Dell PowerVault NX3610 Specifications

Dell FluidFS V3 NAS Solutions For PowerVault
NX3500, NX3600, And NX3610
Administrator's Guide
Notes, Cautions, and Warnings
NOTE: A NOTE indicates important information that helps you make better use of your computer.
CAUTION: A CAUTION indicates either potential damage to hardware or loss of data and tells you
how to avoid the problem.
WARNING: A WARNING indicates a potential for property damage, personal injury, or death.
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jurisdictions. All other marks and names mentioned herein may be trademarks of their respective companies.
2014 - 01
Rev. A02
Contents
1 Introduction.............................................................................................................. 11
How PowerVault FluidFS NAS Works ................................................................................................. 11
FluidFS Terminology............................................................................................................................ 11
Key Features Of PowerVault FluidFS Systems.................................................................................... 12
Overview Of PowerVault FluidFS Systems..........................................................................................13
Internal Cache............................................................................................................................... 14
Internal Backup Power Supply...................................................................................................... 14
Internal Storage............................................................................................................................. 14
PowerVault FluidFS Architecture........................................................................................................ 14
Client/LAN Network.......................................................................................................................15
MD System..................................................................................................................................... 16
SAN Network..................................................................................................................................16
Internal Network............................................................................................................................ 16
Data Caching And Redundancy..........................................................................................................16
File Metadata Protection..................................................................................................................... 16
High Availability And Load Balancing..................................................................................................17
Failure Scenarios............................................................................................................................ 17
Ports Used by the FluidFS System.......................................................................................................18
Required Ports............................................................................................................................... 18
Feature-Specific Ports................................................................................................................... 18
Other Information You May Need...................................................................................................... 19
2 Upgrading to FluidFS Version 3........................................................................... 21
Supported Upgrade Paths................................................................................................................... 21
FluidFS V2 and FluidFS V3 Feature and Configuration Comparison................................................. 21
Performing Pre-Upgrade Tasks.......................................................................................................... 24
Upgrading from FluidFS Version 2.0 to 3.0 ....................................................................................... 25
3 FluidFS Manager User Interface Overview.......................................................29
FluidFS Manager Layout......................................................................................................................29
Navigating Views................................................................................................................................. 29
Working With Panes, Menus, And Dialogs......................................................................................... 30
Showing And Hiding Panes...........................................................................................................30
Opening A Pane Menu.................................................................................................................. 30
Opening A Table Element Menu.................................................................................................. 30
Changing Settings Within A Dialog............................................................................................... 31
Accessing NAS Volume SubTopics.....................................................................................................32
Working With The Event Log.............................................................................................................. 32
Viewing The Event Log..................................................................................................................32
Viewing Event Details.................................................................................................................... 33
Sorting The Event Log................................................................................................................... 33
Searching the Event Log............................................................................................................... 33
4 FluidFS 3.0 System Management........................................................................35
Connecting to the FluidFS Cluster .................................................................................................... 35
Connecting to the FluidFS Cluster Using the FluidFS Manager Web Client............................... 35
Connecting to the FluidFS Cluster CLI Using a VGA Console.....................................................35
Connecting to the FluidFS Cluster CLI through SSH Using a Password.....................................36
Connecting to the FluidFS Cluster CLI through SSH without Using a Password....................... 36
Managing Secured Management....................................................................................................... 36
Adding a Secured Management Subnet ...................................................................................... 37
Changing the Netmask for the Secured Management Subnet .................................................. 38
Changing the VLAN ID for the Secured Management Subnet ................................................... 38
Changing the VIP for the Secured Management Subnet............................................................ 38
Changing the NAS Controller IP Addresses for the Secured Management Subnet................... 39
Deleting the Secured Management Subnet ................................................................................ 39
Enabling Secured Management ...................................................................................................39
Disabling Secured Management ..................................................................................................40
Managing the FluidFS Cluster Name .................................................................................................40
Viewing the FluidFS Cluster Name............................................................................................... 40
Renaming the FluidFS Cluster...................................................................................................... 40
Managing Licensing ............................................................................................................................41
Viewing License Information ........................................................................................................41
Accepting the End-User License Agreement .............................................................................. 41
Managing the System Time ................................................................................................................41
Viewing the Time Zone................................................................................................................. 41
Setting the Time Zone...................................................................................................................42
Viewing the Time ..........................................................................................................................42
Setting the Time Manually............................................................................................................ 42
Viewing the NTP Servers .............................................................................................................. 42
Add or Remove NTP Servers ........................................................................................................43
Enabling NTP ................................................................................................................................ 43
Disabling NTP................................................................................................................................ 43
Managing the FTP Server ................................................................................................................... 44
Accessing the FTP Server .............................................................................................................44
Enabling or Disabling the FTP Server........................................................................................... 44
Managing SNMP .................................................................................................................................44
Obtaining SNMP MIBs and Traps .................................................................................................45
Changing the SNMP Read-Only Community ............................................................................. 45
Changing the SNMP Trap System Location or Contact ............................................................. 45
Adding or Removing SNMP Trap Recipients ............................................................................... 45
Enabling or Disabling SNMP Traps .............................................................................................. 46
Managing the Health Scan Throttling Mode .....................................................................................46
Viewing the Health Scan Throttling Mode .................................................................................. 46
Changing the Health Scan Throttling Mode ............................................................................... 47
Managing the Operation Mode.......................................................................................................... 47
Viewing the Operation Mode .......................................................................................................47
Changing the Operation Mode ....................................................................................................47
Managing Client Connections ...........................................................................................................48
Displaying the Distribution of Clients between NAS Controllers ...............................................48
Viewing Clients Assigned to a NAS Controller ............................................................................48
Assigning a Client to a NAS Controller ........................................................................................48
Unassigning a Client from a NAS Controller ...............................................................................48
Manually Migrating Clients to another NAS Controller .............................................................. 49
Failing Back Clients to Their Assigned NAS Controller ...............................................................49
Rebalancing Client Connections across NAS Controllers ..........................................................49
Shutting Down and Restarting NAS Controllers ............................................................................... 50
Shutting Down the FluidFS Cluster ..............................................................................................50
Starting Up the FluidFS Cluster .................................................................................................... 50
Rebooting a NAS Controller ........................................................................................................ 50
Managing NAS Appliance and NAS Controller .................................................................................. 51
Enabling or Disabling NAS Appliance and Controller Blinking.................................................... 51
5 FluidFS 3.0 Networking ........................................................................................ 53
Managing the Default Gateway ......................................................................................................... 53
Viewing the Default Gateway .......................................................................................................53
Changing the Default Gateway.....................................................................................................53
Managing DNS Servers and Suffixes................................................................................................... 53
Viewing DNS Servers and Suffixes................................................................................................ 54
Adding DNS Servers and Suffixes..................................................................................................54
Removing DNS Servers and Suffixes............................................................................................ 54
Managing Static Routes...................................................................................................................... 55
Viewing the Static Routes............................................................................................................. 55
Adding a Static Route.................................................................................................................... 55
Changing the Target Subnet for a Static Route........................................................................... 56
Changing the Gateway for a Static Route....................................................................................56
Deleting a Static Route..................................................................................................................56
Managing the Internal Network.......................................................................................................... 57
Viewing the Internal Network IP Address..................................................................................... 57
Changing the Internal Network IP Address.................................................................................. 57
Managing the Client Networks........................................................................................................... 57
Viewing the Client Networks........................................................................................................ 58
Creating a Client Network............................................................................................................ 58
Changing the Netmask for a Client Network...............................................................................58
Changing the VLAN Tag for a Client Network............................................................................. 59
Changing the Client VIPs for a Client Network............................................................................59
Changing the NAS Controller IP Addresses for a Client Network...............................................59
Deleting a Client Network............................................................................................................ 60
Viewing the Client Network MTU.................................................................................................60
Changing the Client Network MTU..............................................................................................60
Viewing the Client Network Bonding Mode................................................................................ 60
Changing the Client Network Bonding Mode..............................................................................61
Managing SAN Fabrics.........................................................................................................................61
Managing SAN Fabrics/Subnets....................................................................................................62
Viewing the SAN Network Configuration.....................................................................................62
Adding an iSCSI Fabric.................................................................................................................. 62
Modifying an iSCSI Fabric’s Configuration................................................................................... 62
Deleting an iSCSI Fabric................................................................................................................ 63
Modifying iSCSI Portals................................................................................................................. 63
Viewing Storage Identifiers........................................................................................................... 64
6 FluidFS 3.0 Account Management And Authentication .............................. 65
Account Management and Authentication........................................................................................65
Default Administrative Accounts........................................................................................................ 65
Administrative Account.................................................................................................................66
Support Account........................................................................................................................... 66
Enabling or Disabling the Support Account.................................................................................66
Changing the Support Account Password................................................................................... 67
Using the Escalation Account....................................................................................................... 67
CLI Account...................................................................................................................................68
Default Local User and Local Group Accounts................................................................................. 68
Managing Administrator Accounts.....................................................................................................68
Viewing Administrators................................................................................................................. 69
Adding an Administrator............................................................................................................... 69
Assigning NAS Volumes to a Volume Administrator....................................................................70
Changing an Administrator’s Permission Level............................................................................70
Changing an Administrator’s Email Address................................................................................ 70
Changing a Local Administrator Password................................................................................... 71
Deleting an Administrator..............................................................................................................71
Managing Local Users..........................................................................................................................71
Adding a Local User....................................................................................................................... 71
Changing a Local User’s Group.................................................................................................... 72
Enabling or Disabling a Local User............................................................................................... 72
Changing a Local User Password................................................................................................. 73
Deleting a Local User.................................................................................................................... 73
Managing Password Age and Expiration............................................................................................ 73
Changing the Maximum Password Age........................................................................................73
Enabling or Disabling Password Expiration.................................................................................. 74
Managing Local Groups...................................................................................................................... 74
Viewing Local Groups................................................................................................................... 74
Adding a Local Group....................................................................................................................74
Changing the Users Assigned to a Local Group...........................................................................75
Deleting a Local Group................................................................................................................. 76
Managing Active Directory..................................................................................................................76
Enabling Active Directory Authentication.....................................................................................77
Modifying Active Directory Authentication Settings.................................................................... 78
Disabling Active Directory Authentication................................................................................... 78
Managing LDAP................................................................................................................................... 78
Enabling LDAP Authentication...................................................................................................... 78
Changing the LDAP Base DN........................................................................................................ 79
Adding or Removing LDAP Servers.............................................................................................. 80
Enabling or Disabling LDAP on Active Directory Extended Schema.......................................... 80
Enabling or Disabling Authentication for the LDAP Connection................................................ 80
Enabling or Disabling TLS Encryption for the LDAP Connection................................................ 81
Disabling LDAP Authentication..................................................................................................... 81
Managing NIS.......................................................................................................................................81
Enabling NIS Authentication......................................................................................................... 82
Changing the NIS Domain Name................................................................................................. 82
Changing the Order of Preference for NIS Servers..................................................................... 82
Disabling NIS Authentication........................................................................................................ 83
Managing User Mappings between Windows and UNIX/Linux Users.............................................. 83
User Mapping Policies...................................................................................................................83
User Mapping Policy and NAS Volume Security Style................................................................. 83
Managing the User Mapping Policy..............................................................................................84
Managing User Mapping Rules..................................................................................................... 84
7 FluidFS 3.0 NAS Volumes, Shares, and Exports............................................... 87
Managing the NAS Pool...................................................................................................................... 87
Discovering New or Expanded LUNs............................................................................................87
Viewing Internal Storage Reservations......................................................................................... 87
Viewing the Size of the NAS Pool................................................................................................. 87
Expanding the Size of the NAS Pool.............................................................................................88
Enabling or Disabling the NAS Pool Used Space Alert ............................................................... 88
Enabling or Disabling the NAS Pool Unused Space Alert ........................................................... 88
Managing NAS Volumes .................................................................................................................... 89
File Security Styles.........................................................................................................................89
Thin and Thick Provisioning for NAS Volumes............................................................................ 90
Choosing a Strategy for NAS Volume Creation...........................................................................90
Example NAS Volume Creation Scenarios................................................................................... 91
NAS Volumes Storage Space Terminology ................................................................................. 92
Configuring NAS Volumes ........................................................................................................... 92
Cloning a NAS Volume..................................................................................................................96
NAS Volume Clone Defaults.........................................................................................................96
NAS Volume Clone Restrictions................................................................................................... 97
Managing NAS Volume Clones.....................................................................................................97
Managing CIFS Shares........................................................................................................................ 98
Configuring CIFS Shares............................................................................................................... 98
Viewing and Disconnecting CIFS Connections......................................................................... 100
Using CIFS Home Shares ............................................................................................................101
Changing the Owner of a CIFS Share ........................................................................................102
Managing ACLs or SLPs on a CIFS Share....................................................................................103
Accessing a CIFS Share Using Windows.................................................................................... 104
Accessing a CIFS Share Using UNIX/Linux................................................................................. 105
Managing NFS Exports...................................................................................................................... 105
Configuring NFS Exports.............................................................................................................105
Setting Permissions for an NFS Export....................................................................................... 109
Accessing an NFS Export ........................................................................................................... 109
Managing Quota Rules .....................................................................................................................110
Viewing Quota Rules for a NAS Volume.....................................................................................110
Setting the Default Quota per User ........................................................................................... 110
Setting the Default Quota per Group.......................................................................................... 111
Adding a Quota Rule for a Specific User .................................................................................... 111
Adding a Quota Rule for Each User in a Specific Group............................................................112
Adding a Quota Rule for an Entire Group ..................................................................................112
Changing the Soft Quota or Hard Quota for a User or Group.................................................. 113
Enabling or Disabling the Soft Quota or Hard Quota for a User or Group .............................. 113
Deleting a User or Group Quota Rule.........................................................................................114
Managing Data Reduction.................................................................................................................114
Enabling Data Reduction at the System Level............................................................................ 115
Enabling Data Reduction on a NAS Volume .............................................................................. 115
Changing the Data Reduction Type for a NAS Volume............................................................. 116
Changing the Candidates for Data Reduction for a NAS Volume............................................. 116
Disabling Data Reduction on a NAS Volume.............................................................................. 117
8 FluidFS 3.0 Data Protection................................................................................119
Managing the Anti-Virus Service.......................................................................................................119
Excluding Files and Directory Paths from Scans........................................................................120
Supported Anti-Virus Applications............................................................................................. 120
Configuring Anti-Virus Scanning................................................................................................ 120
Viewing Anti-Virus Events .......................................................................................................... 123
Managing Snapshots......................................................................................................................... 123
Creating On-Demand Snapshots............................................................................................... 124
Managing Scheduled Snapshots ................................................................................................124
Modifying and Deleting Snapshots............................................................................................. 126
Restoring Data from a Snapshot................................................................................................. 127
Managing NDMP............................................................................................................................... 129
Supported DMAs......................................................................................................................... 130
Configuring NDMP ..................................................................................................................... 130
Specifying NAS Volumes Using the DMA................................................................................... 132
Viewing NDMP Jobs and Events.................................................................................................132
Managing Replication........................................................................................................................133
How Replication Works...............................................................................................................134
Target NAS Volumes................................................................................................................... 136
Managing Replication Partnerships............................................................................................ 136
Replicating NAS Volumes............................................................................................................138
Recovering an Individual NAS Volume....................................................................................... 141
Restoring the NAS Volume Configuration................................................................................. 142
Restoring Local Users .................................................................................................................144
Restoring Local Groups...............................................................................................................145
Using Replication for Disaster Recovery.................................................................................... 146
9 FluidFS 3.0 Monitoring........................................................................................ 153
Viewing the Status of Hardware Components.................................................................................153
Viewing the Status of the Interfaces .......................................................................................... 153
Viewing the Status of the Disks...................................................................................................153
Viewing the Status of the Power Supplies..................................................................................154
Viewing the Status of a Backup Power Supply...........................................................................154
Viewing the Status of the Fans....................................................................................................154
Viewing the Status of FluidFS Cluster Services................................................................................ 154
Viewing the Status of Background Processes..................................................................................156
Viewing FluidFS Cluster NAS Pool Trends........................................................................................156
Viewing Storage Usage..................................................................................................................... 156
Viewing FluidFS NAS Pool Storage Usage.................................................................................. 156
Viewing Volume Storage Usage..................................................................................................156
Viewing FluidFS Traffic Statistics.......................................................................................................156
Viewing NAS Controller Load Balancing Statistics...........................................................................157
10 FluidFS 3.0 Maintenance...................................................................................159
Adding and Deleting NAS Appliances in a FluidFS Cluster ............................................................. 159
Adding NAS Appliances to the FluidFS Cluster...........................................................................159
Deleting a NAS Appliance from the FluidFS Cluster...................................................................161
Detaching, Attaching, and Replacing a NAS Controller...................................................................161
Detaching a NAS Controller........................................................................................................ 161
Attaching a NAS Controller ........................................................................................................ 162
Replacing a NAS Controller........................................................................................................ 162
Managing Service Packs....................................................................................................................163
Viewing the Upgrade History ..................................................................................................... 163
Managing Firmware Updates............................................................................................................164
Reinstalling FluidFS from the Internal Storage Device.................................................................... 164
11 Troubleshooting..................................................................................................167
Viewing the Event Log.......................................................................................................................167
Running Diagnostics......................................................................................................................... 167
Running FluidFS Diagnostics on a FluidFS Cluster .................................................................... 167
Launching the iBMC Virtual KVM......................................................................................................168
Troubleshooting Common Issues....................................................................................................169
Troubleshooting Active Directory Issues................................................................................... 169
Troubleshooting Backup Issues..................................................................................................170
Troubleshooting CIFS Issues....................................................................................................... 171
Troubleshooting NFS Issues........................................................................................................175
Troubleshooting NAS File Access And Permissions Issues........................................................179
Troubleshooting Networking Issues........................................................................................... 181
Troubleshooting Replication Issues........................................................................................... 182
Troubleshooting System Issues.................................................................................................. 185
12 Getting Help.........................................................................................................189
Contacting Dell................................................................................................................................. 189
Locating Your System Service Tag................................................................................................... 189
Documentation Feedback................................................................................................................ 189
Introduction
1
The Dell Fluid File System (FluidFS) network attached storage (NAS) solution is a highly-available file
storage solution. The solution aggregates multiple NAS controllers into one system and presents them to
UNIX, Linux, and Microsoft Windows clients as one virtual file server.
How PowerVault FluidFS NAS Works
PowerVault FluidFS NAS leverages the PowerVault FluidFS appliances and the Dell PowerVault MD
storage to provide scale‐out file storage to Microsoft Windows, UNIX, and Linux clients. The FluidFS
system supports SMB (CIFS) and NFS clients installed on dedicated servers or on virtual systems deploying
VMware virtualization.
The MD storage systems manage the “NAS pool” of storage capacity. The FluidFS system administrator
can create NAS volumes in the NAS pool, and CIFS shares and/or NFS exports to serve NAS clients
working on different platforms.
To the clients, the FluidFS system appears as a single file server, hosting multiple CIFS shares and NFS
exports, with a single IP address and namespace. Clients connect to the FluidFS system using their
respective operating systems’ NAS protocols:
•
UNIX and Linux users access files through the NFS protocol
•
Windows users access files through the SMB(CIFS) protocol
The FluidFS system serves data to all clients concurrently, with no performance degradation.
FluidFS Terminology
The following table defines terminology related to FluidFS scale‐out NAS.
11
Term
Description
Fluid File System (FluidFS)
A special purpose, Dell proprietary operating system providing
enterprise class, high‐performance, scalable NAS services using
Dell PowerVault, EqualLogic or Dell Compellent SAN storage
systems.
FluidFS Controller (NAS controller)
Dell hardware device capable of running the FluidFS firmware.
FluidFS Appliance (NAS appliance)
Enclosure containing two NAS controllers. The controllers in an
appliance are called peers, are hot‐swappable and operate in
active‐active mode.
Backup Power Supply (BPS)
A backup power supply that keeps a FluidFS controller running
in the event of power failure and allows it to dump its cache to
a nonvolatile storage device.
FluidFS system (cluster)
Multiple NAS controllers appropriately connected and
configured to form a single functional unit.
PowerVault FluidFS Manager
WebUI Management user interface used for managing
PowerVault FluidFS systems.
NAS reserve (pool)
The SAN storage system LUNs (and their aggregate size)
allocated and provisioned to a FluidFS system.
NAS volume
File system (single-rooted directory/folder and file hierarchy),
defined using FluidFS management functions over a portion of
the NAS reserve.
Client Network (Client LAN)
The network through which clients access CIFS shares or NFS
exports and also through which the PowerVault FluidFS
Manager is accessed.
Client VIP
Virtual IP address(es) that clients use to access CIFS shares and
NFS exports hosted by the FluidFS system.
CIFS share
A directory in a NAS volume that is shared on the Client
Network using the SMB (CIFS) protocol.
NFS export
A directory in a NAS volume that is shared on the Client
Network using the Network File System (NFS) protocol.
Network Data Management Protocol
(NDMP)
Protocol used for NDMP backup and restore.
Replication partnership
A relation between two FluidFS systems enabling them to
replicate NAS volumes between themselves.
Snapshot
A time-specific view of a NAS volume data.
Key Features Of PowerVault FluidFS Systems
The following table summarizes key features of PowerVault FluidFS scale‐out NAS.
Feature
Description
Shared back‐end infrastructure
The MD system SAN and NX36X0 scale‐out NAS leverage the
same virtualized disk pool.
Unified block and file
Unified block (SAN) and file(NAS) storage.
High performance NAS
Support for a single namespace spanning up to two NAS
appliances (four NAS controllers).
Capacity scaling
Ability to scale a single namespace up to 1024 TB capacity.
12
Feature
Description
Connectivity options
1GbE and 10GbE, copper and optical options for connectivity to
the client network.
Highly available and active‐active
design
Redundant, hot‐swappable NAS controllers in each NAS appliance.
Both NAS controllers in a NAS appliance process I/O. BPS allows
maintaining data integrity in the event of a power failure by
keeping a NAS controller online long enough to write the cache
to the internal storage device.
Automatic load balancing
Automatic balancing of client connections across network ports
and NAS controllers, as well as back‐end I/O across MD array
LUNs.
Multi‐protocol support
Support for CIFS/SMB (on Windows) and NFS (on UNIX and Linux)
protocols with ability to share user data across both protocols.
Client authentication
Control access to files using local and remote client
authentication, including LDAP, Active Directory, and NIS.
Quota rules
Support for controlling client space usage.
File security style
Choice of file security mode for a NAS volume (UNIX or NTFS).
Cache mirroring
The write cache is mirrored between NAS controllers, which
ensures a high performance response to client requests and
maintains data integrity in the event of a NAS controller failure.
Journaling mode
In the event of a NAS controller failure, the cache in the remaining
NAS controller is written to storage and the NAS controller
continues to write directly to storage, which protects against data
loss.
NAS volume thin clones
Clone NAS volumes without the need to physically copy the data
set.
Deduplication
Policy‐driven post‐process deduplication technology that
eliminates redundant data at rest.
Compression
LZPS (Level Zero Processing System) compression algorithm that
intelligently shrinks data at rest.
Metadata protection
Metadata is constantly check-summed and stored in multiple
locations for data consistency and protection.
Replication
NAS-volume level, snapshot‐based, asynchronous replication to
enable disaster recovery.
Snapshots
Redirect‐on‐write, user‐accessible snapshots
NDMP backups
Snapshot‐based, asynchronous backup (remote NDMP) over
Ethernet to certified third‐party backup solutions.
Anti‐virus scanning
CIFS anti‐virus scanning by deploying certified third‐party ICAP‐
enabled anti‐virus solutions.
Monitoring
Built‐in performance monitoring and capacity planning.
Overview Of PowerVault FluidFS Systems
PowerVault FluidFS system consists of one or two PowerVault NX36x0 appliances connected and
configured to utilize a PowerVault MD storage array and provide NAS services. PowerVault FluidFS
systems can start with one NX36x0 appliance, and expand with another (identical) appliance as required.
13
NOTE: To identify the physical hardware displayed in PowerVault FluidFS Manager, match the
Service Tag shown in FluidFS Manager with the Service Tag printed on a sticker on the front right
side of the NAS appliance.
All NAS appliances in a FluidFS system must use the same controllers — mixing of 1 GbE and 10 GbE
appliances or controllers is not supported. The following appliances are supported:
•
NX3500 (legacy) — 1 Gb Ethernet client connectivity with 1GB iSCSI back‐end connectivity to the MD
system(s)
•
NX3600 — 1 Gb Ethernet client connectivity with 1GB iSCSI back‐end connectivity to the MD
system(s)
•
NX3610 — 10 Gb Ethernet client connectivity with 10GB Ethernet iSCSI back‐end connectivity to the
MD system(s)
NAS appliance numbers start at 1 and NAS controller numbers start at 0. So, NAS Appliance 1 contains
NAS Controllers 0 and 1 and FluidFS Appliance 2 contains NAS Controllers 2 and 3.
Internal Cache
Each NAS controller has an internal cache that provides fast reads and reliable writes.
Internal Backup Power Supply
Each NAS controller is equipped with an internal Backup Power Supply (BPS) that protects data during a
power failure. The BPS units provide continuous power to the NAS controllers for a minimum of 5
minutes and have sufficient battery power to allow the NAS controllers to write all data from the cache to
non‐volatile internal storage before they shut down.
The NAS controllers regularly monitor the BPS battery status for the minimum level of power required for
normal operation. To ensure that the BPS battery status is accurate, the NAS controllers routinely
undergo battery calibration cycles. During a battery calibration cycle, the BPS goes through charge and
discharge cycles; therefore, battery error events during this process are expected. A battery calibration
cycle takes up to seven days to complete. If a NAS controller starts a battery calibration cycle, and the
peer NAS controller BPS has failed, the NAS controllers enter journaling mode, which might impact
performance. Therefore, Dell recommends repairing a failed BPS as soon as possible.
Internal Storage
Each NAS controller has an internal storage device that is used only for the FluidFS images and as a cache
storage offload location in the event of a power failure. The internal hard drive does not provide the NAS
storage capacity.
PowerVault FluidFS Architecture
PowerVault FluidFS scale‐out NAS consists of:
•
Hardware:
– FluidFS appliance(s)
– MD system
14
•
NAS appliance network interface connections:
– Client/LAN network
– SAN network
– Internal network
The following figure shows an overview of the PowerVault FluidFS architecture:
Figure 1. PowerVault FluidFS Architecture Overview
Client/LAN Network
The client/LAN network is used for client access to the CIFS shares and NFS exports. It is also used by the
storage administrator to manage the FluidFS system. The FluidFS system is assigned one or more virtual
IP addresses (client VIPs) that allow clients to access the FluidFS system as a single entity. The client VIP
also enables load balancing between NAS controllers, and ensures failover in the event of a NAS
controller failure.
If client access to the FluidFS system is not through a router (in other words, the network has a “flat”
topology), define one client VIP. Otherwise, define a client VIP for each client interface port per NAS
controller. If you deploy FluidFS in an LACP environment, please contact Dell Support to get more
information about the optimal number of VIPs for your system.
15
MD System
The PowerVault MD array provides the storage capacity for NAS; the NX36x0 cannot be used as a stand‐
alone NAS appliance. The MD array eliminates the need for separate storage capacity for block and file
storage.
SAN Network
The NX36x0 shares a back‐end infrastructure with the MD array. The SAN network connects the NX36x0
to the MD system and carries the block level traffic. The NX36x0 communicates with the MD system
using the iSCSI protocol.
Internal Network
The internal network is used for communication between NAS controllers. Each of the NAS controllers in
the FluidFS system must have access to all other NAS controllers in the FluidFS system to achieve the
following goals:
•
Provide connectivity for FluidFS system creation
•
Act as a heartbeat mechanism to maintain high availability
•
Enable internal data transfer between NAS controller
•
Enable cache mirroring between NAS controllers
•
Enable balanced client distribution between NAS controllers
Data Caching And Redundancy
New or modified file blocks are first written to a local cache, and then immediately mirrored to the peer
NAS controller (mirroring mode). Data caching provides high performance, while cache mirroring
between peer NAS controllers ensures data redundancy. Cache data is ultimately (and asynchronously)
transferred to permanent storage using optimized data‐placement schemes.
When cache mirroring is not possible, such as during a single NAS controller failure or when the BPS
battery status is low, NAS controllers write directly to storage (journaling mode).
File Metadata Protection
File metadata includes information such as name, owner, permissions, date created, date modified, and a
soft link to the file’s storage location.
The FluidFS system has several built‐in measures to store and protect file metadata:
•
Metadata is managed through a separate caching scheme and replicated on two separate volumes.
•
Metadata is check-summed to protect file and directory structure.
•
All metadata updates are journaled to storage to avoid potential corruption or data loss in the event of
a power failure.
•
There is a background process that continuously checks and fixes incorrect checksums.
16
High Availability And Load Balancing
To optimize availability and performance, client connections are load balanced across the available NAS
controllers. Both NAS controllers in a NAS appliance operate simultaneously. If one NAS controller fails,
clients are automatically failed over to the remaining controllers. When failover occurs, some CIFS clients
reconnect automatically, while in other cases, a CIFS application might fail, and the user must restart it.
NFS clients experience a temporary pause during failover, but client network traffic resumes
automatically.
Failure Scenarios
The FluidFS system can tolerate a NAS controller failure without impact to data availability and without
data loss. If one NAS controller becomes unavailable (for example, because the NAS controller failed, is
turned off, or is disconnected from the network), the NAS appliance status is degraded. Although the
FluidFS system is still operational and data is available to clients, the administrator cannot perform most
configuration modifications and performance might decrease because data is no longer cached.
The impact to data availability and data integrity following a multiple NAS controller failure depends on
the circumstances of the failure scenario. Dell recommends detaching a failed NAS controller as soon as
possible, so that it can be safely taken offline for service. Data access remains intact as long as one of the
NAS controllers in each NAS appliance in a FluidFS system is functional.
The following table summarizes the impact to data availability and data integrity of various failure
scenarios.
Scenario
System Status
Data Integrity
Single NAS controller
failure
Available, degraded
Unaffected
Comments
•
Peer NAS controller enters
journaling mode
•
Failed NAS controller can be
replaced while keeping the
file system online
Sequential dual‐NAS
controller failure in
single NAS appliance
system
Unavailable
Unaffected
Sequential failure assumes that
there is enough time between
NAS controller failures to write all
data from the cache to disk (MD
system or non‐volatile internal
storage)
Simultaneous dual‐ NAS
controller failure in
single NAS appliance
system
Unavailable
Lose data in cache
Data that has not been written to
disk is lost
Sequential dual‐NAS
controller failure in
multiple NAS appliance
system, same NAS
appliance
Unavailable
Unaffected
Sequential failure assumes that
there is enough time between
NAS controller failures to write all
data from the cache to disk (MD
system or non‐volatile internal
storage)
Simultaneous dual‐NAS
controller failure in
multiple NAS appliance
Unavailable
Lose data in cache
Data that has not been written to
disk is lost
17
Scenario
System Status
Data Integrity
Comments
system, same NAS
appliance
Dual‐NAS controller
Available, degraded
failure in multiple NAS
appliance system,
separate NAS appliances
Unaffected
•
Peer NAS controller enters
journaling mode
•
Failed NAS controller can be
replaced while keeping the
file system online
Ports Used by the FluidFS System
The FluidFS system uses the ports listed in the following table. You might need to adjust your firewall
settings to allow the traffic on these ports. Some ports might not be used, depending on which features
are enabled.
Required Ports
The following table summarizes ports that are required for all FluidFS systems.
Port
Protocol
Service Name
22
TCP
SSH
53
TCP
DNS
80
TCP
Internal system use
111
TCP and UDP
portmap
427
TCP and UDP
SLP
443
TCP
Internal system use
445
TCP and UDP
CIFS/SMB
2049–2049+(domain number ‐
1)
TCP and UDP
NFS
4000–4000+(domain number ‐
1)
TCP and UDP
statd
4050–4050+(domain number ‐
1)
TCP and UDP
NLM (lock manager)
5001–5001+(domain number ‐ 1) TCP and UDP
mount
5051–5051+(domain number ‐ 1) TCP and UDP
quota
44421
TCP
FTP
44430–44439
TCP
FTP (Passive)
Feature-Specific Ports
The following table summarizes ports that are required, depending on enabled features.
18
Port
Protocol
Service Name
88
TCP and UDP
Kerberos
123
UDP
NTP
135
TCP
AD ‐ RPC
138
UDP
NetBIOS
139
TCP
NetBIOS
161
UDP
SNMP Agent
162
TCP
SNMP trap
389
TCP and UDP
LDAP
464
TCP and UDP
Kerberos v5
543
TCP
Kerberos login
544
TCP
Kerberos remote shell
636
TCP
LDAP over TLS/SSL
711
UDP
NIS
714
TCP
NIS
749
TCP and UDP
Kerberos administration
1344
TCP
Anti-virus ‐ ICAP
3268
TCP
LDAP global catalog
3269
TCP
LDAP global catalog over TLS/SSL
8004
TCP
ScanEngine server WebUI (AV host)
9445
TCP
Replication trust setup
10000
TCP
NDMP
10550‐10551, 10560‐10568
TCP
Replication
Other Information You May Need
WARNING: See the safety and regulatory information that shipped with your system. Warranty
information may be included within this document or as a separate document.
•
The Getting Started Guide provides an overview of setting up your system and technical
specifications.
•
The Owner's Manual provides information about solution features and describes how to troubleshoot
the system and install or replace system components.
•
The rack documentation included with your rack solution describes how to install your system into a
rack, if required.
•
The System Placemat provides information on how to set up the hardware and install the software on
your NAS solution.
•
Any media that ships with your system that provides documentation and tools for configuring and
managing your system, including those pertaining to the operating system, system management
software, system updates, and system components that you purchased with your system.
•
For the full name of an abbreviation or acronym used in this document, see the Glossary at dell.com/
support/manuals.
19
NOTE: Always check for updates on dell.com/support/manuals and read the updates first because
they often supersede information in other documents.
20
Upgrading to FluidFS Version 3
2
Supported Upgrade Paths
To upgrade to FluidFS version 3.0, the FluidFS cluster must be at FluidFS version 2.0.7630 or later. If the
FluidFS cluster is at a pre‐2.0.7630 version, upgrade to version 2.0.7680 prior to upgrading to version 3.0.
The following table summarizes the supported upgrade paths.
Version 2.0 Release
Upgrades to Version 3.0.x Supported?
2.0.7680
Yes
2.0.7630
Yes
2.0.7170
No
2.0.6940
No
2.0.6730
No
2.0.6110
No
FluidFS V2 and FluidFS V3 Feature and Configuration
Comparison
This section summarizes functionality differences between FluidFS version 2.0 and 3.0. Review the
functionality comparison before upgrading FluidFS to version 3.0.
•
Note: The Version 3.0 column in the table below indicates changes that must be made in some cases,
in order to accommodate version 3.0 configuration options.
Feature
Version 2.0
Management interface
Version 3.0
The NAS ManagerUser Interface has been
updated.
Management
connections
The FluidFS cluster is
managed using a dedicated
Management VIP.
Version 3.0 does not use a Management VIP—
the FluidFS cluster can be managed using any
client VIP.
During the upgrade, the Management VIP from
version 2.0 is converted to a client VIP.
Default management
account
The default administrator
account is named admin.
The default administrator account is named
Administrator.
During the upgrade, the admin account from
version 2.0 is deleted and the CIFS
Administrator account becomes the version
3.0 Administrator account. During the upgrade,
you will be prompted to reset the CIFS
Administrator password if you have not reset it
within the last 24 hours. Make sure to
21
Feature
Version 2.0
Version 3.0
remember this password because it is required
to manage the FluidFS cluster in version 3.0.
User‐defined
management accounts
Only local administrator
accounts can be created.
You can create local administrator accounts or
create administrator accounts for remote users
(members of Active Directory, LDAP or NIS
repositories).
During the upgrade, any user‐defined
administrator accounts from version 2.0 are
deleted.
Workaround: Use one of the following
options:
Convert the administrator accounts to local
users before upgrading and convert them back
to administrator accounts after upgrading.
Re‐create administrator accounts after the
upgrade.
Command Line
Interface (CLI) access
and commands
Administrator accounts log
into the CLI directly.
Version 3.0 introduces a cli account that must
be used in conjunction with an administrator
account to log into the CLI.
In addition, the command set is significantly
different in version 3.0.
Dell Technical Support
Services remote
troubleshooting
account
The remote troubleshooting
account is named fse (field
service engineer).
The remote troubleshooting account is named
support. During the upgrade, the fse account
from version 2.0 is deleted. After the upgrade,
the support account is disabled by default.
FluidFS cluster name
and NetBIOS name
The FluidFS cluster name and
NetBIOS name do not have
to match. The NetBIOS name
can begin with a digit.
The FluidFS cluster name is used as the
NetBIOS name.
Before upgrading, the FluidFS cluster name and
NetBIOS name must be changed to match.
Also, the FluidFS cluster name cannot be
longer than 15 characters and cannot begin
with a digit.
Data reduction
overhead
Version 2.0 does not include
a data
reduction feature.
Version 3.0 introduces a data reduction
feature. If data reduction is enabled, the system
deducts an additional 100GB per NAS
appliance from the NAS pool for data reduction
processing. This is in addition to the amount of
space that the system deducts from the NAS
pool for internal use.
