Professional Radio
GP600 Series
Basic Service Manual
68P64115B23A
Issue: June 2000
ii
Computer Software Copyrights
The Motorola products described in this manual may include copyrighted Motorola computer programs stored
in semiconductor memories or other media. Laws in the United States and other countries preserve for Motorola certain exclusive rights for copyrighted computer programs, including the exclusive right to copy or reproduce in any form, the copyrighted computer program. Accordingly, any copyrighted Motorola computer
programs contained in the Motorola products described in this manual may not be copied or reproduced in
any manner without the express written permission of Motorola. Furthermore, the purchase of Motorola products shall not be deemed to grant, either directly or by implication, estoppel or otherwise, any license under
the copyrights, patents or patent applications of Motorola, except for the normal non-exclusive royalty-free
license to use that arises by operation of law in the sale of a product.
iii
SAFETY INFORMATION
Read this information before using your radio.
SAFE AND EFFICIENT OPERATION OF MOTOROLA TWO-WAY RADIOS
This document provides information and instructions for the safe and efficient operation of Motorola Portable and
Mobile Two-Way Radios. The information provided in this document supersedes the general safety information
contained in user guides published prior to 1 January 1998.
For information regarding radio use in hazardous areas, please refer to the Factory Mutual (FM) approval manual
supplement.
EXPOSURE TO RADIO FREQUENCY ENERGY
Your Motorola Two-Way Radio, which generates and radiates radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic energy
(EME), is designed to comply with the following National and International Standards and Guidelines regarding
exposure of human beings to radio frequency electromagnetic energy:
Federal Communications Commission Report and Order No. FCC 96-326 (August 1996)
American National Standards Institute (C95.1 - 1992)
National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP-1986)
International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNRP- 1986)
European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization (CENELEC):
- ENV 50166-1 1995 E
Human exposure to electromagnetic fields Low
frequency (0 Hz to 10 kHz)
- ENV 50166-2 1995 E
Human exposure to electromagnetic fields High
frequency (10 kHz to 300 GHz)
- Proceedings of SC211/B 1996
“Safety Considerations for Human Exposure to EMFs from
Mobile Telecommunication Equipment (MTE) in the Frequency Range 30MHz - 6 GHz.” (EMF - Electro-Magnetic
Fields)
To assure optimal radio performance and to ensure that your exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic
energy is within the guidelines in the above standards, always adhere to the following procedures:
PORTABLE RADIO OPERATION AND EME EXPOSURE
2.5 to 5.0 cm
(1 to 2 in.)
When transmitting with a portable radio, hold radio in a vertical position with the
microphone 2.5 to 5.0 centimeters (one to two inches) away from the mouth. Keep
antenna at least 2.5 centimeters (one inch) from your head or body when transmitting.
If you wear a portable two-way radio on your body, ensure that the antenna is at
least 2.5 centimeters (one inch) from the body when transmitting.
ELECTROMAGNETIC INTERFERENCE/COMPATIBILITY
NOTE Nearly every electronic device is susceptible to electromagnetic interference (EMI) if
inadequately shielded, designed, or alternately configured for electromagnetic compatibility.
To avoid electromagnetic interference and/or compatibility conflicts, turn off your radio in any facility where
posted notices instruct you to do so. Hospital or health facilities may be using equipment that is sensitive to
external RF energy.
When instructed to do so, turn off your radio when on board an aircraft. Any use of a radio must be in accordance with airline regulations or crew instructions.
iv
SAFETY INFORMATION
OPERATIONAL WARNINGS
Vehicles with an air bag
!
WARNING: Do not place a portable radio in the area over an air bag or in the air bag deployment area. Air bags inflate with great force. If a portable radio is placed in the air bag deployment area and the air bag inflates, the radio may be propelled with great force and cause
serious injury to occupants of vehicle.
Potentially explosive atmospheres
!
WARNING: Turn off your Two-Way radio when you are in any area with a potentially explosive
atmosphere, unless it is a radio type especially qualified for use in such areas (e.g. FM or
Cenelec approved). Sparks in a potentially explosive atmosphere can cause an explosion or
fire resulting in bodily injury or even death.
Batteries
!
WARNING: Do not replace or recharge batteries in a potentially explosive atmosphere. Contact sparking may occur while installing or removing batteries and cause an explosion.
Blasting caps and areas
!
NOTE
WARNING: To avoid possible interference with blasting operations, turn off your radio when
you are near electrical blasting caps. In a “blasting area” or in areas posted “turn off twoway radio”, obey all signs and instructions.
The areas with potentially explosive atmospheres referred to above include fuelling areas such as:
below decks on boats; fuel or chemical transfer or storage facilities; areas where the air contains
chemicals or particles, such as grain, dust or metal powders; and any other area where you would
normally be advised to turn off your vehicle engine. Areas with potentially explosive atmospheres
are often but not always posted.
OPERATIONAL CAUTIONS
Damaged antennas
!
CAUTION: Do not use any portable two-way radio that has a damaged antenna. If a damaged
antenna comes into contact with your skin, a minor burn can result.
Batteries
!
CAUTION: All batteries can cause property damage and/or bodily injury such as burns if a
conductive material such as jewellry, keys or beaded chains touch exposed terminals. The
conductive material may complete an electrical circuit (short circuit) and become quite hot.
Exercise care in handling any charged battery, particularly when placing it inside a pocket,
purse or other container with metal objects.
v
Table of Contents
Chapter 1
INTRODUCTION
1.0 Scope of Manual ..................................................................................................1-1
2.0 Warranty and Service Support.............................................................................1-1
2.1 Warranty Period and Return Instructions .......................................................1-1
2.2 After Warranty Period .....................................................................................1-1
2.3 European Radio Support Centre (ERSC).......................................................1-2
2.4 Piece Parts .....................................................................................................1-2
2.5 Technical Support...........................................................................................1-3
3.0 Radio Model Information......................................................................................1-4
Chapter 2
INTRINSICALLY SAFE RADIO INFORMATION
1.0 FMRC Approved Equipment ................................................................................2-1
2.0 Repair of FMRC Approved Products ...................................................................2-2
2.1 Repair .............................................................................................................2-2
2.2 Relabelling......................................................................................................2-2
2.3 Do Not Substitute Options or Accessories .....................................................2-3
Chapter 3
MAINTENANCE
1.0 Introduction ..........................................................................................................3-1
2.0 Preventive Maintenance ......................................................................................3-1
2.1 Inspection .......................................................................................................3-1
2.2 Cleaning Procedures ......................................................................................3-1
3.0 Safe Handling of CMOS and LDMOS Devices ....................................................3-2
4.0 Repair Procedures and Techniques — General ..................................................3-3
5.0 Disassembling and Reassembling the Radio — General ....................................3-3
6.0 Radio Disassembly — Detailed ...........................................................................3-4
6.1 Front Cover from Chassis Disassembly .........................................................3-4
6.2 Chassis Assembly Disassembly.....................................................................3-6
6.3 Keypad, Display, and Keypad/Option Board Disassembly.............................3-7
6.4 Speaker, Microphone, and Universal Connector Flex Disassembly...............3-8
6.5 PTT Disassembly ...........................................................................................3-9
6.6 Control Top Disassembly .............................................................................3-10
7.0 Radio Reassembly — Detailed .......................................................................... 3-10
7.1 PTT Reassembly ..........................................................................................3-10
7.2 Control Top Reassembly ..............................................................................3-10
7.3 Speaker, Microphone, and Universal Connector Flex Reassembly ............. 3-10
7.4 Keypad, Display, and Keypad Option Board Reassembly ........................... 3-10
7.5 Chassis Assembly Reassembly ...................................................................3-11
7.6 Chassis and Front Cover Reassembly .........................................................3-11
vi
8.0 Option Board Installation ................................................................................... 3-12
9.0 Mechanical View and Parts List......................................................................... 3-14
9.1 GP640 Exploded View and Parts List .......................................................... 3-14
9.2 GP680 Exploded View and Parts List .......................................................... 3-16
10.0 Service Aids ....................................................................................................... 3-18
11.0 Test Equipment.................................................................................................. 3-19
12.0 Programming/Test Cable................................................................................... 3-20
Chapter 4
PERFORMANCE TESTING
1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................... 4-1
2.0 Receiver Performance Tests ............................................................................... 4-1
3.0 Transmitter Performance Tests ........................................................................... 4-2
Chapter 5
RADIO TUNING AND PROGRAMMING
1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................... 5-1
2.0 Global Radio Tuning Setup.................................................................................. 5-1
2.1 Initial Test Equipment Setup .......................................................................... 5-2
3.0 CPS Programming Setup .................................................................................... 5-2
Chapter 6
1.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
5.0
MODEL CHART AND TEST SPECIFICATION
Model Chart (VHF)............................................................................................... 6-1
Model Chart (UHF) .............................................................................................. 6-1
Model Chart (UHF2) ............................................................................................ 6-2
Model Chart (300R1) ........................................................................................... 6-2
Specifications - Professional GP600 Series Radios ............................................ 6-3
Chapter 7
POWER UP SELF-TEST
1.0 Error Codes ......................................................................................................... 7-1
Chapter 1
INTRODUCTION
1.0
Scope of Manual
This manual is intended for use by service technicians familiar with similar types of equipment. It
contains service information required for the equipment described and is current as of the printing
date. Changes which occur after the printing date may be incorporated by a complete Manual
revision or alternatively as additions.
