Sharp VC-488NS User`s manual

USER'S MANUAL
Ethernet over SDH
MUXpro 820/8216
Headquarters:
No. 25, Alley 15, Lane 120,
Sec. 1. Nei-Hu Rd,
Taipei 114, Taiwan
TEL: 886-2-26583000
FAX: 886-2-26583232
Beijing Branch:
3F, A Building,
113 Zhi Chun Lu,
HaiDian District,
Beijing, China
Zip Code: 100086
TEL: 86-10-62522081~87
FAX: 86-10-62522077
Version: 1.4
Date: 2008/06/24
P/N: 07008-00098
MUXpro 820/8216 User Manual
Copyright © 2009 TAINET COMMUNICATION SYSTEM CORP.
All rights reserved
Notice
This document is protected by the international copyright law. No part of this publication may
be reproduced by any means without the expressed permission of Tainet Communication
System Corporation.
TAINET is a registered trademark, and MUXpro 820 and MUXpro 8216 are trademarks of
Tainet Communication System Corporation.
Other product names mentioned in this manual are used for identification purposes only and
may be trademarks or trademarks of their respective companies.
The information provided from Tainet Communication System Corporation is believed to be
accurate. Any changes and enhancements to the product and to the information thereof will
be documented and issued as a new release to this manual.
Trademark
All products and services mentioned herein are the trademarks, service marks, registered
trademarks or registered service marks of their respective owners.
i
MUXpro 820/8216 User Manual
About This Manual
This section guides users on how to use the manual effectively. The manual contains
information needed to install, configure, and operate the TAINET MUXpro Series NG-SDH.
The summary of this manual is as follows:
Chapter 1:
Overview
Introduce the main feature and modularity of MUXpro family.
Chapter 2:
Installation
Provide installation, operation instructions to ensure working properly.
Chapter 3:
Configuration
Detail the configuration and operation instructions.
Chapter 4:
Monitoring and Maintenance
Alarm message, performance monitoring and loop testing function for diagnostic.
Appendix A: Introduction
Describe all connectors with pin definition.
Appendix B: Ordering Information
Ordering information of MUXpro Product.
Appendix C: Trouble Report Form
Allow user to submit equipment-related trouble information back to Tainet.
Appendix D: Trouble Shooting
Provide brief list of trouble shooting tips.
Appendix E: Abbreviations
Provide references for user.
Appendix F: Glossary
Appendix G: Multiplexing Structure
Appendix H: STM-1 Frame Structure
Appendix I: E1 Shape and Jitter Tolerance
ii
MUXpro 820/8216 User Manual
Symbols Used in This Manual
3 types of symbols may be used throughout this manual. These symbols are used to advise
the users when a special condition arises, such as a safety or operational hazard, or to
present extra information to the users. These symbols are explained below:
Warning:
This symbol and associated text are used when death or
injury to the user may result if operating instructions are not
followed properly.
Caution:
This symbol and associated text are used when damages to
the equipment or impact to the operation may result if
operating instructions are not followed properly.
Note:
This symbol and associated text are used to provide the
users with extra information that may be helpful when
following the main instructions in this manual.
iii
MUXpro 820/8216 User Manual
LIMITED WARRANTY
TAINET’s DISTRIBUTOR shall be responsible to its customers for any and all warranties,
which it makes relating to Products, and for ensuring that replacements and other adjustments
required in connection with the said warranties are satisfactory. TAINET warrants to
DISTRIBUTOR that the Products to be delivered hereunder will be free of defects in material
and workmanship under normal use and service for a period of twenty-four (24) months
[twelve (12) months in Taiwan] following the date of shipment to DISTRIBUTOR.
If during the warranty period, any component part of the equipment becomes defective by
reason of material or workmanship, and DISTRIBUTOR notifies TAINET of such defect within
seven days after knowing of such defect, TAINET shall, for any Product that TAINET agrees is
defective, at its option, supply a replacement part, request return of equipment to its plant for
repair, or perform necessary repair at the equipment’s location. At TAINET's option,
DISTRIBUTOR shall destroy any Product that TAINET agrees is defective and shall provide
satisfactory proof of such destruction to TAINET. TAINET is not responsible for Products
damaged by misuse, neglect, accident or improper installation, or if repairs or modifications
were made by persons other than TAINET’s own authorized service personnel, unless such
repairs by others were made with the written consent of TAINET.
THE ABOVE WARRANTY IS IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER WARRANTIES, EXPRESSED OR
IMPLIED. THERE ARE NO WARRANTIES THAT EXTEND BEYOND THE FACE HEREOF,
INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS
FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, AND IN NO EVENT SHALL TAINET BE LIABLE FOR
CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES. If DISTRIBUTOR extends to its customers any additional
warranty with respect to Products that is broader in scope than the warranty provided by
TAINET, DISTRIBUTOR shall be solely responsible for any and all liabilities, obligations and
damages resulting from the extension of such warranty.
TAINET shall not be liable to any person for any special or indirect damages, including, but not
limited to, lost profits, from any cause whatsoever arising from or in any way connected with
the manufacture, sale, handling, repair, maintenance or use of the Products, and in no event
shall TAINET’s liability exceed the purchase price of the Products.
Software Products are provided “as is” and without warranty of any kind. TAINET disclaims all
warranties including the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular
purpose. TAINET shall not be liable for any loss of use, interruption of business or indirect,
special, incidental or consequential damages of any kind. TAINET shall do its best to provide
end users with Software updates during the warranty period under this Agreement.
iv
MUXpro 820/8216 User Manual
TAINET has not been notified of any intellectual property rights or others which may be
infringed by the Products or the promotion, marketing, sale (or resale), or servicing thereof in
the Territory, but TAINET makes NO WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, WITH RESPECT
THERETO.
v
MUXpro 820/8216 User Manual
CONTENTS
CHAPTER 1. OVERVIEW ............................................................................................................... 1 1.1 PRODUCT OVERVIEW ................................................................................................................. 1 1.2 MAIN FEATURES ........................................................................................................................ 6 1.2.1 Network Interfaces ........................................................................................................... 6 1.2.2 LAN Ports ......................................................................................................................... 6 1.2.3 Handling the Ethernet Traffic........................................................................................... 7 1.2.4 E1 Ports ............................................................................................................................ 7 1.2.5 Management Support ....................................................................................................... 8 1.3 TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION ....................................................................................................... 9 1.3.1 Electrical Characteristics ................................................................................................ 9 1.3.2 Timing Control ............................................................................................................... 10 1.3.3 Operation Environment .................................................................................................. 10 1.3.4 Power Requirement ........................................................................................................ 10 1.3.5 Power Consumption ....................................................................................................... 11 1.3.6 Electromagnetic Specification ........................................................................................ 11 1.4 TYPICAL APPLICATIONS ........................................................................................................... 11 1.4.1 Applications for MUXpro ............................................................................................... 11 1.4.2 Applications for MUXpro with 2 transparent LAN ports ............................................... 12 1.4.3 Applications for MUXpro with E1 interfaces ................................................................. 14 1.5 PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION .......................................................................................................... 15 1.5.1 General Description ....................................................................................................... 15 1.6 FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION ..................................................................................................... 16 1.6.1 Network Subsystem Interface ......................................................................................... 16 1.6.2 LAN Port Interfaces ....................................................................................................... 17 1.6.3 Ethernet Switch Subsystem ............................................................................................. 18 1.6.4 Ethernet Mapper Subsystem ........................................................................................... 24 1.6.5 E1 Interface Subsystem .................................................................................................. 28 1.6.6 Mappers for E1 Subsystem ............................................................................................. 29 1.6.7 Timing Subsystem ........................................................................................................... 30 1.6.8 Management Subsystem ................................................................................................. 31 1.6.9 Power Supply Subsystem ................................................................................................ 32 1.6.10 Supervision, Diagnostics and Performance Monitoring ................................................ 32 1.7 TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION ..................................................................................................... 34 CHAPTER 2. INSTALLATION ...................................................................................................... 37 2.1 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................ 37 2.1.1 Unpacking ...................................................................................................................... 37 vi
MUXpro 820/8216 User Manual
2.1.2 2.1.3 2.1.4 2.1.5 2.1.6 Safety Precautions .......................................................................................................... 38 Site Selection and Requirements .................................................................................... 41 Equipment Needed.......................................................................................................... 43 MUXpro Enclosure ......................................................................................................... 43 Connections .................................................................................................................... 47 CHAPTER 3. CONFIGURATION ................................................................................................. 53 3.1 SCOPE...................................................................................................................................... 53 3.2 OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS ...................................................................................................... 53 3.2.1 Connect to Web UI via LAN Port ................................................................................... 53 3.3 FIRST LOGIN ............................................................................................................................ 55 3.4 STARTING CONFIGURATION ..................................................................................................... 55 3.5 THE BASIC CONCEPT IN CONFIGURING MUXPRO ................................................................... 56 3.5.1 System Clock .................................................................................................................. 56 3.5.2 Cross Connection ........................................................................................................... 56 3.5.3 Diagnostic ...................................................................................................................... 57 3.6 “SYSTEM” MAIN FUNCTION GROUP DESCRIPTION................................................................... 57 3.6.1 Device Info ..................................................................................................................... 58 3.6.2 General Setup ................................................................................................................. 58 3.6.3 Manager List .................................................................................................................. 59 3.6.4 SNMP Setup.................................................................................................................... 60 3.6.5 DCC Setup ...................................................................................................................... 60 3.6.6 Alarm Suppression ......................................................................................................... 61 3.6.7 User Management .......................................................................................................... 61 3.6.8 Config & SW Update ...................................................................................................... 62 3.6.9 Craft Port ....................................................................................................................... 62 3.6.10 Device Maintenances ..................................................................................................... 63 3.7 “CONFIGURATION” MAIN FUNCTION GROUP DESCRIPTION ..................................................... 63 3.7.1 Section ............................................................................................................................ 64 3.7.2 VC-4 ............................................................................................................................... 64 3.7.3 Threshold ........................................................................................................................ 65 3.7.4 E1 Interface .................................................................................................................... 65 3.7.5 LAN Port ........................................................................................................................ 66 3.7.6 VCG Group..................................................................................................................... 67 3.7.7 GFP Group ..................................................................................................................... 69 3.7.8 GFP Multiplexer ............................................................................................................ 69 3.7.9 LAPS Group ................................................................................................................... 70 3.7.10 3.7.11 3.7.12 Cross Connect ................................................................................................................ 71 Protection ....................................................................................................................... 72 Synchronization .............................................................................................................. 72 vii
MUXpro 820/8216 User Manual
3.7.13 Bridge ............................................................................................................................. 73 CHAPTER 4. MONITORING AND MAINTENANCE ............................................................... 79 4.1 SCOPE...................................................................................................................................... 79 4.2 “SYSTEM MONITOR” MAIN FUNCTION GROUP DESCRIPTION .................................................. 79 4.2.1 Trace_ID & Signal Label ............................................................................................... 79 4.2.2 VCG LCAS...................................................................................................................... 80 4.3 “FAULT MONITOR” MAIN FUNCTION GROUP DESCRIPTION ..................................................... 80 4.3.1 System Alarm .................................................................................................................. 86 4.3.2 Alarm Log ....................................................................................................................... 87 4.4 “PERFORMANCE MONITOR” MAIN FUNCTION GROUP DESCRIPTION ....................................... 88 4.5 “STATISTICS” MAIN FUNCTION GROUP DESCRIPTION .............................................................. 91 4.5.1 LAN RMON .................................................................................................................... 91 4.5.2 VCG RMON.................................................................................................................... 92 4.6 “DIAGNOSTICS” MAIN FUNCTION GROUP DESCRIPTION .......................................................... 92 4.6.1 Loopback ........................................................................................................................ 92 APPENDIX A A.1 A.2 A.3 A.4 MUXPRO 820 AND 8216 CRAFT PORT (DB-9 CONNECTOR) .................................................... 97 MUXPRO 820 AND 8216 ALARM PORT (DB-9 CONNECTOR)................................................... 97 MUXPRO 820 AND 8216 ON BOARD ETHERNET PORT (RJ-45) ................................................ 97 MUXPRO 820 AND 8216 E1 INTERFACE (SCSI II, FEMALE).................................................... 98 APPENDIX B B.1 B.2 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................ 97 ORDERING INFORMATION............................................................................ 99 MUXPRO 820 ORDER INFORMATION....................................................................................... 99 MUXPRO 8216 ORDER INFORMATION................................................................................... 100 APPENDIX C TROUBLE REPORT ......................................................................................... 103 APPENDIX D TROUBLE SHOOTING ................................................................................... 105 APPENDIX E ABBREVIATIONS............................................................................................. 107 APPENDIX F GLOSSARY .........................................................................................................111 APPENDIX G MULTIPLEXING STRUCTURE ..................................................................... 119 APPENDIX H STM-1 FRAME STRUCTURE......................................................................... 121 APPENDIX I E1 SHAPE AND JITTER TOLERANCE ............................................................ 123 viii
MUXpro 820/8216 User Manual
FIGURES
FIGURE 1-1 FIGURE 1-2 FIGURE 1-3 FIGURE 1-4 FIGURE 1-5 FIGURE 1-6 FIGURE 1-7 FIGURE 1-8 FIGURE 1-9 FIGURE 1-10 FIGURE 2-1 FIGURE 2-2 FIGURE 2-3 FIGURE 2-4 FIGURE 2-5 FIGURE 2-6 FIGURE 2-7 FIGURE 2-8 FIGURE 2-9 FIGURE 3-1 FIGURE 3-2 FIGURE 3-3 FIGURE 3-4 FIGURE 3-5 FIGURE 3-6 FIGURE 3-7 FIGURE 3-8 FIGURE 3-9 FIGURE 3-10 FIGURE 3-11 FIGURE 3-12 FIGURE 3-13 FIGURE 3-14 FIGURE 3-15 FIGURE 3-16 SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE OF MUXPRO SERIES ................................................................... 1 TYPICAL APPLICATIONS FOR MUXPRO SERIES DEVICE ................................................... 12 TYPICAL APPLICATIONS FOR MUXPRO WITH TRANSPARENT LAN PORTS ....................... 13 TYPICAL APPLICATIONS FOR MUXPRO UNIT WITH E1 INTERFACES ................................ 14 MUXPRO 820 FRONT PANEL ........................................................................................... 15 MUXPRO 820 REAR PANEL ............................................................................................. 15 MUXPRO 8216 FRONT PANEL ......................................................................................... 15 MUXPRO 8216 REAR PANEL ........................................................................................... 15 EXAMPLE OF PORT-BASED VLAN FUNCTION ................................................................. 23 SDH TIMING SUBSYSTEM (WITH E1 PORTS), FUNCTIONAL DIAGRAM .............................. 30 MUXPRO 820 FRONT PANEL ............................................................................................ 43 MUXPRO 820 REAR PANEL (AC) ..................................................................................... 43 MUXPRO 820 REAR PANEL (DC) ..................................................................................... 44 MUXPRO 8216 FRONT PANEL .......................................................................................... 45 MUXPRO 8216 REAR PANEL (AC+DC) ........................................................................... 45 BNC CONNECTORS FOR 16 PORTS UNBALANCED E1 PANEL ............................................. 50 WIRE-WRAP CONNECTORS FOR 16 PORTS BALANCED E1 PANEL....................................... 50 CONVERTER CABLE ......................................................................................................... 51 ON THE BACK OF THE UNBALANCED E1 PANEL ................................................................ 51 MUXPRO SERIES WEB INTERFACE LOGIN PAGE ............................................................. 54 MAIN MENU .................................................................................................................... 54 USER MANAGEMENT ....................................................................................................... 55 THE SUB-FUNCTIONS OF SYSTEM MAIN FUNCTION GROUP ............................................. 57 DEVICE INFO ................................................................................................................... 58 GENERAL SETUP .............................................................................................................. 59 MANAGER LIST ............................................................................................................... 59 MANAGER LIST ............................................................................................................... 60 DCC SETUP ..................................................................................................................... 60 ALARM SUPPRESSION ...................................................................................................... 61 USER MANAGEMENT ....................................................................................................... 61 CONFIG & SW UPDATE ................................................................................................... 62 CRAFT PORT SETUP ......................................................................................................... 62 DEVICE MAINTENANCE ................................................................................................... 63 THE SUB-FUNCTIONS OF CONFIGURATION MAIN FUNCTION GROUP ............................... 63 SECTION .......................................................................................................................... 64 FIGURE 3-17 VC-4 ............................................................................................................................... 64 FIGURE 3-18 THRESHOLD..................................................................................................................... 65 ix