Anti‐virus scanning
You can specify which file
types to scan.
You cannot specify which files types to scan—
all files smaller than the specified file size
threshold are scanned.
You can specify whether to allow or deny
access to files larger than the file size
threshold.
As in version 2.0, you can specify file types and
directories to exclude from anti‐virus scanning.
Supported NFS
protocol versions
Version 2.0 supports NFS
protocol version 3.
Version 3.0 supports NFS protocol version 3
and 4.
Supported SMB
protocol versions
Version 2.0 supports SMB
protocol version 1.0.
Version 3.0 supports SMB protocol version 1.0,
2.0, and 2.1.
22
Feature
Version 2.0
Version 3.0
CIFS home shares
Clients can access CIFS
home shares in two ways:
\\<client_VIP_or_name>
\<path_prefix>\<username>
\\<client_VIP_or_name>
\homes
Both access methods point
to the same folder.
Version 3.0 does not include the “homes”
access method. After the upgrade, the “homes”
share will not be present, and clients will need
to use the “username” access method instead.
If you have a policy that mounts the \
\<client_VIP_or_name>\homes share when
client systems start, you must change the
policy to mount the \\<client_VIP_or_name>
\<path_prefix>\<username> share.
Local user names
A period can be used as the
last
character of a local user
name.
A period cannot be used as the last character
of a local user name.
Before upgrading, delete local user names that
have a period as the last character and re‐
create the accounts with a different name.
Local users and local
groups UID/GID range
A unique UID (user ID) or GID
(group ID) can be configured
for
local users and local groups.
The UID/GID range for local users and local
groups is 1001 to 100,000. There is no way to
configure or determine the UID/GID of local
users and local groups. This information is
internal to the FluidFS cluster.
During the upgrade, any existing local users
and local
groups from version 2.0 with a UID/GID that is
outside the version 3.0 UID/GID range will
remain unchanged. Local users and local
groups created after the upgrade will use the
version 3.0 UID/GID range.
Guest account
mapping policy
By default, unmapped users
are
mapped to the guest
account, which allows a
guest account to access a file
if the CIFS share allows guest
access.
Unmapped users cannot access any CIFS
share, regardless of whether the CIFS share
allows guest access.
Guest access is enabled automatically after the
upgrade only if there are guest users already
defined for any CIFS shares in version 2.0.
NDMP client port
The NDMP client port must
be in
the range 1–65536.
The NDMP client port must be in the range
10000–10100.
Before upgrading, the NDMP client port must
be changed to be in the range 10000–10100.
You must also make the reciprocal change on
the DMA servers.
Replication ports
TCP ports 10560–10568 and
26 are used for replication.
TCP ports 10550–10551 and 10560–10568 are
used for replication.
Snapshot schedules
Snapshot schedules can be
disabled.
Snapshot schedules cannot be disabled.
During the upgrade, disabled snapshot
schedules from version 2.0 are deleted.
Internal subnet
The internal (interconnect)
subnet
can be changed from a Class
C
subnet during or after
deployment.
The internal subnet must be a Class C subnet.
Before upgrading, the internal subnet must be
changed to a Class C subnet, otherwise the
service pack installation will fail with the
following message:
“Please allocate a new C-class subnet for
FluidFS Internal Network, run the following
23
Feature
Version 2.0
Version 3.0
command, and then repeat the upgrade:
system
networking subnets add NEWINTER Primary
255.255.255.0 -PrivateIPs x.y.z.1,x.y.z.2
(where x.y.z.* is the new subnet)”.
Note: If you receive this message while
attempting to
upgrade, obtain a Class C subnet that is not
used in your network, run the command to set
the internal subnet (for example: system
networking subnets add NEWINTER Primary
255.255.255.0 –PrivateIPs 172.41.64.1,
172.41.64.2), and retry the service pack
installation.
Port for management
and remote KVM
Only subnet‐level isolation of The following features are available:
management traffic is
Physical isolation of management traffic
supported.
Remote KVM that allows you to view and
manage the NAS controller console remotely
over a network
These features are implemented using the
Ethernet port located on the lower right side of
the back panel of a NAS controller.
1GbE to 10GbE client
connectivity upgrade
Version 2.0 does not support
upgrading an appliance from
1GbE client connectivity to
10GbE client connectivity.
Version 3.0 introduces support for upgrading
an appliance from 1GbE client connectivity to
10GbE client connectivity. Upgrades must be
performed by a Dell installer or certified
business partner.
Performing Pre-Upgrade Tasks
Complete the following tasks before upgrading.
•
The FluidFS cluster must be at FluidFS version 2.0.7630 or later before upgrading to FluidFS version
3.0.
•
When upgrading to V3 “admin” user will not be available anymore, and local “Administrator” must be
used instead. Make sure to know its password, Administrator password must be changed up to 24
Hours before the upgrade. To change Administrator password Login to CLI ( Using SSH ) and run the
following command :system authentication local-accounts users change-password Administrator
CAUTION: The password you set will be required to manage the FluidFS cluster after
upgrading to version 3.0. Make sure that you remember this password or record it in a secure
location.
•
Change the FluidFS cluster name to match the NetBIOS name, if needed. Also, ensure that the FluidFS
cluster name is no longer than 15 characters and does not begin with a digit.
•
Change the internal subnet to a Class C subnet, if needed.
•
Convert user‐defined administrator accounts to local users, if needed.
•
Change policies that mount the \\<client_VIP_or_name>\homes share to mount the \
\<client_VIP_or_name>\<path_prefix>\<username> share, if needed.
24
•
Delete local user names that have a period as the last character and re‐create the accounts with a
different name, if needed.
•
Change the NDMP client port to be in the range 10000–10100, if needed. You must also make the
reciprocal change on the DMA servers.
•
Stop all NDMP backup sessions, if needed. If an NDMP backup session is in progress during the
upgrade, the temporary NDMP snapshot is left in place.
•
Open additional ports on your firewall to allow replication between replication partners, if needed.
•
Remove parentheses characters from the Comment field for CIFS shares and NFS exports.
•
Ensure the NAS volumes do not have the following names (these names are reserved for internal
FluidFS cluster functions):
– .
– ..
– .snapshots
– acl_stream
– cifs
– int_mnt
– unified
– Any name starting with locker_
•
Ensure that at least one of the defined DNS servers is accessible using ping and dig (DNS lookup
utility).
•
Ensure that the Active Directory domain controller is accessible using ping and that the FluidFS cluster
system time is in sync with the Active Directory time.
•
Ensure that the NAS controllers are running, attached, and accessible using ping, SSH, and rsync.
•
Although the minimum requirement to upgrade is that at least one NAS controller in each NAS
appliance must be running, Dell recommends ensuring that all NAS controllers are running before
upgrading.
•
Ensure that the FluidFS cluster system status shows running.
Upgrading from FluidFS Version 2.0 to 3.0
Use the following procedure to upgrade a Dell PowerVault NX3500/NX3600/NX3610 FluidFS cluster from
FluidFS version 2.0 to 3.0.
25
NOTE:
•
Perform pre‐upgrade tasks.
•
Installing a service pack causes the NAS controllers to reboot during the installation process.
This might cause interruptions in CIFS and NFS client connections. Therefore, Dell recommends
scheduling a maintenance window to perform service pack installations.
•
Contact Dell Technical Support Services to obtain the latest FluidFS version 3.0 service pack. Do
not modify the service pack filename.
1.
Login to the FluidFS v2 Manager application using a browser and go to Cluster Management →
Cluster Management → Maintenance → Service Packs.
2.
Browse to the ISO location and click Upload.
The system starts uploading the service pack file.
26
3.
When the file is uploaded, click Install.
The upgrade process starts and may take an hour or more. The upgrade’s progress is displayed as
follows:
4.
During the upgrade, you will be notified that a node has been rebooted. After receiving this message,
wait 15 minutes more so that the reboot of both nodes and the Final Sync are completed.
5.
Login again with the Administrator user (the Admin user is no longer available). The new FluidFS
version 3 Manager UI is displayed.
6.
Make sure the system is fully operational and all components are in Optimal status, before you start
working with it.
27
28
3
FluidFS Manager User Interface Overview
FluidFS Manager Layout
The following image and legend describe the layout of the FluidFS Manager.
Figure 2. FluidFS Manager Web User Interface Layout
FluidFS Manager Sections
❶
Left-hand tabs, used to select a view topic.
❷
Upper tabs, used to select a view subtopic.
❸
Main view area, containing one or more panes. Each pane refers to a different FluidFS
element or configuration setting, which can be viewed/modified/deleted.
❹
The event log, which shows a sortable table of event messages.
❺
The dashboard, which displays various system statistics, statuses and services at a glance.
Navigating Views
A specific FluidFS Manager view is displayed when you select a topic, by clicking the topic tab on the left,
and select a subtopic, by clicking a subtopic tab on top.
For example, to display the System\SNMP view, click the System tab on the left and the SNMP tab on
top.
The FluidFS elements and settings related to the view you selected are displayed in the main view area.
29
Figure 3. Navigating Views in FluidFS Manager
Working With Panes, Menus, And Dialogs
Showing And Hiding Panes
Panes within the main view area display FluidFS elements and settings. A pane’s contents may be hidden
by clicking the
button, and displayed by clicking the
button.
Opening A Pane Menu
To modify a setting or add an element to a pane, click the
button and select the desired menu option.
Opening A Table Element Menu
Some panes display a table of elements, each of which may be edited independently. To modify or delete
an element in a table, click the
desired menu option.
30
button in the row of the element you want to change, then select the
Changing Settings Within A Dialog
When you select a menu option, a dialog box is displayed, which allows you to modify or delete the
element or setting you chose. When you edit a setting and click OK, the dialog closes and the change
takes effect.
31
Accessing NAS Volume SubTopics
NAS Volumes have additional configuration subtopics that are not displayed by default. To display NAS
Volume subtopics and their views:
1.
Enter the NAS Volumes / All NAS Volumes view.
2.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
display.
3.
Click View Details.
in the row of the volume whose subtopic views you want to
The top tabs are replaced by the volume subtopic tabs, and you can access their views by clicking
them.
Working With The Event Log
FluidFS generates events to log normal operations and problems. Events allow you to monitor the FluidFS
cluster, and detect and solve problems.
Events are logged to the Event Log.
Viewing The Event Log
You can view events contained in the Event Log, displayed in the bottom pane of the FluidFS Manager.
32
Figure 4. Event Log
Viewing Event Details
View detailed information for an event contained in the Event Log.
In the Events pane on the bottom of the FluidFS Manager interface, click
whose details you want to view. A dialog box displays the event details.
in the row of the event
Sorting The Event Log
You can sort events contained in the Event Log by column heading.
In the Events pane on the bottom of the FluidFS Manager interface, click the column headings of the
table to sort the events by the values in that column (for example Date, Event).
Searching the Event Log
Search events contained in the Event Log for a specified string.
1.
In the Search field at the top-right of the Events pane, type a search string
2.
Press Enter or click the
3.
The Events table displays all events containing the search string (the search is case-insensitive).
icon.
33
34
FluidFS 3.0 System Management
4
Connecting to the FluidFS Cluster
As a storage administrator, you can use either the FluidFS Manager web client or command line interface
(CLI) to connect to and manage the FluidFS cluster. The FluidFS cluster is accessed through the client
network.
NOTE: To avoid potential management conflicts, Dell recommends that you do not attempt to log
on to both FluidFS Manager and the CLI at the same time.
Connecting to the FluidFS Cluster Using the FluidFS Manager Web Client
Through a browser, log on to the FluidFS Manager web client to manage the FluidFS cluster.
1.
In a browser, enter the FluidFS Manager URL.
The URL for the FluidFS Manager any of the FluidFS VIPs or the DNS name. For example, http://
172.41.2.200/login.
The FluidFS login window is displayed.
2.
In the Username field, type the administrator user name.
By default, the administrator username is Administrator.
3.
In the Password field, type the administrator password.
By default, the administrator username is Stor@ge!
4.
Click Ok.
The FluidFS Manager All NAS Volumes screen is displayed.
Connecting to the FluidFS Cluster CLI Using a VGA Console
Log on to the CLI using a VGA console to manage the FluidFS cluster.
Connect a monitor to one of the NAS controller’s VGA port and connect a keyboard to its USB ports.
1.
In the command line, type cli at the login as prompt.
A welcome message is displayed.
2.
Type the FluidFS cluster administrator user name at the login as prompt.
The default user name is Administrator.
3.
Type the FluidFS cluster administrator password at the password prompt.
The default password is Stor@ge!
You are logged on to the CLI and a Welcome window is displayed, listing the installed FluidFS version
and the available commands in the main menu.
35
Connecting to the FluidFS Cluster CLI through SSH Using a Password
Log on to the CLI through SSH to manage the FluidFS cluster.
1.
Use either of the following options:
– For Windows — Using an SSH client, connect to a client VIP. From the command line, type cli at
the login as prompt:
– For UNIX/Linux — type the following command from a prompt:
ssh cli@<client_VIP_or_name>
2.
Type the FluidFS cluster administrator user name at the login as prompt.
The default user name is Administrator.
3.
Type the FluidFS cluster administrator password at the password prompt.
The default password is Stor@ge!
You are logged on to the CLI and a Welcome window is displayed, listing the installed FluidFS version
and the available commands in the main menu.
Connecting to the FluidFS Cluster CLI through SSH without Using a
Password
You can use SSH keys to bypass the SSH login prompt to manage the FluidFS cluster.
1.
Log on to a UNIX/Linux workstation for which you want to bypass the SSH login prompt.
2.
From the command line, type the following command:
ssh-keygen -t rsa
3.
Press <Enter> at the Enter file in which to save the key (/home/<user_name>/.ssh/id_rsa)
prompt.
4.
Press Enter at the Enter passphrase (empty for no passphrase) prompt and again at the Enter same
passphrase again prompt.
An SSH key is generated at /home/<user_name>/.ssh/id_rsa.pub.
5.
Copy the SSH key.
6.
Log on to the FluidFS system using the CLI with the administrator username and password.
7.
Type the following command:
system administrators edit Administrator -SSHKey “<SSH_key>” in the CLI using a
password.
8.
Now you can use the following command to log on to the FluidFS cluster from the workstation
without needing a password:
ssh <FluidFS_administrator_user_name>@<client_VIP_or_name>
9.
You can also use the following format to run commands from the workstation without needing a
password:
ssh <FluidFS_administrator_user_name>@<client_VIP_or_name> <CLI_command>
Managing Secured Management
By default, all FluidFS cluster management ports are open on all subnets, along with the other ports
needed for client access (CIFS/NFS), replication, and NDMP. Secured management, when enabled,
exclusively limits all management traffic to one specific subnet. The subnet on which secured
management is enabled also has the necessary ports open for client access, replication, and NDMP
36
traffic. Other subnets will not have any of the management ports listening on them, making them
available only for client access, replication, and NDMP traffic. This prevents users on client (data) access
subnets from accessing any FluidFS cluster management functions.
In FluidFS, the ports listed in the following table do not participate in CIFS/NFS communication, but are
exposed on the client network by default. Enabling secured management allows you to expose the
management ports on a management subnet only.
Service Ports
Web Services
80
Secure Web Services
443
FTP
44421
FTP (Passive)
44430–44439
SSH
22
FluidFS Manager communication
35451
Secured management can be enabled only after the system is deployed. To make a subnet secure:
•
It must exist prior to enabling the secured management feature
•
It can reside on the client network (subnet‐level isolation of management traffic) or the LOM (Lights
Out Management) Ethernet port (physical isolation of management traffic). The LOM Ethernet port is
on the lower right side of the back panel of a NAS controller.
•
Log in from this subnet.
Secured management configuration, together with other networking features, is accessed through the
Security Access pane in the System\Internal view.
Adding a Secured Management Subnet
The subnet on which you enable secured management must exist prior to enabling the secured
management feature.
To add a secured management subnet:
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on top.
3.
In the Security Access pane, click
4.
Click New Subnet for FluidFS Management.
.
The New Subnet for FluidFS Management dialog box is displayed.
5.
Click
6.
In the IP Address field, type a management IP address and click OK.
to the right of the VIP1 field.
7.
For each NAS controller:
a) Click
to the right of the NAS controller field.
b) In the IP Address field, type an IP address for the NAS controller and click OK.
8.
To automatically fill the IP addresses for the NAS Controllers and VIP, click Auto Fill.
37
9.
(Optional) Configure the remaining FluidFS management subnet attributes as needed.
– To change the netmask of the network, type a netmask in the Netmask field.
– To specify a VLAN ID, type a VLAN ID in the VLAN Id field.
When a VLAN spans multiple switches, the VLAN ID is used to specify to which ports and
interfaces to send broadcast packets.
10. To separate the new subnet from all client subnets, select This subnet should be physically
separated from all client subnets.
11. Click OK.
Changing the Netmask for the Secured Management Subnet
Change the netmask for the secured management subnet.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on top.
3.
In the Security Access pane, click
4.
Click Modify Subnet for FluidFS Management.
.
The Modify Subnet for FluidFS Management dialog box is displayed.
5.
In the Netmask field, type a netmask for the secured management subnet.
6.
Click OK.
Changing the VLAN ID for the Secured Management Subnet
Change the VLAN ID for the secured management subnet. When a VLAN spans multiple switches, the
VLAN ID is used to specify to which ports and interfaces to send broadcast packets.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on top.
3.
In the Security Access pane, click
4.
Click Modify Subnet for FluidFS Management.
5.
In the VLAN Id field, type a VLAN Id for the secured management VLAN Id.
6.
Click OK.
.
The Modify Subnet for FluidFS Management dialog box is displayed.
Changing the VIP for the Secured Management Subnet
Change the secured management subnet VIP through which the administrator manages the FluidFS
cluster.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on top.
3.
In the Security Access pane, click
4.
Click Modify Subnet for FluidFS Management.
.
The Modify Subnet for FluidFS Management dialog box is displayed.
5.
Click
6.
In the IP Address field, type the new VIP address and click OK.
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to the right of the VIP1 field.
7.
Click OK.
Changing the NAS Controller IP Addresses for the Secured Management
Subnet
Change the NAS controller IP addresses for the secured management subnet.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on top.
3.
In the Security Access pane, click
4.
Click Modify Subnet for FluidFS Management.
.
The Modify Subnet for FluidFS Management dialog box is displayed.
5.
Click
to the right of the NAS controller you want to change.
6.
In the IP Address type an IP address for the NAS controller and click OK.
7.
Click OK.
Deleting the Secured Management Subnet
Delete the secured management subnet if you no longer want to exclusively limit management traffic to
one specific subnet.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on top.
3.
In the Security Access pane, click
4.
Click Delete Subnet for FluidFS Management .
.
The Delete Subnet for FluidFS Management dialog box is displayed.
5.
Click OK.
Enabling Secured Management
Enable secured management to exclusively limit management traffic to one specific subnet.
NOTE:
After enabling secured management, if you are connected to FluidFS Manager through the secured
management subnet, your management session is temporarily interrupted while the change takes
effect. During this time the following message is displayed in FluidFS Manager:
Communication with the cluster was interrupted in process of issuing a command that performs
modification to the cluster.
After the change takes effect, your management session will resume automatically. Management
sessions on all other subnets are disconnected.
NOTE: The subnet on which you enable secured management must exist prior to enabling the
secured management feature.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on top.
3.
In the Security Access pane, click
.
39
4.
Click Restrict Access of FluidFS Management.
The Restrict Access of FluidFS Management dialog box appears.
5.
Check the box whose text starts with All FluidFS management communication….
6.
Click OK.
Disabling Secured Management
Disable secured management to allow management traffic from any subnet.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on top.
3.
In the Security Access pane, click
4.
Click Restrict Access of FluidFS Management.
.
The Restrict Access of FluidFS Management dialog box appears.
5.
Uncheck the box whose text starts with All FluidFS management communication….
6.
Click OK.
Managing the FluidFS Cluster Name
The FluidFS cluster name is a unique name used to identify the FluidFS cluster in FluidFS Manager and the
name that clients use to access the FluidFS cluster. This name is also the FluidFS cluster NetBIOS name.
If clients access the FluidFS cluster by name (instead of IP address), you must add an entry in the DNS
server that associates the FluidFS cluster name to the FluidFS cluster client VIPs. If you are using multiple
client VIPs, add all client VIPs to the DNS server and associate them with the same FluidFS cluster name
(known as round‐robin DNS). This enables client load balancing between client VIPs.
Viewing the FluidFS Cluster Name
View the current FluidFS cluster name that is displayed in FluidFS Manager and the name that clients use
to access the FluidFS cluster.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on top.
3.
The FluidFS cluster name is displayed in the Internal Settings pane, in the Cluster name field.
Renaming the FluidFS Cluster
Changing the FluidFS cluster name changes the name that is displayed in FluidFS Manager and the name
that clients use to access the FluidFS cluster. You must also make the reciprocal change on the DNS
server.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on top.
3.
In the Internal Settings pane, click
4.
Click Modify Cluster Name.
.
The Modify Cluster Name dialog box appears.
5.
In the Cluster Name field, type a new name for the FluidFS cluster.
6.
Click OK.
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Managing Licensing
The license determines which NAS features are available in the FluidFS cluster.
Viewing License Information
All FluidFS cluster features are automatically included in the license for PowerVault scale‐out NAS. FluidFS
Manager displays FluidFS cluster license information, but the license cannot be modified.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Version & License tab on top.
The license information is displayed in the License pane.
Accepting the End-User License Agreement
You must accept the end‐user license agreement (EULA) before using the system. Accepting the EULA is
usually completed during deployment.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Version & License tab on top.
3.
In the License Agreement pane, click
4.
Click Accept License Agreement.
.
The License Agreement dialog box appears.
5.
Click the box next to I accept the license agreement terms and click OK
Managing the System Time
Setting the system time enables:
•
Windows clients to mount the file system
•
Scheduled activities, such as snapshot and replication tasks, to occur at the appropriate time
•
The correct time to be recorded in the Event Log.
There are two options for setting the system time:
•
Manually set the time: Manually set the time for the FluidFS cluster.
•
Automatically synchronize the time with an NTP server: Network Time Protocol (NTP) synchronizes
clocks over a network. If the FluidFS cluster is part of a Windows network, the Active Directory server
can serve as the NTP server. If the FluidFS cluster is not part of a Windows network, configure it to
synchronize with a local NTP server (if such a server exists), or with an NTP server on the Internet.
Viewing the Time Zone
View the current time zone for the FluidFS cluster.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
3.
The time zone is displayed in the Time pane.
41
Setting the Time Zone
Set the time zone for the FluidFS cluster.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
3.
In the Time pane, click
4.
Click Modify Time Configuration.
.
The Modify Time Configuration dialog box appears.
5.
Click the […] button to the right of the Time Zone field.
The Time Zone Search window opens.
6.
Type the name of the city or region that represents the time zone and click the
button.
NOTE: If the time zone is not found, try entering another search string.
7.
When your time zone is found, click OK.
8.
Click OK.
Viewing the Time
The system date and time are displayed in the upper right corner of the FluidFS Management web client
application.
Setting the Time Manually
Manually set the time for the FluidFS cluster if you are not using NTP.
NOTE: NTP must be disabled.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
3.
In the Time pane, click
4.
Click Modify Current Time .
.
The Modify Current Time dialog box appears.
5.
Click the […] button to the right of the Date and time field.
The Choose Date and Time window opens.
6.
Click the [-] and [+] buttons to adjust the year, month, day, hour, minute and second values, then
click OK
7.
Click OK.
Viewing the NTP Servers
View the current NTP servers for the FluidFS cluster.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
3.
The NTP servers are displayed in the Time pane.
42
Add or Remove NTP Servers
Add one or more NTP servers with which to synchronize the FluidFS cluster time. Adding multiple NTP
servers ensures continued time synchronization in the event of an NTP server failure. If the FluidFS cluster
cannot establish contact with the first server, it attempts to connect to the remaining servers in order.
Remove an NTP server if it is no longer available.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
3.
In the Time pane, click
4.
Click Modify Time Configuration.
.
The Modify Time Configuration dialog box appears.
5.
Add or remove NTP servers.
– To add an NTP server, type the host name or IP address of an NTP server in the NTP Servers text
field and click Add.
6.
– To remove NTP server, select an NTP server from the NTP Servers list and click
Click OK.
Enabling NTP
Enable NTP to synchronize the FluidFS cluster time with an NTP server.
NOTE: Add one or more NTP servers with which to synchronize the FluidFS cluster time.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
3.
In the Time pane, click
4.
Click Modify Time Configuration.
.
The Modify Time Configuration dialog box appears.
5.
Select the Use NTP server(s) to keep the cluster time synchronized check box.
6.
Click OK.
Disabling NTP
Disable NTP if you prefer to manually set the FluidFS cluster time.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
3.
In the Time pane, click
4.
Click Modify Time Configuration.
.
The Modify Time Configuration dialog box appears.
5.
Uncheck the Use NTP server(s) to keep the cluster time synchronized check box.
6.
Click OK.
43
Managing the FTP Server
The FluidFS cluster includes an FTP server that provides a storage location for the following types of
system files:
•
Diagnostic results files
•
License file
•
SNMP MIBs and traps
•
Service pack files
Accessing the FTP Server
The FTP server can be accessed at:
ftp://<FluidFS_administrator_user_name>@<client_VIP_or_name>:44421/
For example:
ftp://Administrator@172.22.69.32:44421/
Upon access, you are prompted for the FluidFS cluster administrator password.
Enabling or Disabling the FTP Server
By default, the FTP server is enabled to allow FluidFS Manager to transfer the FluidFS cluster diagnostics.
The FTP server must be enabled to upload service packs and license files, to access and transfer FluidFS
cluster diagnostic results, and to access SNMP MIBs and traps.
To enable or disable the FTP server:
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on the top.
3.
In the Security Access pane, click
4.
Click Modify FTP Accessibility Policy.
.
The Modify FTP Accessibility Policy dialog box appears.
5.
Enable or disable the FTP server.
– To enable the FTP server, select the Allow FTP Access`check box.
6.
– To disable the FTP server, clear the Allow FTP Access check box.
Click OK.
Managing SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is one way to monitor the health of the system and
generate alert messages (SNMP traps) for system problems. To use SNMP, the FluidFS cluster‐specific
Management Information Bases (MIBs) and traps must be compiled into a customer‐provided SNMP
management station. The MIBs are databases of information specific to the FluidFS cluster.
44
Obtaining SNMP MIBs and Traps
The SNMP MIBs and traps for the FluidFS cluster are available for download from the FluidFS cluster FTP
server.
NOTE: The FTP server must be enabled.
Download the SNMP MIBs and traps from:
ftp://<FluidFS_administrator_user_name>@<client_VIP_or_name>:44421/mibs/
Changing the SNMP Read-Only Community
Change the read‐only community for devices reading SNMP variables from the FluidFS cluster. By default,
the read‐only community is FluidFS.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the SNMP tab on the top.
3.
In the SNMP MIB Access pane, click
4.
Click Modify Settings.
.
The Modify MIB SNMP Access Settings dialog box appears.
5.
Type the new community name in the Read community field.
6.
Click OK.
Changing the SNMP Trap System Location or Contact
Change the system location or contact person for FluidFS cluster‐generated SNMP traps. By default, the
SNMP trap system location and contact person are unknown.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the SNMP tab on the top.
3.
In the SNMP Trap pane, click
4.
Click Modify Settings.
.
The Modify MIB SNMP Trap Settings dialog box appears.
5.
To change the SNMP trap system location, type a new location in the System location field.
6.
To change the SNMP trap system contact, type a new contact in the System contact field.
7.
Click OK.
Adding or Removing SNMP Trap Recipients
Add or remove hosts that receive the FluidFS cluster‐generated SNMP traps.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the SNMP tab on the top.
3.
In the SNMP Trap Access pane, click
4.
Click Modify Settings.
.
The Modify MIB SNMP Trap Settings dialog box appears.
45
5.
Add or remove SNMP trap recipients.
– To add an SNMP trap recipient, type a host name or IP address in the Trap Recipients text field
and click Add.
6.
– To remove an SNMP trap recipient, select an SNMP trap recipient and click the
Click OK.
button.
Enabling or Disabling SNMP Traps
Enable or disable SNMP traps by category (NAS Volumes, Hardware, Access Control, Performance &
Connectivity, or System). For enabled SNMP traps, specify the severity of events for which to send SNMP
traps.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the SNMP tab on the top.
3.
In the SNMP Trap Filter pane, click
4.
Click Modify.
.
The Modify SNMP Trap Filter Settings dialog box appears.
5.
Enable or disable SNMP traps.
– To enable SNMP traps, check the events for which to send SNMP traps (NAS Volumes, Hardware,
Access Control, Performance & Connectivity, or System) and select the severity (Major or All) of
events to be sent.
6.
– To disable SNMP traps, uncheck the events that you don’t want to be sent.
Click OK.
Managing the Health Scan Throttling Mode
Health scan throttling has three modes:
•
Normal(Default mode): Health scan is running and scanning the file system to identify potential errors.
•
Maintenance: Health scan is running in high priority and scanning the file system to identify potential
errors.
•
Off: Health scan is off and does not run.
NOTE: Dell recommends keeping the health scan throttling mode set to Normal unless directed
otherwise by Dell Technical Support Services.
Viewing the Health Scan Throttling Mode
View the current health scan throttling mode.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on the top.
The health scan throttling mode is displayed in the Background Processes pane.
46
Changing the Health Scan Throttling Mode
Change the health scan throttling mode. Dell recommends keeping the health scan throttling mode set
to Normal unless specifically directed otherwise by Dell Technical Support Services.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on the top.
3.
In the Background Processes pane, click
4.
Click Modify Health Scan Settings.
.
The Modify Health Scan Settings dialog box appears.
5.
Select the mode you want (Normal mode, Maintenance mode, or Off).
6.
Click OK.
Managing the Operation Mode
The FluidFS cluster has three operation modes:
•
Normal: System serves clients using CIFS and NFS protocols and operates in mirroring mode.
•
Write‐Through Mode: System serves clients using CIFS and NFS protocols, but is forced to operate in
journaling mode. This might have an impact on write performance. This mode of operation is
recommended when, for example, you have repeated electric power failures.
•
No Service: System does not serve clients using CIFS or NFS protocols and allows limited
management capabilities. This mode must be enabled before replacing a NAS appliance.
Viewing the Operation Mode
View the current operation mode.
1.
2.
Click the System tab on the left.
Click the Internal tab on the top.
The operation mode is displayed in the Internal Settings pane, in the Operation Mode field.
Changing the Operation Mode
Changing the operation mode might affect the accessibility and performance of CIFS shares and NFS
exports.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on the top.
3.
In the Internal Settings pane, click
4.
Click Modify Operation Mode.
.
The Modify Operation Mode dialog box appears.
5.
Select a new operation mode (Normal, Write‐Through on, or No service).
6.
You must select the check box next to I acknowledge that changing system operation mode may
have impact on the system accessibility and/or performance.
7.
Click OK.
47
Managing Client Connections
Displaying the Distribution of Clients between NAS Controllers
Display the current distribution of clients between NAS controllers.
1.
2.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
Click the Load Balancing tab on the top.
In the Current Activity pane, the client/router IPs and the NAS Controllers they are connected to are
displayed.
Viewing Clients Assigned to a NAS Controller
View clients that are currently assigned to a particular NAS controller.
1.
2.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
Click the Load Balancing tab on the top.
In the Current Activity pane you can see all clients and the controllers and corresponding interfaces
to which they are connected (in the NAS Controller column).
Assigning a Client to a NAS Controller
You can permanently assign one or more clients to a particular NAS controller. However, for effective
load balancing, Dell does not recommend manually assigning clients to NAS controllers.
Assigning a client to a NAS controller disconnects the client’s connection. Clients automatically
reconnect to the assigned NAS controller.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Load Balancing tab on the top.
3.
In the Current Activity pane, click
controller.
4.
Click Pin Client to NAS Controller.
in the row of the client that you want to assign to the NAS
The Pin Client to NAS Controller dialog box appears.
5.
Select the Pin this client to NAS controller check box.
6.
Select the NAS controller to which to assign the client.
7.
Select the client interface on the NAS controller to which to assign the client.
8.
Click OK.
Unassigning a Client from a NAS Controller
You can permanently unassign one or more clients from a particular NAS controller so the client is
subject to the regular FluidFS cluster load balancing.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Load Balancing tab on the top.
3.
In the Current Activity pane, click
controller..
48
in the row of the client that you want to unassign from a NAS
4.
Click Pin Client to NAS Controller.
The Pin Client to NAS Controller dialog box appears.
5.
Ensure that the Pin Client to NAS Controller check box is unchecked.
6.
Click OK.
Manually Migrating Clients to another NAS Controller
You can manually migrate clients between NAS controllers if, for example, there is an imbalance in
network load on the NAS controllers. Migrating a client to another NAS controller disconnects the client’s
connection. Clients will then automatically reconnect to the NAS controller to which they were migrated.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Load Balancing tab on the top.
3.
In the Current Activity pane, click
4.
Click Move to another controller.
in the row of the client you want to migrate.
The Move Client to NAS Controller dialog box appears.
5.
From the Move this client to drop‐down menu, select the NAS controller to which to migrate the
client.
6.
Click OK.
Failing Back Clients to Their Assigned NAS Controller
You must fail back client connections to their original NAS controller when a NAS controller that was
down becomes available.
Failing back client connections disconnects only the client connections that failed over due to the
original NAS controller failure. Those clients automatically reconnect to the assigned NAS controller.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Load Balancing tab on the top.
3.
In the Current Activity pane, click
4.
Click Balance Clients.
.
The Balance Clients Across NAS Controllers dialog box appears.
5.
Click Failback clients.
6.
Click OK.
Rebalancing Client Connections across NAS Controllers
Rebalancing client connections evenly distributes connections across all the available NAS controllers.
Rebalance client connections in the following scenarios:
•
•
After FluidFS cluster hardware changes (for example, adding a NAS appliance)
When a NAS controller that was down, becomes available
Rebalancing client connections disconnects all client connections. Clients automatically reconnect to the
FluidFS cluster.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Load Balancing tab on the top.
3.
In the Current Activity pane, click
.
49
4.
Click Balance Clients.
The Balance Clients Across NAS Controllers dialog box appears.
5.
Click Rebalance clients.
6.
Click OK.
Shutting Down and Restarting NAS Controllers
In some cases, you must temporarily shut down a FluidFS cluster or reboot a NAS controller.
Shutting Down the FluidFS Cluster
In some cases, you might need to temporarily shut down all NAS controllers in a FluidFS cluster. For
example, you might need to do this if you are moving the NAS hardware to a different location. When a
FluidFS cluster is shut down, NAS volume data is no longer available to clients and clients are
disconnected.
NOTE: Dell recommends scheduling a maintenance window and informing clients that the
resources hosted by the FluidFS cluster is unavailable.
1.
Change the FluidFS cluster operation mode to No Service.
For more information on changing the FluidFS cluster operation mode, see Changing the Operation
Mode
2.
To shut down the NAS controllers, press and release the recessed power button at the back of each
NAS controller.
NOTE: Do not press and hold the power button down for several seconds. Pressing and holding
the power button down for several seconds does not shut down the NAS controllers.
Starting Up the FluidFS Cluster
Start up a FluidFS cluster to resume operation after shutting down all NAS controllers in a FluidFS cluster.
NOTE: Before turning on the system, ensure that all cables are connected, and all components are
connected to a power source.
1.
If previously shutdown, turn the MD system(s) back on before starting the FluidFS cluster.
2.
Press and release the recessed power button at the back of each NAS controller to turn on the NAS
controllers.
3.
Change the FluidFS cluster operation mode to Normal.
For more information on changing the FluidFS cluster operation mode, see Changing the Operation
Mode
Rebooting a NAS Controller
Only one NAS controller can be rebooted in a NAS appliance at a time. Rebooting a NAS controller
disconnects client connections while clients are being transferred to other NAS controllers. Clients
automatically reconnect to the FluidFS cluster.
1.
Click the Hardware tab on the left.
2.
Click the NAS Appliances tab on the top.
3.
In the Overview pane, click
50
in the row of the NAS appliance you want to reboot.
4.
Click Reboot.
The Reboot NAS Controller dialog box appears.
5.
Click OK.
Managing NAS Appliance and NAS Controller
You can configure the system identification button on the NAS appliances or controllers to blink, in order
to easily locate that particular NAS appliance or controller within a rack. The system identification button
for a NAS appliance is located on the front panel and is labeled. The system identification button for a
NAS controller is located on the back panel.
Enabling or Disabling NAS Appliance and Controller Blinking
When NAS appliance blinking is enabled, the system identification button blinks so you can easily locate
the NAS appliance within a rack.
1.
Click the Hardware tab on the left.
2.
Click the NAS Appliances tab on the top.
3.
In the Overview pane, click
4.
Click Blink.
in the row of the NAS appliance you want to enable or disable.
The Blink NAS Appliance dialog box appears.
5.
To enable or disable NAS appliance blinking, choose one of the following options:
– Turn off blinking for the NAS appliance and its NAS controllers
– Turn on blinking for the NAS appliance and both its NAS controllers
– Turn on blinking for the NAS appliance and its NAS controller in slot 1
6.
– Turn on blinking for the NAS appliance and its NAS controller in slot 2
Click OK.
