Siemens IP-Module Product manual

SIMATIC S5
IP 266
Positioning Module
Manual
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
STEP ® SINEC ® and SIMATIC ® are registered trademarks of
Siemens AG.
Subject to change without prior notice.
The reproduction, transmission or use of this document or
its contents is not permitted without express written
authority. Offenders will be liable for damages. All rights,
including rights created by patent grant or registration of a
utility model or design, are reserved.
Copyright© Siemens AG 1991
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
System Overview
Technical Description of the IP 266
Installation Guidelines
Fundamentals of Positioning
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Fundamentals of COM 266
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
Start-Up
STEP 5 Programming
Troubleshooting
Keyword Index
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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Preface
Introduction
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
IP 266
Preface
Preface
The IP 266 is a powerful intelligent I/O "positioning" module that was developed
specially for installation in the S5-100U programmable controller. The IP 266
makes it possible to operate servomotors via power electronics equipment. The
IP 266 can be used in conjunction with the following CPUs:
•
•
•
CPU 100 (6ES5 100-8MA02 only)
CPU 102 (without restriction)
CPU 103 (without restriction)
The IP 266 provides numerous functions for both open-loop and closed-loop
positioning. These functions are described in detail in the section entitled Modes.
The IP 266 provides modes for
•
•
•
positioning
coordinate shift and
correction (compensation)
All modes can be used both separately and as a consequence of individual
functions in machining programs.
The complex open-loop and closed-loop procedures which a standard programmable controller must perform in order to carry out a positioning task
require a great deal of processor time.
The IP 266 can considerably reduce the amount of processor time needed because
it takes over the entire positioning process.
Your control program can thus execute in parallel with the positioning
procedure.
Sequences of motions involving several axes are made possible by the use of
additional IP 266 modules.
Sequencing control can be implemented via the IP 266's digital inputs and
outputs.
Because this module can be installed only in an S5-100U programmable
controller, it has been assumed that the reader is well acquainted with the
S5-100U product manual. The fundamentals of STEP 5 programming are not a
topic of discussion in this manual.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
v
IP 266
Introduction
Introduction
The information presented below is aimed at simplifying use of the manual.
Contents
The contents of the manual can be subdivided into topical categories:
•
Hardware description
Section 1 ("System Overview") and Section 2 ("Technical Description") provide information on the components of the positioning system and their
integration in the S5-100U System.
In addition to explanatory texts on connecting peripherals such as
- screen-based programmers
- encoders and
- power electronics equipment
you will also find detailed information on the connector pin assignments for
the various interfaces and the locations of these interfaces on the IP 266
module.
•
Installation guidelines
All information relevant to system installation can be found in Section 3
("Installation Guidelines"). This includes:
- safety guidelines
- shielding
- switch installation
- module installation and removal procedures
•
Fundamentals of positioning
Section 4 provides information on positioning options within the SIMATIC
system, the principles of positioning and the IP 266's position control
facilities. This section also defines terms such as setpoint, actual value and
following error and the interrelation of acceleration, speed and path.
•
Machine data, modes and traversing programs
The data which the IP 266 needs in order to carry out the positioning process
is discussed in detail in Section 5.
This section also provides information on all modes, how they work, and the
parameters they require.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
vii
Introduction
•
IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
This section provides information on how to
- make a back-up copy of the COM 266 floppy
- install COM 266 and
- use COM 266.
It also includes a full description of all COM 266 screen forms.
•
Communication between the CPU and the IP 266
Defined addressing message frames are used for data interchange over the
bus interface. You must know how to use these message frames when you
want to control the IP 266 via a STEP 5 program (see Section 7).
Examples are presented in Section 9 ("STEP 5 Programming") to show you
how to link and process these message frames in STEP 5 programs.
•
Start-up
This section describes the procedures for installing and starting the IP 266.
The information presented in this section is based on that presented in
Sections 5 and 6.
•
STEP 5 programming (Section 9)
This section uses examples to show you how to use the message frames
discussed in Section 7.
•
Troubleshooting
This section tells you what to do when problems arise. It also provides a list of
errors and information on how they can be rectified.
viii
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Introduction
Training courses
Siemens offers an extensive range of training courses for the SIMATIC STEP 5
system.
For details, please contact your local Siemens branch office.
Reference literature
This manual deals primarily with the IP 266 positioning module. Other components of the SIMATIC S5 system are mentioned only briefly.
Detailed information on these components can be found in the following
literature:
•
Programming Primer for the SIMATIC S5-100U
Practical exercises on the PG 615 programmer
Siemens AG, Berlin and Munich, 1988
Contents:
- Configuration and installation of the S5-100U
- Introduction to programming on the PG 615 programmer
Order No.: ISBN 3-8009-1500-6
•
Programmable Controllers
Volume 1: Logic and Sequence Control Systems; from the
Control Task to the Control Program
Günter Wellenreuther, Dieter Zastrow
Braunschweig 1987
Contents:
- Operating principles of a programmable controller
- Theory of control technology using the STEP 5 programming language for
the SIMATIC S5 programmable controllers
Order No.:
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
ISBN
3-528-04464-0
ix
Introduction
•
IP 266
Electronic Feed Drives for Machine Tools
Hans Groß
Order No.:
ISBN
3-8009-1338-0
Conventions
To improve readability, the manual has been broken down into menus, i. e.:
•
•
•
•
Each section has a thumb index.
At the beginning of the manual you will find an overview of section headers.
Each section is preceded by a detailed breakdown of its contents.
Each section has a three-level breakdown. Headers in bold type are used for
further subdivisioning.
Pages, figures and tables are numbered separately in each section. A list of
the tables and figures in each section can be found on the flip side of the
breakdown for that section.
Certain forms of expression have been used in the manual with which you should
become acquainted before continuing.
•
•
•
•
x
Characteristic abbreviations have been used for a number of terms. Each
abbreviation is explained in detail the first time it appears in the manual.
Example: Programmable controller (PLC)
Cross-references are shown as follows: ("see Section 4.3.2)" refers you to
Section 4.3.2.
There are no page references.
An arrow ( ) is used to indicate an action you must take.
The response to an action is designated by the symbol .
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
•
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Introduction
Information of particular importance is flanked by two gray bars. A key word
or phrase in the upper bar indicates the type of information involved.
Note:
Additional information; emphazises a special feature or characteristic.
CAUTION:
Precautions which must be taken to prevent damage to hardware or software.
WARNING!
Failure to observe these precautionary measures may result in personal injury.
Product manuals always relate to the most recent version of a product. Should
modifications or supplements become necessary in the course of time, an
addendum is published which is then included in the next edition of the manual.
The manual release is shown on the title page, and is incremented by one each
time the manual is revised.
xi
IP 266
•
Introduction
Remarks Form
The Remarks Form is provided for your comments and suggestions.
Conventions
The following conventions are used in this book and are listed for your reference.
Convention
Definition
Example
A box that indicates a type
of hazard,describes its
implications, and tells you
how to avoid the hazard is
safety notation. Some safety
notation includes a graphic
symbol representing an
electrical or radio-frequency
hazard. All safety notation has
one of the following levels of
caution:
•
Indicates that loss of life,
severe personal injury, or
substantial property damage
will result if proper precautions are not taken.
•
Indicates that loss of life,
severe personal injury, or
substantial property damage
can result if proper precautions are not taken.
•
Indicates that minor
personal injury or property
damage can result if proper
precautions are not taken.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
xiii
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1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
System Overview
1.1
Application
..............................1
. 2
1.2
Axis Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. -
3
1.3
Installing the IP 266 in a Simatic S5 System . . .
1 -
6
1.4
Operator Servicing Options (PLC and PG)
and Their Priorities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 -
7
Technical Description of the IP 266
Installation Guidelines
Fundamentals of Positioning
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Fundamentals of COM 266
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
Start-Up
STEP 5 Programming
Troubleshooting
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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Figures
1-1.
1-2.
1-3.
1-4.
1-1.
Positioning with Three Axes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
. Linear Axis with Range Limit Switches
(not to scale) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . The IP 266 in a SIMATIC S5 System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Principle of Job Order Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 -
Axis Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. .2
4
6
7
Tables
3
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
1
System Overview
System Overview
The IP 266 intelligent I/O module adds yet another powerful positioning unit to
the already wide range of S5-100U programmable controller modules. The IP 266
can position drives with exceptional accuracy. Once the programmable controller's CPU has started a job, it is no longer loaded by the IP 266. The positioning
process now executes in parallel with your STEP 5 program.
The IP 266 counts the pulses generated by the incremental encoder. The count is
then used to determine the current position.
Limit switches are connected to the module's digital inputs.
The IP 266 is equipped with the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Serial bus interface to the 100U programmable controller
Digital inputs and outputs
Analog output for driving the power section over the standard ±10 V interface
Status indicators for various operating states
Interface for connecting an incremental position encoder to determine the
current position
Programmer port for connection of a screen-based programmer
The following example illustrates a number of typical applications for positioning
modules. Particular emphasis is placed on the distinctions between the two types
of axes (linear axis and rotary axis).
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
1-1
System Overview
1.1
IP 266
Application
In an assembly line, a gripper takes a workpiece from a conveyor belt and
forwards it to an automatic assembling machine. The part is then returned to the
conveyor belt. Figure 1-1 shows the schematic arrangement. Included in the
illustration are three axes which are positioned e. g. via three IP 266 modules.
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A linear axis can be used for raising and lowering the workpiece as well as for
cross-machining from the conveyor belt to the assembling machine. The movement can be restricted to within defined limits. The conveyor belt can be
initialized as continuous belt (rotary axis).
Fig. 1-1. Positioning with Three Axes
1-2
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1.2
Linear Axis
Table
can be initialized in [mm], [inch]
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IP 266
System Overview
Axis Types
You can operate either
• rotary axes
or
• linear axes on the IP 266. Initialization and operator servicing are dependent
on the axis type.
Any differences are pointed out in the relevant chapters and sections.
This chapter contains a description of the individual types of axis.
Table 1-1. Axis Types
Rotary Axis
Beginning/end of traversing range
Rotary table
Continuous belt
can be initialized in [deg], [mm], [inch]
1-3
System Overview
IP 266
The linear axis
A linear axis is an axis with a limited traversing range. The traversing range is
restricted via
• programmable software limit switches (SA/SE)
• hardware limit switches (HA/HE)
• emergency limit switches (NA/NE)
Start of
machine
End of
machine
Table
Traversing range
N A/N E: Emergency start/end (power section)
H A/H E: Hardware limit switch start/end
S A/S E: Software limit switch start/end
HE NE
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SE
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NA HA SA
Deceleration distance S Br
Clearance distance X
Fig. 1-2. Linear Axis with Range Limit Switches (not to scale)
The software limit switches do not go into force until the reference point has
been determined (see Section 5.3.5).
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The distance between the software limit switches and the hardware limit
switches must be such that the drive can be decelerated at the specified deceleration rate before it reaches the hardware limit switches. In addition to deceleration distance SBR, you must also maintain a clearance distance (X) between
the end of the deceleration distance and the next limit switch.
The same applies to the distance between the hardware limit switches and the
emergency limit switches.
CAUTION:
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Incorrect initialization of the limit switches may result in mechanical damage.
Always make sure that you observe the clearance distance (X).
1-4
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Example
A traversing range of 0 mm to 400 mm
was specified in the machine data for a
continuous conveyor belt. The value
0 mm and the value 400 mm both have
the same physical location on the belt.
When the value 400 mm is reached, the
display switches to 0 mm.
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IP 266
System Overview
The emergency limit switches, which are routed directly to the power section,
must also take the deceleration distance into account.
CAUTION:
If you initialize a linear axis unintentionally as a rotary axis, there are no software limit switches. The drive can be stopped only over hardware limit
switches.
The rotary axis
A rotary axis is an axis with an unlimited positioning range.
This may be e. g.
• a rotary table or
• a continuous belt
When a rotary axis is used, the start and the end of the positioning range are
physically the same point on the axis.
The only effect the start of traversing range and end of traversing range
parameters have is that of switching the actual value displays.
200
100
0 = Start of traversing range
400 = End of traversing range
The hardware limit switches are evaluated in the same way as for a linear axis,
and provide extra protection when the positioning range is to be restricted to
values less than one revolution.
1-5
System Overview
1.3
IP 266
Installing the IP 266 in a SIMATIC S5 System
Data bus
9V
Data
GND
PLC
interface
Command
interpreter
Programmer
port
Setpoint
assignment
Position
controller
DAC
Power
section
M
T
IP266
Figure 1-3. The IP 266 in a SIMATIC S5 System
The IP 266 can be plugged into a bus module slot for analog modules (slot 0 to 7).
In addition to the wiring backplane, the IP 266 is also equipped with interfaces
for connecting
•
•
•
•
1-6
a programmer (PG 635, 675, 685, 730, 750)
power electronics equipment with speed controller over the analog output
8 digital inputs/outputs for limit switches, reference point switches, ...
an incremental position encoder (rotary or linear)
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
1.4
System Overview
Operator Servicing Options (PLC and PG) and Their Priorities
The IP 266 can be controlled via a programmer (PG) or via the programmable controller's CPU.
If job requests are issued to the IP 266 over both interfaces in the same firmware
cycle, the request issued via the programmer has priority but the next PLC job
request is serviced in the subsequent cycle. If this request differs from the PG
request and the latter is still being serviced, the IP 266 aborts the job and flags an
error.
positioning module
IP266
PLC
Job order
processing
Status info
PLC
interface
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
PG
Status info
Programmer
interface
Figure 1-4. Principle of Job Order Processing
The IP 266 accepts two types of positioning requests:
•
Single job orders (or requests) are forwarded to the IP 266 over the programmer port or the PLC interface.
Single job orders are all modes with the exception of mode 8 (AUTO) and
mode 9 (AUTO single block).
•
Machining programs, i. e. a continuous sequence of single job orders, dwells,
corrections and switching operations.
The machining programs must be in the IP 266's memory. A machining program is started over an operator interface by specifying the operating mode
and the program number.
1-7
System Overview
IP 266
Programmer port
The IP 266 can be serviced via a programmer connected over the programmer
port. To do this, you must use the COM 266 software package, which provides
menus and screen forms for initializing the IP 266. Screen forms are also used to
specify the modes and display current actual values.
PLC interface
Input and output blocks are used for IP 266 control via the programmable
controller's CPU and for forwarding return info from the IP 266 to the CPU. These
blocks must be initialized in a STEP 5 program. Positions, mode numbers and the
like can be entered using, for example, numerical setters. The values are
forwarded in the process input and output images.
1-8
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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1
System Overview
2
Technical Description of the IP 266
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
2.1
IP 266 Hardware Configuration
2.2
Interface to the Programmer
2.3
Interface to the Incremental Position Encoder
2.4
Interface to the Motor Power Section
2.5
2.5.1
2.5.2
2.5.3
2.5.4
2.5.5
2.5.6
2.5.7
2.5.8
Interface for Digital Inputs and Outputs
..... 2
Hardware Limit Switches (Pins 3/5) . . . . . . . . . . 2
Reference Point Switch (Pin 4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
External Stop (Pin 6) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
External Start Enable (Pin 7) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Function Signal FUM (Pin 8) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Position Reached (Pin 9) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Switching Function M99 (Pin 10) . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.
2.6
Fault LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. - 22
2.8
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
............. 2 -
1
............... 2 -
4
2 -
5
........ 2 -
9
Installation Guidelines
Fundamentals of Positioning
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Fundamentals of COM 266
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
Start-Up
STEP 5 Programming
Troubleshooting
-
10
11
12
12
13
15
15
18
18
2.7
IP 266 Monitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 - 23
2.7.1 Encoder Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 - 23
2.7.2 Position Control Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 24
Technical Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 26
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Figures
2-1.
2-2.
2-3.
2-4.
2-5.
2-6.
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2-7.
2-8.
2-9.
IP 266 Block Diagram with Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1
Module Overview Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. 3
Programmer Interface Location and Pin Assignments
.. 2 4
Position Encoder Interface Location and Pin
Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . 6
Connection Diagram for the Encoder Connecting
Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . -.
8
Analog Output Interface Location and Pin
Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . 9
Terminal Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . - 10
Switch Connections on the Terminal Block . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 11
"Position Reached" Signal as a Function of
Zero-Speed monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. - 16
Tables
2-1.
2-2.
2-3.
2-4.
Encoder Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . 5
Effect of "External Start" on Single Job Orders
and Automatic Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. - 14
Switching Conditions for the "Position Reached"
Signal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
. . .- 17
Encoder Monitor for 5 V and 24 V Encoders . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 23
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
2
Technical Description of the IP 266
Technical Description of the IP 266
The IP 266 is used for controlled positioning of a drive.
It is utilized primarily in applications involving
• auxiliary axes in metal-working machines
• paper and textile machines
• handling and loading equipment
• feed facilities for transfer and assembly lines
2.1
IP 266 Hardware Configuration
The IP 266 makes it possible for you to position a drive. Once a job has been
started, no further demands pertaining to that job are placed on the programmable controller's CPU. The positioning process is self-sustained, and thus executes
in parallel with your application program.
Operating
system
Programmer
port
S5 bus
interface
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Internal S5 bus
IP266
PG 635
PG 675
PG 685
PG 730
PG 750
Microprocessor
(80C188)
Memory
Counter
Registers
Inputs for an incremental position encoder
5 binary
inputs
3 binary
outputs
DAC
DAC=
Digital-analog
converter
±10 V
connection for
power section
Figure 2-1. IP 266 Block Diagram with Interfaces
Figure 2-1 provides an overview of the most important module components.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
2-1
Technical Description of the IP 266
IP 266
Processor+operating system:
For coordinating all IP 266 tasks
Programmer interface:
For servicing the IP 266 via the COM 266 software
• Start-up
• Input/modification of machine data
• Test mode: Starting traversing programs
Starting single modes/jobs
S5 bus interface:
(to the PLC's CPU)
For servicing the IP 266 via a STEP 5 program
• Starting traversing programs
• Starting single modes (jobs)
• Reading single values from the IP 266 (actual
value, distance to go, following error)
• Acquiring and evaluating status info
Counter:
Input for an incremental position encoder. The
counter counts the encoder pulses.
DAC:
Digital-analog converter: Analog output to the
motor power section. The DAC converts the digital setpoint into an analog setpoint.
Registers:
Digital inputs and outputs
2-2
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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N
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O
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E
R
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IP 266
Technical Description of the IP 266
Locations of the interfaces on the IP 266
The IP 266 communicates with the I/Os over three interfaces located on its
frontplate.
Elements on the IP 266 front plate
FAULT
ANALOG
OUT
P
G
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Fault LED
Red LED
Analog output
9-pin D SUB
Incremental
position encoder
15-pin D SUB
Programmer
port
15-pin D SUB
Screw terminal
For securing the
module
CAUTION!
Possibility of
confusion
6
POSITIONING CONT.
MODUL IP 266
6ES5 266-8MA11
1 2 3 4 5 6
Figure 2-2. Module Overview Diagram
Note:
Be sure not to confuse the interface for the incremental position encoder with
the programmer port. When you connect these I/Os, remember that the
programmer port is the rightmost of the two 15-pin D SUB connectors.
In addition to the two 15-pin D SUB interfaces, the digital inputs and outputs
must be connected to the module's terminal block.
2-3
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ANALOG
OUT
E
N
C
O
D
E
R
2-4
P
G
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
11
12
13
14
15
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Technical Description of the IP 266
IP 266
Interface to the Programmer
You can connect a programmer to the IP 266 via the programmer port. The
programmer port's connector pin assignments are compatible with those of the
CPU module's programmer port. Use a standard interface cable, which is preset
for 9600 bits/s, to connect a programmer.
FAULT
1
9
10
P
G
Pin
Description
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 to 15
Shield
RxD_N
TxD_P
TxD_N
Shield
RxD_P
-
6
POSITIONING CONT.
MODUL IP 266
6ES5 266-8MA11
1 2 3 4 5 6
Figure 2-3. Programmer Interface Location and Pin Assignments
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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B*
R*
R\
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
Technical Description of the IP 266
CAUTION:
Like the encoder interface, the programmer port is a 15-pin interface, and it is
therefore possible to confuse the one with the other. The programmer port is
the one at the right. If you use the wrong interface, the module executes a
RESET.
Interface to the Incremental Position Encoder
The IP 266 requires two signals in quadrature (signals A and B), i. e. displayed by
90 deg. with respect to each other, for position decoding and for ascertaining
the direction of travel. These signals, as well as a reference signal (R), must be
provided by the incremental position encoder.
Table 2.-1. Encoder Signals
Asymmetrical encoder (24 V)
Symmetrical encoder (5 V)
A
A\
B
B\
R
You can connect either encoders with 5 V signals or encoders with 24 V signals.
The 5 V encoders must also provide the inverted signals A\, B\ and R\.
The 15-pin D SUB socket on the module's frontplate contains all supply and signal
lines for both types of encoder.
2-5
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N
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R
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P
G
6
POSITIONING CONT.
MODUL IP 266
6ES5 266-8MA11
1 2 3 4 5 6
E
N
C
FAULT
ANALOG
OUT
O
D
E
R
1
Pin
Abbr.
Description
5V
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
5V
5V
Mint
Mint
Mext
A\
A
24 V
B
B\
R
R\
A*
B*
R*
Encoder voltage
Encoder voltage
Ground (5 V)
Ground (5 V)
Ground (24 V)
Inverted A signal
A signal
Encoder voltage
B signal
Inverted B signal
Reference signal (zero mark)
Inverted reference signal
A signal (24V)
B signal (24V)
Reference signal (zero mark)
•
•
•
•
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Technical Description of the IP 266
IP 266
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
24V
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Figure 2-4. Position Encoder Interface Location and Pin Assignments
The choice between 5 V or 24 V encoder is made in the machine data when you
initialize the IP 266.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Technical Description of the IP 266
In addition to incremental position encoders made by Siemens, you may also use
non-Siemens encoders which conform to the following specifications:
•
•
•
•
Method of measurement:
Supply voltage:
Output signals:
- Symmetrical encoders
(5 V signals)
- Asymmetrical encoders
(switching to P potential only)
24 V encoders
Max. operating frequency
- 5 V encoder
- 24 V encoder
Incremental
5 V or 24 V
A signal
B signal
R reference signal
A\ signal
B\ signal
R\ signal
A* signal
B* signal
R* reference signal
500 kHz for 30 m cable
100 kHz for 25 m cable
We would recommend the following cable for connecting the IP 266 when using
a Siemens encoder (6FC 9 320) for 5 V signals:
Order No.:
6ES5 705-7 ... 1
The three dots in the Order No. stand for the three-digit length code. You will
find a list of length codes in Catalog ST 52.1.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
2-7
7
6
9
10
11
12
3
4
2
1
Shield on
shell
9
2-8
15-pin D Sub
plug connector
Wiring post side
metal-plated shell
15
with screwed connection
6FC9341-1HC
12-pin circular
socket connector
Wiring post side
SIEMENS
6FC9341-1FD
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Technical Description of the IP 266
IP 266
Connecting cable for Siemens 6 FB 9 320 position encoders
A1
bk
A1
br
B1
re
B1
or
R1
ye
R1
gr
0V
0.5
0V
re
bk
+5V
bl
0.5
+5V
ye
0.5
5
6
8
1
3
4
0.5
11
10
2
12
Shield on
shell
Cable 4 x 2 x 0.38 + 4 x 0.5 sq. mm
6 FC 9 343-0AF
1
1
2
7
11 6
3
4 5
9
8
10 12
8
Figure 2-5. Connection Diagram for the Encoder Connecting Cable
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
2.4
Technical Description of the IP 266
Interface to the Motor Power Section
The IP 266 can output an analog setpoint speed of ±10 V over the 9-pin D SUB
socket connector (ANALOG OUT). This voltage is used to control your motor
power section.
5
9
3
FAULT
7
2
ANALOG
OUT
E
N
C
O
D
E
R
P
G
ANALOG
OUT
6
1
Pin
1
2
Description
-
NSETP Voltage for
setpoint speed
3
M
Analog ground
4
5 ... 9
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4
8
POSITIONING CONT.
MODUL IP 266
6ES5 266-8MA11
1 2 3 4 5 6
Figure 2-6. Analog Output Interface Location and Pin Assignments
Siemens provides a prefabricated cable for connecting the analog output to the
power section.
Order No.: Connecting cable 6ES5 705-8 ... 1
The three dots in the Order No. stand for the three-digit length code. You will
find a list of length codes in Catalog ST 52.1.
The connecting cable is equipped with a 9-pin D SUB plug connector and has an
open end for connection of the motor power section.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
2-9
2.5
Pin
1
3
5
7
9
1
3
5
7
9
2
4
6
8
10
2
4
6
8
10
2-10
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Technical Description of the IP 266
IP 266
CAUTION:
The connection information provided by the power equipment manufacturer
and the general installation guidelines for SIMATIC components must be
carefully observed to ensure fault-free operation. You may connect only power
equipment with differential inputs for±10 V, and the analog ground may not
be connected to the external ground.
Interface for Digital Inputs and Outputs
The IP 266 is equipped with five digital inputs and three digital outputs which can
be accessed over the bus module's terminal block.
Terminal block assignments
DI
1
2
L+
L-
3
4
5
Hardware limit switch (start)
Reference point switch
Hardware limit switch (end)
•
•
•
6
7
8
External STOP
External START enable
FUM (function signal - controller
•
•
9
10
enable)
Position reached
Switching function M99
DO
(24 V)
External ground
•
•
•
Enable for other modules
Figure 2-7. Terminal Block
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
2.5.1
N A/N E:
H A/H E:
S A/S E:
Ref:
Technical Description of the IP 266
CAUTION:
Always connect reference potential L- (pin 2 on the terminal block) with the
programmable controller's chassis ground to ensure fault-free module
operation.
The polarity of the hardware limit switches and the "External STOP" can be
specified in the machine data. When you set the machine data parameters, you
can choose between "pos" (positive) polarity for NO contacts and "neg"
(negative) polarity for NC contacts.
Hardware Limit Switches (Pins 3/5)
1
3
5
7
9
1
3
5
7
9
2
4
6
8
10
2
4
6
8
10
Table
NA HA SA
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Ref
SE
HE NE
Emergency limit switch start/end (power section)
Hardware limit switch start/end
Software limit switch start/end
Reference point switch
Figure 2-8. Switch Connections on the Terminal Block
The hardware limit switches restrict the traversing range of the drive system to
defined limits, and must be connected to terminal block pins 3 and 5.
2-11
Technical Description of the IP 266
2.5.2
IP 266
Reference Point Switch (Pin 4)
The drive system is synchronized by reference point approach. The reference
point switch must be connected to pin 4 on the terminal block (see Figure 2-8)
and must lie between the two hardware limit switches. You must make sure that
there is enough room between the reference point switch and the hardware
switches for the drive to decelerate for reference point approach without
reaching a hardware limit switch.
2.5.3
External Stop (Pin 6)
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Machining can be stopped via the "External Stop" input. Travel is then stopped at
the maximum specified deceleration rate and the IP 266 signals an "External
stop". This signal also aborts the machining program (see Section 5.4). In
Automatic mode, a dwell can also be cancelled.
CAUTION:
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An "External stop" in the "Follow-up" and "Controlled jog" control modes
restarts the position controller.
The polarity of the "External Stop" can be specified in the machine data.
2-12
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
2.5.4
Technical Description of the IP 266
External Start Enable (Pin 7)
"External Start Enable" allows you to make the start of a positioning operation
dependent on an external event, such as a signal from another IP 266 (for
instance switching function M99, position reached).
A positioning operation cannot be started on the IP 266 unless this signal is
present.
The signal also makes it possible to disable processing of a machining block or
dwell. The machining program can be resumed at the point of interruption by
activating the signal.
Note:
The "External Start Enable" signal does not interrupt a positioning operation
or dwell that is currently in progress. Blocks belonging to G10 (see Section 5.4)
are treated as two separate blocks.
The polarity of the "External Start Enable" signal is not programmable. The input
must be wired as NO contact.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
2-13
Technical Description of the IP 266
IP 266
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Table 2-2. Effect of "External Start" on Single Job Orders and
Automatic Programs
Type of job order
Single job order
IP 266 actions in the absence of a "External Start
Enable" signal
The positioning order is interpreted but not
serviced.
Signals from the IP 266
Motor waiting for External
Start Enable
The positioning order is executed only when the
"External Start Enable" signal is present.
Automatic mode
Program is executed up to the first positioning
order or first dwell.
Motor waiting for External
Start Enable
The order is interpreted and executed when the
"External Start Enable" signal is present.
Subsequent orders can be disabled by cancelling
Motor waiting for External
this signal.
Start Enable
No other requests are permitted while the IP 266 is waiting for an "External Start
Enable" signal. An attempt to issue another request is flagged with "Illegal
request".
The Stop command resets the "Motor Waiting for External Start Enable" signal
and the job is aborted.
2-14
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
2.5.5
Technical Description of the IP 266
Function Signal FUM (Pin 8)
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The IP 266 outputs the FUM signal when it is ready for operation and has valid
machine data at its disposal.
CAUTION:
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For reasons of safety, you may enable your power section only when the IP 266
has output the FUM signal. To do this, you must interlock the power section's
Enable input with the FUM signal. If the power section has no Enable input, you
must establish the interlock in some other way.
The FUM signal is removed immediately when invalid machine data is transferred
to the IP 266.
The FUM signal is reactivated when the error has been rectified and correct data
forwarded to the IP.
2.5.6
Position Reached (Pin 9)
The "Position Reached" signal indicates error-free completion of a positioning
operation with absolute or relative target specifications.
The signal is generated twice:
• As status bit in the input block (see Section 7)
• As signal on terminal block PIN 9
The following conditions must be fulfilled in order for this signal to be
generated:
• The setpoint position must have reached the specified target coordinate (t1).
• The actual position must lie within the tolerance limits for zero-speed
monitoring (t2).
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
2-15
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t1 t2
a: Setpoint characteristic
b: Actual characteristic
sst: Zero-speed monitoring
2-16
t1:
t2:
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Technical Description of the IP 266
IP 266
S
sst
a
t
Setpoint reached
Actual value within zero-speed monitoring tolerance range
Figure 2-9. "Position Reached" Signal as a Function of Zero-Speed Monitoring
The axis status changes from "machining" to "finished" at the same moment the
"Position Reached" signal is generated.
Note:
During execution of a machining program, the "Position Reached" signal is
output after each block, the axis status signal "finished" only on termination of
the machining program.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
•
Technical Description of the IP 266
Table 2-3 shows the conditions under which the "Position Reached" signal is set.
Table 2-3. Switching Conditions for the "Position Reached" Signal
"Position Reached" is
Actions
set
Actual position lies within the tolerance range of zero-speed
monitoring (beginning at time t2 in Figure 2-9)
Premature termination of a job with absolute or relative target
specification
In machining programs, the termination of machining operations
or dwells is indicated by the "Position Reached" signal.
During execution of a machining program
•
when a dwell is aborted
•
when a traversing movement is aborted
•
In "1/2 jog" following a Stop command
•
"Controlled jog" when the actual position no longer changes in a
sampling interval
•
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
not set
Absolute and relative target specifications:
•
Position setpoint must have reached the target coordinate
and
•
•
A residual distance remains until a new machining operation
is started. A subsequent machining request with the distance
to go shown positions the drive to the original target position
•
•
2-17
Technical Description of the IP 266
IP 266
Exceptions
A large non-compensated drift or a large load may result in the setpoint reaching
the target position while the actual value remains outside zero-speed monitoring. If the maximum following error is not exceeded in the process, the IP 266
sets and starts a 5s watchdog timer. When no movement toward the target is
detected within this time period, the IP 266 terminates the operation with
"Target position not reached".
The "Position Reached" signal is not generated.
2.5.7
Switching Function M99 (Pin 10)
So-called M functions can be programmed in a machining program (see Section 5.4). These functions are returned to the PLC in the form of numerical values.
One of these functions (M99) is also applied to an output; this signal can be used
to execute program-controlled switching operations (for example, enabling
another module).
2.5.8
Examples
The following examples describe how to use the digital inputs and outputs for
• external start enable
• external stop
• position reached
• switching function
2-18
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Technical Description of the IP 266
Example 1
This example examines the performance characteristics of the IP 266 when the
"External Start Enable" signal is set to "0" prior to execution of each block.
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A machining program containing machining operations, dwells, corrections and
M functions is delayed prior to the start of each block by removal of the
"External Start Enable" signal and then aborted with an "External Stop" signal.
Block
Job order
1
Traverse/rapid
2
Machining program
Effect of the absence of the
"External Start" signal
N05 G00 X0 M05
Job is not executed
Traverse with G10
N10 G10 X50 F100 M10
Job is not executed
3
Traverse with G10
N20 G10 X200 F350 M20
Job is not executed
4
Traverse
N30 X250 F400 M00
Job is not executed
5
Dwell
N40 G04 F50 M40
Job is not executed
6
Traverse
N50 X300 F300 M99
Job is not executed
7
Dwell
N60 G04 F50 M60
Job is not executed
8
Correction/offset
N70 G54
Job is executed
9
Traverse
N80 G04 F50 M80
Job is not executed
10
Traverse
N90 X-2000 F2000 M90
Job is not executed
11
Dwell
N100 G04 F50 M99
Job is not executed
12
End of program
N110 M02
Job is executed
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
2-19
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”TP exec.”
signal
External
Start
External
Stop
”Position
reached”
signal
Flying
change
Function
M99
2-20
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Technical Description of the IP 266
IP 266
Example 2
The machining program described in example 1 is started, but the "External Start
Enable" signal is removed only at certain points. The timing diagram below
shows the chronological sequence effected by the "External Start Enable" and
"External Stop" signals.
Start
t
t
t
t
t
Traversing
program
The next job is delayed via the External Start Enable signal
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Technical Description of the IP 266
The "External Start Enable" signal starts the first block of the machining
program.
A short pulse of the "Position Reached" signal appears between blocks that
are not interconnected by a "flying change".
Switching function M99 is active in the sixth block.
The block has executed. Since the "External Start Enable" signal disables
execution of blocks containing machining operations or dwells, program
execution is interrupted.
The "External Start Enable" signal does not interrupt offsets or corrections.
The "External Stop" signal initiates maximum-rate deceleration.
The drive is at a standstill. The machining program is terminated and the
"Machining program executing" signal is removed.
Start of job 2
Start of job 3
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Example 3
Three jobs are started in succession.
Job 1: Absolute target position
Job 2: Relative target position
Job 3: Relative target position
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EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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signal
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Technical Description of the IP 266
2.6
•
Wirebreak or short-circuit on (5 V) incremental
•
•
•
position encoder
No 24 V voltage supply
Polarity reversal of 24 V voltage supply
Power section off
•
•
•
Error in IP 266 restart routine
Open circuit between IP 266 and power section
Blocked drive
•
Incorrect position control (track A/A\ and B/B\
reversed)
2-22
IP 266
Fault LED
The module is equipped with a red fault LED which is located at the right of the
analog output.
This LED flags faults of special IP 266 functions.
LED shows steady light in the event of the
following hardware faults (automatic operation)
LED flashes
•
In the IP 266 restart routine
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
2.7
Technical Description of the IP 266
IP 266 Monitors
The IP 266 is equipped with a number of monitors for monitoring its I/Os. Some of
these monitors are implemented at the hardware level, others at the software
level.
2.7.1
Encoder Monitor
The IP 266 supports hardware and/or software monitors, depending on the type
of encoder used.
The table below lists all available options:
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Table 2-4. Encoder Monitor for 5 V and 24 V Encoders
Monitor
Software
5 V encoder
24 V encoder
The "Error in position control loop" signal is output when the
IP 266 fails to detect pulses in ten consecutive IP cycles
(10 x 3.75 ms).
Hardware
Symmetrical encoders are also
monitored for wirebreaks and
short-circuits, thus enabling a
faster response (even prior to
the conclusion of ten consecutive IP cycles). A wirebreak or
short-circuit is also flagged via
the "Error in position control
loop" signal.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
2-23
IP 266
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Technical Description of the IP 266
Note:
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Software monitoring is possible only in the closed-loop control (automatic)
modes.
In the event of an "Error in the position control loop", the IP 266 aborts the job
currently in progress, using the specified maximum deceleration rate to do so. It
then resets the existing reference point, if any, and starts the open-loop control
"Follow-up" mode. The controller enable signal remains activated. You can now
modify and store machine data on the IP 266.
"Follow-up" mode is terminated as soon as the machine data has been stored,
and the IP is once again in closed-loop control mode.
2.7.2
Position Control Monitor
On the first automatic machining movement following IP 266 power-up, the
module checks the position control direction.
If signals A and B are reversed, the encoder changes the actual value in the
opposite direction to that specified by the setpoint. The IP attempts to match the
actual value to the setpoint over a period of ten IP cycles. During this time, the
analog voltage increases at a very rapid rate. If the two values are still progressing
in opposite directions after ten cycles, the current mode is revoked, the "Followup" mode started, the controller enable (FUM) signal removed, and "Wrong
position control direction" output.
2-24
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Technical Description of the IP 266
Error recovery
Rectify the error by interchanging the signal lines.
Symmetrical encoders (5 V)
Asymmetrical encoders (24 V)
To change the counting direction, reverse
A/A\ and B/B\.
To change the counting direction, reverse A*
and B*.
Proceed as follows:
Switch off the 24 V power supply for the IP 266.
Remove the encoder cable from the module.
Reverse the signal lines as shown in the table above.
Reconnect the encoder and switch on the 24 V supply.
The module once again checks the position control direction, switching off its
position control monitor when the check produces a correct result.
When the "Follow-up" mode is exited, the position control monitor is reenabled and is not disabled again until the new check produces a correct
result.
CAUTION:
Whenever you replace an encoder, always remember to switch off the module's
24 V power supply. Only then can the module's position control monitor detect
an incorrect position control direction.
2-25
Technical Description of the IP 266
Technical Specifications
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2.8
IP 266
Electrical Specifications
Power loss
: 4.5 W typ.
Microprocessor
: iAPx80C188
Process clock frequency
: 16 MHz (quartz frequency)
Memory
EPROM
: 64 Kbytes
RAM
: 32 Kbytes (not battery backed)
EEPROM
:
8 Kbytes
Analog output
Output signal range
: ±10 V
Accuracy
: ±0.8% at ±10 V
Digital signal representation
: 13 bits plus sign
Short-circuit protection
: Yes
Reference potential of the analog
output signal
: Analog ground of the power section
Cable length
: 32 m shielded
Pulse input
Position decoding
: Incremental
Traversing range
: ±32767.999 mm/0.1inch/deg
Input voltages for the tracks
Differential inputs
:
Asymmetrical inputs
: 24 V
5V
Supply voltage for the encoder
(short-circuit-proof, no overload)
:
5 V/350 mA
: 24 V/350 mA
Input frequency and cable length
Symmetrical encoder (5 V)
: Max. 500 kHz for a 30 m shielded cable
Asymmetrical encoders (24 V)
: Max. 100 kHz for a 25 m shielded cable
: Max. 25 kHz for a 100 m shielded cable
Input signals
: 2 pulse trains in quadrature,
1 zero pulse
2-26
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Technical Description of the IP 266
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IP 266
Electrical Specifications
Input currents
5V
24 V
: to RS 422
: 7.3 mA typ.
Digital inputs
Input voltage range
: ±30 V
Galvanic isolation
: No
0 signal
: - 30 V to+5 V
1 signal
: 13 V to 30 V
Permissible quiescent current for 0 signal
: 1.5 mA
Typ. input current at 24 V
: 7.3 mA
Digital outputs
Output voltage range
: 20 V to 30 V
Galvanic isolation
: no
Max. output current for "1" signal
: 100 mA
Short-circuit protection
: Short-circuit-proof output
Length of shielded cable
: Max. 100 m
Supply voltage
Logic voltage generated from ext. 24 V
with switched-mode power supply
: 4.7 V to 5.5 V
Power input from 24 V
without outputs and 24 V encoder
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
: 180 mA typ.
2-27
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1
2
System Overview
Technical Description of the IP 266
3
Installation Guidelines
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
3.1
Safety Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 -
1
3.2
Cable Connections on the IP 266 . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 -
2
3.3
Module Installation/Removal
............... 3 -
4
3.4
Replacing the Position Encoder
............. 3 -
6
Fundamentals of Positioning
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Fundamentals of COM 266
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
Start-Up
STEP 5 Programming
Troubleshooting
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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Figures
3-1.
3-2.
3-3.
Linear Axis with Range Limit Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Shielding the Cables to the IP 266 in a Cabinet . . . . . . . . . 3 Bilateral Shielding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. -
2
3
4
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
Installation Guidelines
3
Installation Guidelines
3.1
Safety Requirements
It is absolutely essential to the overall safety concept that the switching elements
discussed in the following be installed and matched to your system.
