Siemens SIMATIC PCS 7 OSx Setup guide

OSx Migration Cookbook:
A Practical Planning and Implementation Guide for Migrating
Tistar, PCS, and OSx to PCS 7
By David J. Marks
Consulting Software Engineer
Siemens Energy and Automation
Spring House, PA, USA
Based on
PCS 7/505 V6.1
and
PCS 7 V6.1 SP1 with Hotfix 7
OSx Migration Cookbook
August 30, 2006
Table of Contents
1 – Introduction................................................................................................................... 3
2 – Comparing OSx and PCS 7........................................................................................... 5
3 – The Migration Process .................................................................................................. 8
4 – Hardware..................................................................................................................... 10
5 – Networking ................................................................................................................. 13
6 – Naming Issues............................................................................................................. 15
7 – Software and data configurations................................................................................ 16
8 - PLCs ............................................................................................................................ 17
9 – Tags............................................................................................................................. 18
10 – Hierarchy................................................................................................................... 25
11 – Action Requests ........................................................................................................ 26
12 – Batch/BCL ................................................................................................................ 28
13 – Reports ...................................................................................................................... 29
14 – Graphics .................................................................................................................... 30
15 – History....................................................................................................................... 31
16 –@aGlance and RDT ................................................................................................... 32
17 – Testing the Migration................................................................................................ 34
Appendix A – Install.tag format ....................................................................................... 36
Appendix B – Action Request csv file format .................................................................. 37
Appendix C – Fast Action Requests ................................................................................. 40
Appendix D – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire ........................................ 46
Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Instructions......................................................... 68
Appendix F – References.................................................................................................. 74
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1 – Introduction
Introduction
This book covers the migration of Siemens’ OSx control system to
Siemens’ PCS 7 control system. It provides a guide for determining
what needs to be migrated, how that might be done, and what the
scope of such a project might be.
The majority of OSx customers use it to supervise Simatic TI505
PLCs. Thus, the main thrust of this document is how to convert OSx
customers to PCS 7/505 OS, i.e., PCS 7 with the Simatic TI505 OS
option.
This book assumes a basic familiarity with PCS 7 and OSx
functionality and terminology.
This book is not intended to replace manuals and help files that are
already available for OSx and PCS 7. Instead it is meant to help those
who need to make decisions on how to proceed when contemplating a
migration from OSx to PCS 7. This book should be used in
conjunction with the PCS 7/505 OS Setup Guide found on the PCS
7/505 OS CD.
In this book, OSx refers to the Siemens family of control systems that
started with Tistar, evolved into PCS, and finally became PCS 7 OSx.
Definitions
PCS 7 refers to the Siemens control system product whose main
thrust is to provide supervisory control for the Siemens S7 PLCs. It
has now been extended to include the ability to communicate with
Bailey controllers, Siemens Moore ACM controllers, and Simatic
TI505 PLCs.
PCS 7 is used in the name of both control system products. That is
why in this book OSx is used without the PCS 7 prefix and PCS 7 is
used to identify the latest Siemens product to which OSx customers
should migrate including PCS 7/505 OS.
PAS R&D refers to the Research and Development group of the
Process Automation Systems Business Unit of Siemens Energy and
Automation in the USA.
Noteworthy in
6.1
Note the following:
ƒ
PCS 7/505 OS installs Hotfix 7 for PCS 7 V6.1 SP1 unless
you have already installed it. PCS 7/505/OS has not been
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validated to run with any hotfix newer than Hotfix 7.
ƒ
Recipe support for OSx style recipes was dropped in version
6.1. Contact Siemens for further guidance if you are migrating
an OSx system that uses recipes and you need to have OSx
style recipes in PCS 7.
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2 – Comparing OSx and PCS 7
Before proceeding with a migration project, understanding the
differences and similarities between OSx and PCS 7 is crucial.
Client/Server vs.
Peer-to-Peer
Two architectures have been used for OSx and PCS 7: client/server
and peer-to-peer.
In a client/server architecture the HMI (Human Machine Interface –
the user interface) resides on a computer known as a client, and the
reference copy of the data resides on a computer known as a server.
The server provides the data to the client on request. Client
computers do not communicate with PLCs and do not directly
interact with the process. They do so via their host server. Tistar
and PCS 7 are examples of client/server systems.
Because the loss of a server is significant, Tistar and PCS 7 both
allow the use of redundant pairs of servers. Tistar only supports one
pair of redundant servers, and only on the Tistar model 70 version
2.0.0. Most Tistar models do not support redundancy.
PCS 7 supports a distributed client/server architecture. Up to twelve
redundant server pairs are supported. Each pair could have access to
part of the process, and each client can access any of the pairs to
view any part of the whole process. By distributing the process
among the servers, the impact of failure is minimized and the
processing load is spread out among several computers.
OSx is an examples of a distributed peer-to-peer system. In a peerto-peer system, all computers can directly interact with the PLCs
and the process. Two types of peer-to-peer systems exist:
distributed and non-distributed. In a distributed system some
stations have specialized functions, such as gathering trend data or
creating reports. As a result, not all data may be on all stations.
Functions and data are distributed. In a non-distributed system, all
data and all functions are on all stations.
Launch Microsoft Office Outlook.lnk
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2 – Comparing OSx and PCS 7
OSx – PCS 7 Comparison (Architecture/Hardware)
Tistar
Client/Server
Architecture
2 redundant
DEUs plus
10 IGTs
Maximum number of computers
OSx
Peer-toPeer
16 stations
with a
maximum
of 4
Supervisors
PCS 7
Client/Server
12 redundant
server pairs,
32 clients,
1 engineering
1 Single
Station that is
client, server,
and
engineering
Microsoft
Windows
Per
station/per
option/per
number of
tags
1 DEU plus
1 IGT
1
Supervisor
Operating System
Unix
Unix or
Linux
Licensing/Pricing
Per
system/per
IGT
Per
station/Per
option
PLCs Supported
Old TI
(TI520,
TI530,
PM550,
TI560/565),
TI505
TI505,
S5,
S7
Bailey,
APACS,
TI505,
S7
Yes
Yes
No for S7,
Yes for all
others
APT, Tisoft
N/A
N/A
Minimum number of computers
Separate Computer
Required for PLC ES?
Old
TI
PLC/Controller
Engineering
TI505
PLC/Controller
Station
Programming
S5
Tool
APT, Tisoft,
SoftShop
N/A
N/A
S7
6
APT,
Tisoft,
SoftShop
APT, Step 5
Step 7
w/OSx
function
blocks
APT, Tisoft,
SoftShop
N/A
Step 7
OSx Migration Cookbook
August 30, 2006
2 – Comparing OSx and PCS 7
OSx – PCS 7 Comparison (Architecture/Hardware)
Computer
Specific hardware
required?
Tistar
Motorola M68XXX
Single Board Computer
in a VME Chassis
or
Intel 80386 PC
OSx
Intel
Pentium,
Pentium II,
Pentium III
PC
PCS 7
Intel
Pentium 4 PC
H1, S7
No
(minimum
memory and
hard disk
requirements)
Siemens CP1613
(for TI505),
any MS
Windows
supported
network card
(for S7 and
station to station)
H1, S7
TCP/IP
TCP/IP
Yes
Yes
PLC
Communications
Card
NCM,
Siemens CP1413
Siemens CP1413
(PCS 3.1.2A and
earlier),
3Com 3C509,
3Com 3C900
PLC Network
Station to Station
Communications
Tiway
Serial HDLC
(DEU ↔ IGT)
Twisted Pair
(need TP→AUI
conversion for
TI505
communications)
Any supported
by MS Windows
Network Cabling
Tiway/AUI
AUI
Printers Supported
Limited set
Limited set
1
1
(5 w/Xterminals)
4
Floppy, Tape
Floppy, Tape,
Magneto-Optical
disk, CD ROM
Any supported
by MS Windows
Maximum number of
displays per station
Removable media
supported (not all
versions support all
stated media)
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3 – The Migration Process
No two migration projects are alike. However, all such projects
follow the same basic steps.
Understanding
the OSx system
The first step is to understand the OSx system to be migrated. That
means doing an evaluation of the system to understand how OSx
has been applied. What features of OSx are being used and how
much configuration data there is must be determined. Appendix D
has a questionnaire that can provide the questions that need to be
answered.
Understanding
what needs to be
migrated
A migration results in a major change in the way an organization
controls and manages a process. The migration presents that
organization with a chance to re-evaluate their control strategy and
algorithms. Their existing strategy was partly designed around the
feature set of OSx. Now they will be using PCS 7 which does
things differently, provides new features that didn’t exist before,
and may not have features that match some features of OSx.
In some cases, they may want to replicate the OSx system using
PCS 7. In other cases they may decide to re-engineer the way they
do things to better fit within the PCS 7 paradigm.
Designing the
PCS 7 application
Once a decision is made as to what must be migrated, and what will
be newly created, the PCS 7 way of doing it must be determined.
Then, an order in the way the PCS 7 project is created has to be
decided. The number of stations, whether redundancy is
implemented, and what PCS 7 features are used determines the
order of the steps in creating the PCS 7 project. The PCS 7/505
Setup Guide discusses the proper order for creating a project.
Determining how
to create PCS 7
configurations
When the new PCS 7 project is finally implemented, configurations
for each feature will have to be entered into the system. These
configurations can be entered manually, or through bulk import
mechanisms. Some features, such as 505 tags, can only be
configured via a bulk import mechanism. Other features, such as
trend configurations can only be configured manually. Finally,
there are features, such as action requests, which can be configured
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3 – The Migration Process
either way.
