Ayre DX-7
Owner’s Manual
DVD
TITLE
CHP
A y r e
DVD Transport with Progressive Video
Table of
Contents
Welcome to
Ayre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Connections and
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Setup and
Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Controls and
Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Optimization and
Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
About
Aspect Ratios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Advanced
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
On-Screen
Setup Menus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Numbers and
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Statement of
Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
A Technical
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
A Place for
Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Welcome to
Ayre
Please send in your warranty
registration card so we can
stay in contact with you.
Your Ayre DX-7 offers a significant advance in the
video and audio performance of film reproduction
equipment. The excitement and dimensionality of
your favorite films are apparent from the first
viewing. The combination of superb resolution and
a natural, relaxed quality will draw you back to your
home theater, time and time again.
This level of performance has been implemented
using the highest level of workmanship and
materials. You can be assured that the Ayre DX-7
will provide you a lifetime of enjoyment.
Quick Start
The Ayre DX-7 is extremely flexible and versatile.
However, many of the features are primarily of
interest to the advanced user.
The information required to get started is
contained in the first three chapters of this
manual.
The remaining chapters cover additional
information that may be read at your leisure.
2
Connections and
Installation
The Ayre DX-7 is a DVD transport with digital
audio outputs, requiring connection to an audio
processor. It is easy to hook up and use. The
following guidelines will ensure that the installation
goes smoothly.
Location
The infrared beam of the
remote control will also travel
through glass.
A good location for your DVD player is at an easily
accessible height in an open-backed cabinet or on a
shelf. The receiver for the infrared remote control is
mounted behind the display lens on the front panel.
A direct line of sight from the listening position
will ensure the maximum range.
Video Outputs
For additional information on
connecting multiple displays,
please refer to the section
“Advanced Features”.
The progressive video option in your Ayre DX-7
supports every type of video display device, as well
as all video standards around the world. All of the
video outputs are active simultaneously. The DVI
output is primarily intended for use with fixed pixel
(i.e., digital) display devices or external video
3
HVSync
RGB
Prog
Rsrv C
0%
16 - 235
RGB
Rsrv A
DVI
Hsync
Vsync
R/Pr
B/Pb
G/Y
S-Video
DX-7 DVD Transport
Composite
S.N.
SoG
YPbPr
Intrlc
Rsrv D
7.5%
0 - 255
YCbCr
Rsrv B
A y r e
SyncroLink
Control Port
Reserved C
Reserved A
SL Comp
IR Receiver
Digital Audio Outputs
PCM Only
Boulder, Colorado USA
PCM & Compressed
Reserved D
Reserved B
SL PCM
Control Port
Digital Audio Link
Volts
50/60 Hertz
50 W Max
processors. Analog display devices utilizing CRTs
normally achieve their highest performance when
using an analog video output from the DX-7. The
various analog output options are listed below in
order of performance, from highest to lowest.
Choose the highest performing connection that is
compatible with your video display.
DVI
There are two toggle switches
on the rear panel that
configure the DVI signal.
Please refer to the section
“Setup and Configuration”.
DVI (Digital Visual Interface) provides a pure
digital signal path from the DVD disc itself to
digital (fixed pixel) display devices. This category
includes such technologies as plasma, DLP, D-ILA,
LCD, and LCOS. The DVI connection is made via a
single multi-conductor cable equipped with a
rectangular multi-pin connector. Cable length is
normally limited to around 10’ (3 meters) unless an
expensive optical DVI cable is used.
The DVI signal from the Ayre DX-7 is
unencrypted and therefore compatible with both
HDCP and non-HDCP capable displays.
Please note that some display devices using analog
technology (i.e., CRTs) may have a DVI input. In
4
this situation it is usually preferable to use an analog
component connection rather than the DVI
connection. This is because the digital-to-analog
conversion in the Ayre DX-7 will perform at a
higher level than the corresponding conversion in
the display device.
If in doubt about which
connection to use, simply make
a visual comparison to
determine which offers better
performance.
However, a few of these CRT-based displays convert
all incoming signals to digital for certain types of
video signal processing such as scaling. In this case,
using the DVI conversion will be preferred as it
eliminates two extra conversion steps. Consult the
owner’s manual for your display for additional
information.
Component
The component interface is the highest performance
analog interface. The component outputs can be
configured in several ways:
There are three toggle switches
on the rear panel that
configure the component
signal. Please refer to the
section “Setup and
Configuration”.
•
Interlaced or progressive
•
YPbPr or RGB
•
Embedded sync or external sync (RGB only)
When configured as progressive RGB, the sync
(timing) signals can either be added to the Green
connection (Sync on Green, or SoG) for a total of
three wires, or transmitted as separate horizontal
and vertical sync signals (H+V Sync) for a total of
five wires.
5
Please consult the owner’s manual for your display
device to determine which connections are
supported.
S-Video
There are two toggle switches
on the rear panel that
configure both the S-video and
composite signals. Please refer
to the section “Setup and
Configuration”.
The S-video analog interface provides a good level of
performance. The brightness signal is kept separated
from the color signal, but the color detail
(bandwidth) is reduced from the component
connection. S-video is commonly used for
whole-house distribution systems.
Composite
While the analog composite video signal from the
Ayre DX-7 offers higher performance than any other
DVD player, there are inherent performance
restrictions imposed by this connection. The
brightness (black-and-white) and color signals are
mixed together, and cannot be fully separated. This
connection is not recommended for critical viewing,
especially when using a large video display.
Digital Audio Link
When the SyncroLink
interface is connected, both
AES/EBU balanced digital
audio outputs are
automatically turned off.
6
The Ayre DX-7 also includes a high performance
SyncroLink digital audio link. This link transmits
digital audio data to an audio processor and also has
a separate master clock signal that is sent from the
receiver back to the DVD transport, completely
eliminating jitter. This interface is only compatible
with SyncroLink-capable audio processors.
The SyncroLink interface automatically detects
when a compatible SyncroLink device has been
connected.
Digital Audio Outputs
An adapter is available from
Ayre should you need to
connect one of the AES/EBU
digital outputs with an XLR
connector to an S/PDIF input
that uses an RCA connector.
The Ayre DX-7 features two digital audio outputs.
Both are AES/ EBU balanced outputs to ensure the
highest possible level of sonic performance. One of
these outputs will transmit both compressed formats
(e.g., Dolby Digital and DTS) as well as
uncompressed PCM formats (e.g., Compact Disc).
This output should be connected to your
surround-sound processor.
The other AES/EBU balanced output transmits
PCM only and is intended for use with a
two-channel digital-to-analog (D/A) converter. Both
AES/EBU outputs may be used simultaneously.
AC Power
Connect the Ayre DX-7 to an unswitched power
source. The best performance is normally achieved
when the DX-7 is plugged directly into the wall
outlet, without using any power strips or power line
conditioners.
Break-In
Playing the unit for 100 to
500 hours will ensure full
break-in.
Due to the manufacturing processes used for the
wires and capacitors, a break-in period is necessary
for the DVD player to reach its full performance
potential.
7
Setup and
Configuration
Once you have connected the Ayre DX-7 to your
home theater system, you will need to configure it
to ensure compatibility. There are two separate
configuration steps – the video hardware
configuration using small toggle switches on the
rear of the unit, and the software configuration
using an on-screen Setup Navigator.
Perform the video hardware configuration first so
that the on-screen menus will display properly.
Video Hardware Configuration
HVSync
RGB
Prog
Rsrv C
0%
16 - 235
RGB
Rsrv A
SoG
YPbPr
Intrlc
Rsrv D
7.5%
0 - 255
YCbCr
Rsrv B
8
Next to the DVI connector on the rear panel of the
DVD player is a bank of eight small toggle
switches. These are used to configure the video
output signal to properly match your display device.
Two of these switches are used to configure the DVI
output, three are used for the component output,
and one is used for both the S-video and composite
outputs. Two switches are reserved for future use.
You only need to configure the switches that
apply to the connection(s) you are using.
DVI Configuration
HVSync
RGB
Prog
Rsrv C
0%
16 - 235
RGB
Rsrv A
All display devices with a DVI input support the
RGB format for the DVI connection.
“RGB” is the normal setting that should be used
for DVI in most situations.
SoG
YPbPr
Intrlc
Rsrv D
7.5%
0 - 255
YCbCr
Rsrv B
A few displays also support the YCbCr format
allowed by the HDMI specification, which
(depending on the display) may allow for added
flexibility in color adjustments. Please refer to the
owner’s manual for your display for additional
information.
When using the RGB format for DVI, there are two
possible signal levels. Out of 256 possible signal
levels, the video standard (as used on the DVD itself
and in most DVI-capable displays) sets black at level
16 and white at level 235. This allows headroom for
occasional video signal excursions outside this range
(due to video processing or noise).
“16 - 235” is the normal setting that should be
used for DVI in most situations.
However, some display devices were originally
designed for presentations in conjunction with a
personal computer (PC) instead of video signals from
a DVD player. The PC standard sets black at level 0
and white at level 255. If your display device is not
compatible with the correct video levels for the DVI
9
input, set the level switch to the position labeled
“0 - 255”.
Component Configuration
HVSync
RGB
Prog
Rsrv C
0%
16 - 235
RGB
Rsrv A
You must first determine what input signals are
supported by your display device. Please refer to the
owner’s manual for your display for information.
SoG
YPbPr
Intrlc
Rsrv D
7.5%
0 - 255
YCbCr
Rsrv B
If your display supports progressive inputs, this
will provide significantly higher picture quality
than an interlaced signal.
Select the desired signal by setting the toggle switch
to either “Prog” or “Intrlc”.
RGB signals are commonly
only used in the progressive
mode. However, the DX-7
will also output interlaced
RGB signals if so desired.
The component outputs may also be configured for
either YPbPr signals or RGB signals. If your display
accepts both types of signals, the RGB configuration
normally gives slightly better picture quality. Select
the desired signal by setting the toggle switch to
either “YPbPr” or “RGB”.
When in RGB mode, there are two common ways of
sending the synchronization (”sync” or timing)
signals — separate horizontal and vertical sync
signals, or a composite sync signal that is included
with the Green signal. The former mode is called
RGB+HV and requires a five-wire connection. The
latter mode is called SoG (Sync on Green) and
requires a three-wire connection. Select the desired
signal by setting the toggle switch to either
“HVSync” or “SoG”.
