Samsung AlphaPC 164UX Product specifications

AlphaPC 164UX/BX Motherboard
Technical Reference Manual
Preliminary
Notice
The information in this publication has been carefully checked and is believed to be entirely accurate at the time of publication.
Samsung assumes no responsibility, however, for possible errors or omissions, or for any consequences resulting from the use
of the information contained herein.
Samsung reserves the right to make changes in its products or product specifications with the intent to improve function or
design at any time and without notice and is not required to update this documentation to reflect such changes.
This publication does not convey to a purchaser of semiconductor devices described herein any license under the patent rights of
Samsung or others.
AlphaPC 164UX/BX Motherboard
Technical Reference Manual
©1998 Samsung Electronics
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by
any means, electric or mechanical, by photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written consent of Samsung
Electronics.
Samsung and Samsung logo are trademarks of Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.
Alpha, Digital Semiconductor are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation.
FaxBACK and Intel are registered trademarks of Intel Corporation.
GRAFOIL is a registered trademark of Union Carbide Corporation.
Microsoft, MS-DOS, Windows, and Windows 95 are registered trademarks and Windows NT is a trademark of Microsoft
Corporation.
Dallas is a registered trademark of Dallas Semiconductor Corporation.
Q is a registered trademark of Quality Semiconductor,Inc.
SYMBIOS is a registered trademark of Symbios,Inc.
AMD is a registered trademark of Advanced Micro Devices,Inc.
SMC is a registered trademark of Standard Microsystems Corporation.
All other trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
San #24 Nongseo-ri, Kiheung-eup
Yongin-city, Kyungki-do, Korea
449-900
FAX : 82-331-209-4492
TEL : 82-331-209-3282
Printed in the Republic of Korea
Contents
Preface
1
Introduction to the AlphaPC 164UX Motherboard
1.1
1.1.1
1.1.2
1.1.3
1.1.4
1.1.5
1.1.6
1.2
1.2.1
1.3
2
System Components and Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digital Semiconductor 21174 Core Logic Chip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Memory Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
L3 Bcache Subsystem Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Interface Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ISA Interface Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Miscellaneous Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Software Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ARCSBIOS Windows NT Firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware Design Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1–1
1–3
1–3
1–5
1–6
1–6
1–6
1–7
1–7
1–7
System Configuration and Connectors
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.5.1
2.5.2
2.5.3
2.5.4
2.5.5
2.5.6
2.5.7
2.5.8
2.5.9
AlphaPC 164UX Jumper Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPU Speed Selection (Option 1,2,3,&4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bcache Size Jumpers (Option 14,15) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Boot Option Jumper (Option 11) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AlphaPC 164UX Connector Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Bus Connector Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ISA Expansion Bus Connector Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SDRAM DIMM Connector Pinouts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EIDE Drive Bus Connector Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diskette Drive Bus Connector Pinouts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parallel Bus Connector Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
COM1/COM2 Serial Line Connector Pinouts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keyboard/Mouse Connector Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Input Power Connector Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2–3
2–5
2–5
2–5
2–5
2–5
2–8
2–9
2–10
2–11
2–11
2–12
2–12
2–13
iii
2.5.10
2.5.11
2.5.12
2.5.13
2.5.14
2.5.15
2.5.16
2.5.17
2.5.18
2.5.19
3
AlphaPC 164UX Bcache Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digital Semiconductor 21174 Core Logic Chip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21174 Chip Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Main Memory Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System-IO (SIO) Chip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ethernet LAN Controller Chip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI-Ultra SCSI (Fast-20) I/O Processor Chip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Expansion Slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ISA Bus Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Combination Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
XD Bus Device. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ISA Expansion Slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ISA I/O Address Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flash ROM Address Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Clocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reset and Initialization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DC Power Distribution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3–2
3–2
3–3
3–4
3–4
3–6
3–6
3–7
3–8
3–8
3–9
3–10
3–10
3–10
3–10
3–11
3–15
3–17
3–18
Upgrading the AlphaPC 164UX
4.1
4.2
4.2.1
4.2.2
4.2.3
4.2.4
iv
2–13
2–14
2–14
2–15
2–15
2–15
2–16
2–16
2–16
2–16
Functional Description
3.1
3.2
3.2.1
3.2.2
3.2.3
3.2.4
3.2.5
3.2.6
3.2.7
3.3
3.3.1
3.3.2
3.3.3
3.3.4
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
4
Narrow SCSI Bus Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fast and Wide SCSI Bus Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10/100 Mbit Ethernet Connector Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Speaker Connector Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Microprocessor Fan Power Connector Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pin Power LED Connector Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IDE Drive LED Connector Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reset Switch Connector Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Soft Power Connector Pinouts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSI LED Connector Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Upgrading SDRAM Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Increasing Microprocessor Speed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preparatory Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Required Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the 21164 Microprocessor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the 21164 Microprocessor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4–1
4–1
4–2
4–2
4–2
4–3
5
Power and Environmental Requirements
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.3.1
5.3.2
5.3.3
5.3.4
A
5–1
5–1
5–2
5–2
5–3
5–4
5–5
System Address Space
A.1
A.2
A.3
A.3.1
A.4
A.4.1
A.5
A.6
A.7
A.7.1
A.7.2
A.8
A.8.1
A.8.2
A.9
A.10
A.11
A.12
A.13
A.14
A.15
A.15.1
A.15.2
A.16
A.16.1
A.16.2
B
Power Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Environmental Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Physical Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Board Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Board Measurements and Hole Locations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Board Vertical Clearance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ATX I/O Shield Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Address Space. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21164 Address Space. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Address Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21164 Byte/Word PCI Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21164 Size Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cacheable Memory Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Dense Memory Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Sparse Memory Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware Extension Register (HAE_MEM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Memory Access Rules and Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Sparse I/O Space. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware Extension Register (HAE_IO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Sparse I/O Space Access Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Configuration Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Special/Interrupt Cycles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware-Specific and Miscellaneous Register Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI to Physical Memory Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Direct-Mapped Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scatter-Gather Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scatter-Gather TLB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scatter-Gather TLB Hit Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scatter-Gather TLB Miss Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Suggested Use of a PCI Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peripheral Component Architecture Compatibility Addressing and Holes . . .
Memory Chip Select Signal mem_cs_l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A–1
A–6
A–7
A–10
A–12
A–14
A–15
A–15
A–17
A–18
A–18
A–23
A–23
A–23
A–26
A–31
A–31
A–32
A–37
A–38
A–40
A–42
A–42
A–44
A–45
A–45
Supporting Products
B.1
B.2
B.3
Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Thermal Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B–1
B–3
B–3
v
B.4
C
Support, Products, and Documentation
Index
vi
Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B–4
Figures
1–1
2–1
2–2
3–1
3–2
3–3
3–4
3–5
3–6
3–7
3–8
4–1
5–1
5–2
5–3
A–1
A–2
A–3
A–4
A–5
A–6
A–7
A–8
A–9
A–10
A–11
A–12
A–13
A–14
A–15
A–16
A–17
A–18
A–19
A–20
A–21
A–22
A–23
A–24
vii
AlphaPC 164UX Functional Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AlphaPC 164UX Jumper/Connector Location. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AlphaPC 164UX Configuration Jumpers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AlphaPC 164UX L3 Bcache Array . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Main Memory Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AlphaPC 164UX PCI Bus Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AlphaPC 164UX ISA Bus Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interrupt Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AlphaPC 164UX System Clocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Reset and Initialization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AlphaPC 164UX Power Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fan/Heat-Sink Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Board measurement and Hole Position Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Board Vertical Clearance Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ATX I/O Shield Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address Space Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Memory Remapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21164 Address Space Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21164 and DMA Read and Write Transactions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Address Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21174 CSR Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Byte/Word PCI Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dense-Space Address Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Memory Sparse-Space Address Generation – Region 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Memory Sparse-Space Address Generation – Region 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Memory Sparse-Space Address Generation – Region 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Sparse I/O Space Address Translation (Region A, Lower 32MB) . . . . . . . . .
PCI Sparse I/O Space Address Translation (Region B, Higher Area) . . . . . . . . .
PCI Configuration Space Definition (Sparse) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Configuration Space Definition (Dense). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Bus Hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI DMA Addressing Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Target Window Compare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scatter-Gather PTE Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scatter-Gather Associative TLB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scatter-Gather Map Translation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Default PCI Window Allocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
mem_cs_l Decode Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
mem_cs_l Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1–2
2–2
2–4
3–2
3–3
3–5
3–8
3–12
3–16
3–17
3–19
4–4
5–3
5–4
5–5
A–5
A–6
A–8
A–9
A–11
A–12
A–13
A–17
A–21
A–22
A–22
A–25
A–25
A–27
A–27
A–30
A–35
A–36
A–39
A–41
A–43
A–44
A–46
A–47
UXTables
1–1
2–1
2–2
2–3
2–4
2–5
2–6
2–7
2–8
2–9
2–10
2–11
2–12
2–13
2–14
2–15
2–16
2–17
2–18
2–19
2–20
3–1
3–2
3–3
5–1
5–2
A–1
A–2
A–3
A–4
A–5
A–6
A–7
A–8
A–9
A–10
A–11
A–12
A–13
A–14
A–15
B–1
B–2
B–3
B–4
B–5
AlphaPC 164UX SDRAM Memory Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AlphaPC 164UX Jumper/Connector List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Bus Connector Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ISA Expansion Bus Connector Pinouts (J10) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SDRAM DIMM Connector Pinouts (U3 through U8) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EIDE Drive Bus Connector Pinouts (J24) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diskette (Floppy) Drive Bus Connector Pinouts (J33) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parallel Bus Connector Pinouts (J13) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
COM1/COM2 Serial Line Connector Pinouts (J12) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keyboard/Mouse Connector Pinouts (J25) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Input Power Connector Pinouts (J18) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Narrow SCSI Bus Connector (J16) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fast and Wide SCSI Bus Connector Pinouts(J15)) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10/100 Mbit Ethernet Connector Pinouts (J34). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Speaker Connector Pinouts (J23). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Microprocessor Fan Power Connector Pinouts (J35) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power LED Connector Pinouts (J31) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IDE Drive LED Connector Pinouts (J29). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reset Switch Connector Pinouts (J37) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Soft Power Switch Connector Pinouts (J36) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSI LED Connector Pinouts (J17) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ISA I/O Address Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AlphaPC 164UX System Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ISA Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Supply DC Current Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AlphaPC 164UX Motherboard Environmental Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Physical Address Map (Byte/Word Mode Disabled) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Physical Address Map (Byte/Word Mode Enabled) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21164 Byte/Word Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21164 Byte/Word Translation Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Int4_valid and 21164 Address Relationship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Memory Sparse-Space Read/Write Encodings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Address Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Sparse I/O Space Read/Write Encodings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPU Address to IDSEL Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Configuration Space Read/Write Encodings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware and Miscellaneous Address Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Target Window Mask Register Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Direct-Mapped PCI Target Address Translation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scatter-Gather Mapped PCI Target Address Translation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCI Window Power-Up Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Samsung DIMM Part Number List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VisionTek DIMM Part Number List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viking Components DIMM Part Number List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
QesTec DIMM Part Number List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dense-Pac Microsystems DIMM Part Number List. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1–3
2–3
2–5
2–8
2–9
2–10
2–11
2–11
2–12
2–12
2–13
2–13
2–14
2–14
2–15
2–15
2–15
2–16
2–16
2–16
2–16
3–10
3–13
3–14
5–1
5–2
A–1
A–2
A–14
A–14
A–19
A–20
A–21
A–24
A–28
A–29
A–31
A–33
A–37
A–39
A–45
B–1
B–2
B–2
B–2
B–3
viii
Preface
Overview
This manual describes the DIGITAL AlphaPC 164UX/BX motherboard, a module
for computing systems based on the Samsung Alpha 21164 microprocessor and the
Digital Semiconductor 21174 core logic chip.
N
Difference between AlphaPC 164UX and 164BX
•
AlphaPC 164UX motherboard has the Ethernet LAN Controller and Ultra Wide
SCSI Controller which are not on AlphaPC 164BX motherboard.
•
The size of AlphaPC 164BX motherboard’s L3 cache is 2MB.
•
The size of AlphaPC 164UX motherboard’s L3 cache is 2MB or 4MB.
•
Except the above, AlphaPC 164UX motherboard and 164BX motherboard are
the same.
•
The following sections are about AlphaPC 164UX motherboard only.
Audience
This manual is intended for system designers and others who use the AlphaPC
164UX motherboard to design or evaluate computer systems based on the Samsung
Alpha 21164 microprocessor and the Digital Semiconductor 21174 core logic chip.
Scope
This manual describes the features, configuration, functional operation, and interfaces of the AlphaPC 164UX motherboard. This manual does not include specific
bus specifications (for example, PCI or ISA buses). Additional information is available in the AlphaPC 164UX schematics, program source files, and the appropriate
vendor and IEEE specifications. See Appendix C for information on how to order
related documentation and obtain additional technical support.
ix
Manual Organization
As outlined on the next page, this manual includes the following chapters, appendixes, and an index.
x
•
Chapter 1, Introduction to the AlphaPC 164UX motherboard, is an overview of
the AlphaPC 164UX motherboard, including its components, features, and uses.
•
Chapter 2, System Configuration and Connectors, describes the user-environment configuration, board connectors and functions, and jumper functions. It
also identifies jumper and connector locations.
•
Chapter 3, Functional Description, provides a functional description of the
AlphaPC 164UX motherboard, including the 21174 core logic chip, L3 backup
cache (Bcache) and memory subsystems, system interrupts, clock and power
subsystems, and peripheral component interconnect (PCI) and Industry Standard
Architecture (ISA) devices.
•
Chapter 4, Configuring the ARCSBIOS for Windows NT, describes the ARCSBIOS and gives instruction to begin the installation of Windows NT
•
Chapter 5, Upgrading the AlphaPC 164UX, describes how to upgrade the
AlphaPC 164UX motherboard’s DRAM memory and microprocessor speed.
•
Chapter 6, Troubleshooting, describes information about trouble shooting hardware and software during AlphaPC 164UX startup.
•
Chapter 7, Power and Environmental Requirements, describes the AlphaPC
164UX power and environmental requirements and provides board dimensions.
•
Appendix A, System Address Space, describes the mapping of the 40-bit processor
address space into memory and I/O space addresses. It also lists the physical PCI
address spaces and regions, including the 21174 operating registers and PCI/ISA
device registers.
•
Appendix B, Supporting Products, lists sources for components and accessories
not included with the AlphaPC 164UX motherboard.
•
Appendix C, Support, Products, and Documentation, describes how to obtain
Samsung Alpha information and technical support, and how to order Samsung
Semiconductor products and associated literature.
Conventions
This section defines product-specific terminology, abbreviations, and other conventions used throughout this manual.
Abbreviations
•
Register Access
The following list describes the register bit and field abbreviations:
Bit/Field Abbreviation Description
RO (read only)
RW (read/write)
WO (write only)
•
Bits and fields specified as RO can be read but not written.
Bits and fields specified as RW can be read and written.
Bits and fields specified as WO can be written but not read.
Binary Multiples
The abbreviations K, M, and G (kilo, mega, and giga) represent binary multiples
and have the following values.
K
M
G
=
=
=
210 (1024)
220 (1,048,576)
230 (1,073,741,824)
For example:
2KB
4MB
8GB
=
=
=
2 kilobytes
=
4 megabytes =
8 gigabytes =
2 × 210 bytes
4 × 220 bytes
8 × 230 bytes
Addresses
Unless otherwise noted, all addresses and offsets are hexadecimal.
Bit Notation
Multiple-bit fields can include contiguous and noncontiguous bits contained in angle
brackets (< >). Multiple contiguous bits are indicated by a pair of numbers separated
by a colon (:). For example, <9:7,5,2:0> specifies bits 9,8,7,5,2,1, and 0. Similarly,
single bits are frequently indicated with angle brackets. For example, <27> specifies
bit 27.
xi
Caution
Cautions indicate potential damage to equipment, software, or data.
Data Field Size
The term INTnn, where nn is one of 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, or 64, refers to a data field of
nn contiguous NATURALLY ALIGNED bytes. For example, INT4 refers to a
NATURALLY ALIGNED longword.
Data Units
The following data-unit terminology is used throughout this manual.
Term
Words
Bytes
Bits
Other
Byte
Word
Longword/Dword
Quadword
Octaword
Hexword
½
1
2
4
8
16
1
2
4
8
16
32
8
16
32
64
128
256
—
—
Longword
2 Longwords
2 Quadwords
2 Octawords
Note
Notes emphasize particularly important information.
Numbering
All numbers are decimal or hexadecimal unless otherwise indicated. The prefix 0x
indicates a hexadecimal number. For example, 19 is decimal, but 0x19 and 0x19A
are hexadecimal (also see Addresses). Otherwise, the base is indicated by a subscript; for example, 1002 is a binary number.
Ranges and Extents
Ranges are specified by a pair of numbers separated by two periods (..) and are inclusive. For example, a range of integers 0..4 includes the integers 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4.
Extents are specified by a pair of numbers in angle brackets (< >) separated by a
colon (:) and are inclusive. Bit fields are often specified as extents. For example, bits
<7:3> specifies bits 7, 6, 5, 4, and 3.
Register and Memory Figures
Register figures have bit and field position numbering starting at the right (low order)
and increasing to the left (high order).
xii
Memory figures have addresses starting at the top and increasing toward the bottom.
Schematic References
Logic schematics are included in the AlphaPC 164UX design package. In this manual, references to schematic pages are printed in italics. For example, the following
specifies schematic page 26:
“. . . the ethernet controller (pc164ux.26) provide . . .”
Signal Names
All signal names are printed in boldface type. Signal names that originate in an
industry-standard specification, such as PCI or IDE, are printed in the case as found
in the specification (usually uppercase). Active-low signals have a pound sign “*”
appended, or a “not” overscore bar. Signals with no suffix are considered highasserted signals. For example, signals pdata<127:0> is active-high signals. Signals
*CPURESET is active-low signals.
UNPREDICTABLE and UNDEFINED
Throughout this manual the terms UNPREDICTABLE and UNDEFINED are used.
Their meanings are quite different and must be carefully distinguished.
In particular, only privileged software (that is, software running in kernel mode)
can trigger UNDEFINED operations. Unprivileged software cannot trigger UNDEFINED operations. However, either privileged or unprivileged software can trigger
UNPREDICTABLE results or occurrences.
UNPREDICTABLE results or occurrences do not disrupt the basic operation of the
processor. The processor continues to execute instructions in its normal manner. In
contrast, UNDEFINED operations can halt the processor or cause it to lose information.
The terms UNPREDICTABLE and UNDEFINED can be further described as follows:
•
UNPREDICTABLE
–
Results or occurrences specified as UNPREDICTABLE might vary
from moment to moment, implementation to implementation, and
instruction to instruction within implementations. Software can never
depend on results specified as UNPREDICTABLE.
–
An UNPREDICTABLE result might acquire an arbitrary value that is
subject to a few constraints. Such a result might be an arbitrary function of the input operands or of any state information that
xiii
is accessible to the process in its current access mode. UNPREDICTABLE results may be unchanged from their previous values.
Operations that produce UNPREDICTABLE results might also produce exceptions.
–
An occurrence specified as UNPREDICTABLE may or may not happen based on an arbitrary choice function. The choice function is
subject to the same constraints as are UNPREDICTABLE results and
must not constitute a security hole.
Specifically, UNPREDICTABLE results must not depend upon, or be
a function of, the contents of memory locations or registers that are
inaccessible to the current process in the current access mode.
Also, operations that might produce UNPREDICTABLE results must
not write or modify the contents of memory locations or registers to
which the current process in the current access mode does not have
access. They must also not halt or hang the system or any of its components.
For example, a security hole would exist if some UNPREDICTABLE
result depended on the value of a register in another process, on the
contents of processor temporary registers left behind by some previously running process, or on a sequence of actions of different processes.
•
xiv
UNDEFINED
–
Operations specified as UNDEFINED can vary from moment to
moment, implementation to implementation, and instruction to
instruction within implementations. The operation can vary in effect
from nothing, to stopping system operation.
–
UNDEFINED operations can halt the processor or cause it to lose
information. However, UNDEFINED operations must not cause the
processor to hang, that is, reach an unhalted state from which there is
no transition to a normal state in which the machine executes instructions. Only privileged software (that is, software running in kernel
mode) can trigger UNDEFINED operations.
1
Introduction to the AlphaPC 164UX
Motherboard
This chapter provides an overview of AlphaPC 164UX motherboard, including its
components, features, and uses. The motherboard is a module for computing systems
based on the Digital Semiconductor 21174 core logic chip.
The AlphaPC 164UX provides a single-board hardware and software development
platform for the design, integration, and analysis of supporting logic and subsystems.
The board also provides a platform for PCI I/O device hardware and software development.
1.1 System Components and Features
The AlphaPC 164UX is implemented in industry-standard parts and uses a Samsung
Alpha 21164 microprocessor running at 400,433,466,500,533,600,633,and 667MHz.
