Emerson ROC364 Instruction manual

Form A4193
Part Number D301060X012
June 2005
ROC364 REMOTE OPERATIONS CONTROLLER
Instruction Manual
Flow Computer Division
Website: www.EmersonProcess.com/flow
ROC364 Instruction Manual
Revision Tracking Sheet
June 2005
This manual is revised periodically to incorporate new or updated information. The date revision level
of each page is indicated at the bottom of the page opposite the page number. A major change in the
content of the manual also changes the date of the manual, which appears on the front cover. Listed
below is the date revision level of each page.
Page
All Pages
All Pages
Revision
Jun/05
May/02
FloBoss and ROCLINK are marks of one of the Emerson Process Management companies. The Emerson logo is a trademark
and service mark of Emerson Electric Co. All other marks are the property of their respective owners.
© Fisher Controls International, Inc. 1992-2005. All rights reserved.
Printed in the U.S.A.
While this information is presented in good faith and believed to be accurate, Fisher Controls does not guarantee satisfactory
results from reliance upon such information. Nothing contained herein is to be construed as a warranty or guarantee,
express or implied, regarding the performance, merchantability, fitness or any other matter with respect to the products, nor
as a recommendation to use any product or process in conflict with any patent. Fisher Controls reserves the right, without
notice, to alter or improve the designs or specifications of the products described herein.
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Table of Contents ............................................................................................................. iii
Section 1 – General Information................................................................................... 1-1
1.1
Scope of Manual ............................................................................................................................. 1-1
1.2
Manual Contents ............................................................................................................................. 1-1
1.3
Product Overview ........................................................................................................................... 1-2
1.4
Installation Guidelines .................................................................................................................... 1-3
1.5
Power Supply Requirements........................................................................................................... 1-6
1.6
Startup and Operation ................................................................................................................... 1-10
Section 2 – Master Controller Unit, I/O Module Rack, and Wiring......................... 2-1
2.1
Scope............................................................................................................................................... 2-1
2.2
Product Description ........................................................................................................................ 2-1
2.3
Installation....................................................................................................................................... 2-7
2.4 Connecting the MCU to Wiring...................................................................................................... 2-9
2.5
Troubleshooting and Repair.......................................................................................................... 2-12
2.6
ROC364 Specifications................................................................................................................. 2-20
Section 3 – Input and Output Modules ........................................................................ 3-1
3.1
Scope............................................................................................................................................... 3-1
3.2
Product Descriptions....................................................................................................................... 3-1
3.3
Initial Installation and Setup ........................................................................................................... 3-5
3.4
Connecting the I/O Modules to Wiring .......................................................................................... 3-5
3.5
Troubleshooting and Repair.......................................................................................................... 3-21
3.6 Removal, Addition, and Replacement Procedures ....................................................................... 3-28
3.7
I/O Module Specifications ............................................................................................................ 3-30
Section 4 – Communications Cards.............................................................................. 4-1
4.1
Scope............................................................................................................................................... 4-1
4.2
Product Descriptions....................................................................................................................... 4-1
4.3
Installing Communications Cards................................................................................................... 4-8
4.4
Connecting Communications Cards to Wiring ............................................................................. 4-12
4.5
Troubleshooting and Repair.......................................................................................................... 4-19
4.6
Communication Card Specifications ............................................................................................ 4-21
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Section 5 – I/O Converter Card .................................................................................... 5-1
5.1
Scope............................................................................................................................................... 5-1
5.2
Product Description ........................................................................................................................ 5-1
5.3
Initial Installation and Setup ........................................................................................................... 5-2
5.4
Troubleshooting and Repair............................................................................................................ 5-3
5.5
I/O Converter Card Specification ................................................................................................... 5-4
Appendix A – Lightning Protection Module ...............................................................A-1
A.1 Product Description ....................................................................................................................... A-1
A.2 Connecting the LPM to Wiring...................................................................................................... A-2
A.3 Troubleshooting and Repair........................................................................................................... A-2
A.4 Lightning Protection Module Specifications ................................................................................. A-3
Appendix B – Local Display Panel ...............................................................................B-1
B.1 Product Description ........................................................................................................................B-1
B.2 Installation.......................................................................................................................................B-2
B.3 Operation.........................................................................................................................................B-4
B.4 Troubleshooting and Repair..........................................................................................................B-22
B.5 Local Display Panel Specifications ..............................................................................................B-23
Appendix C – I/O Simulation........................................................................................C-1
C.1 Analog Outputs to Analog Inputs ...................................................................................................C-1
C.2 Analog Outputs to Ammeter or Voltmeter .....................................................................................C-2
C.3 Discrete Outputs to Discrete Inputs ................................................................................................C-3
C.4 Discrete Outputs to Pulse Inputs.....................................................................................................C-3
C.5 Potentiometer to Analog Inputs ......................................................................................................C-4
C.6 Switch to Discrete Inputs ................................................................................................................C-5
C.7 Switch to Pulse Inputs.....................................................................................................................C-5
Glossary.......................................................................................................................... G-1
Index ................................................................................................................................. I-1
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SECTION 1 – GENERAL INFORMATION
1.1 Scope of Manual
This manual focuses on the hardware aspects of the ROC364 Remote Operations Controller (ROC)
manufactured by Flow Computer Division of Emerson Process Management. For software aspects, such
as configuration, refer to the respective ROCLINK configuration user manual.
NOTE: Certain hardware versions and functionality may require higher revisions of ROCLINK
configuration software. Verify the version of ROCLINK configuration software.
This section contains the following information:
Section
1.1 Scope of Manual
1.2 Manual Contents
1.3 Product Overview
1.4 Installation Guidelines
1.5 Power Supply Requirements
1.6 Startup and Operation
Page
1-1
1-1
1-2
1-3
1-6
1-9
1.2 Manual Contents
This manual contains the following sections:
Section 2 details the Master Controller Unit (MCU), I/O Module Rack, wiring, troubleshooting, and
specifications.
Section 3 provides information and specifications for the I/O modules.
Section 4 provides details and specifications for the communications cards.
Appendix A describes the optional Lightning Protection Module (LPM) and specifications.
Appendix B describes specifications and how to use the optional Local Display Panel (LDP) to access
operational data and change configuration.
Appendix C shows various ways to set up I/O simulation for troubleshooting components and
configurations.
For more information on software or accessories, please refer to the following manuals.
♦ ROCLINK for Windows Configuration Software User Manual (Form A6091).
♦ ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software User Manual (Form A6121).
♦ ROC/ROC Accessories Instruction Manual (Form A4637).
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1.1.1 FCC Information
This equipment complies with Part 68 of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rules. On the
modem assembly is a label that contains, among other information, the FCC certification number and
Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) for this equipment. If requested, this information must be provided
to the telephone company.
A FCC compliant telephone modular plug is provided with this equipment. This equipment is designed
to be connected to the telephone network or premises’ wiring, using a compatible modular jack that is
Part 68 compliant. See Installation Instructions for details.
The REN is used to determine the quantity of devices that may be connected to the telephone line.
Excessive RENs on the telephone line may result in the devices not ringing in response to an incoming
call. Typically, the sum of the RENs should not exceed five (5.0). To be certain of the number of
devices that may be connected to a line (as determined by the total RENs), contact the local telephone
company.
If this equipment, dial-up modem, causes harm to the telephone network, the telephone company will
notify you in advance that temporary discontinuance of service may be required. But if advance notice is
not practical, the telephone company will notify the customer as soon as possible. Also, you will be
advised of your right to file a complaint with the FCC if you believe it necessary.
The telephone company may make changes to its facilities, equipment, operations, or procedures that
could affect the operation of the equipment. If this happens the telephone company will provide advance
notice so you can make the necessary modifications to maintain uninterrupted service.
If trouble is experienced with this equipment, dial-up modem, for repair or warranty information, please
contact Emerson Process Management, Flow Computer Division (641) 754-2578. If the equipment is
causing harm to the telephone network, the telephone company may request that you disconnect the
equipment until the problem is resolved.
1.3 Product Overview
The ROC364 is a microprocessor-based controller that provides the functions required for a variety of
field automation applications. The ROC364 is used primarily where there is a need for remote
monitoring, measurement, data archival, and control. You can configure the ROC364 for specific
applications including those requiring calculations, PID (Proportional, Integral, and Derivative) Loop
Control, and Function Sequence Tables (FSTs) logic/sequencing control.
The ROC364 features modularized field inputs and outputs (I/O), which provide the flexibility to meet
the requirements of a specific application. Up to 64 I/O modules can be used in any combination of
Discrete Inputs, Discrete Outputs, Analog Inputs, Analog Outputs, and Pulse Inputs.
The modular design of the ROC364 makes it cost-effective for both small and large applications. You
can select from a variety of communications and operator interface options to customize the installation
for a given system. The ROC is approved for use in Class I – Division 2 hazardous area locations.
The FlashPAC includes additional features contained in the firmware, such as 1992 American Gas
Association (AGA) flow calculations, Spontaneous-Report-by-Exception (SRBX or RBX) alarm
messaging, Local Display Panel configuring, and radio power control.
Figure 1-1 shows the major components that make up the ROC Master Controller Unit (MCU). Figure
2-6 shows the outline and mounting dimensions for the ROC364 controller. Refer to Section 2, Master
Controller Unit, I/O Module Rack, and Wiring, for further hardware and firmware details.
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1.4 Installation Guidelines
The design of the ROC makes it highly adaptable to a wide variety of installations; therefore, not all
possibilities can be covered in this manual. If additional information is required concerning a specific
installation, contact your local sales representative.
Planning is essential to a good installation. Because installation requirements depend on many factors
such as the application, location, ground conditions, climate, and accessibility, only generalized
guidelines can be provided in this document.
Backplate
FLASHPAC
®
MEMORY EXPANSION
F1
POWER
2A S.B., 32 VDC
F2
AUX OUT 1
5A, 32 VDC
F3
AUX OUT 2
5A, 32 VDC
SYSTEM
STATUS
1
2
ROC
RAM
3
COM2
POWER
AUX OUT 1
AUX OUT 2
DC PWR
IN
+
AUX PWR
+
OUT 1
GND
+
+
-
MCU
REMOTE OPERATIONS
CONTROLLER
COM1
DISPLAY
OPERATOR
INTERFACE
AUX PWR
OUT 2
®
I/O Modules
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
A B C
A B C
A B C
A B C
A B C
A B C
A B C
A B C
A B C
A B C
11
A B C
12
13
A B C
A B C
14
15
A B C
A B C
16
A B C
I/O Module Wiring /
Termination
I/O Rack
GND
GND
ROC364
Figure 1-1. ROC364 Controller Components Mounted on Backplate
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1.4.1 Environmental Requirements
The ROC364 requires protection from direct exposure to rain, snow, ice, blowing dust or debris,
and corrosive atmospheres. If the ROC is installed outside of a building, it must be placed in a
NEMA 3 or higher rated enclosure to ensure the necessary level of protection.
NOTE: In salt spray environments, it is especially important to ensure that the enclosure is sealed
properly, including all entry and exit points. If salt is allowed to enter, it can shorten the life of
the lithium battery in the ROC and cause the battery to leak corrosive chemicals.
The ROC units are designed to operate over a wide range of temperatures. However, in extreme climates
it may be necessary to provide temperature-controlling devices to maintain stable operating conditions.
In extremely hot climates, a filtered ventilation system or air conditioning may be required. In extremely
cold climates, it may be necessary to provide a thermostatically controlled heater in the same enclosure
as the ROC364. To maintain a non-condensing atmosphere inside the ROC enclosure in areas of high
humidity, it may be necessary to add heat or dehumidification.
1.4.2 Site Requirements
Careful consideration when locating the ROC on the site can help reduce future operational problems.
The following items should be considered when choosing a location:
♦ Local, state, and federal codes often place restrictions on ROC locations and dictate site
requirements. Examples of these restrictions are fall distance from a meter run, distance from
pipe flanges, and hazardous area classifications. Ensure that all code requirements are met.
♦ Locate the ROC to minimize the length of signal and power wiring. By code, line power wiring
must not cross meter runs.
♦ Solar panels must face due South (not magnetic South) in the northern hemisphere and due North
(not magnetic North) in the southern hemisphere. Make sure nothing blocks the sunlight during
any part of the day.
♦ ROC units equipped for radio communications should be located so the antenna has an
unobstructed signal path. Antennas should not be aimed into storage tanks, buildings, or other
tall structures. If possible, ROC units should be located at the highest point on the site. Overhead
clearance should be sufficient to allow the antenna to be raised to a height of at least twenty feet.
♦ To minimize interference with radio communications, locate the ROC away from electrical noise
sources, such as engines, large electric motors, and utility line transformers.
♦ Locate ROC units away from heavy traffic areas to reduce the risk of being damaged by
vehicles. However, provide adequate vehicle access to aid monitoring and maintenance.
1.4.3 Compliance with Hazardous Area Standards
The ROC364 hazardous location approval is for Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D. The class,
division, and group terms are defined as follows:
1. Class defines the general nature of the hazardous material in the surrounding atmosphere. Class I
is for locations where flammable gases or vapors may be present in the air in quantities sufficient
to produce explosive or ignitable mixtures.
2. Division defines the probability of hazardous material being present in an ignitable concentration
in the surrounding atmosphere. Division 2 locations are locations that are presumed to be
hazardous only in an abnormal situation.
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3. Group defines the hazardous material in the surrounding atmosphere and include:
♦
♦
♦
♦
Group A – Atmosphere containing acetylene.
Group B – Atmosphere containing hydrogen, gases, or vapors of equivalent nature.
Group C – Atmosphere containing ethylene, gases, or vapors of equivalent nature.
Group D – Atmosphere containing propane, gases, or vapors of equivalent nature.
For the ROC to be approved for hazardous locations, it must be installed in accordance with the National
Electrical Code (NEC) guidelines or other applicable codes.
When working on units located in a hazardous area (where explosive gases may be present), make
sure the area is in a non-hazardous state before performing procedures. Performing procedures in
a hazardous area could result in personal injury or property damage.
1.4.4 Power Installation Requirements
Typical sources of primary power for ROC installations are line power and solar power. Be sure to route
line power away from hazardous areas, as well as sensitive monitoring and radio equipment. Local and
company codes generally provide guidelines for line power installations. Adhere rigorously to all local
and National Electrical Code (NEC) requirements for line power installations.
Solar power allows installation of the ROC in locations where line power is not available. The solar
panels and batteries must be properly sized for the application and geographic location to ensure
continuous reliable operation. Information contained in the ROC/ROC Accessories Instruction Manual
(Form 4637) can assist in determining the solar panel and battery requirements.
A site may have additional power requirements for radios, repeaters, and other monitoring devices.
Power supply and converter accessories can minimize the number of separate power sources required for
an installation.
The ROC364 can operate from either a 12-volt or a 24-volt nominal power source. If 24-volt transmitter
power is required when operating on 12-volt power, the ROC364 requires an I/O Converter Card to be
installed. Refer to Section 5. The ROC364 has a low-voltage cut-off circuit built in to guard against
draining down power supply batteries.
1.4.5 Grounding Installation Requirements
Ground wiring requirements for line-powered equipment are governed by the National Electrical Code
(NEC). When the equipment uses line power, the grounding system must terminate at the service
disconnect. All equipment grounding conductors must provide an uninterrupted electrical path to the
service disconnect. This includes wire or conduit carrying the power supply conductors.
The National Electrical Code Article 250-83 (1993), paragraph c, defines the material and
installation requirements for grounding electrodes.
The National Electrical Code Article 250-91 (1993), paragraph a, defines the material requirements
for grounding electrode conductors.
The National Electrical Code Article 250-92 (1993), paragraph a, provides installation requirements
for grounding electrode conductors.
The National Electrical Code Article 250-95 (1993) defines the size requirements for equipment
grounding conductors.
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ROC364 Instruction Manual
Proper grounding of the ROC helps to reduce the effects of electrical noise on unit operation and helps
protect against lightning. Lightning Protection Modules are available to provide additional lightning
protection for field wiring inputs and outputs. Refer to Appendix A for information about lightning
protection. A surge protection device installed at the service disconnect on line-powered systems also
offers lightning and power surge protection for the installed equipment.
Telephone surge protectors should be installed for ROC units using modem communications cards.
All earth grounds must have an earth-to-ground rod or grid impedance of 25 ohms or less as measured
with a ground system tester. The grounding conductor should have a resistance of 1 ohm or less between
the ROC enclosure ground lug and the earth ground rod or grid.
1.4.6 I/O Wiring Requirements
I/O wiring requirements are site and application dependent. Local, state, and NEC requirements
determine the I/O wiring installation methods. Direct buried cable, conduit and cable, or overhead
cable are options for I/O wiring installations. Refer to Section 2, Master Controller Unit, I/O Module
Rack, and Wiring, and Section 3, Input/Output Modules.
1.5 Power Supply Requirements
The power consumption of a ROC and related devices determines the requirements for either line
or solar power supplies. Table 1-1 and Table 1-2 provide information to assist in determining power
supply requirements.
Table 1-1 lists the power consumption of the ROC364 and the optional devices available for it. Include
in the power consumption calculations of all device relays, meters, solenoids, radios, and other devices
that receive DC power from the ROC (excluding those connected to the I/O modules). Table 1-2 lists the
power consumption of the various I/O modules available.
A ROC systems power consumption determines power supply and battery size for both line and solar
power supplies. Use the information in Table 1-1 and Table 1-2 to determine power requirements.
For non-analog I/O, size the I/O module scaling resistors for optimal current to minimize current drain
on the power supply. Refer to Section 3.
1.5.1 Determining I/O Channel Power Consumption
To determine the I/O Channel Power:
1. Calculate the Duty Cycle of each I/O channel and enter the values in Table 1-1.
In estimating total I/O power requirements, the Duty Cycle of each I/O channel (built-in I/O or
modular I/O) must be estimated.
For a non-analog I/O channel, the Duty Cycle is the percentage of time that the I/O channel is
active (maximum power consumption). For example, if a Discrete Output is active for 15
seconds out of every 60 seconds, the Duty Cycle is:
Duty Cycle = Active time ÷ (Active time + Inactive time) = 15 sec ÷ 60 sec = 0.25
NOTE: For non-analog I/O, size the I/O module scaling resistors for optimal current to
minimize current drain on the power supply.
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For an analog I/O channel, the Duty Cycle is approximated by estimating the percentage of
time the channel spends in the upper half of its range (span) of operation. For example, if an
Analog Input wired as a current loop (4 to 20 milliamps) device operates in the upper half of its
range 75% of the time, then 0.75 would be used as the Duty Cycle. If the analog channel
generally operates around the midpoint of its span, use 0.5 as the Duty Cycle.
2. To calculate the total power consumed by an I/O channel, first select either the 12 Volt or 24
Volt column in Table 1-1 or Table 1-2 and read the minimum (Pmin) and maximum (Pmax) power
consumption value from the table for the desired I/O channel.
3. Calculate the power consumption for a channel with the Duty Cycle using the following equation
taken into account:
Power = (Pmax x Duty Cycle) + [Pmin (1 – Duty Cycle)]
4. Multiply this value by the quantity (QTY) of I/O channels with the same Duty Cycle and enter
the calculated value in the Sub-Total column.
5. Repeat the procedure for all other I/O channels used.
6. Total the values in the I/O Modules Sub-Total column in Table 1-2.
7. Enter the I/O Modules Total value in Table 1-1.
8. Calculate the Radio Power Consumption total. Refer to Section 1.5.2, Determining Radio
Power Consumption, on page 1-8.
9. Enter the Radio Power Consumption Total value in Table 1-1.
10. Calculate Total power consumption in Table 1-1.
11. Add the power consumption (in mW) of any other devices used with the ROC in the same
power system, but not accounted for in the tables to the Total power consumption value in Table
1-1. Refer to Section 1.5.3, Totaling Power Requirements, on page 1-9.
Table 1-1. Power Consumption of the ROC364 and Powered Devices
Power Consumption (mW)
Device
MCU and I/O Module Rack
I/O Converter Card1
Local Display Panel
Serial Communications Card
Dial-up Modem Card
Leased Line Modem Card
Radio Modem Card
I/O Modules Total from Table 1-2
Radio (Section 1.5.2)
12 Volt
Pmin
Pmax
915
230
25
135
395
110
110
24 Volt
Pmin
Pmax
1705
N/A
25
135
395
110
110
N/A
N/A
QTY
1
N/A
N/A
Duty
Cycle
SubTotal
(mW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
TOTAL
NOTE: 1. The power drawn by field devices connected to I/O modules is included in the Pmax figures in Table
1-2.
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Table 1-2. Power Consumption of the I/O Modules
I/O Module
AI Loop
AI Differential
AI Source
AO Source
RTD Input: Pmin is at –50°C
(–58°F); Pmax is at 100°C (212°F)
DI Isolated
DI Source
PI Isolated
PI Source
Low Level PI
SPI Isolated
SPI Source
DO Isolated
DO Source (Pmax is at 57 mA)
DO Relay 12 Volts
DO Relay 24 Volts
HART Interface Module
Power Consumption (mW)
12 Volt
24 Volt
Pmax2
Pmin
Pmax2
Pmin
170
495
170
495
75
75
75
75
110
305
130
470
145
585
145
585
240
475
475
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
30
20
N/A
85
10
55
30
70
45
10
55
25
815
420
N/A
685
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
30
N/A
20
85
QTY
Duty
Cycle1
SubTotal
(mW)
930
10
205
30
230
45
10
205
25
1585
N/A
470
1285
I/O MODULES TOTAL
NOTES: 1. For analog I/O channels, the Duty Cycle is the percent of time spent in the upper half of the
operating range.
2. The Pmax amount includes any power drawn by a ROC-powered field device such as a
transmitter.
1.5.2 Determining Radio Power Consumption
In determining power requirements for radios:
1. Estimate the Duty Cycle for the radio.
The Duty Cycle is the percentage of time the radio is transmitting (TX). For example, if a radio
is transmitting 1 second out of every 60 seconds, and for the remaining 59 seconds the radio is
drawing receive (RX) power, the Duty Cycle is:
Duty Cycle = TX time ÷ (TX time + RX time) = 1 sec ÷ 60 sec = 0.0167
2. Calculate the total power consumed by a radio, obtain the power (P) consumption values for
transmit and receive from the radio manufacturer’s literature, then use the following equation to
calculate the power consumption for a particular Duty Cycle:
Power = (PTX x Duty Cycle) + [PRX (1 – Duty Cycle)]
3. Determine the power consumption for all radios that use power from the ROC, and enter the total
calculated value in the Sub-Total column in Table 1-1.
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1.5.3 Totaling Power Requirements
To adequately meet the needs of the ROC system, it is important to determine the total power
consumption to size the solar panel and battery backup requirements accordingly. For total power
consumption, add the device values in Table 1-1.
Although Table 1-1 and Table 1-2 take into account the power supplied by the ROC to its connected
devices, be sure to add the power consumption (in mW) of any other devices used with the ROC in the
same power system, but not accounted for in the tables.
Convert the total value (in mW) to Watts by dividing it by 1000.
mW ÷ 1000 = Watts
For selecting an adequate power supply, use a safety factor (SF) of 1.25 to account for losses and other
variables not factored into the power consumption calculations. To incorporate the safety factor,
multiply the total power consumption (P) by 1.25.
PSF = P x 1.25 = _____ Watts
To convert PSF to current consumption in amps (ISF), divide PSF by the system voltage (V), either 12
volts or 24 volts.
ISF = PSF / V = _____ Amps
1.6 Startup and Operation
Before starting up the ROC, perform the following checks to ensure the unit is properly installed.
♦ Make sure the enclosure has a good earth ground.
♦ Make sure the MCU is grounded at the power input connector.
♦ Make sure all I/O module racks are grounded at the GND screw.
♦ Make sure the MCU and I/O module racks are secured to the factory backplate.
♦ Ensure FlashPAC modules are seated in their connectors.
♦ Seat and secure all I/O modules in their sockets.
♦ Check the field wiring for proper installation.
♦ Make sure the input power has the correct polarity.
♦ Make sure the input power is fused at the power source.
Check the input power polarity before turning on the power switch. Incorrect polarity can
damage the ROC.
When installing units in a hazardous area, ensure that the components selected are labeled for use
in such areas. Change components only in an area known to be non-hazardous. Performing these
procedures in a hazardous area could result in personal injury or property damage.
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NOTE: For proper startup, the minimum input voltage level must be 12.5 volts or more for a 12-
volt unit, and 25 volts or more for a 24-volt unit. Once the ROC364 has been successfully
started, the ROC continues to operate normally over the specified input voltage range. If you are
unsure of the input voltage setting for your ROC, refer to the paragraphs on setting the input
voltage jumpers in Section 2.
1.6.1 Startup
Apply power to the ROC364 by plugging in the power terminal block. The Power indicator should light
to indicate that the applied voltage is correct. Then, the System Status indicator should light, and stay
lit, to indicate a valid reset sequence has been completed. After internal checks have been completed,
both AUX PWR indicators should light. The startup sequence may take up to 5 seconds. If any of the
indicators do not light, refer to the Troubleshooting details in Section 2 for possible causes.
1.6.2 Operation
Once startup is successful, configure the ROC to meet the requirements of the application. The
appropriate ROCLINK configuration software user manual describes in detail the procedure for
configuring the ROC. Once the ROC is configured and I/O is calibrated, it can be placed into operation.
Local configuration or monitoring of the ROC through its Operator Interface must be performed
only in an area known to be non-hazardous. Performance of these procedures in a hazardous area
could result in personal injury or property damage.
The ROC can be operated from a host system using ROCLINK configuration software. Consult with
your local sales representative for more information on host system compatibility.
1.6.2.1 Local Display Panel
The Local Display Panel (LDP) is an ASCII terminal with a 4-line by 20-character Liquid Crystal
Display (LCD) and a 4-key keypad. Refer to Appendix B, Liquid Crystal Display (LCD).
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SECTION 2 – MASTER CONTROLLER UNIT, I/O MODULE
RACK, AND WIRING
2.1 Scope
This section describes the core of the ROC364 components, including the Master Controller Unit
(MCU), the FlashPAC module, wiring, the I/O Module rack, the backplate, and the front panel. Topics
covered include:
Section
2.2
Product Description
2.3
Installation
2.4
Connecting the MCU to Wiring
2.5
Troubleshooting and Repair
2.6
ROC364 Specifications
Page
2-1
2-7
2-9
2-12
2-20
2.2 Product Description
The following subsections describe components of the ROC364 including the Master Controller Unit,
FlashPACs, Diagnostic Analog Inputs, Auxiliary Discrete Outputs, I/O Module Rack, and Backplate.
2.2.1 Master Controller Unit
The Master Controller Unit (MCU) is the “brain” of the ROC. Figure 2-1 displays MCU. The MCU
consists of:
♦ NEC V25+ microprocessor.
♦ I/O converter card connector.
♦ On-board memory.
♦ I/O module rack connector.
♦ FlashPAC module sockets.
♦ Diagnostic Analog Inputs.
♦ Operator Interface port.
♦ Auxiliary Discrete Outputs.
♦ Local Display port.
♦ Status indicators.
♦ Communications ports.
♦ Metal housing.
♦ Power fusing and terminations.
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MEMORY EXPANSION
F1
POWER
2A S.B., 32 VDC
F2
AUX OUT 1
5A, 32 VDC
F3
AUX OUT 2
5A, 32 VDC
SYSTEM
STATUS
DC PWR
IN
+
AUX PWR
+
OUT 1
GND
1
2
AUX PWR
OUT 2
ROC
REMOTE OPERATIONS
CONTROLLER
RAM
3
COM2
POWER
AUX OUT 1
AUX OUT 2
+
+
-
FLASHPAC
FLASHPAC
®
COM1
DISPLAY
OPERATOR
INTERFACE
DOC0119A
Figure 2-1. Master Controller Unit
The NEC V25+ is a 16-bit Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) microprocessor
featuring dual 16-bit internal data buses and a single 8-bit external data bus. The ROC364 can address
up to one megabyte of memory and features high-speed direct memory access.
The on-board memory on the MCU includes 128 kilobytes of battery-backed, random access memory
(RAM) for storing data and 32 kilobytes of electrically erasable programmable read only memory
(EEPROM) for storing configuration parameters. Plug-in sockets are provided for the FlashPAC
module. The ROC requires a FlashPAC to operate.
The Operator Interface connector provides direct communications between the ROC and the serial port
of an operator interface, such as a laptop, to provide access to the functionality of the ROC.
The Display connector links the MCU to an optional Local Display Panel (LDP), also called a Liquid
Crystal Display (LCD) panel. The LDP provides local monitoring of I/O and database parameters using
ROCLINK configuration software. Limited editing of parameter values can be performed with the LDP,
including a reset of the ROC. Refer to Appendix B, Resetting the ROC Using the LDP.
The communications connectors labeled COM1 and COM2 allow access to two optional
communications cards installed on the MCU board. The cards can provide serial data communications,
modem, radio modem, or leased-line modem communications.
The I/O Converter Card connector accommodates the optional I/O Converter Card, which provides 24volt transmitter power in 12-volt systems. The connector uses a jumper when the converter card is not
installed. Refer to Section 5.
The I/O module rack connector provides the connection point for the first I/O module rack. Up to three
additional I/O module racks are installed by plugging into a connector on the previous I/O rack.
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Power fusing is accessible from the front of the MCU. Fuses are used for the input power and auxiliary
power outputs. Terminal blocks provide terminations for the input and auxiliary output power. The
source of auxiliary power is the input power, which can be a nominal 12 or 24 volts, depending on the
setting of jumpers located on the MCU. Refer to Section 2.3.3, Setting Voltage Jumpers in the MCU, on
page 2-8.
Indicators are provided for System Status, ROC Power, and auxiliary power (AUX OUT 1 and AUX
OUT 2). Refer to Section 2.5.1, LED Indicators, on page 2-12.
The MCU is housed in a metal case that protects the electronics from physical damage. For protection
from outdoor environments, the unit must be housed in an approved enclosure.
2.2.2 FlashPAC Module
The FlashPAC module contains the operating system, the applications firmware, and communications
protocol, as well as memory storage for history logs and user programs. A FlashPAC module contains
512 kilobytes of flash read-only memory (ROM) and 512 kilobytes of battery-backed Static Random
Access Memory (SRAM). A FlashPAC module is required for the ROC to operate. Back-up power for
the RAM is provided by a self-contained lithium battery. Figure 2-2 shows a FlashPAC module.
The applications firmware consists of functions contained in flash ROM such as:
♦ AGA3 (1985 and 1992 algorithms) and AGA7 Flow Calculations, with metric conversion.
♦ PID (Proportional, Integral, and Derivative) Loop Control.
♦ Support for Function Sequence Tables (FSTs).
♦ Communications Enhancement (dial-up Spontaneous-Report-by-Exception (SRBX) alarming).
♦ Local Display Panel Enhancement (database point monitoring along with configuration access).
♦ Radio Power Control (FlashPAC Version 2.1 or greater).
FLASHPAC
W20217X0012
ROC300 SERIES
------------VER: 2.10
PATENT 5339425
®
DOC0292A
Figure 2-2. Typical FlashPAC Module
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The firmware is programmed into flash memory at the factory, but can be reprogrammed in the field.
The application programs are configured by using ROCLINK configuration software including user
programs, such as the Modbus communications protocol.
When used with ROCLINK configuration software, a FlashPAC module can save a configuration to
disk as an .FCF file and later restore these configuration files into a ROC.
The RAM in a FlashPAC can store 87 history points, each holding 35 days of hourly values. Besides
storing history data, the RAM in a FlashPAC stores user program data. The flash ROM portion of the
FlashPAC is programmed with firmware at the factory and can store user programs downloaded through
a communications port.
Table 2-1, ROC Memory Map, on page 2-4 shows how the ROC memory is allocated. Each memory
location range (for example, 00000 to 1FFFF) represents 128 kilobytes of memory.
Determining FlashPAC Version
To determine the version of a FlashPAC, use ROCLINK configuration software. Select ROC >
Information > Other Information > Version Name, which contains the part and version numbers.
NOTE: The version may have been updated by a download of upgrade firmware into the module,
so the label on the actual FlashPAC module might not be accurate.
Table 2-1. ROC Memory Map
Memory Location
00000 to 1FFFF
20000 to 3FFFF
40000 to 5FFFF
60000 to 7FFFF
80000 to 81FFF
88000 to 9FFFF
A0000 to BFFFF
C0000 to DFFFF
E0000 to FFFFF
FlashPAC
Base RAM
RAM in FlashPAC
RAM in FlashPAC
RAM in FlashPAC
EEPROM (on-board)
Flash ROM
RAM in FlashPAC
Flash ROM
Flash ROM
Usage
Alarm Log, Event Log, and such.
History Data Area, part is for scratch-pad memory in FlashPAC
History Data Area
History Data in FlashPAC
User Configuration Data
Operating System and Applications
User Program Data in FlashPAC
User Program Code in FlashPAC
Operating System Firmware
2.2.3 Diagnostic Inputs and Auxiliary Outputs
The ROC364 MCU monitors the power input voltages, transmitter output voltage, and the board temperature
with diagnostic Analog Inputs designated as “E” points by the configuration software. The inputs can be
calibrated by using ROCLINK configuration software. Two auxiliary Discrete Outputs are also available.
The diagnostic Analog Inputs and auxiliary Discrete Outputs are:
♦ Transmitter supply output voltage – Point Number E1.
♦ Power input voltage – Point Number E2.
