Crestron HD-DA-2-QUAD Specifications

Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
© 2011
Crestron Electronics, Inc.
15 Volvo Drive
Rockleigh, NJ 07647
800.237.2041
www.crestron.com
HDMI™ and High Definition Multimedia Interface are trademarks of HDMI Licensing, LLC in the United States and other countries.
All brand names, product names and trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
ii
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Contents
What is Crestron DigitalMedia™?������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 1
What is HDMI?��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 1
Advantages of HDMI versus Analog Interfaces ...................................................................................................................1
It’s Not Just Cable Length...................................................................................................................................................2
Say Goodbye to Analog.......................................................................................................................................................3
Comparing the Cables........................................................................................................................................................3
Topology............................................................................................................................................................................4
EDID...................................................................................................................................................................................4
HDCP���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 6
Consumer Electronics Control (CEC)...................................................................................................................................7
Audio.................................................................................................................................................................................7
Convergence......................................................................................................................................................................8
DisplayPort.........................................................................................................................................................................8
Summary...........................................................................................................................................................................8
Crestron DigitalMedia����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 9
Features of DigitalMedia ....................................................................................................................................................9
Ethernet Integration..........................................................................................................................................................11
The HD-DTDS Specification and Certification������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 13
Design and Install a DigitalMedia System���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 14
Step 1: Select the Wiring for Each Run..............................................................................................................................14
Wiring Example................................................................................................................................................................20
Step 2: Select DigitalMedia Equipment.............................................................................................................................21
DigitalMedia Room Controllers.........................................................................................................................................30
DigitalMedia In-Wall Transmitters and Receivers..............................................................................................................31
DigitalMedia Repeater DM-DR..........................................................................................................................................36
DM-MD6X1 Switcher........................................................................................................................................................37
Step 3: Prewiring..............................................................................................................................................................38
Step 4: System Commissioning........................................................................................................................................40
Appendix A - Application Diagrams���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 41
Appendix B - HDCP ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 52
HDCP Limits in Source Devices........................................................................................................................................52
Device List as of 12/13/2010...........................................................................................................................................53
Appendix C - HDMI Solutions���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 56
HD-MD8X1 and HD-MD8X2 Switchers..............................................................................................................................56
HD-RX1-F Receiver and HD-TX1-F Transmitter.................................................................................................................58
HD-RX3-F Receiver and HD-TX3-F Transmitter.................................................................................................................61
HD-SCALER......................................................................................................................................................................62
HD-DA-2..........................................................................................................................................................................63
HD-DA-2-QUAD................................................................................................................................................................63
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
iii
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Appendix D: Crestron Certified Cables�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 64
Bulk Cables......................................................................................................................................................................64
Interface Cables...............................................................................................................................................................67
Appendix E: Media Presentation Wall Plates�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 68
Glossary�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 71
Video Resolution Terminology...........................................................................................................................................71
Video Display Terminology................................................................................................................................................72
Encoding Terminology......................................................................................................................................................74
Index of Products������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 75
iv
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
What is Crestron DigitalMedia™?
There’s no question that the digital age is here today. Analog television is off the air; practically every device that plugs into a
display has an HDMI port; the latest MacBooks® only provide DisplayPort outputs; laptops now include built-in Blu-ray players,
and the latest video conferencing systems feature HDMI/DVI outputs exclusively. The products you›re using now won›t work
for much longer. Crestron DigitalMedia (DM) is the only solution that answers the challenges of tomorrow – today.
Crestron began designing products with HDMI technology more than five years ago, and has shipped thousands of HDMI
products over the last three years. But DM is more than just another HDMI switcher or extender; it’s a complete, integrated
solution that manages, controls, and distributes all analog and uncompressed HD digital content over twisted pair or fiber.
DM matrix switchers are flexible, modular systems that can accept virtually every signal type and transmit them long distance
as digital DM signals. Built-in exclusive QuickSwitch HD™ technology, pre-authorized HDCP keys, maintains a constant
handshake for continuous, glitch-free HD switching. At the end points, DM receivers output HDMI and control to the display.
Crestron DigitalMedia is the only solution for the digital age, distributing all analog and uncompressed HD digital signals, and
managing embedded data such as HDCP, EDID and CEC.
Purpose of this guide
The purpose of the Crestron DigitalMedia™ Design Guide is to provide the following:
• Functional background on how High Definition, specifically HDMI, is constructed and transmitted
• How DM can solve HD distribution issues
• Provide detailed information to assist in the design of your HD media distribution system
For more detailed examples and additional installation details, please refer to the latest version of “All Rooms Digitally
Connected” Doc 6251-(future)
What is HDMI?
High Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI) is the first and only consumer electronics industry-supported, uncompressed, all digital audio/video interface. By delivering crystal clear, all digital audio and video via a single cable, HDMI dramatically
simplifies cabling and provides consumers with the highest quality AV experience.
Advantages of HDMI versus Analog Interfaces
HD content ready: Consumers using HDMI devices supporting HDCP have the comfort of knowing that they will have access
to premium HD content now and in the future. Content providers (a.k.a. movie studios and television networks) are requiring
that devices transmit HD video to only “protected outputs” that use HDCP. With today’s HD movies, content can be sent over
unprotected interfaces—such as analog component—because Blu-ray has delayed the activation of the image constraint
token (a.k.a. content protection flag) to help minimize potential transition issues. After December 31, 2010 new players must
limit analog video output of Blu-ray disc content to interlaced standard definition (480i/576i). 2013 is the expiration date for
analog video: no player that passes “Decrypted AACS Content” to analog video outputs may be manufactured or sold after
December 31st, 2013. This means future HD movies will stop being viewable at HD resolutions over analog component and
other unprotected interfaces. A similar situation exists with cable and satellite TV, in which the Motion Picture Association of
America (MPAA) is petitioning the FCC to restrict HD transmission to protected outputs.
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
1
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Quality: Because HDMI is a digital interface, it has lossless transmission and provides the best video quality, unlike analog
video. The difference is especially noticeable in low brightness scenes and at higher resolutions, such as 1080p. Digital video
is sharper than component, and eliminates the softness and ghosting found with component. Small high contrast details, such
as text, especially bring out this difference.
Ease of use: HDMI combines video and multi-channel audio in a single cable, eliminating the cost, complexity, and confusion
of multiple cables currently used in AV systems. This is particularly beneficial when equipment is upgraded or added.
Intelligence: HDMI supports two-way communication between the video source (such as a DVD player) and the DTV, enabling
new functionality such as automatic configuration. By using HDMI, devices automatically deliver the most effective formats
(e.g., 480p vs. 720p, 16:9 vs. 4:3) for the displays to which it is connected, eliminating the need for external intervention
to identify the best resolutions and audio formats.
It’s Not Just Cable Length
The promise of HDMI is great. One cable carrying uncompressed digital HD video and audio; what’s not to like? But mention
HDMI to an AV integrator and you’re likely to get an expletive in response. A quick search of online forums and industry trade
publications uncovers a slew of HDMI related complaints, ranging from annoying switching delays and screen flashing to
complete audio and video failure.
There are two primary reasons for HDMI problems: bandwidth and complexity. Uncompressed HD video requires enormous
digital bandwidth, which is notoriously difficult to push through copper wire. Add popular features such as 1080p resolution
and the potential offered by Deep Color, and the problem worsens.
There are a number of products appearing on the market that attempt to address this issue, some of which actually work
quite well. But the under-discussed issue is the sheer complexity of HDMI.
HDMI is a full-duplex digital communications interface. The creators of HDMI took advantage of its digital nature, and added
several communications mechanisms to automatically control and encrypt content. Unfortunately, the custom installation
industry wasn’t considered in the design process, and HDMI doesn’t scale well. Compounding the problem is the fact that
digital control is relatively new to most of the major AV distribution players, so the learning curve has been very steep.
Though much more complex than analog, HDMI isn’t nearly as complicated as home automation, Ethernet, or any of the
myriad wireless protocols. Companies with experience in these fields are in a position to implement HDMI in environments
that the designers hadn’t anticipated.
This portion of the guide addresses the need for the move to HDMI and explains the new features that HDMI supports. We’ll
demystify the “handshaking” that occurs between HDMI sources, repeaters, and displays, and explore the cause of some
common problems experienced in the field.
2
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Say Goodbye to Analog
Before we get too involved in the technical details, there’s an important question to address: why do we need HDMI? Although
analog video distribution works very well for much of the market, analog is on its way out. Content providers such as
television and movie studios love the fact that HDMI supports the High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP) protocol.
HDCP allows them to encrypt content while it’s on the wire, so it can’t be copied and pirated easily. They’re pushing hard on
the consumer electronics industry to move from analog to HDMI, and they’re making progress. For the unconvinced, here are
a few harbingers of analog’s demise:
Image Constraint Token: The Blu-ray specification has a built-in time bomb: the Image Constraint Token (ICT). This embedded flag forces players to downgrade video on analog outputs to standard definition, which is one quarter the resolution of the
current analog maximum, 1080i.
Content provider support: SkyHD, a popular European satellite service, is already shipping HDMI-only set top boxes. In the
United States, the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) is petitioning the FCC for permission to block movies from
being transmitted on set top box analog outputs.
Feature support: The latest and greatest features are only supported by HDMI. The aforementioned formats aren’t, and
will never be, available over analog. The more discerning consumers, who are the bread and butter for much of the custom
installation industry, expect these sophisticated features.
Any analog distribution system that carries commercially created content runs the risk of becoming obsolete over the next
several years. Now is the time for the consumer electronics and custom installation industries to embrace the transition.
Comparing the Cables
Analog Cables
HDMI Cable
• Separate audio and video cables
• Single AV cable
• Robust signals
• Delicate signals
• Field termination
• Cannot be field-terminated
• Inexpensive
• Very expensive
• Installer friendly
• Difficult to run
• Reliable multi-room distribution
• No reliable multi-room solution
• Distance is rarely an issue
• Limited distance
• Secure cables
• Non-locking cable
• No copy protection (DRM) support
• Supports copy protection
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
3
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
The complexity of HDMI becomes obvious when you compare HDMI cable to analog audio and video cables. Analog cables
typically consist of one to three wire pairs, depending on the format, and they simply carry an audio or video signal (not both).
In contrast, the HDMI cable consists of 19 wires, which carry high speed video, audio and other digital information. The digital
audio and video data is encoded into three color channels and a clock channel. Audio is embedded inside the video data and is
inserted and extracted at each end. Additional information carried by HDMI includes:
DDC: The Data Display Channel (DDC) is a two-way communications interface between the source and the downstream
repeater or display device. This channel was originally provided to communicate device capability information, which is
encoded in a structure known as Extended Display Identification Data (EDID). HDMI devices use EDID to indicate what audio
and video formats they support, discussed in more detail in a later section. The DDC interface is also used to set up and
maintain HDCP encryption.
Hot Plug Detect: The downstream device, or sink, indicates its presence to the source with the Hot Plug Detect (HPD)
signal. This allows each device to know when a cable has been connected and to start authentication.
CEC: Consumer Electronics Control (CEC) channel wiring is mandatory, although implementation of CEC in a product is
optional. The CEC channel uses the industry standard AV Link protocol for remote control functions, and is a one wire
bidirectional serial bus. The CEC feature allows the user to command and control multiple CEC-enabled boxes with one
remote control, and individual CEC-enabled boxes to command and control each other without user intervention.
Depending on the device and manufacturer, DDC, HPD, and CEC signals interact differently. This inconsistency can
negatively affect device performance.
Additional control signals are associated with HDMI, but they are beyond the scope of this guide.
Topology
Every HDMI installation consists of at least one content source, like a cable box or Blu-ray player, and a sink, like a TV or a
projector. Most custom installations also involve at least one repeater, which is a device that accepts and re-transmits HDMI
content. Repeaters include simple devices such as switches and distribution amplifiers as well as more feature-rich devices
like audio and video processors.
EDID
EDID is the information transmitted from a display to a source conveying its resolution capabilities. Initially developed for
computers and monitors, EDID has made its way into consumer electronic devices via HDMI. HDMI display devices and
surround sound receivers use EDID to communicate their audio and video capabilities. For instance, a television may use EDID
to indicate support for the standard HD resolutions plus 1080p and Deep Color. Another TV may not accept higher than
720p/1080i resolution. One audio processor may support Dolby TrueHD while another only supports standard Dolby;
most TVs only support basic stereo audio. All of this information is stored in EDID.
The content source reads and analyzes EDID to determine what formats to send. It is the responsibility of the source, if
equipped, to only send formats that the downstream devices support. For example, Blu-ray players include video scalers to
best match the disc’s native format to the capabilities of the television or projector.
In the simplest installations, with one television and an audio processor, the EDID protocol works reasonably well. Multi-room
installations, on the other hand, can quickly become problematic, with several televisions connected to several sources
through one or more HDMI switches. The switches are responsible for collecting all of the televisions’ EDID and providing one
unified version to the source. Neither the HDMI nor the EDID specifications offer guidance in this scenario. As a consequence,
different switches behave in different ways. Combining multiple EDID can be a complicated issue, so it’s worth researching
how a given switch handles it prior to installation.
4
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Consider a simple system. The client has a 1080p projector with a surround sound processor in the home theater, and a
720p LCD with integrated speakers in the family room. The 1080p projector also supports 720p, but obviously the customer
would prefer 1080p where possible. How should the switch combine the EDID? Some devices on the market simply copy the
EDID from the first output. In our scenario, 1080p video and surround sound audio is sent to the family room, which supports
neither. At best, this results in no audio and no video and at worst, damage to the LCD display or speakers. A slightly smarter
switch may take a “best common” approach, generating merged EDID that limits the content to only what both rooms can
support; 720p video and stereo audio. Now, the client’s sophisticated home theater can no longer achieve exceptional content
quality. Expand this scenario to the installation with five or ten rooms and this simple solution becomes inadequate.
Crestron DigitalMedia is an intelligent system that allows installers to make design decisions that set the fewest limits (if any)
on content quality across multiple displays. For example, let’s say the client only watches Blu-ray content in the home theater,
but watches cable TV in both the home theater and the family room. With the proper switch, the installer can configure
input EDID independently, so that the Blu-ray player can send the full 1080p and surround sound signal to the home theater,
while the cable box, which must support both rooms, is limited to 720p or 1080i. This isn’t much of a sacrifice, since cable
companies don’t actually transmit 1080p content anyway (though some cable boxes will up-convert to 1080p). A really nice
switch accepts surround sound for the home theater, and down-mixes it to basic stereo for the family room.
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
5
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
HDCP
HDCP encryption is another complicating factor in HDMI installations. The HDCP system has two parts:
1. Authenticates HDCP devices to make sure they are authorized to receive the content
2. Encrypts the content to prevent interception during transmission
Authentication ensures that all devices receiving the content are licensed and authorized. Only after successful authentication
can the display output the audio and video streams.
HDCP Encrypts Each Individual Segment of an AV Transmission
HDCP
ENABLED
DISPLAY
HDCP
SOURCE
DigitalMedia
EQUIPMENT
HDCP
ENABLED
DISPLAY
HDCP Authenticates Each Device via the Source
HDCP
ENABLED
DISPLAY
HDCP
SOURCE
DigitalMedia
EQUIPMENT
HDCP
ENABLED
DISPLAY
Devices that re-transmit HDCP content must inform the source of all the downstream connections in the system. Every HDCP
device has a unique ID, known as a KSV (Key Selection Vector), which must be passed to the source. The source must then
verify each device before it transmits content. It is this authentication process that causes the 5-10 second switch times
in HDMI devices.