•
EMERGENCY STOP switch for shutting down the entire system.
•
Hardware limit switches for restricting the traversing range.
These switches initiate a preprogrammed deceleration procedure, and can be
connected as NC or NO contacts to the IP 266's digital inputs.
•
EMERGENCY limit switches for a direct shutdown of the power section. These
switches are not reached until the hardware switches have been overrun.
WARNING!
The failsafe switches for the power section must be designed as NC contacts
(e. g. failsafe shutdown in the event of a wirebreak).
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
3-1
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Power section
Brake
NA/E
HA/E
SA/E
3.2
3-2
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Installation Guidelines
IP 266
Table
End of
machine
NA HA SA
SE
IP 266
HE NE
Test mode
function "STOP"
COM
FUM
Programmer
M
100U
Emergency limit switch start/end
Hardware limit switch start/end
Software limit switch start/end
Figure 3-1. Linear Axis with Range Limit Switches
Cable Connections on the IP 266
CAUTION:
All connections on the IP 266 (inputs, outputs and the 24 V power supply) require
shielded cables to ensure noise immunity.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Installation Guidelines
The following applies as regards cable shielding:
•
Braided shields must be secured to the shield bus over as large an area as
possible (e. g. using metal-plated cable clamps which span the shield).
•
When using cables with foil shields, the sheath wire must be connected over
the shortest possible path (less than 3 cm) with the shield bus.
•
The shielding must be routed from the shield bus to the module.
•
The shield bus must be conductively connected to the supporting bar, the
housing cabinet and the central earthing point in the cabinet.
3
5
7
9
1
3
5
7
9
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10
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The cable shields must be placed on a shield bus near the cable inlet in the
cabinet.
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Shield bus
Cable with foil shield
and sheath wire
Cable with
braided shield
Figure 3-2. Shielding Cables to the IP 266 in a Cabinet
•
To ensure interference-free operation, it is absolutely necessary that all cables
be grounded on both ends, i. e. the shield must be brought into contact with
both the shield bus on the PLC and the I/O connector.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
3-3
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3.3
•
3-4
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Installation Guidelines
IP 266
The diagram below illustrates the principle of bilateral shielding.
I/O (power section/encoder)
Sheath wire
Figure 3-3. Bilateral Shielding
Module Installation/Removal
Installation
Before installing an I/O module, you must set the bus module's coding element to the module type.
Setting the coding element:
CAUTION:
Before installing a new bus module or adjusting the coding element, always
remember to switch off the programmable controller.
A code digit is imprinted on the frontplate of every I/O module. A white
coding pin, which functions as "key", is located on the back of the every
module. How this "key" is set depends on the module, and the setting cannot
be changed. The bus module is equipped with a counterpart to this key for
each slot, a white, rotary coding element which serves as "lock". Using a
screwdriver, set the "lock" on the bus module in accordance with the module
identifier.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
•
Installation Guidelines
The IP 266 can be addressed in the same manner as an analog module in slots
0 to 7.
To install the IP, you need a free bus module slot in this range.
Switch on the 24 V power supply for the IP 266.
Hinge the module onto the top of the bus module.
Swing the IP module down toward the bus module.
Press down firmly and
screw the IP into place.
Removing the IP 266
Switch off the 24 V power supply for the IP 266!
Set the PLC to STOP!
Switch off the power section!
Disconnect
- the cable to the power section from the IP 266's analog output
- the programmer cable from the programmer port
- the incremental decoder cable from the encoder interface!
Loosen the fixing screw on the module!
Remove the module from the programmable controller!
Note:
When the module is disconnected from the supply voltage and removed
from the PLC, all data in its RAM is lost.
Any data that is to be retained must be saved before disconnecting the
module.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
3-5
Installation Guidelines
3.4
IP 266
Replacing the Position Encoder
The steps you must take to remove the encoder for repair or replacement are
listed below, and must be carefully observed.
Proceed as follows to remove the encoder:
Switch off the 24 V power supply for the module.
Disconnect the encoder cable from the module.
Repair the encoder or insert a new one.
Connect the encoder and switch on the module's 24 V power supply.
The position control monitor is activated when an automatic mode that outputs
an analog setpoint greater than 5 V is invoked.
The encoder pulses are compared to the setpoint over a period of ten IP cycles.
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Once the IP 266 has ascertained that the counting direction for setpoint and
actual value are in conformance, the monitor is deactivated.
CAUTION:
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The module's 24 V power supply must always be switched off before removing
the encoder for repair or replacement, as only then can the monitor detect
position control errors.
Once an encoder has been replaced or repaired and reinstalled, the new
position of the zero mark makes reproduction of an old reference point, if any,
impossible.
3-6
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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1
2
3
System Overview
Technical Description of the IP 266
Installation Guidelines
4
Fundamentals of Positioning
5
6
7
8
9
10
4.1
Positioning Methods
4.2
Components of a Position Control System
4.3
4.3.1
4.3.2
4.3.3
Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.
Positioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
.
Setpoint, Actual Value and Following Error
.. 4
Relationships Between a(t), v(t) and s(t) . . . . . . . . 4
-
5
5
5
7
4.4
IP 266 Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 -
8
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 -
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Fundamentals of COM 266
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
Start-Up
STEP 5 Programming
Troubleshooting
....
4 -
1
4
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Figures
4-1.
4-2.
4-3.
4-4.
4-5.
4-6.
4-7.
Positioning Methods
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.
Open-Loop Positioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.
Schematic Diagram for Closed-Loop Positioning . . . . . . . 4
Components of a Position Control System . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Principles of Positioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.
Characteristic of the Following Error
During a Positioning Operation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Relationships Between a(t), v(t) and s(t) (Characteristic
of a Positioning Operation) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.
-
1
2
3
4
5
-
6
-
7
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
4
Fundamentals of Positioning
Fundamentals of Positioning
Positioning means bringing a load to a certain position within a specific period of
time, making allowance for force and torque.
Various methods are used to perform this task.
4.1
Positioning Methods
A drive can be positioned in one of two ways:
• under open-loop control
• under closed-loop control
The figure below shows the options available in conjunction with S5-100U
programmable controllers.
Positioning
Closed-loop control
Three-phase AC
drives
DC drives
IP266 positioning
module
Open-loop control
Fixed-speed drives
385 B high-speed
counter
Stepping motors
IP 267 positioning
module
Figure 4-1. Positioning Methods
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
4-1
Setpoint
generator
4-2
Vsetp(t)
Power section
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Speed
controller
Actuator
M
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Speed
Acceleration
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Fundamentals of Positioning
IP 266
A setpoint generator is required for programmable positioning operations,
regardless of whether positioning is in an open or closed loop.
The setpoint generator's output variable depends on a number of parameters:
• the difference between the current position of the axis and the target
position
• speed
• acceleration/deceleration
Open-loop positioning
When positioning under open-loop control, the setpoint generator provides a
time-dependent speed or speed setpoint Vsetp(t). This is the voltage used to drive the
power section. Drive movement is governed by this voltage. The setpoint
generator outputs the setpoint voltage until the drive has reached the target
position.
During positioning, the setpoint generator is not informed of the current
position. There is thus no guarantee that the drive's final position is identical to
the required target position.
Measuring
transducer
VT
T
M: Motor
T: Tachogenerator
VT: Tacho voltage
Figure 4-2. Open-Loop Positioning
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Fundamentals of Positioning
Closed-loop positioning
When positioning under closed-loop control, the drive's current actual position is
compared with the setpoint position computed by the setpoint generator. The
difference between these two values is fed to the position controller, which
supplies a voltage setpoint. This setpoint is proportional to the positioning speed.
During positioning, deviations are picked up and fed continually to the position
controller, thus enabling precise positioning.
Following a positioning operation, the final position is maintained. The position
controller is able to detect disturbances and compensates any positional
deviations.
IP266
Power section (control) motor and pulse generator
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Sact(t)
-
Position
Speed
controller
controller
+
Actuator
M
T
Power section
Setpoint
generator
Target position
Speed
Acceleration
Figure 4-3. Schematic Diagram for Closed-Loop Positioning
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
4-3
Fundamentals of Positioning
4.2
IP 266
Components of a Position Control System
Mains
power
Safety device
General control
facilities
IP 266 position
controller
Speed controller
with static
converter
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The IP 266's position controller enables precise positioning of the drive. The
following components are required for a position control system:
COM 266
Figure 4-4. Components of a Position Control System
•
Power section
The power section is driven via the IP 266's analog output, and comprises
rotational speed controller and static converter.
•
Motor
The power section drives the motor in accordance with the directives from
the IP 266.
•
Mechanical transmission elements
In addition to the axis, the mechanical transmission elements include gears
and coupling systems.
•
Position measuring system
The position measuring system measures movement. An incremental position
encoder supplies the IP 266 with pulses. The number of pulses is proportional
to the path travelled.
4-4
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
•
Fundamentals of Positioning
I/O
The term "I/O" is used collectively for all other auxiliary facilities.
The most important of these are
- the limit switches used to limit the traversing range
- the programmer used in conjunction with the COM 266 software to service
the IP 266.
4.3
Terms
4.3.1
Positioning
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Positioning means bringing a load to a defined position within a specific period
of time, making allowance for force and torque.
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x
Position B
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Position A
x = Distance to be travelled
F = Driving force
Figure 4-5. Principles of Positioning
4.3.2
Setpoint, Actual Value and Following Error
Execution of a positioning operation requires specification of
• the target coordinate
• acceleration and deceleration rates
• positioning velocities.
Based on this data, the IP 266 computes a theoretical speed characteristic. An
ideal drive system would directly follow this characteristic. The IP 266 provides a
voltage value at its analog output which is proportional to the theoretical speed
characteristic. This value is referred to as the setpoint, and is computed by the
IP 266's setpoint generator.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
4-5
Fundamentals of Positioning
IP 266
Driven by the power section, the drive travels a specific path. In accordance with
the distance traversed, the position encoder generates a number of pulses which
are evaluated by the IP 266's input section. The actual position of the drive is
computed from the pulse count and the value for the encoder resolution. This
value is called the actual value.
The difference between the setpoint Ssetp(t) and the actual value Sact(t) is referred
to as the following error s:
s = Ssetp(t) - Sact(t)
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Figure 4-6 shows the characteristic of the following error during a positioning
operation.
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s = const
a = Setpoint characteristic
b = Actual characteristic
Figure 4-6. Characteristic of the Following Error
During a Positioning Operation
4-6
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Fundamentals of Positioning
4.3.3
Relationships Between a(t), v(t) and s(t)
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In order to position to a defined target, the drive must be moved at a specific speed.
The IP 266 computes the acceleration and deceleration rates from the machine
data. The result is the basic characteristic of a positioning operation.
a(t)
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Acceleration
Constant speed
Deceleration
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t
s(t)
t
Figure 4-7. Relationships Between a(t), v(t) and s(t) (Characteristic
of a Positioning Operation)
The slope of the speed ramp is a measure of the acceleration rate. It is specified in
the unit [m/s2], and is generally obtained from the following equation:
v
a=
t
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
4-7
Fundamentals of Positioning
IP 266
The IP 266 takes into consideration only a constant acceleration or deceleration
rate for each direction. This results in a linear equation for speed v(t).
v=a • t
The unit for speed is [m/s].
The drive's path is then computed from the speed curve.
In the sections with constant acceleration or deceleration, the path traversed has
a parabolic time characteristic
1
s=
•
a • t2
2
In the sections with constant speed, the path is computed as follows:
s=v • t
4.4
IP 266 Modes
In order to compute the setpoint variables Ssetp(t) and Vsetp(t) correctly, the IP 266
requires data which provides a complete description of the drive system.
This data is stored in the module's RAM, and is referred to as machine data.
A mode may be
• a sequence of motions
• a coordinate shift
• a machining program call
A machining program can be stored on the IP 266 to enable automatic execution
of a sequence of motions or special functions (such as dwell or zero offset).
4-8
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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1
2
3
4
System Overview
Technical Description of the IP 266
Installation Guidelines
Fundamentals of Positioning
5
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
5.1
5.1.1
5.1.2
5.1.3
5.1.4
5.1.5
5.1.6
5.1.7
5.1.8
Machine Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Hardware Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Position Decoding and Resolution
......... 5
Traversing Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Speeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.
Acceleration Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Controller Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Correction Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Miscellaneous Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
5.2
Modes and How to Invoke Them
5.3
5.3.1
5.3.2
5.3.3
5.3.4
5.3.5
5.3.6
5.3.7
5.3.8
5.3.9
5.3.10
5.3.11
5.3.12
5.3.13
5.3.14
IP 266 Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Jog 1 (Mode 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Jog 2 (Mode 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Jog under Open-Loop Control (Mode 3)
.... 5
Follow-Up Mode (Mode 4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Set/Approach Reference Point (Mode 5) . . . . 5
Increment Mode Absolute (Mode 6)
....... 5
Increment Mode Relative (Mode 7) . . . . . . . . . 5
Automatic Mode (Mode 8)
................ 5
Automatic Single Block (Mode 9)
.......... 5
Enable Teach-In (Mode 10) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Disable Teach-In (Mode 11) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Absolute Zero Offset (ZO) (Mode 12) . . . . . . . 5
Relative Zero Offset (ZO) (Mode 13) . . . . . . . . 5
Delete Zero Offset (ZO) (Mode 14) . . . . . . . . . 5
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
-
1
3
4
7
9
11
12
15
20
. . . . . . . . . . . 5 - 21
-
23
23
26
26
27
28
38
41
43
44
46
50
50
54
56
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5
6
7
8
9
10
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs (continued)
5.3.15
5.3.16
5.3.17
5.3.18
5.3.19
5.3.20
5.3.21
Enable Tool Offset (TO) (Mode 15) . . . . . . . . . 5
Disable Tool Offset (TO) (Mode 16) . . . . . . . . . 5
Acknowledge Error (Mode 17) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Enable Drift Compensation (Mode 18) . . . . . . 5
Disable Drift Compensation (Mode 19)
..... 5
EEPROM (Mode 26) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Information Modes
(Mode 71, Mode 72, Mode 73) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
5.3.22 Synchronize IP (Mode 99) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
-
5.4
5.4.1
5.4.2
5.4.3
5.4.4
-
Elements of the Traversing Program . . . . . . . . 5
Program Header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Traversing Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Last Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.
Syntax Diagram of a Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
56
61
61
62
64
65
- 66
- 67
68
69
70
91
92
Fundamentals of COM 266
Communication between the CPU and the IP 266
Start-Up
STEP 5 Programming
Troubleshooting
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Figures
5-1.
5-2.
5-3.
5-4.
5-5.
5-6.
5-7.
5-8.
5-9.
5-10.
5-11.
5-12.
5-13.
5-14.
5-15.
5-16.
5-17.
5-18.
5-19.
5-20.
5-21.
5-22.
5-23.
5-24.
5-25.
Encoder Signal Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. Linear Axis with Range Limit Switches (not to scale) . . . . 5 Rotary Axis, Programmable in mm/inch/deg
.......... 5 Acceleration and Deceleration of the Drive System
in Both Directions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. Maximum Deceleration Rate on Abort of a Traversing
Movement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. .Control Response of the Position Controller in
Dependence on the Kv Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Following Error in Dependence on Setpoint and
Actual Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . Using a Zero Offset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. Backlash Outside the Control Loop (compensatible) . . . . 5 Format of an Operator Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Initiating a Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
..Controlling the Traversing Speed via the
Override Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. . Drive Starting Positions for a Reference Point
Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. .Principle of the Reference Point Approach in Example A
5 Reference Point Approach in Example B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Reference Point Approach in Example C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Reference Point Approach in Example D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Deceleration at Different Deceleration Rates
.......... 5 Reproducibility of the Reference Point for
Reference Point Coordinate 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Absolute Target Specification in Mode 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Relative Target Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 The Use of Speeds in Mode 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Zero Offset in Mode 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. Zero Offset for a Rotary Axis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
. Relative Zero Offset with Different Values
............ 5 -
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
7
7
8
11
12
13
14
16
19
23
24
25
29
31
32
33
34
35
36
38
42
48
52
53
55
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Figures (continued)
5-26.
5-27.
5-28.
5-29.
5-30.
5-31.
5-32.
5-33.
Voltage - Speed Characteristic with Drift
Compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. . Erroneous Following Error Characteristic in
Conjunction with Drift Compensation
................5 Format of the Program Header
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Traversing of a Rotary Axis with Backlash . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Overview of Tool Offsets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. Using Zero Offsets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. Overview of Zero Offsets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. Syntax Diagram of a Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. -
63
64
69
78
82
83
86
92
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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Tables
5-1.
5-2.
5-3.
5-4.
5-5.
5-6.
5-7.
5-8.
5-9.
5-10.
5-11.
5-12.
5-13.
5-14.
5-15.
5-16.
5-17.
5-18.
5-19.
5-20.
5-21.
5-22.
5-23.
IP 266 Machine Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. Speeds for Jog Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. Coordinate Shift as Consequence of a Zero Offset . . . . . . 5 Positioning Modes with and without Position Control
.. 5 Overview of Available Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Prerequisites for the Reference Point Approach
(Examples A to D) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
..Drive Performance in Absolute Increment Mode
....... 5 Permissible Functions in "Absolute Increment Mode"
.. 5 Determining the Direction of Travel in Relative
Increment Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. . Using the 'Forward' Function in Mode 7
..............5 Interruption Points in a Traversing Program in Mode 9
. 5 Target Specification in Mode 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Generating a New Traversing Program in Mode 10 . . . . . 5 IP 266 Zero Offset Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. Coordinate Changes Produced by a Zero Offset . . . . . . . . 5 Coordinate Changes Produced by a Tool Offset . . . . . . . . 5 Data for Calibrating the Power Section
...............5 Functions in a Traversing Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Permissible G Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. Tool Offset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. .Effect of Function G53 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. Preselecting Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. Using the F Function in Traversing Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 -
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
2
10
17
21
22
30
39
40
41
42
45
47
49
51
54
57
62
70
72
80
85
87
90
IP 266
5
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
The IP 266 can execute positioning operations only when it has correct machine
data at its disposal. You cannot start a positioning operation until you have
provided the IP with this data.
The machine data and all permissible parameters are discussed in detail in
Section 5.1. In Section 6, you will find information on how to enter these values
and transfer them to the IP 266.
5.1
Machine Data
The machine data describes the properties of
• the drive system,
• the position encoder,
• and the position controller.
The IP 266 needs machine data in order to compute the correct speed and path.
Errored data can therefore result in an unpredictable or incorrect system
response.
You can also enter machine data values for coordinate shifts and corrections
which are needed, for instance, if tool dimensions change.
Table 5-1 shows you which items of machine data you need for different tasks.
The table also provides cross-references to the sections describing these data
items.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-1
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
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Table 5-1. IP 266 Machine Data
Task
Machine Data Item
Parameter
Permissible
Specifications
Units
Module
1 to 99
description
Section 5.1.1
Axis type
linear, rotary
Pos. decoding
Unit of measure
mm, in, deg
and resolution
Encoder type
Travel per encoder revolution
Pulses per encoder revolution
5 V, 24 V
0.001 to 400.000
1 to 65 000
[mm;0.1 in;deg]
[pul]
Software limit switch-start (linear axis)
Software limit switch-end (linear axis)
± 32 767.999
± 32 767.999
[mm;0.1 in;deg]
[mm;0.1 in;deg]
Start of traversing range (rotary axis)
End of traversing range (rotary axis)
Reference point
± 32 767.999
± 32 767.999
± 32 767.999
[mm;0.1 in;deg]
[mm;0.1 in;deg]
[mm;0.1 in;deg]
Maximum speed
Forward speed for JOG 1
Reverse speed for JOG 1
1 to 65 000
1 to 65 000
1 to 65 000
Forward speed for JOG 2
Reverse speed for JOG 2
Incremental speed
1 to 65 000
1 to 65 000
1 to 65 000
Reference point approach speed 1
Reference point approach speed 2
1 to 65 000
1 to 65 000
Maximum deceleration rate
Forward acceleration
Forward deceleration
10 to 9 999
10 to 9 999
10 to 9 999
Reverse acceleration
Reverse deceleration
10 to 9 999
10 to 9 999
Controller
Servo gain (kv) factor
0.1 to 99.9
[1/s]
parameters
Maximum following error
Monitoring of the following error
Zero-speed monitoring
0.001 to 99.999
on, off
0.001 to 64.999
[mm;0.1 in;deg]
Section 5.1.3
Speeds
Section 5.1.4
Acceleration
Deceleration
Section 5.1.5
Section 5.1.6
5-2
mm
min
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range
0.1 in
min
deg
min
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Hardware
mm
s2
0.1 in
s2
deg
s2
[mm;0.1 in;deg]
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IP 266
5.1.1
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Table 5-1. IP 266 Machine Data (continued)
Task
Correction
parameters
Section 5.1.7
Miscellaneous
parameters
Section 5.1.8
Machine Data Item
Start. point=End point
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Parameter Value
Specifications
Permissible
Units
Zero offset 1
Zero offset 2
± 32 767.999
± 32 767.999
[mm;0.1 in;deg]
[mm;0.1 in;deg]
Zero offset 3
Zero offset 4
Tool length compensation
± 32 767.999
± 32 767.999
± 32 767.999
[mm;0.1 in;deg]
[mm;0.1 in;deg]
[mm;0.1 in;deg]
Backlash compensation
0.000 to 64.999
[mm;0.1 in;deg]
Reference point direction
PLC BCD-coded
forw, rev
yes, no
Polarity of the hardware limit switches
IP stop on CPU stop
pos, neg
yes, no
Hardware Description
Module
To distinguish between the IP 266 modules in a PLC, you can assign each IP a
number between 1 and 99.
Axis type
This machine data item is used to specify either a rotary or a linear axis. A linear
axis has a restricted traversing range, which must be limited via hardware limit
switches.
There is no limit to the traversing range of a rotary axis.
On each revolution, the axis goes from the starting point
to the end point. The values assigned for these points
specify the traversing range of the axis. Both points are at
the same physical position. One complete revolution of
the axis does nothing more than change the actual value
indication from the start value to the end value of the
traversing range.
5-3
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
5.1.2
IP 266
Position Decoding and Resolution
Unit of measure
You may use one of the following units of measure on the IP 266 for all positional
specifications:
• Metric system with 0.001 mm as base unit
• Inch with 0.001 inches as base unit
• Degree with 0.001 degrees as base unit
A base unit is the smallest unit that may be entered as the unit of measure.
The specified unit of measure also applies to
• speeds
• acceleration rates and
• encoder resolution
If you have chosen [deg] as the unit of measure, the speed is specified in
[deg/min].
Encoder type
You may connect the following types of encoder to the IP 266:
• Encoders with symmetrical 5 V output signals
• Encoders with asymmetrical 24 V output signals
The encoder type is specified in the machine data's "Encoder type" parameter.
In order to ensure precise measuring of the drive's current position, you must use
an encoder whose resolution meets with your specific requirements.
Two items of data are needed to compute the resolution:
• Travel per encoder revolution and
• Pulses per encoder revolution
Travel per encoder revolution
The "travel per encoder revolution" depends on your drive system, and should
take accurately into account all transmission elements, such as couplings and
gears, which are located between the motor and the incremental encoder.
5-4
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Pulses per encoder revolution
The "pulses per encoder revolution" can be found in the data sheet for your
encoder.
Resolution
The resolution is the quotient of "travel per encoder revolution" and "pulses per
encoder revolution", and must be in the range 0.1 to 99.9.
The following units must be taken into account when computing the resolution.
Travel per encoder revolution
Resolution
[µm/pul]
[µm/pul]
[0.0001 inch/pul]
[0.0001 inch/pul]
Use the following formula to compute the
resolution:
[0.001 deg/pul]
[0.001 deg/pul]
Travel per encoder revolution
A=
Pulses per encoder revolution
Special characteristics of the rotary axis:
To enable reproducibility of the reference point when using a rotary axis, the
ratio between the full machining range and the distance travelled by the drive
during one encoder revolution must be an integer number.
Gear
Encoder
Example:
Traversing range:
0° to 360°
During one encoder revolution, the rotary table revolves
20°.
The ratio of these two values must be an integer number.
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360°
Motor
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= 18
20°
5-5
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Example 1:
An incremental encoder generates 1000 pulses
per revolution. During this time, the reference
point on the axis travels a distance of 5 mm.
The resolution is thus:
IP 266
5 mm
A=
1000 pul
A=
5 µm/pul
Example 2:
In your drive system, you are using an encoder that generates 1000 pulses per
revolution. You are using a rotary axis, and have initialized it in [deg]. During one
encoder revolution, the drive moves 10 degrees.
Based on these values, the encoder resolution computes to the following:
10 deg
A=
1000 pul
A=
0.01
deg/pul
A=
10 · 0.001 deg/pul
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Example 3:
The table below lists a number of examples of permissible and impermissible
parameter values:
Travel per revolution
Unit
Pulses per
revolution
Resolution
Permissible
Unit
[µm/pul]
1 mm
[µm]
5000
0.200
200 deg
[0.001 deg]
1000
200
[0.001 deg/pul]
40 deg
[0.001 deg]
500
80
[0.001 deg/pul]
•
10 in
[0.0001 in]
1800
55.56
[0.0001 in/pul]
•
100 in
[0.0001 in]
2000
500
[0.0001 in/pul]
5-6
•
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
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Encoder direction of rotation
The direction in which the encoder revolves is ascertained from the encoder's two
signals, which are displaced from each other by 90 deg.
A
Signal A leading
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B
t
Signal B leading
The direction changes at this point
Figure 5-1. Encoder Signal Evaluation
5.1.3
Traversing Range
Software limit switches (linear axis only)
The software limit switches are used to define the traversing range of your drive.
In a fully configured drive system, the software limit switches define the internal
boundaries of the traversing range.
Start of
machine
End of
machine
Table
Traversing range
N A/N E: Emergency limit switches start/end
(power section)
H A/H E: Hardware limit switches start/end
S A/S E: Software limit switches start/end
HE NE
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NA HA SA
Deceleration distance S Br
Clearance distance X
Figure 5-2. Linear Axis with Range Limit Switches (not to scale)
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-7
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Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
100 mm 110 mm 0
5-8
IP 266
Note:
The software limit switches are active only when a valid reference point is set.
Target specifications outside the traversing range are not processed. The drive is
decelerated at the software limit switches. Different values may be specified in
the machine data for forward and reverse deceleration.
Start/end of traversing range (rotary axis only)
Start/end of
traversing
range
10 mm
Figure 5-3. Rotary Axis, Programmable in mm/inch/deg
In the case of a rotary axis, the values define the limits of the display range. The
start and the end of the traversing range are at the same physical location.
At the range limits, the display changes
• from the start value to the end value
or
• from the end value to the start value
depending on the direction of rotation.
Absolute target specifications must lie within this range, while relative specifications may exceed it.
The hardware limit switches remain in force as additional protection for the drive
system.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Reference coordinate
The reference point is used to calibrate the axis. Its location can be specified via
the "Set/Approach to reference point" mode (see Section 5.3.5). The "reference
coordinate" machine data parameter is used to assign a value to this position.
The value must lie within the maximum range limits. When you define the
reference point coordinate, you also define the following coordinates:
• coordinate basic origin
• software limit switches
You can make absolute target specifications only in a system with a defined
reference point.
5.1.4
Speeds
The speeds specified in the machine data define the true speeds of the drive
system, and depend on
• the motor rotational speed
• the number of encoder pulses per revolution
• the travel per encoder revolution
The absolute values for all speeds must be less than or equal to the maximum
speed. Input values must be in the range from 1 to 65,000. Depending on the
parameter assignments, the IP expects values in [mm/min], [deg/min] or
[0.1 inch/min].
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Maximum speed
Under IP 266 control, the drive reaches the maximum speed with a setpoint of
±10 V.
CAUTION :
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The maximum speed must be computed from the technical specifications for
the complete drive system (motor, axis, encoder, and so on).
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-9
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Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Direction
Forward
Jog 1
Jog 2
Reverse
Jog 1
Jog 2
5-10
IP 266
Jogging speed
For jog mode, you must define four speeds in the machine data.
Table 5-2. Speeds for Jog Mode
Speed
These four parameters define the speeds for modes Jog 1 and Jog 2.
The specifications for Jog 2 also apply for "Controlled jog", i. e. jogging under
open-loop control.
Incremental speed
The incremental speed is used as the positioning speed in
• incremental feed mode absolute
• incremental feed mode relative
When a traversing program is generated in TEACH-IN mode, this speed is taken
over into the new program.
Reference point approach speed
The IP 266 takes recourse to two speeds in order to determine the reference
point. To enable a purposeful reference point approach, you should specify two
different speeds. Section 5.3.5 explains how these speeds are used.
Note:
Reference point approach speed 1 must be greater than reference point
approach speed 2.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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[mm/min]
Forward acceleration
Constant speed forward
Reverse deceleration
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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5.1.5
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IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Acceleration Rates
In order to reach the speed initialized for the specified mode, the drive must
accelerate.
The following five values may be entered in the machine data:
• Maximum deceleration rate
• Forward acceleration rate
• Forward deceleration rate
• Reverse acceleration rate
• Reverse deceleration rate
The absolute maximum deceleration rate must be greater than or equal to all
other acceleration or deceleration rates.
This deceleration rate is used to stop travel
• when the drive has reached a hardware limit switch or
• when an external Stop command was issued.
The values must be in the range from 10 to 9 999. The entry must be in [mm/s2],
[deg/s2] or [0.1 inch/s2].
Example 1:
This example illustrates the use of the various acceleration and deceleration rates
in normal operation.
vfor
t
vrev
Reverse acceleration
Constant speed in reverse
Reverse deceleration
Figure 5-4. Acceleration and Deceleration of the Drive System
in Both Directions
5-11
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[mm/min]
5.1.6
5-12
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Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
Example 2:
When the drive reaches a hardware limit switch, it decelerates at the maximum
deceleration rate. This is also the case when an external Stop command is issued.
- Hardware limit switch
or external Stop
Vfor
t
Vrev
Forward acceleration
Constant speed forward
Maximum deceleration
Figure 5-5. Maximum Deceleration Rate on Abort of a Traversing Movement
Controller Parameters
Kv (servo gain) factor
The IP 266 uses a proportional-action controller (P controller) for position control.
The only parameter a P controller needs is the servo gain factor Kv. The unit for
the Kv factor is [1/s]; the value range is from 0.1 to 99.9 [1/s].
The higher the Kv factor, the better the control loop's dynamic response.
CAUTION :
An excessively high Kv factor results in
• oscillation,
• instability and
• an impermissibly high machine load
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
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The maximum Kv factor depends on
• the drive's design or dynamic response and
• the quality of the machine.
V
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Vsetp
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a:
b:
c:
d:
Setpoint characteristic
Kv factor too high
Kv factor adequate
Kv factor too low
t
system oscillates
optimum controller initialization
controller too slow; setpoint is reached very slowly
Figure 5-6. Control Response of the Position Controller in Dependence
on the Kv Factor
For best results, start with a very low initial value (1 to 2 1/s) as the basis for
subsequent optimization.
Maximum following error
The difference between the actual position and the setpoint position is called the
following error. A field is provided in the machine data for specification of the
maximum following error, which must be in the range from 0.001 to 99.999.
If the following error exceeds the specified value, the IP 266 aborts the
positioning operation and displays "Maximum following error exceeded" on the
programmer.
The position controller remains active. The axis does not come to a stop until the
following error has been brought back into range.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-13
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IP 266
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Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
a:
b:
Setpoint characteristic
Actual characteristic
s:
Following error
t0:
Start of positioning
t1:
The following error has
reached its maximum range
limit
Following error is brought
back into range
t2:
t1 t2
t
Figure 5-7. Following Error in Dependence on Setpoint and Actual Value
The following error changes in direct proportion to the traversing speed in
accordance with the following equation:
v
s=
kv
[mm]
If the actual value stops changing during a positioning operation, for instance
because
• the encoder failed or
• the power section was switched off,
the following error continually increases.
s = sset - sact
The driving voltage for the power section increases in proportion to the increase
in the following error. If the voltage exceeds 5 V, the current operation is aborted
with "Position control loop interrupted". The IP 266 automatically switches to
follow-up mode, a mode in which the position controller is disabled.
5-14
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Following error monitoring
You can choose between "ENABLE" and "DISABLE". If you choose "DISABLE", the
following error is no longer monitored and may therefore exceed the maximum
value of 99.999.
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Zero-speed monitoring
The IP 266's "Zero-speed monitoring" function also monitors the following error
(difference between actual value and setpoint). In contrast to following error
monitoring, zero-speed monitoring is effective only when the drive is at a
standstill. Because the following error is expected to be very small when the drive
is at zero speed, the value range is more closely restricted, being only from 0.001
to 64.999. When this function has been activated, the error message "Zero-speed
monitor responded" is displayed on the programmer. Aside from this error
message, there is no further reaction of any kind.
Note:
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The tolerance limit for zero-speed monitoring may not exceed the maximum
following error.
5.1.7
Correction Parameters
Tool wear necessitates adjustments to the plant or the program. These
adjustments can be made via various correction parameters.
The use of zero offsets makes it possible to invoke a subroutine in the traversing
program for performing similar or identical positioning operations.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-15
5-16
1st ZO
3rd ZO
50
2nd ZO
70
90
80
90
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Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
Example: Using a zero offset (ZO)
100
110
120
mm
10
20
10
20
10
20
Figure 5-8. Using a Zero Offset
Zero offset (ZO)
A zero offset makes it possible to match the coordinate basic origin to different
conditions.
You must enter four values ("0" is also allowed) in the machine data for zero
offsets 1 to 4. These values need not be identical. Entries not within the traversing
range are reported with an error message.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Also note that
• the software limit switches
• the reference point and
• the actual value
are recomputed when a zero offset is used. When you enter the data, remember
that all coordinates must be within the permissible range (refer to the following
example).
The zero offset values are available only to the programmable ZOs in traversing
programs (see Section 5.4). If you want to specify another zero offset, you must
use modes 12 and 15.
Example:
Table 5.3 contains absolute position values. The "Before" column shows the
positions that were current prior to a ZO. A relative zero offset of - 400 mm
renders the actual value, the software limit switches and the reference point
more positive by 400. As you can see in Table 5-3, this measure puts the software
end limit switch out of range.
Table 5-3. Coordinate Shift as Consequence of a Zero Offset
Reference point
Actual value
Before
Coordinates in mm
After
Software limit switch (start)
-16000
-15600
Software limit switch (end)
32500
32900
0
400
200
600
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-17
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
Tool offset (TO)
The tool offset is a coordinate shift, and is used to compensate for tool wear.
The maximum value for a tool offset depends on the axis used. The value
specified in the machine data can be called up from a traversing program only via
G functions for positive or negative tool offsets (see Section 5.4).
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Value range: ± 32767.999 mm
The sum of the coordinate values for
• software limit switches and
• tool offset
must be in the range ± 32767.999 mm.
Note:
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Invocation of a tool offset does not result in a traversing movement.
Use mode 15 if you want to implement a tool offset other than the one defined in
the machine data.
Following a tool offset, the coordinate system is displaced by the value of that
tool offset, i. e. the values become more positive by the value of the tool offset.
You will find two detailed examples showing the use of tool offsets in the part of
Section 5.3.15 that describes the tool offset mode.
Backlash compensation
"Play" in the drive system is referred to as backlash. On each reversal of the
direction of movement, the backlash causes the motor to rotate without
changing the position of the axis. Backlash outside the position control loop can
be compensated. When the direction of movement is reversed, the IP 266 makes
allowance for the backlash.
5-18
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
M : Motor
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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T
Backlash
T
T: Tachogenerator
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IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Backlash
Displayed actual value increases
Reversal of direction
Actual value display remains constant
although the encoder is generating
pulses axis passes through the backlash
After traversing the path = backlash
value, the actual value display shows the
actual value to be on the decrease
Axis movement around the backlash
: Incremental encoder
Figure 5-9. Backlash Outside the Control Loop (compensatible)
Conditions for correct operation:
• Positive mechanical coupling between drive and slide
- when a distance > backlash value is traversed.
•
Reference point has been approached
- when the distance to zero mark recognition is > backlash value.
•
Following a drive movement within the permissible play of the backlash
(follow-up mode), the conditions for correct operation are no longer fulfilled.
A positive mechanical coupling must be reestablished between the drive and
the slide.
•
Overswing can also result in loss of positive mechanical coupling. This is
possible when the overswing movement caused the distance traversed to be
less than the backlash. Overswing can be avoided by reducing the Kv factor.
5-19
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
5.1.8
IP 266
Miscellaneous Parameters
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Direction of the reference point approach
To enable exact reproducibility, the reference point must always be approached
from the same direction. The direction is selected by specifying "forw" for
forward or "rev" for reverse.
Note:
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Specification of the direction is crucial to the reproducibility of the reference
point (see Section 5.3.5).
PLC BCD-coded
You must enter "yes" in this field when you want to enter the positioning
specification data in BCD format. Entries in BCD code must be in the range
±9 999.999 mm.
Actual value, distance to go and following error, when monitored, are also output in BCD code.
Polarity of the hardware limit switches
The hardware switches and the IP 266 "External Stop" may be designed as NO or
NC contacts. You must enter the identifier for NO or NC in the machine data.
Enter "pos" to identify the switches as NO contact.
Enter "neg" to identify the switches as NC contacts.
IP STOP if CPU STOP
If you enter "YES", the operation in progress when the CPU stops is aborted.
5-20
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
5.2
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Modes and How to Invoke Them
The IP 266 provides a large variety of options for positioning, coordinate shifting
and positional corrections. These options are grouped under the term "modes".
The available modes can be divided into the two basic categories
• open-loop positioning and
• closed-loop positioning
Table 5-4 lists the modes belonging to each of these two categories.
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Table 5-4. Positioning Modes with and without Position Control
Positioning Modes
Without position control
With position control
Output of a
constant speed
setpoint
Setpoint output
= 0 V + drift
voltage
Approach to a
specific target
position; traversing a specific distance
Commandinitiated forward/reverse
travel
Controlled jog
Follow-up mode
Increment
mode absolute
Jog 1
Increment
mode relative
Jog 2
Bring coordinate
system to a
defined state
Approach to
reference point
Automatic
mode
Automatic
single block
mode
In addition to the modes listed above, a number of information modes are also
available. These include modes 71 to 73, which provide information on the status
and position of the drive.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-21
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Table 5-5. Overview of Available Modes
Mode
No
5-22
Description
Section
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Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
No
IP 266
The table below provides an overview of all IP 266 modes and a section reference
for each. You can call up these modes
• from the PLC's CPU via a STEP 5 program or
• from the programmer via the COM 266 software
An appropriate indication is given in the descriptions of those modes, which
cannot be invoked on the programmer.
Mode
Description
Section
1
Jog 1
5.3.1
13
Zero offset relative
5.3.13
2
Jog 2
5.3.2
14
Delete zero offset
5.3.14
3
Controlled jog
5.3.3
15
Enable tool offset
5.3.15
4
Follow-up
5.3.4
16
Disable tool offset
5.3.16
5
Set/approach to ref. point
5.3.5
17
Acknowledge error
5.3.17
6
Increment mode absolute
5.3.6
18
Enable drift compensation
5.3.18
7
Increment mode relative
5.3.7
19
Disable drift compensation
5.3.19
8
Automatic mode
5.3.8
26
EEPROM IP 266
5.3.20
9
Automatic single block
5.3.9
71
Read actual position
5.3.21
10
Enable teach-in mode
5.3.10
72
Read following error
5.3.21
11
Disable teach-in mode
5.3.11
73
Read distance to go
5.3.21
12
Zero offset absolute
5.3.12
99
Synchronize IP
5.3.22
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
5.3
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266 Modes
A mode is invoked on the IP 266 by entering an operator command. An operator
command comprises three elements: the mode, the parameters, and the
keystroke representing the function.
When you select a mode, you choose a function. After entering the required
parameters, you start the mode by choosing the function. Figure 5-10 shows the
elements comprising an operator command. In the following sections, each mode
description is preceded by a diagrammatic line showing the available options for
the operator command for that mode.
Operator command
Parameters
Mode
Example:
Jog 1
Override 1 to 200%
Mode
Parameters
Function
Forw/Rev/Stop/Exec
Function
Figure 5-10. Format of an Operator Command
5.3.1
Jog 1 (Mode 1)
Jog 1
Override 1 to 200%
Mode
Parameters
Forward/Reverse/Stop/Exec
Function
The drive can be positioned at a constant speed. The IP 266 uses jog speed 1 from
the machine data for this purpose. Please remember that you must specify two
speeds in the machine data for this mode, i. e. forward jog speeds 1 and reverse
jog speeds 1. Forward speeds and reverse speeds need not be identical.
After selecting the mode, start the positioning operation by entering the
function "Forward" or "Reverse".
