VTech Write & Learn Notepad Specifications

Electronics
Reuse and Recycling
Manual
prepared for Goodwill of Southwest Florida
and applicable for use by non-profit
institutions throughout Florida
December 14, 2002
produced with funding from the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection Innovative Recycling Grant Program
Prepared by Charlotte County Government
with technical assistance from
Resource Management Group, Inc. (Sarasota, FL)
Printed on recycled paper with a minimum 30% post-consumer content
Table of Contents
Chapter 1.0 Overview and Position Descriptions
1.1
Collections
1.2
Processing
1.3
Recycling
1.4
Retail
1.5
Management
Chapter 2.0 Collections
2.1
Documents
2.2
Acceptance Point
2.3
Store to Store
2.4
Contracted Pickups
2.5
Collection Events
Chapter 3.0 Processing
3.1
Documents
3.2
Work Areas
3.3
Sorting
3.4
Testing
3.5
Inventory
3.6
Preparation for Resale
Chapter 4.0 Recycling
4.1
Documents
4.2
Palletizing Equipment
4.3
Vendor Pickup
Chapter 5.0 Retail
5.1
Documents
5.2
Displays
5.3
Pricing
5.4
Setup
5.5
Purchase
Chapter 6.0 Safety Equipment & Precautions
6.1
Safety Tools
6.2
MSDS – Material Safety Data Sheet
6.3
Hazardous Materials Handling
6.4
Fire Extinguishers
Supporting Documents
1.0 Overview & Position Descriptions
This manual is both an overview of the Goodwill Electronics Recycling Program as
implemented in the Charlotte County Electronics Reuse and Recycling Innovative Grant
project, and a procedural guide for the training of equipment triage and processing.
It is intended to be used to train new processing employees, but it also includes
descriptions for collection and retail positions and responsibilities. It is general enough to
be a useful management reference and specific enough to be used as a guide for setting
up new programs.
The electronics recycling program can be divided into four parts, as depicted in the
diagram “Program Overview” below.
Collections, Processing, Recycling and Retail.
1.1
Collections
Donations are collected from households, businesses, and institutions. Equipment
donations are commonly dropped off at a Goodwill stores, but may be collected from
either regular or special events. Special pickups from a business or institution location
may be arranged by calling the program manager. A fee is typically assessed for special
pickups.
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Positions:
Attendant
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Responsible for donation collection & customer relations.
Works at the donation trailer or store receiving area, depending on
location.
Completes donation slips, accepts recycling fee or hands out the recycling
fee donation flyer.
Moves the equipment inside for tech to sort and accept the slip.
Driver
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1.2
Drives the truck to pick up equipment from businesses, institutions,
special collection events, and other Goodwill stores.
When at Businesses or Institutions hands out the recycling fee donation
flyer, fills out Donation Slip.
Processing
Processing includes sorting, triage, testing and repair.
Positions:
Sorter
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Separate computer equipment from TVs.
Sort computers into complete systems as best as possible.
Deliver electronics to staging area for diagnostic work by a technician.
May perform certain diagnostics, depending on skill and program need.
Technician
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Responsible for any testing, repair or disassembly of equipment.
Enters incoming equipment information into the Data Record Sheet.
Coordinates the palletizing of all equipment destined for recycling and fills
out the Pallet Sheet.
When processing volume is low, these positions may be filled by one person.
1.3
Recycling
Donations that cannot be resold or traded must be properly recycled.
Positions:
There is no recycling position.
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The processing technician is responsible for recording and palletizing all
equipment destined for recycling. The sorter may assist with staging
palletized equipment for collection by the recycling vendor.
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1.4
Retail
The economic success of the program depends on the resale of computers and
televisions.
Positions:
Computer Retail Staff
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Maintains computer system display area.
Provides customer support.
Answers questions and promotes sales.
Television Retail Staff
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Maintains television display area.
Provides customer support.
Keeps video feed running to provide great aesthetic.
All retail employees should be crossed trained for each position to back each other up.
1.5
Management
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Program level management
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Store level management
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Processing leader
o Responsible for implementing overall program strategy, maintaining program
quality and sustainability, and acting as liaison to the community – including
the management of any special collection arrangements (e.g. community
recycling events).
o Supervisor of the retail, collections and processing staff.
o Ensures material needs of the program and good working conditions.
Arranges for recycling collection.
o Arranges for special pickups.
o A technician with process management responsibilities such as record
keeping, quality control and personnel management. In small operations
this may be performed by a technician with oversight by store level
management.
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2.0 Collections
Donations are usually collected 3 ways: store collection, contracted pickups, special event
collection. Collection attendants have two important program responsibilities: customer
relations and fee collection. Attendants must be trained to treat donors with respect and
offer clear options for proper handling of their used electronics.
2.1
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Documents
Donation Slip
Household Brochure
Institutional Brochure
Mail-Back Flyer
Certificate of Reuse, Recycling or Destruction
Donor Survey
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2.2
Acceptance Point (could be trailer, store dock, etc.)
At the trailer or loading dock, the attendant accepts equipment donations and
completes the Donation Slip with help from the donor.
All monitor or TV donations must be accompanied by a $5 processing fee. All
donors are offered Household or Institutional Brochures explaining the program and the
fee. For those who won’t pay the fee, they are allowed to leave the monitors or TVs, if
they accept a Mail-Back Flyer that may later be returned by mail with the fee.
Finally, the attendant delivers the donated equipment to a receiving bin in the
processing area and passes the completed Donation Slip to the sorter or processing
technician.
Special deliveries from county, business or other institutions may require that a
Certificate of Reuse, Recycling or Destruction be delivered by the program as a legal
guarantee of proper disposal.
2.3
Store to Store
The Goodwill store driver making regular rounds between the stores will check for
computer donations before leaving each store. On a space available basis, the driver will
bring the donated equipment to the processing facility at the program store.
When necessary, the electronics program driver (who may be the same driver as
above) may be asked to make special store transfers. For example, a high volume
donation at one of the stores may be redirected to the processing store.
2.4
Contracted Pickups
Some donors (especially business donors) will not deliver equipment to the store
and so collection services can be offered. Collection programs tend to increase the
quantity and quality of donations. A donor pays a fee to make arrangements for a
program driver to go to their site to pick up donated equipment. The fee should be large
enough to cover all costs of the pick up, plus item fees such as monitor charges. A good
place to start is a $40 minimum flat fee, with incremental costs for large quantities
collected or large distances traveled.
2.5
Collection Events
Periodically, perhaps every three or four months, well-advertised special collection
events may be held in different parts of the county. This way, used equipment donors
from different areas will occasionally have a more convenient way to donate their used
equipment compared with drop-off. Event locations should be highly visible and easy for
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residents and businesses to visit. Events may be held in conjunction with county
organized events.
Advertising should include press releases to generate articles of interest to the
community, small ads in local papers, magazines and community newsletters, and phone
calls or mailings to businesses and other institutions. Also consider public service
announcements on radio and television. The demographics and habits of the community
should be taken into account when planning such events.
A collection should have at least one large trailer or other storage unit on site.
There should be two attendants on site to assist donors and handle the electronics. As a
suggestion to help report information to the State, Attendant can ask donors to complete
a Donor Survey form. The survey helps with assessing the impact of the collection and
may provide information valuable for setting up future collection events. Typically, copies
of the survey are required to be mailed to the state following the collection event.
Collection events are used to increase donations of electronics from under-serviced
areas of the county. These events are held in areas that are more convenient than
donating at an established retail store location.
Keys to a successful event:
1. Thorough preparation and planning.
2. Convenient and highly visible location.
3. Varied and timely advertising placed before and up to the day of the event.
4. Adequate storage and staff.
5. Surveys for feedback valuable for planning future events.
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3.0 Processing
The processing of electronics equipment is the most complex and labor intensive part of
the program. However, it represents the value-added element which allows the program
operator to capture value from donated equipment.
Figure 3.0 Processing includes sorting, triage, testing and repair.
3.1
Documents
Data Record Sheet
Donation Slip
Key to Data Record Sheet
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3.2
Work Areas
Figure 3.1 Work areas along the warehouse wall at the Englewood Goodwill.