Figure 1-1 shows the board’s functional components.
Introduction to the AlphaPC 164UX Motherboard
1–1
System Components and Features
Figure 1–1 AlphaPC 164UX Functional Block Diagram
18
Index
Control
Alpha 21164
Microprocessor
2/4MB L3
Bcache
Tag Data
12
Pdata
128
Pecc
16
128-Bit Data
Data Switches
(X5)
168-Pin
Unbuffered
Control
Address
36
SDRAM
DIMM
Sockets
(X6)
DECchip 21174-CA
Control, I/O Interface,
and Address
Commands
Address/Control
Primary PCI Bus
Flash ROM
PCI-to-PCI
Bridge
PCI-to-ISA
Bridge
Ethernet
Controller
1 Dedicated 64-Bit PCI Slot
1 Dedicated ISA Slot
4 Devices
Secondary PCI Bus
SCSI
Controller
SROM
Combination
Controller
Buffer
5 Dedicated 32-Bit PCI Slots
Real Time
Clock
1–2
KBD
Controller
Introduction to the AlphaPC 164UX Motherboard
Diskette
Parallel Port
2 Serial Ports
System Components and Features
1.1.1 Digital Semiconductor 21174 Core Logic Chip
The Alpha 21164 microprocessor is supported by the 21174 core logic chip, which
provides an interface between three units—memory, the PCI bus, and the 21164.
This core logic chip is the interface between the 21164 microprocessor, main memory (addressing and control), and the PCI bus.
Five Data switches provide the memory interface data path.
The 21174 includes the majority of functions necessary to develop a high-performance PC or workstation, requiring minimum discrete logic on the module. It provides flexible and generic functions to allow its use in a wide range of systems.
1.1.2 Memory Subsystem
The synchronous dynamic random-access memory (SDRAM) is contained in three
banks of dual inline memory modules (DIMMs). Single- or double-sided DIMMs
may be used. Each DIMM is 72 bits wide, with 64 data bits and 8 check bits, with
100 MHz or faster speed. Two DIMMs provide 32Mb to 512MB of memory, while
six DIMMs provide up to 1536MB. Table 1–1 lists the DIMM sizes tested
Table 1–1 AlphaPC 164UX SDRAM Memory Configurations
Bank 0
Bank 1
Total
Memory
U3
U4
32MB
16MB
16MB
64MB
16MB
16MB
32MB
32MB
16MB
96MB
128MB
160MB
192MB
(Sheet 1 of 3)
Bank 2
U5
U6
16MB
16MB
16MB
16MB
16MB
32MB
32MB
16MB
16MB
32MB
32MB
16MB
16MB
32MB
32MB
32MB
32MB
64MB
64MB
32MB
32MB
32MB
32MB
64MB
64MB
16MB
16MB
32MB
32MB
32MB
32MB
64MB
64MB
16MB
16MB
U7
U8
16MB
16MB
16MB
16MB
16MB
16MB
32MB
32MB
Introduction to the AlphaPC 164UX Motherboard
1–3
System Components and Features
Table 1–1 AlphaPC 164UX SDRAM Memory Configurations
Bank 1
Bank 2
Total
Memory
U3
U4
U5
U6
192MB
64MB
64MB
32MB
32MB
224MB
64MB
64MB
32MB
256MB
64MB
64MB
64MB
64MB
128MB
128MB
288MB
128MB
320MB
U7
U8
32MB
16MB
16MB
32MB
32MB
32MB
32MB
64MB
64MB
128MB
16MB
16MB
64MB
64MB
64MB
64MB
32MB
32MB
128MB
128MB
16MB
16MB
16MB
16MB
128MB
128MB
32MB
32MB
352MB
128MB
128MB
32MB
32MB
16MB
16MB
384MB
64MB
64MB
64MB
64MB
64MB
64MB
128MB
128MB
32MB
32MB
32MB
32MB
128MB
128MB
64MB
64MB
416MB
128MB
128MB
64MB
64MB
16MB
16MB
448MB
128MB
128MB
64MB
64MB
32MB
32MB
512MB
128MB
128MB
64MB
64MB
64MB
64MB
128MB
128MB
128MB
128MB
256MB
256MB
128MB
128MB
128MB
128MB
16MB
16MB
256MB
256MB
16MB
16MB
128MB
128MB
128MB
128MB
32MB
32MB
256MB
256MB
16MB
16MB
16MB
16MB
256MB
256MB
32MB
32MB
608MB
256MB
256MB
32MB
32MB
16MB
16MB
640MB
128MB
128MB
128MB
128MB
64MB
64MB
544MB
576MB
1–4
Bank 0
(Sheet 2 of 3)
Introduction to the AlphaPC 164UX Motherboard
System Components and Features
Table 1–1 AlphaPC 164UX SDRAM Memory Configurations
Total
Memory
Bank 0
Bank 1
(Sheet 3 of 3)
Bank 2
U3
U4
U5
U6
U7
U8
256MB
256MB
32MB
32MB
32MB
32MB
256MB
256MB
64MB
64MB
672MB
256MB
256MB
64MB
64MB
16MB
16MB
704MB
256MB
256MB
64MB
64MB
32MB
32MB
768MB
128MB
128MB
128MB
128MB
128MB
128MB
256MB
256MB
64MB
64MB
64MB
64MB
256MB
256MB
128MB
128MB
800MB
256MB
256MB
128MB
128MB
16MB
16MB
832MB
256MB
256MB
128MB
128MB
32MB
32MB
896MB
256MB
256MB
128MB
128MB
64MB
64MB
1024MB
256MB
256MB
128MB
128MB
128MB
128MB
256MB
256MB
256MB
256MB
1056MB
256MB
256MB
256MB
256MB
16MB
16MB
1088MB
256MB
256MB
256MB
256MB
32MB
32MB
1152MB
256MB
256MB
256MB
256MB
64MB
64MB
1280MB
256MB
256MB
256MB
256MB
128MB
128MB
1536MB
256MB
256MB
256MB
256MB
256MB
256MB
Note : The following are important items to remember
- in order for the ECC memory feature to work, all DIMMs must be 72bit.
- To populate a bank,you must use 2 matched DIMMs.
1.1.3 L3 Bcache Subsystem Overview
The AlphaPC 164UX board-level L3 backup cache (Bcache) is a 2MB, directmapped, synchronous SRAM with a 128-bit data path. The board is capable of handling an L3 cache size of 4MB. See Section 2.3 for more information about the
Bcache.
Introduction to the AlphaPC 164UX Motherboard
1–5
System Components and Features
1.1.4 PCI Interface Overview
The AlphaPC 164UX PCI interface is the main I/O bus for the majority of functions
(SCSI interface, graphics accelerator, and so on). The PCI interface has a 33-MHz
data transfer rate. An onboard PCI-to-ISA bridge is provided through an Intel
82371SB (SIO) chip.An onboard PCI-to-PCI bridge is provided through an DEC
21052 chip.The AlphaPC 164UX includes advanced features,Such as :six PCI
slots;on-board Ultra-Wide SCSI; on-board 10/100 Mbs Ethernet.
1.1.5 ISA Interface Overview
The ISA bus provides the following system support functions:
•
One expansion slots.
•
An SMC FDC37C666 combination controller chip that provides:
–
A diskette controller.
–
Two universal asynchronous receiver-transmitters (UARTs) with full
modem control.
–
A bidirectional parallel port.
•
A mouse and keyboard controller.
•
Real Time Clock.
1.1.6 Miscellaneous Logic
The AlphaPC 164UX contains the following miscellaneous components:
•
1–6
Synthesizer for clocks:
–
A clock synthesizer (TQ2061) provides a programmable clock source from
300MHz to 800MHz to the 21164 microprocessor. The microprocessor
supplies a clock to the system PLL/clock buffer for the 21174.
–
The 21174 core logic chip provides the SDRAM and PCI clocks.
–
24MHz clock generator provide a clock source for the FDC37C666 ISA
device controller. The controller’s onchip generator then provides other
clocks as needed.
•
AMD PALLV22V1015 and PALCE16V8H programmable logic devices (PLDs)
for PCI bus arbitration.
•
Altera EPM7032-7 for DMA boundary issue.
Introduction to the AlphaPC 164UX Motherboard
Software Support
•
AMD PALLV22V1015JC for clock controller.
1.2 Software Support
The support elements described in this section are either included with the
AlphaPC 164UX or are available separately.
1.2.1 ARCSBIOS Windows NT Firmware
The AlphaPC 164UX motherboard ships with ARCSBIOS firmware and online documentation that describes how to configure the firmware for Windows NT. This firmware
initializes the system and enables you to install and boot the Windows NT operating
system. The ARCSBIOS firmware resides in the flash ROM on the AlphaPC 164UX
motherboard. Binary images of the ARCSBIOS firmware are included in the Firmware
update diskette, along with a license describing the terms for use and distribution.
1.3 Hardware Design Support
The full design database, including schematics and source files, is supplied. User
documentation is also included. The database allows designers with no previous
Alpha architecture experience to successfully develop a working Alpha system with
minimal assistance.
Introduction to the AlphaPC 164UX Motherboard
1–7
2
System Configuration and Connectors
This chapter describes the AlphaPC 164UX configuration, board connectors and
functions, and jumper functions. It also identifies jumper and connector locations.
The AlphaPC 164UX uses jumpers to implement configuration parameters such as
system speed and boot parameters. These jumpers must be configured for the user’s
environment. Onboard connectors are provided for the I/O interfaces, DIMMs, and
serial and parallel peripheral ports.
Figure 2–1 shows the board outlines and identifies the location of jumpers, connectors, and major components. Table 2–1 lists and defines these items.
System Configuration and Connectors
2–1
Figure 2–1 AlphaPC 164UX Jumper/Connector Location
J33
J24
J10
J22
Blk Yellow Red
wire
wire wire
J21
J16
J7
GND
+12
FOK
J15
J6
J28
J5
J2
J30
J36
J29
J23
J37
J31
J17
J34
U55
J12
J25
J35
J13
Pwr LED
IDE LED
Pwr
Switch
Reset
Switch
SCSI LED
U8
2–2
U7
System Configuration and Connectors
U6
U5
U4
U3
J18
AlphaPC 164UX Jumper Configuration
Table 2–1 AlphaPC 164UX Jumper/Connector List
Item
No.
J2
J5
J6
J7
J10
J12
J13
J15
J16
J17
J18
J21
J22
J23
J24
J25
J28
J29
J30
J31
J33
J34
J35
J36
J37
Description
Full length 64 bit PCI slot
Half length 32 bit PCI slot
Full length 32 bit PCI slot
Full length 32 bit PCI slot
Full length ISA slot
Serial Port connector
Parallel port connector
Ultra Fast and Wide SCSI Connector
Narrow SCSI connector
SCSI LED connector
Power connector
Full length 32 bit PCI slot
Full length 32 bit PCI slot
Speaker connector
IDE drive connector
Keyboard/Mouse connector
Configuration jumpers
IDE LED connector
2 pin Power LED connector
5 pin Power LED connector
Floppy drive connector
10/100 Mbit ethernet connector
Microprocessor fan/fan sense connector
Power switch connector
Reset switch connector
Item
No.
U3
U4
U5
U6
U7
U8
U55
Description
DIMM socket 0
DIMM socket 1
DIMM socket 2
DIMM socket 3
DIMM socket 4
DIMM socket 5
Microprocessor socket(21164 Alpha)
2.1 AlphaPC 164UX Jumper Configuration
The AlphaPC 164UX has one set of jumpers located at J28. These jumpers set the
hardware configuration and boot options. Figure 2–1 shows the jumper location on
the AlphaPC 164UX motherboard. Figure 2–2 shows the jumper functions for each
group.
System Configuration and Connectors
2–3
Figure 2–2 AlphaPC 164UX Configuration Jumpers
J28 System Configuration Jumpers
Option 1
Option 2
Option 3
Option 4
Option 5
Option 6
Option 7
Option 8
Option 9
Option 10
Option 11
Option 12
Option 13
Option 14
Option 15
Option 16
Frequency
300 MHz
333 MHz
366 MHz
400 MHz
433 MHz
466 MHz
500 MHz
533 MHz
566 MHz
600 MHz
633 MHz
666 MHz
700 MHz
733 MHz
766 MHz
800 MHz
Option1 Option2 Option3 Option4
In
In
In
In
Out
In
In
In
In
Out
In
In
Out
Out
In
In
In
In
Out
In
Out
In
Out
In
In
Out
Out
In
Out
Out
Out
In
In
In
In
Out
Out
In
In
Out
In
Out
In
Out
Out
Out
In
Out
In
In
Out
Out
Out
In
Out
Out
In
Out
Out
Out
Out
Out
Out
Out
Option 5 : Pyxis Bus Speed Select(Default Out)
Option 6 : Reserved Default Out
Option 7 : Enable SROM Debug Mode(Default Out)
Option 8 : Enable Firmware Debug Mode(Default Out)
Option 9 : Enable only 1 set of Scache(Default Out)
Option 10 : Reserved Default Out
Option 11 : Boot SAFE ARCSBIOS Image(Default Out)
Option 12 : Reserved Default Out
Option 13 : Must be In
Bcache Size
0MB
1MB
2MB
4MB
Option14 Option15
In
Out
In
In
Out
Out
Out
In
Option 16 : FAN OK Signal Do not ever populate(Default Out)
System Configuration and Connectors
2–4
CPU Speed Selection (Option 1,2,3, &4)
2.2 CPU Speed Selection (Option 1,2,3, &4)
The clock synthesizer makes it possible to change the frequency of the microprocessor’s clock input without having to change the clock crystal. Simply set the speed
jumpers to adjust the frequency of the microprocessor’s clock. These speed jumpers
are located at J28-1/2 (Option 1), J28-3/4 (Option 2), J28-5/6 (Option 3), and J28-7/8
(Option 4). These four jumpers set speed at power-up as listed in Figure 2–2.
2.3 Bcache Size Jumpers (Option 14,15)
The Bcache size jumpers are located at J28–27/28 (Option14) and J28–29/30
(Option15), as shown in Figure 2–2. The AlphaPC 164UX-2/-4 is configured with
2MB/4MB of Bcache during production ; the other jumpers shown in Figure 2–2
(0,1) are for other implementations.
Note:
The standard motherboard is manufactured with 128K X 18 or 256K X
18 data SSRAMs.
2.4 Boot Option Jumper (Option 11)
The boot option jumper is located at J28-21/22 (Option 11). The default position for
this jumper is out (Figure 2–2). This jumper selects the image to be loaded into memory from the system flash ROM. With the jumper out the ARCSBIOS firmware is
loaded. With the jumper in, the Safe ARCSBIOS is loaded.
2.5 AlphaPC 164UX Connector Pinouts
This section lists the pinouts of all AlphaPC 164UX connectors. See Figure 2–1 for
connector locations.
2.5.1 PCI Bus Connector Pinouts
Table 2–2 shows the PCI bus connector pinouts.
Table 2–2 PCI Bus Connector Pinouts
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
(Sheet 1 of 3)
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
A4
A8
TDI
Vdd
32-Bit and 64-Bit PCI Connectors (J2, J5, J6, J7, J21, J22)
A1
A5
TRST#
Vdd
A2
A6
+12V
INTA
A3
A7
TMS
INTC
System Configuration and Connectors
2–5
AlphaPC 164UX Connector Pinouts
Table 2–2 PCI Bus Connector Pinouts
(Sheet 2 of 3)
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
A9
A13
A17
A21
A25
A29
A33
A37
A41
A45
A49
A53
A57
A61
B3
B7
B11
B15
B19
B23
B27
B31
B35
B39
B43
B47
B51
B55
B59
—
Gnd
GNT#
+3V
AD<24>
AD<20>
+3V
STOP#
SBO#
+3V
AD<09>
+3V
AD<02>
Vdd
Gnd
INTB
PRSNT2#
Gnd
Vdd
AD<27>
AD<23>
+3V
IRDY#
LOCK#
+3V
AD<12>
Not used
AD<05>
Vdd
A10
A14
A18
A22
A26
A30
A34
A38
A42
A46
A50
A54
A58
A62
B4
B8
B12
B16
B20
B24
B28
B32
B36
B40
B44
B48
B52
B56
B60
Vdd
—
Gnd
AD<28>
IDSEL
Gnd
FRAME#
STOP#
Gnd
AD<13>
Not used
AD<06>
AD<00>
Vdd
TDO
INTD
Gnd
CLK
AD<31>
AD<25>
Gnd
AD<17>
+3V
PERR#
C/BE#<1>
AD<10>
AD<08>
AD<03>
ACK64#
A11
A15
A19
A23
A27
A31
A35
A39
A43
A47
A51
A55
A59
B1
B5
B9
B13
B17
B21
B25
B29
B33
B37
B41
B45
B49
B53
B57
B61
—
RST#
—
AD<26>
+3V
AD<18>
Gnd
+3V
PAR
AD<11>
Not used
AD<04>
Vdd
–12V
Vdd
PRSNT1#
Gnd
Gnd
AD<29>
+3V
AD<21>
C/BE#<2>
DEVSEL#
+3V
AD<14>
Gnd
AD<07>
Gnd
Vdd
A12
A16
A20
A24
A28
A32
A36
A40
A44
A48
A52
A56
A60
B2
B6
B10
B14
B18
B22
B26
B30
B34
B38
B42
B46
B50
B54
B58
B62
Gnd
Vdd
AD<30>
Gnd
AD<22>
AD<16>
TRDY#
SDONE
AD<15>
Gnd
C/BE#<0>
Gnd
REQ64#
TCK
Vdd
—
—
REQ#
Gnd
C/BE#<3>
AD<19>
Gnd
Gnd
SERR#
Gnd
Not used
+3V
AD<01>
Vdd
A65
A69
A73
A77
A81
C/BE#<5>
Gnd
D<56>
D<50>
Gnd
A66
A70
A74
A78
A82
Vdd
D<60>
D<54>
Gnd
D<44>
64-Bit PCI Connectors Only (J2)
A63
A67
A71
A75
A79
2–6
Gnd
PAR64
D<58>
Vdd
D<48>
A64
A68
A72
A76
A80
C/BE#<7>
D<62>
Gnd
D<52>
D<46>
System Configuration and Connectors
AlphaPC 164UX Connector Pinouts
Table 2–2 PCI Bus Connector Pinouts
(Sheet 3 of 3)
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
A83
A87
A91
B63
B67
B71
B75
B79
B83
B87
B91
D<42>
Gnd
D<32>
—
Gnd
D<59>
D<53>
Vdd
D<43>
D<37>
Gnd
A84
A88
A92
B64
B68
B72
B76
B80
B84
B88
B92
Vdd
D<36>
—
Gnd
D<63>
D<57>
Gnd
D<47>
D<41>
Vdd
—
A85
A89
A93
B65
B69
B73
B77
B81
B85
B89
B93
D<40>
D<34>
Gnd
C/BE#<6>
D<61>
Gnd
D<51>
D<45>
Gnd
D<35>
—
A86
A90
A94
B66
B70
B74
B78
B82
B86
B90
B94
D<38>
Gnd
—
C/BE#<4>
Vdd
D<55>
D<49>
Gnd
D<39>
D<33>
Gnd
System Configuration and Connectors
2–7
AlphaPC 164UX Connector Pinouts
2.5.2 ISA Expansion Bus Connector Pinouts
Table 2–3 shows the ISA expansion bus connector pinouts.
Table 2–3 ISA Expansion Bus Connector Pinouts (J10)
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1
5
9
13
17
21
25
29
33
37
41
45
49
53
57
61
65
69
73
77
81
85
89
93
97
Gnd
Vdd
–5V
–12V
+12V
SMEMW#
IOW#
DACK3#
DACK1#
REFRESH#
IRQ7
IRQ5
IRQ3
TC
Vdd
Gnd
IOCS16#
IRQ11
IRQ15
DACK0#
DACK5#
DACK6#
DACK7#
Vdd
Gnd
2
6
10
14
18
22
26
30
34
38
42
46
50
54
58
62
66
70
74
78
82
86
90
94
98
IOCHCK#
SD6
SD4
SD2
SD0
AEN
SA18
SA16
SA14
SA12
SA10
SA8
SA6
SA4
SA2
SA0
LA23
LA21
LA19
LA17
MEMW#
SD9
SD11
SD13
SD15
3
7
11
15
19
23
27
31
35
39
43
47
51
55
59
63
67
71
75
79
83
87
91
95
—
RSTDRV
IRQ9
DRQ2
ZEROWS#
Gnd
SMEMR#
IOR#
DRQ3
DRQ1
SYSCLK
IRQ6
IRQ4
DACK2#
BALE
OSC
MEMCS16#
IRQ10
IRQ12
IRQ14
DRQ0
DRQ5
DRQ6
DRQ7
MASTER#
—
4
8
12
16
20
24
28
32
36
40
44
48
52
56
60
64
68
72
76
80
84
88
92
96
—
SD7
SD5
SD3
SD1
IOCHRDY
SA19
SA17
SA15
SA13
SA11
SA9
SA7
SA5
SA3
SA1
SBHE#
LA22
LA20
LA18
MEMR#
SD8
SD10
SD12
SD14
—
2–8
System Configuration and Connectors
AlphaPC 164UX Connector Pinouts
2.5.3 SDRAM DIMM Connector Pinouts
Table 2–4 shows the SDRAM DIMM connector pinouts.
