Apple M7886 - Power Mac - G4 Cube Specifications


About the
Power Mac G4 Cube
Includes setup and expansion information
for Power Mac G4 Cube computers
K Apple Computer, Inc.
© 2000 Apple Computer, Inc. All rights reserved.
Under the copyright laws, this manual may not be copied, in whole or in part, without the written consent of Apple.
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Every effort has been made to ensure that the information in this manual is accurate. Apple is not responsible for
printing or clerical errors.
Apple Computer, Inc.
1 Infinite Loop
Cupertino, CA 95014-2084
408-996-1010
http://www.apple.com
Apple, the Apple logo, AppleShare, AppleTalk, FireWire, the FireWire logo, Mac, Macintosh, the Mac logo,
Power Macintosh, and QuickTime are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other
countries.
AirPort, the Apple Store, Finder, iMovie, iTools, Power Mac, and Sherlock are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc.
PowerPC and the Power PC logo are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation, used under
license therefrom.
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Simultaneously published in the United States and Canada.
Contents
1
Setting Up
5
Positioning the Computer and Display 5
Setting Up Your Computer 6
Problems? 16
What’s Next? 17
2
Getting to Know Your Computer
19
Your Computer at a Glance 20
Your Computer’s Ports and Connectors 22
Inside Your Computer—Internal Expansion Options 24
QuickTime—Audio and Video on the Internet 26
Sherlock 2—Your Internet Search Detective 28
iMovie 2—Create and Edit Your Own Digital Movies 30
iTools—Free Internet Services for Mac Users 32
Auto Updating—Automatically Keep Your Mac on the Cutting Edge 34
Multiple Users—Turn One Mac Into Many 36
Apple.com—Your Starting Place on the World Wide Web 38
Mac Help—Answers to All Your Macintosh Questions 40
3
Using Your Computer
41
Using Your Apple Pro Keyboard and Apple Pro Mouse 42
Using Your Computer Speakers 44
Using USB Devices 46
Using FireWire Devices 48
Using Your DVD Drive 50
Using Your Modem 52
3
Connecting to an Ethernet Network 53
Using AirPort Wireless Networking 55
Putting the Computer to Sleep to Save Energy 56
Transferring Information Between Two Apple Computers 57
4
Working Inside Your Computer
59
Removing the Computer Core 60
Installing Memory 64
Installing an AirPort Card 66
Replacing the Battery 67
Replacing the Computer Core in the Enclosure 68
5
Troubleshooting
Appendix A
Specifications
71
75
Appendix B
Safety, Maintenance, and Ergonomics
81
Important Safety Information 81
General Maintenance 82
Important Ergonomic and Health-Related Information 83
Communications Regulation Information 85
4
Contents
C H A P T E R
1
1
Setting Up
Congratulations on purchasing your new Power Mac G4 Cube—an elegant, compact, and
professional solution to desktop computing. This chapter contains instructions for setting up
your computer and display.
Positioning the Computer and Display
If your monitor is heavy, be sure to use correct lifting techniques when positioning it.
Position the computer and display so that
m they are on sturdy, flat surfaces
m nothing is on top of the computer or obstructs air flow through the top or rear of the
enclosure, or through the vents of the display
m the computer’s DVD disc drive is not obstructed
The only way to shut off power completely to your computer or display is to
disconnect their power plugs from the power source. Make sure the power cord for your
computer or display is within easy reach so that you can unplug it quickly if necessary.
Important
5
Setting Up Your Computer
Your computer ports and connectors are accessible from the bottom of the computer.
1
6
Chapter 1
Carefully turn the computer upside-down and place it on a soft cloth.
2
Plug one end of the power cord into the power adapter.
Warning
Use only the power adapter that came with your computer.
Power adapter
Power cord
Don’t plug this end of the power cord
into the wall yet. You’ll do that later.
Setting Up
7
3
Plug the power adapter plug into the power socket (marked with the icon ¯) on the bottom
of the computer.
Plug the power adapter
into the computer.
Power socket
8
Chapter 1
4
Plug the other end of the power adapter cord into a grounded power outlet or power strip.
Grounded wall outlet
Setting Up
9
5
Connect your monitor cables according to the following illustration:
Depending on your monitor, you may have one or more cables to connect.
Check the instructions that came with the monitor for further setup information.
Important
ADC monitor port
™
VGA monitor port
Warning Be sure your computer is turned off before connecting your monitor. When
lifting the computer, be careful not to turn the computer on accidentally. Do not connect
or disconnect your monitor when the computer is turned on.
If your monitor has an Apple Display Connector (ADC), connect it to the ADC port (
You can bend the connector at an angle to fit underneath the computer.
10
Chapter 1
).
If your monitor has a VGA connector, attach the VGA-to-VGA adapter that came with your
computer to the VGA port and then connect your monitor cable to the adapter.
Plug the VGA adapter into
the VGA monitor port and
tighten the thumbscrews.
Plug the VGA monitor
cable into this end
of the adapter
and tighten the
thumbscrews.
VGA monitor port
Setting Up
11
6
If required, connect your computer to your Ethernet network and connect your modem to a
phone line.
G Ethernet port
W Modem port
12
Chapter 1
7
Turn your computer right side up.
Do not put anything on
top of the computer. This
will block the air flowing
through the top vents.
Do not place anything
on top of the power button.
Do not block the air flowing
through the opening in the
back of the computer.
Setting Up
13
8
Connect the keyboard cable to a USB port on your monitor, and plug the mouse cable into a
USB port on the keyboard.
USB ports on display
USB ports
on bottom of
computer (2)
USB ports on keyboard (2)
m If your monitor doesn’t have a USB port, connect the keyboard USB cable to a USB port
on the bottom of your computer.
If you wish, raise the keyboard by lifting it and flipping the foot toward the back.
14
Chapter 1
9
Connect your computer speakers.
Your computer speakers have special power requirements that are supported
by the USB ports on your computer and by the USB ports on Apple displays that have the
ADC connector. Do not connect your speakers to other USB devices, such as your keyboard
or external USB hubs, which are not designed to support your speakers.
Important
USB ports on display
USB ports
on bottom of
computer
Digital amplifier
Speaker
Speaker
m If you have an Apple Cinema Display or Apple Studio Display with an ADC connector,
connect your speakers to a USB port on the back of the display.
m If you have a different type of monitor, connect your speakers to a USB port on
the computer.
Setting Up
15
10
Turn on your computer by touching the power button.
Power button
With some Apple monitors, you can also turn on the computer by pressing or touching the
monitor power button.
Problems?
If you don’t see anything on your screen or you think your computer did not start up
properly, check these items:
m Is the power adapter plugged into a power source? If it is plugged into a power strip, is
the power strip turned on? Is the power adapter properly plugged into the computer?
m Are the keyboard and monitor cables connected correctly?
m Is the power button lit on the computer and on the monitor? If not, the computer or
monitor aren’t receiving power. If the power button on your computer is pulsing, it means
the computer is in sleep. Touch the power button or any key to wake it up.
m Are the brightness and contrast controls on the monitor adjusted correctly? If your
monitor has brightness and contrast controls, try adjusting them.
m Try restarting your computer. Touch the power button on the computer for approximately
5 seconds until the computer turns off. Touch it again to turn the computer on.
m If you see a blinking question mark on the screen or a series of flashes from the
computer or display power buttons when you turn on the computer, see Chapter 5,
“Troubleshooting,” on page 71.
16
Chapter 1
When You’re Finished Using Your Computer
To turn off your computer:
m Choose Shut Down from the Special menu.
Do not turn off the computer by turning off the switch on a power strip or by
pulling the power adapter plug (unless you can’t turn off the computer any other way). Your
files or system software could be damaged if your computer is not shut down properly.
Important
Adjusting Your Monitor
Use the Monitors control panel to adjust the settings for your monitor. For information about
troubleshooting your display, see “Problems With Your Display” on page 73. For information
about maintaining your display, see “Maintaining Your Display” on page 83. Additional
information about using your monitor is available in Mac Help.
To register a new Apple Studio Display or Apple Cinema Display with Apple, go to the Apple
World Wide Web site: www.apple.com/register
What’s Next?
m For an overview of your computer’s features, see Chapter 2, “Getting to Know Your
Computer,” on page 19.
m For more information about using your modem, connecting to a network, or using the
computer’s other hardware features, see Chapter 3, “Using Your Computer,” on page 41.
m For information about installing memory, an AirPort wireless networking card, or
changing the computer’s battery, see Chapter 4, “Working Inside Your Computer,” on
page 59.
Setting Up
17
C H A P T E R
2
2
Getting to Know Your Computer
If you’re eager to get started and want to try out a few things, this chapter is for you. It
provides an overview of your computer’s important hardware and software features.