NOTE Before operating or testing these units, please read the Safety Information Section in the
front of this manual.
2.0
Warranty and Service Support
Motorola offers long term support for its products. This support includes full exchange and/or repair
of the product during the warranty period, and service/ repair or spare parts support out of warranty.
Any "return for exchange" or "return for repair" by an authorised Motorola Dealer must be
accompanied by a Warranty Claim Form. Warranty Claim Forms are obtained by contacting an
Authorised Motorola Dealer.
2.1
Warranty Period and Return Instructions
The terms and conditions of warranty are defined fully in the Motorola Dealer or Distributor or
Reseller contract. These conditions may change from time to time and the following notes are for
guidance purposes only.
In instances where the product is covered under a "return for replacement" or "return for repair"
warranty, a check of the product should be performed prior to shipping the unit back to Motorola.
This is to ensure that the product has been correctly programmed or has not been subjected to
damage outside the terms of the warranty.
Prior to shipping any radio back to the appropriate Motorola warranty depot, please contact
Customer Resources (Please see page 2 and page 3 in this Chapter). All returns must be
accompanied by a Warranty Claim Form, available from your Customer Services representative.
Products should be shipped back in the original packaging, or correctly packaged to ensure no
damage occurs in transit.
2.2
After Warranty Period
After the Warranty period, Motorola continues to support its products in two ways.
1.
Motorola's Radio Aftermarket and Accessory Division (AAD) offers a repair service to both
end users and dealers at competitive prices.
2.
AAD supplies individual parts and modules that can be purchased by dealers who are technically capable of performing fault analysis and repair.
1-2
2.3
INTRODUCTION
European Radio Support Centre (ERSC)
The ERSC Customer Information Desk is available through the following service numbers:
Austria:
06 60 75 41
Italy:
16 78 77 387
Belgium:
08 00 72 471
Luxemburg:
08 00 23 27
Denmark:
80 01 55 72
Netherlands:
60 22 45 13
Finland:
08 00 11 49 10
Norway:
80 01 11 15
France:
05 90 30 90
Portugal:
05 05 49 35 70
Germany:
01 30 18 75 24
Spain:
90 09 84 902
Greece:
00 80 04 91 29 020
Sweden:
02 07 94 307
UK:
08 00 96 90 95
Switzerland:
1 55 30 82
Ireland:
18 00 55 50 21
Iceland:
80 08 147
Or dial Customer Care Centre:
Tel: +49 6128 70 2618
Please use these numbers for repair enquiries only
2.4
Piece Parts
Some replacement parts, spare parts, and/or product information can be ordered directly. If a
complete Motorola part number is assigned to the part, it is available from Motorola Radio
Aftermarket and Accessory Division (AAD). If no part number is assigned, the part is not normally
available from Motorola. If the part number is appended with an asterisk, the part is serviceable by
Motorola Depot only. If a parts list is not included, this generally means that no user-serviceable
parts are available for that kit or assembly.
All enquiries should be directed to:
Motorola GmbH
European Parts Department
65232 Taunusstein
Germany.
Warranty and Service Support
2.5
1-3
Technical Support
Motorola Product Services is available to assist the dealer/distributors in resolving any malfunctions
which may be encountered.
UK/Ireland - Richard Russell
Telephone: +44 (0) 1256 488 082
Fax: +44 01256 488 080
Email: BRR001@email.mot.com
Central/East Europe - Siggy Punzenberger
Telephone: +49 (0) 6128 70 2342
Fax: +49 (0) 6128 95 1096
Email: TFG003@email.mot.com
Scandinavia - Bjorn Rambert
Telephone: +46 8 735 9282
Fax: +46 8 735 9280
Email: TCW275X@email.mot.com
Germany - Karin Struck
Telephone: +49 (0) 6128 70 2248
Fax: +49 (0) 6128 95 1082
Email: CKS026@email.mot.com
France - Lionel Lhermitte
Telephone: +33 1 6929 5722
Fax: +33 1 6929 5904
Email: TXE037@email.mot.com
Italy - Ugo Gentile
Telephone: +39 0 2822 0325
Fax: +39 0 2822 0334
Email: C13864@email.mot.com
Africa & Middle East - Ralph Schubert
Telephone: +33 (0)4 4230 5887
Fax: +33 (0)4 4230 4784
Email: ralph.schubert@Motorola.com
1-4
3.0
INTRODUCTION
Radio Model Information
The model number and serial number are located on a label attached to the back of your radio. You
can determine the RF output power, frequency band, protocols, and physical packages. The
example below shows one portable radio model number and its specific characteristics.
Table 1-1 Radio Model Number (Example: MDH25KDC9AA3AE)
MD
H
MD = Motorola Internal Use
H = Portable
Type of Model
Unit
Series
25
Freq.
Band
Power
Level
Physical
Packages
Channel
Spacing
Protocol
K
VHF
(136174MHz)
D
4-5W
C
GP140,
GP320,
GP340,
GP640.
9
Programmable
R
UHF1
(403470MHz)
E
5-6W
Feature
Level
Model
Revision
Model
Package
AA
Conventional
MDC
O
GP320
A
E
H
GP380,
GP680
AN
Conventional
5 Tone
3
GP140,
GP340,
GP640.
S
UHF2
(450-527
MHz)
N
GP1280
CK
MPT
5
GP360
B
LB1
29-42MHz
F
GP360
PW
MPT/5T
6
GP380,
GP680
C
LB2
35-50MHz
E
300R1
(300350MHz)
8
GP1280
Chapter 2
INTRINSICALLY SAFE RADIO INFORMATION
1.0
FMRC Approved Equipment
Anyone intending to use a radio in a location where hazardous concentrations of flammable material
exist (hazardous atmosphere) is advised to become familiar with the subject of intrinsic safety and
with the National Electric Code NFPA 70 (National Fire Protection Association) Article 500
(hazardous [classified] locations).
An Approval Guide, issued by Factory Mutual Research Corporation (FMRC), lists manufacturers
and the products approved by FMRC for use in such locations. FMRC has also issued a voluntary
approval standard for repair service (“Class Number 3605”).
FMRC Approval labels are attached to the radio to identify the unit as being FM
Approved for specified hazardous atmospheres. This label specifies the hazardous
FM
Class/Division/Group along with the part number of the battery that must be used.
APPROVED
Depending on the design of the portable unit, this FM label can be found on the
back of the radio housing or the bottom of the radio housing.Their Approval mark is shown below.
!
WARNING: Do not operate radio communications equipment in a hazardous atmosphere
unless it is a type especially qualified (e.g. FMRC Approved) for such use. An explosion or
fire may result.
WARNING: Do not operate the FMRC Approved Product in a hazardous atmosphere if it has
been physically damaged (e.g. cracked housing). An explosion or fire may result.
