Yamaha CDR400c Series User manual

iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2
User Manual
Pre.12/97
iXOS Software AG
• Technopark • Bretonischer Ring 12 • D-85630 Grasbrunn
Tel. +49 (89) 46005-0 • Fax +49 (89) 46005-199 • email: office@munich.ixos.de
Impressum
ImpressumiXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual
Pre.12/97
Copyright
 1997 iXOS Software AG
All rights reserved, including those regarding reproduction, copying
or other use or communication of the contents of this document or
parts thereof. No part of this publication may be reproduced, transmitted to third parties, processed using electronic retrieval systems,
copied, distributed or used for public demonstration in any form
whatsoever without the written consent of iXOS Software AG. We
reserve the right to update or modify the contents.
Registered trade iXOS: iXOS Software AG.
marks
Other product names are used only to identify the products and may
be registered trademarks of the relevant manufacturers.
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iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
Contents
Contents
1 Introduction............................................................. 9
1.1 About this manual ............................................................................ 9
1.1.1 Software release and further information................................ 9
1.1.2 Structure of this manual........................................................ 11
1.2 Conventions ................................................................................... 12
1.3 iXOS-JUKEMAN — an overview.................................................... 13
1.3.1 Main components ................................................................. 14
1.3.2 Supported hardware ............................................................. 16
2 Installation ............................................................ 21
2.1 Introduction .................................................................................... 21
2.2 Requirements................................................................................. 22
2.2.1 Supported operating systems ............................................... 22
2.2.2 System requirements............................................................ 22
2.3 Windows NT installation ................................................................ 23
2.4 UNIX installation ............................................................................ 25
3 Setting up iXOS-JUKEMAN .................................. 29
iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
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Contents
3.1 Introduction ....................................................................................29
3.2 Set up license keys ........................................................................31
3.2.1 Why do I need license keys? ................................................31
3.2.2 How do I get license keys? ...................................................31
3.2.3 How to enter license keys .....................................................34
3.3 Set up caches and buffers..............................................................36
3.3.1 The directory cache ..............................................................36
3.3.2 How to set up the directory cache.........................................38
3.3.3 The data cache .....................................................................40
3.3.4 How to set up the data cache ...............................................42
3.3.5 The IFS buffer (incremental file system) ...............................44
3.3.6 How to set up the IFS buffer .................................................46
3.4 Set up devices................................................................................48
3.4.1 SCSI devices.........................................................................48
3.4.2 Notes about some operating systems...................................50
3.4.3 Serial lines.............................................................................52
3.4.4 Device description files..........................................................53
3.4.5 Further points to note............................................................57
3.4.6 How to set up devices...........................................................60
3.5 Set up views ...................................................................................67
3.5.1 How to set up views ..............................................................72
3.6 Intregrate iXOS-JUKEMAN into the network ..................................77
3.6.1 The server side .....................................................................77
3.6.2 The client side.......................................................................80
4 Using iXOS-JUKEMAN..........................................85
4.1 Introduction ....................................................................................85
4.2 The server ......................................................................................86
4.3 Starting iXOS-JUKEMAN ...............................................................87
4.3.1 Windows NT:.........................................................................87
4.3.2 UNIX: ....................................................................................90
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iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
Contents
4.4 Modifying the set-up....................................................................... 90
4.4.1 Change buffers and caches.................................................. 90
4.4.2 Add new devices................................................................... 91
4.4.3 Remove devices ................................................................... 92
4.4.4 Change views ....................................................................... 94
4.5 Network administration................................................................... 96
4.6 Attach devices................................................................................ 98
4.7 Detach devices ............................................................................ 100
4.8 Attach devices automatically........................................................ 102
4.9 Display statistics .......................................................................... 104
4.10 Manage disks ............................................................................. 112
4.11 Server parameters ..................................................................... 123
4.11.1 Overview of server parameters......................................... 123
4.11.2 Change server parameters............................................... 130
4.12 Medien brennen/inkrementell beschreiben ................................ 132
4.12.1 Medien brennen (Single Track at Once)........................... 133
4.12.2 Medien inkrementell beschreiben ..................................... 151
4.12.3 Wie werden Medien inkrementell beschrieben? ............... 156
4.12.4 WORM-Filesystem............................................................ 160
5 Supported jukeboxes ......................................... 163
5.1 Introduction .................................................................................. 163
5.2 ASM CDR????............................................................................. 164
5.3 Cope CD Tower ........................................................................... 165
5.4 Cygnet Infinidisc/Infiniwriter ......................................................... 166
5.5 Cygnet ID100 ............................................................................... 167
5.6 Denon DRD-1408......................................................................... 168
5.7 DISC............................................................................................. 169
5.8 DISC DA***.* ................................................................................ 170
5.9 DISC CD-CHG DJ-200/600.......................................................... 171
iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
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Contents
5.10 DSM Terastore Jukeboxen.........................................................172
5.11 ELMS DVL..................................................................................173
5.12 Grundig GMS 1035 ....................................................................174
5.13 Grundig GMS 3200 ....................................................................175
5.14 Grundig GMS 3280 ....................................................................176
5.15 HP WORM/MO...........................................................................177
5.16 Hyundai HAS-550.......................................................................178
5.17 JVC MC-* CDROM Library .........................................................179
5.18 Kodak 100/150 CD ADL 100/150 ...............................................180
5.19 Kodak CDL 144 ..........................................................................181
5.20 Kubik 240 CD Jukebox...............................................................182
5.21 MDI CD 150................................................................................183
5.22 Nakamichi 7 CD MCD-1020 .......................................................184
5.23 Nakamichi 4 CD MJ-4.8s............................................................185
5.24 Nakamichi MJ-5.16si ..................................................................186
5.25 NSM 100 CD Jukebox ................................................................187
5.26 NSM 150 CD Mercury 20/31/40 .................................................189
5.27 NSM 150 CD Mercury 20s/31s/40s ............................................191
5.28 NSM Satellite (seriell) ................................................................192
5.29 Panasonic LF-J50/100/200 CD Jukebox....................................193
5.30 Pioneer 6 CD Changer...............................................................194
5.31 Pioneer 18 CD Changer.............................................................195
5.32 Pioneer 100 CD Jukebox ...........................................................196
5.33 Pioneer 500 CD Jukebox ...........................................................197
5.34 Plasmon D-Series ......................................................................199
5.35 Plasmon 150 CD-Jukebox..........................................................200
5.36 Plextor Megaplex oder PX-J2200 200 CD Jukebox ...................201
5.37 Smart and Friendly 7 CD CDJ 7004...........................................202
5.38 Smart and Friendly 4 CD CDJ 4008...........................................203
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iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
Contents
5.39 Sony CDZ-R360 CD Jukebox .................................................... 204
5.40 Sony-CDL-2?00-?? CD Jukeboxen............................................ 205
5.41 Standard-SCSI2-Jukeboxen ...................................................... 206
5.42 Tower-Jukeboxen ohne LUN-Support........................................ 207
5.43 Einzellaufwerke.......................................................................... 208
5.44 Medien-Abbilder auf Festplatten................................................ 209
5.45 Andere Jukeboxen ..................................................................... 211
6 Command line index........................................... 213
6.1 Introduction .................................................................................. 213
7 Configuration file server.cfg .............................. 237
7.1 Introduction .................................................................................. 237
7.2 The structure of server.cfg ........................................................... 238
7.2.1 View .................................................................................... 239
7.2.2 Geräte................................................................................. 242
7.2.3 Caches und Puffer .............................................................. 243
7.2.4 Server-Parameter ............................................................... 245
7.2.5 Kommentare ....................................................................... 246
8 Logdatei logfile.txt.............................................. 249
9 FAQ/Troubleshooting ......................................... 253
9.1 Häufig gestellte Fragen (FAQ)..................................................... 253
9.2 iXOS-JUKEMAN Server ............................................................... 253
9.3 Problems with CDs....................................................................... 261
9.4 iXOS-JUKEMAN Writer................................................................ 262
9.5 General ........................................................................................ 262
10 Glossar .............................................................. 265
iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
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Contents
11 Index .................................................................. 273
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iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
About this manual
1 Introduction
1.1 About this manual
This manual covers the installation, set-up and usage of iXOS-JUKEMAN,
a server software product for optical media. An introduction into the features and possibilities of the software can be found in the section “iXOSJUKEMAN — an overview” on page 13.
1.1.1 Software release and further information
Covered in this manual is the release iXOS-JUKEMAN version 2.2. The
latest release can always be found on our web server:
http://www.jukeman.com
Our web server contains all the latest information on iXOS-JUKEMAN
pricing, resellers and technical information (Support, FAQs).
There are two newsgroups, jukeman.sales and jukeman.tech for sales
information and technical information respectively. Our news server address is news://www.jukeman.de.
These newsgroups offer information additional to those found in the FAQs
of this manual. It may be a good place to look for special solutions before
you go and ask your distributor or our support.
iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
9
Introduction
New features in version 2.2
• Support for Joliet file system (read/write)
• WORM file system
• Support for multisession CDs (read)
• Support for new jukeboxes
• Enhanced support for OS/2 clients
• Support for Novell clients
• Support for Macintosh clients and HFS
• Hybrid CDs (ISO or HFS alternatively)
• Volume names can be changed with operating system functions
• Burning of multiple volumes from the graphical user interface
• Journal functionality (retains cache contents after a possible power
failure)
• Windows NT properties for all files of the JUKEMAN directory (e. g.
build version)
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iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
About this manual
1.1.2 Structure of this manual
Overview of the software:
• “iXOS-JUKEMAN — an overview” on page 13.
This section is recommended for first time users, who want to discover the possibilities and concepts of iXOS-JUKEMAN.
First time installation and set-up:
• “Installation” on page 21.
• “Setting up iXOS-JUKEMAN” on page 29.
These sections are required for first time installation and set-up of
iXOS-JUKEMAN.
Using iXOS-JUKEMAN:
• “Using iXOS-JUKEMAN” on page 85
A task oriented section for using iXOS-JUKEMAN.
Further information:
• “Supported jukeboxes” on page 163.
• “Command line index” on page 213
• “Configuration file server.cfg” on page 237
• “Log file logfile.txt” on page 249.
• “FAQ/Troubleshooting” on page 253.
iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
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Introduction
1.2 Conventions
The following conceptual and typographic conventions are used in this
manual:
Conceptual conventions:
• Disk: iXOS-JUKEMAN supports all kinds of optical media: CDs,
CD-Rs, PDs, MOs and WORMs which are generally referred to as
disks in this manual.
• GUI: The graphical user interface provides an easy way to administer iXOS-JUKEMAN on Windows NT. Sections dealing specifically with this way of administration are headed “GUI”.
• CLI: The command line interface can be used on Windows NT
and UNIX to administer iXOS-JUKEMAN. Sections dealing specifically with this way of administration are headed “CLI”.
Typographic conventions:
• Commands and program names will be typeset in
this typewriter font.
• To represent a menu selection, the following format will be used:
[MENUNAME]-ENTRY, e. g. [DEVICES]-NEW tells you to open
the “devices” menu and select the entry “new”.
• Parameters to commands will be printed in angle brackets:
<parameter>. Optional parts will be printed in square brackets:
[can be ommitted].
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iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
iXOS-JUKEMAN — an overview
1.3 iXOS-JUKEMAN — an overview
iXOS-JUKEMAN is the leading software product for managing jukeboxes,
drives, and recorders for optical disks. It provides simple and efficient access to optical storage devices with unrivaled performance and flexibility.
Simplicity
iXOS-JUKEMAN presents all available disks as a standard file system,
completely hiding the jukeboxes. The UNIX version acts as a standard
NFS file server; the NT version acts as a standard NT file system that can
be shared across all available protocols. Users can access the disks as
easily as they would access a shared hard disk. Version 2.2 also allows
clients to concurrently write disks.
Efficiency
The file system server provides data and directory structure caching, and
powerful device management and job scheduling features. As a result,
iXOS-JUKEMAN provides the industry’s highest performance - even under extremely high load use.
In addition, iXOS-JUKEMAN’s redundant disk management means you
can count on quick response times with the added advantage of protection against hardware failure.
Flexibility
iXOS-JUKEMAN has been carefully designed to ensure support for a wide
range of environments, including a range of mixed clients and network
protocols.
In addition, iXOS-JUKEMAN is highly customizable. For example, multiple views can be defined with various name formats and configurable
subsets of visible disks.
iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
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Introduction
UNIX
Windows
Disks
OS/2
Macintosh
1.3.1 Main components
iXOS-JUKEMAN consists of a file system server and a CD writer.
The server provides native file system support for multiple client types,
and allows users to view CDs in their preferred file system format. It accesses real hardware devices and hides them completely by presenting
an abstract hierarchical file system. It caches files and directories, optimizes access to CDs and jukeboxes, and minimizes jukebox movements.
The writer supports burning ISO 9660 file systems on recordable disks,
assuring the reliable constant data rate required by CD recorders. In addition, the writer supports Rock Ridge attributes and the Joliet file format.
Version 2.2 of iXOS-JUKEMAN combines the server and writer in a writable file system. It can be configured to present all writable disks as if
they were hard disks, allowing clients to add data to these disks through
the same file system interface that presents the disks for read access.
For each operating system, iXOS-JUKEMAN uses one generic SCSI
driver for all hardware-related software products. A device that works
under one operating system will work equally reliably under all other supported operating systems.
The NT version also includes “Jukeman Administration”, a graphical user
interface (GUI) that makes administration available, both locally or remotely from any PC.
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iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
iXOS-JUKEMAN — an overview
NT network support
NFS
iXOS file system for NT
iXOS file system server
iXOS writer software
iXOS generic SCSI driver
hardware devices
The server
The iXOS-JUKEMAN server controls jukeboxes, disk drives, and the disks
they contain. The server combines all disks in a single file system in which
each disk is a subdirectory of the root directory and the jukeboxes are
hidden.
UNIX clients access the server’s file systems via NFS. The server accepts
NFS requests and replies with the NFS protocol (version 2). Clients mount
the file system just like any other Network File System.
NFS
With Windows NT, iXOS-JUKEMAN includes a native file system that appears as a drive letter, and can be accessed and shared through the file
system file server. This guarantees that the same jukeboxes are supported across both the NFS and NT file system interfaces.
Windows NT
file system
Because NT shares local native file systems across all installed protocols,
PCs can access the file system as easily as they access a network drive.
The same file system can simultaneously be accessed by UNIX clients via
NFS. iXOS-JUKEMAN supports the MacFile service, allowing Macintosh
clients to access the file system.
IXOS JUKEMAN optimizes jukebox performance caching, optimizing disk
movement, parallel access to all devices, advanced queuing, and “request
anticipation”. iXOS-JUKEMAN also recognizes hard disk images as disks
– allowing them to be used as a replacement for CD drives. With the built
in NTFS compression, single hard disks can replace large numbers of
CDs.
For very high performance demands, disks can be replicated across several jukeboxes. When a disk is requested the server automatically
chooses the least loaded jukebox.
iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
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optimized
access
Introduction
The writer
The iXOS-JUKEMAN writer can send either ISO 9660 file systems or raw
data to a disk recorder. Moreover, Rock Ridge attributes or the Joliet format can be used. The writer accepts data from a pre-mastered file, a raw
partition, a disk drive, or from a pipe.
The writer’s preview mode can be used to test the writing process before
you start, and the verify option allows the CD to be verified immediately
after it is written.
incremental
file system
A special feature of iXOS-JUKEMAN is that the file system can also be
used by clients to write to disks. Thus, iXOS-JUKEMAN supports an incremental file system for writable disks. To eliminate the high overhead of
session lead-in and lead-out, iXOS-JUKEMAN provides multi-track writing
which uses the CD space more efficiently than multi-session writing. Up to
96 of the 99 tracks of a CD-R can be written with data. For PDs, WORMs,
and MOs, the number of tracks is not limited.
The generic SCSI driver
iXOS-JUKEMAN provides support for a wide range of devices including
jukeboxes, stand-alone CD-ROM drives and hard disk drives across multiple operating systems.
To minimize the non-portable sections of the drivers, iXOS-JUKEMAN
uses a generic SCSI driver that passes a SCSI command to the hardware
through the operating system.
If a generic driver is not present, the iXOS generic driver must be installed. Once the driver is installed, it works with all iXOS products.
1.3.2 Supported hardware
iXOS is continually adding support for new jukeboxes and recorders. An
up-to-date device list can be found on www.jukeman.com or from support@europe.jukeman.com.
The following tables list the jukeboxes and recorders tested with iXOSJUKEMAN. In the “Type” column, a ‘?’ represents any single letter, a ‘*’
represents any string.
iXOS-JUKEMAN also supports ISO 9660 image files on hard disks (see
“Disk images on hard disk” on page 209). Using NT file compression,
multiple images can be copied to a single hard disk.
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iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
iXOS-JUKEMAN — an overview
Table 1: Supported jukeboxes
Manufactor
Type
Discs
Drives
Details see
page
ASM
ASM CDR????
100-1563
1-44
164
Cope
Tower
6-7
6-7
165
Cygnet
Infinidisc/Infiniwriter
250/500
2, 4, 6, 8
166
Cygnet
ID100
100
1-4
167
Denon
DRD-1408
200
2
168
DISC
D???
238-1478
18-48
169
DISC
DA***.*
DISC
CD-CHG DJ-200/600
200/600
2-6
171
DSM
Terastore
28-1645
1-x
172
ELMS
DVL
100
4
173
Grundig
GMS 1035
35
2
174
Grundig
GMS 3200
200
1-x
175
Grundig
GMS 3280
280
6
176
HP
WORM/MO
any
any
177
Hyundai
HAS-550
JVC
MC-* CDROM Library 200/600
2-6
179
Kodak
ADL 100
100
1
180
Kodak
ADL 150
150
4
180
Kodak
CDL 144
-162
-4
181
Kubik
CDR240M
240
2-4
182
MDI
CD150
150
4
183
Nakamichi
MCD-1020
7
1
184
Nakamichi
MJ-4.8s
4
1
185
Nakamichi
MJ-5.16si
5
1
186
NSM
CDR100XA
100
1
187
NSM
CDR100Rec
100
1
187
NSM
Mercury 20
150
2
189
NSM
Mercury 31
150
4 (3/1)
189
NSM
Mercury 40
150
4
189
NSM
Mercury 20s/31s/40s
150
4
191
NSM
Satellite
-130
1-
192
Panasonic
LF-J50/100/200
50/100/200
2-4
193
Pioneer
DRM-6??x
6
1
194
Pioneer
DRM-1804x
18
1
195
Pioneer
DRM-1004x
100
2-4
196
Pioneer
DRM-5004x
500
2-4
197
170
178
iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
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Introduction
Manufactor
Type
Discs
Drives
Details see
page
Plasmon
CD150J
150
4
200
Plasmon
D-Series
120/240
2/4/6
199
Plextor
MegaPlex
200
2
201
Plextor
PX-J2200
200
2
201
Smart and
Friendly
CDJ 7004
7
1
202
Smart and
Friendly
CDJ 4008
4
1
203
Sony
CDZ-R360
360
2
204
Sony
CDL-2?00-??
125 (225)
2-4
205
any
single drive
1
1
208
-
image on hard disk
-
-
209
Table 2: Supported CD recorders
Manufactor
Type
IFS*
HP
SureStore 4020i
yes
JVC
XR-W1001
JVC
XR-W2001
Kodak
PCD 225
Matsushita
CW-7501
Matsushita
CW-7502
Philips
CDD-522
yes
Philips
CDD-2000
yes
Philips
CDD-2600
yes
Philips
(others)
yes
Pinnacle
RCD-1000
Pioneer
DR-R504X
Plasmon
CDR-480
Plasmon
CDR-4240
Plasmon
CDR-4400
Plasmon
RF4100
Plextor
CD-R PX-R24CS
yes
Plextor
CD-R PX-R412C
yes
Ricoh
RO1060C
Ricoh
RO1080G
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iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
yes
yes
iXOS-JUKEMAN — an overview
Manufactor
Type
IFS*
Ricoh
RS-9200CD
Ricoh
RS-9200GD
Sony
CDU920S
Sony
CDU924S
Teac
CD-R50S-000
Teac
CD-R55S
Yamaha
CDE/CDR100
yes
Yamaha
CDR400(c,t)
yes
*IFS = Incremental file system, allows track-by-track writing of disks
Due to upward compatability of the SCSI command set other recorders of
the listed manufactors should also work with cdglow.
iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
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Introduction
2 Installation
2.1 Introduction
This chapter covers the installation of iXOS-JUKEMAN on Windows NT
and UNIX hosts. A full installation is performed on the jukebox server. In
addition the administration client can be installed on other hosts to allow
remote administration of the iXOS-JUKEMAN server.
Note:
To set up and use the software right after installation, the devices
to be controlled by iXOS-JUKEMAN should be connected and operational.
To exploit all the features of the software, license keys have to be entered
after the installation. Otherwise the software will run in demo mode. After
the installation, read the section “Set up license keys” on page 31.
iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
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Installation
2.2 Requirements
2.2.1 Supported operating systems
iXOS-JUKEMAN runs with the following operating systems:
• AIX 4.*
• DEC UNIX 4.0 (Alpha processor)
• IRIX 6.2, 6.4
• HP-UX 10.*
• Windows NT 3.51, 4.0 (with Alpha or Intel processor)
• Solaris 2.4, 2.5, 2.51, 2.6
An updated list can be ordered from support@europe.jukeman.com.
2.2.2 System requirements
• At least 32 MB memory, 64 MB recommended for burning disks.
• At least one SCSI controller. It is recommended to have a recorder
connected to a separate SCSI controller if you wish to use a recorder
with cdglow. For best results we recommend using Adaptec controllers (2940, 3940). There may be SCSI problems with IBM and Mylex
RAID controllers on Windows NT.
• 20 MB hard disk space for the software. The directory cache size depends on the number of disks and files on each disk. To evaluate disk
space requirements see “Set up caches and buffers” on page 36.
• A hard disk buffer must be configured before using the incremental file
system. The buffer size required depends on the amount of data to be
held in the buffer.
• Sufficient free space for the database “volumes” in which iXOSJUKEMAN stores information about the disks. About 2 kB per licensed
disk will be needed.
• TCP/IP must be configured on the iXOS-JUKEMAN server (IP address
etc.). The protocol used for the network is irrelevant.
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iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
Windows NT installation
2.3 Windows NT installation
The installation program for Windows NT copies files to a directory on
your hard disk, installs iXOS-JUKEMAN services and sets up the registry
entries.
Before you begin installation, log on as administrator or a super user.
Start the program jukeman.exe on the iXOS-JUKEMAN CD-ROM. The
following dialog will open:
In this set-up dialog, specify where you want to install the iXOSJUKEMAN user programs. (The default is %SystemDrive%\jukeman.)
Now select the portions of the software you want to install:
Install Jukebox File System
To install the administration service and the jukebox daemon, which controls jukeboxes and supports both file system and administration service.
The writer and the iso9660 formatter will be installed automatically.
Install Administration Client
To install a graphical user interface with which you can locally or remotely
administer the iXOS-JUKEMAN server.
Disable Autorun Feature
A feature of Windows NT is to run special files on CDs automatically (e.g.,
to start an installation). However, this autorun feature can lead to probiXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
23
Installation
lems and undesired effects on the JUKEMAN server. A checkmark by
Disable Autorun Feature will assure that no autorun files will be started
on the server. This feature can also be configured in the registry
(regedt32.exe):
autorun
feature
You will probably want to install all these items. If you install the administration client on other hosts the iXOS-JUKEMAN server can be administered through the network. The administration client will also run on Windows 95.
The iXOS-JUKEMAN services (iXOS Jukebox Daemon and iXOS Admin
Server) will be started automatically after reboot.
Note:
The startup behavior of these services can be configured with the
“Services” dialog from the NT “Control Panel”.
Click [OK] to start the installation. The installation program creates an
iXOS-JUKEMAN folder containing program icons.
When installation is complete, reboot your system.
To set up the software see “Setting up iXOS-JUKEMAN” on page 29.
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UNIX installation
2.4 UNIX installation
Before you begin installation log on as root.
All the files needed for installation can be found on the iXOS-JUKEMAN
CD-ROM or downloaded from the world wide web (see page 9). To
download, follow the instructions on the web pages. Important files to be
downloaded are the operating system-specific file and the file with configuration examples ('examples.tz').
The following table lists the operating system-specific files. These files
are compressed 'tar' files. To avoid problems with Windows programs the
extension of the files is .tz rather than .tar.Z.
Operating system
File name
AIX 4.*
aix.tz
DEC UNIX 4.0
dec.tz
HP-UX 10.*
hpux.tz
IRIX 6.2, 6.4
irix.tz
Solaris 2.4, 2.5, 2.51, 2.6 solaris.tz
examples.tz
(all)
If all files needed are available, installation may begin:
You will need about 4 MB of disk space for installation.
Create an empty target directory (e.g, jukeman):
mkdir <path>/jukeman
If you are using an iXOS-JUKEMAN CD-ROM, you will find the software
packages for certain UNIX platforms in a subdirectory called 'os' or
'unix'. For instance there is a file called solaris.tz for the Solaris
platform. Change to the source directory where the software package for
your UNIX platform is located.
Copy the file (e. g., solaris.tz) and the examples file (examples.tz)
to the target directory, rename the file to solaris.tar.Z (and examples.tar.Z) and decompress the files. This can be done with the following commands:
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Installation
cp solaris.tz <path>/jukeman/solaris.tar.Z
cp examples.tz <path>/jukeman/examples.tar.Z
cd <path>/jukeman
zcat solaris.tar.Z | tar xvf Now you have all the files except license files, device descriptions and
configuration.
If you wish to update an earlier version, copy the old configuration files
(server.cfg, *.dev, *.sav, *.lic) and the database volumes to the
new target directory. For a first installation it is recommended to extract
template configuration files by issuing the following command:
zcat examples.tar.Z | tar xvf The database volumes will be created by cdnfsd automatically. Now
that you have all the relevant files, the tar files can be deleted:
rm *.tar.Z *.tz
Note that for further installation all jukeboxes connected to the host need
to be operational in order to install the SCSI driver properly.
To install the SCSI driver:
jmsetup
This command installs both the SCSI driver if needed, and the iXOS devices paths. Some older HP machines (800 series) may tell you to install
the SCSI pass through kernel driver (see man scsi_pt(7)).
Since the cdnfsd program runs only under root id and the performance of
cdglow is much higher under root id, change the owner to root and the
permissions to suid:
chown root cdnfsd cdglow
chmod u+s cdnfsd cdglow
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UNIX installation
For HP-UX 10.* change the permissions for both the cdadm and the inquiry command:
chown root cdadm inquiry
chmod u+s cdadm inquiry
To set up the software, see “Setting up iXOS-JUKEMAN” on page 29.
If you just want to use the writer software you do not have to set up anything else. The software is described in the section “Burning disks” on
page 133. If you have already received a license key for the writer software from your distributor, enter it in the file writer.lic as described in
“How to enter license keys” on page 34.
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Introduction
3 Setting up iXOS-JUKEMAN
3.1 Introduction
iXOS-JUKEMAN must be set up before you can start and use the software. The following sections will tell you how to:
• Set up license keys. This section may be skipped if you have no license keys and want to test the software in demo mode.
• Set up caches and buffers. Setting up a directory cache will improve
the overall performance of the server. Setting up this cache pays off as
soon as a new jukebox is attached to the server.
• Set up devices. This sections tells you how to configure device description files which allows you to access the disks in your jukeboxes,
drives and so on.
• Set up views. Here you learn how to set up the presentation of the
iXOS-JUKEMAN file system. By default iXOS-JUKEMAN sets up two
views, which export all disks in both PC format and Rock Ridge format.
• Intregrate iXOS-JUKEMAN into the network. This section describes
how to set up both the server side and the client side of iXOSJUKEMAN, allowing all clients to access the disks they need.
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Setting up iXOS-JUKEMAN
There are two ways the set-up can be performed:
1. With the GUI on Windows NT. The administation client must be
started. This can be done from the NT “Start” menu ([START][PROGRAMS]-[IXOS-JUKEMAN]-JUKEMAN ADMINISTRATION or
by running “jukeboy” from the JUKEMAN directory). The corresponding sections are entitled GUI.
2. By editing configuration files on Windows NT and UNIX. Sections with
this set-up method are entitled CLI (Command Line Interface). The
configuration files can all be found in the JUKEMAN directory.
Both methods are equivalent. Any difference will be noted in the text.
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Set up license keys
3.2 Set up license keys
3.2.1 Why do I need license keys?
Valid license keys allow you to take advantage of all the features of iXOSJUKEMAN.
There are separate license files for the server and the writer software,
which specify a possible license time-out restriction and the number of
disks the server will be allowed to handle. The license files are:
• server.lic contains the number of supported physical disks.
• writer.lic allows the writer software to burn CDs, PDs, WORMs
and MOs on the JUKEMAN server.
There are no special demo versions of the software. The server and the
writer will run in a demo mode if the license key in the relevant license file
is invalid. In demo mode the server will support five disks for two hours.
After two hours it will stop, but can be started again.
The writer software cdglow and the incremental file system will burn up to
128 MBs in demo mode. However, creating a hard disk image from a disk
is not limited.
Note:
When the server starts up, iXOS-JUKEMAN will log information
on the license files in the file “logfile.txt”. This file is described in the section “Log file logfile.txt” on page 249.
3.2.2 How do I get license keys?
There are separate license keys available for server and writer software.
The server license depends on the number of supported disks. The license key is bound to these capabilities and a host ID. The ID can also be
the IP address. The host ID can determined with the following commands:
AIX:
/bin/uname -m
DEC UNIX:
/sbin/ifconfig ln0
IP address
/bin/uname -i
HP-UX:
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demo mode
Setting up iXOS-JUKEMAN
IRIX:
/sbin/sysinfo -s
NT:
either the IP address in the result of ‘ipconfig’or the
network adapter address, which can be determined by the
last entry of the “Workstation active on” line of the result
of net config workstation.
/usr/ucb/hostid
Solaris:
The host ID also appears at the top of the file named logfile.txt in
“Your key for a license order:”.
For an NT host with more than one IP address or network adapter any of
the addresses can be used to obtain a valid license key. The NT host IDs
can also be determined with the GUI by selecting [SERVICE]-LICENSE
KEYS:
Time-out licenses
You can obtain a 30-day evaluation license for a limited number of disks
from our web server http://www.jukeman.com. If you encounter any
problems, send mail to support@europe.jukeman.com.
Unlimited licenses
You can obtain full licenses from your vendor. If you do not know where to
buy iXOS-JUKEMAN, see http://www.jukeman.com or contact presales@jukeman.com.
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Setting up iXOS-JUKEMAN
3.2.3 How to enter license keys
GUI
Windows NT
Select [SERVICE]-LICENCE KEYS:
In this dialog the license keys for the server and the writer are entered independently.
Major Version Number:
Should be '2' for all versions 2.xx of iXOSJUKEMAN.
Server license for _ volumes: Enter the number of supported physical
disks.