Want to create your own video masterpieces? Take a look at iMovie and find out how you can
edit video on your computer. Learn how QuickTime can help you view live video broadcasts
from the World Wide Web. And take advantage of the Internet to research information,
update your software, shop, browse the Web for fun, or just get help when you need it.
Here you’ll find a great selection of your computer’s features presented and briefly
explained. Take a test run and see what your computer can do. For more information about a
specific feature, see Chapter 3, “Using Your Computer,” on page 41, and the online
explanations in Mac Help (see page 40).
Note: Pictures showing the latest software features may appear slightly different on your
screen.
19
Your Computer at a Glance
Digital amplifier
Power button
Power button
Headphone jack
Speaker
DVD disc drive
Speaker
Power adapter
20
Chapter 2
DVD disc drive
Use DVD discs to view DVD movies, install software, and access information. A DVD-ROM
drive works with CD-ROM and DVD-ROM discs, DVD-Video discs, and Photo CDs. It also
plays standard audio discs.
Power button/Power-on light
Touch this button to turn on the computer or wake it from sleep. When the computer is
on, touching the power button puts the computer to sleep. A steady light indicates that the
computer is on. A pulsing light indicates the computer is in sleep.
With some Apple displays, you can also touch or press the monitor power button to turn
the computer on or off, or put it to sleep.
Apple Pro Keyboard and Apple Pro Mouse
Connect your Apple Pro Keyboard to a USB port on your display or computer. Connect
your Apple Pro Mouse to one of the USB ports on the keyboard. For more information
about your keyboard and mouse, see Chapter 3, “Using Your Computer.”
Speakers and digital amplifier
Connect your speakers and digital amplifier to a USB port on an Apple Cinema Display or
Apple Studio Display that has an ADC connector, or connect them to a USB port on your
computer. Your speakers have special power requirements that other USB devices may not
support, so don’t connect the speakers to USB ports on other devices. You can also
connect headphones to the headphone jack on the digital amplifier. For more information
about your speakers and digital amplifier, see “Using Your Computer Speakers” on page 44.
Getting to Know Your Computer
21
Your Computer’s Ports and Connectors
ADC monitor port
P Reset button
¥ Programmer’s
button
™ VGA monitor port
G Ethernet port
W
Internal modem port
F
¯
Security lock port
Power socket
FireWire ports (2)
Latch
22
Chapter 2
USB ports (2)
FireWire ports
Connect your Macintosh to FireWire devices, including digital video cameras, scanners,
hard disk drives, and more. You can connect up to 63 devices and FireWire provides a highspeed method of data transfer between them all.
G
10/100 twisted-pair Ethernet port
Connect your Macintosh to a high-speed Ethernet network.
USB ports
Connect your Macintosh to USB devices, such as keyboards, mouse devices, printers,
scanners, speakers, USB hubs, and more.
Latch
Releases the computer core so you can remove it from the enclosure. Push down on the
latch to release it, then use the latch to pull the core from the enclosure. Never carry your
computer by the latch. You can also attach a security lock to the security lock port to
prevent others from moving or opening the computer.
W
Internal modem port
Connect a phone cord to the internal modem.
¯
Power socket
Connect to the computer’s power adapter cord.
Monitor ports
Connect your Macintosh to Apple monitors that use the Apple Display Connector (ADC) or
to standard monitors that have a video graphics array ( VGA) connector.
¥
Programmer’s button
This button interrupts the normal operation of the computer’s software. You will use this
button rarely or never, only when firmware updates are required for your system.
Directions for using this button are included in the firmware update documentation.
P
Reset button
This button forces the computer to restart. Use the reset button only when you cannot
restart your computer with any of the recommended methods, such as choosing Restart
from the Special menu. For more information about when to use the reset button, see
Chapter 5, “Troubleshooting,” on page 71.
Getting to Know Your Computer
23
Inside Your Computer—Internal Expansion Options
Battery
AirPort Card connector
SDRAM slots (3)
AirPort Card release tab
24
Chapter 2
SDRAM slots
You can install additional memory in your computer by inserting up to 3 DRAM DIMMs in
the memory slots. You can expand your computer’s memory up to 1536 MB.
AirPort Card connector
Connects an AirPort Card, which allows your computer to communicate with a wireless
network.
Battery
Your computer uses a battery that you rarely replace. If you find that your computer is
having trouble starting up, or that the system date and time are frequently incorrect, you
may need to replace the battery. For more information, see “Replacing the Battery” on
page 67.
Getting to Know Your Computer
25
QuickTime—Audio and Video on the Internet
Volume control
Play button
Favorites drawer
Quick access to all of your
QuickTime TV channels.
Pull the tab at the bottom
to open and close the
Favorites drawer.
26
Chapter 2
What You Can Do
In addition to being able to play video and music files on your Mac, with QuickTime you can
watch live and recorded Internet broadcasts.
To Get Started
1
Connect to the Internet.
2
Open QuickTime Player.
3
Open the Favorites drawer.
4
Select a channel.
Tips and Tricks
Add additional QuickTime TV channels
Go to www.apple.com/quicktime and click the QuickTime TV link. There you will find all of
the available QuickTime channels. You can watch a QuickTime TV channel and with one click
add it to the Favorites drawer in QuickTime Player.
Upgrade to QuickTime Pro to do the following:
m
m
m
m
Play back full-screen video and resize movies.
Create streaming movies.
Work with more than 30 audio, video, and image formats, including Flash.
Create, open, edit, and save movies and audio, as easily as copying and pasting.
To Learn More
Internet video is just one of the things you can do with QuickTime. To learn more, start with
QuickTime Help. To download additional channels, watch the latest movie trailers, and find
information on setting up your own Internet streaming server, go to the QuickTime Web site
at www.apple.com/quicktime
Getting to Know Your Computer
27
Sherlock 2—Your Internet Search Detective
Sherlock channels
Search button
Search the Internet for
people, shopping, news,
Apple info, and more.
After you type what
you are looking for,
click this button to
start the search.
Search sites
Search engines that
Sherlock uses to search
the Internet.
28
Chapter 2
What You Can Do
Sherlock 2 is your search detective and personal shopper on the Internet. It provides an easy
way to find people, news, and just about anything. Shop for books and music and search
auction sites, find the best prices—even check product availability.
To Get Started
1
Connect to the Internet.
2
Choose Search Internet from the File menu or double-click the Sherlock icon on the
desktop.
3
Select a Sherlock channel.
4
Type what you are looking for and click the Search button.
Tips and Tricks
Create your own customized Sherlock search channel
1
Choose New Channel from the Channels menu.
2
Select a name, channel type, and icon.
3
Download Sherlock plug-ins and drag them into the search site list. Or hold down the
Option key and drag plug-ins from the other search lists to the icon of your new channel.
To Learn More
To learn more about what you can do with Sherlock, open Mac Help and search for
“Sherlock.” To download additional search plug-ins and find out how you can create your
own Sherlock plug-in, go to the Sherlock Web site at www.apple.com/sherlock
Getting to Know Your Computer
29
iMovie 2—Create and Edit Your Own Digital Movies
iMovie monitor
Preview your
movie or view
video directly from
a connected DV
camcorder.
Shelf
To make clips part
of your movie after
you import them,
drag them from
the shelf to the
clip viewer.
Mode switch
Use this to
switch between
importing from
a camcorder
and editing.
Editing
buttons
Clip viewer
Timeline
viewer
The clip viewer
and the timeline
viewer are visual
timelines for
assembling and
editing your
movie.
Playback controls
Scrubber bar
Use these to play the
movie in the iMovie
monitor.
Use this to select
sections of video.
Video track
Lets you work
with audio
contained in
video clips.
30
Chapter 2
Audio tracks
Playhead
Lets you work with
recordings, music, and
sound effects.
Represents the
location of the frame
showing in the iMovie
monitor. Move the
playhead to see
where things appear
in a movie.
Click these to
open panels for
adjusting and
selecting sounds,
video effects,
titles (text), and
transitions. Click
the Clips button to
see the shelf.
What You Can Do
iMovie is an easy-to-use digital video editing software application. With iMovie and a digital
video camcorder, you can create and edit your own movies. Import video from the camera,
edit clips, add transitions, titles, sound effects, and music. Then copy the movie to a
camcorder tape or create a QuickTime movie.
To Get Started
1
Shoot your video, connect the camera to your computer’s FireWire port, and then open
iMovie.
2
Click the Import button to import movie clips to the shelf, then add them to your movie by
dragging them to the clip viewer.
3
Assemble and edit your movie in the clip viewer and timeline viewer.
4
Add transitions, titles, sound, and music.