In COM 266, the functions are actually keystrokes. Each function is allocated to a
specific function key, and a function is "entered" by pressing the function key to
which it is assigned.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-23
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Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Reverse
Stop
5-24
IP 266
Figure 5-11 illustrates a positioning operation in the "Jog 1" mode. "Forward"
starts the positioning operation. "Stop" initiates a defined deceleration
procedure. The "Reverse" function is executed as soon as the drive reaches zero
speed, as it was issued while deceleration was still in progress.
A direct change from Forward to Reverse is permitted.
Forward
t
t
t
V
t
-V
Figure 5-11. Initiating a Mode
The drive moves at 100% of the specified speed.
"Stop" initiates a defined deceleration procedure.
You can vary the speed with the Override factor. The IP 266 permits entry of an
Override factor of from 1% to 200% of the specified speed.
Note:
Theoretically, an excessively high Override factor could result in the drive
exceeding the maximum speed. In this case, the IP 266 positions at maximum
speed and flags the discrepancy on the monitor's error line.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
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If you want to change the speed during travel, simply forward the appropriate
Override factor to the IP 266.
Change the Override factor in the COM screen form or in the output frame
(PLC IP 266).
Press "Exec".
The drive accelerates or decelerates at a steady state to reach the new
positioning speed.
The IP 266 takes the
- acceleration rate or
- deceleration rate
from the machine data.
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2· V
V
200 %
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Start
50%
Override factor
t
Exec key
t
Figure 5-12. Controlling the Traversing Speed via the Override Factor
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-25
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
5.3.2
IP 266
Jog 2 (Mode 2)
Jog 2
Mode
Override 1 to 200%
Parameters
Forward/Reverse/Stop/Exec
Function
In essence, the "Jog 2" mode is identical to the "Jog 1" mode. The machine data
contains two speed values for this mode:
• Jog 2 forward speed
• Jog 2 reverse speed
The jog speeds for jog mode 1 and jog mode 2 need not be identical.
5.3.3
Jog under Open-Loop Control (Mode 3)
Jog under
Op.-Loop
Contol
Override 1 to 200%
Forward/Reverse/Stop/Exec
Mode
Parameters
Function
In this mode, axis travel is under open-loop control. Computation of the setpoint
position is disabled when this mode is started with
• "Forward" or
• "Reverse"
The setpoint position is now matched to the actual position. The result is a
following error of zero. The setpoint position is matched at the speed defined in
the machine data for Jog 2 mode. This value can be varied from 1 to 200% via the
Override factor. The speed computed from the encoder signals is displayed on the
programmer.
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If you invoked mode 73 before starting Jog 2 mode, the distance to go is
displayed.
Note:
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The IP 266 needs correct data for the drive system (encoder, axis) to attain the
speed displayed. Incorrect machine data will result in incorrect computation of
the actual value.
5-26
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
If the power section is correctly calibrated, the speed displayed and the actual
speed are identical.
The functions
• "Forward"
• "Reverse" and
• "Exec"
are the same in mode 1.
"Stop" decelerates the drive at the specified deceleration rate until it has reached
zero speed. When the axis has reached zero speed, the position control loop is
once again closed and the axis is positioned under closed-loop control.
Follow-Up Mode (Mode 4)
Follow-up
Mode
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5.3.4
Parameters
Start/Stop
Function
Like mode 3, mode 4 is a controlled mode.
Invoke mode 4 with "Start". The IP 266 executes the following operations:
- Computing of the position setpoint is disabled
- The position setpoint is corrected to the actual position
- Actual-value acquisition remains enabled.
The speed controller is thus driven with a setpoint of 0 V ± drift compensation.
A drift compensation value is taken into account only when mode 18 was previously started.
You can adjust the position of the axis either
• manually after switching off the power supply for the power section
or
• via an external speed setpoint.
The coordinate system is not affected. The speed controller can be reenabled at
any time.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-27
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Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
5.3.5
Reference point
Set/Approach
Mode
Parameters
5-28
IP 266
Note:
If your drive system is not free from backlash, care must be taken that the drive
be adjusted by at least the value of the backlash, regardless of whether the
adjustment is made manually or via an external speed setpoint, as only then
can it be guaranteed that a positive mechanical coupling will be maintained
after the adjustment has been made.
"Stop" terminates the mode. The axis returns to the closed-loop state.
Mode 4 is also enabled on a response from the IP 266's encoder monitor. In this
case, a setpoint of 0 V is output. When you have rectified the error, stop mode 4.
The controller is reenabled, as is the position control monitor.
Set/Approach Reference Point (Mode 5)
Start/Stop
Function
This mode is used to synchronize the IP 266's pulse counter with the drive system.
Synchronization of drive and pulse counter is necessary
• to enable an approach to an absolute target position
• to enable evaluation of the software limit switches
• to invoke modes 6, 8, 9 and 10 and
• because the reference point is lost following power-up
When this mode is invoked, the IP 266 assigns the coordinate value specified
under "reference coordinate" in the machine data to the axis position.
Note:
Zero offsets and tool offsets that were in force before the reference point was
assigned are not affected.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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Forward
(actual value increases)
NA
NA/E:
HA/E:
SA/E:
Ref:
HA
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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A
SA
Emergency limit switches start/end
Hardware limit switches start/end
Software limit switches start/end
Reference point switch
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A:
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D:
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IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
The IP 266 provides two options for establishing a reference point:
• Approach reference point
• Set reference point
Approach reference point
When you configured the drive, you installed a reference point switch. The
reference point switch must lie in the positioning range between the two
hardware limit switches. This switch is required for the "Approach reference
point" mode.
Note:
Hardware limit switches cannot be used as reference point switch.
Figure 5-13 illustrates the use of the various switches and their layout in a drive
system.
From the instant at which a switch is actuated until the instant at which it is
passed, the drive moves a specific distance. This distance, or path, is represented
as the spatial extent of the switches. This extent is absolutely necessary for the
correct functioning of the system. The drive must be so designed that it can be
decelerated from the maximum speed without passing the switch.
D
SE
HE
NE
Range of the linear axis
Possible drive
positions prior to a
reference point
approach
Figure 5-13. Drive Starting Positions for a Reference Point Approach
5-29
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
Before approaching a reference point, you must make a distinction between four
different situations. The criteria for making this distinction are
• the position of the drive prior to the reference point approach (position A, B,
C or D)
• the direction from which the reference point is approached
The four examples below describe a reference point approach in dependence on
the starting position of the drive.
The prerequisites listed in Table 5-6 apply to all four examples.
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Table 5-6. Prerequisites for the Reference Point Approach (Examples A to D)
Machine Data
Data item
Value/Specification
Direction of reference point approach
Reverse
Reference point approach speed 1
2000 mm/min
Reference point approach speed 2
200 mm/min
Reference point coordinate
0.000 mm
Example A: The drive is in front of the reference point switch.
Start the reference point approach with "Start". The drive then executes the
following movements in succession:
1. First, the axis accelerates in a forward direction, the IP 266 accelerating it at
the specified acceleration rate. The drive thus accelerates toward the reference point switch.
2. When reference point speed 1 has been reached, the drive continues at a
constant speed.
3. The movement is decelerated when
- the drive has reached the reference point switch and
- this switch is once again opened.
4. When the drive has come to rest, the IP 266 changes the direction of the
reference point approach (to reverse). The drive again accelerates until it
reaches reference speed 1.
5. When the edge of the signal from the reference point switch goes to 1, the
IP 266 decelerates the drive to reference speed 2.
5-30
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
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6. An edge change from 1 to 0 in the signal from the reference point switch sets
an internal Enable signal. When this signal is set, the IP 266 waits (while the
drive is moving at reference speed 2) for the next zero mark pulse from the
encoder. This signal is present only once during each encoder revolution. A
change of the zero mark signal from 0 to 1 sets the reference point. The
reference point coordinate specified in the machine data is assigned to this
position. At the same time, the IP 266 decelerates the drive until it reaches
zero speed. The actual value is detected and displayed.
When the drive is at zero speed, the actual value is lower (i. e. more negative)
than the reference point coordinate.
B
A
HA
REF
HE
NE
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Forward
R
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V for
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V2
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Start
Encoder's zero mark
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V rev
R: Reference point
HA/HE:
V1:
V2:
Hardware limit switches start/end
Reference speed 1
Reference speed 2
Position of the drive:
A: Prior to the reference point approach
B: After the reference point approach
Figure 5-14. Principle of the Reference Point Approach in Example A
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-31
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
A
Forward
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B
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Example B: The drive is positioned to the reference point switch
HE
NE
R
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V2
Encoder's zero mark
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V rev
R: Reference point
Figure 5-15. Reference Point Approach in Example B
This represents a special feature of the "Approach reference point" mode.
Start the reference point approach with "Start". The drive then executes the
following movements:
1. The IP 266 accelerates the drive immediately in the specified direction until it
reaches reference speed 2.
2. A change from 1 to 0 in the signal from the reference point switch sets an
internal Enable signal. When this signal is set, the IP 266 waits for the next zero
mark pulse from the encoder. A change of the zero mark signal from 0 to 1 sets
the reference point. The reference point coordinate specified in the machine
data is assigned to this position. At the same time, the IP 266 decelerates the
drive to zero speed. The actual value is acquired and displayed. When the drive
is at zero speed, the actual value is lower (i. e. more negative) than the
reference point coordinate.
5-32
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
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Example C: The drive is behind the reference point switch.
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A
Forward
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V rev
R: Reference point
Figure 5-16. Reference Point Approach in Example C
Start the reference point approach with "Start". The drive then executes the
following movements:
1. First, the IP 266 accelerates the axis in a forward direction at the specified
acceleration rate. The drive is thus accelerated toward the hardware end limit
switch.
2. When it has reached reference speed 1, the drive moves at constant speed.
3. When the limit switch is reached, the IP 266 decelerates the drive at the
specified deceleration rate.
4. When the drive reaches zero speed, the IP 266 switches it into reverse, again
accelerating it until it reaches reference speed 1.
5. When the edge of the signal from the reference point switch goes from 0 to 1,
the IP 266 decelerates the drive to reference speed 2.
6. An edge change from 1 to 0 in the signal from the reference point switch sets
an internal Enable signal. When this signal is set (the drive is moving at
reference speed 2), the IP 266 waits for the next zero mark pulse from the
encoder. A change from 0 to 1 in the zero mark signal sets the reference point.
The reference point coordinate specified in the machine data is assigned to this
position. At the same time, the IP 266 decelerates the drive to zero speed. The
actual value is acquired and displayed. When the drive is at zero speed, the
actual value is lower (i. e. more negative) than the reference point coordinate.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-33
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
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Example D: The drive is positioned to the hardware end limit switch.
B
Forward
REF
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V rev
R: Reference point
Figure 5-17. Reference Point Approach in Example D
Start the reference point approach with "Start". The drive then executes the
following movements:
1. The IP 266 accelerates the axis in a reverse direction at the specified
acceleration rate. The drive is thus moved toward the reference point switch.
2. When it has reached reference speed 1, the drive moves at a constant speed.
3. When the edge of the signal from the reference point switch goes from 0 to 1,
the IP 266 decelerates the drive to reference speed 2.
4. An edge change from 1 to 0 in the signal from the reference point switch sets
an internal Enable signal. When this signal is set (the drive is moving at
reference speed 2), the IP 266 waits for the next zero mark pulse from the
encoder. A change in the zero mark signal from 0 to 1 sets the reference point.
The reference point coordinate specified in the machine data is assigned to this
position. At the same time, the IP 266 decelerates the drive to zero speed. The
actual value is acquired and displayed. When the drive is at zero speed, the
actual value is lower (i. e. more negative) than the reference point coordinate.
5-34
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
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Actual-value display following a reference point approach
The reference point is set when the position encoder's zero mark signal goes from
0 to 1. At the same time, the drive is decelerated. The drive moves a distance of X
away from the reference point, the value of X depending on the specified
deceleration rate and on reference speed 2. The distance X varies in dependence
on the specified deceleration rates. If the drive is to come to rest exactly at the
reference point, it must be set to this position with the "Increment mode
absolute" following termination of the reference point approach.
V
a1
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a2
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V2
a1, a2, a3: Deceleration values
V2:
Reference point approach speed 2
Encoder's zero mark
Figure 5-18. Deceleration at Different Deceleration Rates
Reproducibility of a reference point
In order to be able to use the traversing programs without any modifications
even after an IP 266 power failure, it must be possible to reproduce the
coordinate zero point exactly. This can be done when you make the next
reference point approach from the same direction.
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A change in the direction of reference point approach shifts the coordinate zero
point. You can thus define two different zero points. The distance between them
depends on the "width" of the reference point switch (see Figure 5-19).
Note:
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If you replace an encoder, the old reference point cannot be reproduced
because of a change in the position of the zero mark.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-35
IP 266
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Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
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Forward
Encoder's zero mark
Location of the coordinate zero point
when the reference
direction is "reverse"
-2 -1 0
1
2
5
9
-5
-2 -1
Location of the coordinate zero point
when the reference
direction is "forward"
1 2
Figure 5-19. Reproducibility of the Reference Point for
Reference Point Coordinate 0
5-36
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Set reference point
Mode 5 allows you to set a reference point without moving the axis. To do so,
select the "Set" function in mode 5. By invoking this function, you can set the
reference point at an arbitrary axis position. The value specified in the machine
data is then assigned to this position.
Tool offsets and zero offsets that existed before this mode was started will still be
taken into account.
Note:
A reference point set with the "Set reference point" function is not
reproducible.
Only when there is positive mechanical coupling can this function be used in drive
systems that are not backlash-free.
The backlash is lost when the reference point is set. In this case, you must
establish a positive mechanical coupling by traversing a distance greater than the
value of the backlash.
5-37
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
5.3.6
IP 266
Increment Mode Absolute (Mode 6)
Linear axis
Increment mode absolute
Override 1 to 200%
Absolute target
position
Start/Stop/Exec
Parameters
Function
Mode
This mode allows you to specify a target position in absolute coordinates. The target position is approached at incremental speed, without regard to the starting
position of the drive. You can vary the incremental speed between 1 and 200% by
specifying an Override factor.
A
- 40 - 30 - 20 - 10
B
0
10
20
30
C
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
s/m
m
Coordinate zero point
Figure 5-20. Absolute Target Specification in Mode 6
Before you can use this mode,
• the reference point must be set and
• the absolute target position specified must lie within the positioning range of
the software limit switches.
5-38
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Example for Figure 5-20
You start mode 6 with the following parameters:
• Override 100%
• Absolute target coordinate: 30 mm
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Table 5-7. Drive Performance in Absolute Increment Mode
Prerequisites
Example (see
Drive Response
Figure 5-20)
Starting point A must be located
The drive moves forward to the specified
In the example,
in front of defined absolute target
position B
target position at 100% incremental speed.
50 mm forward
Starting point C must be located
The drive moves in reverse to the specified
In the example,
behind defined absolute target
position B
target position at 100% incremental speed.
40 mm in reverse
Rotary axis
Increment mode absolute
Mode
Override 1 to 200%
Absolute target
position
Parameters
Start/Stop/Forward/Reverse
/Exec
Function
The IP 266 responds differently to "Start" when the axis is rotary rather than
linear. It computes the shortest possible path to the target position, and positions
the axis accordingly.
If the distance is the same in both directions, the forward direction (clockwise)
has priority. Backlash is not taken into account. If the axis is already at the target
position, no movement is made, i. e. only the displacement of the object to be
positioned is taken into account, not that of the motor.
The "FORWARD" and "REVERSE" functions can also be invoked in this mode.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-39
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Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Function
5-40
Rotary axis
IP 266
The table below lists the permissible functions in absolute increment mode for
both rotary and linear axes.
Table 5-8. Permissible Functions in "Absolute Increment Mode"
Linear axis
START
Approach to target over the shortest Approach to absolute target position
possible path
STOP
Exit mode
FORWARD
Approach to target in forward direction (clockwise). If the axis is already at
the target position, the entire range is
traversed once.
REVERSE
Approach to target in reverse direction
(counter-clockwise). If the axis is already at the target position, the entire
range is traversed once.
EXEC
Change the speed via the Override factor when the axis is "traversing".
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
5.3.7
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Increment Mode Relative (Mode 7)
Increment mode relative
Mode
Override 1 to 200%
Distance
Forward/Reverse/Stop/Exec
Parameters
Function
This mode differs from mode 6 primarily as regards specification of the target
position; in this mode, you specify the target coordinate in relation to the current
position of the drive.
As in mode 6, the incremental speed can be varied by specifying an Override
factor.
Prerequisites when a reference point has been set:
The resulting target coordinate must lie between the two software limit switches.
When you use this mode without having set a reference point, the target position
may lie anywhere within the range of the two hardware limit switches.
The positioning direction depends on
• the first function selected in this mode
and
• the sign of the position specification
Table 5-9 shows how the direction of travel is determined.
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Table 5-9. Determining the Direction of Travel in Relative Increment Mode
Sign of the position
specification
Start function
Direction of travel
Positive
Forward
Forward
Negative
Forward
Reverse
Positive
Reverse
Reverse
Negative
Reverse
Forward
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-41
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A
Travel
5-42
C
- 40 - 30 - 20 - 10
0
10
20
B
30
Starting position
40
Reference point
50
60
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Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
Example: Relative increment mode is to be invoked at starting positions A
(-10 mm) and B (60 mm).
D
Forward
70
(absolute)
Distance
80
90
100
AC
-10 mm
+30 mm
+20 mm
BD
+60 mm
+30 mm
+90 mm
s/m
m
Reference point
Figure 5-21. Relative Target Specification
You start mode 7 with the parameters
- Override 100%,
- Distance: +30 mm
and the "Forward" or "Reverse" function.
Based on the starting positions in Figure 5-21, the table below shows the resulting values:
Table 5-10. Using the 'Forward' Function in Mode 7
Target position
(absolute)
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
5.3.8
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Automatic Mode (Mode 8)
Automatic mode
Mode
Program number
Parameters
Start/Stop
Function
A traversing program (TP) is started in automatic mode. Before you can start a
traversing program, you must write it and store it on the IP 266 (see Section 5-4).
The program may contain
• positioning operations
• coordinate shifts
• corrections and
• dwells.
The IP 266 executes all programmed operations in succession. You run the program by invoking the Start function. Program execution always begins with the
first block in the program.
The Stop function aborts the program. Any zero offsets invoked during program
execution are retained, i. e. they are not reset. Zero offsets are reset only when
the program executes in its entirety.
In automatic mode, enabled tool offsets are retained after the program
terminates or is aborted.
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If a traversing program processes a rotary axis, it is preset for traversing to the
target position over the shortest possible path. Because the IP 266 itself computes
the shortest path, and thus the direction of travel, you must be aware of the
possible results of a flying change; if you have programmed a flying change, you
must know in advance whether such a change is permissible or whether it will
result in an error.
Note:
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A machining program that was aborted with 'Stop' cannot be resumed at the
point of interruption.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-43
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
The remaining distance to go is retained until the next positioning operation.
Interruption of the traversing program via the "External Start Enable" signal is
possible. If a positioning operation or dwell is currently in progress, it is completed prior to interruption of the program. When the signal is enabled, i. e.
when the signal level is "1", the traversing program is resumed at the point of
interruption.
5.3.9
Automatic Single Block (Mode 9)
Automatic single block
Mode
Program number
Parameters
Start/Stop/Exec
Function
Traversing programs written for mode 8 can be used without modification in
mode 9. Before starting the mode, enter the number of the traversing program
you want to execute. Start the mode by selecting the "Start" function.
The IP 266 interrupts program execution prior to every positioning operation or
dwell. Start the next job with "Exec".
As in mode 8, an "External Start Enable" signal can interrupt the traversing program. If a positioning operation or dwell is in progress, it is completed prior to
the interruption.
The IP then awaits the "Exec" command. When you have pressed "Exec", absence
of the "External Start Enable" signal is flagged with an error message. When the
signal is enabled, i. e. becomes "1", the traversing program is resumed at the
point of interruption.
"Exec" is not permitted at this point, and would abort the traversing program.
5-44
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Interruption points in a traversing program in single block mode
Table 5-11 lists the points at which a program is interrupted.
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Table 5-11. Interruption Points in a Traversing Program in Mode 9
Special function
Sample block
Effect
Blocks containing a flying
N10 G10 X1000 F100 M10
Blocks are treated as a single
change (G10 function)
N20 X2000 F500
block. No interruption takes
place.
Blocks containing a flying
change (G10 function) and a
programmed stop (M00 func-
N10 G10 X 1000 F100 M00
N20 X2000 F500
Blocks are executed separately.
The program is interrupted
immediately preceding the
tion)
X2000 function.
Blocks containing
changes,
corrections or
offsets
N10 X100 F1000 M10
The program is not aborted un-
N20 G56 X200 F1000 M11
til function G56 has executed,
i. e. just prior to the new positioning operation.
Blocks containing a programmed stop (function M00)
A programmed stop (M00) is suppressed in mode 9.
Exception: The block containing the M00 function also contains the G10 function.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-45
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
5.3.10 Enable Teach-In (Mode 10)
Enable teach-in
Mode
Program number
Parameters
Start
Function
This mode is used to create a new traversing program for
• automatic mode
• automatic single block mode
Prerequisites to the use of this mode:
• The new traversing program must be assigned a number that has not already
been assigned to another program.
• The IP 266's RAM must contain valid machine data.
• The reference point must be set.
• There must be enough room in the IP 266's RAM for the new program.
Enter a program number that is not yet on the module. A traversing program
with this number is then generated on the IP 266.
Each block in the new program has the same structure, and comprises three elements:
• Block number
• Target position
• Speed
Block number
The blocks are numbered (see Section 5.4) in ascending order, beginning with
N01. The third block thus has the number N03.
5-46
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Target position is specified
by approaching it in
mode 1
mode 2
by entering the coordinate in
mode 6
mode 7
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Target position
You can approach a target position in various modes. A new block is not written
until you press "Exec" while the drive is at zero speed.
Table 5-12. Target Specification in Mode 10
Function directive
The modes can be started by selecting one of the following
functions:
”Forward”
”Reverse”
”Start”
”Exec" if you want to change the override
”Exec" while the axis is at zero speed writes the current
actual position in a new block in the traversing program.
Speed
You can specify a new target position in modes 1, 2/3, 6 and 7. This allows
positioning to take place at the speeds specified in the machine data. You can
vary these speeds via an Override factor, thus enabling extremely exact
positioning.
Incremental speed 100% is always entered for each traversing program block
generated in teach-in mode.
5-47
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Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Jog mode
20%
200 mm/min
5-48
or
Mode 1
Mode 2
Mode 3
1000 mm/min
2000 mm/min
50%
1000 mm/min
absolute
Mode 6
100%
2500 mm/min
IP 266
The figure below illustrates the use of the various speeds.
Start of mode 10
Increment mode
relative
Mode 7
2500 mm/min
Override factor
200%
but at no more
than V max
Incremental speed 100% : 2500mm/min
Positioning to a specific target using various
modes
Speed specified in the
machine data
Selection of the actual
speeds via the Override factor
Following transfer to the block
Entry in the traversing
program
Figure 5-22. The Use of Speeds in Mode 10
Exception:
An error occurs in the position control loop in "Teach-in" mode. In this case, the
IP 266 starts mode 4 on its own initiative.
You must then carry out the following steps:
• Terminate mode 4 by selecting the "Stop" function
• Terminate the "Teach-in" mode with mode 11
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
and
parameters
key for
Mode 10
Prog. no. 7
Start
Mode 1
Override 20%
Forward
Mode 1
Exec
Mode 6
Abs. target
Start
pos.
3000 mm
Mode 6
Exec
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Example:
Generating a new traversing program in "Teach-in" mode:
The table below lists the actions you must take. Start at the top of the table and
work down. The entries in the "Axis status" column indicate the state of the axis
after the relevant key has been pressed.
Table 5-13. Generating a New Traversing Program in Mode 10
Press function
Effect
Axis
Axis
status
position
Program 7 is generated on the
module
Stopped
Arbitrary
Move axis forward at 20% of jog
speed 1
Traversing
Variable in
accordance
with movement
Mode 1
Override 50%
Exec
Change the speed to 50% of jog
speed 1
Traversing
Variable
Mode 1
Stop
Decelerate
Traversing
Variable
Zero speed
Store as block
N01 X1258.250 F2500
Stopped
E. g.
1258.250 mm
Stopped
1258.250 mm
Move to absolute target position
Traversing
Variable
Decelerate at position 3000 mm
Stopped
3000 mm
Store as block 2
Stopped
3000 mm
5-49
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
Disable teach-in
Mode
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5.3.11 Disable Teach-In (Mode 11)
Start
Parameters
Function
This mode disables teach-in (mode 10).
Prerequisites:
Mandatory:
Mode 10 was started.
Recommended:
The creation of positioning blocks in mode 10.
End block Nnn M02 is entered in the machining program. nn is the block number.
The value of Nnn depends on the current length of the traversing program.
5.3.12 Absolute Zero Offset (ZO) (Mode 12)
Absolute zero offset
Absolute coordinate
Mode
Parameters
Start
Function
A ZO is used to assign new coordinates to a drive system. A ZO transforms all coordinates for
• the reference point and
• the software limit switches
and checks them for validity. No reference point need be set when this mode is
invoked.
An "Absolute zero offset" assigns the value of the "Absolute coordinate" parameter to the actual value. This value is referred to in the following as ZO, or zero
offset.
Actvalnew = ZO
The zero point is offset by the value
ZO - Actvalold
The "Invalid position specification" error message is displayed if the maximum
range is exceeded.
5-50
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
relative
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Note:
If mode 12 is restarted, the old ZO is replaced by the new ZO.
The IP 266 also provides other options for specifying a zero offset. The available
options are listed in Table 5-14.
Table 5-14. IP 266 Zero Offset Options
lute
ZO
Mode
abso-
12
Assigns a coordinate value to the current actual position.
This coordinate value is displayed on the programmer as the new
actual position.
13
Offsets a coordinate value by a specifiable value
Traversing
program
G54 to G57
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Effect
Offset in a traversing program by the values specified in the
machine data.
These offsets are reset when the traversing program is exited.
Once set, a zero offset is retained until
• it is overwritten by a new value
• reset via mode 14
or
• the module's power supply is switched off.
Note the following when specifying a zero offset:
Negative offset:
- Offset 32767.999 - |Software end limit switch|
5-51
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
Positive offset:
Offset 32767.999 - |Software start limit switch|
Example: The drive is at the absolute position 50 mm. This position is to be offset
in succession by 400 mm, -200 mm and 0 mm.
Select mode 12.
Enter the coordinate value for the new actual position.
Start the mode with the "Start" function.
Repeat the sequence for each zero offset.
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The coordinate system must "respond" as shown in Figure 5-23. You can control the response by viewing the actual-value displays.
Actual value
REF
HA
0
50
350
400
-250
-200
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NA
Forward
NA
ZO 400 mm
ZO -200 mm
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ZO 0 mm
s
0
= Limit switches (software, hardware, emergency end switch)
Figure 5-23. Zero Offset in Mode 12
5-52
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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Act. position
150 mm
0 mm = PS
200 mm = PE
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Rotary axis:
When using a rotary axis, you may specify an absolute zero offset value outside
the boundaries of the positioning range.
Example: A continuous belt has a positioning range of 0 to 200 mm. The current
actual position is 150 mm.
An absolute zero offset of 300 mm changes the coordinate system
The current actual position is now 300 mm. The positioning range starts at
150 mm and the end of the positioning range is 350 mm.
The coordinate system was thus offset by the value
ZOabs - Actvalold
From this point on, all absolute target specifications must lie within the new
positioning range limits.
Absolute ZO
300 mm
Act. position
300 mm
150 mm = PS
350 mm = PE
PS = Start of positioning range
PE = End of positioning range
Figure 5-24. Zero Offset for a Rotary Axis
You will find an overview of all zero offsets in those portions of Section 5.4 which
deal with G functions G53 to G57.
5-53
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Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
5-54
Relative zero offset
Value
Mode
Parameters
Sign of the value
Start function
Positive
Forward
more negative
Negative
Forward
more positive
Positive
Reverse
more positive
Negative
Reverse
more negative
IP 266
5.3.13 Relative Zero Offset (ZO) (Mode 13)
Forward/Reverse
Function
In contrast to mode 12, this mode allows you to specify the direction of the offset
by selecting the "Forward" or "Reverse" function. You can also, of course, specify
the offset direction by signing the offset value.
This mode does not require that a reference point be set.
The true direction of a zero offset is determined by
• the sign of the offset value
and
• the selected function.
Each time this mode is started, the zero offset is summated as shown in
Figure 5-15.
A zero offset can be reset only via mode 14 or by "power off".
Note:
An absolute zero offset overwrites a relative zero offset.
Table 5-15. Coordinate Changes Produced by a Zero Offset
Coordinates become
The new actual value thus computes to
• Actvalnew = Actvalold - ZO when the direction is "Forward"
• Actvalnew = Actvalold + ZO when the direction is "Reverse"
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
ZO -150 forw.
0
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EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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50
200
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0
0
-300
0
150
-150
150
300
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ZO -50 reverse
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ZO -200 forw.
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IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Example: The drive is at the absolute position + 150 mm. Zero offsets of 300 mm,
- 200 mm, - 150 mm and 50 mm are to be carried out in succession.
Select mode 13.
Enter the value for the offset, including the sign.
Start the mode with the "Forward" or "Reverse" function. The
function specifies the direction of the offset.
Repeat the sequence for each of the zero offsets.
The coordinate system must respond as shown in Figure 5-25.
Note:
If you want to start the mode with the "Reverse" function, you must invert the
sign when you enter the offset value.
Actual value
s
0
200
350
s
Figure 5-25. Relative Zero Offset with Different Values
5-55
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
Delete zero offset
Mode
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5.3.14 Delete Zero Offset (ZO) (Mode 14)
Parameters
Start
Function
This mode deletes (resets) all zero offsets that were set
• via mode 12,
• via mode 13 and
• via G functions (in prematurely aborted traversing programs).
5.3.15 Enable Tool Offset (TO) (Mode 15)
Enable tool offset
Mode
Offset
Parameters
Forward/Reverse
Function
This mode is used to compensate for changes in the tool length caused e. g. by
tool wear.
Prerequisites for a tool offset:
• Valid machine data on the IP 266
• The offset value must lie within the maximum range.
This mode does not require a reference point.
5-56
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
The direction of the tool offset is determined by
• the sign of the offset value and
• the Start function ("Forward" or "Reverse")
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Table 5-16. Coordinate Changes Produced by a Tool Offset
Sign of the
value
Start function
Positive
Forward
more positive
Negative
Forward
more negative
Positive
Reverse
more negative
Negative
Reverse
more positive
Coordinates become
Following a tool offset, the position of the new tool tip is always displayed as
actual position. The tool offset is taken into account when a target position is
specified.
The range of the software limit switches is recomputed following a tool offset.
Use the following formulas as basis for specification of a tool offset:
In a negative direction:
- Tool offset 32767.999 - |Software end limit switch|
In a positive direction:
Tool offset 32767.999 - |Software start limit switch|
The IP 266 does not execute a tool offset outside the permissible range limits.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-57
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Actual position on
start
Location
of the drill
tip on start
Final
position
Location
of the drill
tip when
the final
drilling
position
has been
reached
5-58
100
A
200
250
Tool wear
150
A
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100
B
240
TO = -10 mm
TO and positioning
140
200
B
Location of the drill
tip when the final
drilling position has
been reached
Workpiece is no
longer completely drilled
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Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
Example: Tool offset with mode 15
A drilling program used to drill a hole 15 mm in depth is to carry out the following steps:
1. Move the drill to the start position
2. Switch on the drill
3. Drill feed 15 mm
4. Return drill to the drilling position
5. Switch off the drill
6. Move the drill to the start position
The longer the drill is used, the more the drill depth decreases. When the drill
reaches a length of 40 mm, it can no longer drill a complete hole. The drill tip
remains in the workpiece. A tool offset shifts the coordinates. After being set to
the starting position (100), the drill can once again drill a complete hole.
90
100
190
200
B
B
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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Actual position on
start
Location
of the
drill tip
on start
Final
position
Location
of the drill
tip when
the final
drilling
position
has been
reached
100
A
150
200
A
250
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Tool wear
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IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Example: Tool change and TO
When the tool has reached a length at which a tool offset is no longer possible, it
must be replaced. The new tool is 10 mm too long. This can be compensated for
via a tool offset, thus fulfilling the prerequisites for the automatic drilling
sequence.
100
B
200
B
Tool change, TO and
positioning
TO = 10 mm
100
C
110
130
160
200
C
210
230
260
5-59
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
Example: The traversing range of a linear axis lies between the software limit
switches; a reference point has been set.
Software start limit switch:
- 500 mm
Software end limit switch:
700 mm
Traversing range is from - 500 mm to 700 mm.
Following a tool offset of 100 mm in a forward direction, these limits change as
follows:
Software start limit switch:
- 400 mm
Software end limit switch:
800 mm
The new range limits must be taken into account when specifying absolute target
positions.
You will find an overview of all TO options in Section 5.4.2 under the heading
"G Functions".
Rotary axis
The tool offset value must always be less than the difference between the
end of the traversing range and the start of the traversing range.
If the value is too high, it is rejected and an error message displayed.
A tool offset value that is within the permissible range modifies the actual position by the tool offset value. This does not affect the traversing range, which
maintains its original range limits.
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Example:
Traversing range prior to the TO
0 to 360°
5-60
Traversing range after a TO of 30°
0 to 360°
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Disable tool offset
Mode
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5.3.16 Disable Tool Offset (TO) (Mode 16)
Parameters
Start
Function
This mode resets all tool offsets that were set via
• mode 15 or
• G functions in the traversing programs
Mode 16 cancels all tool offsets, i. e. you cannot use this mode to revoke the tool
offset that was set via mode 15 while retaining the tool offset that was set via
G functions.
Acknowledge error
Mode
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5.3.17 Acknowledge Error (Mode 17)
Parameters
Start
Function
Errors occurring during operation or during IP 266 start-up may have a number of
different causes, such as
• operator input error
• external event (such as tripping of a limit switch)
• incomplete installation (e. g. machine data not complete)
• errors in machine data
Mode 17 is used to acknowledge an error.
Aside from mode 17, you can acknowledge an error only by starting another
mode.
You cannot acknowledge an error by invoking an info (i. e. monitoring) mode.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-61
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
Enable drift compensation
Mode
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5.3.18 Enable Drift Compensation (Mode 18)
Parameters
Start
Function
Prerequisite to correct operation of the IP 266 is a properly calibrated power section (see Table 5-17).
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Table 5-17. Data for Calibrating the Power Section
Power section
input
The motor
+10 V
rotates in the forward direction at the rated speed
- 10 V
rotates in the reverse direction at the rated speed
±0 V
is at zero speed
These conditions must be regarded as ideal conditions, and cannot be attained
during operation. Drift may occur even in well-calibrated power sections due to
• tolerances in the power electronics components and
• temperature drift
You can use mode 18 to compensate for such a drift.
Prerequisites:
• The axis must be at rest ('finished' status)
• The position control loop must be closed
Drift compensation:
Select mode 18
Start mode 18 with the "Start" function.
The IP 266 now monitors the following error for approximately 4 seconds. The
following error corresponds to the drift in the power electronics. The IP 266 then
computes a voltage value proportional to the following error as setpoint speed.
When mode 18 is exited, this constant voltage is continually superimposed on the
position controller's setpoint speed.
An "External Stop" does not abort this mode.
5-62
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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n
VD
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
+10V
Max. attainable with drift
compensation
n rated
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IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Optimum characteristics
n rated
nD
-10V
V
n
nrated
nD
V
VD
:
:
:
:
:
Speed
Rated speed
Drift speed at 0 V
Output voltage
Drift voltage for
0 speed
Figure 5-26. Voltage - Speed Characteristic with Drift Compensation
WARNING!
Serious errors disable the IP and produce a setpoint of 0 V without drift compensation.
Serious errors are:
watchdog errors (internal errors)
resets
The drive moves if there is drift.
The graphic shows that it is no longer possible to cover the full speed range. A
portion of the high negative speed range can no longer be used.
If you were now to execute a positioning operation at a speed within this range,
the following error would continually increase. Figure 5-27 illustrates this more
clearly.
If the following error exceeds the specified maximum value, the IP 266 aborts the
positioning operation currently in progress and outputs an error message.
5-63
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Disable drift compensation
Mode
5-64
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Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Parameters
IP 266
Movement with V max. increase in the following error
Vsetp=V rated
V act
S : Following error
Figure 5-27. Erroneous Following Error Characteristic in Conjunction with
Drift Compensation
Following modification of the machine data and "Power Off", the drift compensation voltage, if any, is disabled. Mode 18 must be restarted in order to
determine the required compensation voltage.
5.3.19 Disable Drift Compensation (Mode 19)
Function
Start
With mode 19, you can disable the drift compensation enabled via mode 18. The
compensation voltage is set back to 0 V.
WARNING!
If there is drift, there will be movement in your drive system, as the
compensation voltage needed to counteract the drift is no longer available.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
5.3.20 EEPROM (Mode 26)
EEPROM
Mode
Direction
Start
Parameters
Function
You can use this mode to transfer data from the IP 266's RAM to EEPROM or from
EEPROM to the IP's RAM.
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Mode 26 always transfers all available data from the source to the destination,
i. e. the machine data and all traversing programs.
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Note:
This mode can be invoked only in a STEP 5 program (see Section 7).
These functions can also be invoked in the COM 266 "TRANSMIT" (TRANSFER)
form (see Section 6.4.2).
This mode is started automatically on the IP 266 run-up that follows a "Power
ON". The IP 266 outputs an error message when the EEPROM contains no valid
machine data.
The service life of an EEPROM chip is 10,000 write cycles.
Example:
The IP 266's RAM contains the following data block:
• One machine data record in DB1
• Several traversing programs in DB1 to DB4
When the mode is started for RAM EEPROM, both the machine data and the
traversing programs are transferred. Any data in the EEPROM prior to the transfer is overwritten with the new data.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-65
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
5.3.21 Information Modes (Mode 71, Mode 72, Mode 73)
Current information can be called up from the IP 266 independently of modes 1
to 19 and 26. The IP 266 provides the so-called Information (or Monitoring)
modes for this purpose. These modes do not affect other modes, and can be
invoked at any time without regard to the status of the axis.
Once started, an Information mode is invoked cyclically, and remains in force until another Information mode is started.
In contrast to modes 1 to 26, modes 71 to 73 do not return information to the
STEP 5 program.
Read actual position
Mode
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Read actual position (mode 71)
Parameters
Start
Function
This mode is preset on IP 266 start-up, and displays the value which the IP 266
computed from the current encoder data and the machine data.
Read following error
Mode
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Read following error (mode 72)
Parameters
Start
Function
This mode allows you to read the following error so that you will have this
information at your disposal should an abort due to a "Response from following
error monitor" be imminent. This, in turn, allows you to react to an increase in
the following error prior to the abort and take measures to rectify the problem.
5-66
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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Mode
Synchronize IP
Mode
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Read distance to go (mode 73)
Parameters
Parameters
Start
Function
Select this mode when you want to initiate additional actions in your STEP 5 program prior to termination of an IP 266 job (e. g. 20 mm before the target
position).
5.3.22 Synchronize IP (Mode 99)
Start
Function
This mode must be selected when the IP 266 is put into operation, as it synchronizes communication between the PLC and the IP 266.
This mode must be started after every PLC cold (power off/power on) or warm
(STOP RUN) restart and after every IP 266 reset. If this mode is not started, it
will not be possible to invoke any other mode.
As in the case of the Information modes, this mode does not return information
to the STEP 5 program.
Note:
This mode is not needed to work with COM 266.
5-67
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
5.4
IP 266
Elements of the Traversing Program
A traversing program is a cohesive sequence of traversing operations, dwells and
corrections. It consists of individual blocks comprising at least one self-contained,
purposeful job.
The traversing programs are stored in the IP 266's RAM, and can be executed as a
whole with mode 8 or block by block with mode 9.
A traversing program is divided into three main parts:
%33 Test program
Program header (see Section 5.4.1)
N1 G25 X300.000 F2000 M10
N2 G04 F1000
N3 X200.250 F1000 M30
N4 G00 X120.000 M40
Traversing blocks
(see Section 5.4.2)
N5 M02
Termination block; end of program (see Section 5.4.3)
A traversing program must comprise at least a program header and a termination
block.
A traversing program may contain no more than 1023 ASCII characters. The number of traversing programs is limited to 250.
The IP 266 provides 7K bytes RAM for traversing programs.
5-68
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
5.4.1
Program Header
The program header comprises
• the program identifier
• the program number
• max. 58 characters of arbitrary text
• a <1> character as header terminator
Program identifier
% =Main program
L =Subroutine
Program number = DB no.