MUXpro 820/8216 User Manual
FIGURE 3-19 FIGURE 3-20 FIGURE 3-21 FIGURE 3-22 FIGURE 3-23 FIGURE 3-24 FIGURE 3-25 FIGURE 3-26 FIGURE 3-27 FIGURE 3-28 FIGURE 3-29 FIGURE 3-30 FIGURE 3-31 FIGURE 3-32 FIGURE 3-33 FIGURE 3-34 FIGURE 3-35 FIGURE 3-36 FIGURE 4-1 FIGURE 4-2 FIGURE 4-3 FIGURE 4-4 FIGURE 4-5 FIGURE 4-6 FIGURE 4-7 FIGURE 4-8 FIGURE 4-9 FIGURE 4-10 FIGURE 4-11 FIGURE 4-12 FIGURE 4-13 FIGURE 4-14 FIGURE 4-15 FIGURE 4-16 FIGURE 4-17 FIGURE 4-18 FIGURE 4-19 E1 INTERFACE ................................................................................................................. 66 LAN PORT ...................................................................................................................... 67 VCG GROUP ................................................................................................................... 68 GFP GROUP..................................................................................................................... 69 GFP MULTIPLEXER ......................................................................................................... 70 LAPS GROUP .................................................................................................................. 70 CROSS CONNECT ............................................................................................................. 71 PROTECTION .................................................................................................................... 72 SYNCHRONIZATION ......................................................................................................... 72 BRIDGE FUNCTIONS ......................................................................................................... 73 GENERAL SETUP .............................................................................................................. 73 DSCP .............................................................................................................................. 74 MAC TABLE .................................................................................................................... 75 PORT BRIDGE CONFIG ..................................................................................................... 75 PORT BASE VLAN .......................................................................................................... 76 TAG BASE VLAN ............................................................................................................ 76 VLAN TAG PRIORITY ..................................................................................................... 77 SPANNING TREE............................................................................................................... 77 THE SUB-FUNCTIONS OF SYSTEM MONITOR MAIN FUNCTION GROUP ............................ 79 TRACE ID AND SIGNAL LABEL ........................................................................................ 79 VCG LCAS .................................................................................................................... 80 THE SUB-FUNCTIONS OF FAULT MONITOR MAIN FUNCTION GROUP ............................... 80 SYSTEM ALARM .............................................................................................................. 86 ALARM LOG .................................................................................................................... 87 THE SUB-FUNCTIONS OF PERFORMANCE MONITOR MAIN FUNCTION GROUP.................. 88 15 MINS STATISTICS CURRENT ........................................................................................ 89 15 MINS STATISTICS HISTORY ......................................................................................... 90 DAY STATISTICS CURRENT .............................................................................................. 90 DAY STATISTICS HISTORY ................................................................................................ 90 THE SUB-FUNCTIONS OF STATISTICS MAIN FUNCTION GROUP ........................................ 91 LAN RMON ................................................................................................................... 91 VCG RMON ................................................................................................................... 92 LOOPBACK ...................................................................................................................... 93 OPTICAL LOCAL LOOPBACK ............................................................................................ 94 E1 LOCAL LOOPBACK ..................................................................................................... 94 OPTICAL REMOTE LOOPBACK ......................................................................................... 95 E1 REMOTE LOOPBACK ................................................................................................... 95 x
MUXpro 820/8216 User Manual
TABLES
TABLE 1-1 TABLE 1-2 TABLE 1-3 TABLE 1-4 TABLE 2-1 TABLE 2-2 TABLE 3-1 TABLE 3-2 TABLE 3-3 TABLE 3-4 TABLE 3-5 TABLE 3-6 TABLE 3-7 TABLE 3-8 TABLE 3-9 TABLE 3-10 TABLE 3-11 TABLE 3-12 TABLE 3-13 TABLE 3-14 TABLE 3-15 TABLE 3-16 TABLE 4-1 TABLE 4-2 TABLE 4-3 TABLE 4-4 TABLE A-1 TABLE A-2 TABLE A-3 TABLE A-4 GENERAL FEATURES OF MUXPRO SERIES PRODUCT ......................................................... 5 ELECTRICAL CHARACTERISTIC OF E1................................................................................ 9 ELECTRICAL CHARACTERISTIC OF ETHERNET ................................................................. 10 GENERAL FEATURES OF MUXPRO SERIES PRODUCT ....................................................... 34 FRONT PANEL DESCRIPTION OF MUXPRO 820 ................................................................ 44 FRONT PANEL DESCRIPTION OF MUXPRO 8216 .............................................................. 46 DEFAULT ID AND PASSWORD FOR MUXPRO PRODUCT FAMILY ........................................ 53 MAIN FUNCTION GROUPS DESCRIPTION ........................................................................... 55 DESCRIPTION OF SECTION FUNCTION .............................................................................. 64 DESCRIPTION OF VC-4 FUNCTION ................................................................................... 64 DESCRIPTION OF E1 INTERFACE FUNCTION...................................................................... 66 DESCRIPTION OF LAN PORT FUNCTION ........................................................................... 67 DESCRIPTION OF VCG GROUP FUNCTION ........................................................................ 68 DESCRIPTION OF GFP GROUP FUNCTION ......................................................................... 69 DESCRIPTION OF GFP MULTIPLEXER FUNCTION .............................................................. 70 DESCRIPTION OF LAPS GROUP FUNCTION ...................................................................... 70 DESCRIPTION OF CROSS CONNECT FUNCTION ................................................................. 71 DESCRIPTION OF PROTECTION FUNCTION ........................................................................ 72 DESCRIPTION OF SYNCHRONIZATION FUNCTION .............................................................. 73 DESCRIPTION OF GENERAL SETUP FUNCTION .................................................................. 74 DESCRIPTION OF PORT BRIDGE CONFIG FUNCTION .......................................................... 75 DESCRIPTION OF SPANNING TREE FUNCTION ................................................................... 78 SDH ALARM MESSAGES ................................................................................................. 80 E1ALARM MESSAGES ..................................................................................................... 83 SYSTEM ALARM MESSAGES ............................................................................................ 85 PM MESSAGES ................................................................................................................ 89 CRAFT PORT PIN ASSIGNMENT FOR MUXPRO 820, 8216 .................................................. 97 ALARM PORT PIN ASSIGNMENT FOR MUXPRO 820, 8216 ................................................ 97 ON-BOARD ETHERNET PORT PIN ASSIGNMENT FOR MUXPRO 820, 8216 ......................... 97 E1 INTERFACE SCSI II, FEMALE PIN ASSIGNMENT FOR MUXPRO 820, 8216 ................... 98 xi
Chapter 1 Overview
Chapter 1. Overview
1.1
Product Overview
Muxpro Series device, a compact terminal, transports TDM and Ethernet traffic
over existing SDH networks. Use Ethernet interface on SDH to plot data to
multiplexer of VC-12s / VC-3s via virtual concatenation. The Muxpro Series device
allows service providers to extend their network service to customer side, reducing
leased lines between two demarcation points, two customer sites, or a customer
site to ISP. Muxpro Series device incorporates STM-1 standard main link,
accessible with 1+1 MSP/APS protection, 8 (or 16)× E1 interfaces and 6 × fast
Ethernet ports. The remote unit can be managed through IP over DCC, VC12
channel and telnet. (See Figure 1-1)
Figure 1-1
System Architecture of MUXpro Series
General Features:
„
System
1
Chapter 1 Overview
„
„
…
Using GFP (according to G.7041) or LAPS (X.85/86) encapsulation
transport Ethernet over SDH, comply with G.707
…
Link Capacity Adjustment Scheme (LCAS) following G.7042 standard.
…
Support VC-3/VC-12 cross connect mapping
…
High order payload with virtual concatenation – mapping the Ethernet
traffic over up to 1xVC-4 links
…
Low order payload with virtual concatenation – mapping the Ethernet
traffic over up to 63 x VC -12 / 3 x VC-3
…
GFP MUX, groom multiple Ethernet ports traffic into different bundles of
Virtual Containers (up to 6 bundles), according to a predefined group
…
Ethernet Line-Service (Point to Point) and Ethernet LAN-Service
(Multipoint to Multipoint)
…
System clock synchronization from primary internal clock; secondary
clock from STM-1 or tributary
…
Configurable through user friendly Web-Interface
…
Manage remote unit via dedicated VC-12 channel or DCC channel
…
Selectable DCC channels: D1~D3, D4~D12, D1~D12
Layer 2 Bridge / Switch Mode
…
Support bridge function for LAN1~LAN4
…
IGMP snooping
…
Spanning Tree Protocol (STP IEEE 802.1D) and status monitoring
…
QoS (VLAN or DSCP selection) via four priority queues, supporting IEEE
802.1P, IPv4 TOS / DiffServ
…
Provide port-based VLAN, 802.1Q VLAN tagging up to 64 VLAN IDs
…
Switch mode supports Ethernet packet length up to 1536 bytes
Transmission Mode
…
„
8 E1 links + 6 Fast Ethernet
Interfaces
…
STM-1 Interface:
2
Chapter 1 Overview
• Number of ports: 2, 1+1 MSP protection available
• Framing: SDH
• Bit Rate: 155.520Mbps
• Jitter Performance: compliant with ITU-T G.783
• Optical Wavelength: 1310nm
• Optical output power: -6dBm
• Receiver sensitivity: -34dBm
• Connectors: SC or FC/PC
…
LAN Interface:
• Number of ports: 6
• Port 1 to 4 support VLAN while Port 5 and 6 do not
• Ethernet Type: 10/100 Base T, auto sensing/auto negotiation
• Compliance Protocol: IEEE802.3u, 802.3x
• Connectors: shielded, RJ45.
…
ITU-T G.703 E1 Interface:
• Number of ports: 8 or 16
• Line Rate: 2.048Mbps
• Line Coding: HDB3
• Jitter Performance: compliant with ITU-T G.823, see Appendix I.
• Connector: SCSI II, female
„
„
Timing Source Setting:
…
Provide internal, optical 1, and optical 2, E1 Tributary clock source as
system clock
…
Recovered clock from STM-1 interface, auto switching in auto mode
…
External clock from E1 tributary (2048Kbits/sec)
Diagnostic Function:
…
Local loopback from SDH or E1 side
3
Chapter 1 Overview
„
„
„
…
Remote loopback from SDH or E1 side
…
PRBS Pattern Test for E1 ports only(error rate <1 in 1012bit)
…
Local loopback from Ethernet side
Management
…
Easy to use Web UI configuration management
…
SNMP v2 with Tainet UNMS
…
Provide 5 SNMP trap IPs and read/write/trap community settings
…
Support configuration upload/download and firmware update
Dimensions and Operating Environment
…
MUXpro 820 =>210mm (W) x 285mm (D) x 41 mm (H)
…
MUXpro 8216 => 437mm (W) x 287mm (D) x 44 mm (H)
…
Operation temperature: 00C ~ 500C
…
Storage temperature: -250C ~ 700C
…
Relative humidity: up to 95% (non-condensing)
Power Requirement
…
MUXpro 820
=>AC: 110V~240 +10V, 50~60+3Hz; DC: -36V ~ -72V
…
MUXpro 8216 =>AC: 110V~240 +10V, 50~60+3Hz: DC: -36V ~ -72V
(AC+DC / DC + DC)
4
Chapter 1 Overview
Table 1-1
General Features of MUXpro Series Product
M820
Cross- Connection
Up to 8 E1
Capacity
M8216
Up to 16 E1
Management
Interface
Craft port: VT-100 terminal
Craft port: VT-100 terminal
Ethernet:
WEB
UI/Telnet/ Ethernet: WEB UI/Telnet/ SNMP
SNMP
SNMP
Management
Built-in SNMP Agent;
Built-in SNMP Agent;
In-band management via DCC; In-band management via DCC;
Out-band management via
Out-band management via
Ethernet
Ethernet
Firmware Upgrade By TFTP
On-Board I/O
Interfaces
Number
Slots
of
I/O
By TFTP
8 ports E1 Interface;
Short haul configurable;
75/120 Ohms configurable
8 ports E1 Interface;
Short haul configurable; 75/120
Ohms configurable
N/A
1
Plug-in I/O Module N/A
1 for tributary E1
Hot
Swappable Not Supported
I/O Modules
Tributary E1
AC: 110V~240V, 50~60Hz;
DC: -36V ~ -72V;
AC: 110V~240+10V,
50~60+3Hz;
DC: -36V ~ -72V;
(AC+DC; or DC+DC)
Dimension
210mm(W) x 285mm(D) x
41mm(H)
437mm(W) x 287mm(D) x
44mm(H)
Environment
Operation temperature: 00C~
500C
Storage temperature: -250C ~
700C
Relative humidity: up to 95%
(non-condensing)
Operation temperature: 00C~
500C
Storage temperature: -250C ~
700C
Relative humidity: up to 95%
(non-condensing)
Power Supply
5
Chapter 1 Overview
1.2
Main Features
1.2.1
Network Interfaces
The MUXpro Series device is accessible with one of the following types of
networking interfaces:
„
Intra-office electrical STM-1 interface
„
Optical interfaces. A wide range of various optical interface options is
available for the MUXpro Series, supporting long-haul/short-haul applications;
Single-link MUXpro Series supports the MSP 1+1 physical layer protection
mechanism.
As part of the SDH network, the optical line transmission subsystem provides high
quality, excellent availability and good performance that can monitor the traffic
path down to the customer premises.
1.2.2
LAN Ports
All the 10/100BaseT LAN ports support auto-negotiation for plug-and-play
Ethernet connectivity. Alternatively, the user to operate at the preferred rate and
mode can configure each port separately.
The services provided by the various ports are showing as follows:
„
The Ethernet ports 1 to 4 are served by a built-in Ethernet switch with support
for QoS, in full compliance with the IEEE 802.3u, 802.3x standards. The
switch supports port-based and IEEE 802.1Q tag-based VLANs, with
configurable characteristics on a per-port basis. The switch operates in the
IEEE 802.1Q that is shared VLAN learning mode (SVL); it means that any
MAC address learned in one VLAN is also used for forwarding decision
affecting the address in the other defined VLANs (the total number of VLANs
that can be defined is 64). The device supports double tagging.
The Ethernet switch supports up to four independent WAN ports (groups),
where each WAN port can be connected to any preferred combination of
virtually concatenated groups. The algorithm that is used for frame forwarding
can be configured in accordance with the application requirements:
…
Bridge only
6
Chapter 1 Overview
…
Bridge and Spanning Tree Protocol (STP)
When the MUXpro is equipped with 6 LAN ports (4 ports with Ethernet switch and
2 transparent ports), the total number of virtually concatenated groups supported
by the MUXpro is 6.
1.2.3
Handling the Ethernet Traffic
The Ethernet traffic is encapsulated for transmission via SDH network using one of
the following link-layer protocols:
„
Generic Framing Procedure (GFP) in accordance with ITU-T Rec. G.7041,
framed mode, including support for GFP multiplexing
„
Link Access Procedure for SDH (LAPS) protocols – per ITU-T Rec. X.85/X.86
draft recommendations.
The six traffic groups from the Ethernet switch are mapped into SDH containers
using virtually concatenated groups. Mapping is flexible, and enables using any
combination of virtually concatenated groups.
Unlike the traffic from the Ethernet switch, which can be switched along with
predefined VLAN groups to various virtually concatenated VCs, the Ethernet traffic
from the two transparent ports are always connected to a fixed group (port 5 to
group 5, etc.).
The fraction of network-linked bandwidth allocated to each virtually concatenated
group can be configured. Besides, LCAS can be used on any virtually
concatenated group with more than one VC to increase or decrease the capability
in accordance with the diverse application requirements, and remove component
VCs that failed.
1.2.4
E1 Ports
The E1 ports of the MUXpro have selectable balanced or unbalanced copper
interfaces per ITU-T Rec. G.703, with support for short-haul applications. The
ports support unframed E1 streams in compliance with ITU-T Rec. G.703. Each
E1 port provides two indications: loss of signal (LOS) and AIS.
The E1 multiplex structure is VC-12, TU-12, TUG-2, TUG-3, or AU-4 where each
E1 port can be placed in any VC-12 inside the STM-1 bandwidth.
7
Chapter 1 Overview
1.2.5
Management Support
Using one of the following methods can perform setup, control and monitor the
status and diagnostics information:
„
ASCII terminal connected to the V.24/RS-232 craft port
„
Telnet host, Web browsers and SNMP-based network management stations
The following access options are supported:
…
Out-of-band access via one of the LAN ports connected to the internal
Ethernet switch (that is, Ethernet ports: 1, 2, 3 and 4)
…
In-band access either through the SDH network, through one of the VCG
ports of the internal Ethernet switch, or through the DCC carried in the
STM-1 link overhead.
The management subsystem supports TFTP for remote software upgrading
downloading, as well as cold software downloading by using an ASCII terminal
directly connected to the MUXpro Series Device. TFTP can also be used to upload
and download the MUXpro configuration database. Network administrators can
use the download facility to allocate confirmed configuration files to all the
managed MUXpro units in the network from a central office (CO).
To further expedite the process, it is also possible to upload the configuration data
stored by a MUXpro unit to the management station as a standard disk file, and
then dispense the file to other units that use the similar configuration.
MUXpro has comprehensive diagnostics capabilities including: real-time alarms
alert users to fault conditions. Alarms are reported to the management station and
simultaneously relayed via ALARM port Ethernet and SDH link monitoring.
8
Chapter 1 Overview
1.3
Technical Specification
1.3.1
Electrical Characteristics
The on board E1 interfaces for MUXpro Series refer to ITU-T G.703 (Physical /
electrical characteristics of hierarchical digital interfaces).
Table 1-2
Electrical Characteristic of E1
Bit rate
2.048 Mbps ± 50ppm
Line code
HDB3
Pulse shape
Meet G.703, see Appendix I
Peak voltage of mark
2.37V± 10%(75Ω) 3V± 10% (120Ω)
Peak voltage of space
0±0.237V(75Ω) 0±0.3V(120Ω)
Pulse width
Ratio of amplitude
244ns± 25ns
0.95 to 1.05
Ratio of width
0.95 to 1.05
Output jitter
Refer to G.823, see Appendix I
Input attenuation
Attenuation ≥6db at 1024kHz
Jitter tolerance
Refer to G.823, see Appendix I
Jitter transfer
Refer to G.823, see Appendix I
Wander
Refer to G.823, see Appendix i
Return loss
51 kHz~102 kHz ≥12dB / 102 kHz~2048 kHz ≥ 18db /
2048 kHz~3072 kHz ≥ 14dB
The on board Ethernet interface for MUXpro Series refers to IEEE-802.3 (Carrier
sense multiple access with collision detection access method and physical-layer
specification) with RJ-45 connector.
9
Chapter 1 Overview
Table 1-3
Electrical Characteristic of Ethernet
Output impedance
5~10 MHz, 85Ω ~111Ω
Return loss
5~10 MHz >15db
Impedance balance
~20Mhz < 29 - 17log(5/10)
Common mode output voltage
<50mV
Differential mode output voltage
See 802.3 14-1(pulse template)
Input impedance
5~10Mhz 85Ω~111Ω
100m
Transmission length
Ratio Isolated resistor
Leakage current
1.3.2
>2MΩ
At 1.5kv <10ma
Timing Control
There are four different methods for timing control: Internal Clock, Hold-over,
Clock Mode Switch Automatically, and STM-1 Line Clock Source.