Configurations that are imported in bulk use files that contain the
configuration data. How these files are created and who creates
them must be decided. Some of these files can be created via an
export from the OSx system. They can also be created using
Microsoft Windows tools such as Excel, or Notepad.
How many items are to be configured, their level of complexity,
and the number of items that are similar determines which features
to configure manually and which to configure via bulk import. For
example, configuring several hundred action requests manually, can
be tedious and time consuming. Exporting them from OSx and
importing them into PCS 7 is quicker and more efficient.
Testing the PCS 7
project
Unless there is an exact duplicate set of PLCs, testing the PCS 7
project requires using the PLCs that are used by the OSx system.
Additionally, it is a good idea to have at least one OSx station and
one PCS 7 station side by side so that the behavior of migrated
alarms, action requests, etc., can be observed. Ideally they should
behave similarly on both systems. See the Section 17 on testing for
considerations when running OSx and PCS 7 side by side.
Some tests should be devised to give an assurance that the PCS 7
system that has resulted from the migration behaves as expected.
Making changes
to the PCS 7
project
Once the PCS 7 system is put into service, a plan should be in place
to decide how further changes will be made without the OSx system
available. In general, the OSx system is discarded. Even if that
system is retained, at some point it will fail permanently and no
longer be repairable. That is one reason the migration was done.
Therefore, future additions and changes will have to be made using
the tools available to the PCS 7 system.
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4 – Hardware
Stations
Both OSx and PCS 7 use a personal computer for each station. In
most cases the PC used in OSx cannot be reused in PCS 7. Two
tables below show the minimum and recommended requirements
for PCS 7 PCs. Unlike OSx PCS 7 does not require specific brands
or models as long as they meet the minimum requirements. The
exception to this is the graphics adapters for multiple displays and
the network card for communications to Simatic TI 505 PLCs.
Note: If you use your own PCs for PCS 7 instead of those supplied
by Siemens, then you run the risk of reduced or billable hardware
support from Siemens.
Mimimum PCS 7 PC Requirements
(as of PCS 7 V6.0 SP3)
NAME
Engineering station
OS single station
OS server
OS archive server dedicated
OS client
Clock
Speed
1 GHz
1 GHz
1 GHz
2 GHz
866MHz
Memory
(RAM)
768 MB
768 MB
768 MB
1 GB
512 MB
Hard Disk
40 GB
40 GB
40 GB
40 GB
40 GB
Recommended PCS 7 PC Requirements
(as of PCS 7 V6.0 SP3)
NAME
Engineering station
OS single station
OS server
OS archive server dedicated
OS client
Clock
Speed
2.8 GHz
2.8 GHz
2.8 GHz
2.8 GHz
2.8 GHz
10
Memory
(RAM)
1 GB
1 GB
1 GB
1 GB
512 MB
Hard Disk
120 GB
120 GB
120 GB
120 GB
80 GB
OSx Migration Cookbook
August 30, 2006
4 – Hardware
Operator
Keyboard
OSx had available a special membrane keyboard that has special
keys that at runtime provide operators one-key access to certain
OSx functions. No such equivalent keyboard exists for PCS 7.
Because PCS 7 uses standard PC keyboards, any standard
membrane keyboard can be used with PCS 7. Customers in harsh
environments have a solution and Siemens does sell its own
membrane keyboard. However, the special one-key access to
runtime functions is not available., You can be configure this access
within a project with a combination of keys on the keyboard.
Trackballs and
touch screens
OSx has also offered track balls and touchscreens for sites whose
surfaces limit the use of mice. These are available for Microsoft
Windows and can be used with PCS 7. In fact the PS/2 trackballs
used with OSx may be directly usable with PCS 7 without any
driver installation. Touch screen monitors may need drivers
installed depending on the brand and model. Contact the touch
screen manufacturer for details.
Backup/Archival
devices
OSx was designed to use either quarter inch cartridge tape (in
versions 3.1.0 and prior) or magneto-optical disk (in versions 3.1.0
and later). Because PCS 7 runs on Microsoft Windows, any device
that has drivers for MS Windows and uses media large enough can
be used for backups and archives. Some devices may require
additional drivers and third party software to work properly.
Printers
Due to the underlying Unix and Linux, OSx has a limited set of
printers that it supports and that list is fixed. Different versions
support different sets. PCS 7 can print to any printer supported by
the underlying Microsoft windows version. Most printers come
with Windows drivers. A migration is an opportunity to upgrade the
printer and at today’s prices the cost is negligible.
Xterminals/Thin
Clients
OSx supports thin clients via the use of Xterminals. A station can
host a real Xterminal or a Microsoft Windows PC running
Xterminal emulation software. This gives the customer additional
displays into the system without purchasing additional stations.
They are called “thin clients” because they only provide an
additional display. All data and files still reside on the host station.
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4 – Hardware
PCS 7 does not support thin clients. However, it does support
multiple displays on a single client and Web clients. Web clients
have not been validated with PCS 7/505 OS 6.1, so at this time they
are not supported.
Up to four displays can be used with PCS 7/505 OS. Because PCS
7 must interact with the graphics drivers, it only supports specific
graphics cards for multiple displays. Contact Siemens to find out
which cards are supported for the version of PCS 7 you will be
installing.
This PCS 7 multiple display option differs from the OSx Xterminal
option. All the displays are manipulated from the same keyboard
and pointing device. Thus, unlike Xterminals, you can only work in
one display at a time. Further, unlike Xterminals which
communicate with a host station over the network, each PCS 7
display is limited in distance from the host to the maximum length
of a video cable. Even so, you would need the keyboard and
pointing device close enough to the display to use them and see the
display at the same time.
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5 – Networking
Network Types
Tistar, PCS/OSx, and PCS 7 use three different network/protocols
for communications. Tistar uses the proprietary network called
Tiway to communicate with PLCs. PCS/OSx and PCS 7 use
H1/Sinec TF and S7. Additionally, PCS/OSx and PCS 7 use
Ethernet/TCP/IP to communicate among stations.
Tiway
Migrating a Tistar system involves converting the PLCs from
Tiway to H1/Sinec TF. Simatic TI505 PLCs communicate over H1.
The Tiway NCM Module in each PLC is replaced with CP1434TF
module.
H1/Sinec TF
H1 is a network that is used to communicate with Siemens older
PLCs. It uses the Sinec TF protocol. H1 uses the same hardware as
Ethernet. That means any wire that can be used for Ethernet can be
used for H1. Additionally, H1 communications can occur over the
same wire being used for TCP/IP communications. This means that
PCS 7 to PLC communications can be integrated with other
commonly used networks at your site. See below about concerns
concerning network isolation and security.
Ethernet/TCP/IP
Station to station communications in PCS/OSx and PCS 7 occurs
via Ethernet using the TCP/IP protocol. OSx uses the same cables
to provide communications between stations and between stations
and PLCs. It also supports dual redundant networks. When two
networks exist PLC communications goes over one network and
station to station communications goes over the other.
PCS 7 uses a different paradigm. One or two Siemens CP1613
cards is required in each server that will communicate with Simatic
TI505 PLCs. That card is only used for PLC communications. A
separate network card must be installed for communications with
clients. This separate card can be any Ethernet TCP/IP card
supported by Microsoft Windows. The cable from each card can
connect to the same physical network so that Sinec TF and TCP/IP
communications occur over the same wire. Normally these are
connected to separate networks to increase performance. H1 can be
redundant; PCS 7 could be connected to three networks.
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5 – Networking
AUI versus
Twisted Pair
OSx systems have primarily used AUI (“Fat” coaxial Ethernet) for
their network cabling. This is an older technology. The newer
technology is twisted pair (TP) cables. Most business networks
have switched from AUI to TP. Sites where the network changed
from AUI to TP have had to install converters that allow AUI PCs
to connect to a TP network. It is possible to make OSx 4.1.1 and
4.1.2/4.1.2A connect directly to a TP network. The 3C900 network
cards in those OSx stations have both AUI and TP connectors. Even
so, the CP1434TF modules in the SIMATIC TI505 PLCs only have
AUI connectors.
When migrating OSx to PCS 7, network cabling must be
considered. An existing Tiway network must be replaced with a
new TP network and converters at each PLC CP module. Although
the CP1613 supports both AUI and TP Siemens recommends that
you convert to all TP cabling due to sporadic communications
drops using a CP1613 with AUI.
______________________________________________________
Note: If AUI is used, breaks of 2 to 3 seconds can occur
sporadically in PLC communications. The PCS 7 monitoring time
for timeouts must not, therefore, be set to less than 5 seconds!
A converter that connects a TP network to an AUI device does not
need separate power. It gets its power from the network. Converters
for TP devices on AUI networks do exist, but these require separate
power supplies since TP connections require higher power than
AUI networks provide. This is another reason AUI cabling is not
recommended.
Network isolation
and security
Siemens has always recommended that you should isolate an OSx
system from the rest of a site’s network by means of a router or a
gateway. This keeps OSx from competing with site traffic for
network bandwidth, makes access to OSx more secure, and still
gives OSx access to other computers on the site network. This
recommendation is also applicable to PCS 7.
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6 – Naming Issues
Name spaces
A name space is a set of names that are managed together. Names
within one name space must be unique. Names in separate name
spaces can coincide. OSx treats the names of tags, and action
requests as separate name spaces. Therefore, an action request can
have the same name as a tag. PCS 7/505 OS manages all of these in
a single name space. Thus, an action request cannot have the same
name as a 505 tag. DBA folder names are also included in this
single namespace.
When importing OSx configurations into PCS 7, object names must
be managed. The PCS 7/505 DBA tool has features to add suffixes
and/or prefixes to the names of imported objects to help make them
unique.