Table 2–4 SDRAM DIMM Connector Pinouts (U3 through U8) 1
(Sheet 1 of 2)
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1
5
9
13
17
21
25
29
33
37
41
45
49
53
57
61
65
69
73
77
81
85
89
93
97
101
105
109
113
117
121
Gnd
DQ3
DQ6
DQ9
DQ13
CB0
NC
DQMB1
A0
A8
3.3V
S2
3.3V
CB3
DQ18
NC
DQ21
DQ24
3.3V
DQ31
NC
Gnd
DQ35
DQ38
DQ41
DQ45
CB4
NC
DQMB5
A1
A9
2
6
10
14
18
22
26
30
34
38
42
46
50
54
58
62
66
70
74
78
82
86
90
94
98
102
106
110
114
118
122
DQ0
3.3V
DQ7
DQ10
3.3V
CB1
3.3V
S0
A2
A10
CK0
DQMB2
NC
Gnd
DQ19
NC
DQ22
DQ25
DQ28
Gnd
SDA
DQ32
3.3V
DQ39
DQ42
3.3V
CB5
3.3V
S1
A3
BA0
3
7
11
15
19
23
27
31
35
39
43
47
51
55
59
63
67
71
75
79
83
87
91
95
99
103
107
111
115
119
123
DQ1
DQ4
DQ8
DQ11
DQ14
Gnd
WE
NC
A4
A12
Gnd
DQMB3
NC
DQ16
3.3V
CKE1
DQ23
DQ26
DQ29
CK2
SCL
DQ33
DQ36
DQ40
DQ43
DQ46
Gnd
CAS
RAS
A5
A13
4
8
12
16
20
24
28
32
36
40
44
48
52
56
60
64
68
72
76
80
84
88
92
96
100
104
108
112
116
120
124
DQ2
DQ5
Gnd
DQ12
DQ15
NC
DQMB0
Gnd
A6
3.3V
NC
NC
CB2
DQ17
DQ20
Gnd
Gnd
DQ27
DQ30
NC
3.3V
DQ34
DQ37
Gnd
DQ44
DQ47
NC
DQMB4
Gnd
A7
3.3V
System Configuration and Connectors
2–9
AlphaPC 164UX Connector Pinouts
Table 2–4 SDRAM DIMM Connector Pinouts (U3 through U8) 1
Pin
125
129
133
137
141
145
149
153
157
161
165
Signal
CK1
S3
3.3V
CB7
DQ50
NC
DQ53
DQ56
3.3V
DQ63
SA0
Pin
126
130
134
138
142
146
150
154
158
162
166
Signal
2
BA1
DQMB6
NC
Gnd
DQ51
NC
DQ54
DQ57
DQ60
Gnd
SA1
(Sheet 2 of 2)
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
127
131
135
139
143
147
151
155
159
163
167
Gnd
DQMB7
NC
DQ48
3.3V
PD
DQ55
DQ58
DQ61
CK3
SA2
128
132
136
140
144
148
152
156
160
164
168
CKE0
PD3
CB6
DQ49
DQ52
Gnd
Gnd
DQ59
DQ62
NC
3.3V
1
2
Pins 1 through 84 are on the front side and pins 85 through 168 are on the back side.
The AlphaPC 164UX uses BA1 as both BA1 and ADDR12. Therefore, four-bank DIMMs using
ADDR<11:0> are the maximum size. (Two-bank DIMMs can use ADDR<12:0>.)
3 Pull-down.
2.5.4 EIDE Drive Bus Connector Pinouts
Table 2–5 shows the EIDE drive bus connector pinouts.
Table 2–5 EIDE Drive Bus Connector Pinouts (J24)
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1
5
9
13
17
21
25
29
33
37
RESET
IDE_D6
IDE_D4
IDE_D2
IDE_D0
MARQ
IOR
MACK
ADDR1
CS0
2
6
10
14
18
22
26
30
34
38
Gnd
IDE_D9
IDE_D11
IDE_D13
IDE_D15
Gnd
Gnd
Gnd
NC
CS1
3
7
11
15
19
23
27
31
35
39
IDE_D7
IDE_D5
IDE_D3
IDE_D1
Gnd
IOW
CHRDY
IRQ
ADDR0
ACT
4
8
12
16
20
24
28
32
36
40
IDE_D8
IDE_D10
IDE_D12
IDE_D14
NC (key pin)
Gnd
BALE
IOCS16
ADDR2
Gnd
2–10
System Configuration and Connectors
AlphaPC 164UX Connector Pinouts
2.5.5 Diskette Drive Bus Connector Pinouts
Table 2–6 shows the diskette (floppy) drive bus connector pinouts.
Table 2–6 Diskette (Floppy) Drive Bus Connector Pinouts (J33)
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1
5
9
13
17
21
25
29
33
Gnd
Gnd
Gnd
Gnd
Gnd
Gnd
Gnd
ID0
ID1
2
6
10
14
18
22
26
30
34
DEN0
DEN1
MTR0
DR0
DIR
WDATA
TRK0
RDATA
DSKCHG
3
7
11
15
19
23
27
31
—
Gnd
Gnd
Gnd
Gnd
Gnd
Gnd
Gnd
Gnd
—
4
8
12
16
20
24
28
32
—
NC
INDEX
DR1
MTR1
STEP
WGATE
WRTPRT
HDSEL
—
2.5.6 Parallel Bus Connector Pinouts
Table 2–7 shows the parallel bus connector pinouts.
Table 2–7 Parallel Bus Connector Pinouts (J13)
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1
5
9
13
17
21
25
STB
PD3
PD7
SLCT
SLIN
Gnd
Gnd
2
6
10
14
18
22
—
PD0
PD4
ACK
AFD
Gnd
Gnd
—
3
7
11
15
19
23
—
PD1
PD5
BUSY
ERR
Gnd
Gnd
—
4
8
12
16
20
24
—
PD2
PD6
PE
INIT
Gnd
Gnd
—
System Configuration and Connectors
2–11
AlphaPC 164UX Connector Pinouts
2.5.7 COM1/COM2 Serial Line Connector Pinouts
Table 2–8 shows the COM1/COM2 serial line connector pinouts.
Table 2–8 COM1/COM2 Serial Line Connector Pinouts (J12)
COM1 Pin
(Top)
COM1 Signal
COM2 Pin
(Bottom)
COM2 Signal
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
DCD1
RxD1
TxD1
DTR1
SG1
DSR1
RTS1
CTS1
RI1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
DCD2
RxD2
TxD2
DTR2
SG2
DSR2
RTS2
CTS2
RI2
2.5.8 Keyboard/Mouse Connector Pinouts
Table 2–9 shows the keyboard/mouse connector pinouts.
Table 2–9 Keyboard/Mouse Connector Pinouts (J25)
2–12
Keyboard Pin
(Bottom)
Keyboard Signal
Mouse Pin
(Top)
Mouse Signal
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
6
MSDATA
NC
Gnd
Vdd
MSCLK
NC
KBDATA
NC
Gnd
Vdd
KBCLK
NC
System Configuration and Connectors
AlphaPC 164UX Connector Pinouts
2.5.9 Input Power Connector Pinouts
Table 2–10 shows the input power connector pinouts.
Table 2–10 Input Power Connector Pinouts (J18)1
Pin
Voltage
Pin
Voltage
Pin
Voltage
Pin
Voltage
1
5
9
13
17
+3.3 V dc
Gnd
5 V SB
Gnd
Gnd
2
6
10
14
18
+3.3 V dc
+5 V dc
+12 V dc
PS_ON
–5 V dc
3
7
11
15
19
Gnd
Gnd
+3.3 V dc
Gnd
+5 V dc
4
8
12
16
20
+5 V dc
P_DCOK
–12 V dc
Gnd
+5 V dc
1
This pinout is ATX-compliant.
2.5.10 Narrow SCSI Bus Connector
Table 2-11 shows the narrow SCSI bus connector pinouts
Table 2–11 Narrow SCSI Bus Connector (J16)
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1
5
9
13
17
21
25
29
33
37
41
45
49
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
NC
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
2
6
10
14
18
22
26
30
34
38
42
46
50
SD0
SD2
SD4
SD6
SDPO
BUS_PRES
TERMPWR
GND
GND
SACK
SMSG
SCD
SIO
3
7
11
15
19
23
27
31
35
39
43
47
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
4
8
12
16
20
24
28
32
36
40
44
48
SD1
SD3
SD5
SD7
GND
GND
GND
SATN
SBSY
SRST
SSEL
SREQ
System Configuration and Connectors
2–13
AlphaPC 164UX Connector Pinouts
2.5.11 Fast and Wide SCSI Bus Connector
Table 2–12 shows the Fast and Wide SCSI bus connector pinouts
Table 2–12 Fast and Wide SCSI Connector Pinouts (J15)
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1
5
9
13
17
21
25
29
33
37
41
45
49
53
57
61
65
69
GND
GND
GND
GND
TERMPWR1
GND
GND
GND
GND
SD14
SD1
SD5
GND
NC
SBSY
SSEL
SD8
GND
2
6
10
14
18
22
26
30
34
38
42
46
50
54
58
62
66
70
GND
GND
GND
GND
TERMPWR1
GND
GND
GND
GND
SD15
SD2
SD6
BUS_PRES
GND
SACK
SCD
SD9
GND
3
7
11
15
19
23
27
31
35
39
43
47
51
55
59
63
67
GND
GND
GND
GND
NC
GND
GND
GND
SD12
SDP1
SD3
SD7
TERMPWR1
SATN
SRST
SREQ
SD10
4
8
12
16
20
24
28
32
36
40
44
48
52
56
60
64
68
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
SD13
SD0
SD4
SDP0
TERMPWR1
GND
SMSG
SIO
SD11
2.5.12 10/100 Mbit Ethernet Connector Pinouts
Table 2–13 shows the Fast and Wide SCSI bus connector pinouts.
Table 2–13 10/100 Mbit Ethernet Connector Pinouts (34)
2–14
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1
5
9
TD_P
U2
MP1
2
6
10
TD_M
RD_M
MP2
3
7
RD_P
U3
4
8
U1
U4
System Configuration and Connectors
AlphaPC 164UX Connector Pinouts
2.5.13 Speaker Connector Pinouts
Table 2–14 shows the speaker connector pinouts.
Table 2–14 Speaker Connector Pinouts (J23)
Pin
Signal
Name
1
2
3
4
SPKR
NC
VDD
GND
Speaker output
—
—
—
2.5.14 Microprocessor Fan Power Connector Pinouts
Table 2–15 shows the microprocessor fan power connector pinouts.
Table 2–15 Microprocessor Fan Power Connector Pinouts (J35)
Pin
Signal
Name
1
2
3
+12V
FAN_OK_L
GND
—
Fan connected
—
2.5.15 Pin Power LED Connector Pinouts
Table 2–16 shows the power LED connector pinouts.
Table 2–16 Power LED Connector Pinouts (J31)
Pin
Signal
Name
1
2
3
4
5
Powerpullup
NC
GND
NC
NC
Power pullup
—
—
—
—
System Configuration and Connectors
2–15
AlphaPC 164UX Connector Pinouts
2.5.16 IDE Drive LED Connector Pinouts
Table 2–17 shows the IDE drive LED connector pinouts.
Table 2–17 IDE Drive LED Connector Pinouts (J29)
Pin
Signal
Name
1
2
ACTIVITY
ACTIVUTYPULLUP
Hard drive active
2.5.17 Reset Switch Connector Pinouts
Table 2–18 shows the reset switch connector pinouts.
Table 2–18 Reset Switch Connector Pinouts (J37)
Pin
Signal
Name
1
2
GND
RSTSWITCH
—
Reset system
2.5.18 Soft Power Switch Connector Pinouts
Table 2–19 shows the soft power switch connector pinouts.
Table 2–19 Soft Power Switch Connector Pinouts (J36)
Pin
Signal
Name
1
2
GND
PWRSWITCH
—
System power on/off
2.5.19 SCSI LED Connector Pinouts
Table 2–20 shows the SCSI LED connector pinouts.
Table 2–20 SCSI LED Connector Pinouts (J17)
2–16
Pin
Signal
Name
1
2
SCSI_BUSY
SCSI_BSY2
—
—
System Configuration and Connectors
3
Functional Description
This chapter describes the functional operation of the AlphaPC 164UX. The description introduces the Digital Semiconductor 21174 core logic chip and describes its
implementation with the 21164 microprocessor, its supporting memory, and I/O
devices. Figure 1–1 shows the AlphaPC 164UX major functional components.
Bus timing and protocol information found in other data sheets and reference documentation is not duplicated. See Appendix C for a list of supporting documents and
order numbers.
Note:
For detailed descriptions of bus transactions, chip logic, and operation,
refer to the 21164 Alpha Microprocessor Hardware Reference Manual
and the Digital Semiconductor 21174 Core Logic Chip Technical Reference Manual. For details of the PCI interface, refer to the PCI System
Design Guide.
Functional Description
3–1
AlphaPC 164UX Bcache Interface
3.1 AlphaPC 164UX Bcache Interface
The 21164 microprocessor controls the board-level L3 backup cache (Bcache) array
(see Figure 3–1). The data bus (pdata<127:0>), check bus (pecc<15:0>),
p_tag_dirty and p_tag_ctl_par signals are shared with the system interface.
Figure 3–1 AlphaPC 164UX L3 Bcache Array
21164
Microprocessor
index<21:4>
Bcache
SRAM
*cacheoe
*cachewe
*tag_ram_oe
*tag_ram_we
index<21:6>
tag_data<38:32>
Tag
Array
tag_data<31:20>
Data
Array
tag_data_par
tag_ctl_par
tag_valid
tag_dirty
pdata<127:0>
pecc<15:0>
untermstclk1
idle_bc
pc164ux.1-2
CDC2351
stclk<9:1>
pc164ux.4
(From 21174 Chip)
pc164ux.5-6
The Bcache is a 2MB or 4MB, direct-mapped, synchronous SRAM (SSRAM)
with a 128-bit data path. It is populated with a quantity of eight 128K X 18 or
256K x 18 SSRAMs for data store, and one 64K X 18 SSRAM for the tag store.
In most cases, wave-pipelined accesses can decrease the cache loop times by
one CPU cycle. The Bcache supports 64-byte transfers to and from memory.
3.2 Digital Semiconductor 21174 Core Logic Chip
The 21174 core logic chip provides a cost-competitive solution for designers using the
21164 microprocessor to develop uniprocessor systems. The chip provides a 128-bit
memory interface and a PCI I/O interface, and includes the Digital Semiconductor
21174-CA chip packaged in a 474-pin plastic ball grid array (PBGA).
3–2
Functional Description
Digital Semiconductor 21174 Core Logic Chip
Figure 3–2 shows the AlphaPC 164UX implementation of the 21174 core logic chip.
Figure 3–2 Main Memory Interface
DIMM 0
DIMM 1
21164
DIMM 2
Data
Switches
(X5)
pdata<127:0>
pecc<15:0>
mdata<128:0>
mecc<15:0>
DIMM 3
DIMM 4
DIMM 5
pc164ux.11
pc164ux.12-14
enabledataswitch<0:2>
paddr<39:4>
*System Control
pc164ux.1-2
* addr_bus_req
adr_cmd_par
cack
cmd<3:0>
dack
fill
fill_error
fill_id
idle_bc
int4_valid<3:0>
sys_res<1:0>
tag_ctl_par
tag_dirty
victim_pending
buf_addr<13:0>
dram_addr<13:0>
21174
*we
Buffers
*buf_we<5:0>
*cas
*buf_cas<5:0>
*ras
*buf_ras<5:0>
miscellaneous
buf_miscellaneous
pc164ux.8-10
pc164ux.15-17
64-Bit PCI
I/O Bus
3.2.1 21174 Chip Overview
The 21174 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) accepts addresses and commands from the 21164 microprocessor and drives the main memory array with the
address, control, and clock signals. It also provides an interface to the 64-bit PCI I/O
bus.
The 21174 chip provides the following functions:
•
Serves as the interface between the 21164 microprocessor, main memory
(addressing and control), and the PCI bus. A three-entry CPU instruction queue
is implemented to capture commands should the memory or I/O port be busy.
•
Provides control to the Data Switch chips to isolate the L3 cache from the main
memory bus during private reads and writes.
Functional Description
3–3
Digital Semiconductor 21174 Core Logic Chip
•
Generates the clocks, row, and column addresses for the SDRAM DIMMs, as
well as all of the memory control signals (*RAS,*CAS, *WE). All of the
required SDRAM refresh control is contained in the 21174.
•
Provides all the logic to map 21164 noncacheable addresses to PCI address
space, as well as all the translation logic to map PCI DMA addresses to system
memory.
Two DMA conversion methods are supported:
•
Direct mapping, in which a base offset is concatenated with the PCI address.
•
Scatter-gather mapping, which maps an 8KB PCI page to any 8KB memory
page. The 21174 contains an eight-entry scatter-gather translation lookaside
buffer (TLB), where each entry holds four consecutive page table entries (PTEs).
Refer to Appendix A for additional details on PCI and DMA address mapping.
3.2.2 Main Memory Interface
Five Data Switches provide the interface between the 21164/L3 cache (pdata<127:0>,
pecc<15:0>) and the memory/21174 (mdata<127:>, mecc<15:0>). The AlphaPC
164UX supports six168-pin unbuffered 72-bit SDRAM DIMM modules. Quadword
ECC is supported on the SDRAM and CPU buses. Even parity is generated on the PCI
bus.
The AlphaPC 164UX supports a maximum of 1536MB of main memory. The memory is organized as three banks. Table 1–1 lists total memory options along with the
corresponding DIMM sizes required. All CPU cacheable memory accesses and PCI
DMA accesses are controlled and routed to main memory by the 21174 core logic
chip.
The AlphaPC 164UX implements the alternate memory mode for SDRAM RAS
and CAS control signals. Alternate memory mode is explained in the Digital
Semiconductor 21174 Core Logic Chip Technical Reference Manual.
3.2.3 PCI Devices
The AlphaPC 164UX uses the PCI bus as the main I/O bus for the majority of
peripheral functions. As Figure 3–3 shows, the board implements the ISA bus as an
expansion bus for system support functions and for relatively slow peripheral
devices.
3–4
Functional Description
Digital Semiconductor 21174 Core Logic Chip
Figure 3–3 AlphaPC 164UX PCI Bus Devices
21174
pc164ux.8-10
Primary PCI Bus
82371SB
SIO Bridge
pc164ux.28
21143
Ethernet
Controller
21052
PCI to PCI
Bridge
pc164ux.26
pc164ux.19
ISA Bus
PCI64
Slot 0
J2
Secondary PCI Bus
53C875
SCSI
Controller
Bus
pc164ux.24
PCI32
Slot 0
J5
PCI32
Slot 1
J6
PCI32
Slot 2
J7
PCI32
Slot 3
J21
PCI32
Slot 4
J22
Device
21052
SIO Bridge
Primary
21143
64 Slot 0
32 Slot 0
32 Slot 1
Secondary 32 Slot 2
32 Slot 3
32 Slot 4
53C875
IDSEL Select
p64_ad24
p64_ad25
p64_ad26
p64_ad28
p32_ad24
p32_ad25
p32_ad26
p32_ad27
p32_ad28
p32_ad29
The PCI bus supports multiplexed, burst mode, read and write transfers. It supports synchronous operation of 33 MHz. It also supports either a 32-bit or 64-bit
data path with 32-bit device support in the 64-bit configuration. Depending upon
the configuration and operating frequencies, the PCI bus supports up to 264-MB/s
(33 MHz, 64-bit) peak throughput. The PCI provides parity on address and data
cycles. Three physical address spaces are supported:
•
32-bit memory space
•
32-bit I/O space
•
256-byte-per-agent configuration space
Functional Description
3–5
Digital Semiconductor 21174 Core Logic Chip
The bridge from the 21164 system bus to the 64-bit PCI bus is provided by the 21174
chip. It generates the required 32-bit PCI address for 21164 I/O accesses directed to the
PCI. It also accepts 64-bit double address cycles and 32-bit single address cycles. However, the 64-bit address support is subject to some constraints. Refer to Appendix A for
more information on 64-bit addressing constraints.
