Sine Systems AFS-3 Specifications

Remote Facilities Controller
Model RFC-1/B
•
Relay Panel
Model RP-8
– INSTALLATION AND OPERATION –
Remote Facilities Controller firmware version 6.00
www.sinesystems.com
Table of Contents
Section I – Safety Information
1.1
1.2
Safety Information
FCC Compliance
Page
1.1
1.2
Section 2 – New Features and System Changes
2.1
Version 6.00
2.1
Section 3 – Installation
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
System Includes
Installing the System
Mechanical Installation
RFC-1/RP-8 Interconnect
RP-8 Channel Block Assignment
RP-8 Telemetry Connections
RP-8 Control Connections
RP-8 Channel Identification
Telephone and Telephone Line Connection
Power Supply
Telemetry Source Inputs
Analog Readings
Status Readings
Calibrating Telemetry Readings
Control Outputs
Telephone Interface
Wireless Telephone with an RJ-11 Adapter
Fixed Location Wireless Telephones
Rural Radiotelephones or Ranch Telephones
Dedicated Control Port
Battery Backup and Clock/Calendar
Power Failure Alarm
Uninterruptible Power Supply
AC Failure Detection on Battery Backup
Lightning Protection Tips
Proper Ground System
Telephone Line Protection
SP-8 Surge Protector
RF Interference
3.1
3.1
3.2
3.2
3.3
3.3
3.4
3.4
3.5
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.7
3.8
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.12
3.12
3.13
3.13
3.13
3.13
3.13
3.14
3.14
Section 4 – Accessories and Miscellaneous Circuit
4.1
RFC-1
Optional Accessories
SP-8 Surge Protector
MA-2 Modem Adapter
PA-2 Printer Adapter
RAK-2 Intelligent Rack Adapter
RS-232 Serial Data Adapter
ACM-2 AC Current Monitor
AFS-3 Audio Failsafe
TSN-3 Thermal Sentry III
TS-1/PS Temperature Sensor (w/Power Supply)
Table of Contents
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.2
4.2
4.2
4.2
i
4.2
Auxiliary Circuits
Audio Detection
Latching Relays
Telemetry Pulse Stretching
Battery Backup
4.3
4.3
4.4
4.4
4.5
Section 5 – Basic Operation
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
Overview
Operation from the Local Telephone
Connecting to the RFC-1
Selecting a Channel
Reading Telemetry Channels
Operating the Control Relays
Issuing other Commands
Disconnecting from the RFC-1
Operating from a Remote Telephone
Connecting to the RFC-1
Operating the RFC-1
Disconnecting from the RFC-1
Alarm System
How the Alarm System Works
Alarm System Setup
Programming Alarm Limits
Programming Telephone Numbers
Enabling / Disabling the Telemetry Alarm System
Enabling / Disabling the Power Failure Alarm
System Limitations
Clock and Calendar
Setting the Calendar
Setting the Clock
Basic Programming
Security Codes
Ring Number
Operating Commands / Notes
5.1
5.1
5.1
5.1
5.2
5.2
5.2
5.2
5.3
5.3
5.3
5.3
5.4
5.4
5.4
5.5
5.5
5.5
5.6
5.6
5.7
5.7
5.7
5.7
5.7
5.7
5.8
Section 6 – Advanced Operations
6.1
6.2
6.3
RFC-1
Introduction
Advanced Programming
Programming Address Table
Using the Programming Mode
Restore Factory Settings
Telemetry Channels
Telemetry Channel Programming
Unit Words
Status Readings
Maximum Scale and Decimal Point
Linear and Logarithmic Scales, Inverted Status and Auto-control Relay
Indirect Power
Telemetry Leading Zero Suppression
Telemetry Settling Time
Number of Telemetry Channels Available
Table of Contents
6.1
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.5
6.5
6.6
6.7
6.7
6.8
6.10
6.10
6.11
ii
6.4
6.5
6.6
6.7
6.8
RFC-1
Clock and Calendar
Setting the Calendar
Day of the Week
Setting the Clock
Automatic Daylight Saving Time Adjustment
Clock Calibration
Action Sequences
Fixed-programming Action Sequences
User-programmable Action Sequences
Control Relay Operation
Action Sequence Delays
Alarm Calls
Logging Telemetry Readings
Conditional Execution
Enabling / Disabling Telemetry Alarms
Extending an Action Sequence
Testing an Action Sequence
Telemetry Alarms
Telemetry Alarm Programming
Channel Number
Trigger Rules
Action Sequence
Upper and Lower Limits
Enabling and Disabling Telemetry Alarms
Blocking Alarms by Time
Alarm Scan Interval and Sequence
Timed Events
Enabling Timed Events
Disabling Timed Events
Date/Time Triggers and Telemetry Channels—Shared Memory Region
Programming a Timed Event
Special Triggering Options
Programming Examples
Telemetry Auto-scan Data Interval
Telemetry Auto-scan Stop Channel
Communication
Programming Telephone Numbers
Extending Telephone Numbers
Setting the Call Attempts
Setting the Call Mode
Calling Voice Numbers
Calling Data Numbers
Calling Pagers in Voice Mode
Calling Pager in Data Mode
Tone/Pulse Dialing
Alarm Call Message Duration
Alarm Call Pause Duration
Ring Sensitivity and Hang-up Detection
Communication Mode
Data Communication Settings
Manual Communication Mode Change
Saving and Restoring System Settings
Terminal Emulation Software
Backing-up System Settings
Restoring System Settings
Table of Contents
6.12
6.12
6.12
6.12
6.12
6.13
6.15
6.15
6.16
6.17
6.18
6.19
6.20
6.21
6.24
6.24
6.25
6.26
6.26
6.26
6.27
6.27
6.28
6.28
6.29
6.30
6.31
6.31
6.31
6.31
6.32
6.33
6.33
6.36
6.36
6.37
6.37
6.38
6.38
6.39
6.39
6.39
6.40
6.41
6.43
6.43
6.43
6.44
6.45
6.46
6.46
6.47
6.48
6.49
6.50
ii
6.9
6.10
6.11
Security Codes
Security Code Programming
Control Security Code Mapping
Incorrect Code Lockout / Communication Mode Switch Delay
Site ID and Other Options
Site Identification Phrase
Hardware Version
Inactive System Timeout
Operating Commands / Notes
6.51
6.51
6.51
6.52
6.53
6.53
6.54
6.54
6.55
Section 7 – Programming Examples
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
7.8
7.9
7.10
7.11
Telemetry Channel—unit word, full scale, decimal point
Site Identification Phrase
Action Sequence
Date/Time Trigger
Alarm Limits—Analog Channel
Alarm Limits—Status Channel
Voice Mode Telephone Number
Text Pager—Voice Mode
Logging Readings—Local Printer
Tower Light Alarm
Tower Light Alarm Block—Daylight Hours
7.2
7.1
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
7.8
7.10
7.11
7.12
Section 8 – Troubleshooting and Service
8.1
8.2
Common Problems and Possible Solutions
Factory Service Policy
8.1
8.3
Section 9 – Specifications
9.1
9.2
Electrical and Mechanical
RFC-1 Remote Facilities Controller
RP-8 Relay Panel
Schematic Diagrams
9.1
9.1
9.1
9.2
Appendix A – Programming Address Table
0000
0256
0640
0724
0852
0948
0984
0996
Telemetry Channels
Date/Time Triggers
Telephone Numbers
Action Sequences
Alarms
Security Codes
Site ID Phrase
Operating Parameters
A.1
A.6
A.14
A.16
A.18
A.20
A.21
A.22
Appendix B – Word Table
Vocabulary List
RFC-1
B.1
Table of Contents
iv
Section 1 — Safety Information and FCC Compliance
1.1
Safety Information
Only qualified technical personnel should attempt to install the RFC-1 system. An attempt to
install this device by a person who is not technically qualified could result in a hazardous
condition to the installer or other personnel, and/or damage to the RFC-1 or other equipment.
Ensure that safety precautions are made before installing this device.
The RFC-1 Remote Facilities Controller is registered with the Federal Communications Commission and certified to
meet specific safety requirements. It is extremely important that the RFC-1 not be modified in any way. Modification
of this equipment will void the FCC certification, void the warranty, and perhaps pose a hazard to the user of this
equipment or to maintenance personnel of your local telephone company.
The RFC-1 Remote Facilities Controller should be serviced only by qualified technical personnel who are familiar with
the implications of FCC Part 68 registration. The RFC-1 Remote Facilities Controller and the RP-8 Relay Panels are
designed for indoor use in a dry location. Installation and operation in other locations could be hazardous.
All cables should be disconnected when servicing the RFC-1 system. Extreme caution should be
used when opening the RFC-1 chassis. High voltages may be present on telephone lines.
Although the RFC-1 has a 12-volt AC power transformer, failure of the transformer could cause
dangerous and potentially lethal voltages to become present.
Depending on the installation, the control circuits of the RP-8 Relay Panel may be connected to sources of up to 120
volts AC and/or several amperes of current. Under certain conditions, these voltage sources can be lethal. Always
use caution when working around these circuits. Disconnect all high voltage and high current sources before
servicing the RFC-1 system.
Exercise caution when working near the connectors on the RP-8. The removable connectors used on the RP-8 leave
slightly exposed tips even when the connector is in place. The tips are not dangerous but they are pointed.
Furthermore, the exposed metal provides a very small point where a short could occur. Be careful when using metal
tools near any exposed wiring. Power should be removed form all devices when performing service.
The RFC-1 contains self-resetting "fuses" that protect it from excessive current.
replacement devices should be of the same type and rating.
If they become damaged,
The RFC-1, like any electronic device, can fail in unexpected ways and without warning. Do not use the RFC-1 in
applications where a life-threatening condition could result if it were to fail.
RFC-1
Safety Information and FCC Compliance
page 1.1
1.2
FCC Compliance
The RFC-1 complies with Part 68 of the FCC rules. On the rear panel of the RFC-1 is a label that contains, among
other information, the FCC registration number and ringer equivalence number (REN) for this equipment. If
requested, this information must be provided to the telephone company.
The REN is used to determine the number of devices that may be connected to the telephone line. Excessive RENs
on the telephone line may result in devices not ringing in response to an incoming call. In most areas, the sum of the
RENs should not exceed 5.0. Contact the local telephone company to determine the maximum REN for the calling
area.
The RFC-1 is designed for use with standard modular (RJ-11C) telephone jacks.
The telephone company may make changes in its facilities, equipment, operations, or procedures that could affect
the operation of the RFC-1. If this happens, the telephone company usually provides advance notice in order for you
to make the necessary modifications to maintain uninterrupted service.
If the RFC-1 causes harm to the telephone network, the telephone company will notify you in advance of service
disconnection. If advance notice isn't practical, the telephone company will notify the customer as soon as possible.
Also, you will be advised of your right to file a complaint with the FCC if you believe it is necessary.
Please contact Sine Systems, Inc., for repair and/or warranty information if you suspect that the RFC-1 has
malfunctioned. If a defective device is causing harm to the telephone network, the telephone company may request
you remove that device from the network until the problem is resolved.
The RFC-1 cannot be used on public coin service telephone lines. Connection to Party Line Service is subject to
state tariffs. Contact your state public utility commission, public service commission, or corporation commission for
information.
The RFC-1 is registered with the Federal Communications Commission and is certified to meet specific safety
requirements. It is important that the RFC-1 not be modified in any way. Modification of this equipment will void the
FCC certification, void the warranty, and perhaps pose a hazard to the user of this equipment or to maintenance
personnel of your local telephone company.
Service should only be performed by qualified technicians that are familiar with the implications of FCC Part 68
registration. Extreme caution should be used if the RFC-1 case is opened while still connected to the telephone line.
High voltages may be present on telephone lines.
RFC-1
Safety Information and FCC Compliance
page 1.2
Section 2 — New Features and System Changes
2.1
Version 6.00
General Feature Updates
The RFC-1 can reset all user programmable settings to their factory default values.
programming code has been added to the system that performs this operation.
A special advanced
The system can be manually forced to both data and voice mode with the command 84. Previously it was possible to
force data mode but the system can now be forced back to voice mode too.
The memory dump/print command has additional options. The legacy mode table-style memory dump is included for
backward compatibility. A new annotated memory dump displays the data in logical groups by function and includes
a description on each line of data. The memory restore dump formats the data so that it can be saved to a text file
and used to reprogram the RFC-1 user memory.
Several user prompts have changed. The prompt to enter the main security code changes from “enter” to “enter
security code.” When an incorrect security code is given, the system now says, “error, goodbye” before
disconnecting. The alert that there is an incoming call when user is connected locally changes from “ring-ring” to
“telephone, ring-ring”. The commands to read/reprogram telephone numbers and alarms now identify the item by
letter “A, B, C, etc”.
Clock & Calenear Updates
The real time clock can optionally adjust automatically for Daylight Savings Time as observed in the United States
using rules established in 2007. This feature is disabled by default to avoid issues in areas that do not observe the
seasonal time change. The feature is enabled through a simple adjustment that is stored in non-volatile memory.
The RFC-1 calendar determines the day of the week when the date is set. This operation is automatic and occurs
without user intervention.
The calendar recognizes all four digits for the year.
When appropriate hardware is available, the real time clock synchronizes to the incoming AC power and corrects the
internal time base for better long-term accuracy. The feature works in areas using either 50 Hz or 60 Hz AC power
and operation is completely transparent. It is enabled by default but can be overridden through user programming.
The legacy clock adjustment procedure still exists for sites that are not powered from an AC main supply. This
feature requires hardware support available in systems that shipped after mid 2003.
Systems that are able to perform the automatic clock sync described above also support an internal power failure
alarm. The system is able to recognize the loss of AC power. This feature works in addition to the legacy power
failure alarm that triggers when power is restored after a failure. The power failure alarm is disabled by default and is
enabled with the command 82.
RFC-1
New Features and System Changes
page 2.1
Telemetry System Updates
Telemetry channels that are programmed as status channels (“on/off”, “normal/alarm”, etc.) can be individually
programmed to invert the status reading. Typical behavior is a reading of “off” when no voltage is present and “on”
when voltage is present. The readings can be swapped so that no voltage reads “on” and voltage present reads “off”.
This eliminates the need for wiring an external inverter circuit.
There are a couple of changes to the telemetry channel status options. Option 0-4 changes from unused to “normal”
(low) / “failure” (high). Option 0-15 changes from “normal / EAS” to “audio failure” (low) / “normal” (high).
Timed-Event Updates
Timed events can be programmed according to the day of the week. In addition to the previously available options,
time triggers can be programmed to operate only on a specific day of the week, weekdays only or weekends only.
New date/time trigger options are available to repeat an event on specific intervals. The value 15 has always been
used to match all values for month, date and hour. The hour can now be programmed with 15-1, 15-2, 15-3 or 15-4
to repeat an event every 1, 2, 3 or 4 hours. Similarly, minute settings can use 15-1 through 15-5 to repeat an event
every 1 through 5 minutes. Programming of events that repeat on a regular cycle is greatly simplified.
Alarms can be enabled and disabled by commands in an action sequence. This means that timed events can now be
used to enable and disable alarms using all of the date/time trigger options.
Telephone Related Updates
The DTMF tone dialing system is capable of generating the tones associated with the ❊ and # keys. These tones are
required by some telephone systems. Previous versions of the RFC-1 could not generate these tones due to
memory limits of the speech processor. Some of the names in the word table were eliminated to create space in
memory for the additional DTMF tones.
The tone dialing system can use a dedicated DTMF tone generator if it is available in hardware. Early hardware
versions use the speech processor to reproduce stored tones. A dedicated tone generator is faster and generates
tones with more accuracy.
Multiple telephone numbers can be chained together to achieve dialing stings longer than the default twelve digits.
Voice calls using tone dialing and data mode calls can utilize this feature. Pulse dialing is limited to 12 digits per
telephone number.
The command 89 now reads and programs telephone number D.
RFC-1
New Features and System Changes
page 2.2
Alarm System Updates
The telemetry alarm channel scanning intervals have changed. The factory default scan interval is still one channel
per 10 seconds. Several new intervals have been added including a shorter 5-second interval as well as a very long
240-second interval.
Alarms can be blocked according to the day of the week. As with timed events, the RFC-1 can block an alarm on a
specific day of the week, weekdays only or weekends only.
Alarms can be blocked for a specific month. This allows alarm blocking to “float” from month to month. This will help
stations that operate at multiple power levels.
Action sequences with fixed programming are stored in the system. These action sequences perform common tasks
without occupying any of the user programmable memory space. Pre-programmed action sequences are available to
place telephone calls, print readings to a local printer or print readings to a remote printer. This frees action
sequence 1 and eliminates some potential programming errors that cause the alarm system to not work as expected.
The user programmable action sequences are designated 1 through 8. The factory programmed action sequences
are designated from 9 up.
The factory programming for all alarms is to trigger action sequence 9. If an alarm occurs and the action sequence
that is triggered has no instructions, the system will substitute action sequence 9.
Action sequences can be chained together to achieve sequences longer than eight instructions.
Alarm calls can be made to text based pagers with a site ID number and can optionally include the number of the
channel that triggered the alarm. In previous RFC-1 versions, the message was limited to a single digit repeated ID
digit. This mode is completely DTMF tone driven however some paging systems may not support this feature.
Alarm calls can be made to text based pagers with complete text messages including the channel that triggered the
alarm and the channel reading when the failure occurred. This feature requires the RFC-1 to have a data modem
(MA-1/2 or RAK-1) and data support from the pager service provider. The data communication follows the automatic
messaging mode specified in the TAP protocol that is supported by most paging terminals. Additional data protocols
have been added to the RFC-1 to support standard and non-standard TAP implementations.
RFC-1
New Features and System Changes
page 2.3
Section 3 — Installation
Only qualified technical personnel should attempt to install the RFC-1 system. An attempt to
install this device by a person who is not technically qualified could result in a hazardous
condition to the installer or other personnel, and/or damage to the RFC-1 or other equipment.
Ensure that safety precautions are made before installing this device.
3.1
System Includes
The RFC-1 Remote Facilities Controller package contains these items:
•
Remote Facilities Controller model RFC-1
•
Rack mounted chassis
•
•
Flat cable with two connectors, 3 ft long
12 VAC wall plug supply
•
•
Modular telephone cable, 7 ft long
Flat blade adjustment screwdriver
•
Operation manual
All systems are fully tested before leaving the factory but damage may occur in transport. When the RFC-1 and RP-8
panels are unpacked, they should be inspected for obvious signs of mechanical damage or loose parts. Loose parts
should be tightened before installation. If damage is found, save the packing material and report it to the shipping
company and the dealer from which it was purchased. Do not install the system.
3.2
Installing the System
The RFC-1 is easy to install if you are careful, patient and alert. Installation is broken down into a series of logical
steps. Perhaps more importantly, you should have some previous engineering experience in a broadcast transmitter
environment. Having access to the building does not qualify you as an engineer. A transmitter can be extremely
unforgiving to stupid mistakes. We cannot protect you from yourself.
We want to make this point very clear: if you are unfamiliar with this type of equipment, please contact a properly
qualified engineer to handle installation and setup of this system.
RFC-1
Installation
page 3.1
3.2.1
Mechanical Installation
The RFC-1 and RP-8 should be mounted in a standard 19-inch equipment rack. The system generates little heat. It
can be mounted in nearly any convenient location. The RP-8 panels should be mounted at a location that is
convenient to the control and metering sources that will be connected to it.
A flat cable is supplied for interconnection between the RFC-1 and the RP-8. The factory supplied cable is three feet
long but it can be replaced with a longer one if the RFC-1 and RP-8 are to be mounted further apart.
Figure 3.1; RFC-1 Remote Facilities Controller and RP-8 Relay Panel
3.2.2
RFC-1 / RP-8 Interconnect
The RFC-1 should be connected to the RP-8 relay panel(s) with the 16 conductor flat (ribbon) cable. This cable is
supplied with the RFC-1. The cable is terminated with one connector at each end. If more than one RP-8 is used in
a system, an extra connector will be supplied with the additional RP-8. The additional connector must be crimped
onto the existing flat cable assembly.
Adding an extra connector to the flat cable is easy—just be careful and be patient. First, slide the connector over the
end of the ribbon cable. Be sure to check three things:
•
The colored stripe (usually red) is on same side of all connectors
•
The ribbon cable lines up with the alignment slots in the connector
•
The connector is perpendicular to the length of the cable
When you are sure that the connector is aligned properly, squeeze the connector together with a small vice or a pair
of pliers. A couple of small blocks of wood or cardboard will protect the plastic connector from the “gripping teeth” of
the vice or pliers. The latches on the edges of the connector will lock into place when the connector is squeezed
together sufficiently.
Plan your installation cable before you install additional connectors. For multiple RP-8 panels that are mounted next
to each other in the rack, the connectors should be placed about six inches apart on the cable. The supplied cable
should work for the most installations. Longer cables may be used if necessary.
RFC-1
Installation
page 3.2
3.2.3
RP-8 Channel Block Assignment
If your system uses only one RP-8 you may skip this section.
Each RP-8 panel in the system should be assigned to a different “block” of eight channels. The channel blocks are:
00-07, 08-15, 16-23, 24-31, 32-39, 40-47, 48-55 and 56-63. Normally, consecutive blocks of channels are used but
this is not necessary.
Channel block assignment is made by moving a selection jumper located at the left end of each RP-8 panel. Simply
move the jumper to the desired block position.
Figure 3.2; RP-8 Channel block select jumper
Be aware that the RFC-1 “rests” on channel 63 during idle conditions (in between telephone calls and not scanning).
If the last block of channels is used (56-63), the telemetry relay for channel 63 will be energized during idle periods.
This is not normally an issue.
RFC-1
Installation
page 3.3
3.2.4
RP-8 Telemetry Connections
Telemetry connections to the RP-8 are made through two-conductor screw terminal connectors. The screw terminal
connectors can be removed for easier installation. There are no locks or catches, grasp the connector firmly and pull
it away from the panel.
The connector can be plugged onto the terminal posts in several directions: horizontal or vertical and left or right
facing. You may choose the position that is most convenient. Any connector orientation is acceptable but be sure to
observe proper signal polarity.
Figure 3.3; RP-8 Telemetry input connection point
Telemetry samples should conform to the following rules:
•
For a full scale voltage reading a minimum of 1.0 volt DC is necessary
•
•
Telemetry samples significantly over 5 volts DC should be dropped with an external attenuator
Absolute maximum telemetry sample is 10 volts DC
•
Telemetry samples can be offset from ground up to 30 volts DC
•
Positive or negative DC voltages can be metered but not both on the same channel
More information on telemetry sources is provided later in this section.
RFC-1
Installation
page 3.4
3.2.5
RP-8 Control Connections
Control connections to the RP-8 are made through three-conductor screw terminal connectors. The screw terminal
connectors can be removed for easier installation. There are no locks or catches, grasp the connector firmly and pull
it away from the panel. In addition, the connector can be plugged onto the terminal posts in several directions:
horizontal or vertical and left or right facing. You may choose the position that is most convenient.
Figure 3.4; RP-8 Control output connection point
The control relays are SPDT with both normally open and normally closed contacts available. Observe proper
orientation between the NO, NC and common terminals when making these connections. Detailed information on
control outputs is given later in this section.
3.2.6
RP-8 Channel Identification
The front of the RP-8 includes a place to record pertinent data regarding each channel. Remember, the channels
read in the correct order from the back of the panel when wiring. Channels read right to left as viewed from the front
of the panel—the lowest channel number is on the far right.
Ch. 07
Ch. 06
Ch. 05
Ch. 04
Ch. 03
Ch. 02
Ch. 01
Ch. 00
Figure 3.5; Order of RP-8 channels as viewed from front
It is often desirable to write the channel number in the space indicated as well as any other information pertinent to
that channel. A grease pencil works well for this task. A permanent marker can be used but it will be difficult to
remove the ink without damaging the painted panel if it becomes necessary to do so.
RFC-1
Installation
page 3.5
3.2.7
Telephone and Telephone Line Connection
The RFC-1 should be connected to a standard (POTS) telephone line with the modular (RJ11C) jack on the rear
panel labeled "Line". A telephone cable is supplied with the RFC-1 for this purpose. A telephone may be connected
to the jack labeled "Phone". This telephone will be used to control the RFC-1 locally (on-site) and will function
normally when the RFC-1 is not online.
Line
Sine Systems
, inc
Phone
Relay Panels
Power
Remote Facilities Controller model RFC-1/B • Sine Systems, Inc. • Nashville, Tennessee
Figure 3.6; RFC-1/B rear panel I/O connectors
3.2.8
Power Supply
Power to operate the RFC-1 and up to eight RP-8 panels is supplied by a 12 volt AC wall-plug transformer that is
supplied with the RFC-1. This transformer is designed for 120 volts AC at 50-60 Hz and is rated at 1 amp. The leads
of this transformer should be stripped and connected to the screw terminal connector marked “12 VAC” on the RP-8.
If more than one RP-8 is used, connect to any one of the RP-8 panels. If the supplied transformer has a connector
on the end of the power cord, simply cut the connector off and discard it.
Figure 3.7; RP-8 Power and I/O connections
In installations where 120 volts AC is not available, the RFC-1 may be powered by any source delivering 12.0 to 14.2
volts AC at 50-60 Hz or 16 to 18 volts DC. The RFC-1 draws a maximum of approximately 0.50 amps when a control
relay is engaged. A 12.6-volt filament transformer makes a good substitute power source. The power source must
be floating. Neither side of the power source should be connected to ground (earth) nor should the power source be
connected to any other equipment. Failure to observe this precaution will result in inaccurate telemetry indications.
RFC-1
Installation
page 3.6
3.3
Telemetry Source Inputs
Telemetry samples may be elevated several hundred volts above ground on some equipment.
Permanent damage may occur to the RFC-1 and/or external equipment if a high voltage telemetry
source is connected to the RP-8! Failure to observe this warning may also cause injury to the
installer or other personnel.
Telemetry inputs are located across the top of the RP-8 panel through the 8 two conductor terminal blocks marked
“Telemetry”. The channels are identified as “00” through “07”. In situations where more than one RP-8 is used,
channel numbers increase by 8 on each successive relay panel.
The RFC-1 will accept either a positive or negative DC voltage source as a telemetry input. One volt DC is the
minimum voltage required for a full-scale reading. A lower input voltage can be used but the maximum reading will
not reach full scale. Low sample voltages can be calibrated initially but changing readings will have steps instead of
being smooth and continuous.
Telemetry samples over 5 volts may be used but calibration accuracy suffers on analog readings. Telemetry sample
voltage is less critical for status on/off channels. Samples for status channels may be up to 10 volts DC. Telemetry
sample voltage should never exceed 16 volts DC.
Excessive telemetry sample voltage reduces the useful range of the 22 turn calibration pots to the last few turns. The
result is an overly sensitive calibration that is “touchy”—a small change of the calibration pot causes a large change
in the telemetry reading.
Telemetry samples that are significantly over 5 volts should be reduced with an external attenuator. One solution is
to add a 2.2 KΩ shunt resistor across the telemetry input terminals and a series resistor in the telemetry sample. The
series resistor should be about 2200 Ω per volt in excess of two volts. For example, to attenuate a telemetry voltage
of 10 volts, use a 2.2 KΩ shunt resistor and an 18 KΩ series resistor. The values are not critical.
The telemetry terminal blocks are polarity specific. Connect the positive (high) side of the telemetry source to the “+”
terminal and the negative (low) side to the “-” terminal. Either side may be ground referenced if necessary.
Telemetry sources may be offset from ground up to 30 volts.
Shielded wire is not normally necessary for short runs to the telemetry inputs since a considerable amount of RFI
filtering is built into the RFC-1. However, long cable runs or lines from AM sampling loops may contain a very large
amount of RF energy which can cause telemetry linearity or other problems. Excessive RF energy can burn the
telemetry input components on the RP-8. This problem can usually be eliminated by inserting 2.5 mH chokes in
series with each telemetry lead.
It makes sense for the telemetry and control on a channel to be related. If the relays on a channel are wired to
control transmitter power, then the telemetry sample on that channel should indicate transmitter power too.
There is no internal hardware connection between the telemetry input and the control I/O. It is entirely possible for a
single channel to control a function that is completely unrelated to the telemetry. System operation is not intuitive in
such a case but the RFC-1 allows this.
Channel readings do not change just because a control function is given. A sample voltage is required to indicate
any change of state. In other words, if you activate the control relay on a channel to turn on a device and there is no
telemetry sample from that device to indicate that the device turned on, the channel reading will still be “status off”.
RFC-1
Installation
page 3.7
3.3.1
Analog Readings
Any telemetry channel can be a status channel on the RFC-1. Explained briefly, the RFC-1 has the capability to read
telemetry over a range of 0000 to 2040. If the reading is:
•
•
Between 0003 and 2039 the telemetry is spoken as four digits
Lower than 0003 the words "status off" are spoken
•
Higher than 2037 the words "status on" are spoken
Thus, any channel can act as either an analog input or a status channel with no specific programming changes. A
voltage must be applied to a telemetry input indicate a change of status. The voltage will be interpreted as a logic
level signal by the RFC-1 using the rules listed above.
3.3.2
Status Readings
The diagram below shows how to wire a telemetry input for a status output. When the external contact is closed, the
channel will read "status on" and when the contacts are open the telemetry will read "status off".
Figure 3.8; Typical wiring for a normally open status channel
The power supply shown in the illustration can be a simple wall-plug transformer that supplies anywhere from 6 to 12
volts DC. A single power supply can be used for many status contacts. The external 1 KΩ resistor is added to
discharge the input smoothing capacitor on the RP-8 more quickly. Without this resistor it takes about 5 seconds to
reach a “status off” reading after the external contacts open. Adjust the telemetry calibration pot so that the system
reads "status on" when the external contact closes.
This example illustrates one method of generating a status indication. There are many others. For example, to read
a closed contact as "status off", connect the voltage source through a 1 KΩ resistor to the positive telemetry terminal
and bridge the contact across the positive and negative telemetry terminals. A closed contact will short the voltage
and produce a "status off" indication.
Figure 3.9; Typical wiring for a normally closed status channel
RFC-1
Installation
page 3.8
In some cases it is necessary to use an externally generated voltage to indicate status. Suppose, for example, that a
large AC contactor that does not have auxiliary contacts is to be metered. A small step-down transformer can be
placed across the coil of the contactor to generate a low voltage AC sample. The low voltage AC can then be routed
through a series diode and resistor (approximately 1 KΩ) to the telemetry input. The 10 µF capacitor on the RP-8
should provide sufficient filtering. Do not apply more than 16 volts DC to the telemetry input terminals!
3.3.3
Calibrating Telemetry Readings
Calibrating the telemetry inputs requires basic operational skills with the RFC-1 in local mode. Skip ahead and read
the section that covers operation from the local phone if you have no previous experience with the RFC-1.
Calibrating the telemetry inputs involves adjusting the channel readings so that they correspond to the readings given
from front panel meters. The process is to adjust the calibration pot just behind the front panel for a given channel
while checking the value with the local phone. Tweak the calibration pot until the RFC-1 reads the same reading that
is shown on the corresponding front channel meter. Channels read right to left as viewed from the front of the
panel—the lowest channel number is on the far right. Make sure that you adjust the correct pot for the channel that
you are calibrating.
Figure 3.10; Telemetry calibration point
The calibration pots are 22-turn trimmer resistors that allow precise adjustment. The pots have a clutch at each
extreme to protect the internal mechanism from traveling too far but the pot will turn indefinitely. It does make a faint
clicking sound at each end of travel.
As you adjust the pot, the RFC-1 will read new values automatically if the change is very large. However, as you
close in on the proper value, you will need to reselect the channel to get an updated reading. Take advantage of as
much of the scale as possible. If the normal reading is 100, calibrate the channel to 1000. This is still well within the
upper limit of 2040 and offers much higher resolution than if the channel was calibrated to 0100.
From the factory, the RFC-1 will read a four-digit value between 0003 and 2039 with no decimal point. Programming
options include different scales, a decimal point, unit words and lead zero suppression. The Advanced Operation
section of this manual contains more information.
RFC-1
Installation
page 3.9
3.4
Control Outputs
While the control relay contacts are rated for 120 volts AC, only low voltage AC or DC sources
should be connected to the RP-8. The large number of exposed terminals on this panel could
result in a hazardous condition to the installer or other personnel if high voltage were present.
Each RP-8 relay panel has eight “On/Raise” relay contacts and eight “Off/Lower” relay contacts. The output relay
contacts are form C (SPDT), floating, and rated at 120 volts AC, 5 amperes resistive, 2 amperes inductive. Both
normally open (NO) and normally closed (NC) contacts are available on the three conductor terminal block for each
relay.
The control relays on the RP-8 are momentary relays that operate as long as the control commands (* or #) are sent
to the RFC-1. An external latching relay must be used if maintained outputs are required. The appropriate output
relay of the RP-8 can be used to provide a control signal to the latching relay. Electrical or mechanical latching relays
can be used but electrical latching relays may chatter if there is a power supply glitch.
3.5
Telephone Interface
The RFC-1 should be connected to an ordinary (POTS) telephone line. In some cases a telephone line is either not
available or is prohibitively expensive. There are several alternatives to a regular telephone line that are compatible
with the RFC-1.
3.5.1
Cellular Telephone with an RJ-11 Adapter
It is possible to connect a cellular telephone to the RFC-1 in place of a telephone line. Some phone manufacturers
offer docking-station devices that equip an off-the-shelf cellular telephone with a standard RJ-11 jack. There are also
stand-alone devices that combine the radio and emulation hardware in one device. Both types of devices emulate a
standard telephone line including dial tone, ring voltage and battery.
Most devices of this type operate better in a typical transmitter environment with an external antenna and a constant
power supply. Some manufacturers offer these items as part of their product line. There are also many aftermarket
devices that may be useful. The best approach is to discuss your needs with your supplier to find a solution that
meets the needs of the specific site.
Most devices that emulate a telephone line generate a functional but non-standard ring signal on incoming calls. The
RFC-1 has a firmware adjustment to help it recognize the non-standard ring signal. The Advanced Programming
section of the RFC-1 documentation provides details on making this adjustment.
3.5.2
Fixed Location Cellular Telephones
An alternative to using a mobile cell phone with an RJ-11 adapter is to use a phone designed specifically for fixed
locations. These devices combine the wireless radio and line emulation hardware into one device.
Fixed location devices tend to cost more than docking stations but they are typically more flexible and more robust
then their low-cost counterparts. For instance, most fixed-location devices easily support an external antenna.
RFC-1
Installation
page 3.10
3.5.3
Radiotelephones and Wireless Extenders
This class of device uses a full duplex radio circuit to extend a POTS telephone line over a radio link. Two small
transceivers are used. One is connected to the telephone line and the remote device emulates the telephone line.
Radiotelephones have a range of roughly 1 to 20 miles depending on terrain. Typically these systems must be
licensed. Channels are usually available in the areas where radiotelephones are most often needed.
Radiotelephone systems can be expensive initially but there is no recurring cost for service once the system installed.
3.5.4
Dedicated Control Port
The RFC-1 may be operated through a non-dial-up communications link such as a dedicated line, a two way radio, a
pager, an STL/SCA link, etc. This additional control method may be used in place of a dial-up line or in addition to a
dial-up line. The dedicated communications link is available as a secondary function through the RJ-11 jack labeled
"Phone" on the RFC-1. The Dedicated Control Port is activated by firmware settings. The Advanced Programming
section of the RFC-1 documentation provides details on making this adjustment.
The Dedicated Control Port is a two-way audio port with 12 volts DC battery to power a telephone. When
the Dedicated Control Port is active, the "Phone" port will be connected in parallel with the "Line" port
during a dial-up connection. Therefore, any device connected to the "Phone" jack will also be connected
to the telephone line and should be FCC Part 68 registered.
This circuit can be used when connecting a leased line to the Dedicated Control Port.
Part
F1-F4
VR1-VR3
C1-C2
Description
¼ amp fast blow fuses
150 volt metal-oxide varistors
2 µF, 200 volt film capacitors
Figure 3.11; Interface for leased line to Dedicated Control Port
The line to the Dedicated Control Port can be any length from a few feet to thousands of feet depending on the
application and tolerable series resistance. C1 and C2 are used to block the 12 volt DC source. If the dedicated line
is connected to a telephone set and the DC voltage source is desired to operate the DTMF keypad, the capacitors
may be eliminated.
RFC-1
Installation
page 3.11
If the DC blocking capacitors are not used, however, two conditions must be satisfied:
•
No more than about 50 mA DC should be drawn from this port—this is an equivalent DC load
resistance of about 240 ohms
•
No DC load, and only a high impedance AC load, should be present across this port when the
RFC-1 is being operated from a dial-up line
Both of these conditions will be satisfied if an ordinary telephone is connected to this port and the telephone is left on
hook when not in use.
This circuit will interface a radio or other 4-wire communications link to the Dedicated Control Port.
Part
T1-T2
R1-R4
C1-C2
Description
600 Ω - 600 Ω audio transformers
3.3 KΩ resistors
2 µF, 200 volt film capacitors
Figure 3.12; Interface for 4-wire audio to Dedicated Control Port
C1 and C2 are used to block the 12-volt DC source. This circuit can be used with a two-way radio, a voice pager, an
SCA/STL sub-channel, or just about any communications link capable of passing voice-grade audio. It is important to
remember that operation of the RFC-1 from this port does not require the entry of the security code so the
communications link itself should be reasonably secure.
The RFC-1 will respond to any DTMF tones on this line when the Dedicated Control Port is activated. DTMF tone
used for other purposes should not appear at this port. The speech synthesizer of the RFC-1 is active on the
dedicated control port at all times and telemetry readings will be spoken as the RFC-1 scans the telemetry channels
for the monitoring and alarm system.
The proper audio level at the dedicated control port can be determined by experimentation and should be adjusted to
the minimum level required for reliable operation. In the above circuit, higher value resistors may be substituted but
do not use series resistors less than 3.3 KΩ if two transformers are used, or less than 1.5K Ω if one transformer is
used.
RFC-1
Installation
page 3.12
3.6
Battery Backup and Clock/Calendar
All of the user options and programmable parameters of the RFC-1 are stored in non-volatile memory that remains
intact if power is interrupted. The clock/calendar requires continuous power and the system will lose the time and
date if power is lost. When power is restored the clock does not advance. Resetting the clock/calendar is simple but
programmed events may be missed if the clock is not running.
