Siemens SIMATIC TIWAY 1 Specifications

DirectNETt
Manual Number DA–DNET–M
WARNING
Thank you for purchasing automation equipment from PLCDirect. We want your new DirectLOGIC automation
equipment to operate safely. Anyone who installs or uses this equipment should read this publication (and any other
relevant publications) before installing or operating the equipment.
To minimize the risk of potential safety problems, you should follow all applicable local and national codes that regulate
the installation and operation of your equipment. These codes vary from area to area and usually change with time. It is
your responsibility to determine which codes should be followed, and to verify that the equipment, installation, and
operation is in compliance with the latest revision of these codes.
At a minimum, you should follow all applicable sections of the National Fire Code, National Electrical Code, and the
codes of the National Electrical Manufacturer’s Association (NEMA). There may be local regulatory or government
offices that can also help determine which codes and standards are necessary for safe installation and operation.
Equipment damage or serious injury to personnel can result from the failure to follow all applicable codes and
standards. We do not guarantee the products described in this publication are suitable for your particular application,
nor do we assume any responsibility for your product design, installation, or operation.
If you have any questions concerning the installation or operation of this equipment, or if you need additional
information, please call us at 1–800–633–0405.
This publication is based on information that was available at the time it was printed. At PLCDirect we constantly
strive to improve our products and services, so we reserve the right to make changes to the products and/or
publications at any time without notice and without any obligation. This publication may also discuss features that may
not be available in certain revisions of the product.
Trademarks
This publication may contain references to products produced and/or offered by other companies. The product and
company names may be trademarked and are the sole property of their respective owners. PLCDirect disclaims any
proprietary interest in the marks and names of others.
Stage is a trademark of Koyo Electronics Industries Co., LTD. Think & Do Software is a trademark of Think & Do
Software, Inc. Texas Instruments is a registered trademark of Texas Instruments, Inc. TI, TIWAY, Series 305, Series
405, TI305, and TI405 are trademarks of Texas Instruments, Inc. Siemens and SIMATIC are registered trademarks of
Siemens, AG. GE is a registered trademark of General Electric Corporation. Series One is a registered trademark of
GE Fanuc Automation North America, Inc. MODBUS is a registered trademark of Gould, Inc. IBM is a registered
trademark of International Business Machines. MS-DOS and Microsoft are registered trademarks of Microsoft
Corporation. Windows and Windows NT are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. OPTOMUX and PAMUX are
trademarks of OPTO 22.
Copyright 1998, PLCDirect Incorporated
All Rights Reserved
No part of this manual shall be copied, reproduced, or transmitted in any way without the prior, written consent of
PLCDirect Incorporated. PLCDirect retains the exclusive rights to all information included in this document.
1
Manual Revisions
If you contact us in reference to this manual, be sure and include the revision number.
Title: DirectNET Reference Manual
Manual Number: DA–DNET–M
Issue
Date
Effective Pages
Description of Changes
Original
1/94
Cover/Copyright
Contents
Original Issue
Rev. A
6/98
Manual History
1-1 – 1-3
2-1 – 2-12
3-1 – 3-30
4-1 – 4-14
5-1 – 5-10
6-1 – 6-21
7-1 – 7-7
A-1 – A-18
B-1 – B-16
C-1 – C-15
D-1 – D-17
E-1 – E-16
F-1 – F-12
Made minor corrections throughout.
1
Table of Contents
i
Chapter 1: How to Use this Manual
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The purpose of this manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Who should read this manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Where to begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How this manual is organized . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supplemental Manuals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1–2
1–2
1–2
1–2
1–3
1–3
Chapter 2: Getting Started with DirectNET Communications
The DirectNET Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
It’s an Easy-to-use Data NETwork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
It has Advantages... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
It has Disadvantages... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How Does it Work? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2–2
2–2
2–2
2–2
2–3
2–3
2–3
What can I use as a network master station? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL405/DL205 PLCs with a DCM or DL340 CPU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operator Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Host Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2–4
2–4
2–5
2–5
What can I use as a network slave station? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPUs with Built-in DirectNET Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Communications Modules and Data Communications Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Compatible Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2–6
2–6
2–6
2–6
Choosing a Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Three Basic Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PLC as Master . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Host as Master . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peer as Master . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Combination Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2–8
2–8
2–8
2–8
2–8
2–8
2–9
What communications program should I use? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Two Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RLL Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DirectNET Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2–10
2–10
2–10
2–11
How can I create a network? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–12
Follow Four Simple Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–12
ii
Table of Contents
Chapter 3: Network Design and Setup
Choosing the Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analyze your Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Identify Your System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Examine Data Sharing Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sketch the Network Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Now you’re ready to build the network cables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3–2
3–2
3–3
3–3
3–4
3–5
Cable Selection and Installation Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–6
Things to Consider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–6
Consideration 1: Physical Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–7
Consideration 2: Electrical Specification RS232C or RS422 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–8
Consideration 3: Cable Schematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–9
Consideration 4: Cable Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–9
Consideration 5: Installation Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–10
Consideration 6: A Quick Test Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–11
DL430 and DL440 Port Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–12
DL405 DCM Port Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–13
DL340 CPU Port Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–14
DL305 DCU Port Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–15
DL240 CPU Port Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–16
Point-to-point Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Host as Master . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Host as Master (continued) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Host as Master (continued) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL405 DCM as Master . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL405 DCM as Master (continued) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3–17
3–17
3–18
3–19
3–20
3–21
Multi-Drop Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
More Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Amplifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cable Termination Resistors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Host as Master . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Host as Master (continued) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Host as Master (continued) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL405 DCM Master . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL405 DCM as Master (continued) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL405 DCM Master (continued) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3–22
3–22
3–22
3–23
3–24
3–25
3–26
3–27
3–28
3–29
Network Design Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–30
You can avoid problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–30
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Table of Contents
Chapter 4: Communication Settings
Selecting the communication settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What do I have to select? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Baud Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Response Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HEX or ASCII Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Station Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4–2
4–2
4–2
4–2
4–2
4–2
4–2
Setting the station parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
For all Masters and Slaves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Host as a Master . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL405 DCM Communication Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Online / Offline Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL305 DCU Communications Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Online / Offline Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL430 and DL440 PLC Communication Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL430 and DL440 Station Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enter the Address (in decimal) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Select HEX or ASCII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Select the Parity Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clear the Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL340 Network Address Selection for Ports 1 and 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL340 Station Type Selection and Address Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL340 Baud Rate Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL340 Selecting the Response Delay Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL340 Selecting Data Format (ASCII/HEX) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL240 Communication Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Select AUX 56 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enter the Address (in decimal) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Select Hex or ASCII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Select the Parity Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Select the baud rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To clear the display and show the current address (instructions) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4–3
4–3
4–3
4–4
4–5
4–5
4–6
4–7
4–7
4–8
4–9
4–9
4–9
4–9
4–9
4–10
4–10
4–11
4–11
4–11
4–12
4–13
4–13
4–13
4–13
4–13
4–13
Communications Settings Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–14
You can avoid problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–14
What part of the manual should you use next? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–14
Do you have a PLC as a master or a Peer as a Master network? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–14
Do you have a Host as a master network? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–14
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Chapter 5: RLL Communications Programs
Why do you need a communications program? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Master Initiates Requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Why Ladder Logic? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5–2
5–2
5–2
Identifying the Master and Slave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Location of Master and Slave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5–4
5–4
Specifying the Amount of Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of Bytes to Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5–5
5–5
Designating the Master Station Memory Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Memory Area of Master . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5–6
5–6
Identifying the Slave Station Memory Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Memory Area of Slave to Read or Write . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5–7
5–7
Controlling the Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Communications Special Relays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Multiple Read and Write Interlocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5–8
5–8
5–9
What part of the manual should you use next? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–10
Start the Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–10
Chapter 6: DirectNET Host Communications Programs
Why do you need a communications program? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Master Initiates Requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DirectNET Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6–2
6–2
6–2
Modes of Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Transmission Bytes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HEX or ASCII Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Type Byte Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6–4
6–4
6–4
6–5
Protocol Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6–6
Controlling the Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Control Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6–8
6–8
Initiating the Request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–10
Enquiry ENQ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–10
Acknowledging the Request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–11
Acknowledge ACK – NAK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–11
Delayed Response to an Enquiry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–11
Defining the Request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Header – HDR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Byte 1: Start of Header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bytes 2 & 3: Target Slave Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Byte 4: Read or Write . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Byte 5: Data Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bytes 6 & 7: Starting Address MSB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bytes 8 & 9: Starting Address LSB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6–12
6–12
6–12
6–12
6–13
6–13
6–13
6–13
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Bytes 10 & 11: Complete Data Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bytes 12 & 13: Partial Data Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bytes 14 & 15: Master Station ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Byte 16: End Transmission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Byte 17: Longitudinal Redundancy Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6–13
6–13
6–13
6–13
6–13
Transferring Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Transmission Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Start of Text, End of Block, End of Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6–14
6–14
6–14
6–15
Calculating the Header Checksum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–16
Longitudinal Redundancy Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–16
Calculating the Data LRC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–17
LRC Example for HEX and ASCII Transfers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–17
Ending the Request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–18
End of Transmission – ETB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–18
Master to Slave Data Transfer Summary Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–18
Timing Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Timeouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL405 Timeouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL205 Timeouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL305 Timeouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Timeouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Communication Retries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Delays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6–19
6–19
6–19
6–19
6–20
6–20
6–20
6–20
What part of the manual should you use next? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–21
Start the Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–21
Chapter 7: Network Operation and Troubleshooting
Starting the Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PLC as Master Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PLC Peer as Master Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Host as Master Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Slave Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7–2
7–2
7–2
7–2
7–2
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
First Place to Look . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Try an Example Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPUs with Built-in DirectNET Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Host Masters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Communication Interface Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL405 DCM Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL305 DCU Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7–3
7–3
7–3
7–3
7–3
7–3
7–4
7–6
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Appendix A: PLC Master / Slave Example
The Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Master Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Slave Station #1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Slave Station #2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install the Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A–2
A–2
A–2
A–2
A–2
A–3
Remember these Four Steps! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A–4
Step 1: Design the Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Example Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Example Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A–5
A–5
A–6
Step 2: Select the Communication Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set the DCM Switches for the Master Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set the DCM Switches for Slave #1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install the DCM and Connect the Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set the PLC Switches for Slave #2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set the Station Address for Slave #2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A–7
A–7
A–8
A–8
A–8
A–9
Step 3: Create the Communications Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connect the Programing Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RLL Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Master Program RLL Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Master Program RLL PLUS Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Slave Station #2 Program RLL Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Slave Station #2 Program RLL PLUS Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A–10
A–10
A–10
A–11
A–12
A–13
A–14
A–14
Step 4: Start the Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Switch the PLCs to Run Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Verify the Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Verify the Write Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Verify the Read Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A–15
A–15
A–16
A–16
A–17
What should I do if it isn’t working correctly? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A–18
Troubleshooting Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A–18
Appendix B: Peer Master Example
The Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peer Station #1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peer Station #2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install the Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B–2
B–2
B–2
B–2
B–3
Remember these Four Steps! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B–4
Step 1: Design the Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Example Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Example Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B–5
B–5
B–5
vii
Table of Contents
Step 2: Select the Communication Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set the DCM Switches for Peer #1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set the DCM Switches for Peer #2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install the DCMs and Connect the Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B–6
B–6
B–7
B–7
Step 3: Create the Communications Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Two Programs are Required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peer Station #1 Program Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peer Station #2 Program Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connect the Programing Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peer Station #1 RLL Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peer Station #1 RLL Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peer Station #2 RLL Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peer Station #2 RLL Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B–8
B–8
B–8
B–8
B–9
B–10
B–11
B–12
B–13
Step 4: Start the Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Switch the PLCs to Run Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Verify the Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Verify the Write Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Verify the Read Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B–14
B–14
B–15
B–15
B–16
What should I do if it isn’t working correctly? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–16
Troubleshooting Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B–16
Appendix C: Host Master Example
The Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Master Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Slave Station #1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install the Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remember these Four Steps! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 1: Design the Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Example Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Example Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 2: Select the Communication Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set the Personal Computer Switches for the Master Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set the PLC Switches for the Slave Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set the Station Address for the Slave Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 3: Create the Communications Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DirectNET Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering the Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Slave Station Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example Program to Read Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example Program to Write Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 4: Start the Network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Execute the PC Master Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Verify the Read Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Verify the Write Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What should I do if it isn’t working correctly? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C–2
C–2
C–2
C–2
C–3
C–4
C–5
C–5
C–6
C–7
C–7
C–7
C–8
C–9
C–9
C–9
C–9
C–9
C–10
C–12
C–14
C–14
C–14
C–14
C–15
C–15
viii
Table of Contents
Appendix D: DL405 Data Types and Memory Maps
DL405 Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Type 31 V Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Type 31 (continued) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Type 32 Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Type 33 Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Type 39 Diagnostic Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D–2
D–2
D–3
D–4
D–5
D–6
DL430 Memory Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D–7
DL440 Memory Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D–8
X Input Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D–9
Y Output Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–10
Remote I/O Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–11
Control Relay Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–13
Stage Control / Status Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–15
Timer Status Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–17
Counter Status Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D–18
Appendix E: DL305 Data Types and Memory Map
DL305 Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Types 31 and 33 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Type 39 Diagnostic Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E–2
E–2
E–3
DL330 Memory Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E–5
DL330P Memory Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E–6
DL340 Memory Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E–7
I/O Point Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E–8
Control Relay Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E–9
Special Relays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–11
Timer / Counter Registers and Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–12
External Timer/Counter Setpoint Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–12
Data Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–13
Stage Control / Status Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–15
Shift Register Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–16
Special Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–17
DL305 / 405 Cross Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–18
Data Type 31: Register Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–18
Data Type 33: I/O Point Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E–18
ix
Table of Contents
Appendix F: DL205 Data Types and Memory Map
DL205 Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Type 31 V-Memory Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Type 31 V-Memory Addresses (continued) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Type 32 Input Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Type 33 Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Type 39 Diagnostic Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F–2
F–2
F–3
F–4
F–5
F–6
DL230 Memory Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F–7
DL240 Memory Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F–8
X Input Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F–9
Y Output Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F–9
Control Relay Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F–10
Stage Control / Status Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F–11
Timer Status Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F–12
Counter Status Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F–12
How to Use
this Manual
In This Chapter. . . .
Ċ Introduction
11
1–2
How to Use this Manual
How to Use this Manual
Introduction
The purpose of this The purpose of our manual is simple. We want to make it easy get your DirectNET
network up and running as soon as possible. Since we understand your time is
manual
money, our goal is to keep the documentation simple and concise.
This manual focuses on the details of the DirectNET network. The manual provides
a general overview of DirectNET along with an explanation of all the steps required
to implement a network.
Since we constantly try to improve our product line, we occasionally issue addenda
documenting new features and changes to the products. If there are addenda
included with this manual, please read through them to see which areas of the
manual or product are affected.
Who should read
this manual
If you understand data networks this manual will provide all the information you need
to get and keep your network up and running. We will use examples and
explanations from time to time to clarify our meaning and perhaps help you brush up
on specific features used in DirectNET communications. This manual is not
intended to be a generic network training manual, but rather a user reference
manual for DirectNET.
Where to begin
If you are in a hurry and already understand the basics of master / slave networks,
use the chart on the next page and proceed on to the chapter that pertains to your
needs. Be sure to keep this manual handy for reference when you run into questions.
If you are new to networking, we suggest starting at Chapter 2, so you can
understand the wide variety of network components and configurations available
with DirectNET. We believe you will be pleasantly surprised with how much can be
accomplished with DirectNET.
1–3
How to Use this Manual
Supplemental
Manuals
There are other manuals occasionally referenced by this manual. These manuals
are not absolutely necessary to install the network, but they do provide additional
details on several products that can be used with DirectNET.
S DL405 User Manual (D4–USER–M)
S DL405 Data Communication Modules (D4–DCM–M)
S DL305 User Manual (D3–USER–M)
S DL305 Data Communications Unit (D3–DCU–M)
S DL205 User Manual (D2–User–M)
Now, you have the material necessary to quickly understand the features and
requirements of DirectNET. So, let’s get started!
How to Use this Manual
How this manual is Ch 2: Getting Started with DirectNET – provides an overview of DirectNET and all
the network components and configurations. It does not provide extensive
organized
information on each network component, but instead highlights some of the basic
features of DirectNET.
Ch 3: Network Design and Setup – shows how to prepare for network installation,
and gives you cable diagrams for the various types of network master and slave
stations.
Ch 4: Communication Parameters – provides detailed information about setting
the master and slave station communication parameters. This is the place to look if
you need to know how to set the communication baud rate, station addresses, etc.
Ch 5: RLL Communications Programs – provides a description of the Relay
Ladder Logic (RLL) instructions used to initiate communications in a network that
uses a PLC as the master station.
Ch 6: DirectLink Communications Programs – If you’re writing your own host
software program or operator interface driver, you’ll find the DirectNET protocol
information in this chapter.
Ch 7: Network Operation and Troubleshooting – provides information on
network startup and troubleshooting techniques.
Appendix A – provides a step by step example of a PLC master / slave network.
Appendix B – provides a step by step example of a PLC peer master network.
Appendix C – provides a step by step example of a host master network.
Appendix D – explains the data types and memory ranges for the DL405 products.
Appendix E – explains the data types and memory ranges for the DL305 products.
Appendix F – explains the data types and memory ranges for the DL205 products.
Getting Started with
DirectNET
Communications
In This Chapter. . . .
12
Ċ The DirectNET Basics
Ċ What can I use as a network master station?
Ċ What can I use as a network slave station?
Ċ Choosing a Configuration
Ċ What communications program should I use?
Ċ How can I create a network?
2–2
Getting Started
Getting Started
The DirectNET Basics
It’s an Easy-to-use
Data NETwork
DirectNET is an easy-to-use data network for the DirectLOGIC family of
products. DirectNET is the perfect choice for those applications requiring data to be
shared between programmable controllers (PLCs) or, between PLCs and a host
computer. This network operates at speeds up to 38.4Kbps and permits you to
upload or download virtually any type of system data. Some examples are:
S Timer / Counter Data
S I/O Information
S Variable Memory Information (V memory, registers, etc.)
It has
Advantages...
DirectNET is a great choice for sharing small amounts of data between network
devices and has many advantages. You can build a data network with a minimal
investment in equipment and training because:
S The DL430, DL440, DL340, and DL240 Central Processing Units
(CPUs) have built-in DirectNET ports.
S In the most common applications there is no need for complex
communications programming. Simple Relay Ladder Logic instructions
can be used to manage the communications, so you don’t have to be a
networking guru to start moving data around.
It has
Disadvantages...
DirectNET operates asynchronously at speeds up to 38.4K baud. Therefore, it is not
the best choice in an application requiring extremely fast update times and moving
large amounts of data.
2–3
Getting Started
How Does it Work? The network is controlled by a master station that issues network commands to
individual slave stations (you cannot “broadcast” a message to all slaves). The
commands may be used to download data to the slave stations, or upload data from
the slave stations. The slave stations only respond to requests from the master
station and cannot initiate communications.
Issues Network Commands
to transfer data
Read V1400 from slave 1.....
Write X0–X15 to slave 3.....
Master
Slave 1
Network Protocol
Network
Specifications
Slave 2
Slave 3
Slave 4
DirectNET uses the DirectNET communications protocol, but you don’t have to
understand the protocol to build the most common network configurations. A
description of the DirectNET protocol is included in Chapter 6 – DirectNET
Communication Programs.
Maximum Number of Slaves
90 per master (RS422 Amplifier
required for over 16 stations)
Configurations
Point-to-point, multi-drop
Interface Type
Serial RS232C / RS422
Half-duplex, Asynchronous operation
Transmission Rate
300 to 38.4K baud
Transmission Distance
3300 Feet (1000 meters)
Protocol
DirectNET
Getting Started
Responds to Network Commands
2–4
Getting Started
What can I use as a network master station?
Getting Started
DL405/DL205 PLCs
with a DCM or
DL340 CPU
The master stations can be any one of
the following:
S DL430 or DL440 PLCs with a DCM
S DL340 CPU (using built-in port)
S DL240 PLC with a DCM
(A DCM is a Data Communication
Module.)
These master stations use Relay Ladder
Logic Instructions to initiate the
communications requests over the
network. No complex programming (or
knowledge of the DirectNET protocol) is
required.
DCM
DL405
DL305
DL340
CPU
DL205
NOTE: The DL205 DCM was not
available for shipment at the time of this
publication.
Availability
will
be
announced at a later date.
DCM
The DCM has no internal program and only processes the data transfer requests
from the master station CPU. The DCM automatically converts the requests into the
appropriate DirectNET commands and issues them to the network.
In a master station.....
issues network
requests
Write
Data
Read
Data
PLC Requests
Data Tranfer
Data
Request
Response
DCM automatically
converts request to
DirectNET Protocol and
sends it to the network
2–5
Getting Started
Operator Interface
Many applications utilize a computer to
act as a central data collection point and
to manage the network requests for data
transfer. The advantage with this
approach is you can perform many
different types of operations with the data
either before or after a request.
The disadvantage is you may have to
write your own communications driver
and that can take a considerable amount
of time for more complex applications.
The communications programming is
difficult unless you have a considerable
amount of network programming
experience. The programs must utilize
the DirectNET protocol used by
DirectNET.
Operator Interface
Getting Started
Host Computer
Many operator interfaces can be used as
a
network
master
station
to
communicate with one or more slave
stations. An operator interface must
have a driver that supports the
DirectNET protocol.
Make sure your operator interface uses
one of the following protocols or has a
driver for the equipment listed.
S DirectNET (DL430, DL440,
D4–DCM)
S Hostlink (TIt or Simaticr TI425,
-430, -435, U-01DM)
S CCM2 (GEr Series Onet)
Many companies advertise some of their
operator interface products will operate
with the DirectLOGIC family of
products. Check with your operator
interface supplier to see if they offer
versions for use with the DirectLOGIC
products.
Host Computer
2–6
Getting Started
Getting Started
What can I use as a network slave station?
CPUs with Built-in
DirectNET Port
One of the benefits of DirectNET is many of the DirectLOGIC CPUs already have
built-in DirectNET ports that can communicate up to 19.2K baud, (38.4K for the
DL340). The following CPUs have this feature.
S DL430, DL440
S DL340
S DL240
Data
Communications
Modules and
Data
Communications
Units
Each DirectLOGIC product family has a general purpose communications
interface. A DCM for the DL405 and DL205 CPUs and a DCU for the DL305 CPUs.
You can use any of the DirectLOGIC PLCs with their appropriate communications
interface as a slave station. A few reasons to use a communication interface are:
S The communication interfaces (except for the DL305 DCU) allow baud
rates of up to 38.4K baud.
S You can leave the CPU built-in port open to attach an operator interface
or programming device.
The following communications interfaces are available.
S D4–DCM (with DL405 CPUs)
S D2–DCM (with DL205 CPUs)
S D3–232–DCU and D3–422–DCU (with DL305 CPUs)
In a slave station, the DCM responds to requests from the network master station.
Write
Data
Read
Data
Data
Request
In a slave station.....
responds to
network requests
PLC Requests
Data Tranfer
Response
(a DCU may or may not be required
depending on the DL305 CPU model chosen.
Compatible
Products
There are also many compatible products from the following families that will
communicate over DirectNET.
S GER Series 1R
S Texas Instruments TI305R and TI405R
S SimaticR TI305 and TI405
2–7
Getting Started
The following diagram shows the various combinations of master and slave stations
available with a DirectNET solution.
DL205 or DL405
PLCs with DCM
or DL340 CPU
Operator Interface
Host Computer
Getting Started
Master
Slave 1
Slave 5
Slave 3
DL340 CPU
DL405 CPUs
DL205 CPU
port
cost
Two built-in DirectNET
ports yield the lowest cost
solution
Built-in DirectNET
yields the lowest
solution
Maximum baud rate= 19.2K
Requires an RS232/422
converter if multi-drop
Requires an RS232/422
converter if multi-drop
Maximum baud rate= 38.4K
Maximum baud rate= 19.2K
Built-in DirectNET
yields the lowest
solution
Slave 2
Slave 4
port
cost
Slave 6
DL405 & DCM
DL305 & DCU
DL205 & DCM
Excellent choice if bottom port
on DL405 is already being used
Use an RS422 DCU if multi-drop and a
third port is required.
Excellent choice if bottom port
on DL205 is already being used
Allows higher performance with
rates up to 38.4K baud
Maximum baud rate= 19.2K
2–8
Getting Started
Choosing a Configuration
Three Basic
Configurations
Getting Started
PLC as Master
The network components can be used to create many different network designs.
However, all networks use a mixture of three basic configurations. Any of the three
configurations can be grouped together or used independently. The type of
configuration determines the types of cables, communication parameters, and
communications programming.
This configuration is very easy to use. A
PLC master / slave configuration utilizes
a DirectLOGICE PLC as the network
master. A small communications
program and a communications
interface (DCM) is required in the master
station. Slave stations can have built-in
DirectNET ports, or, they can have
communication interfaces.
DCM
Master
Slaves
Built-in port
Host as Master
DCM
A host computer, operator interface, or
Master
other intelligent device can be connected
to one or more slave stations. The master
must contain a program (or driver)
capable of issuing network requests
Slaves
using the DirectNET protocol.
Slave stations can have built-in
DirectNET ports, or, they can have
communication interfaces (DCMs or
DCUs).
Built-in port
Peer as Master
Configuration
Limits
Two DL405 PLCs with DCMs as the
network interface can be connected so
either station can initiate a request for
data. Both stations must contain a
communications program to initiate the
requests for data.
This configuration can only be achieved
by using DCMs. No other stations can be
connected in this manner.
S
S
S
Peer Master
DCM
Peer Master
DCM
Up to 90 slave stations can be connected to a single master.
Only one master is allowed for each portion of the network.
A single base can have multiple masters, with each master
communicating to its own slave stations.
DCM
2–9
Getting Started
Combination
Networks
The three types of networks can be combined to solve many different applications.
Even though the configurations can be combined in an application, each network
remains independent. The master station from one network cannot request data
directly from slave stations on another network. This does not mean you cannot
obtain data from these networks, you can. It just requires more than one interface for
that slave station. The following diagram shows a simple application using all three
types of networks, some with multiple interfaces for each station.
Combination
Network
2
1 – PLC as Master Network
S
S
S
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
Master can initiate read or write
with any slave station
PLC with DCM as master
Full range of slave stations
available
2 – Host as Master Network
S
S
S
Host computer (or other
intelligent device) as master
Requires DirectNET program
in the host
Full range of slave stations
available
3 – Peer as Master Network
S
S
S
Two stations only
Only DL405 DCMs
Either station can initiate a
request
ÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇ
Getting Started
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
1
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇ
3
2–10
Getting Started
What communications program should I use?
Getting Started
Two Options
RLL Programs
There are two types of communications programs, RLL instructions or DirectNET
protocol programs. The network configuration determines the type of
communications program required.
S PLC as Master — The PLC master requires instructions in the RLL
program to initiate the requests for data.
S Peer as Master — Both peer masters require instructions in the RLL
program. Since both stations contain network instructions, either station
can initiate a request for data.
S Host as Master — Host computers or operator interfaces must execute
communications programs that can issue network commands with the
DirectNET protocol. You’ll either have to use a DL405 driver, (that
hopefully came with your host software package or operator interface),
or you’ll have to create one.
The RLL instructions are used to describe and initiate the operation the DCM will
process. Here’s an example of a simple RLL communications program. Chapter 4
provides a detailed description of the instructions.
Read Example
Write Example
SP125
Set
SP125
Set
Y50
Communication Error
SP124
Y50
Communication Error
LD
K0201
Module Not Busy
Load Constant
LD
K0003
SP124
LD
K0201
Module Not Busy
Load Constant
LD
K0003
Load Constant
LDA
O1400
Load Constant
LDA
O1400
Load Address
RX
Y0
Load Address
WX
Y0
Read Data
From
Network
Write Data To
Network
2–11
Getting Started
DirectNET
Programs
The communications program used with a hosted network is more complex than the
simple RLL instructions used with the other configurations, but the concept is the
same. The host is the DirectNET master and must use a DirectNET protocol
communications program to initiate all network requests to read or write data. These
communication programs can be written in many different languages, such as
BASIC, C, etc. and must include the appropriate DirectNET protocol commands.
Here’s an example of a simple DirectNET program. Chapter 5 provides a detailed
description of the DirectNET protocol.
DirectNET Program in BASIC
REM Program to read X0–X7 from a DL405 PLC
20
REM
30
REM Define all variables
40
REM
50
REM Change the slave address in HEX at line 60 if required.
60
SLAVEADDRESS=&H1
70
DATATYPE$=CHR$(&H32)
80
DATAADDR$=CHR$(&H30)+CHR$(&H31)+CHR$(&H30)+CHR$(&H31)
90
COMPLETEBLK$=CHR$(&H30)+CHR$(&H30)
100
PARTBLK$=CHR$(&H30)+CHR$(&H32)
110
MASTERADDR$=CHR$(&H30)+CHR$(&H30)
120
NORMAL$=CHR$(&H4E)
130
SLAVEADDR$=HEX$(SLAVEADDRESS)
140
IF LEN(SLAVEADDR$)<2 THEN SLAVEADDR$=”0”+SLAVEADDR$
150
OFFSETADDR$=CHR$(&H20+SLAVEADDRESS)
Getting Started
10
2–12
Getting Started
How can I create a network?
Getting Started
Follow Four Simple You can easily create a DirectNET network by following four simple steps. The
remainder of this manual provides explanations and examples of these steps.
Steps
1. Design the network by:
S Selecting the configuration(s)
S Building the communication
cables.
Don’t ignore the importance of this step
because it determines the type of
switch settings and communications
program you should use. Chapter 3
provides the details.
2. Select the communication settings by:
S Setting the master switches
S Setting the slave switches
Chapter 4 provides switch settings.
3. Write the communication control
program.
S RLL program with PLC master
or
S DirectNET program with host
master
Chapters 5 and 6 provide
programming information.
Switches
ONLINE
OFFLINE
X10
UNIT
ADR
(HEX)
X1
Write Program
Start Network
Request
4. Start the network operation.
Chapter 7 provides a description of
network operation.
Configuration and Cables
Response
Network Design
and Setup
In This Chapter. . . .
13
Ċ Choosing the Configuration
Ċ Cable Selection and Installation Guidelines
Ċ DL430 and DL440 Port Pinouts
Ċ DL405 DCM Port Pinouts
Ċ DL340 CPU Port Pinouts
Ċ DL305 DCU Port Pinouts
Ċ DL240 CPU Port Pinouts
Ċ PointĆtoĆpoint Cables
Ċ MultiĆDrop Cables
Ċ Network Design Checklist
–2
3–2
Network Design and Setup
Choosing the Configuration
Analyze your
Application
There are almost as many ways to build your network as there are grains of sand at
the beach. The first step in determining the configuration is to analyze your
application. As with most things, there’s probably a logical grouping that will point
you in the right direction. If you have several systems you’ll need to decide which
station(s) will be the master(s) and which one(s) will be slaves.
Consider the following example. (It’s the dreaded widget factory.)
Production
Management
Network Design
and Setup
Production Line #1
Production Line #2
Widget
Station 1
Widget
Station 1
Widget
Station 2
Widget
Station 2
Widget
Station 3
Widget
Station 3
Widget
Station 4
Widget
Station 4
Conveyor System
Pack Station
Pack Station
Palletizer
3–3
Network Design and Setup
Determine how you plan to use the information that is transferred. This may help you
design your network. For example, are you trying to share data between several
machines, or are you trying to obtain data to be used in production reports or
spreadsheets? Once you’ve taken a look at your application, you should be able to
identify the configuration needs. For example, our simple widget factory needs to
accomplish the following things.