Work Area Layout
Figure 3.1 depicts the floor configuration for processing work at the Goodwill store in
Englewood. This layout is based on the real world constraints of setting up operations
in a retail store. The elongated shape of the work area allows for easy equipment
movement past the electronics processing area to other operations along the back
wall.
The work area layout includes three main areas:
1. Processing
2. Inventory
3. Recycling Pallet Storage
Activities performed in each area are described below.
1. Processing
Equipment List:
¾ Standard electronics toolkit for testing, repair, disassembly.
¾ Compressed air (canned or compressor driven) for cleaning dust, etc.
¾ Testing PC system with CDROM, modem & printer.
¾ Internet connection for downloading software.
¾ File cabinet for documents and small tools.
This area consists of large bins for temporary holding of electronics equipment and
low shelves used as a testing bench and for storage of parts and tools commonly
used for testing, repair and disassembly. This area also includes a desk and file
cabinet for office work.
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Holding bin at front of processing area at the Englewood facility.
a. Incoming Holding Bins
All electronics equipment and computers coming into Goodwill must be
placed in holding bins at the front of the processing area. The attendant or
sorter deliver items to this spot either from the loading dock or from the
collection area near the front of the store. At this station donations are
examined and data for each entered into the Data Record Sheet.
Testing area with CPU box opened for testing.
b. Testing Benches
This is where tests are performed on incoming monitors, TVs, and CPUs.
The workspace here is also where system upgrades and repairs are done.
Systems are delivered here by the sorter or attendant, processed by the
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technician, and then sent to the pallets for shipping to a recycler, to the
retail area for sale, or to inventory to await sale.
2. Inventory
Equipment List:
¾ Pen and pad of lined paper for written inventory records.
¾ Masking tape for labeling.
¾ Indelible marker for labeling.
This area consists of shelving and storage space for parts that are to be used later
for completing or repairing systems. Complete systems ready for sale may be
stored here temporarily while waiting for retail space to become available. Label
each section of shelf indicating the type of equipment stored there. Always keep
the shelves neat, and keep clear of anything except the designated equipment.
Inventory shelves full of equipment.
3. Recycling
Equipment List:
¾ Pallet truck for moving pallets.
¾ Pen and pad of lined paper for creating handwritten pallet sheets.
¾ Plastic shrink-wrap for wrapping around stacks of palletized equipment.
¾ Wrapping tool for controlling tubes of wrapping material during wrapping.
This area is primarily for holding pallets of equipment that will eventually be sent to
outside recycling facilities. If there is room, this area may be used for storing extra
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bins of equipment when there has been an unusually large donation and equipment
processing is unable to keep up.
Recycling area at the rear of the Englewood processing facility.
3.2
Sorting
Most equipment is going to come into the facility via the receiving dock door on an
individual basis. As it does so, each new piece of equipment will be placed by the
collections attendant into a black receiving bin labeled ‘computer equipment only’. The
sorter receives a Donation Slip along with the equipment in the bin. The slip is then taped
to the equipment for the technician to read at processing time.
Care and concern should be exercised at all times when handling electronics
equipment. Mishandling during the sorting process is a common cause of damage to
donated equipment.
The sorting process divides incoming parts into simple initial categories.
The sorter first separates televisions from all other computer equipment.
Televisions are then separated into these categories:
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Small televisions (less than 19”)
Large televisions (19” or greater)
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The sorter moves televisions from the receiving bin delivered by the attendant to
processing holding bins for TVs only, putting large TVs and small TVs into separate bins.
Computer equipment is often brought in as a set of items together making up a
computer system. Systems consist of at least a CPU box, monitor, keyboard and mouse,
but may include peripherals such as printers, scanners, external drives, etc. The
technician may identify missing items from a complete system and take parts from
inventory to make them complete. System components should be kept together, along
with whatever software and manuals may come with them. Ideally, the sorter delivers
complete systems directly to the technician’s workbench for triage and testing.
If equipment arrives in separate units (without a CPU box, or at least no
compatible CPU box) then they are separated into these categories:
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Monitors = MT
Large Peripherals = LP
o Printer, scanner, external drive, fax, copier, etc.
Small Peripherals = SP
o Mice, keyboard, cable, speaker, microphone, joystick, etc.
The sorter moves monitors and large peripherals from the attendant’s receiving bin
to holding bins designed for each category. Small peripherals may be put into boxes
instead for easier handling.
Record Of Received Items
A Data Record Sheet (DRS) is kept of all equipment arriving at the processing facility. The
DRS was developed to manage information for reporting to the project’s funding
organization. Some data may not be required for managing an ongoing self-funded
operation.
Columns:
Logged By
Date In
Source
Category
Brand
Description
Age
Condition
Status
Tracking
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Initials of technician filling out the Data Record Sheet.
Date item arrived at the processing facility.
Private donation, institutional delivery or special collection.
General equipment type: Monitor, CPU, large peripheral, etc.
Name of manufacturer: Dell, Sony, HP, etc.
Specific type of equipment: P100, MS3, KB, FX, CP, ETC.
Only if TV or monitor: estimated age in years.
Resell 'as is', repair and resell, or recycle.
W = working, NW = nonworking
Retail Tracking # (MMDDYYA) or
Pallet # (e.g. 2D) written on item and on retail sign.
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For allowed column values, see Key to Data Record Sheet.
3.3
Triage
Triage is decision making determined by internal or non-obvious information about
the piece of equipment. An item is determined to be in one of three conditions:
1) resell ‘as is’
2) repair and resell
3) recycle
The technician is responsible for triage and the following procedures.
3.31 CPU Triage
First determine if it is a PC or Mac. The following are examples of PC brands:
IBM, Dell, Gateway, Compaq, Hewlett Packard,
NEC, Acer, Packard Bell, Sony
If the system is called an Apple, PowerMac, iMac or something similar,
or has a logo graphics similar to the one at the right then it is an Apple
system. If it is an Apple system, it should be targeted for recycling
and palletized.
If the system is a PC continue with CPU triage.
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Figure 3.2
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To test a PC box, first give the equipment a visual inspection.
o See if it has any 5.25” drives in it. If yes, the machine is too old. Target
the whole thing for recycling.
o Look for any damage to the outside case that might interfere or cause
problems with normal operations of the machine.
o If it fails visual inspection, there may still be valuable parts (i.e. hard
drive, CDROM, or sound, video, or network cards, RAM chips) that may
be removed and put into inventory.
Next, connect all the major components (keyboard, mouse and monitor) to the
CPU box.
Push the power button to power up the PC. The first screen should show the
chip type and speed.
If a donated computer has at least a Pentium class processor of any speed,
move on to the Boot Check test.
If the system has less than a Pentium processor, look for valuable parts and
remove them for inventory if there are any.
3.32 Monitor Triage
Monitors are the most potentially hazardous of all equipment – the screen has a
large amount of lead and parts of the monitor may still hold a strong residual charge. If a
monitor is broken open in any way, put it into a plastic bag, record its arrival and
condition the Data Record Sheet and recycle it right away. Even if it seems to be in good
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condition, great care must be exercised when handling it. Do not drop it! Monitors are
never disassembled.
When deciding to keep or recycle a monitor several factors come into play. They
can take the form of questions such as the following:
Is the monitor too old to even bother testing it? A monitor outlives its useful life after
about 7-8 years.
• Look on the back of the monitor case for the date it was manufactured.
• If it is older than 7-8 years then it should be targeted for recycling.
• If it is not that old, and, it appears to be working, consider it a candidate for resale
and put it into inventory, possibly to be included with a complete system.
Do you have an overabundance of this type of monitor?
• If the answer to this question is yes, then consider targeting it for recycling. If the
answer is no then put it into inventory for several weeks, maybe even a month, to
see if you are able to add it to a system that has a bad monitor when it comes into
the facility.
• Overabundant or non-working monitors could be disposed of via third party parts
dealers. They will often accept monitors not working, as they will use its parts or
attempt to repair it.
3.33 Large Peripheral Triage
Printer
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If it is a dot matrix printer, recycle it.
Printer or
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Scanner
If it has no cables, check for the proper cable in inventory. If none, recycle.