License expires...:
For an evaluation license, deselect 'never'
and enter the time-out date.
License key is:
Enter your 8 character license key.
You can see 'invalid' change to 'valid' as soon as your license key is
typed in correctly. Confirm the changes by clicking [OK]. If the service
was running, it needs to be restarted to reflect the changes. In this case a
dialog will open and tell you just that. Click [YES], to restart the service.
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CLI
UNIX, Windows NT
Open one of the following files server.lic or writer.lic with a text
editor. The default files look like this:
server.lic:
writer.lic:
unlimited license
version=2
volumes=250
version=2
writer
license=justdemo
license=justdemo
time-out license
version=2
volumes=250
version=2
writer
timeout=1997/06/13
timeout=1997/06/13
license=justdemo
license=justdemo
The settings printed in bold must be changed to match your license.
Replace 'justdemo' by the relevant 8 character license key. In
server.lic replace 250 by the number of supported disks. The order of
the parameters must not be changed.
Save the changed license file. The new settings will be active when the
server is restarted.
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Setting up iXOS-JUKEMAN
3.3 Set up caches and buffers
Caches speed up access to frequently used data. With iXOS-JUKEMAN
you can set up both a directory and a data cache. Caches on your hard
disk are not required to run iXOS-JUKEMAN, since it always holds a directory and data cache in RAM. For a large number of disks, however, it is
recommended to set up at least a directory cache.
In addition, iXOS-JUKEMAN supports incremental writing to disks with the
incremental file system. To use this feature, iXOS-JUKEMAN needs a
buffer on your hard disk to temporarily store the data to be written to the
disks. Using the incremental file system, it is almost as easy writing to optical disks as writing to the hard disk.
Set-up of
Recommendation
directory cache
data cache
IFS buffer
yes
no (see “Note”on page 40)
required for incremental file system only
3.3.1 The directory cache
iXOS-JUKEMAN maintains a directory cache for all controlled disks. It
stores the directory structure and file name information in the cache. This
can improve performance, because a file search can be conducted without having to insert disks into drives of a jukebox. The cache is cyclic: old
entries are dropped, when the cache is full and new entries arrive. The
default size for the directory cache is 1 MB in RAM. Depending on the
number of disks controlled by iXOS-JUKEMAN you may want to set up a
larger hard disk-based directory cache.
Because of sophisticated hash techniques, the directory cache offers exceptionally high performance.
The cache is filled dynamically, when clients access the server and request non-cached directories and files. Internally the caching occurs under the following conditions:
1. If a directory is accessed and it is not found in the cache, then it is
filled into the directory cache.
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Set up caches and buffers
2. If a new disk is inserted into a drive, iXOS-JUKEMAN checks to see if
the root directory is in the cache. If it is not, the parameter autodc
(see section “Server parameters” on page 123) determines what happens next. If set to 0, no caching is performed. If set to 1, caching is
performed only if a permanent hard disk directory cache is configured.
When set to 2, JUKEMAN will cache the entire directory structure.
When setting the size of the directory cache, keep the following in mind:
1. Each file requires 25 bytes plus the length of the file name.
2. Each directory requires 100 bytes plus the length of the directory
name.
3. Administration of the cache consumes approximately 15% of the
space, so you have to add about one sixth of the totals of items 1 and
2 to the sum.
4. If a disk contains extensions in Rock Ridge format, you must allow for
the additional space occupied by the rock ridge name.
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Setting up iXOS-JUKEMAN
3.3.2 How to set up the directory cache
GUI
Windows NT
Select [CONFIGURATION]-BUFFERS AND CACHES:
If the server is running, iXOS-JUKEMAN asks you to shut it down. Click
[YES] to stop it.
1. Deselect No directory cache.
2. Click [DEFAULT] for the default settings.
3. Enter a file name for the cache in the File name field. Please note that
for security reasons the cache file can be created in the JUKEMAN directory or its subdirectories only. If you do not specify a file name, the
size of the RAM directory cache will be changed.
4. Enter the cache size in megabytes in the Size field.
5. Click [OK].
6. If the server has been stopped, a dialog appears to restart it.
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CLI
Note:
UNIX, Windows NT
The file server.cfg must be modified for this task. A detailed
description of the file can be found in “Configuration file
server.cfg” on page 237. It is recommended that you make a
backup copy of the file before editing it.
1. Open the file “server.cfg” with a text editor.
2. Find the section “dircache { ... }”. If it does not exist, add the
following lines to the end of the file:
dircache {
file { <name> }
size { <size> }
}
3. Enter the file name for the cache instead of <name> (e. g., dircache). If you do not specify a path, the cache will be created in the
JUKEMAN directory. This is recommended for security reasons. If you
want to change the size of the RAM directory cache remove the line
“file { <name> }”.
4. Enter the cache size in megabytes instead of <size>.
5. Save the file.
6. The changes become active the next time the server is started.
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Setting up iXOS-JUKEMAN
3.3.3 The data cache
In addition to the directory cache, iXOS-JUKEMAN allows to set up a cyclic cache for regular data. All data accessed will also be stored in this
cache. When the data is accessed again, it can be read directly from the
data cache, so the disk does not have to be accessed. Being cyclic like
the directory cache, when the data cache gets full old data will be replaced as soon as new data is accessed.
The default size of the data cache is 2 MB in RAM. A data cache on the
hard disk can also be set up as a cache file. The name and maximum size
of this file is entered in the configuration file server.cfg.
Note:
40
Setting up a data cache on hard disk does not always guarantee
a higher data rate, because quite frequently when data is accessed by the clients, it has to be written to the hard disk as well.
Depending on the size of the data cache and the number of accesses the data rate may as well decrease.
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Setting up iXOS-JUKEMAN
3.3.4 How to set up the data cache
GUI
Windows NT
Select [CONFIGURATION]-BUFFERS AND CACHES:
If the server is running, iXOS-JUKEMAN asks you to shut it down. Click
[YES] to stop it.
1. Deselect No data cache.
2. Click [DEFAULT] for the default settings.
3. Enter a file name for the cache in the File name field. Please note that
for security reasons the cache file can be created in the JUKEMAN directory or its subdirectories only. If you do not specify a file name, the
size of the RAM data cache will be changed.
4. Enter the cache size in megabytes in the Size field.
5. Click [OK].
6. If the server has been stopped, a dialog appears to restart it.
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Set up caches and buffers
CLI
Note:
UNIX, Windows NT
The file server.cfg must be modified for this task. A detailed
description of the file can be found in “Configuration file
server.cfg” on page 237. It is recommended that you make a
backup copy of the file before editing it.
1. Open the file “server.cfg” with a text editor.
2. Find the section “regcache { ... }”. If it does not exist, add the
following lines to the end of the file:
regcache {
file { <name> }
size { <size> }
}
3. Enter the file name for the cache instead of <name> (e. g., regcache). If you do not specify a path, the cache will be created in the
JUKEMAN directory. This is recommended for security reasons. If you
want to change the size of the RAM data cache, remove the line “file
{ <name> }”.
4. Enter the cache size in megabytes instead of <size>.
5. Save the file.
6. The changes become active the next time the server is started.
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Setting up iXOS-JUKEMAN
3.3.5 The IFS buffer (incremental file system)
With iXOS-JUKEMAN you can write a disk incrementally. After initialization you can copy or move files to a disk as easily as you would move
them to your hard disk. The only difference is that you have to flush the
IFS buffer to actually burn the buffered files to disk.
Note that you require a valid license key if the writer is to burn more than
128 MB to a disk.
To enable incremental writing, iXOS-JUKEMAN needs a global file system
buffer on the hard disk. As soon as the buffer is configured, files can be
copied to the disks. The buffer is configured by setting its size and the
maximum number of files (“inodes”), that can be stored in the buffer.
To determine the correct buffer size and number of inodes, keep in mind
that each file or directory on an unfinished disk requires an inode and that
the size should be sufficient to buffer all data you plan to transfer via the
buffer.
Be sure to finalize all incrementally written CDs before you change the
size of the incremental file system buffer (see “How to write disks incrementally” on page 156). Otherwise those CDs will be of no use.
As an alternative to a single IFS buffer iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 supports
several independent IFS buffers. See “IFS with several independent
buffers” on page 243.
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Setting up iXOS-JUKEMAN
3.3.6 How to set up the IFS buffer
GUI
Windows NT
Select [CONFIGURATION]-BUFFERS AND CACHES:
If the server is running, iXOS-JUKEMAN asks you to shut it down. Click
[YES] to stop it.
1. Deselect No incremental file system.
2. Click [DEFAULT] for the default settings.
3. Enter a file name for the buffer in the File name field. Please note, that
for security reasons the cache file can be created in the JUKEMAN directory or its subdirectories only.
4. Enter the buffer size in megabytes in the Size field.
5. Enter the number of files to be held in the buffer in the Inodes field.
6. Click [OK].
7. If the server has been stopped, a dialog appears to restart it.
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Set up caches and buffers
CLI
Note:
UNIX, Windows NT
The file server.cfg must be modified for this task. A detailed
description of the file can be found in “Configuration file
server.cfg” on page 237. It is recommended that you make a
backup copy of the file before editing it.
iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 supports more than one IFS buffer (see “IFS with
several independent buffers” on page 243). To set up a single IFS buffer
do the following:
1. Open the file “server.cfg” with a text editor.
2. Find the section “fsbuffer { ... }”. If it does not exist add the
following lines to the end of the file:
fsbuffer {
file { <name> }
size { <size> }
inodes { <inodes> }
}
3. Enter the file name for the cache instead of <name> (e. g.,
fsbuffer). If you do not specify a path, the cache will be created in
the JUKEMAN directory. This is recommended for security reasons.
4. Enter the cache size in megabytes instead of <size>.
5. Enter the maximum number of files instead of <inodes>.
6. Save the file.
7. The changes will be reflected the next time the server is started.
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Setting up iXOS-JUKEMAN
3.4 Set up devices
Each device controlled by the server requires a description file that specifies the device type, the SCSI address and properties of the drive, and the
SCSI address or RS232 address of the robot (changing mechanism). The
file also specifies which storage slots the server should use (default is all
slots) and an optional file that stores the contents of the slots. A device
can also be an ISO 9660 image on your hard disk, which is controlled the
same way as ordinary disks.
The following sections explains how to set up SCSI devices for iXOSJUKEMAN.
3.4.1 SCSI devices
This section summarizes the representation of SCSI devices by our generic SCSI driver.
Controllers, buses, IDs, and LUNs
A computer can use several SCSI controllers for multiple SCSI buses.
Each SCSI bus has 8 IDs, named 0-7. Normally, each device on a SCSI
bus requires a SCSI ID. Jukeboxes often need one ID per drive and one
for the robot.
Warning: When you connect devices to the bus, be sure the new devices
use IDs that are not being used by existing devices on the controller. If you use an occupied ID, you can damage your hardware.
Usually, the SCSI controller occupies ID 7, 0-6 are free for devices. SGI
computers occupy ID 0, which means you can connect devices using IDs
1-7.
Each SCSI ID can be split into 8 logical unit numbers (LUNs). The advantage of LUNs is that a jukebox only has to use one SCSI ID, so you
can attach more devices to a single bus.
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SCSI devices and device names
In UNIX and NT, each device is represented by a device name, which is a
path in the root file system tree.
NT hides the devices, but iXOS-JUKEMAN makes the names visible. The
SCSI ID x on bus y of controller z is represented by the path \\.\pzbytx.
So if you have a PCI bus and put Adaptec twin adapters AHA 3940 into
bus slots 0 to 2, you will have 6 SCSI buses, and ID 4 on bus 1 of adapter
2 is represented as \\.\p2b1t4. Each enumeration begins with 0.
Within an ID, LUNs are represented by appending a comma and the LUN.
So \\.\p2b1t4,1 is LUN 1 of SCSI ID 4. \\.\p2b10t4 and
\\.\p2b1t4,0 are the same.
SCSI devices
in NT
In UNIX, all devices are located in a subdirectory of /dev. iXOSJUKEMAN
creates
directories
such
as
/dev/iXOS_SCSI0,
/dev/iXOS_SCSI1, and so on. Each directory represents a SCSI bus.
Devices are represented by numbers. So if your bus is represented by
/dev/iXOS_SCSI1, the device using SCSI ID 4 is represented as
/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/4. If you use LUNs, add a comma and the LUN
number. /dev/iXOS_SCSI1/4,1 is LUN 1 of the device using SCSI ID 4
on bus /dev/iXOS_SCSI1.
SCSI devices
in UNIX
SCSI device representation for iXOS-JUKEMAN
NT
UNIX
\\.\p<P>b<B>t<T>,<L>
/dev/iXOS_SCSI<B>/<T>,<L>
(<P>=adapter, <B>=bus, <T>=SCSI ID, <L>=LUN)
Windows NT: What is the path of MY Jukebox?
If you know which paths represent your devices, you can use the inquiry command (in the JUKEMAN directory) to verify the paths. For example, if you have a HP Sure Store Recorder 4020i that is connected to
the only SCSI bus on an NT system using SCSI ID 5, the command
inquiry \\.\p0b0t5
will return something like
0000002 \\.\p0b0t5 is HP's CD-drive "C4324/C4325"
0000004 ProRevL 1.25, Firmware 04/15/96
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The first line gives the drive type, the second line gives the firmware version.
0000000 Can't open \\.\p0b0t5
occurs if the driver is not running, the path is wrong, the device does not
work, the termination is wrong, or the cable is bad. The device may also
be unknown if it was not running when you booted the system.
If you do not know the paths that represent your devices, call
scsidevs
It returns a complete list of all known and working SCSI devices. If you
add a new controller, you can use these commands to check whether the
path names have changed.
3.4.2 Notes about some operating systems
Windows NT
How do I get rid of all the drive letters after connecting a new jukebox to the server?
When you connect a new jukebox or changer to the server, Windows NT
maps each drive (and even each LUN) to a new drive letter. This is usually not desired. iXOS-JUKEMAN can change this behavior:
The easy way is to configure the jukebox to be attached automatically as
soon as the server starts up. This is desribed in “Attach devices automatically” on page 102. After the second reboot of the server or, alternatively
after a restart of the server after the device is set up and a single reboot
of the server this problem is solved. A more sophisticated solution to this
problem and the background of this process is described in "Frequently
asked questions (FAQ)" on page 253.
Solaris
If you connect new devices to your Solaris host, either the SCSI driver
must be reinstalled with jmsetup or the operating system must be
stopped with /etc/halt and rebooted with boot -r. to prevent it from
controlling the drives in the jukeboxes. For more information see man
vold and man vold.conf or our FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions).
IRIX
In IRIX, the available SCSI IDs are 1 to 7. ID 0 is occupied by the controller. The removable media manager mediad may cause problems; see
man mediad.
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AIX uses a multiplex driver: You can use the devices but not see them. If
you issue the following command:
ls -l /dev/iXOS_SCSI?
the output should look like this:
lrwxrwxrwx
1 root
system
13 Oct 22 14:22
/dev/iXOS_SCSI0-> genscsi/scsi0
lrwxrwxrwx
1 root
system
13 Oct 22 14:22
/dev/iXOS_SCSI1 -> genscsi/scsi1
This shows that the files are in fact symbolic links to our generic SCSI
driver. You can use the csh expansion mechanism ‘{...}’to list the device
paths created by the driver. For example the following command:
ls /dev/iXOS_SCSI{0,1}/{0,1},{0,1}
gives the following output:
/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/0,0 not found
/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/1,0 not found
/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/0,1
/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/1,1
/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/0,0
/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/0,1
/dmv/iXOS_SCSI1/1,0
/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/1,1
(or does not exist)
This shows that on the first SCSI bus (/dev/iXOS_SCSI0) on IDs 0 and
1 there are two hard disks or other SCSI devices which cannot be accessed by the operating system. The access restriction is on LUN 0 only,
whereas LUN 1 normally replies to the command. Our inquiry command
prints the following:
inquiry /dev/iXOS_SCSI0/0,{0,1}
/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/0,0: Bad file number
0000000 /dev/iXOS_SCSI0/0,1 is IBM's unknown "DORS-3"
The operating system is not as restrictive for CD drives and jukeboxes:
inquiry /dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6,0
0000000 /dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6,0 is IBM's CD-drive
"CDRM00203"
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With the following you can find out which IDs and LUNs are occupied by
which devices:
inquiry /dev/iXOS_SCSI{0,1,2,3,4}/{0,1,2,3,4,5,6},0
IDs and LUNs that are not used return “SCSI-Error in 00 - TEST
UNIT READY”)
3.4.3 Serial lines
For several jukebox types, the robot is controlled through a serial line,
which allows you to save a SCSI ID. For the NSM Mercury and Satellite
jukebox, the serial interface allows the software to fully exploit the features of the jukebox and its ability to execute several movements in different states simultaneously. iXOS-JUKEMAN uses this parallel capability;
even under high load the server can satisfy 14 client requests per minute
for different CDs in a single Mercury or Satellite. Moreover, you can connect 16 NSM jukeboxes to a single serial line and all will be able to move
simultaneously.
Each serial line is represented in the file system by a name specific to the
operating system. The first two serial lines are:
AIX:
/dev/tty0
/dev/tty1
DEC UNIX:
/dev/tty00
/dev/tty01
HP-UX 10.*:
/dev/tty0p0
/dev/tty1p0 oder
/dev/tty0p1 (je nach
Rechnermodell)
IRIX:
/dev/ttyd1
/dev/ttyd2
NT
com1:
com2:
Solaris:
/dev/ttya
/dev/ttyb
IRIX
For IRIX, also see the output of man serial.
AIX
For AIX, special serial cables that are required are available from IBM.
The
messages
“alarm
clock
during
tty_open” and
“open(/dev/tty1) timed out” in the log file indicate an incorrect serial cable.
The following section provides you with details of device description files
for server set-up. These files are needed to access the connected devices
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through the server. For Windows NT, this section may be skipped, as you
can use the GUI to generate the device description files.
3.4.4 Device description files
A device description file contains lines in the format <key>=<value>.
Some keys must be specified for all devices, others must be specified
only for certain types.
Device type set-up
The most important parameter is the device type: device=<type>.
The supported Jukeboxes and their type are listed in the following table.
Table 3 - Device types for all supported jukeboxes
Type
Jukeboxes
cdr100
Kodak ADL 100, NSM CDR100XA and CDR100Rec
cygnet
Cygnet Infinidisc
cygnet_id100
Cygnet ID100
denon200
Denon DRD-1408
disc
DISC D???
disc_da
DISC DA***.*
disc_dj
DISC CD-CHG DJ-200/600
dsm
DSM Terastore
elms
ELMS DVL
grundig35
Grundig GMS 1035
grundig200
Grundig GMS 3200
grundig280
Grundig GMS 3280
hyundai
Hyundai HAS-550
image
Hard disk image of a disk or of an ISO 9660 file
jvc
JVC MC-* CDROM Library
kodak_cdl
Kodak CDL 144
kubik
Kubik CDR240M
mercury
Kodak ADL 150, NSM Mercury 20, 31 and 40
nakamichi
Nakamichi MCD-1020, MJ-4.8s, MJ-5.16si
Smart and Friendly CDJ 7004 and CDJ 4008
pioneer6
Pioneer DRM-6??x
pioneer18
Pioneer DRM-1804x
pioneer100
Pioneer DRM-1004x
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Type
Jukeboxes
pioneer500
Pioneer DRM-5004x
plasmond
Plasmon D-Series
plextor200
Plextor MegaPlex (also known as PX-J2200)
ps_lf_j
Panasonic LF-J-50/100/200
satellite
NSM Satellite
scsi2
Standard SCSI-2 jukeboxes
single
SCSI single drives
sony_cdl
Sony CDL-2?00-??
sony_cdz
Sony CDZ-R360
standard
NSM Mercury 20s, 31s and 40s, Plasmon CD150J, ASM Jukeboxen, Grundig M35
tower
Cope Tower
worm
WORM and MO jukeboxes
Drive set-up
Each device description file must also contain a line such as
drive=<path> for each existing drive, where the specified <path> is the
name of the drive. The way the drive names are represented is described
in “SCSI devices and device names” on page 49.
Please note:
The order in which the drives are listed is important and should resemble
the view of the jukebox. Check your jukebox manual to determine which
SCSI ID belongs to which drive.
You have four choices for the drive= lines. They differ in what character,
if any, is to be added after the ‘=’:
1. If the drive is either not available or defective, declare this using the
syntax drive=!. This inhibits all interaction of iXOS-JUKEMAN with
the respective drive.
2. If you want to dedicate a recorder drive for writing disks, use the syntax drive=-. This specification allows the administrator to move disks
into or from the drive, but file system requests will not use this drive.
When the server is running, a drive can be locked and unlocked dynamically with cdadm detach <device> [-d <drive> ] and cdadm
attach <device> [-d <drive> ], respectively.
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3. For a recorder drive you want to use for incremental writing from the
file system, choose the syntax drive=* (see also “Burning disks incrementally” on page 151).
4. In all other cases, use the syntax drive=… .
For example, if you want the server to control a single drive that the generic SCSI driver presents as
\\.\p0b0t4
or
/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
the device description file should look like this:
Windows NT
device=single
drive=\\.\p0b0t4
UNIX
device=single
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
Similarly, a device description file for a pioneer6 changer would look like
this:
device=pioneer6
drive=\\.\p0b0t4
Note:
device=pioneer6
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
The drives in the device description file must be in the same order
as the drive numbers in the jukebox and not in the order of the
SCSI IDs. This applies to all jukeboxes with several SCSI IDs for
the drives. See the documentation that came with the jukebox for
more information on the drive order. The first physical drive of the
jukebox must be the first drive in the device description file.
If the device type is a hard disk image, the drive parameter must be
specified as one or more file names with an ISO image. (see “Disk images
on hard disk” on page 209).
Slot set-up
Using the parameter disks=<slots> you can specify the slots to be used
by the server. Sometimes it can be useful to use only some of the slots,
for instance during set-up or when writable disks are stored in unused
slots (reading empty disks can take some time depending on the drive). If
the server is to use no slot at all, you can specify “disks=-”. In this case
each disk has to be tested individually to be made known to the server,
and the server forgets about the disks when it is shut down.
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If not otherwise specified in the device description file, all slots will be
used. You can specify a few disks by adding a line such as disks=1-3 or
disks=1,2,4-6.
The slots can be specified using the following syntax:
-
no slot
7
slot 7
3,6,40
slots 3, 6 and 40
3-7
slots 3 through 7
2,20-45
slot 2, and slots 20 through 45
Save file set-up
When the server attaches a device, it inspects only the specified disks.
This is useful during installation when you start and stop the server often.
If you do not want the server to inspect the disks upon each start-up, use
the parameter save=<savefile> to specify a save file in which the server
stores information about which disk resides in which slot of the jukebox.
The server uses the file if present or creates it if it is not present.
device=pioneer6
drive=\\.\p0b0t4
save=p6.sav
device=pioneer6
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
save=p6.sav
We recommend to follow this naming scheme: Use the name of the device
description file with the suffix .sav instead of the suffix .dev. This is also
the default setting if the save file is specified as save=*.sav. If the name
of your device description file is p6.dev, the corresponding save file
should be p6.sav.
Please note, that if you change disks manually the state of the save file
will be corrupted. Therefore, manual disk changes should only be done, if
you are aware of how to regain a consistent state (see “cdadm testcd
<device> <list>” on page 233).
Robot set-up
For the device types “nakamichi”, “tower”, “image” and “pioneer6” as well
as “single” a robot need not be specified.
For all other device types, you must specify a robot: robot=<rob>. For
most devices this is another SCSI ID. For “sony_cdz” and “pioneer18”,
this is a LUN of the drive target. This is what a device description file for a
“pioneer18” using slots 1-9 must look like:
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device=pioneer18
drive=\\.\p0b0t3
robot=\\.\p0b0t3,1
disks=1-9
device=pioneer18
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3,1
disks=1-9
For the “kubik”, the robot uses a serial interface. The device description
file looks like this:
device=kubik
drive=\\.\p0b0t1
drive=\\.\p0b0t2
drive=\\.\p0b0t3
drive=\\.\p0b0t4
robot=com2:
device=kubik
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/1
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/2
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
robot=/dev/ttya
For NSM jukeboxes “cdr100”, “mercury”, and “satellite”, a single serial line
controls up to 16 jukeboxes. An additional line robid=<id>, specifies the
ID of the robot on the serial line. Each NSM jukebox has an ID from 0 to
15, which can be checked and set by the Mercury’s or Satellite’s menu, or
directly in the CDR 100 (see NSM manual). A device description file for a
Mercury 20 with Robot ID 7 should look something like:
device=mercury
drive=\\.\p1b0t0
drive=\\.\p1b0t1
robot=com2:
robid=7
device=mercury
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/0
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/1
robot=/dev/ttya
robid=7
Alternatively, the following syntax can be used to define the serial interface and robot ID in one line:
robot=com2:,7
robot=/dev/ttya,7
3.4.5 Further points to note
Make sure the device to be set up is connected properly and operational.
Note:
The section “Supported jukeboxes” on page 163 provides you with
more specific details about the supported jukeboxes with sample
device description files, that can be used with minor modifications.
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3.4.6 How to set up devices
GUI
Windows NT
Select [DEVICES]-NEW... or click [NEW...]:
start-up behavor
device name
device type
used slots
(default: all slots)
(see page 53)
robot
(see page 56)
drives
(see page 54)
Entering the device name
Type a device name into the Name field. This name may be 8 characters
long. This will also be the name of the device description file and the save
file that will be created in the JUKEMAN directory (with the extension
.dev/.sav).
Setting up device type, drives and robot
For a quick set-up of the device description file, the 'Device Wizard' can
be used. Many devices report their assigned SCSI IDs on request, allowing iXOS-JUKEMAN to add the drives to the device description file automatically.
When running the automatic drive detection you should switch off all connected jukeboxes except the one to be configured.
Click [DEVICE WIZARD] to start the drive detection. The device wizard
tries to find out as much as it can about the connected devices and to fill
out the “Device Type”, “Drive” and “Robot” fields. In case a device is not
detected by the device wizard, these fields must be completed by hand.
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For example, all drives that could not be mapped properly appear as
“undefined” in the drives list.
SCSI jukeboxes and changers
SCSI drives, towers, recorders
jukeboxes on serial lines
Select all device types you want the wizard to check for and click
[DETECT]. Detection may take longer if the serial lines are searched for
jukeboxes.
Click [DETECT] to go on.
If the serial lines will be searched for devices, the server needs to be
stopped. Click [YES].
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From the list of detected devices, select the one you wish to configure and
click [CONFIGURE]. The device wizard enters the values into the appropriate fields automatically.
Attach devices automatically
Select “Attach at Server Start” if the device should be attached automatically at server start-up.
Using only several slots
Enter the slots to be used in the “Use only these Slots” field. See page
56 for the syntax. If this field is left blank, all slots will be used.
Using double-sided WORMs/MOs
Select “Double sided” to configure a WORM or MO jukebox (otherwise
this field is greyed out) with double-sided WORMs or MOs.
Add missing fields
If the device wizard failed to detect a device (e. g., if there is more
than one SCSI device with the same SCSI ID attached to different
buses), the following fields must be checked and completed:
Device Type
This is a list of all supported devices. Select your device. If your
cannot find your jukebox in the list it may be a standard SCSI jukebox (see “Table 3 - Device types for all supported jukeboxes” on
page 53).
Robot
For most device types a robot must be specified. Whether it is a
SCSI-ID (most jukeboxes) or a LUN of a SCSI-ID (like Pioneer 18
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CD or Sony CDZ-R360), all possible selections will be listed in this
field. If the robot is a serial line (as with Kubik- or NSM jukeboxes),
the available serial interfaces and Robot IDs will be listed. See
section “Robot set-up” on page 56. Select the appropriate robot
from the list.
If no robot is to be specified (e. g., Pioneer 6), this field is greyed
out.
Drives/Files
Each drive of a jukebox (or one or more files for a hard disk image)
must be specified. Click [ADD...], to select the drives or files. Click
[REMOVE LAST DRIVE] to remove the last drive of the list. To
change the properties of the defined drive, select the drive from the
list and click [DEFINE DRIVE].
The 'Define Drive' dialog lists all drives available, including a defective/missing entry for defect or missing devices. If for example
the second drive of your jukebox is missing or not working, the
second drive must be defined as defective/missing to assure the
drives are accessed properly.
The drives must be added in the same order of the drives in the
jukebox. In the “Properties” group in the upper left of the dialog,
you can select the properties of the drive:
• Not available or defect is the same as defective/missing.
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• Not used by file system can be selected for drives that will be
dedicated to writing disks (see “Production of CDs in jukeboxes”
on page 141).
• In all other cases select Normal use by file system.
These drive properties can be changed at a later time by doubleclicking on a drive in the device definition dialog.
Click [OK] to define the drive. Click [CANCEL] to discard the
changes.
Confirming or discarding the device set-up
Click [OK] to confirm the device set-up. If the server was stopped, it can
be restarted with [SERVICE]-START JUKEBOX SERVICE. The devices
marked as “Attach at Server Start” will be attached. All specified slots
will be scanned for disks, and the directory structure will be stored in the
directory cache. This may take a while, depending on the type of jukebox
and the number of slots to be read.
Click [CANCEL] to discard the set-up.
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CLI
UNIX, Windows NT
Use a text editor to create a file “<name>.dev” in the JUKEMAN directory. Choose a <name> that gives a hint about the configured device (e.
g., mercury or tower).
Enter the following lines in the file:
device=<type>
<type> is the device type of device to be configured. See “Table 3 - Device types for all supported jukeboxes” on page 53.
drive=<path>
Each drive must be specified with a line of this format. The order of the
drive numbers is important, not the order of the SCSI IDs. The “=” may be
followed by a “!”, “-” or a “*”. The meaning of these characters is described in “Drive set-up” on page 54.
<path> is the unique path of a SCSI ID for each drive. A detailed description of SCSI ID representation can be found in “SCSI devices and device
names” on page 49.
robot=<rob>[,<robid>]
The parameter <rob> specifies the robot (SCSI-ID/LUN or serial interface)
of the device. For NSM jukeboxes the parameter <robid> must be specified. See “Robot set-up” on page 56 for more information.
[disks=<slots>]
This line must only be specified, if you do not want to use all slots of a
jukeboxe. The syntax for <slots> is described in “Slot set-up” on page 55.
[save=<savefile>]
If you enter this line, iXOS-JUKEMAN will store information on which disk
is in which slot in the file <savefile> when the jukebox is attached for the
first time. The name of the <savefile> should be the <name> of the device
with the extension .sav (see also “Save file set-up” on page 56.
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If all lines are entered, save the file “<name>.dev”.
The section “Attach devices automatically” on page 102 tells you how to
configure the server to attach one or more devices automatically at startup.
If you have created a device description file named device.dev, the device can be attached with the command
cdadm attach device
The server will inspect the specified slots and present the disks to the
views of the file system. iXOS-JUKEMAN will do this inspection if the devices are attached for the first time or if you attach a device that has no
save file specified.