DigitalMedia solves this “blank screen” issue by using a technology called QuickSwitch HD™. In a standard HDMI switcher,
each display is authenticated dynamically when video is routed to it. With DigitalMedia, the authentication process takes place
as displays are added. During initialization, sources are authenticated with each display through the DigitalMedia system
before any audio or video is routed. By doing this, each switch can occur quickly.
Unfortunately, all sources have a hard limit on the number of displays that can be connected, due to a limit in the number
of KSVs they will accept. The HDCP specification allows for up to 127 devices, but sources usually support far fewer. Many
support fewer than ten devices, and for at least one popular cable box in the field, it’s only one. If a repeater presents a source
with too many KSVs, the source stops transmitting content. Unfortunately, KSV limits are not an advertised feature. Clients
won’t even realize they have a problem until they try to route a given source an extra repeater or display. Audio and video
drops out inexplicably in all connected rooms, typically without so much as an error message.
Again, a solution is needed that allows installers to make intelligent design decisions. During commissioning, the DigitalMedia
system tests the KSV limits of each source, and sets appropriate limits on the switch. It will bring any problem areas to the
attention of the installer, to be solved before becoming end user issues.
6
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Installers must be aware of KSV limit issues in any HDMI installation that involves more than one display. Be sure to research
how your equipment handles scenarios that violate source KSV limits using the device list (page 52) and by testing devices
in the field.
Consumer Electronics Control (CEC)
Each HDMI cable contains a communication link that enables devices connected via HDMI to talk to each other. This protocol
is called Consumer Electronics Control (CEC). When a control system is in place, however, you don’t want other devices
issuing commands. CEC is supposed to contain industry standard commands for interoperability, but inconsistent support
from CE manufacturers has caused a wide variation in the functions that can actually be triggered from each device. Some
examples of this functionality that Crestron has discovered are:
• Multiple DVD players from the same manufacturer, in the same system, communicate with each other so that only
one can play at a time. Every time one player is issued the play command, the player sends a pause command to
the other players over CEC
• When a Blu-ray player is turned off, it sends a power off command, turning off all the displays connected to
the system.
These functional commands are a major issue, because they are sent behind the scenes and without your knowledge. DigitalMedia breaks the communication path between the HDMI devices that are connected to the switch, so these commands
cannot be sent without your approval. In addition, DigitalMedia provides a method to issue CEC commands from a control
system, so the communication link can be used for your benefit, as an alternative to IR and RS-232 control.
Audio
HDMI provides the only transmission link for 7.1 channel HD audio. However, unlike traditional analog video sources, HDMI
sources usually do not transmit multi-channel and 2-channel audio at the same time. This becomes a problem for multi-room
distribution, in which a mixture of surround sound and stereo audio rooms are present. HDMI sources will often shut off
analog outputs when sending audio over HDMI.
Audio Distribution
Crestron DigitalMedia solves this problem by offering special HDMI cards that will take in a multi-channel audio stream and
output both types of audio for distribution. These special cards are noted by a –DSP suffix.
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
7
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Convergence
HDMI enables computers to deliver premium media content, including high-definition movies and multi-channel audio formats.
It is the only interface enabling direct connections to both HDTVs and digital computer monitors implementing the DVI and
HDMI standards, which amounts to hundreds of millions of existing DVI displays.
HDMI is fully compatible with all DVI-enabled computers, because HDMI was developed using the same technology as DVI
(Digital Visual Interface), which has been the most common digital connection for computers. Because HDMI offers both audio
and video over one cable and DVI only carries video, DVI/HDMI connectivity requires a separate audio cable.
DisplayPort
DisplayPort is a newer VESA standard for digital video connection, similar to HDMI in functionality. While HDMI was introduced
in 2001, the latest DisplayPort specification (1.1a) was released in 2008, which has given HDMI devices a huge head start in
device adoption. The DisplayPort standard was driven by the PC industry, to achieve a low cost process for transferring video
from a computer to a laptop screen and external digital video output. Both protocols support 1080p and higher resolutions,
HDCP content protection, multi-channel audio and Deep Color. HDMI additionally supports some items that DisplayPort does
not, such as CEC control and Dolby/DTS 8-channel audio streams.
VESA realized that they were late to the digital video game with DisplayPort, and it didn’t make sense to have a video output
that could not plug into 95% of the displays in the world today. They created DisplayPort Multimode to enable compatibility
with HDMI and DVI (and sometimes RGBHV – but that doesn’t include content protection). This means that an HDMI input can
accept video from DVI, HDMI and DisplayPort devices – making it the most universal connector going forward.
Summary
Wide support from content providers and the consumer electronics marketplace makes HDMI the future of HD video transmission. This brings many pitfalls to the uninformed installer (especially in larger installations) and the problems are
not limited to cable length issues. Processing EDID and managing HDCP requires complex microcontrollers, especially
when several rooms are involved. Switching systems must be easily customizable to intelligently handle HDCP and EDID.
DigitalMedia manages these various communication mechanisms and provides extensive troubleshooting information,
so the installer can solve issues like cable failure, device incompatibilities and content protection complications.
8
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Crestron DigitalMedia
Crestron DigitalMedia distributes uncompressed digital audio and video signals over a choice of shielded twisted pair copper
wire or fiber optic cable. A full selection of switcher input cards, transmitters, and room controllers (receivers), provides
extensive connectivity throughout the installation, supporting a complete range of analog and digital signal types. DigitalMedia
intelligently manages all the different signals and devices, matching each source’s output to the capabilities of the selected
display(s) without scaling or compression. Every signal is preserved in its native video resolution and audio format, ensuring a
pure, lossless signal path.
DigitalMedia handles more than just audio and video. Integrated Gigabit Ethernet, device control (IR, RS-232, CEC) and
USB HID mouse and keyboard distribution allows computers, media servers, and video game consoles to be installed out of
sight and accessed from anywhere in the installation. With no additional wiring, built-in Crestron control is also available for
controlling displays and other room devices.
DigitalMedia:
• Distributes uncompressed digital audio and video over shielded twisted-pair wire (DM CAT or DM 8G STP) or fiber
• Supports HDMI with Deep Color and 7.1 channel HD lossless audio
• Supports video resolutions up to 1920x1200 or 1080p/60
• Allows full 1080p/60 up to 450 feet using DigitalMedia cable
• Supports 50/125 and 62.5/125 multimode fiber for distances up to 1,000 feet (300 meters)
Features of DigitalMedia
DigitalMedia transmits a wide variety of signals:
Audio
Video
Data
HDMI 7.1 Channel
2, 6, or 8 channel PCM
DTS-HD Master Audio™
Dolby® TrueHD
SPDIF
2-Channel Analog
DisplayPort Multimode
HDMI
Component (Y/Pb/Pr)
S-Video
Composite
RGBHV
DisplayPort Multimode
HD-SDI
DVI
Ethernet
IR
RS-232
USB HID
Crestron Control
DigitalMedia is installer-friendly, with a flexible choice of input and output cards. It expands easily to serve the most demanding multi-room solution. Advanced troubleshooting tools can be accessed via the front panel, Crestron Toolbox software, and
control system to identify potential problems with HDCP keys and handshaking, CEC control, video resolutions, USB, wiring
and audio format issues. DigitalMedia accommodates legacy AV systems, provides a zero-latency solution, and drives full HD
content without compression or resolution loss.
Computer Compatibility
Besides handling every available HDTV format supported by HDMI, DigitalMedia also supports the distribution of DVI and RGB
computer signals, and is fully compatible with DVI computer monitors up to 1920 x 1200 WUXGA.
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
9
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
USB HID Switch
DigitalMedia lets you centralize all HD sources – not just television receivers and DVD changers, but also media servers,
computers, and even video game consoles. Built-in USB HID (Human Interface Device) signal routing allows USB HID compatible keyboards, mice, and game controllers to be connected at each display location, extending their signals through to the
centralized equipment via USB HID ports provided on select switcher input cards.
EDID Format Management
Using HDMI provides a variety of video and audio formats to keep track of, and chances are not every device in a system
supports all of the same formats. In a typical one-room system, HDMI attempts to resolve this confusion using EDID. When
two HDMI devices are connected together, the receiving device (a display or surround sound processor) uses EDID to
announce its format capabilities to the source device (a TV tuner or video player), which in turn configures itself to output the
most effective format that both devices can support.
However, serious conflicts can arise in a facility filled with different displays and audio systems. For instance, a Blu-ray player
feeding a 1080p projector in the home theater may restrict itself to a lower resolution, or even shut off completely, if someone
decides to view the same signal on the 32” TV in the bedroom. And, instead of listening to a 7.1 Dolby TrueHD format
supported by a high-end theater sound system, the listening experience may be limited to Dolby 5.1, or even stereo sound.
DigitalMedia uses EDID to prevent such conflicts, assessing the formats supported by each system device, and then allowing
the installer to assign compatible devices in logical arrangements. Conflicting combinations can be prohibited so only the
optimum signal formats get delivered to each display and audio system in the house. Refer to the EDID section on page 4.
QuickSwitch HD™ Technology
Many content providers are using the copy-protection scheme called HDCP to protect products against unauthorized copying.
To view HDCP encrypted content in full high-definition requires the source device to “authenticate” every display and signal
processor through an HDMI connection before delivering an output signal. This process occurs every time any HDMI signal is
switched, causing a complete loss of signal for up to 15 seconds whenever a new source or display is selected anywhere in
the house. Crestron QuickSwitch HD technology eliminates this issue by maintaining a constant HDCP connection with each
HDMI device in the system. By eliminating the need to re-authenticate each time a different source or display is selected,
QuickSwitch HD achieves very fast switching of HDMI signals.
HDCP Key Management
Another aspect to HDCP is its use of “keys” to manage the handshaking that occurs between any two devices. Every HDMI
source device supports a limited number of downstream devices, as determined by the number of HDCP keys available. The
number of HDCP keys is rarely advertised or specified by the manufacturer or service provider, so without warning, the source
simply stops outputting a signal when connected to too many displays or processors. To prevent such surprises, DigitalMedia
switchers test the HDCP limits of each HDMI source, allowing the installer to configure the system around any limitations, or
substitute a different component.
CEC Signal Management
The primary objective of every Crestron system is to enable precisely the control desired for a seamless user experience.
To ensure this outcome, DM switchers intercept the CEC signals that many HDMI devices automatically generate, preventing
any unwanted commands from being executed – like a Blu-ray player attempting to turn off the video display when it gets
turned off, or a DVD player trying to pause the other players in the system when it is playing. Through proper CEC management, DigitalMedia allows you to take control of each device as you like.
10
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Ethernet Integration
DigitalMedia provides an Ethernet transport method in addition to HDMI, control, and USB HID transport. DigitalMedia carries
10/100 Ethernet to each room controller, supporting streaming media for multimedia devices, or providing LAN connectivity
for any room device that requires Ethernet or Internet access. Its Gigabit Ethernet connection to the external LAN helps
maximize bandwidth for each network port. Ethernet is also utilized internally by the Crestron control bus to manage all of the
DM devices in the system and provide display control in each room.
All DM products are Ethernet devices. Ethernet is transported via every DM-CAT, DM 8G, and DM-Fiber connection. When
using a DM-MD8X8, DM-MD16X16, DM-MD32X32, or DM-MD6X1 at the core of your system, the Ethernet uplink occurs at
the switcher, and Ethernet is distributed to the transmitter(s) or room box (or boxes) via the integrated 10/100 Ethernet switch
contained in the switcher, making separate LAN connections unnecessary.
Each DM device (switcher, transmitter, room box) must receive an IP address, via either DHCP (server required)
or static assigning.
Point to Point Systems
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
11
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Switcher Based Systems
DM room boxes (CAT, 8G, and Fiber versions) come fully equipped with an integrated Ethernet switch, and a spare port
is provided. In a scenario where the room box is connected to a DM switcher, this port can be used for connecting other
Ethernet devices. In a point-to-point scenario, the Ethernet port can be used as an uplink to the main network. For example,
if a system contains a DM-TX-200 and a DM-RMC-100, the room box must serve as the uplink point, since the DM-TX-200
does not provide an Ethernet port. But if the DM-TX-200 is replaced with a DM-TX-100 or DM-TX-300, then Ethernet uplink
can happen at either of the transmitters or at the room box, since all of these devices have an available Ethernet port.
NOTE: Both Ethernet ports should not be plugged into the same network. The network connection should be via the switcher
and not the transmitter or receiver.
12
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
The HD-DTDS Specification and Certification
Crestron DigitalMedia was developed to meet the challenges of the digital era. Now, DigitalMedia is rapidly becoming an
industry standard with thousands of successful installations. To guarantee the reliable performance of DigitalMedia systems,
Crestron has created the HD Digital Transport and Distribution System (HD-DTDS) specification. This new spec establishes
an industry standard, and the DM certification program ensures that AV professionals are fully educated and adhere to the
standard. This sets a high benchmark for digital AV systems and gives clients the confidence that our industry remains a
trusted and valued technology resource.
The HD-DTDS specification is a comprehensive roadmap that clearly defines the critical aspects of system design and installation that must be followed to assure reliable system performance. Crestron guarantees and fully supports any DM system
installation that conforms to the HD-DTDS standards.
The complete HD-DTDS specification is available on the Crestron website at www.crestron.com/dmresources.
Crestron offers two levels of certification specific to DigitalMedia.
DM Certified Designer (DMC-D)
The DMC-D track is a free one-day course that concludes with an exam that must be
passed to earn certification. It is a prerequisite for DMC-E. A DM Certified Designer
understands the fundamental differences between analog and digital systems and
the unique design considerations needed to ensure reliable operation. Consultants
are widely adopting the HD-DTDS specification and are earning DMC-D certification.
Classes are conducted in Crestron regional offices throughout North America. Check
the schedule for the next available class near you at www.crestron.com/dmcertification.
DM Certified Engineer (DMC-E)
The DMC-E certification builds upon the DMC-D class. This rigorous three day
program details every aspect of system installation and commissioning. DM certified
engineers demonstrate proficiency in system setup, diagnostics, testing and reporting.
Only a DMC-E is equipped to fully execute and support a DM project. Written into the
specification, only dealers with a DMC-E on staff will be qualified to bid on projects
designed using the HD-DTDS.
Check the schedule for the next available class near you at www.crestron.com/
dmcertification. There is a $1,000 non-waivable registration fee for DMC-E courses.
Courses are in high demand, so registration is limited to only two people per company
per class. The DMC-E course includes DMC-D certification, so there is no need to
register for DMC-D certification.
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
13
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Design and Install a DigitalMedia System
This section will take you though the four steps to successfully design a Crestron DigitalMedia system. The steps are as
follows:
Step 1 – Selecting Wiring Type. The choice of cable determines the output cards and room controllers.
Step 2 – Selecting DigitalMedia Equipment. Pick the correct switch frame, input and output cards, and distribution boxes.
Step 3 – Pre-wiring. Notes and recommendations on system wiring.
Step 4 – System Commissioning. How to optimize the system by managing HDCP keys and EDID data.
