CHARA Array Computer Hardware
c 2001-2009 Nils Turner
Copyright Chapter 1: Introduction
1 Introduction
1
Chapter 2: tomsrtbt
2 tomsrtbt
2
Chapter 3: Bunker Hardware
3
3 Bunker Hardware
3.1 Computer Equipment
3.1.1 DOS/Win95 Computer
The DOS/Windows 95 machine in each bunker Has the uninspiring name of ‘s2dos’, ‘e1dos’,
etc. The machine is actually set up to triple boot into DOS, Windows 95, or Linux, each
with their own partition(s), using the Linux boot utility, ‘LILO’. Linux is only there to allow
archiving and administration of ‘LILO’. At present (September 2006), the DOS/Windows
95 machine will default boot into DOS. To boot into either of the two other operating
systems, type dos or linux at the ‘LILO boot:’ prompt within 5 seconds.
3.1.1.1 Typical Partitioning Scheme
A majority of the DOS/Windows 95 machines have a Quantum Fireball ST3.2A (C/H/S,
782/128/63, 3079MB) hard disk installed. The partitioning scheme we use is:
Partition Flag Cylinders Type Mount
/dev/hda1
1-134
6
/mnt/dos
/dev/hda2 *
135-338
b
/mnt/win95
/dev/hda3
339-781
5
/dev/hda5
339-343
83
/boot
/dev/hda6
344-772
83
/
/dev/hda7
773-781
82
There are some machines which have the Quantum Fireball LC07A (C/H/S, 913/255/63,
7162MB) hard disk installed. For them the partitioning scheme we use is:
Partition Flag Cylinders Type Mount
/dev/hda1
1-67
6
/mnt/dos
/dev/hda2 *
68-169
b
/mnt/win95
/dev/hda3
170-912
5
/dev/hda5
170-172
83
/boot
/dev/hda6
173-907
83
/
/dev/hda7
907-912
82
3.1.1.2 Rebuilding a System
The most convenient utility for rebuilding a system is the ‘tomsrtbt’ small-linux operating
system. It has all the tools for manipulating hard drives and partitions, network cards, and
network mounted file systems.
3.1.2 Linux Computer
The telescope Linux boxes are nearly identical. These are the files that are unique:
/etc/HOSTNAME
/etc/encl/enclServer.cfg
/etc/rc.d/rc.local
/etc/rpc.cfg
/etc/sysconfig/network
/etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0
Chapter 3: Bunker Hardware
4
3.1.2.1 Changing Motherboards
Starting in November of 2001, we have been slowly upgrading the motherboards in the
Linux boxes from a 350MHz Pentium II to a 1GHz Pentium III and remove the IDE RAID
adaptor. The following is a listing of the tasks to do in order.
Spare Parts Needed:
•
•
•
•
2 card slot covers
2 anti-static bags large enough for a typical PCI or ISA card
the new motherboard
a drive bay cover of each type
Tools Needed:
•
•
•
•
•
Xcelite nut drivers
jewelers screwdrivers
masking tape (for labelling wires)
scissors
fiber end protectors
Process:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Use DupliDisk floppy to unitialize the RAID controller.
Disconnect all cables from the back of the PC; label if necessary.
Remove computer from rack.
Open lid. Remove cross brace and fan panel.
Disconnect all drive control cables from motherboard.
Remove DupliDisk controller from its PCI slot. Remove the cables from it and put it
into one of the anti-static bags.
Remove all the other AGP, PCI, and ISA cards from the motherboard. Be careful of
static discharge.
Disconnect power from the motherboard.
Label and disconnect the key lock, hard disk LED, speaker, power LED, power switch,
and reset switch leads from the motherboard.
Unscrew motherboard from case and remove it.
Remove I/O port cover from the case.
Install new I/O port cover into the case.
Install new motherboard and screw it down.
Attach power LED, speaker, reset switch, power switch, and hard disk LED leads to
the motherboard.
Install ISA bus extender, PCI frame grabber, PCI Cyclades, PCI network, and AGP
video cards onto the motherboard.
Attach WOL lead from the network card to the appropriate place on the motherboard.
Remove the upper disk drive (the DupliDisk mirrored disk).
Chapter 3: Bunker Hardware
5
• Move the lower disk up one space.
• Replace primary cable with the high density cable that came with the motherboard.
• Connect the CDROM cable to the IDE2 connector on the motherboard.
• Connect the hard disk cable to the IDE1 connector on the motherboard.
• Connect the floppy disk cable to the FLOPPY connector on the motherboard.
• Replace the fan panel and cross brace.
• Connect motherboard power.
• Replace lid.
• Install computer back into the rack.
• Reconnect cables to the back of the computer.
• Boot computer and go into the BIOS. Under PnP/PCI configuration, reserve IRQs 3,
4, and 11 for Legacy ISA.
• Reboot and enjoy.
3.2 Bunker Connections
There are a number of connections of serial ports between the two machines as well as to
other components in the bunker rack. These connections came from an inspection of the
connections in bunker S1 on 2002-01-24. These are just quick listings for service reference.
Fiber Patch Panel
Pos.
Component Desc.
1
2
3
4
Linux Box TX
Linux Box RX
Fiber-to-Serial Driver J3
Fiber-to-Serial Driver J4
Linux Box
Port
Connector
Component
Connector
par. port
ttyS0
ttyS1
ttyC0
ttyC1
ttyC2
ttyC3
ttyC4
ttyC5
C2C RX
C2C RX
C2C TX
C2CBAYTECH
C2C TX
C2C TX
C2C TX
C2C TX
TCS paddle
Fiber-to-Serial Driver J2
DOS Box COM1
DOS Box COM2
Baytech Outlet strip
PI C-844
Kollmorgen Lower C1
Kollmorgen Upper C1
B&B Electonics RS-232
C2C TX
C2C RX
EIA-232
RS-232
KOLM
KOLM
C2C TX
DOS Box
The only DOS Box port connections are already listed in the above table.