1.3.3
Operation Environment
„
1.3.4
Temperature: Humidity:
…
Storage: -25ºC ~ 70ºC
95%
non-condensing
…
Operation: 0ºC ~ 50ºC
95%
non-condensing
Power Requirement
„
„
MUXpro 820:
…
DC: -36 ~ -72V
…
AC: 110 ~ 240+10V, 50 ~ 60+3Hz
MUXpro 8216:
…
DC: -36 ~ -72V
…
AC: 110 ~ 240+10V, 50 ~ 60+3Hz
…
AC+DC, DC+DC
10
Chapter 1 Overview
1.3.5
Power Consumption
Maximum Power Consumption of MUXpro Series for all modules fully loaded
„
MUXpro 820:
…
„
AC:26W
MUXpro 8216:
…
1.3.6
DC:15W
DC:19W
AC:27W
Electromagnetic Specification
„
EN 55022: 1998+A1: 2000+A2: 2003 Class A
1.4
Typical Applications
1.4.1
Applications for MUXpro
Figure 1-2 shows a typical application for MUXpro. In this application, MUXpro
units provide links to carry the LAN traffic among numerous sites, and enable
efficient access to IP networks (Internet or enterprise intranets). The links are
provided via the SDH network.
The advanced Ethernet switch of the MUXpro enables a variety of flexible routings
of traffic among the various sites. For example, using suitably configured
port-based VLANs enhances authoritarian security; furthermore, using tag-based
VLANs enables both segregation of user’s traffic in accordance with its source and
control over the quality of service (QoS) for each type of traffic.
11
Chapter 1 Overview
Figure 1-2
Typical Applications for MUXpro Series device
The whole network can be managed from a single location, using an SNMP-based
network management station that is connected to one of the MUXpro units. To
avoid using link payload-carrying capacity, the management traffic can be carried
within the SDH overhead, using the DCC.
Note:
The DCC can only be used when the SDH network supports
access and enables transparent connection to the DCC at
the required locations.
1.4.2
Applications for MUXpro with 2 transparent LAN ports
Figure 1-3 shows a typical application for a MUXpro unit equipped with 6 LAN
ports (4 LAN ports connected to the internal Ethernet switch and 2 additional
transparent LAN ports). The user can select the number of transparent LAN ports
that are actually used (enabled).
12
Chapter 1 Overview
Figure 1-3
Typical Applications for MUXpro with Transparent LAN Ports
Typically, each transparent LAN port can be used to serve a specific application,
or a division within a larger enterprise.
The traffic passing through each transparent LAN port is routed to a specific
virtually concatenated group (port 5 – to group 5, port 6 – to group 6, etc.). It
means that each transparent LAN port can be independently routed through the
SDH network, and each port can be allocated exclusive access to a user-selected
fraction of the link bandwidth as well.
The traffic from each LAN port is transparently transported across the SDH
network, with no processing except encapsulation (LAPS or GFP). Therefore, the
MUXpro link serves as a LAN extender; it indicates that a user-provided router or
Layer 2 switch must be used when it is essential to avoid local traffic from flowing
to the remote site through the SDH network.
13
Chapter 1 Overview
1.4.3
Applications for MUXpro with E1 interfaces
Figure 1-4 shows a typical application for a MUXpro unit equipped E1 interfaces.
MUXpro provides a well-developed solution for all the internal communication
requirements of various businesses.
Figure 1-4
Typical Applications for MUXpro Unit with E1 Interfaces
MUXpro Devices provide the broadband connectivity for both voice and LAN
services between the headquarters and the branch offices. For example:
The headquarters’ voice switch is connected to the MUXpro E1 interfaces. Its
traffic is transparently transported over the network to each branch office.
Separated trails can be defined for the connection to the PBX of each branch
office. Moreover, the branch offices can also be connected to the PSTN through
headquarters’ voice switch, irrespective of their geographical location. The total
bandwidth need is one VC-12 per E1 trunk that means most of the STM-1 link
bandwidth is free to carry LAN traffic.
Additionally, the remained bandwidth can be used to carry broadband LAN traffic,
and the management.
14
Chapter 1 Overview
1.5
Physical Description
1.5.1
General Description
Figure 1-5 and Figure 1-6 shows a general outlook of a typical MUXpro 820 Unit.
MUXpro 820 is a compact unit, intended for installation in half 19” racks, on
desktops or shelves. The unit height is 1U (1.75 in). An optional rack-mount
adapter kit enables installing two MUXpro 820 units, side by side, in a 19-inch
rack.
The MUXpro 820 front panel also includes indicators that represent its operating
status.
Figure 1-5
MUXpro 820 Front Panel
Figure 1-6
MUXpro 820 Rear Panel
Figure 1-7 and Figure 1-8 shows a general outlook of a MUXpro 8216 unit.
MUXpro 8216 is a compact unit, intended for installation in full 19” racks, on
desktops or shelves. The unit height is 1U (1.75 in).
The MUXpro 8216 front panel also includes indicators that represent its operating
status.
Figure 1-7
MUXpro 8216 Front Panel
Figure 1-8
MUXpro 8216 Rear Panel
15
Chapter 1 Overview
1.6
Functional Description
The MUXpro includes the following main subsystems:
„
„
„
1.6.1
1.6.1.1
Network interface subsystem, comprising:
…
SDH framer subsystem
…
Network link interfaces
LAN port subsystem, comprising:
…
LAN interfaces
…
Ethernet switch
…
Ethernet mapper for groups 1 to 6
E1 subsystem, comprising:
…
E1 interfaces
…
Mapper
„
Timing subsystem
„
Management subsystem
„
Power supply subsystem.
Network Subsystem Interface
SDH Framer Subsystem
The SDH framer subsystem for the network interface provides the frame
assembly/disassembly services and SDH overhead processing for the link to the
network: Furthermore, The operating mode of the mapper is determined by the
network interface installed on the MUXpro.
The Ethernet and E1 mappers determine the position of the various VCs within the
link frame.
16
Chapter 1 Overview
1.6.1.2
Optical Interfaces for Network Link
The MUXpro can be ordered with two STM-1 ports. The ports are optimally meet
customer’s requirements with a standard form. There are three necessarities
within the optical interface: optical wavelength is 1310nm, optical output power is
-6dBm and receiver sensitivity is -34dBm, MUXpro Series with two network ports
support line protection, i.e., at any time, only one port is active and the other is in
standby. The protection is implemented by means of the standard multiplex
section protection (MSP 1+1) physical-layer protection mechanism, which allows
the service to the customer to be protected against link failure. The ports may be
ordered with SC or FC/PC connectors.
1.6.2
1.6.2.1
LAN Port Interfaces
Basic LAN Port Interfaces
The MUXpro has four identical LAN ports, LAN 1, LAN 2, LAN 3 and LAN 4 with
10/100BaseT Ethernet interfaces for connection to user’s LANs. These ports are
connected to the Ethernet switch subsystem.
Each Ethernet interface supports auto-negotiation. The user can configure the
advertised data rate (10 or 100 Mbps) and operating mode (half-duplex or full
duplex).
Alternatively, auto-negotiation can be disabled and the rate and operating mode
be directly specified.
Each port is terminated in an RJ-45 connector, wired as a hub port. The interface
includes automatic polarity and crossover detection and correction. Therefore, it
can always be connected through a “straight” (point-to-point) cable to any other
type of 10/100BaseT Ethernet port (hub or station).
1.6.2.2
Transparent LAN Port Interfaces
The transparent LAN ports, LAN 5 and LAN 6, have the same type of interfaces as
the basic LAN ports. The only difference is that the transparent ports connect
directly to the encapsulation function, and are connected to fixed virtually
concatenated groups (LAN 5 to group 5, and so on up to group 6 for LAN 6).
17
Chapter 1 Overview
1.6.3
1.6.3.1
Ethernet Switch Subsystem
Ethernet Switch Description
The MUXpro includes an Ethernet switch with VLAN support that fully complies
with the IEEE 802.3/Ethernet V.2 standards, has user-selectable forwarding
algorithms, and provides extensive support for QoS features. The switch has
memory-based switch fabric with true non-blocking switching performance(for
100Mb/s speed, 64byte frame, 148800pps throughput).
The switch collects a wide range of performance monitoring parameters, which
can be read by management. The Ethernet switch has seven ports:
„
Four external ports, connecting to LAN 1 LAN interface, LAN 2 LAN interface,
LAN 3 LAN interface and LAN 4 LAN interface respectively.
„
Four VCG groups. These ports connect to the encapsulation function, part of
the Ethernet mapper subsystem, which processes the traffic for transmission
via SDH network using virtual concatenation. Each port connects to one of the
virtually concatenated groups 1 and 4.
„
Management port, connected internally to the MUXpro management
subsystem.
An independent MAC controller that performs all the functions required by the
IEEE 802.3 protocol supports each port.
The frames passed by the MAC controller are analyzed by the ingress policy
controller of the corresponding port before being transferred to an internal queue
controller, which controls the frame egress priorities and inserts them in four
separate queues. The queues are connected to the ports through the port egress
policy controllers. This approach provides full control over traffic flow, and ensures
that congestion at one port does not affect other ports.
1.6.3.2
Flow Control Options
The user can enable flow control for the switch ports. When flow control is enabled,
it is always activated only on the port (or ports) involved in congestion; on the
contrary, other ports are not affected.
Flow control is available in both the half-duplex and full-duplex modes:
18
Chapter 1 Overview
„
In the half-duplex mode, flow control uses a collision-based scheme to throttle
the connected stations when the free buffer space of the corresponding port is
too low, to avoid discarding frames during network congestion (this approach
is called back pressure). When the buffer space of a port is almost full, its
MAC controller forces a collision in the input port when an incoming frame is
sensed (the alternative, without flow control, is to discard the incoming frame).
„
In the full-duplex mode, the standard flow control method defined in IEEE
802.3x is used, which is based on pause frames and enables stopping and
restoring the transmission from the remote node. However, this method can
only be used when auto-negotiation is enabled on the port, and the node
attached to the port supports pause frames.
The Ethernet switch internal MAC controllers discard all the received IEEE 802.3x
pause frames, even when full-duplex flow control is disabled or the port is in the
half-duplex mode.
1.6.3.3
Forwarding Algorithms
The Ethernet switch operates as a MAC bridge, that automatically learns the MAC
addresses located on the local LAN, and the port through which frames addressed
to a foreign destination are to be transmitted.
The Ethernet switch LAN table can store up to 1024 MAC address/port number
mappings. Only active MAC address/port number mappings are actually stored;
after a user-defined aging interval, inactive mappings are removed from the switch
memory. However, the user can also add static entries, which are not
automatically removed.
When used in more complex networks, the forwarding algorithm can be extended
to include Spanning Tree Protocol (STP), where the user can select between the
basic STP versions. The selection is separately made for each switch port.
The user can also select the STP parameters, which are used in common by the
whole switch, to fine-tune the performance. To help locating forwarding problems,
the user can read the STP algorithm status and current parameter values.
1.6.3.4
VLAN Support
The Ethernet switch can use VLAN information to select the ports among which
traffic can be forwarded. There are two basic methods:
19
Chapter 1 Overview
„
Port-based VLANs. See description in the Support for Port-Based VLAN
section below
„
Tag-based VLAN switching per IEEE 802.1Q. This mode is used to handle
traffic in accordance with user-defined forwarding rules that are based on the
IEEE 802.1Q tags of the frames. For the external LAN ports (LAN 1, LAN 2,
LAN 3 and LAN 4), the user can also select whether to discard untagged
frames, or process them.
See description in the Support for 802.1Q Tag-Based VLAN Switching section
below. MuxPro series also support double tagging.
Note:
The user can configure, for each port, whether it will
participate in a port-based VLAN or will use 802.1Q
tag-based switching. However, a port configured to use
802.1Q tag-based switching may still be included in a
port-based VLAN, where it will serve as egress port for
other ports in the same VLAN.
The switch operates in the IEEE 802.1Q SVL mode.
1.6.3.5
QoS Support
The switch provides support for quality-of-service (QoS) features. Four traffic
classes are supported, where each class is typically assigned to a type of
prioritized frame stream.
The user can specify the QoS criteria from one the following options (or
alternatively, can disable the QoS functionality):
„
Priority determined in accordance with the VLAN ID; for identical VLAN IDs,
the priority is determined by the frame DSCP field (the Differentiated Services
Code point, specified in RFC2474).
„
Priority determined in accordance with the DSCP value, and for identical
DSCP values, by the VLAN ID.
„
Priority determined only by IEEE 802.1p VLAN tag.
„
Priority determined only by the RFC2474 DSCP value.
20
Chapter 1 Overview
For more information regarding the use of VLAN tags, see the Support for 802.1Q
Tag-Based VLAN Switching section below.
Note:
As an alternative to using the information carried by each
frame to determine the QoS during its forwarding by the
switch, the user can assign a fixed priority to any port.
Therefore, when the QoS feature is not enabled, the
egress priority of any frame received through a certain
port is determined only by the user-configured priority of
the frame ingress port. This fixed priority can be
independently selected for each port.
The switch also enables the user to configure the egress scheduling mode:
„
Strict priority mode: all top priority frames are egressed out of a port until that
priority's queue is empty, then the next lower priority queue's frames are
egressed. In other words, whenever a queue has a frame to transmit, it goes
out to the link before any frame in any lower-priority queue.
The strict priority mode guaranties minimum latency for the traffic assigned to a
queue, but can cause the lower priority queues to be starved out, because it may
prevent them from transmitting any frames, but on the other hand ensures that all
the high priority frames egress the switch as soon as possible.
„
Weighted fair queue mode: 8, 4, 2, 1 weighting is applied to the four priorities.
This approach prevents the lower priority frames from being starved out with
only a slightly increased delay to the higher priority frames.
However, only idle bandwidth is used for lower priority frames: to ensure that the
bandwidth assigned to a certain traffic class does not decrease below the
assigned value, when congestion occurs any class cannot more than the assigned
bandwidth.
1.6.3.6
Support for Port-Based VLAN
The Ethernet switch supports user-defined port-based VLANs. A port-based VLAN
is a logical group of ports defined by the user: traffic within the VLAN is forwarded
21
Chapter 1 Overview
only to the VLAN member ports. Therefore, in addition to their functional value as
tools for controlling traffic flow; port-based VLANs are an important security tool.
The Ethernet switch enables defining port-based VLANs that include any of its four
VCG Groups (which are connected to user-defined virtually concatenated groups
in the range of 1 to 4), as well as the port connecting to the MUXpro management
subsystem.
However, any VLAN can include only one external LAN port out of the four
connected to the Ethernet switch, that is, LAN 1, LAN 2, LAN 3 or LAN 4.
Therefore, traffic received through one of these ports cannot reach the other port,
although it can be forwarded through any desired group connected to the switch,
and/or to the internal management port.
See Figure 1-9, which illustrates the functionality of the two port-based VLANs that
are defined in the MUXpro factory-default configuration:
„
One port-based VLAN, designated VLAN Port 1, includes the MUXpro
external port designated LAN 1, the management port, and groups 1 and 3
„
The other port-based VLAN, designated VLAN Port 2, and includes the
MUXpro external port designated LAN 2, the management port, and groups 2
and 4.
The factory-default configurations described above must ensure that the
management subsystem can communicate through the external LAN ports LAN 1
and LAN 2, and through any of the virtually concatenated groups 1 to 4.
Note:
The factory-default configuration has been designed to
separate between even and odd groups, but this is an
arbitrary decision: an external port can connect to any, or
all of the virtually concatenated groups connected to the
Ethernet switch ports.
The maximum number of port-based VLANs that can be defined is 20. For
convenience, the user can also assign a logical name to each VLAN.
22
Chapter 1 Overview
Figure 1-9
1.6.3.7
Example of Port-Based VLAN Function
Support for 802.1Q Tag-Based VLAN Switching
VLAN tags carry additional information that can be used to identify VLAN
membership and priority. Such tags can therefore be used to differentiate among a
variety of traffic in accordance with the VLAN number (identifier – ID) and priority
(preferred QoS).
The information needed to specify the handling of frames in accordance with their
VLAN ID is given in a VLAN switching table, which contains the forwarding rules.
One rule must be defined for each VLAN ID to be processed: any frame with VLAN
Ids not appearing in the table is ignored (discarded upon ingress). The maximum
number of rules that can be defined is 64.
A forwarding rule specifies two types of information:
„
The ports that participate in the forwarding of frames with the corresponding
VLAN ID. Any rule can include a single external (LAN) port – LAN 1 or LAN 2.
Rules must also be defined to include VLANs switched only among VCG
groups, and for the management VLAN, when management VLAN tagging is
enabled.
„
The handling of frame tags. The available selections include:
…
Unmodified: the port transfers the tags of the frames forwarded to it
without any change. Therefore, untagged frames egress the port as
untagged frames, and tagged frames egress the port as tagged frames.
23
Chapter 1 Overview
This mode is available for both the external LAN ports (LAN 1 and LAN 2),
and for virtually concatenated groups 1 to 4.
1.6.4
…
Untagged: all the frames egress the port as untagged frames. Therefore,
untagged frames egress the port unmodified, whereas tagged frames are
converted to untagged frames before egressing the port (this is
performed by removing their tag and recalculating the frame CRC). This
mode is available only for the virtually concatenated groups 1 to 4.
…
Tagged: all the frames egress the port as tagged frames. Therefore,
tagged frames egress the port unmodified, whereas untagged frames are
converted to tagged frames before egressing the port (this is performed
by adding a tag with the VLAN ID which is defined for the corresponding
port, and recalculating the frame CRC). This mode is available only for
the virtually concatenated groups 1 to 4.
…
Double tagged: a tag is always added to all the frames that egress the
port. This mode can be used only when the network supports a frame
size of at least 1526 bytes.
Ethernet Mapper Subsystem
The Ethernet mapper subsystem manages all the functions that are related to the
use of virtual concatenation, and the preparation of LAN traffic for efficient
transport via the SDH network.
The subsystem includes the following functions:
„
LAPS encapsulation
„
GFP encapsulation
„
Group mapper
„
GFP multiplexer
MUXpro unit also supports the Link Capacity Adjustment Scheme (LCAS),
covered by ITU-T Rec. G.7042.
1.6.4.1
Encapsulation Functions
Ethernet frames must be encapsulated before transporting over the SDH network.
Two types of encapsulation are supported:
24
Chapter 1 Overview
„
LAPS (Link Access Protocol – SDH) encapsulation in accordance with ITU-T
Rec. X.86
„
GFP (Generic Framing Procedure) encapsulation in accordance with ITU-T
Rec. G.7041, using the framed mode. mapped into G.707 VC payload.