♦ Auxiliary Discrete Output #1 – Point Number E3.
♦ Auxiliary Discrete Output #2 – Point Number E4.
♦ MCU board temperature – Point Number E5.
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2.2.4 I/O Module Rack
The I/O module rack provides sockets for up to 16 I/O modules. Refer to Figure 2-3. Up to 64 I/O
modules can be used in any combination of Discrete Inputs, Discrete Outputs, Analog Inputs, Analog
Outputs, and Pulse Inputs. A minimum of one rack is required for any ROC connected to field I/O, and a
maximum of four racks can be accommodated. The first rack plugs directly into the I/O module rack
connector on the bottom edge of the MCU. Additional racks plug into each other.
MODULE RACK
2
1
A
B
C
A
B C
3
A
B C
5
4
A
B
C
A
B C
6
A
B
7
C
A
B
9
8
C
A
B C
A
A
B
®
11
10
C
A
B
C
A
B C
GND
13
12
A
B C
A
B C
15
14
A
B C
A
B
16
C
A
B
C
GND
DOC0030C
Figure 2-3. I/O Module Rack
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2.2.5 Backplate
The ROC364 backplate is a mounting panel for an MCU and one or more I/O module racks. Backplates
are available in three sizes to accommodate the indicated number of I/O racks: one rack, two racks, and
three or four racks. Refer to Figure 2-4 for dimensions of the various backplates.
DIM E
DIM C
DIM F
DIM A
DIM
Maximum I/O Points
16
32
64
A
B
C
D
12.40
11.34
13.34
13.12
11.60
21.46
13.00
22.26
11.25
28.58
12.25
29.38
E
F
G
3.94
.38
NO.10
3.94
.38
5/16
4.06
.50
5/16
DIM B
DIM D
DIM = Dimensions in inches
DOC0243A
DIM G
MOUNTING STUD SIZE
Figure 2-4. Backplate and Mounting Dimensions
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2.3 Installation
Component installation is normally performed at the factory when the ROC is ordered. However, the
modular design of the ROC makes it easy to install and to change hardware configurations in the field as
required. The following procedures describe installation of a ROC.
If you are installing the ROC364 into a ROC enclosure, fasten the backplate to the mounting studs or
tapped mounting holes provided in the enclosure. If you installing the ROC364 on a wall panel or in
some other enclosure, refer to Figure 2-4 for the recommended size and location of mounting studs.
For ROC364 units that are currently in service, you must take certain precautions to ensure data is not
lost, equipment is not damaged, and personnel are not exposed to electrical hazards. Refer to Section
2.5, Troubleshooting and Repair, on page 2-12.
When installing units in a hazardous area, ensure that the components selected are labeled for use
in such areas. Change components only in an area known to be non-hazardous. Performing these
procedures in a hazardous area could result in personal injury or property damage.
To add I/O modules, refer to Section 3. To add a communications card, refer to Section 4. To install
accessories for use with the ROC, refer to the ROC/ROC Accessories Instruction Manual (Form A4637).
2.3.1 Mounting the Master Controller Unit to a Backplate
The Master Controller Unit (MCU) and I/O module rack(s) mount to a factory-supplied backplate,
which can be mounted inside an enclosure. The backplates are pre-drilled and tapped to accept the MCU
and one to four I/O module racks. Refer to Figure 2-4.
Equipment and Tools Required: Flat-blade (1/8-inch wide) screwdriver
To mount the MCU to a backplate:
1. Make sure the proper size backplate is being used for the number of I/O module racks
to be installed.
2. Locate the alignment screws on the backplate and place the keyhole slots, located on the base of
the MCU, over the screw heads.
3. Slide the MCU over the alignment screws and secure in place with two 8-32 × 1 inch and
two 8-32 × 2.25 inch screws.
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2.3.2 Mounting an I/O Module Rack to a Backplate
Each I/O module rack has a male and female connector on opposite sides of the rack. The first I/O module
rack plugs directly into the MCU I/O module rack connector. Additional racks plug into each other.
Equipment and Tools Required: Flat-blade (1/8-inch wide) screwdriver
To mount one or more I/O module racks to a backplate:
1. Insert the connector located on the edge of the first rack into the mating connector of the MCU.
2. Align the rack with the mounting holes in the backplate and secure in place with five 6-32 × 0.75
inch machine screws. Refer to Figure 2-4.
3. If a second rack is required, insert the edge connector of the second rack into the edge connector
of the first rack.
4. Align the rack with the mounting holes in the backplate and secure in place with five 6-32 × 0.75
inch machine screws.
2.3.3 Setting Voltage Jumpers in the MCU
The MCU board contains a set of three jumpers to select the nominal input voltage of either 12 or 24
volts. The factory default setting is for 12-volt operation.
Equipment and Tools Required: None
To access the jumpers, proceed as follows:
1. Remove the screws holding the upper MCU cover in place, and lift off the cover.
2. Unplug any terminal blocks, connectors, and FlashPACs.
3. Remove the two screws securing the lower MCU cover, and lift off this cover as well.
4. Position ALL jumpers P1, P2, and P3 in either the 12-volt or 24-volt position, depending on the
nominal value of the ROC input voltage. The jumpers are located just to the right of the Power
Status indicators.
NOTE: The 12 and 24 volt designations indicate nominal voltage values only. When
connected for 12-volt operation, the actual input voltage required for the ROC to start up is
12.5 volts dc. Once powered up, the minimum voltage required to sustain operation (lowvoltage cut-off) is 10.8 volts dc. Likewise, when connected for 24-volt operation, the start-up
voltage required is 25 volts dc, and the low-voltage cut-off is 21.4 volts dc.
5. Replace the covers, screws, connectors, and FlashPAC.
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2.3.4 Installing a FlashPAC Module
Use the following procedure to add a FlashPAC module. This procedure assumes the first-time
installation of a FlashPAC module in an out-of-service ROC. For an in-service ROC, refer to the Section
2.5.10, Replacing a FlashPAC, on page 2-16.
Equipment and Tools Required: None
When working on units located in a hazardous area (where explosive gases may be present), make
sure the area is in a non-hazardous state before performing these procedures. Performing these
procedures in a hazardous area could result in personal injury or property damage.
1. Remove the FlashPAC module retainer by unscrewing the two thumbscrews and sliding the
retainer straight out.
2. Remove and discard the foam insert that blocks the unused slot in the retainer.
Before installing a FlashPAC module, make sure the module connector pins are not bent. Bent
pins can damage the mating connector. Do not attempt to straighten bent pins; instead, replace
the module.
3. Align the key on the module socket with the key of the MCU socket; in this position, the “F” of
“FlashPAC” on the label should be closest to the I/O terminals.
4. Carefully insert the module in the socket and press it in firmly, but gently to seat the module. The
module should move inward slightly. Verify that the module is seated in the connector by gently
lifting up on the module. If it comes out easily, repeat the process.
5. Carefully position the retainer over the FlashPAC, and tighten the thumbscrews. Make sure that
the sloped surface of the retainer is down.
2.4 Connecting the MCU to Wiring
The following paragraphs describe how to connect the ROC to power, ground, and communications
wiring. For connections to I/O modules, refer to Section 3. To wire a communications card, refer to
Section 4.
The power and I/O wiring terminal blocks accept up to 12-gauge AWG solid or stranded copper wire.
NOTE: Use a standard screwdriver with a slotted (flat bladed) 1/8-inch width tip when wiring all
terminal blocks.
2.4.1 Connecting Ground Wiring
Equipment Required: Flat-blade (1/8-inch wide) screwdriver
The ROC and related components must be connected to earth ground. These include the MCU,
I/O module racks, system I/O devices, and the system power source. Each component connects to
earth ground (typically an enclosure ground bar) using the grounding screw provided. The components
should be linked using an 18 AWG or greater conductor. The earth ground wire from the ROC enclosure
ground bar to ground should be at least 12 AWG.
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Ground wiring requirements are governed by the National Electrical Code (NEC) code or other
applicable codes. Excerpts from the NEC code are contained in Section 1, General Information.
For the ROC, connect the GND terminal on the power connector (Figure 2-5) to the enclosure ground
with 12 AWG wire. The enclosure ground must be connected to an appropriate ground rod or grid.
2.4.2 Connecting Main Power Wiring
Equipment Required: Flat-blade (1/8-inch wide) screwdriver
Power connections to the ROC are made at the Master Controller Unit (MCU) through plug-in terminal
blocks. Refer to Figure 2-5. It is important good wiring practice be used when sizing, routing, and
connecting power wiring. All wiring must conform to state, local, and NEC codes.
The power terminal blocks can accommodate a wide range of wire gauges up to 12 AWG. Use 18 AWG
wire or larger for all power wiring.
Use the DC PWR IN +/– terminals to connect the ROC to a DC power source. Before making
connections, make sure the voltage selection jumpers are in the proper position for the voltage
being used, and the hook-up polarity is correct. Refer to Section 2.3.3, Setting Voltage Jumpers in the
MCU, on page 2-8.
The input power (DC PWR IN +/–) is fused at 2 amps by slow-blow fuse (F1), which is accessible
through the front panel and by a 3-amp fuse located on the MCU board. Refer to Section 2.5.3,
Replacing Fuses, on page 2-14.
DC PWR
IN
AUX PWR
OUT 1
+
+
GND
AUX PWR
OUT 2
DOC0123A
Figure 2-5. Power Wiring Connections
2.4.3 Connecting Auxiliary Power Wiring
The AUX PWR OUT 1 and AUX PWR OUT 2 terminals provide switched power from the DC PWR IN
terminals to an external device, such as a radio. The AUX PWR OUT 1 and 2 terminals are switched
independently of each other under software control. Both sets of terminals are disabled if the watchdog
timer times out. The watchdog timer resets the system when power voltage is not met or exceeds the
limitations of the ROC. The two sets of AUX PWR OUT 2 terminals are internally connected in
parallel. The output voltage and current supplied by these terminals is specified in Section 2.6, ROC364
Specifications, on page 2-20.
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The switches employed in the auxiliary outputs are solid-state relays and exhibit a voltage drop
proportional to the current load, typically in the range of 0 to 2 volts dc. The relays can be controlled
automatically using an FST that has been set up to determine the switching conditions. If a FlashPAC is
installed, the auxiliary outputs are switched by using the Status parameter of Discrete Output Point
Number E3 or E4. An LED indicator for each output is activated when the respective output is
energized.
The AUX PWR OUT 1 and AUX PWR OUT 2 terminals are fused at 5 amps by fuses F2 and F3, which
are accessible on the front panel. Refer to Section 2.5.3, Replacing Fuses, on page 2-14.
2.4.4 Connecting Communications Wiring
The ROC has the flexibility to communicate to external devices using several different formats and
protocols. Connectors located on the front panel of the ROC provide both Operator Interface
and data communications.
The Local Operator Interface (LOI) connector is a serial EIA-232 (RS-232) port for communications to
a configuration and monitoring device. This device is typically a personal computer. A null modem
cable (wires to pins 2, 3, and 5, with the wires between pins 2 and 3 cross-connected) is normally used
between the Operator Interface connector and the PC. Figure 2-6 shows the wiring for this port.
Figure 2-6. Operator Interface Connector Wiring Schematic
The Display connector is a parallel port for dedicated communications to an optional Local Display
Panel. The cable supplied with the Local Display Panel plugs into this connector. Refer to Appendix B.
Two data communications ports, labeled COM1 and COM2 on the front of the MCU, are activated
through optional plug-in communications cards. Section 4 details the types of communications cards
available and has information on connecting wiring to the COM1 and COM2 connectors.
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2.5 Troubleshooting and Repair
The troubleshooting and repair procedures help identify and replace faulty boards, fuses, and
FlashPACs. Refer to Section 3 for troubleshooting I/O modules or Section 4 for troubleshooting and
replacing a communications card. Return faulty boards and FlashPACs to your local sales representative
for repair or replacement.
The following tools are required for troubleshooting:
♦ IBM-compatible personal computer.
♦ ROCLINK configuration software.
♦ Digital multimeter, Fluke 8060A or equivalent.
2.5.1 LED Indicators
The Light-emitting diode (LED) indicators, located on the front panel of the MCU, give a first-level
indication of the operation of the ROC. Figure 2-7 shows the location of the indicators and Table 2-2
describes them.
The primary indicator that the MCU is operating normally is the System Status indicator. This indicator
should light within a few seconds after power is applied, and then remain lit. If the System Status
indicator does not remain lit, refer to Table 2-2 for possible causes.
SYSTEM
STATUS
POWER
AUX OUT 1
AUX OUT 2
DOC0122A
Figure 2-7. MCU Status Indicators
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Table 2-2. MCU LED Indicators
Indicator
LED
On
POWER
Off
On
SYSTEM
STATUS
Blinking
Off
AUX OUT 1
AUX OUT 2
On
Off
On
Off
Meaning
Power is applied to the MCU.
MCU does not have power. Possible causes are:
♦ Power not present at power terminals.
♦ Power switch is off if so equipped (older units only).
♦ Defective power switch (older units only).
♦ Fuse F1 is open.
♦ Fuse F4 is open.
♦ Polarity reversed.
Successful startup and the processor is running.
♦ Processor is not running and the controller is attempting to restart.
♦ Possible low battery or bad FlashPAC.
If the POWER indicator is on, indicates insufficient voltage is available to power up
the MCU.
System voltage is present at the AUX PWR OUT 1 terminals.
Fuse F2 is open or the output has been disabled by the software.
System voltage is present at the AUX PWR OUT 2 terminals.
Fuse F3 is open or the output has been disabled by the software.
2.5.2 RAM Backup Procedure using ROCLINK Configuration Software
Before removing power to the ROC, perform the following procedure to avoid losing the ROC
configuration and other data stored in RAM.
User programs cannot be saved out of the ROC. Reload user programs from their original disk files as
instructed in the ROCLINK for Windows Configuration Software User Manual (Form A6091) or the
ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software User Manual (Form A6121).
When installing devices in a hazardous area, make sure each device is labeled for use in such
areas. Procedures involving switching power on or off, or procedures for installing or removing
any wiring or components, must be performed only when the area is known to be non-hazardous.
Performance of these procedures in a hazardous area could result in personal injury or property
damage.
To avoid circuit damage when working with the ROC, use appropriate electrostatic discharge
precautions, such as wearing a grounded wrist strap.
1. Save the current configuration data by selecting ROC > Flags > Write to EEPROM or Flash
Memory Save Configuration. This action saves most of the ROC configuration (but not logs or
FST programs) into the permanent memory accessed when a Cold Start is performed.
2. Save the current configuration data to disk by using the Download > Save ROC Configuration
To Disk function. When replacing or upgrading a FlashPAC, the only way to preserve
configuration data is to save the data to disk and then retrieve the information after the FlashPAC
is installed.
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3. Save all historical database logs (Minute, Hourly, and Daily), Event Log, and Alarm Log to disk
using ROC > Collect Data “All” function as explained in the applicable ROCLINK
configuration software user manual.
4. Save the FSTs to disk using Utilities > FST Editor > FST > Write function in the FST Editor.
Refer to the FST Editor in the applicable configuration software user manual.
2.5.3 Replacing Fuses
The types of fuses used for the ROC364 and their rating values are listed in Table 2-3.
Table 2-3. ROC Fuses
Fuse
F1
F2
F3
F4
Rating
2 A, 32 Volt Slow Blow
5 A, 32 Volt Fast Acting
5 A, 32 Volt Fast Acting
3 A, Bussman GFA 3
Use
Main Power Input
Auxiliary Power Output 1
Auxiliary Power Output 2
Main Power Input (Safety)
Fuses F1, F2, and F3 are accessible from the MCU front panel. Fuse F4 is located on the MCU board and is
accessible only by removing the upper MCU cover. In most cases, a visual inspection of the fuses indicate if
they are open (blown). If in doubt, use a digital multimeter to check for continuity.
To remove fuses F1, F2, or F3 for inspection or replacement, proceed as follows:
1. Disconnect the ROC from its power source.
2. Insert a screwdriver into the slot in the fuse holder cap and rotate counterclockwise 1/4 turn.
3. Remove the screwdriver. The cap and fuse will spring out. Remove the fuse from the cap.
Reverse steps 1, 2, and 3 to install the fuse.
Fuse F4 is soldered to the MCU board. Removal and replacement of fuse F4 is normally performed at
the factory, since it requires removal of the MCU board from its housing. Refer to Section 2.5.12,
Removing and Replacing the MCU Assembly, on page 2-19.
2.5.4 Verifying Battery Voltage
Equipment Required: Voltmeter
The on-board RAM and the real-time clock receive backup power from Battery B1. Battery B1 is a 3.6volts lithium battery, with an expected life of 5 to 10 years. If the ROC is powered down for extended
periods, this may shorten the life of the battery. In older ROC units, Battery B1 is soldered onto the main
circuit board.
A blinking Status LED may be an indication of a bad battery.
To check the battery voltage:
1. Remove power from the ROC.
2. Remove the FlashPAC module as described in Section 2.5.10 on page 2-16.
3. Remove the cover.
4. Remove the communications cards if necessary.
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5. Remove the battery located at B1 on the top right of the MCU.
6. Measure the voltage of the terminals of the removed battery.
7. If the voltage reading is less than 3.6 volts, the battery must be replaced. Refer to Section 2.5.11,
Replacing the Battery, on page 2-18.
If the battery in soldered-in, replacement requires the removal of the MCU board from the housing, and
then the MCU assembly should be returned to your local sales representative for this action. Refer to
Section 2.5.12, Removing and Replacing the MCU Assembly, on page 2-19.
2.5.5 Verifying the ROC can Communicate with the PC
Equipment Required: Personal computer with ROCLINK configuration software installed
To verify that the ROC is communicating with the PC running ROCLINK configuration software:
1. Connect the ROC to the PC and launch ROCLINK configuration software.
2. If the ROC is communicating with ROCLINK configuration software, COM1, COM2, COM3,
or COM4 displays in the lower right corner of the screen.
2.5.6 Verifying RAM
Equipment Required: Personal computer with ROCLINK configuration software installed.
To detect bad RAM:
1. Connect the ROC to ROCLINK configuration software.
2. Select ROC > Information > Other Information tab and verify that RAM Installed is labeled
PRESENT.
The problem could be a bad backup battery or a bad solder joint of the RAM chip.
2.5.7 Performing a Warm Start
A Warm Start temporarily suspends all input/output (I/O) scanning. I/O processes are restarted from
their last calculated values. A Warm Start clears and restarts all user-enabled flags. A Warm Start also
starts all FSTs to the first instruction.
NOTE: If your ROC is semi-functional, refer to Section 2.5.2, RAM Backup Procedure, on page
2-13 before removing power from your ROC.
To perform a Warm Start using the configuration software:
1. Connect the ROC to the PC running ROCLINK configuration software.
2. Click ROC > Flags > Warm Start and click Apply.
To perform a Warm Start using the power option:
1. Remove power from your ROC.
2. Reapply power to the ROC.
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2.5.8 Performing a Cold Start
A Cold Start allows you to reset your ROC based on the selected option.
NOTE: If your ROC is semi-functional, refer to Section 2.5.2, RAM Backup Procedure, on page
2-13 before removing power from your ROC.
To perform a Cold Start:
1. Connect the ROC to ROCLINK configuration software.
2. Select ROC > Flags.
3. Select the Cold Start checkbox.
4. Click the Cold Start Options button.
5. Select the appropriate option and click OK.
2.5.9 Performing a Reset
When you have tried the previous methods for convincing your ROC to cooperate and all other
troubleshooting procedures have failed, perform a reset before returning your ROC to the factory.
A reset returns the ROC’s configuration of I/O points, PID, AGA points, communication
parameters, system variables, Opcode tables, ROC Displays, and LCD displays to their default
values. This reset sets the FST run flags to zero, clears all Alarm and Event Logs, and clears all
User Programs.
NOTE: If your ROC is semi-functional, refer to Section 2.5.2, RAM Backup Procedure, on page
2-13 before removing power from your ROC.
1. Connect your ROC to a computer running ROCLINK configuration software.
2. Select Utilities > Download User Programs or User Program Administrator.
3. Clear all user programs (Clear All) and click OK or Update.
4. Select ROC > Flags.
5. Select the Clear EEPROM checkbox or click Flash Memory Clear and click Apply.
6. Select the Cold Start checkbox.
7. Click the Cold Start Options button.
8. Select the Restore Config & Clear All of the Above (Cold Start & Clear All) radio button and
click OK.
NOTE: Refer to Appendix B, Resetting the ROC Using the LDP.
2.5.10 Replacing a FlashPAC
Equipment Required: Personal computer with ROCLINK configuration software installed
A faulty FlashPAC module can be suspected if the:
♦ Status LED is blinking.
♦ ROC is not communicating.
♦ Data is being corrupted.
2-16
♦ RAM fails to show up in ROCLINK configuration software as
being installed.
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ROC364 Instruction Manual
To replace a FlashPAC module:
When repairing units in a hazardous area, change components only in an area known to be nonhazardous.
There is a possibility of losing the ROC configuration and historical data held in RAM while
performing the following procedure. As a precaution, save the current configuration and
historical data to permanent memory as instructed in Section 2.5.2, RAM Backup Procedure, on
page 2-13.
During this procedure, all power is removed from the ROC and devices powered by the ROC.
Ensure all connected input devices, output devices, and processes remain in a safe state when
power is removed from the ROC and when power is restored to the ROC.
1. Back up your RAM to avoid losing data. Refer to Section 2.5.2, RAM Backup Procedure, on
page 2-13.
2. Remove power by unplugging the block on the power terminal block.
3. Lift up on the FlashPAC to be replaced and remove it from the socket.
Before installing a new FlashPAC module, make sure the FlashPAC connector pins are straight.
Bent pins can damage the mating connector. Do not attempt to straighten bent pins; instead,
replace the FlashPAC.
4. Align the key on the FlashPAC socket with the key of the MCU socket. Carefully insert the
FlashPAC module in the socket and press it in firmly, but gently to seat the FlashPAC. The
FlashPAC should move inward slightly. Verify that the FlashPAC is seated into the connector by
gently lifting up on the FlashPAC. If it comes out easily, repeat the process.
5. Slide the retainer over the FlashPAC module and tighten the thumbscrews. Make sure that the
sloped surface of the retainer is down.
6. Plug in the five-terminal connector to restore power. A Cold Start using EEPROM, Internal
Config Memory, or Flash Memory values automatically occurs and may take a few seconds.
7. Using ROCLINK configuration software, check the configuration data including ROC Displays
and FSTs, and load or modify them as required. In addition, load and start any user programs as
needed.
8. Verify that the ROC performs as required.
9. If you changed the configuration, save the current configuration data to memory by selecting
ROC > Flags > Write to EEPROM or Flash Memory Save Configuration as instructed in the
applicable ROCLINK configuration software user manual.
10. If you changed the configuration including the history database, ROC Displays, or FSTs, save
them to disk.
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2.5.11 Replacing the Battery
This section details how to replace the ROC battery.
When repairing units in a hazardous area, change components only in an area known to be nonhazardous.
There is a possibility of losing the ROC configuration and historical data held in RAM while
performing the following procedure. As a precaution, save the current configuration and
historical data to permanent memory as instructed in Section 2.5.2, RAM Backup Procedure, on
page 2-13.
During this procedure, all power is removed from the ROC and devices powered by the ROC.
Ensure all connected input devices, output devices, and processes remain in a safe state when
power is removed from the ROC and when power is restored to the ROC.
1. Back up your RAM to avoid losing data. Refer to Section 2.5.2, RAM Backup Procedure, on
page 2-13.
2. Remove power from the ROC at the power terminal plug in.
3. Remove the screws from the front cover of the ROC.
4. Remove the screw from the communications cards if necessary.
5. Remove the communications cards.
6. Remove the old battery from the other battery socket (B1) by sliding the hold-down clip to one
side and lifting the battery from the MCU board. If the clip does not readily rotate, you may need
to loosen the screw that secures the hold-down clip.
7. Install the new battery and tighten the clip.
8. Replace the communications card.
9. Replace the communications card’s screw.
10. Replace the second communications card if necessary.
11. Replace the front cover and screws.
12. Reconnect power to the ROC by plugging in the power terminal connector.
13. Using ROCLINK configuration software, check the configuration data including ROC Displays
and FSTs, and load or modify them as required. In addition, load and start any user programs as
needed.
14. Verify that the ROC performs as required.
15. If you changed the configuration, save the current configuration data to memory by selecting
ROC > Flags > Write to EEPROM or Flash Memory Save Configuration as instructed in the
applicable ROCLINK configuration software user manual.
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2.5.12 Removing and Replacing the MCU Assembly
Remove and replace the MCU assembly as instructed in the following procedure.
When repairing units in a hazardous area, change components only in an area known to be nonhazardous.
There is a possibility of losing the ROC configuration and historical data held in RAM while
performing the following procedure. As a precaution, save the current configuration and
historical data to permanent memory as instructed in Section 2.5.2, RAM Backup Procedure, on
page 2-13.
During this procedure, all power is removed from the ROC and devices powered by the ROC.
Ensure all connected input devices, output devices, and processes remain in a safe state when
power is removed from the ROC and when power is restored to the ROC.
1. Unplug the power connector from the ROC.
2. Unplug all connectors and terminal blocks from the MCU.
3. Loosen the screws that secure the MCU case to the ROC backplate.
4. Move the MCU up to disengage it from the I/O module rack and to slide two keyhole slots in the
case backplate into position to fit over the heads of concealed alignment screws. Then lift the
MCU away from the ROC backplate.
5. If you are reasonably sure the FlashPAC modules are functioning (keep in mind all RAM is
normally cleared during factory servicing), you can remove them by unscrewing the two
thumbscrews of their retainer and gently pulling each one from its socket.
6. The MCU must be returned as an assembly (the MCU board must remain in the metal case) to
your local sales representative for repair. If the ROC is equipped with one or two
communications cards, the cards can be removed if desired before returning the MCU assembly.
Follow the applicable procedure in Section 4 for removing these cards.
7. To install a new or repaired MCU assembly, reverse the procedure used for removal in the
previous steps.
8. Reconnect power to the ROC by plugging in the power terminal block.
9. Using ROCLINK configuration software, check the configuration data including ROC Displays
and FSTs, and load or modify them as required. In addition, load and start any user programs as
needed.
10. Verify that the ROC performs as required.
11. If you changed the configuration, save the current configuration data to memory by selecting
ROC > Flags > Write to EEPROM or Flash Memory Save Configuration as instructed in the
applicable ROCLINK configuration software user manual. Also, if you changed the
configuration including the history database, ROC Displays, or FSTs, save them to disk.
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2.6 ROC364 Specifications
ROC364 Specifications
PROCESSOR MEMORY
NEC V25+ running at 8 MHz.
On-Board: 128 KB battery-backed SRAM for data.
32 KB EEPROM for configuration.
FlashPAC: Plug-in module with 512 KB Flash readonly memory (ROM) and 512 KB of battery-backed
static RAM (SRAM).
Memory Reset: Optional LDP permits a cold start
initialization when used during power-up.
I/O CAPACITY
Up to 16 I/O channels per Module Rack. Up to 4
Module Racks (64 I/O channels) per MCU.
OPERATOR INTERFACE PORT
EIA-232D (RS-232D) serial format for use with
portable operator interface. Baud is selectable from
300 to 19,200 bps. Asynchronous format, 7 or 8-bit
(software selectable). Parity can be odd, even, or
none (software selectable). 9-pin, female D-shell
connector provided.
TIME FUNCTIONS
Clock Type: 32 kHz crystal oscillator with regulated
supply, battery-backed. Year/Month/Day and
Hour/Minute/Second.
Clock Accuracy: 0.01%.
Watchdog Timer: Hardware monitor expires after
1.2 seconds and resets the processor. Processor
restart is automatic.
DIAGNOSTICS
These values are monitored: real-time clock/system
clock compare, AI module mid-scale voltage, DI
module default status, AO module D/A voltage, DO
module latch value, I/O transmitter voltage, power
input voltage, MCU board temperature.
POWER REQUIREMENTS
11 to 16 V dc (12.5 V to start up) or 22 to 30 V dc
(25 V to start up), jumper selectable. 1 Watt typical,
excluding I/O power.
AUXILIARY OUTPUT POWER
Input power is software switched to two sets of
auxiliary output power terminals. Each output fused
for 5 A maximum. Output voltage is 0 to 2 V dc less
than input voltage, depending on load.
2-20
I/O POWER CONVERTER (OPTIONAL)
Input: 11 to 16 V dc, 15 mA with no load or shorted
output.
Output: 22 to 24 V dc, up to 0.6 A for transmitter
power.
ENVIRONMENTAL
Operating Temperature: –40° to 70°C (–40° to
158°F).
Storage Temperature: –50° to 85°C (–58° to
185°F).
Operating Humidity: To 95%, non-condensing.
Transient Protection: Meets IEEE C37.90.1-1989.
EMI Immunity: Meets EN61000-4-5 Performance
Criterion B for Industrial Locations.
EMI Emissions: Meets FCC 47 CFR, Part 15,
Subpart J, Class A verified.
DIMENSIONS
MCU: 51 mm D by 203 mm H by 305 mm W (2 in.
D by 8 in. H by 12 in. W). Add 38 mm (1.5 in.) to
depth dimension for memory modules.
Module Rack: 13 mm D by 127 mm H by 305 mm
D (0.5 in. D by 5 in. H by 12 in. W).
MCU w/one Module Rack: 311 mm W by 356 mm
H (12.25 in. W by 14 in. H).
MCU w/two Module Racks: 311 mm W by 565
mm H (12.25 in. W by 22.25 in. H).
MCU w/three or four Module Racks: 311 mm W
by 743 mm H (12.25 in. W by 29.25 in. H).
WEIGHT
MCU: 2.3 kg (5 lbs) nominal.
Module Rack: 0.5 kg (1 lb) nominal.
Backplate: 1.4 to 3 kg (3 to 6.5 lbs).
ENCLOSURE
MCU metal chassis with 2-piece cover and Module
Rack case meet NEMA 1 rating.
BACKPLATE
16 gauge steel.
APPROVALS
Approved by CSA for hazardous locations Class I,
Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D.
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ROC364 Instruction Manual
SECTION 3 – INPUT AND OUTPUT MODULES
3.1 Scope
This section describes the Input/Output (I/O) Modules used with the ROC364 Remote Operations
Controller (ROC).
This section contains the following information:
Section
3.1 Scope
3.2 Product Descriptions
3.3 Initial Installation and Setup
3.4 Connecting the I/O Modules to Wiring
3.5 Troubleshooting and Repair
3.6 Removal, Addition, and Replacement Procedures
3.7 I/O Module Specifications
Page
3-1
3-1
3-5
3-5
3-21
3-28
3-30
3.2 Product Descriptions
The I/O modules plug into the ROC364 I/O module rack sockets and accommodate a wide range of
process inputs and outputs. The I/O module rack provides sockets for up to 16 I/O modules. Up to 64
I/O modules can be used in any combination of Discrete Inputs, Discrete Outputs, Analog Inputs,
Analog Outputs, and Pulse Inputs. A minimum of one rack is required for any ROC connected to field
I/O, and a maximum of four racks can be accommodated. The first rack plugs directly into the I/O
module rack connector on the bottom edge of the MCU. Additional racks plug into each other.
The following modules are available:
♦ Analog Input (AI) Loop
♦ Discrete Output (DO) Relay
♦ Analog Input (AI) Differential
♦ Pulse Input (PI) Source
♦ Analog Input (AI) Source
♦ Pulse Input (PI) Isolated
♦ Analog Output (AO) Source
♦ Slow Pulse Input (SPI) Source
♦ Discrete Input (DI) Source
♦ Slow Pulse Input (SPI) Isolated
♦ Discrete Input (DI) Isolated
♦ Low-Level Pulse Input (LLPI)
♦ Discrete Output (DO) Source
♦ Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD) Input
♦ Discrete Output (DO) Isolated
♦ Highway Addressable Remote Transducer (HART®)
Interface
Below each I/O module socket is a plug-in terminal block for field wiring connections. The plug-in
terminal blocks permit removal and replacement of the modules without the need to disconnect field
wiring. I/O wiring terminal blocks accept up to 12-gauge American Wire Gauge (AWG) solid or
stranded copper wire. Figure 3-1 shows a typical I/O module.
NOTE: Use a standard screwdriver with a slotted (flat bladed) 1/8-inch width tip when wiring all
terminal blocks.
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STATIC
SENSITIVE
DOC0034C
Figure 3-1. Typical I/O Module
3.2.1 Analog Input Loop and Differential Modules
The Analog Input Loop (AI Loop) and Analog Input Differential (AI Differential) modules are used for
monitoring current loop and voltage output devices. Each AI module uses a scaling resistor for scaling
loop current to achieve the proper input voltage.
The AI Loop module provides a source voltage for powering current loop devices and can be used as a
single-ended voltage output. The AI Differential module monitors loop current or voltage input from
externally-powered devices and provides electrical isolation from the ROC power supplies.
3.2.2 Analog Input Source Module
The Analog Input Source (AI Source) module monitors current loop or voltage output devices. The
Analog Input Source module provides a regulated 10-volts source for powering a device, usually a low
power transmitter, and uses a scaling resistor for converting loop current to input voltage.
3.2.3 Analog Output Source Module
The Analog Output Source (AO Source) module provides both a current and a voltage output for
powering analog devices. These outputs are isolated from each other and can be used simultaneously. A
scaling resistor provides a way to set the minimum loop resistance of the current loop to 0 ohms
(installed) or 220 ohms (removed).