Naming
constraints
OSx and PCS 7 do not have the exact same constraints for object
names. Characters that are allowed in OSx and disallowed in PCS 7
will be replaced with underscores when imported via DBA. This
can happen in two situations: tag names and folder names.
OSx uses a colon when specifying a tag and its attribute: e.g.,
TS42:pv. PCS 7 uses a period: e.g., TS42.pv. When DBA
encounters a period in the name of an OSx tag it converts that
period to an underscore as part of the import: e.g., OSx tag
temp.sensor becomes PCS 7 tag structure temp_sensor.
DBA provides a feature to auto-create a folder hierarchy based on
the OSx process group descriptors or the parent tag names. If these
descriptors or names contain characters other than digits or letters,
those characters will be converted to underscores: e.g., a process
group whose descriptor is “My Favorite Process Group” in OSx
will cause a folder whose name is “My_Favorite_Process_Group”
to be created.
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7 – Software and data configurations
PCS 7/505 OS uses the PCS 7 paradigm where a runtime PCS 7
system is running a PCS 7 project. OSx cannot have more than one
project loaded on the system at one time. There are no distinctions
between a system and a project. PCS 7 has this project notion. It is
a “project” that is executed at runtime. More than one project can
be on a system at any given time. You can decide to run a different
project at any time by shutting down the first project, making sure
the second project is propagated to all appropriate stations, and then
run it.
Two software tools are used to create and configure a PCS 7/505
OS project. These are Simatic Manager/WinCC Explorer which
creates and configures the PCS 7 project, and the PCS 7/505
Database Automation Tool (DBA) which converts OSx style
configurations to WinCC format and inserts them into a designated
WinCC project.
WinCC Explorer
WinCC Explorer is the primary tool you use to create your PCS 7
project. It also contains the functions needed to configure features
that don’t involve data migrated from OSx. These include lifebeat
monitoring and time synchronization. WinCC Explorer also has the
button that sends your project into runtime mode.
DBA
DBA is the primary tool you use to convert OSx configurations into
WinCC configurations. After creating a PCS 7 project with WinCC
explorer, you use DBA to import your OSx configurations into the
WinCC project. You can import tags, action requests. Except tags,
these can be created manually or bulk imported from files. Tags
must be bulk imported from files. The files used for bulk import are
normally exported from OSx or the Simatic TI505 programming
tool APT.
Whether a configuration from OSx is recreated manually or
imported in bulk via a file depends on the number of such
configurations. For example, if the OSx system that is migrating to
PCS 7 only has ten action requests, then recreating them manually
in DBA may be faster than trying to export them from OSx. On the
other hand, using the bulk import may be more efficient if there are
700 action requests. The project managers will need to decide
which method is most efficient and least costly. That can differ for
each project.
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8 - PLCs
Old TI PLCs
Tistar can communicate with older TI PLCs such as the 520, 530,
and 560 series, and the PM550. PCS 7 cannot communicate with
these. To migrate a Tistar system with these PLCs, their logic
would have to be recreated Simatic S7 series PLCs. The old TI
PLCs would be discarded.
SIMATIC S5
PLCs
PCS 7 does not support SIMATIC S5 PLCs. Therefore, migrating
an OSx system that uses S5 requires that you recreate their logic on
SIMATIC S7 series PLCs. The S5 PLCs would be discarded.
Configuring
SIMATIC S7
PLCs in PCS 7
SIMATIC S7 PLCs are configured through Simatic Manager which
is a standard part of PCS 7. Consult the PCS 7/505 OS Setup Guide
if you plan to include SIMATIC S7 PLCs in your PCS 7/505 OS
project.
Configuring
SIMATIC TI505
PLCs in PCS 7
SIMATIC TI505 PLCs are configured via DBA. This is done using
the tag files imported into DBA. The first action you need to take
when creating a project through DBA is to configure the PLCs. You
do this by informing DBA which tag files will be used to import
505 tags into you PCS 7 project. This is called “adding an AS
source node” in DBA. DBA then reads the first tag in these files
and configures the PLC to which that tag is assigned. Once DBA
knows about the PLC, you can then enter the PLC’s MAC address
using DBA. When your project is compiled from DBA to WinCC, a
505_PLC tag structure for each TI505 PLC is created.
H1 Associations
in the PLC’s
CP1434TF cards
Each CP1434TF card in a TI505 PLC has a list of the station names
and MAC addresses to which it will be communicating. It does not
have those for your new PCS 7 servers. When migrating to PCS 7,
you will have to add new associations in each CP1434TF module
to which your new PCS 7 system will be connected for each server
that will communicate with that PLC. This is done via the same H1
software you used to do this for your OSx stations.
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9 – Tags
The main unit of data used throughout the OSx and PCS 7 systems
is the tag. However, each applies the term ‘tag’ differently.
What is a tag?
In OSx, a tag is a logical object that groups a particular type of data
with its range, alarm, limits, status, deadband, etc. Each of these
items is called an attribute of the tag. Some attributes are the same
for all tag types. Others differ based on the type.
In PCS 7, the equivalent of an OSx tag object is called a tag
structure. Each OSx 505 tag type is represented by a PCS 7 tag
structure. Each OSx 505 tag attribute is treated as a tag in PCS 7.
For example, suppose there is an OSx 505 AI tag called AI_12. It
has an attribute called PV for process value, the tag’s value in the
PLC. In PCS 7, AI_12 is an instance of a 505_AI tag structure, and
AI_12.PV is a tag in that structure.
How are OSx tags
migrated to PCS
7?
The mechanism used to migrate OSx tags to PCS 7 is determined
by whether the tags are S7 or 505 tags. To migrate S7 tags, transfer
your project from the ES tools you used with OSx to the ES tools
on your PCS 7 engineering station. You may need to upgrade the
ES tools you used with OSx to the latest version. You will also
need to create faceplates and symbols for S7 versions of OSx tag
types on PCS 7. For 505 tags you use DBA to import standard OSx
install.tag files. Faceplates and symbols for 505 tags are provided
with PCS 7/505 OS.
PCS 7 tag
structures and
OSx 505 tags
OSx has 23 different 505 tag types. Tags of 19 of these types can be
migrated to PCS 7. Because PCS 7 treats and configures stations
differently from OSx, there is no need for data_node tags. Because
PCS 7 handles local station errors differently from OSx there is no
need for system tags. Finally, because there is no equivalent to OSx
batch in PCS 7 so there is no need for unit and batch tags.
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9 – Tags
OSx to PCS 7 tag
mapping
When DBA maps an OSx tag to PCS 7 it creates a PCS 7 tag
structure with some number of external and internal tags. This is
because some OSx tag attributes are not networkable. Different
OSx tag types produce different numbers of external and internal
tags.
PCS 7 tag
licensing
The table below shows how many external tags are created for tags
of each OSx tag type. This information determines how large a PCS
7 tag license must be purchased for the new PCS 7 system.
Multiply the total number of networked OSx tags for each tag type
by the number of external PCS 7 tags to which that type maps and
add the totals. Then add some amount for future external tags
created on PCS 7. You will need to purchase the next higher license
number for PCS 7.
OSx to PCS 7 Tag Mapping
OSx Tag Type
AI
AO
DI
DI10
DO
DO10
VLV1
VLV2
RMTR
MTR1
MTR2
CALC
IVAR
TMR
CTR
LOOP
TEXT
CONTROL_NODE
PCS 7 Tag
Structure
505_AI
505_AO
505_DI
505_DI10
505_DO
505_DO10
505_VLV1
505_VLV2
505_RMTR
505_MTR1
505_MTR2
505_CALC
505_IVAR
505_TMR
505_CTR
505_LOOP
505_TEXT
505_PLC
19
External
PCS 7 Tags
16
5
4
5
5
15
10
10
10
10
10
4
4
5
4
21
4
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August 30, 2006
9 – Tags
Install.tag files
Migrating 505 tags from OSx to PCS 7 requires feeding DBA one
or more install.tag files. An install.tag file is a file that contains a
description of one or more OSx tags. Install.tag files have a specific
format that is used by OSx and PCS 7 505/OS DBA to import tags.
DBA does not have a way to manually create PCS 7 tag structures,
nor to create its member tags. Manual creation would have to be
done through WinCC Explorer and that is quite tedious. Therefore,
the preferred way to migrate tags from OSx to PCS 7 is via
install.tag files.
Install.tag files do not have to be called “install.tag.” Any DOS
format (8.3) name is valid. By convention the files end with the
extension “.tag” and the default name in some tools when none is
specified is “install.tag.” DBA does not have a default file name
and allows you to use any name. It will recognize that the file you
picked is invalid if you picked one whose internal structure is not
correct.
Because of the way the workflow is structured in DBA, the
assumption is made that all the tags in an install.tag file are for the
same PLC. As discussed in the section on PLCs, DBA uses the first
tag in the file to determine the PLC to configure. That means that
you should ensure that all tags in an install.tag file are from the
same PLC. You can configure multiple PLCs and associated 505
tags by using more than one install.tag file.
There are three ways to create an install.tag file: manually using a
text editor or a spreadsheet, via APT or from the OSx HMI if you
have OSx 4.1.0 and later. The table below describes this in detail.
There are two types of install.tag files. Tistar format and OSx/PCS
format. DBA only reads OSx/PCS format files. APT can create
either format. If you create your file from APT, make sure you are
using a version of APT that can do OSx/PCS format files and that
you choose either PCS 3.X or PCS 4.X before generating the file.
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9 – Tags
How to Create Install.tag Files
OSX/PCS/Tistar
Version
4.1.2A
4.1.1, 4.1.0A
4.0.0B, 3.1.2A
3.1.0B, 3.0.2E,
2.0.1, 2.0.0P1,
1.3.3
OSx HMI
RBE
information
4
included?
