Malibu Boats 1982 Owner`s manual

I
INTRODUCTION
Welcome Aboard! This manual has been produced with the recreational boater in
mind, as a guide to safe operating practices, general boating regulations and
proper maintenance techniques. Included with this manual may be manufacturer
literature for the engine, trailer and other major components. To ensure each boating experience is a safe and enjoyable one, please read all the materials carefully
before operating your newly purchased craft.
If this is your first time owning or operating this style of boat, it is recommended
you contact your dealer or local boating agency to find out how to enroll in a
boater safety course prior to taking to the water. Please keep this manual onboard
for future reference and pass it along to the new owner if you ever decide to sell
the craft.
Because of our policy of continuous product improvement, the illustrations used
in this manual may not be the same as on your boat and are intended only as representative reference views.
Identification Numbers
Safeguard information about your boat by recording the Hull Identification Number (HIN) and model of your boat, and model and serial numbers of the engine,
trailer, and accessories on the inside front cover of this manual. The HIN is
located on the upper, starboard corner of the transom. The HIN must be clearly
visible and may not be removed, altered or tampered with in any way as regulated
by federal law.
The identification numbers are important! Keep a copy of these numbers stored in
a safe place off the boat. In case of theft, damage, etc., report these numbers to the
local authorities, your insurance agent and your dealer.
Boating Terminology
LENGTH OVERALL (LOA)
BEAM
PORT
SIDE
STARBOARD
SIDE
HELM
TRANSOM
FORWARD
AFT
STERN
GUNWALE
BOW
FREEBOARD
WATERLINE
DRAFT
KC-0036
* An easy way to remember PORT side from STARBOARD side is “PORT”
and “LEFT” both have four letters.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
II
TABLE OF CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
1 Boating Safety ................... 1-1
Boating Regulations ........... 1-1
Boater Responsibilities ....... 1-2
Required Safety
Equipment .......................... 1-2
Recommended
Equipment .......................... 1-4
Emergencies ....................... 1-5
Hazardous Conditions ........ 1-6
Boating Under the
Influence ............................. 1-8
Carbon Monoxide ............... 1-8
Operation By Minors .......... 1-9
Passenger Safety ................. 1-9
Water Sports ....................... 1-9
General Precautions .......... 1-10
Our Environment .............. 1-11
2 Basic Rules of the Road ... 2-1
Aids to Navigation .............. 2-1
Right-of-Way ...................... 2-3
3 Systems, Controls
and Indicators ...................
Systems ...............................
Controls ..............................
Switches .............................
Indicators ............................
3-1
3-1
3-3
3-4
3-6
4 Operation ..........................
Fueling ................................
Lubrication (Outboards) .....
Starting ...............................
Shifting/Running ................
Warning Alarm ...................
Steering ...............................
Stopping .............................
Docking ..............................
Boat Trim ............................
Drive Trim Angle ................
4-1
4-1
4-2
4-2
4-2
4-3
4-3
4-4
4-4
4-5
4-6
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
Page
5 Getting Underway ............
Safety Checklist ..................
Safety Equipment ...............
Boarding .............................
5-1
5-1
5-2
5-2
6 Running .............................
Maneuvering
Techniques ..........................
Salt Water ...........................
Freezing Temperatures .......
Towing Procedure ...............
Anchoring ...........................
Performance Boating ..........
Propellers ............................
6-1
7 Care and Maintenance .....
Repairs and Modifications ..
Electrical .............................
Corrosion Protection ..........
General Maintenance ..........
Fuel System ........................
Steering System ..................
7-1
7-1
7-1
7-3
7-3
7-5
7-5
6-1
6-2
6-2
6-2
6-3
6-4
6-5
8 Troubleshooting ................ 8-1
Trouble Check Chart .......... 8-1
9 Storage ............................... 9-1
Storage Preparation ............. 9-1
Slinging/Lifting ................... 9-3
10 Trailering ........................
Hitch .................................
Safety Chains ....................
Trailering Checklist ..........
Backing Up Trailers .........
Launching .........................
Loading .............................
10-1
10-1
10-2
10-2
10-3
10-4
10-4
11 Glossary of Terms ........... 11-1
CHAPTER 1: BOATING SAFETY
1-1
CHAPTER 1: BOATING SAFETY
The popularity of boating and other water sports has undergone an explosion of
growth in the past few years. Because of this, safety is an important issue for
everyone who shares in the use of our waterways.
This section covers general boating safety information. Throughout this manual
specific precautions and symbols identify safety related information.
!
The Safety Alert Symbol means ATTENTION! BECOME ALERT! YOUR
SAFETY IS INVOLVED!
! DANGER !
Indicates the presence of a hazard which WILL cause SEVERE injury,
death or substantial property damage.
! WARNING
Indicates the presence of a hazard which CAN cause SEVERE injury,
death or substantial property damage.
CAUTION
Indicates the presence of a hazard which WILL or CAN cause MINOR
or MODERATE personal injury or property damage.
NOTICE
Indicates installation, operation or maintenance information which is
important but not hazard-related.
The precautions listed in this manual and on the boat are not all-inclusive. If a procedure, method, tool or part is not specifically recommended, you must satisfy
yourself that it is safe for you and others, and that the boat will not be damaged or
made unsafe as a result of your decision. REMEMBER – ALWAYS USE COMMON SENSE WHEN OPERATING YOUR BOAT!
Boating Regulations
The U.S. Coast Guard is the authority of the waterways; they are there to help the
boating public. State boating regulations are enforced by local authorities. You are
subject to marine traffic laws and “Rules of the Road” for both federal and state
waterways; you must stop if signaled to do so by enforcement officers, and permit
to be boarded if asked.
There are many pamphlets, prepared by the Coast Guard, available to you. These
pamphlets explain “Rules of the Road”, signal lights, buoys, safety, international
and inland regulations and much more than is presented in this manual. For more
information contact your local U.S. Coast Guard Unit or call the Coast Guard
Customer Infoline at 1-800-368-5647.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
1-2
CHAPTER 1: BOATING SAFETY
Boat Safety Labels
Your boat is affixed with various safety labels at the time of manufacture. These
labels appear at specific locations on the craft where safety is of particular concern. Safety labels must remain legible. If you suspect a label is missing or one
becomes damaged, contact your dealer for immediate replacement.
Boater Responsibilities
Registration
The U.S. Coast Guard requires that all power boats operated on the navigable
waters of the United States must be registered in the state of main use; also, many
States require registration in that state whenever boating on waters within their
state boundary. Always contact your state boating authorities (and neighboring
states) for registration information on boats and trailers. Your dealer can supply
you with the appropriate forms.
Education
This manual is not intended to provide complete training on all aspects of boat
operation. We strongly recommend that all operators of this boat seek additional
training on boat handling and safety. Some states require youths 16 years of age
and younger to complete a boating safety course before operating any watercraft.
Many others require operators under the age of 18 to be licensed in small boat
operation.
The following is a listing of some of the agencies and organizations that offer
safety training or information. To find boating safety courses in your area, call
your state’s local boating agency or the Coast Guard boating safety Courseline at
1-800-336-2628 (1-800-245-2628 in Virginia).
• American Red Cross
• U.S. Power Squadrons
• U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
• State Boating Offices
Insurance
You must get insurance before operating your new boat. Loss by fire, theft or
other causes, or liability protection against accidents is a must for responsible
boaters. The boat owner is legally responsible for any damage or injury caused
when he, or someone else operating the boat, is involved in an accident. Many
states have laws detailing minimum insurance needs. Your insurance agent or your
dealer may be able to supply you with more information.
Required Safety Equipment
Your boat has been equipped at the factory with most federally required Class 1
[4.8 m (16 ft.) to less than 7.9 m (26 ft.)] safety equipment for inland waters.
NOTICE
Many state equipment requirements go beyond Coast Guard requirements. Contact your state boating office for further information.
Equipment requirements for coastal and inland waters differ. Check
with local authorities or the Coast Guard for further information
about coastal water requirements.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
CHAPTER 1: BOATING SAFETY
1-3
Personal Floatation Devices
TYPE I
LIFE PRESERVERS
KC-0041
TYPE II
BUOYANT VESTS
KC-0051
Federal law also requires at least one Type I, II, III or V
Personal Floatation Device (PFD) for each person on
board or being towed, and at least one Type IV throwable
PFD in the boat. As the owner, it is your responsibility
to obtain PFDs and other mandatory safety equipment not provided by the boat manufacturer, and to
ensure all equipment is kept in good, serviceable
condition.
PFDs are intended to help save lives. Therefore, you and
your passengers should wear a PFD whenever boating. It
is especially important that children and non-swimmers
wear a PFD at all times. Make certain all passengers
know how to put on and properly adjust their PFDs. Also,
selecting the proper type PFD for your kind of outing
helps ensure your time on the water can be the safest possible. There are four types of PFDs to wear and one type
used for throwing in emergency situations.
Type I:
Most buoyant PFD and effective on all waters,
especially open, rough water.
Type II: Good for calm water near shore on most inland
waters where quick rescue is likely.
TYPE III
FLOTATION AIDS
KC-0042
TYPE IV
THROWABLE DEVICES
KC-0071
TYPE V HYBRID PFD
MUST BE WORN
WHEN UNDERWAY
Type III: Good for most inland water applications where
quick rescue is likely. Come in various styles
and some are designed for watersport activities.
Type IV: Intended for heavy traffic inland waters where
help is always available. Designed to be thrown
to a person in the water and should never be
worn.
Type V: Inflatable design for special use activities and
may be used instead of a Type I, II, or III PFD
if used in accordance with the approval conditions on the label and if worn when the boat is
underway. Some Type V PFDs provide
increased protection against hypothermia.
NOTICE
• If a Type V PFD is to be counted toward the
minimum carriage requirements, it must be
worn.
• Special PFDs are available for skiing and
other watersports. These PFDs are constructed with materials suitable for high
impact falls.
KC-0043
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
1-4
CHAPTER 1: BOATING SAFETY
Keep the following PFD points in mind:
•
•
•
Set an example and wear your PFD. Require your passengers to wear them
also.
Make sure the PFD fits properly; this is especially important for children and
non-swimmers.
At the beginning of each season, check PFDs for damage and test for proper
flotation.
Fire Extinguisher
OVERCHARGED
At least one approved B-1 portable fire extinguisher is
required on most boats. Make sure all passengers know
the location and operating procedure for each fire extinguisher.
Visual Distress Signals
Federal law also requires boats 4.8 m (16 ft.) and longer to
carry day and night visual distress signals when operating
on coastal waters, the Great Lakes, territorial seas or those
waters directly connected to them, up to a point where the
body of water is less than two miles wide.
RECHARGE
KC-0083
NOTICE
Some signaling devices (pyrotechnics) are restricted from use on certain bodies of water, so always check with local authorities.
Recommended Equipment
As a precaution, a good boater will avoid potential
problems on an outing by having additional equipment on board. Normally, this equipment is dependent on the body of water and the length of the trip,
your dealer can assist you:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
First aid kit and manual
Anchor with at least 23 m (75 ft.) of line
Mooring lines and fenders
Bailing device (bucket, hand pump, etc.)
Combination oar/boat hook
Day/night visual distress signal
Lubricant
Tool kit
Spare propeller, nut and washer
Spare fuses
Local charts and compass
Waterproof flashlight
Portable AM/FM radio with weather band
Spare flashlight and radio batteries
Sunglasses and sun block
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
KC-0090
CHAPTER 1: BOATING SAFETY
1-5
Emergencies
Be prepared to deal with emergencies before they happen. Try to formulate a plan
for each type in advance so that decisions can be made quickly and without hesitation. Precious moments lost can mean the difference between losing and saving a
life.
Reporting Accidents
The U.S. Coast Guard requires the owner or operator of a boat involved in an accident to report the incident to the proper marine law enforcement agency for the
State in which the accident occurred. Immediate notification to the nearest State
boating authority is required if a person dies or disappears as a result of a recreational boating accident. If a person dies or injuries requiring more than first aid
are involved, a formal report must be filed within 48 hours of the accident. A formal report must be filed within 10 days for accidents exceeding $500 in property
damage or complete loss of boat.