Production Management: The production management system needs to issue
build orders and obtain data that can be used in production reports. The
management system also needs to monitor the production lines to determine which
line should receive the build orders. For example, one line may be behind schedule
while the other is completely free.
Production Lines 1 & 2: Each production line has a series of operations that must
be followed to build a finished product. Once they are completed they can be sent to
either pack station for packaging. In the real world, we all know that equipment
sometimes doesn’t work quite right, so each station should be monitored for
operational status.
Pack Stations: The finished products are sent to the pack stations, which in turn
send the cases to a palletizer for final shipping. Since there’s only one palletizer and
two stations packing different product models, the pack stations should coordinate
their deliveries.
Palletizer: The palletizer stacks the widgets into (hopefully) nice, neat packages of
widgets that can be sold by the millions.
Examine Data
Sharing
Requirements
Even though the three basic network configurations can be combined in an
application, each network remains independent. The master station from one
network cannot request data directly from slave stations on another network. This
does not mean you cannot obtain data from these networks, you can. It just requires
more than one interface for that slave station. For example, a DL440 PLC station
with two DCM (Data Communication Module) interfaces actually can connect to
three different networks. Check the manual for your particular slave station interface
to determine the maximum number allowed in a single base.
Built-in DirectNET Port
Network #1
DCMs
Networks #2 and #3
Network Design
and Setup
Identify Your
System
Requirements
–4
3–4
Network Design and Setup
Sketch the Network Since all applications must use one (or more) of the three basic network
configurations (PLC as Master, Host as Master and Peer as Master), we can easily
Diagram
draw the complete diagram for our example factory. To refresh your memory, here
are the possible configurations.
Possible Configurations
1 – PLC as Master Network
S
S
S
Master can initiate read or write
with any slave station
PLC with DCM as master
Full range of slave stations
available
2 – Host as Master Network
S
Network Design
and Setup
S
S
Host computer (or other
intelligent device) as master
Requires DirectNET program
in the host
Full range of slave stations
available
Master
DCM
Slaves
Built-in port
DCM
Master
Slaves
Built-in port
3 – Peer as Master Network
S
S
S
Peer Master
DCM
Peer Master
Two stations only
Only DL405 DCMs
Either station can initiate a
request
DCM
DCM
There are many different ways to configure the example. Notice, in the example on
the next page, the areas where the different configurations were used. This example
uses four small networks to solve the problem. The advantages of this approach are
that you can optimize each portion without affecting other parts of the factory.
3–5
Network Design and Setup
Production
Management
2
Production
Line #1
Production
Line #2
1ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉÉ
1
ÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇÇ
Widget
Station 1
Widget
Station 2
Widget
Station 3
Widget
Station 4
Pack Station
3
Pack Station
Palletizer
Now you’re ready
to build the
network cables.
Once you’ve drawn your network configuration, you can build the network cables.
Network Design
and Setup
Conveyor System
–6
3–6
Network Design and Setup
Cable Selection and Installation Guidelines
Things to Consider There are several considerations that help determine the type of cable needed for
your application.
1. Will the DCM be physically connected in a point-to-point configuration or
multi-drop configuration?
2. What electrical specification is best for your application? RS232C or
RS422?
3. What is the cable schematic?
4. What are the relevant cable specifications?
5. What installation guidelines are necessary?
6. Do you just need a quick test cable?
Network Design
and Setup
The next few pages discuss these considerations in detail. If you already know the
type of cable needed, the cable schematics are included on pages 3–17 through
3–29.
3–7
Network Design and Setup
Consideration 1:
Physical
Configuration
DirectNET can be used in either a point-to-point or multi-drop configuration. A
point-to-point connection only has two stations, a master and a slave. You should
use this configuration when you want to connect a DirectNET master station to a
single DirectNET slave station. For example, use the point-to-point configuration to
connect a personal computer, an operator interface, or an intelligent device to a
single station.
Use the multi-drop configuration to connect one master to two or more slaves.
Point to Point
or
DCM
DL405 Master
DirectNET PLC Slave
Network Design
and Setup
DCM
Multi-drop
DirectNET
Masters
DirectNET Slaves
or
DCM
–8
3–8
Network Design and Setup
Consideration 2:
Electrical
Specification
RS232C or RS422
DirectNET supports both RS232C or RS422 communication. Your application and
configuration choice will help determine which electrical specification is best for you.
If you are using multi-drop, you must use RS422. If you are using point-to-point, you
may have a choice between RS232C and RS422.
You can use RS232C if the cable length is less than 50 feet and if the cable will not be
subjected to induced electrical noise that is commonly found near welders, large
motors, or other devices that create large magnetic fields.
You should use RS422 for all other applications. RS422 allows longer cable
distances (up to 3300 feet) and provides higher noise immunity.
RS232C or RS422 for Point-to-Point
or
Network Design
and Setup
DCM
DL405 Master
DirectNET PLC Slave
DCM
RS422 for Multi-drop
DirectNET
Masters
DirectNET Slaves
or
DCM
3–9
Network Design and Setup
Consideration 3:
Cable Schematics
There are two sections in this chapter that provide various types of cable schematics
that are appropriate for most applications. Point-to-Point cable diagrams can be
found on pages 3–17 through 3–21. Multi-drop cable diagrams can be found on
pages 3–22 through 3–29. You may have to combine some of these examples to
design a cable that meets your exact application requirements.
Consideration 4:
Cable
Specifications
Although many types of cables may work for your application, we recommend you
use a cable that is constructed to offer a high degree of noise immunity. A cable
constructed equivalent to Belden 9855 should be sufficient. The following
specifications should be used as a guideline.
Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shielded, twisted-pair
(RS232C only uses two wires and a ground)
Conductor size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 AWG or larger
Insulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Polyethylene
Shield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Copper braid or aluminum foil
Impedance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100W @ 1MHz
Capacitance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60pf / meter or less
Network Design
and Setup
3–10
–10
Network Design and Setup
Consideration 5:
Installation
Guidelines
Your company may have guidelines for cable installation. If so, you should check
those before you begin the installation. Here are some general things to consider.
S Don’t run cable next to larger motors, high current switches, or
transformers. This may cause noise problems.
S Route the cable through an approved cable housing to minimize the risk
of accidental cable damage. Check local and national codes to choose
the correct method for your application.
S Consider redundant cabling if the application data is critical. This allows
you to quickly reconnect all stations while the primary cable is being
repaired.
Cable Shield Grounding — No matter what type of configuration is required, it is
important to ground the cable shield to minimize the possibility of noise. The
preferred method is to connect one end (preferably the receiver end) of the cable
shield to the connector housing. If noise problems are still present and you have a
good earth ground for the cabinet, you should connect one end of the shield to the
cabinet earth ground. Don’t ground both ends of the shield because this will create
induced noise on the cable.
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
Network Design
and Setup
Step 1: Strip back about 2.5” of the shield.
2.5”
Step 2: Crimp a ring connector onto the shield.
Step 3: Secure the shield to
the connector shell.
3–11
Network Design and Setup
Consideration 6:
PLCDirect offers a Universal Cable Kit (part number FA–CABKIT). This cable kit
A Quick Test Cable allows you to connect various types of DirectLOGIC products with an RS232C
cable in a matter of minutes. The kit consists of a cable (phone cable with male plugs
already attached) and several specially wired connectors and phone cables.
The special connectors are a D-sub style with built-in female phone jacks. The kit
includes a wide variety of the special connectors so you can use one kit to easily
connect products from the different DirectLOGIC family of products. To use the kit
just follow these steps.
1. Plug the appropriate D-sub connector onto the device (CPU, DCU, or
DCM).
2. Plug the appropriate D-sub connector onto the other device you are
connecting.
3. Connect the cable to the two D-sub connectors.
WARNING: This cable is suitable for quick testing situations and should not
be used in actual applications. This cable is not shielded and is highly
susceptible to electrical noise. Electrical noise can cause unpredictable
operation that may result in a risk of personal injury or damage to equipment.
Use the cable specifications described earlier in this manual to select a cable
suitable for actual applications.
1. Attach Universal Cable Adapter to the device.
2. Attach another Universal Cable Adapter
to the Device which will connect to the DCM
3. Attach the Universal Cable
Network Design
and Setup
Build A Test Cable In 30 Seconds
9 Pin
Universal 9 pin
D–sub connector
Universal 25 pin
D–sub connector
NOTE: The adapters take care of any pin swapping that may be required between
the devices. You do not have to make any wiring adjustments.
3–12
–12
Network Design and Setup
DL430 and DL440 Port Pinouts
The DL430 and DL440 CPUs have
built-in DirectNET ports. This port is only
a slave port. The following diagram
shows the port pinout connections.
DirectNET
Port
Port Pinouts
Network Design
and Setup
Pin 1
Pin 14
Pin
Signal Definition
Pin
Signal Definition
1
Not connected
14
RS422 data out +
2
RS232C data out
15
Not connected
3
RS232C data in
16
RS422 data out –
4
RS232C RTS
17
Not connected
5
RS232C CTS
18
RS422 RTS –
6
Not connected
19
RS422 RTS +
7
Signal ground
20
Not connected
8
Not connected
21
Not connected
9
RS422 data in +
22
Not connected
10
RS422 data in –
23
RS422 CTS –
11
RS422 CTS +
24
Not connected
12
Not connected
25
Not connected
13
Not connected
Pin labeling conforms to the IBM DTE and DCE standards.
3–13
Network Design and Setup
DL405 DCM Port Pinouts
The DL405 DCM can be used as a
master or slave station interface. The
following diagram shows the port pinout
connections.
DirectNET
Port
Port Pinouts
Pin 1
Pin 14
Signal Definition
Pin
Signal Definition
1
Not connected
14
RS422 data out +
2
RS232C data out
15
RS422 data out –
3
RS232C data in
16
RS422 data in –
4
RS232C RTS
17
RS422 data in +
5
RS232C CTS
18
Not connected
6
Internal Circuit 5V
19
Not connected
7
Internal Circuit 0V
20
Not connected
8
RS422 RTS +
21
Not connected
9
RS422 RTS –
22
RS422 data out +
10
RS422 RTS +
23
RS422 data out –
11
RS422 RTS –
24
RS422data in –
12
RS422 CTS +
25
RS422 data in +
13
RS422 CTS –
Pin labeling conforms to the IBM DTE and DCE standards.
Network Design
and Setup
Pin
3–14
–14
Network Design and Setup
DL340 CPU Port Pinouts
The DL340 CPU has two built-in
DirectNET slave ports under the hinged
cover.
The ports are limited to RS232C
communication, so you have to use an
RS232C/RS422 converter for multi-drop
connections. This port is an RJ11
(handset connector) phone jack. The
DirectLOGICE Universal Cable Kit
(FA–CABKIT) can be used if you do not
want to create a phone jack connection.
DirectNET
Ports 1 and 2
Port 2 is the Master port.
Ports 1 and 2 Pinouts
Network Design
and Setup
1
2
3 4
Phone Jack
Connector
Pin
Signal Definition
1
RS232C data in
2
RS232C data out
3
Request to Send
4
Ground
Pin labeling conforms to the IBM DTE and DCE standards.
3–15
Network Design and Setup
DL305 DCU Port Pinouts
There are two versions of the DL305
DCU.
S D3–232–DCU (RS232C version)
S D3–422–DCU (RS422 version)
The DL305 DCU can only be used as a
slave station interface. If you only have
one master and one slave, you can use
either version. If you have more than one
slave you should probably use the the
RS422 version. You can use the RS232C
version, but you’ll need an RS232C/
RS422 converter (FA–UNICON) for each
station.
D3–422–DCU (RS422)
Port Pinouts
Pin 1
Pin 14
DirectNET
Port
Signal Definition
Pin
Signal Definition
1
Not connected
14
RS422 data out +
2
Not connected
15
RS422 data out –
3
Not connected
16
RS422 data in –
4
Not connected
17
RS422 data in +
5
Not connected
18
Not connected
6
Not connected
19
Not connected
7
Logic ground 0V
20
Not connected
8
Not connected
21
Not connected
9
Not connected
22
RS422 data out +
10
RS422 RTS +
23
RS422 data out –
11
RS422 RTS –
24
RS422data in –
12
RS422 CTS +
25
RS422 data in +
13
RS422 CTS –
D3–232–DCU (RS232C)
Pin
Signal Definition
Pin
Signal Definition
1
Not connected
14
Not connected
2
RS232C TXD
15
Not connected
3
RS232C RXD
16
Not connected
4
RS232C RTS
17
Not connected
5
RS232C CTS
18
Not connected
6
Not connected
19
Not connected
7
Logic ground 0V
20
Not connected
8
Not connected
21
Not connected
9
Not connected
22
Not connected
10
Not connected
23
Not connected
11
Not connected
24
Not connected
12
Not connected
25
Not connected
13
Not connected
Pin labeling conforms to the IBM DTE and DCE standards.
Network Design
and Setup
Pin
3–16
–16
Network Design and Setup
DL240 CPU Port Pinouts
Network Design
and Setup
The DL240 CPU has two built-in
DirectNET ports.
Port 1: can be used for point-to-point
communications with either RS232C or
RS422. However Port 1 cannot be used
in a multi-drop configuration even with an
RS232C / RS422 converter. This is
because the RTS signal pin is used for
5V.
Port 2: can be used for either
point-to-point or multi-drop connections.
An RS232C/RS422 converter is required
for multi-drop connections.
These ports are RJ11 phone jacks. The
DirectLOGIC Universal Cable Kit
(FA–CABKIT) can be used if you do not
want to create a phone jack connection.
Port 1
Port 2
DirectNET
Ports
Port 1 Pinouts
1
2
3 4
5 6
Phone Jack
Connector
Pin
Signal Definition
1
0V
2
5V
3
RS232C Data in
4
RS232C Data out
5
5V
6
0V
Port 2 Pinouts
Pin
Signal Definition
1
0V
2
5V
3
RS232C Data in
4
RS232C Data out
5
Request to Send out
6
0V
Pin labeling conforms to the IBM DTE and DCE standards.
3–17
Network Design and Setup
Point-to-point Cables
Host as Master
Slaves: DL405 DCM, DL405 CPU Port, DL305 RS232C DCU
B
A
DL405
CPU
Port
DL405
DCM
Connect to any of
these devices
DL305
w/DCU
9-pin Connector
RS232C
B
Master
Slave
2 RXD
2 TXD
3 TXD
3 RXD
5 GND
7 GND
1 DCD
4 RTS
4 DTR
5 CTS
A
DL405
CPU
Port
or
DL405
DCM
6 DSR
B
RS232C
Master
Slave
2 TXD
3 RXD
3 RXD
2 TXD
7 GND
7 GND
4 RTS
4 RTS
5 CTS
5 CTS
6 DSR
DL405
CPU
Port
or
DL405
DCM
8 DCD
7 RTS
or
8 CTS
9Ćpin DCE
Connector
or
20 DTR
DL305
w/DCU
25Ćpin Connector
DL305
w/DCU
25Ćpin DTE
Connector
25Ćpin Connector
Pin labeling conforms to the IBM DTE and DCE standards.
Network Design
and Setup
A
25-pin Connector
3–18
–18
Network Design and Setup
Host as Master
(continued)
Slaves: DL340 CPU Port, DCM, DL240 CPU Port
B
A
DL340
CPU Port
DL240
CPU Port 2
C
Connect to any
of these devices
9-pin Connector
A
Network Design
and Setup
B
RS232C
Master
25-pin Connector
Slave
DL340
CPU Port
A
Master
RS232C
B
Slave
2 RXD
2 TXD
2 TXD
3 TXD
1 RXD
1 RXD
3 RXD
5 GND
4 GND
2 TXD
7 GND
4 GND
1 DCD
4 DTR
6 DSR
7 RTS
DL340
CPU Port
4 RTS
Or, use phone cable
adapter provided
with the device
8 CTS
5 CTS
6 DSR
8 DCD
20 DTR
9-pin DCE
Connector
25-pin DTE Connector
A
C
RS232C
Master
DL240
CPU Port 2
Slave
A
Master
RS232C
C
Slave
2 TXD
4 TXD
2 TXD
3 RXD
3 RXD
3 RXD
3 RXD
5 GND
1 GND
4 TXD
7 GND
1 GND
1 DCD
4 RTS
4 DTR
6 DSR
7 RTS
8 CTS
5 CTS
Or, use phone cable
adapter provided
with the device
6 DSR
8 DCD
20 DTR
9-pin DCE
Connector
25-pin DTE Connector
Pin labeling conforms to the IBM DTE and DCE standards.
DL240
CPU Port 2
3–19
Network Design and Setup
Host as Master
(continued)
Slaves: DL305 RS422 DCU
A
DL305
w/DCU
B
Male connector plugs onto DCU
9-pin Connector
A
RS232C
A
B
RS232C
Master
FA–UNICON
Converter for Slave
B
FA–UNICON
Converter for Slave
2 RXD
3 RXD
2 TXD
2 TXD
3 TXD
2 TXD
3 RXD
3 RXD
5 GND
7 GND
4 RTS
1 DCD
20 DTR
4 DTR
25 +5V
DL305
w/DCU
6 DSR
DL305
w/DCU
5 CTS
7 GND
7 GND
6 DSR
7 RTS
8 DCD
8 CTS
20 DTR
20 DTR
25 +5
9-pin
Connector
25-pin DCE
Connector
25-pin
DTE Connector
25-pin DCE
Connector
Pin labeling conforms to the IBM DTE and DCE standards.
Network Design
and Setup
Master
25-pin Connector
3–20
–20
Network Design and Setup
DL405 DCM as
Master
A
Slaves: DL405 DCM, DL405 CPU Port, DL305 RS232C DCU
B
A
B
RS232C
Master
DL405
CPU
Port
DL405
DCM
Slave
2 TXD
3 RXD
3 RXD
2 TXD
4 RTS
4 RTS
5 CTS
5 CTS
7 GND
7 GND
DL405
CPU
Port
or
DL405
DCM
Connect to anyone
of these devices
or
DL305
w/DCU
DL305
w/DCU
25-pin Connector
25-pin Connector
Network Design
and Setup
Slaves: DL340 CPU Port, DL240 CPU Port, DL205 DCM
A
B
DL340 CPU
CPU Port
DL240
CPU Port
Connect to anyone
of these devices
A
Master
RS232C
B
DL340
CPU Port
Slave
A
DL240
C CPU Port
RS232C
Master
Slave
2 TXD
1 RXD
2 TXD
3 RXD
3 RXD
2 TXD
3 RXD
4 TXD
4 RTS
4 GND
3
4 RTS
5 CTS
1 GND
2
7 GND
5
6
5 CTS
7 GND
Use phone cable
adapter
Or, use phone cable
adapter provided
with the device
25-pin Connector
25-pin Connector
Pin labeling conforms to the IBM DTE and DCE standards.
3–21
Network Design and Setup
DL405 DCM as
Master (continued)
A
Slaves: DL305 RS422 DCU
B
A
B
RS422
Master
DL305
w/DCU
Slave
7
10
11
12
13
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
10
11
12
13
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
14
15
16
17
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
17
16
15
14
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
22
23
24
25
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
25
24
23
22
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
25-pin Connector
DL305
w/DCU
25-pin Connector
Network Design
and Setup
Pin labeling conforms to the IBM DTE and DCE standards.
3–22
–22
Network Design and Setup
Multi-Drop Cables
More
Considerations
With RS422 you have great flexibility in how you want to design your network
cabling. You also have to use:
S Network Amplifiers – if you have more than 16 slave stations
S Cable Termination Resistors – to help to reduce data errors.
Network Amplifiers If you have more than 16 slave stations, you should use an RS422 amplifier to
maintain the signal levels. The best amplifiers are regenerative, that is, they recover
the signal and try to reduce any noise signals that are present. Some amplifiers are
not regenerative and amplify the noise as well as the signal. (You can get amplifiers
from several sources. The Black Box catalog is one of many good places to start.)
The following diagram shows some instances where an amplifier is necessary.
Serial Slave Connection
1–16 Slave Stations
RS422
Amp
Network Design
and Setup
Master
Station
Slave
Slave
Slave
Slave
Slave
Parallel Slave Connection
1–16 Slave Stations
RS422
Amp
RS422
Amp
Slave
Master
Station
Slave
Slave
RS422
Amp
Slave
RS422
Amp
Slave
Slave
Slave
RS422
Amp
Slave
RS422
Amp
Slave
Slave
Slave
Slave
3–23
Network Design and Setup
Cable Termination
Resistors
It is important you add termination resistors at each end of the RS422 line. This helps
reduce data errors during data transmission. You should select resistors that match
the cable impedance. For example, a typical 22 AWG solid conductor cable with 4.5
twists per foot has a typical impedance of about 120W.
There are two ways to actually connect the resistors.
S Line-to-Line — this method balances the receive data lines (IN+ and
IN–) and requires one resistor at each end of the line. (The cable
diagrams we’ve provided show this method, but you can use either.)
S Line-to-Ground — this method also balances the receive data lines, but
common mode noise rejection is improved significantly. This method
requires two resistors at each end of the line. Also, since there are two
resistors, the sum total of both resistors should match the cable
impedance.
The following diagram illustrates the two options.
Line-to-Line Termination
Master
Terminate
at Master
Last Slave
7
10
11
12
13
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
19
18
11
23
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
14
15
16
17
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
17
16
15
14
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
22
23
24
25
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
120 ohm
Resistor
Line-to-Ground Termination
Master
Terminate
at Last Slave
Slave
Last Slave
7
10
11
12
13
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
19
18
11
23
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
14
15
16
17
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
9
10
16
14
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
22
23
24
25
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
62 ohm
Resistors
Pin labeling conforms to the IBM DTE and DCE standards.
62 ohm
Resistors
Network Design
and Setup
120 ohm
Resistor
Slave
3–24
–24
Network Design and Setup
Host as Master
A
Slaves: DL405 DCM, DL305 RS422 DCU
C
B
DL405
DCM
DL405
DCM
D
DL305
w/DCU
A
B
C
Master
FA–UNICON Converter
Slave
Slave
3 RXD
2 TXD
2 TXD
3 RXD
5 GND
7 GND
1 DCD
20 DTR
4 DTR
25 +5V
6 DSR
7 RTS
8 CTS
D
RS422 — — —
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
10
11
12
13
7
10
11
12
13
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
10
11
12
13
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
17
16
15
14
17
16
15
14
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
17
16
15
14
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
25
24
23
22
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
22
23
24
25
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
9-pin
Connector
DL305
w/DCU
Termination Resistor
RS422 — — —
Slaves: DL405 CPU Ports
Network Design
and Setup
A
C
B
C
Master
FA–UNICON Converter
Slave
3 RXD
2 TXD
2 TXD
3 RXD
5 GND
7 GND
1 DCD
20 DTR
4 DTR
25 +5V
6 DSR
7 RTS
DL405
CPU
B
D
DL405
CPU
A
8 CTS
D
DL405
CPU
Slave
E
DL405
CPU
Slave
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
10
11
12
13
7
19
18
11
23
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
19
18
11
23
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
19
18
11
23
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
17
16
15
14
9
10
16
14
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
9
10
16
14
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
9
10
16
14
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
9-pin
Connector
DL405
CPU
Termination Resistor
E
DL405
CPU
Pin labeling conforms to the IBM DTE and DCE standards.
Termination Resistor
3–25
Network Design and Setup
Host as Master
(continued)
Slaves: DL340 CPU Port, DL240 CPU Port, DL205 DCM
A
B
Master
A
FA–UNICON Converter
RS422 — — —
2 RXD
3 RXD
3 TXD
2 TXD
5 GND
7 GND
1 DCD
20 DTR
4 DTR
25 +5V
6 DSR
7 RTS
B
8 CTS
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
10
11
12
13
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
17
16
15
14
9-pin Connector
DL340
CPU
Termination Resistor
C
C
FA–UNICON Converter
Slave
D
RXD 1
3 RXD
TXD 2
2 TXD
GND 4
RTS 3
20 DTR
7 GND
DL340
CPU
Or, use phone cable
included with converter
to connect the D-shell to
the phone jack
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
10
11
12
13
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
14
15
16
17
D
FA–UNICON Converter
Slave
TXD 4
2 TXD
RXD 3
3 RXD
GND 1
RTS 5
20 DTR
DL240
CPU
7 GND
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
10
11
12
13
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
14
15
16
17
Port 2
only
Termination Resistor
Pin labeling conforms to the IBM DTE and DCE standards.
Network Design
and Setup
DL240
CPU
3–26
–26
Network Design and Setup
Host as Master
(continued)
Slaves: DL305 RS232C DCU
A
A
B
Master
FA–UNICON Converter
RS422 — — —
2 RXD
3 RXD
3 TXD
2 TXD
5 GND
7 GND
1 DCD
20 DTR
4 DTR
25 +5V
6 DSR
7 RTS
8 CTS
B
9-pin Connector
DL305
DCU with
Convertor
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
10
11
12
13
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
17
16
15
14
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
22
23
24
25
Termination Resistor
C
Network Design
and Setup
C
FA–UNICON Converter
DL305
DCU with
Convertor
Slave
RS232C DCU
D
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
10
11
12
13
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
14
15
16
17
Male connector
plugs onto DCU
D
FA–UNICON Converter
Slave
RS232C DCU
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
10
11
12
13
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
14
15
16
17
Male connector
plugs onto DCU
Termination Resistor
Pin labeling conforms to the IBM DTE and DCE standards.
3–27
Network Design and Setup
DL405 DCM Master
Slaves: DL405 DCM, DL305 RS422 DCU
A
A
RS422 — — —
B
DCM Master
B
DL405
DCM
C
DL405
DCM
C
Slave
DL305
DCU
Slave
7
10
11
12
13
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
10
11
12
13
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
10
11
12
13
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
14
15
16
17
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
17
16
15
14
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
17
16
15
14
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
22
23
24
25
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
25
24
23
22
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
22
23
24
25
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
Termination Resistor
Termination Resistor
DL305
DCU
A
A
B
DCM Master
B
DL405
CPU
C
Slave
C
DL405
CPU
D
Slave
DL405
CPU
Slave
7
10
11
12
13
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
19
18
11
23
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
19
18
11
23
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
19
18
11
23
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
14
15
16
17
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
9
10
16
14
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
9
10
16
14
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
9
10
16
14
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
22
23
24
25
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
Termination Resistor
DL405
CPU
DL405
CPU
Termination Resistor
D
DL405
CPU
Pin labeling conforms to the IBM DTE and DCE standards.
Network Design
and Setup
RS422 — — —
Slaves: DL405 CPU Ports
3–28
–28
Network Design and Setup
DL405 DCM as
Master (continued)
A
Slaves: DL340 CPU Port, DL240 CPU Port
DCM Master
RS422 — — —
A
DL340
CPU
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
10
11
12
13
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
14
15
16
17
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
22
23
24
25
Termination Resistor
B
B
FA–UNICON Converter
Network Design
and Setup
Slave
DL240
CPU
RXD 1
2 TXD
TXD 2
3 RXD
GND 4
RTS 3
20 DTR
7 GND
DL340
CPU
C
Or, use phone cable
included with converter
to connect the D-shell to
the phone jack
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
10
11
12
13
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
14
15
16
17
C
FA–UNICON Converter
Slave
RXD 3
2 TXD
TXD 4
3 RXD
GND 1
RTS 5
20 DTR
DL240
CPU
7 GND
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
10
11
12
13
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
14
15
16
17
Port 2
only
Termination Resistor
Pin labeling conforms to the IBM DTE and DCE standards.
3–29
Network Design and Setup
DL405 DCM Master
(continued)
A
Slaves: DL305 RS232C DCU
DCM Master
A
RS422 — — —
DL305
DCU
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
10
11
12
13
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
14
15
16
17
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
22
23
24
25
Termination Resistor
B
B
FA–UNICON Converter
DL305
DCU
Slave
RS232C DCU
7
10
11
12
13
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
14
15
16
17
Male connector
plugs onto DCU
C
FA–UNICON Converter
Slave
RS232C DCU
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
10
11
12
13
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
14
15
16
17
Male connector
plugs onto DCU
Termination Resistor
Pin labeling conforms to the IBM DTE and DCE standards.
Network Design
and Setup
C
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
3–30
–30
Network Design and Setup
Network Design Checklist
Network Design
and Setup
You can avoid
problems
Incorrect network cabling causes many problems. It’s important to make sure your
network design and cable selection is complete before proceeding to the next
chapters. Have you ......
1. Drawn the network so you can easily identify the types of networks
involved?
2. Used the cable diagrams to understand the network cabling requirements?
Once you have designed the network, you’re ready to set the communications
switches for each of the network stations. Chapter 4 shows you how to set the
switches for the various types of stations.
Communication
Settings
In This Chapter. . . .
14
Ċ Selecting the communication settings
Ċ Setting the station switches
Ċ Communications Settings Checklist
Ċ What part of the manual should you use next?
4–2
Communication Settings
Communication
Settings
Selecting the communication settings.
What do I have to
select?
There are a few things you need to select before you can set the communication
switches for the network stations.
S Baud rate
S Parity
S Response delay
S Hexadecimal or ASCII data representation
S Station address
Baud Rate
All devices on the network must use the same communication settings, but not all of
the masters and slaves offer the same range of settings. This means your choice of
equipment will help you determine the baud rate. For example, the DCM (Data
Communication Module) interfaces can communicate at speeds of 38.4K baud, but
the built-in PLC ports are limited to 19.2K baud (the DL340 can go up to 38.4K baud).
Also, some computer communication cards are limited in the range of available baud
rates. Check the documentation that came with your computer or operator interface
to determine the available communication parameters.
DirectNET can support eight baud rate selections ranging from 300bps to
38.4Kbps. Usually, you should use the highest baud rate possible unless noise
problems appear. If noise problems appear, try reducing the baud rates.
Parity
You can choose between odd parity or no parity. Again, all the devices should be set
the same. Odd parity uses eleven bits total (1 start bit, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, and 1
parity bit.) Odd parity also provides slightly better error checking. Some devices
require no parity, which uses only 10 bits (1 start bit, 8 data bits, and 1 stop bit.)
Response Delay
This sets how long the station will wait before it responds to a communication
request. If you’re using all DirectLOGIC equipment, a response delay is not
required and you should set the time to 0. This is primarily included for those of you
who need to use modems. For example, the DCM may respond too quickly for some
devices, such as telephone or radio modems. If you encounter this problem just
choose a delay from 0 to 500 mS. Your modem manual should suggest the proper
settings.
HEX or ASCII Data
If you want the fastest communication possible, use HEX mode. The difference is in
the way the data is represented. The same data is twice as long in ASCII format, so it
takes longer to transfer. If you have a device on the network that requires ASCII
mode, then select ASCII mode for all the stations, otherwise, use HEX mode.
Station Address
You can have up to 90 slave stations connected to the master. Each station,
including the master, must have a unique network address. There are a few
restrictions on how you can use the available addresses.
Master stations: the master station should be address 0. This insures compatibility
with all slaves.
Slave stations: the slave stations can use addresses1 – 90 and not address 0.