Chapter 3: Bunker Hardware
6
3.3 Other Equipment
3.3.1 S1 Bunker
Description
Cont. Power Strip
Telescope AZ Cont.
Manufacturer
Baytech
Compumotor
Telescope EL Cont.
Compumotor
s1dos
s1
ISA Expansion Chassis
Tip/Tilt Cont.
Focus Cont.
Lower Cylinder Cont.
Tangent
Tangent
AccessIO
PI
PI
Kollmorgen
Upper Cylinder Cont.
Kollmorgen
UPS
...2682
Model
RPC-2
Dynaserv
SD1015B62
Dynaserv
SD1015B62
7414XC
E-500.00
C-844.40
CR062502G308B1
CR062502G308B1
Serial
354212
97041800091
Notes
w/ motor 97B67392C
97041800090
w/ motor 97B67387C
178945
179915
10121804
05190598
145/980526
00H-3056
00H-3057
3.3.2 S2 Bunker
Description
Cont. Power Strip
Telescope AZ Cont.
Manufacturer
Baytech
Compumotor
Telescope EL Cont.
Compumotor
s2dos
ISA Expansion Chassis
s2
Tip/Tilt Cont.
Focus Cont.
Lower Cylinder Cont.
Tangent
AccessIO
Tangent
PI
PI
Kollmorgen
Upper Cylinder Cont.
Kollmorgen
UPS
...5517
Model
RPC-2
Dynaserv
SD1015B62
Dynaserv
SD1015B62
7414XC
P-275.30
C-844.40
CR062502G308B1
CR062502G308B1
Serial
354156
97041800095
Notes
w/ motor 97B67390C
97041800092
w/ motor 97B67385C
178949
10121801
179918
10510796
113/971015
00H-3051
00H-3055
3.3.3 E1 Bunker
Description
ISA Expansion Chassis
Telescope AZ Cont.
Telescope EL Cont.
Tip/Tilt Cont.
Lower Cylinder Cont.
Upper Cylinder Cont.
Manufacturer
AccessIO
Compumotor
Compumotor
PI
Kollmorgen
Kollmorgen
Model
Dynaserv
Dynaserv
Serial
10121806
97041800087
99092800598
07040499
00H-3058
00H-3050
Notes
w/ motor 97B67388C
w/ motor 199MM19985H9
Chapter 3: Bunker Hardware
7
3.3.4 E2 Bunker
Description
ISA Expansion Chassis
Telescope AZ Cont.
Telescope EL Cont.
Tip/Tilt Cont.
Focus Cont.
Lower Cylinder Cont.
Upper Cylinder Cont.
3.3.5 W1 Bunker
3.3.6 W2 Bunker
Manufacturer
AccessIO
Compumotor
Compumotor
PI
PI
Kollmorgen
Kollmorgen
Model
Dynaserv
Dynaserv
Serial
10121803
97041800094
97041800096
05200598
129/980312
00H-3053
00G-2913
Notes
Chapter 4: Computer Configurations
4 Computer Configurations
Card Positions
Slot
Card
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
video (AGP)
(empty)
network (PCI)
Cyclades (PCI)
Empty (PCI)
frame grabber (PCI)
ISA bus extender (PCI/ISA)
8
Chapter 5: Miscellaneous Software Configurations
9
5 Miscellaneous Software Configurations
5.1 Wireless LAN
This section explains how to compile and install the latest RangeLan2 software (rl2-1.7.1)
for the Proxim Symphony wireless LAN system. These cards have a proprietary software
interface. In their spare time, Paul Chinn and others have written a simplified interface
for Linux, burying the proprietary code into a linkable library to comply with the software
license.
5.1.1 Card Hardware Configuration
This step has to be done under Microsoft Windows. Basically, all that is involved here
is to choose a hardware password so that only cards configured with the same passwords
are allowed to talk to each other. Put the Proxim Symphony CD into the drive and let
it autorun its program. Make sure the version of Symphony is 1.3 or higher (1.2 doesn’t
know about the PCI version of the Symphony wireless network card). Also, don’t use
Microsoft’s Hardware Configuration Wizard. Just use the defaults the autorun program
suggests. Proxim’s utility, Maestro, has a feature that allows you to set and/or change the
hardware password of the card.
5.1.2 Software Configuration under Linux
The kernel sources must be installed for this to work. The kernel source is located in the
directory ‘/usr/src/linux/’ (‘/usr/src/linux-2.4/’ for RedHat 7.1 and 7.2). The rl21.7.1 code should be extracted from the archive. If the code is to be compiled on a RedHat
7.1 or 7.2 system, modify the ‘Configure’ script by replacing all ‘/usr/src/linux’ strings
with ‘/usr/src/linux-2.4’. Following this paragraph is a listing of tasks to be executed
on all types of installs (PCMCIA card, PCI card, and ISA card), along with tasks specific
to each of the card types.
• Run make dep in kernel source tree.
• Run make config in rl2 source tree. Going with all the defaults works well. When
it comes time to choose which type of network card to compile for, choose 3 for the
PCMCIA card, 4 for the ISA card, or 5 for the PCI card.
• While still in rl2 source tree, run make modules and make modules_install.
• Add new network information using linuxconf. For the kernel module, use rlmod
(PCI and ISA installs only, leave blank for PCMCIA installs). Exit linuxconf.
• For PCI or ISA installs, manually edit /etc/modules.conf to do some post-install
configuration. After the line that looks something like this:
alias eth1 rlmod
add a line that looks something like this:
post-install rlmod /usr/local/bin/proxcfg eth1 name <name>
Obviously, change <name> to the host name of the network interface.
• For PCMCIA installs, copy docs/rlmod.conf from the rl2 source tree to
‘/etc/pcmcia/’.
Chapter 5: Miscellaneous Software Configurations
10
• For PCMCIA installs, one needs to do the functional equivalent of running postinstall rlmod /usr/local/bin/proxcfg eth1 name <name> for the PCI or ISA installs. I haven’t yet figured out how to do this. It is a minor issue, though.