3.2.4 System-IO (SIO) Chip
The 82371SB SIO chip provides the bridge between the PCI bus and the ISA bus.
The SIO incorporates the logic for the following:
•
PCI and ISA Master/Slave interface
•
Fast IDE interface
•
Plug-n-Play Port for Motherboard Devices
•
Enhanced 7-channel DMA controller that supports fast DMA transfers
•
PCI Specification Revision 2.1 Compliant
•
Functionality of One 82c54 Timer
•
Two 82c59 Interrupt Controller Functions
•
X-Bus Peripheral Support
•
I/O Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controller(IOAPIC) Support
•
Nonmaskable interrupt (NMI) control logic
•
Universal Serial Bus(USB) Host Controller
•
System Power Management
Refer to Intel document 82420/82430 PCIset ISA and EISA Bridges for additional
information.
3.2.5 Ethernet LAN Controller Chip
The 21143 is an Ethernet LAN controller for both 100-Mb/s and 10-Mb/s data rates,
which provides a direct interface to the peripheral component interconnect (PCI)
local bus or the CardBus.
3–6
•
Power-Management and Power-Savings Features
•
Automatic Detection/Sensing Features
Functional Description
Digital Semiconductor 21174 Core Logic Chip
•
Supports PCI and CardBus interfaces
•
Supports an unlimited PCI burst
•
Supports PCI clock speed frequency from dc to 33 MHz; network operation with
PCI clock from 20 MHz to 33 MHz
•
Supports automatic loading of subvendor ID and CardBus card information
structure (CIS) pointer from serial ROM to configuration registers
•
Supports full-duplex operation on both MII/SYM and 10BASE-T ports
•
Provides MicroWire interface for serial ROM (1K and 4K EEPROM)
•
Supports three network ports: 10BASE-T (10 Mb/s), AUI (10 Mb/s), and MII/
SYM (10/100 Mb/s)
•
Supports IEEE 802.3 and ANSI 8802-3 Ethernet standards
For more information about the 21143, refer to the Digital Semiconductor 21143
PCI/CardBus 10/100-Mb/s Ethernet LAN Controller Data Sheet and the Digital
Semiconductor 21143 PCI/CardBus 10/100-Mb/s Ethernet LAN Controller Hardware Reference Manual.
3.2.6 PCI- Ultra SCSI (Fast-20) I/O Processor Chip
•
Performs wide high-speed SCSI bus transfers in single-ended and differential
mode up to 40 MB/s synchronous Ultra SCSI (Fast-20) transfers and 14 MB/s
asynchronous transfers
•
SCRIPTS Instruction Prefetch
•
536-byte buffer allows burst length of up to 128 transfers
•
Load and Store instruction
•
4 KB static RAM for SCRIPTS instruction storage
•
32 additional Scratchpad registers for user-defined functions
•
Designed to provide a smooth migration path from existing Fast SCSI designs
•
Builds upon proven SCSI technologya pin-for-pin replacement for the wide
SCSI industry standard SYM53C825 and SYM53C825A
•
Provides new features for enhanced PCI performance and flexibility
Functional Description
3–7
ISA Bus Devices
3.2.7 PCI Expansion Slots
Six dedicated PCI expansion slots are provided on the AlphaPC 164UX. This allows
the system user to add additional 32-bit or 64-bit PCI options. While both the 32-bit
and the 64-bit slots use the standard 5-V PCI connector and pinout, +3.3 V is supplied for those boards that require it. The SIO chip provides the interface to the ISA
expansion I/O bus.
3.3 ISA Bus Devices
Figure 3–4 shows the AlphaPC 164UX ISA bus implementation with peripheral
devices and connectors. One dedicated ISA expansion slots are provided. System
support features such as serial lines, parallel port, and diskette controller are embedded on the module by means of an FDC37C666 combination controller chip.
Figure 3–4 AlphaPC 164UX ISA Bus Devices
PCI Bus
PCI-to-ISA
Bridge
82371SB
ISA0
la<23:17>
sd<15:0>
sd<7:0>
Transceivers
xd<7:0>
pc164ux.33
dd<11:0>
Transceivers
pc164ux.28
Combination
Controller
37C666
Diskette J33
Parallel J13
KBD
Controller
pc164ux.33
COM1/2 J12
pc164ux.33
Real
Time
Clock
pc164ux.33
NVRAM
pc164ux.28
pc164ux.31
sa<7:0>
sa<19:8>
sa<15:0>
sa<19:0>
pc164ux.29
J10
3–8
Functional Description
ISA Bus Devices
3.3.1 Combination Controller
The AlphaPC 164UX uses the Standard Microsystems Corporation FDC37C666
Super I/O combination controller chip (see Figure 3–4). It is packaged in a 100-pin
QFP configuration. The chip provides the following ISA peripheral functions:
•
Diskette controller–Software compatible to the Intel N82077 FDC. Integrates
the functions of the formatter/controller, digital data separator, write precompensation, and data-rate selection logic requiring no external filter components. Supports the 2.88MB drive format and other standard diskette drives
used with 5.25-inch and 3.5-inch media. FDC data and control lines are
brought out to a standard 34-pin connector (J33). A ribbon cable interfaces the
connector to one or two diskette drives.
•
Serial ports–Two UARTs with full modem control, compatible with NS16450
or PC16550 devices, are brought out to two separate onboard, 9-pin
D-subminiature connectors (J12).
•
Parallel port–The bidirectional parallel port is brought out to an onboard 25-pin
connector (J13). It can be brought out through a 25-pin female D-subminiature
connector on the bulkhead of a standard PC enclosure.
Functional Description
3–9
Flash ROM Address Map
3.3.2 XD Bus Device
The AlphaPC 164UX XD bus drives a NVRAM,RTC,and KBDC devices.
3.3.3 ISA Expansion Slots
One ISA expansion slot is provided for plug-in ISA peripheral (J10).
3.3.4 ISA I/O Address Map
Table 3–1 lists the AlphaPC 164UX ISA I/O space address mapping.
Table 3–1 ISA I/O Address Map
Range (hex)
Usage
060-060
i8042 PRT
064-064
i8042 PRT
1F0-1F7
ATAPI
2F8-2FE
Serial port—COM2
378-37B
Parallel Port—LPT2
3F0-3F5
Floppy
3F6-3F6
ATAPI
3F7-3F7
Floppy
3F8-3FE
Serial port—COM1
3.4 Flash ROM Address Map
The flash ROM is mapped to three regions of memory. Access to the first two
regions is RO. The first two regions provide the software necessary to initialize the
system and transfer execution to the next level of software. When power is turned
on, address ranges 0 to 00.00FF.FFFF and 0F.FC00.0000 to 0F.FFFF.FFFF are
enabled. After the system has been initialized, these two address ranges are disabled.
Byte mode is then enabled in the 21164 and 21174. Byte mode is the only way to
access the flash ROM in address range 87.C000.0000 to 87.FFFF.FFFF. 21164 byte
instructions LDBU and STB must be used to access this region. Any other
instruction will produce UNDEFINED results with the possibility of damaging the
flash ROM.
3–10
Functional Description
Interrupts
3.5 Interrupts
This section describes the AlphaPC 164UX interrupt logic. PCI-, ISA-, and 21174generated interrupts are described. Figure 3–5 shows the interrupt logic.
The PCI-to-ISA SIO bridge chip provides the functionality of two 8259 interrupt
control devices. These ISA-compatible interrupt controllers are cascaded so that 14
external and 2 internal interrupts are available. The PCI interrupt acknowledge command should be used to read the interrupt request vector from the SIO.
However, the AlphaPC 164UX system has more external interrupts than the SIO can
handle. They are sent to an external Shift Registers. This Shift Registers takes these
interrupts with parallel. When the Shift Registers are clocked,data is shifted toward
the serial output and generates irqchain2 finally. During reset, irq<3:0> convey the
system clocking ratios and delays, which are set by jumpers on J28.
Table 3–2 lists each system interrupt, its fixed interrupt priority level (IPL), and its
AlphaPC 164UX implementation. Table 3–3 lists each ISA bus interrupt and its
AlphaPC 164UX implementation.
Functional Description
3–11
3–12
Functional Description
*
pc164ux.26
Ethernet
Controller
pc164ux.24
SCSI
Controller
*scsiirq
*slotNirqX
pc164ux.25
Shift
Register
Secondary PCI Bus
pc164ux.20-22
32 PCI
Slots
pc164ux.25
Shift
Register
*v3_slot0irq3
pc164ux.23
Shift
Register
X can vary from a to d;
N can vary from 0 to 3.
pc164ux.36
Shift
Register
*v3_slot1irqX
pc164ux.23
64 PCI
Slot
irqchain2
pc164ux.8
Flash
ROM
flash_ready_irq
pc164ux.25
Shift
Register
Primary PCI Bus
Real
Time
Clock
pc164ux.33
KBD
Controller
pc164ux.33
isairq
pc164ux.8-10
21174
irq<1,12>
*irq8
FDC
pc164ux.29
ISA
Slot
pc164ux.31
irq<3:7,9:12,14,15>
irq<3,4,6,7>
irq<1,3:7,9:12,14,15>
pc164ux.28
PCI to ISA
Bridge
(SIO)
irq<0:3>
power_fail_irq
halt_irq
mchk_irq
procirqs<6:0>
pc164ux.2
21164
Interrupts
Figure 3–5 Interrupt Logic
Interrupts
Table 3–2 AlphaPC 164UX System Interrupts
21164 Interrupt
IPL1
Suggested Usage
AlphaPC 164UX Usage
irq<0>
20
Corrected system error
Corrected ECC error and
sparse space reserved encodings detected by the 21174
irq<1>
21
—
PCI and ISA interrupts
irq<2>
22
Interprocessor and
timer interrupts
irq<3>
23
—
Reserved
pwr_fail_irq
30
Powerfail interrupt
Reserved
mchk_irq
31
System machine check
interrupt
SIO NMI and 21174 errors
hlt_irq
—
Halt
Reserved
1
IPL = interrupt priority level (fixed).
Functional Description
3–13
Interrupts
Table 3–3 ISA Interrupts
Interrupt
Number
Interrupt Source
IRQ0
Internal timer
IRQ1
Keyboard
IRQ2
Interrupt from controller 2
IRQ3
COM2
IRQ4
COM1
IRQ5
Available
IRQ6
Diskette (floppy)
IRQ7
Parallel port
*IRQ81
Reserved
IRQ9
Available
IRQ10
Available
IRQ11
Available
IRQ12
Mouse
IRQ13
Available
IRQ14
IDE
IRQ15
IDE
1
3–14
The * symbol indicates an active low signal.
Functional Description
System Clocks
3.6 System Clocks
Figure 3–6 shows the AlphaPC 164UX clock generation and distribution scheme.
The AlphaPC 164UX system includes input clocks to the microprocessor as well as
clock distribution for the various system memory and I/O devices. There are other
miscellaneous clocks for ISA bus support. System clocking can be divided into the
following three main areas:
•
Microprocessor input clock — The input clock runs at the operating frequency
of the 21164 microprocessor. The AlphaPC 164UX supports cycle times from
3.33ns to 1.25 ns. This implies input clock frequencies from 300MHz to 800
MHz. The clock is provided by using a TQ2061. The TQ2061’s output is used as
the input clock for the 21164.
•
Clock distribution — Clock distribution includes the distribution of system
clocks from the 21164 microprocessor to the system logic. The AlphaPC 164UX
clock distribution scheme is flexible enough to allow the majority of cycle-time
combinations to be supported. Because the PCI is synchronous to the system clock
generated by the 21164 microprocessor, the PCI cycle time is a multiple of the
21164 cycle time. This distribution scheme supports a PCI operation of 33 MHz.
•
Miscellaneous clocks — The miscellaneous clocks include those needed for
ISA and the combination controller. These clocks are provided by a crystal and a
frequency generator with fixed scaling.
Functional Description
3–15
System Clocks
Figure 3–6 AlphaPC 164UX System Clocks
Clock Gen
(Fast)
TQ2061
Oscclkin
21164
Microprocessor
*Oscclkin
pc164ux.4
Refclkout
Clock Gen
(Slow)
CY2907
Oscillator
pc164ux.4
CY2308
PLL
pc164ux.4
pc164ux.2
Sysclk
DIMM0
DIMM1
buf_dramclkax2
buf_dramclkbx2
21174
DIMM2
buf_dramclkcx2
DIMM3
buf_dramclkdx2
DIMM4
buf_dramclkex2
DIMM5
buf_dramclkfx2
DMA
Hack
p64_clk6
pc164ux.27
p64_clk5
p64_clk4
Arbiter
pc164ux.18
p64_clk3
p64_clk2
p64_clk1
82371SB
p64_clk0
Bridge
pc164ux.10
Clock Driver
(163344)
PCI to PCI
Bridge
(21052)
p32_clk7
p32_clk6
p32_clk5
p32_clk<4:0>
pc164ux.19
pc164ux.4
Arbiter
osc14mhz 14.3MHz
Oscillator
Ethernet
Controller
pc164ux.28
pc164ux.26
pc164ux.28
PCI
64 Slot
pc164ux.23
v83_sysclk
ISA
Slots
pc164lx.29
pc164ux.18
PCI
32 Slots
pc164ux.20-22
3–16
SCSI
Controller
pc164ux.24
Functional Description
KBD
Controller
pc164ux.33
Reset and Initialization
At system reset, the 21164 microprocessor’s procirq<3:0> pins are driven by the
clock divisor values set by four jumpers on J28. During normal operation, these signals are used for interrupt requests. The pins are either switched to ground or pulled
up in a specific combination to set the 21164 microprocessor’s internal divider.
The 21164 microprocessor produces the divided clock output signal sysclk that
drives the CY2308 PLL clock-driver chip. This clock provides the references to synchronize the 21164 microprocessor and the 21174 chip. The 21174 provides the system memory and I/O (PCI) clock references. It also provides system-level clocking
to DIMMs, PCI 64slot, the PCI-ISA bridge, the PCI-PCI controller,Ethernet Controller, DMA Hack and the PCI arbiter.
3.7 Reset and Initialization
An external reset switch can be connected to J37 (pc164UX.35). The reset function
initializes the 21164 microprocessor and the system logic. The vccok signal provides
a full system initialization, equivalent to a power-down and power-up cycle.
When dc_ok signal is inserted to 21174 chip, 21174 chip drives *p64_rst signal to
reset primary PCI devices and PCI to PCI bridge.
As soon as *p64_rst is inserted, PCI to PCI bridge drives *p32_rst signal to reset
secondary PCI devices
Figure 3–7 System Reset and Initialization
J37
pc164ux.35
2
HC125D
*rstswitch
HCT14D
dc_oka
*dc_ok
21164
dc_ok
1
pc164ux.2
Reset Switch
pc164ux.35
J18
pc164ux.34
8
*cpureset
21174
vccok
*p64_rst
pc164ux.10
Power Supply
pc164ux.35
pci-pci
pci 64 slot
pci - isa bridge
ethernet controller
dma hack
*p32_rst
SCSI controller
pci 32 slots
pc164ux.19
Functional Description
3–17
DC Power Distribution
3.8 DC Power Distribution
The AlphaPC 164UX drives its system power from a user-supplied PC power supply. The power supply must provide +12 V dc and -12 V dc, -5 V dc, +3 V dc, and
+5 V dc (Vdd). The dc power is supplied through power connector J18
(pc164ux.34), as shown in Figure 3–8. Power is distributed to the board logic
through dedicated power planes within the eight-layer board structure.
3–18
Functional Description
+3.3 V
Gnd
-5 V
+3.3-V Pull-Ups
pc164ux.23
ISA Conn.
+12 V
-12 V
+5 V (Vcc)
pc164ux.34
1,2,11
3,5,7,13
15,16,17
18
4,6,19,20
12
10
Power
Connector
J18
pc164ux.23
PCI64 Conn.
pc164ux.20-22
PCI32 Conn.
Pull-Downs
+5-V Pull-Ups
Integrated
Circuits
(21174,dimm,
dimm buffer,
flash,sram,
arbiter)
Spkr
pc164ux.34
Voltage
Regulator
+2.5V
Integrated
Circuits/Clocks
(pci-isa,scsi,rtc,
srom,multi i/o,
data switch)
pc164ux.26
Ethernet
controller
Fan
pc164ux.1-2
21164
P/J35
DC Power Distribution
Figure 3–8 AlphaPC 164UX Power Distribution
Functional Description
3–19
4
Upgrading the AlphaPC 164UX
For higher system speed or greater throughput, you can upgrade SDRAM memory
by replacing DIMMs with those of greater size.
When configuring or upgrading SDRAM, observe the following rules:
•
Each DIMM must be a 168-pin unbuffered version and have a frequency of
100 MHz.
•
All DIMMs must be of equal size if they are in the same bank.
4.1 Upgrading SDRAM Memory
You can upgrade memory in the AlphaPC 164UX by adding more DIMMs or replacing the ones that you have with a greater size.
Use the following general guidelines:
1. Observe antistatic precautions. Handle DIMMs only at the edges to prevent
damage.
2. Remove power from the system.
3. Open levers and align the DIMM.
4. Firmly push the module into the connector. Ensure that the DIMM snaps into
the plastic locking levers on both ends.
5. Restore power to the system.
4.2 Increasing Microprocessor Speed
This section describes how to complete the following actions to increase microprocessor speed:
Upgrading the AlphaPC 164UX
4–1
Increasing Microprocessor Speed
•
Replace the Digital Semiconductor 21164 microprocessor with an Alpha chip
that has a higher speed rating.
•
Reconfigure the clock divisor jumpers.
4.2.1 Preparatory Information
Caution:
Static-Sensitive Component – Due to the sensitive nature of electronic
components to static electricity, anyone handling the microprocessor
must wear a properly grounded antistatic wriststrap. Use of antistatic
mats, ESD approved workstations, or exercising other good ESD practices is recommended.
A Samsung 21164 microprocessor with a higher speed rating is available from your
local distributor. See Appendix B for information about supporting products.
When replacing the microprocessor chip, also replace the thermal conducting
GRAFOIL pad. See Appendix B for information about the parts kit, which includes
the heat sink, GRAFOIL pad, two hex nuts, heat-sink clips, 60-mm fan, and four
screws.
4.2.2 Required Tools
The following tools are required when replacing the microprocessor chip:
A TS30 manual nut/torque driver (or equivalent) with the following attachments is
required to affix the heat sink and fan to the microprocessor’s IPGA package:
•
1/4-inch hex bit
•
7/16-inch socket with 1/4-inch hex drive
•
#2 Phillips-head screwdriver bit
4.2.3 Removing the 21164 Microprocessor
Remove the microprocessor currently in place at location U55 by performing the following steps:
1. Unplug the fan power/sensor cable from connector J35 (see Figure 2–1).
2. Remove the four 6-32 X 0.875-inch screws that secure the fan and fan guard to
the heat sink.
3. Remove the fan and fan guard.
4–2
Upgrading the AlphaPC 164UX
Increasing Microprocessor Speed
4. If the sink/chip/fan clip is used, remove it by unhooking its ends from around the
ZIF socket retainers.
5. Using a 7/16-inch socket, remove the two nuts securing the heat sink to the
microprocessor studs.
6. Remove the heat sink by gently lifting it off the microprocessor.
7. Remove and discard the GRAFOIL heat conduction pad.
8. Thoroughly clean the bottom surface of the heat sink before affixing it to the
new microprocessor.
9. Lift the ZIF socket actuator handle to a full 90° angle.
10. Remove the microprocessor chip by lifting it straight out of the socket.
4.2.4 Installing the 21164 Microprocessor
Install the new microprocessor in location U55 by performing the following steps:
Note:
Install the heat sink only after the microprocessor has been assembled to
the ZIF socket.
1. Observe antistatic precautions.
2. Lift the ZIF socket actuator handle to a full 90° angle.
3. Ensure that all the pins on the microprocessor package are straight.
4. The ZIF socket and microprocessor are keyed to allow for proper installation.
Align the microprocessor, with its missing AD01 pin, with the corresponding
plugged AD01 position on the ZIF socket. Gently lower into position.
5. Close the ZIF socket actuator handle to its locked position.
6. Install the heat sink and heat-sink fan as directed in the following steps. A heatsink/fan kit is available from the vendor listed in Appendix B. Refer to Figure 4–1
for heat-sink and fan assembly details.
