Whirlpool E2F40HD045V Specifications

123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953
Inspection Date:
03/27/XXXX
Prepared For:
John & Jane Doe
Prepared By:
Florida Building Inspector
10380 SW Village Center Drive Suite 123
Port Saint Lucie, FL 34987
772.345.2300
Fax: 772.345.FAX.1 (3291)
MyFBI@live.com
Report Number:
1234
Inspector: John Alcorn
© 2011 Florida Building Inspector
123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 2 of 62
From Public Records
From Public Records
© 2011 Florida Building Inspector
This confidential report is prepared exclusively for John & Jane Doe
© 2011 Florida Building Inspector
123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 3 of 62
TABLE OF CONTENTS
REPORT
4
RECEIPT/INVOICE
5
GROUNDS
6
ROOF
11
EXTERIOR
12
ELECTRICAL/AC
14
GARAGE
15
KITCHEN/LAUNDRY
17
BATHROOMS
20
ROOMS
22
INTERIOR
24
PLUMBING
25
HEATING/COOLING
26
ELECTRIC
27
SUMMARY
31
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123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 4 of 62
REPORT OVERVIEW
THE HOUSE IN PERSPECTIVE
CONVENTIONS USED IN THIS REPORT
SATISFACTORY - Indicates the component is functionally consistent with its original purpose but may show signs of normal
wear and tear and deterioration.
MARGINAL - Indicates the component will probably require repair or replacement anytime within five years.
POOR - Indicates the component will need repair or replacement now or in the very near future.
MAJOR CONCERNS - A system or component that is considered significantly deficient or is unsafe.
SAFETY HAZARD - Denotes a condition that is unsafe and in need of prompt attention.
THE SCOPE OF THE INSPECTION
All components designated for inspection in the ASHI Standards of Practice are inspected, except as may be noted in the
“Limitations of Inspection” sections within this report.
It is the goal of the inspection to put a home buyer in a better position to make a buying decision. Not all improvements will
be identified during this inspection. Unexpected repairs should still be anticipated. The inspection should not be considered
a guarantee or warranty of any kind.
Please refer to the pre-inspection contract for a full explanation of the scope of the inspection.
BUILDING DATA
Approximate Age:
Style:
Finished Living Area:
State of Occupancy:
Weather Conditions:
Recent Rain:
Ground cover:
20-25 years (Built in 1989 according to public records)
Single Family
1356 Sq. Ft.
Vacant
Rain
Not prior to today
Wet
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© 2011 Florida Building Inspector
123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 5 of 62
RECEIPT / INVOICE
Florida Building Inspector
10859 SW Village Center Drive Suite 123
Port Saint Lucie, FL 34987
Office: 772.345.2300
Date: 03/27/XXXX
Inspection Number: 1234
Name: John & Jane Doe
Inspection:
Other**
Total:
$XXX
$XXX
$XXX
 Check
 Cash
 Credit Card
**  Wind Mitigation
 Roof Condition Cert
 4-Point Insurance Inspection
 Termite Inspection
 Outbuilding(s)
 Swimming Pool
 Septic System
 Mold Assessment
 Bacteria Test of Well Water
 Chinese Drywall Inspection and Documentation
Inspected By: John Alcorn
Florida Home Inspector License #: HI286
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123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 6 of 62
 Public sidewalk needs repair
SERVICE WALKS  None
Material:
 Concrete
 Flagstone
 Gravel
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
 Poor
Condition:
 Pitched towards home
 Settling cracks
 Brick
 Trip Hazard
 Not visible
 None
DRIVEWAY/PARKING
Material:
 Concrete
 Asphalt
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
Condition:
 Pitched towards home
 Gravel/Dirt
 Poor
 Trip hazard
 Brick
 Other
 Fill cracks and seal
 Settling Cracks  Typical cracks
PORCH (covered entrance)  None
Support Pier:  Concrete
 Wood
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
Condition:
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
Floor:
 Not visible
 Poor
 Poor
 Brick faced
 Railing/Balusters recommended
 Safety Hazard
 Other
 Typical cracks
 None one
 Uneven risers Uneven risers
STOOPS/STEPS
Material:
 Concrete
 Wood
 Other
 Railing/Balusters recommended
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
 Poor
 Cracked
 Settled
Condition:
 Rotted/Damaged
 Safety Hazard
PATIO
 None
 Concrete
 Flagstone
 Kool-Deck®
Material:
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
 Poor
Condition:
 Pitched towards home (See remarks page)
 Brick
 Trip hazard
 Settling Cracks
 Drainage provided  Typical cracks
DECK/BALCONY (flat, floored, roofless area)  None
 Wood
 Metal
 Composite  Not visible  Railing/Balusters recommended
Material:
 Treated
 Painted/Stained
 Other
Finish:
 Improper attachment to house
 Railing loose
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
 Poor
 Wood in contact with soil
Condition:
REAR POOL DECK ROOF & SCREENS
 None
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
 Poor
 Posts/Supports need Repair
Condition:
 Metal Straps/Bolts/Nails/Flashing  Improper attachment to house
Recommend:
FENCE/WALL
 Not evaluated
 Brick/Block
 Wood
Type:
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
Condition:
 N/A
 Satisfactory
Gate:
 None
 Metal
 Poor
 Marginal
 Chain Link  Rusted  Other
 Loose Blocks/Caps
 Typical cracks
 Poor
 Planks missing/damaged
LANDSCAPING AFFECTING FOUNDATION
(See remarks page)
 West
 North
 South
 Satisfactory
Negative Grade:  East
 Recommend additional backfill
 Recommend window wells/covers
 Trim back trees/shrubberies
 Wood in contact with/improper clearance to soil  Yard drains observed - not tested
RETAINING WALL  None
 Satisfactory
Condition:
Material:
 Marginal
 Poor
 Drainage holes recommended
 Safety Hazard
 Leaning/cracked/bowed
(Relates to the visual condition of the wall)
HOSE BIBS
Operates:
 None
 Yes
 No anti-siphon valves
 No
 Not tested
 Not on
GENERAL COMMENTS
Driveway had some settlement, but usable, repair as needed. Driveway swale drain pipe needs cleaning.
Rear screened area - three holes in ceiling panel where something had previously been attached and has been removed.
Recommend sloping front yard away from house to prevent moisture from entering house.
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123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 7 of 62
Driveway cracks
Driveway cracks
Negative grade in front
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123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 8 of 62
Ceiling with holes – rear pool enclosure
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123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 9 of 62
Pipe end – under driveway – swale area
Pipe end – under driveway – swale area
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123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 10 of 62
Septic system inspection (by others)
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123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 11 of 62
ROOF VISIBILITY
 All
 Partial
INSPECTED FROM
 Roof
 Ladder at eaves
STYLE OF ROOF
 Gable
Type:
 Low
Pitch:
ROOF COVERING
Roof:
Type: Asphalt
 None
 Hip
 Medium
Condition:
VALLEYS
Condition:
 Ground (Inspection Limited)  With Binoculars
 Mansard
 Steep
 Shed
 Flat
 Flat
 Other
Estimated Layers: 1 Layer Approximate age of cover: 5-10+ years (Replaced 1/2005)
VENTILATION SYSTEM
 Soffit
Type:
 Yes
 No
Appears Adequate:
(See Interior remarks page) (See Attic section)
 Ridge
 Turbine
Material:  Galv/Alum
FLASHING
 Limited by:
 Not visible
 Satisfactory
 Separated from chimney/roof
 N/A
 Not visible
 Rusted
Material:
 Satisfactory
 Holes
 Gable
 Powered
 Roof
 Other
 Asphalt
 Not visible
 Copper
 Foam
 Marginal  Poor
 Recommend Sealing
 Rubber
 Other
 Rusted
 Other
 Galv/Alum  Asphalt
 Not visible  Other
 Marginal  Poor
 Recommend Sealing
 Lead
 Lead
 Copper
CONDITION OF ROOF COVERINGS
 Satisfactory  Marginal
 Poor
Roof:
 Curling
 Cracking
 Ponding
 Burn Spots
 Broken/Loose Tiles/Shingles
Condition:
 Nail popping
 Granules missing  Alligatoring
 Blistering
 Missing Tabs/Shingles/Tiles
 Moss buildup
 Exposed felt  Cupping
 Incomplete/Improper Nailing
SKYLIGHTS
Condition:
 N/A
 Satisfactory
PLUMBING VENTS
 Yes
 Recommend roofer evaluate
 Cracked/Broken
 Not visible
 Marginal
 Poor
 No
 Satisfactory
 Not Visible
 Marginal
 Poor
Conditions reported above reflect visible portion only
GENERAL COMMENTS
Roof inspection was limited to inspecting from the eaves from a ladder due to rainy weather.
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123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 12 of 62
GUTTERS/SCUPPERS/EAVESTROUGH
 None
 Copper
 Vinyl/Plastic
Material:
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
Condition:
 Corners
 Joints
Leaking:
 Loose
 Missing spikes
Attachment:
 South
Extension needed:  North
SIDING
Material:
Condition:
 Stone
 Slate
 Brick
 EIFS*  Asphalt  Wood
 Typical cracks  Monitor
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
 Fiberboard
 Metal/Vinyl
 Wood rot
 Poor
TRIM, SOFFIT, FASCIA, FLASHING
 Wood
 Fiberboard
Material:
 Recommend repair/painting
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
Condition:
CAULKING
Condition:
 Needs to be cleaned
 Downspouts needed
 Galvanized/Aluminum
 Other
 Poor
 Rusting
 Hole in main run
 Improperly sloped (See remarks page)
 East
 West
(*See remarks page EIFS)
 Fiber-cement  Stucco
 Other
 Peeling paint  Loose/Missing/Holes
 Recommend repair/painting
 Aluminum/Steel
 Damaged wood
 Poor
 Fiber Cement
 Other
 Stucco
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
 Poor
 Recommend around windows/doors/masonry ledges/corners/utility penetrations
WINDOWS & SCREENS
 Wood
Material:
 Torn
Screens:
 Satisfactory
Condition:
 Failed/fogged insulated glass
 Metal
 Vinyl
 Aluminum/Vinyl Clad
 Bent
 Not installed
 Glazing/caulk needed
 Marginal
 Poor
 Wood rot  Recommend repair/painting
SLAB-ON-GRADE/FOUNDATION
 N/A
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
Condition:
 Post tensioned  Poured concrete
Slab:
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
Condition:
 Poor
 Other
 Poor
 Not visible
(See comments page)
BUILDING(S) EXTERIOR WALL CONSTRUCTION
 Not visible
 Framed
 Masonry
Type:
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
 Poor
Condition:
 Other
 Not visible
EXTERIOR DOORS
Weatherstripping:  Satisfactory
Door Condition:  Satisfactory
 Missing
Patio
 Marginal
 Marginal
Storm
 Poor
 Poor
Entrance
 Replace
TERMITE INSPECTION
 None
Mr. “TJ” Lawrence (772-626-2055) from Massey Services performed a termite inspection.
 Satisfactory. No evidence of termites at this time of inspection.
Condition:
 Evidence of termites was found at time of inspection. Recommend you contact “TJ” Lawrence.
 “TJ” Lawrence recommends that you protect your home against future damage caused by termites and
prevent unwanted & unhealthy pests, plus make your lawn and landscape greener, healthier and
beautiful by contacting him at 772-626-2055.
GENERAL COMMENTS
Gutters on only the front portion of the house where the roof pitches toward the gutters.
Screens are missing on main bath window and both guest bedroom windows.
There are three unused hinges on the exterior side of the front entry door.
