Radio Shack USB Electronic Scale Specifications

Internet Enabled Real-time Gas Detection Equipment
iBall Instruments
Enhanced Bloodhound
Description & Operation Manual
External Code Software Load 225 and Over
Internal Code Software Load 23 and Over
Release 16
iBall Instruments
303 Wimbledon Rd.
Edmond, Ok 73034
www.iBallInst.com
405 341 2434
405 844 1080
Carl.B@iBallOffice.com
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
1. OVERVIEW – IBALL INSTRUMENTS BLOODHOUND
The Bloodhound Gas Detection and Chromatograph system was developed using digital
techniques and the very latest in infrared and chemical sensor gas detection. Couple
integrated WITS interfaces, filtered and positive pressure inner case cooling, DC power
power system, and battery backup makes this system unique in the industry. Further,
integrates 3G wireless technology, Ethernet connectivity with an embedded switch to
monitoring and charting via the Internet anywhere in the world.
signal processing
that with multiple
support, a robust
this new product
provide real-time
BLOODHOUND FUNCTIONAL OVERVIEW
Chroma tography Pump
TRAV EL
SAMPL E
CG SA MPLE
REL AY
HOTW IRE
REPLACE MENT
MODULE (HRM)
CHROMA TOGRAP HY COL UMN
Sample Pump
64K FLAS H
ME MORY
RE MOTE LY
UP GRADE ABLE
SAMPL E IN
CG EX HA US T
ELEC TRONIC
FLOW ME TE R
SAMPL E EX HA US T
12 VDC POW ER
PORT
SAMPL E PUMP
MOTOR C TRL
GP RS MODE M
RSSI
AUDI O
ALA RM
8 KEY
KEYBOA RD
Interna l Code 64K
ETHE RNE T
RJ45
1V FULL SCALE
0.1V FUL L SCALE
0.01V FULL SCALE
ALA RM D RY RELA Y CONTAC T
GE OLOGRAP H D RY REL AY CONTAC T
MUL TI
FUNC TI ON
CONTROL
KNOB
Externa l Cod e 64K
256 Control Registers
ANA LOG
OUTP UT
DC AMP
MONI TOR
Battery Backed
Up Re al Ti me
Clock
Bloodhound
Brain Board
AC VOLTS MON
EXHA US T
PRESS URE SE NS OR
AC
FRE QUE NCY
SAMPLE INLE T
VACUUMSE NS OR
CG P RESS URE
SENS OR
PC
SERIAL
PORT
4GB SD Card Interface
USB I NTE RFACE
W ITS
SERIAL
PORT
GE OLO
GRAP H
USB Key Drive Interface
RS232
USB B
RS2 32
RS422
TW ISTED
PAIR
ELECTRIC ALL Y ISOL ATED
The Bloodhound is composed of an infrared detector, a proprietary chromatograph system, medical grade
10,000 hour brushless vacuum pumps, an aircraft grade flow meter, an uninterruptible power system, DC
power input/output port, WITS (Wellsite Information Transfer Specification) communication, Ethernet
connectivity, a wireless 3G data modem and the proprietary digital signal processing system Brain Board and
housed in a rugged plastic Pelican case.
The Bloodhound wireless gas detection equipment has the capability to detect from 0 to 10,000 gas units.
This translates as 0 to 100% typical naturally-occurring hydrocarbon gas mixtures in air. Calibration is
performed using National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable calibration gases.
Lab calibration points include 0%, 2.5%, and 100% pure methane. Complete immunity to saturation or
damage in the presence of high concentrations of both light and heavy hydrocarbon gases precludes the
necessity of constant re-calibration or zero referencing.
The briefcase-sized design also has the ability to pull a sample apart using our proprietary temperature –
controlled and integrated gas chromatograph. This chromatograph has been shown to pull the samples apart
in about five (5) to eight (8) minutes depending on the customer controlled temperature setting; the lower the
temperature the longer the time. Typically, chromatograph readings are available in 3.5 to 8 minutes
depending on the degree of separation desired by the customer.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 2
The Chromatograph can separate Methane, Ethane, Propane, Iso Butane, Normal Butane, Iso Pentane and
Normal Pentane.
On request the Bloodhound has the ability to detect from 0 to 1000 parts per million of H2S (hydrogen sulfide)
within the extracted sample gases. Detection of even greater amounts is possible on a non-linear scale.
This Bloodhound contains its own universal power supply that can accept 90 to 280 volts AC input with a
frequency tolerance of 48 to 65 hertz (Hz). It is lightning, surge, and power spike hardened. If rig power fails,
the Bloodhound has its own internal battery system to keep it alive for two hours.
The inlet sample line is monitored with a new ultrasonic water detector that will immediately stop the sample
pump if any liquids are found to be drawn into the Bloodhound. This will allow the technician to service the
equipment before any damage can occur.
The revolutionary integrated computer control system allows the Bloodhound to monitor and control all vacuum
levels and flow rates using internal powerful state-of-the art flow meters, vacuum pumps and pressure sensors.
Internal 1 micron filtering protects against particulate contamination from outside sources coming in from the
sample line.
Ease of use is assured, with only four active buttons and one knob to learn. Alarms are audible, automatic,
and easy to read and usually easy to correct.
All components within the equipment are designed to be easy to access or replace. With the removal of four
panel screws, all aspects of the internal mechanisms and pneumatics are easily adjusted or removed. The
10,000 hour brushless medical grade pumps are mounted using industrial Velcro for vibration damping and
easy replacement.
The geolograph switch and WITS interfaces are electrically isolated for safety and have adjustable timing
sensitivity and de-bounce control.
If the 3G modem service is active, or the integrated Ethernet connection has connectivity, remote monitoring of
the equipment is available and troubleshooting and/or firmware upgrades can be accomplished remotely. All
aspects of the equipment can be adjusted or monitored remotely. Firmware upgrades or enhancements can
be accomplished through the serial port or through the USB port, or remotely through the 3G modem or
Ethernet connections.
All detection systems are equipped with a USB connection port that permits the use of industry standard USB
memory stick of up to 4 gigabytes of accessible storage space. Primary storage is provided through an
internal 2 gigabyte SD flash card. This is the same card used in popular camera equipment today.
The data that this equipment generates is extremely important, so the real time data is simultaneously stored
in four (4) locations.
1. Locally, within a removable USB memory stick
2. Locally, within an internal SD flash card
3. At the connected computer. As the personal computer pulls in the real-time data from the Bloodhound
equipment, via an EIA-232 (formerly RS-232) or from the USB connection, it is stored locally on the
hard drive within a Microsoft Database structure (Microsoft Access software is not required)
4. If the wireless 3G service is active or the Ethernet connection is live, the data is also transmitted over
the Internet to iBall Instrument’s Data Server Center for storage and Internet display to you or your
customers.
This level of innovation brings a new level of data redundancy to the entire system.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 3
For example, if the data on the connected personal computer is inadvertently deleted or damaged, it can be
restored from the USB memory stick or downloaded from the internal SD card. Or, if the USB memory stick is
not available, it can be downloaded in the field and restored from the iBall Instrument’s Data Server Center.
It NOTE: The Bloodhound stores all job data to the internal SD storage media every 6 seconds. This SD card
can be found on the Brain board. It is a common camera type storage card and can be picked up just about
any electronics store. The Bloodhound comes with a 2 gigabyte storage. Typical storage size is about 500
Kilobytes of information a day. The collected Bloodhound data is primarily stored on this SD card. If a user
has a compatible USB memory stick installed in the Bloodhound USB front panel, the Bloodhound attempts to
also place data onto the memory stick, after it detects it.
It should be noted that a host personal computer is not required to use this equipment on a site that is
monitored only.
Further, the Bloodhound always operates in full range. No more data losses due to not having the correct
settings on the instruments. There are no settings to make or dilution valves to adjust. Further, the
Bloodhound Gas Detection System uses the most advanced Infrared sensor for the best accuracy and
longevity.
All connections to the equipment are made on the side of the case and all access controls are environmentally
protected within the case or can be locked to prevent tampering.
The Bloodhound uses fifth generation high-speed Infrared sensors for hydrocarbon detection as well as new
advanced custom materials used in the high-density packed chromatograph column for better separation of
sampled gases.
The equipment is set up to monitor and sense Methane and like type hydrocarbon based gasses, Oxygen,
Hydrogen Sulfide, and Carbon Dioxide.
2. BLOODHOUND DETECTION SYSTEM
A. Infrared Detector System
Currently most gas detection systems deployed in the exploration industry utilize either a hot-wire or a hotwire/TCD system. These types of hydrocarbon detection systems have been in operation for many decades
and are still in widespread use today. A simple linear calibration was easily possible both mechanically and
electrically.
An industry standard calibration technique calls for injecting a known percentage of methane gas, typically 1%,
into a hot-wire system. Because a hot-wire system is generally linear over its usable range, a known linear
scale for the hot-wire can be calculated using zero and a single-point of calibration. A third point of calibration
is sometimes employed to calibrate the high end scale utilizing 100% methane. This second point of
calibration is generally used on TCD type detectors in order to locate the point to where 100% of injected
methane is detected as raw natural gas, which is usually mostly methane.
Generally a system is deployed to allow the hot-wire and TCD to operate together and hand off the detection
duties as the concentrations change from low ranges to high ranges. Sometimes the system utilizes a type of
air dilution to keep the hot-wire from saturating and causing damage to the burning sensor if the concentration
gets above 5% in air.
Today’s infrared detectors have been shown to react to hydrocarbon based gases from zero to 100% in
concentration without air dilution. This feature garnered great interest within the petroleum geological
community as the benefits of infrared over the traditional hot-wire systems became obvious.
When the same hot-wire calibration technique was used to calibrate an infrared detector, problems were
quickly discovered because the overall output of the infrared detector is not linear. This linear calibration of a
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 4
non-linear output had the effect of reporting extremely high percentages of gas when the true amount of gas
was much less.
Other techniques were used such as a multiple point calibration. This method employed the storage of
multiple points of calibration in a calibration look-up table. This technique utilized the raw output of the
detector and a processor was used to locate the closest value in the table and report the stored output
percentage. This method fails in practice because the raw output values of the detector can vary widely based
on the types or mix of gases being detected, thereby invalidating the look up multi-point table and also causing
false high readings.
Until recently, there was no known method that would easily or better predict the output of the infrared detector
for use in the raw natural gas detection in the drilling fluid. The current Bloodhound system can emulate the
output of a hot-wire /TCD system to assure consistency of information obtained during the drilling process.
B. Gas Detection Subsystem, the HRM03
The Bloodhound detects the gases using an independent gas
detection module known as the Hot-wire Replacement Module, third
generation or otherwise known as the “HRM03”. This module allows
the system to be highly flexible and easily repaired when in the field.
All calibration parameters are stored on the HRM modules in a nonvolatile memory. This allows the module to be pre-calibrated and
stored until replaced as a whole in the field or as a service item. This
is done without the hassle and down-time associated with replacing
hot-wire or catalyst bead technology based systems. This module
allows for the system as a whole to detect hydrocarbon based gases,
CO2, O2, and H2S. It also has a second detector channel for detecting
gases coming from the chromatograph column.
The greatest
innovation of the HRM03 module is the infrared detector. The HRM03 modifies the output characteristics of
the detectors and uses a patent-pending digital signal processing technique to very closely mimic the output
characteristics of a properly operational older hot-wire system in fit form and function without any of the
constant headaches associated with hot-wire systems. It is not uncommon to operate a Bloodhound system
for more than 6 months without the need for calibration. And when checked, usually only needs a tweak.
Attached to the HRM03 module is an electronic flow meter that monitors the gas flow through the system. The
data from the flow meter is given to the Brain Board and the Brain Board then adjusts the amount of power to
the sample motor to constantly adjust the flow rate no matter what vacuum load is on the sample line. In
addition, the HRM03 has an integrated column oven controller that accurately controls the temperature of the
chromatograph column.
C. Brain Board Subsystem
The Brain Board assembly controls all aspects of the Bloodhound system. It sends power and communicates
to the HRM module, communicates to the WITS interfaces and geolograph inputs, controls the analog and
relay outputs, communicates and controls the Ethernet module, communicates and controls the 3G modem,
switches the alarm, controls the chromatograph, monitors the vacuums, sample flow rate, watches for buttons
to be pressed, and dozens of other functions. Truly the heart of the system, it is easily replaced as an
assembly, and by design is robust and rugged.
D. Power Supply Subsystem
The power supply in the Bloodhound is an isolated switching power supply. The AC power that is supplied is
first converted into very high voltage direct current (DC). The incoming voltage and frequency is not important,
as long as there is enough to keep the DC voltage high enough. Generally between 85 and 240 VAC and
between 45 and 65 cycles. This permits the Bloodhound to operate with wildly fluctuating voltage and
frequencies that are very common when running on rig power. The high voltage DC output of the power
supply is inverted to alternating current (AC) and fed to a high frequency transformer, then rectified to generate
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 5
a smooth and regulated 13.5 DC voltage that is used by the Bloodhound to maintain the backup battery and
operate the system.
The internal battery is a common household 12 volt 5 amp hour burglar alarm battery found at Radio Shack or
other battery supply store. This battery is kept charged by the Bloodhound system. When the incoming AC
power fails, this battery will keep the Bloodhound running for around two hours when in like new condition.
This time is reduced as the battery ages. It is recommended to change the battery every year for
maintenance. At a minimum, It should be changed at least every two years. If the battery has an internal short
or if there is a failure in the charge circuit, the 7.5 amp fuse on the Brain Board may open. This fuse is a
standard 7.5 amp ATO type automotive fuse found in any automotive store.
Found on the base plate of the Bloodhound is a DC protection circuit board. This board will monitor the DC
power coming in or going out of the Bloodhound to the Cavitator. The circuitry arrests sparks, surges, and
overloads as well as high frequency noise. This board has a type 3 ATO base automatic reset circuit breaker.
This breaker will open when the load becomes excessive and will remain open until the load is removed. After
cooling for a couple minutes, the breaker will close and apply power to the external load. This board also
holds a load resistor that allows the Bloodhound to monitor the incoming or outgoing amperage (such as to the
Cavitator). The amperage is displayed on the front panel of the Bloodhound and is sent out as part of the
normal data packet to the server system.
E. External Communication Subsystem
The Bloodhound advancements include the ability for independent operation in the field. There have been
many installations on the drilling platform that are unattended. This is where the unit is hooked up in the
service platform next to the drilling deck and monitored and logged off site.
This is done with the use of either a 3G modem or a direct connection to the rig’s Ethernet system using the
Ethernet connection. The 3G modem uses the same system as a cellular telephone to communicate to the
Internet. This system allows the Bloodhound to directly connect to the internet and communicate to the
Bloodhound Data Center Servers. Connection to these servers allow for persons having the user-selected
password to log in and monitor the well remotely or download information. In addition, it allows technicians to
remotely diagnose, adjust, reprogram, or maintain the instrument.
The Ethernet connection is identical except the connection is made through the rigs supplied satellite internet
service. The 3G modem has up to a 1 watt radio output, and with the optional 3 watt booster and 3 dB gain
antenna, can reach just about any site in the United States.
F. Pneumatic System
With the advances of the HRM03 infrared detector system, the Bloodhound pneumatic system has the
advantage of being greatly simplified. The HRM03 infrared detection of gas units will not significantly change
with flow rate changes, or sample temperature. Therefore, the Bloodhound does not need pressure regulators,
large pumps, or distribution manifolds.
The sample line should be conditioned before entering into the Bloodhound system. This conditioning should
always try to remove any condensate or other liquids from the sample line before it is drawn into the
Bloodhound system. Right before the 1/4” inlet, the user should use a pre-filter of around 10-15 microns.
The pre-filter part number we use is G1/4 from Luberfiner or similar type fuel filter. It is a general purpose fuel
filter with a 10 micron paper/mesh construction. This filter serves multiple purposes. It filters any particulate
matter that may accumulate and/or flake off in the sample line during the drilling process. It allows gases and
water vapor to pass through, but will stop any fluid mud that makes its way to the equipment.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 6
NOTE: Never operate the Bloodhound system without filters in place. Running the system without any filtering
will eventually contaminate the sample pump valves with particulate contaminants and cause the sample pump
to fail prematurely. Running the Bloodhound system without an in line filter will void the warranty and it will
cause damage to the Bloodhound system. It is very highly recommended that this same filter also be used as
a last point filter right before entry of the sample gases into the Bloodhound and also at the Cavitator extractor.
As shown in the figures on the next page, starting with the ¼” sample inlet hose barb, the inlet goes directly to
an internal 1 micron medical grade sample filter and then to an internal water sensor detector. The sample
then progresses to the sample pump where it is then put through the flow meter and then the HRM detector
block.
