Motorola 9000SM - Canopy 900 MHz Subscriber Module User manual

Canopy™ Subscriber
Module (SM)
User Manual
SM-UM-en
Issue 5
January 2004
SM User Manual
January 2004
Software Release 4.1
NOTICES
Important Note on Modifications
Intentional or unintentional changes or modifications to the equipment must not be made unless under the express consent of the party
responsible for compliance. Any such modifications could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment and will void the
manufacturer’s warranty.
U.S. Federal Communication Commision (FCC) and Industry Canada (IC) Notification
This device complies with part 15 of the U. S. FCC Rules and Regulations and with RSS-210 of Industry Canada. Operation is subject
to the following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) This device must accept any interference
received, including interference that may cause undesired operation. In Canada, users should be cautioned to take note that high power
radars are allocated as primary users (meaning they have priority) of 5250 – 5350 MHz and 5650 – 5850 MHz and these radars could
cause interference and/or damage to license-exempt local area networks (LELAN).
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the U.S. FCC
Rules and with RSS-210 of Industry Canada. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in
a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio-frequency energy and, if not installed and used in
accordance with these instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. If this equipment does cause harmful
interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment on and off, the user is encouraged to
correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Increase the separation between the affected equipment and the unit;
Connect the affected equipment to a power outlet on a different circuit from that which the receiver is connected to;
Consult the dealer and/or experienced radio/TV technician for help.
FCC IDs and Industry Canada Certification Numbers are listed in the following table:
Module
Types
Frequency Band Range
Maximum
Transmitter
Power
SM AP BH
ISM 2400-2483.5 MHz
SM AP BH
Reflector
FCC ID
Industry Canada
Cert Number
340 mW
Allowed on SM and
BH
ABZ89FC5808
109W-2400
U-NII 5250-5350 MHz
200 mW
Not Allowed
ABZ89FC3789
109W-5200
SM BH
U-NII 5250-5350 MHz
3.2 mW
Recommended
ABZ89FC5807
109W-5210
SM AP BH
U-NII 5725-5825 MHz
200 mW
Allowed on SM and
BH
ABZ89FC4816
109W-5700
SM AP BH
ISM 5725-5850 MHz
200 mW
Allowed on SM and
BH
ABZ89FC5804
109W-5700
The term “IC:” before the radio certification number only signifies that Industry Canada technical specifications were met.
European Community Notification
Notification of Intended Purpose of Product Uses
This product is a two-way radio transceiver suitable for use in Broadband RLAN systems. It uses operating frequencies which are not
harmonized through the EC. All licenses must be obtained before using the product in any EC country.
Declaration of conformity:
Motorola declares the GHz radio types listed below comply with the essential requirements and other relevant provisions of
Directive1999/5/EC.
Relevant Specification
EN 301 893 or similar - radio spectrum
EN301489-17 - EMC
EN60950 – safety
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January 2004
Software Release 4.1
Product Details for Products Tested for Compliance with Relevant EC Directives
Module Type
Frequency
Band Range
Maximum
Transmitter
Power
Effective Isotropic
Radiated Power
(EIRP)
Modulation Type
Operating Channels
Nonoverlapping
Channel
Spacing
Access Point
5.725 to 5.825
GHz
200 mW RMS
1 Watt EIRP
High Index 2-level
FSK
5745 to 5805 MHz in
5-MHz increments
20 MHz
Subscriber
Module
5.725 to 5.825
GHz
200 mW RMS
1 Watt EIRP
High Index 2-level
FSK
5745 to 5805 MHz in
5-MHz increments
20 MHz
Subscriber
Module with
Reflector
5.725 to 5.825
GHz
200 mW RMS
63 Watts EIRP
High Index 2-level
FSK
5745 to 5805 MHz in
5-MHz increments
20 MHz
Backhaul
5.725 to 5.825
GHz
200 mW RMS
1 Watt EIRP
High Index 2-level
or 4-level FSK
5745 to 5805 MHz in
5-MHz increments
20 MHz
Backhaul with
Reflector
5.725 to 5.825
GHz
200 mW RMS
63 Watts EIRP
High Index 2-level
or 4-level FSK
5745 to 5805 MHz in
5-MHz increments
20 MHz
Canopy can be configured to operate at a range of frequencies, but at this time, only channels from 5745 MHz through 5805 MHz of the
5.7 GHz product have been tested for compliance with relevant EC directives. Before configuring equipment to operate outside this
range, please check with your regulator.
Exposure Note
A Canopy module must be installed to provide a separation distance of at least 20 cm (7.9 in) from all persons. When adding the Canopy
reflector dish, the reflector dish must be installed to provide a separation distance of at least 1.5m (59.1 in) from all persons. When so
installed, the module’s RF field is within Health Canada limits for the general population; consult Safety Code 6, obtainable from Health
Canada’s website http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/rpb.
In both configurations the maximum RMS power does not exceed 340mW.
The applicable power density exposure limit is 10 Watt/m2, according to the FCC OET Bulletin 65, the ICNIRP guidelines, and the
Health Canada Safety Code 6. The corresponding compliance distances referenced above have been determined by assuming worst-case
scenarios. The peak power density (S) in the far-field of a radio-frequency source with rms transmit power P and antenna gain G at a
distance d is
S=
P⋅G
4π d 2
In the case of the Canopy SM without reflector, the gain is 8 dBi (a factor of 6.3), so the peak power density equals the exposure limit at
a distance of 13 cm for 2.4 GHz product and 10 cm for 5.2 and 5.7 GHz product. A power compliance margin of over 2 is artificially
introduced by setting the distance to a consistent 20 cm across all modules, giving a power compliance margin of x2.4 for 2.4 GHz
modules and x4 for 5.2 and 5.7 GHz modules.
In the case of the Canopy SM with reflector, the gain depends on frequency and ranges from 19 dBi (a factor of 80) for 2.4 GHz modules
to 26 dBi (a factor of 400) for 5.2 GHz Extended Range and 5.7 GHz modules, so the peak power density equals the exposure limit at a
distance of 10 to 80 cm. A power compliance margin is artificially introduced by defining a consistent compliance distance of 1.5 m
across all modules with reflectors, giving a power compliance margin of x10 for 2.4 GHz modules, x220 for 5.2 GHz Extended Range
modules, and x3.5 for 5.7 GHz modules. The compliance distance is greatly overestimated in this case because the far-field equation
neglects the physical dimension of the antenna, which is modeled as a point-source.
Software License Terms and Conditions
ONLY OPEN THE PACKAGE, OR USE THE SOFTWARE AND RELATED PRODUCT IF YOU ACCEPT THE TERMS OF THIS
LICENSE. BY BREAKING THE SEAL ON THIS DISK KIT / CDROM, OR IF YOU USE THE SOFTWARE OR RELATED
PRODUCT, YOU ACCEPT THE TERMS OF THIS LICENSE AGREEMENT. IF YOU DO NOT AGREE TO THESE TERMS, DO
NOT USE THE SOFTWARE OR RELATED PRODUCT; INSTEAD, RETURN THE SOFTWARE TO PLACE OF PURCHASE FOR
A FULL REFUND. THE FOLLOWING AGREEMENT IS A LEGAL AGREEMENT BETWEEN YOU (EITHER AN INDIVIDUAL
OR ENTITY), AND MOTOROLA, INC. (FOR ITSELF AND ITS LICENSORS). THE RIGHT TO USE THIS PRODUCT IS
LICENSED ONLY ON THE CONDITION THAT YOU AGREE TO THE FOLLOWING TERMS.
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Now, therefore, in consideration of the promises and mutual obligations contained herein, and for other good and valuable consideration,
the receipt and sufficiency of which are hereby mutually acknowledged, you and Motorola agree as follows:
Grant of License. Subject to the following terms and conditions, Motorola, Inc., grants to you a personal, revocable, non-assignable,
non-transferable, non-exclusive and limited license to use on a single piece of equipment only one copy of the software contained on this
disk (which may have been pre-loaded on the equipment)(Software). You may make two copies of the Software, but only for backup,
archival, or disaster recovery purposes. On any copy you make of the Software, you must reproduce and include the copyright and other
proprietary rights notice contained on the copy we have furnished you of the Software.
Ownership. Motorola (or its supplier) retains all title, ownership and intellectual property rights to the Software and any copies,
including translations, compilations, derivative works (including images) partial copies and portions of updated works. The Software is
Motorola’s (or its supplier's) confidential proprietary information. This Software License Agreement does not convey to you any interest
in or to the Software, but only a limited right of use. You agree not to disclose it or make it available to anyone without Motorola’s
written authorization. You will exercise no less than reasonable care to protect the Software from unauthorized disclosure. You agree not
to disassemble, decompile or reverse engineer, or create derivative works of the Software, except and only to the extent that such activity
is expressly permitted by applicable law.
Termination. This License is effective until terminated. This License will terminate immediately without notice from Motorola or
judicial resolution if you fail to comply with any provision of this License. Upon such termination you must destroy the Software, all
accompanying written materials and all copies thereof, and the sections entitled Limited Warranty, Limitation of Remedies and
Damages, and General will survive any termination.
Limited Warranty. Motorola warrants for a period of ninety (90) days from Motorola’s or its customer’s shipment of the Software to
you that (i) the disk(s) on which the Software is recorded will be free from defects in materials and workmanship under normal use and
(ii) the Software, under normal use, will perform substantially in accordance with Motorola’s published specifications for that release
level of the Software. The written materials are provided "AS IS" and without warranty of any kind. Motorola's entire liability and your
sole and exclusive remedy for any breach of the foregoing limited warranty will be, at Motorola's option, replacement of the disk(s),
provision of downloadable patch or replacement code, or refund of the unused portion of your bargained for contractual benefit up to the
amount paid for this Software License.
THIS LIMITED WARRANTY IS THE ONLY WARRANTY PROVIDED BY MOTOROLA, AND MOTOROLA AND ITS
LICENSORS EXPRESSLY DISCLAIM ALL OTHER WARRANTIES, EITHER EXPRESS OF IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT
LIMITED TO IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND
NONINFRINGEMENT. MOTOROLA DOES NOT WARRANT THAT THE OPERATION OF THE SOFTWARE WILL BE
UNINTERRUPTED OR ERROR-FREE, OR THAT DEFECTS IN THE SOFTWARE WILL BE CORRECTED. NO ORAL OR
WRITTEN REPRESENTATIONS MADE BY MOTOROLA OR AN AGENT THEREOF SHALL CREATE A WARRANTY OR IN
ANY WAY INCREASE THE SCOPE OF THIS WARRANTY. MOTOROLA DOES NOT WARRANT ANY SOFTWARE THAT
HAS BEEN OPERATED IN EXCESS OF SPECIFICATIONS, DAMAGED, MISUSED, NEGLECTED, OR IMPROPERLY
INSTALLED. BECAUSE SOME JURISDICTIONS DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF IMPLIED
WARRANTIES, THE ABOVE LIMITATIONS MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.
Limitation of Remedies and Damages. Regardless of whether any remedy set forth herein fails of its essential purpose, IN NO EVENT
SHALL MOTOROLA OR ANY OF THE LICENSORS, DIRECTORS, OFFICERS, EMPLOYEES OR AFFILIATES OF THE
FOREGOING BE LIABLE TO YOU FOR ANY CONSEQUENTIAL, INCIDENTAL, INDIRECT, SPECIAL OR SIMILAR
DAMAGES WHATSOEVER (including, without limitation, damages for loss of business profits, business interruption, loss of business
information and the like), whether foreseeable or unforeseeable, arising out of the use or inability to use the Software or accompanying
written materials, regardless of the basis of the claim and even if Motorola or a Motorola representative has been advised of the
possibility of such damage. Motorola's liability to you for direct damages for any cause whatsoever, regardless of the basis of the form
of the action, will be limited to the price paid for the Software that caused the damages. THIS LIMITATION WILL NOT APPLY IN
CASE OF PERSONAL INJURY ONLY WHERE AND TO THE EXTENT THAT APPLICABLE LAW REQUIRES SUCH
LIABILITY. BECAUSE SOME JURISDICTIONS DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF LIABILITY FOR
CONSEQUENTIAL OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES, THE ABOVE LIMITATION MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.
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granted under this agreement, you agree that Motorola will be under no obligation to provide any support, maintenance or service in
connection with the Software or any application developed by you. Any maintenance and support of the Related Product will be
provided under the terms of the agreement for the Related Product.
Transfer. In the case of software designed to operate on Motorola equipment, you may not transfer the Software to another party except:
(1) if you are an end-user, when you are transferring the Software together with the Motorola equipment on which it operates; or 2) if
you are a Motorola licensed distributor, when you are transferring the Software either together with such Motorola equipment or are
transferring the Software as a licensed duly paid for upgrade, update, patch, new release, enhancement or replacement of a prior version
of the Software. If you are a Motorola licensed distributor, when you are transferring the Software as permitted herein, you agree to
transfer the Software with a license agreement having terms and conditions no less restrictive than those contained herein. You may
transfer all other Software, not otherwise having an agreed restriction on transfer, to another party. However, all such transfers of
Software are strictly subject to the conditions precedent that the other party agrees to accept the terms and conditions of this License, and
you destroy any copy of the Software you do not transfer to that party. You may not sublicense or otherwise transfer, rent or lease the
Software without our written consent. You may not transfer the Software in violation of any laws, regulations, export controls or
economic sanctions imposed by the U.S. Government.
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Software Release 4.1
Right to Audit. Motorola shall have the right to audit annually, upon reasonable advance notice and during normal business hours, your
records and accounts to determine compliance with the terms of this Agreement.
Export Controls. You specifically acknowledge that the software may be subject to United States and other country export control laws.
You shall comply strictly with all requirements of all applicable export control laws and regulations with respect to all such software and
materials.
U.S. Government Users. If you are a U.S. Government user, then the Software is provided with "RESTRICTED RIGHTS" as set forth
in subparagraphs (c)(1) and (2) of the Commercial Computer Software-Restricted Rights clause at FAR 52 227-19 or subparagraph
(c)(1)(ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and Computer Software clause at DFARS 252.227-7013, as applicable.
Disputes. You and Motorola hereby agree that any dispute, controversy or claim, except for any dispute, controversy or claim involving
intellectual property, prior to initiation of any formal legal process, will be submitted for non-binding mediation, prior to initiation of
any formal legal process. Cost of mediation will be shared equally. Nothing in this Section will prevent either party from resorting to
judicial proceedings, if (i) good faith efforts to resolve the dispute under these procedures have been unsuccessful, (ii) the dispute, claim
or controversy involves intellectual property, or (iii) interim relief from a court is necessary to prevent serious and irreparable injury to
that party or to others.
General. Illinois law governs this license. The terms of this license are supplemental to any written agreement executed by both parties
regarding this subject and the Software Motorola is to license you under it, and supersedes all previous oral or written communications
between us regarding the subject except for such executed agreement. It may not be modified or waived except in writing and signed by
an officer or other authorized representative of each party. If any provision is held invalid, all other provisions shall remain valid, unless
such invalidity would frustrate the purpose of our agreement. The failure of either party to enforce any rights granted hereunder or to
take action against the other party in the event of any breach hereunder shall not be deemed a waiver by that party as to subsequent
enforcement of rights or subsequent action in the event of future breaches.
Hardware Warranty in U.S.
Motorola U.S. offers a warranty covering a period of one year from the date of purchase by the customer. If a product is found defective
during the warranty period, Motorola will repair or replace the product with the same or a similar model, which may be a reconditioned
unit, without charge for parts or labor.
IN NO EVENT SHALL MOTOROLA BE LIABLE TO YOU OR ANY OTHER PARTY FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT,
GENERAL, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, EXEMPLARY OR OTHER DAMAGE ARISING OUT OF THE USE
OR INABILITY TO USE THE PRODUCT (INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, DAMAGES FOR LOSS OF BUSINESS
PROFITS, BUSINESS INTERRUPTION, LOSS OF BUSINESS INFORMATION OR ANY OTHER PECUNIARY LOSS, OR FROM
ANY BREACH OF WARRANTY, EVEN IF MOTOROLA HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
(Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages, so the above exclusion or limitation may
not apply to you.) IN NO CASE SHALL MOTOROLA’S LIABILITY EXCEED THE AMOUNT YOU PAID FOR THE PRODUCT.
Trademarks, Product Names, and Service Names
MOTOROLA, the stylized M Logo and all other trademarks indicated as such herein are trademarks of Motorola, Inc. ® Reg. U.S. Pat
& Tm. Office. Canopy is a trademark of Motorola, Inc. All other product or service names are the property of their respective owners.