51
52
FluidFS 3.0 Networking
5
Managing the Default Gateway
The default gateway enables client access across subnets. Only one default gateway can be defined. If
client access does not go through a router (i.e. this is a flat network), a default gateway does not need to
be defined.
Viewing the Default Gateway
View the current default gateway.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
The default gateway is displayed in the Routing pane.
Changing the Default Gateway
Change the default gateway if the default gateway changes for the network.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
3.
In the Routing pane, click
4.
Click Modify Default Gateway.
.
The Modify Default Gateway dialog box appears.
5.
In the Default Gateway field, type a new default gateway IP address.
6.
Click The OK dialog box appears.
Managing DNS Servers and Suffixes
Domain Name Service (DNS) is a networking service that enables users to locate computers by providing
name‐to‐IP address and IP address‐to‐name resolution services. You can configure one or more external
DNS servers (external to the FluidFS cluster but within the site) to be used for name resolution. A DNS
suffix specifies a DNS domain name without the host part of the name (for example, west.example.com
rather than computer1.west.example.com).
If clients access the FluidFS cluster by name, you must add an entry in the DNS server that associates the
FluidFS cluster name to the FluidFS cluster client VIPs. If you are using multiple client VIPs, add all client
VIPs to the DNS server and associate them with the same FluidFS cluster name (known as round‐robin
DNS). This enables client load balancing between client VIPs. In addition, you must configure DNS if you
are using Active Directory, and the DNS servers must be the same DNS servers that your Active Directory
domain controllers use.
53
Viewing DNS Servers and Suffixes
View the current DNS servers providing name resolution services for the FluidFS cluster and the
associated DNS suffixes.
1.
2.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
The DNS servers and suffixes are displayed in the DNS pane.
Adding DNS Servers and Suffixes
Add one or more DNS servers to provide name resolution services for the FluidFS cluster and add
associated DNS suffixes. Adding multiple DNS servers and suffixes ensures continuous name resolution
services in the event of a DNS server failure. If the FluidFS cluster cannot establish contact with the
preferred server, it will attempt to connect to the remaining servers in order.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
3.
In the DNS pane, click
4.
Click Modify.
.
The Modify DNS Settings dialog box appears.
5.
To add a DNS server, type the IP address of a DNS server in the DNS Servers text field and click Add.
6.
DNS servers are listed in descending order of preference.
– To increase the precedence for a DNS server, select a DNS server and click
.
7.
– To decrease the precedence for a DNS server, select a DNS server and click
.
To add a DNS suffix, type the DNS suffix in the DNS Suffixes text field and click Add.
8.
DNS suffixes are listed in descending order of preference.
9.
– To increase the precedence for a DNS suffix, select a DNS suffix and click
.
– To decrease the precedence for a DNS suffix, select a DNS suffix and click
Click OK.
.
Removing DNS Servers and Suffixes
Remove a DNS server or DNS suffix if it is no longer available or used.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
3.
In the DNS pane, click
4.
Click Modify.
.
The Modify DNS Settings dialog box appears.
5.
To remove a DNS server, select a DNS server in the DNS Servers list and click
6.
To remove a DNS suffix, select a DNS suffix in the DNS Suffixes list and click
54
.
.
7.
Click OK.
Managing Static Routes
To minimize hops between routers, static routes are recommended in routed networks when there are
multiple direct paths from the FluidFS cluster to various routers. Static routes allow you to configure the
exact paths in which the system communicates with various clients on a routed network.
Consider the network shown in the following figure. There can be only one default gateway for the
system. Assume that router X is designated as the default gateway. Packets that are sent to clients in
subnet Y would be routed to router X, which would then be sent back (through the switch) to router Y.
These packets travel through router X needlessly, reducing the throughput to all subnets in the network.
The solution is to define, in addition to a default gateway, a specific gateway for certain subnets by
configuring static routes. To do this, you must describe each subnet in your network and identify the
most suitable gateway to access that subnet.
Static routes do not have to be designated for the entire network—a default gateway is most suitable
when performance is not an issue. You can select when and where to use static routes to best meet
performance needs.
Viewing the Static Routes
View the current static route.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
The static routes are displayed in the Routing pane.
Adding a Static Route
When adding a static route, specify the subnet properties and the gateway through which to access this
subnet.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
3.
In the Routing pane, click
.
55
4.
Click Add Static Route.
The New Static Route dialog box appears.
5.
In the Target network subnet ID field, type a network IP address.
For example, 10.10.5.0
6.
In the Target subnet netmask field, type a netmask.
For example, 255.255.255.0
7.
In the Gateway field, type the gateway IP address through which to access the subnet.
For example, 10.10.5.1
8.
Click OK.
Changing the Target Subnet for a Static Route
Change the subnet properties of a static route.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
3.
In the Routing pane, for the static route that you want modify click
4.
Click Modify static route.
.
The Modify Static Route dialog box is displayed.
5.
In the Target network subnet ID field, type a network IP address.
For example, 10.10.5.0
6.
In the Target subnet netmask field, type a netmask.
For example, 255.255.255.0
7.
In the Gateway field, type the gateway IP address through which to access the subnet.
8.
Click OK.
Changing the Gateway for a Static Route
Change the gateway through which to access the subnet for a static route.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
3.
In the Routing pane, for the static route that you want modify click
4.
Click Modify static route.
.
The Modify Static Route dialog box appears.
5.
In the Gateway field, type the gateway IP address through which to access the subnet.
For example, 10.10.5.1
6.
Click OK.
Deleting a Static Route
Delete a static route to send traffic for a subnet through the default gateway instead of a specific
gateway.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
56
3.
In the Routing pane, select the static route that you want modify and click
4.
Click Delete static route.
.
The Delete Static Route dialog box appears.
5.
Click OK.
Managing the Internal Network
The internal network defines the private subnet dedicated to the FluidFS cluster for internal
communication. This range is not routed or accessible by other machines on the network.
Viewing the Internal Network IP Address
View the current internal network IP address. While it is not displayed in FluidFS Manager, the netmask is a
Class C netmask (255.255.255.0).
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on the top.
The internal network IP address is displayed in the Internal Settings pane.
Changing the Internal Network IP Address
You can change the internal network IP address. However, the netmask cannot be changed from a Class
C netmask (255.255.255.0). The internal subnet must not conflict with other subnets on the network. If
sharing internal switches with other FluidFS clusters, make sure that the internal subnet does not conflict
with the internal subnet used for the other FluidFS clusters.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on the top.
3.
In the Internal Settings pane, click
4.
Click Modify Internal Network.
.
The Modify Internal Network dialog box appears.
5.
In the Internal network IP address field, type a network IP address.
For example, 10.255.69.0
6.
In the Internal network mask field, type a network mask IP address.
For example, 255.255.255.0
7.
Click OK.
Managing the Client Networks
The client networks define the client VIP(s) through which clients access CIFS shares and NFS exports. If
client access to the FluidFS cluster is not through a router (in other words, this is a flat network), Dell
recommends defining one client VIP. If clients access the FluidFS cluster through a router, define a client
VIP for each client interface port per NAS controller.
57
Viewing the Client Networks
View the current client networks.
1.
2.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
The client networks are displayed in the Subnets pane.
Creating a Client Network
Create a client network on which clients access CIFS shares and NFS exports.
NOTE: A client network must have at least one client VIP.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
3.
In the Subnets pane, click
4.
Click New Client Subnet.
.
The New Client Subnet dialog box appears.
5.
Add an IP address for each NAS controller.
a) To edit one of the NAS Controller IP values (NAS Controller 0 or NAS Controller 1), select the
relevant row in the IP address list and click
to edit.
The Edit NAS Controller dialog box appears.
b) In the IP Address field, type an IP address for the NAS controller and click OK.
c) Repeat steps (a) and (b) for each NAS controller.
6.
Add client VIPs through which the clients access CIFS shares and NFS exports.
a) To edit one of the VIP values (VIP1, VIP2, VIP3, or VIP4), select the relevant row in the IP address
list and click
to edit.
The Edit VIP dialog box appears.
b) In the IP Address field, type an IP address and click OK.
c) Repeat steps (a) and (b) for each VIP you want to edit.
7.
To automatically fill the IP addresses for the NAS Controllers and VIP, click Auto Fill.
8.
In the Netmask field, type a netmask for the client network.
9.
(Optional) Configure the VLAN ID value if needed. Type a VLAN ID in the VLAN ID field.
NOTE: When a VLAN spans multiple switches, the VLAN tag is used to specify to which ports
and interfaces to send broadcast packets.
10. Click OK.
Changing the Netmask for a Client Network
Change the netmask for a client network.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
3.
In the Subnets pane, in the row of the subnet you want to change, click
58
.
4.
Click Modify.
The Modify Client Subnet dialog box appears.
5.
In the Netmask field, type a netmask for the client network.
6.
Click OK.
Changing the VLAN Tag for a Client Network
Change the netmask for a client network.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
3.
In the Subnets pane, in the row of the subnet you want to change, click
4.
Click Modify.
.
The Modify Client Subnet dialog box appears.
5.
In the VLAN Id field, type a VLAN Id for the client network.
6.
Click OK.
Changing the Client VIPs for a Client Network
Change the client VIPs through which clients access CIFS shares and NFS exports.
NOTE: A client network must have at least one client VIP.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
3.
In the Subnets pane, in the row of the subnet you want to change, click
4.
Click Modify.
.
The Modify Client Subnet dialog box appears.
5.
To edit a client VIP through which the clients access CIFS shares and NFS exports:
a) To edit one of the VIP values (VIP1, VIP2, VIP3, or VIP4), select the relevant row in the IP address
list and click
to edit.
The Edit VIP dialog box appears.
b) In the IP Address field, type an IP address and click OK.
c) Repeat steps (a) and (b) for each VIP you want to edit.
6.
To remove a client VIP, change the IP address value to an empty string.
7.
Click OK.
Changing the NAS Controller IP Addresses for a Client Network
Change the NAS controller IP addresses for a client network.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
3.
In the Subnets pane, in the row of the subnet you want to change, click
4.
Click Modify.
.
The Modify Client Subnet dialog box appears.
59
5.
To edit one of the NAS Controller IP values (NAS Controller 0 or NAS Controller 1):
a) Select the relevant row in the IP address list and click
to edit.
The Edit NAS Controller dialog box appears.
b) In the IP Address field, type an IP address for the NAS controller and click OK.
c) Repeat steps (a) and (b) for each NAS controller.
6.
Click OK.
Deleting a Client Network
Delete a client network if clients no longer need to access CIFS shares and NFS exports on that network.
You cannot delete the Primary subnet.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
3.
In the Subnets pane, in the row of the subnet you want to delete, click
4.
Click Delete.
.
The Delete Client Subnets dialog box appears.
5.
Click OK.
Viewing the Client Network MTU
View the current Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) of the client network.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
The MTU is displayed in the Client interface field.
Changing the Client Network MTU
Change the Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) of the client network to match your environment.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
3.
In the Client interface pane, click
4.
Click Modify Settings.
.
The Modify Client Interface Settings dialog box appears.
5.
In the MTU field, type a new MTU.
If your network hardware supports jumbo frames, enter 9000, otherwise enter 1500.
6.
Click OK.
Viewing the Client Network Bonding Mode
View the current bonding mode (Adaptive Load Balancing or Link Aggregation Control Protocol) of the
client network interface.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
The bonding mode is displayed in the Client interface pane, under the MTU field.
60
Changing the Client Network Bonding Mode
Change the bonding mode (Adaptive Load Balancing or Link Aggregation Control Protocol) of the client
network interface to match your environment.
•
If using ALB, use one client VIP per client port in the FluidFS cluster.
•
If using LACP, use one client VIP per NAS controller in the FluidFS cluster.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Client Network & Time tab on the top.
3.
In the Client Interface pane, click
4.
Click Modify Settings.
.
The Modify Client Interface Settings dialog box appears.
5.
Click the radio button next to the desired option:
– Without link aggregation
6.
– With link aggregation (IEEE 802.1ax), also known as dynamic 802.3ad or LACP
Click OK.
Managing SAN Fabrics
SAN subnets or "fabrics" are the network connections between NAS controllers and PowerVault MD
controllers. In PowerVault systems, the SAN network consists of multiple subnets called SAN, SANb,
SANc, etc.
The number of SAN fabrics depends on the number of SAN ports available on the PowerVault NAS
controllers, and MD controller ports assigned to FluidFS/NAS. The general recommendation is to assign 2
ports on each MD controller to NAS traffic, so the number of SAN subnets are also 2.
The following table summarizes the type and number of physical ports on each type of FluidFS controller:
PowerVault FluidFS Controller
SAN ports Type
SAN ports
NX3500
1GbE
eth30, eth31
NX3600
1GbE
eth30, eth31, eth32, eth33
NX3610
10GbE
eth30, eth31
As a rule:
•
Each NAS Controller should have a SAN NIC and an IP address assigned to each subnet: eth30 on
SAN, eth31 on SANb, and so on.
•
Each MD controller should have a port and an iSCSI Portal address assigned to each subnet.
The following table summarizes the typical configuration of a system with 2 NAS controllers and 2 MD
controllers:
Subnet/Fabric
NAS Controller0
NAS Controller1
MD Array
SAN
eth30:<IP>
eth30: <IP>
port0, <Portal IP>
SANb
eth31:<IP>
eth31:<IP>
port1, <Portal IP>
The netmask and MTU on all subnets must be identical on all FluidFS and MD controller ports.
61
Managing SAN Fabrics/Subnets
In the FluidFS Manager, the SAN Fabrics view allows you to manage the various subnets and addresses on
the PowerVault FluidFS system to ensure they match the configuration of the MD array(s).
Viewing the SAN Network Configuration
To view the SAN network configuration:
1.
Click the Hardware tab on the left.
2.
Click the SAN Fabrics tab on the top.
The currently configured SAN Fabrics are displayed in the Overview pane.
In addition, each SAN fabric (named SAN, SANb, SANc…) has its own pane, named Fabric SAN, Fabric
SANb, and so on. In that pane, you can see that status of each fabric and its connections to FluidFS and
MS controllers.
Adding an iSCSI Fabric
To add an iSCSI fabric:
1.
Click the Hardware tab on the left.
2.
Click the SAN Fabrics tab on the top.
3.
In the Overview pane, click
4.
Click New iSCSI Fabric.
.
5.
In the Network interface dropdown, select the network interface to be used by the SAN fabric.
The New iSCSI Fabric dialog box appears.
6.
In the Netmask field, type the netmask IP address.
7.
In the VLAN Id field, type the VLAN ID for the iSCSI subnet.
8.
In the NAS Controller table, for each NAS controller:
a)
b)
c)
d)
9.
Click
in the row of the NAS controller. The Edit NAS Controller dialog box appears
Enter an IP address to be used by the SAN fabric.
Click OK.
Repeat steps (a) to (c) for each controller.
Click OK.
The new SAN fabric appears in the Overview pane.
Modifying an iSCSI Fabric’s Configuration
To modify the configuration of an iSCSI fabric:
1.
Click the Hardware tab on the left.
2.
Click the SAN Fabrics tab on the top.
3.
In the Overview pane, for the SAN fabric (named Fabric SAN, Fabric SANb, and so on) that you want
to modify, click
4.
.
Click Modify.
The Modify iSCSI Fabric dialog box appears.
62
5.
In the Network interface dropdown, select the network interface to be used by the SAN fabric.
6.
In the Netmask field, type the netmask IP address.
7.
In the VLAN Id field, type the VLAN ID for the iSCSI subnet.
8.
In the NAS Controller table, for each NAS controller:
a)
b)
c)
d)
9.
Click
in the row of the NAS controller. The Edit NAS Controller dialog box appears
Enter an IP address to be used by the SAN fabric.
Click OK.
Repeat steps (a) to (c) for each controller.
Click OK.
Deleting an iSCSI Fabric
To delete an iSCSI fabric:
1.
Click the Hardware tab on the left.
2.
Click the SAN Fabrics tab on the top.
3.
In the Overview pane, for the SAN fabric (named Fabric SAN, Fabric SANb, and so on) that you want
4.
Click Delete.
5.
Click OK.
to delete, click
.
The Delete iSCSI Fabric dialog box appears.
Modifying iSCSI Portals
To modify the iSCSI portals configuration:
1.
Click the Hardware tab on the left.
2.
Click the SAN Fabrics tab on the top.
3.
In the iSCSI Portals Overview pane click
4.
.
Click Modify iSCSI Portals.
The Modify iSCSI Portals dialog box appears.
5.
If the target requires CHAP authentication, select the Target requires CHAP authentication
checkbox, and enter the user name and password details of an authorized user.
6.
To add an iSCSI IP address:
a) Click the Add button under the IP address table. The New IP Address for iSCSI Storage dialog box
appears.
b) Enter the new IP address.
c) Enter a description for the new IP address.
d) Click OK.
7.
To delete an iSCSI IP address:
a) Select the iSCSI IP address in the table.
b) Click
8.
.
Click OK.
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Viewing Storage Identifiers
To view the NAS controller storage identifiers:
1.
Click the Hardware tab on the left.
2.
Click the SAN Fabrics tab on the top.
The NAS controller storage identifiers are displayed in the Storage Identifier of Type: iSCSI pane.
NOTE: All predefined storage identifiers are displayed, regardless of the number of controllers
found in the system.
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FluidFS 3.0 Account Management And
Authentication
6
Account Management and Authentication
There are two types of access to the FluidFS cluster:
•
Administrator‐level access for FluidFS cluster management
•
Client‐level access to CIFS shares and NFS exports
Administrator accounts control administrator‐level access. Users and groups control client‐level access to
CIFS shares and NFS exports.
The FluidFS cluster supports administrator‐level and client‐level authentication for both local and remote
users and groups:
•
Local users and groups: The FluidFS cluster manages and authenticates users and groups. Local
management is useful when you have only a limited number of users and groups. In addition,
authentication does not depend on external servers.
•
Remote users and groups: Manage and authenticate users and groups using the following external
database types. Remote management is useful when you have many users and groups, but depends
on the availability of the external database.
– Active Directory: Configure the FluidFS cluster to access an Active Directory database to
authenticate Windows users.
NOTE: Active Directory can also be used as an LDAP database for UNIX/Linux users.
– NIS or LDAP: Configure the FluidFS cluster to access a NIS or LDAP database to authenticate
UNIX/Linux users.
NOTE: Local and remote users can be managed simultaneously.
NOTE: If you configure Active Directory and either NIS or LDAP, you can set up mappings
between the Windows users in Active Directory and the UNIX/Linux users in LDAP or NIS to
allow one set of credentials to be used for both types of data access.
Default Administrative Accounts
The FluidFS cluster has the following built‐in administrative accounts, each of which serves a particular
purpose.
65
Login Name
Purpose
SSH
Access
Enabled by
Default
SSH
Access
Allowed
VGA
Console
Access
Enabled by
Default
VGA
Console
Access
Allowed
Default
Password
Administrator FluidFS cluster
management
(not a UNIX/
Linux user)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Stor@ge!
support
No
Yes
No
Yes
None (must
be set by
Administrator)
enableescalat Enable
ionaccess
escalation
account
No
No
Yes
Yes
N@sst0r3
(cannot be
changed)
escalation
FluidFS cluster
troubleshooting
when unable to
log in with
support account
No
Yes
No
Yes
N@sst0r3
(cannot be
changed)
cli
Gateway to
command line
interface access
Yes (can
bypass
password
using SSH
key)
Yes (can
N/A
bypass
password
using SSH key)
N/A
N/A
FluidFS cluster
troubleshooting
(regular UNIX/
Linux user)
Administrative Account
The Administrator account is used for FluidFS cluster management using the FluidFS Manager Client and
CLI. This account cannot be removed or renamed. This account has write permission on all CIFS shares
by default.
Support Account
If Dell Technical Support Services needs to perform remote troubleshooting, you can make your system
accessible to them using the support account.
CAUTION: Dell strongly recommends that you do not attempt to use the support account.
Operations performed as the support user are for advanced remote troubleshooting to resolve
critical system issues only. Misuse of this account can damage the FluidFS cluster and/or its data.
NOTE: If Dell personnel must access the support account for remote troubleshooting, Dell
recommends that you change the password to a new, strong password after the troubleshooting
session is concluded.
Enabling or Disabling the Support Account
Enable the support account if Dell Technical Support Services needs to perform remote troubleshooting.
When troubleshooting is complete, disable the support account.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on the top.
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3.
In the Security Access pane, click
4.
Click Modify Remote Support Policy.
.
5.
Enable or disable the support account.
The Modify Remote Support Policy dialog box appears.
– To enable the support account, select the Allow Remote Support check box.
6.
– To disable the support account, clear the Allow Remote Support check box.
Click OK.
Changing the Support Account Password
Dell recommends that you change the support account password to a new, strong password after each
troubleshooting session is concluded.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on the top.
3.
In the Security Access pane, click
4.
Click Change Support User Password.
.
The Change Support User Passworddialog box appears.
5.
In the New Password field, type a password.
The password must be at least seven characters long and contain three of the following elements: a
lowercase character, an uppercase character, a digit, or a special character (such as +, ?, or ∗).
6.
In the Repeat Password field, re‐type the password.
7.
Click OK.
Using the Escalation Account
If Dell Technical Support Services needs to perform remote troubleshooting, but an administrator is
unable to access the FluidFS Manager Client or CLI to enable the support account, you can use the
escalation account instead. The escalation account is enabled using the enableescalationaccess
account, which requires VGA console access.
CAUTION: Dell strongly recommends that you do not attempt to use the escalation account.
Operations performed as the escalation user are for advanced remote troubleshooting to resolve
critical system issues only. Misuse of this account can damage the FluidFS cluster and/or its data.
NOTE: Connect a monitor to the NAS controller’s VGA port and connect a keyboard to one of the
NAS controller’s USB ports.
1.
From the command line, at the login as prompt, enter enableescalationaccess.
2.
at the Password prompt, enter N@sst0r3
3.
Respond to the prompt to specify the number of minutes to keep the escalation account enabled.
4.
Type Yes to the prompt confirming that you want to enable the escalation account.
You are returned to a login prompt and the escalation account is enabled.
5.
Type escalation at the login as prompt.
6.
Type N@sst0r3 at the Password prompt.
67
CLI Account
The CLI account is used with an administrator account to access the command-line interface of the
FluidFS cluster.
Default Local User and Local Group Accounts
The FluidFS cluster has the following built‐in local user and local group accounts, each of which serves a
particular purpose.
Account Type
Account Name
Purpose
Local User
Administrator
Account used for FluidFS cluster management
Local User
nobody
Account used as the owner of everything for guest
accounts
Local Group
Administrators
•
•
Accommodates the Administrator account, and all
other users (local and remote) designated as
administrators
BUILTIN domain group fully compatible with the
Windows Administrators group
Local Group
nobody_group
Accommodates the nobody account
Local Group
Local Users
Accommodates local user accounts
Local Group
Users
BUILTIN domain group fully compatible with the Windows
Users group
Local Group
Backup Operators
BUILTIN domain group fully compatible with the Windows
Backup Operators group
Managing Administrator Accounts
You can both create local administrators and give remote users (AD/LDAP/NIS) administrator permissions.
System alerts are sent to the email address specified for the administrator.
When creating an administrator, you specify an administrator permission level. The permission level
defines the set of actions that are allowed by the administrator. Permission levels are predefined in the
system as follows:
•
NAS Volume Administrator: The following table summarizes which settings a volume administrator
can change for the NAS volume(s) to which they are assigned. They can also view, but not change,
settings for other NAS volumes and the rest of the FluidFS cluster configuration.
•
NAS Cluster Administrator: The administrator can manage any aspect of the FluidFS cluster.
NAS Volume Setting
Volume Administrator Allowed to
Change Setting?
NAS volume folder to which the NAS volume is assigned
Yes
Access time granularity
Yes
Permissions interoperability
Yes
Report zero disk usage
Yes
68
NAS Volume Setting
Volume Administrator Allowed to
Change Setting?
Data reduction
Yes
NAS volume space settings and alert thresholds
Yes
CIFS shares and NFS exports
Yes
Snapshots and snapshot schedules
Yes
Restore NAS volume from snapshot
Yes
Restore NAS volume configuration
Yes
Quotas
Yes
NAS volume clones
No
Replication
No
Viewing Administrators
View the current list of administrator accounts.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Mail & Admins tab on the top.
The administrators are displayed in the Administrator Users pane.
Adding an Administrator
Add an administrator account to manage the FluidFS cluster using the FluidFS Manager Client and CLI.
You can only define other administrators with permission levels that are hierarchically lower than your
own.
NOTE: Before you can create a local administrator, create a local user that becomes an
administrator.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Mail & Admins tab on the top.
3.
In the Administrator Users pane, click
4.
Click New Administrator User.
.
The New NAS Administrator dialog box appears.
5.
Select a local or remote user to become an administrator.
a) Click the […] button to the right of the NAS administrator username field.
b)
c)
d)
e)
The User Browser dialog box appears.
From the Domain name drop‐down menu, select the domain to which the user is assigned.
In the Starts with field, type either the full name of the user or the beginning of the user name.
Click Display.
Select a user from the search results and click OK.
6.
In the Email address field, type the user’s email address.
7.
Select the permission level of the administrator:
– NAS Cluster Administrator: The administrator can manage any aspect of the FluidFS cluster.
– NAS Volume Administrator: The administrator can only view the FluidFS cluster configuration
and manage the NAS volume(s) to which they are assigned.
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8.
Click OK.
Assigning NAS Volumes to a Volume Administrator
By default, new volume administrators can manage all NAS volumes. After a volume administrator is
created, you can change the NAS volumes that can be managed by the volume administrator.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Mail & Admins tab on the top.
3.
In the Administrator Users pane, click
4.
Click Modify.
in the row of the administrator you want to modify.
The Modify Administrator User dialog box appears.
5.
In the Email address, enter the e-mail address for the selected administrator user.
6.
Under Choose the NAS administration level, select NAS volume administrator.
7.
Click the button.
The NAS Volume Browser dialog box appears.
a) Select the NAS Volumes to assign to the volume administrator.
b) Click OK.
The NAS Volume Browser dialog closes.
c) Click Add. The volume is added to the administrator’s volume list.
d) Repeat steps (a) to (c) for each volume you want to add.
8.
Click OK.
Changing an Administrator’s Permission Level
Change the permission level of an administrator account.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Mail & Admins tab on the top.
3.
In the Administrator Users pane, click
4.
Click Modify.
in the row of the administrator you want to modify.
The Modify Administrator User dialog box appears.
5.
Select the permission level of the administrator:
– NAS Cluster Administrator: The administrator can manage any aspect of the FluidFS cluster.
6.
– NAS Volume Administrator: The administrator can only view the FluidFS cluster configuration
and manage the NAS volume(s) to which they are assigned.
Click OK.
Changing an Administrator’s Email Address
Change the permission level of an administrator account.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Mail & Admins tab on the top.
3.
In the Administrator Users pane, click
4.
Click Modify.
in the row of the administrator you want to modify.
The Modify Administrator User dialog box appears.
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5.
In the Email Address field, type the new email address for the administrator.
6.
Click OK.
Changing a Local Administrator Password
You can change the password only for a local administrator account. The password for remote
administrators is maintained in the external database.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the Local Users pane, click
4.
Click Change Password.
in the row of the user whose password you want to change.
The Change Password for Local User dialog box appears.
5.
In the New password field, type a password for the administrator.
The password must be at least seven characters long and contain three of the following elements: a
lowercase character, an uppercase character, a digit, or a special character (such as +, ?, or ∗).
6.
In the Repeat new password field, re‐type the password for the administrator.
7.
Click OK.
Deleting an Administrator
Delete an administrator account when it is no longer used for FluidFS cluster management. The built‐in
Administrator account cannot be deleted.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Mail & Admins tab on the top.
3.
In the Administrator Users pane, click
4.
Click Delete.
in the row of the administrator you want to modify.
The Delete dialog box appears.
5.
Click OK.
Managing Local Users
You can create local users that can access CIFS shares and NFS exports, or that will become a FluidFS
cluster administrator. You might want to create local users in the following cases:
•
You do not have remote users (AD/LDAP/NIS)
•
Both CIFS/NFS will be used, but you have a remote user repository (AD/LDAP/NIS) relevant for only
one protocol and a small number of users using the other protocol
When prompted to authenticate to access a CIFS share, local users must use the following format for the
user name:
<client_VIP_or_name>\<local_user_name>
Adding a Local User
Add a local user account.
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NOTE: The group to which the local user is assigned must exist.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the Local Users pane, click
4.
Click New Local User.
.
The New Local User dialog box appears.
5.
In the User name field, type a name for the local user.
The user name may contain only the following characters: letters, numbers, underscores, hyphens,
spaces, and periods. Also, a period cannot be used as the last character.
6.
Click the […] button to the right of the Primary Local Group field.
The Groups Browser dialog box appears.
7.
Select the group to which the local user is assigned and click OK.
8.
In the Password field, type a password for the local user.
The password must be at least seven characters long and contain three of the following elements: a
lowercase character, an uppercase character, a digit, or a special character (such as +, ?, or ∗).
9.
In the Repeat Password field, re‐type the password for the local user.
10. (Optional) Add secondary groups for this user.
a) Click the […] button under the Secondary Groups list.
The Groups Browser dialog box appears.
b) Select a secondary group you want to add and click OK.
c) Click Add.
d) Repeat steps (a) to (c) for each secondary group you want to add.
11. Click OK.
Changing a Local User’s Group
Change the primary local group to which a local user is assigned.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the Local Users pane, click
4.
Click Modify.
in the row of the user you want to change.
The Modify Local User dialog box appears.
5.
Click the […] button to the right of the Groups field.
The Groups Browser dialog box appears.
6.
Select the group to which the local user is assigned and click OK.
7.
Click OK.
Enabling or Disabling a Local User
Disabling a local user prevents the local user from accessing CIFS shares and NFS exports.
1.
In the Local Users pane, click
2.
Click Modify.
in the row of the user you want to change.
The Modify Local User dialog box appears.
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3.
Enable or disable the local user.
– To enable the local user, clear the Disable access from this local user check box.
4.
– To disable the local user, select the Disable access from this local user check box.
Click OK.
Changing a Local User Password
Change the password for a local user account.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the Local Users pane, click
4.
Click Change Password.
in the row of the user you want to change.
The Change Password for Local User dialog box appears.
5.
In the New Password field, type a new password for the local user.
The password must be at least seven characters long and contain three of the following elements: a
lowercase character, an uppercase character, a digit, or a special character (such as +, ?, or ∗).
6.
In the Repeat new password field, re‐type the password for the local user.
7.
Click OK.
Deleting a Local User
Delete a local user account when the user no longer needs to access CIFS shares and NFS exports, or
manage the FluidFS cluster (in the case of an administrator based on a local user).
NOTE: If the local user has an associated administrator account, you must delete the administrator
account before deleting the local user account.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the Local Users pane, click
4.
Click Delete.
in the row of the user you want to change.
The Delete Local User dialog box appears.
5.
Click OK.
Managing Password Age and Expiration
Changing the Maximum Password Age
You can change the number of days after which local users and local administrators will be forced to
change their password. The password expiration settings for remote users are maintained in the external
database and are not affected by this setting.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on the top.
3.
In the Security Access pane, click
4.
Click Modify Password Expiration Policy.
.
The Modify Password Expiration Policy dialog box appears.
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5.
Click Edit Password Expiration.
The Edit Password Expiration dialog box appears.
6.
In the within [ ] days field, type the number of days after which the password will expire.
7.
Click OK.
Enabling or Disabling Password Expiration
When password expiration is enabled, local users and local administrators are forced to change their
password after the specified number of days. The password expiration settings for remote users are
maintained in the external database and are not affected by this setting.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on the top.
3.
In the Security Access pane, click
4.
Click Modify Password Expiration Policy.
.
The Modify Password Expiration Policy dialog box appears.
5.
Enable or disable local user and administrator password expiration.
– To enable local user and administrator password expiration, select the Password for local users
and administrator users will expire check box.
6.
7.
– To disable local user and administrator password expiration, clear the Password for local users
and administrator users will expire check box.
If password expiration is enabled, in the within [ ] days field, type the number of days after which the
password expires.
Click OK.
Managing Local Groups
Create local groups to apply quota rules to multiple users. You can assign local users, remote users, and
remote users groups to one or more local groups. The primary group to which a user belongs determines
the quota for the user.
Viewing Local Groups
View the current local groups.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
The local groups are displayed in the Local Groups pane.
Adding a Local Group
Add a local group containing local users, remote users, or remote users groups.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the Local Groups pane, click
4.
Click New Local Group.
.
The New Local Group dialog box appears.
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5.
In the Local group name field, type a name for the group.
6.
To add local users to the group:
a) Click the […] button under the Local users in this group list.
The User Browser dialog box appears.
b) In the Search field, type either the full name of the user or the beginning of the user name and
click the
button.
c) Select the user you want to add and click OK.
d) Click Add under the Local users in this group list.
e) Repeat steps (a) to (d) for every user you want to add.
7.
To add domain users to the group:
a) Click the […] button under the Domain users in this group list.
The User Browser dialog box appears.
b) From the Domain drop‐down menu, select the domain to which the user is assigned.
c) In the Search field, type either the full name of the user or the beginning of the user name and
click the
button.
d) Select the user you want to add and click OK.
e) Click Add under the Domain users in this group list.
f) Repeat steps (a) to (e) for every user you want to add.
8.
To add domain groups to the group:
a) Click the […] button under the Domain groups in this group list.
The Group Browser dialog box appears.
b) From the Domain drop‐down menu, select the group’s domain.
c) In the Search field, type either the full name of the group or the beginning of the group name and
click the
button.
d) Select the group you want to add and click OK.
e) Click Add under the Domain users in this group list.
f) Repeat steps (a) to (e) for every group you want to add.
9.
Click OK.
Changing the Users Assigned to a Local Group
Modify which local users, remote users, or remote users groups are assigned to a local group.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the Local Groups pane, click
4.
Click Modify.
in the row of the group you want to delete.
The Modify Local Group dialog box appears.
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5.
To add local users to the group:
a) Click the […] button under the Local users in this group list.
The User Browser dialog box appears.
b) In the Search field, type either the full name of the user or the beginning of the user name and
click the
button.
c) Select the user you want to add and click OK.
d) Click Add under the Local users in this group list.
e) Repeat steps (a) to (d) for every user you want to add.
6.
To add domain users to the group:
a) Click the […] button under the Domain users in this group list.
The User Browser dialog box appears.
b) From the Domain drop‐down menu, select the domain to which the user is assigned.
c) In the Search field, type either the full name of the user or the beginning of the user name and
click the
button.
d) Select the user you want to add and click OK.
e) Click Add under the Domain users in this group list.
f) Repeat steps (a) to (e) for every user you want to add.
7.
To add domain groups to the group:
a) Click the […] button under the Domain groups in this group list.
The Group Browser dialog box appears.
b) From the Domain drop‐down menu, select the group’s domain.
c) In the Search field, type either the full name of the group or the beginning of the group name and
click the
button.
d) Select the group you want to add and click OK.
e) Click Add under the Domain users in this group list.
f) Repeat steps (a) to (e) for every group you want to add.
8.
Click OK.
Deleting a Local Group
Delete a local group if it is no longer used.
NOTE: Before a local group can be deleted, you must remove its members.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the Local Groups pane, click
4.
Click Delete.
in the row of the group you want to delete.
The Delete Local Group dialog box appears.
5.
Click OK.
Managing Active Directory
In environments that use Active Directory (AD), you can configure the FluidFS cluster to join the Active
Directory domain and authenticate Windows clients using Active Directory for access to CIFS shares. The
FluidFS cluster supports mixed mode and native mode Active Directory configurations.
76
Enabling Active Directory Authentication
Join the FluidFS cluster to an Active Directory domain to allow it to communicate with the directory
service.
By default, the FluidFS cluster uses the domain controller returned by Active Directory. Alternatively, you
can designate a domain controller if you want to ensure that the FluidFS cluster uses a specific domain
controller. Adding multiple domain controllers ensures continued authentication of users in the event of
a domain controller failure. If the FluidFS cluster cannot establish contact with the preferred server, it will
attempt to connect to the remaining servers in order.
•
An Active Directory service must be deployed in your environment.
•
The FluidFS cluster must have network connectivity to the directory service.
•
You must be familiar with the Active Directory configuration.
•
The FluidFS cluster requires credentials from an Active Directory account for the join operation. The
join operation is the only action for which these credentials are required, and they are not stored or
cached by the FluidFS cluster.
Use one of the following options for the account used to join the FluidFS cluster to the domain:
– Use a Domain Admin account. This is the preferred method.
– Use an account that has the "join a computer to the domain" privilege, as well as having full
control over all computer objects in the domain.
– If both of the above options are unavailable, the minimum requirements for an account are:
*
An Organizational Unit (OU) admin that has the "join a computer to the domain" privilege, as
well as having full control over objects within that OU, including computer objects.
*
Before joining the FluidFS cluster to the domain, a computer object must be created by the OU
admin for the FluidFS cluster; in the OU privileges to administer are provided. The FluidFS
cluster computer object name, and the NetBIOS name used when joining it, must match.
When creating the FluidFS cluster computer object, in the User or Group field under
permissions to join it to the domain, select the OU admin account. Then, the FluidFS cluster
can be joined using the OU admin credentials.