NOTE: The wiring choice depends on your installation, including any pre-existing infrastructure and the run lengths required.
Step 1: Select the Wiring for Each Run
DigitalMedia supports the following wiring options:
1. DigitalMedia 8G Shielded Twisted Pair (DM-CBL-8G)
2. CresFiber® 8G Multimode Fiber (CRESFIBER8G)
3. Third party multimode fiber
4. DigitalMedia CAT (DM-CBL, DM-CBL-D)
5. Add DigitalMedia “D” Cable to a system where CAT5 is already in place. Use for the “D” side of DM.
Cross-Section Comparison of Cables
DM “D” Cable
DM-CBL-D
DM 8G STP
CATSTP
DM 8G
DM-CBL-8G
DM-CBL
DM-CBL-8G
0.526
in in
0.185
0.185 in
CresFiber 8G
CresFiberDM
8GCAT
CRESFIBER8G
CRESFIBER-8G
DM-CBL
DM CAT
DM “D” Cable
CresFiber
CresFiber
8G
DM “D” Cable
DM 8G STP
DM
“D” Cable
DM
CAT 8G
DM-CBL
DM-CBL-D
CRESFIBER-8G
CRESFIBER-8G
DM-CBL-D
DM-CBL-D
DM-CBL DM-CBL-8G
0.36 in 0.526 in
in in
0.185 in0.5260.36
0.185 in
0.36
0.185inin
• One cable run of DM-CBL, DM-CBL-8G, or CRESFIBER8G is required for each DM room controller (DM-RMC)
connection (refer to Table A for transmission distance capabilities).
• DigitalMedia CAT supports repeaters (DM-DR) to extend transmission distance.
• The transmission distances between repeaters are determined by the video resolution sent over the wires. The
total distance that video can be sent using repeaters is also shown in “Table A - Distances for Original DigitalMedia
Devices” for each cable type. Up to two repeaters may be used to extend the transmission distance.
• The DM Fiber and DM 8G solutions do not use repeaters.
14
DM “D”
8G STP
Cable
DM-CBL-8G
DM-CBL-D
0.185
0.185inin
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Table A - Distances for Original DigitalMedia Devices
Resolution
DigitalMedia CAT
(DM-CBL, DM-CBL-D)
CresFiber®
(CRESFIBER)
CresFiber® 8G
(CRESFIBER8G)
H
T
T
T
Distance between
repeaters
Total distance using up to
2 repeaters
Total Distance
Total Distance
1000 ft (300 m)
1000 ft (300 m)
1080i / 720p / 1080p 24Hz
200 ft (60 m)
1024x768 60Hz
200 ft (60 m)
1280x1024 60Hz
150 ft (45 m)
1920x1200 60Hz
150 ft (45 m)
1080p 60Hz
150 ft (45 m)
1600x1200 60Hz
125 ft (38 m)
375 ft (114 m)
1080p 60Hz Deep Color
50 ft (15 m)
150 ft (45 m)
450 ft (137 m)
NOTE: DM-CBL runs must be a minimum of 15 feet; Original DM devices cannot be used with DM-CBL-8G.
DigitalMedia CAT
H = Distance between repeaters
T = Total distance using up to two repeaters
CresFiber and CresFiber 8G
Fiber transmission distances are not affected
by video resolution, so only a single number
for total distance is shown. Unlike the DM CAT
solution, no repeaters are used.
What is 8G?
DigitalMedia 8G provides ultra high-speed communications over long distances without a repeater. With DM 8G, the entire
uncompressed DigitalMedia signal (Ethernet, HD video, audio, control, USB data) is transmitted over a single fiber or shielded
twisted pair cable. The simplified wiring reduces system complexity and installation time. Power can be provided with the
PoE standard, replacing the external power supply (see Powering DigitalMedia 8G, page 39).
Look for the 8G label to easily find DigitalMedia 8G products.
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
15
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Table B - Distances for DigitalMedia 8G Devices
Resolution
DM 8G STP
(DM-CBL-8G)
DM Cable
(DM-CBL, DM-CBL-D)
CresFiber® 8G
(CRESFIBER8G)
CresFiber®
(CRESFIBER)
T
T
T
T
Total Distance
Total distance
Total Distance
Total Distance
330 ft (100 m)
200 ft (60 m)
1000 ft (300 m)
500 ft (150 m)
1080i / 720p / 1080p 24Hz
1024x768 60Hz
1280x1024 60Hz
1920x1200 60Hz
1080p 60Hz
1600x1200 60Hz
1080p 60Hz Deep Color
DM 8G STP
Unlike original DM devices, no repeaters are
used with DM 8G products, regardless of wire
type.
CresFiber 8G
Similar to original DM fiber, DM 8G fiber does
not require repeaters and resolution does not
affect distance.
About Deep Color
Deep Color is an option that was added to HDMI 1.3. It allows devices to transmit video using 36 bits per pixel instead of
24 bits per pixel. This new color depth allows for 4096 shades each of red, green and blue instead of only 256. It is a good
concept, but in reality it is unlikely to be available anytime soon. Cable and satellite companies do not have the bandwidth
to support transmission of that size. Some Blu-ray players “support” Deep Color, but the Blu-ray standard does not.
This means that the content itself is only 24-bit and the player just dithers the colors, providing no real increase in
video quality.
Given the lack of support for this feature and the decrease in transmission distances that it entails, Crestron recommends
using standard 1080p unless Deep Color is specifically requested.
16
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
DigitalMedia Copper Cable Specifications
DigitalMedia 8G Cable
(DM-CBL-8G)
DigitalMedia CAT
(DM-CBL)
DigitalMedia “D” Cable
(DM-CBL-D)
Outer Diameter (Non-Plenum)
0.244 ± 0.008 in (6.2 ± 0.2 mm)
0.58 in (14.73 mm)
0.3 in (7.62 mm)
Outer Diameter (Plenum)
0.252 ± 0.008 in (6.4 ± 0.2 mm)
0.58 in (14.73 mm)
0.3 in (7.62 mm)
Minimum Bend Radius
2.75 in
4.5 in
3.5 in
Maximum Pull Tension
25 lbf
73 lbf
28 lbf
NOTE: It is recommended to install a pull box at every 90 degree bend to ensure that the DM cable can be put through the
conduit with minimal stress to the wire.
About the Cable
DigitalMedia 8G STP
DM 8G STP is ultra-high performance twisted pair wire for connecting DigitalMedia products. DM 8G STP carries the entire
DM signal (HD video, audio, Ethernet, and USB) on one thin cable up to 330 feet without repeaters.
• DM-CBL-8G-NP-SP500 (non-plenum) supplied in 500 ft spools
• DM-CBL-8G-P-SP500 (plenum) supplied in 500 ft spools
DigitalMedia CAT
This cable is specially engineered by Crestron for DigitalMedia. Up to two patch panels may be used on any DigitalMedia CAT
run, but they must use shielded connectors rated for CAT6a. Because the “D” video cable is shielded, it must be terminated
using shielded RJ45 connectors provided by Crestron (DM-CONN). These connectors can be terminated without any special
tools; all that is needed is a wire cutter/stripper. Refer to Data Sheet Doc. 6767B for additional termination details.
DigitalMedia CAT is available in two versions, plenum and non-plenum:
• DM-CBL-NP-SP500
DigitalMedia CAT - (1) High bandwidth/low crosstalk shielded 4-twisted-pair,
(1) CAT5e, and (1) DMNet control cable; non-plenum, 500 ft spool
• DM-CBL-P-SP500
DigitalMedia CAT - (1) High bandwidth/low crosstalk shielded 4-twisted-pair,
(1) CAT5e, and (1) DMNet control cable; plenum-rated, 500 ft spool
DigitalMedia “D” Cable
Use DigitalMedia “D” Cable to upgrade existing QM systems where CRESCAT-QM is already in place. DM “D” Cable is also
useful in conduit where you need to pull the three DM cables separately because the diameter of a single jacket is too large.
• DM-CBL-D-NP-SP500 (non-plenum) supplied in 500 ft spools
• DM-CBL-D-P-SP500 (plenum) supplied in 500 ft spools
NOTE: Transmission distance is limited to 200 feet max when using DM-CBL or DM-CBL-D to transport DM 8G signals. See
“Table B - Distances for DigitalMedia 8G Devices” on page 16 for more details.
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
17
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
CresFiber® 8G
Crestron makes available a multimode fiber solution for DigitalMedia. CresFiber 8G contains four strands of 50 micron
multimode fiber for long distance transmission inside a single jacket. Two strands are used with original DigitalMedia devices
and the other two strands are available for redundancy and expansion. When using with DM 8G Fiber devices, one strand is
used for DigitalMedia and three strands are for redundancy and expansion.
CresFiber 8G is easy to run and terminate for cable runs that are 300m (1000 ft) or less, and it is highly recommended for
these applications. It contains four fiber strands in a “breakout” cable formation; each strand has its own 3mm jacket with
strength members inside. This gives it the ability to be terminated directly to the SC connector, without requiring a breakout
kit, because each strand can support a large amount of tension.
• CRESFIBER8G-NP: CresFiber fiber optic breakout cable: (4) 50/125 multimode fiber strands available in 500 ft and
1000 ft spools.
• CRESFIBER8G-P: Plenum-rated version available in 500 ft and 1000 ft spools.
• See “Appendix D: Crestron Certified Cables” on page 64 for pre-terminated CresFiber models
NOTE: CRESFIBER has been replaced by CRESFIBER8G in the Crestron catalog as of December 2010.
Fiber Termination
CRESFIBER-TK Termination Kit
DigitalMedia fiber devices use two standard SC multimode connectors for each
signal (DigitalMedia 8G devices only need one). Termination of CresFiber cable can
be accomplished in under 10 minutes per connector using Crestron CRESFIBERCONN-SC50UM connectors and the CRESFIBER-TK termination kit.
The kit includes everything necessary to cut, prepare, clean, and terminate the
fiber. An instructional DVD also accompanies the kit to show proper fiber handling
and termination.
Selecting Third-Party Fiber (advanced)
Picking the correct fiber cabling for your application is a function of distance and the physical location of the cable. The optical
fiber (the part that carries the optical signal) determines the distance, and the jacket configuration depends on the application
(i.e. plenum, outdoor rating, number of fibers, etc). Either 50u or 62.5u multimode fiber may be used so long as the bandwidth
of the fiber is sufficient.
If CresFiber 8G cannot be used, OM3 rated fiber may be substituted for applications using original DM fiber and DM 8G fiber
devices. If OM3 is unavailable, see the bandwidth calculations in the next section for more options. The following section
applies only to DM Fiber applications and is not for DM 8G Fiber applications.
NOTE: DM 8G fiber signals can be carried a maximum of 500 ft using standard OM3 fiber.
Fiber Bandwidth
NOTE: Only for applications using original DM fiber devices (models with “-F” suffix). Not for applications using DM 8G fiber
devices (models with “-S” suffix).
Your selection of fiber cabling must have enough bandwidth to carry the DigitalMedia signals. The bandwidth of multimode
fiber is inversely proportional to the length of the fiber, because of the way multimode fiber works. The bandwidth of the
fiber is measured in Effective Modal Bandwidth (EMB), or MHz*km. For example, a 500MHz*km fiber can carry a 500MHz
signal 1km, or a 250MHz signal 2km. Each fiber cable also has a different EMB rating at the two commonly used multimode
wavelengths, 850nm and 1300nm.
18
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
NOTE: The bandwidth of fiber cables are calculated based on several different standards put out by the TIA/EIA. This is
because the bandwidths vary slightly, depending on whether the light source is a laser or LED. DigitalMedia is a laser-based
fiber system, so the laser bandwidth should be used. This is sometimes referred to as RML BW (restricted mode launch
bandwidth) or EMBc (Effective Modal Bandwidth calculated).
The calculations must be done at both wavelengths to ensure there is enough bandwidth for each. The DigitalMedia application requires the following bandwidth over fiber:
1200MHz @ 850nm
150MHz @ 1300nm
To calculate the distance that a DigitalMedia fiber transmission can be run, divide the bandwidth rating of the fiber by the
DigitalMedia bandwidth. Consider the following examples:
Example 1
Corning® infiniCor600® has the following bandwidth ratings: 500MHz*km @ 850nm and 500MHz*km @ 1300nm.
How far can you send DigitalMedia over that fiber?
850nm: 500MHz*km / 1200MHz = 416m (1365 ft)
1300nm: 500MHz*km / 150MHz = 3.3km (10,826 ft)
NOTE: Regardless of calculation results, 1,000 ft (300 m) is the maximum distance the DM signal can be transmitted.
This fiber is able to drive DigitalMedia up to 416m (1365 ft). If you know the distance and need to determine which fiber
will work, you can also multiply the DigitalMedia bandwidth by the distance to find the minimum fiber bandwidth.
Example 2
I need to send DigitalMedia over fiber 300m. What is the bandwidth requirement for my fiber cable?
850nm: 1200MHz * 300m = 360MHz*km
1300nm: 150MHz * 300m = 45MHz*km
Corning infiniCor600 supports 500MHz*km at both wavelengths, therefore it is an acceptable fiber type for this installation.
Selecting the Jacket Configuration
When using fiber, it is recommended that you have at least two spare fibers for each location; a minimum of four strands in
your fiber jacket should be run to each endpoint. Ensure that your fiber cable has the correct ratings for your installation
(i.e. plenum, outdoor, UL, etc). Crestron recommends using a breakout type cable system for basic installations, because the
fibers can be directly terminated to the DigitalMedia equipment.
Minimum Fiber Optic Cable Bending Radius
Loaded: 20 x Diameter (0.313 in) = 6.26 in
Unloaded: 10 x Diameter (0.313 in) = 3.13 in
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
19
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Wiring Example
An example of copper and fiber room controller wiring connections to a DM-MD8X8 Switcher.