Motorola, Inc
Broadband Wireless Technology Center
50 East Commerce Drive
Schaumburg, IL 60173
USA
http://www.motorola.com/canopy
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
1
WELCOME ................................................................................................................................12
1.1 Feedback.........................................................................................................................12
1.2 Technical Support ...........................................................................................................12
2
ABOUT THIS DOCUMENT.......................................................................................................13
2.1 Intended Use ...................................................................................................................13
2.2 New in This Issue............................................................................................................13
2.3 Additional Feature Information ........................................................................................15
3
SYSTEM OVERVIEW ...............................................................................................................16
3.1 Module-to-Module Communications ...............................................................................16
3.2 Types of SM Applications................................................................................................16
3.3 Synchronization...............................................................................................................18
3.3.1
Unsynchronized Modules ..................................................................................18
3.3.2
Passing Sync .....................................................................................................18
3.4 Wiring ..............................................................................................................................20
4
ADVANCED FEATURES..........................................................................................................21
4.1 Security Features ............................................................................................................21
4.1.1
BRAID................................................................................................................21
4.1.2
DES Encryption .................................................................................................21
4.1.3
AES Encryption..................................................................................................21
4.1.4
AES-DES Operability Comparisons ..................................................................21
4.2 Bandwidth Management .................................................................................................22
4.2.1
Bandwidth and Authentication Manager (BAM) ................................................22
4.2.2
Recharging Buckets ..........................................................................................23
4.2.3
Subscriber Module Perspective.........................................................................23
4.2.4
Interaction of Burst Data and Sustained Data Settings.....................................23
4.3 High-Priority Bandwidth...................................................................................................24
4.3.1
High Priority Uplink Percentage.........................................................................25
4.3.2
UAcks Reserved High .......................................................................................25
4.3.3
DAcks Reserved High .......................................................................................25
4.3.4
NumCtrlSlots Reserved High.............................................................................25
4.3.5
Allocations to Downlink and Uplink....................................................................25
4.3.6
Transmit Frame Spreading................................................................................26
4.4 Branding ..........................................................................................................................26
4.5 Denying All Remote Access............................................................................................28
4.6 Reinstating Remote Access Capability ...........................................................................29
4.7 SNMP ..............................................................................................................................29
4.7.1
Agent .................................................................................................................29
4.7.2
Managed Device................................................................................................29
4.7.3
NMS...................................................................................................................29
4.7.4
Dual Roles .........................................................................................................29
4.7.5
SNMP Commands .............................................................................................30
4.7.6
Traps..................................................................................................................30
4.7.7
MIBS ..................................................................................................................30
4.7.8
MIB-II .................................................................................................................32
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4.8
January 2004
Software Release 4.1
Canopy Enterprise MIB .....................................................................................32
4.7.9
4.7.10 Module Parameters for SNMP Implementation.................................................33
4.7.11 Objects Defined in the Canopy Enterprise MIB.................................................33
4.7.12 Traps Provided in the Canopy Enterprise MIB ..................................................40
4.7.13 MIB Viewers.......................................................................................................41
NAT, DHCP Server, DHCP Client, and DMZ in SM........................................................41
4.8.1
NAT....................................................................................................................42
4.8.2
DHCP.................................................................................................................42
4.8.3
NAT Disabled.....................................................................................................42
4.8.4
NAT with DHCP Client and DHCP Server.........................................................43
4.8.5
NAT with DHCP Client.......................................................................................44
4.8.6
NAT with DHCP Server .....................................................................................45
4.8.7
NAT without DHCP ............................................................................................46
4.8.8
DMZ ...................................................................................................................46
5
SITE PLANNING .......................................................................................................................47
5.1 Selection of SM Types and Passive Reflectors ..............................................................47
5.2 Specific Mounting Considerations...................................................................................47
5.2.1
Lightning Protection...........................................................................................48
5.2.2
Electrical Requirements.....................................................................................48
5.3 General RF Considerations.............................................................................................48
5.3.1
Vertical Beam Width ..........................................................................................48
5.3.2
Radio Horizon ....................................................................................................49
5.3.3
Antenna Downward Tilt .....................................................................................50
5.3.4
Fresnel Loss ......................................................................................................51
5.3.5
Free Space Path Loss .......................................................................................53
5.3.6
Loss Due to Foliage...........................................................................................55
5.3.7
Carrier-to-Interference Ratio..............................................................................55
5.4 Canopy Component Proliferation....................................................................................56
5.4.1
Subscriber Modules...........................................................................................56
5.4.2
Access Point Modules .......................................................................................56
5.4.3
Access Point Clusters........................................................................................56
5.4.4
Backhaul Modules .............................................................................................56
5.5 AP Update of SM Software Release...............................................................................56
5.6 Channel Plans .................................................................................................................58
5.6.1
Physical Proximity .............................................................................................58
5.6.2
Spectrum Analysis .............................................................................................59
5.6.3
Power Reduction to Mitigate Interference .........................................................59
5.6.4
2.4-GHz Channels .............................................................................................60
5.6.5
5.2-GHz Channels .............................................................................................61
5.6.6
5.7-GHz Channels .............................................................................................62
5.6.7
Example Channel Plans for AP Clusters...........................................................63
5.6.8
Multiple Access Points Clusters ........................................................................64
6
IP NETWORK PLANNING........................................................................................................66
6.1 General IP Addressing Concepts....................................................................................66
6.1.1
IP Address .........................................................................................................66
6.1.2
Subnet Mask......................................................................................................66
6.1.3
Example IP Address and Subnet Mask.............................................................66
6.1.4
Subnet Classes..................................................................................................66
6.2 Dynamic or Static Addressing .........................................................................................67
6.2.1
When a DHCP Server is Not Found ..................................................................67
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6.3
January 2004
Software Release 4.1
SM Module Address Assignment ....................................................................................68
6.3.1
Operator Assignment of IP Addresses ..............................................................68
7
SM MODULE INSTALLATION .................................................................................................69
7.1 Unpacking the Canopy Products.....................................................................................69
7.1.1
Component Layout ............................................................................................69
7.1.2
Diagnostic LEDs ................................................................................................70
7.2 Cabling the SM................................................................................................................70
7.2.1
Standards for Wiring..........................................................................................70
7.2.2
Recommended Tools ........................................................................................71
7.2.3
Connector Wiring ...............................................................................................72
7.2.4
Overriding IP Address and Password Setting ...................................................73
7.2.5
Wiring to Extend Network Sync .........................................................................74
7.3 Configuring the SM .........................................................................................................75
7.3.1
Configuration from the Factory ..........................................................................75
7.3.2
GUI Access Difficulty .........................................................................................75
7.3.3
Configuration Procedure....................................................................................76
7.4 Installing the SM..............................................................................................................77
7.5 Verifying System Performance........................................................................................80
8
SM INTERFACE PAGES ..........................................................................................................81
8.1 Status Page.....................................................................................................................82
8.1.1
Status Parameters.............................................................................................83
8.2 Configuration Page .........................................................................................................85
8.2.1
Configuration Parameters..................................................................................86
8.2.2
Configuration Buttons ........................................................................................91
8.3 IP Configuration Page .....................................................................................................92
8.3.1
IP Configuration Parameters with NAT Disabled ..............................................92
8.3.2
IP Configuration Buttons with NAT Disabled.....................................................93
8.3.3
IP Configuration Parameters with NAT Enabled ...............................................94
8.3.4
IP Configuration Buttons with NAT Enabled......................................................98
8.4 NAT Configuration Page .................................................................................................99
8.4.1
NAT Configuration Parameters with NAT Disabled...........................................99
8.4.2
NAT Configuration Buttons with NAT Disabled ...............................................100
8.4.3
NAT Configuration Parameters with NAT Enabled .........................................101
8.4.4
NAT Configuration Buttons with NAT Enabled................................................105
8.5 Event Log Page.............................................................................................................106
8.5.1
Event Log Operator Option..............................................................................106
8.6 AP Eval Data Page .......................................................................................................107
8.6.1
AP Eval Data Parameters................................................................................107
8.7 Ethernet Stats Page ......................................................................................................108
8.7.1
Ethernet Stats Parameters ..............................................................................108
8.8 Expanded Stats Page ...................................................................................................110
8.9 Link Test Page ..............................................................................................................110
8.9.1
Key Link Capacity Test Fields .........................................................................111
8.9.2
Capacity Criteria for the Link ...........................................................................111
8.10 Alignment Page .............................................................................................................111
8.10.1 SM Modes........................................................................................................112
8.10.2 Normal Aiming Mode .......................................................................................112
8.10.3 RSSI Only Aiming Mode..................................................................................112
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8.11 Spectrum Analyzer Page ..............................................................................................113
8.12 BER Results Page ........................................................................................................114
8.12.1 BER Display.....................................................................................................114
8.12.2 BER Results ....................................................................................................114
8.13 Bridge Table Page ........................................................................................................115
9
CANOPY SYSTEM ACCESSORIES ......................................................................................116
10
SM MODULE SPECIFICATIONS .................................................................................117
11
HISTORY OF CHANGES IN THIS DOCUMENT .........................................................119
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LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1: Additional link to extend network sync, Design 3 ..............................................................18
Figure 2: Additional link to extend network sync, Design 4 ..............................................................19
Figure 3: Additional link to extend network sync, Design 5 ..............................................................19
Figure 4: Canopy system wiring .......................................................................................................20
Figure 5: Burst Allocation vs. Sustained Rate, Example 1 ...............................................................23
Figure 6: Burst Allocation vs. Sustained Rate, Example 2 ...............................................................24
Figure 7: Burst Allocation vs. Sustained Rate, Example 3 ...............................................................24
Figure 8: Burst Allocation vs. Sustained Rate, Example 4 ...............................................................24
Figure 9: High-priority channel layout ...............................................................................................25
Figure 10: Example FTP session......................................................................................................27
Figure 11: Example telnet session to change screen logo ...............................................................28
Figure 12: NAT Disabled implementation .........................................................................................42
Figure 13: NAT with DHCP Client and DHCP Server implementation .............................................43
Figure 14: NAT with DHCP Client implementation ...........................................................................44
Figure 15: NAT with DHCP Server implementation..........................................................................45
Figure 16: NAT without DHCP implementation ................................................................................46
Figure 17: Canopy System Calculator page for beam width ............................................................49
Figure 18: Canopy System Calculator page for antenna elevation ..................................................50
Figure 19: Canopy System Calculator page for antenna downward tilt ...........................................51
Figure 20: Fresnel zone ....................................................................................................................52
Figure 21: Canopy System Calculator page for Fresnel zone dimensions ......................................53
Figure 22: Determinants in Rx signal level .......................................................................................54
Figure 23: Canopy System Calculator page for path loss ................................................................55
Figure 24: FTP to AP for SM auto-update ........................................................................................57
Figure 25: Telnet to AP for SM auto-update .....................................................................................58
Figure 26: Telnet to AP to turn off SM auto-update..........................................................................58
Figure 27: Example layout of 7 Access Point clusters......................................................................65
Figure 28: Example of IP address in Class B subnet .......................................................................66
Figure 29: Canopy SM base cover, attached and detached ............................................................69
Figure 30: SM and computer wiring..................................................................................................77
Figure 31: SM attachment to reflector arm .......................................................................................78
Figure 33: Audible Alignment Tone kit and example tone ................................................................79
Figure 34: Status screen for 5.2-GHz SM.........................................................................................82
Figure 35: Status screen for 2.4-GHz SM.........................................................................................83
Figure 36: Configuration screen for 5.2-GHz SM .............................................................................85
Figure 37: Configuration screen for 2.4-GHz SM .............................................................................86
Figure 38: Configuration screen, continued......................................................................................90
Figure 39: IP Configuration screen, NAT disabled, public accessibility ...........................................92
Figure 40: IP Configuration screen, NAT disabled, local accessibility .............................................93
Figure 41: IP Configuration screen, NAT with DHCP client and DHCP server ................................94
Figure 42: IP Configuration screen, NAT with DHCP client..............................................................95
Figure 43: IP Configuration screen, NAT with DHCP server ............................................................96
Figure 44: IP Configuration screen, NAT without DHCP ..................................................................97
Figure 45: NAT Configuration screen, NAT disabled .......................................................................99
Figure 46: NAT Configuration screen, NAT with DHCP client and DHCP server ..........................101
Figure 47: NAT Configuration screen, NAT with DHCP client........................................................102
Figure 48: NAT Configuration screen, NAT with DHCP server ......................................................103
Figure 49: NAT Configuration screen, NAT without DHCP ............................................................104
Figure 50: Event Log screen...........................................................................................................106
Figure 51: Example AP Eval Data page .........................................................................................107
Figure 52: Link Test screen ............................................................................................................110
Figure 53: Alignment screen ...........................................................................................................111
Figure 54: Spectrum Analyzer screen ............................................................................................113
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Figure 55: BER Results screen ......................................................................................................114
Figure 56: Bridge Table screen ......................................................................................................115
LIST OF TABLES
Table 1: Definitions of Canopy components .....................................................................................16
Table 2: Range of links with and without Passive Reflector .............................................................17
Table 3: Categories of MIB-II objects ...............................................................................................32
Table 4: Canopy Enterprise MIB objects for APs, SMs, and BHs ....................................................34
Table 5: Canopy Enterprise MIB objects for APs and BH timing masters........................................35
Table 6: Canopy Enterprise MIB objects for SMs and BH timing slaves..........................................38
Table 7: Example 2.4-GHz channel assignment by sector...............................................................63
Table 8: Example 5.2-GHz channel assignment by sector...............................................................64
Table 9: Example 5.7-GHz channel assignment by sector...............................................................64
Table 10: Subnet masks for Network Classes A, B, and C ..............................................................66
Table 11: SM status LEDs ................................................................................................................70
Table 12: Module auto-sensing per MAC address ...........................................................................71
Table 13: Specifications..................................................................................................................117
LIST OF PROCEDURES
Procedure 1: Replacing the Canopy logo .........................................................................................26
Procedure 2: Denying all remote access ..........................................................................................28
Procedure 3: Reinstating remote access capability..........................................................................29
Procedure 4: Installing the Canopy Enterprise MIB files ..................................................................32
Procedure 5: Auto-updating SMs......................................................................................................57
Procedure 6: Enabling spectrum analysis ........................................................................................59
Procedure 7: Invoking the low power mode......................................................................................60
Procedure 8: Fabricating an override plug........................................................................................74
Procedure 9: Regaining access to the module.................................................................................74
Procedure 10: Extending network sync ............................................................................................74
Procedure 11: Bypassing proxy settings to gain access module web pages...................................75
Procedure 12: Setting mandatory Configuration page parameters ..................................................76
Procedure 13: Setting optional Configuration page parameters.......................................................76
Procedure 14: Installing the SM........................................................................................................77
Procedure 15: Verifying system performance...................................................................................80
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1 WELCOME
Thank you for purchasing Motorola Canopy™ Backhaul Modules. This technology is the latest
innovation in high speed wireless networking. Canopy system features include
•
network speeds of 10/100 BaseT.
•
small compact design.
•
no special requirements for PC setup.
1.1 FEEDBACK
We welcome your feedback on Canopy system documentation.1 This includes feedback on the
structure, content, accuracy, or completeness of our documents, and any other comments you
have. Please send your comments to technical-documentation@canopywireless.com.
1.2 TECHNICAL SUPPORT
To get information or assistance as soon as possible for problems that you encounter, use the
following sequence of action:
1. Search this document, the user manuals that support other modules, and the software
release notes of supported releases
a. in the Table of Contents for the topic.
b. in the Adobe Reader® search capability for keywords that apply.2
2. Visit the Canopy systems website at http://www.canopywireless.com.
3. Ask your Canopy products supplier to help.
4. Gather information such as
•
the IP addresses and MAC addresses of any affected Canopy modules.
•
the software releases that operate on these modules.
•
data from the Event Log page of the modules.
•
the configuration of software features on these modules.
5. Escalate the problem to Canopy systems Technical Support (or another Tier 3 technical
support that has been designated for you) as follows. You may either
•
send e-mail to technical-support@canopywireless.com.
•
call 1 888 605 2552 during the following hours of operation:
Monday through Sunday
7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. EST
For warranty assistance, contact your reseller or distributor for the process.
1
2
Canopy is a trademark of Motorola, Inc.
Reader is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems, Incorporated.
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2 ABOUT THIS DOCUMENT
The following information describes the purpose of this document and the reasons for reissue.
2.1 INTENDED USE
This manual includes Canopy features through Software Release 4.1. The audience for this
manual comprises system operators, network administrators, and equipment installers. The user
of this manual should have
•
basic knowledge of RF theory. (See General RF Considerations on Page 48.)
•
network experience. (See General IP Addressing Concepts on Page 66.)
2.2 NEW IN THIS ISSUE
This document has been revised to include changes in technical content.
Issue 5 introduces the following changes:
Issue 5
•
Rearrangement of topics to make the document easier to return to as a reference
source.
•
Editorial changes to reduce redundancy and clarify technical concepts.
•
Revision of the warranty stated in the legal section above (effective for products
purchased on or after October 1, 2003).
•
Information that supports 2.4-GHz Canopy modules. See
−
Types of SM Applications on Page 16.
−
Selection of SM Types and Passive Reflectors on Page 47.
−
Channel Plans on Page 58.
−
Table 11 on Page 70.
−
Custom RF Frequency Scan Selection List on Page 87.
−
SM MODULE SPECIFICATIONS on Page 117.
•
Reminders to observe local and national regulations.
•
Description of the Canopy Bandwidth and Authentication Manager (BAM) and BAM
features, which provide bandwidth and security above what an AP without the BAM
provides. See Bandwidth and Authentication Manager (BAM) on Page 22.
•
Examples of interactions between burst data rate and sustained data rate settings. See
Interaction of Burst Data and Sustained Data Settings on Page 23.
•
A Configuration page selection in the AP that allows multiple APs to send beacons to
multiple SMs in the same range without interference. See Transmit Frame Spreading
on Page 26.
•
More logical telnet session for branding the interface screens. See Figure 11
on Page 28.
•
Procedures to deny or permit remote access to an SM. See Denying All Remote
Access on Page 28 and Reinstating Remote Access Capability on Page 29.
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Software Release 4.1
•
Information on the MIB (Management Information Base) that a network management
system can access through SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol) to monitor
and control variables in the Canopy system. See SNMP on Page 29.
•
NAT (network address translation) for SMs. See NAT, DHCP Server, DHCP Client,
and DMZ in SM on Page 41.
•
Links to Canopy System Calculator pages for
−
beam width dimensions (see Vertical Beam Width on Page 48).
−
miminum antenna elevation (see Radio Horizon on Page 49.
−
antenna downward tilt angle (see Antenna Downward Tilt on Page 50).
−
Fresnel zone dimensions (see Fresnel Loss on Page 51).
−
free space path loss (see Free Space Path Loss on Page 53).
•
A procedure to use the AP to update the software release of all registered SMs that
are entered onto an action list. See AP Update of SM Software Release on Page 56.
•
A procedure to use the SM as a spectrum analyzer for site planning and for alignment.
See Spectrum Analysis on Page 59.
•
A procedure to reduce the power of module transmission to mitigate or avoid
interference. See Power Reduction to Mitigate Interference on Page 59.
•
Expansion and clarification of available channel frequencies. See Channel Plans on
Page 58.
•
Corrections for the roles of Pins 4 and 5 (to +V return) and Pins 7 and 8 (to +V). See
Connector Wiring on Page 72.
•
Clarifications about the use of an override plug to regain control of a module.
See Overriding IP Address and Password Setting on Page 73.
•
A procedure that allows sync to be passed in one additional link. See Wiring to Extend
Network Sync on Page 74.
•
A procedure to use the Audible Alignment Tone feature. See Step 11 on Page 78.
•
A new field in the Status page to specify the active encryption technology with reboot
and software version information. See Canopy Boot Version on Page 83.
•
A new field in the Configuration page to activate a feature that disallows the SM to
send and receive data through the Ethernet port. See 802.3 Link Enable/Disable on
Page 86.
•
Clarification of the interactions of password settings. See Display-Only Access on
Page 87.
•
A new web page for IP configuration. See IP Configuration Page on Page 92.
•
A new web page for NAT (network address translation) configuration. See NAT
Configuration Page on Page 99.
•
A method to suppress AP data from display on the AP Eval Data page of the SM. See
AP Eval Data Page on Page 107.
•
The part number for ordering the Alignment Tool headset kit. See CANOPY SYSTEM
ACCESSORIES on Page 116.
•
Clarifications in the module specifications table. See SM MODULE SPECIFICATIONS
on Page 117.
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See also HISTORY OF CHANGES IN THIS DOCUMENT on Page 119.
2.3 ADDITIONAL FEATURE INFORMATION
Additional information about features that are introduced in new releases is available in Canopy
Software Release Notes. These release notes are available at http://www.motorola.com/canopy.
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3 SYSTEM OVERVIEW
The Canopy network uses the Canopy components that are defined in Table 1.
Table 1: Definitions of Canopy components
Component
Definition
Access Point Module (AP)
One module that distributes network or Internet services in a 60°
sector to 200 subscribers or fewer.
Access Point cluster
(AP cluster)
Two to six APs that together distribute network or Internet services to
a community of 1,200 or fewer subscribers. Each AP covers a 60°
sector. This cluster covers as much as 360°.
Subscriber Module (SM)
A customer premises equipment (CPE) device that extends network
or Internet services by communication with an AP or an AP cluster.
Cluster Management
Module (CMM)
A module that provides power, GPS timing, and networking
connections for an AP cluster. If this CMM is connected to a
Backhaul Module (BH), then this CMM is the central point of
connectivity for the entire site.
Backhaul Module (BH)
A module that provides point-to-point connectivity as either a
standalone link or a link to an AP cluster through a selected AP.
3.1 MODULE-TO-MODULE COMMUNICATIONS
Each SM communicates with an AP in an assigned time slot that the AP controls. The AP
coordinates the needs of SMs for data in both the downlink and the uplink to provide seamless
communication across the entire network. The BH communicates with another BH, a collocated
connection to the network, and a collocated AP.
The AP uses a point-to-multipoint protocol to communicate with each registered SM. The BH timing
master uses a point-to-point protocol to communicate with a BH timing slave.
For more information about the AP, see Canopy Access Point Module (AP) User Manual. For more
information about the BH, see Canopy Backhaul Module (BH) User Manual.
3.2 TYPES OF SM APPLICATIONS
Subscriber modules are available in 2.4-GHz, 5.2-GHz, and 5.7-GHz frequency bands. Due to
regulatory agency restrictions, a 5.2-GHz SM cannot be used with a reflector in the U.S.A. or
Canada.
A 2.4-GHz or 5.7-GHz SM can be used with a Canopy Passive Reflector dish. This reflector
extends the maximum span of a link as defined in Table 2.
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Table 2: Range of links with and without Passive Reflector
Reflector
Typical Range3
none
5 miles (8 km)
2400SMRF (DES)
with
2400AP (DES)
on SM
15 miles (24 km)
2401SMRF (AES)
with
2401AP (AES)
on SM
15 miles (24 km)
None allowed in
U.S.A or Canada
2 miles (3.2 km)
none
2 miles (3.2 km)
5700SMRF (DES)
with
5700AP (DES)
on SM
10 miles (16 km)
5701SMRF (AES)
with
5701AP (AES)
on SM
10 miles (16 km)
Module in Link
2400SM (DES)
with
2400AP (DES)
2401SM (AES)
with
2401AP (AES)
5200SM (DES)1
with
5200AP (DES)
5201SM (AES)2
with
5201AP (AES)
5700SM (DES)
with
5700AP (DES)
5701SM (AES)
with
5701AP (AES)
NOTES:
1. DES indicates that the module is preconfigured for Data
Encryption Standard security. See DES Encryption on
Page 21.
2. AES indicates that the module is preconfigured for
Advanced Encryption Standard security. See AES
Encryption on Page 21.
3. Terrain and other line of sight circumstances affect the
distance that can be achieved. Additionally, local or
national radio regulations may govern whether and how
the Passive Reflector can be deployed.
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3.3 SYNCHRONIZATION
The CMM is a critical element in the operation of the Canopy system. At one AP cluster site or
throughout an entire wireless system, the CMM provides a GPS timing pulse to each module,
synchronizing the network transmission cycles.