•
FluidFS clusters need read access for the tokenGroups attribute for all users. The default
configuration of Active Directory for all domain computers is to allow read access to the
tokenGroups attribute. If the permission is not given, Active Directory domain users that are in nested
groups or OUs encounter Access Denied errors, and users that are not in nested OUs or groups are
permitted access.
•
The Active Directory server and the FluidFS cluster must use a common time server.
•
You must configure the FluidFS cluster to use DNS. The DNS servers you specify must be the same as
those your Active Directory domain controllers use.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the Active Directory for CIFS and NFS users Authentication pane, click
4.
Click Join.
.
The Join Active Directory dialog box appears.
5.
In the Active Directory domain name field, type a domain to which to join the FluidFS cluster.
6.
(Optional) To add preferred controllers for the join operation and users authentication:
a) Select the Consider these controllers as preferred check box.
b) Type a domain controller host name or IP address in the controllers text field and click Add.
c) Repeat step (b) for each controller you want to add.
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7.
Click OK.
Modifying Active Directory Authentication Settings
You cannot directly modify the settings for Active Directory authentication. You must remove the FluidFS
cluster from the Active Directory domain and then re‐join it to the Active Directory domain.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the Active Directory for CIFS and NFS users Authentication pane, click
4.
Click Modify.
.
The Modify Active Directory dialog box appears.
5.
Click OK.
6.
Follow the instructions in Enabling Active Directory Authentication.
Disabling Active Directory Authentication
Remove the FluidFS cluster from an Active Directory domain if you no longer need the FluidFS cluster to
communicate with the directory service.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the Active Directory for CIFS and NFS users pane, click
4.
Click Leave.
.
The Leave Active Directory dialog box appears.
5.
Click OK.
6.
Follow the instructions in Enabling Active Directory Authentication to re-join the Active Directory.
Managing LDAP
In environments that use Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP), you can configure the FluidFS
cluster to authenticate UNIX/Linux clients using LDAP for access to NFS exports. The LDAP database can
be provided by either an LDAP server or Active Directory.
The FluidFS clusters support the following LDAP configurations:
•
Anonymous LDAP: The connection from the FluidFS cluster to the LDAP server(s) is not
authenticated. The data is sent in plain text.
•
Authenticated LDAP: The connection from the FluidFS cluster to the LDAP server(s) is authenticated
using a user name and password. The data is sent in plain text.
•
LDAP over TLS/SSL: The connection from the FluidFS cluster to the LDAP server(s) is authenticated
and encrypted. To validate the certificate used by the LDAP service, you must export the SSL
certificate from the LDAP service and upload it to the FluidFS cluster.
Enabling LDAP Authentication
Configure the FluidFS cluster to communicate with the LDAP directory service.
78
Adding multiple LDAP servers ensures continued authentication of users in the event of an LDAP server
failure. If the FluidFS cluster cannot establish contact with the preferred server, it will attempt to connect
to the remaining servers in order.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the NIS or LDAP repository for NFS users pane, click
4.
Click Modify Settings.
.
The Modify NIS/LDAP Settings dialog box appears.
5.
Select LDAP.
The LDAP settings fields are displayed.
6.
In the Base DN field, type an LDAP base distinguished name to represent where in the directory to
begin searching for users.
It is usually in the format:
dc=domain, dc=com.
7.
In the LDAP Servers text field, type the host name or IP address of an LDAP server and click Add.
Repeat this step for any additional LDAP servers.
8.
(Optional) Configure the remaining LDAP attributes as needed.
– To indicate that Active Directory provides the LDAP database, select the Use LDAP on Active
Directory Extended Schema check box.
– To authenticate the connection from the FluidFS cluster to the LDAP server, select theUse Non‐
nonymous LDAP bind check box. Then, type the LDAP bind distinguished name used to
authenticate the connection in the Bind DN field and type the LDAP bind password in the Bind
Password field.
– To encrypt the connection from the FluidFS cluster to the LDAP server using TLS, select the Use
TLS over LDAP check box.
9.
– To validate the certificate used by the LDAP service, select the Install LDAP Certificate check box.
Then, click Upload Certificate and select the LDAP SSL certificate to upload to the FluidFS cluster.
Click OK.
Changing the LDAP Base DN
The LDAP base distinguished name represents where in the directory to begin searching for users.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the NIS or LDAP repository for NFS users pane, click
4.
Click Modify Settings.
.
The Modify NIS/LDAP Settings dialog box appears.
5.
Select LDAP.
The LDAP settings fields are displayed.
6.
In the Based DN field, type an LDAP base distinguished name.
It is usually in the format:
dc=domain, dc=com
7.
Click OK.
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Adding or Removing LDAP Servers
There must be at least one LDAP server.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the NIS or LDAP repository for NFS users pane, click
4.
Click Modify Settings.
.
The Modify NIS/LDAP Settings dialog box appears.
5.
Select LDAP.
The LDAP settings fields are displayed.
6.
Add or remove LDAP servers.
– To add an LDAP server, type the host name or IP address of an LDAP server in the LDAP Servers
text field and click Add.
7.
– To remove an LDAP server, select an LDAP server and click
Click OK.
.
Enabling or Disabling LDAP on Active Directory Extended Schema
Enable the extended schema option if Active Directory provides the LDAP database.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the NIS or LDAP repository for NFS users pane, click
4.
Click Modify Settings.
.
The Modify NIS/LDAP Settings dialog box appears.
5.
Enable or disable LDAP on Active Directory extended schema.
– To indicate that Active Directory provides the LDAP database, select the Use LDAP on Active
Directory Extended Schema check box.
6.
– To indicate that an LDAP server provides the LDAP database, clear the Use LDAP on Active
Directory Extended Schema check box.
Click OK.
Enabling or Disabling Authentication for the LDAP Connection
Enable authentication for the connection from the FluidFS cluster to the LDAP server if the LDAP server
requires authentication.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the NIS or LDAP repository for NFS users pane, click
4.
Click Modify Settings.
The Modify NIS/LDAP Settings dialog box appears.
5.
Select LDAP.
The LDAP settings fields are displayed.
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.
6.
Enable or disable authentication for the LDAP connection.
– To enable authentication for the LDAP connection, select the Use Non‐Anonymous LDAP bind
check box. Then, type the LDAP bind distinguished name used to authenticate the connection in
the Bind DN field and type the LDAP bind password in the Bind Password field.
7.
– To disable authentication for the LDAP connection, clear the Use Non‐Anonymous LDAP bind
check box.
Click OK.
Enabling or Disabling TLS Encryption for the LDAP Connection
Enable TLS encryption for the connection from the FluidFS cluster to the LDAP server to avoid sending
data in plain text. To validate the certificate used by the LDAP service, you must export the LDAP SSL
certificate and upload it to the FluidFS cluster.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the NIS or LDAP repository for NFS users pane, click
4.
Click Modify Settings.
.
The Modify NIS/LDAP Settings dialog box appears.
5.
Select LDAP.
The LDAP settings fields are displayed.
6.
Enable or disable TLS encryption for the LDAP connection.
– To enable TLS encryption for the LDAP connection, select the Use LDAP over TLS check box.
7.
– To disable TLS encryption for the LDAP connection, clear the Use LDAP over TLS check box.
If TLS encryption is enabled, enable or disable LDAP certificate validation.
– To enable LDAP certificate validation, select the Install LDAP Certificate check box. Then, click
Upload Certificate and select the LDAP SSL certificate to upload to the FluidFS cluster.
8.
– To disable LDAP certificate validation, clear the Install LDAP Certificate check box.
Click OK.
Disabling LDAP Authentication
Disable LDAP authentication if you no longer need the FluidFS cluster to communicate with the directory
service.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the NIS or LDAP repository for NFS users pane, click
4.
Click Modify Settings.
.
The Modify NIS/LDAP Settings dialog box appears.
5.
Select None.
6.
Click OK.
Managing NIS
In environments that use Network Information Service (NIS), you can configure the FluidFS cluster to
authenticate clients using NIS for access to NFS exports.
81
Enabling NIS Authentication
Configure the FluidFS cluster to communicate with the NIS directory service.
Adding multiple NIS servers ensures continued authentication of users in the event of a NIS server failure.
If the FluidFS cluster cannot establish contact with the preferred server, it will attempt to connect to the
remaining servers in order.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the NIS or LDAP repository for NFS users pane, click
4.
Click Modify Settings.
.
The Modify NIS/LDAP Settings dialog box appears.
5.
Select NIS.
The NIS settings fields are displayed.
6.
7.
In the Domain Name field, type a NIS domain name.
In the NIS Servers text field, type the host name or IP address of a NIS server and click Add.
Repeat this step for any additional NIS servers.
8.
9.
NIS servers are listed in descending order of preference.
– To increase the precedence for a NIS server, select a NIS server and click
.
– To decrease the precedence for a NIS server, select a NIS server and click
Click OK.
.
Changing the NIS Domain Name
The NIS domain name specifies which domain to query in the NIS directory service.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the NIS or LDAP repository for NFS users pane, click
4.
Click Modify Settings.
.
The Modify NIS/LDAP Settings dialog box appears.
5.
In the NIS Domain Name field, type a NIS domain name.
6.
Click OK.
Changing the Order of Preference for NIS Servers
Change the order of preference for a NIS server. If the FluidFS cluster cannot establish contact with the
preferred server, it will attempt to connect to the remaining servers in order.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the NIS or LDAP repository for NFS users pane, click
4.
Click Modify Settings.
The Modify NIS/LDAP Settings dialog box appears.
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.
5.
6.
NIS servers are listed in descending order of preference.
– To increase the precedence for a NIS server, select a NIS server and click
.
– To decrease the precedence for a NIS server, select a NIS server and click
Click OK.
.
Disabling NIS Authentication
Disable NIS authentication if you no longer need the FluidFS cluster to communicate with the directory
service.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
3.
In the NIS or LDAP repository for NFS users pane, click
4.
Click Modify Settings.
.
The Modify NIS/LDAP Settings dialog box appears.
5.
Select None.
6.
Click OK.
Managing User Mappings between Windows and UNIX/
Linux Users
You can define mappings between Windows users in Active Directory and UNIX/Linux users in LDAP or
NIS. This ensures that a Windows user inherits the UNIX/Linux user permissions, and a UNIX/Linux user
inherits the Windows user permissions, depending on the direction of the mapping and the NAS volume
security style.
User Mapping Policies
The user mapping policies include:
•
Automatic mapping: Automatically map all Windows users in Active Directory to the identical UNIX/
Linux users in LDAP or NIS, and map all UNIX/Linux users to the identical Windows users. Automatic
mapping is disabled by default.
•
Mapping rules: Define mappings between specific Windows users in Active Directory and the
corresponding UNIX/Linux users in LDAP or NIS. These specific mapping rules take precedence over
automatic mapping. You can select the direction of the mapping — the mapping can go in one
direction or both:
– Mapping is allowed in one direction:
*
Windows users to a UNIX/Linux user
*
UNIX/Linux user to a Windows user
– Mapping is allowed in both directions between Windows and UNIX/Linux users.
•
User Mapping Policy and NAS Volume Security Style
User mapping permissions depend on the file security style for the NAS volume:
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•
•
•
NTFS security style: Permissions are controlled by Windows and NTFS. The UNIX/ Linux user adheres
to the permissions of the corresponding Windows user, regardless of the UNIX/Linux permission
settings.
UNIX security style: Permissions are based on the UNIX/Linux permissions. The Windows user adheres
to the permissions of the corresponding UNIX/Linux user.
Mixed security style: Both UNIX/Linux and Windows permissions are used. Each user can override the
other userʹ permission settings; therefore, be careful when using the Mixed security style.
Managing the User Mapping Policy
Configure the FluidFS cluster mapping policy to automatically map all users or to only allow mappings
between specific users.
Mapping Windows and UNIX/Linux Users Automatically
Automatically map all Windows users in Active Directory to the identical UNIX/Linux users in LDAP or NIS,
and map all UNIX/Linux users to the identical Windows users. Mapping rules override automatic mapping.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Mapping tab on the top.
3.
In the Mapping Policy pane, click
4.
Click Modify Policy.
.
The Modify User Mapping Policy dialog box appears.
5.
Select Automatically map CIFS and NFS users with the same name.
6.
Click OK.
Mapping Windows and UNIX/Linux Users by Mapping Rules Only
Only allow mappings between specific Windows users in Active Directory and the identical UNIX/Linux
users in LDAP or NIS.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Mapping tab on the top.
3.
In the Mapping Policy pane, click
4.
Click Modify Policy.
.
The Modify User Mapping Policy dialog box appears.
5.
Select Map based on the mapping rules only.
6.
Click OK.
Managing User Mapping Rules
Manage mapping rules between specific users. Mapping rules override automatic mapping.
Creating a User Mapping Rule
Create a mapping rule between a specific Windows user in Active Directory and the identical UNIX/Linux
user in LDAP or NIS. Mapping rules override automatic mapping.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Mapping tab on the top.
3.
In the Mapping Rules pane, click
4.
Click New.
.
The New User Mapping Rule dialog box appears.
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5.
Click the […] button to the right of the CIFS User (Active Directory) field.
The User Browser dialog box appears.
a) From the Domain drop‐down menu, select the domain to which the user is assigned.
b) In the Starts with field, type either the full name of the user or the beginning of the user name
and click the button.
c) Select the user you want to add and click OK.
6.
Click the […] button to the right of the NFS User (NIS/LDAP) field.
The User Browser dialog box appears.
a) From the Domain drop‐down menu, select the domain to which the user is assigned.
b) In the Starts with field, type either the full name of the user or the beginning of the user name
and click the button.
c) Select the user you want to add and click OK.
7.
Select the direction of the user mapping:
– The two users have identical file access permissions (using any protocol)
– The NFS user can access any file accessible by the CIFS user
8.
– The CIFS user can access any file accessible by the NFS user
Click OK.
Deleting a User Mapping Rule
Delete a mapping rule between a specific Windows user in Active Directory and the identical UNIX/Linux
user in LDAP or NIS.
1.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
2.
Click the User Mapping tab on the top.
3.
In the Mapping Rules pane, for the mapping rule that you want to delete, click
4.
Click Delete.
.
The Delete User Mapping Rule dialog box appears.
5.
Click OK.
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86
FluidFS 3.0 NAS Volumes, Shares, and
Exports
7
Managing the NAS Pool
The amount of raw space allocated to the FluidFS cluster (NAS pool) is determined by the MD Array LUNs
assigned to the NAS controllers. The maximum size of the PowerVault FluidFS NAS pool is 1 PB.
The usable size of the NAS pool depends on how much space the system deducts from the NAS pool for
internal use. On average, the system deducts approximately 400 GB per NAS appliance for internal use.
The exact amount of internal space varies by configuration, but it is roughly calculated as follows per
FluidFS cluster:
(256GB ∗ number of NAS appliances) + (4GB ∗ number of MD LUNs/volumes) + 20GB + 0.5% of the
total NAS pool + (100GB * number of NAS appliances, if data reduction is enabled)
Discovering New or Expanded LUNs
You can automatically discover newly created or expanded LUNs on the connected MD Storage arrays.
1.
Click the Hardware tab on the left.
2.
Click the Storage tab on the top.
3.
In the Storage pane, click
and select Discover New or Expanded LUNs.
The Discover New or Expanded LUNs dialog prompts you that the LUN discovery occurs in the
background, and you must refresh the browser page to see the view the new LUNs.
4.
Select the I noted that Discover LUNs is performed in background ... check box and click OK.
Viewing Internal Storage Reservations
View information about the space that the system deducts from the NAS pool for internal use.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on the top.
The internal storage reservations are displayed in the Internal Storage Reservations pane.
Viewing the Size of the NAS Pool
View the current configured size of the NAS pool.
1.
Click the Hardware tab on the left.
2.
Click the Storage tab on the top.
The NAS pool size is displayed in the Overview pane, in the Space allocated to the NAS pool field.
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Expanding the Size of the NAS Pool
You can increase the size of the NAS pool as your NAS storage space requirements increase, without
affecting the services to the clients. However, you cannot decrease the size of the NAS pool.
The maximum size of the NAS pool is 1 PB.
NOTE: The MD Array(s) must have enough capacity to allocate more storage space to the FluidFS
cluster.
1.
Click the Hardware tab on the left.
2.
Click the Storage tab on the top.
3.
In the Overview pane, click
4.
Click Expand NAS Pool.
.
The Expand NAS Pool dialog box appears. The Additional allocation to the NAS pool value is
displayed.
5.
Click OK.
The progress of the expand NAS pool process is displayed in the Expand NAS Pool dialog box. If you
close the dialog box, the process will continue to run in the background.
Enabling or Disabling the NAS Pool Used Space Alert
You can enable an alert that is triggered when a specified percentage of the NAS pool space has been
used.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes ab on the left.
2.
Click the NAS Pool tab on the top.
3.
In the NAS Pool pane, click
4.
Click Modify Space Threshold.
.
The Modify NAS Pool Space Threshold dialog box appears.
5.
Enable or disable the NAS pool used space alert.
– To enable the NAS pool used space alert, select the Alert when used space is over check box.
6.
– To disable the NAS pool used space alert, clear the Alert when used space is over check box.
If the NAS pool used space alert is enabled, in the Alert when used space is over size field, type a
number (from 0 to 100) to specify the percentage of used NAS pool space that triggers an alert.
7.
Click OK.
Enabling or Disabling the NAS Pool Unused Space Alert
You can enable an alert that is triggered when the remaining unused NAS pool space is below a specified
size.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the NAS Pool tab on the top.
3.
In the NAS Pool pane, click
4.
Click Modify Space Threshold.
.
The Modify NAS Pool Space Threshold dialog box appears.
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5.
Enable or disable the NAS pool unused space alert.
– To enable the NAS pool unused space alert, select the Alert when unused space is over check
box.
6.
– To disable the NAS pool unused space alert, clear the Alert when unused space is over check
box.
If the NAS pool unused space alert is enabled, in the Alert when unused space is below size field,
type a size in megabytes (MB), gigabytes (GB), or terabytes (TB) to specify the unused NAS pool space
that triggers an alert.
7.
Click OK.
Managing NAS Volumes
A NAS volume is a portion of the NAS pool in which you create CIFS shares and NFS exports to make
storage space available to clients. NAS volumes have specific management policies controlling their
space allocation, data protection, security style, and so on.
You can either create one large NAS volume consuming the entire NAS Pool or divide the NAS pool into
multiple NAS volumes. In either case you can create, resize, or delete these NAS volumes.
NAS volume availability depends on the availability of the MD Array(s). If the MD Array is offline, NAS
volume data is not available for the FluidFS cluster. Correct the MD Array problem to resume NAS volume
availability.
Several NAS features are configured on a per NAS volume basis:
•
Quota rules
•
Security styles
•
Data reduction
•
Snapshots
•
NDMP backup
•
Replication
File Security Styles
The Windows and UNIX/Linux operating systems use different mechanisms for resource access control.
Therefore, you assign each NAS volume a file security style (NTFS, UNIX, or Mixed) that controls the type
of access controls (permission and ownership) for the files and directories that clients create in the NAS
volume.
A NAS volume supports the following security styles:
•
UNIX: Controls file access using UNIX permissions. A client can change permissions only by using the
chmod and chown commands on the NFS mount point.
•
NTFS: Controls file access by Windows permissions. A client can change the permission and
ownership using the Windows File Properties → Security tab.
•
Mixed: Supports both NTFS and UNIX security styles. If you choose this option, the security of a file or
directory is the last one set. Permissions and access rights from one method to another are
automatically translated. For example, if a Windows administrator sets up file access permissions on a
file through a CIFS Share, a Linux user can access the file through NFS and change all the file
permissions. This option is not recommended in production environments, except where there is a
need for scratch space and when you are not concerned about file access security and simply need
some NAS volume space to store files temporarily.
Both NTFS and UNIX security styles allow multi‐protocol file access. The security style simply determines
the method of storing/managing the file access permissions information within the NAS volume.
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If you need to access the same set of files from both Windows and UNIX/Linux, the best way to
implement multi‐protocol access is by setting up individual user mapping rules or by enabling automatic
user mapping. Ownership and access permissions are automatically translated based on user mapping
settings and file access credentials.
Modifying the file security style of a NAS volume affects only files and directories created after the
modification.
Thin and Thick Provisioning for NAS Volumes
Although PowerVault NAS pool is thickly provisioned to the FluidFS system, NAS volumes can be thin‐
provisioned. With thin‐provisioning (the default), storage space is consumed on the MD Arrays(s) only
when data is physically written to the NAS volume, not when the NAS volume is initially created. Thin‐
provisioning allows NAS volumes to account for future increases in usage. However, because it is possible
for the storage space allocated by the NAS volumes to exceed the storage space allocated to the NAS
pool, ensure that you monitor available capacity on the MD array(s) to ensure that the FluidFS system
always has sufficient free space available. You can also specify a portion of the NAS volume (Reserved
Space) that is dedicated to the NAS volume (no other volumes can take the space). The total Reserved
Space of all NAS volumes cannot exceed the available capacity of the NAS pool.
If a file is deleted from a thin‐provisioned NAS volume, the free space as seen in FluidFS Manager
increases. The freed up capacity is also visible and available to clients in the CIFS shares or NFS exports.
However, the MD array does not report any capacity freed up in the NAS pool.
Thick provisioning allows you to allocate storage space on the MD array(s) statically to a NAS volume (no
other volumes can take the space). Thick provisioning is appropriate if your environment requires
guaranteed space for a NAS volume.
Choosing a Strategy for NAS Volume Creation
Choosing to define multiple NAS volumes enables you to apply different management policies, such as
data reduction, data protection, security style, and quotas, based on your storage needs.
Consider the following factors to help choose the right strategy based on your environment’s
requirements:
•
General requirements  NAS volumes can be easily created, resized (increased or decreased) based
on the system capacity, or deleted.
– NAS volumes can be easily created, resized (increased or decreased) based on the system
capacity, or deleted.
– A single NAS volume can contain NFS exports, CIFS shares, or a combination of NFS exports and
CIFS shares.
– The minimum size of a NAS volume is 20 MB (or if the NAS volume has already been used, the
minimum size is the stored data).
•
Business requirements: A company or application requirement for separation or for using a single
NAS volume must be considered. NAS volumes can be used to allocate storage for departments on
demand, using the threshold mechanism to notify administrators when they approach the end of their
allocated free space.
•
Data reduction: Each NAS volume can have a dedicated data reduction policy to best suit the type of
data it stores.
•
Snapshots: Each NAS volume can have a dedicated snapshot scheduling policy to best protect the
type of data it stores.
•
Security style: In multiple protocol environments, it might be beneficial to separate the data and
define NAS volumes with UNIX security style for UNIX/Linux‐ased clients, and NTFS for Windows‐ased
clients. This enables the administrator to match the security style with business requirements and
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various data access patterns. The security style can also be set to Mixed which supports both POSIX
security and Windows ACLs on the same NAS volume.
•
Quotas: Different quota policies can be applied to different NAS volumes, allowing the administrator
to focus on managing quotas when it is appropriate.
Example NAS Volume Creation Scenarios
The following scenarios provide examples of how NAS volumes can be created to meet the needs of an
example organization with the following conditions:
1.
The average read/write mix is 80/20 and the average hourly change rate for existing data is less than
1%.
2.
The departments and NAS volume requirements are as described in the following table:
Department
Securit Snapsho Replicatio
y Style ts
n
NDMP
Backup
Number Read/
of
Write Mix
CIFS/NF
S
Clients
Hourly
Change % of
Existing Data
Post Production
NFS
Hourly
No
Weekly
20
20/80
1%
Administration
and Finance
CIFS
No
No
Weekly
10
50/50
None
Broadcast
Mixed
No
No
Weekly
10
90/10
None
Press
CIFS
Daily
No
No
5
10/90
5%
Marketing
CIFS
Daily
Yes
No
5
50/50
None
Scenario 1
Create NAS volumes based on departments. The administrator logically breaks up storage and
management into functional groups. In this scenario, the departmental requirements are quite different
and support the design to logically create NAS volumes along department lines.
•
Advantages:
– It is logically easy to manage the NAS volumes.
– The NAS volumes are created to match the exact needs of the department.
•
Disadvantage: The NAS volumes become difficult to manage if the number of departments in the
organization increases.
Scenario 2
We recommend grouping departments that have similar security requirements into NAS volumes. The
administrator creates three NAS volumes: one for NFS, one for CIFS, and another for mixed.
•
Advantage: The NAS volumes work separately between Windows and Linux.
•
Disadvantage: Unwanted services may be provided to certain departments. For example, if the CIFS
volume is backed up weekly for the administration and finance departments, the press and marketing
departments also get backups even though they do not require it.
Scenario 3
NAS volumes can be created based on the feature (snapshots, replication, NDMP backup, and so on).
•
Advantage: The NAS volumes are created to match the exact needs for each feature.
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•
Disadvantage: User mapping is required. A user needs to choose one security style, either NTFS or
UNIX, and based on the security style chosen the correct mapping for other users is set.
NAS Volumes Storage Space Terminology
FluidFS Manager displays storage space details for individual NAS volumes and for all NAS volumes
collectively. The following table defines terminology used in FluidFS Manager related to NAS volume
storage space.
Term
Description
Size
Maximum size of a NAS volume defined by the storage administrator.
Used Space
Storage space occupied by writes to the NAS volume (user data and snapshots).
Reserved Space
A portion of a thin‐provisioned NAS volume that is dedicated to the NAS volume (no
other volumes can take the space). The amount of reserved space is specified by the
storage administrator. Reserved space is used before unreserved space.
Unreserved Space A portion of a thin‐provisioned NAS volume that is not reserved (other volumes can
take the space). The amount of unreserved space for a NAS volume is: (NAS volume
size) – (NAS volume reserved space).
Available Space
Storage space that is physically currently available for the NAS volume. The amount
of available space for a NAS volume is: (unused NAS volume reserved space) + (NAS
volume unreserved space, provided that there is free space in the NAS pool).
Overcommitted
Space
A portion of a thin‐provisioned NAS volume that is not available and not in use by
the NAS volume. The amount of overcommitted space for a NAS volume is: (sum of
all the NAS volume space) - (NAS Pool: Used Space) - (NAS Pool: Unused (unreserved Space).
With thin‐provisioning, storage space is consumed only when data is physically
written to the NAS volume, not when the NAS volume is initially allocated. This
means more storage space can be allocated to the NAS volumes than has been
allocated in the NAS pool itself.
Snapshot Space
Storage space occupied by snapshots of a NAS volume.
Data Reduction
Saving
Storage space reclaimed as a result of data reduction processing.
Configuring NAS Volumes
Manage NAS volumes and NAS volume alerts.
Adding a NAS Volume
Add a NAS volume to allocate storage that can be shared on the network. When a NAS volume is added,
default values are applied for some settings. To change the defaults, you must modify the NAS volume.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
The NAS volumes are displayed in the All NAS Volumes pane.
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Adding a NAS Volume
Add a NAS volume to allocate storage that can be shared on the network. When a NAS volume is added,
default values are applied for some settings. To change the defaults, you must modify the NAS volume.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click New NAS Volume.
.
The New NAS Volume dialog box appears.
5.
In the NAS volume name field, type a name for the NAS volume.
6.
In the Size field, type a size for the NAS volume in megabytes (MB), gigabytes (GB), or terabytes (TB).
NOTE: A NAS volume must have a minimum size of 20MB.
7.
Click OK.
Renaming a NAS Volume
Rename a NAS volume.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, for the NAS volume that you want to rename, click
4.
Click Rename.
.
The Rename NAS Volume dialog box appears.
5.
In the New name field, type a new name for the NAS volume.
6.
Click OK.
Changing Access Time Granularity for a NAS Volume
Change the access time granularity settings of a NAS volume to change the interval at which file‐access
time stamps are updated.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click View Details.
in the row of the volume you want to modify.
The Space view is displayed for the selected volume.
5.
In the NAS Volume Advanced Settings pane, click
6.
Click Modify File Access Time Granularity.
.
The Modify File Access Time Granularity for NAS Volume dialog is displayed.
7.
Select one of the available options:
– Never
– Once (every 5 minutes/an hour/a day)
8.
– Always
Click OK.
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Changing Permissions Interoperability for a NAS Volume
Change the permissions interoperability settings of a NAS volume to change the file access security style
for the NAS volume.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click Modify Interoperability Policy.
in the row of the volume you want to modify.
The Modify CIFS & NFS Interoperability Policy dialog box appears.
5.
Select the file access security style for the NAS volume (Unix, NTFS , or Mixed).
6.
Click OK.
Enabling or Disabling Zero Disk Usage Reporting for a NAS Volume
When zero disk usage reporting is enabled for a NAS volume, the DU (Disk Usage) command reports 0
when the actual allocated size of a file is unknown (as compatible with VMWare thin provisioning).
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click View Details.
in the row of the volume you want to modify.
The volume’s Space view is displayed.
5.
In the NAS Volume Advanced Settings pane, click
6.
Click Modify DU Compatibility.
.
The Modify DU Compatibility for NAS Volume dialog box appears.
7.
Select one of the following reporting options:
– The size of the file as the allocated size
8.
– Zero (0) as the allocated size (VMWare thin provisioning compatible)
Click OK.
Changing the Space Settings of a NAS Volume
Change the space settings of a NAS volume, including provisioning, size, and reserved space.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click Modify NAS Volume Space.
in the row of the volume you want to modify.
The Modify NAS Volume Space dialog box appears.
5.
In the Size section, type a new size for the NAS volume and select the size unit (megabytes [MB],
gigabytes [GB], or terabytes [TB]).
6.
In the Space Provisioning section, select the space provisioning type (Thick or Thin).
NOTE: The new size must be larger than the space used by the NAS volume.
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7.
For Thin NAS Volumes: in the Reserved Space field, type the size of the storage that is statically
allocated to the NAS volume and select the units as megabytes (MB), gigabytes (GB), or terabytes
(TB).
NOTE: The reserved space must be smaller than the configured size of the NAS volume.
8.
Click OK.
Enabling or Disabling a NAS Volume Used Space Alert
You can enable an alert that is triggered when a specified percentage of the NAS volume space has been
used.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click Modify NAS Volume Space.
in the row of the volume you want to modify.
The Modify NAS Volume Space dialog box appears.
5.
6.
7.
Enable or disable a NAS volume used space alert:
– To enable a NAS volume used space alert, select the Alert when used space is over check box.
– To disable a NAS volume used space alert, clear the Alert when used space is over check box.
If a NAS volume used space alert is enabled, in the Over X % of NAS Volume Size field, type a number
(from 0 to 100) to specify the percentage of used NAS volume space that triggers an alert.
Click OK.
Enabling or Disabling a NAS Volume Unused Space Alert
You can enable an alert that is triggered when the remaining unused NAS volume space is below a
specified size. If a client application requires a certain amount of storage space, you might want to enable
an unused space alert to ensure that the application always has the required storage space.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click Modify NAS Volume Space.
in the row of the volume you want to modify.
The Modify NAS Volume Space dialog box appears.
5.
6.
7.
Enable or disable a NAS volume used space alert:
– To enable a NAS volume used space alert, select the Alert when used space is below check box.
– To disable a NAS volume used space alert, clear the Alert when used space is below check box.
If a NAS volume used space alert is enabled, in the Below X % of NAS Volume Size field, type a
number (from 0 to 100) to specify the percentage of used NAS volume space that triggers an alert.
Click OK.
Enabling or Disabling a NAS Volume Snapshot Space Consumption Threshold Alert
You can enable an alert that is triggered when a specified percentage of the NAS volume space has been
used for snapshots.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click Modify NAS Volume Space.
in the row of the volume you want to modify.
The Modify NAS Volume Space dialog box appears.
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5.
Enable or disable a NAS volume snapshot space consumption threshold alert.
– To enable a NAS volume snapshot space consumption threshold alert, select the Alert when
snapshot space is over check box.
6.
– To disable a NAS volume snapshot space consumption threshold alert, clear the Alert when
snapshot space is over check box.
If a NAS volume snapshot space consumption threshold alert is enabled, in the Over X % of NAS
Volume Size field, type a number (from 0 to 100) to specify the percentage of used NAS volume
space that triggers an alert.
7.
Click OK.
Deleting a NAS Volume
After deleting a NAS volume, the storage space used by the deleted NAS volume is reclaimed by the NAS
pool. Deleting a NAS volume deletes all the files and directories as well as its properties, that is, CIFS
shares and NFS exports, snapshots definitions, and so on. Once deleted, the NAS volume cannot be
restored unless it is redefined and restored from an external backup.
•
Before a NAS volume can be deleted, you must remove its CIFS shares, NFS exports, replications,
quota rules, NAS volume clones, and any other reference to the NAS volume.
•
Ensure that the NAS volume is not mounted and warn affected clients that the data will be deleted.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click Delete.
in the row of the volume you want to modify.
The Delete NAS Volume dialog box appears.
5.
Click OK.
Cloning a NAS Volume
Cloning a NAS volume creates a writable copy of the NAS volume. This is useful to test against non‐
production data sets in a test environment without impacting the production file system environment.
Most operations that can be performed on NAS volumes can also be performed on clone NAS volumes,
such as resizing, deleting, and configuring CIFS shares, NFS exports, snapshots, replication, NDMP, and so
on.
The cloned NAS volume is created from a snapshot (base snapshot) from the original NAS volume (base
volume). No space is consumed by the clone NAS volume until data stored on it is modified.
NAS Volume Clone Defaults
The clone NAS volume will have the following default values:
•
Has the same size as its base volume, is thin‐rovisioned, and its reserve space is 0 (and therefore it
consumes no space)
•
Quota usage is copied from the base snapshot of the base volume
•
Quota rules have the default definitions (like a new NAS volume)
•
Has the same permissions on folders including the root directory as the base volume
•
Has the same security style and access time granularity definitions as the base volume
•
There are no CIFS shares, NFS exports, or snapshot schedules defined
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NAS Volume Clone Restrictions
The following restrictions apply to cloned NAS volumes:
•
You cannot create a clone NAS volume of a clone NAS volume (nested clones) unless a clone NAS
volume is replicated to another FluidFS cluster and then cloned.
•
You cannot delete a base volume until all of its clone NAS volumes have been deleted.
•
A snapshot cannot be deleted as long as there are clone NAS volumes based on it.
•
Restoring to an older snapshot fails if it would result in a base snapshot being deleted.
•
You can replicate a clone NAS volume only after the base volume is replicated. If the base snapshot in
the base volume is removed, and a clone NAS volume exists on the replication target FluidFS cluster,
replication between NAS volumes will stop. To resume replication, the cloned NAS volume on the
target FluidFS cluster must be deleted.
•
You cannot create a clone NAS volume from a replication source NAS volume or NDMP snapshot.
However, you can create a clone NAS volume of a replication target NAS volume.
•
Prior to creating a clone NAS volume, data reduction and the snapshot space consumption threshold
alert must be disabled on the base volume (previously deduplicated data is allowed).
•
Data reduction cannot be enabled on a clone NAS volume.
•
Once a NAS volume is cloned, data reduction cannot be re‐enabled until all clone NAS volumes have
been deleted.
•
A clone NAS volume contains user and group recovery information, but not the NAS volume
configuration.
•
Clone NAS volumes count towards the total number of NAS volumes in the FluidFS cluster.
Managing NAS Volume Clones
View, create, and delete NAS volume clones.
Viewing NAS Volume Clones
View the current NAS volume clones.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
to view.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Snapshots tab on the top.
in the row of the volume whose NAS volume clones you want
The cloned volumes are displayed in the Cloned NAS Volumes pane.
Creating a NAS Volume Clone
Cloning a NAS volume creates a writable copy of the NAS volume.
•
There must be an existing snapshot from which the clone NAS volume will be created.
•
Data reduction must be disabled on the base volume.
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•
The snapshot space consumption threshold alert must be disabled on the base volume.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
to view.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Snapshots tab on the top.
6.
In the Snapshots pane, click
7.
Click Clone NAS Volume.
in the row of the volume whose NAS volume clones you want
in the row of the snapshot on which you want to base the clone.
The Clone NAS Volume dialog box appears.
8.
In the Cloned NAS volume name field, type a name for the NAS volume clone.
9.
Click OK.
Deleting a NAS Volume Clone
Delete a NAS volume clone if it is no longer used.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
to view.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Snapshots tab on the top.
6.
In the Snapshotspane, click
7.
Click Delete.
in the row of the volume whose NAS volume clones you want
in the row of the snapshot on which you want to base the clone.
The Deletedialog box appears.
8.
Click OK.
A message appears, warning you that all data on the clone will be lost.
9.
Click the Ignore the above warning checkbox.
10. Click OK.
Managing CIFS Shares
Common Internet File System (CIFS) shares provide an effective way of sharing files across a Windows
network with authorized clients. The FluidFS cluster supports the SMB protocol versions 1.0, 2.0, and 2.1.
When you first create a CIFS share, access is limited as follows:
•
The Administrator account has full access.
•
If you are using Active Directory, the AD domain administrator has full access.
To assign other users full access to a CIFS share, you must log in to the CIFS share, using one of the
above mentioned administrator accounts, and set access permissions and ownership of the CIFS share.
Configuring CIFS Shares
View, add, modify, and delete CIFS shares.
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Viewing All CIFS Shares on the FluidFS Cluster
View all current CIFS shares for the FluidFS cluster.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All CIFS Shares tab on the top.
The CIFS shares are displayed in the All CIFS Shares pane.