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123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 13 of 62
Torn screen – master bedroom bath window
No screen – main bath
No screen – front guest bedroom
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123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 14 of 62
SERVICE ENTRY
 Underground  Overhead
 Weather head/mast needs repair
 No Operative:  Yes
 No
Exterior outlets:  Yes
 No Operative:  Yes
 No
GFCI present:  Yes
 Reverse polarity
 Open ground
 Safety Hazard
Condition:
 Sat.  Marginal  Poor
 Overhead wires too low
 Less than 3’ from balcony/deck/windows
Plate covers are missing on two rear porch outlets.
Wall outlet near A/C is recessed too far – recommend repair.
Electrical outlet plates missing on wall inside pool enclosure
Electrical outlet recessed too far – near A/C unit
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123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 15 of 62
TYPE
 Attached
 None
 Detached
AUTOMATIC OPENER
 Yes
 1-car
 2-car
 3-car
 4-car
 No
 Operable
 Inoperable
 Remote not available
SAFETY REVERSE
 Pressure reverse
Operable:
 Electric eye
ROOFING
Material:
Type: Asphalt Approx. Age: 5-10+ Approx. layers: 1 Layer
 Same as house
 Need(s) adjusting
GUTTERS / EAVESTROUGH
 Satisfactory
Condition:
 None
 Marginal
 Poor
SIDING / TRIM
 Same as house
Siding:
 Stucco
 Same as house
Trim:
 Wood
 Masonry
 Wood
 Metal
 Slate
 Aluminum
FLOOR
Material:
Condition:
 Concrete
 Satisfactory
 Gravel
 Typical cracks
 Asphalt
 Dirt
 Large settling cracks
 Not visible
 Floor level
 Elevated
 Safety hazard
 Vinyl
 Fiberboard
 Vinyl
 Other
 Recommend evaluation/repair
SILL PLATES
 Rotted/Damaged  Recommend repair
OVERHEAD DOOR(S)
 N/A
 Wood
 Fiberglass
 Masonite
 Metal
 Recommend repair
Material:
 Satisfactory  Marginal
 Poor
 Overhead door hardware loose
Condition:
Recommend Priming/Painting Inside & Edges:  Yes  No  Recommend lubrication  Weatherstripping missing/damaged
EXTERIOR SERVICE DOOR
 Satisfactory
Condition:
 None
 Marginal
ELECTRICITY PRESENT
Reverse polarity:  Yes  No
GFCI Present:  Yes  No
 Yes  No
 Poor
 Not visible
Open ground:  Yes
 No
Operates:
 Yes
 No
 Damaged/Rusted
 Safety hazard
 Handyman/extension cord wiring
(Between garage & living area)
FIRE SEPARATION WALLS & CEILING
 N/A
 Present
 Missing
 Satisfactory  Safety hazard(s)  Recommend repair
 Holes walls/ceiling
Condition:
 Not verifiable  Not a fire door
 Needs repair
 Satisfactory
Fire door:
 N/A
 Satisfactory
 Inoperative
 Missing
 Needs repair
Typical Cracks:
 Yes
 No
Moisture Stains Present:  Yes  No
GENERAL COMMENTS
Firewall between garage and living has a (dryer vent) hole to laundry area - Potential Safety Hazard
No automatic garage door opener. Loose wire hanging from ceiling next to electrical outlet.
Metal garage door. Garage door panels on inside of the door have deteriorated in appearance.
The only electrical outlet in the garage is 30A 125/220V outlet – under electrical panel.
Termites were observed in the outer garage wall by an authorized professional inspector from Massey Services, Inc.
Recommend professional treatment of termites and repair/replacement of termite damaged areas of the home.
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123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 16 of 62
Garage door interior
Former dryer vent hole from laundry area to garage
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COUNTERTOPS
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
 Recommend repair/caulking
CABINETS
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
 Recommend repair/adjustment
PLUMBING COMMENTS
 Yes
Faucet Leaks:
 Satisfactory
Sink/Faucet:
Functional Drainage:  Adequate
WALLS & CEILING
 Satisfactory
Condition:
 Marginal
HEATING / COOLING SOURCE
FLOOR
Condition:
 Satisfactory
 No
Pipes leak/corroded:  Yes
 Corroded  Chipped
 Cracked
 Poor
Functional Flow:  Adequate
 Yes
 Marginal
APPLIANCES
(See remarks page)
 Disposal
Operates:  Yes
 No
 Oven
Operates:  Yes
 No
 Range
Operates:  Yes
 No
 Dishwasher Operates:  Yes
 No
 Yes
 No
Dishwasher Airgap:
 Yes
 No
Outlets Present:
 Yes
 No
G.F.C.I.:
Open ground/Reverse polarity within 6’ of water:
 Poor
 No
 Recommend repair
 Poor
 Typical cracks
 Moisture stains
 Sloping
 Squeaks
 No
 Poor
 Trash compactor
 Exhaust fan
 Refrigerator
 Microwave
Operates:  Yes
Operates:  Yes
Operates:  Yes
Operates:  Yes
Dishwasher Drain Line Looped:
 Yes
Operable:
 Yes  No
Operable:
 Yes  No
 Yes  No  Potential safety hazard(s)
 No
 No
 No
 No
 No
GENERAL COMMENTS
Dishwasher runs continually with “water heating” light indicator on – recommend repair.
Drain lines had no visible leaks or signs of backup at the time of inspection.
Garbage disposal wiring is incomplete – recommend rewiring for disposal.
No refrigerator present – water line protrudes from wall.
Light over sink is temporary – has a cord to plug into the wall socket – it does work.
Doors to pool area do not close properly - needs adjustment and weatherstrip - recommend repair.
Water line in area where refrigerator goes
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123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 18 of 62
Wiring for garbage disposal
Kitchen sink overhead light
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LAUNDRY ROOM
ROOM COMPONENTS
 N/A
Faucet leaks:
 Yes  No Pipes leak:
 Yes  No
Laundry sink:
 Yes
 No Heat source present:  Yes  No Room vented:  Yes  No
Cross connections:
 N/A  Wall
 Ceiling
 Floor
 Not vented
Dryer vented:
 Not vented to Exterior
 Recommend repair
 Safety hazard
 Yes
 No Operates:  Yes  No
G.F.C.I. present:
 Washer
 Dryer
 Water heater
 Furnace
Appliances:
 Leaking
 Corroded
 Not tested
Washer hook-up lines/valves:
 Yes  No
 Cap Needed
 Safety hazard  Not visible
Gas Shut-off Valve:  N/A
GENERAL COMMENTS
Dryer should be vented. Recommend periodic cleaning of dryer vent system once repaired.
It appears that the previous dryer was vented through the wall to the garage as well as through the wall and upward to the
attic – recommend repair and vent the dryer to the outdoors.
Two holes in walls for dryer vent
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BATH: MASTER BEDROOM BATH
SINKS / TUBS / SHOWERS
 Yes  No
Faucet leaks:
Fixture(s) Condition:
Loose:
 Yes
 Satisfactory
TOILET
Bowl Loose:
Operates:  Yes  No
 Yes  No
SHOWER / TUB AREA / SINK(S)
 Ceramic
 Fiberglass
Material:
 Satisfactory  Marginal
Condition:
 Adequate
Functional Drainage:
 No
 Marginal
 Toilet leaks
 Masonite
 Poor
 Poor
 Yes  No
Pipes leak:
 Poor
 Cracked bowl/tank
 Cross connection
 Other
 Rotted floors
Functional Flow:  Adequate
 Poor
 Yes
 Yes
 No
 No
Functional Drainage:
 Poor
Where: Where new soaking tub tiles end – unfinished work.
WALLS / CEILING / CABINETS
 Yes
Moisture stains present:
 Yes
G.F.C.I. Present:
 Yes
Within 6’ of water:
 No
 No
 No
Outlets present:  Yes
 No
Operates:
 Yes
 No
Potential safety hazards present:  Yes
Soaking Tub Operable:
Grouting Needed:
HEATING / COOLING SOURCE
 Yes
Window/Door:  Yes  No  Satisfactory
Operates:
Exhaust Fan:  Yes  No
 No
 Marginal
 Yes  No
 No
 Poor
Noisy:
 Yes  No
GENERAL COMMENTS
Window in toilet area has a torn screen.
BATH: BETWEEN TWO GUEST BEDRIOOMS
SINKS / TUBS / SHOWERS
 Yes  No
Faucet leaks:
Fixture(s) Condition:
Loose:
 Yes
 Satisfactory
TOILET
Bowl Loose:
Operates:  Yes  No
 Yes  No
 No
 Marginal
 Yes  No
Pipes leak:
 Poor
 Toilet leaks
 Cracked bowl/tank
 Cross connection
SHOWER / TUB AREA / SINK(S)
 Ceramic
 Fiberglass
Material:
 Satisfactory  Marginal
Condition:
 Yes
 No
Caulk/Grouting Needed:
 Adequate
Functional Drainage:
 N/A  Yes
 No
Whirlpool Operable:
Where: Ceramic wall tile.
 Poor
Functional Flow:  Adequate
 Poor
Access panel to pump/motor:
 Yes  No
WALLS / CEILING / CABINETS
 Yes
Moisture stains present:
 Yes
G.F.C.I. present:
 Yes
Within 6’ of water:
Outlets present:  Yes
 No
Operates:
 Yes
 No
Potential safety hazards present:  Yes
HEAT / COOLING SOURCE
Window/Door:  Yes  No
Exhaust Fan:  Yes  No
 No
 No
 No
 Yes  No
 Satisfactory
Operates:
 Masonite
 Poor
 Marginal
 Yes  No
 Other
 Rotted floors
 No
 Poor
Noisy:
 Yes  No
GENERAL COMMENTS
Recommend replacing toilet bowl cover. Tub wall area needs grouting. Tub has 3 chips at edge. Window screen missing.
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123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 21 of 62
Unfinished tile work at soaking tub – master bath
Tub chips and toilet seat – guest bath
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123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 22 of 62
LOCATION: LIVING/DINING ROOM
 Marginal
Walls & Ceiling:  Satisfactory
 Yes
Moisture stains:
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
Floor:
 Yes
Typical cracks:
 N/A
 Satisfactory
Ceiling Fan:
 No
Outlets:
Electrical:
Switches:  Yes
 Yes
Open ground/Reverse polarity:
 No
Holes:
Heating/Cooling Source:  Yes
 Yes
 No
Bedroom Egress Restricted:  N/A
 No
Doors & Windows:
Operational:  Yes
Locks/Latches Operable:
 Yes
 Poor
 No
Where:
 Poor
 Squeaks
 Slopes
 No
 Marginal
 Poor
 Yes
 No Operates:  Yes  No
 No  Coverplates missing  Safety Hazard
 Doors  Walls  Ceilings
 No
 Missing  Cracked Glass
GENERAL COMMENTS
No ceiling fan or light in dining and living areas – cover is over electric boxes in ceiling.
Ceiling over dining area – loose smoke detector outside of master bedroom
LOCATION: MASTER BEDROOM
 Marginal
Walls & Ceiling:  Satisfactory
 Yes
Moisture stains:
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
Floor:
 Yes
Typical cracks:
 N/A
 Satisfactory
Ceiling Fan:
 No
Outlets:
Electrical:
Switches:  Yes
 Yes
Open ground/Reverse polarity:
 No
Holes:
Heating/Cooling Source:  Yes
 Yes
 No
Bedroom Egress Restricted:  N/A
 No
Doors & Windows:
Operational:  Yes
Locks/Latches Operable:
 Yes
 Poor
 No
Where:
 Poor
 Squeaks
 Slopes
 No
 Marginal
 Poor
 Yes
 No Operates:  Yes  No
 No  Coverplates missing  Safety Hazard
 Doors  Walls  Ceilings
 No
 Missing  Cracked Glass
GENERAL COMMENTS
Door to pool area does not close properly - needs adjustment and weatherstrip - recommend repair.