3.6.1
Power Failure Alarm
This problem can be eased by setting the Power Failure Alarm. This feature causes the RFC-1 to call and report
power failures when AC power is restored. The operator that receives the call can reset the clock and calendar and
check the status of devices connected to the RFC-1. For critical applications an uninterruptible power supply is a
better solution.
3.6.2
Uninterruptable Power Supply
With a proper UPS the RFC-1 can operate normally for extended periods without AC power. A small, inexpensive
UPS designed for personal computers will power the RFC-1 for about 1.5 hours. Low end UPS’s are not "instant
switching" but the filter capacitor in the RFC-1 should store enough energy to cover the switching time.
3.6.3
AC Failure Detection on Battery Backup
When the RFC-1 is powered by a UPS or other constant supply, it is possible to monitor AC power line voltage and
generate an alarm when power fails. Simply connect an unregulated DC wall-plug power supply (approximately 3-6
VDC) to one of the telemetry inputs. The telemetry channel can be calibrated directly in volts and set up with a scale
and decimal point to reflect 120 VAC wall current. The Advanced Programming section of the RFC-1 documentation
provides details on setting the telemetry scale and decimal point.
3.7
Lightning Protection Tips
In most installations the RFC-1 is connected to both a telephone line and a tower (via the transmitter). Any
equipment in this situation is subject to severe abuse from lightning. In some installations this happens frequently.
Lightning can enter through the phone line, mistreat the RFC-1 and exit to the station ground system. It can also hit
the tower, elevate the entire ground system above ground by several kilovolts and exit through RFC-1 to ground.
This is called a "ground surge." In other words, the telephone line can hit the RFC-1 or the RFC-1 can hit the
telephone line. The same thing can happen with the power line.
3.7.1
Proper Ground System
The first step in any protection scheme is to install and maintain a high quality ground system. This will serve two
purposes. First, the intensity of the ground surge will be lowered because of the lower resistance to earth ground and
second, if everything is tied together with low impedance conductors, all equipment will stay closer to the same
electrical potential when the system ground takes a hit. All protection devices, equipment racks and transmitters
should be tied together with low impedance conductors, preferably copper strap, as short and as free from bends as
possible. Do not depend on metal conduit for ground connections. A properly designed and installed ground system
will pay for itself many times over in the damage it prevents.
RFC-1
Installation
page 3.13
3.7.2
Telephone Line Protection
Be sure your local telephone company has installed gas surge arrestors on your incoming telephone lines. Old
installations may contain carbon protectors that tend to provide less reliable protection. Be sure the ground
connection used by the telephone company is an integral part of your station ground system. Sometimes the
telephone company will use a nearby cold water pipe, metal conduit, or isolated ground rod for their ground and this
may be, electrically speaking, quite a distance from your station ground system. Do not disconnect their ground
connection. Instead, add a supplemental conductor from their ground point to the station ground.
We highly recommend that you purchase and install your own telephone line surge protector in addition to the one
installed by the telephone company. Place this between the incoming telephone line and the RFC-1. These spike
protectors are designed to pick up a ground connection through the ground prong on a standard AC outlet so be sure
this is in fact connected to your station ground by the shortest possible means. For best result, install a "dummy" AC
outlet with no AC connections but with a short jumper from the ground terminal on the outlet the metal rack in which
the RP-8 relay panel is mounted. Most protectors have internal, non-replaceable fuses which will blow during a
heavy surge. If this happens, replace the protector. Do not attempt to repair it.
3.7.3
SP-8 Surge Protector
For installations where the maximum in reliability is required we recommend the Sine Systems SP-8 Surge Protector.
The SP-8 provides significant protection against voltage surges from the telephone line, the local telephone and eight
telemetry channels using a combination of ground plane construction, gas surge suppressors, metal oxide varistors,
and carbon film resistors. It mounts directly to the RP-8 Relay Panel.
Damage to the RFC-1 and RP-8 by lightning is not covered under warranty. See the complete warranty for
more information.
3.8
RF Interference
There have been few reported RF problems with the RFC-1 associated with FM transmitters. The RFC-1 has been
tested and found to operate normally in AM RF fields of 632 volts/meter (the ANSI limit for human exposure) with no
additional external filtering. However, extreme conditions exist that require additional external filtering to obtain
reliable operation. Extreme conditions are rare but these problems can be overcome by a combination of one or
more of the following remedies:
•
•
Install an RF filter before the "Line" jack near the RFC-1
Install an RF filter before the "Phone" jack near the RFC-1
•
Loop the ribbon cable several times through a ferrite core at each end
Telephone line RF filters can be obtained through a wholesale distributor or telephone products. Be sure to get an
RF filter and not simply a spike protector.
RFC-1
Installation
page 3.14
Section 4 — Accessories and Miscellaneous Circuits
4.1
Optional Accessories
Several accessories are available for the RFC-1 to extend the capabilities of the basic system. Photographs and
other literature are available from our web site http://www.sinesystems.com.
4.1.1
RP-8 Relay Panel
Every RFC-1 installation must have at least one relay panel. Installations that require more than eight channels of
telemetry and/or control can add extra relay panels. Each additional RP-8 will add eight telemetry inputs and eight
raise/lower control relay pairs. A single RFC-1 can operate up to eight RP-8 Relay Panels for a maximum of 64
channels of telemetry and control.
Additional relay panels install on the existing flat cable with a press on connector that is included with the RP-8. A
block select jumper sets the channel numbers for the new relay panel. Each RP-8 requires two rack spaces.
4.1.2
SIP-8 Status Input Panel
Similar to an RP-8 and not to be confused with the surge protector that has a similar model number, the SIP-8 offers
eight status-only inputs. Unlike the inputs of the RP-8 that require an external voltage source, the SIP-8 inputs are
activated by a switch or relay closure from an external device. It has no control relays.
The Status Input Panel connects to the existing flat cable like an RP-8 and has a block select jumper to set the
channel numbers. It requires a single rack space. This is an ideal solution for sites that have several devices that
need to be monitored in a status configuration.
4.1.2
SP-8 Surge Protector
For maximum reliability we recommend using the SP-8 Surge Protector. The SP-8 mounts on the RP-8 and protects
the telemetry inputs against voltage surges. The SP-8 also includes telephone line surge suppression that provides
significant protection for the RFC-1 against telephone line surges. The SP-8 utilizes a combination of ground plane
construction, gas arrestors, metal oxide varistors, and resistors.
The SP-8/TO is a version of the SP-8 without the telephone line surge protection. It provides surge protection for
eight telemetry inputs and is used for installations with more than one RP-8 relay panel. It is also recommended for
installations with the RAK-1 Intelligent Rack Adapter. The RAK-1 has telephone line protection built in.
4.1.4
MA-2 Modem Adapter
The Modem Adapter model MA-2 provides a means for the RFC-1 to communicate with a remote computer to log
readings remotely. Voice/DTMF capability is not lost when the MA-2 is installed. The MA-2 consists of a small
accessory board that attaches to the RFC-1 and new chassis parts to house the expanded system.
4.1.5
PA-2 Printer Adapter
The Printer Adapter model PA-2 provides a means for the RFC-1 to log readings to a parallel printer located at the
RFC-1 site. Voice/DTMF capability is not lost when the PA-2 is installed. The PA-2 consists of a small accessory
board that attaches to the RFC-1 and new chassis parts to house the expanded system.
RFC-1
Accessories and Miscellaneous Circuits
page 4.1
4.1.6
RS-232 Serial Data Adapter
The RS-232 Serial Data Adapter provides a means for the RFC-1 to communicate with external serial devices. This
adapter can be used with a serial printer on site, or with an external modem or network translation device to access a
remote computer or printer. Voice/DTMF capability is not lost when the RS-232 is installed. The RS-232 consists of
a small accessory board that attaches to the RFC-1 and new chassis parts to house the expanded system.
4.1.7
RAK-2 Intelligent Rack Adapter
The Intelligent Rack Adapter model RAK-2 gives the RFC-1 a network interface that provides a web interface,
email/SMS messaging and network time syncing capabilities. The system includes front panel indicators, telephone
line surge suppression and a universal 120/240 VAC supply. The RAK-2 is housed in a rack mountable chassis and
requires a single rack space.
4.1.8
ACM-2 AC Current Monitor
The ACM-2 AC Current Monitor is designed to monitor tower lighting but it may be used for any application requiring
AC current monitoring. The ACM-2 can monitor up to 70 amps of AC current and it provides a proportional DC
voltage output. Filter circuits in the ACM-2 average the alternating current so that a steady reading is available even
when flashing beacons are used. The DC output connects to a telemetry channel on the RP-8. In most cases, the
resolution of the ACM-2 is more than sufficient to detect the failure of one bulb in a lighting system.
4.1.9
AFS-3 Audio Failsafe
The AFS-3 Audio Failsafe is typically used to trigger an alarm on a remote control system or terminate transmission if
program audio fails. It monitors one or two audio signals and provides a relay contact closure as long as audio is
present on at least one of the audio inputs. When no audio is present on either input for a preset length of time, the
relay contacts open and an Alarm LED lights. The length of the delay is adjustable from 30 seconds to 5.0 minutes in
30-second increments.
4.1.10 Thermal Sentry III
The Thermal Sentry provides an indication of operating efficiency by measuring the air temperature difference across
the transmitter. This device uses sensors to monitor the temperature at both the air intake and exhaust points of the
main transmitter cabinet. The temperature differential is calculated and displayed on the front panel LED display.
After normal operating conditions are determined the tolerance can be set to provide an alarm when the temperature
goes out of range. Thermal efficiency can warn of problems like clogged air filters, failed cooling blowers and
antenna icing before damage occurs to the transmitter. Analog outputs for the intake, exhaust and differential
temperatures are provided for monitoring by the RFC-1. A logic output for the alarm is also provided.
4.1.11 DCA-2 DC Voltage Amplifier
The DCA-2 Telemetry Amplifier increases the voltage of a telemetry sample when the voltage is too low to generate
an accurate reading. The RFC-1/B will give a full scale reading with as little as one volt applied at the telemetry input.
The vast majority of broadcast equipment can generate an adequate sample voltage without assistance. The DCA-2
is designed to assist devices that do not meet the minimum voltage requirement.
4.1.12 TS-1/PS Temperature Sensor with Power Supply
The TS-1/PS Temperature Sensor is a temperature sensor that measures air temperature from 5.0° F to 203.9° F.
The DC output connects to a telemetry input the RP-8 and provides 0.1° resolution. Additional temperature sensors
can share a single power supply and are available as part number TS-1.
RFC-1
Accessories and Miscellaneous Circuits
page 4.2
4.2
Auxiliary Circuits
Accessories are available that give the RFC-1 extra capabilities. Some functions are simple to add with just a few
extra parts.
4.2.1
Audio Detection
In some cases it is desirable to monitor the presence or loss of an audio signal with the RFC-1. This signal can be
used to trigger an alarm in the RFC-1. The circuit shown below is a simple audio detector. It does not provide the
features of AFS-3 Audio Failsafe but it can provide a basic audio status indication.
Part
R1
D1-D2
C1-C2
Description
470 Ω resistor
1N4001 general-purpose diodes
470 µF, 16-volt electrolytic capacitors
Figure 4.1; Simple audio detection circuit
The circuit simply rectifies the audio voltage and charges the capacitors. Any audio level of -6 dBv or greater will
maintain at least 0.5 volts DC at the output. Most line level audio sources are sufficient.
The easiest way to set this up as a loss of audio alarm is to adjust the calibration pot all the way up until you hear a
soft clicking sound—the calibration pots are 22 turn trim pot. Then set the upper limit for this channel to 2040 and the
lower limit to around 0150. With audio present, the reading will be "status on" almost all the time meaning that the
telemetry is pegged against the upper end of the scale. During long pauses the reading will change to numerical
values. An alarm will trigger when the value drops to 0150 or below.
RFC-1
Accessories and Miscellaneous Circuits
page 4.3
4.2.2
Latching Relays
Some devices may require a maintained relay contact for proper operation. While the RFC-1 cannot provide a
maintained relay contact, it is not difficult to use the control relays of the RFC-1 to electrically latch an outboard relay.
The disadvantage of this type of latched relay is that if power fails the relay may chatter or change state. In some
cases this is not an issue but, if it is, a mechanical or magnetically latched relay is probably a better solution.
Part
D1
RY1
Power
Description
1N4005 general-purpose diode
(*omit if a relay with an AC coil is used)
DPDT relay with 12 VDC coil
12 DC wall-plug supply
Figure 4.2; Latched relay that powers up in the on position (left) and in the off position (right)
4.2.2
Telemetry Pulse Stretching
It is sometimes necessary to monitor a device that generates a relatively short pulse to indicate a change of status. If
the duration of the input signal is too short, the RFC-1/B may not have time to capture the pulse and respond
appropriately.
These circuits use a readily available IC, the 74HC123A, to sense the input pulse and generate an output pulse that
can last several seconds. If a second input pulse arrives before the first output pulse has completed, the output signal
timer restarts.
Do not apply an input signal greater than 5 VDC to the 74HC123A or the IC will be damaged. Use a pot or an L-pad
to reduce the input signal voltage.
Power Supply
Any regulated 5 VDC power supply should work since the IC draws very little current. The optional 100µF capacitor
should be added if a switching supply is used.
Timing Options
The duration of the output signal depends on the choice of resistor R1 and capacitor C1. The values in the schematic
produce an output pulse of about 30 seconds.
•
•
Use C1=0.1µF and R1=5K for an output pulse of about 30 seconds
Use C1=0.1µF and R1=10K for an output pulse of about 1 minute
•
Use C1=1.0µF and R1=10K for an output pulse of about 10 minutes
RFC-1
Accessories and Miscellaneous Circuits
page 4.4
4.2.2.1 Rising Edge Detection Circuit
Part
U1
C1-C2
R1
R2
Power
Description
74HC123AN retriggerable timer IC
0.1µF 50V monolithic ceramic capacitor*
5K Ohm ¼ W carbon film resistor*
1M Ohm ¼ W carbon film resistor
5VDC regulated power supply
Figure 4.3; Circuit to detect and extend a rising edge pulse
4.2.2.2 Falling Edge Detection Circuit
Part
U1
C1-C2
R1
R2
Power
Description
74HC123AN retriggerable timer IC
0.1µF 50V monolithic ceramic capacitor*
5K Ohm ¼ W carbon film resistor*
1M Ohm ¼ W carbon film resistor
5VDC regulated power supply
Figure 4.4; Circuit to detect and extend a falling edge pulse
RFC-1
Accessories and Miscellaneous Circuits
page 4.5
4.2.3
Battery Backup
Do not under any conditions apply a DC voltage greater than 19.9 volts (19.9 VDC peak if
significant ripple is present) to the RFC-1. Prolonged exposure will cause the protection circuitry
in the RFC-1 to overheat and be damaged. This maximum voltage rating precludes the use of
some rechargeable batteries.
The user settings in the RFC-1 are stored in non-volatile memory. No user settings are lost when the RFC-1 loses
power. The time and date are the only operational data that are lost as a result of a power failure.
The RFC-1 can be operated on a small uninterruptible power supply. A small UPS designed for small-office, homeoffice use should power the RFC-1 for 30 minutes to several hours depending on the capacity of the UPS.
Alternately, the RFC-1 can be operated during power failures by an external 16 to 18 VDC power supply connected to
the 12 VAC supply input. The DC source must be "floating" (neither side connected to ground) to allow the telemetry
section of the RFC-1 to work properly.
Polarity of the voltage is unimportant since the input connector applies power to the bridge rectifier in the RFC-1. The
following simple circuit provides battery backup for a few dollars plus the cost of batteries.
Part
D1-D4
D5
C1
RY1
Description
1N4005 general-purpose diode
6.2 volt, 1 W zener diode
47 µF, 16 volt or higher*
DPDT relay with 12 VDC coil
Figure 4.5; Battery backup switching circuit
The value of C1 should be just large enough to keep RY1 pulled-in during normal power conditions. If its value is too
large, the switchover will take too long and the RFC-1 will reset. A good starting value for C1 is 47 µF.
The 18-volt battery can be as simple as three 6-volt heavy-duty lantern batteries wired in series. This type of battery
will power the RFC-1 for several hours. The batteries should be changed at intervals of 12 to 18 months even if they
are seldom used due to their limited shelf life.
RFC-1
Accessories and Miscellaneous Circuits
page 4.6
Section 5 — Basic Operation
5.1
Overview
The primary function of the RFC-1 is to monitor and control outboard devices. To perform these functions, a user
connects to the RFC-1 with a telephone. The telephone can be directly connected or through a telephone line. The
user issues two-digit commands with the telephone keypad. The RFC-1 responds with a synthesized voice.
The RFC-1 is controlled with the tones generated by a typical telephone keypad. Rotary phones do not work.
RFC-1 installations can be simple or as complex as is reasonably necessary depending on the site requirements.
The system is capable of answering calls, taking basic telemetry readings and performing manual control activity
immediately on installation. Even non-technical users can take readings and perform basic control operations. With a
few adjustments, basic monitoring activities with telephone alarms can be enabled.
The RFC-1 can also serve more demanding installations requiring automatic power and/or pattern changes. With
appropriate hardware accessories, the system can perform sophisticated monitoring activities with optional data
communications. These more advanced features are described in Section 6 of this document.
Information in this section is based on the original factory programming. Portions of this chapter may not be accurate
if changes have already been made to the system.
5.2
Operation from the Local Telephone
The system can be operated from a telephone that is connected directly to the RFC-1 at the jack labeled "Phone".
This telephone is referred to as the “local phone”. Users control the RFC-1 by entering commands with the keypad of
the local phone. The command codes are described later in this document.
5.2.1
Connecting to the RFC-1
Operation from the local phone is initiated by pushing the button labeled "Local Control" on the RP-8 relay panel.
When the button is pressed, the RFC-1 activates the local phone and speaks the identification phrase "This is RFC1/B". No security code is needed to access the system from the local phone. The system activates immediately and
awaits commands. This state of operation is referred to as the “operating mode”.
As a security precaution, the RFC-1 will not remain active indefinitely. After 2.5 minutes of inactivity the RFC-1 will
release the local phone. Press the local control button to re-activate the RFC-1.
5.2.2
Selecting a Channel
To select a channel, simply enter the two-digit channel number on the telephone keypad while the system is in
operating mode. It is important to use two digits. Enter a leading zero for channels with less than two digits.
Channel numbers start at 00 and continue through 63 depending on how many relay panels are installed. Both digits
must be entered within 5 seconds of one another.
Only one channel can be selected at a time. A channel remains selected until any of the following occur:
•
Another channel is selected
•
A programming command is entered
•
The user hangs up and/or the system disconnects
A channel must be selected to take readings or operate control relays.
RFC-1
Basic Operation
page 5.1
5.2.3
Reading Telemetry Channels
Taking a telemetry reading is as simple as selecting a channel. The RFC-1 responds with the current telemetry value
as soon as the channel is selected. For example, enter 03 on the keypad to take a reading on channel 3. The RFC-1
responds “Channel 03” followed by a four-digit reading or, depending on the calibration, it may give a status reading.
Telemetry is reported when:
•
•
A channel is selected
After a control function
•
The telemetry value of the selected channel changes by more than 10% of the full scale
To simplify telemetry logging, the RFC-1 can scan the channels and report the telemetry values with a single
command. This is an “auto-scan”. Enter the command 64 to perform an auto-scan. The RFC-1 responds with "autoscan" and then reads the telemetry values for channel 00 through 07. Interrupt the scan by entering any command.
5.2.4
Operating the Control Relays
Each channel has two control relays associated with it: one for “on/raise” functions and one for “off/lower” functions.
•
Press the # key to operate the on/raise relay
•
Press the ❊ key to operate the off/lower relay
To activate a control relay, select a channel then press either of the control keys # or ❊. If the control security code
has not been entered, the RFC-1 will request it.
The control relays will operate as long as a control key is pressed, or for a minimum of about one-half second. A
channel must be selected and the control security code must be entered to operate the control relays.
The control security code prevents unauthorized users from controlling the devices that are connected to the RFC-1
control relays. System operation can be restricted so that some operators have the ability to take telemetry readings
but not to make adjustments. The control security code is factory programmed to 66.
If an attempt is made to operate the control relays without giving the control security code, the RFC-1 will request it
by saying: “enter control security code”. If the correct code is not given, the RFC-1 will stop responding to
commands and disconnect.
5.2.5
Issuing Other Commands
The RFC-1 recognizes commands besides those required for selecting and controlling the channels. The command
set is discussed in this section and in the next. All commands are two digits long and generate a spoken response.
It is not necessary to wait for the RFC-1 to finish speaking before issuing another command.
5.2.6
Disconnecting from the RFC-1
To complete a session with the RFC-1, enter the command 99 and hang up the local phone. The RFC-1 will say
“goodbye” when it receives the hang-up command. If the hang-up command is not issued, the RFC-1 will disconnect
automatically after 2.5 minutes of inactivity.
RFC-1
Basic Operation
page 5.2
5.3
Operation from a Remote Telephone
Operating the RFC-1 from a remote telephone is very much like operating it from the local phone. The primary
difference is that the connection is made from a remote location through a telephone line. A user dials the telephone
number at the site where the RFC-1 is installed. The RFC-1 answers and requests a security code. When the
correct code is given, the RFC-1 allows user access. After that, operation is the same from local or remote phones.
5.3.1
Connecting to the RFC-1
The RFC-1 should be connected to a telephone line when it is installed. The first step in connecting to the RFC-1
from a remote location is to call the telephone number. The RFC-1 will answer after two rings and say, “enter
security code”. After the user enters the correct main security code, the RFC-1 identifies itself with the phrase, “this is
RFC-1/B”, and awaits further commands.
The factory setting for the main security code is 12345678. The user has a 10 second window in which to enter this
code. If the correct code is not entered, the RFC-1 says, “error, goodbye” and disconnects from the line.
For security reasons the RFC-1 does not identify itself until the security code is entered. If someone dials the number
by accident, the RFC-1 has not given any useful information.
The RFC-1 can have only one connection active at a time. If an engineer is operating the RFC-1 locally and another
user calls the system, the RFC-1 will alert the local user of the incoming call by saying, “telephone ring-ring”. The
local call will not be interrupted. The incoming call is ignored and the remote user must call back.
5.3.2
Operating the RFC-1
The procedure for taking readings and operating control relays is the same from a remote telephone as it is from the
local phone. In fact, the RFC-1 behaves almost exactly the same when operated from a remote telephone as it does
from the local phone. There are only a few differences:
•
•
Remote connections require a security code before access is granted to the system
A remote call in progress will be disconnected if the local control button is pressed
•
•
Security code programming commands are not allowed from a remote phone
The basic programming security code is only required from a remote connection
Most system adjustments require a security code to be entered before changes are allowed. Since direct access to
the RFC-1 is typically restricted, the security code is not requested when changes are made from the local phone.
5.3.3
Disconnecting from the RFC-1
To complete a session with the RFC-1, enter the command 99 and hang up the local phone. The RFC-1 will say
“goodbye” when it receives the hang-up command. If the hang-up command is not issued on a remote call, the RFC1 will usually disconnect instantly. If it does not, it will disconnect automatically after 2.5 minutes of inactivity.
A session can also be terminated with the command 98 instead of 99. When the command 98 is issued, the RFC-1
disconnects as it does with 99 and it ignores incoming calls for 90 second. This can be useful if the RFC-1 shares
the telephone line with other devices.
RFC-1
Basic Operation
page 5.3
5.4
Alarm System
The RFC-1 can monitor up to eight channels for abnormal telemetry conditions. If an out-of-tolerance condition is
detected, the system will call up to four telephone numbers to notify an operator of the condition. In basic operation,
the RFC-1 calls an operator but it does not attempt to correct the situation without user intervention.
5.4.1
How the Alarm System Works
After the alarm channels have been setup, the RFC-1 compares the current telemetry reading on the channel against
the alarm limits. As long as all systems are operating normally, the telemetry readings should stay within limits. If the
reading is outside of the programmed limits, the channel is technically in an alarm state. However, if the comparison
stopped there, it would be impossible to shut down a transmitter on purpose without generating an alarm.
To avoid that problem, the RFC-1 makes a reference scan at the end of every call, both local and remote. The idea
is that at the end of a call the systems are in a known state and the resulting telemetry conditions are acceptable.
The conditions at that time determine what alarms are armed. If an alarm channel is out of tolerance during the
reference scan, the alarm does not arm on that channel. The telemetry reading must be within the alarm limits at the
end of a call for the alarm on that channel to arm.
All alarms are disabled temporarily when the RFC-1 is online with an operator. Using the RFC-1 to adjust a device
out of limits does not generate an alarm. Likewise, no alarm occurs if a device goes out of limits by itself while a user
is connected.
When an alarm condition is detected, the RFC-1 begins making telephone calls to alert personnel of the condition. It
calls each number and says, “This is RFC-1/B. Telemetry alarm. Channel number,” followed by the number of the
channel that caused the alarm. Then it gives the channel reading at the time of the alarm. Earlier versions of the
RFC-1 gave a less detailed alarm message providing only the site ID and the number of the channel that failed.
Pressing any key interrupts the alarm message and clears the alarm. No more calls will be made for that alarm.
When a user has cleared an alarm, minimal access to the system is granted. Telemetry channels may be polled to
determine current system conditions. The system is still secure because control access has not been granted. If a
control function is activated, the control security code will be requested. The RFC-1 disconnects if the user does not
enter the correct security code.
The alarm call lasts for one minute if a user does not press a key to clear the alarm. The RFC-1 waits one minute
before placing the next call. This provides an opportunity for personnel to contact the RFC-1 and correct the
situation. If a user does not clear the alarm, the call sequence terminates after three call attempts to each number.
If a user clears the alarm, new reference readings are taken when the call ends. The user must adjust the offending
channel back into limits to re-arm the alarm on that channel. If the dialing sequence goes to completion without user
intervention, new reference readings are taken at the end of the sequence. This stops the RFC-1 from dialing
indefinitely for a single alarm.
5.4.2
Alarm System Setup
Three items must be programmed to use the alarm system in the RFC-1.
1.
2.
The channel numbers of the telemetry channels to monitor and appropriate upper and lower limits
Telephone numbers to call when the alarm sequence triggers—up the four telephone numbers
3.
The telemetry alarm system must be enabled using the command 82
RFC-1
Basic Operation
page 5.4
5.4.3
Programming Alarm Limits
The eight alarm channels are designated as A through H. One telemetry channel can be assigned to each alarm. It
is not necessary to use all the alarms nor is it necessary to program them in order. For example, alarm A might
monitor telemetry channel 07 and alarm B could monitor telemetry channel 03 while alarms C-H are left unused.
Using the commands 90 through 97, the RFC-1 will prompt through setting up each alarm. Enter the command 90 to
setup alarm A, 91 for alarm B, and so on. The programming procedure goes like this:
1.
Enter the command 90-97 depending on the alarm to program: 9x
2.
3.
The RFC-1 reads the current settings for the alarm: channel number, upper limit and lower limit
At the prompt, press the # key to reprogram the alarm: #
4.
At the prompt, enter the two-digit telemetry channel number to assign to this alarm: nn
5.
At the prompt, enter the four-digit upper limit to assign to this alarm: uuuu
6.
At the prompt, enter the four-digit lower limit to assign to this alarm: llll
7.
The RFC-1 responds with “OK”, the procedure is complete
The factory settings for all alarms are channel 64 with an upper limit of 2040 and a lower limit of 1020. Channel
number 64 indicates an unused alarm. Channel 64 does not exist. Programming an alarm to channel 64 disables
the alarm. The upper and lower limits do not matter if the channel number is 64.
5.4.4
Programming Telephone Numbers
The telephone numbers are designated as A through D. Each telephone number can contain up to twelve digits. It is
not necessary to use all of the telephone numbers. It is also not necessary to use all the digits in a telephone
number. Enter the ❊ key for unused digits at the end of the telephone number. The RFC-1 reads the blank digits as
the value 10—this is normal.
Using the commands 86 through 89, the RFC-1 will prompt through programming each telephone number. Enter the
command 86 to program telephone number A, 87 for telephone number B, and so on. Use the telephone numbers in
order A through D.
1.
Enter the command 86-89 depending on the telephone number to program: 8x
2.
The RFC-1 reads the current telephone number, all 10s if the number is blank
3.
At the prompt, press the # key to reprogram the telephone number: #
4.
At the prompt, enter the twelve-digit telephone number--use the ❊ for unused digits: nn...
5.
The RFC-1 responds with “OK”, the procedure is complete
There are actually six locations available for telephone numbers. Telephone numbers E and F are only available
through advanced programming.
5.4.5
Enabling / Disabling the Telemetry Alarm System
The master setting for the telemetry alarm system enables or disables all telemetry alarms with a single command.
The command to change this setting is 82. Set the value to 0 to disable the alarm system or 1 to enable the
telemetry alarms. The telemetry alarm system is disabled when the RFC-1 ships from the factory.
1.
Enter the command for the telemetry alarm system: 82
2.
The RFC-1 reads the current setting for the alarm system.
3.
At the prompt, press the # key to reprogram the alarm system status: #
4.
At the prompt, enter a 1 to enable the telemetry alarms or a 0 to disable them: 1
5.
The RFC-1 responds with “OK”, the procedure is complete
RFC-1
Basic Operation
page 5.5
5.4.6
Enabling / Disabling the Power Failure Alarm
The RFC-1 can alert an operator of an AC power failure at the remote site. In most cases, this alarm triggers when
AC power returns. The RFC-1 uses the same dialing procedure as it does for telemetry alarms as described in
section 5.4.1 but the message delivered is “This is RFC-1/B. Power failure.” An operator clears this alarm just like
any other alarm.
The command to enable or disable the power failure alarm is 82. Set the value to 0 to disable the power failure alarm
system or 1 to enable it. The power failure alarm is disabled when the RFC-1 ships from the factory.
1.
Enter the command for the power failure alarm: 81
2.
The RFC-1 reads the current setting for the power failure alarm.
3.
At the prompt, press the # key to reprogram the power failure alarm: #
4.
At the prompt, enter a 1 to enable the power failure alarm or a 0 to disable it: 1
5.
The RFC-1 responds with “OK”, the procedure is complete
At least one telephone number must be programmed for the power failure alarm to be effective. The procedure for
storing telephone numbers is described in section 5.4.4.
More recent hardware versions of the RFC-1 have the ability to detect the loss of AC power. When the power failure
alarm is enabled in a system with this capability, the system will trigger an alarm when loss of AC power is detected.
This allows the system to generate an alarm while operating from a DC supply, such as a backup battery.
When the RFC-1 places telephone calls as a result of the power failure alarm it delivers a message including the site
identification phrase and the alarm message “AC power failure.”
The internal power failure alarms are ineffective when a UPS is used because the RFC-1 does not lose power. To
detect loss of AC power at the site, connect 3-6 volt, unregulated DC wall-plug transformer to an unused telemetry
channel. Calibrate and program the channel to read 120 volts. The system is now able to monitor AC line power.
Program a telemetry alarm on this channel to have the system contact station personnel when power fails.
5.4.7
System Limitations
The RFC-1 has no way of recognizing that changes made from the front panel of the transmitter (or by another
remote control connected in parallel) are being performed by an operator. If a device that is monitored by the RFC-1
is adjusted out of tolerance and the RFC-1 is not responsible for the adjustment, an alarm will be triggered.
If multiple alarms trigger at once, for instance if a site loses AC power and everything shuts down at once, only one
alarm triggers. Which alarm triggers is determined by where the RFC-1 is in the scanning sequence when the failure
occurs. The system relies on the operator to poll the system and determine the nature and degree of failure.
The alarm system is not instantaneous. Alarm channels are scanned at a rate of one channel every 10 seconds after
the initial reference scan completes. In the worst case, it can take up to 80 seconds before an alarm is recognized.
In reality, alarms are nearly always recognized much quicker than that. If not all alarms are used, the worst-case
scenario is less than 80 seconds. The worst case is the number of alarms used multiplied by 10 seconds.
The system stops scanning when alarm triggers. It is possible for the telemetry channel that caused an alarm to
return to normal before an operator is reached. The system does not automatically terminate the alarm.
RFC-1
Basic Operation
page 5.6
If there is not a generator and a UPS is not used, when AC power fails at a site, both the RFC-1 and the transmitter
lose power. When power returns, the RFC-1 makes a new reference scan. If the transmitter does not power up
automatically, the reference scan will show that the power off condition is normal and no alarm will trigger. Use the
power failure alarm to avoid this situation.
Instruct all personnel who will receive alarm calls from the RFC-1 about the various alarms and associated channel
numbers. They need this information so that they can respond appropriately to the alarms.
5.5
Clock and Calendar
Setting the clock and calendar allows the RFC-1 to report the time and date when an alarm occurs. The clock and
calendar are also used to trigger events automatically by the date and time. This is a more advanced topic that is
discussed in the next section of this manual.
5.5.1
Setting the Calendar
Set the calendar in the RFC-1 by entering the command 70. Use leading zeros for values less than 10.
1.
Enter the command to set the calendar: 70
2.
3.
The RFC-1 will read the current settings from memory.
At the prompt, press the # key to set the date: #
4.
At the prompt, enter a two-digit month: n
5.
At the prompt, enter a two-digit date: n
6.
At the prompt, enter a four-digit year: n
7.
The RFC-1 responds with “OK”, the procedure is complete
5.5.2
Setting the Clock
Set the clock in the RFC-1 by entering the command 71. Use a 24-hour clock and use leading zeros for values less
than 10. The seconds reset to zero when the last digit is entered.
1.
Enter the command to set the clock: 71
2.
3.
The RFC-1 will read the current settings from memory.
At the prompt, press the # key to set the date: #
4.
At the prompt, enter a two-digit hour: n
5.
At the prompt, enter a two-digit minute: n
6.
The RFC-1 responds with “OK”, the procedure is complete
RFC-1
Basic Operation
page 5.7
5.6
Basic Programming
The RFC-1 can be programmed to suit the individual needs of the installation and its operators. Alarm parameters,
telephone numbers, security codes, etc. are all programmable. Most of the settings in this section can be changed
from either the local phone or a remote telephone. For safety and security, a few options are only available from the
local phone.
5.6.1
Security Codes
To limit system access to authorized personnel and prevent accidental changes, some functions require a security
code. Security codes only need to be entered once during a call.
In basic operation there are three security codes.
•
Main Security Code: 12345678
•
Control Security Code: 66
•
Basic Programming Security Code: 4088
The main security code restricts access to the system from any remote telephone. The control security code restricts
access to the on/off or raise/lower functions. The basic programming security code restricts the ability to change
system options.
The commands to read and program the security codes are shown below. For security reasons, these commands
only work from the local phone.
•
Main Security Code: 72
•
Control Security Code: 73
•
Basic Programming Security Code: 74
The procedure to program all security codes is basically the same.
1.
Enter the command, 72, 73 or 74, for the security code to program: 7x
2.
The RFC-1 will read the current setting for that security code
3.
At the prompt, press the # key to reprogram the security code: #
4.
At the prompt, enter the appropriate number of digits—use the ❊ for unused digits: nn...
5.
The RFC-1 responds with “OK”, the procedure is complete
The main security code can be up to eight digits long, the control security code and the basic programming security
code can each be up to four digits. Use the ❊ key to fill in unused spaces at the end of the code. A security code
can be disabled by programming all of the code digits with ❊.
5.6.2
Ring Number
In the factory setting, the RFC-1 answers the phone after the second ring. The number of rings is programmable.
1.
Enter the command to program the ring number: 76
2.
The RFC-1 will read the current ring number.
3.
At the prompt, press the # key to reprogram the ring number: #
4.
At the prompt, enter a one-digit ring number: n
5.
The RFC-1 responds with “OK”, the procedure is complete
The RFC-1 can share a telephone line with another device by adjusting the ring number to an appropriate value.
RFC-1
Basic Operation
page 5.8
5.7
Operating Commands / Programming Notes
It may be helpful to keep a table of normal programming for the RFC-1. This serves not only as a reminder of the
current programming but it also acts as a handy guide to remember how to change some common system settings.
Command
Function
Factory Setting
00
Select channel 00
n/a
n/a
nn
Select channel nn
n/a
n/a
63
Select channel 63
n/a
n/a
64
Auto-scan channels
n/a
n/a
66
Enable control functions
66
n/a
70
Set calendar
00/00/0000
n/a
71
Set clock
00:99:00
n/a
72
Main Security Code
12345678
________________________
73
Control Security Code
66
________________________
74
Basic Programming Security Code
4088
________________________
76
Ring Number
2
78
Firmware Version
6.xx
81
Power Failure Alarm Status
0
____
82
Telemetry Alarm Status
0
____
86
Telephone Number A
************
________________________
87
Telephone Number B
************
________________________
88
Telephone Number C
************
________________________
89
Telephone Number D
************
________________________
90
Alarm A
64 / 2040 / 1020
____ / ________ / ________
91
Alarm B
64 / 2040 / 1020
____ / ________ / ________
92
Alarm C
64 / 2040 / 1020
____ / ________ / ________
93
Alarm D
64 / 2040 / 1020
____ / ________ / ________
94
Alarm E
64 / 2040 / 1020
____ / ________ / ________
95
Alarm F
64 / 2040 / 1020
____ / ________ / ________
96
Alarm G
64 / 2040 / 1020
____ / ________ / ________
97
Alarm H
64 / 2040 / 1020
____ / ________ / ________
98
Hang-up and ignore
n/a
n/a
99
Hang-up
n/a
n/a
RFC-1
Basic Operation
Current Setting
____
n/a
page 5.9
Section 6 — Advanced Operation
This section is for qualified technical personnel. It contains information to alter most operating
characteristics of the RFC-1 system. Improper use of this information can cause unexpected or
undesirable behavior. We strongly recommend having a full understanding of the basic
operation of the RFC-1 and the specifics of the installation before applying this information.
Information in this document is based on the original factory programming. Some data presented may not match the
system being programmed if adjustments have already been made.
Effective RFC-1 programming requires attention to detail. The system follows instructions based on the rules and
parameters that you provide. If that data is not correct then the system does not behave as expected.
Functional knowledge of the specific installation is required to make use of the information presented here. In
addition, some degree of comfort working with the RFC-1 is presumed in the documentation that follows.
6.1
Introduction
Section 5 of this document provides enough information to get a basic RFC-1 system running. Using only the data in
that section it is possible to set up a functional remote control. The programming tasks documented in Section 5 are
limited to items that are easy to adjust through command prompts.