M A T R IX
CRESTRON
D M -M D 8X 8
E THE RNET
D M C -H D -D S P
H D M I IN P U T
H D M I IN
2 4V D C P O W E R (55W )
S LO T 1 D M C O-12
D M OU TP UT
U S B H ID
C resF ib er
S LO T 1
FIBER D
FIBER M
HDM I OUT
COM
F IB E R D
M U L T IM O D E FIBER
F IB E R M
A U D IO O U T L
PWR
A U D IO O U T R
LAN
HDM I OUT
D M C -H D -D S P
H D M I IN P U T
D M F IB E R R E C E IV E R / ROOM CONTROLLER
CRESTRON
2 4V D C P O W E R (6W )
D M -R M C -1 0 0-F
S LO T 2
IR O U T 1
IR O U T 2
SENS D IG IT A L IN PU T
RELAY 1
RELAY 2
U SB H ID
P O W E R S U P P LY
CRESTRON
H D M I IN
U S B H ID
24VD C OUT
FIBER D
1 2 0 V A C PW R IN
FIBER M
A U D IO O U T L
A U D IO O U T R
HDM I OUT
D M C -H D -D S P
H D M I IN P U T
D M -C BL
S LO T 3
H D M I IN
HDM I OUT
U S B H ID
D
M
D M CAT R E C E IV E R / ROOM CONTROLLER
CRESTRON
2 4V D C P O W E R (6W )
D M -R M C -1 00
HDM I OUT
LOW CROSSTALK STP - TE R M IN A TE S TO S H IE LDED CO NNECTO R
T E R M IN A T E S T O S T A N D A R D RJ-45 CO NNECTO R
D
COM
M
IR O U T 1
IR O U T 2
A U D IO O U T L
A U D IO O U T R
HDM I OUT
LAN
HDM I OUT
D M C -H D -D S P
H D M I IN P U T
S LO T 4
SENS D IG IT A L IN PU T
RELAY 1
RELAY 2
U SB H ID
H D M I IN
U S B H ID
D
M
A U D IO O U T L
A U D IO O U T R
D M 8G FIBER R E C E IV E R / ROOM CONTROLLER
HDM I OUT
D M C O-45
D M OU TP UT
C resF ib er
S LO T 2
F IB E R MMF/SC
CRESTRON
D M -R M C -1 00-S
2 4V D C P O W E R
HDM I OUT
M U L T IM O D E FIBER
DM IN MMF/SC
COM
IR O U T 1
IR O U T 2
24V
HDM I OUT
P O W E R S U P P LY
CRESTRON
24VD C OUT
D M -C BL -8G
F IB E R MMF/SC
CRESTRON
D M -R M C -1 00-C
24V
PoE IN
24VD C OUT
HDM I OUT
D M -C BL -8G
DM NET
A U D IO O U T L
A U D IO O U T R
HDM I OUT
20
HDM I OUT
COM
IR O U T 1
IR O U T 2
LAN
1 2 0 V A C PW R IN
D M 8G STP R E C E IV E R / ROOM CONTROLLER
CRESTRON
2 4V D C P O W E R
D M -R M C -1 00-C
HDM I OUT
D
M
2 4V D C P O W E R
P O W E R S U P P LY
CRESTRON
DM OUT
S LO T 8
1 2 0 V A C PW R IN
D M 8G STP R E C E IV E R / ROOM CONTROLLER
DM IN
D M C -C A T
D M IN P U T
LAN
COM
DM OUT
PoE IN
DM IN
CAT5
P O W E R S U P P LY
CRESTRON
PWE-4803W
E T H E R N ET
PoE
1 2 0 V A C PW R IN
24V
IR O U T 1
IR O U T 2
LAN
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Step 2: Select DigitalMedia Equipment
Switcher Chassis
There are three DigitalMedia switcher card frames available: DM-MD8X8, DM-MD16X16, and DM-MD32X32. Each switcher
permits inputs to be cascaded with up to four additional switchers, increasing the number of available outputs in the system
while maintaining HDCP compliance. For example, using five DM-MD16X16 switchers in a system will provide a total of 80
available outputs. Even more switchers can be cascaded for applications that do not require HDCP support. Available output
card configurations are explained later in this guide.
• Input and output cards must be selected upon time of order
• Switchers will ship pre-loaded with your custom configuration
• DM-MD8X8 and DM-MD32X32: input and output cards may be added and reconfigured in the field
• DM-MD16X16: only input cards may be added and reconfigured in the field; output cards must be added or configured by Crestron
NOTES:
1. DisplayPort Multimode connectivity is supported via an HDMI or DVI input port using a suitable adapter or interface
cable (not included).
2. For external DMNet power, use a Crestron CNPWS-75, C2N-SPWS300, or other Cresnet power supply as required.
3. DMNet uses the same physical connectors as Cresnet, but the two protocols are not compatible. Be sure you do not
cross-wire DMNet and Cresnet.
4. The EIG connector on the DM product switchers is used to jumper in external power (in the same manner as the
PAC2). See the power and heat calculations on page 39.
5. DigitalMedia 8G does not use DMNet power. See page 39 for details on powering DM 8G.
What is RPS?
All three DigitalMedia switcher card frames are available with a redundant power supply, denoted by “-RPS” at the end of
the model name. With the RPS option, in the event one of the power supplies should fail, the unit will continue to operate as
normal. The DM-MD8X8-RPS, DM-MD16X16-RPS and DM-MD32X32-RPS have an MTBF (Mean Time Between Failures) of
1,000,000 hours.
NOTE: RPS models do not provide DMNet power internally. Instead, DMNet power must be provided by external power
supplies like CNPWS-75 and C2N-SPWS300.
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
21
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
DM-MD8X8 and DM-MD8X8-RPS
• Eight input card slots (field upgradable) for up to eight AV sources
• Eight DM room outputs and/or HDMI outputs; up to 40 outputs using multiple chassis
• Two DMCO-xx type output cards; field upgradeable
• Full audio and USB breakaway
• DM-MD8X8-RPS has an internal redundant power supply for utmost reliability (MTBF of 1,000,000 hours)
DM-MD16X16 and DM-MD16X16-RPS
• 16 input card slots (field upgradeable) for up to 16 AV sources
• 16 DM room outputs and/or HDMI outputs; up to 80 outputs using multiple chassis
• Two DMCO-xxxx type output cards; factory installed
• Full audio and USB breakaway
• DM-MD16X16-RPS has an internal redundant power supply for utmost reliability (MTBF of 1,000,000 hours)
22
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
DM-MD32X32 and DM-MD32X32-RPS
• 32 input card slots (field upgradeable) for up to 32 AV sources
• 32 DM room outputs and/or HDMI outputs; up to 160 outputs using multiple chassis
• Eight DMCO-xx type output cards; field upgradeable
• Full audio and USB breakaway
• 14-space 19-inch rack-mountable
• DM-MD32X32-RPS has 3 power supplies (2 required for operation) for utmost reliability (MTBF of 1,000,000 hours)
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
23
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
DigitalMedia Switcher Input Cards - Local Sources
All input cards provide an HDMI loop output for switcher expansion.
DMC-HD
DMC-HD-DSP
Includes HDMI input, RCA analog audio output (which breaks out the
embedded HDMI audio to feed a multi-room audio distribution system),
and USB HID port (passes a remote mouse/keyboard signal to the source
device, i.e. computer, game console, etc.).
Includes HDMI input, RCA analog audio output (which breaks out the
embedded HDMI audio to feed a multi-room audio distribution system),
and USB HID port (passes a remote mouse/keyboard signal to the source
device, i.e. computer, game console, etc.), plus internal DSP processing to
simultaneously provide both uncompressed 7.1 channel HD surround sound
and 2-channel audio for distribution via the RCA analog audio output,
HDMI, and DigitalMedia.
DMC-VID-RCA-D
Includes multi-format RCA inputs supporting component, S-video, and
composite video signals. Also includes SPDIF digital audio input.
DMC-VID-RCA-A
Includes multi-format RCA inputs supporting component, S-video, and
composite video signals. Also includes RCA analog audio input.
DMC-VID-BNC
Includes multi-format BNC inputs supporting component, S-video,
composite video signals, and balanced or unbalanced stereo audio.
DMC-VID4
Includes four RCA composite video inputs w/built-in sequential switcher
and quad processor. Supports dynamic colored text overlay on all four
video windows for easy identification.
DMC-DVI
Includes DVI-I input supporting DVI, RGBHV, component, S-video, and
composite video signals. Also includes balanced or unbalanced stereo
audio input and USB HID port.
DMC-SDI
Includes support for SD-SDI, HD-SDI and 3G-SDI (1080p/60), while
providing an SDI loop-thru connector. Also includes support for extracting
embedded audio from any of the eight channels.
24
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
DigitalMedia Switcher Input Cards - Remote Sources
DMC-CAT
Receives a DigitalMedia signal from a DigitalMedia transmitter via DM CAT.
Includes DigitalMedia input ports, and RCA analog audio output to break out
audio embedded in the DigitalMedia signal.
DMC-CAT-DSP
Receives a DigitalMedia signal from a DigitalMedia transmitter via DM CAT.
Internal DSP processing enables simultaneous 7.1 and 2-channel audio output.
DMC-F
Receives a DM signal from a DM transmitter via CresFiber or multimode optical
fiber cable. Includes DigitalMedia fiber input and RCA analog audio output.
DMC-F-DSP
Receives a DM signal from a DM transmitter via CresFiber or multimode optical
fiber cable. Internal DSP processing enables simultaneous 7.1 and 2-channel
audio output.
DMC-C
Receives a DigitalMedia signal from a DigitalMedia 8G transmitter via DM 8G
STP. Includes DM 8G STP input, PoE input, and RCA analog audio output to
break out audio embedded in the DigitalMedia signal. See Power and Heat
section for more info on PoE.
DMC-C-DSP
Receives a DigitalMedia signal from a DigitalMedia 8G transmitter via DM 8G
STP. Internal DSP processing enables simultaneous 7.1 and 2-channel audio
output. See Power and Heat section for more info on PoE.
DMC-S
Receives a DigitalMedia signal from a DigitalMedia 8G transmitter via a single
fiber. Includes DM 8G Fiber input and RCA analog audio output to break out
audio embedded in the DigitalMedia signal.
DMC-S-DSP
Receives a DigitalMedia signal from a DigitalMedia 8G transmitter via a single
fiber. Internal DSP processing enables simultaneous 7.1 and 2-channel audio
output.
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
25
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
NOTE: USB HID is a device class, a standard application programming interface (API), which allows devices to communicate
without special drivers. We use the terms “device” port and “host” port – although communication flows both ways, the
important command flow of keyboard strokes, mouse output, etc. goes from the device to the host. The square, type “B”
connector on the DM input cards is considered a host port because it connects to the host, and the DM room controller has
a rectangular type “A” device port for the same reason.
For more information on the USB devices supported by DigitalMedia, please go to www.crestron.com/onlinehelp, Answer ID
5007.
Output Cards
A complete selection of cards is offered to allow numerous combinations of DM (DigitalMedia) and HDMI outputs on a single
DM-MD chassis.
DM CAT, DM 8G STP, DM Fiber, DM 8G Fiber, and HDMI with analog audio output types are available. For the DM CAT, DM
8G STP, and DM 8G Fiber outputs, every other output is accompanied by an HDMI output configured in parallel with the DM
output. This HDMI output carries the same audio and video signals as its companion DM output, perfect for simultaneously
feeding a centralized audio processor via HDMI and a remote display device via DM.
Online Configuration – A convenient on-line program is available to make switcher system configuration simple: www.
crestron.com/dmconfiguration
Configuring the DMCO Cards
DigitalMedia output cards (DMCO) are configured by assembly. There are five types of cards.
26
Type 1
Dual DM Fiber Output
Type 2
Dual DM CAT Output with HDMI
Type 3
Dual HDMI Output with Dual Balanced
Analog Audio
Type 4
Dual DM 8G Fiber Output with HDMI
Type 5
Dual DM 8G STP Output with HDMI
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Each DMCO output card has two, four, six or eight outputs. The DM-MD8X8 can hold two (2) DMCO-xx (must use a 2-digit
DMCO), while the DM-MD16X16 can hold two (2) DMCO-xxxx (must use a 4-digit DMCO), where the “x” is a placeholder for
the card type (1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 0). The DM-MD32X32 can hold (8) DMCO-xx (must use a 2-digit DMCO).
NOTE: A zero (0) in the part name corresponds to a blank slot.
DM-MD8X8
DM-MD32X32
The DM-MD8X8 holds two DMCO-xx type output cards.
DM-MD16X16
The DM-MD16X16 holds two DMCO-xxxx type output cards.
The DM-MD32X32 holds eight DMCO-xx type output cards
Online Configuration – A convenient on-line program is available to make switcher system configuration simple:
www.crestron.com/dmconfiguration
DMCO Examples
DMCO-45
DMCO-45
DMCO-1122
DMCO-2330
NOTE: A blank output board corresponds to the number 0 (zero).
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
27
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
DM-MD8X8 and DM-MD32X32 Output Cards
Output Card
DMCO-10
DMCO-11
DMCO-12
DMCO-13
DMCO-15
DMCO-20
DMCO-22
DMCO-23
DMCO-30
DMCO-33
DMCO-40
DMCO-43
DMCO-44
DMCO-45
DMCO-50
DMCO-53
DMCO-55
DM Fiber Outputs
DM CAT with HDMI
Outputs
HDMI with Stereo
Audio Outputs
DM 8G Fiber with HDMI
Outputs
DM 8G STP with HDMI
Outputs
Type 1
Type 2
Type 3
Type 4
Type 5
2 DM Fiber
4 DM Fiber
2 DM Fiber
2 DM Fiber
2 DM Fiber
2 DM CAT & 1 HDMI
2 HDMI & 2 Stereo
2 8G STP & 1 HDMI
2 DM CAT & 1 HDMI
4 DM CAT & 2 HDMI
2 DM CAT & 1 HDMI
2 HDMI & 2 Stereo
2 HDMI & 2 Stereo
4 HDMI & 4 Stereo
2 HDMI & 2 Stereo
2 8G Fiber & 1 HDMI
2 8G Fiber & 1 HDMI
4 8G Fiber & 2 HDMI
2 8G Fiber & 1 HDMI
2 HDMI & 2 Stereo
2 8G STP & 1 HDMI
2 8G STP & 1 HDMI
2 8G STP & 1 HDMI
4 8G STP & 2 HDMI
DM-MD16X16 Factory-Installed Output Cards
Output Card
DM Fiber Outputs
Type 1
DMCO-1000
DMCO-1100
DMCO-1110
DMCO-1111
DMCO-2100
DMCO-1220
DMCO-2221
DMCO-1120
DMCO-1122
DMCO-1112
DMCO-1300
DMCO-1330
DMCO-1333
DMCO-1130
DMCO-1133
DMCO-1113
DMCO-1550
DMCO-1150
DMCO-1155
DMCO-1115
28
2 DM Fiber
4 DM Fiber
6 DM Fiber
8 DM Fiber
2 DM Fiber
2 DM Fiber
2 DM Fiber
4 DM Fiber
4 DM Fiber
6 DM Fiber
2 DM Fiber
2 DM Fiber
2 DM Fiber
4 DM Fiber
4 DM Fiber
6 DM Fiber
2 DM Fiber
4 DM Fiber
4 DM Fiber
6 DM Fiber
DM CAT with HDMI
Outputs
Type 2
HDMI with Stereo
Audio Outputs
Type 3
DM 8G Fiber with HDMI
Outputs
Type 4
DM 8G STP with HDMI
Outputs
Type 5
2 DM CAT & 1 HDMI
4 DM CAT & 2 HDMI
6 DM CAT & 3 HDMI
2 DM CAT & 1 HDMI
4 DM CAT & 2 HDMI
2 DM CAT & 1 HDMI
2 HDMI & 2 Stereo
4 HDMI & 4 Stereo
6 HDMI & 6 Stereo
2 HDMI & 2 Stereo
4 HDMI & 4 Stereo
2 HDMI & 2 Stereo
4 8G STP & 2 HDMI
2 8G STP & 1 HDMI
4 8G STP & 2 HDMI
2 8G STP & 1 HDMI
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
DMCO-2000
DMCO-2200
DMCO-2220
DMCO-2222
DMCO-2300
DMCO-2330
DMCO-2333
DMCO-2230
DMCO-2233
DMCO-2223
DMCO-3000
DMCO-3300
DMCO-3330
DMCO-3333
DMCO-4000
DMCO-4300
DMCO-4330
DMCO-4333
DMCO-4400
DMCO-4430
DMCO-4433
DMCO-4440
DMCO-4443
DMCO-4444
DMCO-5000
DMCO-5300
DMCO-5330
DMCO-5333
DMCO-5400
DMCO-5440
DMCO-5444
DMCO-5500
DMCO-5530
DMCO-5533
DMCO-5540
DMCO-5544
DMCO-5550
DMCO-5551
DMCO-5553
DMCO-5554
DMCO-5555
2 DM CAT & 1 HDMI
4 DM CAT & 2 HDMI
6 DM CAT & 3 HDMI
8 DM CAT & 4 HDMI
2 DM CAT & 1 HDMI
2 DM CAT & 1 HDMI
2 DM CAT & 1 HDMI
4 DM CAT & 2 HDMI
4 DM CAT & 2 HDMI
6 DM CAT & 3 HDMI
2 HDMI & 2 Stereo
4 HDMI & 4 Stereo
6 HDMI & 6 Stereo
2 HDMI & 2 Stereo
4 HDMI & 4 Stereo
2 HDMI & 2 Stereo
2 HDMI & 2 Stereo
4 HDMI & 4 Stereo
6 HDMI & 6 Stereo
8 HDMI & 8 Stereo
2 HDMI & 2 Stereo
4 HDMI & 4 Stereo
6 HDMI & 6 Stereo
2 HDMI & 2 Stereo
4 HDMI & 4 Stereo
2 HDMI & 2 Stereo
2 8G Fiber & 1 HDMI
2 8G Fiber & 1 HDMI
2 8G Fiber & 1 HDMI
2 8G Fiber & 1 HDMI
4 8G Fiber & 2 HDMI
4 8G Fiber & 2 HDMI
4 8G Fiber & 2 HDMI
6 8G Fiber & 3 HDMI
6 8G Fiber & 3 HDMI
8 8G Fiber & 4 HDMI
2 HDMI & 2 Stereo
4 HDMI & 4 Stereo
6 HDMI & 6 Stereo
2 8G Fiber & 1 HDMI
4 8G Fiber & 2 HDMI
6 8G Fiber & 3 HDMI
2 HDMI & 2 Stereo
4 HDMI & 4 Stereo
2 8G Fiber & 1 HDMI
4 8G Fiber & 2 HDMI
2 DM Fiber
2 HDMI & 2 Stereo
2 8G Fiber & 1 HDMI
2 8G STP & 1 HDMI
2 8G STP & 1 HDMI
2 8G STP & 1 HDMI
2 8G STP & 1 HDMI
2 8G STP & 1 HDMI
2 8G STP & 1 HDMI
2 8G STP & 1 HDMI
4 8G STP & 2 HDMI
4 8G STP & 2 HDMI
4 8G STP & 2 HDMI
4 8G STP & 2 HDMI
4 8G STP & 2 HDMI
6 8G STP & 3 HDMI
6 8G STP & 3 HDMI
6 8G STP & 3 HDMI
6 8G STP & 3 HDMI
8 8G STP & 4 HDMI
NOTE: The DMCO cards for the DM-MD16X16 are factory installed and configured.
