo. Trim a 3/32" x 4" x
36" balsa sheet to fit the right side of the fuse top from
the center of former 5 aft (you’ll have to glue a piece
of leftover 3/32" sheeting to the top of the sheet near
the front so it will extend to the second stringer).
❏ 3. Once you’ve trimmed the sheet to fit the right
side, use it as a pattern to make another sheet from
❏ 10. Remove the fin. Mix up a batch of 30-minute
an additional 3/32" x 4" x 36" balsa sheet for the left
side. Glue the first sheet to the right side of the fuse.
Do not glue the sheeting to the stab saddle. If
necessary, wet the sheeting with water or window
cleaner to help it bend around the formers. Glue the
other sheet to the left side of the fuse.
epoxy. For additional strength, add Great Planes
Milled Fiberglass (GMR6165). Apply a small fillet of
epoxy to strengthen the bond between the insides of
the stab saddles and the main stringers and former 9.
Apply epoxy to the stab saddles and fuse sheeting
and to the bottom of the stab where it contacts the
saddles. Position the stab and place weights on top of
it to hold it down. Confirm stab alignment by repeating
steps 5 and 6. Wipe away excess epoxy and do not
disturb the model until the epoxy fully cures.
❏ 4. Trim the sheeting even with the stab saddles.
Use caution not to trim the ply stab saddles.
Otherwise, you may change the incidence of the stab
which will greatly affect the flying characteristics.
Before we can sheet the rest of the fuse, we have to
glue the stab and fin into position.
❏ 7. Stick a T-pin into the center fuse stringer above
former 1. Tie a small loop in one end of a 60" piece
of string and slip it over the T-pin. Fold a piece of
masking tape over the string near the other end and
draw an arrow on it. Sliding the tape along the string,
align the arrow with one end of the stab as shown in
the photo. Swing the string over to the same position
on the other side of the stab. Shift the stab and slide
the tape along the string until the arrow aligns with
both sides of the stab. The stab must remain
centered on the fuse during this process.
❏ 8. Mark the stab where it aligns with the fuse so it
can be realigned after you take it off.
❏ 5. Fit the stab into the stab saddle. Trim the fuse
❏ 11. After the epoxy from the previous step has
fully cured, fit the fin to the stab by trimming the
bottom of the sheeting until it fits the stab and can be
positioned as described in step 9 (with the TE
vertical and contacting the stab saddles). The TE of
the fin must be even with the TE of the stab.
sheeting and the stringers as necessary until the TE
of the stab aligns with the dotted line on the plan
depicting the TE. Place a weight on top of the stab to
temporarily hold it down.
❏ 6. With the stab in position, measure the distance
from the centerline on the TE of both ends of the stab
down to your workbench. If necessary, lightly trim
the stab saddles until you can get the stab level. If
the stab is not exactly level, but it’s close, sometimes
all it takes is shifting the weight slightly to even it up.
If you do have to sand the saddle to level the stab,
use caution not to change the incidence angle of
the stab.
❏ 9. Remove the stab. Trim the sheeting on the LE of
the fin until you can get it to fit into the notch in former
9. Use a builder’s square to make sure the fin TE will
be perpendicular to the building board in both axes.
-19-
❏ 12. Mix up another batch of 30-minute epoxy and
securely glue the fin to the top of the stab and fuse.
Be certain the fin sheeting is thoroughly bonded to
the stab, but don’t build up a large fillet.
Now that the stab and fin are glued to the fuse, we
can finish sheeting the fuse.
❏ B16. Glue a 1/4" x 1/4" x 30" balsa stringer into the
notches in the tops of the turtledeck.
blends with the curvature of the formers (refer to the
cross section on the plan).
❏ R20. Sheet both sides of the turtle deck from the
❏ B17. Sheet both sides of the turtle deck from the cockpit back (CBX) to former 9 using the two 3/32" x
❏ 13. Trim a 1/2" x 30" strip from a 3/32" x 4" x 30" cockpit back (CB) to former 9 using the two 3/32" x 3-1/2" x 30" balsa sheets leftover from step 13 and
balsa sheet. Glue the 1/2" x 30" strip to the edge of
another 3/32" x 4" x 30" balsa sheet. Sheet the
forward side of the fuse as shown using the 3/32" x
4-1/2" x 30" sheet.
❏ 14. Trim a 1/2" strip from another 3/32" x 4" x 30"
balsa sheet and glue it to a 3/32" x 4" x 30" sheet
(you should now have two 3/32" x 3-1/2" x 30" balsa
sheets leftover, which will be used to sheet the top of
the fuse aft of the cockpit). Sheet the left side of the
fuse with the 4-1/2" sheet the same way.
3-1/2" x 30" balsa sheets leftover from step 13 and
step 14.
step 14 and additional leftover 3/32" balsa. If the
sheeting is difficult to bend, wet it with water or
window cleaner.
Perform steps R18 through R21 only if building
the razorback version.
❏ R21. Position the 5/8" x 1-3/8" x 10-1/2" aft deck
❏ R18. Glue the die-cut 1/8" balsa razor spine to
the top of CBX, 5X and 6X. Note that the aft edge of
the razor spine ends in the middle of 6X.
❏ 15. Use a 3/32" x 4" x 30" balsa sheet to finish
sheeting the forward deck of the fuse top.
Don’t forget, step numbers that are preceded with
a “B” are for the bubble canopy version only.
❏ R19. Trim the tapered 18" balsa fuselage spine to
fit between the fin and the razor spine, then glue it
into position. Bevel the sides of the razor spine so it
-20-
top block on the razor spine and trace its outline.
Carve the top block to the approximate shape, then
glue it into position. Shape the block to match the
rest of the turtle deck, but don’t final shape until
instructed to do so.
❏ 22. Use the stab/fin fillet pattern on the plan to
make two stab/fin fillets from leftover 3/32" balsa,
then test fit and glue them into position.
❏ 23. Take out all the T-pins and remove the fuse top Build the fuse bottom
from your building board. Place the fuselage upsidedown in a suitable building stand (such as a Robart®
Super Stand II, ROBP1402, seen in following photos).
Reinforce glue joints you couldn’t reach earlier.
Before you proceed, remember that the embossed
name on the die-cut 1/8" plywood formers
face forward.
❏ 4.Glue former 5D and both wing saddles into position.
❏ 1. Without using any glue, join former 2B and
❏ 24. Use leftover 1/4" x 1/4" balsa (shaped into
triangle stock) to reinforce the glue joint between the
bottom of the stab and the inside of the stab saddles.
former 4B to the right and left lower crutches (RLC
& LLC). Join the assembly to the fuse top, fitting the
parts into their corresponding notches. Then, add the
tank floor (TF), former 1B, both 3Bs and 5B. Inspect
all joints and make sure the bottom formers align with
the top formers. Make adjustments to any notches
where necessary so all the parts align.
❏ 2. After you have checked the fit of the parts above
and made any adjustments necessary, use medium
or thick CA to glue them into position.
One of the later P-47 prototypes was the XP-47B.
Believe it or not, one of its predecessors, the
XP-47, featured an Allison “V” engine. However,
the “V” configuration was still under development
and had not yet proven itself. With the increasing
demands for a fighter that could carry more
armament, it was realized that a much bigger
airframe than that of the XP-47 would be
required. Thus emerged the larger, radial engine
powered XP-47B.
❏ 3. Glue formers 6B through 9B into the notches of
their respective formers.
-21-
❏ 5. Cut the top and bottom tail gear mounting
rails from the 1/4" x 1/2" x 30" basswood stick (save
the remainder of this stick for the servo tray rails).
Drill 3/32" holes in the rails for the mounting screws.
Add a few drops of thin CA to the holes and allow to
harden. Glue the rails to former 8 where shown on
the plan. Temporarily mount the tail gear to the rails
with four #6 x 1/2" screws (not included).
❏ 9. Slide the 48" long guide tubes through the holes
in the formers and out the exit slots you just cut in the
back of the fuse. Note that there are two tubes on the
left side of the fuse (for the elevator and rudder) and
one tube on the right side of the fuse (for the elevator
only). Slide the 36" long tubes through the holes in
the formers for the tail wheel steering cables. Do not
glue the guide tubes in place until instructed to do so.
through the main side stringers to accommodate
the inner doors, construct the doors, then paint
them to match the trim scheme. Often, the stars
and bars on the fuse sides cross over the doors,
making for an intricate and time-consuming paint
job (see the photos on the kit box).
❏ 10. Glue eight 1/4" x 1/4" x 30" balsa sticks into
❏ 6. Test fit, then glue both die-cut 1/8" plywood tail
gear braces to formers 7 & 8 and the main stringer
as shown.
Refer to this photo for the following seven steps.
the notches of formers 4 through 9 for the bottom
stringers. The stringers nearest the main stringer on
both sides of the fuselage aren’t long enough, so
they’ll have to be spliced together from two stringers.
As you proceed, straighten any twists in the formers
by holding them in position while you glue the
stringers into the notches.
❏ 11. Glue the pushrod guide tubes into the exit
slots in the back of the fuse with 30-minute epoxy
mixed with microballoons. Glue the guide tubes to
the formers with CA.
❏ 12. After the epoxy has fully hardened, sand the
pushrod guide tubes flush with the fuse sides.
Perform steps 15 and 16 only if the intercooler
doors will be open.
❏ 15. Cut two 1/2" x 5-13/16" strips from leftover
1/8" plywood.
❏ 13. Glue a leftover 1/4" x 1/4" stick to former 9 and
the stringers as shown. This will help support the
sheeting when the opening for the tail wheel is cut.
❏ 7. Use coarse sandpaper to scuff three 3/16" x 48"
pushrod guide tubes and two 3/16" x 36" pushrod
guide tubes so glue will adhere. The longer tubes are
for the elevator and rudder and the shorter tubes are
for the tail gear pull-pull steering cable.
❏ 8. Use the precut notches in the ply stab saddles
as a guide to cut the pushrod exit slots in the
sheeting on both sides of the fuse.
❏ 14. Mount a 1-3/4" tail wheel to the tail gear axle.
If necessary, enlarge the hole in the tail wheel with a
#9 drill (a 13/64" drill would work okay). Use a cutoff
wheel to cut the axle to the correct length. File a flat
spot on the axle for the set screw, then temporarily
mount the tail wheel to the tail gear.
Before you continue, decide whether you will
feature the intercooler doors on the fuselage
sides open or closed. If you decide to show the
doors closed, skip the next two steps. All you’ll
need to do is add panel lines depicting the doors
after the model is finished. If you wish to feature
the intercooler doors open, you will have to cut
-22-
❏ 16. Cut out the main stringers as shown on the
plan and in the photo. Glue the strips of plywood
across the inside of the main stringers.
That’s all we need to do on the intercooler doors for
now. The rest will be done after the fuse is sheeted.
Sheet the fuse bottom
❏ 1. The same as you did before sheeting the top of
the fuse, glue leftover 3/32" balsa to both sides of
former 6 to support the sheeting where it will be
spliced together.
❏ 2. You can wait until later, but now would be a
good time to connect air lines to the air cylinder on
the tail gear while it’s still accessible.
❏ 17. Cut the aft fuse stringers that run from former 9
to the end of the fuse from a 1/4" x 1/4" x 30" balsa
stick and glue them into position as shown. Notice that
top edge of the 1/4" x 1/4" stringers that contact the
main stringers should taper to a sharp edge at the end
as shown on the plan (not as they are in the photo).
❏ 5. Sheet the bottom of the fuse from former 5D aft
using two more 3/32" x 4" x 30" balsa sheets. For now,
trim an opening in the sheets just large enough to
clear the tail gear. Later, we’ll instruct you to cut a nice,
neat opening. Gear doors are not featured with this kit,
but may be installed if you wish to fashion them.
❏ 3. Use two 3/32" x 4" x 30" balsa sheets to sheet
both sides of the bottom of the fuse from the middle of
former 6 aft. Save leftover sheeting for the dorsal fin.
❏ 6. True the edges of the fuse sheeting at the back
end to accommodate the 1-3/8" x 3" x 9-1/2" balsa
aft fuse block.
❏ 18. From the remainder of the 1/4" x 1/4" balsa
stick used in the previous step, cut the first two
stringers that run between former 1 and 2 below the
main stringer and glue them into position.
❏ 19. Now would be a good time to install the retract
air tank. You may wait until later if you prefer, but it’s
easiest to do now. Use RTV silicone or epoxy to glue
the air tank to the formers as shown on the plan.
❏ 7. Bevel one end of the aft fuse block to fit former
❏ 4. Use two 3/32" x 4" x 36" balsa sheets to sheet
both sides of the bottom of the fuse from F6 to F1.
-23-
9 and bevel the other end of the block to match the
fin TE. Without gluing it into position, roughly shape
the block to match the fuse and rudder. If you prefer,
hollow the inside of the block with an appropriate
carving gouge or a rotary tool. Look at the following
photo to see what the aft fuse block looks like after
it’s glued into position and sanded to match the fuse.
Note: The opening shown in the photo is not large
enough to completely remove the tail gear from the
fuselage. However, the gear can be dismounted
and maneuvered enough to attach the air lines and
pull-pull cables while it is still partially inside the
fuse. If you prefer to be able to completely remove
the landing gear from the fuselage, enlarge
the opening.
❏ 8. Glue the aft fuse block into position. Temporarily
❏ 10. Use lightweight hobby filler such as Hobbico
HobbyLite™ to fill gaps between the sheeting where
needed. After the filler dries, rough-sand the fuse,
eliminating uneven sheeting and high spots. Save
final sanding for later.
❏ 2. Bevel the top edge of both sides of the dorsal
fin to accommodate the 3/32" sheeting. Glue the
dorsal fin to the fuse and the vertical fin. Be certain
the dorsal fin is centered and vertical.
join the rudder to the fin with the hinges and use
masking tape to hold it, centered, in place. Use a bar
sander with 80-grit sandpaper to blend the fuse, the
aft fuse block and the rudder.
After the British policy of giving names to aircraft had
caught on in the U.S., the XP-47B was dubbed
“Thunderbolt” by C. Hart Miller, Republic’s Director of
Military Contracts. Republic officially approved
the name.
Build the dorsal fin
❏ 3. Use a straightedge as a guide to draw a line on
the fuse sheeting from the “high point” on both sides
of the vertical fin to the front of the dorsal fin.
Skip this section if you are building the
razorback version (or if you’re building one of
the bubble canopy versions that doesn’t have a
dorsal fin).
❏ 9. Trim the bottom sheeting, former 9 and a
portion of the aft fuse block to allow the tail gear to
retract. Use a 1/4" brass tube sharpened at the end
to cut four holes through the sheeting so you can
reach the tail gear mounting screws with a
screwdriver (you thought we were going to forget
didn’t you?).
❏ 1. Cut or sand off the “hump” on the front of the ❏ 4. Use the 3/32" sheeting leftover from the aft fuse
die-cut 1/8" plywood dorsal fin.
-24-
bottom to make the dorsal fin sheeting. Note how the
sheeting blends the fin to the dorsal fin in a nearly
seamless transition. Glue the dorsal fin sheeting into
position on both sides.
❏ 5. Use balsa filler to blend the dorsal fin to the fin
and to the fuselage. While you’re at it, make a small
fillet around the fin and stab, blending them to each
other and to the fuse. Sand the filler after it dries. It
shouldn’t take much filler to do the job (you can see
how the stab and fin are blended in photos later in
the manual).
Hint: Some modelers apply lots of filler, taking the
approach that “you can always sand off what you
don’t need.” However, since balsa filler is harder than
balsa, you usually end up sanding the balsa around
the filler more than the filler itself. For this reason,
you should take your time applying filler and only use
what is needed.
❏ ❏ 1. Cut a 2-5/8" high x 2-3/4" wide opening in the
fuse sheeting for the intercooler air exit as shown in
the preceding sketch. The top of the opening is 1-3/8"
from the center of the sub stringer.