Section 6 addresses tasks that require more involved programming. Some of the tasks are commonly used such as
changing the site identification phrase or adjusting the scale, decimal and unit word on telemetry channels. Other
tasks are used by more demanding installations such as sites that require automatic power and pattern changes.
These sites can also be served by a properly configured RFC-1.
Programming instructions for several of the more commonly used features are available from our web site,
http://www.sinesystems.com. Navigate to the tech support section for the RFC-1 and follow the link to the page that
discusses the specific feature of interest. When given the appropriate input these pages generate step-by-step
programming instructions for setting up the selected feature.
There is a considerable amount of information to discuss in this section due to the flexibility of the RFC-1. The
majority of the adjustments are made in the Advanced Programming Mode. In this mode the RFC-1 allows access to
memory that controls nearly every aspect of its operation. A little effort is required initially to master the programming
mode but the power and flexibility revealed are well worth the effort.
6.2
Advanced Programming
The full potential of the RFC-1 can only be utilized through use of the Advanced Programming Mode—also referred to
simply as programming mode. Programming mode allows access to all of the features and functions of the RFC-1.
This section starts with instructions for using programming mode—how programming mode works. The rest of the
section describes specific features and provides the data needed to make use of the various features.
The documentation for each feature starts with a description of the function performed and available options. In most
cases one or more data tables are presented. The tables assign numeric codes to each available option. These
numeric codes are used to instruct the RFC-1 how it should perform various tasks. Codes are written to specific
areas of memory to enable and disable features and modify system behavior. Each memory location has a
designated address. Programming mode is the means through which the codes are written to memory addresses.
This is where many users start to panic. Relax and take a deep breath. This is not as difficult as it may sound.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.1
6.2.1
Programming Address Table
In the appendix of this document there is a list of all memory addresses with descriptions of what feature is controlled
at each address—the Programming Address Table. This list is the key to programming mode in the RFC-1. It
translates the memory address numbers that the RFC-1 uses into a descriptive map.
The sample below shows the first four memory addresses from the table, 0000 through 0003. The descriptions
indicate that these address control the behavior of telemetry channel 00—setting the unit word, decimal and scale.
Addr
Description
Section
0000
0001
0002
0003
Channel 00: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 00: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 00: full scale and decimal point
Channel 00: linear/log/indirect/invert and auto relay
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.4
6.3.5
- Programming Default Current
0
3
2
0
____
____
____
____
Alternate Use / Notes
Date/time 80: action sequence
Date/time 80: month
Date/time 80: date - value 1
Date/time 80: date - value 2
Memory is broken down into logical blocks. Similar items are grouped together so that they are easier to locate both
by users and the RFC-1. In most cases more than one address must be programmed to achieve a result. In this
example, four addresses are needed to adjust all the options available on the telemetry channel.
There are 1024 unique addresses. For programming purposes they are numbered from 0000 to 1023. Do not be
alarmed by the seemingly large number of addresses. They are grouped into a relatively small number of features.
The shaded areas in Figure 6.1 show how the memory map is broken down by feature. Most of the map is devoted
to telemetry channel settings and date/time functions. These are features that will be discussed shortly.
Figure 6.1; RFC-1 user memory map
Documentation in this section and the Programming Address Table must be used together. The address table has a
column titled Programming Section that gives the section number that holds the data table(s) for each address.
Additionally, each feature description gives the address or range of addresses at which that feature is programmed.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.2
6.2.2
Using the Programming Mode
The programming method is the same for setting up any feature using programming mode. Different address and
data tables are used for each feature but every address is programmed the same way.
Programming mode temporarily suspends normal system activity—telemetry channels are not selected and control
relays do not activate. This frees the keypad so that keystrokes can have different functions.
•
the command to enter programming mode is: 80
•
the command to exit programming mode is: ❊
•
•
in programming mode, the # key acts like an enter key
the advanced programming security code is: 4150
This is how programming mode works:
1.
Enter 80 on the keypad to activate the programming mode.
2.
3.
The RFC-1 responds with "enter advanced programming security code".
Enter the correct code and the RFC-1 will prompt: "enter four digit address".
4.
Enter the address for the item being changed.
5.
The RFC-1 will repeat the memory address as confirmation and wait for you to enter data.
When the RFC-1 is waiting for data in programming mode, your options are:
•
Push # to read the data at the current memory location
•
Push n# to write the value n at the current memory location where n is a value from 0 to 15
•
•
Push 80 to jump to a different memory address
Push ❊ to exit the programming mode
Any time the # key is pressed in this mode, the RFC-1 reads or writes the data at the current address and increments
to the next address. It works like the Enter key does when using a word processor. Pressing the Enter key accepts
the current line and increments to the next line.
Because the address increments automatically, it is not necessary to enter a new address for each data item when
reading or writing a series of addresses. Enter 80 and a new address when jumping forward or backward.
This behavior of the # key leads to the following common mistake. Suppose that an address is entered and the # key
is pressed to read the data. The RFC-1 reads the data and increments the address. The user decides that it should
be changed. At this point the user must press 80 and enter the original address again in order to overwrite the data.
The address has already incremented as a result of reading the data. If the user simply enters the new data and
presses the # key, the new data is written at the address following the original address and not the original address.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.3
6.2.3
Restore Factory Settings
In programming mode there is a special extension command that will reset the RFC-1 back to the factory default
settings. This command will restore all programmable items to the factory settings including security codes, alarm
values, date and time functions, channel settings, telephone numbers, site ID phrase, etc.
To restore the factory settings in the RFC-1:
6.
7.
Enter programming mode: 80
At the prompt, enter the advanced programming security code: 4150
8.
At the prompt for a memory address, enter the restore command: 5623
9. To RFC-1 will ask you to confirm the operation by pressing the pound key: #
10. The RFC-1 will say “OK” when the process is complete—it will take several seconds.
Do not press the # key unless you are certain that you want to restore all user programmable options. The process is
cannot be stopped or undone once the # key has been pressed.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.4
6.3
Telemetry Channels
Incorrect use of the following information can cause unexpected or undesirable behavior. We
strongly recommend that you understand the basic operation of the RFC-1 and the specifics of
the installation before continuing.
If you have not done so already, please read the
documentation above that describes the Advanced Programming Mode before continuing.
Each telemetry channel in the RFC-1 can deliver a status indication or an analog reading with unit word and decimal
point. Channels work either way in the factory setting with default scale. Instead of reading 0000 at the bottom of the
scale, the RFC-1 says “status off”. Instead of reading 2040 at the top of the scale, the RFC-1 says “status on”.
Readings in between are delivered as a 4-digit number with no unit word or decimal point.
To use a channel as a status indicator with the factory settings, apply the voltage and adjust the telemetry calibration
pot until the “status on” reading is delivered. The “status off” reading will be delivered when the voltage is removed.
In cases where the factory settings are not appropriate, any channel can be programmed as a dedicated status
channel or as a purely analog channel. Other status word combinations are also available with this adjustment.
6.3.1
Telemetry Channel Programming
The behavior of a telemetry channel is controlled by four parameters stored in the RFC-1. Each channel is assigned
its own four addresses where these parameters are stored.
•
The first two addresses identify the unit word for analog channels or the word pair for status
channels.
•
•
The third address sets the scale (maximum reading) and the decimal point location.
The fourth address sets the type of scale (linear/logarithmic) and controls other options
The programming address table in Appendix A provides a list of all the memory address and their functions.
Telemetry channel descriptions occupy addresses 0000-0255 in the table.
Telemetry readings are identified by the channel number. Descriptive names cannot be assigned to a channel.
6.3.2
Unit Words
A unit word is a descriptive word that the RFC-1 says after the telemetry reading for a channel. The available words:
kilovolts, amperes, etc. are listed in the Word Table in the Appendix along with a two-digit code identifying each word.
Program the word codes into the first two channel addresses to assign a unit word to the channel.
For example, suppose you want to program Channel 00 with the unit word “kilovolts”.
1.
Enter the Advanced Programming Mode: 80
2.
Enter the Advanced Programming Security Code: 4150
3.
Enter the starting address from the Address Table for Channel 00 telemetry units: 0000
4.
Find the word “kilovolts” in the Word Table and get the values V1 and V2: V1=4, V2=2
5.
Enter V1 for the word “kilovolts”: 4
6.
7.
Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
Enter V2 for the word “kilovolts”: 2
8.
Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
9.
Press the ❊ key to exit programming mode and return to operating mode
When a user selects channel 00, the RFC-1 will give the telemetry value followed by the unit word “kilovolts”.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.5
6.3.3
Status Reading
Status channels are programmed like the unit words above but they are treated as a special case. The first 16 words
in the Word Table (words 0-0 through 0-15) are numbers. Assigning a number as a unit word would be confusing.
Instead, those values behave according to the table below.
Select a telemetry format or status option from one of the tables below and program the values from columns V1 and
V2 in the first two channel addresses.
V1 V2 Telemetry Option / Status Format
0
0
Total silence—the channel is selected but nothing is reported
0
1
The channel is identified but the telemetry value is not reported
0
2
The channel is identified and the telemetry value is reported without unit word—auto status is disabled
0
3
The channel is identified and the telemetry value is reported without unit word—auto status is enabled
The factory setting is 0-3.
V1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
V2
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Speak on logic low
“normal”
“status off”
“off”
“main”
“status 1”
“night”
“normal”
“normal”
“normal”
“status A”
“power failure”
“audio failure”
Speak on logic high
“failure”
“status on”
“on”
“auxiliary”
“status 2”
“day”
“alarm”
“intrusion”
“fire”
“status B”
“normal”
“normal”
Internally, status channels work like analog channels using the default scale 0000 to 2040. The analog reading is
masked with the status words when the channel reading is spoken. The mid-point of the scale, 1020, is the status
trip point from low to high. Therefore, below the trip point is status low and above the trip point is status high.
To calibrate a status channel, apply the telemetry voltage, select the channel and turn the calibration trim pot until the
logic high reading is delivered. The logic low reading is delivered when voltage is removed.
Status readings can be inverted so that the readings are opposite in the table above. This is useful in the case of
devices that use negative or reverse logic. The inverted status feature is enabled with special programming at the
fourth channel address. This feature is documented in section 6.3.5.
Programming example: suppose you want to program Channel 01 with the status pair “normal/alarm”.
1.
2.
Enter the Advanced Programming Mode: 80
Enter the Advanced Programming Security Code: 4150
3.
4.
Enter the starting address from the Address Table for Channel 00 telemetry units: 0004
Find the status pair “normal/alarm” in the table above and get the values V1 and V2: V1=0, V2=10
5.
Enter V1 for the status pair “normal/alarm”: 0
6.
7.
Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
Enter V2 for the status pair “normal/alarm”: 10
8.
Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
9.
Press the ❊ key to exit programming mode and return to operating mode
When a user selects channel 01, the RFC-1 will read “normal” or “alarm” depending on the voltage applied.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.6
6.3.4
Maximum Scale and Decimal Point
Setting an appropriate scale allows the RFC-1 to give a more accurate reading. When choosing the scale, find the
smallest item in the table below that is larger than the highest expected reading. Be sure to allow some headroom for
out of tolerance readings. A telemetry channel will report “upper limit” if the reading exceeds the top of the scale,
Select the maximum scale reading and decimal point location from the table below. Program the value from column
V1 into the third address for the selected channel.
V1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Max reading and decimal
8160
4080
2040 (factory setting)
1020
816.0
408.0
204.0
102.0
V1
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Max reading and decimal
81.60
40.80
20.40
10.20
8.160
4.080
2.040
1.020
Some devices generate very low sample voltages. The RFC-1 requires at least 1.0 volt DC to generate a full-scale
reading no matter which scale is selected. If the maximum sample voltage is less than 1.0 volt, the maximum
attainable reading will be proportional to the maximum voltage. For instance, if the maximum sample voltage is only
1/2 volt then the maximum attainable reading will be 1/2 of the selected scale.
6.3.5
Linear and Logarithmic Scales, Inverted Status and Auto-control Relay
As the sample voltage of a device changes, it normally follows a standard scale so that it can be tracked. The two
most common scales are linear and logarithmic. Most devices output voltages on a linear scale. Power samples are
the most common logarithmic samples but not all power samples are logarithmic. The device output determines
which scale must be used. The factory setting is appropriate in most cases.
Select the scale from the table below and program the value from the column V1 into the fourth address for the
selected channel. Limit the choice to V1=0 or V1=1 unless other specific features are needed.
V1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Linear / Log / Indirect / Inverted
Linear scale
Logarithmic scale
Indirect power—kilowatts
Indirect power—percent power
Inverted status reading
Linear scale
Logarithmic scale
Inverted status reading
Auto Control Relay
Disabled
Disabled
Not available
Not available
Disabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Comments
Default value
Do not program directly, use procedure
Do not program directly, use procedure
Inverted status described below
Auto-control relay described below
Auto-control relay described below
Auto-control relay described below
The inverted status option allows the RFC-1 to internally swap the status reported by a channel. This eliminates the
need for an external logic inverter for devices operating with negative logic. The channel must be programmed with a
status option from the table in section 6.3.3. This option modifies the behavior (changes the polarity) of that setting.
The auto-control relay feature provides an auxiliary contact for equipment that requires a switch closure to operate
properly—such as an antenna monitor. When this feature is active, the off/lower relay activates when the associated
channel is selected. The relay deactivates when another channel is selected.
Do not activate auto-control relay unless you are certain that it is necessary. Improperly activating this feature may
cause the external device to operate unexpectedly.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.7
6.3.6
Indirect Power
The RFC-1 can calculate output power from plate voltage and plate current when a power sample is not available.
This is referred to as an indirect power calculation. This feature requires careful setup to work properly.
Sine Systems provides a web page that will perform the appropriate calculations and generate values to program into
the RFC-1. The web site is http://www.sinesystems.com. Navigate to the tech support section for the RFC-1 and
follow links to the Indirect Power Calculation page. Your web browser must have Javascript enabled to use the page.
No telemetry input is connected on an indirect power channel. Instead, the calculation is derived from the two
channels that precede it. Any channel from 02 up can be setup for indirect power. Connect the plate voltage two
channels lower than the indirect power channel. Connect the plate current one channel lower than the indirect power
channel. For example, connect the plate voltage to channel 00 and the plate current sample to channel 01 for an
indirect power reading on channel 02. Program and calibrate the plate voltage and plate current channels normally.
The indirect power settings use all four channel memory addresses. The normal use described in the Programming
Address Table does not apply. The values that are programmed into those addresses come from the computations
that follow, or that are generated by the web page. The computations are not difficult. The procedure takes a few
minutes to complete.
You must know the transmitter efficiency to program the RFC-1 to calculate the transmitter power output (TPO). For
effective radiated power (ERP) calculations, you must know the efficiency of the entire system--transmitter through
antenna. Due to antenna gain, this is not the same as the transmission line efficiency.
Complete the following steps in order. Write down the result from each instruction on the line to the left of the
instruction. Disregard digits to the right of the decimal after a calculation even if the result is a zero.
Line
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
Value
Instructions
Write down the efficiency as a whole number from 1 to 1023 (see notes above)
Divide line 1 by 256 and write the numbers to the left of the decimal
Multiple line 2 256 and write the result
Subtract line 3 from line 1 and write the result
Divide line 4 by 16 and write the numbers to the left of the decimal
Multiply line 5 by 16 and write the result
Subtract line 6 from line 4 and write the result
Multiply line 2 by 4 and write the result
Units: for “kilowatts” add 2 to line 8 or for “percent power” add 3 to line 8 and write the result
Decimal: use 0 for none, use 1 for 000.0, use 2 for 00.00, use 3 for 0.000
Multiply line 10 by 4 and write the result
Scale multiplier: use 0 for 1x, use 1 for 10x, use 2 for 100x
Add line 11 to line 12 and write the result
Locate the memory addresses for the channel that report the indirect power reading. Use the address table to find
the appropriate channel addresses. Ignore the descriptions in the table and program the values as shown below.
The critical values are in the four yellow shaded areas in the table above.
•
•
Program the value on line 5 in the first memory address
Program the value on line 7 in the second memory address
•
Program the value on line 13 in the third memory address
•
Program the value on line 9 in the fourth memory address
If the sequence was completed correctly, the RFC-1 will recognize that the values represent indirect power
parameters instead of the normal unit words and scales. It will take the appropriate readings and calculate indirect
power when this channel is selected.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.8
6.3.6.a Indirect Power—Theory of Operation
This section provides further information on calculating indirect power. If the sequence above is completed and it
operates successfully then it is not necessary to read this section. This information is useful for troubleshooting.
An indirect power channel has a reading from 0000 to 9999. A decimal point is optional and the unit word will be
either “kilowatts” or “percent power”. If the computed value exceeds 9999 or if either the voltage or current channel
exceeds full-scale, the words "upper limit" are spoken. The telemetry value for the indirect power channel is
computed from the following equation:
P = (E * I * Eff * S) / 10,000,000
P = the four-digit power reading that is calculated—disregarding decimal point
E = the normal four-digit voltage reading in volts—disregarding decimal point
I = the normal four-digit current reading in amps—disregarding decimal point
Eff = efficiency of the transmission line or the entire system from 1 to 1023—disregarding the %
S = the user-selected scale multiplier—1, 10 or 100
E and I are the readings from the plate voltage and plate current channels respectively. These values are in volts
and amps with up to four significant digits but no decimal point. By these rules, the value 10.54 would be 1054.
These values are taken from the two channels below the channel that is calculating the power.
The efficiency value, Eff, comes from the transmitter and transmission line for transmitter power output, TPO,
calculations or from the entire system including antenna gain for effective radiated power, ERP. In the latter case, it
is not unusual for the efficiency number to be greater than 100.
For example, suppose the antenna has a gain of 6.5, the feed line has an efficiency of 75% and the transmitter has
an efficiency of 72%. The overall efficiency (input power-to-ERP) is 6.5 x 0.75 x 0.72 = 3.51. Using this example, the
efficiency would be 351% for ERP calculations. However, the efficiency would be only 72% for TPO calculations.
The efficiency value can be adjusted to allow the computed reading to express a percentage of authorized power. In
this case, the efficiency resulting from the above formula should be multiplied by 100 and then divided by the normal
transmitter output power in kilowatts. The goal is for the reading to be "100.0" at 100% of authorized power. In this
case, select the option for "percent power" the programming sequence above.
The scale multiplier S is used to force the final reading into the acceptable range of readings from 0000 to 9999. To
determine this value, perform a trial calculation of the formula above with the expected normal voltage, current and
efficiency. First use S=10 and compute P. Disregard the decimal point and use the four data digits for voltage and
current. If the calculated value for P is outside of the range 0000 to 9999 or extremely close to either end, use S=1
for a smaller P or S=100 for a larger P.
For example, suppose the expected plate voltage is 8.0 kilovolts, the expected plate current is 3.8 amperes and the
efficiency is 72%. Using the above equation:
(8000 x 3800 x 72 x 1) / 10,000,000 = 218.88
The telemetry reading will use only the digits to the left of the decimal point: 0218. This is a small value given that
the maximum reading is 9999. So in this case it would be better to use S=10 to force the value closer to the middle
of the scale. With S=10 the resulting P=2188 which fits nicely in the scale. Setting S=100 results in P=21888 which
is well beyond the maximum of 9999.
If needed, a decimal point is added to the reading in the channel settings.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.9
6.3.7
Telemetry Leading Zero Suppression
Telemetry values in the RFC-1 are four-digits long. A channel should be calibrated to take advantage of as much of
the telemetry scale as possible for maximum accuracy. Sometimes a telemetry reading will have a zero as the left
most zero in part of its operating scale. The RFC-1 can ignore leading zeros when it reports the telemetry value. The
leading zero still exists as part of the value but it is not spoken.
•
•
Program 1 at address 0998 to enable leading zero suppression
Program 0 at address 0998 to disable leading zero suppression
A leading zero is considered a significant digit if it occurs immediately before a decimal point. In this case the zero
will be spoken even if leading zero suppression is enabled. For example, if a channel reading is 0.951 the leading
zero is not dropped because it is significant. But it is dropped from the reading 09.51 because it is not significant.
It is important to remember that leading zeros are significant when programming alarm limits. The RFC-1 alarm
system always operates with four significant digits. Remember, leading zero suppression silences the leading zeros
but it does not remove them.
It is a common mistake to program alarm limits incorrectly when leading zero suppression is enabled. The best
method is to take a reading of the channel that the alarm will monitor and write down the numbers. If the telemetry
value is not 4 digits long, add zeros to the left of the value until it is 4 digits long. Then set the alarm limits using the
4-digit number. The following example should clarify this point.
Suppose a channel reads “99.5 percent” with leading zero suppression enabled. Alarms are to be programmed at
105.0 percent and 90.0 percent. The common mistake is to program the upper limit as 0105 for 105% and the lower
limit as 0090 for 90%. These values are incorrect because the actual channel reading is 0995. Both the upper and
lower limits are well below the normal reading. The alarm never triggers because it never even arms. The correct
upper limit in this case is 1050 and the correct lower limit is 0900.
6.3.8
Telemetry Settling Time
The telemetry settling time is a very brief delay that occurs between the selection of a channel and the sampling of
the telemetry voltage by the RFC-1 processor. The delay gives sample voltage time to stabilize before the processor
samples it. The factory setting is appropriate in most cases.
Occasionally the initial reading on a telemetry channel is slightly different, usually lower, than subsequent readings of
the same channel. Increasing the delay between the time the channel is selected and the time the RFC-1 samples
the voltage can remedy this situation.
This adjustment affects all channels. If the settling time is set to a large value, there will be a noticeable pause in
between the channel selection and the telemetry value report. Program the value from the column V1 into memory
address 0997 to change the telemetry settling time.
V1 Telemetry settling time
0
0.2 seconds
1
0.4 seconds
2*
0.6 seconds
3
0.8 seconds
4
1.0 seconds
5
1.2 seconds
6
1.4 seconds
7
1.6 seconds
* This is the default setting.
RFC-1
V1
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Telemetry settling time
1.8 seconds
2.0 seconds
2.2 seconds
2.4 seconds
2.6 seconds
2.8 seconds
3.0 seconds
3.2 seconds
Advanced Operation
page 6.10
6.3.9
Number of Telemetry Channels Available
The RFC-1 can support up to 8 relay Panels. Each relay panel has 8 channels. Memory addresses must be
available for all 64 possible channels even though most RFC-1 systems use fewer than that. Rather than leave the
memory for unused channels empty and potentially wasted, that memory space can be used for more date/time
triggers. (Date/time triggers are discussed later in this document.)
The factory setting reserves memory for 16 channels or 2 relay panels. This is adequate for most installations.
When a third (or higher) relay panel is added memory must be swapped back for channel settings. Channel settings
can be programmed before the memory swap is performed and the data will be stored but channels will not respond
to the new settings until the memory swap is programmed.
The table below lists the available options of relay panels used (or channels available) vs. the number of date/time
triggers available. Each relay panel added reduces the available number of date/time triggers by 4. Find the number
of relay panels in use in the table below. Program the value from column V1 at memory address 1015 to reserve
memory for the appropriate number of channels.
V1 Relay Panels
Telemetry Channels Available
0
8 relay panels
Channels 00-63
1
7 relay panels
Channels 00-55
2
6 relay panels
Channels 00-47
3
5 relay panels
Channels 00-39
4
4 relay panels
Channels 00-31
5
3 relay panels
Channels 00-23
6 * 2 relay panels
Channels 00-15
7
1 relay panel
Channels 00-07
8
0 relay panels
All channels use default setting (see below)
* This is the default setting.
Date/Time Triggers Available
48 available
52 available
56 available
60 available
64 available
68 available
72 available
76 available
80 available
Telemetry channels can still be used if their memory has been reallocated to date/time triggers. The channel will
behave according to the default channel setting stored at memory addresses 1020-1023. The default setting has the
same options as all other channels.
The Programming Address Table has an extra column on the right of the page titled “Alternate Use”. This column
provides the description for each memory address when used as a date/time trigger. A sample is shown below.
Addr
Description
Section
0000
0001
0002
0003
0004
0005
0006
0007
Channel 00: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 00: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 00: full scale and decimal point
Channel 00: linear/log/indirect/invert and auto relay
Channel 01: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 01: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 01: full scale and decimal point
Channel 01: linear/log/indirect/invert and auto relay
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.4
6.3.5
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.4
6.3.5
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
- Programming Default Current
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Alternate Use / Notes
Date/time 80: action sequence
Date/time 80: month
Date/time 80: date - value 1
Date/time 80: date - value 2
Date/time 80: hour - value 1
Date/time 80: hour - value 2
Date/time 80: minute - value 1
Date/time 80: minute - value 2
page 6.11
6.4
Clock and Calendar
The clock and calendar are used by the RFC-1 to trigger events by the date and time. Enhancements to the timing
system give the RFC-1 very good long-term accuracy. The clock will attempt to synchronize with the AC main supply
when the RFC-1 is powered from either a 50 Hz or 60 Hz AC supply.
The time and date are lost when the system loses power. When power returns, the clock does not run until an
operator resets it. A small external UPS provides an easy solution for this issue.
6.4.1
Setting the Calendar
Set the calendar in the RFC-1 by entering the command 70 in normal operating mode. The RFC-1 will respond by
reading the current month, day and year in its internal calendar. Then it will give an option to adjust the calendar with
the prompt, “push # to reprogram”. Press the # key to set the date. The RFC-1 will ask for two-digit month and day
and four-digit year. Enter the appropriate digits at each prompt. Use leading zeros for values less than 10.
6.4.2
Day of the Week
Some date/time functions can be programmed to occur only on certain days of the week. To support these features
the RFC-1 determines the day of the week based on the calendar date. This task is performed automatically when
the calendar is set. There is no user command to set the day of the week.
To read the day of the week, enter the command 70 as if reading the calendar date. At the “push # to reprogram”
prompt, press the ❊ key. The RFC-1 will respond with the word “day” followed by a number from 1 to 7 representing
the day of the week. 1=Monday, 2=Tuesday, 3=Wednesday, 4=Thursday, 5=Friday, 6=Saturday, 7=Sunday.
6.4.3
Setting the Clock
Set the clock in the RFC-1 by entering the command 71 in normal operating mode. The RFC-1 will respond by
reading the current hours and minutes in its internal clock. Then it will give an option to adjust the clock with the
prompt, “push # to reprogram”. Press the # key to set the clock. The RFC-1 will ask for the two-digit hour and
minute. Enter two digits at each prompt. Use a 24-hour clock and use leading zeros for values less than 10. The
seconds reset to zero when the last digit is entered.
To avoid random time triggering issues, the RFC-1 clock freezes at power up with 0 hours and 99 minutes. The clock
can be stopped any time by setting those values.
6.4.4
Automatic Daylight Saving Time Adjustment
When this feature is enabled, the RFC-1 will adjust the clock automatically in areas of the United States that observe
Daylight Saving Time. The calendar must be set to the correct date for this option to work properly.
The time change occurs according to the rules established in 2007. The clock is set forward one hour at 2:00 AM on
the second Sunday in March and it is set back one hour at 2:00 AM on the first Sunday in November.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.12
This feature is enabled or disabled in programming mode at address 1017. The table below shows available options.
V1
0
1
Automatic Daylight Saving Time Change
Disabled—no automatic change
Enabled—DST clock adjust (factory setting)
Automatic DST time change is enabled when shipped from the factory. Follow the instructions below to disable it.
1.
2.
Enter the Advanced Programming Mode: 80
Enter the Advanced Programming Security Code: 4150
3.
Enter the address (from the Address Table) for the Auto DST function: 1017
4.
5.
Enter a value of 0 to disable this function: 0 (or enter 1 to enable this function)
Press the # key to write this value (and increment to the next address in memory)
6.
Press the ❊ key to exit programming mode and return to operating mode
Automatic DST adjusts the clock as required. No other changes are made in the system. All date/time triggers occur
according to the values that are programmed. Trigger times are compared against the DST adjusted clock.
6.4.5
Clock Calibration
The RFC-1 real time clock is based in the main processor. Like any processor-based clock, its accuracy is subject to
the manufacturing tolerance of the components. It is normal for the time to drift a little over long time periods.
6.4.5.1 Automatic Calibration
The RFC-1 attempts to synchronize the real time clock to the incoming AC power supply. This typically offers very
good long-term stability. This feature is enabled by default and operates without user intervention when the RFC-1 is
powered from either a 50 Hz or 60 Hz AC main power supply.
Automatic clock calibration requires hardware that was added to RFC-1 systems in mid-2003. Early RFC-1 versions
do not have the hardware necessary to support this feature.
6.4.6.2 Manual Calibration
The RFC-1 clock can be calibrated manually. This can be used to improve the accuracy of RFC-1 versions that do
not have the AC sample hardware or that operate from DC supplies. The RAK-1 powers the RFC-1 from an internal
DC supply so it also benefits from this feature.
Manual clock adjustment trims the speed of the internal clock to compensate for variances in timing components in
the RFC-1. Each step changes the speed by one-half second over a 24-hour period. The AC sync feature is
automatically disabled when a manual clock calibration adjustment is made.
To calibrate the RFC-1 clock, set the RFC-1 clock to a known accurate source. Let it run for several days until the
time drifts by more than a minute. Divide the number of minutes of drift by the number of days to determine how
many seconds the clock drifts per day. Seconds of drift per day = (minutes of drift * 60) / number of days.
Look in the table below for the number that is closest to the clock drift. If the clock runs slow, look for a negative
number. If the clock runs fast, look for a positive number. Each setting in the table is represented by a pair of values:
V1-V2. Program V1 at memory address 1018 and program V2 at address 1019.
The clock loses time when it runs to slow. Suppose the clock is set to a known accurate time. Six days later at 6:00
pm the RFC-1 clock is checked. Instead of 6:00 pm it reads 5:58 pm. It is running too slow and has lost 2 minutes.
Negative numbers in the table below make the clock run faster. The drift is (-1) * (2 * 60) / 6 = -20 seconds/day.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.13
The clock gains time when it runs too fast. Suppose the clock is set to a known accurate time. Six days later at 6:00
pm the RFC-1 clock is checked. Instead of 6:00 pm it reads 6:01 pm. It is running too fast and has gained 1 minute.
Positive numbers in the table below make the clock run slower. The drift is (1 * 60) / 6 = 10 seconds/day.
Using the first example above, find -20 seconds in the table. V1=8 and V2=3. Program the value 8 at address 1018
and the value 3 at address 1019 to make the appropriate calibration.
Using the second example above, find 10 seconds in the table. V1=9 and V2=4. Program the value 9 at address
1018 and the value 4 at address 1019 to make the appropriate calibration.
V1-V2
0-0
0-1
0-2
0-3
0-4
0-5
0-6
0-7
0-8
0-9
0-10
0-11
0-12
0-13
0-14
0-15
1-0
1-1
1-2
1-3
1-4
1-5
1-6
1-7
1-8
1-9
1-10
1-11
1-12
1-13
1-14
1-15
2-0
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-6
2-7
2-8
2-9
2-10
Adjust
-64.0 s
-63.5 s
-63.0 s
-62.5 s
-62.0 s
-61.5 s
-61.0 s
-60.5 s
-60.0 s
-59.5 s
-59.0 s
-58.5 s
-58.0 s
-57.5 s
-57.0 s
-56.5 s
-56.0 s
-55.5 s
-55.0 s
-54.5 s
-54.0 s
-53.5 s
-53.0 s
-52.5 s
-52.0 s
-51.5 s
-51.0 s
-50.5 s
-50.0 s
-49.5 s
-49.0 s
-48.5 s
-48.0 s
-47.5 s
-47.0 s
-46.5 s
-46.0 s
-45.5 s
-45.0 s
-44.5 s
-44.0 s
-43.5 s
-43.0 s
V1-V2
2-11
2-12
2-13
2-14
2-15
3-0
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
3-6
3-7
3-8
3-9
3-10
3-11
3-12
3-13
3-14
3-15
4-0
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
4-8
4-9
4-10
4-11
4-12
4-13
4-14
4-15
5-0
5-1
5-2
5-3
5-4
5-5
Adjust
-42.5 s
-42.0 s
-41.5 s
-41.0 s
-40.5 s
-40.0 s
-39.5 s
-39.0 s
-38.5 s
-38.0 s
-37.5 s
-37.0 s
-36.5 s
-36.0 s
-35.5 s
-35.0 s
-34.5 s
-34.0 s
-33.5 s
-33.0 s
-32.5 s
-32.0 s
-31.5 s
-31.0 s
-30.5 s
-30.0 s
-29.5 s
-29.0 s
-28.5 s
-28.0 s
-27.5 s
-27.0 s
-26.5 s
-26.0 s
-25.5 s
-25.0 s
-24.5 s
-24.0 s
-23.5 s
-23.0 s
-22.5 s
-22.0 s
-21.5 s
V1-V2
5-6
5-7
5-8
5-9
5-10
5-11
5-12
5-13
5-14
5-15
6-0
6-1
6-2
6-3
6-4
6-5
6-6
6-7
6-8
6-9
6-10
6-11
6-12
6-13
6-14
6-15
7-0
7-1
7-2
7-3
7-4
7-5
7-6
7-7
7-8
7-9
7-10
7-11
7-12
7-13
7-14
7-15
Adjust
-21.0 s
-20.5 s
-20.0 s
-19.5 s
-19.0 s
-18.5 s
-18.0 s
-17.5 s
-17.0 s
-16.5 s
-16.0 s
-15.5 s
-15.0 s
-14.5 s
-14.0 s
-13.5 s
-13.0 s
-12.5 s
-12.0 s
-11.5 s
-11.0 s
-10.5 s
-10.0 s
-9.5 s
-9.0 s
-8.5 s
-8.0 s
-7.5 s
-7.0 s
-6.5 s
-6.0 s
-5.5 s
-5.0 s
-4.5 s
-4.0 s
-3.5 s
-3.0 s
-2.5 s
-2.0 s
-1.5 s
-1.0 s
-0.5 s
V1-V2
8-0
8-1
8-2
8-3
8-4
8-5
8-6
8-7
8-8
8-9
8-10
8-11
8-12
8-13
8-14
8-15
9-0
9-1
9-2
9-3
9-4
9-5
9-6
9-7
9-8
9-9
9-10
9-11
9-12
9-13
9-14
9-15
10-0
10-1
10-2
10-3
10-4
10-5
10-6
10-7
10-8
10-9
10-10
Adjust
0.0 s
+0.5 s
+1.0 s
+1.5 s
+2.0 s
+2.5 s
+3.0 s
+3.5 s
+4.0 s
+4.5 s
+5.0s
+5.5 s
+6.0 s
+6.5 s
+7.0 s
+7.5 s
+8.0 s
+8.5 s
+9.0 s
+9.5 s
+10.0 s
+10.5 s
+11.0 s
+11.5 s
+12.0 s
+12.5 s
+13.0 s
+13.5 s
+14.0 s
+14.5 s
+15.0 s
+15.5 s
+16.0 s
+16.5 s
+17.0 s
+17.5 s
+18.0 s
+18.5 s
+19.0 s
+19.5 s
+20.0 s
+20.5 s
+21.0 s
V1-V2
10-11
10-12
10-13
10-14
10-15
11-0
11-1
11-2
11-3
11-4
11-5
11-6
11-7
11-8
11-9
11-10
11-11
11-12
11-13
11-14
11-15
12-0
12-1
12-2
12-3
12-4
12-5
12-6
12-7
12-8
12-9
12-10
12-11
12-12
12-13
12-14
12-15
13-0
13-1
13-2
13-3
13-4
13-5
Adjust
+21.5 s
+22.0 s
+22.5 s
+23.0 s
+23.5 s
+24.0 s
+24.5 s
+25.0 s
+25.5 s
+26.0 s
+26.5 s
+27.0 s
+27.5 s
+28.0 s
+28.5 s
+29.0 s
+29.5 s
+30.0 s
+30.5 s
+31.0 s
+31.5 s
+32.0 s
+32.5 s
+33.0 s
+33.5 s
+34.0 s
+34.5 s
+35.0 s
+35.5 s
+36.0 s
+36.5 s
+37.0 s
+37.5 s
+38.0 s
+38.5 s
+39.0 s
+39.5 s
+40.0 s
+40.5 s
+41.0 s
+41.5 s
+42.0 s
+42.5 s
V1-V2
13-6
13-7
13-8
13-9
13-10
13-11
13-12
13-13
13-14
13-15
14-0
14-1
14-2
14-3
14-4
14-5
14-6
14-7
14-8
14-9
14-10
14-11
14-12
14-13
14-14
14-15
15-0
15-1
15-2
15-3
15-4
15-5
15-6
15-7
15-8
15-9
15-10
15-11
15-12
15-13
15-14
15-15
Adjust
+43.0 s
+43.5 s
+44.0 s
+44.5 s
+45.0 s
+45.5 s
+46.0 s
+46.5 s
+47.0 s
+47.5 s
+48.0 s
+48.5 s
+49.0 s
+49.5 s
+50.0 s
+50.5 s
+51.0 s
+51.5 s
+52.0 s
+52.5 s
+53.0 s
+53.5 s
+54.0 s
+54.5 s
+55.0 s
+55.5 s
+56.0 s
+56.5 s
+57.0 s
+57.5 s
+58.0 s
+58.5 s
+59.0 s
+59.5 s
+60.0 s
+60.5 s
+61.0 s
+61.5 s
+62.0 s
+62.5 s
+63.0 s
+63.5 s
The default setting is 0.0 seconds—the values are V1=8 and V2=0.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.14
6.5
Action Sequences
Functional knowledge of the specific installation is required to make use of the information presented here. In
addition, some degree of comfort working with the RFC-1 is presumed in the documentation that follows.
The RFC-1 can be programmed to respond to telemetry conditions or the time and date. These automatic functions
rely on action sequences—series of instructions stored in memory to perform a specific task or set of tasks. Action
sequences are simple, pre-programmed tasks. They operate only when called by an alarm or a time trigger.
Action sequences can manipulate the control relays of the RFC-1, place telephone calls, print readings, etc. A typical
action sequence might be to activate a relay to turn on filaments, pause several seconds and activate another relay to
turn on the plate voltage. The sequence can be stored so that, when called upon, it will power up the transmitter.
An action sequence is of little use by itself. It is merely a stored set of instructions that perform a specific task. The
action sequence must be activated, or triggered, to perform the task. When combined with a date/time trigger or an
alarm trigger, an action sequence gives the RFC-1 the ability to function automatically.