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
29
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
DigitalMedia Room Controllers
Room controllers provide the connection between the DM signal and output devices such as a television. The table below
lists the features for each model. All room controllers feature a low profile design, perfect for installation behind flat panel
displays and above ceiling mounted projectors. The included external power supply should be used with the DM-RMC-100-F,
DM-RMC-100-C, DM-RMC-200-C, DM-RMC-100-S, and DM-RMC-150-S.
Feature Comparison
Model Name
DM-RMC-100-1
DM-RMC-100-F
DM-RMC-100-C
DM-RMC-100-S
DM-RMC-150-S
DM 8G STP
DM 8G Fiber
DM 8G Fiber
HDMI or DVI
HDMI or DVI
HDMI or DVI
HDMI or DVI
HDMI
HDMI or Analog
HDMI
HDMI or Analog
-
-
30 Watts
-
-
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
DM Communication
DM CAT
DM Fiber
DM 8G STP
Output Video Types
HDMI or DVI
HDMI or DVI
Output Audio Types
HDMI
HDMI
Stereo Amplifier
-
IR Ports
COM Ports
Ethernet
Power Supply
USB Port
DM-RMC-200-C
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
-
Included
Included
Included
Included
Included
Yes
Yes
-
Yes
-
Yes
Relays
2
2
-
2
-
2
Contact Sensing Input
1
1
-
1
-
1
Surface mount
Surface mount
Surface mount
2-gang wall box
Surface mount
Surface mount
Mounting
DM-RMC-100-1
30
DM-RMC-100-F
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
DM-RMC-100-C
DM-RMC-200-C
DM-RMC-100-S
DM-RMC-150-S
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
31
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
DigitalMedia In-Wall Transmitters and Receivers
DM transmitters provide the ability to add remote sources to the switcher system via DM cables and DM-CAT or Fiber cards.
DM transmitters may be used in conjunction with DM switchers, repeaters and receivers.
DM-TX-100/-F DigitalMedia HDMI Transmitter
• Connects to DigitalMedia switcher or receiver via DM CAT (DM-TX-100) or multimode fiber (DM-TX-100-F)
• HDMI/DVI input
• USB HID type “B” host port
• IR/1-way RS-232 port
• LAN port
• Rack-rail or surface mountable
DM-TX-100
DM-TX-100-F
32
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
DM-TX-200 DigitalMedia RGB + HDMI/DVI Transmitter
• 2x1 DigitalMedia switcher transmitter for laptop AV and keyboard/mouse commands over DM CAT
• Connects to DigitalMedia switcher or receiver via DM CAT
• RGBHV and HDMI/DVI input
• Analog audio input
• USB type “A” HID device port
• Mount on surface or in Wiremold® 6000 trough horizontally
DM-TX-201-C DigitalMedia 8G STP Transmitter
• 2x1 DigitalMedia switcher transmitter for computer/AV sources and
keyboard/mouse commands over DM 8G STP
• Connects to DigitalMedia switcher or receiver via DM 8G STP
• RGBHV and HDMI/DVI/DisplayPort Multimode input
• Analog audio input
• USB type “A” HID device port
• Local HDMI monitor output
• Mounts on a flat surface or placed on a shelf
DM-TX-201-S DigitalMedia 8G Fiber Transmitter
• 2x1 DigitalMedia switcher transmitter for computer/AV sources
• and keyboard/mouse commands over CresFiber
• Connects to DigitalMedia switcher or receiver via CresFiber
• RGBHV and HDMI/DVI/DisplayPort Multimode input
• Analog audio input
• USB type “A” HID device port
• Local HDMI monitor output
• Mounts on a flat surface or placed on a shelf
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
33
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
DM-TX-300N/-F DigitalMedia HDMI, DVI-I, + Analog Video Transmitter
The DM-TX-300N allows any common AV signal (video, RGB, DVI, HDMI, DisplayPort Multimode) to be transmitted over a
single wire and output locally. It provides an Ethernet port as well as RS-232 and IR control. This combination enables the
DM-TX-300N to replace traditionally separate pieces of equipment—the analog video extender, digital video extender, video
DA, and mini control processor. It can also be used to extend the input types of an MPS system by adding support for digital
video devices.
• Connects to a DM switcher or receiver via DM CAT
(DM-TX-300N) or fiber (DM-TX-300N-F)
• DVI-I input
• HDMI input
• HDMI output – Can mirror DVI input or follow DM
output
• 1 SPDIF digital audio input
• 2 analog stereo audio inputs – balanced and
unbalanced
•
•
•
•
•
•
Component/S-video/Composite video input
IR/1-way serial port
2-way RS-232 serial port
LAN port
Rack mountable (1 RU)
Can be used as an HDMI converter for analog
signals
• Front panel input selection button
• Power supply included with DM-TX-300N-F
DM-TX1-1G and DM-RX1-1G
The DM-TX1-1G is a single-gang DM CAT HDMI transmitter. The DM-RX1-1G
is a single-gang DM CAT HDMI receiver.
These products can transmit/receive a 1080p/60 8-bit color HDMI signal
125 feet using DM CAT. Repeaters may be used to extend the distance.
These devices connect to other DM products via DM CAT (not fiber) and are
powered by DMNet.
• Compact 1-gang wall mount design
• Fits in a FSR FL-500P-6 Floor Box
• Provides HDMI digital video/audio input at any location
• Also supports DVI and DisplayPort Multimode sources
34
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
DM-TX-200-2G and DM-TX-400-3G
The DM-TX-200-2G and DM-TX-400-3G provide a remote input connection for HDMI and RGB sources as part of a complete
DigitalMedia System and connect to the input of a DM Switcher or RoomBox via DM CAT. Includes a USB HID device port,
allowing a mouse/keyboard to be connected for controlling a computer or other host device at a different location. The
DM-TX-400-3G also includes a remote input for SPDIF and analog AV sources. The DM-TX-200-2G mounts in a 2-gang
electrical box, while the DM-TX-400-3G mounts in a 3-gang electrical box.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Built-in 2x1 AV switcher (200-2G) or 4x1 AV switcher (400-3G)
2-gang (200-2G) or 3-gang (400-3G) wall mount design
Fits in a FSR FL-500P-6 Floor Box
Provides HDMI and RGB/component video inputs
DM-TX-400-3G also provides component and composite inputs
Supports DVI and DisplayPort Multimode sources
Includes mini-TRS stereo audio input
Provides onboard auto-switching capability
Includes USB HID keyboard/mouse port
Detects and reports detailed video and audio input information
Performs automatic AV signal format management via EDID
Enables device control via CEC
Easy setup and diagnostics tools via software
Extends the life of analog-based AV systems
DM-TX-200-2G
DM-TX-400-3G
NOTES:
1. For wiring, use DM-CBL DigitalMedia Cable (DM CAT).
2. HDMI requires an appropriate adapter or interface cable to accommodate a DVI or DisplayPort Multimode signal. CBL-HDDVI and CBL-DP-HD interface cables available separately (see “Appendix D: Crestron Certified Cables” on page 64).
3. The RGB input can accept component, composite, and S-Video signals via direct interface to Crestron MPS Series
products, or through an appropriate adapter (not included). Input sync detection is not provided for composite or S-Video
signal types through the RGB connection.
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
35
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
DigitalMedia Repeater DM-DR
Reproduces signal for error-free delivery with DigitalMedia Cable. Up to two repeaters can be installed in a given signal path.
• Allows DM Cable lengths to be extended in up to 200 ft. increments
• Up to 2 repeaters may be installed in a single DM cable run to enable cable lengths up to 450 feet
• Mounts to a standard 2-gang, 4” square, or UK electrical box
NOTE: DM-DR is not compatible with DM 8G products.
Installing the Repeaters
Repeaters mount to a deep 2-gang or 4-inch square wall
box. DM CAT connections are on the back side and tuck
away neatly inside the gang box.
36
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
DM-MD6X1 Switcher
The DM-MD6X1 is a low cost digital video distribution system designed for a small conference room or classroom. It can
replace three different products: analog video extenders, digital video extenders and USB extenders. It has a variety of input
formats built into the unit enabling you to get all your analog and digital signals into the system without any DM cards. It also
has a built-in power supply to drive connected DM devices so that they don’t need local AC power.
NOTE: DM-MD6X1 is not compatible with DM 8G products.
•
•
•
•
•
•
The DM-MD6X1 can be used as a stand-alone device with transmitters and a room controller
The analog inputs can be expanded with an MPS or RGBHV switcher
The digital inputs can be expanded with an HD-MD8X1 or HD-MD8X2 switcher
Performs analog/HDMI audio conversion
Provides DM devices with 30W of power
Two rack unit size
Video
The DM-MD6X1 supports all common video formats, both analog and digital, and converts them to a single video type to
simplify system design and wiring. The HDMI and DigitalMedia CAT outputs are in parallel so they can be used simultaneously
to send video over structured wiring to the display and output to a local device.
Video Inputs
• Video 1: Composite (NTSC/PAL), S-video (NTSC/
PAL), Component (up to 1080p60)
• Video 2: RGB up to 1920x1200, Component,
S-video and Composite
• HDMI connector, supporting HDCP on any of the
signal types below:
>> HDMI signals up to 1080p60
>> DVI signals up to 1920x1200
>> DisplayPort multimode up to 1920x1200
>> DigitalMedia, from any Crestron DigitalMedia
(CAT) transmitter
Video Outputs
• DM CAT
• HDMI
Audio
The DM-MD6X1 cross-converts all audio formats as well, so analog audio signals can be sent to a display as HDMI audio;
HDMI audio signals from laptops can be output to a traditional analog amplifier.
Audio Inputs
• HDMI and DM – 8-channel high-definition audio
• SPDIF
• Stereo analog audio
USB
Audio Outputs:
• Stereo analog audio with volume control
• 8-channel audio via the DM and HDMI outputs
The DM-MD6X1 can process USB-HID keyboard and mouse signals from other DM devices in the system and relay them to a
connected PC or Mac. Separate USB signal extenders are not required.
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
37
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Step 3: Prewiring
HDCP Wiring Notes
When HDCP is not used, there are no midpoint limitations inherent to DigitalMedia (as with QuickMedia®).
When HDCP is used, too many hops in a single signal path (source to sink) can create potential HDCP problems.
The maximum number of hops is six (i.e., source to wallplate to switcher to receiver to display is three; DM repeaters
and DM receivers are not added to the count).
Contact Crestron Sales Support Services for design support (1-888-CRESTRON).
DigitalMedia CAT
When pre-wiring an installation using DM CAT, ensure that you have provided an area for repeater insertion wherever one
is required, as based on your distance calculations. Crestron recommends that you put the wire in a 2-gang box or trim ring
and leave a 1-foot loop available to splice in a repeater as necessary. There are foot markings on the DM CAT for determining
length of run.
DigitalMedia 8G STP
Repeaters are not compatible with DM 8G STP, so ensure that the 330 foot maximum cable length is sufficient. When wiring,
install DM 8G STP in the same manner as regular CAT6 cable. Consider wiring fiber for cable runs approaching 330 feet.
DigitalMedia Fiber and DigitalMedia 8G Fiber
When installing fiber optic cables, ensure that you have an adequate bend radius available in any conduit you are using. Most
fiber optic cables can support a bend radius of three inches under load. It is also recommended that you install spare fiber
optic strands in the event the fiber breaks. Crestron CresFiber contains 4 strands of fiber. For DM Fiber products, there will be
two spare fiber strands. For DM 8G Fiber products, there will be three spare fiber strands.
Designers should also remember that Crestron recommends that fiber equipment should be powered locally via the included
power supply.
DigitalMedia Device Quantity Limits
There are some HDCP limits as shown, below. Otherwise, there are no DigitalMedia maximum limits. The size of the system
can be increased as far as you like, subject to normal limitations with regard to memory, program size, etc.