❏ ❏ 3. Use the pattern on the plan to make the top and
bottom of the intercooler door from the ABS sheet,
then glue them to the inner door and the fuse sheeting.
Intercooler doors
Skip this section if you’ve decided not to build the
intercooler doors in the open position.
❏ ❏ 4. Make the outer door from the ABS sheet as
shown in the sketch. Sand a slight curve to the aft
❏ ❏ 2. Make an inner door to the dimensions edge of the door, then test fit it into position over the
shown in the sketch from the 2-5/8" x 12" ABS sheet
provided. Scribe one side of the door where shown,
then bend, but do not break it at the line. Glue the
inner door into position and sand the aft edge even
with the fuse.
-25-
door sides and under the fuse sheeting. Trim where
necessary, then glue the outer door into position.
❏ 5. Build the intercooler air exit for the other side of
the fuse the same way.
Mount the engine
The instructions show a U.S. Engines 41cc engine
and a Great Planes Isolation Mount. Other engines
are suitable, provided they are within the
recommended range, but may require a different
engine mount. Keep in mind that you can rotate the
engine to conceal the muffler inside the cowl and to
aim the engine exhaust where you want (the engine
doesn’t have to be mounted exactly inverted). Just
make sure the mount is centered on the reference
lines on the firewall and that the orientation you have
chosen will allow sufficient air flow over the head
and cylinder.
a straightedge to draw lines connecting the four
inner punch marks. Center the engine mount on the
cross marks, then mark and drill the appropriate size
holes for the engine mount.
❏ 3. Tap blind nuts into the back of the firewall
through the holes you drilled. Secure the blind nuts
to the back of the firewall with CA.
❏ 4. Use the drawing of the Isolation Mount on the fuse
plan to mark the location of the mounting holes for
mounting your engine. Trim the bottom of the mount
along the lines. Drill 1/4" holes through the iso plate and
temporarily mount your engine with 1/4-20 x 1-1/4"
bolts and flat washers (not included with this kit).
❏ 7. Test fit the doublers to the crutches in the fuse,
then test fit the firewall. Be certain the firewall will fit
all the way into the notches of the crutches. If it
doesn’t, trim the forward edges of the crutch
doublers as necessary.
❏ 8. After adjustments have been made, glue the
crutch doublers to the crutches with 30-minute epoxy.
❏ 9. Remove the iso plate from the firewall. Glue the
firewall into position with 30-minute epoxy. Use
masking tape or clamps to hold the firewall in place
until the epoxy cures. If you don’t have clamps that
are big enough, use #2 x 1/2" or 3/8" screws to hold
the crutches to the firewall. We used flat head screws
on our prototype and countersunk them into the
crutches. Work neatly and don’t build up a large fillet
of epoxy behind the firewall because we’re going to
add reinforcing triangle stock in the next step.
❏ 1. Use 30-minute epoxy to glue the die-cut 1/8"
plywood forward firewall (FW) to the 1/4" x 6-1/8" x
5-1/2" plywood aft firewall. From now on this
assembly will be referred to as the firewall.
❏ 5. Temporarily mount the iso plate with the engine
to the firewall to confirm that the mounting holes
align. Make adjustments if necessary.
❏ 2. Drill four 19/64" (or 5/16") holes through the
outer punch marks in the firewall only if you are
using a Great Planes Isolation Mount. If you are
using another engine mount, use a ballpoint pen and
❏ 10. Use the 1/2" x 24" basswood triangle stick
to reinforce the glue joint between the four sides of
the firewall and the inside of the fuse crutches and
the tank roof and floor. Glue the sticks into position
with epoxy.
❏ 11. Further reinforce the glue joint by drilling 3/32"
❏ 6. Glue together both sets of die-cut 1/8" plywood holes through the crutches, tank floor and tank roof
parts that make up the right and left fuse
crutch doublers.
-26-
into the edges of the firewall. “Pin” it all together with
round toothpicks glued in place with epoxy.
rubber). Be certain to position the tank so it will not
interfere with your throttle pushrod. As you can see in
the photo, we mounted our tank off to the right side of
the fuse to accommodate the throttle pushrod. The
tank should be mounted securely, yet be removable
for inspection and servicing after the model is
completed and you’ve been flying it for a while.
❏ 15. Drill holes in the firewall or fuse crutches for
the fuel lines, then temporarily mount your tank. Be
certain you are using the correct fuel lines and
rubber stopper for gas or glow fuel.
❏ 12. Temporarily mount the engine to the firewall.
Step back for a moment and think about where you
are going to mount the fuel tank and where you are
going to route your throttle pushrod and fuel lines.
While we’re working on the front end, let’s go ahead
and mount the fuel tank.
❏ 13. Coat the inside of the fuel tank area with fuelproof
paint or epoxy. Allow to dry before proceeding.
There are many ways to position and secure the fuel
tank. The instructions that follow show the installation
of a Great Planes 32 oz. fuel tank positioned for the
U.S. Engines 41cc. Follow these instructions to mount
your tank, or use the instructions as a basic guideline
for a different installation.
❏ 3. Remove the rudder from the fin. Cut out the
The XP-47B made its first flight on May 6, 1941. One
of the first modifications to that design was to
replace fabric covered control surfaces with those
covered with a metal skin. Unfortunately, this
improvement was not a feature of the first 773
Thunderbolts (P-47B) produced and sent into
service, thus resulting in many failures and crashes.
❏ 4. Securely glue the control horn mounting plate
into position, then sand it flush with the rudder.
Hook up the controls
❏ 5. Reposition the rudder on the fin, mark the
❏ 1. Thread a 4-40 nut onto a .095" x 48" wire location of the holes in the control horn on the
pushrod, followed by a 4-40 metal clevis. Fit the
clevis into the second from the outer hole of a nylon
control horn.
❏ 14. Cut fuel tank supports from the 1/2" x 3/4" x ❏ 2. Fit the pushrod through the aft guide tube in the
30" balsa stick and glue them between the crutches
so they will hold your tank in place (note the 1/2" foam
rudder skin and the rudder base to accommodate the
die-cut 1/8" plywood control horn mounting plate.
left side of the fuse. Position the control horn on the
rudder, then mark the location with a ballpoint pen.
-27-
mounting plate, then drill 3/32" holes at the marks
and temporarily mount a heavy duty control horn (not
included) with four #4 x 1/2" screws.
❏ 6. Prepare another pushrod with a 4-40 nut, clevis
and control horn. Slide the pushrod into the forward
guide tube on the left side of the fuse. If necessary,
make a slight bend in the pushrod so the elevator
control horn can be positioned where it will not
interfere with the rudder control horn. Mark the
location of the horn on the elevator and install
another 1/8" ply control horn mounting plate the
same as you did the rudder.
Refer to this photo to hook up the servos.
❏ 7. Mount the elevator control horn to the elevator
with four #4 x 3/8" screws. Mount the other control
horn and pushrod to the other elevator the same way.
❏ 10. Glue both die-cut 1/8" plywood servo tray
doublers between the front servo cutouts across the
top of the servo tray (remember, the servos are
mounted to the bottom of the tray).
❏ 12. Mark the firewall (or the isolation mount if you
are using one) where the throttle pushrod will align
with the arm on your carburetor. Drill a 3/16" hole
through the firewall and the iso plate at the mark you
made. If you are using the iso plate, enlarge the hole
in the plate with a 1/4" drill bit.
❏ 13. Mount your throttle servo to the servo tray
❏ 11. Position the servo tray in the fuse, then drill six using the screws that came with your radio. Hook up
❏ 8. Cut the servo tray mounting rails from the
remainder of the 1/4" x 1/2" basswood stick you used
for the tail gear mounting rails. Use epoxy to glue the
aft rail to former 4 in the notches of the crutches and
glue the side rails to the crutches. Note that the wide
side of the side rails is glued to the crutch.
❏ 9. Test fit the rudder and elevator servos in the
die-cut 1/8" plywood servo tray. The servo tray is
designed to accommodate most standard size
servos. If your servos do not fit, modify the tray as
necessary, or make another tray from 1/8" plywood
(not supplied).
1/16" holes through the tray (two through both sides
and two more through the aft edge) and the servo
tray mounting rails. Remove the servo tray. Add a
drop of thin CA to the holes in the rails. Enlarge the
holes in the servo tray only with a 3/32" drill bit,
then test mount the tray to the rails with six #2 x 1/2"
screws and #2 washers.
the throttle using the 3/16" x 11-3/4" outer pushrod
guide tube, the 11-3/4" flexible plastic pushrod, a ball
link and a nylon clevis as shown on the plan. Glue
the outer guide tube to the firewall. Make an aft
guide tube support from leftover plywood and glue
it in position so the throttle pushrod aligns with the
throttle servo.
❏ 14. Mount the two elevator servos in the servo
Let’s hook up the throttle first. A 3/16" x 11-3/4"
pushrod guide tube and flexible plastic pushrod are
supplied in this kit for the throttle. This is the
recommended setup for ignition engines as metal
pushrods should not be used due to the possibility of
RF (radio frequency) noise. If you are using a glow
engine, you may substitute a metal pushrod or cable
(not supplied) if you prefer.
-28-
tray. Cut the pushrods to the correct length, then
silver solder them to the clevises and connect them
to the servos. Hint: Wipe away residual soldering
flux immediately after the solder has solidified. After
the joint cools, coat the clevis and the solder joint
with oil to prevent rusting. Note: If you would rather
connect the pushrods after the model is covered (so
they won’t be sticking out of the rear end of the
fuselage when you are covering), skip this step for
now and return after covering.
❏ 15. Mount the rudder servo in the servo tray.
Connect the rudder pushrod to the rudder servo with
a split coupler, an additional piece of wire cut from a
.095” x 12” pushrod and a solder-on metal clevis. The
leftover piece of the wire you just cut from the 12”
pushrod (that has a threaded end) will be used for an
aileron pushrod.
Finish the cockpit
Skip the first two steps if you are not going to install
the optional scale cockpit kit.
❏ 1. Finish cutting the rest of the way through the
partially die-cut lines on the 1/8" balsa cockpit deck.
Remove that section of balsa to accommodate the
cockpit kit. Cut through former 4 and remove the
cross-member portion.
❏ 4. Use leftover 3/32" balsa to sheet the open
space on both sides of the fuse between the cockpit
deck and the canopy.
❏ 16. Connect one end of the pull/pull cables to the ❏ 2. Cut out the cockpit kit according to its
tail gear steering arm (we used a Sullivan #520 PullPull Cable kit, not included with this kit). While you
have the tail gear apart, file a flat spot near the top of
the shaft as indicated in the photo. Be certain the flat
spot is positioned so that the steering arm is
perpendicular to the wheel when the set screw is
tightened. It wouldn’t be a bad idea to file a flat spot
near the bottom of the shaft for one of the other set
screws too.
❏ 17. Reassemble the tail gear and thread the
cables through the guide tubes. Mount the tail wheel
steering servo in the servo tray, then connect the
other end of the cables to the servo arm.
instructions, then test fit the parts into the fuse.
❏ 3. Use curved-tip scissors to cut out the molded
canopy along the framing. True the edges with a bar
sander and 150-grit sandpaper.
The rest of the steps in this section are for the
razorback version only.
Early production Thunderbolts were not without
teething pains typical of any new aircraft. Takeoff
runs were long (nearly a half-mile to clear a fifty
foot obstacle) and there were several electrical and
hydraulic glitches, not to mention the unfamiliarity
of a totally new design. One fighter group damaged
or wrecked half of the P-47s received.
-29-
❏ R5. Finish shaping the top of the turtle deck to fit the
canopy and to match the cross section on the plan.
❏ R6. Use the templates on the fuse plan to make
the canopy fairing supports from 1/8" balsa and
the canopy fairings from leftover 3/32" balsa.
BUILD THE WING
Preparation
❏ 1. Cut the right wing panel plan from the rest of the
plan and lay it on your flat building board. Cover the
plan with Great Planes Plan Protector or wax paper.
❏ R7. Glue the canopy fairing supports to the fuse
under the aft edge of the canopy.
❏ 2. Make two spar doublers by cutting a 1/4" x 3/8"
x 42" basswood stick into two 21" long pieces. Bevel
one end of both spar doublers as shown on the plan.
Make two more spar doublers the same way (the
spar doublers are pointed out in the following photo).
❏ 5. Refer to the wing panel plan for the wing you
are building, then glue the laser-cut 1/8" plywood rib
doublers 5A and 5B to both sides of the die-cut 3/32"
balsa rib, making certain you glue the doublers to the
correct sides of the rib.
❏ 6. The same as you did in the previous step, refer
❏ 3. Make four main spars by gluing each spar
❏ R8. Bevel the inside edges of the canopy fairings
to the wing plan for the wing you are building, then
glue the laser-cut 1/8" plywood rib doublers 6A and
6B to both sides of the die-cut 3/32" balsa rib 6,
making certain you glue the doublers to the correct
sides of the rib.
doubler to a 1/4" x 3/8" x 42" basswood stick.
as shown on the plan. With the canopy in position,
test fit, then glue the canopy fairings to the fuse. Use
balsa filler to blend the fairings to the fuse. Sand
when dry. The dashed lines in the photo indicate the
edges of the fairings under the balsa filler.
The fuse and cowl can’t be completed until the wing
and the belly pan are built, so clean off your
workbench, take a break, then build the wing!
❏ 4. Position, but do not glue a laser-cut 1/8"
plywood wing rib doubler 5B over a die-cut 1/8"
plywood wing rib 5. Cut away the balsa portion of
the rib that is not covered by the doubler. Repeat for
the other rib 5.
-30-
❏ 7. Glue the die-cut 3/32" balsa aileron root rib 7B
to rib 7A. Note the two layers of wax paper between
the two ribs aft of the notch. Glue the flap root rib
2D to the side of rib 2B the same way.
❏ 8. Drill a 1/16" hole through the punch mark in
both die-cut 1/8" plywood forward spar joiner
braces (refer to the die drawings on pages 8 & 9 to
locate the forward spar joiner brace).
❏ 9. If you wish to plan ahead a little, you can use a
5/32" brass tube sharpened at the end to cut holes
in the ribs to accommodate the retract air lines so
they can neatly pass through the ribs.
❏ 2. The same way you did the stab skins, tape the
sheets together, apply glue, then wipe the excess
away as you press the edges down. Place weights on
top of the sheets to hold them flat until the glue dries.
Remember, the better job you do of joining the skins,
the less sanding that will be required and the less you
will end up thinning the balsa. The only sanding that
should be required after you glue the skins to the wing
is final sanding with 400-grit sandpaper.
Make the wing skins
If you would rather get started framing up the wing
panel right away, you can make the wing skins later.
Just return to this section when you need to make
the wing skins.
We recommend gluing the wing skins together the
same as we showed you for the stab and fin skins
(using the “masking tape, wood glue and squeegee”
technique). The wing skins are glued to the wing in
two sections; a forward and an aft section with the
seam between the two over the main spars. This
requires eight wing skins; four forward skins and four
aft skins. Each forward skin is made by joining two
3/32" x 3" x 42" balsa sheets and each aft skin is
made by joining three 3/32" x 3" x 42" balsa sheets.
❏ 3. Make three more forward skins the same way.
Make four aft skins, each one consisting of three
3/32" x 4" x 42" balsa sheets.
❏ 4. Sand the skins flat and even.
❏ 1. Gather twenty 3/32" x 3" x 42" balsa sheets to
make the wing skins. Use a straightedge and a sharp
#11 blade to true one edge of sixteen sheets and
true both edges of four sheets. As you proceed, use
a ballpoint pen to mark the trued edge(s) of each
sheet, so you will know which edges are trued when
it’s time to glue them together.
-31-
Build the wing panels
We’ll start with the right wing panel first.
