Model 880A-N4X
Model 880S-N4X
PLC Graphic Control System
Operator’s Installation and Instruction Manual
DETCON, Inc.
3200 Research Forest Dr., A-1
The Woodlands, Texas 77381
Ph.281.367.4100 / Fax 281.298.2868
www.detcon.com
September 11, 2009 • Document # 3290 • Revision 1.0
880-N4X
Page intentionally blank
880-N4X Instruction Manual
ii
880-N4X
Table of Contents
Introduction .............................................................................................................................................1
1.0
1.1
Analog Systems (4-20mA sensors) ...................................................................................................... 1
1.2
Serial Systems (RS-485) ...................................................................................................................... 1
2.0
System Configuration .............................................................................................................................3
2.1
Configuration........................................................................................................................................ 3
2.2
Touch Panel Graphic Display............................................................................................................... 3
2.3
Programmable Logic Controller........................................................................................................... 4
2.4
Isolated Network Adapter .................................................................................................................... 4
2.5
Specifications ....................................................................................................................................... 5
3.0
Installation ...............................................................................................................................................7
3.1
Installing I/O Modules.......................................................................................................................... 7
3.2
Unit Connections.................................................................................................................................. 8
3.3
Initial Power Checks .......................................................................................................................... 11
3.4
Auxiliary 24VDC Input...................................................................................................................... 12
3.5
880 Remote Display Installation (Optional)....................................................................................... 12
4.0
Setup .......................................................................................................................................................15
4.1
User interface ..................................................................................................................................... 15
4.2
Clock and Screen Adjustments........................................................................................................... 16
4.3
880 Setup............................................................................................................................................ 18
4.4
Remote Display Set-up....................................................................................................................... 23
5.0
System Operation ..................................................................................................................................25
5.1
Alarm Indicators................................................................................................................................. 25
5.2
Main Screen........................................................................................................................................ 25
5.3
Channel X Details Screen ................................................................................................................... 26
5.4
Alarm History Screen ......................................................................................................................... 27
6.0
Trouble-shooting ...................................................................................................................................29
6.1
Sensor Faults ...................................................................................................................................... 29
6.2
Troubleshooting RS485 Networks ..................................................................................................... 29
7.0
Spare Parts.............................................................................................................................................31
8.0
Warranty................................................................................................................................................31
Appendix A ........................................................................................................................................................32
RS-485 System Integration Wiring ................................................................................................................ 32
Appendix B ........................................................................................................................................................38
Hexadecimal Table......................................................................................................................................... 38
Appendix C ........................................................................................................................................................39
Revision History............................................................................................................................................. 39
Appendix D ........................................................................................................................................................40
Drawings and Diagrams ................................................................................................................................. 40
880-N4X Instruction Manual
iii
880-N4X
Table of Figures
Figure 1 DA4 4-20mA Configuration .................................................................................................................. 1
Figure 2 RS-485 Network Configuration ............................................................................................................. 2
Figure 3 Back of Touch Panel Display................................................................................................................. 3
Figure 4 Basic PLC .............................................................................................................................................. 4
Figure 5 Isolated Network Adapter ...................................................................................................................... 5
Figure 6 Unit overview......................................................................................................................................... 5
Figure 7 Dimensional Overview .......................................................................................................................... 7
Figure 8 installing Din-Rail mounted modules .................................................................................................... 8
Figure 9 Setting Device Addresses....................................................................................................................... 8
Figure 10 Typical RS-485 connections ................................................................................................................ 9
Figure 11 Typical Analog Sensor Wiring ............................................................................................................ 9
Figure 12 Typical RL-4 Module......................................................................................................................... 10
Figure 13 Main 880 terminal blocks and connections........................................................................................ 10
Figure 14 Typical AC and DC Input Connections ............................................................................................. 10
Figure 15 I/O Module Termination jumper (JP6) .............................................................................................. 11
Figure 16 24VDC adjustment............................................................................................................................. 12
Figure 18 Dimensional Overview ...................................................................................................................... 13
Figure 19 Main 880 terminal blocks and connections........................................................................................ 13
Figure 20 Remote RS-422 connections.............................................................................................................. 14
Figure 21 Remote Interconnect Wiring.............................................................................................................. 14
Figure 22 Typical Input Power connections....................................................................................................... 14
Figure 23 Input Keyboard .................................................................................................................................. 15
Figure 24 Input Keypad...................................................................................................................................... 15
Figure 25 Warning Screen.................................................................................................................................. 16
Figure 26 Main Menu......................................................................................................................................... 16
Figure 27 Screen Settings................................................................................................................................... 17
Figure 28 Clock Adjust Screen........................................................................................................................... 17
Figure 29 Adjust Display Screen........................................................................................................................ 17
Figure 29 Main Screen ....................................................................................................................................... 18
Figure 30 Analog Configuration Screen............................................................................................................. 18
Figure 31 Serial Configuration Screen ............................................................................................................... 19
Figure 32 Inputting the Facility Name ............................................................................................................... 19
Figure 33 Inputting the number of channels....................................................................................................... 20
Figure 34 Channel Detail Screen........................................................................................................................ 21
Figure 36 The Main Screen ................................................................................................................................ 26
Figure 37 Channel Details Screen ...................................................................................................................... 27
Figure 38 Alarm History Screen......................................................................................................................... 27
Figure 39 RS-485 Bus with 4 transceiver chips ................................................................................................. 32
Figure 40 Correct and incorrect wiring schemes................................................................................................ 33
Figure 41 Recommended RS-485 communications set-up ................................................................................ 34
Figure 42 Unbalanced Data Bus......................................................................................................................... 35
Figure 43 Data Bus using two repeaters............................................................................................................. 35
Figure 44 Repeater wiring diagram.................................................................................................................... 35
Figure 45 Daisy Chain wiring diagram .............................................................................................................. 36
Figure 46 Unbalanced Data Bus......................................................................................................................... 36
Figure 47 Four repeater Data Bus ...................................................................................................................... 37
Figure 48 wire length vs. data speed .................................................................................................................. 37
Shipping Address: 3200 A-1 Research Forest Dr., The Woodlands Texas 77381
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 8067, The Woodlands Texas 77387-8067
Phone: 888.367.4286, 281.367.4100 • Fax: 281.292.2860 • www.detcon.com • sales@detcon.com
880-N4X Instruction Manual
iv
880-N4X
1.0 Introduction
The standard Detcon Model 880 is a PLC based graphic control system specifically designed to serve as a host
monitoring and control system for networks of gas detection sensors as well as a wide range of other field
devices. The main unit is programmed as a Modbus master and is available in two versions: Serial (Model
880S-N4X) and Analog (Model 880A-N4X). Both are fully Field configurable and include a NEMA 4X rated
control enclosure, which is rain tight and suitable for outdoor locations in electrically non-hazardous
environments.
The Serial unit (Model 880S-N4X) is designed to monitor up to 32 serial field devices, while the Analog
version (880A-N4X) can monitor up to 72 analog devices via Detcon’s DA4 Modules. The unit features a
color touch screen that graphically displays the status of each device, provides three fully programmable
“Banks” of alarm outputs, and logs alarm events to a USB Drive (optional). The use of standard industrial
components makes Detcon Model 880 an easy and practical choice when configuring point-to-point
monitoring and data acquisition. The system can also be used for remote monitoring simply by adding the 880
Remote Display Unit.
1.1 Analog Systems (4-20mA sensors)
The signal outputs from multiple sensors provide the user with various options for integrating the Model 880
Graphic Control System. One method of integration is accomplished by using 4-20mA signal output gas
sensors with Detcon DA4 Modules (Figure 1). The DA4 Module receives an analog 4-20mA signal
corresponding to the range of detection then changes it to Modbus™ before relaying the information to the
880A. The Sensor’s output signal is calibrated so that a 4mA input represents a reading of “0” and a 20mA
input represents a reading of full scale. The scale used for each sensor is user programmable and can be set in
the field. Readings outside the range of 4-20mA will cause a Fault.
Sensor 4
Sensor 3
COMM
Typical Sensors
M
S
D
L
S
D
4-20mA
INPUT
Sensor 1
Sensor 2
Figure 1 DA4 4-20mA Configuration
Analog 4-20mA networks are typically recognized as the most fail-safe approach.
Module(s), the 880A can communicate with up to 72 analog input channels.