Y
Customer/Project Engineer
APT1
N
Customer/Project Engineer
R&D Tools
Spreadsheet/Text
Editor2
OSx HMI
Y
PAS R&D (billable service)
N
Customer/Project Engineer
N
Customer/Project Engineer
APT1
N
Customer/Project Engineer
R&D Tools
Spreadsheet/Text
Editor2
APT1
Y
PAS R&D (billable service)
N
Customer/Project Engineer
N
Customer/Project Engineer
R&D Tools
Spreadsheet/Text
Editor2
APT1
Y
PAS R&D (billable service)
N
Customer/Project Engineer
N
Y (OSx/PCS)
N (Tistar)
Customer/Project Engineer
Install.tag file
creation
method
R&D Tools3
Spreadsheet/Text
Editor2
N
Who does this?
PAS R&D (billable service)
Customer/Project Engineer
1.
Must be a version of APT that creates OSx/PCS install.tag files Look on the APT
compile screen for PCS version 3.X or 4.X.
2.
Requires knowledge of OSx/PCS install.tag file format and is a manual operation.
3.
The R&D tools do not yet exist for OSx/PCS/Tistar versions earlier than 3.1.2A.
4.
DBA assumes that all tags are alarmable (NOT just those so configured in
OSx/PCS/Tistar) if the install.tag file does not include RBE information.
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9 – Tags
Invalid Tag Types When creating install.tag files from OSx or APT, you might
inadvertently include tags of types that PCS 7/505 does not have
such as BATCH tags or custom tag types. DBA will happily add
these tags to its list. However, they will not be compiled to PCS7
and will produce warnings in the compile log file.
Area and Unit
Tags
If there are AREA or UNIT tags in your install.tag files, AREA and
UNIT tag structures will be created for you by DBA in WinCC.
However, no symbol or faceplate is provided for these.
Networked versus
non-networked
tags
OSx has the concept of networked and non-networked tags.
Networked tags are those tags that have at least one attribute that is
tied to a PLC memory location. Non-networked tags have no ties to
any PLC. All their attributes represent data in OSx.
External versus
internal tags
PCS 7 has a similar concept with external versus internal tags.
External tags are tied to PLC data, while internal tags are not. Just
as OSx tags can have networked and non-networked attributes, PCS
7 tag structures can have both external and internal tags.
Migrating nonnetworked tags
The way to indicate that a tag is non-networked, is to leave the PLC
field blank in an install.tag file. DBA will not accept an install.tag
file whose first tag has no designated PLC. Even if you added nonnetworked tags to an install.tag file whose first tag had a designated
PLC and managed to import them in DBA, the project would not
compile to WinCC.
If non-networked tags are an integral part of the OSx system and
must be migrated to PCS 7, then you will need to design and create
new tag structures in PCS 7 that are equivalent to the nonnetworked tag types. Since in OSx, there is no distinction between
networked and non-networked tag types, you can clone one or more
of the networked tag structures for your non-networked tags. Just
make sure that all the elements in the new structures are designated
9 – Tags
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August 30, 2006
internal. For example, if you need non-networked text tags, you can
create a new tag structure TEXTN that is a duplicate of the
505_TEXT structure, except for the fact that all the tag elements are
designated as internal. If you need faceplates and symbols, you will
have to create these also. These can also be copied from those used
for the 505 structures. Then, for each non-networked OSx tag you
want in PCS 7, create an instance of that all-internal tag structure.
An additional factor to be considered is how the non-networked
tags are manipulated. Networked tags are modified by the PLC or
from a graphic. Since there is no PLC for a non-networked tag,
there is no implicit automated way to write to such tags. When you
design the PCS 7 system you need to provide logic to manipulate
the migrated non-networked tags. OSx can use reports or BCL
programs. In PCS 7 you can create scripts or actions that simulate
the logic used in OSx.
Faceplates and
symbols
OSx has two faceplates for each tag type. A small faceplate and a
large faceplate. The small faceplate is used in tag group displays
and the large faceplates are used in tag detail displays. Symbols
also exist for each tag. You have the freedom to choose from a
variety of animations for these.
PCS 7 has a similar scheme, except it doesn’t have the small
faceplate. Faceplates and symbols are for PCS 7 tag structures.
Symbols exist on some graphic. When you add a tag to a folder in
DBA you are adding a tag symbol to the graphic that will be
associated with that folder when the DBA project is compiled to
WinCC. You can choose in DBA which symbol to use (if more
than one exists) but you cannot choose its animation. If there are
more symbols than can fit on a screen, then some symbols will be
below the bottom of the screen and will not be visible; the default
graphics that DBA creates are not scrollable. You will have to
manually add scroll bars via the PCS 7 Graphics Designer.
Each symbol opens the tag’s faceplate in a separate window when
clicked with the mouse. Unlike OSx, you can have two faceplates
for the same 505 tag structure displayed at the same time.
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9 – Tags
Alarming
DBA sets the alarmability of a tag based on the install.tag file used
to import it into PCS 7. Tags that are configured for alarming in
OSx (but NOT Tistar) have RBE ids assigned to them. In the
install.tag format RBE ids are optional and DBA can accept
install.tag files with and without RBE ids. Files originating from
APT, Tistar, and the OSx 4.1.2, 4.1.1 or 4.1.0/4.1.0A HMI do not
have RBE ids. Files that originate from the 4.1.2A HMI or via the
PAS R&D Data Extraction Services do (except Tistar which does
not implement RBE).
When DBA sees an install.tag file that does not contain any RBE
ids, it makes the assumption that all tags are alarmable. That means
you will have to manually edit the newly imported tags to turn off
alarmability on those tags you do not want to be alarmable to avoid
nuisance alarms.
When DBA sees an install.tag file with RBE ids, it configures those
tags that have RBE ids as alarmable. All other tags are not so
configured. If you want tags that were not alarmed in OSx to be
alarmable in PCS 7 then you will have to manually edit those tags
in DBA.
When setting PCS 7 tags to be alarmable DBA uses defaults for
priorities and levels that may not match how these were set in OSx.
If those are not as they were in OSx or as you want them, you will
need to manually edit each incorrect alarm tag in DBA.
Alarm
suppression
OSx has an alarm suppression feature where the value in one tag
can suppress an alarm in another. This allows for the automated
suppression of nuisance alarms. PCS 7 does not have this feature.
You can turn off a tag’s alarmability at runtime temporarily but that
is a manual operation. OSx alarm suppression could be mimicked
by the use of a PCS 7 action which when a tag reaches a certain
value, turns off the alarmability on another tag. You would also
have to provide for a condition that then turned that alarmability
back on.
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10 – Hierarchy
OSx Screen
Hierarchy
OSx has a concept of a Screen Hierarchy where at runtime,
graphics can be configured so that you can navigate from one
graphic to the next. The navigation topology is a flat graph with up,
down, left, right and home directions. In OSx this hierarchy is
optional. Many implementations navigate via buttons on graphics
or via the graphics selection list.
PCS 7 Plant
Hierarchy
PCS 7 has a similar hierarchy concept and it is not optional.
Navigation is primarily done through this hierarchy. Navigation via
a graphics selection list is also available, but not the preferred
method. The PCS 7 hierarchy is a tree structure based on up to 49
root graphics.
You implement the PCS 7 hierarchy by creating a folder structure
in the DBA plant view. Each folder is associated with a graphic in
the hierarchy. Normally that graphic has the same name as the
folder, but that can be changed. You then add elements such as tags
and action requests to these folders. Normally you design and create
your hierarchy prior to adding tags and action requests unless you
are using the hierarchy features of the tag auto-assign or the action
request import functions.
The design of this hierarchy is critical as this is how operators will
access process graphics to interact with your process. Unlike OSx,
there is no action request summary. Accessing an action request is
done through its symbol and to get access to that symbol you have
to display the graphic on which the action request’s symbol is
located.
DBA gives you several automated ways to start your hierarchy.
When installing tags or action requests you can create folders based
on the process group descriptions or the parent tags. You will still
need to manually edit the hierarchy by creating, deleting, moving,
and renaming folders to get it the way you want it to be.
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11 – Action Requests
An action request is a function that asks an operator to do
something. The request can be as simple as asking the operator to
acknowledge that some event occurred in the system, or as complex
as asking the operator to provide a value or make a choice. Action
requests allow the process to make requests to operators. An
explanation of how these work is in the OSx manual set. Both OSx
and PCS 7/505 implement action requests so that they are similarly
configured and behave the same.
Action request
types
OSx supports 5 different types of action requests: view, event log,
acknowledge, enter value and multi-choice. PCS 7 supports 6 types:
the five OSx types and an additional multi-choice type. To
distinguish between the two the form is labeled Multi-choice (OSx
style) and Multi-choice. The former behaves as in OSx and writes
0x1 through 0x8 for choices 1 through 4 to the answer tag, while
the latter writes the displayed choice to the answer tag.
Migrating action
requests
You can create action requests via DBA either one at a time
manually or by importing them in bulk. Manual creation is through
a form that looks very similar to the one used in OSx. For more
than a few, action requests, bulk import is more efficient and less
tedious.
When you import action requests in bulk, you use a csv file that
contains the action requests. DBA reads these files and configures
the action requests. These files are obtained by exporting the action
requests from OSx or by manually creating them with a spreadsheet
or a text editor. The export from OSx is done via the Data
Extraction Services offered by PAS R&D. You send a backup of
your system to PAS R&D and they return a set of files, one of
which contains action requests.