3.3.1
Unsynchronized Modules
Without this pulse, an AP is unsynchronized, and a BH timing master cannot synchronize a BH
timing slave. An unsynchronized module may transmit during a receive cycle of other modules.
This can cause one or more modules to receive an undesired signal that is strong enough to make
the module insensitive to the desired signal (become desensed).
3.3.2
Passing Sync
In releases earlier than Release 4.0, network sync can be delivered in only one over the air link in
any of the following network designs:
•
Design 1
1. A CMM provides sync in Ethernet protocol to a collocated AP.
2. This AP sends the sync in multipoint protocol over the air to SMs.
•
Design 2
1. A CMM provides sync in Ethernet protocol to a collocated BH timing master.
2. This BH timing master sends the sync in point-to-point protocol over the air to a BH
timing slave.
In Release 4.0 and later releases, network sync can be either delivered as described above or
extended by one additional link in any of the following network designs:
NOTE: In each of these following designs, Link 2 is not on the same frequency band as
Link 4. (For example, Link 2 may be a 5.2-GHz link while Link 4 is a 5.7- or 2.4-GHz link.)
•
Design 3
1. A CMM provides sync in Ethernet protocol to a collocated AP.
2. This AP sends the sync in multipoint protocol over the air to an SM.
3. This SM delivers the sync in Ethernet protocol to a collocated AP.
4. This AP passes the sync in multipoint protocol in the additional link over the air to
SMs.
This design in illustrated in Figure 1.
AP
1
2
SM
AP
3
4
SM
4
SM
CMM
Figure 1: Additional link to extend network sync, Design 3
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•
January 2004
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Design 4
1. A CMM provides sync in Ethernet protocol to a collocated AP.
2. This AP sends the sync in multipoint protocol over the air to an SM.
3. This SM delivers the sync in Ethernet protocol to a collocated BH timing master.
4. This BH timing master passes the sync in point-to-point protocol in the additional
link over the air to a BH timing slave.
This design is illustrated in Figure 2.
AP
2
BH
-M-
SM
BH
-S-
4
3
1
CMM
Figure 2: Additional link to extend network sync, Design 4
•
Design 5
1. A CMM provides sync in Ethernet protocol to a collocated BH timing master.
2. This BH timing master sends the sync in point-to-point protocol over the air to a BH
timing slave.
3. This BH timing slave delivers the sync in Ethernet protocol to a collocated AP.
4. This AP passes the sync in multipoint protocol in the additional link over the air to
SMs.
This design is illustrated in Figure 3.
BH
-M-
1
2
BH
-S-
AP
3
4
SM
4
SM
CMM
Figure 3: Additional link to extend network sync, Design 5
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Wiring and configuration information for this sync extension is described under Wiring to Extend
Network Sync on Page 74.
3.4 WIRING
The wiring scheme of the Canopy system is displayed in Figure 4.
AP units
GPS sync & Ethernet
cables from each unit*
GPS antenna
GPS antenna
cable
network connection
in
optional
backhaul module
300SS
CMM2
AC or DC
power in
grounding
system
* Two cables, Ethernet and GPS sync, connect each sector AP to the CMM2.
Figure 4: Canopy system wiring
The wiring scheme of the SM and computer is displayed in Figure 30 on Page 77.
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4 ADVANCED FEATURES
The following features are available in the Canopy system but not required for basic operation.
4.1 SECURITY FEATURES
Canopy systems employ the following forms of encryption for security of the wireless link:
4.1.1
•
BRAID–a security scheme that the cellular industry uses to authenticate wireless
devices.
•
DES–Data Encryption Standard, an over-the-air link option that uses secret 56-bit keys
and 8 parity bits.
•
AES–Advanced Encryption Standard, an extra-cost over-the-air link option that
provides extremely secure wireless connections. AES uses 128-bit secret keys as
directed by the government of the U.S.A. AES is not exportable and requires a special
AP to process the large keys.
BRAID
BRAID is a stream cipher that the TIA (Telecommunications Industry Association) has
standardized. Standard Canopy APs and SMs use BRAID encryption to
4.1.2
•
calculate the per-session encryption key (independently) on each end of a link.
•
provide the digital signature for authentication challenges.
DES Encryption
Standard Canopy modules provide DES encryption. DES performs a series of bit permutations,
substitutions, and recombination operations on blocks of data. DES Encryption does not affect the
performance or throughput of the system.
4.1.3
AES Encryption
Motorola also offers Canopy products that provide AES encryption. AES uses the Rijndael
algorithm and 128-bit keys to establish a higher level of security than DES. Because of this higher
level of security, the government of the U.S.A. controls the export of communications products that
use AES to ensure that these products are available in only certain regions. The Canopy distributor
or reseller can advise service providers about current regional availability.
4.1.4
AES-DES Operability Comparisons
This section describes the similarities and differences between DES and AES products, and the
extent to which they may interoperate.
Key Consistency
The DES AP and the DES Backhaul timing master module are factory-programmed to enable or
disable DES encryption. Similarly, the AES AP and the AES Backhaul timing master module are
factory-programmed to enable or disable AES encryption.
In either case, the authentication key entered in the SM Configuration page establishes the
encryption key. For this reason, the authentication key must be the same on the SM as on the AP.
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Feature Availability
Canopy AES products operate on the same software as DES products. Thus feature availability
and functionality are and will continue to be the same, regardless of whether AES encryption is
enabled. All interface screens are identical. However, when encryption is enabled on the
Configuration screen
•
the AES product provides AES encryption.
•
the DES product provides DES encryption.
Field-programmable Gate Array
Canopy AES products and DES products use different FPGA (field-programmable gate array)
loads. However, the AES FPGA will be upgraded as needed to provide new features or services
similar to those available for DES products.
Signaling Rates for Backhaul Modules
DES BHs are available in both 10-Mbps and 20-Mbps signaling rates. AES BHs are available with
only a 10-Mbps signaling rate.
Upgradeability
Canopy DES products cannot be upgraded to AES. To have the option of AES encryption, the
network planner must purchase AES products.
Interoperability
Canopy AES products and DES products do not interoperate when enabled for encryption. For
example, An AES AP with encryption enabled cannot communicate with DES SMs. Similarly, an
AES BH timing master with encryption enabled cannot communicate with a DES BH timing slave.
However, if encryption is disabled, AES modules can communicate with DES modules.
4.2 BANDWIDTH MANAGEMENT
Each AP controls SM bandwidth management. All SMs registered to an AP receive and use the
same bandwidth management information that is set in the AP where they are registered.
The Canopy software uses token buckets to manage the bandwidth of each SM. Each SM
employs two buckets: one for uplink and one for downlink throughput. These buckets are
continuously being filled with tokens at a rate set by the Sustained Data Rate variable field in the
AP.
4.2.1
Bandwidth and Authentication Manager (BAM)
Canopy offers the Bandwidth and Authentication Manager (BAM) to manage bandwidth individually
for each SM registered to an AP. BAM allows the setting of Sustained Uplink Data Rate, Sustained
Downlink Data Rate, Uplink Burst Allocation, and Downlink Burst Allocation for the individual SM.
BAM also provides secure SM authentication and user-specified DES encryption keys. BAM is an
optional Canopy software product that operates on a networked PC.
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Recharging Buckets
The Burst Allocation variable field in the AP sets the size of each bucket. This limits the maximum
number of tokens that can fill a bucket.
If the SM transfers data at the Sustained Data Rate, then the bucket refills at the same rate, and
burst is impossible. If the SM transfers data at a rate less than the Sustained Data Rate, then the
bucket continues to fill with unused tokens. In this case, required bursting occurs at the rate
determined by the number of unused tokens.
After a burst is completed, the bucket is recharged at the Sustained Data Rate. Short bursts
recharge faster than large bursts.
4.2.3
Subscriber Module Perspective
Normal web browsing, e-mail, small file transfers, and short streaming video are rarely rate limited,
depending on the bandwidth management settings in the AP or the BAM server. When the SM
processes large downloads such as software upgrades and long streaming video, or a series of
medium-size downloads, these transfer at a bandwidth higher than the Sustained Date Rate
(unless no unused tokens remain in the bucket) until the burst limit is reached.
When the burst limit is reached, the data rate falls to the Sustained Data Rate setting. Then later,
when the SM is either idle or transferring data at a rate slower than Sustained Data Rate, the burst
limit recharges at the Sustained Data Rate.
4.2.4
Interaction of Burst Data and Sustained Data Settings
A Burst Allocation setting
•
less than the Sustained Data Rate yields a Sustained Data Rate equal to the Burst
Allocation. (See Figure 5 and Figure 7.)
•
equal to the Sustained Data Rate negates the burst capability. (See Figure 6.)
•
at zero shuts off the data pipe. (See Figure 8.)
Input Rate
56 Kbps
Sustained Rate
128 Kbps
Burst Allocation
512 Kb
Effective Rate
56 Kbps plus Burst
Figure 5: Burst Allocation vs. Sustained Rate, Example 1
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Input Rate
128 Kbps
Sustained Rate
128 Kbps
Burst Allocation
128 Kb
Effective Rate
128 Kbps with no Burst
Figure 6: Burst Allocation vs. Sustained Rate, Example 2
Input Rate
128 Kbps
Sustained Rate
128 Kbps
Burst Allocation
56 Kb
Effective Rate
56 Kbps with no Burst
Figure 7: Burst Allocation vs. Sustained Rate, Example 3
Input Rate
128 Kbps
Sustained Rate
128 Kbps
Burst Allocation
0 Kb
Effective Rate
0 Kbps
Figure 8: Burst Allocation vs. Sustained Rate, Example 4
4.3 HIGH-PRIORITY BANDWIDTH
To support low-latency traffic such as VoIP (Voice over IP), the Canopy system implements a highpriority channel. This channel does not affect the inherent latencies in the Canopy system but
allows high-priority traffic to be immediately served. The high-priority pipe separates low-latency
trafiic from traffic that is latency tolerant, such as standard web traffic and file downloads.
The Canopy system separates this traffic by recognizing the IPv4 Type of Service Low Latency bit
(Bit 3). Bit 3 is set by a device outside the Canopy system. If this bit is set, the system sends the
packet on the high-priority channel and services this channel before any normal traffic.
NOTE: To enable the high-priority channel, the operator must configure all high-priority
parameters.
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The high-priority channel is enabled by configuration of four parameters in the Configuration web
page. These parameters are:
4.3.1
•
High Priority Uplink Percentage
•
UAcks Reserved High
•
DAcks Reserved High
•
NumCtrlSlots Reserved High
High Priority Uplink Percentage
The High Priority Uplink Percentage parameter defines the percentage of the uplink bandwidth to
dedicate to low-latency traffic. When set, this percentage of RF link bandwidth is permanently
allocated to low-latency traffic, regardless of whether low-latency traffic is present. The system
provides no corresponding downlink parameter because scheduling algorithms in the AP allocate
this bandwidth as needed.
4.3.2
UAcks Reserved High
The UAcks Reserved High parameter defines the number of uplink slots used to acknowledge
high-priority data that is received by an SM. The recommended setting for this parameter is 3. The
recommended setting for the corresponding TotalNumUAcksSlots parameter is 6.
4.3.3
DAcks Reserved High
The DAcks Reserved High parameter defines the number of downlink slots used to acknowledge
high-priority data that is received by an AP. The recommended setting for this parameter is 3. The
recommended setting for the corresponding NumDAckSlots parameter is 6.
4.3.4
NumCtrlSlots Reserved High
The NumCtrlSlots Reserved High parameter defines the number of slots used to send control
messages to an AP. The recommended setting for this parameter is 3. The recommended setting
for the corresponding NumCtlSlots parameter is 6.
4.3.5
Allocations to Downlink and Uplink
Figure 9 illustrates the format of the high-priority channel.
(NOT TO SCALE)
Uplink
Downlink
Beacon
Control
Data Slots
Data H
Collision Control
Slots P
HP indicates
high-priority slots
Figure 9: High-priority channel layout
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Example Allocation
At AP default downlink-to-uplink settings (75% downlink and 25% uplink), if High Priority is set to
25%, then
•
in the uplink, the total of reserved slots is equivalent to 25%, 2 slots in this example:
−
The bandwidth is 64 bytes per slot, repeated 400 times each second.
−
[2 slots/instance] x [64 bytes/slot] x [8 bits/byte] x [400 instances/second] = 409,600 bps
≈ 400 kbps of uplink bandwidth
•
4.3.6
in the downlink, the AP
−
does not reserve slots, but will service all high-priority bandwidth requests.
−
may become saturated by attempting to service too much high-priority traffic.
−
monitors the Low Latency TOS (Type of Service) bit, Bit 3, in the Ethernet frame.
−
prioritizes the traffic in the high-priority queue (when Bit 3 is set) according to the
AP configuration settings for the high-priority channel.
Transmit Frame Spreading
If the operator selects the Transmit Frame Spreading option in the Configuration page of the AP,
SMs between two APs can register in the assigned AP (not the other AP). If all SMs operate on
Release 4.0 or later, then selection of this option is strongly recommended.
With this selection, the AP does not transmit a beacon in each frame, but rather transmits a beacon
in only pseudo-random frames in which the SM expects the beacon. This allows multiple APs to
send beacons to multiple SMs in the same range without interference.
However, if Transmit Frame Spreading is selected in a Release 4.0 AP, and this AP transmits to an
SM that operates on an earlier release, the SM expects more frequent beacons and may lose sync
and eventually lose registration. To avoid this, all SMs that register to an AP that has Transmit
Frame Spreading selected should operate on Release 4.0 or a later release.
4.4 BRANDING
The web-based interface screens on each Canopy module contain the Canopy logo. This logo can
be replaced with a custom company logo. A file named canopy.jpg generates the Canopy logo.
Procedure 1: Replacing the Canopy logo
You can replace the Canopy logo as follows:
1. Copy your custom logo file to the name canopy.jpg on your system.
2. Use an FTP (File Transfer Protocol) session to transfer the new canopy.jpg file to the
module, as in the example session shown in Figure 10.
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> ftp 169.254.1.1
Connected to 169.254.1.1
220 FTP server ready
Name (169.254.1.1:none): root
331 Guest login ok
Password: <password-if-configured>
230 Guest login ok, access restrictions apply.
ftp> binary
200 Type set to I
ftp> put canopy.jpg
ftp> quit
221 Goodbye
Figure 10: Example FTP session
3. Use a telnet session to add the new canopy.jpg file to the file system, as in the
example session shown in Figure 11.
NOTE: Available telnet commands execute the following results:
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ƒ
addwebfile adds a custom logo file to the file system.
ƒ
clearwebfile clears the customer logo file from the file system.
ƒ
lsweb lists the custom logo file and display the storage space available on the
file system.
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/---------\
C A N O P Y
Motorola Broadband Wireless Technology Center
(Copyright 2001, 2002 Motorola Inc.)
Login: root
Password: <password-if-configured>
Telnet+> lsweb
Flash Web files
/canopy.jpg
7867
free directory entries: 31
free file space: 56468
Telnet +> clearwebfile
Telnet+> lsweb
Flash Web files
free directory entries: 32
free file space
64336 bytes
Telnet+> addwebfile canopy.jpg
Telnet +> lsweb
Flash Web files
/canopy.jpg
7867
free directory entries: 31
free file space: 55331
Telnet +> exit
Figure 11: Example telnet session to change screen logo
4.5 DENYING ALL REMOTE ACCESS
For a network where additional security is more important that ease of network administration, all
remote access to an AP can be disabled as follows:
Procedure 2: Denying all remote access
1. Insert the override plug into the RJ-11 GPS sync port of the AP.
2. Power up or power cycle the AP.
3. Access the web page http://169.254.1.1/lockconfig.html.
4. Click the check box.
5. Save the changes.
6. Reboot the AP.
7. Remove the override plug.
RESULT: No access to this AP is possible through HTTP, SNMP, FTP, telnet, or over an RF
link.
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4.6 REINSTATING REMOTE ACCESS CAPABILITY
Where ease of network administration is more important than the additional security that the No
Remote Access feature provides, this feature can be disabled as follows:
Procedure 3: Reinstating remote access capability
1. Insert the override plug into the RJ-11 GPS sync port of the AP.
2. Power up or power cycle the AP.
3. Access the web page http://169.254.1.1/lockconfig.html.
4. Click the check box to uncheck the field.
5. Save the changes.
6. Reboot the AP.
7. Remove the override plug.
RESULT: Access to this AP is possible through HTTP, SNMP, FTP, telnet, or over an RF link.
4.7 SNMP
SNMPv2 (Simple Network Management Protocol Version 2) can be used to manage and monitor
the Canopy modules under SMI (Structure of Management Information) specifications. SMI
specifies management information definitions in ASN.1 (Abstract Syntax Notation One) language.
SNMPv2 supports both 32-bit and 64-bit counters. The SMI for SNMPv2 is defined in RFC 1902 at
http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc1902.html.
4.7.1
Agent
In SNMP, software on each managed device acts as the agent. The agent collects and stores
management information in ASN.1 format, in a structure that a MIB (management information
base) defines. The agent responds to commands to
4.7.2
•
send information about the managed device.
•
modify specific data on the managed device.
Managed Device
In SNMP, the managed device is the network element that operates on the agent software. In the
Canopy network, this managed device is the module (AP, SM, or BH). With the agent software, the
managed device has the role of server in the context of network management.
4.7.3
NMS
In SNMP, the NMS (network management station) has the role of client. An application (manager
software) operates on the NMS to manage and monitor the modules in the network through
interface with the agents.
4.7.4
Dual Roles
The NMS can simultaneously act as an agent. In such an implementation, the NMS acts as
Issue 5
•
client to the agents in the modules, when polling for the agents for information and
sending modification data to the agents.
•
server to another NMS. when being polled for information gathered from the agents
and receiving modification data to send to the agents.
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SNMP Commands
To manage a module, SNMPv2 supports the set command, which instructs the agent to change
the data that manages the module.
To monitor a network element (Canopy module), SNMPv2 supports
•
the get command, which instructs the agent to send information about the module to
the manager in the NMS.
•
traversal operations, which the manager uses to identify supported objects and to
format information about those objects into relational tables.
In a typical Canopy network, the manager issues these commands to the agents of more than one
module (to all SMs in the operator network, for example).
4.7.6
Traps
When a specified event occurs in the module, the agent initiates a trap, for which the agent sends
an unsolicited asynchronous message to the manager.
4.7.7
MIBS
The MIB, the SNMP-defined data structure, is a tree of standard branches that lead to optional,
non-standard positions in the data hierarchy. The MIB contains both
•
objects that SNMP is allowed to control (bandwidth allocation or access, for example)
•
objects that SNMP is allowed to monitor (packet transfer, bit rate, and error data, for
example).
The path to each object in the MIB is unique to the object. The endpoint of the path is the object
identifier.
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Paths
The standard MIB hierarchy includes the following cascading branch structures:
•
•
•
•
•
•
the top (standard body) level:
−
ccitt (0)
−
iso (1)
−
iso-ccitt (2)
under iso (1) above:
−
standard (0)
−
registration-authority (1)
−
member-body (2)
−
identified-organization (3)
under identified-organization (3) above:
−
dod (6)
−
other branches
under dod (6) above:
−
internet (1)
−
other branches
under internet (1) above:
−
mgmt (2)
−
private (4)
−
other branches
under mgmt (2) above: mib-2 (1) and other branches. (See MIB-II below.)
under private (4) above: enterprise (1) and other branches. (See Canopy Enterprise
MIB below.)
Beneath this level are non-standard branches that the enterprise may define.
Thus, the path to an object that is managed under MIB-II begins with the decimal string 1.3.6.1.2.1
and ends with the object identifier and instance(s), and the path to an object that is managed under
the Canopy Enterprise MIB begins with 1.3.6.1.4.1, and ends with the object identifier and
instance(s).
Objects
An object in the MIB can have either only a single instance or multiple instances, as follows:
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•
a scalar object has only a single instance. A reference to this instance is designated by
.0, following the object identifier.
•
a tabular object has multiple instances that are related to each other. Tables in the MIB
associate these instances. References to these instances typically are designated by
.1, .2, and so forth, following the object identifier.
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MIB-II
The standard MIB-II (Management Information Base systems and interface) objects are
programmed into the Canopy modules. To read this MIB, see Management Information Base for
Network Management of TCP/IP-based Internets: MIB II, RFC 1213 at
http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc1213.html.