0 to 255
Max. 58 characters
of arbitrary text
<1> as header terminator
%
5
Main program in DB5
<1>
L
12
Subroutine in DB12
<1>
Figure 5-28. Format of the Program Header
The distinction between main program and subroutine is for documentational
purposes only. The IP makes no distinction. Every program can be either a main
program or a subroutine.
Note:
Recursive structures and reciprocal calls are not possible.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-69
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
5.4.2
IP 266
Traversing Blocks
Table 5-18 lists all functions permitted in a traversing program.
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Table 5-18. Functions in a Traversing Block
Contents of a Traversing Block
Function
Contents
Type of information
Block no.
N
Block number
Subroutine
Function 1
L
Calls
Function 2
G
E. g. type of position specification (absolute/relative)
Preparatory
Function 3
X
Positioning information
Geometry
Function 4
F
E. g. machining speed, dwell time, loop passes
Technology
Function 5
M
Auxiliary functions (output to the PLC interface for
control of machine functions)
Organization
A block may contain one or more of the functions listed in the table. Each block
must begin with a block number. If several functions are to be programmed in
one block, they must be programmed in the order shown in the table. Each
function may appear only once in a given block and must be followed by at least
one <space>. Every block must be terminated with <1>.
The N function (block number)
The first function in a block, the N function, specifies the block number. This block
is mandatory, and consists of the letter "N", followed by a number comprising up
to three digits in the range 0 to 999.
Block numbers may appear in any order, and may be used more than once within
a traversing program.
The blocks are always processed in the order in which they are written in the
traversing program.
5-70
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
Example: N10 L123
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
In the following example, the processing order does not change. The order in
which blocks are processed is determined only by the order of those blocks in the
program.
Example:
%9 Sample program 1
N10 G74 M10
N20 G24 F5
N30 L36
N40 X50 F2000
N50 G20
N60 M02
%8 Sample program 2
N30 G74 M10
N10 G24 F5
N20 L36
N60 X50 F2000
N50 G20
N40 M02
The two sample programs are identical.
The L function
Within a block, another program can be called as subroutine. The subroutine call
must immediately follow the N function, and comprises the letter "L", followed
by the program number of the program to be called.
No further functions may follow the L function. The block may only be terminated with <1>.
<1>
.
..
Subroutines may be nested, but the nesting depth of loops and subroutines
together may not exceed five.
Note:
Recursive structures and reciprocal calls are not possible.
5-71
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
The G function
The first function to follow an N function may also be a G function. A G function
is identified by the letter "G", followed by a two-digit number. A number of
G functions are latching functions, i. e. they remain in force when the traversing
program is exited.
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Table 5-19. Permissible G Functions
G Function
*
Latching
Function Description
00
Rapid traverse
04
10
20
Dwell
Flying change
End of loop
24
25*
26
•
•
27
•
Start of loop
Approach targets over the shortest path
Approach targets in a clockwise direction (rotary axis only)
40
Approach targets in a counter-clockwise direction (rotary
axis only)
Cancel tool offset
43
44
53
Enable positive tool offset
Enable negative tool offset
Cancel offsets
54
55
56
Enable offset 1
Enable offset 2
Enable offset 3
57
70
71
•
•
Enable offset 4
Size specifications in 0.1 inches
Size specifications in mm
74
90*
91
•
•
Approach to reference point
Absolute size specifications
Incremental size specifications
These functions are preset on IP 266 start-up
5-72
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
•
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
G00: Rapid traverse
A defined target is approached at maximum speed. The target must be specified as an X function immediately behind the G function.
A block containing the G00 function must have the following format:
N10 G00 X1000
The drive approaches target position 1000 at maximum speed.
An additional speed specification after the X function is not permitted.
The maximum speed is taken from the machine data.
•
G04: Dwell
A block containing G04 effects a dwell. The duration of the dwell can be
specified in increments of 100 ms with the F function.
Example: N10 G04 F10
The IP executes a dwell of 10 x 100 ms.
•
G10: Flying change
The block that follows the one containing the G10 function is executed without stopping the axis.
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This makes it possible to
- change the speed during a positioning movement
- modify M functions during a continuous positioning
Note:
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By retracting the "External Start Enable" signal, you can also interrupt a
block that was linked to the preceding block via G10.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-73
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
Example 1: Changing the speed during a positioning movement
V
1000
Program without G10
50
M30
100
M31
150
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N10 X50 F1000 M30
N20 X100 F500 M31
N30 X150 F1000 M32
N40 M02
500
s
M32
The G10 function makes of the interrupted movement a positioning operation with smooth speed transitions.
V
1000
Program with G10
50
M30
5-74
100
M31
150
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N10 G10 X50 F1000 M30
N20 G10 X100 F500 M31
N30 X150 F1000 M32
N40 M02
500
s
M32
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Example 2: Alternating M functions
V
1000
Program without G10
N10
N20
N30
N40
500
50
M10
100
M11
150
X50 F1000 M10
X100 F1000 M11
X150 F1000 M12
M02
s
M12
Without the M function output, this movement could also be programmed in
a block:
N10 X150 F1000
A smooth movement of the type programmed in this block can be attained
with the G10 function.
V
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1000
Program with G10
N10
N20
N30
N40
500
50
M10
100
M11
150
G10 X50 F1000 M10
G10 X100 F1000 M11
X150 F1000 M12
M02
s
M12
The "Position reached" signal is not output following a block containing a
G10 function.
In mode 9 (Automatic Single Block), blocks linked with G10 are treated as one
block.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-75
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
When G10 and M00 (programmed stop) are programmed in the same block,
M00 has priority. To continue the program, you must press the EXEC key.
The G10 function (flying change) is not permitted when the block to follow in
a flying change
• acts in the opposite direction
• contains a dwell
• contains only an M02
• is too short to reach the required final speed
• contains a change, a tool offset or a zero ofset
• contains a traversing path which is shorter than the preceding block's
deceleration distance
• could not be completely interpreted before the block containing the G10
finished executing
The traversing program interpreter aborts the program immediately when it
detects one of the above errors. Because the interpreter is always three blocks
ahead of the block currently executing, however, the program is aborted in
the current block rather than in the block that actually caused the error.
Example:
A traversing program containing eight positioning operations is to be processed. The first seven blocks contain a G10 function, i. e. all blocks are to be
executed without stopping in "flying change" mode.
The eighth block, however, was programmed so that a change of direction
would ensue. The interpreter detects this error and aborts the fifth block, the
block currently executing.
Program:
5-76
N10
N20
N30
N40
N50
N60
N70
N80
N90
G10 X50 F100
G10 X80 F200
G10 X130 F300
G10 X155 F400
G10 X200 F500
G10 X240 F600
G10 X280 F700
X0 F800
M02
<--- Traversing program aborted
<--- Block with error
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
•
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
G20: End of loop
G24: Start of loop
Loops may be nested. Subroutines which themselves contain loops may also
be called in a loop. The nesting depth for loops and subroutine calls together
may not exceed five. A continuous loop may be programmed only once, and
only at the highest level. A program invoked via an L function may not
contain a continuous loop.
G20: End of loop
G20 identifies the end of a program loop. A block containing G20 may contain no other functions.
G24: Start of loop
The G24 function identifies the start of a program loop.
The number of loop passes must be specified via the F function.
Example 1:
N20
N120
Example 2:
N20
N130
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
G24
.
.
.
.
.
.
G20
F5
G24
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
G20
F0
A loop with five passes begins on
this line
The loop ends on this line
When you specify a 0 as the
parameter for the number of loop
passes, you define the loop as
continuous loop.
End of the continuous loop.
5-77
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
•
IP 266
G25: Approach target over the shortest path
G26: Approach target in a clockwise direction
G27: Approach target in a counter-clockwise direction
These functions can be executed for a rotary axis only, and are ignored for a
linear axis.
G25: Approach target over the shortest path
When the program is invoked, it defaults to G25. The IP computes the
direction of travel. If the distance is the same in both directions, the target is
approached from the preferred direction (clockwise).
90
270
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0
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180
270
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0
Backlash
270
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The IP does not take backlash compensation into account when computing
the direction, thus making it possible that the longer path will be taken in a
small number of special situations. Figure 5-29 illustrates such a situation.
90
180
180
Traversing movement by the
backlash. Actual value is still
0/360 degrees
Traversing movement by
the backlash and an
additional 180 degrees
Actual value is 180 degrees
Figure 5-29. Traversing of a Rotary Axis with Backlash
Prerequisites:
• The backlash compensation value was entered in the machine data
• G25 was programmed and the distance is the same in both directions
• The direction of travel in the last operation was counter-clockwise
5-78
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Result: The IP 266 chooses the preferred direction. Due to the programmed
backlash, the movement takes longer than it would in the opposite direction.
The distance for the motor-driven axis is longer by the backlash compensation
value.
The function selects the direction of travel only when absolute target positions have been defined.
G26: Approach target in a clockwise direction
All absolute target positions are approached in a clockwise direction.
G27: Approach target in a counter-clockwise direction
All absolute target positions are approached in a counter-clockwise direction.
G26 and G27 are effective only in conjunction with "Absolute size
specifications" (G90).
•
G40: Disable tool offset
G43: Enable positive tool offset
G44: Enable negative tool offset
A tool offset can be regarded as a coordinate shift, and is required to
compensate for changes in the tool length caused by tool wear. An existing
traversing program need not be reprogrammed to include a tool offset, but is
adapted via a compensating factor.
Periodic tool wear (e. g. drill wear) can be measured and corrected using the
G functions. The following table shows the effect of a tool offset.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-79
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Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Positioning
direction
Setpoint
Setpoint
5-80
100
105
80
85
90
Suitable tool
Offset
± 0 mm
15 mm
Tool too short
Offset
-5 mm
IP 266
Table 5-20. Tool Offset
Tool too long
Offset
+5 mm
85
Note
Prior to tool
offset
10 mm
95
15 mm
-5 mm
+5 mm
Following tool
offset and
subsequent
positioning
operation
100
The offset value for functions G43 and G44 is in the machine data on the
IP 266.
In contrast to mode 15, offsets via G functions are additive offsets which
change the total tool offset value by the value of the programmed offset (see
Section 5.3.15).
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
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The following TO limiting values apply for the resulting tool length change:
Values
Maximum offset value
Linear axis
±32 767.999 mm
Rotary axis
End of range start of range
Software end limit switch +
offset value
< 32 767.999 mm
Software start limit switch +
offset value
< 32 767.999 mm
If a traversing program containing a G function for a tool offset is terminated
without the G40 function, the current additive offset is retained.
The additive value can then be reset to zero only together with the external
(offset) value in mode 16 (see Section 5.3.16).
Entry of a new external offset in mode 15 also resets the additive value to
zero.
•
G40: Disable tool offset
The G40 function disables all positive and negative tool offsets in a
traversing program.
•
G43: Enable positive tool offset
The G43 function enables a positive offset of the length specified in the
machine data.
•
G44: Enable negative tool offset
The G44 function enables a negative offset of the length specified in the
machine data.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-81
5-82
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G44 Negative TO
Mode 16
Reset TO
Additive TO
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G40 Reset TO
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TO
Machine
data
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Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
You are now acquainted with the various options for tool offsets, i. e. the tool
offset initiated with mode 15, which can be used as absolute tool offset, and the
tool offset initiated via the G functions, which is an additive tool offset.
The diagram below shows the interplay between modes 15 and 16 and
G functions G40, G43 and G44.
STEP 5 program or COM 266
Mode 15
Start TO
Add to
additive tool
offset value
Reset additive
TO
Reset absolute
TO
Absolute TO
Write absolute
TO
Total TO=additive TO+absolute TO
Figure 5-30. Overview of Tool Offsets
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
•
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
G53: Cancel zero offsets
G54-G57: Enable offset 1-4
These functions effect a relative shift in the axis's coordinate system. Such a
shift may be required when it is necessary to perform identical steps with the
same incremental dimensions at different positions (see Example).
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Example: Using a zero offset
Only one zero offset may be invoked at any given time. A zero offset enabled
via G54 remains in force only until another G function (G54 - G57) is invoked.
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
110
120
mm
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3rd ZO
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10
20
Figure 5-31. Using Zero Offsets
The workpiece is to be drilled at the points indicated.
The three drill holes in each group are the same distance apart. The machining
sequence for the groups can be programmed in a subroutine.
Zero offsets and positioning operations are used to set the start position for the
subsequent subroutine-controlled positioning of the drill.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-83
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
Rough structure of the program:
1. ZO forward + 10 mm (e. g. ZO 1)
2. C a l l s u b r o u t i n e f o r t h e t h r e e d r i l l h o l e s a t t h e p o s i t i o n s 1 0 m m , 2 0 m m a n d
30 mm
3. ZO forward + 50 mm to absolute position 50 mm (e. g. ZO 2) and positioning
to the start position
4. Call subroutine for the three drill holes at the positions + 50 mm, 60 mm and
70 mm
5. ZO forward to absolute position + 90 mm (e. g. ZO 3) and positioning to the
start position
6. Call subroutine for the three drill holes at the positions 90 mm, 100 mm and
110 mm
Four offsets can be entered in the machine data. The sign indicates the
direction of the offset. A G function is assigned to each offset.
- Zero offset 1
G54
(10 mm)
- Zero offset 2
G55
(50 mm)
- Zero offset 3
G56
(90 mm)
- Zero offset 4
G57 (150 mm)
A G-function zero offset is added to both the absolute and relative zero offsets set via modes 12 and 13. The offset value modifies all coordinate values
for
- software limit switches
- reference point
- coordinate zero point
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Enabled zero offsets are automatically reset when the traversing program
terminates.
Zero offsets set in a subroutine are not reset until the main program is exited.
The G53 function resets the zero offsets set in the traversing program and the
associated subroutines.
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Note:
When you abort a traversing program, the set zero offsets are retained, and
can be reset only via mode 14.
5-84
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
•
•
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
G53: Cancel offsets
This function disables the zero offsets enabled in the traversing program.
Table 5-21. Effect of Function G53
These ZOs are disabled
ZOs enabled in the traversing program
ZOs enabled in the traversing program's
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
These ZOs are not disabled
Absolute ZOs set via mode 12
Relative ZOs set via mode 13
subroutines
G54 - G57: Enable offset 1-4
A block containing one of these G functions enables a zero offset.
Figure 5-32 shows how zero offsets interact and how they can be cancelled.
5-85
Reset ZO
from the
traversing
program
Overwrite
ZO from the
traversing
program
5-86
G54
Enable ZO 1
G55
Enable ZO 2
G56
Enable ZO 3
G57
Enable ZO 4
G53
Disable ZO
M02
End of prog.
Total ZO
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Traversing program
Add to
relative ZO
Relative ZO
ZO from the
traversing
program
Absolute ZO
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ZO 4
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Machine
data
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Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
Mode invoked in STEP 5 program or via
COM 266
Disable
mode 14
Mode 13
Positive/
negative
relative ZO
Mode 12
Start
absolute
ZO
Reset
relative ZO
Reset
absolute ZO
Write
absolute ZO
Figure 5-32. Overview of Zero Offsets
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
•
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
G70: Dimensions in 0.1 inch
G71: Dimensions in mm
The IP 266 positioning module always interprets traversing programs in the
dimension specified in the machine data.
Table 5-22. Preselecting Dimensions
Dimensions in the unit
[0.1 inch ]
[mm]
[degrees]
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Invoke via function
G70
G71
G70 and G71 ineffective
Functions G70 and G71 can be used to change the dependence of dimensions
on the specification made in the machine data.
Note:
G functions cannot be used to implement this options for a rotary axis that was
initialized in [deg] in the machine data.
•
G70: Dimensions in 0.1 inch
When the G70 function is invoked, all subsequent distances are interpreted in
units of 0.1 inches and all subsequent speeds in 0.1 inches/min.
•
G71: Dimensions in mm
When G71 is invoked, all subsequent distances are interpreted in mm and all
subsequent speeds in mm/min.
5-87
5-88
50
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Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
-50
50
IP 266
G74: Approach to reference point
This function can be used to approach an existing physical reference point.
The position specified by the value of the reference coordinate is not
approached; this position may differ from that of the physical reference point
due to compensations or offsets.
The incremental speed specified in the machine data is used as approach
speed.
Note:
The G74 function does not execute a reference point approach on the same
basis as mode 5.
The zero offsets and tool offsets currently in force are taken into account in
the actual-value display.
Example:
Following an approach to reference point and subsequent positioning, the
drive is at the position - 50.
Following a zero offset, the actual position is 50 mm and the reference point
position is 100 mm.
Function G74 moves the drive to the position 100 mm, which is the physical
zero point (not to coordinate 0, which is the reference coordinate specified in
the machine data).
Position of the drive
0
ZO = 50 mm
Reference coordinate set via mode 5
100
100
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
•
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
G90: Absolute position specifications
G91: Relative position specifications
These two G functions control the interpretation of all target specifications
(X functions).
G90: Position specifications are interpreted as absolute values
G91: Position specifications are interpreted as relative values
These two G functions control the interpretation of all target specifications
(X functions).
The X function
In this function, the character "X" is followed by a target coordinate for the
positioning operation.
The target coordinate may be specified as either an absolute or relative value
(can be selected via G90/G91).
The numerical value may comprise up to five integer and three decimal places
and a sign.
Max. +32767.999
Min.
- 32767.999
The decimal point may be omitted if the value has no decimal places, and is then
assumed to be located at the last position in the target specification.
If BCD format was specified in the machine data, the target coordinate must be in
the range from + 9999.999 to - 9999.999.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-89
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
The F function
How an F function is interpreted depends on the function which precedes it.
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Table 5-23. Using the F Function in Traversing Blocks
Preceding function in
the block
The F function is
interpreted as
Value range
Unit
G04
Dwell
1 to 65000
Multiple of 100 ms
X function, except for
X function following
G00
Speed
10 to 65000
mm/min
0.1 inches/min
degrees/min
G24
Number of loop passes
0 to 65000
0=Continuous loop
The "F" must be followed by an unsigned integer comprising no more than five
digits.
The M function
M functions are auxiliary functions used to control external events. An M function
consists of the letter "M", followed by a number of no more than two digits. The
binary value of that number is forwarded to the programmable controller, where
it can be evaluated to control other modules or as status info on a positioning
operation.
With the exception of the function M00, M functions following switching
functions, compensation values or offsets have no effect, and are ignored. The
M function that was active before the block was invoked remains in force.
The IP 266 interprets the M00, M02 and M99 functions directly.
•
M00: Programmed stop
M00 interrupts a program for mode 8 or 9. The program can be resumed by
pressing the EXEC key.
In a block containing both M00 and G10, M00 has priority.
An "External stop" is not executed while an M function is in progress.
5-90
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
•
M02: End of program
This function must be programmed in the last block of a main program or
subroutine.
•
M99: External switching function
This switching function is applied directly to an IP 266 digital output. This
output is connected with pin 10 on the terminal block.
All other values (i. e. M01 and M03 to M98) are available to the user.
An M function is output when execution of a block begins, and remains in
force until the next M function is output.
If a traversing program begins with blocks in which no M functions have been
programmed, M255 is output to the PLC. One byte is available for the display.
The value "FF" is displayed if the format is KH, the value "-1" if the format is
KF.
5.4.3
Last Block
The last function programmed in the last block of a traversing program must be
an M function with the parameter 02. The format of the last block is the same as
that of all other blocks.
In its shortest form, the last block must contain
Nnn M02 <1>
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-91
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G10
Flying change
5-92
Block number
N
Target
X
G26
G27
G40
G43
G44
G53
G54
G55
G56
G57
G70
G71
G90
G91
G24
Start of multiple-pass loop
Speed
F
M
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Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
IP 266
Syntax Diagram of a Block
X
Subroutine call
Target
Dwell time in 100 ms
F
Switching function
<1>
G25
Shortest path
Forward (clockwise)
Reverse (counter-clockwise)
Cancel tool offset
Enable positive tool offset
Enable negative tool offset
Cancel zero offset
Enable offset 1
Enable offset 2
Enable offset 3
Enable offset 4
Dimensions in 0.1 inches
Dimensions in mm
Absolute dimensions
Relative dimensions
G74
Approach reference point
G20
End of multiple-pass loop
F
Number of loop passes
Figure 5-33. Syntax Diagram of a Block
The Figure above shows all permissible combinations of functions within a block.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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1
2
3
4
5
System Overview
Technical Description of the IP 266
Installation Guidelines
Fundamentals of Positioning
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
6
Fundamentals of COM 266
7
8
9
10
6.1
6.1.1
6.1.2
6.1.3
Preparations for Using COM 266 . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Copying the COM 266 Floppy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
System Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Starting COM 266 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
6.2
The "FUNCTION SELECT" Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 12
6.3
Hierarchical Structure of COM 266
6.5
Transferring an Existing Machine Data
Record or a Traversing (Machining) Program
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
Start-Up
STEP 5 Programming
Troubleshooting
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
.
-
1
1
2
3
. . . . . . . . . . 6 - 14
6.4
"INPUT" Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 - 15
6.4.1 Entering Machine Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 19
6.4.2 Entering Traversing (Machining) Programs . . . 6 - 40
6 - 50
6.6
COM 266 Test Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 55
6.6.1 Actual-Value Display" Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 57
6.6.2 "Mode Select" Mode
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 63
6.7
Output
6.8
Delete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. - 70
6.9
Information
6.10
COM 266 Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 - 76
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. - 68
..............................6
. - 73
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Figures
6-1.
6-2.
6-3.
6-4.
6-5.
6-6.
6-7.
6-8.
6-9.
6-10.
6-11.
6-12.
6-13.
6-14.
6-15.
6-16.
6-17.
6-18.
6-19.
6-20.
6-21.
6-22.
6-23.
6-24.
6-25.
6-26.
6-27.
6-28.
KOMI Screen Form
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. "CONFIGURATION" Form; COM 266 Screen Layout . . . . 6 Format of the Header Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. Initializing the IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
.."FUNCTION SELECT" Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. Hierarchical Structure of the "FUNCTION SELECT"
Menu and Subsequent Screen Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Structure of the "INPUT" and "OUTPUT" Forms
....... 6 Data Block Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. Machine Data Page 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. Machine Data Page 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. Machine Data Page 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. Machine Data Page 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. Machine Data Page 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. Machine Data Page 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. Machine Data Page 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. Print Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. .Machine Data Printout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. Program Type Select Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. Traversing (Machining) Program Form to DIN with
Sample Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . Traversing (Machining) Program Form in Text Mode
... 6 "TRANSFER" Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. Hierarchical Structure of the TEST Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 "TEST" Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . Mode Select Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. Table of Operating Modes for Testing
................6 Block Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . "DELETE" Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . "INFORMATION" Form with Blank Data Area
......... 6 -
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
3
4
5
8
12
14
15
16
19
22
24
27
30
32
34
37
39
41
43
45
51
56
57
63
66
68
70
73
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Tables
6-1.
6-2.
6-3.
6-4.
Contents of the Fields in the Header Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Mode-Dependent Output Fields
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Function Keys <F2> to <F6> in Modes 1 to 19
....... 6
Input Fields for Modes 1 to 19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
5
- 61
- 65
- 66
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
6
Fundamentals of COM 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
The COM 266 software provides user-friendly support for programming the
IP 266 and putting it into operation. All functions can be executed by making the
appropriate entries in the interactive screen forms. The relevant program sections
are invoked via function keys.
In order to acquaint you with the COM 266 software and how to use it, Section 6.1 provides information on
• making a working copy of the COM 266 floppy
• configuring a system
• starting COM 266 and making all initial preparations for its use
You will then find an overview showing you the hierarchical structure of the
COM 266 software. Section 6.2 provides general information on the COM 266
screen forms which precede the "FUNCTION SELECT" form. The subsequent
sections describe all available COM functions.
6.1
Preparations for Using COM 266
Before putting COM 266 into operation, you should first copy all the files you
need to a floppy.
Standard package
COM 266 is delivered on a floppy disk in the format required by the S5-DOS operating system. Make sure that S5-DOS has been installed on your programmer.
6.1.1
Copying the COM 266 Floppy
Before you start, make a copy of the original COM 266 floppy and store it in a safe
place.
Start the PCP/M86 operating system
Copy the original COM 266 floppy
PCP/M86 provides a utility for formatting and copying floppy disks.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
6-1
Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
To call this utility,
• enter DSKMAINT <1> if you are using an older version of PCP/M• or DISK <1> if you are using the newest version
Please refer to your programmer manual for a detailed description of this utility.
6.1.2
•
System Configuration
First of all, you should learn how to install COM 266 on your hard disk.
Load the PCP/M86 operating system
Insert the COM 266 floppy into drive A
You must now copy the contents of the floppy to USER extent 0 on the hard
disk.
To do so, enter the following line:
PIP B:=A: S5 PDC 13X.CMD <1>
This command copies the COM 266 program to USER extent 0 on your
hard disk.
In order to make it possible to invoke COM 266 from any USER
Set these file attributes with:
SET B: S5 PDC 13X.CMD[RO SYS] <1>
The program is now installed.
When you start S5-DOS, COM 266 will now appear in the "PACKAGE SELECT"
menu.
•
6-2
Preparations for using a programmer that is not equipped with a hard disk
unit:
First, you must generate an S5-DOS floppy. To do so, copy the following files
to a new or blank floppy that has been formatted for PCP/M86:
S5WX000H.CMD
S5WX100X.CMD
S5WX200X.CMD
S5WX201X.CMD
S5WX202X.CMD
S5.CMD
S5KXS02X.CMD
S5KDS01X.DAT
S5KDS02X.DAT
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
6.1.3
Fundamentals of COM 266
Starting COM 266
You can start the COM 266 program from either the hard disk or the floppy.
•
Preparations for a programmer equipped with two floppy disk drives:
Activate drive A by entering A: on the command line and pressing <1>.
Insert the S5-DOS floppy into drive A and the COM 266 floppy into drive B.
•
Preparations for a programmer equipped with a hard disk drive:
Activate drive B
•
Starting S5-DOS:
Enter the following line:
S5
and press <1>.
The KOMI screen form appears briefly during loading
Simatic S5
Serial-No.:
Copyright (C) 1989
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
S5-KOMI
xxxx-yyyy-zzzzzz
All rights reserved
SIEMENS AG
Figure 6-1. KOMI Screen Form
This screen form is then replaced by the "PROGRAM SELECT" menu.
Using the cursor control keys, select the COM 266 program in the "PROGRAM
SELECT" menu.
Start program loading by pressing function key <F1>.
"CONFIGURATION", which is the first of the COM 266 screen forms, is
displayed on your screen.
6-3
Header
Data
area
Function
key
menu
6-4
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Fundamentals of COM 266
CCCC
CCCCCC
CCC
CCC
CCC
CCC
CCCCCC
CCCC
F1
F2
IP 266
The "CONFIGURATION" form
Copyright (c) SIEMENS AG
C O N F I G U R A T I O N
OOOO
OOOOOO
OOO OOO
OOO OOO
OOO OOO
OOO 000
OOOOOO
OOOO
F3
SIMATIC S5/COM266
MMM
MMM
MM MMMM MM
MM MM MM
MM
MM
MM
MM
MM
MM
MM
MM
MM
MM
Version: V**.*
F4
2222
222222
22 22
22
22
22
22222
222222
F5
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66666
66
66
666666
66
66
66
66
66666
F6
666
66666
66
66
666666
66
66
66
66
66666
Serial-No.: 7994-0036-654321
Error line
F7
START
F8
EXIT
Figure 6-2. "CONFIGURATION" Form; COM 266 Screen Layout
Every COM 266 screen form is divided into the four sections shown above.
• Header
• Data area
• Error line
• Function key menu
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
Header:
The two-line header for each screen form comprises six subfields.
Field 1
Field 3
Field 5
Field 2
Field 4
Field 6
Figure 6-3. Format of the Header Lines
Each of these fields contains information specific to the screen form in which they
appear. This information is listed in Table 6-1.
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Table 6-1. Contents of the Fields in the Header Lines
Field
Contents
1
In screen forms that have subordinate screen forms or functions, this field contains the
name of the basic, i. e. supraordinate, screen form. In the basic screen form itself, this field
is blank 1 (see the Example for fields 1 and 2).
2
Field 2 always shows the name of the on-screen form.
3
Field 3 is blank in all screen forms.
4
In some screen forms, this field contains a device identifier. This identifier depends on the
the screen form, and is explained in those screen forms in which it appears.
5
This field always contains the text "SIMATIC S5/COM266".
6
This field is screen form-dependent. In some screen forms, it contains the text "Block:DB...".
The field content is explained in those screen forms in which the field is displayed.
1 Exception: In the "CONFIGURATION" form, this field contains the copyright entry.
Example for fields 1 and 2:
In the "INPUT MACHINEDATA" form, "INPUT" is the name of the basic screen
form and is displayed in field 1 of the header.
MACHINEDATA" identifies the current screen form, and is displayed in spaced
type in field 2.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
6-5
Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
Data area:
The data area of a screen form provides information on
• the machine data
• the defaults
• the configuration parameters
• Traversing (machining) programs
The data area is subdivided into the following fields:
• Fields with fixed texts
A fixed text describes the relevant item of data.
Input fields are displayed in reverse video. These fields are shown in the
manual on a gray background. You may change the contents of these fields.
• Output fields
An output field provides information on data already entered. In the screen
forms, an output field is always preceded by a colon. Data in an output field
cannot be changed.
Error line:
If errors occur during program execution, an appropriate error message is displayed on this line. Auxiliary messages and control information are also displayed
on the error line. Each error message comprises an error code followed by an
error text. The same error code is entered in the error byte in the STEP 5 message
block.
6-6
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Fundamentals of COM 266
Function key menu:
• The function key menu shows the functions which can be invoked in a screen
form. A function is selected by pressing the function key allocated to it.
• You can exit each screen form by pressing <F8>. In many cases, you must
confirm the exit request by pressing <F1>.
Note:
In the screen forms which follow, you will see data in various input and output
fields. This data is only sample data to demonstrate possible field entries.
And what now?
Start the COM 266 program by pressing <F1>.
The "PRESETS" form now appears on your screen. The entries in this screen
form define the working environment for both the IP 266 and COM 266.
6-7
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F1
BEGIN
6-8
:
:
Linear axis
Meier
Generated on
:
12.06.89
Mode
:
ONLINE
Module-No.
Slot-No.
Firmware
:
:
:
11
002
Z 01
Date-Time
:
05 . 10 . 89 - 17 : 35
F2
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Plant designation
Generated by
F3
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:
:
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Drive
Filename
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Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
"PRESETS" form
P R E S E T S
SIMATIC S5/COM266
F4
A
Example
ONLINE-
F5
Header:
The header contains the following information:
• The name of the screen form in field 2
• The name of the software package in field 5
F6
OFFLINE
F7
F8
HELP
EXIT
Figure 6-4. Initializing the IP
: PRESETS
: SIMATIC S5/COM 266
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
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Data area:
Field name
Type
Drive:
Description
Specifies the current drive.
Filename:
I
The filename specifies the file in which your data blocks are to be stored.
You can thus assign different files to different projects or plants. Press
<F7> to display files with file extension 266.
Plant
designation:
I
An entry in this field is mandatory.
If the field is blank, the error message "Inadmissible input" is displayed.
Enter a short characterizational text in this field.
Generated by:
I
An entry in this field is mandatory.
Enter your name. If you entered the name of an existing file under
"Filename", a name will automatically appear in this field.
Generated on:
O
If you entered the name of an existing file, its creation date is displayed
in this field.
If you are creating a new file, the current date and time is displayed.
Mode:
O
Operational status "ONLINE" or "OFFLINE". You can change back and
forth between the two with <F2>, but "ONLINE" will appear only
when the programmer is interfaced to the IP.
"Type" column: I = input field, O = output field
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
6-9
IP 266
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Fundamentals of COM 266
Field name
Module-No*:
Type
I
Description
You may enter a number between 0 and 99 to identify a specific
positioning module in a programmable controller. If machine data has
already been stored on the module, you must enter the same module
number in this field as you entered in the machine data.
(You cannot assign different module numbers to the same module).
Slot-No*:
I
The slot number may theoretically be in the range from 0 to 255, but
should be between 0 and 7. This number is for the purpose of documentation only.
Firmware*:
O
The firmware version is displayed in this output field.
Date-Time:
I
The programmer's hardware clock data is displayed in this field. When
you change these values, you reset the PG clock.
When the programmer is switched off, this setting is lost again.
"Type" column: I = input field, O = output field
* The contents of these fields can be changed only when the operational status is ONLINE.
6-10
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
Function key menu:
<F1>
This key
• takes you to the next screen form and
• forwards the initialization data to the module when correct entries
have been made in all input fields.
<F2>
This key is used to switch back and forth between "ONLINE" and
"OFFLINE" in the "Mode" field.
The following values are read out from the module and displayed in the
screen form in "ONLINE" mode:
• Module number
• Slot number
• Firmware version
The first time COM 266 is started, the module number and slot number
fields are "0".
These fields are not displayed in "OFFLINE" mode.
<F7>
This key is used to display a list of available
• drives or
• file names.
<F8>
Press this key to return to the "CONFIGURATION" menu.
And what now?
Fill in all input fields in the "PRESETS" form.
Press <F1> to display the "FUNCTION SELECT" form.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
6-11
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Fundamentals of COM 266
6.2
F U N C T I O N
TRANS-
6-12
F1
F2
F3
INPUT
OUTPUT
TEST
IP 266
The "FUNCTION SELECT" Menu
S E L E C T
SIMATIC S5/COM266
Drive
:
A
Filename
:
Example
Plant designation
:
Linear axis
Generated by
Generated on
:
:
Meier
12.06.89
Mode
Module-No.
:
:
ONLINE
11
Slot-No.
IP 266 firmware
Date-Time
:
:
:
002
Z 01
05 . 10 . 89 - 17 : 35
F00
F4
FER
F5
DELETE
F6
F7
F8
MATION
INFOR-
EXIT
Figure 6-5. "FUNCTION SELECT" Menu
The "FUNCTION SELECT" menu relists all data from the "PRESETS" form. All fields
in this screen form are output fields; none of the values can be changed.
You can invoke a series of functions in this screen form. When you abort a
function with <F8> (EXIT), COM returns you to the "FUNCTION SELECT" menu.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
Function key menu:
<F1>
Press this key to branch to the screen forms for entering
• machine data and
• traversing (machining) programs.
<F2>
Press this key to display
• machine data and
• traversing (machining) programs.
<F3>
This key is used to invoke the branch of the program used to test modes
1 to 19, and may be pressed in "ONLINE" mode only.
<F4>
Press this key to invoke the "Transfer" function.
This function is used to transfer
• machine data or
• traversing (machining) programs from memory to various storage
media.
<F5>
Press this key to invoke the "Delete" function.
This function is used to delete
• machine data and
• traversing (machining) programs from various storage media.
<F7>
If you want to find out which machine data and traversing (machining)
programs are on which storage media, press this key to invoke the
"Information" function.
<F8>
This key returns you to the "PRESETS" form.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
6-13
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F7
F5
F4
F3
F2
F1
6-14
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6.3
F8
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Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
Hierarchical Structure of COM 266
The Figure below illustrates the hierarchical structure of COM 266. The diagram
shows the names of all screen forms; forms for which there are subordinate
screen forms are outlined in bold type.
Functions or additional screen forms are invoked via the function keys (see
Figure 6-6).
PRESETS
FUNCTION SELECT
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
INFORMATION
DELETE
TRANSFER
TEST
OUTPUT
INPUT
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
Figure 6-6. Hierarchical Structure of the "FUNCTION SELECT" Menu
and Subsequent Screen Forms
And what now?
Now you must decide which function you want to select.
If you have just installed the module, start with the "INPUT" function. This
function is invoked by pressing function key <F1>. You will find detailed
information on the screen forms in this group in the next section.
If the machine data and traversing programs have already been stored on the
module, you can press <F3> to invoke the "Test" function (see Section 6.6).
At this point, however, you should learn how to enter machine data.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
aaaaaaaaaa
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INPUT
MACHINING PROGRAM
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
Fn
n = 1 to 3
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
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INPUT
MACHINEDATA
F1
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
F4
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6.4
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IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
Enter the machine data prompted on your screen.
<F1> takes you from the "FUNCTION SELECT" menu to the program branch
for entering
The "INPUT" form is displayed.
From this form, you can branch to the screen forms for entering machine data
and traversing (machining) programs.
"INPUT" Form
The "INPUT" form is a main screen form with a number of subordinate forms.
Figure 6-7 shows its hierarchical structure. The "OUTPUT" form has the same
hierarchical structure as the "INPUT" form.
INPUT
MACHINEDATA
F1
F7
F8
F7
F8
PRINT
MACHINEDATA
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
INPUT
MACHINING PROGRAM
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
PRINT
MACHINING PROGRAM
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
Figure 6-7. Structure of the "INPUT" and "OUTPUT" Forms
6-15
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F1
MODULE
6-16
I N P U T
:
MACHINEDATA
Block No.
:
DB
F2
F3
PG
FD
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Data Block
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F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
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F1
FUNCTION SELECT
INPUT
F4
F5
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Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
In the following, each input form is preceded by a graphic of the path to that
form.
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
DEVICE:
SIMATIC S5/COM266
BLOCK: DB
1
F6
F7
F8
HELP
EXIT
Figure 6-8. Data Block Selection
Header:
The header shows the following:
• Field 2:
INPUT
• Field 5:
SIMATIC S5 / COM 266
• Output fields for the target device (field 4) and the data block number
(field 6). Both fields are initially blank.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
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Data area:
Field name
Data Block
Type
I
Description
Use <F7> to switch back and forth between MACHINEDATA and
MACHINING PROGRAM.
Block No.
I
Number of the data block in which you want to store your data. Must be
in the range from 0 to 255.
"Type" column: I = input field
Function key menu:
Select the data destination with function keys <F1> to <F3>.
<F1>
Data destination is the IP 266.
Depending on the entry in the "Data Block" field, COM branches to the
screen form for entering
• machine data or
• traversing (machining) programs
<F2>
Data destination is the programmer's RAM.
COM uses the same criterion for the branch as for <F1>.
<F3>
Data destination is the disk drive and file specified in the "PRESETS"
form.
COM uses the same criterion for the branch as for <F1>.
<F7>
Use the 'HELP' key to set the "Data Block" field to either
• MACHINEDATA
or
• MACHINING PROGRAM
<F8>
<F8> (EXIT) returns you to the "FUNCTION SELECT" menu.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
6-17
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Fundamentals of COM 266
6-18
IP 266
And what now?
Position the cursor to the "Data Block" field.
Select MACHINEDATA using <F7>.
Using the cursor control keys, move the cursor to the "Block No." field. Enter
there the number of the data block. Enter "1" in this field.
Choose your data destination with <F1>, <F2> or <F3>.
<F3>, for instance, selects FD as data destination.
Press <F1> to choose the IP 266 as data destination.
Note:
If you have not installed an IP 266, your data destination must be either a disk
drive or the programmer.
The first page of the "INPUT MACHINEDATA" form is displayed on your
monitor screen.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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FUNCTION SELECT
M A C H I N E D A T A
F1
F2
NNEXT
PREVIOUS
PRINT
PAGE
PAGE
MDAT
F3
F4
Figure 6-9.
F1
Module
:
Meas. System
: mm
Axis type
: LINEAR
11
F5
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IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
Entering Machine Data
"INPUT MACHINEDATA" form (page 1)
INPUT
MACHINEDATA
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
INPUT
DEVICE: IP 266
BLOCK: DB 1
SIMATIC S5/COM266
(0 ... 99)
(mm, in, grd)
F6
TRANSFER
F7
F8
HELP
EXIT
Machine Data Page 1
6-19
Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
Header:
The header contains the following:
• Name of the screen form (fields 1 and 2):
INPUT MACHINE DATA
• Name of the software package (field 5):
SIMATIC S5/COM 266
• Data destination. You chose the data destination with <F1> in the "INPUT"
menu.
The output field shows:
DEVICE: IP 266
• You also specified the number of the data block in the "INPUT" form.
The output field contains the string:
BLOCK: DB1.
The header is the same for all seven pages of the "INPUT MACHINEDATA" form.
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Data area:
Field name
Module
Meas.System
Type
I
I
Description
You must enter a number for the module in this field. This is absolutely
mandatory, as a programmable controller may be equipped with more
than one IP 266. The number you enter must be in the range from
0 to 99, and must be identical to the one you entered in the "PRESETS"
form.
Enter the physical unit you want to use. Use <F7> to select mm
(millimeters), in (inches) or deg (degrees). The default is mm.
Axis type
I
The IP 266 supports both linear and rotary axes. Use <F7> to choose
either LINEAR or ROTARY.
"Type" column: I = input field
6-20
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
Function key menu:
<F1>
Press this key to screen the next page of the "INPUT MACHINEDATA"
form. This function is possible only when you have filled in all input
fields correctly.
<F2>
Use this key to screen the preceding page of the "INPUT MACHINEDATA" form. This function is possible only when you have filled in all
input fields correctly.