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LOCATION: FRONT GUEST BEDROOM
 Marginal
Walls & Ceiling:  Satisfactory
 Yes
Moisture stains:
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
Floor:
 Yes
Typical cracks:
 N/A
 Satisfactory
Ceiling Fan:
 No
Outlets:
Electrical:
Switches:  Yes
 Yes
Open ground/Reverse polarity:
 No
Holes:
Heating/Cooling Source:  Yes
 Yes
 No
Bedroom Egress Restricted:  N/A
 No
Doors & Windows:
Operational:  Yes
Locks/Latches Operable:
 Yes
 Poor
 No
Where:
 Poor
 Squeaks
 Slopes
 No
 Marginal
 Poor
 Yes
 No Operates:  Yes  No
 No  Coverplates missing  Safety Hazard
 Doors  Walls  Ceilings
 No
 Missing  Cracked Glass
GENERAL COMMENTS
Carpet in closet is missing in places and is not attached to floor – recommend repair.
Bedroom window screen is missing.
Unfinished carpet in front guest bedroom closet
LOCATION: REAR BEDROOM
 Marginal
Walls & Ceiling:  Satisfactory
 Yes
Moisture stains:
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
Floor:
 Yes
Typical cracks:
 N/A
 Satisfactory
Ceiling Fan:
 No
Outlets:
Electrical:
Switches:  Yes
 Yes
Open ground/Reverse polarity:
 No
Holes:
Heating/Cooling Source:  Yes
 Yes
 No
Bedroom Egress Restricted:  N/A
 No
Doors & Windows:
Operational:  Yes
Locks/Latches Operable:
 Yes
 Poor
 No
Where:
 Poor
 Squeaks
 Slopes
 No
 Marginal
 Poor
 Yes
 No Operates:  Yes  No
 No  Coverplates missing  Safety Hazard
 Doors  Walls  Ceilings
 No
 Missing  Cracked Glass
GENERAL COMMENTS
Window screen is missing.
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INTERIOR WINDOWS / GLASS
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
 Poor
 Needs repair
Condition:
 Representative number of windows operated
 Painted shut (See remarks page)
Evidence of Leaking Insulated Glass:
 Yes  No  N/A Safety Glazing Needed:  Yes  No
 Glazing compound needed  Cracked glass  Hardware missing
 Broken counter-balance mechanism
 Not tested  Safety hazard  Test release mechanism before moving in
Security Bars Present:  Yes  No
FIREPLACE
 None
Location(s):
 Gas (Not Tested)  Wood
 Woodburner stove (See remarks page)  Electric
 Ventless
Type:
 Masonry  Metal (pre-fabricated)  Metal insert
Material:
 Blower built-in Operates:  Yes  No Damper operates:  Yes  No
Miscellaneous:
 Open joints or cracks in firebrick/panels should be sealed
 Fireplace doors need repair
 Yes  No  Damper missing
 Pre-fab panels damaged/worn
Damper Modified for Gas Operation:
 Yes  No Mantle:  N/A  Satisfactory  Adequate
 Loose/missing
Hearth Adequate:
 Marginal
 Poor  Recommend having flue cleaned and re-examined
Physical Condition:  Satisfactory
STAIRS / STEPS / BALCONIES
 Satisfactory
Handrail:
 Satisfactory
Risers/Treads:
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
 Marginal
 Marginal
 Poor
 Poor
SMOKE / CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTORS
(See remarks page)
 Yes  No
Operates:
Present:
Smoke Detector:
Smoke detector in hall by two bedrooms does not operate.
Smoke detector outside of master bedroom works but is loose.
Recommend smoke detectors in all 3 bedrooms.
 Poor
 None
 Safety hazard
 Risers/Treads uneven
 Yes  No
 Not tested
ATTIC/STRUCTURE/FRAMING/INSULATION
 N/A
 Stairs
 Pulldown
 Scuttlehole/Hatch
 No access
 Other
Access:
 In the attic
 Other
Inspected From:  Access panel
 Bedroom hall
 Bedroom closet
 Garage
 Other
Location:
Access Limited By:
 Complete
 Partial
 None
Flooring:
 Batts
 Loose
Average inches: 9 Approx. R-rating: R-19
Insulation:
Type: Fiberglass
 Damaged  Displaced
 Missing  Compressed  Recommend Baffles @ Eaves
 Rafters
 Walls
 Between ceiling joists
 Not visible
Installed In:
 Recommend additional insulation
 Ventilation appears adequate  Recommend additional ventilation
Ventilation:
Attic:  Yes  No
Outside:  Yes  No  Not visible
Fans Exhausted To:  N/A
 Satisfactory  Damaged
 Split
 Disconnected  Leaking
 Repair/Replace
HVAC Duct:
 Satisfactory  Needs repair  Not visible
Chimney Chase:  N/A
 Recommend Structural Engineer
Structural Problems Observed:  Yes  No  Recommend repair
 Rafters
 Trusses
 Wood
 Metal
 Other
Roof Structure:
 No
 N/A
Collar Ties Present:  Yes
 OSB
 lx Wood
 Rotted
 Stained
 Delaminated
Roof Sheathing:  Plywood
 Yes
 No (See remarks page)
Evidence of Condensation/Moisture Leaking:
 Wood
 Metal
 Other
 Not visible
Ceiling Joists:
 Plastic
 Not visible  Improperly installed
Vapor Barriers:  Kraft/foil faced
Firewall Between Units:  N/A  Yes  No  Needs repair/sealing (See remarks page)
 Open junction box(es)
 Handyman wiring
 Visible knob-and-tube
Electrical:
GENERAL COMMENTS
Attic ceiling light pull chain switch does not work – light does work when bulb is turned.
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123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 25 of 62
Main Shut-off Location: On the side exterior wall
WATER SERVICE
 Copper/Galv.  Plastic* (PVC, CPVC, Polybutylene, PEX)  Unknown
Water Entry Piping:  Not visible
Visible Water Distribution Piping:  Copper  Galvanized  Plastic* (PVC, CPVC, Polybutylene, PEX)  Unknown
 Satisfactory  Marginal
 Poor
Condition:
 Unknown
 Service entry
Lead Other Than Solder Joints:  Yes  No
 Adequate
 Poor
 Water pressure over 80 psi
Functional Flow:
 Leaking
 Valves broken/missing
 Dissimilar metal
Pipes, Supply/Drain:  Corroded
 Cast iron
 Galvanized  PVC
 ABS
Drain/Waste/Vent Pipe:  Copper
 Satisfactory  Marginal
 Poor
Cross connection:  Yes  No
Condition:
 Yes
 No
 P-traps recommended
Traps Proper P-Type:  N/A
 Poor
 Recommend plumber evaluate
Functional Drainage:  Adequate
Leaking:  Yes  No
Interior Fuel Storage System:  Yes  No
 Copper
 Brass
 Black iron
 Stainless steel  CSST  Not visible
Gas Line:
 Satisfactory  Marginal
 Poor
Condition:
 N/A
MAIN FUEL SHUT-OFF LOCATION
WELL PUMP
 N/A
 In basement
Location:
 Yes
Pressure Gauge Operates:
SANITARY / GRINDER PUMP
 Yes
 No
Sealed Crock:
 Submersible
 Well house
 No
 Well pit
 Unknown
 Shared well
Well pressure: ??? psi
 Not visible
 N/A
 See www.cityofpsl.com/utility/grinder-system-information.html
WATER HEATER
 N/A
Condition:  Satisfactory  Marginal
Brand name:
Whirlpool
Model #: E2F40HD045V
 Gas
 Electric
 Oil
 Other
Type:
 Yes  No  N/A
 Tank/Piping corroded/leaking
Unit Elevated:
Capacity:
40 gallons
Approximate age: Unknown year(s)
Seismic restraints needed:  Yes
Combustion Air Venting Present:  Yes  No  N/A
 Yes
 No Extension proper:  Yes  No  Missing
Relief Valve:
 N/A  Satisfactory  Pitch proper  Improper
 Rusted
Vent Pipe:
 Poor
 No  N/A
 Recommend repair
 Recommend repair
GENERAL COMMENTS
Septic system inspection done by others – report indicates that the system is satisfactory.
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123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 26 of 62
AIR HANDLER
COOLING SYSTEM
Location: In the utility room
(See remarks page)
HEATING SYSTEM
Brand Name:
Trane
Approximate age:
 Unknown
Model #: TWE031E13FB1
 Gas
 LP
 Oil
 Electric
 Solid Fuel
Energy Source:
 Belt drive
 Direct drive
 Gravity
 Central system  Floor/Wall unit
Warm Air System:
 N/A (sealed)  Visual w/mirror  Flame distortion  Rusted
 Carbon/soot buildup
Heat Exchanger:
Disconnect:  Yes  No
 Normal operating and safety controls observed
Controls:
 Metal duct
 Insul. flex duct  Cold air returns  Duct board  Asbestos-like wrap
Distribution:
 N/A
 Rusted  Improper slope
 Safety hazard
Flue Piping:
 N/A
 Yes
 No
Supports for Piping/Insulation:
 Standard
 Electrostatic
 Satisfactory  Needs cleaning/replacement  Missing
Filter:
Proper Operation:  Yes  No  Not tested
When Turned On By Thermostat:  Fired  Did not fire
 Aux. electric  Aux. gas  N/A
Sub-Slab ducts:  Yes  No  N/A
Heat Pump:
 Exterior temperature  Other
System Not Operated Due To:
 Recommend technician examine
System Condition:  Satisfactory  Marginal
 Poor
Air filter is missing. Recommend replacing every 3 months.
OTHER SYSTEMS
 N/A
 Electric baseboard  Radiant ceiling cable
 Gas space heater
 Woodburning stove (See Remarks page)
 Yes
 No
Proper Operation:
 Satisfactory  Marginal  Poor
System Condition:
 Central system  Wall Unit Location: On the side exterior wall
Age: Unknown yrs.
 Electric
 Gas
 Water
 Other
Energy Source:
 Air cooled
 Water cooled
 Gas chiller
 Geothermal
 Heat pump
Unit Type:
 Leak
 Damage
 Insulation missing
 Satisfactory
Refrigerant lines:
 To pump
 Floor drain
 Other
Condensate Line/Drain:  To exterior
Operation:
Differential 15 F
Difference in temperature (split) should be 14-22 Fahrenheit (See remarks page)
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
 Poor
Condition:
 Not operated due to exterior temperature  Recommend HVAC technician examine/clean/service
GENERAL COMMENTS
A/C unit operated properly.
Trane XL13i Model # 4TTX3030A1000AA
COOLING SYSTEM
Blue tank and pump by A/C unit not connected – water faucet does work and emits water when turned on.