Viewing CIFS Shares on a NAS Volume
View the current CIFS shares for a NAS volume.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the CIFS Shares tab on the top.
in the row of the volume whose CIFS shares you want to view.
The details of the volume’s CIFS shares are displayed.
Adding a CIFS Share
Create a CIFS share to share a directory in a NAS volume using the CIFS protocol. When a CIFS share is
added, default values are applied for some settings. To change the defaults, you must modify the CIFS
share.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the CIFS Shares tab on the top.
6.
In the CIFS Shares pane, click
7.
Click New CIFS Shares.
in the row of the volume whose CIFS shares you want to view.
.
The New CIFS Shares dialog box appears.
8.
In the CIFS Share name field, type a name for the new CIFS share.
9.
Click the […] button to the right of the Folder field.
The Browse Folders dialog box appears.
10. In the folder tree, click [+] to expand subfolders.
11. Select a folder from the tree or type a folder in the edit box under the folder tree. (To share the root
of the NAS volume, type /).
12. Click OK.
13. If the folder you entered doesn’t exist and you want to create it, check the Create the folder if it
does not exist checkbox.
14. Click OK.
Enabling or Disabling Accessed-Based Share Enumeration for a CIFS Share
Create a CIFS share to share a directory in a NAS volume using the CIFS protocol. When a CIFS share is
added, default values are applied for some settings. To change the defaults, you must modify the CIFS
share.
When SLP access‐based share enumeration is enabled, if a given user or group does not have share level
permissions for a particular CIFS share, the CIFS share, and its folders and files, will not be visible to that
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user or group. When SLP access‐based share enumeration is disabled, the CIFS share, and its folders and
files, will be visible to users and groups regardless of whether they have permissions for the CIFS share.
To enable or disable accessed-based share enumeration for a CIFS share:
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click View Details.
in the row of the volume whose CIFS shares you want to view.
5.
Click the CIFS Shares tab on the top.
6.
In the CIFS Shares pane, click
7.
Click Modify.
.
The Modify CIFS Shares dialog box appears.
8.
To enable or disable access‐based share enumeration, select or clear the Access Based Enumeration
check box.
9.
Click OK.
Deleting a CIFS Share
If you delete a CIFS share, the data in the shared directory is no longer shared but it is not removed.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the CIFS Shares tab on the top.
6.
In the CIFS Shares pane, click
7.
Click Delete.
in the row of the volume whose CIFS shares you want to view.
.
The Delete CIFS Shares dialog box appears.
8.
Click OK.
Viewing and Disconnecting CIFS Connections
You can view active CIFS client connections and disconnect individual CIFS connections.
Displaying Active CIFS Connections
Display the current CIFS connections.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the CIFS and NDMP Sessions tab on the top.
The active CIFS connections are displayed in the CIFS Session pane.
Disconnecting a CIFS Connection
Disconnect a particular CIFS connection.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the CIFS & NDMP Sessions tab on the top.
3.
In the CIFS Sessions pane, click
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in the row of the session you want to disconnect.
4.
Click Disconnect.
The Disconnect Connection dialog box appears.
5.
Click OK.
Using CIFS Home Shares
The FluidFS cluster enables you to create a share per client that is limited to that client. For example,
when a client "jsmith" connects to the FluidFS cluster, jsmith will be presented with any available general
shares, as well as a share labeled "jsmith" that is visible only to jsmith.
When creating a CIFS share with a user‐based directory structure (home share), the share will not be
accessible initially. This is because all directories for each user must be created by the storage
administrator. This can be accomplished with a script (user‐created script), batch file, or PowerShell
cmdlet that is written by the storage administrator. Alternatively, the storage administrator can manually
create these folders. This is to provide stricter access controls to the storage administrator. The storage
administrator can decide whether some or all of the users will be given a home share.
Configuring CIFS Home Shares
Enable CIFS home shares to create a share per client that is limited to that client.
1.
Create a CIFS share that is the root of all the users’ folders.
For example, create a CIFS share named users, at directory /users.
2.
Give ownership of the CIFS share to the account that will create the folders (either using a user
created script or manually) for each user’s home share.
a) Using Windows Explorer, connect to the CIFS share.
b) In the security setting of the CIFS share, click on Advanced, and change the owner to Domain
Admins, a specific Domain Administrator, or a FluidFS cluster administrator account.
c) Disconnect from the CIFS share and reconnect to it as the account that has ownership of it, as
previously set in step (b).
3.
Create a CIFS share containing a user‐based directory tree.
a) Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
b) Click the All CIFS Shares tab on the top.
c) In the Home Shares pane, click
.
d) Click Modify Home Shares Policy.
The Modify Home Shares Policy dialog box appears.
e) Click Enable home shares.
The home shares details are displayed.
f) Click the […] button to the right of the NAS volume field.
The NAS Volume Browser opens.
g) Select the NAS volume on which the CIFS home shares are located and click OK.
h) Click the […] button to the right of the Initial path field.
i)
j)
The Folder Browser opens.
Browse to the path created in step (1), for example /users, and click OK.
Select the template for the users’ home folders:
*
Initial path, domain name, and user name
* Initial path and user name
k) Click OK.
4.
Using Windows Explorer, for each user to whom you want to assign a home share, create a folder
that conforms to the Folder Template you selected in step (h).
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Changing the Owner of a CIFS Share
When a CIFS share is created, the owner of the CIFS share must be changed before setting any access
control lists (ACLs) or share level permissions (SLP), or attempting to access the CIFS share. The following
methods can be used to initially change the owner of a CIFS share:
•
Use an Active Directory domain account that has its primary group set as the Domain Admins group.
•
Use the FluidFS cluster Administrator account (used if not joined to Active Directory or Domain Admin
credentials are not available).
Changing the Owner of a CIFS Share Using an Active Directory Domain Account
To change the owner of a CIFS share , the Active Directory domain account must have its primary group
set as the Domain Admins group. These steps might vary slightly depending on which version of
Windows you are using.
1.
Open Windows Explorer and in the address bar type: \\<client_VIP_or_name>.
A list of all CIFS shares is displayed.
2.
Right‐click the required CIFS share (folder) and select Properties.
The Properties dialog box appears.
3.
Click the Security tab and then click Advanced.
4.
Click the Owner tab and then click Edit.
5.
Click Other users or groups.
The Advanced Security Settings dialog box appears.
The Advanced Security Settings dialog box appears.
The Select User or Group dialog box appears.
6.
Choose the domain admin user account that is used to set ACLs for this CIFS share or choose the
Domain Adminsgroup.
7.
Click OK.
8.
Select Replace owner on subcontainers and objects and click OK.
9.
Click the Permissions tab and follow Microsoft best practices to assign ACL permissions for users
and groups to the CIFS share.
10. Click OK.
Changing the Owner of a CIFS Share Using the FluidFS Cluster Administrator Account
If the FluidFS cluster is not joined to Active Directory, use the Administrator account to change the owner
of a CIFS share. These steps might vary slightly depending on which version of Windows you are using.
1.
Start the Map network drive wizard.
2.
In Folder type: \\<client_VIP_or_name>\<CIFS_share_name>.
3.
Select Connect using different credentials.
4.
Click Finish.
5.
When prompted, type the Administrator credentials and click OK.
6.
Right‐click the mapped CIFS share (folder) and select Properties.
The Properties dialog box appears.
7.
Click the Security tab and then click Advanced.
The Advanced Security Settings dialog box appears.
8.
Click the Owner tab and then click Edit.
The Advanced Security Settings dialog box appears.
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9.
Click Other users or groups.
The Select User or Group dialog box appears.
10. Choose the domain admin user account that is used to set ACLs for this CIFS share or choose the
Domain Adminsgroup. Alternatively, the FluidFS cluster Administrator account can be used.
11. Click OK.
12. Select Replace owner on subcontainers and objects and click OK.
13. After the owner is set, unmap the network drive.
14. Remap the network drive as the account that has ownership of it, as set in step (10).
15. Click the Permissions tab of the Advanced Security Settings dialog box and follow Microsoft best
practices to assign ACL permissions for users and groups to the CIFS share.
16. Click OK.
Managing ACLs or SLPs on a CIFS Share
The FluidFS cluster supports two levels of access control to CIFS shares, files, and folders:
•
Access Control Lists (ACLs): Governs access to specific files and folders. The administrator can
control a wide range of operations that users and groups can perform.
•
Share Level Permissions (SLPs): Governs access to entire shares. The administrator controls only read,
change, or full access to an entire share.
SLPs are limited as they only address full control, modify, and read rights for any given user or group at
the CIFS share level. ACLs offer a finer level of control, and can control many more operations than only
read/change/full access. It is recommended to leave the default setting for SLP (everyone has full control)
and use ACLs to control access to the CIFS share, unless there is a specific requirement for SLPs that
cannot be accomplished using ACLs.
Dell recommends that a Windows administrator follows the best practices defined by Microsoft for ACLs
and SLPs.
NOTE: Do not create both ACL‐type permissions and SLPs for the same CIFS share.
NOTE: Do not attempt to create a CIFS share using MMC. Use MMC only to set SLPs.
Setting ACLs on a CIFS Share
To set ACLs, use Windows Explorer procedures. When defining an ACL for a local user account, you must
use the format: <client_VIP_or_name>\<local_user_name>.
Setting SLPs on a CIFS Share
If the FluidFS cluster is not joined to Active Directory, use the Administrator account to change the owner
of a CIFS share. These steps might vary slightly depending on which version of Windows you are using.
To set SLPs, you must use the Microsoft Management Console (MMC) with the Shared Folder snap‐in to
set permissions. Administrators can use a predefined MMC file (.msc) from the Windows Server
2000/2003/2008 start menu and add a Shared Folder snap‐in to connect to the FluidFS cluster. The MMC
does not let you choose which user to connect with a remote computer. By default, it forms the
connection through the user logged on to the machine. To connect through a different user:
•
If the FluidFS cluster that you are trying to manage is joined to an Active Directory, log in to the
management station with <domain>\Administrator.
•
Before using MMC, connect to the FluidFS cluster by using the client VIP address in the address bar of
Windows Explorer. Log in with the administrator account and then connect to MMC.
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NOTE: You might need to reset the local administrator password first.
If there are no predefined MMC files:
1.
Select Start → Run.
2.
Type mmc and click OK.
The [Console 1 ‐Console Root] window is displayed.
3.
Select File → Add/Remove Snap‐n.
4.
Select Shared Folders and click Add.
5.
In the Shared Folders window, choose Another computer and type the FluidFS cluster name (as
configured in the DNS).
Alternatively, you can use the client VIP.
6.
Click Finish.
The new shares tree is displayed in the Console Root window.
7.
Right‐lick on the required CIFS share, and choose Properties.
8.
In the Share Properties window, click the Share Permission tab to set SLPs.
Accessing a CIFS Share Using Windows
Microsoft Windows offers several methods to connect to CIFS shares. To access a CIFS share, the client
must be a valid user (local or remote) and provide a valid password.
Accessing a CIFS Share Using the net use Command
Execute the net use command from a command prompt:
net use <drive_letter>: \\<client_VIP_or_name>\<CIFS_share_name>
Accessing a CIFS Share Using the UNC path
Use the UNC path.
1.
From the Start menu, select Run.
The Run window is displayed.
2.
Type the path to the CIFS share to which you want to connect:
\\<client_VIP_or_name>\<CIFS_share_name>
3.
Click OK.
Accessing a CIFS Share by Mapping the Share as a Network Drive
Map the share as a network drive.
1.
Open Windows Explorer and choose Tools → Map Network Drive.
The Map Network Drive dialog box appears.
2.
From the Drive drop‐own list, select any available drive.
3.
Type the path to the CIFS share to which you want to connect in the Folder field or browse to the
CIFS share:
\\<client_VIP_or_name>\<CIFS_share_name>
4.
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Click Finish.
Accessing a CIFS Share Using the Windows Network
Connect to the share using the Windows Network. This option does not map the share.
1.
From the Start menu, select Computer.
The Computer window is displayed.
2.
Click Network.
3.
Locate the NAS appliance and double‐click it.
4.
From the CIFS shares list, select the CIFS share to which you want to connect.
Accessing a CIFS Share Using UNIX/Linux
Mount the CIFS share from a UNIX/Linux operating system using one of the following commands:
# mount -t smbfs -o user_name=<username>,password=<password> //
<client_VIP_or_name>/<CIFS_share_name> /<local_folder>
# smbmount //<client_VIP_or_name>/<CIFS_share_name> /<local_folder> -o
user_name=<username>
Managing NFS Exports
Network File System (NFS) exports provide an effective way of sharing files across a UNIX/ Linux network
with authorized clients. After creating NFS exports, NFS clients then need to mount each NFS export. The
FluidFS cluster fully supports NFS protocol version v3 and partially supports NFS protocol version v4.
•
Supported NFSv4 features:
– File and byte‐range locking
– Kerberos v5 security using an AD server
– AUTH_SYS legacy weak authentication
– UID translation using an LDAP server (UNIX or AD) or an NIS server
– UTF‐8 file and directory names
Configuring NFS Exports
View, add, modify, and delete NFS exports and control whether NFS v4 is enabled.
Viewing All NFS Exports on a FluidFS Cluster
View all current NFS exports for a FluidFS cluster.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NFS Exports tab on the top.
The NFS exports are displayed in the All NFS Exports pane.
Viewing NFS Exports on a NAS Volume
View the current NFS exports for a NAS volume.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
to view.
in the row of the volume whose NFS exports shares you want
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4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the NFS Exports tab on the top.
Adding an NFS Export
Create an NFS export to share a directory in a NAS volume using the NFS protocol. When an NFS export is
added, default values are applied for some settings. To change the defaults, you must modify the NFS
export.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
exports.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the NFS Exports tab on the top.
6.
In the NFS Exports pane, click
7.
Click New NFS Export.
in the row of the volume to which you want to add NFS
.
The New NFS Export dialog box appears.
8.
Click the […] button to the right of the Directory field.
The Browse Folders dialog box appears.
9.
In the folder tree, click [+] to expand subfolders.
10. Select a folder from the tree or type a folder in the edit box under the folder tree.
(To share the root of the NAS volume, type /). The folder path must be fewer than 255 characters
long and may not contain the following characters: >, ʺ, \, |, ?, and *.
11. Click OK.
12. If the folder you entered doesn’t exist and you want to create it, check the Create the folder if it
does not exist checkbox.
13. (Optional) Click the Allow root access from checkbox and enter the IP address of the single system
that you want to have root access (by default, the root user is "squashed" so that it has no special
permissions).
14. Click OK.
Changing the Client Authentication Methods for an NFS Export
Change the authentication method(s) that clients use to access an NFS export.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
to modify.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the NFS Exports tab on the top.
6.
In the NFS Exports pane, click
7.
Click Modify.
in the row of the volume whose NFS exports shares you want
in the row of the export you want to modify.
The Modify NFS Export dialog box appears.
8.
In the Authentication Methods area, select the check boxes for one or more authentication methods
(UNIX Style, Kerberos v5, Kerberos v5 Integrity, and Kerberos v5 Privacy) that clients are allowed to
use to access an NFS export.
9.
Click OK.
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Changing the Client Access Permissions for an NFS Export
Change the permissions for clients accessing an NFS export.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
to modify.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the NFS Exports tab on the top.
6.
In the NFS Exports pane, click
7.
Click Modify.
in the row of the volume whose NFS exports shares you want
in the row of the export you want to modify.
The Modify NFS Export dialog box appears.
8.
To add access permissions for clients accessing the NFS export:
a) Click the Add button.
The Access Permissions for NFS Export dialog box appears.
b) In the Client Machine Trust area, select an option to specify which client machines (All Clients,
Single Client, Client Machines in a Network, or Client Machines in a Netgroup) are allowed to
access the NFS export.
c) In the Allow Access For area, select whether clients have Read/write or Read only access to the
NFS export.
d) From the Trust Following Users area, select which client accounts (Everyone except root ,
Everyone, or Nobody) are allowed to access the NFS export.
e) Click OK.
9.
To change access permissions for clients accessing the NFS export, click the client name (in blue) in
the Trusted Client Machines column, to open the Access Permissions for NFS Export dialog and
configure as described in step (8).
10. To remove access permissions for clients accessing the NFS export, select an entry in the Access
Details list and click
.
11. Click OK.
Enabling or Disabling Secure Ports for an NFS Export
Requiring secure ports limits client access to an NFS export to ports lower than 1024.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
to modify.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the NFS Exports tab on the top.
6.
In the NFS Exports pane, click
7.
Click Modify.
in the row of the volume whose NFS exports shares you want
in the row of the export you want to modify.
The Modify NFS Export dialog box appears.
8.
Enable or disable secure ports.
– To enable secure ports, select the Require Secure Port checkbox.
– To disable secure ports, clear the Require Secure Port checkbox.
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9.
Click OK.
Enabling or Disabling Reported Size Limiting for an NFS Export
To enable access for client machines that cannot handle large file systems, limit the reported size of the
NFS export.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
to modify.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the NFS Exports tab on the top.
6.
In the NFS Exports pane, click
7.
Click Modify.
in the row of the volume whose NFS exports shares you want
in the row of the export you want to modify.
The Modify NFS Export dialog box appears.
8.
Enable or disable reported size limiting.
– To enable reported size limiting, select the Limit Reported Size To check box.
9.
– To disable reported size limiting, clear the Limit Reported Size Tocheck box.
If reported size limiting is enabled, in the Limit Reported Size field, type the maximum reported size
for the NFS export, and select the size unit as kilobytes (KB), megabytes (MB), gigabytes (GB), or
terabytes (TB).
10. Click OK.
Enabling or Disabling 32-bit File ID Compatibility for an NFS Export
To preserve compatibility with 32‐bit applications, the FluidFS cluster can force 64‐bit clients to use 32‐bit
inode numbers for an NFS export.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
to modify.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the NFS Exports tab on the top.
6.
In the NFS Exports pane, click
7.
Click Modify.
in the row of the volume whose NFS exports shares you want
in the row of the export you want to modify.
The Modify NFS Export dialog box appears.
8.
Enable or disable 32‐bit file ID compatibility.
– To enable 32‐it file ID compatibility, select the Report 32 bit inode to clients check box.
9.
– To disable 32‐it file ID compatibility, clear the Report 32 bit inode to clients check box.
Click OK.
Deleting an NFS Export
If you delete an NFS export, the data in the shared directory is no longer shared but it is not removed.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NFS Exports tab on the top.
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3.
In the All NFS Exports pane, click
4.
Click Delete.
in the row of the NFS export you want to delete.
The Delete dialog box appears.
5.
Click OK.
Enabling or Disabling NFS v4
NFS v4 is enabled or disabled on a system wide basis. By default, NFS v4 is disabled, which forces clients
to use NFS v3 and earlier. You might want to do this if you have clients that are incompatible with NFS v4.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on the top.
3.
In the Internal Settings pane, click
4.
Click Modify NFS Settings.
.
The Modify NFSv4 Settings dialog box appears.
5.
Enable or disable NFS v4:
– To enable NFS v4, select the Enable NFSv4 check box.
6.
– To disable NFS v4, clear the Enable NFSv4 check box.
Click OK.
Setting Permissions for an NFS Export
To assign user access to an NFS export, you must log in to the NFS export using a trusted client machine
account and set access permissions and ownership of the NFS export using the chmod and chown
commands on the NFS mount point.
Accessing an NFS Export
Clients use the mount command to connect to NFS exports using UNIX/Linux.
NOTE: The parameters are recommended parameters. See the mount command manual page in
the respective operating system for more information and other options.
Accessing an NFS Export with UNIX/Linux
To mount an NFS export folder from a shell on a client system, use the su command to log in as root and
run the following command:
# mount <options> <client_VIP_or_name>:/<volume_name>/<exported_folder>
<local_folder>
Accessing an NFS Export with UNIX/Linux Using NFS v4
To mount an NFS export folder and force the use of NFS v4 from a shell on a client system, use the su
command to log in as root and run the following command:
# mount –t nfs4 <client_VIP_or_name>:/<volume_name>/<exported_folder>
<local_folder>
Accessing an NFS Export with UNIX/Linux Using NFS v3
If NFS v4 is enabled on the FluidFS cluster, you can force a specific client to use NFS v3 if needed. To
mount an NFS export folder and force the use of NFS v3, from a shell on a client system, use the su
command to log in as root and run the following command:
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# mount -o nfsvers=3,rsize=32768,wsize=32768 <client_VIP_or_name>:/
<volume_name>/<exported_folder> <local_folder>
Accessing an NFS Export with UNIX/Linux without Default Use of TCP
Older versions of UNIX/Linux do not use TCP by default. To mount an NFS export folder from a shell on a
client system, use the su command to log in as root and run the following command:
# mount -o hard,tcp,nfsvers=3,timeo=3,retrans=10,rsize=32768,wsize=32768
<client_VIP_or_name>:/<volume_name>/<exported_folder> <local_folder>
Accessing an NFS Export with a Mac
To mount an NFS export folder, run the following command:
# mount_nfs -T -3 -r 32768 -w 32768 -P <client_VIP_or_name>:/<volume_name>/
<exported_folder> <local_folder>
Managing Quota Rules
Quota rules allow you to control the amount of NAS volume space a user or group can utilize. Quotas
are configured on a per-NAS-volume basis.
When a user reaches a specified portion of the quota size (soft quota limit) an alert is sent to the storage
administrator. When a user reaches the maximum quota size (hard quota limit), they are unable to write
data to the CIFS shares and NFS exports on the NAS volume.
Viewing Quota Rules for a NAS Volume
View the current quota rules for a NAS volume.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Quota tab on the top.
in the row of the volume whose quotas you want to view.
The quota rules are displayed.
Setting the Default Quota per User
Configure the quota applied to users for which no other quota is defined.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Quota tab on the top.
6.
In the Users Quota pane, click
7.
Click Modify Default Rule.
8.
To enable a soft quota limit, select the Soft Quota check box and type a soft quota limit in
megabytes (MB), gigabytes (GB), or terabytes (TB) at which an alert will be issued.
in the row of the volume whose quotas you want to define.
.
The Modify Default Rule for User Quota dialog box appears
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9.
To enable a hard quota limit, select the Hard Quota check box and type a hard quota limit in
megabytes (MB), gigabytes (GB), or terabytes (TB) at which no more writing to the NAS volume will
be permitted.
10. Click OK.
Setting the Default Quota per Group
Configure the quota applied to groups for which no other quota is defined.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Quota tab on the top.
6.
In the Group Quotas pane, click
7.
Click Modify Default Rule.
in the row of the volume whose quotas you want to define.
.
The Modify Default Rule for Group Quota dialog box appears
8.
To enable a soft quota limit, select the Soft Quota check box and type a soft quota limit in
megabytes (MB), gigabytes (GB), or terabytes (TB) at which an alert will be issued.
9.
To enable a hard quota limit, select the Hard Quota check box and type a hard quota limit in
megabytes (MB), gigabytes (GB), or terabytes (TB) at which no more writing to the NAS volume will
be permitted.
10. Click OK.
Adding a Quota Rule for a Specific User
Configure the quota that is applied to a user.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Quota tab on the top.
6.
In the Users Quotas pane, click
7.
Click New Rule.
in the row of the volume whose quotas you want to modify.
.
The New Rule for User Quota dialog box appears
8.
Click the […] button to the right of the Rule for user field.
The User Browser dialog box appears.
9.
From the Domain name drop‐down menu, select the domain to which the user is assigned.
10. In the Starts with field, type either the full name of the user or the beginning of the user name.
11. Click Display.
12. Select a user from the search results.
13. Click OK.
14. To enable a soft quota limit, select the Soft Quota check box and type a soft quota limit in
megabytes (MB), gigabytes (GB), or terabytes (TB) at which an alert is issued.
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15. To enable a hard quota limit, select the Hard Quota check box and type a hard quota limit in
megabytes (MB), gigabytes (GB), or terabytes (TB) at which no more writing to the NAS volume is
permitted.
16. Click OK.
Adding a Quota Rule for Each User in a Specific Group
Configure the quota applied to each user that belongs to a group.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Quota tab on the top.
6.
In the Groups Quotas pane, click
7.
Click New Rule.
in the row of the volume whose quotas you want to modify.
.
The New Rule for Group Quota dialog box appears
8.
Click the […] button to the right of the Rule for group field.
The Group Browser dialog box appears.
9.
From the Domain drop‐down menu, select the group’s domain.
10. In the Starts with field, type either the full name of the group or the beginning of the group name.
11. Click Display.
12. Select a group from the search results.
13. Click OK.
14. Select Any user in group.
15. To enable a soft quota limit, select the Soft Quota check box and type a soft quota limit in
megabytes (MB), gigabytes (GB), or terabytes (TB) at which an alert is issued.
16. To enable a hard quota limit, select the Hard Quota check box and type a hard quota limit in
megabytes (MB), gigabytes (GB), or terabytes (TB) at which no more writing to the NAS volume is
permitted.
17. Click OK.
Adding a Quota Rule for an Entire Group
Configure the quota applied to all users in a group collectively.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Quota tab on the top.
6.
In the Groups Quotas pane, click
7.
Click New Rule.
in the row of the volume whose quotas you want to modify.
.
The New Rule for Group Quota dialog box appears
8.
Click the […] button to the right of the Rule for group field.
The Group Browser dialog box appears.
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9.
From the Domain drop‐down menu, select the group’s domain.
10. In the Starts with field, type either the full name of the group or the beginning of the group name.
11. Click Display.
12. Select a group from the search results.
13. Click OK.
14. Select The group itself.
15. To enable a soft quota limit, select the Soft Quota check box and type a soft quota limit in
megabytes (MB), gigabytes (GB), or terabytes (TB) at which an alert is issued.
16. To enable a hard quota limit, select the Hard Quota check box and type a hard quota limit in
megabytes (MB), gigabytes (GB), or terabytes (TB) at which no more writing to the NAS volume is
permitted.
17. Click OK.
Changing the Soft Quota or Hard Quota for a User or Group
To configure a quota applied to a user, users in a group, or a group:
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click View Details.
in the row of the volume whose quotas you want to modify.
5.
Click the Quotas tab on the top.
6.
In the Users Quota or Groups Quotas pane, click
7.
Click Modify.
8.
To change the soft quota limit, type a new soft quota limit in kilobytes (KB), megabytes (MB),
gigabytes (GB), or terabytes (TB) at which an alert will be issued.
9.
To change the hard quota limit, type a new hard quota limit in kilobytes (KB), megabytes (MB),
gigabytes (GB), or terabytes (TB) at which no more writing to the NAS volume will be permitted.
in the row of the rule you want to modify.
The Modify Rule dialog box appears
10. Click OK.
Enabling or Disabling the Soft Quota or Hard Quota for a User or Group
To configure a quota applied to a user, users in a group, or a group:
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Quotas tab on the top.
6.
In the Users Quota or Groups Quotas pane, click
7.
Click Modify.
in the row of the volume whose quotas you want to modify.
in the row of the rule you want to modify.
The Modify Rule dialog box appears
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8.
Enable or disable the soft quota limit.
– To enable the soft quota limit, select the Soft Quota check box.
9.
– To disable the soft quota limit, clear the Soft Quota check box.
Enable or disable the hard quota limit.
– To enable the hard quota limit, select the Hard Quota check box.
– To disable the hard quota limit, clear the Hard Quota check box.
10. Click OK.
Deleting a User or Group Quota Rule
Delete a user or group quota rule if you no longer need to control the amount of NAS volume space a
user or group can utilize.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Quotas tab on the top.
6.
In the Users Quota or Groups Quotas pane, click
7.
Click Delete.
in the row of the volume whose quotas you want to modify.
in the row of the rule you want to modify.
The Delete Quota Rule dialog box appears
8.
Click OK.
Managing Data Reduction
Data reduction is enabled on a per NAS volume basis. The FluidFS cluster supports two types of data
reduction:
•
Data deduplication: Uses algorithms to eliminate redundant data, leaving only one copy of the data
to be stored. The FluidFS cluster uses variable-size block level deduplication as opposed to file level
deduplication.
•
Data compression: Uses proprietary algorithms to reduce the size of stored data.
Data reduction also provides space savings for snapshots taken after files have been reduced.
By default, data reduction is applied only to files that have not been accessed or modified for 30 days, in
order to minimize the impact of data reduction on performance. The minimum file size to be considered
for data reduction processing is 64 KB. Data reduction is applied per NAS controller, that is, the same
chunks of data that are owned by the different NAS controllers are not considered duplicates.
Because quotas are based on logical rather than physical space consumption, data reduction does not
affect quota calculations.
In the event that you disable data reduction, data remains in its reduced state during subsequent read
operations by default. You have the option to enable rehydrate‐on‐read when disabling data reduction,
which causes “rehydration” (reversal of data reduction) of data on subsequent read operations. You
cannot rehydrate an entire NAS volume with a single command, although you could accomplish this by
reading the entire NAS volume.
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There are several factors to consider when enabling data reduction:
•
Data reduction processing has a 5‐20% impact on the performance of read operations on reduced
data. There is no impact on write operations on reduced data.
•
Increased internal traffic during data reduction processing.
•
Data is rehydrated for anti‐virus scanning.
•
Data is rehydrated before being replicated to a target NAS volume.
•
You cannot enable data reduction on a cloned NAS volume.
•
Data reduction stops automatically when a NAS volume has less than 5 GB unused space. Therefore, a
NAS volume resize operation can inadvertently stop data reduction.
Enabling Data Reduction at the System Level
Before you can enable data reduction for a NAS volume, you must enable data reduction at the system
level.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on the top.
3.
In the Background Processes pane, click
4.
Click Modify Data Reduction Settings.
.
The Modify Data Reduction Settings dialog box appears.
5.
Check the "Schedule the Data Reduction…" checkbox.
6.
Select the hour at which to run data reduction.
7.
Select the period (in hours) for which to run data reduction.
8.
Click OK.
Enabling Data Reduction on a NAS Volume
Data reduction is enabled on a per NAS volume basis.
NOTE: Data reduction must be enabled at the system level before it will run on individual NAS
volumes.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
want to modify.
4.
Click View Details.
in the row of the volume whose data reduction settings you
The volume’s Space view is displayed.
5.
In the Data Reduction pane, click
6.
Click Modify Data Reduction Policy.
.
The Modify Data Reduction Policy dialog box appears.
7.
Click Enable data reduction on this NAS volume.
Data reduction settings are displayed.
8.
To enable compression as well as deduplication, select In addition to de-duplication use
compression during the file optimization.
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9.
To change the number of days after which data reduction is applied to files that have not been
accessed, type the number of days in the Optimize files that were not accessed in the last field.
NOTE: The number of days must be at least 30.
10. To change the number of days after which data reduction is applied to files that have not been
modified, type the number of days in the Optimize files that were not modified in the last field.
NOTE: The number of days must be at least 30.
11. Click OK.
Changing the Data Reduction Type for a NAS Volume
Change the data reduction type (Deduplication or Deduplication and Compression) for a NAS volume.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
want to modify.
4.
Click View Details.
in the row of the volume whose data reduction settings you
The volume’s Space view is displayed.
5.
In the Data Reduction pane, click
6.
Click Modify Data Reduction Policy.
.
The Modify Data Reduction Policy dialog box appears.
7.
To enable or disable compression as well as deduplication, select or clear In addition to deduplication use compression during the file optimization.
8.
Click OK.
Changing the Candidates for Data Reduction for a NAS Volume
Change the number of days after which data reduction is applied to files that have not been accessed or
modified for a NAS volume.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
want to modify.
4.
Click View Details.
in the row of the volume whose data reduction settings you
The volume’s Space view is displayed.
5.
In the Data Reduction pane, click
6.
Click Modify Data Reduction Policy.
.
The Modify Data Reduction Policy dialog box appears.
7.
To change the number of days after which data reduction is applied to files that have not been
accessed, type the number of days in the Optimize files that were not accessed in the last field.
8.
To change the number of days after which data reduction is applied to files that have not been
modified, type the number of days in the Optimize files that were not modified in the last field.
9.
Click OK.
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Disabling Data Reduction on a NAS Volume
By default, after disabling data reduction on a NAS volume, data remains in its reduced state during
subsequent read operations. You have the option to enable rehydrate‐on‐read when disabling data
reduction, which causes a rehydration (reversal of data reduction) of data on subsequent read operations.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
want to modify.
4.
Click View Details.
in the row of the volume whose data reduction settings you
The volume’s Space view is displayed.
5.
In the Data Reduction pane, click
6.
Click Modify Data Reduction Policy.
.
The Modify Data Reduction Policy dialog box appears.
7.
Click Disable data reduction on this NAS volume.
8.
To rehydrate data on subsequent read operations, select the Files, which were processed by data
reduction, will be saved rehydrated during read checkbox.
9.
Click OK.
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FluidFS 3.0 Data Protection
8
Managing the Anti-Virus Service
The FluidFS cluster anti‐virus service provides real‐time anti‐virus scanning of files stored in CIFS shares.
The anti‐virus service applies only to CIFS shares; NFS is not supported. The scan operation is transparent
to the client, subject to the availability of an anti‐virus server.
A file is scanned only when a client tries to open the file (not when an infected file is written, a file is
opened to read/modify attributes, old files are opened for re‐write, and so on).
The anti‐virus service consists of two components:
•
One or more network‐accessible computers running a supported third‐party, ICAP‐ enabled anti‐virus
application to provide the anti‐virus scanning service to the FluidFS cluster.
•
A FluidFS cluster anti‐virus scanning policy that specifies file extensions and directories to exclude
from scans, an anti‐virus scanning file size threshold, and whether to allow or deny files larger than
the file size threshold.
When a CIFS share client requests a file from the FluidFS cluster, the FluidFS cluster passes the file to an
anti‐virus server for scanning and then takes one of the following actions:
•
If the file is virus‐free, the FluidFS cluster permits client access. The FluidFS cluster does not scan that
file again, providing it remains unmodified since the last check.
•
If the file is infected, the FluidFS cluster denies client access. There is no indication to the client that
the file is infected. The client experience is:
– A file deletion returns a system‐specific ʺfile not foundʺ state for a missing file, depending on the
client’s computer.
– An access denial might be interpreted as a file permissions problem.
Only storage administrators can recover an uninfected version of the file, or access and process the
infected file. To gain access to an infected file, you must connect to the CIFS share through another CIFS
share on which the anti‐virus service is disabled. Otherwise, the FluidFS cluster recognizes the file as
infected, and denies access. You may also access the file through an NFS export, because NFS does not
support anti‐virus.
File transfers between the FluidFS cluster and the anti‐virus server are not encrypted. Therefore, Dell
recommends protecting/restricting the communication.
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Excluding Files and Directory Paths from Scans
You can determine which files and directory paths are scanned, using extension or location properties as
follows:
•
File Extensions Excluded From Virus Scan: Specifies file extensions (file types) to exclude from
scanning, such as docx.
•
Directories Excluded From Virus Scan: Specifies directory paths to exclude from scanning, such
as /tmp/logs (alternatively, folders and sub‐folders).
The wildcards * (asterisk) and ? (question mark) are permitted when specifying directory paths, such as /
user/*/tmp or /user/t?p.
Supported Anti-Virus Applications
For the latest list of supported anti‐virus applications, see the Dell Fluid File System Version 3 Support
Matrix. At the time of this writing, the FluidFS cluster supports the following anti‐ virus applications:
•
McAfee VirusScan Enterprise 8.8
•
McAfee VirusScan Enterprise for Storage 1.0.2
•
Sophos Endpoint Security and Control 10.0
•
Symantec Protection Engine for Cloud 7.0
•
Symantec ScanEngine 5.2
•
TrendMicro InterScan Web Security Suite 3.1
Configuring Anti-Virus Scanning
To perform anti‐virus scanning, you must add an anti‐virus server and then enable anti‐virus scanning on a
per CIFS share basis.
Adding an Anti-virus Server
Add one or more anti‐virus servers. Dell recommends adding multiple anti‐virus servers to achieve high‐
availability of virus scanning, and reduce the latencies for file access. NAS anti‐virus allocates scanning
operations to the anti‐virus servers to maximize the available scanning bandwidth. The fewer the available
anti‐virus servers, the more time required to scan files.
NOTE:
•
The anti‐virus server must be network accessible. Dell recommends that the server is located on
the same subnet as the FluidFS cluster.
•
The anti‐virus server must run a supported ICAP‐enabled anti‐virus application.
•
The anti‐virus server must be present and working. If no server is available, file access is denied
to clients.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Data Protection tab on the top.
3.
In the Antivirus Scanners pane, click
4.
Click New Antivirus Server.
.
The New Antivirus Server dialog box appears.
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5.
In the Antivirus Server field, type the host name or IP address of the anti‐virus server.
6.
In the Port field, type the port that the FluidFS cluster uses to connect to the anti‐virus server.
7.
Click OK.
Deleting an Anti-virus Server
Delete an anti‐virus server when it is no longer available.
NOTE:
If you have only one anti‐virus server, you cannot delete that server until you first disable anti‐virus
scanning on all CIFS shares.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Data Protection tab on the top.
3.
In the Antivirus Scanners pane, click
4.
Click Delete.
in the row of the server you want to delete. .
The Delete dialog box appears.
5.
Click OK.
Enabling Anti-virus Scanning for a CIFS Share
Anti‐virus scanning is enabled on a per CIFS share basis.
NOTE:
You must configure anti‐virus servers before enabling anti‐virus scanning for a CIFS share.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All CIFS Shares tab on the top.