OSx treats action requests as a separate namespace from tags. PCS
7 handles them in the same namespace. Therefore, You cannot have
action requests in PCS 7 whose name is the same as a PCS 7 tag
structure. When doing a bulk import into DBA you are given the
opportunity to add a prefix to all your action requests to ensure that
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11 – Action Requests
their names are unique.
Fast action
requests
In OSx properly configured action requests are reported by the PLC
because trigger tags are configured as RBE tags. This means that
action requests can be triggered and reset faster than once per
second. OSx will see these action requests and operators will still
have to respond.
In PCS 7 the server scans for action request trigger tags and the
scan cycle is no faster than once per second. That means that action
requests that are triggered and reset within the same PCS 7 scan
cycle may be missed. This is because, unless you configured them
as such, action request trigger tags are not automatically treated as
alarm tags whose data is communicated via RBE. If you do
configure trigger tags as alarm tags you may get an alarm and alarm
message in addition to an action request. Appendix C has a
procedure that shows how to configure trigger tags as alarm tags so
that they get the benefit of RBE, without producing alarms and
alarm messages in PCS 7. There is a companion DBA project
available that illustrates the procedure.
Action request
annunciation and
acknowledgement
As discussed in the section on the Plant Hierarchy, there is no
action request summary. Action requests are annunciated in a
manner similar to alarms using the alarm group display. From the
alarm summary one can travel to the page on which the symbol for
that action request is located, open its faceplate and answer or
acknowledge it.
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12 – Batch/BCL
OSx supports a form of batch processing that is NOT compliant
with any standard. This feature uses a combination of Batch and
Unit tags, and BCL programs. No analogue of this feature exists in
PCS 7. PCS 7 does have a batch option called Simatic Batch, but it
is not integrated with PCS 7/505 OS and cannot be used with
SIMATIC TI505 PLCs. However, you can create your own custom
PCS 7 batch feature similar to the one in OSx if it is an integral part
of what you want to migrate from OSx. You use standard features
of PCS 7 to do so.
Creating an
OSx-style batch
feature on PCS 7
Standalone BCL
programs
Follow these steps to create an OSx-style batch feature on PCS 7:
•
Become familiar with the OSx batch logic in your
application so you understand what will be migrated to PCS
7. This means understanding exactly what BCL (Batch
Control Language) and C language statements in your BCL
programs do.
•
Create PCS 7 tags that will fill the function of OSx batch
and unit tags. If any of these were networked on OSx, make
them external on PCS 7 and tie them to the appropriate PLC
memory locations. You can either create new tag structures
that are clones of OSx batch and unit tags or use existing
structures.
•
Design and create PCS 7 actions that do what your BCL
programs on OSx do. Actions in PCS 7 use triggers similar
to those used by OSx BCL programs. Since BCL programs
are a combination of C and BCL, you can rewrite this logic
in C and PCS 7 APIs (Application Programming Interfaces
– library functions). PCS 7 actions can also be written using
Visual Basic. Some functionality may not transfer directly
and you may have to re-design the logic you are trying to
migrate.
Some OSx applications use BCL programs to execute non-batch
logic. As described above, these can be recreated in PCS 7 using
actions.
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13 – Reports
OSx has two report editors: Xess and Classic. Both have similar
functionality, except Xess can produce graphical output while
Classic is text only. Both work from a spreadsheet paradigm. PCS
7 has one editor – the Report Designer. This editor’s paradigm is a
drawing canvas to which you add objects and text, some of which
can get their data and attributes from tag values. As a result, the
internal structure of OSx reports is not the same as the internal
structure of PCS 7 reports. Additionally, the way you tell the report
to access tag and history data differs. There is no software that can
convert OSx reports to PCS 7. You will have to manually redesign
and recreate those you want to migrate to PCS 7.
read and write
OSx reports support reading and writing arbitrary non-tag data from
arbitrary OSx database tables via the read and write functions. This
functionality is not available in PCS 7. Since the PCS 7 data store is
organized differently than in OSx, the data you are trying to read or
write in a report may not even exist in PCS 7. You will need to redesign the logic of reports that use these functions.
writetag
OSx reports support being able to write to tags via the writetag
function. PCS 7 reports do not have this functionality. PCS 7
actions can do this and can be triggered on events similar to those
that trigger OSx reports (tag change and time). You should redesign any writetags you wish to migrate as actions in PCS 7.
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14 – Graphics
There are two types of graphics that you may be migrating. Those
that originate in Tistar and those that originate in PCS OSx. Tistar
graphics are made from VGA line drawings. PCS OSx are based on
Kinesix’s Sammi HMI. Both of these have distinctly different
internal formats from PCS 7 graphics which are based on a format
used by WinCC. Both OSx and WinCC graphics have similar
functionality.
Conversion
Converting Tistar graphics to WinCC is not possible. These must
be recreated using the WinCC Graphics Designer. Converting PCS
OSx graphics is possible. PAS R&D provides a Graphics
Conversion service that converts a PCS OSx graphic to its static
equivalent in WinCC. It is as if a digital photo of the graphic was
made. However, this is not just an image. The objects in the
converted graphic are modifiable/movable lines and polygons.
Once you receive the converted graphics, you then have to add the
animations using the Graphics Designer.
Using the
hierarchy
Because DBA creates a hierarchy for you, you can use that to your
advantage to set up your graphics and their navigation. When you
compile a DBA project a blank graphic containing a symbol for
each of its objects is created for each DBA folder and placed in the
PCS 7 hierarchy. You can then replace each blank graphic with a
graphic of your choosing. Make sure you use a folder name or a
name for its associated graphic that matches the name of the
graphic with which you will replace it.
If you use PAS R&D’s Data Extraction service, included in the files
you get is a text file that is a cross reference of tags and graphics in
OSx. This file has a list of graphics and which tags each references,
and a list of tags along with which graphic that tag is on. This report
is also available in 4.1.2/4.1.2A OSx systems. You can use this
information to build your hierarchy in DBA. The limitation is that
DBA will not allow you to have the same tag in more than one
folder and consequently the associated graphic. You will have to
remedy that later in the Graphics Designer.
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15 – History
Trend data
Both OSx and PCS 7 can capture and store actual tag values for
future reference. This is called trend data. In OSx trending is
configured via the Historical Trend Configurator, while in PCS 7
it is configured via Tag Logging in WinCC Explorer. Both have
similar functionality.
Alarm and
process messages
OSx captures alarm and process messages in a single file called the
Daily Log File. PCS 7 captures these in the Alarm Log. Unlike
OSx you must configure alarm logging to capture the messages.
OSx does this for all messages by default.
Report outputs
OSx also considers report outputs as history and captures all
outputs as part of its archives. PCS 7 does not have the capability to
save report outputs to files. Reports are designed to be printed.
However, there is third-party software that can install a “printer”
whose output goes to a file.
Migrating OSx
history data
There is no mechanism included in PCS 7 that allows one to
migrate OSx history to PCS 7. However, there are some things you
can do manually to get this data available on PCS 7 stations.
Daily log files and Classic report outputs are text files that can be
copied to PCS 7 stations and be viewed using non-PCS 7 software
such as Notepad. Some Xess reports can produce output in Excel
or ASCII format. These could then be viewed with Microsoft Excel
or Notepad or imported into third-party graphing packages on a
PCS 7 station.
There is no way to convert OSx trend data so that it is directly
viewable in PCS 7. However, OSx has a utility, called htp, which
can convert OSx trend data to columnar text files. These files could
then be processed using OSx Unix/Linux tools or Microsoft
Windows tools into a format that would be acceptable as csv input
to Microsoft Excel or as input to some other software. Bear in
mind that this is a tedious process for large amounts of trend data as
you need to manually specify each trended point (tag:attribute and
perhaps bit). Additionally you would have to load old trend data
from archives onto an OSx station to do this. An alternative is to
keep an OSx station to view the old data.
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16 –@aGlance and RDT
@aGlance
PCS 7 has an @aGlance server option, called @PCS 7, that you can
install. If you were using @aGlance with OSx, the PCS 7
@aGlance server may work with your client. However, you may
have to reconfigure the client as the data you were reading from
OSx may differ in PCS 7.
RDT
There is no feature in PCS 7 that is equivalent to OSx’s RDT. If
you want to be able to upload and download from PCS 7’s data
store to a database such as Oracle on another computer, the
following possibilities exist (this list may not be all possibilities):
•
Use @PCS 7 to send PCS 7 data to another computer.
•
Use PCS 7’s OPC server to send PCS 7 data to another
computer and to download data to PCS 7 from another
computer.
•
Write a PCS 7 action that can send PCS 7 data to another
computer and download data to PCS 7 from another
computer via ftp.
In all cases above, you would need some software on the remote
computer (script, program, database option, client, etc.) that would
take the data received and put it into the remote database and
respond to requests from PCS 7 for data from the remote database.
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17 – Window Groups
Window Groups
Later versions of OSx have a feature where you can capture the
arrangement of up to three graphics and tag details and save it by
name. This allows operators to bring up their favorite grouping of
graphics and tag details arranged the way they want.
PCS 7 has two ways that the equivalent can be done: Picture
Windows and Picture Groups. With the WinCC Graphics designer,
you can embed graphics and faceplates into a single graphic
arranged as you want it. Alternatively, you can capture Picture
Groups, an arrangement of open graphics and faceplates at runtime
by user. See the WinCC and PCS 7 help files for further details.
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17 – Testing the Migration
Running OSx and One of the ways to determine the success of a migration is to run an
PCS 7 side by side original station and a newly migrated station side by side. Ideally
alarms and action requests that are triggered on the original station
will also trigger on the migrated station. How this is set up depends
on what install.tag files were used to create the PCS 7 project.