• No more than 128 devices total (each DigitalMedia switch counts as one device)
• You cannot go more than six levels – i.e., hops - deep (each DigitalMedia switch counts as one level; see page 52 for
details)
• For design assistance, contact Crestron Sales Support Services
38
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Power and Heat Calculations
The DM-MD8X8, DM-MD16X16, and DM-MD32X32 provide 24VDC power for equipment connected via DM CAT, such as
transmitters, room controllers, and repeaters. RPS models do not supply any power via DMNet. Specifications are as follows:
Max Power
Consumption
Heat Dissipated
(BTU/Hr)
Power available
via DMNet
DM-MD8X8
211 Watts
475
55 Watts
DM-MD16X16
376 Watts
792
110 Watts
DM-MD32X32
1100 Watts
3000
220 Watts
Room Controller, Repeater, and Transmitter Power Consumption:
•
•
•
•
DM-RMC-100-1 – 6 Watts
DM-RX1-1G – 5 Watts
DM-DR – 3 Watts
DM-TX-100 – 9 Watts
•
•
•
•
DM-TX-200 – 12 Watts
DM-TX1-1G – 4 Watts
DM-TX-200-2G – 10 Watts
DM-TX-400-3G – 12 Watts
NOTE: The DM-TX-300N/-F and all DM 8G STP devices (models with a “-C” suffix) ship with a power supply.
If more power is needed for DigitalMedia devices, it can be provided externally using the “EIG” jumpers to bring in power from
a standard 24V Crestron power supply. Refer to the manual for hookup information.
Powering DigitalMedia 8G
DM 8G room controllers and transmitters include external “wall
wart” power supplies. For DM 8G Fiber, the included power supply
is the only option for power. However, for DM 8G STP products,
power can be provided through the DM 8G STP cable. When using
this method, the external power supply is no longer necessary.
Room controllers and transmitters can be placed where power
outlets are not available.
DM 8G PoE Example
The CEN-SW-POE-5 provides four PoE ports that are connected
via CAT5/6 to the “POE IN” ports on each output card. DM 8G STP
connects the output cards to the room controllers and provides power
for the modules.
On the DM 8G STP (DMCO type 5) output cards, there are ports
labeled “POE IN.” Simply connect a CAT5/6 type cable from a PoE
power supply or switch into the “POE IN” port on the output card.
The DM switcher will automatically send this power over DM 8G
STP to the room controllers and transmitters.
Crestron makes several products capable over supplying PoE.
These products include:
• PWE-4803RU: Single port PoE injector; can power one
DM 8G product
• CEN-SW-POE-5: Rack or wall mountable switch;
includes four ports (plus one uplink) and can power up
to four DM 8G products
• CEN-SW-POE-24: Rack mountable switch; includes 24
ports for powering up to 24 DM 8G products
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
39
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Step 4: System Commissioning
The commissioning process tunes the system for optimal performance. Commissioning may be
done from the front panel of the DM switcher or using the Wizard in Crestron Tool Box.
The DigitalMedia system works out of the box to route any of the sources to any display to test
the signal flow.
Once all of the equipment is installed, the system requires commissioning, which tests the
integrity and capabilities of cable, sources and destinations.
The switcher tests all HDMI sources and displays for switching limitations imposed by the
number and support of HDCP Keys.
40
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Appendix A - Application Diagrams
Residential Multi-Room Distribution
Multi-room distribution in residential environments involves the combining of several sources and format types to different makes and resolutions of displays. Crestron DigitalMedia enables the distribution, resolution determination and HDCP
management across a minimal whole home infrastructure. DM allows a homeowner to play the content where they want it,
when they want without compromising resolution.
• Multi-source, multi-room HDMI distribution
• Remote located sources using DM transmitters
• Up to 8 sources and 8 displays
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
41
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Commercial Video Conference Room
Video conference rooms require combining disparate media to be transmitted to a remote location and on multiple local
displays simultaneously. All teleconference codecs now provide an HD signal via HDMI with HDCP protection. The Crestron
DigitalMedia distribution system brings all your sources together—analog and digital—managing resolutions and EDID to
provide the highest quality signal with our exclusive low-latency QuickSwitch HD™ switching technology.
• Multi-source, multi-display/endpoint HDMI distribution
• Remote sources using hot-swappable DM transmitters into interface plates
• Up to 8 sources and 8 displays
42
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Commercial Small Room with Single Display
An average simple presentation room is equipped with a single display and several analog and digital sources for the
presenter, including a laptop port. In addition, the instructor has a local display to view their computer output. These smaller
rooms usually have very tight space requirements for equipment in the lectern. This simple DigitalMedia solution provides a
great amount of AV input flexibility without compromising on digital video or complicating the room wiring.
• Single DM transmitter with multi-source switching
• Single DM receiver provides HDMI content and display control
• System controlled by simple wall mounted interface/processor
NOTE: External power supply not shown
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
43
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Commercial Conference Room with MPS, QM and DM
Components
With a number of input card options and room controller boxes, Crestron DigitalMedia can be easily incorporated into existing
Crestron QuickMedia distribution systems. Integrating DigitalMedia distribution into your existing topology provides access to
High Definition content without having to rebuild an entire installed system.
• MPS-300 provides AV switching and control
• DM-MD6X1 hybrid switcher provides MPS-300 with digital DM connectivity
• QM wall plate transmitters for analog AV sources
• Fliptop QM interface/keypad with DM transmitter provides VGA and HDMI connectivity
• HDMI switcher for additional HDMI sources in the system
• All sources sent to display over a single format and single DM cable
44
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Digital Signage System
Digital Out-Of-Home advertising and information systems require dynamic high resolution graphics, glitch-free switching and
a straightforward topology. Crestron DigitalMedia provides the best method of content delivery in High Definition.
• Multi-source, multi-display HDMI distribution
• Long distance capability using CresFiber
• Source computer control via HID USB connection on any DM-RMC
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
45
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Multi-Window Processing and Annotation with DM Switching
Displaying and annotating multisource/multi-display HD content transmitted over HDMI can be complicated or nearly impossible, as most systems cannot maintain HDCP across multiple points. Crestron DM, combined with the DVPHD-GB video
processor, provides HD multi-window processing, annotation and switching.
• Multi-source, multi-display HDMI distribution
• Multi-Window processing and annotation over any source(s)
• Maintains HDMI with HDCP from source unit to display
46
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Large-Scale System
Large scale distribution systems require switcher systems with the flexibility and power to manage multiple source and
destination resolutions and HDCP keys.
• 16 input card slots (field upgradable)
• Two output module slots with up to eight outputs on each module (factory upgradable only)
• Full audio and USB breakaway
• 7-space 19-inch rack-mountable
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
47
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Low Cost HD Video Conferencing System
•
•
•
•
48
DMCI/DM input card set provides analog video to HDMI conversion
DMCI/DM input card set extracts audio from HDMI signal and provides volume control
DMCI/DM input card set provides DVI with balanced audio input for an HDMI switcher
System maintains HDMI fast switching with full HDCP compliance
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Low Cost Complete DigitalMedia Solution
•
•
•
•
All sources, both analog and digital, switched to a single digital output
Remote-located sources and USB HID devices using DM transmitters
Up to 3 DM sources, 2 analog sources and 1 HDMI source
Simple control using wall mounted keypad/processor
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
49
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Low Cost Classroom Using DM 8G
•
•
•
•
•
50
Laptop and Blu-Ray sources located at podium, local monitor can display either source
Single DM 8G STP cable runs from the podium to the room controller located by the ceiling projector
Projector connects via HDMI, a built-in 30 Watt amplifier powers speakers in the room
Simple control using a control system connected via Ethernet
Room controller sends power from the power supply to the podium via DM 8G STP
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Powerful Boardroom Using DM 8G and DM CAT
•
•
•
•
DM-MD8X8 connects to control system via Ethernet, wall plates via DigitalMedia CAT
Two room controllers and two computer centers connect to the DM-MD8X8 via DigitalMedia 8G STP
First room controller (DM-RMC-100C) sends video to the projector via HDMI
Second room controller (DM-RMC-200-C) sends video to a monitor via HDMI, connects the USB keyboard and
mouse, and controls the Blu-Ray player via IR
• Computer center (DM-TX-201-C) at the podium sends Blu-Ray audio and video to the DM-MD8X8
• Computer center (DM-TX-201-C) at the conference table sends USB signals from the keyboard and mouse to the
laptop, sends audio and video from the laptop to the DM-MD8X8, and mirrors the laptop display on a local monitor
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
51
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Appendix B - HDCP
HDCP Limits in Source Devices
All HDMI sources that utilize HDCP limit the number
of devices that may be connected at any given time.
An important aspect of HDCP is its use of “keys” to
manage the handshaking that occurs between any
two devices.
Every HDMI source device has a limit to the number
of downstream devices it can support, determined
by the number of available HDCP keys, while
simultaneously limiting the depth of devices in the
signal path.
Too many devices or greater-than-allowed depth
in a signal path (from source to display) may create
problems with displaying of audio and video content.
The HDCP specification states that the maximum
depth of devices between source and display is six.
Connecting too many displays or processors causes
the source to simply stop outputting a signal without
warning.
To prevent failures, DigitalMedia tests the HDCP
limits of each HDMI source, allowing the installer
to configure the system around any limitations,
or substitute a different component.
This diagram presents a few possibilities to illustrate
the HDCP key and device depth limitations.
NOTE: Room Media Controllers and Repeaters do not
require HDCP Keys and do not count as devices.
52
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Device List as of 12/13/2010
The following is a list of the devices Crestron has tested, and the maximum number of devices each supports.
High Definition Disc Players
Source Type
Manufacturer
Model
HDCP Keys
Blu-Ray
Denon
BDP-1610
16
Blu-Ray
LG
BD-270
10
Blu-Ray
LG
Super Multi-Blue
16
Blu-Ray / HD-DVD
LG
LG-BD370
10
Blu-Ray / HD-DVD
LG
LG-BD390
16
Blu-Ray
Integra
DBS 6.9
3
Blu-Ray
Integra
DBS 30.1
3
Blu-Ray
Insignia
NS-2BRDVD
13
Blu-Ray
Marantz
DV4001
9
Blu-Ray
Marantz
BD-7004
3
Blu-Ray
Marantz
BD-7003
3
Blu-Ray
Panasonic
DMP-BD80
3
Blu-Ray
Panasonic
DMP-BD60
3
Blu-Ray
Panasonic
DMP-BD35
3
Blu-Ray
Panasonic
DMP-BD30
3
DVD (upscale 1080P)
Philips
DVP5990/12
9
Blu-Ray
Philips
BDP 7200
16
Blu-Ray
Pioneer
BD-LX80
16
Blu-Ray
Pioneer
BD-LX91
16
Blu-Ray
Pioneer Elite
BDP-05FD
16
Blu-Ray
Pioneer
BDP-6000
16
Blu-Ray
Samsung
BD-P-3600
16
Blu-Ray
Samsung
BD-P-1600
7
Blu-Ray
Samsung
BD-P1500
7
Blu-Ray
Samsung
BD-P1000
16
Blu-Ray
Samsung
DBD-P1500
16
Blu-Ray
Samsung
BD-UP5000
10
Blu-Ray
Samsung
BD-T3600
16
Blu-Ray
Sharp
BD-HP21U
3
Blu-Ray
Sharp
BD-HP22
3
Blu-Ray
Sharp
BD-HP50
3
Blu-Ray
Sharp
BD-HP20
16
Blu-Ray
Sony
DVD-P DPX - 2380
9
Blu-Ray
Sony
BDZ-X100
8
Blu-Ray
Sony
BDP-S5000ES
16
Blu-Ray
Sony
BDP-S350
8
Blu-Ray
Sony
BDP-S360
8
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
53
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
High Definition Disc Players
Source Type
Manufacturer
Model
HDCP Keys
Blu-Ray
Sony
BDP-S550
10
Blu-Ray
Sony
BDP-S2000ES
16
Blu-Ray
Sony
BDPS301
16
Upscaling DVD
Sony
DVP-NS71HP
16
Upscaling DVD
Sony
DVP-NS72HP
9
HD-DVD
Toshiba
HD-A3
16
HD-DVD
Toshiba
HD-A30
16
HD-DVD
Toshiba
HD-D3
16
HD-DVD
Toshiba
HD-E1
10
HD-DVD
Toshiba
HD-A20
10
HD-DVD
Toshiba
HD-A35
16
Cable, TiVo® & Satellite Set Top Boxes*
Source Type
Manufacturer
Model
HDCP Keys
IPTV Set Top Box
Advanced Digital Broadcast
ADB-3800W
16
Satellite receiver
DirecTV
HR21
NA
Dish Network Receiver
Dish Network
ViP-211
16
Satellite receiver
EchoStar Europe
Vi P211
16
Satellite receiver
Echostar STB
VIP-222
16
Hospitality Tuner
Enseo
HD2000
16
HD Set Top Box
Motorola
VIP 1200
16
Cable Box
Motorola
DCT-3200
1
Cable Box
Motorola
DCT-3412
1
Cable Box
Motorola
DCT-6412
1
Cable Box
Motorola
DCT-6416
1
Cable Box
Motorola
DCH-3416
1
Cable Box
Scientific Atlanta
Explorer 8300HD
16
Cable Box
Scientific Atlanta
Explorer 4250HD
16
Satellite receiver
Sky
Sky HD
16
HD Set Top Box
TiVoHD
TiVoHD
16
*These sources were tested with firmware from the indicated cable company. Other cable companies’ products may have
different limits.
54
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Media Servers, Game Systems & Other Devices
Source Type
Manufacturer
Model
HDCP Keys
Video Processor
Anchor Bay
Edge 101
8
Media Server
Apple
Apple TV
16
Media Server
Crestron
ADMS
16
Media Player
DVICO
TViX HD M-6500A
none
Game System
Microsoft
XBOX 360
16
Media Server
Roku
N1000
16
Game System
Sony
PS3
16
Media Server
Vudu
VUDUBX100
16
Media Server
Western Digital
WDTV
No HDCP
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
55
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Appendix C - HDMI Solutions
All the following HDMI Solutions are compatible with DigitalMedia products.
HD-MD8X1 and HD-MD8X2 Switchers
QuickSwitch HD™ switchers from Crestron enable high performance HDMI signal selection with groundbreaking new
features designed by Crestron to deliver trouble-free, low-latency switching of all your DVD and Blu-ray Disc™ players, HDTV
receivers, media servers, game consoles, multimedia computers, surround processors and high-def displays. The HD-MD8X1
model features eight HDMI inputs, and a single HDMI output to feed a video display or processor. The HD-MD8X2 offers two
HDMI outputs.
• High-performance 8x1 and 8X2 HDMI switchers
• Low-latency QuickSwitch HD switching technology
• Supports HDMI with Deep Color and 7.1 channel HD lossless audio
• Compatible with DVI and DisplayPort Multimode (adapters required)
• Supports video resolutions up to WUXGA 1920x1200 and HD 1080p60
• Detects and reports detailed video and audio input information
• Manages HDCP digital rights management for connected devices
• Performs automatic AV signal format management via EDID
• Includes front panel controls with security lockout
• Allows audio breakaway switching
• Enables device control via CEC
• Simple setup and diagnostics via software
• Native control system integration via Ethernet or Cresnet
• Provides input expansion for the AMS-AIP or other HDMI products
• Single-space 19-inch rack-mountable
56
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
HD-MD8X2 Application
Advanced HDMI switcher featuring low-latency QuickSwitch HD™ switching technology, HDCP management, EDID resolution
reporting, CEC device control access, audio breakaway, and native Crestron control via Cresnet or Ethernet.