•
An action sequence is a stored set of instructions that perform a task when activated.
•
An action sequence must be triggered by an alarm or the clock/calendar to function.
It is difficult to discuss action sequences without making references to alarms and date/time triggers and it is
impossible to discuss alarms in the RFC-1 without knowledge of action sequences. Action sequences will be covered
here. Alarms and date/time triggers will be covered in the next segment. The topics are discussed separately to help
avoid information overload. Section 7 contains programming examples that illustrate how all the pieces fit together.
The RFC-1 stores eight user-programmable action sequences and five fixed-programming action sequences. There
is no difference between the two types of action sequences except where they are stored in the system. Otherwise,
they obey the same system rules and operate using the same set of instructions.
6.5.1
Fixed-programming Action Sequences
There are five fixed-programming action sequences that can be used to perform common tasks. They are stored in
the permanent memory of the system and cannot be altered. These action sequences are designated as shown in
the following table.
Seq
9
10
11
12
13
Instructions
9-0
8-8
8-8, 8-15
8-8, 9-0
8-9
Description
Initiates a set of telephone calls to all available numbers
Sends a set of telemetry readings to a local device
Sends a set of telemetry readings to a local device without a new reference scan
Sends a set of telemetry readings to a local device then initiates a set of telephone calls
Sends a set of telemetry readings to a remote device
Previous software versions of the RFC-1 used action sequence 1 as the default action sequence for all alarms. As of
software version 6, all alarms default to action sequence 9. This frees all of the programmable action sequences for
use without any adverse effects. Reprogramming action sequence 1 no longer disrupts the standard alarm calling
ability. Simply use action sequence 9, the default setting, when the standard call loop is needed.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.15
6.5.2
User-programmable Action Sequences
The RFC-1 can store up to 8 action sequences having up to 8 steps each. The available instructions are listed in the
text that follows along with a unique code that identifies each instruction. Select the instructions and program the
corresponding codes in the appropriate area of memory for the action sequence. The programming address table in
Appendix A provides a list of all memory address and their functions. Action sequences occupy addresses 07240851 in the table.
This section of the programming address table for action sequence 1 is shown below. Notice that each step is
identified by two values that are listed as value 1 and value 2. These two values correspond to the column labeled
V1-V2 in the tables of available commands that follow.
Addr
Description
0724
0725
0726
0727
0728
0729
0730
0731
0732
0733
0734
0735
0736
0737
0738
0739
Action Sequence 1:
Action Sequence 1:
Action Sequence 1:
Action Sequence 1:
Action Sequence 1:
Action Sequence 1:
Action Sequence 1:
Action Sequence 1:
Action Sequence 1:
Action Sequence 1:
Action Sequence 1:
Action Sequence 1:
Action Sequence 1:
Action Sequence 1:
Action Sequence 1:
Action Sequence 1:
Section
step 1 – value 1
step 1 – value 2
step 2 – value 1
step 2 – value 2
step 3 – value 1
step 3 – value 2
step 4 – value 1
step 4 – value 2
step 5 – value 1
step 5 – value 2
step 6 – value 1
step 6 – value 2
step 7 – value 1
step 7 – value 2
step 8 – value 1
step 8 – value 2
6.4.1
6.4.1
6.4.1
6.4.1
6.4.1
6.4.1
6.4.1
6.4.1
6.4.1
6.4.1
6.4.1
6.4.1
6.4.1
6.4.1
6.4.1
6.4.1
- Programming Default Current
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Alternate Use / Notes
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
_________________________
Instructions in an action sequence are performed in order from step 1 to step 8. A step that is “blank” will terminate
the action sequence. The instruction code for a blank instruction is 15-15. The factory setting for all userprogrammable action sequences is completely blank.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.16
6.5.3
Control Relay Operation
The RFC-1 can operate any of the control relays as a step in an action sequence. Select an instruction from the list
below and program V1 and V2 in the action sequence to activate the associated control relay. Control relays are
momentary activation only. There is no need to execute an on instruction followed by a corresponding off instruction.
V1-V2
0-0
0-1
0-2
0-3
0-4
0-5
0-6
0-7
0-8
0-9
0-10
0-11
0-12
0-13
0-14
0-15
Relay Activated
Channel 00 on
Channel 01 on
Channel 02 on
Channel 03 on
Channel 04 on
Channel 05 on
Channel 06 on
Channel 07 on
Channel 08 on
Channel 09 on
Channel 10 on
Channel 11 on
Channel 12 on
Channel 13 on
Channel 14 on
Channel 15 on
V1-V2
1-0
1-1
1-2
1-3
1-4
1-5
1-6
1-7
1-8
1-9
1-10
1-11
1-12
1-13
1-14
1-15
Relay Activated
Channel 16 on
Channel 17 on
Channel 18 on
Channel 19 on
Channel 20 on
Channel 21 on
Channel 22 on
Channel 23 on
Channel 24 on
Channel 25 on
Channel 26 on
Channel 27 on
Channel 28 on
Channel 29 on
Channel 30 on
Channel 31 on
V1-V2
2-0
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-6
2-7
2-8
2-9
2-10
2-11
2-12
2-13
2-14
2-15
Relay Activated
Channel 32 on
Channel 33 on
Channel 34 on
Channel 35 on
Channel 36 on
Channel 37 on
Channel 38 on
Channel 39 on
Channel 40 on
Channel 41 on
Channel 42 on
Channel 43 on
Channel 44 on
Channel 45 on
Channel 46 on
Channel 47 on
V1-V2
3-0
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
3-6
3-7
3-8
3-9
3-10
3-11
3-12
3-13
3-14
3-15
Relay Activated
Channel 48 on
Channel 49 on
Channel 50 on
Channel 51 on
Channel 52 on
Channel 53 on
Channel 54 on
Channel 55 on
Channel 56 on
Channel 57 on
Channel 58 on
Channel 59 on
Channel 60 on
Channel 61 on
Channel 62 on
Channel 63 on
V1-V2
4-0
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
4-8
4-9
4-10
4-11
4-12
4-13
4-14
4-15
Relay Activated
Channel 00 off
Channel 01 off
Channel 02 off
Channel 03 off
Channel 04 off
Channel 05 off
Channel 06 off
Channel 07 off
Channel 08 off
Channel 09 off
Channel 10 off
Channel 11 off
Channel 12 off
Channel 13 off
Channel 14 off
Channel 15 off
V1-V2
5-0
5-1
5-2
5-3
5-4
5-5
5-6
5-7
5-8
5-9
5-10
5-11
5-12
5-13
5-14
5-15
Relay Activated
Channel 16 off
Channel 17 off
Channel 18 off
Channel 19 off
Channel 20 off
Channel 21 off
Channel 22 off
Channel 23 off
Channel 24 off
Channel 25 off
Channel 26 off
Channel 27 off
Channel 28 off
Channel 29 off
Channel 30 off
Channel 31 off
V1-V2
6-0
6-1
6-2
6-3
6-4
6-5
6-6
6-7
6-8
6-9
6-10
6-11
6-12
6-13
6-14
6-15
Relay Activated
Channel 32 off
Channel 33 off
Channel 34 off
Channel 35 off
Channel 36 off
Channel 37 off
Channel 38 off
Channel 39 off
Channel 40 off
Channel 41 off
Channel 42 off
Channel 43 off
Channel 44 off
Channel 45 off
Channel 46 off
Channel 47 off
V1-V2
7-0
7-1
7-2
7-3
7-4
7-5
7-6
7-7
7-8
7-9
7-10
7-11
7-12
7-13
7-14
7-15
Relay Activated
Channel 48 off
Channel 49 off
Channel 50 off
Channel 51 off
Channel 52 off
Channel 53 off
Channel 54 off
Channel 55 off
Channel 56 off
Channel 57 off
Channel 58 off
Channel 59 off
Channel 60 off
Channel 61 off
Channel 62 off
Channel 63 off
Control relay activations are always momentary. The relay operating time controls the minimum length of time that a
control relay is engaged when activated. When a relay is activated manually, the relay will be engaged as long as the
control key is pressed. This setting is stored at memory address 1006 in the address table.
V1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
RFC-1
Minimum control relay operate time
0.3 seconds
0.6 seconds (default setting)
0.9 seconds
1.2 seconds
1.5 seconds
1.8 seconds
2.1 seconds
2.4 seconds
V1
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Minimum control relay operate time
2.7 seconds
3.0 seconds
3.3 seconds
3.6 seconds
3.9 seconds
4.2 seconds
4.5 seconds
4.8 seconds
Advanced Operation
page 6.17
6.5.4
Action Sequence Delays
The RFC-1 pauses for about one-half second between the steps of an action sequence. This can be adjusted in an
individual action sequence by placing a delay instruction at the appropriate point(s) in the action sequence. Delay
instructions can be used in succession to create a longer delay. Select the appropriate delay instruction(s) from the
table below and program corresponding V1 in the action sequence as needed.
V1
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
V2
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Delay Length
1 second
2 seconds
5 seconds
10 seconds
20 seconds
30 seconds
45 seconds
60 seconds
The default delay of one-half second between the steps of an action sequence can also be adjusted globally. This
setting changes the delay in between all instructions of all action sequences. Select an appropriate delay from the
table below and program V1 at address 1007 in the memory address table.
V1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
RFC-1
Delay length
0.2 seconds
0.4 seconds (default setting)
0.6 seconds
0.8 seconds
1.0 seconds
1.2 seconds
1.4 seconds
1.6 seconds
V1
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Delay length
1.8 seconds
2.0 seconds
2.2 seconds
2.4 seconds
2.6 seconds
2.8 seconds
3.0 seconds
3.2 seconds
Advanced Operation
page 6.18
6.5.5
Alarm Calls
The RFC-1 can place telephone calls as a step in an action sequence. The message delivered depends on the
condition that triggers the action sequence. The message typically consists of the site identification phrase followed
by an indication of the condition that triggered the call such as a telemetry alarm or power failure. The message
repeats for a pre-determined length of time.
Select an instruction from the table below and program the corresponding V1 and V2 in the action sequence to
generate telephone calls as part of an action sequence.
V1
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
V2
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Telephone call instructions
Call all telephone numbers in rotation: A, B, C, D, E, F, A, B, C, …
Call all telephone numbers in weighted rotation: A, B, A, C, A, D, A, E, A, F, A, B, …
Call telephone number A the programmed number of times
Call telephone number B the programmed number of times
Call telephone number C the programmed number of times
Call telephone number D the programmed number of times
Call telephone number E the programmed number of times
Call telephone number F the programmed number of times
The number of calls placed to a given telephone number is determined by the call attempts setting. Each telephone
number has its own call attempts setting. The setting is programming in the address following the telephone number
digits. See telephone number programming for more information.
When the RFC-1 places a telephone call, the call lasts for a pre-set amount of time, the call duration. The outgoing
message is repeated for the duration of the call. Select a call duration setting from the table below and program the
corresponding V1 at address 1003. Call duration applies to voice mode calls only.
V1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Telephone call duration
10 seconds
10 seconds
20 seconds
30 seconds (default setting)
40 seconds
50 seconds
60 seconds
70 seconds
V1
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Telephone call duration
80 seconds
90 seconds
100 seconds
110 seconds
120 seconds
130 seconds
140 seconds
150 seconds
The RFC-1 pauses between outgoing calls when multiple telephone calls are made, the call pause duration. This
provides an opening for an operator to contact the system. Select a call pause duration from the table below and
program the corresponding V1 at address 1004.
V1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
RFC-1
Telephone call pause duration
10 seconds
10 seconds
20 seconds
30 seconds (default setting)
40 seconds
50 seconds
60 seconds
70 seconds
V1
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Telephone call pause duration
80 seconds
90 seconds
100 seconds
110 seconds
120 seconds
130 seconds
140 seconds
150 seconds
Advanced Operation
page 6.19
6.5.6
Logging Telemetry Readings
The RFC-1 can send a set of telemetry readings to a printer or computer as a step in an action sequence. The
logging device can be connected directly to the RFC-1 or at a remote location. The set of readings will start with
channel 00 and end at the programmed auto-scan stop channel. The default setting stops at channel 07. Readings
are printed with a header that includes the site identification phrase, the date and time and the action sequence.
Select the appropriate logging function from the table below and program the corresponding V1 and V2 in the action
sequence to log a set of telemetry readings as part of an action sequence.
V1
8
8
V2
8
9
Telemetry Logging Function
Send readings to a local device or using a full time connection
Send readings to a remote device that requires a telephone call
Instruction 8-9, logging to a remote device, requires an optional data modem to be installed in the RFC-1. This
instruction automatically dials telephone number F. The telemetry readings are sent after the modems connect.
To stop the RFC-1 from dialing telephone number F as part of the normal dialing loop, program 10 for the first digit of
the telephone number. Programming a 10 as the first digit makes telephone number F appear to be blank to the
dialing sequence. The first active digit of the telephone number will be at address 0711. The remote logging
command is programmed to lookup telephone number F this way.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.20
6.5.7
Conditional Execution
There are no instructions in the RFC-1 action sequences for performing loops or making complex decisions. These
kinds of functions are simply beyond the capabilities of the available memory and processing power. However, there
are some instructions that can be used to perform simple conditional behavior.
V1
8
V2
14
Description
Stop execution and recheck telemetry
This instruction stops execution of the action sequence and rechecks the telemetry on the channel
that triggered the alarm. If the alarm condition has cleared, the action sequence terminates
immediately. If the alarm condition still exists, the action sequence starts over from the first step but
does not stop to check telemetry again. Instead, it continues to the next step in the action sequence
after the 8-14 instruction. Use only in an action sequence that is triggered by a telemetry alarm.
A common use for this instruction is to stop the RFC-1 from calling with an alarm when a telemetry input briefly
fluctuates out of tolerance. A short delay is inserted at the beginning of the action sequence to allow the device time
to self-correct. Then the 8-14 instruction is used and then the alarm dialing instruction is used.
For example, suppose the telemetry input on channel 02 is a small DC voltage that is proportional to the audio input
to a transmitter. An alarm is programmed to monitor channel 02 so that when this voltage drops below a certain
point, a call is made to alert personnel of an audio failure. Even with a large capacitor it may be normal for this
voltage to briefly drop below the alarm threshold during extended quite passages. In this case an alarm might trigger
because input falls out of tolerance. But by the time the RFC-1 alerts station personnel it is likely that the quite
passage is done and everything is normal. It will appear to be a false alarm.
The 8-14 instruction can be used to avoid the above situation. A new action sequence will be programmed and,
keeping with the example, the alarm that monitors channel 02 will be programmed to trigger the new action
sequence. The action sequence consists of: a short delay of 5 seconds with the instruction 8-2 (from section 6.5.3),
then the 8-14 instruction, then the typical dialing instruction, 9-0. When triggered, the action sequence will pause for
5 seconds giving the audio level time to recover. The 8-14 instruction will cause channel 02 to be rechecked. If it is
back in limits the sequence terminates. If it is still out of limits the action sequence will restart. The delay repeats, the
8-14 is ignored on the second pass and then the dialing instruction executes.
V1
8
V2
15
Description
Inhibit new telemetry reference scan upon completion of the action sequence
The RFC-1 normally records a new set of reference readings at the end of an action sequence. This
stops the system from triggering the same alarm repeatedly. Placing this instruction as the final step
of an action sequence suppresses this telemetry reference scan.
A common use for this instruction is to automatically adjust a channel until it is back in limits. The action sequence
typically consists of one or more relay actions with delays, if needed. The final step in the sequence is 8-15.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.21
An example is the easiest way to illustrate how this works. Suppose the telemetry input on channel 01 is a
transmitter output power sample. An alarm is programmed to monitor channel 01 so that if the transmitter power
goes too high, the RFC-1 will adjust it down into limits.
The RFC-1 control relays are momentary activation, about one-half second. Depending on how the transmitter
control works, there is no guarantee that a single, brief relay closure will bring the transmitter power back into limits.
Without the 8-15 instruction, the RFC-1 will activate the action sequence normally. When the action sequence
completes, a new set of reference readings are taken. Keeping with the example, after the action sequence
completes the power will be lower but not necessarily in limits. When the new reference reading is made, the out-oftolerance condition will be considered normal on the next alarm check because the reference reading reflects the outof-tolerance condition. (If you are wondering why the system operates this way, consider what would happen if it did
not and you tried to shut your transmitter off. The non-stop phone calls would become annoying very quickly!)
The solution is to use the 8-15 instruction in the action sequence. The action sequence has the necessary relay
closure(s) to lower the transmitter power followed by the 8-15 instruction. The 8-15 instruction must be the final step.
When this action sequence executes, the relays operate and the reference reading update is skipped. On the next
alarm check, the current power reading is still out-of-tolerance. The action sequence will be triggered again and the
power will be lowered until it is back into limits.
In certain conditions it is necessary to have the RFC-1 treat an alarm as if the channel reading is within limits so that
the alarm will trigger as needed. Common uses for this behavior are transmitter power changes and tower light
monitoring. These instructions are typically used in conjunction with devices that operate at multiple levels and have
alarm limits associated with each level of operation. This implies that there are multiple alarms set up monitoring the
channel with the inappropriate alarms blocked during hours of the day in which they do not apply.
Setting up and blocking alarms is beyond the scope of this example. The next section of this documentation
discusses these topics. For this example it is only necessary to accept that multiple alarms can monitor the same
channel and alarms can be blocked during inappropriate hours of the day so that alarms do not conflict.
V1
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
V2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Description
Force the telemetry reference for Alarm A into limits
Force the telemetry reference for Alarm B into limits
Force the telemetry reference for Alarm C into limits
Force the telemetry reference for Alarm D into limits
Force the telemetry reference for Alarm E into limits
Force the telemetry reference for Alarm F into limits
Force the telemetry reference for Alarm G into limits
Force the telemetry reference for Alarm H into limits
An example best illustrates use of these instructions. Suppose a transmitter is supposed drop to low power in the
evening. A power reading on channel 01 indicates at what power level the transmitter is operating. Two alarms in
the RFC-1 monitor this channel. One alarm is active during the day and has limits that are appropriate for daytime
power; it is blocked at night. The other alarm is active at night after the power change and has appropriate nighttime
power limits; it is blocked during the day.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.22
In this example, the RFC-1 has been programmed to make the power changes automatically. At the appropriate
times of day the RFC-1 will execute an action sequence activating relays as needed to change the transmitter power.
When the sequence terminates a new reference reading is made for the alarms. If for some reason the transmitter
does not change power, the RFC-1 will record the current reading as the reference and it will be considered normal
even if it is out-of-tolerance. What is needed is a mechanism to verify that the transmitter made the power change
and is within the appropriate limits.
The solution requires a few things to happen in sequence. First, the block on the low power alarm must end. This
occurs automatically as a function of time. Just make sure the alarm block ends before the power change occurs.
Next, the power change action sequence executes. Following the relay commands to change the transmitter power,
the action sequence has the instruction 10-X selected from the table above. The instruction to use depends on which
alarm is monitoring the telemetry channel. For this example, Alarm B is monitoring the power channel at nighttime
power so the instruction is 10-2 for alarm B.
With the addition of the 10-2 instruction the system verifies the power change on the first alarm scan after the power
change occurs. The 10-X instructions effectively enable or activate the specified alarm by setting the channel reading
within alarm limits. The true status of the system is determined on the next alarm scan and the alarm will trigger if the
channel reading is out of limits. The alarm can call station personnel to alert that the transmitter power did not
change so that the change can be made manually.
Similar behavior can be used to verify that tower lights have turned on in the evening. In most cases the tower lights
are controlled by an automated system so the action sequence only has the appropriate 10-X instruction without any
relay commands. Otherwise the example is the same. Tower light alarms are typically blocked during the day so first
the alarm block must expire. Then a timed action sequence executes the 10-X instruction. The next alarm scan
checks the tower light status and calls personnel if needed.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.23
6.5.8
Enabling / Disabling Telemetry Alarms
Telemetry alarms can be selectively enabled and disabled by an action sequence. This is particularly useful for
transmitters that operate at multiple power levels. The appropriate alarm can be enabled using the same action
sequence that changes the transmitter power.
Be aware that any alarms that are disabled using these commands will remain disabled until they are enabled using
the corresponding enable command, or until the system restarts. These commands do not have a time limit.
All alarms are enabled at power up. When these command are used, there is the potential for a false alarm if main
system power fails. The next action sequence event that occurs after power is restored enables and disables the
alarms as programmed.
V1
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
6.5.9
V2
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Disable a telemetry alarm
Disable alarm A
Disable alarm B
Disable alarm C
Disable alarm D
Disable alarm E
Disable alarm F
Disable alarm G
Disable alarm H
V1
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
V2
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Enable a telemetry alarm
Enable alarm A
Enable alarm B
Enable alarm C
Enable alarm D
Enable alarm E
Enable alarm F
Enable alarm G
Enable alarm H
Extending an Action Sequence
A single action sequence can have up to eight instructions. This is satisfactory for most uses. There are rare
instances that require more than eight steps to occur. Action sequences can be chained together in series to address
such situations. Chaining together action sequences comes at the expense of reducing the total number of action
sequences available. Memory is available for eight action sequences. If two are chained together then the system
effectively has only seven action sequences.
A second action sequence is chained to the first by including an instruction at the final position of the first sequence.
The instruction indicates to the system that a chain is to occur and which action sequence is next in the chain. The
instructions are shown in the following table.
V1
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
V2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Description
Execute action sequence 1 next
Execute action sequence 2 next
Execute action sequence 3 next
Execute action sequence 4 next
Execute action sequence 5 next
Execute action sequence 6 next
Execute action sequence 7 next
Execute action sequence 8 next
An action sequence cannot chain to itself. This would result in an infinite loop.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.24
6.5.10 Testing an Action Sequence
Action sequences are typically activated by telemetry alarms or by date/time triggers. However, it is possible to
trigger an action sequence manually for testing purposes or for ease of system use.
Suppose an action sequence is programmed to adjust an antenna switch and change transmitter power. The action
sequence can be used to perform the procedure manually. This would help ensure that the procedure is done
correctly when performed by personnel without a strong technical background.
1.
2.
From normal operating mode, enter the command 85 to manually trigger an action sequence.
The RFC-1 requests the control security code if it has not already been given during this call.
3.
The RFC-1 responds with “enter one digit action sequence”.
4.
Enter a single digit from 1-8 to activate the corresponding action sequence or, enter 0 to cancel.
The control security code must be entered before a manual action sequence trigger. This is to verify that the user is
authorized to control the equipment attached to the RFC-1. The RFC-1 will request the code if it has not been
entered already during the call.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.25
6.6
Telemetry Alarms
Incorrect use of the following information can cause unexpected or undesirable behavior. We
strongly recommend that you understand the basic operation of the RFC-1 and the specifics of
the installation before continuing. Please read the documentation above that describes the
Advanced Programming Mode before continuing if you have not done so already.
There are 8 telemetry alarms in the RFC-1. Each alarm can be programmed to monitor any physical channel from
channel 00 to 63. It is also possible for two alarms to monitor the same physical channel such as when a transmitter
operates at two different power levels. In these cases only one alarm is usually active at a time, the other alarms are
blocked so that they do not trigger at inappropriate times of day.
In response to an out-of-tolerance alarm condition, the RFC-1 can be programmed to call station personnel and
report the problem or to log a set of telemetry readings or to try and take corrective actions or even a combination of
these. The default response is to call station personnel and report the condition. Programming the system to make
corrections requires thorough knowledge of the installation and the devices. In most cases calling to report the
condition and/or logging readings is sufficient.
When an alarm condition is detected an action sequence is triggered. The alarm specifies the condition to watch for
such as the channel number and the telemetry limits. It points to an action sequence that will execute when the
alarm limits are exceeded. In the factory settings all alarms trigger a default action sequence that has one
instruction—call all the available telephone numbers to report the alarm.
It is easy to reprogram an alarm to trigger a different action sequence if a different response is desired. The action
sequence can contain any of the commands discussed in section 6.5 of this document.
6.6.1
Telemetry Alarm Programming
The eight telemetry alarms in the RFC-1 are designated Alarm A-H. Each alarm must be programmed with a channel
number, upper and lower telemetry limits, an action sequence to trigger and a trigger rule. There are 12 memory
addresses that store the data for each alarm.
•
the first two memory locations identify the telemetry channel to monitor
•
•
the third memory location identifies the trigger rule for the alarm
the fourth memory location stores the number of the action sequence that is triggered
•
the rest of the memory locations store upper and lower limits of four digits each
The programming address table in Appendix A provides a list of all the memory address and their functions. Alarms
A-H occupy memory addresses 0852-0947 in the table.
6.6.2
Channel Number
As mentioned above, there are 8 telemetry alarms in the RFC-1. Each alarm can be programmed to monitor any
physical channel’s telemetry input from channel 00 to 63. When programming the channel number in the alarm, the
first digit of the channel number is programmed at the first memory address and the second digit of the channel is
programmed at the second address. Program the first address with 0 if the channel number is less than 10.
Unused alarms are set to monitor channel number 64. This channel cannot exist so the alarm is disabled.
Each alarm can monitor only one telemetry channel but two alarms (or more) can monitor the same channel. This is
useful in situations such as a transmitter that operates at multiple power levels. In these cases only one alarm is
usually active at a time, the other alarms are blocked so that they do not trigger at inappropriate times of day.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.26
6.6.3
Trigger Rules
The trigger rule determines the conditions under which the alarm activates—which alarm limits are critical. The
default trigger rule is adequate in most cases as long as the alarm limits are set properly. Program the value from the
column V1 into the third memory location for the selected alarm.
It is a common mistake to program alarm limits incorrectly when leading zero suppression is enabled. The best
method is to take a reading of the channel that the alarm will monitor and write down the numbers. If the telemetry
value is not 4 digits long, add zeros to the left of the value until it is 4 digits long. Set the alarm limits using the 4-digit
number. See section 6.3.7 for more information.
V1 Trigger Condition—trigger the alarm when…
1
The telemetry varies more than 2.5% from the reference reading
2
The telemetry varies more than 5.0% from the reference reading
3
The telemetry varies more than 10% from the reference reading
4
The telemetry varies more than 20% from the reference reading
5*
The telemetry crosses either limit—but only if it was within limits at the time of the reference scan
6
The telemetry exceeds the upper limit—but only if it was within limits at the time of the reference scan
7
The telemetry falls below the lower limit—but only if it was within limits at the time of the reference scan
8
The telemetry crosses either limit—unconditionally
9
The telemetry exceeds the upper limit—unconditionally
10
The telemetry falls below the lower limit—unconditionally
* This is the default setting.
Trigger rules 1-4, the percentage change rules, are useful for transmitters operating at multiple power levels. Using
the percentage change rules allows a single alarm to monitor the transmitter at all power levels. The reference
reading is taken automatically when the transmitter power level is changed by the RFC-1, either manually or
automated with date/time triggers. The upper and lower limits are ignored when these trigger rules are used. For
convenience they can be set to 9999 and 0000 respectively.
Trigger rules 5 through 7 are appropriate for most cases. In fact, trigger rule 5 can be used in place of 6 and 7 most
of the time by programming the alarm limits properly. The important distinction for trigger rules 5-7 is that the RFC-1
can be used to adjust a piece of equipment to an out of tolerance condition without generating an alarm. If this was
not the case, consider what happens when a transmitter must run at abnormally low power for maintenance or turning
the transmitter off.
Trigger rules 8-10 should be used with caution. They seem harmless from their short descriptions but they make the
RFC-1 alarms very persistent. These rules trigger as long as the monitored device is out of tolerance—they do not
stop calling after contacting an operator. If the situation is left uncorrected, they will trigger repeatedly until the
condition is rectified. Consider this carefully before using them.
6.6.4
Action Sequence
This value specifies which action sequence executes when the alarm triggers. Valid action sequences numbers are
from 1 to 12. Action sequences 1-8 are programmable. Action sequences 9-12 are fixed. Action sequence 9 is
usually a safe choice if you are not sure which action sequence to use.
The selected action sequence must be programmed to perform the appropriate task. If the selected action sequence
has no instructions or if an invalid sequence number is used, the system will substitute action sequence 9.
Review section 6.5 for more information on action sequences. Program the number of the action sequence to
execute at the fourth memory address for the selected alarm.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.27
6.6.5
Upper and Lower Limits
The upper and lower limits specify the range of acceptable telemetry values for a channel. Limits are programmed
using 4 digits. If the telemetry channel reading has a decimal point, ignore the decimal but keep the digits following
the decimal. Digits are critical. Decimal points and unit words are not critical. If the reading is not 4 digits long, add
zeros to the left until the reading has 4 digits.
For example, to program an upper limit of 105.0 percent when the normal reading is 99.8 percent, set the upper limit
to 1050. To program a lower limit of 90 percent when the normal reading is 99.8 percent, set the lower limit to 0900.
In come cases only one limit is considered critical. The default trigger rule can be used. Set the alarm limits to
compensate.
•
•
If only the upper limit is critical, set the upper limit as necessary and set the lower limit to 0000
If only the lower limit is critical, set the lower limit as necessary and set the upper limit to 9999
Setting alarm values on status channels causes some confusion but it is really quite easy. Status channels are
treated as numbers internally. The scale is the same as the factory default setting, 0000 to 2040, and the trip point is
mid-scale, 1020. When monitoring a status channel, typically only one limit is considered critical and the other is
usually ignored. The following general rules work well in most cases.
•
To trigger when the input goes from low to high, set the upper limit to 1500 and the lower limit to 0000
•
To trigger when the input goes from high to low, set the upper limit to 9999 and the lower limit to 0500
These rules refer to the voltage sample on the telemetry input; not the resulting channel reading. Status channel
readings can be inverted in software. The channel reading may not be an accurate indicator of the voltage sample.
6.6.6
Enabling and Disabling Telemetry Alarms
There are three ways to enable and disable telemetry alarms in the RFC-1.
1.
2.
Enter commands manually to enable or disable a single alarm or the entire alarm system.
Use alarm blocks to disable one or more alarms as a function of month, day and time of day.
3.
Selectively enable and disable alarms with commands in an action sequence.
The telemetry alarm system can be enabled and disabled with a single command, 82, in the RFC-1. The RFC-1 will
deliver the current telemetry alarm system status then it will say “push # to reprogram”. If you press the # key, the
RFC-1 responds with “enter one digit”. Press 0 to disable the telemetry alarm system or 1 to enable the telemetry
alarm system. All other entries are invalid.
The RFC-1 ships from the factory with the telemetry alarm system disabled. You must enable it for the RFC-1 to
scan for telemetry conditions.
In the default settings all alarms are programmed to monitor channel 64. This effectively disables the alarm. Enable
an alarm by programming a valid channel number and upper and lower limits. The commands 90-97 are provide the
easiest method for reading and adjusting alarm values. See Section 5 of this manual for details on these commands.
Enabling and disabling telemetry alarms in an action sequence is discussed in Section 6.5 of this manual. That
section covers all of the commands that can be used in an action sequence.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.28
6.6.7
Blocking Alarms by Time
It is possible to disable a telemetry alarm during certain hours of the day by programming an alarm block. Alarm
blocks are used in cases where an alarm is not valid during part of the day. Tower light monitoring is a good
example. Tower lights are typically not on during daylight hours so an alarm monitoring tower light power can be
blocked to prevent a false alarm.
Alarm blocks use the same memory area that date/time triggers use—memory addresses 0256-0639. An alarm
block is a special programming case and the RFC-1 will recognize it as an alarm block instead of a date/time trigger.
Date/time triggers are discussed in the next section. It is not necessary to know how they work yet. Alarm blocks
share the memory space. A sample selection from the programming address table will help illustrate this.
Addr
Description
0256
0257
0258
0259
0260
0261
0262
0263
Date/time trigger 48:
Date/time trigger 48:
Date/time trigger 48:
Date/time trigger 48:
Date/time trigger 48:
Date/time trigger 48:
Date/time trigger 48:
Date/time trigger 48:
Section
action sequence
month
date—value 1
date—value 2
hour—value 1
hour—value 2
minute—value 1
minute—value 2
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
- Programming Default Current
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Alternate Use / Notes
Alarm block 48:
Alarm block 48:
Alarm block 48:
Alarm block 48:
Alarm block 48:
Alarm block 48:
Alarm block 48:
Alarm block 48:
block indicator
alarm to block
month
day(s) of week
start hour—V1
start hour—V2
end hour—V1
end hour—V2
The listing above shows how the alarm block data uses the date/time trigger memory. Look specifically at the column
labeled Alternate Use. It describes the alarm block.
•
The first memory address is always programmed to 15 for an alarm block.
•
•
The second memory address identifies the alarm (A-H) to block using numbers 1-8 respectively.
The third memory location identifies the month (1-12 or 15) in which to activate the block.
•
•
The fourth memory location identifies the day of week (1-7 or 13-15) on which to activate the block.
The fifth and sixth memory locations store the start time (hour) of the alarm block.
•
The seventh and eighth memory locations store the end time (hour) of the alarm block.
Always program a 15 in the first memory location to indicate to the RFC-1 that this is an alarm block and not a
date/time trigger.
For the alarm to block, use numbers 1-8 to represent alarms A-H where: 1=A, 2=B, 3=C, 4=D, 5=E, 6=F, 7=G, 8=H.
An alarm block can be active every month or during only a specific month. Use numbers 1-12 to represent the
months January - December respectively. Program the value 15 if the block should be active every month.
An alarm block can be active every day of the week, a specific day of the week, weekdays only or weekends only.
Use numbers 1-7 to represent the days of the week where: 1=Monday, 2=Tuesday, 3=Wednesday, 4=Thursday,
5=Friday, 6=Saturday, 7=Sunday. Extra day of the week values are: 13=every weekday (Monday-Friday),
14=weekend days (Saturday & Sunday), 15=every day of the week.
The start hour and stop hour define the hours of the day that the block will be active. When a block is active, the
specified alarm does not occur—it is blocked. Alarm blocks start and stop on the hour—there are not enough
memory address in the group to store hours and minutes. Alarm block hours are programmed using a 24-hour clock.
The block time can cross midnight.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.29
Each hour setting uses 2 memory addresses. Program the first digit of the hour at the location listed as “V1” and
program the second digit at the memory location listed as “V2”. Do this with both the start and stop hours. The
example below shows programming for an alarm block that is active every day of the week in every month from
8:00pm (20 hours) to 6:00am (06 hours).
Addr
Description
0256
0257
0258
0259
0260
0261
0262
0263
Date/time trigger 48:
Date/time trigger 48:
Date/time trigger 48:
Date/time trigger 48:
Date/time trigger 48:
Date/time trigger 48:
Date/time trigger 48:
Date/time trigger 48:
6.6.7
Section
action sequence
month
date—value 1
date—value 2
hour—value 1
hour—value 2
minute—value 1
minute—value 2
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
- Programming Default Current
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
15
1
15
15
2
0
0
6
Alternate Use / Notes
Alarm block 48:
Alarm block 48:
Alarm block 48:
Alarm block 48:
Alarm block 48:
Alarm block 48:
Alarm block 48:
Alarm block 48:
block indicator
alarm to block
month
day(s) of week
start hour—V1
start hour—V2
end hour—V1
end hour—V2
Alarm Scan Interval and Sequence
The alarm scan interval determines how frequently the RFC-1 checks the alarm channels. The alarm scan sequence
determines in what order the alarm channels are checked.
In the factory setting the RFC-1 checks one alarm channel every 10 seconds. The alarms are checked in rotation:
alarm A, B, C, and so on. After alarm H is checked the system loops back to alarm A. Unused alarms are ignored so
if only alarms A-C are used the rotation will loop from alarm C to alarm A.
The rate at which the alarms are checked can be changed according to the table below. Additionally, there is a
weighted scan rotation that checks alarm H more frequently than all other alarms. The weighted scan rotation is:
alarm A, H, B, H, C, H, and so on. The weighted scan gives alarm H higher priority than the other alarms.
V1 Scan Interval
Scan Rotation
0
5 seconds
Normal: A, B, C, D, E, F, …
1 * 10 seconds
Normal: A, B, C, D, E, F, …
2
15 seconds
Normal: A, B, C, D, E, F, …
3
30 seconds
Normal: A, B, C, D, E, F, …
4
45 seconds
Normal: A, B, C, D, E, F, …
5
60 seconds
Normal: A, B, C, D, E, F, …
6
120 seconds
Normal: A, B, C, D, E, F, …
7
240 seconds
Normal: A, B, C, D, E, F, …
* This is the default setting.
V1
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Scan Interval
5 seconds
10 seconds
15 seconds
30 seconds
45 seconds
60 seconds
120 seconds
240 seconds
Scan Rotation
Weighted: A, H, B, H, C, H, …
Weighted: A, H, B, H, C, H, …
Weighted: A, H, B, H, C, H, …
Weighted: A, H, B, H, C, H, …
Weighted: A, H, B, H, C, H, …
Weighted: A, H, B, H, C, H, …
Weighted: A, H, B, H, C, H, …
Weighted: A, H, B, H, C, H, …
The scan interval and sequence are programmed at memory address 1013. Select the value from the table above
and program it at this address to adjust the scan interval and/or scan rotation.
The scan interval and the number alarms in use determine how often a specific alarm channel will be checked.
Assuming the default setting of 10 seconds for the scan interval, a single alarm will be checked every 10 seconds. If
two alarms are used, each alarm is checked every 20 seconds. Alarm conditions are typically recognized within
several seconds in actual use due to randomness and statistical distribution.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.30
6.7
Timed Events
Incorrect use of the following information can cause unexpected or undesirable behavior. We
strongly recommend that you understand the basic operation of the RFC-1 and the specifics of
the installation before continuing. Please read the documentation above that describes the
Advanced Programming Mode before continuing if you have not done so already.
The RFC-1 has an internal clock and calendar that allow it to trigger an action sequence by the time and date with a
wide variety of options. Memory is available for at least 48 date/time triggers but there may be more depending on
the installation. This will be discussed later in this section.
Timed events are disabled when a user is connected. This includes local and remote connections in both voice and
data modes. When a connection is active, any timed events that are scheduled will not occur either during the
session or after it ends. The user session completely overrides automated activity. This decreases the potential for
a user and the RFC-1 perform conflicting activities.
New telemetry reference values for the alarm system are taken after an action sequence completes. This includes
action sequences that are triggered by the internal clock/calendar. This is usually desirable as it prevents the RFC-1
from interpreting a programmed activity as an alarm condition and taking inappropriate corrective actions.