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MAIN PANEL Location: Garage
 Satisfactory  Marginal
 Poor
Condition:
Amperage: 100 Volts 120/240
 Breakers  Fuses
Adequate Clearance To Panel:  Yes  No
 No  Not visible
Appears Grounded:  Yes
 Yes
 No
Operative:  Yes  No
G.F.C.I. present:
 Yes
 No
Operative:  Yes  No
A.F.C.I. present:
 Copper
 Aluminum
 Copper clad aluminum
 Not visible
MAIN WIRE:
 Tapping before the main breaker
 Double tapping of the main wire
 Satisfactory
 Poor
 Federal Pacific Panel Stab Lok® (See remarks page)*
Condition:
SUB PANEL(S)
Location 1:
 None apparent
Location 2:
Location 3:
 Panel not accessible
 Not evaluated Reason:
 Copper
 Aluminum
 Copper clad aluminum
Branch Wire:
 No Neutral isolated:
 Yes  No  Safety hazard
Neutral/ground separated:  Yes
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
 Poor  Recommend separating/isolating neutrals
Condition:
ELECTRICAL FIXTURES
A representative number of installed lighting fixtures, switches, and receptacles located inside the house, garage, and exterior
walls were tested and found to be:
 Satisfactory
 Marginal
 Poor
Condition:
 Open grounds  Reverse polarity  GFCIs not operating
 Solid conductor aluminum branch wiring circuits*
(See remarks page)
 Ungrounded 3-prong outlets
 Recommend electrician evaluate/repair*
GENERAL COMMENTS
Panel size appeared to be compatible to service size.
Electrical panel – in garage
COOLING SYSTEM- SEE PREVIOS PAGE
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CHINESE DRYWALL THRESHOLD INSPECTION
Sentinel Indicators of Drywall Associated Corrosion
Exposed copper electrical wiring and/or the air conditioning evaporator coils were inspected and found to be:
Condition:
 Satisfactory
 Evidence of blackening of copper wiring or cooling coils
Recommendation:
 None
 Contact a trained professional to perform a home assessment
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Swimming Pool
DESCRIPTION OF SWIMMING POOL
Pool Type:
Heater:
Filters:
Pumps:
Blowers:
Valves:
Electrical Components:
Fencing:
Decking / Coping:
Below Ground
Solar Heater (Not Tested)
Cellular Media Filter
Circulation Pump
Air Bubbler
Jandy
Breaker at Equipment
Screened pool area with two automatic closing screen doors
Concrete
SWIMMING POOL OBSERVATIONS
Pool filtering system was operational.
Since the equipment is older, a higher level of maintenance for the will likely be required.
RECOMMENDATIONS / OBSERVATIONS
None
LIMITATIONS OF SWIMMING POOL INSPECTION
As prescribed in the pre-inspection contract, this is a visual inspection only. Inspection of pool components were limited by
(but not restricted to) the following conditions:
Components beneath the water level are not inspected.
Chemical composition of the water is not inspected as part of the inspection.
Underground piping or electrical components are not inspected.
Effectiveness of the filter(s) and heating system(s) are not inspected.
Please also refer to the pre-inspection contract for a detailed explanation of the scope of this inspection.
Pool equipment
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Swimming pool
Rear view
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ITEMS NOT OPERATING
None apparent
MAJOR CONCERNS
Item(s) that have failed or have potential of failing soon.
Termite inspections by others revealed that there are termites in the outer garage wall.
Termites were observed in the outer garage wall by an authorized professional inspector from Massey Services, Inc.
Recommend professional treatment of termites and repair/replacement of termite damaged areas of the home.
Typical termites
POTENTIAL SAFETY HAZARDS
Hole in garage wall to laundry room for dryer vent.
Recommend locks on two exterior screen doors to the pool area.
DEFERRED COST ITEMS
Items that have reached or are reaching their normal life expectancy or show indications that they may require repair or
replacement anytime during the next five (5) years.
None apparent
* Items listed in this report may inadvertently have been left off the Summary Sheet. Customer should read the
entire report, including the Remarks.
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REMARKS
SERVICE WALKS/DRIVEWAYS
Spalling concrete cannot be patched with concrete because the new will not bond with the old. Water will freeze between the
two layers, or the concrete will break up from movement or wear. Replacement of the damaged section is recommended.
Walks or driveways that are close to the property should be properly pitched away to direct water away from the foundation.
Asphalt driveways should be kept sealed and larger cracks filled so as to prevent damage from frost.
Patios that have settled towards the structure should be mudjacked or replaced to assure proper pitch. Improperly pitched
patios are one source of wet basements.
EXTERIOR WOOD SURFACES
All surfaces of untreated wood need regular applications of paint or special chemicals to resist damage. Porch or deck
columns and fence posts which are buried in the ground and made of untreated wood will become damaged within a year or
two.
Decks should always be nailed with galvanized, stainless steal or aluminum nails. Decks that are not painted or stained
should be treated with a water sealer.
GRADING AND DRAINAGE
Any system of grading or landscaping that creates positive drainage (moving water away from the foundation walls) will help
to keep a basement dry. Where negative grade exists and additional backfill is suggested, it may require digging out around
the property to get a proper pitch. Dirt shall be approximately 6” below the bottom sill and should not touch wood surfaces.
Flower beds, loose mulched areas, railroad ties and other such landscaping items close to the foundation trap moisture and
contribute to wet basements. To establish a positive grade, a proper slope away from the house is 1” per foot for
approximately 5-6 feet. Recommend ground cover planting or grass up to foundation.
ROOF AND SURFACE WATER CONTROL
Roof and surface water must be controlled to maintain a dry basement. This means keeping gutters cleaned out and
aligned, extending downspouts, installing splashblocks, and building up the grade so that roof and surface water is
diverted away from the building.
WINDOW WELLS
The amount of water which enters a window well from falling rain is generally slight, but water will accumulate in window
wells if the yard is improperly graded. Plastic window well covers are useful in keeping out leaves and debris.
RETAINING WALLS
Retaining walls deteriorate because of excessive pressure buildup behind them, generally due to water accumulation.
Conditions can often be improved by excavating a trench behind the retaining wall and filling it with coarse gravel. Drain
holes through the wall will then be able to relieve the water pressure.
Retaining walls sometime suffer from tree root pressure or from general movement of topsoil down the slope. Normally,
these conditions require rebuilding the retaining wall.
RAILINGS
It is recommended that railings be installed for any stairway over 3 steps and porches over 30” for safety reasons. Balusters
for porches, balconies, and stairs should be close enough to assure children cannot squeeze through.
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REMARKS
Valleys and Flashings that are covered with shingles and/or tar or any other material are considered not visible and are not
part of the inspection.
Tar and Gravel Roofs are a type of covering on a pitched roof requires ongoing annual maintenance. We recommend that a
roofing contractor evaluate this type of roof. Infra-red photography is best used to determine areas of potential leaks.
Flat roofs are very vulnerable to leaking. It is very important to maintain proper drainage to prevent the ponding of water. We
recommend that a roofing contractor evaluate this type of roof.
ROOF TYPE
LIFE EXPECTANCY
SPECIAL REMARKS
Asphalt
Shingles
15-20 years
Used on nearly 80% of all residential roofs; requires
little maintenance
Asphalt
Multi-Thickness Shingles*
20-30 years
Heavier and more durable than regular asphalt
shingles
Asphalt
Interlocking Shingles*
15-25 years
Especially good in high-wind areas
Asphalt Rolls
10 years
Used on low slope roofs
Built-up
Roofing
10-20 years
Used on low slope roofs; 2 to 3 times as costly as
asphalt shingles
Wood Shingles*
10-40 years1
Treat with preservative every 5 years to prevent
decay
Clay Tiles*
Cement Tiles*
20 + years
20 + years
Durable, fireproof, but not watertight, requiring a
good subsurface base
Slate Shingles*
30-100 years2
Extremely durable, but brittle and expensive
Asbestos
Cement Shingles*
30-75 years
Durable, but brittle and difficult to repair
Metal
Roofing
15-40 + years
Comes in sheets & shingles; should be well
grounded for protection from lightning; certain
metals must be painted
Single Ply
Membrane
Polyurethane
with Elastomenic
Coating
15-25 years
(mfgr’s claim)
New material; not yet passed test of time
5-10 years1
Used on low slope roofs.
* Not recommended for use on low slope roof
1
2
Depending on local conditions and proper installation
Depending on quality of slate
Roof coverings should be visually checked in the spring and fall for any visible missing shingles, damaged coverings or other
defects. Before re-roofing, the underside of the roof structure and roof sheathing should be inspected to determine that the
roof structure can support the additional weight of the shingles.
Wood shakes and shingles will vary in aging, due to the quality of the material, installation, maintenance, and surrounding
shade trees. Ventilation and drying of the wood material is critical in extending the life expectancy of the wood. Commercial
preservatives are available on the market, which could be applied to wood to impede deterioration.
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REMARKS
CHIMNEYS
Chimneys built of masonry will eventually need tuckpointing. A cracked chimney top that allows water and carbonic acid to
get behind the surface brick/stone will accelerate the deterioration. Moisture will also deteriorate the clay flue liner. Periodic
chimney cleaning will keep you apprised of the chimney’s condition. The flashing around the chimney may need resealing
and should be inspected every year or two. Fireplace chimneys should be inspected and evaluated by a chimney professional
before using. Chimneys must be adequate height for proper drafting. Spark arrestors are recommended for a wood burning
chimney, and chimney caps for fossil fuels.
Unlined Chimney should be re-evaluated by a chimney technician.
Have flue cleaned and re-evaluated. The flue lining is covered with soot or creosote and no representation can be made as to
the condition.
NOT EVALUATED
The flue was not evaluated due to inaccessibility such as roof pitch, cap, cleanout not accessible, etc.
CRICKET FLASHING
Small, sloped structure made of metal and designed to drain moisture away from a chimney. Usually placed at the back of a
chimney.
GUTTERS AND DOWNSPOUTS
This is an extremely important element in basement dampness control. Keep gutters clean and downspout extensions in place
(4’ or more). Paint the inside of galvanized gutters, which will extend the life. Shortly after a rain or thaw in winter, look for
leaks at seams in the gutters. These can be recaulked before they cause damage to fascia or soffit boards. If no gutters exist, it
is recommended that they be added.
SIDING
Wood siding should not come in contact with the ground. The moisture will cause rotting to take place and can attract
carpenter ants. See page 34 for siding that have known problems, but are not always recognizable. EIFS This type of siding is
a synthetic stucco and has experienced serious problems. It requires a certified EIFS inspector to determine condition.
Brick and stone veneer must be monitored for loose or missing mortar. Some brick and stone are susceptible to spalling. This
can be caused when moisture is trapped and a freeze/thaw situation occurs. There are products on the market that can be used
to seal out the moisture. This holds true for brick and stone chimneys also.
Metal siding will dent and scratch. Oxidation is a normal reaction in aluminum. There are good cleaners on the market and it
is recommended that they be used occasionally. Metal siding can be painted.
DOORS AND WINDOWS
These can waste an enormous amount of energy. Maintain the caulking around the frames on the exterior. Check for drafts in
the winter and improve the worst offenders first. Windows that have leaky storm windows will usually have a lot of sweating.
Likewise, well-sealed storms that sweat indicate a leaky window. It is the tighter unit that will sweat (unless the home has
excess humidity to begin with).
Wood that exhibits blistering or peeling paint should be examined for possible moisture sources: roof leaks, bad gutters,
interior moisture from baths or laundry or from a poorly vented crawl space. Some paint problems have no logical
explanation, but many are a symptom of an underlying problem. A freshly painted house may mask these symptoms, but after
you have lived in the home for a year or two, look for localized paint blistering (peeling). It may be a clue.
New glazing will last longer if the raw wood is treated with boiled linseed oil prior to glazing. It prevents the wood from
drawing the moisture out of the new glazing.
CAULKING
Many different types of caulk are available on the market today. Check with a paint or hardware store for the kind of
application you need.