Peer stations: the peer stations can use addresses 1 – 90. There are only two
stations in this configuration and either one can act as a master and initiate a
request, however; each station is restricted from using address 0.
4–3
Communication Settings
Setting the station parameters
For all Masters and You have to set the switches for all the stations on the network, masters and slaves.
Set the switches so all the stations have the same communication parameters. The
Slaves
next several pages provide the switch settings for the DirectLOGIC network
components. You can quickly scan the pages to find the settings for your devices.
Read the descriptions carefully because most network problems are caused by
incorrect switch settings.
Host as a Master
It seems there’s a computer manufacturer on every corner these days, so it would be
impossible for us to provide the communication settings for all of them. Just check
the documentation that came with your computer to determine how to set the
parameters.
Communication
Settings
4–4
Communication Settings
DL405 DCM
Communication
Switches
There are two banks of switches located on the rear of the DCM that are used to set
the communications parameters.
OFF ON
Switch Positions
Time*
6
7
8
0 OFF OFF OFF
2 ON OFF OFF
5 OFF ON OFF
10 ON ON OFF
20 OFF OFF ON
50 ON OFF ON
100 OFF ON ON
500 ON ON ON
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
NO Parity
Set to OFF
Delay Time
*Delay time in milliseconds
Baud Rate
ODD Parity
Self Test
SW 4
1
2
3
4
COM Timeout Enable
Hexadecimal Mode
Station
Type
Switch Positions
Baud
1
2
3
300 ON OFF OFF
600 OFF ON OFF
1200 ON ON OFF
2400 OFF OFF ON
4800 ON OFF ON
9600 OFF ON ON
19200 ON ON ON
38400 OFF OFF OFF
Switch Positions
Station Type
1
DirectNET Slave
OFF
DirectNET Master
OFF
DirectNET Peer
ON
Modbus) RTU Slave ON
2
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
COM Timeout Disable
ASCII Mode
SW 5
Communication
Settings
DCM Rear View
Baud Rate: Positions 1 – 3 on SW4 are used to set the baud rate for the DCM. There
are eight baud rate selections available from 300 baud to 38.4K baud.
Parity: Position 4 on SW4 selects between the two parity options, odd or none.
Self-Test: Position 5 on SW4 selects the factory self-test and should always be
switched off. If the self-test is on, the module will not operate correctly.
Response Delay Time: Positions 6 – 8 on SW4 set the response delay time. This is
primarily used when you’re using modems and determines how long the DCM will
wait before it responds to a communication request. If you’re using all
DirectLOGIC equipment, a response delay is not required and you should set the
time to 0. If you’re using a modem, check the documentation to determine the proper
delay time.
Station Type: Positions 1 and 2 on SW5 select the DCM protocol and the station
type, master or slave. The DCM is very versatile and can actually support a second
protocol ModbusR. Be sure you have selected the proper protocol for your network,
either DirectNET or ModbusR.
Host as Master: If you’re using a host as master, set the DCM as a DirectNET slave.
PLC as Master: If the DCM is in a master station, then set the DCM as a DirectNET
master. If the DCM is in a slave station, then set the DCM as a DirectNET slave.
Peer as Master: If you’re using a peer network, set both stations as DirectNET
peers.
Communication Timeout: Position 3 on SW5 selects the communication timeout.
Don’t disable the timeout for normal use. Communication Timeout Disable is
normally used only if you’re developing your own DirectNET programs. By disabling
the timeout, you can send one DirectNET component without any communication
problems. If you have this timeout disabled and a communication error does occur,
you must restart communications by sending a retry or an End of Transmission
(EOT) command.
ASCII / HEX Mode: Position 4 on SW5 selects between ASCII and HEX modes of
data representation. Set the switch to match your network parameters.
4–5
Communication Settings
Online / Offline
Switch
Address Switch
In the Offline position, this switch logically
disconnects the DCM from the network (just as
if you pulled the cable from the connector.)
Once this switch is moved to the Offline
position, the DCM will not communicate with
the network.
If you move the switch to the Online position,
the DCM will communicate with the network,
but not until the master sends another request
for communication. This does not operate like
the reset switch on many personal computers.
ONLINE
OFFLINE
The DCM station address is set by the two
rotary switches located on the front of the unit.
Addresses are in hexadecimal format with
valid addresses from 0 (only used for the
master station) to hexadecimal 5A. The
addresses do not have to be sequential, but
each station must have a unique address.
The top rotary switch is used to set the most
significant digit of the HEX address. The
bottom switch is used to set the least
significant digit the HEX address. For
example, to set a DCM address of HEX 10
(decimal 16), set the top rotary switch to 1 and
the bottom rotary switch to 0.
UNIT
ADR
(HEX)
X10
X1
Even though the DCM address is set in hexadecimal, it’s a good idea to remember
the decimal equivalent. This is because the communications program and the
DirectSOFT package use the decimal equivalent of the HEX address. It’s easy to
convert from HEX to decimal.
HEX Format
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
A B C
D
E
F
10 11 12 13 14 15
HEX 3C
3 x 16 = 48
+
C = 12
= 60 decimal
Communication
Settings
NOTE: The DCM address switch settings are
only read at power up. If you’ve want to
change the address and the DCM is already
running, you’ll have to cycle the system power
for the base containing the DCM to initialize
the change.
4–6
Communication Settings
DL305 DCU
Communications
Switches
First, make sure you have the correct model of DCU. There are two models.
S D3–232–DCU (RS232C version)
S D3–422–DCU (RS422 version)
The DL305 DCU can only be used as a slave station interface. If you only have one
master and one slave, you can use either version. If you have more than one slave
you should probably use the the RS422 version. You can use the RS232C version,
but you’ll need an RS232C / RS422 converter for each one.
The communications parameters are set by the first switch block, which is located on
the side of the unit.
ON OFF
ASCII Mode
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Not Used
PGM Mode at power up
10 ms Response Delay Time
Self Test
ODD Parity
Block 1
HEX Mode
Not used
Run Mode at power up
No Response Delay Time
Self Test off (set to this position)
NO Parity
Baud Rate
Switch Positions
Baud
1
2
300 OFF OFF
1200 ON OFF
9600 OFF ON
19200 ON ON
DCU Side View
Baud Rate: The first two switches on block 1 are used to set the baud rate for the
DCU. There are four baud rate selections available ranging from 300bps to
19.2Kbps.
Communication
Settings
Parity: Switch 3 on block 1 selects between the two parity options, odd or none.
Self-Test: Switch 4 on block 1 selects the factory self-test and should always be
switched off. If the self-test is on, the DCU will not operate correctly.
Response Delay Time: Switch 5 on block 1 sets the response delay time. This sets
how long the DCU will wait before it responds to each component of a DirectNET
communication request. If you’re using all DirectLOGIC equipment, a response
delay is not required and you should turn off the switch.
The DCU is not recommended for use with modems since it may respond too quickly
for some devices. If you encounter this problem, you can turn on the delay switch to
provide a 10 ms delay. If this still does not work, check your device manual to see if
the device requires more than a 10 ms delay. The DL340 CPU built-in ports provide
more extensive delay timing than can be achieved with a DCU.
Mode at Power-up: Switch 6 on block 1 allows you to select the CPU operating
mode when system power is supplied. If the switch is turned on, the CPU
automatically enters Program mode when power is supplied. If the switch is off, the
CPU automatically enters Run mode when power is supplied.
ASCII / HEX Mode: Switch 8 on block 1 selects between ASCII and HEX modes of
data representation.
4–7
Communication Settings
Online / Offline
Switch
Address Switch
In the Offline position, this switch logically
disconnects the DCU from the network (just as
if you pulled the cable from the connector.)
Once this switch is moved to the Offline
position, the DCU will not communicate with
the network. (The switch is set to Offline when
you’re using a handheld programmer.)
If you move the switch to the Online position,
the DCU will communicate with the network,
but not until the master sends another request
for communication. This does not operate like
the reset switch on many personal computers.
The DCU station address is set by the second
switch block, which is located on the side of
the unit. Unlike the DL405 DCM, the DCU
uses decimal addresses. The decimal
address is set in BCD (Binary Coded
Decimal) format with valid addresses from
1 to 90 decimal. For example, to set an
address of 10, you should turn on switches 4
and 2.
The addresses do not have to be sequential,
but each station must have a unique address.
(Binary Value)
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Not used
64
32
16
8
4
2
1
Block 2
NOTE: The DCM address switch settings are
only read at power up. If you’ve want to
change the address and the DCM is already
running, you’ll have to cycle the system power
for the base containing the DCM to initialize
the change.
Communication
Settings
4–8
Communication Settings
Communication
Settings
DL430 and
DL440 PLC
Communication
Switches
If you look at the back of the DL440 CPU you
will notice a small bank of switches. Switches 2,
3, and 4 are used to set the communication
parameters for the bottom communication
port.
Switch 2 — It’s usually best to turn off this
switch. If in the on position this switch will
override the CPU slave address, and set the
address to 1. (Remember each device on the
network must have a unique address.) When in
the off position you can use a programming
device to set the address.
Switch 3 & 4 — These switches select the
baud rate for the bottom port. Set the baud rate
to match the other network stations.
Baud
3
4
300
OFF
OFF
1200
OFF
ON
9600
ON
OFF
19200
ON
ON
DL405 PLC
Rear View
4–9
Communication Settings
DL430 and DL440
Station Addresses
With DirectSOFT, use AUX 56 from the
Auxiliary functions menu to set the port
parameters.
With the DL405 Handheld Programmer, use
AUX 56 to set the port parameters. The
following example shows how to use the
handheld programmer to set the address.
DirectSOFT
DL405 HP
NOTE: The PLC port address is set in decimal,
not hexadecimal.
Select AUX 56
CLR
CLR
AUX
5
6
ENT
ENT
AUX 5* CPU CFG
AUX 56 CPU N/W ADDRESS
Enter the Address (in decimal)
X
X
ENT
AUX 56 CPU N/W ADDRESS
N/W # 01
Select HEX or ASCII
To change the mode press ....
then press enter. ENT
AUX 56 CPU N/W ADDRESS
HEX / ASCII
Select the Parity Option
Clear the Display
To clear the display press....
CLR
OK
Communication
Settings
AUX 56 CPU N/W ADDRESS
NONE / ODD
To change the parity press ....
then press enter. ENT
4–10
Communication Settings
DL340 Network
Address Selection
for Ports 1 and 2
DL340
Network
Addressing
Switch
D3–340 CPU
PWR
RUN
RX
BATT
TX
CPU
Network
Address
Mode
Switch
Fixed Station
Address
Selectable
Station
Address
FIXED
FIXED
USER
USER
(Network Address (Network Address
is set to 01)
is set to 03)
FIXED
USER
PRG
RAM/UVPROM
RS232C
SW4
SW3
Most
Significant
Digit
Least
Significant
Digit
Port 1 (RS232C): Network address selection is accomplished with the Network
Address Mode Switch and the two rotary switches 3 and 4.
Network Address Mode Switch sets fixed or selectable network address.
Rotary Switch 3 sets the least significant decimal digit of the network address.
Rotary Switch 4 sets the most significant decimal digit of the network address.
In the example above, when the Network mode switch is set to FIXED the network
address will default to 01, when the Network mode switch is set to USER the network
address (set with the rotary switches) is 03. Note, if the rotary switches are set to 00,
the network address will default to 01.
Communication
Settings
Port 2 (RS232C): Network address selection is set by using a programming device to
enter the value for the most significant digit and least significant digit in addresses
R771 and R772 respectively.
DL340
Station Type
Selection and
Address Ranges
The station type for Port 1 is fixed as a Slave and cannot be changed. The station
type for Port 2 can be selected by setting the appropriate switch positions (6 and 7)
on the SW1 switch bank.
Port
Bit 6
Bit 7
Address
Protocol
Range
1
N/A
N/A
Slave
1 – 90
2
Off
Off
On
On
Off
On
Off
On
Slave
Master
Peer
Modbus/
RTU
1 – 90
1 – 90
1 – 90
1 – 247
SW1
4–11
Communication Settings
DL340 Baud Rate
Selection
The following chart shows how to configure the baud rate for Port 1 (RS232C) of the
DL340 using dipswitch SW1, switches 3, 4 and 5. Port 2 baud rate is set by using a
programming device to enter the baud rate in address R773 (in BCD or HEX).
Port 2
Port 1
Port 1 300 Baud
Port 1 4800 Baud
ON 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
ON 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Baud
R773
300
1
OFF
OFF
Port 1 600 Baud
Port 1 9600 Baud
600
2
ON 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
ON 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1200
3
SW1
2400
4
OFF
OFF
Port 1 1200 Baud
Port 1 19200 Baud
4800
5
ON 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
ON 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9600
6
19200
7
OFF
OFF
Port 1 2400 Baud
Port 1 38400 Baud
38400
8
ON 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
ON 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9600
0, 9 to FF
OFF
DL340 Selecting
the Response
Delay Time
OFF
You can use the Handheld Programmer of DirectSOFT to select an on and off
response delay time of up to 1980 ms. The time delay is calculated based on a preset
number that is loaded into two memory locations. These presets indicate the number
of 20 ms intervals that will be used as the delay. For example, an entry of 2 would
result in a 40 ms response delay time.
Port
On Delay
Off Delay
Port 1
R776
R777
Port 2
R774
R775
RS232
C
Request
to Send
400ms
100ms
On delay
Off delay
R776 = 20, 20 x 20ms intervals = 400ms on delay
R777 = 5, 5 x 20ms intervals = 100ms off delay
DL340 Selecting
Data Format
(ASCII/HEX)
A special propose relay is used to select between ASCII and HEX transmission
modes. When this relay is off, HEX mode is used. When this relay is turned on, ASCII
mode is used. Off is the default state.
S Port 1
SP1077
S Port 2
SP1076
Communication
Settings
RS232
C
Transmit
Data
4–12
Communication Settings
DL240
Communication
Settings
The DL240 CPU is set similarly to the DL405
CPUs, except that all parameters can be set
with AUX 56 from DirectSOFT or the Handheld
Programmer.
DL240 PLC
CPU
PWR
BATT
RUN
CPU
DL240
CPU
RUN
STOP
TERM
CH1
CH2
CH3
CH4
PORT 1
Communication
Settings
PORT2
4–13
Communication Settings
The following example shows you can set the port parameters with the DL205
Handheld Programmer.
NOTE: The PLC port address is set in decimal,
not hexadecimal.
DirectSOFT
DL205 HP
Select AUX 56
CLR
CLR
AUX
F
G
5
6
ENT
ENT
AUX 5* CPU CFG
AUX 56 CPU N/W ADDRES
Enter the Address (in decimal)
X
X
ENT
AUX 56 CPU N/W ADDRES
N/W # 01
Select Hex or ASCII
To change the mode press ....
then press enter.
ENT
AUX 56 CPU N/W ADDRES
NONE / ODD
ENT
AUX 56 CPU N/W ADDRES
300/1200/9600/19.2K
Select the Parity Option
To change the parity press ....
then press enter.
Select the baud rate
To change the baud rate press ....
then press enter.
To clear the display and show the current address (instructions)
CLR
AND X7
OR X10
Communication
Settings
ENT
AUX 56 CPU N/W ADDRES
HEX / ASCII
4–14
Communication Settings
Communications Settings Checklist
You can avoid
problems
The majority of problems are caused by incorrect switch settings. Make sure you
have set the switches for each station. Have you...
1. Checked your computer documentation to obtain host master switch
settings? (if applicable)
2. Set the communications switches for all stations?
3. Set the network addresses for all stations?
Now, you’re ready to create the communications programs.
What part of the manual should you use next?
Do you have a PLC If you have a PLC as a master or a Peer as a master network, use Chapter 5,
Creating RLL Communications Programs. This chapter describes the RLL
as a master or a
instructions used to initiate network communication requests.
Peer as a Master
network?
Communication
Settings
Do you have a
Host as a master
network?
If you have a Host as a master network, use Chapter 6, Creating DirectNET
Communications Programs. This chapter explains the DirectNET protocol in detail.
RLL
Communications
Programs
In This Chapter. . . .
15
Ċ Why do you need a communications program?
Ċ Identifying the Master and Slave
Ċ Specifying the Amount of Data
Ċ Designating the Master Station Memory Area
Ċ Identifying the Slave Station Memory Area
Ċ Controlling the Communications
Ċ What part of the manual should you use next?
5–2
RLL Communications Programs
Why do you need a communications program?
The Master
Initiates Requests
DirectNET is a master / slave network, therefore; the master station must initiate
requests for network data transfers. If you’re using a PLC as the master station, you
use simple RLL instructions to initiate the requests.
Why Ladder Logic? Since the DCM (network interface) does not contain any RLL, you have to use the
PLC to issue the commands telling the DCM where to read or write data. The DCM
takes the PLC commands and converts them into the appropriate DirectNET
commands. The RLL instructions identify the following items.
1. Slot location of the DCM master and the slave station address.
(using the LD instruction)
2. Amount of data (in bytes) you want to transfer.
(using the LD instruction)
3. Area of memory to be used by the master.
(using the LDA instruction)
4. Area of memory to be used by the slave, and whether it is a read or write
operation. (using either the RX or WX instruction)
5. Interlocks for communication timing and multiple RX and WX routines.
This example reads 3 bytes of data from Slave Address #1,(starting at Y0), into the
Master PLC starting at V40600 (Control Relays).
Example RLL Program
8pt
Input
Communication Error
SP125
Set
8pt
Input
DCM
16pt
Input
Master PLC
16pt
16pt
Output Output
V40600
–
V40601
Y50
Communication Not Busy
SP124
LD
K0201
DCM Slot
Slave Address
Y0 – Y17
LD
K0003
15
8
Y20 – Y37
Transfer 3 bytes
RLL Communications
Programs
Slave Address 1
LDA
O40600
Master Starting Address
Type of Operation
RX
Y0
Slave Starting Address
Slave Address 2
0
5–3
RLL Communications Programs
This example writes 3 bytes of data from the Master Station (starting at V40600) to
Y0 – Y37 in Slave Station #1.
Master PLC
DCM
V40600
15
8
0
V40601
16pt
16pt
Output Output
Y0 Y20
–
–
Y17 Y37
Example RLL Program
Communication Error
SP125
Set
Y50
Slave Address 1
Communication Not Busy
SP124
LD
K0401
DCM Slot
Slave Address
LD
K0003
Slave Address 2
Transfer 3 bytes
LDA
O40600
Master Starting Address
Type of Operation
WX
Y0
Slave Starting Address
The following paragraphs explain each operation and provide some helpful hints to
make your programs simple and easy to follow.
RLL Communications
Programs
5–4
RLL Communications Programs
Identifying the Master and Slave
Location of Master Whenever the WX or RX instructions are used, they must be preceded with the
necessary LD and LDA instructions to set up the communication addresses, data to
and Slave
transfer and the location for the transference. The first Load (LD) instruction
identifies the slot location of the DCM master and the slave station address.
(Remember, the slot numbers start at 0.)
The constant (K) portion of the instruction actually contains two pieces (bytes) of
information. The first two digits specify the DCM master location and the second two
digits specify the slave station location.
It is necessary to specify both master and slave locations because you can have
more than one DCM master in the base and you can have up to 90 slave stations for
each master.
2 3
0 1
Slot of DCM
LD
K0201
A
Slave Address
(in decimal)
Valid Slot Range: 0–7
Valid Slave Address: 1–90
Example:
Master Slot: 2 hex, 2 decimal
Slave Address: 1 hex, 1 decimal
Slave Address 2
Slave Address 3
Slave Address 1
* See Note on DCM Address
NOTE: The LD instruction K value is entered in decimal, but the DCM master and
slave addresses are in HEX (The DCU, DL340, DL430 and DL440 all have their
addresses set in decimal.) You have to convert the HEX addresses for the DCM to
their decimal equivalent for the LD instruction. It’s easy to convert from HEX to
decimal.
HEX Format
RLL Communications
Programs
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C D E F
HEX 3C
10 11 12 13 14 15
3 x 16 = 48 + C = 12 = 60 decimal
5–5
RLL Communications Programs
Specifying the Amount of Data
Number of Bytes to The second LD instruction indicates the
amount of data (in bytes) that needs to be
Transfer
transferred. You have to specify the
amount of data in complete bytes. For
example, Y0 – Y27 would be three bytes
of data.
The different PLC families do not always
use the same types of memory or the
same byte boundaries. For example, the
DL305 does not use a separate data type
for input and output points. Appendices
D, E, F provide complete listings of the
DL405, DL305 and DL205 memory
types.
LD
K0201
LD
K0003
Number of Bytes
in Hex
Example:
3 bytes of data to be transferred
The number of bytes specified also depends on the type of data you want to obtain.
For example, the DL405 Input points can be accessed by V-memory locations or as
X input locations. However, if you only want X0 – X27, you’ll have to use the X input
data type because the V-memory locations can only be accessed in 2-byte
increments. The following table shows the byte ranges for the various types of
DirectLOGIC products.
DL 205 / 405 Memory
Bytes
V memory
T / C current value
16
16
2
2
Inputs (X, GX, SP)
8
1
Outputs
(Y, C, Stage, T/C bits)
8
1
Scratch Pad Memory
8
1
Diagnostic Status
8
1
Bits per
unit
Number of
bytes
Data registers
T / C accumulator
8
16
1
2
I/O, internal relays,
shift register bits, T/C
bits, stage bits
1
1
Scratch Pad Memory
8
2
Diagnostic Status
(5 word R/W)
16
10
DL305 Memory
RLL Communications
Programs
Bits per
unit
5–6
RLL Communications Programs
Designating the Master Station Memory Area
Memory Area of
Master
The Load Address (LDA) instruction
specifies the V memory area of the
master that will be used. This is the
starting address (in octal). Additional
sequential locations may be used,
depending on the number of bytes that
are being transferred. Since all DL405
data is mapped into V memory, you can
easily access the data you need.
If you are reading information from the
slave station, this is the destination area,
or the area where the master will store the
information.
If you are writing information to the slave
station, this is the source area, or the area
where the master will obtain the
information that will be transferred to the
slave.
NOTE: Since V memory words are
always 16 bits, you may not always use
the whole word. For example, if you only
specify 3 bytes and you are reading Y
outputs from the slave, you will only get
24 bits of data. In this case, only the 8
least significant bits of the last word
location will be modified. The remaining 8
bits are not affected.
LD
K0201
LD
K0003
LDA
O40600
Letter “O”
specifies
an Octal
Address
Example:
V memory location 40600 will be the
starting point of the data transfer area
for the master. The following locations
will be used to store the data.
MSB
V40600
LSB
15
MSB
15
RLL Communications
Programs
V memory
Address
0
V40601
LSB
0
5–7
RLL Communications Programs
Identifying the Slave Station Memory Area
Memory Area of
Slave to Read or
Write
The Read Network (RX) or Write Network
(WX) is the last instruction in the routine.
Use the RX if you want to read data from
the slave, or use the WX instruction if you
want to write data to the slave.
You have to specify the data type and the
starting address (in octal) for the slave.
(Remember, you have to specify a data
type that will work correctly with the
number of bytes specified.)
If you use the RX instruction, the data will
be read from the slave starting at the
address specified. If you use the WX
instruction, the data will be written to the
slave starting at the address specified.
LD
K0201
LD
LDA
Data Type
and
Address
K0003
O40600
RX
Y0
Example:
Read from slave starting at Y0.
NOTE: If you are using an RLL communications program to transfer data to or from a
DL305 slave station, the data type is slightly different. For example, the DL305 I/O
points are accessed with the GY data type. AppendixE provides a complete listing of
the memory types and cross references for the DL305 family.
8pt
Input
8pt
Input
DCM
16pt
Input
16pt
Output
Master PLC
16pt
Output
V40600
–
V40601
Y0 – Y17
15
8
0
Y20 – Y37
Slave Address 1
RLL Communications
Programs
Slave Address 2
5–8
RLL Communications Programs
Controlling the Communications
Communications
Special Relays
When you execute communication with a
DCM,
chances
are
good
the
communication may take longer than the
actual PLC scan. If the DCM is busy, you
shouldn’t initiate another request until it is
finished. Fortunately, there’s an easy
solution for this.
There are two SPs (special relays) for
each slot in the CPU base which are used
to provide communication status. For
example, slot 0 has SP120 and SP121.
SP120 is the Busy relay and, when turned
on, indicates the DCM is busy. SP121
indicates there is a communication error
for slot 0.
You should always use the DCM Busy SP
in your RLL programs to ensure the DCM
is ready.
The communication error SP is optional,
but it’s a good way to monitor the
communication status in the RLL
program. If you use the communication
error SP, make sure you place it at the
beginning of your communication
routines.
This
is
because
the
communication error relay is always
reset (turned off) whenever an RX or WX
instruction is executed.
SP125
Set
Y50
Communication Error
SP124
LD
K0201
LD
K0003
DCM Busy
LDA
O40600
RX
Y0
Special Purpose Communication Relays
Communication Busy
SP120
SP122
SP124
SP126
SP130
SP132
SP134
SP136
Communication Error
SP121
SP123
SP125
SP127
SP131
SP133
SP135
SP137
DL405
RLL Communications
Programs
Slot
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
5–9
RLL Communications Programs
Multiple Read and
Write Interlocks
If you’re using multiple reads and writes in
the RLL program, you have to interlock
the routines to make sure all the routines
are executed. If you don’t use the
interlocks, then the CPU will only execute
the first routine. This is because the DCM
can only handle one routine at a time.
In the example, once the RX instruction is
executed, C0 is set. When the DCM has
finished the communication task, the
second routine is executed and C0 is
reset.
If you’re using RLL Plus, you can just put
each routine in a separate program stage
to ensure proper execution. In most all
cases, RLL Plus is a much more efficient
way to create automation program.
Appendix A provides a master / slave
example with both RLL and RLL Plus
program descriptions.
Interlocking Relay
SP124 C0
LD
K0201
LD
K0003
LDA
O40600
RX
Y0
Set
C0
Interlocking Relay
SP124 C0
LD
K0201
LD
K0003
LDA
O40400
WX
Y0
RST
C0
RLL Communications
Programs
5–10
RLL Communications Programs
What part of the manual should you use next?
RLL Communications
Programs
Start the Network
Once you’ve created the communications program, you can start the network.
Chapter 7 provides information concerning network operation and troubleshooting.
Appendices A and B provide examples of PLC master and PLC Peer networks. Both
of these networks use RLL instructions for the communications program.
DirectNET Host
Communications
Programs
16
In This Chapter. . . .
— Why do you need a communications program?
— Modes of Operation
— Protocol Components
— Controlling the Communications
— Initiating the Request
— Acknowledging the Request
— Defining the Request
— Transferring Data
— Calculating the Header Checksum
— Ending the Request
— Timing Considerations
— What part of the manual should you use next?
6–2
DirectNET Host
Communications Prog.
DirectNET Host Communications Programs
Why do you need a communications program?
The Master
Initiates Requests
Since DirectNET is a master / slave network, the master station must initiate
requests for network data transfers. If you’re using a host as the master station, you
will need to use a communications program written with the DirectNET protocol.
DirectNET
Programs
The communications program used with a hosted network is more complex than the
simple RLL instructions used with the other configurations, but the concept is the
same. The host is the DirectNET master and must use a DirectNET protocol
communications program to initiate all network requests to read or write data. These
communication programs can be written in many different languages, such as
BASIC, C, etc. and must include the appropriate DirectNET commands.
Here’s an example of a DirectNET program. (This is just part of the program.)
DirectNET Program in BASIC
10
REM Program to read X0–X7 from a DL405 PLC
20
REM
30
REM Define all variables
40
REM
50
REM Change the slave address in HEX at line 60 if required.
60
SLAVEADDRESS=&H1
70
DATATYPE$=CHR$(&H32)
80
DATAADDR$=CHR$(&H30)+CHR$(&H31)+CHR$(&H30)+CHR$(&H31)
90
COMPLETEBLK$=CHR$(&H30)+CHR$(&H30)
100
PARTBLK$=CHR$(&H30)+CHR$(&H32)
110
MASTERADDR$=CHR$(&H30)+CHR$(&H30)
120
NORMAL$=CHR$(&H4E)
130
SLAVEADDR$=HEX$(SLAVEADDRESS)
140
IF LEN(SLAVEADDR$)<2 THEN SLAVEADDR$=”0”+SLAVEADDR$
150
OFFSETADDR$=CHR$(&H20+SLAVEADDRESS)
NOTE: This manual does not show you how to build communications programs that
manage the data storage and communications ports. You should check the
documentation that came with your programming software to determine the
appropriate techniques to solve these requirements.
6–3
DirectNET Host Communications Programs
Master
Read Request
Slave
Initiate
Request
Acknowledge
Define Request
Acknowledge
Receipt of Data
Acknowledge and
Respond with
Data
Finished – All
Data Sent
Finished
Write Request
Initiate
Request
Acknowledge
Define Request
Acknowledge
Transmit Data
Acknowledge
Receipt of Data
Finished
The remainder of this chapter discusses the individual elements of DirectNET
protocol programs.
DirectNET Host
Communications Prog.
The following diagram shows the general structure of the communications. The
program must:
S identify the slave station.
S indicate the type and amount of data to transfer.
S manage the communications between the master and slave.
6–4
DirectNET Host
Communications Prog.
DirectNET Host Communications Programs
Modes of Operation
Transmission
Bytes
DirectNET can transfer a maximum of 65,791 bytes ( 256 blocks 256 bytes each +
an additional 255 bytes) in a single request. The actual amount of system
information that is transferred depends on the mode of operation.
HEX or ASCII Mode There are two modes used with the DirectNET protocol, HEX or ASCII. You must
choose the mode of operation before you write the program. The major difference is
in the way the data is represented in the data packet. ASCII mode requires twice as
many bytes to transfer data. There are also minor differences in the command
structure which affect the way the enquiries and headers operate.
NOTE: This only applies to a Host master, since the DCM has the capability to detect
the data transfer mode and adjust for the additional number of bytes to be used when
transferring in ASCII mode.
If you’re transferring small amounts of data, or if the data is not being used to control
system timing, then it’s generally easier to use ASCII mode for DirectNET
programs. You should use HEX mode if you’re transferring large amounts of data
and you need the fastest possible communication time.
The following diagram shows the difference between HEX and ASCII modes.
HEX Mode
Transfer 8 Output Points
Byte 1
7
0
Y0 – Y7
1 byte
7
0
ASCII Mode
Byte 1
bits 0 – 3 in ASCII code
+
Byte 2
bits 4 – 7 in ASCII code
6–5
DirectNET Host Communications Programs
In HEX mode, the number of bytes transferred is equal to the number of bytes for the
selected data type. ASCII mode requires twice as many bytes to transfer the same
data. Here’s a listing of the data types and their corresponding byte requirements.
DL205/405
Data Type
Description
Bits per
unit
Number of bytes
HEX
ASCII
31
V memory
T / C current value
16
16
2
2
4
4
32
Inputs (X, GX, SP)
8
1
2
33
Outputs
(Y, C, Stage, T/C bits)
8
1
2
39
Diagnostic Status
8
1
2
DL305
Data Type
Description
Bits per
unit
Number of bytes
HEX
ASCII
31
Data registers
T / C accumulator
8
16
1
2
2
4
33
I/O, internal relays,
shift register bits, T/C
bits, stage bits
1
1
2
39
Diagnostic Status
(5 word R/W)
16
10
20
DirectNET Host
Communications Prog.