When using DA4
1.2 Serial Systems (RS-485)
Another method of integration commonly used in industrial applications is the RS-485 serial communications
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880-N4X
network, or Modbus™ (Figure 2). RS-485 serial communication is used for multipoint communications and is
a popular choice due to ease of wiring installation.
Advantages of using RS-485 serial communication:
¾
¾
¾
¾
¾
Inexpensive method allowing multiple devices to communicate over a single twisted pair of wires.
More data/information can be sent beyond the simple 4-20mA signal.
Transceiver communication up to 4,000 feet without using repeaters.
Highly resistant to induced noise when proper cable and terminations are used.
Two-way (bi-directional), half-duplex, data bus communication consisting of multiple transmitter and
receiver combinations.
Most systems use the RS-485 master/slave architecture for multiple device communication. Each slave unit
has a unique address and responds to data packets generated by the master. The master periodically polls all
connected slave units.
The protocol used by Detcon for the RS-485 communications is the Modbus¥ RTU, which is compatible with
most PLC’s, MMI’s, and distributed control systems. The Modbus¥ RTU protocol is standard and allows for
a maximum of 32 sensors and/or field devices to be used in this configuration.
1
2
Typical Sensors
FAULT
ALARM 3
NO COMM
ALARM 2
POWER
ON / OFF
ALARM 1
31
32
Figure 2 RS-485 Network Configuration
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880-N4X
2.0 System Configuration
The Model 880 is designed to monitor and display the status of field sensor devices, provide programmable
alarm outputs, and log alarm incidents via a USB drive. The system is equipped with a color graphic touch
screen display. Control electronics are industry standard PLC modules pre-selected to fit the application.
Three programmable “Banks” of Alarms are designed to give the user the ability to set up three “Zones” of
Alarm 1, Alarm 2, Alarm 3 and Fault conditions. Through the use of the Detcon RL4 Modules, each alarm
can provide multiple sets of contacts for customer annunciator connections: Common, Normally Open, and
Normally Closed.
2.1 Configuration
The Model 880 is equipped with:
x
x
x
x
x
8.31" x 6.24" (211.2 x 158.4 mm) Color Graphical Touch Screen display panel
Four slot Programmable Logic Controller (PLC)
o Two communication port CPU Module
o Eight channel Relay Output Module
o Communications Module (2ea.)
Isolated Network Adapter
24VDC 10Amp Power Supply
Fault, Alarm, Communications, and Power Panel Indicator LED’s
2.2 Touch Panel Graphic Display
The Model 880 is equipped with a graphic display panel (Figure 3) that is prompted to display information
such as the operational status of each monitoring device, alarm output readings, and record alarm incidents to a
USB Drive.
DC Input
NOT
Used
+
24V . . . .
Dedicated
power supply
recommended
PWR
CPU
TxD
RxD
PLC Serial Port
BACK VIEW
USB Type A Port
USB Type B Port
Ethernet 10/100
Base T Connector
Audio Line Out
BOTTOM VIEW
Figure 3 Back of Touch Panel Display
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880-N4X
The touch panel acts as a master interface to the internally located PLC. As such, the touch panel polls the
PLC, which, in turn, polls the field devices for information. A wand is used on the screen to operate system
controls and/or move to additional screens.
A USB port (Figure 3) is located on the back of the display at the bottom. When a USB Drive (USB Memory
Stick) is installed, the display will automatically log to the drive when any alarms and/or faults have been
recorded by the PLC. The information is logged into a folder named ‘Log’ and named ‘Alarm_yymmdd.txt’
where yy is the year, mm is the month, and dd is the day. The files are written in text format.
2.3 Programmable Logic Controller
At the core of the Model 880 is the modular Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), which is designed to offer
maximum flexibility in system configuration (Figure 4). The PLC and all other electronic components are
mounted within the enclosure.
RELAY OUT
RELAY
DATA
COM
CPU
Direct
205
PWR
BATT
RUN
TERM
STOP
LOGIC
0
1
2
3
RUN
CPU
DATA
COM
4
5
6
7
D2-08TR
D2-DCM
D2-DCM
5-240VAC
1A 50/60Hz
C
+
C
L
0
L 4
1
G
5
2
6
3
7
5-30VDC
5mA-1A
Figure 4 Basic PLC
Installed in the PLC is the programmable Central Processing Unit (CPU), which processes all instructions,
data, and polls all field devices. The CPU utilizes flash memory to store the running program. All units are
shipped with firmware loaded and a lithium battery installed. The CPU has two communication ports. The
top RS232 port (Port 1) is the programming and interface for the touch display panel. The 15-pin bottom port
(Port 2) supports RS232 or RS422 and serves as I/O master for the RS-485 Modbus™ network. The PLC
contains an 8-channel Relay Output Module that controls the LED’s on the front panel of the unit. The PLC
also utilizes two Data Communication Modules (DCM’s) that are used to communicate with the Remote
Display (if connected), and Auxiliary units such as printers or other external compatible devices.
2.4 Isolated Network Adapter
The Model 880 PLC uses an Isolated Network Adapter to interface devices on the RS-485 Modbus™ network.
The Isolated Network Adapter (Figure 5) converts RS-422/485 signals from sensors and other digital devices,
to an RS-232 signal that the main CPU can utilize.
The Isolated Network Adapter performs well in noisy environments where data corruption is possible due to
induced noise. The Isolated Network Adapter can also be used to verify whether or not the unit is
communicating and polling. To simplify troubleshooting, the Isolated Network Adapter has transmit and
receive LED’s.
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880-N4X
A
Figure 5 Isolated Network Adapter
RELAY OUT
RELAY
DATA
COM
CPU
Direct
L
LOGIC
205
PWR
BATT
RUN
CPU
RUN
TERM
STOP
DATA
COM
4
5
6
7
0
1
2
3
D2-08TR
D2-DCM
D2-DCM
N
Input Details
100-240VAC 3.5A Maximum
Power Factor Corrected
Frequency : 50/60Hz
5-240VAC
1A 50/60Hz
Made in China
C
+
C
L
45JB
5
US
C
US
R
ALM V.ADJ
2
Output Details
Continuous Loading 24VDC/10A
H
6
3
+V
DC ON
+V
-V
-V
+
4
1
C
NOT
Used
0
L
G
7
5-30VDC
5mA-1A
24V . . . .
Dedicated
power supply
recommended
PWR
CPU
TxD
RxD
A
RXD
C3
C3
C03
WMS1C03
240V10000
WMS1C03
240V10000
WMS1C03
240V10000
I ON
TXD
TXD EN
B
TXD
RXD
CTS
C-A
I ON
I ON
TXD+
TXDRXD+
RXD0V
TXD+
TXDRXD+
RXD0V
24V -
REMOTE
OUTPUT
RS-422
SLAVE
24V +
VAC (L1)
Ground
NEU (L2)
+V
C-A
TX+
TXRXRX+
C-B
24VDC
INPUT
X1
X1
ALARM 2
NO COMM
X2
FAULT
X2
ALARM 3
X1
X1
COMM
X2
X2
A
B
ON / OFF
COMM
COMM
COMM
COMM
COMM
COMM
COMM
COMM
COMM
COMM
COMM
COMM
M
S
D
M
S
D
M
S
D
M
S
D
M
S
D
M
S
D
M
S
D
M
S
D
M
S
D
M
S
D
M
S
D
M
S
D
M
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
4-20mA
INPUT
4-20mA
INPUT
4-20mA
INPUT
4-20mA
INPUT
4-20mA
INPUT
4-20mA
INPUT
4-20mA
INPUT
4-20mA
INPUT
4-20mA
INPUT
4-20mA
INPUT
4-20mA
INPUT
4-20mA
INPUT
4-20mA
INPUT
4-20mA
INPUT
+
X1
ALARM 1
COMM
M
S
D
X2
RS-485 VDC
Primary Out
Figure 6 Unit overview
2.5 Specifications
Capacity
User Configurable
Serial Units: Up to 32 serial devices
Analog Units: Up to 72 analog inputs using the Detcon DA-4 Modules
Inputs
RS-485 Modbus™ RTU
Outputs
Primary: RS-485
Slave: RS-485
Remote Output: RS-422
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880-N4X
Power Input
100-240VAC 50~60Hz
18-30VDC
Power Consumption
Base Unit <40W – Not to include I/O Modules and sensors
Total Power is dependent on number of I/O modules, number of sensors, and the type of sensors attached.
Total power of unit with I/O modules and gas sensors not to exceed 200 Watts.