5
When you are finished, choose Export from the File menu.
Tips and Tricks
Share your desktop iMovie with your friends and family
Export your movie as a QuickTime Web movie and then copy the movie to your iDisk or use
HomePage to create your own iMovie theater so that others can view your movie on the
Internet.
To Learn More
For more information on using iMovie, see the iMovie Tutorial or iMovie Help. For the latest
on iMovie, including iMovie updates, additional plug-ins, and a list of compatible DV
camcorders, go to the iMovie Web site at www.apple.com/imovie
Getting to Know Your Computer
31
iTools—Free Internet Services for Mac Users
32
Chapter 2
Email
KidSafe
Get your own Mac.com email address.
It’s easy and free, and works with your
favorite email clients.
KidSafe makes the Internet a safer place
for your kids. KidSafe gives them access
to more than 75,000 educator-approved
Web sites and blocks all the rest.
iDisk
HomePage
With your very own 20 megabyte storage
space on Apple’s Internet server, iDisk is
the easy way to share files over the
Internet. Using iDisk, you can easily share
photos and movies, as well as import
them into your own Web site.
Build your own personal Web site in three
easy steps. Create a birth announcement,
résumé, or photo album, or set up your
own iMovie theater. Apple will even host
your Web site on its Internet server, so it’s
always there for the world to see.
What You Can Do
iTools is a new class of Internet services from Apple created exclusively for Mac users. With
iTools, you can email your friends, make the Internet safer for your children, and share
photos and movies. You can even create your own Web site.
To Get Started
1
Connect to the Internet.
2
Go to www.apple.com
3
Click the iTools tab and then click the Free Sign Up button.
Tips and Tricks
Upload pictures to your iDisk to create custom iCards
You can send iCards with your own custom pictures. Save your images as GIF or JPEG files
and then copy them to the Pictures folder on your iDisk. Your images will then appear as
picture choices when you create an iCard in the Create Your Own section.
Start with a HomePage template to create your own Web page in minutes
HomePage has Web page templates that you can modify with your own text and images. For
example, teachers can use the HomePage education templates to post recent class news,
homework assignments, and other information for parents. You can also use the HomePage
photo album and iMovie templates to share your pictures and movies easily with your friends
and family.
Create an alias of your iDisk for easy access
Instead of connecting to the Web manually to open your iDisk, you can select the icon of
your iDisk and choose Make Alias from the File menu. Whenever you want to access your
iDisk, double-click the alias and enter your password.
Use KidSafe in conjunction with the Multiple Users control panel
Use the Multiple Users control panel to set up your computer for your entire family to share.
Now you can set up KidSafe for each of your children’s accounts.
Getting to Know Your Computer
33
Auto Updating—Automatically Keep Your Mac on the Cutting Edge
Update Now
Instantly check Apple’s Internet
servers to see if any updates
are available for your software.
The Software Update control
panel displays all of the
available updates useful for
keeping your computer
running smoothly.
Set Schedule
Set the day of the
week and time of day to
check automatically for
software updates.
34
Chapter 2
What You Can Do
Auto updating uses the Internet to download (and even install) the latest updates, drivers,
and other enhancements from Apple—automatically. You can even set your Mac to check
Apple’s server periodically and download and install updated software for you.
To Get Started
1
Connect to the Internet.
2
Choose Control Panels from the Apple menu and then choose Software Updates from the
submenu.
3
Click the Update Now button.
4
Select the software you want to update and then click Install.
Tips and Tricks
Adjust your Software Updates schedule
If you have an Internet connection that is always on, you can set a schedule for your
computer so that it checks for software updates at a certain time on specific days of the
week. If you have a dial-up connection and you are not connected, Software Updates will
check the next time you connect.
Install new software automatically
You can set up your Mac so that every week it checks for and installs the latest software. Set a
schedule for your computer to check for software updates and deselect the “Ask me before
downloading new software” checkbox.
To Learn More
For more information on using Software Updates, search for “Software Updates” in
Mac Help. For the latest information on the Mac OS, go to the Mac OS Web site at
www.apple.com/macos
Getting to Know Your Computer
35
Multiple Users—Turn One Mac Into Many
Accounts
Set the appearance of
the user’s environment.
If you want to control
the user’s access to
certain applications,
choose Limited
or Panels.
36
Chapter 2
What You Can Do
With Multiple Users, you can allow up to 40 different users to share a single Mac with their
own customized settings and private storage space. For example, users can set their own
desktop picture, sort their views the way they like, bookmark favorite Web sites, and do many
other things that create, in effect, a personalized Mac for each individual user. You can also
specify how much access—and liberty to change things—each individual user can have.
To Get Started
1
Choose Control Panels from the Apple menu and then choose Multiple Users from the
submenu.
2
Turn Multiple User Accounts on.
3
Click the Options button to configure overall multiple user settings such as the Welcome
message and other options.
4
Click the New User button.
5
Edit the user’s information, access privileges, and applications.
6
Close the Multiple Users control panel.
Each time the computer starts up the login window appears. To go back to the login window
after another user has already logged in, choose Log Out from the Special menu.
Tips and Tricks
Create a voice print passphrase
Record yourself speaking a phrase such as “My voice is my password.” Your Mac stores your
voice print for comparison. Later, when you want to log in by speaking your passphrase, your
Mac analyzes the biometrics of your voice to make sure you are who you say you are.
To Learn More
For more information on setting up Multiple Users, including creating a voice print
passphrase, search for “Multiple Users” in Mac Help. For the latest information on the
Mac OS, go to the Mac OS Web site at www.apple.com/macos
Getting to Know Your Computer
37
Apple.com—Your Starting Place on the World Wide Web
iReview
www.apple.com/ireview
Your personal guide to the
Internet, with in-depth reviews
and recommendations of sites
ranging from news to travel,
music, and sports.
iCards
www.apple.com/icards
Use the Internet to send greeting
cards to your friends and family.
Macintosh
Products Guide
www.apple.com/guide
For great hardware and software
products for your Mac, check
this Web site or look for
the Mac symbol.
38
Chapter 2
Apple Support
www.apple.com/support
Find the latest troubleshooting
information, download software
updates, find information on
product protection plans,
and more.
Apple Hot News
www.apple.com/hotnews
Want the latest Apple news straight
from the source? Check out Apple
Hot News. You can find information
on software updates for your Mac
and third-party software, QuickTime
hot picks, and information on the
next big Apple event.
The Apple Store
www.apple.com/store
Your one-stop shop for the
latest Apple hardware and software
products, including select software
and accessories from our
third-party developers.
Getting to Know Your Computer
39
Mac Help—Answers to All Your Macintosh Questions
Search
Got a question?
Type it here and
click Search.
40
Chapter 2
C H A P T E R
3
3
Using Your Computer
This chapter provides explanations and procedures for using your computer. You’ll find
instructions for using the important features of your computer, including your keyboard and
mouse, modem, FireWire, USB, networking, and more.
Explanations are provided for
m “Using Your Apple Pro Keyboard and Apple Pro Mouse” on page 42
m “Using Your Computer Speakers” on page 44
m “Using FireWire Devices” on page 48
m “Using Your DVD Drive” on page 50
m “Using Your Modem” on page 52
m “Connecting to an Ethernet Network” on page 53
m “Using AirPort Wireless Networking” on page 55
m “Putting the Computer to Sleep to Save Energy” on page 56
m “Transferring Information Between Two Apple Computers” on page 57
41
Using Your Apple Pro Keyboard and Apple Pro Mouse
You can quickly adjust settings such as volume or eject CD or DVD discs using the
keyboard controls.
Your Apple Pro Keyboard has “hot” function keys that you can set up to open your frequently
used applications or documents. For example, you can use hot function keys to open your
Web browser, word processor, or favorite game. Once applications are open, you can use the
hot function keys to switch quickly between them.
Volume Up key
Function keys
Volume Down key
Media Eject key
Mute key
Assigning Hot Function Keys
Assigning an application to a function key is simple. The first time you press one of the
function keys, a dialog box appears that lets you assign any of the function keys to an
application. After that, you can change function key assignments using the Keyboard
control panel.
Using the Standard Function Keys
You can quickly change a key from a control or hot function key to a standard function key by
pressing that key and the Fn key at the same time. You can also use the Keyboard control
panel to reverse the keys so that the standard function keys are primary and the screen
controls and hot function keys are secondary.
42
Chapter 3
Using Your Apple Pro Mouse
To position the pointer using your mouse, move the mouse over any suitable surface such as
your desktop, mouse pad, or other textured surface. (Some smooth, glassy surfaces provide
less pointer control than others.) To click an object, press down once on the mouse body
until you feel a click. To double-click an item, press down twice in quick succession. If you
need to keep the mouse pressed down as you reposition the pointer, squeeze the two grips
on the side of the mouse as you lift the mouse to reposition it.