Refer to this photo for the following six steps.
❏ ❏ 4. Use some of the 1/4" x 1/4" rib jigs leftover
from building the tail surfaces to hold ribs 2A, 2B,
2.5, 3 and 3.5 over their position on the plan. Use rib
jigs on other ribs as necessary to help hold the wing
panel firmly to your building board.
❏ ❏ 5. Place a shim made from leftover 1/8" balsa
under the bottom spar at rib 12. Rib 12 should have
rib jigs to hold it down.
❏ ❏ 6. Be certain the jig tabs of all the ribs are
contacting the building board, then glue ribs 3.5 through
12 to the bottom main spar using a small builder’s
square to hold the ribs vertical as you proceed.
❏ ❏ 9. Cut a shaped 36" balsa leading edge to the
length shown on the plan. Glue the LE, centered
height-wise, to ribs 2A through 12 except for rib 2.5.
Note that the bottom of the LE near the tip will have to
be trimmed where it interferes with the building surface.
❏ ❏ 10. Temporarily remove the aft spar joiner brace
and rib 2.5 from the assembly (the absence of rib 2.5
will allow positioning of a C-clamp on the bottom
spar and the spar joiner). Use 30-minute epoxy to
glue the forward spar joiner brace to the front of the
top and bottom main spars. Wipe away excess epoxy
before it hardens—especially from inside the spar
joiner to accommodate the wing joiner later on.
❏ ❏ 1. Use large T-pins to securely hold one of the
main spars to your building board over its location on
the plan. The root end of the spar should extend
beyond the wing centerline approximately 1/16". Do
not use any T-pins outward of rib 10 as the spar is
going to be raised.
❏ ❏ 2. Fit, but do not glue, the die-cut 1/8" balsa
inner TE spar into ribs 3 through 6, then join the
assembly to the bottom main spar on the plan.
❏ ❏ 7. Fit, but do not glue the top spar and the
die-cut 1/8" plywood forward and aft spar joiner
braces to the panel. Make sure you have installed the
braces right side up (the root ends are cut at an angle
for dihedral). Be certain the top spar extends past the
joiner braces by 1/16", then glue the top spar to ribs 4
through 12, but not to the joiner braces.
❏ ❏ 8. Making certain the jig tabs of the ribs are
❏ ❏ 3. Join ribs 7 through 12 to the assembly, then contacting the building board as you proceed, glue
join the die-cut 1/8" balsa outer TE spar to ribs 8
through 12.
the outer TE spar to ribs 8 through 12 and glue the
inner TE spar to ribs 3 through 7.
-32-
❏ ❏ 11. Glue ribs 2A and 2.5 to the forward spar
joiner brace.
❏ ❏ 12. Use 30-minute epoxy to glue the aft spar
joiner brace to the spars. Immediately after you
position your clamps, use a leftover piece of 1/4" x
3/8" basswood to scrape away excess epoxy from
inside the spars. Any epoxy left inside the cavity
made by the spars and spar braces will make it
difficult when inserting the spar joiner later on.
❏ ❏ 16. Make gussets from leftover 1/8" balsa and
glue them to the forward dowel plate as shown on
the plan.
❏ ❏ 17. Drill 1/4" holes through the 1/4" x 2" x 7-3/4"
plywood wing bolt plate where shown on the plan.
Note: Though the holes are not shown in the wing
bolt plate in the following photos, yours should now
be drilled.
❏ ❏ 20. Make the tip LE from the 3/4" x 3/4" x 8"
balsa stick, then glue it into position on ribs 11 & 12
and the LE.
❏ ❏ 13. Align the front of rib 1B with the aft joiner
brace, using it to set the angle of the rib. Glue 1B to
the aft joiner brace. Glue rib 1A to the forward joiner
brace the same way.
❏ ❏ 14. Test fit the die-cut 1/8" plywood wing bolt
plate brace (WBPB) between the ribs 1B and 2B.
Use the die-cut 1/8" plywood dihedral gauge (DG)
to align 1B over the plan and to set it at the correct
angle. Adjust the wing bolt plate brace if necessary,
then glue it into position.
❏ ❏ 15. Test fit, then glue the laser-cut 1/8" plywood
forward dowel plate between ribs 1A and 2A the
same as you did the wing bolt plate brace using the
dihedral gauge to align rib 1A with the plan.
❏ ❏ 18. Test fit the wing bolt plate in ribs 1 & 2 and
the die-cut 1/8" plywood rib doublers 1C and 2C.
Use 30-minute epoxy to glue the rib doublers to the
ribs, then remove the wing bolt plate before the
epoxy hardens.
❏ ❏ 19. Glue the die-cut 1/8" plywood aft dowel
plate (it’s the 1-1/4" disk with a 5/16" hole in the
middle) to the forward spar joiner brace centered on
the 1/16" hole you drilled during preparation.
-33-
❏ ❏ 21. Use the 3/32" x 4" x 36" balsa sheet you set
aside earlier (and marked “shear web”) to make the
shear webs that fit between ribs 4 through 12 as
shown on the plan. Glue the shear webs into position.
During speed run testing of early production
P-47s, test pilots attained a level flight speed of
over 400 mph.
❏ ❏ 9. Use the top and bottom flap skin patterns
on the plan to make the top and bottom flap skins
from two 3/32" x 4" x 24" balsa sheets. The bottom
skin doesn’t quite fit on a 4" sheet, so you’ll have to
add a little piece of 3/32" balsa to the corner at the
trailing edge. You can make just one top and bottom
skin now, or make all four at the same time.
Sheet the top of the wing panels
❏ ❏ 1. Use a bar sander with 80-grit sandpaper to
sand the top of the ribs, shear webs and spars even
to accommodate the wing sheeting.
❏ ❏ 2. If you haven’t already done so, return to page
31 and make the wing skins.
❏ ❏ 10. Use the aileron skin pattern on the plan to
❏ ❏ 3. Trim one edge of a forward skin to fit the LE.
make two aileron skins from a 3/32" x 3" x 42" balsa
sheet (or go ahead and make all four aileron skins
from two 3/32" x 3" x 42" sheets).
You’ll have to cut a little “step” at the end to
accommodate the 3/4" x 3/4" balsa tip LE.
❏ 6. Glue the forward skin to the wing. The way we
prefer is to apply aliphatic resin to all the ribs and to
the top main spar, then glue the front of the skin to the
LE with CA. If you find it necessary, wet the skin with
window cleaner or water, then bend it into position
using weights to hold it down until the glue dries.
❏ ❏ 7. Trim the aft skin to fit the wing. The aft skin
extends from the main spar to the middle of the inner
TE (refer to the cross section on the plan) and past
the outer TE by approximately 1/8" (to allow for
trimming later).
❏ ❏ 11. Position the top flap skin on the wing. Align
the TE of the skin over its location shown on the plan.
Mark the tops of the ribs as shown in the photo
where the LE of the flap skin passes over them.
Remove the flap skin.
❏ ❏ 12. Cut two 1" x 20" strips from the 1/32" x 2" x
24" plywood sheet. Use medium or thick CA to
laminate one of the ply strips to a 1/16" x 2-3/4" x 24"
balsa sheet. Trim the balsa sheeting to make a 3/32"
x 1" x 20" balsa/ply strip. This will be the inner TE
sheeting that goes in front of the flap on the top of
the wing.
❏ ❏ 4. Trim the aft edge of the skin even with the
middle of the top main spar. Since the forward skin
isn’t wide enough to reach the LE near the root end,
glue the piece you just cut off back onto the aft edge
of the skin.
❏ ❏ 5. Sand the skin flat and smooth. Remember, if
you sand the skins before gluing them to the wing,
the only sanding you should have to do after you
glue them to the wing is final sanding. This avoids
sanding the skin too thin.
❏ ❏ 13. Trim the ends of the inner TE sheet to fit
between ribs 2 & 7. The ply side goes up. The front of
❏ ❏ 8. Sand the aft skin flat and smooth, then glue the sheet joins the wing sheeting already in position.
it to the wing. Sheet the TE of the wing between ribs
1 & 2 with leftover 3/32" balsa.
-34-
The TE extends to 1/16" in front of the marks you
made that indicate the front of the top flap skin
(providing a 1/16" gap between the flap skin and the
inner TE sheet—refer to the photo in the following
step). Test fit the inner TE sheet. If necessary, sand the
balsa side of the inner TE sheet so it will be even with
the aft wing sheeting. When satisfied with the fit, glue
the inner TE sheet to the wing.
Mount the landing gear
❏ 1. Make two 3" long outer landing gear rails from
the 1/4" x 5/8" x 6" maple stick and two 2-1/4" long
inner landing gear rails from the 1/4" x 1/2" x 5"
maple stick.
❏ 4. Once you have established the exact positioning
of the landing gear rails and test fitted the gear, use
30-minute epoxy to permanently glue the rails into
position. For additional strength, add Great Planes
Pro Milled Fiberglass to the epoxy. For a secure bond,
it is not necessary to apply an excessive amount of
epoxy which makes a mess and interferes with the fit
of the gear. Instead, make certain you thoroughly mix
equal amounts of epoxy and make fillets, but keep
them neat. Do not use fast curing epoxy.
❏ 5. After the epoxy has fully hardened, drill 7/64"
holes in the rails for #6 x 1/2" screws (not included) to
mount the gear. Temporarily mount the landing gear.
❏ ❏ 14. Bevel the inside of the TE of the top flap
skin (as indicated by the dashed lines on the plan
and in the sketch on page 38), then glue it to the top
of the flap ribs. Do not glue the top flap skin to any
of the wing sheeting.
❏ ❏ 15. Bevel the inside of the TE of one of the
aileron skins, then glue it to the top of the aileron ribs.
❏ ❏ 16. Remove the wing panel from your building
board (yaaaay!). Trim the jig tabs off the bottom of the
ribs. Look for glue joints that don’t look strong or ones
you’ve missed earlier and reinforce them with CA.
Sand the bottom of the ribs, shear webs and spars
even to accommodate the bottom wing sheeting. If
you prefer, you can go ahead and “neaten up” the top
of the wing by trimming the top of the LE and the tip
LE even with the top sheeting. Don’t final shape until
instructed to do so.
❏ 2. Position, but do not glue the outer rail in rib 6 of
the right wing panel. Temporarily hold the inner rail to
rib 5 with a small C-clamp.
❏ 6. Temporarily remove the partially die-cut sections
of ribs 2.5, 3.5 and 4, so the gear can be retracted for
test fitting. Mount a 5" wheel to the landing gear, then
retract the gear into the wing to make sure there is no
interference with any of the ribs. Make adjustments
where needed.
Note: If you have to enlarge the hole in the wheel to
fit on the axle bolt that comes with the gear, use a
size “F” (or 1/4") drill.
❏ ❏ 17. Using the hole in the wing bolt plate as a
guide, use a 1/4" drill or a 1/4" brass tube sharpened
on one end to cut a hole in the top wing sheeting.
This will help you locate the hole in the wing bolt
plate after the wing is totally sheeted.
❏ 7. If you haven’t already done so, drill holes in ribs
5 through 2A for routing your retract air lines.
❏ 3. Test fit the landing gear. Position the outer rail in ❏ 8. Fit the retracts into the left panel the same way.
rib 6 as close to the gear as possible (to give the
❏ 18. Return to step 1 on page 32, position the left wing mounting screws as much “meat” as possible to bite ❏ 9. Now that you see how the retracts fit in the wing
panel plan over your building board and build the left
wing panel.
into), yet still allowing for installation and removal of
the gear.
-35-
and that they operate correctly, replace the partially
die-cut sections into the ribs and glue them in place.
the notches in the ribs. Make certain your servos will
fit between the rails when mounted to the 1/2" x 1" x
1" basswood servo mount blocks. If the servo rail
spacing is not wide enough to accommodate your
servos and the blocks, cut new notches in the ribs to
increase the spacing.
joiners are birch ply and one of the joiners is lite-ply.The
lite-ply joiner goes in the middle. It is best to clamp the
assembly to a flat board or your workbench protected
with wax paper to ensure that it will remain flat and true.
Simply clamping the joiners to each other may result in
a twisted part.
❏ 12. Glue the servo hatch rails into the notches of ❏ 2. Use a long bar sander with 80-grit sandpaper to
the ribs for the aileron and flap servos. Glue leftover
1/4" x 1/4" balsa sticks to the servo rails to support
the wing sheeting.
❏ 10. Remove the gear. Coat the inside of the landing
gear area on both wing halves with fuelproof paint or
epoxy. For a scale appearance, simulate the green zinc
chromate used to coat aluminum by mixing yellow, blue
and aluminum paint. If possible, it is best applied with
an airbrush for uniform coverage. For increased
durability, first apply three strips of fiberglass cloth
where indicated to the top sheeting inside the wing.This
will strengthen the sheeting where the ribs will be
trimmed to accommodate the wheel after the bottom
sheeting is added.
Refer to this photo for the following three steps.
true the root end of both wing panels by sanding the
ends of the spars and top wing sheeting even.
❏ 13. Some modelers install paper tubes in the wing
for routing the servo cords. This is not really
necessary on this model, because the lightening
holes in the ribs are large enough to easily pass the
cords by dangling them through after the wing is
sheeted. But, if you prefer, install tubes at this time.
You can make tubes from rolled up paper.
Completed on September 12, 1942, the improved
P-47C was released featuring metal covered
rudder and elevators and a vertical antenna mast.
Join the wing panels
❏ 11. Cut four 3-15/16" long servo hatch rails from a ❏ 1. Use 30-minute epoxy to glue together the three
1/4" x 3/8" x 16" basswood stick. Test fit the rails into
die-cut 1/8" plywood wing joiners. Note that two of the
-36-
❏ 3. Test fit the joiner in both wing halves. It may be
necessary to sand the bottom or sides of the joiner to
get it to fit. If you encounter difficulty, there may be
some glue or slivers stuck between the spars and spar
joiners in the wing. If this is the case, stick a piece of
Great Planes Adhesive Backed 80-grit sandpaper to a
leftover 1/4" x 3/8" basswood stick and use it as a mini
sander to remove the obstruction.
❏ 5. Once you have achieved a good fit of the wing ❏ 2. Cut eight 1-1/4" long hinge blocks for the
panels with the wing joiner and the wing bolt plate,
separate the wing panels, apply 30-minute epoxy to
all joining pieces, then permanently glue the wing
halves together. Hold with clamps until the epoxy
fully hardens.
aileron hinges from the 1/2" x 3/4" x 12" balsa stick.
Glue the hinge blocks to the outer TE of both wing
panels where shown on the plan.
NOTE: Make the hinge blocks longer if you plan to
use flat hinges instead of hinge points.
❏ 3. Sand the bottom edges of the spars, hinge
Sheet the bottom of the wing
blocks and wing ribs even and remove glue bumps
that will interfere with the bottom sheeting.
❏ 4. If installing optional machine guns (made from
brass or aluminum K & S tubing, not included), glue
leftover 1/4" balsa to the aft edge of the LE between
ribs 6 & 7 as shown on the plan.
❏ 4. Without using glue, test fit the wing panels
together with the wing joiner and the wing bolt plate.
How did it come out? Make adjustments where
necessary for a good fit and to achieve the correct
dihedral. As shown in the sketch, one wing tip at rib
12 should be 6-7/8" above the workbench when the
other half of the wing is laying flat.
IMPORTANT!
Make certain your 30-minute epoxy provides
enough working time to complete the following
step. It might help to make a dry run to see how
long it takes you to position all of your clamps.
❏ 1. Cut eight 1-1/2” long flap hinge blocks from
the 12” shaped balsa stick shown in the sketch. Glue
the flap hinge blocks to the inner TE of both wing
panels where shown on the plan. Use a ballpoint pen
to make a dimple on the outside of the inner TE’s
corresponding to the center of the hinge blocks. This
will help you identify where to drill the holes for the
hinges later.