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
57
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
HD-RX1-F Receiver and HD-TX1-F Transmitter
Crestron HDMI over Fiber Transmitters and Receivers deliver straightforward, cost-effective digital AV signal extension for
use in the home, classroom, or corporate boardroom. The HD-RX1-F receiver works with the HD-TX1-F transmitter (sold
separately) to enable wire runs up to 1000 feet using just a single multimode fiber cable (For MM OPTICAL fiber wiring, use
CRESFIBER-SINGLE-SC or other quality simplex multimode fiber optic cable).
The HD-RX1-F and HD-TX1-F feature a single HDMI output, supporting high-quality HDMI with Deep Color and 7.1 channel
HD lossless audio, as well as DVI video signals (HDMI requires an appropriate adapter or interface cable to accommodate
a DVI signal. CBL-HD-DVI interface cables available separately), for connection to a High Definition video display, projector,
computer monitor, or AV processor. Additional IR and bidirectional RS-232 ports are also provided, allowing control signals to
be routed along with the HDMI signal for a true one-wire AV interface solution. For a solution with even more features, see the
HD-RX3-F and HD-TX3-F products.
The HD-RX1-F and HD-TX1-F are housed in attractive, compact enclosures, with provisions for mounting to any flat surface,
or to one rail of a 19 inch EIA equipment rack. Crestron also offers a complete range of professional AV interface cables and
wall plates for a total custom installation solution.
• Extends uncompressed digital video, audio, and
control signals 1000 feet over a single multimode
fiber
• Supports HDMI with Deep Color
• Supports 7.1 channel HD lossless audio up to 48
kHz
• Also compatible with DVI
58
•
•
•
•
•
•
Handles resolutions up to 1920x1200 and 1080p60
Passes EDID, CEC, and HDCP
Universal IR repeater up to 192kHz
Bidirectional RS-232 extender up to 115k Baud
No programming or configuration needed
12 VDC power pack included
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
HD-TX1-F and HD-RX1-F Application Example 1
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
59
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
HD-TX1-F and HD-RX1-F Application Example 2
60
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
HD-RX3-F Receiver and HD-TX3-F Transmitter
The HD-RX3-F and HD-TX3-F work together to extend uncompressed HDMI, analog audio, Ethernet, USB HID, and control
signals up to 1000 feet over a single fiber optic cable. Hide the thin fiber in plain sight without drilling holes or tearing into
walls. Use the CresFiber CLEAR cable to conceal the fiber along baseboards and in corners.
The HD-RX3-F receiver and HD-TX3-F transmitter support HDMI 1.3a with deep color and 7.1 channel lossless audio. Ethernet
speeds up to 10/100 are supported as well. Each unit has a single HDMI port, a USB HID port, a mini-TRS port, an Ethernet
port, a COM port, and an IR port.
• Extends uncompressed digital video, audio,
networking, HID, and control signals 1000 feet over
a single multimode fiber
• Works reliably without any programming or
configuration
• Supports HDMI 1.3a with Deep Color
• Supports 7.1 channel lossless audio up to 48 kHz
• Also compatible with DVI and DisplayPort Multimode
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Includes analog stereo audio input/output
Handles resolutions up to 1920x1200 and 1080p60
Passes CEC, EDID and HDCP
Supports 100Base-T Fast Ethernet
Includes universal IR repeater up to 192kHz
Extends bidirectional RS-232 up to 115k Baud
Includes built-in USB HID mouse/keyboard extender
Provides electrical isolation for outdoor runs
12VDC power pack included
61
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
HD-SCALER
The HD-SCALER scales the input signal to match the native resolution of your display or other HDMI device. The HD-SCALER
integrates seamlessly with a DigitalMedia system and has a variety of input capabilities.
• Features built-in 2x1 auto-switching
• Compact, low-profile surface mount design - fits
behind a flat panel display or above a projector
• Equipped with 125 pre-defined input resolutions
• Automatically scales any input signal to match the
• Affords ability to define any custom resolution
native resolution of your display
• Allows adjustable overscan up to 5%
• Perfect for adapting all kinds of video devices to
• Displays EDID, HDCP, and input signal information
handle any resolution
on screen
• 100% HDCP compliant with all the intelligence of
• Includes built-in test patterns for precise display
Crestron DigitalMedia
setup
• Provides one HDMI digital video/audio output
• Configurable via OSM using IR remote (included)
• Includes HDMI, RGB/video, and analog audio inputs
• Allows control system interface via Cresnet
• Supports RGBHV, RGBS, RGsB, component,
• Integrates seamlessly with Crestron MPS and
composite, and S-Video analog sources
DigitalMedia
• Supports HDMI, DVI, and DisplayPort Multimode
• Mini-TRS audio input
digital sources
62
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
HD-DA-2
The HD-DA-2 is a compact wall or rack mountable 1-to-2 HDMI distribution amplifier. With the HD-DA-2, the audio portion of
an HDMI signal can be added or extracted easily on the fly. The HD-DA-2 can split an HDMI signal into video for the display
and audio for the surround sound processor. The audio is available in both SPDIF (coaxial) and analog forms. The HD-DA-2
will also do the reverse, merging SPDIF (coaxial or optical) audio with an HDMI video signal into two HDMI outputs. In addition,
the HD-DA-2 splits one HDMI input into two HDMI outputs.
• Three-in-one HDMI toolbox
• Provides a one in, two out HDMI signal splitter
• Enables extracting analog and SPDIF audio signals from the HDMI
source
• Enables embedding SPDIF audio (coax or optical) onto the HDMI outputs
• Creates an HDMI signal from separate video (HDMI/DVI/DisplayPort
Multimode) and audio (SPDIF) sources
• Supports HDMI w/Deep Color and 7.1 channel HD lossless audio
• Includes front panel input signal and HDCP status indicators
• Allows versatile configuration of audio EDID and HDCP key handling
• No programming or control system required
HD-DA-2-QUAD
The HD-DA-2-QUAD provides four independent 1-to-2 HDMI distribution amplifiers in a single rack-space unit. EDID and HDCP
management is built-in. Common uses are to split four HDMI sources or expand the outputs of an HD-MD8X2.
• Provides four independent HDMI splitters
• Enables audio “loop-thru” for DVPHD inputs
• Supports HDMI 1.3a with Deep Color and 7.1
channel HD lossless audio
• Passes EDID, CEC, and HDCP
• Compatible with DVI and DisplayPort Multimode*
• Supports video resolutions up to WUXGA
1920x1200 and HD 1080p60
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
• Includes front panel input sync LEDs
• Manages HDCP digital rights management for
connected devices
• Performs automatic AV signal format management
via EDID
• Single-space 19-inch rack-mountable
• Includes external power supply
• No programming or control system required
63
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Appendix D: Crestron Certified Cables
Bulk Cables
Original DigitalMedia Cable
DM-CBL-NP-SP500
500 ft spool
(1) High-bandwidth/low-crosstalk shielded
non-plenum
4-twisted pair
blue w/red
stripe
(1) CAT5e and (1) DMNet control cable
DM-CBL-P-SP500
500 ft spool
(1) High bandwidth/low-crosstalk shielded
plenum
4-twisted pair
blue w/yellow
stripe
(1) CAT5e and (1) DMNet control cable
DM-CBL-D-NP-
500 ft spool
SP500
DM-CBL-D-P-SP500
High-bandwidth/low-crosstalk shielded
non-plenum
blue
plenum
blue
4-twisted pair
500 ft spool
High-bandwidth/low-crosstalk shielded
4-twisted pair
NOTE: Every patch point insertion or MP-WP185 wall plate reduces overall DM cable run length by 10 feet.
DigitalMedia 8G Cable
DM-CBL-8G-NP-
500 ft spool
(1) DM 8G shielded 4-twisted pair
non-plenum
blue
DM-CBL-8G-P-SP500
500 ft spool
(1) DM 8G shielded 4-twisted pair
plenum
blue
CRESFIBER8G-NP-
500 ft spool
CresFiber Multimode Fiber Optic Cable -
non-plenum
orange w/
SP500
CresFiber® 8G
SP500
CRESFIBER8G-NP-
50/125 x4 breakout
1000 ft spool
SP1000
CRESFIBER8G-P-
SP1000
64
non-plenum
orange w/
plenum
orange w/
50/125 x4 breakout
500 ft spool
SP500
CRESFIBER8G-P-
CresFiber Multimode Fiber Optic Cable -
black text
CresFiber Multimode Fiber Optic Cable -
black text
50/125 x4 breakout
1000 ft spool
CresFiber Multimode Fiber Optic Cable 50/125 x4 breakout
black text
plenum
orange w/
black text
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Pre-Terminated CresFiber
CresFiber Clear cables are pre-terminated, transparent, and under 1mm in diameter. Install along molding or corners for an
invisible solution without drilling holes in walls. CresFiber patch cables are pre-terminated and plenum-rated.
CresFiber Single
CRESFIBER-SINGLE-
1.5 ft
Simplex Multimode
3 ft
Simplex Multimode
SC-P-1.5
CRESFIBER-SINGLE-
6 ft
Simplex Multimode
20 ft
Simplex Multimode
30 ft
Simplex Multimode
60 ft
Simplex Multimode
100 ft
Simplex Multimode
no armor
plenum
no armor
plenum
no armor
plenum
armor
plenum
armor
plenum
armor
plenum
armor
plenum
no armor
plenum
no armor
plenum
no armor
plenum
no armor
plenum
no armor
plenum
no armor
plenum
armor
plenum
armor
plenum
armor
plenum
armor
Fiber Optic Cable
Fiber Optic Cable
200 ft
SC-ARMORED-P-200
CRESFIBER-SINGLE-
plenum
Fiber Optic Cable
SC-ARMORED-P-100
CRESFIBER-SINGLE-
no armor
Fiber Optic Cable
SC-ARMORED-P-60
CRESFIBER-SINGLE-
plenum
Fiber Optic Cable
SC-P-30
CRESFIBER-SINGLE-
Simplex Multimode
12 ft
SC-P-20
CRESFIBER-SINGLE-
no armor
Fiber Optic Cable
SC-P-12
CRESFIBER-SINGLE-
plenum
Fiber Optic Cable
SC-P-6
CRESFIBER-SINGLE-
no armor
Fiber Optic Cable
SC-P-3
CRESFIBER-SINGLE-
plenum
Simplex Multimode
Fiber Optic Cable
300 ft
SC-ARMORED-P-300
Simplex Multimode
Fiber Optic Cable
CresFiber Dual
CRESFIBER-DUAL-SC-
1.5 ft
P-1.5
CRESFIBER-DUAL-
Fiber Optic Cable
3 ft
Duplex Multimode
6 ft
Duplex Multimode
SC-P-3
CRESFIBER-DUAL-
Fiber Optic Cable
SC-P-6
CRESFIBER-DUAL-
Fiber Optic Cable
12 ft
SC-P-12
CRESFIBER-DUAL-
20 ft
Duplex Multimode
30 ft
Duplex Multimode
Fiber Optic Cable
SC-P-30
CRESFIBER-DUAL-SC-
Fiber Optic Cable
60 ft
ARMORED-P-60
CRESFIBER-DUAL-SC-
100 ft
Duplex Multimode
200 ft
Duplex Multimode
Fiber Optic Cable
ARMORED-P-200
CRESFIBER-DUAL-SCARMORED-P-300
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
Duplex Multimode
Fiber Optic Cable
ARMORED-P-100
CRESFIBER-DUAL-SC-
Duplex Multimode
Fiber Optic Cable
SC-P-20
CRESFIBER-DUAL-
Duplex Multimode
Fiber Optic Cable
300 ft
Duplex Multimode
Fiber Optic Cable
65
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
CresFiber Clear
CRESFIBER-SINGLE-
30 ft
SC-CLEAR-NP-30
CRESFIBER-SINGLE-
transparent
Fiber Optic Cable
60 ft
SC-CLEAR-NP-60
CRESFIBER-SINGLE-
Simplex Multimode
Simplex Multimode
transparent
Fiber Optic Cable
100 ft
SC-CLEAR-NP-100
Simplex Multimode
transparent
Fiber Optic Cable
V-Cable Triamese Cables
V-CBL-T
Crestron V-Cable Triamese Cables provide clean, flexible connectivity for
our DM CAT-based V-Panel touchpanel displays (V12 and V15). Available
in black or white and in 3, 6, 9, and 15 feet lengths, V-Cables provide
an unobtrusive solution for connecting the touchpanel to a wall plate or
running across a desk top. Their durable yet flexible construction allows
V-Cables to fit neatly inside the base of a tilt model V-Panel, or dress
cleanly behind a VESA-mounted V-Panel.
The V12 and V15 model V-Panels are each furnished with one 3 ft V-Cable included, while V12-TILT and V15-TILT models
include one 15 ft V-Cable each. Other lengths may be purchased for use with any V-Panel that features DM CAT type connections.
V-Cables may also be used with a Crestron DigitalMedia™ system wherever a short, flexible interface cable is required, such
as between a DM CAT transmitter and MP-WP185 wall plate.
NOTE: No more than two V-Cables should be used in a given DM signal path.
66
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Interface Cables
Crestron Interface Cables support all types of analog and digital video and audio signals. A durable yet flexible CL3-rated
jacket affords excellent handling with allowance for in-wall installation.
CBL-HD
HDMI interface cable – Non-Plenum Jacket
Available Lengths: 1.5, 3, 6, 12, 20, and 30 ft
CBL-DP-HD
DisplayPort to HDMI interface cable – NonPlenum Jacket
CBL-DVI
DVI-I interface cable – Non-Plenum Jacket
Available Lengths: 1.5, 3, 6, 12, 20, and 30
ft
CBL-HD-DVI
HDMI to DVI interface cable – Non-Plenum
Jacket
Available Lengths: 1.5, 3, 6, 12, 20, and 30 ft
Available Lengths: 1.5, 3, 6, 12, 20, and 30
ft
CBL-AUDIO
CBL-RCA
1/8” Mini-TRS unbalanced stereo audio
interface cable – Non-Plenum Jacket
RCA composite video or S/PDIF digital audio
interface cable – Non-Plenum Jacket
Available Lengths: 1.5, 3, 6, and 12 ft
Available Lengths: 1.5, 3, 6, 12 ft
CBL-RCA2
CBL-RCA3
RCA stereo audio interface cable – NonPlenum Jacket
RCA component video interface cable – NonPlenum Jacket
Available Lengths: 1.5, 3, 6, 12 ft
Available Lengths: 1.5, 3, 6, 12 ft
CBL-VGA-AUD
CBL-VGA
DB15HD computer VGA interface cable w/
Mini-TRS audio – Non-Plenum Jacket
DB15HD computer VGA interface cable – NonPlenum Jacket
Available Lengths: 3, 6, 12, 25 ft
Available Lengths: 1.5, 3, 6, 12, 25 ft
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
67
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Appendix E: Media Presentation Wall Plates
Media Presentation Wall Plates (available in black and white) complete the total Crestron package, ensuring end-to-end
Crestron quality for every installation. A range of wall plates is offered to support all types of analog and digital video, audio,
and control signals. These single-gang wall plates fit off-the-shelf decorative wall plates and are gang-able for custom wall,
lectern and rack mount applications.
MP-WP110
MP-WP100
RCA Composite Video with RCA
Stereo Audio
Three gold-plated RCA connectors color-coded and labeled for
composite video and stereo audio.
Bulkhead type feed-thru connectors are used, providing female
RCA connections at the rear.