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3.2.4 Discrete Input Source and Isolated Modules
The Discrete Input Source (DI Source) and Discrete Input Isolated (DI Isolated) modules monitor the
status of relays, solid-state switches, or other two-state devices. Each module can accommodate one DI.
Both types of modules provide an LED that lights when the input is active. Both types of modules use a
scaling resistor for scaling the input range. Functions supported by both modules are: Latched Discrete
Input, Standard Discrete Input, and Time-Duration Input (TDI).
The DI Source module provides a source voltage for dry relay contacts or for an open-collector solidstate switch. The DI Isolated module accepts an external voltage from a powered two-state device and
provides electrical isolation from the ROC power supplies.
3.2.5 Discrete Output Source and Isolated Modules
The Discrete Output Source (DO Source) and Discrete Output Isolated (DO Isolated) modules provide
two-state outputs to energize relays and power small electrical loads. Each module provides one DO.
Both types of modules provide an LED that lights when the input is active. Both modules are fused for
protection against excessive current. Functions supported by both modules are: Latched Discrete Output,
Toggle Discrete Output, Timed Duration Output (TDO), and TDO Toggle.
The DO Source module supplies switched current-limited power to small loads. The DO Isolated
module acts as a solid-state normally-open switch for activating externally powered devices. The solidstate switch is optically isolated from the power supplies in the ROC.
3.2.6 Discrete Output Relay Module
The Discrete Output Relay (DO Relay) module provides two sets of “dry” relay contacts to switch
voltages of up to 250 volts ac. One set of contacts is normally open and the other set is normally closed.
Two types of relay modules are available, one with a 12 volts dc energizing coil and the other with a 24
volts dc energizing coil.
The DO Relay provides an LED that lights when the input is active and functions supported by the
module include: Latched Discrete Output, Toggle Discrete Output, Timed Duration Output (TDO), and
TDO Toggle.
3.2.7 Pulse Input Source and Isolated Modules
The Pulse Input Source (PI Source) and Pulse Input Isolated (PI Isolated) modules count pulses from
pulse-generating devices. Each module can accommodate one Pulse Input.
Both types of modules provide an LED that lights when the input is active. Both types of modules use a
scaling resistor for scaling the input range. Input pulses are counted by a 16-bit counter capable of
storing up to 6.5 seconds of pulse counts for a 10 kilohertz input signal. Functions supported by both
modules include slow-counter input, slow rate input, fast counter input, and fast rate input.
NOTE: At the maximum input frequency of 10 kilohertz, the input pulses must not exceed 6.5
seconds of pulse counts. The PI module limit is 20 seconds of pulse counts at 3 kilohertz
maximum input frequency.
The PI Source module provides a source voltage for dry relay contacts or for an open-collector solidstate switch. The PI Isolated module accepts an external voltage from a powered device and provides
electrical isolation from the ROC power supplies.
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3.2.8 Slow Pulse Input Source and Isolated Modules
The Slow Pulse Input Source (SPI Source) and Slow Pulse Input Isolated (SPI Isolated) modules count
the changes in the status of relays, solid-state switches, or other two-state devices. Each module can
accommodate one Pulse Input.
The modules provide an LED that lights when the input is active. Both types of modules use a scaling
resistor for scaling the input range. Functions supported are controlled by the ROC firmware. For
example: Raw Pulse Accumulation, Running Total (Entered Rollover) in engineering units (EUs), Rate
(Max Rollover) in EUs, Today’s Total (Max Rollover) in EUs, or Rate Alarm.
The SPI Source module provides a source voltage for dry relay contacts or for an open-collector solidstate switch. The SPI Isolated module accepts an external voltage from a powered two-state device and
provides electrical isolation from the ROC power supplies.
3.2.9 Low-Level Pulse Input Module
The Low-Level Pulse Input module counts pulses from pulse-generating devices having a voltage range
of 30 millivolts to 3 volts peak-to-peak. The module can accommodate one Pulse Input.
Input pulses are counted by a 16-bit counter that is capable of storing up to 22 seconds of pulse counts
for a 3 kilohertz input signal. The module provides electrical isolation between the input pulses and the
ROC power supplies.
3.2.10 RTD Input Module
The Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD) module monitors the temperature signal from an RTD
source. The module can accommodate one input from a two-, three-, or four-wire RTD source.
The active element of an RTD probe is a precision, temperature-dependent resistor, made from a
platinum alloy. It has a predictable positive temperature coefficient, meaning its resistance increases
with temperature. The RTD input module works by supplying a small current to the RTD probe and
measuring the voltage drop across it. Based on the voltage curve of the RTD, the signal is converted to
temperature by the ROC firmware.
3.2.11 HART Interface Module
The HART Interface Module provides communications between a ROC and other devices using the
Highway Addressable Remote Transducer (HART) protocol. The module has its own microprocessor
and mounts in the I/O module sockets.
The HART Interface Module communicates digitally to HART devices through the I/O termination
blocks associated with the module position. Each HART module contains two separate channels. Each
channel polls all HART devices connected to it before the other channel is polled. Each channel can be
configured to operate in either the point-to-point mode or the multi-drop mode. In the point-to-point
mode, each module channel supports one HART device.
In the multi-drop mode, each channel can support up to five HART devices for a total of ten devices for
each module. By using the multi-drop mode with multiple HART modules, up to 32 HART devices
(limited by ROCLINK configuration software) can be supported by a single ROC.
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3.3 Initial Installation and Setup
Each I/O module installs in the ROC in the same manner. Any I/O module can be installed into any I/O
module socket. To install a module on a ROC that is not in service, perform the following steps. For an
in-service ROC, refer to Section 3.5, Troubleshooting and Repair, on page 3-21.
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions (such as wearing a grounded wrist
strap) may reset the processor or damage electronic components, resulting in interrupted
operations.
When preparing a unit for installation into a hazardous area, change components in an area
known to be non-hazardous.
1. Install the I/O module by aligning the pins with the desired I/O module socket and pressing
gently, but straight down.
2. Tighten the module retaining screw.
3. Make sure a field wiring terminal block is installed in the socket adjacent to where the I/O
module was installed. If a Lightning Protection Module is to be installed for this I/O channel,
refer to Appendix A.
3.3.1 Calibrating an I/O Module
After an I/O module is installed, configure, and calibrate the associated I/O channel using ROCLINK
configuration software.
3.4 Connecting the I/O Modules to Wiring
Each I/O module electrically connects to field wiring by a separate plug-in terminal block. In addition,
the ROC enclosures provide a ground bus bar for terminating the sheath on shielded wiring. The
following paragraphs provide information on wiring field devices to each type of I/O module. I/O wiring
terminal blocks accept up to 12-gauge AWG solid or stranded copper wire.
The sheath surrounding shielded wiring should never be connected to a signal ground terminal or
to the common terminal of an I/O module. Doing so makes the I/O module susceptible to static
discharge, which can permanently damage the module. Connect the shielded wiring sheath to a
suitable earth ground only.
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3.4.1 Analog Input Loop Module
The Analog Input Loop module monitors either loop current or output voltage from field devices.
The module provides source power at terminal A for the loop. The AI Loop module operates by
measuring the voltage at terminals B and C. For current loop monitoring, scaling resistor R1 generates a
voltage across terminals B and C that is proportional to the loop current (I). A 250-ohms scaling resistor
(R1) is supplied by the factory (0.1%, 1/8 watts) to accommodate either 0 to 20 milliamps or 4 to 20
milliamps current loop transmitters. This translates to a maximum operating input voltage of 5 volts dc,
which is the upper limit of the module.
When using a transmitter with a maximum current requirement different from 20 milliamps, R1 should
be scaled to achieve full-scale deflection at 5 volts dc. The formula for determining a new value of R1 is
given in Figure 3-2, where “I Maximum” is the upper end of the operating current range, such as 0.025
amps for a 0 to 25 milliamps device.
R1=250
ROC-POWERED
CURRENT LOOP
DEVICE
I
+
-
A
B
C
+T
AI LOOP
I LIMIT
VS
+
-
TO SELECT PROPER VALUE OF R1:
DOC0153J
VS = SOURCE VOLTAGE FROM MODULE = 11 TO 30 VDC, 25 mA MAX
R1 =
5 VOLTS
I MAXIMUM
Figure 3-2. AI Loop Module Field Wiring for Current Loop Devices
Figure 3-3 shows a typical voltage signal input. Terminal B is the “+” signal input and terminal C is the
“–” signal input. These terminals accept a voltage signal in the 0 to 5 volts range. Since terminal C
connects to a signal ground (non-isolated logic ground), the Analog Input must be a single-ended.
Ensure that no scaling resistor (R1) is installed when the module is used to sense a voltage signal.
Figure 3-3. AI Loop Module Field Wiring for Voltage Devices
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3.4.2 Analog Input Differential Module
A schematic representation of the field wiring connections to the input circuit of the Analog Input
Differential module is shown in Figure 3-4, Figure 3-5, and Figure 3-6.
The Analog Input Differential module measures either output voltage (Vo) or loop current (I) from
externally-powered devices only. The module operates by measuring the voltage between field wiring
terminals B and C. The module input is semi-isolated from the ROC power supply and signal commons.
When connecting voltage devices, the 5-volts input voltage limit of the module must not be exceeded. If
the output of the field device is in the range of 0 to 5 volts dc, do not use a scaling resistor; ensure that
the supplied 250-ohms scaling resistor is removed. Refer to Figure 3-4 for connecting field devices with
outputs of 5 volts dc or less.
The voltage cannot be negative. The A to D converter divides the 0 to 5 volts signal into 4095 counts
and the last 95 counts (being 4001 to 4095) represent overvoltage. If you use a 0 to 1 volt input to the
converter, the resolution is reduced, as there are only 800 counts with which to work.
For field devices with output voltages that exceed 5 volts dc, two scaling resistors, R1 and R2, are
required (not supplied). Figure 3-5 shows how to connect field devices with outputs exceeding 5 volts dc
and where to install scaling resistors (at least 1%, 1/8 watts). The equation for determining values of
scaling resistors R1 and R2 is given in Figure 3-5. For example, if VO = 10 volts, and
R1 = 250 ohms, then R2 = 250 ohms. Note that R1 must be less than 4.5 kilohms.
R1 = OPEN
SELF-POWERED
ANALOG VOLTAGE
DEVICE
A
+
B
Vo
C
-
AI DIFF
N/C
+
200K
-
200K
DOC0155A
Vo = VOLTAGE FROM ANALOG DEVICE = 0 TO 5 VDC
Figure 3-4. AI Differential Module Field Wiring for Low Voltage Devices
R1
AI DIFF
N/C
SELF-POWERED
ANALOG VOLTAGE
DEVICE
A
+
Vo
R2
-
B
C
+
200K
-
200K
TO SCALE R1 AND R2 FOR:
DOC0156A
Vo = VOLTAGE FROM ANALOG DEVICE = 5 TO 100 VDC
R1 MUST BE LESS THAN 4.5K OHM (1.0K OHM TYPICAL)
R2 =
R1(Vo - 5)
5
Figure 3-5. AI Differential Module Field Wiring for Higher Voltage Devices
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ROC364 Instruction Manual
For current loop devices, scaling resistor R1 generates a voltage across terminals B and C that is
proportional to the loop current. When connecting current loop devices, the value of R1 must be selected
such that the 5-volts input limit of the module is not exceeded under maximum operating current
conditions. For 0 to 20 milliamps or 4 to 20 milliamps devices, the value of R1 would be 250 ohms. In
this case, you can use the 250-ohms (0.1%, 1/8 watt) scaling resistor supplied by the factory. The
formula for determining the value of R1 is given in Figure 3-6, where “I Maximum” is the upper end of
the operating current range, such as 0.025 amps for a 0 to 25 milliamps device.
R1
AI DIFF
SELF-POWERED
CURRENT LOOP
DEVICE
I
+
N/C
A
+
B
Vo
–
C
–
200K
200K
TO SELECT PROPER VALUE FOR R1:
DOC0154A
Vo = VOLTAGE FROM ANALOG DEVICE = 0 TO 5 VDC
R1 =
5 VOLTS
I MAXIMUM
Figure 3-6. AI Differential Module Field Wiring for Current Loop Devices
3.4.3 Analog Input Source Module
A schematic representation of the field wiring connections to the input circuit of the Analog Input
Source module displays in Figure 3-7 and Figure 3-8. The AI Source module normally monitors the
voltage output of low-voltage transmitters, but it can be used for monitoring loop current. The module
provides source power at terminal A for the loop. The Analog Input Source module operates by
measuring the voltage across terminals B and C. The module accepts a maximum input voltage of 5
volts dc, which is the upper operating limit of the module.
Figure 3-7 shows a typical voltage signal input. Terminal B is the positive (+) signal input and terminal
C is the negative (–) signal input. These terminals accept a voltage signal in the 0 to 5 volts range. Since
terminal C connects to common, the Analog Input can only be a single-ended input. Make sure no
scaling resistor is installed when wiring the module for a voltage signal.
AI SRC
+10Vdc
ROC-POWERED
+
VOLTAGE DEVICE
–
A
SIGNAL = 0 TO 5
+10Vdc
B
+
C
–
V SRC
Vs
Figure 3-7. AI Source Module Field Wiring for Voltage Devices
The AI Source module can be used for monitoring loop current as shown in Figure 3-8. For current loop
monitoring, scaling resistor R1 generates a voltage across terminals B and C that is proportional to the
loop current (I).
3-8
Input and Output Modules
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
For example, a 250-ohms scaling resistor would accommodate either 0 to 20 milliamps, or 4 to 20
milliamps current loop transmitters (the transmitter must be able to operate on 10 volts dc or be powered
from another source). This translates to a maximum operating input voltage of 5 volts dc, which is the
upper limit of the module. When using a transmitter with a maximum operating current requirement
different from 20 milliamps, R1 should be sized to achieve full-scale deflection at 5 volts. The formula
for determining a new value of R1 displays in Figure 3-8.
R1
I
+
ROC-POWERED
CURRENT LOOP
DEVICE
A
–
+10 Vdc
B
+
C
–
AI SRC
V SRC
Vs
TO SELECT PROPER VALUE OF R1:
Vs = SOURCE VOLTAGE FROM MODULE = 10 Vdc, 20 mA MAX
R1 =
5 VOLTS
I MAXIMUM
Figure 3-8. AI Source Module Field Wiring for Current Loop Devices
3.4.4 Analog Output Source Module
A schematic representation of the field wiring connections to the output circuit of the Analog Output
Source module displays in Figure 3-9 and Figure 3-10. The AO Source module can provide either loop
current or output voltage to non-powered field devices. The Analog Output Source module provides a 0
to 5.5 volts output at terminal A, and a 0 to 30 milliamps current source output at terminal B. Terminal
C is referenced to the ROC common.
Resistor R1 (0-ohm resistor supplied) helps keep the loop resistance within the operating range of the
module. Remove the 0-ohm resistor when the loop resistance between terminals B and C is less
than 100 ohms.
Terminals A and B are both active at the same time. Figure 3-9 shows wiring for a ROC-powered
current loop device, and Figure 3-10 shows wiring for an output voltage to non-powered field devices.
R1=0
AO SRC
+V
+I
220
LEVEL
DOC0158A
(Modified)
COM
A
B
C
I
+
ROC-POWERED
LOOP DEVICE
-
REMOVE RESISTOR R1 WHEN LOOP
RESISTANCE IS LESS THAN 100 OHMS
I = 30 mA MAX
Figure 3-9. Analog Output Source Module Field Wiring for Current Loop Devices
3-9
Input and Output Modules
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
R1=0
AO SRC
+V
+I
220
LEVEL
COM
A
+
C
ROC-POWERED
VOLTAGE DEVICE
Vo
B
-
DOC0159A
V o = OUTPUT VOLTAGE FROM MODULE = 0 TO 5 VDC, 5 mA
Figure 3-10. Analog Output Source Module Field Wiring for Voltage Devices
3.4.5 Discrete Input Source Module
A schematic representation of the field wiring connections to the input circuit of the Discrete Input
Source module displays in Figure 3-11.
The Discrete Input Source module is designed to operate only with non-powered discrete devices,
such as “dry” relay contacts or isolated solid-state switches. Use of the module with powered
devices may cause improper operation or damage.
The Discrete Input Source module operates by providing a voltage across terminals B and C that is
derived from internal voltage source Vs. When a field device, such as a set of relay contacts, is connected
across terminals B and C, the closing of the contacts completes a circuit, which causes a flow of current
between Vs and ground at terminal C. This current flow is sensed by the DI module, which signals the
ROC electronics that the relay contacts have closed. When the contacts open, current flow is interrupted
and the DI module signals the ROC electronics that the relay contacts have opened.
A 10-ohms scaling resistor (R1) is supplied by the factory and accommodates a source voltage (Vs) of
11 to 30 volts dc. The source voltage is the input voltage to the ROC. However, it is desirable to
optimize the value of R1 to reduce the current drain from the source or reduce the heat generated in
the module due to high source voltage. The formula for determining the value of R1 is given in
Figure 3-11. For optimum efficiency, R1 should be scaled for a loop current (I) of 3 milliamps.
R1=10
ROC-POWERED
PULSE DEVICE
I
RW
A
N/C
B
+
C
–
DI SRC
VS
3.3K
TO OPTIMIZE SCALING RESISTOR R1:
VS – 1
– RW – 3.3K
R1 =
I
R1 + RW + 3.3K = LOOP RESISTANCE = 4.5K OHMS MAX
I = LOOP CURRENT = 3 mA TYPICAL
RW = RESISTANCE OF FIELD WIRING
VS = SOURCE VOLTAGE FROM MODULE = 11 TO 30 VDC
DOC0143A
Modified
Figure 3-11. Discrete Input Source Module Field Wiring
3-10
Input and Output Modules
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
3.4.6 Discrete Input Isolated Module
A schematic representation of the field wiring connections to the input circuit of the Discrete Input
Isolated module displays in Figure 3-12.
NOTE: The Discrete Input Isolated module is designed to operate only with discrete devices
having their own power source, such as “wet” relay contacts or two-state devices providing an
output voltage. The module is inoperative with non-powered devices.
The Discrete Input Isolated module operates when a field device provides a voltage across terminals B
and C of the module. The voltage sets up a flow of current sensed by the module that, in turn, signals the
ROC electronics that the field device is active. When the field device no longer provides a voltage,
current stops flowing and the DI module signals the ROC electronics that the device is inactive.
A 10-ohms scaling resistor (R1) is supplied by the factory and accommodates an external voltage (Vo) of
11 to 30 volts dc. However, it is desirable to optimize the value of R1 to reduce the current drain from
the source or reduce the heat generated in the module due to high source voltage. The formula for
determining the optimum value of R1 displays in Figure 3-12. For best efficiency, R1 should be scaled
for a loop current (I) of 3 milliamps.
R1=10
SELF-POWERED
DISCRETE DEVICE
I
+
VO
RW
–
A
B
C
N/C
DI ISO
3.3K
+
–
TO OPTIMIZE SCALING RESISTOR R1:
VO – 1
– RW – 3.3K
R1 =
I
R1 + RW + 3.3K = LOOP RESISTANCE = 4.5K OHMS MAX
I = LOOP CURRENT = 3 mA TYPICAL
RW = RESISTANCE OF FIELD WIRING
VO = VOLTAGE FROM DISCRETE DEVICE = 11 TO 30 VDC
DOC0144A
Figure 3-12. Discrete Input Isolated Module Field Wiring
3.4.7 Discrete Output Source Module
A schematic representation of the field wiring connections to the output circuit of the Discrete Output
Source module displays in Figure 3-13.
The Discrete Output Source module is designed to operate only with non-powered discrete
devices, such as relay coils or solid-state switch inputs. Using the module with powered devices
may cause improper operation or damage to occur.
The Discrete Output Source module provides a switched voltage across terminals B and C that is derived
from internal voltage source Vs. A field device, such as a relay coil, is energized when the ROC
electronics provides a voltage at terminals B and C. When Vs is switched off by the ROC electronics, the
field device is no longer energized.
3-11
Input and Output Modules
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
When using the Discrete Output Source module to drive an inductive load, such as a relay coil, a
suppression diode should be placed across the input terminals to the load. This protects the
module from the reverse Electro-Motive Force (EMF) spike generated when the inductive load is
switched off.
DO SRC
1 Amp
N/C
+5V
VS
A
+
CONTROL
–
I LIMIT
+ ROC-POWERED
B
–
C
DISCRETE DEVICE
DOC0145A
Figure 3-13. Discrete Output Source Module Field Wiring
3.4.8 Discrete Output Isolated Module
A schematic representation of the field wiring connections to the output circuit of the Discrete Output
Isolated module is shown in Figure 3-14.
NOTE: The Discrete Output Isolated module is designed to operate only with discrete devices
having their own power source. The module is inoperative with non-powered devices.
The Discrete Output Isolated module operates by providing a low or high-output resistance to a field
device. When the field device provides a voltage across terminals A and B of the module, current either
flows or is switched off by the DO Isolated module. The switching is controlled by the ROC electronics.
DO ISO
+5V
1 Amp
A
B
CONTROL
DOC0146A
(Modified)
C
COM
NO
+
VO
–
SELF-POWERED
DISCRETE DEVICE
N/C
TERMINAL A CONNECTION IS COMMON
TERMINAL B CONNECTION TO BE MADE FOR NORMALLY OPEN APPLICATIONS
TERMINAL C CONNECTION IS NO CONNECT
VO = VOLTAGE FROM DISCRETE DEVICE = 11 TO 30 VDC, 1.0 A MAX
Figure 3-14. Discrete Output Isolated Module Field Wiring
3-12
Input and Output Modules
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ROC364 Instruction Manual
3.4.9 Discrete Output Relay Module
A schematic representation of the field wiring connections to the output circuit of the Discrete Output
Relay module displays in Figure 3-15.
NOTE: The Discrete Output Relay module is designed to operate only with discrete devices
having their own power source. The module will be inoperative with non-powered devices.
The Discrete Output Relay module operates by providing both normally-closed and normally-open
contacts to a field device. Normally-closed contacts use terminals B and C, and normally-open contacts
use terminals A and B. ROCLINK configuration software controls the status of the contacts (open or
closed).
There are two versions of the DO Relay module. The 12 volts version (which has a 12 volts energizing
coil) must be used when the ROC input voltage is a nominal 12 volts dc, and the 24 volts version (which
has a 24 volts energizing coil) must be used when the ROC input voltage is a nominal 24 volts dc.
DO RLY
NO
VS
COM
CONTROL
NC
A
B
+
VO
–
C
SELF-POWERED
DISCRETE DEVICE
DOC0147A
TERMINAL A CONNECTION TO BE MADE FOR NORMALLY OPEN APPLICATIONS
TERMINAL B IS COMMON
TERMINAL C CONNECTION TO BE MADE FOR NORMALLY CLOSED APPLICATIONS
VO= VOLTAGE FROM DISCRETE DEVICE = 0 TO 30 VDC OR 0 TO 115 VAC, 5 A MAX
Figure 3-15. Discrete Output Relay Module Field Wiring
3.4.10 Pulse Input Source Module
A schematic representation of the field wiring connections to the input circuit of the Pulse Input
Source module is shown in Figure 3-16.
The Pulse Input Source module is designed to operate only with non-powered discrete devices,
such as “dry” relay contacts or isolated solid-state switches. Use of the module with powered
devices may cause improper operation or damage to occur.
The Pulse Input Source module provides a voltage across terminals B and C that is derived from internal
voltage source Vs. When a field device, such as a set of relay contacts, is connected across terminals B
and C, the opening and closing of the contacts causes current to either flow or not flow between Vs and
ground at terminal C.
This interrupted, or pulsed current flow is counted and accumulated by the PI Source module, which
provides the accumulated count to the ROC electronics upon request.
3-13
Input and Output Modules
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
A 10-ohms scaling resistor (R1) is supplied by the factory and accommodates a source voltage (Vs) of
11 to 30 volts dc and a pulse source with a 50% Duty Cycle. The source voltage is the input voltage to
the ROC. However, it is desirable to optimize the value of R1 to reduce the current drain from the
source or reduce the heat generated in the module due to high source voltage. The formula for
determining the value of R1 is given in Figure 3-16. For optimum efficiency, R1 should be scaled for a
loop current (I) of 5 milliamps.
R1=10
ROC-POWERED
PULSE DEVICE
I
RW
A
N/C
B
+
C
–
2.2K
PI SRC
VS
TO OPTIMIZE SCALING RESISTOR R1:
VS – 1
– RW – 2.2K
R1 =
I
R1 + RW + 2.2K = LOOP RESISTANCE = 3.4K OHMS MAX
I = LOOP CURRENT = 5 mA TYPICAL
RW = RESISTANCE OF FIELD WIRING
VS = SOURCE VOLTAGE FROM MODULE = 11 TO 30 VDC
Figure 3-16. Pulse Input Source Module Field Wiring
3.4.11 Pulse Input Isolated Module
A schematic representation of the field wiring connections to the input circuit of the Pulse Input Isolated
module is shown in Figure 3-17.
NOTE: The Pulse Input Isolated module is designed to operate only with devices having their
own power source, such as “wet” relay contacts or two-state devices providing an output voltage.
The module is inoperative with non-powered devices.
The Pulse Input Isolated module operates when a field device provides a voltage across terminals B and
C of the module. The voltage sets up a flow of current sensed by the module. When the field device no
longer provides a voltage, current stops flowing.
This interrupted, or pulsed current flow is counted and accumulated by the PI module, which provides
the accumulated count to the ROC electronics upon request.
A 10-ohms scaling resistor (R1) is supplied by the factory, which accommodates a field device with
pulse amplitude (Vo) of 11 to 30 volts dc and a Duty Cycle of 50%. However, it is desirable to optimize
the value of R1 to reduce the current drain from the source or reduce the heat generated in the module
due to amplitudes greater than 30 volts dc. The formula for determining the value of R1 displays in
Figure 3-17. For optimum efficiency, R1 should be scaled for a loop current (I) of 5 milliamps.
3-14
Input and Output Modules
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
R1=10
SELF-POWERED
PULSE DEVICE
A
+
VO
RW
–
B
C
N/C
PI ISO
2.2K
+
–
TO OPTIMIZE SCALING RESISTOR R1:
VO – 1
– RW – 2.2K
R1 =
I
R1 + RW + 2.2K = LOOP RESISTANCE = 3.4K OHMS
I = LOOP CURRENT = 5 mA TYPICAL
DOC0149A
RW = RESISTANCE OF FIELD WIRING
VO = VOLTAGE FROM PULSE DEVICE = 11 TO 30 VDC
Figure 3-17. Pulse Input Isolated Module Field Wiring
3.4.12 Slow Pulse Input Source Module
A schematic representation of the field wiring connections to the input circuit of the Slow Pulse Input
Source (SPI) module is shown in Figure 3-18.
The Slow Pulse Input source module is designed to operate only with non-powered devices, such
as “dry” relay contacts or isolated solid-state switches. Use of the module with powered devices
may cause improper operation or damage to occur.
The Slow Pulse Input Source module operates by providing a voltage across terminals B and C
that is derived from internal voltage source Vs. When a field device, such as a set of relay contacts,
is connected across terminals B and C, the closing of the contacts completes a circuit, which causes a
flow of current between Vs and ground at terminal C.
This current flow is sensed by the SPI module, which signals the ROC electronics that the relay contacts
have closed. When the contacts open, current flow is interrupted and the SPI module signals the ROC
electronics that the relay contacts have opened. The ROC counts the number of times the contacts switch
from open to closed, and stores the count. The ROC checks for the input transition every 50
milliseconds.
A 10-ohms scaling resistor (R1) is supplied and accommodates a source voltage (Vs) of 11 to 30 volts
dc. The source voltage is either the input voltage to the ROC. However, it is desirable to optimize the
value of R1 to reduce the current drain from the source or reduce the heat generated in the module due to
high source voltage. The formula for determining the value of R1 is given in Figure 3-18. For optimum
efficiency, R1 should be scaled for a loop current (I) of 3 milliamps.
3-15
Input and Output Modules
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
R1=10
SPI SRC
N/C
A
I
ROC-POWERED
DISCRETE DEVICE
B
Rw
Vs
3.3K
+
-
C
TO OPTIMIZE SCALING RESISTOR R1:
Vs- 1
R1
DOC0151
Modified
- R w - 3.3K
I
R1 + Rw + 3.3K = LOOP RESISTANCE = 4.5K OHMS
I = LOOP CURRENT = 3 mA
R w = RESISTANCE OF FIELD
V s = SOURCE VOLTAGE FROM MODULE = 11 TO 30
Figure 3-18. Slow Pulse Input Source Module Field Wiring
3.4.13 Slow Pulse Input Isolated Module
A schematic representation of the field wiring connections to the input circuit of the Slow Pulse Input
Isolated module is shown in Figure 3-19.
NOTE: The Slow Pulse Input isolated module is designed to operate only with devices having
their own power source, such as “wet” relay contacts or two-state devices providing an output
voltage. The module is inoperative with non-powered devices.
The Slow Pulse Input Isolated (SPI) module operates when a field device provides a voltage across
terminals B and C of the module. The voltage sets up a flow of current sensed by the module, which
signals the ROC electronics that the field device is active. When the field device no longer provides a
voltage, current stops flowing and the SPI module signals the ROC electronics that the device is
inactive. The ROC counts the number of times the current starts flowing, and stores the count. The ROC
checks for the input transition every 50 milliseconds.
A 10-ohms scaling resistor (R1) is supplied by the factory, which accommodates an external voltage
(Vo) of 11 to 30 volts dc. However, it is desirable to optimize the value of R1 to reduce the current drain
from the source or reduce the heat generated in the module due to high source voltage. The formula for
determining the value of R1 displays in Figure 3-19. For optimum efficiency, R1 should be scaled for a
loop current (I) of 3 milliamps.
R1=10
SPI ISO
SELF-POWERED
DISCRETE
DEVICE
A
I
+
RW
VO
-
N/C
B
+
C
-
3.3K
TO OPTIMIZE SCALING RESISTOR R1:
R1
Vo - 1
I
DOC0152A
- R w - 3.3K
R1 + R w + 3.3K = LOOP RESISTANCE = 4.5K OHMS
I = LOOP CURRENT = 3 mA
R w = RESISTANCE OF FIELD
V o = VOLTAGE FROM DISCRETE DEVICE = 11 TO 30 VDC
Figure 3-19. Slow Pulse Input Isolated Module Field Wiring
3-16
Input and Output Modules
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
3.4.14 Low-Level Pulse Input Module
A schematic representation of the field wiring connections to the input circuit of the Low-Level Pulse
Input module is shown in Figure 3-20. The field wiring connects through a separate terminal block that
plugs in next to the module allowing replacement of the module without disconnecting field wiring.
NOTE: The Low-Level Pulse Input module is designed to operate only with pulse-generating
devices having their own power source. The module does not work with non-powered devices.
The Low-Level Pulse Input module operates when a field device provides a pulsed voltage between
30 millivolts and 3 volts peak-to-peak across terminals B and C of the module. The pulsed voltage is
counted and accumulated by the module, which provides the accumulated count to the ROC electronics
on request.
PI LL
SELF-POWERED
PULSE DEVICE
A
N/C
+
B
+
200K
–
C
–
200K
DOC0150A
Figure 3-20. Low-Level Pulse Input Module Field Wiring Schematic
3.4.15 RTD Input Module
The RTD input module monitors the temperature signal from a Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD)
sensor or probe. The RTD module is isolated, reducing the possibility of lightning damage. A Lightning
Protection Module (LPM) will not protect the RTD, but it helps protect the rack in which the module is
installed.
The RTD module must to be calibrated while disconnected from the RTD probe; therefore, it may be
more convenient to perform calibration before connecting the field wiring. However, if the field wiring
between the ROC and the RTD probe is long enough to add a significant resistance, then calibration
should be performed in a manner that takes this into account.
For a three- or four-wire RTD with the wires used to connect up each leg are of the same length and
size, the error generated will be zero or at least no different for any given length. This is because the
RTD input uses the resistance of the wire loop(s) not passing through the RTD to correct for the wire
resistance of the loop with the RTD.
3.4.15.1 Calibrating the RTD Module
The following instructions describe how to calibrate an RTD input channel for use with an RTD probe
having an alpha value of either 0.00385 or 0.00392 ohms/degree C. This procedure requires a resistance
decade box with 0.01-ohm steps and an accuracy of ±1%. You also need a personal computer running
ROCLINK configuration software.
NOTE: In ROCLINK configuration software, use the Calibrate button associated with the
Analog Input configuration.
3-17
Input and Output Modules
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
NOTE: The RTD module input can be calibrated before installing it in the field when short wire
WHT
C
A B C
WHT
B
1
RED
A
RTD
runs will be used, but if the RTD module is used as a temperature input to a flow calculation,
then the RTD should be calibrated at the same time as the pressure inputs.
DECADE BOX
A4464821
Figure 3-21. Calibration Setup
Table 3-1. Calibration Resistance Values
ALPHA
0.00385
0.00392
–50ºC (58ºF)
80.31 Ohms
79.96 Ohms
100ºC (212ºF)
138.50 Ohms
139.16 Ohms
NOTE: Resistance values for RTD probes with other alpha
values can be found in the temperature-to-resistance
conversion table for that probe.
1. Connect the decade box as shown in Figure 3-21.
2. Set the decade box to the –50°C (–58°F) resistance value corresponding to the RTD alpha value
in Table 3-1.