10
S-Video and Composite Configuration
HVSync
RGB
Prog
Rsrv C
0%
16 - 235
RGB
Rsrv A
SoG
YPbPr
Intrlc
Rsrv D
7.5%
0 - 255
YCbCr
Rsrv B
The S-video and composite outputs only output
interlaced signals. There are different standards for
these signals in different parts of the world. The
switch marked “0%” and “7.5%” controls whether
the black level is changed by adding setup to the
NTSC signals. PAL signals are unaffected by the
setting of this switch.
Setup is normally only used in North America. If
you live in the USA, Canada, or Mexico, setting
this switch to “7.5%” will produce a signal that
matches your other video source components.
Residents of other countries should set this switch
to “0%”.
Please refer to the chapter “Optimization and
Customization” for additional information on
playing DVDs from other countries.
Setup Navigator
The Ayre DX-7 has a wide variety of system settings
that may be configured via the On-Screen Setup
Menus (page 49). To simplify the initial setup of
your player, the Setup Navigator allows you to
configure the basic settings via a series of on-screen
questions.
11
Angle
Setup
Rpt A-B
Repeat
Subtitle
Program
Search
Random
Light
Step
Audio
Connect the video output of the DX-7 to your video
display. With the power turned on, press the
“Setup” button located on the lower portion of the
remote control.
The “Setup” button in the top left
corner of the remote is only used to
customize the remote control’s
programming (page 15).
Use the cursor buttons on the remote control to
navigate the On-Screen Setup Menus. The arrow
buttons will move the highlighted cursor. Press the
Select button when your choice is highlighted.
SELECT
Start
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
Setup Navigator
Setup Navigator
Move
ENTER
Start
Auto Start Off
Select
SETUP
To use the Setup Navigator (recommended), press
“Select”. If you do not want to use the Setup
Navigator, select “Auto Start Off”. The system
settings may also be configured directly using the
On-Screen Setup Menus as described on page 49.
Exit
OSD Language
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
Setup Navigator
Language
OSD Language
Move
12
ENTER
English
français
Español
Select
SETUP
Exit
Select your preference of languages to be used for the
on-screen display (OSD). This is the language that
will be used for the On-Screen Setup Menus and
other messages. Additionally, this language will also
be used for the default audio and subtitle languages
(page 57).
TV Type
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
Setup Navigator
TV Connection
TV Type
Move
ENTER
Widescreen (16:9)
Standard (4:3)
Select
SETUP
Select which type of video display you are using.
The “Widescreen” setting is for modern displays
with an aspect ratio of 16:9, while the “Standard”
setting is for conventional displays with an aspect
ratio of 4:3.
Exit
Digital Jack
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
Setup Navigator
Amp Connection
Digital Jack
Move
ENTER
Dolby Digital
Dolby Digital/DTS
Dolby Digital/MPEG
Dolby D/DTS/MPEG
PCM
Not Connected
Select
SETUP
Exit
This screen allows you to specify the types of digital
audio signals that are sent to your audio processor.
DVD discs may have one or more of several different
types of soundtracks available, including Dolby
Digital, DTS, MPEG, and PCM. Your audio
processor may not be capable of processing all of
these soundtracks. Select the setting that
corresponds to the capabilities of your audio
processor. Please consult the owner’s manual for
additional information.
Most modern audio processors are capable of
decoding both Dolby Digital and DTS
soundtracks. If your audio processor has both
Dolby Digital and DTS logos on its front panel,
select the setting “Dolby Digital/DTS”.
See page 51 for additional information on the
various types of audio soundtracks that are found on
DVDs.
13
96 kHz PCM Audio
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
Setup Navigator
Amp Connection
96 kHz PCM Audio
Move
ENTER
No
Yes
Don’t Know
Select
SETUP
Exit
A few DVDs have a high resolution soundtrack
using 96 kHz PCM. If your audio processor is
capable of accepting 96 kHz PCM audio data, select
“Yes”. Select “No” if your audio processor is not
capable of accepting 96 kHz PCM audio data. If you
are not sure, select “Don’t Know”.
Exit Setup Navigator
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
Setup Navigator
Exit Setup Navigator
Move
14
ENTER
Save Changes
Delete Changes
Start Again
Select
SETUP
Exit
This screen allows you to confirm your settings
before exiting the Setup Navigator. “Save Changes”
will save the settings you have made and exit. Select
“Delete Changes” to exit without changing any of
the system settings. “Start Again” will return you to
the beginning of the Setup Navigator.
Controls and
Operation
The front panel display
brightness function is only
available at the front panel.
The Ayre DX-7 DVD transport may be controlled
using either the front panel buttons or the included
remote control. Basic functions are available at both
locations, and many additional functions are
available only at the remote control.
This chapter will provide you with all the
information necessary to operate your DX-7. It is
divided into three sections:
•
Basic Functions
•
Important Functions for DVDs
•
Useful Functions for CDs
In addition there a many other sophisticated
functions available for the advanced user. These are
described in a separate chapter, Advanced Features
(page 39).
Press the “Aux” button on the
remote control to control the
DVD player.
The remote control for the DX-7 is a backlighted,
universal design that can control your entire home
theater system. Up to eight separate components can
be programmed for operation, either by entering
preset configurations on the remote control’s
15
For remote control
customization only (page 15).
Toggles between “Standby” and
“Operate” mode (page 19).
TU P
SE
PWR
Select device to control here.
Press “Aux” for DVD player
(page 15).
CBL
AUX
VCR
TV
SAT
CD
AMP
TNR
1
2
3
4
5
6
“+10” function (page 23).
7
8
9
“Clear” function (page 45).
MUTE
0
ENTER
“Next” function (page 21).
“Last Memory” function
(page 43).
Controls volume of device
programmed to “AMP” button
when in DVD mode (page 18).
“Condition Memory” function
(page 44).
Enter numerical values
(page 23).
“Previous” function (page 20).
LAST
VOL
SLEEP
CH
“Return” function (page 24).
INPUT
EXIT
E
GUID
“Cursor” buttons and “Enter”
function (page 22).
“Top Menu” function (page 47).
“Menu” function (page 23).
SELECT
“Display” function (page 46).
“Play” function (page 20).
“Reverse Scan” function
(page 21).
INF
NU
O
ME
“Forward Scan” function
(page 21).
“Stop” function (page 20).
“Pause” function (page 20).
“Open/Close” function
(page 19).
Angle
Setup
Rpt A-B
Repeat
Subtitle
Program
Search
Random
“Angle” (page 48).
Audio
Step
“Setup” (page 49).
“Audio” (page 24).
“Reverse Step” (page 39).
16
“Repeat” (page 25).
“Search” (page 40).
“Subtitle” (page 24).
“Program” (page 41).
Light
“Rpt A-B” (page 40).
“Random” (page 26).
A y r e
“Forward Step” (page 39).
“Light” (page 25).
Indicates that multiple camera angles are available.
Indicates that the title number of a DVD is being displayed.
Indicates that the track number of a CD is being displayed.
indicates that the chapter number of a DVD is being displayed.
Indicates that an on-screen menu operation is being performed.
Indicates that the remaining playback time is being displayed.
Indicates that the disc is stopped and the Display function has been activated.
Indicates that the currently loaded DVD’s
Condition Memory settings are memorized.
Indicates Repeat mode.
DVD
VCD
GUI
TITLE
TRK
CHP
CONDITION
TOTAL
REMAIN
DOLBY
DIGITAL
LAST
MEMO
Displays the chapter/track numbers, etc.
Indicates that the currently loaded DVD’s Last Memory location is memorized.
Indicates Dolby Digital audio playback.
When a disc is playing, “4” lights .
When a disc is paused, “ ;” lights .
“CD” lights when an audio CD is loaded.
“VCD” lights when a Video CD is loaded.
Indicates that a DVD is loaded.
17
keypad, or by downloading custom configurations
from your PC with an optional cable. See the
separate remote control owner’s manual for
additional information.
The remote control is factory programmed so that
when the “Aux” button is pressed it will operate the
Ayre DX-7, when the “CD” button is pressed it will
operate an Ayre CD player, and when the “Amp”
button is pressed it will operate an Ayre
preamplifier or integrated amplifier.
The remote control is factory programmed so
that the volume and mute buttons will always
operate the device programmed to the “Amp”
button, no matter which device is currently
selected.
Since the remote control is capable of operating
many different products, some of the button labels
may not match the function names used for each
device.
DVD
TITLE
A y r e
18
CHP
Basic Functions
These basic functions apply to all discs, including
CDs, DVDs, and Video CDs.
PWR
Standby/Operate
The “Standby/Operate” button toggles the unit
between normal operation and standby mode. When
in standby mode a green status LED in the display
window is illuminated, and all internal circuitry
remains powered. This ensures optimal performance
with a minimum of warm-up time.
Please note that the “Pwr” button on the remote
control corresponds to the “Standby/Operate”
function on the DX-7.
Open/Close
The “Open/Close” button opens and closes the disc
tray. An open tray may also be closed by pressing
gently on the front edge of the tray. When the tray
is closed, almost all DVDs will automatically begin
playing. This is because the DVD format allows the
disc to send commands to the player.
Please note that the “Record” button on the
remote control corresponds to the
“Open/Close” function on the DX-7.
19
Play
Pressing the “Play” button initiates playback of the
disc. If the drawer is open, pressing “Play” will also
close the drawer.
Pause
Pressing the “Pause” button will pause the disc
playback. Playback may be resumed either by
pressing the “Pause” button again or the “Play”
button.
Stop
Pressing the “Stop” button will stop disc playback.
However, if you are playing a DVD, the display
shows “RESUME” and the position is memorized.
Press “Play” to start from the memorized position,
or press “Stop” a second time to clear the memorized
position.
The resume position remains memorized as long
as the disc is in the player, even if you switch the
power off. If you want to remove the disc, but
still want to resume playback from the last
stopped position, use the “Last Memory” feature
instead (page 43).
CH
Previous
Pressing the “Previous” button will back up to the
start of the current chapter (DVD) or track (CD).
20
Additional presses will move to previous chapters or
tracks.
Please note that the “CH-” button on the remote
control corresponds to the “Previous” function
on the DX-7.
Next
CH
Pressing the “Next” button will move to the start of
the next chapter (DVD) or track (CD). Additional
presses will move to subsequent chapters or tracks.
Please note that the “CH+” button on the remote
control corresponds to the Next function on the
DX-7.
Reverse Scan
Pressing and holding the
front panel “Previous” button
will engage the “Reverse
Scan” function.
