Level 2 Service Manual
A840, A860
Digital Wireless Telephone
CDMA 800/1900 MHz; GSM 900/1800 MHz
Level 2 Service Manual
2
Contents
A840
6809485A78-O
Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Product Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Product Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Regulatory Agency Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Computer Program Copyrights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
About this Service Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Warranty Service Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Parts Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Product Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
General Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Controls, Indicators, and Input/Output (I/O) Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Battery Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Theory of Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
MSM6300 System Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
PM6050 Device Description. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
RFR6000 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
RFL6000 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Tools and Test Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Disassembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Removing the Battery Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Removing and Replacing the RUIM (Removable User Information Memory) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Removing and Replacing the Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Removing and Replacing the Antenna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Removing and Replacing the Keypad Bezel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Removing and Replacing the Speaker Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Removing and Replacing the Keyboard Stiffener . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Removing and Replacing the Flip Assembly and Transceiver Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Removing and Replacing the Flip Display Lens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Removing and Replacing the Flip Assembly Sleeve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Removing and Replacing the Flip Knuckle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Removing the Display Bezel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Removing the Display Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Removing and Replacing the Keypad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Removing the Motor/Vibrator Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Phone Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Personality Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Programming: Software Upgrade and Flexing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Related Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Exploded View Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Exploded View Parts List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
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Contents
4
A840
June 07, 2004
6809485A78-O
Level 2 Service Manual
2
A840
6809485A78-O
Introduction
Introduction
Motorola® Inc. maintains a worldwide organization that is dedicated to provide
responsive, full-service customer support. Motorola products are serviced by an
international network of company-operated product-care centers as well as
authorized independent service firms.
Available on a contract basis, Motorola Inc. offers comprehensive maintenance and
installation programs that enable customers to meet requirements for reliable,
continuous communications.
To learn more about the wide range of Motorola service programs, contact your local
Motorola products representative or the nearest Customer Service Manager.
Product Identification
Motorola products are identified by the model number on the housing. Use the entire
model number when inquiring about the product. Numbers are also assigned to
chassis and kits. Use these numbers when requesting information or ordering
replacement parts.
Product Names
Product names are listed on the front cover. Product names are subject to change
without notice. Some product names, as well as some frequency bands, are available
only in certain markets.
Regulatory Agency Compliance
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the
following conditions:
• This device may not cause any harmful interference
• This device must accept interference received, including interference that may
cause undesired operation
This class B device also complies with all requirements of the Canadian
Interference-Causing Equipment Regulations (ICES-003).
Cet appareil numérique de la classe B respecte toutes les exigences du Règlement
sur le matériel brouilleur du Canada.
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5
Introduction
A840
Computer Program Copyrights
The Motorola products described in this manual may include Motorola computer
programs stored in semiconductor memories or other media that are copyrighted
with all rights reserved worldwide to Motorola. Laws in the United States and other
countries preserve for Motorola, Inc. certain exclusive rights to the copyrighted
computer programs, including the exclusive right to copy, reproduce, modify,
decompile, disassemble, and reverse-engineer the Motorola computer programs in
any manner or form without Motorola's prior written consent. Furthermore, the
purchase of Motorola products shall not be deemed to grant either directly or by
implication, estoppel, or otherwise, any license or rights under the copyrights,
patents, or patent applications of Motorola, except for a nonexclusive license to use
the Motorola product and the Motorola computer programs with the Motorola
product.
About this Service Manual
Using this service manual and the suggestions contained in it assures proper
installation, operation, and maintenance. Refer questions about this manual to the
nearest Customer Service Manager.
Audience
This service manual aids service personnel in testing and repairing A840
telephones. Service personnel should be familiar with electronic assembly, testing,
and troubleshooting methods, and with the operation and use of associated test
equipment.
Use of this manual assures proper installation, operation, and maintenance of
Motorola products and equipment. It contains all service information required for
the equipment described and is current as of the printing date.
Scope
This manual provides basic information relating to A840 telephones, and also to
provides procedures and processes for repairing the units at Level 1 and 2 service
centers including:
• Unit swap out
• Repairing of mechanical faults
• Basic modular troubleshooting
• Testing and verification of unit functionality
• Initiate warranty claims and send faulty modules to Level 3 or 4 repair
centers
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Level 2 Service Manual
Introduction
Conventions
The following special characters and typefaces are used in this manual to emphasize
certain types of information.
➧
G
E
H
Note: Emphasizes additional information pertinent to the subject
matter.
Caution: Emphasizes information about actions that may result in
equipment damage.
Warning: Emphasizes information about actions that may result in
personal injury.
Keys to be pressed are represented graphically. For example, instead of “Press
the Menu Key”, you will see “Press H”.
Information from a screen is shown in text as similar as possible to what
displays on the screen. For example, ALERTS or ALERTS or ALERTS.
Information that you need to type is printed in boldface type.
Warranty Service Policy
The product is sold with the standard 12-month warranty terms and conditions.
Accidental damage, misuse, and extended warranties offered by retailers are not
supported under warranty. Non warranty repairs are available at agreed fixed
repair prices.
Out-of-Box Failure Policy
The standard out of box failure criteria applies. Customer units that fail very early
on after the date of sale, are to be returned to Manufacturing for root cause analysis,
to guard against epidemic criteria. Manufacturing will bear the costs of early life
failure.
Product Support
Customer’s original units will be repaired but not refurbished as standard.
Appointed Motorola Service Hubs will perform warranty and non-warranty field
service for level 2 (assemblies) and level 3 (limited PCB component). The Motorola
High Technology Centers will perform level 4 (full component) repairs.
Customer Support
Customer support is available through dedicated Call Centers and in-country help
desks. Product Service training is available through the local Motorola Support
Center.
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Introduction
A840
Parts Replacement
When ordering replacement parts or equipment, include the Motorola part number
and description used in the service manual or supplement.
When the Motorola part number of a component is not known, use the product model
number or other related major assembly along with a description of the related
major assembly and of the component in question.
In the U.S.A., to contact Motorola, Inc. on your TTY, call: 800-793-7834
Accessories and Aftermarket Division (AAD)
Order replacement parts, test equipment, and manuals from AAD.
U.S.A.
Outside U.S.A.
Phone: 800-422-4210
Phone: 847-538-8023
FAX: 800-622-6210
FAX: 847-576-3023
In EMEA call +49 461 803 1638.
In Asia call +65 648 62995.
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Level 2 Service Manual
Specifications
Specifications
General Function
Frequency Range 1900 MHz PCS
Frequency Range 800 MHz CDMA
Frequency Range GSM 900
Frequency Range DCS 1800
Channel Spacing
Channels (CDMA)
Channels (GSM)
Modulation
Transmitter Phase Accuracy
Duplex Spacing
Frequency Stability
Power Supply
Average Transmit Current
Average Stand-by Current
Dimensions
(with 750 mAh Li ion battery)
Size (Volume)
Weight
Temperature Range
Humidity
Battery Life, 750 mAh Li Ion Battery
Transmitter Function
RF Power Output
Input/Output Impedance
Transmit Audio Response
Modulation
CDMA Transmit Waveform Quality
(Rho)
6809485A78-O
Specification
1931.250 -1988.750 MHz Rx
1851.250 -1908.750 MHz Tx
869.04 - 893.97 Rx
824.04 - 848.97 Tx
880-915 MHz Tx (with EGSM)
925-960 MHZ Rx
1710-1785 MHz Tx
1805-1880 MHz Rx
50 kHz PCS
30 kHz CDMA/AMPS
1200 PCS CDMA
832 CDMA
174 EGSM, 374 PCS, carriers with 8 channels
per carrier
1M25D1W (1.25 MHz bandwidth) CDMA
3G1XRTT (1.25 MHz bandwidth) CDMA-1X
F3 +12 kHz for 100% at 1 kHz AMPS
5 Degrees RMS, 20 Degrees peak
80 MHz PCS
45 MHz AMPS
± 300 Hz (CDMA)
+ 2.5 ppm (AMPS)
3.6V Li Ion 750 mAh battery
310 mA at +13 dBm)
3.40 mA
94mmX49mmX23mm
3.7 in. x 1.9 in. x 0.9 in.