-37-
❏ 5. Trim the ends of the 5/8" x 1-1/2" x 8" balsa
center LE block to fit against the forward dowel
plates between the LE’s. Temporarily fit the center LE
block into position, then use a ballpoint pen (or a
5/32" brass tube) to mark the location of the dowel
holes on the back of the block (disregard the fact that
the bottom of the wing is sheeted in this photo, as
yours is not yet sheeted).
❏ 6. Use a 5/32" brass tube sharpened on the end
or a 5/32" drill to drill holes through the center LE
block at the marks you made. Set the center LE
aside for now.
❏ 7. Cut the 5/16" x 15" dowel into two 6-7/8" wing
dowels. Round one end of both dowels as shown on
the plan and temporarily fit them into the wing. If the
dowels fit tightly, don’t force them into place, but
sand them as necessary for an easy, yet snug fit. Do
not glue the dowels in yet.
support the wing. The tip jigs are positioned under
ribs 12. If necessary, lightly tack glue the jigs to the
wing to keep them from shifting.
Refer to this sketch for the following two steps.
❏ 10. Sheet the bottom of the wing the same as you
did the top of the wing with the forward and aft wing
skins. Do not apply glue to the ribs and the hatch
mounting rails around the aileron and flap servo
hatch openings. This will facilitate cutting the hatch
openings and trimming the sheeting when it’s time to
fit the hatches. Use your weight bags or magazines
to hold the sheeting down until the glue dries.
❏ 11. Bevel the inside edges of the bottom aileron
and flap skins, then glue them into position. Avoid
gluing the ends of the flap and aileron skins to each
other. Use leftover 3/32" balsa to sheet the center TE
between the flaps.
❏ 8. Assemble the die-cut 1/8" plywood wing jigs ❏ 12. Remove the wing from the jigs. Trim the ends
as shown. The shorter “jig feet” are for the tip jigs.
Refer to this photo for the following three steps.
of the wing sheeting even with tip ribs W-12.
❏ 13. Use a razor plane followed with a bar sander
and 80-grit sandpaper to trim the top and bottom of
the leading edge even with the wing sheeting. Refer
to the cross section on the plan to get the correct
shape of the LE.
❏ 14. Using the holes in the top sheeting and the
❏ 3. Place the wing upside-down on your
workbench. Use a razor saw blade to cut through
ribs 2C through 7 on both wing panels just ahead of
the top and bottom flap skins as indicated by the
dashed lines in the sketch. Remove the flaps from
the wing.
wing bolt plate inside the wing as a guide, use a 1/4"
drill (or a 1/4" brass tube sharpened on one end) to
cut 1/4" holes through the bottom wing sheeting.
Build the ailerons
❏ 1. Use a razor saw to separate the ailerons from
the wing by cutting through the ribs.
❏ 9. Place the wing upside-down on your workbench ❏ 2. Sand the wing sheeting and the remainder of
and position the wing jigs under the wing. The
forward center jig fits on the wing dowels. The aft
center jig is positioned above the 1/8" ply wing bolt
braces. The middle jigs should be positioned near
ribs 7, so that they contact the top sheeting and
the ribs even with the outer TE’s.
Even though we’re working on the ailerons right
now, let’s go ahead and remove the flaps from the
wing as well...
-38-
❏ 4. Trim the remainder of the ribs on the wing in the
flap area as shown in the photo and the previous
❏ ❏ 12. Mark the centerlines of both the aileron LE
and the outer TE spar, then drill holes or cut slots for
the hinges (not included). Just the same as on the
tail surfaces, we use Robart large hinge points (you’ll
have to shorten the outermost hinge point to fit in the
tip of the aileron).
sketch. Trim the bottom wing sheeting even with the
inner TE’s. Bevel the balsa portion of the top wing
sheeting to the top ply sheeting.
Back to the ailerons...
❏ ❏ 5. Sand the leading edges of the right aileron
skins and aileron ribs even.
❏ ❏ 8. Tack glue the 3/8" x 7/8" x 24" balsa aileron
leading edge to the outer TE spar. The best way to do
this is to lightly spray the front of the aileron LE with
CA accelerator, add five evenly spaced drops of thick
or medium CA to the outer TE spar, then firmly press
the aileron LE into position (the bottom of the right
wing panel is shown in this photo, though the top of
the right wing panel is shown in following photos).
❏ ❏ 9. Trim the top and bottom of the aileron LE
even with the top of the wing.
❏ ❏ 13. Shape the aileron LE to a “V” to allow for
control throw. The aileron on the wing plan shows how
far aft to make the bevel. Test fit the aileron to the wing
with the hinges. Be certain you can achieve 3/4" of
control throw. Make adjustments if necessary.
❏ 14. Fit and hinge the left aileron to the wing the
same as you did the right.
While we’re working near the end of the wing, let’s
go ahead and finish up the wing tips...
❏ ❏ 6. Cut a 2" long control horn wedge from the
❏ ❏ 10. Test fit, then glue the right aileron to the
12" tapered balsa stock shown in the sketch. Glue
the wedge into the aileron where shown on the plan.
❏ ❏ 7. Cut three 1-1/4" long aileron hinge blocks
aileron LE. The aileron should quite accurately
match up with the LE. After the aileron is glued into
position, carefully sand the area, blending the
aileron, LE and the wing.
from the same triangular balsa wedge, then glue
them into the aileron where shown on the plan.
❏ ❏ 11. Break the aileron free from the wing.
-39-
The P-47D “Razorback” was actually a P-47C
produced at Republic’s new factory in Evansville,
Indiana. They were identical in every way to the
Farmingdale, Long Island-built P-47C’s.
❏ ❏ 15. Center the right aileron and securely tape it Build the flaps
❏ ❏ 4. Remove the flap horn. True the ends of the
to the wing. This will help with alignment and shaping
of the wing tip.
flap LE’s even with the ends of the flap.
❏ ❏ 16. Glue one of the shaped 1-1/4" balsa wing
tip blocks to the right wing tip. Use a razor plane or
a carving knife followed by a bar sander with 80-grit
sandpaper to shape the tip to match the wing, but do
not round the tip yet. As you proceed, view the tip
from all angles to be certain it matches the tapering
angle of the top and bottom of the wing.
We’ll build the right one first...
❏ ❏ 1. Sand the front edges of the top and bottom flap ❏ ❏ 5. Cut a flap root template and flap tip
skin and the front of the flap ribs of the right flap even.
❏ ❏ 2. Place the right flap over the plan and temporarily
insert the die-cut 1/16" plywood flap horn into the flap
where shown.
❏ ❏ 3. Cut the 7/8" x 1-5/8" x 24" balsa flap LE into
❏ ❏ 17. Round the wing tip and sand to its final shape.
❏ 18. Glue the other balsa wing tip block to the left
tip and shape it the same way.
a 5-7/8" long piece and a 13-1/4" long piece. Securely
glue both flap LE’s to the flap, but not to the flap
horn. Note that the top of the flap LE’s should be even
with the top of the flap, while the excess extends
below (as seen in the following photo).
-40-
template from the wing plan, then attach them to the
ends of the flap using 3M 75 repositionable spray
adhesive or something similar.
❏ ❏ 6. Use a razor plane followed by a bar sander
to shape the flap LE to match the templates on the
ends of the flaps. It’s easiest to first shape the top
and bottom of the flap LE even with the top and
bottom of the flap, then shape the LE to match the
templates on both ends.
inner TE spar. Use a 3/16" brass tube sharpened at
the end or a 3/16" drill bit to drill the hole for the hinge.
Drill the remaining holes in the wing the same way.
❏ 10. Use a straightedge and a ballpoint pen to
lightly mark centerlines on the bottom of the flap and
the bottom of the wing at the location of each hinge.
Note that the centerlines are perpendicular to the
flap LE and the inner TE spar.
❏ 11. Glue together both pieces of the die-cut 1/8"
plywood flap hinge drill jig. As you can see in the
following photos, the drill jig will be used to guide
your drill for drilling the holes for the flap hinges. For
additional accuracy, glue a 7/32" O.D. (3/32" I.D.)
brass tube and a 1/8" balsa 90-degree gusset to the
jig as shown.
❏ 13. Turn the wing around so the LE is facing you.
Reposition the drill jig as shown and drill the holes in
the flaps. Just the same as when drilling the holes in
the wing, be certain the tab on the bottom of the drill
jig is contacting the inner TE. As you can see in the
photo, we’ve wrapped a piece of tape around the
brass tube so the holes drilled in the flap will only be
1-1/8" deep. The outermost hole in the flap should
only be 7/8" deep.
❏ ❏ 7. Test fit the flap to the wing. The root end of
the flap should align with the wing and the tip end
should align with the aileron. There should also be
1/32" to 1/16" gap between the top of the flap and
the ply/balsa wing sheeting. Sand and shape the flap
as necessary to achieve this fit.
❏ ❏ 8. Sand the ends of the flap for adequate
spacing between the wing and the aileron.
❏ 12. Position the flap hinge drill jig on the bottom of ❏ 14. Test fit the flaps to the wing with the hinges.
the wing, centering the brass tube over one of the
The outermost hinge in each flap must be shortened.
forward until the tab on the bottom is contacting the
of interference. Make adjustments where necessary.
❏ 9. Return to the first step and assemble the left hinge centerlines you marked. Push the drill jig Move the flaps up and down and observe any points
flap the same way.
-41-
Make the servo hatches
Start with the right aileron hatch...
❏ 15. Drill a 1/16" hole through the punch mark in
both 1/16" ply flap control horns. Add a few drops of
thin CA to the holes to harden the wood. Allow the
CA to fully harden. Sand the excess CA off and redrill
the holes. Test fit a metal 4-40 clevis to make sure it
fits well.
❏ 4. Remove the servo hatch and enlarge the holes
in the hatch cover only with a 3/32" drill bit.
Countersink the holes in the cover to accommodate
the six #2 x 3/8" flat-head screws. A Dremel # 178
cutting bit works perfectly for countersinking the holes.
If you’d rather not bother countersinking the holes, you
may use regular #2 x 3/8" screws (not supplied).
❏ 5. Temporarily mount the hatch cover to the wing
with the screws.
❏ 16. Final sand the flaps, finishing with 400-grit
sandpaper, then use 30-minute epoxy to securely
glue the flap horns into position. Fill the remaining
gap between the two sections of the flap LE with
leftover 1/16" balsa or balsa filler.
❏ 3. Securely tape the hatch cover into position. Drill
1/16" holes through the hatch cover and the servo rails.
❏ 6. Make the other aileron hatch and the flap
❏ 1. Cut a hole in the bottom wing sheeting of the
right panel to fit the die-cut 1/16" plywood aileron
servo hatch cover. Start with a small hole first, then
carefully enlarge it to fit the hatch cover. As you
“zero-in” on the correct size of the hole, use the
hatch cover itself as a template to accurately trim the
wing sheeting. Note that the sides of the opening
should extend to the center of the ribs and the front
and back edges of the opening should extend
approximately 5/16" past the rails.
hatches the same way.
Hook up the controls
Refer to this photo for the following four steps.
Refer to this photo for the following four steps.
❏ 17. Cut a passage in the inner TE’s to accommodate
the flap horns. Test fit the flaps once more to make sure
the horns do not interfere with the inner TE’s. Make
adjustments if necessary.
The “belly pan” under the wing conceals the air
ducting for the supercharger. One duct carries air
from the intake in the front of the cowl back to the
supercharger (driven by the turbine) and two
smaller ducts carry exhaust gasses from the
engine to the turbine.
❏ 2. Test fit the aileron servo hatch cover into the
opening. If necessary trim the edges of the opening
or sand the edges of the hatch cover for a good fit.
-42-
❏ 1. Refer to the plan for the correct servo
orientation, then use the screws included with the
servos to mount both aileron and both flap servos to
two 1/2" x 1" x 1" basswood servo mounting
blocks. It will probably be necessary to trim some of
the blocks to accommodate the servo cords.
❏ 2. Use 30-minute epoxy to glue the servo ❏ 6. Use four #4 x 1/2" screws to mount a control
mounting blocks to the inside of the hatch covers. Be
certain the servos are positioned on the covers
according to the plan and that the servo mounting
blocks will not interfere with the hatch cover
mounting rails.
horn to the mounting plate.
❏ 7. Connect the aileron to the aileron servo with a
pushrod made from the hardware shown on the plan
and in the photo (one of the 12" pushrods is the one
with a threaded end leftover from hooking up the
rudder). Be certain to use silver solder and don’t
forget to wipe away residual soldering flux right after
the solder has solidified. Coat the pushrod and the
clevis with a film of oil to prevent rusting.
❏ 8. Hook up the left aileron the same way.
❏ 3. Secure each servo mounting block to the hatch
cover with a #2 x 3/8" flat head screw. Permanently
install the screws with CA or epoxy.
❏ 4. Cut a slot in the aileron servo hatch covers for
the servo arm.
❏ 9. Make the flap pushrods from the hardware
shown on the plan. For most servos the length of the
pushrods will be the same as shown on the plan.
Temporarily connect the flaps to the flap servos with
the pushrods.
Note: Don’t forget that the flap servos are not
centered, but the servo arms are forward when the
flaps are retracted (up).
Finish the wheel wells
Refer to this photo for the following four steps.
❏ ❏ 2. Temporarily mount the right landing gear in
the wing. Cut the wheel well opening and the ribs so
the gear can be retracted. Just the same as you did
in the previous step, start with a small hole and
carefully enlarge it until you can retract the gear. A
Dremel moto tool with a Robart 90-degree adapter
and a sanding drum is a useful tool to neatly trim the
ribs to accommodate the wheel.
❏ 5. Determine the location of the die-cut 1/8"
plywood control horn mounting plate on the
bottom of the right aileron. Cut into the bottom of the
aileron to accommodate the die-cut 1/8" plywood
mounting plate, then glue it into position just the
same as you did for the elevators and rudder.
❏ ❏ 1. Using the right wing plan as a guide, cut the ❏ 3. Fit the left landing gear and wheel in the wing the
opening in the bottom of the wing to accommodate
the landing gear. Start by cutting a small hole, then
carefully enlarge it until you can get the gear in.
-43-
same way. Reinforce the unsupported sheeting around
the wheel opening by laminating leftover 1/16" crossgrain balsa to the inside of the bottom sheeting.
❏ 4. Glue strips of leftover 1/32" plywood under the
balsa sheeting inside the landing gear cutouts to
support a balsa landing gear cover.
❏ 6. Make wheel cover mounts by drilling 1/2"
holes through a 1/2" thick basswood sheet (not
included with this kit). Cut or sand away surrounding
material until you have a block with a half-circle on
one end as shown in the photo. Make four of these.
❏ 9. Trim the ends of the blocks so the covers will align
with the gear. Use a straightedge for alignment. As you
can see in the photo, the length of the blocks determines
how close you can get the covers to the gear.
❏ 5. Make landing gear hatch covers from leftover
3/32" balsa. After the model is covered, the hatch
covers can be attached with clear tape.
You can make the optional wheel covers now, or wait
until the model is covered. Since the landing gear
struts do not retract fully into the wing, the wheel
covers extend below the wing and should not be on
the model when in flight. Therefore, the wheel covers
shown in the photos on the box cover are intended
for static display only.
❏ 10. Attach the gear covers to the mount blocks with
❏ 7. Use 30-minute epoxy to permanently glue two #2 x 1/2" screws (not included). When it’s time to cover
mounts to each landing gear strut as shown in
the photo.
❏ 8. Cut out two wheel covers from 1/8" lite ply (not
included with this kit) using the pattern supplied on
the plan.
-44-
the model, cover the landing gear covers to match the
invasion stripes on the bottom of the wing (if the trim
scheme you’ve chosen has invasion stripes).
While we’re finishing the wing, let’s go ahead and
work on the optional machine guns...