The “Reverse Scan” mode scans backward through
the disc. If the “Reverse Scan” mode has been
maintained for more than five seconds, the unit will
remain in the scan mode after the button has been
released. Press “Play” when the desired location has
been reached.
Forward Scan
Pressing and holding the
front panel “Next” button
will engage the “Forward
Scan” function.
21
The “Forward Scan” mode scans forward through the
disc. If the “Forward Scan” mode has been
maintained for more than five seconds, the unit will
remain in the scan mode after the button has been
released. Press “Play” when the desired location has
been reached.
Display Brightness
The front panel display of the DX-7 has three
brightness settings, plus an “Off” position. Pressing
the front panel “Display Brightness” button will
scroll through the four choices. A blue LED next to
the display illuminates when the display is turned
off.
When the display is off, pressing any key will
illuminate the display for a few seconds. If the disc
is playing when the display is off, pressing “Play”
will illuminate the display without affecting
playback.
Important Functions for DVDs
The DVD format introduced many useful features
beyond the basic ability to simply play a movie.
Using these additional features requires navigational
tools found on the remote control.
Cursor Buttons
SELECT
Nearly all DVDs feature on-screen menus to access
the various features found on the disc. These menus
use a highlighted cursor that is controlled by using
the “Cursor” buttons. When the desired selection is
highlighted, press the “Select” button on the remote
control.
Please note that the “Select” button on the
remote control corresponds to the “Enter”
function on the DX-7.
22
Menu
NU
ME
The on-screen menus found on nearly all DVDs will
normally automatically display upon loading the
disc. Anytime you wish to return to the disc menu,
press the “Menu” button on the remote control.
Number Buttons
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
ENTER
The number buttons are used to directly input
numeric values, as well as enter numbers for direct
title and chapter (track for CDs) searches. Direct
searches will immediately take you to the desired
title or chapter (track for CDs).
To directly access a title on a DVD, press the
number of the title while the DVD is stopped. To
directly access the chapter (track for CDs), press the
desired number while the disc is playing.
Please note that the “Enter” button on the
remote control corresponds to the “+10”
function on the DX-7.
Various components use different methods to enter
values with more than two digits. When using the
Ayre DX-7, press the “Enter” key to increment by
10. Then press the desired value of the final digit.
For example, to enter the value “10”, press “Enter”,
then “0” (where “Enter” corresponds to the “+10”
function).
Direct searches cannot be performed for
numbers 20 or greater. To directly access these
titles and chapters, use the Search mode (page
40).
23
EXIT
Return Function
When you are using on-screen menus, the “Return”
function allows you to go back one menu level.
When you are using the On-Screen Setup Menus
(page 49), changes to the system settings will not be
saved.
Please note that the “Exit” button on the remote
control corresponds to the “Return” function on
the DX-7.
Audio
Audio
Most DVDs have multiple soundtracks. These
usually these offer choices of different languages,
although some discs will have a choice of different
encoding schemes (DTS or PCM). You can select a
preferred language that will automatically play
using the On-Screen Setup Menus (page 56), or you
can scroll through the available soundtrack choices
using the “Audio” button on the remote control.
Video CDs do not have the same capacity for
multiple soundtracks found on DVDs. In order to
offer two languages, many Video CDs have one
language in one channel and second language on
the other channel. When playing Video CDs (or
audio CDs) the “Audio” function scrolls through
the choices of stereo, left channel only (mono), or
right channel only (mono).
Subtitle
Subtitle
Many DVDs offer a choice of subtitles. You can
select a preferred language that will automatically
24
display using the on-screen setup menus (page 56),
or you can scroll through the available subtitle
choices, or turn the subtitles off completely, using
the “Subtitle” button on the remote control.
Pressing the “Subtitle” button once displays the
current setting. Additional presses will scroll
through the available choices. One way to turn
subtitles off is to press the “Subtitle” button once
and then press the “Sleep” button to activate the
“Clear” function (page 45).
Light
Light
When any key is pressed on the remote control, the
backlight will illuminate the keys with a soft blue
glow for a few seconds. Conveniently placed in the
lower right corner, the “Light” button allows you to
turn the backlight on without activating any
functions on the DVD player.
Convenient Functions for CDs
While the following functions also work with
DVDs, they are most often used with audio CDs.
Repeat
Repeat
Pressing the “Repeat” button selects between
normal play mode, repeat track (or chapter on a
DVD) mode, and repeat disc (or title on a DVD)
mode. The status of the “Repeat” mode is shown on
the front panel display.
25
To exit the “Repeat” mode, either press the
“Repeat” button to scroll through the modes, or
simply press the “Sleep” button, which activates
the “Clear” function (page 45).
Random
Random
Pressing the “Random” button will play the tracks
(chapters on a DVD) in random order. When
playing a DVD, pressing the “Random” button
twice will play the titles in random order.
To exit the “Random” mode, either press the
“Random” button to scroll through the modes,
or simply press the “Sleep” button, which
activates the “Clear” function (page 45).
26
Optimization and
Customization
The Ayre DX-7 offers many advanced features,
especially when playing DVDs.
DVDs from Around the World
There are times when you may wish to play DVDs
from other countries. In this situation there are two
items that must be considered – whether the video
standards match between the disc and your video
display, and region coding issues.
World-Wide Video Standards
There are two commonly used video standards
around the world, NTSC and PAL. NTSC is used in
North America and Japan, while PAL is used in
other areas, including Europe, Asia (except Japan),
Australia, South America, and Africa.
There will be a label on the DVD package to
indicate which video standard was used. The Ayre
DX-7 is compatible with both formats. When
playing an NTSC disc the player will output an
NTSC signal, and when playing a PAL disc the
27
player will output a PAL signal.
However, many video displays will only accept one
type of signal and not the other. In order to view
DVDs using a different video standard, your display
must be capable of accepting both types of signals.
In general, most plasma displays and front
projectors will accept both video standards, while
most direct-view CRT televisions will only accept
one video standard. Please consult your owner’s
manual for additional information.
Region Coding
In order to control distribution of DVDs, the DVD
format has incorporated region coding of both discs
and players. There are six distinct regions that have
been defined around the world. This coding system
normally prevents you from playing discs from
another region on your player, even if your video
display is compatible with the video standard on the
disc. However, the Ayre DX-7 has both automatic
and manual region switching, so that DVDs from
any region may be easily played.
In nearly all cases, the automatic region switching
will work perfectly. When the disc is loaded, the
player queries the disc and temporarily adjusts its
own region setting to match the disc.
RCE Discs
There are some discs that attempt to prevent them
from playing on region-free players, called RCE
28
(Region Coding Enhancement) discs. The Ayre
DX-7 can also play these, although you may need to
set the region manually.
When the player queries these RCE discs, they tell
the player that they are from all regions. The player
then cannot adjust itself automatically to the correct
region. The disc then queries the player to see if the
player’s region matches the disc’s actual region.
Playback is only allowed if the regions match.
To ensure proper playback of RCE discs, you may
need to manually change the region of the player to
match the RCE disc. This is accomplished via a
hidden function in the On-Screen Setup Menus
(page 63).
Since most RCE discs are Region 1, it is usually
convenient to leave the player set to Region 1
also. Most RCE discs will then play automatically,
and the player will automatically adjust to play the
region of non-RCE discs.
Multiple Video Displays
As all of the video outputs on the DX-7 are active
simultaneously, it is possible to connect more than
one video display at a time. This may be especially
useful in whole-house distribution systems.
Please note however that this practice may result in
a slight decrease in your system’s performance. This
is not due to any limitations of the DX-7; rather it
is because modern video displays use switching
power supplies that inject a level of noise into the
29
system’s ground connection that contaminates the
signals.
If you are using multiple video displays, you may
wish to disconnect the auxiliary displays when
critically viewing the main display. Please note that
turning the auxiliary displays into Standby mode is
not helpful in this regard, as the switching power
supplies are still operating even when the video
display is in “Standby” mode. Instead you must
either disconnect the AC power completely from the
auxiliary displays or disconnect the signal cables
joining the auxiliary displays to your system.
Control Port
Control Port
The Control Port on the rear panel of the DX-7
allows the unit to communicate with a system
controller such as a Crestron or AMX. The Control
Port uses opto-isolators to ensure that there are no
unwanted ground loops created when using a system
controller.
Pre-terminated cables, command files, and
detailed information regarding the Control Port
are available upon request from the Ayre factory.
There are two separate functions performed by the
Control Port; reception of commands and
transmission of the currently playing DVD’s aspect
ratio.
30
Command Functions
Reserved C
Reserved A
SL Comp
IR Receiver
Reserved D
Reserved B
SL PCM
Control Port
The DX-7 may either be controlled by the remote
control via a receiver on the front panel or by a
system controller via the Control Port. A small
toggle switch on the rear panel selects which mode
is active.
For normal use, set this switch to “IR Receiver”.
Set the switch to “Control Port” only when using
a custom programmed system controller.
Command files are available from the Ayre factory
in both Crestron and Pronto (CCF) format. These
files include discrete on/off commands.
DVD Aspect Ratio Information
All DVDs use one of three aspect ratios; standard,
widescreen, or letterbox. Each DVD has its aspect
ratio coded in the disc. The Control Port can
transmit this information to a system controller so
that the aspect of the video display can be
automatically adjusted to match the disc.
A few DVDs have incorrect aspect ratio codes.
These discs will still require manual adjustment of
the video display’s aspect ratio.
31
SyncroLink Configuration
Reserved C
Reserved A
SL Comp
IR Receiver
Reserved D
Reserved B
SL PCM
Control Port
32
The SyncroLink digital audio link can be configured
to match the capabilities of your
SyncroLink-equipped audio processor. If your
processor can decode compressed digital audio
formats such as Dolby Digital and DTS, set the rear
panel configuration switch to “SL Comp”. If your
processor is only capable of decoding PCM data, set
the switch to “SL PCM”. Please consult the owner’s
manual for information on your audio processor.
About
Aspect Ratios
The term aspect ratio simply refers to the ratio of an
objects’s width to its height. Nonetheless there is
some room for confusion, as both the video display
itself and the picture stored on a disc have an aspect
ratio. Most viewers prefer to see the film in its
original aspect ratio, which preserves the director’s
intention for the composition of the film.
Aspect Ratios of Video Displays
Originally video displays were created with a 4:3
aspect ratio, mimicking the original aspect ratio
used in films. These types of displays are still
available today, and are often referred to as
“standard” displays.