If you run out of room and want to
keep the mouse clicked while you
lift it, click the mouse, then squeeze
the sides with your thumb and
fingers as you lift.
You can adjust the feel of your mouse by turning the dial underneath. Turning the dial one
direction makes the feel of clicking the mouse stiffer; turning it the other way makes clicking
the mouse easier.
Turn the ring on the bottom of the mouse to “ +” for more
tension, “ O” for medium tension, and “ – ” for less tension.
For More Information About Your Keyboard and Mouse
Additional information on configuring the keyboard controls and hot function keys is
available in Mac Help. Choose Mac Help from the Help menu and search for “keyboard”
or “mouse.”
Using Your Computer
43
Using Your Computer Speakers
Your computer speakers can provide high-fidelity sound for all the music, games, and
multimedia you play on your computer.
USB ports on display
USB ports
on bottom of
computer
Digital amplifier
Speaker
Speaker
The USB ports on your computer have been enhanced to support the power requirements of
your speakers. Be sure to connect your speakers to one of the computer USB ports. If you
have an Apple Cinema Display or Apple Studio Display with an ADC connector, you can also
connect the speakers to the USB ports on the display instead.
Do not connect your speakers to other USB devices, such as your keyboard or
external USB hubs, that are not designed to support your speakers.
Important
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Chapter 3
After connecting your speakers and starting up your computer, you can adjust the speakers’
sound using the Sound control panel. You can adjust the volume of sound played through
the speakers and balance their sound output individually.
You can also connect headphones to the headphone jack on the digital amplifier. You can
adjust your headphone sound using the Sound control panel.
Using Your Speakers Without the Grille
For optimal sound fidelity, you can remove the protective grilles from the speaker fronts.
Gently pull the grilles from the speakers and store them in a safe place. Be sure that your
speakers are not exposed to foreign objects that might touch their inner mechanisms. Be
sure to replace the grilles when moving your computer and speakers to a new location.
For optimal sound, remove the grille.
The grille fits on the speaker only one way. Align
the notch on the bottom when you put it back on.
For More Information on USB Speakers
Additional information on USB speakers and the Sound control panel is available in
Mac Help. Choose Mac Help from the Help menu and search for “USB” or “sound.”
You can also find information on Apple’s USB Web site at www.apple.com/usb
Using Your Computer
45
Using USB Devices
Your computer comes with USB ports, which you use to connect many different types of
external devices, including printers, digital cameras, game pads, joysticks, keyboards and
mouse devices, and storage devices. USB makes it easy to connect external equipment. Once
you connect the device, it is ready to use. You don’t need to restart your computer.
Your display may have
USB ports built into it.
USB ports
on bottom of
computer (2)
USB ports on keyboard (2)
To use a USB device with your computer, connect the device to the computer and install its
software or configure your computer to work with the device once. From then on, your
computer automatically loads the correct software whenever you attach the device.
Note: Apple has already included software to work with many USB devices. In most cases
you do not need to install the software that came with the device. If, when you connect a
USB device, your computer cannot find the correct software, it asks you to search the
Internet to find it.
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Chapter 3
Connecting Multiple USB Devices
Your computer has two USB ports built in. If you are using an Apple Studio Display or Apple
Cinema Display with your computer, you have two additional USB ports to which you can
connect your keyboard and speakers.
Do not attach your speakers to the USB ports on your keyboard or to an
external USB hub. They are not designed to support your speakers. Plug your speakers into a
USB port on your computer, or into the USB ports on an Apple Studio Display or Apple
Cinema Display that has an ADC cable.
Important
If you have more USB devices than you have available USB ports, purchase a USB hub. The
USB hub connects to an open port on your computer and provides additional USB ports
(usually four or seven).
USB hub
For More Information on USB
Additional information on USB is available in Mac Help. Choose Mac Help from the Help
menu and search for “USB.” You can also find information on Apple’s USB Web site at
www.apple.com/usb
For information on USB devices available for your computer, go to the Macintosh Products
Guide at www.apple.com/guide
Using Your Computer
47
Using FireWire Devices
Your computer has two FireWire ports. FireWire is a high-speed data system that lets you
easily connect and disconnect external devices—such as digital video (DV ) cameras, printers,
scanners, and hard disks. You can connect and disconnect FireWire devices without restarting
your computer.
FireWire ports (2)
These are some of the things you can do with FireWire:
m Connect a digital video camera and capture or transfer high-quality video directly to your
computer. Then you can use video-editing software such as iMovie to edit the video.
m Connect an external FireWire hard disk drive and use it to back up data or transfer files. A
FireWire hard disk icon appears on your desktop immediately after you connect the drive
to your computer. In addition, most FireWire hard disks get their power from the FireWire
cable, so there is no need to carry around a power supply.
m If you have a problem with your computer that prevents you from starting up or you want
to transfer files, you can use FireWire to connect your computer to another computer so
that your computer will appear as an external hard disk on the other computer (a feature
known as “FireWire target disk mode”).
To use a FireWire device with your computer, connect the device to the computer and install
any software that came with the device. Your computer automatically senses when you attach
a new device.
To start up from a FireWire hard disk that has the Mac OS on it, use the Startup Disk control
panel to select the FireWire hard disk as the startup drive. If your FireWire hard disk doesn’t
appear or can’t be selected in the control panel, consult the FireWire hard disk vendor for
updated software drivers.
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Chapter 3
FireWire Target Disk Mode
If you have a problem with your computer that prevents you from starting up or if you
just want to transfer files between two computers, you can use FireWire to connect your
computer to another computer and then have it appear as an external hard disk on the
other computer.
The computer you want to connect your computer to must have FireWire
version 2.3.3 or later installed. Use Apple System Profiler, available in the Apple menu, to
check the version of FireWire installed. If you have an older version, check the Apple FireWire
Web site at www.apple.com/firewire
Important
To connect your computer in FireWire target disk mode, follow these steps:
1
Use a FireWire cable to connect your computer to another FireWire-equipped computer.
2
Start up your computer and immediately hold down the T key.
Your computer display shows the FireWire disk mode indicator, and the computer internal
hard disk icon appears on the desktop of the other computer.
3
When you are finished transferring files, drag the computer hard disk icon to the Trash to
unmount the drive.
4
Press the power button on the monitor to shut your computer down and then disconnect
the FireWire cable.
For More Information on FireWire
Additional information on FireWire, including setting up a network of FireWire devices, is
available in Mac Help. Choose Mac Help from the Help menu, and search for “FireWire.” You
can also find information on Apple’s FireWire Web site at www.apple.com/firewire
For information on the FireWire devices available for your computer, go to the Macintosh
Products Guide at www.apple.com/guide
Using Your Computer
49
Using Your DVD Drive
You can install or run software from CD and DVD discs using the DVD drive. You can also
use your DVD drive to play DVD movies, multimedia on CD-ROM discs, and music from
audio CDs.
Note: If you have older software that comes on floppy disks, contact the software
manufacturer to see if the software is available on a CD-ROM disc or purchase an external
USB or FireWire floppy disk drive (such as an LS120/SuperDisk) for your computer from your
Apple dealer or the Apple Store (www.apple.com/store).
Inserting Discs
To install or use programs from a CD or DVD disc, do the following:
m Place a disc in the slot, with the label of the disc facing you, and push gently until the
drive draws the disc in.
When the icon for the disc appears on the screen, the disc is ready for use.
Insert a disc with the label facing toward you.
Always hold the disc by its edges only.
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Chapter 3
Ejecting a Disc
You eject a disc by dragging the disc icon to the Trash, or by pressing the Media Eject key on
your keyboard.
If you are unable to eject a disc, hold down the mouse and restart your computer. When the
computer restarts, the disc is ejected.
Playing DVD and Audio Discs
You can use the DVD drive to play DVD-Video discs on your computer. Insert the DVD disc
and then open Apple DVD Player (in the Applications folder on your hard disk). To listen to a
standard audio CD, use the AppleCD Audio Player program in the Applications folder. You
can also use the AutoPlay section of the QuickTime Settings control panel or the Play portion
of the Control Strip to control audio CD playback.
For More Information on Your DVD Drive
For instructions on using Apple DVD Player, open the player and then choose Apple DVD
Player Help from the Help menu. Additional information on using CD or DVD discs is
available in Mac Help. Choose Mac Help from the Help menu and search for “discs.”
Using Your Computer
51
Using Your Modem
Your computer comes with an Apple 56K internal modem installed. To connect the Apple
56K internal modem, use the phone cord that came in the box with the computer.