WARNING: Do not replace or charge batteries in a hazardous atmosphere. Contact sparking
may occur while installing or removing batteries and cause an explosion or fire.
WARNING: Do not replace or change accessories in a hazardous atmosphere. Contact
sparking may occur while installing or removing accessories and cause an explosion or fire.
WARNING: Do not operate the FMRC Approved Product unit in a hazardous location with the
accessory contacts exposed. Keep the connector cover in place when accessories are not
used.
WARNING: Turn radio off before removing or installing a battery or accessory.
WARNING: Do not disassemble the FMRC Approved Product unit in any way that exposes
the internal electrical circuits of the unit.
Radios must ship from the Motorola manufacturing facility with the hazardous atmosphere capability
and FM Approval labeling. Radios will not be “upgraded” to this capability and labeled in the field.
A modification changes the unit’s hardware from its original design configuration. Modifications can
only be done by the original product manufacturer at one of its FMRC audited manufacturing
facilities.
!
WARNING: Failure to use an FMRC Approved Product unit with an FMRC Approved battery
or FMRC Approved accessories specifically approved for that product may result in the
dangerously unsafe condition of an unapproved radio combination being used in a
hazardous location.
Unauthorized or incorrect modification of an FMRC Approved Product unit will negate the Approval
rating of the product.
2-2
INTRINSICALLY SAFE RADIO INFORMATION
2.0
Repair of FMRC Approved Products
REPAIRS FOR MOTOROLA FMRC APPROVED PRODUCTS ARE THE RESPONSIBILITY OF
THE USER
You should not repair or relabel any Motorola manufactured communication equipment bearing the
FMRC Approval label (“FMRC Approved Product”) unless you are familiar with the current FMRC
Approval standard for repairs and service (“Class Number 3605).
You may want to consider using a repair facility that operates under 3605 repair service approval.
!
WARNING: Incorrect repair or relabeling of any FMRC Approved Product unit could
adversely affect the Approval rating of the unit.
WARNING: Use of a radio that is not intrinsically safe in a hazardous atmosphere could
result in serious injury or death.
FMRC’s Approval Standard Class Number 3605 is subject to change at any time without notice to
you, so you may want to obtain a current copy of 3605 from FMRC. Per the December, 1994
publication of 3605, some key definitions and service requirements are as follows:
2.1
Repair
A repair constitutes something done internally to the unit that would bring it back to its original
condition Approved by FMRC. A repair should be done in an FMRC Approved facility.
Items not considered as repairs are those in which an action is performed on a unit which does not
require the outer casing of the unit to be opened in a manner which exposes the internal electrical
circuits of the unit. You do not have to be an FMRC Approved Repair Facility to perform these
actions.
2.2
Relabelling
The repair facility shall have a method by which the replacement of FMRC Approval labels are
controlled to ensure that any relabelling is limited to units that were originally shipped from the
Manufacturer with an FM Approval label in place. FMRC Approval labels shall not be stocked by the
repair facility. An FMRC Approval label shall be ordered from the original manufacturer as needed to
repair a specific unit. Replacement labels may be obtained and applied by the repair facility
providing satisfactory evidence that the unit being relabelled was originally an FMRC Approved unit.
Verification may include, but is not limited to: a unit with a damaged Approval label, a unit with a
defective housing displaying an Approval label, or a customer invoice indicating the serial number of
the unit and purchase of an FMRC Approved model.
Repair of FMRC Approved Products
2.3
2-3
Do Not Substitute Options or Accessories
The Motorola communications equipment certified by Factory Mutual is tested as a system and
consists of the FM Approved portable, FM Approved battery, and FM Approved accessories or
options, or both. This Approved portable and battery combination must be strictly observed. There
must be no substitution of items, even if the substitute has been previously Approved with a different
Motorola communications equipment unit. Approved configurations are listed in the FM Approval
guide published by FMRC, or in the product FM Supplement. This FM Supplement is shipped with
FM Approved radio and battery combination from the manufacturer. The Approval guide, or the
Approval standard Class Number 3605 document for repairs and service, can be ordered directly
through Factory Mutual Research Corporation located in Norwood, Massachusetts.
2-4
INTRINSICALLY SAFE RADIO INFORMATION
Chapter 3
MAINTENANCE
1.0
Introduction
This chapter provides details about the following:
2.0
Preventive maintenance (inspection and cleaning)
Safe handling of CMOS and LDMOS devices
Disassembly and reassembly of the radio
Repair procedures and techniques
Installation of Option Boards
Preventive Maintenance
The radios do not require a scheduled preventive maintenance program; however, periodic visual
inspection and cleaning is recommended.
2.1
Inspection
Check that the external surfaces of the radio are clean, and that all external controls and switches
are functional. It is not recommended to inspect the interior electronic circuitry.
2.2
Cleaning Procedures
The following procedures describe the recommended cleaning agents and the methods to be used
when cleaning the external and internal surfaces of the radio. External surfaces include the front
cover, housing assembly and battery case. These surfaces should be cleaned whenever a periodic
visual inspection reveals the presence of smudges, grease, and/or grime.
NOTE Internal surfaces should be cleaned only when the radio is disassembled for service
or repair.
The only recommended agent for cleaning the external radio surfaces is a 0.5% solution of a mild
dishwashing detergent in water. The only factory recommended liquid for cleaning the printed circuit
boards and their components is isopropyl alcohol (70% by volume).
!
CAUTION: The effects of certain chemicals and their vapors can have harmful results on certain
plastics. Avoid using aerosol sprays, tuner cleaners, and other chemicals.
Cleaning External Plastic Surfaces
Apply the 0.5% detergent-water solution sparingly with a stiff, non-metallic, short-bristled brush to
work all loose dirt away from the radio. Use a soft, absorbent, lintless cloth or tissue to remove the
solution and dry the radio. Make sure that no water remains entrapped near the connectors, cracks,
or crevices.
3-2
MAINTENANCE
Cleaning Internal Circuit Boards and Components
Isopropyl alcohol (70%) may be applied with a stiff, non-metallic, short-bristled brush to dislodge
embedded or caked materials located in hard-to-reach areas. The brush stroke should direct the
dislodged material out and away from the inside of the radio. Make sure that controls or tunable
components are not soaked with alcohol. Do not use high-pressure air to hasten the drying process
since this could cause the liquid to collect in unwanted places. After completing of the cleaning
process, use a soft, absorbent, lintless cloth to dry the area. Do not brush or apply any isopropyl
alcohol to the frame, front cover, or back cover.
NOTE Always use a fresh supply of alcohol and a clean container to prevent contamination by
dissolved material (from previous usage).
3.0
Safe Handling of CMOS and LDMOS Devices
Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices are used in this family of radios, and
are susceptible to damage by electrostatic or high voltage charges. Damage can be latent, resulting
in failures occurring weeks or months later. Therefore, special precautions must be taken to prevent
device damage during disassembly, troubleshooting, and repair.
Handling precautions are mandatory for CMOS circuits and are especially important in low humidity
conditions. DO NOT attempt to disassemble the radio without first referring to the following
CAUTION statement.
!
CAUTION: This radio contains static-sensitive devices. Do not open the radio unless you are properly
grounded. Take the following precautions when working on this unit:
Store and transport all CMOS devices in conductive material so that all exposed
leads are shorted together. Do not insert CMOS devices into conventional plastic
“snow” trays used for storage and transportation of other semiconductor devices.
Ground the working surface of the service bench to protect the CMOS device. We
recommend using the Motorola Static Protection Assembly (part number
0180386A82), which includes a wrist strap, two ground cords, a table mat, and a
floor mat.
Wear a conductive wrist strap in series with a 100k resistor to ground. (Replacement
wrist straps that connect to the bench top covering are Motorola part number RSX4015.)
Do not wear nylon clothing while handling CMOS devices.
Do not insert or remove CMOS devices with power applied. Check all power
supplies used for testing CMOS devices to be certain that there are no voltage
transients present.
When straightening CMOS pins, provide ground straps for the apparatus used.
When soldering, use a grounded soldering iron.