Most modern displays now use a 16:9 aspect ratio
and are referred to as “widescreen” displays.
Widescreen displays are preferred for displaying the
wide aspect ratio movies that have been commonly
made for the last 40 years.
The aspect ratios of video displays are usually given
as a ratio of integers. However as noted below, the
33
aspect ratios of films are usually normalized to one.
To make comparisons between video displays and
films easier, the ratios for displays can also be
normalized to one. Hence 16:9 becomes 1.78:1 and
4:3 becomes 1.33:1.
Aspect Ratios of Films
Nearly all films made from the 1920s through the
early 1950s used an aspect ratio of 1.37:1. To
compete against the threat of television, movie
studios began adding features such as color and a
wider (larger) picture.
Now nearly all films are made in a widescreen
format. The most commonly used aspect ratios
today are 1.85:1 and 2.35:1. This wider picture
allows for more dramatic and creative visual
compositions.
Matching Film to Display
When the aspect ratio of the film closely matches
the aspect ratio of the display, the film can easily be
viewed as the director intended. This happens when
watching a 1.37:1 film on a 1.33:1 standard video
display or when watching a 1.85:1 film on a 1.78:1
widescreen video display, as there is only a
negligible mismatch. But when there is a significant
mismatch between the aspect ratios of the film and
video display, some action must be taken to allow
the film to be viewed without distortion.
34
Widescreen Displays
Let’s start with a widescreen movie shot in 1.85:1
and viewed on a 1.78:1 widescreen video display. In
this case virtually the entire image can be seen with
no adjustments required. The film is presented in
the same way as in a movie theater.
If we want to now watch a standard movie shot in
1.37:1, we run into a problem. The narrower picture
automatically fills up the screen, stretching and
distorting the image.
This is clearly unacceptable, so we use the “Aspect
Ratio” control on the video display to shrink the
image horizontally, restoring the proper geometry.
The display device also adds black (or sometimes
grey) vertical bars on each side of the picture. These
correspond to the movable curtains used to block
part of the screen in a movie theater.
A few widescreen displays erroneously lack an
“Aspect Ratio” control when fed a progressive
video signal. In this case, standard films are
unavoidably stretched to fill the display. One
workaround for this problem is to feed both
progressive and interlaced signals to the display.
When watching a standard (1.37:1) film, select
the interlaced input on the video display to allow
adjustment of the aspect ratio.
35
Standard Displays
When watching a standard (1.37:1) film on a
standard (1.33:1) display, we can see virtually the
full image without adjustments. Again, the film is
presented in the same way as it would be in a movie
theater.
However if we watch a widescreen (1.85:1) film, we
have a new problem. The picture will be distorted as
the wide image is squeezed to fit the standard
display.
Again, this distorted image is unacceptable. A few
high-quality standard video displays will allow for
the vertical size of the picture to be decreased,
restoring the proper image geometry. But since
nearly all standard displays lack any type of “Aspect
Ratio” control, this capability is instead built into
all DVD players.
By selecting “4:3 (Letterbox)” for the “TV Screen”
setting in the on-screen setup menus (see page 53),
when a widescreen disc is played the player will
automatically squeeze the image vertically to restore
the correct geometry while adding black bars at the
top and bottom.
Additional Factors
So far everything has been relatively straightforward.
However, there are a few more cases to consider that
introduce some complexity to the situation.
36
Very Wide Films
Many films are made with aspect ratios even wider
than 1.85:1, such as 2.35:1. Even on a widescreen
(1.78:1) video display these films would be distorted
if they were simply allowed to fill the screen.
Instead thin black bars are added to the top and
bottom of the image on the disc itself when the
transfer from film to video is made.
On a widescreen display these will properly be
shown as thin black bars. This is perfectly normal
and there is no distortion of the image. On a
standard display, additional black bars will be added
by the DVD player (or much less commonly by the
display itself). The end result will be thick black
bars at the top and bottom of the screen. Again this
is perfectly normal.
Pan and Scan Discs
Sometimes when a widescreen film is transferred to
DVD, only the center portion is scanned. This
process is called “pan and scan” and changes the
aspect ratio to 1.33:1, allowing for viewing on
standard displays without the use of black bars.
However this not only changes the film director’s
original visual composition, but can even lead to
critical elements being left out of the picture
entirely.
These discs are often euphemistically called
“fullscreen”. Most film enthusiasts prefer to watch
the film’s original aspect ratio and therefore avoid
these discs. As far as compatibility with either
37
widescreen or standard displays, pan and scan discs
will work in the same way as standard 1.37:1 films.
Letterboxed Discs
Since all DVD players can convert a widescreen disc
to display properly on a standard video display,
there is no technical reason to make a letterboxed
disc. However in the early days of DVD, movie
studios were selling to a much smaller audience of
DVD player owners. Instead of making a new
transfer to DVD in widescreen format, to save
money they would use an existing transfer that had
been made for the laser disc format. Since laser disc
had no provision for widescreen films, these transfers
were done in letterboxed format, where the black
bars at the top and bottom of the image were added
to the disc itself during the transfer process.
These letterboxed discs will display properly on a
standard display. However, on a widescreen display
you will not only see black bars at the top and
bottom of the image from the letterboxing process
on the disc itself, but the display will add additional
black bars at the sides of the image to maintain the
correct picture geometry. The final result is a very
small picture centered on your screen.
Most widescreen displays have a “zoom” mode that
will expand the image in all four directions to fill
the screen. However, the picture resolution suffers as
many of the available pixels on the disc have been
discarded. Fortunately as the market for DVDs have
grown these types of discs are now rarely seen.
38
Advanced
Features
The Ayre DX-7 also has many advanced features.
These functions are more complex to use, but can be
useful for the advanced user.
Step
Slow Play Function
While the unit is playing, press and hold one of the
“Step” buttons to engage slow playback. While
there is only one reverse playback speed, the forward
playback speed can be adjusted from ½ speed to
1/16 speed in four increments, using the “Step”
buttons. To return to normal playback, press the
Play button.
Step
Frame Advance Function
While a DVD is paused, the picture may be
advanced by pressing the “Step” buttons. The
picture advances one frame each time the forward
button is pressed, and backwards several frames each
time the reverse button is pressed.
39
Search
Search
You may quickly find a specific location on the disc
by using the “Search” function. Pressing the
“Search” button on the remote control scrolls
through the choices of searching by title, chapter
(track for CD), or time.
Enter the desired location using the number
buttons, and then press “Play”.
When in “Search” mode, the “+10” function
(“Enter button on the remote control) does not
function. Instead enter numbers sequentially. For
example, to enter “23”, press “2”, “3”.
Time search is not possible with CDs or with
DVDs when the disc is stopped.
Rpt A-B
Repeat A-B
“Repeat A-B” allows two functions; repeating a
section of the disc, or returning to a marked
location. Press the “Repeat A-B” button at the
beginning and end of the section you wish to repeat.
To return to a specified location, press “Repeat A-B”
at the desired location. Press “Play” to return to the
specified location.
You can only perform “Repeat A-B” within the
same title, chapter, or track.
40
To cancel repeat play or clear the specified location,
press the “Sleep” button to activate the “Clear”
function.
Program
Program
To play only specific titles, chapters, or tracks in a
specific order, use the “Program” function. In
addition, up to 24 programs for DVDs may be saved
in memory for later use. The “Program” function is
especially useful for running planned
demonstrations using specific discs.
Many DVDs have UOPs (User Operation
Prohibitions) that don’t allow the Program
function to be used.
Program Chapter Program Title
Current:
Title 7
Chapter 1
Title
1
(Chapter 1~34)
Program Memory – Off
Move
PROGRAM
To create a program, press the “Program” button
while a disc is loaded. For DVDs you will have a
choice of either “Program Chapter” or “Program
Title”. For CDs and Video CDs the screen will
display “Program Track”.
Exit
When using “Chapter Program” with DVDs, first
select the desired title. Use the “Down” cursor
button to enter the program window, then use
the “Up” cursor button to highlight “Title”. Use
the number buttons to enter the desired title
number. Only chapters within the same title can
be programmed during DVD chapter
programming.
In the program window, use the number buttons to
enter the numbers of titles, chapters, or tracks in the
desired playing order. Press “Play” to begin
playback.
41
To delete a number in the program, use the cursor
buttons to highlight the incorrect number. Then
press the “Sleep” button to activate the “Clear”
function.
To insert a number in the program, use the cursor
buttons to highlight the desired location. Press the
number buttons of the number to be inserted. The
new number is inserted before the previously
highlighted number.
You may also insert a pause in the program. The
player will pause when this point is reached in the
program, and must be put into the play mode
manually. Simply press the “Pause” button when the
cursor is in the desired location. A pause cannot be
programmed as the first or last position in the
program, and two or more pauses may not be
programmed in succession.
Chapter
07 4 Program 03
You may also create a program”on the fly” while
playing a discs. Simply press and hold the Program
button for at least two seconds at any point during
playback of a title, chapter, or track, and it will be
added to a program without displaying the Program
screen. When a title, chapter, or track is successfully
added to the program, it is shown momentarily in
the display, as well as its position in the program.
When using this function to program DVDs, first
use the “Program” button to select either
“Program Chapter” or “Program Title” as
desired.
42
Program Chapter Program Title
Current:
Title 7
Chapter 1
Title
1
(Chapter 1~34)
Program Memory
Move
On
Off
PROGRAM
Exit
Programs for DVDs may be saved to memory. The
DX-7 can memorize the programs on up to 24
DVDs. When in the “Program” menu, use the
cursor buttons to highlight the “Program Memory”
menu item. Select the “On” setting and then press
the “Select” button to activate the “Enter” function
to save the program in memory.
When more than 24 programs are memorized,
programs will automatically be erased in
chronological order from the oldest program. To
prevent the player from erasing older programs that
you still may use regularly, you may manually erase
unwanted programs stored in memory. Simply load
a DVD that has a program stored in memory. Press
the “Program” button to display the “Program”
screen. Use the cursor buttons to highlight the
“Program Memory” menu item. Select the “Off”
setting and then press the “Select” button to activate
the “Enter” function to erase the program in
memory.
LAST
Last Memory Function
The “Last Memory” function allows you to resume
watching a disc from the point you left off. Unlike
the “Resume” function (page 20), the “Last
Memory” function is effective even if the disc is
removed from the player. Up to five discs may have
the resume location memorized.