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REMARKS
EXTERIOR DOORS
The exposed side of exterior doors needs to be painted or properly stained and varnished to prevent discoloring and
delamination. Weatherstripping is a must to prevent drafts.
ELECTRICAL
Extension cord wiring to an automatic door opener should be removed and an outlet should be installed by the opener.
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REMARKS
OVERHEAD DOOR OPENERS
We recommend that a separate electrical outlet be provided. Openers that do not have a safety reverse are considered a
safety hazard. Small children and pets are especially vulnerable. We recommend the operating switches be set high enough so
children cannot reach them. If a electric sensor is present, it should be tested occasionally to ensure it is working.
GARAGE SILL PLATES should be elevated or treated lumber should be used. If this is not the case, try to direct water
away to prevent rotting.
A/C COMPRESSORS
They should not become overgrown with foliage. Clearance requirements vary, but 2’ on all sides should be considered
minimal with up to 6’ of air discharge desirable. If a clothes dryer vent is within five to ten feet, either relocate the vent or do
not run when the A/C is running. The lint will quickly reduce the efficiency of the A/C unit.
BURNERS
Any appliance such as a water heater, furnace, etc. should have the flame a minimum of 18" above the floor. Any open flame
less than 18" from the floor is a potential safety hazard. The appliance should also be protected from vehicle damage.
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KITCHEN REMARKS
PLASTER ON WOOD LATH
Plaster on wood lath is an old technique and is no longer in general use. Wood lath shrinks with time and the nails rust and
loosen. As a result, the plaster may become fragile and caution is needed in working with this type of plastering system.
Sagging ceilings are best repaired by laminating drywall over the existing plaster and screwing it to the ceiling joists.
PLASTER ON GYPSUM LATH (ROCK LATH)
Plaster on gypsum lath will sometimes show the seams of the 16” wide gypsum lath, but this does not indicate a structural
fault. The scalloping appearance can be leveled with drywall joint compound and fiberglass mesh joint tape or drywall can be
laminated over the existing plaster on the ceiling.
WOOD FLOORING
Always attempt to clean wood floors first before making the decision to refinish the floor. Wax removers and other mild
stripping agents plus a good waxing and buffing will usually produce satisfactory results. Mild bleaching agents help remove
deep stains. Sanding removes some of the wood in the floor and can usually be done safely only once or twice in the life of
the floor.
NAIL POPS
Drywall nail pops are due to normal expansion and contraction of the wood members to which the drywall is nailed and are
usually of no structural significance.
CARPETING
Where carpeting has been installed, the materials and condition of the floor underneath cannot be determined.
APPLIANCES
(If report indicated appliances were operated, the following applies) Dishwashers are tested to see if the motor operates and
water sprays properly. Stoves are tested to see that burners are working and oven and broiler get hot. Timer and controls are
not tested. Refrigerators are not tested.
No representation is made to continued life expectancy of any appliance.
ASBESTOS AND OTHER HAZARDS
Asbestos fibers in some form are present in many homes, but are often not visible and cannot be identified without testing.
If there is reason to suspect that asbestos may be present and if it is of particular concern, a sample of the material in question
may be removed and analyzed in a laboratory. However, detecting or inspecting for the presence or absence of asbestos is not
a part of our inspection.
Also excluded from this inspection and report are the possible presence of, or danger from, radon gas, lead-based paint, urea
formaldehyde, toxic or flammable chemicals and all other similar or potentially harmful substances and environmental
hazards.
WINDOWS
A representative number of windows are inspected.
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REMARKS
STALL SHOWER
The metal shower pan in a stall shower has a potential or probable life of 10-20 years depending on quality of the pan
installed. Although a visible inspection is made to determine whether a shower pan is currently leaking, it cannot be stated
with certainty that no defect is present or that one may not soon develop. Shower pan leaks often do not show except when
the shower is in actual use.
CERAMIC TILE
Bathroom tile installed in a mortar bed is excellent. It is still necessary to keep the joint between the tile and the tub/shower
caulked or sealed to prevent water spillage from leaking through and damaging the ceilings below. Ceramic tile is often
installed in mastic. It is important to keep the tile caulked or water will seep behind the tile and cause deterioration in the
wallboard. Special attention should be paid to the area around faucets and other tile penetrations.
EXHAUST FANS
Bathrooms with a shower should have exhaust fans when possible. This helps to remove excess moisture from the room,
preventing damage to the ceiling and walls and wood finishes. The exhaust fan should not be vented into the attic. The proper
way to vent the fan(s) is to the outside. Running the vent pipe horizontally and venting into a gable end or soffit is preferred.
Running the vent pipe vertically through the roof may cause condensation to run down the vent pipe, rusting the fan and
damaging the wallboard. Insulating the vent pipe in the attic will help to reduce this problem.
SLOW DRAINS on sinks, tubs, and showers are usually due to build up of hair and soap scum. Most sink popups can be
easily removed for cleaning. Some tubs have a spring attached to the closing lever that acts as a catch for hair. It may require
removing a couple of screws to disassemble. If you cannot mechanically remove the obstruction, be kind to your pipes. Don’t
use a caustic cleaner. There are several bacteria drain cleaners available. They are available at hardware stores in areas
where septic tanks are used. These drain cleaners take a little longer to work, but are safe for you and your pipes.
SAFETY HAZARDS
Typical safety hazards found in bathrooms are open grounds or reverse polarity by water.
Replacing these outlets with G.F.C.I.’s are recommended.
WHIRLPOOL TUBS
This relates to interior tubs hooked up to interior plumbing. Where possible, the motor will be operated to see that the jets are
working. Hot tubs and spas are not inspected.
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ROOMS REMARKS
DOOR STOPS
All swinging doors should be checked for door stops. Broken or missing door stops can result in door knobs breaking through
drywall or plaster.
CLOSET GUIDES
Sliding closet doors should be checked to see that closet guides are in place. Missing or broken closet guides can cause
scratches and damage to doors.
COLD AIR RETURNS
Bedrooms that do not have cold air returns in them should have a 3/4” gap under the doors to allow cold air to be drawn into
the hall return.
AN INSPECTION VERSUS A WARRANTY
A home inspection is just what the name indicates, an inspection of a home...usually a home that is being
purchased. The purpose of the inspection is to determine the condition of the various systems and structures of the
home. While an inspection performed by a competent inspection company will determine the condition of the
major components of the home, no inspection will pick up every minute latent defect. The inspector’s ability to
find all defects is limited by access to various parts of the property, lack of information about the property and
many other factors. A good inspector will do his or her level best to determine the condition of the home and to
report it accurately. The report that is issued is an opinion as to the condition of the home. This opinion is arrived
at by the best technical methods available to the home inspection industry. It is still only an opinion.
A warranty is a policy sold to the buyer that warrants that specific items in the home are in sound condition and
will remain in sound condition for a specified period of time. Typically, the warranty company never inspects the
home. The warranty company uses actuarial tables to determine the expected life of the warranted items and
charges the customer a fee for the warranty that will hopefully cover any projected loss and make a profit for the
warranty seller. It is essentially an insurance policy.
The service that we have provided you is an inspection. We make no warranty of this property. If you desire
warranty coverage, please see your real estate agent for details about any warranty plan to which their firm may
have access.
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REMARKS
WINDOW FRAMES AND SILLS
Window frames and sills are often found to have surface deterioration due to condensation that has run off the window and
damaged the varnish. Usually this can be repaired with a solvent style refinisher and fine steel wool. This is sometimes a sign
of excess humidity in the house.
See comments regarding caulking doors and windows.
FIREPLACES
It is important that a fireplace be cleaned on a routine basis to prevent the buildup of creosote in the flue, which can cause a
chimney fire.
Masonry fireplace chimneys are normally required to have a terra cotta flue liner or 8 inches of masonry surrounding each
flue in order to be considered safe and to conform with most building codes.
During visual inspections, it is not uncommon to be unable to detect the absence of a flue liner either because of stoppage at
the firebox, a defective damper or lack of access from the roof.
WOODBURNERS
Once installed, it can be difficult to determine proper clearances for woodburning stoves. Manufacturer specifications, which
are not usually available to the inspector, determine the proper installation. We recommend you ask the owner for paperwork,
verifying that it was installed by a professional contractor.
VENTILATION
Ventilation is recommended at the rate of one square foot of vent area to 300 square feet of attic floor space, this being
divided between soffit and rooftop. Power vents should ideally have both a humidistat and a thermostat, since ventilation is
needed to remove winter moisture as well as summer heat. Evidence of condensation such as blackened roof sheathing, frost
on nail heads, etc. is an indication that ventilation may have been or is blocked or inadequate.
INSULATION
The recommended insulation in the attic area is R-38, approximately 12”. If insulation is added, it is important that the
ventilation is proper.
SMOKE DETECTORS
Smoke detectors should be tested monthly. At least one detector should be on each level. CO detectors are not required by
most states, but for safety reasons, are highly recommended.
VAPOR BARRIERS
The vapor barrier should be on the warm side of the surface. Most older homes were built without vapor barriers. If the vapor
barrier is towards the cold side of the surface, it should be sliced or removed. Most vapor barriers in the attic are covered by
insulation and therefore, not visible.
SAFETY GLAZING
Safety glazing requirements vary depending on the age of the home. Every attempt is made to identify areas where the lack of
safety glazing presents an immediate safety hazard, such as a shower door. In some older homes it is difficult to determine if
safety glazing is present, since the glass is not marked. Therefore, no representation is made that safety glazing exists in all
appropriate areas.
INSULATED GLASS
Broken seal in thermopane/insulated windows are not always visible nor detectible due to humidity and temperature changes
during the day. Other factors such as window covering, dirty windows, and lack of accessibility, personal property placed in
front of the windows all effect the view of the windows at the time of the inspection.
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REMARKS
BASEMENT
Any basement that has cracks or leaks is technically considered to have failed. Most block basements have step cracks in
various areas. If little or no movement has occurred and the step cracks are uniform, this is considered acceptable. Horizontal
cracks in the third or fourth block down indicate the block has moved due to outside pressure. They can be attributed to many
factors such as improper grading, improperly functioning gutter and downspout system, etc. Normally if little or no
movement has taken place and proper grading and downspouts exist, this is considered acceptable. If the wall containing the
stress crack(s) has moved considerably, this will require some method of reinforcement. Basements that have been freshly
painted or tuckpointed should be monitored for movement. This will be indicated by cracks reopening. If cracks reappear,
reinforcement may be necessary. Reinforcing a basement wall can become expensive.
FOUNDATION (COVERED WALLS)
Although an effort has been made to note any major inflections or weaknesses, it is difficult at best to detect these areas when
walls are finished off, or basement storage makes areas inaccessible. No representation is made as to the condition of
these walls.
MONITOR indicates that the walls have stress cracks, but little movement has occurred. In our opinion, the cracks should be
filled with mortar and the walls monitored for further movement and cracking. If additional movement or cracking occurs,
reinforcement may be necessary.
HAVE EVALUATED We recommend that the walls be re-evaluated by a structural engineer or basement repair company
and estimates be obtained if work is required.
VAPOR BARRIER
Floors that are dirt or gravel should be covered with a vapor barrier.
MOISTURE PRESENT
Basement dampness is frequently noted in houses and in most cases the stains, moisture or efflorescence present is a
symptom denoting that a problem exists outside the home. Usual causes are improper downspout extensions or leaking
gutters and/or low or improper grade (including concrete surfaces) at the perimeter of the house. A proper slope away from
the house is one inch per foot for four to six feet.