Plug one end of the phone cord into the modem port on the bottom of the computer and
the other end into a standard RJ-11 telephone wall jack.
W Modem port
.
Make sure you connect the internal modem to an analog phone line—the kind
used typically in homes. The modem will not work with a digital phone line.
Important
More information about the internal modem is available in Mac Help (in the Help menu).
Warning Disconnect your modem from the phone jack during lightning or thunder
storms. This will prevent a destructive voltage overload from damaging the modem.
Using an External USB Modem
To connect an external USB modem, use a USB cable to connect the modem to a free USB
port on the keyboard, computer, USB monitor, or USB hub.
Check the documentation that came with the modem to see if it needs to be plugged into a
power outlet. Also look for instructions about installing modem software and connecting the
modem to a telephone line.
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Chapter 3
Connecting to an Ethernet Network
Your computer comes with built-in 10/100 megabit per second (Mbps) twisted-pair Ethernet
networking capability, which you can use to connect to a network.
G Ethernet port
Connecting to a network gives you access to other computers. You may be able to store
and retrieve information, use network printers, modems, and electronic mail, or connect to
the Internet. You can also use Ethernet to share files between two computers or set up a
small network.
If you’re connecting to an existing network, you may be able to get information about the
network and the software you need to use it from a network administrator who oversees its
operation. Identify your organization’s network administrator before you begin.
Follow these guidelines when selecting a cable for your network:
Type of twisted-pair Ethernet
Use twisted-pair cable types
10 Mbit
Category 3, 5, or 6
100 Mbit
Category 5 or 6
For more information about using your computer on a network or setting up a network, see
Mac Help (in the Help menu).
Using Your Computer
53
Connecting to a Twisted-Pair Ethernet Network
You can connect directly to a 10/100 twisted-pair Ethernet network.
You can also connect your computer to an Ethernet network that uses thin coaxial cables. To
do this, you need an RJ-45–to–Thin Coax adapter (available from other manufacturers).
See your Apple-authorized dealer for more information on Ethernet media adapters.
To connect your Macintosh to a centralized 10/100 twisted-pair Ethernet network, follow
these steps:
1
Plug one end of an RJ-45 twisted-pair cable into the Ethernet port on your Macintosh.
2
Plug the other end of the cord into an RJ-45 wall outlet or external hub that is connected to a
twisted-pair Ethernet network.
RJ-45 wall plate
Ethernet hub or switch
Twisted-pair Ethernet cable
After you start up the computer, you need to configure the software for your network
connection. Your network administrator can provide the necessary information. You can also
get help configuring your network software using Mac Help (in the Help menu).
For More Information on Using Ethernet
Additional information, including setting up an Ethernet network or transferring files using
Ethernet, is available in Mac Help. Choose Mac Help from the Help menu and search for
“Ethernet” or “network.”
For information on networking products you can use with your computer, go to the
Macintosh Products Guide at www.apple.com/guide
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Chapter 3
Using AirPort Wireless Networking
AirPort offers an easy and affordable way to provide wireless Internet access anywhere in the
home, at work, or in the classroom. Instead of using traditional cables, AirPort uses wireless
local area network (LAN) technology to provide wireless communication between multiple
computers. Through a wireless network you can set up access to the Internet, transfer files,
play multiplayer games, and more.
Your computer is AirPort-ready. The only thing you need to add is an AirPort Card. You install
the AirPort Card in a slot inside the computer and connect it directly to the end of a built-in
antenna cable.
How AirPort Provides Wireless Internet Access
With AirPort, you set up a wireless connection to a device known as a base station, which has
a physical connection to the Internet. AirPort technology works like a cordless telephone.
The handset of the cordless phone makes a wireless connection to the base, which is
connected to the telephone line. Similarly, your computer makes a wireless connection to
the base station, which is connected to the telephone line or Ethernet network.
Telephone or Ethernet connection
AirPort Base Station
Wireless Network Connections
If you install an AirPort Card, you can
m connect your computer to a computer network that has wireless access
m use your computer to provide network access for other computers using wireless cards
m establish a wireless connection and share information with another computer that has an
AirPort Card
Using Your Computer
55
Check with your network administrator for more information about reaching the network’s
wireless access point.
Warning Several kinds of objects placed near the computer can cause interference. See
the instructions that come with an AirPort Card or AirPort Base Station to learn about
avoiding interference. You may also find more information in the Apple Technical
Information Library: til.info.apple.com
To connect your computer to an existing network, check with the network administrator.
For More Information on AirPort
To purchase an AirPort Card or AirPort Base Station, contact your Apple-authorized dealer or
go to the Apple Store at www.apple.com/store
Additional information on AirPort is available in AirPort Help. Choose Help Center from the
Help menu and choose AirPort Help. You can also find information on Apple’s AirPort Web
site at www.apple.com/airport
Putting the Computer to Sleep to Save Energy
Your computer is set to go to sleep after a period of inactivity. Sleep is a state in which your
computer uses very little power. You can also put the computer to sleep whenever you want.
When the computer goes to sleep, it saves its state so that when you wake the computer,
your programs, documents, and control panel settings are exactly as you left them. You use
the Energy Saver control panel, part of the computer’s system software, to adjust sleep
settings. For further energy savings, disconnect the computer from its power source or turn
off the power strip when the computer is not in use.
To put your computer to sleep, you can
m touch the power button on the computer
m select a sleep mode in the Energy Settings portion of the Control Strip
m choose Sleep from the Special menu
When the computer is in sleep, the power button light pulses.
You wake the computer by touching the power button on the computer or by pressing a key.
With some Apple monitors, you can also use the monitor power button to put the computer
to sleep and wake it.
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Chapter 3
Transferring Information Between Two Apple Computers
If two Apple computers are not connected by a network, you can transfer information
between them by connecting them with an Ethernet crossover cable (in effect creating a
small network of just two computers). You connect the cable to each computer’s Ethernet
port and then turn on file sharing on both computers, or configure the computers’ Ethernet
settings to create a small network. For more information about configuring such an Ethernet
connection, see Mac Help.
You can also connect two Apple computers using a FireWire cable. You can then use FireWire
target disk mode to transfer files from one computer to another. For more information about
using FireWire target disk mode, see “FireWire Target Disk Mode” on page 49.
If you have an Internet connection, you can also transfer files via the Internet to your iDisk
storage area on iTools, where you or another iTools user can download them. For more
information about iTools, see “iTools—Free Internet Services for Mac Users” on page 32.
Using Your Computer
57
C H A P T E R
4
4
Working Inside Your Computer
This chapter provides information and instructions for working inside your computer. Read
the overview information in this chapter to make sure devices that you intend to install are
compatible with your Macintosh, then follow the installation instructions.
Warning
Always turn off and disconnect power from the computer before opening it.
Instructions are provided for the following procedures:
m “Removing the Computer Core” on page 60
m “Installing Memory” on page 64
m “Installing an AirPort Card” on page 66
m “Replacing the Battery” on page 67
59
Removing the Computer Core
1
To shut down your computer, choose Shut Down from the Special menu. Wait five minutes
to allow the computer’s internal components to cool.
Warning Always shut down the computer before opening it. Do not attempt to install
items while it is turned on.
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2
Turn the computer upside-down on a soft, clean cloth.
3
Unplug all the cables from the computer except the power cord.
m If you have never plugged in your computer: Connect the computer’s power cord and
plug it in.
4
Touch the bare metal of the AGP graphics card to discharge any static charge.
Touch the bare metal between the
VGA monitor port and the ADC monitor port.
Always do this before you touch any parts, or install any components, inside the
computer. To avoid generating static electricity, do not walk around the room until you have
finished installing the device and reinstalled the computer core.
Important
5
Unplug the power cord and power adapter.
Working Inside Your Computer
61
6
Push down on the latch to release it.
Press down on the
latch to release it.
Allow the latch to extend completely.
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Chapter 4
7
Gently pull the core from the computer enclosure.
Working Inside Your Computer
63
Installing Memory
You can install additional dynamic random-access memory (DRAM) in packages called Dual
Inline Memory Modules (DIMMs).
Your computer’s DRAM can be expanded to a maximum of 1536 megabytes (MB) by
installing DIMMs in the three DRAM DIMM slots on the main logic board.
If you use 512 MB DIMMs, they must have 256 megabit (Mbit) devices. You can use 256 MB
DIMMs that have 256 Mbit or 128 Mbit devices. To check the compatibility of these DIMMs,
see the Apple Macintosh Products Guide on Apple’s Web site: www.apple.com/guide
DIMMs must fit these specifications:
m “PC-100” Synchronous DRAM (SDRAM)
m 3.3 volt ( V )
m 64-bit wide, 168-pin module
m Maximum number of memory devices on a DIMM is 16.
m Unbuffered; do not use registered or buffered SDRAM.
m Height must not exceed 1.38 inches (35 millimeters).