The MIB-II standard categorizes each object as one of the types defined in Table 3:
Table 3: Categories of MIB-II objects
4.7.9
Objects in
category…
Control or identify the status of…
system
system operations in the module.
interfaces
the network interfaces for which the module is configured.
ip
Internet Protocol information in the module.
icmp
Internet Control Message Protocol information in the module.
(These messages flag IP problems and allow IP links to be tested.)
tcp
Transport Control Protocol information in the module (to control
and ensure the flow of data on the Internet).
udp
User Datagram Protocol information in the module (for checksum
and address).
Canopy Enterprise MIB
For additional reporting and control, the Canopy Releases 3.2.5 and later provide the Canopy
Enterprise MIB, which extends the objects for any NMS that uses SNMP interaction. This MIB
comprises five text files that are formatted in standard ASN.1 (Abstract Syntax Notation One)
language.
Procedure 4: Installing the Canopy Enterprise MIB files
To use this MIB, perform the following steps:
1. On the NMS, immediately beneath the root directory, create directory mibviewer.
2. Immediately beneath the mibviewer directory, create directory canopymibs.
3. Download the following three standard MIB files from http://www.simpleweb.org/ietf/mibs
into the mibviewer/canopymibs directory on the NMS:
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•
SNMPv2-SMI.txt, which defines the Structure of Management Information
specifications.
•
SNMPv2-CONF.txt, which allows macros to be defined for object group, notification
group, module compliance, and agent capabilities.
•
SNMPv2-TC.txt, which defines general textual conventions.
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4. Move the following five files from your Canopy software package directory into the
mibviewer/canopymibs directory on the NMS (if necessary, first download the software
package from http://www.motorola.com/canopy):
•
whisp-tcv2-mib.txt (Textual Conventions MIB), which defines Canopy systemspecific textual conventions
•
WHISP-GLOBAL-REG-MIB.txt (Registrations MIB), which defines registrations for
global items such as product identities and product components.
•
WHISP-BOX-MIBV2-MIB.txt (Box MIB), which defines module-level (AP, SM, and
BH) objects.
•
WHISP-APS-MIB.txt (APs MIB), which defines objects that are specific to the AP or
BH timing master.
•
WHISP-SM-MIB.txt (SM MIB), which defines objects that are specific to the SM or
BH timing slave.
•
CMM3-MIB.txt (CMM3 MIB), which defines objects that are specific to the
CMMmicro.
NOTE: The operator should not edit these MIB files in ASN.1. These files are intended for
manipulation by only the NMS. However, the operator can view these files through a
commercially available MIB viewer.
5. Download a selected MIB viewer into directory mibviewer.
6. As instructed by the user documentation that supports your NMS, import the eight MIB files
that are listed above.
4.7.10 Module Parameters for SNMP Implementation
Canopy modules provide the following Configuration web page parameters that govern SNMP
access from the manager to the agent:
•
Display-Only Access, which specifies the password that allows only viewing.
•
Full Access, which specifies the password that allows both viewing and changing.
•
Community String, which specifies the password for security between managers and
the agent.
•
Accessing Subnet, which specifies the subnet mask allows managers to poll the
agents.
•
Trap Address, which specifies the IP address of the NMS.
For more information about each of these fields, see the user document that supports the module.
4.7.11 Objects Defined in the Canopy Enterprise MIB
The Canopy Enterprise MIB defines objects for
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•
APs and BH timing masters
•
SMs and BH timing slaves
•
CMMmicros
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AP, SM, and BH Objects
The objects that the Canopy Enterprise MIB defines for each AP and BH Timing Master are listed
in Table 4.
Table 4: Canopy Enterprise MIB objects for APs, SMs, and BHs
Object Name
Issue 5
Value Syntax
Operation Allowed
bhModulation
Integer
manage and/or monitor
bhTimingMode
Integer
manage and/or monitor
boxTemperature
DisplayString
monitor
bridgeEntryTimeout
Integer
manage and/or monitor
clearEventLog
Integer
manage and/or monitor
colorCode
Integer
manage and/or monitor
displayOnlyAccess
DisplayString
manage and/or monitor
fullAccess
DisplayString
manage and/or monitor
linkNegoSpeed
DisplayString
manage and/or monitor
pass1Status
DisplayString
monitor
pass2Status
DisplayString
monitor
reboot
Integer
manage and/or monitor
snmpMibPerm
Integer
manage and/or monitor
webAutoUpdate
Integer
manage and/or monitor
whispBoxBoot
DisplayString
monitor
whispBoxEsn
WhispMACAddress
monitor
whispBoxEvntLog
EventString
monitor
whispBoxFPGAVer
DisplayString
monitor
whispBoxSoftwareVer
DisplayString
monitor
whispBridgeAge
Integer
monitor
whispBridgeDesLuid
WhispLUID
monitor
whispBridgeExt
Integer
monitor
whispBridgeHash
Integer
monitor
whispBridgeMacAddr
MacAddress
monitor
whispBridgeTbErr
Integer
monitor
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Value Syntax
Operation Allowed
whispBridgeTbFree
Integer
monitor
whispBridgeTbUsed
Integer
monitor
AP and BH Timing Master Objects
The objects that the Canopy Enterprise MIB defines for each AP and BH Timing Master are listed
in Table 5. The highlighted objects are commonly monitored by the manager. The traps provided in
this set of objects are listed under Traps Provided in the Canopy Enterprise MIB on Page 40.
Table 5: Canopy Enterprise MIB objects for APs and BH timing masters
Issue 5
Object Name
Value Syntax
Operation Allowed
actDwnFragCount
Gauge32
monitor
actDwnLinkIndex
Integer
monitor
actUpFragCount
Gauge32
monitor
apBeaconInfo
Integer
manage and/or monitor
asIP1
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
asIP2
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
asIP3
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
authKey
DisplayString
manage and/or monitor
authMode
Integer
manage and/or monitor
berMode
Integer
manage and/or monitor
dAcksReservHigh
Integer
manage and/or monitor
dataSlotDwn
Integer
monitor
dataSlotUp
Integer
monitor
dataSlotUpHi
Integer
monitor
defaultGw
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
downLinkEff
Integer
monitor
downLinkRate
Integer
monitor
dwnLnkAckSlot
Integer
monitor
dwnLnkAckSlotHi
Integer
monitor
dwnLnkData
Integer
manage and/or monitor
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Object Name
Value Syntax
Operation Allowed
dwnLnkDataRate
Integer
manage and/or monitor
dwnLnkLimit
Integer
manage and/or monitor
encryptionMode
Integer
manage and/or monitor
expDwnFragCount
Gauge32
monitor
expUpFragCount
Gauge32
monitor
fpgaVersion
DisplayString
monitor
gpsInput
Integer
manage and/or monitor
gpsStatus
DisplayString
monitor
gpsTrap
Integer
manage and/or monitor
highPriorityUpLnkPct
Integer
manage and/or monitor
lanIp
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
lanMask
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
linkAirDelay
Integer
monitor
linkAveJitter
Integer
monitor
linkDescr
DisplayString
monitor
linkESN
PhysAddress
monitor
linkInDiscards
Counter32
monitor
linkInError
Counter32
monitor
linkInNUcastPkts
Counter32
monitor
linkInOctets
Counter32
monitor
linkInUcastPkts
Counter32
monitor
linkInUnknownProtos
Counter32
monitor
linkLastJitter
Integer
monitor
linkLastRSSI
Integer
monitor
linkLUID
Integer
monitor
linkMtu
Integer
monitor
linkOutDiscards
Counter32
monitor
linkOutError
Counter32
monitor
linkOutNUcastPkts
Counter32
monitor
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Object Name
Value Syntax
Operation Allowed
linkOutOctets
Counter32
monitor
linkOutQLen
Gauge32
monitor
linkOutUcastPkts
Counter32
monitor
linkRegCount
Integer
monitor
linkReRegCount
Integer
monitor
linkRSSI
Integer
monitor
linkSessState
Integer
monitor
linkSpeed
Gauge32
monitor
linkTestAction
Integer
manage and/or monitor
linkTestDuration
Integer
manage and/or monitor
linkTestError
DisplayString
monitor
linkTestLUID
Integer
manage and/or monitor
linkTestStatus
DisplayString
monitor
linkTimeOut
Integer
monitor
maxDwnLinkIndex
Integer
monitor
maxRange
Integer
manage and/or monitor
numCtlSlots
Integer
manage and/or monitor
numCtlSlotsReserveHigh
Integer
manage and/or monitor
numCtrSlot
Integer
monitor
numCtrSlotHi
Integer
monitor
numDAckSlots
Integer
manage and/or monitor
numUAckSlots
Integer
manage and/or monitor
PhysAddress
PhysAddress
monitor
privateIp
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
radioSlicing
Integer
monitor
radioTxGain
Integer
monitor
regCount
Integer
monitor
regTrap
Integer
manage and/or monitor
rfFreqCarrier
Integer
manage and/or monitor
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Object Name
Value Syntax
Operation Allowed
sectorID
Integer
manage and/or monitor
sessionCount
Integer
monitor
softwareBootVersion
DisplayString
monitor
softwareVersion
DisplayString
monitor
testDuration
Integer
monitor
testLUID
Integer
monitor
txSpreading
Integer
manage and/or monitor
uAcksReservHigh
Integer
manage and/or monitor
upLinkEff
Integer
monitor
upLinkRate
Integer
monitor
upLnkAckSlot
Integer
monitor
upLnkAckSlotHi
Integer
monitor
upLnkDataRate
Integer
manage and/or monitor
upLnkLimit
Integer
manage and/or monitor
whispGPSStats
Integer
monitor
SM and BH Timing Slave Objects
The objects that the Canopy Enterprise MIB defines for each SM and BH Timing Slave are listed in
Table 6. The highlighted objects are commonly monitored by the manager.
Table 6: Canopy Enterprise MIB objects for SMs and BH timing slaves
Object Name
Issue 5
Value Syntax
Operation Allowed
airDelay
Integer
monitor
alternateDNSIP
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
arpCacheTimeout
Integer
manage and/or monitor
authKey
DisplayString
manage and/or monitor
authKeyOption
Integer
manage and/or monitor
calibrationStatus
DisplayString
monitor
defaultGw
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
dhcpcdns1
IpAddress
monitor
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Object Name
Issue 5
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Value Syntax
Operation Allowed
dhcpcdns2
IpAddress
monitor
dhcpcdns3
IpAddress
monitor
dhcpCip
IpAddress
monitor
dhcpClientEnable
Integer
manage and/or monitor
dhcpClientLease
TimeTicks
monitor
dhcpCSMask
IpAddress
monitor
dhcpDfltRterIP
IpAddress
monitor
dhcpDomName
DisplayString
monitor
dhcpIPStart
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
dhcpNumIPsToLease
Integer
manage and/or monitor
dhcpServerEnable
Integer
manage and/or monitor
dhcpServerLeaseTime
Integer
manage and/or monitor
dhcpServerTable
DhcpServerEntry
monitor
dhcpSip
IpAddress
monitor
dmzEnable
Integer
manage and/or monitor
dmzIP
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
dnsAutomatic
Integer
manage and/or monitor
enable8023link
Integer
manage and/or monitor
hostIp
IpAddress
monitor
hostLease
TimeTicks
monitor
hostMacAddress
PhysAddress
monitor
jitter
Integer
monitor
lanIp
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
lanMask
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
naptEnable
Integer
manage and/or monitor
naptPrivateIP
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
naptPrivateSubnetMask
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
naptPublicGatewayIP
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
naptPublicIP
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
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Object Name
January 2004
Software Release 4.1
Value Syntax
Operation Allowed
naptPublicSubnetMask
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
naptRFPublicGateway
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
naptRFPublicIP
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
naptRFPublicSubnetMask
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
networkAccess
Integer
manage and/or monitor
powerUpMode
Integer
manage and/or monitor
prefferedDNSIP
IpAddress
manage and/or monitor
radioDbm
DisplayString
monitor
radioSlicing
Integer
monitor
radioTxGain
Integer
monitor
registeredToAp
DisplayString
monitor
rfScanList
DisplayString
manage and/or monitor
rssi
Integer
monitor
sessionStatus
DisplayString
monitor
tcpGarbageCollectTmout
Integer
manage and/or monitor
timingPulseGated
Integer
manage and/or monitor
udpGarbageCollectTmout
Integer
manage and/or monitor
Ports Designations in SNMP
SNMP identifies the ports of the module as follows:
•
Interface 1 represents the RF interface of the module. To monitor the status of
Interface 1 is to monitor the traffic on the RF interface.
•
Interface 2 represents the Ethernet interface of the module. To monitor the status of
Interface 2 is to monitor the traffic on the Ethernet interface.
These interfaces can be viewed on the NMS through definitions that are provided in the standard
MIB files.
4.7.12 Traps Provided in the Canopy Enterprise MIB
Canopy modules provide the following SNMP traps for automatic notifications to the NMS:
Issue 5
•
whispGPSInSync, which signals a transition from not synchronized to synchronized.
•
whispGPSOutSync, which signals a transition from synchronized to not synchronized.
•
whispRegComplete, which signals registration complete.
•
whispRegLost, which signals registration lost.
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4.7.13 MIB Viewers
Any of several commercially available MIB viewers can facilitate management of these objects
through SNMP. Some are available as open source software. The Canopy division does not
endorse, support, or discourage the use of any these viewers.
To assist end users in this area, the Canopy division offers a starter guide for one of these
viewers—MRTG (Multi Router Traffic Grapher). This starter guide is titled Canopy Network
Management with MRTG: Application Note, and is available in the Library section under Support at
http://www.motorola.com/canopy. MRTG software is available at http://mrtg.hdl.com/mrtg.html.
Other MIB viewers are available and/or described at the following web sites:
http://ns3.ndgsoftware.com/Products/NetBoy30/mibbrowser.html
http://www.adventnet.com/products/snmputilities/
http://www.dart.com/samples/mib.asp
http://www.edge-technologies.com/webFiles/products/nvision/index.cfm
http://www.ipswitch.com/products/whatsup/monitoring.html
http://www.koshna.com/products/KMB/index.asp
http://www.mg-soft.si/mgMibBrowserPE.html
http://www.mibexplorer.com
http://www.netmechanica.com/mibbrowser.html
http://www.networkview.com
http://www.newfreeware.com/search.php3?q=MIB+browser
http://www.nudesignteam.com/walker.html
http://www.oidview.com/oidview.html
http://www.solarwinds.net/Tools
http://www.stargus.com/solutions/xray.html
http://www.totilities.com/Products/MibSurfer/MibSurfer.htm
4.8 NAT, DHCP SERVER, DHCP CLIENT, AND DMZ IN SM
In Release 4.1 and later releases, the Canopy system provides NAT (network address translation
for SMs in the following combinations of NAT and DHCP (Dynamic Host Confiuration Protocol):
Issue 5
•
NAT Disabled (as in earlier releases)
•
NAT with DHCP Client and DHCP Server
•
NAT with DHCP Client
•
NAT with DHCP Server
•
NAT without DHCP
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NAT
NAT isolates the SMs from the Internet. This both enhances SM security and obviates the need for
a special assignment scheme of IP addresses that identify the SMs. Where NAT is active, the SM
serves as a Layer 3 switch. (By contrast, where NAT is not active, the SM serves as a Layer 2
bridge.)
In the Canopy system, NAT supports HTTP, ICMP (Internet Control Message Protocols), and FTP
(File Transfer Protocol), but does not support IPsec (IP Secure).
4.8.2
DHCP
DHCP enables a device to be assigned a new IP address and TCP/IP parameters, including a
default gateway, whenever the device reboots. Thus DHCP reduces configuration time, conserves
IP addresses, and allows modules to be moved to a different network within the Canopy system.
In conjunction with the NAT features, each SM provides
4.8.3
•
a DHCP server that assigns IP addresses to computers connected to the SM by
Ethernet protocol.
•
a DHCP client that receives an IP address for the SM from a network DHCP server.
NAT Disabled
The NAT Disabled implementation is illustrated in Figure 12.
Figure 12: NAT Disabled implementation
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This implementation is provisioned as displayed in Figure 38: IP Configuration screen, NAT
disabled on Page 92 and Figure 44: NAT Configuration screen, NAT disabled on Page 99.
4.8.4
NAT with DHCP Client and DHCP Server
The NAT with DHCP Client and DHCP Server implementation is illustrated in Figure 13.
Figure 13: NAT with DHCP Client and DHCP Server implementation
This implementation is provisioned as displayed in Figure 40: IP Configuration screen, NAT with
DHCP client and DHCP server on Page 94 and Figure 45: NAT Configuration screen, NAT with
DHCP client and DHCP server on Page 101.
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NAT with DHCP Client
The NAT with DHCP Client implementation is illustrated in Figure 14.
Figure 14: NAT with DHCP Client implementation
This implementation is provisioned as displayed in Figure 41: IP Configuration screen, NAT with
DHCP client on Page 95 and Figure 46: NAT Configuration screen, NAT with DHCP client on
Page 102.
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NAT with DHCP Server
The NAT with DHCP Server implementation is illustrated in Figure 15.
Figure 15: NAT with DHCP Server implementation
This implementation is provisioned as displayed in Figure 42: IP Configuration screen, NAT with
DHCP server on Page 96 and Figure 47: NAT Configuration screen, NAT with DHCP server on
Page 103.
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NAT without DHCP
The NAT without DHCP implementation is illustrated in Figure 16.
Figure 16: NAT without DHCP implementation
This implementation is provisioned as displayed in Figure 43: IP Configuration screen, NAT without
DHCP on Page 97 and Figure 48: NAT Configuration screen, NAT without DHCP on Page 104.
4.8.8
DMZ
In conjunction with the NAT features, a DMZ (demilitarized zone) allows the assignment of one IP
address behind the SM for a device to logically exist outside the firewall and receive network traffic.
The first three octets of this IP address must be identical to the first three octets of the NAT private
IP address.
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5 SITE PLANNING
The following considerations are critical in the choice of a location for the wireless network
infrastructure.
Note: Since each site is unique, typically many additional considerations are critical.
5.1 SELECTION OF SM TYPES AND PASSIVE REFLECTORS
A system plan may include
•
SMs that are not mounted to Passive Reflectors, operate in the 5.2-GHz band, and
communicate with an AP in the 5.2-GHz band.
•
SMs that are not mounted to Passive Reflectors, operate in either the 2.4-GHz band or
the 5.7-GHz band, and communicate with an AP in the same band.
•
SMs that are mounted to Passive Reflectors, operate in the 2.4-GHz band or the 5.7GHz band, and communicate with an AP in the same band.
The network planner should select the model of SM for each site based on
•
an attempt to design for cross-band collocation of APs with BH timing masters (to
avoid self-interference). See Physical Proximity on Page 58.
•
the constraint that both the AP and the SM must operate on the same encryption
standard. See Interoperability on Page 22.
•
the distance of the SM from the AP. A Passive Reflector is required for each SM in the
5.7-GHz band that is further than 2 miles (3.2 km) from the AP and for each SM in the
2.4-GHz band that is further than 5 miles (8 km) from the AP.
See Types of SM Applications on Page 16.
5.2 SPECIFIC MOUNTING CONSIDERATIONS
The Canopy SM must be mounted
•
vertically (the internal antenna is vertically polarized).
•
with hardware that the wind and ambient vibrations cannot flex or move.
•
where a grounding system is available.
•
at a proper height:
•
–
higher than the tallest points of objects immediately around them (such as trees
and buildings).
–
at least 2 feet (0.6 m) below the tallest point on the roof or antenna mast (for
lightning protection).
in a line-of-sight path
–
to the AP in the RF link.
–
that will not be obstructed by trees as they grow or structures that are later built.
Note: Visual line of sight does not guarantee radio line of sight.
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Lightning Protection
The network plan must include lightning protection. The following precautions are strongly
recommended:
5.2.2
•
Install a lightning protection system for the site.
•
Observe all local and national codes that apply to grounding for lightning protection.
•
Use a Canopy Surge Suppressor to protect equipment from surges on the Ethernet
cable that is connected to the Canopy System.
Electrical Requirements
The network plan must also conform to applicable country and local codes, such as the NEC
(National Electrical Code) in the U.S.A. If uncertain of code requirements, the planner should
engage the services of a licensed electrician.
5.3 GENERAL RF CONSIDERATIONS
The network planner must account for the following general characteristics of RF transmission and
reception.