We made the machine guns on our prototype after
the wing was covered, but they are easier to make
now, before the wing is covered.
❏ 2. Temporarily position the wing dowels in the
wing, then glue the center LE (prepared earlier) into
position. Remove the dowels, then shape the center
LE to match the shape of the wing and the LE’s.
You may permanently glue the dowels in place as
❏ 15. Lightly coat one end of each machine gun with described in the following step, or wait until the
❏ 11. Refer to the wing plan and mark the location
a dab of CA. Allow to fully harden. This will provide
enough interference to hold the machine guns in the
brass tubes in the wing, yet allow for removal during
transportation.
and spacing of the machine guns on the LE of the
wing. Use a 9/32" brass tube sharpened on one end
to drill holes through the LE and the 1/4" balsa inside.
Hint: After you drill the first hole, insert a brass tube.
Use it as an alignment cue for drilling the rest of the
holes in that wing half. This way all your machine
guns will align.
❏ 12. After you’ve drilled all the holes for the
machine guns in both wing halves, cut the 9/32"
brass tube into eight 1-1/4" pieces. Deburr the ends
of each tube.
❏ 13. Glue the tubes into the wing. Use a bar sander
to sand the ends of the tubes so they are flush with
the LE.
model is covered.
❏ 3. Use a piece of leftover music wire or something
similar to apply 30-minute epoxy to the holes in the
aft dowel braces where the dowels fit and in the
holes in the LE of the wing. Apply epoxy to the
dowels as you twist them into position, thoroughly
spreading the epoxy. Wipe away excess epoxy
before it hardens.
❏ 4. Securely tape the flaps to the wing in the up
There were several versions of the “D”, beginning
with the D-1, featuring an additional pair of cowl
flaps. The D-5 featured water injection and two-point
bomb or drop tank shackles on the belly.
position. Place the fuse upside-down in a building
cradle and set the wing in the fuse. Mark both sides
of the fuse where the wing LE contacts it (refer to the
following photo). Remove the wing from the fuse.
FINAL CONSTRUCTION
Mount the wing to the fuselage
❏ 14. Make the machine guns from three sizes of ❏ 1. Use 30-minute epoxy to securely glue both 1/2"
telescoping K & S brass or aluminum tubing (1/4",
7/32", 3/16"). Cut the tubes to the correct length, glue
them together with thick or medium CA, then
square-off and deburr the ends.
x 1-1/4" x 1-1/4" maple wing bolt blocks in the fuse
where shown on the plan. As you can see in the
photo at step 6, one corner of the blocks has been
rounded for a finished appearance.
-45-
❏ 5. Place a straightedge on one side of the fuse
across the line you marked and the aft edge of the
wing cradle where former 5 and the crutch meet.
Draw a 6" line on the fuse as shown. This will be a
guide to position the aft portion of the ply wing fillet
base later.
❏ 10. Remove the wing from the fuse. Enlarge the
holes in the wing bolt plate in the wing with a 17/64"
drill. Enlarge the holes in the bottom sheeting to
accommodate the head of the nylon 1/4-20 wing
bolts and the paper wing bolt tube (refer to the
photo at step 11 of Build the Belly Pan).
❏ 11. Use a 1/4-20 tap to cut threads in the wing bolt
blocks in the fuse. Add a few drops of thin CA to the
holes and allow it to harden. Retap the holes.
❏ 12. Reposition the wing on the fuse and bolt it in
place with the fillet bases still taped down.
❏ 6. Use masking tape to hold the die-cut 1/32"
plywood wing fillet bases to the fuse crutches.
❏ 7. Place the wing on the fuse. As best as you can,
center the wing dowels in the oversized holes in F2.
Build the wing fillets
❏ 1. Turn the model right side up and place it on its
landing gear or in your building cradle. Check to make
sure the ply fillet bases are positioned correctly and
that they will fit the wing. Make adjustments where
necessary. This may require removing the wing and
repositioning the fillets a few times.
❏ 2. Place the model upside-down in your building
cradle and remove the wing and ply fillet bases.
Protect the center section of the wing with wax paper
or Great Planes Plan Protector so glue from the wing
fillet bases will not adhere.
❏ 13. Stand approximately ten feet behind the model
and view the alignment of the stab and wing. If
necessary, place shims made from leftover balsa
between the fillet and the fuse to bring the wing into
alignment with the stab.
❏ 8. Stick a T-pin into the center of the bottom of the
aft end of the fuse. Align the wing using the same “pin
and string” technique we showed you for aligning the
stab. Once the wing is aligned, place weights on the
bottom of the wing to hold it in position while you drill
the wing bolt holes in the next step.
❏ 14. Once you have achieved alignment, use
30-minute epoxy to glue the laser-cut plywood wing
❏ 9. Using the 1/4" holes in the sheeting and the wing dowel doublers to former 2. Be certain you have not
bolt plate inside the wing as a guide, drill #7 (or
13/64") holes through the wing bolt blocks in the fuse.
glued the dowels to the doublers. Do not disturb the
model until the epoxy has fully cured.
-46-
❏ 3. Glue the wing fillet bases to the fuse with a
mixture of 30-minute epoxy and microballoons or
other suitable filler. Working quickly before the epoxy
cures, tape the fillet bases back into position and bolt
the wing to the fuse. Reposition the model on your
workbench right side up and wipe away excess
epoxy and filler. Use whatever practical means
necessary to be certain the fillet bases are fully
contacting the wing (you can see in the photo that we
tack glued leftover balsa to the fuse, holding the fillet
down in the flap area). Do not disturb the model until
the epoxy has fully cured.
❏ 9. Use lightweight balsa filler to build up a smooth
fillet covering the balsa sheeting and tri stock and
blending the fuse to the fillet base. The more time
you spend applying and smoothing the filler, the less
sanding you will have to do after it dries.
❏ 10. Sand the fillets as necessary, blending them to
❏ 7. Cover the fillet gussets joining the fuse to the
the fuse.
fillet bases with leftover 1/16" balsa.
Build the belly pan
❏ 1. Set the fuse upside-down in your building stand
and bolt the wing to the fuselage. Mark the locations
of the die-cut 1/8" plywood belly pan formers 3C
and 4C on the bottom of the wing.
❏ 4. Use a hobby knife to carefully score the fillet
bases at the TE of the flaps. Make a sharp bend in
the fillet bases toward the bottom of the fuse where
you scored them. Glue the fillet bases to the fuselage
in alignment with the lines you marked earlier. Trim
the fillet bases even with the TE of the flap.
❏ 5. Take the wing off the fuse and trim the inner
edges of the fillet bases even with the fuse crutches.
Refer to this photo for the following three steps.
❏ 8. Cut the 1/2" x 30" balsa tri stick into two 15"
pieces. Make saw cuts in the tri stock and glue it to
the fillet base and the fuse. Glue an additional piece
of leftover 1/16" balsa over the tri stock.
Now for the fun part...
❏ 2. Bevel the bottom edge (remember, the bottom
is the bottom of the plane even if it is upside-down in
your stand right now) of the die-cut 1/8" plywood
belly pan former 5E to accommodate the sheeting
when it is added later. Test fit 5E and make sure that
when in position on the trailing edge of the wing, it is
the same height as 5D so the fuse sheeting and the
belly pan sheeting will align.
❏ 3. Cover former 5D on the fuselage with wax
❏ 6. Use the templates on the plan to make two sets of
fillet gussets from leftover 3/32" balsa. Glue the
gussets to the fillet bases and the fuse sides as shown.
paper so you don’t inadvertently glue 5-E to it. You
can use 3M 75 Repositionable spray adhesive to
hold the wax paper in position.
This is a photo of the balsa filler just after application.
As you can see, little sanding will be required when
it dries.
-47-
❏ 4. Glue 5-E to the bottom of the wing with 1/16"
plywood spacers between it and former 5-D.
Refer to this photo for the following four steps.
sheets that cover the belly pan between the bottom of
the wing and the middle of the first stringer. Test fit one
of the sheets, trim as required for a good fit, then glue
it into position. Fill the little corner near the wing
leading edge with a piece of leftover 3/32" balsa.
❏ 13. Apply lightweight balsa filler where needed to
blend the belly pan to the wing. Allow to dry fully,
then sand smooth.
❏ 10. Glue the other sheet into position the same way.
❏ 5. The same as you did at the back of the wing,
place 1/16" spacers between 2C and F-2, then glue
2C to the bottom of the wing.
Note: Make certain that the spacers are at least 1/2"
from the outer edges of the formers, so they will not
interfere with your razor saw when you cut through
the sheeting that will be added later.
❏ 6. Cut three 1/4" x 1/4" x 30" balsa stringers to the
correct length and glue them into the notches of
formers 5E, 2C, 2 and 1. The formers will naturally
bow outward continuing the curvature of the belly pan.
❏ 14. Use a fine razor saw to cut through the sheeting
and stringers between 2B and 2C separating the belly
pan from the fuse.
❏ 15. Remove the wing from the fuse and sand the
edges of the belly pan sheeting even with the
formers on the front and back of the wing. Similarly,
sand the sheeting even with former 2B on the fuse.
❏ 11. Cut holes in the belly pan sheeting for the wing ❏ 16. Bolt the wing back onto the fuse and make
bolt tubes. Cut two wing bolt tubes from the 1/2"
cardboard tube, then glue them into position.
❏ 7. Insert formers 3C and 4C, then glue them into
position.
certain everything fits well. Use filler or sand where
necessary so the joint between the belly pan and the
wing looks good.
Assemble the cowl
❏ 8. Glue leftover 1/4" x 1/4" balsa sticks into the
notches of former 2 and the firewall.
❏ 9. Use the belly pan sheeting pattern on the plan
and two 3/32" x 3" x 30" balsa sheets to make the two
❏ 12. Cover the rest of the belly pan with two more
3/32" x 3" x 30" balsa sheets. While you’re working
on the bottom of the fuse, add pieces of leftover
3/32" balsa to the bottom of the wing fillet bases.
-48-
❏ 1. Use curved-tip scissors to cut the molded ABS
left and right cowl sides, cowl front and left and
right cowl rings along the molded-in cutlines. The
cutlines are most easily seen from inside the pieces.
❏ 2. Use a bar sander with 80-grit sandpaper to true test fit them to the cowl. When a good fit is achieved,
the edges of the cowl pieces so they fit well. Clean
the plastic with alcohol, then thoroughly roughen
the inside edges of all the joints with coarse
sandpaper. Later, the inside seams will be reinforced
with fiberglass tape and epoxy. The plastic must be
scuffed for the epoxy to adhere.
glue the cowl flaps to the cowl, and then to each other.
❏ 7. Use the template on the plans to cut the cowl
❏ 3. Securely tape the left and right cowl sides together
❏ 5. Make six cowl mounts using the twelve die-cut
1/8" plywood cowl block sides and six 3/8" x 5/8" x
7/8" hardwood cowl mount blocks.
on the inside and the outside with masking tape. Join
the cowl front to the taped-together sides. Use CA to
glue the sides to the front, then to each other.
Note: If CA accelerator is required, apply only a small
amount just where it is required. Too much accelerator
may soften the plastic.
❏ 6. Glue a die-cut 1/8" plywood cowl mount base
between the supports at the bottom. Use a moto-tool to
❏ 4. If necessary, trim the aft edges of the cowl sides cut an elongated hole in the center of each base. The
so they are even. Tape the cowl flaps together, then
hole should be approximately 3/32" wide and 3/8" long.
-49-
ring sections from the 5/8" x 2" x 30" balsa sheet.
Hint: Use 3M 75 Repositionable spray adhesive to
temporarily glue the templates directly onto the
balsa sheet. Cut the sections out, then peel off the
paper templates.
Note: If you do not have a table saw or a belt sander to
accurately cut out the cowl rings, keep in mind that the
ends of the cowl rings are the only edges that really
need to be cut accurately (since they determine the
locations of the cowl mounts). The outer edges will be
sanded flush with the fuse and the inner edges do not
join to anything.
❏ 8. Test fit the cowl ring sections and the cowl
mounts to the front of the fuselage. Make adjustments
to the cowl ring sections if necessary.
Hint: Removing the elevators and rudder enables you
to stand the fuselage vertically on its tail.
❏ 9. Once you have positioned the cowl mounts and
the cowl rings, remove one of the cowl ring sections,
add medium CA, then carefully reposition the cowl
ring, permanently gluing it into position. Glue the
remaining five cowl ring sections into position the
same way. Do not glue the cowl mounts to the
fuselage until after the fuse is covered.
❏ 17. Test fit, then temporarily tack-glue the baffle
into the cowl against the lip that joins the cowl front
to the sides. Trim as necessary for a good fit.
❏ 18. Fit the cowl to the engine, trimming the
opening in the baffle as necessary until you have
achieved adequate clearance all the way around.
❏ 10. Remove the cowl mounts. Sand the cowl ring
❏ 19. Remove the cowl. Determine the location of
sections even with the fuselage. Round the edges as
shown on the plan. As you can see, this is easily
done with the cowl mounts off the model.
accessories to be mounted inside the cowl, such as an
ignition switch (if using an ignition engine), fueling
system, remote glow igniter, air fill valve, etc.Temporarily
mount those items where you prefer, then cut holes in
the cowl to access them. Cut additional holes where
necessary for the exhaust outlet and the needle valve.
❏ 14. Have an assistant hold the cowl in position, or
❏ 11. Reposition the cowl mounts to the fuse. Drill use masking tape. Drill 3/32" holes through the cowl
1/16" holes through the elongated holes in the cowl
mount bases and into former 1. Temporarily hold the
cowl mounts in position with six #2 x 3/8" screws and
#2 washers. The cowl mounts will be permanently
glued in place after the model is covered.
and the cowl mount blocks. Remove the cowl and
enlarge the holes in the cowl only with a 5/32" drill.
Add a few drops of thin CA to all the holes and allow
it to harden.
❏ 15. Test mount the cowl to the cowl mounts with
six #6 x 1/2" screws and #6 washers.
Refer to this photo while building the engine
baffle in the next few steps.
Note: IMAA rules specify that magneto spark
ignition engines must be equipped with a manually
operated coil-grounding switch to stop the engine.
This switch must be mounted in a location that is
readily available to both the pilot and the helper. As
mentioned in the front of the manual, Great Planes
makes an Ignition Switch Harness (GPMG2150)
that is suitable for this purpose.
❏ 20. Glue the baffle to the cowl. Reinforce the seam
between the cowl front and sides with several 3-inch
long strips of 1" glass cloth and 30-minute epoxy.
Reinforce the seams on the top and bottom of the cowl
sides with additional strips of 1" glass cloth and epoxy.
While you’re at it, use some of the leftover epoxy to
lightly coat the plywood baffle so it will be fuelproof and
water resistant when wet-sanding the cowl.
❏ 12. Cut six 1" x 1" squares from the leftover 1/32"
ply sheeting (from the flap area of the wing). Glue the
squares to the inside of the cowl where they will align
with the cowl mounts.
❏ 13. Mount the engine to the fuse. Place the cowl on
the fuse and mount a prop on your engine. Align the
cowl so the prop will have clearance all the way
around and is centered on the engine. View the
alignment of the cowl with the engine and the fuselage
from all angles. Make adjustments as needed.
❏ 16. Now that you’ve mounted the cowl, use the
template on the plan to make an engine baffle from
1/8" lite plywood (not included). The baffle will guide all
incoming air over the head and cylinder of the engine
for maximum cooling. The cutout is for the US Engine
41cc. If you are using a different engine, you’ll have to
make the cutout by trial and error fitting.
-50-
With demand for P-47’s beginning to exceed
production capabilities at the Evansville and
Farmingdale plants, a third factory was needed.
Under license, the Curtiss Aircraft Company in
Buffalo, NY, began production on the P-47G,
identical to P-47D’s.