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3.5 Set up views
The views concept allows you to set up the iXOS-JUKEMAN file system to
your liking. This way a structure can be built to present all the disks
clearly to network users.
For instance, if you had hardware managing 700 disks and all these disks
would be visible as subdirectories to a single root directory, the clients
accessing the data might be presented with problems to find the desired
disks. For this reason like in every file system a tree structure should be
established, the disks being the leaves of this tree.
Clarity
This allows not only the client access to be controlled but also the access
to special disks will be made easier for the clients. A software developer
may want to use only certain disks contraining PC products. It would
speed up his or her work, if he or she could see just the disks he or she
needs.
Moreover, different clients need different views to the file system. PCs
usually need the file name format 8.3 with no consideration for upper or
lower case, whereas some UNIX NFS clients prefer to use long file names
embedded in the optional Rock Ridge extensions to the ISO 9660 file
system standard. Or some clients may access all the disks, whereas other
clients may only use a certain subset of the available disks.
iXOS-JUKEMAN supports a variety of views to the file system, which differ
in the name format and the number of visible disks. “Figure 1” on page 70
presents some examples for different views in different name formats.
Name format
Meaning
pc
PC format (8.3)
rr
Rock Ridge extensions
hs
High Sierra format
The PC format is a modified High Sierra format, optimized for PC clients.
The version number is suppressed and all file names will be converted to
lower case. This is most important for PC clients that do the conversion to
upper case characters themselves. If these clients received names in upper case the file names would be converted into strange, generic names.
By default the file names will be in 8.3 format due to compatability resons
for Windows for Workgroup clients. This behavior can be configured with
the server parameter fullvn (see “Server parameters” on page 123). In
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Setting up iXOS-JUKEMAN
any case by explicitly renaming volume names any name up to 32 characters long can be chosen.
The Rock Ridge format displays file and directory names in ISO 9660
format, with regard to the Rock Ridge extensions (if available). These additions to ISO 9660 allow UNIX file names to be presented in ISO 9660
file systems. The Rock Ridge extensions may also contain UNIX file permissions.
In High Sierra format the file and directory names will be presented exactly as stored on disk. However, the version numbers that form an integral part of the ISO 9660 standard are useless for most clients. This format is only supported for completeness.
The views are defined in the file server.cfg.
Drive letter
On Windows NT, each view can be assigned a drive letter. This is optional, since views can also appear as subdirectories of other views, so
the number of views is not limited by the number of available drive letters.
To make a view available to the clients it is enough to share the appropriate directory or drive letter with the desired permissions.
A view is a path for UNIX clients, that can be mounted with NFS. There
are three default views: There is the 'Root' view which can be mounted
with '<hostname>:/' in the 'mount' command. This 'Root' view contains
two other views named 'views_pc' and 'views_rr'. 'views_pc' is a view
that contains all disks as subdirectories in PC format (8.3 format).
'views_rr' also contains all disks, only the file names are in Rock Ridge
format with long UNIX file names and permissions, if available. To mount
this view on UNIX the 'mount' command must include
'<hostname>:/views_rr'.
These default views are defined in the file server.cfg and will be sufficient for most purposes. Feel free to add new views to this set-up, if
needed.
Disk sets
Each view defined in server.cfg must contain a disk set specification.
The disk set is a list of all the disk names that will be visible to the clients.
For most views the disk set specification is discs { * }, in which case
all disks are visible, but you can restrict the disk set by explicitly listing
only those names that should be visible. Furthermore, invisible disks may
be explicitly specified using the syntax deny { }. The curly brackets of
both the discs and the deny section contain a list of blank separated
disk names or csh-like meta characters as listed in the following table.
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Table 4 - Disk set syntax
Char.
Meaning
Example
possible disks (e. g.)
?
any single character
ix?s
ixas, ixos, ixks..
*
any string
ix*s
[...]
list of alternatives
[abc]horn
[-]
range of characters
[a-m]horn
ixs, ixmas, ixotic...
ahorn, bhorn,
chorn
ahorn, ..., mhorn
[^]
restricted characters [^d]*
{cow,
alternative strings
mick}*
{...,.
..,...
}
all starting without “d”
all starting with cow or
mick
Summary:
• iXOS-JUKEMAN allows to set up a tree of views.
• Each view is represented as a directory.
• A view may contain subviews or any disk set of all the disks controlled
by iXOS-JUKEMAN.
• Each view has a name format specifying how the contents of the view
are presented to the clients.
• Each view can be shared to the clients with the operating system
functions.
• Each view can be assigned an optional drive letter on Windows NT.
The following figure illistrates a view set-up, where view_1 and view_2
contain a selection of disks in pc format and rr format respectively. In
contrast, view_3 contains two subviews (view_3a and view_3b). Subviews
themselves may also contain views. In this case, however the subviews
contain a selection of disks.
Please note, that view_3 is assigned a name format (rr). This name format will be inherited by the subviews, if nothing else is specified.
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Disks
pc
rr
rr
view_1
view_2
view_3
ixos97.cd1
ix_nix_l.isa
workbone.rrt
iXBackup-Templates_1_97
iXOS97.cd1
iX_NIX_LISA-96
iX-database.work
rr
hs
view_3a
view_3b
iXOS_Training.97
*
(all disks available)
Figure 1 - Example for different views
In server.cfg the description for the above views set-up would look like
this:
views {
list { view_1 view_2 view_3 }
roots {
view_1 {
discs { ixos97.cd1 usenix_l.isa workbone.rrt }
}
view_2 {
discs { iX*}
format { rr }
}
view_3 {
format { rr }
views {
list { view_3a view_3b }
roots {
view_3b {
discs { * }
format { hs }
}
view_3a {
discs { iXOS_Train* }
}
}
}
}
}
}
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3.5.1 How to set up views
GUI
Windows NT
Select [CONFIGURATION]-FILE SYSTEM VIEWS:
The dialog shows the default views configuration. Using this dialog, new
views may be added and configured, and existing views may be changed,
renamed, or removed.
By default, the 'Root' view is mapped to the drive letter Z: and contains
two subviews 'views_pc' and 'views_rr' in the PC name format and the
Rock Ridge name format, respectively. 'views_pc' is mapped to drive
letter X: and 'views_rr' is mapped to drive letter Y:.
Adding a new view:
Click on a view that has “contains views” selected. Click [NEW]. A new
subview will be appended to the selected view. Now enter a name for the
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new view and confirm with 'RETURN'. If a view is to contains subviews
contains views must be selected for this view. Otherwise click contains
volumes.
Renaming a view:
Select the corresponding view and click [RENAME], or double-click the
view. Enter a new name and press 'RETURN'.
Removing a view:
Please note that all subviews will be lost, if a view is deleted. Select the
appropriate view and click [REMOVE].
Assign a view a drive letter:
Select a view and a drive letter from the list Available as Drive. The drive
letter can then be shared to the clients. If you select [none] wählen, the
view will not be assigned a drive letter. Please note, that executables
cannot be started from these drive letters on the server. To do this,
the corresponding drive must additionally be mapped as a network drive
on the server. This can be easily done with the Windows NT Explorer.
Setting up disk sets for a view:
The field visible volumes lists all disk names visible to the clients (all by
default). The field excluded volumes lists all disk names, that will not be
visible to the clients explicitly (none by default).
The specification can either be as meta characters in csh syntax (see
“Table 4” on page 69) or explicitly by specifying a blank separated list of
disk names. The [CONTENTS] dialog lists the disk names. Please note
that the name must be entered in the correct name format. As opposed to
the original disk name, the disk name in one of the three name formats is
always unique.
Confirming or discarding the views set-up:
Click [OK] to confirm the views set-up.
Click [CANCEL] to discard the changes.
Please note:
If you change a view name the changes will not be active unless
'RETURN' is pressed. In some cases the [OK] button can only be clicked
if you click somewhere else in the view tree (e. g. Root).
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The administration client will save the views configuration in the file
server.cfg.
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CLI
UNIX, Windows NT
Note:
The file server.cfg must be modified for this task. A detailed
description of the file can be found in “Configuration file
server.cfg” on page 237. It is recommended that you make a
backup copy of the file before editing it.
Open the file server.cfg with a text editor. The views are entered in the
views { ... } section. The first parameter that must be specified is
list { }, containing the names of all views on top level. Following this
section is the parameter roots { }, containing all views names and
their definition. Each view that contains subviews has its own views { }
section (with its own list { } and roots { } section).
Each view that is to contain disks can have the following parameters:
Parameter
format
discs
deny
drive
label
raw
Value
Name format (pc, rr, hs). If this parameter is not specified
the name format will be taken from the superordinate view.
The default name format for views on top level is pc.
The visible disks (* for all). See “Table 4 - Disk set syntax”
on page 69.
The excluded disks. See “Table 4 - Disk set syntax” on
page 69.
Drive letter under Windows NT Windows NT (will be ignored under UNIX). If not specified, the view will not be assigned a drive letter.
Label for the drive letter under Windows NT (Default:
JUKEMAN, ignored under UNIX). May contain octal escape
sequences like “\040” for a space.
The raw { 1 } parameter selects a view format in which
all disks are represented through the raw file system. You
do not see the directories and files of the disks, but the full
disk as a large file. The directory structure is explained in
“Raw filesystem” on page 240.
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Suppose you wanted to export the following disk set: A view views_pc,
containing all disks for PC clients in the name format pc, a view
views_rr, containing all disks for UNIX clients in the name format rr
and a view find_easier, containing two subviews. One subview should
contain all the disks starting with the letters a, b, c, ..., m in PC format and
leave out all disks starting with archive. The other subview should contain all disks starting with the letters n-z:
drive { Z }
views {
list { views_pc views_rr find_easier }
roots {
views_pc { format { pc } discs { * } drive
views_rr { format { rr } discs { * } drive
find_easier {
views {
list { a_m n_z }
roots {
a_m { format { pc } discs { [a-m]* }
n_z { format { pc } discs { [n_z]* }
}
}
}
}
}
{ X } }
{ Y } }
deny { archive*} }
}
Root
views_pc
views_rr
find_easier
a_m
all disks
(pc format)
all disks
(rr format)
disks a-m
without
archive*
(pc format)
n_z
disks n-z
(pc format)
Please make sure that the number of opening brackets “{” must match the
number of closing “}” brackets.
Save the file server.cfg when the set-up of the views is finished. On
UNIX systems a directory must be created and shared for each view. How
to do this is explained in the following section.
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3.6 Intregrate iXOS-JUKEMAN into
the network
Until now you have:
• installed iXOS-JUKEMAN
• entered license keys
• set up caches and buffers
• set up devices
• set up views.
This section teaches you the last few steps necessary to enable the clients to access the disks when the server is started.
3.6.1 The server side
iXOS-JUKEMAN on Windows NT
The NT version of iXOS-JUKEMAN fits many different environments, including those that are mixed. It supports the NFS protocol, making it a
true NFS server. UNIX clients simply mount it as they mount any network
file system. Simultaneously, it presents all disks in a native file system for
NT, which can be exported through all available protocols.
When the host boots up the iXOS-JUKEMAN server is started. Depending
on the set-up of the views new drive letters appear for the views. If you did
not modify the views configuration, the view views_pc will be mapped to
drive letter X:. All disks of all connected devices will be displayed as subdirectories of X:. The drive letter Y: is the view views_rr. These two
views will be shared to NFS clients automatically. PC clients can map X:
and Y: as network drives provided these drive letters are shared. The
Root view, containing both views_pc and views_rr, is mapped to drive
letter Z:. It is also shared for NFS clients.
The disks can be accessed using the File Manager on the server. The
drive letters or directories can be shared using the standard operating
system functions (for administrators or super users).
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All views you set up in addition must be explicitly shared. This can be
easily done with the Windows NT Explorer. For example, if you configured
a view which is mapped to drive letter W::
In the Explorer, move the mouse pointer to the drive letter or directory you
wish to share and click the right mouse button. Select [SHARING] from
the pop-up menu. A dialog will pop up in which the drive letter or directory
can be shared to the clients.
The following problems may occur in some cases:
• Sometimes a PC client has to deal with long file names (e. g., if a Rock
Ridge view is mounted — the PC format view automatically converts
the file names to 8.3) and cannot handle it. The solution to this problem is to rename the disks on the server. This can be done with the
Windows NT Explorer, with a dialog of the administration client (see
“Rename disks” on page 119) or with the command cdadm rename,
described on page 225.
• Some CD software assume the root directory of a disk to be the same
as the root directory of the drive, not taking into account the disk name
as part of the path. As a result an installation may fail, because the
appropriate files cannot be located. If this happens, share the corresponding subdirectory, map it as a network drive on the client PC and
the installation will work.
• To execute programs on the server from the iXOS-JUKEMAN file system the disks have to be mapped as a network drive on the server. It is
not possible to start these programs from the drive letters created with
the views set-up.
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iXOS-JUKEMAN on UNIX
On UNIX iXOS-JUKEMAN cooperates with the standard NFS server. If no
NFS is running, the set-up of the file system is finished. If NFS is running,
you must set up the standard rpc.mountd daemon to cooperate with the
server.
rpc.mountd monitors all file systems, including that of iXOS-JUKEMAN.
If clients mount a network file system they ask rpc.mountd for a root file
handle. This file handle is the key for any further requests to the standard
nfsd or iXOS-JUKEMAN’s NFS-Jukebox-Server. It is not possible to access the network file system without this key.
A root file handle can only be generated, is there is a root for the file system. Therefore, you must create an empty directory for each view. The hierarchy of the directories to be created must follow the hierarchy of the
views. A subdirectory must be created for each subview. The views are
normally /views_rr for the Rock Ridge format and /views_pc for the
PC format. Any other file names are possible as well (although they do not
comply with the standard server.cfg file and must be entered into this
file accordingly).
If, for example, the views set-up corresponds to that of “Figure 1 - Example for different views” on page 70, the following directories must be created on the UNIX server:
mkdir
mkdir
mkdir
mkdir
mkdir
/view_1
/view_2
/view_3
/view_3/view_3a
/view_3/view_3b
/
pc
rr
rr
view_1
view_2
view_3
rr
hs
view_3a
view_3b
Next export a file system by telling rpc.mountd to give the file handles to
clients. Most flavors of UNIX maintain a file /etc/exports (Solaris: see
below) containing all exported file systems. You can simply add a line to
this file containing just the character /. This will tell rpc.mountd to export all views of the server file system. Please note, that this will also
cause all other directories of the server to be shared. It is recommended
to export only the directories representing the views. To do this add the
following lines to /etc/exports:
/views_pc
/views_rr
This will export the standard views to all hosts. You can also set the access permissions for certain hosts:
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/views_pc -ro
/views_rr donald daisy garfield localhost
These lines will export /views_pc read-only to all hosts and /views_rr
to the hosts donald, daisy, garfield and the server itself. Please
keep in mind that the entry localhost is mandatory when specifying
certain hosts.
On Solaris the exported file systems are listed in the file
/etc/dfs/dfstab. To export the standard views, add the following lines
to the file:
share -F nfs /views_pc
share -F nfs /views_rr
On some UNIX systems (Solaris and others), the change does not take
effect immediately. On Solaris, call the commands unshareall and
shareall to update the export list. Other UNIX systems offer the exportfs command. Use exportfs -a to export all file systems. Another
method is to reboot the server. You can easily test if the directories are
exported by using showmount -e. When you start iXOS-JUKEMAN, it
tests whether the directories for all views are exported by requesting the
file handle from rpc.mountd. It stops if it cannot get a file handle, and
prints a message in the log file.
3.6.2 The client side
Windows clients
As soon as the directories representing the views are shared on the
server it is possible to map the directories as network drives on the client
PC.
For instance, the view jukeman on the server jukeserver is shared. To
use it from a client, you can select Map Network Drive from the explorer:
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NFS Clients (UNIX, NT)
NFS clients, e. g., UNIX clients, can mount the standard views
<jukeman_hostname>:/views_pc
or
<jukeman_hostname>:/views_rr
of a Windows NT JUKEMAN server.
For example:
mount -o timeo=99,retrans=14 jm_hostname:/views_pc /cds
The disks can then be accessed from the directory /cds on the client.
Both the UNIX and NT versions of iXOS-JUKEMAN support the NFS protocol. NFS clients can mount the file system of a UNIX JUKEMAN server
as they mount any network file system, but they need to add some parameters for the mount command. For example,
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mount -o port=4027,timeo=99,retrans=14,soft
<hostname>:/views_rr /cd
mounts the server’s file system on the empty directory /cd of the client.
Once this is done, all disks appear as subdirectories of /cd. The simple
command ls -l /cd shows a list of all available disks.
Depending on the operating system, some versions of mount require additional parameters, e. g.,
mount -F nfs -o port=.. or mount -f NFS,port=… . See man
mount for details.
The port=4027 option tells mount that the NFS server uses port 4027
instead of 2049, which is used by the standard NFS daemon. This enables the server to coexist with the standard nfsd so clients can use both
hard disks and jukeboxes on the server computer concurrently. NT does
not include a standard nfsd; consequently, the NT version uses the standard port, and you do not need to specify the port number.
For some newer UNIX operating systems like Solaris 2.5, DEC UNIX 4.0
or IRIX 6.4 the mount command should include a further option 'vers=2'.
Without this option NFS version 3 would be used. iXOS-JUKEMAN supports NFS protocol version 2 only, so that the client would use version 2
anyway after negotiating with the server.
mount -o port=4027,timeo=99,retrans=14,soft,vers=2
host:/views_rr /cd
To understand the other options you need to be familiar with NFS clients:
A user level application accesses a mounted network file system as if it
were any local magnetic disk. The kernel of the client computer automatically generates NFS requests and waits for the answers, which in turn are
used to satisfy the accesses requested by the application. But networks
may drop a request or an answer. Therefore, the NFS client built into the
client’s kernel not only generates NFS requests, but also retransmits them
if it does not receive a reply within a reasonable time.
The timeo=99 option instructs the kernel’s NFS client to retransmit a request if there is no reply after 99 tenths of a second (9,9 seconds). These
retransmits are not visible to the users, except for messages such as “NFS
server not responding, still trying”. Short time-outs increase
the network load because each disk move can cause several useless retransmits. Long time-outs are bad if a packet is dropped by an unreliable
network and a user must wait until the kernel’s NFS client retransmits the
request. After each retransmit, the time-out value is doubled, up to a
maximum of one minute.
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The retrans=14 option instructs the kernel’s NFS client to automatically
retransmit a request 14 times before it gives up and the file system access
that caused the NFS request fails. It makes sense to specify a high value
because if several clients access different disks located in the same jukebox, the server must move these disks, and the last client must wait a long
time. You can avoid long wait times if you have enough jukeboxes and
enable the server to distribute the load by duplicating the disks and
spreading them over the jukeboxes. This enables you to build failuretolerant archives with predictable short response times.
The soft option instructs the kernel’s NFS client to give up after all retransmits. You can also specify hard angeben causing the client not to
give up even after the last retransmit. If you specify an additional intr
option the system call that caused the NFS request may be interrupted
with a signal. If you specify hard without intr the only way to finish the
system call is a server response.
If the mount command generates a “no such file or directory”
message, make sure the /cd directory on the client side and the
/views_rr on the server side exist. If you receive a “permission denied” message, just export /views_rr on the server side.
If your client computer uses a PC operating system such as DOS or NT
arbeitet, you can install an NFS client on the PC or install a PC file server
such as samba on the server computer. You can obtain samba from the
iXOS ftp server ftp.ixos.de, or from samba.anu.edu.au, under
pub/samba. The latest version of samba is included with iXOSJUKEMAN. You can find more information about this package at the
samba web site, http://samba.anu.edu.au.
Macintosh Clients
iXOS-JUKEMAN allows Macintosh clients to access disks in a jukebox. To
export the iXOS-JUKEMAN file system to Macintosh computers, the
‘MacFile’service module for Windows NT must be installed. The module
can be installed from the ‘Network’ configuration dialog in the ‘Control
Panel’. It is either on the Windows NT CD-ROM or on an additional CDROM available from Microsoft.
If that service is installed, then a virtual volume can be created with the
File Manager (not with the Windows NT Explorer!). Such a volume can be
connected from the Macintosh clients over an NT share name.
There is one restriction with the MacFile service: If disks in a jukebox are
changed, then the Macintosh clients are not notified about changed or
news disks. The above explained volume has to be recreated.
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4 Using iXOS-JUKEMAN
4.1 Introduction
This section is devided into taks described for both the GUI and the CLI:
Section
The server
Starting iXOS-JUKEMAN
Modifying the set-up
Network administration
Attach devices
Detach devices
Attach devices automatically
Display statistics
Manage disks
Server parameters
Burning disks/writing incrementally
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100
102
104
112
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4.2 The server
The jukebox file server is the core of iXOS-JUKEMAN. It controls the devices, and replies to NFS requests and to requests from the iXOSJUKEMAN local file system for NT. The server and all the programs and
files it needs are in the JUKEMAN directory. All paths described here are
relative to the JUKEMAN directory.
The server cdnfsd runs as a daemon and receives requests from NFS
clients, from cdadm and from the iXOS-JUKEMAN native file system for
NT. It creates logfile.txt for messages and a database volumes for
disk names and properties. It needs a file server.lic containing the license key (to use the IFS it also needs a valid writer.lic) and a file
server.cfg containing the server configuration.
To enable task distribution and efficient service to a large number of clients, the server splits into separate threads. The number of threads increases with the number of devices. They share text and data to minimize
load on the computer.
The server controls devices for handling disks and exports the disks in a
single large file system in which each disk is represented by a directory.
NFS clients need just a single mount, and PC clients connect a single
network drive. The server hides the physical positions of the disks. Each
disk is represented by a subdirectory, whether it is in a storage slot or in a
drive. Clients don’t know if a disk is actually stored in a jukebox, a tower
or is a copy stored in another jukebox. They experience faster access to
the disk because the server chooses the jukebox with less load.
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4.3 Starting iXOS-JUKEMAN
4.3.1 Windows NT:
Starting the server
On NT the services “iXOS Admin Server” and “iXOS Jukebox Daemon”
will be started automatically when the server is installed followed by a reboot of the host. This behavior can be changed with the “Services” table
from the “Control Panel”:
Clicking [START] and [STOP] the selected service can be started and
stopped (in that order). Clicking [STARTUP] you can select, whether the
selected service should be started automatically.
Alternatively, the services can be started from the command line by an
administrator or super user with cdstart.bat from the JUKEMAN directory or net start cdnfsd.
Starting the administration client
You can start the administration client under Windows NT in one of the
following ways:
1. [START]-[PROGRAMS]-[IXOS-JUKEMAN]-JUKEMAN ADMINISTRATION.
2. Running “jukeboy” from the JUKEMAN directory.
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NT Administration client
Menu entries
Meaning
Page
Start or stop the jukebox service
Select a host for network administration ................ 96
Enter license keys ................................................. 34
Exit the administration client
Set up views .......................................................... 72
Edit the volumes database ..................................112
Edit server parameters .........................................130
Set up buffers and caches ..................................... 42
Attach a device to the server ................................. 98
Detach a device from the server ...........................100
Show contents, manage disks ..............................112
Set up new devices ............................................... 60
Remove devices ................................................... 92
Set up selected device .......................................... 60
Burn disks ............................................................147
Display volume statistics ......................................105
Display device statistics .......................................106
Display statistics for selected device ....................107
Reset Statistics
Open the online help
Information about iXOS-JUKEMAN (version)
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The iXOS-JUKEMAN administration client is a graphical user interface
(GUI) that can be run on any Windows NT or Windows 95 computer in the
network. The network address of the host where iXOS-JUKEMAN is running is stored in the file “jukeboy.ini” in the %systemroot% directory.
You can configure devices and views on the file system and insert and
remove disks from a jukebox using the GUI.
To maintain the configuration, the administration client reads and writes
the server configuration file (server.cfg) and a device description file
for each device.
You can also edit these files manually (see the sections entitled CLI), but
is is easier to use the GUI to configure devices and exported views.
The main dialog has a menu and a list of devices. These devices can be
‘attached’or ‘detached’. ‘Attached’indicates that the device is controlled
by iXOS-JUKEMAN.
The property ‘Startup’ indicates whether a device should be attached
automatically at the start-up of iXOS-JUKEMAN or manually (‘manual’).
Using the ‘Attach’ button, you can add devices from the list to be controlled by iXOS-JUKEMAN.
The buttons can only be selected if you configured devices. If you just
started iXOS-JUKEMAN in its virgin state for the very first time devices
must be configured as described in “Set up devices” on page 48.
Communication between the GUI and the server is always initiated by the
GUI, not the other way round. This is why the server cannot tell the GUI
that a device has been detached using an cdadm command from the
command line or that a device got switched off. The relevant device will
still be listed as being attached in the device list of the GUI. If you are uncertain of the current state of the server, either restart the GUI or click the
Attach/Detach button. This also applies to situations where the GUI issues
a time-out error.
Note:
If you do not use the GUI to configure the devices, you can name the device description and save files anything you want. Put them into the directory where cdnfsd.exe resides, since this is where iXOS-JUKEMAN
looks for them. However, random names can lead to problems if you use
the GUI afterwards, since the GUI only accepts device description files
with the name of the device (as stored in server.cfg) and the extension
.dev.
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4.3.2 UNIX:
In the JUKEMAN directory, call:
./cdnfsd
You must be logged in as root. iXOS-JUKEMAN should display a message like this:
Starting iXOS-JUKEMAN Version 2.2 Server, build 1007.12
Copyright 1991-1997 iXOS Software AG
... iXOS-JUKEMAN started
The server starts up and exports the file systems. The exported file systems (e. g. /views_rr) can be mounted with NFS (even locally). The
disks do not appear in the directories representing the views (e. g.
/views_rr or /views_pc); these directories’ destiny is to be mount
points for rpc.mountd. These directories must be mounted to access the
disks.
4.4 Modifying the set-up
All settings described in the chapter “Setting up iXOS-JUKEMAN” on page
29 (license keys, buffers and caches, devices, views) are not the subject
of frequent changes. However, the set-up sometimes needs to be
changed, e. g., if new devices should be controlled by iXOS-JUKEMAN.
The following sections tell you what to do in these cases.
4.4.1 Change buffers and caches
Note:
If you change the properties of a cache (directory cache, data
cache) or of the IFS buffer all stored data of the relevant cache or
buffer will be lost. All data in the IFS buffer must first be written to
disk using the “cdadm writer flush…” command (see “Burning
disks incrementally” on page 151).
Follow the instructions in “Set up caches and buffers” on page 36.
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4.4.2 Add new devices
You can set up new devices at any time. Please note that the limit of licensed disks may be exceeded when you attach new devices to the
server (see “Set up license keys” on page 31). Disks exceeding the limit
appear as “- limit -” in the [CONTENTS] dialog or with “cdadm survey…”. These disks are not visible in the file system.
Follow the instructions in “How to set up devices” on page 60. The section
“Attach devices” on page 98 tells you how to attach these newly defined
devices to the server.
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4.4.3 Remove devices
GUI
Windows NT
1. Select the corresponding device from the device list.
2. Click [DETACH] to detach the selected device.
3. Click [REMOVE] to remove the selected device. The device description file and the save file will be deleted. The names of the disks located in the removed device will remain in the volumes database of
iXOS-JUKEMAN. The advantage is that any renamings will not be lost
if the disks are made available again. If you want to delete the disk
names from the volumes database, read the section “Delete unavailable disks from the database” on page 116.
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CLI
UNIX, Windows NT
1. Change to the JUKEMAN directory.
2. Enter “cdadm detach <device>” to detach the device. <device> is
the name of the device to be removed.
3. Remove the corresponding device from the file server.cfg (see
“Configuration file server.cfg” on page 213). To to this, open the file
server.cfg. All devices are defined in the devices section.
For instance, with the following device configuration,
devices {
list
{ p18 mercury }
p18
{ startup { automatic } }
mercury { startup { manual } }
}
to remove the device mercury change the section in the following way:
devices {
list
{ p18 }
p18
{ startup { automatic } }
}
The names of the disks located in the removed device will remain in the
volumes database of iXOS-JUKEMAN. The advantage is that any renamings will not be lost if the disks are made available again. If you want
to delete the disk names from the volumes database, read the section
“Delete unavailable disks from the database” on page 119.
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4.4.4 Change views
Follow the instruction in “How to set up views” on page 72.
If you change the views manually in the file server.cfg the changes
can be made active with the command cdadm cvtree (see page 217)
without having to stop the server. On UNIX, the corresponding directories
must be created and exported as described in “Intregrate iXOS-JUKEMAN
into the network” on page 77.
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4.5 Network administration
GUI
Windows NT
The GUI communicates via TCP/IP (port 4072) with the Admin service,
which must be running on the (NT) host where iXOS-JUKEMAN is running. In most cases, this will be the local host (the default), but since the
GUI can run on any computer in the network, you can choose a particular
host.
Select [SERVICE]-SELECT HOST:
1. Enter the host name or IP address in the text field of the dialog. If
iXOS-JUKEMAN and the GUI run on the same host you can simply
enter localhost.
2. Click [OK] to administer iXOS-JUKEMAN remotely. The administration
client tries to contact the administration server on the specified host. If
the connection fails you will get the following error message:
If this happens, check the host name and whether iXOS-JUKEMAN is
started on the host.
Click [CANCEL] to cancel the dialog. Click [EXIT] to quit the administration client.
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You can call the administration client cdadm with an optional parameter “h <hostname>”. If this parameter is specified the command will not be
executed locally, but on the specified host.
Example:
cdadm -h jukeserver attach tower.dev
will attach the device with the device description file tower.dev to the
host “jukeserver”.
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4.6 Attach devices
GUI
Windows NT
1. Select the corresponding device from the device list.
2. Click [ATTACH] to attach the device to the server.
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CLI
UNIX, Windows NT
1. Change to the JUKEMAN directory.
2. Enter cdadm attach <device>. <device> is the name of the device
description file. The extension .dev may be omitted.
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4.7 Detach devices
GUI
Windows NT
1. Select the corresponding device from the device list.
2. Click [DETACH] to detach the selected device from the server.
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CLI
UNIX, Windows NT
1. Change to the JUKEMAN directory.
2. Enter cdadm detach <device>. <device> is the name of the device
description file. The extension .dev may be omitted.
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4.8 Attach devices automatically
Using the command cdadm (see section “Command line index” on page
213), devices can be attached or detached dynamically while the server is
running. In addition, you may specify a list of devices to be attached
automatically when the server starts up.
The server will not respond to file system requests while devices are being attached automatically. If, in contrary, the devices are being attached
with cdadm after the server start-up, there is a small time gap in which the
server will accept file system requests, but will respond with error messages, since the disks cannot be found. This can be avoided if you list the
devices in the file server.cfg.
This is especially useful with NFS. If the server fails the clients will not be
affected. They do not receive error messages, they just wait for the server
to reply. This demonstrates the power of the stateless NFS concept.