3. Enter the value displayed for “Raw A/D Input” as the value for “Adjusted A/D 0%” using the
Analog Inputs configuration screen for the RTD input. Refer to ROCLINK > Configure > I/O >
AI Points Advanced tab.
4. Set the decade box to the 100°C (212°F) resistance value given in Table 3-1.
5. Enter the value displayed for “Raw A/D Input” as the value for “Adjusted A/D 100%” using the
Analog Inputs Advanced configuration screen for the RTD input.
6. Enter –50°C (–58°F) for “Low Reading EU” using the Analog Inputs configuration screen. Refer
to ROCLINK > Configure > I/O > AI Points General tab.
7. Enter 100°C (212°F) for the “High Reading EU” using the Analog Inputs configuration screen.
8. Click Apply to save the changes.
3-18
Input and Output Modules
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ROC364 Instruction Manual
3.4.15.2 Connecting RTD Module Field Wiring
The RTD sensor connects to the RTD module with ordinary copper wire. To avoid a loss in accuracy,
sensor wires should be equal in length, of the same material, and the same gauge. To avoid possible
damage to the RTD module from induced voltages, sensor wires should be kept as short as possible.
This is typically 3.35 meters (100 feet) or less. A schematic representation of the field wiring
connections to the input circuit of the RTD input module displays in Figure 3-22, Figure 3-23, Figure
3-24, and Figure 3-25.
Two-wire RTDs are connected to module terminals A and B. Terminal B must be connected to terminal
C, as shown in Figure 3-22.
RTD
RED
ROC-POWERED
2-WIRE, 100 OHM
RTD PROBE
A
WHT
B
C
RED
WHT
+
I SRC
-
WHT
DOC4007A
Modified
Figure 3-22. RTD Input Module Field Wiring for Two-Wire RTDs
Three-wire RTDs have an active element loop and a compensation loop. The active element loop
connects across terminals A and B. The compensation loop connects across B and C. The compensation
loop helps increase the accuracy of the temperature measurement by allowing the RTD module to
compensate for the resistance of hookup wire used between the probe and RTD module.
In operation, the RTD module subtracts the resistance between terminals B and C from the resistance
between terminals A and B. The remainder is the resistance of only the active element of the probe. This
compensation becomes more important as the resistance of the hookup wire increases with distance
between the probe and the ROC. Of course, in order to perform properly, the compensation loop must
use the same type, size, and length of hookup wire as the active element loop.
The RTD module is designed for only one compensation loop, and this loop is not isolated from the
active element loop because terminal B is common to both loops. In the 3-wire RTD, the wires connect
to module terminals A, B, and C, as shown in Figure 3-23.
It is important to match the color-coding of the RTD probe wires to the proper module terminal, because
the probe wire colors vary between manufacturers. To determine which leads are for the compensation
loop and which are for the active element, read the resistance across the probe wires with an ohmmeter.
The compensation loop reads 0 ohms, and the RTD element reads a resistance value matching the
temperature curve of the RTD.
RTD
RED
3-WIRE,100-OHM,
RTD PROBE
A
WHT
B
WHT
C
RED
WHT
I SRC
WHT
DOC0161A
Modified
Figure 3-23. RTD Input Module Field Wiring for Three-Wire RTDs
3-19
Input and Output Modules
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
RTDs with four wires normally have the compensation loop separate from the active element loop to
increase the accuracy of the probe. Various colors are used for the probe wires. For example, some
probes have wire colors of red and white for the RTD element loop and black leads for the compensation
loop, while other probes use two red leads for the active element loop and two white leads for the
compensation loop.
The connections in Figure 3-24 connect a 4-wire RTD with compensation loop to the 3-wire RTD
module. The RTD module designed for 3-wire use does not permit a 4-wire RTD to provide any
additional accuracy over a 3-wire RTD.
RTD
RED
4-WIRE RTD WITH
COMPEN-SATION
LOOP
A
RED
B
WHT
C
RED
WHT
I SRC
WHT
WHT
DOC4008A
Figure 3-24. RTD Input Module Field Wiring for Four-Wire RTD With Compensation Loop
Figure 3-25 shows the connections for a single-element, 4-wire RTD. The two leads for one side of the
RTD are both red, and for the other side, they are both white.
RTD
RED
4-WIRE RTD
WITH SINGLE
ELEMENT
RED
A
WHT
B
WHT
C
RED
WHT
I SRC
WHT
DOC4009A
Figure 3-25. Field Wiring for Four-Wire, Single Element RTD
3.4.16 HART Interface Module
The HART Interface module allows the ROC to interface with up to ten Highway Addressable Remote
Transducer (HART) devices per I/O slot. The HART module provides “loop source” power (+T) on
terminal A and two channels for communications on terminals B and C. The +T power is regulated by a
current limit. If the power required by all connected HART devices exceeds 40 milliamps (more than an
average of 4 milliamps each), the total number of HART devices must be reduced.
The HART module polls one channel at a time. If more than one device is connected to a channel in a
multi-drop configuration, the module polls all devices on that channel before it polls the second channel.
The HART protocol allows one second per poll for each device, so with five devices per channel the
entire poll time for the module would be ten seconds.
In a point-to-point configuration, only one HART device wires to each HART module channel. In a
multi-drop configuration, two to five HART devices can connect to a channel. In either case, terminal A
(+T) is wired in parallel to the positive (+) terminal on all of the HART devices, regardless of the
channel to which they are connected. Channel 1 (terminal B) is wired to the negative (–) terminal of a
single HART device, or in parallel to the negative terminals of two to five devices. Likewise, channel 2
(terminal C) is wired to the negative (–) terminal of a single HART device, or in parallel to the negative
terminals of a second group of two to five devices. Refer to Figure 3-26.
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HART MODULE
ROC-POWERED
HART DEVICE 1
+
A
-
B
I LIMIT
MUX
C
ROC-POWERED
HART DEVICE 2
ROC-POWERED
HART DEVICE 5
+T
MODEM
+
DOC0295A
-
+
+
-
-
CHANNEL 1, MULTI-DROP MODE
ROC-POWERED
HART DEVICE
CHANNEL 2, POINT-TO-POINT MODE
Figure 3-26. Field Wiring for a HART Interface Module
3.5 Troubleshooting and Repair
Use troubleshooting and repair to identify and replace faulty modules. Faulty modules must be returned
to your local sales representative for repair or replacement.
If an I/O point does not function correctly, first determine if the problem is with the field device or the
I/O module as follows:
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions (such as wearing a grounded wrist
strap) may reset the processor or damage electronic components, resulting in interrupted
operations.
1. Isolate the field device from the ROC by disconnecting it at the I/O module terminal block.
2. Connect the ROC to a computer running ROCLINK configuration software.
3. Perform the appropriate test procedure described in the following sections.
A module suspected of being faulty should be checked for a short circuit between its input or output
terminals and the ground screw. If a terminal not directly connected to ground reads zero (0) when
measured with an ohmmeter, the module is defective and must be replaced.
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3.5.1 Analog Input Modules
Equipment Required: Multimeter
To determine if an Analog Input module is operating properly, its configuration must first be known.
Table 3-2 shows typical configuration values for an Analog Input:
Table 3-2. Analog Input Module Typical Configuration Values
Parameter
Adjusted A/D 0 %
Adjusted A/D 100 %
Low Reading EU
High Reading EU
Filter EUs
Value
800
4000
0.0000
100.0
xxxxx
Corresponds To
1 volt dc across scaling resistor Rs
5 volts dc across Rs
EU value with 1 volt dc across Rs
EU value with 5 volts dc across Rs
Value read by AI module
When the value of Filtered Engineering Units (EU) is –25% of span as configured above, it is an
indication of no current flow (0 milliamps), which can result from open field wiring or a faulty field
device.
When the value of Filtered EUs is in excess of 100% of span as configured above, it is an indication of
maximum current flow, which can result from shorted field wiring or a faulty field device.
When the value of Filtered EUs is between the low and high readings, you can verify the accuracy of the
reading by measuring the voltage across scaling resistor Rs (Vrs) with the multimeter. To convert this
reading to the filtered EUs value, perform the following:
Filtered EUs = [((Vrs – 1) ÷ 4) × Span] + Low Reading EU,
where Span = High Reading EU – Low Reading EU
This calculated value should be within one-tenth of one percent of the Filtered EUs value measured by
the ROC. To verify an accuracy of 0.1 percent, read the loop current with a multimeter connected in
series with current loop. Be sure to take into account that input values can change rapidly, which can
cause a greater error between the measured value and the calculated value.
If the calculated value and the measured value are the same, the AI module is operating correctly.
3.5.2 Analog Output Modules
The Analog Output module is a source for current loop or voltage devices. Two test procedures are
provided to verify correct operation.
♦ Check AO Current Loop Source Installations on page 3-23.
♦ Check AO Voltage Source Installations on page 3-23.
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3.5.2.1 Check AO Current Loop Source Installations
Equipment Required: Multimeter
Personal Computer running ROCLINK configuration software
1. Taking appropriate precautions, disconnect the field wiring going to the AO module
terminations.
2. Connect a multimeter between the B and C terminals of the module and set the multimeter to
measure current in milliamps.
3. Using ROCLINK configuration software, put the AO point associated with the module under test
in Manual mode (Scanning Disabled).
4. Set the output to the High Reading EU value.
5. Verify a 20-milliamps reading on the multimeter.
6. Calibrate the Analog Output High Reading EU value by increasing or decreasing the “Adjusted
D/A 100%” value.
7. Set the output to the Low Reading EU value.
8. Verify a 4-milliamps reading on the multimeter.
9. Calibrate the Analog Output Low Reading EU value by increasing or decreasing the “Adjusted
D/A 0%” value.
10. Enable scanning (Scanning Enabled or Auto) for the AO point, remove the test equipment, and
reconnect the field device.
11. If possible, verify the correct operation of the AO module by setting the High Reading EU and
Low Reading EU values as before (Scanning Disabled) and observing the field device.
3.5.2.2 Check AO Voltage Source Installations
Equipment Required: Multimeter
Personal Computer running ROCLINK configuration software
To check operation of the Analog Output module powering a voltage device:
1. If the resistance value (R) of the field device is known, measure the voltage drop (V)
across the device and calculate the output EU value using the following formula.
EU value = [((1000V/R – 4) ÷ 16) × Span] + Low Reading EU,
where Span = High Reading EU – Low Reading EU
2. Compare the computed value to the output EU value measured by the ROC with ROCLINK
configuration software. It is normal for the reading to be several percent off, depending on the
accuracy tolerance of the device and how rapidly changes occur in the output value.
3. Calibrate the Analog Output EU values by increasing or decreasing the “Adjusted D/A % Units.”
4. If the Analog Output is unable to drive the field device to the 100% value, confirm the +V
(1 to 5 volts) voltage is present at the field device.
♦ If the voltage is present and the device is not at the 100% position, the resistance value of the
device is too large for the +V voltage. Use a field device with a lower internal resistance.
♦ If the voltage is not present at the field device, but it is present at field wiring terminal B,
there is excessive resistance or a break in the field wiring.
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3.5.3 Discrete Input Source Module
Equipment Required: Jumper wire
1. Place a jumper across terminals B and C.
2. The LED on the module should light and the Status as read by ROCLINK configuration software
should change to “On.”
3. With no jumper on terminals B and C, the LED should not be lit and the Status should be “Off.”
4. If the unit fails to operate, make sure a correct value for the module resistor is being used.
3.5.4 Discrete Input Isolated Module
Equipment Required: Voltage generator capable of generating 11 to 30 volts dc
Personal Computer running ROCLINK configuration software
1. Supply an input voltage across terminals B and C.
2. The LED on the module should light and the Status as read by ROCLINK configuration software
should change to “On.”
3. With no input on terminals B and C, the LED should not be lit and the Status should be “Off.”
4. If the unit fails to operate, make sure a correct value for the module resistor is being used.
3.5.5 Discrete Output Source Module
Equipment Required: Multimeter
Personal Computer running ROCLINK configuration software
1. Place the Discrete Output in manual mode (Scanning Disabled) using ROCLINK configuration
software.
2. With the output Status set to “Off,” less than 0.5 volts dc should be measured across pins B and
pin C.
3. With the output Status set to “On,” approximately 1.5 volts dc less than the system voltage
(Vs–1.5) should be measured across terminals A and B.
4. If these values are not measured, check to see if the module fuse is open, verify the module is
wired correctly, and verify the load current requirement does not exceed the 57-milliamps
current limit value of the module.
3.5.6 Discrete Output Isolated Module
Equipment Required: Multimeter
Personal Computer running ROCLINK configuration software
1. Place the Discrete Output in manual mode (Scanning Disabled) using ROCLINK configuration
software.
2. Set the output Status to “Off” and measure the resistance across terminals A and B. No
continuity should be indicated.
3. Set the output Status to “On” and measure the resistance across terminals A and B. A reading of
15 kilohms or less should be obtained.
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3.5.7 Discrete Output Relay Module
Equipment Required: Multimeter
Personal Computer running ROCLINK configuration software
1. Place the Discrete Output in manual mode (Scanning Disabled) using ROCLINK configuration
software.
2. Set the output Status to “Off” and measure the resistance across terminals B and C. A reading of
0 ohms should be obtained.
3. Measure the resistance across terminals A and B. No continuity should be indicated.
4. Set the output Status to “On” and measure the resistance across terminals B and C. No continuity
should be indicated.
5. Measure the resistance across terminals A and B. A reading of 0 ohms should be obtained.
3.5.8 Pulse Input Source and Isolated Modules
Equipment Required: Pulse Generator
Voltage Generator
Frequency Counter
Jumper wire
For both types of modules, there are two methods of testing.
♦ Testing Pulse Input High-Speed Operation on page 3-25.
♦ Testing Pulse Input Low-Speed Operation on page 3-25.
NOTE: When checking the operation of the Pulse Input Source and Isolated modules, ensure
the scan rate for the Pulse Input is once every 6.5 seconds or less as set by ROCLINK
configuration software.
3.5.8.1 Testing Pulse Input High-Speed Operation
To verify high-speed operation:
1. Connect a pulse generator having sufficient output to drive the module to terminals B and C.
2. Connect a frequency counter across terminals B and C.
3. Set the pulse generator to a value equal to, or less than 10 kilohertz.
4. Set the frequency counter to count pulses.
5. Verify the count read by the counter and the total accumulated count (Accumulated Pulses) read
by the ROC are the same using ROCLINK configuration software.
3.5.8.2 Testing Pulse Input Low-Speed Operation
To verify low-speed operation of the PI Source module:
1. Alternately jumper across terminals B and C.
2. The module LED should cycle on and off, and the total accumulated count (Accumulated Pulses)
should increase.
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To verify low-speed operation of the PI Isolated module:
1. Alternately supply and remove an input voltage across terminals B and C.
2. The module LED should cycle on and off, and the total accumulated count (Accumulated Pulses)
should increase.
3.5.9 Slow Pulse Input Source Module
Equipment Required: Jumper wire
To verify low-speed operation of the PI Source module:
1. Connect and remove a jumper across terminals B and C several times to simulate slow switching.
2. The module LED should cycle on and off and the total accumulated count (Accumulated Pulses)
should increase.
3.5.10 Slow Pulse Input Isolated Module
Equipment Required: Jumper wire
To verify low-speed operation of the PI Isolated module:
1. Alternately supply and remove an input voltage across terminals B and C.
2. The module LED should cycle on and off and the total accumulated count (Accumulated Pulses)
should increase.
3.5.11 Low-Level Pulse Input Module
Equipment Required: Pulse Generator
Frequency Counter
Personal Computer running ROCLINK configuration software
NOTE: When checking the operation of the Low-Level Pulse Input module, ensure that the Scan
Period for the Pulse Input is once every 22 seconds or less as set by ROCLINK configuration
software.
To verify operation:
1. Connect a pulse generator, with the pulse amplitude set at less than 3 volts, to terminals B and C.
2. Connect a frequency counter across terminals B and C. Set the pulse generator to a value equal to
or less than 3 kilohertz.
3. Set the frequency counter to count pulses.
4. Verify that the count read by the counter and in the total accumulated count (Accumulated
Pulses) read by the ROC are the same using ROCLINK configuration software.
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3.5.12 RTD Input Module
The RTD module is similar in operation to an AI module and uses the same troubleshooting and repair
procedures. The RTD module can accommodate two-wire, three-wire, or four-wire RTDs. If two-wire
RTDs are used, terminals B and C must be connected together. If any of the input wires are broken or
not connected, ROCLINK configuration software indicates the “Raw A/D Input” value is either at
minimum (less than 800) or maximum (greater than 4000) as follows:
♦ An open at terminal A gives a maximum reading.
♦ An open at terminal B gives a minimum reading.
♦ An open at terminal C gives a minimum reading.
To verify the operation of the RTD module:
1. Disconnect the RTD and connect a jumper between terminals B and C of the RTD module.
2. Connect an accurate resistor or decade resistance box with a value to give a low end reading
across terminals A and B. The resistance value required can be determined by the temperatureto-resistance conversion chart for the type of RTD being used.
3. Use ROCLINK configuration software to verify that the Raw A/D Input value changed and
reflects the Adjusted A/D 0% value.
4. Change the resistance to reflect a high temperature as determined by the temperature-to-
resistance conversion chart.
5. Verify that the Raw A/D Input value changed and reflects the Adjusted A/D 100% value.
3.5.13 HART Interface Module
The HART Interface Module provides the source for the HART devices and uses two test procedures to
verify correct operation.
♦ Verify HART Integrity of Loop Power on page 3-27.
♦ Verify HART Communications on page 3-28.
3.5.13.1 Verify HART Integrity of Loop Power
Equipment Required: Multimeter
1. Measure voltage between terminals A and B to verify channel 1.
2. Measure voltage between terminals A and C to verify channel 2.
3. The voltage read in both measurements should reflect the value of +T less the voltage drop of the
HART devices. Zero voltage indicates an open circuit in the I/O wiring, a defective HART
device, or a defective module.
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3.5.13.2 Verify HART Communications
Equipment Required: Dual-trace Oscilloscope
In this test, the HART module and the ROC act as the host and transmit a polling request to each HART
device. When polled, the HART device responds. Use the oscilloscope to observe the activity on the two
HART communication channels. There is normally one second from the start of one request to the start
of the next request.
1. Attach one input probe to terminal B of the HART module and examine the signal for a polling
request and response for each HART device connected to this channel.
2. Attach the other input probe to terminal C and examine the signal for a polling request and
response for each HART device connected.
3. Compare the two traces. Signal bursts should not appear on both channels simultaneously.
Each device on one channel is polled before the devices on the other channel are polled. If a channel
indicates no response, this could be caused by faulty I/O wiring or a faulty device. If the HART module
tries to poll both channels simultaneously, this could be caused by a defective module, in which case the
module must be replaced.
3.6 Removal, Addition, and Replacement Procedures
Use the following when removing, adding, or replacing I/O modules.
3.6.1 Impact on I/O Point Configuration
When an I/O module is replaced with the same type of I/O module, it is not necessary to reconfigure the
ROC. Modules that are treated as the same type include:
♦ Discrete Input Isolated and DI Source Modules.
♦ Discrete Output Isolated, DO Source, and DO Relay Modules.
♦ Analog Input Loop, AI Differential, AI Source Modules, and RTD Input Modules.
♦ Pulse Input Isolated and PI Source Modules.
♦ Slow Pulse Input Isolated and SPI Source Modules.
If a module is to be replaced with one of the same type, but configuration parameters need to be
changed, use ROCLINK configuration software to make the changes off-line or on-line. To minimize
“down time” before you replace the module, perform changes (except for ROC Display and FST
changes) off-line by first saving the ROC configuration to disk. Modify the disk configuration, replace
the module, and then load the configuration file into the ROC.
To make changes on-line, replace the module, proceed directly to the configuration display for the
affected point, and modify parameters as needed. Remember to consider the impact on FSTs and other
points that reference the affected point.
Any added modules (new I/O points) start up with default configurations. Even though adding a module,
removing a module, or moving a module to a new position in the ROC does not directly affect the
configuration of other I/O points, it can affect the numbering of I/O points of the same type. This, in
turn, can impact an FST or higher-level point because the referencing of I/O points is done by a
sequence-based point number.
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For example, if you have AI modules installed in slots A7, A10, and A11, adding another AI module in
slot A8 changes the point numbers of the Analog Inputs for modules in slots A10 and A11.
If one or more FSTs, or higher level points, such as a PID loop or AGA Flow, have been
configured in the ROC, be sure to reconfigure them according to the changes in I/O modules.
Operational problems will occur if you do not reconfigure the ROC.
3.6.2 Removing and Installing an I/O Module
Use the following procedure to remove/install an I/O module with the ROC power off. The procedure is
performed using ROCLINK configuration software.
There is a possibility of losing the ROC configuration and historical data held in RAM while
performing the following procedure. As a precaution, save the current configuration and
historical data to permanent memory as instructed in Section 2, Troubleshooting and Repair.
Change components only in an area known to be non-hazardous.
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions (such as wearing a grounded wrist
strap) may reset the processor or damage electronic components, resulting in interrupted
operations.
During this procedure all power will be removed from the ROC and devices powered by the ROC.
Ensure that all connected input devices, output devices, and processes remain in a safe state when
power is removed from the ROC and when power is restored to the ROC.
1. Perform a RAM backup as in Section 2, Troubleshooting and Repair.
2. Disconnect the input power by unplugging the 5-terminal connector.
3. Perform one of the following steps, depending on whether the module is to be removed or
installed:
♦ If removing the module, loosen the module retaining screw and remove the module by lifting
straight up. It may be necessary to rock the module gently while lifting.
♦ If installing the module, insert the module pins into the module socket. Press the module
firmly in place. Tighten the module retaining screw. Refer to Section 3.6.1, Impact on I/O
Point Configuration, on page 3-28.
4. After the module is removed/installed, reconnect the input power.
5. Check the configuration data, ROC Displays, and FSTs, and load or modify them as required.
Load and start any user programs as needed.
6. If you changed the configuration, save the current configuration data to memory by selecting
ROC > Flags > Write to EEPROM or Flash Memory Save Configuration as instructed in the
applicable ROCLINK configuration software user manual.
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7. If you changed the configuration, including the history database, FSTs, and ROC Displays, save
them to disk. Refer to Section 2, Troubleshooting and Repair, for more information on
performing saves.
3.7 I/O Module Specifications
The specifications for the various I/O modules are given in this section.
3.7.1 Analog Input Modules—Loop and Differential
Analog Input Loop Module Specifications
FIELD WIRING TERMINALS
A: Loop Power (+T).
B: Analog Input (+).
C: Common (–).
INPUT (CONTINUED)
Impedance: Greater than 400 kΩ (without scaling
resistor).
Normal Mode Rejection: 50 dB @ 60 Hz.
INPUT
Type: Single-ended, voltage sense. Current loop
with scaling resistor (R1).
Loop Current: 0 to 25 mA maximum range. Actual
range depends on scaling resistor used.
Voltage Sensing: 0 to 5 V dc, software configured.
Accuracy: 0.1% of full scale at 20 to 30°C (68 to
86°F). 0.5% of full scale at –40 to 70°C (–40 to
158°F).
POWER REQUIREMENTS
Loop Source: 25 mA maximum, from ROC power
supply (Vs = 11 to 30 V dc).
Module: 4.9 to 5.1 V dc, 6 mA maximum; –4.5 to –
5.5 V dc, 2 mA maximum (supplied by ROC).
ISOLATION
Not isolated. Terminal C tied to power supply
common.
Analog Input Differential Module Specifications
FIELD WIRING TERMINALS
A: Not used.
B: Positive Analog Input (+).
C: Negative Analog Input (–).
INPUT (CONTINUED)
Normal Mode Rejection: 50 dB @ 60 Hz.
Impedance: Greater than 400 kΩ (without scaling
resistor).
INPUT
Type: Voltage sense. Externally-powered current
loop sensing with scaling resistor (R1).
Voltage: 0 to 5 V dc, software configured.
Accuracy: 0.1% of full scale at 20 to 30°C (68 to
86°F). 0.5% of full scale at –40 to 70°C (–40 to
158°F).
POWER REQUIREMENTS
4.9 to 5.1 V dc, 6 mA maximum; –4.5 to –5.5 V dc,
2 mA maximum (supplied by ROC).
3-30
INPUT ISOLATION
Greater than 400 kΩ input to power supply
common.
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ROC364 Instruction Manual
Analog Input Modules—Loop and Differential Common Specifications
SCALING RESISTOR
250 Ω (supplied) for 0 to 20 mA full scale. 100 Ω
for 0 to 50 mA (externally-powered only).
RESOLUTION
12 bits.
FILTER
Single pole, low-pass, 40-ms time constant.
CONVERSION TIME
30 µs typical.
VIBRATION
20 Gs peak or 0.06 in. double amplitude, 10 to
2,000 Hz, per MIL-STD-202 method 204
condition F.
MECHANICAL SHOCK
1500 Gs 0.5 ms half sine per MIL-STD-202 method
213, condition F.
3-31
CASE
Solvent-resistant thermoplastic polyester, meets
UL94V-0.
Dimensions are 15 mm D by 32 mm H by 43 mm
W (0.60 in. D by 1.265 in. H by 1.69 in. W), not
including pins.
ENVIRONMENTAL
Meets the Environmental specifications of the
ROC, in which the module is installed, including
Temperature, Humidity, and Transient Protection
specifications.
WEIGHT
37 g (1.3 oz).
APPROVALS
Approved by CSA for hazardous locations Class I,
Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D.
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3.7.2 Analog Input Source Module
Analog Input Source Specifications
FIELD WIRING TERMINALS
A: 10 V dc.
B: Analog Input.
C: Common.
FILTER
Single pole, low-pass, 40 ms time constant.
INPUT
Type: Single-ended, voltage sense; can be current
loop if scaling resistor (not supplied) is used.
Voltage: 0 to 5 V dc, software configurable.
Resolution: 12 bits.
Accuracy: 0.1% of full scale at 20 to 30°C (68 to
86°F). 0.5% of full scale at –40 to 65°C (–40 to
149°F).
Impedance: Greater than 400 kΩ (without scaling
resistor).
Normal Mode Rejection: 50 db @ 60 Hz.
VIBRATION
20 Gs peak or 0.06 in. double amplitude,
10 to 2,000 Hz, per MIL-STD-202 method 204
condition F.
CONVERSION TIME
30 µs typical.
SOURCE POWER
9.99 to 10.01 V dc, 20 mA maximum.
MECHANICAL SHOCK
1500 Gs 0.5 ms half sine per MIL-STD-202,
method 213, condition F.
CASE
Solvent-resistant thermoplastic polyester, meets
UL94V-0. Dimensions 15 mm D by 32 mm H by 43
mm W (0.6 in. D by 1.265 in. H by 1.690 in. W), not
including pins.
POWER REQUIREMENTS
4.9 to 5.1 V dc, 6 mA maximum; –4.5 to –5.5 V dc,
2 mA maximum (all supplied by ROC).
ENVIRONMENTAL
Meets the Environmental specifications of the
ROC, in which the module is installed, including
Temperature, Humidity, and Transient Protection.
INPUT ISOLATION
Not isolated. Terminal C is tied to power supply
ground.
WEIGHT
37 g (1.3 oz).
SURGE WITHSTAND
Meets IEEE 472 / ANSI C37.90a.
APPROVALS
Approved by CSA for hazardous locations Class I,
Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D.
3.7.3 Analog Output Source Module
Analog Output Source Specifications
FIELD WIRING TERMINALS
A: Voltage Output.
B: Current Output.
C: Common.
VOLTAGE OUTPUT
Type: Voltage source.
Range: 1 to 5 V dc with 0 to 5.25 V dc
overranging. 25 mA maximum.
Resolution: 12 bits.
3-32
VOLTAGE OUTPUT (CONTINUED)
Accuracy: 0.1% of full-scale output from 20 to
30°C (68 to 86°F). 0.5% of full-scale output for
–40 to 65°C (–40 to 149°F).
Settling Time: 100 µs maximum.
Reset Action: Output returns to zero percent
output or last value (software configurable) on
power-up (Warm Start) or on watchdog timeout.
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Analog Output Source Specifications (Continued)
CURRENT OUTPUT
Type: Current loop.
Range: 4 to 20 mA with 0 to 22 mA overranging,
adjusted by scaling resistor. A 0 Ω resistor is
supplied.
Loop Source: 11 to 30 V dc, as supplied by ROC
for “+T” power (typically 24 V dc).
Loop Resistance at 12 V dc: 0 Ω minimum,
250 Ω maximum.
Loop Resistance at 24 V dc: 200 Ω minimum,
750 Ω maximum.
Resolution: 12 bits.
Accuracy: 0.1% of full-scale output at 20 to 30°C
(68 to 86°F). 0.5% of full-scale at –40 to 65°C
(–40 to 149°F).
Settling Time: 100 µs maximum.
Reset Action: Output returns to zero percent
output or last value (software configurable) on
power-up (Warm Start) or on watchdog timeout.
POWER REQUIREMENTS
Module Alone: 24 mW typical.
Module w/Current Loop: 400 mW @ 4 mA output
to 590 mW @ 20 mA output.
VIBRATION
20 Gs peak or 0.06 in. double amplitude,
10 to 2,000 Hz, per MIL-STD-202 method 204
condition F.
MECHANICAL SHOCK
1500 Gs 0.5 ms half sine per MIL-STD-202,
method 213, condition F.
WEIGHT
37 g (1.3 oz) typical.
CASE
Solvent-resistant thermoplastic polyester, meets
UL94V-0.
Dimensions are 15 mm by 32 mm by 43 mm (0.6
in. D by 1.265 in. H by 1.69 in. W), not including
pins.
ENVIRONMENTAL
Meets the Environmental specifications of the ROC
in which the module is installed, including
Temperature, Humidity, and Transient Protection.
APPROVALS
Approved by CSA for hazardous locations Class I,
Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D.
OUTPUT ISOLATION
Not isolated. Terminal C tied to power supply
common.
3.7.4 Discrete Input Modules—Source and Isolated
Discrete Input Source Module Specifications
FIELD WIRING TERMINALS
A: Not used.
B: Discrete device source/signal.
C: Common.
INPUT
Type: Contact sense.
Range: Inactive: 0 to 0.5 mA. Active: 2 to 9 mA.
Source Voltage: 11 to 30 V dc.
Source Current: Determined by source voltage
(Vs), loop resistance (Rl), and scaling resistor (Rs,
10 Ω supplied):
I = (Vs – 1)/(3.3K + Rl + Rs)
3-33
POWER REQUIREMENTS
Source Input: 9 mA maximum from ROC power
supply.
Module: 4.9 to 5.1 V dc, 1 mA maximum (supplied
by ROC).
INPUT ISOLATION
Not isolated. Terminal C tied to power supply
common.
Input and Output Modules
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
Discrete Input Isolated Module Specifications
POWER REQUIREMENTS
4.9 to 5.1 V dc, 1 mA maximum (supplied by ROC).
FIELD WIRING TERMINALS
A: Not used.
B: Positive Discrete Input.
C: Negative Discrete Input.
INPUT
Type: Two-state current sense.
Range: Inactive: 0 to 0.5 mA. Active: 2 to 9 mA.
Current: Determined by input voltage (Vi), loop
resistance (Rl), and scaling resistor (Rs), 10 Ω
supplied):
I = (Vi – 1)/(3.3K + Rl + Rs)
Maximum Voltage: 30 V dc forward, 5 V dc
reverse.
INPUT ISOLATION
Isolation: 100 Ω minimum, input to output, and
input or output to case.
Voltage: 4,000 V ac (RMS) minimum, input to
output.
Capacitance: 6 pF typical, input to output.
Discrete Input Modules—Source and Isolated Common Specifications
INPUT
Loop Resistance (Rl): 4.5 kΩ maximum.
Frequency Response: 0 to 10 Hz maximum, 50%
Duty Cycle.
Input Filter (Debounce): Software filter is
configured as the amount of time that the input
must remain in the active state to be recognized.
VIBRATION
20 Gs peak or 0.06 in. double amplitude,
10 to 2,000 Hz, per MIL-STD-202 method 204
condition F.
MECHANICAL SHOCK
1500 Gs 0.5 ms half sine per MIL-STD-202 method
213, condition F.
3-34
WEIGHT
37 g (1.3 oz).
CASE
Solvent-resistant thermoplastic polyester, meets
UL94V-0.
Dimensions are 15 mm D by 32 mm H by 43 mm W
(0.60 in. D by 1.27 in. H by 1.69 in. W), not
including pins.
ENVIRONMENTAL
Meets the Environmental specifications of the ROC
in which the module is installed, including
Temperature, Humidity, and Transient Protection.
APPROVALS
Approved by CSA for hazardous locations Class I,
Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D.
Input and Output Modules
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
3.7.5 Discrete Output Modules—Source and Isolated
Discrete Output Source Module Specifications
FIELD WIRING TERMINALS
A: Not used.
B: Positive (to field device).
C: Negative.
OUTPUT
Type: Solid-state relay, current sourced, normallyopen.
Active Voltage: 11 to 30 V dc provided.
Active Current: Limited to 57 mA.
Inactive Current: Less than 100 µA with 30 V dc
source.
Frequency: 0 to 10 Hz maximum.
POWER REQUIREMENTS
Output Source: 11 to 30 V dc, 57 mA maximum
from ROC power supply.
Module: 4.9 to 5.1 V dc. 1 mA in “Off” state and 6
mA in “On” state.