Install.tag files that originate via Siemens’ Data Extraction
Services, or directly from OSx 4.1.2A contain alarming
information. Install.tag files that originate from Tistar via Siemens’
Data Extraction Services, directly from OSx 4.1.1, OSx 4.1.0x, or
from APT, do not.
When PCS 7/505 DBA reads an install.tag file that has alarming
information in it, it configures those tags and only those tags to be
alarmable. In such a case, the tags designated as alarmable in PCS 7
will match those configured in OSx.
When PCS 7/505 DBA reads an install.tag file without alarming
information in it, it assumes that all tags are to be designated as
alarmable. In that case which tags are designated as alarmable in
PCS 7 differs from OSx. Such a difference can also occur if the
alarmability designation is changed in DBA or new alarm tags are
added that did not exist in OSx.
Once such a difference between PCS 7 and OSx is introduced, the
difference cannot be removed even if the tags that are different are
changed back. This is because OSx and PCS 7 use internal ids to
communicate alarmability to the 505 PLCs. That allows the PLCs
to inform OSx and PCS 7 when an alarm or action request occurs.
This mechanism is called Report by Exception (RBE) and the ids
are called RBE ids. It is these ids that are in the install.tag files.
Before the difference was introduced, the RBE ids in the install.tag
files caused both systems to use the same ids for the same tags.
Once the difference was introduced, new ids were generated which
cannot be changed back to the original since the RBE id is not
accessible from the DBA user interface.
When both PCS 7 and OSx are using the same RBE ids, then both
can run side by side communicating with the same PLCs and both
should see alarms and action requests triggered at about the same
time. When they have different RBE ids, then RBE should be
turned off on the OSx side to avoid showing the wrong alarms or
action requests. OSx 4.1.2A has the ability to turn off RBE built in.
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17 – Testing the Migration
PCS/OSx 3.1.2A through 4.1.2 have a patch available (patch
20270) that can add that capability. There is no patch for PCS prior
to 3.1.2A. For Tistar, no patch is necessary since RBE is not
implemented. In systems where RBE can be turned off, it is done
by setting the RBE delivery time in Network Setup to 0.
A system that does not have RBE, or has it turned off, scans the
PLCs instead of waiting to be informed. Such a system will see
alarms slightly later than the PCS 7 system. That is due to scan
cycle time delays. PCS 7 gets informed when the event happens, the
Tistar/PCS/OSx system finds out on the next scan, which can be as
much as a few seconds later.
Because RBE cannot be turned off on PCS systems earlier than
3.1.2A, those systems cannot run side by side with PCS 7 unless
they use separate PLCs or their RBE ids match.
Tistar/PCS/OSx and PCS 7 Side by Side (Summary)
PCS 7
505OS
Implements
RBE
Install.tag
files from
user
interface
have RBE
ids
Install.tag
files from
Data
Extraction
Services
have RBE
ids
Install.tag
files from
APT have
RBE ids
Can turn
off RBE
OSx
4.1.2A 4.1.0-4.1.2
PCS
3.1.2A-4.0.0B prior to 3.1.2A
Tistar
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
N/A
Y
N
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N/A
Y
Y
Y
(patch 20270)
(patch 20270)
N
N/A
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Appendix A – Install.tag format
An install.tag file is a csv type file that contains three types of records delimited by
commas. Tag records introduce a tag. Following a tag record are one or more attribute
records. There are as many attribute records as there are attributes for that tag. Following
all tag and attributes there can optionally be process group records. Process group records
are only available in files generated by APT.
This format is documented in the APT Applications manual and the OSx Process
Configuration manual. Since these manuals were written, three new optional fields were
added to the attribute records. These fields are only used in the STATUS attribute record
of networked tags. DBA can accept files with and without these three optional fields.
DBA uses these fields to set the alarmability of tags. Only those tags configured for
alarming should have these fields. See the description in the section on tags above. The
fields are documented below.
New Status Attribute Fields
Field
Data Type
Maximum
length
RBE ID
Integer as text
5
Zero
Zero
Integer as text
Integer as text
1
1
36
Description
RBE ID = pseudo_tag + RBE offset
The RBE offset is stored in the
record whose key is 48 in the config
table. The RBE offset is usually 0
The digit 0
The digit 0
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Appendix B – Action Request csv file format
Action request csv files are used by DBA to import action request configurations from
OSx. These files have two types of records: action request records and process group
records. There are always 32 process group records. All records are delimited by semicolons.
Action Request Records
Field
Number
1
2
Field
Record
Identifier
Request Name
Data
Type
Max
length
Notes
Text
2
The string AR
Text
13
3
Request Type
Text
24
4
Criticality
Text
7
5
Text1
Text
56
6
Text2
Text
56
7
Text3
Text
56
Text
13
Text
19
Text
11
8
9
10
Trigger Tag
Name
Trigger Tag
Attribute
Trigger Tag
Bit Name
37
One of the following
strings:
• View
• Enter Value
• Acknowledge
• Event Log
• Multi-Choice (OSx
style)
Warning for normal
requests
Alarm for urgent
requests
OSx embedding format
is replaced by C
language style
formatting.
OSx embedding format
is replaced by C
language style
formatting.
OSx embedding format
is replaced by C
language style
formatting.
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Appendix B – Action Request csv file format
Action Request Records (Continued)
Field
Number
Field
Data
Type
11
Trigger Tag
Bit
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
Answer Tag
Name
Answer Tag
Attribute
Reset Tag
Name
Reset Tag
Attribute
Reset Tag Bit
Name
Reset Tag Bit
Embedded
Tag1 Name
Embedded
Tag1 Attribute
Embedded
Tag2 Name
Embedded
Tag2 Attribute
Embedded
Tag3 Name
Embedded
Tag3 Attribute
Choice1
Choice2
Choice3
Choice4
Max
length
Notes
Hex
number as
text
10
Starts with 0X and is
padded with leading
zeroes
Text
13
Text
19
Text
13
Text
19
Text
11
Hex
number as
text
10
Text
13
Text
19
Text
13
Text
19
Text
13
Text
19
Text
Text
Text
Text
13
13
13
13
38
Starts with 0X and is
padded with leading
zeroes
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Appendix B – Action Request csv file format
Process Group Records
Field
Number
1
2
3
Field
Record
Identifier
Process Group
Number
Process Group
Description
Data
Type
Max
length
Notes
Text
1
The string P
Text
2
An integer from 1 to
32
Text
30
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Appendix C – Fast Action Requests
Fast Action Request Configuration Procedure
DBA configuration of an Action Request results in a message created in Alarm Logging.
The Action Request TRIGGER variable is monitored by Alarm Logging for changes. If
the variable’s value is not otherwise being read by thePCS7, Alarm Logging will default
to scanning it at a one second rate. This is standard PCS7 behavior.
This procedure is applicable only for Action Request TRIGGER variables named
“tagname.EventRaw#1” that are defined in the SIMATIC 505 CP1434TF RBE channel.
This procedure defines the steps that will cause the TRIGGER variable to have the
channel “Report by Exception” (RBE) processing. This processing takes each RBE
change detected in the 505 PLC and places it in the PCS7 DataManager. This will result
in Alarm Logging receiving each change for the TRIGGER tag and thereby the Action
Request is triggered.
When the TRIGGER variable is processed as RBE, each change in the trigger value
detected by the 505 PLC is placed in the PCS7 DataManager.
For the PCS7 505 OS, the only variables that can be given RBE processing are the
variables named “tagname.EventRaw#1”. The variable must be configured in DBA as an
alarm in order for it to have RBE processing.
Simply configuring the TRIGGER variable as an alarm in DBA is sufficient to have a
“Fast” Action Request that triggers on any change detected in the TRIGGER value.
When the TRIGGER is a sampled value being read at the Alarm Logging default one
second rate, then fast changes in the trigger such as a momentary change from ON to
OFF and back to ON will most likely result in the OFF change being missed. However, if
the TRIGGER variable is processed as RBE, each value change will be placed in the
PCS7 DataManager.
Action Request Needs RBE, but TRIGGER ALARM Not Desired
It might be the case that the Action Request must have RBE processing, but the alarm
message for the TRIGGER variable is not desired.
A separate zip file named OS505_ORIGINAL.zip holds a complete PCS7 project, and its
corresponding DBA file and the 505 INSTALL.TAG file. The project was built using the
English language settings in Windows and in PCS7.
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The OS505_ORIGINAL project holds the configuration for a single Action Request that
also has its TRIGGER variable defined as an alarm. The project illustrates how to assign
the alarm to a PCS7 Area that is “ignored” and not made visible to any operator. This
“hiding” procedure involves configuration steps in DBA, in PCS7 “User Administration”
and also in PCS7 “OS Project Editor”.
The project can be unzipped to view the configuration directly. The configuration
procedure is now detailed with screen captures. The project is configured for the users
Administrator and OPERATOR1. The password for both is “aaaaaa”, six lowercase letter
“a”.
First, in DBA define a top level folder named IGNORE_ALARMS. This folder name
will correspond to a PCS7 Area. The screen shot shows that an Action Request has
already been configured for the ACTION_REQUESTS folder and the Action Request
TRIGGER variable named DO_0 has been placed in the IGNORE_ALARMS folder.
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The Action Request configuration:
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The DO_0 has been configured as an alarm in DBA.
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After a DBA compile, open the PCS7 “OS PROJECT EDITOR” utility and make the
setting to have the Area named “IGNORE_ALARMS” to be ignored.
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Now all that remains is to use the PCS7 “User Administrator” utility to make the settings
for each user to have no access to the Area named “IGNORE_ALARMS”.