The user can select the preferred encapsulation mode, separately, for each
virtually concatenated group. The encapsulation parameters can also be
configured, for best performance in specific applications.
The encapsulated frames of each group are applied to the corresponding group
mapper.
1.6.4.2
Group Mapper Functions
The group mappers plot the LAN traffic for transmission over the SDH network.
The mappers also create the virtually concatenated groups that enable the user to
control the utilization of the bandwidth available on the link to the SDH network.
Note:
For compatibility with equipment from other vendors, the
user can configure the group mappers to simulate the use
of virtual concatenation even when the group includes a
single virtual container.
The mapper serving the Ethernet switch can manage up to four groups (these are
always groups 1 to 4).
Link bandwidth utilization is configured within two steps:
„
Define the bandwidth allocated to each group: selecting the type and the
number of VCs allocated to each group makes this. The bandwidth is
allocated using virtual concatenation.
Following are several examples of bandwidth allocation enabled by virtual
concatenation:
25
Chapter 1 Overview
…
When using VC-3: the maximum of two virtually concatenated groups per
MUXpro. For example, a group using two VC-3s can be used to carry the
maximum traffic load of a 100Base-TX Ethernet port.
…
When using VC-12: the 63 VC-12s can be divided as required to create
up to 6 groups. For example, a group using 5 VC-12 can be used to carry
the full traffic load of a 10BaseT Ethernet port over SDH.
It is allowed to build virtually concatenated groups using different types of
VCs: for example, when using VC-12 to carry E1 traffic, one or two groups can use
VC-3s, and the remaining bandwidth (17 VC-12) can be assigned to one or two
additional virtually concatenated groups.
„
Route the groups. The routing is defined by any means of mapping (mapping
is the selection of specific VCs to be used to carry each group, the number
needed to carry the bandwidth selected in Step 1 showing above).
This operation creates the trails that are needed to connect the local users to
remote locations via the SDH network.
1.6.4.3
Support for LCAS
Each virtually concatenated group with two or more VCs can be configured to
support LCAS. With LCAS, the capability of a virtually concatenated group can be
decreased when one of the VCs get failed; when the failure no longer appear, the
group will automatically recover and return to the normal capability.
The user can configure diverse LCAS protocol parameters, and can also specify a
minimum number of VCs for the group capacity; if the number of VCs decreases
below this minimum, an alarm will be generated.
1.6.4.4
GFP Multiplexer Function
Virtual concatenation provides the means to transport payloads at rates that differ
from those are available in the standard SDH hierarchy. Therefore, virtual
concatenation is always used by the MUXpro to carry the LAN traffic (unless a
single VC is used).
Although virtual concatenation leads to improved utilization of available bandwidth,
better utilization would be achieved by taking into consideration the statistical
allocation of traffic generated by multiple Ethernet nodes, and reserving bandwidth
only for the average load. The capability is provided by the MUXpro GFP
26
Chapter 1 Overview
multiplexer function.
Note:
To use GFP multiplexing, all of the multiplexed groups must use
GFP encapsulation.
Groups not connected to the GFP multiplexer may use LAPS
encapsulation.
To use GFP multiplexing, the groups to be multiplexed are routed, after GFP
encapsulation, to the multiplexer, instead of directly to the group mapper.
Specifically, all the virtually concatenated groups to be multiplexed must use the
same type of VCs.
The GFP multiplexer is configured as follows:
„
Selection of the virtually concatenated groups to be multiplexed.
For a MUXpro with six LAN ports, the maximum number of virtually
concatenated groups is 6; therefore, 2 multiplexing options (referred to as
GFP multiplexers) are available:
…
One multiplexing group of at least one virtually concatenated group and
the maximum is up to six virtually concatenated groups. All these groups
must use the same type of VCs.
„
Allocation of bandwidth guaranteed to each multiplexed group, in 16.67%
increments.
„
Assignment of an individual channel identifier (ID) to each group.
„
Selection of the primary group. The primary group is the only virtually
concatenated group that is actually mapped as a regular virtually
concatenated group (as explained in the Group Mapper section above, the
mapping defines the bandwidth and routing within the SDH network).
Therefore, by specifying the primary group bandwidth in Step 2 above you actually
specify the bandwidth that is allocated to the multiplexed stream. The bandwidth
guaranteed to each of the other multiplexed groups (referred to as secondary
groups) is the calculated as the fraction of the primary group bandwidth.
27
Chapter 1 Overview
Note:
Only secondary groups that are not mapped can be connected
to a GFP multiplexer. For convenience, when a group is added
as secondary group to a GFP multiplexer, its encapsulation
mode is automatically changed to GFP.
The GFP multiplexer output is managed by the group mapper, instead of the
member groups (the member groups are not connected to the mapper). The
mapper output is then inserted into the SDH frames in reference to the mapping
defined for the primary group.
The main advantage of GFP multiplexing is the way bandwidth allocation is
handled:
„
The minimum bandwidth provided to any multiplexed group is guaranteed; it
is always the fraction of primary group bandwidth specified in Step 2.
„
If temporarily one of the member groups does not utilize the guaranteed
bandwidth, for example, because of low traffic load, the unutilized bandwidth
is used to carry the traffic of the other groups. Therefore, no bandwidth is
wasted if another user requires it.
The use of GFP multiplexing does not detract in any way from the security
conferred by the uses of port-based VLANs; moreover, only the end points at
which the GFP multiplexing/de-multiplexing taking place are aware of the
multiplexed group structure.
1.6.5
1.6.5.1
E1 Interface Subsystem
E1 Ports
MUXpro operating in SDH networks can be equipped with eight or sixteen
independent E1 ports, which depends on the product model. MUXpro 820 has 8
independent E1 ports and MUXpro 8216 has 16 independent E1 ports. The ports
process the signals as unframed streams.
The E1 interfaces support 120Ω balanced line interface which are terminated in
SCSI II, female connector, with nominal transmit level of ±3V and also support 75
Ω unbalanced interface, with nominal transit level of ±2.37V
28
Chapter 1 Overview
1.6.5.2
Bandwidth occupied by E1 Traffic
When some of the bandwidth is assigned to E1 traffic, it reduces the number of
VC-12s available for carrying Ethernet traffic.
The reduction in bandwidth available for LAN traffic is as follows:
1.6.6
„
MUXpro 820: the number of VC-12s will be reduced by 8, form 63 to 55 if full
E1 is assigned.
„
MUXpro 8216: the number of VC-12s will be reduced by 16, form 63 to 47 if
full E1 is assigned.
Mappers for E1 Subsystem
The functions provided by the mappers serving the various E1 interface options
are described below. The multiplexing structure is as Appendix G.
1.6.6.1
Functions of E1 Mapper for SDH Network Interface
The E1 mapper enables mapping the data stream of each E1 port to any of the 63
VC-12 in the STM-1 signal.
To enable rapid service start-up, default mappings are used:
„
When no groups are used, the signal from each E1 port is inserted in the
VC-12 with the same number, that is, E1 port No. 1 is inserted in VC-12 No. 1,
E1 port No. 2 is inserted in VC-12 No. 2, etc.
„
When groups are used, the groups are mapped first, followed by the E1 ports,
in the following order:
…
All the defined groups (starting with the group 1 and up the maximum
defined) are assigned the first VC-12s
…
The signal from the E1 port is inserted in the first free VC-12 after the last
VC-12 assigned to a group, and so on.
In most applications, these defaults need not be changed:
„
When the MUXpro operates as a terminal multiplexer, which connects to the
transport backbone through an ADM, the ADM can always be configured to
perform any cross-connection that may be required.
29
Chapter 1 Overview
„
1.6.7
1.6.7.1
In a point-to-point connection between two MUXpro, the only reason to
change the defaults is to adapt the MUXpro to change in the original
utilization of its ports.
Timing Subsystem
SDH Timing Subsystem for MUXpro with E1 Ports
MUXpro 82xx Clock Selection Diagram:
Figure 1-10
SDH Timing Subsystem (with E1 ports), functional diagram
Figure 1-10 shows the functional block diagram of the SDH timing subsystem for
MUXpro with E1 ports.
For redundancy, the timing subsystem includes two similar sections, one for
selecting the primary SDH clock reference and the other for the secondary clock.
The user can specify the SDH clock reference source from the following options:
„
Automatic and revertible clock source switching: The reference source of the
recovered clocks can be selected automatically in accordance with the
primary or secondary clock of which status is normal. The primary clock
source will be selected if both primary and secondary clock statuses are
normal. In case of the primary clock source failed, MUXpro automatically
switches from the primary clock source to the secondary one. In case of the
primary clock source recovered, MUXpro automatically switches back from
30
Chapter 1 Overview
the secondary clock source to the primary one. Therefore, different sources
must be configured for the primary and secondary clocks.
„
1.6.7.2
Locked to a recovered clock (RX clock option). The reference source of the
recovered clocks can be selected in accordance with the desired method of
clock dissemination in the user’s network:
…
RX SDH – reference source locked to the receive clock recovered from
the line signal by the STM-1 interface. This timing mode is also called
loopback timing. Either Optical1 or Optical2 can be selected for RX SDH.
The SDH timing of the MUXpro units can be locked to the highly accurate
master clock of the SDH network.
…
RX E1 – reference clock locked to the receive clock recovered from the
E1 line signal received by the desired E1 interface. This timing mode is
also called external timing. One of E1 ports can be selected for RX E1.
MUXpro820 provides E1 port 1 to E1 port 8. MUXpro8216 provides E1
port 1 to E1 port 16.This timing mode can enable locking the SDH timing
of the MUXpro units used in a private network to the timing of the E1
network.
…
Internal clock: The internal oscillator of MUXpro units provides the timing
reference(accuracy+4.6ppm) for MUXpro units used in a private network
Output clock
Output clock is used as reference source for the far end. One of E1 ports can be
selected for Output clock. MUXpro820 provides E1 port 1 to E1 port 8.
MUXpro8216 provides E1 port 1 to E1 port 16. All clock options described above
may be used as Output clock (2048Kb/sec) to the far end.
1.6.8
1.6.8.1
Management Subsystem
Firmware Updating
The operation of the MUXpro management subsystem and of its other circuits is
determined by software stored in flash memory.
The firmware can be updated using TFTP through any of the management access
options described above. Using remote downloading enables network operators to
distribute software from a central location rapidly and efficiently. However, other
31
Chapter 1 Overview
firmware like U-Boot, Linux Kernel, and FPGA must be sent by the factory to
execute updating process.
Note:
Before you upgrade RAMdisk, you are suggested to copy
your VCDB parameters in advance. Otherwise all the
setting will be returned to factory default because after
upgrading RAMdisk, the system will restart to confirm its
version. VCDB parameters make a lot of difference and
lead system cannot save previous parameter setting.
1.6.9
Power Supply Subsystem
MUXpro can be ordered with100 to 240 +10VAC, 50/60+3 Hz or -36 to -72 VDC
power supply. The unit does not provide a power ON/OFF switch; therefore, starts
operating as soon as power is connected.
1.6.10
Supervision, Diagnostics and Performance Monitoring
The MUXpro supports comprehensive diagnostics, performance monitoring, and
supervision and maintenance capabilities, for easy maintenance and rapid
detection and location of faults.
1.6.10.1
Alarm Reporting
MUXpro generates time-stamped alarm messages that cover all the system
events. The time stamp is provided by an internal real-time clock. Up to 255 of the
most recent alarms can be stored in an internal buffer; in case the MUXpro is
powered down, up to 100 of the most recent alarms are stored in non-volatile
memory, and remain available for display and analysis after the MUXpro is
powered up again.
The alarm messages stored in the buffer can be read on-line by means of the local
supervisory terminal, a Telnet host or Web browser, and can also be automatically
sent as traps to selected management stations.
32
Chapter 1 Overview
1.6.10.2
Performance Monitoring
Performance monitoring capabilities includes collection of statistics for the
application layer, as well as for the physical layer for the user and network ports.
1.6.10.3
Diagnostic Test
The maintenance capabilities include the following functions.
„
STM-1 network links: local and remote loopback
„
Ethernet: local loopback
„
E1 tributaries: local and remote loopback
„
The duration of the loopback can be limited, by specifying a time-out interval
after which the loopback is automatically disconnected.
„
Ping for IP connectivity testing.
The loopback enable rapid and efficient isolation of the equipment unit causing the
problem, thereby enabling rapid restoration of service. Error free test is less than 1
in 1012bits.
1.6.10.4
Physical Characteristics
The MUXpro is a compact unit (only 1U high). One or two units can be installed
side by side in a 19” rack, using appropriate rack-mount kits.
Cooling is by free air convection. In addition, the MUXpro has a miniature internal
cooling fan. The air intake vents are located on the side walls, and the exhaust
vent is located on the rear panel.
33
Chapter 1 Overview
1.7
Technical Specification
Table 1-4
LAN Ports
General Features of MUXpro Series Product
Number of Ports
4
Compatibility
Relevant Section IEEE802.3u, 802.3x
Data Rate
‧ 10BaseT: 10 Mbps
‧ 100Base-Tx: 100 Mbps
‧ Auto-sensing, Auto-negotiation
Internal LAN Traffic Ethernet switch with four LAN ports, one
Processing
port for management subsystem, and
four VCG ports (toward the network)
connected to virtually concatenated
groups 1 to 4.
Supports QoS, port-based VLANs and
tag-based VLAN switching
Transparent
LAN Ports
Connectors
RJ-45, shielded
Number of Ports
2
Data Rate
‧ 10BaseT: 10 Mbps
‧ 100Base-Tx: 100 Mbps
‧ Auto-sensing, Auto-negotiation
Internal LAN Traffic Transparent connection to a virtually
Processing
concatenated group (5 and 6)
E1 Interfaces
Connectors
RJ-45, shielded
Number of Ports
8 (MUXpro 820) 16 (MUXpro 8216)
Compatibility
ITU-T Rec. G.703, unframed
Line Rate
2.048Mbps+50ppm
Line Coding
HDB3
Interface Type (By 120Ω balanced
75Ω unbalanced
customer’s order)
Connectors
SCSI II, female
STM-1 Optical Number of Ports
Network
Optical line coding
Interface
Framing
2, 1+1 MSP protection available
Binary Non-Return-to-Zero
SDH, see Appendix H.
Bit Rate
155.520Mbps
Optical Wavelength
1310nm
34
Chapter 1 Overview
Optical
Power
Timing
Output -6dBm
Receiver Sensitivity
-34dBm
Connectors
SC or FC/PC
SDH Timing Source
‧ Internal clock
‧ RX SDH – Locked to clock recovered
from STM-1 interface
‧ RX PDH – Locked to clock recovered
from selected PDH interface
PDH Timing Source
‧ RX SDH – Locked to clock recovered
from STM-1 interface
‧ RX VC-12/RX VC3 – Locked to clock
recovered from VC-12 received from
remote end
Indicators
General
Indicators
System ‧
‧
‧
‧
‧
‧
LAN Port Indicators
STM-1
Indicators
Power
Physical
PWR (green) – Power
TST (yellow) – Test
MAJ ALM – Major alarm
MIN ALM – Minor alarm
ACO – Alarm Cut Off
TRI ( For MUXpro 8216) – Tributary
‧ LINK (green) – LAN link integrity
‧ ACT (green) – LAN data activity
Port ‧ LOS1 (red) – Loss of Signal Optical 1
‧ LOS2 (red) – Loss of Signal Optical 2
Supply Voltage
AC Source
110 to 240+10VAC
50 to 60+3Hz
Supply Voltage
DC Source
-36 to -72 VDC
Dimension
MUXpro 820: Half 19”, 1U
210mm(W)*285mm(D)*41mm(H)
MUXpro 8216: Full 19”, 1U
437mm(W)*287mm(D)*44mm(H)
Operating
Environment
Operating
temperature
0 to 50°C / 32 to 122°F
Storage temperature -25 to 70°C / -13 to 158°F
Relative humidity
35
Up to 95%, non-condensing
Chapter 2 Installation
Chapter 2. Installation
2.1
Introduction
This Chapter provides installation, operational instructions for the MUXpro Series
Product and to ensure that the unit is working properly.
2.1.1
Unpacking
Make a preliminary inspection of the shipping container before unpacking,
evidence of damage should be noted and reported immediately to the nearest
Tainet representative.
Unpack the equipment as follows:
„
Place the container with the top facing upwards.
„
Unpack equipment carefully, check for completeness against the purchase
order.
„
Inspect equipment for shipping damage, including bent or loose hardware, or
broken connectors.
„
To prevent electrostatic discharge (ESD) damage, avoid touching the internal
components. Before plugging in any user interface module, please turn the
power off.
MUXpro's shipping package should include the following items:
„
A MUXpro stand alone unit
„
User Manual in CD type
„
A power adapter and/or a power cord
„
DB-9 Cable
„
Kits for rack installation (MUXpro 820 is by order; MUXpro 8216 is included)
37
Chapter 2 Chapter 2
2.1.2
2.1.2.1
Safety Precautions
General Safety Precautions
Caution:
Either the operator or the user may perform no internal settings,
adjustment, maintenance, and repairs; only skilled service
personnel who are aware of the hazards involved may perform
such activities. Always observe standard safety precautions
during installation, operation, and maintenance of this product.
Warning:
For your protection and to prevent possible damage to
equipment when a fault condition, e.g., a lightning stroke or
contact with high-voltage power lines, occurs on the cables
connected to the equipment, the case of the MUXpro. Unit must
be properly grounded at any time. Any interruption of the
protective (grounding) connection inside or outside the
equipment, or the disconnection of the protective ground
terminal can make this equipment dangerous.
Intentional interruption is prohibited.
Caution:
Dangerous voltages may be present on the cables connected
to the MUXpro.
z
z
Never connect cables to a MUXpro unit if it is not properly
installed and grounded.
Disconnect all the connected cables to the electrical
connectors of the MUXpro before disconnecting the
MUXpro power cable.
38
Chapter 2 Installation
Before switching on this equipment and before connecting any other cable, the
protective ground terminal of MUXpro must be connected to a protective ground.