88 cc (5.37 in.3) without antenna
<100g (3.84 oz) with battery
-30° C to +60° C (-22° F to +140° F)
80% Relative Humidity at 50° C (122° F)
Up to 180 minutes digital talk time (IS 95 A/B)
Up to 90 minutes talk time (Analog)
Up to 250 hours (IS 95 A/B) standby time
Up to 350 hours (IS 2000) standby time
Up to 15 hours standby time (Analog)
All talk and standby times are approximate and
depend on network configuration, signal strength,
and features selected.
Specification
0.20 watts -23 dBm into 50 ohms (CDMA
nominal)
.6 watts -27.0 dBm into 50 ohms (AMPS
nominal)
50 ohms (nominal)
6 dBm/octave pre-emphasis
1M25DIW (1.25 MHz bandwidth) CDMA
0.94
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9
Specifications
A840
Receiver Function
Receive Sensitivity
Audio Distortion
Adjacent and Alternate Channel
Desensitization
IM (AMPS)
10
Specification
-116 dBm (AMPS, SINAD, C-MSG weighted)
Sinad 12dB or greater
-104 dBm (CDMA, 0.5% Static FER) 0.5% or less
Less than 5% at 1004 Hz, +/- 8 kHz peak
frequency deviation (transmit and receive)
3% BER max at 107 dBm signal; -94 dBm/30 kHz,
-65 dBm/60 kHz
Greater than 65 dB
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Level 2 Service Manual
Product Overview
Product Overview
Motorola A840 mobile telephones feature Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA)
technology. The mobile telephone uses a simplified icon and Graphical user
interface (GUI) for easier operation, allow Short Message Service (SMS) text
messaging, and include clock, alarm, datebook, calculator, and caller profiling
personal management tools. The A840 also has a built in camera. The phone
provides 32 Embedded ring tones including VibraCall vibrating alert and 32
Downloadable/Customizable iMelody ring tones. The A840 is a dual band, quad
mode phone that allow user roaming with a single handset between the 800/1900
MHz CDMA bands and the 900/1800 MHz GSM bands.
Manual switching between CDMA and GSM and GSM and CDMA is supported by
a soft button and icons to indicate mode of operation.
The A840 telephone consists of a main housing assembly and a flip assembly. The
phone has the main circuit board, battery, headset jack, and accessory connector in
the main housing assembly. The display and camera are located in the hinged flip
assembly.
The flip assembly contains the entire hinge mechanism. It is attached to the main
housing by four screws. The main display is on the inside of the flip assembly and
a LED display on the outside of the flip assembly. The main display is a 176 x 220
pixels, 262K color TFT LCD. The external display is a 96x64 pixel, 4K-color CSTN.
The camera is a 350K pixel, VGA CMOS Sensor Camera.
The main housing assembly includes a battery cover, chassis, main circuit board,
keypad and plastic front housing.
The main circuit board contains the Receiver, Transmitter, Synthesizer and Control
Logic Circuitry which together comprise the dual band tri-mode phone electronics.
The telephones are made of polycarbonate plastic with a metal enclosure. The
display and speaker, as well as the 18-key keypad, transceiver printed-circuit board
(PCB), microphone, charger and headphone connectors, and power button are
contained within the flip form-factor housing. The 750 mAh Lithium Ion (Li Ion)
battery provides up to 178 minutes of talk time in CDMA mode with up to 264 hours
of standby time1.
Features
A840 telephones use advanced, self-contained, sealed, custom integrated circuits to
perform the complex functions required for CDMA communication. Aside from the
space and weight advantage, microcircuits enhance basic reliability, simplify
maintenance, and provide a wide variety of operational functions.
Features available in this family of telephones include:
• 1.3 M-pixel Camera with Integrated Flash
• Multi-Media Messaging (MMS)
• Video clips capture & playback
• Self Portrait Viewfinder External Display
• 64 Polyphonic, 18mm Office Quality Speaker Phone, Stereo Headset Support
• Integrated MP3 Player, MP3 and MIDI Ringers
•
1. All talk and standby times are approximate and depend on network configuration, signal strength, and features selected. Standby
times are quoted as a range from DRX=2 to DRX=9. Talk times are quoted as a range from DTX off to DTX on.
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11
Product Overview
A840
• Picture Caller ID on External & Internal Display
• Digital Camera Features: Photo Album, Slide Show Viewer, 4X Digital Zoom,
Auto timer, Shutter Tones, Adjustable Resolution, Adjustable Lighting Conditions, Exposure Settings, 4 Image Styles.
• Digital Camcorder Features: Adjustable video length for up to 3 minutes,
Recording sound on/off option, Flash light, Adjustable video quality, Adjustable
lighting conditions and exposure settings,
• SD compatible T-Flash Memory Expansion Slot
• Connectivity via Bluetooth™ and CE bus
• Speaker Independent Digit and Name Dialing
• 5-way Navigation, Simultaneous button press for BREW Gaming
• PIM functionality, PC Sync with optional Mobile Phone Tools Software, Predictive Text (iTAP), 500 Multi-fielded Phonebook Entries
• High speed data support (CDMA1X and GPRS).
• TTY compliant
• Hearing Aid Telephone Interconnection System (HATIS) support
• AFLT/aGPS location services2
Simplified Text Entry
iTAP™ predictive text entry. Press a key to generate a character and a dynamic
dictionary uses this to build and display a set of word or name options. The iTAP™
feature may not be available in all languages.
2. Network, subscription or service provider dependent feature. Not available in all areas.
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Level 2 Service Manual
General Operation
General Operation
Controls, Indicators, and Input/Output (I/O) Connectors
The A840 telephones’ controls are on the front and side of the device, and on the
keyboard as shown in Figure 1. Other hardware features are shown in Figure 2.
Left Soft Key
Perform
functions
identified by left
display prompt.
Right Soft Key
Perform
functions
identified by right
display prompt.
Camera Key
CLR Key
Send Key
Make &
answer calls,
view recently
dialed calls list.
Voice
Recognition Key
Press once to
activate speakerindependent
voice recognition.
Press & hold to
record voice
records, contacts,
& shortcut names.
Volume Keys
Adjust earpiece
& ringer volume.
Smart Key
Select menu
items, make &
end calls, set
ring styles.
5-Way
Navigation Key
Scroll through menus
& lists, set feature
values. From home
screen, press K key
in center to access
U-Max. In menus,
press K to select
highlighted item.
Power/End Key
Turn phone
on/off, end
phone calls, exit
menus.
Accessory Port
032407o
Figure 1. Controls and Indicators Locations
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13
General Operation
A840
Headset Jack
Camera Lens
Take photos to send
to others & use
on your phone.
Camera Key
External
Display
Integrated ShortRange Flash
Projected when
taking flash photos.
040183o
Figure 2. Hardware Features Locations
Menu Navigation
A840 telephones have a simple icon based GUI. The phone also features a
user-definable Quick Access menu accessed by holding down the Menu key.
A 5-way navigation key allows you to move easily through menus.