Brain Board
Pressure Monitoring
Chromatograph Port
HRM Detector
Block
Chromatograph
Side
Chromatograph Column
10,000 Hour
CG Pressure
Pump
CG Exhaust
Chromatograph
Solenoid
Brain Board
Water Vac Monitoring
Detector Sample Port
Sample Inlet
1/4" Hose Barb
Travel Gas Inlet
Or Common Air
1
Micron
Filter
10,000 Hour
Sample Pump
Low Pressure Tubing
Electronic Flow
Meter
HRM Detector
Block Gas
Units Side
1/2" Exhaust
Port
High pressure Tubing
Bloodhound Sample And Chromatograph Pneumatic System
NOTE: The 1/2” exhaust must have a MINIMUM 1/2” exhaust tubing run from the Bloodhound to the external
of the Logging Trailer or other housing.
If the exhaust is not run correctly or if there is ANY back pressure, the Bloodhound will not operate correctly
and will malfunction. This equipment is sensitive to all back pressure on the exhaust.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 7
3. CONNECTIONS TO THE BLOODHOUND SYSTEM
All outside connections are made to the external surfaces of the case to allow for the case to be closed when
in operation.
A. Cooling Vent
On the side of the case is a large 1.9” filtered positive pressure cooling air
intake. This allows for the Bloodhound to regulate internal temperatures on hot
days, allows for the air to be filtered, and for a source of positive pressure. If
the filter is not used, dirt and debris can enter into the case of the Bloodhound
causing contamination and damage to the system over time.
The Bloodhound uses internal positive pressure through this filter to keep dust,
dirt and debris out of the inside case and system. Always use an air filter on the
Bloodhound system for years of trouble free operation. If the Bloodhound
needs to use a filtered source from an outside duct, such as an air conditioning
system, the size of the vent is the same as a 1 1/2” PVC tubing fitting and has a good friction fit. This allows
for easy plumbing of outside filtered sources. Blocking of this vent is not recommended and can cause the
Bloodhound to issue a high temperature alarm. The filter used is a common Dust Buster filter part number
VF100 that can be found on line. The exhaust of the Bloodhound can be found on the bottom of the case. Do
not block the exhaust hole on the bottom. If the Bloodhound alarms due to high temperature, unblocking the
cooling ports will quickly bring the temperature down.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 8
NOTE: If operating the Bloodhound for any significant time without the air filter, dust and dirt will accumulate
within the Bloodhound case and onto the electronic printed circuit boards. This dust and dirt can be somewhat
conductive and can cause erratic behavior within the system. In extreme cases of weather change, humidity
can accumulate and cause the dust to become a fine mud and adhere to the surface of the printed circuit
boards. Any significant dust and dirt within the Bloodhound case found during repair or replacement means
that the unit was run for a length of time without this critical filter and will void the warranty or incur additional
charges for cleaning.
B. Ethernet Connectivity
Above the air inlet there is one or more RJ45 Ethernet connector(s). These connectors hook into a multi-port
Ethernet network and operates using DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) services, which are the
most common type of network to date. After the Bloodhound has a successful DHCP inquiry and setup, the IP
(Internet Protocol) addres will scroll by on the lower right hand of the LCD screen.
Once a IP address has been assigned to the Bloodhound connection, the Bloodhound will listen for an
incoming TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) connection on the assigned IP address and port 23. The iBall
Instruments Gas Chart Program can also use this Ethernet connection to connect to the Bloodhound. This IP
number can be found on the lower right hand side of the LCD as it scrolls.
The best type of connection is if the user is at a drilling site that has Ethernet connectivity, such as a satellite
connection. This is the best way for the Bloodhound system to connect to the Internet Database Servers at the
iBall Data Center. Connection to iBall’s Data Center allows for transmission of real time data to any internetconnected computer, and also allows for technicians to remotely diagnose, adjust, reprogram, or maintain the
instrument.
When there is a successful connection to the Bloodhound, and the Bloodhound has received its first command
from the server or software, the lower right hand corner of the LCD will display ETHERNET and a connection
timer. This is to show the user that there is a good connection to the iBall Server System.
C. 3G Cellular Radio Connection
On the side of the case there is a SMA antenna connection for the wireless 3G Cellular modem that provides
internet connectivity when the local rig cannot supply one. This allows the Bloodhound to connect to the iBall
Data Center for transmission of real time data and also allows remote technicians to diagnose, adjust,
reprogram, or maintain the equipment. In order for the 3G modem to operate the antenna has to be attached
to the SMA connector.
The user can monitor the connection of the 3G modem by viewing the lower right hand corner of the LCD
screen. It is important to watch for the RSSI messages. The RSSI stands for Received Signal Strength
Indicator and goes from 0 to 100%.
802.11 Wireless connection. If the 3G Cellular Radio is being utilized for connection to the Internet, the
Bloodhound will also supply a local 802.11 WiFi Connection for laptops, computers, or other wireless device.
The password for the WiFi connection is printed and located on the front face panel of the Bloodhound.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 9
(4) Wireless
Connection to
Laptop
(5) 3G To
Cellular Internet
802.11 Antenna
Internet
3G Antenna
(2). 3G Modem
802.11 WiFi
(1). 5 port
Ethernet Switch
(6) Rig Site
Satalite Connection
To Internet
(3) Bloodhound
Network Interface
Card
(7) Wired Connection
Through Embedded
Switch
(8) Brain Board
Inside Bloodhound
Outside Bloodhound
The connectivity of the Enhanced Bloodhound is expanded with the use of a 5 port Ethernet Switch, and an
internal intelligent 3G modem.
Please reference the above drawing.
(1) 5 port 1Giggabit Ethernet Switch
(2) 3G advanced GPRS/EDGE Cellular AT&T modem system complete with its own operating system. This
3G modem acts as a Gateway, Firewall, DNS server, DHCP server, port forwarding device and 802.11
transceiver WiFi system.
(3) The Bloodhound NIC (Network Interface Card)
(4) Wireless internet connection to a local laptop or other 802.11 WiFi enabled device such as smart phones,
tablets, and iPads.
(5) 3G connection to the Internet through the Cellular System
(6) Local Rig supplied Ethernet cable for Internet accessibility
(7) A wired connection to the Bloodhound switch that can access either the on board 3G Cellular internet
connection (2) or the wired rig supplied Ethernet Connection (6).
(8) The Brain Board that controls all aspects of the connections and connection type.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 10
The Networking connection to the Bloodhound system can basically take one of two forms. Either the primary
Networking connection is through the internal 3G modem, or the primary Networking connection is through a
Rig Supplied Ethernet cable.
It cannot do both at the same time and if both are connected at the same time -- (6) external Ethernet and (5)
3G Cellular -- then the Bloodhound will eventually choose one and start using it. It may not produce the results
that the user is expecting.


To Choose the 3G Cellular modem, disconnect the rig supplied Ethernet cable and attach the
external 3G antenna.
To choose the rig supplied Ethernet cable, disconnect the 3G Cellular Antenna and connect the
rig supplied Ethernet cable.
If the Primary Networking connection is through the internal 3G modem (2), then the 802.11 WiFi is enabled for
wireless devices and services. External devices connected to the 1Giggabit Ethernet switch connection (1) will
be able to access the Internet through the 3G modem.
If the Primary Networking connection is through a Rig Supplied Ethernet cable connection such as a satellite
connection (6), Then the 3G modem (2) must not have the external antenna connected (5). By not connecting
the external 3G antenna, the modem will automatically power down and allow for external connections to take
over. When the internal 3G modem is powered down all 802.11 WiFi connections will terminate.
The Bloodhound NIC card (3) will utilize either connection type that is available to the Internet.
If the user is switching from one type of connection to the other, please allow up to 15 minutes for the system
to automatically reset itself up to the new connection type. You will know the Bloodhound has a successful
connection to the Internet when the message ETHERNET xx shows in the lower right hand corner of the LCD.
D. Audible Alarm
Below the 3G radio modem, there is an audible alarm module. The alarm will sound when the Bloodhound
detects a problem with the system, or with one of the parameters it is monitoring. Alarm parameters are:
02 Blocked Sample Line
06 Low Flow Rate
10 High Temperature
14 Unit In Shutdown
18 High Exhaust Prs
03 High Sensor Volts
07 Low Line Voltage
11 Low Case Temp
15 Geolograph Noise
19 Low DC Amps
04 Low Sensor Volts
08 High Line Voltage
12 High Gas Units
16 CG Pressure Low
20 Service Required
05 High Flow Rate
09 High DC Amps
13 HRM Warmup
17 High H2S
21 Water Detected
E. DC Power Port
The DC power port allows the user to either power the Bloodhound from an external DC source, or power an
external Cavitator extractor system from the internal power supply. The DC port has overload, spike, sag and
transient protection built in. If powering the Bloodhound system from a DC power port from an automobile, or
other 12VDC lead acid battery, make sure to connect with correct polarity. Otherwise a fuse in the automotive
system will open.
If running a DC Cavitator extractor system, the amps can be monitored from the LCD panel or remotely
through the Internet. As an added feature, and with the correct adapter, this 12 volt DC power port can run just
about any automotive appliance such as cell phone chargers. Output current is limited to 10 amperes by an
internal fuse.
F. AC Power Port
Below the DC port is the universal AC power input. This AC input can handle from 90 – 260 volts AC and from
45 – 65 hertz (Hz) without any problems. Overseas operation on 240 volts, 50 Hz is as normal as 120 volts,
60Hz. It is configured to use a standard computer power cable.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 11
G. Personal Computer Connector (USB B-Type Connector)
Next to the AC power port is the USB B-type connector used to connect the Bloodhound to a Personal
Computer. If planning to use the USB B connector to connect to a PC, you must load the USB to Serial Driver
first. It can be found at www.iballinst.com. This driver configures the USB computer connection to the
Bloodhound as if it was a serial port. Normally, the USB driver puts the serial connection on COM 3 but not
always. This is a common USB to Serial adapter driver. When connected through the USB driver, the Serial
parameters are still 115200 Baud, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, and no parity (8N1). The Bloodhound charting
software will scan all available serial ports and find the Bloodhound. Therefore, knowing which serial port
number is not an issue when using the iBall Instruments Gas Charting software. This USB serial driver is
found on the USB key drive on the faceplate of the Bloodhound.
H. 10 Pin Pason RS 422 Serial WITS Connector
In order to communicate to the Pason Electronic Drilling Recorder (EDR) system without the hassle of any
external hardware, iBall has incorporated a Pason RS422 connection interface into the Bloodhound. This
allows for direct connection to the Pason EDR system to obtain duplex WITS communication. Generally, no
user intervention is necessary on the Bloodhound to access the Pason WITS information when using this
connection. After connecting the 10 pin round military type cabling to the Bloodhound from the Pason EDR
system, the Bloodhound automatically establishes communicates to the Pason system and starts acquiring
and sending WITS data.
NOTE: On sites with a Pason EDR system, just because the Pason cable can fit into a connector found on the
site does not mean that the connection will work. Pason advises to always connect the Bloodhound to the
“Toolpush” Connection Panel on the outside of the Rig Manager’s trailer, or, if that is not present, then to the
“Toolpush” Computer itself via one of the cables attached to it. (In the event that Pason does not have
somewhere to mount the “Toolpush” Connection Panel, they leave cables extending outside of the Rig
Manager’s trailer with the RS422 connectors accessible. In that case, they are simply cable ends, so are not
labelled.) Always connecting to the “Toolpush” Connection Panel or the “Toolpush” Computer will ensure that
the proper connection is made and the TPC will not require any configuration change to receive WITS.
I. 9 Pin Male WITS Interface
If the drilling rig has a TOTCO, EPOCH or other like drilling system, then the communications to the drilling
computer will come from a different source. If connecting to a TOTCO system, A TOTCO technician must
come to the drilling site and hook up a secondary computer. This computer talks to the rig and makes
available the WITS information through a 9 pin null modem cable to the Bloodhound’s 9 pin WITS port. If
connecting to an EPOCH system, the WITS data comes from a box called a Device Extender. The Device
Extender allows for depth pulses, pump pulses, and on bottom marking. It also has serial ports for WITS data.
Connect the Bloodhound 9 pin male WITS connector through a null modem cable to this EPOCH system,
COM 1. Almost all drilling rigs that have computer monitoring systems have a WITS serial interface of some
kind.
If the connection to the Bloodhound 9 pin male WITS interface is made from the male 9 pin serial port of an
external computer, then a null modem Female to Female cable will be mandatory.
J. 9 Pin Female Serial PC Port
The 9 pin female serial port allows for connections to the host computer system. This connector shares a
common communication bus as the USB B connector described above. If the user is using the USB B
connector to connect to a PC, then serial data will still come out of this connector, but the Bloodhound will not
be able to hear data coming in from this port. This makes this port a handy output to a data logger when using
the USB B connector to go to a PC. The Serial parameters are 115200 Baud, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, and no
parity (8N1). The Gas Chart software will scan all available serial ports and find the Bloodhound, so knowing
the serial port number is not an issue when using the charting software.
If connecting this the 9 pin female connector from the Bloodhound to a 9 pin male serial port on an external
computer, then a standard 9 pin male to 9 pin female cable will be mandatory.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
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K. Geolograph Switch Input
The red and black spring terminal clamps are for the geolograph switch input. On rigs that are not WITS or
WITSML (Wellsite Information Transfer Standard Markup Language) compliant, the most common method to
transmit drilling foot changes is with a switch connected in some manner to the mechanical geolograph. As
more rigs become WITS and WITSML compliant, this should be less common.
L. Sample Gas Inlet
The smaller ¼” hose barb connection on the side is for the sample gas in. Right before this connector, there
should always be a line filter and a water catch canister (dropout jar).
Do not allow liquids to enter into the Bloodhound through this sample gas inlet port.
M. Sample Gas Exhaust
The exhaust is a ½” hose barb connection. This larger size exhaust hose keeps the system from developing
exhaust back pressure, or getting plugged with ice during cold weather. Do not plug the exhaust line or reduce
the internal diameter of the exhaust to anything less than 1/2”. This is because any back pressure will
increase and the system will not operate correctly.
NOTE: Under no circumstances is the exhaust line, at any point, to be physically higher than the Bloodhound
case bottom. Under normal operations, water and water vapor is expelled from the exhaust. If the exhaust
line is higher than the case bottom exhaust port then water cannot exit the exhaust and will eventually flow
back into the system causing damage. Water damage is in no way covered under warranty and is an
additional charge on rental items.
4. KNOB OPERATION AND CONTROL
On the front panel of the Bloodhound Gas Detection System, there is a knob marked “Attenuation” (or
“Adjust”). This function knob is used to access many features of the Bloodhound system. When first turning
the knob, the LCD screen switches to ask the user to select a knob function. Keep rotating the knob to select
from one of the functions. The selections of knob functions are:
GAS UNITS ATTEN – set attenuation (Register 30)
COLUMN TEMP – set chromatograph temperature
GAS UNITS ZERO – set gas units zero
GAS UNITS LOW SPAN – set gas units low span
GAS UNITS HIGH SPAN – set gas units high span
CO2 ZERO – set CO2 zero
CO2 SPAN – set CO2 span
O2 SPAN – set O2 span
H2S ZERO – set H2S zero
H2S SPAN – set H2S span
HRM OEMSETUP – sets pans, zeros, and readjusts
the chromatograph to zero
START CG CAL CYCLE – starts calibration cycle
POWER DOWN – turns off Bloodhound
After Rotating the knob until the desired function is seen, press the green Enter/Mute key. This tells the
Bloodhound that you wish to access the selected function and the LCD will then instruct you further. After
adjusting the instrument to the desired level, press the Enter/Mute key again. The settings are saved and the
Bloodhound resumes normal operations. To exit at any time, either press any of the red buttons, or just wait
60 seconds for the selection to “time-out.”
Notes on the knob function: Be patient and get a feel for the knob adjustment. Some functions have the knob
sensitive to adjustment, and others will seem sluggish. Further, if the user does not change the knob, the
adjustment function will time out after 60 seconds and the Bloodhound will return to normal operations.