Format of the devices section in the file server.cfg
The section devices contains a subsection called list. This is where
devices are listed (to be more specific, the section lists the names of the
device description files. The extension .dev may be omitted). The next
subsections specify whether or not each device is to be attached automatically at server start-up. A device for which manual attach is defined
has no effect in server.cfg (apart from making it known to the GUI in
NT, so you can attach it manually through the GUI). This allows you to
disable automatic attach of a device without deleting it in server.cfg. A
device for which automatic attach is defined is attached by the server
upon start-up before the server accepts any file system requests. This
avoids a time gap in which the file system is present but incomplete.
Example for a device list
Suppose you have two jukeboxes, whose device description files are
named mercury.dev and pioneer.dev, and you want the Mercury to
be attached automatically upon server start-up. The devices section in
server.cfg should then look like this:
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devices {
list { mercury pioneer }
mercury { startup { automatic } }
pioneer { startup { manual } }
}
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4.9 Display statistics
iXOS-JUKEMAN allows to print statistics about device and disk accesses.
There are three types of statistics:
• the amount of transferred data and disk moves concerning the disks in
all controlled devices
• the amount of transferred data and disk moves concerning the disks in
a specific device
• The amount of transferred data and disk moves concerning the disks
in one device (summed up)
The values are with regard to the running server process. To view the
statistics for a specific disk, sort the list by disk names. One of the following name formats may be selected: PC format, Rock Ridge format, High
Sierra format, and original disk name.
To find out which disks are accessed most frequently, the list can be
sorted appropriately. 'Reads' is the number of read accesses to data
blocks of 64kB maximum.
The value 'moves' is the number of moves of a disk into a drive of a jukebox. If this number is very large the overall performance may be improved
by inserting the disk into a separate CD-ROM drive or tower.
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GUI
Windows NT
[STATISTICS]-VOLUME STATISTICS:
The following dialog will pop up:
The dialog displays a list of all disks controlled by iXOS-JUKEMAN. Displayed are:
• disk name (volume)
• number of read accesses (reads)
• MBs read (MBs)
• number of moves of a disk into a drive (moves)
The list can be sorted by any of the four columns (radio button sort by).
The disk name can be displayed in original format, PC format, Rock Ridge
format, or High Sierra format, depending on the radio button Format.
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[STATISTICS]-DEVICE STATISTICS:
The following dialog will pop up:
The dialog displays a list of all disks controlled by iXOS-JUKEMAN. Displayed are:
• device name (device)
• number of read accesses (reads)
• MBs read (MBs)
• number of moves of a disk into a drive of the device (moves)
The list can be sorted by any of the four columns (radio button sort by).
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[STATISTICS]-CD STATISTICS PER DEVICE:
The following dialog will pop up:
The dialog displays a list of all disks controlled by iXOS-JUKEMAN. Displayed are:
• disk slot (slot) and disk name (CD)
• number of read accesses (reads)
• MBs read (MBs)
• number of moves of a disk into a drive (moves)
The list can be sorted by any of the four columns (radio button sort by).
The disk name can be displayed in original format, PC format, Rock Ridge
format, or High Sierra format, depending on the radio button Format.
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CLI
UNIX, Windows NT
From the command line statistics can be printed with the command cdadm
survey (see also page 229).
The order of the parameters is:
1. What should be reported?
2. What should be displayed in the report?
3. Shall the report be contrained (e. g., just one device)?
4. Shall the output be sorted and by what criteria?
The first two parameters are mandatory, the others are optional.
Five list type paramters preceeded with ‘-’are available, one for devices,
three for disks and one for drives:
-d print a list of devices (jukeboxes or drives)
-v
print a list of disks
-n
print the contents of the volumes database.
-s
like -v, but for all slots of a device, even if only a subset of slots is
configured to be used (see description of disks= in “Slot set-up” on
page 55).
-r
print a list of drives.
The second parameter, preceeded with ‘+’, determines the source of information. Depending on the list type, only several parameters can be
used.
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General:
+d device names of attached devices (to be more specific: the name of
the device description file)
+n Total number of slots of a device
+s
Slot number
+i
inode number in volumes database
Disks:
+m type of disk (CD-ROM, rewritable...)
+R
'r', if a recorder is necessary to read, 'a' otherwise
+a
'@', if the disk is in a drive, '-' otherwise
+u
'+', if the disk can be accessed by the file system, '-' otherwise
+U
time of last access to disk in seconds since 1970
+S
size of the disk, including free space (in kBytes)
+I
file system implementation (e. g., iso, hfs, ifs, ixw)
+v
file system-specific information
+Y
'rw', if the disk is writable, 'r' otherwise
Names:
+o original disk name
+r
disk name in Rock Ridge format (rr)
+p
disk name in PC format (pc)
+h
disk name in High Sierra format (hs)
For standard disks the name is printed in the chosen name format. Disks
exceeding the limit of licensed disks appear as “-limit-”. An empty CDR appears as “-blank-” or “-badCD-”, depending if the recorder can tell
the difference. Disks in a format foreign to iXOS-JUKEMAN appear as “nostd-”. If it is neither possible to read the disk nor to explicitly judge the
disk as being an empty writable disk, it appears as “-badCD-”. Nonexisting slots appear as “-------”. This can be the case if not all packs
are fitted in a jukebox. Finally, empty slots appear as “-empty-”.
Incremental file system:
+B amount of data buffered for a volume
+W
amount of data written (physically) to the disk
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+w
W+B (total amount of data for a disk)
+F
S-W (free space on physical disk)
+f
S-w (free space for further data)
+T
number of tracks written to a disk
Statistics:
+D amount of data (MBytes) read from a disk
+-D like +D, but set all values to zero afterwards
+P number of operations on a disk, i. e. read accesses with max. block
size of 64kB
+-P like +P, but set all values to zero afterwards
+M
number of movements of a disk into a drive
+-M like +M, but set all values to zero afterwards
Examples:
The command “cdadm survey -d +d” lists the device description file
names of all attached devices.
“cdadm survey -v +dsipr” prints a list of devices names, slot numbers, inodes and disk names in the pc and rr format for all disks in all
attached devices.
“cdadm survey -v +oIv” prints a list of original disk names, file system implementation and file system-specific information, e. g.:
Online Docu V6tation hfs BlockSize=512 BlockCount=398748
CSMDN610C
iso BlockSize=2048 BlockCount=320189
asterix
ifs Blocksize=2048 Total=333000 Written=3584
Buffered=1 Used=3585 Blank=329416 Free=329415 Tracks=3
wormimage
ixw Backup=0 BlockSize=1024 FCB=64-65
Data=2048-2048 CTime=878292409 Hid=1053741549 OCTime=878292409
OHid=1053741549
Restricting the output:
<column>=<value> or
<column>!<value>
You can restrict the output using parameters such as d=<device> or
d!<device>. The former prints information for the specified device only.
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The latter prints information for all other devices (negative comparison).
For a disk list, you can apply restrictions for all columns, even if a column
is not selected. Examples: “cdadm survey -v +sip d=juke.dev” will
print all disks of juke.dev. “cdadm survey -v +dsipr p=ixos96”
will print the disk with the PC format name ixos96.
Note:
(t)csh and bash users must preceed ! with a backslash to
avoid its usual function as History operator.
Sorting the output:
Finally, you can specify how the output should be sorted:
s:<criteria> sorts the output list according to the specified options.
<criteria> is a list of column names (may be preceeded with '-' to reverse
sort order). The output is sorted by these columns.
Examples:
“cdadm survey -v +dsipr s:d-S” lists the disks, sorted by device
name and within a device, by slot number. Like restrictions, you can use
sort options, even if the specified column is not printed:
Thus “cdadm survey -v +dspr s:i” prints all disks sorted by inodes,
but does not print any inode numbers. This may be useful if you want to
see disks in the order in which they were made known to the server, because the server associates inode numbers with disks sequentially.
The results of commands to show amounts of buffered or written data,
free space, and so on, are expressed in kBbytes (1024 Bytes).
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4.10 Manage disks
GUI
Windows NT
The [CONTENTS] dialog
Select [CONTENTS] or [DEVICES]-CONTENTS. The dialog will display a
list of all slots and their current contents. The disk names appear in the
selected name format for standard disks. The following special labels may
also appear:
Lable
-limit-
-blank-badCD-
-empty-nostd------x?????????
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Meaning
This label appears if the limit of licensed disks is exceeded. These disks will not be visible in the file system.
Empty disk. Will appear only if the recorder is able to
detect empty disks, otherwise -badCD- will appear.
Empty or not readable/defect disk. Since some recorders will not be able to detect empty disks, the distinction
cannot uniquely be done.
Empty slot.
Disks in a format foreign to iXOS-JUKEMAN.
Non-existing slots (e. g. missing packs in a jukebox).
Generic name (e. g., x0000327). A disk will be assigned such a name, if another disk with the same
name is already stored in the volumes database or if
the disk has got no name. These disks can be renamed
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This dialog lists all slots of the currently selected device. The list displays
the slot number followed by the disk name in the selected name format.
By default, the original name of the disk is displayed (Original). The name
format can be selected with one of the radion buttons PC, RR, HS, and
Original.
Rename disks
Note:
iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 allows disks to be renamed using the operating system functions (e. g., Windows NT Explorer or UNIX
mv command). The renaming takes place for the name format
defined for the view.
The disk name can only be changed if one of the three name formats PC,
RR or HS is selected. The original name stored on the disk cannot be
changed for obvious reasons. The Rename dialog allows to change the
name for any of the three name formats.
1. Click on the disk to be renamed.
2. Click [RENAME]. This button can only be clicked if a single disk is selected. The selected name format must not be “Original”. The following
dialog will pop up:
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3. Enter a new name for the desired name format.
4. Click [OK] to accept the changes. Click [CANCEL] to discard the
changes.
Insert/remove disks
Depending on your type of jukebox (mail slot or not), the GUI offers two
different buttons to change disks:
The button [CHANGE CD] is available, if the jukebox does not have a
mail slot to change disks. To change a disk in this type of jukebox, select
the slots in which disks should be changed and click [CHANGE CD].
Then you must change the disks using the corresponding mechanism of
the jukebox. Afterwards, the server will scan the selected slots and display
their contents as if you clicked on [TEST].
If your jukebox has a mail slot (e. g., Mercury, Kubik or standard jukeboxes), the GUI offers the buttons [INSERT] and [REMOVE] instead of
[CHANGE CD]. They can be used to change disks using the mail slot.
Click [INSERT] to instruct the server to look for an empty slot and open
the mail slot. Insert a disk and close the mail slot. If one or more slots are
selected, only this range of slots will be scanned for empty slots.
Click [REMOVE] to remove a disk from the jukebox. This button is only
available if a single occupied slot is selected.
Note:
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Please note that disks can be changed manually in single
drives and towers, without using iXOS-JUKEMAN. These drives
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will be scanned periodically for new disks (see server parameter dcheck in section “Server parameters” on page 123).
Move disks to or from a drive
If a disk is accessed by a client request it will be moved to a drive automatically. If you want to move a disk into a specific drive (e. g., a recorder)
click [MOVE CD] and select the slot number and the drive:
To move a disk from a drive back to its slot select “from Drive back to
Slot” and select the drive.
Test disks
If you are uncertain about the contents of a slot (e. g., if you changed
disks manually without using the GUI) you can explicitly test the contents
of one or more slots. To to this, select the corresponding slots and click
[TEST].
Rescan jukebox
Click [RESCAN] to refresh the internal memory of the jukebox. This is required for some jukeboxes with a non-volatile memory if you changed
disks manually, and can do no harm when performed on other jukeboxes.
Please note that a complete rescan can take some time for bigger jukeboxes (such as Pioneer DRM-5004x, JVC MC-200/600, DISC CD-CHG
DJ-200/600). For these jukeboxes, a partial rescan can be performed if
the relevant disks are tested.
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[INCREMENTAL FS]
The incremental file system is described in section “Burning disks incrementally” on page 151.
The [VOLUMES] dialog
Select [CONFIGURATION]-VOLUMES. This dialog displays the disk
names of all disks known to iXOS-JUKEMAN (and the renamings). All disk
names scanned by iXOS-JUKEMAN are stored in the internal volumes
database, even if you remove disks from a jukebox or drive.
Available disks are marked “+”, currently unavailable disks are marked “”. A disk is unavailable either if the device containing the disk is not attached or if the disk was removed from the device. Clicking [RENAME]
will open the dialog described in “Rename disks” on page 113.
Delete unavailable disks from the database
Select a disk name from the list and click [DELETE], or press the ‘Delete’
key to delete the name of an unavailable disk from the volumes database
(the selected name format must not be ‘Original’). You need to confirm
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this before the name is actually deleted. To remove the disk names of all
unavailable disks, click [DELETE ALL UNUSED VOLUMES].
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CLI
UNIX, Windows NT
List disks
You can display a list of all disks using the following command:
cdadm survey -v +idsoprh
The following columns are printed (see page 229 for a list of other columns):
(1) Disk ID in the volumes database,
(2) name of the device description file,
(3) slot number,
(4) original disk name,
(5) pc name,
(6) rr name,
(7) hs name.
The output will look similar to this:
(1)
362
325
137
535
0
541
(2)
tower.dev
tower.dev
tower.dev
tower.dev
tower.dev
tower.dev
(3)
(4)
1
2
3
4
5
6
MSVC42
MSVC41
OFF95_Z_01
VSENT_CD1
-emptyVSENT_CD3
(5)
msvc.42
msvc41
offpro95.eng
vs_stud1.97
-emptyvs_stud3.97
(6)
(7)
msvc.42
MSVC41
OFF95_Z_01
vs_stud1.97
-emptyvs_stud3.97
MSVC42
x000325
OFF95_Z_01
VSENT_CD1
-emptyVSENT_CD3
In some cases you will notice strange disk names such as x000325 in the
second row. This is a generic name assigned by iXOS-JUKEMAN. A disk
is assigned a generic name if the disk does not have a name or if the disk
name is already stored in the volumes database for another disk. If a
disk is removed from a device its name remains in the database. All renamings for the disk in the pc/rr/hs format will be remembered if the
same disk is inserted again at a later time. To remove the name of an unavailable disk from the database see “Delete unavailable disks from the
database” on page 119.
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Rename disks
Note:
iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 allows disks to be renamed using the operating system functions (e. g., Windows NT Explorer or UNIX
mv command). The renaming takes place for the name format
defined for the view.
cdadm rename [[-<nf>] <old> [<new>]]
renames the disk from <old> to <new> for the specified name format <nf>
which must be either pc, rr or hs (see “Set up views” on page 67). <old>
must be an existing disk name for <nf>, <new> must not exist. A disk
name exists if it is stored in the volumes database even if the disk with
the corresponding name is currently not inserted in a device. This is to
avoid disk name conflicts when attaching and detaching jukeboxes. The
old name will be replace by the new name in the database volumes.
Delete unavailable disks from the database
A disk name will remain stored in the volumes database if the disk is removed from a device. Its name can be deleted explicitly in the following
way:
cdadm rename -<nf> <old>
In comparison to renaming a disk the <new> name is missing. To delete
the disk names of all unavailable disks from the volumes database (i. e.,
disks listed as “-” by cdadm survey -n +uo), use the command cdadm
rename without any parameters. Please note that all renamings for these
disks will be lost!
Insert/remove disks
You can use the commands cdadm insert and cdadm remove to insert disks into or remove disks from a device. The command cdadm import is identical with cdadm insert, the command cdadm export is
identical with cdadm remove.
Due to the different types of jukeboxes there are four main scenarios for
inserting and removing disks (see also the relevant sections in “Supported
jukeboxes” on page 163):
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i) For single drives and drives in tower jukeboxes a disk change is very
easy: Just insert the disks into or remove them from the drives. No interaction with the server is required. The server will check these drives for
disk changes periodically (see parameter dcheck in “Server parameters”
on page 123). The changed disks do not have to be tested anymore, as
with earlier versions of iXOS-JUKEMAN. Please note that for this feature
to work on Windows NT, the autorun feature has to be disabled (see page
23).
ii) The jukebox provides a separate mail slot.
cdadm remove <device>
instructs the server to move a disk from the jukebox to the mail slot. If the
jukebox contains a bad disk it is moved to the mail slot preferably. Otherwise the server moves the first found disk to the mail slot. For nearly all
jukebox types, the mail slot will be ejected automatically. You must then
take out the disk and close the mail slot again. With the Kubik jukebox
after the acoustic signal the mail slots can be opened manually. Then you
can take out the disk and close the mail slot again.
To insert a disk use the command:
cdadm insert <device>
This command instructs the server to search a free slot and then open the
tray or release the mail slot. Insert a disk and press the Enter button or
close the mail slot. The jukebox tests the disk afterwards.
You can restrict the choice of disks or slots using additional parameters:
cdadm remove <device> <name>
instructs the server, to remove a disk called <name> in the default name
format.
cdadm insert <device> 20-30
instructs the server to import a disk into one of the slots 20 through 30. An
error message is printed if none of these slots is empty.
Similarly:
cdadm remove <device> 27
instructs the server to remove the disk in slot 27.
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iii) The pioneer500 has a virtual mail slot which is in fact a position of the
robot. The grundig35 has a mail slot which is hidden under an additional
door. You can use all of the above commands, but with the additional
switch -f (cdadm insert -f ... or cdadm remove -f ...). As soon as
the command returns, the picker of the pioneer500 is in its change position, or the door of the grundig35 may be opened. Open the jukebox door
and insert or remove the disk The time-out for the disk change is specified
by the trayto parameter (see “Server parameters” on page 123) which is
60 seconds by default. iXOS-JUKEMAN waits for the door to be closed
and continues to answer the accumulated file system requests for the
jukebox. You do not need to issue the following command:
cdadm testcd <device>
which had to be issued in earlier versions to tell the server the disk
change is finished.
iv) Jukeboxes with no mail slot, e. g., jukebox types cdr100, sony, pioneer6, and pioneer18. For all these devices, cdadm insert and cdadm
remove request the server to block incoming requests and free the
drives. Then you can manually change the disks. After making changes
use cdadm testcd to tell the server which disks are changed and that
the device can resume normal operation. Clients do not receive error
messages, they simply think the server was slow for a while. A typical
command sequence is:
cdadm insert <device>
(blocks user requests - now change
disks 2 and 3)
cdadm testcd <device> 2-3
(server inspects disks and resumes
normal operation)
Move disks to or from a drive
cdadm movecd <device> <drive> <slot>
Moves a disk from <slot> to <drive>, where the latter is an integer in the
range of 1 to the number of drives in the respective jukebox (e. g., 4 for a
Mercury). If the slot is 0 or not specified, the server will move the disk in
drive <drive> back to its slot.
Example:
cdadm movecd jb.dev 3 42
moves the disk from slot 42 to drive 3.
cdadm movecd jb.dev 3
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moves the disk from drive 3 back to its slot.
Note that the drive must be active (not disabled by a drive=! line in the
device description file) to be accessible for move commands (see “Drive
set-up” on page 54).
Test disks
cdadm testcd <device> <list>
The command testcd can be used to test the contents of slots, especially to make newly inserted disks known to the server.
Example:
cdadm testcd jb.dev 27
instructs iXOS-JUKEMAN, to move the disk from slot 27 to a drive and to
check its contents.
cdadm testcd jb.dev 12-45
tests the disks in slots 12 through 45. See also “cdadm
<device> <list>” on page 233.
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testcd
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4.11 Server parameters
You can change the server behavior using several parameters, though the
default values are usually quite sensible. server.cfg override default
values and command options override default values and server.cfg
values.
A few parameters can be changed dynamically while the server is running. See “Change server parameters” on page 130.
4.11.1 Overview of server parameters
Dynamic parameters
autodc=1
This parameter controls the caching of the directory structure of a disk
(see “The directory cache” on page 36). If a disk is inserted into a drive,
iXOS-JUKEMAN checks if the root directory. If it is not in the cache then
autodc controls the further behavior. If set to 0, no caching is performed.
If set to 1, caching is performed only if a permanet hard disk directory
cache is configured. When set to 2, iXOS-JUKEMAN will cache the entire
directory structure, even if only a RAM cache is configured. The dynamic
caching performed due to file system requests is not affected by this parameter.
blanks=0
After changing a disk or issuing a ‘test’command iXOS-JUKEMAN tries to
determine the type of disk. For empty CD-Rs or disks which are not ISO
9660-conforming or non-finalized disks written with the incremental file
system (see “Burning disks incrementally” on page 151) this test cannot
be completed successfully with many reader driver. In these cases the
disk will be tested in a recorder drive to determine the disk type.
The parameter blanks can be used to speed up the test procedure. If set
to 0, disks are first tested in reader drives (faster than recorders), and
eventually in recorders a second time. If set to 1, disks are always tested
in recorder drives, if available. If set to 2, no testing is performed and the
disks are assumed to be blank.
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fullvn=0
By default, disk names in the PC name format are converted to 8.3 in
lower case. If fullvn is set to 1, only the conversion to lower case is
done with up to 32 characters. This is useful for networks, where only
Windows NT or Windows 95 PCs are used, but not if Windows for Workgroups clients are used.
hfsiso=1
iXOS-JUKEMAN supports Apple HFS CDs and Hybrid CDs which contain
both HFS and ISO 9600 directory structures. For Hybrid CDs, by default
iXOS-JUKEMAN reads the ISO 9660 directory structure and ignores the
HFS structure. If this parameter is 0, preferences are reversed, and Hybrid CDs will appear as HFS, not as ISO 9660..
ignore=0
All other values than 0 cause the server to ignore all file system requests.
This can be changed dynamically, for example to block the server for
awhile.
iotimo=60
Time-out in seconds until failed disk reads are abandoned.
loglev=4
iXOS-JUKEMAN maintains a log file called logfile.txt in the
JUKEMAN directory. The messages in this file are classified in ten log
levels, where level 0 is of highest priority (see also “Log file logfile.txt” on
page 249). The parameter loglev is the limit that keeps log messages
with a higher log level than this limit out of the log file. For your first try,
use a value of 5 or 6 to see if everything works fine.
lwords=5
The iXOS-JUKEMAN server internally stores last recent log messages in
a buffer. If problems occur, than this buffer is written to the log file. This
parameter sets the log level for the ‘last words’.
mdelay=3
iXOS-JUKEMAN has a sophisticated adaptive scheduling policy for accessing disks. It learns from accesses in the past. When the server has to
move a disk out of a drive to insert a new one, the server must first select,
which disk will be removed from the drive to make room for the new disk.
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It is often preferable to delay this disk exchange as data requests are
usually queued for the current disk. This parameter sets a limit according
the delay. Value 0 means a strict serial use of the access queue (not very
sensible). The greater the value the longer the delay even if there is not
access to the disk.
rahead=3
Specifies the number of chunks the data cache tries to read ahead.
reject=1
Specifies how incomplete disks are treated (e. g., if the burning process
for a CD was interrupted). For reject=0, iXOS-JUKEMAN tries to read
as much as it can from the incomplete disk. For reject=1, no incomplete
iXOS-JUKEMAN-CDs will be accepted. If set to 2, no incomplete disks at
all will be accepted.
The default is reject=1. If the disk is not fully readable, it is very likely
that some error occurred during burning the disk, and it appears as a bad
disk. This setting will make sure to mark only those disks as readable
where disk length and actually written data match.
trayto=60
This parameter can be used together with Kodak CDL 144, Hyundai HAS550, Plasmon D-Series, and Sony CDL-2*** jukeboxes. It is the time in
seconds that the server waits until the mail slot of a jukebox is closed
manually. After that time, the mail slot tray is closed automatically and the
new (or old) disk is tested.
For the Pioneer DRM 5004 X and the Grundig GMS 1035 the parameter
has a special meaning due to the virtual mail slot and the door hiding the
mail slot, respectively: It specifies the time-out for the user to open the
door, exchange the disk, and close the door again for a disk change. After
this time-out normal operation is resumed.
For all other types of jukeboxes this parameter is irrelevant.
The following table lists the dynamic parameters as well as the units, the
default values, the minimum and the maximum values:
Table 5 - Dynamic parameters
Name
Unit
Default value Minimum
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Maximum
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Name
Unit
Default value Minimum
Maximum
autodc
1
0
2
blanks
0
0
2
fullvn
0
0
1
ignore
0
0
1
60
0
3,600
loglev
4
0
9
lwords
5
0
9
mdelay
3
0
99
rahead
3
0
1000
60
0
99,999,999
iotimo
trayto
seconds
seconds
Static parameters
cdnfsp=100003
This parameter defines with which program number iXOS-JUKEMAN registers its NFS service, if no other program of that kind exists. Value 0
means no registration.
dcheck=300
iXOS-JUKEMAN performs a periodic disk check for single drives and towers. This simplifies changing of disks, since no interaction with the server
is required. The change is detected automatically.
The parameter defines a time intervall in centiseconds. After this time
iXOS-JUKEMAN checks whether a disk has been changed. Value 0 turns
off the check.
jobnum=192
Defines how many file system requests the server can queue internally. If
you have more than 1,000 clients, increase this number.
maxcvt=1000
This parameter defines how many nodes the view tree of the controlled
disks can have.
maxthr=40
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Specifies how many processes can be started.
mountp=20000234
Defines the program number the server uses to register its mount service
if there is no such program already registered. Use 0 for no registration at
all.
nonfsd=0
Set this parameter to 1 to prevent the NFS server built in iXOS-JUKEMAN
from starting. This is only useful on Windows NT, as NFS is the only way
to connect to the file system if iXOS-JUKEMAN is running on UNIX.
portno=4027 (UNIX) or 2049 (NT)
Defines the UDP port for NFS and cdadm requests.
rtrack=131072 (128 KB)
Defines the size of chunks of files to be cached in the data cache (in RAM
or as a file). This value must be a multiple of 8,192 (8 KB) sein.
synclm=0
With a value of 1 log messages will not be buffered but written directly to
the log file.
waitpm=0
This parameter defines the time (in seconds) the server waits for a delayed portmapper to be started.
The following table lists the static paramters as well as the units, the default values, the minimum and the maximum values:
Table 6 - Static parameters
Name
Unit
cdnfsp
dcheck
jobnum
1/100 seconds
Default value
Minimum
Maximum
100,003
0
99,999,999
300
0
999,999
192
9
8,192
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Name
Unit
Default value
Minimum
Maximum
maxcvt
1,000
10
65,536
maxthr
40
12
1,024
mountp
20,000,234
0
99,999,999
nonfsd
0
0
1
portno
4,027 (2,049)
1
65,536
131,072
8,192
16,777,216
0
0
1
0
0
3,600
rtrack
bytes
synclm
waitpm
128
seconds
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4.11.2 Change server parameters
GUI
Windows NT
Select [CONFIGURATION]-PARAMETERS:
The dialog shows a list of server parameters along with their current values, their permanent values from the file server.cfg and the default
values.
Select the parameter you wish to change and click [EDIT], double-click
the parameter.
In the “Permanent” text field, the value in the file server.cfg can be
set. In the “Current value” text field, the value can be changed dynamically while the server is running. This only works for some parameters
(see “Table 5” on page 125).
Click [OK] to confirm the changes, click [CANCEL] to discard the
changes.
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CLI
UNIX, Windows NT
In server.cfg, all server parameters have the common format <key> {
<value> }. <key> is the name of the parameter and <value> is a nonnegative integer in decimal or hex notation.
Change parameters permanently
To change a value permanently, add an entry in server.cfg. If there is
no parameters section, create it and list all parameters to be changed.
For example, you want to change the log level of the server which is set
with the parameter loglev. The default value is 4, and you want to use
log level 5. Enter the following section in your server.cfg file:
parameters {
loglev { 5 }
}
Change parameters at server start-up
If you want to change the log level (or any other parameter) for a single
server session only, start the server in the following way:
./cdnfsd loglev=5
The server will start with the log level set to 5.
Change parameters dynamically
If you want to change a server parameter while the server is running, type
(for instance):
cdadm setpar loglev 5
and the parameter will be changed dynamically. Please note that this
method works for just a few parameters (see “Table 5” on page 125).
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4.12 Burning disks/writing incrementally
It is possible to write data to disks in two ways with iXOS-JUKEMAN,
namely, in batch mode or incrementally and transparently using the file
system.
Batch mode was also a feature of version 1.3b of iXOS-JUKEMAN. The
writeable disks are placed in the jukebox and the recorder is reserved for
the write process. Once JUKEMAN is instructed to insert a disk into the
appropriate drive, the burning process begins in the same way as a disk
would be burned in a normal stand-alone drive. Finally the disk is returned
to its original slot. It is then possible to include this disk into the overall
group of disks, which are an already visible and accessible part of the file
system, by clicking on Test (c.f. “Manage disks” on page 112). In this way
you achieve a visible migration of data: First the data is collected on a
hard disk, before it is written to the disk to be burned and finally integrated
into the file system. The drive used for burning is reserved by deactivating
same in the device description file (see also “Drive set-up” on page 54). It
is also possible to reserve the required drive dynamically during normal
operation of the jukebox (e.g to reserve drive 1, simply use the command
cdadm detach jb.dev -d 1). It is then possible to move a disk to this
drive with the command cdadm movecd jb.dev 1 <slot> or remove a
disk from this drive with the command cdadm movecd jb.dev 1. When
the drive no longer needs to be reserved, it can be used again for reading
with the command cdadm attach jb.dev -d 1.
Write process
Description
GUI
CLI
see page:
Single Track at Once
133
147
142
Incremental file system
WORM file system
151
160
156
—
158
162
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4.12.1 Burning disks (Single Track at Once)
The writing software in iXOS-JUKEMAN can transport the data to be written to a CD, PD, WORM or MO recorder drive. To actually burn a disk,
you need the writing software cdglow together with iso9660, the latter
used to generate the required standard ISO 9660 file system. Windows
NT also supports the burning of disks from the GUI.
cdglow
Please read the following before attempting to burn a disk:
Burning disks requires a steady stream of data at a constant rate. CD recorders which operate at the basic speed require a data transfer rate of
150 kB per second. With dual- and quad-speed recorders, the required
data transfer speed is 300 and 600 kB per second respectively. If the data
available in the internal buffer of the CD recorder is not sufficient to
maintain this rate, then the burning process is prematurely interrupted
with the SCSI error message: “buffer underrun” and the CD can no
longer be used.
iXOS-JUKEMAN is designed to fully exploit the features of the controlled
devices. However, it cannot compensate for an insufficent hardware setup or operating errors.
The following errors typically cause such buffer underrun errors:
• If the data source is not directly connected to the jukebox, i.e. if
the data is being transferred over a network.
• If you are copying data from a CD drive, whose speed is the same
or less than that of the recorder drive. An example of this is if you
copy data from a quad-speed to the Brenner Yamaha CDE 100 II
with variable speed capability. In this case however, it is possible
to reduce the effective recording speed with the cdglow options f1 and -f2.
Another cause of error is when there are too many devices attached to the
same SCSI controller as that used by the CD recorder. Some recorders
cannot even operate if there are other devices attached to the same controller. In this case it is required to use separate controllers for the read
drives and the recorder drive. In some cases, however, this problem can
be avoided by giving the recorder drive a higher priority (e.g. 6) than the
other drives.