Color Display
The A840 phone features a 176 x 220 pixel, 262K color display. The display provides
constant graphical representations of battery capacity and signal strength, as well
as the real-time clock.
Display animation makes the phone’s icon menu move smoothly as the user scrolls
up and down.
➧
14
Whether a phone displays all indicators depends on the programming and services
to which the user subscribes.
June 09, 2004
6809485A78-O
Level 2 Service Manual
General Operation
Figure 2 shows some common icons displayed on the LCD.
5. Message
4. Roam
3. Signal
Strength
(Oà \ rÑuyÉ
Service Provider
10/15/04
2. Coverage
1. Bluetooth
Connection
7. Ring Alert
032419o
8. AGPS
Service
6:35am
PH.BOOK
RECENT
6. Battery
Level
9. Location
(Oà \ rÑuyÉ
Date
Service Provider
10/15/04
032418o
Clock
Left Soft Key
Label
RECENT
6:35am
PH.BOOK
Right Soft Key
Label
032237o
Figure 3. A840 Display Icon Indicators
Alert Settings
In addition to preset ring tones, A840 telephones allow the user to download
additional ring tones. (Availability is carrier and Network dependant).
Motorola A840 phones incorporate the VibraCall® discreet vibrating alert that
avoids disturbing others when a ringing phone is unacceptable.
Alerts can be set to ring only, vibrate only, vibrate then ring, or no ring or vibrate.
Additionally, the profiling feature allows users to identify incoming calls by a
specific ringer tone.
Battery Function
Battery Charge Indicator
The telephone displays a battery charge indicator icon in the idle screen to indicate
the battery charge level. The gauge shows four levels: 100%, 66%, 33%, and Low
Battery.
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General Operation
A840
Battery Removal
Removing the battery causes the device to shut down immediately and loose any
pending work (partially entered phone book entries or outgoing messages, for
example).
E
All batteries can cause property damage and/or bodily injury such as burns if a
conductive material such as jewelry, keys, or beaded chains touch exposed terminals.
The conductive material may complete an electrical circuit (short circuit) and
become quite hot. Exercise care in handling any charged battery, particularly when
placing it inside a pocket, purse, or other container with metal objects.
G
If the battery is removed while receiving a message, the message is lost.
➧
To ensure proper memory retention, turn the phone OFF before removing the
battery. Immediately replace the old battery with a fresh battery.
Operation
For detailed operating instructions, refer to the appropriate User Guide listed in
the Related Publications section toward the end of this manual.
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Level 2 Service Manual
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A840
6809485A78-O
Theory of Operation
Theory of Operation
MSM6300 System Overview
QCT’s MSM6300 solution, part of QCT’s MSM6xxx Mobile Station Modem (MSM™)
family of chipsets and system. The 6300-series chipset supports cellular-cdma2000,
PCS-cdma2000, gpsone position location, EGSM-900, and DCS-1800 handset operation with direct conversions from RF to baseband using RadioOne Zero-IF architecture. It is optimized to support voice and multimedia data applications while
enabling CDMA2000 1X and GSM GPRS network benefits. The MSM6300 solution
provides a seamless migration path from 2G to 3G services and applications, and
increases voice capacity for CDMA2000 1X networks. It will also enable CDMA
developers to quickly develop 3G CDMA2000 1X handsets that exceed the specifications of mobile stations for worldwide cdmaOne™ and 3G 1xMC systems, including those based on IS-95A/B,IS-2000 and 3GPP 51.010 standards.
The MSM6300 chipset solution consists of the MSM6300 Baseband processor, direct
conversion RFL6000TM and RFR6000TM receive devices, RTR6300TM RF transceiver IC, PM6050TM power management device and a compatible power amplifier
device. These devices perform all of the signal processing and power management
in the subscriber unit.
The MSM6300 chipset and system software features radioOne direct conversion
architecture and incorporates a low-power, high-performance RISC microprocessor
core featuring the ARM926EJ-S™ CPU and Jazelle™ accelerator circuit for advanced Java applications from ARM® Limited. The MSM6100 solution integrates
two, low-power, high-performance QDSP4000™ digital signal processor (DSP)
cores. Use of the ARM926EJ-S™ CPU and QDSP4000 DSP eliminates the need for
the multimedia companion processor(s) normally required for video-based applications, playing MP3 music files and MIDI synthesizer/CMX functions.
The MSM6300 chipset and system software incorporates the advanced feature set
of QCT’s Wireless Internet Launchpad™ suite of technologies, integrated MPEG-4
video decoding/encoding, MP3 audio decoding, a 2D/3D graphics accelerator for
advanced gaming applications, a Compact Media Extension (CMX™)/MIDI synthesizer, a digital camera interface, an enhanced LCD interface, and JPEG encoding/
decoding.
The MSM6300 solution supports QUALCOMM’s gpsOne™ position location technology, including standalone mode in which the handset can act as a GPS receiver.
The gpsOne solution, featuring SnapTrack™ technology, offers robust data availability under the most challenging conditions, whether in concrete-and-steel highrises, convention centers, shopping malls, or urban canyons. Using a hybrid
approach that utilizes signals from both the GPS satellite constellation and from
CDMA cell sites, the gpsOne solution enhances location services availability,
accelerates the location determination process and provides better accuracy for
callers, whether during emergency situations or while using GPS-enabled commercial applications. The MSM6300 solution also supports the Wireless Internet
Launchpad’s VectorOne™ compass capability.
The MSM6300 chipset reduces radio bill-of-materials (BOM) by the introduction of
RadioOne RF devices System BOM is further reduced by supporting interfaces to
next generation memories architectures such as; NAND FLASH, Pseudo SRAM
(PSRAM), Page and Burst mode NOR FLASH and low power SDRAM (LP-SDRAM).
QCT provides a complete software suite, Dual-Mode Subscriber (DMSS) software,
for building handsets around the MSM6300 chipset. DMSS software is designed
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Theory of Operation
A840
to run on a Subscriber Unit Reference (SURF) phone platform, an optional development platform optimized to assist in evaluating, testing and debugging DMSS
software.
The MSM6300 device is offered in a 341-ball, 0.5mm pitch Chip Scale Package (CSP)
production package. Additionally, the MSM6300 solution supports QUALCOMM’s
Binary Run-time Environment for Wireless™ (BREW™) applications development
platform.
The MSM6300 device interfaces directly with QCT’s new radioOne RF ASICs.
radioOne is a revolutionary technology for CDMA transceivers that uses Zero
Intermediate Frequency (ZIF), or direct conversion, architecture for the wireless
handset market. This direct conversion eliminates the need for large IF Surface
Acoustic Wave (SAW) filters and additional IF circuitry, which significantly reduces
the handset BOM parts count, facilitating multiband and multimode handsets that
can be produced in smaller form factors. radioOne technology also incorporates the
frequency synthesis and passive elements used in converting Baseband signals to
and from RF. A single external dualband local oscillator is used for the CDMA and
GSM receiver, which will provide the capabilities needed to operate on systems
around the world and will simplify the procurement of parts and the cost of
designing CDMA/GSM handsets.
Figure 4. Motorola MSM6300 System Block Diagram
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Theory of Operation
PM6050 Device Description
The PM6050 device (Figure 2) integrates all wireless handset power management,
general housekeeping, and user interface support functions into a single mixed
signal IC. Its versatile design is suitable for CDMA and non-CDMA handsets, as
well as other wireless products such as PC cards, modems, PDAs, etc. The power
management portion accepts power from all the most common sources – battery,
external charger, adapter, coin cell back-up – and generates all the regulated
voltages needed to power the appropriate handset electronics. It monitors and
controls the power sources, detecting which sources are applied, verifying that they
are within acceptable operational limits, and coordinates battery and coin cell
recharging while maintaining the handset electronics supply voltages. Eight
programmable output voltages are generated using low dropout voltage regulators,
all derived from a common trimmed voltage reference.