Data Type Byte
Requirements
6–6
DirectNET Host
Communications Prog.
DirectNET Host Communications Programs
Protocol Components
All DirectNET program read and write requests use the following protocol
components.
S Enquiry (ENQ) – initiates a request (from the master) with the slave
stations.
S Header (HDR) – defines the operation as a read or write, the slave
station address, and the type and amount of data to be transferred.
S Data (DATA) – the actual data that is being transferred.
S Acknowledge (ACK) – verifies communication is working correctly.
S End of Transmission (EOT) – indicates the communication is finished.
6–7
DirectNET Host Communications Programs
Master
Read Request
ENQ
Slave
Initiate
Request
Acknowledge
HDR
ACK
Write Request
Acknowledge
Receipt of Data
EOT
Finished
ENQ
Initiate
Request
HDR
DATA
EOT
ACK
Define Request
Acknowledge and
Respond with
Data
ACK – DATA
Finished – All
Data Sent
EOT
Acknowledge
ACK
Acknowledge
ACK
Acknowledge
Receipt of Data
ACK
Define Request
Transmit Data
Finished
DirectNET Host
Communications Prog.
The following diagram shows how the protocol components are used with read and
write requests.
6–8
DirectNET Host
Communications Prog.
DirectNET Host Communications Programs
Controlling the Communications
Control Codes
All read or write requests use ASCII control codes and a Longitudinal Redundancy
Check (LRC) to manage the communications between the master and slave. The
control codes identify the beginning and ending of the protocol components such as,
enquiry, acknowledge, etc. The LRC is used to ensure the data was transmitted and
received correctly.
Symbol
HEX
ASCII
Code
ENQ
05
Enquiry – initiate request
ACK
06
Acknowledge – the communication was received without
error
NAK
15
Negative Acknowledge – there was a problem with the
communication
SOH
01
Start of Header – beginning of header
ETB
17
End of Transmission Block – end of intermediate block
STX
02
Start of Text – beginning of data block
ETX
03
End of Text – End of last data block
EOT
04
End of Transmission – the request is complete.
Description
6–9
DirectNET Host Communications Programs
Read Request
Master
ENQ
Write Request
Slave
N
Target Address
ENQ
ENQ
N
Target Address
ACK
HDR
HDR
STX
Full Data Block
ETB
LRC
ACK
ACK
ACK
ACK
ACK
ACK
STX
Full Data Block
ETB
LRC
DATA
DATA
STX
Last Data Block
ETX
LRC
ACK
EOT
EOT
ACK
ACK
STX
Last Data Block
ETX
LRC
ACK
DATA
N
Target Address
ACK
SOH
Header
ETB
LRC
ACK
DATA
Slave
N
Target Address
ENQ
ACK
SOH
Header
ETB
LRC
ACK
ACK
Master
EOT
EOT
EOT
EOT
DirectNET Host
Communications Prog.
The following diagram shows how these control codes are combined with the protocol components to build
the DirectNET format for read and write requests. Note, the slave components are automatically generated
as a response to the requests from the master station. Your custom DirectNET program must generate the
protocol components for the master station.
6–10
DirectNET Host
Communications Prog.
DirectNET Host Communications Programs
Initiating the Request
Enquiry
ENQ
The Enquiry is a three character message that initiates the request with the
appropriate slave station. The message always begins with 4E (“N”), which means
normal enquiry sequence. The second character contains the offset station address,
which is the station address plus HEX 20. The last character is the ASCII control
code for ENQ.
Hexadecimal ASCII code for “N”
ENQ
N
Target Address
ENQ
Byte 1
Byte 2
Byte 3
4E
22
05
Offset slave address.
Example –
Address HEX 2 + HEX 20 = HEX 22
ASCII control code for ENQ
Note: Slave addresses for the DL430, DL440, DL340 and the DCU
have been set in decimal. It will be necessary for you to convert the address from decimal to the Hexadecimal equivalent before adding the
HEX 20 offset.
3
60 Decimal
16 60
48
12
3C Hexadecimal
HEX Format 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C D E F
10 11 12 13 14 15
6–11
DirectNET Host Communications Programs
Acknowledge
ACK – NAK
The three character acknowledge commands are used by both the master and slave
stations to indicate the status of the communication. An ACK is used if the
information was transmitted (or received) without any problems. If there are
problems, Not Acknowledge (NAK) is used.
A NAK will also be returned from the slave if something is incorrect in the header or
data packet. This could be incorrect byte boundaries, an invalid address, etc. If the
master receives a NAK response, it can either try to re-transmit the data, or it can
terminate the request and try again.
The first two characters are the same as the Enquiry sequence. The third character
is the control code for an ACK or NAK.
N
Target Address
ACK
Hexadecimal ASCII code for “N”
Byte 1
Byte 2
Byte 3
4E
22
06 or 15
Offset slave address.
Example –
Address HEX 2 + HEX 20 = HEX 22
ACK
ASCII control code for ACK (06)
or NAK (15)
Delayed Response When text is being transmitted over the network, there may be character
combinations that are identical to an enquiry sequence. Network slave stations
to an Enquiry
would interpret the character sequence as an enquiry even though it was actually
data being sent to an identified slave.
A delay has been implemented to automatically eliminate this possibility. The delay
occurs between the receipt of an enquiry from the master and the acknowledgment
response from the slave. When the slave recognizes an enquiry sequence an
internal timer (with the time preset to the amount of time to transmit 2 characters) is
started. The slave ignores the enquiry if another character is received before the
timeout period has elapsed.
DirectNET Host
Communications Prog.
Acknowledging the Request
6–12
DirectNET Host
Communications Prog.
DirectNET Host Communications Programs
Defining the Request
Header – HDR
The header is a 17-byte (18-byte for ASCII transmissions) message that defines the
operation. It is sent by the master station and specifies the following.
S type of operation (read or write)
S type of data being transferred
S data address
S number of complete data blocks
S number of bytes in the last data block
SOH
Header
ETB
LRC
HDR
ASCII Coded Representation Example
Byte:
1
2, 3
4
5
6, 7
8, 9
10, 11
12, 13
14, 15
16
17(18)
01
3034
30
31
3431
3031
3031
3930
3031
17
08
3038
SOH
Target
Slave
Read
or
Write
Data
Type
Starting Starting Number Bytes
Address Address Com- in Last
MSB
LSB
plete
Block
Blocks
Master
ID
Hex
ASCII
ETB LRC
Byte 1:
Start of Header
The first byte in the header is the ASCII control code (01) that indicates this is the
beginning of a header.
Bytes 2 & 3:
Target Slave
Address
The second and third bytes of the header indicate which slave station will be used.
This is the normal slave station address (in HEX ASCII code) that you assigned
during the network setup. This is not the offset slave station address, (with 20 HEX
added to the address), that is used with the enquiry sequence. For example, a slave
station with address 04 would be 3034 in ASCII code.
The table below shows how to decode the HEX/ASCII slave address. Remember if
the slave address is in HEX it will be necessary to translate the address to decimal
before decoding the HEX ASCII address. In the example below a slave station has a
network address of 04 decimal and the equivalent HEX ASCII code is 3034.
Decimal or ASCII Station Address
04
ASCII Character
HEX Code
0
30
1
31
2
32
3
33
4
34
3034
Target Slave Address
in HEX ASCII Code
5
35
6
36
7
37
A
41
B
42
C
43
D
44
E
45
F
46
6–13
DirectNET Host Communications Programs
Byte 4 indicates whether the operation is a read or write request. A value of HEX
ASCII 30 is read, HEX ASCII 38 is write.
Byte 5:
Data Type
This byte identifies the type of memory to be accessed. Appendices D–F provide a
complete listing of the data types and memory references for product families.
Bytes 6 & 7:
Starting Address
MSB
The address is the starting point for the data transfer. The data is transferred from
this point forward. For example, to transfer the first 32 X input points from a DL405
PLC the starting address would be V40400. The request would actually obtain
V40400 and V40401 since there are 16 points per V-memory location.
Bytes 6 and 7 define the most significant byte of the ASCII coded memory address.
For example, the reference address for V40400 is 4101. This is obtained by
converting the octal number to hexadecimal and adding 1, the most significant byte
of this value is then decoded into HEX ASCII. The most significant byte would be
HEX 41 or HEX ASCII 3431. Appendices D–F provide complete references for the
addresses used in the various DirectLOGIC PLC families.
Bytes 8 & 9:
Starting Address
LSB
These bytes define the least significant byte of the address obtained in the step
above. So to continue on with our example of reading the first 32 inputs at memory
location V40400 from a DL405 PLC, the reference value for this location would be
4101. The least significant byte of the reference value (01) would be decoded to
3031 in HEX ASCII.
Bytes 10 & 11:
Complete Data
Blocks
Bytes 14 & 15:
Master Station ID
This is the coded number of complete data blocks that should be transferred.
DirectNET can transfer 256 bytes in a single data block. Take the number of bytes
and divide by 256 to obtain the number of complete data blocks. This results in a
valid range of 00 – FF HEX, or 3030 – 4646 HEX ASCII. If you’re not transferring at
least 256 bytes, then this field should be HEX 00 or HEX ASCII 3030.
For example, if you are transferring 200 V-memory locations, you would have the
following: 200 x 2 bytes per location = 400 bytes. 400 bytes / 256 per block =1
complete block, with 144 bytes remaining. For one (01) complete data block, the
value entered for this field would be the HEX ASCII code of 3031.
This is the HEX ASCII coded number of bytes in the last data block. If you did not
have a an even number of complete data blocks, then you had some remaining
bytes. Enter the number of remaining bytes here. The valid range is 00 – FF HEX, or
3030 – 4646 HEX ASCII.
For example above with 144 bytes (or 90 bytes in HEX) the value entered in this field
would be the HEX ASCII code of 3930.
This is the master station address. Since the master station should be address 0 or
1, this field is always HEX ASCII 3030 or 3031 for addresses 0 and 1 respectively.
Byte 16:
End Transmission
Byte 16 always contains the HEX ASCII code for End of Transmission Block. This
field always contains HEX ASCII17.
Bytes 12 & 13:
Partial Data Block
This is a checksum that is used to verify the communications were received without
Byte 17:
any errors. This is calculated by taking the exclusive OR of the bytes between the
Longitudinal
Redundancy Check start of header (SOH) and the end of transmission (ETB) bytes (bytes 2 – 15). If
you’re using ASCII format, then this actually takes two bytes which makes the
header an 18 byte message. The LRC is explained in more detail later in this chapter.
DirectNET Host
Communications Prog.
Byte 4:
Read or Write
6–14
DirectNET Host
Communications Prog.
DirectNET Host Communications Programs
Transferring Data
Data Blocks
The data blocks contain the actual data that is being transferred between the master
and slave station. DirectNET transfers data in full blocks of 256 8-bit bytes, or partial
blocks of less than 256 8-bit bytes. The 256 byte limit does not include control
characters that signal the end of the data. To determine the number of full blocks,
divide the number of bytes by 256. The remainder is the number of bytes in the
partial data block.
Since ASCII mode requires twice as many bytes for the data, you can transfer more
information per request with HEX mode.
Transmission
Sequence
Since the data is transmitted in bytes, it is important to understand how the original
value is separated during transmission. DirectNET uses a simple byte swapping
process where the least significant byte is transferred first. In ASCII mode, the
original data is split into 4-bit units and then converted into 8-bit bytes.
Memory types that only use 1 byte are also treated in the same manner. For
example, a 1-byte memory type would yield 1 byte in HEX mode, but two bytes in
ASCII mode (4 bits converted into 2, 8-bit bytes).
The following diagram shows the differences between HEX and ASCII modes.
Transfer 200 V-memory
Locations
V1400 (octal)
MSB
LSB
V1650 (octal)
HEX Mode
ASCII Mode
V1400 (octal)
MSB
V1400 (octal)
LSB
2, 8-bit bytes per location
MSB
1
2
3
4
4, 8-bit bytes per location
LSB
3
MSB
4
(200 x 2) / 256 = 1 full block )
(200x2) – (1 x 256) = 144 byte partial
LSB
1
2
(200 x 4) / 256 = 3 full blocks )
(200x4) – (3 x 256) = 32 byte partial
6–15
DirectNET Host Communications Programs
The HEX ASCII control codes that indicate the beginning and end of data blocks are
used to manage the data transfer. Start of Text (STX) indicates the beginning of a
data block. If there are several blocks, all but the last block will terminate with the End
of Block (ETB) code. The last block always ends with End of Text (ETX). All transfers
also include an LRC checksum. ( For a data block, the checksum is the exclusive OR
of all bytes between the STX and ETB/ETX characters. The LRC is discussed in
more detail later.)
The following diagram shows the communication sequence.
STX
Data Block
ETB or ETX
LRC
Hexadecimal ASCII
code for STX
Byte 1
up to 256 Data Bytes
Byte n
Byte n+1
02
lsb msb ...... lsb msb
17 or 03
Checksum
Data
HEX ASCII control code for ETB (17)
or ETX (03)
DATA
LRC
DirectNET Host
Communications Prog.
Start of Text, End
of Block, End of
Text
6–16
DirectNET Host
Communications Prog.
DirectNET Host Communications Programs
Calculating the Header Checksum
Longitudinal
Redundancy
Check
The LRC yields a checksum which is used to verify the communications are being
received without errors. For a header, this checksum is calculated by taking the
exclusive OR of all bytes between the Start of Header and End of Transmission
(ETB). For a data block, the checksum is the exclusive OR of all bytes between the
STX and ETB/ETX characters. To take the exclusive OR, just convert the HEX
values to binary and then examine the bits. For each bit position, an even number of
‘1’s results in a checksum value of 0. An odd number of ‘1’s results in a checksum
value of 1. Here’s an LRC calculation example based on the values used in the
discussion of the header.
HEX ASCII Coded Representation
Byte:
1
2, 3
4
5
6, 7
8, 9
10, 11
12, 13
14, 15
16
17(18)
01
3034
30
31
3431
3031
3031
3930
3031
17
08
3038
SOH
Target
Slave
Read
or Write
Data
Type
Data
Address
MSB
Data
Address
LSB
Number
Complete
Blocks
Bytes
in Last
Block
Master
ID
ETB
LRC
Byte
Target slave:
HEX
ASCII
Value
HEX
ASCII
Binary Representation
B7
B6
B5
B4
B3
B2
B1
B0
128
64
32
16
8
4
2
1
(byte 2)
(byte 3)
30
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
34
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
Read or write:
(byte 4)
30
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
Data Type:
(byte 5)
31
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
Data address MSB:
(byte 6)
(byte 7)
34
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
31
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
(byte 8)
(byte 9)
30
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
31
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
(byte 10)
(byte 11)
30
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
31
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
(byte 12)
(byte 13)
39
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
30
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
Master address:(byte 14)
(byte 15)
30
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
31
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
Total Number of “1s”
0
0
14
14
1
2
0
6
Even (E) or Odd (O)
E
E
E
E
O
E
E
E
Exclusive OR Results:
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
Data address LSB:
Complete blocks:
Bytes in last block:
Hexadecimal Value
0
8
HEX ASCII Code
30
38
6–17
DirectNET Host Communications Programs
HEX Mode: 1 byte
LRC Checksum
Decimal 8
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 byte
7
0
16
17
17
08
ETB
LRC
ASCII Mode: 2 bytes
16
17 & 18
17
3038
ETB
LRC
Calculating the Data LRC
You should always calculate the LRC when either writing data to a slave or reading
data from a slave. Note, during a read command slave stations will calculate their
own LRC to be verified by the receiving device. However, you must calculate the
value for LRC verification.
The LRC is included in the header and data transmissions. For a data block, the
checksum is the exclusive OR of all bytes between the STX and ETB/ETX
characters. (The example program in Appendix C shows how to do this in a BASIC
program.)
NOTE: You only have to verify the checksum when you are creating your own
DirectNET communications programs. If the master is a DirectLOGIC PLC with a
communications interface, RLL instructions are used for the communication
program and checksum verification is done automatically.
LRC Example for
HEX and ASCII
Transfers
HEX Mode
STX 21
32
03
51 ETB/ETX LCR
21 = 0010 0001
This example shows
how to calculate the
LRC for the same data
being transferred in
either HEX or ASCII
mode.
32 = 0011 0010
03 = 0000 0011
51 = 0101 0001
0100 0001 = 41 LCR
ASCII Mode
STX 32
31
33
32
30
33
35
31 ETB/ETX LCR
32 = 0011 0010
31 = 0011 0001
33 = 0011 0011
32 = 0011 0010
30 = 0011 0000
33 = 0011 0011
35 = 0011 0101
31 = 0011 0001
0000 0101 = 3035 LCR
(0000 0101 = 05 = 3035 HEX ASCII)
DirectNET Host
Communications Prog.
From the table the checksum value is decimal 8. The checksum is contained in byte
17 of the header, but the actual value that is included depends on which mode of
operation you are using. In HEX mode, this would be HEX 08. If you’re using ASCII
mode, then the value would be 3038 and the LRC now requires two bytes (17 and
18). The following diagram shows the differences in a HEX or ASCII mode LRC.
6–18
DirectNET Host
Communications Prog.
DirectNET Host Communications Programs
Ending the Request
End of
Transmission –
ETB
When the last data block has been transferred and acknowledged, the End of
Transmission (EOT) character is sent. The master station must always end the
communication by sending an EOT (HEX ASCII 04). The following diagram shows
the EOT format.
HEX ASCII
code for EOT
EOT
EOT
Byte 1
04
Master to Slave
Data Transfer
Summary Sheet
Host Master Station
Slave Station
N
ENQ
Offset Target Address
ENQ
4E 21 05
N
Offset Target Address
ACK
ACK
SOH
4E 21 05
Target Address
HDR
Write
Function
Starting Address
Whole Blocks
Remaining Bytes
Host Number
ETB
LRC
01 3031 38 37 3030 3134 3031 3045 3030 17 LRC
ACK
ACK
06
STX
DATA
Full Data Block
(256 bytes)
ETB
LRC
02
Date
17
LRC
ACK
ACK
ACK
ACK
06
STX
DATA
Last Data Block
ETX
LRC
02
Date
03 LRC
06
EOT
EOT
04
6–19
DirectNET Host Communications Programs
Timeouts
DL405 Timeouts
The network communications generally operate very quickly and without problems.
However, as with all things, problems can occur. Timeouts occur when either the
master or slave does not receive a response to a communication within a certain
period of time. There are two timeout possibilities.
S Slave timeout – this occurs when the slave does not respond within a
specified time. When the slave times out, you must send an EOT from
the host to terminate the communication
S Master timeout – this occurs when the slave station does not receive the
complete communication from the master within a specified time. The
slave station will send an EOT to signal that the communications have
been terminated. The master must also send an EOT back to the slave
to acknowledge the termination. (This allows the next communication to
begin.)
The following tables provide the maximum times that DirectLOGIC products will
wait for a communication before entering a timeout condition.
Communication Segment
Master sends ENQ → Slave sends ACK
800
Master receives ACK → sends Header
800
Slave receives Header → sends ACK/NAK
(Destination – write is slave, read is master)
Master receives ACK → Data is transferred
Destination receives Data → sends ACK/NAK
Source receives ACK/NAK → sends EOT
DL205 Timeouts
within (ms)
Communication Segment
2000
20000
20000
800
within (ms)
Master sends ENQ → Slave sends ACK
800
Master receives ACK → sends Header
800
Slave receives Header → sends ACK/NAK
(Destination – write is slave, read is PLC)
Master receives ACK → Data is transferred
Destination receives Data → sends ACK/NAK
Source receives ACK/NAK → sends EOT
2000
20000
20000
800
DirectNET Host
Communications Prog.
Timing Considerations
6–20
DirectNET Host
Communications Prog.
DirectNET Host Communications Programs
DL305 Timeouts
Communication Segment
Master sends ENQ → Slave sends ACK
800
Master receives ACK → sends Header
800
Slave receives SOH → waits for Header LRC
300 baud
1200 baud
9600 baud
19.2K baud
Slave receives Header → sends ACK/NAK
(Destination – write is slave, read is PLC)
Master receives ACK → Data is transferred
Destination receives Data → sends ACK/NAK
300 baud
1200 baud
9600 baud
19.2K baud
Source receives ACK/NAK → sends EOT
Managing
Timeouts
Communication
Retries
Delays
within (ms)
2670
670
670
670
2000
20000
33340
8340
8340
8340
800
All communications finish with an EOT being sent from the master station. Even if
the slave station sends an EOT to signal that it has aborted the communication, the
master still must send an EOT to enable the slave to accept a new enquiry.
If you are reading information from a slave and the LRC calculated in your program
does not match the slave station LRC, you do not have to abort the communication
with an EOT. Instead, send a NAK which will signal the slave to re-transmit the data.
If you send an EOT you must restart the entire request.
The slave stations send NAKs to signal the master to try sending header or data
packets again. The master can either re-transmit a maximum of three times, or, send
an EOT to restart the request.
Each portion of the communication requires a delay to allow the PLC to process the
information. If you send data without allowing for the delay, the communication may
be ignored (which causes a timeout), or the parity check will fail (which causes a NAK
response). The following table provides delay times for the DirectLOGIC
products.
Information to Process
Delay (ms)
ACK of data packets,
headers
1
All other ACKs, headers,
EOTs
1
NOTE: The communication interfaces have delay switches that increase this delay
time. If those delays are selected, add the appropriate times to the figures shown
here.
6–21
DirectNET Host Communications Programs
Start the Network
Once you’ve created the communications program, you can start the network.
Chapter 7 provides information concerning network operation and troubleshooting.
Appendix C provides an example of a hosted network.
DirectNET Host
Communications Prog.
What part of the manual should you use next?
Network Operation
and Troubleshooting
In This Chapter. . . .
Starting the network
Troubleshooting
17
7–2
Network Operation and Troubleshooting
Network Operation
& Troubleshooting
Starting the Network
PLC as Master
Networks
If you’re using a PLC as the master station, you must put the CPU in Run mode
before the communications program can be executed. This is because the PLC
master uses RLL instructions included in your application program to initiate the data
transfer requests. There are two ways to place the CPUs in run mode.
S Turn the keyswitch to the RUN position.
S Turn the keyswitch to the TERM position and use a programming device
to change the operating mode.
PLC Peer as
Master Networks
PLC Peer master networks require both CPUs be in Run mode, since either station
can initiate data transfer requests. Both stations contain the necessary RLL
instructions.
Host master networks require a DirectNET communications program to manage
the data requests. If you’re using a host software package you should check the
documentation that came with it for network startup information. If you created your
own DirectNET program, you’ll have to execute the program file to get things
started. Check the documentation for your particular programming language to
determine the steps required to execute program files.
Depending on your application, you may also have to place the slave PLCs in Run
mode to obtain meaningful data. The DCM and DCU interfaces also have On-line
switches that must be in the On-line position before communications can begin.
CPUs with built-in ports do not necessarily have to be in Run mode, but again the
data may not be current.
Host as Master
Networks
Slave Stations
7–3
Network Operation and Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Try an Example
Program
Sometimes it is helpful to have an example you can try. AppendicesA,B, andC
provide examples of the three network configurations. You can quickly and easily
build a small network to make sure you are following all the appropriate steps. These
are especially helpful if this is your first DirectNET application.
CPUs with Built-in
DirectNET Ports
Most problems that occur with the CPUs are related to communication settings.
Check the switch settings, and/or use a programming device to check the station
address.
Host Masters
DirectNET programs must manage all aspects of network communication including
timing considerations. Chapter 6 provides information on network timing issues that
can affect network performance.
The communications interfaces, DCMs and DCUs, have indicators that are
Communication
Interface Indicators specifically for communication status. The following paragraphs show these
indicators and describe their meanings.
Network Operation
& Troubleshooting
First Place to Look If the network does not seem to be working correctly, check the following items.
1. Cable and connections. Incorrectly wired cables and loose connectors
cause the majority of problems. Verify you’ve selected the proper cable
configuration and check to see the cable is wired correctly.
2. Switch settings. Make sure you’ve set the slave stations to match the
communication parameters required by the master station (DCM, operator
interface or host computer).
3. Incorrect protocol. Make sure your network stations are all set for the same
protocol. DirectNET networks can use the DirectNET or HostLink/CCM2
protocol selections.
4. Communications program. Check the communications program for errors.
7–4
Network Operation and Troubleshooting
DL405 DCM
Indicators
Check the DCM indicators to verify the DCM is operating correctly. The following
diagram shows the proper indicator conditions.
Self Test Indicator: ON
Module Power:
ON
Network Operation
& Troubleshooting
NAK: ON if a
NAK is either
sent or received
TOUT: ON if a
timeout has
occurred in the
DCM
Master Mode:
ON if master
OFF if slave
PWR
OK
NAK
ENQ
TOUT
HDR
MSTR
DATA
Send/Receive Enquiry:
FLASHING
Send/Receive Header:
FLASHING
Send/Receive Data
Packet: FLASHING
The following table provides additional troubleshooting details for the DL405 DCM.
7–5
Network Operation and Troubleshooting
Indicator Status
PWR or OK off
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
Check the PLC source power.
DCM is defective
Replace the DCM.
MSTR off (and DCM is in a master
station)
Switch setting is incorrect
Remove power from the PLC, remove the
DCM and check switch positions1 and 2
on SW5.
ENQ indicator does not come on
when communications program is
executed
The PLC master station is not in Run
mode
Place the PLC in Run mode.
Online / Offline switch is in the Offline
position
Set the switch to Online.
Communications program is not correct
Check the communications program.
Verify the address, amount of data, and
data type are correct.
ENQ stays on, but NAK, TOUT, or
HDR indicators do not come on at
all
Communication timeout is disabled
Remove power from the PLC, remove the
DCM, and check switch position 3 on
RTS and CTS signals are not looped back SW5.
on the master station end of the cable
Remove master station connector, ensure
that RTS and CTS are connected
according to the cable diagram.
ENQ comes on and TOUT indicator
flashes
RLL communications program is not
correct
Check the communications program.
Verify the address is correct.
Modes are different
Set baud rate, parity, and mode
(HEX/ASCII) to match the master station.
Communication cable
Verify the cable is wired according to the
cable pinouts.
ENQ indicator comes on and NAK
indicator flashes
(slave responds, but the data is
incorrect)
Modes are different
Set baud rate, parity, and mode
(HEX/ASCII) to match the master station.
Communication cable
Make sure the + and – connections are
correct (RS422). Check pin 7 (GND) if
you’re using RS232C.
ENQ and HDR indicators come on
and the NAK indicator flashes
Communications program is not correct
Check the amount of data being
transferred. You must use the correct byte
boundaries for the data type being used.
Modes are different
DATA indicator is on, but the NAK
indicator comes on intermittently
Electrical noise
Set baud rate, parity, and mode
(HEX/ASCII) to match the master station.
Make sure the system has good earth
grounds. Only one end of the cable shield
should be grounded.
If you’re using RS232C, try using RS422 .
Network Operation
& Troubleshooting
PLC power is disconnected
7–6
Network Operation and Troubleshooting
DL305 DCU
Indicators
Check the DCU indicators to verify the DCU is operating correctly. The following
diagram shows the proper indicator conditions.
Network Operation
& Troubleshooting
On when PLC is in
Run Mode
On when PLC
battery needs
replacing
On when CPU
watchdog timer has
expired
On when data is
being transmitted
RUN
DATA
BATT
DIAG
CPU
PWR
On when internal
diagnostic tests are
complete
On when base
power is on. If an
external power
supply is used, both
base power and the
external supply must
be on.
7–7
Network Operation and Troubleshooting
The following table provides additional troubleshooting details for the DL305 DCU.
Indicator Status
PWR off
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
Check the PLC source power.
DCU is not connected to the CPU
properly
Make sure the DCU is securely fastened
to the CPU and that no connector pins are
bent.
DCU external power source (if used) is
not connected
Check the external power source.
DCU is defective
Replace the DCU
DIAG off
DCU is defective
Replace the DCU
DATA does not flash during
communications
Loose or incorrectly wired cable
Check the cable connections and pinouts.
Online / Offline switch is in the Offline
position
Set the switch to Online.
Communications program is not correct
Check the master communications
program. Verify the address, amount of
data, and data type are correct. (See
Appendices D, E, and F for address
references.)
Network Operation
& Troubleshooting
PLC power is disconnected
PLC
Master / Slave
Example
In This Chapter. . . .
1A
Ċ The Example
Ċ Remember these Four Steps!
Ċ Step 1: Design the Network
Ċ Step 2: Select the Communication Settings
Ċ Step 3: Create the Communications Program.
Ċ Step 4: Start the Network
Ċ What should I do if it isn't working correctly?
A–2
Appendix A
Master / Slave Example
PLC Master / Slave Example
The Example
This chapter provides an example of a PLC master / slave network and is designed
for the experienced user. This chapter does not provide detailed descriptions of
network concepts and communications parameters. If you’re unfamiliar with
networking concepts, or if you want to know more detailed information about
DirectNET, you may want to read Chapters 2 – 5 before setting up the example
network.
Example
Equipment
A PLC master with a DCM interface connected to one or more PLC or DCM slaves is
the most popular type of network. The PLC is the network master and uses the DCM
to initiate all communication requests. The DCM or PLC slave stations respond to
the master station requests for data.
This chapter provides an example that allows you to quickly and easily set up a small
master / slave network.
Master Station
Slave #1
Slave #2
Master Station
The following equipment is needed in the master station.
S DL405 Base (4, 6, or 8 slot)
S DL430 or DL440 CPU
S D4–DCM Data Communications Module
S I/O modules, including at least one I/O simulator
Slave Station #1
The following equipment is needed in slave station #1.
S DL405 Base (4, 6, or 8 slot)
S DL430 or DL440 CPU
S I/O modules, including at least one output module
Slave Station #2
The following equipment is needed in slave station #2.
S DL405 Base (4, 6, or 8 slot)
S DL430 or DL440 CPU
A–3
PLC Master / Slave Example
Normally, you can install the modules in any manner. However, we’d like to keep our
examples consistent between the different configurations. Install the equipment in
the following order.
WARNING: To minimize the risk of electrical shock, personal injury, or equipment
damage, always disconnect the system power before installing or removing any
system component.
1. Install the CPU in the far left side of the base in the position marked
“CPU/Power Supply”. When inserting components into the base, tilt the
component slightly forward sliding the tab on the bottom of the component
into the slot in the base. Push the top of the component into the base until it
is seated firmly, then tighten the securing screw at the top of the
module/unit.
Each unit has a plastic tab at the
bottom and a screw at the top.
With the unit tilted slightly
forward, hook the module’s
plastic tab on the base.
Gently push the top of the unit
back until it is firmly installed in
the base.
Secure the unit to the base by
tightening the top screw.
You can connect the power wiring now (if it’s not already connected), but
don’t connect the source power yet.
2. For the master station and slave stations #1 and #2, reserve slot 0 for the
DCM. (Slot 0 is the slot next to the CPU.) Set the DCMs aside for now. (You
need to set the dipswitches and station addresses first.)