5.3.1
Vertical Beam Width
The transmitted beam in the vertical dimension covers more area beyond the beam center. The
Canopy System Calculator page BeamwidthRadiiCalcPage.xls automatically calculates the radii of
the beam coverage area. Figure 17 displays an image of this file.
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Canopy™ System
Calculator
Automatically calculate
Inner Radius of Vertical Beam Width
Outer Radius of Vertical Beam Width
Distance from near -3 dB to far -3 dB
from known
Angle of Antenna Downward Tilt
Elevation of Antenna
Vertical Beam Width
Determinants
Enter Values
Elevation of antenna (meters)
Elevation of antenna (feet)
Angle of antenna downward tilt (from 0-degree horizontal)
Angle of vertical beam width (from -3 dB to -3 dB)
Results
Read Values
Inner radius of vertical beam width (kilometers)
Outer radius of vertical beam width (kilometers)
Distance from near -3 dB to far -3 dB (kilometers)
Inner radius of vertical beam width (miles)
Outer radius of vertical beam width (miles)
Distance from near -3 dB to far -3 dB (miles)
Figure 17: Canopy System Calculator page for beam width
5.3.2
Radio Horizon
Because the surface of the earth is curved, higher module elevations are required for greater link
distances. This effect can be critical to link connectivity in link spans that are greater than 8 miles
(12 km). The Canopy System Calculator page AntennaElevationCalcPage.xls automatically
calculates the minimum antenna elevation for these cases, presuming no landscape elevation
difference from one end of the link to the other. Figure 18 displays an image of this file.
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Canopy™ System
Calculator
Automatically calculate
Minimum Antenna Elevation
from known
Distance from Transmitter to Receiver
Determinants
Enter Values
Distance from transmitter to receiver (kilometers)
Distance from transmitter to receiver (miles)
Results
Read Values
Minimum antenna elevation (meters)
Minimum antenna elevation (feet)
Figure 18: Canopy System Calculator page for antenna elevation
5.3.3
Antenna Downward Tilt
The appropriate angle of antenna downward tilt is derived from both the distance between
transmitter and receiver and the difference in their elevations. The Canopy System Calculator page
DowntiltCalcPage.xls automatically calculates this angle. Figure 19 displays an image of this file.
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Canopy™ System
Calculator
Automatically calculate
Angle of Antenna Downward Tilt
from known
Distance from Transmitter to Receiver
Elevation of Transmitter
Elevation of Receiver
Determinants
Enter Values
Distance from transmitter to receiver (kilometers)
Elevation of transmitter (meters)
Elevation of receiver (meters)
Distance from transmitter to receiver (miles)
Elevation of transmitter (feet)
Elevation of receiver (feet)
Results
Read Values
Angle of antenna downward tilt (from metric calculation)
Angle of antenna downward tilt (from English standard calculation)
Figure 19: Canopy System Calculator page for antenna downward tilt
5.3.4
Fresnel Loss
The Fresnel (pronounced fre·NEL) Zone is a theoretical three-dimensional area around the line of
sight of an antenna transmission. Objects that penetrate this area can cause the received signal
strength of the transmitted signal to fade. Out-of-phase reflections and absorption of the signal
result in signal cancellation.
An unobstructed line of sight is important, but is not the only determinant of adequate placement.
Even where the path has a clear line of sight, obstructions such as terrain, vegetation, metal roofs,
or cars may penetrate the Fresnel zone and cause signal loss. Figure 20 illustrates an ideal
Fresnel zone.
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Fresnel zone
receiver
transmitter
Transmitter
or Amplifier
Figure 20: Fresnel zone
The Canopy System Calculator page FresnelZoneCalcPage.xls automatically calculates the
Fresnel zone clearance that is required between the visual line of sight and the top of a highelevation object in the link path. Figure 21 displays an image of this file.
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Canopy™ System
Calculator
Automatically calculate
Fresnel Zone (vertical dimension)
from known
Distance from Transmitter to Receiver
Distance from High-elevation Object to Receiver
Frequency
Determinants
Enter Values
Distance from transmitter to receiver (kilometers)
Distance from high-elevation object to receiver (kilometers)
Distance from transmitter to receiver (miles)
Distance from high-elevation object to receiver (miles)
Frequency (GHz)
Results
Read Values
Maximum Fresnel zone radius, midway between Tx and Rx (meters)
Fresnel zone radius at object (meters)
Minimum clearance required beween line of sight and top of object (meters)
Maximum Fresnel zone radius, midway between Tx and Rx (feet)
Fresnel zone radius at object (feet)
Minimum clearance required beween line of sight and top of object (feet)
Figure 21: Canopy System Calculator page for Fresnel zone dimensions
5.3.5
Free Space Path Loss
An RF signal in space is attenuated by atmospheric and other effects as a function of the distance
from the initial transmission point. The further a reception point is placed from the transmission
point, the weaker is the received RF signal.
Free space path loss is a major determinant in Rx (received) signal level. Rx signal level, in turn, is
a major factor in the system operating margin (fade margin), which is calculated as follows:
system operating margin = Rx signal level − Rx sensitivity
The Rx sensitivity of the SM is stated under SM MODULE SPECIFICATIONS on Page 117. The
determinants in Rx signal level are illustrated in Figure 22.
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Tx antenna
loss
Rx antenna
gain
free space signal
Tx
cable
loss
Rx
cable
loss
distance
Rx
signal
level
Tx
power
receiver
or amplifier
Transmitter
transmitter
or amplifier
Amplifier
Figure 22: Determinants in Rx signal level
Rx signal level is calculated as follows:
Rx signal level dB = Tx power − Tx cable loss + Tx antenna gain − free space path loss
+ Rx antenna gain − Rx cable loss
NOTE: This Rx signal level calculation presumes that a clear line of sight is established
between the transmitter and receiver and that no objects encroach in the Fresnel zone.
The Canopy System Calculator page PathLossCalcPage.xls automatically calculates free space
path loss. Figure 23 displays an image of this page.
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Canopy™ System
Calculator
Automatically calculate
Free Space Path Loss
from known
Distance from Transmitter to Receiver
Frequency
Determinants
Enter Values
Distance from transmitter to receiver (kilometers)
Distance from transmitter to receiver (miles)
Frequency (GHz)
Results
Read Values
Free space path loss from metric input (dB)
Free space path loss from English standard input (dB)
Figure 23: Canopy System Calculator page for path loss
5.3.6
Loss Due to Foliage
The foliage of trees and plants causes additional signal loss. Seasonal density, moisture content of
the foliage, and other factors such as wind may change the amount of loss. Caution should be
exercised when a link is used to transmit though this type of environment.
5.3.7
Carrier-to-Interference Ratio
The C/I (Carrier-to-Interference) ratio defines how much signal advantage must be engineered into
the radio link to tolerate an interfering transmission.
Note: The C/I ratio is typically a design feature of the radio.
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5.4 CANOPY COMPONENT PROLIFERATION
The network planner must account for the coordination of both initial and future Canopy modules.
5.4.1
Subscriber Modules
The planner must always consider the distribution of SMs as relative to the distribution of APs and
clusters. The planner must also consider that the SMs and the AP to which they register should
operate on the same software release. See AP Update of SM Software Release on Page 56.
5.4.2
Access Point Modules
The number of APs deployed can vary from site to site, based on the locations of SMs that these
modules must reach. The mounting scheme can also vary from site to site. The APs need not be
mounted adjacent to each other. For example, on a three-legged tower, two APs can be mounted
to each tower leg.
5.4.3
Access Point Clusters
Each AP cluster requires a CMM for seamless operation within the entire Canopy system. Thus the
network planner should consider the number and locations of CMMs that will be deployed as the
Canopy network grows.
5.4.4
Backhaul Modules
The network planner should consider where BHs will be required
•
to connect the Canopy system to the outer network.
•
to span distances with a wireless link (see Types of SM Applications on Page 16).
•
to generate and deliver network sync to a site (see Synchronization on Page 18).
•
to pass network sync in one additional link to a remote site (see Synchronization on
Page 18).
The network planner should also consider the frequency band of each BH that will be deployed
•
to avoid self-interference (see Physical Proximity on Page 58).
•
to use the extended range that the Canopy Passive Reflector dish provides (see Types
of SM Applications on Page 16 and Selection of SM Types and Passive Reflectors on
Page 47).
5.5 AP UPDATE OF SM SOFTWARE RELEASE
In Release 4.1 and later releases, the operator can upgrade to a later release any SM that
operates on Release 4.0 or later. To do so, the operator uses the FTP (File Transfer Protocol) and
telnet utilities. The interval required for each SM update is approximately four minutes.
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Procedure 5: Auto-updating SMs
To upgrade SMs to a later release, the operator performs the following steps:
1. FTP the file SMboot.bin, FPGA, and the action list to AP, as shown in Figure 24.
< ls
062403_D40.jbc APASboot.bin BH10boot.bin
SMboot.bin
41actionlist.txt APboot.bin BH20boot.bin
> ftp 172.16.1.1
Connected to 172.16.1.1.
220 FTP server ready
Name (172.16.1.1:user):
331 Guest login ok
Password:
230 Guest login ok, access restrictions apply.
Remote system type is Type:.
ftp> binary
200 Type set to I.
ftp> put SMboot.bin
local: SMboot.bin remote: SMboot.bin
500 'EPSV': command not understood.
227 Entering Passive Mode (172,16,1,1,4,1)
150 Opening BINARY mode data connection for SMboot.bin
100% |*************************************| 712 KB 229.55
KB/s 00:00 ETA
226 Transfer complete.
729668 bytes sent in 00:03 (209.57 KB/s)
ftp> put 062403_D40.jbc
local: 062403_D40.jbc remote: 062403_D40.jbc
227 Entering Passive Mode (172,16,1,1,4,2)
150 Opening BINARY mode data connection for 062403_D40.jbc
100% |*************************************| 156 KB 219.48
KB/s 00:00 ETA
226 Transfer complete.
159859 bytes sent in 00:00 (156.18 KB/s)
ftp> put 41actionlist
local: 41actionlist remote: 41actionlist
ftp: local: 41actionlist: No such file or directory
ftp> put 41actionlist.txt
local: 41actionlist.txt remote: 41actionlist.txt
227 Entering Passive Mode (172,16,1,1,4,3)
150 Opening BINARY mode data connection for 41actionlist.txt
100% |*************************************| 53 58.81
KB/s 00:00 ETA
226 Transfer complete.
53 bytes sent in 00:00 (0.25 KB/s)
ftp> exit
221 Goodbye.
Figure 24: FTP to AP for SM auto-update
2. Update the SMs in a telnet session to the AP, as shown in Figure 25.
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> telnet 172.16.1.1
Trying 172.16.1.1...
Connected to 172.16.1.1.
Escape character is '^]'.
/---------\
C A N O P Y
Motorola Broadband Wireless Technology Center
(Copyright 2001, 2002 Motorola Inc.)
Telnet+> update 41actionlist.txt
Figure 25: Telnet to AP for SM auto-update
3. In the Canopy Boot Version field of the Status page of each SM that was targeted for
update, confirm that the SM has been updated.
4. Turn off updating in a telnet session to the AP, as shown in Figure 26.
RESULT: All SMs that are registered to the AP are upgraded to the later release.
> telnet 172.16.1.1
Trying 172.16.1.1...
Connected to 172.16.1.1.
Escape character is '^]'.
/---------\
C A N O P Y
Motorola Broadband Wireless Technology Center
(Copyright 2001, 2002 Motorola Inc.)
Telnet+> updateoff
Back on the original Telnet session:
13:15:40 UT : 11/10/03 : AutoUpdate currently Disabled.
Telnet+>
Figure 26: Telnet to AP to turn off SM auto-update
5.6 CHANNEL PLANS
For 5.2- and 5.7-GHz modules, 20-MHz wide channels are centered every 5 MHz. For 2.4-GHz
modules, 20-MHz wide channels are centered every 2.5 MHz. This allows the operator to
customize the channel layout for interoperability where other Canopy equipment is collocated.
Regardless of whether 2.4-, 5.2-, or 5.7-GHz modules are deployed, channel separation
between modules should be at least 20 MHz.
5.6.1
Physical Proximity
A BH and an AP that operate in the same frequency band should be separated by at least
100 feet (30 meters). At closer distances, the frame structures that these modules transmit and
receive cause interference.
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A BH and an AP on the same tower, or separated by less than 100 feet (30 meters), require a
CMM. The CMM properly synchronizes all Canopy modules to prevent interference and desensing
of the modules.
NOTE: Cross-band deployment of APs and BH is the recommended alternative (for
example, a 5.2-GHz AP collocated with 5.7-GHz BH).
5.6.2
Spectrum Analysis
In Release 4.1 and later releases, the operator can
•
use an SM as a spectrum analyzer.
•
view a table that shows power level in RSSI and dBm for each frequency throughout
the entire 20-MHz range, regardless of limited selections in the Custom RF
Frequency Scan Selection List field of the Configuration page.
•
select an AP channel that minimizes interference from other RF equipment.
This functionality can be used during the alignment of an SM, but is especially helpful for frequency
selection during site planning.
The following procedure causes the SM to drop any active RF link. If a link is dropped
when the spectrum analysis begins, the link can be re-established after a 15-minute
interval has elapsed.
Procedure 6: Enabling spectrum analysis
The Spectrum Analyzer in SM and BHS feature provides this functionality. To enable this
functionality, the operator performs the following steps:
1. Access the Expanded Stats page of the SM.
2. On the Expanded Stats page, click Spectrum Analyzer.
3. On the Spectrum Analyzer page, click Enable.
RESULT: The feature is enabled.
4. Click Enable again.
RESULT: The system measures RSSI and dBm for each frequency.
5. Repeatedly click Enable.
RESULT: The system repeats the measurement and refreshes the displayed data until the
spectrum analysis mode times out, 15 minutes after the mode was invoked in Step 3.
5.6.3
Power Reduction to Mitigate Interference
In Release 4.1 and later releases, where any module (SM, AP, BH timing master, or BH timing
slave) is close enough to another module that self-interference is possible, the operator can set the
SM to operate at 18 dB less than full power.
The following procedure can cause the SM to drop an active RF link to a module that is
too far from the low-power SM. If a link is dropped when Power Control is set to low, the
link can be re-established by only Ethernet access.
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Procedure 7: Invoking the low power mode
The Power Control feature provides this functionality. To enable this functionality, the operator
performs the following steps:
1. Access the Configuration page of the module.
2. In the Power Control parameter, click Low.
3. Click Save Changes.
4. Click Reboot.
5. Access the Alignment page of the SM.
6. Assess whether the desired links for this module achieve
•
RSSI greater than 700.
•
jitter value between 0 and 4 in Release 4.0 and later releases or between 5 and 9 in
any earlier release.
7. Access the Link Test page of the module.
8. Assess whether the desired links for this module achieve
•
uplink efficiency greater than 90%.
•
downlink efficiency greater than 90%.
9. If the desired links fail to achieve any of the above measurement thresholds, then
a. access the module by direct Ethernet connection.
b. access the Configuration page of the module.
c.
in the Power Control parameter, click Full.
d. click Save Changes.
5.6.4
2.4-GHz Channels
Channel selections for the AP in the 2.4-GHz band depend on whether the AP is deployed in
cluster. Channel selections for the BH are not similarly limited.
2.4-GHz BH and Single AP Available Channels
A BH or a single 2.4-GHz AP can operate in the following channels, which are separated by only
2.5-MHz increments.
(All Frequencies in GHz)
2.4150
2.4275
2.4400
2.4525
2.4175
2.4300
2.4425
2.4550
2.4200
2.4325
2.4450
2.4575
2.4225
2.4350
2.4475
2.4250
2.4375
2.4500
The channels of adjacent 2.4-GHz APs should be separated by at least 20 MHz.
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2.4-GHz AP Cluster Recommended Channels
Three non-overlapping channels are recommended for use in a 2.4-GHz AP cluster:
(All Frequencies in GHz)
2.4150
2.4350
2.4575
This recommendation allows 20 MHz of separation between one pair of channels and 22.5 MHz
between the other pair. The network planner can use the Spectrum Analysis feature in an SM or
BHS, or use a standalone spectrum analyzer, to evaluate the RF environment. Where spectrum
analysis identifies risk of interference for any of these channels, the planner can compromise this
recommendation as follows:
•
Select 2.4375 GHz for the middle channel
•
Select 2.455 GHz for the top channel
•
Select 2.4175 GHz for the bottom channel
In any case, the plan should allow at least 20 MHz of separation between channels. See Spectrum
Analysis on Page 59.
5.6.5
5.2-GHz Channels
Channel selections for the AP in the 5.2-GHz band depend on whether the AP is deployed in
cluster. Channel selections for the BH are not similarly limited.
5.2-GHz BH and Single AP Available Channels
A BH or a single 5.2-GHz AP can operate in the following channels, which are separated by 5-MHz
increments.
(All Frequencies in GHz)
5.275
5.290
5.305
5.320
5.280
5.295
5.310
5.325
5.285
5.300
5.315
The channels of adjacent APs should be separated by at least 20 MHz. However, 25 MHz of
separation is advised.
5.2-GHz AP Cluster Recommended Channels
Three non-overlapping channels are recommended for use in a 5.2-GHz AP cluster:
(All Frequencies in GHz)
5.275
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5.300
5.325
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5.7-GHz Channels
Channel selections for the AP in the 5.7-GHz band depend on whether the AP is deployed in
cluster. Channel selections for the BH are not similarly limited.
5.7-GHz BH and Single AP Available U-NII Channels
A BH or a single 5.7-GHz AP can operate in the following U-NII channels, which are separated by
5-MHz.
(All Frequencies in GHz)
5.745
5.765
5.785
5.750
5.770
5.790
5.755
5.775
5.795
5.760
5.780
5.800
5.805
The channels of adjacent APs should be separated by at least 20 MHz. However, Canopy advises
25-MHz separation.
5.7-GHz AP Cluster Recommended U-NII Channels
Four non-overlapping U-NII channels are recommended for use in a 5.7-GHz AP cluster:
(All Frequencies in GHz)
5.745
5.765
5.785
5.805
The fully populated cluster requires only three channels, each reused by the module that is
mounted 180° opposed. The four channels above are also used for backhaul point-to-point links.
5.7-GHz BH and Single AP Available ISM/U-NII Channels
A BH or a single 5.7-GHz AP enabled for ISM/U-NII frequencies can operate in the following
channels, which are separated by 5-MHz increments.
(All Frequencies in GHz)
Issue 5
5.735
5.765
5.795
5.825
5.740
5.770
5.800
5.830
5.745
5.775
5.805
5.835
5.750
5.780
5.810
5.840
5.755
5.785
5.815
5.760
5.790
5.820
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The channels of adjacent APs should be separated by at least 20 MHz. However, 25 MHz of
separation is advised.
5.7-GHz AP Cluster Recommended ISM/U-NII Channels
Six non-overlapping ISM/U-NII channels are recommended for use in a 5.7-GHz AP cluster:
(All Frequencies in GHz)
5.735
5.775
5.815
5.755
5.795
5.835
The fully populated cluster requires only three channels, each reused by the module that is
mounted 180° offset. The six channels above are also used for backhaul point-to-point links.
As noted above, a 5.7-GHz AP enabled for ISM/U-NII frequencies can operate on a frequency as
high as 5.840 GHz. Where engineering plans allow, this frequency can be used to provide an
additional 5-MHz separation between AP and BH channels.
5.6.7
Example Channel Plans for AP Clusters
Examples for assignment of frequency channels and sector IDs are provided in Table 7, Table 8,
and Table 9. Each frequency is reused on the sector that is at a 180° offset. The entry in the
Symbol column refers to the layout in Figure 27 on Page 65.
NOTE: The operator specifies the sector ID for the module as described under Sector ID on
Page 108.
Table 7: Example 2.4-GHz channel assignment by sector
Direction of Access
Point Sector
Issue 5
Frequency
Sector ID
Symbol
North (0°)
2.4150 GHz
0
A
Northeast (60°)
2.4350 GHz
1
B
Southeast (120°)
2.4575 GHz
2
C
South (180°)
2.4150 GHz
3
A
Southwest (240°)
2.4350 GHz
4
B
Northwest (300°)
2.4575 GHz
5
C
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Table 8: Example 5.2-GHz channel assignment by sector
Direction of Access
Point Sector
Frequency
Sector ID
Symbol
North (0°)
5.275 GHz
0
A
Northeast (60°)
5.300 GHz
1
B
Southeast (120°)
5.325 GHz
2
C
South (180°)
5.275 GHz
3
A
Southwest (240°)
5.300 GHz
4
B
Northwest (300°)
5.325 GHz
5
C
Table 9: Example 5.7-GHz channel assignment by sector
5.6.8
Direction of Access
Point Sector
Frequency
Sector ID
Symbol
North (0°)
5.735 GHz
0
A
Northeast (60°)
5.755 GHz
1
B
Southeast (120°)
5.775 GHz
2
C
South (180°)
5.735 GHz
3
A
Southwest (240°)
5.755 GHz
4
B
Northwest (300°)
5.775 GHz
5
C
Multiple Access Points Clusters
When deploying multiple AP clusters in a dense area, consider aligning the clusters as shown in
Figure 27. However, this is only a recommendation. An installation may dictate a different pattern of
channel assignments.