<F4>
Press this key to start a printout.
<F6>
Once you have filled in all input fields, you can press this key to store
the machine data on the specified destination device.
The data destination is shown in the header.
Data stored on the IP 266 is first verified. Errors are flagged on the
error line. When an error is detected, the page of the "INPUT
MACHINEDATA" form in which the error was made is displayed on the
monitor.
<F7>
Use this key to choose the values for 'Meas.System' and 'Axis type'.
<F8>
After confirming your intention to exit by responding to the relevant
prompt with <F1>, this key returns you to the "FUNCTION SELECT"
menu.
With the exception of <F7>, the function key menu is the same for all seven
pages of the "INPUT MACHINEDATA" form. <F7> is included in the function key
menu on pages 1, 3 and 7 only.
And what now?
Enter 11 (the same number entered in the "PRESETS" form) in the 'Module'
field.
Set the cursor to the input field for 'Meas.System' and make your selection
with <F7>. The default value for this field in [mm].
Move the cursor to 'Axis type' and select the linear axis with <F7>. The word
'LINEAR' is displayed in the input field.
Press <F1> to screen the second page of the "INPUT MACHINEDATA" form.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
6-21
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Module: 11
Maximum deceleration
:
Acceleration fwd.
:
Deceleration fwd.
:
Acceleration rev.
:
Deceleration rev.
:
F1
F2
NEXT
PREVIOUS
PRINT
PAGE
PAGE
MDAT
6-22
F3
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F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
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FUNCTION SELECT
INPUT
M A C H I N E D A T A
F4
F1
F5
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Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
"INPUT MACHINEDATA" form (page 2)
INPUT
MACHINEDATA
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
DEVICE: IP266
Dimensional unit: mm
SIMATIC S5/COM266
BLOCK: DB 1
Axis type: LINEAR
1000 [mm/sec ]
(10 ... 9999)
500 [mm/sec ]
(10 ... 9999)
500 [mm/sec ]
(10 ... 9999)
500 [mm/sec ]
(10 ... 9999)
500 [mm/sec ]
(10 ... 9999)
F6
F7
TRANSFER
F8
EXIT
Figure 6-10. Machine Data Page 2
Header:
The header is the same as on page 1 of the "INPUT MACHINEDATA" form.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
Data area:
Field name
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Type
Description
Module
O
These fields are the same as those on page 1 of the
Meas.System
Axis type
O
O
screen form.
Maximum deceleration
I
Acceleration fwd.
I
You must enter these data items in the appropriate
fields.
Remember that "Maximum deceleration" must be the
Deceleration fwd.
I
highest absolute value.
Acceleration rev.
I
Deceleration rev.
I
"Type" column: I = input field, O = output field
Function key menu:
In contrast to the function key menu for page 1, the function key menu for page
2 does not contain <F7>.
And what now?
Fill in all input fields on this page.
Note:
You cannot exit an input field until you have entered a value.
Press <F1> to screen page 3 of "INPUT MACHINEDATA".
6-23
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Following error monitoring :
F1
F2
NEXT
PREVIOUS
PRINT
PAGE
PAGE
MDAT
6-24
F3
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IP-STOP if CPU-STOP
:
Gain factor
:
Backlash comp. value
:
Standstill monitor
:
Max. following error
:
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[1/sec]
(0.1...99.9)
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:
5V
(5V/24V)
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Encoder type
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F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
INPUT
M A C H I N E D A T A
Module: 11
[mm]
(0.000...64.999)
2.000
[mm]
(0.001...64.999)
15.000
[mm]
(0.001...64.999)
16.6
0.000
F4
F5
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FUNCTION SELECT
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Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
"INPUT MACHINEDATA" form (page 3)
INPUT
MACHINEDATA
F1
DEVICE: IP 266
SIMATIC S5/COM266
BLOCK: DB 1
Dimensional unit: mm
Axis type: LINEAR
(yes/no)
no
on (on/off)
F6
TRANSFER
F7
F8
HELP
EXIT
Figure 6-11. Machine Data Page 3
Header:
The header is the same as on page 1 of the "INPUT MACHINEDATA" form.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
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Data area:
Field name
Type
Description
Module
Meas.System
Axis type
O
Refer to the data area for page 2
Encoder type
I
Enter the type of encoder you are using in this field. You have a choice
between two types of encoders:
5V
(symmetrical encoders)
24 V
IP-STOP if
I
CPU-STOP
(asymmetrical encoders)
When an error occurs during execution of the STEP 5 program, it is
sometimes best to stop the IP. You can do so by entering "yes" in this
field or selecting "yes" with <F7>.
Active modes are interrupted with STOP.
This aborts all active modes except mode 4.
Gain factor
I
This factor defines the gain factor for the position controller in the unit
1/sec. The permissible value range for the gain factor is from 0.1 to 99.9,
although system limitations or machine data specifications (such as the
resolution or the maximum speed) preclude the use of some of these
values in the majority of cases.
Backlash comp.
value
I
This value is added to the travel distance on each traversing (machining)
movement that involves a reversal of the direction of travel, thus
enabling compensation of backlash outside the control loop (drive
backlash). The backlash is compensated only when there is positive
mechanical coupling between drive and slide. When a reference point is
approached, this may be the case immediately following the approach.
Otherwise, you must program the movement yourself.
"Type" column: I = input field, O = output field
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
6-25
Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
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Data area (continued)
Field name
Standstill
Type
I
monitor
Max. following
error
Description
Maximum difference between the setpoint position and the actual
position when the position controller is active. This value must be
greater than zero and less than the maximum following error.
I
Maximum difference between the setpoint position and the actual
position during traversing (machining) under closed-loop control. The
maximum following error must be equal to or greater than the
tolerance range of the standstill (zero-speed) monitor.
Following error
monitoring
I
You can disable monitoring of the following error by entering "off" in
this field or selecting "off" with <F7>. The default is "on".
"Type" column: I = input field, O = output field
Function key menu:
The function key menu is the same as that on page 1 of "INPUT MACHINEDATA".
You can use <F7> to select the appropriate value for the "Encoder type", "IPSTOP if CPU-STOP" and "Following error monitoring" fields.
And what now?
Fill in all fields on this screen page. An input field for which there is no default
can be exited only after an entry has been made.
Press <F1> to screen page 4 of "INPUT MACHINEDATA".
6-26
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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[mm]
(+- 32767.999)
-400.000
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[mm]
(+- 32767.999)
Software upper limit
: +400.000
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[mm]
(+- 32767.999)
Tool length offset
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F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
[mm]
(+- 32767.999)
Ref. point coordinate
Software lower limit
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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FUNCTION SELECT
INPUT
M A C H I N E D A T A
Module: 11
:
:
:
F1
F2
NEXT
PREVIOUS
PRINT
PAGE
PAGE
MDAT
F3
F4
F1
0.000
0.000
F5
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IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
"INPUT MACHINEDATA" form (page 4)
INPUT
MACHINEDATA
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
DEVICE: IP 266
SIMATIC S5/COM266
BLOCK: DB 1
Dimensional unit:mm
Axis type: LINEAR
F6
F7
TRANSFER
F8
EXIT
Figure 6-12. Machine Data Page 4
Header:
The header is the same as that on page 1 of "INPUT MACHINEDATA".
6-27
Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
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Data area for a linear axis:
Field name
Module
Meas.System
Axis type
Type
Description
O
Refer to the data area on page 2
Ref. point
coordinate
I
The reference point coordinate must lie between the lower and upper
software limit switches or at the exact position of one of these switches.
Software lower
limit
I
This value specifies the lower software limit switch. This value must be
lower than that for the upper software limit switch and must also be
such that the axis cannot reach the lower hardware limit switch during
deceleration.
Software upper
limit
I
This value defines the coordinate of the upper software limit switch. This
value must be greater than that for the lower software limit switch and
must also be such that the axis cannot reach the upper hardware limit
switch during deceleration.
Tool length
offset
I
This value is used to compensate for tool wear. Each target position in a
traversing (machining) program is offset by this value. The tool length
offset is added to any previous tool offset, and can be used repeatedly.
"Type" column: I = input field, O = output field
6-28
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
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Data area for a rotary axis:
If you are using the IP 266 to operate a rotary axis, the two fields for the software
limit switches are replaced by fields for
• the start of the traversing (machining) range and
• the end of the traversing (machining) range
Field name
Module
Meas.System
Type
Description
O
Refer to the data area on page 2
I
The reference point coordinate must lie within the traversing
Axis type
Ref. point
coordinate
Start of traversing (machi-
(machining) range or at exactly the upper or lower limit of that range.
I
ning) range
End of tra-
traversing (machining) range.
I
versing (machining) range
Tool length
offset
This value specifies the start of the traversing (machining) range for the
rotary axis, and must be lower than the value specifying the end of the
This value specifies the end of the traversing (machining) range for the
rotary axis, and must be higher than the value specifying the start of the
traversing (machining) range.
I
See the table entitled 'Data Area for a Linear Axis'
"Type" column: I = input field, O = output field
Function key menu:
The function key menu is identical to that for page 2 of "INPUT MACHINEDATA".
And what now?
Fill in all input fields on this page.
Press <F1> to screen page 5 of "INPUT MACHINEDATA".
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
6-29
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Zero offset 1
:
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(+- 32767.999)
Zero offset 2
:
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(+- 32767.999)
Zero offset 3
:
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(+- 32767.999)
Zero offset 4
:
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F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
6-30
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FUNCTION SELECT
INPUT
M A C H I N E D A T A
Module: 11
F1
F2
NEXT
PREVIOUS
PRINT
PAGE
PAGE
MDAT
F3
F4
F1
F5
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Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
"INPUT MACHINEDATA" form (page 5)
INPUT
MACHINEDATA
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
DEVICE: FD
SIMATIC S5/COM266
BLOCK: DB 1
Dimensional unit: mm
(+- 32767.999)
10.000 [mm]
25.000 [mm]
30.000 [mm]
35.000 [mm]
F6
Axis type: LINEAR
F7
F8
TRANSFER
EXIT
Figure 6-13. Machine Data Page 5
Header:
The header is identical to that on page 1 of "INPUT MACHINEDATA"
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
Field name
Module
Meas.System
Zero offset 1 to 4
Fundamentals of COM 266
Data area:
Type
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Description
Axis type
O
You already entered the parameters for these fields on page 1.
I
Each of the four zero offsets is independent of the others, and can also
be activated in traversing (machining) programs via G54 to G57. These
values are added to the offsets used in modes 12 and 13.
If several ZOs are used in a traversing (machining) program, they are not
added; instead, they replace the existing ZOs.
For instance, a zero offset set with G54 would be overwritten by a zero
offset set with G56.
"Type" column: I = input field, O = output field
Function key menu:
The function key menu is identical to that on page 2 of "INPUT MACHINEDATA".
And what now?
Fill in the fields for the zero offsets.
Press <F1> to screen page 6 of "INPUT MACHINEDATA".
6-31
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M A C H I N E
Module: 11
Maximum speed
:
Jog speed 1 fwd
:
Jog speed 1 rev
:
Jog speed 2 fwd
:
Jog speed 2 rev
:
Incremental speed
:
F1
F2
NEXT
PREVIOUS
PRINT
PAGE
PAGE
MDAT
6-32
F3
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F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
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FUNCTION SELECT
D A T A
F4
F1
F5
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Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
"INPUT MACHINEDATA" form (page 6)
INPUT
MACHINEDATA
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
INPUT
DEVICE: FD
SIMATIC S5/COM266
BLOCK: DB1
Dimensional unit: mm
F6
Axis type: LINEAR
15000 [mm/min]
(1...65000)
2000 [mm/min]
(1...65000)
2000 [mm/min]
(1...65000)
4000 [mm/min]
(1...65000)
4000 [mm/min]
(1...65000)
12000 [mm/min]
(1...65000)
F7
TRANSFER
F8
EXIT
Figure 6-14. Machine data Page 6
Header:
The header is identical to that on page 1 of "INPUT MACHINEDATA".
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
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Data area:
Field name
Type
Description
Module:
Meas.System:
Axis type:
O
These fields are the same as those in the data area on page 1.
Maximum speed
I
This value defines the speed at which the axis is positioned when the
power section's applied voltage is 10 V. All subsequent speed specifications must be lower than or equal to the maximum speed.
Jog speed 1 fwd:
I
Speed for forward jogging in "Jog 1" mode.
Jog speed 1 rev:
I
Speed for reverse jogging in "Jog 1" mode.
Jog speed 2 fwd:
I
Speed for forward jogging in "Jog 2" mode.
Jog speed 2 rev:
I
Speed for reverse jogging in "Jog 2" mode.
Incremental
I
Speed for modes 6 and 7.
speed:
"Type" column: I = input field, O = output field
Function key menu:
The function key menu is identical to that on page 2 of the "INPUT
MACHINEDATA" form.
And what now?
Enter all speed values in the appropriate fields.
Press <F1> to screen page 7 of "INPUT MACHINEDATA".
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
6-33
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Reference speed 1
:
1000
[mm/min]
(1...65000)
Reference speed 2
:
500
[mm/min]
(1...65000)
Reference direction
:
fwd
[fwd/rev]
Pulses/revolution
:
1000
[pulses/rev.]
(1...65000)
Travel/revolution
:
5.000
[mm]
(0.001...400.000)
PLC BCD coded
:
no
[yes/no]
Polarity HW limit switch
:
neg
[pos/neg]
6-34
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F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
INPUT
M A C H I N E D A T A
Module: 11
F1
F2
NEXT
PREVIOUS
PRINT
PAGE
PAGE
MDAT
F3
F4
F5
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FUNCTION SELECT
INPUT
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Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
"INPUT MACHINEDATA" form (page 7)
F1
MACHINEDATA
DEVICE: FD
SIMATIC S5/COM266
BLOCK: DB1
Dimensional unit: mm
Axis type: LINEAR
F6
TRANSFER
F7
F8
HELP
EXIT
Figure 6-15. Machine Data Page 7
Header:
The header is identical to that on page 1 of "INPUT MACHINEDATA".
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
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Data area:
Field name
Type
Description
Module:
Meas.System:
Axis type:
O
These fields are the same as those in the data area on page 1.
Reference
speed 1:
I
The drive begins a reference point approach at this speed. Reference
speed 1 is the higher of the two speeds for the initial approach to
reference point, and must be less than or equal to the maximum speed.
Reference
speed 2:
I
The IP 266 requires this speed for an exact approach to the reference
point. Reference speed 2 must be less than or equal to the maximum
speed and less than or equal to reference speed 1.
Reference
direction:
I
Defines the direction for the reference point approach. Use <F7> to
choose between 'forward' and 'reverse'.
Pulses/
revolution:
I
Specifies the number of pulses per encoder revolution (this information
can be obtained from the encoder's rating plate).
Travel/
revolution:
I
The distance traversed per encoder revolution must be entered in this
field. The value must take into account all ratios between encoder and
axis.
PLC BCD coded:
I
When you select "yes" with <F7>, all coordinates transferred from the
PLC are interpreted in BCD code. The value range in BCD format is
restricted to +/-9999999 µm.
Polarity HW limit
I
switch:
This field is used to indicate which edge of the limit switch or "External
Stop" signal is to be evaluated.
"Type" column: I = input field, O = output field
The "travel/pulses" resolution is computed from the values for "travel/revolution" and "pulses/revolution"
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
6-35
Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
Function key menu:
With the exception of <F7>, the function key menu is identical to that on page 1
of this screen form.
<F7> is used to select predefined texts for the following input fields:
• Reference direction
• PLC BCD coded
• Polarity HW limit switch
And what now?
Fill in all input fields.
You have now entered all machine data.
Press <F6> to transfer the machine data to its destination.
"Active" appears briefly on the error line.
Additional function keys in the "INPUT" menu:
You can output any page of the screen form to your printer by pressing <F4> (Print Screen function). Before attempting to start a printout, be
sure that you initialized the printer with S5-DOS.
You can screen through all pages with <F1> or <F2>, and make changes if
necessary. You can forward your changes to the data destination while on
any page with <F6>.
Press <F8> when you want to return to the "FUNCTION SELECT" menu. You
must confirm your request to exit with F1.
6-36
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
F1
Fundamentals of COM 266
Printing out the machine data
The following print menu is displayed when you start a printout by pressing <F4>:
INPUT
M A C H I N E D A T A
COM 266-IP 266
F2
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
F3
DEVICE: FD
SIMATIC S5/COM266
Linear axis
F4
F5
BLOCK: DB100
Siemens AG
DATE:
Meier
Lines per page (40 - 95)
:
72
Columns per line (80 - 132)
:
96
F6
MDAT
16
F7
11
90
SIMATIC S5
PAGE:
F8
PRINT
EXIT
Figure 6-16. Print Form
Header:
The header is taken from the screen form in which you selected the Print
function.
For example, if you are in the "INPUT MACHINEDATA" form and press <F4>, the
header for the printout is taken from that screen form.
6-37
Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
SIMATIC S5
COM 266-IP 266
These
cannot
LINEAR AXIS
Meier
items of data You can enter arbitrary combe modified in mentary in this gray-backed in-
DATE:
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Siemens AG
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Data area:
The entries you make in the upper portion of the data area indicate how you
want to end your printout. The information entered in this area is printed out at
the end of the machine data or traversing (machining) program listing.
PAGE:
The current date is output in the
"DATE" field. You can change
any way, and appear at put field; the commentary then the date prior to starting the
the same location on all appears at this location in the printout. The page number is
printouts.
printout. The information on output next to the word
the last line was taken from the
"PRESETS" form.
"PAGE".
In the lower portion of the data area you will find two fields for initializing the
printer. The fields can be changed only with S5-DOS.
"Lines per page (40-95)":
"Columns per line (80-132)":
6-38
The specified number of lines per page is
shown in this field.
The specified number of columns per line is
shown in this field.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
Function key menu:
<F4>
Press this key to start the printout.
The following message is displayed on the error line while printing is
in progress:
FEC
Printing ...
When the printer stops, you will see the message:
FEE
Printed!
<F8>
This key has two functions.
While a printout is being made, you can abort it by pressing this key.
When you do so, "Abort printing (Y/N) ?" is displayed on the error line.
You must either confirm the abort request by entering Y or revoke it by
entering N.
If you press this key when the printer has stopped, you immediately exit
the Print menu.
A machine data printout has the following layout:
Machinedata
LINEAR
Source
FD
DB no.
1
Module
11
Maximum deceleration
:
500
[mm/sec ]
(10...9999)
Acceleration fwd
:
200
[mm/sec ]
(10...9999)
:
1000
[mm/min]
(10...9999)
Dimensional unit
mm
...
...
...
Incremental speed
Siemens AG
Printout
Simatic S5
Machinedata
COM 266 - IP 266 LINEAR AXIS
Date 16.11.90
Page 1
Meier
Figure 6-17. Machine Data Printout
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
6-39
Fundamentals of COM 266
6.4.2
IP 266
Entering Traversing (Machining) Programs
The structure of traversing (machining) programs corresponds in all essentials to a
subset of the DIN 66 025 standard. The programs comprise a sequence of ASCII
characters, and may not exceed 1023 characters in total.
COM 266 stores traversing (machining) programs in data blocks. These blocks are
distinguished from one another by a data block number. Each data block
generated by COM 266 contains precisely one traversing (machining) program.
COM 266 enters the data block number in the traversing (machining) program's
header as program number. The total number of data blocks may not exceed 250.
Data block numbers must be in the range from 0 to 255.
Traversing (machining) programs can be written in two modes of representation:
•
•
To DIN 66 025
In Text mode
In addition, mode 10 ("TEACH-IN") allows you to generate traversing (machining)
programs automatically.
Please refer to Section 5.4 for more detailed information on traversing
(machining) programs.
Entering a traversing (machining) program
Press <F1> in the "FUNCTION SELECT" menu to screen the "INPUT" form.
You are already acquainted with this screen form from your "experiments"
with the "Input Machinedata" function.
Fill in the two input fields as follows:
Data block
Block-No.
: Traversing (machining) PROGRAM
: DB 2
Press <F1>, <F2> or <F3> to select the destination for your data (e. g.
<F3> for disk drive).
You are now in the "INPUT MACHINING PROGRAM" form.
6-40
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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Program type:
F1
F2
INPUT
INPUT
DIN
TEXT
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
MAIN
F3
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M A C H I N I N G
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IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
"INPUT MACHINING PROGRAM" form
INPUT
P R O G R A M
F4
DEVICE: FD
SIMATIC S5/COM266
F5
F6
Block: DB2
SAMPLE PROGRAM
F7
F8
HELP
EXIT
Figure 6-18. Program Type Select Form
Header:
The header shows the names of the screen form and the software package. The
"DEVICE" and the "BLOCK" are taken from your entries in the "INPUT" form.
"DEVICE" identifies the data destination. This data is stored in data block DB 2
("BLOCK: DB2").
6-41
Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
Data area:
The input field for "Program type" is subdivided into two sections, the first of
which is for entry of the program type. Using <F7>, you can choose between
• MAIN
for a main program and
• SUB
for a subroutine
In the second part of the input field, you can enter an arbitrary text as
commentary.
Function key menu:
<F1>
Press this key when you want to enter traversing (machining) programs
to DIN.
<F2>
Press this key if you want to enter traversing (machining) programs in
Text mode.
<F7>
Use this key to choose "MAIN" or "SUB" in the first section of the
"Program type" field.
<F8>
Press this key to exit the screen form.
And what now?
Select the program type and enter a commentary.
Press <F1> to enter programs to DIN.
Press <F2> to enter programs in Text mode (optional).
6-42
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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F1
MACHINING PROGRAM
Prog. header:
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
%2
N01
N02
G74
G24
M10
F5
N03
N04
N05
L36
X50
G20
F2000
N06
M02
F1
F2
F3
NEXT
PREVIOUS
DIN-->
PAGE
PAGE
TEXT
F7
D I N
F4
INSERT
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F3
FUNCTION SELECT
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
F5
DELETE
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IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
Entering programs to DIN
The following screen form is displayed when you press <F1> in the "INPUT
MACHINING PROGRAM" form:
INPUT
MACHINING PROGRAM D I N
F1
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
INPUT
DEVICE: FD
BLOCK: DB2
SIMATIC S5/COM266
SAMPLE PROGRAM
M20
F6
STORE
F7
TRAPRO
F8
PRINT
EXIT
Figure 6-19. Traversing (Machining) Program Form to DIN with Sample Program
Header:
The header is taken from the Program Selection form.
6-43
Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
Data area:
The program header for the traversing (machining) program is displayed on the
first line in the data area.
"%2 SAMPLE PROGRAM" identifies a main program stored in DB2. "SAMPLE
PROGRAM" was entered in the preceding screen form as commentary.
The remaining lines in the data area are for the program itself. Only one block
may be entered on each line. Refer to Section 5.4 for more detailed information
on the structure of traversing (machining) programs and the blocks of which they
are comprised.
When you have reached the last line in the data area, the screen is scrolled up one
line.
Function key menu:
<F1>
If the last page of the traversing (machining) program has not yet been
reached, use this key to page down.
<F2>
Use this key to page up.
<F3>
Press this key to change from "DIN" to "TEXT MODE". When you press
this key, the cursor must be located in a line containing a complete,
correct block.
<F4>
Press this key to insert a blank line above the line containing the cursor.
<F5>
Press this key to delete the line containing the cursor.
<F6>
Press this key to forward a syntactically correct traversing (machining)
program to the selected destination device. The data block is assigned
the number shown in the header, which is identical to the program
number in the first line of the data area. If a traversing (machining)
program with this number already exists, you are prompted to indicate
whether or not you want to overwrite the old file. If you reply in the
affirmative, the old file is overwritten.
<F7>
Press this key to output the traversing (machining) program to printer.
<F8>
Press <F8> to exit the screen form.
6-44
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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mm
Prog. header
Stat. number:
Function 1 [L]
F1
F2
NEXT
PREVIOUS
BLOCK
BLOCK
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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INPUT
MACHINING PROGRAM
Tool offset: off
Function 2 [G]
Loop start
Function 3 [X]
Target:
Function 4 [F]
Function 5 [M]
Feed rate:
F3
DIN
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F7
T E X T
F4
INSERT
F3
FUNCTION SELECT
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
DEVICE:FD
Offset: undef
F5
DELETE
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IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
Entering traversing (machining) programs in Text mode
The following screen form, in which only one block may be entered, is
displayed when you press <F2> in the "INPUT MACHINING PROGRAM"
form.
F2
MACHINING PROGRAM T E X T
SIMATIC S5/COM266
BLOCK: DB2
Dimensions: absolute
%2 SAMPLE PROGRAM
02
5
F6
TEXT-->
STORE
F7
F8
HELP
EXIT
Figure 6-20. Traversing (Machining) Program Form in Text Mode
Header:
The header is taken from the Program Selection form.
6-45
Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
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Data area:
Field name
Type
O
Description
The current physical unit is displayed in the first output field. This unit is
applied to all distances and speeds.
• "mm"
can be selected via G70
• "0.1 in"
can be selected via G71
In the course of a traversing (machining) program, the unit can be
changed as often as necessary via G70/G71.
Tool offset
O
The tool offset status is displayed in this field.
• "off"
can be selected via G40
• "negative"
can be selected via G44
• "positive"
can be selected via G43
The sign of a value is not displayed in this field.
Offset
O
This field shows the number of the last zero offset.
• "undef"
can be selected via G53
• "1 on"
can be selected via G54
• "2 on"
• "3 on"
• "4 on"
Dimensions
O
can be selected via G55
can be selected via G56
can be selected via G57
The numerical values of the target functions (X functions) can be interpreted as either absolute or incremental values.
G70 Absolute
G71 Incremental
Program
O
%2 SAMPLE PROGRAM
header
Stat. number
(Block number)
I
Enter the block number as a numerical value in this field. A block number may comprise up to three digits. Block numbers need not be entered
in ascending order. The blocks are processed in the order in which they
are entered, without regard to the block number.
"Type" column: I = input field, O = output field
6-46
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Fundamentals of COM 266
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IP 266
Field name
Function 1 [L]
Type
I
Description
Enter a number in this field when you want to invoke a subroutine. If an
entry is made in this field, the text "Subroutine no." is displayed.
Function 2 [G]
I
Press <F7> to display the available G functions. An error message is
displayed if you enter any G function not in this list.
Function 3 [X]
I
Enter a target position in this field. How this target position is interpreted depends on the entry in the "Dimensions" field.
Function 4 [F]
I
The contents of this field depend on the preceding function in the
traversing (machining) block.
If the preceding
function is...
Function 5 [M]
I
Text
... the following is displayed:
Value
Unit
an X function
Feed rate:
400
mm/min
G04
Dwell time
1000
msec
G24
Loop pass:
5
An M function is output at the beginning of a block.
Function
Output
Text
M00
M02
M99
Program stop
Program end
Number
00
02
99
M01 and
01 or
M03 to M98
03 to 98
No further blocks may be appended following an M02 function.
"Type" column: I = input field
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
6-47
Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
Function key menu:
<F1>
Page down through the blocks to the end of the program.
<F2>
Page up through the blocks to the beginning of the program.
<F3>
Press this key to switch to "DIN" mode.
<F4>
Press this key to insert a new block in front of the block that is currently
on screen.
<F5>
Press this key to delete the on-screen block.
<F6>
Press this key to forward a syntactically correct traversing (machining)
program to the specified destination device. The destination data
block is assigned the number shown in the header, which is identical to
the program number in the first line of the data area.
If a traversing (machining) program with this number already exists, you
are prompted to indicate whether or not you want to overwrite the old
file. If you reply in the affirmative, the old file is overwritten.
<F7>
Use this key to select a G function.
<F8>
Press this key to exit the screen form without storing the data.
6-48
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
And what now?
Enter a traversing (machining) program. Before doing so, select either
DIN mode by pressing <F1>
or
TEXT MODE by pressing <F2>.
Forward the traversing (machining) program to the specified destination
device (FD, PG, IP 266) with <F6>.
Exit the screen form with <F8>. You must confirm your intention to exit by
pressing <F1>.
The "FUNCTION SELECT" menu is displayed.
You have now generated machine data and a traversing (machining) program.
•
If you entered your data directly on the IP 266 (target device: IP 266), you can
now invoke the "TEST" function. The description of this function begins in
Section 6.6.
•
If you stored your data on the floppy or programmer, you must first forward
it to the IP 266 before continuing. You will find details on how to do so in the
next section.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
6-49
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Fundamentals of COM 266
6.5
6-50
IP 266
Transferring an Existing Machine Data Record or a
Traversing (Machining) Program
Once you have generated machine data in the programmer or on floppy disk, you
can load it into the IP 266 with the "Transfer" function.
Press <F4> in the "FUNCTION SELECT" menu to select the "Transfer"
function.
This function allows you to transfer machine data or traversing (machining)
programs from a source to a destination device.
The "TRANSMIT" (TRANSFER) form is displayed on the programmer screen.
Note:
The "Transfer" function can be invoked only when the axis status is "stopped"
(i. e. "finished").
Exception:
When an operation is aborted with "Error in position control loop", the machine
data can be edited and forwarded to the IP with <F6> with mode 4, even when
the axis status is "traversing".
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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Device
Block No.
:
:
Drive
Filename
Plant code
:
:
:
Developer
Generation date
:
:
RAM
F1
EEPROM
F2
EEPROM
RAM
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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Data Block:
F3
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T R A N S M I T
FD
1
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IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
"TRANSMIT" (TRANSFER) form
DEVICE: FD
SIMATIC S5/COM266
Source
F4
TRANSFER
BLOCK: DB
Machinedata
Target
IP 266
1
F5
(*= all DBs)
B
Example
LINEAR AXIS
MEIER
12.12.89
F6
F7
F8
HELP
EXIT
Figure 6-21. "TRANSFER" Form
Some of the fields in the header are initially blank. The current values are not
entered in these fields until you have started the "Transfer" function by pressing
<F4> in the "TRANSMIT" (TRANSFER) form.
This is taken into account in the following description of the fields in this screen
form.
6-51
Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
Header:
• The header is as follows before you start the "Transfer" function by pressing
<F4> in the "TRANSMIT" form:
The word "TRANSMIT" is shown as the name of the screen form.
The name of the software package is the same as in all screen forms.
The DEVICE field is blank, as is the field "BLOCK: DB".
• While the "Transfer" function is executing, the name of the screen form is
supplemented by either "MACHINEDATA" or "MACHINING PROGRAM" in
field 2 of the header, depending on your entries in the data area of the
"TRANSMIT" form.
The "DEVICE" field now shows the source device and the "BLOCK" field the
number of the data block you want to transfer. Field 2 of the header indicates
whether machine data or traversing (machining) programs are being
transferred.
Data area:
Before starting the transfer, you must enter
• the source and
• the destination.
These values are displayed when the transfer function has been started.
"Data Block" field: Before starting the Transfer function, select either
MACHINEDATA or MACHINING PROGRAMS with <F7>. When the Transfer
function is started, your selection is displayed in the header as supplement to the
name of the screen form.
6-52
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Fundamentals of COM 266
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IP 266
Field
Source
Device:
Select one of the following with <F7>:
•
•
•
Destination
Module/IP 266
Programmer/PG
Disk drive/FD
The next selection is displayed each time you press <F7>.
DB No.:
Enter the number of the data block you
The source data block is displayed as
want to transfer.
default. You may change this number.
An asterisk (*) in this input field
automatically selects all "traversing
The DB no. of the destination device is
irrelevant.
(machining) program" DBs.
"*" is also allowed for transferring
machine data from FD to FD.
Drive:
Filename:
If the DEVICE is a floppy disk or hard
disk, you will be prompted to specify
The drive identifier is taken from the
"PRESETS" form, and cannot be
the drive. Make the appropriate
selection with <F7>.
changed.
If you selected a drive, you must enter
The name specified in the "PRESETS"
the filename in this field. Select a file
from the list of files on the relevant
drive with <F7>. "Data block missing"
form is displayed as filename, and
cannot be changed.
is displayed if no file is available.
Plant code
The "Plant code", "Developer" and "Generation date" fields are updated in
Developer
Generation
date
accordance with the file selected.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
6-53
Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
Function key menu:
If the IP is disconnected from the mains power, or if a power failure occurs, the
data in its RAM is lost, and must therefore be stored on EEPROMs before the IP is
actually put into operation in the plant. This applies to both machine data and
traversing (machining) programs. On IP start-up, this data is transferred to IP
RAM. The EEPROM has a maximum storage capacity of 8 Kbytes, only 7K of which
is available for traversing (machining) programs. The remaining capacity is
needed for machine data and housekeeping routines.
<F1>
Press this key to transfer the data currently on the module to EEPROM.
This data may include machine data and/or programs.
<F2>
Before the data stored on EEPROM can be used, it must be transferred
to the IP's RAM. The IP 266 normally makes this transfer automatically
in its restart routine. If you want to retransfer data from EEPROM to
RAM (because the data in RAM has been modified, for instance), you
can do so by pressing <F2>.
<F4>
Press this key to start the transfer you defined in the data area of this
screen form.
<F7>
This key is used as selector key for the following input fields:
"Device:"
"Drive:"
"Filename:"
<F8>
This key terminates the "TRANSFER" function and returns you to the
"FUNCTION SELECT" menu.
6-54
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
And what now?
Machine data must be available on the IP 266 before you can proceed to the
"TEST" form.
If no valid machine data is in the IP's RAM, you must forward this data to the
IP 266 from the programmer, disk or EEPROM.
Select the source device and the number of the data block containing the
machine data.
If your source is a disk, enter the drive and the name of the source file.
Select the IP 266 as destination.
Start the transfer with <F4>.
Press <F8> to return to "FUNCTION SELECT".
If you have not yet generated machine data, please do so. You will find details on
this procedure in Section 6.4.1.
If your machine data is on EEPROM, transfer it to the IP's RAM with <F2>.
6.6
COM 266 Test Mode
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COM's Test Mode allows you to test the interplay between the IP 266 and the
mechanical elements of the drive in all modes.
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C A U T I O N:
If your system has just been installed, please follow the steps below in order.
Prerequisites:
• The programmer must be interfaced to the IP 266.
• The programmer must be in "ON LINE" mode. You can change the
programmer mode by pressing <F2> in the "PRESETS" form.
Start the "Test" function by pressing <F3> in the "FUNCTION SELECT"
menu.
The "TEST" form is displayed.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
6-55
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6-56
Actual-value display mode
F1
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TEST
TEST
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Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
Figure 6-22 shows the hierarchical structure of the "TEST" form.
There are two "TEST" modes:
When the "TEST" function is invoked, COM 266 is in the "Actual-value display"
mode. The default operating mode is the "FOLLOW-UP" mode (mode 4). This
mode has not been started, however. The output fields in the data area are not
yet updated.
The second "TEST" mode is "Mode Select". In this mode, you can make changes in
the screen form's input fields.
FUNCTION SELECT
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
F3
TEST
TEST
Mode Select mode
F1
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
Mode table
F7
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
F6
Figure 6-22. Hierarchical Structure of the TEST Form
And now?
Once you have become acquainted with the two "TEST" form modes, you can
begin your first test.
The two "TEST" modes are described in detail in Sections 6.6.1 and 6.6.2.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
6.6.1
F1
OP.MODE
Fundamentals of COM 266
"Actual-Value Display" Mode
T E S T
DEVICE: IP 266
Actual value
Following error
Distance to go
:
:
:
Aux. function
:
Tool ref. pt.
:
reset
CLC
:
on
Teach-Mode
:
off
Status
:
finished
F2
F3
START
STOP
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
12.105
. 2
. 0
Mode
:
Program
:
Distance
:
[mm]
Override
:
(1% ... 200%)
4
F4
F5
SIMATIC S5/COM 266
BLOCK: DB
[mm]
[mm]
[mm]
M02
FOLLOW-UP
F6
F7
F8
EXIT
Figure 6-23. "TEST" Form
In this "TEST" mode, the IP 266 provides the current actual position, following
error/speed, distance to go and switching functions.
These values are recomputed and redisplayed at regular intervals.
6-57
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Fundamentals of COM 266
6-58
IP 266
Header:
Header field 2 shows the name of the on-screen form, which consists only of the
word "TEST", in spaced type, until you have invoked an operating mode
(Figure 6-23). Field 1 is initially blank, and is not filled in until you have started a
mode (see Section 6.3.3).
Note:
COM 266 automatically generates mode 17 (reset errors) when you exit the
"TEST" form with <F8>. When "TEST" is reinvoked, "START ERROR RESET" is
displayed in field 2 and the name of the "TEST" form in field 1.
Field 5 shows the name of the software package, i. e. SIMATIC S5/COM 266. IP 266
is displayed in field 4 ("DEVICE"), and the text "BLOCK: DB" in field 6.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
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Data area:
Field name
Type
Description
Actual value:
O
The current position of the axis is displayed in this field. The basis for the
display is the specified dimensional unit.
Following
O
The difference between the actual position and the setpoint position is
error:
displayed in this field. The upper limiting value is defined in the machine
data parameter "Max. following error" (see Section 5.1.6).
Speed:
O
In modes 3 and 4, "Following error" is replaced by "Speed". This field
shows the actual speed computed by the IP 266.
Distance to go:
O
When a mode is started with absolute or relative target position
specification, the IP 266 computes the distance between the target
position and the current position of the drive. During traversing, the
continually changing value is displayed in this field.
Switching
function:
O
M functions may be programmed in a traversing (machining) program.
When mode 8 or 9 is started in a traversing (machining) program, the
programmed M functions are displayed in this screen form field.
"Type" column: O = output field
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
6-59
IP 266
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Fundamentals of COM 266
Field name
Tool ref. pt.:
Type
O
Description
The word "set" appears in this field when mode 5 has executed. The
word "reset" is displayed if there is no reference point.
CLC:
O
This field shows the controller status.
"On" is displayed in all modes except 3 and 4.
"Off" is displayed in modes 3 and 4.
Teach-Mode:
O
The word "on" is displayed in this field when a traversing (machining)
program is generated in mode 10. The word "off" appears only when
mode 10 is terminated with mode 11.
Status:
O
finished:
running:
Mode
Program
Distance
Override
O
No mode has been started.
As soon as the zero-speed monitor is tripped during a
traversing movement, the displayed changes from "running"
to "finished".
A mode has been started and is still in progress.
In "actual-value display" mode, these fields are static output fields, and
are used to display the specified mode and all parameters.
"Type" column: O = output field
6-60
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
Overview of the output fields in the "TEST" form
Table 6-2 provides an overview of TEST" form output fields
• following error
• distance to go and
• aux. function
and their use in the various modes.
The "following error" is replaced by the "speed" in the open-loop control modes.
Table 6-2. Mode-Dependent Output Fields
Mode
Following error
1
•
2
•
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Speed
3
•
4
•
Distance to go
Aux. function
5
•
6
•
•
7
•
•
8
•
•
•
9
•
•
•
10
•
11
•
12
•
13
•
14
•
15
•
16
•
17
•
18
•
19
•
6-61
Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
Function key menu:
<F1>
Press this key to screen the "Mode Select" form. The actualvalue display is "frozen" to the current value. The "Mode",
"Program", "Distance" and "Override" fields become input
fields, and the cursor is set to the start of the "Mode" field.
<F2> ... <F6>
These keys are mode-dependent. Refer to Table 6-3 in
Section 6.6.2 for a key-to-mode assignment list.
<F8>
Press this key to exit the "TEST" form and screen the
"FUNCTION SELECT" menu. COM 266 generates mode 17
when you press this key.
And what now?
The "TEST" form's "Mode Select" subform is described in detail in the next
section.
6-62
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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6.6.2
Mode
Program
Distance
Override
F1
VALUES
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
"Mode Select" Mode
TEST
JOG 1 STOP
DEVICE: IP 266
SIMATIC S5/COM 266
:
ACT.
F2
F3
START
STOP
4
F4
F5
BLOCK: DB 1
Actual Value
:
50.602
[mm]
Following error
:
0.013
[mm]
Distance to go
:
0.000
[mm]
Aux. function
:
M02
Tool ref. pt.
:
reset
CLC
: on
Teach-In Mode
:
off
Status
: finished
FOLLOW-UP
:
:
[mm]
:
(1% ... 200%)
F6
F7
F8
HELP
EXIT
Figure 6-24. Mode Select Form
Header:
The header is identical to that for the "Actual-Value Display" mode of this screen
form.
6-63
Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
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Data area:
Field name
Actual value,
Type
O
distance to go,
following error
Aux. function
Description
These fields show the actual values that were on screen at the instant at
which the mode was changed.
O
The last M function activated is displayed in this field, or "255" if no M
functions were invoked (in the PLC: KH format="FF", KF format="1").
M02 is output following termination of a traversing (machining)
program.
Mode
I
Enter the number of the required mode in this field. The mode number
must be in the range from 1 to 19. The mode identification text is
displayed at the right of this number. Press <F7> to screen a list of all
modes (1 to 19).