Giving Assistance
If you see a distress signal or suspect a boat is in trouble, you must assume it is a
real emergency and render assistance immediately. By law, the operator in charge
of the craft is obligated to provide assistance to any individual in danger if such
assistance can be provided safely. Failure to render assistance can result in a fine
and/or imprisonment.
The 1971 Boating Safety Act grants protection to a “Good Samaritan” boater providing good faith assistance, and absolves a boater from any civil liability arising
from such assistance.
Fires
Most fires are the result of gasoline
and oil accumulating in the bilge
from careless fueling practices. Use
the fire extinguisher at the base of
the flames using a sweeping motion.
Prudent and accurate use of the available chemicals should contain all but
the worst fires. Verify that the fire has
been extinguished. If so, check damage and get assistance immediately.
If not, get out and swim at least
23 meters (25 yards) upwind from
the boat and use the visual distress
signals to get assistance.
KC-0160
On board fires involving the fuel system usually result in either an explosion that
completely destroys the boat, or the boat burning to the waterline and self extinguishing. Deciding on abandoning the boat or staying to fight the fire is difficult
and depends on many factors. Try to formulate a fire plan in advance to make
that decision quickly and without hesitation.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
1-6
CHAPTER 1: BOATING SAFETY
! WARNING
Gasoline will float on top of water and can burn. If the boat is abandoned, swim up wind, far enough to avoid fuel that may spread over
the surface of the water to avoid serious injury.
Capsizing and Swamping
A boat may capsize or swamp when least expected. Like fires, try to formulate a
plan in advance on what to do if it should happen. Keep in mind the following
guidelines:
• Try to turn the engine OFF to prevent damage.
• If others were on board, try to locate
them, make sure they’re conscious
and that they can swim.
• Stay with the boat, it will float!
Climb up on the hull and try to get
assistance.
• Don’t try to swim to shore. It’s usually further than it looks.
KC-0170
Hazardous Conditions
Every waterway poses hazards that you should avoid; shallow water, tree stumps,
sand bars, etc. Ask local boaters for information and consult a marine chart when
boating on unfamiliar waters. As the operator of the boat, you should try to avoid
all hazards, known and unknown. The following information does not contain all
possible water hazards.
Weather
Getting caught in severe weather is
hazardous. Check with local
weather stations, the U.S. Coast
Guard, or Weather service broadcasts (162.55 or 162.40 Megahertz)
for the latest conditions. It is recommended to check the weather not
only before but periodically while
you are boating.
OK
!
KC-0210
Dam Spillways
The water around a dam spillway is a hazardous area. It is subject to rapid
changes. Boaters must keep clear of the spillway areas below dams.
Weeds
Weeds are generally a threat to your boat’s engine. Weeds on the propeller may
cause the engine to vibrate. They may also restrict water intake causing the engine
to overheat. If you run into weeds, stop the engine and clear the propeller and
water intake completely of weeds. Consult the engine operating manual for more
information.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
CHAPTER 1: BOATING SAFETY
1-7
NOTICE
Weeds can sometimes be removed by shifting to neutral, pausing a
moment, then shifting to reverse to unwind the weeds from the propeller.
Shallow Water Operation
Operating in shallow water presents a number of hazards. Water of any depth may
contain stump fields, sand bars, rocks, or other unmarked underwater hazards.
Sand bars in narrow inlets are constantly shifting, making it difficult to mark them
with buoys. Sometimes, sand bars are indicated by waves as they form into breakers when passing over the sand bar. If you ground the boat on a sand bar, seek help
from another boater.
If the engine strikes an underwater hazard, check for boat and engine damage. If
the engine vibrates excessively after striking an underwater obstruction, it may
indicate a damaged propeller.
Warning Markers
ALPHA FLAG
DIVERS FLAG
DISTRESS FLAG
RED
BLACK
BLUE
ORANGE
USED BY
RECREATIONAL
DIVERS INDICATES
DIVER'S
POSITION
WORLDWIDE VESSELS
ENGAGED IN DIVING
OPERATIONS - DOES
NOT INDICATE
DIVER'S POSITION
INDICATES
FELLOW
BOATER IS IN
NEED OF
ASSISTANCE
KC-0352
It is a good idea to ask local authorities if
there are hazardous areas and how they are
marked. Boaters must also recognize the flag
designs which indicate that skin divers are
present and keep well clear of the area.
Watch for swimmers. Swimming areas may
not be marked. Steer clear from the area and
always remain alert.
KC-0250
KC-0260
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
1-8
CHAPTER 1: BOATING SAFETY
Navigation markers serve as a means of identifying navigable routes, and indicate
water hazards. Boaters should become familiar with navigation markers and stay
within marked boundaries and clear of hazards.
Boating Under the Influence
! WARNING
Federal and state laws prohibit operating a boat under the influence of
alcohol and other drugs. These regulations are actively enforced.
Impaired operation may result in severe personal injury or death.
Boating, alcohol and the use of other drugs just doesn’t
mix. These substances reduce your reaction time and
affect your better judgment. Combined with the sun,
wind, waves, and noise of other watercraft, the effects of
drugs are increased and will significantly reduce your
reaction time. As the owner/operator, you are responsible
for the alcohol/drug use and on-board behavior of your
passengers.
KC-0153
NOTICE
If the operator’s blood alcohol content is 0.10% (0.08% in some states)
or above, violators are subject to a civil penalty up to $1,000 or criminal penalty up to $5,000, one year imprisonment or both. Operating a
boat under the influence can also result in a loss of motor vehicle driving privileges.
Carbon Monoxide
Carbon Monoxide (CO) is a colorless and odorless gas produced by
all engines and fuel burning appliances. Even with the best boat
design and construction, plus the utmost care in inspection, operaKC-5032
tion, and maintenance, hazardous levels of CO may still be present in
accommodation spaces under certain conditions. To reduce CO accumulation,
always ventilate the boat interior by opening the deck hatches, windows or canvas
to provide adequate ventilation.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
CHAPTER 1: BOATING SAFETY
1-9
! DANGER !
EXTREME HAZARD – Carbon monoxide gas (CO) is colorless, odorless and extremely dangerous. All engines and fuel burning appliances
produce CO as exhaust. Direct and prolonged exposure to CO will
cause BRAIN DAMAGE or DEATH. Signs of exposure to CO include
nausea, dizziness and drowsiness. Sources of CO include:
4. Operating with high bow angle.
1. Blockage of boat exhausts by
obstruction.
KC-0462
KC-0461
2. Exhausts traveling along obstruction.
5. Exhausts from other vessels in
confined areas.
KC-0467
KC-0464
3. Operating at slow speed or while
dead in the water.
6. Operating with canvas tops and
side curtains in place without
ventilation.
KC-0465
KC-0469
ENSURE ADEQUATE VENTILATION FOR CORRECT AIR MOVEMENT
THROUGH BOAT!
Operation By Minors
Minors must always be supervised by an adult whenever operating a boat. Many
states have laws regarding the minimum age and licensing requirements of
minors. Be sure to contact the state boating authorities for information.
Passenger Safety
Whenever you are going for an outing, make sure that at least one passenger is
familiar with the operation and safety aspects of the boat in case of emergency.
Show all passengers the location of emergency equipment and explain how to use
it. Don’t allow passengers to drag their feet or hands in the water, or sit on the
bow, sundeck, or gunwale while the engine is running.
Water Sports
NOTICE
It is unlawful to participate in water sports while under the influence of
alcohol or other drugs.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
1-10
CHAPTER 1: BOATING SAFETY
When participating in water sports, be safe and courteous and follow these guidelines:
• Be considerate to fishermen and others you share the water with.
• Do not perform water sports in congested areas.
• Stay away from navigation markers.
• Stay away from other boats and water sports participants.
• Return immediately to a fallen water sport participant.
• Regularly inspect water sport equipment to ensure it is safe.
! WARNING
• Water sport participants must wear a USCG approved flotation
device. A type III water ski vest is an approved and practical PFD.
• Keep at least 30 m (100 ft.) away from all other objects.
• When water sporting have an experienced driver and aft facing
observer in the boat.
• Never water sport in shallow water or at night.
• Never jump from a moving boat.
• Always keep a downed water sporter in sight.
• Turn the motor OFF before you get close to someone in the water.
CIRCLE
BACK
TO DOCK
CUT ENGINE
SPEED FASTER
SPEED SLOWER
SPEED OK
TURN LEFT
STOP
TURN RIGHT
SKIER IN WATER
SKIERS O.K.
WATER SPORT HAND SIGNALS
KC-0271
General Precautions
Your safety, the safety of your passengers, and other boaters are among your
responsibilities as operator of this boat. Your boat must be in compliance with
U.S. Coast Guard safety equipment regulations. You should know how to react
correctly to adverse weather conditions, have good navigation skills, and follow
the “rules of the road” as defined by the Coast Guard and state/county/local regulations.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
CHAPTER 1: BOATING SAFETY
1-11
! WARNING
Read and understand this manual and the engine manual, and be sure
that you understand all controls and operating instructions before
attempting to operate the boat. Improper operation can be extremely
hazardous.
Before each outing you should check all safety equipment, such as fire extinguishers, PFDs, flares, distress flags, flashlights, engine stop switch, etc. They should
be operable, in good condition, readily visible, and easily accessed.
Tell someone of your travel plans. Check local weather reports before casting off;
do not leave the dock area when strong winds and electrical storms are in the area
or predicted to be in the area.
Know the weight capacity of your boat. Do not overload your boat.
Our Environment
As a boater, you already appreciate nature’s beauty and the
peace of the great outdoors. It is a boater’s responsibility to
protect the natural environment by keeping waterways clean.
Don’t put anything in the water you wouldn’t want to eat
or drink!
Conserve Fishery Resources
There is a tremendous drain on our fishery resources. Over-fishing and pollution
have strained the fish population. Do your part by keeping only what you will eat
by practicing catch-and-release.
Foreign Species
If you trailer your boat from lake to lake, you may unknowingly introduce a foreign aquatic species from one lake to the next. Thoroughly clean the boat below
the water line, remove all weeds and algae, and drain the bilge and livewells
before launching the boat in a new body of water.
Fuel and Oil Spillage
The spilling of fuel or oil into our waterways contaminates the environment and is
dangerous to wildlife. Never discharge or dispose fuel or oil into the water; it is
prohibited and you could be fined. There are two common, accidental types of discharge:
•
•
Overfilling the fuel tank
Pumping contaminated bilge water
! WARNING
Fumes from rags can collect in bilge and be extremely hazardous.
Never store rags used to wipe-up fuel or solvent spills in the boat.
Dispose of rags properly ashore.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
1-12
CHAPTER 1: BOATING SAFETY
Discharge and Disposal of Waste
Waste means all forms of garbage, plastics, recyclables, food, wood, detergents,
sewerage and even fish parts in certain waters - in short, nearly everything. We
recommend you bring back everything you take out with you for proper disposal
ashore. If you have a marine sanitation device (head or marine toilet) installed, use
an approved pump-out facility at your marina. Many areas prohibit the discharge
of sewerage overboard or even an operable overboard waste discharge.
Excessive Noise
Noise means engine noise, radio noise or even yelling. Many bodies of water have
adopted noise limits. Don’t use thru-transom exhaust unless you’re well off shore.
Music and loud conversation can carry a considerable distance on water, especially at night.
Wake and Wash
Be alert for NO WAKE zones. You may be responsible for any damage or injury
caused by your wake/wash. Prior to entering a NO WAKE zone, come off plane to
the slowest steerable speed.
Exhaust Emissions
Increased exhaust (hydrocarbon) emissions pollute our water and air. Keep your
engine tuned and boat hull clean for peak performance. Consult your dealer and
engine manual for information.
Paints
If your boat is kept in water where marine growth is a problem, the use of antifouling paint may reduce the growth rate. Be aware of environmental regulations
that may govern your paint choice. Contact your local boating authorities for
information.
Cleaning Agents
Household cleaners should be used sparingly and not discharged into waterways.
Never mix cleaners and be sure to use plenty of ventilation in enclosed areas. DO
NOT use products which contain phosphates, chlorine, solvents, non-biodegradable or petroleum based products. Citrus based cleaners are excellent for marine
cleaning purposes and are safe for you and the environment. Refer to MAINTENANCE for more information.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
2-1
CHAPTER 2: BASIC RULES OF THE ROAD
! WARNING
The nautical rules of the road must be followed to prevent collisions
between vessels. Like traffic laws for automobiles, the operator is
legally required to follow the rules.