If the RFC-1 is used to adjust equipment to an out of tolerance condition, it assumes that this is an intentional action
and does not trigger an alarm. If this not the desired behavior, the telemetry reference scan can be inhibited through
action sequence programming discussed previously.
6.7.1
Enabling Timed Events
The clock controls the master on/off switch for timed events. Set the clock and calendar with valid date and time
information and any timed events that are programmed will be active.
6.7.2
Disabling Timed Events
When the RFC-1 loses power the clock resets to 00:99:00 and freezes. Timed events cannot occur in this state.
Likewise, to disable all timed events, set the clock hours to 00 and the minutes to 99. Disable an individual timed
event by writing its memory block with the value 0. This completely removes the date/time trigger from memory.
6.7.3
Date/Time Triggers and Telemetry Channels—Shared Memory Region
Memory is permanently allocated for 48 date/time triggers in the RFC-1. These 48 date/time triggers occupy
addresses 0256-0639 in the Programming Address Table. Additionally, shared memory is available that can increase
the number up to 80 date/time triggers. The extra memory is taken from memory that would otherwise store
telemetry channel descriptors. Memory for the higher channel numbers that are not commonly used can be allocated
for more date/time triggers.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.31
Looking at the Programming address table, the date/time triggers appear to be numbered backward. As the address
increases—the normal direction for programming—the number of the date/time trigger decreases. This is not a
mistake. The numbering is consistent as the date/time triggers transition into shared memory. This selection from
the Programming Address Table highlights the transition—notice the Alternate Use column. See section 6.7.4 for
more information on allocating memory for date/time triggers.
- Programming Default Current
Addr
Description
Section
0248
0249
0250
0251
0252
0253
0254
0255
Channel 62: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 62: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 62: full scale and decimal point
Channel 62: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 63: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 63: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 63: full scale and decimal point
Channel 63: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.4
6.3.5
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.4
6.3.5
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Date/time 49: action sequence
Date/time 49: month
Date/time 49: date - value 1
Date/time 49: date - value 2
Date/time 49: hour - value 1
Date/time 49: hour - value 2
Date/time 49: minute - value 1
Date/time 49: minute - value 2
0256
0257
0258
0259
0260
0261
0262
0263
Date/time trigger 48:
Date/time trigger 48:
Date/time trigger 48:
Date/time trigger 48:
Date/time trigger 48:
Date/time trigger 48:
Date/time trigger 48:
Date/time trigger 48:
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Alarm block 48:
Alarm block 48:
Alarm block 48:
Alarm block 48:
Alarm block 48:
Alarm block 48:
Alarm block 48:
Alarm block 48:
6.7.4
action sequence
month
date—value 1
date—value 2
hour—value 1
hour—value 2
minute—value 1
minute—value 2
Alternate Use / Notes
block indicator
alarm to block
month
day(s) of week
start hour—V1
start hour—V2
end hour—V1
end hour—V2
Programming a Timed Event
A timed event is a combination of two things: a date/time trigger and an action sequence. The date/time trigger
contains all data for when the event will occur but not what happens. The action sequence holds the instructions that
are executed but it contains no timing information whatsoever. This results in a system that is both flexible and
efficient.
•
the first memory location identifies the action sequence to trigger
•
•
the second memory location store the month in which to trigger
the third and fourth memory locations store the date or day of week on which to trigger
•
•
the fifth and sixth memory locations store the hour at which to trigger
the seventh and eight memory locations store the minute at which to trigger
Program a single digit 1-8 for the number of the action sequence that the date/time should trigger.
Program a month from 1 to 12. It is okay to program a two-digit month in this location—enter both digits the press #
to write a month value larger than 9. Program the value 15 to have the trigger activate every month.
The date setting uses two memory locations. Program the first digit of the date in the first location (V1) and the
second digit of the date in the second location (V2). Use 0 for the first digit (V1) if the date is below 10. Program the
value 15 at both locations to trigger an event every day of a month.
The hour setting uses two memory locations. Program the first digit of the hour in the first location (V1) and the
second digit in the second location (V2). Use a 24-hour clock. Program a 0 for the first digit if the value is below 10.
Program the value 15 at both locations to trigger an event every hour of a day.
The minute setting uses two memory locations. Program the first digit of the minute in the first location (V1) and the
second digit in the second location (V2). Program a 0 for the first digit if the value is below 10.
Special codes that provide other triggering options are described below.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.32
6.7.5
Special Triggering Options
The RFC-1 has settings that simplify programming for events that repeat on easily defined intervals.
date/time trigger will trigger an event using the specified interval(s).
A single
Program V1 and V2 from the table below for date value 1 and 2 to trigger an event on the specified days of the week.
V1
15
15
15
15
15
V2
1
2
3
4
5
Day(s) of the Week
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
V1
15
15
15
15
15
V2
6
7
13
14
15
Day(s) of the Week
Saturday
Sunday
Weekdays only: Monday through Friday
Weekends only: Saturday & Sunday
Every day: Monday through Sunday
Program V1 and V2 from the table below for hour value 1 and 2 to trigger an event when the specified number of
hours passes.
V1
15
15
15
15
15
V2
1
2
3
4
15
Hour trigger
Every hour (same as 15-15)
nd
Every 2 hour
rd
Every 3 hour
th
Every 4 hour
Every hour
Program V1 and V2 from the table below for minute value 1 & 2 to trigger an event when the specified number of
minutes passes.
V1
15
15
15
15
15
15
6.7.6
V2
1
2
3
4
5
15
Minute trigger
Every minute (same as 15-15)
Every 2 minutes
Every 3 minutes
Every 4 minutes
Every 5 minutes
Every minute
Programming Examples
Shown below are examples of some commonly performed tasks and minor variations of those tasks to show how the
programming changes. Programming date/time triggers is not difficult; there are just a number of options to consider.
Suppose we need to print a set of telemetry readings to a local printer once every hour at 5 minutes after the hour on
every day of every month. The preset action sequence 11 will perform the print function. We will use date/time
trigger 1 but any unused date/time trigger will work. Starting at address 0632 the programming is shown below.
Addr
Description
Section
0632
0633
0634
0635
0636
0637
0638
0639
Date/time trigger 1: action sequence
Date/time trigger 1: month
Date/time trigger 1: day - value 1
Date/time trigger 1: day - value 2
Date/time trigger 1: hour - value 1
Date/time trigger 1: hour - value 2
Date/time trigger 1: minute - value 1
Date/time trigger 1: minute - value 2
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
- Programming Default Current
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
11
15
15
15
15
15
0
5
Alternate Use / Notes
Alarm block 1: block indicator
Alarm block 1: alarm
Alarm block 1: month
Alarm block 1: day of week
Alarm block 1: start hour - V1
Alarm block 1: start hour - V2
Alarm block 1: end hour - V1
Alarm block 1: end hour - V2
This tells the system to trigger action sequence 10, every month, every day, every hour at 5 minutes after the hour.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.33
The previous example can be altered to print every day at 6:00 am. The programming is shown below.
Addr
Description
Section
0632
0633
0634
0635
0636
0637
0638
0639
Date/time trigger 1: action sequence
Date/time trigger 1: month
Date/time trigger 1: day - value 1
Date/time trigger 1: day - value 2
Date/time trigger 1: hour - value 1
Date/time trigger 1: hour - value 2
Date/time trigger 1: minute - value 1
Date/time trigger 1: minute - value 2
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
- Programming Default Current
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
11
15
15
15
0
6
0
0
Alternate Use / Notes
Alarm block 1: block indicator
Alarm block 1: alarm
Alarm block 1: month
Alarm block 1: day of week
Alarm block 1: start hour - V1
Alarm block 1: start hour - V2
Alarm block 1: end hour - V1
Alarm block 1: end hour - V2
Use multiple date/time triggers to repeat an event at different times. To print a second set of readings at 6:00 pm,
program another date/time trigger. Remember to use a 24-hour clock. The programming is shown below.
Addr
Description
Section
0624
0625
0626
0627
0628
0629
0630
0631
Date/time trigger 2: action sequence
Date/time trigger 2: month
Date/time trigger 2: day - value 1
Date/time trigger 2: day - value 2
Date/time trigger 2: hour - value 1
Date/time trigger 2: hour - value 2
Date/time trigger 2: minute - value 1
Date/time trigger 2: minute - value 2
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
- Programming Default Current
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
11
15
15
15
1
8
0
0
Alternate Use / Notes
Alarm block 2: block indicator
Alarm block 2: alarm
Alarm block 2: month
Alarm block 2: day of week
Alarm block 2: start hour - V1
Alarm block 2: start hour - V2
Alarm block 2: end hour - V1
Alarm block 2: end hour - V2
Or, use a single date/time trigger to repeat an event at an interval. To print a set of readings every 3 hours, program
a date/time trigger as shown below.
Addr
Description
Section
0632
0633
0634
0635
0636
0637
0638
0639
Date/time trigger 1: action sequence
Date/time trigger 1: month
Date/time trigger 1: day - value 1
Date/time trigger 1: day - value 2
Date/time trigger 1: hour - value 1
Date/time trigger 1: hour - value 2
Date/time trigger 1: minute - value 1
Date/time trigger 1: minute - value 2
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
- Programming Default Current
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
11
15
15
15
15
3
0
0
Alternate Use / Notes
Alarm block 1: block indicator
Alarm block 1: alarm
Alarm block 1: month
Alarm block 1: day of week
Alarm block 1: start hour - V1
Alarm block 1: start hour - V2
Alarm block 1: end hour - V1
Alarm block 1: end hour - V2
Obviously this is not an exhaustive list of the programming options but it should start to give you an idea of what is
possible using very little programming.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.34
Suppose we need to turn a transmitter on every day at 5:30 am in April and that action sequence 3 is programmed to
perform this task. We will use date/time trigger 1 but any unused date/time trigger will work.
Addr
Description
Section
0632
0633
0634
0635
0636
0637
0638
0639
Date/time trigger 1: action sequence
Date/time trigger 1: month
Date/time trigger 1: day - value 1
Date/time trigger 1: day - value 2
Date/time trigger 1: hour - value 1
Date/time trigger 1: hour - value 2
Date/time trigger 1: minute - value 1
Date/time trigger 1: minute - value 2
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
- Programming Default Current
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
4
15
15
0
5
3
0
Alternate Use / Notes
Alarm block 1: block indicator
Alarm block 1: alarm
Alarm block 1: month
Alarm block 1: day of week
Alarm block 1: start hour - V1
Alarm block 1: start hour - V2
Alarm block 1: end hour - V1
Alarm block 1: end hour - V2
We can alter this example to turn the transmitter on only on weekdays, not on weekends, with the programming
change shown below.
Addr
Description
Section
0632
0633
0634
0635
0636
0637
0638
0639
Date/time trigger 1: action sequence
Date/time trigger 1: month
Date/time trigger 1: day - value 1
Date/time trigger 1: day - value 2
Date/time trigger 1: hour - value 1
Date/time trigger 1: hour - value 2
Date/time trigger 1: minute - value 1
Date/time trigger 1: minute - value 2
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
- Programming Default Current
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
4
15
13
0
5
3
0
Alternate Use / Notes
Alarm block 1: block indicator
Alarm block 1: alarm
Alarm block 1: month
Alarm block 1: day of week
Alarm block 1: start hour - V1
Alarm block 1: start hour - V2
Alarm block 1: end hour - V1
Alarm block 1: end hour - V2
Suppose we need to turn the transmitter off every day at 6:30 pm in April and that action sequence 4 is programmed
to perform this task. Date/time trigger 2 will trigger the action sequence. The programming is shown below.
Addr
Description
Section
0624
0625
0626
0627
0628
0629
0630
0631
Date/time trigger 2: action sequence
Date/time trigger 2: month
Date/time trigger 2: day - value 1
Date/time trigger 2: day - value 2
Date/time trigger 2: hour - value 1
Date/time trigger 2: hour - value 2
Date/time trigger 2: minute - value 1
Date/time trigger 2: minute - value 2
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
6.6.4
- Programming Default Current
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
4
15
15
1
8
3
0
Alternate Use / Notes
Alarm block 2: block indicator
Alarm block 2: alarm
Alarm block 2: month
Alarm block 2: day of week
Alarm block 2: start hour - V1
Alarm block 2: start hour - V2
Alarm block 2: end hour - V1
Alarm block 2: end hour - V2
Again, this is not an exhaustive list. But using the special trigger options it is easy to create recurring events without
a lot of programming.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.35
6.7.7
Telemetry Auto-scan Data Interval
The telemetry auto-scan data feature provides logging data at fixed intervals. It is a timed event that operates very
much like a date/time trigger event but it is a very specialized case. First, it is not programmed in the same area of
memory as the other date/time triggers. Second, it has a fixed set of timing options. And third, it has a fixed function
and that is to send data readings to an external device.
The programming options for this feature are easy. Find the number of relay panels that are installed in the system in
the table below and program V1 from the table at address 1012 in the programming address table.
V1 Number of relay panels installed
0*
Feature disabled
1
1 relay panel—8 telemetry channels maximum
2
2 relay panels—16 telemetry channels maximum
3
3 relay panels—24 telemetry channels maximum
4
4 relay panels—32 telemetry channels maximum
5
5 relay panels—40 telemetry channels maximum
6
6 relay panels—48 telemetry channels maximum
7
7 relay panels—56 telemetry channels maximum
8
8 relay panels—64 telemetry channels maximum
* This is the default setting.
The timing interval, the time between sets of telemetry readings, is calculated automatically. It is a function of the
number of telemetry channels available. The interval will be between 1 and 4 minutes.
The function performs a telemetry auto-scan in data mode. The scan starts with channel 00 and ends with the useradjustable auto-scan stop channel.
6.7.8
Telemetry Auto-scan Stop Channel
The auto-scan stop channel, mentioned above, tells the RFC-1 at what channel to stop during an automatic logging
sequence. The auto-scan stop channel is located at memory addresses 1010-1011.
Set the stop channel by programming the first digit of the stop channel at memory location 1010 and the second digit
at memory location 1011. Program a zero at address 1010 if the channel number is less than 10, such as 01, 02, 03,
etc. Valid channel numbers for the stop channel are 01-63.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.36
6.8
Communication
Incorrect communication settings can cause the RFC-1 to place repeated, unwanted calls to
unsuspecting people or places. It is solely your responsibility to verify that the RFC-1 is
programmed to contact only authorized personnel.
6.8.1
Programming Telephone Numbers
The six telephone numbers stored in the RFC-1 are designated as Telephone Number A-F. Each telephone number
contains up to twelve digits. If more digits are required telephone numbers can be chained together for more digits.
It is not necessary to use all the digits in a number. Telephone numbers A through D are easily programmed with the
commands 86, 87, 88 and 89 respectively. Refer to section 5 for more information on these commands.
The programming address table in Appendix A provides a list of all memory address and their functions. Telephone
numbers are stored in memory at addresses 0640-0723 in the table.
In addition to the digits to dial, telephone numbers in the RFC-1 have a dialing mode setting and a programmable
number of call attempts. There are fourteen memory locations available for each telephone number.
•
The first twelve memory locations store the telephone number.
•
•
The thirteenth memory location stores the call mode or an optional pager site ID digit.
The fourteenth memory location determines how many attempts are made when calling the number.
Starting with the first address of the selected telephone number, program one digit of the telephone number at each
successive address. If all twelve digits are not needed, enter the value 10 for unused digits at the trailing end of the
number. The RFC-1 recognizes 10 as an unused digit in a telephone number.
•
To dial the ❊ key, program the value 11 in the number where the ❊ should occur.
•
To dial the # key, program the value 12 in the number where the # should occur.
When dialing in voice mode using pulse dialing, the ❊ and # digits will be translated into a short pause because these
characters do not exist on rotary telephones.
•
Programming the value 13 inserts a one-second pause in a telephone number.
•
Programming the value 14 inserts a two-second pause in a telephone number.
When dialing in voice mode using pulse dialing, both values insert a one-second pause. When dialing in data mode
both values insert a two second pause.
Special instructions apply when programming numbers for pagers that may take precedence over the rules above.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.37
6.8.2
Extending Telephone Numbers
When more than twelve digits are needed for a single call, two (or more) telephone numbers can be chained together
to form one longer telephone number. Program the final digit of a telephone number with the value 15 as an indicator
to continue dialing the next telephone number. Program the first digit of the next telephone number with a 10 (blank)
to keep the RFC-1 from dialing the extended number as part of the calling rotation.
In the example below, telephone numbers B and C are chained together for a long dialing sequence. The extra digits
and pauses are used to show a case in which extra digits would be needed when dialing a number. In this example,
the Notes column provides details for the value programmed at each address.
- Programming Default Current
Addr
Description
Section
Alternate Use / Notes
0654
0655
0656
0657
0658
0659
0660
0661
0662
0663
0664
0665
0666
0667
Telephone number B: value 1
Telephone number B: value 2
Telephone number B: value 3
Telephone number B: value 4
Telephone number B: value 5
Telephone number B: value 6
Telephone number B: value 7
Telephone number B: value 8
Telephone number B: value 9
Telephone number B: value 10
Telephone number B: value 11
Telephone number B: value 12
Telephone number B: call mode--voice/data/pager ID
Telephone number B: call attempts
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.4
6.8.3
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
0
3
9
14
14
1
13
6
1
5
5
5
5
15
0
3
dial 9 for an outside line
pause 2 seconds
pause 2 seconds more
dial 1 for long distance
pause 1 second
area code is 615
“
“
number is 555-1212
“
“
chain to next telephone number
call in voice mode
make three call attempts max
0668
0669
0670
0671
0672
0673
0674
0675
0676
0677
0678
0679
0680
0681
Telephone number C: value 1
Telephone number C: value 2
Telephone number C: value 3
Telephone number C: value 4
Telephone number C: value 5
Telephone number C: value 6
Telephone number C: value 7
Telephone number C: value 8
Telephone number C: value 9
Telephone number C: value 10
Telephone number C: value 11
Telephone number C: value 12
Telephone number C: call mode--voice/data/pager ID
Telephone number C: call attempts
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.4
6.8.3
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
0
3
10
1
2
1
2
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
0
0
make this number appear blank
finish the telephone number
“
“
“
unused digits, fill with value 10
“
“
“
“
“
“
call mode is set above
call attempts are set above
The call mode and call attempts of a long dialing sequence are determined by the settings for the first number in the
chain. The settings in the extended numbers are ignored and should be set to 0.
6.8.3
Setting the Call Attempts
Telephone numbers can be called more than once in the event that a number is busy on the first attempt. Each
telephone number A-F has a call attempt setting. This sets the maximum number of times the number will be dialed.
If a user clears the alarm then calls are stopped.
Call attempts can be set from 1 to 4. Values greater than 4 will be result in a maximum of 4 calls. The factory setting
is two attempts for each number.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.38
6.8.4
Setting the Call Mode
Each telephone number has an associated dialing mode. This setting determines how the number is dialed: in voice
mode, data mode or pager mode. There are two pager modes: pager mode and legacy pager mode. Pager mode
supports many features of modern paging systems. Legacy pager mode sends a single digit repeatedly to the paging
terminal for rudimentary site identification.
Select the call mode from the table below and program the associated V1 at the appropriate address to set the call
mode for a telephone number. Some call modes require special programming. Details are provided below.
V1 Call Mode
0 * Voice mode
1
Data mode to modem
2
Pager mode to text pager using data terminal
3
Pager mode to text pager using DTMF tones
4
Legacy pager mode with site ID digit 0
5
Legacy pager mode with site ID digit 1
6
Legacy pager mode with site ID digit 2
7
Legacy pager mode with site ID digit 3
* This is the default setting.
V1
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Call Mode
Legacy pager mode with site ID digit 4
Legacy pager mode with site ID digit 5
Legacy pager mode with site ID digit 6
Legacy pager mode with site ID digit 7
Legacy pager mode with site ID digit 8
Legacy pager mode with site ID digit 9
Legacy pager mode with site ID digit ❊
Legacy pager mode with site ID digit #
Many paging systems use the ❊ and # keys as control keys. Items 14 and 15 may not work with all paging systems.
6.8.4.1 Calling Voice Numbers
Voice mode is the default setting for all calls. In a voice call, the RFC-1 dials the telephone and speaks a message to
alert station personnel of the condition that triggered the call. The message consists of the site identification phrase
followed by a brief message that describes the condition such as, “telemetry alarm” or “power failure”. No extra
hardware is required for voice mode calling.
6.8.4.2 Calling a Data Number
Data mode calls are used when the RFC-1 is performing a remote logging function to a personal computer or other
remote terminal. Data calls require a modem accessory for the RFC-1 such as the MA-2 Modem Adapter.
In a data call, the RFC-1 establishes a data connection between its modem and the modem at the associated
telephone number. Once a connection is made, communication takes place using ASCII data. This data stream can
be captured by a software terminal program on a personal computer and logged to a file or sent to a printer.
An alarm call in data mode will send a message consisting of the date and time, the site identification phrase and a
brief alarm message. It will look similar to the sample below.
Date: 01/01/2006
Time: 04:38:29
Site: This is RFC1B
Telemetry Alarm Channel 00: 107.2 Percent Power
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.39
6.8.4.3 Calling Pagers in Voice Mode
The RFC-1 can call a text pager in data mode or in voice/DTMF mode. Calling a pager in voice mode does not
require extra hardware. The pager message will consist of a programmable site ID number and, optionally, the
number of the telemetry channel that triggered the alarm.
The RFC-1 must be set to dial using DTMF tones rather than pulse dialing to call a pager in this mode. This setting is
discussed in section 6.8.5.
Calling a pager in voice mode requires the RFC-1 to call the pager and send extra digits as if a person was paging.
Some paging systems recognize keystrokes immediately on answering. Other paging systems require keystrokes to
navigate a menu system before paging. The RFC-1 should be able to interact with either type of system with proper
programming. Paging systems with menus require commands and pauses to be simulated in the ID described below.
Calling a text-based pager with the RFC-1 requires programming two telephone numbers. The first number is the
telephone number of the pager. It can be programmed as telephone number A, B, C or D. The second number is the
site ID that will be sent to the pager. This can be the telephone number at the transmitter site or any other series of
numbers that will uniquely identify the site. The site ID number must be programmed at telephone number E.
There are special rules for programming the site ID number. The first digit must be 10 of the site ID number must be
10. This stops the standard calling routines from dialing the site ID number. All remaining digits of telephone number
E are programmed with the digits that will be sent to the pager. If the paging terminal has a menu, those keystrokes
should be programmed here as well.
•
•
To dial the ❊ key, program the value 11 in the site ID number where the ❊ should occur.
To dial the # key, program the value 12 in the site ID number where the # should occur.
•
To insert a pause, program the value 13 in the site ID number where the pause should occur.
Some paging systems require the sender to terminate the entry, in this case the site ID, by pressing the # key.
Program the value 12 as the last digit of the site ID to send the #. The paging system will interpret this tone as the
end of the sequence and terminate the call. Most systems will time out and send the page even without the # key.
If the value 11 (❊) is programmed as a digit in the site ID, the RFC-1 will send a dash and the number of the channel
that triggered the alarm. Some paging systems ignore the ❊ key in which case these characters may be dropped.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.40
In the example below, the telephone number for the pager is 555-1212 and the site ID that will be sent to the pager is
615-228-3500. The optional ❊ command is being used to add the channel number to the display and the # key is
being sent to terminate the page.
- Programming Default Current
Addr
Description
Section
Alternate Use / Notes
0682
0683
0684
0685
0686
0687
0688
0689
0690
0691
0692
0693
0694
0695
Telephone number D: value 1
Telephone number D: value 2
Telephone number D: value 3
Telephone number D: value 4
Telephone number D: value 5
Telephone number D: value 6
Telephone number D: value 7
Telephone number D: value 8
Telephone number D: value 9
Telephone number D: value 10
Telephone number D: value 11
Telephone number D: value 12
Telephone number D: voice/data/pager ID
Telephone number D: call attempts
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.2
6.7.3
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
0
3
5
5
5
1
2
1
2
10
10
10
10
10
2
1
pager number 555-1212
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
unused digits, fill with value 10
0696
0697
0698
0699
0700
0701
0702
0703
0704
0705
0706
0707
0708
0709
Telephone number E: value 1
Telephone number E: value 2
Telephone number E: value 3
Telephone number E: value 4
Telephone number E: value 5
Telephone number E: value 6
Telephone number E: value 7
Telephone number E: value 8
Telephone number E: value 9
Telephone number E: value 10
Telephone number E: value 11
Telephone number E: value 12
Telephone number E: voice/data/pager ID
Telephone number E: call attempts
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.2
6.7.3
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
0
3
10
6
1
5
2
2
8
3
5
0
0
11
12
10
Pager ID or terminal phone: 10
Pager ID or terminal phone: V1
Pager ID or terminal phone: V2
Pager ID or terminal phone: V3
Pager ID or terminal phone: V5
Pager ID or terminal phone: V6
Pager ID or terminal phone: V7
Pager ID or terminal phone: V8
Pager ID or terminal phone: V9
Pager ID or terminal phone: V10
Pager ID or terminal phone: V11
Pager ID or terminal phone: V12
Pager ID or terminal phone: V13
Pager ID or terminal phone: V14
pager call, data mode
one call attempt
RFC-1 versions prior to 6.00 had limited paging capability. In legacy pager mode, the RFC-1 dials the pager and
sends a single digit repeatedly to the paging terminal. The result is a pager display filled with a single digit. The digit
that is sent is programmable and serves as a site ID number. The site ID number is programmable as part of the call
mode setting of the telephone number. See the table above with call mode settings for details.
Legacy pager mode is included for backward compatibility. If telephone number E is already in use then legacy
pager mode can be used as an alternative. Legacy paging mode cannot respond to paging system menus.
6.8.4.4 Calling Pagers in Data Mode
The RFC-1 can also send full text messages to a pager by calling a paging terminal in data mode. This type of call
provides the most information of the available paging options but it has a more involved setup. Text paging requires
a data modem accessory, model MA-2 Modem Adapter, and an access number to a data based paging terminal.
The RFC-1 sends text messages to a paging terminal using the TAP protocol in automatic message mode. This is a
standard protocol used by many service providers. Setting up the RFC-1 to send text messages requires a data
access number from the paging service provider and the baud rate and data protocol of the paging terminal. The
baud rate adjustment of the RFC-1 has special settings to accommodate paging terminals. The baud rate and data
format settings are discussed later in this section.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.41
In this mode, the RFC-1 calls the paging terminal via modem. After the modems establish a connection, the RFC-1
sends a specially coded message to the paging terminal. The message includes the pager ID number to identify the
message recipient and the message to be delivered to the pager.
As in voice mode paging, data mode paging requires two telephone numbers. The first number is the paging terminal
number—the telephone number to the modem bank of the service provider. It can be programmed at telephone
number A, B, C or D. The second number is the pager ID—this is typically the telephone number of pager. The pager
ID must be programmed at telephone number location E.
There are special rules for programming the pager ID number. The first digit of the pager ID number must be 10.
This stops the standard calling routines from dialing the site ID number. The remaining digits of telephone number E
are used to store the pager ID number. Unused digits should be filled with the value 10.
Some paging systems require a 10-digit pager ID and others require only 7 digits. This is determined by the pager
service provider. Program the pager ID number according to the requirements of the service provider. As with all
other telephone numbers, fill unused digits in the pager ID with the value 10.
In the example below, the telephone number for the paging data terminal is 555-1212 and the telephone number of
the pager that will receive the message is 615-228-3500.
- Programming Default Current
Addr
Description
Section
Alternate Use / Notes
0682
0683
0684
0685
0686
0687
0688
0689
0690
0691
0692
0693
0694
0695
Telephone number D: value 1
Telephone number D: value 2
Telephone number D: value 3
Telephone number D: value 4
Telephone number D: value 5
Telephone number D: value 6
Telephone number D: value 7
Telephone number D: value 8
Telephone number D: value 9
Telephone number D: value 10
Telephone number D: value 11
Telephone number D: value 12
Telephone number D: voice/data/pager ID
Telephone number D: call attempts
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.2
6.7.3
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
0
3
5
5
5
1
2
1
2
10
10
10
10
10
3
1
paging data terminal 555-1212
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
unused digits, fill with value 10
0696
0697
0698
0699
0700
0701
0702
0703
0704
0705
0706
0707
0708
0709
Telephone number E: value 1
Telephone number E: value 2
Telephone number E: value 3
Telephone number E: value 4
Telephone number E: value 5
Telephone number E: value 6
Telephone number E: value 7
Telephone number E: value 8
Telephone number E: value 9
Telephone number E: value 10
Telephone number E: value 11
Telephone number E: value 12
Telephone number E: voice/data/pager ID
Telephone number E: call attempts
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.1
6.7.2
6.7.3
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
0
3
10
6
1
5
2
2
8
3
5
0
0
10
10
10
Pager ID or terminal phone: 10
Pager ID or terminal phone: V1
Pager ID or terminal phone: V2
Pager ID or terminal phone: V3
Pager ID or terminal phone: V4
Pager ID or terminal phone: V5
Pager ID or terminal phone: V6
Pager ID or terminal phone: V7
Pager ID or terminal phone: V8
Pager ID or terminal phone: V9
Pager ID or terminal phone: V10
Pager ID or terminal phone: V11
Pager ID or terminal phone: V12
Pager ID or terminal phone: V13
pager call, voice mode
one call attempt
When an alarm call is made to a pager in this mode, the pager receives a message that contains the RFC-1 site ID
phrase followed by the phrase “Telemetry Alarm” then the channel number that caused the alarm and the value of the
channel at the time of the alarm. No time/date information is sent since most pagers place a time/date stamp on the
message when it is received.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.42
6.8.5
Tone / Pulse Dialing
The original RFC-1 hardware with the mechanical sounding voice only pulse dials. Later models that use the humanmale sounding speech-processor perform tone dialing using the speech-processor. The tones are designed to
compensate for component tolerances. More recent models have a dedicated hardware for generating DTMF tones.
Use of the dedicated tone generator is recommended if hardware supports this feature. This is the factory default
setting on new systems that have appropriate hardware.
The speech-processor generated tones are a workable substitute for a dedicated tone generator in most cases.
There are a few telephone line emulation devices do not accept them. Pulse dialing should work with all POTS lines
and can be used in situations where the imprecise DTMF tones do not work reliably.
V1
0
1
2
Dialing Method
Pulse
Tones generated by speech processor
Tones generated by dedicated hardware
Program the value from the column V1 into memory address 0999 set the dialing method. Tones generated by
dedicated hardware are the preferred option if your hardware supports this option.
6.8.6
Alarm Call Message Duration
When making an alarm call in voice mode the RFC-1 will repeat the alarm message for a predetermined time-period.
This time-period is adjustable. Select the message duration from the table below and program the corresponding V1
at address 1003.
V1 Alarm Call Duration
0
10 seconds
1
10 seconds
2
20 seconds
3*
30 seconds
4
40 seconds
5
50 seconds
6
60 seconds
7
70 seconds
* This is the default setting.
6.8.7
V1
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Alarm Call Duration
80 seconds
90 seconds
100 seconds
110 seconds
120 seconds
130 seconds
140 seconds
150 seconds
Alarm Call Pause Duration
When making alarm calls in voice mode the RFC-1 will pause between calls to allow an operator to contact the
system. This time-period is adjustable. Select the pause duration from the table below and program the
corresponding V1 at address 1004.
V1 Alarm Call Pause Duration
0
10 seconds
1
10 seconds
2
20 seconds
3
30 seconds
4
40 seconds
5
50 seconds
6 * 60 seconds
7
70 seconds
* This is the default setting.
RFC-1
V1
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Alarm Call Pause Duration
80 seconds
90 seconds
100 seconds
110 seconds
120 seconds
130 seconds
140 seconds
150 seconds
Advanced Operation
page 6.43
6.8.8
Ring Sensitivity and Hang-up Detection
Previous versions of the RFC-1 used a different, non-linear scale for the ring sensitivity
adjustment. The scale below is only appropriate for systems running version 6.0 or higher.
Using this data table to adjust earlier versions can cause unexpected and undesirable behavior.
Attention!
In previous versions of the RFC-1 the ring sensitivity setting shared a memory location with the dedicated control port
feature. The dedicated control port adjustment has been combined with the communication mode at address 1002.
In version 6, ring sensitivity is combined with the pulse hang-up detection disable setting.
Modern communication systems offer a variety of devices that provide the services of a traditional phone system.
Many of these devices generate a ring signal that not the same as the ring signal generated by a standard telephone
line. In some cases, it is necessary to adjust the RFC-1 so that it recognizes the ring signal.
The adjustment only affects ring detection. It has no effect on outbound dialing or on DTMF tone detection.
Select the ring sensitivity setting from the table below and program the corresponding V1 at address 1014. Higher
values have more aggressive ring detection. Do not select a value of V1 higher than 7 unless you have a very specific need.
V1 Sensitivity Hang-up Detector
0
-3
enabled
1
-2
enabled
2
-1
enabled
3* 0
enabled
4
+1
enabled
5
+2
enabled
6
+3
enabled
7
+4
enabled
* This is the default setting.
V1
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Hang-up Detector
disabled
disabled
disabled
disabled
disabled
disabled
disabled
disabled
Description
Slow ring detect—high noise immunity
Typical operating value—POTS line setting
Quick ring detect—low noise immunity
Devices that emulate a telephone line often require this adjustment. Devices include cellular phone docking stations
and broadband voice line interfaces. Any device that regenerates the incoming ring signal may require increasing the
ring sensitivity. The setting V1=7 usually works with these devices.
This adjustment also provides a method to disable the hang-up detector in the RFC-1. The hang-up pulse detector is
responsible for determining when the RFC-1 has lost the telephone line unexpectedly. With the detector disabled,
the RFC-1 will not respond to a lost telephone line. It will remain in operating mode until the hang-up command, 99,
is issued or until the idle system timer expires—2.5 minutes in the factory setting. See below.
The pulse hang-up detector should only be disabled in situations where the RFC-1 is receiving false pulses and
dropping the connection at inappropriate times on a recurring basis.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.44
6.8.9
Communication Mode
This adjustment sets the mode for incoming calls only. It has no effect on outgoing telephone calls.
The communication mode determines what type of connections the RFC-1 receives for monitoring and control. It
also determines whether the connection is part-time or full-time. A dial-up connection is typically part-time; the
connection is broken at the end of the call. A data connection can be part-time or full-time over a dedicated line.
The default communication mode for the RFC-1 is dial-up, voice connection. This is what the device was originally
designed to do and it is capable of operating this way with no additional hardware. The RFC-1 can operate over an
RS-232 serial data connection with additional hardware accessories. When used this way the RFC-1 responds to the
same commands as it does over a dial-up voice connection.
Remote data collection is possible through action sequence programming and date/time triggers.
sequence programming for more details.
See action
For software options, visit our website: http://www.sinesystems.com.
Voice mode and data mode are not mutually exclusive but only one communication port can be active at a time. The
RFC-1 can switch between the two modes seamlessly. When dial-up connections are used, the RFC-1 can be
programmed to answer in one mode, and then try the other mode if the first connection is not successful.
The RFC-1 also offers a dedicated control mode. When this feature is enabled, the RFC-1 remains active on the
selected port—it does not disconnect as it does at the end of a dial-up connection. Use of a dedicated port does not
limit use of the RFC-1 to only the dedicated port. If a dial-up connection occurs, the RFC-1 can suspend the
dedicated session and accept the dial-up connection. The RFC-1 will resume communication on the dedicated
connection when the dial-up connection is complete.
For example, the RFC-1 can support a dedicated data connection for normal operation. In an emergency, an
engineer can call the RFC-1 in voice mode and operate the system normally. The RFC-1 will resume data
communication when the call is complete.
V1 Dial-up Primary Mode
0 * Voice
1
Data
2
Voice
3
Data
4
Voice
5
Data
6
Voice
* This is the default setting.
Dial-up Secondary Mode
None
None
Data
Voice
None
None
Data
Dedicated Control Mode
None
None
None
None
Voice
Voice
Voice
When the dedicated control mode is enabled over a voice connection, the RFC-1 activates the local phone port
whenever it is not busy with a call. Using this mode requires a full-time, voice-grade audio link and a DTMF tone
generator. The audio link transmits commands via DTMF tones to the RFC-1. Responses are sent back to the
remote site over the audio link. Details of the audio link are discussed in the installation section of this document.
When voice is the primary dial-up mode and data is the secondary mode, the main security code must be entered to
activate voice mode. This must occur before the RFC-1 security code timer expires. The RFC-1 will switch to data
mode if the timer expires before the code is entered. The time is set at address 1016—the incorrect security code
lockout time. The default setting of 10 seconds works well in most cases.
If data is the primary mode, the RFC-1 will switch to voice mode if the data device does not connect in a timely
manner. This is a safety measure to avoid being locked out of the system in an emergency.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.45
6.8.10 Data Communication Settings
References in this section to paging terminals are strictly for full-text paging in data mode. This adjustment has no
effect on voice mode paging.
The data communication setting is determined by the device(s) that the RFC-1 will connect to in data mode. This
adjustment sets the data format for incoming and outgoing connections. The RFC-1 has two data communication
settings, one for standard data connections and another for paging terminals. The same adjustment controls both.
The data format for all data connections that are not paging terminals is 8 data bits, no parity and 1 stop bit (8,N,1).
The TAP protocol that the RFC-1 uses for data communication with paging terminals specifies a connection at 300
baud, 7 data bits, even parity and 1 stop bit (7,E,1). This format is available for compliance with the specification but
most paging systems will operate at 2400 baud, 8,N,1.
There are four standard data protocol options and four pager data protocol options in the table below. Each of the
options repeats so that all 16 combinations are available. If the RFC-1 will not be used to connect to a paging
terminal then the Pager Protocol setting can be disregarded. In this case, there are only four options to choose from
so the choice is limited to values 0 through 3.
In the table below, find the pair of columns that matches both the required data protocol and pager protocol. Program
the value from column V1 at memory address 1005 to set the baud rate and data protocols accordingly.
V1 Data Protocol
0
9600 baud, 8,N,1
1 * 2400 baud, 8,N,1
2
1200 baud, 8,N,1
3
300 baud, 8,N,1
4
9600 baud, 8,N,1
5
2400 baud, 8,N,1
6
1200 baud, 8,N,1
7
300 baud, 8,N,1
* This is the default setting.