The grounding connection is made through the power cable, which must be
inserted in a power socket (outlet) with protective ground contact. Therefore, the
power cable plug must always be inserted in a socket outlet provided with a
protective ground contact, and the protective action must not be negated by use of
an extension cord (power cable) without a protective conductor (grounding).
Whenever MUXpro units are installed in a rack, make sure that the rack is properly
grounded and connected to a reliable, low-resistance grounding system. Make
sure that fuses of the required rating are used for replacement. The use of
repaired fuses and the short-circuiting of fuse holders are forbidden.
Whenever it is likely that the protection offered by fuses has been impaired, the
instrument must be made inoperative and be secured against any unplanned
operation.
2.1.2.1.1
Laser Safety Classification
MUXpro units equipped with laser devices comply with laser product performance
standards set by government agencies for Class 1 laser products. The modules do
not emit hazardous light, and the beam is totally enclosed during all in-service
modes of customer operation and maintenance.
MUXpro units are shipped with protective covers installed on all the optical
connectors. Do not remove these covers until you are ready to connect optical
cables to the connectors. Keep the covers for reuse, to reinstall the cover over the
optical connector as soon as the optical cable is disconnected.
2.1.2.1.2
Laser Safety Statutory Warning and Operating Precautions
All the personnel involved in equipment installation, operation, and maintenance
must be aware that the laser radiation is invisible. Therefore, the personnel must
strictly observe the applicable safety precautions and particularly must avoid
looking straight into optical connectors, neither directly nor using optical
instruments.
In addition to the general precautions described in this section, be sure to observe
the following warnings when operating a product equipped with a laser device.
Failure to observe these warnings could result in fire, bodily injury, and damage to
the equipment.
39
Chapter 2 Chapter 2
Warning:
To reduce the risk of exposure to hazardous radiation:
Do not try to open the enclosure. There are no user-serviceable
components inside.
Do not operate controls, make adjustments, or perform
procedures to the laser device other than those specified herein.
Allow only authorized Tainet service technicians to repair the unit
herein.
Allow only authorized Tainet service technicians to repair the unit.
2.1.2.2
Protection against Electrostatic Discharge (ESD)
An electrostatic discharge occurs between two objects when an object carrying
static electrical charges touches, or is brought near enough, the other object.
Static electrical charges appear as a result of friction between surfaces of
insulating materials, separation of two such surfaces and may also be induced by
electrical fields.
Routine activities such as walking across an insulating floor, friction between
garment parts, friction between objects, etc. can easily build charges up to levels
that cause damage, especially when humidity is low.
Caution:
MUXpro internal boards contain components sensitive to ESD. To
prevent ESD damage, do not touch internal components or
connectors.
If you are not using a wrist strap, before touching a MUXpro unit
or performing any internal settings on the MUXpro, it is
recommended to discharge the electrostatic charge of your body
by touching the frame of a grounded equipment unit.
Whenever feasible, during installation works use standard ESD protection wrist
straps to discharge electrostatic charges. It is also recommended to use garments
40
Chapter 2 Installation
and packaging made of antistatic materials or materials that have high resisting,
yet are not insulators.
2.1.3
2.1.3.1
Site Selection and Requirements
Physical Requirements
The MUXpro can be installed in racks, on desktop and shelves. All the connections,
except for the STM-1 interface connection, are made to the rear panel.
For installation in 19” racks, Tainet offers dedicated rack mount kits that enable
installing one or two MUXpro units side-by-side. Two MUXpro units installed with
the rack mount kit occupy a height of 1U.
2.1.3.2
Power Requirements
AC-powered MUXpro units should be installed within 1.5m (5 feet) of an
easily-accessible grounded AC outlet that is capable of furnishing the required AC
supply voltage, in the range of 100 to 240+10 VAC, 50 to 60+3 Hz.
DC-powered MUXpro units require a -36 to -72 VDC power source with positive
terminal grounded. In addition, the DC power connector contains the chassis
(frame) ground terminal.
2.1.3.3
Network and User Connections
This section presents general requirements regarding the connections to the
various MUXpro interfaces. For specific information regarding pin allocations in the
MUXpro connectors, refer to Appendix A .
2.1.3.3.1
Network Connection
Optical Ports. MUXpro units can be ordered with two STM-1optical ports.
Each port has two optical connectors, one is for the receive input and the other is
for the transmit output. The MUXpro can be ordered with FC/PC or SC connectors,
for use over single-mode or multimode fibers.
2.1.3.3.2
E1 Port Connections
Each MUXpro E1 port can be configured to use either one of the following
interfaces
41
Chapter 2 Chapter 2
2.1.3.3.3
„
120 Ω balanced interface for operation over an SCSI II, female connector.
„
75 Ω unbalanced interface for operation over coaxial cable.
LAN Port Connections
The MUXpro have six LAN ports.
Each LAN port has a 10/100BaseTX Ethernet interface terminated in an RJ-45
connector, designated LAN 1 to LAN 6, respectively, for connection to LANs
operating on UTP media.
The interface connector is wired as a hub port that includes automatic crossover
detection and correction. Therefore, it can always be connected through a
“straight” (point-to-point) cable to any other 10/100BaseTX port (hub or station).
2.1.3.3.4
Supervisory Terminal Port Connections
The out-of-band supervisory port of the MUXpro, designated CRAFT, has a serial
RS-232 asynchronous DCE interface terminated in a 9-pin D-type female
connector, designated CRAFT. The port can be directly connected to terminals
that use a wired point-to-point cable.
2.1.3.3.5
Alarm Relays Connections
The alarm interface is included in the ALARM connector (see Appendix A ).
The interface includes four relays, two for the major alarms including office audio
and visible alarm system and the other two for the minor alarms including office
audio and visible alarm system as well.
2.1.3.3.6
Ambient Requirements
The ambient operating temperature of the MUXpro is 0 to 50°C (32 °F to 122 °F),
at a relative humidity of up to 95%, non-condensing.
The MUXpro is cooled by free air convection, and also has a miniature internal
cooling fan. When the MUXpro is installed in a 19" rack, allow at least 1U of space
below and above the unit.
2.1.3.3.7
Electromagnetic Compatibility Considerations
The MUXpro is designed to comply with the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC)
requirements of Sub-Part J of FCC Rules, Part 15, for Class A electronic
equipment, and additional applicable standards. To meet these standards, it is
necessary to perform the following actions:
42
Chapter 2 Installation
2.1.4
„
Connect the MUXpro to a low-resistance grounding system.
„
Whenever feasible, use shielded cables.
Equipment Needed
The cables you need to connect to the MUXpro depend on the MUXpro application.
You can use standard cables or prepare the suitable cables yourself in
accordance with the information given in Appendix A .
Contact Tainet Technical Support Department if other interface cables are
necessary.
2.1.5
MUXpro Enclosure
This section presents a physical description of the MUXpro versions.
2.1.5.1
MUXpro 820 Front Panel Description
Figure 2-1
Figure 2-2
MUXpro 820 front panel
MUXpro 820 rear panel (AC)
43
Chapter 2 Chapter 2
Figure 2-3
MUXpro 820 rear panel (DC)
The components located on the front panel are arranged in several functional
groups:
System status indicators: The groups of indicators located in the lower middle
side of the panel display the system status.
„
Table 2-1
LED
Indicator /
Buttons
LOS
Front Panel Description of MUXpro 820
Status
Description
Red
Alarm in SDH channel 1/channel 2
Off
SDH L1/L2 is in normal condition
Green
Power ON
Off
Power OFF
Red
Major alarm occurred in the system
Off
No major alarm
Yellow
Minor alarm occurred in the system
Off
No minor alarm
Yellow
For test purpose, when loopback function is enabled,
LED will turn to yellow
Off
Loopback function disabled
ACO
Yellow
After pressing ACO button, LED will turn to yellow instead
RST
Press
Reset the hardware by pressing this button
ACO
Press
Alarm Cut Off button, press to clear the alarm
PWR
MAJOR
MINOR
TST
„
The aggregated interfaces area: The aggregated interfaces (at the left side)
include optical interfaces.
The optical interfaces include two pairs of optical connectors, identified as Optical
1 and Optical 2. Each pair consists of a transmit (TX) connector and a receive (RX)
connector. Link status indicators are located to the right of each pair of connectors.
„
Auxiliary connector area: includes the ALARM and CRAFT connectors.
44
Chapter 2 Installation
…
ALM:
The ALARM relay contact is to extend the major and minor alarm of MUXpro
820 to the office audible and visual alarm system. Refer to Appendix A for its
pin assignment.
…
CRAFT:
The Front panel CRAFT port serves as a normal supervise port and operates
at standard RS-232 DCE mode in DB-9 type connector, it can direct connect
to PC COM port for operation.
The components located on the rear panel are arranged in several functional
groups:
2.1.5.2
„
Power supply: The rear panels include only the AC or DC power connector (in
accordance with order), for connection of the MUXpro 820 supply voltage and
protective ground. The AC connector has a built-in fuse.
„
LAN ports: The LAN ports include six Ethernet interfaces (4 VLAN ports, 2
transparent ports) terminated in LAN 1, LAN 2, LAN 3, LAN 4, LAN 5 and LAN
6. Each connector has a pair of built-in indicators.
„
E1 interface: 8 E1 ports for SCSI II female connector. Hot Swappable is not
supported.
MUXpro 8216
Figure 2-4
Figure 2-5
MUXpro 8216 front panel
MUXpro 8216 rear panel (AC+DC)
The components located on the front panel are arranged in several functional
groups:
„
System status indicators: The groups of indicators located in the lower middle
side of the panel display the system status.
45
Chapter 2 Chapter 2
„
The aggregated interfaces area: The aggregated interfaces (at the left side)
include optical interfaces.
„
The optical interfaces include two pairs of optical connectors, identified as
Optical 1 and Optical 2. Each pair consists of a transmit (TX) connector and a
receive (RX) connector. Link status indicators are located to the right of each
pair of connectors.
„
Auxiliary connector area: includes the ALARM and CRAFT connectors.
ALM:
…
The ALARM relay contact is to extend the major and minor alarm of MUXpro
820 to the office audible and visual alarm system. Refer to Appendix A for its
pin assignment.
CRAFT:
…
The Front panel CRAFT port serves as a normal supervise port and operates
at standard RS-232 DCE mode in DB-9 type connector, it can directly connect
to PC COM port for operation.
Table 2-2
LED Indicator /
Buttons
LOS
PWR
MAJOR
MINOR
TST
Front Panel Description of MUXpro 8216
Status
Red
Alarm in SDH channel 1/channel 2
Off
SDH L1/L2 is in normal condition
Green
Power ON
Off
Power OFF
Red
Major alarm occurred in the system
Off
No major alarm
Yellow
Minor alarm occurred in the system
Off
No minor alarm
Yellow
For test purpose, when loopback function is
enabled, LED will turn to yellow
Off
Loopback function disabled
Yellow
After pressing ACO button, LED will turn to
yellow instead
Off
Alarm disappears, back to normal condition
Yellow
Abnormal tributary E1 card
Off
Normal tributary E1 card
ACO
TRI
Description
46
Chapter 2 Installation
LED Indicator /
Buttons
Status
Description
RST
Press
Reset the hardware by pressing this button
ACO
Press
Alarm Cut Off button, press to clear the alarm
The components located on the rear panel are arranged in several functional
groups:
2.1.6
„
Power supply: The rear panel includes only the AC or the DC power
connector (in accordance with order), for connection of the MUXpro 820
supply voltage and protective ground. The AC connector has a built-in fuse.
„
LAN port: There are six Ethernet interfaces (4 VLAN ports, 2 transparent ports)
terminated in LAN 1, LAN 2, LAN 3, LAN 4, LAN 5 and LAN 6. Each
connector has a pair of built-in indicators.
„
E1 interface: 16 E1 ports for SCSI II female connector, 8 for built-in E1 and
the other 8 E1 ports are tributary. Tributary E1 card is hot swappable.
Connections
Caution:
Before installing a MUXpro unit, review the safety
precautions given in Section 2.1.2
2.1.6.1
Installing a MUXpro Unit
MUXpro units are intended for installation on desktops, shelves or in 19” racks.
For rack installation, a rack mount kit is available from Tainet. Refer to the
installation leaflet of the rack mount kit for detailed instructions.
Do not connect power to the enclosure before it is installed in the designated
position.
2.1.6.2
Cable Connection, General
Before starting, refer to the site installation plan and identify the cables intended
for connection to the MUXpro unit.
47
Chapter 2 Chapter 2
For general information regarding the required connections, refer to Section 2.1.3.
„
General Optical Cable Handling Instructions
When connecting optical cables make sure to prevent cable twisting and avoid
sharp bends (unless otherwise specified by the optical cable manufacturer, the
minimum fiber bending radius is 35 mm). Always leave some slacks, to prevent
stress.
Caution:
Make sure all the optical connectors are closed at all times by the
appropriate protective caps, or by the mating cable connector.
Do not remove the protective cap until an optical fiber is
connected to the corresponding connector, and immediately install
a protective cap after a cable is disconnected.
Before installing optical cables, it is recommended to clean thoroughly their
connectors using an approved cleaning kit.
2.1.6.3
Connecting MUXpro to Ground and Power
Any interruption of the protective (grounding) conductor (inside or outside the
device) or disconnecting the protective earth terminal can make the device
dangerous. Intentional interruption is prohibited.
48
Chapter 2 Installation
Caution:
Before switching this MUXpro unit on and before connecting any
other cable, MUXpro protective ground terminals must be
connected to protective ground.
This connection is made through the DC or AC power cable.
The power cord plug should only be inserted in an outlet
provided with a protective ground (earth) contact. The protective
action must not be negated by using an extension cord (power
cable) without a protective conductor (grounding).
Warning:
Dangerous voltages may be present on the cables connected
to the MUXpro:
z
z
Never connect cables to a MUXpro unit if it is not properly
installed and grounded. This means that its power cable
must be inserted in an outlet provided with a protective
ground (earth) contact before connecting any user or
network (network) cable to the MUXpro.
Disconnect all the cables connected to the connectors of
the MUXpro before disconnecting the MUXpro power
cable.
Power should be supplied to MUXpro through a power cable terminated in an
appropriate plug, in accordance with the required power source.
„
To connect MUXpro power and ground
…
Connect one end of the power cable to the MUXpro power connector.
…
When ready to apply power, insert the plug at other end of the power
cable into a socket (outlet) with a protective ground contact. The PWR
indicator of the MUXpro must light.
49
Chapter 2 Chapter 2
2.1.6.4
Connecting MUXpro Links to Network Ports
The network connections are made in accordance with the interface type ordered
for your MUXpro:
„
Optical Cable Connection Instructions
Optical interfaces: connect to the optical connectors in the Optical 1 and Optical 2
areas.
„
2.1.6.5
To connect optical cables to the MUXpro network interface:
…
For each optical interface (Optical 1 or Optical 2), refer to the site
installation plan and identify the corresponding pair of cables intended for
connection to the corresponding TX and RX connectors.
…
Connect the prescribed transmit fiber (connected to the receive input of
the remote equipment) to the TX connector. Leave enough slack to
prevent strain.
…
Connect the prescribed receive fiber (connected to the transmit output of
the remote equipment) to the RX connector of the same interface. Leave
enough slack to prevent strain.
Connecting MUXpro to E1 Ports
„
To connect cables to the MUXpro E1 ports
The connection to the MUXpro E1 ports is made to be suitable for the SCSI II;
female connectors designated E1. Different model of MUXpro Series has different
amount of E1 ports. For MUXpro 820, there are 8 built-in E1 ports. For MUXpro
8216, there are 16 E1 ports, 8 for built-in and others are tributary.
Figure 2-6
Figure 2-7
BNC connectors for 16 ports unbalanced E1 panel
Wire-wrap connectors for 16 ports balanced E1 panel
50
Chapter 2 Installation
Figure 2-8
Figure 2-9
2.1.6.6
Converter cable
On the back of the unbalanced E1 panel
Connecting MUXpro to LAN Ports
„
To connect cables to the MUXpro LAN ports
The connection to the MUXpro LAN ports is made to the RJ-45 connectors
designated LAN. Use a standard (station) cable wired point-to-point for connection
to any type of Ethernet port (hub or station).
2.1.6.7
Management Connections
„
To connect cables to the MUXpro supervisory ports
The connections to the CRAFT connector are made as follows:
…
Connection to a supervision terminal with 9-pin connector: by means of a
straight cable (a cable wired point-to-point).
…
Connection to modem with 9-pin connector (for communication with
remote supervision terminal): by means of a crossed cable.
Additional connection options are presented in Appendix A .
„
To connect to a management station, Telnet host or Web browser
The link to network management stations using SNMP, to Telnet hosts and/or Web
browsers can be provided in two ways:
…
In-band, it can be linked through the network. This connection is
automatically available when the network cables are connected, provided
51
Chapter 2 Chapter 2
IP connectivity to the management station; Telnet host or Web browser is
available through the network port.
…
2.1.6.8
Through the LAN 1 to LAN 4 connector, provided IP connectivity to the
management station or Telnet host is available through the LAN the port
is connected to (for example, when the management station, Telnet host
or Web browsers is attached to the same LAN, or connected to the same
WAN).
Connecting to MUXpro ALARM Connector
„
To connect to MUXpro ALARM connector
The connection to the ALARM connector is made by means of a cable provided by
the customer, in accordance with the specific requirements of each site. Refer
to Appendix A for connector pin functions.
52
Chapter 3 Configuration
Chapter 3. Configuration
3.1
Scope
This chapter provides general operating instructions and preliminary configuration
instructions of WEB UI for MUXpro units.
3.2
Operating Instructions
3.2.1
Connect to Web UI via LAN Port
The factory default IP of MUXpro series is 192.168.0.1 with mask 255.255.0.0.
User can configure MUXpro with web interface via RJ-45 connector.
There are two Admin users with user ID admin and tainet. Default ID and
Password Table is shown below:
Table 3-1
Default ID and Password for MUXpro product family
Login ID
MUXpro 820
MUXpro 8216
Login Password
admin
admin
tainet
tainet
admin
admin
tainet
tainet
53
Chapter 3 Configuration
Figure 3-1
MUXpro Series Web Interface Login Page
Figure 3-2
Main Menu
54
Chapter 3 Configuration
3.3
First Login
We suggest user change the default password, referring to the step below.