Display
8” inch diagonal Graphic Backlit LCD Touch screen display
Electrical Classification
NEMA 4 Enclosure
Dimensions
18''W x 20''H x 8.75''D
Operating Temperature Range
0°C to +45°C
Warranty
One year
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Rev. 1.0
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880-N4X
3.0 Installation
The Detcon Model 880 PLC is a wall-mount enclosure, and can be mounted anywhere that is rated safe for
NEMA 4X enclosures. The enclosure is equipped with wall-mounting flanges for easy wall mount
installations. Care should be given to prevent sharp objects from colliding with the touch screen display as
damage to the display may cause the unit to become inoperative. The screen can be cleaned with a mild
detergent and a lint free cloth. Never use an abrasive cleaner on the display.
Securely mount the 880 Enclosure in accordance with Figure 7.
18.0"
8.75"
Ø0.3"
14.0"
18.8"
FAULT
ALARM 3
NO COMM
ALARM 2
POWER
ON / OFF
ALARM 1
8.5"
20.0"
Mounting Flange
Figure 7 Dimensional Overview
3.1 Installing I/O Modules
The 880-N4X provides Din-Rail space for the addition of Din-Rail mounted I/O Modules. There is enough
room for the addition of up to 14 modules, but the number of modules that can be mounted should be
determined more by the current load imposed on the unit than by the physical space provided. The maximum
current load on internally mounted modules is to be restricted to 4Amps (96Watts). An RS-485 connector is
provided for Modbus™ and power connections for these Din-Rail mounted modules.
WARNING: The use of the 880’s 24VDC to power unit mounted Din-Rail modules and external
devices is be restricted to no more than 4Amps (96 Watts). Care should be taken to insure that the
total current of devices utilizing this power does not exceed this rating, as this may cause detrimental
damage to the unit and will void the warranty. An External Power Source should be used to power
any and all components or devices that exceed this rating.
I/O Modules should be mounted on the Din-Rail starting from the right and plugging additional modules in to
the left. An RS-485 cable with the appropriate I/O connector is provided on the right side of the Din-Rail and
should be plugged into the first module. An RS-485 connector is also provided to plug into the installed
modules on the left side. Both of the connectors must be plugged into the modules for RS-485
Communications to work properly.
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880-N4X
TB3-J1
COMM
M
S
D
M
S
D
M
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
RELAY
RELAY
RELAY
TB3-J2
COMM
COMM
M
S
D
M
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
4-20mA
INPUT
4-20mA
INPUT
-SBA
RS-485
Cable to
Output Terminal
Blocks.
COMM
+
COMM
Add
Additional
Modules
as
needed.
Maximum
of 12
Modules.
+
-
S
B
A
RS-485 and Power Cable
Figure 8 installing Din-Rail mounted modules
I/O Module Addressing
I/O modules must be properly addressed to establish correct communications. All Modules are addressed in
Hexadecimal. I/O Addressing is dependent on the type of module being installed, and is discussed in Section
4.3, 880 Setup. The I/O module’s address is established by setting the two rotary switches to the
correspondingly correct position. The top rotary switch sets the Most Significant Bit (MSB). The bottom
rotary switch sets the Least Significant Bit (LSB). For an address of 01, set the top switch (MSB) to 0 and the
bottom switch (LSB) to 1. See Appendix B for Decimal to Hexadecimal conversion.
NOTE: All addresses must be unique. There can be no duplication of addresses or a Communication
Error (NO COMM) will occur.
COMM
COMM
COMM
COMM
COMM
COMM
COMM
COMM
M
S
D
M
S
D
M
S
D
M
S
D
M
S
D
M
S
D
M
S
D
M
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
L
S
D
4-20mA
INPUT
4-20mA
INPUT
RELAY
CD
AB E
F01
45 6
F01
23
45 6
L
S
B
4-20mA
INPUT
23
M
S
B
4-20mA
INPUT
CD
AB E
RELAY
7 89
RELAY
7 89
RELAY
Figure 9 Setting Device Addresses
3.2 Unit Connections
Analog Connections
1. For Analog Units (880A), communication is accomplished by using Detcon DA4 modules and the RS485 Modbus™. The 4-20mA sensors are directly connected to the DA4 modules, while the DA4
modules are connected via the RS-485 Modbus™ to the 880 PLC (Figure 10). The correct setup of
the DA4’s is covered in Section 4.3 880 Setup.
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WARNING: The use of the 880’s 24VDC to power unit mounted Din-Rail modules is be restricted to
no more than 4Amps (§96 Watts). Care should be taken to insure that the total current of devices
utilizing this power does not exceed this rating, as this may cause detrimental damage to the unit and
will void the warranty.
Sensor 4
RS-485 to 880
Sensor 3
COMM
Typical Sensors
M
S
D
L
S
D
4-20mA
INPUT
Sensor 1
Sensor 2
Figure 10 Typical Analog Sensor Wiring
Serial Connections
2. For Serial Units (880S), connect the RS-485 Modbus™ network to the terminal blocks labeled
“Primary RS-485,” “A,” “B,” and “Shld” (Figure 11). Ensure that the network is properly laid out.
Proper layout of the RS-485 network is important for correct operation. Refer to Appendix A (RS-485
Integration and Wiring) for proper network layouts.
+
A
B
WARNING: The use of the 24VDC output to power external components should be restricted to no
more than 4Amps (§96 Watts). This equates to 32 sensors and/or field devices, maximum. Care
should be taken to insure that the total current of devices utilizing this power does not exceed the
4Amp rating, as this may cause detrimental damage to the unit and will void the warranty.
RS-485 VDC
Primary Out
Figure 11 Typical RS-485 connections
3. External annunciators should be connected to Detcon RL4 Modules. The Detcon RL4 Modules
communicate via Modbus™, and should be connected along with other serial devices directly to the
RS-485 Modbus™. The correct setup of the RL4’s is covered in Section 4.3 880 Setup. Connections
are provided on each RL4 module for associated annunciators. These connections consist of a set of
terminals (Common, Normally Open, Normally Closed) for the associated relay.
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Rev. 1.0
Page 9 of 40
880-N4X
FAULT
A
ALARM 3
RS-485 from 880
A
COMM
M
S
D
L
S
D
A
RELAY
ALARM 2
ALARM 1
A
Figure 12 Typical RL-4 Module
4. Terminal blocks are provided for connection to other external devices such as a remote display, a
printer, or other device capable of communication with the 880. The Remote display should be
connected to the “REMOTE OUTPUT” terminal blocks, and other devices should be connected to the
“RS-422 SLAVE” terminal blocks.
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
TXD+
TXDRXD+
RXD0V
TXD+
TXDRXD+
RXD0V
Part of
TB2
REMOTE
OUTPUT
RS-422
SLAVE
Figure 13 Main 880 terminal blocks and connections
5. If applicable, connect a 24VDC Battery Backup or Auxiliary 24V source to the Circuit Breaker
labeled “24VDC INPUT” (24V+ and 24V–) (Figure 14).
NOTE: This input should be capable of supplying at least 7 Amps at 24VDC in order for the unit to
operate properly. Insufficient current capabilities may cause detrimental damage to the unit and will
void the warranty.
C3
C3
C03
WMS1C03
240V10000
WMS1C03
240V10000
WMS1C03
240V10000
VAC (L1)
24V +
Ground
I ON
I ON
24V -
NEU (L2)
I ON
24VDC
INPUT
Figure 14 Typical AC and DC Input Connections
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880-N4X
6. Connect 110-220VAC input to the Circuit Breakers labeled “VAC (L1)” and labeled “NEU (L2)”.
Connect external ground to the Green/Yellow terminal labeled “GROUND” (Figure 14). The power
supply is able to accept AC input voltages from 100 to 240VAC at 50 or 60Hz.
General Wiring Notes:
™ When I/O Modules are located at a remote distance from the controller, an end-of-line terminating resistor
is required to enhance communications reliability. Identify the last I/O Module in the loop, and open the
module casing using the clip release points. Locate and install the jumper on JP6 (TERM) Figure 15. This
adds a 120: resistor to the end of the line. If applicable, add a 120: resistor to the last Modbus™ gas
sensor.
Jumper located
on component
side of PCB
Figure 15 I/O Module Termination jumper (JP6)
™ Follow generally accepted guidelines for RS-485 serial networks. Do not wire I/O Modules and/or
Modbus™ gas sensors in long-distance ‘T-Tap’ configurations. Stay with direct serial configurations. See
Appendix A for serial communications configuration guidelines.