If at all possible, handle CMOS devices by the package and not by the leads. Prior to
touching the unit, touch an electrical ground to remove any static charge that you
may have accumulated. The package and substrate may be electrically common. If
so, the reaction of a discharge to the case would cause the same damage as
touching the leads.
Repair Procedures and Techniques — General
4.0
3-3
Repair Procedures and Techniques — General
Parts Replacement and Substitution
When damaged parts are replaced, identical parts should be used. If the identical replacement part
is not locally available, check the parts list for the proper Motorola part number and order the part
from the nearest Motorola Communications parts center listed in the “Piece Parts” section of this
manual.
Rigid Circuit Boards
This family of radios uses bonded, multi-layer, printed circuit boards. Since the inner layers are not
accessible, some special considerations are required when soldering and unsoldering components.
The printed-through holes may interconnect multiple layers of the printed circuit. Therefore, exercise
care to avoid pulling the plated circuit out of the hole.
When soldering near the 20-pin and 40-pin connectors:
Avoid accidentally getting solder in the connector.
Be careful not to form solder bridges between the connector pins.
Examine your work closely for shorts due to solder bridges.
Flexible Circuits
The flexible circuits are made from a different material than the rigid boards, and require different
soldering techniques. Excessive prolonged heat on a flexible circuit can damage the material.
Therefore, avoid excessive heat and excessive bending.
For parts replacement, use the ST-1087 Temperature-Controlled Solder Station with a 600-700
degree tip, and use small diameter solder such as ST-633. The smaller size solder will melt faster
and require less heat to be applied to the circuit.
To replace a component on a flexible circuit:
1.
Grasp with seizers (hemostats) the edge of the flexible circuit near the part to be removed.
2.
Pull gently.
3.
Apply the tip of the soldering iron to the component connections while pulling with the seizers.
NOTE Do not attempt to puddle-out components. Prolonged application of heat may damage the
flexible circuit.
5.0
Disassembling and Reassembling the Radio — General
Since these radios may be disassembled and reassembled with the use of only four (board to
casting) screws, it is important to pay particular attention to the snaps and tabs, and how parts align
with each other.
The following tools are required for disassembling the radio:
Small flat blade screwdriver
penknife-size screwdriver
TORX™ T6 screwdriver
3-4
MAINTENANCE
If a unit requires more complete testing or service than is customarily performed at the basic level,
send this unit to a Motorola Authorized Service Center. (See Chapter 1 for a list of authorized
service centers.)
The following disassembly procedures should be performed only if necessary:
Chassis Assembly Disassembly (Paragraph 6.2)
Keypad, Display, and Keypad/Option Board Disassembly (Paragraph 6.3)
Speaker, Microphone, and Universal Connector Flex Disassembly (Paragraph 6.4)
PTT Disassembly (Paragraph 6.5)
Control Top Disassembly (Paragraph 6.6)
6.0
Radio Disassembly — Detailed
6.1
Front Cover from Chassis Disassembly
1.
Turn off the radio.
2.
Remove the battery:
a.
Pull down on the two battery-release buttons.
b.
With the buttons pulled down, the top of the battery will fall from the radio.
c.
Remove the battery from the radio.
Battery Release
Buttons
Figure 3-1 Battery Removal
3.
Remove the antenna.
Radio Disassembly — Detailed
4.
3-5
Pull the volume and channel selector knobs off of their shafts.
Knobs
Figure 3-2 Knob Removal
NOTE Both knobs slide on and off. However, they are supposed to fit very tightly on their shafts.
5.
Separate the chassis from the internal electronics front cover assembly as follows:
a.
Insert a small, flat-blade screwdriver, or similar instrument, in between the thin retaining
wall and the chassis at the bottom of the radio. Do not mar the O-ring sealing area on the
housing.
b.
Slowly pry the bottom of the chassis from the cover by pushing the small flat-blade
screwdriver down, and rotating the handle of the tool over and behind the base of the
radio. This prying action forces the thin inner plastic wall toward the base of the radio,
releasing the two chassis base tabs.
Radio Chassis
Figure 3-3 Chassis Removal
!
CAUTION: Marring the front cover O-ring sealing area will prevent the radio from sealing properly.
NOTE Flexible ribbon circuits (flexes) connecting the front cover assembly and the chassis pre-
vent you from completely separating the two units. Display radios and radios with option
boards have two flexes.
3-6
MAINTENANCE
6.
Lay the chassis down. Rotate the front cover backward and slightly away from the chassis.
7.
Lift the latches on the main circuit board to release the flexes from their connectors.
Latches
Flex Connectors
Figure 3-4 Unlatch Flex Connectors
6.2
Chassis Assembly Disassembly
Use a TORX™ screwdriver with a T6 head to remove the four screws holding the main boardto the
chassis.
Compliant
Ground
Contact
Main Board
Radio Chass
O-ring
Retaining
Features
Figure 3-5 Remove Main Board from Chassis
1.
!
Lift the main board from the chassis (See Figure 3-5).
CAUTION: Refer to the CMOS CAUTION paragraph on page 2 before removing the main board. Be sure
to use ESD protection when handling circuit boards.
2.
Remove the four small O-ring retainers from their slots in the chassis. Note the alignment of
the retainers for reassembly.
Radio Disassembly — Detailed
6.3
3-7
3.
Remove the O-ring.
4.
Slide off the ground contact from the top corner boss of the radio chassis.
Keypad, Display, and Keypad/Option Board Disassembly
1.
If the disassembly of the keypad, the keypad printed circuit board, or the display is required,
lift the microphone flex circuit up, and carefully remove the microphone and its boot from the
front cover pocket. (See Figure 3-6.)
2.
Lay this flex circuit to one side.
3.
To remove the keypad retainer shield:
a.
Insert the tip of a “penknife size,” flat blade screwdriver in the opening at the end of the
keypad retainer arm tab.
b.
Pry the tab away from the side of the front cover until it moves past the ledges on the
side wall. Duplicate this procedure for each of the four retainer arm tabs.
Speaker-Microphone
Flex Circuit Tail
Flat Blade
Screwdriver
Keypad Retainer
Arm Tabs (4)
Retainer
Top Hooks
Retainer
Figure 3-6 Remove Retainer
!
4.
Note that the two “top hooks” are still held underneath the front cover—right below the
speaker. Lift the keypad retainer out of the front cover; then, lift and pivot the two hooks out of
the front cover.
5.
If disassembly involves the removal of the display module, disconnect the display flex from the
keypad option board connector by lifting the latch on the connector. (This is similar to the process for releasing the flexes.)
6.
The display module is attached to the front cover with a double-sided adhesive pad. Carefully
pull up on the display module, using a small screwdriver, if necessary, and remove it from the
front cover. Use a new piece of double-sided adhesive to re-mount the display to the cover.
CAUTION: Take care not to damage the display. Do not cut, bend, or pinch the heat seal. Display
modules contain CMOS devices. Be sure to use ESD protection.
3-8
MAINTENANCE
7.
The keypad/option board, and the keypad, can be removed without the use of tools.
Retainer
1
Display Module
2
Keypad/Option Board
3
Keypad
Radio Body
Figure 3-7 Removing the Keypad Retainer and Other Boards from the Radio Body
NOTE At this point, the Option Board Installation Procedure should be performed, if necessary.
6.4
Speaker, Microphone, and Universal Connector Flex Disassembly
1.
Turn the screw at the bottom of the dustcover counterclockwise with your fingers. Lift the dustcover out of its pocket.
NOTE The dustcover must be removed to remove the speaker-microphone assembly flex circuit.
The speaker is held in place with a two-legged retainer bracket. The bracket legs are
secured by the front cover slots. Be careful not to damage the speaker when removing the
retainer bracket.
2.
Using a screwdriver, push down on the portion of the speaker retainer bracket pointing toward
the bottom of the radio. Then, remove the retainer by slightly pushing it toward the top of the
radio until you slide it past the front cover slot.
3.
Pull the rubber microphone boot from its seated position. Unless you are replacing the microphone, leave it in the boot.