„
System Æ User Management: [Change password]
Figure 3-3
User Management
Caution:
There are two Admin users with user name admin and tainet. These two
default Admin users cannot be deleted and we suggest changing the default
password for security reasons. If the password of any Admin user is lost,
press and hold the ACO button in the front panel for over 10 seconds and
release the ACO button. Finally, press RST button and the password of two
Admin users will be restored to default values after rebooting.
3.4
Starting Configuration
There are seven main function groups in the Web UI. The description is as below.
Table 3-2
Main function groups description
Main Function
Groups
Description
System
The basic configuration of the system, including time and
date, device Info, and user management etc.
Configuration
The main function of the MUXpro. The function includes
the most settings of connectivity, Cross Connect and
VLAN function etc.
55
Chapter 3 Configuration
3.5
System Monitor
User can check the parameters of connection, including
VCG status, Transmitted Trace ID and Expected Trace
ID of Section, VC-4 or VC12.
Fault Monitor
User can check the current alarm event history and
alarm log.
Performance Monitor
User can check the parameters of PM, such as CV, ES,
SES, and UAS.
Statistics
User can check the statistics of LAN traffic or VCG traffic.
Diagnostics
For diagnostics, user can use this function to Loopback
and verify the connection.
The Basic Concept in Configuring MUXpro
After entering the access level, user may follow the instructions below to become
familiar with MUXpro Series Product and be able to configure the units; therefore,
the units can work properly. This section will explain the basic concepts during
configuring MUXpro product.
3.5.1
System Clock
Define whether the system clock to be Internal or externally received from the
selected ports. Here you can also select the Primary and Secondary clock as the
system clock from the indicated port or optical line. If the port or line providing the
Primary clock fails, the alternative port for Secondary clock will become active as a
backup clock. For more information, please refer to 3.7.12
3.5.2
Cross Connection
Establish the internal communication link between SDH and either E1 or VCG.
This allows user to do the assignment for the indicated time slots. There are two
kinds of cross connection commands, e1xcset and vcgxcset. E1xcset is the E1
port (channel) assigned command, and is used to do the cross connection of E1
ports. Vcgxcset command is a usage for cross a connection to SDH (channel),
vcgxcm is used to execute multiple time slots cross connections. For more
information, please refer to 3.7.10
56
Chapter 3 Configuration
3.5.3
Diagnostic
MUXpro Series Product provides the diagnostic ability such as the function of
alarm status, performance monitoring and loopback testing. The alarm status
shows the current alarm condition in the alarm buffer, and the performance
monitoring lists the performance evaluation as a group report for 15-minutes /
1-day interval. The loopback testing may force the data to loop back and check the
connection section by section. For more information, please refer to 4.6
3.6
“System” Main function Group Description
This section introduces the sub-functions of “System” Main function group. The
“System” main function group includes [Device Info], [General Setup], [Manager
List], [SNMP Setup], [DCC Setup], [Alarm Suppression], [User Management],
[Config & SW Update], [Craft Port], and [Device Maintenances] functions.
Figure 3-4
The Sub-functions of System Main Function Group
57
Chapter 3 Configuration
3.6.1
Device Info
User can check the system information and IP settings from this page.
Figure 3-5
3.6.2
Device Info
General Setup
In this web page, user can set System Information, Date/Time setting and IP
settings under the pull down menu of [Category].
58
Chapter 3 Configuration
Figure 3-6
3.6.3
General Setup
Manager List
This function allows user to set the IP of PC which the UNMS Client software is
installed so the MUXpro units can be monitored and controlled remotely.On the
other hand, the SNMP Mode in SNMP Setup function should be enabled before
the MUXpro unit can be managed by the UNMS Client. Refer to 3.6.4 for the
details of SNMP Setup function.
Figure 3-7
Manager List
59
Chapter 3 Configuration
3.6.4
SNMP Setup
The SNMP Mode can be set to Enable so the MUXpro unit can be managed by
universal network management system (UNMS). If it is set to Disable, then the
UNMS will not see the MUXpro unit in the network.
This function allows user to set the “read community string” and “write read
community string” of SNMP. When system alarm occurs, user can set trap IP
where system alarm message will send to.
Figure 3-8
3.6.5
Manager List
DCC Setup
In this web page, user can set DCC(Data Communication Channels) IP and
channels of section.
Figure 3-9
DCC Setup
60
Chapter 3 Configuration
3.6.6
Alarm Suppression
In this web page, user can set whether the alarm messages display in WEB UI
(The path:Fault Monitor Æ System Alarm. For more information, please refer to
Section 4.3)
Figure 3-10
3.6.7
Alarm Suppression
User Management
In this page, user can add and delete user account. User can modify the password
of accounts (except current user). On the other hand, two default Admin users with
user name admin and tainet cannot be deleted, but the password can be changed.
Figure 3-11
User Management
61
Chapter 3 Configuration
3.6.8
Config & SW Update
This web page allows user to upload / download configuration file and perform
upgrade by downloading software via TFTP.
Figure 3-12
3.6.9
Config & SW Update
Craft Port
This web page allows user to change the baud rate of craft port connection. The
default baud rate is 38400bps.
Figure 3-13
Craft Port Setup
62
Chapter 3 Configuration
3.6.10
Device Maintenances
This web page allows user to reboot the device or restore to default settings.
Figure 3-14
3.7
Device Maintenance
“Configuration” Main function Group Description
This section introduces the sub-functions of “Configuration” Main function. The
“Configuration” main function includes “Section”, “VC-4”, “Threshold”, “E1
Interface”, “LAN Port”, “VCG Group”, “GFP Group”, “GFP Multiplexer”, “LAPS
Group”, “Cross Connect”, “Protection”, and “Synchronization” functions and one
submenu “Bridge”.
Figure 3-15
The Sub-functions of Configuration Main Function Group
63
Chapter 3 Configuration
3.7.1
Section
This web page allows user to set parameters of Section.
Figure 3-16
Table 3-3
Description of Section function
Pull down menu
Description
Optical No.
User can choose which optical port that will be modified.
AdminStatus
Enable or Disable the specified optical port.
DEG Threshold
Select the BER value; the signal-degraded alarm will be
generated for the port if the value is exceeded.
EXC Threshold
Select the BER value; the error rate degradation alarm
will be generated for the port if the value is exceeded.
Transmitted
ID
Trace Specify the path trace label.
(J0 Tx Path Trace)
Expected Trace ID
3.7.2
Section
Specify Expected the path trace label.
(J0 Expected Path Trace)
VC-4
This web page allows user to set parameters of VC-4/VC-3.
Figure 3-17
Table 3-4
Description of VC-4 function
Pull down menu
Optical No.
VC-4
Description
User can choose which optical port that will be
64
Chapter 3 Configuration
modified.
3.7.3
Signal Label(0~FF)
Specify the expected signal label (one byte)
Transmitted Trace ID
Specify the path trace label.
(J1 Tx Path Trace)
Expected Trace ID
Specify Expected the path trace label.
(J1 Expected Path Trace)
Threshold
This web page allows user to set the threshold of CV, ES, SES, and SEFS(UAS).
Figure 3-18
3.7.4
Threshold
E1 Interface
This web page allows user to set parameters of E1 interface(VC-12).
65
Chapter 3 Configuration
Figure 3-19
Table 3-5
E1 Interface
Description of E1 Interface function
Pull down menu
3.7.5
Description
VC-12
Choose which E1(VC-12) that will be modified.
Port Name
Use to enter a logical name for the E1 port.
Admin Status
Use to enable/disable the flow of traffic through the
selected E1 port.
Rx Equalizer
Determine the maximum attenuation of the receive
signal that can be compensated for by the port
received path, to obtain the BER performance required
by the standards.
DEG Threshold
Select the BER value; the signal-degraded alarm will
be generated for the port if the value is exceeded.
EXC Threshold
Select the BER value; the error rate degradation alarm
will be generated for the port if the value is exceeded.
Transmitted Trace ID
Specify the path trace label.
(J2 Tx Path Trace)
Expected Trace ID
Specify Expected the path trace label.
(J2 Expected Path Trace)
LAN Port
This web page allows user to set parameters of LAN Port.
66
Chapter 3 Configuration
Figure 3-20
Table 3-6
LAN Port
Description of LAN Port function
Pull down menu
Description
LAN
Choose which LAN Port that will be modified.
Port Name
Use to enter a logical name for the LAN port.
Auto Negotiation
Use to enable/disable the Auto Negotiation function of
LAN Port.
Auto-negotiation is used to select automatically the mode
providing the highest possible traffic handling capability
Admin Status
Use to enable/disable the flow of traffic through the
selected LAN port.
Max
capability Specify the highest traffic handling capability to be
advertised
advertised during the auto-negotiation process. The
operating mode selected as a result of auto-negotiation
cannot exceed the advertised capability.
This parameter is displayed only when auto-negotiation
is enabled.
Flow
control/back Select the usage of flow control (when operating in the
Pressure
full duplex mode), or back pressure (when operating in
the half-duplex mode)
3.7.6
VCG Group
This web page allows user to set parameters of VCG group.
67
Chapter 3 Configuration
Figure 3-21
Table 3-7
VCG Group
Description of VCG Group function
Pull down
menu
Description
VCG
Choose which VCG that will be modified.
VC Level
Select the type of VC used to carry the corresponding virtually
concatenated group.
This parameter is one of the parameters that determine the
bandwidth made available to the virtually concatenated
group.
LCAS
Use to enable/disable use of the Link Capacity Adjustment
Scheme (LCAS) on the corresponding group.
Specify the path trace label(LAN port VC-12 use only).
Transmitted
Trace ID
J2 Tx Path Trace
Expected Trace Specify Expected the path trace label(LAN port VC-12 use
only).
ID
J2 Expected Path Trace
Encapsulation
Select the method of encapsulation used by the virtually
concatenated group.
GFP Channel Select the GFP channel identifier.
ID(0~255)
This field is displayed only when GFP Encapsulation is used..
Max Differential Select the maximum differential delay among the VCs
Delay(0~64) carrying the selected group that can be corrected.
A larger value increases the latency; therefore always select
the minimum value that can compensate for the expected
delay variation.
68
Chapter 3 Configuration
Extended
Select the extended signal label, which is part of the SDH
Signal
Label overhead when virtual concatenation is used.
(0~FF)
3.7.7
GFP Group
This web page allows user to set parameters of GFP group.
Figure 3-22
Table 3-8
GFP Group
Description of GFP Group function
Pull down menu
Description
VCG
Choose which VCG that will be modified.
FCS
Control the use of error detection for the payload.
PTI For Client Data Select the payload type identifier (PTI) inserted in GFP
(0~8)
frames.
UPI For Client Data Select the user payload identifier (PTI) inserted in GFP
(0~255)
frames.
Delta(1~7)
Select the number of error-free frame headers that must
be received before frame synchronization is declared.
Core & Payload Control the use of frame core and payload data
Scrambling
scrambling.
3.7.8
GFP Multiplexer
This web page allows user to set parameters of GFP multiplexer. Configure GFP
multiplexing parameters. A GFP multiplexer can handle up to four virtually
concatenated groups.
69
Chapter 3 Configuration
Figure 3-23
Table 3-9
GFP Multiplexer
Description of GFP Multiplexer function
Pull down menu
3.7.9
Description
GFP Mux Name
Use to assign a logical name to the GFP multiplexer.
Primary
The virtually concatenated group that serves as the transport
group of the GFP multiplexer output.
VCG1~ VCG6
The number indicates the fraction of the total bandwidth
guaranteed to the corresponding group.
The total bandwidth available to the GFP multiplexer output is
the bandwidth configured for the primary virtually
concatenated group.
LAPS Group
This web page allows user to set parameters of LAPS group. These parameters
are relevant only when LAPS encapsulation is used for at least one virtually
concatenated group.
Figure 3-24
Table 3-10
LAPS Group
Description of LAPS Group function
Pull down menu
VCG
Address(0~FF)
Description
Choose which VCG that will be modified.
Select the HDLC address to be used by the LAPS
70
Chapter 3 Configuration
protocol for handshaking.
The standard HDLC address for the Ethernet
encapsulated with LAPS is 4.
Control(0~FF)
Select the HDLC control address to be used by the LAPS
protocol for handshaking.
The standard HDLC control value for the Ethernet
encapsulated with LAPS is 3.
SAPI value(0~FFFF) Select the service access point identifier (SAPI) for the
LAPS protocol.
The standard SAPI for the Ethernet MAC is FE01.
3.7.10
Cross Connect
This web page allows user to set Cross Connect. Map the payload from the
various MUXpro interfaces to specific TUs, for transmission through the SDH link.
Figure 3-25
Table 3-11
Cross Connect
Description of Cross Connect function
Pull down menu
Description
Operation
Choose which VCG or E1 that will be mapped
Optical 1 & 2
If the Protection is disabled, user can choose which optical
port to be used.
71
Chapter 3 Configuration
3.7.11
Protection
This web page allows user to set Protection function.
Figure 3-26
Table 3-12
Protection
Description of Protection function
Pull down menu
Description
MSP 1+1
Control the use of MSP 1+1 protection switching on the link
to the SDH network
Revertive Mode
As the Optical 1 being unplugged or disconnected, the
system will automatically switch to Optical 2 for backup.
If this function Enable, as soon as the Optical 1 is back in
service for over the “Wait To Restore Times”, the system will
switch the traffic back to Optical 1 from Optical 2.
Wait To Restore When protection switching is enabled and a link interface
Times(300~720) becomes active, specify the duration of time during which all
the alarms reported by the framer will be ignored.
Switch Command
There are four command can be used to test the
connection:Clear, Lockout of Protection, Force Switch, and
Manual Switch.
3.7.12
Synchronization
This web page allows user to set the parameters of clock.
Figure 3-27
Synchronization
72
Chapter 3 Configuration
Table 3-13
Description of Synchronization function
Pull down menu
3.7.13
Description
Clock Source
There are four options:Auto, Primary Rx Clock, Second
Primary Rx Clock
Rx Clock, and Internal.
There are nineteen options:E1-1 to E1-16, Optical 1 to 2,
Second Rx Clock
and none.
There are nineteen options:E1-1 to E1-16, Optical 1 to 2,
Output Clock
and none.
There are seventeen options:E1-1 to E1-16, and none.
Bridge
This section introduces the “Bridge” functions. The “Bridge” functions include
“General Setup”, “DSCP”, “MAC Table”, “Port Bridge Config”, “Port Base VLAN”,
“Tag Base VLAN”, “VLAN Tag Priority”, “Spanning Tree”.
Figure 3-28
3.7.13.1
Bridge functions
General Setup
“General Setup” functions include Aging Time, Qos Mode, and Scheduling Mode.
Figure 3-29
General Setup
73
Chapter 3 Configuration
Table 3-14
Description of General Setup function
Pull down menu
Description
Aging
Time Select the maximum time learned MAC destination
(16~4080s)
addresses are stored.
3.7.13.2
QoS Mode
Specify the QoS criteria for directing frames to the four
prioritized egress queues of the Ethernet switch.
Scheduling Mode
Select the frame egress scheduling mode when QoS
support is enabled
DSCP
This web page allows user to set priority of DSCP. The priority “3” is the highest
priority.
Figure 3-30
3.7.13.3
DSCP
MAC Table
This web page allows user to set static MAC mapping of LAN Ports
74
Chapter 3 Configuration
Figure 3-31
3.7.13.4
MAC Table
Port Bridge Config
This web page allows user to set parameters of VLAN of LAN ports.
Figure 3-32
Table 3-15
Port Bridge Config
Description of Port Bridge Config function
Pull down menu
Description
LAN
Choose which LAN port to be modified.
VLAN Mode
Select the type of VLAN in which the port participates, and
the frame-processing mode.
Egress Mode
Specify the egress mode for the corresponding port of the
Ethernet switch.
PVID(1~4094)
Specify the default VLAN ID (VID) associated with the
corresponding port.
Port Priority
(0~255)
Specify the port priority, used by STP to generate the port
ID.
Port Cost
(0~65535)
Specify the cost added by the port to the total cost to the
root bridge.
75
Chapter 3 Configuration
3.7.13.5
Port Base VLAN
This web page allows user to set which LAN combine with VCG or MGN port.
Figure 3-33
3.7.13.6
Port Base VLAN
Tag Base VLAN
This web page allows user to set static tag-based switching for the egress LAN
ports.
Figure 3-34
Tag Base VLAN
76
Chapter 3 Configuration
3.7.13.7
VLAN Tag Priority
This web page allows user to set the egress priority of the frames. The priority “3”
is the highest priority.
Figure 3-35
3.7.13.8
VLAN Tag Priority
Spanning Tree
This web page allows user to set the Spanning Tree Protocol parameters in
accordance with the specific requirements of the customer’s application. When the
STP Mode is set to Enable, it takes effect on LAN port 1 to 4 and the LAN port
status can be checked in this page.
Figure 3-36
Spanning Tree
77
Chapter 3 Configuration
Table 3-16
Description of Spanning Tree function
Pull down menu
Description
STP Mode
Use to enable/disable Spanning Tree function.
Priority(0~65535) Specify the bridge priority.
Forward Delay
(4~30s)
Specify the time spent in the listening and in the learning
state while moving from the Blocking to the Forwarding state.
Max Age(6~40s)
Specify the maximum age of received protocol information
before it is discarded.
Hello Time(1~10s) Specify the time interval between consecutive transmissions
of bridge protocol data units (BPDUs).
78
Chapter 4 Monitoring and Maintenance
Chapter 4. Monitoring and Maintenance
4.1
Scope
This chapter provides instructions for obtianing information about alarm message,
performance monitoring and loop testing function for diagnostic. Users can see the
details in the sections below.
4.2
“System Monitor” Main function Group Description
This section introduces the sub-functions of “System Monitor” Main function. The
“System Monitor” main function includes “Trace_ID & Signal Label” and “VCG
LCAS” functions.
Figure 4-1
4.2.1
The Sub-functions of System Monitor Main Function Group
Trace_ID & Signal Label
The web page allows user to check parameters of connection.