™ Use Detcon Recommended cabling whenever possible.
x Belden P/N 1502P cable is recommended for a single cable providing serial communications and
power.
x Belden 9841 cable is recommended for a single cable providing serial communications only.
™ Ground the cable shielding at the Model 880 Controller only. Other points of grounding may cause a
ground loop, and induce unwanted noise on the RS-485 line, which in turn may disrupt communications.
3.3 Initial Power Checks
Upon completion of all field wiring, apply power to the 880 by: 1) setting both the AC Circuit Breakers and
DC Circuit Breakers to “ON”, 2) pushing the “POWER ON/OFF” switch on the front panel. The “POWER”
LED should illuminate. If all connections have been made properly, the “FAULT” and “ALARM” LED’s
should not be illuminated. The unit will go through a brief initialization and display the “Main Screen”
(Figure 29, Section 4.3). The “AC” box on the display should be green showing that AC is attached to the
unit. The “USB” box should be gray to indicate that no USB drive is attached.
Measure the voltage across the power supply output (V+ and V-). The reading should be 24 ±2.4VDC. If the
voltage is out of tolerance, make adjustments using the 24VDC Adjustment Potentiometer on the 24Volt
Power Supply.
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24VDC Adjust
+V
DC ON
+V
-V
-V
Output Details
Continuous Loading 24VDC/10A
H
ALM V.ADJ
R
US
C
C
US
45JB
Made in China
Input Details
100-240VAC 3.5A Maximum
Power Factor Corrected
Frequency : 50/60Hz
L
N
Figure 16 24VDC adjustment
3.4 Auxiliary 24VDC Input
If an Auxiliary 24VDC Input is to be connected to the unit, the voltage may need to be adjusted to insure
proper operation. If the 24VDC input is being used to operate the unit, the source must be able to provide at
least 7Amps to insure proper unit operation. The unit utilizes a 10A Circuit Breaker to provide over current
protection.
Measure the voltage across the power supply output (V+ and V-). This voltage should read 24 ±2.4VDC. If
the 24VDC Input is to be used as a Backup or Auxiliary 24VDC Input, adjustments may be required to insure
that it is below the internal power supply voltage. If the voltage measured across the Power Supply is lower
than the Auxiliary 24VDC Input, the internal power supply will not be utilized to supply power to the unit.
The Auxiliary 24VDC Input to the unit should be adjusted to at least 0.1~0.15VDC below the unit’s 24V
Power Supply for correct operation. This will insure that the unit does not operate on the Auxiliary 24VDC
Input unless the AC input power is lost.
3.5 880 Remote Display Installation (Optional)
The Detcon Model 880 Remote Display enclosure is rated NEMA 4X, which is rain tight and suitable for
outdoor locations in electrically non-hazardous environments. The enclosure is equipped with four (4) wallmounting brackets for easy wall mount installations. Care should be given to prevent sharp objects from
colliding with the touch screen. The screen can be cleaned with a mild detergent and a lint free cloth. Never
use an abrasive cleaner on the display.
1. Securely mount the 880 Enclosure in accordance with Figure 17.
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13.85"
10"
6.8"
Ø0.344"
14.75"
15.75"
www.detcon.com
Mounting Flange
Figure 17 Dimensional Overview
2. Run the serial cable between the Main 880 enclosure and the 880 Remote Display enclosures.
TXD+
TXDRXD+
RXD0V
3. Connect the RS-422 Serial communications cable to the terminal blocks labeled “REMOTE
OUTPUT” in the Main 880 enclosure (Figure 18).
REMOTE
OUTPUT
Figure 18 Main 880 terminal blocks and connections
4. Connect the RS-422 Serial communications cable to the input terminal blocks inside the 880 Remote
Display labeled “TERMINAL INPUT” as shown in (Figure 19).
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TXD+
TXDRXD+
RXD0V
880-N4X
TERMINAL
INPUT
Figure 19 Remote RS-422 connections
REMOTE
OUTPUT
TERMINAL
INPUT
0V
RXDRXD+
TXDTXD+
MAIN 880
TXD+
TXDRXD+
RXD0V
TXD+
TXDRXD+
RXD0V
CUSTOMER SUPPLIED
WIRING
REMOTE DISPLAY
Figure 20 Remote Interconnect Wiring
5. Connect 110-220VAC input to the Fuse Block labeled “VAC (L1)” in the lower left of the enclosure.
Connect Neutral (or L2) to terminal labeled “NEU (L2)” and Ground to the Green/Yellow terminal
labeled “GROUND” (Figure 21). The power supply is able to accept AC input voltages from 100 to
240 volts at 50 or 60Hz.
1A
I
VAC (L1)
NEU (L2)
Ground
O
Figure 21 Typical Input Power connections
Upon completion of all field wiring, apply power to the Main 880 and the 880 Remote Display. The unit will
go through a brief initialization and display the “Main Screen” (Figure 29). The “AC” box on the display
should be green to show that AC is attached to the unit. The “USB” box will be gray to indicate if no USB
drive is attached.
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4.0 Setup
The 880 incorporates a Touch Screen Graphic Display Panel. A Stylus ‘Wand’ is provided for use with the
touch screen display. Care should be given to prevent sharp objects from colliding with the touch screen
display as damage to the display may cause the unit to become inoperative. The screen can be cleaned with a
mild detergent and a lint free cloth. Never use an abrasive cleaner on the display.
4.1 User interface
When an alphanumeric or text string is called for, the unit will display an alphanumeric keyboard for the user
to input information (Figure 22). Information typed by the user will be displayed in the box just above the
keyboard. The keyboard is fully functional allowing the user to input spaces, special characters (i.e. ‘*’, ‘&’,
etc.), and make changes between lowercase characters and capitals by using the CAP key. Once the user has
input the correct information, the ‘Enter’ key will transfer the complete string to the appropriate ‘Box’ on the
screen and the alphanumeric keyboard will disappear.
Figure 22 Input Keyboard
When a number is called for, the unit will display a keypad for the user to input the appropriate numeric
response (Figure 23). Information entered by the user will be displayed in the box to the left of the keypad.
Once the user has input the correct information, the ‘Enter’ key will transfer the numeric value to the
appropriate ‘Box’ on the screen and the keypad will disappear. Many keypad entries display a minimum,
maximum, and current box. These boxes show the lower limit, upper limit, and current value of the number
being entered. Numeric entries outside of these restrictions will not be accepted.
Figure 23 Input Keypad
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The display screen also contains a number of “buttons”. These “buttons” act as toggle switches that change
state when activated by the wand. These buttons will indicate the change in state by some obvious means such
as a change in color, name, or both (i.e., when changing the state of an alarm from ascending to descending the
button will change from a blue button displaying “ASC” to a gray button displaying “DES”).
4.2 Clock and Screen Adjustments
Adjustments to the clock and screen are made entering the display’s Setup Screens. Only the Clock and
Screen adjustments are discussed here. Changing other aspects of the Touch Panel may cause the unit to
operate improperly and should not be attempted.
Access the display’s System Setup Screens by touching the upper left corner of the touch panel with the wand
and holding it there for 3-5 seconds. A warning box will appear (Figure 24). If no action is taken within 60
seconds, the display system will return to the Main Screen. To return to the Main Screen select “Exit”.
WARNING: Selecting OK will stop the PLC driver; therefore, all communication between the touch
panel and the PLC will cease.
Figure 24 Warning Screen
To enter the display’s Setup Screen, select “OK”. The Main Menu will be displayed (Figure 25).
Figure 25 Main Menu
From the Main Menu select the “Setting” button to enter the “Setting” Screen (Figure 26).
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Figure 26 Screen Settings
From the “Setting” Screen, select the “Adjust Clock” button to adjust the clock (Figure 27) or the “Adjust
Display” button to adjust the Display Screen (Figure 28).
Figure 27 Clock Adjust Screen
To adjust the Time and Date use the arrow keys. Once the correct time and date have been set, select “OK” to
close the screen. Select “Main Menu” to exit the “Setting” screen, and select “Exit” to exit the Setup screens.
To adjust the display use the arrow keys. Once the display has been adjusted, select “OK” to close the screen.
Select “Main Menu” to exit the “Setting” screen, and select “Exit” to exit the Setup screens.