Expensive solutions to basement dampness are frequently offered. It is possible to spend thousands of dollars on solutions
such as pumping out water that has already entered or pumping of chemical preparations into the ground around the house,
when all that may be necessary are a few common sense solutions at the exterior perimeter. However, this is not intended to
be an exhaustive list of causes and solutions to the presence of moisture. No representation is made to future moisture
that may appear.
PALMER VALVE
Many older homes have a valve in the floor drain. This drain needs to remain operational.
DRAIN TILE
We offer no opinion about the existence or condition of the drain tile, as it cannot be visibly inspected.
BASEMENT ELECTRICAL OUTLETS
We recommend that you have an outlet within 6' of each appliance. The appliance you plan to install may be different than
what exists, therefore the inspection includes testing a representative number of receptacles that exist. It is also recommended
to have ground fault circuit interrupts for any outlet in the unfinished part of the basement and crawl spaces.
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REMARKS
CRAWL SPACES
Crawl spaces are shallow spaces between the first level floor joist and the ground. Access to this area may be from the inside,
outside or not accessible at all. Ductwork, plumbing, and electrical may be installed in the space in which access may be
necessary. The floor of the crawl space may be covered with concrete, gravel, or may be the original soil. A vapor barrier
may be a sheet of plastic or tar paper and installed over or under this material. The vapor barrier will deter the moisture from
the earth from escaping into the crawl space and causing a musty smell. Ventilation is also important to control excess
moisture buildup. Vents may be located on the outside of the house and are normally kept open in the summer and closed for
the winter (where freezing may occur).
The basement/crawl space diagram indicates areas that are covered and not part of a visual inspection. Every attempt is made
to determine if paneling is warped, moisture stains are bleeding through, etc. Storage that blocks the visibility of a wall is not
removed to examine that area. Therefore, it is important that on your walk-through before closing, you closely examine these
areas.
Closed crawl spaces that have vents to the outside should have insulation under the floor above the crawl space.
HAVE EVALUATED
We recommend that the walls be re-evaluated by a structural engineer or basement repair company and estimates be obtained
if work is required.
MONITOR
Indicates that the walls have stress cracks, but little movement has occurred. In our opinion, the cracks should be filled with
mortar and the walls monitored for further movement and cracking. If additional movement or cracking occurs,
reinforcement may be necessary.
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REMARKS
WELLS
Examination of wells is not included in this visual inspection. It is recommended that you have well water checked for purity
by the local health authorities and, if possible, a check on the flow of the well in periods of drought. A well pit should have a
locked cover on it to prevent anyone from falling into the pit.
SEPTIC SYSTEMS
The check of septic systems is not included in our visual inspection. You should have the local health authorities or other
qualified experts check the condition of the septic system.
In order for the septic system to be checked, the house must have been occupied within the last 30 days.
WATER PIPES
Galvanized water pipes rust from the inside out and may have to be replaced within 20 to 30 years. This is usually done in
two stages: horizontal piping in the basement first, and vertical pipes throughout the house later as needed. Copper pipes
usually have more life expectancy and may last as long as 60 years before needing to be replaced.
HOSE BIBS
During the winter months it is necessary to make sure the outside faucets are winterized. This can be done by means of a
valve located in the basement. Leave the outside faucets open to allow any water standing in the pipes to drain, preventing
them from freezing. Hose bibs cannot be tested when winterized.
WATER HEATER
The life expectancy of a water heater is 5-10 years. Water heaters generally need not be replaced unless they leak. It is a good
maintenance practice to drain 5-10 gallons from the heater several times a year. Missing relief valves or improper extension
present a safety hazard.
WATER SOFTENERS
During a visual inspection it is not possible to determine if water is being properly softened.
PLUMBING
The temperature/pressure valve should be tested several times a year by lifting the valve’s handle. Caution: very hot water
will be discharged. If no water comes out, the valve is defective and must be replaced.
SHUT-OFF VALVES
Most shut-off valves have not been operated for long periods of time. We recommend operating each shut-off valve to: toilet
bowl, water heater, under sinks, main shut-off, hose faucets, and all others. We recommend you have a plumber do this, as
some of the valves may need to be repacked or replaced. Once the valves are in proper operating order, we recommend
opening and closing these valves several times a year.
POLYBUTYLENE PIPING
This type of piping has a history of problems and should be examined by a licensed plumber and repaired or replaced as
necessary.
MECHANICAL DEVICES MAY OPERATE AT ONE MOMENT AND LATER MALFUNCTION;
THEREFORE, LIABILITY IS SPECIFICALLY LIMITED TO THOSE SITUATIONS WHERE IT
CAN BE CONCLUSIVELY SHOWN THAT THE MECHANICAL DEVICE INSPECTED WAS
INOPERABLE OR IN THE IMMEDIATE NEED OF REPAIR OR NOT PERFORMING THE
FUNCTION FOR WHICH IS IT WAS INTENDED AT THE TIME OF INSPECTION.
CSST
Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing is an alternative to traditional black iron gas piping. It is a continuous, flexible, stainless
steel pipe with an exterior PVC covering.
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REMARKS
HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING units have limited lives. Normal lives are:
GAS-FIRED HOT AIR…………………..15-25 years
OIL-FIRED HOT AIR…………………... 20-30 years
CAST IRON BOILER…………………... 30-50 years
(Hot water or steam)
or more
STEEL BOILER………………………… 30-40 years
(Hot water or steam)
or more
COPPER BOILER………………………. 10-20 years
(Hot water or steam)
CIRCULATING PUMP (Hot water)……. 10-15 years
AIR CONDITIONING COMPRESSOR…8-12 years
HEAT PUMP……………………………..8-12 years
Gas-fired hot air units that are close to or beyond their normal lives have the potential of becoming a source of
carbon monoxide in the home. You may want to have such a unit checked every year or so to assure yourself that it
is still intact. Of course a unit of such an age is a good candidate for replacement with one of the new, high
efficiency furnaces. The fuel savings alone can be very attractive.
Boilers and their systems may require annual attention. If you are not familiar with your system, have a heating
contractor come out in the fall to show you how to do the necessary thing Caution: do not add water to a hot boiler!
Forced air systems should have filters changed every 30 to 60 days of the heating and cooling season. This is
especially true if you have central air conditioning. A dirty air system can lead to premature failure of your
compressor - a $1,500 machine.
Oil-fired furnaces and boilers should be serviced by a professional each year. Most experts agree you will pay for
the service cost in fuel saved by having a properly tuned burner.
Read the instructions for maintaining the humidifier on your furnace. A malfunctioning humidifier can rust out a
furnace rather quickly. It is recommended that the humidifier be serviced at the same time as the furnace, and be
cleaned regularly. During a visual inspection it is not possible to determine if the humidifier is working.
Have HVAC technician examine - A condition was found that suggests a heating contractor should do a further
analysis. We suggest doing this before closing.
Heat exchangers cannot be examined nor their condition determined without being disassembled. Since this
is not possible during a visual, non-technically exhaustive inspection, you may want to obtain a service
contract on the unit or contact a furnace technician regarding a more thorough examination.
Testing pilot safety switch requires blowing out the pilot light. Checking safety limit controls requires
disconnecting blower motor or using other means beyond the scope of this inspection. If the furnace has not been
serviced in last 12 months you may want to have a furnace technician examine.
CO Test This is not part of a non-technical inspection. If a test was performed, the type of tester is indicated on the Heating
System page.
Combustible Gas Detector If a gas detector was used during the inspection of the furnace and evidence of
possible combustible gases was noted, we caution you that our test instrument is sensitive to many gases and not a
foolproof test. None-the-less, this presents the possibility that a hazard exists and could indicate that the heat
exchanger is, or will soon be, defective.
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REMARKS
Every effort has been made to evaluate the size of the service. Three wires going into the home indicate 240 volts. The total
amperage can be difficult to determine. We highly recommend that ground fault circuit interrupters (G.F.C.I.) be connected
to all outlets around water. This device automatically shuts the circuit off when it senses a current leak to ground. This device
can be purchased in most hardware stores. G.F.C.I.’s are recommended by all outlets located near water, outside outlets, or
garage outlets. Pool outlets should also be protected with a G.F.C.I.
See diagram below:
If you do have G.F.C.I.’s, it is recommended that you test
(and reset) them monthly. When you push the test button, the
reset button should pop out, shutting off the circuit. If it
doesn’t, the breaker is not working properly. If you don’t test
them once a month, the breakers have a tendency to stick and
may not protect you when needed.
Knob and tube wiring found in older homes should be
checked by an electrician to insure that the wire cover is in
good condition. Under no circumstances should this wire be
covered with insulation. Recess light fixtures should have a
baffle around them so that they are not covered with
insulation. The newer recessed fixtures will shut off if they
overheat. (no representation is made as to proper recess
lighting fixtures).
Federal Pacific Stab-Lok® Electrical panels may be unsafe. See www.google.com (Federal Pacific)
Aluminum wiring in general lighting circuits has a history of over heating, with the potential of a fire. If this
type of wiring exists, a licensed electrical contractor should examine the whole system.
ARC FAULTS
In some areas arc faults are required in new homes, starting in 2002 and these control outlets in the bedrooms.
REVERSE POLARITY
A common problem that surfaces in many homes is reverse polarity. This is a potentially hazardous situation in which the hot
and neutral wires of a circuit are reversed at the outlet, thereby allowing the appliance to incorrectly be connected. This is an
inexpensive item to correct.
Each receptacle has a brass and silver screw. The black wire should be wired to the brass screw and the white wire should go
to the silver screw. When these wires are switched, this is called “reverse polarity.” Turning off the power and switching
these wires will correct the problem.
Main service wiring for housing is typically 240 volts. The minimum capacity for newer homes is 100 amps though many
older homes still have 60 amp service. Larger homes or all electric homes will likely have a 200 amp service.
Main service wiring may be protected by one or more circuit breakers or fuses. While most areas allow up to six main
turnoffs, expanding from these panels is generally not allowed.
COOLING
Testing A/C System and Heat Pump- The circuit breakers to A/C should be on for a minimum of 24 hours and the outside
temperature at least 60 degrees for the past 24 hours or an A/C system cannot be operated without possible damage to the
compressor. Check the instructions in your A/C manual or on the outside compressor before starting up in the summer. Heat
pump can only be tested in the mode it’s running in. Outside temperature should be at least 65° for the past 24 hours to run in
cooling mode.
Temperature differential, between 14°-22°, is usually acceptable. If out of this range, have an HVAC contractor examine it. It
is not always feasible to do a differential test due to high humidity, low outside temperature, etc.
This confidential report is prepared exclusively for John & Jane Doe
© 2011 Florida Building Inspector
123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 46 of 62
COSTS OF REMODELING OR REPAIR
The prices quoted below include a range of prices based on a typical metropolitan area. Individual prices from contractors
can vary substantially from these ranges. We advise that several bids be obtained on any work exceeding $500 dollars. DO
NOT RELY ON THESE PRICES... GET FURTHER ESTIMATES.