The following information outlines only the most basic of the nautical rules of the
road. For more information, contact your local U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary.
Aids to Navigation
Learn to recognize the different buoys and day markers; they are the signposts of
the waterway. There are 2 primary marking systems in use in the U.S.; the Uniform State Waterway Marking System (USWMS) used on inland waters and
maintained by each state, and the Federal Waterway Marking System (FWMS)
used on coastal waters and rivers and maintained by the U.S. Coast Guard
(USCG). In addition, the FWMS has two modified systems; Western River Buoyage, and Intracoastal Waterway Buoyage. Be sure to check with local authorities
on the buoyage system in use.
The type of hazard/warning buoys and markers depends on the area of jurisdiction. Check with local boating authorities.
USWMS System
In the USWMS Lateral System, well defined channels are marked with red and
black buoys. Lateral means the sides of the channel are marked and the boat
should pass between them.
The USWMS Cardinal System is used when there is no well defined channel or
where an obstruction may be approached from more than one direction. With the
cardinal system:
•
•
•
Pass north or east of BLACK-TOPPED WHITE buoy.
Pass south or west of RED-TOPPED WHITE buoy.
RED and WHITE VERTICALLY STRIPED buoy indicates boat should pass
outside of the buoy (away from shore).
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
2-2
CHAPTER 2: BASIC RULES OF THE ROAD
Uniform State Regulatory Markers
USWMS regulatory markers are white with international orange geometric
shapes; you must obey regulatory markers.
UNIFORM STATE WATERWAY MARKING SYSTEM (USWMS)
CONTROLLED
AREA
DANGER
BOATS
KEEP OUT
INFORMATION
DO NOT PASS
BETWEEN SHORE
AND BUOY
SPECIAL
PURPOSE
NAVIGATE TO
STARBOARD
FACING UPSTREAM
NAVIGATE TO
PORT FACING
UPSTREAM
NAVIGATE TO
SOUTH OR WEST
NAVIGATE TO
NORTH OR EAST
MID-CHANNEL
KC-0411
FWMS System
The FWMS Lateral System is for use on navigable waters except Western Rivers
and Intracoastal Waterways.
The markings on these buoys are oriented from the perspective of being entered
from seaward (the boater is going towards the port). This means that red buoys are
passed on the starboard (right) side of the vessel when proceeding from open
water into port, and green buoys to the port (left) side.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
CHAPTER 2: BASIC RULES OF THE ROAD
2-3
The right side (starboard) of the channel is marked with RED, even numbered
buoys. The left (port) side of the channel is marked with GREEN, odd numbered
buoys.
UNLIGHTED
BELL BUOY
SPAR BUOY
CAN BUOY
LIGHTED BUOY
NUN BUOY
KC-0420
The middle of the channel is marked with RED and
WHITE vertically striped buoys; pass close to these buoys.
Obstructions, channel junctions, etc. are marked with RED
and GREEN horizontally striped buoys.
A RED band at the top means the preferred channel is to
the left of the buoy; a GREEN top band means the preferred channel is to the right of the buoy.
Day markers are colored and numbered the same as
buoys. RED, triangular day markers with even numbers
mark the starboard side of the channel. GREEN, square
day markers with odd numbers mark the port side of the
channel.
SPHERICAL SAFE
WATER MARKER
KC-0430
STARBOARD
DAY
MARKER
Lights, bells and horns are used on buoys for night or poor
visibility conditions.
Right-Of-Way
NOTICE
In general, boats with less maneuverability have
right-of-way over more agile craft. You must stay
clear of the vessel with right-of-way and pass to his
stern.
PORT
DAY
MARKER
KC-0440
Privileged Boats
Privileged boats have right-of-way and can hold course and speed. Sailboats and
boats paddled or rowed have the right-of-way over motor boats. Sailboats under
power are considered motorboats. Small pleasure craft must yield to large commercial boats in narrow channels.
Burdened Boats
The burdened boat is the boat that must make whatever adjustments to course and
speed necessary to keep out of the way of the privileged boat.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
2-4
CHAPTER 2: BASIC RULES OF THE ROAD
Crossing Situation
12 O'CLOCK
In crossing situations, the boat to
the right from the 12 o’clock to
the 4 o’clock position has the
right-of-way. It must hold course
and speed. The burdened boat
keeps clear and passes behind the
privileged boat. Boats going up
and down a river have the privilege over boats crossing the river.
PRIVILEGED
VESSEL
Meeting Head-On
Neither boat has the right-of-way
in this situation. Both boats
should decrease speed, should
turn to the right, and pass port-toport. However, if both boats are
on the left side of a channel, each
vessel should sound two short
horn blasts and pass starboard to
starboard.
DANGER ZONE
BURDENED
VESSEL
4 O'CLOCK
KC-0471
HONK
HONK
HONK
HONK
PASSING
PORT TO
PORT
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
MEETING
HEAD TO
HEAD
PASSING
STARBOARD TO
STARBOARD
CHAPTER 2: BASIC RULES OF THE ROAD
2-5
Overtaking
The boat that is overtaking one ahead of it is the burdened boat and must make
any adjustments necessary to keep out of the way of the privileged boat.
PRIVILEGED
VESSEL BEING
OVERTAKEN
BURDENED
VESSEL
OVERTAKING
KC-0601
The General Prudential Rule
The general prudential rule regarding right-of-way is that if a collision appears
unavoidable, neither boat has right-of-way. As prescribed in the Rules of the
Road, both boats must act to avoid collision.
Night Running
Boats operating between sunset and sunrise (hours vary by state) must use navigational lights. Nighttime operation, especially during bad weather or fog can be
dangerous. All Rules of Road apply at night, but it is best to slow down and stay
clear of all boats, regardless of who has right-of-way. Protect your night vision by
avoiding bright lights and have a passenger, if possible, help keep watch for other
boats, water hazards, and aids to navigation.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
3-1
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEMS, CONTROLS AND INDICATORS
Knowing the systems, controls and indicators on your boat is essential for safe
and proper operation. The systems, controls and indicators shown in this section
may be optional or slightly different than those on your boat.
Systems
! WARNING
Regularly inspect and maintain all systems to prevent unexpected hazards associated with worn or faulty components. Always replace system components and hardware with marine grade parts, not
automotive components.
Ventilation
The ventilation system is designed to remove and prevent the accumulation of
explosive vapors in the hull and engine compartment. Therefore, proper ventilation is extremely important to boat safety.
Powered systems consist of a blower which “pulls” air out from the engine compartment and bilge area; one or more vents allow fresh air in. Natural systems
have both intake and exhaust vents; as the boat moves, air is forced into the intake
and escapes through the exhaust vents.
Fire Extinguishing
Models equipped with an Automatic Fire Extinguishing System
automatically actuate when temperatures reach a preset limit. When
actuation occurs, a loud popping sound may be heard followed by
“rushing” air sound. When a discharge occurs, immediately shut
down all electrical and mechanical systems and powered ventilation.
KC-5040
! WARNING
If the fire system discharges, wait for at least 15 minutes before opening
engine hatch. Fire system gas displaces oxygen to “smother” the fire.
Opening the hatch too soon may feed oxygen to the fire and flashback
can occur.
Fuel
The basic fuel system consists of one or more tanks,
either portable or built-in, with vent, level sensor and
fuel indicator. Permanent tanks are equipped with an
anti-siphon valve to prevent fuel from accumulating in
the bilge if a hose should break. Some models are
equipped with a fuel shutoff valve to prevent fuel from
reaching the engine. It is recommended that the shutoff valve be closed during long periods of inactivity or
storage. Boat models with multiple fuel tanks are also
equipped with a fuel selection valve for individual
tank selection.
KC-1003
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEMS, CONTROLS AND INDICATORS
OFF
When the engine is operating, the fuel pump “pulls” fuel
from the tank, bringing it into the engine where it is distributed to the cylinders and burned. Oil injected engines
also include an oil reservoir and pump for injecting oil
into the system. Consult the engine operator’s manual for
fuel recommendations.
AUX
3-2
MAIN
Engine Oil
KC-1001.1
Depending on engine type, your boat may be equipped with one of several engine
lubrication systems. Many small to mid-range outboards are lubricated by oil
mixed directly with the gasoline in the fuel tank, while other outboards may be
equipped with an oil injection system. In both systems, the oil is consumed as the
engine runs. Oil injection systems include a separate reservoir for oil containment
and an oil pump or combination fuel/oil pump that supplies oil to the fuel system
for engine lubrication.
Stern drive engines, like automobile engines, use a continuous loop lubrication
system that must be periodically serviced. Consult the engine operator’s manual
for oil recommendations.
Exhaust
The engine exhaust system removes the gases produced by the running engine and
helps to vent them away from the boat. Inboard engines are equipped with a muffler and may use water injection as part of the exhaust system. Some stern drives
are equipped with an exhaust diverter valve which, when activated, routes engine
exhaust to through-transom exhaust pipes or down through the propeller hub.
Through-transom exhaust is only used when well offshore. Never change or modify the standard manufactured exhaust system.
Cooling
The majority of marine engines are cooled by the continuous intake of raw lake
water and circulating it around components. Inboards are equipped with seacocks
and strainers at the raw water intake. Some marine engines used in saltwater may
be equipped with a self-contained freshwater cooling system that pumps engine
coolant through a heat exchanger to reduce engine
temperature. Raw water is circulated through the other
side of the heat exchanger to absorb engine heat from
the coolant.
Any water intake or outlet below the water line is
equipped with a seacock. Seacocks, located at the
through-hull fitting, should be kept closed during long
periods of inactivity and opened only when needed.
KC-2165.1
! WARNING
Keep seacocks closed during periods of inactivity. A downstream hose
failure could flood the boat if the seacock is left open.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEMS, CONTROLS AND INDICATORS
3-3
Electrical
The boat is equipped with a 12-volt direct current (12 VDC) negative ground electrical system. The positive (red) wire is hot and feeds current from the battery to
the electrical systems. The negative (black) wire is ground and completes the circuit back to the battery. Until the engine is running at high idle or faster, all electrical power comes from the main battery. Once the engine is started and running
above 1200 RPM, electrical power is then provided by the engine alternator. The
alternator provides more power as engine speed is increased. When the engine is
operating, the alternator is charging the battery.
More electrical accessories than ever are being used on today’s boats. Continuous
operation of electrical accessories when the engine is not operating, or operating
at low idle (trolling) speeds may discharge the battery to the point where it may
not be able to crank the engine. A poorly maintained battery will discharge more
quickly, and if corrosion is present, the engine might not start due to high electrical resistance at the battery terminals, even though there may be sufficient battery
reserves to start the engine.
Controls
! WARNING
Improperly maintained controls are hazardous and may cause sudden
loss of control. Make sure all steering and shift/throttle hardware,
cables and fluid levels are regularly inspected and maintained.
Improper maintenance may result in a loss of control, resulting in serious injury or death.
Steering Control
Your boat is equipped with a steering wheel for controlling the direction of travel.
The steering system itself may be mechanical, power-assisted or hydraulic in
operation.
Boat steering is not self-centering. Always keep a secure grip on the steering
wheel to maintain full boat control.
With mechanical steering, the helm unit transfers rotary motion of the steering
wheel to linear motion in the cable which pushes or pulls the steering arm. Some
boats are equipped with two cables; one cable pushes and the other pulls.
With power-assisted systems, the helm unit transfers rotary motion of the steering
wheel to linear motion which pushes or pulls a cable. The cable movement is
sensed and a signal is sent to a hydraulic pump which moves the hydraulic cylinder attached to the steering arm.
A hydraulic system has a pump mounted directly to the steering wheel with two
hoses running from the pump to a hydraulic cylinder. When the steering wheel is
turned, it moves the hydraulic cylinder which is connected to the steering arm. A
reservoir, either separate or integral with the pump, holds extra fluid to prevent air
from entering the system.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
3-4
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEMS, CONTROLS AND INDICATORS
Shift/Throttle Control
The shift/throttle control on your boat differs from model to model and may
depend on the engine used. The following single lever and dual lever controls are
typical of the operation of most controls used. Be sure to consult the engine or
control manual for specific operational differences.
NOTICE
All shift/throttle controls are equipped with a safety switch for “start in
neutral only” operation. Be sure the control is in neutral before
attempting to start the engine.