Figure 28 Adjust Display Screen
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4.3 880 Setup
1) From the “Main Screen” (Figure 29), enter the “System Configuration Screen” by touching the “System
Configuration” box with the wand.
Figure 29 Main Screen
2) The display will prompt for a password to enter the 880 “System Configuration Screen”. The default
password is “1234”. Enter the password in the Pop-Up Screen and press enter to continue. This will open
the “System Configuration Screen” (Figure 30 – Analog, Figure 31 - Serial). The default password maybe
change using the “Edit Password” option, located in the “Utilities” menu.
Figure 30 Analog Configuration Screen
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NOTE: The System Configuration Screens differ only slightly between the Analog and Serial units.
Figure 31 Serial Configuration Screen
3) Use the wand to select the “FACILITY NAME” box. A keyboard will appear to allow input of the facility
name (Figure 32). The facility name can be any alphanumeric string of no more than 40 characters. After
the facility name has been entered, use the ‘ENTER’ key to transfer the string to the “System
Configuration Screen”.
Figure 32 Inputting the Facility Name
4) Select the “TOTAL # OF CHANNELS” Box and input the number of channels that will be attached to the
unit. For Analog units the number of channels is limited by the number of DA4 Modules connected to the
unit, with a maximum of 72 channels (18 DA4 Modules). For RS-485 units the maximum number of
channels is 32.
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Figure 33 Inputting the number of channels
5) Select the “# OF RELAYS BANK 1”, “2”, and/or “3” Box and input the number of RL4 Modules that will
be attached to the unit for each “BANK” of alarms. (Maximum of 6 RL4 Modules per “BANK”). This
will configure the unit for those relay Modules.
NOTE: Pre-selected addresses are set in the firmware of the 880 for the alarm “Banks”. These addresses
are directly related to the RL4 module addresses and the RL4 relays used for annunciators. Each “Bank”
of alarms can have up to 6 related RL4 Modules associated with it, giving a maximum of 18 RL4
Modules that can be connected to the unit. Each RL4 Module must have its own discreet Modbus™
address, and that address must be enabled by the user before it can become operational.
a) To enable an RL4 module, the “Bank” must be chosen that the RL4 will be associated with, and the
number of RL4 Modules for that bank must be entered into the configuration of the 880.
b) Set the address on each RL4 module to the appropriate address for that “Bank”. Each RL4 Module
must have a distinct address, and the addresses for each bank must increase sequentially. The
addresses used by the 880 are listed in the following table.
Bank
BANK 1
RL4 Address
80h
81h
82h
83h
84h
85h
Bank
BANK 2
RL4 Address
86h
87h
88h
89h
8Ah
8Bh
Bank
BANK 3
RL4 Address
8Ch
8Dh
8Eh
8Fh
90h
91h
Each RL4 Module has one Relay for each alarm of that “Bank”. Alarm 1 is labeled on the RL4 Module as
Address 1, Alarm 2 is labeled as Address 2, Alarm 3 is labeled as Address 3, and Fault is labeled as Address 4
(refer to Figure 9).
6) Select the “EXIT” box to exit the “System Configuration Screen” and return to the “Main Screen”.
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7) Each channel must be set up with the correct parameters for each sensor. Use the wand to select a channel
from the “Main Screen”, this will open that channels corresponding “Channel X Details Screen” (Figure
34).
Figure 34 Channel Detail Screen
8) The Model 880 is set up for RS-485 Modbus™ communication. All communications with the sensors are
accomplished through the RS-485 communications Protocols. The set up for Serial Sensors (Model 880S)
is different from the set up for Analog Sensors (Model 880A) using the DA4 Modules:
Serial Sensor Addressing (880S)
a) The 880S is set up for RS-485 communication with Serial Sensors. All sensor addresses must start at
01hex and increment sequentially. Serial Sensors should be addressed (in hex) to match the channel
number (in decimal) that they are assigned to. I.E., channel number 1 should be addressed as 01hex,
and likewise channel number 10 should be addressed as 0Ahex. Failure to do so will cause a
communication fault to occur, and the fault will not clear until the addresses are set properly for all
sensors attached to the unit. Refer to Appendix B for Hexadecimal to Decimal conversion table.
Analog Sensor Addressing (880A)
a) The 880A is set up for RS-485 communication with Analog Sensors via the Detcon DA4 Module(s).
The DA4 Module addresses must start at 01hex and increment sequentially. I.E., the first DA4 should
have address 01hex, the second 02hex, etc., continuing sequentially until the last DA4. The maximum
number of DA4’s that can be connected to the unit is 18, or 12hex.
b) Each DA4 module will accept 4 Analog Sensor inputs; labeled 1-4 on the DA4 (refer to Figure 10).
The physical channel number of a sensor corresponds to the DA4 it is connected to, as well as the
sensor input on the corresponding DA4.
Example: If the sensor is connected to input 1 on the DA4 addressed at 01hex, it would be channel 1 on
the 880A. If the sensor is connected to input 2 of the same DA4 it would be channel 2 on the 880A.
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Continue this sequence for the third and fourth gas channels. Channel 5 would be connected to the second
DA4, addressed at 02hex. A matrix table for the Model DA4 modules would look like this:
880A Ch #
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
…
68
70
71
72
DA4 #
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
…
18
18
18
18
DA4 Hex Address
01hex
01hex
01hex
01hex
02hex
02hex
02hex
02hex
03hex
…
12hex
12hex
12hex
12hex
Sensor Position
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
1
…
1
2
3
4
c) Continue this addressing scheme until all analog sensors have been correctly identified by the 880A.
8) Select “Channel Description”. The keyboard will appear, allowing the input of the Channel Tag Name, or
a brief description of the sensor, up to 20 characters maximum.
9) Select “Gas Type”, and input the gas type of the sensor. (i.e., H2S, LEL, CO2, etc.) Up to 10 characters
maximum.
10) Select “Range” and input the range of the Sensor. (i.e. 25, 50, 100, etc.) Note that the input will not allow
the placement of a decimal point, therefore entries of 10 for a unit of 10ppm or 10% should be entered as
100, and likewise entries of 5 for 5ppm or 5% should be entered as 500. To correctly place the decimal
point in the entry, select the “Decimal Place” box and enter the decimal point placement. (i.e., a “Range”
entry of 100 with a “Decimal Place” of 1 provides a range of 10.0, 10ppm or 10%. Likewise, a “Range”
entry of 500 with a “Decimal Place” of 2 provides a range of 5.00, 5ppm or 5%.)
11) Select “Fault” to set the Fault as latching or non-latching. When de-activated (gray), the ‘N-L’ button will
cause the Fault to reset itself only when the fault condition is cleared or fixed. When activated (blue), the
“Fault” ‘LAT’ button will cause the Fault to be “Latching” and will not allow the Fault to reset until the
fault condition is fixed or cleared and the reset button is pressed.
12) Select “Alarm 1” to set the level at which Alarm 1 will be activated (typically 10% of full range).
13) Select “Alarm 2” and set the level at which Alarm 2 will be activated (typically 20% of full range).
14) Select “Alarm 3” and set the level at which Alarm 2 will be activated (typically 50% of full range).
15) Next to “Alarm 1”, “Alarm 2”, and “Alarm 3”, boxes are two buttons labeled ‘ASC/DES’ and ‘LAT/N-L’
dependent on the current state of the button. When activated, these buttons will turn from gray to blue.
The button labeled ‘ASC/DES’ will set the sensor alarm for ascending (ASC) or descending (DES)
respectively. The button labeled ‘LAT/N-L’ will set the sensor alarm for latching (LAT) or non-latching
(N-L) respectively. Set the appropriate values for each alarm respectively:
a) When activated (blue), the ‘ASC’ button will cause the associated Alarm to activate when the sensor
value rises above the value set for that Alarm (Ascending). When de-activated (gray), the ‘DES’
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button will cause the associated Alarm to activate when the sensor value falls below the value set for
that Alarm (Descending). Set Alarm’s 1, 2, and 3 to either ascending or descending.
b) When activated (blue), the ‘LAT’ button will cause the associated Alarm to be “Latching” and will not
allow that Alarm to reset until the cause is cleared or removed and the Alarm is reset with the reset
button. When de-activated (gray), the ‘N-L’ button will cause the associated Alarm to be reset when
the cause of the alarm is either cleared or removed. Set Alarm’s 1, 2, and 3 to either latching or nonlatching.