ITEM
Masonry fireplace
Install prefab fireplace
Insulate attic
Install attic ventilating fan
Install new drywall over plaster
Install new warm air furnace
Replace central air conditioning/heat pump
Install humidifier
Install electrostatic air cleaner
Increase electrical service to 200 amps
Run separate elec. line for dryer
Run separate elec. line for A/C
Install hardwired smoke detector
Install new disposal
Install new dishwasher
Install new hot water boiler
Install new 30-50 gallon water heater
Install new 75 gallon water heater
Dig and install new well
Install new septic system
Re-grade around exterior
Install new sump pump
Build new redwood or pressuretreated deck
Install storm windows
Install wood replacement windows
Install aluminum or vinyl
replacement window
Install new gutters and downspouts
Install asphalt shingle o/existing
Tear off existing roof and install
new asphalt shingle roof
Install 1-ply membrane rubberized roof
Install new 4-ply built-up tar & gravel
Remove asbestos from pipes in basement
Concrete drive or patio
Plus removal of old
Clean chimney flue
Add flue liner for gas fuel
Add flue liner for oil or wood
UNIT
Each
Each
Square foot
Each
Square foot
Each
Per ton
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Each
Square foot
ESTIMATED PRICE
$4,000 - $8,000
2,000 - 4,000
.75 - 1.25
200 - 300
1.75 - 2.75
1,800 - 3,500
1,000 – 1,500
300 - 500
800 - 1,500
1,000 – 1,500
125 - 200
135 - 200
100 - 180
150 - 250
500 – 1,000
2,000 - 4,000
350 - 650
750 – 1,000
get estimate
get estimate
get estimate
150 - 300
15 - 30
Each
Each
Each
60 - 150
400 - 800
150 - 400
Lineal foot
Square foot
Square foot
4.00 – 8.00
1.20 - 1.70
2.50 - 4.00
Square foot
Square foot
Lineal foot
Square foot
Square foot
Each
Each
Each
get estimate
get estimate
get estimate
4.50 – 9.00
1.50 - 3.00
100 - 200
900 - 1,200
2,800 - 3,500
Deferred Costs - It is impossible to determine how long these items will last before needing replacement. The report
addresses most of these items from a “condition” standpoint.
This confidential report is prepared exclusively for John & Jane Doe
© 2011 Florida Building Inspector
123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 47 of 62
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE TIPS
I.
FOUNDATION & MASONRY: Basements, Exterior Walls: To prevent seepage and condensation problems.
a. Check basement for dampness & leakage after wet weather.
b. Check chimneys, deteriorated chimney caps, loose and missing mortar.
c. Maintain grading sloped away from foundation walls.
II.
ROOFS & GUTTERS: To prevent roof leaks, condensation, seepage and decay problems.
a. Check for damaged, loose or missing shingles, blisters.
b. Clean gutters, leaders, strainers, window wells, drains. Be sure downspouts direct water away from
foundation. Cut back tree limbs.
c. Check flashings around roof stacks, vents, skylights, chimneys, as sources of leakage. Check vents,
louvers and chimneys for birds nests, squirrels, insects.
d. Check fascias and soffits for paint flaking, leakage & decay.
III.
EXTERIOR WALLS: To prevent paint failure, decay and moisture penetration problems.
a. Check painted surface for paint flaking or paint failure. Cut back shrubs.
b. Check exterior masonry walls for cracks, looseness, missing or broken mortar.
IV.
DOORS AND WINDOWS: To prevent air and weather penetration problems.
a. Check caulking for decay around doors, windows, corner boards, joints. Recaulk and weatherstrip as
needed. Check glazing, putty around windows.
V.
ELECTRICAL: For safe electrical performance, mark & label each circuit.
a. Trip circuit breakers every six months and ground fault circuit interrupters (G.F.C.I.) monthly.
b. Check condition of lamp cords, extension cords & plugs. Replace at first sign of wear & damage.
c. Check exposed wiring & cable for wear or damage.
d. If you experience slight tingling shock from handling or touching any appliance, disconnect the appliance
& have it repaired. If lights flicker or dim, or if appliances go on and off unnecessarily, call a licensed electrician.
VI.
PLUMBING: For preventive maintenance.
a. Drain exterior water lines, hose bibs, sprinklers, pool equipment in the fall.
b. Draw off sediment in water heaters monthly or per manufacturer’s instructions.
c. Have septic tank cleaned every 2 years.
VII.
HEATING & COOLING: For comfort, efficiency, energy conservation and safety.
a. Change or clean furnace filters, air condition filters, electronic filters as needed.
b. Clean and service humidifier. Check periodically and annually.
c. Have oil burning equipment serviced annually.
VIII.
INTERIOR: General house maintenance.
a. Check bathroom tile joints, tub grouting & caulking. Be sure all tile joints in bathrooms are kept well
sealed with tile grout to prevent damage to walls, floors & ceilings below.
b. Close crawl vents in winter and open in summer.
c. Check underside of roof for water stains, leaks, dampness & condensation, particularly in attics and
around chimneys.
IX.
Know the location of:
• Main water shutoff valve.
• Main electrical disconnect or breaker.
• Main emergency shutoff switch for the heating system.
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© 2011 Florida Building Inspector
123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 48 of 62
Only by Paul Carroll
_________________________________________________________
123 SW. Street Dr.
Office:
Port St. Lucie, FL 34953
Fax:
paul@septicinspections.net
____________________________________
Web Address: www.septicinspections.net
E-Mail:
STANDARD SEPTIC INSPECTION REPORT
1. System Address
123 SW South Street, Port St Lucie, FL 34953
2. Requested By
John Alcorn / Florida Building Inspector
City
Port St. Lucie, Florida
.
3. System Owner
.
4. System Buyer
.
5. Number of Septic Systems on Location
1 . If More Then One System, Use a NEW FORM for each system
6. Type of System: PERFORMANCE BASED
SEPTIC TANK
900
X 1050
1200
9. Type of Tank: CONCRETE X CONCRETE- BLOCK
10. Is Tank Properly Sealed? YES X NO
a.
GRAY-WATER
G/P/D:
7. If Performance Based, Name Of Manufacture:
8. Tank Size in Gallons: 750
X
and In: POOR
1350
1500
2000
FIBERGLASS
.
Model #
2500
.
Other
.
PLASTIC/POLY
.
GOOD X EXCELLENT
Operating Order
Waste level is below inlet line / little solids and sludge / ran water from inside / palm tree front of tank
.
NO X If Yes, Explain Why
.
11. Does Tank Need Pumping Out? YES
12. Type of Drain-field: GRAVITY X RAISED
BED X TRENCH
13. Drain-field Material Is: ROCK X RUBBER ROCK
DRY-WELL
INFILTRATOR
Other
EEE-ZZZ LAY
14. Drain-field Size Is: Approximately 360 Sq. Ft. and working at time of inspection
15. If a RAISED DRAIN-FIELD, Check Lift Station Pump. Is Pump Working?
YES
.
.
.
NO
If NO, Explain Why
N/A
X .
.
16. If a RAISED DRAIN-FIELD, Check HIGH-LEVEL Alarm. Is Alarm Working? YES
NO
N/A X .
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© 2011 Florida Building Inspector
123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 49 of 62
.
If NO, Explain Why
17. Is there a GRAY-WATER system for the washer?
Is it working?
. NO
YES
X
. N /A
. NO
. If no, explain why
Page 1 of 2
Florida Building Inspector, 123 SW South Street, Port St Lucie, FL 34953.
YES
18. ADDRESS CONTINUED
19. Is There A GRAY-WATER System For The Kitchen Sink?
NO
Is It Working? YES
20. Septic System is Located
NO
YES
X
N/A
If NO, Explain Why
.
.
.
.
in the front yard / home is not occupied
.
21. 750 tank = 1-3 BR. / 900 tank = 2-4 BR. / 1050 tank = 3-5 BR. / 1200 tank = 4-6 BR. / 1350 tank = 5-7 BR.
22. Current number of bedrooms:
3-BR
.
23. Is there currently a garbage disposal unit in place?
Yes
.
SPECIAL NOTE /
VISUAL INSPECTION only, pump-out and soil boring NOT INCLUDED with Inspection .
Buyer not present at inspection / tank holding water / system passed inspection and wet-test .
Inspection of the above system does NOT GUARANTEE future performance.
To the best of my knowledge, I confirm that the above information is true.
NOTE!!! This inspection was performed as a STANDARD inspection and shall not be considered or
Interpreted as an ADVANCED inspection per 64E-6 Department of Health procedure for
Non-mandatory inspections and assessment of existing system.
James X Doe
Contractors Name
XXXXXXXXXX
License No.
03 / 28 / XX__
Date of Inspection
Florida Building Inspector
Page 2 of 2
Uniform Mitigation Verification Inspection Form
Maintain a copy of this form with insurance policy
Inspection Date:
Owner Information
Friday, June 17, 2011
Owner Name: John & Jane Doe
Address: 123 SW South St
City: Port Saint Lucie
County:
Insurance Company:
Year of Home : 1989
Zip: 34953
# of Stories:
1
Contact Person: Jane Doe
Home Phone:
Work Phone:
Cell Phone: 123-456-7890
Policy #:
Email: janedoe@semoreanddolittle.ca
I, John Alcorn, personally conducted the inspection of the residence identified on this form and in my professional
opinion, all the data I reported is true and correct.
1. Building Code: What building code was used to design and build the structure?
A. 1994 South Florida Building Code (building permit application date of 9/1/1994 or later in Miami-Dade and
Broward Counties (also known as the High Velocity Hurricane Zone (HVHZ)).
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B. Building code prior to the 1994 South Florida Building Code (building permit application date of 8/31/1994 or
earlier in Miami-Dade and Broward Counties (HVHZ).
C. 2001 Florida Building Code (building permit application date of 3/1/2002 or later outside the HVHZ).
D. Building code prior to the 2001 Florida Building Code (building permit application date of 2/28/2002 or earlier
outside the HVHZ).
E. Unknown or undetermined.
2. Predominant Roof Covering:
Permit Application Date: 1/10/2005 or Date of Installation:
A. At a minimum meets the 2001 Florida Building Code or the 1994 South Florida Building Code and has a
Miami-Dade NOA or FBC 2001 Product Approval listing demonstrating compliance with ASTM D 3161 (enhanced
for 110MPH) OR ASTM D 7158 (F, G or H), OR FBC TAS 100-95 and TAS 107-95, OR FMRC 4470 and/or 4471
(for metal roofs).
B. Does not meet the above minimum requirements.
C. Unknown or undetermined.
NOTE: At least one photo documenting the existence of each visible and accessible construction or mitigation
attribute marked in Sections 3 through 9 must accompany this form.
3. Roof Deck Attachment: What is the weakest form of roof deck attachment?
A. Plywood/Oriented strand board (OSB) roof sheathing attached to the roof truss/rafter (spaced a maximum of 24”
o.c.) by staples or 6d nails spaced at 6” along the edge and 12” in the field. -OR- Batten decking supporting wood
shakes or wood shingles.-OR- Any system of screws, nails, adhesives, other deck fastening system or truss/rafter
spacing that has an equivalent mean uplift resistance of 55 psf.
B. Plywood/OSB roof sheathing with a minimum thickness of 7/16” attached to the roof truss/rafter (spaced a
maximum of 24” o.c.) by 8d common nails spaced 6” along the edge and 12” in the field.-OR- Any system of
screws, nails, adhesives, other deck fastening system or truss/rafter spacing that has an equivalent mean uplift
resistance of 103 psf.
C. Plywood/OSB roof sheathing with a minimum thickness of 7/16” attached to the roof truss/rafter (spaced a
maximum of 24” o.c.) by 8d common nails spaced 6” along the edge and 6” in the field. -OR- Dimensional
lumber/Tongue & Groove decking with a minimum of 2 nails per board. -OR- Any system of screws, nails,
adhesives, other deck fastening system or truss/rafter spacing that has an equivalent mean uplift resistance of 182
psf.
D. Reinforced Concrete Roof Deck.
Inspectors Initials:
Property Address: 123 SW South Street, Port St Lucie, FL 34953
*This verification form is valid up to five (5) years provided no material changes have been made to the structure.