Pager Protocol
2400 baud, 8,N,1
2400 baud, 8,N,1
2400 baud, 8,N,1
2400 baud, 8,N,1
300 baud, 8,N,1
300 baud, 8,N,1
300 baud, 8,N,1
300 baud, 8,N,1
V1
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Data Protocol
9600 baud, 8,N,1
2400 baud, 8,N,1
1200 baud, 8,N,1
300 baud, 8,N,1
9600 baud, 8,N,1
2400 baud, 8,N,1
1200 baud, 8,N,1
300 baud, 8,N,1
Pager Protocol
2400 baud, 7,E,1
2400 baud, 7,E,1
2400 baud, 7,E,1
2400 baud, 7,E,1
300 baud, 7,E,1
300 baud, 7,E,1
300 baud, 7,E,1
300 baud, 7,E,1
The parallel printer options for the RFC-1 found in the RAK-1 and the PA-1 or PA-2 convert serial data from the RFC1 to parallel data suitable for a parallel printer. The serial data input on these devices operates at 2400 baud 8,N,1.
If any of these options are used then the data protocol should be at a compatible setting. The factory setting works
well with these devices.
The modem adapter options MA-1 and MA-2 have a maximum speed of 2400 baud. The factory setting works well
with these devices. Faster settings are meant for direct serial connections using the RS-232 serial data adapter.
There are no high-speed data rates available. The RFC-1 does not generate a data stream fast enough to require a
high-speed link. Furthermore, the RFC-1 does not perform data compression or error correction.
6.8.11 Manual Communication Mode Change
For testing purposes, the RFC-1 can shift between voice and data modes with commands from the local phone or
terminal keyboard. These commands require no special programming. Issue the command 84 from normal
operating mode. The RFC-1 will respond with the prompt, “enter one digit command”.
•
Enter 0 to switch to voice mode immediately
•
•
Enter 1 to switch to data mode immediately
Enter ❊ to abort the command
This command has other options for backing up system data. See the next section for details.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.46
6.8.12 Saving and Restoring System Settings
If the RFC-1 has a data accessory attached, the system settings can be copied to the connected device. If the device
is a printer then a formatted list of the settings can be printed. If the device is a modem or terminal, software can
collect the data and store it to a file. Depending on the data format selected, the file can be printed or saved as a
backup and used to restore the system settings should it become necessary.
These commands require no special programming. Issue the command 84 from normal operating mode. The RFC-1
will respond with the prompt, “enter one digit command”.
•
Enter 2 to perform a legacy data dump—all user memory is copied to the data port in a simple table
•
Enter 3 to perform an annotated data dump—all user memory is copied to the data port with
descriptions
•
Enter 4 to perform an save/restore data dump—all user memory is copied to the data port in a
special format
Enter ❊ to abort this command
•
The command can be issued from either the local phone or from the keyboard if a terminal is attached and data mode
is active. The data stream will be sent to the data port in either case. The command has no voice mode equivalent.
Pressing the local control button or the ESC key, if a terminal is attached, will halt the memory dump. Memory is not
modified or cleared by this procedure; the contents are copied to the data port in the appropriate format. See Restore
Factory Settings to clear the system memory.
Legacy Data Dump
The legacy data dump is a simple table consisting of a starting address followed by the 8 data bytes from the next 8
memory addresses. It is included for backward compatibility. A short sample is shown below.
0000 00 03 02 00 00 03 02 00
0008 00 03 02 00 00 03 02 00
…
1016 01 00 08 00 00 03 02 00
Annotated Data Dump
The annotated data dump displays the data address range, followed by the data and a brief description of the data.
Data is ordered by address but broken down by function and displayed in variable length lines. This dump is most
informative and easiest to read. This format is the best for printing a copy of the system settings.
0000 - 0003
0004 - 0007
…
1017 – 1023
RFC-1
00 03 02 00
00 03 02 00
Channel 00
Channel 01
00 08 00 00 03 02 00
Memory D
Advanced Operation
page 6.47
Save/Restore Data Dump
The save/restore data dump copies the memory contents to the data port in a format that should be captured by a
computer. The dump is a continuous feed of data from every address in order from 0000 to 1023. Each data byte is
followed by a “#” character. There are spaces in the data stream but there are no addresses, no comments and no
carriage returns or line feeds. A short sample is shown below.
00 # 03 # 02 # 00 # 00 # 03 # 02 # 00 # 00 # 03 # 02 # 00 # 00 # 03 # 02 # 00 #
00 # 03 # 02 # 00 # 00 # 03 # 02 # 00 # 00 # 03 # 02 # 00 # 00 # 03 # 02 # 00 #
…
00 # 00 # 00 # 07 # 00 # 00 # 04 # 06 # 01 # 00 # 08 # 00 # 00 # 03 # 02 # 00 #
*
The # character after each value is included so that the captured data can be used to reprogram the RFC-1. Use a
terminal program such as HyperTerminal to capture the data stream and save it to a file. The file must be a pure text
file with no line breaks or other formatting information.
To restore the RFC-1 settings, connect to the system, enter programming mode and transmit the file to the RFC-1 in
text mode. The RFC-1 will interpret the text as if a user is entering programming commands from the terminal
keyboard. The final ❊ character terminates programming mode.
6.8.13 Terminal Emulation Software
HyperTerminal is no longer included with the Windows operating system. The software is available for download but
it appears that the software is no longer free for private use. Users of Windows Vista and Windows 7 may be able to
download and use an earlier version of the software.
Other programs are available that can be used in place of HyperTerminal. TeraTerm is a good substitute that is
open-source and easily downloaded
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.48
6.8.14 Backing-up System Settings
The following instructions assume that you know how to connect and operate the RFC-1 in data mode with the
installed data accessory. The examples use HyperTerminal in Windows. Other software and other computer
platforms will work. Use appropriate terminal emulation software that is for the operating system.
Using HyperTerminal to capture the RFC-1/B settings
To backup the system settings, connect the terminal to the data port. The connection method will vary depending on
the data accessory used. If a direct connection is used, follow the instructions below from the beginning. If a remote
connection is used, establish a connection to the RFC-1 as you normally would then skip to step 3 below.
1.
Connect the terminal, start the terminal software and open a connection on the appropriate port. If
the factory settings are used then the data format is 2400 baud 8,N,1. Flow control should be set
to none or software.
2.
Connect to the RFC-1 with the local telephone.
3.
In the HyperTerminal menu bar, select Transfer > Capture Text. A dialog window will open that
prompts for a filename. Select a folder where the data should be stored and provide an appropriate
filename. Use the default extension .txt because this will be a pure text file.
4.
Access the RFC-1 and enter the command 84. The RFC-1 will prompt for a “one-digit command”.
Enter 4 to start the data dump.
5.
The RFC-1 will begin sending data. The data will appear in the terminal window and it will be
captured to the text file that was specified above. This will take several seconds.
6.
The RFC-1 will say “OK” when the dump is complete. The final character in the dump will be a ❊.
7.
In the HyperTerminal menu bar, select Transfer > Capture Text > Stop. This closes the file and
stops HyperTerminal from adding any more data to it. The final character in the file must be the ❊.
8.
The process is complete. The file contains the data backup suitable for reprogramming the RFC-1.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.49
6.8.15 Restoring System Settings
The following instructions assume that you know how to connect and operate the RFC-1 in data mode with the
installed data accessory. The examples use HyperTerminal in Windows. Other software and other computer
platforms will work. Use appropriate terminal emulation software that is for the operating system.
Using HyperTerminal to restore the RFC-1/B settings
To restoring the system settings, connect the terminal to the data port. The connection method will vary depending on
the data accessory used. If a direct connection is used, follow the instructions below from the beginning. If a remote
connection is used, establish a connection to the RFC-1 as you normally would then skip to step 3 below.
1.
Connect the terminal, start the terminal software and open a connection on the appropriate port. If
the factory settings are used then the data format is 2400 baud 8,N,1. Flow control should be set
to none or software.
2.
Connect to the RFC-1 with the local telephone.
3.
Access the RFC-1 and enter the command 80 to use programming mode. At the prompt, enter the
advanced programming security code. When prompted for a “four-digit address”, enter “0000”.
This initiates programming mode in the RFC-1 starting at the first memory address.
4.
In the HyperTerminal menu bar, select Transfer > Send Text File. A dialog window will open to
select a file. Select the file that contains the RFC-1 backup data created with the procedure above.
5.
HyperTerminal will begin transmitting the text. To the RFC-1 it appears that a user is typing new
data values at the keyboard each followed by the # key. The transfer will program all 1024 memory
locations of the RFC-1 and then send a final ❊ character to exit programming mode. At this point
the process is complete and the word “exit” should be the final word on the terminal. The RFC-1
will be in normal operating mode waiting for further commands.
6.
Take control of the system or enter 99 and disconnect.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.50
6.9
Security Codes
There are four security codes in the RFC-1. They are: the main security code, the control security code, the basic
programming security code and the advanced security code. The easiest way to read and reprogram the security
codes is using the prompted commands 72, 73, 74 and 75. They are described in section 5 of this document.
For security reasons, the prompted commands only work from the local phone. If it becomes necessary to change
the security codes from a remote location, the codes can be changed in programming mode.
6.9.1
Security Code Programming
All of the security codes can be changed in programming mode—including two extra control security codes that are
not discussed in basic operation. Security codes are stored at memory addresses 0948-0983 in the address table.
•
The main security code starts at address 0948.
•
•
Control security code A starts at address 0956.
Control security code B starts at address 0960.
•
•
Control security code C starts at address 0964.
The advanced programming security code starts at address 0972.
•
Control security code block assignments start at address 0976.
The main security code can be up to eight digits long. All other codes can be up to four digits long. Program a single
digit at each memory address. If a shorter code is used, fill the unused spaces at the end with the value 10. A code
will be disabled if it programmed entirely with the value 10.
6.9.2
Control Security Code Mapping
Up to this point all references to control security codes mention a single control security code. There are, in fact,
three control security codes in the RFC-1. They are referred to as control security code A, B and C. Each block of
channels, in other words each relay panel, can be assigned one of the three control security codes. In the factory
settings control security code A is assigned to all relay panels. This is appropriate for most installations.
Using multiple control security codes allows critical and non-critical functions to be wired to separate relay panels and
given different codes. Only personnel who are allowed access to critical functions should be given that security code.
Use of multiple control security codes also allows a single RFC-1 to control up to three transmitters with an extra
degree of security. If each transmitter is connected to a different relay panel then a different control security code can
be assigned to each transmitter. Only the main security code is needed to take readings. But controlling a
transmitter requires the control security code assigned to that transmitter’s relay panel.
To assign a control security code to a block of channels, select the code A, B or C from the table below and program
the value in column V1 at the memory address for the corresponding channel block. These assignments are made at
memory address 0976-0983 in the address table.
V1 Control Security Code
1 * Assign control security code A
2
Assign control security code B
3
Assign control security code C
* This is the default setting.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.51
6.9.3
Incorrect Code Lockout / Communication Mode Switch Delay
The RFC-1 disconnects when an incorrect security code is given. This is a security measure to stop an intruder from
making repeated attempts at guessing a code. The RFC-1 will ignore incoming calls for a short time period after a
code fails. This feature can be used to thwart attempts to guess the RFC-1 security code.
The duration of time that calls are ignored is adjustable. The factory setting is short enough so that an authorized
user should not have a problem contacting the system if a code is entered incorrectly. The time period can be made
longer should the need arise. This lockout period only applies to calls, not connection through the local phone.
Select a lockout time from the table below and program the value from column V1 at memory address 1016 to adjust
the security code lockout time.
V1 Security Code Lockout & Com. Mode Switch
0
10 seconds
1 * 10 seconds
2
20 seconds
3
30 seconds
4
40 seconds
5
50 seconds
6
60 seconds
7
70 seconds
* This is the default setting.
V1
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Security Code Lockout & Com. Mode Switch
80 seconds
90 seconds
100 seconds
110 seconds
120 seconds
130 seconds
140 seconds
150 seconds
This setting also determines the length of time the RFC-1 waits before switching communication mode from voice
mode to data mode. See communication mode programming for more details.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.52
6.10
Site ID and Other Options
The section provides information on features that do not fall into any of the topics that have already been covered.
6.10.1 Site Identification Phrase
The site identification phrase is what the RFC-1 uses to identify itself. This is the phrase that is spoken, or printed,
when the RFC-1 comes online or when it calls out with an alarm notification. The factory setting is "This is RFC-1/B”.
The site ID phrase can be programmed with any six words from the word table in Appendix B. Each word in the table
is identified by a two-digit code. The site ID phrase occupies memory locations 0984-0995 in the address table.
Each word occupies two consecutive memory locations. Program the code pairs for the selected words starting at
memory address 0984. Do not program more than six words.
Attempting to program more than six words can cause undesirable behavior. The addresses following the site ID
phrase control other system functions—specifically, the system hardware version at address 0996. If the wrong data
is programmed at this address, the RFC-1 seizes the telephone line making it impossible to call the system.
If all six words are not used, program the unused words with “voice pause 1”. Do not use the longer voice pauses or
unintended features may activate. See below for details.
If word 6, stored at addresses 0994-0995, is programmed with "voice pause 5", the RFC-1 will not prompt for a
security code when it answers a call. This may be useful when sharing the telephone line with other equipment.
If word 6, stored at addresses 0994-0995, is programmed with "voice pause 4", the RFC-1 adds an extra 2 second
pause before it prompts for a security code. Some telephone networks have a longer delay before making a
connection. The added pause should ensure that the operator hears the security code prompt.
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
page 6.53
6.10.2 Hardware Version
Incorrect hardware version settings can cause undesirable system behavior. If incorrect data is
programmed, the RFC-1 seizes the telephone line making it impossible to call the system. Do not
change this setting unless you are certain that it is required for your installation.
The hardware revision is set at the factory and does not normally require adjustment. If the firmware is upgraded in
the field then it may be necessary to adjust this setting.
RFC-1 hardware revisions 1.05 and earlier use a telephone line interface module labeled “XECOM”. A firmware
adjustment is required to support this device when firmware is upgraded. Dial-up connections will not operate until
this adjustment is made from the local phone. Most systems do not require this adjustment.
Program the value from column V1 in the table below at memory address 0996 to adjust the hardware version.
V1
0
1
2
3
PCB Revisions
1.00-1.05
1.06-1.99 & 2-9
10-15
16
Description
“XECOM” DAA module for telephone line interface
Discrete parts for telephone line interface
ISD2590P speech processor (imprecise tone dial)
HT9200 tone generator added
The hardware version can only be determined by looking at the system board. If the hardware version cannot be
determined from the descriptions above, V1=1 is usually a safe setting.
6.10.3 Inactive System Timeout
As a precaution, the RFC-1 will disconnect after a predetermined period of inactivity—no commands received through
either tones or serial data. Find the maximum period of inactivity allowed in the table below. Program the value from
column V1 at memory address 1000 to adjust the time-period for the inactive system timeout.
V1 Idle system time-out
0
30 seconds
1
60 seconds
2 * 2.5 minutes
3
5 minutes
4
8.5 minutes
5
13 minutes
6
18.5 minutes
7
25 minutes
* This is the default setting.
RFC-1
V1
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Idle system time-out
32.5 minutes
41 minutes
50.0 minutes
61 minutes
72.5 minutes
85 minutes
98.5 minutes
113 minutes
Advanced Operation
page 6.54
6.11
Operating Commands / Programming Notes
It may be helpful to keep a table of normal programming for the RFC-1. This serves not only as a reminder of the
current programming but it also acts as a handy guide to remember how to change some common system settings.
Command
Function
Factory Setting
00
Select channel 00
n/a
n/a
nn
Select channel nn
n/a
n/a
63
Select channel 63
n/a
n/a
64
Auto-scan channels
n/a
n/a
66
Enable control functions
66
n/a
70
Set calendar
00/00/0000
n/a
71
Set clock
00:99:00
n/a
72
Main Security Code
12345678
________________________
73
Control Security Code
66
________________________
74
Basic Programming Security Code
4088
________________________
75
Advanced Programming Security Code
4150
________________________
76
Ring Number
2
78
Firmware Version
6.xx
n/a
80
Advanced Programming Mode
n/a
n/a
81
Power Failure Alarm Status
0
____
82
Telemetry Alarm Status
0
____
84
Manual Serial Commands
n/a
n/a
85
Manual Action Sequence Trigger
n/a
n/a
86
Telephone Number A
************
________________________
87
Telephone Number B
************
________________________
88
Telephone Number C
************
________________________
89
Telephone Number D
************
________________________
90
Alarm A
64 / 2040 / 1020
____ / ________ / ________
91
Alarm B
64 / 2040 / 1020
____ / ________ / ________
92
Alarm C
64 / 2040 / 1020
____ / ________ / ________
93
Alarm D
64 / 2040 / 1020
____ / ________ / ________
94
Alarm E
64 / 2040 / 1020
____ / ________ / ________
95
Alarm F
64 / 2040 / 1020
____ / ________ / ________
96
Alarm G
64 / 2040 / 1020
____ / ________ / ________
97
Alarm H
64 / 2040 / 1020
____ / ________ / ________
98
Hang-up and ignore
n/a
n/a
99
Hang-up
n/a
n/a
RFC-1
Advanced Operation
Current Setting
____
page 6.55
Section 7 — Programming Examples
This section contains programming examples. It does not contain information about using the
Advanced Programming Mode of the RFC-1. You should be familiar with the section of this
documentation that details Advanced Programming before using the examples in this section.
You must be familiar with setup and operation of the RFC-1 for the information in this section to be useful.
Unintended or random changes from incorrect use of programming mode can cause erratic behavior in the RFC-1.
7.1
Telemetry Channel—unit word, full scale, decimal point
In this example we will program channel 00 with the unit word “kilovolts”, a maximum reading with decimal point of
“204.0” and set the channel for “logarithmic” tracking.
1.
2.
Enter the advanced programming mode: 80
Enter the advanced programming security code: 4150
3.
Enter the starting address from the address table for channel 00 telemetry units: 0000
4.
5.
Find the word “kilovolts” in the word table and get the values V1 and V2: V1=4, V2=2
Enter V1 for the word “kilovolts”: 4
6.
Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
7.
8.
Enter V2 for the word “kilovolts”: 2
Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
9. From Section 6.3.3 find the maximum reading of “204.0” and get the value V1: V1=6
10. Enter V1 for the maximum reading of “204.0”: 6
11. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
12. From section 6.3.4 find the setting for logarithmic tracking and get the value V1: V1=1
13. Enter V1 for logarithmic tracking: 1
14. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
15. Press the ❊ key to exit the programming mode
Every channel can be setup with a unit word; the full-scale reading and decimal point location can be changed; and
the tracking method—linear, logarithmic or indirect—can be changed. Use the address table to find the starting
address for the channel to be programmed.
RFC-1
Programming Examples
page 7.1
7.2
Site Identification Phrase
In the first example we will change the Site Identification Phrase—the phrase that the RFC-1 says when it answers
the phone or when it reports an alarm. The factory programming is “This is RFC-1/B”. We will change it to say,
“Hello this is Curly”. Any words or letters from the Word Table can be used.
16. Enter the advanced programming mode: 80
17. Enter the advanced programming security code: 4150
18. Enter the starting address from the address table for the Site ID Phrase: 0984
19. Find the word “hello” in the word table and get the values V1 and V2: V1=3, V2=8
20. Enter V1 for the word “hello”: 3
21. Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
22. Enter V2 for the word “hello”: 8
23. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
24. Find the words “this is” in the word table and get the values V1 and V2: V1=7, V2=11
25. Enter V1 for the words “this is”: 7
26. Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
27. Enter V2 for the words “this is”: 11
28. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
29. Find the word “Curly” in the word table and get the values V1 and V2: V1=2, V2=4
30. Enter V1 for the word “Curly”: 2
31. Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
32. Enter V2 for the word “Curly”: 4
33. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
34. Find the “25ms voice pause” in the word table and get the values V1 and V2: V1=10, V2=5
35. Enter V1 for the “25ms voice pause”: 10
36. Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
37. Enter V2 for the “25ms voice pause”: 5
38. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
39. Find the “25ms voice pause” in the word table and get the values V1 and V2: V1=10, V2=5
40. Enter V1 for the “25ms voice pause”: 10
41. Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
42. Enter V2 for the “25ms voice pause”: 5
43. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
44. Find the “25ms voice pause” in the word table and get the values V1 and V2: V1=10, V2=5
45. Enter V1 for the “25ms voice pause”: 10
46. Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
47. Enter V2 for the “25ms voice pause”: 5
48. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
49. Press the ❊ key to exit the programming mode
The Site ID Phrase can be up to six “words” long. “Hello this is Curly” only uses three of those words because “this
is” is considered a single word. The last three words are programmed with the “25 ms voice pause” so that they will
be silent. For a little fun, try replacing one of the voice pauses with “nyuk, nyuk, nyuk” from the Word Table.
RFC-1
Programming Examples
page 7.2
7.3
Action Sequence
In this example we will program action sequence 2 to activate the channel 00 “on” relay, pause 15 seconds, and then
activate the channel “01” on relay. A sequence like this might be used to power up transmitter filaments with a short
delay then turn on the plate voltage.
The commands used by action sequences are documented in Section 6 of this manual. The commands in the
example come from tables in Section 6.5.
1.
Enter the advanced programming mode: 80
2.
Enter the advanced programming security code: 4150
3.
4.
Enter the starting address from the address table for Action Sequence 2: 0740
Find the action sequence command for “channel 00 on” and get V1 and V2: V1=0, V2=0
5.
6.
Enter V1 for the command channel 00 on: 0
Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
7.
Enter V2 for the command channel 00 on: 0
8.
9.
Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
Find the action sequence command for a 15 second pause and get V1 and V2: V1=8, V2=3
10. Enter V1 for the 15 second pause command: 8
11. Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
12. Enter V2 for the 15 second pause command: 3
13. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
14. From Section 6, find the command for channel 01 on and get V1 and V2: V1=0, V2=1
15. Enter V1 for the command channel 01 on: 0
16. Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
17. Enter V2 for the command channel 01 on: 1
18. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
19. Press the ❊ key to exit the programming mode
An action sequence is of little use by itself—it is merely a set of instructions to perform a task. It must be told when to
perform that task. When combined with a time trigger or an alarm, an action sequence gives the RFC-1 the ability to
perform functions automatically.
In the next example we will program a time trigger that could be used to call upon this action sequence to turn the
transmitter on.
RFC-1
Programming Examples
page 7.3
7.4
Date/Time Trigger
In this example we will program Date/Time Trigger 1 to activate the action sequence that we programmed in the
previous segment. The action sequence is one that could be used to turn on a transmitter: activate the channel 00
on relay, pause 15 seconds, and then activate the channel 01 on relay. We will program the time trigger to activate
the action sequence every day at 6:00am.
1.
Enter the advanced programming mode: 80
2.
Enter the advanced programming security code: 4150
3.
4.
Enter the starting address from the address table for date/time trigger 1: 0632
Enter the number of the action sequence that should be triggered: 2
5.
6.
Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
Enter up to two digits for the month in which this trigger should function: 15 (every month)
7.
Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
8.
9.
Enter the first digit for the date in which this trigger should function: 15 (every day)
Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
10. Enter the second digit for the date in which this trigger should function: 15 (every day)
11. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
12. Enter the first digit for the hour at which this trigger should function: 0
13. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
14. Enter the second digit for the hour at which this trigger should function: 6
15. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
16. Enter the first digit for the minute at which this trigger should function: 0
17. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
18. Enter the second digit for the minute at which this trigger should function: 0
19. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
20. Press the ❊ key to exit the programming mode
Section 6 describes the use of the value 15 in a date/time trigger to perform an event every month and/or every day.
The clock and calendar must be set before the time trigger can function. Issue the commands 70 and 71 in the
operating mode, not while in programming mode, and the RFC-1 will prompt for the time and date.
RFC-1
Programming Examples
page 7.4
7.5
Alarm Limits—Analog Channel
In this example we will program Alarm A to monitor telemetry channel 03 with an upper limit of 105.0 and a lower limit
of 090.0 and place a series of alarm calls if either limit is exceeded. The normal reading on this channel is
approximately 100.0.
In this example, we will use the fixed, factory programmed action sequence 9. It is programmed to call all
programmed telephone numbers in sequence. When programming alarm limits, ignore the decimal point and enter
four significant digits. If a channel reading does not have four digits, pad the left side of the number with zeros until
the reading is four digits long. This is the channel reading to use for setting the alarm limits.
1.
Enter the advanced programming mode: 80
2.
Enter the advanced programming security code: 4150
3.
4.
Enter the starting address from the address table for alarm A: 0852
Enter the first digit of the telemetry channel to be monitored: 0
5.
6.
Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
Enter the second digit of the telemetry channel to be monitored: 3
7.
Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
8.
9.
From Section 6, enter the number of the trigger rule: 5 (upper or lower limit crossing)
Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
10. Enter the number of the Action Sequence that should be triggered: 9 (place telephone calls)
11. Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
12. Enter the first digit of the upper limit: 1
13. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
14. Enter the second digit of the upper limit: 0
15. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
16. Enter the third digit of the upper limit: 5
17. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
18. Enter the fourth digit of the upper limit: 0
19. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
20. Enter the first digit of the lower limit: 0
21. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
22. Enter the second digit of the lower limit: 9
23. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
24. Enter the third digit of the lower limit: 0
25. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
26. Enter the fourth digit of the lower limit: 0
27. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
28. Press the ❊ key to exit the programming mode
Alarms A-H in the RFC-1 can be reprogrammed using the basic programming commands 90-97 respectively. Only
the channel number and limits can be changed with the basic programming commands. Changing the trigger rule
and action sequence require using the advanced programming mode.
In the factory default settings, all alarms trigger action sequence 9, which is programmed to call all available
telephone numbers. In later examples we will program telephone numbers to complete the alarm setup.
There is a master on/off switch for the telemetry alarm system. Adjust this setting with the command 82. A value of 0
disables all telemetry alarms and the value 1 enables the telemetry alarms.
RFC-1
Programming Examples
page 7.5
7.6
Alarm Limits—Status Channel
In this example we will program Alarm B to monitor telemetry channel 05 for the loss of voltage on a status channel.
The alarm will have an upper limit of “9999” and a lower limit of “0500”. This might be the case if an audio failsafe is
monitoring presence of an audio signal. The output of the failsafe is connected so that 5 volts DC is applied to the
telemetry input when audio is present and 0 volts DC is applied when audio fails.
In this case the upper limit is not needed. The upper limit 9999 is used because it is so high it will never be able to
trip this alarm. The lower limit does the work in this example but the value is not critical—any value from 0100 to
1000 would work.
When the channel reading goes from “status on” to “status off”, the equivalent analog reading goes from above 2000
to 0. The midpoint of that range (~1000) is where the status reading actually changes. So the value 0500 is selected
because it is below the trip point and large enough so that it must be crossed as the analog data drops to 0000.
1.
Enter the advanced programming mode: 80
2.
Enter the advanced programming security code: 4150
3.
4.
Enter the starting address from the address table for alarm B: 0864
Enter the first digit of the telemetry channel to be monitored: 0
5.
6.
Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
Enter the second digit of the telemetry channel to be monitored: 5
7.
Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
8.
9.
From Section 6, enter the number of the trigger rule: 7 (lower limit crossing only, 5 also works)
Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
10. Enter the number of the action sequence that should be triggered: 9 (place telephone calls)
11. Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
12. Enter the first digit of the upper limit: 9
13. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
14. Enter the second digit of the upper limit: 9
15. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
16. Enter the third digit of the upper limit: 9
17. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
18. Enter the fourth digit of the upper limit: 9
19. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
20. Enter the first digit of the lower limit: 0
21. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
22. Enter the second digit of the lower limit: 5
23. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
24. Enter the third digit of the lower limit: 0
25. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
26. Enter the fourth digit of the lower limit: 0
27. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
28. Press the ❊ key to exit the programming mode
The reverse of this alarm would trigger when 5 volts DC is applied and the channel reading is “status on”. The alarm
limits would be “1500” for the upper limit, “0000” for the lower limit and either trigger rule 5 or 6 would work.
The telemetry channel requires no special programming—it uses the auto-status feature of the RFC-1. The channel
is calibrated so that it reads “status on” when the voltage is applied and “status off” when the voltage is removed.
RFC-1
Programming Examples
page 7.6
7.7
Voice Mode Telephone Number
In this example we will program Telephone Number A with a voice number to call when an alarm occurs. We will use
the fictitious telephone number 615-555-1212. Since this telephone number is only 10 digits long and the RFC-1 can
dial up to 12 digits, we will pad the end of the number with the value 10 to represent an unused digit. Since this is a
voice number and it might be busy, we will set the number of call attempts to 2.
1.
Enter the advanced programming mode: 80
2.
3.
Enter the advanced programming security code: 4150
Enter the starting address from the address table for Telephone Number A: 0640
4.
5.
Enter the first digit of the telephone number: 6
Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
6.
Enter the second digit of the telephone number: 1
7.
8.
Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
Enter the third digit of the telephone number: 5
9.
Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
10. Enter the fourth digit of the telephone number: 5
11. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
12. Enter the fifth digit of the telephone number: 5
13. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
14. Enter the sixth digit of the telephone number: 5
15. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
16. Enter the seventh digit of the telephone number: 1
17. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
18. Enter the eighth digit of the telephone number: 2
19. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
20. Enter the ninth digit of the telephone number: 1
21. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
22. Enter the tenth digit of the telephone number: 2
23. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
24. Enter the eleventh digit of the telephone number (unused): 10
25. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
26. Enter the twelfth digit of the telephone number (unused): 10
27. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
28. Enter the calling mode for this telephone number (voice): 0
29. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
30. Enter the number of call attempts for this telephone number: 3
31. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
32. Press the ❊ key to exit the programming mode
Telephone numbers A-D can be programmed through basic programming commands 86-89 respectively. The calling
mode and number of attempts are not adjustable through basic programming but the factory settings are appropriate
for most installations. The factory setting for all telephone numbers is for voice mode and two call attempts.
RFC-1
Programming Examples
page 7.7
7.8
Text Pager—Voice Mode
In this example we will program Telephone Number B with a voice pager number to call when an alarm occurs. We
will use the fictitious telephone number 555-1212 for the pager number. Text pager calls require a site ID number to
be programmed at Telephone Number E. We will use 228-3500 for the site ID number. Unused digits will be filled
with the value 10. And because this telephone number dials a paging system, which is not likely to be busy, we will
set the call attempts to 1.
The RFC-1 can optionally send the channel number that caused the alarm when it sends a message to a text pager
in voice mode. Programming the value 11 after the site ID number activates this feature. This feature may not be
compatible with all paging systems. In this example, we will include this option.
Some paging systems require the user to send the # key to terminate the message. The RFC-1 can send the # key
by programming the value 12 as the last digit of the site ID number. This feature is not necessary for all paging
systems. In this example, we will include this option.
1.
Enter the advanced programming mode: 80
2.
Enter the advanced programming security code: 4150
3.
4.
Enter the starting address from the address table for telephone number B: 0654
Enter the first digit of the telephone number: 5
5.
6.
Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
Enter the second digit of the telephone number: 5
7.
Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
8.
9.
Enter the third digit of the telephone number: 5
Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
10. Enter the fourth digit of the telephone number: 1
11. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
12. Enter the fifth digit of the telephone number: 2
13. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
14. Enter the sixth digit of the telephone number: 1
15. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
16. Enter the seventh digit of the telephone number: 2
17. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
18. Enter the eighth digit of the telephone number (unused): 10
19. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
20. Enter the ninth digit of the telephone number (unused): 10
21. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
22. Enter the tenth digit of the telephone number (unused): 10
23. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
24. Enter the eleventh digit of the telephone number (unused): 10
25. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
26. Enter the twelfth digit of the telephone number (unused): 10
27. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
28. Enter the calling mode for this telephone number (text pager in voice mode): 3
29. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
30. Enter the number of call attempts for this telephone number: 1
31. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
This example continues on the next page.
RFC-1
Programming Examples
page 7.8
The pager number is programmed. Jump to a new address to program the site ID number. This is the telephone
number of the site where the RFC-1 is installed. Any number that helps you identify the specific site should work but
many paging systems require a telephone number.
32. Jump to a new address in advanced programming mode: 80
33. Enter the starting address from the address table for Telephone Number E: 0696
34. Enter the first digit of the telephone number: 10
35. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
36. Enter the second digit of the telephone number: 2
37. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
38. Enter the third digit of the telephone number: 2
39. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
40. Enter the fourth digit of the telephone number: 8
41. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
42. Enter the fifth digit of the telephone number: 3
43. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
44. Enter the sixth digit of the telephone number: 5
45. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
46. Enter the seventh digit of the telephone number: 0
47. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
48. Enter the eighth digit of the telephone number: 0
49. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
50. Enter the ninth digit of the telephone number (optional alarm channel display): 11
51. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
52. Enter the tenth digit of the telephone number (optional # key terminator): 12
53. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
54. Enter the eleventh digit of the telephone number (unused): 10
55. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
56. Enter the twelfth digit of the telephone number (unused): 10
57. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
58. Press the ❊ key to exit the programming mode
The first digit of the site ID number at memory address 0696 must be 10. This stops the calling routine from dialing
the site ID as a contact telephone number. It would be useless to have the site call itself to report an alarm.
It is not necessary to program any specific values for the call mode or number of attempts for telephone number E
(addresses 0708 or 0709). They are ignored when this area is used to store a site ID for paging.
RFC-1
Programming Examples
page 7.9
7.9
Logging Readings—Local Printer
In this example we will program Action Sequence 3 to print a set of readings on a local printer (connected to a PA-1/2
or an RAK-1) and we will program Date/Time Trigger 2 to activate the action sequence hourly at 10 minutes past the
hour to automatically log the transmitter readings.
1.
Enter the advanced programming mode: 80
2.
Enter the advanced programming security code: 4150
3.
4.
Enter the starting address from the address table for Action Sequence 3: 0756
From Section 6, find the command for local printing and get V1 and V2: V1=8, V2=8
5.
6.
Enter V1 for the local print command: 8
Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
7.
Enter V2 for the local print command: 8
8.
Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
The action sequence is programmed. Jump to a new address to program the date/time trigger.
9.
Enter the advanced programming mode command to jump to a new address: 80
10. Enter the starting address from the address table for Date/Time Trigger 2: 0624
11. Enter the number of the action sequence that should be triggered: 3 (programmed above)
12. Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
13. Enter up to two digits for the month in which this trigger should function: 15 (every month)
14. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
15. Enter the first digit for the date in which this trigger should function: 15 (every day)
16. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
17. Enter the second digit for the date in which this trigger should function: 15 (every day)
18. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
19. Enter the first digit for the hour at which this trigger should function: 15 (every hour)
20. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
21. Enter the second digit for the hour at which this trigger should function: 15 (every hour)
22. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
23. Enter the first digit for the minute at which this trigger should function: 1
24. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
25. Enter the second digit for the minute at which this trigger should function: 0
26. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
27. Press the ❊ key to exit the programming mode
Printing to a remote printer is similar except that the action sequence command is 8-9 and a telephone number must
be programmed at Telephone Number F. See Section 6 for details.
Section 6 describes the use of the value 15 in a date/time trigger to perform an event every month and/or every day.
Readings will be printed from channel 00 to the auto-scan stop channel. The auto-scan stop channel is programmed
at addresses 1010-1011. The default setting is channel 07.
The clock and calendar must be set before the time trigger can function. Issue the commands 70 and 71 in the
operating mode, not while in programming mode, and the RFC-1 will prompt for the time and date.
RFC-1
Programming Examples
page 7.10
7.10
Tower Light Alarm
In this example we will program an alarm to monitor a telemetry channel that has a sample from a tower lighting
system. We will use channel 06 as our telemetry input. It is programmed to read “100.0 percent” when all lights are
operating properly—this is a direct reading from the telemetry sample programmed with the unit word “percent”.
Alarm C will be programmed to monitor channel 06 for 10 percent over and 10 percent under. Adjust the alarm limits
to suit your system.
1.
Enter the advanced programming mode: 80
2.
3.
Enter the advanced programming security code: 4150
Enter the starting address from the address table for Alarm C: 0876
4.
Enter the first digit of the telemetry channel to be monitored: 0
5.
6.
Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
Enter the second digit of the telemetry channel to be monitored: 6
7.
8.
Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
From Section 6, enter the number of the trigger rule: 5
9.
Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
10. Enter the number of the Action Sequence that should be triggered: 1
11. Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
12. Enter the first digit of the upper limit: 1
13. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
14. Enter the second digit of the upper limit: 1
15. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
16. Enter the third digit of the upper limit: 0
17. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
18. Enter the fourth digit of the upper limit: 0
19. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
20. Enter the first digit of the lower limit: 0
21. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
22. Enter the second digit of the lower limit: 9
23. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
24. Enter the third digit of the lower limit: 0
25. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
26. Enter the fourth digit of the lower limit: 0
27. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
28. Press the ❊ key to exit the programming mode
Alarms A-H in the RFC-1 can be reprogrammed using the basic programming commands 90-97 respectively. Only
the channel number and limits can be changed with the basic programming commands. Changing the trigger rule
and action sequence require using the advanced programming mode. This example could also have been
programmed with the command 92 since both the trigger rule and action sequence use the default values.
In the factory default settings, all alarms trigger action sequence 9, which is programmed to call all available
telephone numbers.
There is a master on/off switch for the telemetry alarm system. Adjust this setting with the command 82. A value of 0
disables all telemetry alarms and the value 1 enables the telemetry alarms.
In the next example we will program an alarm block that disables the tower light alarm during daylight hours.
RFC-1
Programming Examples
page 7.11
7.11
Tower Light Alarm Block—Daylight Hours
In this example we will program an alarm block that disables the telemetry alarm programmed in the previous
example. In this case we want to block the tower light alarm so that it is not active during daylight hours. The block is
not necessary if you are using an ACM-2 AC Current Monitor and have a daylight sensor connected to the
appropriate inputs. The daylight sensor is the preferred method but the alarm block is effective if programmed
properly.
Alarm blocks share memory space with the date/time triggers. The alarm block will be programmed at Date/Time
Trigger 2. We will block the alarm from 6 am to 6 pm every day of the week during the month of April. These are
fictitious times chosen for the example. Choose times appropriate for your installation and region.
1.
Enter the advanced programming mode: 80
2.
Enter the advanced programming security code: 4150
3.
4.
Enter the starting address from the address table for Date/Time Trigger 2: 0624
Enter the value that indicates that this is an alarm block rather than a time trigger: 15
5.
6.
Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
Enter the number representing the alarm to block (1=A, 2=B, 3=C, etc.): 3
7.