The display for mode 5 differs from that of the other modes in that an
additional input field is provided at the right of the mode identification
text; using <F7>, you can set this field to either "set" or "approach".
Program
I
Enter the number of a traversing (machining) program in this field for
modes 8, 9 and 10.
Distance
I
An entry must be made in this field for modes which require a distance
specification for an absolute or relative positioning operation, a zero
offset or a tool offset.
Override
I
The speed for a positioning operation can be modified by entering an
override factor in this field (for modes 1 to 7). The positioning speed can
also be altered during traversing. The override factor must be forwarded
to the IP with <F6>.
"Type" column: I = input field, O = output field
6-64
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
Function key menu:
The function key menu in this screen form is mode-dependent. Table 6-3 shows
the allocation of the five commands "Start", "Stop", "Forward", "Reverse" and
"Transfer" to modes 1 to 19.
Table 6-3. Function Keys <F2> to <F6> in Modes 1 to 19
Mode
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
F2
Start
F3
Stop
F4
Forward
F5
Reverse
F6
Transfer
1
Jog 1
•
•
•
•1
2
Jog 2
•
•
•
•1
3
Jog open loop
•
•
•
•1
4
Follow-up mode
•
•
5
Reference point approach
•
•
6
Incremental absolute
•
•
•*
•*
•1
7
Incremental relative
•
•
•
•1
8
Automatic
•
•
•2
9
Autom. single statement
•
•
•3
10
Teach-In on
•
11
Teach-In off
•
12
Zero offset absolute
•
13
Zero offset relative
14
Clear zero offset
15
Tool offset
16
Tool offset off
•
17
Delete error
•
18
Drift compensation
•
19
Drift compensation off
•
•
•
•
•
•
* Rotary axis only
1 The current speed can be modified via the override factor when the axis is "traversing
(machining)" (axis status "running").
2 Acknowledge an M00 function (programmed stop)
3 Execute next block
6-65
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Mode
•
F1
6-66
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
F2
2
3
TEST
INCREMENTAL_ABSOLUTE
F3
4
5
6
START
Jog speed 1
Jog speed 2
Jog open loop
Follow-up mode
Reference point approach
Incremental absolute
Incremental relative
Automatic
Autom. single statement
Teach-In on
F4
7
Program
Distance/Targe
t
•
•
Override
•
•
•
Entry required for this mode
•
•
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
Enter number of operating mode
F5
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Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
Auxiliary screen form for Mode Select
Different modes require different entries in the "TEST" form's input fields.
Table 6-4 shows the allocation of input fields to modes.
Table 6-4. Input Fields for Modes 1 to 19
8
9
10 11 12 13 14 15
•
•
•
•
DEVICE: IP266
F6
TRANSFER
•
F7
16
17 18 19
•
Selecting a mode
If you do not know the number of the mode you want to select, press <F7>
(HELP) to screen a mode list.
SIMATIC S5 / COM266
BLOCK: DB
Operating modes for testing
Teach-In off
Zero offset absolute
Zero offset relative
Clear zero offset
Tool offset
Tool offset off
Delete error
Drift compensation
Drift compensation off
5
F8
EXIT
Figure 6-25. Table of Operating Modes for Testing
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
The Help menu lists all modes and their numbers.
Header:
The header does not change when you screen the Help menu.
Data area:
The data area comprises a single input field. After viewing the mode list, enter
the number of the mode you want in this field.
Function key menu:
<F6>
Press this key to transfer the mode number you entered in the Help
menu to the 'Mode' field in the "TEST" form.
<F8>
Press this key to exit the Help menu without transferring the mode
number to the "TEST" form.
The mode always defaults to 4 when you exit Help with <F8>.
And now?
Practice using the TEST forms.
Enter various different modes and view the changes in the data area and the
function key menu.
You have now familiarized yourself with the COM 266 screen forms and menus
you need to start with. The remaining screen forms, which are also invoked in the
"FUNCTION SELECT" menu, are described in detail in the following subsections.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
6-67
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6.7
<F1>:
<F2>:
<F3>:
Data Block :
Block No. :
6-68
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Fundamentals of COM 266
F1
F2
F3
MODULE
PG
FD
IP 266
Output
The "Output" form is invoked by pressing function key <F2> in the "FUNCTION
SELECT" menu. This screen form allows you to display machine data or traversing
(machining) programs on the programmer. Press <F1>, <F2> or <F3> to
select the data source:
IP 266
Programmer (PG)
FD
The structure of the "Output" form is the same as that of the
shown in Figure 6-7.
O U T P U T
DEVICE:
DB
F4
F5
F6
"INPUT" form
"OUTPUT" form
SIMATIC S5/COM 266
BLOCK: DB
MACHINEDATA
1
F7
F8
HELP
EXIT
Figure 6-26. Block Selection
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
The structure of each "OUTPUT" form is identical to that of the corresponding
"INPUT" form; the only difference is the name of the form shown in the header.
The data display begins when you have pressed <F1>, <F2> or <F3>.
•
Output machine data
The seven screen form pages of machine data are displayed when you
entered MACHINEDATA in the 'Data Block' field or selected MACHINEDATA
with <F7>.
The data on each screen page is identical to that on the corresponding page
of the "INPUT MACHINEDATA" form. All fields are input fields, i. e. the data
in these fields can be overwritten. You can store and print out your new data.
•
Output traversing (machining) program
You can display your traversing (machining) program by entering
MACHINING PROGRAM in the 'Data Block' field or by selecting MACHINING
PROGRAM with <F7>. You can edit the program and store any changes
made.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
6-69
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6.8
D E L E T E
Data block :
Source device :
F1
6-70
F2
F3
Block-No.: DB
F4
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Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
Delete
Screen the "DELETE" form by pressing <F5> in the "FUNCTION SELECT"
menu.
DEVICE:
SIMATIC S5/COM 266
BLOCK: DB
MACHINEDATA
F5
DELETE
F6
(* = all DBs)
F7
F8
HELP
EXIT
Figure 6-27. "DELETE" Form
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
Header:
• Prior to first-time execution of the "DELETE" function:
You will see only the word "DELETE" as screen form name.
The "DEVICE" field is initially blank, as is the "BLOCK" field.
•
Machinedata" or "Traversing (machining) Program" appears in the header
while the "DELETE" function is executing, depending on your entry in the
data area of the screen form.
The "DEVICE" field now shows the identifier of the device on which data is
being deleted, and the "BLOCK" field the number of the data block. The
screen form name, which is now complete, indicates what is being deleted
(machine data or traversing (machining) programs).
•
Further delete operations
Each time a new Delete operation is started, the header shows the
information for the preceding Delete.
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Data area:
You must specify the following before executing the "DELETE" function:
• The type of data block
• The device on which data is to be deleted
• The number of the data block to be deleted
Field name
Data block
Type
I
Description
Use <F7> to select either "MACHINEDATA" or "MACHINING
PROGRAM".
Source device
I
This field is used to select the device on which data is to be deleted.
Use <F7> for cyclic enabling of the source devices.
Block No.: DB
I
Enter the number of the data block to be deleted in this field or enter
"*" to delete all existing DBs.
"Type" column: I = input field
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
6-71
Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
Function key menu:
<F5>
When you have specified the file you want to delete, press this key to
start the Delete operation. The output fields in the header are updated.
A prompt is displayed on the error line asking you whether you are sure
you want to start the Delete operation. If you confirm with <F1>, the
word "Deleted" appears to show you that the Delete operation has
been successfully completed.
Entry of a non-existent file is flagged by an error message.
<F7>
Use this key in the "Data block" field to
"MACHINEDATA" and "MACHINING PROGRAM".
choose
between
<F8>
Use this key in the "Data block" field to
"MACHINEDATA" and "MACHINING PROGRAM".
choose
between
6-72
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
6.9
Name
Fundamentals of COM 266
Information
You can invoke this function to screen an overview of all machine data or
traversing (machining) programs stored on the IP 266, FD or PG.
This function is invoked by pressing <F7> in the "FUNCTION SELECT" menu.
The data area of the "INFORMATION" screen form is blank when this function
is invoked.
INFORMATION
I N F O R M A T I O N:
Length
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Name
DEVICE:
Data block :
Length
F1
F2
F3
F4
MODULE
PG
FD
PRINT
SIMATIC S5/COM 266
BLOCK: DB
MACHINEDATA
Name
F5
Length
F6
Name
Length
F7
F8
HELP
EXIT
Figure 6-28. "INFORMATION" Form with Blank Data Area
6-73
Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
Header:
The header contains the following information:
• Screen form name:
INFORMATION
INFORMATION
• Name of the software package:
SIMATIC S5/COM 266
• "DEVICE" field
The contents of this field depend on which key you press to start the
function (i. e. <F1>, <F2> or <F3>).
Data area:
Until you have selected a device, no filenames are displayed in the data area and
the cursor is set to the screen form's only input field.
Choose between MACHINING PROGRAM and MACHINEDATA.
The portion of the screen form beneath the line
Name Length Name Length Name Length Name Length
is not filled in until the device has been selected.
Example:
Press <F7> in the "FUNCTION SELECT" menu to invoke the Information
function.
The text MACHINEDATA is displayed in the 'Data block' field. Press <F3> to
select a disk drive (FD) as source.
All data blocks on the source device that contain machine data are listed in
the data area.
You specified the disk drive in the "PRESETS" form.
6-74
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
Fundamentals of COM 266
Function key menu:
<F1>
The Information function outputs the IP 266's data directory.
<F2>
The Information function outputs the programmer's data directory.
<F3>
The Information function outputs the numbers of the data blocks on
the disk.
<F4>
This key is added to the function key menu after you have selected a
device, and is used to output the data block list to printer.
Note:
The printer must be on and must also have been initialized with
S5-DOS.
<F7>
Use this key to select the data block type, i. e.
MACHINEDATA
or
MACHINING PROGRAM
<F8>
Exit and return to the "FUNCTION SELECT" menu.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
6-75
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F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
6-76
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Fundamentals of COM 266
IP 266
6.10 COM 266 Error Messages
In all COM 266 screen forms, one line is reserved to display error codes and the
corresponding error messages.
Error line
These messages provide information on incorrect parameters or parameter
syntax errors and problems relating to a positioning operation or to the
hardware. Once an installation has been correctly initialized, any error messages
normally relate directly to positioning operations or to the limits of the traversing
(machining) range. These errors are flagged in the "TEST" form and on the PLC.
An error message can be cleared by starting a new mode in which that error
cannot occur or by invoking mode 17.
When an error message has occurred and the COM 266 test mode is exited, the
error message is cleared on both the programmer and the PLC.
Note:
When the test mode is exited, COM 266 invokes mode 17.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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1
2
3
4
5
6
System Overview
Technical Description of the IP 266
Installation Guidelines
Fundamentals of Positioning
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Fundamentals of COM 266
7
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
7.1
7.1.1
7.1.2
7.1.3
8
9
10
Output Frame (PLC CPU IP 266) . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Byte 0: Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Byte 1: Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Byte 2: Program Number, Reference
Point or EEPROM RAM Parameters . . . . . . . . 7
7.1.4 Byte 3: Override Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
7.1.5 Bytes 4 to 7: Positioning Specifications . . . . . . . 7
7.1.6 Example of a Complete Output Frame . . . . . . . 7
-
7.2
7.2.1
7.2.2
7.2.3
7.2.4
7.2.5
-
Input Frame (IP 266 PLC CPU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Byte 0: Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Byte 1: M Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Byte 2: Status Bits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Byte 3: Error Flags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Bytes 4 to 7:Input Values for the
Monitoring Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Start-Up
STEP 5 Programming
Troubleshooting
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
2
4
5
7
7
8
- 11
12
14
14
15
18
- 19
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Figures
7-1.
7-2.
7-1.
7-2.
7-3.
7-4.
7-5.
7-6.
7-7.
7-8.
Example of Data Interchange Between CPU
and IP 266 (in slot 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. Interpreting a Job Order in Dependence
on the TOGGLE Bit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. -
Module Address Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Addressing of the Output Frame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Overview of the Output Frame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Command Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
..
Position Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.
Entering a Small Negative Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Addressing of the Input Frame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Overview of the Input Frame
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
1
6
Tables
1
2
3
5
8
- 10
- 12
- 13
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
PS
CPU
LIW88, LIW90, LIW92 and LIW94
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7
TQW88, TQW 90, TQW92 and TQW94
IP
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IP 266
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
The IP 266 can be plugged into slots 0 to 7 of the S5-100U programmable
controller. Eight bytes are reserved in both the process input (PII) and process
output (PIO) image for each slot. The CPU and the IP 266 use all eight bytes of the
PII and the PIO to interchange data. Please note that the IP 266 requires version
6ES5-100-8MA02, or a newer version, of the CPU 100.
In this manual, an interchange of data is referred to as a "frame". From the
STEP 5 point of view, there are two types of "frames":
Data interchange:
PLC CPU IP 266
Output frame
Data interchange:
IP 266 PLC CPU
Input frame
Table 7-1. Module Address Assignments
CPU
SLOTS
Analog
addresses
0
1
2
3
64
to
71
72
to
79
80
to
87
88
to
95
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
4
5
6
96
to
103
104
to
111
112
to
119
266
7
8
9
120 The slots from
to 8 up may not
be used
127
The permissible address range is from 64 to 127. The IP 266 is addressed with byteoriented or word-oriented Load and Transfer statements, as are analog input or
analog output modules.
Figure 7-1. Example of Data Interchange Between CPU and IP 266 (in slot 3)
7-1
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
IP 266
The IP 266 interchanges data with the programmable controller's CPU over the
100U bus. To make this possible, you must write operator commands to the
process output image (PIO). From here, these commands are forwarded to the
IP 266 once in each data cycle. A bit in byte 1 of the output frame prevents
multiple execution of identical job orders.
The data in the output frame is needed to operate the IP 266, providing the IP 266
with information on
• the mode
• the parameters and
• the operations to be carried out.
Data from the IP 266 is forwarded to the PII in each firmware cycle (every 3.75 ms).
7.1
Output Frame (PLC CPU IP 266)
The allocation of the bytes in the output frame depends on which slot the IP 266
is plugged into in the PLC. Table 7-2 shows the allocation of the output bytes (QB)
to the current slot numbers.
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Table 7-2. Addressing of the Output Frame
Byte in the output frame
Slot
number
Byte 0
Byte 1
Byte 2
Byte 3
Byte 4
Byte 5
Byte 6
Byte 7
0
QB 64
QB 65
QB 66
QB 67
QB 68
QB 69
QB 70
QB 71
1
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
2
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
3
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
4
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
5
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
6
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
7
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
7-2
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
1
6
7
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
Table 7-3. Overview of the Output Frame
Byte
Description
Recommended data
format
0
Mode codes
KF
Bit 7
TOGGLE
KM
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
0
0
TRANS
REV
FWD
STOP
integer digits in the value to the IP 266.
BCD:
byte 4, bits 4 to 7: sign of the BCD number
Binary:
16-bit binary number for forwarding the decimal digits to the IP 266.
BCD:
byte 6, bits 4 to 7: least-significant integer
byte 6, bits 0 to 3 and
byte 7, bits 0 to 7: three decimal digits in the BCD number
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Bit 0
START
2
Byte parameter for various modes
3
Override factor
KF
4
5
Binary-coded:
16-bit fixed-point number with sign (bit 7 in byte 4) for forwarding the
KF
KM/KF
KH
byte 4, bits 0 to 3 and
byte 5, bits 0 to 7: 3 BCD digits
KF
KH
7-3
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Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
7.1.1
Mode no. in KF format
Description
7-4
IP 266
Byte 0: Mode
Byte 0 is used for coding the modes, which you can invoke via a STEP 5 program.
To choose a mode, enter one of the mode numbers listed in the table below in
byte 0 in KF format.
Mode no. in KF format
Description
1
2
3
JOG 1
JOG 2
CONTROLLED JOG
13
14
15
ZERO OFFSET RELATIVE
CLEAR ZERO OFFSET
TOOL OFFSET ON
4
5
6
FOLLOW-UP MODE
REFERENCE POINT
INCREMENTAL ABSOLUTE
16
17
18
TOOL OFFSET OFF
ACKNOWLEDGE ERROR
DRIFT COMPENSATION ON
7
8
9
INCREMENTAL RELATIVE
AUTOMATIC
AUTOMATIC SINGLE BLOCK
19
26
71
DRIFT COMPENSATION OFF
RAM EEPROM
READ ACTUAL POSITION
10
11
12
TEACH-IN ON
TEACH-IN OFF
ZERO OFFSET ABSOLUTE
72
73
99
READ FOLLOWING ERROR
READ DISTANCE TO GO
SYNCHRONIZE IP
Note:
Mode 99 must be started before issuing the first job order.
Modes 71 to 73 are monitoring modes, and can be started in parallel to all other
modes. Even while a mode is in progress, you can switch between modes 71 to 73
without affecting the process.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
7.1.2 Byte 1: Commands
The commands for executing a mode depend on the mode specified in byte 0.
Table 7-4 lists the permissible commands for all modes.
Table 7-4. Command Codes
Command
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
START
0/1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
STOP
0/1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
FORWARD
0/1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
REVERSE
0/1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
TRANSFER
0/1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
Note:
Only one of the bits 0 to 4 may be set at any given time. An error is flagged if
you set more than one of these bits, and the job request is not serviced. Bits 5
and 6 must always be "0".
TOGGLE bit
Bit 7 has a special function, and is used as Execute bit. A change in the value of
this bit informs the IP 266 that a new job request has been issued. In this case, the
IP 266 interprets the frame as a new job request.
The next job cannot be started until bit 7 once again changes its signal state, thus
ensuring that a given job will not be reinterpreted and restarted in every cycle.
This bit must be set to "0" in the restart OBs, thus ensuring that the first job will
always be started on a change from 0 1.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
7-5
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IP 266
cycle
Bit 7
7-6
Job request is interpreted in this cycle
Byte
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
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Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
IP 266
The IP 266 scans this TOGGLE bit in each firmware cycle, and starts a new job
where appropriate (see Figure 7-2).
t
1
0
Cycle trigger; beginning of a new cycle
Figure 7-2. Interpreting a Job Order in Dependence on the TOGGLE Bit
Example: Give the IP 266 the Start command for the specified mode by coding
byte 1 as shown below. Before the command was forwarded to the IP, bit 7 was 0.
This issues the Start command "Forward" to the IP 266. The mode is started because the TOGGLE bit (bit 7) changed from 0 to 1.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
7.1.3
Mode
5
7.1.4
Use
Reference point:
Bit 0 = 0 : approach
Bit 0 = 1 : set
8
Number of the machining
Example:
9
10
program
KF = +7
Program no. 7
26
Direction of data transfer:
IP EEPROM IP RAM
Bit 0 = 0 : RAM EEPROM
1 : EEPROM RAM
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
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IP 266
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
Byte 2: Program Number, Reference Point or
EEPROM RAM Parameters
The contents of this byte depend on the specified mode.
In modes 5, 8, 9, 10 and 26, byte 2 is used as byte parameter. It is irrelevant in all
other modes.
KM FORMAT
KF FORMAT
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
X
X: variable; bit 1 to 7 irrelevant
1
Example: This bit combination is
used to transfer data from the
IP 266's EEPROM to IP RAM, i.e.
the current RAM contents are
overwritten.
Byte 3: Override Factor
Byte 3 is the second of the byte parameters, and contains the override factor. A
valid value must be entered in this byte for all modes which allow modification of
the speed via an override factor. The value must be in the range from 1% to 200%,
and should be entered in KF (fixed-point constant) format if possible. The override factor is transferred in byte 1 to the IP 266 with "TRANSFER".
7-7
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Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
7.1.5
Byte
7-8
Binary
IP 266
Example:
Assuming you want to operate your drive in mode 1 (JOG 1) with an override
factor of 75%.
Enter the number in byte 3 in binary (KF format).
KF = +75
Set bit 4 in byte 1 to activate the override factor during a traversing movement.
Bytes 4 to 7: Positioning Specifications
A number of IP 266 modes require specification of a position.
This value may be:
• an absolute target position or coordinate (see modes 6 and 12)
or
• a relative position (see modes 7, 13 and 15)
Enter this value in bytes 4 to 7 of the output message as follows:
Table 7-5. Position Specifications
BCD
4
Sign and
Sign and the
5
integer digits
three highest integer digits
6
Decimal
First integer digit
7
digits
and 3 decimal digits
The value can be entered in one of two formats. The value range depends on the
format used:
Binary:
±32767.999
BCD:
± 9999.999
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
Binary-coded positions
15 bits are provided for the integer portion of the number. It is thus possible to
represent the number 215 - 1, or 32 767. In the case of a negative number, the
integer portion is represented as two's complement. The decimal digits are
specified as an absolute value.
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BCD-coded positions
The sign is specified in bits 4 to 7 of byte 4. If the number is negative, bit 7, at
least, must be "1". Since there are three decimal places, four decades are still
available for the integer portion of the number.
Binary (KF fixed-point
constant format)
Integer positions
Byte 4
Byte 5
BCD (KH hexadecimal
constant format)
Byte 4
Byte 5
Byte 6 (bits 4 to 7)
Decimal positions
Byte 6
Byte 7
Byte 6 (bits 0 to 3)
Byte 7
Positions in the range 0 to - 0.999
Special rules govern the definition of a binary value between -1 and 0 (e. g. - 0.5).
These values have an integer value of - 0, which cannot be represented as two's
complement. When you want to specify a position in this range, you must enter
the values that make up the position in the following order:
1. Enter integer position "0" as a positive value in bytes 4 and 5.
2. Enter the decimal positions as a negative number in two's complement
representation in bytes 6 and 7.
A small negative number in BCD format is defined in the usual manner.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
7-9
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Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
Position
specification
Binary
KF
BCD
KH
Integer positions
Decimal positions
Position
specification
7-10
Byte 4
Byte 4
Byte 5
= sign and integer positions
Binary (KF format)
Byte 5
IP 266
Example 1:
The drive is to be moved a distance of - 50.500 mm in "relative increment mode"
(mode 7).
Byte 6
= sign and integer positions
- 50
8005
Byte 4
Byte 5
- 50
Byte 4
Byte 5
Byte 6 (bits 4 to 7)
Byte 6
Byte 7
500
Byte 6 (bits 0 to 3)
Byte 7
Byte 6
Byte 7
= decimal positions
500
= 1 integer and 3 decimal positions
0500
BCD (KH format)
8005
0500
Example 2:
The drive is to be moved the very short distance of - 0.500 mm in "relative increment mode" (mode 7). When you enter the value in binary, you must specify the
decimal digits as a negative number.
Table 7-6. Entering a Small Negative Value
Byte 7
Binary
KF
0
= sign and integer positions
- 500
= decimal positions
BCD
KH
8000
= sign and integer positions
0500
= 1 integer and 3 decimal positions
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
Byte
0
2
4, 5
6, 7
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
7.1.6 Example of a Complete Output Frame
The drive is to be moved backward - 35.750 mm in "relative increment mode"
(mode 7) at 20% of the incremental speed. BCD is to be used as data format.
The data formats recommended in Table 7-3 have been used in the table below
for the output frame.
Output frame:
KF
KH
1
0
8003
5750
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
KM
Bit
7
0/
1
Bit
6
0
Bit
5
0
Bit
4
0
Remarks
Bit
3
1
Bit
2
0
Bit
1
0
Bit
0
+7
Mode 7
0
Bit 3:
REVERSE command
Bit 7:
TOGGLE bit
Not relevant in this mode
Relative distance - 35.750 mm
The TOGGLE bit (bit 7) must change its value each time a command is issued. If it
was 0 for the last command, you must now enter a 1.
7-11
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Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
7.2
7-12
IP 266
Input Frame (IP 266 PLC CPU)
The allocation of the bytes in the input frame depends on the slot used for the
IP 266 in the programmable controller. Like Table 7-2 for the output frame,
Table 7-7 shows the allocation of the input bytes (IB) to the current slot numbers.
Table 7-7. Addressing of the Input Frame
Slot
number
Byte 0
Byte 1
Byte 2
Byte 3
Byte 4
Byte 5
Byte 6
Byte 7
0
IB 64
IB 65
IB 66
IB 67
IB 68
IB 69
IB 70
IB 71
1
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
2
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
3
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
4
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
5
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
6
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
7
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
Byte in the input frame
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
2
3
4
5
6
7
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
Table 7-8. Overview of the Input Frame
Byte
Description
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Recommended data
format
0
Current mode
KF
1
M function
KF
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
0/1
0/1
0/1
0/1
0/1
0/1
0/1
0/1
Current IP 266 error codes
KM
Status bits for axis, controller and machine data
KH
Bytes 4 to 7 are used for actual position, distance to go or following error,
depending on the specified mode and on the current monitoring command.
Binary:
16-bit fixed-point number with sign (bit 7 in byte 4) used to forward the
integer positions of the value to the IP 266.
KF
BCD:
Byte 4, bits 4 to 7: sign of the BCD number
Byte 4, bits 0 to 3 and
KH
Byte 5, bits 0 to 7: 3 BCD digits
Binary:
16-bit binary number used to forward the decimal positions to the IP 266.
KF
BCD:
Byte 6, bits 4 to 7: least-significant integer position
Byte 6, bits 0 to 3 and
KH
Byte 7, bits 0 to 7: three decimal positions
7-13
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
7.2.1
IP 266
Byte 0: Mode
The IP 266 acknowledges the mode in byte 0. This value can be read in KF (fixedpoint constant) format.
Example:
The IP 266 returns the mode that is currently in progress or was just executed in
byte 0 of the input frame.
KF = +2
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The current mode is mode 2 (JOG 2).
Note:
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Neither the current monitoring mode (71, 72 or 73) nor mode 99, which
synchronizes the IP 266, is acknowledged.
7.2.2
Byte 1: M Function
In modes 8 and 9, the drive is positioned via machining programs. If M functions
were written in these programs, their values are entered in byte 1 when the
relevant machining block is processed. The value is best read out in KF format.
Value range of Mnn:
nn is a two-digit number in the range 00 to 99. If no M function is programmed, the IP 266 forwards the three-digit
number "255" to the COM program (PLC format KH: "FF";
format KF: "- 1").
Example:
The IP 266 returns the following in byte 1:
KF = +50
An M50 function has been written in the machining program.
7-14
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
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7.2.3 Byte 2: Status Bits
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
IP 266 is synchronized
Number format: 1 = BCD, 0 = BINARY
Axis is in position
Controller is on
IP266 is in Teach-In mode
No reference point
No valid machine data
Job completed; 0 = Job in progress
Bit 0 = 1 The IP is synchronized. This bit is set to "1" if the IP 266 was correctly
synchronized with mode 99.
= 0 This bit is set to "0" on every IP 266 runup (Ident run).
Bit 1: Specified number format
Binary or BCD has been entered in the machine data on the IP 266.
The IP 266 returns the relevant code in bit 1 so that you will be able to
interpret the values for position specifications correctly.
= 1: BCD
= 0: Binary
Bit 2 = 1 The axis is in position. This bit is set when the actual position is within
the standstill or zero-speed monitor's tolerance range (see Section 2.5.6).
This bit also goes from 0 to 1 when a dwell time has expired.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
7-15
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
IP 266
Bit 3 = 1 The controller is on. This bit is always set when the position controller
is on.
= 0 This bit is set to "0" in modes 3 and 4.
Bit 4 = 1 The IP 266 is in Teach-In mode. This bit is set when you select mode 10
(Teach-In mode).
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= 0 This bit is reset to "0" when the Teach-In mode is terminated by
invoking mode 11.
Note:
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When mode 10 is aborted because of an "error in the position control loop",
the IP 266 enters mode 4. When mode 4 is terminated with the Stop command,
the Teach-In mode must also be terminated by invoking mode 11.
Bit 5 = 1 No reference point has been set. Target positions may be specified or
a machining program invoked only when a reference point has been
set. An error is flagged if you attempt to execute an operation that
requires a reference point.
= 0 The reference point is set.
Bit 6 = 1 Valid machine data is not available. You can start a mode only when
the IP 266 has been correctly initialized, i. e. when valid machine data
is available.
= 0 Valid machine data is available on the IP 266.
Bit 7 = 1 This bit is set when a job has executed.
In modes 8 and 9, it is set only when the relevant mode has terminated.
It is not set after single machining operations.
= 0 The job is in progress.
7-16
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
Example 1:
The reference point is set:
The IP 266 services a job request in a controlled mode (e. g. mode 6). The status
data is returned in BCD format. All input data is valid.
The IP 266 returns the following in byte 2:
Byte
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
2
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
IP 266 is synchronized
BCD-coded data
Axis is not in position
Controller is on
Teach-In off
Reference point is set
Machine data is OK
Job is in progress
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
7-17
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
IP 266
Example 2:
The IP 266 receives a request to position the axis in a controlled mode (mode 1, 2
or 7). All status data is returned in binary. The machine data is correct. There is no
reference point.
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The IP 266 returns the following in byte 2:
Byte
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
2
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
IP 266 is synchronized
BCD-coded data
Axis is in position
Controller is on
Teach-In off
No reference point
Machine data is OK
Job is in progress
7.2.4
Byte 3: Error Flags
IP 266 errors are flagged in bits 0 to 4 of byte 3. The error code is right-justified
and in binary. Use KH (hexadecimal constant) format to read the error code. You
will find a list of error messages in Section 10.
The error codes forwarded to the PLC are identical to those output by COM 266.
7-18
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
7.2.5
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
Bytes 4 to 7: Input Values for the Monitoring Functions
In each firmware cycle, the IP 266 returns a monitoring mode-dependent value. If
you entered a monitoring function in the output frame for the IP 266, the IP 266
returns a current value in bytes 4 to 7 at regular intervals. These values can be
read out in either KF or KH format.
Binary (KF format)
Integer positions
Decimal positions
Position
specification
BCD in
KH format
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Byte 4
Binary in
KF format
=
BCD (KH format)
Byte 4
Byte 4
Byte 5
Byte 5
Byte 6 (bits 4 to 7)
Byte 6
Byte 6 (bits 0 to 3)
Byte 7
Byte 7
Example:
The drive is positioned under closed-loop control in "JOG 2" mode (mode 2). Monitoring function mode 72 was also selected in the output frame.
The IP 266 returns the current following error in bytes 4 to 7,
e. g. + 5.310 mm
Byte 5
+5
= sign and integer digits
0000
sign and 3 integer digits
Byte 6
Byte 7
310
= decimal digits
5310
= least-significant integer position
and 3 decimal digits
7-19
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1
2
3
4
5
6
7
System Overview
Technical Description of the IP 266
Installation Guidelines
Fundamentals of Positioning
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Fundamentals of COM 266
Communication Between the CPU and the IP 266
8
Start-Up
8.1
Configuring the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
8.1.1 IP 266 Limit Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
8.1.2 The Power Section on the IP 266's
Analog Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
8.1.3 Drive System Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
8.1.4 The Incremental Position Encoder . . . . . . . . . . . 8
8.1.5 Programmer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
8.1.6 Checking the Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
9
10
8.2
Computing the Machine Data
8.3
Initializing the IP 266
8.4
Executing the Start-Up Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 - 12
STEP 5 Programming
Troubleshooting
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
-
1
1
-
3
3
4
5
6
.............. 8 -
7
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 - 11
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Figures
8-1.
8-2.
8-1.
8-2.
Location of the Programmer Interface and
Connector Pin Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. 5
Linear Axis and Range Limit Switches (not to scale) . . . . . 8 - 16
Tables
Data for Initializing the IP 266 Hardware
and the Peripheral Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
. Formulas for Computing the Machine Data
........... 8 -
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
7
8
IP 266
Start-Up
8
Start-Up
8.1
Configuring the System
Before putting the IP 266 into operation, you must check to make sure that you
are using the right interface module and that the peripheral elements have been
assigned the correct parameters.
These peripheral elements include:
• the emergency limit switches
• the power section on the IP 266's analog output
• the hardware limit switches
• the drive system mechanics
• the incremental position encoder
• the programmer.
8.1.1
IP 266 Limit Switches
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In order to limit the positioning range, you must fit limit switches which ensure
that the drive will be moved only within its mechanical limitations.
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WARNING!
The limit switches must be connected and tested before powering up the IP 266
and the power section.
As regards the IP 266, you must differentiate between software limit switches,
hardware limit switches and emergency limit switches.
• Software limit switches
You define the locations of the software limit switches in the machine data.
These switches are activated when a reference point is set.
• Hardware limit switches
Hardware limit switches are switches which are connected to the IP 266 via
connecting leads. They are connected to the terminals on the terminal block,
and are used to limit the path of travel.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
8-1
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Start-Up
•
The emergency limit switches are properly connected.
8-2
IP 266
Check the following carefully:
- The hardware start limit switch defines the start of the traversing range,
and must be connected to PIN 3 on the terminal block.
- The hardware end limit switch defines the end of the traversing range, and
must be connected to PIN 5 on the terminal block.
Note:
You must observe the minimum distances when installing the limit switches, i. e.
there must be a sufficient distance for deceleration.
The hardware limit switches are properly connected.
ok
Emergency limit switches
The emergency limit switches must be directly connected to the power
section. When a hardware limit switch fails, the emergency limit switch must
ensure a reliable power section shutdown.
Check the following:
The connecting leads for the two emergency limit switches must be run
directly to the power section.
CAUTION:
Connecting the emergency limit switches to the IP 266 is not allowed.
ok
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
8.1.2
Start-Up
The Power Section on the IP 266's Analog Output
The power section must be connected to the IP 266's analog output.
Check the connection between the IP 266 and the power section
When you calibrate the power section, make sure that there is sufficient
power reserve. The drive must never be operated at the current limit, as the
motor speed could not follow the setpoint speed.
8.1.3
Drive System Mechanics
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All mechanical elements located between the motor and the part of the drive to
be positioned are part of the drive system mechanics.
There may be play (backlash) in the drive system.
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CAUTION:
Backlash can be compensated for only when it is outside the position control
loop. Backlash within the position control loop results in oscillations in the
control response.
To prevent backlash in the position control loop, the incremental position
encoder should be connected directly to the motor shaft.
Check your drive system for backlash.
If you detect backlash outside the position control loop, measure it exactly.
The backlash is
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
mm/inches/degrees
8-3
Start-Up
8.1.4
IP 266
The Incremental Position Encoder
Control precision depends on the location of the encoder in the drive system. A
sequence of movements can be easily verified when the encoder is mounted
directly on the motor axis.
Check to make sure that the encoder is correctly installed.
You must use an encoder which supplies two pulse trains displaced by 90 deg.
with respect to each other and a zero mark signal.
You may use a 5 V or a 24 V encoder.
In addition to all required signals, the 5 V version must also supply the
inverted signal for each signal.
.
Which encoder version are you using?
V
If you are using a 5 V encoder, check the following:
Does the encoder supply the inverted signals?
You must select an encoder resolution that enables evaluation of a sufficient
number of pulses per interval even at low speeds. The minimum resolution
should be greater than the positioning accuracy.
The maximum operating frequency of encoder and module must not be
exceeded at Vmax. The maximum operating frequencies for 5 V and 24 V
encoders are as follows:
• For symmetrical 5 V encoders: 500 kHz
• For asymmetrical 24 V encoders: 100 kHz (for a max. cable length of 25 m)
24 V encoders: 25 kHz (for a max. cable length of 100 m)
8-4
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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8.1.5
ANALOG
OUT
E
N
C
O
D
E
R
P
G
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
11
12
13
14
15
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IP 266
Start-Up
Programmer
The module is equipped with two 15-pin D subminiature interfaces. The programmer must be connected to the one at the right.
FAULT
1
9
10
P
G
Pin
Description
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 to 15
Shield
RxD_N
TxD_P
TxD_N
Shield
RxD_P
-
6
POSITIONING
MODULE IP 266
6ES5 266-8MA11
1 2 3 4 5 6
Figure 8-1. Location of the Programmer Interface and
Connector Pin Assignments
CAUTION:
The programmer interface and the encoder interface both have 15 pins, and it is
possible to confuse the two. Remember that the programmer interface is the
one on the right.
If you confuse the two, the module executes a Reset.
8-5
Start-Up
Checking the Wiring
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8.1.6
IP 266
ok
Check all cabling
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- Make sure that the control cable and the power cable are
sufficiently far apart and without kinks.
ok
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- Make sure that the cables to and from the controller are shielded
over their entire length, and that the cable shields are grounded
at both ends.
ok
One important point is the laying of the ground wires, as insufficient
cross-sections, ground loops or failure to connect the ground may
result in malfunctions. Locating and eliminating such problems can be
costly and time-consuming.
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Make sure that the ground wires have sufficient cross-sectional area
and are properly laid and connected.
ok
Make sure that the leads for the n
twisted.
set
and M signals are shielded and
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If you are using a 5 V encoder, check to make sure that the inverse
signal leads are shielded.
ok
ok
8-6
- Encoder cable (ENCODER)
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- Setpoint cable (ANALOG OUT)
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- Digital cable
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- FUM signal wired?
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Check the following cables for short-circuits and wirebreaks and
make sure that the pin assignments are as described in the section
dealing with the hardware (Section 2):
ok
ok
ok
ok
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Start-Up
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IP 266
ok
- 24 V supply
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- After making sure that all components are off circuit, attach the
cables and screw them down.
ok
8.2
Computing the Machine Data
In this section, you will learn to compute the machine data with which you must
initialize the IP 266. The machine data is based on the capabilities and mechanics
of the drive.
In order to compute the machine data, you need information on the hardware.
Please take this information from the data sheets describing the drive and/or
from the commissioning report.
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Table 8-1. Data for Initializing the IP 266 Hardware and the Peripheral Elements
The following data is required
Abbreviation
Unit
•
•
•
Motor/axis ratio
Motor speed at 10 V
Travel per encoder revolution
ü
n10V
xG
[1/min]
[mm]
•
•
•
Pulses per encoder revolution
Hardware start limit switch
Hardware end limit switch
IG
HA
HE
[1]
[mm]
[mm]
•
Time needed to decelerate from v max. to zero speed
t
[s]
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
[1]
8-7
Start-Up
IP 266
The following values are computed on the basis of this data:
Table 8-2. Formulas for Computing the Machine Data
The factor ü must be taken into account only
when it is not part of xg.
Maximum deceleration rate bmax
Vmax
[ mm/60s ]
bmax [ mm/s2 ] =
t
[s]
Take the time from the commissioning report
for the power section you are using.
Vmax
bmax [ mm/s2 ] =
t · 60
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Maximum velocity (speed)
Vmax [mm/min] = xg · n10V · ü
mm
s2
Maximum following error s
[ mm/60s ]
Vmax
s [mm] =
Kv
[ 1/s ]
Vmax
s [mm] =
Kv · 60
The following data is computed from the results of these calculations
Kv (gain) factor
Kv
The gain factor depends on the design, dynamics
[ 1/
s
]
and disturbance variables (load variations)
affecting your drive. An optimum gain factor
cannot be ascertained until the system is actually
put into operation. A very low value (1 to 21/s)
should be selected for start-up in order to avoid
damage.
8-8
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Start-Up
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Computing a set of machine data:
Machine data item
Limits
Example
Module
Measuring system
0 to 99
mm, in, deg.
11
mm
Axis type
Linear, rotary
Linear
The following applies for all deceleration and acceleration rates:
|a| |bmax|
|b| |bmax|
The absolute acceleration and/or deceleration rates must be less than the absolute maximum
deceleration rate bmax.
Maximum deceleration
Acceleration fwd.
10 to 9999 mm/s2
10 to 9999 mm/s2
1000
500
mm/ 2
s
mm/ 2
s
mm/ 2
s
mm/ 2
s
mm/ 2
s
Deceleration fwd.
Acceleration rev.
Deceleration rev.
10 to 9999 mm/s2
10 to 9999 mm/s2
10 to 9999 mm/s2
500
500
500
Encoder type
IP-STOP if CPU-STOP
Gain factor
5 V, 24 V
yes, no
0.1 to 99.9 1/s
5V
no
16.6
Backlash compensation
Zero-speed monitor
Max. following error
0.000 to 64.999 mm
0.001 to 64.999 mm
0.001 to 99.999 mm
0.000 mm
2.000 mm
15.000 mm
Following error monitoring
on, off
on
1/
s
The following condition applies for the switching elements
-
software start limit switch
software end limit switch
reference point coordinate
XSA
XSE
REF:
XHA < XSA < XREF < XSE < XHE
XHA is the hardware start limit switch, X HE the hardware end limit switch.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
8-9
IP 266
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Start-Up
Machine data item
Limits
Example
Reference point coordinate
Software start limit switch
Software end limit switch
± 32767.999 mm
± 32767.999 mm
± 32767.999 mm
0.000 mm
-400.000 mm
400.000 mm
Tool length offset
± 32767.999 mm
0.000 mm
For a rotary axis, the two fields for the software limit switches are replaced by the two fields
start of traversing range and
end of traversing range.