Pressing the “Last” button on the remote control
during play will activate the “Last Memory”
function to memorize the location to return to later.
The front panel display will indicate “LAST”. When
43
the disc is reloaded, the “LAST” indicator will again
light. To begin play at the memorized location,
press “Last” on the remote control while the disc is
stopped.
Nearly all DVDs will automatically begin playing
when loaded. Be sure to press the “Stop” button
before pressing the “Last” button.
Pressing “Play” will begin playback at the start of
the disc.
Please note that the “Last” button on the remote
control corresponds to the “Condition Memory”
function on the DX-7.
To clear the “Last Memory” location, press the
“Sleep” button to activate the “Clear” function while
“Last Memory” is displayed in the on-screen display.
“Last Memory” is only displayed for a few
seconds after the DVD is loaded. To clear the
“Last Memory” location at any time, press “Last
Memory” to mark a new location, and then press
the “Sleep” button to activate the “Clear”
function.
INPUT
Condition Memory Function
The “Condition Memory” function allows you to
memorize four settings for each of up to 15 DVDs.
These settings comprise:
44
•
Soundtrack
•
Subtitle
•
Angle
•
OSD
To memorize the current settings, press the “Input”
button on the remote control while the DVD is
playing.
Please note that the “Input” button on the
remote control corresponds to the “Condition
Memory” function on the DX-7.
The next time the disc is loaded, “COND” appears in
the front panel display and “Condition Memory”
appears in the on-screen display. To clear the
memorized settings, press the “Sleep” button to
activate the “Clear” function while “Condition
Memory” is being displayed on the screen.
The “Condition Memory” function is especially
useful when you wish to have a specific
soundtrack (e.g., DTS or PCM) be the default for
a particular DVD.
SLEEP
Clear Function
The “Clear” function works in conjunction with a
number of features. It is used to cancel “Repeat” and
“Random” playback, erase “Last Memory” and
“Condition Memory” settings, turn “Subtitles” off,
and to edit “Programs”.
Please note that the “Sleep” button on the
remote control corresponds to the “Clear”
function on the DX-7.
45
INF
O
Display Function
The “Display” function will show information about
the currently loaded disc on the on-screen display.
Please note that the “Info” button on the remote
control corresponds to the “Display” function on
the DX-7.
When a DVD is playing, pressing the “Info” button
to activate the “Display” function will scroll
through four different information displays. All of
them will show the current title, chapter, and total
elapsed time.
•
The first screen additionally shows the
remaining time in the title and the total time in
the title.
•
The second screen additionally shows the time
in the current chapter and the total time of the
chapter.
•
The third screen additionally shows the
remaining time in the chapter and the total
time in the chapter.
•
The fourth screen additionally shows the
bitstream transmission rate.
Pressing and holding the “Info” button will
display only the first screen (as long as the button
is held), without requiring you to scroll through
the other three screens to exit.
When a DVD is stopped, pressing the “Info” button
will display a list of titles and chapters on the disc.
46
When a CD is playing, pressing the “Info” button
will scroll through two different information
displays.
•
The first screen shows the track number, the
track time, the remaining track time, and the
total track time.
•
The second screen shows the track number, the
total number of tracks, the track time, the
remaining time of the CD, and the total time of
the CD.
Pressing and holding the “Info” button will
display only the first screen (as long as the button
is held), without requiring you to scroll through
the second screen to exit.
When a CD is stopped, pressing the “Info” button
will display the total time of the disc and the time
of each track.
E
GUID
Top Menu Function
A very few DVDs have a two-level menu system.
The “Top Menu” (also called a “Title Menu” or
“Disc Menu”) will show the titles available on the
disc. The normal menu (also somewhat confusingly
called a “Root Menu”) will show the choices
available in a given title.
The normal menus are accessed with the “Menu”
button, while the top menu is accessed by pressing
the “Guide” button to activate the “Top Menu”
function. For most discs, the “Top Menu” function
47
either produces no action or duplicates the “Menu”
function.
Please note that the “Guide” button on the
remote control corresponds to the “Top Menu”
function on the DX-7.
Angle
Angle
The DVD format allows for scenes to be filmed from
multiple camera angles. The viewer may select
between the different available camera angles by
pressing the “Angle” button. A single press displays
the current angle and total available angles.
Additional presses will scroll through the available
choices.
With the exception of adult entertainment titles
and a few music videos, almost no DVDs use
multiple angles.
System Reset
It is possible to perform a system reset. This will
restore all on-screen setup menu items to their
original factory defaults, and clear all saved settings
such as “Condition Memory”, “Last Memory”, and
“Program” memory.
To reset the system, place the unit in “Standby”.
Then press and hold the “Stop” button on the front
panel while placing the unit in “Operate” mode
using the “Standby/Operate” button on the front
panel.
48
On-Screen
Setup Menus
The Ayre DX-7 has on-screen setup menus that
allow you to adjust a variety of system settings to
ensure compatibility with your system. The basic
menu items have normally already been set up by
using the Setup Navigator (see page 11). Following
is information regarding the more detailed items.
Angle
Setup
Rpt A-B
Repeat
Subtitle
Program
Search
Random
Audio
Step
SELECT
Light
To access these on-screen setup menus, press the
“Setup” button located on the lower portion of the
remote control.
The “Setup” button in the top left
corner of the remote is only used to
customize the remote control’s
programming.
Use the cursor buttons on the remote control to
navigate the on-screen setup menus. Once you have
made the desired changes, press the “Setup” button
again to exit the on-screen setup menus.
If a disc is playing, some of the on-screen setup
menu choices will be unavailable and greyed-out.
In this case, stop the disc before entering the
“Setup” mode.
49
Indicator Colors
Next to each option in the on-screen setup menus is
a colored indicator that shows which setting is
currently selected. The color of this indicator
corresponds to which types of discs are affected by
each particular menu option.
•
Blue
DVD only
•
Yellow DVD and Video CD
•
Green
All formats
If a setting applicable only to DVDs is changed
while a Video CD or CD is loaded, a blue DVD
icon appears in the upper right hand corner of the
screen to indicate that the setting does not apply
to the currently loaded disc. The new setting will
be effective the next time a DVD is loaded.
Audio 1
The on-screen setup menu items listed under the tab
“Audio 1” configure the Ayre DX-7 so that the
digital audio output will match the capabilities of
your audio processor.
There are two digital audio outputs on the rear
panel of the DX-7. Some of these options only affect
the “Compressed + PCM” output, while other
settings affect both the “Compressed + PCM”
output and the “PCM Only” output.
50
Dolby Digital
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
Dolby Digital Out Dolby Digital
DTS Out - Dolby Digital4PCM
96kHz PCM Out – 96kHz
MPEG Out – MPEG4PCM
Digital Out – On
Move
SETUP
Exit
Nearly all DVDs have a Dolby Digital soundtrack
(and optionally others as well). If your audio
processor accepts Dolby Digital signals, set this
option to “Dolby Digital”. The audio processor will
decode the Dolby Digital signal to recreate the
soundtrack.
If your audio processor does not accept Dolby
Digital signals, set this option to
“Dolby Digital > PCM”. The DX-7 will then
decode the Dolby Digital soundtrack and convert
the audio signal to two-channel PCM.
This setting only affects the “Compressed + PCM”
output. The “PCM Only” output will always
convert a Dolby Digital soundtrack to
two-channel PCM.
DTS
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
Dolby Digital Out – Dolby Digital
DTS Out Off
96kHz PCM Out - DTS
MPEG Out – MPEG4PCM
Digital Out – On
Move
SETUP
A few DVDs have a soundtrack using technology
from DTS in addition to the Dolby Digital
soundtrack. When present, the DTS soundtrack will
usually offer somewhat improved sound quality
compared to the Dolby Digital soundtrack.
Exit
If your audio processor accepts a DTS signal, set the
DTS option to “DTS”. Otherwise set the DTS
option to “Off”. The Ayre DX-7 will not convert a
DTS soundtrack to PCM. If your audio processor
does not accept a DTS signal, instead select the
“Dolby Digital” soundtrack.
51
The choice of which soundtrack is played can be
made either via the main menu of the DVD itself,
or by scrolling through the soundtrack choices
using the “Audio” button on the remote control
(page 24).
This setting only affects the “Compressed + PCM”
output. If a DTS soundtrack is selected, no signal
will be present at the “PCM Only” output.
96 kHz PCM
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
Dolby Digital Out – Dolby Digital
DTS Out – DTS
96kHz PCM Out 96kHz 4 48kHz
MPEG Out - 96kHz
Digital Out – On
Move
SETUP
Exit
A few DVDs include a PCM soundtrack with a
sample rate of 96 kHz. This provides the highest
possible audio performance from DVD-Video discs.
If your audio processor will accept a 96 kHz PCM
audio signal, set this option to “96kHz”. If not, then
set this option to “96kHz > 48kHz”. In this case the
original soundtrack will be downsampled to the
lower sample rate to allow compatibility.
This setting affects both the “Compressed +
PCM” output and the “PCM Only” output.
MPEG Audio
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
Dolby Digital Out – Dolby Digital
DTS Out – DTS
96kHz PCM Out – 96kHz
MPEG Out MPEG
Digital Out - MPEG4PCM
Move
SETUP
Another technology used to store the audio
soundtrack on a DVD is MPEG audio. This was
proposed for use in Europe, but was quickly
supplanted by Dolby Digital by most film studios.
Very few discs include an MPEG audio soundtrack.
Exit
If your audio processor accepts an MPEG audio
signal, select “MPEG”. Otherwise set the MPEG
audio option to “MPEG > PCM”.
52
This setting only affects the “Compressed + PCM”
output. The “PCM Only” output will always
convert an MPEG audio soundtrack to
two-channel PCM.
Digital Output
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
Dolby Digital Out – Dolby Digital
DTS Out – DTS
96kHz PCM Out – 96kHz
MPEG Out – MPEG4PCM
Digital Out On
Off
Move
SETUP
The digital audio output may be turned off for
diagnostic purposes. It is normally recommended to
set this option to “On”.
This setting affects both the “Compressed +
PCM” output and the “PCM Only” output.
Exit
Audio 2
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
Audio DRC
Move
High
Medium
Low
Off
SETUP
Exit
The Audio 2 setup tab only contains a single menu
option. This is not a one-time setting to match your
system, but rather an adjustment that can be made
to the audio playback.