Mini-DIN S-Video with RCA
Stereo Audio
One gold-plated 4-pin mini-DIN
connector and two gold-plated
RCA connectors color-coded and
labeled for S-video and stereo
audio. Bulkhead type feed-thru
connectors are used, providing
female mini-DIN and RCA connections at the rear.
MP-WP125
MP-WP120
RCA Component Video with RCA
Stereo Audio
Five gold-plated RCA connectors
color-coded and labeled for
component video and stereo audio.
Bulkhead type feed-thru connectors are used, providing female
RCA connections at the rear.
RCA Component & Composite
Video with two RCA Stereo
Audio jacks
Eight gold-plated RCA connectors color-coded and labeled
for separate component and
composite video and stereo audio.
Bulkhead type feed-thru connectors are used, providing female
RCA connections at the rear.
MP-WP130 & MP-WP131
DB15HD Computer VGA w/Mini-TRS Stereo Audio Bulkhead
One female DB15HD connector (i.e., HD-15, DE-15) and one 1/8” mini-TRS connector, labeled for
computer VGA and stereo audio.
MP-WP130: A bulkhead type feed-thru connector is used, providing a female DB15HD connection
at the rear. Audio wiring is connected via a 3-pin terminal block.
MP-WP131: A 12” breakout cable assembly at the rear provides five BNC connections. Audio wiring
is connected via a 3-pin terminal block.
68
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
MP-WP140
MP-WP150
Media Presentation Wall Plate DVI-I w/Mini-TRS Stereo Audio
Media Presentation Wall Plate HDMI™ w/Mini-TRS Stereo Audio
One Dual Link DVI-I connector
and one 1/8” mini-TRS connector,
labeled for DVI and stereo audio. A
bulkhead type feed-thru connector
is used, providing a female DVI-I
connection at the rear. Audio wiring
is connected via a 3-pin terminal
block.
One Type A HDMI connector and
one 1/8” mini-TRS connector,
labeled for HDMI and stereo audio.
A bulkhead type feed-thru connector is used, providing a female HDMI
connection at the rear. Audio wiring
is connected via a 3-pin terminal
block.
MP-WP160
MP-WP152
Media Presentation Wall Plate HDMI™
One Type A HDMI connector. A
bulkhead type feed-thru connector
is used, providing a female HDMI
connection at the rear.
Media Presentation Wall Plate DisplayPort w/Mini-TRS Stereo
Audio
One DisplayPort connector and one
1/8” mini-TRS connector, labeled
for DisplayPort and stereo audio. A
bulkhead type feed-thru connector is used, providing a female
DisplayPort connection at the rear.
Audio wiring is connected via a
3-pin terminal block.
MP-WP180
MP-WP162
Media Presentation Wall Plate DisplayPort
One DisplayPort connector. A
bulkhead type feed-thru connector
is used, providing a female DisplayPort connection at the rear.
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
Media Presentation Wall Plate
- Crestron QuickMedia™ w/
Cresnet
One female 8-pin RJ-45 connector,
and one 4-pin 3.5mm detachable
terminal block, labeled for QuickMedia™ and Cresnet®, respectively.
Bulkhead type connectors are used,
providing a female RJ-45 and
detachable terminal block connections at the rear.
69
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
MP-WP185
Media Presentation Wall Plate
- Crestron DigitalMedia CAT w/
DMNet
Two female 8-pin RJ-45 connectors, and one 4-pin 3.5mm
detachable terminal block, labeled
for DigitalMedia. Bulkhead type
connectors are used, providing
female RJ-45 and detachable
terminal block connections at the
rear.
MP-WP190
Media Presentation Wall Plate Cresnet
One 4-pin 3.5mm detachable
terminal block, labeled for Cresnet
control.
A paralleled terminal block connection is provided at the rear.
70
MP-WP186
Media Presentation Wall Plate Crestron DigitalMedia Fiber
Two female SC type optical fiber
connectors, labeled for DigitalMedia. Bulkhead type feed-thru
connectors are used, providing
female SC connections at the rear.
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Glossary
Video Resolution Terminology
1080i An HDTV standard that specifies an interlaced resolution of 1920 x 1080.
1080p
1080p refers to the 1920x1080 “progressive scan” HDTV format. 1080p is currently the highest resolution in the HDTV
standard.
480i
480 interlaced; a form of standard definition digital television (SDTV) that approximates the quality of analog television but not
considered high definition television (HDTV). Even though the native resolution of DVDs is 480p, they are viewed at 480i on an
NTSC analog television.
480p
480 progressive; a form of standard definition digital television (SDTV) comparable to VGA computer displays but not considered high definition television (HDTV), though 480p is discernibly cleaner and slightly sharper than analog television. The
native resolution of DVD is 480p, but that resolution can be seen only if a DVD player outputs a progressive scan signal and
the DTV has progressive scan or component video inputs; it is also known as EDTV.
720p
720 progressive; one of two currently used formats designated as high definition television in the ATSC DTV standard, this
technology comprises 720 vertical pixels and 1,280 horizontal pixels. The p stands for progressive, as opposed to interlaced,
scanning, which is used in the other accepted HDTV standard, known as 1080i. Contrary to myth, 720p is not inferior to
1080i; 720p has fewer lines but also has the advantages of progressive scanning and a constant vertical resolution of 720
lines, making it better able to handle motion.
Deep Color
A color depth standard associated with high definition TVs and video gear that include HDMI 1.3 connections. The Deep Color
standard supports 10-bit, 12-bit and 16-bit color depths, up from 8-bit, which is the current standard for consumer video.
DigitalMedia supports all but the 16-bit color depth. All earlier versions of HDMI just supported 8-bit color. (Because video
is based on three primary colors, you’ll sometimes see Deep Color described as 30-bit, 36-bit and 48-bit.) A higher color bit
depth enables finer gradations between different shades of the same color, for smoother gradients and reduced color banding.
Deep Color gives TVs the potential to display billions rather than millions of colors, but in order to see that improvement, the
entire video production chain has to use it (camera, editing, format, player, display).
Down-convert
In DTV, the conversion from a higher resolution input signal number to a lower one. For example, some DTV receivers can be
set to down-convert an HDTV 1080i signal to a standard 480i signal that any TV can display.
|
800-237-2041 crestron.com
71
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Video Display Terminology
Aspect Ratio The ratio of width to height in a video picture or other graphic image. Traditional U.S. TV broadcasts and computer monitors
feature a 4:3 aspect ratio; HDTV has a 16:9 ratio.
16:9 Sometimes expressed as 16 x 9 or 16 by 9 (known as 1.78:1 in the film world). The standard DTV widescreen television
screen size, or aspect ratio, which is 16 arbitrary units wide by nine arbitrary units high, as compared to a standard TV aspect
ratio of 4:3. The phrase describes the shape of a TV set or program, not an actual inch measurement.
4:3 Standard “square” NTSC TV screen size aspect ratio of four arbitrary units wide by three wide arbitrary units high; often
expressed as 4x3 or 4 by 3. It was originally known as the Academy Ratio (as in Academy of Motion Picture Arts and
Sciences, the film industry organization that awards the Oscars) prior to 1954 and the introduction of widescreen aspect ratio
film formats; also known in the film world as 1.33:1.
Anamorphic Adopted from the film technique of shooting a widescreen image on a square 35mm frame, it›s the process of compressing
widescreen images to fit into the squarer standard 4:3 television signal. The images are then expanded for viewing in their
original format on a widescreen display device. Widescreen or letterboxed DVDs that are not anamorphic have less detail
when projected on a widescreen monitor. In other words, a non-anamorphic widescreen DVD is designed to be shown letterboxed on a standard “square” TV but appears with a black box all around the image when shown on a larger 16:9 widescreen
TV. To fill a 16:9 screen, a non-anamorphic DVD has to be stretched, resulting in loss of resolution and detail. Conversely, a
DVD that is anamorphic, enhanced for 16:9, or enhanced for widescreen, delivers 33 percent more resolution than regular
letterboxed transfers. It was designed to be shown on a 16:9 TV, and does not need to be manipulated to fit. When one of
these DVDs is shown on a “square” TV, it is often subject to anamorphic down-conversion artifacts unless the
TV has a vertical compression feature.
Anamorphic down-conversion Processing present in all DVD players that converts the image from an anamorphic DVD for display on a regular 4:3 TV.
In the initial setup of a DVD player is a choice between a 16:9 or a 4:3 TV; the 4:3 options engage this processing,
which often introduces artifacts such as jaggies and undulations during pans.
Component video The elements that make up a video signal, consisting of luminance and two separate chrominance signals, expressed either
as Y R-Y B-Y or Y Pb Pr.
DisplayPort
A digital display interface standard put forth by the Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) that defines a new
license-free, royalty-free, digital audio/video interconnect, intended to be used primarily between a computer and its display
monitor or a computer and a home theater system.
72
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
DisplayPort Multimode
This version of DisplayPort can be converted to HDMI, DVI or RGBHV. Virtually 100% of DisplayPort sources today implement
this version.
DVI Digital Visual Interface; a digital interface specification created by an industry consortium, the Digital Display Working Group.
This universal standard for connecting flat panel monitors is also used for data projectors, plasma displays, and digital TVs.
Using a DVI connector and port, a digital signal sent to an analog device is converted into an analog signal (if the device is
digital, such as a flat panel monitor, no conversion is necessary). There are three different DVI configurations: DVI-A for analog
signals, DVI-D for digital signals, and DVI-I (integrated) for both analog and digital signals.
DTV Digital television is a generic term that refers to all digital television formats, including high definition television (HDTV) and
standard definition television (SDTV).
HDMI
High Definition Multimedia Interface. USB-like digital video connectivity standard designed as a successor to DVI. Transmits
both digital audio and video signals and incorporates HDCP digital copy protection.
Interlaced scanning Scanning method used by the 1080i HDTV format. As opposed to progressive scanning, in which the CRT›s electron beam
scans or “paints” all lines at once, interlaced scanning TVs paint odd-numbered lines in succession, then go back and fill
in the remaining even-numbered lines. This method is more prone to artifacts and less stable than progressive.
Progressive scan A method of displaying images on a CRT monitor or a high definition TV in which all the lines of a picture are drawn in one
quick burst, from left to right and from top to bottom. Compare this to interlacing, in which every other line is displayed in
two successive swoops to form a complete picture.
SDTV Standard definition television. Digital television format that includes 480-line resolution in both interlaced (480i) and progressively scanned (480p) formats; offers discernible improvement over conventional analog NTSC picture resolution,
with less noise; similar to DVD or satellite TV quality but not considered high definition.
Widescreen
An image with an aspect ratio greater than 1.33:1, or a picture wider and narrower than a traditional television image. Typically refers to TVs in the 16:9 aspect ratio.
Y Pb Pr Luminance, and two chrominance channels of blue minus luminance and red minus luminance. This technical shorthand for
component video is also written as Y Cb Cr (or Y R-Y B-Y). |
800-237-2041 crestron.com
73
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Encoding Terminology
AC-3 This digital surround sound format for home audio is called Dolby Digital in theaters. It is a 5:1 format, with six separate audio
tracks. AC-3 has been chosen as the official sound format for digital TV and is commonly used to encode DVD soundtracks.
Authentication Authentication ensures that digital data transmissions are delivered to the intended receiver. Authentication also assures the
receiver of the integrity of the data and its source. The simplest form of authentication requires a username and a password
to gain access to a particular account. But authentication protocols can also be based on secret key encryption, such as DES,
or on public key systems using digital signatures.
DRM Digital Rights Management is a secure technology that enables the copyright owner of a piece of intellectual property (such as
a music, video, or text file) to specify what a user can do with it. Typically, this is used to offer downloads that can›t be played
or burned to CD without paying for a license.
HDCP High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection. A copy protection scheme developed by Intel used in conjunction with DVI and
HDMI connections.
KSV
A set of numbers transmitted between HDCP-protected sources and sinks during the authentication ‘handshake’ to validate
that the devices are authorized to receive the content. Some HDMI sources have limited buffer space to hold KSVs and as
such can only be routed to a few HDMI devices before their buffer overflows and content playback stops.
74
Crestron DigitialMedia™ Design Guide
Index of Products
C
O
Cable
DM-CBL DM-CBL-8G DM-CBL-D Card Interface
DMCI 48
14, 15, 16, 17, 35, 64
14, 15, 16, 17, 64
14
Output Cards
DMCO 26, 27, 29
DMCO-11 43
DMCO-22 43, 46
DMCO-1111 49
DMCO-2222 49
H
R
HDMI Essentials
HD-DA-2 HD-DA-2-QUAD
HD-MD8X1 HD-MD8X2 HD-RX1-F HD-RX3-F HD-SCALER HD-TX1-F HD-TX3-F Receivers
DM-RX1-1G 34, 39
Repeaters
DM-DR 36, 39
Room Controllers
DM-RMC-100 43, 45, 46, 47, 49, 50, 52
DM-RMC-100-1 39
DM-RMC-100-C 31
DM-RMC-100C 54
DM-RMC-100-F 43, 49
DM-RMC-200-C 31, 54
DM-TX-100-F 50
63
63
48
58
61
62
58
61
I
Input Cards
DMC-C DMC-CAT DMC-CAT-DSP DMC-C-DSP DMC-DVI DMC-F DMC-F-DSP DMC-HD DMC-HD-DSP DMC-S DMC-SDI DMC-S-DSP DMC-VID4 DMC-VID-BNC DMC-VID-RCA-A
DMC-VID-RCA-D
|
25
49, 50
25, 43, 46
25
24, 43, 46, 49, 50
25, 50
25
24, 47, 49, 50
24, 43, 46
25
24
25
24, 49
24
24, 50
24, 49
800-237-2041 crestron.com
S
Switchers
DM-MD6X1 37, 44, 47, 52
DM-MD8X8 11, 20, 21, 22, 27, 28, 39, 43, 46, 47, 50,
51, 54
DM-MD16X16 27, 39, 49
DM-MD32X32 27, 39
T
Transmitters
DM-TX1-1G 34, 39
DM-TX-100 32, 39, 43
DM-TX-200 33, 35, 39, 46, 47, 50
DM-TX-200-2G 39, 54
DM-TX-201-C 33, 54
DM-TX-300 45, 49
DM-TX-400-3G 35, 39
75
Crestron World Headquarters
15 Volvo Drive
Rockleigh, NJ 07647
800.237.2041
201.767.3400
Fax: 201.767.1903
crestron.com
Crestron International Headquarters
Oude Keerbergsebaan 2
2820
Rijmenam
Belgium
+32.15.50.99.50
Fax: +32.15.50.99.40
crestron.eu
Crestron Asia Headquarters
Room 2501, 25/F, Westin Centre
No. 26 Hung To Road
Kwun Tong
Hong Kong
+852.2341.2016
Video Ph: +852.2373.7530
Fax: +852.2344.0889
crestronasia.com
Crestron Latin America Headquarters
Blvd. Manuel Avila Camacho No 37-1A
Col. Lomas de Chapultepec
CP 11560 México DF
+55.5093.2160
Fax: +55.5093.2165
crestronlatin.com
Printed in USA Doc.4789X 1/11
Products manufactured in the United States.
All brand names, product names and trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
Specifications subject to change without notice. Refer to www.crestron.com for detailed specifications.
©2010 Crestron Electronics, Inc.