Single lever controls operate as both a gear shifter and a throttle.
A. Neutral Position - Safety switch will allow starting in
this position only.
B
B. Forward Position - Press release button under handle
to allow shifting to forward (or reverse) position.
A
C
D
D
C. Reverse Position - Do not shift quickly from forward
to reverse.
D. Throttle Position - Pushing in forward or pulling in
reverse increases engine speed.
KC-0620.1
Never attempt to shift without the engine running. For engine warm-up, a separate
lever on the control is used for throttle advance when in neutral.
Dual lever controls have individual levers for transmission shift and engine throttle.
A. Shift Lever - Neutral is in center detent position;
push for forward, pull for reverse.
A
B. Throttle Lever - Full throttle is all the way up, idle
is all the way down.
For engine warm-up, the shift lever is positioned in neu- B
tral and the throttle lever is advanced as needed.
KC-0653.1
CAUTION
Do not shift too quickly from forward to reverse. Stay in neutral, or
idle position until the boat has lost most of its headway before completing the shift to reverse or engine damage may occur.
Switches
Each electrical circuit on your boat is equipped with a control switch. Some
switches may have an LED indicator for easy ON/OFF identification. Most
switches will have a fuse holder, or circuit breaker adjacent to the switch.
Master Power Switch – Disconnects the boat electrical systems from the batteries. When not using the boat, keep this switch in the OFF position.
Fuel Gauge Switch – Allows you to check the amount of fuel in the fuel tank
when the navigation lights are OFF or the ignition switch is OFF.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEMS, CONTROLS AND INDICATORS
Battery Switch – Connects the battery to the electrical
system. Provides isolation and positive disconnect of battery to protect against tampering, electrical fire hazards,
and battery rundown. Rotate switch to the OFF position
when the boat is not in use.
3-5
ON
Navigation Lights Switch – Controls the running and
anchor lights for night operation. NAV position will turn
on the red and green navigation bow lights, white stern
light, and gauge illumination. ANC position turns on only
the white stern light for night anchoring.
OFF
KC-0704.1
NOTICE
Never operate the boat between sunset and sunrise with the switch in
the anchor light position. Running lights are legally required to indicate direction and right-of-way at night.
Blower Switch (Stern Drive Only) – Activates the engine box ventilation blower
to remove explosive fumes from the engine and bilge areas.
Bilge Switch – Activates the bilge pump to remove excess water from the bottom
of the boat. Some models are equipped with an automatic bilge pump setting.
Switch to AUTO whenever the boat is in operation, water will be pumped-out as it
enters the bilge and the pump will automatically shutdown when the bilge is dry.
CAUTION
Be sure to switch the bilge OFF (not AUTO) when the boat is not in use.
Wave action or trailer travel can cause the pump to drain the battery.
Running the pump when the bilge is dry will damage the pump.
Ignition Switch – Starts and stops the engine. A built-in
protection system prevents the engine from starting in
any other gear than neutral. Be sure to consult the engine
operator’s manual for more information.
Horn Button – Push and hold to sound the horn.
Trim Switch – If your engine is equipped with power
trim and tilt, this switch activates that function. Push and
hold the switch until the engine is at the desired angle.
Use this switch in combination with the trim gauge.
BOW DOWN
P
O
R
T
S
T
B
D
UP
DN
TYPICAL
TRIM
SWITCH
KC-0931
Trim Tab Switches – These rocker switches control the
trim tabs located on the port and starboard transom.
Adjusting trim tabs will improve the ride of your boat and
correct listing from side to side due to varying conditions.
BOW UP
KC-0932
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
3-6
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEMS, CONTROLS AND INDICATORS
Engine Stop Switch and Lanyard – The engine
stop switch stops the engine when engaged. Attach
the lanyard to the boat operator whenever the
engine is running. If the operator is thrown from
the seat or moves too far from the helm, the lanyard will engage the switch and shut off the
engine.
To attach the lanyard, connect one end to the safety
switch and the hook on the opposite end of the
lanyard to a strong piece of clothing on the operator, such as a belt loop.
SAFETY SWITCH
LANYARD
HOOK
KC-0950
! WARNING
Attach the Engine Stop Switch lanyard to the operator before starting
the engine. This will prevent the boat from becoming a runaway if the
operator is accidentally thrown away from the helm.
The Engine Stop Switch can only be effective when it is in good working condition. Observe the following:
●
Never remove or modify the Engine Stop Switch and/or lanyard.
●
Lanyard must always be free from obstructions that could interfere
with its operation.
Once a month: Check switch for proper operation. With engine running, pull lanyard. If engine does not stop, see your DEALER for
replacement of switch.
NOTICE
The engine will not start unless the engine stop switch lanyard is
attached.
Indicators
NOTICE
Some boat models may be equipped with a multi-gauge instrument
which integrates the functions of several single gauges.
Instruments are illuminated for night operation. Their type, number, and location
vary by model; some may not appear on your model.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEMS, CONTROLS AND INDICATORS
15
10
20
35
25
30
30
0
40
60
50
25
35
5
3-7
20
15
40
70
40
45
30
20
RPM
80
MPH
x 100
50
KPH
KC-0700
KC-0710
Tachometer
Registers engine speed in revolutions per minute (RPM). Use this gauge to keep
the engine within the proper operating range. Consult the engine manual for the
proper RPM operating range for your engine.
Speedometer
Registers forward boat speed in miles per hour. Use this gauge to monitor fuel
consumption and propeller performance. Since most marine speedometers operate
with water pressure, accuracy is only approximate.
Fuel Level Gauge
On models with a permanent fuel tank, this gauge
registers approximate fuel level in the gas tank. The
Ignition switch must be in the RUN position to activate
the gauge.
E
1/
2
F
FUEL
KC-0720
Water Pressure Gauge
Registers the water circulated by the water pump in
pounds per square inch (PSI). Use this gauge to observe
that the engine cooling system is operating properly.
Consult the engine manual for the normal operating PSI
range.
15
20
10
25
5
30
WATER
PRESS
KC-0730
Oil Level Gauge (Oil Injection Only)
Registers the level of injection oil in the reservoir. Some
injection systems may provide an indicator on the reservoir. Consult the engine manual for more information.
DN
UP
Trim Gauge
Measures engine or stern drive tilt and indicates the relative position of the bow, up or down when boat is on
plane. Use this gauge to monitor boat trim.
TRIM
KC-0740
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
3-8
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEMS, CONTROLS AND INDICATORS
Voltmeter
Indicates the condition of the main or cranking battery in
volts DC. Normal operating range is 12+ volts.
10 13 16
-
+
VOLTS
KC-0750
Ammeter
Measures the charging current in the electrical system.
Consult the engine manual for the normal operating
range.
0
50
-
50
+
AMP
KC-0760
Engine Water Temperature Gauge
Indicates the water/coolant temperature inside the
engine. Consult the engine manual for the normal operating range.
0
5
6
C x 10
7
10 15
0
8
24
F x 10
TEMP
KC-0770
Engine Oil Pressure Gauge
(Stern Drive Only)
Indicates the pressure of the lubricating oil inside the
engine. Consult the engine manual for the normal operating range.
1
0
KPa x 100
2
3
4
40
80
PSI
OIL
KC-0780
Engine Hourmeter
Registers accumulated engine operating time, and is activated when the ignition switch is in the “ON” position.
Be aware that time will be logged whenever the ignition
switch is “ON”, even when the engine is not running. Use
the hourmeter to keep accurate logs for scheduled maintenance.
ENGINE
HOURS
0 00 0 00 0h
Quartz 100
KC-0782
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
4-1
CHAPTER 4: OPERATION
This section describes the basics of fueling, starting, running, steering, trimming,
docking and stopping your boat. Since there is a variety of control and engine
options, be sure to consult the other owner’s manuals provided with your boat.
Fueling
Portable tanks must be removed from the boat when fueling. Consult the engine
operator’s manual for proper procedures. Built-in tanks have the fuel filler aft in
the boat. Models with oil injection also have fillers for the oil reservoir.
! DANGER !
Gasoline is extremely flammable and highly explosive under certain
conditions. Always stop the engine and never smoke or allow open
flames or sparks within 15 m (50 ft.) of the fueling area.
CAUTION
To prevent unwarranted engine damage, consult your engine operator’s manual for manufacturer recommended fuel/oil ratios and mixing specifications.
Take care not to spill gasoline. If gasoline is spilled accidentally, wipe up all traces
of it with dry rags and immediately dispose of the rags properly onshore. When
fueling:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Close all doors, hatches, windows, and other compartments.
Extinguish cigarettes, pipes, stoves, and all other flame producing items.
Make sure all power is off, and do not operate any electrical switches.
Remove fuel fill cap. Insert hose
nozzle and make sure nozzle is
in contact with or grounded
against fill opening. This will
reduce the risk of static spark.
Add fuel in accordance with the
engine operator’s manual. Do
not fill to capacity to allow for
KC-0991
fuel expansion.
Tighten the fuel filler cap completely after refueling.
Check oil level.
NOTICE
Each time you fill up, inspect fuel lines for leaks and hose deterioration.
After fueling, you should:
•
•
Close fill cap securely and wipe up spillage.
Open all windows, hatches, doors, and compartments.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
4-2
CHAPTER 4: OPERATION
Lubrication (Outboards)
Your engine may be equipped with an oil injection system that automatically
feeds oil to the engine. Use lubricant that is recommended by the manufacturer, or
NMMA TC-W3 certified. You will find the recommended lubricant listed in the
engine manual. If you need assistance, consult your dealer.
Starting
1.
2.
3.
4.
Open vent screw on fuel tank (portable tanks).
Connect fuel line to fuel tank (portable tanks).
Squeeze fuel primer bulb several times until firm (outboard models).
Operate blower (stern drive models).
! WARNING
The blower must be operated for a minimum of 4 minutes before each
time the engine is started. In addition, the blower should be operated
continuously when at idle and during slow speed running. Failure to
operate the blower can cause an explosion.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Attach Emergency Engine Stop Switch lanyard to its switch and to the
operator.
Place shift/throttle control handle in NEUTRAL.
Turn key clockwise to START position. After motor starts, release key.
Push control handle forward to go forward, pull back for reverse.
CAUTION
Always go slowly in reverse to avoid taking water in over the transom.
You can swamp the boat by taking on too much water.
Shifting/Running
Follow these guidelines when shifting
your boat:
•
•
•
Pause in neutral before shifting
from forward to reverse, or reverse
to forward.
Avoid shifting into reverse while
the boat is traveling forward at
speed.
Keep the shifter control clean and
clear of obstructions.
To shift into forward: press the neutral lock button while pushing the control lever forward.
To shift into reverse: press the neutral
lock button while pushing the control
lever backward.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
BOW
REVERSE
FORWARD
KC-1060
CHAPTER 4: OPERATION
4-3
Warning Alarm
CAUTION
Continued operation after the warning alarm has sounded may cause
severe engine damage.
Your boat may be equipped with a warning alarm that will sound if an engine
problem develops. If the warning alarm sounds, IMMEDIATELY throttle back to
idle speed and shift into neutral. IMMEDIATELY check the gauges and stop the
engine. On some models, the horn may emit a short chirping sound during starting
to verify operation.
Steering
Practice steering your boat. Make sure that the steering system is working correctly and is properly maintained. Follow these guidelines to keep your boat handling well.
RIGHT TURN
Turn wheel to right—Stern
will move to left.
LEFT TURN
Turn wheel to left—Stern
will move to right.
BACKING TO LEFT
Turn wheel to left—Stern
will pull to left.
KC-1071
•
•
•
Keep the cable end clear of obstructions such as wiring, control cables, fuel
lines, tow lines and mooring lines.
Keep the moving parts clean and lubricated.
Inspect the steering cables for kinks, damage, and corrosion.
! WARNING
The steering system must be in good operating condition for safe boat
operation. Frequent inspection, lubrication, and adjustment by your
dealer is recommended.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
4-4
CHAPTER 4: OPERATION
All boats have a tendency to wander somewhat at slow speeds. A natural reaction
to this effect is to steer the boat back and forth in an attempt to compensate for
wandering. Invariably, the compensation will result in oversteer and only worsen
the effect. Keep the steering wheel in the center position, the boat will wander
back and forth somewhat, but the overall course will be a straight one.