❏ 24. Refer to the photo on the box and at step 4 of
Scale Details for placement of the oil cooler shutters,
then shape the oil cooler shutters as you did the
turbo-supercharger cover.
❏ 21. Make certain the outside of the cowl is
thoroughly scuffed with sandpaper. Fill the seam
between the cowl front and the cowl sides and the
seams between the cowl sides with filler such as
automotive Bondo. It is not necessary to fill the seam
between the cowl flaps and the rest of the cowl as this
is an actual seam on the P-47.You will probably have to
apply the Bondo in a few stages as it hardens rapidly.
After the Bondo fully hardens, wet-sand the cowl
starting with 150-grit sandpaper, gradually progressing
to finer grades ending with 400-grit. When you’re done
sanding, your cowl should look something like the one
in the photo.
While we’re working with plastic parts, let’s prepare the
turbo-supercharger cover and the oil cooler shutters.
The “bubble canopy” version was a result of pilots'
complaints of lack of rearward visibility. In 1943 a
P-47D-5 was modified by removing the razor
spine and fitting a modified Hawker Tempest
bubble canopy. In addition to the new canopy was
a flat, armored windscreen. The first production
version of the bubble canopy was designated
P-47D-25-RE (produced in Farmingdale), of
which 385 were built.
Balance the airplane laterally
IMPORTANT: Do not confuse this procedure with
“checking the C.G.” or “balancing the airplane
fore and aft.” That very important step will be
covered later in the manual.
❏ 22. Cut the turbo-supercharger cover along the Now that the basic airframe is completed, it’s time to
cutlines (most easily seen from the inside).
balance the airplane laterally (side-to-side).
❏ 1. Make sure all the main components are
installed in the model (landing gear, servos, engine,
exhaust system, etc.). Mount the wing to the fuse.
❏ 2. With the wing level, have a helper help you lift
the model by the engine propeller shaft and the
bottom of the fuse under the TE of the fin. Do this
several times.
FINISHING
Final Preparations
While some modelers prefer to mount the
receiver and battery pack before covering the
model (and before the C.G. is checked), it is best
to mount them after the model is covered. By
correctly positioning the receiver battery and the
receiver, the model may require no additional
ballast to achieve the desired C.G. Instructions on
balancing the model are provided after the
covering section.
❏ 1. If you haven’t already done so, remove all
components including the engine, servos, pushrods,
landing gear etc.
❏ 2. Use fuelproof model paint, finishing resin or
epoxy thinned with alcohol to fuelproof all areas that
may be exposed to fuel or engine exhaust. These
include the wheel wells, trailing edge of the wing in
the flap area, the firewall and engine compartment,
the wing saddle in the fuse, belly pan formers 2 and
5 and the inside of the tail gear compartment.
Note: It is highly recommended that the wheel wells be
fuelproofed before covering the top of the wing. If the
covering is already down, some of the paint may soak
through the balsa, causing blemishes in the covering.
❏ 3. Inspect all surfaces for uneven glue joints and
seams that require filler. Apply filler where needed.
Many small dents or scratches in the balsa can be
repaired by applying a few drops of water to the area
and allowing it to dry. This will cause the wood to
swell, so you can sand it back to shape.
❏ 4. Final sand the entire model with progressively finer
❏ 3. If one wing always drops when you lift the grits of sandpaper, finishing with 320 or 400-grit. Don’t
❏ 23. Place a sheet of coarse sandpaper on the
bottom of the fuse. Use the bottom of the fuse to
final-shape the turbo-supercharger cover exit.
model, it means that side is heavy. Balance the
airplane by gluing weight inside the other wing tip.
An airplane that has been laterally balanced will
track better in loops and other maneuvers.
-51-
press down too hard while sanding over sheeted areas
(which is pretty much the whole model!). This can
cause thin spots in the sheeting over ribs or formers. It’s
also helpful to use fresh, new sandpaper.
Painting
Everything that was painted on this model was
painted with Top Flite LustreKote (except for the
canopy frame—more on that later). LustreKote was
selected because it matches MonoKote and dries
fast. Usually, you can paint one color in the morning,
then wet-sand and paint a second coat later that
same day. Some modelers prefer to do the painting
after they cover the model, but we recommend
painting the intercooler air exits (if you have built them
in the open position) and the wing fillets before, since
they are attached to the model. The wing fillets can be
covered with MonoKote if done in several sections,
but we think it’s easier to paint them.
Due to all the hard-to-reach corners and small
surfaces of the intercooler air exits, it would be
nearly impossible to paint them with a spray can. Too
much paint comes from a can to coat all the “nooks
and crannies” without ending up with runs. Painting
small parts like this is much better accomplished
with an airbrush. With an airbrush you have control
over the amount of paint that is being applied—a
much finer mist can be sprayed, making it virtually
difficult to get the paint to run. The wing fillets could
be painted from a spray can, but you will achieve
better results if these are airbrushed too. Though
LustreKote is only available in spray cans, there is a
way to apply it through an airbrush. Here’s how:
❏ 2. Transfer the paint from the cup into your If you choose to duplicate the paint scheme on the
airbrush jar. Thin LustreKote about 50%. We use K &
B thinner. Other thinners may work, but should be
tested for compatibility. Now your LustreKote is ready
to spray through your airbrush.
❏ 3. Mask and paint the intercooler air exits to match
your trim scheme. A little bit of careful sanding will
remove ridges built up where the paint meets the
masking tape. A final coat of clear (also applied
through an airbrush) will finish the job.
Note: If using aluminum, do not sand the final coat.
Small scratches left from even the finest sandpaper
will not disappear after a clear coat is applied. It is
best just to apply aluminum (such as on the wing
fillet), let dry, then clear coat.
The rest of the plastic parts that are not built onto
the model (such as the cowl, oil cooler shutters,
turbo-supercharger cover on the bottom of the
fuse, the canopy) can be painted after the model
is covered. Paint these parts whenever you’re
ready. Following are instructions how to paint the
cowl like the one on the kit box cover...
kit box, paint the cowl in this sequence:
A. Apply at least two coats of primer, allowing to dry
and wet-sanding between coats.
B. Paint the aft end of the cowl white.
C. Mark the guidelines for the yellow as described
above. Mask, then paint the yellow.
D. Mark the guidelines for the red. Mask, then paint
the red.
E. Mark the guidelines for the blue. On the full-size
Tarheel Hal, the blue extends only about halfway
across the cowl flaps. As you can imagine, this would
be difficult and time consuming to mask. We cheated
by painting the entire cowl flaps blue (nobody will
notice!). If you want a really professional job (as we
did on our prototype—don’t try this unless you’re a
pretty good painter), you could apply stick-on stars to
the white you already painted on the cowl flaps, then
paint the cowl flaps blue. Peel off the stars, leaving
behind stars of white paint under the blue. Now the
stars will never peel off.
F. Lightly wet-sand the entire cowl with 400 or
600-grit sandpaper, then spray on a coat of clear.
G. Paint the inside of the front of the cowl and the
baffle flat black.
Just like the cowl, the canopy can be painted at
any time. Here are some guidelines on how to
paint the canopy...
❏ To mark the stripes around the cowl after you’ve
❏ 1. Spray the paint through a tube into a cup.
Spraying the paint through a tube keeps much of it
from becoming airborne.
applied primer, tape a pencil to a wood block of
appropriate height and lightly draw lines all the way
around. Use the line as a guide for applying masking
tape for painting.
-52-
LustreKote is not recommended for painting the
clear butyrate canopy frame because it will curl
the edges over time. Select another type of paint
that will not react with butyrate, such as Pactra
Formula-U or Chevron.
❏ 1. After the canopy has been cut out and trimmed to
fit the fuse, carefully sand the edges with 400-grit
sandpaper, then wash the canopy in warm, soapy water.
Covering
Warning: Never cut the covering on critical
structural areas of the model. These areas include
the stab, fin and wing sheeting—especially near
the fuse where the stresses can be high. Modelers
who cut the covering on the model tend to cut into
the sheeting, weakening it. If you have a colorful
trim scheme (such as the one on the kit box),
occasionally it may be necessary to make a small
cut in the covering here and there. This is
acceptable as long as the cut is small and is not
over sheeting on a critical area. Cuts that go
across the grain weaken the balsa more than cuts
that go with the grain.
❏ 2. Cover the stab, fin and dorsal fin first. This is
rather straightforward. You can cover the elevators
and rudder now, or wait until later.
❏ 3. Make the invasion stripes for the fuse. As you
can see, the invasion stripes are not simply straight
strips of black and white MonoKote, but are curved
due to the oval cross-section and tapering angle of
the fuse. Each invasion stripe must be custom made
to fit the fuse. Here’s how we made the invasion
stripes for our prototype on the kit box:
A. Determine the width of the stripes. On our prototype
we made them 3" wide. Mark their location on both
sides of the fuse along the side stringer.
❏ 2. Mask off the clear areas of the canopy by The model on the kit box cover was covered with
applying masking tape to the framing. Use a pencil to
simultaneously press the tape into the corners while
marking guidelines for trimming.
❏ 3. Use a hobby knife to trim the masking tape
along the pencil-drawn guide lines, then peel off the
excess tape.
MonoKote film. This trim scheme isn’t as difficult as
it is time-consuming and can be accomplished by
modelers who are fairly skilled with iron-on films. It
helps to tackle the job in small sections (seams are
preferred over wrinkles and frustration!). Some of
the covering techniques we used are described
below. If you are anxious to get your model in the air
as soon as possible, or would rather not spend too
much time covering, there are many conventional
military schemes (such as olive drab and aluminum
or grey) that are easier to duplicate. Top Flite offers
flat MonoKote in several military colors. The stars
and bars insignias provided on the decal sheet
should work with any military trim scheme.
B. Use a builder’s square to mark short vertical
guidelines.
❏ 4. Cover the rest of the clear areas with masking
tape or a plastic bag. Mask off the inside of the
canopy to protect it from overspray.
❏ 5. Paint the canopy frame.
❏ 6. Paint the rest of the molded plastic parts to
match your trim scheme (including the turbosupercharger cover and the oil cooler shutters).
Cover the fuse
❏ 1. Use a dust brush, compressed air or a Top Flite
Tack Cloth to remove balsa dust from the model.
Thoroughly clean your work area, removing any balsa
dust or particles that could get underneath the covering
and mess up your finish. Get out your covering tools
and “gear up” your work shop for covering.
-53-
C. Using the guidelines as a start, mark the invasion
stripes around the fuse with 1/8" wide flexible
vinyl tape. On this model you can see that the
invasion stripes go only about halfway (whew!).
Carefully view the stripes from all angles, making
sure they are vertical and parallel with each
other. This is a total “eyeball” procedure, so
taking your time now will show when your model
is done.
F. Before you remove the 1/8" wide tape from the
fuse, use a fine pencil or a ballpoint pen to lightly
mark the stripes directly on the fuse. These will
serve as guidelines for positioning the MonoKote
stripes when you iron them on.
D. Peel the backing off a piece of white MonoKote film
and tape it to the fuse tightly over the first invasion
stripe. As you can see, the 1/8" wide tape on the
fuse will show through the covering. Using the
tape underneath to guide your pen, mark both
edges of the invasion stripe on the covering.
G. Iron the invasion stripes to the fuse. As can be seen
in the photo, we are planning to make the stars and
bars from MonoKote (though your kit comes with decals
which can be applied directly over the covering).
front of and behind the cockpit on the top. The red
pinstripes between the white scallops and aluminum
are cut from red MonoKote using a Top Flite Smart
Stripe™ and then are ironed into position carefully,
curving them as you go.
❏ 5. Cover the elevators and rudder. The blue, yellow
and red flag on the rudder is made from MonoKote
and ironed into position after the rudder is covered in
orange. The stripes are 1-1/8" wide (meaning the
yellow one in the middle is 1-1/4" to allow for overlap)
and extend to 2-1/2" from the trailing edge of the fin.
❏ 6. After the fuse is covered, fuelproof the cowl
mounts and then glue them into position.
❏ 4. The red, white and blue “scallops” on the front of
E. Remove the covering and cut the stripe along the
guidelines you drew (making the white invasion
stripes 1/8" wider on both sides to allow for
overlapping). Use a tissue dampened with denatured
alcohol to remove any ink left on the covering. Cut the
rest of the stripes the same way.
the fuse were done the same as the invasion stripes—
using 1/8" wide vinyl tape on the fuse as a guide to
draw the outlines directly onto the covering. Note that
the blue was applied in three strips. The photo shows
the white outline and the bottom blue strip already
ironed into position. Don’t forget to lightly mark the
pattern on the fuse before you remove the tape. The
aluminum on the fuse was applied after the white and
blue scallops, followed by the flat black anti-glare in
-54-
The final variant of the P-47 was the P-47N-25
rolling off the Republic Farmingdale production line
in 1945. The “N” featured squared-off clipped wing
tips and an increased wingspan to accommodate
four additional 50-gallon internal wing tanks. The
goal of increasing range to fulfill the roll of bomber
escort (and to become more competitive with the
P-51 Mustang) was accomplished.
Cover the wing
❏ 1. If you’ve chosen the “Tarheel Hal” trim scheme
on the kit box cover, the wing isn’t as detailed as the
fuse and is rather straightforward. Start by covering
the belly pan in four strips running from front to back.
❏ 2. Add the invasion stripes. These can be straight
strips of MonoKote. On our prototype we made them
3-1/2" wide (meaning the white stripes should be
3-3/4" wide to allow for a 1/8" over lap on both sides
of the black).
❏ 3. Cover the remainder of the wing in aluminum.
❏ 4. Cover the flaps and ailerons starting with the
ends, then the bottoms and tops. Make certain the
invasion stripes on the flaps line up with the invasion
stripes on the wing.
Apply panel lines
If you plan to do the panel lines with a pen, don’t do
them until after the model is completely finished and
has been balanced. This will minimize all the
handling you’ll be doing in the meantime which can
smudge the panel lines.
If you think your model looks good now, wait ‘til you
see it with panel lines. Panel lines are easy to apply
and really enhance the model’s appearance. The
pictures on the box cover may be used as a
reference, but if your model will be entered in
competition refer to 3-view drawings in your
documentation package for accurate placement of
the lines.
❏ 5. Cover the 1/16" ply aileron and flap hatch Some of the panel lines on the model on the kit box
covers, the balsa retract hatch covers and the wheel
covers (if you’ve made them) to match the bottom of
the wing.
Apply the decals
❏ 1. Cut the decals from the included decal sheet.
cover are made from MonoKote and some of them are
drawn with a Top Flite Panel Line Pen (TOPQ2510).
The ones that go around the fuse are MonoKote
because, the same as the invasion stripes, they are not
straight and cannot be drawn on with a straightedge. All
the rest of the panel lines are made with the Panel Line
Pen. Use a Top Flite Smart Stripe (TOPR2420) to cut
panel lines from black MonoKote.
The various hatches and rivets were made using a Top
Flite Scale Template (TOPR2187) and homemade
templates from sheets of plastic.
Note: Ink panel lines that come into contact with fuel
will wash away immediately. Over time they will
smudge and fade from handling with oily hands, but
they can always be “freshened up” by going back over
them with a Panel Line Pen. If you would prefer more
permanent panel lines, make them from MonoKote.
FINAL ASSEMBLY
Join the control surfaces
❏ 1. Test fit the control surfaces with the hinges to
❏ 2. Place the decals on the model where shown on
the kit box. For larger decals such as the stars and
bars, first dip the decal in a solution of warm water
and soap (about five or six drops of liquid dish soap
per quart of water). Then, place the decal on the
model, slide it into position, and squeegee the water
out from under the decal with a rubber squeegee or
a piece of soft balsa. This will aid in positioning the
decal and eliminate air bubbles. Some small wrinkles
can be removed with a little heat from a heat gun.
make sure they fit. If necessary, trim hinges that are
too long (a few of the flap and aileron hinges on our
prototype had to be shortened to fit all the way in).