“Audio DRC” stands for “Audio Dynamic Range
Compression”. Normally this option should be set
to “Off”. However, if you are watching a film late at
night and wish to avoid disturbing other members
of your household, then Audio DRC may be turned
on. Soft sounds such as dialog can then be heard
more clearly without increasing the volume of the
loud sounds.
Audio DRC only applies to discs with a Dolby
Digital soundtrack.
53
Video
The on-screen setup menu items listed under the
“Video” tab configure the Ayre DX-7 so that the
video output will match the capabilities of your
video display.
TV Screen
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
TV Screen 4:3 (Letterbox)
Picture Quality - 4:3 (Pan & Scan)
S-Video Out - 16:9 (Wide)
Still Picture – Auto
On Screen Display – Position - Normal
Angle Indicator – On
Move
SETUP
Exit
It is extremely important to select the “TV Screen”
setting that matches your display device. DVDs are
manufactured with two different aspect ratios for the
picture information itself (although black bars may
be added to the top and bottom of the picture
information to create many different aspect ratios for
the final displayed picture).
Video displays are also manufactured with two
different aspect ratios, 16:9 (widescreen) and 4:3
(standard). Nearly all widescreen displays allow the
aspect ratio to be adjusted so that all DVDs are
displayed in their correct original aspect ratio.
However most standard displays do not allow the
aspect ratio to be adjusted, instead requiring the
DVD player to modify the picture signal to create
the proper aspect ratio.
When the DVD player changes the aspect ratio of
a widescreen DVD to match a standard 4:3
display, there is an unavoidable loss of vertical
resolution.
If your video display is a widescreen model,
configure this setting to “16:9 (Wide)”. If your
54
display is a standard model, configure this setting to
“4:3 (Letterbox)”.
It is recommended not to select the “4:3 (Pan &
Scan” setting, as this only functions properly when
allowed by the DVD. To date there are virtually
no widescreen DVDs that support the “Pan &
Scan” setting.
Picture Quality
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
TV Screen – 16:9 (Wide)
Picture Quality Cinema
S-Video Out - Animation
Still Picture - Standard
On Screen Display – Position - Normal
Angle Indicator – On
Move
SETUP
Exit
This setting has no effect on the operation of the
Ayre DX-7 with progressive scan video. Its original
purpose was to change the interlaced video signals
to conform with the video standards used in various
countries. Instead the DX-7 allows these
adjustments to the video signal to be made with
switches on the rear panel (page 11).
S-Video Out
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
TV Screen – 16:9 (Wide)
Picture Quality – Standard
S-Video Out S1
Still Picture - S2
On Screen Display – Position - Normal
Angle Indicator – On
Move
SETUP
Exit
This setting has no effect on the operation of the
Ayre DX-7 with progressive scan video. Its original
purpose was to send aspect ratio information to the
video display on the S-video connection. Instead the
DX-7 outputs aspect ratio information via the
Control Port (page 30).
55
Still Picture
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
TV Screen – 16:9 (Wide)
Picture Quality – Standard
S-Video Out – S2
Still Picture Field
On Screen Display - Frame
Angle Indicator - Auto
Move
SETUP
Exit
This setting affects the appearance of the picture
when the DVD is paused. Normally this should be
set to “Auto”. The DVD player then uses
information on the disc to determine if it was made
with an interlaced source (i.e., video) or a
progressive source (i.e., film) However some discs
are incorrectly flagged, causing the appearance of a
paused picture to be unsatisfactory. Temporarily
changing this setting may improve the appearance
of a paused picture.
On Screen Display
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
TV Screen – 16:9 (Wide)
Picture Quality – Standard
S-Video Out – S2
Still Picture – Auto
On Screen Display Position - Wide
Angle Indicator - Position - Normal
Off
SETUP Exit
Move
The operation indicators (“Play”, “Stop”, “Resume”,
etc.) are normally displayed at the top of the screen.
However, if you are watching a letterboxed DVD on
a widescreen video display, it may be useful to use
the “Zoom” mode on the display to eliminate the
black bars at the top and bottom of the picture
(page 38). However, the “Zoom” mode may also
eliminate the operation indicators.
In this case, configure the “On Screen Display”
setting for “Position - Wide”. This will lower the
position of the on-screen operation indicators so they
remain visible. Alternatively, you may choose to
turn them off altogether by selecting the “Off”
setting.
56
Angle Indicator
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
TV Screen – 16:9 (Wide)
Picture Quality – Standard
S-Video Out – S2
Still Picture – Auto
On Screen Display – Position - Normal
Angle Indicator On
Off
SETUP Exit
Move
A few DVDs will have certain scenes filmed from
multiple camera angles. In this situation, an icon in
the shape of a movie camera will be displayed on
both the front panel display and on your video
display. This will inform you that multiple viewing
angles are available. Should you wish to turn off the
on-screen angle indicator, change this setting to
“Off”.
Language
The DVD format has the capability to provide many
different language options. However, most discs
provide only one or two language options. Many of
the settings described in this section will only work
with those discs that provide the pertinent language
options.
OSD Language
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
OSD Language English
Audio Language - français
Subtitle Language - Español
Auto Language – On
DVD Language – w/Subtitle Language
Subtitle Display – On
Subtitle Off – Selected Subtitle
SETUP Exit
Move
The On-Screen Display (OSD) can use different
languages for the on-screen menus and operation
indicators. Select the preferred language using the
cursor keys of the remote control. In units shipped
to most countries, the choices include English,
French, and Spanish. However, units shipped to
Japan offer the choice of English or Japanese.
57
Audio Language
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
OSD Language – English
Audio Language English
Subtitle Language - French
Auto Language - Spanish
DVD Language - Other
Subtitle Display – On
Subtitle Off – Selected Subtitle
SETUP Exit
Move
Many DVDs offer multiple language options for the
soundtrack. You can specify the desired default
language setting for the audio soundtrack. If that
soundtrack exists on a DVD, it will automatically be
selected for play. In units shipped to most countries,
the choices include “English”, “French”, “Spanish”,
and “Other”. However, units shipped to Japan offer
the choice of “English”, “Japanese”, and “Other”.
Regardless of the status of this setting, you can
scroll through the available soundtrack choices
using the “Audio” button on the remote control.
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
Audio Language
List of Languages
en: English
Move
+/-
Code (0~2)
0
5
1
4
RETURN Return
ENTER
Select
SETUP
Exit
If the “Other” setting has been selected, you will
have the choice of entering the desired language
from either by scrolling through a list of
abbreviations (and also complete names for the more
common languages), or directly entering a numeric
code. The complete list of language codes may be
found at the end of this chapter.
Subtitle Language
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
OSD Language – English
Audio Language – English
Subtitle Language English
Auto Language - French
DVD Language - Spanish
Subtitle Display - Other
Subtitle Off – Selected Subtitle
SETUP Exit
Move
58
Many DVDs offer multiple language options for the
subtitles. You can specify the desired default
language setting for the subtitle. If that subtitle
language exists on a DVD, it will automatically be
selected for play. In units shipped to most countries,
the choices include “English”, “French”, “Spanish”,
and “Other”. However, units shipped to Japan offer
the choice of “English”, “Japanese”, and “Other”.
Regardless of the status of this setting, you can
scroll through the available subtitle choices using
the “Subtitle” button on the remote control.
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
Subtitle Language
List of Languages
Code (0~2)
en: English
Move
+/-
0
5
1
4
RETURN Return
ENTER
Select
SETUP
Exit
If the “Other” setting has been selected, you will
have the choice of entering the desired language
from either by scrolling through a list of
abbreviations (and also complete names for the more
common languages), or directly entering a numeric
code. The complete list of language codes may be
found at the end of this chapter.
Auto Language
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
OSD Language – English
Audio Language – English
Subtitle Language – English
Auto Language On
DVD Language - Off
Subtitle Display – On
Subtitle Off – Selected Subtitle
SETUP Exit
Move
Setting the Auto Language option to “On” will
automatically play domestic movies in the original
language soundtrack with the subtitles turned off.
Foreign movies will be played in the original
language soundtrack with the subtitles turned on.
This setting only operates when language setting
for both the “Audio Language” and “Subtitle
Language” are the same. Please note that this
function may not be effective with all discs.
DVD Language
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
OSD Language – English
Audio Language – English
Subtitle Language - w/Subtitle Language
Auto Language - English
DVD Language French
Subtitle Display - Spanish
Subtitle Off - Other
SETUP Exit
Move
Some DVDs offer multiple language options for the
menu screens. You can specify the desired default
language setting for the menu screens. If that menu
screen language exists on a DVD, it will
automatically be selected for play. In units shipped
to most countries, the choices include “w/Subtitle
Language”, “English”, “French”, “Spanish”, and
“Other”. However, units shipped to Japan offer the
choice of “w/Subtitle Language”, “English”,
59
“Japanese”, and “Other”.
Setting this option to “w/Subtitle Language”
automatically assigns the language selected in the
Subtitle Language setting. This is recommended
for most situations.
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
DVD Language
List of Languages
en: English
Move
+/-
Code (0~2)
0
5
1
4
RETURN Return
ENTER
Select
SETUP
Exit
If the “Other” setting has been selected, you will
have the choice of entering the desired language
from either by scrolling through a list of
abbreviations (and also complete names for the more
common languages), or directly entering a numeric
code. The complete list of language codes may be
found at the end of this chapter.
Subtitle Display
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
OSD Language – English
Audio Language – English
Subtitle Language – English
Auto Language – On
DVD Language - On
Subtitle Display Off
Subtitle Off - Assist Subtitles
SETUP Exit
Move
This setting will determine if the subtitles are
automatically displayed or not. In addition, a few
DVDs have an additional subtitle selection that is
intended for those viewers who are hard of hearing.
In addition to the written transcription of the
dialog, these subtitles also include written
descriptions of other background sounds. Selecting
“Assist Subtitle” for this setting will automatically
select these subtitles, if they exist on a particular
disc.
Regardless of the status of this setting, you can
scroll through the available subtitle choices using
the “Subtitle” button on the remote control.
60
Subtitle Off
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
OSD Language – English
Audio Language – English
Subtitle Language – English
Auto Language – On
DVD Language – w/Subtitle Language
Subtitle Display - With Audio
Subtitle Off Selected Subtitle
SETUP Exit
Move
The DVD format allows the disc itself to issue
commands to the DVD player. Rarely, a disc may
automatically display subtitles even when they have
been turned off at the DVD player. This setting
allows you to select the language of the subtitles
that are displayed with this type of DVD.