If donated as part of a system, see if you have proper drivers already.
If not, and an install disk is with it, you may need to install the software from
the disk.
ƒ If it is donated alone and there is no software with it, look for drivers online.
ƒ No drivers available? Recycle.
FAX, Copier, or UPS (Uninterrupted Power Supply)
ƒ If it has no power cable, check for the correct ones in inventory and recycle it
if none are found.
3.34 Small Peripheral Triage
For small peripherals, there is no triage, only simple testing. See ‘Small Peripheral
Testing’ below in section 3.4.
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3.35 Television Triage
There are several visual checks used to determine whether to recycle a television or
not. Store policy determines these criteria and may vary. The technician will not have to
turn on the television to decide.
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3.4
If
If
If
If
the TV is less than 14”, it is too small to sell enough money. Recycle it.
the TV does not have a digital tuner, recycle it.
the TV has no coaxial cable connection in the back, recycle it.
it is not cleanable or has significant exterior damage, recycle it
Testing
Testing determines if a system is ready for retail, needs repair, disassembly, or
ultimately needs recycling.
It is assumed that the technician has sufficient prior training and certification, or is
trained by a certified lead or senior certified technician. Training should include becoming
familiar with the terms and basic procedures described herein. This guide will serve to
remind/refresh the technician of their training and hands on experience. Some of the
procedures described here will not make sense to someone without initial technical
training.
The technician is responsible for the following procedures.
3.41 CPU Testing
Testing the central processing unit (CPU) can be lengthy and involved. Attention
must be paid to many details, including the management of diagnostic time. The
technician must be aware of time spent on a unit to keep focus on systems that may be
repaired most easily. Of course, safety is always of main concern and caution must be
exercised when working on any computer equipment. In general, a technician should
spend a maximum of 30 minutes per system on these tasks. After a certain point, there
will be more labor put into a system than can be recouped by its resale.
Testing includes three steps:
• Step 1: Boot Test
• Step 2: Data Destruction & Operating System Reinstall
• Step 3: Minimum Specification Check & Hardware Reinstall
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If the technician determines the CPU is not functional or repair will be too time
consuming, the CPU should be disassembled, saving usable parts to inventory, and
recycled.
Step 1 – Boot Test
CPU testing begins with turning on the system and checking its boot sequence.
Sometimes a computer will not properly boot up to the desktop. One of the first things to
do if the operating system doesn’t load properly is to go into the Bios screen (by pressing
F8 when prompted during the boot sequence) and reset the Bios and CMOS to their
default settings. This will often work to solve the basic boot problem.
If this does not work you might have to open up the computer and first check if
everything is connected properly and/or anything is missing. If everything checks OK try
using a boot disc start the computer. If you think you know the operating system type,
use boot disc for that OS, or if not you can use a DOS boot disc.
Figure 3.3
a) Listen for a single beep almost immediately after the machine is powered on. This
indicates that the POST test is starting.
b) If there is no beep, RAM is probably missing or damaged. Install/replace RAM from
inventory. Make sure you use the same type of RAM to replace defective RAM; i.e.,
SIMMS must be used in pairs, DIMMS can be installed singularly. Reboot.
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c) You can watch the progression of the POST test as it will display the size of RAM in
the machine. The total amount of RAM that is active and properly working will
display for a second or two until the screen clears.
d) Now open the computer and view the RAM directly to see if the displayed amount
and the physical amounts match. Again, make sure you use the same type of RAM
to replace defective RAM and reboot.
e) Next, the PC will begin to boot into its operating system. You may receive one of
several possible drive controller errors when the OS tries to detect the different
hard drives connected the mother board. If so, reboot with a DOS boot disk and
load correct drivers for the problem hard drive.
f) If the boot sequence beeps properly, indicates no driver errors, yet still does not
bring up the desktop there is probably a serious motherboard problem.
Disassemble the CPU box, saving any good parts to inventory, and recycle the rest
of the CPU.
Step 2 - Data Destruction & Operating System Reinstall
Figure 3.4
For privacy and security reasons, it is program policy to reformat every system
hard drive in order to completely erase any pre-existing files and data.
All operating systems need a license to run. Since reformatting the system
drive removes license information along with all other files, the information must be
retrieved first before a reformat occurs.
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SANDRA is software used for obtaining licensing data from a Windows operating
system. It can be downloaded at www.sisoftware.demon.co.uk.
After retrieving license information, the hard drive can then be reformatted and
the original OS reinstalled using the same retrieved license number.
Do the following to destroy drive data and restore the licensed OS
1) Install SANDRA application according to instructions at the download site.
Run SANDRA to get a product key code and then write it down. If there is
no code (this would be very rare) then swap out the drive and repeat
SANDRA code extraction.
2) Reformat the hard drive and reinstall exactly the same OS based on
extracted key code.
3) After OS reinstall, run Scandisk.exe under Start, Run. Then run the Disk
Defragmenter under Start, Programs, Accessories, System Tools.
Step 3 - Minimum Specification Check & Hardware Reinstall
In order to meet minimum customer needs, every retail system must meet the
following minimum specifications:
System hard drive: 1 GB
RAM:
32 MB
CDROM:
Any speed.
Modem:
26 kbps
Monitor:
>=14” color SVGA
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Figure 3.5
The technician proceeds as follows:
a) Look for each part of the system specification.
b) If the part exists, check to see if it meets the minimum specification. Test the
part to be sure it works.
c) If it fails to meet the minimum spec, remove it, take one from inventory that
meets the spec and install it.
d) If the part is missing, take one from inventory that meets the spec and install it.
e) Test any replacement parts before continuing.
f) After the system meets all specifications, it is ready for retail.
4.42 Monitor Testing
Plug the monitor into the test PC system. Boot the machine. Use the monitor controls
or to properly center and resize the desktop. If it displays the workspace of the
operating system properly then it probably is a good working monitor. If any of the
resolution/size controls are NOT working properly target the monitor for recycling and
palletize it.
3.43 Large Peripheral Testing
Printer
• Connect to the test computer system with cables, run Add/Remove Hardware
from the Windows Control Panel and see if you have proper drivers.
• If not, install drivers and turn on printer.
• Try printing a test page.
• If test page does not work check all connections. If proper drivers have been
installed run a diagnostic on the printer using the installed printer software.
• If it still won’t print, recycle.
• If it prints but the page appearance is smudged, run the printer head cleaning
procedure in the manual or help software for the printer is available for
instructions on how to do it.
Scanner
• Connect to the test computer system with cables, run Add/Remove Hardware
from the Windows Control Panel and see if you have proper drivers.
• If not, install drivers and turn on scanner.
• Try scanning a test page.
• If test page does not work check all connections. If proper drivers have been
installed run a diagnostic on the printer using the installed printer software.
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•
If it still won’t scan properly, recycle.
Large peripheral testing on the workbench.
3.44 Small Peripheral Testing
Keyboard
• Check to see if cable pins are in good shape.
• If they’re OK, plug it in. Recycle if not.
• Select Run… from the Windows Start menu, type notepad.exe and hit OK
• Type every letter on the keyboard, including numbers, and other special
characters including the space bar, arrow keys, etc.
• Use the Shift key and repeat.
• Use the Caps Lock and repeat.
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Mouse
• Check to see if cable pins are in good shape.
• If they’re OK, plug it in. Recycle if not.
• Check for basic cursor control, up & down, left to right, etc.
• Check for smooth motion. If motion is jumpy, remove and clean the track ball
and track ball contacts/rollers.
• Run Mouse from the Windows Control Panel.
3.45 Television Testing
To test TV to see if it is sellable:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Set TV on workbench.
Connect “rabbit ears” to the TV using an antenna adapter if necessary.
Plug TV into AC outlet and turn it on.
If it black and white, recycle it.
Set the tuner (channel changer) to a low frequency channel, such as ch. 2-13
If any of these channels receive a good signal, then the tuner is probably in
working order. If not, recycle the television.
g. After the tuner has been established as working, pay attention to the CRT
(screen). Are there any irregularities on the CRT? (ie. A dominant color that
can not be adjusted – Any multi-colored areas, or “rainbow” effect located
anywhere on the CRT)
h. If these irregularities cannot be adjusted so they can be corrected – place the
TV on a pallet with other recyclable/bad TV’s
3.5
Inventory
Inventory is a collection of individual parts sorted by kind and stored for possible
use in future systems. It also consists of unsold systems waiting for retail space to
become available.