With this configuration, the alarm for DO_0 will still occur, but the alarm message will
no appear for any user. This configuration gives the desired behavior for an Action
Request requiring RBE (so that no TRIGGER changes are missed). This configuration
also gives the proper monitoring and control behavior for the TRIGGER where its alarm
message is not desired. With this configuration the TRIGGER alarm message does not
appear, acknowledgement of the TRIGGER alarm is not necessary, the PCS7 Area button
for “IGNORE_ALARMS” does not appear, and the EventState alarm indications do not
appear. This behavior is made possible by first assigning the DO_0 tag to the
IGNORE_ALARMS folder in DBA and then performing the subsequent configuration in
the PCS7 “OS Proejct Editor” and the PCS7 “User Administrator”.
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Appendix D – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire
Introduction
This questionnaire is meant to help those who want to evaluate an OSx/PCS or Tistar
system for migration to PCS 7/505 OS. Migration means that the customer replaces his
OSx/PCS or Tistar system with a PCS 7/505 OS system communicating with the same
PLCs. The supervisory logic and strategy used in the OSx/PCS or Tistar system is
replicated (as much as possible) on the PCS 7/505 OS system. That will involve moving
some data and configurations from the old system to the new system.
Because PCS 7/505 and OSx/PCS/Tistar do not have the same exact architecture and
features, you must evaluate the OSx/PCS/Tistar system so that a decision can be made on
whether a conversion project is worth the effort and what level of effort is involved. The
alternative is to replace the OSx/PCS/Tistar system with a new PCS 7 system whose
configurations and graphics have been created from scratch.
Customers have much invested in the existing hardware and in the intellectual property
(IP) that is represented by their control strategy. They are eager to preserve as much of it
as possible. However, all systems eventually reach their end of life and for computerized
systems, this could be much sooner than the end of life of the process being controlled.
This questionnaire can help make the decision of how much hardware and IP can be
preserved during the conversion.
A companion software tool exists that can be run on the system to be evaluated. It will
help obtain that data that is difficult, tedious, or time consuming to obtain manually.
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire
Section 1 – System Architecture
1. OSx/PCS/Tistar Version
You can get this information by logging into Linux or Unix as user tistar and running
the following command:
cat /usr/tistar/bin/deu.ver
PAS R&D should be contacted for further help if the system version is other than
4.1.2A, 4.1.1, 4.1.0A, 4.0.0B, 3.1.2A, 3.1.0B, 3.0.2E, 2.0.1, 2.0.0P1, 1.3.3.
What version of OSx/PCS/Tistar is involved?
Comments:
2. Architecture Block Diagram
Provide a block diagram of the system architecture that best represents the system
you are evaluating.
a) From the attached OSx/PCS/Tistar System Architecture Drawing Templates,
select the most appropriate system design. “X” out any non-applicable items, and
include clarification comments as required. Or,
b) Complete and attach a block diagram of the system architecture for this system in
Visio. Or,
c) Attach a copy of the customer’s system architecture drawing with this area and/or
system specific components identified.
2. Computer Hardware
Most OSx/PCS/Tistar hardware cannot be reused for PCS 7/505 OS. New PCs must
be purchased.
PCS/OSx: list the customer’s current stations using one of the forms below.
Tistar: describe the system using the forms below.
a) Use the PC Requirements Tables below to determine what new PCs will be
needed to satisfy the customer requirements. Check the latest PCS 7/505 OS
readme file for any changes.
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire
b) List the new PCs that the customer will need and who will supply them using the
form below.
Comments:
3. PC Operating System Software
PCS 7 runs on MS Windows 2000.
Who will be supplying the Operating System for the new PCs?
Comments:
4. Network Hardware/Topology
Tistar: Tistar systems use the proprietary Tiway network to communicate with PLCs.
Conversion to PCS 7/505 OS requires running Industrial Ethernet and installing one
or two CP1434TF modules in each PLC. Decide whether to run AUI or TP cabling.
Additionally, H1 software is needed to program the CP1434TF modules. This
software may come with new CP1434TF cards or is available as a free download
from Siemens.
Are CP1434TF modules needed and how many?
Will H1 software be needed?
OSx/PCS: OSx/PCS connects to 505 series PLCs using AUI (Coaxial) cabling or TP
with a TP-to-AUI converter at each CP1434TF module in each PLC. Only systems
using 3COM 3C900 network cards can use TP cables.
PCS 7/505 OS: Servers can communicate with the PLCs using either AUI or TP
cables. Servers communicate with clients via TP cables.
Do new network cables need to be run and will these be AUI or TP?
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire
Do TP-to-AUI converters need to be purchased?
Comments:
5. Printers
Older OSx/PCS/Tistar systems may be using printers that are no longer directly
supported in MS Windows and would need additional drivers installed. These are
being used because those versions of OSx/PCS/Tistar may not support newer printers.
This may be a good time to replace these older printers with newer ones.
Does the customer need to replace the printers they use with OSx/PCS/Tistar?
Comments:
6. PLCs
PCS 7/505 was designed to add a channel to PCS 7 for TI505 controllers.
OSx/PCS/Tistar systems can also communicate with other controllers.
Tistar: These systems can communicate to older obsolete TI controllers such as
TI520, TI530, TI560, TI565, and PM550. These are not supported by PCS 7.
OSx/PCS: These systems can communicate with S5 and S7 controllers.
Communicating with S7 controllers from PCS 7/505 requires additional software be
installed.
WinCC (standalone version) has an S5 channel, but that does not support RBE.
Does the system have S7 or S5 controllers?
PCS 7/505 requires all 505 series PLCs to have the latest firmware. Older
OSx/PCS/Tistar systems can communicate with PLCs that have older firmware.
Are there PLCs that will need firmware upgrades?
List all the PLCs applicable to this system conversion in the form: PLC Table, below.
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Comments:
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire
Section 2 – Data, Functionality & Graphics Conversion Information
To be able to gauge the level of effort required, fill in the forms below. Some data may
not be directly transferable and may require custom programming such as using Global
Scripting and the User Archive.
1. Tags
OSx/PCS/Tistar type Tags must be imported into WinCC using OSx format install.tag
files. There should be one install.tag file per PLC, as the PCS 7/505 Database
Automation tool (DBA) uses the PLC of the first tag in the file for all the tags in the
file.
a) The table in Section 9 above shows the methods available for creating install.tag
files from the various versions of OSx/PCS/Tistar.
How will install.tag files be created?
b) If APT is the source of install.tag files, then APT must be new enough to create
OSx format files. Look at the APT compile screen for PCS version 3.X or 4.X.
Does the customer’s version of APT need upgrading?
c) DBA can only import networked tags from OSx/PCS/Tistar (tags that represent
data in a PLC). If the customer’s supervisory control logic uses non-networked
tags, then the tags must be recreated in WinCC manually as local tags along with
the supervisory control logic that uses them. This requires knowing how
OSx/PCS/Tags map to WinCC tags, and what features of PCS 7/505 can be used
to recreate the control logic.
Are non-networked tags used?
Comments:
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire
2. HMI Graphics Conversion
a) Tistar Customers: Tistar uses VGA line graphics that cannot be converted to
WinCC. These must be recreated by hand.
Who will recreate the graphics?
b) OSx/PCS Customers: OSx/PCS systems use SAMMI graphics. A service
provided by PAS R&D can convert the static and dynamic objects in customer
graphics to static objects in WinCC graphics. Animation of the dynamic objects
must be recreated by hand. Standard graphics such as faceplates and symbols are
recreated in WinCC by the import of install.tag files and are fully functional
Will PAS R&D be converting the customer graphics?
Who will recreate the customer graphics’ animations?
Comments:
3. Action Requests
OSx/PCS/Tistar style action requests exist in PCS 7/505 OS. They are entered via a
configuration screen similar to the one in OSx. Transferring action requests from
OSx/PCS/Tistar can be done manually or via csv files exported from OSx/PCS/Tistar
and imported into PCS 7/505 OS. PAS R&D offers a service that generates the csv
files.
Who will transfer action requests?
Comments:
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire
4. Batch
There is no PCS 7/505 feature exactly equivalent to OSx/PCS/Tistar Batch. See
Section 12 above for a way to recreate OSx/PCS/Tistar Batch on PCS 7.
Does the system use the OSx/PCS/Tistar Batch Feature?
Comments:
5. Reports and BCL Programs
OSx/PCS/Tistar reports and non-Batch OSx/PCS BCL programs can write to process
data as a result process events. A way to replicate the equivalent functionality in PCS
7/505 usingt Global Scripting may be needed.
Does the system have reports or non-Batch BCL programs that write to process data?
Comments:
6. RDT
The OSx/PCS Remote Data Transfer (RDT) feature provides a communications
channel between OSx/PCS and an external Oracle database using special customercreated RDT programs. This functionality may need to be replicated on PCS 7/505
Does the system use RDT?
Comments:
7. @aGlance
OSx/PCS can serve data to external clients using @aGlance software. An @aGlance
channel exists for PCS 7, but has not been tested with PCS 7/505 OS.
Does the system use @aGlance?
Comments:
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire
8. Trend data
Direct access to OSx/PCS/Tistar trend data from PCS 7/505 does not exist.
Converting OSx/PCS/Tistar trend data for access from within PCS 7/505 is a special
project. Using the htp (historical trend print) utility to dump OSx/PCS/Tistar trend
data to text files is an option or keeping the old system for access to old trend data is
another option.
Will the customer need access to OSx/PCS/Tistar trend data after the conversion?