The range limits are identical to those for a linear axis.
Zero offset 1
Zero offset 2
Zero offset 3
± 32767.999 mm
± 32767.999 mm
± 32767.999 mm
10.000 mm
25.000 mm
30.000 mm
Zero offset 4
± 32767.999 mm
35.000 mm
All speeds must be lower than Vmax
Maximum speed
Jog speed 1 fwd.
Jog speed 1 rev.
1 to 65000 mm/min
1 to 65000 mm/min
1 to 65000 mm/min
15000
2000
2000
Jog speed 2 fwd.
Jog speed 2 rev.
Incremental speed
1 to 65000 mm/min
1 to 65000 mm/min
1 to 65000 mm/min
4000
4000
12000
Reference point approach speed 1
Reference point approach speed 2
Reference direction
1 to 65000 mm/min
1 to 65000 mm/min
fwd./rev.
1000
500
fwd.
Pulses/revolution
Distance/revolution
PLC BCD-coded
1 to 65000 pulses/rev.
0.001 to 400.000 mm
yes, no
1000 pulses/rev.
5.000 mm
no
Polarity HW limit switch
pos/neg
neg
8-10
mm/
min
mm/
min
mm/
min
mm/
min
mm/
min
mm/
min
mm/
min
mm/
min
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
8.3
Start-Up
Initializing the IP 266
Before you can use the IP 266, you must first supply it with valid machine data.
You have two options for entering machine data:
• Defining machine data for a newly installed system
• Loading an existing record from a non-volatile storage medium
Entering machine data for a newly installed system
Before putting a new system into operation, you must define your machine data
for that system.
The information presented in Section 8.2 showed you how to compute the
required data on the basis of the drive's technical specifications.
To enter your machine data, you need a programmer and the COM 266 software
package.
Start COM 266 as described in Section 6 and proceed to the "FUNCTION SELECT"
menu. All COM 266 basic functions are invoked from within this menu.
The input of machine data is described in detail in Section 6.4.1.
Loading an existing record from a non-volatile storage medium
Invoke the TRANSFER function in the "FUNCTION SELECT" menu (see Section 6.5)
to load an existing set of machine data.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
8-11
Start-Up
8.4
IP 266
Executing the Start-Up Test
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The drive must be within the permissible traversing range before the IP 266 can
be tested together with the drive. This range is defined by the two hardware limit
switches.
CAUTION:
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All limit switches must be correctly installed before executing the start-up test,
i. e. both the hardware limit switches and the emergency limit switches must be
connected.
Remember that you can actuate the emergency off switch at any time!
It has been assumed that your power section has been matched to the drive.
The first step
Power up the PLC
Switch on the 24 V supply
No CPU program need be available
at this point.
If you entered "yes" for ”IP-STOP if
CPU-STOP" in the IP 266 machine
data, the CPU must be at RUN.
The CPU should not address the
IP 266 during the first phase of the
start-up procedure.
The power section is still off.
Connect the programmer to the IP 266
Start COM 266
(ON-LINE)
Keep an eye on the monitor's error line when making your entries. If a problem
occurs, it will be flagged on this line.
8-12
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Start-Up
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For testing, a set of machine data and a traversing program are stored on
EEPROM. Since this data does not necessarily coincide with your hardware, you
may find that errors will be reported. Change the machine data as indicated by
the error messages. These messages, and the changes they indicate, will apply
primarily to the encoder type, the polarity and the encoder resolution.
CAUTION:
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The IP 266 outputs the enable signal (FUM) directly when it detects data whose
logic and signal level are correct. If a positioning operation was triggered, it will
be started immediately!
Correct the machine data as indicated by the error messages.
Generate a traversing program for modes 8 and 9 and transfer it to the IP 266.
Testing the axis
Select the COM 266 test mode.
Start mode 4 (follow-up mode)
The following is displayed in the screen form's output fields:
Axis status: running
ok
CLC: off
ok
Switch on the power section
The axis must remain at zero speed and its drift must be barely perceptible. If
this is not the case, you must repeat the fine adjustment for 0 volts on the
drive.
Stop mode 4 and check the return data.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Axis status: finished
ok
CLC: on
ok
8-13
Start-Up
IP 266
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Testing the encoder's direction of rotation
CAUTION:
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If the encoder rotates in the wrong direction, there is direct feedback from the
position control loop (the CLC is on). As a result, the drive, instead of stopping,
traverses at maximum speed. You must therefore make sure that the drive can
be immediately stopped via external switches whenever necessary while performing this test. Should the drive begin to oscillate when it is at zero speed,
you must reduce the gain (Kv) factor!
The IP 266 monitors the position control direction, aborting the current operation
with an error message when an error occurs and starting mode 4.
When the IP detects the correct sense of rotation, it disables the monitor; the
monitor remains disabled until mode 4 is once again started. When mode 4 is
terminated, the position control direction is again monitored.
Please note:
A forward traversing movement always means a movement in the direction of
the software end limit switch, whose coordinate position must be higher than
that of the software start limit switch. The IP 266 generates a positive output
voltage (setpoint speed). The incremental encoder must be connected to the IP in
such a way that the resulting direction of rotation causes the IP's counter to
function as an up counter. The IP's counter counts up when the A signal is
detected before the B signal. The opposite is true in the event of a reverse
traversing movement.
As regards the direction of rotation of the encoder and the motor, the conventions are the same for linear and rotary axes. A clockwise (or forward)
traversing movement always means a positive output voltage (setpoint speed), a
counter-clockwise (or reverse) traversing movement a negative output voltage.
When the axis traverses in a clockwise direction, the IP's counter must count up. A
forward movement moves the axis toward the end of the traversing range,
which, in the case of a rotary axis, is the same as the start of the traversing range,
but which must always be more positive than the latter.
8-14
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Start-Up
Select mode 3 (Controlled jog).
Select a low speed (approx. 1-5 %) via "Override".
Select the "Forward" function and observe the actual position; this value must
increase.
If the actual position value decreases, switch off the power section immediately!
In this case, you must interchange encoder signals A-A\ and B-B\ (if you are using
a 5 V encoder) or A* and B* (if you are using a 24 V encoder) and retest the
direction of rotation. Forward travel must result in an increase in the actual
position, reverse travel in a decrease.
Testing the hardware limit switches
Initiate forward traversing in mode 3.
Trip and hold the hardware end limit switch.
The traversing movement must be aborted with the "HW end limit switch
tripped" error message. There must be no further travel when a new "Mode 3
forward" command is issued.
ok
Initiate reverse travel in mode 3.
Release the hardware end limit switch during traversing.
Trip the start limit switch.
The traversing movement must be aborted with the error message "HW start
limit switch tripped". There must be no further travel when a new "Mode 3
reverse" command is issued.
ok
Start mode 3 "Forward" and release the hardware start limit switch during
traversing. Traversing movements in both directions are now once again
possible.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
8-15
Start-Up
IP 266
Refer to the following figure when you want to simulate tripping of a limit switch
within the traversing range:
Traversing range
HE NE
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Table
N A/N E: Emergency start/emergency end limit switch
(power section)
H A/H E: Hardware start/hardware end limit switch
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Traversing range
Deceleration distance S Br
Clearance distance X
Figure 8-2. Linear Axis with Range Limit Switches (not to scale)
Move the drive at a controlled jog toward the hardware start limit switch.
During traversing, actuate the relevant limit switch briefly, then release it.
The drive decelerates at maximum deceleration speed.
Travel is now possible only in the direction of the hardware end limit switch.
Move the drive at a controlled jog toward the hardware end limit switch.
During traversing, actuate the relevant limit switch briefly, then release it.
The drive decelerates at maximum deceleration speed.
Bidirectional travel is now impossible.
Should this situation occur, you must hold the relevant hardware limit switch in
one of the two directions before starting the "controlled jog".
8-16
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Start-Up
Testing the following error
Travel a considerable distance in mode 1 or 2 ("Jog 1" or" Jog 2"), observe the
following error, and stop travel.
The result must be the buildup of a following error which, after some time,
remains fairly constant and then goes back to zero following deceleration. At
zero speed, the following error can vary by approximately ± 3 increments,
depending on the drive calibration. If it varies by more than ± 3 increments,
you must either increase the Kv factor or recalibrate the drive. The following
error should assume approximately the following value during traversing:
v [mm/min]
s [mm] =
60 · kv · [1/s]
Testing the maximum speed
Move your drive in mode 3 with an override factor of 100%.
The computed speed is displayed in the test form. If this speed does not
coincide with the speed specified in the machine data, you must check and
correct your specifications.
Computing the reference point
Select "Reference point approach" mode (mode 5).
Initiate the "Start" function.
The drive must execute a traversing routine and return "Reference point set".
ok
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
8-17
Start-Up
IP 266
Possible errors:
1. The drive does not move although "Reference point set" is displayed.
You have accidentally executed a "Set reference point".
2. The drive traverses, but does not reduce its speed at the reference point
switch and does not find the reference point.
The reference point switch is either defective or is an "NC" contact.
3. The drive reduces its speed at the reference point switch, but continues
traversing until it reaches the limit switch. "Reference point deleted" is
displayed on the monitor.
The zero mark of the encoder is not used in the IP 266. You must test the
reference point switch signal and the zero mark signal.
If the reference point exists, the software limit switches are also effective.
Traverse in both directions in mode 1 or 2 and check to see whether the
software limit switches are tripped before the hardware limit switches are
reached.
If necessary, you must shift the coordinates of the software limit switches so
that the drive comes to a standstill before reaching the hardware limit
switches.
Increment mode
Once the coordinate system has been established, you can approach absolute
target positions.
Enter various different target positions in modes 6 and 7 and check to see if
the axis reaches these positions.
Executing automatic programs
Write a short traversing program and transfer it to the module.
Test this program in modes 8 and 9.
8-18
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Start-Up
Teach-In
Select mode 10 ("Teach-in on").
Specify a program number.
Start mode 10.
Return info: Teach-in: on
ok
Approach various positions and store them with "Transfer".
Start mode 11 ("Teach-in off").
Execute the program you generated in "Teach-in" mode. Supplement the
program in DIN or Text mode by adding
dwells,
loops,
programmed stop,
speed changes and the like.
Familiarize yourself with the following modes
• Zero offset absolute (mode 12)
ok
•
Zero offset relative (mode 13)
ok
•
Clear zero offset (mode 14)
ok
•
Tool offset (mode 15)
ok
•
Tool offset off (mode 16)
ok
•
Acknowledge error (mode 17)
ok
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
8-19
Start-Up
IP 266
Generate an error such as "External STOP".
The error is flagged on the programmer
ok
Start mode 17.
The error is acknowledged.
ok
•
Drift compensation (mode 18)
ok
•
Drift compensation off (mode 19)
ok
Save the optimized machine data and traversing programs on floppy and
transfer the contents of the floppy to the module's EEPROM.
Controlling the IP 266 via the programmable controller
After testing the interplay between the IP 266 and your drive, you must test the
positioning application in your STEP 5 program.
Refer to the following sections for help:
• Section 7, which describes communications between the PLC's CPU and the
IP 266
• Section 9, which provides two examples for using the input and output
messages.
8-20
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
System Overview
Technical Description of the IP 266
Installation Guidelines
Fundamentals of Positioning
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Fundamentals of COM 266
Communication between the CPU and the IP 266
Start-Up
9
STEP 5 Programming
10
9.1
9.1.1
9.1.2
9.1.3
9.1.4
9.1.5
What to Observe when Programming
....... 9
General Information on Program Structure
.. 9
Edge Evaluation and Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Programming the TOGGLE Bit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Error Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
Automatic Synchronization in OB 1 . . . . . . . . . . 9
-
1
1
2
3
3
4
9.2
Switches, Indicators and Flags in the
Sample Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 -
5
9.3
Description of Sample Program 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 -
9
9.4
9.4.1
9.4.2
9.4.3
9.4.4
Sample Program 1: Overall Structure . . . . . . . . 9
Cold S5-100U Restart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Cyclic Operation with OB 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
FB 26: Control FB for the IP 266 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Selecting Modes via IB 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
9.5
Sample Program 2: Traversing to Two Fixed
Target Positions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 - 33
Troubleshooting
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
-
10
11
12
14
19
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Figures
9-1.
Using a Linear Axis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9. 9
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
STEP 5 Programming
9
STEP 5 Programming
9.1
What to Observe when Programming
9.1.1
General Information on Program Structure
When programming the IP 266, you must observe a number of special features
and exceptions. These are discussed in detail below.
Response to starting a mode
When you start a mode, you can expect the latest status info at the earliest two
cycles later. If you are using a high-speed CPU in conjunction with a short OB 1
cycle time, you may not receive this information until the third or fourth cycle.
Cycle n
Cycle n+1
Cycle n+2
Cycle n+3
Cycle n+4
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Cycle n-1
Mode is
Earliest
response to
invocation
of a mode
in cycle n
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started
Response
when mode
is started in
cycle n-1 or
earlier, i.e.
status info
is not up to
date
Process output image is forwarded to IP 266 (readied in cycle n)
Process input image is read from the IP 266 (in cycle n-1)
A special programming technique should be used to prevent repeated reading of
"out of date" information.
Two optional techniques are discussed below:
• A blank cycle can be programmed in each second OB 1 cycle to ensure that
the status info will be read no earlier than cycle n+2. However, this alone
does not ensure that the current status info will be read.
• A preferable technique would be to evaluate the signal edge of the "Job
terminated/in progress" bit.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
9-1
STEP 5 Programming
9.1.2
IP 266
Edge Evaluation and Modes
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The preferable technique to ensure a readout of the latest status info is edge
evaluation.
Sequence:
1. A job is started in cycle n. The status info shows "Job terminated".
2. The status info still shows "Job terminated" in cycle n+1 because the job had
not yet been started when the process input image was read.
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Note:
If this status bit were the only criterion for starting a new job, it would be
possible to start another job at this point although the first is still in progress.
The first job would thus be aborted and error F82 ("Inadmissible job") flagged.
The IP 266 reports "Job in progress" in cycle n+2 at the earliest.
It would therefore be preferable to use an edge flag to make sure that this problem cannot occur. No job can be started unless this flag is set, and it is set only
when the IP 266 returns "Job in progress".
Application in example 2 (see Section 9.5):
When a job is started, flag 3.0 is reset. As long as this flag is not set, no job can be
started. The flag is not set and a further job initiated until the IP 266 reports "Job
in progress".
A new job can be started when the IP 266 changes the status bit from "Job in
progress" to "Job terminated".
9-2
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
9.1.3
9.1.4
STEP 5 Programming
Programming the TOGGLE Bit
A change in the value of the TOGGLE bit informs the IP 266 that a new job
request is waiting to be serviced. The IP 266 then interprets and executes this
request .
Job n-1
Job n
Job request is
serviced
Job request is
serviced
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Job n+1
Job request is
not serviced
Job n+2
Job request is
serviced
Job n+3
To the IP 266
with TOGGLE
To the IP 266
with TOGGLE
To the IP 266
with TOGGLE
To the IP 266
with TOGGLE
To the IP 266
with TOGGLE
= "1"
= "0"
= "0"
= "1"
= "1"
Job n+4
Job request is
not serviced
In sample program 1, the TOGGLE bit is programmed in FB 25.
Error Analysis
Errors should be analyzed to enable the STEP 5 program to respond quickly to an
event.
It is recommended that errors be analyzed in every cycle. When doing so, however, you should also keep track of the "Job terminated" bit so that you will not
respond to "old" data.
9-3
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STEP 5 Programming
9.1.5
9-4
IP 266
Automatic Synchronization in OB 1
Mode 99 is the first mode the IP 266 will accept. Only then can one of the modes
1 to 73 be started. Mode 99 should therefore be invoked automatically in OB 1.
The TOGGLE bit must always be set to "1" for this mode.
Note:
No status info is returned for mode 99. If this mode executes without error, bit 0
is set in byte 2 of the input message (PII).
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
9.2
STEP 5 Programming
Switches, Indicators and Flags in the Sample Programs
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Maintained-contact/momentary-contact switches
All control elements for the program are interfaced over IB 3 and IB 4. Some
inputs require only momentary-contact switches, while others require maintained-contact switches. Inputs I 3.0 to I 4.7 are listed in the table below.
Input
Function
Maintainedcontact
switch
Momentarycontact
switch
•
Function
I 3.0
External start enable (IP pin 7)
NC contact
I 3.1
START
•
NO contact
I 3.2
STOP
•
NO contact
I 3.3
FORWARD
•
NO contact
I 3.4
REVERSE
•
NO contact
I 3.5
TRANSFER
•
NO contact
I 3.6
Override 100 % / 50 %
•
I 4.0
Selector switch for mode 5
•
NO contact
I 4.1
Selector switch for mode 2
•
NO contact
I 4.2
Selector switch for mode 6
•
NO contact
I 4.3
Selector switch for mode 8
•
NO contact
I 4.4
Selector switch for mode 9
•
NO contact
I 4.5
Absolute target specification
+360.800 mm / -360.600 mm
•
Continuous operation for mode 7
(brief example in Section 9.5)
•
I 3.7
I 4.6
I 4.7
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
NO contact
9-5
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STEP 5 Programming
Output
9-6
IP 266
Indicator elements/outputs
Lights when/is on when
Call in
Q 2.0
No external start enable signal (IP pin 7)
FB 26
Q 2.1
IP not initialized/synchronized
OB 1
Q 2.2
No reference point
FB 26
Q 2.3
IP in follow-up mode
FB 26
Q 2.4
Axis not in position
FB 26
Q 2.6
"Lower drill"
FB 20
Q 2.7
"Raise drill"
FB 20
QB 5
Error code, hexadecimal (KH)
FB 20
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
F 3.0
STEP 5 Programming
Flags, auxiliary flags and edge flags
Flag
Function
Edge flag (in example 2, Section 9.5)
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Remarks
This flag prevents a second job
from being started until "Job in
progress" has been returned
(see Section 9.5).
F 4.0
Auxiliary flag for START
These flags prevent repeated
F 4.1
Edge flag for START
F 4.2
Auxiliary flag for STOP
forwarding of the same job
requests to the IP when a command remains in force over
F 4.3
Edge flag for STOP
F 4.4
Auxiliary flag for FORWARD/REVERSE
F 4.5
Edge flag for FORWARD/REVERSE
F 4.6
Auxiliary flag for TRANSFER
F 4.7
Edge flag for TRANSFER
more than one OB 1 cycle
(see FB 20).
9-7
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STEP 5 Programming
Flag
9-8
IP 266
Function
F 5.0
Auxiliary initialization flag
F 6.0
START
F 6.1
STOP
F 6.2
FORWARD
F 6.3
REVERSE
F 6.4
TRANSFER
Remarks
FB 6 is transferred to byte 1
of the output message (QB 65
in the example). Before FB 6 is
transferred to QB 65, the
TOGGLE bit must be programmed in F 6.7.
F 6.5
F 6.6
F 6.7
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
9.3
STEP 5 Programming
Description of Sample Program 1
A workpiece is to be machined on an assembly line comprising several assembly
bays. The following steps are to be carried out at four positions within the
positioning range of the linear axis:
Position 0:
Position 0 is the home position of the worktable in the linear
axis's traversing range. It is at this position that a workpiece is
to be placed on the table for machining and at which the
workpiece is to be placed back on the table after machining.
Positions 1 to 3:
Holes are to be drilled in the workpiece at these three
positions. When the hole has been drilled at the last of these
three positions, the drive is to return to position 0. The
procedure can be restarted when the workpiece has been
removed from the table.
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A traversing program is used to approach positions 0 to 3. External activities in
the STEP 5 program are initiated via M functions. Figure 9-1 shows an installation
suitable for this example.
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Workpiece
Actual position
100
1
2
3
400 420 440
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Worktable
[mm]
Figure 9-1. Using a Linear Axis
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
9-9
STEP 5 Programming
9.4
IP 266
Sample Program 1: Overall Structure
For better readability, many subfunctions have been programmed in separate
FBs. The diagram below illustrates the overall structure:
OB 22
OB 1
Cyclic
operation
FB 27
Wait loop
FB 20
Read actual values
FB 10
Mode 99
FB 4/Mode 4
For errors in the position control loop
FB 26
Main
program
FB 5/Mode 5
Traversing
FB 2/Mode 2
FB 6/Mode 6
FB 8/Mode 8
FB 9/Mode 9
FB 21/START
FB 23 FORWARD/
REVERSE
FB 24/TRANSFER
FB 22/STOP
FB 25/TOGGLE
9-10
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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9.4.1
Timer 0
no
Reset and enable
timer
END
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
STEP 5 Programming
Cold S5-100U Restart
Before you can work with the IP 266 following a cold S5-100U restart, you must
wait for completion of the module's runup phase. You must program the waiting
time in OB 22, which executes after every "Power OFF/Power ON". The programmed waiting time must be at least 3 seconds.
OB 22
START
Call the delay time FB.
Call wait loop
FB 27
NAME
Set timer
M1
yes
SCHL
DELAY
BE
JU
AN
JC
FB
27
END
FB 27 NAME:DELAY
START
Force RLO = 1 and load timer with 3 s
JC
L
=M1
KT 300.0
SD
T
0
Time-out after 3 s
T
0
=SCHL
Reset timer and enable with RLO = 0
A
R
A
T
T
T
0
0
0
L
SD
BE
KT
T
001.0
0
9-11
STEP 5 Programming
9.4.2
IP 266
Cyclic Operation with OB 1
At the beginning of each OB 1 cycle, a check must be made to see whether the
IP 266 has been initialized. This check consists of scanning bit 0 in byte 2 of the
input message (PII).
If the IP 266 has not been synchronized, mode 99 must be invoked in FB 10.
If the IP has been synchronized, FB 26 is invoked. All further functions in the sample program are started from FB 26.
9-12
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP synchronized?
Aux. flag
set AND IP synchonized in bit 0?
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
FB 10
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yes
yes
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IP synchronized?
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IP 266
STEP 5 Programming
OB 1
START
Call FB for IP 266 synchronization via
mode 99 in dependence on the status
bits in the input message.
Set auxiliary flag
Call FB 10
Set output
(indicator)
Call FB 26 for
machining
AN
S
JC
NAME
AN
=
Reset output
(indicator)
NAME
I
F
FB
I
Q
66.0
5.0
10
MO99
Set output if IP not synchronized
66.0
2.1
The FB for selecting the mode can be
invoked when the IP 266 has been
synchronized.
A
A
F
I
5.0
66.0
JC
AXIS1
BE
FB
26
FB 26
END
9-13
STEP 5 Programming
9.4.3
IP 266
FB 26: Control FB for the IP 266
The following steps are executed in succession in this FB:
• Read input message (PII)
• Error analysis
• Scan external signals
• Check reference point and set if required
• Select mode
• Select function
• Program TOGGLE bit
The relevant calls must be made in this FB to invoke additional modes or change
existing modes.
The sample program could also be upgraded by programming mode interlocks.
One complete FB 26 pass is equivalent to one OB 1 cycle.
9-14
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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Call FB 20
Error
Wrong position
control direction or
break in position
control loop
Controller
off?
External
start enable signal
present?
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
STEP 5 Programming
FB 26 - NAME:AXIS1
Unconditional FB call to read the input
frame (PII) from the IP 266
START
FB 20
yes
yes
yes
Invoke mode 4
NAME
no
FB 4
Jump to Stop
NAME
JC FB
READ
O(
L
L
KH
IB
20
Mode 4 is invoked in the event of an
error in the position control direction
(F B2) or in the position control loop
(F B6).
00B2
67
!=F
)
O(
L
KH
!=F
)
00B6
JC FB
MO4
4
Set output according
to RLO
AN
=
JB
I
66.3
Q
2.3
=STOP
2
AN
=
I
Q
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
The indicator for follow-up mode goes
on when the controller is off.
3.0
2.0
9-15
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STEP 5 Programming
Reference
point missing?
Mode 5
selected?
Mode 2
selected?
Job terminated and axis not
in position?
Set output according
to RLO
9-16
IP 266
2
Set output to indicate that there is no
reference point
yes
yes
yes
A
=
Set outputs
according to RLO
FB 5
FB 2
NAME
no
A
NAME
A
AN
=
I
Q
A
I
JC FB
MO5
JC FB
MO2
I
I
I
Q
66.5
2.2
no
Invoke mode for approaching/setting re-
ference point when the relevant input is
set.
4.0
5
no
Invoke "Jog 2" mode when relevant input
is set.
2
4.1
Set indicator for "Job terminated" AND
"Axis not in position"
66.7
66.2
2.4
3
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
STEP 5 Programming
3
Invoke mode 6, 8 or 9 when the associated
input is set.
Mode 6
selected?
Mode 8
selected?
Mode 9
selected?
Mode 5, 6, 8 or
9 selected?
Mode 2
selected?
Mode 2 or
9 selected?
4
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
FB 6
no
FB 8
no
no
4.2
6
MODE 6
NAME
A
I
JC FB
MO6
4.3
8
MODE 8
NAME
A
I
JC FB
MO8
4.4
9
MODE 9
NAME
A
I
JC FB
MO9
FB 9
"START" in mode 5, 6, 8 or 9
no
FB 21 Start
NAME
FB 23 FWD/REV
NAME
NAME
O
I
4.0
MODE 5
O
O
O
I
I
I
4.2
4.3
4.4
MODE 6
MODE 8
MODE 9
JC FB
START
A
JC
O
I
FB
O
I
JC FB
TRANS
I
21
no
"FORWARD/REVERSE" in mode 2
4.1
23
MODE 2
FWDREV
FB 24 TRANS
"TRANSFER" in modes 2 and 9
4.4
4.1
24
9-17
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Unconditional
STOP call
flag set?
Edge
END
9-18
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STEP 5 Programming
IP 266
4
Unconditional STOP call
FB 22 STOP
yes
STOP
JU
NAME
STOP
FB 25 TOGGLE
O
O
O
NAME
FB
F
F
F
22
Call the TOGGLE FB if edge flag for START,
STOP, FWD/REV or TRANSFER was set.
4.1
4.3
4.5
O
F
4.7
JC FB 25
TOGGLE
START
STOP
FWD/REV
TRANSFER
BE
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
9.4.4
STEP 5 Programming
Selecting Modes via IB 4
All modes are selected in FB 26. In almost all cases, the number of the FB is identical to the mode number.
• FB 2 is for "Jog 2" mode
• FB 5 is for approach/set reference point mode
• FBs 6, 8 and 9 are for modes 6, 8 and 9
• The only exception is mode 99. Since not all CPUs allow FB numbers as high as
99, the FB number for this mode is 10. This mode is also the only mode that is
directly invoked in OB 1.
All FBs for selecting a mode have the same structure. First, the number of the
mode, in binary, is entered in output byte 64 (output byte 64 is byte 0 of the
output frame; see Section 7.1). For some modes, the mode parameters are also
preset in dependence on specific conditions, and entered in the relevant bytes.
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FB 10: Synchronize IP 266
FB 10 is always invoked automatically in OB 1 when bit 0 in byte 2 of the input
frame is "0" (IB 66).
If the IP has not been synchronized, mode 99 must be started with the TOGGLE
bit = "1" and the START function.
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FB 10 - NAME:MO99
START
aaaaaaaa
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Enter parameters
in the output
frame
Mode 99 is loaded into QB 64, START and
TOGGLE bit into QB 65
L
T
KB
QB
99
64
L
T
BE
KB
QB
129
65
END
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
9-19
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STEP 5 Programming
I 3.6
set?
Select 50 %
override and enter
into QB 67
9-20
yes
IP 266
FB 2: Jog 2 with override specification
When the mode number has been entered into QB 64, input 3.6 is scanned. Select
an override of 50 % or 100 %, depending on the selector switch setting. This
value is entered in QB 67.
FB 2 - NAME:MO2
START
Select mode
Enter mode
number into
QB 64
Select 100 %
override and enter
into QB 67
M100
L
KB
2
T
QB
64
Override set via selector switch:
A
JC
I
3.6
=M100
L
KB
T
QB
BEU
50
67
50%
L
T
BE
100
67
100%
KB
QB
50% / 100%
END
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
STEP 5 Programming
FB 4: Follow-up mode
The only entry made in this FB is the mode number. In the sample program, this
mode cannot be selected via switches. It is invoked only to respond to error
messages.
FB 4 - NAME:MO4
START
START
Enter mode
number and
select
"APPROACH"
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Mode 4 (follow-up mode) is invoked in the
Enter mode
number in QB 64
sample program only to respond to a position
control loop error or an error in the position
control direction.
END
L
T
KB
QB
4
64
BE
FB 5: Approach/Set reference point
When this operating mode has been selected, a "0" in QB 66 sets the
"APPROACH" submode.
FB 5 - NAME:MO5
The reference point approach is invoked via
the "Set" parameter:
L
T
KB
QB
5
64
MODE 5
L
T
BE
KB
QB
0
66
0 = Set
END
9-21
STEP 5 Programming
IP 266
FB 6: Increment mode absolute
In addition to the mode number, this mode requires specification of an override
factor and an absolute target position.
Simple parameters were chosen for the sample program.
Select the parameters as follows via input I 4.5:
I 4.5 = 0
positive direction
Enter override factor 30 % in QB 67 and target
position 360.800 mm in QW 68 and QW 70.
I 4.5 = 1
negative direction
Enter override factor 60 % in QB 67 and target
position 360.600 mm in QW 68 and QW 70.
If the positioning specifications are in binary,
•
QW 68 contains the integer digits and
•
QW 70 the decimal digits of the value
9-22
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
STEP 5 Programming
FB 6 - NAME:MO6
START
yes
Override 30%
Target+360.800 mm
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Selecting mode 6
Enter mode
L
T
no
A
JC
Override 60 %
Target -360.600 mm
END
MINU
KB
QB
T
QW
BEU
6
64
Determining the direction in dependence on
the switch at input 4.5
I 4.5= 1
I
4.5
=MINU
Loading an override factor of 30% and the
integer and decimal digits of the value for
the positive direction of travel:
L
T
KB
QB
30
67
L
T
L
KF
QW
KF
+360
68
+800
INTEGER DIGITS
70
DECIMAL DIGITS
OVERRIDE 30%
Loading an override factor of 60% and the
integer and decimal digits of the value for
the negative direction of travel:
L
T
KB
QB
60
67
L
T
L
KF
QW
KF
-360
68
+600
INTEGER DIGITS
T
BE
QW
70
DECIMAL DIGITS
OVERRIDE 60%
9-23
STEP 5 Programming
IP 266
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FB 8/FB 9: Automatic mode/Automatic single block mode
In both cases, enter the number of the mode in QB 64 and the number of the
traversing program in QB 66.
START
aaaaaaaa
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aaaa
Enter mode number
Enter TP number
END
FB 8 - NAME:MO8
FB 9 - NAME :MO9
Invoking mode 8 with traversing
program 5
Invoking mode 9 with traversing
program 5
L
T
L
KB
QB
KB
8
64
5
L
T
L
KB
QB
KB
9
64
5
T
BE
QB
66
T
BE
QB
66
The traversing program for mode 8 and mode 9
As an example, the following traversing program is used to approach three
positions; drilling is started at these positions via an M function.
Traversing program %5
Subroutine L6
N01 G00 X100 M00
N02 G04 F50
N01 X20 F100
N02 G04 F100 M30
N03 G91
N04 280 F200
N05 G24 F3
N03 G04 F100 M40
N04 M02
The first step in main program %5 is the
approach to start position 0 (100 mm),
where, for example, a workpiece can be
placed on the worktable. The table is then
to be brought to the starting position for
the drilling procedure.
Subroutine L6 executes three times. Dwells
N06 L6
N07 G20
N08 G00 X100 M00
simulate the drilling operation, which
•
is enabled with M30 and
•
disabled with M40.
N09 G04 F50 M99
N10 M02
After drilling, the drive is brought back to
position 0. The M99 function initiates
removal of the workpiece from the table.
9-24
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
STEP 5 Programming
"External start enable" switch
The "External start enable" switch must be wired as an NC contact. The IP 266 will
accept no jobs until it receives a "1" signal. In FB 26, this signal is scanned and
routed via Q 2.0 to pin 7 on the IP 266's terminal block.
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Selecting the functions for the different modes via IB 3
Not all functions are allowed in all modes. To preclude errors due to selection of
an invalid function, the program in FB 26 checks the function for validity. If the
RLO is 1 (valid function), the program branches to the relevant "Command FB".
Function
Command FB
For mode
START
FB 21
5, 6, 8, 9
STOP
FB 22
All modes
FWD/REV
FB 23
2
TRANSFER
FB 24
2, 9
The table above lists only the modes programmed in the sample program.
Refer to Table 6-3 in Section 6.6.2 for a list of all modes and their functions.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
9-25
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Setting auxiliary flags and edge flags
Input set
AND auxiliary flag
not set?
Input set?
no
Auxiliary flag = 0
2nd to nth cycle
9-26
yes
no
Edge flag = 0
yes
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STEP 5 Programming
IP 266
Every "Command FB" includes the following code-evaluation routine:
Edge flags
A
AN
=
A
=
I 3.1
F 4.0
F 4.1
Edge flag = 1
Auxiliary flags
I 3.1
F 4.0
Auxiliary flag = 1
This routine works with auxiliary flags and edge flags, and ensures that a
command is entered in the output byte only once in the first cycle that follows
setting of the input. Edge flag 4.1 is used for this purpose.
0th cycle
Switch/key is actuated
1st cycle
Input appears in the PII as being set
Auxiliary flag
=1
Edge flag
=1
is entered in output byte
Input remains set
Auxiliary flag
=1
Edge flag
=0
is not entered in output byte
Frame
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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Job in progress?
Edge flag = 0?
Load bit 0 = 1
(QB 65) into FY 6
END
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
STEP 5 Programming
The edge flag for programming the TOGGLE bit is also required (FB 25/FB 26).
FB 21 - NAME:START
START
Programming the auxiliary and edge flags for the
START function
yes
no
Evaluate auxiliary
and edge flags
yes
Job in progress abort
AN I
66.7
BEC
Programming the edge and auxiliary flags
A
AN
=
A
I
F
F
I
3.1
4.0
4.1
3.1
=
F
4.0
AN F
BEC
Load Start command
L
KB 1
T
FY 6
START KEY
EDGE FLAG
START KEY
no
Edge flag not yet set abort
4.1
START COMMAND
BE
9-27
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STEP 5 Programming
Edge flag = 0?
no
Load bit 1 = 1
(QB 65) into FY 6
9-28
IP 266
FB 22 - NAME:STOP
START
Programming the auxiliary and edge flags for the
STOP function
Program auxiliary and edge flags
A
I
3.2
STOP KEY
AN F
4.2
Evaluate auxiliary
and edge flags
=
A
=
T
BE
F
I
F
FY
4.3
3.2
4.2
Load Start command
L
KB 2
EDGE FLAG
STOP KEY
yes
Edge flag not yet set abort
AN F
4.3
BEC
6
STOP COMMAND
END
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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Edge flag = 0?
Forward?
Reverse?
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
STEP 5 Programming
FB 23 - FORWARD/REVERSE
Two inputs are scanned in this FB to gather the information required to program
the auxiliary and edge flags. The inputs for FORWARD and REVERSE are ORed.
FB 23 - NAME:FWDREV
START
Programming the auxiliary and edge flags
for the FWD/REV functions
Process auxiliary and
edge flags as
function of the
FORWARD or
REVERSE input
Programming the edge and auxiliary flags
O
I
3.3
FORWARD
O
I
3.4
REVERSE
yes
no
yes
yes
Load bit 2 = 1
(QB 65) into FY 6
no
Load bit 3 = 1
(QB 65) into FY 6
no
END
AN
=
O
O
F
F
I
I
4.4
4.5
3.3
3.4
=
F
4.4
AN F
BEC
JC
A
JC
M001
L
KB
T
FY
BEU
4
6
FWD command
M002
L
T
BE
8
6
REV command
KB
FY
FORWARD
REVERSE
Edge flag not yet set abort
4.5
Jump in dependence on the keys for FWD
and REV
A
I
3.3
=M001
I
3.4
=M002
BEU
Load start command
9-29
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STEP 5 Programming
Job terminated?
Edge flag = 0?
no
Load bit 4 = 1 into
FY 6
9-30
IP 266
FB 24 - TRANSFER
In the example, the TRANSFER command is allowed only as long as the job is not
yet "TERMINATED". It is used to forward a speed modification (override) or start
a traversing program block in Single Block mode.
FB 24 - NAME:TRANS
START
Programming the auxiliary and edge flags for the TRANSFER
command
yes
no
Evaluate auxiliary
and edge flags in
dependence on the
input
yes
When job terminated abort
A
I
66.7
BEC
Programming the auxiliary and edge flags
A
AN
=
A
I
F
F
I
3.5
4.6
4.7
3.5
=
F
4.6
AN F
BEC
L
KB
T
BE
FY
16
TRANSFER
EDGE FLAG
TRANSFER
Edge flag not yet set abort
4.7
6
TRANSFER COMMAND
END
FB 25 - TOGGLE bit
The TOGGLE bit must be inverted to enable the IP 266 to recognize a job as being
a new job.
If the nth job was started with TOGGLE = "1", job n + 1 must be started with
TOGGLE = "0". In FB 25, the STEP 5 operations AW and OW were used to invert
the TOGGLE bit.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
STEP 5 Programming
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IP 266
FB 25 - NAME:TOGGLE
Programming the TOGGLE bit: Inverting the
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START
Was TOGGLE
bit="1"?
yes
Scanning the TOGGLE bit from the preceding
job
A
Q
65.7
JC =INVT
no
Bit 7 is set to "1" in
FY 6 (preset in
FB 21 to 24).
FY 6 is loaded into
QB 65.
Bit 7 is set to "0" in
FY 6 (preset in
FB 21 to 24).
FY 6 is loaded into
QB 65.
TOGGLE bit was "0"; invert TOGGLE bit in
command flag byte FY 6
L
FY 6
L
OW
T
KH
0080
QB
65
TOGGLE BIT "1"
BEU
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TOGGLE bit was "1"; invert TOGGLE bit in
command flag byte FY 6
END
INVT
L
L
AW
FY
KH
6
007F
T
BE
QB
65
TOGGLE BIT "0"
FB 25 is invoked only if a command edge flag was set (in FB 21 to FB 24).
FB 20 - Read actual values
The IP 266 provides three modes for reading out IP data (see Section 5).
The default mode is mode 71, which is used to read the actual position.
Since mode 71 is to be used in the example, it need not be explicitly started. In
contrast to the other modes, modes 71 to 73 can also be started while the axis is
traversing ("Running" status).
The first part of the program in FB 20 displays the errors flagged in IB 67.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
9-31
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STEP 5 Programming
M 30
output?
M 40
output?
no
9-32
IP 266
Reading of the input frame (PII) is only outlined. In practice, you would program
the response to specific system states to suit your particular requirements.
One practice-based application has been programmed in the function block.
Using M functions, you can trigger external activities
such as
lower drill
(M 30 in the example)
raise drill
(M 40 in the example)
FB 20 - NAME:READ
START
Reading the mode, M function and status
byte and displaying errors
L
IB 64
MODE
Read input
bytes
Display errors
L
L
L
T
Read actual values
yes
Activate the
"Lower drill"
function
yes Activate the "Raise
drill" function
IB
IB
IB
QB
L
IW
L
no
IB
65
L
KB
!=F
=
Q
30
2.6
M30
LOWER DRILL
==> LOWER DRILL
L
L
65
40
M40
2.7
RAISE DRILL
==> RAISE DRILL
IB
KB
!=F
=
Q
BE
65
66
67
5
70
M FUNCTION
STATUS
ERRORS
DISPLAY
Reading the integer and decimal digits
L
IW 68
INTEGER DIGITS
DECIMAL DIGITS
END
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
9.5
STEP 5 Programming
Sample Program 2: Traversing to Two Fixed Target
Positions
A second sample program is to be written to move the drive from one fixed
target position to another in "Relative increment" mode. At each of the two
fixed target positions, the direction of travel is to be reversed and a new
positioning operation started.
•
Example
Flags
M 3.0
Is used as
Edge flag
Flag bit 3.0 must be set to start a positioning operation. This bit ensures that a
mode can be started only when the Job Terminated bit has been set for this
operation.
To start the first operation, the bit must be set "externally", e.g. via an input.
You must scan this input in OB 1.
You can take basic functions, such as the wait loop for the IP runup and mode 99
for synchronizing the IP 266, from sample program 1. This means that you can use
OB 22, FB 27, OB 1 and FB 10.
In OB 1, FB 11 must be invoked in place of FB 26.
The description of FB 11 includes only the automatic sequence controlled by this
function block.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
9-33
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STEP 5 Programming
Job
terminated?