Stopping
1.
2.
3.
Slowly bring the control lever to the idle position. If the boat has been driven
for a long period of time at high speed, allow the engine a 2-3 minute cooldown period at low idle.
Turn the ignition key to the OFF position.
If any problems were encountered during the outing, have the boat inspected
by your dealer and request any necessary repairs before the next outing.
! WARNING
Do not use the engine stop switch for normal shut down. Doing so may
impair your ability to re-start the engine quickly or may create a hazardous swamping condition.
Docking
Practice docking before attempting it for the first time. Use a float, like a plastic
milk jug with a line and small weight, as your docking target.
! WARNING
Never use your hand, arm or other part of your body to attempt to
keep the boat from hitting the dock. The boat could push against the
dock, causing severe injury.
Follow these guidelines when docking:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Approach docks with the port side of the boat if possible.
Come to a stop a short distance from the dock, then proceed slowly.
Have fenders, mooring lines and crew ready.
Observe how the wind and current are moving your boat. Approach the dock
with the boat pointed into the wind, if possible. If the wind or current is pushing you away from the dock, use a sharper angle of approach. If you must
approach the dock downwind or down current, use a slow speed and shallow
angle. Be ready to reverse to stop and maintain position.
If there is no wind or current, approach the dock at a 10 to 20 degree angle.
If possible, throw a line to a person on the dock and have that person secure a
bow line.
With the bow secure, swing the stern in with the engine, or pull it in with a
boat hook.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
CHAPTER 4: OPERATION
WIND or CURRENT
4-5
WIND or CURRENT
KC-1120
Before tying-up the boat, be sure to use enough fenders to protect the boat from
damage. If possible, tie-up with the bow towards the waves with a good quality
double-braided nylon line. Tie-up only to the lifting or tie-down eyes; never use
the handrails or windshield frames. If the boat is to be moored for a long period of
time, use chafing protectors on lines to protect the gelcoat finish. Leave a little
slack in the lines to allow for some wave movement or tidal action if applicable.
Follow these guidelines when departing:
•
Very slowly shift into forward at idle speed.
•
When the stern moves away from the dock, turn the engine away from the
dock.
•
Cast off bow line and back away.
If the wind or current is pushing away from the dock, cast off all lines and allow to
drift until you are clear.
Boat Trim
The performance of your boat depends on load weight and distribution. Distribute
weight evenly, from bow to stern, and also from port to starboard. After loading,
the boat’s trim can be adjusted by changing the engine trim angle.
PROPER DISTRIBUTION
IMPROPER DISTRIBUTION (BOW HEAVY)
KC-1260
KC-1270
IMPROPER DISTRIBUTION
(STARBOARD HEAVY)
KC-1280
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
4-6
CHAPTER 4: OPERATION
Drive Trim Angle
Trim angle is the angular relationship between the lower drive unit and the transom of the boat. Boat trim while underway greatly affects boat performance and
efficiency. For best results, the boat should be on plane and trimmed to reduce the
wetted surface. With less boat in the water, both speed and fuel economy
increases. Engines with manual trim must be adjusted for best overall operation
for the load and conditions. Engines with power trim should be adjusted continuously for best results.
If the engine is trimmed in too far (closer to the boat bottom), speed drops, fuel
economy decreases, and the boat may not handle correctly. However, it does provide better acceleration from a stand still; and because it forces the bow down, visibility is improved. If the engine is trimmed out too far (away from the boat
bottom), steering torque may increase, the boat may be difficult to get on a plane,
and may bounce.
DN
UP
TRIM
CORRECT
DN
UP
TRIM
IN TOO FAR
DN
UP
TRIM
OUT TOO FAR
KC-1150
! WARNING
Do not trim the engine out too far or the boat may begin to “porpoise”
(bounce up and down). Porpoising reduces control and visibility.
To use power trim effectively, always start with the engine trimmed in. As the boat
planes, increase the angle out. Experience is the best teacher for understanding
proper trim.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
5-1
CHAPTER 5: GETTING UNDERWAY
There are many things to consider to make your boating trip safe and enjoyable.
This section includes a safety checklist, boarding guidelines, boat loading, and
capacity information.
The contents of this section should be read and understood before casting off.
Remember, if you have a problem during your cruise, you canÕt get out and Þx it,
or walk to safety or for help.
You are responsible for the safety of all passengers, the boat, and any damage the
boat or its wake may cause. Always keep passengers from blocking your view so
that you do not run into other boats, swimmers, water skiers, personal water vehicles, or aids to navigation.
Safety Checklist
The following checks are essential to safe boating and must be performed before
starting the engine. Get in the habit of performing these checks in the same order
each time so that it becomes routine.
! WARNING
DO NOT launch the boat if any problem is found during the Safety
Check. A problem could lead to an accident during the outing causing
severe injury or death. Have any problem attended to immediately; see
your dealer.
Pre-Operation
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Check the weather report, wind and water conditions.
Check that the required safety equipment is on board.
Check that the Þre extinguisher is fully charged.
Check that bilge drain plugs are installed properly.
Check that no fuel, oil or water is leaking or has leaked into the bilge
compartment.
Check all hoses and connections for leakage and damage.
Check the propeller for damage.
Check the engine cooling water intake pick-up for blockage.
Check that battery terminals are clean and tight.
Check electrical circuits (lights, pumps, horn, etc.) for proper operation.
Check that throttle/shift control is in neutral.
Check that the steering system operates properly.
Check that all required maintenance has been performed.
During Operation
¥
¥
¥
Check gauges frequently for signs of abnormal behavior.
Check that controls operate smoothly.
Check for excessive vibration.
After Operation
¥
¥
¥
Fill fuel tank to prevent moisture due to condensation.
Check for fuel, oil and water leakage.
Check the propeller for damage.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
5-2
CHAPTER 5: GETTING UNDERWAY
Safety Equipment
Federal and local laws require certain safety equipment to be on board at all times.
In addition, responsible boaters carry other equipment in case of emergency.
Check with local boating authorities for any additional requirements over and
above federal requirements.
Boarding
When boarding the boat, always step in. Do not jump. Avoid stepping on Þberglass or other potentially slippery surfaces. Board one person at a time.
Do not board the boat while carrying gear. Set gear on the dock, board the boat
and then pick-up the gear.
Boat Loading
The performance of your boat is dependent on load weight and distribution. Passengers should board one at a time and should distribute themselves to maintain
trim. Remember to distribute weight from right to left, and also from front to
back.
! WARNING
All passengers should be carefully seated and not be riding on the deck,
gunwale, rear sun deck, or elevated pedestal Þshing seats while underway. Passengers riding in the bow rider seats should exercise extreme
caution. During rough water operation, passengers in the bow rider
seats should move to the aft passenger seats.
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Do not allow your passengers to ride with their feet dangling over the side,
ßoating debris can cause serious injury.
Avoid excess weight in the bow or stern.
Securely stow all extra gear in stowage areas to prevent load shifting. Do not
stow gear on top of safety equipment; safety equipment must be quickly
accessible.
In adverse weather, reduce the load in the boat. People/load capacity ratings
are based upon normal boating conditions.
Do not use the engine unit as a boarding ramp. Make sure engine is off when
swimmers, divers, and skiers are boarding to prevent injury.
Capacity
Boats less than 6.4 m (20 ft.) are required by the USCG to have a certiÞcation
plate, attached to the hull near the transom, indicating maximum person/load
capacity. The person/load capacity is determined by various USCG formulas.
Actual capacity is determined by the availability of proper seating on the boat.
Acceptable seating determines the number of passengers, not the overall load
capacity.
NOTICE
The capacity plate for outboard powered boats lists the maximum
horsepower that the boat can safely use. It is unlawful to overpower a
boat.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
CHAPTER 5: GETTING UNDERWAY
5-3
U.S. COAST GUARD
MAXIMUM CAPACITIES
8 PERSONS OR 1150 LBS.
1600
140
LBS. PERSONS, MOTOR, GEAR
H.P. MOTOR
THIS BOAT COMPLIES WITH U.S. COAST
GUARD SAFETY STANDARDS IN EFFECT
ON THE DATE OF CERTIFICATION
OUTBOARD
POWERED
BOATS ONLY
MANUFACTURER:
MODEL:
DESIGN COMPLIANCE WITH NMMA REQUIREMENTS BELOW IS
VERIFIED. MFGR. RESPONSIBLE FOR PRODUCTION CONTROL.
LOAD CAPACITY • COMPARTMENT VENTILATION
STEERING, FUEL AND ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS
INTERNATIONAL LIGHTS • BASIC FLOTATION
MANEUVERABILITY
CERTIFIED
NATIONAL MARINE MANUFACTURERS ASSN.
KC-1440
! WARNING
Do not exceed the USCG certiÞed maximum capacities under any circumstances. Overloading will reduce freeboard and increase the likelihood of swamping, especially in heavy seas. Overloading causes
handling to become sluggish, making it difÞcult to react quickly.
Overpowering on outboard-powered craft is extremely dangerous.
Overpowering will make the boat unstable and could cause loss of control.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
6-1
CHAPTER 6: RUNNING
We urge you and all others operating the boat to seek certified instruction from the
local boating authorities.
This section is designed to present the most basic operational principles. It is NOT
intended to cover all conditions encountered during operation. Therefore, the principles presented in this manual are limited to the facts related directly to the operation of the boat, while the responsibility for the proper application of these
principles belongs to you.
Maneuvering Techniques
Steering response depends on three
factors: engine position, motion and
throttle.
STERN
CIRCLE
BOW
CIRCLE
Like an automobile, high speed
maneuvering is relatively easy and
takes little practice to learn. Slow
speed maneuvering, on the other
hand, is far more difficult and
requires time and practice to master.
When making tight maneuvers, it is
important to understand the effects of
turning. Since both thrust and steering are at the stern of the boat, the
stern will push away from the direction of the turn. The bow follows a
smaller turning circle than the stern.
The effects of unequal propeller
thrust, wind, and current must also be
KC-1470
kept in mind. While wind and current
may not always be present, an experienced boater will use them to his advantage. Unequal thrust is an aspect shared by
all single engine propeller-driven watercraft. A clockwise rotation propeller tends
to cause the boat, steering in the straight ahead position, to drift to starboard when
going forward, and to port when going backward. At high speed, this effect is usually unnoticed, but at slow speed; especially during backing, it can be powerful.
For this reason, many veteran boaters approach the dock with the port side of the
boat toward the dock, if possible.
Stopping (checking headway) is a technique that must be developed. Since a boat
has no brakes, reverse thrust is used to slow and stop the boat. The momentum of
the boat will vary according to the load as well as the speed. Make it a practice to
slow to idle (no-wake) speed before shifting into reverse.
It is best to learn maneuvering skills in open water away from traffic. Adequate
practice is the only way to develop your boating skills.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
6-2
CHAPTER 6: RUNNING
Salt Water
If boat is moored in salt water for long periods, tilt the engine out of the water
(except during freezing temperatures). After removing the boat from the water,
lower the engine to the run (down) position until the cooling system has drained
thoroughly. Hose the entire hull down with fresh water and wipe dry.
Today’s engines are built for operation in either fresh or salt water. Fresh water
internal flushing is not normally required, however, it may be desirable after use in
salt, polluted, or brackish water. Your dealer will assist you in securing the appropriate engine flushing device.
Freezing Temperatures
When the boat will be operated and left in the water and temperatures drop below
freezing, the engine must remain in the tilted down (submerged) position at all
times to prevent water in the engine from freezing. When the boat is removed
from the water, drain the engine completely.
Towing Procedure
If seas are rough, it may not be easy to extend the tow line from one boat to
another. In these cases, use a light throwing line with a weight on one end and
with the heavier towing line secured to it.
Never attempt to tow a much larger or grounded vessel. Because of the tremendous stress caused by towing, use a tow line that is rated at least 4 times the gross
weight of the boat being towed. Tow ropes must always be in good condition, free
of any cuts or abrasions.
Attach tow line to the bow eye on the disabled boat. Attach the opposite end of the
bridle only to the stern eyes of the tow boat. Wrap the bridle with chafing gear
where it rubs against the boat or any corners. Leave at least 2 boat lengths between
the boats for adequate movement.