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In addition to this, no activites or real-time processes, which would overload the hard disk or SCSI busses, should be allowed to run while burning a CD.
If you are unsure about the properties of a device, the cdglow command
should be run with the option -p. Though it is usually not possible to
simulate the laser performance, this option allows the recording process
to be simulated and whether buffer underrun error is likely to occur. If this
is the case, either the buffer can be enlarged or the speed of the CD recorder can be reduced with the options -f2 or -f1. If you plan to copy a
CD, it is also possible to copy the contents first to the hard disk to the ISO
9660 standard. The write command will then use this file as the source.
The actual write command is as follows:
cdglow [-p] [-v] [-w] [-c] [-f1|-f2] [-b size]
[-s source] [-t target] [-l length] [-a size]
With this command, the data is is written to the CD (WORM or MO) in ISO
9660 format on a single track.
-p
preview mode: data is received but not burned
-v
on completion, verify that there are no differences between
the source data and what actually now appears on the CD.
-w
write to WORM and MO.
-c
only check the size of the source.
-f1
single-speed recording-the default is the highest possible
speed.
-f2
dual-speed recording
-b <size>
size of the RAM buffer (in decimal or hexidecimal) –default
is 8 MB.
-s <source> <source> contains the ISO 9660-file system - default is
stdin.
-S
indicates that the source is not a CD drive.
-t <target>
-T
<target> is the CD recorder - default is stdout.
-l <length>
indicates how many bytes should be written.- default is the
whole ISO image.
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indicates that the target is not a CD recorder. This mode
allows up to 128 KB to be written to the hard disk without a
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-a <size>
the granularity of the control-output, which determines the
frequency with which confirmation messages are output
when recording data - default value is 1 MB, which corresponds to -a 0x100000. This means that for every
megabyte of data written to the CD, a message will be output. The actual value provided for <size> will be rounded
up to the nearest MB. If <size> is set to 0, then no messages are output.
Successful completion of the cdglow command is confirmed by the return
code 0: other values indicate that an error occurred. Such errors are protocolled in stderr.
When working with UNIX, the cdglow command must either be run under
root or have its s-(„sticky“-) bit set. Otherwise the speed of the data
stream is not properly maintained. The equivalent user under NT is Administrator.
A variety of data sources can be used for cdglow, an example of which is
a file or partition with a master image formatted to ISO 9660, or another
CD drive. In the latter case, it is possible to copy the contents of one CD
onto another, providing the speed of the recorder is slower than that of the
source.
A more advanced application is, while producing the ISO 9660 file system,
to pipe this file system simultaneously to cdglow. The software is optimized, so that the real-time capabilities of the operating system are fully
exploited to maintain the constant rate of data transfer. This is also the
case when the source data is dynamically generated. The precautions
mentioned above must still be observed, however.
It is important to be aware that certain drives in the IMS range simulate (“p”) the burn process so accurately, that successful completion of such a
simulation requires opening and closing the mail slot, or removing and reinserting the caddy. This is necessary to simulate the actual removal of
the CD during a genuine recording. During an actual genuine burning of a
CD, the door of the drive should of course not be opened. This is also the
case for a simulated recording process with the above family of drives and
to prevent the door being opened by mistake, the relevant functionality is
deactivated during a simulation. However, should the simulation not be
successful, it is sometimes necessary to turn the recorder drive off and on
again in order to be able to remove the disk. CD recorders in this range
include a variety of drives from Grundig, Hewlett Packard, Kodak, Matsushita, Philips, Pioneer, Plasmon and Yamaha.
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iso9660
iso9660 is program which formats a file system to the ISO 9660 standard. This allows the use of the Rock Ridge extensions, which contain
information about UNIX file names and permissions. A file system resulting from this program can be written to its own partition or file before it is
burned onto disk. Alternatively, depending on the hardware (see above), it
can be channelled directly to cdglow, whereupon the need for such a
large interim storage is avoided. In either scenario changes to the source
file system should be avoided while iso9660 is running and ensure that
the target file system does not share the same directory path of another
image produced by an earlier running of the program.
Typically, a Level 1 ISO 9660 file system is generated, in which the file
names are converted to conform to the standard 8.3 convention. A limitation of this convention is that only capital letters, numbers and underscores can form such a file name. This is however necessary to provide a
file system which is almost universally accessible and readable.
iso9660 is not limited to this convention, however, and with appropriate
parameters certain extensions are permissable. This will of course have
the effect, that not all operating systems will be able to read the files, especially if iXOS-JUKEMAN is not installed on the operating system in
question. For this reason, it is advisable to carry out tests before burning
CD’s whose file systems exploit this feature.
ISO 9660-conforming parameters and options
rr
This parameter allows the Rock Ridge extensions to be added to areas
which are not occupied by ISO 9660. As a result, the image contains an
ISO 9660 file system with additional POSIX properties, which can then be
processed by file systems able to understand these rr extensions. The
added advantage of this system is that the source documents can be
named arbitrarily, as both the converted ISO 9660 names together with
the rr names now reside on the target disk.
joliet
Writes a disk in Joliet format (Unicode-support, long filenames).
isolevel2
Permits the use of file names up to 32 characters long, corresponding to
ISO 9660 Interchange Level 2. Level 1 allows only the 8.3 format for normal files.
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fitcd
With this parameter it is possible to check if the size of a resultant image
would be greater than the storage capacity of a 74-minute CD (650 MB).
Should this be the case, the program discontinues, thus preventing an image being generated that would not actually fit onto a CD.
If the output from iso9660 is piped directly to cdglow this parameter is
not necessary, as the latter carries out a similar check before writing to
the CD and will not start if the image would be too big.
maxsize=<bytes> (decimal oder hexadecimal)
This parameter has the same functionality as 'fitcd', except that it is
possible to state the required limit explicitly. This is particulary important,
e.g., for 63-minute CD-Rs, whose capacity is only 553 MB. When 'fitcd'
and 'maxsize=<bytes>' are used together, only the value of 'maxsize' is
considered.
followlinks
Used to support UNIX symbolic links.
norelocation
Allows the use of rr directories which are deeper than 8 levels, which is
the standard limit of ISO 9660.
ignorefail
Replaces unreadable files or directories with empty equivalents.
checkfail
Excludes unreadable files or directories from the image.
source=<path>
Indicates the path of the root directory.
stdout=<file> und stderr=<file>
Specifies the file name of the ISO 9660 image and the file name for error
messages. If not specified, the data is written to the relevant data streams
stdout and stderr.
name=<volume_name>
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Sets the name of the medium, which is stored in the so-called “primary
volume descriptor”. To avoid problems, no white space should appear in
this name.
publisher=“Text”, preparer=“Text”, applid=“Text”
Specifies the publisher, the preparer and the application ID.
ignore=<chars>
This allows certain files to be excluded from the image. The program considers the original file names as though the string <chars> were removed.
If the reslultant name is the same as that of a file which already exists,
then the original file is ignored and does not appear in the image. If this
value is set to ~, e.g. then the file ~source.c is excluded from the image
if there already exists a file source.c. Should no such replica file names
be found, then this parameter has no effect.
exclude=<path>
Allows a sub-directory to be excluded from the image.
replace=@<path1>@<path2>
Allows a sub-directory branch to be inserted or replaced.
To write both source directories /y and /z to a disk, create an empty directory /x and call
iso9660 source=/x replace=@/x/y@/y replace=@/x/z@/z
This will create a CD with the subdirectories y and z and their contents.
This option provides lots of possibilities. This feature can be tested conveniently with hard disk images (see “Disk images on hard disk” on page
209).
With the following option, you can include all the necessary options in one
file:
options=<file>
Each line of this file should contain only one option. By default, the files
.iso9660 und iso9660.ini are used to store such options.
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Options and parameters which do not conform to ISO 9660
It must be emphasized that the use of the following options will lead to
ISO 9660 images which will not be fully readable by all operating systems.
longnames
Permits the use of long file names.
nicenames
Allows any character to be used to construct the file name. However, it is
better to use the option allow=<charlist> (see below).
noversion
Suppresses the version number.
dir.ext
Permits the use of '.xxx' extensions to directory names.
omit.
Suppresses the trailing period ( . ) of ISO 9660 file names.
.by_
Replaces leading periods ( . ) with underscores ( _ ).
allow=<charlist>
By default, standard ISO 9660 permits only the use of capital letters,
numbers, periods and underscores. Small letters must therefore be capitalized and any characters which are not allowed are converted to the underscore.’_’.
This option allows you to extend the list of characters which can appear in
the resultant image. An example is allow=-~ which allows bothof these
characters to appear infile names. By using allow=all or allow=ALL it
is possible to prevent any conversion from taking place. This should not
be confused with the option nicenames; which has a more extensive effect as it ignores a number of ISO 9660 conventions, e.g., the version
number. For this reason it is preferable to use allow=all instead of nicenames.
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Examples
Consider a CD recorder which is connected to the first SCSI bus with the
ID 6. It will therefore be addressed by als \\.\p0b0t6 or
/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6. These values can be checked out with the command inquiry as follows:
inquiry \\.\p0b0t6 or inquiry /dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6
This provides you with the manufacturer and the product number. As soon
as you have identified the Cd recorder, you can burn a Cd with the follwing:
iso9660 source=\ixos | cdglow -t \\.\p0b0t6
or
iso9660 source=/ixos | cdglow -t /dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6
This generates an ISO 9660 image from \ixos (/ixos) and all subdirectories
under this directory tree and burns a Cd with this image. To check the
data transfer rate, simulate the recording with the preview mode as follows::
iso9660 source=\ixos | cdglow -p -t \\.\p0b0t6
or.
iso9660 source=/ixos | cdglow -p -t /dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6
If iso9660 does not meet the necessary data transfer rate, use a separate file or partition:
iso9660 source=\ixos > \temp\image
cdglow -s \temp\image -S -t \\.\p0b0t6
or.
iso9660 source=/ixos > /tmp/image
cdglow -s /tmp/image -S -t /dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6
where \temp\image (/tmp/image) is the target file. The effective data
transfer rate used by cdglow can then be reduced by using the option f1 or -f2.
The attribute of the image can be modified by a variety of iso9660 options, e.g.:
iso9660 rr name=USR1 source=\usr1 > \temp\image
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or.
iso9660 rr name=USR1 source=/usr1 > /tmp/image
This example generates an ISO 9660 image from the directory tree \usr1
(or /usr1) with Rock Ridge extensions.
CD can also be copied, if you have a second drive, e.g., \\.\p0b0t3 or.
/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3:
cdglow -v -s \\.\p0b0t3 -t \\.\p0b0t6
or.
cdglow -v -s /dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3 -t /dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6
These commands copy one Cd to another and verify the results. It is important, however, that the source CD is faster than target CD. If this is not
the case, then the options -f1 or -f2 should be used to lower the speed
of the recording process.
Messages
cdglow produces message which each begin with the time in hundreds of
seconds. From these messages it is possible to see, e.g., which device
was found by cdglow, how many blocks of data should be written, how
much data has already been read into the buffer, when the recording
process has ended and when the CD has been finally made ready for
reading. If you use the option -v, then an additional verification is carried
out by comparing the source and the target. Should there be a difference,
the number of and identity of the blocks which differ is output. The source
and target should, of course, be identical, but should any errors occur
during the transfer of data over the SCSI connection, it will be indicated
here. If a verification is successful, the output code should is 0.
Should an actual error occur, an error message is output. In such a case
two error messages are usually output. This arises from the fact that at
the beginning of the recording, cdglow splits into two threads witha view
to maintaining the required data transfer rate. This has the advantage that
if one is interrupted, then the other acts as a backup process.
Production of CDs in jukeboxes
Unlike our Jukebox-Server, cdglow has no knowledge of jukeboxes.
However, it is possible to produce CDs with the help of this server.
Note that as of version 2.1 of iXOS-JUKEMAN, you do not need to set up
two different device description files or to change the only device description file in order to reserve a recorder for writing, as you had to in previous
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versions. Likewise, the CD-Rs you intend to write can be included in the
set of slots administered by iXOS-JUKEMAN.
First you disable the recorder drive of your jukebox for use by the file
system with the command
cdadm detach jb.dev -d 4
(see also “Command line index” on page213). This assumes that the
jukebox description file is jb.dev and that the recorder is the fourth drive
of the jukebox.
After burning the disk the drive can be reattached with the command
cdadm attach jb.dev -d 4
Next insert the recordable disks into the jukebox, which can be done using
the cdadm insert command. For more information see “Manage disks”
on page 112. Note that setting the blanks parameter (see “Server parameters” on page 123) to a value of 2 for this purpose will speed up this
process considerably (do not forget to reset the parameter to its previous
value).
If you plan to insert a large number of CD-Rs, importing them one by one
may be time consuming. You can open the jukebox to perform the import
manually. You must, however, detach the jukebox before you can open it.
After the import, and after reattaching the jukebox, the following command
must be issued:
cdadm rescan jb.dev
to update the jukebox’s memory concerning which slots are filled and
which are empty (see “cdadm rescan <device>” on page 227). The
command is only mandatory for jukeboxes with non-volatile memory, like
the Pioneer 5004X or the Grundig GMS 3200 which might otherwise damage themselves. For other types of jukeboxes this command will do no
harm.
After successful import of the CD-Rs you have two options depending on
whether your want to write only one or two CDs or plan to burn a whole
series.
Burning individual CDs
Simply place an empty CD in the recorder drive. This is achieved by issuing a command similar to the following:
cdadm movecd jb.dev 4 9
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This has the effect of moving a CD from slot 9 to the recorder drive (4) of
the jukebox (jb.dev).
The CD can now be recorded like in any other CD recorder, while still allowing other CDs to be read. An example the required command is:
cdglow -v -s C:\temp\image.iso -S -t \\.\p1b0t5
or.
cdglow -v -s /tmp/image.iso -S -t /dev/iXOS_SCSI1/5
This command burns the ISO image onto the CD found attached to SCSIID 5 of the second SCSI controller and carries out a verification.
The CD can finally be moved out of the recorder drive back into slot 9 with
the command
cdadm movecd jb.dev 4
The Cd can then be removed with the command cdadm remove jb.dev
9 or the following command can be used to include the recorded CD as
part of the jukebox file:
cdadm testcd jb.dev 9
Alternatively the CD can be inserted into the device description file by inserting the slotnumber into the CD (disk=...).
Burning more than one disk form a single source
Our software contains the batch script burncds.bat for Windows NT
and the shell script burncds.sh for UNIX to allow several CDs to be
burned from the one source. These scripts assume that the jukebox is already connected to the server, that the recorder has been appropriately
reserved for the burning process and that the corresponding slots have
writeable CDs. The scripts must first be tailored to the specific system
configuration, however, and this is carried out with the following command:
burncds <device> <destination> <source> <slotnumbers>
or
burncds.sh <device> <destination> <source> <slotnumbers>
where <device> is the name of the device description file, <destination>
the SCSI-ID of the recorder drive and <source> is the source data to be
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burned. This value is either the SCSI-ID of another drive or the name of
the file where the ISO file system image can be found. Finally,
<slotnumbers> indicates the a list of all the slots containing the CDs to be
burned.
Assuming
jukebox.dev,
is
the
device
description
file,
C:\temp\source.iso or /tmp/source.iso the file containing the
ISO file system image, \\.\p0b0t6,0 or /dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6 the
SCSI-ID of the recorder drive and that the CDs in slots 1 to 5 need to be
burned, then the appropriate command is:
burncds jukebox.dev "\\.\p0b0t6,0"
C:\temp\source.iso 1 2 3 4 5
or
burncds.sh jukebox.dev /dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6
/tmp/source.iso 1 2 3 4 5
Please note that the quotation marks are necessary when running the
Windows NT script. This prevents the 0 being considered as another argument, rather than the actual LUN (in NT, the comma ‘,’is used to separate arguments).
If the source data is in another SCSI CD drive, e.g., \\.\p1b0t3,3 or
/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/4, and the target CDs are in the slots 17, 25 and 39,
then the following command is required:
burncds jukebox.dev "\\.\p0b0t6,0" "\\.\p1b0t3,3" 17 25
39
or
burncds.sh jukebox.dev /dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6
/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/4 17 25 39
If the syntax of the typed-in command is correct, then an output similar to
the following should appear on the screen:
Burning CD in Slot 3 of jukebox.dev with source
C:\temp\source.iso bzw. /dev/iXOS_SCSI1/4
All messages from each recording are then channelled into a file of the
name <Slot#>.out and, correspondingly, there will be one such output
file for each slot included in the original burn command. In addition, there
also exists the script makecd.bat, which is called by burncds.bat for
each slot number. These files should be checked for possible errors, e.g.,
concerning the transport of the CDs or buffer problems. A positive indica-
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tor that everything was successful is when the files correspond to each
slot are the same size or if they differ only by a one or two bytes.
Configuring burncds.sh (.bat) and makecd.bat
The above scripts must be tailored to the system configuration before being used. The specific lines which may need to be changed are indicated
by the trailing comment # CONFIGURE or by the leading/trailing comments rem CONFIGURE BEGIN and rem CONFIGURE END gesetzt.
Such lines in burncds.sh include:
PATH=$HOME/projects/jukeman/bin:$PATH # CONFIGURE
In the above the path $HOME/projects/jukeman/bin must be replaced with the path of the actual JUKEMAN.
cdadm movecd $devfile 1 $i # CONFIGURE
If the recorder drive is not the first drive in the jukebox (i.e. not the first
drive which appears in the device desrciption file) you need to replace 1
with the number of the correct drive.
cdglow -v -s $jukesource $glowoption -t $jukedest #
CONFIGURE
The recording itself is started with this line. Further options cdglow may
also be added in here, e.g., -f1 or -f2, should the speed of the source
not be high enough, or the option -b <size> in order to change the size of
the recorder buffer. It is also very useful to use the option -p in order to
carry out a simulation before actually executing the genuine burn jobs.
cdadm movecd $devfile 1 # CONFIGURE
Identical to cdadm movecd, which is described above.
The following line in burncds.bat should also be examined:
set jukeroot=D:\jukeman
The path D:\jukeman should be replace with the actual path of the
JUKEMAN directory (probably C:\jukeman).
In makecd.bat the following lines may need to be modified:
%jukeroot%\cdadm movecd %devfile% 1 %1
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If the recorder drive is not the fist jukebox drive (i.e. the first drive listed in
the device description file), then the parameter 1 must be replaced by the
actual recorder drive number.
%jukeroot%\cdglow -v -b 0x400000 %glowoption% -s
%jukesource% -t %jukedest%
This line initiates the actual recording process Further options for cdglow
may also be added in here, e.g., -f1 or -f2, should the speed of the
source not be high enough, or the option -b <size> in order to change the
size of the recorder buffer (-b 0x400000 sets the buffer to 4 MB, the
default value is 8 MB).
%jukeroot%\cdadm movecd %devfile% 1
This has exactly the same effect as cdadm movecd.
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GUI
Windows NT
Select [WRITE]-SINGLE TRACK AT ONCE.
The following dialogue box appears:
Source:
You can select one of the following sources:
ISO-Image
Choose from the selection the appropriate ISO disk image.
Disc Drive
Select the appropriate source drive from the list.
Jukebox
Select the jukebox, the source drive and the required slots.
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FS Tree
Select a directory using FS Tree. There are a variety of sources for this
option:
Volume label indicates what the newly-recorded disk should be called.
The ISO Options are described in sections “ISO 9660-conforming parameters and options” on page 136 and the Non ISO Options in section
“Options and parameters which do not conform to ISO 9660” on page 139.
[COMPUTE VOLUME SIZE] can be used to find out the size of the disk to
be recorded.
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[EDIT TREE] is used to exclude, insert or rename specific files or subdirectories.:
[DELETE]: Deletes the selected file or sub-directory from the tree. The
file or directory will then be marked with a red cross and be
excluded from the recording.
[INSERT]:
Allows a file or sub-directory to be inserted into the tree at a
preselected point.
[RENAME]: Renames the selected files or sub-directories: this affects
the name of the file in the target, and not the actual name in
the source, which remains the same.
[CLOSE]:
Applies the changes and closes the dialogue box.
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Target:
You can choose one of the following targets:
ISO-Image
Select the target directory from the list provided and type in the name for
the ISO image.
Recorder
Choose the recorder drive from the list.
You can set the speed of the recording here (single-, dual- or maximaum
speed). The option write in test mode only allows a simulation to be car-
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ried out. Both burn data to the disc and burn data and verify it can be
used to start the recording process, in the latter case also with a verification flag.
Jukebox
Choose the jukebox, recorder drive and required slots. From iXOSJUKEMAN 2.2 and later versions, it is possible to select more than one
slot, so that several CD can be burned using the same source.
The individual slots can be selected by using the [CTRL] key or, if the
slots are consecutive, using [SHIFT].
When you have selected the Source and the Target, it is then possible to
start the recording process with [WRITE]. [CANCEL] allows you to leave
the dialogue without recording.
4.12.2 Burning disks incrementally
From version 2.0 it is possible to record disks incrementally and transparently. This means that it is possible to regard the CD as if it were a noral
hard disk, once the appropriate initialisation has been carried out. The
only difference is that the contents of the system buffer must at some
point be explicitly burned onto the CD. It is important to note that the disk
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will be written in accordance with Level 1 of the ISO 9660 file system
standard. Of particular relevance is that the file names will then have
conform to the 8.3 standard will original file names will be converted accordingly.
If you do not have a valid license (c.f. “Set up license keys” on page 31)
for cdglow, which is normally stored in writer.lic, it is possible to
write up to a maximum of 128 MB to a disk.
To allow the transparent recording of a disk, iXOS-JUKEMAN requires a
global file system buffer on the hard disk. This can be entered directly into
the file server.cfg, but can be configure in NT using the graphical interface. The relevant procedure is discribed in section “How to set up the
IFS buffer” on page 46.
It is absolutely important that the data from this buffer is written to disk
before the corresponding partition is modified (size, etc.) as the data will
otherwise be lost. The transfer can be carried out with the flush command.
Tip:
Please note that a disk which has been initizlised, but not yet finalized, can be read in the appropriate format in the recorder
drive only by iXOS-JUKEMAN. Once the disk has been finalized,
the disk can be read in any drive, even without iXOS-JUKEMAN.
The following commands pertain to the transparent recording of a disk:
cdadm writer action=format location=<dev>
cdadm writer [fsi=ifs] [buffer=<bufname>] action=init
location=<dev> vname=<name>
cdadm writer action=flush vname=<name>
cdadm writer action=purge vname=<name>
cdadm writer action=finalize vname=<name>
cdadm writer action=verify track=<number> vname=<name>
For all of the above, the speed of the recording can be set with the parameter speed=1, speed=2 or speed=4 (the default is dual speed). The
size of the ring buffer can be set using the parameter ring=<size>, otherwise the default value of 4 MB is used.
´The following commands may be used with the command cdadm survey -v (or -s):
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+S
Size of disk including free space
+B
Size of buffered data
+W
Size of written data
+w
W+B (data size for a disk)
+F
S-W (free physical space for a disk)
+f
S-w (free space for further data)
+T
number of written tracks
All results in kB (1024 Byte)
The following is a detailed description of the commands:
cdadm writer action=format location=<dev>
Format the specified disk (not possible for CD-Rs, but for MOs, and PDs
as well as hard disk images). <dev> is in the format <device>,<slot>.
<device> is the name of the device description file and <slot> is the slot
number.
Example:
cdadm writer action=format location=mo_box.dev,10
cdadm writer [fsi=ifs] [buffer=<bufname>] action=init
location=<dev> vname=<name>
This will create an incremental file system on the specified disk. A CD-R
can be written with up to 99 tracks. There is not such limitation for PDs,
WOMRs, MOs and hard disk images. Please note that iXOS-JUKEMAN
does not compute if there is sufficient space for the final contents track to
finalize the disk. <dev> is in the format <device>,<slot>. <device> is the
name of the device description file and <slot> is the slot number.
The optional parameter fsi=ifs specifies the incremental
(ifs) as the the file system implementation to be used. This
default setting if this parameter is not specified. Another file
plementation is the WORM file system ixw (see “WORM file
page 160).
file system
is also the
system imsystem” on
It is possible to set up several independent buffers for the incremental file
system with iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 (see “IFS with several independent buffers” on page 243). The parameter buffer=<bufname> must be specified
if you use this set-up where <bufname> must be one of the buffer names
defined in server.cfg. Each write access to the disk <name> will use
the buffer specified during initialization.
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Example:
cdadm writer fsi=ifs action=init location=jukebox.dev,1
vname=CDR_001
The incremental file system can be tested with hard disk images, even If
you do not have a recorder or writeable disks (see “Disk images on hard
disk” on page 209). This can be set-up using the GUI on NT or by creating
a device description file (e. g., iso.dev), with the following contents:
Windows NT
device=image
drive=C:\temp\rfs.iso
UNIX
device=image
drive=/tmp/rfs.iso
The file C:\temp\rfs.iso or /tmp/rfs.iso must exist and be bigger
than 64 KB (all data stored in this file will be overwritten!). When the hard
disk image is attached, use the command
cdadm writer fsi=ifs action=init location=iso.dev,1
vname=<name>
to initialize an incremental file system for C:\temp\rfs.iso or
/tmp/rfs.iso.
cdadm writer action=flush vname=<name>
Writes all buffered data to the disk <name>.
cdadm writer action=purge vname=<name>
Delete all buffered data for disk <vname>.
cdadm writer action=finalize vname=<name>
Finalize an incrementally written CD.
cdadm writer action=verify track=<number> vname=<name>
Verifies track number <number>. If you specify track=all all tracks will
be verified. If no track is specified, the last written track will be verified.
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4.12.3 How to write disks incrementally
GUI
Windows NT
Select [CONTENTS]:
Select [INCREMENTAL FS...]:
At least one separate recorder or a recorder in a jukebox enabled for IFS
is needed to use the incremental file system. Alternatively, to test the
functionality a hard disk image can be used (see “Disk images on hard
disk” on page 209).
Format disk
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Click [FORMAT]. Formatting of a disk may take some time.
Initialize disk
The disk needs to be initialized before files can be actually written to it.
Writeable disks appear as -badCD- or -blank- in the list, deppending of
the recorder. Select the disk to be initialized and click [INITIALIZE...]. You
will be asked for the disk label, and the disk is initialized using this name.
Once the disk is initialized files can be copied to it. Everything written to
the disk is stored in the IFS buffer first.
Write buffered data
Click [FLUSH] to actually write the buffered data to disk. This will write an
additional track to the disk.
Two tracks are already used when the disk is initialized. One more track is
required for the table of contents when finalizing the disk. Up to 96 tracks
can be written to a CD-R, since a CD-R is limited to 99 tracks. There is no
limitation to the number of tracks for PDs, WORMs, MOs, and hard disk
images. Please note that iXOS-JUKEMAN does not check if sufficient
space is provided on the disk to write the final contents track.
Delete buffered data
Select the disk for which the buffered data should be deleted and click
[PURGE].
Finalize disk
Click [FINALIZE] when no further data shall be written to the disk.
The disk is converted to the ISO 9660 standard level 1. It can be read in
any drive, even without iXOS-JUKEMAN.
Test disk
If the disk is finished using finalize the disk can be made visible in the
file system by testing it. See “Test disks” on page 115.
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CLI
UNIX, Windows NT
Initialize disk
cdadm writer fsi=ifs action=init location=jb.dev,27
vname=vol
This command initializes the CD-R in slot 27 of device jb.dev using the
name “vol”. Once the disk is initialized files can be copied to it. Everything written to the disk is stored in the IFS buffer first.
Write buffered data
To actually write the buffered data to the disk issue the command:
cdadm writer action=flush vname=vol
This will write an additional track to the disk.
Two tracks are already used when the disk is initialized. One more track is
required for the table of contents when finalizing the disk. Up to 96 tracks
can be written to a CD-R, since a CD-R is limited to 99 tracks. There is no
limitation to the number of tracks for PDs, WORMs, MOs, and hard disk
images. Please note that iXOS-JUKEMAN does not check if sufficient
space is provided on the disk to write the final contents track.
Verify written data
The last written track can be verified with the command:
cdadm writer action=verify vname=vol
You can also specify the options track=<number> or track=all to
verify track number <number> or all tracks.
Finalize disk
The disk can be finalized with the following command:
cdadm writer action=finalize vname=vol
The disk is converted to ISO 9660.
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Test disk
To make the finalized disk visible in the file system, issue the following
command:
cdadm testcd jb.dev 27
This instructs iXOS-JUKEMAN, to test the CD in slot 27 and add it to the
file system.
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4.12.4 WORM file system
Note:
The WORM file system is for system integrators. End users
should configure and use it with special care.
The WORM file system is a special file system implementation to write
WORMs, MOs, and PDs (but not CD-Rs) incrementally and more efiiciently. Compared to the IFS, files are written directly to the disks so
there is not need to issue a cdadm writer flush command. Please
note that disks written with the current version of the WORM file system
can be read by iXOS-JUKEMAN only. It will be possible with a later version of iXOS-JUKEMAN however, to finalize these disks to ISO 9660.
To use the WORM file system enter a section similar to the following in
the file server.cfg:
ixworm {
maxOpenDatafiles
numInodes
rehashWarning
HWerrorLog
DataFilePath
ixwhashdir
nodesize
files
file1 {
path {
size {
mode {
}
}
{
{
{
{
{
10 }
250000 }
20 }
d:\temp\hw_errors.txt }
e:\testdata }
{
{ 4 }
{ file1 }
c:\temp\hashdi1 }
50 }
mapped }
ixwhashname {
nodesize { 4 }
files
{ file1 }
file1 {
path { e:\testdata\hashname }
size { 50 }
mode { mapped }
}
}
ixwhashfile {
nodesize { 4 }
files
{ file1 }
file1 {
path { e:\testdata\hashfile }
size { 50 }
mode { mapped }
}
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}
ixwinodes {
nodesize { 64 }
files
{ file1 file2 }
file1 {
path { e:\testdata\inode1 }
size { 200 }
mode { file }
}
file2 {
path { e:\testdata\inode2 }
size { 200 }
mode { file }
}
}
}
Parameter
maxOpenDatafiles
Meaning
numInodes
Total number of files/directories that can be
managed by the hash tables of the WORM file
systems.
Limit for the number of rehashes, which must be
exceeded to issue warnings (“file system is getting full”). Many of these warnings appear in the
log files with a low (important) log level indicate
the WORM file system getting full.
File name for the permanent log file for hardware
errors.
Path for temporary files. This directory must provide enough space to temporarily hold the data
to be written to disk.
Inode size in bytes. Constant 4 for Hash tables
and 64 for inode- tables.
List of file labels. The hash tables and inode tables can be distributed across several files.
File name. One for list label listed under files.
rehashWarning
HWerrorLog
DataFilePath
nodesize
files
path
size
mode
Maximum number of open files for the WORM
file system. This parameter selects the number
of files that can be written at the same time.
File size in MB.
mapped or file. Specifies if the file is created
memory mapped or directly.