3.
In the Antivirus Scanners pane, click
scanning.
4.
In the File System tab navigation pane, select CIFS Shares.
5.
Click Modify Virus Scan Settings.
in the row of the CIFS share for which you want to enable
The Modify Virus Scan Settings dialog box appears.
6.
Select the Enable virus scan check box.
7.
(Optional) Configure the remaining anti‐virus scanning attributes as needed.
– To exempt file extensions from anti‐virus scanning, select the Do not scan files with the
following extensions check box and specify the extensions in the Do not scan files with the
following extensions list.
– To exempt directories from anti‐virus scanning, select the Do not scan files with the following
folders check box and specify the directories in the Do not scan files with the following folders
list.
– To deny access to files larger than the specified anti‐virus scanning file size threshold, select the
Deny access to large unscanned files check box.
8.
– To change the maximum size of files that are included in anti‐virus scanning, type a size in the
Maximum file size for anti-virus scanning field in kilobytes (KB), megabytes (MB), gigabytes (GB),
or terabytes (TB).
Click OK.
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Allowing or Denying Access to Large Unscanned Files
Specify whether to allow or deny access to files that are larger than the specified anti‐virus scanning file
size threshold for a CIFS share.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All CIFS Shares tab on the top.
3.
In the Antivirus Scanners pane, click
scanning.
4.
In the File System tab navigation pane, select CIFS Shares.
5.
Click Modify Virus Scan Settings .
6.
Select the Enable virus scan check box.
7.
To allow or deny access to large unscanned files, clear or select the Deny access to large unscanned
files check box.
8.
Click OK.
in the row of the CIFS share for which you want to enable
The Modify Virus Scan Settings dialog box appears.
Changing the Anti-virus Scanning File Size Threshold for a CIFS Share
Change the maximum size of files that are included in anti‐virus scanning for a CIFS share.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All CIFS Shares tab on the top.
3.
In the Antivirus Scanners pane, click
scanning.
4.
In the File System tab navigation pane, select CIFS Shares.
5.
Click Modify Virus Scan Settings .
in the row of the CIFS share for which you want to enable
The Modify Virus Scan Settings dialog box appears.
6.
In the Maximum file size for anti-virus scanning field, type a file size in kilobytes (KB), megabytes
(MB), gigabytes (GB), or terabytes (TB).
7.
Click OK.
Including or Excluding File Extensions and Directories in Anti-virus Scanning for a CIFS
Share
Specify whether to perform anti‐virus scanning for all file extensions and directories for a CIFS share, or
exempt some file extensions and directories from anti‐virus scanning.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All CIFS Shares tab on the top.
3.
In the Antivirus Scanners pane, click
scanning.
4.
In the File System tab navigation pane, select CIFS Shares.
5.
Click Modify Virus Scan Settings .
in the row of the CIFS share for which you want to enable
The Modify Virus Scan Settings dialog box appears.
6.
To exempt file extensions from anti‐virus scanning, select the Do not scan files with the following
extensionscheck box and specify the extensions in the Do not scan files with the following
extensions list.
7.
To exempt directories from anti‐virus scanning, select the Do not scan files with the following
folderscheck box and specify the directories in theDo not scan files with the following folders list.
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8.
To remove an extension or folder from the exemption list, select the extension or folder and click
9.
Click OK.
.
Disabling Anti-virus Scanning for a CIFS Share
Anti‐virus scanning is disabled on a per CIFS share basis.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All CIFS Shares tab on the top.
3.
In the Antivirus Scanners pane, click
4.
In the File System tab navigation pane, select CIFS Shares.
5.
Click Modify Virus Scan Settings .
in the row of the CIFS share for which you want to modify.
The Modify Virus Scan Settings dialog box appears.
6.
Clear the Enable virus scan check box.
7.
Click OK.
Viewing Anti-Virus Events
Events related to anti‐virus scanning can be viewed in the Events pane at the bottom of the FluidFS
Manager display.
Managing Snapshots
Snapshots are read‐only, point‐in‐time copies of NAS volume data. Storage administrators can restore a
NAS volume from a snapshot if needed. In addition, clients can easily retrieve files in a snapshot, without
storage administrator intervention.
Snapshots use a redirect‐on‐write method to track NAS volume changes. That is, snapshots are based
upon a change set. When the first snapshot of a NAS volume is created, all snapshots created after the
baseline snapshot contain changes in relation to the previous snapshot.
There are various policies that can be set for creating a snapshot, including when a snapshot is to be
taken and how long to keep snapshots. For example, mission‐critical files with high churn rates might
need to be backed up every 30 minutes, whereas archival shares might only need to be backed up daily.
Because snapshots retain old version of files on the NAS volume, be sure to monitor available capacity on
the NAS volume and schedule and retain snapshots in a manner that ensures that the NAS volume always
has sufficient free space for both user data and snapshots. Dell also recommends enabling a snapshot
space consumption alert to be triggered when snapshots are consuming significant NAS volume space.
The FluidFS cluster automatically deletes one or more of the oldest snapshots for a NAS volume in the
following cases:
•
If you delete a NAS volume, the FluidFS cluster deletes all of the snapshots for the NAS volume.
•
If you restore a NAS volume from a snapshot, the FluidFS cluster deletes all the snapshots created
after the snapshot from which you restored the NAS volume.
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Creating On-Demand Snapshots
Create a NAS volume snapshot to take an immediate point‐in‐time copy of the data.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
snapshot.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Snapshots tab on the top.
6.
In the Snapshotspane, click
7.
in the row of the volume for which you want to create a
.
Click New Snapshots.
The New Snapshotdialog box appears.
8.
In the Snapshot Name field, type a name for the snapshot.
9.
Click OK.
Managing Scheduled Snapshots
You can create a schedule to generate snapshots regularly. To minimize the impact of snapshot
processing on system performance, we recommend scheduling snapshots during off‐peak times.
Snapshots created by a snapshot schedule will be named using the format
<snapshot_schedule_name>_YYYY_MM_DD HH_MM.
Creating a Snapshot Schedule for a NAS Volume
Create a NAS volume snapshot schedule to take a scheduled point‐in‐time copy of the data.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
snapshot schedule.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Snapshots tab on the top.
in the row of the volume for which you want to create a
6.
In the Snapshots Scheduling pane, click
7.
Click New Snapshots Scheduling.
.
The New Snapshots Scheduling dialog box appears.
8.
In the Snapshots Scheduling Name field, type a name for the snapshot Schedule.
9.
Specify when to create snapshots.
– To schedule snapshot creation every X minutes, select Take snapshot every and type the desired
frequency in minutes.
– To schedule snapshot creation for a specific day and time, select Take snapshot on and select
the day, hour and minute the snapshot should be created.
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10. (Optional) Configure the remaining snapshot schedule attributes as needed.
– To retain all snapshots that are created by the snapshot schedule indefinitely, clear the Retain
each snapshot for check box.
– To define an expiration period for the snapshots that are created by the snapshot schedule in the
future, select the Retain each snapshot for check box and specify the retention period for
snapshots in minutes, hours, days, or weeks.
11. Click OK.
Changing the Snapshot Schedule Frequency
Change how often to create snapshots for a snapshot schedule.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
to modify.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Snapshots tab on the top.
in the row of the volume whose snapshot schedule you want
6.
In the Snapshots Scheduling pane, click
7.
Click Modify.
in the row of the schedule you want to modify.
The Modify Snapshots Scheduling dialog box appears.
8.
In the Snapshot scheduling name field, type a name for the snapshot Schedule.
9.
Specify when to create snapshots.
– To schedule snapshot creation every X minutes, select Take snapshot every and type the desired
frequency in minutes.
– To schedule snapshot creation for a specific day and time, select Take snapshot on and select
the day, hour and minute the snapshot should be created.
10. Click OK.
Changing the Retention Policy for a Snapshot Schedule
Specify whether to retain all snapshots that are created by a snapshot schedule, or configure the
snapshots to expire after a certain period of time.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
to modify.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Snapshots tab on the top.
in the row of the volume whose snapshot schedule you want
6.
In the Snapshots Scheduling pane, click
7.
Click Modify.
in the row of the schedule you want to modify.
The Modify Snapshots Scheduling dialog box appears.
8.
To retain all snapshots that are created by the snapshot schedule indefinitely, clear the Retain each
snapshot for check box.
9.
To define an expiration period for the snapshots that are created by the snapshot schedule in the
future, select the Retain each snapshot for check box and specify the retention period for snapshots
in minutes, hours, days, or weeks.
10. Click OK.
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Deleting a Snapshot Schedule
Specify whether to retain all snapshots that are created by a snapshot schedule, or configure the
snapshots to expire after a certain period of time.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
to modify.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Snapshots tab on the top.
6.
In the Snapshots Scheduling pane, click
7.
Click Delete .
in the row of the volume whose snapshot schedule you want
in the row of the schedule you want to modify.
The Delete dialog box appears.
8.
Click OK.
Modifying and Deleting Snapshots
Manage snapshots that were created on demand or by a schedule.
Renaming a Snapshot
Rename a snapshot.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
to modify.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Snapshots tab on the top.
6.
In the Snapshots pane, click
7.
Click Modify .
in the row of the volume whose snapshot schedule you want
in the row of the snapshot you want to rename.
The Modify Snapshot dialog box appears.
8.
In the New name field, type a new name for the snapshot.
9.
Click OK.
Changing the Retention Policy for a Snapshot
Specify whether to retain the snapshot indefinitely or expire the snapshot after a period of time.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
to modify.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Snapshots tab on the top.
6.
In the Snapshots pane, click
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in the row of the volume whose snapshot schedule you want
in the row of the snapshot you want to rename.
7.
Click Modify .
The Modify Snapshot dialog box appears.
8.
To retain all snapshots that are created by the snapshot schedule indefinitely, clear the Retain each
snapshot for check box.
9.
To define an expiration period for the snapshots that are created by the snapshot schedule in the
future, select the Retain each snapshot for check box and specify the retention period for snapshots
in minutes, hours, days, or weeks.
10. Click OK.
Deleting a Snapshot
Delete a snapshot if you no longer need the point‐in‐time copy of the data.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
to modify.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Snapshots tab on the top.
6.
In the Snapshots pane, click
7.
Click Delete .
in the row of the volume whose snapshot schedule you want
in the row of the snapshot you want to rename.
The Delete dialog box appears.
8.
Click OK.
Restoring Data from a Snapshot
You can restore data in two ways:
•
Restore individual files: Once a snapshot is created, the FluidFS cluster creates a client‐ accessible
snapshots directory containing a copy of the files included in the snapshot. Clients can easily restore
individual files from a snapshot using copy and paste, without storage administrator intervention. This
method is useful for the day‐to‐day restore actions of individual files.
•
Restore a NAS Volume from a snapshot: The storage administrator can restore an entire NAS volume
where copy and paste of huge amounts of data would take significant time. This method is useful in
the case of an application error or virus attack.
Snapshots retain the same security style as the active file system. Therefore, even when using snapshots,
clients can access only their own files based on existing permissions. The data available when accessing a
specific snapshot is at the level of the specific share and its subdirectories, ensuring that users cannot
access other parts of the file system.
Viewing Available Snapshots
View the snapshots available for restoring data.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
to modify.
4.
Click View Details.
in the row of the volume whose snapshot schedule you want
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5.
Click the Snapshots tab on the top.
The snapshots are displayed in the Snapshots pane.
Restoring a NAS Volume from a Snapshot
View the snapshots available for restoring data.
The storage administrator can restore an entire NAS volume from a snapshot. The restored NAS volume
will contain all the NAS volume data that existed at the time the snapshot was created. Each file in the
restored NAS volume will have the properties, such as permission and time, which existed when you (or a
schedule) created the snapshot.
CAUTION:
The restore operation cannot be undone. Any data created or changed between the time of the
snapshot and the time the restore operation is completed, is permanently erased. You should
restore a NAS volume from a snapshot only if you first understand all the repercussions of the
restore operation, as described below.
After you restore a NAS volume from a snapshot:
•
The FluidFS cluster deletes any snapshots created after the snapshot from which you restored the
NAS volume. Snapshots created before the snapshot from which you restored the NAS volume are
not affected.
•
Current CIFS clients of the NAS volume are automatically disconnected.
•
Current NFS clients of the NAS volume receive stale NFS file handle error messages. You must
unmount and then re‐mount the NFS exports.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Snapshots tab on the top.
6.
In the Snapshots pane, click
7.
Click Rollback NAS Volume.
in the row of the volume you want to restore.
in the row of the snapshot you want to restore.
The Rollback NAS Volume dialog box appears.
8.
Click OK.
The NAS volume is rolled back to the selected snapshot, and all snapshots created after the selected
snapshot disappear from the Snapshots pane.
Restoring Files Using UNIX/Linux or Windows
This restore option allows clients to restore a file from a snapshot using copy and paste.
1.
Access the NFS export or CIFS share.
2.
Access the .snapshots directory.
3.
Find the snapshot according to its time of creation.
4.
Copy the file from its snapshot location to its original location.
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Restoring Files Using Windows Only
Snapshots integrate into the Shadow Copies and previous versions features of Windows. This restore
option allows clients to restore a file using previous versions.
1.
Right‐click the file, select Properties, and then click the Previous Versions tab. A list containing
available previous versions of the file is displayed.
2.
Click the version to restore, and then click Restore.
Managing NDMP
Snapshots integrate into the Shadow Copies and previous versions features of Windows. This restore
option allows clients to restore a file using previous versions.
The FluidFS cluster supports Network Data Management Protocol (NDMP), which is an open standard
protocol that facilitates backup operations for network attached storage, including FluidFS cluster NAS
volumes. The FluidFS cluster supports NDMP versions 2, 3, and 4. NDMP should be used for longer‐term
data protection, such as weekly backups with long retention periods.
The FluidFS cluster supports only a three‐way backup, wherein a supported, third‐party Data Management
Application (DMA) server mediates the data transfer between the FluidFS cluster and the storage device.
The FluidFS cluster supports full backup, incremental backup, differential backup (dump levels 0‐9), and
Direct Access Recovery (DAR).
A FluidFS cluster includes an NDMP server that performs NAS volume backups to an external DMA server.
The FluidFS cluster does not use a dedicated address for backup operations; any configured client
network address can be used. Data is sent over Ethernet.
After you configure and start NDMP in a FluidFS cluster, the NDMP server monitors the client network for
backup requests from the DMA servers. The DMA server then accesses (mounts) the NAS volumes that it
intends to back up and initiates the backup operations. Multiple NDMP backups can run at the same time.
To minimize the impact of NDMP backup processing on system performance, schedule NDMP during off‐
peak times.
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The following steps are involved in backing up NAS volume data using NDMP:
1.
The DMA server creates a connection to the FluidFS cluster IP address.
NOTE: NDMP does not provide High Availability (HA). If a backup session is interrupted due to
connection loss, the session is terminated.
2.
The NDMP server on the FluidFS cluster creates a temporary snapshot of each NAS volume that the
DMA server designated for backup. Alternatively, when performing a backup of replication target NAS
volumes, the FluidFS cluster does not create a dedicated NDMP snapshot. Instead, it uses the base
replica snapshot from the last successful replication.
Temporary NDMP snapshots are named using the following format:
ndmp_backup_<session_ID>_<controller_number>
NOTE: Manually deleting the temporary snapshot will immediately terminate the current
backup session. The error on the DMA application will be data unavailable or internal.
NOTE: If a backup session is terminated with an error, the temporary snapshot might remain,
and can be safely deleted manually.
3.
The NDMP server copies the NAS volume data to the DMA server.
4.
After receiving the data, the DMA server moves the data to a storage device, such as a local disk or
tape device.
5.
Once the backup completes, the NDMP server deletes the temporary snapshots.
Supported DMAs
For the latest list of supported DMAs, see the Dell Fluid File System Version 3 Support Matrix. At the time
of this writing, the FluidFS cluster supports the following DMAs:
•
CommVault Simpana 9.0
•
Quest NetVault Backup 8.6x and 9.0x
•
Symantec BackupExec 2010R3 and 2012
•
Symantec NetBackup 7.0
•
Symantec Protection Engine
•
IBM Tivoli Storage Manager 6.3
Configuring NDMP
Before you can take an NDMP backup, you must add a DMA server and configure the NDMP user name,
password, and client port.
Adding a DMA Server
Configure one or more DMA servers from which the NDMP server can service NAS volume backup
requests. There is no limit on the number of DMA servers taking backups at any point in time.
•
The DMA server must run a supported NDMP backup application.
•
The DMA server must be network accessible.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Data Protection tab on the top.
3.
In the NDMP pane, click
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.
4.
Click Modify Settings.
5.
In the DMA Servers text field, type the IP address of a DMA server and click Add.
The Modify NDMP Settings dialog box appears.
Repeat this step for any additional DNA servers.
6.
Click OK.
Removing a DMA Server
Remove a DMA server if it is no longer needed for NDMP backups.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Data Protection tab on the top.
3.
In the NDMP pane, click
4.
Click Modify Settings.
.
The Modify NDMP Settings dialog box appears.
5.
In the DMA Servers list, click the DMA server you want to remove and click
6.
Click OK.
.
Changing the NDMP Password
A user name and password are required when configuring an NDMP server in the DMA. The default
password is randomized and must be changed prior to using NDMP.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Data Protection tab on the top.
3.
In the NDMP pane, click
4.
Click Change Password.
.
The Change Password dialog box appears.
5.
In the New Password field, type an NDMP password.
The password must be at least seven characters long and contain three of the following elements: a
lowercase character, an uppercase character, a digit, or a special character (such as +, ?, or ∗).
6.
In the Repeat Password field, re‐type the NDMP password.
7.
Click OK.
Changing the NDMP Username
A user name and password are required when configuring an NDMP server in the DMA. By default, the
user name is backup_user. You can change this user name if needed.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Data Protection tab on the top.
3.
In the NDMP pane, click
4.
Click Modify Settings .
.
5.
In the Backup user name field, type a new NDMP user name.
6.
Click OK.
The Modify NDMP Settings dialog box appears.
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Changing the NDMP Client Port
By default, the NDMP server monitors port 10000 for incoming connections. You can change the client
port to match the port used by the DMA.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Data Protection tab on the top.
3.
In the NDMP pane, click
4.
Click Modify Settings .
5.
In the NDMP Port field, type a new client port.
6.
Click OK.
.
The Modify NDMP Settings dialog box appears.
Specifying NAS Volumes Using the DMA
In order to perform backup and restore operations, the DMA server must be configured to be able to
access the FluidFS cluster.
On each DMA server, you must configure the following:
•
Client VIP (or a DNS name) that the DMA server accesses. If you ever change the client VIP, you must
also make the reciprocal change on the DMA servers.
NOTE: NDMP has no load balancing built in. A single DMA backing up 10 NAS volumes from a
single client VIP forces all 10 sessions to be on the same NAS controller. Therefore, Dell
recommends using DNS round‐robin to provide load balancing, by specifying the DNS name of
the FluidFS cluster in the DMA.
•
NDMP user name and password (default user name is backup_user).
•
Port that the NDMP server monitors for incoming connections (default port is 10000).
In addition, some DMA servers require the following:
•
Host name of the FluidFS cluster, which uses the following format:
<controller_number>.<FluidFS_cluster_name>
•
OS type: Dell Fluid File System
•
Product: Compellent FS8600
•
Vendor: Dell Inc.
Most backup applications automatically list the available NAS volumes to back up. Otherwise, you can
manually type in the NAS volume path. The FluidFS cluster exposes backup NAS volumes at the following
path:
/<NAS_volume_name>
To improve data transfer speed, limit the number of concurrent backup jobs to one per NAS controller.
Viewing NDMP Jobs and Events
All NDMP jobs and events can be viewed using FluidFS Manager.
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Viewing Active NDMP Jobs
View all NDMP backup and restore operations being processed by the FluidFS cluster.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the CIFS & NDMP Sessions tab on the top.
The NDMP jobs are displayed in the NDMP Sessions pane.
Viewing NDMP Events
Events related to NDMP backups can be viewed in the Events pane at the bottom of the FluidFS Manager
display.
Managing Replication
Replication allows you to copy NAS volume data from the local (source) FluidFS cluster to a different NAS
volume on the local FluidFS cluster or to a remote (target) FluidFS cluster.
The following figure shows an overview of local replication between NAS volumes on a single FluidFS
cluster.
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Replication can be used in various scenarios to achieve different levels of data protection.
Replication Scenarios
Description
Fast backup and restore
Maintain full copies of data for protection against data loss,
corruption, or user mistakes
Disaster recovery
Mirror data to remote locations for failover during a disaster
Remote data access
Applications can access mirrored data in read‐only or read‐write
mode if volumes are promoted or cloned
Online data migration
Minimize downtime associated with data migration
Configuring replication is a three step process:
•
Add a replication partnership between two FluidFS clusters.
•
Add replication for a NAS volume.
•
Run replication on demand or schedule replication.
How Replication Works
Replication leverages snapshots. The first time you replicate a NAS volume, the FluidFS cluster copies the
entire contents of the NAS volume. For subsequent replication operations, the FluidFS cluster copies only
the data that changed since the previous replication operation started. This allows for faster replication,
efficient use of system resources, and saves on storage space while keeping data consistent. Replication
is asynchronous, meaning that data is replicated to the target NAS volume based on a predefined
schedule, which can be different for each volume.
The amount of time replication takes depends on the amount of data on the NAS volume and the
amount of data that has changed since the previous replication operation.
Replication receives priority over serving data to clients.
When replicating a NAS volume to another FluidFS cluster, the target FluidFS cluster must be set up as a
replication partner. Each FluidFS cluster may have multiple replication partners, enabling you to replicate
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different NAS volumes to different partners, depending on operational requirements. However, each
individual NAS volume can be replicated to only one target NAS volume on one replication partner. The
following figure summarizes which replications scenarios are supported and unsupported.
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Once a partner relationship is established, replication is bi‐directional. One system could hold target NAS
volumes for the other system as well as source NAS volumes to replicate to that other system.
A replication policy can be set up to run according to a set schedule or on demand. Replication
management flows through a secure SSH tunnel from system to system over the client network.
To access or recover data, you can promote a target NAS volume to a recovery NAS volume and grant
clients access to the recovery NAS volume data. The recovery NAS volume will appear as a local NAS
volume.
Target NAS Volumes
A target NAS volume is a read‐only copy of the source NAS volume that resides on the target FluidFS
cluster. The target NAS volume holds identical system configuration information (quota rules, snapshot
policy, security style, and so on) as the source NAS volume. You can promote target NAS volumes to
recovery NAS volumes temporarily or permanently and grant clients access to recovery NAS volume data.
The following considerations apply to target NAS volumes:
•
Unlike source NAS volumes, you cannot create snapshots of target NAS volumes.
•
There must be sufficient free space on the target FluidFS cluster to store the target NAS volumes.
•
The system retains only the current replica of the source NAS volumes. To roll back to a previous
point in time, you must use snapshots.
•
You can either replicate the source NAS volume to an existing NAS volume or to a new target NAS
volume. If you replicate to an existing NAS volume, the NAS volume must not contain any data you
want to retain. Any data residing on the NAS volume will be overwritten and cannot be recovered.
•
Target NAS volumes count towards the total number of NAS volumes in the FluidFS cluster.
Managing Replication Partnerships
When replicating a NAS volume to another FluidFS cluster, the other FluidFS cluster must be set up as a
replication partner. This is a bi‐directional replication trust—source NAS volumes and target NAS volumes
can be located on either system.
Adding a Replication Partnership
Add a replication partner before configuring replication.
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NOTE:
•
Both the source and target FluidFS clusters have the same NAS appliance count. For example, if
the source FluidFS cluster has two NAS appliances, the target FluidFS cluster must have two NAS
appliances. Do not attempt to replicate a four‐NAS appliance FluidFS cluster to a two‐NAS
appliance FluidFS cluster. Attempting to establish a replication partnership between FluidFS
clusters with different NAS appliance counts fail.
•
The FluidFS version installed on the target FluidFS cluster must be the same as or more current
than the FluidFS version installed on the source FluidFS cluster.
•
The source and target FluidFS clusters must be able to communicate with each other so that
replication operations can occur.
•
Verify that the FluidFS replication ports are open on your firewall to allow replication between
the source and target FluidFS clusters.
•
The target FluidFS cluster has enough space to replicate the data from the source FluidFS
cluster.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Data Protection tab on the top.
3.
In the Cluster Partnerships pane, click
4.
Click New.
.
The New Cluster Partnership dialog box appears.
5.
In the IP address of partner cluster field, enter the IP address of the remote cluster.
Changing the Local or Remote Networks for a Replication Partnership
Change the local or remote replication network or IP address for a replication partnership.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Data Protection tab on the top.
3.
In the Cluster Partnerships pane, click
4.
Click Modify.
on the row of the partnership you want to modify. .
The Modify Cluster Partnership dialog box appears.
5.
Configure the local and remote replication networks, ensuring that the FluidFS clusters can
communicate with each other over the specified networks (that is, routing is in place).
– To change the client network used for replication on the local FluidFS cluster, select a client
network from the Local Replication Information Client Network drop‐down menu.
– To change the IP address used for replication on the local FluidFS cluster, select an IP address
from the Local Replication Information Replication IP Address drop‐down menu.
– To change the client network used for replication on the remote FluidFS cluster, select a client
network from the Remote Replication Information Client Network.
6.
– To change the IP address used for replication on the remote FluidFS cluster, select an IP address
from the Remote Replication Information Replication IP Address drop‐down menu.
Click OK.
Delete a Replication Partnership
When you delete a replication partnership, the replication relationship between the source and target
FluidFS clusters is discontinued. When deleting a replication partnership, ensure that both systems are up
and running. If both systems are up, the replication partnership is deleted on both systems. If one of the
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systems is down or unreachable, the partnership is deleted only on the system that is running. Once the
other system comes back up, the partnership must be deleted on that system too.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Data Protection tab on the top.
3.
In the Cluster Partnerships pane, click
4.
Click Delete.
the row of the partnership you want to delete.
The Delete dialog box appears.
5.
Click OK.
Replicating NAS Volumes
You can perform manual and scheduled replication operations, and pause, resume, delete, and monitor
replication.
Adding Replication for a NAS Volume
Adding a replication creates a replication relationship between a source NAS volume and a target NAS
volume. After adding a replication, you can set up a replication policy to run according to a set schedule
or on demand.
NOTE: Create a target NAS volume on the target FluidFS cluster that is the same size or larger than
the source NAS volume.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Replication tab on the top.
6.
In the Replication Partnership pane, click
7.
Click Connect.
in the row of the volume you want to replicate.
.
The Connect to Partner of Replication dialog box appears.
8.
In the Destination cluster drop down, select a FluidFS cluster.
9.
Click the […] button to the right of the Destination NAS volume field.
The NAS volume browser opens.
10. Select the destination volume and click OK.
11. In the Connect to Partner of Replication dialog, click OK.
A warning stating that ALL changes on the destination NAS volume will be lost is displayed.
12. Click the Ignore the above warning check box, then click OK.
The replication partnership is displayed in the Replication Partnership pane.
Deleting Replication for a NAS Volume
Deleting replication for a NAS volume is similar to disabling replication for a NAS volume in that it does
not disrupt replication operations for other NAS volumes or the replication partnership between the
source and target FluidFS clusters. After deleting replication, the target NAS volume becomes a
standalone, writable NAS volume. You can delete replication from either the source or target FluidFS
cluster.
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NOTE:
•
The target NAS volume must be promoted to a standalone NAS volume.
•
You must remove replication schedules for the replication.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumestab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
delete.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Replication tab on the top.
6.
In the Replication Partnership pane, click
7.
Click Disconnect.
in the row of the volume whose replication you want to
.
The Disconnect from Partner of Replication dialog box appears.
8.
Click OK.
The replication partnership is removed from the Replication Partnership pane.
Running Replication on Demand
After a replication is created, you can replicate a NAS volume on demand. You can run replication only
from the source FluidFS cluster.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumestab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Replication tab on the top.
6.
In the Replication Status pane, click
7.
Click Replicate Now .
in the row of the volume you want to replicate.
.
The Replicate Now dialog box appears.
8.
Click OK.
Scheduling Replication
After a replication is created, you can replicate a NAS volume on demand. You can run replication only
from the source FluidFS cluster.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumestab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
schedule.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Replication tab on the top.
6.
In the Replication Scheduling pane, click
7.
Click New Replication Scheduling .
in the row of the volume whose replication you want to
.
The New Replication Scheduling dialog box appears.
8.
In the Replication scheduling name field, type a name for the replication schedule.
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9.
Specify when to run replication:
– To run replication based on a period of time, select Take replication every [ ] minutes and type in
the number of minutes.
– To run replication based on day and time, select Take replication on and select the day, hour and
minute at which to run replication.
10. Click OK.
Changing a Replication Schedule
Change the frequency that replication runs for a replication schedule.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumestab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
schedule.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Replication tab on the top.
6.
In the Replication Scheduling pane, click
7.
Click Modify.
in the row of the volume whose replication you want to
in the row of the schedule you want to change. .
The Modify Replication Scheduling dialog box appears.
8.
Specify when to run replication:
– To run replication based on a period of time, select Take replication every [ ] minutes and type in
the number of minutes.
9.
– To run replication based on day and time, select Take replication on and select the day, hour and
minute at which to run replication.
Click OK.
Deleting a Replication Schedule
Change the frequency that replication runs for a replication schedule.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumestab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
want to delete.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Replication tab on the top.
6.
In the Replication Scheduling pane, click
7.
Click Delete.
8.
Click OK.
in the row of the volume whose replication schedule you
in the row of the schedule you want to delete.
The Delete Replication Scheduling dialog box appears.
Pausing Replication
When you pause a replication, any replication operations for the NAS volume that are in progress are
suspended. While replication is paused, scheduled replications do not take place. Replication may be
paused for individual NAS volumes, but you cannot pause all in‐progress replication operations taking
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place in a FluidFS cluster, or between a specified pair of replication partners. You can pause replication
only from the source FluidFS cluster.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumestab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
want to delete.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Replication tab on the top.
6.
In the Replication Scheduling pane, click
7.
Click Disable.
in the row of the volume whose replication schedule you
.
The Disable Replication dialog box appears.
8.
Click OK.
Resuming Replication
When you resume replication, any replication operations that were in progress at the time the operation
was disabled will resume. In addition, any replication schedules will resume at their next scheduled time.
Replication may be resumed for individual NAS volumes, but you cannot resume all in‐progress
replication operations taking place in a FluidFS cluster, or between a specified pair of replication partners.
You can resume replication only from the source FluidFS cluster.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumestab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
want to resume.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Replication tab on the top.
6.
In the Replication Scheduling pane, click
7.
Click Enable.
8.
Click OK.
in the row of the volume whose replication schedule you
.
The Enable Replication dialog box appears.
Monitoring Replication Progress
Monitor the progress of all replication operations being processed for the FluidFS cluster.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All Replicationstab on the top.
All source and destination volumes are displayed in tables, and their replication status is displayed in
the Status column.
Recovering an Individual NAS Volume
When a NAS volume is defined as a replication target, users may not write to it, as it only replicates
changes made to the replication source volume. If the source volume is down because of a malfunction,
you may want to "promote" the target and "demote" the source; i.e. switch their roles so that the former
target is now the "master" or source. This is so that clients can write to the promoted volume.
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Promoting a Target NAS Volume
When you resume replication, any replication operations that were in progress at the time the operation
was disabled will resume. In addition, any replication schedules will resume at their next scheduled time.
Replication may be resumed for individual NAS volumes, but you cannot resume all in‐progress
replication operations taking place in a FluidFS cluster, or between a specified pair of replication partners.
You can resume replication only from the source FluidFS cluster.
When you promote a target NAS volume, you have the option to demote it at a later time, thereby
making the promotion temporary. Alternatively, you can permanently promote it. Promoting a target NAS
volume to a recovery NAS volume makes the target NAS volume writable, and clients can manually fail
over to it. This operation can be performed regardless of whether the source NAS volume is available.
The recovery NAS volume’s data will be complete up to the point in time of the most recent successful
replication.
When you promote a target NAS volume, any replication operations for the NAS volume that are in
progress are suspended. You can promote a target NAS volume from either the source or target FluidFS
cluster.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumestab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Replication tab on the top.
6.
In the Replication Status pane, click
7.
Click Promote Destination.
in the row of the volume you want to promote.
.
The Promote Destination dialog box appears.
8.
Click OK.
Demoting a Target NAS Volume
Demote the target NAS volume to resume the original replication operations. When you demote a target
NAS volume, all data written to the recovery NAS volume while it was temporarily promoted will be lost.
You can demote a target NAS volume only from the source FluidFS cluster.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumestab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
4.
Click View Details.
5.
Click the Replication tab on the top.
6.
In the Replication Status pane, click
7.
Click Demote Destination.
in the row of the volume you want to promote.
.
The Demote Destination dialog box appears.
8.
Click OK.
Restoring the NAS Volume Configuration
Restoring the NAS volume configuration is an effective way to restore the following NAS volume settings
without having to manually reconfigure them:
•
CIFS shares
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•
NFS exports
•
Snapshot schedules
•
Quota rules
This is useful in the following circumstances:
•
After recovering a system
•
After recovering a NAS volume
•
When failing over to a replication target NAS volume
NAS Volume Configuration Backups
Whenever a change in the NAS volumeʹs configuration is made, it is automatically saved in a format that
allows you to restore it later. The configuration is stored and encrypted in the .clusterConfig folder, which
is located in the NAS volumeʹs root folder. This folder can be backed up, either individually, or with the
NAS volumeʹs user data, and later restored.
The configuration of a NAS volume can be restored on another NAS volume on the same system or on
another system.
A NAS volume configuration backup can be made available to be restored using the following methods:
•
The storage administrator can manually copy the .clusterConfig folder to the NAS volume from its
backup or from another NAS volume. When using a backup from another system, the restore
operation works only if the saved configuration was taken from a system using the same FluidFS
version.
•
The storage administrator can copy the .clusterConfig folder to the NAS volume from its backup or
from another NAS volume using an NDMP restore. When using a backup from another system, the
restore operation works only if the saved configuration was taken from a system using the same
FluidFS version.
•
The .clusterConfig folder is automatically copied to target NAS volumes during replication.
Restoring the NAS Volume Configuration
When you restore a NAS volume configuration, it overwrites and replaces the existing configuration.
Clients that are connected to the FluidFS cluster are disconnected. Clients will then automatically
reconnect to the FluidFS cluster.
1.
Ensure the .clusterConfig folder has been copied to the root folder of the NAS .clusterConfigvolume
on which the NAS volume configuration will be restored.
One way to access the root folder of a NAS volume is to open Windows Explorer and in the address
bar type: \\<client_VIP_or_name>\C$\<NAS_volume>\.
2.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
3.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
4.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
restore.
5.
Click Restore Settings.
in the row of the volume whose configuration you want to
The Restore NAS Volume Settings dialog box appears.
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6.
Select the settings to restore from backup:
– To restore CIFS shares, select the CIFS Shares check box.
– To restore NFS exports, select the NFS Exports check box.
– To restore snapshot schedules, select the Snapshot Scheduling check box.
– To restore quota rules, select the Quota Rules check box.
Click OK.
7.
Restoring Local Users
Restoring the local user configuration provides an effective way to restore all local users without having
to manually reconfigure them. This is useful in the following circumstances:
•
After recovering a system
•
When failing over to a replication target NAS volume
Local Users Configuration Backups
Whenever a change in the local user configuration is made, it is automatically saved in a format that
allows you to restore it later. The configuration is stored and encrypted in the .clusterConfig folder, which
is located in the NAS volumeʹs root folder. This folder can be backed up, either individually, or with the
NAS volumeʹs user data, and later restored.
A local users configuration backup can be made available to be restored using the following methods:
•
The storage administrator can manually copy the .clusterConfig folder to a NAS volume in the system
from its backup or from another system. When using a backup from another system, the restore
operation works only if the saved configuration was taken from a system using the same FluidFS
version.
•
The storage administrator can copy the .clusterConfig folder to a NAS volume in the system from its
backup or from another system using an NDMP restore. When using a backup from another system,
the restore operation works only if the saved configuration was taken from a system using the same
FluidFS version.
•
The .clusterConfig folder is automatically copied to target NAS volumes during replication.
Restoring Local Users
Local users can be restored by restoring the configuration stored on the most current NAS volume in the
FluidFS cluster and restoring it on the same system or on another system.
When you restore the local user configuration, it overwrites and replaces the existing configuration.
Clients that are currently connected to the FluidFS cluster are disconnected. Clients will then
automatically reconnect.
1.
Ensure the .clusterConfig folder has been copied to the root folder of a NAS volume on the system
on which to restore local users. One way to access the root folder of a NAS volume is to open
Windows Explorer and in the address bar type:
\\<client_VIP_or_name>\C$\<NAS_volume>\.
2.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
3.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
4.
In the Local Users pane, click
5.
Click Restore Local Users.
.
The Restore Local Users dialog box appears.
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6.
In the Restore local users from backup taken from cluster drop‐down menu, select the cluster
whose backup will be used to restore local users.
7.
Click OK.