When a sellable system is put into inventory, it is assigned a tracking number in
expectation of its future sale.
When an incoming donated part is determined to be in working condition, the value
INV is recorded in the Tracking column of the Data Record Sheet before the part is put
into inventory. No tracking number is assigned, and a complete inventory is only taken
every 3 months. Parts obtained from disassembly are added to inventory without record.
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Higher volumes than were experienced in this project would probably require a
unique inventory ID to be used in a strict inventory tracking system. Without high
volumes, an inventory tracking system would be inefficient at such a small scale.
3.6
Preparation for Resale
All equipment must be cleaned before sale. The sorter can do this, but the technician
may need to if the sorter is unable or there is no sorter position.
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
While still back in the processing room, before any items are put out on the sales
floor, all items for sale should be thoroughly cleaned. Nobody wants to buy
anything that has finger marks and handprints or dirt smudges on it. A little elbow
grease may be needed here, but the end results will be well worth the effort.
Take care not to get cleaning fluid running down into the cooling vents on the
sides/back/top of monitors. Do not spray the cleaning fluid onto the item and wipe.
When employing cleaning fluid you should spray the cleaner onto a rag or paper
towel first, then rub the surface of the device.
Be sure not to soak the rag/paper towel. Only a small amount of cleaning fluid is
needed to be effective. The cleaning fluid is from a concentrate and will cut
through most dirt jobs or grease with only a short but sustained effort.
If you are using rags they will become unusable at a certain point because they will
become too soaked or too dirty. When this becomes the case you can rinse them
out under warm water, then hang them to dry and get a dry rag. If you’re using
paper towels then make sure the dirtied ones find their way into a trash can
somewhere. This will go a long way to helping keep the work area clean.
Further retail preparation is described in Chapter 4.
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4.0 Recycling
The National Safety Council has projected that, by the year 2005, PCs will be
retired at a rate of more than 63 million a year. Toxic materials like lead, mercury and
arsenic can leak into groundwater from electronics dumped in landfills, or pollute the air
when incinerated with other waste. Improper disposal of electronics is now a violation of
Florida’s hazardous waste regulations.
What cannot be resold must be recycled. Triage and technical choices mean that a
large proportion of donated equipment must be disposed of, and done so properly.
A recycling vendor must be selected to take unsold equipment away to be further
de-manufactured. Pallets must be prepared carefully in order to meet specifications of the
recycling vendor when they come to pick them up.
The recycling space must be large enough for at least a dozen pallets and the
pallets clearly labeled with unique numbers that will increase over time. In this program,
we used a number and letter combination: 1A, 1B, 1C, … ,1Z, 2A, 2B, and so on. This
accounting system allows for large volumes over time without repetition. Simpler
accounting systems were considered, including simple numeric: 1,2,3, and so on.
Full pallets in the recycling area to the rear of the processing facility.
4.1
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Documents
Pallet Sheet
Recycling Work Order / Receipt
Recycling Invoice
Vendor Certificate of Destruction
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4.2
Palletizing Equipment
Sorting is necessary for safe stacking of equipment on pallets. Other temporary
storage methods, like large bins or ‘dumpsters’, may not need sorting. Ask your recycling
vendor to be sure.
In preparing equipment for recycling they must be divided into the following
categories and placed on separate pallets:
• CPUs
• Monitors/TVs
• Large peripherals like printers, scanners, faxes, etc.
• Small peripherals like keyboards, mice and small component parts.
Any faulty component parts that have been removed from a system should also be
divided by type and put into separate boxes before palletizing. Sorting is necessary only
when the recycling vendor requests it.
• Hard drives
• Floppy drives/CDROM drives
• Motherboards, Accessory cards, Memory chips / Processor chips
• Any other miscellaneous parts should be grouped together for easier demanufacturing.
Place the item to be recycled on the appropriate pallet in the recycling work area.
You will want record what you are sending by category because your recycling vendor will
be charging by the item type, count, weigh, etc., so it is good to know exactly what you
sent. (See sample Recycling Invoice attached.)
When a piece of equipment is added to a pallet, the action is recorded in the Pallet
Sheet for that pallet. The Tracking Number, Data Record Sheet Date, Category, and
Brand, Description and Donation Source are entered into the electronic version of the
Pallet Sheet and also into a hand written sheet created for each pallet. Double entry helps
to find and correct mistakes that may occur in the process.
Pallet Stacking Instructions
Pallets are stacked up to 5 feet high.
CPU stacking procedure:
1. Stack on sides if possible, upright if necessary for a proper fit.
2. Insert cardboard layer every third CPU layer (optional).
Monitors & Television stacking procedure:
1. Stack with screen face down.
2. Alternate screen face up and screen face down if necessary to fit on the pallet.
3. Insert cardboard between each layer.
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Large peripheral stacking procedure:
Note: These items are the most difficult to stack because they will come in many
types, sizes and shapes. Great care must be exercised in stacking these items.
1. Place like-sized and shaped items together.
2. Place as closely and solidly together as possible to avoid shifting during
shipping.
3. Insert cardboard layer every 2 feet if possible.
Small peripheral stacking procedure:
These items are not placed directly onto pallets, but into labeled boxes in the
recycling work area. For example, bad keyboards all go in a box labeled
‘Keyboards’, bad mice in a box labeled ‘Mice’, etc. Since the boxes have no pallet
number, no pallet number is indicated when entering the small peripheral in the
Data Record Sheet Tracking column. The recycling vendor collects these items
separate from palletized items.
Apply stretch wrap to every pallet when the pallet is half full and again when it is full. Pull
some plastic from the spool and press or tape on a bottom corner of the pallet. Stretch
wrap is added by circling the pallet as the plastic is pulled off the spool. Keep constant
tension on the wrap as you pull so as to better secure the stack.
4.3
Vendor Pickup
When the number of filled pallets begins to fill available space the contracted
recycling firm needs to be notified and a date set for pallet collection. The lead technician
is responsible for attending the collection. On that day, after loading the pallets, the truck
driver should give a Recycling Work Order to the lead technician. The Pallet Sheet created
since the last pickup are gathered together, stapled to the Recycling Receipt and filed. A
Recycling Invoice and Certificate of Destruction should follow within two weeks, with
copies of each filed with the matching Recycling Work Order.
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5.0 Retail
The economic success of the program depends on the resale of computers and
televisions. The retail part of the program needs the attention and support of the store
manager to ensure that customers see a clean and orderly retail display, and that they get
their any questions answered promptly and simply.
Some of the technician’s time may be spent answering questions and helping
customers choose a system or peripheral that best meets their needs.
5.1
Documents
Pricing Guide
Retail FAQ
Retail Signs:
ƒ System Sign Example
ƒ LP Sign Example
ƒ TV Sign Example
5.2
Displays
There should be at least two retail staff persons trained and responsible for
maintaining the television and computer displays.
Computer Display
In this project, the computer retail display was constructed and located near the
front of the store. The project team installed a long counter against a store wall. It is
long enough to display up to 6 systems (Fig. 1 following page).
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There is a shelf to the right for printers and other large peripherals. There is a
separate rack for software and books (Fig. 2).
Fig. 1
Fig. 2
Computer systems, peripherals, books and software on display.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
As much as possible, try to keep systems together. If a system came in the door
with a good printer, display and sell the printer with the system that it came in
with.
Make enough room made for each system so that the shelf does not look crowded.
The space needed can vary depending on printers, speakers and other extra
equipment a system might be displayed with.
Place a large sign visible indicating there are computers are for sale.
Hang on the wall above the display a sign explaining that all equipment is tested,
and done so by trained technicians.
Retail FAQ sheets should be available at the display. It should have a list of
common questions and answers for potential customers. This should reduce the
amount of time a technician spends answering questions.
Each system for sale should have a System Retail Sign made for it and posted
nearby on display.