Press the # key to enter this value and increment to the next address in memory
8.
9.
Enter up to two digits for the month in which this block should be active: 4 (April)
Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
10. Enter the day of the week on which this block should be active: 15 (every day)
11. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
12. Enter the first digit of the hour at which this alarm block starts: 0
13. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
14. Enter the second digit of the hour at which this alarm block starts: 6
15. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
16. Enter the first digit of the minute at which this alarm block ends: 1
17. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
18. Enter the second digit of the minute at which this alarm block ends: 8
19. Press the # key to write this value and increment to the next address in memory
20. Press the ❊ key to exit the programming mode
The ability to block an alarm during a specific month or on certain days of the week was added in software version 6.
Alarm blocks are available in previous versions but they are active every day of the year. The programming section
of this manual details the options available for blocking alarms.
The alarm channel is scanned even when it is blocked but when the system tries to trigger an alarm during the
blocked hours it is bypassed.
RFC-1
Programming Examples
page 7.12
Section 8 — Troubleshooting and Factory Service
8.1
Problem:
Common Problems and Possible Solutions
The RFC-1 does not power up.
Solutions: With the ribbon cable connecting the RFC-1 and the RP-8 check for a short circuit across the 12 VAC
terminals on the RP-8. Check the wall-plug power supply for 12 VAC.
Problem:
The RFC-1 powers up and responds but telemetry cannot be calibrated.
Solutions: The wrong calibration pot is being adjusted. The telemetry connections count left to right from the rear of
the RP-8 panel, but the pots are counted from right to left as viewed from the front of the panel. Channel
00 is on the far right and channel 07 is on the far left.
The channel may be programmed incorrectly. Check the fourth data location in the programming for the
channel that is not responding. Typically the value should be 0 or 1 but 4 or 5 may also be appropriate.
Other values will cause the channel to be treated as an indirect power channel where the data for the
channel is calculated from the two preceding channels instead of the DC sample on the channel input.
Problem:
Telemetry works but control functions don't work. RFC-1 says, "enter control security code".
Solutions: Read the section on operation completely. The command to enable control relay functions is 66. If the
control security code has been changed from the factory setting, you will need to enter it as well.
Problem:
Telemetry works but control functions don't work. The RFC-1 drops the line when a control is activated.
Solutions: This is a symptom of lightning damage. This problem can be caused by many component failures. The
most common are D18 and D19 on the relay panel; U1, U2 or U3 on the relay panel; or U6 in the main
system.
Problem:
One or more telemetry channels always read "status off” regardless of the voltage on the sample.
Solutions: Telemetry samples are polarity sensitive. Make sure that the telemetry sample is connected properly.
The calibration pot may be turned all the way down. These pots are 22 turns from end to end. They do
not stop turning at the ends. A clutch protects the internal mechanism.
When a system is damaged by lightning, it may be unable to switch the relays necessary to select a
telemetry sample. The system will need to be repaired by a knowledgeable technician.
Problem:
One or more telemetry channels always reads "status on" regardless of the voltage on the sample.
Solutions: The calibration pot is turned up too high. These pots are 22 turns from end to end. They do not stop
turning at the ends. A clutch protects the internal mechanism.
When a system is damaged by lightning, it may be unable to switch the relays necessary to select a
telemetry sample. The system will need to be repaired by a knowledgeable technician.
RFC-1
Troubleshooting and Factory Service
page 8.1
Problem:
There is hum on the line when the RFC-1 answers a call but there is no hum when operated locally.
Solutions: The telephone line may be shorted or the telephone line is too long and is receiving interference. Check
the line. If it is okay, try shielded cable and an off-the-shelf inline filter to eliminate the offending signal.
Depending on the frequency of the interference ferrite beads, filter capacitors or chokes may be
necessary.
Problem:
The RFC-1 operates normally from the local phone but works intermittently from remote locations.
Solutions: Check the telephone line for problems or interference and eliminate any problems on the line. Try
shielded cable and an off-the-shelf inline filter to eliminate the offending signal. Depending on the
frequency of the interference ferrite beads, filter capacitors or chokes may be necessary.
If the RFC-1 only fails to recognize tones from a specific location, it is likely that there is something
unusual about the phones at that site. Many phone systems produce only short tone bursts when a key
is pressed. These tone bursts are typically on the order of about 50ms. The RFC-1 requires 40ms of
clean tone to detect and decode. It only takes about 10ms of distortion to make this fail.
Some
telephone systems (and cellular phones) have longer tones as a programming option.
Line level can also be a factor particularly with cellular phones. The tone detector in the RFC-1 is not
adjustable but passing more signal into the detector can be helpful in this situation. Possible adjustments
to the system vary by board revision. A very detailed discussion is available on our website:
http://www.sinesystems.com.
Problem:
The telephone line to the RFC-1 always rings busy when the RFC-1 is connected to the line. When the
RFC-1 is not connected to the line, the telephone rings normally.
Solutions: It is very likely that memory address 0996 was overwritten by accident when the site ID phrase was
reprogrammed. Reprogram address with the value “1” and the RFC-1 should return to normal operation.
Here is the procedure step by step. Enter the keystrokes in bold type.
1.
Connect with the RFC-1/B from the local phone
2.
3.
Enter the programming mode: 80
The RFC-1/B will prompt for the advanced programming security code: 4150
4.
5.
The RFC-1/B will prompt for a four digit address: 0996
The RFC-1/B will repeat the address and wait for a command
6.
Enter the correct value and press the pound key (#): 1#
7.
8.
Exit the programming mode by pressing the star (*) key: *
Disconnect from the RFC-1/B and hang up: 99
Problem:
A latching control relay contact is needed and the RFC-1 control relays only momentary activation.
Solutions: The RFC-1 cannot latch the control relays. An outboard latching relay is required. A dual-coil, latching
relay is probably easiest to connect. Select the coil and contact ratings as required for the specific
installation. Use the RFC-1 control relays to switch the control voltage to the coils of the latching relay.
RFC-1
Troubleshooting and Factory Service
page 8.2
8.2
Factory Service Policy
Terms are subject to change without prior notice.
8.2.1
Warranty
Sine Systems, Inc. guarantees our products to be free from manufacturing defect for a period of one year from the
original date of purchase from Sine Systems, Inc. This warranty covers the parts and labor necessary to repair the
product to factory specifications.
This warranty does not cover damage by lightning, normal wear, misuse, neglect, improper installation, failure to
follow instructions, accidents, alterations, unauthorized repair, damage during transit, fire, flood, tornado, hurricane or
acts of God and/or nature.
Warranty Service
There is no charge for repair service on items covered under warranty. The customer is responsible for payment of
shipping charges to return equipment to Sine Systems for service. Damage due to negligence, lightning or other acts
of nature are not considered warranty issues.
Service Policy
Sine Systems offers same day repair service on all of our products. We typically repair and return products within 24
hours of arrival whenever it is feasible to do so. Because we offer immediate service, we do not provide loaner
equipment. If we cannot immediately repair a product, we may offer other options at our discretion.
Sine Systems does not require prior authorization on repairs. See the factory repair service page on our website,
www.sinesystems.com, for details on returning products for service. Sine Systems is not responsible for items lost in
transport or delivered to an incorrect address.
8.2.2
Return Policy
This policy only applies to equipment purchased directly from Sine Systems, Inc. Equipment purchased through a
third party vendor (dealer) is subject to the return policy of the vendor. Arrangements for return or exchange must be
handled through the vendor.
Sine Systems policy on returns and exchanges with the factory is broken down according to the following schedule:
30 days
Items may be returned within thirty days from the date that they ship from our factory. Sine Systems will apply a full
refund, less shipping charges, provided that the equipment is in new condition. There must be no cosmetic damage,
all accessories must be included and unopened and all manuals must be included and undamaged. If any items are
missing, damaged or opened, a 5% restocking fee will be applied.
60 days
Items may be returned within sixty days from the date that they ship from our factory. Sine Systems will apply 15%
restocking fee. This fee covers the cost of returning the items to new condition, replacing accessories, replacing
manuals and re-packaging. These items must eventually be sold as reconditioned instead of new.
Beyond 60 days
After sixty days, Sine Systems will recondition the equipment according to our repair policy but we will not accept it
for return or exchange.
RFC-1
Troubleshooting and Factory Service
page 8.3
Section 9 — Specifications
9.1
RFC-I Remote Facilities Controller
9.1.1
Connections
Relay panel: 16-conductor 0.1" pitch pin/plug
Telephone:
RJ-11C modular connector
Local phone: RJ-11C modular connector
9.1.2
Indicators
Power: green LED
9.1.3
Power
Voltage: 12 Volts AC supplied by wall-plug transformer
Current: 250mA nominal, ~750mA maximum
9.1.4
Dimensions
Size:
19" (w) x 6.5" (d) x 1.75" (h)
Weight: 1.5 Ibs.
9.1.5
Environmental
This device does not generate a significant amount of heat. It should only be installed indoors in a dry environment.
This device complies with the limits for a Class B computing device pursuant to Subpart J of Part 15 of FCC Rules.
9.2
RP-8 Relay Panel
9.2.1
Connections
Relay panel:
Telemetry input:
Control output:
Power input:
9.2.2
input/output via 16-conductor 0.1" pitch pin/plug
2-position removable screw-terminal connectors
3-position removable screw-terminal connectors
2-position removable screw-terminal connector
Power
Voltage: 10 volts DC unregulated supplied by RFC-1
9.2.3
Dimensions
Size:
19" (w) x 2.0" (d) x 3.5" (h)
Weight: 1.5 Ibs.
9.2.4
Telemetry
Minimum input:
Maximum input:
Typical input:
Offset input:
Impedance:
Resolution:
9.2.5
Control
Relay contacts:
RFC-1
1 VDC to attain a full-scale reading
10 VDC absolute maximum
0-5 VDC range
30 VDC offset from ground
-50K ohms
1 part in 1020 minimum with accuracy of 0.5% of programmed full scale
120 VAC, 5 amps resistive / 2 amps inductive absolute maximum
Specifications
page 9.1
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
- Programming Section Default Current
Address Description
0000
0001
0002
0003
0004
0005
0006
0007
0008
0009
0010
0011
0012
0013
0014
0015
0016
0017
0018
0019
0020
0021
0022
0023
0024
0025
0026
0027
0028
0029
0030
0031
0032
0033
0034
0035
0036
0037
0038
0039
0040
0041
0042
0043
0044
0045
0046
0047
RFC-1
Channel 00: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 00: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 00: full scale and decimal point
Channel 00: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 01: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 01: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 01: full scale and decimal point
Channel 01: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 02: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 02: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 02: full scale and decimal point
Channel 02: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 03: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 03: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 03: full scale and decimal point
Channel 03: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 04: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 04: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 04: full scale and decimal point
Channel 04: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 05: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 05: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 05: full scale and decimal point
Channel 05: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 06: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 06: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 06: full scale and decimal point
Channel 06: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 07: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 07: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 07: full scale and decimal point
Channel 07: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 08: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 08: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 08: full scale and decimal point
Channel 08: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 09: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 09: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 09: full scale and decimal point
Channel 09: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 10: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 10: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 10: full scale and decimal point
Channel 10: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 11: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 11: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 11: full scale and decimal point
Channel 11: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
Programming Address Table
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Alternate Use / Notes
Date/time 80: action sequence
Date/time 80: month
Date/time 80: date - value 1
Date/time 80: date - value 2
Date/time 80: hour - value 1
Date/time 80: hour - value 2
Date/time 80: minute - value 1
Date/time 80: minute - value 2
Date/time 79: action sequence
Date/time 79: month
Date/time 79: date - value 1
Date/time 79: date - value 2
Date/time 79: hour - value 1
Date/time 79: hour - value 2
Date/time 79: minute - value 1
Date/time 79: minute - value 2
Date/time 78: action sequence
Date/time 78: month
Date/time 78: date - value 1
Date/time 78: date - value 2
Date/time 78: hour - value 1
Date/time 78: hour - value 2
Date/time 78: minute - value 1
Date/time 78: minute - value 2
Date/time 77: action sequence
Date/time 77: month
Date/time 77: date - value 1
Date/time 77: date - value 2
Date/time 77: hour - value 1
Date/time 77: hour - value 2
Date/time 77: minute - value 1
Date/time 77: minute - value 2
Date/time 76: action sequence
Date/time 76: month
Date/time 76: date - value 1
Date/time 76: date - value 2
Date/time 76: hour - value 1
Date/time 76: hour - value 2
Date/time 76: minute - value 1
Date/time 76: minute - value 2
Date/time 75: action sequence
Date/time 75: month
Date/time 75: date - value 1
Date/time 75: date - value 2
Date/time 75: hour - value 1
Date/time 75: hour - value 2
Date/time 75: minute - value 1
Date/time 75: minute - value 2
page A.1
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
- Programming Section Default Current
Address Description
0048
0049
0050
0051
0052
0053
0054
0055
0056
0057
0058
0059
0060
0061
0062
0063
0064
0065
0066
0067
0068
0069
0070
0071
0072
0073
0074
0075
0076
0077
0078
0079
0080
0081
0082
0083
0084
0085
0086
0087
0088
0089
0090
0091
0092
0093
0094
0095
RFC-1
Channel 12: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 12: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 12: full scale and decimal point
Channel 12: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 13: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 13: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 13: full scale and decimal point
Channel 13: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 14: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 14: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 14: full scale and decimal point
Channel 14: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 15: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 15: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 15: full scale and decimal point
Channel 15: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 16: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 16: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 16: full scale and decimal point
Channel 16: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 17: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 17: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 17: full scale and decimal point
Channel 17: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 18: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 18: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 18: full scale and decimal point
Channel 18: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 19: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 19: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 19: full scale and decimal point
Channel 19: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 20: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 20: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 20: full scale and decimal point
Channel 20: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 21: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 21: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 21: full scale and decimal point
Channel 21: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 22: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 22: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 22: full scale and decimal point
Channel 22: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 23: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 23: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 23: full scale and decimal point
Channel 23: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
Programming Address Table
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Alternate Use / Notes
Date/time 74: action sequence
Date/time 74: month
Date/time 74: date - value 1
Date/time 74: date - value 2
Date/time 74: hour - value 1
Date/time 74: hour - value 2
Date/time 74: minute - value 1
Date/time 74: minute - value 2
Date/time 73: action sequence
Date/time 73: month
Date/time 73: date - value 1
Date/time 73: date - value 2
Date/time 73: hour - value 1
Date/time 73: hour - value 2
Date/time 73: minute - value 1
Date/time 73: minute - value 2
Date/time 72: action sequence
Date/time 72: month
Date/time 72: date - value 1
Date/time 72: date - value 2
Date/time 72: hour - value 1
Date/time 72: hour - value 2
Date/time 72: minute - value 1
Date/time 72: minute - value 2
Date/time 71: action sequence
Date/time 71: month
Date/time 71: date - value 1
Date/time 71: date - value 2
Date/time 71: hour - value 1
Date/time 71: hour - value 2
Date/time 71: minute - value 1
Date/time 71: minute - value 2
Date/time 70: action sequence
Date/time 70: month
Date/time 70: date - value 1
Date/time 70: date - value 2
Date/time 70: hour - value 1
Date/time 70: hour - value 2
Date/time 70: minute - value 1
Date/time 70: minute - value 2
Date/time 69: action sequence
Date/time 69: month
Date/time 69: date - value 1
Date/time 69: date - value 2
Date/time 69: hour - value 1
Date/time 69: hour - value 2
Date/time 69: minute - value 1
Date/time 69: minute - value 2
page A.2
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
- Programming Section Default Current
Address Description
0096
0097
0098
0099
0100
0101
0102
0103
0104
0105
0106
0107
0108
0109
0110
0111
0112
0113
0114
0115
0116
0117
0118
0119
0120
0121
0122
0123
0124
0125
0126
0127
0128
0129
0130
0131
0132
0133
0134
0135
0136
0137
0138
0139
0140
0141
0142
0143
RFC-1
Channel 24: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 24: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 24: full scale and decimal point
Channel 24: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 25: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 25: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 25: full scale and decimal point
Channel 25: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 26: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 26: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 26: full scale and decimal point
Channel 26: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 27: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 27: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 27: full scale and decimal point
Channel 27: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 28: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 28: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 28: full scale and decimal point
Channel 28: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 29: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 29: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 29: full scale and decimal point
Channel 29: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 30: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 30: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 30: full scale and decimal point
Channel 30: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 31: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 31: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 31: full scale and decimal point
Channel 31: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 32: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 32: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 32: full scale and decimal point
Channel 32: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 33: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 33: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 33: full scale and decimal point
Channel 33: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 34: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 34: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 34: full scale and decimal point
Channel 34: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 35: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 35: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 35: full scale and decimal point
Channel 35: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
Programming Address Table
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Alternate Use / Notes
Date/time 68: action sequence
Date/time 68: month
Date/time 68: date - value 1
Date/time 68: date - value 2
Date/time 68: hour - value 1
Date/time 68: hour - value 2
Date/time 68: minute - value 1
Date/time 68: minute - value 2
Date/time 67: action sequence
Date/time 67: month
Date/time 67: date - value 1
Date/time 67: date - value 2
Date/time 67: hour - value 1
Date/time 67: hour - value 2
Date/time 67: minute - value 1
Date/time 67: minute - value 2
Date/time 66: action sequence
Date/time 66: month
Date/time 66: date - value 1
Date/time 66: date - value 2
Date/time 66: hour - value 1
Date/time 66: hour - value 2
Date/time 66: minute - value 1
Date/time 66: minute - value 2
Date/time 65: action sequence
Date/time 65: month
Date/time 65: date - value 1
Date/time 65: date - value 2
Date/time 65: hour - value 1
Date/time 65: hour - value 2
Date/time 65: minute - value 1
Date/time 65: minute - value 2
Date/time 64: action sequence
Date/time 64: month
Date/time 64: date - value 1
Date/time 64: date - value 2
Date/time 64: hour - value 1
Date/time 64: hour - value 2
Date/time 64: minute - value 1
Date/time 64: minute - value 2
Date/time 63: action sequence
Date/time 63: month
Date/time 63: date - value 1
Date/time 63: date - value 2
Date/time 63: hour - value 1
Date/time 63: hour - value 2
Date/time 63: minute - value 1
Date/time 63: minute - value 2
page A.3
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
- Programming Section Default Current
Address Description
0144
0145
0146
0147
0148
0149
0150
0151
0152
0153
0154
0155
0156
0157
0158
0159
0160
0161
0162
0163
0164
0165
0166
0167
0168
0169
0170
0171
0172
0173
0174
0175
0176
0177
0178
0179
0180
0181
0182
0183
0184
0185
0186
0187
0188
0189
0190
0191
RFC-1
Channel 36: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 36: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 36: full scale and decimal point
Channel 36: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 37: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 37: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 37: full scale and decimal point
Channel 37: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 38: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 38: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 38: full scale and decimal point
Channel 38: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 39: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 39: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 39: full scale and decimal point
Channel 39: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 40: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 40: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 40: full scale and decimal point
Channel 40: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 41: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 41: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 41: full scale and decimal point
Channel 41: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 42: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 42: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 42: full scale and decimal point
Channel 42: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 43: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 43: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 43: full scale and decimal point
Channel 43: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 44: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 44: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 44: full scale and decimal point
Channel 44: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 45: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 45: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 45: full scale and decimal point
Channel 45: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 46: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 46: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 46: full scale and decimal point
Channel 46: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 47: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 47: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 47: full scale and decimal point
Channel 47: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
Programming Address Table
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Alternate Use / Notes
Date/time 62: action sequence
Date/time 62: month
Date/time 62: date - value 1
Date/time 62: date - value 2
Date/time 62: hour - value 1
Date/time 62: hour - value 2
Date/time 62: minute - value 1
Date/time 62: minute - value 2
Date/time 61: action sequence
Date/time 61: month
Date/time 61: date - value 1
Date/time 61: date - value 2
Date/time 61: hour - value 1
Date/time 61: hour - value 2
Date/time 61: minute - value 1
Date/time 61: minute - value 2
Date/time 60: action sequence
Date/time 60: month
Date/time 60: date - value 1
Date/time 60: date - value 2
Date/time 60: hour - value 1
Date/time 60: hour - value 2
Date/time 60: minute - value 1
Date/time 60: minute - value 2
Date/time 59: action sequence
Date/time 59: month
Date/time 59: date - value 1
Date/time 59: date - value 2
Date/time 59: hour - value 1
Date/time 59: hour - value 2
Date/time 59: minute - value 1
Date/time 59: minute - value 2
Date/time 58: action sequence
Date/time 58: month
Date/time 58: date - value 1
Date/time 58: date - value 2
Date/time 58: hour - value 1
Date/time 58: hour - value 2
Date/time 58: minute - value 1
Date/time 58: minute - value 2
Date/time 57: action sequence
Date/time 57: month
Date/time 57: date - value 1
Date/time 57: date - value 2
Date/time 57: hour - value 1
Date/time 57: hour - value 2
Date/time 57: minute - value 1
Date/time 57: minute - value 2
page A.4
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
- Programming Section Default Current
Address Description
0192
0193
0194
0195
0196
0197
0198
0199
0200
0201
0202
0203
0204
0205
0206
0207
0208
0209
0210
0211
0212
0213
0214
0215
0216
0217
0218
0219
0220
0221
0222
0223
0224
0225
0226
0227
0228
0229
0230
0231
0232
0233
0234
0235
0236
0237
0238
0239
RFC-1
Channel 48: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 48: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 48: full scale and decimal point
Channel 48: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 49: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 49: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 49: full scale and decimal point
Channel 49: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 50: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 50: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 50: full scale and decimal point
Channel 50: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 51: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 51: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 51: full scale and decimal point
Channel 51: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 52: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 52: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 52: full scale and decimal point
Channel 52: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 53: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 53: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 53: full scale and decimal point
Channel 53: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 54: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 54: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 54: full scale and decimal point
Channel 54: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 55: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 55: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 55: full scale and decimal point
Channel 55: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 56: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 56: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 56: full scale and decimal point
Channel 56: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 57: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 57: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 57: full scale and decimal point
Channel 57: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 58: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 58: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 58: full scale and decimal point
Channel 58: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 59: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 59: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 59: full scale and decimal point
Channel 59: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
Programming Address Table
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Alternate Use / Notes
Date/time 56: action sequence
Date/time 56: month
Date/time 56: date - value 1
Date/time 56: date - value 2
Date/time 56: hour - value 1
Date/time 56: hour - value 2
Date/time 56: minute - value 1
Date/time 56: minute - value 2
Date/time 55: action sequence
Date/time 55: month
Date/time 55: date - value 1
Date/time 55: date - value 2
Date/time 55: hour - value 1
Date/time 55: hour - value 2
Date/time 55: minute - value 1
Date/time 55: minute - value 2
Date/time 54: action sequence
Date/time 54: month
Date/time 54: date - value 1
Date/time 54: date - value 2
Date/time 54: hour - value 1
Date/time 54: hour - value 2
Date/time 54: minute - value 1
Date/time 54: minute - value 2
Date/time 53: action sequence
Date/time 53: month
Date/time 53: date - value 1
Date/time 53: date - value 2
Date/time 53: hour - value 1
Date/time 53: hour - value 2
Date/time 53: minute - value 1
Date/time 53: minute - value 2
Date/time 52: action sequence
Date/time 52: month
Date/time 52: date - value 1
Date/time 52: date - value 2
Date/time 52: hour - value 1
Date/time 52: hour - value 2
Date/time 52: minute - value 1
Date/time 52: minute - value 2
Date/time 51: action sequence
Date/time 51: month
Date/time 51: date - value 1
Date/time 51: date - value 2
Date/time 51: hour - value 1
Date/time 51: hour - value 2
Date/time 51: minute - value 1
Date/time 51: minute - value 2
page A.5
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
- Programming Section Default Current
Address Description
Alternate Use / Notes
0240
0241
0242
0243
0244
0245
0246
0247
0248
0249
0250
0251
0252
0253
0254
0255
Channel 60: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 60: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 60: full scale and decimal point
Channel 60: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 61: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 61: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 61: full scale and decimal point
Channel 61: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 62: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 62: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 62: full scale and decimal point
Channel 62: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
Channel 63: telemetry units or status format - value 1
Channel 63: telemetry units or status format - value 2
Channel 63: full scale and decimal point
Channel 63: linear/log/indirect and auto relay
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
6.3.2
6.3.2
6.3.3
6.3.4
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
3
2
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Date/time 50: action sequence
Date/time 50: month
Date/time 50: date - value 1
Date/time 50: date - value 2
Date/time 50: hour - value 1
Date/time 50: hour - value 2
Date/time 50: minute - value 1
Date/time 50: minute - value 2
Date/time 49: action sequence
Date/time 49: month
Date/time 49: date - value 1
Date/time 49: date - value 2
Date/time 49: hour - value 1
Date/time 49: hour - value 2
Date/time 49: minute - value 1
Date/time 49: minute - value 2
0256
0257
0258
0259
0260
0261
0262
0263
0264
0265
0266
0267
0268
0269
0270
0271
0272
0273
0274
0275
0276
0277
0278
0279
0280
0281
0282
0283
0284
0285
0286
0287
Date/time 48: action sequence
Date/time 48: month
Date/time 48: date - value 1
Date/time 48: date - value 2
Date/time 48: hour - value 1
Date/time 48: hour - value 2
Date/time 48: minute - value 1
Date/time 48: minute - value 2
Date/time 47: action sequence
Date/time 47: month
Date/time 47: date - value 1
Date/time 47: date - value 2
Date/time 47: hour - value 1
Date/time 47: hour - value 2
Date/time 47: minute - value 1
Date/time 47: minute - value 2
Date/time 46: action sequence
Date/time 46: month
Date/time 46: date - value 1
Date/time 46: date - value 2
Date/time 46: hour - value 1
Date/time 46: hour - value 2
Date/time 46: minute - value 1
Date/time 46: minute - value 2
Date/time 45: action sequence
Date/time 45: month
Date/time 45: date - value 1
Date/time 45: date - value 2
Date/time 45: hour - value 1
Date/time 45: hour - value 2
Date/time 45: minute - value 1
Date/time 45: minute - value 2
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Alarm block 48: block indicator
Alarm block 48: alarm
Alarm block 48: month
Alarm block 48: day(s) of week
Alarm block 48: start hour - V1
Alarm block 48: start hour - V2
Alarm block 48: end hour - V1
Alarm block 48: end hour - V2
Alarm block 47: block indicator
Alarm block 47: alarm
Alarm block 47: month
Alarm block 47: day(s) of week
Alarm block 47: start hour - V1
Alarm block 47: start hour - V2
Alarm block 47: end hour - V1
Alarm block 47: end hour - V2
Alarm block 46: block indicator
Alarm block 46: alarm
Alarm block 46: month
Alarm block 46: day(s) of week
Alarm block 46: start hour - V1
Alarm block 46: start hour - V2
Alarm block 46: end hour - V1
Alarm block 46: end hour - V2
Alarm block 45: block indicator
Alarm block 45: alarm
Alarm block 45: month
Alarm block 45: day(s) of week
Alarm block 45: start hour - V1
Alarm block 45: start hour - V2
Alarm block 45: end hour - V1
Alarm block 45: end hour - V2
RFC-1
Programming Address Table
page A.6
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
Address Description
0288
0289
0290
0291
0292
0293
0294
0295
0296
0297
0298
0299
0300
0301
0302
0303
0304
0305
0306
0307
0308
0309
0310
0311
0312
0313
0314
0315
0316
0317
0318
0319
0320
0321
0322
0323
0324
0325
0326
0327
0328
0329
0330
0331
0332
0333
0334
0335
RFC-1
Date/time 44: action sequence
Date/time 44: month
Date/time 44: date - value 1
Date/time 44: date - value 2
Date/time 44: hour - value 1
Date/time 44: hour - value 2
Date/time 44: minute - value 1
Date/time 44: minute - value 2
Date/time 43: action sequence
Date/time 43: month
Date/time 43: date - value 1
Date/time 43: date - value 2
Date/time 43: hour - value 1
Date/time 43: hour - value 2
Date/time 43: minute - value 1
Date/time 43: minute - value 2
Date/time 42: action sequence
Date/time 42: month
Date/time 42: date - value 1
Date/time 42: date - value 2
Date/time 42: hour - value 1
Date/time 42: hour - value 2
Date/time 42: minute - value 1
Date/time 42: minute - value 2
Date/time 41: action sequence
Date/time 41: month
Date/time 41: date - value 1
Date/time 41: date - value 2
Date/time 41: hour - value 1
Date/time 41: hour - value 2
Date/time 41: minute - value 1
Date/time 41: minute - value 2
Date/time 40: action sequence
Date/time 40: month
Date/time 40: date - value 1
Date/time 40: date - value 2
Date/time 40: hour - value 1
Date/time 40: hour - value 2
Date/time 40: minute - value 1
Date/time 40: minute - value 2
Date/time 39: action sequence
Date/time 39: month
Date/time 39: date - value 1
Date/time 39: date - value 2
Date/time 39: hour - value 1
Date/time 39: hour - value 2
Date/time 39: minute - value 1
Date/time 39: minute - value 2
- Programming Section Default Current
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
Programming Address Table
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Alternate Use / Notes
Alarm block 44: block indicator
Alarm block 44: alarm
Alarm block 44: month
Alarm block 44: day(s) of week
Alarm block 44: start hour - V1
Alarm block 44: start hour - V2
Alarm block 44: end hour - V1
Alarm block 44: end hour - V2
Alarm block 43: block indicator
Alarm block 43: alarm
Alarm block 43: month
Alarm block 43: day(s) of week
Alarm block 43: start hour - V1
Alarm block 43: start hour - V2
Alarm block 43: end hour - V1
Alarm block 43: end hour - V2
Alarm block 42: block indicator
Alarm block 42: alarm
Alarm block 42: month
Alarm block 42: day(s) of week
Alarm block 42: start hour - V1
Alarm block 42: start hour - V2
Alarm block 42: end hour - V1
Alarm block 42: end hour - V2
Alarm block 41: block indicator
Alarm block 41: alarm
Alarm block 41: month
Alarm block 41: day(s) of week
Alarm block 41: start hour - V1
Alarm block 41: start hour - V2
Alarm block 41: end hour - V1
Alarm block 41: end hour - V2
Alarm block 40: block indicator
Alarm block 40: alarm
Alarm block 40: month
Alarm block 40: day(s) of week
Alarm block 40: start hour - V1
Alarm block 40: start hour - V2
Alarm block 40: end hour - V1
Alarm block 40: end hour - V2
Alarm block 39: block indicator
Alarm block 39: alarm
Alarm block 39: month
Alarm block 39: day(s) of week
Alarm block 39: start hour - V1
Alarm block 39: start hour - V2
Alarm block 39: end hour - V1
Alarm block 39: end hour - V2
page A.7
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
Address Description
0336
0337
0338
0339
0340
0341
0342
0343
0344
0345
0346
0347
0348
0349
0350
0351
0352
0353
0354
0355
0356
0357
0358
0359
0360
0361
0362
0363
0364
0365
0366
0367
0368
0369
0370
0371
0372
0373
0374
0375
0376
0377
0378
0379
0380
0381
0382
0383
RFC-1
Date/time 38: action sequence
Date/time 38: month
Date/time 38: date - value 1
Date/time 38: date - value 2
Date/time 38: hour - value 1
Date/time 38: hour - value 2
Date/time 38: minute - value 1
Date/time 38: minute - value 2
Date/time 37: action sequence
Date/time 37: month
Date/time 37: date - value 1
Date/time 37: date - value 2
Date/time 37: hour - value 1
Date/time 37: hour - value 2
Date/time 37: minute - value 1
Date/time 37: minute - value 2
Date/time 36: action sequence
Date/time 36: month
Date/time 36: date - value 1
Date/time 36: date - value 2
Date/time 36: hour - value 1
Date/time 36: hour - value 2
Date/time 36: minute - value 1
Date/time 36: minute - value 2
Date/time 35: action sequence
Date/time 35: month