5.1.3 IP Masquerading using the netfilter Model
On the “network bridge” machine it will be necessary to forward the IP packets from the
wireless side (usually eth1) to the wired side (usually eth0). This is easiest using the
iptables model. Here are the steps to make this happen.
• CHARA machines are set up to bootup to runlevel 3 (full networking, no X). Therefore,
the ipchains link only needs to be removed from ‘/etc/rc.d/rc3.d/’.
• Create the file ‘/etc/rc.d/rc.firewall’ with the following contents:
# Load the NAT module (this pulls in all the others).
modprobe iptable_nat
# In the NAT table (-t nat), Append a rule (-A) after routing
# (POSTROUTING) for all packets going out eth0 (-o eth0) which
# says to MASQUERADE the connection (-j MASQUERADE).
iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o eth0 -j MASQUERADE
# Turn on IP forwarding
echo 1 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward
Make sure it is executable.
• Append the following lines onto the end of the file, ‘/etc/rc.d/rc.local’:
# Start masquerading to allow use of wireless LAN
echo "Setting up wireless LAN forwarding ... "
/etc/rc.d/rc.firewall
• Reboot to make sure the settings take effect.
Chapter 6: Pinouts
11
6 Pinouts
6.1 Serial Standard
This section is just for reference.
6.1.1 DB-25
Pin
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
20
22
Abbrev.
TxD
RxD
RTS
CTS
DSR
GND
DCD
DTR
RI
Description
Transmit Data
Receive Data
Request to Send
Clear to Send
Data Set Ready
Signal Ground
Data Carrier Detect
Data Terminal Ready
Ring Indicator
6.1.2 DB-9
Pin
3
2
7
8
6
5
1
4
9
Abbrev.
TxD
RxD
RTS
CTS
DSR
GND
DCD
DTR
RI
Description
Transmit Data
Receive Data
Request to Send
Clear to Send
Data Set Ready
Signal Ground
Data Carrier Detect
Data Terminal Ready
Ring Indicator
6.1.3 NULL-MODEM
Side 1
TxD
RxD
RTS
CTS
DSR/DCD
GND
DTR
Side 2
RxD
TxD
CTS
RTS
DTR
GND
DSR/DCD
A full serial cable capable of working in all cases uses 9 conductors. When one needs
to get a serial cable that works with 8 conductors (for instance, using an existing CAT-5
cable), one usually leaves the Ring Indicator (RI) disconnected.
Chapter 6: Pinouts
12
6.2 DB-9/25 to RJ-45 Connections
CHARA employs a plethora of serial and serial-like connections. These are accomplished
by the means of standard, straight-through CAT-5 cables and DB-9/25-to-RJ-45 adapters
at either end.
6.2.1 RJ-45 Nomenclature
The RJ-45 plug is the male part while the jack is the female part. It consists of 8 conductors
in a row on one side, and a clip (or clip receptacle in the case of the jack) on the other
side. Looking at the jack, clip receptacle down, pin 1 is the far left conductor, pin 8 the
far right. Several different manufacturers of DB-9/25-to-RJ-45 adapters are reasonably
consistent with at color-to-conductor mapping (including between the DB-9 and DB-25
models), which is as follows:
Conductor Color
1
Blue
2
Orange
3
Black
4
Red
5
Green
6
Yellow
7
Brown
8
White (or Gray)
6.2.2 CHARA DB-9/25-to-RJ-45 Adapter Models
C2C TX
One of the two workhorses in the CHARA stable. The following table shows the pin-to-color
mapping for both the DB-9 and DB-25 connectors. This works for both female and male
varieties of DB connectors.
DB-9 Pin Color
DB-25 Pin Description
1
Blue
8
DCD
2
Red
3
TxD
3
Green
2
RxD
4
White (or Gray)
20
DTR
5
Orange
7
GND
6
Black
6
DSR
7
Yellow
4
RTS
8
Brown
5
CTS
9
N/C
22
RI
Chapter 6: Pinouts
13
C2C RX
This is the other of the two workhorses in the CHARA stable. The following table shows
the pin-to-color mapping for both the DB-9 and DB-25 connectors. This works for both
female and male varieties of DB connectors.
DB-9 Pin Color
DB-25 Pin Description
1
Blue
8
DCD
2
Green
3
TxD
3
Red
2
RxD
4
Brown
20
DTR
5
Orange
7
GND
6
Yellow
6
DSR
7
Black
4
RTS
8
White (or Gray)
5
CTS
9
N/C
22
RI
FIBER
The tip/tilt signals for the telescopes are sent over dedicated serial lines from a computer
in the west end of the OPLE building to the computers in the bunkers. This long-distance
serial connection is made by means of serial-to-fiber converters near each computer, and a
multi-mode fiber pair between the two. There are two varieties of serial-to-fiber converters,
one made by BlackBox, and the other by B&B Electronics. The B&B DB-25 connector
follows the C2C TX scheme. The following table shows the pin-to-color mapping for the
BlackBox DB-25 connector.
DB-25 Pin Color
DB-25 Pin Color
1
Blue
14
N/C
2
Green
15
N/C
3
Red
16
N/C
4
Black
17
N/C
5
White (or Gray)
18
N/C
6
Yellow
19
N/C
7
Orange
20
Brown
8
N/C
21
N/C
9
N/C
22
N/C
10
N/C
23
N/C
11
N/C
24
N/C
12
N/C
25
N/C
13
N/C
Chapter 6: Pinouts
14
BAYTECH
The Baytech RPC-2 remote power control strips have only an RJ-45 jack on them with a
certain conductor-to-CAT-5 mapping. The following table shows the pin-to-color mapping
for both the DB-9 and DB-25 connectors. This works for both female and male varieties of
DB connectors.
