Miller PipeWorx 400 Troubleshooting guide

OPERATIONS MANUAL
PipeWorx MIG Gun
Manufactured for Miller Global Pipe Systems
250 Amp
Part Number: 195399
300 Amp
Part Number: 195400
400 Amp
Part Number: 300240
Safety Depends On You!
DO NOT INSTALL, OPERATE OR REPAIR
THIS EQUIPMENT WITHOUT READING
THIS OPERATING MANUAL AND THE ARC
WELDING SAFETY PRECAUTIONS ON THE
INSIDE FRONT COVER.
Bernard™ Guns are designed and built
with safety in mind, but operators must
follow prescribed safety guidelines.
Miller Electric Mfg. Co.
An Illinois Tool Works Company
1635 West Spencer Street
Appleton, WI 54914 USA
International Headquarters-USA
USA Phone: 920-735-4504 Auto-Attended
USA & Canada FAX: 920-735-4125
International FAX: 920-735-4125
European Headquarters - United Kingdom
Phone: 44 (0) 1204-593493
Fax: 44 (0) 1204-598066
MillerWelds.com
© 2014 Bernard Printed in U.S.A. DFB-OPPW-2.1
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
Some probability of
death or serious injury
Some probability of
death or serious injury
ELECTRIC SHOCK
CAN KILL
1.
Arc welding equipment uses electric energy to create molten bonded metal. Protect
yourself and others from possible electric shock/electrocution with proper training
and review of safety manuals.
2.
Equipment improperly used can cause fatalities.
2.1
Turn off any electrically powered equipment and powered support equipment when not in use. Accidental grounding or activation of equipment can
cause circuit completion, electric shock, arc flash, fires, and burns.
2.2
Electrode, gun components, and work surfaces are electrical conductors.
These surfaces are ‘live’ when system is in use.
2.2.1
2.3
3.
5.
Check for proper termination.
2.3.1
Check for proper grounding and attachments.
2.3.2
Check for proper service termination of input to National Electrical
Codes and local codes with trained and certified electricians.
2.3.3
Keep welding ground as close to workpiece as possible.
2.3.4
Inspect gun, holders, cords, clamps, terminators, and cables for
frayed wires, defects, and abrasion leading to short circuit conditions or current capacity reductions.
2.3.5
Use proper ‘sized’ guns, cables, and connections for current being
carried. Use of equipment with duty cycle less than expected can
lead to premature component degradation and short circuiting.
2.3.6
Never touch two or more electrically ‘live’ parts together including guns and holders. This compounds open circuit voltage and
provides feedback circuits with potential of electrical shock.
2.3.7
Isolate components in automated equipment if possible. Place warning
labels on electrically ‘live’ parts where isolation is not possible.
Wear proper safety equipment and clothing.
3.1
4.
Typically ‘stick’ equipment is ‘live’ when equipment is on. Although
modern MIG welding equipment disconnects power from the
electrode when not in use, the potential for accidental triggering
occurs. Treat all equipment with safety in mind.
Falls can be dangerous.
5.1
Keep work area clear as not to trip or fall into open circuits, causing shock.
5.2
When working at levels above ground, protect yourself from shock-causing
falls.
Some probability of
death or serious injury
ELECTRICITY AND
WATER DON'T MIX
1.
Never dip electrode in water for cooling.
2.
Do not stand in water or on damp floors while welding, or do not weld in the rain.
Avoid wearing wet or sweaty clothes as they provide an easier electric current path
to you.
3.
Always insulate yourself from the work and ground by wearing proper safety
equipment and clothing.
3.1
3.2
3.3
1.
Where compressed gases are to be used at the job site, special precautions
2.
Always secure cylinders in an upright position to a fixed support so that they cannot be knocked over. Valve protection caps should always be in place except when
cylinder is in use.
3.
Locate cylinders clear of areas where they may be struck and safe distance from
welding or any other source of heat, sparks, or flame.
4.
Cylinders must be handled carefully to prevent damage to their walls, valves, or
safety devices. Never lift cylinders by valves or caps.
5.
Keep your head and face away from cylinder valve outlet regulator when opening
cylinder valves.
6
All regulators, hoses, fittings, etc. should be properly maintained and in good
condition as per the manufacturer’s recommendations. Faulty equipment should be
replaced immediately.
7.
Never strike an arc on a cylinder or allow any other electrically ‘live’ parts to come
in contact with a cylinder. This can cause a violent rupture or lead to a rupture during handling.
should be used to prevent hazardous situations.
Some probability of
death or serious injury
Isolate yourself from all moist conditions with dry hole-free clothing,
gloves, and rubber-soled (nonconductive) shoes. Use a nonconductive
platform to isolate yourself from conductors, water, and dampness.
When welding in damp locations and in awkward positions, such as sitting
or lying, make certain insulating material is large enough to cover your full
area of physical contact with work and ground.