Figure 4-2
Trace ID and Signal Label
79
Chapter 4 Monitoring and Maintenance
4.2.2
VCG LCAS
The web page allows user to check VCG status.
Figure 4-3
4.3
VCG LCAS
“Fault Monitor” Main function Group Description
This section introduces the sub-functions of “Fault Monitor” Main function. The
“Fault Monitor” main function includes “System Alarm” and “Alarm Log” functions.
Figure 4-4
The Sub-functions of Fault Monitor Main Function Group
Table 4-1 shows the alarm messages generated by the SDH, specifies their class
(Major or Minor), type (Alarm, Performance Monitoring and State), and explains
their meaning.
Table 4-1
Message
STM1_LOS
SDH Alarm Messages
Description
Loss of signal
Corrective Actions
Type
1. Check cable
Alarm
connections to the link
connector.
2. Check line and/or
other communication
equipment providing the
link to the specified
Optical module.
3. Replace the Optical
80
Class
Major
Chapter 4 Monitoring and Maintenance
Message
Description
Corrective Actions
Type
Class
module.
STM1_LOF
Loss of frame
Clean up the Optical Alarm
fiber
Major
STM1_OOF
Out of Frame–A1, OOF state exited when Alarm
A2 incorrect for >= 4 consecutive SDH
625 us
frames are received
with
valid
framing
patterns
Major
STM1_RS_TIM
Regenerator
Check
Regenerator Alarm
section
trace section Received trace
identifier
identifier and Expected
mismatch
trace identifier setting
Minor
STM1_MS_AIS
Multiplex
AIS
section Check the higher layer Alarm
alarms
Major
STM1_MS_RDI
Multiplex section Check Multiplex section Alarm
remote
defect alarm of FAR END
indication
Minor
STM1_MS_EXC
Multiplex section Informative alert
Excessive Errors
Alarm
Major
STM1_MS_DEG
Multiplex section Informative alert
Degraded
Alarm
Minor
STM1_AU_AIS
Administrative unit Check the higher layer Alarm
AIS
alarms
Major
STM1_AU_LOP
Administrative unit Check Cross Connect Alarm
loss of pointer
setting of FAR END
Major
STM1_HP_UNEQ HO
unequipped
path Check the signal label Alarm
of received V5 byte
Minor
STM1_HP_TIM
HO path
identifier
mismatch
trace Check
HO
path Alarm
Received trace identifier
and Expected trace
identifier setting
Minor
STM1_HP_RDI
HO path remote Check HO path alarm of Alarm
defect indication FAR END
Minor
STM1_HP_EXC
Higher Order Path Informative alert
Excessive Errors
Alarm
Major
STM1_HP_DEG
Higher Order Path Informative alert
Degraded
Alarm
Minor
81
Chapter 4 Monitoring and Maintenance
Message
Description
Corrective Actions
Type
Class
STM1_TU_AIS
Tributary unit AIS Check the higher layer Alarm
alarms
Major
STM1_TU_LOP
Loss of pointer
Major
STM1_HP_LOM
Loss
multi-frames
Alarm
Major
STM1_HP_PLM
HO path payload Check the received C2 Alarm
label mismatch
byte
Minor
Check Cross Connect Alarm
setting of FAR END
of Informative alert
STM1_LP_UNEQ LO
unequipped
path Check the signal label Alarm
of received V5 byte
Minor
STM1_LP_TIM
LO path
identifier
mismatch
trace Check LO path
Alarm
Received trace identifier
and Expected trace
identifier setting
Minor
STM1_LP_PLM
LO path payload Check the received C2 Alarm
label mismatch
byte
Minor
STM1_LP_RDI
LO path remote Check LO path alarm of Alarm
defect indication FAR END
Minor
GFP_CH_ID_mis Channel
ID Check
Channel
ID Warning
match
mismatch
for setting for primary VCG
primary
VCG within GFP MUX
within GFP MUX
RX_LCAS_CRC_ Received
error
error in
mode
CRC Informative alert
LCAS
Warning
RX_LAPS_Frame Received Frame Check
Encapsulation Alarm
_mismatch
mismatch
for setting for VCG#
LAPS
Encapsulation
Minor
GFP_loss_of_syn loss of sync for Check
Encapsulation Alarm
c
GFP
setting for VCG#
Encapsulation
Major
Diff_delay_exceed Differential delay Informative alert
s_Max
exceeding
the
Maximum (loss of
alignment)
Warning
VCG_VC_LP_LO Loss
Alarm
Of Informative alert
82
Major
Chapter 4 Monitoring and Maintenance
Message
M
Description
Corrective Actions
Type
Class
Multi-frames
defect
TX_LCAS_ADD_ Defect of
NOR_timeout
NORMAL
ADD
RS_ Informative alert
after
Event
TX_LCAS_ADD_ Defect of RS_ACK Informative alert
ACK_timeout
after ADD
Event
Table 4-2 shows the alarm messages generated by the E1 module, specifies their
class (major or minor), type (alarm or performance monitoring), and explains their
meaning.
Table 4-2
Message
E1 Alarm Messages
Description
Corrective Actions
Type
Class
ET1_LOS
Loss of Synchronous –
Local lost of multi-frame
synchronization alarm on
the specified link
1. Check cable
Alarm
connections to the
link connector.
2. Check line
and/or other
communication
equipment
providing the link to
the specified E1
module.
3. Replace the E1
module.
Major
ET1_AIS
E1 AIS
Informative alert.
Alarm
Major
ES_QTR_TCA
Error Seconds – Counting Informative alert.
Error Seconds over 15
-minute threshold.
P.M.
Minor
SES_QTR_TCA
Severely Error Seconds – Informative alert.
Counting Severe Error
Seconds over
15-minute threshold.
P.M.
Major
UAS_QTR_TCA
Unavailable Second –
Counting Unavailable
Second over 15-minute
P.M.
Major
83
Informative alert.
Chapter 4 Monitoring and Maintenance
Message
Description
Corrective Actions
Type
Class
threshold.
SEFS_QTR_TC
A
Severely Error Frame
Second– Counting
Severely Error Frame
Second over 15-minute
threshold.
Informative alert.
P.M.
Major
ES_DAY_TCA
Error Seconds – Counting Informative alert.
Error Seconds over 1 day
threshold.
P.M.
Minor
SES_DAY_TCA
Severely Error Seconds –
Counting Severely Error
Seconds over 1 day
threshold.
Informative alert.
P.M.
Major
UAS_DAY_TCA
Unavailable Second –
Counting Unavailable
Second over 1 day
threshold.
Informative alert.
P.M.
Major
SEFS_DAY_TC
A
Severely Error Frame
Second– Counting
Severely Error Frame
Second over 1 day
threshold.
Informative alert.
P.M.
Major
CV_QTR_TCA
15 Minutes Code/Bipolar
Violation – Code/Bipolar
Violation over specify
threshold.
Informative alert.
P.M.
Minor
CV_DAY_TCA
1 day Code/Bipolar
Violation – Code/Bipolar
Violation over specify
threshold.
Informative alert.
P.M.
Minor
84
Chapter 4 Monitoring and Maintenance
Table 4-3 lists the alarm messages generated by the System module, specifies
their class (major or minor), type (alarm, warning, event), and explains their
meaning.
Table 4-3
System Alarm Messages
Message
Description
Corrective Actions
ClkPriOver
Range
Primary Reference Out
of Range–which the
Primary Reference is
off the PLL centre
frequency by more
than±12ppm.
ClkSecOve
rRange
Secondary Reference
Check Secondary
Out of Range –which
Reference Clock
the Secondary
source
Reference is off the PLL
centre frequency by
more than±12ppm.
Warning
ClkHoldOv
er
Indicates
that
the Check Primary and
device is in Holdover Secondary
mode.
Reference Clock
source
Warning
ClkLock
Indicates
that
the Informative alert.
device is locked to the
input reference.
Warning
FeCardFail
Fast Ethernet Daughter Check Fast Ethernet Alarm
board’s fail signal
Daughter board
Replace Fast
Ethernet Daughter
board
Major
Fan1Fail
FAN1’s fail signal
Check FAN1
Replace FAN1
Alarm
Major
Fan2Fail
FAN2’s fail signal
Check FAN2
2. Replace FAN2
Alarm
Major
Pwr1Fail
Power1’s fail signal
Check Power1
Replace Power1
Alarm
Major
Pwr2Fail
Power2’s fail signal
Check Power2
Replace Power2
Alarm
Major
85
Check Primary
Reference Clock
source
Type
Class
Warning
Chapter 4 Monitoring and Maintenance
Message
4.3.1
Description
Corrective Actions
board’s Check E1 Daughter
board
Replace E1
Daughter board
Type
E1CardFail
E1 Daughter
fail signal
E1CardIns
erted
E1 Daughter board has Informative alert.
been inserted
Warning
E1CardRe
moved
E1 Daughter board has Informative alert.
been removed
Warning
System Alarm
The web page allows user to check the current alarm.
Figure 4-5
System Alarm
86
Alarm
Class
Major
Chapter 4 Monitoring and Maintenance
4.3.2
Alarm Log
This web page allows user to check alarm history.
Figure 4-6
Alarm Log
87
Chapter 4 Monitoring and Maintenance
4.4
“Performance Monitor” Main function Group Description
This section introduces the sub-functions of “Performance Monitor” Main function.
The “Performance Monitor” main function includes “Section”, “VC-4”, “VC-3”,
“VC-12”, and “E1” submenus.
This Statistics include the statistics of CV, ES, SES, and SEFS/UAS of near end
and far end, it includes 15 mins and 1 day statistics of current and history data.
Figure 4-7
The Sub-functions of Performance Monitor Main Function Group
Table 4-4 describes the performance evaluation and monitoring functions provided
by the MUXpro.
88
Chapter 4 Monitoring and Maintenance
The performance parameters defined for MUXpro statistics are listed below:
Table 4-4
PM Messages
CV
BIP-8 errors,
RS:B1 byte
MS:B2 bytes
Path:B3 byte
VC:BIP-2 in the V5 byte
ES
At each layer, an Error Second (ES) is a second with one or more
Coding Violations at that layer OR one or more incoming defects (e.g.,
SEF, LOS, AIS, LOP) at that layer has occurred.
SES
A Severely Error Second (SES) is a second with x or more CVs at that
layer, or a second during which at least one or more incoming defects at
that layer has occurred.
SEFS
A Severely Error Framing Second (SEFS) is a second containing one or
more SEF events.
UAS
An unavailable second is calculated by counting the number of seconds
that the interface is unavailable.
The SONET/SDH interface is set to be unavailable at the onset of 10
contiguous SESs.
Once unavailable, the SONET/SDH interface becomes available at the
onset of 10 contiguous seconds with no SESs.
A special case exists when the 10 second period leading to available or
unavailable time crosses a 900 second statistics window boundary, as
the foregoing description implies that the CV, ES, SES, SEFS, and UAS
counts the PREVIOUS interval must be adjusted.
Figure 4-8
15 Mins Statistics Current
89
Chapter 4 Monitoring and Maintenance
Figure 4-9
15 Mins Statistics History
Figure 4-10
Day Statistics Current
Figure 4-11
Day Statistics History
90
Chapter 4 Monitoring and Maintenance
4.5
“Statistics” Main function Group Description
This section introduces the sub-functions of “Statistics” Main function. The
“Statistics” main function includes “LAN RMOS” and “VCG RMON” submenus.
Figure 4-12
4.5.1
The Sub-functions of Statistics Main Function Group
LAN RMON
This web page allows user to check the statistics of LAN Port.
Figure 4-13
LAN RMON
91
Chapter 4 Monitoring and Maintenance
4.5.2
VCG RMON
This web page allows user to check the statistics of VCG.
Figure 4-14
4.6
VCG RMON
“Diagnostics” Main function Group Description
This section introduces the sub-functions of “Diagnostics” Main function. The
“Diagnostics” main function has only one function “Loopback”.
4.6.1
Loopback
When the system is powered up, MUXpro Series with tributary E1 card will
execute self-test procedure to check whether the card is ready or failed to
initialized. Moreover, MUXpro Series will also check whether the Ethernet card is
available or not.
The self-test helps to validate system’s integrity. If tributary E1 card has failed,
“TRI” LED in the front panel will be flashed till the tributary E1 card returns to
working stage.
The “Loopback” function allows user to test the connection except power-up
self-test. User can choose which kind of the loopback to be executed.
92
Chapter 4 Monitoring and Maintenance
Figure 4-15
Loopback
The MUXpro series support Optical and E1 user-controlled loopback function.
Both Optical and E1 support local (analog) loopback and remote (digital) loopback.
The available test and loopback functions are described in the following
paragraphs. The front panel LED (TST) of MUXpro will be ON while the loopback
test is taking place.
Local Looback:
When the local loopback is activated on a selected port, it connects the port
transmitting signal to the input of the receive path. The test signal is provided by
the equipment, which is routed by the DXC data pump to that port. This equipment
must receive its own transmission.
93
Chapter 4 Monitoring and Maintenance
Figure 4-16
Figure 4-17
Optical Local Loopback
E1 Local Loopback
Remote Loopback:
When the remote loopback is activated on a selected port, it returns the received
signal towards the remote user equipment connected to the same port. The
remote loopback is performed by connecting the port receiving the signal, after
regeneration, to the transmit path. The test signal is provided by user’s equipment,
which is connected to the remote end of the link, and it must receive its own
transmission.
94
Chapter 4 Monitoring and Maintenance
Figure 4-18
Figure 4-19
Optical Remote Loopback
E1 Remote Loopback
95
Appendix A Introduction
Appendix A Introduction
A.1
MUXpro 820 and 8216 Craft Port (DB-9 Connector)
MUXpro 820 and 8216’s Craft port use DB-9 connector, and pin descriptions for
the DB-9 lists are shown in the following table. They are RS232 / V.28 electric
signal interfaces.
Table A-1
Craft port pin assignment for MUXpro 820, 8216
Description
A.2
Source
Transmitted data
2
DTE
Received data
3
DCE
Signal ground
5
Common
MUXpro 820 and 8216 Alarm Port (DB-9 Connector)
Table A-2
A.3
DB9 pin (male)
Alarm port pin assignment for MUXpro 820, 8216
DB9
(female)
Pin 1
Pin 2
Pin 3
Pin 4
Pin 5
Pin 6
Pin 7
Pin 8
Signal
RA
RA
RA
RA
RV
RV
RV
RV
MAJ_A MAJ_B MIN_A MIN_B MAJ_A MAJ_B MIN_A MIN_B
Pin 9
MUXpro 820 and 8216 on Board Ethernet Port (RJ-45)
Table A-3
On-Board Ethernet port pin assignment for MUXpro 820, 8216
RJ-45
Pin 1
Pin 2
Pin 3
Pin 4
Signal
TPO+( TPO-(o
TPi+(i) N/C
o)
)
97
Pin 5
Pin 6
Pin 7
N/C
TPi-(i) N/C
Pin 8
Pin 9
N/C
N/C
Appendix A Introduction
A.4
MUXpro 820 and 8216 E1 Interface (SCSI II, Female)
Table A-4
E1 Interface SCSI II, female pin assignment for MUXpro 820, 8216
SCSI –II pin number
Description
1/2/35/36
FGND
19/20
R_TIP7 / T_TIP7
21/22
R_TIP6 / T_TIP6
23/24
R_TIP5 / T_TIP5
25/26
R_TIP4 / T_TIP4
27/28
R_TIP3 / T_TIP3
29/30
R_TIP2 / T_TIP2
31/32
R_TIP1 / T_TIP1
33/34
R_TIP0 / T_TIP0
53/54
R_RING7 / T_RING7
55/56
R_RING6 / T_RING6
57/58
R_RING5 / T_RING5
59/60
R_RING4 / T_RING4
61/62
R_RING3 / T_RING3
63/64
R_RING2 / T_RING2
65/66
R_RING1 / T_RING1
67/68
R_RING0 / T_RING0
98
Appendix B Ordering Information
Appendix B Ordering Information
B.1
MUXpro 820 Order Information
Part Number
Product Code
Description
MUXpro 820 Ethernet over SDH
MUXpro 820F
000-110-0001L
/BE/SC/A/?
000-110-0004L
000-110-0010L
000-110-0011L
10/100BaseTx Fast Ethernet over SDH device, with 8 ports
on board balanced E1 interface, SC type optical fiber
connector and AC power inlet.
MUXpro 820F
/BE/SC/D
10/100BaseTx Fast Ethernet over SDH device,
with 8 ports on board balanced E1 interface, SC
type optical fiber connector and -48VDC power
inlet.
MUXpro
820F/UE/SC/A
10/100BaseTx Fast Ethernet over SDH device,
with 8 ports on board unbalanced E1 interface,
SC type optical fiber connector and AC power
inlet.
MUXpro
820F/UE/SC/D
10/100BaseTx Fast Ethernet over SDH device,
with 8 ports on board unbalanced E1 interface,
SC type optical fiber connector and -48VDC
power inlet.
000-110-0005L /BP8B
Back Panel, with wire-wrap connectors for 8 ports
balanced E1 from SCSI connector
000-110-0006L /BP8U
Back Panel, with BNC connectors for 8 ports
unbalanced E1 from SCSI connector
99
Appendix B
B.2
Ordering Information
MUXpro 8216 Order Information
Part Number
Product Code
Description
MUXpro 8216 Ethernet over SDH
10/100BaseTx Fast Ethernet over SDH
device, with 8 ports on board balanced E1
interface, SC type optical fiber connector
and redundant AC plus -48VDC power
inlet. May order optional 8 ports E1
module separately for total up to 16 ports
E1 service.
000-110-0002 MUXpro 8216F
000-110-0002L /BE/SC/AD/?
10/100BaseTx Fast Ethernet over SDH
000-110-0012L
MUXpro
8216F/UE/SC/AD
device, with 8 ports on
board unbalanced E1 interface, SC type
optical fiber connector
and redundant AC plus -48VDC power
inlet. May order
optional 8 ports E1 module separately for
total up to 16 ports
000-110-0007L /BP16B
Back Panel, with wire-wrap connectors for
16 ports balanced E1 from SCSI
connector
000-110-0008L /BP16U
Back Panel, with BNC connectors for 16
ports unbalanced E1 from SCSI connector
/&
Specify additional interface module
000-110-0003L /8E1-B
8 ports balanced E1 module
000-110-0009L /8E1-U
8 ports unbalanced E1 module
/?