Each large peripheral for sale should have a LP Retail Sign made for it and posted
nearby on display.
Computers should be turned on and running with the desktop showing.
Be sure that a screen saver program is active to prevent monitor burn.
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Television Display
In this project, the television retail display was located near the rear of the store
(Fig 3).
A video tape player used to feed a picture signal to the televisions. It was in a back
room near the display, out of site.
Fig. 3
Televisions on display.
•
•
•
•
5.3
Keep like-sized TVs displayed together: small near small, large near large, etc.
There should be a large sign visible indicating there are televisions for sale.
Each system should have a retail sign made for it and posted near on display.
In our program, we would sometimes display monitors for sale when there were
not enough TVs to fill the space.
Pricing
Use the Pricing Guide to calculate a sale price for a CPU system or large peripheral.
Create the pricing guide by researching current market prices for individual parts. Look on
the internet, call local electronics stores, ask the store manager, etc. The store manager
makes the final decision on pricing.
Keep prices updated based on changing market conditions and local seasonal retail
patterns.
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5.4
Setup
Immediately after recording the incoming system or part in the Data Record Sheet,
and before moving system to the retail display inventory, the technician writes a date
code on back or bottom of item with indelible marker. The format should be MMDDYYA.
For instance, the first item recorded on May 19th, 2002 would be marked as 051902A, the
second as 051902B, the third as 051902C, and so on.
CPU Systems, large peripherals and TVs get a retail sign.
Once items are put on the showroom floor, ensure that all relevant data and
materials remain with the equipment to assist customers with their purchase.
Small peripherals and software books get a price tag with a unique store tag color
to help track these items at the register.
A technician should be responsible for the set up of each CPU system or large
peripheral at the retail display.
Televisions are setup by retail staff assigned to the TV retail display.
5.5 Purchase
At the time of purchase:
•
•
•
The retail staff removes the retail sign comes off the display.
The date of sale is recorded on the sign.
Retail staff returns the sign to the processing file drawer, where it is matched
with and stapled to its original mate in the DISPLAY folder before filing it in
the SOLD folder.
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6.0 Safety Equipment and Precautions
The health of electronics recycling workers is threatened when there are not
sufficient safeguards in the work place. All necessary precautions are taken to protect
workers in the project. All recycled materials are sent to United States facilities where
laws are in place to protect worker safety.
6.1 Safety Tools
Each worker should have available to them one of each of the following safety tools:
a) Protective eyewear – they are to be used when a worker is blowing or
vacuuming dust from inside a computer case. You must use the kind with side
shields.
b) Ground wrist strap – should always be worn when a worker is moving about the
inside of a computer case and at no other time.
c) Back support belt – should be worn by any worker whom is loading/unloading
computer equipment from Goodwill’s large plastic bins.
6.2 MSDS – Material Safety Data Sheet
At this time the only known hazardous materials that will be used during the
Electronics Recycling Project are Windex (or other glass cleaner), used to clean plastic
cases of PCs and printers, keyboards and mice, power supplies (inside the PCs
themselves) and the High Voltage circuitry of monitors and televisions.
MSDS sheets for these items will comprise the bulk of the SAFETY BOOK (see
attached). Other hazardous materials can be added later as needed.
6.3 Hazardous Materials Handling
Known hazardous materials & conditions consist of the following:
a) Monitors/TVs – televisions and computer monitors contain circuitry known as
the HIGH VOLTAGE circuit and can hold an extremely large electrical charge
for a long period of time. This stored electrical charge can be as high as
6000 volts. Therefore, special handling practices MUST be observed in
order to ensure worker safety. Where a worker would normally be found
using a grounding wrist strap while working on a computer, work performed
on TVs and monitors should be done without the use of the grounding strap.
Workers should also try to use their right hands when entering the internal
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parts of a monitor/TV. This is to avoid any electrical discharge from going
through the cardiac area in the event of an accidental discharge.
b) Power Supplies – power supplies have a few large capacitors in them that
can hold a significant amount of energy (like a battery) that can be present
even after a PC is shut down and unplugged from its AC source. Because of
this ability to hold an electrical charge for a period of time it poses a
respectable electric shock threat. If any workers are unsure of handling
procedures for power supplies they should contact the Technical Consultant
onsite or the Assistant Computer Technician for assistance.
c) Glass Cleaner – May contain irritating or hazardous materials. Please check
the label and follow all instructions and warnings given by the manufacturer.
6.4 Fire Extinguishers
Class C fire extinguishers should be located at either end of the electronics work
area, near where computer devices will be plugged into AC outlets. An additional
extinguisher should be located out in the warehouse area where computer devices will be
stored. An appropriate experienced official, such as fire department personnel should
provide instructions on usage.
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April 11, 2002
Charlotte County Government
Attn: Information Technology Services
18500 Murdock Circle, Suite 131
Port Charlotte, FL 33948-1094
Subject: Certificate of Data Destruction
Dear Information Technology Services:
This letter certifies that Goodwill Industries of Southwest Florida under the supervision of
Resource Management Group, Inc. has collected, processed, stored, and/or transferred all
electronic equipment collected from Charlotte County in performance of Purchase Order
BOARD2002001395 in accordance with all applicable Federal, State, and County regulations.
Items were collected on January 30, 2002 and March 6, 2002, and have been demanufactured,
rendered unusable for their intended purpose and recycled by Secure Environmental Electronics
Recycling, Inc. or refurbished for reuse and sold (or inventoried for sale) as functional equipment
by Goodwill Industries of Southwest Florida.
Sincerely,
Jesse White
President
Cc:
Barbara Kula, Charlotte County, Department of Environmental Services
Tammy Warr, Store Manager, Englewood, Goodwill Industries of Southwest Florida
Cert_ReuseRecycleDestruct.doc
6/28/2004
Page 1 of 1
.
Consumer Survey
1. How did you hear about this electronics collection event?
… TV Ad
… Radio
… Newspaper Ad
… Friend/word of mouth
… Flyer
… Other ________________
2. Why did you come here today to recycle your electronic product(s)? (Choose up to two)
… I had no other place to take this product
… This was a convenient way to get rid of my old electronics
… Other (please specify): _______________________________________________________________
3. How far did you travel today to recycle your electronics (give your best estimate)? ________ miles
4. What items did you bring in today?
Item
How
many?
Product
Brand
How old is
the item?
(in years)
TV
Computer (CPU)
Computer Monitor
Computer Peripheral:
Mouse
Keyboard
Printer
Scanner
Other: ______________
Other: ______________
Is it
working?
Y
Y
Y
N
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
N
N
N
N
N
Is it a previously
used or second
hand item?
Y N
Y N
Y N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
N
N
N
N
N
5. How many computers and TVs do you have at home? ________
6. Who do you think should pay for the safe recycling and disposal of these electronic products?
(Check no more than 2)
… Customer/user
… Government
… Retail store
… Other (please specify): ___________________
… Electronics manufacturer
7. Who do you think should operate the program for safe recycling and disposal of electronics?
(Check no more than 2)
… Retail store
… Charity
… Electronics manufacturer
… Other (please specify): ___________________
… Government
8. If you had to pay to recycle your electronics, when would you prefer to pay?
… When I purchase the item
… When I recycle the item
… Other (please specify): _______________________________________________________________
9. If you had to pay to recycle your electronics, what is the most you would be willing to pay? $_______
10. The electronics you brought in today were used by a
… Residence
… Government
… Business
… Institution
Thank you for participating in today’s electronics collection event.
(To be filled out by collection event host)
Collection event location (city, state): __________________
Collection event type (e.g. municipal drop off, retailer): _______________
Date: ___________
Participant Number __________
TODAY’s Date
Logged
By
_______________
Date In
880/DataRecordSheet.doc
6/28/2004
Donation
Source
Page ______ of ________
Category
Brand
Description
Age
Condition
Status
Tracking
prepared by Resource Management Group, Inc.
941-358-7730
Electronics Donation form
To be filled out for ALL computer/electronics equipment that is donated to Goodwill
Date:
Donor’s Zip Code:
Items being dropped off
Item
Age
(yrs old)
Manufacturer
TV
Monitor
Computer
Printer
Scanner
Software/Books
Does it work?