Fix water leaks prior to welding, or immediately stop should they occur,
and provide proper repair.
4.
Keep everything dry including clothing, work area, cables, electrode holder, and
power supply.
5.
Never handle ‘live’ electrical or welding equipment with bare hands while standing
in water or while hands and/or feet are wet. Dangerous electric shock can result.
FIRE
1.The welding area.
1.1
Remove all fire hazards from the weld area. If this is not possible, move
work to a hazard-free area or cover all combustibles with a fire-resistant
cover. Bear in mind that hot material and sparks from the welding process
easily go through small cracks and openings into adjacent areas.
1.2
Do not weld in areas which have a flammable atmosphere containing
explosive gases or vapors. Avoid paint booths, solvent cleaning tanks,
ventilators, and storage areas which contain grain or wood dust.
1.3
After welding, turn off all equipment or place gun in a safe location in
which no part of the electrode circuit is contacting the workpiece or
ground. Accidental engagement could create a fire hazard.
1.4
Keep all equipment clean, free of oil and grease.
1.5
Keep the appropriate fire extinguishing equipment in weld area.
1.6
A fire watcher must be present with the appropriate fire extinguishing
equipment and until the area is deemed safe after welding if the following
conditions exist:
Wear proper safety glasses or eye protection should arcing occur.
Disconnect power when making any service connections of equipment. ‘Lock Out,
Tag Out’ all circuits and feeds.
CYLINDERS MAY
EXPLODE
1.7
1.6.1
Combustibles are within the weld area.
1.6.2
Combustibles which can be ignited by sparks are near the weld
area.
1.6.3
Openings in the floors, dividers, and walls may expose combustibles to weld sparks.
1.6.4
Combustibles are adjacent to floors, dividers, or walls that could
be ignited by radiant or conductive heat.
After welding has been completed make sure the area is free of glowing
embers, sparks, and any flames.
2.Equipment.
2.1 See ‘CYLINDERS MAY EXPLODE’ section, #2 and #3.
2.2
Periodically check all shielding gas line connections for leaks. Also check
the condition of all hoses.
2.3
Keep all protective clothing free of oil and grease.
2.4
Flammable hair preparations should not be used.
2.5
When working with gas-powered equipment, these precautions should be
followed:
2.5.1
Turn off engine and allow to cool before refueling.
2.5.2
Carefully refuel equipment to prevent spillage. Wipe up all spilled
fuel and do not restart engine until fumes have been eliminated.
2.5.3
Never add fuel near an open flame, when engine is running, or
while arc welding.
2.5.4
Do not overfill fuel tank, heat may expand the fuel causing it to
overflow and ignite.
3.
Some probability of
death or serious injury
Wear suitable clothing to reduce risk of burns to exposed skin.
3.1
Wear durable, flame-resistant clothing with closed, opaque weaves. This
reduces chance of ‘sun’ burn, contact burns, and accidental ignition of
clothing that could occur.
3.1.1
FUMES & GASES
3.2
1.Illness or death can result from breathing fumes, gases, or oxygen enrichment or
depletion that welding may produce.
2.
Provide proper ventilation to avoid breathing fumes and gases produced by
welding. It may be necessary to supply fresh air to the welder with an air-supplied
respirator or other means when working in a confined space.
3.
The three major toxic gases associated with GMAW are ozone, nitrogen dioxide,
and carbon monoxide.
4.
Do not weld near degreasing or other cleaning operations involving
chlorinated hydrocarbons. Heat and arc rays can react with solvent vapors and
form phosgene, a highly toxic gas, along with other irritating products.
5.
Shielding gases can displace air. Use special care to insure that breathing air is
safe when welding in confined area. Upon entering a confined space, check the
breathing air to make sure it is safe. Check gas connections for leaks after installation and regularly thereafter.
6.
If welding causes dizziness, nausea, or respiratory irritation, ventilation is inadequate.
7.
Operate engine-powered equipment in open, well-ventilated areas or exhaust the
engine’s fumes outdoors. Never ventilate with oxygen.
8.
Read and understand the manufacturer’s instructions for this equipment and other
welding equipment. This includes the Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and
your employer’s safety practices.
4.
Do not wear wet or damp clothing.
Wear appropriate gloves, shoes, and outer protection as described to
prevent electrical shock.
Protect others from arc rays that can burn unintentionally.
4.1
Provide suitable screening to reduce exposure of others to existing welding areas.
4.2
Provide proper eye protection.
4.3
Provide suitable clothing.
Minor personal injury
or damage to equipment
1.
Improperly balanced equipment can result in personal injury and/or damage to
equipment.
2.
Check and maintain equipment daily for safe operation.
3.
Read and understand the manufacturer’s instructions for this equipment and
other welding equipment. This includes your employer’s safety practices.
For most
efficient operation
Some probability of
death or serious injury
1.
2.