This computer uses SDRAM DIMMs. Only “PC-100” DIMMs from recent Power
Macintosh G3 and G4 computers and servers are compatible with the ones your computer
uses; DIMMs used in other older Macintosh computers are not. Do not use older DIMMs
even if they fit into the DRAM DIMM slots.
Important
Video memory for standard Macintosh models is supplied by Synchronous DRAM (SDRAM)
soldered onto the AGP 2X graphics card that supplies the computer’s monitor port. Standard
Macintosh models come with 16 megabytes (MB) of SDRAM video memory.
You can use the Apple System Profiler program installed on your computer to check the
amounts of DRAM and video memory installed.
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Chapter 4
1
Open the ejectors on the DRAM DIMM slots you want to use by pushing down on them.
2
Align a DRAM DIMM in the DRAM slot as pictured and push the DIMM down until the
ejectors snap into place.
Important
Do not touch the DIMM’s connectors. Handle the DIMM only by the edges.
DRAM DIMM (Your DIMM’s shape and components may vary.)
The DRAM DIMM is designed to fit into
Connectors
the slot only one way. Be sure to align the
notches in the DIMM with the small ribs
inside the slot. With the ejectors in the
open position (as shown), push down
on the DIMM until it snaps into place.
The ejectors will automatically close.
Ejector
(Your slot may have one or two ejectors.
They should be pushed outward and down
to be in the open position, as shown.)
3
Notches
DRAM slot (1 of 3)
Ribs (inside slot)
Replace the computer core in the enclosure. (See “Replacing the Computer Core in the
Enclosure” on page 68.)
Working Inside Your Computer
65
Installing an AirPort Card
1
Open the hinged connector panel and insert your card.
Remove the tape holding
the antenna cable down.
Use this latch to release the
hinged connector panel, and
swing the panel open.
AirPort Card connector
2
The AirPort Card is designed to
fit into the connector only one way.
Insert the card until it is firmly seated.
Plug in the antenna cable and close the hinged connector panel.
Slip the clear plastic tab attached
to the AirPort Card behind
this component.
Plug the antenna cable into the
hole in the end of the AirPort Card.
If you want to remove the AirPort Card,
press this tab to lower the two catches
holding the card in place.
Tuck the excess antenna cable into this opening so that it
won’t get snagged when you reinstall the core into the enclosure.
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3
Replace the computer core in the enclosure. (See “Replacing the Computer Core in the
Enclosure” on page 68.)
Replacing the Battery
Your computer has a 3.6 V lithium battery. Some signs that you need to replace the battery
are intermittent problems starting up the computer and random changes in its date and time
settings. You can purchase a replacement battery from an Apple-authorized dealer.
1
Remove the battery from its holder, noting the orientation of the battery’s positive end. (Plus
and minus are also marked on the battery holder.)
Batteries contain chemicals, some of which may be harmful to the environment.
Please dispose of used batteries according to your local environmental laws and guidelines.
Important
Remove the battery by pulling it out
of its holder. If one is present, unsnap
the plastic band securing the battery
in place. Positive (+) and negative (-)
symbols are molded into the plastic
inside the holder. Be sure to orient the
battery correctly when you install it.
If you removed a plastic band, snap
it back into place.
2
Insert the new battery in the holder, making sure the battery’s positive and negative symbols
align with those on the holder.
Warning Installing the battery incorrectly may cause an explosion. Be sure the battery’s
positive and negative poles are correctly oriented in the holder. Use only the same type of
battery or an equivalent recommended by the manufacturer of the original.
3
Replace the computer core in the enclosure. (See “Replacing the Computer Core in the
Enclosure” on page 68.)
Working Inside Your Computer
67
Replacing the Computer Core in the Enclosure
To replace your computer core in the enclosure, do the following:
1
Carefully lift the core by the latch, align it over the enclosure, and lower the core into the
enclosure.
The core will fit into the enclosure only one way.
The ports on the core face the back of the enclosure.
Make sure the core is fully seated in the enclosure.
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2
Push the latch down until it locks into place.
Don’t lift or carry your computer by the core latch. The enclosure could fall off
the core and be damaged.
Warning
Working Inside Your Computer
69
C H A P T E R
5
5
Troubleshooting
If you have a problem while working with your computer, here are some things you can try
right away.
If the computer won’t respond or the pointer won’t move:
First, make sure the mouse and keyboard are connected.
m Unplug and then plug in the connectors and make sure they are firmly seated.
Then try to cancel what the computer is doing.
m Press the Command (x) and Q keys at the same time to try quitting the current
application.
m Press the Command (x) and period keys at the same time and, if a dialog box appears,
click Cancel.
m If that doesn’t work, hold down the Option and Command (x) keys and then press the
Esc key. If a dialog box appears, click Force Quit. Restart the computer by choosing
Restart from the Special menu in the Finder to be sure the problem is entirely cleared up.
m Press the reset button on the bottom of the computer. (The button is marked with the
P icon.)
m If that doesn’t work, touch the power button on the computer for 5 seconds until the
computer turns off. After the computer turns off, touch the button again to turn it on.
m If all else fails, unplug the power cord to turn the computer off, then replug the power
cord and restart the computer.
m If the problem occurs only when you use a particular program, check with the
program’s manufacturer to see if it is compatible with your computer.
m If the problem occurs frequently, choose Mac Help from the Help menu. Look at the
section on how to prevent and solve problems. You may need to check for extension
conflicts or reinstall your computer’s system software.
71
If the computer freezes during startup or you see a continuous flashing
question mark for more than a minute:
Turn off your system extensions.
m Start up your computer while holding down the Shift key.
If that doesn’t work, start up using the system software CD.
m Insert your system software CD and start up while holding down the C key. (Make sure
the Caps Lock key is not engaged.)
After the computer starts up:
m See the troubleshooting information in the onscreen help. Choose Mac Help from the
Help menu. Look at the section on how to prevent and solve problems. You may need to
check for extension conflicts or reinstall your computer’s system software.
If the computer won’t turn on or start up:
First, make sure the power cord is connected to a working power source and the power
adapter is properly connected.
m The plug on the power adapter must be completely inserted into the computer’s power
socket and firmly seated for your computer to operate correctly.
Reset the computer’s parameter random-access memory (PRAM).
m Start up the computer and immediately hold down the Command (x), Option, P, and R
keys until you hear the startup sound a second time. Then select your hard disk as the
computer’s startup disk using the Startup Disk control panel.
If that doesn’t work:
m If you recently installed additional memory or an AirPort Card, make sure that it is
correctly installed and that it is compatible with your computer. See if removing it allows
the computer to start up.
m Contact an Apple-authorized service provider.
Software Problems
If you have a problem with a software program:
m For problems with software from a manufacturer other than Apple, contact the
manufacturer.
If you have a problem using your computer or working with the Mac OS:
m Look at the Help Center (in the Help menu) for instructions and troubleshooting
information.
m Go to the Apple Support Web site on the Internet for the latest troubleshooting
information and software updates: www.apple.com/support
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If you have trouble using wireless communication:
m Make sure you have properly configured the software.
m Make sure the computer or network you are trying to connect to is running and has a
wireless access point.
m Make sure you are within antenna range of the other computer or the network’s access
point. Nearby electronic devices or metal structures can interfere with wireless
communication and reduce this distance. Repositioning or rotating the computer may
improve reception.
m See AirPort Help (in the Help Center) and the instructions that came with the wireless
device for more information.
Problems With Your Display
Warning If you have a problem with your Apple display and nothing presented in this
manual solves it, contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. If
you attempt to repair the display yourself, any damage you may cause to the display will
not be covered by the limited warranty on your display. Contact an Apple-authorized
dealer or service provider for additional information about this or any other warranty
question.
No image appears on the screen.
Make sure the display and computer are turned on.
Make sure the cables are connected properly to your computer and the display.
Make sure your computer is not in sleep.
Make sure the display brightness and contrast are set properly. Some monitors have
brightness and contrast controls on or under their front edge.
m Reset your computer’s PRAM. (See page 72.)
m
m
m
m
The screen image appears dim or flickers.
m Adjust the display brightness and contrast settings. Some monitors have brightness and
contrast controls on or under their front edge. Depending on how dim your monitor
appears, you may be able to adjust brightness or contrast using the Monitors control
panel.
m Calibrate the monitor using the Calibrate option in the Monitors control panel.
m The flickering may be caused by interference from a nearby power line, a fluorescent
light, or an electrical device—for example, a radio, a microwave oven, or another
computer. Try relocating nearby electrical devices, such as your speakers, or moving your
computer and display.