3. Install the I/O Simulator in slot 1, next to the DCM slot.
Appendix A
Master / Slave Example
Install the
Equipment
A–4
Remember these Four Steps!
Use these steps to build your example
network. The remainder of this chapter
provides detailed explanations and
examples of these steps.
Master / Slave
1. Design the network by:
S Selecting the configuration
(this is a master / slave
configuration)
S Building the communication
cables
2. Select the communication settings by:
S Setting the master switches
S Setting the slave switches
3. Write the communication control
program.
S RLL program is used with PLC
master
4. Start the network operation.
Master / Slave
Request
Response
Appendix A
Master / Slave Example
PLC Master / Slave Example
A–5
PLC Master / Slave Example
The Example
Configuration
In this chapter we’ll use the following example configuration to create a simple
master slave network.
WARNING: These examples are for illustration purposes only and are not intended
for use in actual applications. This is because there may be many aspects of your
system safety precautions that are not addressed in the examples. If you use these
examples in actual applications, you are increasing the risk of personal injury and/or
property damage.
Goal:
1. Write a bit pattern from an input module (X0 – X7) to Slave #1
2. Read 1 V memory location from Slave #2.
Master Station
Slave #1
Slave #2
Appendix A
Master / Slave Example
Step 1: Design the Network
A–6
Appendix A
Master / Slave Example
PLC Master / Slave Example
The Example Cable
In our example configuration we have:
S A PLC with a DCM as the master station
S A PLC with a DCM as slave station #1.
S A DL440 PLC with a built-in DirectNET port as slave station #2
We’ll have to use the pinout diagrams for those slaves. Also, since we have more
than one slave station we’ll use the RS422 multi-drop cable.
DCM to DCM to PLC port cable pinout
Master – DCM
Slave#1 – DCM
Slave#2 – PLC
7
10
11
12
13
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
10
11
12
13
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
7
19
18
11
23
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
14
15
16
17
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
17
16
15
14
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
9
10
16
14
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
22
23
24
25
+OUT
–OUT
–IN
+IN
25
24
23
22
+IN
–IN
–OUT
+OUT
Resistor
(optional for
this example)
A–7
PLC Master / Slave Example
Set the DCM
Switches for the
Master Station
The next step is to set the master station DCM communication parameters. We will
use the following settings in our example.
S On-line / Off-line — On-line position
S Address — 0 (hexadecimal)
S Baud Rate — 19.2K
S Parity — None
S Response Delay Time — 0
S Network Protocol — DirectNET Master
S Mode — HEX
PWR
OK
NAK
ENQ
TOUT
HDR
MSTR
DATA
ONLINE
OFFLINE
X10
UNIT
ADR
(HEX)
X1
OFF ON
Switch Positions
Time*
6
7
8
0 OFF OFF OFF
2 ON OFF OFF
5 OFF ON OFF
10 ON ON OFF
20 OFF OFF ON
50 ON OFF ON
100 OFF ON ON
500 ON ON ON
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
NO Parity
Set to OFF
Delay Time
*Delay time in milliseconds
Baud Rate
ODD Parity
Self Test
SW 4
1
2
3
4
COM Timeout Enable
Hexadecimal Mode
DCM Rear View
SW 5
Network
Protocol
Switch Positions
Baud
1
2
3
300 ON OFF OFF
600 OFF ON OFF
1200 ON ON OFF
2400 OFF OFF ON
4800 ON OFF ON
9600 OFF ON ON
19200 ON ON ON
38400 OFF OFF OFF
Switch Positions
Protocol
1
DirectNET Slave
OFF
DirectNET Master
OFF
DirectNET Peer
ON
Modbus RTU Slave ON
COM Timeout Disable
ASCII Mode
2
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
Appendix A
Master / Slave Example
Step 2: Select the Communication Settings
A–8
Appendix A
Master / Slave Example
PLC Master / Slave Example
Set the DCM
Switches for
Slave #1
Slave station #1 is a DL405 PLC with a DCM as the network interface. Set the DCM
address to 1. Set the communication parameters to match the master station.
S Address — 1 (hexadecimal)
S On-line / Off-line — On-line position
S Baud Rate — 19.2K
S Parity — None
S Response Delay Time — 0
S Network Protocol — DirectNET Slave
S Mode — HEX
Install the DCM and Install the DCMs in the slots next to the CPU for the master station and slave station
#2. Connect the communication cables to the appropriate units.
Connect the
Cables
NOTE: Remember that the pinout diagrams are different for the DCMs and the
bottom CPU port. Make sure the cables are connected to the proper device.
Set the PLC
Switches for
the Slave #2
Slave station #2 is a DL405 PLC. If you
look at the back of the DL405 CPU you
will notice a small bank of switches.
Switches 2, 3, and 4 are used to set the
communication parameters for the
bottom communication port.
Switch 2 — This switch selects the CPU
slave address. If this switch is On, then
an address of 1 is used. If the switch is
Off, then you can use a programming
device to set the address.
Switch 3 & 4 — These switches select
the baud rate for the bottom port.
Baud
3
4
300
OFF
OFF
1200
OFF
ON
9600
ON
OFF
19200
ON
ON
Set switch 2 to OFF – Address 1.
Set switch 3 ON and 4 OFF – 9600 Baud
Switch 1 does not apply to the networking
example. It is used to select the battery low indictor
operation.
DL405 PLC
Rear View
A–9
PLC Master / Slave Example
With DirectSOFT, use AUX 56 from the
Auxiliary functions menu to set the port
parameters.
With the DL405 handheld programmer, use
AUX 56 to set the port parameters. The
following example shows how to use the
handheld programmer to set the address.
DirectSOFT
NOTE: The PLC port address is set in decimal,
not hexadecimal.
DL405
Handheld
Programmer
Select AUX 56
CLR
CLR
AUX
5
6
ENT
ENT
AUX 5* CPU CFG
AUX 56 CPU N/W ADDRESS
Enter the Address (in decimal)
0
2
ENT
AUX 56 CPU N/W ADDRESS
N/W # 02
Set Address to 2 (decimal)
Select HEX or ASCII
To change the mode press ....
then press enter. ENT
AUX 56 CPU N/W ADDRESS
HEX / ASCII
Select HEX mode for data transfer.
Select the Parity Option
To change the parity press ....
then press enter. ENT
AUX 56 CPU N/W ADDRESS
NONE / ODD
Set Parity to none.
Clear the Display
To clear the display press....
CLR
OK
Appendix A
Master / Slave Example
Set the Station
Address for
Slave #2
A–10
Appendix A
Master / Slave Example
PLC Master / Slave Example
Step 3: Create the Communications Program.
Program
Description
In the example network, we’ll use 8 switches on the input simulator in the master
system to set a bit pattern that will be written to an output module on the slave
station #1. Also, we’ll read the current value of a timer from slave station #2. Our
example requires a program in both the master and slave stations.
Goal:
1. Write a bit pattern from an input module (X0 – X7) to Slave #1
2. Read one V-memory location (V0000 – two bytes) from Slave #2, store in
V2000.
Master Station
Write Command
X0 - X7
Read Command
MSB
V2000
LSB
15
Y0 - Y7
MSB
0
V0
15
Slave #1
LSB
0
Slave #2
The example provides the instructions needed for the DirectSOFT programming
Connect the
Programing Device package and for the DL405 Handheld Programmer. In either case, you should
connect the programming device to the top port on the DL405 CPU. We assume you
understand how to use the DirectSOFT Programming Package and/or the
Handheld Programmer. If you aren’t familiar with these, you should probably review
those product manuals prior to trying to enter these programs.
The program examples on the following pages show both RLL and RLL PLUS
examples. The RLL PLUS approach eliminates the need for the interlocking relays
and is generally a much more straightforward programming method.
A–11
PLC Master / Slave Example
The following diagram shows the RLL instructions used in the communications
program. Chapter 5 provides detailed descriptions of the instructions. You should
always use the interlocking relays to ensure that the DCM has adequate time to
finish a communication task.
Interlocking Relay
DCM Busy Relay
SP120 C0
Slot Location of DCM
LD
K0001
Slave address
K0001
Number of bytes
to transfer
LD
LDA
O40400
Memory area of
master station
WX
Write command
and memory area of
slave station
Y0
Set
C0
Interlocking Relay
SP120 C0
LD
K0002
Slot Location of DCM
Slave address
LD
K0002
LDA
O2000
Number of bytes
to transfer
Memory area of
master station
Read command
and memory area of
slave station
RX
V0
RST
C0
END
End of program
Appendix A
Master / Slave Example
RLL Instructions
A–12
Appendix A
Master / Slave Example
PLC Master / Slave Example
Master Program
RLL Example
DirectSOFT
SP120 C0
DL405 HP Mnemonics
LD
K0001
LD
K0001
LDA
O40400
WX
Y0
Set
C0
SP120 C0
LD
K0002
LD
K0002
LDA
O2000
RX
V0
RST
C0
END
$0
STRN SP120
$1
ANDN C0
$2
LD K0001
$3
LD K0001
$4
LDA O40400
$5
WX Y0
$6
SET C0
$8
STRN SP120
$9
AND C0
$10
LD K0002
$11
LD K0002
$12
LDA O2000
$13
RX V0
$15
RST C0
$16
END
A–13
PLC Master / Slave Example
DirectSOFT
DL405 HP Mnemonics
ISG 0
SP120
LD
K0001
LD
K0001
LDA
O40400
WX
Y0
JMP
S1
SG 1
SP120
LD
K0002
LD
K0002
LDA
O2000
RX
V0
JMP
S0
END
$0
ISG S0
$1
STRN SP120
$2
LD K0001
$3
LD K0001
$4
LDA O40400
$5
WX Y0
$6
JMP S1
$8
SG S001
$9
STRN SP120
$10
LD K0002
$11
LD K0002
$12
LDA O2000
$13
RX V0
$15
JMP S0
$16
END
Appendix A
Master / Slave Example
Master Program
RLL PLUS Example
A–14
Appendix A
Master / Slave Example
PLC Master / Slave Example
Slave Station #2
Program
RLL Example
Our example requires a program in slave station #2. The slave station program is
much easier because the master station program controls the communication. In the
slave station, we’re just using a self-resetting timer to provide a data value.
DirectSOFT
T0
DL405 HP Mnemonics
TMR
T0
K9999
END
Slave Station #2
Program
RLL PLUS Example
DirectSOFT
DL405 HP Mnemonics
ISG 0
T0
$0
STRN T0
$1
TMR 0
$2
K9999
$3
END
TMR
T0
K9999
END
$0
ISG S0
$1
STRN T0
$2
TMR 0
$3
K9999
$4
END
A–15
PLC Master / Slave Example
Switch the PLCs to
Run Mode
Only the master station needs to be in Run
mode to execute the communications
program. However, for this example to work
correctly all CPUs should be in Run mode.
You can use the programming devices to
place them in Run mode,or you just turn the
keyswitch to the RUN position.
CPU/POWER 110/220VAC
RUN
PWR
BATT
TERM
RUN
I/O
STOP
CPU
COM
Appendix A
Master / Slave Example
Step 4: Start the Network
A–16
Appendix A
Master / Slave Example
PLC Master / Slave Example
Verify the Network
Check the DCM indicators to verify that the network is operating correctly. shows the
proper indicator conditions. The ENQ, HDR, and DATA indicators should be
flashing.
Self Test Indicator: ON
Module Power: ON
Master Mode:
ON if master
OFF if slave
PWR
NAK
TOUT
MSTR
OK
ENQ
HDR
DATA
Send/Receive Enquiry:
FLASHING
Send/Receive Header:
FLASHING
Send/Receive Data
Packet: FLASHING
Verify the Write
Command
Now you can change the I/O simulator
switch
settings
and
verify
the
communications.
1. Set every other switch to the ON
position
2. Look at the first slave station output
module. The indicators should match
the I/O simulator switch settings.
3. Change the I/O simulator switch
settings at random and notice how the
output module indicators change.
Master
Slave
Input
Simulator
Output
Module
A–17
PLC Master / Slave Example
You’ll need to use the programming device to
verify the read requests. Connect the
programming device and complete the
following steps.
DirectSOFT
DL405
Handheld
Programmer
Monitor a V Location
CLR
CLR
V
0
WD ST ENT
ENT
V
1
V MON 0000
V
0
XXXX
Appendix A
Master / Slave Example
Verify the Read
Command
A–18
Appendix A
Master / Slave Example
PLC Master / Slave Example
What should I do if it isn’t working correctly?
Troubleshooting
Steps
If the network does not seem to be working correctly, check the following items.
1. Cable and connections. Incorrectly wired cables and loose connectors
cause the majority of problems. Verify that you’ve selected the proper cable
configuration and check that the cable is wired correctly.
2. Dipswitch settings. Make sure you’ve set the switches to allow the same
communication settings for both stations.
3. Communications program. Verify that the program has been entered as
shown in the example.
4. If the network still doesn’t work correctly go to Chapter 7, Network
Operation and Troubleshooting, and use the troubleshooting charts.
Peer Master Example
1B
In This Chapter. . . .
— The Example
— Remember these Four Steps!
— Step 1: Design the Network
— Step 2: Select the Communication Settings
— Step 3: Create the Communications Programs
— Step 4: Start the Network
— What should I do if it isn’t working correctly?
B–2
Peer Master Example
The Example
Appendix B
Peer Master Example
This chapter provides an example of a peer-to-peer network and is designed for the
experienced user. This chapter does not provide detailed descriptions of network
concepts and communications parameters. If you’re unfamiliar with networking
concepts, or if you want to know more detailed information about DirectNET, you
may want to read Chapters 2 – 5 before setting up the example network.
A DCM peer network utilizes two DCMs, with both configured as peer stations. You
can only have two stations in this configuration. Either unit can initiate a
communications request. (The DCMs automatically compensate for the possibility
of data collisions.)
Example
Equipment
This chapter provides an example that allows you to quickly and easily set up a peer
network.
Peer Station #1
Peer Station #2
Peer Station #1
The following equipment is needed peer station #1.
S DL405 Base (4, 6, or 8 slot)
S DL430 or DL440 CPU
S D4–DCM Data Communications Module
S I/O modules, including at least one I/O simulator
Peer Station #2
The following equipment is needed in peer station #2.
S DL405 Base (4, 6, or 8 slot)
S DL430 or DL440 CPU
S D4–DCM Data Communications Module
S I/O modules, including at least one output module
B–3
Peer Master Example
Install the
Equipment
Normally, you can install the modules in any manner. However, we’d like to keep our
examples consistent between the different configurations. Install the equipment in
the following order.
WARNING: To minimize the risk of electrical shock, personal injury, or
equipment damage, always disconnect the system power before installing or
removing any system component.
Appendix B
Peer Master Example
1. Install the CPU as described in the DL405 User Manual. You can connect
the power wiring now (if it’s not already connected), but don’t connect the
source power yet.
2. For both stations, reserve slot 0 for the DCM. (Slot 0 is the slot next to the
CPU.) Set the DCMs aside for now. (You need to set the dipswitches and
station addresses first.)
3. Install the I/O Simulator in slot 1 of peer station #1.
4. Install the output module in slot 1 of peer station #2.
B–4
Peer Master Example
Remember these Four Steps!
Appendix B
Peer Master Example
Use these steps to build your example
network. The remainder of this chapter
provides detailed explanations and
examples of these steps.
Peer to Peer
1. Design the network by:
S Selecting the configuration
(this is a Peer as Master
configuration)
S Building the communication
cables.
2. Select the communication settings by:
S Setting the Peer Master switches
3. Write the communication control
program.
S RLL program is used with PLC
master
Peer to Peer
4. Start the network operation.
Request
Request
B–5
Peer Master Example
Step 1: Design the Network
The Example
Configuration
In this chapter we’ll use the following example configuration to create a simple peer
network.
WARNING: These examples are for illustration purposes only and are not
intended for use in actual applications. This is because there may be many
aspects of your system safety precautions that are not addressed in the
examples. If you use these examples in actual applications, you are
increasing the risk of personal injury and/or property damage.
Peer Station #1
Peer Station #2
The Example Cable In our example configuration we have a DCM in each station. Since we only have two
stations (point-to-point) we can use RS232C communications.
RS232C DCM to DCM Cable
Peer #1
Peer #2
2 TXD
3 RXD
3 RXD
2 TXD
4 RTS
4 RTS
5 CTS
5 CTS
7 GND
7 GND
Appendix B
Peer Master Example
Goal:
1. Peer #1 – write a bit pattern from an input module (X0 – X7) to station #2.
2. Peer #2 – read 1 V memory location from station #1.
B–6
Peer Master Example
Step 2: Select the Communication Settings
Appendix B
Peer Master Example
Set the DCM
Switches for
Peer #1
The next step is to set the communications parameters for the DCM in peer station
#1. We will use the following settings in our example.
S On-line / Off-line — On-line position
S Address — 1 (hexadecimal)
S Baud Rate — 38.4K
S Parity — None
S Response Delay Time — 0
S Network Protocol — DirectNET Peer
S Mode — HEX
PWR
OK
NAK
ENQ
TOUT
HDR
MSTR
DATA
ONLINE
OFFLINE
X10
UNIT
ADR
(HEX)
X1
OFF ON
Switch Positions
Time*
6
7
8
0 OFF OFF OFF
2 ON OFF OFF
5 OFF ON OFF
10 ON ON OFF
20 OFF OFF ON
50 ON OFF ON
100 OFF ON ON
500 ON ON ON
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
NO Parity
Set to OFF
Delay Time
*Delay time in milliseconds
Baud Rate
ODD Parity
Self Test
SW 4
1
2
3
4
COM Timeout Enable
Hexadecimal Mode
DCM Rear View
SW 5
Network
Protocol
Switch Positions
Baud
1
2
3
300 ON OFF OFF
600 OFF ON OFF
1200 ON ON OFF
2400 OFF OFF ON
4800 ON OFF ON
9600 OFF ON ON
19200 ON ON ON
38400 OFF OFF OFF
Switch Positions
Protocol
1
DirectNET Slave
OFF
DirectNET Master
OFF
DirectNET Peer
ON
Modbus RTU Slave ON
COM Timeout Disable
ASCII Mode
2
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
B–7
Peer Master Example
The next step is to set the communications parameters for the DCM in peer station
#2. Notice the settings are exactly the same, with the exception of the address.
S On-line / Off-line — On-line position
S Address — 2 (hexadecimal)
S Baud Rate — 38.4K
S Parity — None
S Response Delay Time — 0
S Network Protocol — DirectNET Peer
S Mode — HEX
Install the DCMs
and Connect the
Cables
Install the DCMs in the slots next to the CPU for both peer stations and connect the
communication cable.
Appendix B
Peer Master Example
Set the DCM
Switches for
Peer #2
B–8
Peer Master Example
Step 3: Create the Communications Programs
Two Programs are
Required
With peer networks, you need a communications program in both stations. Each
program contains the necessary instructions to initiate the data requests.
Peer Station #1
Program
Description
For peer station #1, we’ll use 8 switches on the input simulator to set a bit pattern that
will be written to an output module on peer station #2.
Appendix B
Peer Master Example
Goal: Write a bit pattern from an input module (X0 – X7) to peer station #2.
Peer Station #1
Peer Station #2
Write Command
X0 – X7
Peer Station #2
Program
Description
Y0 – Y7
For peer station #2, we want to read a V memory location from peer station #1.
Goal: Read 1 V memory location from peer station #1.
Master Station #1
Master Station #2
Read Command
MSB
15
V0
LSB
MSB
0
15
V2000
LSB
0
B–9
Peer Master Example
The example provides the instructions needed for the DirectSOFT programming
Connect the
Programing Device package and for the DL405 Handheld Programmer. In either case, you should
connect the programming device to the top port on the DL405 CPU. We assume you
understand how to use the DirectSOFT Programming Package and/or the
Handheld Programmer. If you aren’t familiar with these, you should probably review
those product manuals prior to trying to enter these programs.
The program examples on the following pages show both RLL and RLL PLUS
examples. The RLL PLUS approach eliminates the need for the interlocking relays
and is generally a much more straightforward programming method.
Appendix B
Peer Master Example
B–10
Peer Master Example
Peer Station #1
RLL Instructions
The following diagram shows the RLL instructions used in the communications
program for peer station #1. Chapter 5 provides detailed descriptions of the
instructions. Since we also plan to use peer station #2 to read a V memory location
from peer station #1, we’re using a self-resetting timer to provide a data value. This
will make it easier to verify our example is working correctly.
Appendix B
Peer Master Example
NOTE: This example does not have multiple communications requests in each
station. If you need multiple requests in your application, you should use the
interlocking relays to ensure the DCM has adequate time to finish a communication
task. See Chapter 4 for more detailed information.
Goal: Write a bit pattern from an input module (X0 – X7) to peer station #2.
Self-resetting Timer
T0
T0
TMR
K9999
Slot Location of DCM
DCM Busy Relay
SP120
LD
K0002
Peer #2 address
K0001
Number of bytes
to transfer
LD
LDA
O40400
Memory area of
peer #1
WX
Write command and
memory area of
peer #2
Y0
END
End of program
B–11
Peer Master Example
Peer Station #1
RLL Example
DirectSOFT
T0
SP120
DL405 HP Mnemonics
TMR
T0
K9999
LD
K0002
K0001
LDA
O40400
WX
Y0
END
NOTE: To create this program in RLL PLUS, just add an initial stage (ISG 0) to the
beginning of the program.
Appendix B
Peer Master Example
LD
$0
STRN T0
$1
TMR 0
$2
K9999
$3
STRN SP120
$4
LD K0002
$5
LD K0001
$6
LDA O40400
$7
WX Y0
$8
END
B–12
Peer Master Example
Peer Station #2
RLL Instructions
The following diagram shows the RLL instructions used in the communications
program for peer station #2. Chapter 5 provides detailed descriptions of the
instructions.
NOTE: This example does not have multiple communications requests in each
station. If you need multiple requests in your application, you should use the
interlocking relays to ensure the DCM has adequate time to finish a communication
task. See Chapter 4 for more detailed information.
Appendix B
Peer Master Example
Goal: Read 1 V memory location from peer station #1.
Slot Location of DCM
DCM Busy Relay
SP120
LD
K0001
Peer #1 address
K0001
Number of bytes
to transfer
LD
LDA
O02000
Memory area of
peer #2
RX
Read command and
memory area of
peer #1
V0
END
End of program
B–13
Peer Master Example
Peer Station #2
RLL Example
DirectSOFT
SP120
DL405 HP Mnemonics
LD
K0001
LD
K0002
RX
V0
END
NOTE: To create this program in RLL PLUS, just add an initial stage (ISG 0) to the
beginning of the program.
Appendix B
Peer Master Example
LDA
O02000
$0
STRN SP120
$1
LD K0001
$2
LD K0002
$3
LDA O2000
$4
RX V0
$5
END
B–14
Peer Master Example
Step 4: Start the Network
Appendix B
Peer Master Example
Switch the PLCs to
Run Mode
For this example to work correctly both CPUs
should be in Run mode. You can use the
programming devices to place them in Run
mode,or you can just turn the keyswitch to the
RUN position.
CPU/POWER 110/220VAC
RUN
PWR
BATT
TERM
RUN
I/O
STOP
CPU
COM
B–15
Peer Master Example
Verify the Network
Check the DCM indicators to verify the network is operating correctly. shows the
proper indicator conditions. The ENQ, HDR, and DATA indicators should be
flashing.
Self Test Indicator: ON
Module Power: ON
PWR
NAK
TOUT
MSTR
OK
ENQ
HDR
DATA
Send/Receive Enquiry:
FLASHING
Send/Receive Header:
FLASHING
Verify the Write
Command
Now you can change the I/O simulator
switch
settings
and
verify
the
communications.
1. Set every other switch to the ON
position
2. Look at the first slave station output
module. The indicators should match
the I/O simulator switch settings.
3. Change the I/O simulator switch
settings at random and notice how the
output module indicators change.
Send/Receive Data
Packet: FLASHING
Peer #1
Peer #2
Input
Simulator
Output
Module
Appendix B
Peer Master Example
Master Mode:
ON if master
OFF if slave
(should be off
for this example)
B–16
Peer Master Example
Verify the Read
Command
You’ll need to use the programming device to
verify the read requests. Connect the
programming device to peer station #2 and
complete the following steps.
Appendix B
Peer Master Example
DirectSOFT
V 2001
V MON 0000
DL405
Handheld
Programmer
V2000
XXXX
Monitor a V Location
CLR
CLR
V
2
0
0
0
WD ST ENT
ENT
What should I do if it isn’t working correctly?
Troubleshooting
Steps
If the network does not seem to be working correctly, check the following items.
1. Cable and connections. Incorrectly wired cables and loose connectors
cause the majority of problems. Verify you’ve selected the proper cable
configuration and check that the cable is wired correctly.
2. Dipswitch settings. Make sure the switches are set the same for both
stations.
3. Communications program. Verify the program has been entered as shown
in the example.
4. If the network still doesn’t work correctly go to Chapter 7, Network
Operation and Troubleshooting, and use the troubleshooting charts.
Host Master Example
1C
In This Chapter. . . .
— The Example
— Remember these Four Steps!
— Step 1: Design the Network
— Step 2: Select the Communication Settings
— Step 3: Create the Communications Program
— Step 4: Start the Network.
— What should I do if it isn’t working correctly?
C–2
Host Master Example
The Example
Example
Equipment
A hosted network utilizes an intelligent device, such as a personal computer, to act
as the network master station. Slave stations can be DCMs or DirectLOGIC PLCs
with built-in DirectNet ports. The host device initiates all communication requests
and the slaves respond to the requests for data. This example is not intended to
show you how to build DirectLink programs. You should review your programming
language manuals and Chapter 6 of this manual before you attempt to build your
own DirectLink programs.
This chapter provides an example that allows you to quickly and easily set up a
hosted network.
Peer Master
Example
Appendix C
Host Master Example
PC Master Station
Slave Station #1
Master Station
You need a personal computer for the master station.
Slave Station #1
The following equipment is needed slave station #1.
S DL405 Base (4, 6, or 8 slot)
S DL430 or DL440 CPU
S I/O modules, including at least one I/O simulator and one output module
C–3
Host Master Example
Install the
Equipment
Normally, you can install the modules in any manner. However, we’d like to keep our
examples consistent between the different configurations. Install the equipment in
the following order.
WARNING: To minimize the risk of electrical shock, personal injury, or
equipment damage, always disconnect the system power before installing or
removing any system component.
1. Install the CPUs as described in the DL405 User’s Manual. You can
connect the power wiring now (if it’s not already connected), but don’t
connect the source power yet.
2. Install the I/O Simulator in slot 0 of slave station #1, next to the CPU.
3. Install the Output module in slot 1 of slave station #1.
Appendix C
Host Master Example
Host Master
Example
C–4
Host Master Example
Remember these Four Steps!
Use these steps to build your example
network. The remainder of this chapter
provides detailed explanations and
examples of these steps.
Host
1. Design the network by:
S Selecting the configuration
(this is a Host as Master
configuration)
S Building the communication
cables.
Appendix C
Host Master Example
2. Select the communication settings by:
S Setting the station switches
3. Write the communication control
program.
S DirectNET program is used with
Host master configurations.
.
.
.
130
140
150
160
170
NORMAL$=CHR$(&H4E)
SLAVEADDR$=HEX$(SLAVEADDRESS)
IF LEN(SLAVEADDR$)<2
THEN SLAVEADDR$=”0”+SLAVEADDR$
OFFSETADDR$=CHR$(&H20+SLAVEADDRESS)
ENQ$=CHR$(&H5)
4. Start the network operation.
Host
Request
Response
Peer Master
Example
.
.
.
C–5
Host Master Example
Step 1: Design the Network
The Example
Configuration
In this chapter we’ll use the following example configuration to create a simple Host
master network.
WARNING: These examples are for illustration purposes only and are not
intended for use in actual applications. This is because there may be many
aspects of your system safety precautions that are not addressed in the
examples. If you use these examples in actual applications, you are
increasing the risk of personal injury and/or property damage.
Goal:
1. Read a bit pattern from an input module (X0 – X7) in Slave #1
2. Write a bit pattern to an output module (Y0 – Y7) in Slave #1.
PC Master Station
Slave Station #1
Appendix C
Host Master Example
Host Master
Example
C–6
Host Master Example
The Example Cable In our example configuration we have:
S A personal computer as the master station
S A DL440 PLC with a built-in DirectNet port as slave station #1
Since this is a simple point-to-point network, we can use RS232C communications.
RS232C
Master – PC
Slave#1 – PLC
2 TXD
2 TXD
3 RXD
3 RXD
5 GND
7 GND
1 DCD
4 RTS
4 DTR
5 CTS
6 DSR
6 DSR
7 RTS
8 DCD
8 CTS
20 DTR
Peer Master
Example
Appendix C
Host Master Example
9-pin Connector
25-pin Connector
C–7
Host Master Example
Step 2: Select the Communication Settings
Set the Personal
Computer as the
Master Station
Set the PLC
Switches for
the Slave Station
The next step is to set the personal computer communication parameters (in the
BASIC program). The parameters are typically set with software on the personal
computer. The best place to find this information is in the documentation that came
with your computer. It is important the communication settings for both the master
and the slave(s) are the same. We will use the following settings in our example.
S Baud Rate — 9600 baud
S Parity — None
DL405 PLC
Rear View
Appendix C
Host Master Example
Slave station #1 is a DL405 PLC. If you
look at the back of the DL405 CPU you
will notice a small bank of switches.
Switches 2, 3, and 4 are used to set the
communication parameters for the
bottom communication port.
Switch 2 — This switch selects the CPU
slave address. If this switch is On, then
an address of 1 is used. If the switch is
Off, then you can use a programming
device to set the address.
Switch 3 & 4 — These switches select
the baud rate for the bottom port.
Baud
3
4
300
OFF
OFF
1200
OFF
ON
9600
ON
OFF
19200
ON
ON
Set switch 2 to OFF – Address 1.
Set switch 3 ON and 4 OFF – 9600 Baud
Switch 1 does not apply to the networking
example. It is used to select the battery low indictor
operation.
Host Master
Example
C–8
Host Master Example
Set the Station
Address for the
Slave Station
With DirectSOFT, use AUX 56 from the
Auxiliary functions menu to set the port
parameters.
With the DL405 Handheld Programmer, use
AUX 56 to set the port parameters. The
following example shows how to use the
handheld programmer to set the address.
DirectSOFT
NOTE: The PLC port address is set in decimal,
not hexadecimal.
DL405
Handheld
Programmer
Select AUX 56
CLR
CLR
AUX
5
6
ENT
ENT
AUX 5* CPU CFG
AUX 56 CPU N/W ADDRESS
Enter the Address (in decimal)
Appendix C
Host Master Example
0
1
ENT
AUX 56 CPU N/W ADDRESS
N/W # 01
Set Address to 1 (decimal)
Select HEX or ASCII
To change the mode press ....
then press enter. ENT
AUX 56 CPU N/W ADDRESS
HEX / ASCII
Select ASCII mode for data transfer.
Peer Master
Example
Select the Parity Option
AUX 56 CPU N/W ADDRESS
NONE / ODD
To change the parity press ....
then press enter. ENT
Set Parity to none.
Clear the Display
To clear the display press....