HOT
Hot metal such as electrode stubs and workpieces should never be handled.
1.1
Serious burns and injury can occur from accidental contact with hot materials.
1.2
Wear protective clothing to prevent burns to exposed skin.
1.2.1 Wear insulated gloves.
1.2.2 Wear clothing that resists heat penetration and ignition.
1.3
Assume that all metal pieces in the weld area are hot.
2.
If touching, always test any metal and discarded electrodes for heat. Do not assume any material in the welding area is cool to touch.
3.
Mark welded work HOT or place small pieces in marked container.
Minor personal injury
or damage to equipment
ARC RAYS
CAN BURN
1.
The welding arc produces a bright light emitting concentrated volumes of
ultraviolet and infrared rays. These rays are harmful to unprotected eyes or skin.
Protection shall be taken to inhibit exposure.
2.
Protect eyes from arc rays.
2.1
Do not observe the arc or its reflection without eye protection including
filtered lenses.
2.1.1
2.1.2
2.2
Filters with cover plates shall be worn to reduce exposure to rays.
Cracked or broken lenses should be replaced immediate­ly, reducing risk of unfiltered light entry into eyes.
Protect face area from arc rays by using proper hooding and shields.
2.2.1 Hood shall be opaque.
2.2.2 Hood shall be replaced immediately, reducing risk of unfiltered
light entry, should cracks or holes occur.
CHECK MSDS
1.
Material Safety Data Sheets are designed to help you understand how to safely
work with chemicals and materials in your work area.
1.1
Follow data sheet instructions for proper ventilation or respiration.
1.2
Follow proper first aid treatment should accidents occur.
1.3
Keep proper fire extinguishing equipment as denoted on data sheet.
1.4
Do not exceed exposure limits.
1.5
Dispose of material properly.
2.
Read and understand data sheets regarding the hazards associated with the use
of chemicals and materials.
Keep clothing, tools, hands, fingers, or any other part of your body away from
moving parts of the machine such as v-belts, gears, and fans.
Never operate any equipment without safety guards.
Minor personal injury
or damage to equipment
1.
PINCH POINTS
BALANCE EQUIPMEN T
SAFETY REFERENCES
AWS Z49.1
(ANSI) “Safety in Welding and Cutting”
AWS C5.6
“Recommended Safe Practices for Gas-Metal Arc Welding”
AWS F4.1
“Recommended Safe Practices for the Preparation for Welding
and Cutting of Containers and Piping”
AWS C5.1
“Recommended Practices for Plasma Arc Welding”
AWS C5.3
“Recommended Practices for Air Carbon Arc Gouging and Cutting”
Available from the American Welding Society, P.O. Box
351040, Miami, Florida 33135
ANSI Z41
“Standard for Personal Protection - Protective Footwear”
ANSI Z49.1
“Safety in Welding and Cutting”
ANSI Z87.1
“Practice for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection”
ANSI Z88 .2
“Standard Practice for Respiratory Protection”
Available from the American National Standards Institute,
11 W. 42nd St., New York, NY 10036
Code of Federal Regulations (OSHA)
Section 29, Parts 1900-1910.999 and 1910.1000
Available from the U.S. Government Printing Office,
Washington, DC 20402
CSA W117.2
“Safety in Welding, Cutting, and Allied Processes”
Available from the Canadian Standards Association, 178
Rexdale Blvd., Rexdale, Ontario, Canada M9W 1R3
CGA Pub. P-1
“Safe Handling of Compressed Gas in Containers”
Available from the Compressed Gas Association, 1725
Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington. VA 22202-4100
NFPA51B
“Fire Prevention in Cutting and Welding Processes”
NPFA70
“National Electrical Code”
Available from the National Fire Protection Association,
Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02269
page 1
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS CONTINUED...
EMF Information
Considerations About Welding And The Effects Of Low Frequency
Electric And Magnetic Fields
Welding Current, as it flows through welding cables, will cause
electronic magnetic fields. There has been and still is some concern
about such fields. However, after examining more than 500 studies
spanning 17 years of research, a special blue ribbon committee of
the National Research Council concluded that: “The body of evidence,
in the committee’s judgment, has not demonstrated that exposure
to power frequency electric and magnetic fields is a human-health
hazard.” However, studies are still going forth and evidence continues
to be examined. Until the final conclusions of the research are
reached, you may wish to minimize your exposure to electromagnetic
fields when welding or cutting.
To reduce magnetic fields in the workplace, use the following
procedures:
1.
Keep cables close together by twisting or taping them.
2.
Arrange cables to on side and away from the operator.
3.
Do not coil or drape cables around your body.
4.
Keep welding power source and cables as far away from operator
as practical.
5.
Connect work clamp to workpiece as close to the weld as
possible.
About Pacemakers:
Pacemaker wearers consult your doctor first. If cleared by your
doctor, them following the above procedures is recommended.