The device’s general housekeeping functions include a 10-bit ADC whose input is
selected by a 10-position analog multiplexer having five internal and five external
connections. The internal connections are used to monitor voltage sources, charging
status, and current flow. The five external connections are available to monitor
system parameters such as temperature, RF output power, and battery ID. Various
oscillator, clock, and counter circuits are provided to initialize and maintain valid
pulse waveforms and measure time intervals for higher-level handset functions. A
dedicated controller manages the TCXO warm-up and signal buffering, and key
parameters (under-voltage lockout and crystal oscillator signal presence) are monitored to protect against detrimental conditions. Handset-level user interfaces are
also supported. The IC includes four backlight or LED drivers with brightness
(current) control that could be used for the keypad, the LCD, and two user definable
general-purpose drivers. Independent vibrator and ringer/buzzer drivers alert
handset users of incoming calls; these independent drivers can be used simultaneously for dual-function applications. A speaker driver with volume control
supports speakerphone and melody-ringer applications. The speaker and ringer/
buzzer drivers share common PM6050 circuitry, so only one can be used at a time.
An MSM device controls and statuses the PM6050 IC using a three-line Serial Bus
Interface (SBI) supplemented by an Interrupt Manager for time-critical information. Another dedicated IC interface circuit monitors multiple trigger events and
controls the power-on sequence. The PM6050 is a mixed signal BiCMOS device and
is available in the 56-pad Bump Chip Carrier (56 BCCP) package that includes a
large center slug for electrical ground and thermal relief. Since the PM6050 IC
includes so many diverse functions, its operation is more easily understood by
considering major functional blocks individually. Therefore, the PM6050 document
set is organized according to the following device functionality:
• Input Power Management
• Output Voltage Regulation
• General Housekeeping
• User Interfaces
• IC Interfaces
Most of the information contained in this Device Specification is organized accordingly – including the circuit groupings within the block diagram (Figure 1-1) and
detailed electrical specifications (Section 4). To begin, introductory descriptions of
all the PM6050 device’s circuits are provided in the following subsections.
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Theory of Operation
A840
Figure 5. PM6050 Block Diagram
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Theory of Operation
RTR00 Overview
The RTR6300 is a RF transceiver IC, an integral component of QUALCOMM’s 6300series chipset. All 6300-series ICs are highly integrated and fulfill specific functions; functional requirements are partitioned between the ICs to yield complete,
optimal multi-band, multi-mode transceiver implementations. Overall transceiver
performance depends on the combined, complementary performance of all the ICs
in the chipset. The RTR6300 IC supports multi-band, multi-mode phones with two
receiver signal paths and four transmitter signal paths.
Receiver paths:
• EGSM-900
• DCS-1800
GSM Transmitter paths:
• EGSM-900 ( using OPLL techniques)
• DCS-1800 ( using OPLL techniques)
CDMA Transmitter paths ( cdma2000, also known as 1x cdma, cdma 1x, or simply
1x):
• Cellular bands
• PCS bands
Figure 6. RTR6300 Functional Block Diagram
Numerous secondary functions are integrated on-chip as well:
June 07, 2004
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Theory of Operation
A840
Phase-locked loop circuits:
• PLL#1 and an on-chip VCO supports cdma2000 TX modes
• PLL#2
Supports EGSM RX & TX, DCS RX &TX, and CDMA2000 RX modes using an
external VCO
Supports gpsone using the RFR6000 on-chip VCO
Transceiver LO generation and distribution circuits
• EGSM-900 RX and TX
• DCS-1800 TX and RX
• Cellular-TX
• PCS- TX
Analog support functions
• Reference signal of the MSM transmit DACs
• Transmit gain control
• Bias control
• Digital Interfaces
• 3 –line serial bus interface ( SBI)
• Dedicated RF_ON ( TX_ON) control line
The device is fabricated using an advanced SiGe BiCMOS process that accommodates high-frequency, high-precision analog circuits as well as low-power CMOS
functions. Designed to operate with 2.7 to 3.0 Volt power supplies, it is compatible
with single-cell Li-Ion batteries.
RTR6300 is available in a small, thermally efficient package (48 BCCP)
RFR6000 Overview
The RFR6000 is an RF-to-Baseband receiver IC, an integral component of QUALCOMM’s radioOne TM Zero-IF chipset. All radioOne ICs are highly integrated and
fulfill specific functions; functional requirements are partitioned between the ICs
to yield complete, optimal transceiver implementations. Overall radioOne performance depends on the combined, complementary performance of all the ICs in the
chipset.
The RFR6000 IC provides the zero-IF receiver signal path, from RF to analog
Baseband, for multi-band, multi-mode handsets including combinations of the
following:
Bands:
• Cellular bands
• PCS bands
• GPS band
Modes:
• AMPS-FM
• CDMA (known as IS-95, cdmaOne, IS-98, cdma2000, 1x EV-DO)
• gpsOne TM
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Theory of Operation
Figure 7. RFR6000 Block Diagram
Numerous secondary functions are integrated on-chip as well: the Rx LO generation
and distribution circuits; the GPS VCO circuit; and various interface, control, and
status circuits. The RFR6000 Zero-IF architecture and highly integrated implementation greatly reduces handset PCB size and material costs compared to earliergeneration RFICs. Major RFR6000 functional blocks are described in this chapter’s
subsections.
The RFR6000 IC accepts as many as three inputs from the handset RF front-end
design (PCS, Cellular, and GPS). The analog Baseband outputs interface with one
of QUALCOMM’s Mobile Station Modem (MSM6XXX) devices that also provide
status and control signaling. Power reduction features controlled by the MSM (such
as selective circuit power-down, gain control, and bias control) extend handset
standby time. Integrated Rx LO circuits, ideally supplemented by the RFT6100
transmitter IC, provide frequency plan flexibility and further reduce PCB parts
count.
The device is fabricated using an advanced SiGe BiCMOS process that accommodates high-frequency, high-precision analog circuits as well as low-power CMOS
functions and is designed to operate with 2.7 to 3.0 volt power supplies. Although
the MSM operates at lower voltages, compatibility is assured and latch-up is
prevented by RFR6000 input and output buffers when its VDDM (pin 23) is
connected to the MSM pad voltage.
The RFR6000 IC is available in the 40-pin bump chip carrier (40 BCCP) package
that includes a large center ground slug for improved RF grounding, mechanical
strength, and thermal continuity.
RFL6000 Overview
The RFL6000 is a dual LNA IC, an integral component of QUALCOMM’s radioOne
Zero-IF chipset. All radioOne ICs are highly integrated and fulfill specific functions;
functional requirements are partitioned between the ICs to yield complete, optimal
transceiver implementations. Overall radioOne performance depends on the combined, complementary performance of all the ICs in the chipset
June 07, 2004
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Theory of Operation
A840
The RFL6000 IC includes two LNA circuits, one optimized for the Cellular band
and one for PCS. The LNAs are separated from all other receive functions contained
within the RFR6000 receiver IC to improve mixer LO to RF isolation – a critical
parameter in the Zero-IF architecture. Isolation is further improved using high
reverse isolation circuits in the LNA designs.