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A
A
C
B
B
C
A
C
B
A
C
B
B
C
A
B
C
A
C
B
A
A
B
C
A
C
B
A
C
B
B
C
A
B
C
A
C
B
B
C
A
A
Figure 27: Example layout of 7 Access Point clusters
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6 IP NETWORK PLANNING
A proper IP addressing method is critical to the operation and security of a Canopy network. The
following information provides the background for the planner or operator to select an appropriate
method.
6.1 GENERAL IP ADDRESSING CONCEPTS
Basic concepts of IP addressing and subnet masks are required for networking.
6.1.1
IP Address
The IP address is a 32-bit binary number that has four parts (octets). This set of four octets has two
segments, depending on the class of IP address. The first segment identifies the network. The
second identifies the hosts or devices on the network. The subnet mask marks a boundary
between these two sub-addresses.
6.1.2
Subnet Mask
The subnet mask is a 32-bit binary number that filters the IP address. Where a subnet mask
contains a bit set to 1, the corresponding bit in the IP address is part of the network address.
6.1.3
Example IP Address and Subnet Mask
In Figure 28, the first 16 bits of the 32-bit IP address identify the network:
Octet 1
Octet 2
Octet 3
Octet 4
IP address 169.254.1.1
10101001
11111110
00000001
00000001
Subnet mask 255.255.0.0
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
Figure 28: Example of IP address in Class B subnet
In this example, the network address is 169.254, and 216 (65,536) hosts are addressable.
6.1.4
Subnet Classes
A subnet is classified as either a Class A, Class B, or Class C network. Subnet masks that classify
the network are shown in Table 10.
Table 10: Subnet masks for Network Classes A, B, and C
Class
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Network Portion
Host Portion
A
11111111
00000000 00000000 00000000
B
11111111 11111111
00000000 00000000
C
11111111 11111111 11111111
00000000
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Identification of Subnet Class
Subnet masks are not shipped in the IP packet. The packet contains only the 32-bit IP address of
the destination. For this reason, information devices rely on assumption to distinguish between
•
the portion of the IP address that identifies the network address
•
the portion of the IP address that identifies the host.
IP systems developed a form of logic to make this determination:
•
Class A network addresses always have the first bit of the IP address set to 0.
•
Class B network addresses always have their first bit set to 1 and their second bit
set to 0.
•
Class C network addresses always have their first two bits set to 1 and the third bit
set to 0.
With this logic, an information device can identify the subnet mask to apply to the IP address and
where to route the data.
6.2 DYNAMIC OR STATIC ADDRESSING
For any computer to communicate with a Canopy module, the computer must be configured to
either
•
use DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol). In this case, when not connected to
the network, the computer derives an IP address on the 169.254 network within two
minutes.
•
have an assigned static IP address (for example, 169.254.1.5) on the 169.254
network.
NOTE: If an IP address that is set in the SM is not the 169.254.x.x network address,
then the network operator must assign the computer a static IP address in the same
subnet.
6.2.1
When a DHCP Server is Not Found
The following is a synopsis of an Internet Draft available at
http://www.ietf.org/internet-drafts/draft-ietf-zeroconf-ipv4-linklocal-05.txt. This draft describes how
Microsoft and Apple operating systems react when a DHCP server is not found on the network.
To operate on a network, a computer requires an IP address, a subnet mask, and possibly a
gateway address. Either a DHCP server automatically assigns this configuration information to a
computer on a network or an operator must input these items.
When a computer is brought online and a DHCP server is not accessible (such as when the server
is down or the computer is not plugged into the network), Microsoft and Apple operating systems
default to an IP address of 169.254.x.x and a subnet mask of 255.255.0.0 (169.254/16).
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6.3 SM MODULE ADDRESS ASSIGNMENT
Each SM requires an IP address on the network. This IP address is for only management
purposes. For security, the SM should be either
•
not assigned a routable IP address.
•
assigned a routable IP address only if a firewall is present to protect the SM.
From the factory, each Canopy module—AP, BH, or SM—is assigned a unique MAC (Media
Access Control) address and the following default networking information:
6.3.1
•
IP address of 169.254.1.1
•
Subnet mask of 255.255.0.0
•
Network gateway of 169.254.0.0
Operator Assignment of IP Addresses
The Canopy network operator assigns IP (Internet Protocol) addresses to computers and network
components, by either static or dynamic IP addressing. The operator also must identify the
appropriate subnet mask and network gateway to each module. The SM requires a networkaccessible IP address.
The operator must first know how the service provider assigns IP addresses on this
network.
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7 SM MODULE INSTALLATION
The following steps are required to install a Canopy SM:
1. Unpacking the Canopy Products. See Page 69.
2. Cabling the SM. See Page 70.
3. Configuring the SM. See Page 75.
4. Installing the SM. See Page 77.
5. Verifying System Performance. See Page 80.
7.1 UNPACKING THE CANOPY PRODUCTS
Upon receipt, carefully inspect all shipping boxes for signs of damage. If you find damage,
immediately notify the transporatation company.
Unpack the equipment, making sure that all of the components ordered have arrived. Saving all the
packing materials is recommended. These can be used to transport the equipment to and from
installation sites.
7.1.1
Component Layout
The simple design of the Canopy SM allows for easy deployment. As shown Figure 29, the base
cover of the module snaps off when a lever on the back of the base cover is depressed. This
exposes the Ethernet and GPS sync connectors and diagnostic LEDs.
Canopy SM
RJ45
Connector
RJ11
Connector
Connection
LEDs
Base Cover
Ethernet
Cable
Base Cover
Release
Lever
Base Cover
Ethernet
Cable
Figure 29: Canopy SM base cover, attached and detached
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Diagnostic LEDs
The diagnostic LEDs report the following information about the current status of the SM, as
described in Table 11 for the timing slave.
NOTE: Table 11 identifies the LEDs in order of their left-to-right position as the cable
connections face downward.
Table 11: SM status LEDs
Notes
Label
Color
when
Active
Status if
Registered to an
AP
LNK/5
green
Ethernet link
Continuously lit when link is
present.
ACT/4
orange
Presence of data
activity on the
Ethernet link
Flashes during data transfer.
Frequency of flash is not a
diagnostic indication.
GPS/3
red
Unused
SES/2
green
Unused
SYN/1
orange
Presence of sync
PWR
red
DC power
Operating Mode
If this SM is not registered to
an AP, then these three
LEDs cycle on and off from
left to right.
Always lit when power is
correctly supplied.
Aiming Mode
These five LEDs act as a
bar graph to indicate the
relative quality of alignment.
As RSSI (received signal
strength indicator) and jitter
improve during alignment,
more of these LEDs are lit.
Always lit when power is
correctly supplied.
7.2 CABLING THE SM
The use of shielded cable for all Canopy infrastructure associated with BHs, APs, and CMMs is
strongly recommended. The environment these modules operate in often has significant unknown
or varying RF energy. Operator experience consistently indicates that the additional cost of
shielded cabling is more than compensated by predictable operation and reduced costs for
troubleshooting and support.
7.2.1
Standards for Wiring
The following information describes the wiring standards for installing a Canopy system.
All diagrams use the EIA/TIA-568B color standard.
Either RJ-45 straight-thru or RJ-45 crossover cable can be used to connect a (network interface
card), hub, router, or switch to a module. Canopy modules that are currently available can autosense whether the Ethernet cable in a connection is wired as straight-thru or crossover. Some
modules that were sold earlier do not.
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Table 12 identifies by MAC address whether a module auto-senses the Ethernet cable type.
Table 12: Module auto-sensing per MAC address
Module Type
MAC Address (ESN) of
Non Auto-sensing
Module
MAC Address (ESN) of
Auto-sensing Module
2.4-GHz modules
(no ESNs)
(all ESNs)
5.2 Modules
≤ 0a003e0021c8
≥ 0a003e0021c9
5.7 Modules
≤ 0a003ef00f79
≥ 0a003ef00f7a
Where a non auto-sensing module is used
•
use an RJ-45 straight-thru cable to connect to a NIC (network interface card).
•
use an RJ-45 crossover cable to connect to a hub, switch, or router.
Where the Canopy AC wall adapter is used
7.2.2
•
the +V is +11.5 VDC to +30 VDC, with a nominal value of +24 VDC.
•
the maximum Ethernet cable run is 328 feet (100 meters).
Recommended Tools
The following tools may be needed for cabling the SM:
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•
RJ-45 crimping tool
•
electrician scissors
•
wire cutters
•
cable testing device.
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Connector Wiring
The following diagrams correlate pins to wire colors and illustrate crossovers where applicable.
RJ-45 Straight-thru Ethernet Cable
Pin 1 →
Pin 2 →
Pin 3 →
Pin 4 →
Pin 5 →
Pin 6 →
Pin 7 →
Pin 8 →
white / orange
orange
white / green
blue
white / blue
green
white / brown
brown
Pin
← Pin 1
← Pin 2
← Pin 3
← Pin 4
← Pin 5
← Pin 6
← Pin 7
← Pin 8
RJ-45 Straight-thru
Pin
TX+ 1
1 RX+
TX- 2
2 RX-
RX+ 3
3 TX-
+V return
4
4
5
5
RX- 6
+V
+V return
6 TX-
7
7
8
8
+V
Pins 7 and 8 are used to carry power to the Canopy modules.
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RJ-45 Crossover Ethernet Cable
Pin 1 →
Pin 2 →
Pin 3 →
Pin 4 →
Pin 5 →
Pin 6 →
Pin 7 →
Pin 8 →
white / orange
orange
white / green
blue
white / blue
green
white / brown
brown
Pin
← Pin 3
← Pin 6
← Pin 1
← Pin 4
← Pin 5
← Pin 2
← Pin 7
← Pin 8
RJ-45 Crossover
Pin
TX+ 1
3 RX+
TX- 2
6 RX-
RX+ 3
1 TX+
+V return
4
4
5
5
RX- 6
+V
+V return
2 TX-
7
7
8
8
+V
Pins 7 and 8 are used to carry power to the Canopy modules.
7.2.4
Overriding IP Address and Password Setting
Canopy systems offer a plug that allows the operator to temporarily override some SM settings and
thereby regain control of the module. This plug is needed for access to the module in any of the
following cases:
•
The operator has forgotten either
−
the IP address assigned to the module.
−
the password that provides access to the module.
•
The module has been locked by the No Remote Access feature. (See Denying All
Remote Access on Page 28 and Reinstating Remote Access Capability on Page 29.)
•
Local access is desired for a module that has had the 802.3 link disabled in the
Configuration page of the module.
This override plug resets the LAN 1 IP address to 169.254.1.1. The plug allows the operator to
access the module through the default configuration without changing the configuration. The
operator can then view and reset any non-default values.
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Acquiring the Override Plug
The operator can either purchase or fabricate an override plug as follows. To purchase an override
plug for a nominal fee, order the plug at http://www.best-tronics.com/motorola.
Procedure 8: Fabricating an override plug
To fabricate an override plug
1. Install an RJ-11 6-pin connector onto a 6-inch length of CAT 5 cable.
2. Pin out all 6-pins.
3. Short (solder together) Pins 4 and 6 on the other end. Do not connect any other wires to
anything. The result should be as follows:
Pin 1
Pin 2
Pin 3
Pin 4
Pin 5
Pin 6
→ white / orange
→ white / green
→ white / blue
→ green
→ blue
→ orange
← Pin 1
← Pin 2
← Pin 3
← Pin 6
← Pin 5
← Pin 4
Using the Override Plug
The operator can regain access to the module as follows:
Procedure 9: Regaining access to the module
To use the override plug
1. Insert override plug into the RJ-11 GPS sync port of the module.
2. Apply power to the module through the Ethernet cable.
RESULT: The module reboots with the default IP address of 169.254.1.1,
password fields blank, and all other configuration values as previously set.
3. Set passwords as desired.
4. Change configuration values if desired.
5. Save the settings.
6. Remove the override plug.
7. Power cycle the module.
7.2.5
Wiring to Extend Network Sync
The following procedure can be used to extend network sync by one additional hop, as described
under Synchronization on Page 18. Where a collocated module receives sync over the air, the
collocated modules can be wired to pass the sync as follows:
Procedure 10: Extending network sync
1. Connect the GPS Sync ports of the collocated modules with RJ-11 cable.
2. Set the Sync Input parameter on the Configuration page of the collocated AP or BH timing
master to Sync to Received Signal (Timing Port).
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3. Set the Frame Timing Pulse Gated parameter on the Configuration page of the collocated
SM to Enable. See Frame Timing Pulse Gated on Page 89.
NOTE: This setting prevents interference in the event that the SM loses sync.
7.3 CONFIGURING THE SM
To put configuration changes into effect in any case, the operator must:
1. Make the change(s) on the web page of the module.
2. Click the Save button to temporarily save the change(s).
3. Click the Reboot button to reboot the module and implement the change(s).
To configure the SM, the operator must manually set each parameter. (No Quick Start page is
available.)
7.3.1
Configuration from the Factory
From the factory, the SM is configured to not transmit on any frequency. This configuration ensures
that an operator does not accidentally turn on an unsynchronized SM.
Site synchronization of SMs is required because
•
•
7.3.2
Canopy modules
−
transmit or receive, but not at the same time.
−
use TDD (Time Division Duplexing) to distribute signal access of the downlink and
uplink frames.
When one SM transmits while another receives signal, the transmitting module may
interfere with or desense the receiving module. In this context, interference is selfinterference (within the same Canopy network).
GUI Access Difficulty
Proxy settings in the web browser may prevent access to the Canopy GUI (graphical user
interface). This can occur when the computer has used a proxy server address and port to
configure a Canopy module. In this case, perform the following procedure to toggle the computer to
not use the proxy setting.
GUI Access Procedure
Perform the following steps to access the GUI of this module:
Procedure 11: Bypassing proxy settings to gain access module web pages
1. Launch Microsoft Internet Explorer.
2. Select Tools → Internet Options → Connections → LAN Settings.
3. Uncheck the Use a proxy server… box.
NOTE: If an alternate web browser is used, the menu selections differ from the above.
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Configuration Procedure
This procedure includes both required and optional settings.
Required Steps
Perform the following steps to configure the SM:
Procedure 12: Setting mandatory Configuration page parameters
1. Remove the base cover of the SM. (See Figure 29 on Page 69.)
2. In the powered down state, connect the Ethernet cable to the Ethernet port on both the SM
and the computer.
3. Connect a power source to the SM.
RESULT: When power is applied to a Canopy module or the unit is reset on the webbased interface, the module requires approximately 25 seconds to boot. During this
interval, self-tests and other diagnostics are being performed. See Diagnostic LEDs on
Page 70.
4. Assign an RF frequency for the module. See Custom RF Frequency Scan Selection List on
Page 87.
5. Assign an IP address to the module for the target network, and assign an appropriate
subnet mask and network gateway. See
•
LAN1 Network Interface Configuration, IP Address on Page 93.
•
LAN1 Network Interface Configuration, Subnet Mask on Page 93.
•
LAN1 Network Interface Configuration, Gateway IP Address on Page 93.
6. Configure the appropriate color code on the SM so that SM can register. See Color Code
on Page 87.
Optional Steps
In addition, the operator can perform the following optional steps:
Procedure 13: Setting optional Configuration page parameters
1. Assign as many as several passwords to prevent unauthorized users from connecting to
the web-based interface of the SM. From the factory, no default password is assigned and
password protection is turned off.
−
Passwords can be from 1 to 16 characters. Any combination of characters is
allowed, except for the following special characters:
“ , . ‘ { } / \
; : [ ] ( ) ` ~
−
Either of two types of passwords can be configured: display-only or full-access.
The display-only password allows the operator to view the current status of
the module. The full-access password allows the operator to both view the
current status and change the module configuration. The red lettering to
the right of the entry fields indicates that a password is set, but does not
allow the operator see the password.
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For a description of interactions between settings of these types of passwords, see
Display-Only Access on Page 88 and Full Access on Page 88.
NOTE: If the operator forgets either the password or the IP address for the module, a
Canopy system override plug can be used to regain access. For details, see
Overriding IP Address and Password Setting on Page 73.
2. Populate the Site Name, Site Location, and Site Contact fields. This is for only
information purposes. See
•
Site Name on Page 91.
•
Site Contact on Page 91.
•
Site Location on Page 91.
7.4 INSTALLING THE SM
NOTE: When power is applied to a Canopy module or the unit is reset on the web-based interface,
the module requires approximately 25 seconds to boot. During this interval, self-tests and other
diagnostics are being performed.
To install the Canopy SM, perform the following steps:
Procedure 14: Installing the SM
1. Remove the base cover of the SM. (See Figure 29 on Page 69.)
2. In the powered down state, attach the cables to the SM.
(See Cabling the SM on Page 70 and Figure 30 on Page 77.)
outside wall
Ethernet cable
Ethernet cable
SM
Computer
24 VDC to
to NIC Canopy
300SS
wall adapter
10 AWG
CU wire
ground
system
Figure 30: SM and computer wiring
3. Choose the best mounting location for your particular application.
4. Optionally, attach the SM to the arm of the Canopy Passive Reflector dish assembly as
shown in Figure 31.
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NOTE: The arm is molded to receive and properly aim the module relative to the aim of the
dish. Use stainless steel hose clamps for the attachment.
Stainless steel
hose clamps
Reflector dish arm
Figure 31: SM attachment to reflector arm
5. Use stainless steel hose clamps or equivalent fasteners to lock the SM into position.
6. Connect the module to an Ethernet/Power port on the computer.
7. Unlock the module from the locked down state.
8. On the computer, access the Alignment page of this module.
9. In the RF Carrier Frequency field, select the frequency that the AP transmits.
10. In the RSSI Only Mode field, ensure that the Disabled button is selected.
11. For coarse alignment of the SM, either
a. use the LEDs in the module as follows:
(1) On the computer, click Enable Aiming Mode.
NOTE: This places the module into the Normal Aiming Mode. The module
is automatically placed into the Operating Mode after 15 minutes. To
return the module to the Operating Mode before this interval has expired,
click Disable Aiming Mode. To return the module to an aiming mode after
this interval has expired, click Enable Aiming Mode.
(2) At the module, observe the six status LEDs in the module. See Figure 29 on
Page 69.
(3) Move the module slightly in the vertical plane until the largest number of LEDs is
lit. See Table 11 on Page 70.
b. use the Audible Alignment Tone feature (Release 4.0 and later) as follows:
(1) On the computer, click Disable Aiming Mode.
(2) Connect the cable from the Canopy Alignment Tool Headset kit to the RJ-11 port
of the SM.
(3) Connect the Alignment Tool Headset, and earpiece, or a small battery-powered
speaker to this RJ-11 cable.
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(4) Listen to the alignment tone for
•
pitch, which indicates greater RSSI by higher pitch.
•
volume, which indicates less jitter by higher volume.
•
cadence, which indicates registration to the AP by a tone interruption of 0.155
seconds of quiet in each 2-second interval.
In Adobe Reader® 6.0 or later release, to hear an example of the alignment tone
as the SM aligns and registers, click on the picture in Figure 32.
Figure 32: Audible Alignment Tone kit and example tone
(5) Move the module slightly until you hear the highest pitch and highest volume.
(6) Continue to move the module slightly until you hear the tone interruptions, if
possible.
12. On the computer, in the RSSI Only Mode field, click Enabled.
13. Click Enable Aiming Mode.
14. Simultaneously, begin to
•
move the module slightly in the vertical plane.
•
on the computer, click Enable Aiming Mode frequently to refresh the page as the
module moves (or select the auto-refresh option for this web page).
•
monitor the screen for a simultaneous RSSI level of greater than 700, jitter value
between 0 and 4 in Release 4.0 and later releases or between 5 and 9 in any
earlier release, and efficiencies greater than 90% for both the uplink and the
downlink.