California Proposition 65
Warning
Welding or cutting equipment produces fumes or gases which contain
chemicals known to the State of California to cause birth defects and
in some cases, cancer. (California Health and Safety Code Section
25249.5 et seq.) This product contains chemicals, including lead,
known to the state of California to cause cancer, and birth defects or
other reproductive harm. Wash hands after use.
Introduction
Commercial Warranty
Thank you for choosing Bernard. The product you have purchased has
been carefully assembled and factory tested prior to shipment. Should
you experience problems with installation or performance, please refer
to the “Troubleshooting Guide” in this manual.
Product is warranted to be free from defects in material and
workmanship for 1 year after the sale by an authorized Buyer. Rear
strain reliefs are covered by a lifetime warranty.
Before installing, compare the equipment received against the invoice
to verify that the shipment is complete and undamaged. It is the
responsibility of the purchaser to file all claims of damage or loss that
may have occurred during transit with the carrier.
The manual contains general information on the operation of this
Bernard product. Before installing or operating any equipment, read
and understand the information and safety precautions presented
in this manual. Also, note the various data plates, labels, and tags
attached to the product.
While every precaution has been taken to assure the accuracy of this
manual, Bernard assumes no responsibility for errors or omissions.
Bernard assumes no liability for damages resulting from the use of
the information contained herein. Bernard shall have no liability to
the buyer for consequential damages or be liable to the in tort for
any negligent manufacture of the goods or for the omissions of any
warning therefrom.
Bernard reserves the right to repair, replace or refund the purchase
price of non-conforming product. Product found not defective will be
returned to the Buyer after notification by Customer Service.
Bernard makes no other warranty of any kind, expressed or implied,
including, but not limited to the warranties of merchantability or fitness
for any purpose. Bernard shall not be liable under any circumstances
to Buyer, or to any person who shall purchase from Buyer, for
damages of any kind. Including, but not limited to any, direct, indirect
incidental or consequential damages or loss of production or loss of
profits resulting from any cause whatsoever, including, but not limited
to, any delay, act, error or omission of Bernard.
Genuine Bernard parts must be used for safety and performance
reasons or the warranty becomes invalid. Warranty shall not apply
if accident, abuse, or misuse damages a product, or if a product is
modified in any way except by authorized Bernard personnel.
Part I General Description
The Bernard PipeWorx MIG Gun is designed primarily for processing mild steel electrode under GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding), MIG
(Metal Inert Gas), MAG (Metal Active Gas), FCAW (Flux Cored Arc
Welding), and MOG (Metal without Gas).
The PipeWorx MIG Gun provides rapid neck interchangeability, typically during production processes. Neck may also be positioned on
line within a 360 degree rotation. This position allows for movements
between standard horizontal welding, overhead, and hard-to-reach
side angles. The neck includes an optional jump liner system that
effectively reduces costs associated with one-piece liner systems.
Bernard is concerned about your higher productivity.
The PipeWorx MIG Gun meets or exceeds NEMA (National Electrical
Manufacturer’s Association) EW3 requirements for guns used in a
wide variety of applications including aluminum, silicone bronze, and
hard facing alloys to name a few. With Bernard’s flexibility, many applications can be accommodated with field installed options increasing
performance and maneuverability.
page 2
Part II Installation
1. Your gun has been shipped with a specific feeder connector,
neck, and sized for electrode as per the part number indicated on its package. Please inspect the received gun against
this part number for accuracy.
2. Turn off power prior to any installation.
8. Safely feed electrode through the gun and approximately 1”
(25 mm) beyond head/gas diffuser.
9. Reinstall the contact tip over the electrode and lock into
position by reinstalling the nozzle.
3. Fully extend gun and cable. Press liner fully into power pin.
Welding current and duty cycle
shall not exceed published
specification of this product. If such
conditions exist, product life and
performance will be reduced.
4. Safely expose approximately 2” (51 mm) of electrode
beyond feeder or adaptor block.
5. Power Pin
Connect the power pin of the direct plug gun by sliding
the electrode into the liner and the power fitting into the
drive housing of the feeder. Fully seat the unit in position
and tighten into place as designated in the manufacturer’s
instructions. On initial installations, a thin film of silicone
lubricant will aid installation and prevent o-ring damage.
Attach control lead wires to the appropriate plug, terminals,
or lead kit. Plug or wire into the control circuit of the feeder
as designated in manufacturer’s instructions.
If a gas hose is provided, connect to the feeder’s solenoid
circuit to deliver shielding gas to the arc. If no gas hose is
provided, gas is delivered through the power pin. Refer to
the manufacturer’s instructions for proper gas connection at
the feeder block or solenoid.
6. Remove nozzle from head assembly.
7. Pull contact tip from head/gas diffuser. An unobstructed
electrode path has now been established.
Part III Helpful Operating Tips
Nozzles:
1. If anti-spatter is used, do not coat nozzle insulator as this
may degrade insulating material.