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
Y/N
includes documentation
& license Y / N
other (specify)
Is there anything else we should know about your donation, like any special
features (extra ram, faster processor, fancy sound cards, etc.)?
Goodwill location: (circle one)
Punta Gorda Charlotte Harbor
donorforms.doc
06/28/04
Pt. Charlotte
Englewood
US17/Winn Dixie ADC
WalMart ADC
Prepared by RMG
941-358-7730
Electronics Recycling and You
Electronics Recycling
As local resident donating used electronics and
computer equipment you need to know what the
consequences of disposal are and your responsibility
in the recycling process.
You need to know:
‰
‰
‰
‰
‰
Improper disposal of electronics is a
violation of Florida’s hazardous waste
regulations.
Toxic materials like lead, mercury and
arsenic can leak into groundwater from
electronics dumped in landfills, or pollute
the air when incinerated with other
waste.
The National Safety Council has
projected that more than 63 million PCs
a year will be retired by 2005.
Over 80% of donations to Goodwill and
other non-profits are not saleable. This
places a disposal liability on these
organizations.
The health of electronics recycling
workers is threatened when there are not
sufficient safeguards in the work place.
Goodwill Industries of SW Florida sends
all recyclable materials to United States
facilities where laws are in place to
protect worker safety.
Individuals, businesses and governments have
been bringing their worn out computers and TVs to
places like Goodwill for a long time. But year after
year, Goodwill and similar collection facilities have
been incurring the disposal costs of electronic
merchandise that it cannot resell - ultimately causing
the organization to spend money on hefty disposal
fees rather than vital community programs.
Our programs are designed to reduce potential
environmental hazards and to efficiently reuse items
that still work. Because some of the materials
donated are saleable, we have been able to offset
some disposal fees. However, steadily increasing
donations mean these fees are rising. In order to
keep recovery and recycling programs economically
viable and fairly distribute the costs, we are asking
electronics donors to do their part and pitch in a small
portion of the cost of disposal fees.
Doing Your Part
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Goodwill is offering fee-based safe and secure
environmental disposal options including data
destruction, resale and recycling of donated
electronics.
Goodwill has now implemented a $5.00
contribution to accompany all monitor and TV
donations (in working order or not.) Collection
services also available for a fee.
Everyone pays the same fee, whether you are a
household, business or government agency.
The fee is minimal compared to the cost of new
equipment.
Your participation helps make low cost
technology available to Goodwill customers and
helps fund our job training programs.
Even though you are paying a fee, there still
may be tax benefits of your donation, please
consult with your accountant to determine the
value of your contribution.
Goodwill Accepts These Items in
Working Condition
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Computers
Monitors
Televisions
Terminals
Keyboards
Mice
Video Game Consoles
Copiers
Fax Machines
VCRs
DVD players
Video Cameras
Wireless Devices
Cellular Phones
Stereos
Telephones
Microwave Ovens
Working and non-working
computer equipment, including
monitors, terminals and
televisions, are accepted in
return for a small fee.
For large donations collection call Goodwill at
941-475-9401.
Proper Disposal Required
COMPUTER MONITORS and TVs
Contain significant amounts of lead.
Older televisions may contain cancer causing
PCBs, a known carcinogen.
PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARDS
Contain lead, chromium and mercury.
BATTERIES
May contain lead, mercury and cadmium.
SWITCHES & RELAYS
Can contain hazardous amounts of mercury.
Charlotte County Goodwill Stores
Englewood
1501 Placida Road
9-6 (7days)
475-9401
Alternatives to Disposal
Reduce
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Lease equipment, instead of purchase.
Identify and buy durable products.
Repair instead of replace.
Buy upgradeable systems and upgrade
when you can.
Buy ‘green’ products that minimize
problems in the first place.
Reuse
ƒ Resell what still works.
ƒ Donate old but working equipment to a
school or charity.
ƒ Return your equipment to the dealer or
manufacturer.
Recycle
ƒ Donate old equipment – working or not
– to local centers that have electronics
recovery shops in place.
ƒ Pay the small fee to support continued
electronics recovery operations.
April 2002
Who to contact…
Port Charlotte
2340 Tamiami Trail
9-5:30 (6days) 12-5 Sundays
627-9444
Goodwill
1501 Placida Rd
Englewood, FL 34224
941-475-9401
www.shopgoodwill.com
Punta Gorda
1826 S. Tamiami Trail
9-5:30 (6days)
575-0770
State Department of Environmental Protection
www.dep.state.fl.us/waste/categories/electronics/
850-488-0300
Charlotte Harbor
4694 Tamiami Trail
9-5:30 (6days) 12-5 Sundays
627-6616
Ethical and
Legal Disposal
of Electronics
Household
Donors
Resource Management Group, Inc.
200 S. Washington Blvd. Suite 10
Sarasota, FL 34236
941-358-7730
www.recyclesmart.com
Printed on Recycled Paper
Printed on Recycled Paper
Electronics Recycling and You
Electronics Recycling
As a local source of used electronics and
computer equipment you need to know what the
consequences of disposal are and your responsibility
in the recycling process.
You need to know:
‰
‰
‰
‰
‰
Improper disposal of electronics is a
violation of Florida’s hazardous waste
regulations and may subject you to
federal Superfund cleanup liability.
Toxic materials like lead, mercury and
arsenic can leak into groundwater from
electronics dumped in landfills, or
pollute the air when incinerated with
other waste.
The National Safety Council has
projected that more than 63 million PCs
a year will be retired by 2005.
Over 80% of donations to Goodwill and
other non-profits are not saleable. This
places a disposal liability on these
organizations.
The health of electronics recycling
workers is threatened when there are
not sufficient safeguards in the work
place. Goodwill Industries of SW
Florida sends all recyclable materials to
United States facilities where laws are in
place to protect worker safety.
Individuals, businesses and governments have
been bringing their worn out computers and TVs to
places like Goodwill for a long time. But year after
year, Goodwill and similar collection facilities have
been incurring the disposal costs of electronic
merchandise that it cannot resell - ultimately causing
the organization to spend money on hefty disposal
fees rather than vital community programs.
Our programs are designed to reduce potential
environmental hazards and to efficiently reuse items
that still work. Because some of the materials
donated are saleable, we have been able to offset
some disposal fees. However, steadily increasing
donations mean these fees are rising. In order to
keep recovery and recycling programs economically
viable and fairly distribute the costs, we are asking
electronics donors to do their part and pitch in a small
portion of the cost of disposal fees.
Doing Your Part
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Goodwill is offering fee-based safe and secure
environmental disposal options including data
destruction, resale and recycling of donated
electronics.
Goodwill has now implemented a $5.00
contribution to accompany all monitor and TV
donations (in working order or not.) Collection
services also available for a fee.
Everyone pays the same fee, whether you are a
household, business or government agency.
The fee is minimal compared to the cost of new
equipment.
Your participation helps make low cost
technology available to Goodwill customers and
helps fund our job training programs.
Even though you are paying a fee, there still
may be tax benefits of your donation, please
consult with your accountant to determine the
value of your contribution.
Goodwill Accepts These Items in
Working Condition
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Computers
Monitors
Televisions
Terminals
Keyboards
Mice
Video Game Consoles
Copiers
Fax Machines
VCRs
DVD players
Video Cameras
Wireless Devices
Cellular Phones
Stereos
Telephones
Microwave Ovens
Working and non-working
computer equipment, including
monitors, terminals and
televisions, are accepted in
return for a small fee.
For large donations collection call
Goodwill at 941-475-9401.
Proper Disposal Required
Florida statutes require that businesses, schools,
non-profit organizations, and government entities not
discard electronic equipment that contains hazardous
materials. Used electronics must be recycled or
properly disposed of as hazardous waste.
Alternatives to Disposal
Reduce
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
COMPUTER MONITORS and TVs
Contain significant amounts of lead.
Older televisions may contain cancer
causing PCBs, a known carcinogen.
PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARDS
Contain lead, chromium and mercury.
BATTERIES
May contain lead, mercury and
cadmium.