NOTE The speaker-microphone assembly flex circuit goes through the front cover wall to the out-
side wall. To replace this assembly, you must peel-off the universal connector escutcheon
label. The existing escutcheon cannot be reassembled; a new part must be used. (See item
number 10 on the exploded view drawing.)
4.
Peel-off the universal connector flex circuit escutcheon (label).
5.
Pry the flex circuit (adhesive held) backer board away from the front cover, and remove the
universal connector tail of the speaker-microphone assembly through its opening in the front
cover.
Radio Disassembly — Detailed
3-9
Notch In
Speaker @ 12:00
Speaker
Universal Connector
Tail
Speaker Orientation
Tab @ 12:00
Microphone Boot
Microphone
Speaker Microphone
Flex Circuit Assembly
6.
6.5
Figure 3-8 Removal Speaker-Microphone Assembly
After the universal connector tail of the speaker-microphone assembly is removed, the
assembly can be completely removed. If it is necessary to replace the speaker or
microphone, or both, do it while the flex circuit is removed from the front cover. When
reassembling the microphone in its boot, make sure the microphone port faces the round hole
in the bottom of the boot.
PTT Disassembly
1.
If required, the PTT bezel, and the PTT seal assembly, can be disassembled using a small
screwdriver, as follows:
PTT Bezel
Tab
"T" Shaped Retainer Tab
Tab
PTT Seal
Figure 3-9 PTT Removal
a.
Pry back the T-tab found inside the front cover (in between the four buttons on the PTT
assembly).
b.
Remove the PTT bezel by slightly bowing it until the top and bottom tabs are released
from the slots in the front cover.
c.
The PTT seal can be easily lifted from the bezel without the use of tools.
3-10
6.6
MAINTENANCE
Control Top Disassembly
1.
To remove the control top assembly, place a screwdriver next to the antenna boss, and pry it
against the control top escutcheon. This will lift the control top escutcheon away from its
double-sided adhesive. Grab the double-sided adhesive near the volume potentiometer, and
lift it away.
2.
Remove the control top seal, emergency button, and transmit light pipe.
7.0
Radio Reassembly — Detailed
7.1
PTT Reassembly
7.2
1.
Replace transmit light pipe and control top seal.
2.
Place a new control top escutcheon adhesive against the front cover. Press the control top
escutcheon tightly against the adhesive.
3.
Put the PTT seal in the PTT bezel.
Control Top Reassembly
1.
Place the bezel top tab in the top slot inside the front cover PTT opening. Slightly bow the
bezel so that the bottom tab can fall inside the bottom slot.
2.
Press the PTT assembly against the front cover opening.
NOTE Look inside the front cover to make sure the T-tab is fully engaged with the front cover. If
necessary, press the T-tab toward the top of the radio until it becomes fully engaged.
7.3
7.4
Speaker, Microphone, and Universal Connector Flex Reassembly
1.
Feed the universal connector tail of the speaker-microphone flex assembly through the opening in the side wall of the front cover.
2.
Peel-off the adhesive liner on the back of the universal connector tail of the flex circuit. Attach
the flex tail to the front cover using the guide pins for correct alignment.
3.
Replace the universal connector escutcheon. Make sure that all the connector openings align
with the gold pads on the flex circuit.
4.
Align the notch in the speaker at the twelve o’clock position with the tab on the front cover.
(See Figure 3-8.)
5.
Place the speaker retainer bracket into the hole on the top of the front cover, and bend the
retainer down to fit underneath the boss below the speaker.
Keypad, Display, and Keypad Option Board Reassembly
1.
If you are replacing the display, use a new double-sided adhesive display pad (item number
17 on the exploded view diagram).
2.
Replace the keypad, and the keypad/option board. Make sure the display module flex tail is
connected correctly to the connector on the keypad/option board.
3.
Insert the “top hooks” of the keypad retainer into the slots below the speaker (above the
display) in the front cover. Snap all four of the retainer arm tabs in place in the front cover.
Radio Reassembly — Detailed
3-11
NOTE Pull the speaker-microphone flex circuit out of harm’s way during reassembly.
4.
Re-insert the microphone and boot into the pocket in the front cover.
5.
Lay the speaker-microphone flex on top of keypad/option board retainer.
Catches
Retainer
Figure 3-10 Lock retainer catches to the radio’s body
7.5
Chassis Assembly Reassembly
1.
Slide on the ground contact (if necessary) on the top corner boss of the chassis.
2.
Replace the O-ring. The tabs on the O-ring should reach around the chassis and point down.
3.
Stretch the O-ring to place it into the retaining pocket at the bottom end of the chassis.
NOTE When properly assembled, the retainers on the O-ring should align with the slots on the
chassis. If this is not the case, remove and replace the O-ring until it is aligned with the
chassis and completely seated in place around the perimeter.
4.
Ensure that the antenna nut insulator is correctly replaced by pushing it all the way to the top
of the antenna nut.
5.
Replace the battery contact seal (if necessary) surrounding the battery contact.
6.
Place the main circuit board straight down on top of the chassis.
NOTE Be sure the battery contact seal protrudes through the chassis and is not pinched under the
chassis.
7.
7.6
Use the T6 TORX screwdriver to fasten the screws holding the main board to the chassis.
Chassis and Front Cover Reassembly
1.
Align the chassis assembly end-to-end with the front cover assembly.
2.
Insert the tails of the flex circuits into their respective connectors at the bottom of the front
cover.
3.
Push down the latches on the connectors to hold the flex circuits to the main board.
4.
Slide the volume potentiometer and frequency switch shafts into their respective holes in the
front cover.
3-12
MAINTENANCE
5.
Push the chassis assembly completely into the top of the front cover until it settles in place.
6.
Be sure the O-ring is properly seated.
7.
Snap the bottom of the chassis into the front cover.
8.
Reassemble the knobs, dust cover, antenna, and battery.
Radio Chassis
Figure 3-11 Fastening the Chassis
8.0
Option Board Installation
1.
With the keypad retainer removed, the keypad backer board can be removed without the use
of tools.
2.
Remove the jumper flex from the connector on the keypad board. Notice the orientation of the
flex to the connector. Arrows on the jumper flex point to the correct way of inserting the flex
into the connector.
3.
Discard the keypad backer board.
4.
The “breakaway” tab at the top of all option boards contains an extra row of keys and is used
to accommodate other radio models.
5.
Break-off and discard the option board tab, taking care not to damage the option board. Trim
any tab fragments that may remain on the option board.
Option Board Installation
3-13
Retainer
Jumper Flex
TO KP
Keypad/Option
Board
Display Flex
Figure 3-12 Changing the Keypad/Option Board
6.
Reassemble the option board to the front cover assembly.
7.
Insert the display flex circuit into the connector on the option board.
8.
Insert the jumper flex circuit into the connector on the option board. Notice the orientation of
the flex circuit. Arrows on the jumper flex point to the correct way of inserting the flex into the
connector.
9.
Replace the retainer by placing the two top hooks into the slots below the speaker in the front
cover; then, pivot the retainer into the front cover. Ensure that all four tab arms snap correctly
into the front cover.
10. With the keypad option board, display, and retainer correctly in place, the front cover assembly can now be reassembled as described in Paragraph 7.6 (Chassis and Front Cover Reassembly).