16) At the bottom of the screen are three boxes labeled “RELAY BANK SELECT”, “1”, “2”, and “3”. These
Bank Selection boxes will assign each sensor to a bank of alarms. Assigning a sensor to a Bank of alarms
allows the operator to create groups of sensor Alarms. When activated (Green) the sensor will be assigned
to the bank selected. I.E., selecting Bank 1 will assign that sensor to Bank 1; therefore, should an alarm
occur, it triggers the appropriate alarm in Bank 1 only.
17) Once all parameters for the sensor have been set appropriately, select “EXIT” to return to the Main Screen.
18) Proceed through all channels, setting each channel’s parameters to the desired values. When all channels
have been correctly set the unit should be ready for normal operation.
4.4 Remote Display Set-up
The remote display must be setup to match the main 880. The screens are duplicates of the Main 880;
therefore, the setup is accomplished in much the same manner as the main unit.
1)
From the “Main Screen” (Figure 29), enter the “System Configuration Screen” by touching the “System
Configuration” box with the wand.
2)
The display will prompt for a password to enter the 880 “System Configuration Screen”. The default
password is “1234”. Enter the password in the Pop-Up Screen and press enter to continue. This will
open the “System Configuration Screen” (Figure 30 – Analog, Figure 31 - Serial).
3)
Use the wand to select the “FACILITY NAME” box. A keyboard will appear to allow input of the
facility name (Figure 32). The facility name can be any alphanumeric string of no more than 40
characters, and should be the same as the Facility Name entered in the Main 880. After the facility name
has been entered, use the ‘ENTER’ key to transfer the string to the “System Configuration Screen”.
4)
Select the “TOTAL # OF CHANNELS” Box and input the number of channels that will be attached to the
unit. This number must match the number entered in the Main 880.
5)
Select the “Exit” box to exit the “System Configuration Screen” and return to the “Main Screen”.
6)
The “Channel Description”, “Gas Type”, and the range decimal point must be setup in the Remote
Display to match the information used to setup the Main 880. Sensor Range and Alarm information
should not be altered at the Remote Display. (This information is transferred over from the Main 880).
Use the wand to select a channel from the “Main Screen” and open that channel’s corresponding
“Channel Detail Screen” (Figure 34).
a) Select “Channel Description”. The keyboard will appear, allowing the input of the Channel Tag
Name, or a brief description of the sensor, up to 20 characters maximum. The “Channel Description”
here must match the “Channel Description” entered at the Main 880.
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b)
Select “Gas Type”, and input the gas type of the sensor. (i.e., H2S, LEL, CO2, etc.) Up to 10
characters maximum. The “Gas Type” entered here must match the “Gas Type” entered at the Main
880.
c) The Range of the sensor is transferred by the Main 880 and should not be changed in the Remote
Display. However, the decimal point must be set for the range to be displayed correctly. Therefore
ranges of 10 for a unit of 10ppm or 10% will be displayed as 100, likewise entries of 5 for 5ppm or
5% will be displayed as 500. To correctly place the decimal point in the entry, select the “Decimal
Place” box and enter the decimal point placement. (i.e., a “Range” entry of 100 with a “Decimal
Place” of 1 provides a range of 10.0, 10ppm or 10%. Likewise, a “Range” entry of 500 with a
“Decimal Place” of 2 provides a range of 5.00, 5ppm or 5%.)
7)
Proceed through all channels, setting each channel’s “Channel Description” and “Gas Type” to that setup
in the Main 880. When all channels have been correctly set-up the unit should be ready for normal
operation.
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5.0 System Operation
The touch screen display serves as the graphic user interface to the system. Maneuvering through the system
screens and accessing data fields is accomplished by touching the wand to the appropriate area, box, button, or
key on the screen. The provided “wand” should be the only instrument used to activate the screen as other
instruments may cause damage to the screen. Care should be given to prevent sharp objects from colliding
with the touch screen display as damage to the display may cause the unit to become inoperative. The screen
can be cleaned with a mild detergent and a lint free cloth. Never use an abrasive cleaner on the display.
5.1 Alarm Indicators
The Main 880 Graphics Display Console contains 5 LED’s, and 1 push button/LED Power Switch on the front
panel. The push button switch turns power on and off to the Main 880.
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
The "POWER ON" LED is lit when the Console is powered up using the “Power On/Off” Button. If the
Main 880 has a Battery Backup and AC Power is lost the “POWER ON” LED will reamin illuminated to
indicate that power is still applied to the unit.
The "NO COMM" LED will illuminate when any of the serial inputs are not communicating with the PLC.
In the case of Serial Sensors this will reflect the sensor that is not communicating properly. In the case of
Analog Sensors that communicate via a DA4 Module, this will be reflected as a blinking “COM” by the
sensors that the DA4 Module is associated with.
The "ALARM 1" LED is illuminated when any one of the sensors in the field, meets or exceeds, the alarm
1 set point when Alarm 1 is set for ascending. When the alarm is set to descending the LED will
illuminate when the sensor falls below this set point. The "ALARM 1" LED works independently of the
“BANK” a sensor is assigned to, and will illuminate no matter what “BANK” is in an alarm condition.
The "ALARM 2" LED is illuminated when any one of the sensors in the field, meets or exceeds, the alarm
2 set point when Alarm 2 is set for ascending. When the alarm is set to descending the LED will
illuminate when the sensor falls below this set point. The "ALARM 2" LED works independently of the
“BANK” a sensor is assigned to, and will illuminate no matter what “BANK” is in an alarm condition.
The "ALARM 3" LED is illuminated when any one of the sensors in the field, meets or exceeds, the alarm
3 set point when Alarm 3 is set for ascending. When the alarm is set to descending the LED will
illuminate when the sensor falls below this set point. The "ALARM 3" LED works independently of the
“BANK” a sensor is assigned to, and will illuminate no matter what “BANK” is in an alarm condition.
The "FAULT" LED is illuminated anytime there is a sensor fault. The "FAULT" LED works
independently of the “Bank” a sensor is assigned to, and will illuminate no matter what “Bank” is in a
fault condition.
5.2 Main Screen
The main screen is the default screen of the unit (Figure 35). The screen displays the first 8 channels, channel
descriptions, current readings, gas type, and sensor status for each channel. If the status of a sensor is such that
the sensor is in an alarm condition, the corresponding “FLT”, “ALM1”, “ALM2”, “ALM3”, or “COM” will
blink to signify that condition. Touching a channel number (Ch-X) will open the corresponding channels
“Channel X Details Screen”. This screen will provide more information on the selected channel.
Near the top left of the screen, just below the Detcon Logo, there will be 2 to 9 selection buttons (Labeled “18,” “9-16,” “17-24,” etc.) dependent on the total number of channels set up in the “System Configuration
Screen.” These buttons represent the pages that display the associated 8 channels; up to page 9 (Channels 6572). Selecting any of these buttons with the wand will open the corresponding page to display those
corresponding channels. These pages are all duplicates of the main page, with the exception of the channels
being displayed.
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Each channel is displayed as a separate line item on the main screen. Each channel also has an associated
“Channel Detail Screen”. To open a channels detail screen touch the appropriate channel with the wand, this
will open the associated channels detail screen (Section 5.3).
Figure 35 The Main Screen
A row of boxes is located at the bottom of the screen. The second box displays the time and date.
The “AC” box is green when the unit is running on applied AC or if applicable the Auxiliary 24VDC Input.
“USB Out” displays the status of the USB port on the back of the display. When a USB Drive is not installed,
the button will be gray and display “USB Out”. When a USB Drive (USB Memory stick) is installed, the unit
will go through an initialization of the drive and the “USB Out” button will change to green, displaying “USB
Eject”. To eject the USB Drive, touch the button with the wand. When the button turns gray and displays
“USB Out” it is safe to remove the USB Drive from the port.
“Reset” will clear alarms that have been set as latching after the alarm condition has passed. This will only
work when alarms have been set as “Latching”, and only after the alarm condition has been cleared.
“Alarm History” is a select button that will open the “Alarm History Screen” (Section 5.4).
“System Configuration” is a select button that opens the “System Configuration” Screen (Section 4.3).
5.3 Channel X Details Screen
When selected, each channel will open its own detail screen (Figure 36). This screen provides a graphic
representation of the last 30 minutes of the sensor’s activity. The display allows the user to move forward or
backward in the graphic to display activity before or after the displayed time using the arrow keys in the upper
left of the graphic display.