Figure 8. RFL6000 Block Diagram
The RFL6000 is a multi-band multi-mode IC:
Bands:
• Cellular bands
• PCS bands
Modes:
• AMPS-FM
• CDMA (known as IS-95, cdmaOne, IS-98, cdma2000, 1xEVDO)
The two LNAs are dedicated to different frequency bands; the CLNA supports
Cellular bands while the PLNA supports PCS bands. The PLNA gain is always
controlled via the Serial Bus Interface (SBI) with three valid settings: Max, Mid,
and Low. Three CLNA gain states are also controlled via the SBI for CDMA signal
reception, but only two gain states are available for FM operation (Max and Low).
When operating in the Cellular-FM mode, the CLNA gain is controlled by a
dedicated MSM signal applied to pin 6 (FM_STEP) rather than the SBI.
The IC operating mode and LNA bias currents are automatically adjusted via
software to minimize DC power consumption. The IC is placed in Sleep, Rx, and
Rx/Tx modes depending upon the handset’s status, with LNA bias current also
adjusted to meet RF performance requirements with minimal power dissipation
when active.
The device is fabricated using a SiGe BiCMOS process ideally suited for highperformance RF circuits and digital I/O functions. All analog/RF functions operate
off a common supply voltage (VDDA), with the digital I/O circuits operating off a
separate supply (VDDM). VDDM is connected to the MSM_PAD voltage to assure
compatibility across the digital interface and prevent latch-up conditions.
The RFL6000 IC is packaged in a very small 16-pin bump chip carrier (16 BCCP)
that includes a center slug for soldering directly to PCB ground. This provides
excellent RF grounding, mechanical strength, and a solid thermal path.
24
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A840
6809485A78-O
Tools and Test Equipment
Tools and Test Equipment
The following table lists tools and test equipment recommended for disassembly
and reassembly of A840 telephones. Use either the listed items or equivalents.
Table 1. General Test Equipment and Tools
Motorola Part Number1
RSX4043-A
Description
Application
Torque Driver
Used to remove and replace screws
Torque Driver Bit T-6 Plus, Apex 440-6IP
Torx Plus or equivalent
Used with torque driver
See Table 7
Rapid Charger
Used to charge battery and power
phone
0180386A82
Antistatic Mat Kit (includes 66-80387A95
antistatic mat, 66-80334B36 ground
cord, and 42-80385A59 wrist band)
Provides protection from damage to
device caused by electrostatic discharge
(ESD)
6680388B67
Disassembly tool, plastic with flat and
pointed ends (manual opening tool)
Used during assembly/disassembly of
phone
6680388B01
Tweezers, plastic
Used during assembly/disassembly
Digital Multimeter, HP34401A2
Used to measure battery voltage
Flip disassembly tool
Used to disassembly the flip assembly
—
—
6688054N01
1. To order in North America, contact Motorola Aftermarket and Accessories Division (AAD) at (800) 422-4210 or
FAX (800) 622-6210; Internationally, AAD can be reached by calling (847) 538-8023 or by fax (847) 576-3023.
2. Not available from Motorola. To order, contact Hewlett Packard at (800) 452-4844.
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Disassembly
A840
Disassembly
The procedures in this section provide instructions for the disassembly of a A840
telephone. Tools and equipment used for the phone are listed in Table 1, preceding.
28
G
Many of the integrated devices used in this phone are vulnerable to damage from
electrostatic discharge (ESD). Ensure adequate static protection is in place when
handling, shipping, and servicing the internal components of this equipment.
G
Avoid stressing the plastic in any way to avoid damage to either the plastic or
internal components.
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Level 2 Service Manual
Disassembly
Removing the Battery Cover
1.
2.
3.
4.
Ensure the phone is turned off.
Slide the battery cover latch as shown in Figure 9.
Gently lift the top end of the battery cover away from the phone.
Lift the battery cover away from the phone.
1
3
Battery Cover Latch
2
040546o
Figure 9. Removing the Battery Cover
5.
6.
7.
6809485A78-O
To replace, align the battery cover to the phone.
Slide the bottom end of the battery cover into the phone.
Lower the top end of the battery cover onto the phone until battery cover latch
snaps into place.
June 07, 2004
29
Disassembly
A840
Removing and Replacing the RUIM (Removable User Information Memory)
1.
2.
3.
Remove the battery cover as described in the procedures.
Turn the battery cover over and unlock the RUIM latch as shown in Figure 9.
Lift the RUIM out of the battery door.
040548o
Figure 10. Removing the RUIM
4.
5.
6.
7.
30
To replace, place the RUIM into position in the batttey door. Observe the
notched corner when inserting the RUIM.
Slide the RUM latch over the RUIM to secure it.
Turn the batter cover over.
Replace the battery cover as described in the procedures.
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Level 2 Service Manual
Disassembly
Removing and Replacing the Battery
E
All batteries can cause property damage and/or bodily injury such as burns if a
conductive material such as jewelry, keys, or beaded chains touch exposed terminals.
The conductive material may complete an electrical circuit (short circuit) and
become quite hot. Exercise care in handling any charged battery, particularly when
placing it inside a pocket, purse, or other container with metal objects.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Ensure the phone is turned off.
Remove the battery cover as described in the procedures.
Lift the top of the battery near the antenna out of the battery compartment as
shown in Figure 11.
Lift the battery out of the phone.
1
2
040547o
Figure 11. Removing the Battery
5.
6.
7.
6809485A78-O
To replace, align the battery with the battery compartment so the contacts on
the battery match the battery contacts in the phone.
Insert the battery, printed arrow first, into the battery compartment and push
down.
Insert the ridge at the bottom of the housing into the base of the phone, then
push the battery down and snap it into place.
June 07, 2004
31
Disassembly
A840
Removing and Replacing the Antenna
1.
2.
3.
Remove the battery cover, and battery as described in the proceures.
By hand, rotate the antenna base counterclockwise, as indicated by the red
arrows until loose.
When the antenna threads are completely disengaged, slide the antenna out
of the housing. See Figure 12.
1
2
040545o
Figure 12. Removing the Antenna
G
Ensure antenna threads are properly engaged before tightening to prevent damage
to the antenna or housing.
4.
5.
32
To replace, insert the threaded end of the antenna carefully into the housing
and, after ensuring the threads are properly engaged, rotate clockwise. Tighten
firmly by hand.
Replace the battery, and battery cover as desicribed in the procedures.
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Level 2 Service Manual
Disassembly
Removing and Replacing the Keypad Bezel
1.
2.
Remove the battery cover, battery, and antenna, as described in the
procedures.
Turn the phone over and carefully insert the disassembly tool under the keypad
bezel and gently bend the bezel outward from the rear housing to release the
2 snaps on the side of the housing (See Figure 13).
2 snap locations
each side
keypad bezel
040346o
Figure 13. Removing the Keypad Bezel
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
6809485A78-O
Repeat step 2 for the other side of phone.
When all four snaps have been released, carefully lift the keypad bezel away
from the phone.
To replace, align the keypad bezel with the phone housing.
Carefully press the keypad bezel into the phone housing until the snaps engage.
Replace the antenna, battery, and battery cover as described in the procedures.
June 07, 2004
33
Disassembly
A840
Removing and Replacing the Speaker Cover
1.
2.
3.
Remove the battery cover, battery, antenna, and keypad bezel as described in
the procedures.
Insert the disassembly tool under the outer edges of the speaker cover to release
the latches on each side.
Slide the speaker cover toward the antenna to remove.
speaker cover
disassembly tool
040347o
Figure 14. Removing the Speaker Cover
4.
5.
6.
34
To replace, slide the speaker cover onto the phone.
Gently press down on the sides of the speaker cover to engage the latches.
Replace the keypad bezel, antenna, battery, and battery cover as described in
the procedures.