❏ 2. Join all the control surfaces to the model with
the hinges using 30-minute epoxy. Do one control
surface at a time, mixing up fresh batches of epoxy
as required.
Hint: Add a drop of plastic-compatible oil or a dab of
petroleum jelly to the hinge pins to keep epoxy from
entering. You can also lightly coat the LE of the
control surface and the TE of the model with a thin
film of oil to prevent epoxy from adhering.
❏ 3. Don’t forget to fill out the identification decal and
stick it somewhere in your model. The AMA requires
this information in or on the model.
-55-
Hook up the controls
❏ 1. Route the air lines through the wing for the main
gear. Leave the lines long enough to connect them to
the landing gear outside of the wing. Connect the air
lines to the landing gear, then mount the gear in the
wing. Hold the landing gear hatch covers to the wing
with clear tape. If you haven’t already done so,
secure the wheel axle and nuts with a drop of thread
locking compound. Add a drop of oil to the axles
(even if the wheels spin freely now, the plastic hubs
can soften and deform due to the friction caused by
the speed and weight of the model while taking off
and landing—we’ve seen it happen!
❏ 7. Add a few drops of thin CA to the holes for the
control horn mounting screws in the elevators,
rudder and ailerons. Mount the control horns using
four #4 x 1/2" screws on each horn.
❏ 8. Connect the horns to the clevises on the
pushrods using 4-40 nuts to lock the clevises to the
rods. Use a silicone retainer on every clevis.
❏ 1. Position the turbo-supercharger cover on the
bottom of the fuse and draw a line around it with a
felt-tip pen.
❏ 2. Route the air lines through the fuselage, then
connect them to the cylinder on the tail gear.
Mount the tail gear. Make certain all the set screws
on the tail gear are secured with a drop of thread
locking compound.
❏ 3. Mount the engine and hook up all the systems
inside the cowl including the fuel lines, in-line fuel
filler valve, remote glow igniter (if used), etc.
Scale details
❏ 9. Mount the retract air valve and air valve servo. In
our prototype, we mounted the air valve to the fuse
❏ 4. Apply a few drops of thin CA to the holes in the crutch with a scratch-built mount and mounted the air
servo blocks and servo tray for the servo mounting
screws, allow to dry, then mount the servos in the wing
and fuse. Install servo extension cords as necessary.
Secure all connections with vinyl tape, heat shrink
tubing, or special clips intended for that purpose.
Make certain none of the servo cords will interfere with
the landing gear or other moveable systems.
❏ 5. Temporarily connect the servos to your receiver
valve servo to the servo tray as shown. Though a micro
servo was used, there is room for a standard servo.
❏ 10. Install your scale Top Flite cockpit kit (if you’ve ❏ 2. Carefully cut the covering just inside the line
built one) and a pilot. We used the Top Flite 1/5-scale
WW II pilot (TOPQ9032). This is an upper body only
pilot, but there is a full body pilot available as well
(TOPQ9030).
you marked. Peel the covering off.
and battery pack (they may not yet be mounted in
the model), turn on your radio, center the trims on
the transmitter, then center all the servos.
❏ 6. Tentatively connect the servos to the pushrods
(adjustments may need to be made when the control
throws are set up later). Mount the flap and servo
hatch covers in the wing with the #2 x 3/8" flat head
screws. Disconnect the radio.
One problem that occurred with the removal of the
razor spine to accommodate the bubble canopy
was tail flutter. Beginning with the D-40, a dorsal fin
was added to rectify this. The dorsal fin was also
retrofitted to all previous variants still flying.
-56-
❏ 3. Glue the turbo-supercharger cover in position
with thin CA. Do not use CA accelerator.
hobby knife with a sharp #11 blade to carefully cut a
1/16" strip of covering from the fuse. Remove the
covering, exposing the bare balsa. This will allow the
canopy to be securely attached to the fuse—not just
to the covering.
❏ 2. Securely glue the canopy to the fuse using canopy
glue such as J & Z Products Z RC/56 (JOZR5007). Use
rubber bands or masking tape to hold the canopy in
position until the glue dries.
Static display propeller
❏ 4. Mount the oil cooler shutters the same way.
There are several ways to make a scale antenna
mast. However you do yours, you should not
permanently mount the antenna mast to the
fuselage—if it gets bumped, it’s best to have the mast
pop off rather than break off which would require a
repair job.
❏ 6. Fill the empty space inside the cowl with a Top
Flite 1/5-scale Replica Radial Engine (TOPQ7903).
You can get as detailed as you prefer. We just trimmed
the engine to fit, painted it grey and black, then held it
to the ply baffle in the cowl with a couple of #2 x 3/8"
screws (not supplied). A few of the simulated cylinders
will have to be cut off to accommodate the real engine.
Mount the canopy
Though the bubble canopy is shown in the photos,
the razorback canopy is mounted the same way.
❏ 5. Refer to the photos on the kit box cover or to
your scale documentation for the exact location and
shape of an antenna mast. We shaped our antenna
mast from a piece of leftover 1/8" balsa and glued it
to a mounting plate that was made from a piece of
leftover ABS. Heat the mounting plate and bend it to
match the curve of the fuse. Paint the antenna mast
to match your trim scheme, then attach the mounting
plate to the fuse with double-sided tape.
❏ 1. Position the canopy on the fuse. Use a felt-tip
pen to trace its outline onto the covering. Use a
-57-
If you choose to make a static display propeller and prop
hub, the amount of effort and time required will be
determined by the level of accuracy you wish to achieve.
On our prototype we simulated the Hamilton Standard
hydromatic prop (13ft. 1-7/8in. dia) by shaping a single
wood blade from a block of basswood and using it as a
mold to vacuum-form four front halves and four back
halves from .030" ABS plastic sheet. The halves were
glued together making four complete blades. We glued
a 1/2" x 6" wood dowel into the root of each blade so
they could be plugged into the hub.The hub was shaped
from a basswood block with a rotary tool and a drill
press. The spinner was turned on a lathe from a
basswood block, then joined to the hub. The bolts were
added later. Finish your display prop with a Hamilton
Standard decal sheet by Major Decals (MAJQ0006),
followed by a light coat of flat clear LustreKote.
leading edge at the location of rib 5 (not alongside
the fuse). This is where your model should balance
for your first flights. Later, you may wish to
experiment by shifting the C.G. up to 1/2" forward or
back to change the flying characteristics. Moving the
C.G. forward may improve the smoothness and
arrow-like tracking, but it may then require more
speed for takeoff and make it more difficult to slow
down for landing. Moving the C.G. aft makes the
model more agile with a lighter and snappier feel. In
any case, start at the location we recommend and do
not at any time balance your model outside the
recommended range.
The Curtiss electric prop (13ft. dia) would be easier to
model due to the simplicity of the hub and the closer
resemblance to model airplane propellers—you could
purchase two oversize wood model airplane props,
round the tips and join them in a four-blade fashion. A
spinner could be made from a wood dowel.
attach weight to the cowl. It is not intended to support
weight. Tail weight may be added by using Great
Planes (GPMQ4485) “stick-on” lead weights and later,
if the balance proves to be OK, you can open the fuse
bottom and glue these permanently in position.
❏ 4. Once you have determined where to mount the
battery pack and receiver and any additional weight
required to achieve the correct balance, take the
model off the balance stand and remove the wing.
❏ 5. Mount the receiver and battery pack. As you
can see in previous photos we mounted our receiver
on a plate (with R/C foam rubber in between) made
from leftover 1/8" plywood that was attached to the
servo tray. The battery pack was wrapped in R/C
foam rubber and securely held in position above the
fuel tank with a sheet of lite-ply. Simply stuffing the
battery pack into position with foam rubber is not
sufficient. Attach additional lead weight to the tail or
nose as necessary.
❏ 6. Mount the receiver on/off switch and charging
GET YOUR MODEL READY TO FLY
Balance your model
NOTE: This section is VERY important and must
NOT be omitted! A model that is not properly
balanced will be unstable and possibly unflyable.
At this stage your model should be in ready-to-fly
condition with all of the systems in place including
the engine, landing gear, scale details, covering and
painting and the radio system (less the receiver and
battery pack). After you find out where the C.G. is
right now, you can mount the receiver and battery
pack in a location that will minimize (or eliminate) the
amount of additional ballast required to get the C.G.
at the correct location.
❏ 1. Accurately mark the C.G. on the top of the wing
on both sides of the fuselage. The C.G. is shown on
the plan (CG) and is located 5-1/4" back from the
❏ 2. With the wing attached to the fuselage, all parts of
the model installed (ready to fly), an empty fuel tank
and the landing gear retracted (up), place the model on
a Great Planes CG Machine at the balance point you
marked, or hold it upside-down with the stabilizer level.
Note: It will be necessary to substitute the base rods
that come with the C.G. Machine with longer base rods.
jack where they can be connected to the receiver
and battery pack and will be readily accessible from
outside the model. Secure the connection between
the battery pack and the switch with vinyl tape, heat
shrink tubing or special clips suitable for that
purpose. Route your receiver antenna inside or
outside the fuselage.
❏ 7. Mount the wing onto the fuse and recheck the
C.G.
❏ 3. If the tail drops, the model is “tail heavy" and
you must add weight* to the nose to balance. If the
nose drops, it is “nose heavy” and you must add
weight* to the tail to balance.
*If possible, first attempt to balance the model by
positioning the battery pack and receiver where
required. If you are unable to obtain proper balance
by doing so, then it will be necessary to add weight to
the nose or tail to achieve the correct balance point.
NOTE: Nose weight may be easily installed by gluing
lead weights into the engine compartment. Do not
-58-
The cost of production P-47’s as delivered was
$82,997 for a B model in 1942, $79,752 for a D
model in 1944 and $78,642 for an N model in 1945.
Set the control surface throws
❏ 1. If you haven’t already done so, center all the
servos. The servo arms on the flap servos should be
positioned so the flaps are up when the switch on the
transmitter is in the “up” position.
❏ 2. Make certain all the controls move in the correct
direction.
❏ 3. Adjust your pushrod hookups as necessary to
provide the proper control surface movements as shown.
CONTROL SURFACE THROWS
We recommend the following control surface throws:
NOTE: Throws are measured at the widest part of
the elevators, rudder, ailerons and flaps.
High Rate
Low Rate
ELEVATOR:
3/4" up
3/4" down
1/2" up
1/2" down
AILERONS:
3/4" up
3/4" down
1/2" up
1/2" down
RUDDER:
1-3/4" right
1-3/4" left
FLAPS:
3-1/4" down
TRIM MIXING
Mix 1/16" of down elevator at full flaps to eliminate
pitch-up that occurs when the flaps are extended.
The balance point and control surface throws listed
in this manual are the ones at which the P-47 flies
best. Set up your aircraft to those specifications. If,
after a few flights, you would like to adjust the
throws or C.G. to suit your tastes, that is fine. Too
much control surface throw can make your model
difficult to control or force it into a stall, so
remember...More is not better.
PREFLIGHT
Identify your model
No matter if you fly at an AMA sanctioned R/C club
site or if you fly somewhere on your own, you should
always have your name, address, telephone number
and AMA number on or inside your model. It is
required at all AMA R/C club flying sites and AMA
sanctioned flying events. Fill out the identification
sticker included with this kit and place it on or inside
your model.
Charge your batteries
Follow the battery charging procedures in your radio
instruction manual. You should always charge your
transmitter and receiver batteries the night before
you go flying and at other times as recommended by
the radio manufacturer.
NOTE: Checking the condition of your receiver battery
pack is highly recommended. This is especially
important on a large scale model such as this. All
battery packs, whether it’s a trusty pack you’ve just
taken out of another model, or a new battery pack you
just purchased, should be cycled, noting the discharge
capacity. Oftentimes a weak battery pack can be
identified (and a valuable model saved!) by comparing
its actual capacity to its rated capacity. Refer to the
instructions and recommendations that come with your
cycler. If you don’t own a battery cycler, perhaps you
can have a friend cycle your pack and note the capacity
for you.
Balance your propellers
Carefully balance your propellers before you fly. An
unbalanced prop is the single most significant cause
of vibration that can damage your model. Not only
will engine mounting screws and bolts loosen,
possibly with disastrous effect, but vibration may
also damage your radio receiver and battery.
Vibration can also cause your fuel to foam, which
will, in turn, cause your engine to run hot or quit.
-59-
We use a Top Flite Precision Magnetic Prop Balancer™
(TOPQ5700) in the workshop and keep a Great
Planes Fingertip Prop Balancer (GPMQ5000) in our
flight box.
Ground check your model
Follow the engine manufacturer’s instructions to
break-in your engine. After you run the engine on
your model, inspect your model closely to make sure
all screws remain tight and your pushrods and
connectors are secure.
Range check your radio
Ground check the operational range of your radio
before the first flight of the day. With the transmitter
antenna collapsed and the receiver and transmitter
on, you should be able to walk at least 100 feet away
from the model and still have control. Have an
assistant stand by your model and, while you work
the controls, tell you what the control surfaces are
doing. Repeat this test with the engine running at
various speeds with an assistant holding the model,
using hand signals to show you what is happening.
If the control surfaces do not respond correctly, do
not fly! Find and correct the problem first. Look for
loose servo connections or broken wires, corroded
wires on old servo connectors, poor solder joints in
your battery pack or a defective cell, or a damaged
receiver crystal from a previous crash.
ENGINE SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
Failure to follow these safety precautions may
result in severe injury to yourself and others.
Keep all engine fuel in a safe place, away from high
heat, sparks or flames, as fuel is very flammable. Do
not smoke near the engine or fuel; and remember
that engine exhaust gives off a great deal of deadly
carbon monoxide. Therefore do not run the engine
in a closed room or garage.
Get help from an experienced pilot when learning to
operate engines.
Use safety glasses when starting or running engines.
Do not run the engine in an area of loose gravel or
sand; the propeller may throw such material in your
face or eyes.
Keep your face and body as well as all spectators
away from the plane of rotation of the propeller as
you start and run the engine.
Keep these items away from the prop: loose
clothing, shirt sleeves, ties, scarfs, long hair or loose
objects such as pencils or screwdrivers that may fall
out of shirt or jacket pockets into the prop.
Use a “chicken stick” or electric starter to start the
engine. Do not use your fingers to flip the propeller.
Make certain the glow plug clip or connector is
secure so that it will not pop off or otherwise get into
the running propeller.
Make all engine adjustments from behind the
rotating propeller.
The engine gets hot! Do not touch it during or right
after operation. Make sure fuel lines are in good
condition so fuel will not leak onto a hot engine,
causing a fire.
To stop a glow engine, cut off the fuel supply by
closing off the fuel line or following the engine
manufacturer’s recommendations. Do not use hands,
fingers or any other body part to try to stop the
engine. To stop a gasoline powered engine an on/off
switch should be connected to the engine coil. Do not
throw anything into the propeller of a running engine.
AMA SAFETY CODE
Read and abide by the following Academy of Model
Aeronautics Official Safety Code:
RADIO CONTROL
1. I will have completed a successful radio
equipment ground check before the first flight of a
new or repaired model.
2. I will not fly my model aircraft in the presence of
spectators until I become a qualified flier, unless
assisted by an experienced helper.
3. I will perform my initial turn after takeoff away
from the pit or spectator areas and I will not
thereafter fly over pit or spectator areas, unless
beyond my control.
4. I will operate my model using only radio control
frequencies currently allowed by the Federal
Communications Commission...
GENERAL (Excerpt)
1. I will not fly my model aircraft in sanctioned
events, air shows, or model flying demonstrations
until it has been proven to be airworthy by having
been previously successfully flight tested.