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Using the WORM file system
If you entered the section ixworm in the file server.cfg a disk can be
initialized after the next server start-up using the following command:
cdadm writer fsi=ixw action=init location=<dev>
[size=<vsize>] [blksize=<bsize>] vname=<name>
fsi=ixw selects the WORM file system.
<dev> is in the format <device>,<slot>. <device> is the name of the device description file, <slot> is the slot number.
The last two parameters are relevant for hard disk images only: <vsize>
specifies the size of the image in MB. The block size <bsize> is 1 kB by
default and must be a multiple of 512 and <= 4096.
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5 Supported jukeboxes
5.1 Introduction
The hardware can be chosen from a variety of jukeboxes for CD-ROMS
and writable disks. It does not matter that most of these devices are controlled in different ways.
Most functional differences are invisible for the user, but some properties
have an impact on the user interface. For instance, a jukebox lacking a
mail slot usually will not change disks itself upon request. For a jukebox
controlled via a serial interface, the appropriate serial port has to be
specified.
This chapter covers diffrent jukeboxes, their functionality, and the relevant
device description files. In case you skipped the set-up chapter, please
keep in mind that a lot of time can be saved by adding lines such as
“disks=1-5” or “save=*.sav” to the device description files.
This chapter makes use of the common meta characters “?” (any single
character) and “*” (any string) to address jukeboxes with similar names.
Note:
On top of each of the following pages there is a sample device
description file to minimize any problems you may have setting
up the jukebox. The samples are set in two columns. Windows
NT on the left, UNIX on the right.
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5.2 ASM CDR????
Device type: standard
Windows NT
device=standard
drive=\\.\p0b0t3
drive=\\.\p0b0t4
drive=\\.\p0b0t5
drive=\\.\p0b0t6
robot=\\.\p0b0t1
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=standard
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/5
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/1
save=*.sav
ASM provides a range of CDR jukeboxes with capacities from 100-1563
CDs. Up to 44 CD-ROM or CD-R drives can be fitted. Only drives with
caddies are supported. Please make sure to insert caddies into the mail
slot so the arrow points to you, not to the jukebox. The robot is accessed
through SCSI-2.
The CDRXXXX jukeboxes can be fitted with CD recorders supported by
iXOS-JUKEMAN.
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Cope CD Tower
5.3 Cope CD Tower
Device type: tower
Windows NT
device=tower
drive=\\.\p0b0t1,0
UNIX
device=tower
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4,0
The SCSI IDs of the Cope Tower are mapped to LUNs internally. This
means you can connect up to seven towers with up to 49 drives to a single SCSI bus.
You need to enter only one drive in the device description file, the rest is
done by iXOS-JUKEMAN.
You do not need to provide a save file as it has no effect.
For drives in this tower you do not have to perform a CD change by
means of the GUI or cdadm commands anymore. All CDs can be changed
manually, since all drive are checked for disk changes periodically. (see
server parameter dcheck in “Server parameters” on page 123).
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5.4 Cygnet Infinidisc/Infiniwriter
Device type: cygnet
Windows NT
device=cygnet
drive=\\.\p0b0t4
drive=\\.\p0b0t5
robot=\\.\p0b0t1
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=cygnet
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/5
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/1
save=*.sav
The Cygnet Infinidisc is a modular jukebox for CDs/CD-Rs. It supports 250
CDs (expandable to 500 CDs using a second Disk Storage Unit DSU).
The number of drives can be 2 up to 8 for an Infinidisc 250 (with DSU), or
4 for an Infinidisc 500. Depending on the number of carousels the jukebox
can have several mail slots.
The Infinidisc cannot be configured automatically with the Device Wizard
on Windows NT as the jukebox does not provide the required information.
The drives, the robot, and the device type must therefore entered
“manually” in the GUI.
The Infinidisc can be fitted with recorders supported by iXOS-JUKEMAN.
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Cygnet ID100
5.5 Cygnet ID100
Device type: cygnet_id100
Windows NT
device=cygnet_id100
drive=\\.\p0b0t3
drive=\\.\p0b0t4
drive=\\.\p0b0t5
robot=\\.\p0b0t1
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=cygnet_id100
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/5
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/1
save=*.sav
The ID100 can be equipped with up to 5 packs containing 20 CDs each.
Up to 4 drives can be fitted in the jukebox. The robot is addressed through
SCSI-2.
The Cygnet ID100 can be fitted with recorders supported by iXOSJUKEMAN.
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5.6 Denon DRD-1408
Device type: denon200
Windows NT
device=denon200
drive=\\.\p2b0t4
drive=\\.\p2b0t5
robot=\\.\p2b0t6
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=denon200
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI2/4
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI2/5
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI2/6
save=*.sav
The Denon DRD-1408 jukebox for 200 CDs is equipped with two 8-speed
reader drives. Disk changes are performed similar to the NSM CDR 100
by removing the packs, inserting the disks into the packs, and reinserting
the packs again. The Denon jukebox does not provide a mail slot.
The DRD-1408 cannot be automatically configured with the Device Wizard on Windows NT.
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DISC
5.7 DISC
Device type: disc
Windows NT
device=disc
drive=\\.\p0b0t2
drive=\\.\p0b0t3
drive=\\.\p0b0t4
drive=\\.\p0b0t5
robot=\\.\p0b0t6
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=disc
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/2
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/5
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6
save=*.sav
DISC offers a wide range of jukeboxes with capacities that range from 250
to 1,500 CDs. The number of drives and recorders varies between 18 and
28.
The jukeboxes are controlled by one or more SCSI robots and use caddies to protect the disks. They use one or more mail slots to exchange
CDs. To import a CD first put the CD in the caddy and the caddy in the
mail slot. The export command puts the CD in this mail slot.
The DISC jukeboxes can be fitted with recorders supported by iXOSJUKEMAN.
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Supported jukeboxes
5.8 DISC DA***.*
Device type: disc_da
Windows NT
device=disc_da
drive=\\.\p0b0t3,0
robot=\\.\p0b0t3,1
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=disc_da
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3,0
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3,1
save=*.sav
These jukeboxes are equipped with up to 4 drives (reader or recorder
drives supported by iXOS-JUKEMAN).
The DISC DA jukeboxes have a mail slot just like the NSM Mercury or the
Pioneer DRM 1004X. The DISC DA is controlled through SCSI and
achieves good CD change and access times.
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DISC CD-CHG DJ-200/600
5.9 DISC CD-CHG DJ-200/600
Device type: disc_dj
Windows NT
device=disc_da
drive=\\.\p0b0t3,0
robot=\\.\p0b0t3,1
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=disc_da
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3,0
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3,1
save=*.sav
The DISC CD-CHG jukeboxes contain 200 or 600 CDs and can be
equipped with 2 to 6 drives (4 reader and 2 recorder drives). The robot is
controlled through SCSI-2. The jukeboxes have a mail slot. The CDs are
placed in packs of 50 CDs.
The DISC jukeboxes can be fitted with recorders supported by iXOSJUKEMAN.
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5.10 DSM Terastore Jukeboxen
Device type: dsm
Windows NT
device=dsm
drive=\\.\p0b0t3,0
robot=\\.\p0b0t3,1
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=dsm
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3,0
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3,1
save=*.sav
DSM offers jukeboxes starting from 28 up to 1,600 disks (CDs, WORMs or
MOs). The number of drives is highly configurable. The disk change is
performed by means of an exchange slot. Please make sure to insert the
caddies into the exchange slot so the arrow points to you, not to the jukebox. The jukeboxes can be operated either by a serial RS232 line or via
SCSI-2. iXOS-JUKEMAN supports the SCSI-2 variant.
The DSM jukeboxes can be fitted with recorders supported by iXOSJUKEMAN.
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ELMS DVL
5.11 ELMS DVL
Device type: elms
Windows NT
device=elms
drive=\\.\p0b0t3
drive=\\.\p0b0t4
drive=\\.\p0b0t5
drive=\\.\p0b0t6
robot=\\.\p0b0t1
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=elms
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/5
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/1
save=*.sav
The DVL can contain up to 5 packs, with 20 CDs each. Up to 4 drives can
be fitted in the jukebox. The robot is controlled through SCSI-2. It is not
recommended to change packs while the jukebox is running.
This jukebox has no mail slot. CDs can be changed as described in “NSM
100 CD Jukebox” on page 187.
The ELMS DVL can be fitted with recorders supported by iXOSJUKEMAN.
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Supported jukeboxes
5.12 Grundig GMS 1035
Device type: grundig35
Windows NT
device=grundig35
drive=\\.\p0b0t3
drive=\\.\p0b0t4
robot=\\.\p0b0t5
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=grundig35
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/5
save=*.sav
The Grundig GMS 1035 has room for 35 CDs and 2 drives, on of which
can be a recorder drive.
The device type is 'grundig35'. The jukebox may have a mail slot, which
is, however, hidden by a door, which you should not open during normal
operation. To import/export discs you should apply the -f switch to the
cdadm commands, e.g. 'cdadm import -f g35'. With the -f switch,
the command will return already when it is feasible to open the door
(instead of waiting till the CD is tested). The trayto server parameter is
used as a time-out for the door here; if the door is not opened <trayto>
seconds after the cdadm -f call returned, normal operation is resumed.
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Grundig GMS 3200
5.13 Grundig GMS 3200
Device type: grundig200
Windows NT
device=grundig200
drive=\\.\p1b0t3
drive=\\.\p1b0t4
drive=\\.\p1b0t5
drive=\\.\p1b0t6
robot=\\.\p1b0t2
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=grundig200
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/3
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/4
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/5
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/6
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/2
save=*.sav
The Grundig jukebox GMS 3200 can take up to 200 CDs, and has four
reader or recorder drives. It has a mail slot like the Mercury and a SCSI
robot.
The GMS 3200 can be fitted with recorders supported by iXOSJUKEMAN.
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Supported jukeboxes
5.14 Grundig GMS 3280
Device type: grundig280
Windows NT
device=grundig280
drive=\\.\p1b0t1
drive=\\.\p1b0t2
drive=\\.\p1b0t3
drive=\\.\p1b0t4
drive=\\.\p1b0t5
drive=\\.\p1b0t6
robot=\\.\p1b0t0
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=grundig280
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/1
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/2
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/3
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/4
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/5
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/6
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/0
save=*.sav
The Grundig jukebox GMS 3280 contains 8 packs with 35 CDs each. Six
drives can be fitted which can also be recorder drives.
The GMS 3280 can be fitted with recorders supported by iXOSJUKEMAN.
For inserting CDs it is recommended to put the disk in the mail slot before
issuing the cdadm insert command or to finish the import/export within
60 seconds to avoid problems with the jukebox firmware.
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HP WORM/MO
5.15 HP WORM/MO
Device type: worm
Windows NT
device=worm
drive=\\.\p0b0t1
drive=\\.\p0b0t2
drive=\\.\p0b0t3
robot=\\.\p0b0t4
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=worm
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/1
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/2
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
save=*.sav
The HP WORM/MO jukeboxes are available in all different configurations
with up to 12 drives and 238 disks. The robot is controlled through SCSI2.
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Supported jukeboxes
5.16 Hyundai HAS-550
Device type: hyundai
Windows NT
device=hyundai
drive=\\.\p0b0t1
robot=\\.\p0b0t4
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=hyundai
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/1
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
save=*.sav
The Hyundai HAS-550 has the device type hyundai and a mail slot. This
jukebox has an interesting design where the drive at the same time works
as a transporter.
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JVC MC-* CDROM Library
5.17 JVC MC-* CDROM Library
Device type: jvc
Windows NT
device=jvc
drive=\\.\p0b0t0
drive=\\.\p0b0t1
drive=\\.\p0b0t2
robot=\\.\p0b0t4
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=jvc
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/0
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/1
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/2
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
save=*.sav
The JVC jukeboxes contain 200 or 600 CDs and can be fitted with 2 to 6
drives (4 reader and 2 recorder drives). The robot is controlled through
SCSI-2. CDs can be changed conveniently with the mail slot. The CDs are
placed in packs of 50 CDs.
The JVC jukeboxes can be fitted with recorders supported by iXOSJUKEMAN.
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Supported jukeboxes
5.18 Kodak 100/150 CD ADL 100/150
Device type: cdr100 bzw. mercury
When used with iXOS-JUKEMAN the Kodak jukeboxes are identical to the
NSM CDR 100 (ADL 100) or NSM Mercury (ADL 150).
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Kodak CDL 144
5.19 Kodak CDL 144
Device type: kodak_cdl
Windows NT
device=kodak_cdl
drive=\\.\p0b0t3
robot=\\.\p0b0t4
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=kodak_cdl
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
save=*.sav
The CD Library 144 jukebox can be fitted with 1 to 4 CD-ROM/CD-R
drives. The drives and packs of 18 CDs allow a flexible use of the jukebox. Between 108 and 162 CDs can be loaded. The doors can be locked
and a mail slot secured by a password keeps your data safe. The robot is
controlled through SCSI-2. The jukebox cannot be configured using the
Device Wizard on Windows NT.
Please note that the CDL 144 has been tested with firmware level 1.4b.
Proper operation with later firmware revisions is not granted. It is recommended to take out the cartridges when moving the jukebox, as the disks
are not locked in position and may fall out of the cartidges.
The CDL 144 can be fitted with recorders supported by iXOS-JUKEMAN.
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Supported jukeboxes
5.20 Kubik 240 CD Jukebox
Device type: kubik
Windows NT
device=kubik
drive=\\.\p0b0t3
drive=\\.\p0b0t4
drive=\\.\p0b0t5
drive=\\.\p0b0t6
robot=com1:
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=kubik
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/5
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6
robot=/dev/tty0
save=*.sav
In Kubik’s CDR240M 240 CDs are arranged in a flat roundabout. On the
back, four CD-ROM drives are ready to catch CDs that are ejected from
the carousel by four thin pushers in the middle of the carousel. An additional pusher throws CDs to a separate mail slot on the front. If you access a disk, the jukebox rotates the carousel until the CD reaches the position in front of the drive in which it must be inserted. Then the pusher
throws it into the drive, the drive inserts it, and you can access the data.
The robot is controlled by a serial line, so the device description file is
similar to a Mercury jukebox, but since each Kubik jukebox requires an
exclusive line, you do not need to specify a robot ID.
The Kubik has a separate mail slot so importing and exporting CDs is
similar to NSM’s Mercury. The difference is that it is not a tray; it’s simply
a slot that you open manually if it is unlocked and then close it manually.
Then a disk can be inserted or changed.
Note that for the Kubik jukebox cdadm insert and cdadm remove use
special strategies. If you do not specify a slot number or CD name, the
server chooses a slot with the goal of keeping the roundabout balanced.
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MDI CD 150
5.21 MDI CD 150
Device type: mercury
As related to iXOS-JUKEMAN, this jukebox is identical to the NSM Mercury.
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Supported jukeboxes
5.22 Nakamichi 7 CD MCD-1020
Device type: nakamichi or nec
Windows NT
device=nakamichi
drive=\\.\p0b0t2,0
save=nec.sav
UNIX
device=nakamichi
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/2,0
save=nec.sav
The small Nakamichi changer is a good choice for evaluating iXOSJUKEMAN in demo mode. Up to 7 disks can be inserted into this changer.
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Nakamichi 4 CD MJ-4.8s
5.23 Nakamichi 4 CD MJ-4.8s
Device type: nakamichi oder nec
device=nec
drive=\\.\p0b0t4,0
save=*.sav
device=nec
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4,0
save=*.sav
This 4 CD changer with an 8x drive, suitable as an internal device, is very
well suited as a fast device in a hierarchical jukebox system.
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5.24 Nakamichi MJ-5.16si
Device type: nakamichi
Windows NT
device=nakamichi
drive=\\.\p0b0t3,0
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=nakamichi
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3,0
save=*.sav
The Nakamichi MJ-5.16si is a 5 CD changer with a 16x drive.
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NSM 100 CD Jukebox
5.25 NSM 100 CD Jukebox
Device type: cdr100
Windows NT
device=cdr100
drive=\\.\p0b0t4
robot=com1:
robid=4
save=cdr100.sav
UNIX
device=cdr100
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
robot=/dev/ttya
robid=4
save=cdr100.sav
The CDR100 offers a capacity of 100 CDs and a high performance due to
its small size.
The devices are controlled efficiently by serial lines using a special protocol which allows up to 16 devices to be daisy-chained. The robot ID robid is a number between 0 and 15, so that up to 16 devices can be controlled by a single serial line.
Starting with version 2.1, you can combine the settings for the robot and
the robot ID using the syntax robot=<serial port>,<robid> which can be
used instead of two separate lines robot and robid. For example,
robot=com1:,4
bzw. robot=/dev/ttya,4
With the CDR100, use the same number for SCSI-ID and robot ID, especially if you have more than one (up to seven) devices. Refer to the
CDR100 manual for information about changing the robot ID.
The CDR100 has a single drive and no mail slot, so you cannot instruct
the server to export a disk to a mail slot. You change CDs by detaching
the jukebox, changing the CDs manually, closing the jukebox, attaching
the jukebox to the server, and calling:
cdadm testcd <device> <list>
which instructs the server to inspect the slots enumerated in <list>.
If you cannot detach the jukebox because you want to change CDs while
the file system is in use and you do not want to cause errors, use cdadm
insert and cdadm remove, to block user requests.
The cdadm insert <device> and cdadm remove <device> commands
instruct the server to free the drive in the jukebox, so you can open the
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door and change disks without impacting the clients. Clients do not receive errors, but they must wait for a response. As soon as you finish
changing the CDs, close the door and tell the server which CDs you
changed and to resume to normal operation. For example after you
blocked the jukebox using the command
cdadm insert <device>
and changed the CDs in slots 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8, call the command
cdadm testcd <device> 2-5,8
which instructs the server to inspect slots 2-5 and 8 and to resume normal
operation, including execution of all requests for the jukebox that were
blocked while you changed CDs. Be sure to change the CDs quickly so
users do not have to wait for responses longer than necessary.
The CDR100 can be fitted with recorders supported by iXOS-JUKEMAN.
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NSM 150 CD Mercury 20/31/40
5.26 NSM 150 CD Mercury 20/31/40
Device type: mercury
Windows NT
device=mercury
drive=\\.\p0b0t3
drive=\\.\p0b0t4
drive=\\.\p0b0t5
drive=\\.\p0b0t6
robot=com2:,0
save=mercury.sav
UNIX
device=mercury
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/5
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6
robot=/dev/ttyb,0
save=mercury.sav
iXOS-JUKEMAN fully uses the Mercury’s parallel capabilities and effectively servers 14 requests per minute for different CDs with a single Mercury. The four drives make it a good choice for archives in whicht high
throughput and fast response times to many client requests are key requirements.
The Mercury is simple to use. Its CD tray enables the server to import and
export CDs without mistakes, and three removeable magazines for 50
CDs each allow to quickly exchange 50 CDs, 100 CDs, or all 150 CDs.
The Mercury changer is controlled by a serial line with a capacity for up to
16 jukeboxes (even for mixed use with CDR100 jukeboxes on the same
line). Note that the front key must be locked to permit software control.
The order of drives in the device description file must be the same as the
order of the drive numbers (not the order of the SCSI IDs). On the back of
newer Mercury 31/40 (20) jukeboxes there are four (two) switches to set
the SCSI IDs. Older Mercury 31/40 models use IDs 3 to 6 corresponding
to drives 1 to 4; Mercury 20 models use IDs 3 and 4 for the two drives.
The first drive in the device description file must be drive 1 of the jukebox,
and so on.
Note that as of iXOS-JUKEMAN version 2.1 you can combine the two
lines for the serial line and the robot ID by using the syntax robot=<serial
port>,<robid>.
The tray simplifies import and export of CDs. To import a CD, call:
cdadm insert <device>
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and the jukebox opens the tray. Insert a CD and press any button or the
tray, and the jukebox closes the tray. The server inspects the new CD and
it appears in the server’s file system views. If you want to remove a CD,
call:
cdadm remove <device>
and the server moves a CD to the tray and opens it. The server preferably
removes an invalid CD. If you want to choose a particular CD, you can
specify its slot number or name in the default name format. For example,
cdadm remove device 25
causes the jukebox to remove the CD from slot 25, and
cdadm remove device x11r5
causes the jukebox to remove the CD named x11r5.
The Mercury can be fitted with recorders supported by iXOS-JUKEMAN.
Please note that the Mercury jukebox must be locked with the key switch
to operate with iXOS-JUKEMAN.
For Mercury jukeboxes with Plextor drives, iXOS-JUKEMAN version 2.2
supports an accelerated read in of CDs, known as “fast toc”.
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NSM 150 CD Mercury 20s/31s/40s
5.27 NSM 150 CD Mercury
20s/31s/40s
Device type: standard
Windows NT
device=standard
drive=\\.\p0b0t2
drive=\\.\p0b0t3
drive=\\.\p0b0t4
drive=\\.\p0b0t5
robot=\\.\p0b0t6
save=mercury.sav
UNIX
device=standard
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/2
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/5
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6
save=mercury.sav
These jukeboxes differ from the respective models without the trailing ‘s’
by using SCSI control instead of a serial line. Internally, however, the
SCSI commands are transformed to serial commands. The advantage of
these models is the pure SCSI connection; disadvantages include the
need for another free SCSI ID for the robot, and more importantly, the
throughput under high load can be worse than the serial models. This is
due to inherent problems of the transformation of SCSI commands into
serial commands.
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5.28 NSM Satellite (serial)
Device type: satellite
Windows NT
device=satellite
drive=\\.\p0b0t3
drive=\\.\p0b0t4
drive=\\.\p0b0t5
drive=\\.\p0b0t6
robot=com2:,0
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=satellite
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/5
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6
robot=ttyb,0
save=*.sav
The NSM Satellite combines the reliability of NSM jukeboxes with a
modular design. The Satellite has a capacity of 60 to 135 CDs and can be
fitted with up to four drives. It is not recommended to remove the packs
while the Satellite is running.
The drives allow a faster CD read in which is supported by iXOSJUKEMAN.
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Panasonic LF-J50/100/200 CD Jukebox
5.29 Panasonic LF-J50/100/200 CD
Jukebox
Device type: ps_lf_j
Windows NT
device=ps_lf_j
drive=\\.\p0b0t4
drive=\\.\p0b0t3
drive=\\.\p0b0t2
robot=\\.\p0b0t6
save=ps.sav
UNIX
device=ps_lf_j
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/2
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6
save=ps.sav
iXOS-JUKEMAN supports the Panasonic LF-J* jukeboxes with with double-head drives for CD-ROMs and 'Phase change' disks.
The drives can read CD-ROMs, and read and write Phase-Change disks.
Therefore, some peculiarities have to be kept in mind:
The “LUN mode” of the jukebox (DIP switch 5 on the back of the jukebox)
should be set to 1. This avoids the drives to appear twice.
The jukebox contains magazines for 10 disks each. Every magazine is
dedicated to either CD-ROMs or PDs. The CD-ROMs can be inserted and
removed in the usual way using the mail slot. The sensitive PDs should
not be removed from the jukebox.
The jukebox recognizes the magazines dedicated to PDs and does not
allow these disks to be inserted or removed using the mail slot.
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5.30 Pioneer 6 CD Changer
Device type: pioneer6
Windows NT
device=pioneer6
drive=\\.\p0b0t3
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=pioneer6
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3
save=*.sav
The Pioneer 6-pack has several variations, depending on the type of drive
used. DRM-602x, DRM-604x, and DRM-624x mainly differ in speed. The
changer is always invisible, and it has no separate address, so the device
description file does not specify a robot.
The changer has no mail slot, so importing and exporting CDs requires
the same commands you use for NSM’s CDR100. But instead of opening
and closing a door, your must press the MAGAZINE EJECT button, turn
one of the trays out of the magazine, and insert a CD with data side up
and label side down, put the magazine back into the changer, and then
issue the testcd command.
Use external termination if you experience SCSI problems with this
changer.
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Pioneer 18 CD Changer
5.31 Pioneer 18 CD Changer
Device type: pioneer18
Windows NT
device=pioneer18
drive=\\.\p0b0t3,0
robot=\\.\p0b0t3,1
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=pioneer18
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3,0
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3,1
save=*.sav
The DRM-1804x 18-CD changer uses three small 6-pack magazines. It
addresses the actual changer separately, so it must be specified in the
device description file. The changer is always LUN 1 of the drive.
CD import and export commands are the same as those for the Pioneer 6CD changer or the NSM CDR100.
Use external termination if you experience SCSI problems with this
changer.
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Supported jukeboxes
5.32 Pioneer 100 CD Jukebox
Device type: pioneer100
Windows NT
device=pioneer100
drive=\\.\p0b0t4
drive=\\.\p0b0t3
drive=\\.\p0b0t2
robot=\\.\p0b0t6
save=p100.sav
UNIX
device=pioneer100
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/2
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/0
save=p100.sav
This jukebox contains up to 100 CDs and two to four drives. One drive
can be a recorder (supported by iXOS-JUKEMAN) which occupies the
space of two readers, hence only two more readers are feasible in this
case.
The example configuration is a Pioneer DRM 1004X with 3 reader drives.
For a flawless disk change, keep the following in mind: If the DIP switches
3 and 4 are set to “OFF” (factory setting) the jukebox must be locked with
the key switch. If DIP switch 3 is set to “ON” and DIP switch 4 is set to
“OFF” the mail slot can be controlled by both SCSI commands and the
operating keys, independent of the key switch setting.
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Pioneer 500 CD Jukebox
5.33 Pioneer 500 CD Jukebox
Device type: pioneer500
Windows NT
device=pioneer500
drive=\\.\p0b0t2
drive=\\.\p0b0t3
drive=\\.\p0b0t4
drive=\\.\p0b0t5
robot=\\.\p0b0t6
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=pioneer500
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/2
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/5
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6
save=*.sav
The Pioneer DRM-5004x offers 4 drives and room for 500 CDs. Both the
robot and the drives are controlled by SCSI. So the drives can read data
while the changer is moving a CD through the large jukebox.
The jukebox has a virtual mail slot which is in fact a position of the
changer. Use
cdadm -f insert device
to move the changer halfway up and stop it. By specifying the -f switch
the command returns as soon as the jukebox door may be opened. (which
is, unfortunately, not so easy and requires some some power and/or skill).
The time-out for the disk-change is specified by the trayto parameter
(see “Server parameters” on page 123). Otherwise the jukebox resumes
normal operation. Insert a CD in the changer and close the door again.
iXOS-JUKEMAN waits for the door to be closed and moves the CD to an
empty slot. Afterwards, the accumulated file system requests queue is
worked off. As iXOS-JUKEMAN is monitoring the door status, there is no
need to issue the command
cdadm testcd device
to tell the server the CD change is finished.
Similarly, using the command
cdadm -f remove device
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a CD is exported with the changer. Open the door as soon as the command returns, remove the CD, and close the door to resume normal operation. You can also specify a slot number or CD name:
cdadm -f remove device x11r5
instructs the server to remove the CD named x11r5.
The DRM-5004x can be fitted with recorders supported by iXOSJUKEMAN.
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Plasmon D-Series
5.34 Plasmon D-Series
Device type: plasmond
Windows NT
device=plasmond
drive=\\.\p0b0t2
drive=\\.\p0b0t3
robot=\\.\p0b0t1
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=plasmond
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/2
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/1
save=*.sav
The Plasmon D-Series is available with room for 120, 240, or 480 slots for
CDs or PDs, and can have 2, 4, or 6 drives fitted. PDs cannot be changed
using the mail slot.
The magazines must be fitted in ascending order, so that at least magazine 1 must be fitted. It is recommended to fit all magazines.
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5.35 Plasmon 150 CD-Jukebox
Device type: standard
Windows NT
device=standard
drive=\\.\p0b0t2
drive=\\.\p0b0t3
drive=\\.\p0b0t4
drive=\\.\p0b0t5
robot=\\.\p0b0t6
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=standard
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/2
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/5
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6
save=*.sav
As related to iXOS-JUKEMAN the Plasmon CD150J is identical to the
NSM Mercury 40s/31s range of jukeboxes.
Please note that the key switch must be locked for a flawless operation
with iXOS-JUKEMAN.
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Plextor Megaplex oder PX-J2200 200 CD Jukebox
5.36 Plextor Megaplex oder PX-J2200
200 CD Jukebox
Device type: plextor200
Windows NT
device=plextor200
drive=\\.\p2b0t4
drive=\\.\p2b0t5
robot=\\.\p2b0t6
save=plextor.sav
UNIX
device=plextor200
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI2/4
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI2/5
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI2/6
save=plextor.sav
The Plextor Jukebox provides space for 200 CDs and is fitted with 2
reader drives. CD changes are performed similar to the NSM CDR 100.
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Supported jukeboxes
5.37 Smart and Friendly 7 CD CDJ
7004
Device type: nakamichi oder nec
As related to iXOS-JUKEMAN this changer is identical to the Nakamichi
MCD-1020.
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Smart and Friendly 4 CD CDJ 4008
5.38 Smart and Friendly 4 CD CDJ
4008
Device type: nakamichi oder nec
As related to iXOS-JUKEMAN this changer is identical to the Nakamichi
MJ-4.8s.
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5.39 Sony CDZ-R360 CD Jukebox
Device type: sony_cdz
Windows NT
device=sony_cdz
drive=\\.\p0b0t4,0
drive=\\.\p0b0t4,1
robot=\\.\p0b0t4,7
save=*.sav
UNIX
device=sony_cdz
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4,0
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4,1
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4,7
save=*.sav
The Sony CDZ-R360 maintains 360 CDs in a small jukebox with 2 drives.
The changer and drives use different LUNs of the same SCSI-ID, so you
can connect several jukeboxes to a single bus. The CDZ-R360 uses LUNs
0 and 1 for the drives and LUN 7 for the changer.
Similar to NSM’s CDR100 or the small Pioneer changers, the CDZ-R360
has no mail slot. For the CDR100, CDs are changed manually; the CDZR360 supports CD exchange with the changer. After you open the door,
the jukebox may move the first CD to the changer. Ignore this CD. Use the
three small black buttons on the right to set the number of the slot in
which you want to insert, export or change a disk. Press the larger Enter
button. If there is a CD in the slot you chose, the jukebox moves it to the
changer. Otherwise it frees the changer. Then you can remove the CD on
the changer or put a new one on it. Press the Enter button again. The
jukebox moves the new CD, if any, to the slot, and proceeds with the next
slot. You can change a CD there or choose a new number with the three
small black buttons. If you do not want to change more CDs, close the
door. The jukebox frees the changer automatically. Tell the server in
which slots CDs have changed by issuing the command
cdadm testcd <device>
for the slots involved.