Select “With Audio” to display the subtitles in the
same language as the “Audio Language” setting.
Select “Subtitle Language” to display subtitles in the
same language as the “Subtitle Language” setting.
General
The on-screen setup menu items listed under the
“General” tab configure a few miscellaneous settings
of the Ayre DX-7.
Setup Menu Mode
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
Setup Menu Mode Expert
Setup Navigator Basic
Parental Lock – Level 8
Background Color – Blue
Move
SETUP
There are two choices for displaying the on-screen
setup menus, “Basic” and “Expert”. Selecting
“Expert” will display all of the available
configuration options. Selecting “Basic” will only
show the basic configuration options.
Exit
If “Basic” is selected and the “OSD Language” is
set to “English”, on-screen help information will
be displayed for each menu option.
61
Setup Navigator
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
Setup Menu Mode – Expert
Setup Navigator Start
Parental Lock – Level 8
Background Color – Blue
Move
SETUP
Exit
The Setup Navigator simplifies the process of
configuring the on-screen menu settings of the Ayre
DX-7. This process in normally performed when the
DVD player is installed in your system. However,
any time you wish you may run the Setup Navigator
again. Normally this is done only when new
equipment has been installed in your system, or you
may choose to change the settings directly via the
on-screen menus.
Parental Lock
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
Setup Menu Mode – Expert
Setup Navigator
Parental Lock Level Change
Background Color - Password Change
Move
SETUP
Exit
The DVD format allows the player to block
objectionable scenes from discs, using a
user-specified access code. However, virtually no
discs have been made that use this feature.
Furthermore, it is not particularly difficult to defeat
the parental lock. For these reasons it is not
recommended to use the “Parental Lock” feature.
If you have used the “Parental Lock” feature and
forgotten your password, the password can be
cleared by resetting the system (page 48). Please
note that the reset procedure clears all saved
settings, and not just the password.
62
Background Color
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
Setup Menu Mode – Expert
Setup Navigator
Parental Lock – Level 8
Background Color Blue
Black
Move
SETUP
Exit
You can select which color appears on your video
display when the DVD player is in “Stop” mode.
The choices are “Blue” and “Black”.
Display Firmware Revision
The firmware revision and current region setting
may be displayed using a hidden on-screen setup
menu item. In the “Setup Menu Mode”, change the
setting to “Basic”. Then, while the cursor is
highlighting the “Setup Menu Mode” selection,
press the “Info” button to activate the “Display”
function.
Audio1 Audio2 Video Language General
Setup Menu Mode Expert
Setup Navigator Basic
Parental Lock – Level 8
Region:1 / Ver:1.024(4) /AV1:7.00
Change menu mode
Move
SETUP
Exit
If you wish, the current region setting may be
changed manually in this screen. While the region
setting and firmware revision are displayed, press
the “Input” button to activate the “Condition
Memory” function and then press the desired region
number using the number buttons. The information
will disappear from the screen. The new region
setting may be confirmed by pressing the “Info”
button to activate the “Display” function again.
Language Code List
When selecting language preferences for subtitles
and audio soundtracks, the frequently used
languages have names that show in the on-screen
setup menus. Other languages must be entered by
using a numeric code.
63
Frequently Used Languages
Chinese (zh), 2608
Dutch (nl), 1412
English (en), 0514
French (fr), 0618
German (de), 0405
Greek (el), 0512
Italian (it), 0920
Japanese (ja), 1001
Korean (ko), 1115
Portuguese (pt), 1620
Russian (ru), 1821
Spanish (es), 0519
Swedish (sv), 1922
Complete Language List
Abkhazian (ab), 0102
Afar (aa), 0101
Afrikaans (af), 0106
Albanian (sq), 1917
Amharic (am), 0113
Arabic (ar), 0118
Armenian (hy), 0825
Assamese (as), 0119
Aymara (ay), 0125
Azerbaijani (az), 0126
Bashkir (ba), 0201
Basque (eu), 0521
Bengali (bn), 0214
Bhutani (dz), 0426
Bihari (bh), 0208
Bislama (bi), 0209
Breton (br), 0218
Bulgarian (bg), 0207
Burmese (my), 1325
Byelorussian (be), 0205
Cambodian (km), 1113
Catalan (ca), 0301
Chinese (zh), 2608
64
Corsican (co), 0315
Croatian (hr), 0818
Czech (cs), 0319
Danish (da), 0401
Dutch (nl), 1412
English (en), 0514
Esperanto (eo), 0515
Estonian (et), 0520
Faroese (fo), 0615
Fiji (fj), 0610
Finnish (fi), 0609
French (fr), 0618
Frisian (fy), 0625
Galician (gl), 0712
Georgian (ka), 1101
German (de), 0405
Greek (el), 0512
Greenlandic (kl), 1112
Guarani (gn), 0714
Gujarati (gu), 0721
Hausa (ha), 0801
Hindi (hi), 0809
Hungarian (hu), 0821
Icelandic (is), 0919
Indonesian (in), 0914
Interlingua (ia), 0901
Interlingue (ie), 0905
Inupiak (ik), 0911
Irish (ga), 0701
Italian (it), 0920
Hebrew (iw), 0923
Japanese (ja), 1001
Javanese (jw), 1023
Kazakh (kk), 1111
Kannada (kn), 1114
Kashmiri (ks), 1119
Kinyarwanda (rw), 1823
Kirghiz (ky), 1125
Kirundi (rn), 1814
Korean (ko), 1115
Kurdish (ku), 1121
Laothian (lo), 1215
Latin (la), 1201
65
Lingala (ln), 1214
Lithuanian (lt), 1220
Latvian (lv), 1222
Macedonian (mk), 1311
Malagasy (mg), 1307
Malay (ms), 1319
Malayalam (ml), 1312
Maltese (mt), 1320
Maori (mi), 1309
Marathi (mr), 1318
Moldavian (mo), 1315
Mongolian (mn), 1314
Nauru (na), 1401
Nepali (ne), 1405
Norwegian (no), 1415
Occitan (oc), 1503
Oriya (or), 1518
Oromo (om), 1513
Panjabi (pa), 1601
Pashto, Pushto (ps), 1619
Persian (fa), 0601
Polish (pl), 1612
Portuguese (pt), 1620
Quechua (qu), 1721
Rhaeto-Romance (rm), 1813
Romanian (ro), 1815
Russian (ru), 1821
Samoan (sm), 1913
Sangho (sg), 1907
Sanskrit (sa), 1901
Scots-Gaelic (gd), 0704
Serbian (sr), 1918
Serbo-Croatian (sh), 1908
Sesotho (st), 1920
Setswana (tn), 2014
Shona (sn), 1914
Sindhi (sd), 1904
Sinhalese (si), 1909
Siswati (ss), 1919
Slovak (sk), 1911
Slovenian (sl), 1912
Somali (so), 1915
Spanish (es), 0519
66
Sundanese (su), 1921
Swahili (sw), 1923
Swedish (sv), 1922
Tagalog (tl), 2012
Tajik (tg), 2007
Tamil (ta), 2001
Tatar (tt), 2020
Telugu (te), 2005
Thai (th), 2008
Tibetan (bo), 0215
Tigrinya (ti), 2009
Tonga (to), 2015
Tsonga (ts), 2019
Turkish (tr), 2018
Turkmen (tk), 2011
Twi (tw), 2023
Ukrainian (uk), 2111
Urdu (ur), 2118
Uzbek (uz), 2126
Vietnamese (vi), 2209
Volapük (vo), 2215
Welsh (cy), 0325
Wolof (wo), 2315
Xhosa (xh), 2408
Yiddish (ji), 1009
Yoruba (yo), 2515
Zulu (zu), 2621
67
Numbers and
Specifications
DVI Output
Selectable output formats:
RGB, video levels (16 - 235)
RGB, PC levels (0 - 255)
YCbCr, 4:2:2, video levels (16 - 235)
(NTSC and PAL discs)
Progressive Component Output
Selectable output formats:
YPbPr, 700 mV, 0% setup
RGB, 700 mV, 0% setup
(NTSC and PAL discs)
Interlaced Component Output
Selectable output formats:
YPbPr, 700 mV, 0% setup
(NTSC and PAL discs)
RGB, 714 mV, 7.5% setup
RGB, 714 mV, 0% setup
(NTSC discs)
68
RGB, 700 mV, 0% setup
(PAL discs)
S-Video and Composite
Outputs
Selectable output formats:
714 mV, 7.5% setup
714 mV, 0% setup
(NTSC discs)
700 mV, 0% setup
(PAL discs)
Power Consumption
Dimensions
Weight
35 watts
20 watts, standby mode
17-¼" W x 13-¾" D x 4-¾" H
44 cm x 35 cm x 12 cm
15 pounds
6.8 kg
69
Statement of
Warranty
Please take a moment to fill
out and return the enclosed
warranty registration card.
Your Ayre DX-7 DVD player is warranted against
defects in workmanship and materials for a period of
five years from the date of purchase, except for the
transport mechanism. The warranty period for the
transport mechanism is two years from the date of
purchase. This warranty is transferable to
subsequent purchasers within the original warranty
period. All warranty claims must be made through
an authorized Ayre dealer or distributor.
Warranty Statement
1. If any defects are found in the materials or
workmanship of this Ayre product within the
warranty period, the unit will be repaired or
replaced by Ayre Acoustics, Inc. (Ayre) or its
authorized agent.
2. Purchaser must return the product, packed in the
original shipping carton, freight prepaid to:
Ayre Acoustics, Inc.
2300-B Central Avenue
Boulder, Colorado 80301
70
or to Ayre’s authorized agent.
3. Ayre reserves the right to inspect any product
that is the subject of any warranty claim prior to
repairing or replacing it. Final determination of
warranty coverage lies solely with Ayre.
Out-of-warranty claims will be billed for labor,
materials, return freight, and insurance as required.
Any product for which a warranty claim is accepted
will be returned to the purchaser and the cost of
shipping and insurance will be factory prepaid
within the boundaries of the USA. Units to be
shipped outside of the USA will be shipped freight
collect only.
4. Ayre strives to manufacture the finest possible
equipment, and therefore reserves the right to make
improvements on its products, without necessarily
assuming an obligation to retrofit such changes
upon its previously manufactured models.