2. I will not fly my model aircraft higher than
approximately 400 feet within 3 miles of an airport
without notifying the airport operator. I will give right
of way to and avoid flying in the proximity of full scale
aircraft. Where necessary an observer shall be used
to supervise flying to avoid having models fly in the
proximity of full scale aircraft.
IMAA SAFETY CODE (excerpts)
3. Where established, I will abide by the safety
rules for the flying site I use and I will not willfully and
deliberately fly my models in a careless, reckless
and/or dangerous manner.
Definition:
For the purpose of the following IMAA Safety Code,
the term Giant Scale shall refer to radio controlled
model aircraft, either scale or non-scale, which have
a wingspan of 80 inches or more for monoplanes
and 60 inches or more for multi-winged model
aircraft and have a ramp weight (fueled and ready to
fly) of 55 lbs. or less.
7. I will not fly my model unless it is identified with
my name and address or AMA number, on or in the
model.
Section 1.0: SAFETY STANDARD
1.1 Adherence to Code: This safety code is to be
strictly followed
9. I will not operate models with pyrotechnics (any
device that explodes, burns, or propels a projectile
of any kind).
1.2 The most current AMA Safety Code in effect is to
be observed. However, the competition sections of
the code may be disregarded.
-60-
Section 3.0: Safety Check
3.4 Flight Testing: All Giant Scale R/C aircraft are to
have been flight tested and flight trimmed with a
minimum of six flights before the model is allowed to
fly at an IMAA Sanctioned event.
3.5 Proof of Flight: The completing and signing of
the Declaration section of the Safety Inspection form
by the pilot (or owner) shall document as fact that
each aircraft has been successfully flight-tested and
proven airworthy prior to an IMAA event.
Additional General Recommendations
Servos need to be of a rating capable to handle the
loads that the control surfaces impose upon the servos.
Standard servos are not recommended for control
surfaces. Servos should be rated heavy-duty. For flightcritical control functions a minimum of 45 inch/ounces
of torque should be considered. This should be
considered a minimum for smaller aircraft and higher
torque servos are strongly encouraged for larger
aircraft. The use of one servo for each aileron and one
for each elevator half is strongly recommended. Use of
dual servos is also recommended for larger aircraft.
Section 5.0: EMERGENCY ENGINE SHUT OFF
(kill switch)
5.1 All magneto spark ignition engines must have a
coil grounding switch on the aircraft to stop the
engine. This will also prevent accidental starting of
the engine. This switch shall be readily available to
both pilot and helper. This switch is to be operated
manually and without the use of the radio system.
On-board batteries shall be 1000 mAh up to 20 lbs.,
1200 mAh to 30 lbs., 1800 mAh to 40 lbs. and 2000
mAh over 40 lbs. flying weight. The number and size of
servos, size and loads on control surfaces and added
features should be considered as an increase to these
minimums. Batteries should be able to sustain power to
the onboard radio components for a minimum of one
hour total flying time before recharging.
5.2 Engines with battery power ignition systems
must have a switch to turn off the power from the
battery pack to disable the engine from firing. This
will also prevent accidental starting of the engine.
This switch shall be readily available to both pilot
and helper. This switch shall be operated manually
and without the use of the radio system.
Redundant and
is recommended.
5.3 There must also be a means to stop the engine
from the transmitter. The most common method is to
close the carburetor throat completely using throttle
trim; however, other methods are acceptable. This
requirement applies to all glow/gas ignition engines
regardless of size.
Section 6.0: RADIO REQUIREMENTS
6.1 All transmitters must be FCC type certified.
6.2 FCC Technician or higher-class license required
for 6 meter band operation only.
Generally, it is recommended that no attempt should be
made to fly a radio controlled model aircraft with a
gasoline engine in which the model aircraft weight
would exceed twelve (12) pounds (underpowered) per
cubic inch of engine displacement, or be less than five
(5) pounds (overpowered) per cubic inch of engine
displacement. Example: Using a 3 cu. in. engine, a
model would likely be underpowered at an aircraft
weight greater than 36 pounds. With the same engine,
an aircraft weighing less than 15 pounds would likely
be overpowered.
Servo arms and wheels should be rated heavy duty.
Glass-filled servo arms and control horns are
highly recommended.
Control surfaces linkages are listed in order of preference:
1. Cable system (pull-pull). A tiller bar is highly
recommended along with necessary bracing.
systems
2. Arrow Shaft, fiberglass or aluminum, 1/4" or 5/16"
O.D. bracing every six (6) to ten (10) inches is
highly recommended.
The use of anti-glitch devices for long leads
are recommended.
3. Tube-in-tube (nyrod). Bracing every few inches is
highly recommended. Inner tube should be totally
enclosed in outer tube.
fail-safe
battery
There is no maximum engine displacement limit, as
it is the position of this body that an underpowered
aircraft presents a greater danger than an
overpowered aircraft. However, the selection of
engine size relative to airframe strength and power
loading mandates good discretionary judgement by
the designer and builder. Current AMA maximums
for engine displacement are 6.0 cu. in. for two-stroke
and 9.6 cu. in. for four-stroke engines. These
maximums apply only to AMA Sanctions concerning
competition events (such as 511, 512, 515 and 520)
and, as such, the maximums apply. All IMAA (non
competition) events should be sanctioned as Class
“C” events, in which these engine size maximums do
not apply.
-61-
4. Hardwood dowel, 3/8" O.D. bracing every six (6)
to ten (10) inches is highly recommended.
Hinges should be rated heavy duty and manufactured
for Giant Scale use primarily. Homemade and original
design hinges are acceptable if determined to be
adequate for the intended use.
Clevis (steel, excluding heavy-duty ball links) and
attachment hardware should be heavy duty 4-40
threaded rod type. 2-56 threaded size rod is acceptable
for some applications (e.g. throttle). Clevis is to have
lock nuts and sleeve or spring keepers.
Propeller tips should be painted or colored in a
visible and contrasting manner so as to increase the
visibility of the propeller tip arc.
- END OF IMAA SAFETY CODE -
❏
During the last few moments of preparation your
mind may be elsewhere anticipating the excitement
of your first flight. Because of this, you may be more
likely to overlook certain checks and procedures
that should be performed after your model is built.
To help avoid this, we’ve provided a checklist to
make sure you don’t overlook these important
areas. Many are covered in the instruction manual,
so where appropriate, refer to the manual for
complete instructions. Be sure to check the items off
as you complete them (that’s why we call it a
check list!).
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
1. Fuelproof all areas exposed to fuel or
exhaust residue such as the firewall/engine
compartment, fuel tank compartment, wing
saddle area, trailing edge of the wing, the
flap area and wheel wells, etc.
2. Check the C.G. according to the
measurements provided in the manual.
3. Secure the battery and receiver with a strip of
balsa or plywood. Simply stuffing them into
place with foam rubber is not sufficient.
4. Extend your receiver antenna and make sure it
has a strain relief inside the fuselage to keep
tension off the solder joint inside the receiver.
5. Balance your model laterally as explained in
the instructions.
6. If you haven’t already done so, glue the wing
dowels into the wing with epoxy.
7. File flat spots on the tail gear axle and
steering shaft for the set screws to lock onto.
8. Use threadlocking compound to secure
critical fasteners such as the nuts that hold
the main gear axles in place, screws that
hold the carburetor arm (if applicable), set
screws, screw-lock pushrod connectors if
used, etc.
9. Add a drop of oil to the axles so the wheels
will turn freely.
❏ 10. Make sure all hinges are securely glued
in place.
❏ 11. Reinforce holes for wood screws with thin
CA where appropriate (control horns, servo
hatches, servo mounting screws, etc.).
❏ 12. Confirm that all controls operate in the
correct direction and the throws are set up
according to the manual. Make sure there
are silicone retainers on all the clevises and
that all servo arms are secured to the servos
with the screws included with your radio.
❏ 13. Make sure the jam nuts are present and
tightened on all thread-on metal clevises.
❏ 14. Secure connections between servo wires
and Y-connectors or servo extensions, and
the connection between your battery pack
and the on/off switch with vinyl tape, heat
shrink tubing or special clips suitable for
that purpose.
❏ 15. Make sure any servo extension cords you
may have used do not interfere with other
systems (servo arms, landing gear,
pushrods, etc.).
❏ 16. Secure the pressure tap (if used) to the
muffler with high temp RTV silicone, thread
locking compound or J.B. Weld.
❏ 17. Make sure all fuel lines are connected and
are not kinked.
❏ 18. Use a Great Planes AccuPoint Laser incidence
meter (GPMR4020) to check the wing for twists
and attempt to correct before flying.
❏ 19. Balance your propeller (and spare
propellers).
❏ 20. Tighten the propeller nut and spinner.
❏ 21. Place your name, address, AMA number and
telephone number on or inside your model.
❏ 22. Cycle your receiver battery pack (if
necessary) and make sure it is fully charged.
❏ 23. If you wish to photograph your model, do this
before your first flight.
❏ 24. Range check your radio when you get to the
flying field.
-62-
One might question the selection of an older
technology, bulkier radial engine vs. a more modern
and streamlined “V” engine for the P-47. A problem
of “V” engines is their liquid cooling systems
(including a radiator) which is susceptible to gun fire.
Before Glycol became available, liquid cooled
engines also featured extremely large radiators
adversely affecting aerodynamics. Early P-47
design team members were not willing to “put all
their eggs in one basket” and utilized “V” engines for
some of their other projects.
FLYING
The Top Flite Giant P-47 is a great-flying scale
warbird that flies smoothly and predictably. It does
not,
however,
possess
the
self-recovery
characteristics of a primary R/C trainer and should
be flown only by experienced R/C pilots.
CAUTION
(THIS APPLIES TO ALL R/C AIRPLANES): If, while
flying, you notice any unusual sounds, such as a lowpitched “buzz,” this may indicate control surface flutter.
Because flutter can quickly destroy components of
your airplane, any time you detect flutter you must
immediately cut the throttle and land the airplane!
Check all servo grommets for deterioration (this may
indicate which surface fluttered) and make sure all
pushrod linkages are secure and free of play. If the
control surface fluttered once, it probably will flutter
again under similar circumstances unless you can
eliminate the free-play or flexing in the linkages. Here
are some things which can cause flutter: Excessive
hinge gap; Not mounting control horns solidly; Poor fit
of clevis pin in horn; Side-play of pushrod in guide
tube caused by tight bends; Poor fit of Z-bend in servo
arm; Insufficient glue used when gluing in the elevator
joiner wire; Excessive play or backlash in servo gears;
and Insecure servo mounting.
Fuel mixture adjustment
A fully cowled engine may run at a higher temperature
than an un-cowled engine. For this reason, the fuel
mixture should be richened so the engine runs at
about 200 rpm below peak. By running the engine
slightly rich, you will help prevent dead stick landings
caused by overheating.
For reassurance and to keep an eye on other traffic,
it is a good idea to have an assistant on the flight line
with you. Tell him to remind you to throttle back once
the plane gets to a comfortable altitude. While full
throttle is usually desirable for takeoff, most scale
models fly more smoothly and more scale-like at
reduced speeds.
Flight
Takeoff
Before you get ready to takeoff, see how the model
handles on the ground by doing a few practice runs
at low speeds on the runway. Hold “up” elevator to
keep the tail wheel on the ground. If necessary,
adjust the tail wheel or main wheels until the model
rolls straight down the runway. If you need to calm
your nerves before the maiden voyage, shut the
engine down and bring the model back into the pits.
Top off the fuel, then check all fasteners and control
linkages for peace of mind. Takeoff on high rates—
especially if you are taking off into a crosswind. For
your first few flights takeoff with the flaps retracted
(up). Later, the takeoff roll can be shortened by
taking off with half-flaps.
When you’re ready for takeoff, point the model
straight down the runway, hold a bit of up elevator to
keep the tail on the ground to maintain tail wheel
steering, then gradually advance the throttle. As the
model gains speed decrease up elevator allowing
the tail to come off the ground. One of the most
important things to remember with a tail dragger is to
always be ready to apply right rudder to counteract
the torque of the engine, keeping the model heading
straight. Gain as much speed as your runway and
flying site will safely allow before gently applying up
elevator, lifting the model into the air. At this moment
it is likely that you may need to apply more right
rudder to counteract engine torque. Be smooth on
the elevator stick, allowing the model to establish a
gentle climb to a safe altitude before turning into the
traffic pattern.
Take it easy with your P-47 for your first few flights,
gradually getting acquainted with it as your engine
breaks in. Adjust the trims to maintain straight and
level flight. After flying around for a while, and still at
a safe altitude, execute practice landing approaches
by reducing the throttle and extending the gear to
see how the model handles at slower speeds. If you
plan to land with the flaps, practice slow flight and
landing approaches with the flaps extended while
still at a comfortable altitude. Add power to see how
she climbs with flaps as well. Continue to fly around,
executing various maneuvers and making mental
notes (or having your assistant write them down) of
what trim or C.G. changes may be required to fine
tune the model so it flies the way you like. Mind your
fuel level, but use this first flight to become familiar
with your model before landing.
Landing
Landings may be executed with or without flaps.
Modelers unfamiliar with flaps usually make their first
few landings without them, but learn to prefer landing
with flaps later on. If you are unsure, you could
always land with the flaps set to half of their full
setting. Mix down elevator with flaps as described in
the “Control Throws” section on page 59 of the
manual. If you are landing without flaps, the nose of
the model will pitch down slightly when the landing
gear is extended. When you’re ready to land with
flaps, maintain an engine R.P.M. that is slightly
higher than normal to overcome the additional drag.
Flaps should be extended after the throttle and
airspeed have been reduced and the model is on the
downwind leg of the landing pattern.
-63-
To initiate a landing approach, make your final turn
toward the runway (into the wind) keeping the nose
down to maintain airspeed and control. Level the
attitude when the model reaches the runway
threshold, modulating the throttle as necessary to
maintain your glide path and airspeed. If you are
going to overshoot, smoothly advance the throttle
(always ready on the right rudder to counteract
torque) and climb out to make another attempt.
When you’re ready to make your landing flare and
the model is a foot or so off the deck, smoothly
increase up elevator until it gently touches down.
Once the model is on the runway and has lost flying
speed, hold up elevator to place the tail on the
ground, regaining tail wheel control. Refrain from
using flaps during dead-stick landings unless you’re
near the runway and already lined-up. Without
power, flaps will reduce the model’s range causing it
to land shorter than you may normally expect.
Have a ball! But always stay in control and fly in
a safe manner.
GOOD LUCK AND GREAT FLYING!
3-VIEW DRAWING
Use this layout for trim
scheme planning only.
Not suitable for scale
documentation.
Here is the Engineering and Performance data for a
P-47-D-25 (similar to the one on our kit box cover):
Model: P-47D-25-RE
Quantity built: 385
AAF Serial numbers: 42-26389 to 42-26773
Engine: Pratt & Whitney R-2800-59
Power rating: 2,000/2,300 hp
Propeller: Hamilton Standard Hydromatic 25E50 13’
1-7/8" dia.
Dimensions:
Span: 40’ 9-5/16"
Length: 35’ 10"
Height: 14’ 9-1/8"
Wing area: 300 sq ft
Weights:
Empty: 10,000 lb
Gross: 14,600 lb
Max: 17,500 lb
Speeds:
Max: 429 mph at 30,000 ft
Landing: 106 mph
Climb:
6.2 min to 15,000 ft
8.5 min to 20,000 ft
11 min to 25,000 ft
Service ceiling: 42,000 ft
Fuel:
Internal: 370 US gal
External: 410 US gal
Range:
Max: 1,030 miles @ 10,000 ft (5.3 hrs)
Normal: 590 miles @ 25,000 ft
Armament: 6 or 8 x 0.50-in mg (fifty caliber
machine gun) with from 267 to 425 rpg
(rounds per gun)
Bombs: 2 x 1,000 lb, Max load 2,500 lb
Printed in USA
B
C
D
A