OUTPUT ISOLATION
Not isolated. Terminal C tied to power supply
common.
Discrete Output Isolated Module Specifications
POWER REQUIREMENTS
4.9 to 5.1 V dc. 1 mA in “Off” state and 6 mA in “On”
state.
FIELD WIRING TERMINALS
A: Positive (field device power).
B: Negative.
C: Not Used.
OUTPUT
Type: Solid-state relay, normally-open.
Active Voltage: 11 to 30 V dc.
Active Current: Fuse-limited to 1.0 A continuous at
75°C (167°F), externally supplied.
Inactive Current: Less than 100 µA at 30 V dc.
Frequency: 0 to 10 Hz maximum.
OUTPUT ISOLATION
Isolation: 100 MΩ minimum, input to output, and
input or output to case.
Voltage: 4,000 V ac (RMS) minimum, input to
output.
Capacitance: 6 pF typical, input to output.
Discrete Output Modules—Source and Isolated Common Specifications
VIBRATION
20 Gs peak or 0.06 in. double amplitude,
10 to 2,000 Hz, per MIL-STD-202 method 204
condition F.
ENVIRONMENTAL
Meets the Environmental specifications of the ROC
in which the module is installed, including
Temperature, Humidity, and Transient Protection.
MECHANICAL SHOCK
1500 Gs 0.5 ms half sine per MIL-STD-202, method
213, condition F.
WEIGHT
37 g (1.3 oz) typical.
CASE
Solvent-resistant thermoplastic polyester, meets
UL94V-0.
Dimensions are 15 mm D by 32 mm H by 43 W mm
(0.6 in. D by 1.265 in. H by 1.690 in. W), not
including pins.
3-35
APPROVALS
Approved by CSA for hazardous locations Class I,
Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D.
Input and Output Modules
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
3.7.6 Discrete Output Relay Module
Discrete Output Relay Module Specifications
VIBRATION
21 G peak or 0.06" double amplitude, 10-2000 Hz
per MIL-Std-202, Method 204, Condition F.
FIELD WIRING TERMINALS
A: Normally-open contacts.
B: Common.
C: Normally-closed contacts.
OUTPUT
Type: SPDT dry relay contact.
Maximum Contact Rating (Resistive Load):
30 V dc, 4 Amps.
125 V ac, 4 Amps.
250 V ac, 2 Amps.
Frequency: 0 to 10 Hz maximum.
OUTPUT ISOLATION
Isolation: 10 MΩ minimum, input to output, and
input or output to case.
Voltage: 3,000 V ac (RMS) minimum, input to
output.
POWER REQUIREMENTS
12 V dc Version: 4.9 to 5.1 V dc, 1 mA for module.
12 V dc, 25 mA for relay coil (energized) typical.
24 V dc Version: 4.9 to 5.1 V dc, 1 mA for module.
24 V dc, 12.5 mA for relay coil (energized) typical.
MECHANICAL SHOCK
1500 G 0.5 ms half sine per MIL-Std-202, Method
213, Condition F.
WEIGHT
37 g (1.3 oz) typical.
CASE
Solvent-resistant thermoplastic polyester, meets
UL94V-0.
Dimensions are 15 mm D by 32 mm H by 43 mm
W (0.6 in. D by 1.265 in. H by 1.690 in. W), not
including pins.
ENVIRONMENTAL
Meets the Environmental specifications of the ROC
in which the module is installed, including
Temperature, Humidity, and Transient Protection.
APPROVALS
Approved by CSA for hazardous locations Class I,
Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D.
3.7.7 Pulse Input Modules—Source and Isolated
Pulse Input Source Module Specifications
FIELD WIRING TERMINALS
A: Not used.
B: Pulse Input/source voltage.
C: Common.
INPUT
Type: Contact sense.
Source Voltage: 11 to 30 V dc.
Range: Inactive: 0 to 0.5 mA. Active: 3 to 12 mA.
Source Current: Determined by source voltage
(Vs), loop resistance (Rl) and scaling resistor (Rs):
I = (Vs – 1)/(2.2K + Rl + Rs)
3-36
POWER REQUIREMENTS
Source Input: 11 to 30 V dc, 6 mA maximum from
ROC power supply.
Module: 4.9 to 5.1 V dc, 1 mA maximum (supplied
by ROC).
INPUT ISOLATION
Not isolated. Terminal C tied to power supply
common.
Input and Output Modules
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
Pulse Input Isolated Module Specifications
POWER REQUIREMENTS
4.9 to 5.1 V dc, 2 mA maximum (supplied by ROC).
FIELD WIRING TERMINALS
A: Not used.
B: Positive Pulse Input.
C: Negative Pulse Input.
INPUT
Type: Two-state, current-pulse sense.
Range: Inactive: 0 to 0.5 mA. Active: 3 to 12 mA.
Input Current: Determined by input voltage (Vi),
loop resistance (Rl) and scaling resistor (Rs):
I = (Vi – 1)/(2.2K + Rl + Rs)
INPUT ISOLATION
Isolation: 100 MΩ minimum, input to output, and
input or output to case.
Voltage: 4,000 V ac (RMS) minimum, input to
output.
Capacitance: 6 pF typical, input to output.
Pulse Input Modules—Source and Isolated Common Specifications
INPUT
Scaling Resistor (Rs): 10 Ω supplied (see Input
Source Current equation to compute other value).
Frequency Response: 0 to 12 kHz maximum, 50%
Duty Cycle.
Input Filter: Single-pole low-pass, 10 µs time
constant.
VIBRATION
20 Gs peak or 0.06 in. double amplitude,
10 to 2,000 Hz, per MIL-STD-202 method 204
condition F.
MECHANICAL SHOCK
1500 Gs 0.5 ms half sine per MIL-STD-202, method
213, condition F.
3-37
WEIGHT
37 g (1.3 oz).
CASE
Solvent-resistant thermoplastic polyester, meets
UL94V-0.
Dimensions are 15 mm D by 32 mm H by 43 mm W
(0.60 in. D by 1.27 in. H by 1.69 in. W), not
including pins.
ENVIRONMENTAL
Meets the Environmental specifications of the ROC
in which the module is installed, including Temperature, Humidity, and Transient Protection.
APPROVALS
Approved by CSA for hazardous locations Class I,
Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D.
Input and Output Modules
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
3.7.8 Slow Pulse Input Modules—Source and Isolated
Slow Pulse Input Source Module Specifications
MODULE RACK TERMINALS
A: Not used.
B: Input/source voltage.
C: Common.
INPUT
Type: Contact sense.
Range: Inactive: 0 to 0.5 mA. Active: 2 to 9 mA.
Source Voltage: 11 to 30 V dc.
Source Current: Determined by source voltage
(Vs), loop resistance (Rl), and scaling resistor (Rs):
I = (Vs – 1)/(3.3K + Rl + Rs)
POWER REQUIREMENTS
Source Input: 11 to 30 V dc, 9 mA maximum from
ROC power supply.
Module: 4.9 to 5.1 V dc, 1 mA maximum (supplied
by ROC).
INPUT ISOLATION
Not isolated. Terminal C tied to power supply
common.
Slow Pulse Input Isolated Module Specifications
POWER REQUIREMENTS
4.9 to 5.1 V dc, 1 mA maximum (supplied by ROC).
FIELD WIRING TERMINALS
A: Not used.
B: Positive input.
C: Negative input.
INPUT
Type: Two-state current sense.
Range: Inactive: 0 to 0.5 mA. Active: 2 to 9 mA.
Current: Determined by input volt-age (Vi), loop
resistance (Rl), and scaling resistor (Rs):
I = (Vi – 1)/(3.3K + Rl + Rs)
Maximum Voltage: 30 V dc forward, 5 V dc
reverse.
INPUT ISOLATION
Isolation: 100 MΩ minimum, input to output, and
input or output to case.
Voltage: 4,000 V ac (RMS) minimum, input to
output.
Capacitance: 6 pF typical, input to output.
Slow Pulse Input Modules—Source and Isolated Common Specifications
INPUT
Loop Resistance (Rl): 4.5 kΩ maximum for best
efficiency.
Scaling Resistor (Rs): 10 Ω supplied (see Input
Source Current equation to compute other value).
Frequency Response: 0 to 10 Hz maximum, 50%
Duty Cycle.
Input Filter (Debounce): 50 ms.
WEIGHT
37 g (1.3 oz).
VIBRATION
20 Gs peak or 0.06 in. double amplitude,
10 to 2,000 Hz, per MIL-STD-202 method 204
condition F.
ENVIRONMENTAL
Meets the Environmental specifications of the ROC
in which the module is installed, including
Temperature, Humidity, and Transient Protection.
MECHANICAL SHOCK
1500 Gs 0.5 ms half sine per MIL-STD-202 method
213, condition F.
APPROVALS
Approved by CSA for hazardous locations Class I,
Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D.
3-38
CASE
Solvent-resistant thermoplastic polyester, meets
UL94V-0.
Dimensions 15 mm D by 32 mm H by 43 mm W
(0.6 in. D by 1.265 in. H by 1.690 in. W), not
including pins.
Input and Output Modules
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
3.7.9 Pulse Input Module—Low Level
Pulse Input Module—Low Level Specifications
MODULE RACK TERMINALS
A: Not used.
B: Positive Pulse Input.
C: Negative Pulse Input.
VIBRATION
20 Gs peak or 0.06 in. double amplitude,
10 to 2,000 Hz, per MIL-STD-202 method 204
condition F.
INPUT
Type: Two-state, voltage-pulse sense.
Active Range: 30 mV minimum to 3 V maximum,
peak-to-peak.
Frequency Response: 0 to 3 kHz, 50% Duty
Cycle.
Impedance: 500 kΩ.
MECHANICAL SHOCK
1500 Gs 0.5 ms half sine per MIL-STD-202,
method 213, condition F.
POWER REQUIREMENTS
4.9 to 5.1 V dc, 2 mA maximum (supplied by ROC).
INPUT ISOLATION
Isolation: 10 MΩ minimum, input or output to case.
Voltage: 4,000 V ac (RMS) minimum, input to
output.
Capacitance: 6 pF typical, input to output.
CASE
Solvent-resistant thermoplastic polyester, meets
UL94V-0.
Dimensions 15 mm D by 32 H mm by 43 mm (W
0.60 in. D by 1.27 in. H by 1.69 in. W), not
including pins.
WEIGHT
37 g (1.3 oz).
ENVIRONMENTAL
Meets the Environmental specifications of the ROC
in which the module is installed, including
Temperature, Humidity, and Transient Protection.
APPROVALS
Approved by CSA for hazardous locations Class I,
Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D.
3-39
Input and Output Modules
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
3.7.10 Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD) Input Module
Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD) Input Module Specifications
POWER REQUIREMENT
11 to 30 V dc, 38 mA maximum, supplied by ROC
power supply.
FIELD WIRING TERMINALS
A: RTD “Red” Input.
B: RTD “White” Input.
C: RTD “White” Input (3- or 4-wire).
INPUT
RTD Type: 100 Ω, platinum, with a temperature
coefficient of 0.3850*, 0.3902, 0.3916, 0.3923, or
0.3926 Ω/°C.
Temperature Range: Fixed at –50 to 100°C
(–58 to 212°F).
Excitation Current: 0.8 mA.
Impedance: 4 MΩ minimum.
Filter: Single pole, low pass, 4 Hz corner
frequency.
RESOLUTION
12 bits.
VIBRATION
20 Gs peak or 0.06 in. double amplitude,
10 to 2,000 Hz, per MIL-STD-202 method 204
condition F.
MECHANICAL SHOCK
1500 Gs 0.5 ms half sine per MIL-STD-202 method
213, condition F.
ENVIRONMENTAL
Meets the Environmental specifications of the ROC
in which the module is installed, including
Temperature and Humidity.
WEIGHT
37 g (1.3 oz).
ACCURACY
± 0.1% of Input Temp. Range at Operating Temp.
from 23 to 27°C (73 to 81°F).
± 0.45% of Input Temp. Range at Operating Temp.
from 0 to 70°C (32 to 158°F).
± 0.8% of Input Temp. Range at Operating Temp.
from –20 to 0°C (–4 to 32°F).
LINEARITY
± 0.03% ± 1 LSB independent conformity to a
straight line.
CASE
Solvent-resistant thermoplastic polyester, meets
UL94V-0.
Dimensions are 15 mm D by 32 mm H by 43 mm
W (0.60 in. D by 1.265 in. H by 1.69 in. W), not
including pins.
APPROVALS
Approved by CSA for hazardous locations Class I,
Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D.
* Available as an accessory.
3-40
Input and Output Modules
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
3.7.11 HART Interface Module
HART Interface Module Specifications
FIELD WIRING TERMINALS
A: Loop Power (+T).
B: Channel 1 (CH1).
C: Channel 2 (CH2).
VIBRATION
20 Gs peak or 0.06 in. double amplitude,
10 to 2,000 Hz, per MIL-STD-202 method 204
condition F.
CHANNELS
Two HART-compatible channels, which
communicate via digital signals only.
Mode: Half-duplex.
Data Rate: 1200 bps asynchronous.
Parity: Odd.
Format: 8 bit.
Modulation: Phase coherent, Frequency Shift
Keyed (FSK) per Bell 202.
Carrier Frequencies: Mark: 1200 Hz.
Space: 2200 Hz, ± 0.1%.
MECHANICAL SHOCK
1500 Gs 0.5 ms half sine per MIL-STD-202,
method 213, condition F.
HART MODULES AND DEVICES SUPPORTED
Up to six HART Modules and 32 HART devices
maximum.
Point-to-Point Mode: Two HART devices per
module (one per channel).
Multi-drop Mode: Up to ten HART devices per
module (five per channel).
LOOP POWER
Total power supplied through module for HART
devices is 20 mA per channel at 10 to 29 V dc.
Each HART device typically uses 4 mA.
WEIGHT
48 g (1.7 oz) nominal.
CASE
Solvent-resistant thermoplastic polyester, meets
UL94V-0.
Dimensions 15 mm D by 51 mm H by 43 mm W
(0.60 in. D by 2.00 in. H by 1.69 in. W), not
including pins.
ENVIRONMENTAL
Meets the Environmental specifications of the ROC
in which the module is installed, including
Temperature, Humidity, and Surge specifications.
APPROVALS
Approved by CSA for hazardous locations Class I,
Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D.
POWER REQUIREMENTS
Loop Source: 11 to 30 V dc, 40 mA maximum
from ROC power supply.
Module: 4.9 to 5.1 V dc, 17 mA maximum.
3-41
Input and Output Modules
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
SECTION 4 – COMMUNICATIONS CARDS
4.1 Scope
This section describes the communications cards used with the Remote Operations Controllers.
This section contains the following information:
Section
4.1 Scope
4.2 Product Descriptions
4.3 Installing Communications Cards
4.4 Connecting Communications Cards to Wiring
4.5 Troubleshooting and Repair
4.6 Communication Card Specifications
Page
4-1
4-1
4-8
4-12
4-19
4-21
4.2 Product Descriptions
The communications cards provide communications between the ROC and a host system or external
devices. The ROC364 provide room for two communications cards. The communications cards install
directly onto the Master Controller Unit (MCU) board and activate communications ports (COM1 and
COM2) when installed. The following cards are available:
♦ EIA-232 (RS-232) Serial Communications Card.
♦ EIA-422 / 485 (RS-422 / 485) Serial Communications Card.
♦ Radio Modem Communications Card.
♦ Leased-Line Modem Communications Card.
♦ Dial-Up Modem Communications Card.
NOTE: Refer to Form A6090 for information concerning the optional Remote MVS
Communications Card.
NOTE: Use a standard screwdriver with a slotted (flat bladed) 1/8-inch width tip when wiring all
terminal blocks.
4-1
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
4.2.1 EIA-232 (RS-232) Serial Communications Card
The EIA-232 (RS-232) communications cards meet all EIA-232 (RS-232) specifications for singleended, asynchronous data transmission over distances of up to 15.24 meters (50 feet). The EIA-232 (RS232) communications cards provide transmit, receive, and modem control signals. Normally, not all of
the control signals are used for any single application.
LED Indicators
Figure 4-1. EIA-232 (RS-232) Serial Communications Card
The current EIA-232 (RS-232) communications card includes LED indicators that display the status of
the RXD, TXD, DTR, DCD, CTS, and RTS control lines. LED indicators are detailed in Table 4-1.
Refer to Section 4.4.1, EIA-232 (RS-232) Communications Card Wiring, on page 4-13.
4-2
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
Table 4-1. Communications Card LED Indicators
LED
RXD
TXD
DTR
DCD
CTS
RTS
RI
DSR
OH
Status and Activity
The RXD receive data LED blinks when data is being received. The LED is on for a space and off
for a mark.
The TXD transmit data LED blinks when data is being transmitted. The LED is on for a space and
off for a mark.
The DTR data terminal ready LED lights when the modem is ready to answer an incoming call.
When DTR goes off, a connected modem disconnects.
The DCD data carrier detect LED lights when a valid carrier tone is detected.
CTS indicates a clear to send message.
The RTS ready to send LED lights when the modem is ready to transmit.
The RI is the ring indicator LED light.
The DSR is the data set ready indicator LED light.
The OH is the off hook indicator LED light. A dial tone has been detected and the telephone line is
in use by your modem.
NOTE: The last three LED indicators are used only on the Dial-up modem communications card.
4-3
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
4.2.2 EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) Serial Communications Card
The EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) communication cards meet all EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) specifications
for differential, asynchronous transmission of data over distances of up to 1220 meters (4000 feet). The
EIA-422 (RS-422) drivers are designed for party-line applications where one driver is connected to, and
transmits on, a bus with up to ten receivers. The EIA-485 (RS-485) drivers are designed for true multipoint applications with up to 32 drivers and 32 receivers on a single bus. Refer to Figure 4-2.
NOTE: EIA-422 (RS-422) devices cannot be used in a true multi-point application where
multiple drivers and receivers are connected to a single bus and any one of them can transmit or
receive data.
LED Indicators
P4 Jumper
Figure 4-2. EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) Serial Communications Card
The current EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) communications card includes LED indicators that display the
status of the RXD, TXD, and RTS control lines. LED indicators are detailed in Table 4-1. Jumper P4
applies to the transmit mode. The default setting (RTS jumper on) allows a multi-drop configuration, such
as is normally possible with EIA-485 (RS-485) communications. Refer to Section 4.4.2, EIA-422/485
(RS-422 / 485) Communications Card Wiring, on page 4-14 for more information.
4-4
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
4.2.3 Radio Modem Communications Card
The Radio Modem Communications Card sends and receives full-duplex or half-duplex, asynchronous
Frequency Shift Keyed (FSK) signals to the audio circuit of a two-way radio. The modem incorporates a
solid-state push-to-talk (PTT) switch for keying the radio transmitter. Refer to Figure 4-3.
LED indicators on the card show the status of the RXD, TXD, DTR, DCD, CTS, and RTS control
lines. LED indicators are detailed in Table 4-1 on page 4-3.
Jumper P6 determines whether the PTT signal is isolated or grounded. Use connector P7 signals for
monitoring or connecting to an analyzer. Refer to Section 4.3.1, Setting Modem Card Jumpers, on page
4-10 for more information.
The output attenuation can be reduced, as necessary, to better match the modem output to the line or
radio. Plugging a resistor into the card at R2 makes the adjustment. Refer to Section 4.3.2, Setting
Modem Card Attenuation Levels, on page 4-11.
Refer to Section 4.4.3, Radio Modem Communications Card Wiring, on page 4-15.
FB1
1
R1
30
U2
R2
30
J1
P1
R2 Attenuation
C2
C4
C1
P4
2
4
R7
R8
R9
R10
R11
R12
2
FB3
FB4
2W
4W
P5
2
4
P6
ISO
GND
2
4
C12
U5 C8
C10
C13
U7
U4
C11
C19
U8
R21
C14
R22
Y2
C22
C20
J2
P8
30
W1
RP2
R23
C24 C23
RTS CTS DCD DTR TXD RXD
RP1
LED Indicators
CR6 CR5 CR4 CR3 CR2 CR1
U6
P6 Jumper
VR3
VR4
VR5
VR6
C15
C16
R13
R14
R15
CR7
CR8
R16
C17
R17
R18
R19
R20
C18
1
1
2
C5
C6
C7
FB2
VR2
T2
T1
C21
2W
4W
VR1
30
2
4
U1
2W
4W
R6
P3
U3
C9
R5
R26
P2
Y1
R24
C25
FB5
FB6
U9
P7
1
P7 Connector
7
2
U10
1
COM PORTS
1
2
5
C28
C29
C27
LEASED LINE/RADIO MODEM
R25
C26
3
DOC0247A
Figure 4-3. Radio Modem Communications Card
4-5
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
4.2.4 Leased-Line Modem Communications Card
The Leased-Line Modem Communications Card is a 202T modem that is FCC part 68 tested for use
with leased-line or private-line telephone networks. Refer to Figure 4-4. Two- or four-wire, half- or fullduplex asynchronous operation is supported at a software selectable 300, 600, and 1200 baud to Bell and
CCITT standards.
LED indicators on the card show the status of the RXD, TXD, DTR, DCD, CTS, and RTS control lines.
LED indicators are detailed in Table 4-1 on page 4-3.
The Leased-Line Modem Communications Card has three jumpers (P3, P4, and P5) that permit either
two-wire or four-wire operation. Use connector P7 signals for monitoring or connecting to an analyzer.
Refer to Section 4.3.1, Setting Modem Card Jumpers, on page 4-10 for more information.
The output attenuation can be reduced, as necessary, to better match the modem output to the line or
radio. Plugging a resistor into the card at R2 makes the adjustment. Refer to Section 4.3.2, Setting
Modem Card Attenuation Levels, on page 4-11.
Refer to Section 4.4.4, Leased-Line Modem Communications Card Wiring, on page 4-16.
FB1
1
R1
30
U2
R2
30
J1
P1
R2 Attenuation
C2
C4
C1
P4
2
4
2W
4W
P5
2
4
R7
R8
R9
R10
R11
R12
ISO
GND
FB3
FB4
C12
U5 C8
C10
C13
U7
U4
P5 Jumper
VR3
VR4
VR5
VR6
C19
U8
R21
R22
J2
30
C18
Y2
C22
C20
P8
W1
RP2
C24 C23
R23
R24
C25
FB5
FB6
U9
P7
P7 Connector
1
3
U10
7
1
COM PORTS
1
2
5
C28
C27
LEASED LINE/RADIO MODEM
C29
Y1
R25
CR6 CR5 CR4 CR3 CR2 CR1
C11
P4 Jumper
P6
2
C15
4
C16
R13
R14
R15
CR7
CR8
R16
C17
R17
R18
R19
R20
C14
C26
RP1
LED Indicators
RTS CTS DCD DTR TXD RXD
U6
P3 Jumper
2
2
1
1
2
C5
C6
C7
FB2
VR2
T2
T1
C21
2W
4W
VR1
30
2
4
U1
2W
4W
R6
P3
U3
C9
R5
R26
P2
DOC0246A
Figure 4-4. Leased-Line Modem Communications Card
4-6
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
4.2.5 Dial-Up Modem Communications Card
The Dial-up Modem Communications Card supports V.22 bis / 2400 baud communications with autoanswer/auto-dial features. The modem card is FCC part 68 approved for use with public-switched
telephone networks (PSTNs). The FCC label on the card provides the FCC registration number and the
ringer equivalent. The modem card has automatic adaptive and fixed compromise equalization,
eliminating the need to adjust ports or move jumpers during installation and setup. Refer to Figure 4-6
and Figure 4-5.
The modem card interfaces to two-wire, full-duplex telephone lines using asynchronous operation at
data rates of 600, 1200, or 2400. The card interfaces to a PSTN through an RJ11 jack. The modem can
be controlled using industry-standard AT command software. A 40-character command line is provided
for the AT command set, which is compatible with EIA document TR302.2/88-08006.
The modem automatically hangs up after a configured period of communications inactivity. Automated
Dial-up Spontaneous-Report-by-Exception (SRBX) alarm reporting capabilities are possible with the
FlashPAC. Refer to the appropriate ROCLINK user manual for configuration information.
LED indicators on the card show the status of the RXD, TXD, DTR, DSR, RI, and OH control lines.
Refer to Table 4-1. The modem card also provides EIA-232 (RS-232) level output signals for an
analyzer at the COM1 or COM2.
Refer to Section 4.4.5, Dial-Up Modem Communications Card Wiring, on page 4-18.
LED Indicators
DOC0389A
Figure 4-5. Dial-up Modem Communications Card – New
4-7
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
30
C1
CR1
P2
R1
1
30
R2
FB1
FB2
FB3
C2
U1
C3
U3
1
2
U2
C4
C5
U4
FB5
C6
C19
2
1
J1
P1
C18
FB4
FB
C13
U8
30
FB7
P3
30
FB8
U6
R3
R4
U7
C8
C9
COM PORTS
1
2
C11
C7
R5
C12
Y1
C17
1
U5
FB
FB6
J2
C16
CR5
2
CR7
CR4
C15
CR6
C10
CR3
C14
DSR DTR TXD RXD
RI
LED Indicators
OH
RP1
CR2
DOC0245A
Figure 4-6. Dial-up Modem Communications Card – Old
4.3 Installing Communications Cards
The following procedures assume the first-time installation of a communications card in a ROC that
is currently not in service. For units currently in service, refer to the procedures in Section 4.5,
Troubleshooting and Repair, on page 4-19.
Change components only in an area known to be non-hazardous.
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions (such as wearing a grounded wrist
strap) may reset the processor or damage electronic components, resulting in interrupted
operations.
To install a communications card, proceed as follows:
1. Remove the power from the ROC.
2. Remove the FlashPAC.
3. Remove the screws that hold the MCU upper cover in place, and lift off the cover.
4. Install the communications card onto the MCU. Orient the card with the COM PORTS arrow
pointing down. Plug the card into its mating connectors and gently press until the connectors
firmly seat.
5. Install the retaining screw to secure the card. For Dial-up and Leased-Line communications
cards, continue with step 5; otherwise, proceed to step 7.
4-8
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
6. Remove the plastic plug on the right-hand side of the ROC chassis and install the phone jack in
the hole. Figure 4-7 shows the jack location.
7. Connect the jack cable to the P2 connector on the communications card. You may discard the
square shim that accompanies the installation kit.
RJ11 Phone Jack
Figure 4-7. Phone Jack Location
NOTE: If you are installing a Dial-up or Leased-Line Modem Card, it is recommended that you
install a telephone-style surge protector between the RJ11 jack and the outside line.
8. If you are installing a Radio or Leased-Line Modem Card, be sure to set the jumpers on the card
in the proper position as described in Table 4-2, Jumper Positions for the Modem Cards, on page
4-10.
9. If you are installing a Radio or Leased-Line Modem Card, be sure to set the output attenuation
level as described in Table 4-3, Radio and Leased-Line Modem Communications Card
Attenuation Levels, on page 4-11.
10. If a second communications card is to be installed, repeat steps 3 through 7. Install the second
card on top of the first communications card.
10. Reinstall the cover.
11. After installing the communications card, apply the LED identification decal to the window on
the front cover. Figure 4-8 shows the decal location.
12. Install the FlashPAC.
13. Refer to Section 4.4, Connecting Communications Cards to Wiring, on page 4-12 for information
on connecting wiring communications cards.
4-9
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
COM 2
COM 1
RAD/PL
RXD
TXD
DTR
DCD
CTS
RAD/PL
RXD
TXD
DTR
DCD
CTS
RTS
RTS
2ND DECAL
1ST DECAL
DOC0118A
Figure 4-8. Location of LED Identification Decal
4.3.1 Setting Modem Card Jumpers
The Leased-Line and Radio Modem Communications Cards make use of jumpers to select certain
operational modes. These jumpers must be properly positioned for the modem to operate correctly.
Table 4-2 shows the operating modes and the associated jumper positions for the cards. Refer to Figure
4-3 and Figure 4-4 for jumper locations.
The Leased-Line Communications Card is set by default for 2-wire operation. To use it for 4-wire
operation, jumpers P3, P4, and P5 must be placed in the positions indicated in Table 4-2.
The Radio Modem Communications Card uses jumper P6 to enable power control for keying a radio.
The jumper either grounds or isolates the push-to-talk (PTT) return line. Jumper P6 has a default setting
of GND (ground), but it can be set to ISO (isolated) to achieve a floating PTT, if the radio circuit
requires it.
Table 4-2. Jumper Positions for the Modem Cards
Mode
2-Wire (default)
4-Wire
Mode
PTT Grounded (default)
PTT Isolated
4-10
Leased-Line Modem Jumpers
P3
P4
P5
2W
2W
2W
4W
4W
4W
Radio Modem Jumper
P6
–
–
GND
–
–
ISO
–
–
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
4.3.2 Setting Modem Card Attenuation Levels
The output attenuation of the Leased-Line and Radio Modem Communications Cards is set by default to
0 dB (no attenuation). This level can be reduced, as necessary, to better match the modem output to the
line or radio. The adjustment is made by plugging a resistor into the card at the location labeled R2.
Refer to Figure 4-9. Table 4-3 lists resistor values and the amount of attenuation they provide.
Table 4-3. Radio and Leased-Line Modem Communications Card Attenuation Levels
Attenuation
(dB)
–2
–4
–6
–8
–10
Notes:
R2 Value
(Ohms)
205 K
82.5 K
47.5 K
30.9 K
21.5 K
Attenuation
(dB)
–12
–14
–16
–18
–20
R2 Value
(Ohms)
15.8 K
11.5 K
8.66 K
6.65 K
5.11 K
1. All resistor values are nominal; 1% ¼ W resistors are acceptable.
2. Attenuation for leased or private-line operation or for a GE MCS
radio is normally in this case, no resistor is needed.
3. Attenuation for a GE TMX radio is typically –20 dB.
4. Attenuation for an MDS radio is typically –10 dB.
R2 Attenuation Resistor
R2
COM PORTS
Figure 4-9. Location of Attenuation Resistor
4-11
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
4.4 Connecting Communications Cards to Wiring
Signal wiring connections to the communications cards are made through the communications port
connector and through TELCO (RJ11) connectors supplied with certain modem cards. These
connections are summarized in Table 4-4 and detailed in Sections 4.4.1 to 4.4.5.
NOTE: Use a standard screwdriver with a slotted (flat bladed) 1/8" width tip when wiring all
terminal blocks.
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions (such as wearing a grounded wrist
strap) may reset the processor or damage electronic components, resulting in interrupted
operations.
Table 4-4. ROC300-Series Communications Card Signals
Comm Card
Port Pin
EIA-232 (RS-232) CARD
EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485)
CARD, 422 Usage
EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485)
CARD, 485 Usage
RADIO MODEM
LEASED-LINE MODEM,
COMM Port, 4-wire Private
Line
LEASED-LINE MODEM,
RJ11 Port, 2-Wire
LEASED-LINE MODEM,
RJ11 Port, 4-Wire
DIAL-UP MODEM, RJ11
Port
DIAL-UP MODEM, COMM
Port (output only for
analyzer)
4-12
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
DCD
RX
TX
DTR
COM
DSR
RTS
CTS
RI
RX–
RX+
TX+
OUT–
OUT+
PTT+
PTT–
RXA
TIP2
COM
RING2
TIP2
(BLK)
SPK
TXA
TX–
RXD
RING1
TIP
(RED)
TIP1
(RED)
RING
(RED)
RING
(GRN)
RING1
(GRN)
TIP
(GRN)
RING2
(YEL)
TXD
DTR
COM
Communications Cards
TIP1
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
RI
SHUT
DOWN
+5V
DSR
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
4.4.1 EIA-232 (RS-232) Communications Card Wiring
Figure 4-10 shows the relationship between the EIA-232 (RS-232) signals and pin numbers for the
communications port 9-pin connector.
Figure 4-10. EIA-232 (RS-232) Wiring Schematic
4-13
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
4.4.2 EIA-422/485 (RS-422 / 485) Communications Card Wiring
Figure 4-11 shows the signals and pin numbers for the communications port 9-pin connector. Wiring
should be twisted pair cable, one pair for transmitting and one pair for receiving. Jumper P4 controls the
RTS transmit functions in the EIA-422 (RS-422) mode. Jumper P4 has a default setting of RTS for
multi-drop communications. Placing jumper P4 in the ON position enables the card to continuously
transmit (point-to-point).
Figure 4-12 shows the relationship between the EIA-485 (RS-485) signals and pin numbers for the
communications port 9-pin connector. Wiring should be twisted-pair cable.
Figure 4-11. EIA-422 (RS-422) Wiring Schematic
Figure 4-12. EIA-485 (RS-485) Wiring Schematic
4-14
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
4.4.3 Radio Modem Communications Card Wiring
The following signal lines are used with most radios:
Comm Port
3
4
5
7
Signal Line
RXA
TXA
COM
PTT+
8
PTT–
Description
Receive data
Transmit data
ROC power supply ground
Push-to-talk switch
Push-to-talk return
(may be grounded)
The radio modem uses jumper P6 to determine the use of the PTT return line. Refer to Section 4.3.1,
Setting Modem Card Jumpers, on page 4-10.
The Radio Modem Card is shipped without a resistor installed in the R2 position. To modify the
attenuation level, select a resistor (R2) as directed by Table 4-3, Radio and Leased-Line Modem
Communications Card Attenuation Levels, on page 4-11.
Figure 4-13 shows the relationship between the radio modem signals and pin numbers for the
communications port 9-pin connector.