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Sony-CDL-2?00-?? CD Jukeboxen
5.40 Sony-CDL-2?00-?? CD Jukeboxen
Device type: sony_cdl
Windows NT
device=sony_cdl
drive=\\.\p0b0t2
drive=\\.\p0b0t3
drive=\\.\p0b0t4
drive=\\.\p0b0t5
robot=\\.\p0b0t6
save=sony_cdl.sav
UNIX
device=sony_cdl
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/2
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/3
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/5
robot=/dev/iXOS_SCSI0/6
save=sony_cdl.sav
The Sony-CDL-2100 jukeboxes provide room for 125, the CDL-2200
models for 225 CDs. The jukeboxes can be fitted with up to four drives
(reader or recorder drives supported by iXOS-JUKEMAN).
The Sony-CDL-2* like the NSM Mercury or the Pioneer DRM 1004X have
a mail slot. The SONY-CDL-2* is controlled through SCSI and achieves
good CD change and access times.
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Supported jukeboxes
5.41 Standard-SCSI-2 jukeboxes
Device type: standard
iXOS-JUKEMAN supports all standard SCSI-2 jukeboxes with a mail slot.
The device description files are similar to the Plasmon jukebox (see page
200), but may vary in the number of drives. Most standard SCSI-2 jukeboxes can be fitted with recorders supported by iXOS-JUKEMAN (see
“Supported hardware” on page 16).
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Tower jukeboxes with no LUN support
5.42 Tower jukeboxes with no LUN
support
Device type: single
Windows NT
device=single
drive=\\.\p1b0t0
drive=\\.\p1b0t1
drive=\\.\p1b0t2
drive=\\.\p1b0t3
drive=\\.\p1b0t4
drive=\\.\p1b0t5
drive=\\.\p1b0t6
UNIX
device=single
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/0
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/1
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/2
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/3
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/4
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/5
drive=/dev/iXOS_SCSI1/6
For tower jukeboxes where each drive is addressed by its own SCSI ID,
the device type single is used. All drives must be listed.
CD changes can be performed with no interaction with the server (see
server parameters dcheck in “Server parameters” on page 123).
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5.43 Single drives
Device type: single
Windows NT
device=single
drive=\\.\p0b0t4
UNIX
device=single
drive=dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4
iXOS-JUKEMAN supports single drives. They are treated as small and
simple jukeboxes.
Several single drives can be listed in one device description file.
CD changes can be performed manually without interacting with the
server. The server will check these drives for disk changes periodically
(see server parameter dcheck in “Server parameters” on page 123).
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Disk images on hard disk
5.44 Disk images on hard disk
Device type: image
Windows NT
device=image
drive=D:\fakedisk.iso
UNIX
device=image
drive=/fakedisk.iso
Instead of real CD drives you can also use ISO 9660 formatted hard disk
images of CDs (see also "iso9660" on page 136). If the file
D:\fakedisk.iso or /fakedisk.iso is an ISO 9660 formatted disk
image, it can be accessed with the above device description file. The file
system of the image appears as a subdirectory in the file system of iXOSJUKEMAN, as if it was a real CD in a real drive. Using this method you
can set up small and fast CD servers running on hard disks only. For example with 20 CDs containing 200 MB each, you can set up a server by
copying the CDs on a 4 GB hard disk and adding lines in the format format
drive=<abbild>
below
device=image
in the device description file.
A convenient way to copy CDs to hard disk is the program cdglow.
Example:
cdglow -s \\.\p0b0t4 -t D:\images\fakedisk.iso -T
or
cdglow -s /dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4 -t /images/fakedisk.iso -T
This will copy the CD in the drive with SCSI ID 4 on the first SCSI bus to
the specified file.
On Windows NT even more CDs can be copied to hard disk if you use the
transparent compression feature of NT. Mit NTFS you can compress a file
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Supported jukeboxes
or a whole directory tree transparently. To do this, create a directory such
as \images on an NTFS partition, and compress it with the file manager.
All images created in this directory will be compressed automatically.
Another way to create ISO 9660 files is to use the formatting program
iso9660. See “iso9660” on page 136.
Thus, hard disk images and transparent compression can be used to set
up cost-effective and fast CD servers. Used in combination with jukeboxes
the overall performance can be increased if the most frequently accessed
disks are replicated as hard disk images.
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Other jukeboxes
5.45 Other jukeboxes
iXOS is continually adding new features and support for new jukebox
types. Send mail to support@europe.jukeman.com to get an updated
list of supported devices.
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Command line index
6 Command line index
6.1 Introduction
The following pages contain brief descriptions of the commands that can
be passed to the program cdadm.
Note:
For reasons of clarity the optional paramter “-h <hostname>” is
left out on the following pages. Using this parameter, the iXOSJUKEMAN server can be administered from any host where the
administration client cdadm is installed. See section “Network
administration” on page 96.
If you want to...
use this command:
attach a device to the server
cdadm attach
215
detach a device from the server
cdadm detach
218
query server parameters
cdadm getpar
219
set server parameters
cdadm setpar
228
insert disks into a device
cdadm insert
220
move disks to a drive
cdadm movecd
223
print out surveys
cdadm survey
229
remove disks from a device
cdadm remove
226
rename disks
cdadm rename
175
test, if the server is running
cdadm null
224
test certain slots for disks
cdadm testcd
233
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page
213
Command line index
If you want to...
use this command:
use the incremental file system
cdadm writer
182
log messages
cdadm logmsg
222
214
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Command line index
cdadm attach <device> [-d <drive> ]
attach
Function:
Attach the specified device (or drive) to the server. The effect of this
command is that the device and its volumes are controlled by iXOSJUKEMAN. The device (or drive) cannot be accessed unless it is attached.
The parameter <device> represents a valid device description file in the
JUKEMAN directory. These files have the extension .dev. The extension
may be omitted in the command.
If the optional parameter -d <drive> is specified, a drive locked dynamically with cdadm detach -d… will be attached again. <drive> is the logical drive number.
To attach a device automatically when the server starts up, add it to the
file server.cfg (see “Configuration file server.cfg” on page 237).
Example:
cdadm attach p18.dev
cdadm attach p18
(equivalent)
Error messages:
Error message
Meaning
attach p18: No device description file
*error* -1
Device description file not found.
attach p18: name in use
*error* -1
Device already attached.
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Command line index
cdadm byebye
byebye
Function:
Terminate the iXOS-JUKEMAN demon cdnfsd. The server will stop and
accept no further requests. The server can be restarted by running
cdstart.bat (under NT) or cdnfsd (under UNIX) (see “Starting iXOSJUKEMAN” on page 87).
Example:
cdadm byebye
cdadm down
(Synonym)
Error messages:
Error message
Meaning
RPC failed: cannot connect to
server
*error* -3
Service not running
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Command line index
cdadm cvtree
cvtree
Function:
Rescan the configurable volume tree (views). This can be useful when
views are changed in the server.cfg configuration file (see
“Configuration file server.cfg” on page 237). The server does not need to
be restarted, to reflect changes to the views configuration.
Example:
cdadm cvtree
Error messages:
-
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Command line index
cdadm detach <device> [-d <drive> ]
detach
Function:
Detach the specified device (or drive) from the server. The device and its
volumes are no longer controlled by iXOS-JUKEMAN. The device (or
drive) cannot be accessed until it is attached again.
The parameter <device> represents a valid device description file in the
JUKEMAN directory. These files have the extension .dev. The extension
may be omitted in the command.
If the optional parameter -d <drive> is specified, the drive with the logical
number <drive> will be locked dynamically, while the server is running.
This locked drive will not be used for any further file requests to the
server. However, it is possible to move disks into this drive with cdadm
movecd… and to remove disks from this drive (e. g., to use the drive for
writing disks).
Example:
cdadm detach p18.dev
cdadm detach p18
(equivalent)
Error messages:
Error message
Meaning
No such device
*error* 19
Device is not attached or does not
exist.
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Command line index
cdadm getpar <key>
getpar
Function:
Get the value of the server parameter <key>. Refer to the section “Server
parameters” on page 245 for a list of all parameters. Server parameters
may be set in the configuration file server.cfg or with the cdadm setpar command. Note that some parameters cannot be changed while the
server is running. See “Static parameters” on page 126.
Example:
cdadm getpar loglev
Error messages:
Error message
Meaning
No parameter "xyz" available
*error* -1
No or wrong <key> parameter
given.
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Command line index
cdadm insert [-f] <device> [<list>]
cdadm import [-f] <device> [<list>]
insert
import
Function:
Insert a disk into the specified device.
The parameter <device> represents a valid device description file in the
JUKEMAN directory. These files have the extension .dev. The extension
may be omitted in the command.
The optional <list> parameter may be used to specify any number and
selection of slots. The following syntax is used to specify a variety of slots:
7
slot 7
3,6,40
slots 3, 6 and 40
3-7
slots 3 through 7
2,20-45 slots 2 and slots 20 through 45
(no specification): all slots available.
The specified slots will be scanned for empty slots and a single volume
can be inserted into the first found empty slot. If there are no free slots,
you will get an error message.
Note that for some devices like single drives and towers there is a dynamic drive check to detect disk changes (see server parameter dcheck
in section “Server parameters” on page 123). You do not need to issue
this command if you want to insert disks into these devices.
The optional -f switch can be used with the Pioneer DRM-500 and the
Grundig GMS 1035. Using this switch, the command will return as soon as
the door may be opened for a disk to be inserted. This is to prevent you
from opening the jukebox door too early. If the switch is not specified, the
command will wait, until the disk changes is finished.
Example:
cdadm insert merc 4-12
Error messages:
Error message
Meaning
No such device
*error* 19
Specified device does not exist or
is not attached.
No good slot found
*error* -1
No empty slot in specified range.
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Command line index
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Command line index
cdadm logmsg <level> <message>
logmsg
Function:
Add <message> to the file logfile.txt. The <level> parameter is the
log level of the message. The log file is described in "Log file logfile.txt"
on page 249. If <level> goes beyond the parameter loglev, the message
will not be logged.
Example:
cdadm logmsg 5 This goes to logfile.txt
Error messages:
-
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Command line index
cdadm movecd <device> <drive> [<slot>]
movecd
Function:
Move a disk from <slot> to <drive> or remove a disk from <drive>. This
command will especially be useful, if you want to move a certain (writable)
disk into a recorder drive to burn data on it.
The parameter <device> represents a valid device description file in the
JUKEMAN directory. These files have the extension .dev. The extension
may be omitted in the command.
The <drive> parameter is a number between 1 and the total number of
drives in a jukebox (e.g., 4 in a Mercury jukebox).
If the <slot> parameter is specified, the disk from that slot will be moved
into the specified drive. If <slot> is omitted or specified as 0, the disk currently placed in drive <drive> will be removed from that drive (to its previous slot).
Example:
cdadm movecd merc.dev 2 8
Error messages:
Error message
Meaning
No such device
*error* 19
Specified device does not exist or
is not attached.
testing.dev no slot 55
*error* -1
Specified slot number is not valid.
Not that many drives
*error* -1
Specified drive number is not valid.
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Command line index
cdadm null
null
Function:
Check if the server is active. If the server is active, there is no result. An
error message will be produced if the server is not running.
Example:
cdadm null
Error messages:
Error message
Meaning
RPC failed: cannot connect to
server
*error* -3
Server not running.
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Command line index
cdadm rename [[-<nf>] <old> [<new>]]
rename
Function:
Rename a disk in the name format <nf>. There are three possible name
formats (see also “Set up views” on page 67):
pc
rr
hs
PC format (8.3)
Rock Ridge extensions
High Sierra format
If no name format is supplied, the disk name will be changed for all name
formats that match the old name specified.
A single disk may have a different name for each name format. The name
format that is visible to the client is set in the server.cfg configuration
file (see “Configuration file server.cfg” on page 237).
The <old> parameter is the current name of the disk in the given name
format.
The <new> parameter is the new name of the disk. This parameter must
not be an already existing name from the volumes database. If it is omitted, the <old> name will be removed from the database, provided that the
disk is not in use.
If cdadm rename is called without any parameters, all unused volume
names will be removed from the database. These names can then be assigned to other volumes (see also “Rename disks” on page 119).
Example:
cdadm rename -pc demo.cd1 office.cd1
cdadm rename
(removes unused volume names from the database)
Error messages:
Error message
Meaning
Volume is active
*error* -1
You tried to remove a name of a
disk that is in use.
No such name
*error* -1
<old> name not known to iXOSJUKEMAN.
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Command line index
cdadm remove [-f] <device> [<list>]
cdadm export [-f] <device> [<list>]
remove
export
Function:
Remove a volume from the specified device.
The parameter <device> represents a valid device description file in the
JUKEMAN directory. These files have the extension .dev. The extension
may be omitted in the command.
The optional <list> parameter may be used to specify any number and
selection of slots. The following syntax is used to specify a variety of slots:
7
slot 7
3,6,40
slots 3, 6 and 40
3-7
slots 3 through 7
2,20-45 slots 2 and slots 20 through 45
(no specification): all slots available.
(As an alternative for the slot number, a disk name may be specified.)
The slot range will be scanned for occupied slots and a single volume will
be removed from the first found occupied slot. If there are no occupied
slots, you will get an error message.
Note that for some devices like single drives and towers there is a dynamic drive check to detect disk changes (see server parameter dcheck
in section “Server parameters” on page 123). You do not need to issue
this command if you want to remove disks from these devices.
The optional -f switch can be used with the Pioneer DRM-500 and the
Grundig GMS 1035. Using this switch, the command will return as soon as
the door may be opened for a disk to be removed. This is to prevent you
from opening the jukebox door too early. If the switch is not specified, the
command will wait, until the disk change is finished.
Example:
cdadm remove merc 2,5,6
Error messages:
Error message
Meaning
No such device
*error* 19
Specified device does not exist or
is not attached.
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Command line index
cdadm rescan <device>
rescan
Function:
Reinitializes the internal memory of the jukebox, which stores information
about which slot or drive contains which disk. This command is needed for
some jukeboxes, if disks were changed manually. The jukebox would not
know about these changes and could damage itself as it tries to move a
disk in a slot which is presumed empty. The other way around the jukebox
will not move disks into a drive if the slot is presumed empty according to
the internal memory.
Execution of this command can take quite some time, since by default all
slots are tested (e. g., about one hour for the Pioneer 5004 X), Alternatively, iXOS-JUKEMAN version 2.2 allows a partial rescan for the Pioneer
1004 X and 5004 X as well as the JVC MC-* and DISK CD CHG-* jukeboxes with the command “cdadm testcd”, e. g., cdadm testcd
pi500.dev 1-20. Please note, that the server parameter blanks (s.
Seite 123) must be set to 0 to guarantee these test are actually done.
However, the command “cdadm testcd” applied to all slots of the jukebox should not be mistaken as a substitute for cdadm rescan: A rescan
refers to the internal memory of the jukebox, whereas a testcd refers to
the internal volumes database of the server.
The parameter <device> represents a valid device description file in the
JUKEMAN directory. These files have the extension .dev. The extension
may be omitted in the command.
Example:
cdadm rescan jb.dev
Error messages:
Error message
Meaning
No such device
*error* 19
Specified device does not exist or
is not attached.
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Command line index
cdadm setpar <key> <value>
setpar
Function:
Set the server parameter <key> to <value>. Refer to the section “Server
parameters” on page 245 for a list of all parameters. Server parameters
also may be set in the configuration file server.cfg. Note that some parameters cannot be changed while the server is running. See “Static parameters” on page 126.
Example:
cdadm setpar loglev 2
Error messages:
Error message
Meaning
No parameter "xyz" available
*error* -1
Wrong <key> parameter given.
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Command line index
cdadm survey <surveytype> <columns> [<restrict>]
[<sortby>]
survey
Function:
Print a survey based on devices, disks, or drives, depending on several
parameters, which specify the columns, restrictions and sort criterion.
The following options may be specified:
<surveytype> Meaning
-d
Survey based on devices
-v
Survey based on disks
-n
Survey based on the volumes database
-s
Survey based on the slots
-r
Survey based on the drives
<columns>
Print out...
General:
+d
+n
+s
+i
device names of attached devices
Total number of slots of a device
Slot number
inode number in volumes database
Disks:
+m
+R
type of disk media (CD-ROM, HD image...)
'r', if a recorder is necessary to read, 'a' otherwise
+a
'@', if the disk is in a drive, '-' otherwise
+u
'+', if the disk can be accessed, '-' otherwise
+U
+S
+I
time of last access to disk in seconds since 1970
size of the disk, including free space (in kBytes)
file system implementation (e. g., iso, hfs, ifs, ixw)
+v
+Y
file system specific informationen
'rw', if the disk is writable, 'r' otherwise
Names:
+o
+r
original disk name
disk name in Rock Ridge format (rr)
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Command line index
<columns>
Print out...
+p
disk name in PC format (pc)
+h
disk name in High Sierra format (hs)
*
IFS :
+B
+W
+w
+F
+f
+T
amount of buffered data for a volume
amount of data (physically) written to the disk
W+B (total amount of data for a disk)
S-W (free space on physical disk)
S-w (free space for further data)
number of written tracks for a disk
Statistics:
+D
amount of data (MBytes) read from a disk
+-D
like +D, but set all values to zero afterwards
+P
+-P
number of operations on a disk, i. e. read accesses with
max. block size of 64kB
like +P, but set all values to zero afterwards
+M
+-M
number of movements of a volume into a drive
like +M, but set all values to zero afterwards
Drives:
+n
+v
+p
+i
+t
+r
SCSI address (path) of drive or file name for images
vendor string
product ID
logical drive number
drive type (0=hard disk, 4=CD recorder, 5=CD-ROM,
7=opt. drive, 8=jukebox)
'r', if drive is a recorder, '-' otherwise
+f
'f', if drive is defective or missing, '-' otherwise
+u
'u', if drive is locked dynamically, '-' otherwise
*
IFS = Incremental File System. Sizes in kBytes (1024 bytes).
Possible combinations:
cdadm survey -d +dnRDPMr
cdadm survey -v +dsimRauUSIvYorphBWwFfTDPMf
cdadm survey -s +dsimRauUSIvYorphBWwFfTDPMf
cdadm survey -n +iuUIYorphDPM
cdadm survey -r +dnvpitrfu
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Command line index
Note:
Any <column> name may be preceeded with :<char> to get
quoted output for that parameter, where <char> is a single character. For instance cdadm survey -d +:'d lists all attached
devices, where the device names will be quoted ('dev1.dev',
'dev2.dev'...).
<restrict>:
This optional parameter may be used to limit the survey output to entries
specified in the format:
<column>=<value> (print all lines where <columns> is <value>)
<column>!<name> (print all lines where <columns> is not <value>)
Example:
cdadm survey -v +do m=HD-image
This command will print a disk-based survey with device names and original disk names for all disks with the type HD-image.
<sortby>:
This optional parameter may be used to sort the output by one or more
columns:
s:[-]<columns>
The optional - reverses the sort order.
Example:
cdadm survey -v +do m=HD-image s:dB
´This command will print a list of all hard disk images sorted by name and
size of buffered data.
Example:
cdadm survey -d +d
print a list of all attached devices
cdadm survey -n +oPDM u=+ s:o print disk names and statistics.
Output is limited to accessible
disks (u=+) and sorted by original disk names (s:o)
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Command line index
Error messages:
Error message
Meaning
usage: cdadm survey -d|-v|-s +..
*error* -1
Wrong <reporttype>.
illegal column name x
*error* -1
column name x does not
exist (see <columns> table)
or is not allowed in conjunction with <reporttype>.
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Command line index
cdadm testcd <device> <list>
testcd
Function:
Test one or more slots of an attached device for their contents. Disks inserted manually will not be seen by the server, unless their corresponding
slots are tested with this command. Depending on the jukebox type a rescan needs to be accomplished beforehand (see page 227).
The parameter <device> represents a valid device description file in the
JUKEMAN directory. These files have the extension .dev. The extension
may be omitted in the command.
The optional <list> parameter may be used to specify any number and
selection of slots. The following syntax is used to specify a variety of slots:
7
slot 7
3,6,40
slots 3, 6 and 40
3-7
slots 3 through 7
2,20-45 slots 2 and slots 20 through 45
Example:
cdadm testcd merc.dev 4,5,10-20
Error messages:
Error message
Meaning
No such device
*error* 19
Specified device does not exist or
is not attached.
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Command line index
cdadm writer …
writer…
Function:
The "cdadm writer..." commands access the incremental file system.
A detailed description can be found in the section “Burning disks incrementally” on page 151.
format
(1)cdadm writer action=format location=<location>
Format a PD/MO disk or a hard disk image. This may take some time.
init
(2) cdadm writer [fsi=ifs] action=init location=<location>
vname=<volume>
Initialize a writable disk. This command creates a recordable file system on the specified disk. Two small tracks will be written for initialization. One more track will be written for initialization. Therefore, up to
96 tracks can be written to a CD-R, since it is limited to 99 Tracks. For
PDs, WORMs, MOs and hard disk images there is no such limitation.
The software will currently not check the space needed for the final table of contents track. Enough space must be left for successful finalization.
flush
(3) cdadm writer action=flush vname=<volume>
Actually write all buffered data to the specifies disk.
verify
(4) cdadm writer action=verify [track=<number>]
If track=... is not specified, the last written track will be verified, otherwise the track with number <number>. If track=all is specified, all
tracks will be verified.
purge
(5) cdadm writer action=purge vname=<volume>
Purge all buffered data for the disk <volume>.
finalize
(6) cdadm writer action=finalize vname=<volume>
Finalize a disk with an incremental file system. All buffered data must
be flushed from the buffer to the disk with a cdadm writer flush
command before it can be finalized.
<location> is in the format <device>,<slot>, where <device> is the name
of a valid device description file and <slot> is the slot number.
In addition the parameter speed=1, speed=2 or speed=3 can be specified to select the writing speed (default: double speed). The parameter
ring=<size> selects the ring buffer size used for writing (default: 4 MB).
Example:
cdadm writer action=init location=jb.dev,4 vname=CDR_01
cdadm writer action=flush vname=CDR_01
cdadm writer action=verify vname=CDR_01
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Command line index
cdadm writer action=finalize vname=CDR_01
Error messages:
Error message
Meaning
no vname ?
*error* -1
<volume> name is missing.
illegal action type
*error* -1
Specified action not allowed.
no vname burning
*error* -1
Wrong disk name or missing
<location>.
bad location
*error* -1
Invalid <location>. Maybe the slot is
missing..
p_wrfs(): bad init track
*error* -1
Disk has not been initialized.
trec_init() fails
*error* -1
Disk could not be initialized.
trec_reserve() fails
*error* -1
Track reservation did not succeed.
cannot flush corrupted volume
*error* -1
Buffered data could not be written
to disk.
cannot finish track
*error* -1
Track could not be finished (disk
could be corrupt)
incomplete track
*error* -1
Incomplete Track.
cannot read PVD from track 2
*error* -1
Primary Volume Descriptor could
not be read.
cannot start track 1
*error* -1
Track could not be started.
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Configuration file server.cfg
7 Configuration file server.cfg
7.1 Introduction
The main configuration file for iXOS-JUKEMAN is server.cfg. It contains sections for file system views, devices, server parameters, buffer
and cache sizes, and comments. The file lives in the JUKEMAN directory.
If this file does not exist under UNIX, you can create an example configuration file (see “UNIX” on page 25).
Each section of this file has a name. Following this name is a block of parameters in curly brackets { ... }. This block contains named parameters, with their values again given in curly brackets. These values can be
other parameters or defined values.
Example:
devices { list { jb1 jb2 }
jb1 { startup { automatic } }
jb2 { startup { manual }
}
This example defines the section devices. It contains 3 parameters
(list, jb1, and jb2). The parameter list contains the values jb1 and
jb2 (in this case two devices, which start-up behavior is to be defined in
the following lines). The parameter jb1 and jb2 both contain a parameter
startup, specifying the start-up behavior. For jb1, startup has the
value automatic, i. e. the device jb1 will be attached automatically
when the server is started. jb2 must be attached manually.
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Configuration file server.cfg
7.2 The structure of server.cfg
This is a sample server.cfg file:
drive { W }
views {
list { find_easy views_pc views_rr }
roots {
find_easy {
views {
list { a_m n_z some }
roots {
some {
format { rr }
This section defines 3 views:
deny { micros*}
discs { *}
views_rr, views_pc, and find_easy
}
(page 239)
n_z {
discs { [n-z]* }
}
a_m {
discs { [a-m]* }
}
}
}
discs { *}
}
views_pc {
discs { *}
}
views_rr {
drive { Y }
format { rr }
label { UNIX }
}
}
}
devices {
list { testing HardDisk Device1 }
Devices
testing { startup { automatic } }
HardDisk { startup { automatic } }
(page 242)
Device1 { startup { manual } }
}
parameters {
Server parameters
dcheck { 300 }
loglev { 1 }
(page 245)
}
fsbuffer {
file { fsbuffer }
IFS buffer for incr. writing
size { 40 }
(page 243)
inodes { 10000 }
}
dircache {
Directory cache
file { dircache }
size { 40 }
(page 245)
}
regcache {
Data cache
file { regcache }
size { 40 }
(page 245)
}
comment {
Comments (page 246)
This is just a short comment
}
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Configuration file server.cfg
7.2.1 Views
This section defines a tree of views (see “Set up views” on page 67). The
views are enclosed in the following structure in server.cfg:
[drive { <letter> }]
views {
list { <view_1> <view_2> ... <view_n> }
roots {
<view_1> { ... }
<view_2> { ... }
...
<view_n> { ... }
}
}
The views section may be preceeded by drive { <letter> }. All the
views definded in server.cfg will be available as subdirectories of this
drive letter <letter> (e. g., X) under Windows NT. The drive letter is ignored under UNIX.
The list section lists the names of any number of views (<view_1> to
<view_n>), The roots section gives a definition for each view of the
list section. The definition is a selection of the following parameters:
Parameter
Value
format
Name format (pc, rr, hs). If not specified, the name format will be inherited from the superordinate view. The default name format is pc.
discs
Visible disks (* for all). See “Table 4 - ” on page 69.
deny
Excluded disks. See “Table 4 - ” on page 69.
drive
Drive letter under Windows NT (will be ignored under UNIX). If not
specified, the view will not be assigned a drive letter.
label
Label for the drive letter under Windows NT (Default: JUKEMAN, ignored under UNIX). May contain octal escape sequences like “\040” for
a space.
raw
The raw { 1 } parameter selects a view format in which all disks are
represented through the raw file system. You do not see the directories
and files of the disks, but the full disk as a large file. The directory
structure is explained in “Raw filesystem” on page 240.
If a view is not to contain disks but subviews, its definition is another
views section. In the next example, the view overview contains a number of subviews:
views {
list { overview }
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Configuration file server.cfg
roots {
overview {
[drive { <letter> }]
views {
list { <subview_1> ... <subview_n> }
roots {
<subview_1> { ... }
...
<subview_n> { ... }
}
}
}
}
}
Another Example:
drive { Z }
views {
list { x y } roots {
x { drive { X } discs { * } label { ALLDISCS } }
y { drive { Y } views {
list { a_m n_z } roots {
a_m { discs { [a-m]* } }
n_z { discs { [n_z]* } }
}
}
}
}
The example above presents all disks under x, some under y/a_m and
some under /y/n_z.
x and y are available as NT drives X: and Y:. Z: contains X: and Y:.
X: is labeled “ALLDISCS”, other drives have the default label “JUKEMAN”.
Under UNIX, presented directories are /, /x, /y, /y/a_m, /y/n_z.
Note, that you must create empty directories /x, /y, /y/a_m, /y/n_z
and export them to see the disks after an appropriate NFS mount command on port 4027 (see “Intregrate iXOS-JUKEMAN into the network” on
page 77).
Raw filesystem
In the raw file system, each is disk is represented through the following
directory structure:
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Configuration file server.cfg
The tracks directory contains audio data of our experimental audio file
system, which is tested for Plextor drives only and is not a component of
iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2. For more information see medium\readme.txt.
The volume directory contains several views on the disk data:
1. For read access in the cached directory the data cache will be used
(see “The data cache” on page 40). Write access, however, will be
done directly on the SCSI device or hard disk image.
2. In the direct directory all write and read accesses will be done directly on the SCSI device or hard disk image.
The files stupid and clever in the cached/direct directories both
contain all data of a disk in a large file:
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Configuration file server.cfg
File
stupid
clever
Meaning
Allows read and write access to the disc blocks. Used and unused block will not be distinguished.
The raw file system will perform a more distinct error handling
for clever files.
It tries to read each block separately. Upon read failure, it
asks the volume’s underlying file system for unused blocks. If
all unreadable blocks turn out to be unused, the raw file system succeeds and delivers zero bytes. In case of write failure
on a clever file, the raw file system pretends success if all unwritable blocks are either unused or do already contain exactly the data that the user tried to write.
This is useful for backups of iXOS-JUKEMAN’s WORM file
system, since it makes the write calls idempotent, and simplifies recovery after a crash during update of a backup through
the raw file system.
The raw file system can be used, for example, to easily make ISO images
on hard disk or to copy disks.
7.2.2 Devices
This section of server.cfg specifies, whether devices will be attached
automatically at server start (setting automatic) or manually (setting
manual). Devices that are not listed will not be attached. It is not required, to list all devices in this section, as they can always be attached
manually with “cdadm attach <device>” (page 215). Each entry <xyz>
presupposes a corresponding file <xyz>.dev in the JUKEMAN directory.
The GUI on Windows NT expects all devices to be listed in this section.
This is to keep in mind when making changes to server.cfg manually.
Example:
devices {
list
{ p18 mercury device3 }
p18
{ startup { automatic } }
mercury { startup { manual } }
device3 { startup { automatic } }
}
This example defines 3 devices (p18, mercury, device3). The device
names are listed in the list { } section. The following lines specify the
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start-up behavior of the devices. Both p18 and device3 will be attached
automatically when the server is started. mercury has to be attached
manually.
7.2.3 Caches and buffers
Caches and buffers may be configured in the following sections. All file
sizes are in MBytes. See “Set up caches and buffers” on page 36 for a
detailed description.
IFS (incremental file system)
This is a buffer that temporarily holds data copied to wirtable disks with
operating system commands. To actually burn the buffered data to the
disk a “cdadm writer flush” command must be issued. The incremental file system is described in “Burning disks incrementally” on page
151.
Example:
fsbuffer {
file { fsbuffer }
size { 100 }
inodes { 10000 }
}
The example defines a buffer of 40 MB. The file name of the buffer is
fsbuffer. The maximum number of inodes (i. e., the number of files and
directories that can be stored in the buffer) is 10,000.
IFS with several independent buffers
iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2, in addition to setting up an IFS with one buffer, allows setting up several independent buffers. You select one of these buffers when you initialize a disk.
The section for these buffers is ifs { … }. The parameter list { }
specifies the names of all buffers (buffer names may be up to 15 characters). In the buffers section, the properties for each buffer are defined.
The following parameters may be specified:
Parameter
Value
file
Contains the name of the buffer file or partition. Under UNIX a partition
may be specified as a buffer (raw{1}). For a partition, specify the
block device not the character device.
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Configuration file server.cfg
size
Buffer size in MBytes.
inodes
Maximum number of files and directories that can be stored in the
buffer.
volumes
Maximum number of disks for this buffer.
bsize
Optional. Specifies the buffer block size (default: 2048 Bytes).
raw
Optional. If the value specified for file is a partition the parameter
raw { 1 } must be added to the buffer definition.