3-14
MAINTENANCE
Mechanical View and Parts List
9.1
GP640 Exploded View and Parts List
16
15
13
14
10
11
9
8
7
6
5
12
4
3
2
1
17
19
21
18
22
20
23
24
25
26
27
29
28 30
31
32
33
34
35
9.0
Figure 3-13 GP640 Radio Exploded Mechanical View
Mechanical View and Parts List
Item
Motorola
Part
Number
3-15
Description
Item
Motorola
Part
Number
Description
1
See Chapter 6
Antenna
30
3280534Z01
Seal, Contact
2
3680529Z01
Knob, Volume
31
3280536Z01
Gasket, o-Ring
3
3680530Z01
Knob, Frequency
32
3980698Z01
4
1380525Z01
Escutcheon, Top
Contact, Ground, Compliant,
VHF
5
3380644Z01
Escutcheon, Label
33
2780518Z01
Chassis
6
3280533Z01
Seal, Control Top
34
See Chapter 6
Battery
7
6180527Z01
Litepipe, Tx
35
HLN9714A
Beltclip
8
1364279B06
Front, label
9
1586059A01
Dust Cover, Universal
Connector
10
1386058A01
Escutcheon, Universal Flex
11
1580666Z03
Front Cover, Basic
12
Not Field
Replaceable
Escutcheon, FM
13
7580532Z01
Keypad, Side Control
14
1380528Z01
Bezel, Side Control
15
7580620Z03
7580620Z04
Keypad, Blank
Keypad, Full
16
0104007J99
Keypad Board Assembly
17
4280498Z01
Retainer, Keypad PCB
18
3586057A01
Felt Speaker
19
1480577C01
Boot, Microphone
20
5085962A02
Speaker
21
5013920A04
Microphone
22
8480549Z01
Flex, UC
23
2113740A41
Capacitor, 33pF
24
4280504Z01
Retainer, Speaker
25
0304726J04
Screw
26
See Chapter 6
Back Cover Kit incl. chassis
main board
27
8480475Z02
Flex, Keypad/Controller
28
1480652Z01
Insulator, Antenna
29
7580556Z01
Pad, Thermal
3-16
15
10
11
9
8
7
6
12
4
5
3
2
13
14
16
17
18
20
19
22
24
21
25
23
26
29
27
30
28
32
31
33
35
34 36
37
38
39
40
41
GP680 Exploded View and Parts List
1
9.2
MAINTENANCE
Figure 3-14 GP680 Radio Exploded View
Mechanical View and Parts List
Item
Motorola
Part
Number
3-17
Description
Item
Motorola
Part
Number
Description
1
See Chapter 6
Antenna
30
0304726J04
Screw
2
3680529Z01
Knob, Volume
31
3980667Z01
Contact, finger
3
3680530Z01
Knob, Frequency
32
See Chapter 6
4
1380525Z03
Escutcheon, Top
Back Cover Kit incl. chassis
main board
5
3380644Z01
Escutcheon, Label
33
8480475Z02
Flex, Keypad/Controller
6
3280533Z01
Seal, Control Top
34
1480652Z01
Insulator, Antenna
7
6180527Z01
Litepipe, Tx
35
7580556Z01
Pad, Thermal
8
1364279B07
Front, label
36
3280534Z01
Seal, Contact
9
1586059A01
Dust Cover, Universal
Connector
37
3280536Z01
Gasket, O-Ring
38
3980698Z01
Contact, Ground, Compliant
10
1386058A01
Escutcheon, Universal Flex
39
2780518Z01
Chassis
11
1580666Z04
Front Cover with Keypad
(DTMF)
40
See Chapter 6
Battery
41
HLN9714A
Beltclip
12
Not Field
Replaceable
Escutcheon, FM
13
7580532Z01
Keypad, Side Control
14
1380528Z01
Bezel, Side Control
15
7580620Z05
Keypad
16
0104007J99
Keypad Board Assembly
17
7580540Z01
Pad, Display
18
5104949J07
LCD Module
19
7580637Z01
Pad, LCD Back
20
4280498Z01
Retainer, Keypad PCB
21
3586057A01
Felt Speaker
22
1480577C01
Boot, Microphone
23
5085962A02
Speaker
24
5013920A04
Microphone
25
8480549Z01
Flex, UC
26
2113740A41
Capacitor, 33pF
27
4280504Z01
Retainer, Speaker
28
1480503Z01
Boot, Backup Battery
29
6062884G01
Backup Battery
3-18
MAINTENANCE
10.0
Service Aids
Table 3-1 lists service aids recommended for working on the GP640/GP680 Radios. While all of
these items are available from Motorola, most are standard shop equipment items, and any
equivalent item capable of the same performance may be substituted for the item listed.
Table 3-1 Service Aids
Motorola
Part No.
Description
Application
RLN4460_
Portable Test Set
Enables connection to the audio/accessory
jack. Allows switching for radio testing.
RKN4075_
Ribless Programming Cable
Connects radio to Computer.
RKN4074_
Programming Cable/Test
Cable
Connects radio to RIB (RLN4008).
RLN4008_
Radio Interface Box (RIB)
Enables communications between the radio
and the computer’s serial communications
adapter.
HLN9756_
BNC Adaptor
Adapts radio’s antenna port to BNC cabling
of test equipment.
HKN9743_
MAP27 Cable
Connects radio to computer for MAP27
applications in MPT requirements.
HLN9742_
Flash Upgrade Adapter
Provides connections to the computer or RIB
programming /test cable
0180305G54
Shop Battery Eliminator
Interconnects radio to power supply.
8180384F66
Bench Test Housing Eliminator
for long housing.
Provides for troubleshooting of the radio
when the housing is removed.
8180384F68
Bench Test Housing Eliminator
for short housing.
Provides for troubleshooting of the radio
when the housing is removed.
RLN4510
Battery Eliminator 7.5V
Interconnects radio to power supply.
EPN4040
Wall-Mounted Power Supply
Used to supply power to the RIB (UK).
EPN4041
Wall-Mounted Power Supply
Used to supply power to the RIB (Euro)
3080369B71 or
3080369B72
Computer Interface Cable
Use B72 for the IBM PC AT. All other IBM
models use B71. Connects the computer’s
serial communications adapter to the RIB.
(RLN4008)
Test Equipment
3-19
11.0 Test Equipment
Table 3-2 lists test equipment required to service the GP640/GP680 Radios and other two-way radios.
Table 3-2 Recommended Test Equipment
Motorola Part
No.
Description
Characteristics
Application
R2600_NT
Comms System
Analyzer
(non MPT)
This monitor will
substitute for items with
an asterisk *
Frequency/deviation meter
and signal generator for
wide-range troubleshooting
and alignment
R2680_NT
to be ordered
with
RLN1022_ (H/W)
RLN1023_ (S/W)
Comms System
Analyzer
(MPT1327)
This monitor will
substitute for items with
an asterisk *
Frequency/deviation meter
and signal generator for
wide-range troubleshooting
and alignment
*R1072_
Digital Multimeter
*R1377_
AC Voltmeter
100 µV to 300 V,
5Hz-1MHz, 10 Megohm
input impedance
Audio voltage
measurements
WADN4133_
Delay
Oscilloscope
2 Channel 40 MHz
bandwidth,
5 mV/cm - 20 V/cm
Waveform measurements
R1440_
Wattmeter,
Transmitter power output
measurements
0180305F22
0180305F30
0180305F39
RLN4610_
Plug-in Element
Plug-in Element
Plug-in Element
Carry case
Thruline 50-Ohm, ±5%
accuracy
10W, 50 - 125 MHz
10W, 100 - 250 MHz
10W, 200 - 500 MHz
Wattmeter and
6 elements
*T1013_
RF Dummy Load
S1339_
RF Millivolt Meter
100mV to 3 VRF,
10 kHz to 1.2 GHz
RF level measurements
S1348_
220V Power
Supply
0-20V, 5A
Programmable
AC/DC voltage and current
measurements
3-20
MAINTENANCE
12.0 Programming/Test Cable
1metre
Cable
1metre
Cable
Side
Connector
Figure 3-15 Programming/Test Cable
Internal
Connections
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
Pin Outs
External Speaker +
Brown
External Speaker -
Dark Blue
Option B +
Red
External Mic
Grey
Option Select 2
Light Blue
Option Select 1
Tan
Ground
Black
Receive Data
Yellow
8
Transmit Data
Pink
9
RSSI
Orange
Tx Audio / Rx Audio
Violet
11
Boot Control
Green
12
Not Used
White
13
Figure 3-16 Pin Configuration of the Side Connector
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
10
Programming/Test Cable
3-21
25 Pos Male D
Connector
Side Connector
1
1
5
2
2
7
3
8
4
15
5
20
6
16
7
9
8
9
10
11
18
12
25
13
25 Pos Female
D Connector
15
1
4
11
Figure 3-17 Wiring of the Connectors
3-22
MAINTENANCE
Chapter 4
PERFORMANCE TESTING
1.0
Introduction
The receiver and transmitter performance tests are contained in Tables 4-1 and 4-2 respectively.