DB-9 Pin Color
DB-25 Pin Description
1
Black
8
DCD
2
Red
3
TxD
3
Green
2
RxD
4
White (or Gray)
20
DTR
5
Brown
7
GND
6
N/C
6
7
Yellow
4
RTS
8
Blue
5
CTS
9
N/C
22
RI
N/C
Orange
N/C
The unused colored wires should be taped such that they don’t touch each other in the
connector.
C844
The PI C-844 motor controller has a DB-9 connector. The following table shows the pinto-color mapping for this DB-9 connector.
DB-9 Pin Color
1
White (or Gray)
2
Green
3
Red
4
Blue
5
Orange
6
N/C
7
Brown
8
Yellow
9
N/C
N/C
Black
The unused colored wires should be taped such that they don’t touch each other in the
connector.
Chapter 6: Pinouts
15
KOLM
The Kollmorgen CR 6250 motor controller has a DB-9 connector. The following table shows
the pin-to-color mapping for this DB-9 connector.
DB-9 Pin Color
1
N/C
2
Green
3
Red
4
N/C
5
Orange
6
N/C
7
N/C
8
N/C
9
N/C
N/C
Blue
N/C
Black
N/C
Yellow
N/C
Brown
N/C
White (or Gray)
The unused colored wires should be taped such that they don’t touch each other in the
connector.
PPORT
The TCS hand paddle is connected to the parallel port on the telescope computer. Parallel
ports are DB-25 connectors. The following table shows the pin-to-color mapping for this
DB-25 connector.
DB-25 Pin Color
DB-25 Pin Color
1
N/C
15
N/C
2
Blue
16
N/C
3
Red
17
N/C
4
Orange
18
Green
5
Yellow
19
N/C
6
N/C
20
N/C
7
N/C
21
N/C
8
N/C
22
N/C
9
N/C
23
N/C
10
N/C
24
N/C
11
N/C
25
N/C
12
N/C
N/C
Black
13
N/C
N/C
Brown
14
N/C
N/C
White (or Gray)
The unused colored wires should be taped such that they don’t touch each other in the
connector.
Chapter 6: Pinouts
16
TCS PAD
The TCS hand paddle has a DB-9 connector. The following table shows the pin-to-color
mapping for this DB-9 connector.
DB-9 Pin Color
1
Blue
2
Red
3
Orange
4
Yellow
5
Green
6
N/C
7
N/C
8
N/C
9
N/C
N/C
Black
N/C
Brown
N/C
White (or Gray)
The unused colored wires should be taped such that they don’t touch each other in the
connector.
6.2.3 CHARA Cable Connections
“Straight-through” Cable
• C2C TX on one end, C2C TX on the other end; or
• C2C RX on one end, C2C RX on the other end
Computer to BlackBox Serial-to-Fiber Converter
• Computer: C2C TX
• BlackBox: FIBER
The BlackBox converters require configuration as to which end of the fiber run is “TX”,
and which is “RX”. The following table lists the required positions of the user-configurable
switches.
Switch TX (OPLE Building End)
RX (Bunker End)
SW1
A
A
SW2-1 Down
Down
SW2-2 Down
Down
SW2-3 Down
Down
SW2-4 Down
Down
SW2-5 Up
Down
SW2-6 Up
Up
SW2-7 Up
Up
SW2-8 Down
Down
Computer to B&B Serial-to-Fiber Converter
• Computer: C2C TX
• B&B: C2C TX
Chapter 6: Pinouts
Computer to Baytech RPC-2
• Computer: Baytech
• Baytech: bare CAT-5 cable
Computer to PI C-844 Motor Controller
• Computer: C2C TX
• C-844: C844
Computer to API Motor Controller
This system is no longer in use.
• Straight-through Cable
Computer to Kollmorgen CR 6250 Motor Controller
• Computer: C2C TX
• Kollmorgen: KOLM
Computer to New Focus 8732 Picomotor Controller
• Straight-through Cable
Computer to New Focus 875x Picomotor Controller
• Null-Modem Cable
Computer to TCS Hand Paddle
• Computer: PPORT Connected to the Parallel Port
• TCS Hand Paddle: TCS PAD connected to DB-9 at top of unit
17
Chapter 7: Hard Disk Inventory
18
7 Hard Disk Inventory
In the process of running the array, there have been some failed hard disks. So far, all
of them have occurred in the computers in the bunkers – most likely due to temperature
fluctuations and a dusty environment. Once a disk is replaced, the suspect one is probably
useable – with some caveats. The disk should be repartitioned to have just one partition,
the whole disk, and badblocks should be run on it.
7.1 Resurrecting a Suspect Disk
Run tomsrtbt on the machine with the suspect disk installed. To avoid inadvertently
destroying a wanted file system, it is best that this machine only has the suspect disk
installed. The machine gustav has a removable hard disk frame and carriage setup to make
this work easier.
First of all, if the disk has already been partitioned, delete all the partitions (using the
fdisk utility) and re-create one that spans the whole disk.
Run the badblocks utility in the following manner:
badblocks -o /tmp/bblks -v -w /dev/hda1
The -o /tmp/bblks switch will store the bad blocks list in the file, ‘/tmp/bblks’ (because
tomsrtbt is running, the file is only stored in RAM), the -v switch give verbose output,
the -w performs a write then readback robust test, and ‘/dev/hda1’ is the disk partition
undergoing the bad block check.
After completion, make an ext2 file system on the disk, with the following command:
mke2fs -l /tmp/bblks /dev/hda1
Mount the partition and copy the file ‘/tmp/bblks’ to the partition. You might want to
rename it to something less cryptic and give it a date. Make a copy of it for the records.
7.2 Suspect Disk Database
Disks that have gone through the inspection process have been labelled with a little sticker.
The following table lists a bit of the history of each disk
Disk
Make/Model
Comments
1
Fujitsu MPD3043AT
C/H/S, 2095/64/63, 4.3GB; ????-??-??: Installed in a bunker Linux box; 2002-02-01: 9
bad blocks found.