A. Gas Units Attenuation
The attenuation setting adjusts the gas readings down or up from 1 percent of the “normal” (that is, nonadjusted) reading to 200 percent of the “normal” reading. To adjust the attenuation, turn the knob left and right
to adjust the attenuation to the desired level. The adjust level can be selected from 1 to 200 percent.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 13
The reason for providing this adjustment is to allow the Bloodhound to generate gas readings similar to older
technologies, such as hot-wire or catalyst bead systems. In most hot-wire or catalyst bead systems, when
high levels of hydrocarbon-based gases enter the detector, the system experiences problems immediately
reacting to the high gas levels, causing carbon buildup and other damage. This causes the system to become
inaccurate or to drift. In order to keep this damage to a minimum, air dilution was introduced to “cut” or air
dilute the sample. This had the desired effect of minimizing the damage to the system and to also allow for
final adjustment to the gas units based on experience, mud weight or any other parameter. Because the
infrared detector system cannot be saturated or damaged with 100% raw natural gas, and can instantly
monitor high levels of hydrocarbon based gases, physical air dilution of the sample gas is simply not needed.
However, this adjustment was still requested as an operational parameter. Further, the ability to not only cut,
but also amplify the sample gas readings, gives new flexibility to the mud logging community
B. Chromatograph Column Temperature
The Bloodhound’s internal chromatograph periodically takes a small portion of the sample gas flowing through
the Bloodhound and separates the hydrocarbon component gases C1 (methane), C2 (ethane), C3 (propane),
IC4 (iso-butane), NC4 (normal-butane), IC5 (Iso-pentane), and NC5 (Normal-pentane). (See the Bloodhound
Chromatograph section of this manual for a more detailed discussion.)
Each chromatograph column has an ideal working temperature, typically between 140 and 190 degrees F. For
a given column, a higher temperature will cause the components to move through the column faster, but at the
price of poorer peak separation. Do not set the column temperature over 220 degrees F.
C. Gas Units Zero, Low Span and High Span
When adjusting the Gas Units Zero, disconnect the inlet hose and allow the Bloodhound to stabilize in air.
When adjusting the Gas Units Low Span and High Span, please be sure that the correct gas is injected.
When adjusting the Gas Units Low Span, you will have to inject 2.5% methane gas in air for the duration of the
adjustment.
NOTE: In the Bloodhound system 1% methane is 100 Gas Units and 2.5% methane is 250 Gas Units.
recommend that the Bloodhound system is calibrated using 2.5% methane in air.
We
When adjusting the Gas Units High Span, user must inject 100% methane (or wall gas) for the duration of the
adjustment. Adjust the instrument to read as close to 8,000 ( or as the user prefers ) as possible while in
calibration mode. The reading will change after exiting the calibration mode.
D. CO2, O2, and H2S Zero and Span
When selecting a CO2, O2, or H2S zero or span setting, it is as simple as injecting clean air or a known sample
gas and adjusting the output to match the gas injected. Note that there is no O2 zero adjustment. O2 zero
adjustment is automatically performed when 100% Methane or wall gas is injected.
If adjusting the zero and span on a particular gas, always adjust the zero first, then the span. Adjusting the
span first and then zero will throw off the span adjustment.
Oxygen Sensor Notes
This sensor was included as a differential monitor as to the amount of methane in the sample.
observes 5% of methane then the O2 should change about 1% no matter where it is presently.
If user
The O2 is an electrochemical sensor does not have a sacrificial element so it should exhibit a long life.
However, because of its construction, the O2 sensor is highly sensitive to any exhaust back pressure. If the
user desires the O2 sensor to work correctly, the Bloodhound must have a 1/2” exhaust line or it will fail rather
quickly. Prolonged exposure to back pressure will cause irreparable damage to the sensor and will
necessitate replacement.
The sensor is constructed using sandwiched layers of chemicals. The reactive chemical is an acid between
two electrochemical layers. As oxygen is presented, a reaction between the acid and the electrochemical
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 14
layers is made and a voltage difference is seen on the electrical bias. The tradeoff is that it is very sensitive to
pressure changes because any pressure changes push or pull the acid onto one of the electrochemical layers
and a reaction is made as well.
Furthermore, it has cross reactivity to other chemicals that may be encountered in the drilling process. One of
the most reactive is acetylene which may be generated using carbide for a lag check. Acetylene may knock
the sensor out for up to 20 minutes. Because of these cross reactions, it is not immune to drift and should be
adjusted to 21% periodically to air. To do this just disconnect the sample line for a few of minutes and adjust to
21%.
“Fuming” mud which is emitting gases other than normally seen may cause the O2 to appear to drift as well,
when in reality it is reacting to the loss of O2 that the fumes have replaced. Keep in mind where the sample is
being taken from.
E. Gas Units Quick Check
If the user would like to do a quick check on the gas units output, the easiest way is to use a small hand held
cigarette lighter. Place the lighter up to the ¼” sample port and press the lever to allow gas to escape. Do not
strike the lighter. This will inject butane into the system. Doing this for 10 seconds will give a good spike
reading on the Bloodhound. The output amount of the spike will vary depending on the attenuation settings,
the damping settings, and the actual amount of butane injected. A typical spike with attenuation at 30, normal
damping, and a 10 second burst from a lighter that has ¾” a flame would be about 150 to 300 gas units,
depending on how the user holds their fingers around the lighter.
F. Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Quick Check
The O2 and CO2 detectors in room air read about 21% O2 and 0.01% CO2. To check the detectors, take a 2
liter or 1 gallon plastic bag and remove the air from it by squeezing it. Then take a deep breath and hold it for
3 to 5 seconds. The longer you hold it the more O2 is removed and replaced with CO2. After that, breathe into
the bag until it has about 2 liters into it. Human expiratory gases are about 17-19% O2 and 2-5% CO2. The
readings on the Bloodhound should reflect somewhere around these numbers. You should at least see them
change.
G. Recommended Calibration Gases
We recommend the following gases and supplier company to be used with the Bloodhound system. Each
bottle should last more than a year with regular calibrations. A regulator that is compatible with and will fit all
tanks described below: Model 620-SSC10.
MESA Specialty Gas & Equipment a Division of MESA International Technologies, Inc.
2427 South Anne Street, Santa Ana, CA 92704
Toll-Free: (866) 470-MESA (6372) Tel: (714) 434-7102; Fax (714) 434-8006
http://www.mesagas.com/
Following are the part numbers and descriptions.
High Range Calibration Gas – 99+ % Methane:
S1971
METHANE 99.0% MIN PURITY
CYLINDER:58L
VALVE CGA:C-10
CONTENTS:58 LITERS
PRESSURE:1000 PSI
SHELF LIFE:NO LIMIT
Note: wall gas (also known as city or house gas) can be used for the high range calibration. This is the fuel
that is piped to houses and business for cooking and heating. It is natural gas that has been refined to remove
moisture and most of the butane and propane, leaving mostly methane. Because the high range only needs a
very high methane concentration to generate a set point, and because the unit automatically adjusts the upper
range limit of the calibration based on the gas reactivity, a pure high range calibration gas is not necessary.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 15
Low Range Calibration Gas - 2.5% Methane in Air
J197150LA
METHANE 2.50%
AIR BALANCE
GRADE:CERTIFIED
CYLINDER:103L
VALVE CGA:C-10
CONTENTS:103 LITERS
PRESSURE:1000 PSI
SHELF LIFE:3 YEARS
Chromatograph Calibration Gas - EQUAL 5 PART MIXTURE
08/01/08-1
METHANE 0.75%
ETHANE 0.75%
PROPANE 0.75%
BUTANE 0.75%
ISOBUTANE 0.75%
BALANCE: NITROGEN
GRADE:CERTIFIED
CYLINDER:103L
VALVE CGA:C-10
CONTENTS:103 LITERS
PRESSURE:1000 PSI
SHELF LIFE:3 YEARS
Chromatograph Calibration Gas - EQUAL 7 PART MIXTURE
MASA REF 112840
192013-15
METHANE 1.00%
ETHANE 1.00%
PROPANE 1.00%
BUTANE 1.00%
ISOBUTANE 1.00%
PENTANE 1.00%
ISOPENTANE 1.00%
BALANCE: NITROGEN
GRADE:CERTIFIED
CYLINDER:108-110 LTR Steel 50” x 15”
VALVE CGA:510 Brass
CONTENTS:65 CF LITERS
PRESSURE:255 PSI
SHELF LIFE:3 YEARS
Carbon Dioxide Calibration Gas - 5% CO2 CALIBRATION GAS
J10135VA
CARBON DIOXIDE 5.00%
Balance: Air
GRADE:CERTIFIED
CYLINDER:103L
VALVE CGA:C-10
CONTENTS:103 LITERS
PRESSURE:1000 PSI
SHELF LIFE:3 YEARS
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 16
Hydrogen Sulfide Calibration Gas - 100PPM H2S GAS
Z1053100PN
HYDROGEN SULFIDE 100 PPM
Balance: NITROGEN
GRADE:CERTIFIED
CYLINDER:A58L
VALVE CGA:C-10
CONTENTS:58 LITERS
PRESSURE:500 PSI
SHELF LIFE:1 YEAR
H. HRM OEM SETUP
This knob command is a powerful function that will set the HRM module to standard factory
specifications. When this function is used it will zero the gas reading and the H2S reading, set the O2 span,
and readjust the CG to zero and such. In order for this function to operate correctly, the Bloodhound should
breathe fresh air for about an hour, be up to temperature, and then this function would be used. On a brand
new HRM module, the HRM should run for 24 hours to allow the H2S, O2 and VQ500 to stabilize, then it
should be used twice in a row.
The downside is that if this command is used during a well in use, it will zero all the sensors to the current gas
levels. So, the worst case is that if a logger uses it incorrectly, he should then allow the Bloodhound to sample
clear air for an hour or so then use it again.
When this function is used, it will appear that all the readings on the Bloodhound will freeze, because the HRM
is not talking to the Brain Board while in this process of OEM setup.
I. Start CG Calibration Cycle
This knob command starts the chromatograph calibration cycle. This cycle automatically sets the time
windows within which the five or seven gas component peaks will appear. See the Bloodhound
Chromatograph section of this manual for a description of how to calibrate the chromatograph.
J. Power Down
This knob command is a secondary method of turning off the Bloodhound. Using this method, first disconnect
the unit from power (it will continue to run on the internal battery). Then select “POWER DOWN” and press the
MUTE/ENTER button.
NOTE: The primary way to turn off the Bloodhound is to disconnect the unit from power, then press
the red START/STOP button.
5. Front Panel Computer Control (Brain Board)
A. Buttons
On the front panel of the Bloodhound computer are eight (8) buttons that can also light up. The labeled
buttons light up when there is a VACUUM FAULT, PRESSURE FAULT, or BLOCKED SAMPLE LINE.
Only five (5) of the buttons are active for user input.
1> START/STOP – when pressed after the power cord is unplugged, this red button will cause the
Bloodhound to power down.
2> RED – any red button will cause the Bloodhound to “back-out” of any pending menu operation and go back
to normal operation.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 17
3> MUTE/ENTER – use to choose the selection shown. Pressing when no selection is shown cycles among
MUTE 600 (seconds) / ALARM OFF / ALARM ON, as shown in the lower right of the display. This button
does not actually turn off the alarms, but just mutes the sounder.
4> UP – press at the same time as DOWN to display the menu. Then use to move up in the menu list.
5> DOWN – press at the same time as UP to display the menu. Then use to move down in the menu list.
B. Display
When in the normal mode of operation, the LCD display shows many points of information.
On the top line, the current time, day, date, and internal equipment temperatures are displayed for both the
internal temperature on the circuit board and for the HRM module. Keep in mind that these are the internal
temperatures of the equipment and not the outside ambient temperature. Internal temperatures within the
Bloodhound generally run about 10 degrees Fahrenheit higher than outside the case.
The second line is reserved for any alarm messages such as “Blocked Sample Line.” If there are no alarms to
show, the line will display the current job number, serial number, internal software version number and external
software version numbers. If you call technical support, these pieces of information may be asked of you.
The third line displays the Drill Depth title, the Rate Of Penetration (ROP) in minutes per foot, and the voltage
of the primary sensing element. The voltage number represents how much of the detected gas the instrument
sees. The higher the number, the more gas it will see. If the number is zero or low, an alarm will sound and
the error will show.
The fourth line displays the Drill Depth in large numbers followed by the Rate of Penetration in feet per hour,
followed by the voltage from the chromatograph sensing element.
The fifth line displays the extractor DC amps pulled from the Bloodhound. Amperage over 6 amps may
indicate that the extractor needs replacement. To the right of the amps, is the hydrogen sulfide content in
parts per million.
The sixth line shows the gas units title, followed by a display of the chromatograph pressure. Chromatograph
pressure is generally around 800 to 1200 millimeters of mercury (mmHg) depending on the chromatograph
column and the prevailing atmospheric pressure. If the Brain Board senses a low chromatograph pressure, an
alarm will sound to alert to notify the user to a possible chromatograph problem.
The seventh line shows the gas units, followed by the sample vacuum level used to draw in the sample gases
from the extractor. System vacuum is generally between –5 and –450 mmHg. Excessive vacuum will trigger
the system to alert the user to a vacuum problem or blockage of the sample line. The Bloodhound has enough
suction power to easily pull sample through a 1000+ ft of 1/4” OD tubing. To the right of the sample vacuum is
percent carbon dioxide.
The eighth line holds the current sample flow rate in liters per hour, followed by a scrolling screen that will
display general technical and current operational parameters, as follows:
USB and SD storage card operational status
Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI)
3G modem connection indicator
Chromatograph count down timer (CGT)
Digital attenuation level (%DA)
Mute status, “Alarm On”, “Alarm Off”, or ”Mute xxx”
WITS good or No WITS
If WITS data is present, it will then display bit depth “Bit xxxx.x”
If there is a present Ethernet connection it will display “ETHERNET xx”
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 18
If the MainLog program is running and is talking to the Bloodhound, “MAINLOG” will appear.
MUTE If there is an alarm condition, the Brain Board will display the problem. This alarm is accompanied with
an audible alarm tone. To mute the alarm tone, press the Enter/Mute key. This will place the alarm in a muted
state for ten (10) minutes (600 seconds). Pressing it a second time defeats the audible alarm and the display
will show ALARM OFF. Pressing it a third time will display “ALARM ON”. Hitting the Enter/Mute key does not
turn off any alarms but rather mutes the sounder for a given amount of time. If ALARM OFF is selected, the
Bloodhound will not make an audible tone.
Pressing the Up and Down Arrow keys at the same time will bring up a menu. To select an item on the menu
display, press the Up or Down key. This will move the highlight bar up and down. After the desired selection
is highlighted, press the Enter/Mute key. This will bring up the selected function for adjustment.
SET TIME/DATE - to set the time and/or date
TRANSFER LAS DATA TO USB KEY - to transfer LAS data to the USB memory stick
REGISTER SETUP - to check or change a register setting
SET DEPTH COUNTER - to set the depth counter
SET JOB NUMBER - to set the job number
SET GAS UNITS ALARM LEVEL - to set the gas units alarm level
TRANSFER JOB DATA TO USB KEY - to transfer stored data from the internal SD memory to the
USB memory stick
When setting any function, the up arrow, down arrow, and enter key are used to manipulate the data. When
making large changes to numbers just press and hold the up or down arrow key. The numbers will start to
scroll slow, fast, faster, and then very fast. This is handy when setting the depth from 2000 to 8000 or such.
After the new value has been set, just hit the Enter/Mute key to store the new changes and return to the
normal operational screen. To cancel a selection, just press any red key to return to normal operating view.
C. Menu Selections
SET TIME/DATE
This allows the user to set the current time and date. The Bloodhound has an integrated Real Time Clock
(RTC) that will keep the current time and date even when the power is turned off to the Bloodhound. There is
a small watch battery on the brain board that keeps the RTC alive. This battery also allows for storage of
some other non-volatile and non-critical information such as depth, HOBBS timer, and packet counter. If you
remove the watch battery for more than a couple of minutes, prepare to give a call to correct some of the lost
non-critical data. If you lose time frequently on power down, it is time to replace it. This battery is expected to
last about 5 years. The part number is on the battery and a replacement can be found at Radio Shack or other
electronics outlet.
TRANSFER LAS DATA TO USB KEY
The Bloodhound stores LAS job data to the internal SD storage media. This SD card can be found on the
Brain board. It is a common camera type storage card and can be picked up just about any electronics store.
The Bloodhound comes with a 2 gigabyte storage card but it can use just about any sized one. The collected
Bloodhound LAS data is primarily stored on this SD card. If a user has a compatible USB memory stick
installed in the Bloodhound front panel, the Bloodhound attempts to also place the LAS data onto the USB key
after it detects it. This menu selection allows the user to walk up to the Bloodhound, insert a USB key, and
download the current job LAS data into the USB key. This key can then be taken to a PC where it can be
loaded into a mud logging program or opened with Microsoft Excel for editing.