Restoring Local Groups
Restoring the local group configuration provides an effective way to restore all local groups without
having to manually reconfigure them. This is useful in the following circumstances:
•
After recovering a system
•
When failing over to a replication target NAS volume
Local Groups Configuration Backups
Whenever a change in the local group configuration is made, it is automatically saved in a format that
allows you to restore it later. The configuration is stored and encrypted in the
.clusterConfig folder, which is located in the NAS volumeʹs root folder. This folder can be backed up,
either individually, or with the NAS volumeʹs user data, and later restored.
A local groups configuration backup can be made available to be restored using the following methods:
•
The storage administrator can manually copy the .clusterConfig folder to a NAS volume in the system
from its backup or from another system. When using a backup from another system, the restore
operation works only if the saved configuration was taken from a system using the same FluidFS
version.
•
The storage administrator can copy the .clusterConfig folder to a NAS volume in the system from its
backup or from another system using an NDMP restore. When using a backup from another system,
the restore operation works only if the saved configuration was taken from a system using the same
FluidFS version.
•
The .clusterConfig folder is automatically copied to target NAS volumes during replication.
Restoring Local Groups
Local groups can be restored by restoring the configuration stored on the most current NAS volume in
the FluidFS cluster and restoring it on the same system or on another system.
When you restore the local groups configuration, it overwrites and replaces the existing configuration.
Clients that are currently connected to the FluidFS cluster are disconnected. Clients will then
automatically reconnect.
1.
Ensure the .clusterConfig folder has been copied to the root folder of a NAS volume on the system
on which to restore local users. One way to access the root folder of a NAS volume is to open
Windows Explorer and in the address bar type:
\\<client_VIP_or_name>\C$\<NAS_volume>\.
2.
Click the Access Control tab on the left.
3.
Click the User Repositories tab on the top.
4.
In the Local Groups pane, click
5.
Click Restore Local Groups.
.
The Restore Local Groups dialog box appears.
6.
In the Restore local groups from backup taken from cluster drop‐down menu, select the cluster
whose backup will be used to restore local groups.
7.
Click OK.
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Using Replication for Disaster Recovery
You can create a disaster recovery configuration in which you replicate data from a primary FluidFS
cluster to a target FluidFS cluster. You can fail over to the target cluster if the primary FluidFS cluster stops
responding because of an unexpected failure (hardware, disk, and so on). The target FluidFS cluster can
either be used solely for backup for the primary site, or it can have its own NAS volumes sharing data at
the target site. In a bi‐directional configuration, both FluidFS clusters can act as a failover target for each
other.
After you have fixed the problem that caused the original FluidFS cluster to fail, you can manually fail back
to the original configuration in which clients access data on the source NAS volume, which in turn
replicates to the target NAS volume. Depending on time and bandwidth considerations, failing back to
the source NAS volume might take a considerable amount of time to complete.
The following considerations apply when using replication for disaster recovery:
•
If the original source NAS volume is no longer available, you can configure the recovery NAS volume
to replicate to another NAS volume in the original source FluidFS cluster. However, if the original
source NAS volume is available, Dell recommends failing back to it. Failing back to the original source
NAS volume usually takes less time than failing back to a new NAS volume. If the FluidFS clusters have
a common snapshot, they only need to synchronize the data that changed after that snapshot was
created. If no common snapshot is available, or if replicating to a new NAS volume, all data must be
synchronized.
•
A single FluidFS cluster cannot contain two sets of CIFS home shares. Consider the example in which
Cluster A and Cluster B both have CIFS home shares, for different sites or user bases. Cluster A and
Cluster B both serve as replication destinations for each other’s NAS volume that contains the CIFS
home shares. If the administrator tries to fail over Cluster A’s NAS volume that contains CIFS home
shares to Cluster B, Cluster B rejects this operation because it already has CIFS home shares defined
on it.
Managing the DNS Configuration for Single NAS Volume Failover
For single NAS volume failover, it is important that the environment is set up to properly migrate clients of
the NAS volumes you are failing over, without disrupting the clients of other NAS volumes you are not
failing over.
When a NAS Volume is failed over from one FluidFS cluster to another, the IP addresses that are used to
access it change from Cluster A’s IP addresses to Cluster B’s IP addresses. Dell recommends facilitating
this change using DNS. It is recommended to set up a DNS entry to correlate to each NAS volume, and
change the DNS entry for single NAS volumes when they are failed over.
For example, suppose Marketing and Sales have their own NAS volumes, with a CIFS share on the NAS
volume named marketing_share and sales_share respectively. A DNS entry named FluidFSmarketing, is
created for Marketing and another DNS entry for Sales named FluidFSsales is created. Both NAS volumes
point to the same set of client VIPs on source Cluster A. Marketing can access the Marketing NAS volume
or CIFS share using
\\FluidFSmarketing\marketing, and Sales can access the Sales NAS volume or CIFS share using \
\FluidFSsales\sales.
Initially, both DNS entries FluidFSmarketing and FluidFSsales point to the same set of client VIPs. At this
point, both the marketing and sales CIFS shares can be accessed from either one of the DNS names,
FluidFSmarketing or FluidFSsales. When you want to fail over a single NAS volume (for example
Marketing) change the DNS entries for FluidFSmarketing to resolve to the client VIPs on Cluster B.
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Dell recommends that you maintain a table to track which DNS entries are used to access each NAS
volume. This helps when performing failover and setting up group policies.
Setting Up and Performing Disaster Recovery
This section contains a high‐level overview of setting up and performing disaster recovery. In these
instructions, Cluster A is the source FluidFS cluster containing the data that must be backed up and
Cluster B is the target FluidFS cluster, which backs up the data from source cluster A.
Prerequisites
•
Cluster B is installed, but has no NAS volumes configured.
•
Cluster A and Cluster B have the same NAS appliance count. For example, if Cluster A has two NAS
appliances, Cluster B must have two NAS appliances.
•
Cluster A and Cluster B are at the same FluidFS version.
•
Cluster B has different network settings (client, SAN, internal, and so on) than source Cluster A,
however, Cluster A and Cluster B must be able to communicate with each other so that replication
operations can occur.
•
Cluster B has enough space to replicate all data from Cluster A.
Phase 1 — Build Replication Partnership Between Source Cluster A And Backup Cluster B
1.
Log on to cluster A.
2.
Set up replication partnership between source cluster A and backup cluster B.
For more information on setting up replication partners, see Adding a Replication Partnership.
3.
Create a replication policy for all the source volumes in cluster A to target volumes in cluster B.
NOTE: Replication policy is a one to one match on a volume basis, for example:
Source volume A1 (cluster A) to target volume B1 (cluster B)
Source volume A2 (cluster A) to target volume B2 (cluster B)
…………………………
Source volume An (cluster A) to target volume Bn (cluster B)
NOTE: FluidFS v2 supports auto generate target volume during addition of the replication
policy. For FluidFS 1.0, you must create the target volumes in cluster B and make sure that the
volume size is big enough to accommodate the corresponding source volume data in cluster A.
4.
Start the replication scheduler to ensure that at least one successful replication has occurred for all
the source volumes in cluster A.
If the replication fails, fix the problems encountered and restart the replication process. This ensures
that all source volumes in cluster A have at least one successful replication copy in cluster B. Set up a
regular replication schedule, so the target volumes in cluster B always have most up to date
replication copy for cluster A.
CAUTION: Replication restore is not a complete BMR restore, settings such as network
configuration (client, SAN, and IC) cannot be backed up and restored using the replication
method. Note all cluster A settings (for use when restoring cluster A) including network
configuration, cluster wide settings such as volume name, alert settings, and so on for future use.
If the system restore operation fails to restore these settings, you can manually restore the cluster
A settings back to their original values.
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Phase 2 — Cluster A Fails And Client Requests Fail Over To Backup Cluster B
If source cluster A stops responding because of an unexpected failure (hardware, disk, and so on), you
must:
1.
Log on to backup cluster B.
2.
Delete the existing replication policy for all replication target volumes.
– When deleting the replication policy from the destination cluster B — FluidFS replication manager
tries to contact source cluster A, which fails. The volume on destination cluster B must have its
configuration restored using Cluster Management → Restore NAS Volume Configuration.
3.
– When deleting the replication policy from the source cluster A — You are given an option to apply
the source volumes configuration to the destination volume. If you do not remember to select
this, or it fails, the configuration of the source volume from cluster A can be restored onto the
destination volume on cluster B using Cluster Management → Restore NAS Volume
Configuration.
Confirm replication policy deletion on backup cluster B, and that the source volume configuration
from cluster A is applied.
Currently the following volume configurations can be restored:
– NFS exports
– CIFS shares
– Quota rules
– Snapshot schedule
– NAS volume alerting, security style and related parameters
– NAS volume name
– NAS volume size
This transforms target volumes (B1, B2, .. Bn) to standalone volumes. Repeat this procedure to bring
all target volumes in cluster B to standalone volumes with volume configuration applied from cluster
A.
4.
From the NAS Manager web interface, restore the NAS system configuration from cluster A.
This restores cluster B configuration to cluster A settings. Currently the following cluster system
configuration can be restored:
– Protocols configuration
– Users and Groups
– User mappings
– Monitoring configuration
– Time configuration
– Antivirus hosts
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5.
Ensure that cluster B is used to temporarily serve client requests during the fail over time.
Administrators must perform the following steps to set up DNS and authentication:
a) Point the DNS names from customer DNS server to cluster B instead of cluster A.
Ensure that the DNS server on cluster B is the same as the DNS server or in the same DNS farm as
the DNS server of cluster A. Existing client connections may break and may need to be reestablished. You must unmount and remount the NFS Exports on the client.
NOTE: Complete steps b, c, and d only for single volume failovers.
b) On DNS, manually update the DNS entry for the NAS volume that was failed over.
This step is to repoint end users that are accessing this volume from cluster A to cluster B, while
the end users keep accessing it using the same DNS name.
NOTE: Client systems may need to refresh DNS cache.
c) To force CIFS and NFS clients to cluster B, we also must delete the CIFS shares and NFS exports
on cluster A.
This forces the CIFS and NFS clients to reconnect, at such time they are connected to cluster B.
After restoring the source volume’s configuration on cluster B, all of the shares and exports will
be present on the destination volume (on cluster B), so no share/export configuration information
is lost.
d) The failed over volume now can be accessed using the exact same DNS name and share name as
it was when hosted on cluster A, except now it is hosted on cluster B.
NOTE: NFS mounts must be un-mounted and mounted again. Active CIFS transfers fail
during this process, but if CIFS shares are mapped as local drives, they automatically
reconnect once the replication is deleted, DNS is updated, and NFS/CIFS shares are deleted
on cluster A.
e) Join AD server or LDAP/NIS.
Ensure that the AD and LDAP are in the same AD/LDAP farm or same server.
Phase 3 — Restore Cluster A Fail Back From Cluster B To Cluster A
1.
Fix the reason that caused cluster A to fail (replace hardware, replace disk, and so on), and if required
reinstall FluidFS.
2.
Rebuild the cluster (use the settings for cluster A that you saved earlier), format the NAS reserve, and
set up the network (client, SAN, and IC) as before.
3.
Log on to cluster B and set up the replication partnership between cluster B and cluster A.
For more information on setting up replication partners, see Adding a Replication Partnership.
4.
Create replication policy for all the source volumes in cluster B to target volumes in cluster A.
NOTE: Replication policy is a one to one match on volume base, for example:
Source volume B1 (cluster B) to target volume A1 (cluster A)
Source volume B2 (cluster B) to target volume A2 (cluster A)
…………………………
Source volume Bn (cluster B) to target volume An (cluster A)
NOTE: FluidFS v2 supports auto generate target volume during addition of the replication
policy. For FluidFS 1.0, you must create the target volumes in cluster B and make sure that the
volume size is big enough to accommodate the corresponding source volume data in cluster A.
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5.
In the NAS Manager web interface, select Data Protection → Replication → NAS Replication and
click Replicate Now for all the volumes in cluster B (B1, B2, .., Bn).
If the replication fails, fix the problems encountered and restart the replication process. Ensure that
all the volumes are successfully replicated to cluster A.
6.
Delete the replication policy for all the volumes (B1, B2, .. Bn) and apply source volume configuration
from cluster B to cluster A.
Repeat this procedure to delete all the replication policies and bring all target volumes in cluster A to
standalone volumes.
– When deleting the replication policy from the destination cluster B — FluidFS replication manager
tries to contact source cluster A, which fails. The volume on destination cluster B must have its
configuration restored using Cluster Management → Restore NAS Volume Configuration.
7.
– When deleting the replication policy from the source cluster A — You will be given an option to
apply the source volumes configuration to the destination volume. If you do not remember to
select this, or it fails, the configuration of the source volume from cluster A can be restored onto
the destination volume on cluster B using Cluster Management → Restore NAS Volume
Configuration.
Log on to cluster A.
8.
From the NAS Manager web interface, restore the NAS system configuration from cluster B.
This changes cluster A global configuration settings, like, protocol setting, time setting,
authentication parameters, and so on to cluster B settings.
NOTE: If system configuration restore fails, manually set them back to the original settings (use
the settings for cluster A that you saved earlier).
Cluster A is restored to its original settings.
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9.
Start using cluster A to serve client requests.
Administrators must perform the following steps to set up DNS and authentication:
a) Point the DNS names from customer DNS server to cluster A instead of cluster B.
Ensure that the DNS server on cluster A is the same as the DNS server or in the same DNS farm as
the DNS server of cluster B. Existing client connections may break and need to re-establish during
this process.
NOTE: Complete steps b, c, and d only for single volume failovers.
b) On DNS, manually update the DNS entry for the NAS volume that was failed over.
This step repoints end users that are accessing this volume from cluster B to cluster A, while the
end users keep accessing it using the same DNS name.
NOTE: Client systems may need to refresh DNS cache.
c) To force CIFS and NFS clients to cluster A, we also must delete the CIFS shares and NFS exports
on cluster B.
This forces the CIFS and NFS clients to reconnect, at such time they are connected to cluster A.
After restoring the source volume’s configuration on cluster A, all of the shares and exports will
be present on the destination volume (on cluster A), so no share/export configuration information
is lost.
d) The failed over volume now can be accessed using the exact same DNS name and share name as
it was when hosted on cluster B, except now it is hosted on cluster A.
NOTE: NFS mounts must be un-mounted and mounted again. Active CIFS transfers fail
during this process, but if CIFS shares are mapped as local drives, they automatically
reconnect once the replication is deleted, DNS is updated, and NFS/CIFS shares are deleted
on cluster B.
e) Join AD server or LDAP/NIS.
Ensure that the AD and LDAP are in the same AD/LDAP farm or same server.
10. Build up replication structure between source cluster A and backup cluster B, to set up replication
policy between cluster A and cluster B, use cluster B volumes as replication target volumes, to
prepare for next disaster recover.
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152
FluidFS 3.0 Monitoring
9
Viewing the Status of Hardware Components
FluidFS Manager displays the status of the following NAS appliance and NAS controller hardware
components:
•
Networks
•
Disks
•
Power supplies
•
Backup power supply
•
Fans
In the Hardware\NAS Appliances view, each NAS appliance has its own pane, in which its controllers and
their components are displayed in a tree view. You can expand each node by clicking its [+] button, and
collapse it by clicking its [-] button.
Viewing the Status of the Interfaces
View the status of the interfaces in a NAS controller.
1.
Click the Hardware tab on the left.
2.
Click the NAS Appliances tab on the top.
3.
In the pane of the NAS appliance you want to view, expand the NAS Controllers node.
4.
Expand the node of the controller you want to view.
5.
Under the controller node, expand the Client Network, SAN Network and Internal Network nodes
to view their NIC components and their statuses.
Viewing the Status of the Disks
View the status of the interfaces in a NAS controller.
1.
Click the Hardware tab on the left.
2.
Click the NAS Appliances tab on the top.
3.
In the pane of the NAS appliance you want to view, expand the NAS Controllers node.
4.
Expand the node of the controller you want to view.
5.
Under the controller node, expand the Local Disks node to view each disk and its status.
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Viewing the Status of the Power Supplies
View the status of the power supplies in a NAS appliance.
1.
Click the Hardware tab on the left.
2.
Click the NAS Appliances tab on the top.
3.
In the pane of the NAS appliance you want to view, expand the NAS Controllers node.
4.
Expand the node of the controller you want to view.
5.
Under the controller node, expand the PSUsnode to view each power supply and its status.
Viewing the Status of a Backup Power Supply
View the status of the power supplies in a NAS appliance.
1.
Click the Hardware tab on the left.
2.
Click the NAS Appliances tab on the top.
3.
In the pane of the NAS appliance you want to view, expand the NAS Controllers node.
4.
Expand the node of the controller you want to view.
5.
Under the controller node, examine the BPS node to view the backup power supply and its status.
Viewing the Status of the Fans
View the status of the power supplies in a NAS appliance.
1.
Click the Hardware tab on the left.
2.
Click the NAS Appliances tab on the top.
3.
In the pane of the NAS appliance you want to view, expand the NAS Controllers node.
4.
Expand the node of the controller you want to view.
5.
Under the controller node, expand the Fans node to view each fan and its status.
Viewing the Status of FluidFS Cluster Services
To view the status of services configured on a FluidFS cluster (such as Active Directory, LDAP, DNS, and
NTP), click the Dashboard tab in the pane on the right of the FluidFS Manager display.
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155
Viewing the Status of Background Processes
Some operations take some time to perform and do not complete immediately, such as detaching a NAS
controller. In these cases, you can monitor the progress of operations in FluidFS Manager.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on the top.
In the Background Processes pane, the status of each background process is displayed.
Viewing FluidFS Cluster NAS Pool Trends
FluidFS Manager displays statistics about the NAS pool for a FluidFS cluster, including total capacity,
unused reserved space, unused unreserved space, and used space.
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the NAS Pool tab on the top.
The NAS pool trends are displayed in the NAS Pool Trends pane.
Viewing Storage Usage
Viewing FluidFS NAS Pool Storage Usage
To view the total size and current usage of the NAS pool:
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the NAS Pool tab on the top.
The NAS pool size and used space values are displayed in the NAS Pool pane.
Viewing Volume Storage Usage
To view the historical storage usage of a NAS Volume:
1.
Click the NAS Volumes tab on the left.
2.
Click the All NAS Volumes tab on the top.
3.
In the All NAS Volumes pane, click
to view.
4.
Click View Details.
5.
The Space view is display.
in the row of the volume whose NAS volume clones you want
The storage usage history is displayed in the NAS Volume Space Trends pane.
Viewing FluidFS Traffic Statistics
FluidFS Manager displays line charts that show traffic statistics over time for a FluidFS system.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click thePerformance tab on the top.
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3.
Graphs for the following performance values are displayed:
– Overall Read Throughput – click the Client, Replication , and NDMP buttons to display or hide
the relevant performance graphs.
– Overall Write Throughput – click the Client, Replication , and NDMP buttons to display or hide
the relevant performance graphs.
– Client Read Throughput – click the Network, CIFS , and NFS buttons to display or hide the
relevant performance graphs
– Client Write Throughput – click the Network, CIFS , and NFS buttons to display or hide the
relevant performance graphs.
– CIFS & NFS Operations – click the Read, Write , and Other buttons to display or hide the relevant
performance graphs.
Viewing NAS Controller Load Balancing Statistics
FluidFS Manager displays statistics about load balancing for a NAS controller, including processor
utilization and the number of connections to the NAS controller.
1.
Click the Performance & Connectivity tab on the left.
2.
Click the Load Balancing tab on the top.
The load statistics are displayed for each controller in a separate pane.
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FluidFS 3.0 Maintenance
10
Adding and Deleting NAS Appliances in a FluidFS Cluster
Use FluidFS Manager to add or delete a NAS appliance in a FluidFS cluster.
Adding NAS Appliances to the FluidFS Cluster
You can add a NAS appliance (two NAS controllers) to the FluidFS cluster to increase processing power.
Adding a NAS appliance allows additional client connections and evenly redistributes client connections
and FluidFS cluster operations among more NAS controllers contributing their resources.
For high availability reasons, you must add NAS appliances as NAS controller pairs. You cannot add a
single NAS controller. Only one NAS appliance can be added at a time up to a maximum of two NAS
appliances (four NAS controllers).
Adding a NAS appliance is a seamless operation that does not interrupt current FluidFS cluster operations.
After the NAS appliance is successfully added, new client connections are automatically distributed to all
NAS controllers, ensuring that there is efficient load balancing between all NAS controllers.
NOTE:
•
The additional NAS appliance is mounted in a rack and cabled, and the NAS controllers are in
standby mode and powered on. A NAS controller is on and in standby mode if the power LED is
flashing green at around two flashes per second.
•
NAS appliance service tags are recorded.
•
New client VIP IP addresses are available to be added to the new NAS appliance. If client access
to the FluidFS cluster is not through a router (in other words, a flat network), Dell recommends
defining one client VIP for effective load balancing.
•
New NAS controller IP addresses are available to be added to the new NAS appliance. Verify that
there are two additional IP addresses available per NAS appliance.
NOTE: Due to the complexity and precise timing required, Dell recommends that you schedule a
maintenance window to add the NAS appliance(s).
1.
(Directly cabled internal network only) If the FluidFS cluster contains a single NAS appliance, with a
direct connection on the internal network, re‐cable the internal network as follows.
a)
b)
c)
d)
e)
Cable the new NAS appliance(s) to the internal switch.
Remove just one of the internal cables from the original NAS appliance.
Connect a cable from each NAS controller port vacated in Step b to the internal switch.
Remove the second internal cable from the original NAS appliance.
Connect a cable from each NAS controller port vacated in Step d to the internal switch.
2.
Click the Hardware tab on the left.
3.
Click the NAS Appliances tab on the top.
4.
In the Overview pane, click
.
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5.
Click New NAS Appliance.
The New NAS Appliance dialog box appears.
6.
Select the NAS appliance to add to the FluidFS cluster.
a) In the top pane, select the NAS appliance.
b) Click Add Appliance.
The selected NAS appliance is moved to the bottom pane.
c) Click Finish.
*
For Fibre Channel NAS appliances, the Configure Client Network page displays.
*
7.
For iSCSI NAS appliances, the Configure IP Addresses for NAS Controller iSCSI HBAs page
displays.
(iSCSI only) Complete the Configure IP Addresses for NAS Controller iSCSI HBAs page to configure
the IP addresses for SAN / eth30.
a) Select a NAS controller and click Edit Settings.
The Edit Controller IP Address dialog box appears.
b) In the IP Address field, type an IP address for the NAS controller.
c) Click OK.
Repeat the preceding steps for each NAS controller.
d) To specify a VLAN tag, type a VLAN tag in the VLAN Tag field.
When a VLAN spans multiple switches, the VLAN tag is used to specify to which ports and
interfaces to send broadcast packets.
e) Click Next.
8.
(iSCSI only) Complete the Configure IP Addresses for NAS Controller iSCSI HBAs page to configure
the IP addresses for SANb / eth31.
a) Select a NAS controller and click Edit Settings.
The Edit Controller IP Address dialog box appears.
b) In the IP Address field, type an IP address for the NAS controller.
c) Click OK.
Repeat the preceding steps for each NAS controller.
d) To specify a VLAN tag, type a VLAN tag in the VLAN Tag field.
When a VLAN spans multiple switches, the VLAN tag is used to specify to which ports and
interfaces to send broadcast packets.
e) Click Next. The Configure Client Network page displays.
9.
If needed, add additional client VIPs through which the clients will access CIFS shares and NFS
exports.
a) In the Virtual IPv4 Addresses area, click Add.
The Add Client IP Address dialog box appears.
b) In the IPv4 Address field, type a client VIP IP address.
c) Click OK.
10. Add an IP address for each new NAS controller. Repeat the following steps for each NAS controller.
a) (iSCSI only) Complete the Configure IP Addresses for NAS Controller iSCSI HBAs page to
configure the IP addresses for SANb / eth31.
b) In the IP Address field, type an IP address for the NAS controller.
c) Click OK.
11. (Optional) Configure the remaining client network attributes as needed.
– To change the netmask of the client network, type a new netmask in the Netmask field.
– To specify a VLAN tag, type a VLAN tag in the VLAN Tag field.
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12. Click Next.
After you are finished configuring each client network, the Connectivity Report page displays.
13. Use the Connectivity Report page to verify connectivity between the FluidFS cluster and the MD
array. The NAS controller ports must show the status Up before you can complete the wizard. If you
click Finish and the NAS controller ports do not have the status Up, an error will be displayed.
– For iSCSI NAS appliances, when the Connectivity Report initially appears, iSCSI log ons might still
be occurring in the background, causing some or all of the FluidFS cluster iSCSI initiators to show
the status Not Found/Disconnected. If this happens, wait 30 seconds, then click Refresh to
update the Connectivity Report. When the iSCSI log ons are complete and the Connectivity
Report has been refreshed, the status for each FluidFS cluster iSCSI initiator shows Up.
– For Fibre Channel NAS appliances, when the Connectivity Report initially appears, the FluidFS
cluster HBAs show the status Not Found/Disconnected. You must record the WWNs and
manually update fabric zoning on the Fibre Channel switch. Then, click Refreshto update the
Connectivity Report. When the zoning is configured correctly and the Connectivity Report has
been refreshed, the status for each FluidFS cluster HBA shows Up.
14. Click Finish.
Deleting a NAS Appliance from the FluidFS Cluster
If an attempt to add a NAS appliance to a FluidFS cluster fails, the entry for the NAS appliance must be
deleted from the FluidFS cluster before you can reattempt to add the NAS appliance or add a different
NAS appliance.
1.
Click the Hardware tab on the left.
2.
Click the NAS Appliances tab on the top.
3.
In the Overview pane, click
4.
Click Delete (Un-Joined).
in the row of the NAS appliance you want to delete.
The Delete (Un-Joined) NAS Appliance dialog box appears.
5.
Click OK.
Detaching, Attaching, and Replacing a NAS Controller
Use these procedures to replace a failed NAS controller.
Detaching a NAS Controller
Detach a NAS controller only if the NAS controller needs to be replaced with a new NAS controller. After
you detach a NAS controller, it resets to its factory defaults and powers off, if possible. Otherwise, you
must reinstall the FluidFS software to reset the NAS controller to its factory defaults.
Only one NAS controller at a time can be detached in a NAS appliance. Detaching a NAS controller
disconnects client connections while clients are being transferred to other NAS controllers. Clients will
then automatically reconnect to the FluidFS cluster. While a NAS controller is detached from the FluidFS
cluster, CIFS shares and NFS exports remain available (although performance might decrease because
data is no longer cached); however, most FluidFS cluster configuration changes are not allowed.
CAUTION: Only detach a NAS controller under the direction of Dell Technical Support Services.
1.
Click the Hardware tab on the left.
2.
Click the NAS Appliances tab on the top.
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3.
In the Overview pane, click
detach.
4.
Click Detach.
in the row of the NAS appliance whose controller you want to
The Detach NAS Controller dialog box appears.
5.
In the NAS controller dropdown, select the controller you want to detach.
6.
Click OK.
The progress of the detach process is displayed in the Detach dialog box. If you close the dialog box,
the process will continue to run in the background. The NAS controller is detached when the NAS
controller State changes to Detached.
Attaching a NAS Controller
Attach a new NAS controller when replacing an existing NAS controller. Once attached, the new NAS
controller inherits the FluidFS cluster configuration settings of the existing NAS controller.
NOTE: Verify that the NAS controller being attached is in standby mode and powered on. A NAS
controller is on and in standby mode if the power LED is flashing green at around two flashes per
second.
1.
Click the Hardware tab on the left.
2.
Click the NAS Appliances tab on the top.
3.
In the Overview pane, click
controller.
4.
Click Attach.
in the row of the NAS appliance to which you want to attach a
The Attach NAS Controller dialog box appears.
5.
In the NAS controller dropdown, select the controller you want to attach.
6.
Click OK.
The progress of the attach process is displayed in the Attachdialog box. If you close the dialog box,
the process will continue to run in the background. The NAS controller is attached when the NAS
controller Statechanges to Formatted.
7.
(Fibre Channel only) After the attach operation completes, record the new WWNs and manually
update fabric zoning on the Fibre Channel switch.
Replacing a NAS Controller
In the event of a failure where a NAS controller cannot be brought back online (for example, a
malfunctioning NAS controller), you must remove the existing NAS controller from the FluidFS cluster and
replace it with a different NAS controller.
While a NAS controller is detached from the FluidFS cluster, CIFS shares and NFS exports remain available
(although performance might decrease because data is no longer cached); however, most FluidFS cluster
configuration changes are not allowed. Therefore, it is important to replace a failed NAS controller as
soon as possible.
NOTE: Only replace a NAS controller under the direction of Dell Technical Support Services.
NOTE: Before replacing the NAS controller ensure that the existing NAS controller is verified as
failed by Dell Technical Support Services.
1.
Detach the existing NAS controller.
2.
Ensure that all cables are labeled.
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3.
Disconnect all cables from the back of the existing NAS controller.
4.
Remove the existing NAS controller from the NAS appliance chassis.
a) Press the controller release button to disengage the controller handle.
b) Push the controller handle down until the controller disengages from the appliance.
c) Use the controller handle to pull the controller out of the appliance.
5.
Insert the new NAS controller in the NAS appliance chassis.
a)
b)
c)
d)
Ensure that the controller cover is closed.
Align the controller with the appropriate slot in the appliance.
Push the controller into the appliance until the controller seats into place.
Push the handle toward the front of the appliance until it locks.
6.
Reconnect all cables to the same ports on the new NAS controller. The NAS controller automatically
powers on if at least one power supply is connected to a power source.
7.
Attach the new NAS controller.
Managing Service Packs
The FluidFS cluster uses a service pack methodology to update the FluidFS software.
Viewing the Upgrade History
View a list of service pack updates that have been installed on the FluidFS cluster.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Version & License tab on the top.
The system’s version history is displayed in the Software Upgrade pane.
Installing a Service Pack to Update the FluidFS Software
NOTE:
•
Installing a service pack causes the NAS controllers to reboot during the installation process.
This might cause interruptions in CIFS client connections. In addition, active NDMP jobs are
terminated. Therefore, Dell recommends scheduling a maintenance window to perform service
pack installations.
•
Contact Dell Technical Support Services to obtain service packs. Do not modify the service pack
filename.
•
Ensure that all NAS controllers are powered on and their State is Formatted (the State is
displayed in the Hardware\NAS Appliances view). You cannot update the FluidFS software if a
NAS controller is down or detached.
•
The FluidFS cluster FTP server must be enabled.
WARNING: The service pack installation process is irreversible. The FluidFS cluster cannot be
reverted back to a previous version once updated.
You can upload and install the service pack upgrade file to your FLuidFS system using the CLI or the web
UI.
To upload and install the service pack upgrade file using the CLI:
Use an FTP client to upload the service pack file to the FluidFS cluster FTP server at:
ftp://<FluidFS_administrator_user_name>@<client_VIP_or_name>:44421/ servicepack/
The file must be transferred using binary mode.
For example, the following command sequence can be used on a Windows command prompt:
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ftp
open <client_VIP_or_name> 44421
<FluidFS_administrator_user_name>
<FluidFS_administrator_password>
cd servicepack bin
put <path_to_service_pack>/DellFluidFS-3.0.<xxxx>-SP.sh quit
To upload and install the service pack upgrade file using the web UI:
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Version & License tab on the top.
3.
In the Software Upgrade pane, click
and click Upload Software Package.
The Upload Software Version file dialog is displayed.
4.
Click the […] button to the right of the Software version file field.
A file browser dialog box appears.
5.
Browse to the software version file, select it and click Open.
6.
Click OK.
Managing Firmware Updates
Firmware is automatically updated on NAS controllers during service pack updates and after a failed NAS
controller is replaced. After a firmware update is complete, the NAS controller reboots. It is important that
you do not remove a NAS controller when a firmware update is in progress. Doing so corrupts the
firmware. A firmware update is in progress if both the rear power‐on LED and cache active/off‐load LED
repeatedly blink amber 5 times and then blink green 5 times. If you connect a monitor to a NAS
controller’s VGA port during a firmware update, the following message is displayed: Executing firmware
updates for TopHat system.
Reinstalling FluidFS from the Internal Storage Device
Each NAS controller contains an internal storage device from which you can reinstall the FluidFS factory
image. If you experience general system instability or a failure to boot, you might have to reinstall the
image on one or more NAS controllers.
NOTE: Only reinstall the FluidFS software under the direction of Dell Technical Support Services.
WARNING: Reinstalling the FluidFS software on all NAS controllers will revert your system to
factory defaults. All data on the FluidFS cluster will be unrecoverable after performing the
procedure.
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NOTE:
1.
•
If the NAS controller is still an active member in the FluidFS cluster, you must first detach it.
•
Connect a monitor to the NAS controller’s VGA port and connect a keyboard to one of the NAS
controller’s USB ports.
Press and release the recessed power button at the back of the NAS controller to shut down the NAS
controller.
NOTE: Power off only the NAS controller on which you are reinstalling the FluidFS software. Do
not power off the remaining NAS controllers. Powering off a NAS controller disconnects client
connections while clients are being transferred to other NAS controllers. Clients will then
automatically reconnect to the FluidFS cluster.
2.
Press and release the recessed power button at the back of the NAS controller to turn on the NAS
controller.
3.
When you see the F11 = BIOS Boot Manager prompt, press F11.
4.
Select the boot device USB Flash Disk.
5.
Select Reinstall Dell FluidFS <FluidFS_release_to_install>.
NOTE: Reinstall the NAS controller to FluidFS version 2.0 only if you are redeploying the NAS
controller in a FluidFS version 2.0 cluster.
6.
Confirm the action by typing resetmysystem (version 3.0) or resetmysystem -v2 (version 2.0) and
pressing Enter.
7.
Once the reinstallation completes, the NAS controller will reboot into standby mode.
8.
After reinstalling FluidFS, attach the NAS controller to a FluidFS cluster.
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11
Troubleshooting
Viewing the Event Log
You can view messages about system events and errors in the Event Log.
Running Diagnostics
Running diagnostics helps you detect problems with the FluidFS cluster. The diagnostic options available
for the FluidFS cluster are:
•
FluidFS diagnostics: Used to diagnose software issues.
•
Embedded system diagnostics: Used to diagnose hardware issues.
Running FluidFS Diagnostics on a FluidFS Cluster
FluidFS diagnostics can be run while the FluidFS cluster is still online and serving data. The following
FluidFS diagnostic options are available:
•
Client Connectivity Diagnostic
•
File Accessibility Diagnostic
•
File System Diagnostic
•
General System Diagnostic
•
Network Diagnostic
•
Performance Diagnostic
•
Protocols Log Diagnostic
On completion of the diagnostics, the compressed archive of the diagnostic result files are available from
the FluidFS cluster FTP server at:
ftp://<FluidFS_administrator_user_name>@<client_VIP_or_name>:44421/diagnostics/archive/
<diagnostic_name>
NOTE: The FluidFS cluster FTP server must be enabled.
1.
Click the System tab on the left.
2.
Click the Internal tab on the top.
3.
In the Diagnostics Tools pane, click
Performance, Client Connectivity).
4.
Click Run.
in the row of the tool you want to run (e.g. Network,
The Run Diagnostic dialog box appears.
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5.
Enter any requested diagnostic parameters and click OK.
After the diagnostics have been run, FluidFS Manager will perform a Phone Home of the diagnostics
if the FluidFS cluster FTP server is enabled.
Launching the iBMC Virtual KVM
The iBMC (Integrated Baseboard Management Controller) virtual KVM (keyboard, video, and mouse)
allows you to view and manage the NAS controller console remotely over a network. If Dell Technical
Support Services needs to perform remote troubleshooting, you can make your system accessible to
them using the iBMC virtual KVM.
•
To use the iBMC virtual KVM, you must use a computer with Internet Explorer.
•
Before connecting to the iBMC virtual KVM, determine the iBMC IP address and password.
– To determine the iBMC IP address of the NAS controller:
*
If the NAS controller is in standby mode (a NAS controller is on and in standby mode if the
power LED is flashing green at around two flashes per second), the iBMC IP address is
192.168.254.253.
*
If the FluidFS cluster is configured, the iBMC IP address is based on the NAS controller number:
<internal_class_C_address>.<controller_number_plus_one_times_two>
For example, if the internal address range is 10.255.69.0/24, the iBMC IP address of NAS
controller 0 is 10.255.69.2, the iBMC IP address of NAS controller 6 is 10.255.69.14, and so on.
•
To determine the iBMC password:
– If the NAS controller is in standby mode (a NAS controller is on and in standby mode if the power
LED is flashing green at around two flashes per second), the iBMC password is Stor@ge!.
– If the FluidFS cluster is configured, the iBMC password is synchronized with the support account
password.
1.
Connect a network cable to the LOM (Lights Out Management) Ethernet port on a NAS controller.
The LOM Ethernet port is located on the lower right side of the back panel of a NAS controller.
2.
Connect a Windows client to the iBMC.
a) Connect a Windows client to the same network used for the LOM Ethernet port.
b) Set the IP address of the Windows client to match the iBMC subnet.
c) Open an Internet Explorer web browser. In the address bar of the web browser, type the iBMC IP
address of the NAS controller. The iBMC login page appears.
d) In the Username field, type ADMIN.
e) In the Password field, type the iBMC password.
f) Click OK.
The iBMC Properties page appears.
3.
Launch the iBMC virtual KVM.
a) In the navigation pane, expand vKVM & vMedia and click Launch.
b) In the right pane, click Launch Java KVM Client.
The Video Viewer appears and displays the FluidFS cluster console.