2
Quantum Fireball ST3.2A
C/H/S, 782/128/63, 3079MB; ????-??-??: Installed in the S1 bunker TCS box; 2002-02-04:
No bad blocks found.
Chapter 7: Hard Disk Inventory
19
3
Quantum Fireball ST3.2A
C/H/S, 782/128/63, 3079MB; ????-??-??: Installed in the E1 bunker TCS box; 2002-02-05:
No bad blocks found; 2003-01-17: No bad blocks
found; 2005-09-23: No bad blocks found; ??????-??: Installed in E2 bunker Linux box; 200712-15: Removed from E2 bunker Linux box;
2007-12-15: Disk reconfigured to be S2 bunker
Linux box; 2007-12-15: Installed in S2 bunker
Linux box.
4
Fujitsu MPD3043AT
C/H/S, 525/255/63, 4125MB; ????-??-??: Installed in irimage; 2002-11-25: Removed from
irimage; 2003-01-22: No bad blocks found;
2003-06-16: Installed in W1 bunker TCS box.
5
Western Dig. Caviar 2250
C/H/S, 1010/9/55, 244MB; ????-??-??: Installed in 486-based gustav; 2002-02-05: No bad
blocks found.
6
Fujitsu MPD3043AT
C/H/S, 525/255/63, 4125MB; ????-??-??: Installed in the E1 bunker Linux box; 2002-01-28:
Removed from E1 bunker Linux box; 2002-0206: No bad blocks found.
7
Fujitsu MPD3043AT
C/H/S, 525/255/63, 4125MB; ????-??-??: Installed in the W2 bunker Linux box; 2002-0109: Removed from W2 bunker Linux box; 200202-06: No bad blocks found; 2002-03-13: Installed in second Leach rack-mount computer;
2003-01-15: Removed from second Leach rackmount computer; 2003-01-15: Installed in gps.
8
Quantum Fireball ST3.2A
C/H/S, 782/128/63, 3079MB; ????-??-??: Installed in a bunker TCS box; 2002-02-06: No
bad blocks found; 2003-01-28: Installed in S1
bunker TCS box.
9
Fujitsu MPD3043AT
C/H/S, 525/255/63, 4125MB; ????-??-??: Installed in a bunker Linux box; 2002-02-06: 9 bad
blocks found; 2005-07-19: Installed in artsctr.
10
Fujitsu MPD3043AT
C/H/S, 525/255/63, 4125MB; ????-??-??: Installed in the S1 bunker Linux box; 2002-01-30:
Removed from S1 bunker Linux box; 2002-0313: No bad blocks found; 2002-03-13: Installed
in the first Leach rack-mount computer.
Chapter 7: Hard Disk Inventory
20
11
Quantum Fireball ST3.2A
C/H/S, 782/128/63, 3079MB; ????-??-??: Installed in the E2 bunker TCS box; 2002-04-16:
Removed from E2 bunker TCS box; 2002-04-16:
1 bad block found.
12
Quantum Fireball ST3.2A
C/H/S, 782/128/63, 3079MB; ????-??-??: Installed in the W1 bunker TCS box; 2002-04-19:
Removed from W1 bunker TCS box; 2002-04-24:
No bad blocks found; 2008-01-09: 80 bad blocks
found.
13
Quantum Fireball LC07A
C/H/S, 913/255/63, 7162MB; ????-??-??: Installed in the W2 bunker TCS box; 2002-04-19:
Removed from the W2 bunker TCS box; 200204-24: No bad blocks found.
14
Quantum Fireball LC07A
C/H/S, 913/255/63, 7162MB; ????-??-??: Installed in the E1 bunker TCS box; 2002-04-23:
Removed from E1 bunker TCS box; 2002-04-25:
No bad blocks found; 2002-11-26: Installed in
irimage; 2003-01-15: Removed from irimage;
2003-01-15: Stored intact for future use of National Instruments PC-516 card.
15
Quantum Fireball ST3.2A
C/H/S, 782/128/63, 3079MB; ????-??-??: Installed in the S1 bunker TCS box; 2002-04-24:
Removed from S1 bunker TCS box; 2002-04-25:
No bad blocks found; 2003-01-21: 5 bad blocks
found.
16
Quantum Fireball ST3.2A
C/H/S, 782/128/63, 3079MB; ????-??-??: Installed in the S1 bunker TCS box; 2003-0120: Disk failure; 2003-01-23: Removed from S1
bunker TCS box.
17
Quantum Fireball LC07A
C/H/S, 913/255/63, 7162MB; ????-??-??: Installed in the E1 bunker TCS box.
18
Fujitsu MPD3043AT
C/H/S, 525/255/63, 4125MB; ????-??-??: Installed in wobble; 2002-11-26: Removed from
wobble; 2003-01-15: Installed in the second
Leach rack-mount computer (now irimage).
Chapter 7: Hard Disk Inventory
21
19
Fujitsu MPC3043AT
C/H/S, 525/255/63, 4125MB; ????-??-??: Installed in ople; 2002-11-26: Removed from
ople; 2003-01-16: Installed in the old ople computer (now king); 2005-08-01: Removed from
king; 2008-01-15: No bad blocks found.
20
Fujitsu MPD3043AT
C/H/S, 525/255/63, 4125MB; ????-??-??: Installed in ople; 2002-11-26: Removed from
ople; 2003-01-17: No bad blocks found; 200507-19: Installed in lindberg; ????-??-??: Removed from lindberg; 2008-01-10: No bad
blocks found.
21
Fujitsu MPD3043AT
C/H/S, 525/255/63, 4125MB; ????-??-??: Originally installed in irimage; 2002-11-25: Removed from irimage; 2003-01-22: No bad blocks
found; 2005-04-28: Installed in W2 bunker
Linux box.
22
Quantum Fireball ST3.2A
C/H/S, 782/128/63, 3079MB; ????-??-??: Installed in the E2 bunker TCS box; 2003-03-03:
At least 8 bad blocks found.