REGISTER SETUP
The Bloodhound register settings enable the unit to be flexible as well as powerful in operations. Registers are
small bits of information held in non-volatile memory locations that dictate how the Bloodhound operates.
There are 255 registers that each hold a number from 0 to 255. All operational settings are made through
register values one way or another. Do not set register values unless you know what the results will be.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 19
Incorrect register settings may cause the Bloodhound to have undesired results, become unstable or even
unusable. On the other hand, the register settings can allow the user to fine tune the operations of the
Bloodhound for optimum performance. This all depends on how knowledgeable the user is of the registers
and their settings. A very good explanation of the Bloodhound registers can be found later in this document.
SET DEPTH COUNTER
This menu item allows the user to quickly set a starting depth for the drilling process. To set the depth from its
current number, just press and hold the up or down key. The numbers will start to scroll slow, fast, faster, and
then very fast. This is handy when making a large number change. After the new value has been set, just hit
the Enter/Mute key to store the new changes and return to the normal operational screen.
SET JOB NUMBER
The job number is very important to the Bloodhound system in two ways. The job number tells the
Bloodhound what job number to place into the data packet. Generated packets are sent to the charting
software and the remote server system. This tells the server system into what file to place the data. If the job
number changes, the remote server software will start a new chart and file. Also when changing the job
number, the Bloodhound knows to start a new BH_DATA.IBD file on the SD storage card and if inserted, the
USB memory stick. Usually the job number is the last item to be changed upon rig up of the Bloodhound
system at a well site.
SET GAS UNITS ALARM LEVEL
The Bloodhound has the ability to set off an alarm if a preset gas units level has been passed. This allows the
mud logger to either identify the zone or to warn of a possible dangerous situation. Set this value to zero to
defeat the alarm.
TRANSFER JOB DATA TO USB KEY
The Bloodhound stores all job data to the internal SD storage media every 6 seconds. Typical data storage
size is about 500 kilobytes of information per day. The collected Bloodhound data is primarily stored on this
card. If a user has a compatible USB memory stick installed in the Bloodhound front panel, the Bloodhound
attempts to also place data onto the USB key after it detects it. This menu selection allows the user to walk up
to the Bloodhound, insert a USB key, and download the current job data into the USB key. This key can then
be taken to a PC where it can be loaded into the gas charting software.
D. USB Ports and Data Storage
Two industry standard USB ports can be found on the front panel of the Bloodhound computer. At this time
only the top port is used. This USB port allows the use of external USB memory sticks to be used as
secondary mass storage of the data collected. Any USB memory stick can be used; however, it is
recommended that the short versions be used to permit the case to be closed during operations. When
inserting a USB memory stick, it may take up to 60 seconds for the Bloodhound to recognize it. All data is
stored and organized on the memory stick and SD card in the root directly under the file name BH_DATA.IBD.
When starting or changing to a new job number, this file is renamed to OLDFILE.IBD and a new
BH_DATA.IBD is started. Changing back to the old or last job number will not restore/rename the old IBD file
but will destroy the last record, OLDFILE.IBD too. Internally there is a 2 gigabyte or 4 gigabyte SD flash
storage card that is the primary point of storage. The job data files found on this card can be extracted or
deleted through external commands using the serial port that is explained later in this document. The data can
also be transferred to the USB memory stick from the SD card using the menu option.
6. SERVICE AND REPAIR OF THE BLOODHOUND
The design of the Bloodhound was conceived with modularity, serviceability, reliability, and portability as
paramount. Off-the-shelf common parts were selected to allow the user to service the Bloodhound with readily
available parts from local vendors. The Bloodhound system can be broken down into 5 subsystems. Each
subsystem can be exchanged for a new system when it is upgraded or repaired.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 20
A. Gas Detection System – HRM03 / Electronic Flow Meter Replacement
To replace the HRM03 module or the electronic flow meter, first disconnect electrical power to the Bloodhound
and then turn the unit off by selecting “POWER DOWN.” After that, remove the four panel screws that hold the
top cover in place and pull up on the panel about 4 inches and then move the panel towards your person and
stand the cover up in place. This will expose the inner workings of the Bloodhound system.

Find the HRM03 module and disconnect the four electrical cables

Remove the two nylon locking nuts that hold the assembly in place using a 7/16” wrench

Pull upward on the HRM03 module until it clears the mounting bolts.

Remove the tubing that is attached in three places, noting which tubing goes where. If the tubing is
attached back in the wrong place, the unit will not operate correctly. There is a flow diagram elsewhere in
this document.

Disconnect the electrical cabling coming from electronic flow meter to the Brain Board at the Brain Board
end. This is a 4 pin locking connector. This locking connector has a small tab on one side that must be
pressed in order for the connector to come loose from the Brain Board. Do not force.

Replace the module and/or flow meter and assembly is the reversal of removal.
B. Sample and Chromatograph Pumps
The sample pump and chromatograph pumps are high performance medical grade brushless pumps from
Parker. The sample pump and chromatograph pumps are a special order item from Parker and can be
ordered from iBall Instruments. The pumps are a brushless medical grade pump system. The chromatograph
pump is a two wire pump and the sample pump is a three wire pump. They are not interchangeable.
Each brushless pump has a service life of a minimum of 10,000 hours. This translates to over 416 days of
nonstop use. Or more than a year of service per pump.
C. Chromatograph Sample Solenoid
The chromatograph sample solenoid is an Ingersoll Rand part number P251SS-012-D-G. The part is readily
available from Grainger. You can easily call or visit their web site at www.grainger.com and you can have
them delivered to your door. Keep in mind that there is an adjustment on the bottom of the solenoid. on
occasion the solenoid is not adjusted correctly from the factory. If this adjustment is not correct the solenoid
will not transfer the gases correctly. The solenoid is adjusted correctly when there is no cross flow or leakage
between the open and closed positions and a proper amount is injected per sample.
NOTE: User will have to transfer the electrical connector and the plastic fittings from the old solenoid to the
new one.
D. Tubing
There are two types of tubing used in the Bloodhound system. A thick black rubberized tubing and a small 1/8”
ID clear PVC vinyl tubing.
The thick black rubber tubing is automotive grade high vacuum/pressure Goodyear tubing part number 65113.
It is available from Auto Zone or just about any other auto parts store. This tubing has excellent temperature,
characteristics and resists kinking on hard corners. This dark black tubing is shown in the pneumatic diagram
as a heavy dark black line. It is used immediately following the particulate filter, through a plastic T, and then
goes to the inlet side of the sample pump and the sample line vacuum monitor port on the Brain Board. It is
also used to connect the Chromatograph pump inlet to the chromatograph column and through another T
connector to the chromatograph monitor port on the Brain Board.
The second type of tubing is a common 1/8” ID clear PVC tubing that can be found in just about any hardware
store and can be bought for a few cents per ft. A benefit of the clear line is that it useful to observe if any
contaminants or liquids have entered the system.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 21
E. Chromatograph Column
The chromatograph column fits snuggly in the case at the upper right-hand side. It can be replaced in a matter
of minutes by disconnecting one electrical cable and the input and exhaust tubing. Take care to pull the tubing
straight off the connectors, because side pressure can cause the connectors to break.
7. THE BLOODHOUND CHROMATOGRAPH SYSTEM
A. Control of the Bloodhound Chromatograph System
The control of the Bloodhound system is through 2 registers and the control knob.
Register 15
Register 15 is the number in minutes between injection of samples. Typically it is set to 5, 8, or 14. When this
time expires, the Bloodhound will start another chromatograph injection and cycle. Setting the column
temperature to a higher level will allow for the separations to transfer through the column at a faster pace
which will allow the user to reduce this injection timing but may lose the C1-C2 separation.
Register 18
Register 18 is the maximum number of seconds to inject the sample into the chromatograph column. Typically
set to 5, and should not be set greater than 10. This timer is automatically adjusted on the fly by the Brain
Board in order to keep from saturating the column with sample gas and causing distortions in the separations.
Column Temperature
When turning the control knob, one of the options displayed is column temperature. Typically the temperature
is set to around 120 to 150 degrees F. The user has the ability to adjust this temperature to compensate for
the degradation of the column over time or to adjust the performance characteristics of the chromatograph
system. Do not set the column temperature over 210 degrees F. Internally there is a thermal fuse that is
preset to operate at 240 degrees F. The closer the user sets the column temperature to this level, the more
likely this fuse will open up and the column will become useless because it will not be able to hold temperature.
If the thermal fuse opens, the protective insulation must be peeled off and the thermal fuse replaced. The
thermal fuse is provided to keep the column from overheating in case of a controller failure.
NOTE: If the user changes the column temperature, it is highly recommended that chromatograph be
calibrated as the Bloodhound employs a slope peak detector and peak timing for high accuracy. Changing the
temperature changes the elution time of the gasses and therefore changes both of these sampled
characteristics.
B. Calibration of the Bloodhound Chromatograph System
If the temperature of the column is changed to a higher or lower temperature, the user must recalibrate the
Bloodhound chromatograph system in order to maintain accuracy.
To calibrate the Bloodhound
chromatograph system the user will need a recirculation bag and a tank of calibration gas. The calibration gas
is a 5 or 7 part mixture consisting of equal parts of methane, ethane, propane, iso-butane, normal butane, isopentane and normal pentane. These gases are typically supplied as a 5 or 7 part mixture containing 1% of
each with the remainder nitrogen.
To prepare to calibrate the chromatograph, make recirculation bag, which is a Ziploc bag with two (2) pieces of
clear PVC tubing taped into the lower corners. This type of bag allows for the calibration gas to continuously
recirculate through the Bloodhound system for calibration and testing. To construct a recirculation bag, obtain
a 1 gallon Ziploc bag and cut off the two bottom corners. Obtain 2 pieces of clear PVC tubing from a hardware
supply house. One piece of clear PVC tubing 1/2” ID and the other 1/4” ID. Tape these pieces of tubing into
the corners of the bag, and (temporarily} put tape on the end of the ¼” tube. Squeeze air out of the bag.
Connect the regulator from a tank of 5 or 7 part calibration gas bottle to the Ziploc baggie and fill the baggie
with the 5 or 7 part calibration gas and then move to the Bloodhound.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 22
Attach the calibration gas bag 1/4” ID hose to the 1/4” Bloodhound inlet connector hose for at least 30 seconds
then connect the ½” ID hose from the bag to the 1/2” exhaust port The calibration gas is now being
recirculated from the exhaust port, through the bag, and into the sample port in a closed loop system. This
technique conserves calibration gas.
Monitor the chromatograph output using the gas charting software. The output should look something like the
CG output picture on page 24. Adjust the column temperature until the desired performance of the
chromatograph is achieved. Keep in mind that natural gas is mostly methane. If you increase the column
temperature too much, the C1 and C2 peaks will merge when raw natural gas is present. Set the injection
timing to capture the 5 or 7 part calibration gas peaks.
The Bloodhound can be calibrated using 5 part or 7 part calibration gas. The parts must be at least 0.75% in a
nitrogen balance. If the Bloodhound sees 5 peaks, it will calibrate using 5 parts. If the Bloodhound sees 7
peaks, it will be calibrated for 7 parts. The example on page 24 is for 7 part calibration gas.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 23
When the output of the chromatograph is as desired, start the automatic calibration cycle by adjusting the knob
until “START CG CALIBRATION CYCLE” is seen and press the MUTE/ENTER button. A countdown will begin
on the display showing how long it will be until gases from the previous chromatograph cycle clear out, so that
the calibration cycle can start. When the calibration cycle is complete, the unit will be calibrated and the 5 part
gases will show equal gas units using the gas charting program.
Leave the bag connected for additional cycles if you wish to check the calibration.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 24
FIGURE 12 – CHROMATOGRAPH OUTPUT EXAMPLE
Double left clicking on the gas chart will bring up a select tool that changes color and is “stuck” to the tip of the
cursor. Also at the tip of the cursor is a green information box that displays the time in minutes. If the cursor
goes to the left of the geolograph tick marks, the green information box displays the depth. This is useful in
selecting a range of feet or minutes of data. By double clicking on a second point on the Gas Chart, you have
just selected a range of data, and the Select Items Box will appear.
Examine Raw Chromatograph This
button allows the user to see a
close-up view of the selected
chromatograph output.
Left
clicking and holding on the
chromatogram will allow the user to
adjust the trace up and down on
the display window. If the trace is
too large or too small, the user can
adjust the overall visual size in the
Program and Equipment Setup
Screen, under the Chromatograph
Tab. When the user is satisfied
with the display, a print can be
made of the chromatogram.
Select Items Box
The peak search times are shown as heavy-colored overlays on the chromatograph curve. Each time-window
is centered on its associated vertical line.
The data for the particular chromatogram is available to the right of the chromatogram. If a particular peak
timing is off, or is incorrectly labeled, then all the user has to do is click on the Set Cx peak, place the cross
hairs over the correct peak, and DOUBLE CLICK on the peak to set the new timing window for that
component.
To see the previous separation, hit the Previous button. To see the next separation, hit the Next button.
Calibrating or adjusting the flow rate:
If you want to calibrate the flow rate, get a flow meter. The best one to calibrate with is a clear plastic
flowrater. It should be labeled 0 - 5 LPM. Omega Part number FL-2039.
From a console connection to the Bloodhound type in "calibrate flow" and enter.
This will put the Bloodhound into a calibration mode that will allow you to adjust the flow.
Rotate the black knob on the face of the Bloodhound clockwise to increase the flow rate. Adjust to 1LPM on
the plastic flowrator using the external flow meter.
Wait until the process times out. At that time the Bloodhound will internal electronic flow meter will have been
calibrated.
To just manually adjust the flow rate of the Bloodhound, set register 10 to a pump power number from 1 100. This will set the sample pump percent motor power level. The Bloodhound will not be able to
automatically adjust the flow rate when the flow rate is in this override mode.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 25
8. COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
The Bloodhound can be controlled calibrated, programmed, and set up using a command line interface. To
interface with the Bloodhound, connect to the USB B-type connector on the side of the Bloodhound to an
available USB A-type connector on the side, front, or back of your computer. Alternately, you can also use a
PC DB9 Male to DB9 Female serial cable from an available male DB9 serial port of user’s computer to the
Female DB9 found on the side of the Bloodhound.
NOTE: If a USB cable is used to connect the Bloodhound to a PC, the USB driver must be loaded first. This
driver can be found on the USB key supplied with the unit or can be found at www.iballinst.com
After connecting to the Bloodhound, if there are serial packets coming out of the instrument, pressing the
[ENTER] key will temporally suspend the transmissions of the packets for 60 seconds. This is to preclude
interference with the command structure. When no more commands are coming in, the data packets will
automatically start being sent again.
To communicate directly to the Bloodhound, open the HyperTerminal like program on the computer. If using
Version 80 or later of the gas charting software on the computer, the serial port number will automatically be
found and used. The communications parameters are 115200 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, and 1 stop bit.
(8N1). All ASCII characters that are entered are internally converted inside the Bloodhound to upper case.
Therefore, commands are not case sensitive. This is true for both the 9 pin serial cable and the USB B
connection.
Commands sent to the Bloodhound must be in the following format:
COMMAND MODIFIER 1 MODIFIER 2 [ENTER]
An example is:
ECHO ON[ENTER]
By default, the command line interface echo is off. To view what you typing, you must enter the command
ECHO ON[ENTER]
The commands available are:
SETREG
STATUS
ECHO
CGTEMP
READREG
CALIBRATE
LINK
CGSAMPLE
VER
SETTIME
SETPACKETNUM
MUTE
HOBBS
WRITEETIME
GEOHIT
?
REBOOT
SETJOBNUM
SETDEPTH
SHUTDOWN
SETREG
All functions of the Bloodhound are controlled using register settings. Registers are small points of nonvolatile
memory that hold information critical to the operation of the Bloodhound. The register command starts with the
SETREG command followed with the register number to be changed and then lastly with the value to be
stored. Register numbers are from 0 to 32767 and the register values range from 0 to 255. The common
registers used are from 0 – 255. The rest are used for nonvolatile storage and should not be modified unless
directed by a representative.
To set a register to a different value type in the command:
Setreg 5 0[ENTER]
Register 5 is 0
The Bloodhound will respond with a report of what the registers new contents are.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 26
READREG
To read a register from the Bloodhound, enter the command READREG followed by the register number to
read. Register numbers are from 0 to 32767 and the register values range from 0 to 255.
To read a register enter the following command:
readreg 5
Register 5 is 1
VER
This command returns the version of the software load.
To check the software version load enter the following command:
ver [ENTER]
iBall Firmware V61
Boot Loader V17
REBOOT
This command performs a hardware reboot on the Bloodhound. This has the same effect as powering off the
unit and then powering back up.