SWITCHES & RELAYS
Can contain hazardous amounts of
mercury.
Lease equipment, instead of purchase.
Identify and buy durable products.
Repair instead of replace.
Buy upgradeable systems and upgrade
when you can.
Buy ‘green’ products that minimize
problems in the first place.
Reuse
ƒ Resell what still works.
ƒ Donate old but working equipment to a
school or charity.
ƒ Return your equipment to the dealer or
manufacturer.
Recycle
ƒ Donate old equipment – working or not
– to local centers that have electronics
recovery shops in place.
ƒ Pay the small fee to support continued
electronics recovery operations.
Ethical and Legal
Disposal of
Electronics
Businesses and
Institutions
April 2002
Who to contact…
Goodwill
1501 Placida Rd
Englewood, FL 34224
941-475-9401
www.shopgoodwill.com
State Department of Environmental Protection
www.dep.state.fl.us/waste/categories/electronics/
850-488-0300
When improperly released into the
environment, these toxins disperse
into groundwater and threaten the
entire community.
Resource Management Group, Inc.
200 S. Washington Blvd. Suite 10
Sarasota, FL 34236
941-358-7730
www.recyclesmart.com
Printed on Recycled Paper
Printed on Recycled Paper
Key to Data Record Sheet
Logged by
Initials of who entered the data into the sheet.
Date In
Date that the item was brought in to the processing facility regardless of whether its resold or
recycled.
Donation source
Business, business pick up = we or GW picked it up, give it a unique code, eg. CC = Charlotte
County);
Private = PR
(if donation not from Englewood store, name the store)
Educational = ED
Category
Each item should fall into 1 category:
C = CPU's
L = laptops
LP = large peripherals
MT = monitor/terminal
SP = small peripherals
MF = Microfiche
ML = Microfilm
TVL = TV screen > 19"
TVS = TV screen < 19"
Brand
Name of manufacturer; i.e., Dell, Sony, HP, etc. If a generic built PC enter "GN".
AC Acer
APC
AE Advanced Electronics
AL Atlas
AN Action
AP Apple
AST
AT ATT
CA Canon
CM Compudyne
CO Commodor
CQ Compaq
CN Citizen
CR Curry
CT CTX
DA Daewoo
DE dell
DMI
ELL
EP Epson
GE GE
GMS
GN Generic
GR Gravis
880/KeyToDataRecordSheet.doc
6/28/2004
GS Goldstar
GY gateway
HI Hitachi
HP HP
IBM
KN Kenisko
LE Leading Edge
LT Labtech
LX Lexmark
MAC
MB Mitsubishi
MC Micron
MG Magnavox
MM Memorex
MN Manhattan
MS Microsoft
MT Mitsumi
MV Markvision
NEC
NW New World
OK Okidata
PB packard bell
PH Phiko
PS Panasonic
Page 1 of 2
QS Quick Shot
RV Reveal
RCA RCA
SDS
SA Sanyo
SH Sharp
SM Samtron
SS Samsung
SC Smith Corona
SY Sony
ST Star
SL Sylvania
SD Sysdyne
TA Taxan
TC Team Concepts
TO TOSHIBA
TL Triple Life
TT TTX
TY Tandy
US Unisys
USR
WTV WebTV
ZE Zenith
prepared by Resource Management Group, Inc.
941-358-7730
Description
If CPU or Laptop then indicate processor type and speed:
80xx
286
386
486
PI ###
PII ###
PIII ###
MAC
If large peripheral:
DMP Dot matrix printer
IJ
Ink jet printer
LJ
Laser jet printer
PT
Generic printer
FAX
Fax
SC
Scanner
CP
Copier
UPS
Uninterrupted power supply
OT Other
If small peripheral:
KB
Keyboard
MD
Modem
MS
Mouse
MS3
3 Button mouse
OT
Other
If monitor or TV, indicate inches of Screen
eg. 14”, 15”, 17”, 19” (OK to enter just number – inches understood)
Age
If TV or monitor, indicate age in years. Else, indicate NA.
Condition
S = sale 'as is'
RR = repair & resell
P = parts
R = recycle
Status
W = working
NW = non-working
Tracking
If the CPU, LP or TV is to be sent to retail space, give it a tracking # and write it on the item (w/
indelible ink) in the form DDMMYYA, DDMMYYB, DDMMYYC, and so on.
If item or component was sent to recycling, indicate pallet #. Small peripherals are not palletized
get no pallet number.
880/KeyToDataRecordSheet.doc
6/28/2004
Page 2 of 2
prepared by Resource Management Group, Inc.
941-358-7730
Electronics Recycling and You
Individuals, businesses and governments have been bringing their worn out computers and
TVs to places like Goodwill for a long time. But year after year, Goodwill and similar collection
facilities have been incurring the disposal costs of electronic merchandise that it cannot resell ultimately causing the organization to spend money on hefty disposal fees rather than vital
community programs.
Our programs are designed to reduce potential environmental hazards and to efficiently
reuse items that still work. Because some of the materials donated are saleable, we have been
able to offset some disposal fees. However, steadily increasing donations mean that these fees
are rising. In order to keep recovery and recycling programs economically viable and fairly
distribute the costs, we are asking electronics donors to do their part and pitch in a small portion
of the cost of disposal fees.
Doing Our Part
ƒ Goodwill is offering safe and secure environmental disposal options including data
destruction, reuse and recycling of donated electronics.
Doing Your Part
ƒ Goodwill has now implemented a $5.00 contribution to accompany each monitor and TV
donation (in working order or not.) Collection services are also available for a fee.
ƒ Everyone pays the same fee, whether you are a household, business or government agency.
The fee is minimal compared to the cost of new equipment.
ƒ Your participation helps make low cost technology available to Goodwill customers and helps
fund the job training program for our technical staff.
ƒ
Even though you are paying a fee, there still may be tax benefits of your donation, please
consult with your accountant to determine the value of your contribution.
Please consider helping Goodwill by contributing the small fee. Do it for yourself, your family and your community.
Just cut or tear off the bottom of this flyer and mail it in with your contribution payable to Goodwill.
For more information about electronics recycling problems and answers, ask for reading materials at your
Goodwill register.
cut here
cut here
----------------------------------------------------------------------Date of your donation ___/___/___
#monitors ___ x $5 = ______
Goodwill store donated to:_____________________
#televisions ___ x $5 = ______
total fee
= ______
Do not send cash.
Send check payable to Goodwill, or use credit card:
Card#: _______________________________
Expiration date: ___/___/___ Type: _______
Mail to: Goodwill
Attn: Tammy Warr
1501 Placida Rd.
Englewood, FL 34224
Brand
Description
Donation
source
05/30/02
05/16/02
05/16/02
05/16/02
05/21/02
05/23/02
05/28/02
05/30/02
05/31/02
06/06/02
06/06/02
TVS
TVL
TVS
TVS
TVS
TVS
TVL
TVS
TVL
TVS
TVL
PS
SEARS
EMERSON
PS
MGA
AOC
HO
AUDIOVOX
NEC
GS
QUASAR
9
21
15
14
14
13
22
8
27
9
19
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
1P
1P
1P
1P
1P
1P
1P
1P
1P
1P
1P
1P
1P
1P
1P
1P
05/21/02
05/23/02
05/30/02
05/30/02
06/04/02
06/06/02
06/14/02
06/14/02
06/21/02
06/21/02
06/27/02
06/27/02
06/27/02
06/27/02
07/04/02
07/06/02
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
LP
BROTHER
BROTHER
LANIER
XEROX
CA
HP
EP
APEX
FORTIS
PS
CA
EP
HP
HP
AP
CA
FAX
FAX
FAX
COPIER
IJ
IJ
DMP
DMP
DMP
LJ
IJ
IJ
IJ
IJ
IJ
IJ
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
1Q
1Q
1Q
1R
1R
1P
05/28/02
06/21/02
06/28/02
07/04/02
07/04/02
05/16/02
MT
MT
MT
MT
MT
MT
PB
PRINCETON
PROVIEW
BROTHER
SL
GN
14
10
15
10
13
14
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
1R
1R
1R
1R
1R
06/25/02
06/25/02
06/27/02
06/27/02
06/27/02
TVS
TVS
TVS
TVL
TVL
KMC
MG
SY
MB
LINYTRON
8
9
8
21
22
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
Datasheet
Date
1O
1O
1O
1O
1O
1O
1O
1O
1O
1O
1O
Tracking
Category
PALLET TRACKING SPREADSHEET
1R
1R
06/28/02
07/04/02
TVL
TVS
GE
GS
22
5
1R
1S
1S
1S
1S
1S
1S
1S
1S
05/23/02
06/04/02
06/04/02
06/07/02
06/24/02
06/25/02
06/28/02
07/06/02
07/06/02
C
C
C
C
C
C
LP
C
C
1U
1U
1U
07/05/02
07/05/02
07/05/02
TVS
TVS
TVS
GE
SR2000
BENTLY
14
14
4
PR
PR
PR
INV
INV
INV
06/28/02
07/02/02
07/05/02
MT
SP
SP
MAGITRONIC
PC
PB
14
KB
MS
PR
PR
PR
PB
486
TO
486 LAPTOP
VTECH
LEARNING LAPTOP
PB
486
GN
P133
VTECH
LEARNING LAPTOP
VTECH
LEARNING LAPTOP
CQ
486
DELTA GOLD
SERVER
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PR
PRICING GUIDE for Electronics Recycling Project
(updated June 2002)
Computer Systems:
$1 per megahertz of processor speed (if amount doesn’t end in a 5 or 0 then round to
nearest 5 dollar mark; ex. P133 would go for $135.00)
$20 for every 32MB of RAM
$20 for every Gigabyte of hard drive space
14 – 15” monitors = no extra charge
add $15 if 17” monitor
add $30 if 19” monitor
add $45 if larger than 19”
If you install a 56K modem add $10
Monitors (sold separate from system):
$20 for a 14 or 15”monitor
$35 for a 17”
$50 for a 19”
$65 for monitors larger than 19”
TVs (all TVs must be color and have digital tuners):
13” > 10yrs old = $10
13” < 10yrs old = $15
19” > 10yrs old = $30
19” < 10yrs old = $35
25” > 10yrs old = $40
25” < 10yrs old = $45
27” > 10yrs old = $50
27” < 10yrs old = $55
TVs larger than 27” add $5 per inch
Printers:
Small Inkjet printers (ex. - canon BJC240 or a Compaq IJ300) = $20
Large inkjet printers (ex. - HP 800 series) = $35
Older Laser printers (ex. - HP LJIIP) = $35
Newer Laser printers (ex. - Epson Action Laser 1500) = $50
Peripherals:
Fax machines (thermal print) = $25
Fax machines (plain paper print) = $35
All copy machines = $35
Scanners (42 bit) = $25
Scanners (anything less than 42 bit) = $15
Frequently Asked Questions
about our Computers for Sale
What can these computers do?
The retail sign for each system will give you information
about system speed and memory, as well as details about
modem speed, monitor type, operating system and loaded
software.
Can they get you on the internet?
Yes. All our systems have modems for connecting to the
internet by a phone line. Modem speed for each system is
listed in the sign for each system.
Will they run the latest software?
Some will, some won’t: but all systems have a CDROM drive
to install and run your software. The retail sign for each
system will give you information needed to determine if they
are compatible with the particular software you are
interested in.
Where do they come from?
Our computers are donated by people like you, as well as
collected from and local businesses and county government.
Are they guaranteed?
All electronics equipment is sold ‘as is’, with no express
warranties or guarantee made by Goodwill Industries.
Retail FAQ.doc
Page 1 of 1
prepared by Resource Management Group, Inc.
941-358-7730
Pentium 166MHz
w/ 2GB Hard Drive
$185.00
only
Compaq Presario
33.4 kbps Modem
8x CDROM
64 MB RAM
15” SVGA Color Monitor
Keyboard and Mouse
Loaded with Windows98,
Acrobat Reader,
and WinZip
*
**
All computer equipment sold ‘as is’, with no express warranties or guarantee made by Goodwill Industries
See cashier for return policy
DATE RETAILED: _____/_____/_____
DATE SOLD:
_____/_____/_____
Retail Sign_CPU_Template.doc
TN 052302A
BRAND – Ink Jet Printer
*
**
All electronic equipment sold ‘as is’, with no express warranties or guarantee made by Goodwill Industries
See cashier for return policy
DATE RETAILED: _____/_____/_____
DATE SOLD:
_____/_____/_____
TN 052302A
___________________________________________________________________________________
RetailSign_LP_Template.doc
BRAND - ____” Screen
___ w/ Remote (if checked)
___ Cable Ready (if checked)
*
**
All electronic equipment sold ‘as is’, with no express warranties or guarantee made by Goodwill Industries
See cashier for return policy
DATE RETAILED: _____/_____/_____
DATE SOLD:
_____/_____/_____
TN 052302A
___________________________________________________________________________________
RetailSign_TV_Template.doc
ELECTRICAL SAFETY
RECOMMENDATIONS
1. PREVENTION
PREVENTION must be the primary goal of any occupational safety program.
However, since contact with electrical energy occurs even in facilities that
promote safety, safety programs should provide for an appropriate emergency
medical response.
2. SAFE WORK PRACTICES
No one who works with electric energy should work alone, and in many
instances, a "buddy system" should be established. It may be advisable to have
both members of the buddy system trained in CPR, as one cannot predict which
one will contact electrical energy.
Every individual who works with or around electrical energy should be familiar
with emergency procedures. This should include knowing how to de-energize an
electrical system before rescuing or beginning resuscitation on a worker who
remains in contact with an electrical energy source.
All workers exposed to electrical hazards should be made aware that even "low"
voltage circuits can be fatal, and that prompt emergency medical care can be
lifesaving.
3. CPR AND ACLS PROCEDURES
CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION (CPR) and first aid should be
immediately available at every work site. This capability is necessary to provide
prompt (within 4 minutes) care for the victims of cardiac or respiratory arrest,
from any cause.
Employers may contact the local office of the American Heart Association, the
American Red Cross, or equivalent groups or agencies, to set up a course for
employees.
Provisions should be worked out at each work site to provide ADVANCED
CARDIAC LIFE SUPPORT (ACLS) within 8 minutes (if possible), usually by
calling an ambulance staffed by paramedics. Signs on or near phones should give
the correct emergency number for the area, and workers should be educated
regarding the information to give when the call is made. For large facilities, a
prearranged place should be established for company personnel to meet
paramedics in an emergency.
Adopoted from a document published by OSHA on the internet, http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/85-104.html?
“Preventing Electrocutions of Workers in Fast Food Restaurants”
NIOSH ALERT: December 1984 - DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 85-104
Safety_Book.doc
How to Perform ADULT CPR
This document is intended as a supplement to information learned in a complete CPR
course instructed by the American Heart Association. It is not to be used as your only
guide for CPR and does not replace formal training in CPR. Please use this only as a
guideline for the proper steps in CPR, and replace any information below with
information deemed more current by your local CPR professional. For more information
please contact your local American Heart Association for class information.
1. Make sure the scene is safe for you to help.
2. Make sure you have universal precautions: gloves, pocket mask, etc.
3. Make sure you know how many patients you have.
4. Determine if they are conscious by tapping and shouting "Are you OK?"
5. If no response have someone call 911.
6. Position the patient on their back.
7. Open the airway with a head-tilt chin-lift or jaw-thrust maneuver.
8. LOOK-LISTEN-&-FEELING for breathing. CHECK BREATHING FOR 5-10
SECONDS.
9. If they aren't breathing VENTILATE TWICE.
10. Check for a pulse by palpating (feeling) the carotid artery. CHECK THE PULSE
FOR 10 SECONDS.
11. If there is no pulse BEGIN CHEST COMPRESSIONS at a rate of 15
COMPRESSIONS to 2 BREATHS.
12. Recheck the pulse after ONE MINUTE.
13. CONTINUE UNTIL HELP ARRIVES, OR, UNTIL YOU FEEL TOO TIRED TO
CONTINUE.
Adopted from various sources on American heart Assn. website and American Red Cross website.
Safety_Book.doc