June 07, 2004
6809485A78-O
Level 2 Service Manual
Disassembly
Removing and Replacing the Keyboard Stiffener
1.
2.
Remove the battery cover, battery, antenna, keypad bezel, and speaker cover
as described in the procedures.
Remove the two screws at the bottom of the phone near the polyphonic speaker
(See Figure 15)..
screw location
032216o
Figure 15. Removing the rear housing bottom screws
3.
4.
Lift the bottom end of the keyboard stiffener toward the flip knuckles.
Use the disassembly tool to disconnect the keypad flex connector (See Figure
16).
Keyboard Stiffener
Keyboard Flex Connector
032216o
Figure 16. Removing the Keyboard Flex Connector
6809485A78-O
June 07, 2004
35
Disassembly
A840
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Lift the keyboard stiffener away from the phone.
To replace, align the keyboard stiffener to the transceiver board.
Connect the keyboard flex connector to its socket on the transceiver board.
Lower the keyboard stiffener onto the transceiver board.
Insert and tighten two screws near the polyphonic speaker assembly.
Replace the speaker cover, keypad bezel, antenna, battery, and battery cover
as described in the procedures.
Removing and Replacing the Flip Assembly and Transceiver Board
1.
2.
Remove the battery cover, battery, antenna, keypad bezel, speaker cover, and
keyboard stiffener as described in the procedures.
Use the disassembly tool to disconnect the flip assembly flex connector. (See
Figure 17).
Flip Flex
Connector
disassembly tool
032216o
Figure 17. Removing the Flip Assembly Flex Connector
36
June 07, 2004
6809485A78-O
Level 2 Service Manual
Disassembly
3.
Use the T6 driver to remove the two flip assembly screws. Set the screws aside
for reuse (See Figure 18).
flip assembly
screw locations
032216o
Figure 18. Removing the Flip Assembly Screws
4.
G
6809485A78-O
Carefully separate the flip assembly from the transceiver board and rear
housing assembly.
This product contains static-sensitive devices. Use anti-static handling procedures
to prevent electrostatic discharge (ESD) and component damage.
June 07, 2004
37
Disassembly
A840
5.
Turn the transceiver board and rear assembly over and lift the transceiver
board away from the rear housing..
transceiver board
032216o
Figure 19. Removing the Transceiver Board
6.
To replace, align the transceiver board to the rear housing assembly and lower
it into place on the rear housing.
7. With the flip assembly knuckles in the "flip open" position, align the flip
assembly flex connector to the transceiver board.
8. Connect the flip assembly flex connector to its socket on the transceiver board.
9. Align the flip assembly screw bosses to the screw holes on the transceiver
board.
10. Hold the assembly together and insert the flip assembly screws into the rear
housing assembly and tighten to 1.25 inch-pounds.
11. Replace the keyboard stiffener, speaker cover, keypad bezel, antenna, battery,
and battery cover as described in the procedures.
38
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Level 2 Service Manual
Disassembly
Removing and Replacing the Flip Display Lens
1.
2.
Remove the battery cover, battery, antenna, keypad bezel, speaker cover,
keyboard stiffener, flip assembly, and transceiver board as described in the
procedures.
Insert a small knife blade into the seam between the main lens and the flip
sleeve edge and pry up the main lens edge (see Figure 20).
flip display lens
knife blade
flip assembly
040370o
Figure 20. Removing the Flip Display Lens
3.
4.
5.
6809485A78-O
Insert the flat end of the disassembly tool into the gap created by the knife
blade and separate the display lens from the flip assembly.
To replace, align the display lens to the flip assembly. Expose the display lens
adhesive. Carefully press the display lens into position on the flip assembly.
Replace the transceiver board and flip assembly, keypad stiffener, speaker
cover, keypad bezel, antenna, battery, and battery cover as described in the
procedures.
June 07, 2004
39
Disassembly
A840
Removing and Replacing the Flip Assembly Sleeve
1.
2.
Remove the battery cover, battery, antenna, keypad bezel, speaker cover,
keyboard stiffener, flip assembly, transceiver board, and flip display lens as
described in the procedures.
Grasp the flip assembly and pull firmly as indicated by the red arrows to
remove the flip assembly sleeve (See Figure 21).
flip assembly
flip assembly sleeve
040369o
Figure 21. Removing the Flip Assembly Sleeve.
3.
4.
40
To replace, insert the flip assembly into the flip assembly sleeve and push
firmly until the flip assembly is fully inserted into the flip assembly sleeve.
Replace the flip display lens, transceiver board, flip assembly, keyboard
stiffener, speaker cover, keypad bezel, antenna, battery, and battery cover as
described in the procedures.
June 07, 2004
6809485A78-O
Level 2 Service Manual
Disassembly
Removing and Replacing the Flip Knuckle
1.
G
Remove the battery cover, battery, antenna, keypad bezel, speaker cover,
keyboard stiffener, flip assembly, transceiver board, flip display lens, and flip
assembly sleeve as described in the procedures.
The flexible printed cable (FPC) (flex) is easily damaged. Exercise extreme care when
handling.
2.
3.
Remove the knuckle by removing the hinge assembly side followed by the side
where the flex is routed.
Carefully slide the display flex through the knuckle. Avoid damage to the
display flex (see Figure 22).
040371o
Figure 22. Removing the Knuckle.
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June 07, 2004
41
Disassembly
A840
Removing the Display Bezel
1.
G
Remove the battery cover, battery, antenna, keypad bezel, speaker cover,
keyboard stiffener, flip assembly, transceiver board, flip display lens, flip
assembly, flip assembly sleeve, and flip knuckle as described in the procedures.
The flexible printed cable (FPC) (flex) is easily damaged. Exercise extreme care when
handling.
2.
Use the metal tweezers to release the five latches in the sequence shown (see
Figure 23).
4
bezel latch
3
display bezel
atch
5
2
bezel latch
1
032218o
Figure 23. Removing the Display Bezel
3.
4.
5.
6.
42
To replace, align the connector with it’s socket on the transceiver board.
Gently press the flex connector into position onto the flex connector socket.
Lower the display bezel over the display module. Gently and firmly press the
latches into position. Ensure all the latches are engaged.
Replace the flip knuckle, flip assembly sleeve, flip assembly, flip display lens,
transceiver board, flip assembly, keyboard stiffener, speaker cover, keypad
bezel, antenna, battery, and battery cover as described in the procedures.
June 07, 2004
6809485A78-O
Level 2 Service Manual
Disassembly
Removing the Display Module
1.
2.
3.
Remove the battery cover, battery, antenna, keypad bezel, speaker cover,
keyboard stiffener, flip assembly, transceiver board, flip display lens, flip
assembly, flip assembly sleeve, flip knuckle, and display module as described
in the procedures.
Use the disassembly tool to disconnect the flex connector from the display
module assembly (see Figure 24).
Carefully, lift the display module up and away from the remainder of the flip
assembly.
032233o
Figure 24. Removing the Display Module
4.
5.
6.
6809485A78-O
To replace, seat the display module back into the flip assembly.
Carefully re-connect the flex connector.
Replace the display bezel, flip knuckle, flip assembly sleeve, flip assembly, flip
display lens, transceiver board, flip assembly, keyboard stiffener, speaker
cover, keypad bezel, antenna, battery, and battery cover as described in the
procedures.
June 07, 2004
43
Disassembly
A840
Removing and Replacing the Keypad
1.
2.
Remove the antenna, battery cover, battery, rear housing assembly, flex
connector, and transceiver board assembly as described in the procedures.
Use the plastic tweezers to lift the keypad from the front housing as shown in
Figure 25.