STATUS
This starts the packet transmissions in the Bloodhound. If the registers are set up to do so, then the data
packets begin to be sent out the various communications port. The data packets are described elsewhere in
this document.
CALIBRATE
The calibrate command allows the user to set a calibration point for the vacuum, flow, and amperage settings.
The valid calibration modes are:
CALIBRATE AMPS[ENTER]
CALIBRATE VAC[ENTER]
CALIBRATE FLOW[ENTER]
To calibrate the amperage settings, disconnect any devices that are currently connected to the DC power port
on the side of the Bloodhound. After that enter CALIBRATE AMPS command. After a couple of seconds hit
the [ENTER] key and the new zero amps will be stored.
To calibrate both the sensors for the sample vacuum and the chromatograph pressure, first disconnect the
chromatograph pressure and sample vacuum lines from the sensors on the Brain Board. Then enter the
CALIBRATE VAC command. After a few seconds, hit the [ENTER] key to return to normal operations. After
calibration, the vacuum level will be set between -6 and -8 mmHg before connecting the lines. It will not show
zero. This is to compensate for tubing length. Reconnect the chromatograph pressure and sample vacuum
lines to the correct sensors on the Brain Board.
To calibrate the flow, connect a clear plastic flow meter to the sample port. The flow meter should be able to
read between 0 and 5 liters per minute (LPM). Since the Bloodhound is drawing a vacuum, connect the tubing
to the top of the flow meter. Then enter the CALIBRATE FLOW[ENTER]. The flow meter should drop to zero.
Turn the knob on the face of the Bloodhound clockwise until 1LPH is shown on the plastic flow meter. Wait for
the function to time out and the calibration will be set.
SETTIME
To remotely set the time or set the time through the serial port, enter the command
Settime [ENTER]
The Bloodhound will respond with the following string;
To set the time, use command SETTIME ???? VALUE
Use HOURS, MINUTES, SECONDS, DAY, DATE, MONTH, YEAR
Use only up to 2 digits in all fields
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 27
Example: SETTIME HOURS 18
Current time is:
Sun 2008 Apr 02
09:36:12
All the user has to do after that is enter the information in ASCII form. The following is an example of setting
the hours.
SETTIME HOURS 14
The Bloodhound will respond with the new date
Current time is:
Sun 2008 Apr 02 14:36:12
NOTE: Please use the 24 hour time format
ECHO
This command turns the echo on and off to the unit. The unit boots up with echo off as the default. Echo is
the return of the characters that you have typed through the return serial path and also all error messages.
The echo can be turned on by entering the command:
ECHO ON [ENTER]
To turn the echo off, just enter the command:
ECHO OFF [ENTER]
LINK
Within the Bloodhound, there are multiple serial ports that connect to multiple optional modules. These
optional modules are all controlled serially from the Bloodhound computer. When the user wants to directly
connect the PC serial port to one of the serially controlled modules, or one module to another, the LINK
command is used. Simply put, the link command links the communications port that you are using to any one
of the other optional serial modules inside the Bloodhound.
Valid link commands are:
Link GPS[ENTER]
Link USB[ENTER]
Link MODEM[ENTER]
Link WITS[ENTER]
Link PC[ENTER]
Link HRM[ENTER]
Link ETHERNET[ENTER]
For example, this allows the user to link from a remote location using the 3G modem to the WITS serial port to
see if WITS data is operating correctly, or to the HRM module to modify some of the operating parameters.
The details of the communications to these modules are beyond the scope of this document.
GEOHIT
When this command is entered, it is the same as momentarily shorting out the geolograph contacts. This will
increase the foot depth the same as if the geolograph contact switch was hit.
GEOHIT[ENTER]
The geolograph depth will increase one foot. This allows the remote technician to help diagnose a switch
problem.
SETDEPTH
This command will return or set the current depth on the Bloodhound.
To receive the current depth of the geolograph counter enter:
>Setdepth[ENTER]
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 28
DRILL DEPTH IS: 2813
To set the depth counter, enter the command followed by the new depth.
>Setdepth 2800[ENTER]
DRILL DEPTH IS: 2800
CGTEMP
This command will allow the user to set the column temperature remotely or through the console. To use just
enter the command with the desired temperature to run the column at. NOTE: Do not generally run the column
over 210 degrees F. There is a thermal fuse set at 240 degrees F. Temperature is in degrees F.
CGTEMP 150[ENTER]
CGSAMPLE
This is also a troubleshooting command. When issuing this command the Bloodhound will automatically
restart a chromatograph cycle no matter where it is in the chromatograph timing. This command is used to
help calibrate and troubleshoot the chromatograph.
CGASMPLE[ENTER]
WRITEETIME
This command is used to individually set the timing of the CG center point (peak), in seconds.
WRITEETIME C1 70
This example would set the peak timing for C1 to 70 seconds.
MUTE
The mute command will allow the remote user to silence or turn off the local alarm tone generator.
To set the mute for a number of minutes, just add the modifier.
MUTE 0[ENTER]
Will turn on the alarm tone if an alarm is present
MUTE 5[ENTER]
Will mute the Bloodhound for 5 minutes
MUTE 1000[ENTER]
Will turn off the Bloodhound alarm.
NOTE: If there is no present alarm, the tone will not be sounding, even if set to 0. Setting MUTE to a number
greater than 1000 has no effect.
?
Sending a question mark [enter] to the console will return the string Bloodhound and the model number 4.
This allows for the charting software or any other software to check to see if there is a Bloodhound connected
to that port.
?[ENTER]
Bloodhound 4
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 29
SETPACKETNUM
This command will allow the user to view or set a specific packet number starting point. Most packets that
come out of the Bloodhound have a sequential packet number. This allows the software to monitor and keep
track of the packets in sequential order as well as look for missing packets. If changing the Bloodhound out
mid-job, due to system failure or other reason, it may be necessary to set the packet number so that duplicate
packet numbers are not sent. If the packet number is over 2,000,000,000, the number will be reset to zero on
the next job number change.
SETPACKETNUM[ENTER]
Packet number is: 187889
SETPACKETNUM 100[ENTER]
Packet number is: 100
HOBBS
This is an internal timer that keeps track of the number of minutes that the unit has been running since first
power up and since it was last serviced. HOBBS USE shows the user how many hours since it was last
serviced, HOBBS shows total number of hours in operation since construction.
HOBBS[ENTER]
HOBBS USE: 968 Hours
HOBBS: 1118 Hours
SETJOBNUM
The job number is very important to the Bloodhound system in 2 ways. The job number tells the Bloodhound
what job number to place into the data packet. Generated packets are sent to the charting software and the
remote server system. This tells the server system into what file to place the data. If the job number changes,
the remote server software will start a new chart and file. Also when changing the job number, the Bloodhound
knows to start a new BH_DATA.IBD file on the SD storage card and if inserted, the USB memory stick.
Usually the job number is the last to be changed on a rig up of the Bloodhound system at a well site.
To view the job number just enter the command
SETJOBNUM[ENTER]
JOB NUMBER IS: 106
To set the job number to a value, enter the value
SETJOBNUM 1223[ENTER]
JOB NUMBER IS: 1223
And the job number will be set.
SHUTDOWN
Entering this command will make the Bloodhound enter a shutdown mode. What this does is shut down the
pumps. This command is used when the Bloodhound is not being used in the field. It allows the Bloodhound
to operate normally except without using the pumps. This can make the pumps last longer if the unit is not
going to be operational for a long period of time or if the sample line is occluded.
To exit the shutdown mode, just enter the command again.
SHUTDOWN
Unit entering shutdown mode
SHUTDOWN
Unit exiting shutdown mode
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 30
9. REGISTER SETTINGS AND MODES OF OPERATION
The Bloodhound register settings enable the unit to be flexible as well as powerful in operations. Registers are
small bits of information held in non-volatile memory locations that dictate how the Bloodhound operates.
There are over 255 registers that hold a number from 0 to 255. All operational settings are made through
register values. The register settings can allow the user to fine tune the operations of the Bloodhound for
optimum performance. This all depends on how knowledgeable the user is of the registers and their settings.
NOTE: To effectively set up and operate the Bloodhound, the registers must be set correctly. Failure to do so
will cause undetermined results. Do not set register values unless you know what the results will be.
Unlisted registers are not used and should not be changed from the default setting by the user because they
could become active in later loads of software. Registers that are not listed should not be changed. Register
settings and changes can be made through the menu, through the serial port, or remotely through the wireless
connection.
BLOODHOUND REGISTER INFORMATION AND SETTINGS
The Bloodhound register settings enable the unit to be flexible as well as powerful in operations. Registers
are small points of information held in non-volatile memory locations that dictate how the Bloodhound
operates. All registers hold a number from 0 to 255. All operational settings are made through register values
one way or another. Do not set register values unless you know what the results will be.
Incorrect register settings may cause the Bloodhound to have undesired results,
become unstable or even unusable.
On the bloodhound: Pressing the Up and Down Arrow keys at the same time will bring up a menu. To
select an Item on the menu display, just press the Up or Down key. This will move the highlight bar up and
down. After the desired selection is highlighted, press the Enter/Mute key. This will bring up the selected
function for adjustment. To check and/or adjust a register setting select the REGISTER SETUP line, and use
up/down keys to scroll to register of interest. Registers 1 through 6 and 8 are not available in this way.
Gas Chart software on a computer directly connected to the Bloodhound: Right click on the chart to
bring up the CONTROL PANEL.
Click on REAL TIME DATA to bring up the real time data window, and move it out of the way.
On the CONTROL PANEL, click the SETUP BUTTON, then on BLOODHOUND.
To read a register, type READREG RN (where RN is the register number) in the SEND BLOODHOUND
COMMAND window and click on the SEND button.
The result of the query will appear at the bottom of the REAL TIME DATA window, in the communications
stream from the Bloodhound.
To set a register, type SETREG RN ## (where ## is the number to put in the register) in the SEND
BLOODHOUND COMMAND window and click on the SEND button.
The result of the change will appear at the bottom of the REAL TIME DATA window, in the communications
stream from the Bloodhound.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 31
REG.
FUNCTION
4
External code version.
5
Absolute number of
resets high byte
6
Absolute number of
resets low byte
9
Enhanced Gas unit
feature set - multi
sensor set
8
First time power up
register setup
10
SUCTION PUMP
MANUAL SETTING
(Flow meter override)
11
Flow meter regulated
flow rate
12
Gas readings out to
WITS
15
GC INJECT TIMING
Units
Range
Factory
Setting
85
0-199
Liters
per
Hour
(LPH)
0
60
1
MIN
5-12
8
COMMENT
This register holds the external firmware code
version.
Register 5 and 6 work together to make an
unsigned integer which is the absolute number
of resets from the very first power up.
Register 5 and 6 work together to make an
unsigned integer which is the absolute number
of resets from the very first power up.
This turns on and off the patent pending
software feature set that allows the Bloodhound
to utilize the full range set of the sensors and
automatically calibrate and maintain itself
Normally set to 1 or on. Set to 0 for off.
If this register is not 85 then a routine is called
that will set the registers to factory levels. This
register tells the BH if it has ever been booted
before. On a first time startup, the BH sets all
255 registers to a factory default and then sets
Register 8 to 85.
This register is used to set the pump to a static
level in case the electronic flow meter fails. If
this is register is not zero then the BH takes this
number and forces the sample gas pump to stay
at this power level, typically 170 is a good
number to start with. If this register is set to 0
then the BH uses feedback from the electronic
flow meter to regulate the speed of the suction
pump.
Sets the flow in LPH, that the BH will regulate
to. The BH takes readings from the electronic
flow meter and regulates its sample gas pump
and flow rate. If this register is set to 255, the
sample gas motor is turned all the way on.
If this register is not 0 then the BH will send gas
readings to the WITS interface after a good
connection is made to the WITS interface using
the null packet. If this register is 0 the BH will not
send any gas readings out the WITS interface,
but will continue sending the null packet to keep
the connection going.
When this time expires, the BH will start another
chromatograph injection and cycle. Setting the
column temperature to a higher level will allow
for the separations to transfer through the
column at a faster pace which will allow the user
to reduce this injection timing but may lose the
C1 C2 separation.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 32
REG.
FUNCTION
Units
Range
Factory
Setting
16
Data Record Timing
SEC
6
18
GC MAX
INJECT TIME
SEC
5
22
GAS
READING DAMPING
(low range)
25
GEOLOGRAPH
DEBOUNCE TIMER
26
WITS OUTPUT GAS
UNITS DIVISOR
27
Last time clean power
down flag
SEC
1-120
5
1-120+
10
Either
1 or
100
100
1
COMMENT
Number of seconds between data records sent
to USB and SD card. This is the number of
seconds between storing the data packet to the
USB key storage device. If the USB drive is not
inserted or if there is a problem with the USB
drive then there will be no data stored in the
USB. The data is always sent to the SD card for
storage.
Maximum number of seconds to inject the
sample into the chromatograph column.
Typically set to 5 and should not be set greater
than 10. This timer is automatically adjusted on
the fly in order to keep from saturating the
column with sample gas and causing distortions
in the separations.
This register sets the low range damping
number. This is the number of samples that is
used in order to slow or speed up the response
curve of the gas units output. This also changes
the points to which the change over between the
low range and high range occurs. A larger
number will give an overall smaller absolute
number on the high range. A smaller number
will give an overall larger number on the high
range. Setting this register higher will make the
output more sluggish. Setting it lower will allow
for a faster response. Not the same as
averaging.
The geolograph switch input can sometimes be
noisy or needs a debounce in seconds. This
register sets up the number in seconds that the
switch has to be at rest before another contact
will be counted.
When sending total gas out to an EDR via
WITS, this will be the divisor for the gas units
value. i.e. a setting of 100 outputs gas units ÷
100 and a setting of 1 outputs gas units ÷ 1. Do
not set to 0. Pason expects gas in % and that is
why the 100 divisor is used. Totco/ Rigwatch
expects gas to be in “Gas Units 0-10,000” which
is why it needs to be set to 1 in their case.
If the last time it powered down was clean this
register will be zero. A clean power down is
where the power plug is pulled and the power
off button was hit. If the unit is going through a
reset, then this will be a 1.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 33
REG.
FUNCTION
Units
28
LO & HI gas detector
independence
29
Power down timer
MIN
30
GAS READING
ATTENUATION
%
32
Feet per geolograph
closer
Geolograph noise spike
count alarm level
FT
34
Foot tick chirp
milliseconds
36
HIGH GAS RANGE
ATTENUATION
37
High Amps Alarm on
12V Cavitator terminals
39
41
Low Amps Alarm
H2S sensor Defeat
33
Range
0 OR 1
Factory
Setting
0
120
1-200
100
1
180
0
30
Note:
60-sec
average
5
0-1
0-1
1
1
COMMENT
IR independence register : This register sets up
the way the high range and low range interact.
If this register is set to 0 then the IR ranges are
not independent and are joined This means
when the gas level reaches the end of the low
range it then goes to the high range IR sensor,
but it calculates out the high range sensor level
at the low level point. This attaches the high
point of the low range calibration to the low
point of the high range calibration to help
calculate the new response curve. If this
register is 1 then the IR sensors are
independent from each other. This means
when the gas level reaches the end of the low
range then it jumps to the high range where
ever it is at on the gas level concentration. This
usually shows up as abnormally large high
range gas units. The BH enters this mode and
cancels the dampening when in calibration
mode. Setting this register to 1 will basically
show the calibration points when the calibration
gas is injected.
This is the number of minutes before power
down when the AC power is lost.
This is a percentage of the calibrated output - It
has the same effect as air dilution. 100 = 100%
output, 50 = 50% output, and so on.
This is the number of feet incremented per
geolograph contact closure.
If there are noise spikes on the geolograph line
and the spike count is greater than this number
then the Bloodhound will alarm with a noisy
geolograph alarm. If set to 0 this alarm is
disabled.
Sets the time in milliseconds that the sonalert
will chirp when a foot is drilled. The larger the
number the longer and louder the chirp.
Same as register 30 but for the high range. Is
additive to register 30. Output = (adjusted low
range +
(corrected and adjusted high range x
(reg36/100) ) ) x (reg 30/100)
Set to 0 to disable alarm.
0 = off, 1 = activate alarm
0 = no data - off, 1 = on (firmware >= 170).
Every time the Bloodhound power is cycled this
register is reset to 0 to default to the “off”
position.
If Register 41 = 255 the H2S sensor will remain
on after a power cycle of the Bloodhound.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 34
REG.