Specify power cord
330-010-0001
/A
330-010-0001L
North American
10A/125V, 6 feet
330-010-0002
/E
330-010-0002L
European power cord, 3-pin (round pin),
10A/250V, 1.83M
330-010-0003
/B
330-010-0003L
British power cord, 3-pin, 10A/250V, 13A
fuse
100
power
cord,
3-pin,
Appendix B Ordering Information
330-010-0006
/I
330-010-0006L
India power cord, 3-pin, 6A/250V, 1.83M
330-010-0007
/C
330-010-0007L
China power cord, 3-pin, 10A/250V, 1.83M
101
Appendix C Trouble Report
Appendix C Trouble Report
Company
Local Representation
Purchase Order No
Equipment Serial No
Software Version
Please describe:
1. Testing Network Structure
2. Configuration
3. Testing Network Equipment
4. Trouble Description
E-MAIL:
TEL:
FAX:
Signature:
Date:
TAINET COMMUNICATION SYSTEM CORP.
E-MAIL: sales@tainet.net
103
/
FAX: 886-2-2658-3232
/
Appendix D Trouble Shooting
Appendix D Trouble Shooting
Trouble Shooting Table
1
Configured parameter values are lost after equipment restart
When user modifies or changes the parameters, the user should save the
configurations in the flash memory by entering the “Save Configuration” menu,
and then reboot the system by entering the “Reboot” menu.
2
Console / Telnet / Web User Name and Password
When accessing the device through Telnet or the Web, the user will be
prompted to enter the password. User can try the default user name “admin”
and password “admin” to log in.
3
Access denied
There are several conditions that will disable user’s access to the device via
Console, Telnet or the Web.
Message
Solution
Incorrect user
The password entered is incorrect. Check the user name
and password again.
105
Appendix E Abbreviations
Appendix E Abbreviations
For the purpose of this recommendation, the following abbreviations are used in G.783:
Abbreviation
Description
AIS
Alarm Indication Signal
ALS
Automatic Laser Shutdown
APS
Automatic Protection Switching
AU
Administrative Unit
AUG
Administrative Unit Group
BER
Bit Error Ratio
BIP
Bit Interleaved Parity
CM
Connection Matrix
CMISE
Common Management Information Service Element
DCC
Data Communications Channel
EOW
Engineering Order-Wire
ES
Error Second
FEBE
Far End Block Error
FERF
Far End Receive Failure
HCS
Higher order Connection Supervision
HOA
Higher Order Assembler
HOI
Higher Order Interface
HP
Higher order Path
HPA
Higher order Path Adaptation
HPC
Higher order Path Connection
HPOM
Higher order Path Overhead Monitor
HPT
Higher order Path Termination
HUG
Higher order path Unequipped Generator
LCS
Lower order Connection Supervision
LOF
Loss Of Frame
LOI
Lower Order Interface
LOM
Loss Of Multi-frames
LOP
Loss Of Pointer
LOS
Loss Of Signal
107
Appendix E
Abbreviations
Abbreviation
Description
LP
Lower order Path
LPA
Lower order Path Adaptation
LPC
Lower order Path Connection
LPOM
Lower order Path Overhead Monitor
LPT
Lower order Path Termination
LTI
Loss of all Incoming Timing references
LUG
Lower order path Unequipped Generator
MCF
Message Communications Function
MS
Multiplex Section
MSA
Multiplex Section Adaptation
MSOH
Multiplex Section OverHead
MSP
Multiplex Section Protection
MST
Multiplex Section Termination
NDF
New Data Flag
NE
Network Element
NEF
Network Element Function
NNI
Network Node Interface
OFS
Out-of-Frame Second
OHA
OverHead Access
OOF
Out Of Frame
PDH
Plesiochronous Digital Hierarchy
PPI
PDH Physical Interface
POH
Path OverHead
PSE
Protection Switch Event
RS
Regenerator Section
RSOH
Regenerator Section OverHead
RST
Regenerator Section Termination
SD
Signal Degrade
SDH
Synchronous Digital Hierarchy
SDXC
Synchronous Digital hierarchy Cross-Connect
SEMF
Synchronous Equipment Management Function
SES
Severely Error Second
SETG
Synchronous Equipment Timing Generator
SETPI
Synchronous Equipment Timing Physical Interface
SETS
Synchronous Equipment Timing Source
SF
Signal Fail
108
Appendix E Abbreviations
Abbreviation
Description
SLM
Signal Label Mismatch
SPI
SDH Physical Interface
STM
Synchronous Transport Module
TIM
Trace Identifier Mismatch
TMN
Telecommunications Management Network
TU
Tributary Unit
UNEQ
UnEquipped
VC
Virtual Container
ACO
Alarm Cut Off
ASW
Application SoftWare
BFW
Boot FirmWare
CIT
Craft Interface Terminal
CM
Configuration Management
FM
Fault Management
HW
HardWare
IP
Internet protocol
LU
Line interface Unit card
MIB
Management Information Base
MPU
Main Processing Unit
NE
Network Element
NM
Network Manager
OAM&P
Operations, administration, maintenance and provisioning
PM
Performance Monitoring
POST
Power-On Self-Test
RTC
Real Time Clock
SD
Signal Degrade
SF
Signal Failure
SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol
SW
SoftWare
TCA
Threshold Crossing Alert
VCDB
Variable Configuration Data Block
109
Appendix F
Glossary
Appendix F Glossary
KEYWORD
10 Base-T
100 Base-T
EXPLANATION
Part of the original IEEE 802.3 standard, 10 Base-T is the Ethernet
specification of 10 Mbps base-band that uses two pair of
twisted-pair, Category 3, 4 or 5 cabling- using one pair to send data
and the other to receive. 10 Base-T has a distant limit of about 100
meters per segment.
Based on the IEEE 802.3u standard, 100BaseT is the Fast Ethernet
specification of 100 Mbps base-band that uses UTP wiring.
100BaseT sends link pulse over the network when no traffic is
present.
Address Mask
The address mask for an IP address is used to identify the boundary
between the network portion of the address and host portion.
ADSL
Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line: An evolving high-speed
transmission technology originally developed by Bell-core and mow
standardized by ANSI as T1.413.
Uses existing UTP copper wires from Telephone Company’s central
office to subscriber’s premises.
Involves electronic equipment in the form of ADSL modems at
central office and subscriber’s premises.
Sends digital signal up and down these copper wires and sends
more information one way than the other- hence the term
“asymmetric”.
ARP
Address Resolution Protocol is a method to find a host’s physical
address from its IP address. An ARP request is sent to the network,
naming the IP address, then machine with that IP address returns its
physical address so it can receive the transmission.
ATM
Asynchronous Transfer Mode. International standard for cell relay in
which multiple service types (such as voice, video, or data) are
conveyed in fixed-length (53-byte) cells. Fixed-length cells allow cell
processing to occur in hardware, thereby reducing transit delays.
ATM is designed to take advantage of high-speed transmission
media such as E3, SONET, and T3.
111
Appendix F
Glossary
KEYWORD
EXPLANATION
Authentication
Proof that the information came from the user or location that
repeatedly sent it. One example of authenticating software is
through digital signature.
Bandwidth
This is the capacity on a link usually measured in bits-per-second
(bps).
Bridging
Bridging provides LAN-to-LAN frame forwarding services between
two or more LANs. Frames from one LAN are forwarded across a
bridge to a connected LAN. Bridging works is similar to the way
repeaters work except that bridges forward frame based on their
MAC address.
CBR
Constant Bit Rate: An ATM Forum Q-o-S class created for use in
ATM network. CBR is used for communications on precision
clocking to guarantee trustworthy delivery.
CHAP
Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol is an alternative
protocol that avoids sending password over the wire by using a
challenge/response technical.
Class A network
Part of Internet Protocol hierarchical addressing scheme. Class A
networks have only 8 bits for defining networks and 24 bits for
defining hosts on each network.
Class B network
Part of Internet Protocol hierarchical addressing scheme. Class B
networks have only 16 bits for defining networks and 16 bits for
defining hosts on each network.
Class C network
Part of Internet Protocol hierarchical addressing scheme. Class C
networks have only 24 bits for defining networks and 8 bits for
defining hosts on each network.
CLI
Command Line Interface: Allow you to configure TAINET’-s products
with maximum flexibility.
CO
Central Office. A CO is a facility that serves local telephone
subscribers. In the CO, subscriber’s lines are joined to switching
equipment that allows them to connect to each other for both local
and long distance calls.
CPE
Customer Premise Equipment is privately owned telecommunication
equipment at an organization’s site that is attached to the
telecommunication network. CPE equipment includes routers,
modem, PBX, telephones and video communication equipment.
Crossover
Ethernet Cable
A cable that wires a pin to its opposite pin, for example RX+ is wired
to TX+. This cable connects two similar device, for example, two
112
Appendix F
KEYWORD
Glossary
EXPLANATION
data terminal equipment (DTE) or data communication equipment
(DCE) devices.
DCE
Data Communication Equipment is typically a modem or other type
of communication device. The DCE sits between the DET (data
terminal equipment) and a transmission circuit such as a phone line.
DHCP
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol automatically assigns IP
address to clients when they log on. DHCP centralizes IP address
management on the central computers that run the DHCP server
program.
DNS
Domain Name System. A database of domain names and their IP
address-e-s. DNS is the primary naming system for many distributed
networks, including the internet.
Domain Name
The unique name that identifies an Internet site. Domain Names
always have 2 or more parts that are separated by dots. Generally
speaking, the part on the left is the most specific and the part on the
right is the most general.
DSL
Digital Subscriber Line technologies enhance the data capacity of
the existing twisted-pair wire that runs between the local telephone
company switching offices and most homes and offices. There are
actually seven types of DSL services, ranging in speeds form 16 K
bits/sec to 52 M bits/sec. The services are either symmetric (traffic
flows at the same speed in both directions) or asymmetrical (the
downstream capacities higher than the upstream capacities). DSL
connections are point-to-point dedicated circuits, which means that
they are always connected. There is no dial-up. There is also no
switching, which means that the line is a direct connection into the
carrier’s frame relay, ATM or Internet-connect system.
DSLAM
A Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiple-x-e-r is a network device.
Usually at a telephone company central office, that receives signals
from multiple customer Digital Subscriber Line connections and puts
the signals on the a high-speed backbone line using multiplexing
techniques. Depending on the product, DSLAM Multiple-x-e-r
connects DSL lines with some combination of asynchronous transfer
mode ATM, frame relay or IP networks.
DTE
Originally, Data Terminal Equipment meant Dumb Terminal
Equipment. But today it is a computer, bridge or router that
interconnects local area network (LAN) in increasingly more
113
Appendix F
Glossary
KEYWORD
EXPLANATION
intelligent ways.
Dynamic route
Also known as adaptive routing, this technique automatically adapts
to traffic or physical network revisions.
Ethernet
A very common method of networking computers in a LAN. There
are a number of adaptations to the IEEE 802.3 Ethernet standard,
including adaptations with data rates of 10 Mbps and 100 Mbps over
coaxial cable, twisted-pair cable and fiber-optical cable.
FTP
File transfer protocol: The TCP/IP protocol used for transmitting files
between network nodes, it supports a broad range of file types and is
defined in RFC 959.
Gateway
A gateway is a computer system or other device that acts as a
translator between two systems that do not use the same
communication protocols, data formatting structures, languages
and/or architecture.
HTTP
Hyper Text Transfer Protocol. The most common protocol used on
the Internet HTTP is the primary protocol used for web sites and web
browsers. It is also prone to certain kinds of attack.
IGMP
Internet Group Management Protocol: Employed by IP hosts, the
protocol that reports their multicast group membership to an
adjacent multicast router.
IP
Internet Protocol. The IP (currently IP version 4), is the underlying
protocol for routing packets on the Internet and other TCP/IP-based
networks.
IP Pool
Internet Protocol Pool refers to the collective group of IP address
locates in any particular place.
ISP
Internet Service Provider connections into the Internet for home
users and businesses. There are local, regional, national, and global
ISPs. You can think of local ISPs as the gatekeepers into Internet.
Jack Type
Different type of jacks (RJ-11, RJ-45 or RJ-48) can be used for an
ISDN line. The RJ-11 is the most common in the world and is most
often used for analog phones, modems and fax machines. RJ-48
and RJ-45 are essentially the same, as they both have the same
8-pin configuration. An RJ-11 jack can fit into an RJ-45 / RJ-48
connector, however, an RJ-45/RJ-48 cannot fit into an RJ-11
connector.
LAN
Local Area Network is a shared communication system to which
many computers are attached. A LAN, as its mane implies, is limited
114
Appendix F
KEYWORD
Glossary
EXPLANATION
to a local area. This has to do more with the electrical characteristics
of the medium than the fact that many early LANs.
LED
Light Emitting Diode. LED are visual indicators that relay information
about the status of specific Scorpio 1401 / 02 functions to user by
lighting up, turning off or blinking. LED-slugs are usually found on
the front panel of the physical device. Examples include Status,
Power and System LEDS.
LLCMultiplexing
LLC encapsulation allows multiplexing of multiple protocols over a
single ATM virtual circuit. By prefixing the PDU (Payload Data Unit)
with an IEEE 802.2 Logical Link Control (LLC) header, each protocol
can be identified.
Loop-reach
Loop reach defines speed that can be attained at various distances.
This is very important for DSL technology as distance from the CO
influences attainable speeds.
MAC
On a local area network (LAN) or other network, the Media Access
Control (MAC) address is your computer’s unique hardware number.
(On an Ethernet LAN, it is the mane as your Ethernet address). The
MAC layer frames data for transmitted as a stream of bits.
Modem
Modulator-demodulator: A device that converts digital signal to
analog and vice-versa so that digital information can be transmitted
over analog communication facilities, such as voice-grade telephone
lines.
Name Resolution
The allocation of an IP address to a host name. See DNS.
NAT
Network Address Translation is the translation of an Internet
Protocol address used within one network to a different IP address
known within another network. NAPT extends the notion of
translation one step further by also translating transport identifier
(e.g., TCP and UDP port numbers, ICMP query identifiers). This
allows the transport identifiers of a number of private hosts to be
multiplexed into the transport identifiers of a single external address.
NAPT allows a set of hosts to share a single external address.
Network
Any time you connect 2 or more computers together so that they can
share resources, you have a computer network. Connect 2 or more
networks together and you have an internet.
Node
Any single computer connected to a network.
PAP
Password Authentication Protocol (PAP) is a security protocol that
requires users to enter password before accessing a security
115
Appendix F
Glossary
KEYWORD
EXPLANATION
system. The user’s name and password are sent over the wire to a
server there they are compared with a database of user account
names and password. This technical is vulnerable to wiretapping
(eavesdropping) because the password can be captured and used
by someone to log onto the system.
Port
An Internet port refers to a number that is part of a URL, appearing
after a colon (:) right after the domain name, Every service on an
Internet server listens on a particular port number on that server.
Most services have standard port numbers, e.g., Web servers
normally listen on port 80.
An interface on a computer for connecting peripherals or device to
Port (H/W)
the computer. A printer port, for example, is an interface that is
designed to have a printer connected to it. Ports can be defined by
specific hardware.
POTS
Plain Old Telephone Service is the analog telephone service that
runs over copper twisted-pair wires and is based on the original Bell
telephone system. Twisted-pair wires connect homes and
businesses to a neighborhood central office. This is called the local
loop. The central loop. The central office is connected to other
central offices and long-distance facilities.
PPP
Point to point. PPP encapsulates and transmits IP (Internet protocol)
data-gram over serial point-to-point links. PPP works with other
protocol such as IPX (Internet work Packet Exchange).
RIP
Routing Information Protocol is an interior or intra-domain routing
protocol that uses the distance-vector routing algorithms. RIP is
used on the Internet and is common in the NetWare environment as
a method for exchange routing information between routers.
Router
A device that connects two networks together. Routers monitor,
direct and filter information that passes between these networks.
Because of their location, routers are a good place to install traffic or
mail filter. Routers are also prone to attacks because they contain a
great deal of information about a network.
Server
A computer, or a software package, that provides a specific kind of
service to client software running on the computers.
SNMP
System Network Management Protocol is a popular management
protocol defined by the Internet community for TCP/IP networks. It is
a communication protocol for collecting information from device on
116
Appendix F
KEYWORD
Glossary
EXPLANATION
the network.
Static Routing
Static routers tell the Scorpio routing information that it cannot learn
automatically through other means. The need for Static Routing can
arise in cases their RIP is disabled on the LAN or a remote network
is beyond the one that is directly connected to a remote node.
VC-base
multiplexing
Each ATM VC carries PDU-s of exactly one protocol type. When
multiple protocols need to be transported, there is a separate VC for
each protocol.
WAN
Wide Area Networks link geographically dispersed offices in other
cities or around the globe. Just about any long-distance
communication medium can serve as a WAN link, including switched
and permanent telephone circuits, terrestrial radio systems and
satellite system.
117
Appendix G Multiplexing Structure
Appendix G Multiplexing Structure
MUXpro series’ multiplexing structure is as above.
**MUXpro series do not support DS3/E3
119
Appendix H
Appendix H STM-1 Frame Structure
MUXpro series support standard STM-1 frame structure as above.
121
STM-1 Frame Structure
Appendix I E1 Shape and Jitter Tolerance
Appendix I E1 Shape and Jitter Tolerance
269ns
244+25
V
20%
100%
10%
20%
10%
244+50
194ns
50%
Normal pulse
244ns
219ns
244-25
0%
20%
488 ns
244+244
Mask of the pulse at 2048Kb/s interface
A0
A1
A2
Sinusoidal input
Jitter Amplitude
(pk-pk UI)
f0
f1
f2
Jitter frequency
f3
f4
E1 Lower Limit of Maximum Input Jitter Tolerance
MUXpro series meet the standard E1 sharp and Jitter tolerance.
p-p Amplitude
Frequency
A1
A2
F1
F2
F3
F4
1.5UIpp
0.2UIpp
20Hz
2400Hz
18KHz
100KHz
123