Upgrading the AlphaPC 164UX
4–3
Increasing Microprocessor Speed
Figure 4–1 Fan/Heat-Sink Assembly
Screw, 6-32 x 0.875 in
Qty 4
Guard, Fan
Fan
Clip, Heat Sink/Chip/Fan
Nut, Hex, 1/4-20, 2011-T3
Aluminum, 0.438 in Across
Flats, Qty 2
Torque to 20 +/- 2 in-lbs
Heat Sink, with Fan
Mounting Holes
Thermal Pad
Airflow
Alpha 21164
FM-06013.AI4
a. Put the GRAFOIL thermal pad in place. The GRAFOIL pad is used to improve
the thermal conductivity between the chip package and the heat sink by replacing micro air pockets with a less insulative material. Perform the following
steps to position the GRAFOIL pad:
1. Perform a visual inspection of the package slug to ensure that it is free of
contamination.
2. Wearing clean gloves, pick up the GRAFOIL pad. Do not perform this
with bare hands because skin oils can be transferred to the pad.
3. Place the GRAFOIL pad on the gold-plated slug surface and align it
with the threaded studs.
4–4
Upgrading the AlphaPC 164UX
Increasing Microprocessor Speed
b. Attach the microprocessor heat sink. The heat-sink material is clear anodized,
hot-water-sealed, 6061-T6 aluminum. The nut material is 2011-T3 aluminum
(this grade is critical). Perform the following steps to attach the heat sink:
1. Observe antistatic precautions.
2. Align the heat-sink holes with the threaded studs on the ceramic package.
3. Handle the heat sink by the edges and lower it onto the chip package,
taking care not to damage the stud threads.
4. Set a calibrated torque driver to 20 in-lbs, ±2 in-lbs (2.3 Nm, ±0.2 Nm).
The torque driver should have a mounted 7/16-inch socket.
5. Insert a nut into the 7/16-inch socket, place on one of the studs, and
tighten to the specified torque. Repeat for the second nut.
6. If the sink/chip/fan clip is used, properly install it by positioning it over
the assembly and hooking its ends around the ZIF socket retainers.
c. Attach the heat-sink fan assembly:
1. Place the fan assembly on top of the heat sink, aligning the fan mounting
holes with the corresponding threaded heat-sink holes. Align the fan so
that the fan power/sensor wires exit the fan closest to connector J35 (see
Figure 2–1). Fan airflow must be directed into the heat sink (fan label
facing down toward the heat sink).
2. Place the fan guard on top of the fan. Orient the guard so that the corner
mounting areas lay flush against the heat sink.
3. Secure the fan and fan guard to the heat sink with four 6-32 X 0.875-inch
screws.
4. Plug the fan power/sensor cable into connector J35.
Important: When installing the microprocessor, you must change the frequency of
its clock output by setting the system clock divisor jumpers, as described
in Section 2.2.
Upgrading the AlphaPC 164UX
4–5
5
Power and Environmental Requirements
5.1 Power Requirements
The AlphaPC 164UX motherboard requires a minimum of a 300 watt power supply.
The power supply must be ATX-compliant.
Table 5–1 Power Supply DC Current Requirements
Voltage
Current
+3.3 Vdc,±5%
+5 Vdc,±5%
-5 Vdc,±5%
+12 Vdc,±5%
-12 Vdc,±5%
14 A
25 A
0.5 A
10 A
0.5 A
Caution:
Fan sensor required. The 21164 microprocessor cooling fan must
have a built-in sensor that will drive a signal if the airflow stops. The
sensor is connected to the motherboard connector J35. When the signal
is generated, the speaker generates a tone..
5.2 Environmental Requirements
The 21164 microprocessor is cooled by a small fan blowing directly into the chip’s
heat sink. The AlphaPC 164UX motherboard is designed to run efficiently using
only this fan. Additional fans may be necessary depending upon cabinetry and the
requirements of add-in cards and disk drives.
Power and Environmental Requirements
5–1
Physical Parameters
The AlphaPC 164UX motherboard is specified to run within the environment listed
in Table 5–2.
Table 5–2 AlphaPC 164UX Motherboard Environmental Requirements
Parameter
Specification
Operating Temperature
Storage Temperature
Relative Humidity
10°C to 40°C (50°F to 104°F)
-55°C to 125°C ( -67°F to 257°F)
10% to 90% with maximum wet bulb temperature 28°C
(82°F) and a minimum dew point 2°C (36°F)
11°C/hour ±2°C/hour (20°F/hour ±4°F/hour)
Rate of (dry bulb) temperature
change
5.3 Physical Parameters
This section has four parts: the first illustrates the board dimensions for AlphaPC
164UX. the second shows the distances between the board mounting holes and the
edges of the board; the third shows the vertical clearances required by the board
components at all points within the border of the AlphaPC 164UX.
All holes and board measurements are compliant with the ATX 2.01 specification.
The AlphaPC 164UX exceeds the ATX height indications in two places. The first is
(the 2.5’ region).The second is at the location of the SCSI connectors(the 1.0’ region
to the left of the second PCI slots).
the fourth shows the ATX I/O shield dimensions.
5.3.1 Board Dimensions
The AlphaPC 164UX motherboard is an ATX-size printed wiring board (PWB) with
the following dimensions:
•
Length: 30.48 cm (12.0 in ±0.0005 in)
•
Width: 24.38 cm (9.6 in ±0.0005 in)
•
Height: 6.86 cm (2.7 in)
The board can be used in certain desktop and deskside systems that have adequate
clearance for the 21164 heat sink and its cooling fan. All ISA and PCI expansion
slots are usable in standard desktop or deskside enclosures.
5–2
Power and Environmental Requirements
Physical Parameters
5.3.2 Board Measurements and Hole Locations
Figure 5–1 shows the Board Measurements and Hole Locations for the AlphaPC
164UX.
Figure 5–1 Board measurement and Hole Position Diagram
9.600"
.250"
.400"
.650"
5.550"
3.750"
12.00"
.250"
3.1"
Board Measurements and Hole Locations
1.300"
Power and Environmental Requirements
5–3
Physical Parameters
5.3.3 Board Vertical Clearance
Figure 5–2 shows the Board Vertical Clearance for the AlphaPC 164UX.
Figure 5–2 Board Vertical Clearance Diagram
0.5"
1.0"
2.5"
1.5"
0.5"
Vertical Clearance Requirements
5–4
Power and Environmental Requirements
1.0"
1.5"
Physical Parameters
5.3.4 ATX I/O Shield Requirements
Figure 5–3 shows the ATX I/O shield dimensions for the AlphaPC 164UX.
Figure 5–3 ATX I/O Shield Dimensions
Standard 9 pin DSUB
connector cutouts
with these center
points
4.924
Standard 25 pin
DSUB connector
cutout with this center
point
3.454
2.436
1.60
1.774
.640
1.134
.990
.856
0.54
.256
.247
.240
Radius = .490 on both
circles. Dimensions
represent center of
circles.
.020
.150
6.250
Power and Environmental Requirements
5–5
A
System Address Space
This appendix describes the mapping of 21164 40-bit physical addresses to memory
and I/O space addresses. It also describes the translation of a 21164-initiated address
(addr_h<39:4>) into a PCI address (ad<63:0>) and the translation of a PCI-initiated
address into a physical memory address.
PCI addressing topics include dense and sparse address space and scatter-gather
address translation for DMA operations.
1.1 Address Map
The system address mapping operates with byte/word transactions enabled or disabled. Byte/word operation is controlled by PYXIS_CTRL1<0> (IOA_BEN).
Table A–1 shows system address mapping operations when IOA_BEN equals 0
(byte/word operation disabled).
Table A–1 Physical Address Map (Byte/Word Mode Disabled)
21164 Address1
Size (GB)
(Sheet 1 of 2)
Selection
00.000.0000 – 01.FFFF.FFFF
8.00
Main memory
E.0000.0000 – E.FFFF.FFFF
4.00
Dummy memory region
80.0000.0000 – 83.FFFF.FFFF
16.00
PCI sparse memory region 0, 512MB
84.0000.0000 – 84.FFFF.FFFF
4.00
PCI sparse memory region 1, 128MB
85.0000.0000 – 85.7FFF.FFFF
2.00
PCI sparse memory region 2, 64MB
85.8000.0000 – 85.BFFF.FFFF
1.00
PCI sparse I/O space region A, 32MB
85.C000.0000 – 85.FFFF.FFFF
1.00
PCI sparse I/O space region B, 32MB
86.0000.0000 – 86.FFFF.FFFF
4.00
PCI dense memory
87.0000.0000 – 87.1FFF.FFFF
0.50
PCI sparse configuration space
System Address Space
A–1
Address Map
Table A–1 Physical Address Map (Byte/Word Mode Disabled)
21164 Address1
Size (GB)
(Sheet 2 of 2)
Selection
87.2000.0000 – 87.3FFF.FFFF
0.50
PCI special/interrupt acknowledge
87.4000.0000 – 87.4FFF.FFFF
0.25
21174 main CSRs
87.5000.0000 – 87.5FFF.FFFF
0.25
21174 memory control CSRs
87.6000.0000 – 87.6FFF.FFFF
0.25
21174 PCI address translation
87.7000.0000 – 87.7FFF.FFFF
0.25
Reserved
87.8000.0000 – 87.8FFF.FFFF
0.25
21174 miscellaneous CSRs
87.9000.0000 – 87.9FFF.FFFF
0.25
21174 power management CSRs
87.A000.0000 – 87.AFFF.FFFF
0.25
21174 interrupt control CSRs
87.B000.0000 – 87.FFFF.FFFF
1.25
Reserved
1
All addresses in the range of 80.0000.0000 and 8F.FFFF.FFFF are aliased. Address bits 36 through
38 are ignored in the address.
Table A–2 shows system address mapping operations when IOA_BEN equals 1
(byte/word operation enabled).
Table A–2 Physical Address Map (Byte/Word Mode Enabled)
21164 Address
A–2
Size (GB)
(Sheet 1 of 2)
Selection
00.000.0000 – 01.FFFF.FFFF
8.00
Main memory
E.0000.0000 – E.FFFF.FFFF
4.00
Dummy memory region
80.0000.0000 – 83.FFFF.FFFF
16.00
PCI sparse memory region 0, 512MB
84.0000.0000 – 84.FFFF.FFFF
4.00
PCI sparse memory region 1, 128MB
85.0000.0000 – 85.7FFF.FFFF
2.00
PCI sparse memory region 2, 64MB
85.8000.0000 – 85.BFFF.FFFF
1.00
PCI sparse I/O space region A, 32MB
85.C000.0000 – 85.FFFF.FFFF
1.00
PCI sparse I/O space region B, 32MB
86.0000.0000 – 86.FFFF.FFFF
4.00
PCI dense memory
87.0000.0000 – 87.1FFF.FFFF
0.50
PCI sparse configuration space
87.2000.0000 – 87.3FFF.FFFF
0.50
PCI special/interrupt acknowledge
87.4000.0000 – 87.4FFF.FFFF
0.25
21174 main CSRs
87.5000.0000 – 87.5FFF.FFFF
0.25
21174 memory control CSRs
System Address Space
Address Map
Table A–2 Physical Address Map (Byte/Word Mode Enabled)
21164 Address
Size (GB)
(Sheet 2 of 2)
Selection
87.6000.0000 – 87.6FFF.FFFF
0.25
21174 PCI address translation
87.7000.0000 – 87.7FFF.FFFF
0.25
Reserved
87.8000.0000 – 87.8FFF.FFFF
0.25
21174 miscellaneous CSRs
87.9000.0000 – 87.9FFF.FFFF
0.25
21174 power management CSRs
87.A000.0000 – 87.AFFF.FFFF
0.25
21174 interrupt control CSRs
87.B000.0000 – 87.BFFF.FFFF
0.25
Reserved
88.0000.0000 – 88.FFFF.FFFF
4.00
PCI memory space INT8
98.0000.0000 – 98.FFFF.FFFF1
4.00
PCI memory space INT4
A8.FFFF.FFFF1
4.00
PCI memory space INT2
B8.0000.0000 – B8.FFFF.FFFF1
4.00
PCI memory space INT1
89.0000.0000 – 89.FFFF.FFFF
4.00
PCI I/O space INT8
99.0000.0000 – 99.FFFF.FFFF1
4.00
PCI I/O space INT4
A9.FFFF.FFFF1
4.00
PCI I/O space INT2
B9.0000.0000 – B9.FFFF.FFFF1
4.00
PCI I/O space INT1
8A.0000.0000 – 8A.FFFF.FFFF
4.00
PCI configuration space, type 0, INT8
9A.0000.0000 – 9A.FFFF.FFFF1
4.00
PCI configuration space, type 0, INT4
AA.FFFF.FFFF1
4.00
PCI configuration space, type 0, INT2
BA.0000.0000 – BA.FFFF.FFFF1
4.00
PCI configuration space, type 0, INT1
8B.0000.0000 – 8B.FFFF.FFFF
4.00
PCI configuration space, type 1, INT8
9B.0000.0000 – 9B.FFFF.FFFF1
4.00
PCI configuration space, type 1, INT4
AB.FFFF.FFFF1
4.00
PCI configuration space, type 1, INT2
BB.0000.0000 – BB.FFFF.FFFF1
4.00
PCI configuration space, type 1, INT1
C7.FFFF.FFFF2
1.00
Flash ROM read/write space
A8.0000.0000 –
A9.0000.0000 –
AA.0000.0000 –
AB.0000.0000 –
C7.C000.0000 –
1
Address bits 37 and 38 are generated by the 21164 and not by software. These address bits are
used by the 21164 to indicate to external hardware that this transaction is a byte, word, longword,
or quadword operation.
2 Read/write transactions to flash ROM must be done with byte transactions to address range
87.C000.0000 through 87.FFFF.FFFF. All other transaction types will produce UNDEFINED
results.
System Address Space
A–3
Address Map
The 21164 address space is divided into two regions using physical address <39>:
•
0 – 21164 access is to the cached memory space.
•
1 – 21164 access is to noncached space. This noncached space is used to access
memory-mapped I/O devices. Mailboxes are not supported.
The noncached space contains the CSRs, noncached memory space (for diagnostics),
and the PCI address space. The PCI defines three physical address spaces: a 64-bit
PCI memory space, a 4GB PCI I/O space, and a 256 byte-per-device PCI configuration space. In addition to these three address spaces on the PCI, the 21164’s noncached space is also used to generate PCI interrupt acknowledge and special cycles.
The 21164 has visibility to the complete address space. It can access the cached
memory region, the CSR region, the PCI memory region, the PCI I/O region, and
the configuration regions (see Figure 1–1).
The PCI devices have a restricted view of the address space. They can access any
PCI device through the PCI memory space or the PCI I/O space; but they have no
access to the PCI configuration space. The system restricts access to the system
memory (for DMA operations) to the use of five programmable windows in the PCI
memory space (see Figure 1–1).
A–4
System Address Space
Address Map
Figure 1–1 Address Space Overview
21164
Environment
Main System
Memory
PCI
Memory Space
PCI Window
PCI
Device
21164
PCI
Device
PCI I/O Space
CSRs
PCI
Configuration
Space
LJ-05395.AI4
DMA access to the system memory is achieved using windows in one of the following three ways:
•
Directly, using the “Monster Window” with dual-address cycles (DAC), where
ad<33:0> equals addr_h<33:0>.
•
Directly-mapped, by concatenating an offset to a portion of the PCI address.
•
Virtually, through a scatter-gather translation map. The scatter-gather map
allows any 8KB page of PCI memory address region to be redirected to any
8KB cached memory page, as shown in Figure 1–2.
System Address Space
A–5
PCI Address Space
Figure 1–2 Memory Remapping
21164 CPU
Cached Memory Space (8GB)
PCI Memory
Space
8KB
Page
PCI Window
Direct Map
PCI Window
Scatter-Gather
Map
LJ-05396.AI4
1.2 PCI Address Space
The system generates 32-bit PCI addresses but accepts both 64-bit address (DAC1)
cycles and 32-bit PCI address (SAC2) cycles. Accessing main memory is as follows:
•
Window 4, the “Monster Window,” provides full access to main memory. It is
accessed by DAC only with ad<40> equal to 1. Memory address addr_h<33:0>
equals PCI address ad<33:0>.
•
Window 3 can be either DAC or SAC, but not both. If DAC, ad<63:40> must be
zero, ad<39:32> must match the DAC register, and ad<31:0> must hit in window 3.
•
Windows 0, 1, and 2 are SAC-only.
1 Dual-address cycle (PCI 64-bit address transfer) requires that address bits <63:32> contain a nonzero value.
2 Single-address cycle (PCI 32-bit address transfer) requires that address bits <63:32> contain a value of zero.
A–6
System Address Space
21164 Address Space
1.3 21164 Address Space
Figure 1–3 shows an overview of the 21164 address space. Figure 1–4 shows how
the 21164 address map translates to the PCI address space and how PCI devices
access the 21164 memory space using DMA transactions. The PCI memory space is
double mapped via dense and sparse space.
The 21164 I/O address map has the following characteristics:
•
Provides 4GB of dense1 address space to completely map the 32-bit PCI memory space.
•
Provides abundant PCI sparse1 memory address space because sparse-space
regions have byte granularity and is the safest memory space to use (that is, no
prefetching). Furthermore, the larger the space the less likely software will need
to dynamically relocate the sparse-space segments. The main problem with
sparse space is that it wastes 21164 address space (for example, 16GB of 21164
address space maps to 512MB of PCI sparse space).
The system provides three PCI sparse-space memory regions, allowing 704MB
of total sparse-space memory. The three regions are relocatable using the
HAE_MEM CSR. The simplest configuration allows for 704MB of contiguous
memory space.
–
512MB region, which may be located in any naturally aligned 512MB segment of the PCI memory space. Software programmers may find this region
sufficient for their needs and can ignore the remaining two regions.
–
128MB regions, which may be located on any naturally aligned 128MB segment of the PCI memory space.
–
64MB region, which may be located on any naturally aligned 64MB segment of the PCI memory space.
•
Limits the PCI I/O space to sparse space. Although the PCI I/O space can handle
4GB, most PCI devices will not exceed 64KB for the foreseeable future. The
system provides 64MB of sparse I/O space because address decoding is faster.
•
Provides two PCI I/O sparse-space regions: region A, which is 32MB and is
fixed in PCI segment 0–32MB; and region B, which is also 32MB, but is relocatable using the HAE_IO register.
1 Dense and sparse space address space are described later in this chapter.
System Address Space
A–7
21164 Address Space
Figure 1–3 21164 Address Space Configuration
21164
Memory Space
Cached
Memory
Scatter-Gather
or
Direct
Translation
PCI Windows
Reserved
PCI Memory
Space
PCI Memory
Dense Space
PCI I/O
Space
PCI Memory
Sparse Space
PCI I/O
Space
21164 Programmed I/O
DMA Read/Write
LJ-05397.AI4
A–8
System Address Space
21164 Address Space
Figure 1–4 21164 and DMA Read and Write Transactions
39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 31 30
Size
00
Physical
Address
0
000XX
00.0000.0000
8GB Cached
Memory
01.FFFF.FFFF
02.0000.0000
Reserved
0=Cached
Memory
Space
1=Noncached
I/O
Space
00XXX
7F.FFFF.FFFF
80.0000.0000
0100X
83.FFFF.FFFF
84.0000.0000
01010
84.FFFF.FFFF
85.0000.0000
01011
85.8000.0000
0110X
86.0000.0000
PCI Memory
Sparse Space
704MB Maximum
PCI I/O Sparse
Space — 64MB
PCI Memory Dense
Space — 4GB
0111X
86.FFFF.FFFF
87.0000.0000
PCI Configuration,
CIA CSRs, Flash ROM
1000X
87.FFFF.FFFF
88.0000.0000
Byte/Word PCI
Space — 16GB
8B.FFFF.FFFF
LJ-04868.AI4
System Address Space
A–9
21164 Address Space
A.3.1 System Address Map
Figure 1–5 shows the following system address regions:
•
Main memory address space contains 8GB. All transactions contain 64 bytes, are
cache-block aligned, and are placed in cache by the 21164. Both Istream and
Dstream transactions access this address space.
•
PCI sparse-space memory region 1 contains 512MB. Noncached 21164 read/write
transactions are allowed, including byte, word, tribyte, longword (LW), and quadword (QW) types. There is no read prefetching.
•
PCI sparse-space memory region 2 contains 128MB.
•
PCI sparse-space memory region 3 contains 64MB.
•
PCI I/O sparse-space memory region A contains 32MB and is not relocatable.
•
PCI I/O sparse-space memory region B contains 32MB and is relocatable by
way of the HAE_IO register.
•
PCI dense memory space contains 4GB for 21164 noncached 21164 transactions. It is used for devices with access granularity greater or equal to a LW.
Read prefetching is allowed, and thus read transactions can have no side effects.
•
The PCI configuration space is used for noncached 21164 access. Sparse-space
read/write transactions are allowed, including byte, word, tribyte, LW, and QW
types. Prefetching of read data is not allowed.
Figure 1–6 shows a detailed view of PCI configuration space that includes 21174
CSRs. The 21174 CSR address space is chosen for hardware convenience.