FUNCTION
Units
Range
Factory
Setting
42
O2 Sensor Defeat
0-1
1
43
CO2 Sensor Defeat
0-1
1
45
ALARM MUTE TIMER
1-25
10
46
47
50
High internal temp level
low internal temp level
High sample flow alarm
setting
Low sample flow alarm
setting
High Vacuum level
alarm setting
High gas units alarm
level
51
52
53
54
Chromatograph low
pressure alarm setting
55
3G MODEM ON OR
OFF
H2S alarm level in parts
per million / 10
56
LPH
120
35
200
If this register is set to 0 then the O2
sensor is effectively off and will read
zero. Also the LCD screen will show
OFF instead of a percent number and the
WITS packet 1225 will not be sent out
the WITS interface.
If this register is set to 0 then the
CO2 sensor is effectively off and will
read zero, also the LCD screen will
show OFF instead of a percent number and
the WITS packet 1222 will not be sent
out the WITS interface
Mute timer in minutes. NOTE: not to exceed 25.
This is the number of seconds that the mute key
will mute the alarm tone.
High internal temp level usually set to 120 deg F
low internal temp level usually set to 35 deg F
Manual says "Normally set to 90"
LPH
20
Manual says "Normally set to 40"
mmHg
200
200 means -200 mmHg
22
High gas units alarm level / 100. This is the gas
units alarm level divided by 100. So if this is set
to 10 then the alarm level is 1000 gas units.
Set to 0 to turn off. Factory set at 22 (2200 gas
units)
When the chromatograph pressure falls below
10 times this level an alarm is set. Set to 0 to
disable. (70 = 700 mmHg)
1 - Internal modem is ON
0 - Internal modem is OFF
0 = off. IF the H2S is above this level then the
alarm will sound. The alarm is off, not the
sensor. Go to Reg 41 to shut off the sensor.
This sensor is divided by 10, thus 50 = 500 ppm.
1 = 10 ppm alarm levels.
If this register = 0 then the alarm relay will close
on all alarms. If this register = 1 then the alarm
relay will close on just the H2S alarm. This does
not effect the normal alarms.
MIN
mmHg
70
1
PPM
0-200
50
57
External alarm relay
control.
0 or 1
0
58
GC AVERAGING TO
ELIM NOISE FLOOR
debug messages
control
1-35
1
59
61
62
C1 timing window
before and after peak
time
C2 timing window
before and after peak
time
COMMENT
0
6
6
This will send debug messages over the given
port: 0 = debug messages off; 1 = PC PORT; 2
= WITS PORT; 3 = MODEM PORT; 4 = SB72
PORT; 5 = off; 6 = HRM PORT
C1 timing window before and after peak time
(vert line)
C2 timing window before and after peak time
(vert line)
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 35
REG.
63
64
65
66
FUNCTION
C3 timing window
before and after peak
time
IC4 timing window
before and after peak
time
NC4 timing window
before and after peak
time
Chromatograph noise
floor window
Units
Range
Factory
Setting
25
COMMENT
C3 timing window before and after peak time
(vert line)
35
IC4 timing window before and after peak time
(vert line)
40
NC4 timing window before and after peak time
(vert line)
20
(opt. value
is 5)
This is the size, in hundreds of microvolts, of the
noise window for the chromatograph. Typically
20 (= 2000 microvolts = 2 millivolts) on the
HRM03
0 = Send with Pason WITS handshake (note:
zero DOES work with Rigwatch & TOTCO)
1 = Send with no handshake (only for special
clients who want no handshake)
0 = Send as Gas Units
1 = Send as PPM
67
WITS data sending
mode
0
68
WITS C values sending
format
0
10. DATA INFORMATION, STORAGE AND TRANSMISSION
All information within the Bloodhound is stored or transmitted as a common text-based string or file. If a new
job number is entered through the computer panel or set remotely, the Bloodhound will rename the old file and
start a new file for the data to be stored under.
The data that is transmitted to the Internet or via the serial port by the Bloodhound is in simple ASCII human
readable packet form. The packet is broken into fields that are separated by commas. An example of the
main data packet that is transmitted is as follows:
*5727_0011,2013/12/15,10:14:44,12404.6,3703.08,13.52,0.00,100,93.7,0.746,80.393,6
0,-18,13.2,4.095,1.725,711,0.7114322,0.382,0.00,12
,21,100,121.5,60,0.0,97.4,1124,2688658,409.47,515.28,531.41,589.42,517.47,8,151.3,12313.1,1070,612.84,529.03,C205,
A Bloodhound Minimum Data Packet is always sent internally to the SD card and the USB memory stick, if
installed, for storage.
The Bloodhound will send other packets of information based on internal activity. If the user has other
equipment connected to the Bloodhound and is only interested in gas detection information then it should be
configured to ignore all other packets.
The simple checksum is the 8 bit rollover sum of all the ASCII characters starting with and including the ‘*’ and
ending with and including the ‘,’ preceding the checksum delineated item. The checksum delineated item will
always have a preceding capitol C before the ASCII number such as “C91”. The checksum will always be the
last item on the list.
All other packets that are generated from the Bloodhound start with other symbols and also end with a carriage
return and line feed.
If the packet starts with a “*” then it is the main Bloodhound data packet.
If the packet starts with a “^” then it is a WITS data packet information.
If the packet starts with a “@” then it is a Bloodhound minimum data only packet.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 36
The descriptions of the data packets are as follows.
A. Main Bloodhound Packet
The main data packet starts with an asterisk followed by the data fields separated by commas, and then the
packet is ended with a carriage return and line feed. All data output is ASCII text and can be seen using a
terminal program such as HyperTerminal. This packet is used by the gas charting software.
The Bloodhound packet fields are broken down in the following chart.
Field Description
Type
Value / Range
1
Header, holds SN/Job #
String Serial Number Underscore Job Number
2
Date
String YYYY/MM/DD Year Month Day separated by a “/”
3
Time
String HH:MM:SS 24 hour Minute Second separated by a “:”
4
Drill Depth
Float
Depth in feet up to 99999.9
5
Gas Units
Float
Gas units from 0 to 10000.0
6
O2 Percent
Float
0.0 to 100.0
7
CO2 Percent
Float
0.0 to 100.0
8
Attenuation
Float
0.0 to 200
9
Internal Temp
Float
-120.0 to +200.0
10
Drill Rate Min/Ft
Float
0.0 to 500.0
11
Drill Rate Ft/Hour
Float
0.0 to 1000.0
12
Sample Flow Rate
Float
0.0 to 400. LPH
13
Sample Vac Pressure
Float
+120.0 to –800.00 mmHg
14
Power Supply Volts
Float
0.0 to 24.0 VDC
15
Pri Methane DET VDC
Float
0.00000 to 4.09600 VDC
16
Sec Methane DET VDC
Float
0.00000 to 4.09600 VDC
17
Chromatograph Test #
UInt
0 to 65536
18
Chromatograph VDC
Float
0.00000 to 8.2000 VDC
19
H2S DET VDC
Float
0.00000 to 4.40000 VDC
20
H2S PPM
Float
0.00 to 500.00
21
ERROR NUM
String Error number (s) separated by spaces
22
Sample Motor % Power
UInt
0 – 200
23
RSSI Percent
UInt
0 – 100
24
AC voltage
Float
0.0 – 300.0
25
AC Freq
Float
0.0 – 200.0 Hz
26
Amps through DC port
Float
-15.0 to 15.0
27
HRM module temp
Float
-40 to 200.0
28
Chromatograph Press
Float
1500.0 to –1500.00 mmHg
29
Packet number
ULong 0 to 4,000,000,000
30
C1 Gas Units
Float
0.00 to 10000.00
31
C2 Gas Units
Float
0.00 to 10000.00
32
C3 Gas Units
Float
0.00 to 10000.00
33
IC4 Gas Units
Float
0.00 to 10000.00
34
NC4 Gas Units
Float
0.00 to 10000.00
35
Exhaust Pressure
Float
-200 to +800 (mmHg)
36
Column Temperature
Float
0.00 to 500.00
37
Lag Depth
Float
0 - 40000.0
38
HOBBS use in hours
Long
0 - 2,000,000,000
39
Iso Pentane
Float
0.00 - 10000.00
40
Normal Pentane
Float
0.00 - 10000.00
41
8 Bit Checksum
Byte
0 – 255
NOTES:
1> The packet number always increments by one as packets are sent. Packet numbers will roll over if greater
then 4 billion, or if greater than 2 billion and the job number is changed.
2> Chromatograph test number will roll over at 65536
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 37
3> The last comma delineated item is the simple checksum, it will always have a C preceding the ASCII 8 bit
number.
Bloodhound ERROR Number Codes In the Error Field
In the Bloodhound packet, one of the fields is for error (condition) number codes. This number(s) represents
the current condition or conditions and notification of instance that needs to take place such as a blocked
sample line. Below is a table that shows the currently transmitted conditions and the corresponding error
(condition) code number. More than one condition can be present, and if so, are separated by a space.
Condition
No Alarm
Blocked Sample Line
Detector High Voltage
Detector Voltage Low
Code
0
2
3
4
High Flow Rate
Low Flow Rate
Low Power Voltage
High Amps at Cavitator Conn.
5
6
7
9
High Temperature in Case
Low Temperature in Case
High Gas Units
10
11
12
HRM Warming Up
Unit In Shutdown Mode
Geolograph Switch Noise
13
14
15
CG Low Pressure
16
High H2S Reading
17
Exhaust Blocked (high ex prs)
Low DC port amps
Service is reqired
Flooded
Flood override
18
19
20
21
22
Overhaul
255
Associated Bloodhound Register Setting
Reg 52: factory setting 200 (means –200 mmHg)
No register setting - Automatic from HRM
No register setting - Automatic from HRM (if Primary &
Secondary voltage = 0.010 detector is inoperable
due to flooding)
Reg 50: factory setting 200 LPH
Reg 51: factory setting 20 LPH
Set at 11.1 VDC No register setting (AC power lost)
Reg 37: factory setting 5 (60-sec average)
Set to 0 to disable
Reg 46: factory setting 120 degrees F
Reg 47: factory setting 35 degrees F
Reg 53: factory setting 22 (means 2200 units)
Set to 0 to disable
Unit is warming up
No register settings
Reg 33: factory setting 180 spikes
Set to 0 to disable
Reg 54: factory setting 70 (means 700 mmHg)
Set to 0 to disable
Reg 56: factory setting 50
Can set from 0 to 200
Set to 0 to disable alarm. To disable data stream set
reg 41 to 0.
Set to 50 mmHg - No register setting
If the Cavitator is disconnected
The Bloodhound will require service
The water detector has detected water in the inlet
Water has entered the system and service technicians
have overridden the warning
Permanent electronics failure, service required
B. WITS Data Fields Packet
The Bloodhound collects and monitors the WITS data that is available while during the drilling process.
The Bloodhound then collects all WITS data and builds a packet. It then sends the formed packet to the host
server. All packets start with common fields and the collected WITS packets are appended to it. The end of
the packet is terminated with a carriage return and line feed.
WITS Packet Example:
^,0008_0107,2008/04/20,13:11:13,189092,01082000.4,01102000.4,0112294.1,01130.0,01
15303.9,01177.9,011911.7,012069.3,01213301.7,01220.2,0123110.8,012477.6,012596.0,0126669.0,0127-3.0,012840.0,
0130396.7,0137213292.0,014011.0,0142584285.1,01436334.5,0144206959.0,01450.0,0150
584285.1,
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 38
1
2
3
4
5
6–X
^
Serial_Job
Year/Month/Date
Hour:Minute:Seconds
Packet Number
WITS Packets
String
String
String
String
Long
String
Start Packet Character
Packet identifier
Date
Time
Same as the Main Bloodhound Packet number
See WITS Packet Structure Below
The WITS packet structure is formed by a semi fixed string structure. All points of information are separated
by commas. Each point starts with 4 characters that represent a field data identifier followed by an ASCII float
value. The number”01102000.4” would mean WITS packet type 0110 and the value would be 2000.4.
Packet type 0110 is hole depth and 2000.4 would be the depth in feet. The number of packets that are sent
depends on the type of system the Bloodhound is connected to and how the system is set up.
A list of known WITS data types are as follows:
1736 Nitrogen Rate
0824 Gamma
0108 Bit Depth
1815 Nitrogen Pressure In
0829 Porosity 1 Lag Calc
0110 Hole Depth
1816 UBD Flow Pressure
0831 Porosity 1
0111 True Vert Depth
1817 UBD Flow Temp
0832 Porosity 2 Lag Calc
0112 Block Height
1818 Down Hole Pressure 1
0834 Porosity 2
0113 On Bottom ROP F/H
1819 Down Hole Temp
0839 FormationDenLagCalc
0114 Hook Load
1820 Condensate Out
0841 Formation Density
0115 Hook Load
1821 Hydrocarbon Flow
0913 Downhole Pressure
0116 Weight On Bit
1826 H2S
1108 Hole Depth
0117 Weight On Bit
1827 Nitrogen Volume In
1110 Total Mud Volume
0118 Rotary Torque
1828 Total Gas Return
1111 Total Mud Volume
0119 Rotary Torque
1829 Nitrogen Volume Out
1115 Mud Tank Volume 1
0120 Rotary RPM
1830 Water Out
1116 Mud Tank Volume 2
0121 Standpipe Pressure
1831 Water Nozzle
1117 Mud Tank Volume 3
0122 Casing Pressure
1984 System Info
1118 Mud Tank Volume 4
0123 Pump 1 Strokes Per Min
6310 Magnetic Toolface
1119 Mud Tank Volume 5
0124 Pump 2 Strokes Per Min
6311 Gravity Toolface
1120 Mud Tank Volume 6
0125 Pump 3 Strokes Per Min
6339 Magnetic Toolface
1121 Mud Tank Volume 7
0126 Total Mud Volume
6340 Gravity Toolface
1122 Mud Tank Volume 8
0127 PVTTotal Mud Gain/Loss
1129 Trip Tank Mud Volume
0128 Flow
1212 Methane C1
0130 Total Pump Output
1213 Ethane C2
0137 Total Strokes Sum
1214 Propane C3
0139 WITS Lag Calc
1215 Iso Butane IC4
0140 WITS Gas
1216 Normal Butane NC4
0141 H2S
1217 Iso Pentane IC5
0142 TotalPumpDisplacement
1218 Normal Pentane NC5
0143 Pump 1 Total Strokes
1219 Neo Pentane NC5
0144 Pump 2 Total Strokes
1220 Iso Hexane IC6
0145 Pump 3 Total Strokes
1221 Normal Hexane NC6
0150 TotalPumpDisplacement
1222 Carbon Dioxide CO2
0408 Bit Depth
1223 Acetylene
0410 Hole Depth
1225 Oxygen O2
0414 Standpipe Pressure
1226 Gas Specific Gravity
0713 Inclination
1705 Cement Date
0715 Azimuth
1706 Cement Time
0716 Magnetic Toolface
1712 Cement Pump Pressure
0717 Gravity Toolface
1716 Cement Slurry Rate
0722 Toolface Threshold
1719 Slurry Density
0813 Resistivity 1 Lag Calc
1724 Event Number
0816 Resistivity 1
1728 Cement Stage Volume
0817 Resistivity 2 Lag Calc
1734 Cement Water Rate
0820 Resistivity 2
1735 Annulus Pressure
0821 Gamma Lag Calc
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 39
C. Bloodhound Data Sent Out to Electronic Drilling Recorder (EDR) via WITS
The Bloodhound is set up to send a packet out to the EDR via WITS every 6 seconds. This is done through
either the 9 pin male serial connector at 9600 baud (8N1) or through the Pason 10 pin military style connector.
If Register 67 is zero, a Pason Handshake is sent. If Register 12 is not zero then the Bloodhound will attempt
to send total gas to the WITS interface after a good connection is made to the WITS interface using the null
packet. If Register 12 is is zero the Bloodhound will not send the gas readings out the WITS interface - all it
will do is send the null packet to keep the connection going.
The packets the Bloodhound sends out to WITS, in order, are:
0140 –Total Gas (if Register 12 is not zero). The Total Gas value sent is divided by the number in Register 26.
1212 – C1
if Register 68 is 0, sent as Gas Units. If Register 68 is 1, sent as parts per million (PPM).
1213 – C2
if Register 68 is 0, sent as Gas Units. If Register 68 is 1, sent as parts per million (PPM).
1214 – C3
if Register 68 is 0, sent as Gas Units. If Register 68 is 1, sent as parts per million (PPM).
1215 – iC4
if Register 68 is 0, sent as Gas Units. If Register 68 is 1, sent as parts per million (PPM).
1216 – nC4
if Register 68 is 0, sent as Gas Units. If Register 68 is 1, sent as parts per million (PPM).