5. The above warranty is the sole warranty given by
Ayre, and is in lieu of all other warranties. All
implied warranties, including warranties of
merchantability or fitness for any particular purpose
shall be strictly limited in duration to five years
from the date of original purchase, and upon
expiration of the warranty period (five years), Ayre
shall have no further obligation of any kind, whether
express or implied. Further, Ayre shall in no event
be obligated for any incidental or consequential
damages as a result of any defect or any warranty
claim, whether express or implied.
71
6. Ayre does not authorize any third party,
including any dealer or sales representative to
assume any liability of Ayre or make any warranty
for Ayre. The unit must not have been altered or
improperly serviced. The serial number on the unit
must not have been altered or removed.
7. Warranty registration cards must be completed
and mailed to Ayre within 30 days of purchase. Ayre
may, at its option, require from the purchaser valid
proof of purchase (dated copy or photocopy of
dealer's original invoice).
72
A Technical
Glossary
480i
A shorthand way of referring to an interlaced NTSC
signal, where “480” refers to the number of actual
picture lines and “i” refers to Interlaced.
480p
A shorthand way of referring to a progressive NTSC
signal, where “480” refers to the number of actual
picture lines and “p” refers to Progressive.
576i
A shorthand way of referring to an interlaced PAL
signal, where “576” refers to the number of actual
picture lines and “i” refers to Interlaced.
576p
A shorthand way of referring to a progressive PAL
signal, where “576” refers to the number of actual
picture lines and “p” refers to Progressive.
AES/EBU
The Audio Engineering Society and European
Broadcast Union are standards setting organizations
in the US and Europe, respectively. The term
“AES/EBU” is commonly used to refer to the system
of transmitting digital audio signals used in
professional studios. This format is very similar to
the S/PDIF digital audio standard, although the
performance is higher due to the use of balanced
73
interconnect cables employing three-pin XLR
connectors.
Aspect Ratio
The ratio of the video display’s width to its height.
The two common aspect ratios used for video
displays are 16:9 (1.78:1), also known as
“widescreen”, and 4:3 (1.33:1), also known as
“standard”.
CRT
The Cathode Ray Tube is the original analog
technology used in video displays. It is still used
today in both direct-view displays as well as front
and rear projection systems. Although the
maximum light output levels are limited,
CRT-based displays are unrivaled for their
smoothness and ability to accurately reproduce fine
gradations in dark areas of the image.
Component
Composite
Compressed Audio
74
A video signal using three separate video
components, for example RGB or YPbPr.
Component signals may be either Interlaced or
Progressive.
An Interlaced video signal that combines brightness
(black-and-white) information together with color
information. Performance is reduced compared to
Component video or S-Video, as the video signals
cannot be perfectly separated again as required by
the display device.
To allow storage of more video information on a
DVD, the digital audio soundtrack is compressed to
take up less room. The PCM digital audio data is
compressed by discarding data that is deemed to be
of less importance. Various companies have
developed proprietary schemes for reducing the
quantity of audio data while attempting to
minimize the impact on sound quality. See also
Dolby Digital, DTS, and MPEG Audio.
D-ILA
Digital-Imaging Light Amplifier is a type of LCOS
video display technology developed by JVC. This is
one example of a Fixed Pixel display.
DLP
Digital Light Processing is the name of Texas
Instrument’s movable micro-mirror technology used
in video displays. This is one example of a Fixed
Pixel display.
Dolby Digital
A Compressed Audio format developed by Dolby Labs,
this is found on virtually all DVDs.
DTS
A Compressed Audio format developed by Digital
Theater Systems. A DTS soundtrack is found on
some DVDs, and in generally considered to sound
better than the Dolby Digital soundtrack, in part
due to the higher data rates used (less compression).
DVI
The Digital Visual Interface was developed as a way
to send digital video signals to a Fixed-Pixel (i.e.,
digital) display without any additional conversions
to or from analog.
Fixed Pixel
In a CRT video display the cathode ray, or beam,
can be focused at any arbitrary point on the viewing
surface. Thus multiple Resolutions are easily
supported. In contrast, Fixed Pixel (i.e., digital)
displays have the individual Pixels in predetermined
locations. Incoming signals must be converted to
the native resolution of the display element itself.
This conversion process, called Scaling, can introduce
visible artifacts if not performed at a high
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performance level. All fixed pixel displays have
internal scalers incorporated internally.
HDMI
The High Definition Multimedia Interface is an
extension of the DVI interface that adds HDCP,
digital audio, and inter-device communication link,
all in a smaller connector. The DVI output of the
Ayre DX-7 can be connected to an HDMI display
by using an adapter connector. In this situation the
video is passed through to the display device, but
there is no digital audio or communication link
present.
HDCP
High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection is a
method of scrambling the DVI or HDMI video
signal in an attempt to avoid copying of copyrighted
material. Only “authorized” devices have the key to
descramble the signal so that it is viewable. The
Ayre DX-7 does not use HDCP, so it is compatible
with all DVI and HDMI displays, whether or not
they use HDCP.
Interlaced
An interlaced video system draws half of the picture
lines on the video display at a time. The
odd-numbered lines are displayed in one pass and
the even numbered lines in the next. The interlaced
format was developed as a means of reducing the
bandwidth required for television broadcasting, but
can result in visible artifacts in the picture compared
to Progressive video.
LCD
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A Liquid Crystal Display is the familiar display as
found on laptop computers. These are most often
transmissive displays, where a white light source
behind the display element shines through colored
Pixels to create an image. This is one example of a
Fixed Pixel display.
LCOS
Liquid Crystal On Silicon places the LCD display
element directly on the silicon wafer that forms the
electronic control circuitry. A transmissive display
element cannot be used as the silicon is not
transparent. Instead, a reflective display element is
used. This is one example of a Fixed Pixel display.
MPEG
Moving Picture Experts Group is an international
standards organization that developed the MPEG-2
video compression algorithm used in the DVD
format.
MPEG Audio
One type of Compressed Audio developed by Philips.
This was originally proposed as the audio format to
be used on European DVDs, in a political
compromise designed to share royalty revenues
between Philips and Dolby. Philips was late to
market with this format, and it has now largely been
supplanted by Dolby Digital.
MPEG Decoder
The MPEG decoder is a highly complex integrated
circuit that decodes the video and audio information
stored on the DVD.
NTSC
The National Television Standards Committee is the
body defining the television video signal format
used in the North America. Japan also uses a
variation of this signal. This format has a total of
525 lines, of which 480 are used for the actual
picture information.
PAL
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Phase Alternating Line is the video signal format
used in Europe, Asia (except Japan), Australia,
Africa, and South America. This format has a total
of 625 lines, of which 576 are used for the actual
picture information.
PCM
Pulse Code Modulation is the fundamental method
used to store audio or video as digital codes. This is
the highest performing method of storing audio,
and is the system used on CDs. See also Compressed
Audio.
Pixel
As a digital format, DVD reproduces video image as
a grid of very fine colored dots. The smallest
element of this video image is called a pixel, which
is a shortened form of Picture Element.
Plasma
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A plasma video display uses ionized gases to excite
colored phosphors, similar to the way that a
fluorescent light bulb operates. This is one example
of a Fixed Pixel display.
Progressive
A progressive video system draws all of the picture
lines on the video display in one pass. Commonly
used for computer displays, progressive video results
in a more stable, flicker-free picture than does
Interlaced video.
RCE
Region Coding Enhancement is a more
sophisticated system of Region Coding developed to
enforce the playback of DVDs only in their intended
region. Playback of RCE discs may require changing
the DVD players region setting manually.
Region Coding
In an attempt to control the distribution of DVDs,
the DVD forum has designated eight different
regions throughout the world. Discs from any given
region are normally only playable on DVD players
purchased from that same region.
Resolution
Every video display device or video format has a
maximum number of Pixels that can be displayed.
This resolution is specified as the number of
horizontal pixels by the number of vertical pixels.
The resolution of a DVD is 720x480 for NTSC discs
and 720x576 for PAL discs. Scaling must be used to
convert this resolution to the resolution of a Fixed
Pixel display. The horizontal resolution of a CRT
(i.e., analog) is somewhat ambiguous, as there are no
discrete pixels used in this technology.
RGB
RGB is short for Red-Green-Blue. The human eye
can visualize all colors from various combinations of
red, green, and blue light. All color video displays
use red, green, and blue to create color. Any signals
input to a color display device that are not in RGB
format must be converted to RGB before being sent
to the display element itself. Except for computer
monitors, most video display contain this circuitry
internally. When making an RGB connection to a
display device, synchronization (timing) signals are
also required. This can be accomplished either via
RGB+HV or SoG.
RGB+HV
Red-Green-Blue + Horizontal-Vertical is one
method of transferring RGB video signals. In this
connection method, the horizontal and vertical sync
(timing) signals are separated from the video signals
themselves. Thus a total of five wires are required.
Scaling
Scaling is the process of converting a video signal
from one Resolution to another. As with any type of
signal processing, care must be taken to ensure that
the signal is not degraded by the processing itself.
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SoG
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Sync-on-Green refers to an RGB video connection
that has the sync (timing) signals combined with
the green signal. Only three wires are required for
this connection, compared with five wires for an
RGB+HV video connection.
S/PDIF
The Sony/Philips Digital Interface Format is
commonly used to transmit digital audio
information from a source (such as a DVD player) to
a receiver (such as an audio processor). The
connectors used for S/PDIF are common RCA
(Cinch) connectors. Also see AES/EBU.
S-Video
An Interlaced video signal that has two components;
one for brightness (black-and-white) information
and another for color information. Performance is
much better than Composite video, but due to
bandwidth restrictions, has less color detail than
does interlaced Component video.
UOP
The DVD format allows the disc itself to send
commands to the player. A User Operation
Prohibition is a disc-based command that tells the
DVD player to ignore commands issued by the user.
For example, some DVDs will display the FBI
warning at the beginning of the disc and issue a
UOP that temporarily disables most user
commands.
YCbCr
A digital Component signal, where Y is the brightness
(black-and-white) signal, and Cb and Cr are the
color signals. The picture on a DVD is stored in
YCbCr format, as it requires less storage space for a
given visible resolution than does RGB.
YPbPr
An analog Component signal, where Y is the
brightness (black-and-white) signal, and Pb and Pr
are the color signals.
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Notes
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Ayre Acoustics, Inc.
2300-B Central Avenue
Boulder, Colorado 80301
www.ayre.com
+1-303-442-7300