Figure 4-13. Radio Modem Wiring Schematic
4-15
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
The following signals, used only for monitoring or connecting to an analyzer, are available at connector
P7 located at the bottom edge of the card. These signals are normally not active. To activate the signals,
SHUTDOWN (pin 8) must be grounded by connecting a jumper between pin 8 and pin 2. All unused
signals can be left un-terminated.
P7 Terminal
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Function
+5 volts dc
COM
DCD
TXD
DTR
RTS
RXD
Shutdown
4.4.4 Leased-Line Modem Communications Card Wiring
The Leased-Line Modem Card interfaces to a leased line through the RJ11 jack. Refer to Section 4.3.1,
Setting Modem Card Jumpers, on page 4-10 for jumper settings (P3, P4, and P5) and Section 4.2.3,
Setting Modem Card Attenuation Levels, on page 4-11 for attenuation resistor (R2) values.
The signals present depend on the mode of operation of the card, either 2-wire or 4-wire.
RJ11 Terminal
BLK
RED
GRN
YEL
Operating Mode
2-Wire
4-Wire
(Not used)
Tip2
Ring
Ring1
Tip
Tip1
(Not used)
Ring2
NOTE: On the Leased-Line Modem Card, Tip and Ring is shown reversed to comply with
normal telephone signals and functions normally with the two signals reversed.
Figure 4-14 shows the wiring connections to the card.
4-16
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
Figure 4-14. Leased-Line Modem Wiring Schematic
The 9-pin COM1 and COM2 connectors can be used to connect the modem to a private line. This
connector is not FCC approved and cannot be used for leased-line operation. Present signals are:
COMM Port
1
2
6
9
Operating Mode
2-Wire
4-Wire
–
Tip2
–
Ring2
Ring
Ring1
Tip
Tip1
The following signals, used only for monitoring or connecting to an analyzer, are available at connector
P7 located at the bottom edge of the card. These signals are normally not active. To activate the signals,
SHUTDOWN (pin 8) must be grounded to pin 2 using a jumper. All unused signals can be left unterminated.
P7 Terminal
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
4-17
Function
+5 volts dc
COM
DCD
TXD
DTR
RTS
RXD
Shutdown
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
4.4.5 Dial-Up Modem Communications Card Wiring
The Dial-Up Modem Card interfaces to a PSTN line through the RJ11 jack with two wires. The
following signals, used only for monitoring or connecting to an analyzer to COM1 or COM2. These
signals are normally not active. To activate the signals, ground pin 7 (SHUTDOWN) to pin 5 using a
jumper. All unused signals can be left unterminated. The signals present at the RJ11 connector are:
RJ11
Terminal
GRN
RED
Operating Mode
(2-Wire)
Tip
Ring
Figure 4-15 shows the relationship between the Dial-up modem signals and pin numbers for the RJ11
and COMM port connectors.
Be careful to avoid shorting the +5 volt supply (pin 8 on the COMM port connector) to common
(pin 5) or to any ground when wiring to the COMM port. Grounding pin 8 causes the ROC to halt
operation and data may be lost once a restart is initiated.
Figure 4-15. Dial-Up Modem Wiring Schematic
4-18
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
The following signal lines (output only) are available at the COMM port for wiring to an analyzer or
monitor:
COMM Port
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Signal Line
SPK
RXD
TXD
DTR
COM
RI
SHUTDOWN
+5V
DSR
Description
Speaker
Receive data
Transmit data
Data terminal ready
Common
Ring indicator
Disable signal lines
5-volts dc power
Data set ready
4.5 Troubleshooting and Repair
There are no user-serviceable parts on the communications cards. If a card appears to be operating
improperly, verify that the card is set up according to the information contained in Section 4.3, Installing
Communications Cards, on page 4-8. If it still fails to operate properly, the recommended repair
procedure is to remove the faulty card and install a working communications card. The faulty card
should be returned to your local sales representative for repair or replacement.
4.5.1 Replacing a Communications Card
To remove and replace a communications card on an in-service ROC, perform the following procedure.
Be sure to observe the cautions to avoid losing data and damaging equipment.
Change components only in an area known to be non-hazardous.
There is a possibility of losing the ROC configuration and historical data held in RAM while
performing the following procedure. As a precaution, save the current configuration and historical
data to permanent memory as instructed in Section 2, RAM Backup Procedure.
Failure to exercise proper electrostatic discharge precautions (such as wearing a grounded wrist
strap) may reset the processor or damage electronic components, resulting in interrupted
operations.
During this procedure, all power will be removed from the ROC and devices powered by the ROC.
Ensure all connected input devices, output devices, and processes remain in a safe state when
power is removed from the ROC and when power is restored to the ROC.
1. To avoid losing data, perform backups as explained in Section 2, RAM Backup Procedure.
2. Disconnect power to the ROC by unplugging the power connector.
3. Remove the FlashPAC module.
4. Remove the screws that hold the cover in place, and lift off the cover.
4-19
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
5. If the 6-pin header connector is still in socket J9 on the main board (just below the bottom edge
of the communications card), remove it.
6. If the communications card is a Dial-up or Leased-Line Modem Card, unplug the phone jack
cable from board connector P2.
7. Remove the retaining screw from the middle of the communications card. Using a rocking
motion to disengage the connectors, pull the card free from the main circuit board or from the
card below.
8. To reinstall a communications card, orient the card with the COM PORTS arrow pointing down.
Plug the card into its mating connectors and gently press until the connectors firmly seat. Install
the retaining screw to secure the card.
9. For a Dial-up or Leased-Line Modem Card, connect the phone jack cable to the board connector
P2.
10. If a second modem card was removed, repeat the previous steps.
11. If you are installing a replacement modem card, be sure to set the jumpers on the card in the
proper position (Section 4.3.1, Setting Modem Card Jumpers, on page 4-10) and to set the output
attenuation level (Section 4.3.2, Setting Modem Card Attenuation Levels, on page 4-11).
12. Reinstall the FlashPAC.
13. Reconnect power to the ROC by plugging in the power connector.
14. Use ROCLINK configuration software to check the configuration data, ROC Displays, and
FSTs, and load or modify them as required. In addition, load and start any user programs as
needed.
15. Verify that the ROC performs as required.
16. If you changed the configuration, save the current configuration data to memory by selecting
ROC > Flags > Write to EEPROM or Flash Memory Save Configuration as instructed in the
applicable ROCLINK configuration software user manual.
17. If you changed the configuration including the history database, ROC Displays, or FSTs, save
them to disk.
4-20
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
4.6 Communication Card Specifications
The following tables list the specifications for each type of communications card.
Serial Communication Cards Specifications
EIA-232D (RS-232) CARD
Meets EIA-232 (RS-232) standard for single-ended
data transmission over distances of up to 15 m
(50 ft).
Data Rate: Selectable from 300 to 9600 baud,
depending on the configuration software used.
Format: Asynchronous, 7 or 8-bit (software
selectable) with full handshaking.
Parity: None, odd, or even (software selectable).
EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) CARD
Meets EIA-422 (RS-422) and EIA-485 (RS-485)
standard for differential data transmission over
distances of up to 1220 m (4000 ft).
As many as ten devices can be connected on an
EIA-422 (RS-422) bus.
As many as 32 devices can be connected on an
EIA-485 (RS-485) bus.
Data Rate: Selectable from 300 to 9600 bps.
Format: Asynchronous, 7 or 8-bit (software
selectable).
Parity: None, odd, or even (software selectable).
Termination Load: 140 Ω, jumper selectable.
LED INDICATORS
Individual LEDs for RXD, TXD, DTR, DCD, CTS,
and RTS signals not all apply to EIA-422/485
(RS-422/485) communications.
POWER REQUIREMENTS
4.75 to 5.25 V dc, 0.15 W maximum (supplied by
ROC).
ENVIRONMENTAL
Same as the ROC in which the card is installed.
Refer to the respective ROC specifications.
DIMENSIONS
25 mm H by 103 mm W by 135 mm L (1 in. H by
4.05 in. W by 5.3 in. L).
WEIGHT
80 g (3 oz) nominal.
APPROVALS
Approved by CSA for hazardous locations Class I,
Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D.
Radio Modem Specifications
OPERATION
Mode: Full or half-duplex, direct connection to
radio.
Data Rate: Up to 1200 baud asynchronous
(software selectable).
Parity: None, odd, or even (software selectable).
Format: Asynchronous, 7 or 8 bit (software
selectable).
Modulation: Phase coherent, Frequency Shift
Keyed (FSK).
Carrier Frequencies: Mark 1200 Hz ± 0.1%;
Space 2200 Hz ± 0.1%.
Input Impedance: 20 kΩ, unbalanced.
Output Impedance: 600 Ω balanced.
RTS-to-Transmission Delay: Configurable in
10 ms increments.
Sensitivity: –35 dBm.
PTT Signal: Isolated, solid-state switch.
LED Indicators: TXD, RXD, DTR, DCD, CTS, and
RTS.
4-21
POWER REQUIREMENTS
4.75 to 5.25 V dc, 0.11 W typical (supplied by
ROC).
ENVIRONMENTAL
Operating Temperature: –40 to 75ºC (–40 to
167ºF).
Storage Temperature: –50 to 85ºC (–58 to
185ºF).
Operating Humidity: To 95% relative, noncondensing.
DIMENSIONS
25 mm H by 103 W mm by 135 mm L (1 in. H by
4.05 in. W by 5.3 in. L).
WEIGHT
100 g (3.6 oz) typical.
APPROVALS
Approved by CSA for hazardous locations Class I,
Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D.
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
Leased-Line Modem Specifications
OPERATION
Mode: Full or half-duplex on 2-wire or 4-wire
private channel (compatible with Bell 202T).
Data Rate: Up to 1200 baud asynchronous
(software selectable).
Parity: None, odd, or even (software selectable).
Format: Asynchronous, 7 or 8 bit (software
selectable).
Modulation: Phase coherent, Frequency Shift
Keyed (FSK).
Carrier Frequencies: Mark 1200 Hz ± 0.1%;
Space 2200 Hz ± 0.1%.
Input Impedance: 600 Ω balanced transformer
input.
Output Impedance: 600 Ω balanced transformer
output.
RTS-to-Transmission Delay: Configurable in 10
ms increments.
Sensitivity: –35 dBm.
Maximum Output Level: 0 dBm nominal into
600 Ω.
LED Indicators: TXD, RXD, DTR, DCD, CTS, and
RTS.
Surge Protection: Conforms to FCC part 68.
4-22
OPERATION (CONTINUED)
Certification: FCC Part 68 tested.
Connector: RJ11 type.
POWER REQUIREMENTS
4.75 to 5.25 V dc, 0.11 W typical (supplied by
ROC).
ENVIRONMENTAL
Operating Temperature: –40 to 75ºC (–40 to
167ºF).
Storage Temperature: –50 to 85ºC (–58 to
185ºF).
Operating Humidity: To 95% relative, noncondensing.
DIMENSIONS
25 mm H by 103 mm W by 135 mm L (1 in. H by
4.05 in. W by 5.3 in. L).
WEIGHT
135 g (4.7 oz) typical.
APPROVALS
Approved by CSA for hazardous locations Class I,
Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D.
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
Dial-Up Modem Specifications
OPERATION
Mode: Full-duplex 2-wire for Dial-up PSTN (Bell
212 compatible).
Data Rate: Up to 14.4K bps asynchronous
(software selectable).
Parity: None, odd, or even (software selectable).
Format: 8, 9, 10, or 11 bits, including start, stop,
and parity (software selectable).
Modulation: V.32 and V.32 bis, V.21 and 103,
binary phase-coherent FSK, V.22 and 212A, and
V.22 bis.
Transmit Amplitude: –1 dB typical.
Telephone Line Impedance: 600 Ω typical.
RTS-to-Transmission Delay: Configurable in 10
ms increments.
Receiver Sensitivity: Off-to-On threshold: –45
dBm. On-to-Off threshold: –48 dBm.
Maximum Output Level: 0 dBm nominal into
600 Ω.
LED Indicators: TXD, RXD, DTR, DSR, RI, and
OH.
Surge Protection: Conforms to FCC part 68 and
DOC.
Surge Isolation: 1000 V ac and 1500 V peak.
Certification: FCC Part 68 approved.
Connector: RJ11 type.
4-23
POWER REQUIREMENTS
4.5 to 5.5 V dc, 0.4 W maximum (supplied by
ROC).
ENVIRONMENTAL
Operating Temperature: –40 to 75ºC
(–40 to 167ºF).
Storage Temperature: –50 to 85ºC
(–58 to 185ºF).
Operating Humidity: To 95% relative, noncondensing.
DIMENSIONS
25 mm H by 103 mm W by 135 mm L (1 in. H by
4.05 in. W by 5.3 in. L).
WEIGHT
130 g (4.6 oz) typical.
FCC INFORMATION
Registration Number: DWE-25983-M5-E.
Ringer Equivalent: 1.0B
APPROVALS
Approved by CSA for hazardous locations Class I,
Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D.
Communications Cards
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
SECTION 5 – I/O CONVERTER CARD
5.1 Scope
This section describes the I/O Power Converter Card optionally available for the ROC364 Remote
Operations Controller. Topics covered include:
Section
Page
5.2 Product Description
5.3 Initial Installation and Setup
5.4 Troubleshooting and Repair
5.5 I/O Converter Card Specification
5-1
5-2
5-3
5-4
5.2 Product Description
The I/O Power Converter Card, which mounts on the MCU board, is used when the ROC is powered
from a 12-volt power supply and 24 volts dc is required to power field transmitters (Table 5-1). A
maximum of twenty five 4-to-20 milliamp loops can be accommodated by the card. If more than twenty
five current loops need to be accommodated, a separate 24-volt dc power supply must be used.
Figure 5-1 shows the I/O converter card.
RP1
R4
R3
U2
P1
U1
CR2
Q1
R6
RP2
C3
1
Q2
L1
CR1
C2
C4
DOC0124A
Figure 5-1. I/O Converter Card
NOTE: Use a standard screwdriver with a slotted (flat bladed) 1/8-inch width tip when wiring all
terminal blocks.
5-1
I/O Converter Card
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
Table 5-1. I/O Converter Card Requirements
MCU Input
Voltage (V dc)
Are 4 to 20 MA
Loops Used?
Is a Converter
Needed?
12
12
24
24
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
No
5.3 Initial Installation and Setup
The following procedure assumes a first-time installation. For units currently in service, certain
precautions must be taken to assure that data is not lost and equipment is not damaged. Refer to 5.4.1,
Replacing an I/O Converter Card, on page 5-3.
When repairing units in a hazardous area, change components only in an area known to be nonhazardous.
There is a possibility of losing the ROC configuration and historical data held in RAM while
performing the following procedure. As a precaution, save the current configuration and
historical data to permanent memory as instructed in Section 2, RAM Backup Procedure
During this procedure, all power is removed from the ROC and devices powered by the ROC.
Ensure all connected input devices, output devices, and processes remain in a safe state when
power is removed from the ROC and when power is restored to the ROC.
To install the converter card, proceed as follows:
1. Remove power from the ROC.
2. Remove the FlashPAC.
3. Remove the four screws securing the MCU upper cover in place, and then lift off the cover.
4. Locate connector J1 on the MCU board. If a shorting plug is plugged into J1, remove it.
5. Grasp the I/O converter card by its edges and position the card connector over connector J1 on
the MCU board. Push down firmly, but gently, to seat the card into the connector.
6. Secure the card in place using three 6-32 screws.
7. Reinstall the FlashPAC.
8. Reinstall the MCU cover.
9. Apply power to the ROC.
5-2
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Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
5.4 Troubleshooting and Repair
The troubleshooting and repair procedures are designed to help identify and replace faulty cards. Faulty
I/O Converter Cards should be returned to your local sales representative for repair or replacement.
First indications of possible I/O Converter Card failure are when:
♦ More than one I/O device fails to operate properly.
♦ The value for diagnostic Analog Input +T (Point Number E1) as read by the configuration
software is less than 22 volts dc.
If the reading is questionable, the voltage may be confirmed by measuring the voltage at terminal “A” of
any Analog Input Loop module.
5.4.1 Replacing an I/O Converter Card
If you are installing an I/O Converter Card for the first time, refer to Section 5.3, Initial Installation and
Setup, on page 5-2. To remove and replace a converter card on an in-service ROC, perform the
following procedure. Be sure to observe the cautions to avoid losing data and damaging equipment.
When repairing units in a hazardous area, change components only in an area known to be nonhazardous.
There is a possibility of losing the ROC configuration and historical data held in RAM while
performing the following procedure. As a precaution, save the current configuration and
historical data to permanent memory as instructed in Section 2, RAM Backup Procedure
During this procedure, all power is removed from the ROC and devices powered by the ROC.
Ensure all connected input devices, output devices, and processes remain in a safe state when
power is removed from the ROC and when power is restored to the ROC.
1. Remove power from the ROC.
2. Remove the FlashPAC.
3. Remove the screws that hold the MCU upper cover in place, and then lift off the cover.
4. Remove the three screws securing the I/O Converter Card. Using a rocking motion to disengage
the card from its connector, pull the card free from the MCU board.
5. To reinstall an I/O Converter Card, orient the card over connector J1 on the MCU board so that
plug P1 will fit into it. Gently press until the connector firmly seats.
6. Install the three 6-32 retaining screws to secure the card to the MCU board.
7. Reinstall the MCU cover.
8. Reinstall the FlashPAC.
9. Reconnect power to the ROC by plugging in the power terminal block.
10. Check the configuration data, ROC Displays, and FSTs, and modify them as required.
11. Verify that the ROC performs as required.
5-3
I/O Converter Card
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
12. If you changed the configuration, save the current configuration data to memory by selecting
ROC > Flags > Write to EEPROM or Flash Memory Save Configuration as instructed in the
applicable ROCLINK configuration software user manual.
13. If you changed the configuration, including the history database, FSTs, and ROC Displays, save
them to disk.
5.5 I/O Converter Card Specification
I/O Converter Card Specifications
INPUT
11 to 16 V dc, 15 mA with no load or shorted
output.
ENVIRONMENTAL
Same as the ROC364 unit. See the specifications in
Section 2.6.
OUTPUT
22 to 24 V dc, up to 0.6 A for transmitter power.
DIMENSIONS
63 mm W by 76 mm L (2.45 in. W by 3 in. L).
5-4
I/O Converter Card
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
APPENDIX A – LIGHTNING PROTECTION MODULE
This appendix describes the Lightning Protection Module (LPM) used with the Remote Operations
Controller.
This section contains the following information:
Section
A.1 Product Description
A.2 Connecting the LPM to Wiring
A.3 Troubleshooting and Repair
A.4 Lightning Protection Module Specifications
Page
A-1
A-2
A-2
A-3
A.1 Product Description
Figure A-1 shows a front and side view of the module. The LPM helps prevent damage to I/O modules
and to built-in I/O circuitry from any high-voltage transients that may occur in field wiring. The LPMs
plug into the field wiring I/O module sockets.
The LPM provides screw terminals for connecting to field wiring. It has sockets for plugging in a range
resistor, especially when used with built-in I/O. The module also provides a ground wire for connection
to the enclosure ground bar.
BUILT-IN FIELD WIRING
TERMINATION BLOCK
LPM-2
}
I/O WIRING
CONNECT GREEN WIRE
TO ENCLOSURE GROUND
BAR OR GROUND LUG
FRONT VIEW
SIDE VIEW
DOC0138A
Figure A-1. Lightning Protection Module
In general, it is recommended a LPM be used to protect the circuitry for each field input or output. An
LPM can be used with any type of input or output as long as the normal operating range of the input or
output is less than the clamping release voltage of the LPM. The LPM cannot be used with a 120 volt
ac signal on a DO Relay Module. The LPM is most often used with Analog and Pulse Inputs. The
LPM has little effect with an RTD module; however, the LPM protects the I/O rack and other modules.
NOTE: Use a standard screwdriver with a slotted (flat bladed) 1/8-inch width tip when wiring all
terminal blocks.
A-1
Lightning Protection Module
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
A.2 Connecting the LPM to Wiring
There is a one-to-one correspondence between the LPM terminals and the terminals of the I/O channel
being protected. If you are connecting field wiring to the LPM, refer to the I/O wiring information in this
instruction manual.
NOTE: The LPM module provides sockets for a plug-in range (scaling) resistor. These sockets,
which are internally connected to the module’s middle and right-most screw terminals, must be
used when installing a range resistor for a built-in Analog Input channel. For an Analog Input
module or any other module using a scaling resistor, either the sockets on the I/O module or on
the LPM may be used for the scaling resistor.
The LPM module provides a ground wire for connection to the enclosure ground bar or ground lug. The
enclosure ground bar or ground lug must in turn be connected to a good earth ground. Do not use the
power system ground for this connection.
To add an LPM to protect an I/O module, perform the following steps.
If you are installing an LPM on a ROC currently in service, and there is a field device connected
to the I/O channel that will receive the LPM, make sure the field device will not be left in an
undesirable state when it is disconnected from the ROC.
Do not use the LPM with a 120 volt ac signal on a DO Relay Module.
1. Unplug the field wiring module block from the channel for which the LPM is going
to be installed.
2. Plug the LPM into the field wiring terminal block socket located in step 1.
3. Connect the LPM ground wire to the ground bus bar. The ground bar must be connected to a
good earth ground. Do not use the power system ground for this connection.
4. Transfer any field wiring from the unplugged module block to the built-in termination block on
the LPM.
A.3 Troubleshooting and Repair
The Lightning Protection Modules function by shunting the high voltage transients through gas
discharge tubes to the ground lead. In the event of an I/O signal failure, verify the signal is not
interrupted by the LPM.
1. Before removing an LPM, make sure all devices and processes remain in a safe state.
2. Remove the LPM and disconnect the field wiring.
3. Remove any range resistors from the LPM.
4. With a digital multimeter, verify continuity through each connector socket to the corresponding
field wiring terminal. If there is no continuity, replace the LPM.
5. With a digital multimeter, check each of the input terminals for continuity to the ground lead. If
the test shows continuity to the ground lead, replace the LPM.
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ROC364 Instruction Manual
A.4 Lightning Protection Module Specifications
Lightning Protection Module Specifications
ELECTRICAL
Series Resistance: 10 Ω from input to output, each
terminal.
DC Clamping Voltage: 72 to 108 V dc.
100 V/ms Impulse Clamping Voltage: 500 V
maximum.
Clamping Release Voltage: 52 V minimum.
10 KV/µs Impulse Clamping Voltage: 900 V
maximum.
Surge Life: Module can withstand 300 surges of 10
to 1000 µs duration at 500 A minimum.
Insulation Resistance: 10,000 MΩ minimum.
Capacitance: 1.0 pF maximum @ 1 MHz, each
terminal.
CASE
Material: ABS polycarbonate thermoplastic.
Dimensions: 17 mm H by 21 mm W by 40 mm D
(0.65 in. H by 0.84 in. W by 1.58 in. D).
Length of Ground wire: 1.2 m (48 in) nominal.
SURGE WITHSTAND
Meets surge requirements IEEEC62.31.
ENVIRONMENTAL
Meets the Environmental specifications of the ROC
in which the module is installed, including
Temperature, Humidity, and Transient Protection.
WEIGHT
34 grams (1.2 ounces).
APPROVALS
Approved by CSA for hazardous locations Class I,
Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D.
A-3
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ROC364 Instruction Manual
APPENDIX B – LOCAL DISPLAY PANEL
This appendix describes the Local Display Panel used with the ROC300-Series Remote Operations
Controller (ROC).
This section contains the following information:
Section
B.1 Product Description
B.2 Installation
B.3 Operation
B.4 Troubleshooting and Repair
B.5 Local Display Panel Specifications
Page
B-1
B-2
B-4
B-22
B-23
B.1 Product Description
The Local Display Panel (LDP) is an ASCII terminal with a 4-line by 20-character Liquid Crystal
Display (LCD) and a 4-key keypad. Refer to Figure B-1. The unit mounts in the door of a ROC
enclosure and displays a variety of point data. The LDP can be used to change the value of numeric
parameters. Refer to Section B.3.11.2, Editing LCD Parameter Values, on page B-21. These are
parameters that have been previously selected using ROCLINK configuration software.
The LDP communicates to the ROC and receives its power through the DISPLAY connector located on
the front panel of the ROC. The Local Display Panel allows you to view the point configuration and
related point data values on-site without requiring a personal computer.
The Local Display Panel uses both menu and point displays to convey ROC information. The point
displays provide current, relevant information specific to a point.
Liquid Crystal
Display
>I/O
SYS
FST
AGA
PID
MSG
DB
LCD
UP DOWN ENTER MENU
Function Keys
Figure B-1. Local Display Panel
B-1
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
B.2 Installation
A kit is available for field installations of the Local Display Panel (LDP) in a ROC enclosure that contains
cutouts for the LDP in the door. The Local Display Panel kits come in three colors:
♦ White – Part Number FSACC-1/LCWH.
♦ ANSI 61 Gray – Part Number FSACC-1/LCDAH.
♦ Regal Gray – Part Number FSACC-1/LCDRH.
The kits include the items in the following list:
Description
LCD Sub-Assembly
Window
Gasket
Display Cover Assembly
6-32 × .25 Screws
6-32 Hex Nuts
Flat Wire Clips
RTV Sealant
Cable Assembly
Quantity
1
1
1
1
2
3
2
1
1
Refer to Figure B-2 for how these parts fit together. Note that the panel is also referred to as the LCD.
LCD
SUB-ASSEMBLY
WINDOW GASKET
HEX
NUT
SCREW
DISPLAY
COVER ASSEMBLY
PRE-PUNCHED DOOR
(NOT INCLUDED)
CABLE
ASSEMBLY
Figure B-2. LDP Parts Orientation
B-2
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
Use the following steps to install the Local Display Panel.
1. Inspect the kit and verify that there are no missing parts.
2. Remove the cutout cover from the enclosure door.
3. Place two small drops of Room Temperature Vulcanizing (RTV) sealant on the LCD sub-
assembly to hold the window in place while installing the panel. Refer to Figure B-3.
TAB UP
LCD SUB-ASSEMBLY
RTV
RTV
WINDOW
Figure B-3. LCD Sub-Assembly
4. Remove the protective paper from the window and place the window in the cavity.
5. Place a small bead of RTV (approximately 1/16" wide) onto the gasket surface. Align the gasket
holes to the door studs with the RTV facing the door and press into place. Refer to Figure B-4.
INSIDE VIEW OF DOOR
GASKET
HOLES
RTV
DOOR
STUDS
GASKET
Figure B-4. LCD Inside View of Door
6. Place a small bead of RTV (approximately 1/16" wide) around the edge of the window. Refer
to Figure B-5.
B-3
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
RTV
HOLES
INSIDE VIEW
OF DOOR
LCD SUB-ASSEMBLY
WITH WINDOW
Figure B-5. LCD RTV Installation
7. Position the LCD sub-assembly over the door studs and press into place.
8. Fasten the LCD sub-assembly with the hex nuts provided in the kit.
9. Attach the display cover to the outside of the enclosure door with the two screws provided in the
kit.
10. Connect the display cable assembly to the display (DISPLAY) port of the ROC. Use the flat wire
clips to hold the cable in place. Make sure the cable does not interfere with the door.
B.3 Operation
B.3.1 Function Keys
You operate the Local Display Panel with the four function keys located below the LDP. Each one of
the four keys relates to a function key label displayed above the key on the bottom line of the display
area. Table B-1 lists the labels for the keys and the functions they provide.
B-4
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Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
Table B-1. Function Key Labels and Descriptions
Label
UP
DOWN
ENTER
DONE
MENU
SCAN
NEXT
PREV
HOLD
ESC
INC
DEC
SIGN
EDIT
Description
Moves the cursor up one line at a time. “>” indicates the current selection.
Press and hold for 5 to 10 seconds on ROC power-up, to perform a Cold Start.
Moves the cursor down one line at a time. “>” indicates the current selection.
Activates the selection pointed to by the cursor and shows a menu or point display. In the event
there are no points to display, the current menu display remains and the cursor returns to the
beginning of the list.
Saves and completes the action you currently performed. Displays the next required screen.
Returns to the menu display last used. Press multiple time to return to the Main Menu.
Monitors a point display in an updating mode.
Press the SCAN key (the label changes to HOLD). The display updates with current values from
the ROC every second, and the display automatically scrolls through all points of the selected type
at a rate of about 4 seconds per configured point. This scrolling mode continues until the HOLD
key is pressed.
Show the next display if multiple displays exist. When NEXT is pressed at the end of the list, the
first display in the list is shown. This key is disabled during the SCAN mode.
Show the previous display if multiple displays exist. When PREV is pressed at the head of the list,
the first display in the list remains displayed. This key is disabled during the SCAN mode.
HOLD stops the display from scrolling between points (but values continue to be updated once
per second), holding the display at the current point. When the key is pressed, the HOLD label
changes to SCAN.
Available only when in an EDIT mode, this key cancels the current action and returns the last
display.
Increments the displayed number to the next number (when “9” is reached, it starts over at “0”).
Used to enter a Password or to enter numeric values when editing parameters.
Decreases the displayed number to the previous number (when “0” is reached, it starts over at
“9”). Used to enter a Password or to enter numeric values when editing parameters.
Change between a positive (+) and negative (–) value.
Show a display prompting you to enter a value.
B.3.2 Display Format
The Local Display Panel provides you with menu, point, system information, and user configured
displays. The Main Menu display provides a list of other displays and allows you to select a display for
viewing. Figure B-6 shows the Main Menu display.
>I/O
AGA
DB
UP
SYS
FST
PID
MSG
LCD
DOWN
ENTER MENU
Figure B-6. Typical Main Menu Display
The menu displays have lists of items for selection. The UP or DOWN function keys move the cursor (>)
through the menu list. After moving the cursor to the desired item, press ENTER. If the item exists in the
ROC configuration, a new display for the selected item appears. This display may be another menu or an
information display. If the item does not exist, the cursor moves to the start of the menu display list.
B-5
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
To return to the previous menu, press MENU. To return to the Main Menu, press MENU until the Main
Menu displays.
B.3.3 Main Menu Display
The Main Menu provides eight menu selections. Table B-2 describes the menu items. The subsequent
subsections provide detail for the various Main Menu selections.
Table B-2. Main Menu Items of the Local Display Panel
Menu
I/O
SYS
DB
AGA
PID
FST
MSG
LCD
Description
Provides a menu from which you can select monitored values from the five Input/Output (I/O)
groups: Discrete Inputs, Discrete Outputs, Analog Inputs, Analog Outputs, and Pulse Inputs.
Provides four displays of system parameters and related information.
Provides a menu for viewing points in the history database.
Provides a point display for each configured AGA point.
Provides a point display for each configured PID point.
Provides a point display for each configured FST point.
Provides a point display for each configured FST message point.
Provides eight displays that you define using ROCLINK configuration software. Provides a menu
to view or edit of parameters.
B.3.4 I/O Menu Display
The Local Display Panel returns the I/O menu display after it is selected from the Main Menu. Refer to
Figure B-7. The I/O menu allows you to select point displays from the various I/O groups configured in
the ROC. Move the cursor with the UP or DOWN keys and press ENTER to select the desired I/O group.
If the selected I/O group does not have any points configured in the ROC, the I/O menu remains
displayed and the cursor moves to the beginning of the list. To return to the Main Menu, press MENU.
>DI’s
DO’s
AI’s
UP
AO’s
PI’s
DOWN
ENTER
MENU
Figure B-7. I/O Menu Display
The point displays provide current information specific to a point selected from the I/O group list. For
example, the point display for an Analog Input shows the associated Tag, Units, Point Number, Active
Alarms state, and the process variable Value expressed in engineering units.
Table B-3 identifies the I/O types available from the I/O menu. For further information about the point
parameters, see the applicable ROCLINK configuration software user manual.
B-6
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
Table B-3. I/O Menu Point Types
Parameter
DI
DO
AI
AO
PI
Description
Provides a point display for each configured Discrete Input.
Provides a point display for each configured Discrete Output.
Provides a point display for each configured Analog Input.
Provides a point display for each configured Analog Output.
Provides a point display for each configured Pulse Input.
B.3.4.1 Discrete Input Point Display
The display shown in Figure B-8 is a typical display for each Discrete Input point. Press HOLD to stop
the display from automatically scrolling between points. Press SCAN to begin automatically scanning.
To return to the I/O menu display, press MENU. The Discrete Input point display shows the parameters
listed in Table B-4.
DI Tag
PT# A13
OFF
EU 0.00
ACC 160461
HOLD
MENU
Figure B-8. Discrete Input Point Display
Table B-4. Discrete Input Point Display Parameters
Parameter
DI Tag
PT#
OFF or ON
EU
ACC
B-7
Description
10-character identifier Tag for the Discrete Input.
Module rack letter and Point Number of the Discrete Input as installed in the ROC.
Status (state) of the Discrete Input. “OFF” indicates the input is off or that a switch is open.
“ON” indicates the input is on or that a switch is closed. The Status value can be changed in
the manual mode (Scanning Disabled) to lock an input to either the “OFF” or “ON” state.
Used only when the Discrete Input is configured as a Timed Duration Input (TDI). EU Value
is calculated at Scan Period intervals using the 0% Pulse Width, 100% Pulse Width, Zero
EU, Span EU, and TDI count parameters.
Accumulated Value is the number of positive (“0” to “1”) transitions of the Discrete Input.
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
B.3.4.2 Discrete Output Point Display
Each selected Discrete Output returns a display similar to the one in Figure B-9. Press HOLD to stop the
display from automatically scrolling between points. Press SCAN to begin automatically scanning. To
return to the I/O menu display, press MENU. The Discrete Output point display shows the parameters
listed in Table B-5.