2. Nozzle should be cleaned as often as possible. Spatter
buildup can often lead to poor gas shielding or short circuiting between the contact tip and the nozzle.
3. Spatter should be removed with the proper tools designed
for spatter removal.
4. In high temperature welding applications, heavy duty consumables are recommended.
Contact Tips, Gas Diffusers:
1. Contact tips may be removed and rotated in gas diffuser,
providing an additional wear surface and extending the
service life of the product.
2. Inspect nozzle for spatter adhesion, blocked gas ports, and
carburized contact surfaces. Clean as often as possible.
3. If anti-spatter is used, periodically check gas ports for blockage.
4. When using dual shield electrode, periodically check gas
ports in gas diffuser for clogging caused by flux from within
the electrode.
Cable:
1. Periodically check torques of neck and end fittings. Loose
fittings can cause overheating and premature failure of the
gun.
2. Sharp bends and loops in the cable should be avoided. Often
the best solution is to suspend the wire feeder from a boom
or trolley, thus eliminating a large number of bends and
keeping the cable clear of hot weldments.
3. Do not immerse liner into solvents for cleaning; the liner
may be periodically blown out with compressed air.
4. Avoid rough surfaces and sharp edges that can cause tears
and nicks in cable jacket which can cause premature failure.
5. Periodically check all cables and ground connections.
6. Use anti-seize on all threaded connections.
page 3
Part III Helpful Operating Tips (cont.)
Feeder:
End User Stocking Recommendations:
1. Check drive rolls for wear; be sure drive rolls and guide
tubes are clean and free of debris. Do not overtighten drive
rolls; set as per manufacturer’s specifications.
2. Use clean, non-corroded electrode.
3. When installing or replacing electrode, you may: remove
burrs from end of electrode, remove head/gas diffuser and
contact tip, and/or straighten the first few inches of electrode.
Nozzles....................................... 5 for every 1 gun in service
Contact Tips............................... 30 for every 1 gun in service
Gas Diffusers............................. 4 for every 1 gun in service
Triggers...................................... 1 for every 10 guns in service
Necks......................................... 1 for every 20 guns in service
Handle Kits................................. 1 for every 20 guns in service
Replacement Cables................... 1 for every 20 guns in service
Strain Relief Kits........................ 1 for every 20 guns in service
Adaptor Kits............................... Order as Necessary
Power Pin Kits........................... Order as Necessary
These stocking recommendations are only initial guidelines based on
an 80 hour work period. You should work closely with your distributor
to tailor a stocking program that suits your specific needs. Results will
vary.
Part IV Maintenance and Repair
See pages 6 and 7 for parts lists
B. Service
Disconnect gun from equipment, allow to cool, and remove
electrode from liner before servicing.
FIGURE #1
Contact Tip
Nozzle
Gas Diffuser
Section 1. Nozzle
A. Removal
Threaded fit nozzle can be removed by turning in a counterclockwise direction.
B. Service
Inspect nozzle for cracks and degradation of insulation.
Clean the nozzle as often as possible to prevent spatter
build-up which can lead to poor gas shielding or short circuiting. Replace the nozzle when loose, worn, or producing
erratic gas shield.
C. Installation
Replace threaded fit nozzle by threading in a clockwise direction. Nozzle body is used to secure contact tip.
Section 2. Contact Tip
Bernard has designed Centerfire™ Contact Tips to allow rapid installation and adjustment.
A. Removal
Cut electrode and remove all burrs. Remove threaded fit
nozzle by turning in a counterclockwise direction. Pull the
Centerfire Contact Tip from gas diffuser.
To extend contact tip life, reface front of contact tip and
clean the bore. Contact tips may be rotated in gas diffuser/
head socket providing additional wear surface and extending
the service life of the product.
C. Installation
Replacement is accomplished by cutting electrode and
removing all burrs. Slide contact tip over electrode into gas
diffuser and replace threaded fit nozzle by threading in a
clockwise direction. Nozzle body is used to secure contact
tip.
Section 3. Gas Diffuser
A. Removal
The head may be removed with an appropriate wrench in a
counterclockwise rotation.
B. Service
Inspect head for spatter, blocked gas ports, and carburized
surfaces. Clean as often as possible. Replace with new gas
diffuser when wear prevents engagement of contact tip or
nozzle.
C. Installation
Firmly secure gas diffuser with an appropriate wrench in a
clockwise rotation, torque to 144 in-lbs. Be sure insulator
cap is in place as shown in figure #1.
Section 4. Neck
A. Removal
Grasp lock nut and rotate counterclockwise, rotation will free
neck from end fitting.
B. Installation
Before installing, inspect neck and end fitting for debris,
clean if necessary. Install neck in reverse order, torque to 38
in-lbs. NOTE: Refer to Jump Liner literature for liner cut off
sizes (if used).
page 4
Part IV Maintenance and Repair (cont.)