For example, to set up two buffers replace the fsbuffer { }section
with the following section in server.cfg:
ifs {
list { small_buffer big_buffer }
buffers {
small_buffer {
file { small.buf }
size { 40 }
inodes { 10000 }
volumes { 20 }
}
big_buffer {
file { big.buf }
size { 800 }
inodes { 300000 }
volumes { 400 }
}
}
}
The example defines two buffers: small_buffer (40 MB) for up to 20
disks and 10,000 files/directories and big_buffer (800 MB) for up to
400 disks and 300,000 files/directories. When initializing a disk the corresponding buffer is specified in the following fashion:
cdadm writer fsi=ifs buffer=small_buffer action=init
location=jb.dev,5 vname=CDR_007
or
cdadm writer fsi=ifs buffer=big_buffer action=init
location=jb.dev,5 vname=CDR_007
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Configuration file server.cfg
Directory cache
This cache stores the directory names of the disks known to iXOSJUKEMAN. See “The directory cache” on page 36 for a detailed description.
Example:
dircache {
file { dircache }
size { 40 }
}
The example sets up a directory cache of 40 MB. The file name of the
cache is dircache.
If the line “file { dircache }” is omitted, the RAM cache size will be
changed.
Data cache
This cache stores data read from the disks controlled by iXOS-JUKEMAN.
See “The data cache” on page 40 for a detailed description.
Example:
regcache {
file { regcache }
size { 40 }
}
This example sets up a data cache of 40 MB. The file name of the cache
is regcache.
If the line “file { regcache }” is omitted, the RAM cache size will be
changed.
7.2.4 Server parameters
The following server parameters may be set in server.cfg:
(See “Server parameters” on page 123 for a full description of the parameters)
Name
Unit
Default
Min. Max.
Function
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Configuration file server.cfg
Name
Default
Min. Max.
Function
autodc
1
0
2
Caching behavior
blanks
0
0
2
CD type assumption/test
cdnfsp
100003
0
99999999
Program ID of NFS service
0
999999
Periodic drive checking
dcheck
Unit
1/100 Sec. 300
fullvn
0
0
1
PC name format (8.3 or 32)
hfsiso
1
0
1
Hybrid CDs: 0=HFS, 1=ISO
ignore
0
0
1
Lock server, ignore requests
iotimeo seconds
jobnum
60
0
3600
Time-out for failed disk read
192
9
8192
Number of queue entries
loglev
4
0
9
Level of log messages
lwords
5
0
9
Internal log messages level
maxcvt
1000
10
65536
Number of nodes for views
maxthr
40
12
1024
Maximale Anzahl Threads
mdelay
3
0
99
Delay for disk changes
mountp
20000234
0
99999999
Program ID of mount service
nonfsd
0
0
1
Startup behav. of NFS server
portno
4027
1
65536
UDP port number
rahead
3
0
1000
Number of chunks read ahead
reject
1
0
2
Reject of incomplete disks
131072
8192
16777216
Data block size for caches
0
0
1
Log message buffering
rtrack
Bytes
synclm
trayto
seconds
60
0
99999999
Delay for mail slot close
waitpm
seconds
0
0
3600
Wait delay for portmapper
Example:
parameters {
dcheck { 300 }
loglev { 3 }
}
This example sets the dcheck server parameter to 300 and the log level
loglev to 3 when the server starts up.
7.2.5 Comments
This section contains any comments and remarks that you wish to put in
the server.cfg file. Everything in this section will be ignored when the
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configuration file is read in by the server. Note that the comment itself
must not contain a “}” .
Example:
comment {
I'm just a comment.
I will be ignored.
You know at the end.
That life has been short.
}
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Log file logfile.txt
8 Log file logfile.txt
Normally, reading the file logfile.txt should not be necessary for purposes other than personal interest in internal server affairs. Tracing errors
is also a reason the file should be consulted for. If you send us error reports by fax or email, please always include the relevant parts of the log
file.
All messages of the server go to the log file in the JUKEMAN directory.
These messages have different levels: low levels for important messages,
higher levels for less important messages. The server parameter loglev
is a limit that keeps messages with a higher level than this limit out of the
log file.
• The lowest level 0 which covers all starting and stopping errors as well
as hardware errors that crash the server.
• Levels 1 and 2 are for hardware error messages.
• Level 3 is for starting and stopping messages of devices.
• Level 4 is for new disks.
• Level 5 is for disk changes and other different events.
• Levels 6, 7, 8, and 9 are for error tracing only: You can use these levels, but they are far too complex to be described here in detail.
The default log level 4. Most messages up to this level and some messages from level 5 are easily comprehensible. This is a typical log message:
3 3/29:1137:310 @ 2 \\.\p0b0t5 is YAMAHA's CD-drive CDR400c
The first number is the log level. This message is about attaching a drive
which is important enough for level 3.
The next number is the time in the following format:
month/date:HourMinute:SecondTenthsecond.
(months: 1-9 january-september, O=october, N=november, D=december)
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Log file logfile.txt
The next symbol specifies the type of process that issued the command.
The process symbols are:
@
controls a drive. It actually reads the data requested by clients.
%
controls a changer. For simple jukeboxes it may also control the
drive.
?
accepts NFS requests and replies immediately or queues them.
$
accepts internal requests to support the native file system of the
NT version.
#
schedules the requests from ? and $ and passes them to % and @.
&
creates and terminates the threads @ and % upon request of #.
-
is a @ or % process during asynchronous task processing.
~
is a portmapper which is started if the operating system does not
run a portmapper (see the description of the waitpm server parameter, page 123).
^
monitors manual disk changes in single drives and towers (see
the description of the dcheck server parameter, page 123).
=
accepts cdadm requests via TCP/IP.
After the process type, a digit or letter may follow. Non-trivial requests that
cannot be satisfied quickly from cache are assigned these digits or letters
cyclically. This simplifies the task of tracing a single user request through
the large file of a busy server. A blank indicates that no specific request
caused the action. Finally, there is the individual log message. This may,
for example, report that a specific piece of hardware was detected, or that
the server found a disk. Disk names are reported in rr and pc format.
A large class of messages are SCSI error reports:
2 3/27:0329:349 @ 7 \\.\p0b0t5: 28
00
00
00
02
9b
00
00
01
1 3/27:0329:349 @ 7 SCSI-Error in 28 - READ (10)
1 3/27:0329:349 @ 7 status=2 sense=3 - MEDIUM ERROR
1 3/27:0329:350 @ 7 ascode 0x14 0x00 - BLOCK NOT FOUND
2 3/27:0329:355 @ 7 ReRead(0x14d800+0x800) got after 1 fault
2 3/27:0329:355 @ 7 red after 2 attempts from x11r5
Here the server reports an error that ocurred during a SCSI READ command on a disk. The first line reports the complete SCSI command: Ten
bytes that were sent to the drive. The next line reports the command key,
28 hexadecimal, with the SCSI command name, the 10-byte version of the
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Log file logfile.txt
SCSI READ command. The next line reports the SCSI status and sense
key together with the meaning of the sense key. The next line shows the
additional sense code reported by the drive and its explanation as given
in the vendors SCSI manual or in the SCSI standard. If the hardware
failed, this explanation should point out which part of it failed and why.
The last two lines are not part of the standard SCSI error message; they
report that the server retried the READ command and got the requested
data in the second attempt from a disk called x11r5. 0x14d800+0x800
means the server tried to read 0x800 (2 KB) bytes at disk offset
0x14d800.
Relocate the log file
If you want to maintain the log file somewhere else than the JUKEMAN
directory, enter the following section in the file server.cfg:
logfile {
file { <path + file name of the log file> }
}
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9 FAQ/Troubleshooting
9.1 Frequently asked questions
(FAQ)
This is a summary of frequently asked questions about the iXOSJUKEMAN server.
9.2 iXOS-JUKEMAN Server
I connected a new jukebox to my PC and new drive letters appeared.
Why did this happen?
At startup time, NT inspects the hardware for devices which could represent file systems. For instance a normal (internal) CD drive fits perfectly
well in this scheme. For SCSI devices, the type (according to the SCSI
standard) is checked in this process, but unfortunately some devices don't
respond properly to this request (for instance the Yamaha CDR 100 pretends to be a WORM drive). In the absence of jukeman, all devices capable of containing a file system would be displayed for instance in the file
manager.
Since using a CD drive directly as well as through jukeman might yield
unexpected results in some rare circumstances, and some customers
would moreover like to connect a larger number of drives than can be
covered by drive letters, jukeman can override this standard behavior described in the preceding paragraph in two ways.
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1. If you chose to attach the corresponding device automatically on server
startup (in server.cfg either by direct editing or via the GUI), then the
JUKEMAN server does the necessary changes in the NT system to hide
the drive letters during the next reboot. Please note that this takes effect
only after a second reboot, since only then this changes get visible to the
operating system!
In case that you change the startup mode again, or if the server isn't able
to connect to the devices (which might be switched off for instance), the
so called claim established by the automatic attach will disappear again
after the second reboot.
2. If you want to get rid of the direct access by drive letters permanently,
you have the choice to use the registry editor regedt32.
In
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE
|
--SYSTEM
|
--CurrentControlSet
|
--Services
genscsi
claims
you may add entries for each drive you want to get rid of.
Say for instance that (after rebooting with the connected devices) our
command scsidevs yields among others an output line like
0000008 \\.\p2b0t2,0 is TOSHIBA's CD-drive “CD-ROM XM-3501TA”
and you want to hide this drive.
Then choose “Add value...” from the Edit menu and input as value the target id, where the first four characters are skipped, i.e. p2b0t2,0 in our example.
Data type should be REG_DWORD and the corresponding value, which
must be supplied after OK should be 2 (with hex radix, which is the default).
You should then see an entry like
p2b0t2,0:REG_DWORD:0x2
in the right part of the window afterwards.
Please note:Using this option is a very powerful and thus dangerous action. You will most probably forget what you did in some weeks time, and
this will give you (not to mention other users) a very hard time if you try to
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connect another device, say a hard disk, to the claimed address, since
you won't be able to use it until you remove the claim.
So you should very carefully consider what your intents are, and at least
leave a note and inform your friendly local system administrator, if you
choose to use this option.
Why can't my jukebox distinguish between bad CDs and empty
slots?
Why are empty CD recordables labelled as bad CDs or not even recognized?
Most unfortunately some jukeboxes and/or their drives are not capable of
distinguishing between empty slots and bad CDs, hence iXOS jukeman
can't either there. In other words: This is a problem of your hardware, not
of our software.
Likewise, the treatment of an empty CD recordable depends on the type
of CD drive or writer you are using. Some drives label them as bad CD,
some don't even acknowledge that there is a CD.
What does the logfile message 'CANNOT GET FH: 13 - Permission
denied' mean?
This message occurs if the directory, which is created to mount on the client computers, is not exported. This means, in fact, that you didn't read
the manual carefully enough. Please refer to section 'Setup file system
views' in the manual for further details.
NFS mount on Solaris 2.5 or Dec UNIX
To mount the iXOS-JUKEMAN file system on Solaris 2.5, IRIX 6.* or Dec
UNIX workstations an additional option is useful. The option is
vers=2
Example:
mount -F nfs -o port=4027,soft,retrans=14,timeo=99,vers=2 machine_name:/views/rr /mount_point
The reason is that the NFS daemon of iXOS-JUKEMAN uses NFS protocol version 2, not the newer NFS protocol version 3 on these operating
systems. Please note, that omitting this option will lead to negotiations
between the NFS client and our server resulting in version 2 anyway.
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Why do I get weird SCSI errors, in particular data transfer overrun
messages with reference to a command “[0x8 ...]” on the console of
Solaris workstations?
Why do I get I/O Errors when I try to read a non root directory of a CD
on Solaris?
Both errors are due to problems with the Solaris Volume Management
daemon, vold. It is by default configured to control all CD drives, including
those which are controlled by iXOS-JUKEMAN.
When, upon a file system request, the jukebox inserts a CD into the drive,
vold detects the change and tries to automatically mount the CD - not a
bad idea. Unfortunately, Sun thinks all discs containing file systems, including CDs, have 512 Byte blocks, and therefore computes too many
blocks for read commands (0x8 is the hexadecimal operation code of a
SCSI read command).
For example, if Solaris wants to read 64 KBytes from CD, a normal CD
drive with 2048 Byte blocks must deliver 32 blocks. Sun computes that 64
KBytes are 128 Blocks and asks for them. The drive replies by sending
128 Blocks - which are 256 KBytes. Of course they do not fit into the 64
KByte buffer - therefore the error message is quite reasonable. Having
detected that the CD is not mountable, vold tries to get rid of it and instructs the drive to eject the CD. The drive does it, and iXOS-JUKEMAN
can no longer access the CD. Typically it was able to read the root directory (because this was faster than the failed mount), but then the CD is
ejected, and iXOS-JUKEMAN cannot read anymore.
The solution depends on how brute you are. These are your options:
1. Kill vold (most brute, works immediately)
2. Delete /etc/vold.conf (prohibits that vold starts during boot)
3. Delete the line describing all CD drives from /etc/vold.conf (this is the
line starting with “use cdrom...”, normally placed just after the comment
line “# Devices to use”
4. Edit this line so that it does not describe CDs in jukeboxes.
The last option requires that you look closely to the device names
and pathes and detect which device represents which CD drive.
Windows95 clients and slow jukeboxes
If you have lots of Windows95 clients clients competing for CDs in a slow
jukebox, the LanManager Client may time out.
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You can increase the client time-out by increasing the registry value
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CURRENTCONTROLSET\
SERVICES\LANMANWORKSTATION\PARAMETERS\SessTimeOut
for each client.
The default is 45 (seconds). 300 is reasonable for slow jukeboxes.
How to restrict access to the JUKEMAN filesystem for certain hosts?
The restriction of the access to the JUKEMAN filesystem can be done with
an option at the export of the filesystem. Such an option defines a list of
hosts, which can mount the exported filesystem. But it is necessary to include the 'localhost' in the hosts list.
Example for Solaris 2.4:
The file /etc/dfs/dfstab can contain the following line:
share -F nfs -o rw=localhost:host2:host3:host4 /views/pc
License codes: unlimited and limited
Without a license code the iXOS-JUKEMAN server runs in demo mode,
which means that after 2 hours the jukebox daemon has to be restarted
and only the first 5 CD slots in a jukebox can be seen in the JUKEMAN
filesystem.
The demo mode of the writer software allows you to burn 128MB on CDRs. Copying disks to hard disk images is not restricted.
To have no such restrictions you need a license code, which consists of 8
lower case letters.
There are two possibilities:
- Test license code, which expires on a certain date
- Full license code (see the software distributor list for ordering)
On UNIX platforms the license code is bound to the hostid. On Windows
NT the license code is either bound to the IP address or to the network
adapater card address.
Solaris: /usr/ucb/hostid
AIX: /bin/uname -m
HP-UX: /bin/uname -i
IRIX: /sbin/sysinfo -s
DEC UNIX: /sbin/ifconfig ln0
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NT: Either the IP address in the result of ipconfig or the network adapter
address, which can be determined by the last entry of the “Workstation
active on” line of the result of 'net config workstation'
The host identifier(s) appear as wells at the top of the logfile logfile.txt
in lines with the format “Your key for a licence order:”.
For testing purposes, temporary licenses for a reasonable number of CDs
may be obtained by contacting support@usa.jukeman.com or directly from
www.jukeman.com.
A server license is also bound to a certain amount of CDs one server
controls. Also, one iXOS-JUKEMAN server installation can control several
jukeboxes at once and so the total amount of CDs in all jukeboxes can be
taken for licensing.
For the server software the license code has to be inserted in the file
'server.lic'. Example:
version=2
volumes=700
license=abcdefgh
If you got a test license code, the file 'server.lic' must also contain the expiration date. Example:
version=2
volumes=360
timeout=1996/09/30
license=abcdefgh
A license code for the writer software has to be inserted in file 'writer.lic'.
Example:
version=2
writer
license=ijklmnop
Example for test license:
version=2
writer
timeout=1996/09/30
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license=ijklmnop
NFS server plus iXOS-JUKEMAN (NT)
In iXOS-JUKEMAN a NFS server is integrated. To use another NFS
server for exporting filesystems on harddisk and the jukeman filesystem,
some configuration has to be done, because both compete for several
ressources:
- port 2049 (default for NFS services)
- port 111 for the portmapper
- anouncement as NFS service
To tell iXOS-JUKEMAN not to start the own NFS service, the file
'server.cfg' has to contain the following parameters:
parameters {
portno=4027
waitpm=300
nonfsd=1
}
portno=4027 sets an alternative port for the internal communication of
iXOS-JUKEMAN. nonfsd=1 causes iXOS-JUKEMAN not to register itself
as NFS service.
waitpm=300 causes iXOS-JUKEMAN to try 5 minutes an inquiry for another portmapper at port 111.
PC-NFS and mount of iXOS-JUKEMAN (UNIX) filesystem
PC-NFS Pro Version 1.0 and 2.0 does not have the possibility to mount a
filesystem over a different port than default (2049). If iXOS-JUKEMAN is
installed on a UNIX server, per default port 4027 is used to distinguish
NFS requests for the UNIX mount daemon and for iXOS-JUKEMAN.
Because it is not possible to set the port number with PC-NFS Pro, the
only way to mount the jukebox filesystem is to set the port 2049 for iXOSJUKEMAN NFS as parameter in file 'server.cfg'. But then the UNIX mount
daemon cannot be used furthermore.
PC-NFS 5.1 for Windows 3.1 and WfW 3.11 has a port number option
and therefore it can be used to mount the jukeman filesystem over port
4027, for instance.
command:
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net use y: hostname:/views/pc /port=4027 /ro
JUKEMAN does not work properly. What shall I do?
As a general rule, you should first check this manual and the manual of
your jukebox to ensure that your setup is o.k.
A good starting point for your investigations is to reboot the host jukeman
runs on, while the jukebox(es) you plan to use are properly connected and
powered up. At least you should restart the server.
The most useful mean for troubleshooting is the log file, logfile.txt, which
you will find in the installation directory, or, more precisely, in the directory
where the cdnfsd program resides. Check it out when an error occurs.
Refer to section “Log messages” in the manual for details on reading the
logfile.
Roughly one can distinguish three types of problems:
1. The server does not start up correctly
2. A device can not be attached
3. You can't access a CD.
Startup problems
Make sure that you don't attach any devices automatically by editing the
server.cfg file either directly or via the GUI.
Check by means of the control panel that the services iXOS Admin Server
and iXOS Jukebox Daemon as well as the devices iXOS generic SCSI
driver and iXOS Jukebox File System have been installed and started.
Another means of information might be the event log, in particular for
hardware problems. If our command scsidevs does not show any SCS devices, you most probably encounter hardware problems.
You should check by an appropriate ps (ps -aux or ps -efl should do), that
no cdnfsd is already running. Note that cdnfsd must either be started by
root or must be suid.
Attaching problems
Attaching problems are almost always due to an incorrect device file.
Check first that you chose the right device type. For each SCSI id listed
as drive you should verify by our command inquiry that you can actually
reach it. A typical output should be anything like
inquiry \\.\p2b0t2,0
0000002 \\.\p2b0t2,0 is TOSHIBA's CD-drive “CD-ROM XM-3501TA”
0000003 ProRevL 1875, Firmware 07/06/95
If you encounter a “Can't open” error, you should use our command
scsidevs to get a list of all known SCSI devices.
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inquiry /dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4,0
0000002 /dev/iXOS_SCSI0/4,0 is TOSHIBA's CD-drive "CD-ROM XM3501TA"
0000003 ProRevL 1875, Firmware 07/06/95
If you encounter a “Bad file number” error, you should check for known
devices by
inquiry /dev/iXOS_SCSI?/*
Alternatively you may try to attach a drive in a jukebox as a single device
to check if this drive is alright.
The same procedure as for drives applies to SCSI changers/robots as
well, except that you can't use them as single drives of course.
If your jukebox has a changer which is adressed by a serial line, you
should check for logfile errors of type either
tty_open(xxx) - No such file or directory
or in case of NSM jukeboxes
nsm_recv(): got 0 bytes garbage:
which are caused by an incorrect robot line in the device file.
Please make as well sure for NSM jukeboxes that the robid is correct check their manual for the details.
You should check the manual of your jukebox as well to ensure that the
order of drives in the device file corresponds exactly to the ordering which
the changer has in mind. This is a common cause of problem, and sometimes the manual are not very valuable in this respect.
If you changed CDs in the jukebox manually or nothing else helps, you
should stop the server, delete the save file of the corresponding jukebox
and start the server again. This will cause the jukebox to rescan all slots.
9.3 Problems with CDs
A CD is labelled as bad CD, although it can be read perfectly well on
other CD drives
In most cases this is due to the fact that you exceeded the number of CDs
given in your licence file. All excess CDs simply can not be addressed by
jukeman.
Moreover any CD not which does not comply to the iso9660 standard or
its extensions Rock Ridge or Joliet is labelled as bad CD as well.
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Note, however, that some instances of bad CD tags are due to the fact
that not all jukeboxes adhere the convention that the CD is inserted label
up into the slots.
The testcd takes very long
This is again a problem of your hardware. Some CD drives and recorders
need much time to read a CD or to detect that it is empty. iXOS jukeman
assumes that it is much better for you to wait a little till you eventually can
read the CD than to return that it is a bad CD (what we can't know beforehand).
9.4 iXOS-JUKEMAN Writer
Error message: BUFFER UNDERRUN
If you are not sure about the qualities of your hardware, you should first
simulate the burning by using cdglow's -p option. This option simulates
the writing as closely as possible, meaning that the only missing action is
the real burning on the CD. If you get a buffer underrun error in this mode,
you should either lower the speed of the recorder by means of the -f options, allocate a larger buffer by means of the -b option, or try to convert
or save the source to one large file on a hard disk and try again with this
file as source.
Please note that the version 2.0 of cdglow for AIX 4.* did not account for a
slight change in the implementation of the plock subroutine, which caused
problems like failing memory locks are an ever growing size of the cdglow
process. These problems have been solved in version 2.1, so please upgrade to this version.
9.5 General
How can I get support for iXOS jukeman?
If you have tried everything which was listed under section “JUKEMAN
does not work properly. What shall I do?” without success, you can contact us either at support@ixos.de, Tel. +49 46005-0 or FAX +49 46005-
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199 for customers outside of the US or Canada, or at jukesupport@belmont.ixos.com, Tel. 415-294-5800, FAX 415-294-5836.
Please be prepared to supply the following information: Hardware platform, operating system and version, iXOS jukeman version (can for instance be obtained from the first line in the logfile), the contents of the
logfile.txt and of server.cfg and all devices which cause problems.
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Glossar
10 Glossar
API
Application Programming Interface: a set of routines, protocols, and tools
for building software applications.
CLI
Command Line Interface, a program that will accept and execute typed in
commands. See also “Conventions” on page 12.
Client
A program that runs locally on a host and exchanges data with a server
program.
Gerätebeschreibungsdatei
here: A file specifying the properties of a device (e. g., a jukebox) controlled by iXOS-JUKEMAN. The file contains the device type, the drives
and the slots to be used. The extension of these files is .dev and they
are located in the JUKEMAN directory.
GUI
Graphical User Interface. A program interface that takes advantage of the
computer's graphics capabilities to make the program easier to use. Welldesigned graphical user interfaces can free the user from learning complex command languages. See also “Conventions” on page 12.
High Sierra
File format for à ISO 9660-conforming CD-ROMs.
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Glossar
IFS
Incremental File System. A procedure used by iXOS-JUKEMAN to write
optical disks trackwise. Using the IFS files can be copied, moved, or deleted from disks in the usual way.
Inode
An inode is a data structure storing file properties. Each file has an inode,
describing properties such as the physical position of the file on a disk. By
default an inode occupies 2048 bytes.
ISO 9660
A file system standard, defining the hierarchical directory structure for CDROMs definiert (also known as High Sierra agreement). ISO stands for
International Standard Organisation.
Joliet
File system format based on à ISO 9660. The Joliet format offers special
extensions such as Unicode.
JUKEMAN-directory
The directory in which iXOS-JUKEMAN is installed.
LUN
Logical Unit Number: A subunit of a SCSI ID. A SCSI ID can have up to 8
LUNs.
MO
Magneto-Optical: Rewriteable magneto-optical disk.
NFS
Network File System: Developed by Sun to allow computers to access
files over a network as if they were on local disks; now public domain, a
de-facto standard. iXOS-JUKEMAN supports NFS protocol version 2.
PD
Phase change Dual: Optical rewritable disk.
Roboter
here: A mechanism moving the disks of a jukebox to the drives.
Rock Ridge
File system extensions based on ISO 9660 to represent UNIX file names
in ISO 9660. These extension can also contains file owner and permissions.
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SCSI
Small Computers System Interface: SCSI is a parallel interface ANSI
standard for attaching peripheral devices to computers.
SCSI-ID
Unique ID of a SCSI device.
WORM
Write Once, Read Many: Writeable optical disk that can be written once.
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Glossar
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Index
11 Index
[
[option] 12
<
<parameter> 12
A
administration client (GUI)
start 87
attach 215
attach at server start (devices
dialog) 62
attach automatically 102, 242
attach button 98
autodc 123
Autorun-Feature 23
available as drive (views dialog) 73
B
blanks 123
buffer 36, 243
IFS 44
incremental file system 243
purge 234
write to disk 234
Burning disks 132
CLI 141
byebye 216
C
cache 36, 243
for data 40, 245
for directories 36, 245
caching 13
CD see disk
cdadm
index 213
cdadm attach 215
cdadm byebye 216
cdadm cvtree 217
cdadm detach 218
cdadm export 226
cdadm getpar 219
cdadm -h (network administration)
97
cdadm import 220
cdadm insert 119, 220
cdadm logmsg 222
cdadm movecd 121, 223
cdadm null 224
cdadm remove 119, 226
cdadm rename 119, 225
cdadm rescan 227
cdadm setpar 228
cdadm survey 108, 229
cdadm testcd 122, 233
cdadm writer 234
cdglow (Writing software) 133
cdnfsp 126
CLI 12
clients
Macintosh 83
NFS 81
Windows 80
command line 213
comments 246
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269
Index
contains views (views dialog) 72
contains volumes (views dialog) 72
contents dialog 112
conventions 12
cvtree 217
D
data cache 40, 245
data cache set-up
CLI 43
GUI 42
dcheck 126
demo mode 31
detach 218
detach button 100
device
add 91
attach
E
Excluded volumes (Views-Dialog)
73
export 226
F
CLI 99
GUI 98
attach automatically 102
detach
CLI 101
GUI 100
remove
CLI 93
GUI 92
server.cfg 242
type 53
device description file 53
device set-up 48
CLI 65
GUI 60
device wizard (devices dialog) 60
directory cache 36, 245
directory cache set-up
CLI 39
GUI 38
disc
invisible (deny) 239
visible 239
disk 12
finalize 234
formatting 234
initializing 234
insert/remove (CLI) 119
insert/remove (GUI) 114
manage (CLI) 118
manage (GUI) 112
move (GUI) 115
270
rename (CLI) 119
rename (GUI) 113
rescan (GUI) 115
test (CLI) 122
test (GUI) 115
verify 234
Disk sets 68
double sided (devices dialog) 62
drive
set-up 54
drive letter 239
FAQ 253
file system 13
finalize 234
finalize disk 234
flush 234
format 234
formatting disks 234
fullvn 124
G
getpar 219
GUI 12
start 87
H
hfsiso 124
High Sierra format (hs) 68
host ID 31
I
IFS buffer 44
IFS buffer set-up
CLI 47
IFS buffer setup
GUI 46
ignore 124
import 220
incremental file system
buffer 243
iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
Index
purge buffer 234
verify tracks 234
write to disk 234
incremental writing 234
init 234
initializing disks 234
Inkrementelles Filesystem 151
insert 220
installation 21
UNIX 25
Windows NT 23
iotimo 124
iso9660 136
J
jobnum 126
Joliet-Format 136
jukebox
add 91
attach
CLI 99
GUI 98
attach automatically 102
detach
CLI 101
GUI 100
device type 53
overview 17, 163
remove
CLI 93
GUI 92
set-up 48
jukebox set-up
CLI 65
GUI 60
M
Macintosh clients 83
Major Version Number 34
maxcvt 126
maxthr 126
mdelay 124
Medien brennen
GUI 147
Medien inkrementell beschreiben
151
CLI 158
GUI 156
menu
[Configuration]- Buffers and
Caches 38
[Configuration]-Buffers and
Caches 42, 46, 130
[Configuration]-File System Views
72
[Configuration]-Volumes 116
[Devices]-Contents 112
[Devices]-New... 60
[Service]-License Keys 34
[Service]-Select Host 96
menus 88
Menü
[Write]-Single Track At Once 147
MO see disk
mountp 127
movecd 223
N
L
label for drive letter 239
license key set-up
CLI 35
GUI 34
license keys
enter 31
log file 249
loglev 124
logmsg 222
lwords 124
network administration
CLI 97
GUI 96
network integration 77
newsgroups 9
NFS clients 81
nonfsd 127
null 224
O
operating systems 22
P
parameters (server) 123
PC format (pc) 67
iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
271
Index
PD see disk
portno 127
purge 234
R
rahead 125
raw file system 240
recorder
overview 18
reject 125
remove 226
remove button 92
rename 225
reports 229
rescan 227
robot
set-up 56
Rock Ridge format (rr) 68
RPC failed: cannot connect to
server 216, 224
rtrack 127
S
samba 83
SCSI
devices 48
SCSI driver 14, 16
serial line (robot) 52
server 14
server parameters 123, 245
change (CLI) 131
change(GUI) 130
server start
UNIX 90
Windows NT 87
server.cfg 237
cache/buffer 243
comments 246
data cache 245
devices 242
dircache 39
directory cache 245
fsbuffer 47
incremental file system buffer
243
regcache 43
server parameters 245
several IFS buffer 243
272
views 75, 239
server.lic 31
set up license keys 31
setpar 228
set-up 29
slot
set-up 55
sort
survey output 231
start
administration client (GUI) 87
server (UNIX) 90
server (Windows NT) 87
statistics 104
CLI 108
GUI 105
survey 229
syncclm 127
system requirements 22
T
test license 32
testcd 233
time-out license 32
trayto 125
U
use only these slots (devices dialog)
62
V
verify 234
views 13
in server.cfg 239
name format 67
set-up 67
views set-up
CLI 75
GUI 72
visible volumes (views dialog) 73
volumes database
delete disk names (CLI) 119
delete disk names (GUI) 116
volumes dialog 116
W
waitpm 127
iXOS-JUKEMAN 2.2 User Manual Pre.12/97
Index
Windows 95 24
Windows clients 80
WORM see disk
WORM-Filesystem 160
writable file system 14
writer 14, 16, 234
writer.lic 31
WWW address 9
X
x000325 (disk name) 118
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