032220o
Figure 25. Removing the Keypad
3.
4.
44
To replace, insert the keypad into the front housing, ensuring the keys align
properly with the openings in the front housing.
Replace the transceiver board, rear housing assembly, antenna, battery, and
battery housing as described in the procedures.
June 07, 2004
6809485A78-O
Level 2 Service Manual
Disassembly
Removing the Motor/Vibrator Assembly
1.
2.
Remove the battery cover, battery, antenna, keypad bezel, speaker cover,
keyboard stiffener, keypad flex, flip flex connector, transceiver board, flip
assembly, flip display lens, flip sleeve, flip display bezel, display module
assembly as described in the procedures.
Use the flat edge of the disassembly tool to remove the motor/vibrator assembly
from the flip housing (see Figure 26).
motor/vibrator assembly
032232o
Figure 26. Removing the Motor/Vibrator Assembly
3.
6809485A78-O
June 07, 2004
45
Disassembly
46
A840
June 07, 2004
6809485A78-O
Level 2 Service Manual
Phone Identification
Phone Identification
Personality Transfer
A personality transfer is required when a phone is express exchanged or when the
main board is replaced. Personality transfers reproduce the customer's original
personalized details such as menu and stored memory such as phone books, or even
just program a unit with basic user information such as language selection.
Identification
Each Motorola CDMA phone is labeled with a variety of identifying numbers.
Figure 27 describes the current identifying labels.
Type approval
information
Mfg by
MOTOROLA INC. FCC ID: IHDT5UV1 EE 3
Transceiver
model
Radio serial no. :
ESN, yr, month of
mfg, warr. code
(Code 39)
D414AF0E8AA
CANADA: 109 182 230A; TYPE:UVKA
832/2412 CHANNEL OPERATION
SWF3001A
H7 25821A2
SN: D414AF0EYAA A56
VY
NAMPS
info. (analog)
Transceiver model
(code 39)
G6 #
Radio SN: ESN+
year, month of
mfg, warranty
code
Factory
designation
APC Code
Board
tracking ID
G6VYY
Week, year, day
& shift, line, cell,
side of
manufacture
020463o
Figure 27. CDMA Telephone Identification Label
6809485A78-O
June 07, 2004
47
Troubleshooting
A840
Troubleshooting
Table 2. Level 1 and 2 Troubleshooting Chart
Symptom
1. Telephone will not turn on or stay on.
2. Telephone exhibits poor reception or
erratic operation such as calls frequently
dropping or weak or distorted audio.
3. Display is erratic, or provides partial or
no display.
Probable Cause
Verification and Remedy
a) Battery either discharged or
defective.
Measure battery voltage across a 50 ohm (>1
Watt) load. If the battery voltage is <3.25 Vdc,
recharge the battery using the appropriate battery
charger. If the battery will not recharge, replace the
battery. If battery is not at fault, proceed to b.
b) Battery connectors open or
misaligned.
Visually inspect the battery connectors on both the
battery and the telephone. Realign and, if
necessary, either replace the battery or refer to a
Level 3 Service Center for the battery connector
replacement. If battery connectors are not at fault,
proceed to c.
c) Transceiver board defective.
Remove the transceiver board. Substitute a known
good transceiver board and temporarily
reassemble the unit. Press the PWR button; if unit
turns on and stays on, disconnect the dc power
source and reassemble the telephone with the
new transceiver board. Verify that the fault has
been cleared. If the fault has not been cleared then
proceed to d.
d) keyboard assembly failure.
Replace the keyboard assembly. Temporarily
connect a +3.6 Vdc supply to the battery
connectors. Depress the PWR button. If unit turns
on and stays on, disconnect the dc power source
and reassemble with the new keyboard assembly.
a) Antenna assembly defective.
Check to make sure that the antenna pin is
properly connected to the transceiver board
assembly. If connected properly, substitute a
known good antenna. If the fault is still present,
proceed to b.
b) Transceiver board defective.
Replace the transceiver board (refer to 1c). Verify
that the fault has been cleared and reassemble the
unit with the new transceiver board.
a) Connections to or from
transceiver board defective.
Check general condition of flex and flex connector.
If the flex and connector are good, check that the
flex connector is fully connected. If not, check
connector to transceiver board connections. If
faulty connector, replace the transceiver board. If
connector is not at fault, proceed to b.
b) Flip assembly defective.
Temporarily replace the flip assembly with a known
good assembly. If fault has been cleared,
reassemble with the new flip assembly. If fault not
cleared, proceed to c.
c) Transceiver board assembly
defective.
Replace the transceiver board (refer to 1c). Verify
that the fault has been cleared and reassemble the
unit with the new transceiver board.
4. Incoming call alert transducer audio
distorted or volume is too low.
Replace the transceiver board (refer to 1c). Verify
Faulty transceiver board assembly. that the fault has been cleared and reassemble the
unit with the new transceiver board.
5. Telephone transmit audio is weak.
(usually indicated by called parties
complaining of difficulty in hearing voice).
a) Microphone connections to the
transceiver board assembly
defective.
48
June 07, 2004
Gain access to the microphone as described in the
procedures. Check connections. If connector is
faulty proceed to c; if the connector is not at fault,
proceed to b.
6809485A78-O
Level 2 Service Manual
Troubleshooting
Table 2. Level 1 and 2 Troubleshooting Chart (Continued)
Symptom
Probable Cause
b) Microphone defective.
Gain access to microphone. Disconnect and
substitute a known good microphone. Place a
call and verify improvement in transmit signal as
heard by called party. If good, reassemble with
new microphone. If microphone is not at fault,
reinstall original microphone and proceed to c.
c) Transceiver board assembly
defective.
Replace the transceiver board assembly (refer to
1c). Verify that the fault has been cleared and
reassemble the unit with the new transceiver board
assembly.
6. Receive audio from earpiece speaker is a) Connections to or from
transceiver board assembly
weak or distorted.
defective.
7. Phone does not sense when flip is
opened or closed (usually indicated by
inability to answer incoming calls by
opening the flip, or inability to make
outgoing calls).
8. Vibrator feature not functioning.
9. Internal Charger not working.
Verification and Remedy
Gain access to the transceiver board assembly as
described in the procedures. Check flex and the
flex connector from the flip assembly to the
transceiver board assembly. If flex is at fault,
replace flip assembly. If flex connector is at fault,
proceed to d. If connection is not at fault, proceed
to b.
b) Flip assembly defective.
Temporarily replace the flip assembly with a known
good assembly. If fault has been cleared,
reassemble with the new flip assembly. If fault not
cleared, proceed to c.
c) Antenna assembly defective.
Check to make sure the antenna is installed
correctly. If the antenna is installed correctly,
substitute a known good antenna assembly. If this
does not clear the fault, reinstall the original
antenna assembly and proceed to d.
d) Transceiver board assembly
defective.
Replace the transceiver board assembly (refer to
1c). Verify that the fault has been cleared and
reassemble with the new transceiver board
assembly.
a) Flip assembly defective.
Temporarily replace the flip assembly with a known
good assembly. If fault has been cleared,
reassemble with the new flip assembly. If fault not
cleared, proceed to b.
b) Transceiver board assembly
defective.
Replace the transceiver board assembly (refer to
1c). Verify that the fault has been cleared and
reassemble the unit with the new transceiver board
assembly.
Transceiver board assembly
defective.
Replace the transceiver board assembly (refer to
1c). Verify that the fault has been cleared and
reassemble the unit with the new transceiver board
assembly.
Faulty charger circuit on
transceiver board assembly.