DO Tag
PT# A13
OFF
EU 0.00
ACC 160461
HOLD
MENU
Figure B-9. Discrete Output Point Display
Table B-5. Discrete Output Point Display Parameters
Parameter
DO Tag
PT#
OFF or ON
EU
ACC
Description
10-character identifier Tag for the Discrete Output.
Module rack letter and Point Number of the Discrete Output as installed in the ROC.
Status (state) of the Discrete Output. “OFF” indicates that the output is off or that the relay is
open. “ON” indicates that the output is on or that the relay is closed. The Status value can be
changed in the manual mode (Scanning Disabled) to lock an input to either the “OFF” or “ON”
state.
Used only when Discrete Output is configured as a Timed Duration Output (TDO). The output
value is calculated from EU Value using the 0% Count, 100% Count, Low Reading EU, and
High Reading EU parameters.
Accumulated Value is the number of positive (“0” to “1”) transitions of the Discrete Output.
B.3.4.3 Analog Input Point Display
Figure B-10 shows a typical Analog Input display. Press HOLD to stop the display from automatically
scrolling between points. Press SCAN to begin automatically scanning. To return to the I/O menu
display, press MENU. The Analog Input point display shows the parameters listed in Table B-6.
AI Tag
Units
EU 0.00
ALM 00000011
PT# A2
HOLD
MENU
Figure B-10. Analog Input Point Display
B-8
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
Table B-6. Analog Input Point Display Parameters
Parameter
AI Tag
Units
EU
PT#
ALM
Description
10-character identifier Tag for the Analog Input.
10-character unit of measurement identifier for the EU Value assigned to the Analog Input.
Value in engineering units (EU).
Module rack letter and Point Number of the Analog Input as installed in the ROC.
Alarm Code is an 8-bit field. If a bit is set to “1”, the alarm is active. If a bit is set to “0,” the alarm
is cleared.
Figure B-11 shows the alarm code bits and the alarms they represent for an Analog Input point.
Alarm Code
0
0
0
0 0
0
0
Manual Flag
0
Low Alarm Flag
Scanning Enabled / Disabled
A-D Failure
Low Low Alarm Flag
Not Used
High Alarm Flag
Rate Alarm Flag
High High Alarm Flag
Figure B-11. Analog Input Alarm Code Bits
B-9
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
B.3.4.4 Analog Output Point Display
Each selected Analog Output returns a display similar to the one in Figure B-12. Press HOLD to stop the
display from automatically scrolling between points. Press SCAN to begin automatically scanning. To
return to the I/O menu display, press MENU. The Analog Output point display shows the parameters
listed in Table B-7.
AO Tag
Units
EU 0.00
ALM 00000011
PT# A8
SCAN
NEXT
PREV
MENU
Figure B-12. Analog Output Point Display
Table B-7. Analog Output Point Display Parameters
Parameter
AO Tag
Units
EU
PT#
ALM
Description
10-character identifier Tag for the Analog Output.
10-character unit of measurement identifier for the engineering units assigned to the Analog
Output.
Output EU Value in engineering units.
Module rack letter and Point Number of the Analog Output as installed in the ROC.
Alarm Code is an 8-bit field. If a bit is set to “1”, the alarm is active. If a bit is set to “0,” the
alarm is cleared.
Figure B-13 shows the alarm code bits and the alarms they represent for an Analog Output point.
Alarm Code
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Manual Flag
Not Used
D-A Failure
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Figure B-13. Analog Output Alarm Code Bits
B-10
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
B.3.4.5 Pulse Input Point Display
The display shown in Figure B-14 is a typical display for each Pulse Input point. Press HOLD to stop
the display from automatically scrolling between points. Press SCAN to begin automatically scanning.
To return to the I/O menu display, press MENU. The Pulse Input point display shows the parameters
listed in Table B-8.
PI Tag
Units
EU 0.00
ALM 00000011
PT# A11
SCAN
NEXT
PREV
MENU
Figure B-14. Pulse Input Point Display
Table B-8. Pulse Input Point Display Parameters
Parameter
PI Tag
Units
EU
PT#
ALM
Description
10-character identifier Tag for the Pulse Input.
10-character unit of measurement identifier for the engineering units (EU) assigned to the
Pulse Input.
If the EU Options flag has been set to Rate (Max Rollover), then the EU / time displays. If
Today’s Total (Max Rollover) was selected, then the EUs accumulated since Contract Hour
display.
Module rack letter and Point Number of the Pulse Input as installed in the ROC.
Alarm Code is an 8-bit field. If a bit is set to “1”, the alarm is active. If a bit is set to “0,” the
alarm is cleared.
Figure B-15 shows the alarm code bits and the alarms they represent for a Pulse Input point.
Alarm Code
0
0
0
0
0
0
Manual Mode
0
0
Low Alarm
Not Used
Low Low Alarm
Not Used
High Alarm
High High Alarm
Rate Alarm
Figure B-15. Pulse Input Alarm Code Bits
B-11
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
B.3.5 SYS Parameter Displays
The Main Menu selection SYS provides four displays showing current system parameters. Press HOLD
to stop the display from automatically scrolling between displays. Press SCAN to place the display in
HOLD. To return to the Main Menu display, press MENU.
B.3.5.1 SYS Parameter Display 1
Figure B-16 shows a typical SYS Parameter Display 1. Table B-9 describes the parameters returned in
SYS Parameter Display 1.
Station Name
ADDR 1
GROUP 2
14:52:12
11/11/04
SCAN PREV NEXT MENU
Figure B-16. SYS Parameter Display 1
Table B-9. SYS Parameter Display 1
Parameter
Station Name
Addr
Group
Time
Date
Description
20-character identifier for the location of the ROC.
Number identifying the ROC Address.
Number identifying the ROC Group.
Current time kept by the real-time clock of the ROC.
Current date kept by the real-time clock of the ROC.
B.3.5.2 SYS Parameter Display 2
SYS Parameter Display 2 shown in Figure B-17 provides information about the ROC firmware. Table
B-10 describes the parameters returned in SYS Parameter Display 2.
W68067
Ver 2.23
Emerson
FCD ROC300
Jan 15, 2004
13:51
SCAN PREV
NEXT
MENU
Figure B-17. SYS Parameter Display 2
Table B-10. SYS Parameter Display 2
Parameter
Version Name
Ver
ID
Time Created
B-12
Description
Part number of the firmware in the ROC.
Version of the firmware in the ROC.
Emerson as creator of the firmware and the type of ROC.
Time and date that the firmware was created.
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
B.3.5.3 SYS Parameter Display 3
Figure B-18 shows a typical SYS Parameter Display 3. This display informs you which input/output
types are in manual mode (Scanning Disabled).
MANUAL MODE AT:
ALL CLEAR
MANUAL MODE AT:
AIS AOS DIS DOS PIS
HOLD
SCAN
MENU
PREV NEXT MENU
Figure B-18. SYS Parameter Display 3
Table B-11. SYS Parameter Display 3
Parameter
Scanning
States
Description
All Clear – All I/O points have Scanning set to Enabled.
AIS – One or more Analog Inputs has Scanning set to Disabled.
AOS – One or more Analog Outputs has Scanning set to Disabled.
DIS – One or more Discrete Inputs has Scanning set to Disabled.
DOS – One or more Discrete Outputs has Scanning set to Disabled.
PIS – One or more Pulse Inputs has Scanning set to Disabled.
B.3.5.4 SYS Parameter Display 4
Figure B-19 shows a typical SYS Parameter Display 4. This display informs you which category of I/O
point types are in an alarm condition. Press HOLD to stop the SYS Parameter Display from scrolling.
Press SCAN to place the display in HOLD.
To locate the specific I/O point that is in alarm, view the I/O point display and scroll through all the
Point Numbers of the indicated type while looking at the Alarm Code.
ALARM CONDITION AT:
ALL CLEAR
ALARM CONDITION AT:
AIS AOS DIS DOS PIS
HOLD
SCAN
MENU
PREV NEXT MENU
Figure B-19. SYS Parameter Display 4
Table B-12. SYS Parameter Display 4
Parameter
Scanning
States
B-13
Description
All Clear – No I/O points have an alarm condition.
AIS – One or more Analog Inputs has an alarm condition.
AOS – One or more Analog Outputs has an alarm condition.
DIS – One or more Discrete Inputs has an alarm condition.
DOS – One or more Discrete Outputs has an alarm condition.
PIS – One or more Pulse Inputs has an alarm condition.
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
B.3.6 DB Menu Display
Selecting DB from the Main Menu returns a display similar to the one in Figure B-20. The Local
Display Panel function keys NEXT and PREV provide access to historical database points for the base
RAM area. Position the cursor next to the desired RAM area and press ENTER. There are 30 points
possible in each RAM area; the point numbering begins at #1 within each area.
>BASE
RAM1
RAM2
UP
DOWN
ENTER
MENU
Figure B-20. DB Menu Display
The display shown in Figure B-21 is a typical display for each historical database point. Press HOLD to
stop scrolling between points. Press SCAN to place the display in HOLD. To return to the DB menu
display, press MENU. The DB point display shows the parameters listed in Table B-13.
AGA1
CUR VAL
DB#4
SCAN
NEXT
PREV
23.38
MENU
Figure B-21. DB Point Display
Table B-13. DB Point Display Parameters
Parameter
Point Tag ID
DB#
CUR VAL
Description
10-character identifier Tag for the database point.
Point for the selected RAM area. Point number can be 1 through 30 for each RAM area.
Current value read for use by the historical database.
B.3.7 AGA Point Displays
The parameters for each AGA point are viewed in three sequential displays. View AGA Display 1
contains the current flow rate and alarm. View AGA Display 2 contains the volume accumulation for
today and yesterday. View AGA Display 3 contains the energy accumulation for today and yesterday.
Press HOLD to stop the display from automatically scrolling between displays. Press SCAN to place the
display in HOLD. To return to the Main Menu display, press MENU.
Normally, the values in these AGA displays can only be viewed; however, with ROCLINK configuration
software and a Password, orifice plate values can be edited. Refer to Figure B-22. Select either VIEW
(Section B.3.7, AGA Point Displays, on page B-14) or Plate Change (Section B.3.7.4, Entering Plate
Change Information, on page B-17).
B-14
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
>VIEW
Plate Change
UP
DOWN
ENTER
MENU
Figure B-22. AGA Menu Display
B.3.7.1 AGA Point Display 1 – View
Figure B-23 shows a typical View AGA Point Display 1. Table B-14 describes the parameters shown on
an AGA Point Display 1.
AGA2
MCF/DAY
CUR RATE
5003.34
ALM 00000000
SCAN
PREV NEXT
MENU
Figure B-23. AGA Point Display 1
Table B-14. AGA Point Display 1 Parameters
Parameter
Meter ID Tag
Units
CUR RATE
ALM
Description
10-character identifier for the AGA point.
Unit of measurement identifier for the engineering units (EU) assigned to the AGA point.
Current instantaneous flow rate in volume units/day.
8-bit field. If a bit is set to “1”, the alarm is active. If a bit is set to “0,” the alarm is cleared.
Figure B-24 shows the alarm code bits and the alarms they represent for an AGA point.
Alarm Code
0
0
0
0
0
0
Manual Mode
0
0
Low Alarm
No Flow
Not Used
Not Used
High Alarm
Not Used
Not Used
Figure B-24. AGA Point Display 1 Alarm Code Bits
B-15
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
B.3.7.2 AGA Point Display 2 – View
Figure B-25 shows a typical View AGA Point Display 2. The AGA Point Display 2 shows the
parameters listed in Table B-15.
AGA2
CUR TTL
622.07
Y’DAY TTL 988.24
SCAN
PREV NEXT
MCF
MENU
Figure B-25. AGA Point Display 2
Table B-15. AGA Point Display 2 Parameters
Parameter
Meter ID Tag
Units
CUR TTL
Y’DAY TTL
Description
10-character identifier for the AGA point.
Unit of measurement identifier for the engineering units (EU) assigned to the AGA point.
Flow Accumulation volume since Contract Hour.
Flow Accumulation for Yesterday’s volume for the day prior to Contract Hour.
B.3.7.3 AGA Point Display 3 – View
Figure B-26 shows a typical View AGA Point Display 3. The AGA Point Display 3 shows the
parameters listed in Table B-16.
AGA2
CUR TTL
622.07
Y’DAY TTL 988.24
SCAN PREV NEXT
MMBTU
MENU
Figure B-26. AGA Point Display 3
Table B-16. AGA Point Display 3 Parameters
Parameter
Meter ID Tag
Units
CUR TTL
Y’DAY TTL
B-16
Description
10-character identifier for the AGA point.
Unit of measurement identifier for the engineering units (EU) assigned to the AGA point.
Energy accumulation since Contract Hour.
The accumulated energy for day prior (yesterday) to Contract Hour.
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
B.3.7.4 Entering Plate Change Information
Select Plate Change from the AGA Menu Display to change the orifice plate size. After selecting, Plate
Change, the Enter Password display appears.
B.3.7.4.1 Entering a Password
Certain requests return the Password display shown in Figure B-27. The Password prompt appears as
four asterisks (*).
NOTE: Information describing how to set up Passwords is located in the appropriate ROCLINK
configuration user manual.
ENTER PASSWORD
INC
****
NEXT
ENTER
ESC
Figure B-27. Plate Change Password Display
To change an asterisk to a Password character:
1. Press the INC (increase) key until the correct number appears.
NOTE: The value that is currently being edited appears with an underscore.
2. Once the correct number appears, press NEXT to move right to the next asterisk.
3. Press the INC (increase) key until the correct number appears.
4. Once the correct number appears, press NEXT to move right to the next asterisk.
5. Continue this procedure for each asterisk until all four Password numbers display.
6. Press ENTER to enter the Password.
If the Password is valid, a new display appears.
B.3.7.4.2 Changing the Plate Size
To change the Plate Size:
1. Select AGA from the Main Menu.
2. Select Plate Change from the AGA Display.
3. Enter your Password. Refer to Section B.3.7.4.1, Entering a Password, on page B-17.
4. Select the AGA point using PREV and NEXT and press ENTER. Press ESC to return to the
AGA Display. Refer to Figure B-28.
SELECT AGA
Meter ID Name
PREV
NEXT
ENTER
ESC
Figure B-28. Select AGA Point Display
B-17
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
Upon selecting an AGA point, a display appears (Figure B-29) showing the amount of time
allowed before the LDP reverts to a view-only mode.
Time Out (Minutes)
10
EDIT
ENTER
ESC
Figure B-29. Time Out Display
5. To edit the Time Out value, press EDIT.
6. Press INC (increase) until the correct number appears.
7. Once the correct number appears, press NEXT to move the next value if necessary.
8. Press ENTER to save the Time Out value. The display changes to show the time remaining
(Figure B-30).
Time Remaining
16:25
DONE
ESC
Figure B-30. Time Remaining Display
9. Press DONE to continue editing the Plate Size.
10. To change the orifice size (Figure B-31) perform one of the following:
♦ Press DEC (decrease) and INC (increase) to change the size in 1/8-inch increments. Press
DONE when you are finished.
♦ Press EDIT to enter the exact size using INC (increase) and NEXT. Press ENTER when
you are finished.
Plate Size = 4.000
Enter Plate Size
DEC
INC
INC
DONE
EDIT
+4.0000000
NEXT
ENTER ESC
Figure B-31. Plate Size Editing Displays
11. Select Yes or NO to save to EEPROM (Internal Config Flash Memory). If you press YES, an
entry is generated in the Event Log and AGA menu displays. If you press NO, you exit the Plate
Change routine without a change being registered to EEPROM.
Write to EEPROM?
YES
NO
Figure B-32. Write to EEPROM Display
B-18
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
B.3.8 PID Point Displays
The display shown in Figure B-33 is a typical display for each PID (Proportional, Integral, and
Derivative) point. Press HOLD to stop the display from automatically scrolling between displays. Press
SCAN to place the display in HOLD. To return to the Main Menu display, press MENU. The PID point
display shows the parameters listed in Table B-17.
PID #1
SP 0.00
PV 0.00
HOLD
PRI
MAN
OUT 0.00
MENU
Figure B-33. PID Point Display
Table B-17. PID Point Display Parameters
Parameter
Tag
OVR or PRI
SP
Mode
PV
OUT
Description
10-character identifier Tag for the PID point.
Loop Status indicates the running state of the PID as Override or Primary.
Setpoint for the PID loop displayed.
Operating mode, either AUTO (automatic) or MAN (manual).
Process Variable input for the PID loop displayed.
Corrected Output for the PID loop displayed.
B.3.9 FST Point Displays
Figure B-34 shows a typical FST Point Display. Press HOLD to stop the display from automatically
scrolling between displays. Press SCAN to place the display in HOLD. To return to the Main Menu
display, press MENU. Table B-18 lists the FST point display parameters.
FST SEQ# 1
Status: OFF
HOLD
MENU
Figure B-34. FST Point Display
Table B-18. FST Point Display Parameters
Parameter
Tag
Status
B-19
Description
10-character identifier Tag for the FST point.
Current state of the FST: OFF, RUNNING, or TRACE.
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
B.3.10 MSG Point Displays
Each selected FST message point returns a display similar to the one in Figure B-35. Press HOLD to
stop the display from automatically scrolling between displays. Press SCAN to place the display in
HOLD. To return to the Main Menu display, press MENU. The MSG Point Display shows the
parameters listed in Table B-19.
Message
Tag
HOLD
Arg2 Val
-8888.00
MENU
Figure B-35. MSG Point Display
Table B-19. MSG Point Display Parameters
Parameter
Message
Arg2 Val
Tag
Description
30-character text specified by Argument 1 of the FST Mesg #1 command.
Current Argument 2 Value of the parameter specified by Argument 2 of the FST Mesg command.
10-character identifier Tag for the FST Registers point being displayed.
B.3.11 LCD Point Displays
LCD points consist of various ROC point parameters, which are selected by using the LCD Setup
display in ROCLINK configuration software. There are eight possible LCD points, each of which can
have three parameter values displayed. Each parameter value is preceded by a user-entered description.
Normally, the values in these LCD points can only be viewed; however, with ROCLINK configuration
software and a user-entered Password, these values can be edited. Refer to Figure B-36.
Select either:
♦ VIEW – Section B.3.11.1, Viewing LCD Parameter Values, on page B-21.
♦ EDIT – Section B.3.11.2, Editing LCD Parameter Values, on page B-21.
>VIEW
EDIT
UP
DOWN ENTER MENU
Figure B-36. LCD Menu Display
B-20
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
B.3.11.1 Viewing LCD Parameter Values
Each LCD Point Display consists of three lines, with a 10-character text field and the value of a point
parameter. There are eight LCD Point Displays. Refer to Figure B-37.
If the ROC has the LCD program loaded, select VIEW from the LCD Menu Display. Press HOLD to
stop the display from automatically scrolling between displays. Press SCAN to place the display in
HOLD. To return to the Main Menu display, press MENU.
Text
Text
Text
SCAN
Line
Line
Line
NEXT
1 Value
2 Value
3 Value
PREV1 MENU
Figure B-37. LCD Point Display
Table B-20. LCD Menu Display Parameters – View
Parameter
Text
Line 1, 2, or 3 Value
Prev #
Description
Text describing the point value selected in the Line 1, 2, or 3 Value.
Value of the point selected to display.
Number of the LCD Point currently displayed.
B.3.11.2 Editing LCD Parameter Values
Selecting EDIT from the LCD Menu Display to edit LCD parameters.
To edit the LCD Parameter values:
1. Select LCD from the Main Menu.
2. Select EDIT from the LCD Display.
3. Enter your Password. Refer to Section B.3.7.4.1, Entering a Password, on page B-17.
4. Select the LCD point using PREV and NEXT. Press ESC to return to the LCD Display.
Select Point to Edit
Text
Line 2 Value
PREV
NEXT
EDIT
MENU
Figure B-38. LCD Point Display – EDIT
5. Press EDIT to display Figure B-39.
Enter New Value
SIGN
±128.00
NEXT
ENTER
ESC
Figure B-39. Parameter Editing Display
6. Press SIGN to change between a positive (+) and negative (–) value.
B-21
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
7. Press NEXT to continue editing the value.
8. Press INC (increase) until the correct number appears and press NEXT to move right.
9. Continue this procedure for each number.
10. Press ENTER to change the value.
11. Select Yes or NO to save to EEPROM (permanent Internal Config Flash memory). If you press
YES, an entry is generated in the Event Log and LCD menu displays. If you press NO, you exit
the routine without a change being registered to EEPROM.
Write to EEPROM?
YES
NO
Figure B-40. Write to EEPROM Display
B.4 Troubleshooting and Repair
A Local Display Panel that does not function normally should be returned to your local sales
representative for repair or replacement.
B.4.1 Resetting the ROC Using the LDP
The LDP permits a reset for all FlashPACs, version 2.00 and greater. To initiate a reset:
1. Power down the ROC.
2. Press and hold the left-most function key.
3. Reapply power to the ROC while holding down the left-most function key.
♦ For FlashPAC version 2.20 or greater, this action resets all communication port
configurations to factory defaults, disables all FSTs, and disables any user programs installed
in the ROC. All other applications including AGA, FID, FST, and history configurations are
not affected, and event log, alarm log, and history data is preserved.
♦ For ROC units with a FlashPAC, versions less than 2.20, this reset returns the ROC to
factory defaults for all point and communications parameters.
B-22
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
B.5 Local Display Panel Specifications
Local Display Panel Specifications
DISPLAY
4-line by 20-character LCD. Display size 25.4 mm
by 76.2 mm (1 in. by 3 in.). Temperature
compensated for constant contrast.
PUSHBUTTONS
Four contact-type with weather-proof membrane
cover.
PORTS
Connects to DISPLAY port on ROC with cable
supplied. 0.61 m (2 ft) and 2.29 m (7.5 ft) lengths
available.
POWER REQUIREMENTS
4.75 V dc to 5.25 V dc, 2.5 mA nominal, and –4.50
to –5.25 V dc, 2.0 mA nominal, both supplied by
ROC.
B-23
ENVIRONMENTAL
Meets the Environmental specifications of the
ROC, in which the module is installed, including
Temperature, Humidity, and Transient Protection
specifications.
DIMENSIONS
20 mm D by 127 mm W by 133 mm H (0.8 in. D by
5 in. W by 5.25 in. H).
WEIGHT
0.77 kg (1.7 lb) nominal.
APPROVALS
Approved by CSA for hazardous locations Class I,
Division 2, Groups A, B, C, and D.
Local Display Panel
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
APPENDIX C – I/O SIMULATION
This appendix describes how to simulate inputs and outputs to verify the proper operation of the ROC.
The simulations make use of the various types of I/O modules available for the ROC.
This section contains the following information:
Section
C.1 Analog Outputs to Analog Inputs
C.2 Analog Outputs to Ammeter
C.3 Discrete Outputs to Discrete Inputs
C.4 Discrete Outputs to Pulse Inputs
C.5 Potentiometer to Analog Inputs
C.6 Switch to Discrete Inputs
C.7 Switch to Pulse Inputs
Page
C-1
C-2
C-3
C-3
C-4
C-5
C-5
NOTE: Use a standard screwdriver with a slotted (flat bladed) 1/8-inch width tip when wiring all
terminal blocks.
C.1 Analog Outputs to Analog Inputs
The Analog Output source module simulates a transmitter by feeding a 4 to 20 milliamps current to
either an Analog Input Loop module or an Analog Input Differential module. Figure C-1 and Figure C-2
show wiring connections.
R1=0
R1=250
AO SRC
AI LOOP
+V
+I
220
A
B
COM
LEVEL
+T
A
+
B
-
C
Vs
I LIMIT
+
-
C
DOC0176A
Figure C-1. Current Loop — AO Source Module to AI Loop Module
R1=250
R1=0
AO SRC
AI DIFF
+V
+I
220
COM
A
A
B
B
C
C
N/C
+
200K
-
200K
LEVEL
DOC0178A
Figure C-2. Current Loop — AO Source Module to AI Differential Module
C-1
I/O Simulation
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
The Analog Output Source module simulates a transmitter feeding a 0 to 5 volts dc signal to an Analog
Input Differential module. Figure C-3 shows wiring connections.
R1=OPEN
R1=0
AO SRC
AI DIFF
+V
+I
220
COM
LEVEL
A
A
B
B
C
C
N/C
+
200K
-
200K
DOC0177A
Figure C-3. Voltage Input — AO Source Module to AI Differential Module
C.2 Analog Outputs to Ammeter or Voltmeter
Figure C-4 and Figure C-5 show how to use ammeter or voltmeter to check an Analog Output Source
module by directly reading the current or voltage from the module.
R1=0
AO SRC
+V
+I
220
COM
A
B
C
+
AMPS
-
LEVEL
DOC0179A
Figure C-4. Current Loop — AO Source Module to Ammeter
R1=0
AO SRC
+V
A
+
+I
220
VOLTS
B
COM
C
LEVEL
-
DOC0180A
Figure C-5. Voltage Output — AO Source to Voltmeter
C-2
I/O Simulation
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
C.3 Discrete Outputs to Discrete Inputs
Figure C-6 shows how to use a Discrete Output Source module to simulate a device transmitting a
discrete voltage level to a Discrete Input Isolated module.
Figure C-6. DO Source Module to DI Isolated Module
Figure C-7 shows how to use a Discrete Output Isolated module to simulate relay contacts to a Discrete
Input Source module.
DO ISO
+5V
R1=10
1 Amp
DI SRC
COM
NO
CONTROL
N/C
A
B
+
-
A
B
C
C
N/C
3.3K
Vs
+
–
DOC0182A
Figure C-7. DO Isolated Module to DI Source Module
C.4 Discrete Outputs to Pulse Inputs
Figure C-8 shows how to use a Discrete Output Source module to simulate a device transmitting pulses
(such as turbine meter) to a Pulse Input Isolated module.
Figure C-8. DO Source Module to PI Isolated Module
C-3
I/O Simulation
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
Figure C-9 shows how to use a Discrete Output Isolated module simulate a relay contact to a Pulse Input
Source module.
1 Amp
DO ISO
R1=10
COM
+5V
NO
N/C
CONTROL
+
A
N/C
B
B
+
C
C
A
-
2.2K
PI SRC
Vs
–
DOC0184A
Figure C-9. DO Isolated Module to PI Source Module
C.5 Potentiometer to Analog Inputs
Figure C-10 shows how to use a potentiometer to simulate a transmitter feeding a 4 to 20 milliamps
current signal to an Analog Input Loop module.
R2
R1=250
AI LOOP
A
+T
B
+
C
-
5K OHMS
Vs
I LIMIT
Vs = 12 VDC: R2 = 390 OHMS
DOC0185A
Vs = 24 VDC: R2 = 1K OHMS
Figure C-10. Potentiometer Input to AI Loop Module
Figure C-11 shows how to use a potentiometer and power source to simulate a transmitter feeding a
4 to 20 milliamps current signal to an Analog Input Differential module.
R1=OPEN
AI DIFF
R2
+
A
AUX PWR OUT 1
5K OHMS
-
N/C
B
+
C
-
AUX PWR = 12 VDC, R2 = 8.2K OHMS
200K
200K
DOC0186A
AUX PWR = 24 VDC, R2 = 20K OHMS
Figure C-11. Potentiometer Input to AI Differential Module
C-4
I/O Simulation
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
C.6 Switch to Discrete Inputs
Figure C-12 shows how to use a switch and power source to simulate a device transmitting a discrete
voltage level to a Discrete Input Isolated module.
R1=10
+
SWITCH
N/C
A
AUX PWR OUT 1
3.3K
+
B
–
C
–
DI ISO
DOC0187A
Figure C-12. Switch Input to DI Isolated Module
Figure C-13 shows how to use a switch to simulate relay contacts to a Discrete Input Source module.
R1=10
DI SRC
N/C
A
SWITCH
Vs
3.3K
+
B
-
C
DOC0188A
Figure C-13. Switch Input to DI Source Module
C.7 Switch to Pulse Inputs
Figure C-14 shows how to use a switch to simulate relay contacts to a Pulse Input Source module.
R1=10
PI ISO
+
SWITCH
AUX PWR OUT 1
A
B
N/C
2.2K
+
-
-
C
DOC0190A
Figure C-14. Switch to PI Source Module
C-5
I/O Simulation
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
Figure C-15 shows how to use a switch and power supply to simulate a device transmitting discrete
pulses (turbine meter) to a Pulse Input Isolated module.
R1=10
PI SRC
A
SWITCH
B
C
N/C
Vs
2.2K
+
-
DOC0189A
Figure C-15. Switch to PI Isolated Module
C-6
I/O Simulation
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
GLOSSARY
A
AGA – American Gas Association.
AI – Analog Input.
AO – Analog Output.
Analog – Analog data is represented by a continuous variable, such as an electrical current signal.
AP – Absolute Pressure.
ASCII – American (National) Standard Code for Information Interchange.
AWG – American Wire Gauge.
B
BTU – British Thermal Unit, a measure of heat energy.
Built-in I/O – I/O channels that are fabricated into the ROC and do not require a separate module. Also
called “on-board” I/O.
C
CMOS – Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor. Type of microprocessor used by the ROC.
COM1 / COM2 – Port on the ROC364 that may be used for host communications, depending on the
installed communications card.
Configuration – Typically, the software setup of a device, such as a ROC, that can often be defined and
changed by the user. Can also mean the hardware assembly scheme.
CSA – Canadian Standards Association.
CTS – Clear to Send modem communications signal.
D
DB – Database.
dB – Decibel. A unit for expressing the ratio of the magnitudes of two electric signals on a logarithmic
scale.
DCD – Carrier Detect modem communications signal.
DI – Discrete Input.
Discrete – Input or output that is non-continuous, typically representing two levels such as on/off.
DO – Discrete Output.
DMM – Digital multimeter.
DP – Differential Pressure.
DSR – Data Set Ready modem communications signal.
DTR – Data Terminal Ready modem communications signal.
G-1
Glossary
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
Duty Cycle – Proportion of time during a cycle that a device is activated. A short Duty Cycle conserves
power for I/O channels, radios, and such.
DVM – Digital voltmeter.
E
EDS – Electronic Static Discharge.
EEPROM – Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory, a form of permanent memory.
EFM – Electronic Flow Metering or Measurement.
EIA-232 (RS-232) – Serial Communications Protocol using three or more signal lines, intended for
short distances.
EIA-422 (RS-422) – Serial Communications Protocol using four signal lines.
EIA-485 (RS-485) – Serial Communications Protocol requiring only two signal lines. Can allow up to
32 devices to be connected together in a daisy-chained fashion.
EMF – Electro-motive force.
EMI – Electro-magnetic interference.
EU – Engineering Units.
F
FCC – Federal Communications Commission.
Firmware – Internal software that is factory-loaded into a form of ROM. In the ROC, the firmware
supplies the software used for gathering input data, converting raw input data calculated values,
storing values, and providing control signals.
FlashPAC Module – Memory module (uses Flash ROM and RAM) that contains the operating system,
applications firmware, and communications protocol in a ROC.
Flash ROM – A type of read-only memory that can be electrically re-programmed. It is a form of
permanent memory (needs no backup power).
FSK – Frequency Shift Keyed.
FST – Function Sequence Table, a type of program that can be written by the user in a high-level
language designed by Emerson Process Management.
G
GFA – Ground fault analysis.
GND – Electrical ground, such as used by the ROC power supply.
GP – Gauge Pressure.
H
HART – Highway Addressable Remote Transducer.
hw – Differential pressure.
G-2
Glossary
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
I, J
I/O – Input/Output.
I/O Module – Module that plugs into an I/O slot on a ROC to provide an I/O channel.
IEC – Industrial Electrical Code.
K
Kbytes – Kilobytes.
kHz – Kilohertz.
L
LCD – Liquid Crystal Display. Display only device used for reading data.
LDP – Local Display Panel. A display-only device that plugs into a ROC unit via a parallel interface
cable. The LDP consists of a 4-line by 20-character alphanumeric display and four keys used to
access information stored by the ROC.
LED – Light-emitting diode.
LOI – Local Operator Interface. Refers to the serial EIA-232 (RS-232) port on the ROC through which
local communications are established, typically for configuration software running on a PC.
LPM – Lighting Protection Module provides lightning and power surge protection for ROC units that
use I/O Modules.
M
mA – Milliamp(s); one thousandth of an ampere.
MCU – Master Controller Unit.
Modbus – A popular device communications protocol developed by Gould-Modicon.
Modular I/O – I/O channels that are provided on a ROC by means of I/O modules. See I/O Module.
MPU – Micro-processor Unit.
mW – Milliwatts, or 0.001 watt.
mV – Millivolts, or 0.001 volt.
MVS – Multi-Variable Sensor. The MVS provides differential pressure, static pressure, and temperature
inputs for orifice flow calculation.
N
NEC – National Electrical Code.
NEMA – National Electrical Manufacturer’s Association.
O
OH – Off-Hook modem communications signal.
Off-line – Accomplished while the target device is not connected (by a communications link). For
example, off-line configuration is configuring a ROC in a electronic file that is later loaded into the
ROC.
G-3
Glossary
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
Ohms – Units of electrical resistance.
On-line – Accomplished while connected (by a communications link) to the target device. For example,
on-line configuration is configuring a ROC while connected to it, so that current parameter values
are viewed and new values can be loaded immediately.