When the sensor goes into a fault or alarm condition the “Current Conditions” box will highlight and blink the
associated fault(s) or alarm(s). Each fault or alarm has a different color for ease in dissociating the condition.
These conditions will remain highlighted and blinking until the conditions to correct them are met. I.E., a
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‘CAL’ fault will not clear until the sensor returns to normal operation and, if set to non-latching and ascending,
Alarm 1 will not clear until the “Concentration” falls below the set “Alarm 1 Level.”
Figure 36 Channel Details Screen
5.4 Alarm History Screen
When alarms are initiated, the unit stores information about these alarms into memory. If a USB Drive is
installed in the back of the display, this information is written onto the drive for permanent storage (USB
Drive sold separately). The information can also be viewed on the “Alarm History Screen” by using the wand
to select the “Alarm History” button on the Main Screen.
Figure 37 Alarm History Screen
The Alarm History Screen displays Fault and Alarm events throughout operation of the unit (Figure 37).
Navigation buttons located at the bottom of the page allow the user to view all logged data. The view can be
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changed from Alarm History to Alarm Count, with a detail button that allows viewing more information on
each event recorded.
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6.0 Trouble-shooting
6.1 Sensor Faults
The unit is set up such that Sensor faults will set Fault alarms associated with that sensor. If a sensor goes into
a fault condition, that channel will flag a fault. From the “Main Screen” each channel can be quickly viewed
to see which channel is causing the fault. That sensor should be then checked to find the cause of the fault.
Faults are logged in the Alarm History for aid in tracing intermittent sensor problems. Refer to the appropriate
sensor manual for more information on trouble-shooting sensor faults.
6.2 Troubleshooting RS485 Networks
The first step in finding the bad device or several bad devices is to start at the master:
1. Disconnect the data wires (A & B) from the output terminal blocks.
2. Connect a working slave device directly to the master (attached directly to the output terminal blocks)
and make sure that it is functional. If it is not, replace the master’s transceiver chip or board. In the
case of an 880 Controller, this would be the FA-ISOCON Module.
3. Once this is done stop the master from communicating, but do not power it down. This is
accomplished on the Model 880 by unplugging the phone jack connection to the FA-ISOCON
Module.
4. Unplug all of the slave devices from the data bus.
5. Disconnect the working device connected in Step 2, and re-connect the data bus wires (A&B) to the
master.
6. Use a voltmeter to measure the voltage across the A and B wires and write the reading down. This
reading should be 400-500 millivolts.
7. Go to the first slave device. Re-connect or plug the device in and measure the voltage across A and B.
Write down the reading. The measurement taken should be 400 to 500 millivolts. If the voltage is not
within the specified range, verify that all devices have been unplugged from the data bus.
8. Unplug the first device and proceed to the next slave device. Record the meter readings. Again the
reading should be 400-500mV. If the reading is not 400-500mV a wiring problem may exist, or the
transmitter may be non-operational.
9. Repeat the procedure with each slave device, recording the readings along the way. If any of the other
readings taken are above or below the first reading by more than 50 millivolts, that unit’s transmitter
or the module should be replaced.
880-N4X Instruction Manual
Rev. 1.0
Page 29 of 40
880-N4X
Slave
ID 01
ID 02
ID 03
ID 04
ID 05
ID 06
ID 07
ID 08
ID 09
ID 0A
ID 0B
Results similar to those
shown here should be
expected. In this example
slave device 03 and 0B
would need to be changed.
Master
425
425
425
425
425
425
425
425
425
425
425
MV
451
430
486
410
420
432
422
415
418
440
310
Difference
26
5
61
-15
-5
7
-3
10
-7
15
115
Measuring at the master device between dc common and A, or dc common and B should give a reading of
around 2.5vdc. Remember this is with the power on, but with no communication taking place.
Another method of troubleshooting is to enable the communications and remove all the slaves. Proceed to
plug 1 slave in and see if communication is good. If so, plug in the next slave and check again.
Repeat this with each slave until all of the slaves are plugged in or one of the slaves takes the data bus down.
The following table consists of recommended cables and their specifications from Belden. These cables are
designed with RS-485 in mind and should be used for RS-485 data buses.
Belden#
9841
9842
8132
pairs
1
2
2
AWG
24
24
28
Impedance
120ohm
120ohm
120ohm
The root cause of many RS-485 communication problems can be traced back to incorrect cabling, incorrect
cable and wire types, and the use of incorrect wiring schemes. It is easier to avoid these problems by
following a few simple guidelines:
9
9
9
9
9
Use good wiring schemes (refer to Appendix A).
Use recommended cables.
Properly connect data lines and shields.
Insure proper termination of data lines.
Use isolated repeaters to avoid grounding problems.
880-N4X Instruction Manual
Rev. 1.0
Page 30 of 40
880-N4X
7.0 Spare Parts
Recommended spare parts list:
Detcon Part #
Description
995-321091
995-08TR00-000
995-323220-100
995-508803-500
360-DLP240-024
347-SSP000-00A
0300
CPU Replacement Battery
PLC Relay Module,
Communications Module
Isolated Network Adapter Module
24VDC 240Watt Power supply
Stylus ‘Wand’ for Touch Screen Display
3Amp 3AG Slo-Blo Fuse
Include Detcon part number when ordering spare parts.
The PLC CPU Module is programmed to match the 880 Unit (Analog or Serial).
replacements, please contact Detcon.
For CPU Module
The Touch Screen Graphic Display is programmed to match the 880 Unit (Analog or Serial). For display
replacements, please contact Detcon.
8.0 Warranty
All warranties are FOB the Detcon factory. Should any product fail to perform in accordance with published
specifications within the warranty period, return it freight pre-paid to Detcon Inc., 3200 Research Forest Drive
Suite A-1, The Woodlands, Texas 77381 for necessary repairs.
Detcon Inc., as manufacturer, warrants each new PLC Graphic Control Unit to be free from defects in material
and workmanship under intended normal use for a period of one year. The warranty period begins on the date
of shipment to the original purchaser and ends one year thereafter.
880-N4X Instruction Manual
Rev. 1.0
Page 31 of 40
880-N4X
Appendix A
RS-485 System Integration Wiring
RS-485 is a generic electrical specification only. It does not specify connector types, protocols, or cable type.
It is the responsibility of the installer to provide a correct physical installation for the RS-485 network to
function properly.
RS-485 is very inexpensive and inherently rugged, allowing multiple devices to communicate over a single
twisted pair of wires. Detcon has chosen to implement the Modbus™ protocol using the RS-485 electrical
specification.
RS-485 is a two way half-duplex data bus made up of a transceiver (transmitter and receiver). In its simplest
form, one transceiver is located on each end of a twisted pair cable of up to 4,000 feet maximum. Data can be
sent in either direction, but can only be sent in one direction at a time.
The specification allows for the connection of up to 40 unit loads (UL’s) to the twisted pair. An older
transceiver chip would have represented 1 UL. Connection of more than 40 UL’s to the bus will limit the
drivers and cause attenuation of the signal, thus preventing the system from operating properly.
Since RS-485 allows multiple devices to be connected to the bus, wiring is not as straightforward as it is in a
bus with only 2 devices. The best wiring scheme is the daisy-chain connection from device 1 to device 2 to
device 3 to device n. All devices that tap into the bus should not be at the end of long stubs, branches, or ttaps. A true daisy-chain has direct wiring between devices with no minor branches.
Detcon equipment contains four wiring terminals for RS-485 connections. Two for A(+) and two for B(-). All
connections should be made directly to these. Figure 3.1 shows an electrical representation of a simple RS485 bus with 4 transceiver chips.
Figure 38 RS-485 Bus with 4 transceiver chips
The use of a daisy-chain connection will perform the best in all applications given the bus is properly
terminated. The RS-485 standard specifies the transceiver characteristics only, not the interconnection of the
transceivers themselves. Depending on the environment, distance and other factors it is possible to connect
transceivers using flat cable, twisted pair cable, even PCB traces. However, for the most reliable data transfer
in industrial environments, shielded twisted pair is required. Wiring of 24 AWG is highly recommended, but
18 to 28AWG can be used.
880-N4X Instruction Manual
Rev. 1.0
Page 32 of 40
880-N4X
The characteristic impedance of the cable must be between 100 to 120 ohms. Twisted pair is used because if
the cable does run near a noise source both conductors will pick up the same amount of noise; therefore,
effectively canceling it out.
Incorrect Wiring Schemes
Among the biggest problems with an RS-485 bus is the use of incorrect wiring schemes mixed with improper
or no line termination.