Refer to Chapter 5 for the test equipment set up. Note that all test measurements are taken at 25°C.
2.0
Receiver Performance Tests
The receiver performance tests are described in Table 4-1 below.
Table 4-1 Receiver Performance Checks
Test Name
Communications
Analyzer
Radio
Test Set
Comments
Reference
Frequency
Mode: PWR MON
Monitor: Frequency error
Input at RF In/Out
TEST MODE,
Test Channel
4 carrier
squelch output at
antenna
PTT to continuous (during the
performance
check)
Frequency error to be
±200Hz VHF
±600Hz UHF
Rated Audio
Mode: GEN
Output level: 1.0mV RF
Mod: 1kHz tone at
3kHz deviation
Monitor: DVM: AC Volts
TEST MODE
Test Channel
4 carrier
squelch
PTT to OFF
(centre), meter
selector to
Audio PA
Set volume control to
3.16Vrms
Distortion
As above, except to distortion
As above
As above
Distortion 3.0%
Typical
Sensitivity
(SINAD)
As above, except SINAD,
lower the RF level for 12dB
SINAD.
As above
PTT to OFF
(centre)
RF input to be
0.25µV
Noise
Squelch
Threshold
(only radios
with conventional system need to
be tested)
RF level set to 1mV RF
As above
PTT to OFF
(centre), meter
selection to
Audio PA, spkr/
load to speaker
Set volume control to
3.16Vrms
As above, except change frequency to a conventional
system. Raise RF level from
zero until radio unsquelches.
out of TEST
MODE; select
a
conventional
system
As above
Unsquelch to occur at
<0.25µV.
Preferred SINAD =
9-10dB
4-2
3.0
PERFORMANCE TESTING
Transmitter Performance Tests
The transmitter performance tests are described in Table 4-2 below.
Table 4-2 Transmitter Performance Checks
Test Name
Communications
Analyzer
Radio
Test Set
Comments
Reference
Frequency
Mode: PWR MON
Monitor: Frequency error
Input at RF In/Out
TEST MODE,
Test Channel
4 carrier
squelch
PTT to continuous (during the
performance
check)
Frequency error to be
±200Hz VHF
±600Hz UHF
Power RF
As above
As above
As above
Refer to Maintenance Specifications
Voice
Modulation
Mode: PWR MON
atten to -70, input to RF In/
Out
Monitor: DVM, AC Volts
Set 1kHz Mod Out level for
0.025Vrms at test set,
80mVrms at AC/DC test set
jack
As above
As above, meter
selector to mic
Deviation:
VHF, UHF,
≥ 4.0kHz but
≤ 5.0kHz.
(25 kHz Ch Sp)
Voice
Modulation
(internal)
Mode: PWR MON
atten to -70, input to RF In/
Out
TEST MODE,
Test Channel
4 carrier
squelch output at
antenna
Remove
modulation
input
Press PTT switch on
radio. Say “four”
loudly into the radio
mic. Measure deviation: VHF, UHF,
≥ 4.0kHz but
≤ 5.0kHz
(25 kHz Ch Sp)
DTMF
Modulation
As above,
TEST MODE,
Test Channel
4 DTMF output at
antenna
As above
Deviation:
VHF, UHF,
≥ 3.05kHz but
≤ 3.45kHz
(25 kHz Ch Sp).
PL/DPL
Modulation
As above
BW to narrow
TEST MODE,
Test
Channel 4
TPL
DPL
As above
Deviation:
VHF, UHF,
≥500Hz but
≤ 1000Hz.
(25 kHz Ch Sp).
Chapter 5
RADIO TUNING AND PROGRAMMING
1.0
Introduction
This chapter provides an overview of the Customer Programming Software (CPS) and tuner program
which are designed for use in a Windows 95/98 environment. These programs are available in
separate kits as listed in the Table 5-1. An Installation instruction manual is also included with each kit.
NOTE Refer to the appropriate program on-line help files for the programming procedures.
Table 5-1 Software Installation Kits Radio Tuning Setup
Description
Kit Number
EMEA CD
ENLN4116_
Installation Card
2.0
68P64113B14_
Global Radio Tuning Setup
A personal computer (PC) using Windows 95/98 and a global tuner program are required to tune the
radio. To perform the tuning procedures, the radio must be connected to the PC, radio interface box
(RIB), and test equipment shown in Figure 5-1.
RF Adaptor
HLN9756
3.5 mm to
Ferrule BNC
Battery
Eliminator
7.5V Reg.
RLN4510
+12VDC
Power
Supply
Radio
Service Monitor
or Counter
Transmit
Wattmeter
Receive
20 dB Pad
RF Generator
Audio In
Battery Block
0180305G54
Tx
Test Box
RLN4460
Rx
Program / Test Cable
RKN 4074
DB9
RIB
RLN-4008
RIB Power Supply
Sinad Meter
AC Voltmeter
DB15
AC Plug
120/230 Vac
Audio Generator
Tx Data
Rx
Data
Gnd
Computer Interface
Cable 3080369B72
Figure 5-1 Radio Tuning Test Equipment Setup
5-2
2.1
RADIO TUNING AND PROGRAMMING
Initial Test Equipment Setup
The supply voltage is connected to the radio using a Motorola battery eliminator, P/N 0180305G54.
The initial test equipment (Figure 5-1) control settings are listed in Table 5-2.
NOTE Refer to appropriate program on-line help files for the tuning procedures.
Table 5-2 Initial Equipment Control Settings
Service Monitor
Test Set
Power Supply
Monitor Mode: Power Monitor
Speaker set: A
Voltage: 7.5Vdc
RF Attenuation: -70
Speaker/load:
Speaker
DC on/standby:
Standby
AM, CW, FM: FM
PTT: OFF
Volt Range: 10V
Oscilloscope Source: Mod
Oscilloscope Horizontal: 10mSec/Div
Oscilloscope Vertical: 2.5kHz/Div
Oscilloscope Trigger: Auto
Monitor Image: Hi
Monitor BW: Nar
Monitor Squelch: mid CW
Monitor Volume: 1/4 CW
3.0
Current: 2.5A
CPS Programming Setup
The CPS programming setup, shown in Figure 5-2, is used to program the radio codeplug.
NOTE Refer to appropriate program on-line help files for the codeplug programming procedures.
Radio
Ribless
Programming
Cable RKN4075
Test Box
RLN4460
Battery
Block
0180305G54
Battery
Eliminator
7.5V Reg.
RLN4510
+12VDC
Power
Supply
Program/
Test Cable
RKN4074
DB15
DB9
Tx Data
Rx
Data
Gnd
RIB
RLN4008
Computer Interface
Cable
3080369B72
RIB Power Supply
120/230 Vac
Figure 5-2 CPS Programming Setup
Chapter 6
MODEL CHART AND TEST SPECIFICATION
1.0
Model Chart (VHF)
Professional GP600 Series (VHF)
Model
MDH25KDC9CK3_E
MDH25KDC9CK6_E
Description
GP640 VHF 136-174 MHz 5W
GP680 VHF 136-174 MHz 5W
Item
X
X
Description
PMLD4113_
PMLN4216_
GP640 VHF Back Cover Kit
GP640 VHF Front Cover Kit
PMLD4114_
PMLN4304_
GP680 VHF Back Cover Kit
GP680 VHF Front Cover Kit
6864110B14_
GP640 Basic User Guide
X
6864110B19_
GP680 Basic User Guide
X
X
PMAD4023_
VHF 14cm (150-161 MHz) Antenna
X
X
HNN9008_
Battery, NiMH Standard
X
X
X
x = Indicates one of each is required.
2.0
Model Chart (UHF)
Professional GP600 Series (UHF)
Model
MDH25RDC9CK3_E
MDH25RDC9CK6_E
Description
GP640 UHF 403-470 MHz 4W
GP680 UHF 403-470 MHz 4W
Item
X
X
Description
PMLE4133_
PMLN4216_
GP640 UHF Back Cover Kit
GP640 UHF Front Cover Kit
PMLE4134_
PMLN4304_
GP680 UHF Back Cover Kit
GP680 UHF Front Cover Kit
6864110B14_
GP640 Basic User Guide
X
6864110B19_
GP680 Basic User Guide
X
X
NAE6483_
UHF Whip (403-470 MHz) Antenna
X
X
HNN9008_
Battery, NiMH Standard
X
X
X
x = Indicates one of each is required.