15. When the RSSI level is greater than 700, stop the movement of the module and click
Disable in the RSSI Only Mode field.
16. Access the Status page.
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17. Monitor this page for the messages Scanning, Syncing, Registering, Registered,
Alignment.
NOTE: If the SM does not register with the AP, ensure that both modules are
configured to the same color code in the Configuration page of each. In
Release 4.0 and later releases, the Expanded Stats page of the AP provides a link
to the Reg Failed SMs page, where the cause of a registration failure may be
found.
18. Resume slight movements of the module
19. When the best achievable values are simultaneously displayed on the Status page, lock
the module into position.
NOTE: If any of these values is not achieved, the SM may be operational but
manifest occasional problems.
7.5 VERIFYING SYSTEM PERFORMANCE
To verify the performance of the Canopy system after the SMs have been installed, perform the
following steps:
Procedure 15: Verifying system performance
1. Access the web-based interface for the AP (by opening http://<ip-address>, where the
<ip-address> is the address of the individual module).
2. In the menu on the left-hand side of the web page, click on GPS Status.
3. Verify in the Satellites Tracked field that the AP is seeing and tracking satellites. (To
generate the timing pulse, the module must track at least 4 satellites.)
4. Verify that the Antenna Status field displays the value OK.
5. Access the Status Page of the SM.
6. Verify that the SM is still registered to the AP.
7. Access the Configuration page of the SM.
8. Note the frequency that is selected in the Custom RF Frequency Scan Selection List
field.
9. Access the Configuration page of the AP.
10. Verify that the frequency that is selected in the RF Frequency Carrier field is the same as
noted above.
11. Access the AP Eval Data page of the SM.
12. Verify that the AP is shown in the Sector ID field.
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8 SM INTERFACE PAGES
The Canopy SM interface provides a series of web pages to configure and monitor the unit. The
following is a quick reference to the interface screens.
NOTE: These screens are subject to change by subsequent software versions.
Access to the web-based interface is available only through a computer that is directly connected
or connected through a network to the SM. If the computer is not connected to a network when the
module is configured on a bench, then disabling of the proxy setting in the computer may be
required. In the address bar of the browser, the operator enters the IP address of the SM (default
is 169.254.1.1).
The interface of the SM provides access to the following pages:
Status
Configuration
IP Configuration
NAT
Configuration
Event Log
AP Eval Data
Ethernet Stats
Expanded Stats
These pages resemble those of the BH timing slave, but differ and are unique to the SM.
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8.1 STATUS PAGE
Examples of a Status screens are displayed in Figure 33 and Figure 34.
Figure 33: Status screen for 5.2-GHz SM
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Figure 34: Status screen for 2.4-GHz SM
The Status page provides information on the operation of this SM. This is the default web page for
the SM.
8.1.1
Status Parameters
The Status page provides the following parameters:
Device Type
This field indicates the type of the Canopy module. Values include the frequency band of the
module, the protocol that is used, and the MAC address of the module.
Canopy Boot Version
This field indicates the version of the software that is operated on the module, the date and time of
boot, and whether the module is secured by DES or AES encryption (see Security Features on
Page 21). When requesting technical support, provide the information from this field.
FPGA Version
This field indicates the version of the field-programmable gate array (FPGA) on the module. When
requesting technical support, provide the information from this field.
Uptime
This field indicates how long the module has operated since power was applied.
System Time
This field provides the current time. Any SM that registers to an AP inherits the system time, which
is displayed in this field as GMT (Greenwich Mean Time).
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Ethernet Interface
This field indicates the configuration of the Ethernet interface on the module.
Session Status
This field displays the following information about the current session:
•
Scanning indicates that this SM currently cycles through the RF frequencies that are
selected in the Configuration page. (See Custom RF Frequency Scan Selection List on
Page 87.
•
Syncing indicates that this SM currently attempts to receive sync.
•
Registering indicates that this SM has sent a registration request message to the AP
and has not yet received a response.
•
Registered indicates that this SM is both
•
−
registered to an AP.
−
ready to transmit and receive data packets.
Alignment indicates that this SM is in an aiming mode. See
−
Table 11 on Page 70.
−
Alignment Page on Page 111.
Registered AP
This field displays the IP address of the AP to which this SM is registered.
RSSI
This field displays the current RSSI (Radio Signal Strength Indicator) if the module is registered to
an AP. An acceptable link has an RSSI of greater than 700. However, to achieve the best link
possible, the alignment of the module should balance good RSSI values against good jitter values.
NOTE: Unless the page is set to auto-refresh, the value displayed is the RSSI value at the
instant the Status page was called. To keep a current view of the RSSI, the browser screen
must be refreshed or the page must be set to auto-refresh.
Jitter
This field displays the quality of the currently received signal if the module is registered to an AP.
An acceptable link has a jitter value between 0 and 4 in Release 4.0 and later releases or between
5 and 9 in any earlier release.
However, to achieve the best link possible, the alignment of the module should balance good jitter
values against good RSSI values.
NOTE: Unless the page is set to auto-refresh, the value displayed is the jitter value at the
instant the Status page was called. To keep a current view of the jitter, the browser screen
must be refreshed or the page must be set to auto-refresh.
Air Delay
This field displays the distance in feet between this SM and the AP. To derive the distance in
meters, the operator should multiply the value of this parameter by 0.3048. Distances reported as
less than 200 feet (61 meters) are unreliable.
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Site Name
This field indicates the name of the physical module. The operator can assign or change this name
on the Configuration web page. This information is also set into the sysName SNMP MIB-II object
and can be polled by an SNMP management server.
Site Contact
This field indicates contact information for the physical module. The operator can provide or
change this information on the Configuration web page. This information is also set into the
sysName SNMP MIB-II object and can be polled by an SNMP management server.
8.2 CONFIGURATION PAGE
Examples of Configuration screens are displayed in Figure 35 and Figure 36.
Figure 35: Configuration screen for 5.2-GHz SM
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Figure 36: Configuration screen for 2.4-GHz SM
The Configuration web page contains all of the configurable parameters that define how the
module operates. The first line of information on the Configuration screen echoes the Device Type
from the Status web page.
8.2.1
Configuration Parameters
As shown in Figure 35, the Configuration page provides the following parameters:
802.3 Link Enable/Disable
The operator specifies whether to not allow the SM to send and receive data through the Ethernet
port even when the RF link to the AP is active. This field toggles on or off the Browser-based
Disabling of Subscriber Module Ethernet Interface feature in Release 3.2 and later releases. The
operator can alternatively control this feature from the AP.
When enabled, this feature
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•
disallows the SM user to access the link, as in the case where the user account is
delinquent.
•
allows the operator to partition the network for troubleshooting or another analytical or
operation function.
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The operator selects either
•
Enable to activate this feature.
•
Disable to deactivate this feature.
Link Negotiation Speeds
The operator specifies the type of link speed desired for the Ethernet connection. The default for
this parameter is that all speeds are selected. The recommended setting is a single speed
selection for all APs, BHs, and SMs in the operator network.
Custom RF Frequency Scan Selection List
The operator specifies the frequency that the SM scans to find the access point. The frequency
band of the SM affects what channels the operator selects.
In the 2.4-GHz frequency band, the SM can register to an AP that transmits on a
frequency 2.5 MHz higher than the frequency that the SM receiver locks when the scan
terminates as successful. This establishes a poor-quality link. To prevent this, the
operator should select frequencies that are at least 5 MHz apart.
In a 2.4-GHz SM, this field displays all available channels, but has only three recommended
channels selected by default. See 2.4-GHz AP Cluster Recommended Channels on Page 61.
In a 5.2-GHz SM, this field displays only ISM frequencies. In a 5.7-GHz SM, this field displays both
ISM and U-NII frequencies. If the operator selects all frequencies that are listed in this field (default
selections), then the SM scans for a signal on any channel. If the operator selects only one, then
the SM limits the scan to that channel. Since the frequencies that this field offers for each of these
two bands are 5 MHz apart, a scan of all channels does not risk establishment of a poor-quality link
as in the 2.4-GHz band.
A list of channels in the band is provided in one of the following sections:
•
2.4-GHz Channels on Page 60.
•
5.2-GHz Channels on Page 60.
•
5.7-GHz Channels on Page 62.
(The selection labeled Factory requires a special software key file for implementation.)
Color Code
The operator specifies a value from 0 to 254. For registration to occur, the color codes of the SM
and of the AP must match. Color code is not a security feature. Color code allows the operator to
segregate an individual network or neighbor Canopy networks.
Color code also allows the operator to force an SM to register to only a specific AP, even if the SM
can reach multiple APs. On all Canopy modules, the default setting for the color code value is 0.
This value matches only the color code of 0 (not all 255 color codes).
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Display-Only Access
The operator enters the same password in both Display-Only Access fields for verification. When
used, the display-only password allows only viewing activities on the module.
This protection interacts with the Full Access password protection as follows:
•
If the display-only password is set and the Full Access password is not, then:
−
The display-only password is tied to telnet and FTP sessions to the module.
−
Anyone who enters the display-only password can view or change activities. This
configuration is not recommended.
•
If the Full Access password is also set, then the Full Access password is tied to
telnet and FTP sessions.
•
If the display-only password is not set and the Full Access password is, then no
password is required to view activities on the module.
•
If neither password is set, then anyone can view or change activities. This
configuration is not recommended.
If the operator-assigned Display-Only Access password is forgotten, then the operator must both:
1. physically access the module.
2. use an override plug to electronically access the module configuration parameters at
169.254.1.1. See Overriding IP Address and Password Setting on Page 73.
Full Access
The operator enters the same Full Access password in both fields for verification. When used, the
Full Access password
•
allows both viewing and change activities on the module.
•
is tied to telnet and FTP sessions to the module.
When the web-based interface prompts for this password, no user name is required. However,
when a telnet or FTP session prompts for this password, the user name root must be entered in
addition to the password.
If the operator-assigned Full Access password is forgotten, then the operator must both
1. physically access the module.
2. use an override plug to electronically access the module configuration parameters at
169.254.1.1. See Overriding IP Address and Password Setting on Page 73.
NOTE: The operator can unset either password (revert the access to no password required).
To do so, the operator types a space into the field and reboots the module. Any password must
be entered twice to allow the system to verify that that the password is not mistyped. After any
password is set and a reboot of the module has occurred, a Password Set indicator appears
to the right of the field.
Webpage Auto Update
The operator enters the frequency (in seconds) for the web browser to automatically refresh the
web-based interface. The default setting is 0. The 0 setting causes the web-based interface to
never be automatically refreshed.
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SM Power Up Mode With No 802.3 Link
The operator specifies the default mode in which this SM will power up when the module senses no
Ethernet link. The operator selects either
•
Power Up in Aim Mode—the module boots in an aiming mode. (See Table 11 on
Page 70 and Alignment Page on Page 111.) When the module senses an Ethernet
link, this field is automatically reset to Power Up in Operational Mode. When the
module senses no Ethernet link within 15 minutes after power up, the module carrier
shuts off.
•
Power Up in Operational Mode—the module boots in Operational mode. The module
attempts registration. This is the default selection.
Bridge Entry Timeout
The operator specifies the appropriate bridge timeout for correct network operation with the existing
network infrastructure. Timeout occurs when the AP encounters no activity with the SM (whose
MAC address is the bridge entry) within the interval that this field specifies. The Bridge Entry
Timeout should be a longer period than the ARP (Address Resolution Protocol) cache timeout of
the router that feeds the network.
This field governs the timeout interval, even if a router in the system has a longer timeout interval.
The default value of this field is 25 minutes.
An inappropriately low Bridge Entry Timeout setting may lead to temporary loss of
communication with the other module.
Authentication Key
The operator specifies the type of encryption. This field is used only if authentication is required by
the AP:
•
Use Default Key specifies the predetermined key for authentication in the BAM server.
See Bandwidth and Authentication Manager (BAM) on Page 22.
•
Use This Key specifies the hexadecimal key that is permanently stored on the SM.
Frame Timing Pulse Gated
If this SM extends the sync pulse to a BH master or an AP, then the operator selects either
•
Enable—If this SM loses sync from the AP, then do not propagate a sync pulse to the
BH timing master or other AP.
•
Disable— If this SM loses sync from the AP, then propagate the sync pulse to the BH
timing master or other AP.
See Wiring to Extend Network Sync on Page 74.
NOTE: This setting prevents interference in the event that the SM loses sync.
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Power Control
In Release 4.1 and later releases, the operator selects either
•
Low to set the SM to operate at 18 dB less than full power to reduce the possibility of
self-interference with a nearby module.
•
Normal to allow the SM to operate at full power.
Selection of Low can cause the SM to drop an active RF link to a module that is
relatively far from the low-power SM. If a link is dropped when Power Control is set to
Low, the link can be re-established by only Ethernet access.
See Power Reduction to Mitigate Interference on Page 59.
Figure 37: Configuration screen, continued
As shown in Figure 37, the Configuration page continues with the following parameters:
Community String
The operator specifies a control string that allows an SNMP NMS (network management system) to
access MIB information about this SM. No spaces are allowed in this string. The default string is
Canopy.
Accessing Subnet
The operator specifies the NMS server that is allowed to access MIB information from the module.
The following two types of information must be entered:
•
The network IP address in the form xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
•
The CIDR (Classless Interdomain Routing) prefix length in the form /xx (for example,
198.32.0.0/16 where /16 is a subnet mask of 255.255.0.0).
NOTE: For more information on CIDR, execute an Internet search on “Classless
Interdomain Routing.”
The default treatment is to allow all networks access (set to 0).
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Trap Address
The operator specifies the IP address (xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx) of an NMS server to which trap information
should be sent. Trap information informs the monitoring system that something has occurred. For
example, trap information is sent:
•
after a reboot of the module.
•
when an NMS server attempts to access agent information but either
−
supplied an inappropriate community string or SNMP version number.
−
is associated with a subnet to which access is disallowed.
Permission
The operator can set this parameter to Read Only to disallow any parameter changes by the NMS.
Site Name
The operator specifies a string to associate with the physical module. This parameter is written into
the sysName SNMP MIB-II object and can be polled by an SNMP management server. The buffer
size for this field is 128 characters.
Site Contact
The operator enters contact information for the module administrator. This parameter is written into
the sysContact SNMP MIB-II object and can be polled by an SNMP management server. The
buffer size for this field is 128 characters.
Site Location
The operator enters information about the physical location of the module. This parameter is written
into the sysLocation SNMP MIB-II object and can be polled by an SNMP management server. The
buffer size for this field is 128 characters.
8.2.2
Configuration Buttons
The Configuration page provides the following buttons:
Save Changes
When the operator clicks this button, any changes that have been made on the Configuration page
are recorded in flash memory. However, these changes do not apply until the next reboot of the
module.
Undo Saved Changes
When the operator clicks this button, any changes that have been made but were not committed by
a reboot of the module are undone.
Set to Factory Defaults
When the operator clicks this button, all configurable parameters are reset to the factory settings.
Reboot
When the operator clicks this button, the module reboots. When the operator has changed
parameters in the Configuration page, the system highlights the Reboot button as a reminder that
a reboot (in addition to a save operation) is required to implement the changes.
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8.3 IP CONFIGURATION PAGE
An example of an IP Configuration screen is displayed in
•
Figure 38 on Page 92 for the NAT Disabled implementation with public accessibility.
•
Figure 39 on Page 93 for the NAT Disabled implementation with local accessibility.
•
Figure 40 on Page 94 for the NAT with DHCP Client and DHCP Server
implementation.
•
Figure 41 on Page 95 for the NAT with DHCP Client implementation.
•
Figure 42 on Page 96 for the NAT with DHCP Server implementation.
•
Figure 43 on Page 97 for the NAT without DHCP implementation.
The set of parameters that the IP Configuration page provides depends on whether network
address translation is enabled.
8.3.1
IP Configuration Parameters with NAT Disabled
When NAT (network address translation) is disabled on the NAT Configuration page as shown in
Figure 44 on Page 99, the IP Configuration page provides the following parameters:
Figure 38: IP Configuration screen, NAT disabled, public accessibility
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Figure 39: IP Configuration screen, NAT disabled, local accessibility
LAN1 Network Interface Configuration, IP Address
The operator enters the non-routable IP address that will be associated with the Ethernet
connection on this module. (The default IP address from the factory is 169.254.1.1.) If the operatorassigned IP address is forgotten, then the operator must both
1. physically access the module.
2. use an override plug to electronically access the module configuration parameters at
169.254.1.1. See Overriding IP Address and Password Setting on Page 73.
LAN1 Network Interface Configuration, Subnet Mask
The operator enters an appropriate subnet mask for the module to communicate on the network.
The default subnet mask is 255.255.255.0. See General IP Addressing Concepts on Page 66.
LAN1 Network Interface Configuration, Gateway IP Address
The operator enters the appropriate gateway for the module to communicate with the network. The
default gateway is 169.254.0.0. See SM Module Address Assignment on Page 68.
8.3.2
IP Configuration Buttons with NAT Disabled
Regardless of whether NAT is enabled, the IP Configuration page provides the following buttons:
Save Changes
When the operator clicks this button, any changes that have been made on the IP Configuration
page are recorded in flash memory. However, these changes do not apply until the next reboot of
the module.
Undo Saved Changes
When the operator clicks this button, any changes that have been made but were not committed by
a reboot of the module are undone.
Set to Factory Defaults
When the operator clicks this button, all configurable parameters are reset to the factory settings.
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Reboot
When the operator clicks this button, the module reboots. When the operator has changed
parameters in the IP Configuration page, the system highlights the Reboot button as a reminder
that a reboot (in addition to a save operation) is required to implement the changes.
8.3.3
IP Configuration Parameters with NAT Enabled
When NAT (network address translation) is enabled, the IP Configuration page provides the
following parameters:
Figure 40: IP Configuration screen, NAT with DHCP client and DHCP server
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Figure 41: IP Configuration screen, NAT with DHCP client
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Figure 42: IP Configuration screen, NAT with DHCP server
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Figure 43: IP Configuration screen, NAT without DHCP
NAT Private Network Interface Configuration, IP Address
The operator assigns an IP address for module management. This address is available from only
Ethernet access to the SM. The last characters of this address must be .1. This address becomes
the base for the range of DHCP-assigned addresses.
NAT Private Network Interface Configuration, Subnet Mask
The operator assigns a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 or a more restrictive subnet mask.
DMZ Host Interface Configuration, IP Address
The operator either enables or disables DMZ for this SM. See DMZ on Page 46.
Additionally, the operator assigns the DMZ IP address to be used for this SM when DMZ is
enabled. The first three octets of this address are automatically set as identical to the first three
octets of the address assigned in the NAT Private Network Interface Configuration, IP Address
field above. Only one such address is allowed.
Behind this SM, the device that should receive network traffic must be assigned this address. The
system provides a warning if the operator enters an address within the range that DHCP can
assign.
NAT Public Network Interface Configuration, IP Address
This field displays the IP address of the SM. If DHCP Client is enabled, then the DHCP server
automatically assigns this address.
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NAT Public Network Interface Configuration, Subnet Mask
This field displays the subnet mask of the SM. If DHCP Client is enabled, then the DHCP server
automatically assigns this subnet mask.
NAT Public Network Interface Configuration, Gateway IP Address
This field displays the gateway IP address for the SM. If DHCP Client is enabled, then the DHCP
server automatically assigns this gateway IP address.
RF Public Network Interface Configuration, IP Address
The operator either enables or disables the RF public interface for this SM. Additionally, the
operator assigns the IP address for over-the-air management of the module when the RF public
interface is enabled.
RF Public Network Interface Configuration, Subnet Mask
The operator assigns the subnet mask for over-the-air management of the module when the RF
public interface is enabled.
RF Public Network Interface Configuration, Gateway IP Address
The operator assigns the gateway IP address for over-the-air management of the module when the
RF public interface is enabled.
8.3.4
IP Configuration Buttons with NAT Enabled
Regardless of whether NAT is enabled, the IP Configuration page provides the following buttons:
Save Changes
When the operator clicks this button, any changes that have been made on the IP Configuration
page are recorded in flash memory. However, these changes do not apply until the next reboot of
the module.
Undo Saved Changes
When the operator clicks this button, any changes that have been made but were not committed by
a reboot of the module are undone.
Set to Factory Defaults
When the operator clicks this button, all configurable parameters are reset to the factory settings.