BOW
EYE
STERN EYES
TOW LINE
KC-2111
! DANGER !
When towing, use only the bow and stern eyes; never use cleats, handrails, etc. Do not allow anyone to be in line with the tow rope. If the
rope should break or pull free, a dangerous recoil could occur resulting
in severe injury or death to anyone in its path.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
CHAPTER 6: RUNNING
6-3
Adjust the tow line to match wave action. Keep the boats on the crest or in the
trough of the waves at the same time. In protected, calm waters, shorten the line
for better handling. Always tow at moderate speed, allowing for adverse wind and
wave conditions. Have the operator of the towed boat steer with you if possible.
If you need a tow, or wish to tow another boat, use great care. The boat structure
can be damaged by excessive pulling strain. You should always offer help to a boat
in trouble. However, towing a capsized, grounded, or hull damaged boat is dangerous. Give assistance to the occupants; then call the proper authorities.
Anchoring
Dropping Anchor
There are many types of anchors available on the market.
The choice of one anchor over another depends on many
factors. An anchor will usually hold best in a mixture of
mud and clay or in hard sand. A lightweight Danforth
anchor is recommended for general boating. For more
information on anchors consult your dealer.
DANFORTH
ANCHOR
KC-1571
! WARNING
Always anchor from the bow; NEVER anchor from the stern. A small
amount of current will make the boat unsteady…a strong current can
pull a boat, anchored by the stern, under water and keep it there.
When anchoring, it is helpful to keep a few guidelines in mind.
•
4
Make sure the line is tied to the
anchor and tie the other end of the
line to the forward cleat or bow
eye.
Head the boat into the wind or
current over the spot where you
want to lower the anchor.
Stop the boat before lowering the
anchor.
KC-1531
When the anchor hits bottom,
slowly back up the boat, keeping tension on the line. Let out an anchor line
that is 4 to 6 times the depth of the water. For example, if you are in 3 m (10
ft.) of water, let out 12 to 18 m (40 to 60 ft.) of line.
Secure anchor line to the bow cleat. Pull on line to make sure anchor is holding.
Occasionally check your position against the shoreline. If the anchor is dragging and you are drifting, reset the anchor.
•
•
•
•
ES
M
TI TH
6 EP
TO E D
TH
•
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
6-4
CHAPTER 6: RUNNING
Weighing (Pulling In) Anchor
Start engine and move forward until anchor line is straight up and down. Pull hard
to lift anchor from the bottom material.
If the anchor is stuck, attach anchor line to the bow cleat so that it is taut. The up
and down motion of the bow from wave action may lift the anchor from the bottom. If the anchor remains stuck, let out a few more feet of line and attach it to the
bow cleat. Slowly maneuver the boat around the anchor until the anchor pulls
loose. Be sure to keep the line tight during this procedure.
Performance Boating
Some boat models; especially those with high horsepower engines, are capable of
truly exhilarating performance. Don’t be tempted to push your boat to its limits
until you are completely familiar with the boat’s operating characteristics. The
operator should have at least 10 hours of experience with the boat before any
extended full throttle operation.
Here are some guidelines for performance operation. Read them, practice them,
and soon you will be operating your boat to its full capability.
Before Running
•
•
•
•
Keep the bottom clean and free of scum, barnacles and other growth. Growth
on the hull can slow the boat down considerably.
Prepare the boat. Be sure all gear is properly stowed and compartments are
latched.
Weight distribution affects performance. Keep weight in the boat low and
evenly distributed. Remove unnecessary weight and keep on shore.
The propeller should be of the proper pitch to turn the recommended RPM
rating for the engine and of the proper type for your average load and individual requirements. Your dealer can help you select a performance propeller.
When Underway
! WARNING
Keep one hand on the wheel and the other on the throttle at all times. If
the boat begins to operate in an unsafe way, pull back on the throttle
and trim the engine IN at the same time. Failure to maintain control
could result in severe injury or death.
•
•
Increase speed. The bow will start to come down.
When the bow begins to fall, trim the engine out. Trimming the engine out at
speed will cause the boat to rise up. The boat will begin accelerating without
adjusting the throttle because less of the boat is dragging in the water. Steering will become easier because the propeller has less torque.
! WARNING
Do not trim the engine out too far or the boat may begin to “porpoise”
(bounce up and down). Porpoising reduces control and visibility and
lowers top speed and fuel efficiency. Failure to maintain control or visibility could result in serious injury or death.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
CHAPTER 6: RUNNING
•
6-5
Watch the tachometer to keep the engine within the full throttle operating
range. See the engine operator’s manual for the proper tachometer reading at
full throttle.
High speed operation on smooth water is very stable, but quick reactions and
adjustments are needed to maintain control. Know your limits and stay within
them. Always keep one hand on the steering wheel and the other on the throttle;
constant adjustments are necessary for rapidly changing conditions. Small inputs
of throttle and steering are exaggerated at high speeds. Depending on the speed,
keep watch well ahead so that you may have enough time to react.
Propellers
The propeller converts the engine’s power into the thrust
needed to propel the boat. Care and selection of your propeller is very important to proper boat operation. Propellers are identified by two numbers, such as 13 x 19, and a
material identification, such as aluminum or stainless
steel. In the number sequence, the first number is the
diameter of the propeller and the second is the pitch.
Pitch is the angle of the
blades expressed in the
DIAMETER
theoretical distance a
propeller travels in
KC-1580
each revolution. In
the above example, the pitch is 19, or each
revolution of the propeller pushes the
boat 483 mm (19 inches) through the
water. A 19 pitch is considered
“higher” pitched and a 15 pitch propeller is considered “lower” pitched.
PITCH
(ONE REVOLUTION)
Keep these guidelines in mind when selecting a propeller:
•
•
•
•
KC-1581
There are many different propeller designs for specific operating characteristics, including the number of blades, relief holes, cupping, etc. Do not attempt
to change propellers until after you have a chance to determine your average
load and individual requirements. Your dealer is best qualified to help you
select a propeller.
Engine RPM must be within the recommended operating range. Refer to the
engine operator’s manual.
Higher propeller pitch reduces: RPM, acceleration, engine noise, and usually
improves fuel economy and top speed.
Lower propeller pitch increases: RPM, acceleration, engine noise, reduces
fuel economy and top speed.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
6-6
CHAPTER 6: RUNNING
! WARNING
To prevent accidental start-up, complete the following before installing
or removing the propeller:
●
Put the remote control in the ÒNEUTRALÓ position.
●
Put the main switch in the ÒOFFÓ position and remove the key.
Failure to observe this warning could result in severe injury
A smaller pitch propeller should be selected for water skiing or for heavy loads. A
smaller pitch propeller will develop more thrust for raising skiers quickly. When a
skier has fallen, or a skier is not being towed, it is important that the operator
watch the tachometer to make sure engine RPM does not continuously exceed the
maximum full throttle RPM range of the engine.
! WARNING
DO NOT use your hand to hold the propeller when loosening the nut.
Put a wood block between the cavitation plate and the propeller blade
to prevent the propeller from turning. Failure to observe this warning
could result in injury.
Problems associated with propellers include ventilation, cavitation, and blow-out.
These problems have similar symptoms and are best diagnosed by an expert. If
you think you have a propeller related problem, consult your dealer.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
7-1
CHAPTER 7: CARE AND MAINTENANCE
This section describes how to care and maintain your boat. It includes information
about maintaining electrical components, corrosion protection, and general maintenance. Use the service/maintenance log provided to track maintenance performed.
Repairs and Modifications
Your boat has been designed for safety in the harsh marine environment and thoroughly tested and certified for compliance with applicable safety standards. Because
of the possibility of interference with the design of the boat, owner installation of
additional equipment or modification of factory equipment is not recommended.
In addition, do not attempt to make repairs unless you are certified to do so, have the
necessary authorized repair information, and use approved marine replacement
parts.
Your dealer is qualified to make such repairs, additions or modifications to your
boat that will not compromise safety, design integrity, or warranty coverage.
Electrical
Battery
! WARNING
Batteries contain sulfuric acid which can cause severe burns. Wear protective clothing to avoid acid contact with skin, eyes, etc. Failure to
observe this warning could result in severe injury.
Check the battery frequently for
signs of corrosion. If corrosion is
evident, clean terminal posts with a
baking soda and water solution and
a wire brush. Before cleaning,
remove the vent caps and seal the
vent wells with corks to prevent the
solution from getting inside the
battery.
NOTICE
Some batteries are sealed,
and cannot be filled.
Check the fluid levels in the cells.
Usually, a level approximately 6 to
13 mm (1/4 to 1/2 inch) above the
plates is sufficient. If needed, fill
with distilled water; do not overfill!
TERMINAL
POST
VENT CAP
VENT WELL
MAXIMUM
LIQUID
LEVEL
MINIMUM
LIQUID
LEVEL
PLATES
KC-1620
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
7-2
CHAPTER 7: CARE AND MAINTENANCE
! WARNING
Batteries produce explosive hydrogen gas. Never attempt starting your
engine with jumper cables under any circumstances. Keep all sparks,
flames and smoking materials away from batteries. Risk of spark at the
battery post igniting gasoline or hydrogen fumes is too great. Always
wear eye protection when near batteries and have adequate ventilation
when charging. An explosion can cause blindness or other serious
injuries.
Batteries are perishable products and will self-discharge. If you operate your boat
sparingly, you may want to charge your battery occasionally. To recharge, remove
the battery from the boat and remove the battery caps (when applicable). Recharge
the battery according to the directions enclosed with your battery charger. When
installing the battery in the boat, make sure the battery is secured in the battery
box.
Circuit Breakers and Fuses
All electrical circuits are protected from overload by the use of fuses or circuit
breakers. In the event of an overload or short circuit, the fuse will blow or circuit
breaker will trip. If a circuit continuously overloads under normal operating conditions, have your boat inspected by the dealer immediately.
! WARNING
Never exceed the recommended fuse sizes or bypass the fuse safeguard.
Always install the proper (type and rating) fuses whenever replacing or
changing fuses. Continuous fuse/breaker failures indicate a severe
problem and requires immediate attention. Failure to install correct
fuse may result in damage to the electrical system or severe personal
injury.
Some boat models have each individual circuit
protected with a circuit breaker located next to
the switch. To reset a tripped circuit breaker,
switch OFF the circuit, wait about one minute
for the breaker to cool, push the breaker button
fully, and switch ON the circuit.
Some boat models have circuits protected by
fuses. If the fuse should blow-out, locate the
fuse block behind the instrument panel. Use a
fuse removal/installation tool to replace the
fuse.
NOTICE
The electrical system is designed to
protect you from short circuits and
overload. Any modifications to the
system, such as adding electrical
acces-sories, should be done by a
qualified technician.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
AUTOMOTIVE STYLE
FUSE PANEL
KC-1635
CHAPTER 7: CARE AND MAINTENANCE
7-3
Some installed accessories, such as
the stereo, have an additional fuse
located in the positive lead of the
stereo. Some in-line fuse holders can
be found near the battery.
TYPICAL IN-LINE FUSE HOLDER
(TWIST AND PULL TO OPEN)
KC-1640
Corrosion Protection
Galvanic Corrosion
Galvanic corrosion (electrolysis), is the break-up of metals due to the effects of
electrolytic action. When two dissimilar metals are immersed in a conductive fluid
such as salt water, an electric current is produced, much like a battery. As the current flows, it takes with it tiny bits of the softer metal. If not stopped, a great deal
of damage could occur.
If you operate in salt, polluted, or brackish waters, your boat should be equipped
with a transom mounted zinc anode to prevent damage to those metal parts coming in contact with the water. By design, the anode is self-sacrificing. It is slowly
eroded away by electrolytic action and requires periodic inspection for deterioration. If the zinc shows extreme erosion, it must be replaced for continued protection.
Most engines are equipped with one or more zinc anodes which must also be
inspected regularly for deterioration. Some boat models may be equipped with an
electronic cathode system. This system emits a low current electrical charge into
the water close to the metal components. This charge cancels the effect of electrolysis.
CAUTION
Never paint or coat zinc anodes or cathodes with any substance. Once
covered, they do not provide protection from galvanic corrosion.
Replace anodes if they have deteriorated 50% or more.