Test a selection of batteries in the rear pocket of
the desktop charger. Check LED display for the
charging indications. If these are charging
properly, then the internal charger is at fault.
Replace the transceiver board assembly (refer to
1c). Verify that the fault has been cleared and
reassemble the unit with the new transceiver board
assembly.
Ensure the headset plug is fully seated in the jack
11. No or weak audio when using headset. a) Headset not fully pushed home. socket. If fault not cleared, proceed to b.
Replace the transceiver board assembly (refer to
b) Faulty jack socket on transceiver 1c). Verify that the fault has been cleared and
board assembly.
reassemble the unit with the new transceiver board
assembly.
6809485A78-O
June 07, 2004
49
Troubleshooting
A840
Programming: Software Upgrade and Flexing
Contact your local technical support engineer for information about equipment and
procedures for flashing and flexing.
Related Publications
Motorola A840 CDMA User Guide, English/Spanish 6809482A51 (SJJN6405A)
50
June 07, 2004
6809485A78-O
Level 2 Service Manual
Troubleshooting
Exploded View Diagram
1
3
2
4
5
6
7
8
10
9
11
13
12
14
16
15
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
Figure 28. Exploded View
6809485A78-O
June 07, 2004
51
Troubleshooting
A840
Exploded View Parts List
Table 3. Exploded View Parts List
Item
Number
Motorola Part
Number
1
1389819N03
camera bezel
2
6189691N02
CLI lens
3
7589314N02
flip stop grommet
4
1589315N04
knuckles
5
1589875N04
Barrel cover
6
0789724N01
Magnesium frame
7
5587736N01
Hinge assembly
8
3289412N02
CLI display gasket
9
1589700N04
Flip sleeve assembly
10
8489850N02
Camera assy
11
5989943N01
Vibrator motor assy
12
7289424N01
Display module
13
6189690N05
Main lens
14
8489450N02
Hinge flex
15
8490009N01
Speaker assy
16
3289413N04
Main display gasket
17
0789918N02
Display bezel
18
5402393T02
Label
19
1589331N02
Keypad bezel assy
20
0187521Y03
21
E
52
Description
keyboard assembly
transceiver PC Board Assy
22
0789414N02
23
8587488Y01
Rear endo assy
Antenna
24
0389469N02
Screw, stiffener
25
0387791L01
Screw, knuckle
26
1589318N03
Speaker cover
27
SNN5695A
SNN5615
battery 720 mAh
battery 1140 mAh
28
1589333N04
battery cover
There is a danger of explosion if the Lithium Ion battery pack is replaced incorrectly.
Replace only with the same type of battery or equivalent as recommended by the
battery manufacturer. Dispose of used batteries according to the manufacturer’s
instructions.
June 07, 2004
6809485A78-O
Level 2 Service Manual
Troubleshooting
Accessories
Table 4. Accessories
Description
Power Solutions
Battery Slim LiIon (720mAh)
Battery High Performance (1440mAh)
Travel Charger Linear U.S.
Travel Charger Mid Rate U.S. New ID
Travel Charger Rapid U.S. (non-leakage)
In-Vehicle Solutions
Bluetooth Car Kit
Self Install HF Retractable (Razorbill)
Professional Install Car Kit (Junction Box Only)
HUC for PCC
Low Tier VPA Mid rate
VPA Verizon Exclusive Rapid
Vehicle Power Adapter, New ID Rapid
Audio & Connectivity
Paladin Bluetooth Headset
Caller ID Bluetooth Headset
Quadrant Bluetooth Speaker
Qwerty Bluetooth Keyboard
Platform Stereo Headset
FM Stereo Headset
Retractable Headset (new customizable)
One Touch Headset (new customizable)
Mono Headset Black
Mono Headset Silver
Mono Headset (new customizable)
Over the Ear Headset
Neck Loop headset
T-Flash Card 16 meg
T-Flash Card 32 Meg
T-Flash Card 64 meg
T-Flash card 128 meg
T-Flash Card (32 Meg) and T-Flash to SD Adaptor in Jewel Case
T-Flash to SD adaptor
USB 2.0 Card Reader
Mobile Phone Tools Phase II - USB
Mobile Phone Tools Phase II - CD ROM
Consumer Personalization
Carry Cases
Lanyard
Holster
Belt Clip
6809485A78-O
June 07, 2004
Part Number
TBD
SNN5615A
SPN4992
SPN5037
SPN5049
S9642
SYN0613
S9950
TBD
SYN9901
SYN0707
SYN9826A
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
SYN8609
SYN9050
SYN9351
SYN8390B
AAYN4264A
SYN9350
SYN8908
SYN7875
SYN0940
SYN0941
SYN0942
SYN0943
SYN0941A
SYN0893A
SYN1045A
S9752B
SVN4776B
TBD
SYN9490A
TBD
SYN8763
53
Troubleshooting
54
A840
June 07, 2004
6809485A78-O
Level 2 Service Manual
2
Index
A840
6809485A78-O
A
Index
removing 33
keypad, removing and replacing 44
alert settings 15
antenna, removing and replacing 32
M
B
menu structure 15
motor/vibrator Assembly, removing and replacing 45
battery
charge indicator 15
function 15
removing 31
battery cover, removing and replacing 29
N
names
product 5
C
Canadian Interference-Causing Equipment regulations 5
copyrights
computer software 6
D
disassembly 28
display bezel
removing 42
display module, removing and replacing 43
O
operation 13
alert settings 15
battery 15
controls, indicators, and I/O connectors 13
icons 15
menu navigation 14
menu structure 15
overview, product 11
P
E
exploded view diagram 51
exploded view parts list 52
F
FCC rules 5
features
text entry 12
Flip Assembly and Transceiver Board, removing and
replacing 36
flip assembly sleeve, removing and replacing 40
flip display lens, removing and replacing 39
flip knuckle, removing and replacing 41
I
identification 47
product 5
Introduction 5
K
keyboard stiffener, removing and replacing 35
keypad
removing 44
keypad bezel
6809485A78-O
parts
exploded view diagram 51
exploded view parts list 52
product
identification 5
names 5
product overview 11
features 11
publications, related 50
R
regulatory agency compliance 5
related publications 50
removing
antenna 32
battery 16, 31
battery cover 29
display bezel 42
display module 43
Flip Assembly and Transceiver Board 36
flip assembly sleeve 40
flip display lens 39
flip knuckle 41
keyboard stiffener 35
keypad 44
keypad bezel 33
June 04, 2004
Index-1
Index
A840
motor/vibrator 45
speaker cover 34
replacement parts
ordering 8
replacing
antenna 32
battery 31
battery cover 29
display bezel 42
display module 43
Flip Assembly and Transceiver Board 36
flip assembly sleeve 40
flip display lens 39
flip knuckle 41
keyboard stiffener 35
keypad 44
keypad bezel 33
motor/vibrator assembly 45
speaker cover 34
S
service manual
about 6
audience 6
conventions 7
scope 6
service policy 7
customer support 7
out of box failure 7
product support 7
shut down
upon battery removal 16
SIM card
personality transfer 47
speaker cover, removing and replacing 34
specifications 9
support
customer 7
product 7
T
text entry 12
tools and test equipment 27
W
warranty service 7
Index-2
June 04, 2004
6809485A78-O
MOTOROLA, the Stylized M Logo, and all other trademarks indicated as such herein are trademarks of Motorola, Inc.
® Reg. U.S. Pat. & Tm. Off.
© 2004 Motorola, Inc.
All rights reserved.
Personal Communications Sector,
Sawgrass International Concourse
789 International Parkway
Sunrise, FL 33325-6220
@6809485A75@
6809485A78-O