Section 5. Jump liner (Optional)
Section 7. Cable
A. Removal
A. Inspection
Remove nozzle, gas diffuser and neck. Remove used jump
liner from the back end of neck.
Replace the cable assembly if the following conditions are
evident on the exterior of the cable: cuts and/or abrasions in
cable jacketing exposing copper stranding, abrupt kinking
of cable causing abnormal heating in area of bend, loss of
control circuit function as verified through continuity tests,
slippage of insulating jacket exposing copper stranding, or
crushed cable.
B. Service
Inspect for excessive wear and debris on the inside diameter.
Do not dip jump liner in solvents for cleaning. Jump liners
may be periodically blown out with shop air. Replace with
new jump liner when excessive wear or debris produces
poor electrode feed.
B. Replacement
Using a replacement cable, install the terminated cable end
to the adapter block. It will be necessary to install or confirm
that the flexible strain relief and cap is in place before preparation (See Figure 3).
C. Installation
Insert jump liner making sure the liner stop is fully seated at
the back of the neck. Take the tapered end of the neck and
insert into end fitting of the gun handle. Install the neck. Trim
and deburr the liner past the nozzle end of the neck.
FIGURE #3
Cable
Install gas diffuser and nozzle.
Cap
Section 6. Handle
Upper Handle
Spring
Left Half
Handle
Screws
Lower Handle/
Switch Assembly
Handle Screws
(250A)
Strain Relief
(300A & 400A)
FIGURE #2
Post Fasteners
Primary Trigger Leads
& Spare Leads
Screw
Adapter Block
Strain Relief
(250A)
Right Half
Post Fasteners
Liner
Liner Lock
(300A & 400A)
A. Removal
Remove screws, post fasteners. Separate and remove handle
halves.
B. Service
Inspect for cracks, deformation of hex areas, debris, holes,
loose or missing threaded inserts, excessive wear, exterior
heat deformation, and warpage. If any of the above conditions exist, replace with new handle or clean all surfaces
with mild detergent and reinstall. Test switch for continuity.
Clean any debris from trigger, if necessary, replace with new
trigger handle assembly.
C. Installation
Position cable in handle half. Pressing lead wire terminal
fully into terminals of switch. Position remaining handle half
so leads are not pinched and movement of the trigger is not
impaired. Post fasteners, and screws; torque to 10 in-lbs
(1.1 Nm)
Direct Plug
Torque the end fitting into the adapter block to 17 ft-lbs (23
Nm). Strip the appropriate control leads 1/4” (6.4 mm) and
crimp to appropriate butt connections of trigger leads. Finalize installation.
C. Repair
There is no authorized repair of welding cable due to product
liability. Control leads may be repaired by splicing high
temperature 18 AWG lead wire with nylon coated butt connectors, or spare leads can be used.
Section 8. Liners
A. Removal
Remove nozzle and gas diffuser
Guns with jump liner: Remove neck. Lay cable straight.
Grasp liner lock which protrudes from power pin (some
direct plugs may require removal of additional components
to access the liner lock) and remove from cable assembly.
B. Service
Inspect for excessive wear and debris on the inside diameter.
Do not dip liner in solvents for cleaning. Liner may be
periodically blown out with shop air. Replace with new liner
when excessive wear or debris produces poor electrode
feed.
page 5
Part IV Maintenance and Repair (cont.)
C. Installation
Miller Power Pins
Insert liner into power pin with cable laying straight. Continue until liner lock is fully seated into power pin. A twisting
motion may be necessary to seat o-ring (some direct plugs
may require installation of additional components to secure
liner).
A. Removal
Remove the power pin tip that retains the liner from the
power pin with the appropriate wrench. Remove liner and
rigid strain relief from gun assembly. Position control lead
wires as necessary as not to damage them. Remove power
pin from adapter block using appropriate wrenches in a
counterclockwise rotation (See Figure 3).
Making sure cable is straight, trim and deburr liner beyond
end of neck to 9/16” (14.3 mm)
When using Jump Liner: Trim and deburr liner with 1/4”
(6.4 mm) extending beyond the gun handle. Install neck.
Install gas diffuser and nozzle.
FIGURE #3
Section 9. Rigid Strain Relief
Cable
A. Removal
Using a counterclockwise motion, unseat cap and sleeve
assembly from rigid strain relief. Remove screw securing
strain relief to adapter block.
B. Service
Inspect all components for cracks, debris, excessive wear
and breakage. Replace with new components if safety or
performance of product is compromised.
Cap
Spring
Strain Relief
(300A & 400A)
Primary Trigger Leads
& Spare Leads
Screw
Adapter Block
Strain Relief
(250A)
C. Installation
Align flats in rigid strain relief with flats on adapter block.
Slide strain relief onto adapter block and install screw.