CLR
OK
C–9
Host Master Example
Step 3: Create the Communications Program
DirectNET
Programs
Example Program
The communications program used with a hosted network is more complex than the
simple RLL instructions used with the other configurations, but the concept is the
same. The host is the DirectNET master and must use a DirectNET protocol
communications program to initiate all network requests to read or write data. These
communication programs can be written in many different languages, such as
BASIC, C, etc. and must include the appropriate DirectNET protocol commands.
We’ve provided two host programs for this example. The programs are written in
BASIC, which is provided with many personal computers.
Goal:
1. Read a bit pattern from an input module (X0 – X7).
2. Write a bit pattern to the first output module (Y0–Y7). (We’ll actually use
V40500, which is the V-memory location that corresponds to Y0–Y7).
Read Command
10110110
MSB
15
Entering the
Program
Slave Station
Programs
V40500
Appendix C
Host Master Example
Write Command
0111001
X0 – X7
LSB
0
You can use most any file editor to enter the program. Make sure your editor does not
embed formatting codes. For example, most word processing packages and/or
desktop publishing packages embed codes that describe the page layout. These
types of packages are generally not suitable for entering programs.
The slave station does not require any programming in this example.
NOTE: The DL405 CPU must be in the ASCII mode for the following BASIC
programs to work.
Host Master
Example
C–10
Host Master Example
Peer Master
Example
Appendix C
Host Master Example
Example Program
to Read Data
10
20
30
40
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460
The following program will read X0–X7 from Slave Station #1.
REM Program to read X0–X7 from a 405 PLC
REM
REM Define all variables
REM
REM Change the slave address in HEX at line 60 if required.
SLAVEADDRESS=&H1
DATATYPE$=CHR$(&H32)
DATAADDR$=CHR$(&H30)+CHR$(&H31)+CHR$(&H30)+CHR$(&H31)
COMPLETEBLK$=CHR$(&H30)+CHR$(&H30)
PARTBLK$=CHR$(&H30)+CHR$(&H32)
MASTERADDR$=CHR$(&H30)+CHR$(&H30)
NORMAL$=CHR$(&H4E)
SLAVEADDR$=HEX$(SLAVEADDRESS)
IF LEN(SLAVEADDR$)<2 THEN SLAVEADDR$=”0”+SLAVEADDR$
OFFSETADDR$=CHR$(&H20+SLAVEADDRESS)
ENQ$=CHR$(&H5)
ACK$=CHR$(&H6)
SOH$=CHR$(&H1)
STX$=CHR$(&H2)
ETB$=CHR$(&H17)
NAK$=CHR$(&H15)
ETX$=CHR$(&H3)
EOT$=CHR$(&H4)
RED$=CHR$(&H30)
DATA$=””
REM
REM Build enquiry and header
REM
SLAVEENQ$=NORMAL$+OFFSETADDR$+ENQ$
HEADER$=SOH$+SLAVEADDR$+RED$+DATATYPE$+DATAADDR$
HEADER$=HEADER$+COMPLETEBLK$+PARTBLK$+MASTERADDR$+ETB$
REM
REM Begin active program
REM
CLS
OPEN ”COM1:9600,N,8,1,RS,DS” AS #1
LRC=0
GOSUB 770
RETRY=0
REM
Do Enquiry
PRINT #1,SLAVEENQ$;
INPUT #1,ENQRES$:PRINT ”Enquire Response = ”;ENQRES$
IF MID$(ENQRES$,3,1)=ACK$ THEN GOTO 480
RETRY=RETRY+1
IF RETRY>2 THEN GOTO 760
GOTO 410
C–11
Host Master Example
Host Master
Example
REM
Do Header
RETRY=0
PRINT #1,HEADER$;LRC$;
INPUT #1,HEADERRESP$:PRINT ”Header Response = ”;HEADERRESP$
IF MID$(HEADERRESP$,1,1)=ACK$ THEN GOTO 560
RETRY=RETRY+1
IF RETRY>2 THEN GOTO 760
GOTO 490
REM
Get the data
RETRY=0
INPUT #1,DAT$
GOSUB 850
IF VALUELRC$=DATLRC$ THEN GOTO 640
PRINT #1,NAK$;
RETRY=RETRY+1
IF RETRY>2 THEN GOTO 760
GOTO 570
REM
Print the data to the screen
PRINT ”Data = ”;VALUE$
REM
Do the ACK
RETRY=0
PRINT #1,ACK$;
INPUT #1,ACKRESP$:PRINT ”EOT = ”;ACKRESP$
IF MID$(ACKRESP$,1,1)=EOT$ THEN GOTO 750
RETRY=RETRY+1
IF RETRY>2 THEN GOTO 760
GOTO 680
REM
Do the EOT
PRINT #1,EOT$;
CLEAR:CLOSE:END
REM
REM Routine to calculate LRC
REM
FOR I=2 TO (LEN(HEADER$)–1)
LRC=LRC XOR ASC(MID$(HEADER$,I,1))
NEXT I
LRC$=HEX$(LRC):IF LEN(LRC$)<2 THEN LRC$=”0”+LRC$
RETURN
REM
REM Routine to remove data from data packet, Get LRC for check in main
REM
VALUELRC=0
DATLRC$=””
FOR I=2 TO (LEN(DAT$)–3)
VALUE$=VALUE$+MID$(DAT$,I,1)
VALUELRC=VALUELRC XOR ASC(MID$(DAT$,I,1))
NEXT I
DATLRC$=MID$(DAT$,(LEN(DAT$)–1),2)
VALUELRC$=HEX$(VALUELRC)
IF LEN(VALUELRC$)<2 THEN VALUELRC$=CHR$(&H30)+VALUELRC$
RETURN
Appendix C
Host Master Example
470
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490
500
510
520
530
540
550
560
570
580
590
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610
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970
C–12
Host Master Example
Peer Master
Example
Appendix C
Host Master Example
Example Program
to Write Data
10
20
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40
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60
70
80
90
100
110
120
130
140
150
160
170
180
190
200
210
220
230
240
250
260
270
280
290
300
310
320
330
The following program will write a value to Y0 – Y7 in Slave Station #1.
REM Program to write X0–X7 to a 405 PLC
REM
REM Define all variables
REM
REM Change the slave address in HEX at line 60 if required
SLAVEADDRESS=&H1
DATATYPE$=CHR$(&H33)
DATAADDR$=CHR$(&H30)+CHR$(&H31)+CHR$(&H30)+CHR$(&H31)
COMPLETEBLK$=CHR$(&H30)+CHR$(&H30)
PARTBLK$=CHR$(&H30)+CHR$(&H32)
MASTERADDR$=CHR$(&H30)+CHR$(&H30)
REM
NORMAL$=CHR$(&H4E)
SLAVEADDR$=HEX$(SLAVEADDRESS)
IF LEN(SLAVEADDR$)<2 THEN SLAVEADDR$=”0”+SLAVEADDR$
OFFSETADDR$=CHR$(&H20+SLAVEADDRESS)
ENQ$=CHR$(&H5)
ACK$=CHR$(&H6)
SOH$=CHR$(&H1)
STX$=CHR$(&H2)
ETB$=CHR$(&H17)
NAK$=CHR$(&H15)
ETX$=CHR$(&H3)
EOT$=CHR$(&H4)
RITE$=CHR$(&H38)
DATA$=””
REM
REM Build enquiry and header
REM
SLAVEENQ$=NORMAL$+OFFSETADDR$+ENQ$
HEADER$=SOH$+SLAVEADDR$+RITE$+DATATYPE$+DATAADDR$
HEADER$=HEADER$+COMPLETEBLK$+PARTBLK$+MASTERADDR$+ETB$
REM
C–13
Host Master Example
Host Master
Example
REM Begin active program
REM
CLS
OPEN ”COM1:9600,N,8,1,RS,DS” AS #1
LRC=0:DATLRC=0
INPUT ”ENTER DATA STRING (2 DIGITS, 0–F) ” , VALUE$
GOSUB 650
GOSUB 730
RETRY=0
PRINT #1,SLAVEENQ$;
INPUT #1,ENQRESP$:PRINT ”Enquire Response = ”;ENQRESP$
IF MID$(ENQRESP$,3,1)=ACK$ THEN GOTO 490
RETRY=RETRY+1
IF RETRY>2 THEN GOTO 640
GOTO 430
RETRY=0
PRINT #1,HEADER$;LRC$;
INPUT #1,HEADERRESP$:PRINT ”Header Response = ”;HEADERRESP$
IF MID$(HEADERRESP$,1,1)=ACK$ THEN GOTO 560
RETRY=RETRY+1
IF RETRY>2 THEN GOTO 640
GOTO 500
RETRY=0
PRINT #1,DAT$;DATLRC$;
INPUT #1,DATRESP$:PRINT ”Data Response = ”; DATRESP$
IF MID$(DATRESP$,1,1)=ACK$ THEN GOTO 630
RETRY=RETRY+1
IF RETRY>2 THEN GOTO 640
GOTO 570
PRINT #1,EOT$;
CLEAR:CLOSE:END
REM
REM Routine to calculate LRC
REM
FOR I=2 TO (LEN(HEADER$)–1)
LRC=LRC XOR ASC(MID$(HEADER$,I,1))
NEXT I
LRC$=HEX$(LRC):IF LEN(LRC$)<2 THEN LRC$=”0”+LRC$
RETURN
REM
REM Routine to put data into packet and calulate data LRC
REM
DAT$=CHR$(&H2)+VALUE$+CHR$(&H3)
FOR I=2 TO (LEN(DAT$)–1)
DATLRC=DATLRC XOR ASC(MID$(DAT$,I,1))
NEXT I
DATLRC$=HEX$(DATLRC):IF LEN(DATLRC$)<2 THEN DATLRC$=”0”+DATLRC$
RETURN
Appendix C
Host Master Example
340
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C–14
Host Master Example
Peer Master
Example
Appendix C
Host Master Example
Step 4: Start the Network.
Execute the PC
Master Program
This program was designed to work with GWBasic. Complete the following steps to
execute the example program.
1. Start GWBasic.
2. Load the file you used to create the read example program.
Verify the Read
Command
Now you can change the I/O simulator
switch
settings
and
verify
the
communications.
1. Set every other switch to the ON
position .
2. Execute the program. Look at the
screen to verify the data matches the
I/O simulator switch settings.
3. Change the I/O simulator switch
settings at random and execute the
program again. Notice how the data
changes.
Slave
Verify the Write
Command
You can change the bit pattern for the
output module to verify it is working
correctly. For example, enter FFFF. This
should turn on the first eight output points
in slave station #2.
Notice the numbers are entered in
hexadecimal format. Here’s a cross
reference for a few patterns.
S FFFF – all on
S 0000 – all off
PC Master
FFFF
PC Master
Slave
C–15
Host Master Example
What should I do if it isn’t working correctly?
Troubleshooting
Steps
If the network does not seem to be working correctly, check the following items.
1. Cable and connections. Incorrectly wired cables and loose connectors
cause the majority of problems. Verify you’ve selected the proper cable
configuration and check to see the cable is wired correctly.
2. Dipswitch settings. Make sure you’ve set the slave stations to match the
communication parameters required by the master station (operator
interface or personal computer).
3. Communications program. Verify the program has been entered as shown
in the example.
4. If the network still doesn’t work correctly go to Chapter 7, Network
Operation and Troubleshooting, and use the troubleshooting charts.
Appendix C
Host Master Example
Host Master
Example
DL405
Data Types and
Memory Maps
In This Chapter. . . .
— DL405 Data Types
— DL430 Memory Map
— DL440 Memory Map
— X Input Bit Map
— Y Output Bit Map
— Remote I/O Bit Map
— Control Relay Bit Map
— Stage Control / Status Bit Map
— Timer Status Bit Map
— Counter Status Bit Map
1D
D–2
DL405 Data Types and Memory Map
DL405 Data Types
The following table shows the data types available with the DL405 products.
DL405
Data Type
Description
Bits per
unit
Number of bytes
HEX
ASCII
31
V memory
T / C current value
16
16
2
2
4
4
32
Inputs (X, GX, SP)
8
1
2
33
Outputs
(Y, C, Stage, T/C bits)
8
1
2
39
Diagnostic Status
8
1
2
NOTE: Not all DL405 CPUs offer the same memory ranges. Check your DL405 User
Manual to determine the ranges for your particular model.
Host Master
Example
Appendix D
DL405 Memory Map
Data Type 31
V Memory
V-memory Address
Memory Type
DirectNET Reference
Address
V00000
V00001
———
V00377
TMR Current Time
TMR Current Time
———
TMR Current Time
0001
0002
———
0100
V01000
V01001
———
V01177
CTR Current Count
CTR Current Count
———
CTR Current Count
0201
0202
———
0280
V01400
V01401
———
V7377
V
V
———
V
0301
0302
———
0F00
V10000
V10001
———
V17777
V
V
———
V
1001
1002
———
2000
V40000
V40001
———
V40077
GX
GX
———
GX
4001
4002
———
4040
D–3
DL405 Data Types and Memory Map
Data Type 31
(continued)
Memory Type
DirectNET Reference
Address
V40400
V40401
———
V40423
X
X
———
X
4101
4102
———
4114
V40500
V40501
———
V40523
Y
Y
———
Y
4141
4142
———
4154
V40600
V40601
———
V40677
C
C
———
C
4181
4182
———
41C0
V41000
V41001
———
V41077
Stage Bits
Stage Bits
———
Stage Bits
4201
4202
———
4240
V41100
V41101
———
V41117
TMR Status Bits
TMR Status Bits
———
TMR Status Bits
4241
4242
———
4250
V41140
V41141
———
V41147
CTR Status Bits
CTR Status Bits
———
CTR Status Bits
4261
4262
———
4268
V41200
V41201
———
V41205
Special Relay
Special Relay
———
Special Relay
4281
4282
———
4286
V41215
V41216
———
V41234
Special Relay
Special Relay
———
Special Relay
428E
428F
———
429D
Appendix D
DL405 Memory Map
V-memory Address
Host Master
Example
D–4
DL405 Data Types and Memory Map
Host Master
Example
Appendix D
DL405 Memory Map
Data Type 32
Inputs
V-Memory Address
Memory Type
Range
DirectNET
Reference Address
V40000 LSB
V40000 MSB
V40001 LSB
———
V40077 LSB
V40077 MSB
GX
GX
GX
———
GX
GX
0007 – 0000
0017 – 0010
0027 – 0020
———
1767 – 1760
1777 – 1770
0001
0002
0003
———
007F
0080
V40400 LSB
V40400 MSB
V40401 LSB
———
V40423 LSB
V40423 MSB
X
X
X
———
X
X
0007 – 0000
0017 – 0010
0027 – 0020
———
0467 – 0460
0477 – 0470
0101
0102
0103
———
0127
0128
V41200 LSB
V41200 MSB
V41201 LSB
———
V41205 LSB
V41205 MSB
Special Relay
Special Relay
Special Relay
———
Special Relay
Special Relay
0007 – 0000
0017 – 0010
0027 – 0020
———
0127 – 0120
0137 – 0130
0181
0182
0183
———
018B
018C
V41215 LSB
V41215 MSB
V41216 LSB
———
V41234 LSB
V41234 MSB
Special Relay
Special Relay
Special Relay
———
Special Relay
Special Relay
0327 – 0320
0337 – 0330
0347 – 0340
———
0707 – 0700
0717 – 0710
019B
019C
019D
———
01B9
01BA
D–5
DL405 Data Types and Memory Map
Data Type 33
Outputs
Memory Type
Range
DirectNET
Reference Address
V40500 LSB
V40500 MSB
V40501 LSB
———
V40523 LSB
V40523 MSB
Y
Y
Y
———
Y
Y
0007 – 0000
0017 – 0010
0027 – 0020
———
0467 – 0460
0477 – 0470
0101
0102
0103
———
0127
0128
V40600 LSB
V40600 MSB
V40601 LSB
———
V40677 LSB
V40677 MSB
C
C
C
———
C
C
0007 – 0000
0017 – 0010
0027 – 0020
———
1767 – 1760
1777 – 1770
0181
0182
0183
———
01FF
0200
V41000 LSB
V41000 MSB
V41001 LSB
———
V41077 LSB
V41077 MSB
Stage Bits
Stage Bits
Stage Bits
———
Stage Bits
Stage Bits
0007 – 0000
0017 – 0010
0027 – 0020
———
1767 – 1760
1777 – 1770
0281
0282
0283
———
02FF
0300
V41100 LSB
V41100 MSB
V41101 LSB
———
V41117 LSB
V41117 MSB
Timer Status Bits
Timer Status Bits
Timer Status Bits
———
Timer Status Bits
Timer Status Bits
0007 – 0000
0017 – 0010
0027 – 0020
———
0367 – 0360
0377 – 0370
0301
0302
0303
———
031F
0320
V41140 LSB
V41140 MSB
V41141 LSB
———
V41147 LSB
V41147 MSB
Counter Status Bits
Counter Status Bits
Counter Status Bits
———
Counter Status Bits
Counter Status Bits
0007 – 0000
0017 – 0010
0027 – 0020
———
0167 – 0160
0177 – 0170
0321
0322
0323
———
032F
0330
Appendix D
DL405 Memory Map
V-Memory Address
Host Master
Example
D–6
DL405 Data Types and Memory Map
Data Type 39
Diagnostic Status
You can use Data Type 39 to obtain DirectNET diagnostic status. The following
tables show the reference addresses for the various types of information and the
DirectNET error codes (used with address 0000).
DirectNET Reference
Data Returned
0000
Last error and previous error*
0002
Number of successful communications
0004
Number of erroneous communications
0006
Number of retries for header
0008
Number of retries for data
Host Master
Example
Appendix D
DL405 Memory Map
* The last error code is contained in the most significant byte. The previous error code is in the least significant byte. Two codes that are displayed are
cleared by two successful communication exchanges.
Error
Code
Applicable
Data Type
Error Description
00
All types
The transfer was successful.
01
All types
A timeout occurred in the serial link.
03
32, 33
A request was made to read or write a non-existent I/O point.
04
32, 33
A request was made for data of more I/O points than are available.
05
All types
06
31
07
All types
08
36
09
All types
0A
39
0B
36, 39
0C
All types
Three attempts were made to transmit the header.
0D
All types
Three attempts were made to transmit the data.
0F
All types
The header unit number is incorrect. An invalid function was requested.
14
All types
One or more errors occurred during the data block transfer. Possible errors are:
invalid STX, ETC, LRC, or ETB is received; a parity, framing, or overrun error
occurred.
15
All types
EOT from the master station could not be received.
16
All types
A code other than ACK or NAK was received.
1D
31, 33, 36
1E
All types
A request was made to read or write odd bytes. The number of data requested
was not a multiple of 4 in the ASCII mode.
A request was made to read or write one or more non-existent memory
locations.
A request was made to read or write a zero data byte.
An attempt was made to write a protected memory.
An invalid code is specified or an attempt was made to write to an invalid
address.
A request was made to read or write one or more non-existent diagnostic status
words.
An invalid starting address is used in the PC type read, scan start/stop,
diagnostic status read or write request.
There is a format error in the non-header portion of the message.
There is a format error in the header block.
D–7
DL405 Data Types and Memory Map
DL430 Memory Map
Memory Type
Discrete Memory
Reference
(octal)
Word Memory
Reference
(octal)
Qty.
Decimal
Symbol
Input Points
X0 – X477
V40400 – V40423
320
X0
Output Points
Y0 – Y477
V40500 – V40523
320
Y0
Control Relays
C0 – C737
V40600 – V40635
512
Special Relays
SP0 – SP137
SP320 – SP617
V41200 – V41205
V41215 – V41230
288
Timers
T0 – T177
None
128
Timer Current
Values
None
V00000 – V00177
128
Timer Status Bits T0 – T177
V41100 – V41107
128
Counters
None
128
CT0 – CT177
C0
C0
SP0
TMR
K100
V0
T0
K100
T0
CNT CT0
K10
None
V01000 – V01177
256
Counter Status
Bits
CT0 – CT177
V41040 – V41147
128
Data Words
None
V1400 – V7377
3072
Stages
S0 – S577
V41000 – V41027
384
V1000
Appendix D
DL405 Memory Map
Counter
Current Values
K100
CT0
None specific, used with many
instructions
S0
S 001
Remote In / Out
GX0 – GX737
V40000 – V40037
512
System
parameters
None
V7400 – V7777
256
GX0
GX0
None specific, used with many
instructions
Host Master
Example
SG
D–8
DL405 Data Types and Memory Map
DL440 Memory Map
Memory Type
Discrete Memory
Reference
(octal)
Word Memory
Reference
(octal)
Qty.
Decimal
Symbol
Input Points
X0 – X477
V40400 – V40423
320
X0
Output Points
Y0 – Y477
V40500–40523
320
Y0
Control Relays
C0 – C1777
V40600–40677
1024
Special Relays
SP0 – SP137
SP320 – SP617
SP620 – SP717
V41200–41205
V41215–41230
V41231 – V41234
352
Timers
T0 – T377
None
256
Timer Current
Values
None
V00000 – V00377
256
Timer Status Bits T0 – T377
V41100 – V41117
256
Counters
None
128
CT0 – CT177
C0
C0
SP0
TMR
K100
V0
T0
K100
T0
CNT CT0
Host Master
Example
Appendix D
DL405 Memory Map
K10
Counter
Current Values
None
V01000 – V01177
128
Counter Status
Bits
CT0 – CT177
V41040 – V41147
128
Data Words
None
V1400 – V7377
V10000 – V17777
3072
Stages
S0 – S1777
V41000 – V41077
1024
V1000
K100
CT0
None specific, used with many
instructions
S0
SG
S 001
Remote In / Out
GX0 – GX1777
V40000 – V40077
1024
System
parameters
None
V700 – V737
V7400 – V7777
288
GX0
GX0
None specific, used with many
instructions
D–9
DL405 Data Types and Memory Map
X Input Bit Map
This table provides a listing of the individual Input points associated with each V-memory address bit for the
DL430 and DL440 CPUs.
MSB
DL430/DL440 Input (X) Points
17
16
15
14
13
12
017
016
015
014
013
037
036
035
034
033
057
056
055
054
077
076
075
117
116
137
LSB
Address
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
012
011
010
007
006
005
004
003
002
001
000
V40400
032
031
030
027
026
025
024
023
022
021
020
V40401
053
052
051
050
047
046
045
044
043
042
041
040
V40402
074
073
072
071
070
067
066
065
064
063
062
061
060
V40403
115
114
113
112
111
110
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
V40404
136
135
134
133
132
131
130
127
126
125
124
123
122
121
120
V40405
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
V40406
177
176
175
174
173
172
171
170
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
V40407
217
216
215
214
213
212
211
210
207
206
205
204
203
202
201
200
V40410
237
236
235
234
233
232
231
230
227
226
225
224
223
222
221
220
V40411
257
256
255
254
253
252
251
250
247
246
245
244
243
242
241
240
V40412
277
276
275
274
273
272
271
270
267
266
265
264
263
262
261
260
V40413
317
316
315
314
313
312
311
310
307
306
305
304
303
302
301
300
V40414
337
336
335
334
333
332
331
330
327
326
325
324
323
322
321
320
V40415
357
356
355
354
353
352
351
350
347
346
345
344
343
342
341
340
V40416
377
376
375
374
373
372
371
370
367
366
365
364
363
362
361
360
V40417
417
416
415
414
413
412
411
410
407
406
405
404
403
402
401
400
V40420
437
436
435
434
433
432
431
430
427
426
425
424
423
422
421
420
V40421
457
456
455
454
453
452
451
450
447
446
445
444
443
442
441
440
V40422
477
476
475
474
473
472
471
470
467
466
465
464
463
462
461
460
V40423
Appendix D
DL405 Memory Map
11
Host Master
Example
D–10
DL405 Data Types and Memory Map
Y Output Bit Map
This table provides a listing of the individual output points associated with each V-memory address bit for
both the DL430 and DL440 CPUs.
Host Master
Example
Appendix D
DL405 Memory Map
MSB
DL430/DL440 Output (Y) Points
17
16
15
14
13
12
017
016
015
014
013
037
036
035
034
033
057
056
055
054
077
076
075
117
116
137
LSB
Address
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
012
011
010
007
006
005
004
003
002
001
000
V40500
032
031
030
027
026
025
024
023
022
021
020
V40501
053
052
051
050
047
046
045
044
043
042
041
040
V40502
074
073
072
071
070
067
066
065
064
063
062
061
060
V40503
115
114
113
112
111
110
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
V40504
136
135
134
133
132
131
130
127
126
125
124
123
122
121
120
V40505
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
V40506
177
176
175
174
173
172
171
170
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
V40507
217
216
215
214
213
212
211
210
207
206
205
204
203
202
201
200
V40510
237
236
235
234
233
222
221
220
217
216
215
214
213
212
211
210
V40511
257
256
255
254
253
252
251
250
247
246
245
244
243
242
241
240
V40512
277
276
275
274
273
272
271
270
267
266
265
264
263
262
261
260
V40513
317
316
315
314
313
312
311
310
307
306
305
304
303
302
301
300
V40514
337
336
335
334
333
332
331
330
327
326
325
324
323
322
321
320
V40515
357
356
355
354
353
352
351
350
347
346
345
344
343
342
341
340
V40516
377
376
375
374
373
372
371
370
367
366
365
364
363
362
361
360
V40517
417
416
415
414
413
412
411
410
407
406
405
404
403
402
401
400
V40520
437
436
435
434
433
432
431
430
427
426
425
424
423
422
421
420
V40521
457
456
455
454
453
452
451
450
447
446
445
444
443
442
441
440
V40522
477
476
475
474
473
472
471
470
467
466
465
464
463
462
461
460
V40523
D–11
DL405 Data Types and Memory Map
Remote I/O Bit Map
This table provides a listing of the individual remote I/O points associated with each V-memory address bit.
MSB
DL430/DL440 Remote I/O (GX) Points
17
16
15
14
13
12
017
016
015
014
013
037
036
035
034
033
057
056
055
054
077
076
075
117
116
137
LSB
Address
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
012
011
010
007
006
005
004
003
002
001
000
V40000
032
031
030
027
026
025
024
023
022
021
020
V40001
053
052
051
050
047
046
045
044
043
042
041
040
V40002
074
073
072
071
070
067
066
065
064
063
062
061
060
V40003
115
114
113
112
111
110
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
V40004
136
135
134
133
132
131
130
127
126
125
124
123
122
121
120
V40005
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
V40006
177
176
175
174
173
172
171
170
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
V40007
217
216
215
214
213
212
211
210
207
206
205
204
203
202
201
200
V40010
237
236
235
234
233
222
221
220
217
216
215
214
213
212
211
210
V40011
257
256
255
254
253
252
251
250
247
246
245
244
243
242
241
240
V40012
277
276
275
274
273
272
271
270
267
266
265
264
263
262
261
260
V40013
317
316
315
314
313
312
311
310
307
306
305
304
303
302
301
300
V40014
337
336
335
334
333
332
331
330
327
326
325
324
323
322
321
320
V40015
357
356
355
354
353
352
351
350
347
346
345
344
343
342
341
340
V40016
377
376
375
374
373
372
371
370
367
366
365
364
363
362
361
360
V40017
417
416
415
414
413
412
411
410
407
406
405
404
403
402
401
400
V40020
437
436
435
434
433
432
431
430
427
426
425
424
423
422
421
420
V40021
457
456
455
454
453
452
451
450
447
446
445
444
443
442
441
440
V40022
477
476
475
474
473
472
471
470
467
466
465
464
463
462
461
460
V40023
517
516
515
514
513
512
511
510
507
506
505
504
503
502
501
500
V40024
537
536
535
534
533
532
531
530
527
526
525
524
523
522
521
520
V40025
557
556
555
554
553
552
551
550
547
546
545
544
543
542
541
540
V40026
577
576
575
574
573
572
571
570
567
566
565
564
563
562
561
560
V40027
617
616
615
614
613
612
611
610
607
606
605
604
603
602
601
600
V40030
637
636
635
634
633
622
621
620
617
616
615
614
613
612
611
610
V40031
657
656
655
654
653
652
651
650
647
646
645
644
643
642
641
640
V40032
677
676
675
674
673
672
671
670
667
666
665
664
663
662
661
660
V40033
717
716
715
714
713
712
711
710
707
706
705
704
703
702
701
700
V40034
737
736
735
734
733
732
731
730
727
726
725
724
723
722
721
720
V40035
757
756
755
754
753
752
751
750
747
746
745
744
743
742
741
740
V40036
777
776
775
774
773
772
771
770
767
766
765
764
763
762
761
760
V40037
Host Master
Example
10
Appendix D
DL405 Memory Map
11
D–12
DL405 Data Types and Memory Map
This portion of the table shows additional Remote I/O points available with the DL440.
MSB
17
DL440 Additional Remote I/O (GX) Points
16
15
14
13
12
Host Master
Example
Appendix D
DL405 Memory Map
1017 1016 1015 1014 1013 1012
11
1011
10
7
6
5
LSB
4
3
2
1
0
Address
1010 1007 1006 1005
1004 1003
1002 1001 1000
V40040
1037 1036 1035 1034 1033 1032 1031 1030 1027 1026 1025
1024 1023
1022 1021 1020
V40041
1057 1056 1055 1054 1053 1052 1051 1050 1047 1046 1045
1044 1043
1042 1041 1040
V40042
1077 1076 1075 1074 1073 1072 1071 1070 1067 1066 1065
1064 1063
1062 1061 1060
V40043
1117
1116
1115
1114
1113
1112
1111
1110
1107
1106
1105
1104
1103
1102
1101
1100
V40044
1137
1136
1135
1134
1133
1132
1131
1130
1127
1126
1125
1124
1123
1122
1121
1120
V40045
1157
1156
1155
1154
1153
1152
1151
1150
1147
1146
1145
1144
1143
1142
1141
1140
V40046
1177
1176
1175
1174
1173
1172
1171
1170
1167
1166
1165
1164
1163
1162
1161
1160
V40047
1217 1216 1215 1214 1213 1212
1211
1210 1207 1206 1205
1204 1203
1202 1201 1200
V40050
1237 1236 1235 1234 1233 1222 1221 1220 1217 1216 1215
1214 1213
1212 1211
1210
V40051
1257 1256 1255 1254 1253 1252 1251 1250 1247 1246 1245
1244 1243
1242 1241 1240
V40052
1277 1276 1275 1274 1273 1272 1271 1270 1267 1266 1265
1264 1263
1262 1261 1260
V40053
1317 1316 1315 1314 1313 1312
1310 1307 1306 1305
1304 1303
1302 1301 1300
V40054
1337 1336 1335 1334 1333 1332 1331 1330 1327 1326 1325
1324 1323
1322 1321 1320
V40055
1357 1356 1355 1354 1353 1352 1351 1350 1347 1346 1345
1344 1343
1342 1341 1340
V40056
1377 1376 1375 1374 1373 1372 1371 1370 1367 1366 1365
1364 1363
1362 1361 1360
V40057
1417 1416 1415 1414 1413 1412
1311
1410 1407 1406 1405
1404 1403
1402 1401 1400
V40060
1437 1436 1435 1434 1433 1432 1431 1430 1427 1426 1425
1411
1424 1423
1422 1421 1420
V40061
1457 1456 1455 1454 1453 1452 1451 1450 1447 1446 1445
1444 1443
1442 1441 1440
V40062
1477 1476 1475 1474 1473 1472 1471 1470 1467 1466 1465
1464 1463
1462 1461 1460
V40063
1517 1516 1515 1514 1513 1512
1510 1507 1506 1505
1504 1503
1502 1501 1500
V40064
1537 1536 1535 1534 1533 1532 1531 1530 1527 1526 1525
1524 1523
1522 1521 1520
V40065
1557 1556 1555 1554 1553 1552 1551 1550 1547 1546 1545
1544 1543
1542 1541 1540
V40066
1577 1576 1575 1574 1573 1572 1571 1570 1567 1566 1565
1564 1563
1562 1561 1560
V40067
1617 1616 1615 1614 1613 1612
1610 1607 1606 1605
1604 1603
1602 1601 1600
V40070
1637 1636 1635 1634 1633 1622 1621 1620 1617 1616 1615
1614 1613
1612 1611
1610
V40071
1657 1656 1655 1654 1653 1652 1651 1650 1647 1646 1645
1644 1643
1642 1641 1640
V40072
1677 1676 1675 1674 1673 1672 1671 1670 1667 1666 1665
1664 1663
1662 1661 1660
V40073
1717 1716 1715 1714 1713 1712
1511
1611
1710 1707 1706 1705
1704 1703
1702 1701 1700
V40074
1737 1736 1735 1734 1733 1732 1731 1730 1727 1726 1725
1711
1724 1723
1722 1721 1720
V40075
1757 1756 1755 1754 1753 1752 1751 1750 1747 1746 1745
1744 1743
1742 1741 1740
V40076
1777 1776 1775 1774 1773 1772 1771 1770 1767 1766 1765
1764 1763
1762 1761 1760
V40077
D–13
DL405 Data Types and Memory Map
Control Relay Bit Map
This table provides a listing of the individual control relays associated with each V-memory address bit.