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Troubleshooting Common Issues
Troubleshooting Active Directory Issues
Group Quota For An Active Directory User Does Not Work
Description
Group quota is defined for an Active Directory group; however, when a group
member consumes space, the actual usage of the group does not grow and the
group limitation is not enforced.
Cause
The NAS cluster solution quota enforcement is performed based on the UID and GID
of the file (UNIX) or the SID and the GSID of the primary group of the user (NTFS), if
defined.
For Active Directory users, the Primary Group setting is not mandatory, and if not
defined, the used space is not accounted to any group. For group quota to be
effective with Active Directory users, their primary group must be assigned.
Workaround
To setup the primary group for an Active Directory user:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Open the Active Directory management.
Right-click on the desired user.
Select the Member Of tab.
The group you need must be listed.
Click the group and then click the Set Primary Group button.
Now quotas takes effect for the user's group.
Active Directory Authentication
Description
A valid Active Directory user fails to authenticate.
Cause
Probable causes may be:
•
•
•
•
Workaround
1.
2.
3.
4.
The user is trying to authenticate using an incorrect password.
The user is locked or disabled in Active Directory.
Active Directory domain controllers are offline or unreachable.
System clock and Active Directory clock are out of sync.
Check the NAS cluster solution system event log in the NAS Manager for errors.
Verify that the user is not disabled or locked in Active Directory.
Verify that domain controllers are online and reachable using the network.
Kerberos requires client/server clocks to be in sync. Verify the system time is in
sync with the domain controller time and if required, configure the NTP setting
of the system.
Troubleshooting Active Directory Configuration
Description
Unable to add Active Directory users and groups to CIFS shares.
Cause
Probable causes may be:
•
•
•
Unable to ping the domain using FQDN.
DNS may not be configured.
NTP may not be configured.
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Workaround
When configuring the system to connect to an Active Directory domain:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Ensure that you use FQDN and not the NETBIOS name of the domain or IP
address of the domain controller.
Ensure that the user has permissions to add systems to the domain.
Use the correct password.
See DNS Configuration tab and enter the correct information.
Configure the NTP information and ensure that the system time matches the
domain time.
If multiple NAS systems are used, ensure that you set different NETBIOS names.
The system defaults to CIFS Storage as the name.
Ensure that you select Authenticate users' identity via Active Directory and local
users database.
Troubleshooting Backup Issues
Troubleshooting Snapshots
Description
Taking and deleting snapshots fail.
Cause
Probable causes may be:
•
•
•
•
•
Workaround
•
•
•
•
•
•
There are many client I/O requests waiting to be serviced, including a request to
remove a large directory.
There are many snapshot creation/deletion requests being currently processed.
Another snapshot request for the volume is currently being executed.
The total number of snapshots reached the system limit.
Incorrect IP address was specified in the backup job.
For a manual request failure, retry taking or deleting the snapshot after a minute or
two.
If the request originated from the snapshot scheduler, wait another cycle or two. If
the failure persists, try taking or deleting the snapshot manually on the same
volume.
Check the dashboard if the system is under heavy workload. If the system is under
a heavy workload, wait until the workload decreases and reissue the snapshot
request.
Check the snapshot schedule. A very dense snapshot schedule has a negative
impact on the overall performance of the system. The accumulated snapshot rate
must not exceed 20 snapshots per hour per system.
Check the total number of snapshots in the system. If the number is in thousands,
delete a few snapshots and retry.
Ensure the Client virtual IP address is specified in the backup job.
Troubleshooting An NDMP Internal Error
Description
Backup or restore fails with an internal error.
Cause
NDMP internal errors are indicators of a file system not being accessible or a NAS
volume not being available.
Workaround
If the backup application cannot connect to a NAS appliance:
1.
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Log in to the NAS Manager or open a remote terminal to the appliance.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
On the NAS Manager, go to Data Protection → NDMP → NDMP Configuration
page. In NAS CLI, go to Data Protection NDMP Configuration menu.
Verify that NDMP is enabled. If NDMP is enabled, go to step 5.
On the NAS Manager, the Enabled check box must be checked.
In the NAS CLI, type view and ensure that State is set to Enabled.
If NDMP is not enabled, enable it.
Verify that backup application IP address is configured in NDMP.
On the NAS Manager, the DMA server list must include the IP address of the
backup application.
In the NAS CLI, type view and ensure that the DMA Servers list includes the IP
address of the DMA application trying to access the NAS appliance.
If the backup appliance can connect to a NAS appliance but cannot log in, use
backup_user as the user name for the NDMP client, while setting up the NDMP
backup/restore in your backup application. The default password for NDMP client is
Stor@ge!
To change the password:
1.
2.
3.
Log in to the NAS Manager or open remote terminal to the appliance.
In the NAS Manager, go to Data Protection → NDMP → NDMP Configuration
page. In NAS CLI, go to Data Protection → NDMP → Configuration menu.
In the NAS Manager, click Change Password. In the NAS CLI, run the command:
data-protection ndmp configuration set-Password
<new_password>
If the backup application can log into the NAS appliance, but if no volumes are
available for backup, verify that the NAS appliance has NAS volumes created on it.
Troubleshooting CIFS Issues
Misconfigured AV Host Settings Result In Access Denied To CIFS files
Description
The Dell NAS cluster solution supports antivirus scans on a per CIFS share basis. When
a file on a share is opened by a client application, the NAS cluster solution sends the
file to an antivirus host to be scanned.
If no antivirus host is available, access to the file and to the whole share, is inhibited.
Cause
Since the antivirus hosts are not available on the NAS cluster solution, files cannot be
opened on an antivirus enabled CIFS share.
Workaround
Ensure that the problem appears only on antivirus enabled shares, while clients
accessing other shares do not experience such problems.
Check the status of the antivirus hosts and the network path between the NAS cluster
solution and the antivirus hosts.
CIFS Access Denied
Description
CIFS access to a file or folder is denied.
Cause
A client without sufficient permissions performs an operation on a file/folder.
Workaround
Check the permissions on the file/folder and set the required permissions.
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CIFS ACL Corruption
Description
Cause
CIFS ACL corruption.
•
•
•
•
Workaround
ACLs were accidently changed by a user or script.
ACL is corrupted after an antivirus application accidently quarantined
corresponding files.
ACL got corrupted after data recovery by backup application due to compatibility
issues.
ACL got corrupted after migrating data from different location by using third party
application. For example, RoboCopy.
Check the current ACL setting in the Windows client. Redefine the ACLs for the files
by using a Windows client the same way you initially defined it. Verify that you set the
ACLs as the owner of the files, directories, and shares. In case you cannot redefine
your ACLs since you currently do not have permissions, perform the following steps:
1.
2.
3.
Restore the files from snapshots or backup.
In the case you have migrated the data from a different location using RoboCopy
application, there is a good chance you can restore ACLs by copying only ACLs
metadata, instead of re-copying the whole data.
In case all file system ACLs are corrupted, you can restore all data from the NAS
replication partner.
CIFS Client Clock Skew
Description
CIFS client clock skew.
Cause
The client clock must be within 5 minutes range from the Kerberos server (that is
Active Directory) clock.
Workaround
Configure the client to clock-synch with the Active Directory (as an NTP server) to
avoid clock skews errors.
CIFS Client Disconnection On File Read
Description
CIFS client disconnection on file read.
Cause
Extreme CIFS workload during controller failover.
Workaround
Client needs to reconnect and open the file again.
CIFS Client General Disconnection
Description
CIFS client disconnection.
Cause
In case the system identified a general issue with the CIFS service, it automatically
recovers but the failure causes all users to be disconnected and the above event to be
triggered.
Workaround
If this issue repeats frequently, contact Dell.
CIFS Client Login Failure
Description
CIFS client login failure.
Cause
User supplied incorrect password upon connection.
172
Workaround
Interactive users can retry with correct password. Applications and servers may need
special attention as the user/password, which is usually set in a script or configuration
file, has probably expired.
CIFS Connection Failure
Description
CIFS client share access denied.
Cause
The user is unknown in the Active Directory server, and the NAS system mapped this
user to a guest user. If the share does not allow guest access, the user receives an
access denied alert.
Workaround
Ensure that the user is listed in the Active Directory server the NAS is using.
Alternatively, you can remove the guest limitation for the share. If the user can now
access the share as guest, the newly created files are owned by the nobody/guest
user.
CIFS Delete On Close Denial
Description
Files are deleted while they are in use.
Cause
If a file is deleted when it is open, it is marked for deletion, and is deleted after it is
closed. Until then, the file appears in its original location but the system denies any
attempt to open it.
Workaround
Notify the user who tried to open the file that the file is deleted.
CIFS File Access Denied
Description
CIFS file access denied.
Cause
Client has insufficient privileges to perform the requested operation on the file.
Workaround
This is an informative event. The user may request to modify the file ACL to allow
access.
CIFS File Sharing Conflict
Description
CIFS file sharing conflict.
Cause
When a file is opened using the CIFS protocol, the opening application communicates
the sharing mode that must be used while this file is open.
This sharing mode describes what other users activities are allowed on this file, while
it is open.
This definition is sent by the application and the user cannot control/configure it.
After there is a violation of the sharing definition, the user receives an access denied
error and this event is issued.
Workaround
This is an informative event; The administrator may contact the locking user and
request to close the application referencing this file.
The application which opened the file may not have shut down gracefully. It is
recommended to reboot the client if possible.
CIFS Guest Account Invalid
Description
CIFS service cannot start.
Cause
A valid CIFS guest account is required for CIFS functionality.
Workaround
Configure the system guest account with a valid account.
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CIFS Locking Inconsistency
Description
CIFS service is interrupted due to CIFS interlocking issues.
Cause
CIFS client interlocking scenarios.
Workaround
System recovers itself automatically, issuing the above event when recovered.
CIFS Maximum Connections Reached
Description
Maximum number of CIFS connections per NAS controller is reached.
Cause
Each NX3600 appliance is limited to 200 concurrent CIFS connections and each
NX3610 and FS8600 is limited to 1500 connections.
•
•
•
Workaround
The system is in an optimal state and the number of CIFS clients accessing one of
the controllers reaches the maximum. In such a scenario, consider adding another
NAS appliance.
The system is in optimal state but the clients are significantly unbalanced between
NAS controllers. In this case, rebalance the clients using the NAS Manager.
The system is in degraded state (one or more NAS controllers are down) and the
CIFS clients are left over on the remaining controller. In this case, wait until the
system returns to optimal or decrease the number of CIFS clients in the system.
If all NAS controllers are in optimal mode, the connections are divided between both
of them.
CIFS Share Does Not Exist
Description
Cause
Workaround
Client attempts to connect to an inexistent share.
•
•
Spelling mistake on client side.
Accessing the incorrect server.
List the available NAS shares and verify that all shares are displayed and nothing has
changed unintentionally.
Verify that you can access the problematic share using a Windows client:
1.
2.
Click Run.
Enter the client access VIP and share name: \\<Client_VIP>\<CIFS_share_name>
CIFS Path Share Not Found
Description
Cause
Client accessed a share which refers to an inexistent directory in the NAS container.
•
•
Workaround
List all available shares on the NAS and identify the problematic share. It must have an
indication that it is not accessible.
1.
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The NAS system is restored from a backup or remote replication. During restore
time, the directory structure is not complete and a few directories may not exist.
Communicate the status and wait for the restore process to complete.
A client with authorization, deletes or alters a directory that is mounted by another
client.
If multiple users are accessing the same dataset, it is recommended that you apply
a strict permission scheme to avoid such conflicts.
Restore the problematic path from a backup.
2.
3.
Manually create the missing directories. Set permissions to control access as
required.
Remove the share and communicate to the client.
CIFS Write To Read Only Volume
Description
Client tries to modify a file on read-only volume.
Cause
A NAS volume is set to read-only when it is the target of a replication.
The most frequent reason for this event is either:
•
•
•
Workaround
The user meant to access the target system for read purposes, but also tries to
modify a file by mistake.
The user accesses the incorrect system due to similarity in name/IP.
The user is accessing a NAS container, which was made a replication target
without his knowledge.
In order to write to this volume, replication must be detached first. Refer the user to
the correct location.
Troubleshooting NFS Issues
Cannot Mount NFS Export
Description
When attempting to mount an NFS export, the mount command fails due to various
reasons such as:
•
•
•
•
•
Cause
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Workaround
Permission denied.
Appliance not responding due to port mapper failure - RPC timed out or input/
output error.
Appliance not responding due to program not registered.
Access denied.
Not a directory.
The client connects using NFS/UDP and there is a firewall in the way.
The client is not in the export list, the appliance could not recognize the client
system through NIS, or the appliance does not accept the identity you provided.
The NAS cluster solution is down or has internal file system problems.
The mount command got through to the port mapper, but the rpc.mountd NFS
mount daemon was not registered.
Client system’s IP address, IP range, domain name or netgroup is not in the export
list for the volume it is trying to mount from the NAS appliance.
Either the remote path or the local path is not a directory.
The client does not have root authority or is not a member of the system group.
NFS mounts and unmounts are only allowed for root users and members of the
system group.
If the issue is due to NFS/UDP and firewall, check if the client mounts using UDP (this
is usually the default) and there is a firewall in the path. If a firewall exists, add an
appropriate exception to the firewall.
If the issue is due to permissions:
•
•
Verify the path you provided is correct.
Check that you are trying to mount as root.
175
•
Check that the system's IP address, IP range, domain name or netgroup is in the
exports list.
If the appliance not responding due to a port mapper failure:
•
•
•
Check the NAS cluster appliance status.
Check the network connection by trying to NFS mount from some other system.
Verify if other users experience the same problem.
If the appliance is not responding due to the program not registered, check if the port
mapper on your client is up.
If the issue is due to access denied:
•
Get a list of the appliance exported file systems using the command:
showmount -e <FluidFS hostname>
•
•
Check the system name or netgroup name is not in the user list for the file system.
Check the file systems related to the NFS through the NAS cluster solution user
interface.
If the issue is due to the directory, check the spelling in your command and try to run
the mount command on both directories.
NFS Export Does Not Exist
Description
Attempted to mount an export that does not exist.
Cause
This failure is commonly caused by spelling mistakes on the client system or when
accessing the wrong server.
Workaround
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Check the available exports on the NAS; verify that all the required exports exist.
On the problematic client, verify that the relevant export is available to this client:
% showmount -e <Server name/IP>
Export list for <Server name/IP>:
/abc 10.10.10.0
/xyz 10.10.10.0
If the export is available, review the export name spelling in the relevant mount
command on the client. It is recommended to copy paste the export name from
the showmount output to the mount command.
NFS File Access Denied
Description
This event is issued when an NFS user does not have enough permissions for the file
on a NAS container.
Cause
File ownership is UID/UNIX and the user is not privileged to access the file, or, file
ownership is SID/ACL and after translation to UID/UNIX the permissions do not allow
access to the file.
Workaround
For native access (when CIFS user accesses SID/ACL file or NFS user accesses UID/
UNIX file) understanding the missing permission is standard.
If the access is non-native, translation rules come to effect and it is recommended
that you contact Dell Technical Support.
176
NFS Insecure Access To Secure Export
Description
User tries to access a secure export from an insecure port.
Cause
Secure export requirement means that the accessing clients must use a well-known
port (below 1024), which usually means that they must be a root (uid=0) on the client.
Workaround
•
•
•
Identify the relevant export and verify that it is set as secure (requires secure client
port).
If the export must remain secure, see the NFS client documentation in order to
issue the mount request from a well-known port (below 1024).
If a secure export is not required (e.g., the network is not public), ensure that the
export is insecure and retry accessing it.
NFS Mount Fails Due To Export Options
Description
This event is issued when NFS mount fails due to export options.
Cause
The export list filters client access by IP, network or netgroup, and screens the
accessing client.
Workaround
1.
2.
3.
4.
Verify the relevant export details. Write down all existing options so that you are
able to revert to them.
Remove IP/client restrictions on the export and retry the mount.
If the mount succeeds, verify that the IP or domain is explicitly specified, or that it
is part of the defined network or netgroups. Pay attention to pitfall scenarios,
where the network netmask is not intuitive, for example, 192.175.255.254 is part
of 192.168.0.0/12, but not of 192.168.0.0/16.
After the mount succeeds, adjust the original options accordingly.
NFS Mount Fails Due To Netgroup Failure
Description
This event is issued when client fails to mount an NFS export because the required
netgroup information cannot be attained.
Cause
This error is usually the outcome of a communication error between the NAS system
and the NIS/LDAP server. It can be a result of network issue, directory server overload,
or a software malfunction.
Workaround
Repeat the following process for each configured NIS server, each time leaving just a
single NIS used, starting with the problematic NIS server:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Inspect the NIS/LDAP server logs and see if the reason for the error is reported in
the logs.
Complete a network test by pinging the NAS from a client located in the same
subnet as the NIS/LDAP server.
Ping the NIS/LDAP server from a client located in the same subnet as the NAS.
If a packet loss is evident on one of the above, resolve the network issues in the
environment.
Using a Linux client located in the same subnet as the NAS and configured to use
the same directory server, query the netgroup details from the NIS/LDAP server
using the relevant commands. Ensure that the reply is received in a timely
manner (up to 3 seconds).
You can temporarily workaround the problem by removing the netgroup restriction
on the export and/or by defining an alternative directory server.
177
Identify the relevant export and the options defined for it, while focusing on the
netgroup definition. Document the used netgroup in order to restore it after the issue
is solved and remove the netgroup limitation.
NFS Mount Path Does Not Exist
Description
Client tries to mount a mount path that does not exists on a NAS container.
Cause
This error usually occurs in one of the following scenarios:
•
•
•
Workaround
1.
2.
3.
4.
When accessing a system which is being restored from backup or remote
replication. The full directory structure is available only when the restore is
complete.
When a client with an authorization to access a higher directory in the same path
deletes or alters a directory which is being mounted by another client.
When multiple users are accessing the same data set, it is recommended to apply
a strict permission scheme to avoid this scenario.
If the NAS system is being restored, communicate the current status to the client
and instruct the client to wait for the restore process to complete.
In the other case, there are three options:
– Restore the problematic path from a backup.
– Manually create the missing directories to enable the mount. Clients receive
errors when trying to access existing data in a deleted path.
– Remove the export and communicate this to the client.
List all available exports on the NAS and identify the problematic export. It must
have an indication that it is not accessible.
Delete the export or create the directory where the export points to.
NFS Owner Restricted Operation
Description
NFS client is not permitted to perform the requested action to the specific file.
Cause
NFS user attempted a chmod or chgrp operation while not being the owner of the
file.
Workaround
This is a minor, user-level issue. Frequent events of this type may indicate a malicious
attempt to access restricted data.
NFS Write To Read-Only Export
Description
NFS client tries to perform modifications on a read-only export.
Cause
An NFS export can be defined as a read-only export. A client accessing a read-only
export cannot perform write operations or modify included files.
Workaround
This event, by itself, does not require any administrative intervention.
NFS Write To Read-Only Volume
Description
An NFS user tries to modify a file on a read-only volume.
Cause
A NAS volume becomes read-only when it is set as the target in a replication relation.
Modifying a read-only volume is inhibited, until the replication relation is removed and
the volume returns to a simple, normal state.
Workaround
Inform the user(s) of the state of the NAS volume.
178
NFS Write To Snapshot
Description
An NFS user tries to modify a file located in a snapshot.
Cause
NAS volume snapshots cannot be modified by design.
Workaround
Snapshot data cannot be modified. A snapshot is an exact representation of the NAS
volume data at the time of its creation.
NFS Access Denied To A File Or Directory
Description
User cannot access the NFS file or directory even though the user belongs to the
group owning the NFS object and the group members are permitted to perform the
operation.
Cause
NFS servers (versions 2 and 3) use the Remote Procedure Call (RPC) protocol for
authentication of NFS clients. Most RPC clients have a limitation of up to 16 groups
passed to the NFS server. If a user belongs to more than 16 UNIX groups, as supported
by some UNIX flavors, some of the groups are not passed and are not checked by the
NFS server and thus the user's access may be denied.
Workaround
A possible way to verify this problem is to use newgrp to temporarily change the
primary group of the user and thus ensure it is passed to the server.
The simple workaround, although not always feasible, is to remove the user from
unnecessary groups, leaving only 16 groups or less.
Troubleshooting NAS File Access And Permissions Issues
Cannot Change The Ownership Of A File Or A Folder
Description
Every file on the NAS system is owned by either a
UNIX or NTFS user. Inability to change ownership is
treated differently, depending on whether the
access is native or non-native.
Cause
The user is not authorized to perform the
ownership change.
Workaround
An authorized user must perform this action.
Cannot Modify NAS Files
Description
Cause
A user or an application cannot modify a file.
•
•
•
Workaround
•
•
The client cannot modify a file due to lack of
permissions on the file.
The NAS volume has reached full capacity and
the file system denies any write requests,
including overwrites.
The NAS volume is a target in a replication
relationship and is read only.
If the problem appears only on some files, this
is a permission issue. Verify that the user
account has modify permissions on the file or
use a different user account.
If the problem is related to a specific NAS
volume:
179
a.
b.
Verify there is enough free space on the
NAS volume or expand it.
Verify that the accessed NAS volume is not
a target of a replication.
Mixed File Ownership Denied
Description
Both file owner and group owner must be from the
same identity type (either UNIX or NTFS). An
attempt to set different identity types was
detected.
Cause
It is impossible to change only the file owner ID to
UID if the original file ownership is SID/GSID.
Workaround
To change the file ownership to UNIX style
ownership, set UID and GID at the same time.
Problematic SMB Access From A Linux Client
Description
A Linux/UNIX client is trying to mount a NAS
cluster solution share using SMB (using /etc/fstab
or directly using smbmount).
A Linux/UNIX client is trying to access the file
system using the smbclient command, such as:
smbclient //<nas>/<share> -U user
%password -c ls
Workaround
It is recommended that you use the NFS protocol
interfaces to access the NAS cluster solution
FluidFS systems from Linux/UNIX clients. To
workaround this issue:
1.
2.
Ensure that your admin creates NFS exports to
same locations that you use to access using
CIFS and connect to them using mount
command from Linux/UNIX clients.
Use NFS-based interfaces to access the NAS
cluster solution. For example, from the
NAGIOS Linux management system, use the /
check_disk command instead of the /
check_disk_smb command.
Strange UID And GID Numbers On Dell NAS System Files
Description
New files created from Ubuntu 7.x clients get the
UID and GID of 4294967294 (nfsnone).
Cause
By default, Ubuntu 7.x nfs clients do not specify rpc
credentials on their nfs calls. As a result, files
created from these clients, by any user, are owned
by 4294967294 (nfsnone) UID and GID.
Workaround
To force UNIX credentials on NFS calls, add the
sec=sys option to the NAS cluster solution mounts
in the Ubuntu fstab file.
180
Troubleshooting Networking Issues
Name Server Unresponsive
Description
All NIS, LDAP, or DNS servers are unreachable or not responding.
Workaround
For each server:
1.
2.
3.
Ping the server from a client on NAS cluster solution subnet and verify it
responds.
Issue a request to the server from a client on the NAS cluster solution subnet and
verify it responds.
Check server logs to understand the cause the server fails to respond to requests.
Specific Subnet Clients Cannot Access The NAS Cluster Solution
Description
Users (new or old), accessing from specific network(s) or cannot access the NAS
cluster solution.
Cause
This issue is due to a conflict between the users' subnet addresses and the NAS
system internal network's address. The NAS system routes the response packets to the
incorrect network.
Workaround
1.
2.
Check the internal network addresses of the NAS system and verify if there is a
conflict with the problematic client network addresses.
If a conflict exists, manually change the conflicting NAS internal network address
using either the NAS Manager or CLI.
Troubleshooting DNS Configurations
Description
Unable to connect to the NAS cluster solution using the system name and/or unable
to resolve host names.
Cause
Probable causes may be:
•
•
Workaround
1.
2.
3.
Unable to ping system using Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN).
Unable to connect to the NAS Manager using system name.
Verify that the client IP information is set correctly.
Verify that the NAS cluster solution controller is configured to the correct DNS
server.
Contact DNS server administrator to verify the DNS record creation.
Determining The IQN Of The NAS Cluster Solution Controllers Using CLI
Description
Determining the IQN of the NAS cluster solution controllers using CLI.
Workaround
Using an ssh client and the NAS Management VIP, log in to the NAS cluster solution
CLI as an admin.
From the command line, type the following command:
system maintenance luns iscsi-configuration view
181
Troubleshooting RX And TX Pause Warning Messages
Description
The following warning messages may be displayed when the NAS Manager reports
connectivity in a Not Optimal state:
Rx_pause for eth(x) on node
1 is off.
Tx_pause for eth(x) on node 1 is off.
Cause
Flow control is not enabled on the switch(es) connected to a NAS cluster solution
controller.
Workaround
See the switch vendor's documentation to enable flow control on the switch(es).
Troubleshooting Replication Issues
Replication Configuration Error
Description
Replication between the source and destination NAS volumes fails because the source
and destination systems’ topologies are incompatible.
Cause
The source and destination systems are incompatible for replication purposes.
Workaround
Upgrade the NAS cluster solution which is down. Verify that both the source and
destination have the same number of NAS controllers.
NOTE: You cannot replicate between a four-node NAS cluster and two-node
NAS cluster.
Replication Destination Cluster Is Busy
Description
Replication between the source NAS volume and the destination NAS volume fails
because the destination cluster is not available to serve the required replication.
Cause
Replication task fails because the destination cluster is not available to serve the
required replication.
Workaround
Administrators must verify the replication status on destination system.
Replication Destination FS Is Busy
Description
Replication between the source NAS volume and the destination NAS volume fails.
Cause
Replication task fails because the destination cluster is temporarily unavailable to
serve the required replication.
Workaround
The replication continues automatically when the file system releases part of the
resources. Administrators must verify that the replication continues automatically after
a period of time (an hour).
Replication Destination Is Down
Description
Replication between the NAS source volume and the NAS destination volume fails.
Cause
Replication task fails since the file system of the destination NAS volume is down.
Workaround
Administrators must check if the file system is down in the destination system using
the monitoring section of the NAS Manager. If the NAS cluster solution file system is
not responding, administrators must start the system on the destination cluster. The
replication continues automatically after the file system starts.
182
Replication Destination Is Not Optimal
Description
Replication between the NAS source volume and the NAS destination volume fails
because the destination NAS volume is not optimal.
Cause
Replication fails because file system of the destination NAS volume is not optimal.
Workaround
The administrators must check the system status of destination system using the
monitoring section of the NAS Manager to understand why the file system is not
optimal. The replication continues automatically after the file system recovers.
Replication Destination Volume Is Busy Reclaiming Space
Description
Replication between the NAS source volume and the NAS destination volume fails
because the destination NAS volume is busy freeing up space.
Cause
Replication task fails because the destination NAS volume is busy freeing up space.
Workaround
The replication continues automatically when the space is available. The
administrators must verify that the replication automatically continues after a period
of time (an hour).
Replication Destination Volume Is Detached
Description
Replication between the NAS source volume and the NAS destination volume fails
because the NAS destination volume is detached from the NAS source volume.
Cause
Replication task fails because the destination NAS volume was previously detached
from the source NAS volume.
Workaround
The administrators must perform the detach action on the NAS source volume. If
required, reattach both NAS volumes in a replication relation.
Replication Disconnection
Description
Replication between the NAS source volume and the NAS destination volume fails
because the connection between source and destination systems is lost.
Cause
Network infrastructure disconnection between the source and the destination.
Workaround
The administrator must check if the replication is automatically restored. If the
replication is not automatically restored, check the network communication between
the source cluster and the destination cluster. Network communication can be
checked by using a third party system in the same subnet that can ping both the
source and destination clusters.
Replication Incompatible Versions
Description
Replication between the NAS source volume and the NAS destination volume fails
because the system version of the source NAS cluster is higher than the system
version of the destination cluster.
Cause
Replication task fails since the system version of the source NAS cluster is higher than
the system version of the destination cluster.
Workaround
Administrators must upgrade the system version of the destination cluster to match
the system version of the source cluster.
183
Replication Internal Error
Description
Replication between the source and the destination NAS volumes fails due to an
internal error.
Workaround
Contact Dell to resolve this issue.
Replication Jumbo Frames Blocked
Description
Replication between the NAS source volume and NAS destination volume fails
because the jumbo frames are blocked over the network.
Cause
Replication task fails because jumbo frames are blocked over the network.
Workaround
The administrator must verify that the network configuration between the source
cluster and the destination cluster has enabled transferring jumbo frames across the
switches or routers.
Replication Destination Does Not Have Enough Space
Description
Replication between NAS source volume and NAS destination volume fails because
there is not enough space in the destination NAS volume.
Cause
Replication task fails because there is not enough space in the destination NAS
volume.
Workaround
Increase the space of the destination NAS volume.
Replication Source Is Busy
Description
Replication between the NAS source volume and the NAS destination volume fails
because the file system of the source NAS volume is busy replicating other NAS
volumes.
Cause
Replication task fails because the file system of the source NAS volume is busy
replicating other NAS volumes.
Workaround
The replication continues automatically when the file system releases part of the
resources. The administrators must verify that the replication automatically continues
after a period of time (an hour).
Replication Source Is Down
Description
Replication between the NAS source volume and the NAS destination volume fails
because the file system of source NAS volume is down.
Cause
The file system of the source NAS volume is down.
Workaround
Administrators must check if the NAS cluster solution is down in the source system,
by checking the monitoring section of the NAS Manager. If the NAS cluster solution is
down, the administrators must start the file system on the source cluster. The
replication continues automatically when the file system starts.
Replication Source Is Not Optimal
Description
Replication between the source and the destination NAS volumes fails because the file
system of the source NAS volume is not optimal.
Cause
Replication fails since the file system of the source is not optimal.
184
Workaround
The administrator must check the file system status of source system, using the
monitoring section in the NAS Manager, to understand why the file system is not
optimal.
Replication Source Volume Is Busy Reclaiming Space
Description
Replication between the NAS source volume and the NAS destination volume fails
because the source NAS volume is busy reclaiming space.
Cause
Replication task failed since the source NAS volume is busy reclaiming space.
Workaround
The replication continues automatically when space is available. Administrators must
verify that the replication automatically continues after a period of time (an hour).
Troubleshooting System Issues
Troubleshooting System Shutdown
Description
During a system shutdown using the NAS Manager, the system does not stop and the
controllers do not shutdown after 20 minutes.
Cause
The system shutdown procedure is comprised of two separate processes:
•
•
Stopping the file system
Powering down the NAS cluster solution controllers
The file system may take a long time to clean the cache to the storage either due to
lot of data, or due to an intermittent connection to the storage.
During the powering down stage, the issue can be due to the OS kernel hanging on
the controller or failing to sync its state to the local drive.
Workaround
If the file system has stopped and if one of the controllers are still up, you can
physically power down the controller using the power button.
If file system has not stopped, you must let it continue working. The file system
reaches a 10 minute timeout, flushes its cache to the local controllers, and continues
the shutdown process.
NAS Container Security Violation
Description
NAS container security violation.
Cause
Selecting security style for a NAS container dictates the dominant protocol to be used
to set permissions on files in this volume. NFS for UNIX security style volumes and
CIFS for NTFS security style volumes.
Consequently, this makes some operations invalid:
•
•
•
•
•
Setting UNIX permissions for a file in an NTFS Security style container.
Setting UID/GID ownership for a file in an NTFS Security style container.
Setting ACL for a file in a UNIX Security style container.
Changing read-only flag for a file in a UNIX Security style container.
Setting SID/GSID ownership for a file on UNIX Security style container.
The NAS container security style must reflect the main protocol used to access its
files.
Workaround
If a user frequently needs to perform a cross-protocol security related activity, split
the data into separate NAS containers based on the main access protocol.
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Multiple Errors Received During File System Format
Description
You receive multiple errors during a file system format.
Cause
Probable causes may be:
•
•
•
•
•
Workaround
Incorrect SAN IPs are used in the Dell NAS Initial Deployment Utility (IDU).
Incorrect IQNs used while defining hosts in the MDSM.
Uneven number of LUNs are mapped to the host group.
LUN size is below the minimum required size.
Less than minimum number of required LUNs.
If incorrect SAN IPs are used while running the NAS IDU:
1.
2.
Verify that the MD discovery IP used while running the NAS IDU is on the same
subnet as one of the two SAN IPs configured on your controllers.
To verify MD discovery IP, log in to your NAS Manger IP using CLI and run the
following command:system maintenance luns configuration iscsiview
This command shows the MD discovery IP.
If the IP is not in the same subnet as the IPs configured for your SAN, change the MD
discovery IP to one of the subnets defined on your controller's SAN A and B.
If incorrect IQNs are used while defining hosts in MDSM, verify that the IQNs
displayed in MDSM match the controller IQNs.
To change the discovery IP in the CLI, run the following command:
system maintenance luns configuration iscsi-set iSCSIDiscoveryIPs <IP Address> none none
After the command is complete, refresh the host port identifiers. You can now run the
configuration wizard from the NAS Manager again.
1.
2.
Compare if the IQNs displayed in MDSM are the same as displayed under the
Mappings tab in the hosts section in the NAS Manager.
If there is a mismatch, correct the IQNs used for the hosts in MDSM and try
formatting the system. The LUNs must be discovered and formatted.
If the issue is due to uneven number of LUNs:
1.
2.
3.
If an error is encountered, verify that even number of LUNs are mapped to the
host group. An odd number of LUNs is not supported. LUNs have to grow in pairs
starting from 2 to 16.
If uneven LUNs are used, correct the count by adding or removing a LUN.
Try to format the system.
If the LUN size is below minimum requirements:
1.
2.
3.
Verify that the LUNs are larger than the minimum required size of 125 GB.
If the LUNs are less than 125 GB, change LUN size to meet or exceed the
minimum required size.
Try to format the system.
If the LUN count is below the minimum requirements:
1.
2.
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Verify that more than one LUN is mapped to the host group. The minimum
number of LUNs required is 2.
If the number of LUNs is less than 2, add LUNs to meet the required minimum
LUN count of 2.
3.
Try to format the system.
Associating LUN Names To Virtual Disks
Description
Determining which LUNs in the NAS Manager are virtual disks in the Modular Disk
Storage Manager (MDSM).
Workaround
Open the NAS Manager web interface and go to Cluster Management →
Maintenance → Add Luns. This page displays all LUNs that the NAS cluster solution
has access to (assigned to the NAS cluster solution host group). Each LUN can be
identified using its world-wide name. In the NAS Manager web interface, the LUN's
world-wide name is preceded by a prefix.
Open MDSM and go to the Logical tab and click Virtual Disk. The virtual disk worldwide identifier is displayed in the Properties pane. This workaround enables you
determine which virtual disks are assigned to the NAS file system.
NAS IDU Failed To Discover Any Controllers
Description
NAS IDU failed to discover any controllers.
Cause
IPV6 may not be enabled on your workstation.
Workaround
Enable IPV6 support on your management workstation.
Attach Operation Fails
Description
The operation to attach the controller to NAS cluster fails.
Workaround
•
•
•
Connect a keyboard and monitor to the controller that failed the attach operation,
and view the error message to determine why the attach operation failed.
Verify the following:
– While the controller was detached, the IP assigned to it on the client network
was not allocated to another host. While the controller is detached, it loses its
identity, including IP addresses. When it is attached, its identity is applied back
to the controller, including the IP addresses.
– Verify the default gateway is in the Primary subnet by using the NAS Manager.
In Cluster Management → Network Configuration, view the default gateway.
In Cluster Management → Subnets, to view the Primary subnet on the client
network. If the default gateway is not in the Primary subnet, change the default
gateway. For attach to succeed, the default gateway must be pingable.
After an attach operation fails, the controller must manually be reset to standby
mode. This is done by connecting a keyboard and monitor to the controller that
failed attach, and pressing the system identification button key
the on-screen instructions.
, as directed by
Controller Taking Long Time To Boot Up After Service Pack Upgrade
Description
The controller takes a long time to boot up after upgrading the service pack of the
controller firmware.
Workaround
•
•
Connect a keyboard and monitor to the controller that is taking a long time to
boot up.
If the system is booting, and is at the boot phase, let the upgrades finish. This can
take up to 60 minutes to complete.
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•
188
Do not reboot the controller manually if it is in the boot phase Executing System
Upgrades.
Getting Help
12
Contacting Dell
NOTE: Dell provides several online and telephone-based support and service options. If you do not
have an active Internet connection, you can find contact information on your purchase invoice,
packing slip, bill, or Dell product catalog. Availability varies by country and product, and some
services may not be available in your area.
To contact Dell for sales, technical support, or customer-service issues:
1.
Go to dell.com/contactdell.
2.
Select your country or region from the interactive world map.
When you select a region, the countries for the selected regions are displayed.
3.
Select the appropriate language under the country of your choice.
4.
Select your business segment.
The main support page for the selected business segment is displayed.
5.
Select the appropriate option depending on your requirement.
Locating Your System Service Tag
Your system is identified by a unique Express Service Code and Service Tag number. The Express Service
Code and Service Tag are found on the front of the system by pulling out the information tag. This
information is used by Dell to route support calls to the appropriate personnel.
Documentation Feedback
If you have feedback for this document, write to documentation_feedback@dell.com. Alternatively, you
can click on the Feedback link in any of the Dell documentation pages, fill up the form, and click Submit
to send your feedback.
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