23
Quantum Fireball LC07A
C/H/S, 913/255/63, 7162MB; ????-??-??: Installed in the W2 bunker TCS box; 2003-03-04:
Probably no bad blocks found.
24
Quantum Fireball ST3.2A
C/H/S, 782/128/63, 3079MB; ????-??-??: Installed in the W1 bunker TCS box; 2003-03-04:
Probably no bad blocks found; 2003-06-12: Disk
failure; 2003-06-12: Removed from W1 bunker
TCS box.
25
Fujitsu MPD3043AT
C/H/S, 525/255/63, 4125MB; ????-??-??: Installed in W1 bunker Linux box.
26
Fujitsu MPD3043AT
C/H/S, 525/255/63, 4125MB; ????-??-??: Installed in W2 bunker Linux box; 2005-04-28:
Disk failure; 2005-04-28: Removed from W2
bunker Linux box.
27
Fujitsu MPD3043AT
C/H/S, 525/255/63, 4125MB; ????-??-??: Installed in E2 bunker Linux box; ????-??-??: Removed from E2 bunker Linux box.
Chapter 7: Hard Disk Inventory
22
28
Fujitsu MPD3043AT
C/H/S, 525/255/63, 4125MB; ????-??-??: Installed in E1 bunker Linux box.
29
Fujitsu MPD3043AT
C/H/S, 525/255/63, 4125MB; ????-??-??: Installed in S2 bunker Linux box; 2007-12-15: Disk
failure; 2007-12-15: Removed from S2 bunker
Linux box; 2008-01-16: No bad blocks found.
30
Quantum Fireball ST3.2A
C/H/S, 782/128/63, 3079MB; ????-??-??: Installed in the S2 bunker TCS box; 2003-03-04:
Probably no bad blocks found.
31
Fujitsu MPD3043AT
C/H/S, 525/255/63, 4125MB; ????-??-??: Installed in S1 bunker Linux box; 2007-06-06: Removed from S1 bunker Linux box.
32
Quantum Fireball LM10A
C/H/S, 1249/255/63, 10.2GB; 2004-09-16: Installed in pakyderm; 2009-04-28: Removed from
pakyderm.
33
Quantum Fireball LM10A
C/H/S, 1249/255/63, 10.2GB; 2004-09-23: Installed in inman.
34
Western Digital
C/H/S, 24321/255/63, 200GB; 2004-10-01:
CHARA backup drive 1.
35
Western Digital
C/H/S, 24321/255/63, 200GB; 2004-10-01:
CHARA backup drive 2.
36
Quantum Fireball LM10A
C/H/S, 1249/255/63, 10.2GB; 2004-10-01: Installed in elefant.
37
Western Digital
C/H/S, 24321/255/63, 200GB; 2004-10-05:
CHARA backup drive 3.
38
Seagate ST320014A
C/H/S, 2434/255/63, 20GB.
39
Western Dig. Caviar 2200
C/H/S, 989/12/35, 212MB; ????-??-??: Theo’s
old music bundle backup disk; 2005-09-22: No
bad blocks found.
40
Western Digital
C/H/S, 24321/255/63, 200GB; 2005-10-13:
CHARA backup drive 4.
41
Western Digital
C/H/S, 24321/255/63, 200GB; 2005-10-13:
CHARA backup drive 5.
Chapter 7: Hard Disk Inventory
23
42
Western Digital
C/H/S, 24321/255/63, 200GB; 2005-10-13:
CHARA backup drive 6.
43
Western Digital
C/H/S, 38913/255/63, 320GB; 2006-10-13:
CHARA backup drive 7.
44
Western Digital
C/H/S, 38913/255/63, 320GB; 2006-10-13:
CHARA backup drive 8.
45
Western Digital
C/H/S, 38913/255/63, 320GB; 2006-10-13:
CHARA backup drive 9.
46
Western Dig. Caviar 35100
C/H/S, 627/255/63, 5163MB; 2007-08-09: Installed in flimage.
47
Seagate ST340824A
C/H/S, 4865/255/63, 40GB; ????-??-??: Installed in gustav as the unilink disk; 2006-0925: Removed from gustav; 2008-01-08: No bad
blocks found.
48
Maxtor 91360D8
C/H/S, 1653/255/63, 13.2GB; ????-??-??: Installed in jamaica; 2007-11-05: Removed from
jamaica; 2008-01-15: No bad blocks found.
49
Western Dig. Caviar 12500
C/H/S, 620/128/63, 2500MB. ????-??-??: Installed in igor. 2008-01-16: 2 bad blocks found.
50
Maxtor 92049U6
C/H/S, 2491/255/63, 20GB; Unknown origin;
Windows NT, 2000, or XP installed on NTFS
partition; 2008-01-30: No bad blocks found.
51
Quantum Fireball LM10A
C/H/S, 1249/255/63, 10.2GB; 2008-01-30: No
bad blocks found.
52
Western Dig. Caviar 136AA
C/H/S, 1653/255/63, 13.2GB; ????-??-??: Installed in lem; 2008-01-31: No bad blocks found.
53
Western Dig. Caviar 31600
C/H/S, 197/255/63, 1582MB; 2008-01-31: No
bad blocks found.
54
Western Dig. Caviar 36400
C/H/S, 784/255/63, 1582MB; 2008-02-01: No
bad blocks found.
55
Western Dig. Caviar 2540
540MB; 2008-02-01: Disk won’t spin up.
Chapter 7: Hard Disk Inventory
24
56
Quantum Fireball LCT 10
C/H/S, 1216/255/63, 9767MB; ????-??-??: Installed in rye.
57
Seagate ST310232A
C/H/S, 1216/255/63, 9767MB; ????-??-??: Installed in the new feynman.
58
Western Dig. Caviar 28400
C/H/S, 1027/255/63, 8249MB; 2008-02-01: No
bad blocks found.