MSB
DL430/DL440 Control Relays (C)
17
16
15
14
13
12
017
016
015
014
013
037
036
035
034
033
057
056
055
054
077
076
075
117
116
137
LSB
Address
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
012
011
010
007
006
005
004
003
002
001
000
V40600
032
031
030
027
026
025
024
023
022
021
020
V40601
053
052
051
050
047
046
045
044
043
042
041
040
V40602
074
073
072
071
070
067
066
065
064
063
062
061
060
V40603
115
114
113
112
111
110
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
V40604
136
135
134
133
132
131
130
127
126
125
124
123
122
121
120
V40605
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
V40606
177
176
175
174
173
172
171
170
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
V40607
217
216
215
214
213
212
211
210
207
206
205
204
203
202
201
200
V40610
237
236
235
234
233
222
221
220
217
216
215
214
213
212
211
210
V40611
257
256
255
254
253
252
251
250
247
246
245
244
243
242
241
240
V40612
277
276
275
274
273
272
271
270
267
266
265
264
263
262
261
260
V40613
317
316
315
314
313
312
311
310
307
306
305
304
303
302
301
300
V40614
337
336
335
334
333
332
331
330
327
326
325
324
323
322
321
320
V40615
357
356
355
354
353
352
351
350
347
346
345
344
343
342
341
340
V40616
377
376
375
374
373
372
371
370
367
366
365
364
363
362
361
360
V40617
417
416
415
414
413
412
411
410
407
406
405
404
403
402
401
400
V40620
437
436
435
434
433
432
431
430
427
426
425
424
423
422
421
420
V40621
457
456
455
454
453
452
451
450
447
446
445
444
443
442
441
440
V40622
477
476
475
474
473
472
471
470
467
466
465
464
463
462
461
460
V40623
517
516
515
514
513
512
511
510
507
506
505
504
503
502
501
500
V40624
537
536
535
534
533
532
531
530
527
526
525
524
523
522
521
520
V40625
557
556
555
554
553
552
551
550
547
546
545
544
543
542
541
540
V40626
577
576
575
574
573
572
571
570
567
566
565
564
563
562
561
560
V40627
617
616
615
614
613
612
611
610
607
606
605
604
603
602
601
600
V40630
637
636
635
634
633
622
621
620
617
616
615
614
613
612
611
610
V40631
657
656
655
654
653
652
651
650
647
646
645
644
643
642
641
640
V40632
677
676
675
674
673
672
671
670
667
666
665
664
663
662
661
660
V40633
717
716
715
714
713
712
711
710
707
706
705
704
703
702
701
700
V40634
737
736
735
734
733
732
731
730
727
726
725
724
723
722
721
720
V40635
Host Master
Example
10
Appendix D
DL405 Memory Map
11
D–14
DL405 Data Types and Memory Map
This portion of the table shows additional Control Relays points available with the DL440.
Host Master
Example
Appendix D
DL405 Memory Map
MSB
DL440 Additional Control Relays (C)
LSB
Address
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
757
756
755
754
753
752
751
750
747
746
745
744
743
742
741
740
V40636
777
776
775
774
773
772
771
770
767
766
765
764
763
762
761
760
V40637
1017 1016 1015 1014 1013 1012
1011
1010 1007 1006 1005
1004 1003
1002 1001 1000
V40640
1037 1036 1035 1034 1033 1032 1031 1030 1027 1026 1025
1024 1023
1022 1021 1020
V40641
1057 1056 1055 1054 1053 1052 1051 1050 1047 1046 1045
1044 1043
1042 1041 1040
V40642
1077 1076 1075 1074 1073 1072 1071 1070 1067 1066 1065
1064 1063
1062 1061 1060
V40643
1117
1116
1115
1114
1113
1112
1111
1110
1107
1106
1105
1104
1103
1102
1101
1100
V40644
1137
1136
1135
1134
1133
1132
1131
1130
1127
1126
1125
1124
1123
1122
1121
1120
V40645
1157
1156
1155
1154
1153
1152
1151
1150
1147
1146
1145
1144
1143
1142
1141
1140
V40646
1177
1176
1175
1174
1173
1172
1171
1170
1167
1166
1165
1164
1163
1162
1161
1160
V40647
1217 1216 1215 1214 1213 1212
1211
1210 1207 1206 1205
1204 1203
1202 1201 1200
V40650
1237 1236 1235 1234 1233 1232 1231 1230 1227 1226 1225
1224 1223
1222 1221 1220
V40651
1257 1256 1255 1254 1253 1252 1251 1250 1247 1246 1245
1244 1243
1242 1241 1240
V40652
1277 1276 1275 1274 1273 1272 1271 1270 1267 1266 1265
1264 1263
1262 1261 1260
V40653
1317 1316 1315 1314 1313 1312
1310 1307 1306 1305
1304 1303
1302 1301 1300
V40654
1337 1336 1335 1334 1333 1332 1331 1330 1327 1326 1325
1324 1323
1322 1321 1320
V40655
1357 1356 1355 1354 1353 1352 1351 1350 1347 1346 1345
1344 1343
1342 1341 1340
V40656
1377 1376 1375 1374 1373 1372 1371 1370 1367 1366 1365
1364 1363
1362 1361 1360
V40657
1417 1416 1415 1414 1413 1412
1410 1407 1406 1405
1404 1403
1402 1401 1400
V40660
1437 1436 1435 1434 1433 1432 1431 1430 1427 1426 1425
1424 1423
1422 1421 1420
V40661
1457 1456 1455 1454 1453 1452 1451 1450 1447 1446 1445
1444 1443
1442 1441 1440
V40662
1477 1476 1475 1474 1473 1472 1471 1470 1467 1466 1465
1464 1463
1462 1461 1460
V40663
1517 1516 1515 1514 1513 1512
1311
1411
1510 1507 1506 1505
1504 1503
1502 1501 1500
V40664
1537 1536 1535 1534 1533 1532 1531 1530 1527 1526 1525
1511
1524 1523
1522 1521 1520
V40665
1557 1556 1555 1554 1553 1552 1551 1550 1547 1546 1545
1544 1543
1542 1541 1540
V40666
1577 1576 1575 1574 1573 1572 1571 1570 1567 1566 1565
1564 1563
1562 1561 1560
V40667
1617 1616 1615 1614 1613 1612
1610 1607 1606 1605
1604 1603
1602 1601 1600
V40670
1637 1636 1635 1634 1633 1622 1621 1620 1617 1616 1615
1614 1613
1612 1611
1610
V40671
1657 1656 1655 1654 1653 1652 1651 1650 1647 1646 1645
1644 1643
1642 1641 1640
V40672
1677 1676 1675 1674 1673 1672 1671 1670 1667 1666 1665
1664 1663
1662 1661 1660
V40673
1717 1716 1715 1714 1713 1712
1710 1707 1706 1705
1704 1703
1702 1701 1700
V40674
1737 1736 1735 1734 1733 1732 1731 1730 1727 1726 1725
1724 1723
1722 1721 1720
V40675
1757 1756 1755 1754 1753 1752 1751 1750 1747 1746 1745
1744 1743
1742 1741 1740
V40676
1777 1776 1775 1774 1773 1772 1771 1770 1767 1766 1765
1764 1763
1762 1761 1760
V40677
1611
1711
D–15
DL405 Data Types and Memory Map
Stage Control / Status Bit Map
This table provides a listing of the individual stage control bits associated with each V-memory address bit.
MSB
DL430/DL440 Stage (S) Control Bits
17
16
15
14
13
12
017
016
015
014
013
037
036
035
034
033
057
056
055
054
077
076
075
117
116
137
LSB
Address
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
012
011
010
007
006
005
004
003
002
001
000
V41000
032
031
030
027
026
025
024
023
022
021
020
V41001
053
052
051
050
047
046
045
044
043
042
041
040
V41002
074
073
072
071
070
067
066
065
064
063
062
061
060
V41003
115
114
113
112
111
110
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
V41004
136
135
134
133
132
131
130
127
126
125
124
123
122
121
120
V41005
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
V41006
177
176
175
174
173
172
171
170
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
V41007
217
216
215
214
213
212
211
210
207
206
205
204
203
202
201
200
V41010
237
236
235
234
233
222
221
220
217
216
215
214
213
212
211
210
V41011
257
256
255
254
253
252
251
250
247
246
245
244
243
242
241
240
V41012
277
276
275
274
273
272
271
270
267
266
265
264
263
262
261
260
V41013
317
316
315
314
313
312
311
310
307
306
305
304
303
302
301
300
V41014
337
336
335
334
333
332
331
330
327
326
325
324
323
322
321
320
V41015
357
356
355
354
353
352
351
350
347
346
345
344
343
342
341
340
V41016
377
376
375
374
373
372
371
370
367
366
365
364
363
362
361
360
V41017
417
416
415
414
413
412
411
410
407
406
405
404
403
402
401
400
V41020
437
436
435
434
433
432
431
430
427
426
425
424
423
422
421
420
V41021
457
456
455
454
453
452
451
450
447
446
445
444
443
442
441
440
V41022
477
476
475
474
473
472
471
470
467
466
465
464
463
462
461
460
V41023
517
516
515
514
513
512
511
510
507
506
505
504
503
502
501
500
V41024
537
536
535
534
533
532
531
530
527
526
525
524
523
522
521
520
V41025
557
556
555
554
553
552
551
550
547
546
545
544
543
542
541
540
V41026
577
576
575
574
573
572
571
570
567
566
565
564
563
562
561
560
V41027
MSB
DL440 Additional Stage (S) Control Bits
LSB
Appendix D
DL405 Memory Map
11
Address
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
617
616
615
614
613
612
611
610
607
606
605
604
603
602
601
600
V41030
637
636
635
634
633
622
621
620
617
616
615
614
613
612
611
610
V41031
657
656
655
654
653
652
651
650
647
646
645
644
643
642
641
640
V41032
677
676
675
674
673
672
671
670
667
666
665
664
663
662
661
660
V41033
717
716
715
714
713
712
711
710
707
706
705
704
703
702
701
700
V41034
737
736
735
734
733
732
731
730
727
726
725
724
723
722
721
720
V41035
757
756
755
754
753
752
751
750
747
746
745
744
743
742
741
740
V41036
777
776
775
774
773
772
771
770
767
766
765
764
763
762
761
760
V41037
Host Master
Example
17
D–16
DL405 Data Types and Memory Map
MSB
17
DL440 Additional Stage (S) Control Bits (continued)
16
15
14
13
12
Host Master
Example
Appendix D
DL405 Memory Map
1017 1016 1015 1014 1013 1012
11
1011
10
7
6
5
4
LSB
3
2
1
0
Address
1010 1007 1006 1005
1004 1003
1002 1001 1000
V41040
1037 1036 1035 1034 1033 1032 1031 1030 1027 1026 1025
1024 1023
1022 1021 1020
V41041
1057 1056 1055 1054 1053 1052 1051 1050 1047 1046 1045
1044 1043
1042 1041 1040
V41042
1077 1076 1075 1074 1073 1072 1071 1070 1067 1066 1065
1064 1063
1062 1061 1060
V41043
1117
1116
1115
1114
1113
1112
1111
1110
1107
1106
1105
1104
1103
1102
1101
1100
V41044
1137
1136
1135
1134
1133
1132
1131
1130
1127
1126
1125
1124
1123
1122
1121
1120
V41045
1157
1156
1155
1154
1153
1152
1151
1150
1147
1146
1145
1144
1143
1142
1141
1140
V41046
1177
1176
1175
1174
1173
1172
1171
1170
1167
1166
1165
1164
1163
1162
1161
1160
V41047
1217 1216 1215 1214 1213 1212
1211
1210 1207 1206 1205
1204 1203
1202 1201 1200
V41050
1237 1236 1235 1234 1233 1222 1221 1220 1217 1216 1215
1214 1213
1212 1211
1210
V41051
1257 1256 1255 1254 1253 1252 1251 1250 1247 1246 1245
1244 1243
1242 1241 1240
V41052
1277 1276 1275 1274 1273 1272 1271 1270 1267 1266 1265
1264 1263
1262 1261 1260
V41053
1317 1316 1315 1314 1313 1312
1310 1307 1306 1305
1304 1303
1302 1301 1300
V41054
1337 1336 1335 1334 1333 1332 1331 1330 1327 1326 1325
1324 1323
1322 1321 1320
V41055
1357 1356 1355 1354 1353 1352 1351 1350 1347 1346 1345
1344 1343
1342 1341 1340
V41056
1377 1376 1375 1374 1373 1372 1371 1370 1367 1366 1365
1364 1363
1362 1361 1360
V41057
1417 1416 1415 1414 1413 1412
1311
1410 1407 1406 1405
1404 1403
1402 1401 1400
V41060
1437 1436 1435 1434 1433 1432 1431 1430 1427 1426 1425
1411
1424 1423
1422 1421 1420
V41061
1457 1456 1455 1454 1453 1452 1451 1450 1447 1446 1445
1444 1443
1442 1441 1440
V41062
1477 1476 1475 1474 1473 1472 1471 1470 1467 1466 1465
1464 1463
1462 1461 1460
V41063
1517 1516 1515 1514 1513 1512
1510 1507 1506 1505
1504 1503
1502 1501 1500
V41064
1537 1536 1535 1534 1533 1532 1531 1530 1527 1526 1525
1524 1523
1522 1521 1520
V41065
1557 1556 1555 1554 1553 1552 1551 1550 1547 1546 1545
1544 1543
1542 1541 1540
V41066
1577 1576 1575 1574 1573 1572 1571 1570 1567 1566 1565
1564 1563
1562 1561 1560
V41067
1617 1616 1615 1614 1613 1612
1610 1607 1606 1605
1604 1603
1602 1601 1600
V41070
1637 1636 1635 1634 1633 1622 1621 1620 1617 1616 1615
1614 1613
1612 1611
1610
V41071
1657 1656 1655 1654 1653 1652 1651 1650 1647 1646 1645
1644 1643
1642 1641 1640
V41072
1677 1676 1675 1674 1673 1672 1671 1670 1667 1666 1665
1664 1663
1662 1661 1660
V41073
1717 1716 1715 1714 1713 1712
1710 1707 1706 1705
1704 1703
1702 1701 1700
V41074
1737 1736 1735 1734 1733 1732 1731 1730 1727 1726 1725
1724 1723
1722 1721 1720
V41075
1757 1756 1755 1754 1753 1752 1751 1750 1747 1746 1745
1744 1743
1742 1741 1740
V41076
1777 1776 1775 1774 1773 1772 1771 1770 1767 1766 1765
1764 1763
1762 1761 1760
V41077
1511
1611
1711
D–17
DL405 Data Types and Memory Map
Timer Status Bit Map
This table provides a listing of the individual timer contacts associated with each V-memory address bit.
MSB
DL430/DL440 Timer (T) Contacts
17
16
15
14
13
12
017
016
015
014
013
037
036
035
034
033
057
056
055
054
077
076
075
117
116
137
LSB
Address
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
012
011
010
007
006
005
004
003
002
001
000
V41100
032
031
030
027
026
025
024
023
022
021
020
V41101
053
052
051
050
047
046
045
044
043
042
041
040
V41102
074
073
072
071
070
067
066
065
064
063
062
061
060
V41103
115
114
113
112
111
110
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
V41104
136
135
134
133
132
131
130
127
126
125
124
123
122
121
120
V41105
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
V41106
177
176
175
174
173
172
171
170
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
V41107
MSB
DL440 Additional Timer (T) Contacts
17
16
15
14
13
12
217
216
215
214
213
237
236
235
234
233
257
256
255
254
277
276
275
317
316
337
LSB
Address
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
212
211
210
207
206
205
204
203
202
201
200
V41110
222
221
220
217
216
215
214
213
212
211
210
V41111
253
252
251
250
247
246
245
244
243
242
241
240
V41112
274
273
272
271
270
267
266
265
264
263
262
261
260
V41113
315
314
313
312
311
310
307
306
305
304
303
302
301
300
V41114
336
335
334
333
332
331
330
327
326
325
324
323
322
321
320
V41115
357
356
355
354
353
352
351
350
347
346
345
344
343
342
341
340
V41116
377
376
375
374
373
372
371
370
367
366
365
364
363
362
361
360
V41117
Appendix D
DL405 Memory Map
Host Master
Example
D–18
DL405 Data Types and Memory Map
Counter Status Bit Map
This table provides a listing of the individual counter contacts associated with each V-memory address bit.
Host Master
Example
Appendix D
DL405 Memory Map
MSB
DL430/DL440 Counter (CT) Contacts
17
16
15
14
13
12
017
016
015
014
013
037
036
035
034
033
057
056
055
054
077
076
075
117
116
137
LSB
Address
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
012
011
010
007
006
005
004
003
002
001
000
V41140
032
031
030
027
026
025
024
023
022
021
020
V41141
053
052
051
050
047
046
045
044
043
042
041
040
V41142
074
073
072
071
070
067
066
065
064
063
062
061
060
V41143
115
114
113
112
111
110
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
V41144
136
135
134
133
132
131
130
127
126
125
124
123
122
121
120
V41145
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
V41146
177
176
175
174
173
172
171
170
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
V41147
DL305
Data Types and
Memory Map
In This Chapter. . . .
— DL305 Data Types
— DL330 Memory Map
— DL330P Memory Map
— DL340 Memory Map
— I/O Point Bit Map
— Control Relay Bit Map
— Special Relays
— Timer / Counter Registers and Contacts
— Data Registers
— Stage Control / Status Bit Map
— Shift Register Bit Map
— Special Registers
— DL305 / 405 Cross Reference
1E
E–2
DL305 Data Types and Memory Map
DL305 Data Types
The following table shows the data types available with the DL405 family of
products.
DL305
Data Type
Data Types
31 and 33
DL305
Data Type
31
Description
Appendix E
DL305 Memory Map
Number of bytes
HEX
ASCII
31
Data registers
T / C accumulator
8
16
1
2
2
4
33
I/O, internal relays,
shift register bits, T/C
bits, stage bits
1
1
2
39
Diagnostic Status
(5 word R/W)
16
10
20
The following table provides address references for data types 31 and 33.
Description
Data registers
Read/
Write
PGM Ref.
DirectNET
Ref
PGM Ref.
DirectNET
Ref
R/W
400 – 577
41 – 80
600 – 677
01 – 40
400 – 577
700 – 777
01 – 40
41 – 80
81 – A0
01 – 40
T / C accumulator
33
Bits per
unit
DL330 Ranges
DL340 Ranges
Input / Output bits
R/W
R/W
R/W
000 – 157
700 – 767
01 – 0E
39 – 3F
000 – 157
700 – 767
1000–1067
01 – 0E
39 – 3F
41 – 47
Internal Relay Bits
Read
Write
160 – 377
160 – 373
0F – 20
0F – 20
160 – 377
160 – 373
0F – 20
0F – 20
Shift Register Bits
T / C Bits
R/W
400 – 577
21 – 30
400 – 577
21 – 30
Read
600 – 677
31 – 38
600 – 677
31 – 38
E–3
DL305 Data Types and Memory Map
Data Type 39
Diagnostic Status
You can use Data Type 39 to obtain DirectNET diagnostic status. The only valid
address for the DL305 products is 0000 (hex). There are 5 status words that can be
read or cleared. You must access these words as a complete group. The following
tables show the reference addresses for the various types of information and the
DirectNET error codes (used for word 1).
Address
Read/Write
Word
Diagnostic Status
0000 (h)
Read
Write 0
(to clear)
1
Last error and previous error*
Previous error code
2
Number of successful communications
3
Number of erroneous communications
4
Number of retries for header
5
Number of retries for data
* The last error code is contained in the most significant byte. The previous
error code is in the least significant byte. Two codes that are displayed are
cleared by two successful communication exchanges.
Appendix E
DL305 Memory Map
E–4
DL305 Data Types and Memory Map
Error
Code
Applicable
Data Type
00
All types
The transfer was successful. 00 also occurs if:
1. The transfer direction (Read / Write) is not 30 or 38.
2. A code other than ASCII code 0 to F has been received in ASCII mode.
3. E01 or E10 occurred during a write operation from the host to the CPU.
01
All types
A timeout occurred in the serial link.
03
32, 33
A request was made to read or write a non-existent I/O point.
04
32, 33
A request was made for data of more I/O points than are available.
05
All types
06
31
07
All types
08
36
09
All types
0A
39
0B
36, 39
0C
All types
Three attempts were made to transmit the header.
0D
All types
Three attempts were made to transmit the data.
0F
All types
The header unit number is incorrect. An invalid function was requested.
10
All types
Power is turned on
Appendix E
DL305 Memory Map
31, 33
Error Description
A request was made to read or write odd bytes. The number of data requested
was not a multiple of 4 in the ASCII mode.
A request was made to read or write one or more non-existent memory
locations.
A request was made to read or write a zero data byte.
An attempt was made to write a protected memory.
An invalid code is specified or an attempt was made to write to an invalid
address.
A request was made to read or write one or more non-existent diagnostic status
words.
An invalid starting address is used in the PC type read, scan start/stop,
diagnostic status read or write request.
After power-up, an attempt was made to execute a function before a scan
start/stop, or diagnostic status read or write.
14
All types
One or more errors occurred during the data block transfer. Possible errors are:
invalid STX, ETC, LRC, or ETB is received; a parity, framing, or overrun error
occurred.
15
All types
EOT from the master station could not be received.
16
All types
A code other than ACK or NAK was received.
1D
31, 33
36
1E
All types
In the data transfer between the host and the slave, one of the following errors
occurred in the slave CPU: E02, E21, E31, or E41.
The communication between the host and the slave is disconnected.
There is a format error in the header block.
E–5
DL305 Data Types and Memory Map
DL330 Memory Map
Memory Type
Discrete Memory
Reference
(octal)
Register Memory
Reference
(octal)
Qty.
Decimal
Symbol
Input / Output
Points
000 – 157
700 – 767
R000 – R015
R070 – R076
168 Total
Control Relays
160 – 373
R016 – R037
140
C0
C0
Special Relays
374 – 377
770 – 777
R037
R077
12
772
376
Timers /
Counters
600 – 673
674 – 677*
None
64
Timer / Counter
Current Values
None
R600 – R673
R674 – R677*
64
Timer / Counter
Status Bits
T600 – T673
T674 – T677*
None
64
Data Words
None
R400 – R563
116
Shift Registers
400 – 577
None
128
010
000
TMR
T600
K100
R600
CNT C600
K10
K100
T600
None specific, used with many
instructions
SR
400
417
Special
Registers
None
R574 – R577
4
R574 – R575 used with FAULT
R576 – R577 Auxiliary Accumulator
* T/ C Setpoint Unit Only. Can be used as data registers if the Timer/Counter Setpoint Unit or Thumbwheel Interface Module is not used. R564 – R573 contain the preset value used with the Timer /
Counter Setpoint Unit. R674 – R677 contain the current values for these timers or counters.
Appendix E
DL305 Memory Map
E–6
DL305 Data Types and Memory Map
DL330P Memory Map
Memory Type
Discrete Memory
Reference
(octal)
Register Memory
Reference
(octal)
Qty.
Decimal
Symbol
Input / Output
Points
000 – 157
700 – 767
R000 – R015
R070 – R076
168 Total
Control Relays
160 – 174
200 – 277
R016 – R017
R020 – R027
77
C0
C0
Special Relays
175 – 177
770 – 777
R017
R077
11
772
176
Timers /
Counters
600 – 673
674 – 677*
None
64
Timer / Counter
Current Values
None
R600 – R673
R674 – R677*
64
Timer / Counter
Status Bits
T600 – T673
T674 – T677*
None
64
Data Words
None
R400 – R563
116
Stages
S0 – S177
R100 – R117
128
010
000
TMR
T600
K100
R600
CNT C600
K10
K100
T600
None specific, used with many
instructions
S1
SG
S 001
Special
Registers
None
R574 – R577
4
R574 – R575 used with FAULT
R576 – R577 Auxiliary Accumulator
* T/ C Setpoint Unit Only. Can be used as data registers if the Timer/Counter Setpoint Unit or Thumbwheel Interface Module is not used, which provides a total of 128 data registers.
Appendix E
DL305 Memory Map
R564 – R573 contain the preset value used with the Timer / Counter Setpoint Unit. R674 – R677 contain the current values for these timers or counters.
E–7
DL305 Data Types and Memory Map
DL340 Memory Map
Memory Type
Discrete Memory
Reference
(octal)
Register Memory
Reference
(octal)
Qty.
Decimal
Symbol
Input / Output
Points
000 – 157
700 – 767
R000 – R015
R070 – R076
168 Total
Control Relays
160 – 373
1000 – 1067
R016 – R037
R100 – R106
180
C0
C0
Special Relays
374 – 377
770 – 777
1070 – 1077
R037
R077
R107
20
772
376
Timers /
Counters
600 – 673
674 – 677*
None
64
Timer / Counter
Current Values
None
R600 – R673
R674 – R677*
64
Timer / Counter
Status Bits
T600 – T673
T674 – T677*
None
64
Data Words
None
R400 – R563
R700 – R767
172
Shift Registers
400 – 577
None
128
010
000
TMR
T600
K100
R600
CNT C600
K10
K100
T600
None specific, used with many
instructions
SR
400
417
Special
Registers
None
R574 – R577
R770 – R777
12
R574–R575 used with FAULT
R576–R577 Auxiliary Accumulator
R770–R777 Communications Setup
* T/ C Setpoint Unit Only. Can be used as data registers if the Timer/Counter Setpoint Unit or Thumbwheel Interface Module is not used. R564 – R573 contain the preset value used with the Timer /
Counter Setpoint Unit. R674 – R677 contain the current values for these timers or counters.
Appendix E
DL305 Memory Map
E–8
DL305 Data Types and Memory Map
I/O Point Bit Map
These tables provide a listing of the individual Input points associated with each
register location for the DL330, DL330P, and DL340 CPUs.
MSB
007
017
027
037
047
057
067
077
107
117
127
137
147
157
167
177
707
717
727
737
747
757
767
I/O References
006
016
026
036
046
056
066
076
106
116
126
136
146
156
166
176
706
716
726
736
746
756
766
005
015
025
035
045
055
065
075
105
115
125
135
145
155
165
175
705
715
725
735
745
755
765
004
014
024
034
044
054
064
074
104
114
124
134
144
154
164
174
704
714
724
734
744
754
764
003
013
023
033
043
053
063
073
103
113
123
133
143
153
163
173
703
713
723
733
743
753
763
LSB
002
012
022
032
042
052
062
072
102
112
122
132
142
152
162
172
702
712
722
732
742
752
762
001
011
021
031
041
051
061
071
101
111
121
131
141
151
161
171
701
711
721
731
741
751
761
000
010
020
030
040
050
060
070
100
110
120
130
140
150
160
170
700
710
720
730
740
750
760
Register
Number
R0
R1
R2
R3
R4
R5
R6
R7
R10
R11
R12
R13
R14
R15
n/a
n/a
R70
R71
R72
R73
R74
R75
R76
Appendix E
DL305 Memory Map
NOTE: 160 – 167 can be used as I/O in a DL330 or DL330P CPU under certain
conditions. 160 – 177 can be used as I/O in a DL340 CPU under certain conditions.
You should consult the DL305 User Manual to determine which configurations allow
the use of these points.
These points may be used as control relays. You cannot use them as both control
relays and as I/O points. Also, if you use these points as I/O, you cannot access
these I/O points as a Data Register reference using the DSTR5 (F55) and DOUT5
(F65) functions.
E–9
DL305 Data Types and Memory Map
Control Relay Bit Map
The following tables provide a listing of the individual control relays associated with
each register location for the DL305 CPUs.
NOTE: 160 – 167 can be used as I/O in a DL330 or DL330P CPU under certain
conditions. 160 – 177 can be used as I/O in a DL340 CPU under certain conditions.
You should consult the DL305 User Manual to determine which configurations allow
the use of these points.
You cannot use them as both control relays and as I/O points. Also, if you use these
points as I/O, you cannot access these I/O points as a Data Register reference using
the DSTR5 (F55) and DOUT5 (F65) functions.
MSB
167
177
207
217
227
237
247
257
267
277
307
317
327
337
347
357
367
166
176
206
216
226
236
246
256
266
276
306
316
326
336
346
356
366
DL330
Control Relay References
165
164
163
162
175
174
173
172
205
204
203
202
215
214
213
212
225
224
223
222
235
234
233
232
245
244
243
242
255
254
253
252
265
264
263
262
275
274
273
272
305
304
303
302
315
314
313
312
325
324
323
322
335
334
333
332
345
344
343
342
355
354
353
352
365
364
363
362
373
372
LSB
161
171
201
211
221
231
241
251
261
271
301
311
321
331
341
351
361
371
160
170
200
210
220
230
240
250
260
270
300
310
320
330
340
350
360
370
Register
Number
R16
R17
R20
R21
R22
R23
R24
R25
R26
R27
R30
R31
R32
R33
R34
R35
R36
R37
* Control relays 340 – 373 can be made retentive by setting a CPU dipswitch. See the DL305 User Manual for details on setting CPU dipswitches.