A–10 System Address Space
21164 Address Space
Figure 1–5 System Address Map
Main Memory — 8GB
39 38
35 34 33
4 3
0
Memory Address
0 0 0 0 0 0
PCI Sparse Memory Space — 512MB Region 1
39 38
35 34 33
7 6
PCI Memory Address <28:2>
1 0 X 0 0 0
3 2
0
Size 0 0 0
PCI Sparse Memory Space — 128MB Region 2
39 38
7 6
35 34 33 32 31
PCI Memory Address <26:2>
1 0 X 0 0 1 0 0
3 2 1 0
Size 0 0 0
PCI Sparse Memory Space — 64MB Region 3
39 38
35 34 33 32 31 30
7 6
PCI Memory Address <25:2>
1 0 X 0 0 1 0 1 0
3 2 1 0
Size 0 0 0
PCI I/O Sparse Space — 32MB Region A
39 38
35 34 33 32 31 30 29
7 6
PCI I/O Address <24:2>
1 0 X 0 0 1 0 1 1 0
3 2 1 0
Size 0 0 0
PCI I/O Sparse Space — 32MB Region B
39 38
35 34 33 32 31 30 29
7 6
PCI I/O Address <24:2>
1 0 X 0 0 1 0 1 1 1
3 2 1 0
Size 0 0 0
PCI Memory Dense Space — 4GB
39 38
35 34 33 32 31 30 29
2 1 0
PCI Memory Address <31:2>
1 0 X 0 0 1 1 0
0 0
PCI Configuration Space
39 38
35 34 33 32 31
1 0 X 0 0 1 1 1
28 27
CSR
Space
7 6
Address
3 2 1 0
Size 0 0 0
LJ-05398.AI4
System Address Space
A–11
21164 Byte/Word PCI Space
Figure 1–6 21174 CSR Space
PCI Configuration Space
39 38
35 34 33 32 31
1 0 X 0 0 1 1 1
CPU Address
31 30 29 28
28 27
7 6
CSR
Space
Size (GB)
Address
Size 0 0 0
Contents
0
0
0
0.5
PCI Configuration Space
0
0
1
0.5
PCI IACK/Special Cycle
0
1
0
0
0.25
21174 Main CSRs
0
1
0
1
0.25
Main Memory Control CSRs
0
1
1
0
0.25
21174 Address Translation
0
1
1
1
0.25
Reserved
2.00
Miscellaneous
1
3 2 1 0
FM-06062.AI4
1.4 21164 Byte/Word PCI Space
The 21164 supports byte/word instructions that allow software to perform byte granularity transactions to and from I/O space without using sparse address space. This
space is divided into four regions: memory, I/O, configuration – type 0, and configuration – type 1, as shown in Figure 1–7.
A–12 System Address Space
21164 Byte/Word PCI Space
Figure 1–7 Byte/Word PCI Space
PCI Memory Space — 4GB
39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 31
1 Size X 1 0 0 0
2 1 0
PCI Memory Address <31:2>
0 0
PCI I/O Space — 4GB
39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 31
1 Size X 1 0 0 1
0
PCI I/O Address
PCI Type 0 Configuration Space — 4GB
39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 31
1 Size X 1 0 1 0
2 1 0
PCI Configuration Address <31:2>
0 0
PCI Type 1 Configuration Space — 4GB
39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 31
1 Size X 1 0 1 1
2 1 0
PCI Configuration Address <31:2>
0 1
LJ-05399.AI4
Operations are the same for the four regions. The 21164 will issue a single byte/word
read or write transaction for PCI byte and word instructions. The 21164 will not
pack longword load instructions. The 21164 can pack up to eight longword store
instructions for a single 32-byte block into one transaction. Up to four quadword
instructions can also be packed to the same 32-byte block. Byte/word support is
enabled when 21164 IPR register ICSR<17> equals 1 and when 21174 CSR register
PYXIS_CTRL1<0> also equals 1.
System Address Space
A–13
21164 Byte/Word PCI Space
Table 1–3 shows noncached 21164 addresses when byte/word support is enabled.
Table A–3 21164 Byte/Word Addressing
Instruction
addr_h
<38:37>
int4_valid
<3>
<2>
<1>
<0>
LDQ
00
INT8
—
—
—
LDL
01
addr_h<3:2>
—
Undefined
—
LDWU
10
addr_h<3:1>
—
—
Undefined
LDBU
11
addr_h<3:0>
—
—
—
STQ
00
INT4 Mask
—
—
—
STL
01
INT4 Mask
—
—
—
STW
10
addr_h<3:1>
—
—
Undefined
STB
11
addr_h<3:0>
—
—
—
A.4.1 21164 Size Field
Table A–4 shows the calculation of the 21164 size field.
Table A–4 21164 Byte/Word Translation Values
Size<38:37>
Data Size
00
INT8 (Quadword — 8 bytes, 64 bits)
01
INT4 (Longword — 4 bytes, 32 bits)
10
INT2 (Word — 2 bytes, 16 bits)
11
INT1 (Byte — 1 byte, 8 bits)
The following transactions use single data transfers on the PCI:
•
INT1 and INT2 read and write transactions
•
INT4 read transactions
The following transactions have multiple data transfers on the PCI:
•
INT4 write transactions
•
INT8 read and write transactions
A–14 System Address Space
Cacheable Memory Space
1.5 Cacheable Memory Space
Cacheable memory space is located in the range 00.0000.0000 to 01.FFFF.FFFF. The
21174 recognizes the first 8GB to be in cacheable memory space. The block size is
fixed at 64 bytes. Read and flush commands to the 21164 caches occur for DMA
traffic.
1.6 PCI Dense Memory Space
PCI dense memory address space is located in the range 86.0000.0000 to
86.FFFF.FFFF. This address space is typically used for memory-like data buffers
such as a video frame buffer or a nonvolatile RAM (NVRAM). Dense space does not
allow byte or word access, but has the following advantages over sparse space:
•
Contiguous locations — Some software, such as the default graphics routines of
the Windows NT operating system, requires memory-like transactions. These
routines cannot use sparse-space addresses, because they require transactions on
the PCI bus to be at adjacent 21164 addresses, instead of being widely separated
as in sparse space. As a result, if the user-mode driver manipulates its frame
buffer in sparse space, it cannot hand over the buffer to the common
Windows NT operating system graphics code.
•
Higher bus bandwidth — PCI bus burst transfers are not usable in sparse space
except for a 2-longword burst for quadword write transactions. Dense space is
defined to allow both burst read and write transactions.
•
Efficient read/write buffering — In sparse space, separate transactions use separate read or write buffer entries. Dense space allows separate transactions to be
collapsed in read and write buffers (as the 21164 does).
•
Few memory barriers (MBs) — In general, sparse-space transactions are separated by MB instructions to avoid read/write buffer collapsing. Dense-space
transactions only require barriers when explicit ordering is required by the software.
Dense space is provided for the 21164 to access PCI memory space, not for access to
PCI I/O space. Dense space has the following characteristics:
•
It holds a one-to-one mapping between 21164 addresses and PCI addresses.
A longword address from the 21164 will map to a longword on the PCI with no
shifting of the address field. Hence, the term dense space. Sparse space, on the
other hand, maps a large piece of 21164 memory space (32 bytes) to a small
piece (such as a byte) on the PCI.
System Address Space
A–15
PCI Dense Memory Space
•
The concept of dense space (and sparse space) is applicable only to a 21164-generated address. There is no such thing as dense space (or sparse space) for a PCI
generated address.
•
Byte or word transactions are not possible in dense space. The minimum access
granularity is a longword on write transactions and a quadword on read transactions. The maximum transfer length is 32 bytes (performed as a burst of eight
longwords on the PCI). Any combination of longwords may be valid on write
transactions. Valid longwords surrounding an invalid longword(s) (called a hole)
are required to be handled correctly by all PCI devices. The 21174 will allow
such holes to be issued.
•
Read transactions will always be performed as a burst of two or more longwords
on the PCI because the minimum granularity is a quadword. The 21164 can
request a longword but the 21174 will always fetch a quadword, thus prefetching
a second longword. Therefore, this space cannot be used for devices that have
read side effects. Although a longword may be prefetched, the prefetch buffer is
not treated as a cache and so coherency is not an issue. A quadword read transaction is not atomic on the PCI; that is, the target device is at liberty to force a retry
after the first longword of data is sent, and then to allow another PCI device to
take control of the PCI bus1.
•
The 21164 merges noncached reads of up to 32 bytes maximum. The largest
dense-space read transaction is 32 bytes from the PCI bus.
•
Write transactions to dense space are buffered in the 21164 chip. The 21174 supports a burst length of 8 on the PCI, corresponding to 32 bytes of data. Also, the
21174 provides four 32-byte write buffers to maximize I/O write transaction performance. These four buffers are strictly ordered. Write transactions are sent out
on the bus in the order that they were received from the 21164. Avoid write
buffer merging and use memory barrier (MB) and write memory barrier (WMB)
instructions carefully.
1 The 21174 does not drive the PCI lock signal and this cannot ensure atomicity. This is true
of all current Alpha microprocessors.
A–16 System Address Space
PCI Sparse Memory Space
Figure 1–8 shows dense-space address generation.
Figure 1–8 Dense-Space Address Generation
21164 Address
39 38
1
35 34 33 32 31
05 04
02 01 00
1 1 0
00
<31:5>
int4_valid
21164
PCI Dense
Memory
Address
31
05 04
02 01 00
00
LJ04264A.AI4
The following list describes address generation in dense space:
•
addr_h<31:5> value is sent directly out on ad<31:5>.
•
addr_h<4:2> is not sent out by the 21164 and instead is inferred from the
int4_valid<3:0>.
•
ad<4:3> is a copy of addr_h<4:3>.
•
ad<2> differs for read and write transactions as follows:
–
For a read transaction, ad<2> is zero (that is, the minimum read transaction
resolution in noncached space is a quadword).
–
For a write transaction, ad<2> equals addr_h<2>.
1.7 PCI Sparse Memory Space
The system provides three regions of contiguous 21164 address space that maps
to PCI sparse memory space. The total 21164 range is from 80.0000.0000 to
85.7FFF.FFFF.
System Address Space
A–17
PCI Sparse Memory Space
A.7.1 Hardware Extension Register (HAE_MEM)
In sparse space, addr_h<7:3> are used to encode byte enable bits, size bits and the
low-order PCI address, ad<2:0>. This means that there are now five fewer address
bits available to generate the PCI physical address.
The system provides three sparse-space PCI memory regions and allows all three
sparse-space regions to be relocated by way of bits in the HAE_MEM register. This
provides software with great flexibility.
A.7.2 Memory Access Rules and Operation
The Alpha instruction set can express only aligned longword and quadword data references. The PCI bus requires the ability to express byte, word, tribyte, longword
(double word), and quadword references. Intel processors are capable of generating
unaligned references, so the 21174 should be able to emulate the resulting PCI transactions to ensure compatibility with PCI devices designed for Intel systems.
The size of the data transfer (byte, word, tribyte, longword, or quadword) and the
byte enables are encoded in the 21164 address. The 21164 signals addr_h<6:3> are
used for this purpose, leaving the remaining addr_h<31:7> signals to generate a PCI
longword address <26:3>1. This loss of address bits has resulted in a 21164 22GB
sparse 32-bit address space that maps to only 704MB of address space on the PCI.
The rules for accessing sparse space are as follows:
•
Sparse space supports all the byte encodings that may be generated in an Intel
system to ensure compatibility with PCI devices/drivers. The results of some
references are not explicitly defined. These are the missing entries in Table 1–6
(that is, word size with address<6:5> = 11). The hardware will complete the reference, but the reference is not required to produce any particular result, nor will
the system report an error.
•
Software must use longword load or store instructions (LDVSTL) to perform a
reference of longword length or less on the PCI bus. The bytes to be transferred
must be positioned within the longword in the correct byte lanes as indicated by
the PCI byte enable bits. The hardware does not shift bytes within the longword.
Quadword load and store instructions must be used only to perform quadword
transfers. Use of STQ/LDQ instructions for any other references will produce
UNPREDICTABLE results.
1 Quadword encoding is provided by way of 21164 address bits <6:3>. In this case, 21164
address bit <7> is treated as zero by the hardware.
A–18 System Address Space
PCI Sparse Memory Space
•
Hardware does not perform read-ahead (prefetch) transactions in sparse space
because read-ahead transactions may have detrimental side effects.
•
Programmers are required to insert memory barrier (MB) instructions between
sparse-space transactions to prevent collapsing in the 21164 write buffer. However, this is not always necessary. For example, consecutive sparse-space
addresses will be separated by 32 bytes (and will not be collapsed by the 21164).
•
Programmers are required to insert MB instructions if the sparse-space address
ordering/coherency to a dense-space address is to be maintained.
•
Table 1–6 shows encoding of the 21164 address for sparse-space read transactions to PCI space. An important point to note is that signals addr_h<33:5> are
directly available from the 21164 pins. On read transactions, the 21164 sends out
addr_h<2:0> indirectly on the int4_valid pins. Signals addr_h<2:0> are
required to be zero. Transactions with addr_h<2:0> not equal to zero will produce UNPREDICTABLE results.
•
Table A–5 shows the relation between int4_valid<3:0> and addr_h<4:3> for a
sparse-space write transaction. Unlisted int4_valid patterns will produce
UNPREDICTABLE results (that is, as a result of collapsing in the 21164 write
buffer; or by issuing a STQ instruction when a STL instruction is required).
Table A–5 Int4_valid and 21164 Address Relationship
EV5 Data Cycle
Int4_valid<3:0>1
Address<4:3>
First
00 01
00
00 10
00
01 00
01
10 00
01
00 01
10
00 10
10
01 00
11
Second
10 00
11 00
1
2
11
(STQ)2
11
All other int4_valid patterns result in UNPREDICTABLE results.
Only one valid STQ case is allowed.
System Address Space
A–19
PCI Sparse Memory Space
Table 1–6 defines the low-order PCI sparse memory address bits. Signals
addr_h<7:3> are used to generate the length of the PCI transaction in bytes, the byte
enable bits, and ad<2:0>. The 21164 signals addr_h<30:8> correspond to the quadword PCI address and are sent out on ad<25:3>.
Table 1–6 PCI Memory Sparse-Space Read/Write Encodings
Size
addr_h<4:3>
Byte
Word4
00
01
Byte Offset
addr_h
<6:5>
ad<2:0>
Data-In Register
PCI Byte Byte Lanes
Enable1 63.....32 31.......0
00
A<7>2,003
1110
OOOX
01
A<7>,00
1101
OOXO
A<7>,00
1011
OXOO
11
A<7>,00
0111
XOOO
00
A<7>,00
1100
OOXX
A<7>,00
1001
OXXO
10
A<7>,00
0011
XXOO
00
A<7>,00
1000
OXXX
10
01
21164
Instruction
Allowed
LDL,STL
LDL,STL
Tribyte
10
01
LDL,STL
A<7>,00
0001
XXXO
Longword
11
00
LDL,STL
A<7>,00
0000
XXXX
Quadword
11
11
LDQ,STQ
000
0000
XXXX XXXX
1 Byte enable set to 0 indicates that byte lane carries meaningful data.
2 A<7> = addr_h<7>.
3 In PCI sparse memory space, ad<1:0> is always zero.
4 Missing entries (for example, word size with 21164 address = 11) enjoy
A–20 System Address Space
UNPREDICTABLE results.
PCI Sparse Memory Space
The high-order ad<31:26> are obtained from either the hardware extension register
(HAE_MEM) or the 21164 address depending on sparse-space regions, as shown in
Table 1–7. See the Digital Semiconductor 21174 Core Logic Chip Technical Reference Manual for more information about the 21174 HAE_MEM CSR.
Table 1–7 PCI Address Mapping
21164
Address
Region
ad
<31>
<30>
<29>
<28>
<27>
<26>
CPU<32>
CPU<31>
80.0000.0000
to
83.FFFF.FFFF
1
HAE_MEM HAE_MEM HAE_MEM CPU<33>
<31>
<30>
<29>
84.0000.0000
to
84.FFFF.FFFF
2
HAE_MEM HAE_MEM HAE_MEM HAE_MEM HAE_MEM
<15>
<14>
<13>
<12>
<11>
CPU<31>
85.0000.0000
to
85.FFFF.FFFF
3
HAE_MEM HAE_MEM HAE_MEM HAE_MEM HAE_MEM
<7>
<6>
<5>
<4>
<3>
HAE_MEM
<2>
Figure 1–9 shows the mapping for region 1.
Figure 1–9 PCI Memory Sparse-Space Address Generation – Region 1
21164 Address
35 34 33
39 38
1
SBZ
0
08 07 06 05 04 03 02
00
PCI QW Address
int4_valid
21164
HAE_MEM CSR
31
29 28
00
43
31
29 28
03 02 01 00
Length in Bytes
Byte Offset
0 0
PCI Address
LJ04265A.AI4
System Address Space
A–21
PCI Sparse Memory Space
Figure 1–10 shows the mapping for region 2.
Figure 1–10 PCI Memory Sparse-Space Address Generation – Region 2
21164 Address
35 34 33 32 31
39 38
SBZ
1
1 0 0
08 07 06 05 04 03 02
00
PCI QW Address
int4_valid
21164
HAE_MEM CSR
31
16 15
11 10
00
43
31
27 26
Length in Bytes
Byte Offset
03 02 01 00
0 0
PCI Address
LJ-04266.AI4
Figure 1–11 shows the mapping for region 3.
Figure 1–11 PCI Memory Sparse-Space Address Generation – Region 3
21164 Address
35 34 33 32 31 30
39 38
1
SBZ
1 0 1 0
08 07 06 05 04 03 02
00
PCI QW Address
int4_valid
21164
HAE_MEM CSR
31
08 07
02 01 00
43
31
26 25
03 02 01 00
Length in Bytes
Byte Offset
0 0
PCI Address
LJ-04267.AI4
A–22 System Address Space
PCI Sparse I/O Space
1.8 PCI Sparse I/O Space
The PCI sparse I/O space is divided into two regions — region A and region B.
Region A addresses the lower 32MB of PCI I/O space and is never relocated. This
region will be used to address the (E)ISA devices. Region B is used to address a further 32MB of PCI I/O space and is relocatable using the HAE_IO register.
A.8.1 Hardware Extension Register (HAE_IO)
In sparse space, the 21164 address bits <7:3> are used to encode byte enable bits,
size bits, and the low-order ad<2:0>. This means that there are now five fewer
address bits available to generate the PCI physical address.
The system provides two PCI sparse I/O space regions and allows one region to be
relocated by way of bits in the HAE_IO register.
A.8.2 PCI Sparse I/O Space Access Operation
The PCI sparse I/O space is located in the range 85.8000.0000 to 85.FFFF.FFFF.
This space has characteristics similar to the PCI sparse memory space. This 2GB
21164 address segment maps to two 32MB regions of PCI I/O address space. A read
or write transaction to this space causes a PCI I/O read or write command. The highorder PCI address bits are handled as follows:
•
Region A: This region has addr_h<34:30> = 10110 and addresses the lower
32MB of PCI sparse I/O space. Signals ad<31:25> are asserted at zero by the
hardware (see Figure 1–12). Region A is used to address (E)ISA address space
(the EISA 64KB I/O space cannot be relocated). Figure 1–12 shows PCI sparse
I/O space address translation in Region A.
•
Region B: This region has addr_h<34:30> = 10111 and addresses a relocatable
32MB of PCI sparse I/O space. This 32MB segment is relocated by assigning
ad<31:25> to equal HAE_IO<31:25>. Figure 1–13 shows PCI sparse I/O space
address translation in Region B.
The remainder of the PCI I/O address is formed in the same way for both regions:
•
ad<24:3> are derived from addr_h<29:8>.
•
ad<2:0> are defined in Table 1–8.
System Address Space
A–23
PCI Sparse I/O Space
Table 1–8 contains the PCI sparse I/O space read/write encodings.
Table 1–8 PCI Sparse I/O Space Read/Write Encodings
Size
addr_h<4:3>
Byte
Word
00
3
01
Byte Offset
addr_h
<6:5>
21164
Instruction
Allowed
Data-In Register
Byte Lanes
63.....32 31.......0
ad<2:0>
PCI Byte
Enable1
00
A<7>2,00
1110
OOOX
01
A<7>,00
1101
OOXO
A<7>,00
1011
OXOO
11
A<7>,00
0111
XOOO
00
A<7>,00
1100
OOXX
A<7>,00
1001
OXXO
10
A<7>,00
0011
XXOO
00
A<7>,00
1000
OXXX
10
01
LDL,STL
LDL,STL
Tribyte
10
01
LDL,STL
A<7>,00
0001
XXXO
Longword
11
00
LDL,STL
A<7>,00
0000
XXXX
Quadword
11
11
LDQ,STQ
000
0000
XXXX XXXX
1 Byte enable set to 0 indicates that byte lane carries meaningful data.
2 A<7> = addr_h<7>.
3 Missing entries (for example, word size with 21164 address = 11) enjoy
A–24 System Address Space
UNPREDICTABLE results.