Troubleshooting
73
No colors appear on the screen or the colors don’t look right.
m Make sure the display is connected firmly to the computer.
m You may want to calibrate your monitor using the Monitors control panel. For more
information on color and your display, see Mac Help.
m Open the Monitors control panel and check if your monitor is set to display grays. For
more information on color and your display, see Mac Help.
After you change the screen resolution, desktop icons move.
m Changing the screen resolution affects the display of information on your screen. The
operating system may automatically reposition icons after you change the screen
resolution.
The screen freezes.
m If you are using both Energy Saver and a screen saver program, the screen saver program
may be conflicting with Energy Saver. Turn off either the screen saver program or Energy
Saver and restart your computer.
The light on the front of the monitor is flashing.
On some Apple flat panel displays, the power light can display a series of short flashes when
an error has been detected.
m If you see a repeating sequence of three short flashes, the monitor is detecting input in
the wrong video format. Check that your monitor is compatible with your graphics card
and that you’ve installed the correct monitor software, if your monitor came with
installation software.
m If you see a sequence of two short flashes and a long flash, the monitor is detecting a
problem with a backlighting lamp. Contact an Apple-authorized dealer or service provider.
74
Chapter 5
A P P E N D I X
A
A
Specifications
Processor and Memory Specifications
Processor
m PowerPC™ G4 processor, 1 megabyte (MB) backside level 2 cache
Random-access memory (RAM)
m Minimum of 64 megabytes (MB) of Synchronous Dynamic Random-Access Memory
(SDRAM), maximum of 1536 MB
m All SDRAM is supplied in removable Dual Inline Memory Modules (DIMMs).
m Three slots are available for DIMMs that are
m “PC-100” SDRAM DIMMs
m 3.3 volt ( V ) unbuffered, 64-bit wide, 168-pin
m DIMMS can be any of the following capacities:
m 32 MB, 64 MB, or 128 MB DIMMS (64-bit wide, 64 Mbit technology)
m 128 MB or 256 MB DIMMS (64-bit wide, 128 Mbit technology)
m 512 MB DIMMS (64-bit wide, 256 Mbit technology)
The Mac OS system software provides information about your computer, including the
amount of memory.
Dimensions and Operating Environment
Dimensions
m Weight: 14.0 pounds (6.35 kg)
Weight includes basic configuration only (no display or speakers). Weight may be greater
if optional devices are installed.
m Height: 9.8 inches (24.8 cm)
m Width: 7.7 inches (19.5 cm)
m Depth: 7.7 inches (19.5 cm)
75
Operating environment
m
m
m
m
Operating temperature: 10° to 35° C (50° to 95° F)
Storage temperature: –40° to 47° C (–40° to 116.6° F)
Relative humidity: 5% to 95% (noncondensing)
Altitude: 0 to 3048 meters (0 to 10,000 feet)
DVD-ROM Drive Specifications
m Disc diameters supported: 8 cm and 12 cm (3.15 in. and 4.7 in.)
Data capacity
m CD-ROM: 656 megabytes (MB), Mode 1, 748 MB, Mode 2
m DVD-ROM: 4.70 gigabytes (GB), single-sided, single-layer; 8.5 GB, single-sided,
double-layer; 9.4 GB, double-sided, single-layer; 17 GB, double-sided, double-layer
m DVD-RAM: 4.7 GB, single-sided, single-layer
m DVD-R: 3.95 GB, single-sided, single-layer
m CD-Audio: 74 minutes and 42 seconds play time
USB Specifications
m Two Universal Serial Bus (USB) Type A ports
m 500 milliamperes (mA) at 5 volts ( V ) is available per port for a total of 1 ampere.
FireWire Specifications
m Main logic board: Two built-in standard 6-pin FireWire connectors
m Data transfer speed: 100, 200, and 400 megabits per second (Mbps)
Power
m
m
m
m
76
Appendix A
Input voltage range: 8 to 33 volts ( V )
Input power range: Approximately 1 watt ( W )
Output voltage range: Approximately 13 to 30 V
Output power range: Up to 10 W
Ethernet Specifications
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
IEEE 802.3 compliant
Maximum cable length: 100 meters (m)
Protocols: Open Transport, AppleShare, AppleTalk, NetWare for Macintosh, TCP/IP
Connector: RJ-45 for 10Base-T and 100Base-TX
Media, 10Base-T: Category 3 or higher UTP on 2 pairs up to 100 m
Media, 100Base-TX: Category 5 UTP on 2 pairs up to 100 m
Channel speeds: IEEE Auto Negotiation of 10Base-T and 100Base-TX
Modem Specifications
m Data communications standard: K56Flex and V.90
m Speed: 53 kilobits per second (Kbps)
m Fax standard: ITU V.17
Specifications for the AirPort Card (Optional)
m
m
m
m
Wireless data rate: 11 megabits per second (Mbps) maximum
Range: Up to 150 feet (data rates may vary depending on environmental conditions)
Frequency band: 2.4 to 2.5 gigahertz (GHz)
Radio output power: 15 dBm (nominal)
Compatibility
m 802.11 Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS) 1, 2 Mbps standard
m 802.11 HR DSSS 11 Mbps draft standard
Digital Amplifier Headphone Jack Specifications
m Full Scale Output level: 3.0 V peak-to-peak with a 5 kilohm load
Noise, distortion, and bandwidth
m Input sound signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) less than 82 decibels (dB) unweighted (typical)
for recording to system disk or system main memory
m Output sound signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) less than 80 dB unweighted (typical)
m Distortion: Total harmonic distortion: 0.08 percent
m Bandwidth: 20 hertz (Hz) to 20 kilohertz (kHz)
Specifications
77
Video Memory and Graphics Controller
m Graphics controller: AGP card with Apple Display Connector (ADC) and VGA connector
Video Display Modes
Your monitor may not support all the resolutions listed here. For technical specifications for
your specific display, go to the Apple Web site and check the specifications for your product
listed there: www.apple.com/store
VGA port
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
640 x 480 at 60, 67, 72, 75, 85, 90, 100, 120 Hz
800 x 600 at 56, 60, 72, 75, 85, 90, 100, 120 Hz
832 x 624 at 75 Hz
1024 x 768 at 60, 70, 75, 85, 90, 100, 120 Hz
1152 x 870 at 75 Hz
1280 x 960 at 75 Hz
1280 x 1024 at 60, 75, 80 Hz
1600 x 1200 at 60, 65, 70, 75, 85 Hz
1920 x 1080 at 60, 72, 76 Hz
Apple Display Connector port
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
78
Appendix A
640 x 480
640 x 480 (stretched)
800 x 500
800 x 600
800 x 512 (pixel doubled)
800 x 600 (stretched)
832 x 624
1024 x 640
1024 x 768
1024 x 768 (stretched)
1280 x 800
1280 x 1024
1600 x 1024
1600 x 1200
Power Supply
DC line input
m Line voltage: 128.5 V DC
Power Requirements for Devices You Can Connect
USB devices
m Each of the computer’s built-in USB ports is allotted 500 milliamperes (mA).
FireWire devices
m The computer can provide up to 10 W total to the FireWire ports.
System Clock and Battery
m CMOS custom circuitry with long-life lithium battery. You can purchase replacement
batteries from an Apple-authorized dealer.
Specifications
79
A P P E N D I X
B
B
Safety, Maintenance, and Ergonomics
This appendix provides important information about safety procedures, routine
maintenance, and ergonomic considerations for using your computer and display.
Important Safety Information
The only way to disconnect power completely from your computer is to unplug the power
cord from the main power supply. Similarly, to disconnect your display completely, you must
also unplug its power cable from the computer or other power outlet. Make sure at least one
end of the power cord is within easy reach so that you can unplug the computer or display
when necessary.
For your own safety and that of your equipment, always take the following precautions.
Disconnect the power plug from your computer or display if any of the following
conditions exists:
m the power cord or plug becomes frayed or otherwise damaged
m you spill something into the case
m your computer or display are exposed to rain or any other excess moisture
m your computer or display have been dropped or the case has been otherwise damaged
m you suspect that your computer or display needs service or repair
m you want to clean the computer or display case or screen
To prevent accidents and damage to your computer or display, be sure that you always follow
these instructions:
m Keep your computer and display away from sources of liquids and moisture.
m Don’t set anything on top of the computer or display.
m Keep the computer and display vents free from obstruction.
81
m Never remove the case from the monitor, or remove the core from your computer when
it’s running.
m During lightning storms, disconnect your modem from the phone jack to prevent a
destructive voltage overload from damaging the modem.