Appendix E
DL305 Memory Map
E–10
DL305 Data Types and Memory Map
MSB
167
166
207
217
227
237
247
257
267
277*
206
216
226
236
246
256
266
276
DL330P
Control Relay References
165
164
163
162
174
173
172
205
204
203
202
215
214
213
212
225
224
223
222
235
234
233
232
245
244
243
242
255
254
253
252
265
264
263
262
275
274
273
272
LSB
161
171
201
211
221
231
241
251
261
271
160
170
200*
210
220
230
240
250
260
270
Register
Number
R16
R17
R20
R21
R22
R23
R24
R25
R26
R27
* Control relays 200 – 277 can be made retentive by setting a CPU dipswitch. See the DL305 User Manual for details on setting CPU dipswitches.
Appendix E
DL305 Memory Map
MSB
167
177
207
217
227
237
247
257
267
277
307
317
327
337
347
357
367
166
176
206
216
226
236
246
256
266
276
306
316
326
336
346
356
366
1007
1017
1027
1037
1047
1057
1067
1006
1016
1026
1036
1046
1056
1066
DL340
Control Relay References
165
164
163
162
175
174
173
172
205
204
203
202
215
214
213
212
225
224
223
222
235
234
233
232
245
244
243
242
255
254
253
252
265
264
263
262
275
274
273
272
305
304
303
302
315
314
313
312
325
324
323
322
335
334
333
332
345
344
343
342
355
354
353
352
365
364
363
362
373*
372
1005
1004
1003
1002
1015
1014
1013
1012
1025
1024
1023
1022
1035
1034
1033
1032
1045
1044
1043
1042
1055
1054
1053
1052
1065
1064
1063
1062
LSB
161
171
201
211
221
231
241
251
261
271
301
311
321
331
341
351
361
371
1001
1011
1021
1031
1041
1051
1061
160
170
200
210
220
230
240
250
260
270
300
310
320
330
340*
350
360
370
1000
1010
1020
1030
1040
1050
1060
Register
Number
R16
R17
R20
R21
R22
R23
R24
R25
R26
R27
R30
R31
R32
R33
R34
R35
R36
R37
R100
R101
R102
R103
R104
R105
R106
* Control relays 340 – 373 can be made retentive by setting a CPU dipswitch. See the DL305 User Manual for details on setting CPU dipswitches.
E–11
DL305 Data Types and Memory Map
Special Relays
The following table shows the Special Relays used with the DL305 CPUs.
CPUs
DL330P
DL330
DL340
DL330
DL330P
DL340
DL340
Special
Relay
Description of Contents
175
100 ms clock, on for 50 ms and off for 50 ms.
176
Disables all outputs except for those entered with the SET
OUT instruction.
177
Battery voltage is low.
374
On for the first scan cycle after the CPU is switched to Run
Mode.
375
100 ms clock, on for 50 ms and off for 50 ms.
376
Disables all outputs except for those entered with the SET
OUT instruction.
377
Battery voltage is low.
770
Changes timers to 0.01 second intervals. Timers are
normally 0.1 second time intervals.
771
The external diagnostics FAULT instruction (F20) is in use.
772
The data in the accumulator is greater than the comparison
value.
773
The data in the accumulator is equal to the comparison
value.
774
The data in the accumulator is less than the comparison
value.
775
An accumulator carry or borrow condition has occurred.
776
The accumulator value is zero.
777
The accumulator has an overflow condition.
1074
The RX or WX instruction is active.
1075
An error occurred during communications with the RX or
WX instructions.
1076
Port 2 communications mode: on = ASCII mode, off = HEX
mode. DirectNET supports both ASCII and HEX modes
and Modbus only supports HEX mode.
1077
Port 1 communications mode: on = ASCII mode, off = HEX
mode
Appendix E
DL305 Memory Map
E–12
DL305 Data Types and Memory Map
Timer / Counter Registers and Contacts
The following table shows the locations used for programming timer or counters.
Since timers and counters share the same data area, you cannot have timers and
counters with duplicate numbers. For example, if you have Timer 600, you cannot
have a Counter 600.
Each register contains the current value for the timer or counter. Each timer or
counter also has a timer or counter contact with the same reference number.
NOTE: Counter current values are retentive and retain their state after a power
cycle.
607
617
627
637
647
657
667
677*
606
616
626
636
646
656
666
676*
Timer/Counter References/Registers
605
604
603
602
615
614
613
612
625
624
623
622
635
634
633
632
645
644
643
642
655
654
653
652
665
664
663
662
675*
674*
673
672
601
611
621
631
641
651
661
671
600
610
620
630
640
650
660
670
* Used with Timer / Counter Setpoint Unit and /or Thumbwheel Interface Module.
External
Timer/Counter
Setpoint Unit
Registers 674–677 are used in programming for use with the Timer/Counter
Setpoint Unit and the Thumbwheel Interface Module that are available in some
compatible product families. The registers contain the current time or count. There is
also a status bit for each register with the same reference number. For example, the
current value for Timer 674 is stored in R674 and the status contact is T674.
Appendix E
DL305 Memory Map
The presets for these modules are stored
in R564 – R573 as follows.
S R564 – R565 — 1st T/C preset
S R566 – R567 — 2nd T/C preset
S R570 – R571 — 3rd T/C preset
S R572 – R573 — 4th T/C preset
The example shows how a 4-digit
number would be represented in these
registers.
R565
0 0 0 1 00 1 1
1
3
R564
0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1
4
5
E–13
DL305 Data Types and Memory Map
Data Registers
The following 8-bit data registers are primarily used with data instructions to store
various types of application data. For example, you could use a register to hold a
timer or counter preset value.
Some data instructions call for two bytes, which will correspond to two consecutive
8-bit data registers such as R401 and R400. The LSB (Least Significant Bit) will be in
register R400 as bit0 and the MSB (Most Significant Bit) will be in register R401 as
bit17.
NOTE: Data Registers are retentive.
407
417
427
437
447
457
467
477
507
517
527
537
547
557
406
416
426
436
446
456
466
476
506
516
526
536
546
556
405
415
425
435
445
455
465
475
505
515
525
535
545
555
DL330 / DL330P
8-Bit Data Registers
404
403
414
413
424
423
434
433
444
443
454
453
464
463
474
473
504
503
514
513
524
523
534
533
544
543
554
553
563
402
412
422
432
442
452
462
472
502
512
522
532
542
552
562
401
411
421
431
441
451
461
471
501
511
521
531
541
551
561
400
410
420
430
440
450
460
470
500
510
520
530
540
550
560
Appendix E
DL305 Memory Map
E–14
Appendix E
DL305 Memory Map
DL305 Data Types and Memory Map
407
417
427
437
447
457
467
477
507
517
527
537
547
557
406
416
426
436
446
456
466
476
506
516
526
536
546
556
405
415
425
435
445
455
465
475
505
515
525
535
545
555
707
717
727
737
747
757
767
706
716
726
736
746
756
766
705
715
725
735
745
755
765
DL340
8-Bit Data Registers
404
403
414
413
424
423
434
433
444
443
454
453
464
463
474
473
504
503
514
513
524
523
534
533
544
543
554
553
563
704
703
714
713
724
723
734
733
744
743
754
753
764
763
402
412
422
432
442
452
462
472
502
512
522
532
542
552
562
702
712
722
732
742
752
762
401
411
421
431
441
451
461
471
501
511
521
531
541
551
561
701
711
721
731
741
751
761
400
410
420
430
440
450
460
470
500
510
520
530
540
550
560
700
710
720
730
740
750
760
E–15
DL305 Data Types and Memory Map
Stage Control / Status Bit Map
This table provides a listing of the individual stages and stage control bits. These are
only available with the DL330P CPU.
MSB
007
017
027
037
047
057
067
077
107
117
127
137
147
157
167
177
Stage References
006
016
026
036
046
056
066
076
106
116
126
136
146
156
166
176
005
015
025
035
045
055
065
075
105
115
125
135
145
155
165
175
004
014
024
034
044
054
064
074
104
114
124
134
144
154
164
174
003
013
023
033
043
053
063
073
103
113
123
133
143
153
163
173
LSB
002
012
022
032
042
052
062
072
102
112
122
132
142
152
162
172
001
011
021
031
041
051
061
071
101
111
121
131
141
151
161
171
000
010
020
030
040
050
060
070
100
110
120
130
140
150
160
170
Register
Number
R100
R101
R102
R103
R104
R105
R106
R107
R110
R111
R112
R113
R114
R115
R116
R117
Appendix E
DL305 Memory Map
E–16
DL305 Data Types and Memory Map
Shift Register Bit Map
The shift register bits listed below are used in the shift register instruction. These
outputs are discrete bits and are not the same locations as the 8 Bit Data Registers.
These bits are retentive meaning they retain their state after a power cycle.
NOTE: The DL330P does not have Shift Register bits. Shift Register instructions in
the DL330P use Control Relays memory references.
MSB
407
417
427
437
447
457
467
477
507
517
527
537
547
557
567
577
406
416
426
436
446
456
466
476
506
516
526
536
546
556
566
576
DL330 / DL340
Shift Register References
405
404
403
402
415
414
413
412
425
424
423
422
435
434
433
432
445
444
443
442
455
454
453
452
465
464
463
462
475
474
473
472
505
504
503
502
515
514
513
512
525
524
523
522
535
534
533
532
545
544
543
542
555
554
553
552
565
564
563
562
575
574
573
572
LSB
401
411
421
431
441
451
461
471
501
511
521
531
541
551
561
571
400
410
420
430
440
450
460
470
500
510
520
530
540
550
560
570
Register
Number
R40
R41
R42
R43
R44
R45
R46
R47
R50
R51
R52
R53
R54
R55
R56
R57
Appendix E
DL305 Memory Map
With the DL340 CPU, these bits can also be used as control relays if they are not
used with a Shift Register instruction.
E–17
DL305 Data Types and Memory Map
Special Registers
This table provides a listing of the special registers used with the DL305 CPUs.
CPUs
DL330
DL330P
DL340
DL340 Only
Special
Register
Description of Contents
R574 – 575 Contains the error code used with the FAULT instruction.
R576 – 577 Auxiliary accumulator used with the MUL and DIV
instructions.
R771
Sets the upper byte of the station address assigned to the
bottom communication port. Therefore, this will contain the
1st and 2nd digits of the address.
R772
Sets the lower byte of the station address assigned to the
bottom communication port. This only contains one digit,
which is the 3rd digit of the address.
R773
Sets the baud rate for the bottom communication port.
R774
Sets the leading communications delay time for the bottom
communication port.
R775
Sets the trailing communications delay time for the bottom
communication port.
R776
Sets the leading communications delay time for the top
communication port.
R777
Sets the trailing communications delay time for the top
communication port.
Appendix E
DL305 Memory Map
E–18
DL305 Data Types and Memory Map
DL305 / 405 Cross Reference
If you are using a DL405 Master, you will have to make some slight changes in the
way you request certain types of data. For example, the DL405 uses V-memory
references instead of Register references. This section shows the cross references.
NOTE: Not all DL305 devices offer the same memory ranges. Check your DL305
User Manual to determine the ranges for your particular model.
Data Type 31:
Register Access
To get to ...
TMR / CTR
Accumulator
in a DL305
Use
Reference
...
in a DL405
To get to ...
Register Data
in a DL305
Use
Reference
...
in a DL405
R600
V000
R401, 400*
V100
R601
V001
R403, 402
V101
———
———
———
———
R624
V024
R777, 776
V237
R677
V077
Two bytes of DL305 register data are returned with one DL405 V memory
location.
Appendix E
DL305 Memory Map
Data Type 33:
I/O Point Access
Non RLL PLUS CPUs
To get to ...
I/O Points, CRs, &
Shift Registers
in a DL305
Use
Reference
...
in a DL405
To get to ...
TMR / CNT Status Bit
in a DL305
Use
Reference
...
in a DL405
IO 000
GY000
600
GY600
IO 001
GY001
601
GY601
———
———
———
———
IO 157
GY157
677
GY677
CR160
GY160
———
———
CR 377
GY377
IO 700
GY700
IO 701
GY701
———
———
IO 1067
GY1067
SR 400
GY400
SR 401
GY401
———
———
SR 577
GY577
E–19
DL305 Data Types and Memory Map
RLL PLUS CPUs
To get to ...
I/O Points, CRs, &
Shift Registers
in a DL305
Use
Ref.
...
in a
DL405
To get to ...
Stage Status Bit
in a DL305
Use
Ref.
...
in a
DL405
To get to ...
TMR / CNT Status
Bit
in a DL305
Use Ref.
...
in a
DL405
IO 000
GY000
000
GY200
600
GY600
IO 001
GY001
001
GY201
601
GY601
———
———
———
———
———
———
CR160
GY160
177
GY377
677
GY677
———
———
CR 277
GY277
IO 700
GY700
IO 701
GY701
IO 1067
GY1067
SR 200
GY400
SR 201
GY 401
———
———
SR 277
GY477
Appendix E
DL305 Memory Map
DL205
Data Types and
Memory Map
In This Chapter. . . .
— DL205 Data Types
— DL230 Memory Map
— DL240 Memory Map
— X Input Bit Map
— Y Output Bit Map
— Control Relay Bit Map
— Stage Control / Status Bit Map
— Timer Status Bit Map
— Counter Status Bit Map
1F
F–2
Appendix F
DL205 Memory Map
DL205 Data Types and Memory Map
DL205 Data Types
The following table shows the data types available with the DL205 products.
DL205
Data Type
Description
Bits per
unit
Number of bytes
HEX
ASCII
31
V memory
T / C current value
16
16
2
2
4
4
32
Inputs (X, GX, SP)
8
1
2
33
Outputs
(Y, C, Stage, T/C bits)
8
1
2
39
Diagnostic Status
8
1
2
NOTE: Not all DL205 devices offer the same memory ranges. Check your DL205
System Operation Manual to determine the ranges for your particular model.
Host Master
Example
Peer Master
Example
Data Type 31
V-Memory
Addresses
V-memory Address
Memory Type
DirectNET Reference
Address
V00000
V00001
———
V00177
TMR Current Time
TMR Current Time
———
TMR Current Time
0001
0002
———
0080
V01000
V01001
———
V01177
CTR Current Count
CTR Current Count
———
CTR Current Count
0201
0202
———
0280
V02000
V02001
———
V03777
V
V
———
V
0401
0402
———
0800
V04000
V04001
———
V04377
Non-volatile V
Non-volatile V
———
Non-volatile V
0801
0802
———
0900
V07620
V07621
———
V07737
Special V
Special V
———
Special V
0F91
0F92
———
0FE0
V07746
V07647
———
V07777
Special V
Special V
———
Special V
0FE7
0FE8
———
1000
F–3
DL205 Data Types and Memory Map
V-memory Address
Memory Type
DirectNET Reference
Address
V40400
V40401
———
V40423
X
X
———
X
4101
4102
———
4114
V40500
V40501
———
V40523
Y
Y
———
Y
4141
4142
———
4154
V40600
V40601
———
V40617
C
C
———
C
4181
4182
———
4190
V41000
V41001
———
V41037
Stage Bits
Stage Bits
———
Stage Bits
4201
4202
———
4218
V41100
V41101
———
V41107
TMR Status Bits
TMR Status Bits
———
TMR Status Bits
4241
4242
———
4248
V41140
V41141
———
V41147
CTR Status Bits
CTR Status Bits
———
CTR Status Bits
4261
4262
———
4268
V41200
V41201
———
V41205
Special Relay
Special Relay
———
Special Relay
4281
4282
———
4286
V41226
V41227
———
V41230
Special Relay
Special Relay
———
Special Relay
428F
4290
———
4299
Appendix F
DL205 Memory Map
Data Type 31
V-Memory
Addresses
(continued)
Host Master
Example
F–4
Host Master
Example
Peer Master
Example
Appendix F
DL205 Memory Map
DL205 Data Types and Memory Map
Data Type 32
Input Points
V-Memory Address
Memory Type
Range
DirectNET
Reference Address
V40400 LSB
V40400 MSB
V40401 LSB
———
V40423 LSB
V40423 MSB
X
X
X
———
X
X
0007 – 0000
0017 – 0010
0027 – 0020
———
0467 – 0460
0477 – 0470
0101
0102
0103
———
0127
0128
V41200 LSB
V41200 MSB
V41201 LSB
———
V41205 LSB
V41205 MSB
Special Relay
Special Relay
Special Relay
———
Special Relay
Special Relay
0007 – 0000
0017 – 0010
0027 – 0020
———
0127 – 0120
0137 – 0130
0181
0182
0183
———
018B
018C
V41226 LSB
V41226 MSB
———
V41230 LSB
V41230 MSB
Special Relay
Special Relay
———
Special Relay
Special Relay
0547 – 0540
0557 – 0550
———
0607 – 0600
0617 – 0610
01AD
01AE
———
01B1
01B2
F–5
DL205 Data Types and Memory Map
V-Memory Address
Memory Type
Range
DirectNET
Reference Address
V40500 LSB
V40500 MSB
V40501 LSB
———
V40523 LSB
V40523 MSB
Y
Y
Y
———
Y
Y
0007 – 0000
0017 – 0010
0027 – 0020
———
0467 – 0460
0477 – 0470
0101
0102
0103
———
0127
0128
V40600 LSB
V40600 MSB
V40601 LSB
———
V40617 LSB
V40617 MSB
C
C
C
———
C
C
0007 – 0000
0017 – 0010
0027 – 0020
———
0367 – 0360
0377 – 0370
0181
0182
0183
———
019F
01A0
V41000 LSB
V41000 MSB
V41001 LSB
———
V41037 LSB
V41037 MSB
Stage Bits
Stage Bits
Stage Bits
———
Stage Bits
Stage Bits
0007 – 0000
0017 – 0010
0027 – 0020
———
0767 – 0760
0777– 0770
0281
0282
0283
———
02BF
02C0
V41100 LSB
V41100 MSB
V41101 LSB
———
V41107 LSB
V41107 MSB
Timer Status Bits
Timer Status Bits
Timer Status Bits
———
Timer Status Bits
Timer Status Bits
0007 – 0000
0017 – 0010
0027 – 0020
———
0167 – 0160
0177 – 0170
0301
0302
0303
———
030F
0310
V41140 LSB
V41140 MSB
V41141 LSB
———
V41147 LSB
V41147 MSB
Counter Status Bits
Counter Status Bits
Counter Status Bits
———
Counter Status Bits
Counter Status Bits
0007 – 0000
0017 – 0010
0027 – 0020
———
0167 – 0160
0177 – 0170
0321
0322
0323
———
032F
0330
Appendix F
DL205 Memory Map
Data Type 33
Outputs
Host Master
Example
F–6
Appendix F
DL205 Memory Map
DL205 Data Types and Memory Map
Data Type 39
Diagnostic Status
You can use Data Type 39 to obtain DirectNET diagnostic status. The following
tables show the reference addresses for the various types of information and the
DirectNET error codes (used with address 0000).
DirectNET Reference
Data Returned
0000
Last error and previous error*
0002
Number of successful communications
0004
Number of erroneous communications
0006
Number of retries for header
0008
Number of retries for data
Host Master
Example
Peer Master
Example
* The last error code is contained in the most significant byte. The previous error code is in the least significant byte. Two codes that are displayed are
cleared by two successful communication exchanges.
Error
Code
Applicable
Data Type
Error Description
00
All types
The transfer was successful.
01
All types
A timeout occurred in the serial link.
03
32, 33
A request was made to read or write a non-existent I/O point.
04
32, 33
A request was made for data of more I/O points than are available.
05
All types
06
31
07
All types
08
36
09
All types
0A
39
0B
36, 39
0C
All types
Three attempts were made to transmit the header.
0D
All types
Three attempts were made to transmit the data.
0F
All types
The header unit number is incorrect. An invalid function was requested.
14
All types
One or more errors occurred during the data block transfer. Possible errors are:
invalid STX, ETC, LRC, or ETB is received; a parity, framing, or overrun error
occurred.
15
All types
EOT from the master station could not be received.
16
All types
A code other than ACK or NAK was received.
1D
31, 33, 36
1E
All types
A request was made to read or write odd bytes. The number of data requested
was not a multiple of 4 in the ASCII mode.
A request was made to read or write one or more non-existent memory
locations.
A request was made to read or write a zero data byte.
An attempt was made to write a protected memory.
An invalid code is specified or an attempt was made to write to an invalid
address.
A request was made to read or write one or more non-existent diagnostic status
words.
An invalid starting address is used in the PC type read, scan start/stop,
diagnostic status read or write request.
There is a format error in the non-header portion of the message.
There is a format error in the header block.
F–7
DL205 Data Types and Memory Map
Memory Type
Discrete Memory
Reference
(octal)
Word Memory
Reference
(octal)
Qty.
Decimal
Symbol
Input Points
X0 – X177
V40400 – V40407
128
X0
Output Points
Y0 – Y177
V40500 – V40507
128
Y0
Control Relays
C0 – C377
V40600 – V40617
256
Special Relays
SP0 – SP117
SP540 – SP577
V41200 – V41204
V41226 – V41227
112
Timers
T0 – T77
Timer Current
Values
None
Timer Status Bits T0 – T77
Counters
C0
64
V41100 – V41103
64
CT0 – CT77
C0
SP0
64
V0 – V77
Appendix F
DL205 Memory Map
DL230 Memory Map
TMR
K100
V0
T0
K100
T0
64
CNT CT0
K10
Counter
Current Values
None
V1000 – V1077
64
Counter Status
Bits
CT0 – CT77
V41140 – V41143
64
Data Words
None
V2000 – V2377
256
None specific, used with many
instructions
Data Words
Non–volitale
None
V4000 – V4177
128
None specific, used with many
instructions
Stages
S0 – S377
V41000 – V41017
256
V1000
K100
CT0
S 001
System
parameters
None
V7620 – V7647
V7750–V7777
48
None specific, used for various
purposes
1 – The DL205 systems are limited to 128 discrete I/O points (total) with the present system hardware available. These can be mixed between input
and output points as necessary.
Host Master
Example
S0
SG
F–8
Appendix F
DL205 Memory Map
DL205 Data Types and Memory Map
DL240 Memory Map
Memory Type
Discrete Memory
Reference
(octal)
Word Memory
Reference
(octal)
Qty.
Decimal
Symbol
Input Points
X0 – X177
V40400 – V40407
128 1
X0
Output Points
Y0 – Y177
V40500 – V40507
128 1
Y0
Control Relays
C0 – C377
V40600 – V40617
256
Special Relays
SP0 – SP137
SP540 – SP617
V41200 – V41205
V41226 – V41230
144
Timers
T0 – T177
Timer Current
Values
None
Timer Status Bits T0 – T177
Counters
C0
SP0
128
V0 – V177
128
V41100 – V41107
128
CT0 – CT177
C0
TMR
K100
V0
T0
K100
T0
128
CNT CT0
Host Master
Example
Peer Master
Example
K10
Counter
Current Values
None
V1000 – V1177
128
Counter Status
Bits
CT0 – CT177
V41140 – V41147
128
Data Words
None
V2000 – V3777
1024
None specific, used with many
instructions
Data Words
Non–volitale
None
V4000 – V4377
256
None specific, used with many
instructions
Stages
S0 – S777
V41000 – V41037
512
V1000
K100
CT0
S0
SG
S 001
System
parameters
None
V7620 – V7737
V7746–V7777
106
None specific, used for various
purposes
1 – The DL205 systems are limited to 128 discrete I/O points (total) with the present system hardware available. These can be mixed between input
and output points as necessary.
F–9
DL205 Data Types and Memory Map
This table provides a listing of the individual Input points associated with each V-memory address bit for the
DL230 and DL240 CPUs.
MSB
DL230/DL240 Input (X) Points
LSB
Address
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
017
016
015
014
013
012
011
010
007
006
005
004
003
002
001
000
V40400
037
036
035
034
033
032
031
030
027
026
025
024
023
022
021
020
V40401
057
056
055
054
053
052
051
050
047
046
045
044
043
042
041
040
V40402
077
076
075
074
073
072
071
070
067
066
065
064
063
062
061
060
V40403
117
116
115
114
113
112
111
110
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
V40404
137
136
135
134
133
132
131
130
127
126
125
124
123
122
121
120
V40405
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
V40406
177
176
175
174
173
172
171
170
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
V40407
Appendix F
DL205 Memory Map
X Input Bit Map
Y Output Bit Map
This table provides a listing of the individual output points associated with each V-memory address bit for
both the DL230 and DL240 CPUs.
MSB
DL230/DL240 Output (Y) Points
LSB
Address
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
017
016
015
014
013
012
011
010
007
006
005
004
003
002
001
000
V40500
037
036
035
034
033
032
031
030
027
026
025
024
023
022
021
020
V40501
057
056
055
054
053
052
051
050
047
046
045
044
043
042
041
040
V40502
077
076
075
074
073
072
071
070
067
066
065
064
063
062
061
060
V40503
117
116
115
114
113
112
111
110
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
V40504
137
136
135
134
133
132
131
130
127
126
125
124
123
122
121
120
V40505
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
V40506
177
176
175
174
173
172
171
170
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
V40507
Host Master
Example
F–10
Host Master
Example
Peer Master
Example
Appendix F
DL205 Memory Map
DL205 Data Types and Memory Map
Control Relay Bit Map
This table provides a listing of the individual control relays associated with each V-memory address bit.
MSB
DL230/DL240 Control Relays (C)
LSB
Address
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
017
016
015
014
013
012
011
010
007
006
005
004
003
002
001
000
V40600
037
036
035
034
033
032
031
030
027
026
025
024
023
022
021
020
V40601
057
056
055
054
053
052
051
050
047
046
045
044
043
042
041
040
V40602
077
076
075
074
073
072
071
070
067
066
065
064
063
062
061
060
V40603
117
116
115
114
113
112
111
110
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
V40604
137
136
135
134
133
132
131
130
127
126
125
124
123
122
121
120
V40605
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
V40606
177
176
175
174
173
172
171
170
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
V40607
217
216
215
214
213
212
211
210
207
206
205
204
203
202
201
200
V40610
237
236
235
234
233
232
231
230
227
226
225
224
223
222
221
220
V40611
257
256
255
254
253
252
251
250
247
246
245
244
243
242
241
240
V40612
277
276
275
274
273
272
271
270
267
266
265
264
263
262
261
260
V40613
317
316
315
314
313
312
311
310
307
306
305
304
303
302
301
300
V40614
337
336
335
334
333
332
331
330
327
326
325
324
323
322
321
320
V40615
357
356
355
354
353
352
351
350
347
346
345
344
343
342
341
340
V40616
377
376
375
374
373
372
371
370
367
366
365
364
363
362
361
360
V40617
F–11
DL205 Data Types and Memory Map
This table provides a listing of the individual stage control bits associated with each V-memory address bit.
MSB
DL230/DL240 Stage (S) Control Bits
LSB
Address
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
017
016
015
014
013
012
011
010
007
006
005
004
003
002
001
000
V41000
037
036
035
034
033
032
031
030
027
026
025
024
023
022
021
020
V41001
057
056
055
054
053
052
051
050
047
046
045
044
043
042
041
040
V41002
077
076
075
074
073
072
071
070
067
066
065
064
063
062
061
060
V41003
117
116
115
114
113
112
111
110
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
V41004
137
136
135
134
133
132
131
130
127
126
125
124
123
122
121
120
V41005
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
V41006
177
176
175
174
173
172
171
170
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
V41007
217
216
215
214
213
212
211
210
207
206
205
204
203
202
201
200
V41010
237
236
235
234
233
232
231
230
227
226
225
224
223
222
221
220
V41011
257
256
255
254
253
252
251
250
247
246
245
244
243
242
241
240
V41012
277
276
275
274
273
272
271
270
267
266
265
264
263
262
261
260
V41013
317
316
315
314
313
312
311
310
307
306
305
304
303
302
301
300
V41014
337
336
335
334
333
332
331
330
327
326
325
324
323
322
321
320
V41015
357
356
355
354
353
352
351
350
347
346
345
344
343
342
341
340
V41016
377
376
375
374
373
372
371
370
367
366
365
364
363
362
361
360
V41017
MSB
DL240 Additional Stage (S) Control Bits
LSB
Appendix F
DL205 Memory Map
Stage Control / Status Bit Map
Address
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
417
416
415
414
413
412
411
410
407
406
405
404
403
402
401
400
V41020
437
436
435
434
433
432
431
430
427
426
425
424
423
422
421
420
V41021
457
456
455
454
453
452
451
450
447
446
445
444
443
442
441
440
V41022
477
476
475
474
473
472
471
470
467
466
465
464
463
462
461
460
V41023
517
516
515
514
513
512
511
510
507
506
505
504
503
502
501
500
V41024
537
536
535
534
533
532
531
530
527
526
525
524
523
522
521
520
V41025
557
556
555
554
553
552
551
550
547
546
545
544
543
542
541
540
V41026
577
576
575
574
573
572
571
570
567
566
565
564
563
562
561
560
V41027
617
616
615
614
613
612
611
610
607
606
605
604
603
602
601
600
V41030
637
636
635
634
633
632
631
630
627
626
625
624
623
622
621
620
V41031
657
656
655
654
653
652
651
650
647
646
645
644
643
642
641
640
V41032
677
676
675
674
673
672
671
670
667
666
665
664
663
662
661
660
V41033
717
716
715
714
713
712
711
710
707
706
705
704
703
702
701
700
V41034
737
736
735
734
733
732
731
730
727
726
725
724
723
722
721
720
V41035
757
756
755
754
753
752
751
750
747
746
745
744
743
742
741
740
V41036
777
776
775
774
773
772
771
770
767
766
765
764
763
762
761
760
V41037
Host Master
Example
17
F–12
Appendix F
DL205 Memory Map
DL205 Data Types and Memory Map
Timer Status Bit Map
This table provides a listing of the individual timer contacts associated with each V-memory address bit.
MSB
DL230/DL240 Timer (T) Contacts
LSB
Address
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
017
016
015
014
013
012
011
010
007
006
005
004
003
002
001
000
V41100
037
036
035
034
033
032
031
030
027
026
025
024
023
022
021
020
V41101
057
056
055
054
053
052
051
050
047
046
045
044
043
042
041
040
V41102
077
076
075
074
073
072
071
070
067
066
065
064
063
062
061
060
V41103
MSB
Additional DL240 Timer (T) Contacts
LSB
Address
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
117
116
115
114
113
112
111
110
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
V41104
137
136
135
134
133
132
131
130
127
126
125
124
123
122
121
120
V41105
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
V41106
177
176
175
174
173
172
171
170
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
V41107
Counter Status Bit Map
This table provides a listing of the individual counter contacts associated with each V-memory address bit.
Host Master
Example
Peer Master
Example
MSB
DL230/DL240 Counter (CT) Contacts
17
16
15
14
13
12
017
016
015
014
013
037
036
035
034
033
057
056
055
054
077
076
075
074
MSB
LSB
Address
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
012
011
010
007
006
005
004
003
002
001
000
V41140
032
031
030
027
026
025
024
023
022
021
020
V41141
053
052
051
050
047
046
045
044
043
042
041
040
V41142
073
072
071
070
067
066
065
064
063
062
061
060
V41143
Additional DL240 Counter (CT) Contacts
LSB
Address
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
117
116
115
114
113
112
111
110
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
V41144
137
136
135
134
133
132
131
130
127
126
125
124
123
122
121
120
V41145
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
V41146
177
176
175
174
173
172
171
170
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
V41147