PCI Sparse I/O Space
Figure 1–12 PCI Sparse I/O Space Address Translation (Region A, Lower 32MB)
21164 Address
35 34 33 32 31 30 29
39 38
1
SBZ
08 07 06 05 04 03 02
00
1 0 1 1 0
<29:8>
int4_valid
21164
43
31
25 24
Length in Bytes
Byte Offset
03 02 01 00
0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
PCI Address
LJ-04268.AI4
Figure 1–13 PCI Sparse I/O Space Address Translation (Region B, Higher Area)
21164 Address
35 34 33 32 31 30 29
39 38
1
SBZ
08 07 06 05 04 03 02
00
1 0 1 1 1
int4_valid
21164
HAE_IO CSR
31
25 24
43
31
25 24
03 02 01 00
Length in Bytes
Byte Offset
0 0
PCI Address
LJ04269A.AI4
System Address Space
A–25
PCI Configuration Space
1.9 PCI Configuration Space
The PCI configuration space is located in the range 87.0000.0000 to 87.1FFF.FFFF.
Software is advised to clear PYXIS_CTRL<FILL_ERR_EN> when probing for PCI
devices by way of configuration space read transactions. This will prevent the 21174
from generating an ECC error if no device responds to the configuration cycle (and
random data is picked up on the PCI bus).
A read or write transaction to this space causes a configuration read or write cycle on
the PCI. There are two classes of targets that are selected, based on the value of the
CFG register.
•
Type 0 — These are targets on the primary 64-bit PCI bus. These targets are
selected by making CFG<1:0> = 0.
•
Type 1 — These are targets on the secondary 32-bit PCI bus (that is, behind a
PCI-to-PCI bridge). These targets are selected by making CFG<1:0> = 1.
Note:
CFG<1:0> = 10 or 11 are reserved (by the PCI specification).
Software must program the CFG register before running a configuration cycle.
Sparse address decoding is used. Signals addr_h<6:3> are used to generate both the
length of the PCI transaction in bytes and the byte enable bits. Signals ad<1:0> are
obtained from CFG<1:0>. Signals addr_h<28:7> correspond to ad<23:2> and provide the configuration command information (such as which device to select). The
high-order ad<31:24> are always zero.
Figure 1–14 depicts PCI configuration space (sparse). Figure 1–15 shows PCI configuration space (dense).
A–26 System Address Space
PCI Configuration Space
Figure 1–14 PCI Configuration Space Definition (Sparse)
CPU Address
39 38
1
35 34
MBZ
32 31
29 28
21 20
16 15
13 12
07 06 05 04 03 02
00
1 1 1 0 0 0
Length
Byte Offset
CFG<1:0>
Type 0 PCI
Configuration
Address
Type 1 PCI
Configuration
Address
31
11 10
IDSEL
31
27 26
Function
24 23
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
08 07
16 15
Bus
11 10
Device
02 01 00
Register
08 07
Function
0 0
02 01 00
Register
0 1
LJ04270A.AI4
Figure 1–15 PCI Configuration Space Definition (Dense)
31
24 23
16 15
11 10
08 07
02 01 00
Byte Offset
CFG<1:0>
31
11 10
IDSEL
31
27 26
24 23
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Function
16 15
Bus
08 07
11 10
Device
02 01 00
Register
08 07
Function
02 01 00
Register
0 1
LJ-05400.AI4
System Address Space
A–27
PCI Configuration Space
Peripherals are selected during a PCI configuration cycle if the following three conditions are met:
1. Their IDSEL pin is asserted.
2. The PCI bus command indicates a configuration read or write.
3. Address bits <1:0> are 00.
Address bits <7:2> select a Dword (longword) register in the peripheral’s 256-byte
configuration address space. Transactions can use byte masks.
Peripherals that integrate multiple functional units (for example, SCSI and Ethernet)
can provide configuration space for each function. Address bits <10:8> can be
decoded by the peripheral to select one of eight functional units.
Signals ad<31:11> are available to generate the IDSEL bits (note that IDSEL bits
behind a PCI-to-PCI bridge are determined from the device field encoding of a type
1 access). The IDSEL pin of each device is connected to a unique PCI address bit
from ad<31:11>. The binary value of addr_h<20:16> is used to select which
ad<31:11> is asserted, as shown in Table A–9.
Table A–9 CPU Address to IDSEL Conversion
CPU Address <20:16>
ad<31:11> – IDSEL
00000
0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 1
00001
0000 0000 0000 0000 0001 0
00010
0000 0000 0000 0000 0010 0
00011
0000 0000 0000 0000 0100 0
.....
.... .... .... .... .... .
.....
.... .... .... .... .... .
10011
0100 0000 0000 0000 0000 0
10100
1000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0
10101
0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0
.....
...(No device selected)
.....
—
11111
0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0
A–28 System Address Space
PCI Configuration Space
Note:
If a quadword access is specified for the configuration cycle, then the
least significant bit of the register number field (such as ad<2>) must be
zero. Quadword transactions must access quadword aligned registers.
If the PCI cycle is a configuration read or write cycle but the ad<1:0> are 01 (that is,
a type 1 transfer), then a device on a hierarchical bus is being selected via a PCI-toPCI bridge. This cycle is accepted by the PCI-to-PCI bridge for propagation to its
secondary PCI bus. During this cycle, <23:16> selects a unique bus number, and
address <15:8> selects a device on that bus (typically decoded by the PCI-to-PCI
bridge to generate the secondary PCI address pattern for IDSEL). In addition,
address <7:2> selects a Dword (longword) in the device’s configuration space.
Table 1–10 contains the PCI configuration space read/write encodings.
Table 1–10 PCI Configuration Space Read/Write Encodings
Size
addr_h<4:3>
Byte
00
Word3
01
Byte Offset
addr_h
<6:5>
21164
Instruction
Allowed
Data-In Register
Byte Lanes
63.....32 31.......0
ad<2:0>
PCI Byte
Enable1
00
A<7>2,00
1110
OOOX
01
A<7>,00
1101
OOXO
A<7>,00
1011
OXOO
11
A<7>,00
0111
XOOO
00
A<7>,00
1100
OOXX
A<7>,00
1001
OXXO
10
A<7>,00
0011
XXOO
00
A<7>,00
1000
OXXX
10
01
LDL,STL
LDL,STL
Tribyte
10
01
LDL,STL
A<7>,00
0001
XXXO
Longword
11
00
LDL,STL
A<7>,00
0000
XXXX
Quadword
11
11
LDQ,STQ
000
0000
XXXX XXXX
1 Byte enable set to 0
2 A<7> = addr_h<7>.
3 Missing entries (for
indicates that byte lane carries meaningful data.
example, word size with addr_h<6:5> = 11) generate UNPREDICTABLE results.
Each PCI-to-PCI bridge can be configured via PCI configuration cycles on its primary
PCI interface. Configuration parameters in the PCI-to-PCI bridge will identify the bus
number for its secondary PCI interface and a range of bus numbers that may exist hierSystem Address Space
A–29
PCI Configuration Space
archically behind it. If the bus number of the configuration cycle matches the bus number of the bridge chip’s secondary PCI interface, it will accept the configuration cycle,
decode it, and generate a PCI configuration cycle with ad<1:0> = 00 on its secondary
PCI interface. If the bus number is within the range of bus numbers that may exist
hierarchically behind its secondary PCI interface, the bridge chip passes the PCI configuration cycle on unmodified (ad<1:0> = 01). It will be accepted by a bridge further
downstream. Figure 1–16 shows a typical PCI hierarchy. This is only one example of
how the 21174 can be used in a system design.
Figure 1–16 PCI Bus Hierarchy
Memory
Bcache
64-Bit Slots
21174
ASIC
PCI
Graphics
21164
64-Bit PCI Bus
PCI-to-PCI
Bridge
PCI-to-(E)ISA
Bridge
Internal PCI
32-Bit
Slots
SCSI
SCSI
SCSI
Ethernet
Slot
(E)ISA
Bus
Slot
Slot
Audio
LJ-05401.AI4
A–30 System Address Space
PCI Special/Interrupt Cycles
1.10 PCI Special/Interrupt Cycles
PCI special/interrupt cycles are located in the range 87.2000.0000 to 87.3FFF.FFFF.
The Special cycle command provides a simple message broadcasting mechanism on
the PCI. The Intel processor uses this cycle to broadcast processor status; but in general it may be used for logical sideband signaling between PCI agents. The special
cycle contains no explicit destination address, but is broadcast to all agents. Each
receiving agent must determine if the message contained in the data field is applicable to it.
A write access in the range 87.2000.0000 to 87.3FFF.FFFF causes a special cycle on
the PCI. The 21164’s write data will be passed unmodified to the PCI. Software
must write the data in longword 0 of the hexword with the following fields:
•
Bytes 0 and 1 contain the encoded message.
•
Bytes 2 and 3 are message dependent (optional) data fields.
A read of the same address range will result in an Interrupt Acknowledge cycle on
the PCI and return the vector data provided by the PCI-EISA bridge to the 21164.
1.11 Hardware-Specific and Miscellaneous Register Space
These registers are located in the range 87.4000.0000 to 87.FFFF.FFFF.
Table A–11 lists the address map for the hardware-specific registers.
Table A–11 Hardware and Miscellaneous Address Map
CPU Address <39:28>
Selected Region
1000 0111 0100
General control, diagnostic, performance monitoring, and
error logging registers
1000 0111 0101
Memory control registers
1000 0111 0110
PCI address translation (scatter-gather, windows, and so
on)
1000 0111 0111
Reserved
1000 0111 1000
Miscellaneous registers
1000 0111 1001
Power management registers
1000 0111 1010
Interrupt controller registers
1000 0111 11xx
Flash ROM read/write space – for programming
System Address Space
A–31
PCI to Physical Memory Address
The address space here is a hardware-specific variant of sparse-space encoding. For
the CSRs, addr_h<27:6> specifies a longword address where addr_h<5:0> must be
zero. All the 21174 registers are accessed with a LW granularity. For more specific
details on the 21174 CSRs, see the Digital Semiconductor 21174 Core Logic Chip
Technical Reference Manual. For the flash ROM, addr_h<30:6> defines a byte
address. The fetched byte is always returned in the first byte lane (bits <7:0>).
1.12 PCI to Physical Memory Address
Incoming PCI addresses (32-bit or 64-bit) have to be mapped to the 21164 cached
memory space (8GB). The 21174 provides five programmable address windows that
control access of PCI peripherals to system memory.
The mapping from the PCI address to the physical address can be direct, direct
mapped (physical mapping with an address offset), or scatter-gather mapped
(virtual mapping). These five address windows are referred to as the PCI target
windows.
Window 4 maps directly, using the “Monster Window” with dual-address cycles
(DAC), where ad<33:0> equals addr_h<33:0>.
The following three registers are associated with windows <3:0>:
•
Window base (W_BASE) register
•
Window mask (W_MASK) register
•
Translated base (T_BASE) register
In addition, there is an extra register associated with window 3 only. This is the window DAC register and is used for PCI 64-bit addressing (that is, the DAC mode).
The following text applies only to windows <3:0>.
The window mask register provides a mask corresponding to ad<31:20> of an
incoming PCI address. The size of each window can be programmed to be from
1MB to 4GB in powers of two, by masking bits of the incoming PCI address using
the window mask register, as shown in Table A–12. (Note that the mask field pattern
was chosen to speed up timing-critical logic circuits.)
A–32 System Address Space
PCI to Physical Memory Address
Table A–12 shows the PCI target window mask fields.
Table A–12 PCI Target Window Mask Register Fields 1
PCI_MASK<31:20>
Size of Window
Value of n
0000 0000 0000
1MB
20
0000 0000 0001
2MB
21
0000 0000 0011
4MB
22
0000 0000 0111
8MB
23
0000 0000 1111
16MB
24
0000 0001 1111
32MB
25
0000 0011 1111
64MB
26
0000 0111 1111
128MB
27
0000 1111 1111
256MB
28
0001 1111 1111
512MB
29
0011 1111 1111
1GB
30
0111 1111 1111
2GB
31
1111 1111 1111
4GB
32
Otherwise
UNPREDICTABLE
—
1
Only the incoming ad<31:n> are compared with <31:n> of the window base register, as shown in
Figure 1–18. If n=32, no comparison is performed.
Based on the value of the window mask register, the unmasked bits of the incoming
PCI address are compared with the corresponding bits of each window’s window
base register. If one of the window base registers and the incoming PCI address
match, then the PCI address has hit the PCI target window. Otherwise, the PCI
address has missed the window. A window enable bit, W_EN, is provided in each
window’s window base register to allow windows to be independently enabled
(W_EN = 1) or disabled (W_EN = 0).
If a hit occurs in any of the four windows that are enabled, then the 21174 will
respond to the PCI cycle by asserting the signal devsel. The PCI target windows
must be programmed so that their address ranges do not overlap; otherwise, the
results are UNDEFINED.
System Address Space
A–33
PCI to Physical Memory Address
The window base address must be on a naturally aligned boundary address depending on the size of the window1. This rule is not particularly difficult to obey, because
the address space of any PCI device can be located anywhere in the PCI’s 4GB memory space, and this scheme is compatible with the PCI specification:
A PCI device specifies the amount of memory space it requires via the Base registers in its configuration space. The Base Address registers are implemented so
that the address space consumed by the device is a power of two in size, and is
naturally aligned on the size of the space consumed.
A PCI device need not use all the address range it consumes (that is, the size of the
PCI address window defined by the base address) and it does not need to respond to
unused portions of the address space. The one exception to this is a PCI bridge that
requires two additional registers (the base and limit address registers). These registers accurately specify the address space that the bridge device will respond to2 and
are programmed by the power-on self-test (POST) code. The 21174, as a PCI hostbridge device, does not have base and limit registers3, but does respond to all the
addresses defined by the window base register (that is, all addresses within a window).
Figure 1–17 shows how the DMA address ranges of a number of PCI devices are
accepted by the PCI-window ranges. PCI devices are allowed to have multiple DMA
address ranges, as shown for device 2. The example also shows that the window can
be larger than the corresponding device’s DMA address range, as shown for device
0. Device 1 and device 2 have address ranges that are accepted by one window.
Each window determines whether direct mapping or scatter-gather mapping is used
to access physical memory.
1 For example, a 4MB window cannot begin at address 1MB. It must start at addresses
4MB, 8MB, 12MB, ... .
2 A PCI bridge device responds to all addresses in the range: base ≤ address < limit.
3 Host-bridge devices, because they are under system control, are free to violate the rules.
A–34 System Address Space
PCI to Physical Memory Address
Figure 1–17 PCI DMA Addressing Example
21164 System
PCI Device's DMA
Memory Space
8KB
Page
Scatter-Gather
Map
21164 Memory
Space (8GB)
PCI Memory
Space (4GB)
PCI
Device 0
PCI
Device 1
PCI
Device 2
LJ-05402.AI4
Figure 1–18 shows the PCI window logic. The comparison logic associated with
ad<63:32> is only used for DAC1 mode; and only if enabled by a bit in the
window base register for window 3. This logic is only applicable to window 3. The
remaining windows only recognize 32-bit PCI addresses (that is, SAC 2 cycles).
For a hit to occur in a DAC address, ad<63:40> must be zero, ad<39:32> must
match the window DAC base register, and ad<31:20> must also have a compare hit.
This scheme allows a naturally aligned, 1MB–4GB PCI window to be placed anywhere in the first 1TB of a 64-bit PCI address. When an address match occurs with a
PCI target window, the 21174 translates the 32-bit PCI address to addr_h<33:0>.
1 Dual-address cycle (DAC) — only issued if <63:32> are nonzero for a 64-bit address.
2 Single-address cycle (SAC) — all 32-bit addresses. A PCI device must use SAC if
<63:32> equals 0.
System Address Space
A–35
PCI to Physical Memory Address
Figure 1–18 PCI Target Window Compare
PCI Address
63
40
Zero
Detect
32
39
Compare &
Hit Logic
31
n n-1
02
20 19
Hit (Window 3 Only)
Target
Window
Hit Logic
Hit Window 3
Hit Window 2
Hit Window 1
Hit Window 0
W_DAC
Window Enable (WENB)
31
n n-1
Wn_BASE DAC
31
Wn_MASK
20
XXXXX
n n-1
00000000
Window 3 SG Bit
Window 2 SG Bit
Window 1 SG Bit
Window 0 SG Bit
20
11111
LJ04273A.AI4
A–36 System Address Space
Direct-Mapped Addressing
1.13 Direct-Mapped Addressing
The target address is translated by direct mapping or scatter-gather mapping as determined by the Wx_BASE_SG (scatter-gather) bit of the window’s PCI base register.
If the Wx_BASE_SG bit is clear, the DMA address is direct mapped, and the translated address is generated by concatenating bits from the matching window’s translated base register (T_BASE) with bits from the incoming PCI address. The bits
involved in the concatenation are defined by the window mask register as shown in
Table A–13. The unused bits of the translated base register (also in Table A–13) must
be cleared (that is, the hardware performs an AND-OR operation to accomplish the
concatenation). Because memory is located in the lower 8GB of the 21164 address
space, the 21174 ensures (implicitly) that address bits <39:33> are always zero.
Because the translated base is simply concatenated to the PCI address, then the direct
mapping is to a naturally aligned memory region. For example, a 4MB directmapped window will map to any 4MB region in main memory that falls on a 4MB
boundary (for instance, it is not possible to map a 4MB region to the main memory
region 1MB–5MB).
Table A–13 lists direct-mapped PCI target address translations.
Table A–13 Direct-Mapped PCI Target Address Translation
W_MASK<31:20>
Size of Window
Translated Address <32:2>
0000 0000 0000
1MB
Translated Base<33:20> : ad<19:2>
0000 0000 0001
2MB
Translated Base<33:21> : ad<20:2>
0000 0000 0011
4MB
Translated Base<33:22> : ad<21:2>
0000 0000 0111
8MB
Translated Base<33:23> : ad<22:2>
0000 0000 1111
16MB
Translated Base<33:24> : ad<23:2>
0000 0001 1111
32MB
Translated Base<33:25> : ad<24:2>
0000 0011 1111
64MB
Translated Base<33:26> : ad<25:2>
0000 0111 1111
128MB
Translated Base<33:27> : ad<26:2>
0000 1111 1111
256MB
Translated Base<33:28> : ad<27:2>
0001 1111 1111
512MB
Translated Base<33:29> : ad<28:2>
0011 1111 1111
1GB
Translated Base<33:30> : ad<29:2>
(Sheet 1 of 2)
System Address Space
A–37
Scatter-Gather Addressing
Table A–13 Direct-Mapped PCI Target Address Translation
W_MASK<31:20>
Size of Window
Translated Address <32:2>
0111 1111 1111
2GB
Translated Base<33:31> : ad<30:2>
1111 1111 1111
4GB
Translated Base<33:32> : ad<31:2>
Otherwise
Not supported
—
(Sheet 2 of 2)
1.14 Scatter-Gather Addressing
If the Wx_BASE_SG bit of the PCI base register is set, then the translated address is
generated by a lookup table. This table is called a scatter-gather map. Figure 1–20
shows the scatter-gather addressing scheme — full details of this scheme are provided later in Section 1.15, but for now a quick description is provided. The incoming PCI address is compared to the PCI window addresses looking for a hit. The
translated base register, associated with the PCI window that is hit, is used to specify
the starting address of the scatter-gather map table in memory. Bits of the incoming
PCI address are used as an offset from this starting address, to access the scattergather PTE. This PTE, in conjunction with the remaining, least-significant PCI
address bits, forms the required memory address.
Each scatter-gather map entry maps an 8KB page of PCI address space into an 8KB
page of the 21164 address space. This offers a number of advantages to software:
•
Performance: ISA devices map to the lower 16MB of memory. The Windows NT
operating system currently copies data from here to user space. The scatter-gather
map eliminates the need for this copy operation.
•
User I/O buffers might not be physically contiguous or contained within a page.
With scatter-gather mapping, software does not have to manage the scattered
nature of the user buffer by copying data.
In the personal computer (PC) world, scatter-gather mapping is not an address translation scheme but is used to signify a DMA transfer list. An element in this transfer
list contains the DMA address and the number of data items to transfer. The DMA
device fetches each item of the list until the list is empty. Many of the PCI devices
(such as an EISA bridge) support this form of scatter-gather mapping.