Opcode – Type of message protocol used by the ROC to communicate with ROCLINK configuration
software, as well as host computers with ROC driver software.
Operator Interface – Local Operator Interface (LOI) refers to the serial EIA-232 (RS-232) port on the
ROC through which local communications are established, typically for configuration software
running on a PC.
P, Q
Parameter – A property of a point that typically can be configured or set by the user. For example, the
Point Tag ID is a parameter of an Analog Input point. Parameters are normally edited by using
ROCLINK configuration software running on a PC.
Pf – Flowing pressure.
PC – Personal computer.
PI – Pulse Input.
PID – Proportional, Integral, and Derivative feedback loop control action.
Point – Software-oriented term for an I/O channel or some other function, such as a flow calculation.
Points are defined by a collection of parameters.
Point Number – The rack and number of an I/O point as installed in the ROC system.
PRI – Primary PID control loop.
Protocol – A set of standards that enables communication or file transfers between two computers.
PSTN – Public switched telephone network.
PT – Process Temperature.
PTT – Push-to-talk signal.
Pulse – Transient variation of a signal whose value is normally constant.
PV – Process Variable.
R
Rack – For a ROC, a rack is a row of slots into which I/O modules may be plugged. The rack is given a
letter to physically identify an I/O channel location, such as “A” for the first rack. Built-in I/O
channels are assigned a rack identifier of “A,” while diagnostic I/O channels are considered to be in
rack “E”.
RAM – Random Access Memory. In a ROC, it is used to store history, data, most user programs, and
additional configuration data.
RBX – Report-by-Exception. In a ROC, it always refers to Spontaneous RBX in which the ROC
contacts the host to report an alarm condition.
RFI – Radio frequency interference.
G-4
Glossary
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
RI – Ring Indicator modem communications signal.
ROC – Remote Operations Controller, Emerson Process Management’s microprocessor-based unit that
provides remote monitoring and control.
ROCLINK and ROCLINK 800 – Configuration software used to configure ROC units to gather data,
as well as most other functions.
ROM – Read-only memory. Typically used to store firmware.
RTD – Resistance Temperature Detector.
RTS – Ready to Send modem communications signal.
RTV – Room Temperature Vulcanizing, typically a sealant or caulk like silicone rubber.
RXD – Received Data communications signal.
S
SAMA – Scientific Apparatus Maker’s Association.
Script – An uncompiled text file (such as keystrokes for a macro) that is interpreted by a program to
perform certain functions. Typically, scripts can be easily created or edited by the end-user to
customize the software.
Soft Points – A type of ROC point with generic parameters that can be configured to hold data as
desired by the user.
SP – Setpoint, or Static Pressure.
SPI – Slow Pulse Input
SPK – Speaker.
SRAM – Static Random Access Memory. Stores data as long as power is applied; typically backed up
by a lithium battery or supercapacitor.
SRBX – Spontaneous-Report-by-Exception. In a ROC, it always refers to SRBX in which the ROC
contacts the host to report an alarm condition.
T-Z
TDI – Timed Discrete Input, or Timed Duration Input.
TDO – Timed Discrete Output, or Timed Duration Output.
Tf – Flowing temperature.
TLP – Type (of point), Logical (or point) number, and Parameter number.
TXD – Transmitted Data communications signal.
G-5
Glossary
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
INDEX
Numerics
12-volt power................................................................ 1-5
24-volt power................................................................ 1-5
A
AGA .............................................................................B-6
AGA Point Displays ...................................................B-14
Display 1................................................................B-15
Display 2................................................................B-16
Display 3................................................................B-16
Alarm Code Bits ....................................... B-9, B-10, B-11
Analog Inputs
Alarm Code Bits ......................................................B-9
Differential............................................................... 3-2
Differential Wiring................................................... 3-7
Loop......................................................................... 3-2
Loop Wiring............................................................. 3-6
Point Display............................................................B-8
Point Display Parameters.........................................B-9
Source ...................................................................... 3-2
Source Wiring .......................................................... 3-8
Troubleshooting ..................................................... 3-22
Analog Outputs
Alarm Code Bits ....................................................B-10
Analog Outputs to Analog Inputs.............................C-1
AO Source to AI Differential as Current Loop ........C-1
AO Source to AI Differential as Voltage Input ........C-2
AO Source to AI Loop as Current Loop ..................C-1
AO Source to Ammeter............................................C-2
AO Source to Voltmeter ...........................................C-2
Checking Voltage Source Installations................... 3-23
Point Display..........................................................B-10
Point Display Parameters.......................................B-10
Source ...................................................................... 3-2
Source Wiring .......................................................... 3-9
Troubleshooting ..................................................... 3-22
Antenna......................................................................... 1-4
Attenuation Levels
Communications Cards.......................................... 4-11
AUTO ...........................................................................B-5
AUX OUT 1 ............................................................... 2-13
AUX OUT 2 ............................................................... 2-13
AUX PWR OUT 1...................................................... 2-10
AUX PWR OUT 2...................................................... 2-10
Auxiliary Discrete Output............................................. 2-4
Auxiliary Outputs ....................................................... 2-11
Auxiliary Power Wiring.............................................. 2-10
B
B1
Backplate ...................................................................... 2-6
Dimensions .............................................................. 2-6
Installation ............................................................... 2-6
Mounting the I/O Module Rack............................... 2-8
Mounting the MCU to a Backplate.......................... 2-7
Backup Procedure
RAM ...................................................................... 2-13
Battery
Replacing ............................................................... 2-18
Verify Voltage ........................................................ 2-14
C
Calibration
I/O Modules............................................................. 3-5
RTD Module .......................................................... 3-17
Class I ........................................................................... 1-5
Clock
Battery ................................................................... 2-14
Cold Start.................................................................... 2-16
COM1........................................................................... 4-1
COM2........................................................................... 4-1
Communications
Verifying the ROC can Communicate with the PC
......................................................................... 2-15
Wiring Operator Interface.......................................2-11
Communications Cards................................................. 4-1
Attenuation Levels..................................................4-11
Dial-up Modem........................................................ 4-7
EIA-232 (RS-232) ................................................... 4-2
EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) ..................................... 4-4
Jumpers.................................................................. 4-10
Leased-Line Modem................................................ 4-6
LED Indicators......................................................... 4-3
Radio Modem .......................................................... 4-5
Specifications......................................................... 4-21
Troubleshooting ..................................................... 4-19
Wiring .................................................................... 4-12
Configuration
I/O Point ................................................................ 3-28
Connecting
Auxiliary Power Wiring......................................... 2-10
Communications Wiring .........................................2-11
Ground Wiring ......................................................... 2-9
Main Power Wiring................................................ 2-10
Connectors
J1 ........................................................................... 5-2
P7 .............................................................4-5, 4-6, 4-7
CTS............................................................................... 4-3
Current Loop
AO Source Module to AI Differential Module ........C-1
AO Source Module to AI Loop Module ..................C-1
AO Source to Ammeter............................................C-2
Battery.................................................................... 2-14
I-1
Index
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
D
Database
DB Menu Display ..................................................B-14
DB.................................................................................B-6
DC Power Source ....................................................... 2-10
DC PWR IN +/– ......................................................... 2-10
DCD.............................................................................. 4-3
DEC ..............................................................................B-5
Diagnostic Inputs .......................................................... 2-4
Dial-up Modem Communications Cards ...................... 4-7
Wiring .................................................................... 4-18
Discrete Inputs
Isolated..................................................................... 3-3
Isolated Troubleshooting........................................ 3-24
Isolated Wiring....................................................... 3-11
Point Display............................................................B-7
Point Display Parameters.........................................B-7
Source ...................................................................... 3-3
Source Troubleshooting ......................................... 3-24
Source Wiring ........................................................ 3-10
Discrete Outputs
Auxiliary .................................................................. 2-4
Discrete Outputs to Discrete Inputs .........................C-3
Discrete Outputs to Pulse Inputs..............................C-3
DO Isolated to DI Source.........................................C-3
DO Isolated to PI Source .........................................C-4
DO Source to DI Isolated.........................................C-3
DO Source to PI Isolated .........................................C-3
Isolated..................................................................... 3-3
Isolated Troubleshooting........................................ 3-24
Isolated Wiring....................................................... 3-12
Point Display............................................................B-8
Point Display Parameters.........................................B-8
Relay ........................................................................ 3-3
Relay Troubleshooting ........................................... 3-25
Relay Wiring .......................................................... 3-13
Source ...................................................................... 3-3
Source Troubleshooting ......................................... 3-24
Source Wiring ........................................................ 3-11
Display Format .............................................................B-5
Division 2 ..................................................................... 1-5
DONE ...........................................................................B-5
DOWN..........................................................................B-5
Dry Relay Contacts....................................................... 3-3
DSR .............................................................................. 4-3
DTR .............................................................................. 4-3
Duty Cycle............................................................. 1-7, 1-9
E
EDIT .............................................................................B-5
EEPROM
Write to .................................................................. 2-13
EIA-232 (RS-232) Communications Cards .................. 4-2
Wiring .................................................................... 4-13
EIA-232 (RS-232) Port............................................... 2-11
EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) Communications Cards .... 4-4
Wiring .................................................................... 4-14
Enclosure ...................................................................... 1-4
I-2
ENTER .........................................................................B-5
Environmental Requirements ....................................... 1-4
ESC...............................................................................B-5
F
FCC Information .......................................................... 1-2
Figure 1-1. ROC364 Controller Components Mounted on
Backplate .................................................................... 1-3
Figure 2-1. Master Controller Unit .............................. 2-2
Figure 2-2. Typical FlashPAC Module ........................ 2-3
Figure 2-3. I/O Module Rack....................................... 2-5
Figure 2-4. Backplate and Mounting Dimensions ....... 2-6
Figure 2-5. Power Wiring Connections ..................... 2-10
Figure 2-6. Operator Interface Connector Wiring
Schematic...................................................................2-11
Figure 2-7. MCU Status Indicators............................ 2-12
Figure 3-1. Typical I/O Module ................................... 3-2
Figure 3-2. AI Loop Module Field Wiring for Current
Loop Devices .............................................................. 3-6
Figure 3-3. AI Loop Module Field Wiring for Voltage
Devices ....................................................................... 3-6
Figure 3-4. AI Differential Module Field Wiring for Low
Voltage Devices .......................................................... 3-7
Figure 3-5. AI Differential Module Field Wiring for
Higher Voltage Devices .............................................. 3-7
Figure 3-6. AI Differential Module Field Wiring for
Current Loop Devices ................................................. 3-8
Figure 3-7. AI Source Module Field Wiring for Voltage
Devices ....................................................................... 3-8
Figure 3-8. AI Source Module Field Wiring for Current
Loop Devices .............................................................. 3-9
Figure 3-9. Analog Output Source Module Field Wiring
for Current Loop Devices ........................................... 3-9
Figure 3-10. Analog Output Source Module Field Wiring
for Voltage Devices................................................... 3-10
Figure 3-11. Discrete Input Source Module Field Wiring
.................................................................................. 3-10
Figure 3-12. Discrete Input Isolated Module Field Wiring
...................................................................................3-11
Figure 3-13. Discrete Output Source Module Field
Wiring ....................................................................... 3-12
Figure 3-14. Discrete Output Isolated Module Field
Wiring ....................................................................... 3-12
Figure 3-15. Discrete Output Relay Module Field Wiring
.................................................................................. 3-13
Figure 3-16. Pulse Input Source Module Field Wiring
.................................................................................. 3-14
Figure 3-17. Pulse Input Isolated Module Field Wiring
.................................................................................. 3-15
Figure 3-18. Slow Pulse Input Source Module Field
Wiring ....................................................................... 3-16
Figure 3-19. Slow Pulse Input Isolated Module Field
Wiring ....................................................................... 3-16
Figure 3-20. Low-Level Pulse Input Module Field Wiring
Schematic.................................................................. 3-17
Figure 3-21. Calibration Setup .................................. 3-18
Figure 3-22. RTD Input Module Field Wiring for TwoWire RTDs ................................................................ 3-19
Index
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
Figure 3-23. RTD Input Module Field Wiring for ThreeWire RTDs ................................................................ 3-19
Figure 3-24. RTD Input Module Field Wiring for FourWire RTD With Compensation Loop........................ 3-20
Figure 3-25. Field Wiring for Four-Wire, Single Element
RTD........................................................................... 3-20
Figure 3-26. Field Wiring for a HART Interface Module
.................................................................................. 3-21
Figure 4-1. EIA-232 (RS-232) Serial Communications
Card............................................................................. 4-2
Figure 4-2. EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) Serial
Communications Card................................................. 4-4
Figure 4-3. Radio Modem Communications Card....... 4-5
Figure 4-4. Leased-Line Modem Communications Card
.................................................................................... 4-6
Figure 4-5. Dial-up Modem Communications Card –
New............................................................................. 4-7
Figure 4-6. Dial-up Modem Communications Card .... 4-8
Figure 4-7. Phone Jack Location ................................. 4-9
Figure 4-8. Location of LED Identification Decal..... 4-10
Figure 4-9. Location of Attenuation Resistor............. 4-11
Figure 4-10. EIA-232 (RS-232) Wiring Schematic ... 4-13
Figure 4-11. EIA-422 (RS-422) Wiring Schematic ... 4-14
Figure 4-12. EIA-485 (RS-485) Wiring Schematic ... 4-14
Figure 4-13. Radio Modem Wiring Schematic .......... 4-15
Figure 4-14. Leased-Line Modem Wiring Schematic
.................................................................................. 4-17
Figure 4-15. Dial-Up Modem Wiring Schematic....... 4-18
Figure 5-1. I/O Converter Card.................................... 5-1
Figure A-1. Lightning Protection Module................... A-1
Figure B-1. Local Display Panel..................................B-1
Figure B-2. LDP Parts Orientation ..............................B-2
Figure B-3. LCD Sub-Assembly .................................B-3
Figure B-4. LCD Inside View of Door ........................B-3
Figure B-5. LCD RTV Installation ..............................B-4
Figure B-6. Typical Main Menu Display .....................B-5
Figure B-7. I/O Menu Display.....................................B-6
Figure B-8. Discrete Input Point Display.....................B-7
Figure B-9. Discrete Output Point Display..................B-8
Figure B-10. Analog Input Point Display ....................B-8
Figure B-11. Analog Input Alarm Code Bits ...............B-9
Figure B-12. Analog Output Point Display................B-10
Figure B-13. Analog Output Alarm Code Bits...........B-10
Figure B-14. Pulse Input Point Display .....................B-11
Figure B-15. Pulse Input Alarm Code Bits ................B-11
Figure B-16. SYS Parameter Display 1 .....................B-12
Figure B-17. SYS Parameter Display 2 .....................B-12
Figure B-18. SYS Parameter Display 3 .....................B-13
Figure B-19. SYS Parameter Display 4 .....................B-13
Figure B-20. DB Menu Display.................................B-14
Figure B-21. DB Point Display..................................B-14
Figure B-22. AGA Menu Display ..............................B-15
Figure B-23. AGA Point Display 1 ............................B-15
Figure B-24. AGA Point Display 1 Alarm Code Bits
..................................................................................B-15
Figure B-25. AGA Point Display 2 ............................B-16
Figure B-26. AGA Point Display 3 ............................B-16
Figure B-27. Plate Change Password Display ...........B-17
Figure B-28. Select AGA Point Display ....................B-17
I-3
Figure B-29. Time Out Display .................................B-18
Figure B-30. Time Remaining Display......................B-18
Figure B-31. Plate Size Editing Displays ..................B-18
Figure B-32. Write to EEPROM Display ..................B-18
Figure B-33. PID Point Display.................................B-19
Figure B-34. FST Point Display ................................B-19
Figure B-35. MSG Point Display ..............................B-20
Figure B-36. LCD Menu Display ..............................B-20
Figure B-37. LCD Point Display ...............................B-21
Figure B-38. LCD Point Display – EDIT ..................B-21
Figure B-39. Parameter Editing Display....................B-21
Figure B-40. Write to EEPROM Display ..................B-22
Figure C-1. Current Loop — AO Source Module to AI
Loop Module...............................................................C-1
Figure C-2. Current Loop — AO Source Module to AI
Differential Module ....................................................C-1
Figure C-3. Voltage Input — AO Source Module to AI
Differential Module ....................................................C-2
Figure C-4. Current Loop — AO Source Module to
Ammeter .....................................................................C-2
Figure C-5. Voltage Output — AO Source to Voltmeter
....................................................................................C-2
Figure C-6. DO Source Module to DI Isolated Module
....................................................................................C-3
Figure C-7. DO Isolated Module to DI Source Module
....................................................................................C-3
Figure C-8. DO Source Module to PI Isolated Module
....................................................................................C-3
Figure C-9. DO Isolated Module to PI Source Module
....................................................................................C-4
Figure C-10. Potentiometer Input to AI Loop Module
....................................................................................C-4
Figure C-11. Potentiometer Input to AI Differential
Module........................................................................C-4
Figure C-12. Switch Input to DI Isolated Module .......C-5
Figure C-13. Switch Input to DI Source Module.........C-5
Figure C-14. Switch to PI Source Module...................C-5
Figure C-15. Switch to PI Isolated Module .................C-6
Firmware.....................................................................B-12
Flash Memory Save Configuration............................. 2-13
FlashPAC ...................................................................... 2-3
Determining Version ................................................ 2-4
Installation ............................................................... 2-9
Replacing ............................................................... 2-16
Frequency Shift Keyed
FSK.......................................................................... 4-5
FST ...............................................................................B-6
Function Sequence Table .......................................B-19
Point Display .........................................................B-19
Function Keys...............................................................B-4
Fuses........................................................... 2-3, 2-10, 2-14
G
Gauges of Wire ........................................................... 2-10
GND .................................................................. 2-10, 4-10
Ground Wiring.............................................................. 2-9
Grounding
Requirements ........................................................... 1-6
Index
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
P7 ................................................................ 4-16, 4-17
Groups A, B, C, D......................................................... 1-5
H
L
HART Interface Module ............................................... 3-4
Troubleshooting ..................................................... 3-27
Wiring .................................................................... 3-20
Hazardous Location Approval ...................................... 1-5
Highway Addressable Remote Transducer - HART ..... 3-4
HOLD ...........................................................................B-5
LCD ..............................................................................B-6
Point Displays........................................................B-20
Leased-Line Modem Communications Card ................ 4-6
Attenuation Levels..................................................4-11
Jumpers.................................................................. 4-10
Wiring .................................................................... 4-16
LED Indicators ........................................................... 2-12
Communications Cards............................................ 4-3
Lightning Protection Module
LPM.........................................................................A-1
Specifications...........................................................A-3
Troubleshooting .......................................................A-2
Wiring ......................................................................A-2
Local Display Panel
Display Format ........................................................B-5
DM Menu Display .................................................B-14
Installation ...............................................................B-2
LDP..........................................................................B-1
Main Menu Items.....................................................B-6
Resetting ................................................................B-22
Specifications.........................................................B-23
Troubleshooting .....................................................B-22
Location Requirements................................................. 1-4
Low-Level Pulse Input ............................... 3-4, 3-17, 3-26
Low-Voltage Cut-off.............................................. 1-5, 2-8
LPM
Lightning Protection Module...................................A-1
I
I/O.................................................................................B-6
Input/Output............................................................. 1-2
Simulation................................................................C-1
Wiring Requirements ............................................... 1-6
I/O Converter Card ....................................................... 5-1
Replacing ................................................................. 5-3
Specifications........................................................... 5-4
Troubleshooting and Repair..................................... 5-3
I/O Menu
Display.....................................................................B-6
Point Types...............................................................B-7
I/O Module Rack .......................................................... 2-5
Mounting.................................................................. 2-8
I/O Modules.................................................................. 3-1
Calibration ............................................................... 3-5
Installation ............................................................... 3-5
Point Configuration................................................ 3-28
Removing and Installing ........................................ 3-29
Specifications......................................................... 3-30
Troubleshooting ..................................................... 3-21
Wiring ...................................................................... 3-5
INC ...............................................................................B-5
Input Voltages .................................................................2-4
Inputs
Diagnostic ................................................................ 2-4
Installation .................................................................... 2-7
FlashPAC ................................................................. 2-9
Ground Wiring ......................................................... 1-6
I/O Converter Card .................................................. 5-2
I/O Module-Power Off........................................... 3-29
I/O Modules ............................................................. 3-5
Local Display Panel .................................................B-2
Power Requirements ................................................ 1-5
Installation Guidelines .................................................. 1-3
ISO.............................................................................. 4-10
J, K
J1................................................................................... 5-2
Jumpers
Communications Cards.......................................... 4-10
P1 ........................................................................... 2-8
P2 ........................................................................... 2-8
P3 ................................................... 2-8, 4-6, 4-7, 4-10
P4 ..................................................4-6, 4-7, 4-10, 4-14
P5 ...........................................................4-6, 4-7, 4-10
P6 .................................................................. 4-5, 4-10
I-4
M
Main Menu Display ......................................................B-5
Main Power Wiring .................................................... 2-10
Manuals ........................................................................ 1-1
Master Controller Unit.................................................. 2-1
MCU
Replacing/Removing ............................................. 2-19
Memory Map ................................................................ 2-4
MENU ..........................................................................B-5
Menu Display ...............................................................B-6
Modem Cards
Attenuation Levels..................................................4-11
Dial-up Communications Cards............................... 4-7
Jumpers.................................................................. 4-10
Leased-Line Communications Cards....................... 4-6
Radio Communications Cards ................................. 4-5
Surge Protection....................................................... 1-6
Module Rack ................................................................ 2-5
Mounting an I/O Module Rack to a Backplate ............. 2-8
Mounting the MCU to a Backplate............................... 2-7
MSG .............................................................................B-6
Point Displays........................................................B-20
N
National Electrical Code
NEC ......................................................................... 1-5
Index
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
OH ................................................................................ 4-3
Operation .................................................................... 1-10
Operator Interface....................................................... 2-11
Wiring .................................................................... 2-11
Low-Level ............................................. 3-4, 3-17, 3-26
Point Display ......................................................... B-11
Point Display Parameters....................................... B-11
Slow Isolated ........................................................... 3-4
Slow Source............................................................. 3-4
Source ...................................................................... 3-3
Source Troubleshooting ......................................... 3-25
Source Wiring ........................................................ 3-13
Push-to-Talk
PTT ........................................................................ 4-10
P, Q
R
P1, P2, & P3 Voltage Jumpers ...................................... 2-8
P3 Jumper .....................................................4-6, 4-7, 4-10
P4 Jumper ............................................4-6, 4-7, 4-10, 4-14
P5 Jumper .....................................................4-6, 4-7, 4-10
P6 Jumper ............................................................ 4-5, 4-10
P7 Connector ..................................................4-5, 4-6, 4-7
P7 Jumper .......................................................... 4-16, 4-17
Password.....................................................................B-17
Performing a Cold Start .............................................. 2-16
Performing a Reset ..................................................... 2-16
PID................................................................................B-6
Parameters..............................................................B-19
Point Displays ........................................................B-19
Pin 2................................................................... 4-16, 4-17
Pin 8................................................................... 4-16, 4-17
Plate Change ...............................................................B-17
Point Numbers
E1 .................................................................... 2-4, 5-3
E2 ........................................................................... 2-4
E3 .................................................................. 2-4, 2-11
E4 .................................................................. 2-4, 2-11
E5 ........................................................................... 2-4
Points
Configuration ......................................................... 3-28
Potentiometer Input to AI Differential Module.............C-4
Potentiometer Input to AI Loop Module.......................C-4
Power
Installation Requirements ........................................ 1-5
LED........................................................................ 2-13
Power Consumption Calculations............................ 1-7
Radio Requirements................................................. 1-9
Requirements ........................................................... 1-5
Source ...................................................................... 1-5
Supply Requirements ............................................... 1-6
Surge Protection Device........................................... 1-6
Totaling Requirements ........................................... 1-10
Voltage Requirements .............................................. 2-8
Wiring Auxiliary .................................................... 2-10
Power Wiring .............................................................. 2-10
PREV ............................................................................B-5
Product Overview ......................................................... 1-2
Pulse Inputs
Alarm Code Bits ....................................................B-11
Isolated..................................................................... 3-3
Isolated Troubleshooting........................................ 3-25
Isolated Wiring....................................................... 3-14
Radio Modem Communications Cards......................... 4-5
Attenuation Levels..................................................4-11
Jumpers.................................................................. 4-10
Wiring .................................................................... 4-15
Radio Power Control .................................................... 2-3
Radio Power Requirements .......................................... 1-9
RAM........................................................................... 2-15
Backup Procedure.................................................. 2-13
Verifying RAM ...................................................... 2-15
Remote Operations Controllers - ROC......................... 1-1
Repair ................................................................ 2-12, 3-21
Replacing a FlashPAC ................................................ 2-16
Replacing an I/O Converter Card ................................. 5-3
Replacing the Battery ................................................. 2-18
Replacing/Removing the MCU Assembly.................. 2-19
Reset ........................................................................... 2-16
Warm Start ............................................................. 2-15
Resetting the Local Display Panel ..............................B-22
Resistance Temperature Detector - RTD Input ............. 3-4
Resistors ....................................................................... 1-7
RI .................................................................................. 4-3
ROC Memory Map....................................................... 2-4
ROC/FloBoss Accessories Instruction Manual (Form
A4637) ........................................................................ 1-1
ROC364
Product Overview .................................................... 1-2
ROC364 Specifications .............................................. 2-20
ROCLINK 800 Configuration Software User Manual
(Form A6121) ............................................................. 1-1
ROCLINK for Windows Configuration Software User
Manual (Form A6091) ................................................ 1-1
RTD Inputs ................................................................... 3-4
Calibration ............................................................. 3-17
Troubleshooting ..................................................... 3-27
Wiring ........................................................... 3-17, 3-19
RTS............................................................................... 4-3
RXD.............................................................................. 4-3
NEMA 3........................................................................ 1-4
NEXT............................................................................B-5
Nominal Power Source ................................................. 1-5
O
I-5
S
Save
Write to EEPROM or Flash Memory Save
Configuration ................................................... 2-13
Scaling Resistors .......................................................... 1-7
SCAN ...........................................................................B-5
Setting Voltage Jumpers in the MCU............................ 2-8
Index
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
SHUTDOWN .................................................... 4-16, 4-17
SIGN.............................................................................B-5
Site Requirements......................................................... 1-4
Slow Pulse Inputs
Isolated..................................................................... 3-4
Isolated Troubleshooting........................................ 3-26
Isolated Wiring....................................................... 3-16
Source ...................................................................... 3-4
Source Troubleshooting ......................................... 3-26
Source Wiring ........................................................ 3-15
Solar
Panels....................................................................... 1-4
Specifications
Communication Card ............................................. 4-21
I/O Converter Card .................................................. 5-4
I/O Modules ........................................................... 3-30
Lightning Protection Module .................................. A-3
Local Display Panel ...............................................B-23
ROC364 ................................................................. 2-20
Startup................................................................ 1-10, 1-11
Voltage Requirements .............................................. 2-8
Surge Protection Device ............................................... 1-6
Switch
Switch Input to DI Isolated Module.........................C-5
Switch Input to DI Source Module ..........................C-5
Switch to Discrete Inputs .........................................C-5
Switch to PI Isolated Module...................................C-6
Switch to PI Source Module ....................................C-5
Switch to Pulse Inputs..............................................C-5
SYS...............................................................................B-6
SYS Parameter Displays.............................................B-12
Display 1................................................................B-12
Display 2................................................................B-12
Display 3................................................................B-13
Display 4................................................................B-13
System Status..................................................... 2-12, 2-13
T
Table 1-1. Power Consumption of the ROC364 and
Powered Devices......................................................... 1-8
Table 1-2. Power Consumption of the I/O Modules .... 1-9
Table 2-1. ROC Memory Map .................................... 2-4
Table 2-2. MCU LED Indicators ............................... 2-13
Table 2-3. ROC Fuses................................................ 2-14
Table 3-1. Calibration Resistance Values................... 3-18
Table 3-2. Analog Input Module Typical Configuration
Values........................................................................ 3-22
Table 4-1. Communications Card LED Indicators....... 4-3
Table 4-2. Jumper Positions for the Modem Cards.... 4-10
Table 4-3. Radio and Leased-Line Modem
Communications Card Attenuation Levels ............... 4-11
Table 4-4. ROC300-Series Communications Card Signals
.................................................................................. 4-12
Table 5-1. I/O Converter Card Requirements ............... 5-2
Table B-1. Function Key Labels and Descriptions ......B-5
Table B-2. Main Menu Items of the Local Display Panel
....................................................................................B-6
Table B-3. I/O Menu Point Types ................................B-7
I-6
Table B-4. Discrete Input Point Display Parameters ...B-7
Table B-5. Discrete Output Point Display Parameters
....................................................................................B-8
Table B-6. Analog Input Point Display Parameters .....B-9
Table B-7. Analog Output Point Display Parameters
..................................................................................B-10
Table B-8. Pulse Input Point Display Parameters ...... B-11
Table B-9. SYS Parameter Display 1.........................B-12
Table B-10. SYS Parameter Display 2.......................B-12
Table B-11. SYS Parameter Display 3.......................B-13
Table B-12. SYS Parameter Display 4.......................B-13
Table B-13. DB Point Display Parameters ................B-14
Table B-14. AGA Point Display 1 Parameters...........B-15
Table B-15. AGA Point Display 2 Parameters...........B-16
Table B-16. AGA Point Display 3 Parameters...........B-16
Table B-17. PID Point Display Parameters................B-19
Table B-18. FST Point Display Parameters ...............B-19
Table B-19. MSG Point Display Parameters .............B-20
Table B-20. LCD Menu Display Parameters – View
..................................................................................B-21
Temperature of ROC.......................................................2-4
Totaling Power Requirements..................................... 1-10
Troubleshooting.......................................................... 2-12
Analog Inputs ........................................................ 3-22
Analog Outputs...................................................... 3-22
Communications Cards.......................................... 4-19
Discrete Input Isolated ........................................... 3-24
Discrete Input Source ............................................ 3-24
Discrete Output Isolated ........................................ 3-24
Discrete Output Relay............................................ 3-25
Discrete Output Source.......................................... 3-24
HART Interface Module ........................................ 3-27
I/O Converter Card .................................................. 5-3
I/O Modules........................................................... 3-21
I/O Simulation .........................................................C-1
Lightning Protection Module...................................A-2
Low-Level Pulse Input........................................... 3-26
Performing a Cold Start ......................................... 2-16
Performing a Reset ................................................ 2-16
Pulse Inputs............................................................ 3-25
Removing and Replacing the MCU Assembly ...... 2-19
Replacing a FlashPAC ........................................... 2-16
Replacing the Battery ............................................ 2-18
Resetting the Local Display Panel .........................B-22
RTD Input .............................................................. 3-27
Slow Pulse Input Isolated ...................................... 3-26
Verifying Battery Voltage ...................................... 2-14
Verifying RAM ...................................................... 2-15
Verifying the ROC can Communicate with the PC
......................................................................... 2-15
Turbine Meter ...............................................................C-6
TXD.............................................................................. 4-3
U
UP.................................................................................B-5
User Manuals................................................................ 1-1
Index
Rev Jun/05
ROC364 Instruction Manual
V
Verifying RAM ........................................................... 2-15
Verifying the ROC can Communicate with the PC..... 2-15
Version ........................................................................B-12
Version Name .............................................................B-12
Voltage Input
AO Source Module to AI Differential Module ........C-2
Voltage Jumpers in the MCU........................................ 2-8
Voltage Output
AO Source Module to Voltmeter..............................C-2
W, X, Y, Z
Warm Start .................................................................. 2-15
Watchdog Timer.......................................................... 2-10
Wire Gauges ............................................................... 2-10
Wiring
AI and PI to LPM.................................................... A-2
Analog Input Differential Module ........................... 3-7
Analog Input Loop................................................... 3-6
Analog Input Source ................................................ 3-8
Analog Output Source.............................................. 3-9
Auxiliary Power..................................................... 2-10
Communications Cards.......................................... 4-12
Dial-up Modem Communications Cards ............... 4-18
Discrete Input Isolated ............................................3-11
Discrete Input Source ............................................ 3-10
Discrete Output Isolated ........................................ 3-12
Discrete Output Relay............................................ 3-13
Discrete Output Source...........................................3-11
EIA-232 (RS-232) Communications Cards ........... 4-13
EIA-422/485 (RS-422/485) Communications Cards
......................................................................... 4-14
Ground ..................................................................... 2-9
Ground Wiring Installation ...................................... 1-6
HART Interface Module ........................................ 3-20
I/O Modules............................................................. 3-5
Leased-Line Modem Communications Cards........ 4-16
Lightning Protection Module...................................A-2
Main Power............................................................ 2-10
Operator Interace ....................................................2-11
Pulse Input Isolated................................................ 3-14
Pulse Input Source ................................................. 3-13
Radio Modem Communications Card ................... 4-15
Requirements ........................................................... 1-6
RTD Input ..................................................... 3-17, 3-19
Slow Pulse Input Isolated ...................................... 3-16
Slow Pulse Input Source ........................................ 3-15
Write to EEPROM...................................................... 2-13
If you have comments or questions regarding this manual, please direct them to your local sales representative or
contact:
Emerson Process Management
Flow Computer Division
Marshalltown, Iowa 50158 U.S.A.
Houston, TX 77041 U.S.A.
Pickering, North Yorkshire UK Y018 7JA
Website: www.EmersonProcess.com/flow
I-7
Index
Rev Jun/05