Comments:
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire
Section 3 – Customizations
Use this section to describe any customizations that the OSx/PCS/Tistar system being
converted has that will affect the conversion. These could include custom software,
custom menus, etc. Be specific and indicate who did the customization. If there is any
question, PAS R&D can evaluate the system. For OSx/PCS systems, that would
require sending a backup of the system to the PAS R&D team. For Tistar systems,
travel to the customer site would be required.
PLEASE REVIEW YOUR DATA AND RESPONSES TO THESE SURVEY
QUESTIONS. THIS INFORMATION WILL BE USED AS A BASIS FOR
EVALUATING THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PCS 7/505 CONVERSION
EFFORT.
When you have completed this survey, e-mail it along with all relevant
supporting data to the engineers who will help you evaluate the system..
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire
OSx/PCS Station Table
Name
Type
(Intel PC, HP
Workstation)
Function
(Supervisor,
Operator)
#
Xterminals
licensed
RDT
(Y/N)
@aGlance
(None, 1 user, 10 user)
Special Hardware
(trackball, operator keyboard, touch screen,
etc.)
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire
OSx/PCS Station Table (continued)
Name
Type
(Intel PC, HP
Workstation)
Function
(Supervisor,
Operator)
#
Xterminals
licensed
RDT
(Y/N)
57
@aGlance
(None, 1 user, 10 user)
Special Hardware
(trackball, operator keyboard, touch screen,
etc.)
Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire
Appendix 2 – Tistar System Description Form
DEU
(Main Data
Computer)
IGTs
(HMI
terminals)
Tiway
Network
Redundant?
Y
N
(Model 70 only)
Number:___________
(Do not include onboard Model 20 IGT)
Redundant?
Y
N
Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire
PCS 7/505 OS Station Table
Name
Function
(OS Single, OS Client, OS Server, etc.)
Clock Speed
Memory
Hard Disk
Supplier
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire
PLC Table
PLC Name
PLC Model
(TI545, TI555,
TI575, S5, S7,
etc.)
PLC Version
(1102, 416,
etc.)
Programming
Tool
(APT, Tisoft,
SoftShop, ES
Tools, Other)
60
Programming
Tool Version
Number of New
CP1434TF
Modules Needed
(Tistar w/TI505
series only)
Firmware
Upgrade
Needed?
(Y/N)
Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire
Tag Type
AI
AO
AREA
CALC
CTR
DI
DI10
DO
DO10
IVAR
LOOP
MTR1
MTR2
RMTR
TEXT
TMR
VLV1
VLV2
Number of Tags
Number
Networked Non-Networked
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire
OSx/PCS/Tistar Data Count
Data
Number
Graphics
Action Requests
Areas
Recipes
Components
Recipes
Reports
Write to
process data
Total
Trend Points
RDT Programs
(OSx/PCS only)
BCL Programs
(OSx/PCS only)
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire
Off board IGT
DEU
Serial
Tiway
TI545
TI545
Tistar Model 20
Configuration 1
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire
DEU
IGT
Serial
IGT
Serial
Tiway
Tiway
TI545
TI545
Tistar Model 70
Configuration 2
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire
Primary DEU
Backup DEU
IGT
Serial
Serial
Ethernet
IGT
Serial
Tiway
Tiway
TI545
TI545
TI545
Tistar Model 70
Configuration 3
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire
Failover circuit
Primary
Backup
Supervisor
Supervisor
Operator
Ethernet
Ethernet
S5-155U
TI575
TI545
TI555
OSx/PCS
Configuration 4
66
S7-416
Operator
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Survey Questionnaire
Primary
Ethernet
Ethernet
S5-155U
TI575
TI545
TI555
OSx/PCS
Configuration 5
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Instructions
Introduction
These instructions explain how to use the System Evaluation Tool to gather data so that
Tistar/PCS/OSx systems can be evaluated for candidacy for migration to PCS 7/505 OS
and to help determine the scope of the project.
Components
•
Questionnaire: This questionnaire (in Appendix D above) is the primary component
of the tool. Filling out this document by answering the questions and entering data in
the tables, generates the necessary data needed to do a system evaluation. This
document is in Microsoft Word format so it can be modified to fit a particular
situation.
•
Software Tool: This tool is used to obtain the questionnaire data that is difficult,
tedious, or time consuming to obtain manually. This tool comes in the form of a
compressed Linux/Unix 3.5 inch floppy disk image containing source code that is
compiled on the system to be evaluated before running. That allows the tool to usable
on a wide variety of Tistar/PCS/OSx systems with different libraries, databases, and
data locations. It also allows evaluators with appropriate knowledge to modify the
tool to obtain any necessary additional data.
This component has only been tested for use on the following version systems:
° Tistar Model 20: 1.3.3 with a 3.5 inch floppy drive
° PCS: 3.0.2E, 3.1.0B, 3.1.2A, 4.0.0B
° OSx: 4.1.0A, 4.1.1, 4.1.2A
•
Instructions: This document.
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Instructions
General Procedure
The steps below explain how to use this tool when no modifications are needed.
1. Obtain the questionnaire and the software tool.
2. Read the questionnaire to become familiar with the data needed to do an evaluation
3. Transfer the software tool floppy disk image to a Linux/Unix floppy disk.
4. Install the software tool onto the system to be evaluated using the Linux/Unix floppy
disk.
5. Compile the software tool.
6. Execute the software tool.
7. Fill out the questionnaire. Some of those questions use the data generated by the
software tool.
8. Forward the completed questionnaire to those engineers who will do the evaluation.
These need to have both Tistar/PCS/OSx and PCS 7/505 OS expertise.
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Instructions
Transferring the Software Tool to a Linux/Unix Floppy
This procedure should be done on any station of a PCS/OSx system or on the onboard
IGT of a Tistar Model 20.
Perform the following steps on 1.3.3, 3.0.2E, 3.1.0B, 4.0.0B, and 4.1.0A systems.
1. Save the compressed floppy disk image to an MS Windows floppy.
2. Log into Unix as user ‘root’
3. Set the current directory to /tmp by typing:
cd /tmp
4. Insert the floppy disk into the floppy drive
5. Copy the compressed floppy disk image into the /tmp directory by typing:
doscp a:tool.Z tool.Z
6. Uncompress the image by typing:
uncompress tool.Z
7. Remove the MS Windows floppy from the floppy drive and insert a new empty DOS
formatted floppy
8. Copy the disk image to the floppy disk by typing:
dd if=tool of=/dev/fd0 bs=48k
9. Remove the uncompressed floppy image by typing:
rm tool
10.
Exit the Unix command line by typing:
exit
The result is a Unix floppy containing the software tool.
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Instructions
Perform the following steps on 4.1.1 and 4.1.2A systems.
1. Save the compressed tool floppy disk image to an MS Windows floppy.
2. Log into Linux as user ‘root’
3. Set the current directory to /tmp by typing:
cd /tmp
4. Insert the floppy disk into the floppy drive
5. Copy the compressed floppy disk image into the /tmp directory by typing:
mcopy a:tool.Z tool.Z
6. Uncompress the image by typing:
uncompress tool.Z
7. Remove the MS Windows floppy from the floppy drive and insert a new empty DOS
formatted floppy
8. Copy the disk image to the floppy disk by typing:
dd if=tool of=/dev/fd0 bs=48k
9. Remove the uncompressed floppy image by typing:
rm tool
10.
Exit the Unix command line by typing:
exit
The result is a Linux floppy containing the software tool
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Instructions
Installing, Compiling and Running the Software Tool
The following steps should be done on the Primary station of the PCS/OSx system being
evaluated or on the onboard IGT of the Tistar Model 20 being evaluated.
1. Log into Linux or Unix as user ‘tistar’.
2. Set the current directory to be /tmp by typing:
cd /tmp
3. Insert the Linux/Unix software tool floppy into the floppy drive.
4. Load the software tool source code into the /tmp directory by typing:
tar xvf /dev/fd0
5. Set the current directory to be the directory of the appropriate software tool source
code.
On 3.1.2A, 4.0.0B, 4.1.0A, 4.1.1, or 4.1.2A systems type:
cd /tmp/sys_eval/312A412A
On 3.0.2E or 3.1.0B systems type:
cd /tmp/sys_eval/302E310B
On 1.3.3 systems type:
cd /tmp/sys_eval/tistar
6. Compile the source code by typing:
compile_it
Warning C4046 can be safely ignored on Tistar systems.
7. Run the software tool by typing:
system_data > data.txt
8. View the data using the appropriate file viewer.
On 1.3.3, 3.0.2E, 3.1.0B, 3.1.2A, 4.0.0B, or 4.1.0A systems type:
pg data.txt
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Appendix E – System Evaluation Tool Instructions
On 4.1.1 or 4.1.2A systems type:
more data.txt
9. The data file, data.txt, can also be transferred to an MS Windows floppy for viewing
and printing using MS Windows tools. Insert a DOS formatted floppy into the floppy
Drive.
On 1.3.3, 3.0.2E, 3.1.0B, 3.1.2A, 4.0.0B, or 4.1.0A systems type:
doscp data.txt a:
On 4.1.1 or 4.1.2A systems type:
mcopy –a
data.txt a:
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Appendix F – References
The following references have been published for various versions of various software in
differing years and under differing part numbers. Pick the version appropriate for your
project. In most cases these references came or come with your software and systems.
APT Manual Set
APT Product Literature
Tistar Manual Set
Tistar Product Literature
PCS Manual Set
PCS Product Literature
OSx Manual Set
OSx Manuals on CD
OSx product Literature
PCS 7/505 OS Setup Guide
PCS 7/505 OS Help Files
PCS 7/505 OS Product Literature
PCS 7 Help Files
PCS 7 Product Literature
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