Your computer is equipped with a three-wire grounding plug—a plug that has a third
grounding pin. This is a safety feature. Don’t modify the plug to fit into an ungrounded
outlet. Contact a licensed electrician to replace the outlet with a properly grounded one. Do
not defeat the purpose of the grounding plug!
Be careful when lifting or moving your monitor, if it’s heavy. Be sure to use correct lifting
procedures, lifting with your legs. When carrying the monitor, make sure the monitor is
facing you. Don’t carry the monitor by its stand.
Electrical equipment may be hazardous if misused. Operation of this product by children
must always be supervised by an adult. Do not allow children access to the interior of any
electrical product and do not permit them to handle electrical cables
General Maintenance
If you need to clean the computer or display beyond wiping them down with a clean cloth,
follow these instructions:
1
Turn your computer and display off.
2
Disconnect the computer power cable from the electrical outlet or power strip. If your
display has a power cable connected to an outlet, disconnect it as well.
3
Disconnect the display’s cables from the computer.
4
Clean the display screen with soft, lint-free paper or cloth dampened with mild soap
and water.
Warning Do not spray liquid directly onto the display screen. Liquid could drip inside
the display and cause electrical shock.
5
Wipe the computer or display case surfaces lightly with a clean, soft cloth dampened
with water.
Don’t use alcohol, aerosol sprays, solvents, or abrasives that might damage the finish on
the case.
82
Appendix B
Protecting Your DVD Disc Drive
To keep your DVD disc drive working properly:
m Position your computer so that you can easily insert discs without obstructions.
m Do not put anything on top of the drive.
m Keep your computer away from any source of moisture.
Maintaining Your Display
To maintain your display and ensure its long life:
m Do not press on the surface of the display screen.
m Do not write on the screen or touch the screen with a sharp object.
m If you will not be using your display and computer for a day or more, turn off the
computer and display or use Energy Saver.
m Turn off your monitor, turn down the brightness, or use a screen saver program that dims
or varies the image on the screen when the computer is idle for a prolonged time.
Important Ergonomic and Health-Related Information
Here are some guidelines for adjusting the furniture in your office to reduce glare and to
accommodate your physical size and shape.
m An adjustable chair that provides firm, comfortable support is best. Adjust the height of
the chair so your thighs are tilted slightly and your feet are flat on the floor.
The back of the chair should support your lower back (lumbar region). Follow the
manufacturer’s instructions for adjusting the backrest to fit your body properly.
m When you use the computer keyboard, your shoulders should be relaxed. Your upper arm
and forearm should form an approximate right angle, with your wrist and hand in roughly
a straight line.
You may have to raise your chair so your forearms and hands are at the proper angle to
the keyboard. If this makes it impossible to rest your feet flat on the floor, you can use a
footrest with adjustable height and tilt to make up for any gap between the floor and your
feet. Or you may lower the desktop to eliminate the need for a footrest. Another option is
to use a desk with a keyboard tray that’s lower than the regular work surface.
Safety, Maintenance, and Ergonomics
83
m Position the mouse at the same height as your keyboard. Allow adequate space to use the
mouse comfortably.
m Arrange the monitor so the top of the screen is slightly below your eye level when you’re
sitting at the keyboard. The best distance from your eyes to the screen is up to you,
although most people seem to prefer 18 to 28 inches (45 to 70 cm).
m Position the monitor to minimize glare and reflections on the screen from overhead lights
and nearby windows. You may want to use a tiltable monitor stand. The stand lets you set
the monitor at the best angle for viewing, helping to reduce or eliminate glare from
lighting sources you can’t move.
45– 70 cm (18– 28 in.)
Shoulders relaxed
Forearms and hands
in a straight line
Top of the screen at or slightly
below eye level (You may need
to adjust the height of your
monitor by placing something
under it or by raising your
work surface.)
Forearms level
or tilted slightly
Screen positioned to avoid
reflected glare
Lower back supported
Clearance under work surface
Thighs tilted slightly
Feet flat on the floor
For more information about health, safety, and maintenance, go to Apple’s World Wide Web
site: www.apple.com/about/ergonomics
84
Appendix B
Communications Regulation Information
FCC Compliance Statement
This device complies with part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) This
device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including
interference that may cause undesired operation. See instructions if interference to radio or television reception
is suspected.
Radio and Television Interference
The equipment described in this manual generates, uses, and can radiate radio-frequency energy. If it is not
installed and used properly—that is, in strict accordance with Apple’s instructions—it may cause interference with
radio and television reception.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device in accordance
with the specifications in Part 15 of FCC rules. These specifications are designed to provide reasonable protection
against such interference in a residential installation. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not
occur in a particular installation.
You can determine whether your computer system is causing interference by turning it off. If the interference
stops, it was probably caused by the computer or one of the peripheral devices.
If your computer system does cause interference to radio or television reception, try to correct the interference
by using one or more of the following measures:
m Turn the television or radio antenna until the interference stops.
m Move the computer to one side or the other of the television or radio.
m Move the computer farther away from the television or radio.
m Plug the computer into an outlet that is on a different circuit from the television or radio. (That is, make
certain the computer and the television or radio are on circuits controlled by different circuit breakers or
fuses.)
If necessary, consult an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple. See the service and support information that
came with your Apple product. Or, consult an experienced radio/television technician for additional suggestions.
Important Changes or modifications to this product not authorized by Apple Computer, Inc., could void the
FCC Compliance and negate your authority to operate the product.
This product was tested for FCC compliance under conditions that included the use of Apple peripheral devices
and Apple shielded cables and connectors between system components. It is important that you use Apple
peripheral devices and shielded cables and connectors between system components to reduce the possibility of
causing interference to radios, television sets, and other electronic devices. You can obtain Apple peripheral
devices and the proper shielded cables and connectors through an Apple-authorized dealer. For non-Apple
peripheral devices, contact the manufacturer or dealer for assistance.
Responsible party (contact for FCC matters only): Apple Computer, Inc., Product Compliance, 1 Infinite Loop
M/S 26-A, Cupertino, CA 95014-2084, 408-974-2000.
Industry Canada Statement
This Class B device meets all requirements of the Canadian interference-causing equipment regulations.
Cet appareil numérique de la Classe B respecte toutes les exigences du Règlement sur le matériel
brouilleur du Canada.
Communications Regulation Information
85
VCCI Class B Statement
Laser Information
Making adjustments or performing procedures other than those specified in your equipment’s
manual may result in hazardous radiation exposure.
Warning
Do not attempt to disassemble the cabinet containing the laser. The laser beam used in this product is harmful to
the eyes. The use of optical instruments, such as magnifying lenses, with this product increases the potential
hazard to your eyes. For your safety, have this equipment serviced only by an Apple-authorized service provider.
If you have an internal Apple CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, or DVD-RAM drive in your computer, your computer is a Class
1 laser product. The Class 1 label, located in a user-accessible area, indicates that the drive meets minimum safety
requirements. A service warning label is located in a service-accessible area. The labels on your product may differ
slightly from the ones shown here.
Class 1 label
Service warning label
Laser Specifications
Laser on pickup unit (when reading a CD)
m Type: Semiconductor GaAlAs laser
m Wavelength: 790 nm
m Power out of objective lens: 3.3mW
m Beam divergence: horizontal 12º vertical 35º
Laser on pickup unit (when reading DVD)
m Type: Semiconductor GaAlAs laser
m Wavelength: 658 nm
m Power out of objective lens: 6 mW
m Beam divergence: horizontal 8.5º vertical 27º
Exposure to Radio Frequency Energy
The radiated output power of the optional AirPort Card is far below the FCC radio frequency exposure limits.
Nevertheless, it is advised to use the wireless equipment in such a manner that the potential for human contact
during normal operation is minimized.
Mouse and Keyboard Information
The Apple optical mouse is a Class 1 LED product. This product complies with the requirements of European
Directives 72/23/EEC and 89/336/EEC.
It also complies with the Canadian ICES-003 Class B Specification.
86
Communications Regulation Information
High-Risk Activities Warning
This computer system is not intended for use in the operation of nuclear facilities, aircraft navigation or
communications systems, or air traffic control machines, or for any other uses where the failure of the computer
system could lead to death, personal injury or severe environmental damage.
ENERGY STAR® Compliance
As an ENERGY STAR® partner, Apple has determined that this product meets the ENERGY STAR® guidelines for
energy efficiency. The ENERGY STAR® program is a partnership with office product equipment manufacturers to
promote energy-efficiency. Reducing energy consumption of office products saves money and reduces pollution
by eliminating wasted energy.
Communications, Telephone, and Modem Regulation Information
For information on FCC regulations, radio and television interference, and telephone and modem information as
it relates to this product, see the files in the Communications Regulations folder, inside the Apple Extras folder on
your hard drive.
Communications Regulation Information
87