6-2
3.0
MODEL CHART AND TEST SPECIFICATION
Model Chart (UHF2)
Professional GP600 Series (UHF2)
Model
Description
MDH25SDC9CK3_E
MDH25SDH9CK6_E
GP640 UHF2 450-527 MHz 4W
GP680 UHF2 450-527 MHz 4W
Item
X
X
Description
PMLE4122_
PMLN4216_
GP640 UHF2 Back Cover Kit
GP640 UHF2 Front Cover Kit
PMLE4123_
PMLN4304_
GP680 UHF2 Back Cover Kit
GP680 UHF2 Front Cover Kit
6864110B14_
GP640 Basic User Guide
X
6864110B19_
GP680 Basic User Guide
X
X
PMAE4008_
UHF 14cm (465-527 MHz) Antenna
X
X
HNN9008_
Battery, NiMH Standard
X
X
X
x = Indicates one of each is required.
4.0
Model Chart (300R1)
Professional GP600 Series (300R1)
Model
MDH25EDC9CK3_E
MDH25EDH9CK6_E
Description
GP640 300R1 300-350 MHz 4W
GP680 300R1 300-350 MHz 4W
Item
X
X
Description
PMLD4125_
PMLN4216_
GP640 300R1 Back Cover Kit
GP640 300R1 Front Cover Kit
PMLD4126_
PMLN4304_
GP680 300R1 Back Cover Kit
GP680 300R1 Front Cover Kit
6864110B14_
GP640 Basic User Guide
X
6864110B19_
GP680 Basic User Guide
X
X
PMAD4022_
VHF 9cm (300-344 MHz) Antenna
X
X
HNN9008_R
Battery, NiMH Standard
X
X
X
x = Indicates one of each is required.
Specifications - Professional GP600 Series Radios
5.0
6-3
Specifications - Professional GP600 Series Radios
Data is specified for +25°C unless otherwise stated.
General Specifications
Channel Capacity
16 (Conventional)
Power Supply
Rechargeable battery 7.5v
Dimensions: H x W x D (mm)
With standard high capacity NiMH battery
With ultra high capacity NiMH battery
With NiCD battery
With Lilon battery
Height excluding knobs
137 x 57.5 x 37.5
137 x 57.5 x 40.0
137 x 57.5 x 40.0
137 x 57.5 x 33.0
Weight: (gm)
With Standard high capacity NiMH battery
With Ultra high capacity NiMH battery
With NiCD battery
With Lilon battery
GP640
420
500
450
350
GP680
428
508
458
358
Average Battery Life @5/5/90 Cycle:
With Standard high capacity NiMH battery
With Ultra high capacity NiMH battery
With NiCD battery
With Lilon battery
Low Power
11 hours
14 hours
12 hours
11 hours
High Power
8 hours
11 hours
9 hours
8 hours
Sealing:
Withstands rain testing per
MIL STD 810 C/D /E and IP54
Shock and Vibration:
Protection provided via impact
resistant housing exceeding MIL STD
810-C/D /E and TIA/EIA 603
Dust and Humidity:
Protection provided via environment
resistant housing exceeding MIL STD
810 C/D /E and TIA/EIA 603
6-4
MODEL CHART AND TEST SPECIFICATION
Transmitter
*Frequencies - Full Bandsplit
Channel Spacing
Frequency Stability
(-25°C to +55°C, +25° Ref.)
Power
Modulation Limiting
FM Hum & Noise
Conducted/Radiated Emission
Adjacent Channel Power
Audio Response (300 - 3000 Hz)
Audio Distortion
VHF: 136-174 MHz
UHF: 403-470 MHz
UHF2: 450-527 MHz
300R1: 300-350 MHz
12.5/20/25 kHz
±2.5 ppm
±5.0 ppm (UHF2, 300R1)
136 - 174: 1-5W
403 - 470: 1-4W
450 - 527: 1-4W
300 - 350: 1-4W
±2.5 @ 12.5 kHz
±4.0 @ 20 kHz
±5.0 @ 25 kHz
-40 dB Typical
-36 dBm <1 GHz
-30 dBm >1 GHz
-60 dB @ 12.5 kHz
-70 dB @ 20/25 kHz
+1 to -3 dB
<3% Typical (UHF, UHF2, VHF)
<5% Typical (300R1)
Receiver
*Frequencies - Full Bandsplit
VHF: 136-174 MHz
UHF: 403-470 MHz
UHF2: 450-527 MHz
300R1: 300-350 MHz
Channel Spacing
12.5/20/25 kHz
Frequency Stability
(-25°C to +55°C, +25° Ref.)
±2.5 ppm
Sensitivity (12 dB SINAD) EIA
.25 µV Typical (UHF, UHF2, VHF)
.35 µV Typical (300R1)
.50 µV Typical (UHF, UHF2, VHF, 300R1)
Sensitivity (20 dB SINAD) ETS
Intermodulation EIA
-70 dB (UHF, VHF)
-65db, (UHF2, 300R1)
Adjacent Channel Selectivity
60 dB @ 12.5 kHz
70 dB @ 20/25 kHz
Spurious Rejection
>70 dB
Rated Audio
0.5W
Audio Distortion @ Rated Audio
<3% Typical
Hum & Noise
-40 dB @ 12.5 kHz (UHF, VHF)
-45 dB @ 12.5 kHz (UHF2, 300R1)
-50 dB @ 20/25 kHz
Audio Response (300 - 3000 Hz)
+1 to -3 dB
Conducted Spurious Emission
-57 dBm <1 GHz
-47 dBm >1 GHz
ETS 300 086
*Availability subject to the laws and regulations of individual countries.
Chapter 7
POWER UP SELF-TEST
1.0
Error Codes
Turning on the radio starts a self-test routine that checks the radio functionality. If the checks are
successful, the radio generates two high-pitched self-test pass tones, or a musical tone (selected in
CPS). If the self-test is not successful, one low-pitched tone is heard. Radios with displays are able
to display the error codes. The displayed error codes and related corrections are listed in Table 7-1.
Table 7-1 Power Up Error Codes
If the error code
displayed is...
then, there is a...
To correct the problem...
“Chan Spacing”
Invalid channel spacing.
Reprogram codeplug with correct spacings.
“EEPROM Cksum”
Codeplug structure mismatch or
non-existence of codeplug.
Reprogram codeplug with correct version
and retest radio.
If message reoccurs, replace main board or
return it to the nearest Motorola depot.
“Synth Lock”
Channel frequency invalid for radio
model.
Reprogram codeplug with correct
frequency and channel range.
“RF Config”
Channel frequency outside allowed Reprogram codeplug with valid
range or invalid channel number for frequencies/channels.
channel frequency plan.
“RAM Test”
RAM test failure
Turn radio off-on.
If message reoccurs replace main board or
return it to the nearest Motorola depot.
“Personality D”
Personality data invalid
Reprogram codeplug with valid personality.
“Dynamic CP”
Dynamic codeplug failure.
Turn radio off then on.
If message reoccurs replace main board or
return it to the nearest Motorola depot.
“Flash Cksum”
Radio EPROM failure.
Turn radio off then on.
If message reoccurs replace main board or
return it to the nearest Motorola depot.
“Hardware Test”
Radio hardware failure.
Turn radio off-on.
If message reoccurs replace main board or
return it to the nearest Motorola depot.
No Display
Display module is not connected.
Check connection between main board and
the display module.
Display module faulty.
Replace display module.
300Hz Tone
Radio hardware failure or invalid
(Radio Without Display) codeplug.
Turn radio off then on.
If tone still sounds reprogram codeplug and
retest. If tone continues to sound replace
the main board or return it to the nearest
Motorola depot.
7-2
POWER UP SELF-TEST