1217 – IC5
if Register 68 is 0, sent as Gas Units. If Register 68 is 1, sent as parts per million (PPM).
1218 – NC5
if Register 68 is 0, sent as Gas Units. If Register 68 is 1, sent as parts per million (PPM).
1222 – CO2
1225 – O2
1826 – H2S
0138 – Lag Strokes (if PC connected)
0139 – Lag Depth (If PC connected)
Following is a sample transmission from the Bloodhound out to WITS:
&&
01400.0000
12120.00
12130.00
12140.00
12150.00
12160.00
12170.00
12180.00
12220.00
122520.92
18260.00
0138280
013914832
!!
The Bloodhound rs422 Pason interface specifications overview
In order to communicate to the Pason Electronic Drilling Recorder (EDR) system without the hassle of any
external hardware, iBall has incorporated a Pason RS422 connection interface into the Bloodhound. This
allows for direct connection to the Pason EDR system to obtain duplex WITS communication.
Generally, no user intervention is necessary on the Bloodhound to access the Pason WITS information when
using this connection. After connecting the 10 pin round military type cabling to the Bloodhound from the
Pason EDR system, the Bloodhound automatically establishes communicates to the Pason system and starts
acquiring and sending WITS data.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 40
NOTE: On sites with a Pason EDR system, just because the Pason cable can fit into a connector found on the
site does not mean that the connection will work. Pason advises to always connect the Bloodhound to the
Toolpush Connection Panel on the outside of the Rig Manager’s trailer, or, if that is not present, then to the
Toolpush Computer itself via one of the cables attached to it. (In the event that Pason does not have
somewhere to mount the Toolpush Connection Panel, they leave cables extending outside of the Rig
Manager’s trailer with the RS422 connectors accessible. In that case, they are simply cable ends, so are not
labelled.) Always connecting to the Toolpush Connection Panel or the Toolpush Computer will ensure that the
proper connection is made and the TPC will not require any configuration change to receive WITS.
Communication Hardware
The Bloodhound system has integrated an improved and electrically isolated RS-422 interface that directly
connects to the Pason EDR system utilizing the common Pason 10 pin interface cabling system.
Improvements include the addition of input current limiting resistors, over/under voltage protection diodes,
isolated grounding, and a 500 volt electrical isolation barrier between the external interface and the internal
electronics.
Communication Specifics
American national standard ANSI/TIA/EIA-422-B (formerly RS-422) and its international equivalent ITU-T
Recommendation V.11 (also known as X.27), are technical standards that specify the "electrical characteristics
of the balanced voltage digital interface circuit". It provides for data transmission, using balanced or differential
signaling, with unidirectional/non-reversible, generally resistively balanced and terminated transmission lines,
point to point, or multi-drop communication systems. In contrast to EIA-485 (which is multi-point instead of
multi-drop), EIA-422/V.11 does not allow multiple drivers but only multiple receivers. Pason only uses the
interface as a point to point wiring system between a central communications hub and a distal communications
device.
The current title of the ANSI standard is “TIA-422 Electrical Characteristics of Balanced Voltage Differential
Interface Circuits” and is now in revision B, published in May 1994, and was reaffirmed by the
Telecommunications Industry Association in 2005.
Several key advantages offered by this standard include a differential receiver, a differential driver, and with
correct load balancing, data rates as high as 10 mega baud at 12 meters (40 ft). Several key disadvantages
with the Pason implementation of the RS-422 interface is, high cost of the physical cabling, the absence of any
electrical isolation between nodes and the central communications point, inducted noise accumulated from
parallel high voltage power lines, and the physical damage to the cabling caused by heavy equipment and
common rig ground traffic.
EIA-422 (RS-422) only specifies the electrical signaling characteristics of a single balanced signal. Protocols
and pin assignments are defined in other specifications. The mechanical connections for this interface are
specified by EIA-530 (DB-25 connector) or EIA-449 (DC-37 connector), however common minimal devices
exist which have 4 screw-posts to implement the transmit and receive pair only.
When used in relation to communications wiring, RS-422 wiring refers to cable made of 2 sets of twisted pair,
often with each pair being shielded, and a ground wire. While a double pair cable such as common telephone
cabling may be practical for many RS-422 applications, the RS-422 specification only defines one signal path
and does not assign any function to it.
The Pason RS-422 interface for external devices uses a 10 pin round military connector with 4 pins and 4
conductors called out and a common ground pin between the proximal and distal connections. Electrical
isolation is not present at the proximal end but is expected to have minimal over, under and electrical spike
protection only and is not hardened to current proposed lightning electrical models. This probably is the
reason behind the high number of electrical interface failures and dead ports after lightning strike scenarios.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 41
Using the common and specified 0-5VDC bi-directional electrical methods, the maximum practical cable length
is 1200 meters with no minimal length. With proper cable twist and shielding, maximum data rates are 10
Mbit/s at 12 m or 100 kbit/s at 1200 meters. Even though EIA-422 and EIA-485 share the same electrical
interface hardware, the EIA-422 communications standard cannot implement a truly multi-point
communications network, however one driver can be connected to up to ten receivers when the load is
properly balanced. This is due to the fact that the communications protocol for EIA-485 contains device
addresses where the protocol for EIA-422 does not.
A common use of EIA-422 is for RS-232 extenders. Pason, in effect, uses the EIA-422 interface, as a RS-232
serial device extender for all devices wishing to utilize the WITS information system.
According to Pason EDR Version 3.0+, when Pason RS-422 WITS interface is connected to distal equipment
the proximal Pason equipment is generally set to AUTO. In this mode, the distal equipment is required to set
up the communications baud rate, and serial data parameters to the Pason WITS system using the required
WITS null packet.
This is done by the distal equipment (Bloodhound) sending the WITS packet 0111 as a null:
NOTE: The WITS packet 0111 sent as a null is known as a null packet.
Example:
&&[CR]
0111-9999[CR]
!![CR]
Where [CR] is a carriage return ASCII character
This packet is sent repeatedly to the proximal Pason system. When this occurs, and the distal equipment is
connected to an EDR port that has not been damaged from a prior lightning event, the cabling is intact and
connected at both ends, and there is no inducted noise due to close proximity high voltage power lines, the
proximal port is supposed to change from AUTO to the baud rate, bit count, parity, and stop bits at which the
distal equipment is transmitting.
At that time the distal equipment can maintain the connection to the proximal Pason system by changing from
a null packet to general WITS packet information such as gas units or lag information. If the distal equipment
does not want to send the proximal Pason system WITS information, the distal system can maintain the
connection and reception of WITS information by continuing to send the null packet.
Currently, the Bloodhound system expects to communicate to the Pason EDR system at 9600 baud, 8 data
bits, 1 stop bit with no parity. This can be changed remotely by IBall Instruments technicians.
D. Bloodhound Minimum Data Packet
The Bloodhound has a second type of data packet. This packet is used to make the storage of data into
smaller files so that the files will take less time to transmit. The minimum packet is always the packet stored
on the SD card and the USB memory stick.
Bloodhound minimum packet example.
@,080420,111341,187955,2001.6,2001.6,8.09,20.89,0.60,11.347,1809,1.240,0,123.6,46
.3,23,12,1004,18,10,
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
The @ character
Year/Month/Date
Hour:Minute:Seconds
Packet Number
Drill Depth
Bit Depth
Gas Units
String
String
String
ULong
Float
Float
Float
Start of packet character
Date
Time
0 – 4 Billion
0.0 – 60,000.00
0.0 – 60,000.00
0.0 – 10,000.00
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 42
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
O2 Percent
CO2 Percent
Drill Rate Min/Ft
CG Test Number
CG Volts
H2S PPM
Gamma
Total Strokes Per Minute
Weight On Bit
Rotary RPM
Pipe Pressure
Inclination
Azimuth
Float
Float
Float
Uint
Float
Float
Float
Float
Float
Float
Float
Float
Float
0.0 – 100.00
0.0 – 100.00
0.0 – 500.00
0 – 65536
0 – 8.2000
0 – 1,000,000
0 – 1,000,000
0 – 500
0 – 1,000,000
0 – 500
0 – 1,000,000
0 – 360
0 – 360
11. EXPLANATION OF FILES GENERATED BY THE BLOODHOUND
A. BH_LAS.LAS File
The Bloodhound generates an LAS file that is stored locally in the internal SD card and to the external USB
memory stick if compatible and inserted. If there is not a USB memory stick inserted, the data will be stored
only on the internal SD card. A LAS record is stored every time a foot is drilled. This allows the operator to
walk up to the Bloodhound and insert a USB key and download the LAS data. If the bit is pulled and the same
depth drilled more than once, the depth will show up more than once.
The LAS data is saved as a comma-delimited text file. In order, the data items are:
 Drill depth (NOT LAGGED)
 Drill rate min/ft
 Gas units
 C1
 C2
 C3
 IC4
 NC4
 Gas units
 Gamma
 O2
 CO2
 H2S
 Inclination
 Azimuth
 Year / Month / Date
 Hours : Minutes : Seconds
Example of LAS data for two feet:
2000,3.292,38.73,1.8,3.5,6.2,8.5,9.1,38.73,0.0,0.0,0.95,0,0.0,0.0,08/04/19,09:47:
59,
2001,2.367,49.42,2.1,2.7,5.3,8.4,9.0,49.42,300.3,20.7,0.90,0,210.0,65.0,08/04/19,
09:50:26,
This information is easily imported into any logging program that allows for import of LAS data.
B. BH_DATA.IBD File
The second data file that can be downloaded from the Bloodhound equipment is the .IBD (iBall Data) file. It is
a comma-delimited file that contains a packet of data from every 6 seconds of operation, rather from each foot.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 43
In order, the data items are:




















@ Symbol to show the start of the packet
Year / Month / Date
Hours : Minutes : Seconds
Packet number
Drill depth (NOT LAGGED)
Bit depth
Gas units
O2
CO2
Drill rate minutes per foot
Chromatograph test number
chromatograph voltage
H2S ppm
Gamma
Total strokes per minute
Weight on bit
Rotary RPM
Pipe Pressure
Inclination
Azimuth
Example for two packets (6 seconds apart):
@,080419,095224,187005,2001.6,2001.6,2.47,20.98,0.68,2.367,1,0.859,0,300.3,276,8,
69,3302,210,65,
@,080419,095230,187006,2001.6,2001.6,2.86,20.97,0.66,2.367,1,0.859,0,300.3,276,8,
69,3302,210,65,
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 44
12. BLOODHOUND TROUBLESHOOTING TIPS
Problem
How do I turn off the
alarm horn?
High Temperature
Alarm triggered
Need to set static IP
address on Ethernet
connection
BH not connecting to
internet
Need to set up 3G
(cell) data service
3G connection issues
Troubleshooting Tip
If there is an alarm condition, the Brain Board will display the problem. This alarm is
accompanied with an audible alarm tone. To mute the alarm tone, press the
Enter/Mute key. This will place the alarm in a muted state for ten (10) minutes (600
seconds). Pressing the Enter/Mute key a second time defeats the audible alarm
and the rolling display at the bottom right of the Bloodhound display screen will
show ALARM OFF. Pressing the Enter/Mute key a third time will display “ALARM
ON”. Hitting the Enter/Mute key does not turn off any alarms but rather mutes the horn
for a given amount of time. If ALARM OFF is selected, the horn will not sound.
Unblock the cooling air intake (on end) or exhaust (on bottom) or replace clogged air
filter
First connect your Bloodhound to the local LAN. On the USB key there is a program
called Bloodhound_IP_Setup.exe. After running this on a computer that is also
connected to the LAN, you should see in the right panel, a Netburner
number. Highlight this and click on launch webpage. From the webpage, at the top,
click on static instead of DHCP and include the IP address.
Internal BH Netburner card must be set to 115200 baud, and not have the same IP
setting as the external NetburnerEX (if present)
In order for the 3G modem to operate, there a configuration procedure that must be
implemented: 1. An operational SIM (Subscriber ID Module) card must be inserted into
the 3G modem correctly. (The SIM card must have 3G connectivity activated through
the subscription service.); 2. The Bloodhound has to set up the 3G modem according
to the subscription service. After an activated SIM card is inserted into the 3G modem,
setting Register 55 to the correct value and then setting Register 123 will tell the
Bloodhound to set up the 3G modem to the user’s subscription carrier. (See detailed
descriptions of Register 55 and Register 123 settings in Manual Appendix B.) A
discussion of methods of setting registers is included in Manual Section 9. To set up
the Bloodhound system for a subscription carrier, first set Register 55 to the
appropriate number from the list below. 1 - Cingular/New ATT system (default, most
popular); 2 - Old ATT system "PROXY"; 3 - Old ATT system "INTERNET"; 4 - Old ATT
system "PUBLIC"; 5 - T-Mobile; 6 - Cellular One. After setting register 55, set Register
123 to 1. This will tell the Bloodhound that you have set Register 55, and that it is to
take the selection and set up the modem for the user’s cellular carrier. (After the
Bloodhound is finished configuring the 3G modem, it will then reset Register 123 back
to 0.) The user can then monitor the connection using the lower right hand corner of
the LCD screen. It is important to watch for the RSSI, CN and NC messages. The
RSSI stands for Received Signal Strength Indicator and goes from 0 to 100%. When
using the 3G modem, CN indicates a current connection to the server and NC
indicates no connection. VERY IMPORTANT! Check the registry settings at 114
through 117 for the proper IP address and 118 and 119 for the proper port numbers
associated with that Bloodhound serial number.
If the Bloodhound LCD says “MODEM NONE” there is a physical fault that keeps the
brain board from talking to the modem. This could be as easy as a loose cable or an
actual hardware fault with the modem or brain board. Normally it should say “MODEM
NC xxx” or MODEM CN xxx”. NC means there is no connection to the iBall Data
Center Server and CN means connected to the iBall Data Center Server.
The RSSI is the signal strength of the closest tower, which is not necessarily the right
carrier. Therefore, if the RSSI says 50%, it will not guarantee a good connection, but it
does indicate that the 3G modem is operational.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 45
Move the antenna a foot over. This has fixed many connection problems.
Move the antenna higher. A higher antenna will reach out further. A change in one
foot of height can increase the distance it can travel over a mile. A small move from
the top of the trailer to the top of the AC compressor may do the trick.
If there is more than one radio antenna in the area, move them as far apart as
physically possible. At least 6 feet of separation is good, but 12 feet would be ideal. If
the antennas are too close together, one or both may not operate or be intermittent.
That is because they are screaming into each other’s ears and can not hear the tower.
This includes small laptop 3G antennas and 802.11 (WI-FI) antennas. All cellular
equipment has automatic power reduction systems. If a similar close-by system is
screaming in its ear, it will reduce its own power as much as possible (thinking it is
close to a tower) and will therefore fail to connect to the tower.
Ground Plane: Make sure that the antenna has a good ground plane. This can be any
grounded metal plate that the antenna is connected to. This actually helps in setting
up the standing wave that the antenna generates, and has the effect of boosting the
signal. If the user has a magnetic mount antenna, a 12” x 12” steel plate should be
used; the larger the better. The aluminum rooftops of trailers provide a good ground
plane, but some form of ferrous (iron-containing) material is required to stabilize the
magnetic base. An empty metal wire spool will work wonders. Placing the antenna on
a fiberglass rooftop is not helpful.
Running the antenna out a window is perfectly fine, until the window is
slammed/closed onto the cable. This will crush the outer shield into/through the
dielectric insulation and result in the center conductor shorting out the antenna or
affecting its transmission ability. The antenna cables are thin and cheaply constructed.
The shorting of the coax can burn out a booster amplifier as well, doubling the
problem. A rule of thumb is this “if the antenna cable must be run through a window, it
must be held in place, not forced in place. This coax should be handled and installed
as if it were a glass fiber.
3G connection issues
(con’t)
Check for an antenna grounding fault. If the antenna cable goes through the trailer
wall, check for a ground fault. To do this, disconnect the antenna from the Bloodhound
and place an AC voleter between the antenna ground and the Bloodhound antenna
ground. There should be very little voltage difference. If there is any real voltage
difference between the two, a grounding fault exists and must be repaired. Ideally, the
ground of the antenna should be at the same potential as the Bloodhound antenna
ground. Excessive AC voltage will cause damage to the modem and/or the brain
board.
Typically, if the user can talk on a cell phone when looking at the Bloodhound, a
booster will not be required. If equipped with a booster, remove or change out the
booster. This will eliminate the booster as a possible problem.