Date/time 35: date - value 1
Date/time 35: date - value 2
Date/time 35: hour - value 1
Date/time 35: hour - value 2
Date/time 35: minute - value 1
Date/time 35: minute - value 2
Date/time 34: action sequence
Date/time 34: month
Date/time 34: date - value 1
Date/time 34: date - value 2
Date/time 34: hour - value 1
Date/time 34: hour - value 2
Date/time 34: minute - value 1
Date/time 34: minute - value 2
Date/time 33: action sequence
Date/time 33: month
Date/time 33: date - value 1
Date/time 33: date - value 2
Date/time 33: hour - value 1
Date/time 33: hour - value 2
Date/time 33: minute - value 1
Date/time 33: minute - value 2
- Programming Section Default Current
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
Programming Address Table
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Alternate Use / Notes
Alarm block 38: block indicator
Alarm block 38: alarm
Alarm block 38: month
Alarm block 38: day(s) of week
Alarm block 38: start hour - V1
Alarm block 38: start hour - V2
Alarm block 38: end hour - V1
Alarm block 38: end hour - V2
Alarm block 37: block indicator
Alarm block 37: alarm
Alarm block 37: month
Alarm block 37: day(s) of week
Alarm block 37: start hour - V1
Alarm block 37: start hour - V2
Alarm block 37: end hour - V1
Alarm block 37: end hour - V2
Alarm block 36: block indicator
Alarm block 36: alarm
Alarm block 36: month
Alarm block 36: day(s) of week
Alarm block 36: start hour - V1
Alarm block 36: start hour - V2
Alarm block 36: end hour - V1
Alarm block 36: end hour - V2
Alarm block 35: block indicator
Alarm block 35: alarm
Alarm block 35: month
Alarm block 35: day(s) of week
Alarm block 35: start hour - V1
Alarm block 35: start hour - V2
Alarm block 35: end hour - V1
Alarm block 35: end hour - V2
Alarm block 34: block indicator
Alarm block 34: alarm
Alarm block 34: month
Alarm block 34: day(s) of week
Alarm block 34: start hour - V1
Alarm block 34: start hour - V2
Alarm block 34: end hour - V1
Alarm block 34: end hour - V2
Alarm block 33: block indicator
Alarm block 33: alarm
Alarm block 33: month
Alarm block 33: day(s) of week
Alarm block 33: start hour - V1
Alarm block 33: start hour - V2
Alarm block 33: end hour - V1
Alarm block 33: end hour - V2
page A.8
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
Address Description
0384
0385
0386
0387
0388
0389
0390
0391
0392
0393
0394
0395
0396
0397
0398
0399
0400
0401
0402
0403
0404
0405
0406
0407
0408
0409
0410
0411
0412
0413
0414
0415
0416
0417
0418
0419
0420
0421
0422
0423
0424
0425
0426
0427
0428
0429
0430
0431
RFC-1
Date/time 32: action sequence
Date/time 32: month
Date/time 32: date - value 1
Date/time 32: date - value 2
Date/time 32: hour - value 1
Date/time 32: hour - value 2
Date/time 32: minute - value 1
Date/time 32: minute - value 2
Date/time 31: action sequence
Date/time 31: month
Date/time 31: date - value 1
Date/time 31: date - value 2
Date/time 31: hour - value 1
Date/time 31: hour - value 2
Date/time 31: minute - value 1
Date/time 31: minute - value 2
Date/time 30: action sequence
Date/time 30: month
Date/time 30: date - value 1
Date/time 30: date - value 2
Date/time 30: hour - value 1
Date/time 30: hour - value 2
Date/time 30: minute - value 1
Date/time 30: minute - value 2
Date/time 29: action sequence
Date/time 29: month
Date/time 29: date - value 1
Date/time 29: date - value 2
Date/time 29: hour - value 1
Date/time 29: hour - value 2
Date/time 29: minute - value 1
Date/time 29: minute - value 2
Date/time 28: action sequence
Date/time 28: month
Date/time 28: date - value 1
Date/time 28: date - value 2
Date/time 28: hour - value 1
Date/time 28: hour - value 2
Date/time 28: minute - value 1
Date/time 28: minute - value 2
Date/time 27: action sequence
Date/time 27: month
Date/time 27: date - value 1
Date/time 27: date - value 2
Date/time 27: hour - value 1
Date/time 27: hour - value 2
Date/time 27: minute - value 1
Date/time 27: minute - value 2
- Programming Section Default Current
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
Programming Address Table
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Alternate Use / Notes
Alarm block 32: block indicator
Alarm block 32: alarm
Alarm block 32: month
Alarm block 32: day(s) of week
Alarm block 32: start hour - V1
Alarm block 32: start hour - V2
Alarm block 32: end hour - V1
Alarm block 32: end hour - V2
Alarm block 31: block indicator
Alarm block 31: alarm
Alarm block 31: month
Alarm block 31: day(s) of week
Alarm block 31: start hour - V1
Alarm block 31: start hour - V2
Alarm block 31: end hour - V1
Alarm block 31: end hour - V2
Alarm block 30: block indicator
Alarm block 30: alarm
Alarm block 30: month
Alarm block 30: day(s) of week
Alarm block 30: start hour - V1
Alarm block 30: start hour - V2
Alarm block 30: end hour - V1
Alarm block 30: end hour - V2
Alarm block 29: block indicator
Alarm block 29: alarm
Alarm block 29: month
Alarm block 29: day(s) of week
Alarm block 29: start hour - V1
Alarm block 29: start hour - V2
Alarm block 29: end hour - V1
Alarm block 29: end hour - V2
Alarm block 28: block indicator
Alarm block 28: alarm
Alarm block 28: month
Alarm block 28: day(s) of week
Alarm block 28: start hour - V1
Alarm block 28: start hour - V2
Alarm block 28: end hour - V1
Alarm block 28: end hour - V2
Alarm block 27: block indicator
Alarm block 27: alarm
Alarm block 27: month
Alarm block 27: day(s) of week
Alarm block 27: start hour - V1
Alarm block 27: start hour - V2
Alarm block 27: end hour - V1
Alarm block 27: end hour - V2
page A.9
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
Address Description
0432
0433
0434
0435
0436
0437
0438
0439
0440
0441
0442
0443
0444
0445
0446
0447
0448
0449
0450
0451
0452
0453
0454
0455
0456
0457
0458
0459
0460
0461
0462
0463
0464
0465
0466
0467
0468
0469
0470
0471
0472
0473
0474
0475
0476
0477
0478
0479
RFC-1
Date/time 26: action sequence
Date/time 26: month
Date/time 26: date - value 1
Date/time 26: date - value 2
Date/time 26: hour - value 1
Date/time 26: hour - value 2
Date/time 26: minute - value 1
Date/time 26: minute - value 2
Date/time 25: action sequence
Date/time 25: month
Date/time 25: date - value 1
Date/time 25: date - value 2
Date/time 25: hour - value 1
Date/time 25: hour - value 2
Date/time 25: minute - value 1
Date/time 25: minute - value 2
Date/time 24: action sequence
Date/time 24: month
Date/time 24: date - value 1
Date/time 24: date - value 2
Date/time 24: hour - value 1
Date/time 24: hour - value 2
Date/time 24: minute - value 1
Date/time 24: minute - value 2
Date/time 23: action sequence
Date/time 23: month
Date/time 23: date - value 1
Date/time 23: date - value 2
Date/time 23: hour - value 1
Date/time 23: hour - value 2
Date/time 23: minute - value 1
Date/time 23: minute - value 2
Date/time 22: action sequence
Date/time 22: month
Date/time 22: date - value 1
Date/time 22: date - value 2
Date/time 22: hour - value 1
Date/time 22: hour - value 2
Date/time 22: minute - value 1
Date/time 22: minute - value 2
Date/time 21: action sequence
Date/time 21: month
Date/time 21: date - value 1
Date/time 21: date - value 2
Date/time 21: hour - value 1
Date/time 21: hour - value 2
Date/time 21: minute - value 1
Date/time 21: minute - value 2
- Programming Section Default Current
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
Programming Address Table
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Alternate Use / Notes
Alarm block 26: block indicator
Alarm block 26: alarm
Alarm block 26: month
Alarm block 26: day(s) of week
Alarm block 26: start hour - V1
Alarm block 26: start hour - V2
Alarm block 26: end hour - V1
Alarm block 26: end hour - V2
Alarm block 25: block indicator
Alarm block 25: alarm
Alarm block 25: month
Alarm block 25: day(s) of week
Alarm block 25: start hour - V1
Alarm block 25: start hour - V2
Alarm block 25: end hour - V1
Alarm block 25: end hour - V2
Alarm block 24: block indicator
Alarm block 24: alarm
Alarm block 24: month
Alarm block 24: day(s) of week
Alarm block 24: start hour - V1
Alarm block 24: start hour - V2
Alarm block 24: end hour - V1
Alarm block 24: end hour - V2
Alarm block 23: block indicator
Alarm block 23: alarm
Alarm block 23: month
Alarm block 23: day(s) of week
Alarm block 23: start hour - V1
Alarm block 23: start hour - V2
Alarm block 23: end hour - V1
Alarm block 23: end hour - V2
Alarm block 22: block indicator
Alarm block 22: alarm
Alarm block 22: month
Alarm block 22: day(s) of week
Alarm block 22: start hour - V1
Alarm block 22: start hour - V2
Alarm block 22: end hour - V1
Alarm block 22: end hour - V2
Alarm block 21: block indicator
Alarm block 21: alarm
Alarm block 21: month
Alarm block 21: day(s) of week
Alarm block 21: start hour - V1
Alarm block 21: start hour - V2
Alarm block 21: end hour - V1
Alarm block 21: end hour - V2
page A.10
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
Address Description
0480
0481
0482
0483
0484
0485
0486
0487
0488
0489
0490
0491
0492
0493
0494
0495
0496
0497
0498
0499
0500
0501
0502
0503
0504
0505
0506
0507
0508
0509
0510
0511
0512
0513
0514
0515
0516
0517
0518
0519
0520
0521
0522
0523
0524
0525
0526
0527
RFC-1
Date/time 20: action sequence
Date/time 20: month
Date/time 20: date - value 1
Date/time 20: date - value 2
Date/time 20: hour - value 1
Date/time 20: hour - value 2
Date/time 20: minute - value 1
Date/time 20: minute - value 2
Date/time 19: action sequence
Date/time 19: month
Date/time 19: date - value 1
Date/time 19: date - value 2
Date/time 19: hour - value 1
Date/time 19: hour - value 2
Date/time 19: minute - value 1
Date/time 19: minute - value 2
Date/time 18: action sequence
Date/time 18: month
Date/time 18: date - value 1
Date/time 18: date - value 2
Date/time 18: hour - value 1
Date/time 18: hour - value 2
Date/time 18: minute - value 1
Date/time 18: minute - value 2
Date/time 17: action sequence
Date/time 17: month
Date/time 17: date - value 1
Date/time 17: date - value 2
Date/time 17: hour - value 1
Date/time 17: hour - value 2
Date/time 17: minute - value 1
Date/time 17: minute - value 2
Date/time 16: action sequence
Date/time 16: month
Date/time 16: date - value 1
Date/time 16: date - value 2
Date/time 16: hour - value 1
Date/time 16: hour - value 2
Date/time 16: minute - value 1
Date/time 16: minute - value 2
Date/time 15: action sequence
Date/time 15: month
Date/time 15: date - value 1
Date/time 15: date - value 2
Date/time 15: hour - value 1
Date/time 15: hour - value 2
Date/time 15: minute - value 1
Date/time 15: minute - value 2
- Programming Section Default Current
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
Programming Address Table
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Alternate Use / Notes
Alarm block 20: block indicator
Alarm block 20: alarm
Alarm block 20: month
Alarm block 20: day(s) of week
Alarm block 20: start hour - V1
Alarm block 20: start hour - V2
Alarm block 20: end hour - V1
Alarm block 20: end hour - V2
Alarm block 19: block indicator
Alarm block 19: alarm
Alarm block 19: month
Alarm block 19: day(s) of week
Alarm block 19: start hour - V1
Alarm block 19: start hour - V2
Alarm block 19: end hour - V1
Alarm block 19: end hour - V2
Alarm block 18: block indicator
Alarm block 18: alarm
Alarm block 18: month
Alarm block 18: day(s) of week
Alarm block 18: start hour - V1
Alarm block 18: start hour - V2
Alarm block 18: end hour - V1
Alarm block 18: end hour - V2
Alarm block 17: block indicator
Alarm block 17: alarm
Alarm block 17: month
Alarm block 17: day(s) of week
Alarm block 17: start hour - V1
Alarm block 17: start hour - V2
Alarm block 17: end hour - V1
Alarm block 17: end hour - V2
Alarm block 16: block indicator
Alarm block 16: alarm
Alarm block 16: month
Alarm block 16: day(s) of week
Alarm block 16: start hour - V1
Alarm block 16: start hour - V2
Alarm block 16: end hour - V1
Alarm block 16: end hour - V2
Alarm block 15: block indicator
Alarm block 15: alarm
Alarm block 15: month
Alarm block 15: day(s) of week
Alarm block 15: start hour - V1
Alarm block 15: start hour - V2
Alarm block 15: end hour - V1
Alarm block 15: end hour - V2
page A.11
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
Address Description
0528
0529
0530
0531
0532
0533
0534
0535
0536
0537
0538
0539
0540
0541
0542
0543
0544
0545
0546
0547
0548
0549
0550
0551
0552
0553
0554
0555
0556
0557
0558
0559
0560
0561
0562
0563
0564
0565
0566
0567
0568
0569
0570
0571
0572
0573
0574
0575
RFC-1
Date/time 14: action sequence
Date/time 14: month
Date/time 14: date - value 1
Date/time 14: date - value 2
Date/time 14: hour - value 1
Date/time 14: hour - value 2
Date/time 14: minute - value 1
Date/time 14: minute - value 2
Date/time 13: action sequence
Date/time 13: month
Date/time 13: date - value 1
Date/time 13: date - value 2
Date/time 13: hour - value 1
Date/time 13: hour - value 2
Date/time 13: minute - value 1
Date/time 13: minute - value 2
Date/time 12: action sequence
Date/time 12: month
Date/time 12: date - value 1
Date/time 12: date - value 2
Date/time 12: hour - value 1
Date/time 12: hour - value 2
Date/time 12: minute - value 1
Date/time 12: minute - value 2
Date/time 11: action sequence
Date/time 11: month
Date/time 11: date - value 1
Date/time 11: date - value 2
Date/time 11: hour - value 1
Date/time 11: hour - value 2
Date/time 11: minute - value 1
Date/time 11: minute - value 2
Date/time 10: action sequence
Date/time 10: month
Date/time 10: date - value 1
Date/time 10: date - value 2
Date/time 10: hour - value 1
Date/time 10: hour - value 2
Date/time 10: minute - value 1
Date/time 10: minute - value 2
Date/time 9: action sequence
Date/time 9: month
Date/time 9: date - value 1
Date/time 9: date - value 2
Date/time 9: hour - value 1
Date/time 9: hour - value 2
Date/time 9: minute - value 1
Date/time 9: minute - value 2
- Programming Section Default Current
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
Programming Address Table
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Alternate Use / Notes
Alarm block 14: block indicator
Alarm block 14: alarm
Alarm block 14: month
Alarm block 14: day(s) of week
Alarm block 14: start hour - V1
Alarm block 14: start hour - V2
Alarm block 14: end hour - V1
Alarm block 14: end hour - V2
Alarm block 13: block indicator
Alarm block 13: alarm
Alarm block 13: month
Alarm block 13: day(s) of week
Alarm block 13: start hour - V1
Alarm block 13: start hour - V2
Alarm block 13: end hour - V1
Alarm block 13: end hour - V2
Alarm block 12: block indicator
Alarm block 12: alarm
Alarm block 12: month
Alarm block 12: day(s) of week
Alarm block 12: start hour - V1
Alarm block 12: start hour - V2
Alarm block 12: end hour - V1
Alarm block 12: end hour - V2
Alarm block 11: block indicator
Alarm block 11: alarm
Alarm block 11: month
Alarm block 11: day(s) of week
Alarm block 11: start hour - V1
Alarm block 11: start hour - V2
Alarm block 11: end hour - V1
Alarm block 11: end hour - V2
Alarm block 10: block indicator
Alarm block 10: alarm
Alarm block 10: month
Alarm block 10: day(s) of week
Alarm block 10: start hour - V1
Alarm block 10: start hour - V2
Alarm block 10: end hour - V1
Alarm block 10: end hour - V2
Alarm block 9: block indicator
Alarm block 9: alarm
Alarm block 9: month
Alarm block 9: day(s) of week
Alarm block 9: start hour - V1
Alarm block 9: start hour - V2
Alarm block 9: end hour - V1
Alarm block 9: end hour - V2
page A.12
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
Address Description
0576
0577
0578
0579
0580
0581
0582
0583
0584
0585
0586
0587
0588
0589
0590
0591
0592
0593
0594
0595
0596
0597
0598
0599
0600
0601
0602
0603
0604
0605
0606
0607
0608
0609
0610
0611
0612
0613
0614
0615
0616
0617
0618
0619
0620
0621
0622
0623
RFC-1
Date/time 8: action sequence
Date/time 8: month
Date/time 8: date - value 1
Date/time 8: date - value 2
Date/time 8: hour - value 1
Date/time 8: hour - value 2
Date/time 8: minute - value 1
Date/time 8: minute - value 2
Date/time 7: action sequence
Date/time 7: month
Date/time 7: date - value 1
Date/time 7: date - value 2
Date/time 7: hour - value 1
Date/time 7: hour - value 2
Date/time 7: minute - value 1
Date/time 7: minute - value 2
Date/time 6: action sequence
Date/time 6: month
Date/time 6: date - value 1
Date/time 6: date - value 2
Date/time 6: hour - value 1
Date/time 6: hour - value 2
Date/time 6: minute - value 1
Date/time 6: minute - value 2
Date/time 5: action sequence
Date/time 5: month
Date/time 5: date - value 1
Date/time 5: date - value 2
Date/time 5: hour - value 1
Date/time 5: hour - value 2
Date/time 5: minute - value 1
Date/time 5: minute - value 2
Date/time 4: action sequence
Date/time 4: month
Date/time 4: date - value 1
Date/time 4: date - value 2
Date/time 4: hour - value 1
Date/time 4: hour - value 2
Date/time 4: minute - value 1
Date/time 4: minute - value 2
Date/time 3: action sequence
Date/time 3: month
Date/time 3: date - value 1
Date/time 3: date - value 2
Date/time 3: hour - value 1
Date/time 3: hour - value 2
Date/time 3: minute - value 1
Date/time 3: minute - value 2
- Programming Section Default Current
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
Programming Address Table
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Alternate Use / Notes
Alarm block 8: block indicator
Alarm block 8: alarm
Alarm block 8: month
Alarm block 8: day(s) of week
Alarm block 8: start hour - V1
Alarm block 8: start hour - V2
Alarm block 8: end hour - V1
Alarm block 8: end hour - V2
Alarm block 7: block indicator
Alarm block 7: alarm
Alarm block 7: month
Alarm block 7: day(s) of week
Alarm block 7: start hour - V1
Alarm block 7: start hour - V2
Alarm block 7: end hour - V1
Alarm block 7: end hour - V2
Alarm block 6: block indicator
Alarm block 6: alarm
Alarm block 6: month
Alarm block 6: day(s) of week
Alarm block 6: start hour - V1
Alarm block 6: start hour - V2
Alarm block 6: end hour - V1
Alarm block 6: end hour - V2
Alarm block 5: block indicator
Alarm block 5: alarm
Alarm block 5: month
Alarm block 5: day(s) of week
Alarm block 5: start hour - V1
Alarm block 5: start hour - V2
Alarm block 5: end hour - V1
Alarm block 5: end hour - V2
Alarm block 4: block indicator
Alarm block 4: alarm
Alarm block 4: month
Alarm block 4: day(s) of week
Alarm block 4: start hour - V1
Alarm block 4: start hour - V2
Alarm block 4: end hour - V1
Alarm block 4: end hour - V2
Alarm block 3: block indicator
Alarm block 3: alarm
Alarm block 3: month
Alarm block 3: day(s) of week
Alarm block 3: start hour - V1
Alarm block 3: start hour - V2
Alarm block 3: end hour - V1
Alarm block 3: end hour - V2
page A.13
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
Address Description
- Programming Section Default Current
Alternate Use / Notes
0624
0625
0626
0627
0628
0629
0630
0631
0632
0633
0634
0635
0636
0637
0638
0639
Date/time 2: action sequence
Date/time 2: month
Date/time 2: date - value 1
Date/time 2: date - value 2
Date/time 2: hour - value 1
Date/time 2: hour - value 2
Date/time 2: minute - value 1
Date/time 2: minute - value 2
Date/time 1: action sequence
Date/time 1: month
Date/time 1: date - value 1
Date/time 1: date - value 2
Date/time 1: hour - value 1
Date/time 1: hour - value 2
Date/time 1: minute - value 1
Date/time 1: minute - value 2
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
6.7.4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Alarm block 2: block indicator
Alarm block 2: alarm
Alarm block 2: month
Alarm block 2: day(s) of week
Alarm block 2: start hour - V1
Alarm block 2: start hour - V2
Alarm block 2: end hour - V1
Alarm block 2: end hour - V2
Alarm block 1: block indicator
Alarm block 1: alarm
Alarm block 1: month
Alarm block 1: day(s) of week
Alarm block 1: start hour - V1
Alarm block 1: start hour - V2
Alarm block 1: end hour - V1
Alarm block 1: end hour - V2
0640
0641
0642
0643
0644
0645
0646
0647
0648
0649
0650
0651
0652
0653
0654
0655
0656
0657
0658
0659
0660
0661
0662
0663
0664
0665
0666
0667
0668
0669
0670
0671
Telephone number A: value 1
Telephone number A: value 2
Telephone number A: value 3
Telephone number A: value 4
Telephone number A: value 5
Telephone number A: value 6
Telephone number A: value 7
Telephone number A: value 8
Telephone number A: value 9
Telephone number A: value 10
Telephone number A: value 11
Telephone number A: value 12
Telephone number A: voice/data/pager ID
Telephone number A: call attempts
Telephone number B: value 1
Telephone number B: value 2
Telephone number B: value 3
Telephone number B: value 4
Telephone number B: value 5
Telephone number B: value 6
Telephone number B: value 7
Telephone number B: value 8
Telephone number B: value 9
Telephone number B: value 10
Telephone number B: value 11
Telephone number B: value 12
Telephone number B: voice/data/pager ID
Telephone number B: call attempts
Telephone number C: value 1
Telephone number C: value 2
Telephone number C: value 3
Telephone number C: value 4
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.4
6.8.3
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.4
6.8.3
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
0
2
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
0
2
10
10
10
10
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
RFC-1
Programming Address Table
page A.14
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
Address Description
0672
0673
0674
0675
0676
0677
0678
0679
0680
0681
0682
0683
0684
0685
0686
0687
0688
0689
0690
0691
0692
0693
0694
0695
0696
0697
0698
0699
0700
0701
0702
0703
0704
0705
0706
0707
0708
0709
0710
0711
0712
0713
0714
0715
0716
0717
0718
0719
0720
RFC-1
Telephone number C: value 5
Telephone number C: value 6
Telephone number C: value 7
Telephone number C: value 8
Telephone number C: value 9
Telephone number C: value 10
Telephone number C: value 11
Telephone number C: value 12
Telephone number C: voice/data/pager ID
Telephone number C: call attempts
Telephone number D: value 1
Telephone number D: value 2
Telephone number D: value 3
Telephone number D: value 4
Telephone number D: value 5
Telephone number D: value 6
Telephone number D: value 7
Telephone number D: value 8
Telephone number D: value 9
Telephone number D: value 10
Telephone number D: value 11
Telephone number D: value 12
Telephone number D: voice/data/pager ID
Telephone number D: call attempts
Telephone number E: value 1
Telephone number E: value 2
Telephone number E: value 3
Telephone number E: value 4
Telephone number E: value 5
Telephone number E: value 6
Telephone number E: value 7
Telephone number E: value 8
Telephone number E: value 9
Telephone number E: value 10
Telephone number E: value 11
Telephone number E: value 12
Telephone number E: voice/data/pager ID
Telephone number E: call attempts
Telephone number F: value 1
Telephone number F: value 2
Telephone number F: value 3
Telephone number F: value 4
Telephone number F: value 5
Telephone number F: value 6
Telephone number F: value 7
Telephone number F: value 8
Telephone number F: value 9
Telephone number F: value 10
Telephone number F: value 11
- Programming Section Default Current
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.4
6.8.3
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.4
6.8.3
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.4
6.8.3
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
6.8.1
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
0
2
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
0
2
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
0
2
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
Programming Address Table
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Alternate Use / Notes
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
Pager ID or terminal phone: 10
Pager ID or terminal phone: V1
Pager ID or terminal phone: V2
Pager ID or terminal phone: V3
Pager ID or terminal phone: V4
Pager ID or terminal phone: V5
Pager ID or terminal phone: V6
Pager ID or terminal phone: V7
Pager ID or terminal phone: V8
Pager ID or terminal phone: V9
Pager ID or terminal phone: V10
Pager ID or terminal phone: V11
Pager ID or terminal phone: V12
Pager ID or terminal phone: V13
Remote print phone num: 10
Remote print phone num: V1
Remote print phone num: V2
Remote print phone num: V3
Remote print phone num: V4
Remote print phone num: V5
Remote print phone num: V6
Remote print phone num: V7
Remote print phone num: V8
Remote print phone num: V9
Remote print phone num: V10
page A.15
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
Address Description
- Programming Section Default Current
Alternate Use / Notes
0721
0722
0723
Telephone number F: value 12
Telephone number F: voice/data/pager ID
Telephone number F: call attempts
6.8.1
6.8.4
6.8.3
10
0
2
____
____
____
Remote print phone num: V11
Remote print phone num: V12
Remote print phone num: V13
0724
0725
0726
0727
0728
0729
0730
0731
0732
0733
0734
0735
0736
0737
0738
0739
0740
0741
0742
0743
0744
0745
0746
0747
0748
0749
0750
0751
0752
0753
0754
0755
0756
0757
0758
0759
0760
0761
0762
0763
0764
0765
0766
0767
0768
Action Sequence 1: step 1 - value 1
Action Sequence 1: step 1 - value 2
Action Sequence 1: step 2 - value 1
Action Sequence 1: step 2 - value 2
Action Sequence 1: step 3 - value 1
Action Sequence 1: step 3 - value 2
Action Sequence 1: step 4 - value 1
Action Sequence 1: step 4 - value 2
Action Sequence 1: step 5 - value 1
Action Sequence 1: step 5 - value 2
Action Sequence 1: step 6 - value 1
Action Sequence 1: step 6 - value 2
Action Sequence 1: step 7 - value 1
Action Sequence 1: step 7 - value 2
Action Sequence 1: step 8 - value 1
Action Sequence 1: step 8 - value 2
Action Sequence 2: step 1 - value 1
Action Sequence 2: step 1 - value 2
Action Sequence 2: step 2 - value 1
Action Sequence 2: step 2 - value 2
Action Sequence 2: step 3 - value 1
Action Sequence 2: step 3 - value 2
Action Sequence 2: step 4 - value 1
Action Sequence 2: step 4 - value 2
Action Sequence 2: step 5 - value 1
Action Sequence 2: step 5 - value 2
Action Sequence 2: step 6 - value 1
Action Sequence 2: step 6 - value 2
Action Sequence 2: step 7 - value 1
Action Sequence 2: step 7 - value 2
Action Sequence 2: step 8 - value 1
Action Sequence 2: step 8 - value 2
Action Sequence 3: step 1 - value 1
Action Sequence 3: step 1 - value 2
Action Sequence 3: step 2 - value 1
Action Sequence 3: step 2 - value 2
Action Sequence 3: step 3 - value 1
Action Sequence 3: step 3 - value 2
Action Sequence 3: step 4 - value 1
Action Sequence 3: step 4 - value 2
Action Sequence 3: step 5 - value 1
Action Sequence 3: step 5 - value 2
Action Sequence 3: step 6 - value 1
Action Sequence 3: step 6 - value 2
Action Sequence 3: step 7 - value 1
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
RFC-1
Programming Address Table
page A.16
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
Address Description
0769
0770
0771
0772
0773
0774
0775
0776
0777
0778
0779
0780
0781
0782
0783
0784
0785
0786
0787
0788
0789
0790
0791
0792
0793
0794
0795
0796
0797
0798
0799
0800
0801
0802
0803
0804
0805
0806
0807
0808
0809
0810
0811
0812
0813
0814
0815
0816
0817
RFC-1
Action Sequence 3: step 7 - value 2
Action Sequence 3: step 8 - value 1
Action Sequence 3: step 8 - value 2
Action Sequence 4: step 1 - value 1
Action Sequence 4: step 1 - value 2
Action Sequence 4: step 2 - value 1
Action Sequence 4: step 2 - value 2
Action Sequence 4: step 3 - value 1
Action Sequence 4: step 3 - value 2
Action Sequence 4: step 4 - value 1
Action Sequence 4: step 4 - value 2
Action Sequence 4: step 5 - value 1
Action Sequence 4: step 5 - value 2
Action Sequence 4: step 6 - value 1
Action Sequence 4: step 6 - value 2
Action Sequence 4: step 7 - value 1
Action Sequence 4: step 7 - value 2
Action Sequence 4: step 8 - value 1
Action Sequence 4: step 8 - value 2
Action Sequence 5: step 1 - value 1
Action Sequence 5: step 1 - value 2
Action Sequence 5: step 2 - value 1
Action Sequence 5: step 2 - value 2
Action Sequence 5: step 3 - value 1
Action Sequence 5: step 3 - value 2
Action Sequence 5: step 4 - value 1
Action Sequence 5: step 4 - value 2
Action Sequence 5: step 5 - value 1
Action Sequence 5: step 5 - value 2
Action Sequence 5: step 6 - value 1
Action Sequence 5: step 6 - value 2
Action Sequence 5: step 7 - value 1
Action Sequence 5: step 7 - value 2
Action Sequence 5: step 8 - value 1
Action Sequence 5: step 8 - value 2
Action Sequence 6: step 1 - value 1
Action Sequence 6: step 1 - value 2
Action Sequence 6: step 2 - value 1
Action Sequence 6: step 2 - value 2
Action Sequence 6: step 3 - value 1
Action Sequence 6: step 3 - value 2
Action Sequence 6: step 4 - value 1
Action Sequence 6: step 4 - value 2
Action Sequence 6: step 5 - value 1
Action Sequence 6: step 5 - value 2
Action Sequence 6: step 6 - value 1
Action Sequence 6: step 6 - value 2
Action Sequence 6: step 7 - value 1
Action Sequence 6: step 7 - value 2
- Programming Section Default Current
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
Programming Address Table
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Alternate Use / Notes
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
page A.17
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
Address Description
- Programming Section Default Current
Alternate Use / Notes
0818
0819
0820
0821
0822
0823
0824
0825
0826
0827
0828
0829
0830
0831
0832
0833
0834
0835
0836
0837
0838
0839
0840
0841
0842
0843
0844
0845
0846
0847
0848
0849
0850
0851
Action Sequence 6: step 8 - value 1
Action Sequence 6: step 8 - value 2
Action Sequence 7: step 1 - value 1
Action Sequence 7: step 1 - value 2
Action Sequence 7: step 2 - value 1
Action Sequence 7: step 2 - value 2
Action Sequence 7: step 3 - value 1
Action Sequence 7: step 3 - value 2
Action Sequence 7: step 4 - value 1
Action Sequence 7: step 4 - value 2
Action Sequence 7: step 5 - value 1
Action Sequence 7: step 5 - value 2
Action Sequence 7: step 6 - value 1
Action Sequence 7: step 6 - value 2
Action Sequence 7: step 7 - value 1
Action Sequence 7: step 7 - value 2
Action Sequence 7: step 8 - value 1
Action Sequence 7: step 8 - value 2
Action Sequence 8: step 1 - value 1
Action Sequence 8: step 1 - value 2
Action Sequence 8: step 2 - value 1
Action Sequence 8: step 2 - value 2
Action Sequence 8: step 3 - value 1
Action Sequence 8: step 3 - value 2
Action Sequence 8: step 4 - value 1
Action Sequence 8: step 4 - value 2
Action Sequence 8: step 5 - value 1
Action Sequence 8: step 5 - value 2
Action Sequence 8: step 6 - value 1
Action Sequence 8: step 6 - value 2
Action Sequence 8: step 7 - value 1
Action Sequence 8: step 7 - value 2
Action Sequence 8: step 8 - value 1
Action Sequence 8: step 8 - value 2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
6.5.2
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
0852
0853
0854
0855
0856
0857
0858
0859
0860
0861
0862
0863
Alarm A: channel number - value 1
Alarm A: channel number - value 2
Alarm A: trigger rule
Alarm A: action sequence
Alarm A: upper limit - value 1
Alarm A: upper limit - value 2
Alarm A: upper limit - value 3
Alarm A: upper limit - value 4
Alarm A: lower limit - value 1
Alarm A: lower limit - value 2
Alarm A: lower limit - value 3
Alarm A: lower limit - value 4
6.6.2
6.6.2
6.6.3
6.6.4
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6
4
5
9
2
0
4
0
1
0
2
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
RFC-1
Programming Address Table
page A.18
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
Address Description
0864
0865
0866
0867
0868
0869
0870
0871
0872
0873
0874
0875
0876
0877
0878
0879
0880
0881
0882
0883
0884
0885
0886
0887
0888
0889
0890
0891
0892
0893
0894
0895
0896
0897
0898
0899
0900
0901
0902
0903
0904
0905
0906
0907
0908
0909
0910
0911
RFC-1
Alarm B: channel number - value 1
Alarm B: channel number - value 2
Alarm B: trigger rule
Alarm B: action sequence
Alarm B: upper limit - value 1
Alarm B: upper limit - value 2
Alarm B: upper limit - value 3
Alarm B: upper limit - value 4
Alarm B: lower limit - value 1
Alarm B: lower limit - value 2
Alarm B: lower limit - value 3
Alarm B: lower limit - value 4
Alarm C: channel number - value 1
Alarm C: channel number - value 2
Alarm C: trigger rule
Alarm C: action sequence
Alarm C: upper limit - value 1
Alarm C: upper limit - value 2
Alarm C: upper limit - value 3
Alarm C: upper limit - value 4
Alarm C: lower limit - value 1
Alarm C: lower limit - value 2
Alarm C: lower limit - value 3
Alarm C: lower limit - value 4
Alarm D: channel number - value 1
Alarm D: channel number - value 2
Alarm D: trigger rule
Alarm D: action sequence
Alarm D: upper limit - value 1
Alarm D: upper limit - value 2
Alarm D: upper limit - value 3
Alarm D: upper limit - value 4
Alarm D: lower limit - value 1
Alarm D: lower limit - value 2
Alarm D: lower limit - value 3
Alarm D: lower limit - value 4
Alarm E: channel number - value 1
Alarm E: channel number - value 2
Alarm E: trigger rule
Alarm E: action sequence
Alarm E: upper limit - value 1
Alarm E: upper limit - value 2
Alarm E: upper limit - value 3
Alarm E: upper limit - value 4
Alarm E: lower limit - value 1
Alarm E: lower limit - value 2
Alarm E: lower limit - value 3
Alarm E: lower limit - value 4
- Programming Section Default Current
6.6.2
6.6.2
6.6.3
6.6.4
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.2
6.6.2
6.6.3
6.6.4
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.2
6.6.2
6.6.3
6.6.4
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.2
6.6.2
6.6.3
6.6.4
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
Programming Address Table
6
4
5
9
2
0
4
0
1
0
2
0
6
4
5
9
2
0
4
0
1
0
2
0
6
4
5
9
2
0
4
0
1
0
2
0
6
4
5
9
2
0
4
0
1
0
2
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Alternate Use / Notes
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
page A.19
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
Address Description
- Programming Section Default Current
Alternate Use / Notes
0912
0913
0914
0915
0916
0917
0918
0919
0920
0921
0922
0923
0924
0925
0926
0927
0928
0929
0930
0931
0932
0933
0934
0935
0936
0937
0938
0939
0940
0941
0942
0943
0944
0945
0946
0947
Alarm F: channel number - value 1
Alarm F: channel number - value 2
Alarm F: trigger rule
Alarm F: action sequence
Alarm F: upper limit - value 1
Alarm F: upper limit - value 2
Alarm F: upper limit - value 3
Alarm F: upper limit - value 4
Alarm F: lower limit - value 1
Alarm F: lower limit - value 2
Alarm F: lower limit - value 3
Alarm F: lower limit - value 4
Alarm G: channel number - value 1
Alarm G: channel number - value 2
Alarm G: trigger rule
Alarm G: action sequence
Alarm G: upper limit - value 1
Alarm G: upper limit - value 2
Alarm G: upper limit - value 3
Alarm G: upper limit - value 4
Alarm G: lower limit - value 1
Alarm G: lower limit - value 2
Alarm G: lower limit - value 3
Alarm G: lower limit - value 4
Alarm H: channel number - value 1
Alarm H: channel number - value 2
Alarm H: trigger rule
Alarm H: action sequence
Alarm H: upper limit - value 1
Alarm H: upper limit - value 2
Alarm H: upper limit - value 3
Alarm H: upper limit - value 4
Alarm H: lower limit - value 1
Alarm H: lower limit - value 2
Alarm H: lower limit - value 3
Alarm H: lower limit - value 4
6.6.2
6.6.2
6.6.3
6.6.4
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.2
6.6.2
6.6.3
6.6.4
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.2
6.6.2
6.6.3
6.6.4
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6.6.5
6
4
5
9
2
0
4
0
1
0
2
0
6
4
5
9
2
0
4
0
1
0
2
0
6
4
5
9
2
0
4
0
1
0
2
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
0948
0949
0950
0951
0952
0953
0954
0955
0956
0957
0958
0959
Main security code - value 1
Main security code - value 2
Main security code - value 3
Main security code - value 4
Main security code - value 5
Main security code - value 6
Main security code - value 7
Main security code - value 8
Control security code A - value 1
Control security code A - value 2
Control security code A - value 3
Control security code A - value 4
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
6
6
10
10
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
RFC-1
Programming Address Table
page A.20
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
- Programming Section Default Current
Address Description
0960
0961
0962
0963
0964
0965
0966
0967
0968
0969
0970
0971
0972
0973
0974
0975
0976
0977
0978
0979
0980
0981
0982
0983
Control security code B - value 1
Control security code B - value 2
Control security code B - value 3
Control security code B - value 4
Control security code C - value 1
Control security code C - value 2
Control security code C - value 3
Control security code C - value 4
Basic programming security code - value 1
Basic programming security code - value 2
Basic programming security code - value 3
Basic programming security code - value 4
Advanced programming security code - value 1
Advanced programming security code - value 2
Advanced programming security code - value 3
Advanced programming security code - value 4
Control security code for channels 00-07
Control security code for channels 08-15
Control security code for channels 16-23
Control security code for channels 24-31
Control security code for channels 32-39
Control security code for channels 40-47
Control security code for channels 48-55
Control security code for channels 56-63
0984
0985
0986
0987
0988
0989
0990
0991
0992
0993
0994
0995
Site ID phrase: word 1 - value 1
Site ID phrase: word 1 - value 2
Site ID phrase: word 2 - value 1
Site ID phrase: word 2 - value 2
Site ID phrase: word 3 - value 1
Site ID phrase: word 3 - value 2
Site ID phrase: word 4 - value 1
Site ID phrase: word 4 - value 2
Site ID phrase: word 5 - value 1
Site ID phrase: word 5 - value 2
Site ID phrase: word 6 - value 1
Site ID phrase: word 6 - value 2
RFC-1
Alternate Use / Notes
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.1
6.9.2
6.9.2
6.9.2
6.9.2
6.9.2
6.9.2
6.9.2
6.9.2
6
6
10
10
6
6
10
10
4
0
8
8
4
1
5
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
6.10.1
6.10.1
6.10.1
6.10.1
6.10.1
6.10.1
6.10.1
6.10.1
6.10.1
6.10.1
6.10.1
6.10.1
7
11
9
8
8
12
8
9
0
1
8
8
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
Programming Address Table
page A.21
Appendix A –– Programming Address Table
Address Description
0996
0997
0998
0999
1000
1001
1002
1003
1004
1005
1006
1007
1008
1009
1010
1011
1012
1013
1014
1015
1016
1017
1018
1019
1020
1021
1022
1023
RFC-1
- Programming Section Default Current
Hardware version
6.10.2
Telemetry settling time
6.3.8
Telemetry leading zero suppression
6.3.7
Telephone dialing mode (tone/pulse)
6.8.5
Inactive system timeout
6.10.3
Answer ring number
5.6.2
Communication mode (data/voice)
6.8.9
Telephone call alarm message duration
6.5.5
Telephone call pause between calls duration
6.5.5
Serial data protocol and baud rate
6.8.10
Control relay minimum operate time
6.5.3
Action sequence delay between steps
6.5.4
Action sequence at power-on action (power failure alarm) 6.4.8
Telemetry alarm system enable/disable
6.6.6
Telemetry auto-scan stop channel – tens digit
6.7.8
Telemetry auto-scan stop channel – ones digit
6.7.8
Telemetry auto-scan data interval
6.7.7
Telemetry alarm scan interval and sequence
6.6.7
Telephone ring detection sensitivity
6.8.8
Shared memory selector (telemetry labels/time triggers)
6.7.3
Security code failure lockout time
6.9.3
Daylight savings time auto-adjust enable/disable
6.4.4
Clock speed adjustment—value 1
6.4.5
Clock speed adjustment—value 2
6.4.5
Default telemetry units or status format—value 1
6.3.2
Default telemetry units or status format—value 2
6.3.2
Default full scale and decimal point
6.3.3
Default linear/log/indirect and auto relay
6.3.4
3
2
1
1
0
2
3
2
4
0
1
1
10
0
0
7
2
0
3
6
1
0
8
0
0
3
2
0
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Programming Address Table with RAK-2 Default Settings
Alternate Use / Notes
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
__________________________
page A.22
Appendix B –– Word Table
Values V1 and V2 are used to identify the words when programming.
Word
V1
V2
Word
V1
V2
Word
V1
V2
zero
one
two
three
four
five
six
seven
eight
nine
ten
eleven
twelve
thirteen
fourteen
fifteen
A
action
address
advanced
alarm
AM
amperes
audio
auto
auxiliary
B
basic
Bozo
C
channel
code
command
control
Curly
D
day
degrees
digit
E
enter
error
exit
F
failure
fire
FM
G
Gonzo
goodbye
Hal
H
hello
here
hours
I
Igor
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
8
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
8
1
1
8
1
1
2
2
2
8
2
2
2
8
2
2
2
8
2
3
3
8
3
3
3
8
3
3
3
8
3
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
7
0
1
2
3
4
5
7
6
11
8
8
10
9
12
15
0
3
4
10
5
7
8
11
10
11
13
12
14
0
1
13
4
5
7
14
8
9
11
15
12
intrusion
J
K
kilovolts
kilowatts
L
Larry
limit
local
lower
M
main
malfunction
manual
memory
milliamps
millivolts
milliwatts
minutes
Moe
month
N
network
night
normal
number
nyuk nyuk nyuk
O
off
OK
on
Oscar
P
percent
percent power
point
pound
power
programming
push
Q
R
ratio
reflected
reprogram
ring
S
scan
security
sequence
site
software
Spanky
speaking
status
T
telemetry
3
9
9
4
4
9
4
4
4
4
9
4
2
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
9
5
5
5
5
2
9
5
5
5
5
9
5
6
6
6
6
6
6
9
9
6
1
6
6
9
6
6
7
7
7
7
7
7
9
7
14
0
1
2
3
2
4
5
6
7
3
8
1
9
10
14
15
0
1
3
5
4
4
7
8
9
9
5
10
11
12
14
6
15
0
1
3
5
7
8
7
8
10
14
11
12
9
14
15
1
2
3
4
5
8
10
9
telephone
temperature
This is
time
to
transmitter
triggered
U
upper
V
version
volts
W
water
watts
X
Y
year
Z
25 ms voice pause
50 ms voice pause
100 ms voice pause
200 ms voice pause
500 ms voice pause
,
;
:
/
=
CR
CR&LF
&
+++
DTMF 0
DTMF 1
DTMF 2
DTMF 3
DTMF 4
DTMF 5
DTMF 6
DTMF 7
DTMF 8
DTMF 9
DTMF *
DTMF #
3.95 second voice pause
7
2
7
7
7
7
7
9
8
9
8
8
9
1
8
9
9
8
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
10
2
11
12
13
14
15
11
1
12
2
3
13
13
4
14
15
6
0
5
6
7
8
9
14
2
3
1
13
11
10
4
12
15
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
RFC-1
Word Table
page B.1