OIR-B1-1802 (Rev. 02/10) Adopted by Rule 69O-170.0155.
E. Other:
F. Unknown or unidentified.
G. No attic access.
4. Roof to Wall Attachment: What is the weakest roof to wall connection?
A. Toe Nails
Rafter/truss anchored to top plate of wall using nails driven at an angle through the rafter/truss and
attached
to the top plate of the wall.
B. Clips
Metal attachments on every rafter/truss that are nailed to one side (or both sides in the case of a
diamond
type clip) of the rafter/truss and attached to the top plate of the wall frame or embedded in the
bond beam.
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C. Single Wrap Metal Straps must be secured to every rafter/truss with a minimum of 3 nails, wrapping over and
securing
to the opposite side of the rafter/truss with a minimum of 1 nail. The Strap must be attached to the
top plate of the wall frame or embedded in the bond beam in at least one place.
D. Double Wrap Both Metal Straps must be secured to every rafter/truss with a minimum of 3 nails, wrapping over
and
securing to the opposite side of the rafter/truss with a minimum of 1 nail. Each Strap must be
attached to the top plate of the wall frame or embedded in the bond beam in at least one place.
Anchor bolts structurally connected or reinforced concrete roof.
E. Structural
F. Other:
G. Unknown or Unidentified
H. No attic access
5. Roof Geometry: What is the roof shape(s)? (Porches or carports that are attached only to the fascia or wall of the host
structure
and not structurally connected to the main roof system are not considered in the roof geometry determination.)
A. Hip Roof
Hip roof with no other roof shapes greater than 10% of the total building perimeter.
B. Non-Hip Roof
Any other roof shape or combination of roof shapes including hip, gable, gambrel,
mansard and
other roof shapes not including flat roofs.
C. Flat Roof
Flat roof shape greater than 100 square feet or 10% of the entire roof, whichever is greater.
6. Gable End Bracing: For roof structures that contain gables, please check the weakest that apply:
A. Gable End(s) are braced at a minimum in accordance with the 2001 Florida Building Code.
B. Does not meet the above minimum requirements.
C. Not applicable, unknown or unidentified.
7. Wall Construction Type: Check all wall construction types for exterior walls of the structure and percentages for each:
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
Wood Frame
Un-Reinforced Masonry
Reinforced Masonry
Poured Concrete
Other: __________________
100%
%
%
%
%
8. Secondary Water Resistance (SWR): (standard underlayments or hot mopped felts are not SWR)
A. SWR
Self adhering polymer modified bitumen roofing underlayment applied directly to the sheathing or
foam
adhesive SWR barrier (not foamed on insulation) applied as a secondary means to protect the
dwelling from water intrusion.
B. No SWR
C. Unknown or undetermined.
9. Opening Protection: What is the weakest form of wind borne debris protection installed on the structure? (Exterior
openings include, but are not limited to: windows, doors, garage doors, skylights, etc. Product approval may be required for
opening protection devices without proper rating identification.)
A. All Exterior Openings (Glazed and Unglazed) All exterior openings are fully protected at a minimum with
impact resistant coverings, impact resistant doors and/or impact resistant window units that are listed as wind borne debris
protection devices in the product approval system of the State of Florida or Miami-Dade County and meet the requirements
of one of
Inspectors Initials:
Property Address: 123 SW South Street, Port St Lucie, FL
34953
*This verification form is valid up to five (5) years provided no material changes have been made to the structure.
OIR-B1-1802 (Rev. 02/10) Adopted by Rule 69O-170.0155.
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© 2011 Florida Building Inspector
123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 52 of 62
the following for “Cyclic Pressure and Large Missile Impact”. For the HVHZ, systems must have either a Miami-Dade NOA
or FBC Approval marked “For Use in the HVHZ”.
Miami-Dade County Notice of Acceptance (NOA) 201, 202 and 203. (Large Missile - 9 lb.)
Florida Building Code Testing Application Standard (TAS) 201, 202 and 203. (Large Missile – 9 lb.)
American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) E 1886 and ASTM E 1996. (Large Missile – 9 lb.)
Southern Standards Technical Document (SSTD) 12. (Large Missile – 9 lb.)
For Skylights Only: ASTM E 1886/E 1996. (Large Missile - 4.5 lb.)
For Garage Doors Only: ANSI/DASMA 115. (Large Missile – 9 lb.)
B. All exterior openings are fully protected at a minimum with impact resistant coverings, impact resistant doors
and/or impact resistant window units that are listed as windborne debris protection devices in the product approval
system of the State of Florida or Miami-Dade County and meet the requirements of one of the following for “Cyclic
Pressure and Large Missile Impact”:
ASTM E 1886 and ASTM E 1996. (Large Missile – 4.5 lb.)
SSTD 12. (Large Missile – 4 lb. to 8 lb.)
For Skylights Only: ASTM E 1886/E 1996. (Large Missile - 2 to 4.5 lb.)
C. All exterior openings are fully protected at a minimum with impact resistant coverings, impact resistant doors
and/or impact resistant window units that are listed as windborne debris protection devices in the product approval
system of the State of Florida or Miami-Dade County and meet the requirements of one of the following for “Cyclic
Pressure and Small Missile Impact”:
Miami-Dade County NOA 201, 202 and 203. (Small Missile – 2grams)
Florida Building Code TAS 201, 202 and 203. (Small Missile – 2 grams)
ASTM E 1886 and ASTM E 1996. (Small Missile – 2 grams)
SSTD 12. (Small Missile – 2 grams)
D. All exterior openings are fully protected with windborne debris protection devices that cannot be indentified as
Miami Dade or Florida Building Code (FBC) product approved. This does not include plywood/OSB or plywood
alternatives (see Answer “H”).
All Glazed Exterior Openings
E. All glazed exterior openings are fully protected at a minimum with impact resistant coverings and/or impact
resistant window units that meet the requirements of one of the standards listed in Answer “A” of this question.
(Large Missile – 9 lb.)
F. All glazed exterior openings are fully protected at a minimum with impact resistant coverings and/or impact
resistant window units that meet the requirements of one of the standards listed in Answer “B” of this question.
(Large Missile – 2 lb. - 8 lb.)
G. All glazed exterior openings are fully protected at a minimum with impact resistant coverings and/or impact
resistant window units that meet the requirements of one of the standards listed in Answer “C” of this question.
(Small Missile – 2 grams)
H. All glazed exterior openings are covered with plywood/OSB meeting the requirements of Section 1609 and
Table 1609.1.4 of the 2004 FBC (with 2006 supplements).
I. All glazed exterior openings are fully protected with wind-borne debris protection devices that cannot be
identified as
Miami-Dade or FBC product approved. This does not include plywood/OSB or other plywood
alternatives that do not meet Answer H (see Answer “K”).
None or Some Glazed Openings
J. At least one glazed exterior opening does not have wind-borne debris protection.
K. No glazed exterior openings have wind-borne debris protection. This includes plywood/OSB or plywood
alternative systems that do not meet Answer “H”.
L. Unknown or undetermined.
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© 2011 Florida Building Inspector
123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 53 of 62
Inspectors Initials:
Property Address: 123 SW South Street, Port St Lucie, FL 34953
*This verification form is valid up to five (5) years provided no material changes have been made to the structure.
OIR-B1-1802 (Rev. 02/10) Adopted by Rule 69O-170.0155.
MITIGATION INSPECTIONS MUST BE CERTIFIED BY A QUALIFIED INSPECTOR.
Section 627.711(2), Florida Statutes, provides a listing of individuals who may sign this form.
Qualified Inspector Name: John Alcorn
Inspection Company: Florida Building Inspector
License Type: Standard
(Building) Inspector
License #: BN4683
Phone: 772-345-2300
Qualified Inspector – I hold an active license or certificate as a: (check one)
Hurricane mitigation inspector certified by the My Safe Florida Home Program.
Building code inspector certified under Section 468.607, Florida Statutes.
General, building or residential contractor licensed under Section 489.111, Florida Statutes.
Professional architect licensed under Section 481.213, Florida Statutes.
Professional engineer licensed under Section 471.015, Florida Statutes.
Other individual or entity recognized by the insurer as possessing the necessary qualifications to properly
complete this form pursuant to Section 627.711(2)(f), Florida Statutes.
Individuals signing this form must have their license or certificate in an “Active” status at time of the inspection.
I, John Alcorn, am a qualified inspector and I personally performed the inspection.
Qualified Inspector Signature:
Date:
An individual or entity who knowingly provides or utters a false or fraudulent mitigation verification form with the
intent to obtain or receive a discount on an insurance premium to which the individual or entity is not entitled
commits a misdemeanor of the first degree (Section 627.711(3), Florida Statutes). The Qualified Inspector who
certifies this form is strictly liable for all acts, statements, concealment of facts, omissions, and documentation
provided by his or her employee who actually performed the inspection.
Homeowner to complete: I certify that the named Qualified Inspector or his or her employee did perform an inspection of
the residence identified on this form and that proof of identification was provided to me or my Authorized Representative.
Signature: ___________________________________ Date: __________________________
An individual or entity who knowingly provides or utters a false or fraudulent mitigation verification form with the
intent to obtain or receive a discount on an insurance premium to which the individual or entity is not entitled
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© 2011 Florida Building Inspector
123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 54 of 62
commits a misdemeanor of the first degree. (Section 627.711(3), Florida Statutes)
The definitions on this form are for inspection purposes only and cannot be used to certify any product or
construction feature as offering protection from hurricanes.
Inspectors Initials:
Property Address: 123 SW South Street, Port St Lucie, FL 34953
*This verification form is valid up to five (5) years provided no material changes have been made to the structure.
OIR-B1-1802 (Rev. 02/10) Adopted by Rule 69O-170.0155.
This confidential report is prepared exclusively for John & Jane Doe
© 2011 Florida Building Inspector
123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 55 of 62
FLORIDA BUILDING INSPECTOR
10380 SW Village Center Drive, Suite 123, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34987 - Tel: (772) 345-2300
3. Roof Deck Attachment:
Inspectors Initials:
Property Address: 123 SW South Street, Port St Lucie, FL 34953
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© 2011 Florida Building Inspector
123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 56 of 62
4. Roof to Wall Attachment:
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© 2011 Florida Building Inspector
123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 57 of 62
Inspectors Initials:
Property Address: 123 SW South Street, Port St Lucie, FL 34953
5. Roof Geometry:.
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© 2011 Florida Building Inspector
123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 58 of 62
Inspectors Initials:
Property Address: 123 SW South Street, Port St Lucie, FL 34953
This confidential report is prepared exclusively for John & Jane Doe
© 2011 Florida Building Inspector
123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 59 of 62
6. Gable End Bracing:
Inspectors Initials:
Property Address: 123 SW South Street, Port St Lucie, FL 34953
This confidential report is prepared exclusively for John & Jane Doe
© 2011 Florida Building Inspector
123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 60 of 62
7. Wall Construction Type:
Inspectors Initials:
Property Address: 123 SW South Street, Port St Lucie, FL
3495334953
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© 2011 Florida Building Inspector
123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 61 of 62
8. Secondary Water Resistance (SWR):
Inspectors Initials:
Property Address: Property Address: 123 SW South Street, Port St
Lucie, FL 34953
This confidential report is prepared exclusively for John & Jane Doe
© 2011 Florida Building Inspector
123 SW South Street, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34953 Page 62 of 62
9. Opening Protection:
Inspectors Initials:
Property Address: 123 SW South Street, Port St Lucie, FL 34953
This confidential report is prepared exclusively for John & Jane Doe
© 2011 Florida Building Inspector