59
Western Dig. Caviar 136AA
C/H/S, 1653/255/63, 13.2GB; 2004-09-23: Possible disk failure; 2008-02-01: No bad blocks
found.
60
Western Dig. Caviar 24300
C/H/S, 524/255/63, 4209MB; Spare disk for
abraham (Red Hat 7.0 installed).
61
Western Dig. Caviar 28400
C/H/S, 1027/255/63, 8249MB; ????-??-??: Installed in nicmos.
62
Western Dig. WD800AAJS00B4A0 SATA
C/H/S, ????/???/??, 80GB; 2008-12-09: Removed from Nixsys 1E1B09.
63
Seagate
SATA
ST3200826AS
C/H/S, ????/???/??, 200GB; 2008-??-??:
Loaned to Michigan; 2008-12-10: Returned
from Michigan.
64
Western Dig. WD800AAJS00B4A0 SATA
C/H/S, ????/???/??, 80GB; 2008-12-10: Removed from Nixsys 1E1B0A; 2009-04-28: Installed in pakyderm.
65
Seagate ST340016A
C/H/S, ????/???/??, 40GB; ????-??-??: Installed in allures; 2009-04-13: Removed from
allures.
66
Western
WD800
67
?
C/H/S, ????/???/??, ??GB; ????-??-??: Installed in zoot; 2009-03-12: Removed from
zoot.
68
?
C/H/S, ????/???/??, ??GB; ????-??-??:
stalled in allures.
In-
69
?
C/H/S, ????/??/??, 120GB; 2009-03-12:
stalled in allures.
In-
Dig.
Caviar
C/H/S, 9729/255/63, 80GB; ????-??-??: Installed in zoot; 2009-03-12: Removed from zoot
(OS still installed).
Chapter 7: Hard Disk Inventory
25
7.3 Using the Suspect Disks
For the highest reliability in using one of the suspect disks, it is best to decide how you
want to lay the disk out with respect to the partitions and run the procedure described in
the “Resurrecting a Suspect Disk” section on each partition before installing a Linux-based
OS. The format command in Windows does something similar. Sure it will take longer,
but the peace of mind will be worth it.
Chapter 8: UPS Units
26
8 UPS Units
The CHARA Array uses many uninterruptable power supply (UPS) units to protect the
running computers from shutting down ungracefully and leaving the attached hardware state
in limbo. The CHARA Array uses three types of UPS units, all manufactured by American
Power Conversion (APC), and part of their Smart-UPS series. The most common has the
model number, SU700BX120. This is a 700 kVA UPS, suitable for providing about 10
minutes of power for two computers and their monitors. A second type has the model
number SU420NET. This is a 420 KVA UPS, suitable for providing about 10 minutes of
power for one computer and monitor. There are three instances of the third type of UPS.
It has the model number, SU3000RM3U (or SU3000RMXL3U). It is a 3000 kVA UPS.
The SU700BX120 uses two user-replaceable sealed lead-acid battery cells. The replacement type is: Panasonic LC-R127R2P1. The SU420NET uses one cell of the same type.
The SU3000 units use eight cells of the same type.
8.1 Serial Numbers
SU700BX120 UPS Locations
Ser. No.
Location
NS0129332682
WS9851005517
WS9926006375
WS9926006280
WS9926006309
WS9926006292
NS0129233082
WS9926006339
WS9851006305
WS9926006278
NS0129233047
WS9926006296
WS9926009253
WS9926009254
WS9851005481
NS0129332690
NS9922130046
WS9851005482
WS9926006376
NS0129332686
WS9851005468
NS0129233082
S1 Bunker
S2 Bunker
E1 Bunker
E2 Bunker
W1 Bunker
W2 Bunker
Spare Rack
Network Switch Rack
BC Area, NIRO Rack
BRT Area, IR metrology laser
Operations Center, ‘ctrscrut’, ‘lyot’
Operations Center, ‘zoot’, ‘pakyderm’, ‘elefant’
Operations Center, ‘candler’
Operations Center, ‘lakewood’
Operations Center, ‘allures’
Operations Center, ‘konkoly’
Operations Center, ‘concam’
Machine Shop
Operations Center, switches and hubs
Kapteyn Cottage, ‘kapteyn’
Trailer South, ‘decatur’
Trailer North, ‘tofino’
SU420NET UPS Locations
Ser. No.
Location
Chapter 8: UPS Units
NS0135242697
NS0135242649
27
Trailer South, ‘garnett’
Operations Center, network closet (men’s room)
SU3000RM(XL)3U UPS Locations
Ser. No.
Location
GSU Prop. No.
QS0437221011
QS0437221029
WS0105013042
‘ctrscrut’ Rack
OPLE Rack
Network Switch Rack
502367
8.2 Service Info
Here is a listing of the service information for the individual UPS units. Prior to January
2002, the information is sketchy.
Service History
Ser. No.
Service History
NS0129233047
2002-10-02: UPS enters service; 2005-10-05: Charge problem; 2005-10-13: Cycled power; 2005-10-18: Charge problem; 2005-10-21: Batteries replaced.
2003-09-04: UPS enters service.
2002-01-07: UPS enters service.
2002-04-09: UPS enters service.
2003-01-06: UPS enters service; 2005-09-09: Charge problem; 2005-09-17: Cycled power; 2005-11-08: Charge problem; 2005-11-09: Batteries replaced.
2002-04-09: UPS enters service; ????-??-??: Charge problem; 2008-12-30: Cycled power; 2009-01-14: Charge problem; 2009-01-14: Battery replaced.
2002-04-09: UPS enters service.
????-??-??: UPS enters service; 2004-01-31: Charge problem; 2004-02-03: Batteries replaced; 2005-11-09: Charge
problem; 2005-11-09: Batteries replaced.
2005-02-07: UPS enters service in ‘ctrscrut’ rack
2005-02-17: UPS enters service in OPLE rack.