Torque screw to 12 in-lbs (1.4 Nm). Using the arrows on
the cap to align with mating grooves, slide the cap and
sleeve assembly toward the rigid strain relief until seated,
and turn clockwise until engaging snap is felt.
Power Pin
Liner
Liner Lock
B. Service
Test lead wires for continuity when trigger is engaged. Lubricate o-rings with silicone lubricant. Inspect all components
for cracks, debris, excessive wear, and breakage. Replace
with new components if safety or performance of product is
compromised.
C. Installation
Assemble power pin onto adapter block in a clockwise rotation using appropriate wrenches. Torque to 13 ft-lbs (17.6
Nm)
Install liner. Install power pin tip and tighten to retain liner
assembly (See Figure 3).
page 6
Part V 250 Amp Gun Exploded Diagram and Parts List
Gun Part Number: 195399
1
DE
MA
ITEM
1
2
3
4
5
6
T
U.S
NS
IN
.A.
3
5
2
6
4
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
25
7
24
8
9
15
11
14
10
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
22
AMP
14
12
20
13
21
19
16
23
17
18
PART
NUMBER
NST-3800B
TT-035
DS-1
4323R
1840057-2
QT2-60
DESCRIPTION
Nozzle
Contact Tip
Diffuser
Cap
Q-Nut Insulator, Front
Neck (Includes neck and items
#5, 7, 8)
1840057-1 Q-Neck Cover
1840031 Q-Neck Insulator, Rear
QJL-3545 Jump Liner
4207
Nut
4209
Screw
1780062 Handle Half, Upper
2620054 Lower Handle Half & Switch
Assy.
1880194 Handle Kit (Includes items #10,
#11, #12, #13)
2660001 Terminal
4932
Butt Connector
2520048 Spring
2520007 Strain Relief
2520047M Strain Relief Set with plug
2280056 Screw
1620003 Screw Cover
2200101 Power Pin Assy.
1010027 Adaptor Block
L3B-15
Liner
2200135 Power Pin Tip
page 7
Part V 300 Amp Gun Exploded Diagram and Parts List
Gun Part Number: 195400
1
ITEM
1
2
3
4
5
6
3
5
27
2
6
4
7
8
9
10
26
7
8
10
9
25
10
11
24
21
AMP
23
22
12
20
17
13
14
15
16
19
19
18
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
PART
NUMBER
NS-5818C
T-045
DS-1
4323R
1840057-2
QT2-60
DESCRIPTION
Nozzle
Contact Tip
Diffuser
Cap
Q-Nut Insulator, Front
Neck (Includes neck and
items #5, #7, #8)
1840057-1 Q-Neck Cover
1840031 Q-Neck Insulator, Rear
QJL-3545 Jump Liner
1880219 Handle Kit (Includes handle
and items # 13, 14, 15, 16)
177488
Trigger
177271
Terminal
2280044 Screw
2030029 Nut
203296-005 Screw
177272
Nut
M169700-12 Handle Spring
2520033 Strain Relief
2520066 Strain Relief Set
4932
Butt Connector
GN2021
Electrical Connection
2280056 Screw
1620003 Screw Cover
1010027 Adaptor Block
2200101 Power Pin Assy.
L3B-15
Liner
2200135 Power Pin Tip
page 8
Part V 400 Amp Gun Exploded Diagram and Parts List
Gun Part Number: 300240
1
DE
MA
ITEM
1
2
3
4
5
6
IN
3
U.S
.A.
.035
NA
5
RD
2
D -1
25
6
4
24
7
7
8
9
10
8
9
23
10
10
11
22
19
AMP
21 20
12
18
15
17
13
17
14
16
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
PART
NUMBER
NS-5818C
T-045
D-1
4423R
1840057-2
QT2-60
DESCRIPTION
Nozzle
Contact Tip
Diffuser
Cap
Q-Nut Insulator, Front
Neck (Includes neck and
items #5, #7, #8)
1840057-1 Q-Neck Cover
1840031 Q-Neck Insulator, Rear
QJL-3545 Jump Liner
1880198 Handle Kit (Includes handle
and items #13, #14)
5662
Trigger
2660001 Terminal
4209
Screw
4207
Nut
2520042 Handle Spring
2520041 Strain Relief
2520066 Strain Relief Set
4932
Butt Connector
GN2021 Electrical Connection
2280056 Screw
1620003 Screw Cover
1010027 Adaptor Block
2200101 Power Pin Assy.
L3B-15
Liner
2200135 Power Pin Tip
page 9
Part VI Troubleshooting Guide
PROBLEM
POSSIBLE CAUSE
CORRECTIVE ACTION
1. Electrode does not feed.
1. Feeder relay.
2. Broken control lead.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Poor adaptor connection.
Worn or broken switch.
Improper drive roll size.
Drive roll tension misadjusted.
Burn back to contact tip.
Wrong size liner.
Buildup inside of liner.