Salt Water Corrosion
The entire boat should be rinsed with fresh water and washed immediately after
use in salt water. If the boat is used primarily in salt water, wax the hull monthly
and apply corrosion inhibitor to all hardware. See your dealer for products suitable for the marine salt water environment. Fresh water internal flushing is recommended when used in salt, polluted, or brackish waters. Flush the entire engine
cooling system with fresh water for at least 5 minutes after use in these waters.
See your dealer for appropriate flushing devices.
General Maintenance
Marine Growth
If accelerated marine growth is a problem in your area, an anti-fouling bottom
paint may be necessary to slow growth and prevent gelcoat damage. Before selecting a bottom paint, talk with other boaters and your dealer to determine which
product works best in your area. Many local variables can affect the selection of
paint. Be sure to follow the paint manufacturer’s directions exactly.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
7-4
CHAPTER 7: CARE AND MAINTENANCE
Cleaning
Periodic cleaning is the best way to keep your boat looking new. Regular washing
and waxing keep dirt and scum from building up and deteriorating the finish.
Keeping your boat in “show room” condition means greater personal satisfaction
and higher resale value. Special cleaning products are available from your dealer
to remove mildew.
Fiberglass Hull
When washing the boat, be sure to use a mild detergent and warm water solution.
DO NOT use abrasive cleaners, solvents, ammonia or chlorine as these will damage the gelcoat surface. Under extreme conditions, special cleaners may be used
to remove marine growth, such as scum or algae, from the hull; see your dealer.
Waxing the entire gelcoat surface at least twice a season is recommended for all
climates. Use of a specially formulated marine gelcoat wax will prevent color fade
and soil and scum adhesion. If the gelcoat has chalked or faded from lack of
proper maintenance, buffing may be necessary to bring back the shiny appearance.
Hand buffing with #7 rubbing compound or power buffing with glazing compound
#1 will quickly restore the surface.
Upholstery
Regular washing with mild detergent and warm water or non-solvent type automotive vinyl cleaner is sufficient to keep the cushions, canopy top, and other vinyl
coverings in good condition. Keep the cushions from becoming soaked and dry
off thoroughly after washing to prevent mildew accumulation after the boat is covered. Prop the cushions up in the boat when covered to allow air circulation and
spray with mildew repellent. Lubricate canopy top snaps with petroleum jelly.
For tough stains on vinyl such as adhesive, rust, etc., use a citrus cleaner followed
by a mild detergent and warm water. For ink stains, apply denatured alcohol and
wipe off. Note that some products such as suntan lotion, shoe polish and wet
leaves may stain permanently.
Although not always convenient, minimizing your boat’s contact with damaging
ultraviolet (UV) rays and storing removable seats and canopies indoors when not
being used will increase the longevity of vinyl upholstery.
CAUTION
Certain automotive, household and industrial cleaners can cause further damage and discoloration. Solvents and dry cleaning fluids, or
products that contain dyes such as waxes, should be used with caution.
Whenever cleaning stubborn stains, be sure to test the treatment in an
unseen area first. The following stain treatments should be used with
discretion. Between steps, be sure to rinse thoroughly with plenty of
clean water and allow to dry.
Carpet
Occasional vacuuming and washing with mild detergent and warm water or household carpet cleaners will keep the carpet clean. Thoroughly hose the detergent out of
the carpet and into the bilge. This is usually the best time to clean the bilge. Let the
carpet dry in the sun to prevent any mildew or odor caused by moisture.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
CHAPTER 7: CARE AND MAINTENANCE
7-5
Windshield
A clean windshield is important. If your boat is equipped with a glass windshield,
applying a non-abrasive glass cleaner with a soft cloth will remove most dirt and
smudges. Smoked plexi-glass or plastic windshields should be cleaned with a
mild soap solution and damp cloth only. Harsh detergents, solvents, chemicals or
dry cloths used on any glass or plastic windshield will scratch the surface.
Bilge
Your bilge accumulates oil and greasy dirt over a period of time and should be
cleaned out. Usually, ordinary soap and water does not remove the accumulation,
and something stronger is necessary. Consult your dealer for recommendations on
special bilge cleaning products.
Holding Tank
If your boat has an optional waste holding tank installed, various chemicals are available to control odors and help break
down solids. Consult your marine dealer as to what to use.
After the holding tank is emptied, fill tank with fresh water and
pump it out again to rinse.
NOTICE
KC-4055
Overboard discharge of waste should only be used in approved areas.
There are many marinas that are certified to pump out your holding tank.
Stainless Steel and Chrome
Stainless steel and chrome plated parts are not totally resistant to corrosion. Occasional cleaning and polishing with a marine chrome and stainless polish will
maintain and extend the useful life. In salt water areas, rinse all hardware with
fresh water and apply a light coating of corrosion inhibitor oil to enhance appearance.
Fuel System
Fuel lines, vent hoses, and drain hoses should be checked frequently for leaks.
Some models are equipped with removable inspection plates for fuel system component inspection. If a leak occurs around the fitting, then tightening of the hose
clamps may be all that is necessary. However, if the leak continues, replace the
hose immediately to prevent a build-up of fluids or gases. Surface cracking on the
hose indicates wear, and replacement is recommended. Use fuel system parts certified for marine use only; do not substitute automotive parts in marine application.
Steering System
The steering system is the primary link for engine control and must be inspected
and maintained regularly. The hardware at both the helm and engine end of the
steering cable must be checked frequently for tightness. Refer to the engine operator’s manual for the appropriate torques.
The steering bar must be lubricated monthly to ensure smooth operation. Turn the
steering wheel to a full starboard turn to expose the bar. Use a high quality waterproof marine grease and fully coat the bar. Turn the steering wheel back and forth
to work the grease in.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
7-6
CHAPTER 7: CARE AND MAINTENANCE
INSPECT
HARDWARE
INSPECT
HARDWARE
STEERING
BAR
TYPICAL OUTBOARD ENGINE STEERING LINK
KC-1645
CHECK FILL PLUG
AND FLUID LEVEL
HELM PUMP/
RESERVOIR
INSPECT
CONNECTIONS
AT PUMP
INSPECT
CYLINDER
SEALS
INSPECT FITTINGS
AT CYLINDER
INSPECT
HARDWARE
KC-1883
Hydraulic and power-assisted systems must also be inspected. Make sure hydraulic hoses are tight and leak-free. Cylinder seals should be checked for dampness
indicating leakage. Check the fluid reservoir monthly and top-off if necessary.
Consult the steering system manufacturer’s manual for more information.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
8-1
CHAPTER 8: TROUBLESHOOTING
The following chart will assist you in finding and correcting minor mechanical
and electrical problems. If an engine problem is indicated, consult your engine
owner’s manual.
Some problems may require specialized skill and tools to correct them; see your
dealer.
Trouble Check Chart
Symptom
Possible Cause
Engine will not crank
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Engine stop switch not connected
Throttle/shift control in gear
Main circuit breaker open
Battery terminals corroded
Weak battery
Loose or corroded battery wiring connections
Engine problem
Engine cranks
but will not start
•
•
•
•
No fuel in tank
Fuel filter clogged
Contaminated fuel
Engine problem
Poor boat
performance
•
•
•
•
•
•
Contaminated fuel
Uneven load distribution
Engine trim wrong
Improper propeller selection
Excessive water in bilge
Engine problem
Poor gas mileage
•
•
•
•
Plugged flame arrestor (stern drive)
Engine trim wrong
Marine growth on hull
Engine problem
Throttle/shifting
problems
• Corroded cable
• Kink in cable
• Engine problem
Excessive vibration
• Propeller damaged or fouled
• Bent propeller shaft
• Engine problem
Electrical problems
• Blown fuse or open circuit
• Loose wiring connections
• Defective switch or gauge
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
9-1
CHAPTER 9: STORAGE
Storage or winter lay-up requires special preparation to prevent damage to the
boat. Perform all annual maintenance at this time.
Without proper preparation, storage for long periods of time may cause internal
parts of the engine and drive unit to rust because of lack of lubrication. Or, if the
boat is stored in below freezing temperatures, water inside the bilge or cooling
system may freeze causing damage. Damage to the boat due to improper storage
will not be covered by the warranty. The following procedures should help prevent
damage to your boat.
Storage Preparation
While The Boat Is Still In The Water
1.
2.
Fill fuel tank and add the proper amount of fuel stabilizer and conditioner
according to the manufacturer’s recommendations.
Operate boat for at least 15 minutes to be sure that treated fuel has reached
engine.
NOTICE
If the boat is to be stored for more than 5 months, stored in a high
moisture (humidity) environment, in temperature extremes, or stored
outdoors, “fog” the engine with a rust preventative fogging oil according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. See your dealer.
When The Boat Is Removed From The Water
NOTICE
Remove the bilge drain plug immediately after taking the boat out of
the water. After washing, raise the bow of the boat high to allow as
much water as possible to drain while performing other storage preparations.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Flush the engine cooling system with clean water. DO NOT exceed 1500
RPM when flushing.
Perform all scheduled maintenance. For stern drives, tuning the engine and
changing the oil and fuel filters (if equipped) is especially important.
Thoroughly clean the hull, deck and interior of the boat as soon as it is
removed from the water. Cleaning at this time is easier because the marine
growth is still wet. Be sure to allow for a couple of days of air drying to prevent mildew due to trapped moisture.
Apply a coat of wax to the entire surface of the boat and rust inhibitor on all
metal parts.
Clean all traces of dirt, oil, grime, and grease from the engine and bilge.
Touch-up areas of engine where paint has been removed.
Prepare the engine for storage according to the instructions contained in the
engine owner’s manual.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
9-2
•
•
•
•
•
•
CHAPTER 9: STORAGE
Store the bilge drain plug in a plastic bag and tape it to the throttle control
lever so that it is easily found for reactivation.
Remove the battery from the boat. Clean, fully charge and store the battery in
an area not subject to freezing temperatures. Never store batteries close to
heat, spark, or flame producing devices.
Repack trailer wheel bearings with water resistant wheel bearing grease. If the
trailer is equipped with bearing protectors, squirt grease into hubs with a
grease gun.
Park trailer and boat in a protected area. If the rig is left outside, install a boat
cover. See your dealer.
Loosen tie-downs and winch line but be sure the boat is resting properly on
hull supports.
Jack up trailer and place blocks under trailer frame to relieve weight on trailer
tires and springs.
Reactivating The Boat After Storage
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Charge and install battery in boat.
Check engine and bilge for signs of nesting animals; clean as necessary.
Check entire engine for cracks and leaks caused by freeze damage.
Check hose condition and all hose clamps for tightness.
Install bilge drain plugs.
Perform daily maintenance. If not performed during lay-up, perform annual
maintenance.
If the boat is equipped with the optional fresh water cooling system (stern
drive only) and was drained for storage, fill the system with fresh coolant
solution.
Check and lubricate steering system.
Remove blocks from under trailer frame.
Tighten tie-downs and trailer winch line.
Check tire pressure and lug nuts on trailer.
Take the boat to the water and start it. It may take a minute of cranking to
allow the fuel system to prime. Allow a one minute cool down period for
every 15 seconds of cranking. When the engine starts, keep a close watch over
the gauge readings and check for leakage and abnormal noises. Keep speeds
low for the first 15 minutes until the engine has reached normal operating
temperature.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
CHAPTER 9: STORAGE
9-3
Slinging/Lifting
LIFT RINGS
SPREADER
BAR
SLINGS
SPREADER
BAR
KC-1861
If the boat is to be removed from the water without a trailer, follow these guidelines:
•
•
•
•
•
Never attach lifting cables to cleats, ski tow eyes or hand rails. Attach cables
only to the lifting eyes in the transom and bow.
Cover lifting cables with rubber hose or other protectors to prevent damage to
the finish.
Attach guide lines to the bow and stern to control movement.
Use spreader bars and keep lifting pressure vertical to prevent side load
damage.
Keep the bow slightly higher than the stern to prevent engine damage.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
10-1
CHAPTER 10: TRAILERING
This section provides information about trailering. It describes the hitch and
safety chains, backing your trailer, preparing to launch, launching, and loading
your trailer. Also included is a trailering checklist.
! WARNING
• The trailer must be matched for the boat’s weight and hull.
• The towing vehicle must have the capability of pulling the load.
Pulling a load that exceeds the trailer’s or vehicle’s towing capacity
may cause loss of control.