Reboot
When the operator clicks this button, the module reboots. When the operator has changed
parameters in the IP Configuration page, the system highlights the Reboot button as a reminder
that a reboot (in addition to a save operation) is required to implement the changes.
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8.4 NAT CONFIGURATION PAGE
An example of an NAT Configuration screen is displayed in
•
Figure 44 on Page 99 for the NAT Disabled implementation.
•
Figure 45 on Page 101 for the NAT with DHCP Client and DHCP Server
implementation.
•
Figure 46 on Page 102 for the NAT with DHCP Client implementation.
•
Figure 47 on Page 103 for the NAT with DHCP Server implementation.
•
Figure 48 on Page 104 for the NAT without DHCP implementation.
The set of parameters that the NAT Configuration page provides depends on whether NAT
(network address translation) is enabled. The default state of this page is with NAT disabled.
8.4.1
NAT Configuration Parameters with NAT Disabled
When NAT (network address translation) is disabled, the NAT Configuration page provides the
following parameters:
Figure 44: NAT Configuration screen, NAT disabled
ARP Cache Timeout
If a router upstream has an ARP cache of longer duration (as some use 30 minutes), then the
operator enters a value of longer duration than the router ARP cache. The default value of this field
is 20 seconds.
NAT Enable/Disable
The operator either disables NAT, or enables NAT to view additional options.
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TCP Session Garbage Timeout
Where a large network exists behind the SM, the operator can set this value to lower than the
default value of 1440 minutes (24 hours). This action makes additional resources available for
greater traffic than the default value accommodates.
UDP Session Garbage Timeout
The operator may adjust this value in the range of 1 to 1440 minutes, based on network
performance. The default value of this parameter is 4 minutes.
8.4.2
NAT Configuration Buttons with NAT Disabled
Regardless of whether NAT is enabled, the NAT Configuration page provides the following buttons:
Save Changes
When the operator clicks this button, any changes that have been made on the NAT Configuration
page are recorded in flash memory. However, these changes do not apply until the next reboot of
the module.
Undo Saved Changes
When the operator clicks this button, any changes that have been made but were not committed by
a reboot of the module are undone.
Set to Factory Defaults
When the operator clicks this button, all configurable parameters are reset to the factory settings.
Reboot
When the operator clicks this button, the module reboots. When the operator has changed
parameters in the NAT Configuration page, the system highlights the Reboot button as a reminder
that a reboot (in addition to a save operation) is required to implement the changes.
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NAT Configuration Parameters with NAT Enabled
When NAT (network address translation) is enabled, the NAT Configuration page provides the
following parameters:
Figure 45: NAT Configuration screen, NAT with DHCP client and DHCP server
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Figure 46: NAT Configuration screen, NAT with DHCP client
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Figure 47: NAT Configuration screen, NAT with DHCP server
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Figure 48: NAT Configuration screen, NAT without DHCP
ARP Cache Timeout
If a router upstream has an ARP cache of longer duration (as some use 30 minutes), then the
operator enters a value of longer duration than the router ARP cache. The default value of this field
is 20 seconds.
NAT Enable/Disable
The operator either disables NAT, or enables NAT to view additional options.
TCP Session Garbage Timeout
Where a large network exists behind the SM, the operator can set this value to lower than the
default value of 1440 minutes (24 hours). This action makes additional resources available for
greater traffic than the default value accommodates.
UDP Session Garbage Timeout
The operator may adjust this value in the range of 1 to 1440 minutes, based on network
performance. The default value of this parameter is 4 minutes.
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DHCP Client Enable/Disable
The operator selects either
•
Enable to allow the network DHCP server to assign the NAT Public Network Interface
Configuration IP address, subnet mask, and gateway IP address for this SM.
•
Disable to
−
disable DHCP server assignment of this address.
−
enable the operator to assign this address.
DHCP Server Enable/Disable
The operator selects either
•
•
Enable to
−
allow this SM to assign IP addresses, subnet masks, and gateway IP addresses to
attached devices.
−
assign a start address for the SM.
−
designate how many IP addresses may be leased on the IP Configuration page of
this SM.
Disable to disallow the SM to assign addresses to attached devices.
DHCP Server Lease Timeout
The operator may adjust this value in the range of 1 to 30 days, based on network performance.
The default value of this parameter is 30 days.
DNS IP Address
The operator selects either
•
Obtain Automatically to allow the system to set the IP address of the DNS server.
•
Set Manually to allow the operator to set both a preferred and an alternate DNS IP
address.
Preferred DNS IP Address
If the DNS IP Address parameter is set to Set Manually, then the operator sets this parameter as
the preferred address of the DNS server.
Alternate DNS IP Address
If the DNS IP Address parameter is set to Set Manually, then the operator sets this parameter as
the alternate address of the DNS server.
8.4.4
NAT Configuration Buttons with NAT Enabled
Regardless of whether NAT is enabled, the NAT Configuration page provides the following buttons:
Save Changes
When the operator clicks this button, any changes that have been made on the NAT Configuration
page are recorded in flash memory. However, these changes do not apply until the next reboot of
the module.
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Undo Saved Changes
When the operator clicks this button, any changes that have been made but were not committed by
a reboot of the module are undone.
Set to Factory Defaults
When the operator clicks this button, all configurable parameters are reset to the factory settings.
Reboot
When the operator clicks this button, the module reboots. When the operator has changed
parameters in the NAT Configuration page, the system highlights the Reboot button as a reminder
that a reboot (in addition to a save operation) is required to implement the changes.
8.5 EVENT LOG PAGE
This page may contain information that can be useful under the guidance of Canopy technical
support. For this reason, the operator should not clear the contents of this page before contacting
technical support.
An example of the Event Log screen is displayed in Figure 49.
Figure 49: Event Log screen
8.5.1
Event Log Operator Option
The Event Log page provides only one button for the operator:
Clear Event Log
When the operator clicks this button, all of the Event Log page data is cleared.
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8.6 AP EVAL DATA PAGE
The AP Eval Data web page provides information about the AP that the SM sees. An example of
such information is shown in Figure 50.
NOTE: In Release 4.0 and later releases, the data for this page can be suppressed by the
Disable Display of AP Eval Data selection in the SM Scan Privacy field of the
Configuration page on the AP.
Figure 50: Example AP Eval Data page
8.6.1
AP Eval Data Parameters
The AP Eval Data page provides the following parameters that can be useful to manage and
troubleshoot a Canopy system:
Index
This field displays the index value that the Canopy system assigns (for only this page) to the AP
where this SM is registered.
Frequency
This field displays the frequency that the AP transmits.
ESN
This field displays the MAC address (electronic serial number) of the AP.
Jitter
This field displays the last jitter value that was captured between this SM and the AP.
Range
This field displays the distance in feet between this SM and the AP. To derive the distance in
meters, the operator should multiply the value of this parameter by 0.3048.
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Session Count
This field displays how many times this SM has gone into and out of session with the AP. If this
number is particularly large, a problem may exist in the link (for example, improper line of sight or
interference).
Sector ID
This field displays the value of the Sector ID field that is provisioned for the AP.
Color Code
This field displays the value of the Color Code field that is provisioned for the AP.
Sector User Count
This field displays how many SMs are registered on the AP.
Rescan APs
The operator can click this button to force the SM to rescan for the frequencies that are selected in
the Configuration page. (See Custom RF Frequency Scan Selection List on Page 87.) This SM will
then register to the AP that provides the best results for RSSI, Jitter, and number of registered
SMs.
8.7 ETHERNET STATS PAGE
The Ethernet Stats web page reports TCP throughput and error information for the Ethernet
connection of the SM.
8.7.1
Ethernet Stats Parameters
The Ethernet Stats page provides the following parameters:
inoctets count
This field displays how many octets were received on the interface, including those that deliver
framing information.
inucastpkts count
This field displays how many inbound subnetwork-unicast packets were delivered to a higher-layer
protocol.
innucastpkts count
This field displays how many inbound non-unicast (subnetwork-broadcast or subnetwork-multicast)
packets were delivered to a higher-layer protocol.
indiscards count
This field displays how many inbound packets were discarded without errors that would have
prevented their delivery to a higher-layer protocol. (Some of these packets may have been
discarded to increase buffer space.)
inerrors count
This field displays how many inbound packets contained errors that prevented their delivery to a
higher-layer protocol.
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inunknownprotos count
This field displays how many inbound packets were discarded because of an unknown or
unsupported protocol.
outoctets count
This field displays how many octets were transmitted out of the interface, including those that
deliver framing information.
outucastpkts count
This field displays how many packets for which the higher-level protocols requested transmission to
a subnetwork-unicast address. The number includes those that were discarded or not sent.
outnucastpkts count
This field displays how many packets for which the higher-level protocols requested transmission to
a non-unicast (subnetwork-broadcast or subnetwork-multicast) address. The number includes
those that were discarded or not sent.
outdiscards count
This field displays how many outbound packets were discarded without errors that would have
prevented their transmission. (Some of these packets may have been discarded to increase buffer
space.)
outerrrors count
This field displays how many outbound packets contained errors that prevented their transmission.
RxBabErr
This field displays how many receiver babble errors occurred.
EthBusErr
This field displays how many Ethernet bus errors occurred on the Ethernet controller.
CRCError
This field displays how many CRC errors occurred on the Ethernet controller.
RxOverrun
This field displays how many receiver overrun errors occurred on the Ethernet controller.
Late Collision
This field displays how many late collisions occurred on the Ethernet controller. A normal collision
occurs during the first 512 bits of the frame transmission. A collision that occurs after the first 512
bits is considered a late collision.
A late collision is a serious network problem because the frame being transmitted is
discarded. A late collision is most commonly caused by a mismatch between
duplex configurations at the ends of a link segment.
RetransLimitExp
This field displays how many times the retransmit limit has expired.
TxUnderrun
This field displays how many transmission-underrun errors occurred on the Ethernet controller.
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CarSenseLost
This field displays how many carrier sense lost errors occurred on the Ethernet controller.
8.8 EXPANDED STATS PAGE
The Expanded Stats web page provides statistics that the Canopy module collects. To facilitate
troubleshooting, a Canopy technical support representative may ask the operator for specific
information from this web page.
For the SM, the Expanded Stats page provides links to the following web pages:
•
Link Capacity Test. See Link Test Page on Page 110.
•
Alignment or Operational Mode statistics. See Alignment Page on Page 111.
•
Receive BER Results. See BER Results Page on Page 113.
•
Spectrum Analyzer (in Release 4.1 and later). See Spectrum Analysis on Page 59.
NOTE: A power cycle or reboot drops the contents of these pages.
8.9 LINK TEST PAGE
An example of the Link Capacity Test screen is displayed in Figure 51.
Figure 51: Link Test screen
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The Link Capacity Test page allows the operator to measure the throughput and efficiency of the
RF link between two Canopy modules. To test a link using this page, the operator
1. enters into the Duration field how long (in seconds) the RF link should be tested.
2. clicks the Start Test button.
3. clicks the Refresh Display button (if the web page is not set to automatically refresh).
4. views the results of the test.
8.9.1
Key Link Capacity Test Fields
The key fields in the test results are
8.9.2
•
Downlink RATE, expressed in bits per second
•
Uplink RATE, expressed in bits per second
•
Downlink Efficiency, expressed as a percentage
•
Uplink Efficiency, expressed as a percentage.
Capacity Criteria for the Link
A Canopy system link is acceptable only if the efficiencies of the link test are greater than 90% in
both the uplink and downlink direction. It is recommended that when a new link is installed, a link
test be executed to ensure that the efficiencies are within recommended guidelines.
8.10 ALIGNMENT PAGE
An example of the Alignment screen is displayed in Figure 52.
Figure 52: Alignment screen
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8.10.1 SM Modes
The Alignment web page provides tools to assist in the alignment of an SM to an AP. Whether and
how these tools operate depends on the mode that the operator invokes. The following modes are
available:
•
Normal Aiming Mode
•
RSSI Only Aiming Mode
•
Operating Mode
Regardless of the mode that the operator selects to align the module, all of the following indications
are required for an acceptable link between the modules:
•
RSSI greater than 700
•
jitter value between 0 and 4 in Release 4.0 and later releases or between 5 and 9 in
any earlier release
•
uplink efficiency greater than 90%
•
downlink efficiency greater than 90%
NOTE: If any of these values is not achieved, the SM may be operational but manifest
occasional problems. In Release 4.0 and late releases, RSSI measurement is more
consistent and jitter control is improved.
In either aiming mode, either the Alignment page must be set to automatically refresh or the
operator must repeatedly click the Enable Aiming Mode button to keep current data displayed as
the module is moved. After 15 minutes in an aiming mode, the module is automatically reset into
the Operating Mode.
8.10.2 Normal Aiming Mode
In the Normal Aiming Mode
•
the screen displays the RSSI level and the jitter value.
•
the five left-most LEDs in the module act as a bar graph that indicates the best
achieved RSSI level and jitter value when the greatest number of LEDs is lit. (The
colors of the LEDs are not an indication in this mode.)
To invoke the Normal Aiming Mode, the operator
1. ensures that the Disabled button on the RSSI Only Mode line is checked.
2. clicks the Enable Aiming Mode button. (The aiming procedure is described on Page 79.)
8.10.3 RSSI Only Aiming Mode
In the RSSI Only Aiming Mode, the screen displays the signal strength based on the amount of
energy in the selected frequency, regardless of whether the SM is registered to the AP. This mode
simplifies the aiming process for long links, such as where the module is mounted to a Canopy
Passive Reflector.
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To invoke the RSSI Only Aiming Mode, the operator
1. selects the frequency of the AP in the Configuration Page of the SM. See Custom RF
Frequency Scan Selection List on Page 87.
2. clicks the Enable button on the RSSI Only Mode line of the Alignment page.
3. clicks the Enable Aiming Mode button. (The aiming procedure is described on Page 79.)
8.11 SPECTRUM ANALYZER PAGE
An example of the Alignment screen is displayed in Figure 53.
Figure 53: Spectrum Analyzer screen
The Spectrum Analyzer web page displays the power level in both RSSI and dBm units for each
frequency that is analyzed. Either the Spectrum Analyzer page must be set to automatically refresh
or the operator must repeatedly click the Enable button to keep current data displayed.
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8.12 BER RESULTS PAGE
An example of the BER Results screen is displayed in Figure 54.
Figure 54: BER Results screen
8.12.1 BER Display
This page displays the current bit error rate in the link between the SM and the AP, but only when
the AP is configured to send the BER stream.
The value in the Measured Bit Error Rate field represents the BER at the moment of the last
browser refresh. To keep the value of this field current, the operator should either repeatedly click
the Refresh Display button or set the screen to automatically refresh.
8.12.2 BER Results
The link is acceptable if the value of this field is less than 10-4. If the BER is greater than 10-4, then
the operator must re-evaluate the installation of both modules in the link.
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8.13 BRIDGE TABLE PAGE
An example of the Bridge Table screen is displayed in Figure 55.
Figure 55: Bridge Table screen
The Bridge Table page identifies by MAC address and LUID the modules to which this SM serves
as a Layer 2 bridge.
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9 CANOPY SYSTEM ACCESSORIES
The following accessories are available to use with the Canopy system. To purchase accessories,
contact an authorized Canopy dealer unless otherwise noted.
•
Universal mounting bracket
•
Passive reflector dishes
•
102 − 132 VAC power supply with North American plug (Part Number ACPS110)
•
100 − 240 VAC power supply with North American, UK, and Euro plugs
(Part Number ACPSSW-02)
•
Alignment Tool Headset (Part Number ACATHS-01)
•
Cable assemblies for the Canopy system. These can be ordered from Best-Tronics
Manufacturing, Inc. at http://www.best-tronics.com/motorola.
NOTE: For the RF environment in which Canopy Backhaul, Access Point, and
CMMs often operate, the use of shielded cable is strongly recommended for
infrastructure cables that connect these modules.
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10 SM MODULE SPECIFICATIONS
Table 13 provides the specifications of the Canopy SM.
Table 13: Specifications
Specification
Frequency Band Ranges
Canopy System Range
ISM: 2.4 to 2.4835 GHz
U-NII: 5.25 to 5.35 GHz and 5.725 to 5.825 GHz
ISM in Release 4.0 and later: 5.725 to 5.850 GHz
Access Method
TDD/TDMA
Signaling Rate
10 Mbps
Maximum Aggregate
Throughput for 2.4-, 5.2-,
and 5.7-GHz SMs
Downlink: 4.6 Mbps at default allocation of 75%, but variable
based on packet size.
Modulation Type
High-index 2-level FSK (Frequency Shift Keying)
(Optimized for interference rejection)
Carrier to Interference (C/I)
3 dB nominal
Receiver Sensitivity
−83 dBm at 10−4 BER
Operating Range
Up to 2 miles (3.2 km) with integrated antenna in the 5.2-GHz
and 5.7-GHz bands.
Uplink: 1.6 Mbps at default allocation of 25%, but variable based
on packet size.
Up to 5 miles (8 km) with integrated antenna in the 2.4-GHz
band.
Up to 10 miles (16 km) with passive reflector on the SM in the
5.7-GHz band.
Up to 15 miles (24 km) with passive reflector on the SM in the
2.4-GHz band.
Transmitter Power
Meets FCC U-NII/ISM and IC LELAN ERP Limit.
Antenna
Integrated patch. Vertically polarized.
In 2.4-GHz band with passive reflector:
17° horizontal x 17° vertical beam width.
In 5.2-GHz band and 5.7-GHz band without passive reflector:
60° horizontal x 60° vertical beam width.
In 5.7-GHz band with passive reflector:
6° horizontal x 6° vertical beam width.
DC Power (measured at
DC converter)
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0.3 A @ 24 VDC (7.2 watts) typical.
0.35 A @ 24 VDC (8.4 watts) maximum (long cable runs, high
ambient temperature, high transmit ratio). Set by downlink
percentage.
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Specification
Canopy System Range
Ethernet, GPS sync, and
GPS coax cables
The use of cables that are rated for the operation temperature of
the product and that conform to UV light protection specifications
is mandatory. The use of shielded cables is strongly
recommended. For information about the supplier of these
cables, see CANOPY SYSTEM ACCESSORIES on Page 116.
Interface
10/100BaseT, half/full duplex.
Rate auto-negotiated (802.3 compliant).
Protocols Used
IPv4, UDP, TCP, ICMP, Telnet, HTTP, FTP, SNMP, DES.
Optionally, AES.
Protocols Supported
Switched Layer 2 Transport with support for all common Ethernet
protocols, such as IPv6, NetBIOS, DHCP, IPX.
Software Upgrade Path
Remotely downloaded into flash memory
Network Management
HTTP, telnet, FTP, SNMP
Wind
118 miles/hour (190 km/hour)
Operation Temperature
−40° F to +131º F (−40° C to +55° C)
Weight
1 lb (0.45 kg) without passive reflector.
Reflector Dish Weight
6.5 lb (2.9 kg) with assembly, without module
Dimensions
11.75” H x 3.4” W x 3.4” D (29.9 cm H x 8.6 cm W x 8.6 cm D)
Reflector Dish Dimensions
18” H x 24” W (45.7 cm H x 61.0 cm W)
Mean Time Between
Failure (MTBF)
40 years
Mean Time to Repair
15 minutes
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11 HISTORY OF CHANGES IN THIS DOCUMENT
Issue 4 introduced the following changes:
•
Information that supports Release 4.1 features
•
Information that supports 2.4-GHz modules
Issue 3 introduced the following changes:
•
AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) security product description
•
5.7-GHz ISM support of 6 channels (increased from 4 with 5.7-GHz U-NII)
•
5.7-GHz ISM frequencies approved for use in Canada as in the U.S.A.
•
List of MAC (Media Access Control) addresses for older modules that do not
automatically sense the cabling scheme (These modules require the installer to
correctly choose whether to use straight-thru or crossover cables.)
Issue 2 introduced the following changes:
•
−
European Community Notification.
−
RF Exposure.
−
software license terms and conditions.
•
Internationalization of measurement units to provide metric units aside the English
units
•
Updates for new hardware features, to reflect that modules that are shipped from the
publication date forward
•
Issue 5
Updates in the Notices section for
−
auto-sense the Ethernet termination (Either a straight-thru or crossover RJ-45
cable can be used to connect to either a network interface card or a hub, switch, or
router.)
−
include additional cable openings to facilitate shielded cable installation.
Changes in specifications to reflect the expanded lower temperature limit (-40°F/-40°C)
for all equipment
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