1. Consult feeder manufacturer.
2 a. Test & connect spare control lead.
b. Install new cable.
3. Test & replace leads and/or contact pins.
4.Replace.
5. Replace with proper size.
6. Adjust tension at feeder.
7. See ‘Contact Tip Burn Back’.
8. Replace with correct size.
9. Replace liner, check condition of electrode.
2. Contact Tip burn back.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Improper voltage and/or wire feed speed.
Erratic wire feeding.
Improper contact tip stickout.
Improper electrode stickout.
Faulty ground.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
3. Contact Tip disengages from head.
1. Worn gas diffuser.
2. Improper contact tip installation.
3. Extreme heat or duty cycle.
Set parameters.
See ‘Erratic Wire Feeding’.
Adjust nozzle/contact tip relationship.
Adjust gun to base metal relationship.
Repair all cables & connections.
1. Replace contact tip and/or gas diffuser.
2. Install as per ‘Maintenance & Repair’ (Section
2).
3. Replace with heavy duty consumables as per
‘Accessories’ Section.
4. Short contact tip life.
1. Contact tip size.
2. Electrode eroding contact tip.
3. Exceeding duty cycle.
1. Replace with proper size.
2. Inspect and/or change drive rolls.
3. Replace with properly rated Bernard MIG Gun.
5. Erratic arc.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Worn contact tip.
Buildup inside of liner.
Wrong contact tip size.
Not enough bend in neck.
1.Replace.
2. Replace liner, check condition of electrode.
3. Replace with correct size contact tip.
4. Replace with 45º or 60º neck.
6. Erratic wire feeding.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Buildup inside of liner.
Wrong size liner.
Improper drive roll size.
Worn drive roll.
1.
2.
3.
4
5. Improper guide tube relationship.
5
6. Improper wire guide diameter.
7. Gaps at liner junctions.
6.
7
8. Feeder malfunction.
9. Contact tip.
8.
9.
Replace liner, check condition of electrode.
Replace with new liner of proper size.
Replace with proper size drive roll.
a. Replace with new drive roll.
b. Stone edge of groove on drive roll.
a. Adjust/replace guide as close to drive rolls
as possible.
b. Eliminate all gaps in electrode path.
Replace with proper guide diameter.
a. Replace with new liner trimming as per
‘Maintenance & Repair’ (Section 5 & 8).
b. Replace guide tube/liner, trim as close to
mating component as possible.
Consult feeder manufacturer.
Inspect and replace.*
page 10
Part VI Troubleshooting Guide (cont.)
PROBLEM
POSSIBLE CAUSE
CORRECTIVE ACTION
7. Extreme spatter.
1. Improper machine parameters.
2. Improper contact tip installation.
3. Improper shielding.
4. Contaminated wire or work piece.
1. Adjust parameters.
2. Adjust nozzle/contact tip relationship.
3 a. Verify shielding gas coverage.
b. Verify gas mixture.
4. Clean wire and work piece.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5
8. Porosity in weld.
Insulator worn.
Gas diffuser damaged.
Extreme heat or duty cycle.
Solenoid faulty.
No gas.
6. Flow improperly set.
7. Gas ports plugged.
8. Ruptured gas hose.
9. Control circuit loss.
10.Worn, cut or missing o-rings.
11.Loose fittings.
9. Gun running hot.
1. Exceeding duty cycle.
2. Loose or poor power connection.
10.Liner is discolored full length.
1. Short circuit to electrode.
2. Broken copper stranding in power cable.
11.Sporadic feeding of aluminum electrode.
1. Contact tip galling.
2. Synthetic liner melting.
3. Wire deformed by feed rolls.
Replace nozzle/insulator.
Replace gas diffuser.
Replace with heavy duty consumables.
Replace solenoid.
a. Install full tanks.
b. Check supply.
c. Hose leaks.
6.Adjust.
7 a. Clean or replace gas diffuser.
b. Clean nozzle.
8. Repair or replace cable or line.
9. See ‘Electrode Does Not Feed’.
10.Replace o-rings
11.Tighten gun & cable connections to specified torque. See ‘Maintenance & Repair’
(Section 7).
1. a. Replace with properly rated Bernard gun.
b. Decrease parameters to within gun rating.
2. a. Clean, tighten or replace cable grounding
connection.
b. Tighten gun & cable connections to
specified torque. See ‘Maintenance & Repair’
(Section 7).
1. Isolate electrode reel from feeder and drive
block. Consult feeder manufacturers manual.
2. Replace MIG Gun.
1. Inspect & replace.*
2. a. Replace liner.
b. Replace with composite liner.
c. Replace with Q-Gun neck
and jump liner.
3. Adjust drive rolls as per feeder manufacturer’s
manual.
*In some cases with aluminum and mild steels, it may be necessary to use a contact tip with either a larger or smaller bore size.
Notes
© 2014 Bernard Printed in U.S.A. DFB-OPPW-2.1