Add a 3 watt booster in the antenna path. This can stretch the distance to over 25
miles with a good 3db gain omni-directional antenna. A Yagi antenna can improve
transmission and reception greater than 25 miles. A booster should NEVER be
powered up without an antenna connected, otherwise damage will result to the
booster. Replace the antenna and adapter and/or booster.
Open the Bloodhound case. Watch the modem (upper left) for a few minutes in the
Bloodhound. The lights should shut off when the NC timer reaches close to zero. If the
modem does not power down and then back up, it can not reestablish a fresh
connection to the tower. If the modem does not power down and then back up, there
is a physical fault with the brain board, and it needs repair.
On the modem there is a green light. If the light keeps blinking and never goes solid,
then the modem is unable to sync to a tower for communications. You most likely
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 46
have an antenna problem.
Remove the SIM card, place it into a cell phone and see if there is connectivity or 3G
data, or make a phone call if it has a voice subscription. This will also have the effect of
reseating the SIM card when it is reinstalled back into the modem.
Replace the SIM card with a known good one and test. On rare occasion, these go
bad too. Keep in mind that the modem is set up for a specific carrier. Placing an ATT
SIM card into a modem that was configured for CELLULAR ONE will not work.
Most Bloodhound hardware modem failures can be traced to an electrical storm or
local lightning strike event.
To enable the serial USB connection between the computer and the Bloodhound, the
user must load the serial USB driver program. It is imperative that the USB serial
driver be loaded into the computer before plugging in the USB serial cable to the
Bloodhound. If the USB serial cable is already connected, remove the USB cable
and then install the serial port driver.
The driver can be found at
www.iballinst.com/ftp/usbkey or on the USB key installed in the front panel of the
Bloodhound. After loading the serial USB driver software, connect the USB cable to
the computer, then start the Gas Chart program. The program will search the serial
ports and connect to the Bloodhound.
If this is not successful, check in the computer’s Control Panel / Add or Remove
Programs list for SILICON LABORATORIES CP210x DRIVERS and remove all
instances of them. Then, with the BH USB cord disconnected, run the the driver install
program from the BH flash drive. After the driver install, plug in the BH USB cord and
start Gas Chart. The program will search the serial ports and connect to the
Bloodhound.
If still not successful, check what comm port the BH has been assigned to, as follows:
(For Windows XP computers)
Gas Chart running on
adjacent computer
cannot find
Bloodhound through
USB serial cord
connection









Right click on “Start” in the lower left corner of the screen. This will open a small
Options Menu
Left click on “Explore.” This will open the Start Menu
Right click on “My Computer” in the Start Menu. This will open a small Options
Menu
Right click on “Properties”
Left Click on Tab that reads “Hardware”
Left Click on button reading “Device Manager”
Scroll down to “Comm Ports”
Double click on “Comm Ports”
Look for “CP2101” and record the Comm Port number that appears.
Note: if the Comm Port assigned to CP2101 is great than “20” then the CP2101 driver
must be re-assigned to a number within the range of Com Ports 1 through 9. The
procedure for reassignment follows:
Re-assigning the Bloodhound connection Com Port:
(For Windows XP computers)



Right click on “Start” in the lower left corner of the screen. This will open a small
Options Menu
Left click on “Explore.” This will open the Start Menu
Right click on “My Computer” in the Start Menu. This will open a small Options
Menu
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 47












Right click on “Properties”
Left Click on Tab that reads “Hardware”
Left Click on button reading “Device Manager”
Scroll down to “Comm Ports”
Double click on “Comm Ports”
Right Click on “CP2101” if the Comm Port assigned is greater than 20
Click on “Properties”
Click on “Port Settings Tab”
Click on “Advanced Button” at bottom
From the Advanced Settings for Comm X Window
At the bottom in the Comm Port Number field, click the Down Arrow
Select a Comm Port between 5 and 20, then click “OK”
Note: Select a Comm Port in this field that that you know is not assigned to another
USB device, even if the Comm Port is marked as “in-use.”
Connect an Ethernet cable from the BH to a router that can assign an IP Address, or to
a switch or hub behind a router that can assign an IP Address. Connect an ethernet
cable from the local computer to the same device. The router can be connected to the
internet or not, it doesn’t matter.
Gas Chart running on
adjacent computer
cannot find
Bloodhound through
Ethernet Connection
Pason Blue Cable
connector not
working
Not receiving data
from WITS
Not getting WITS info
into BH on drillsite
with Autodrill EDR
Total Gas readings
not going out to WITS
Pason Total Gas
reading is 100 times
higher than
Bloodhound says
Want C1, C2 etc.
values to go out to
WITS as PPM.
Look on the front of the Bloodhound panel. Locate the LCD and observe the scrolling
information on the lower right hand corner. An IP and PORT address will scroll by and
appear i.e. 192.168.1.100:23. This is the IP and PORT number that the Bloodhound
has been assigned to by the Gateway or Router.
Start the Gas Chart Program. When the Gas Chart Program is running and chart
appears on the screen, right click on the chart to bring up the “Gas Chart Control Box.”
Click on “Setup” then Click on “Bloodhound” tab. Enter the Local IP PORT number
obtained from the Bloodhound Display into the Local Ethernet or Internet Settings box,
and Check the box labeled “Use Ethernet Instead Of Serial Connection.”
The Gas Chart program will now connect to the Bloodhound using the Ethernet
connection.
Just because the Pason cable can fit into a connector found on the site does not mean
that the connection will work. Pason advises to always connect the Bloodhound to the
Toolpush Connection Panel on the outside of the Rig Manager’s trailer, or, if that is not
present, then to the Toolpush Computer itself via one of the cables attached to it. (In
the event that Pason does not have somewhere to mount the Toolpush Connection
Panel, they leave cables extending outside of the Rig Manager’s trailer with the RS422
connectors accessible. In that case, they are simply cable ends, so are not labeled.)
Check Register 67. 0 = Communicate to WITS with the Pason handshake (note: zero
DOES work with Rigwatch & TOTCO). 1 = Send with no handshake.
For Autodrill, external NetburnerEX serial port 0 has to be set to 9600 baud 8N1
Check Register 12. If this register is 0 the BH will not send the Total Gas out the WITS
interface. If this register is not 0 then the BH will attempt to send total gas to the WITS
interface.
Set Register 26 to 100. When sending total gas out to a WITS system, Register 26 will
be the divisor for the gas units. i.e., 100 = gas units / 100. i.e., 1 = gas units / 1. Do
not set this register to 0. The Pason system has a tendency to report gas units 100x
the value received from the instrument.
Set Register 68 to 1. 0 = Send as Gas Units; 1 = Send as PPM
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 48
This is due to an electrical or mechanical problem which may need adjusents to
remove. Register 25 is the debounce register. Adjusting it will eliminate the multiple
bouncing of the microswitch within reason. There are two sources as to excess depth
counts.
Mechanical Contact Bounce: when the arm of the geolograph contacts or releases
the switch, the switch moves into the open or closed mode. When it does, the contacts
bounce on and off inside the switch itself. Register 25 will eliminate these multiple
strikes if even set to 1 second, because contact bounce lasts only milliseconds.
Mechanical Switch Bounce: if the mechanical geolograph arm is constantly
bouncing up and down due to wind, chatter, or a faulty or loose mechanism, it can
cause multiple hits on the microswitch. Register 25 can be set to a higher number,
such as 60 seconds or more, to counter this problem. Another way to counter this
problem is to use a depth wheel from US Geosupply with one of our corrective PC
boards in it. This device connects to the geolograph cable and counts depth in only
one direction.
Geolograph hookup
not working right
Electrical Induced Noise: when the geolograph cable is placed over large power
lines, especially when in the same power conduit running under roadways, a single
twisted pair cable will have induced noise on it. Sometimes this noise can reach as
high as 80 volts AC. The Bloodhound system uses an electrically isolated geolograph
input in order to protect the Bloodhound system from this induced voltage, but it can
not cancel the noise on the geolograph line. In this case the Bloodhound will usually
give a noisy geolograph alarm.
Electrical Ground Potential Noise: when the trailer holding the Bloodhound is at a
great ground potential relative to the drilling rig, an induced DC reference can be
generated on the geolograph line. In both cases, to eliminate the noise, try the
following steps:
 If you are not running CAT 5E cable for the geolograph, go get some.
 Run CAT 5E Network Cable. This cable has a high twist to it which helps eliminate
the induced noise.
 Run CAT 5E Shielded Network Cable. This cable has an additional conductive
shield that helps eliminate induced noise.
 There are 8 conductors in CAT 5E. You are probably using 2 for the geolograph
cable. Strip back the other 6 and the shield wire, if it has a shield, tie them all
together and connect them to the black 12VDC screw terminal power lead on the
same side of the Bloodhound. This will reference the geolograph line to the
Bloodhound ground reference and eliminate the noise. Do not connect the far end
of the 6 cables and or shield wire to anything. (If you do so, you do not have a
shield, you just have another ground line and that will not help you.)

Span adjusent
unsuccessful
If you are using a 2 conductor wire, strip back and tie a small piece of wire from the
black geolograph terminal to the black 12VDC power lead. At least you will have a
common ground reference in the case of induced noise.
When adjusting the zero and span on a particular gas, always adjust the zero first,
then the span. Adjusting the span first and then zero will throw off the span adjusent.
This sensor was included as a differential monitor as to the amount of methane in the
sample. If user observes 5% of methane then the O2 should change about 1% no
matter where it is presently.
Oxgen sensor drifts
It is very sensitive to back pressure, and is sensitive to chemicals that may be
encountered in the drilling process. One of the most reactive is acetylene which may
be generated using carbide for a lag check. Acetylene may knock the oxygen sensor
out for up to 20 minutes. Because of these cross reactions, it is not immune to drift
and should be adjusted to 21% periodically to air. To do this just disconnect the
sample line for a few of minutes and adjust to 21%.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 49
“Fuming” mud which is emitting gases other than normally seen may cause the O2 to
appear to drift as well, when in reality it is reacting to the loss of O2 that the fumes have
replaced. Keep in mind where the sample is being taken from.
There are four (4) registers that affect the way the high range automatically adjusts
itself. In adjusting these registers, the user can mimic any type of system currently in
use.
REGISTER 22 – Low Range Gas Reading Damping
This register sets the low range damping number. This is the number of samples that
is used in order to slow or speed up the response curve of the gas units output. This
also changes the points to which the changeover between the low range and high
range occurs. A larger number will give an overall smaller absolute number on the
high range. A smaller number will give an overall larger number on the high range.
Setting this register higher will make the output more sluggish. Setting it lower will
allow for a faster response. Not the same as averaging. Normally between 5 and 120,
maximum is 120. Factory setting is 5.
High Range Gas
reads too high
REGISTER 28 - IR Independence Register
This register sets up the way the high range and low range interact. If this register is
set to zero then the IR ranges are not independent and are joined. This means when
the gas level reaches the end of the low range it goes to the high range IR sensor, but
it calculates out the high range sensor level at the low level point. This attaches the
high point of the low range calibration to the low point of the high range calibration to
help calculate the new response curve. Normally 0.
If this register is 1 then the IR sensors are independent from each other. This means
when the gas level reaches the end of the low range it jumps to the high range where
ever it is at on the gas level concentration. This usually shows up as abnormally large
high range gas units. The Bloodhound enters this mode (and cancels damping) when
in calibration mode. Setting this register to 1 will show the calibration points when the
calibration gas is injected. Normally 0.
REGISTER 30 – Attenuation
This is the Attenuation described in detail above. This is a percentage of the calibrated
output - it has the same effect as air dilution. 50 = 50% output, 100 = 100% output, up
to 200 %. Factory setting is 100. A setting of about 30 may result in a similar output to
old hot wire instruments.
USB memory stick
not working
Can see peaks on
the chromatogram,
but they are not being
quantified (especially
at low Total Gas
levels)
REGISTER 36 – Hi Range Attenuation
Same as Register 30, but for the high range only. Is additive to register 30.
Factory setting = 30.
Plug it into the Bloodhound upper USB port only; the lower port is not active. When
inserting a USB memory stick, it may take up to 60 seconds for the Bloodhound to
recognize it.
Try setting Register 66 (factory setting is 20) down to 10 or 5.
Most likely cause is some kind of Antenna (Bloodhound, cell phone, wireless
router, etc.) too close to BH. Move antennas as far as possible from the BH.
Total Gas Reading is
Noisy
Noise can be induced through Pason Cable or Power cable or Antenna cable or a
combination of these, or through the BH case.
Remove each cable until noise gone. Also try connecting Cavitator power neg (black
screw terminal) to rig chassis ground, making chassis common to rig chassis ground.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 50
If noise still present, re-attach cables and wrap unit in tin foil, leave fan openings open.
If still noisy, rent vehicle and run Bloodhound from rented vehicle away from platform.
There are three items on the Real Time Data screen of Gas Chart that tell the user
about the flow properties. These 3 things are have a relational operation to each other.
Vac - tells the user how much vacuum is being pulled on the sample line. If it is a high
negative number then there is a high vacuum, if it is a very low negative number then
there is no draw on the line. If above -200 the Bloodhound will turn the sample motor
off (see % motor power) until the occlusion in the line is cleared. The pump has the
ability to pull up to -600 mmHg on the line, but is programmed to not let it get that high
because if there is not a good flow in the line at -200 mmHG then something is
blocking the line so it is limited to -200.
Percent Motor Power - This tells the user how much energy the Bloodhound is giving
the sample motor. A higher number means a higher voltage is being sent to the
sample motor. Typically if below 100, there should not be any problems; if above 100
the motor may be going out or there is an occlusion building in the line. 200% (12 volts
DC) is maximum. If allowed to build up to 200, the motor % power will cycle back to 0
% power to give the motor a rest and cool off as it starts to build again. Sometimes
this will allow the motor to restart if it is marginal. Generally a higher power will draw a
higher vacuum on the line and a higher flow rate (LPH). A lower power will reduce the
vacuum and flow rate.
Sample Flow Rate
Troubleshooting
LPH (liters per hour) flow - The flowmeter in the unit monitors the flow through the
system. The Bloodhound will change the motor power up and down until a flow rate of
55 to 645 LPH is obtained . If the line starts to get plugged up, the power to the motor
is increased to maintain the flow. This results in a higher vacuum. If the line is
disconnected from the Bloodhound the vacuum will drop to almost zero, and the flow
rate will increase until the motor power is once again adjusted to compensate for the
pressure change.
If the pump motor is bad, as the power increases, the motor does not turn, the vac and
flow are low, and when the power reaches 200, it cycles back down to 0 and tries
again. This can be tested momentarily by connecting a clean piece of tubing to the
inlet port and blowing into it. If the flow meter shows a flow briefly, then the motor is
not running.
If the pump is bad, there would be no vacuum on the inlet port and the vacuum and
flow would be low or missing.
If the flowmeter is bad, you would see the vacuum build up and then suddenly drop as
the percent motor increased and then dropped to cycle again. To overcome a bad
flowmeter, set Register 10 to something like 80. This will set the pump to a static
power setting and bypass the flow meter. This allows the Bloodhound to finish the job.
When Register 10 is set to a motor power percent number (1 to 199), the sample motor
is on a constant setting and the flowmeter may change but the power to the motor will
not. In addition, the flow rate alarms are defeated. Since flow rate does not effect the
sensors, this setting is ok for finishing a job.
If the vacuum sensor is bad, you would see good flow and percent motor but an odd
vacuum. This can be tested by placing a finger over the inlet. If the vacuum suddenly
increases the sensor is ok, if not then the vacuum sensor is bad.
One interesting thing is when there is a lot of water built up in the line you will see the
flow/vac/power cycle up and down as the water allows for air to burp in the line.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 51
If Pri and Sec Volts = 0.010, instrument has been flooded - return to iBall, or try:
Sucked Water Into
Instrument
Note: There is no guarantee this procedure will work, so start working on your
Plan B now. Turn off the instrument and disconnect the sample tubing from the
instrument. Remove 4 screws holding instrument cover and lift cover towards you.
Replace sample line filter located inside left front of instrument with a new filter.
Replace cover and power up instrument. Set Register 10 to 199. This runs the
sample pump at full power, which may help dry out the instrument’s internals. If you
have a drying tube (Drierite or equivalent), connect it to the sample intake port to predry the air entering the instrument. Write down the current Chromatograph Column
temperature and set the Chromatograph Column temperature to 190 degrees. This
will help dry out the column. After an hour running under these conditions, reset the
Column temperature to what it was before and set Register 10 to 0, which sets the
sample pump to automatic operation. Zero the Total Gas reading and test the
instrument with test gas or a butane lighter.
Copyright 2014 Carl Bright Inc. All Rights Reserved
Page 52