2001-05-24: UPS enters service in OPLE rack; 2003-10-07:
Charge problem; 2003-10-07: Cycled power; 2005-02-17:
Battery meltdown; 2005-02-17: UPS taken out of service;
2005-02-25: UPS moved to Network Switch rack; 2007-????: Complete failure.
????-??-??: UPS enters service; 2004-06-05: Charge problem; 2004-06-17: Batteries replaced.
NS0129233082
NS0129332682
NS0129332686
NS0129332690
NS0135242649
NS0135242697
NS9922130046
QS0437221011
QS0437221029
WS0105013042
WS9851005468
Chapter 8: UPS Units
WS9851005481
WS9851005482
WS9851005517
WS9851006305
WS9851006307
WS9926006278
WS9926006280
WS9926006292
WS9926006296
WS9926006309
WS9926006334
WS9926006339
WS9926006375
WS9926006376
WS9926009253
????-??-??: UPS enters service; 2001-09-15: Batteries replaced (approx. date); 2004-05-10: Charge problem; 200405-13: Cycled power; 2004-06-14: Charge problem; 200406-16: Cycled power; 2005-02-15: Charge problem; 200502-25: Batteries replaced.
????-??-??: UPS enters service; 2000-03-15: Batteries damaged by heat gun overload (approx. date); 2001-08-15:
Batteries replaced (approx. date).
????-??-??: UPS enters service; 2002-01-07: Batteries
replaced.
????-??-??: UPS enters service; 2001-10-11: Batteries replaced; 2003-08-07: Charge problem; 2003-10-07: Batteries replaced; 2005-01-27: UPS moved to NIRO rack.
????-??-??: UPS enters service; 2003-01-06: UPS fails
to keep ‘konkoly’ running during brown-out; 2003-01-06:
UPS taken out of service.
????-??-??: UPS enters service.
????-??-??: UPS enters service; 2002-01-15: Batteries
replaced.
????-??-??: UPS enters service; 2003-09-04: UPS taken
out of service; 2003-10-10: Batteries replaced; 2003-10-10:
UPS enters service.
????-??-??: UPS enters service; 2003-06-16: Charge problem; 2003-06-16: Cycled power; 2003-10-09: Battery meltdown; 2003-10-09: UPS taken out of service; 2004-10-05:
Batteries replaced; 2004-10-05: UPS enters service; 200708-27: Charge problem; 2007-09-02: Cycled power.
????-??-??: UPS enters service; 2003-06-16: Charge problem; 2003-06-17: Cycled power; 2003-09-20: Charge problem; 2003-10-08: Batteries replaced.
????-??-??: UPS enters service; 2002-07-16: Batteries replaced; 2002-08-15: Batteries replaced; 2002-10-02: UPS
taken out of service.
????-??-??: UPS enters service; 2001-10-11: Batteries replaced; 2003-08-15: Charge problem; 2003-10-07: Batteries replaced.
????-??-??: UPS enters service; 2003-03-24: Charge problem; 2003-05-27: Cycled power; 2003-06-10: Batteries
replaced.
????-??-??: UPS enters service; 2002-01-23: Batteries
replaced.
????-??-??: UPS enters service; 2002-04-24: Batteries replaced; 2005-08-11: Charge problem; 2005-08-11: Cycled
power; 2005-08-25: Charge problem; 2005-08-25: Batteries
replaced.
28
Chapter 8: UPS Units
WS9926009254
????-??-??: UPS enters service; 2004-04-06: Charge problem; 2004-04-08: Batteries replaced.
29
Concept Index
30
Concept Index
B
R
badblocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Bunker Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Bunker Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Rebuilding a TCS box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
resurrecting a suspect disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
rl2 Linux configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
C
Changing Motherboards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Computer Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
D
DOS/Win95 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
H
Hard Disk Inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Hardware Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
I
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
IP Masquerading using the netfilter Model . . 10
L
Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
M
Miscellaneous Software Configurations . . . . . . . . . . 9
mke2fs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
S
Serial Numbers, UPS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Service History, UPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Service Info, UPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SU3000RM(XL)3U UPS Locations . . . . . . . . . . . .
SU420NET UPS Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SU700BX120 UPS Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Suspect Disk Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
26
27
27
27
26
26
18
T
TCS box typical partitioning scheme . . . . . . . . . . . 3
tomsrtbt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
U
UPS Locations, SU3000RM(XL)3U . . . . . . . . . . .
UPS Locations, SU420NET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
UPS Locations, SU700BX120 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
UPS Serial Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
UPS Service History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
UPS Service Info . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
UPS Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Suspect Disks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
27
26
26
26
27
27
26
25
P
W
Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Wireless LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
i
Table of Contents
1
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
2
tomsrtbt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
3
Bunker Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3.1
Computer Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.1 DOS/Win95 Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.1.1 Typical Partitioning Scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.1.2 Rebuilding a System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.2 Linux Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.2.1 Changing Motherboards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2 Bunker Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3 Other Equipment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.1 S1 Bunker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.2 S2 Bunker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.3 E1 Bunker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.4 E2 Bunker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.5 W1 Bunker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.6 W2 Bunker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
3
3
3
3
4
5
6
6
6
6
7
7
7
4
Computer Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
5
Miscellaneous Software Configurations . . . . . . 9
5.1
6
Wireless LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
5.1.1 Card Hardware Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
5.1.2 Software Configuration under Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
5.1.3 IP Masquerading using the netfilter Model . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
6.1
Serial Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.1.1 DB-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.1.2 DB-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.1.3 NULL-MODEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.2 DB-9/25 to RJ-45 Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.2.1 RJ-45 Nomenclature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.2.2 CHARA DB-9/25-to-RJ-45 Adapter Models . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.2.3 CHARA Cable Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7
11
11
11
11
11
12
12
16
Hard Disk Inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
7.1
7.2
7.3
Resurrecting a Suspect Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Suspect Disk Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Using the Suspect Disks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
ii
8
UPS Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
8.1
8.2
Serial Numbers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Service Info . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Concept Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30