NOTICE
Check the certification label on the left forward side of your trailer. The
label is required to show the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR),
which is the load carrying capacity plus the weight of the trailer itself.
Be sure that the total weight of your boat, engine, gear, and trailer do
not exceed the GVWR.
Trailer laws on things such as lighting, registration, trailer brakes, gross vehicle
weight, etc., vary widely from state to state. Contact your state Department of
Motor Vehicles (and that of other states through which you may be traveling) for
laws with which you must be in compliance.
Hitch
Hitches are divided into classes that
specify the gross trailer weight (GTW)
and maximum tongue weight for each
class. Always use a hitch with the same
class number as the trailer, or greater.
LATCH
RELEASE
HANDLE
SOCKET
KC-1700
Most boat trailers connect to a ball hitch
that is bolted or welded to the towing
vehicle. Clamp-on bumper hitches are
not recommended.
The trailer hitch coupler must match the
size of the hitch ball. Never use a hitch
ball that does not match the trailer coupler. The correct ball diameter is marked
on the trailer coupler.
TRAILER
COUPLER
CLAMP
PROPER SIZE
TOW BALL
RELEASE HANDLE
LOCK PIN
TOWING VEHICLE
HITCH
KC-1651
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
10-2
CHAPTER 10: TRAILERING
Safety Chains
CRISSCROSS SAFETY CHAINS
Safety chains on your boat trailer
provide added insurance that it will
not become completely detached
from the towing vehicle when underway.
Crisscross the chains under the trailer
tongue to prevent the tongue from
dropping to the road if the trailer separates from the hitch ball. Rig the
chains as tight as possible with just
enough slack to permit tight turns.
TOW
VEHICLE
TRAILER
BOTTOM VIEW OF HITCH COUPLING
KC-1691
Make sure the proper chains are correctly attached between the towing vehicle
and trailer before and during each trip.
Trailering Checklist
Below is a checklist to follow when trailering your boat:
•
•
•
•
Consult your state laws as to brake and axle load requirements. Check brakes
for proper operation and fluid level prior to departure on each trip.
Check springs and undercarriage for loose parts.
Check tires for proper inflation. Under-inflated tires heat up rapidly and tire
damage or failure is likely to occur.
Wheel bearings and lug nuts should be checked before each trip.
WINCH STAND BOW STOP
WINCH
LINE
BOW EYE
WINCH
STAND
SAFETY
CHAIN
KC-1711.2
•
•
•
Your boat should be fastened to the trailer with the winch line connected to
the bow eye, PLUS a bow tie-down to the winch stand or trailer tongue. A
safety chain, strap or rope can be used as a suitable tie down. The stern of
your boat should be secured to the trailer from the stern eyes.
Check to be sure the taillights and turning signals work prior to towing.
Too much or too little tongue weight will cause difficult steering and will
make tow vehicle sway. A rough rule of thumb is 5% to 10% of boat and
trailer weight on the tongue.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
CHAPTER 10: TRAILERING
•
•
•
•
•
10-3
Convertible tops and detachable windshields are not designed to stay on boats
at highway speeds. Before towing, take down the convertible top, side curtains, back cover and detachable windshield if so equipped.
Carry a spare tire for both your trailer and your towing vehicle along with sufficient tools to change them.
Consult the engine operator’s manual for engine related trailering precautions.
On extended trips, carry spare wheel bearings, seals, and races.
While traveling, check the wheel hubs every time you stop for gas or refreshments. If the hub feels abnormally hot, the bearing should be inspected before
continuing your trip.
• When rounding turns on highways or streets, do not cut
corners. Also, go slow over
railroad tracks.
• Outboard motors should be
tied in place so they will not
tilt or turn due to road shock.
Continuous road shocks may
TRAILER PATH
fatigue the boat steering
system.
• Before backing your trailer
into water, disconnect the light
plug from the towing vehicle
to reduce the likelihood of
blowing out lights when they
become submerged.
KC-1731
Backing Up Trailers
If you have never towed a trailer
before, take the time to practice backing your trailer before using it for the
first time. Follow these guidelines
when backing:
•
•
•
•
Back slowly and make small
steering adjustments.
Turn the car wheels in the opposite direction you want the trailer
to go.
After the trailer begins moving,
turn the car to follow it.
Have a second person assist you
with hand signals.
BACKING TO RIGHT
BACKING TO LEFT
FOLLOWING THRU TURN
KC-1761
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
10-4
CHAPTER 10: TRAILERING
Launching
Before launching your boat, stay to one side and watch a couple of launchings to
notice any problems on the ramp and the effects of the wind and current on launching. It is a common courtesy to prepare the boat for launching away from the ramp
especially during busy periods. Perform the pre-launch sequence as follows:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Remove the boat cover, if equipped.
Check that bilge drain plug is in place.
Remove any additional trailering tie-downs from the boat.
Attach the bow and stern docking lines and fenders if necessary.
Disconnect the trailer lights from the car.
Launching with two people is recommended. Since all launches are different from
each other in some way, the following procedure must be modified to fit the
launch in use:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Back the boat down the ramp until the wheels are at least halfway submerged. Keep the trailer/car combination as straight as possible and at 90
degrees to the shore line.
Loosen and detach the bow strap from the bow eye.
Back the boat further down until the top of the fenders are about
50 mm (2 in.) above the water.
Board the boat and start it. If possible, remain on the trailer until the engine
has warmed-up.
Loading
Loading, like launching, is best done with two people:
1.
2.
3.
Back the trailer into the water until the top of the fenders are about
75 mm (3 in.) above the water. Keep the trailer/car combination as straight as
possible and, if possible, at 90 degrees to the shoreline. Set the parking brake
securely.
Approach the trailer in a straight line from at least 1.5 m (5 ft.) out. Use
“bursts” of propeller thrust to move towards the trailer at the slowest steerable speed. Guide the boat onto the support bunks.
Check to see that the boat is centered on the support rails and is headed in a
straight line for the bow stop (bumper board).
! WARNING
Excessive throttle can cause the boat to travel over the bumper board
causing extensive damage to the boat, trailer, and car and could cause
severe personal injury.
4.
Using a very light touch on the throttle, ease the boat forward until the bow
comes to rest against the bow stop (bumper board).
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
CHAPTER 10: TRAILERING
10-5
CAUTION
The winch bow strap is merely a means of securing the boat to the
trailer and is not intended to winch or pull the boat onto the trailer.
Winching the boat onto the trailer could cause severe injury.
5.
6.
7.
Attach and tighten the winch bow strap.
Pull the trailer up the ramp and attach any additional tie-downs and connect
the trailer light harness.
Pull drain plug.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
11-1
CHAPTER 11: GLOSSARY
ABOARD – On or in the boat.
AFLOAT – On the water.
AFT – Toward the rear or stern of the boat.
AGROUND – Touching bottom.
AMIDSHIP – Center or middle of the boat.
ANCHOR – (1) An iron casting shaped to grip the lake bottom to hold the boat. (2) The act of setting
the anchor.
ASHORE – On the shore.
ASTERN – Toward the stern.
BAIL – To remove water from the bottom of the boat with a pump, bucket, sponge, etc.
BAITWELL – A miniature livewell used to store and keep live bait alive and healthy.
BEAM – The widest point on the boat.
BEARING – Relative position or direction of an object from the boat.
BILGE – The lowest interior section of the boat hull.
BILGE KEELS – The raised areas or aluminum extrusions on the bottom of a boat that parallel the
keel.
BOARDING – To enter the boat.
BOUNDARY WATERS – A body of water between two areas of jurisdiction; i.e., a river between two
states.
BOW – The front of the boat.
BULKHEAD – Vertical partition (wall) in a boat.
BUNKS – Carpeted trailer hull supports.
BURDENED BOAT – Term for the boat that must “give-way” to boats with the right-of-way.
CAPACITY PLATE – A plate that provides maximum weight capacity and engine horsepower rating
information. It is located in full view of the helm.
CAPSIZE – To turn over.
CAST-OFF – To unfasten mooring lines in preparation for departure.
CENTER LINE – A lengthwise imaginary line which runs fore and aft with the boat’s keel.
CHINE – The point on a boat where the side intersects (meets) the bottom.
CLEAT – A deck fitting with ears to which lines are fastened.
CONSOLE – Also called helm. The steering wheel area of the boat.
CRANKING BATTERY – The main battery used for engine starting and electrical circuits.
CURRENT – Water moving in a horizontal direction.
DECK – The open surface on the boat where the passengers walk.
DEEP CYCLE BATTERIES – Special long-running batteries which can be repeatedly discharged and
recharged without significant loss of power.
DOLLY WHEEL – A rolling jack assembly at the front of the trailer used for positioning the coupler
during trailer hookup.
DRAFT – The depth of the boat below the water line, measured vertically to the lowest part of the hull.
ELECTROLYSIS – The break-up of metals due to the effects of galvanic corrosion.
FATHOM – Unit of depth or measure; 1 fathom equals 6 feet.
FENDERS – Objects placed alongside the boat for cushioning. Sometimes called bumpers.
FORE – Toward the front or bow of the boat. Opposite of aft.
FREEBOARD – The distance from the water to the gunwale.
FUEL SENDING UNIT – The electrical device that is mounted on the outside of a built-in fuel tank and
controls the dashboard fuel gauge.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual
®
Pulling Ahead
Owner's Manual
1982 – 1992 Models
Manufacturers of Malibu and Flightcraft Boats
11-2
CHAPTER 11: GLOSSARY
GIVE-WAY BOAT – (1) Term for the boat that must take whatever action necessary to keep well clear
of the boat with the right-of-way in meeting or crossing situations. (2) The burdened boat.
GUNWALE – The rail or upper edge of a boat’s side.
HEAD – A marine toilet.
HELM – The steering wheel or command area.
HULL – The body of the boat.
HYPOTHERMIA – A physical condition where the body loses heat faster than it can produce it.
IN-LINE FUSE – A type of protective fuse located in the power wire of a direct current (DC) circuit usually near the battery.
KEEL – The lowest portion of the boat; extends fore and aft along the boat’s bottom.
LIST – Leaning or tilt of a boat toward the side.
MAKING WAY – Making progress through the water.
MARINECHART – Seagoing maps showing depths, buoys, navigation aids, etc.
MOORING – An anchor, chain, or similar device that holds a boat in one location.
NAVIGATION AID – Recognizable objects on land or sea such as buoys, towers or lights which are
used to fix position to identify safe and unsafe waters.
NO-WAKE SPEED – The speed at which a boat travels to produce an imperceptible wake.
PFD – Personal flotation device.
PITOT TUBE – See SPEEDOMETER PICKUP TUBE.
PLANING HULL – A hull designed to lift, thereby reducing friction and increasing efficiency.
PORPOISE – A condition in which the bow bounces up and down caused by trimming the engine too
far out.
PORT – (1) The left side of a boat when facing the bow. (2) A destination or harbor.
PRIVILEGED BOAT – Term used for the boat with the right-of-way.
RIGHT-OF-WAY – Term for the boat that has priority in meeting or crossing situations. The stand on or
privileged boat.
RULES OF THE ROAD – Regulations for preventing collisions on the water.
SPEEDOMETER PICKUP TUBE – Also called pitot tube. The plastic device that extends below the
bottom of the boat. It connects to the speedometer with plastic flexible tubing.
SPLASHWELL – The section of an outboard-equipped boat that is just forward of the transom.
STAND ON BOAT – Term for the boat that must maintain course and speed in meeting or crossing
situations. The privileged boat.
STARBOARD – The right side of the boat when looking towards the bow.
STERN – The back of the boat.
STOW – To pack the cargo.
SURGE BRAKES – A type of trailer braking system designed to automatically actuate when the tow
vehicle’s brakes are applied.
TRANSDUCER – The unit that sends/receives signals for the depth sounder.
TRANSOM – The transverse beam across the stern.
TRIM – Fore to aft and side to side balance of the boat when loaded.
UNDERWAY – Boat in motion; i.e., not moored or anchored.
USCG – United States Coast Guard
WAKE – The waves that a boat leaves behind when moving through the water.
WATERWAY – A navigable body of water.
V-PAD – A modified vee hull design with a small, flat area in the keel aft.
VISUAL DISTRESS SIGNAL – A device used to signal the need for assistance such as flags, lights
and flares.
Sport Boat Owner’s Manual