Most existing installations do not have wire runs in a daisy-chain like fashion; instead, wire runs typically
originate from a central point and run to different devices in a star-like pattern. This is a very undesirable way
to wire an RS-485 bus. The chances of problem free operation over the life of the equipment decreases
dramatically the further you stray from a straight daisy-chain wiring scheme. The bus needs to be terminated
at each end of the cable run to operate ideally. Other wiring schemes introduce multiple “cable ends” making
it impossible to balance the lines. Wiring as in Figure 39 (A, B & C) would provide reliable data flow.
Figures D, E & F could possibly work, but would require many repeaters and an experience worker with RS485 communications and networks knowledge to achieve implementation.
Figure 39 Correct and incorrect wiring schemes
Figure 40 shows a typical RS-485 communication setup using 2-wire digital communication. Each RS-485
loop should have (1) beginning and (1) end, with a 120-ohm resistor at the end of each loop.
880-N4X Instruction Manual
Rev. 1.0
Page 33 of 40
880-N4X
Figure 40 Recommended RS-485 communications set-up
Grounding
Another problem that can occur with RS-485 is incorrect grounding. Neither one of the two conductors in the
cable is ground. Both of the conductors are supplying a current to maintain a voltage level relative to an
external reference. A third conductor must be supplied to establish a reference through earth ground.
RS-485 is specified be able to work normally with a ±7V ground potential difference and survive ±25V surges.
In most applications, the equipment is powered from its own DC power supplies. This is good as long as the
supplies are located in the same physical location, and the DC commons are tied together and tied to earth
ground.
Problems occur when part of the data bus is powered by one supply and the second part of the bus is powered
by a power supply located elsewhere. In this case, earth ground is being relied upon to be the reference
between the two sections of the bus. If noise is induced onto the earth ground of one power supply and not the
other, data errors may occur. This is even more likely to occur when the distance between ground references
is large. A solution to this problem is to install an isolated repeater into the data bus to isolate the grounds
from each other, thus enabling the bus to use only one of the two references.
Isolated Repeaters
Repeaters can play many rolls in the implementation of an RS-485 data bus. Repeaters can: 1) Extend the
distance if needed to go further than 4000 feet. 2) Allow for the addition of more devices to the bus. 3)
Increase signal strength and integrity. 4) Solve grounding problems and solve some of the problems that occur
when an incorrect wiring scheme is implemented.
A repeater consists of two transceivers working together. One transceiver is connected to the main data bus
and the other transceiver connects to the remainder of the devices as it creates a new and separate data bus.
Figure 41 depicts a data bus that implements an undesirable branched wiring scheme. Depending on the
length of the taps of slave 1 and slave 2, they may or may not communicate properly back to the master. Long
lengths of cable to slaves 1 and 2 create four ends to the cable instead of two, which cannot be balanced with
the two terminating resistors on the extreme ends. Without a balanced bus, the long taps of slave 1 & 2 will
introduce reflections to the signal that can lead to problematic operation in the field. These problems can be
very hard to diagnose, isolate, and fix.
880-N4X Instruction Manual
Rev. 1.0
Page 34 of 40
880-N4X
Figure 41 Unbalanced Data Bus
The addition of 2 repeaters (Figure 42) can solve this problem. The repeaters look like short stubs to the main
bus, and at the same time they create 2 new buses that have all the same characteristics as the main bus. Each
leg must have termination resistors to balance the new data bus.
Figure 42 Data Bus using two repeaters
Be sure to check the equipment being installed. Some manufacturers include a built-in terminating resistor
that can be selected by a jumper or dipswitch. Detcon Model 880 has such a jumper located on the FA-isonet
card. The jumper is labeled “120 ohm Term.”
Detcon 600 series gas sensors and DA1 modules do not include this resistor, and therefore, if one of these
devices is the last on the RS-485 bus, a discrete 120 ohm resistor should be placed across the “A” and “B”
terminals on the connector board. Figure 43 illustrates the wiring scheme of a repeater when used in a wiring
bus with DA-1 devices.
Figure 43 Repeater wiring diagram
880-N4X Instruction Manual
Rev. 1.0
Page 35 of 40
880-N4X
Device Hook-Up
Installation should begin by deciding where devices will be located and how the connections between devices
and the master will be established. The ideal scenario would look like Figure 44. The example shows the 880
Controller connected to 11 slave devices using a daisy-chain wiring scheme. This would require 2 different
twisted pair cables, one pair for power, and the other for the RS-485 data bus.
Connections would be point-to-point starting at the master and running to the last slave. The RS-485 data
cable should come into the sensor enclosure and be connected to the A & B terminals. The next segment of
cable should also connect to the A & B terminals and leave the enclosure headed for the next device. The
shields must be tied together inside the enclosure and not allowed to short to any other wires or surfaces. The
shield should be connected only inside the Model 880 cabinets to the shield terminal. The Rt label in the
drawing shows where the termination resistors would be installed.
%QPVTQN4QQO
4V
D
C
4V
Figure 44 Daisy Chain wiring diagram
Daisy Chain Wiring is ideal, although wiring may already exist or the wiring cannot be run this way for some
reason. Figure 45 shows a more realistic wiring situation that may occur.
%QPVTQN4QQO
C
D
Figure 45 Unbalanced Data Bus
880-N4X Instruction Manual
Rev. 1.0
Page 36 of 40
880-N4X
In this case it is impossible to balance the data bus because there is no distinct beginning or end to the cable
run. The best way to make this type of installation successful is to install repeaters in a few key areas as
shown in Figure 46. Repeaters are used to eliminate the t-taps or stubs, which can cause communication
problems. The location and number of stubs will dictate where repeaters need to be installed. Four repeaters
are installed to eliminate the stubs.
4V
TGRGCVGT
4V
%QPVTQN4QQO
4V
4V
4V
TGRGCVGT
4V
4V
D
C
TGRGCVGT
TGRGCVGT
4V
4V
4V
Figure 46 Four repeater Data Bus
Notice there are 5 different data buses that make up the communications network. The first one consists of the
master located in the control room, device 09, repeater #1, device 01, device 02, repeater #2, device 03, and
device 05. Notice the termination resistors at the beginning and end of this bus section. The second bus starts
at repeater #2. It consists of the repeater and device 04. Since this is a new bus, it has terminating resistors at
each end. The third bus starts at repeater #1. It includes device 08, repeater #3, device 07, repeater #4, and
device 06. It also has its own resistors. The fourth bus starts at repeater #3 and consists of the repeater, device
0A, and the terminating resistors. The fifth bus starts at repeater #4 and consists of the repeater, device 0B,
and termination resistors. This configuration isolates all of the t-tap stubs. This configuration should function
properly as long as the wire type and proper distances are observed.
The following chart shows an approximation of wire length vs. data speed. Detcon operates its equipment at
19,200bps (baud) and lower.
ODRU
ODRU
ODRU
MDRU
MDRU
MDRU
HV
HV
HV
HV
HV
HV
Figure 47 wire length vs. data speed
880-N4X Instruction Manual
Rev. 1.0
Page 37 of 40
880-N4X
Appendix B
Hexadecimal Table
ID#
none
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
SW1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
SW2
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
880-N4X Instruction Manual
ID#
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
SW1
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
5
5
SW2
B
C
D
E
F
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
0
1
2
3
4
5
ID#
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
SW1
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
8
SW2
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
0
Rev. 1.0
ID#
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
SW1
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
SW2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
ID#
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
SW1
A
A
A
A
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
SW2
C
D
E
F
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
ID#
215
216
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
232
233
234
235
236
237
238
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
SW1
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
SW2
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
Page 38 of 40
880-N4X
Appendix C
Revision History
Revision
0.0
1.0
Date
02/25/09
09/25/09
880-N4X Instruction Manual
Changes made
Original Release.
Discrete relays removed, unit programmed to use RL-4 Modules instead.
Rev. 1.0
Page 39 of 40
880-N4X
Appendix D
Drawings and Diagrams
1. 880-N4X Dimensional Overview
2. 880-N4X Component Layout
3. 880-N4X Wiring Diagram
880-N4X Instruction Manual
Rev. 1.0
Page 40 of 40
880-N4X
880-N4X Instruction Manual
Rev. 1.0
880-N4X
880-N4X Instruction Manual
Rev. 1.0
880-N4X
880-N4X Instruction Manual
Rev. 1.0