A–38 System Address Space
Scatter-Gather Addressing
Each scatter-gather map page table entry (PTE) is a quadword and has a valid bit in
bit position 0, as shown in Figure 1–19. Address bit 13 is at bit position 1 of the map
entry. Because the 21174 implements valid memory addresses up to 16GB, then bits
<63:22> of the scatter-gather map entry must be programmed to 0. Bits <21:1> of
the scatter-gather map entry are used to generate the physical page address. The
physical page address is appended to ad<12:5> of the incoming PCI address to generate the memory address.
System implementations may support less than 16GB of physical addressing; however, any unused address bits must be forced to zero. Otherwise, behavior will be
UNPREDICTABLE.
Figure 1–19 Scatter-Gather PTE Format
63
21 20
01 00
MBZ
PAGE_ADDRESS<32:13>
VALID
LJ-04275.AI4
The size of the scatter-gather map table is determined by the size of the PCI target
window as defined by the window mask register shown in Table A–14. The number
of entries in the table equals the window size divided by the page size (8KB). The
size of the table is simply the number of entries multiplied by 8 bytes.
The scatter-gather map table address is obtained from the translated base register and
the PCI address as shown in Table A–14.
Table A–14 Scatter-Gather Mapped PCI Target Address Translation (Sheet 1 of 2)
W_MASK<31:20>
Size of SG
Map Table
Translated Address <32:2>
0000 0000 0000
1KB
Translated Base<33:10>1 : ad<19:13>
0000 0000 0001
2KB
Translated Base<33:11> : ad<20:13>
0000 0000 0011
4KB
Translated Base<33:12> : ad<21:13>
0000 0000 0111
8KB
Translated Base<33:13> : ad<22:13>
0000 0000 1111
16KB
Translated Base<33:14> : ad<23:13>
System Address Space
A–39
Scatter-Gather TLB
Table A–14 Scatter-Gather Mapped PCI Target Address Translation (Sheet 2 of 2)
W_MASK<31:20>
Size of SG
Map Table
Translated Address <32:2>
0000 0001 1111
32KB
Translated Base<33:15> : ad<24:13>
0000 0011 1111
64KB
Translated Base<33:16> : ad<25:13>
0000 0111 1111
128KB
Translated Base<33:17> : ad<26:13>
0000 1111 1111
256KB
Translated Base<33:18> : ad<27:13>
0001 1111 1111
512KB
Translated Base<33:19> : ad<28:13>
0011 1111 1111
1MB
Translated Base<33:20> : ad<29:13>
0111 1111 1111
2MB
Translated Base<33:21> : ad<30:13>
1111 1111 1111
4MB
Translated Base<33:22> : ad<31:13>
1
Unused bits of the Translated Base Register must be zero for correct operation.
1.15 Scatter-Gather TLB
An eight-entry translation lookaside buffer (TLB) is provided in the 21174 for scatter-gather map entries. The TLB is a fully associative cache and holds the eight
most-recent scatter-gather map lookup PTEs. Four of these entries can be locked to
prevent their being displaced by the hardware TLB-miss handler. Each of the eight
TLB entries holds a PCI address for the tag and four consecutive 8KB 21164 page
addresses as the TLB data, as shown in Figure 1–20.
A–40 System Address Space
Scatter-Gather TLB
Figure 1–20 Scatter-Gather Associative TLB
PCI
DAC Address
Cycle <31:15>
8KB CPU Page Address
Hit
TAG
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
DATA
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
PCI Address<14:13>
Memory Page
Address<32:13>
Physical Memory
Dword Address
PCI
Address<12:2>
Index
LJ04276A.AI4
Each time an incoming PCI address hits in a PCI target window that has scattergather translation enabled, ad<31:15> are compared with the 32KB PCI page
address in the TLB tag. If a match is found, the required 21164 page address is one of
the four items provided by the data of the matching TLB entry. PCI address
ad<14:13> selects the correct 8KB 21164 page from the four pages fetched.
A TLB hit avoids having to look up the scatter-gather map PTEs in memory, resulting in improved system performance. If no match is found in the TLB, the scattergather map lookup is performed and four PTE entries are fetched and written over an
existing entry in the TLB.
The TLB entry to be replaced is determined by a round-robin algorithm on the
unlocked entries. Coherency of the TLB is maintained by software write transactions to the SG_TBIA (scatter-gather translation buffer invalidate all) register.
The tag portion contains a DAC flag to indicate that the PCI tag address <31:15>
corresponds to a 64-bit DAC address. Only one bit is required instead of the highorder PCI address bits <39:32> because only one window is assigned to a DAC
cycle, and the window-hit logic has already performed a comparison of the highorder bits with the PCI DAC base register. Figure 1–21 shows the entire translation
from PCI address to physical address on a window that implements scatter-gather
System Address Space
A–41
Scatter-Gather TLB
mapping. Both paths are indicated — the right side shows the path for a TLB hit,
while the left side shows the path for a TLB miss. The scatter-gather TLB is shown
in a slightly simplified, but functionally equivalent form.
A.15.1 Scatter-Gather TLB Hit Process
The process for a scatter-gather TLB hit is as follows:
1. The window compare logic determines if the PCI address has hit in one of the
four windows, and the PCI_BASE<SG> bit determines if the scatter-gather path
should be taken. If window 3 has DAC-mode enabled, and the PCI cycle is a
DAC cycle, then a further comparison is made between the high-order PCI bits
and the PCI DAC BASE register.
2. PCI address ad<31:13> is sent to the TLB associative tag together with the
DAC hit indication. If ad<31:13> and the DAC bits match in the TLB, then
the corresponding 8KB 21164 page address is read out of the TLB. If this entry
is valid, then a TLB hit has occurred and this page address is concatenated
with ad<12:2> to form the physical memory address. If the data entry is
invalid, or if the TAG compare failed, then a TLB miss occurs.
A.15.2 Scatter-Gather TLB Miss Process
The process for a scatter-gather TLB miss is as follows:
1. The relevant bits of the PCI address (as determined by the window mask register) are concatenated with the relevant translated base register bits to form the
address used to access the scatter-gather map entry (PTE) from a table located in
main memory.
2. Bits <20:1> of the map entry (PTE from memory) are used to generate the physical page address, which is appended to the page offset to generate the physical
memory address. The TLB is also updated at this point, using a round-robin
algorithm, with the four PTE entries that correspond to the 32KB PCI page
address that first missed the TLB. The tag portion of the TLB is loaded with this
PCI page address, and the DAC bit is set if this PCI cycle is a DAC cycle.
3. If the requested PTE is marked invalid (bit 0 is clear), then a TLB invalid entry
exception is taken.
A–42 System Address Space
Scatter-Gather TLB
Figure 1–21 Scatter-Gather Map Translation
63
40 39
32 31
n n-1
20 19
02
13 12
0000000000000000000
Window
Hit
Offset
Compare
Logic
31
W_DAC
n n-1
ad_h<31:13>
sent to TLB
for PCI window
"hit."
20
XXXXX
Wn_BASE
DAC indicator
also sent.
Wn_MASK 00000000 11111
33
n-10
10
n-11
000000000
Tn_BASE 0
Tn_BASE Select
n-10 n-11
33
00
03
Scatter-Gather
Table Address
000
Scatter-Gather Map in Memory
Base
63
21 20
01
000000000000000000
00
V
TAG
20
Scatter-Gather TLB
Data
01
DAC Tag Addr<31:13>
00
V
Offset
Physical
Memory
Address
32
13 12
02
Offset
LJ-04277.AI4
System Address Space
A–43
Suggested Use of a PCI Window
1.16 Suggested Use of a PCI Window
Figure 1–22 shows the PCI window assignment after power is turned on (configured
by firmware), and Table A–15 lists the details. PCI window 0 was chosen for the
8MB to 16MB EISA region because this window incorporates the mem_cs_l logic.
PCI window 3 was not used as it incorporates the DAC cycle logic. PCI window 1
was chosen arbitrarily for the 1GB, direct-mapped region, and PCI window 2 is not
assigned.
Figure 1–22 Default PCI Window Allocation
PCI
Memory Space
21164
Memory Space
4GB
4GB
2GB
1GB
Direct-Mapped
Window 1
1GB
1GB
1GB
16MB
8MB
0
8MB
Scatter-Gather
Window 0
0MB
LJ-04278.AI4
A–44 System Address Space
Suggested Use of a PCI Window
Table A–15 lists the PCI window power-up configuration characteristics.
Table A–15 PCI Window Power-Up Configuration
PCI Window
Assignment
Size
Comments
0
Scatter-gather
8MB
Not used by firmware; mem_cs_l disabled
1
Direct-mapped
1GB
Mapped to 0GB to 1GB of main memory
2
Disabled
—
—
3
Disabled
—
—
A.16.1 Peripheral Component Architecture Compatibility Addressing and Holes
The peripheral component architecture allows certain (E)ISA devices to respond to
hardwired memory addresses. An example is a VGA graphics device that has its
frame buffer located in memory address region A0000–BFFFF. Such devices
“pepper” memory space with holes, which are collectively known as peripheral component compatibility holes.
The PCI-EISA bridge decodes PCI addresses and generates a signal, mem_cs_l,
which takes into account the various PC compatibility holes.
A.16.2 Memory Chip Select Signal mem_cs_l
The PCI-EISA bridge can be made using the following two chips:
•
Intel 82374EB EISA System Component (ESC)
•
Intel 82375EB PCI-EISA Bridge (PCEB)
The PCI-EISA bridge provides address decode logic with considerable attributes
(such as read only, write only, VGA frame buffer, memory holes, and BIOS shadowing) to help manage the EISA memory map and peripheral component compatibility
holes.
This is known as main memory decoding in the PCI-EISA chip, and results in the
generation of the memory chip select (mem_cs_l) signal. One exception is the VGA
memory hole region that never asserts mem_cs_l. If enabled, the 21174 uses this signal with the W0_BASE register.
In Figure 1–23, the two main holes are shown lightly shaded, while the mem_cs_l
range is darkly shaded.
System Address Space
A–45
Suggested Use of a PCI Window
This mem_cs_l range in Figure 1–23 is subdivided into several portions (such as the
BIOS areas) that are individually enabled/disabled using CSRs as listed here:
•
The MCSTOM (top of memory) register has a 2MB granularity and can be programmed to select the regions from lMB up to 512MB.
•
The MCSTOH (top of hole) and MCSBOH (bottom of hole) registers define a memory hole region where mem_cs_l is not selected. The granularity of the hole is 64KB.
•
The MARl,2,3 registers enable various BIOS regions.
•
The MCSCON (control) register enables the mem_cs_l decode logic, and in
addition selects a number of regions (0KB to 512KB).
•
The VGA memory hole region never asserts mem_cs_l.
Figure 1–23 mem_cs_l Decode Area
4GB
MCSTOM
512MB Max
16MB
MCSTOH
Main Memory Hole
Hole
MCSBOH
1MB
1MB-64KB
MCSCON
BIOS Area
VGA Memory
(A0000-BFFF)
512KB
MAR1,2,3
Hole
MCSCON
MCSCON
LJ-04279.AI4
A–46 System Address Space
Suggested Use of a PCI Window
Note:
For more detail, please refer to the Intel 82378 System I/O Manual.
As shown in Figure 1–24, PCI window 0 in the 21174 can be enabled to accept the
mem_cs_l signal as the PCI memory decode signal. With this path enabled, the PCI
window hit logic simply uses the mem_cs_l signal. For example, if mem_cs_l is
asserted, then a PCI window 0 hit occurs and the devsel signal is asserted on the PCI.
Figure 1–24 mem_cs_l Logic
mem_cs_l
1
PCI Address
Wn_BASE
Window 0
Hit Detect
Logic
0
devsel
Wn_MASK
W0_BASE<MEMCS_ENABLE>
LJ-04280.AI4
Consequently, the window address area must be large enough to encompass the
mem_cs_l region programmed into the PCI-EISA bridge. The remaining window
attributes are still applicable and/or required:
•
The Wx_BASE_SG bit in the W0_BASE register determines if scatter-gather or
direct-mapping is applicable.
•
The W0_ MASK register size information must match the mem_cs_l size for the
scatter-gather and direct-mapping algorithms to correctly use the translated base
register.
•
The mem_cs_l enable bit, W0_BASE<MEMCS_ENABLE>, takes precedence
over W0_BASE<W_EN>.
System Address Space
A–47
B
Supporting Products
This appendix lists sources for components and accessories that are not included
with the AlphaPC 164UX.
B.1 Memory
Dual inline memory modules (DIMMs) are available from the following sources:
Samsung Semiconductor Inc.
3566 North First St.
San Jose, CA 95134 USA
Phone: 1-408-544-4322
Table B–1 Samsung DIMM Part Number List
Size
Part Number (# of Bank)
Width
ECC
16MB
KMM374S203BTN (2 Bank)
KMM374S203BTL (2 Bank)
KMM374S403ATN (2 Bank)
KMM374S403BTN (2 Bank)
KMM374S403BTL (2 Bank)
KMM374S803AT (2 Bank)
KMM374S823AT (4 Bank)
KMM374S823ATL (4 Bank)
KMM374S1600AT (2 Bank)
KMM374S1623AT (4 Bank)
KMM374S1623ATL (4 Bank)
72bit
Yes
72bit
Yes
72bit
Yes
72bit
Yes
32MB
64MB
128MB
VisionTek
1175 Lakeside Dr.
Gurnee,IL 60031
Supporting Products
B–1
Memory
Phone: 847-360-7500
Fax: 847-360-7403
Table B–2 VisionTek DIMM Part Number List
Size
Part Number
Width
ECC
16MB
64MB
128MB
VT16455.0
VT164.0
VT164V6.0
72bit
72bit
72bit
Yes
Yes
Yes
Viking Components
11 Columbia
Laguna Hills,Ca 92656
Phone: 800-338-2361
Fax : 408-643-7250
Table B–3 Viking Components DIMM Part Number List
Size
Part Number
Width
ECC
16MB
32MB
64MB
128MB
VE2721U4SN3-DC01
VE4721U4SN3-DC01
VE8721U4SN3-DC01
VE16722U4SN3-DC01
72bit
72bit
72bit
72bit
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
QesTec, Inc.
23 Midstate Drive, Suite 104
Midstate Office Park
Auburn,Ma 01501
Phone: 508-832-5006
Fax: 508-832-5441
Table B–4 QesTec DIMM Part Number List
B–2
Size
Part Number
Width
ECC
16MB
32MB
64MB
QS272SG
QS472SG
QS872SG
72bit
72bit
72bit
Yes
Yes
Yes
Supporting Products
Thermal Products
DeskStation Technology - Dist. for Dense-Pac
15729 College Blvd
Lenexa, KS 66219
Phone: 800-793-3375
Table B–5 Dense-Pac Microsystems DIMM Part Number List
Size
Part Number
Width
ECC
64MB
128MB
256MB
DN06408x72-00
DN12816x72-00
DN25632x72-00
72bit
72bit
72bit
Yes
Yes
Yes
B.2 Thermal Products
Thermal Products Components included in this heat-sink and fan solution are heat
sink, GRAFOIL pad, two hex nuts, heat-sink clips, 60-mm fan, and four screws.
These are available from:
United Machine and Tool Design
River Road
Fremont, NH 03044
Phone: 603-642-5040
Fax: 603-642-5819
PN 70-32810-02
B.3 Power Supply
An ATX form-factor power supply, suitable for use with the AlphaPC 164UX
(+3.3 V, +5 V, –5 V, +12 V, –12 V), is available from:
Emacs Electronics USA, Inc.
1410 Gail Borden Place C-4
El Paso, TX 79935
Phone: 915-599-2688
PN AP2-5300F (300 W)
Supporting Products
B–3
Enclosure
B.4 Enclosure
An enclosure, suitable for housing the AlphaPC 164UX and its power supply, is
available from:
Axxion
11 B Leigh Fisher
El Paso,Tx. 79906
Phone: 915-772-0360
Fax: 915-778-3200
PN: DL17
Addtronics Industrial
43263 Osgood Road
Fremont, Ca 94539
Phone: 510-490-9898
Fax: 510-490-7132
PN EX-6890A
California PC Products
205 Apollo Way
Hollister,Ca. 95023
Phone: 408-637-2250
Fax: 510-490-7132
PN: 6D3APD,6C6APD
B–4
Supporting Products
C
Support, Products, and Documentation
If you need technical support, an Alpha CPU brochure, or help deciding which documentation best meets your needs, visit the Samsung Semicondcutor World Wide Web
Internet site:
http://www.samsungsemi.com
You can also call or e-mail to Samsung CPU Marketing Team. Please use the following information lines for support.Samsung Alpha Products
For documentation and general information:
Korea
82-331-209-3285
United States and Canada:
1-408-544-4510
Europe
49-6196-663410
Electronic mail address:
alphainfo@sec.samsung.com
For technical support:
Phone
82-331-209-3282
Fax
82-331-209-4492
Electronic mail address:
alphatech@sec.samsung.com
Support, Products, and Documentation
C–1
To order the AlphaPC 164UX motherboard, contact your local distributor. The following tables list some of the semiconductor products available from Samsung Electronics.
Chips
Order Number
Samsung Electronics 21164 Alpha microprocessor (466 MHz)
KP21164-466CN
Samsung Electronics 21164 Alpha microprocessor (500 MHz)
KP21164-500CN
Samsung Electroncis 21164 Alpha microprocessor (533 MHz)
KP21164-533CN
Samsung Electronics 21164 Alpha microprocessor (566 MHz)
KP21164-566CN
Samsung Electroncis 21164 Alpha microprocessor (600 MHz)
KP21164-600CN
Samsung Electronics 21164 Alpha microprocessor (633 MHz)
KP21164-633CN
Samsung Electroncis 21164 Alpha microprocessor (667 MHz)
KP21164-667CN
Motherboard kits include the motherboard and motherboard user’s manual.
C–2
Motherboard Kits
Order Number
Samsung Electroncis AlphaPC 164LX Motherboard Kit for Windows NT
MB164LX
Samsung Electroncis AlphaPC 164UX Motherboard Kit for Windows NT
MB164UX
Samsung Electroncis AlphaPC 164BX Motherboard Kit for Windows NT
MB164BX
Support, Products, and Documentation
Samsung Alpha Documentation
The following table lists some of the available documentation.
Title
Order Number
21164 Alpha Microprocessor Hardware Reference Manual
KP164-HR-1
21164 Alpha Microprocessor Data Sheet
KP164-DS-1
AlphaPC 164LX Motherboard Technical Reference Manual
MB164LX-TM1
AlphaPC 164LX Motherboard Windows NT User’s Manual
MB164LX-UM2
AlphaPC 164UX/BX Motherboard Technical Reference Manual MB164UX/BX-TM1
AlphaPC 164UX/BX Motherboard Windows NT User’s Manual MB164UX/BX-UM1
You can order the following associated documentation directly from the vendor.
Title
Vendor
Alpha AXP Architecture Reference Manual
PN EY–T132E–DP
Call your local distributor or call
Butterworth-Heinemann (Digital Press)
at 1-800-366-2665
Alpha Architecture Handbook1
PN EC–QD2KB–TE
See previous entry
Samsung 21164 Alpha
Microprocessor Hardware Reference Manual
KP164-HR1-0397
Samsung Electronics Ltd.
San #24, Nongseo-ri, Kiheung-eup
Yongin-city, Kyungki-do, Korea 449-900
Online, World Wide Web access at URL
http://www.sec.samsung.com
Samsung 21164 Alpha
Microprocessor Data Sheet
KP164-DS1-0397
See previous entry
Digital Semiconductor 21174 Core Logic Chip Digital Equipment Corporation
Digital Semiconductor
Technical Reference Manual
PN EC–R12GB–TE (Available Summer, 1997) 77 Reed Road
Hudson, MA 01749 USA
Online, World Wide Web access at URL:
http://www.digital.com/semiconductor
Support, Products, and Documentation
C–3
Title
Vendor
PCI Local Bus Specification, Revision 2.1
PCI Multimedia Design Guide, Revision 1.0
PCI System Design Guide
PCI-to-PCI Bridge Architecture Specification,
Revision 1.0
PCI BIOS Specification, Revision 2.1
PCI Special Interest Group
U.S.
1–800–433–5177
International 1–503–797–4207
Fax
1–503–234–6762
82420/82430 PCIset ISA and EISA Bridges
(includes 82371SB)
Intel Corporation
Literature Sales
P.O. Box 7641
Mt. Prospect, IL 60056
Phone: 1-800-628-8686
FaxBACK Service: 1-800-628-2283
BBS: 1-916-356-3600
Super I/O Combination Controller
(FDC37C666) Data Sheet
Standard Microsystems Corporation
80 Arkay Drive
Hauppauge, NY 11788
Phone: 1-516-435-6000
Fax: 1-516-231-6004
1
C–4
This handbook provides information subsequent to the Alpha AXP Architecture Reference Manual.
Support, Products, and Documentation