F 3.0
set ?
yes
9-34
IP 266
In FB 11, flag 3.0 is set in dependence on the Job Terminated bit. If this flag is not
set, FB 11 is simply exited. If it is set, and if the "Job Terminated" bit is also set in
the input byte, FB 11 invokes the function block used to invert the TOGGLE bit.
FB 11 - NAME:CONTROL
START
Program the input frame for mode 7,
including the mode, the override factor and
the distance:
Program frame
NAME
no
yes
Set F 3.0
no
Job
terminated?
NAME
END
JU
FB
LOAD
12
Check to see whether a new job is allowed
and, if so, invoke FB 13:
AN
S
AN
I
F
F
JC
A
JC
=END
I
66.7
FB 13
66.7
3.0
3.0
TOGGLE
BE
no
yes
Call FB 13
(to invert TOGGLE
bit)
END
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
STEP 5 Programming
FB 12 - NAME:LOAD
START
Program output
bytes 64 and 67 to 71
END
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Mode 7 requires the following data:
•
Mode number in QB 64
•
Override factor in QB 67
•
Relative distance specification in bytes
QB 68 to QB 71
•
"Forward" or "Reverse" command in
QB 65
L
T
L
T
L
T
L
T
BE
KF
QB
KF
QB
KF
QW
KF
QW
+7
64
+100
67
+50
68
+0
70
These specifications define a distance of
50.000 mm.
Like the TOGGLE bit, the command is
alternately set and reset in FB 13.
9-35
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STEP 5 Programming
Was the last
direction FWD?
Was TOGGLE
= "1" ?
Bit 7 is set to "1"
in FY 6.
FY 6 is loaded into
QB 65.
9-36
IP 266
When a job request is allowed and the output frame has been programmed, the
start command must be loaded into QB 65 and the TOGGLE bit inverted.
FB 13 - NAME:TOGGLE
Inverting the direction of travel in depen-
START
dence on the last traversing operation.
Reset flag 3.0 and
command flag FY6
no
Bit 3 is set to "1"
in FY 6
("Rev" command)
Bit 2 is set to "1"
in FY 6
("Fwd" command)
CONT:
yes
no
Bit 7 is set to "0"
in FY 6.
FY 6 is loaded into
QB 65.
INVT:
A
F
3.0
R
L
T
F
KH
FY
3.0
0
6
A
S
JC
S
Q
F
=
F
65.2
6.3
CONT
6.2
yes
Inverting the TOGGLE bit and transferring
the command byte to the output frame.
A
JC
L
Q
=
FY
65.7
INVT
6
L
OW
T
KH
0080
QB
65
BEU
L
L
FY
KH
6
007F
QB
65
AW
T
BE
END
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
STEP 5 Programming
"Automatic" positioning sequence as per example 2
State 1:
Job terminated and flag 3.0=0; no job initiated, drive is at a
standstill:
Motor must be started by setting F 3.0 to "1".
State 2:
Job terminated and flag 3.0=1:
The TOGGLE FB is entered and a new mode preset.
State 3:
Job terminated and flag 3.0=0, but no job order has been initiated:
Loops are run through but no activities performed.
State 4:
Job in progress and flag 3.0=0:
Flag 3.0 is set to "1", thus making it possible to issue a new job
request. The only condition that has not yet been met to enable a
new job to be started is the "Job terminated" bit from the IP 266's
input message.
The next possible state is the same as state 2. Alternate positioning
in a positive and negative direction must be programmed in the
TOGGLE FB.
Summary:
The example enables generation of a new job request only when the "Job
terminated" bit has been read. It is thus unnecessary to terminate an old job with
STOP before starting a new one.
•
Condition for issuing a new request:
Job terminated and F 3.0=1
•
Condition for setting flag bit F 3.0 to "1":
Job in progress
Once the automatic sequence has been started, positioning continues until the
FB 11 call has been deactivated in OB 1.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
9-37
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1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
System Overview
Technical Description of the IP 266
Installation Guidelines
Fundamentals of Positioning
Machine Data, Modes and Traversing Programs
Fundamentals of COM 266
Communication between the CPU and the IP 266
Start-Up
STEP 5 Programming
10
Troubleshooting
10.1
Types of Error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 - 1
10.2
List of Errors and Possible Causes . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 - 3
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
10
Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
This section provides detailed information on the errors which may occur when
using the IP 266.
During direct communication between the PLC's CPU and the IP 266, the error
code is forwarded in KH (hexadecimal constant) format. When you service the
IP 266 via COM 266, the error code and the associated text are displayed on the
monitor's error line.
The error codes flagged on the PLC are identical to those displayed by COM 266.
10.1
Types of Error
To simplify troubleshooting, this section provides a complete list of error codes
and the associated error texts.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
10-1
Troubleshooting
IP 266
F02
Wrong resolution
F0F Position tolerance out of range
F61
Incorrect hardware limit switch polarity
F6A Incorrect following error
Machine data
errors
F10
F11
Traversing
program errors
F2F Erroneous G-function
Mass storage
errors
Inadmissible input
Memory overflow
FD0 Only one continuous loop allowed
FD1 No end of loop programmed
IM 511 errors
(programmer)
F31
Module errors
F3F Incorrect file
General errors
F40
F41
Invalid drive
Syntax or name not correct
Not allowed
F5F Frame error
F81
Orderlist PG is full
FBD EEPROM failure
FBE No data in EEPROM/RAM !
FF0 Abort printing (Y/N) ?
FFF Inadmissible input
10-2
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
10.2
Troubleshooting
List of Errors and Possible Causes
Due to the exceptionally large number of errors which may be flagged on the
PLC, it is necessary to have at hand a comprehensive list showing the error
message for each error code. This list begins on the next page. In some cases,
information has also been provided on measures for error recovery. For each
error listed you will find a cross-reference to one or more sections in the manual;
these sections provide more detailed information on the error in question.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
10-3
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Troubleshooting
F02
F05
10-4
IP 266
Error Code
Recovery Procedures
A=
Crossreference
Wrong resolution
Section 5.1.2
The resolution must lie in the range from 0.1 to 99.9, and is computed as
follows:
Travel per encoder revolution
Pulses per encoder revolution
The unit of resolution depends on the parameter specification. You must
take into account that the dimensional unit of resolution is always
Basic unit/1000
Pulses
Basic unit
Resolution
mm
µm
0.1 inch
deg
0.0001 inch
0.001 deg
F03
Wrong maximum speed
The speed specification must lie in the range from 1 to 65000.
Section 5.1.4
F04
Wrong JOG/INC speed
All speeds must be 1 and of the specified maximum speed.
Section 5.1.4
Wrong reference speed
For the IP 266, reference speed 1 must be 1 and the specified
maximum speed. Reference speed 2 must also be > 1, but reference
speed 1.
Section 5.1.4
1 reference speed 2 reference speed 1 maximum speed.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Troubleshooting
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IP 266
Error Code
CrossReference
Recovery Procedures
F06
Wrong acceleration
The maximum acceleration must be 10 and 9999 mm/s 2 (0.1 inch/s 2,
Section 5.1.5
deg/s 2). The remaining acceleration/deceleration values must also be 10
but the maximum acceleration rate.
F07
Wrong software limit switch
Section 5.1.3
The traversing range of a linear axis is defined by the coordinates of the
"Software start limit switch" and the "Software end limit switch". These
two coordinates may not be identical (that of the start limit switch must
always be lower than that of the end limit switch) and must lie in the range
from +/- 32767.999 mm (+/- 3276.799 inches, +/- 32767.999 degrees).
F08
Wrong reference point
The reference point coordinate must be the coordinate of the "software
end limit switch" and the coordinate of the "software start limit switch".
F09
Vmax is too low
The low limit of the programmed maximum speed depends on the
resolution A [µm/pulse] ("travel per encoder revolution"/"pulses per
Section 5.1.3
Section 5.3.5
encoder revolution"). Vmax must be greater than 4 · A [µm/pulse].
F0A
Loop gain too low
Section 5.1.6
The low limit of the KV factor is 0.1 [1/sec].
F0B
Loop gain too high
The loop gain (KV factor) must be less than 100 [1/sec], but not so high that
Section 5.1.6
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a voltage corresponding to the maximum speed is output for a system
deviation of 1 pulse, i.e. the loop gain in 1/sec must be less than
vmax [mm/min] · 1000
A [µm/pulse] · 60
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
10-5
IP 266
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Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
CrossReference
Error Code
F0C Wrong module number
When <F1> (Start) is pressed in the PRESETS form, the COM 266 software
executes a module identification test. When a set of machine data is
Section 5.1.1
entered on the IP 266, the specified module number is compared with the
module number in the machine data. The machine data must contain the
same number as the one entered.
F0D
Zero offset too large
Every zero offset may assume values in the range +/-32767.999 mm.
Among other things, a zero offset changes the coordinates of the software
Section 5.1.7
limit switches. Each offset value must be such that the coordinates of the
software limit switches still lie in the range from +/-32767.999 mm
(+/-32767.999 inches, +/-32767.999 degrees) after being shifted.
F0E Wrong tool offset
A tool offset is restricted to +/-32767.999. The coordinate of the software
Section 5.1.7
end limit switch plus zero offset and the coordinate of the software start
limit switch plus zero offset must lie in the range +/-32767.999 mm
(+/-32767.999 inches, +/-32767.999 degrees). Remember that the zero
offset is a signed value. In the case of a rotary axis, the tool offset must also
lie within the traversing range.
F0F
Position tolerance out of range
Section 5.1.6
The tolerance range for zero-speed monitoring extends from 0.001 to
64.999 mm, and must also be less than the maximum following error.
F10
10-6
Inadmissible input
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Troubleshooting
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IP 266
Error Code
Recovery Procedures
CrossReference
F11
Memory overflow
Section 5.4
F12
Separate functions with blanks
F13
Program already exists
Section 5.4
F14
Block syntax incorrect
Section 5.5.4
F15
Field cannot be exited
Section 5.4
F16
Terminate processing?
Section 5.4
F17
End function already present
Section 5.4.2
F18
Input after L-function prohibited
Section 5.4.2
F19
X-function not present
Section 5.4.2
F1A
Input after last entry prohibited
Section 5.4.2
F1B
Limit value of the function exceeded
Section 5.4.2
Section 5.4.2
F1C X-function incorrect correction
Section 5.4.2
F1D
Section 5.4.2
Section 6
Insert prohibited
F1E Not stored Machining (traversing) program incomplete
Section 5.4
F1F
Output impossible file DB-No. not identical
Section 5.4
F20
Block type inadmissible
Section 5.4
F21
Function key inhibited block incomplete
Section 5.4
F22
G-function prohibited input
Section 5.4
F23
No other functions with L-function. Delete?
Section 5.4
F24
Error in F-function
Section 5.4
F25
Block type missing
Section 5.4
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
10-7
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Troubleshooting
Error Code
F2C Erroneous L-function
Section 5.4
F2D
Section 5.4
10-8
Erroneous M-function
IP 266
Recovery Procedures
CrossReference
F26
Block number missing
Section 5.4
F27
Block complete Function key
Section 5.4
F28
Momentary (current) G-function needs entry
Section 5.4
F29
X-function must be followed by F-function
Section 5.4
F2A
X-function missing entry prohibited
Section 5.4
F2B
Final block present Function key inhibited
Section 5.4
F2E Erroneous Blocknumber
Section 5.4
F2F
Erroneous G-function
Section 5.4
F31
Invalid drive
F32
Drive read failed
F33
Element list missing
F34
Data block missing
F35
DB or file already exists
F36
DB or file missing
F37
File exists
F38
Drive (floppy) write protected
F39
File write protected
F3A
New element too long
F3B
Too many elements
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
F3D
F54
Troubleshooting
Error Code
Recovery Procedures
F3F
Incorrect file
F40
Syntax or name not correct
F41
Not allowed
F42
Data block missing
F43
Overwrite data block?
F44
Data block missing
F45
Delete data block?
F46
Deleted!
F48
Illegal value!
F50
Data block missing
F51
Cable not connected to PG
F52
Memory on PCB (module) too small
F53
Watchdog error PCB
-
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
CrossReference
F3C File missing
Directory full
F3E Disk full
Section 6
F4C Cable not connected!
This error is flagged over the programmer interface, i.e. in COM 266 and in
those situations in which it is not possible to communicate with the
positioning module. This error is flagged in the following instances:
The cable is not connected or is improperly connected
The positioning module has no power supply
Transmission (transfer) error
10-9
IP 266
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Troubleshooting
Error Code
Cross-
Reference
Recovery Procedures
F55
Erroneous data transfer
F56
Erroneous data transfer
F57
BREAK received
F58
PCB (module) does not answer
F5A
Wrong baudrate
F5D
Parity error
F5E Overflow error
F5F
Frame error
F61
Incorrect hardware limit switch polarity
The only permissible values are "0" (NO contact, positive) and "1"
(NC contact, negative). The IP 266 can detect an invalid parameter value
only when neither hardware limit switch is actuated at the instant at which
the machine data is entered. The hardware limit switches are also evaluated when a rotary axis is used. If none have been connected, NO contacts
must be programmed.
F62
Maximum speed too high for this resolution
When a 5V encoder is used, the counter chip can count pulse trains with a
maximum baud rate of 500 kHz. At the specified maximum speed in conjunction with the specified resolution [µm/pulse], this value is exceeded.
F66
Invalid range limit value
Section 5.1.3
This error occurs only in conjunction with a rotary axis. The cause of error is
the same as that for error F07.
F68
10-10
Invalid dimensional unit
Permissible dimensional units are millimeters, inches and degrees.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Troubleshooting
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IP 266
Error Code
Recovery Procedures
F69
Backlash compensation out of range
Cross-
Reference
Section 5.1.7
The backlash compensation value must be in the range 0.001 to
64.999 mm.
F6A
Following error out of range
The following error must be in the range 0.001 to 99.999.
F81
(Job) orderlist PG is full
Section 5.1.6
Because of the sluggishness of its mechanical parts, the module cannot
process job orders as fast as these can be issued. The last job order issued
via the programmer or PLC is lost, and must be retried.
F82
Inadmissible order
The last job order from the PLC or programmer contained either an
undefined mode or was meaningless at this point.
Example: An attempt to start an axis that was already traversing. The
order is ignored.
F83
Block stored
This error is flagged only in mode 10 (TEACH-IN).
F84
Axis operational no inputs possible
F85
(Job) orderlist PLC is full
Coincides with error F81, but for the PLC. The last job order must be
Section 5.3.10
reissued.
F86
High-speed change and final block
Section 2.5.4
The selected mode cannot be started because of a "0" signal at the
"external start enable" digital input.
F87
Speed range exceeded
Either the override factor is not within the range 1% to 200% or the speed
selected via (valid) override factor exceeds the maximum speed. This error
Section 5.1.4
occurs only in jog modes 1 and 2 and in incremental mode. The positioning
module automatically prevents exceeding of these limiting values.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
10-11
IP 266
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Troubleshooting
Error Code
Cross-
Reference
Recovery Procedures
F8A
Reference point missing
Section 5.3.5
F8B
Max. following error exceeded
The maximum following error specified in the machine data was exceeded
and the current operation is aborted with a deceleration ramp. The
Section 5.1.6
position control loop remains in force and the axis does not reach zero
speed until the following error has been reduced. The following-error
monitor is not activated unless the maximum following error is exceeded
despite axis movement or the actual value no longer changes and the
specified maximum following error is such that it is exceeded at an analog
voltage of less than 5 volts. Possible causes:
-
Load torque too high
Acceleration rate too high
Loop gain too low
- Value specified as maximum following error too low
In these four cases, the axis can be moved in controlled jog mode. The
machine data must be adapted accordingly.
-
The machine data specifications for maximum speed and
resolution are incorrect, i.e. were not matched to one another.
This can be checked by comparing the speed specified for controlled jog
mode with the displayed speed.
F8C Wrong PCB (module) number
Once the positioning module contains at least one correct machine data
record, it is no longer possible to change the module number. The number
stored can be viewed in COM 266's PRESETS form.
F8D
Data block missing
F8E Wrong or no machine data
F8F
10-12
Erroneous machine data
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
Troubleshooting
Error Code
Recovery Procedures
F90
PG is offline
F91
Overwrite machine data?
F92
Program No. limit reached
F93
Data block missing
F94
Overwrite machining (traversing) program?
F95
Automatic prohibited
F97
Stroke limit exceeded (traversing range exceeded)
F98
Program stroke limit exceeded (not enough room for traversing program)
F99
Left limit switch tripped
Section 5.1.3
F9A
Right limit switch tripped
Section 5.1.3
F9B
External STOP occurred
Section 2.5.3
F9C Lower software switch tripped
Section 5.1.3
F9D
Section 5.1.3
Upper software switch tripped
F9E Operating mode prohibited in Teach-In
Only jog modes 1 to 3 and increment modes 6 and 7 are permitted in
Teach-In mode.
F9F
Erroneous operating mode processed
FA0
Standstill (zero-speed) monitor tripped
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
CrossReference
Section 6.1.3.
Section 5.4
Section 5.1.3
Section 5.4
Section 5.3.10
Section 5.1.6
10-13
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Troubleshooting
Error Code
Recovery Procedures
FB0
Machining program erroneous (error in traversing program)
FB1
Machining (traversing) program already exists! Change Prog-No?
10-14
IP 266
CrossReference
FA1
Watch-Dog
Section 5.3.18
FA2
Watch-Dog
Section 5.3.18
FA3
Error at block start
FA4
Sub-program DB-No too large
The DB number must lie in the range from 1 to 255.
FA5
G-function prohibited
FA6
Loop only as outer loop
FA7
Nesting depth exceeded
Section 5.4.2
FA8
Wrong X-function
Section 5.4.2
FA9
Wrong F-function
Section 5.4.2
FAA
Stroke too long (traversing path too long)
Section 5.5.4
FAB Machining speed too high (traversing speed too high)
FAC Error at block end
FAD End of program precedes end of loop
Section 5.4.2
FAE Block not permitted after flying change
Section 5.4.2
Section 5.4
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Troubleshooting
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IP 266
Error Code
Recovery Procedure
FB2
CrossReference
Invalid position control direction
The encoder's position control direction is checked on an IP 266 cold
restart. If an error is detected, the IP starts mode 4. You must then switch
off the IP 266's 24 V power supply and change the position control
direction (see Section 3.4).
If no error was detected following a positioning operation during which
an analog voltage greater than 5 V was output, the IP 266 deactivates the
position control monitor.
The monitor is reactivated each time mode 4 is started.
FB3
Machining program is active
FB5
Target position not yet reached
The setpoint position is already within the target range. The actual
position is still outside the tolerance range of the zero-speed monitor and
is no longer approaching the target coordinate, and the following error is
lower than the specified maximum. Possible causes:
- The tolerance range of the zero-speed monitor is too small
- The gain factor is too low or
-
The power section has too much drift (drift compensation, mode 18)
The position control loop was interrupted during execution of a
traversing operation, and the distance to go is less than the maximum
following error. If the distance to go is greater, however, "Maximum
following error exceeded" is flagged.
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
10-15
IP 266
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Troubleshooting
Error Code
CrossReference
Recovery Procedures
FB6
Error in position control loop
There is no change in the actual position even though the analog voltage
(setpoint speed) exceeds 5 V. The current operation is aborted and mode 4
(follow-up mode) automatically started. In follow-up mode, the position
controller is off. Follow-up mode can be terminated at any time. The
position controller is then reenabled.
Possible causes:
- Encoder not connected, incorrectly connected or defective
- The module's analog output is not wired
-
The power section is not switched on or not enabled
The axis is blocked by an obstacle of some kind or is jammed.
FB7
PLC failure
FB8
Invalid path specification
FB9
Invalid tool offset
FBA Invalid G function for dimensional unit "degrees"
Section 5.1.7
Kap. 5.3.15
Section 5.4.2
FBB Path specification not in BCD code
FBC EEPROM not programmable!
FBD EEPROM failure!
FBE No data in EEPROM/RAM !
FD0
Only one continuous loop permitted
FD1
No end of loop
Section 5.4.2
FEC Printing
FED Printer not ready!
10-16
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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IP 266
Error Code
Recovery Procedures
FF0
Abort printing (Y/N)?
FF2
Printer not initialized!
COM 266 takes the printer parameters from S5-DOS to print data. When
this error is flagged, exit COM 266 and initialize the printer interface with
FFB Last page!
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
Troubleshooting
CrossReference
FEF Printing aborted!
S5-DOS.
FF4
´*´ is not allowed here!
FF5
Tilde (˜) stands for 'to the power of 2'
FF6
Invalid mode
FF7
Invalid time entered
Section 6.1.3
FF8
No plant designation entered
Section 6.1.3
FF9
No filename entered
Section 6.1.3
Section 5.3
FFA DB stored
Section 6.9
FFC Key prohibited
FFD HELP key not allowed here!
FFE Exit COM266?
FFF Inadmissible input
10-17
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Index
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Index
Index
A
Automatic
Acceleration rate
- Forward
- Reverse
Actual position
- Read
Actual value
Actual-value display
- Mode
5-11
5-11, 6-22,
6-23
- Single block
- Synchronization
Auxiliary screen form
5-44, 5-46
9-4
5-11, 6-22,
6-23
2-15, 5-13
- Mode select
Auxiliary function
Axis
6-66
5-90, 6-57
5-66
4-5, 4-6, 6-57,
6-59, 6-63,
- Position
- Status
7-15
2-16, 6-57,
6-60, 6-63
6-64
- Test
- Type
8-13
1-3, 5-3, 6-19,
6-20
6-56, 6-57,
6-60
- Following a reference
point approach
B
7-1
7-1
Addressing
- Input frame
Analog addresses
7-12
7-1
ANALOG OUT
Analog output
- Power section
2-9
2-9
8-3
Application
Assignments
- Terminal block
Asymmetrical
1-2
- Mode
- Program
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-47
5-35
Address assignment
- Module
Address range
- 24V encoder
- Encoder
Automatic
Axis at zero speed
- Exec
2-10
8-4
6-25
5-43, 5-46
8-18
Backlash
- Compensation
- Compensation value
Base unit
BCD-coded
Binary-coded
- Position
Block
- DB
- Number
- Selection
- Syntax diagram
5-18, 5-19,
5-28, 5-37,
5-78, 5-79,
6-25, 8-3
5-18, 6-25
5-78, 6-24,
6-25
5-4
7-8, 7-15
7-8, 7-15
7-9
6-71
5-46, 5-70,
6-17, 6-45,
6-46, 6-53
6-16
5-92
1
Index
Blank cycle
Braided shield
Bus module slot
IP 266
9-1
3-3
3-5
C
Cable
- Connection
- Length
- Shielding
Calibrating
- Axis
- Power section
CLEAR
- Screen form
Clearance distance
Closed-loop positioning
Coding
- Command code
- Element
- Mode
- Pin
3-2
8-4
3-2, 3-3
CONFIGURATION
- Screen form
Configuring
6-3, 6-4
8-1
Connecting cable
Continuous belt
Continuous loop
2-8
1-3, 1-5
5-77
Control
Controller
8-4
6-57, 6-60,
6-63
- Enable (FUM)
- On
- Parameters
5-9
5-62
2-24
7-15, 7-16
5-12
1-4
Coordinate shift
Coordinate zero point
Correction parameters
5-79
5-35
5-15
4-3
Current error code
7-13
7-5
D
3-4
7-4
3-4
D SUB interface
Data
- Area
2-3
6-4, 6-6
COM 266
- Error messages
- Hierarchical structure
6-1
6-76
6-14
- Starting
Command
Command code
6-3
7-2
7-5
Data block
- Selection
Data cycle
6-17, 6-71
6-16
7-2
- Coding
Communication
- PLC-CPU/IP 266
7-5
7-1
5-67, 10-1
- Text mode
Data format
- Recommended
6-40
Compensation voltage
Components
- Module
- Position control system
5-64
2-1
4-4
DB-No.
Deceleration
- Distance
- Time
Computing
- Machine data
- Reference point
8-7, 8-9
8-17
2
- Bus
- Interchange
- Transfer direction
1-6
7-1
6-17, 7-7
7-3, 7-13
6-51, 6-53
1-4
8-7
Deceleration rate b max
- Forward
5-11, 6-22,
6-23
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Deceleration rate b max
- Maximum
- Reverse
Decimal digit
Index
Distance to go
5-11, 6-22,
6-23, 8-8
5-11, 6-22,
6-23
7-8, 7-9, 7-19
5-44, 6-57,
6-59 - 6-61,
6-63, 6-64
- Read
5-67
5-27, 5-63,
8-13
- Compensation
5-27, 5-62,
5-64
5-62
Drift
Degrees
Delete
DELETE
5-4
6-70
- Screen form
Developer
Device
6-70
6-9, 6-51, 6-53
6-51, 6-53,
Drive
Drive system
- Mechanics
6-71
2-2
5-87, 6-45,
Dwell time
Digital-analog converter
Dimensions
6-46
5-87
5-87
E
Edge evaluation
EEPROM RAM parameter
9-1, 9-2
7-7
Dimensioning system
- Maximum
- Monitoring
6-19, 6-20
5-13
6-24, 6-26
EEPROM
- Service life
Emergency limit switch
6-54, 5-65, 7-7
5-65
1-4, 1-5, 3-1,
- Read
DIN
DIN 66 025
5-66
6-43, 6-44
EMERGENCY STOP
Emergency stop switch
8-1, 8-2, 8-12
3-2
3-1
- Representation
Direction
- Offset
6-40
Enable
- Negative tool offset
- Offset 1-4
5-79, 5-81
5-83, 5-85
Direction of travel
- Increment mode relative
Direction of rotation
5-41
5-41
- Positive tool offset
Enable input
Encoder
5-79, 5-81
2-15
2-6
- Encoder
Direction reversal
- Inch
- Metric
5-7, 8-14
5-18, 5-19
5-4
5-4
- Asymmetrical
- Direction of rotation
- Installation
- Location
2-5, 6-25
5-7, 8-14
8-4
8-4
Disable tool offset
5-79, 5-81
- Maximum operating
frequency
8-4
- in 0.1 inches
- in mm
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
- Power electronics
5-84
6-9, 6-51, 6-53
8-3
5-73, 5-90,
6-47, 7-15
3
Index
Encoder
- Monitor
- Signal
IP 266
Exit
2-23
2-5
- Test mode
External start
6-76
- Symmetrical
- Type
Encoder (5 V)
2-5, 6-25
5-4, 6-24, 6-25
- Effect
- Enable
External STOP
2-14
5-44
2-12
- Symmetrical
Encoder (24 V)
- Asymmetrical
8-4
- Polarity
External switching function
2-11
5-91
Encoder revolution
- Pulse
- Travel
8-4
F
8-7, 10-4
8-7, 10-4
F function
Factor
5-90
8-7
5-91
- Override
Fault LED
Feed rate
6-64
2-22
6-47
Field contents
- Header
Filename
6-5
6-9, 6-51,
Final block
Firmware
6-53
5-68, 5-91
6-10
End
- Hardware limit switch
- of program
Entering
- Machine data
Error
- Acknowledgement
- Analysis
- Code
5-61
9-3
7-13, 7-18,
- Flag
- General
10-4
7-18
10-2
- Cycle
Flying change
1-7, 7-2, 7-6
5-43, 5-73,
5-76
6-4, 6-6, 6-7,
6-76, 10-1
10-3
Foil shield
Following error s
3-3
4-5, 4-6, 5-13,
5-14, 5-15,
- Line
- List
- Possible causes
Error messages
- COM 266
Evaluation
- Signal Edge
”Exec”
- Command
- Key
- While axis at zero speed
Execute bit
4
6-40
10-3
5-26, 5-62,
6-57, 6-59,
6-61, 6-63,
6-76
9-1
5-44
5-76
5-47
7-5
- Absolute
- Maximum
- Monitoring
- Read
Follow-up mode
6-64
5-38
5-13, 8-8
5-15, 6-24,
6-26
5-67
5-27
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Index
Forward (FWD)
Frame
FUM
6-65, 7-3, 7-5
7-1
2-10, 2-15
G90: Absolute position
specifications
G91: Relative position
5-89
- Signal
Function
- 1 (L)
8-6
5-23
6-45, 6-47
specifications
Generation date
Ground wire
5-89
6-9, 6-51, 6-53
8-6
6-45, 6-47
6-45, 6-47
6-45, 6-47
Grounded shield
8-6
- 5 (M)
- Hardware limit switch
FUNCTION SELECT
6-45, 6-47
8-15
Hardware
- Configuration
- Fault
- Menu
- Screen form
Function signal FUM
6-12, 6-70
6-12, 6-70
Hardware limit switch
- 2 (G)
- 3 (X)
- 4 (F)
H
- End
- Polarity
G
G function
5-72
G00: Rapid traverse
G04: Dwell
G10: Flying change
5-73
5-73
5-73, 5-76
- Testing
Header
- Field contents
G20: End of loop
G24: Start of loop
G25: Approach target
5-77
5-77
Help
over shortest path
G26: Approach target in
clockwise direction
5-78
Hierarchical structure
- COM 266
- TEST form
5-78, 5-79
- Start
- Menu
- Function
2-1
2-22
1-4, 2-10,
2-11, 3-1, 8-1
8-7
2-11, 5-20,
6-34, 6-35
8-7
8-15
6-4, 6-5
6-5
6-66, 6-67
5-90
6-56
6-14
6-56
G27: Approach target in
counter-clockwise direction
G40: Disable tool offset
5-78, 5-79
5-79, 5-81
I
G43: Enable positive tool offset
G44: Enable negative tool offset
G53: Cancel zero offsets
G54 - G57: Enable offset 1 - 4
5-79, 5-81
5-79, 5-81
5-83, 5-85
5-83, 5-85
- Programmer
Inch
Increment mode
Increment mode absolute
G70: Dimensions in 0.1 inches
G71: Dimensions in mm
G74: Approach to reference
5-87
5-87
- Functions
- Key menu
- Keys <F1> to <F6>
5-40
6-4, 6-7
6-65
5-88
- Linear axis
- Rotary axis
5-38
5-39
point
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IM 511 error
10-2
5-4
8-18
5-38, 5-40
5
Index
IP 266
Increment mode relative
Incremental encoder
Incremental position encoder
5-41
8-14
2-5, 8-3, 8-4
Interface
- D SUB
- PLC
2-3
2-3
1-8
Incremental speed
5-10, 5-47,
5-48, 6-32,
6-33
- Position encoder
INTERRUPT
Interruption of the
2-6
6-42
Information
INFORMATION
- Screen form
6-73
traversing program
Interruption points
Inversion
5-44
5-45
- Signal
Invoking
- Modes
2-5
I/O
IP
4-5
6-73
Information modes
Initialization
- IP 266
5-66
8-11
INPUT
- Screen form
- Traversing program
6-16
6-40
Input
- Digital
- Process image (PII)
2-10
7-1
Input fields
Input frame
- Addressing
6-66
7-1, 7-12
7-12
- Overview
INPUT MACHINEDATA
- Screen form
7-13
5-21
- Synchronization
5-67
IP 266
- Initialization
- Removal
8-11
3-5
- Run-up
- Synchronized
- Teach-in mode
5-65
7-15
7-15
IP STOP if CPU STOP
5-20, 6-24,
6-25
6-19, 6-22,
6-24, 6-27,
6-30, 6-32,
6-34
J
Job
- in progress
7-15
- Completed
- Terminated/in progress
7-15
9-1
INPUT MACHINING PROGRAM
- Screen form
Input value
6-41
- Monitoring function
Installation
- Encoder
- Guidelines
7-19
3-4
8-4
3-1
- Speed
- Under open control
Jog 1
- Forward speed
5-10
5-26
5-23
6-32, 6-33
Integer digit
Interchange
- Signal line
7-8, 7-9, 7-19
- Reverse speed
Jog 2
- Forward speed
6-32, 6-33
5-26
6-32, 6-33
- Reverse speed
6-32, 6-33
6
Jog
2-25
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Index
K
KOMI screen form
Kv (servo gain) factor
6-3
5-12, 5-13,
5-19, 6-24,
6-25, 8-8
L
Machine data
- Error
- Missing
- Optimized
- Print
- Valid
10-2
7-15
8-20
6-37
7-16
L function
Last block
5-71
5-91
Machining Traversing
MACHINING PROGRAM
Machining program form
6-17
Latching
LED flashes
Limit switch
5-72
2-22
8-1
- Text mode
MAIN
Main program
6-45
6-42
5-69, 6-42
- Hardware
- Software
Linear axis
1-4, 2-11, 8-1
1-4, 8-1
1-3, 1-4, 5-3,
Mass storage error
Maximum deceleration
rate bmax
10-2
Maximum following error
- Increment mode absolute
Linear encoder
5-7
5-38
1-6
7-1
8-4
- Encoder
Maximum speed
- Testing
8-4
5-9, 6-32, 6-33
8-17
- End
- Nesting
5-77
5-71
Mechanics
- Drive system
Metric system
8-3
5-4
- Pass
5-90, 6-45,
6-47
5-77
Measuring system
Mext
Mint
6-19, 6-20
2-6
2-6
Mode
5-23, 6-9,
6-57, 6-60,
6-63, 6-64,
Load statement
Location
- Encoder
Loop
- Start
Loop gain KV factor
Maximum operating frequency
M
M function
M00: Programmed stop
M02: End of program
M99: External switching function
Machine data
- Computing
- Entering
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
5-11, 8-8
5-13, 6-24,
6-26
5-90, 5-91,
6-59, 7-14
5-90
5-91
- 1 to 19
- Actual-value display
7-2, 7-4, 7-14
6-65, 6-66
6-56, 6-57,
6-60
5-91
4-8, 5-1, 5-2,
5-3, 5-84, 6-17
- Coding
- Invoking
- Mode select
7-4
5-21
6-56, 6-63
8-7, 8-9
6-40
- Operating mode selection
- Overview
5-56, 6-63
5-22
7
Index
Mode
- Screen form
- Select
- Table
Mode select
- Auxiliary screen form
- Help form
- Mode
Mode select form
Module
- Address assignment
- Components
IP 266
6-63
6-66
6-56
Nesting
- Depth
- Loop
5-71, 5-77
5-71
6-65
NO contact
Noise
- Immunity
3-2
6-66
6-56, 6-63
6-64
Number
- Format
- of traversing programs
7-15
5-68
5-3, 6-19, 6-20
7-1
2-1
Number of pulses
- Incremental position
encoder
8-3, 8-4
- Error
- Installation
- Number
10-2
3-4
6-10
O
- Removal
- Restart
- Start/restart
3-4
6-54
6-54
Monitor
- Following error
- Function
- Hardware
- Mode
2-23
5-15, 6-24,
6-26
5-20
OFFLINE
6-9, 6-11
Offset
5-51, 5-52,
5-56, 5-84,
6-45, 6-46
- Additive
- Cancel
- Direction
5-80
5-85
5-84
7-19
2-23
7-4, 7-14, 7-19
- Relative
ONLINE
Open-loop positioning
5-83
6-9, 6-11
4-2
- Position control direction
- Software
Monitoring function
2-24
2-23, 2-24
Operational status
Operator
- Command
6-9, 6-11
5-23
- Input value
Motor
- Power section
7-19
4-4
2-9
- Servicing options
- Servicing priority
Operator command
1-7
1-7
7-2
- Shaft
- Speed
Motor axis
Motor/axis
8-3
8-7
8-4
Optimized machine data
Output
- Digital
- Process image (PIQ)
8-20
8-7
OUTPUT
- Screen form
Output fields
6-68
- ”TEST” form
6-61
- Ratio
N
N function
NC contact
8
5-70, 5-71
5-20
2-10
7-1, 7-2
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Output message
- Overview
Override
- Factor
Overswing
Overview
- Input frame
- Output frame
Index
7-1, 7-2
7-3
6-57, 6-60,
Position control direction
- Monitor
Position control system
2-24, 2-25, 3-6
2-24, 3-6
6-63, 6-64
5-24, 5-25,
6-64, 7-7
- Components
Position encoder
- Interface
4-4
- Replacement
- Revolution
- Signal
3-6
8-7
2-4
5-19
7-13
7-3
Position reached
P
- Switching conditions
Parameter
Path of travel
- Limit
5-23, 7-2
8-1
PG
- Date and time
Phase displacement
6-10
- Signal
Plant designation
Plant code
2-5
6-9
6-51, 6-53
PLC BCD-coded
PLC interface
5-20, 6-34,
6-35
1-8
Polarity
- External start enable
- External STOP
2-13
2-11, 2-12
- Hardware limit switch
2-11, 5-20,
6-34, 6-35
Position
- Axis
- Decoding
- Encoder
- Measuring system
7-15
5-4
8-4
4-4
- Range 0 to -0.999
- Relative
- Resolution
7-9
7-8
5-4
- Specifications
7-8
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
2-6
2-15, 2-16,
2-18,
2-17
Position specifications
- Absolute
- BCD-coded
7-8, 7-19
5-89
7-9
- Binary-coded
- Relative
Positioning
7-9
5-89, 7-8
2-1, 4-1, 4-5
- Closed-loop
- Direction
- Open-loop
4-2
5-41
4-2
- Range
Positioning methods
Positioning specifications
8-1
4-1
- Value range 0 to -0.999
Positive mechanical coupling
7-9
5-28, 5-37,
6-25
Power electronics equipment
- Drift
Power section
1-6
5-62
1-5, 4-4, 5-62,
- Analog output
Preferred direction
PRESETS
8-2, 8-12
8-3
5-78, 5-79
- Screen form
6-8
- Form
6-37
- Function
6-37
Print
9
Index
Printer
- Initialization
Printout
- Function
- Machine data
- Procedure
- Screen form
- Terminated
Process image
- Inputs (PII)
- Outputs (PIQ)
Program
IP 266
6-21, 6-36,
6-39, 6-75
6-38
Rapid traverse
Ratio
- Motor/axis
6-21, 6-39
6-37
6-37
Recovery procedure
Reference
- Coordinate
6-21
6-37
6-39
7-1
7-1, 7-2
5-73
8-7
10-4 - 10-17
5-9, 5-28, 5-88
- Direction
- Signal
- Speed 1
6-34, 6-35
2-5
6-34, 6-35
- Speed 2
Reference point
6-34, 6-35
1-4, 5-5, 5-9,
6-27, 6-28,
- END
6-57, 6-60,
6-63, 6-64
6-47
6-29, 6-35,
6-57, 6-60,
6-63, 7-16
- STOP
Program type
Program header
6-47
6-41, 6-42
5-68, 5-69,
- Computing
- Direction
- Missing
8-17
5-20, 5-35
7-15
- Machining program
Program number
6-45, 6-46
6-44
5-69, 7-7
- Physical
- Reproducibility
5-88
5-20, 5-35,
5-36
PROGRAM SELECT
- Menu
- Screen form
6-3
6-3
- Set
- Switch
5-28, 5-37
2-10, 2-12,
5-29, 8-4
Programmed stop
Programmer
- Port
5-45, 5-90
8-5
1-8, 2-4
Proper installation
- Encoder
Pulse
8-4
- Encoder revolution
Pulses per encoder revolution
Pulses/revolution
8-7, 10-4
5-5
6-34, 6-35
Reference point approach
- Direction
- Speed
- Speed 1
- Position
10
2-4
7-9
5-20, 5-23
5-10
6-34, 6-35
- Speed 2
Reference point coordinate
Relative shift
R
R x D_P
Range 0 to -0,999
Removal
- IP 266
Replacement
- Position encoder
2-12, 5-28,
5-29, 5-30,
5-88
6-34, 6-35
6-27, 6-28,
6-29
5-83
3-4
3-5
3-6
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Representation
- DIN 66 025
- Text mode
Index
6-40
6-40
Screen form
- PRESETS
- PROGRAM SELECT
5-20, 5-35,
5-36
- TEST
- TRANSMIT
Service life
6-56
6-50, 6-51
Reset
Reverse
REVERSE (REV)
5-63, 8-5
6-65
7-3, 7-5
- EEPROM
Setpoint
- Generator
5-65
4-5
4-2
Resolution
- Wrong
Rotary axis
5-4, 5-5, 6-35
10-4
1-3, 1-5, 5-3,
- Speed
Setpoint position
- Computation
2-9
2-15, 5-13
5-26
5-8, 5-43,
5-53, 5-60,
5-78
Sheath wire
Shield
- Bus
3-4
2-4
3-3
- Increment mode absolute
- Zero offset
Rotary encoder
5-39
5-53
1-6
Shielding
- Bilateral
- Cable
3-3, 8-6
3-4
3-3
Rotary table
Run-up
- IP 266
1-3, 1-5
Reproducibility
- Reference point
5-65
Sign
8-6
8-6
7-8
Safety requirements
3-1
Signal
- FUM
- Inverted
8-6
2-5, 8-4
Screen form
- CLEAR
- CONFIGURATION
- Phase-displaced
Signal line
- Interchange
2-5
6-70
6-3, 6-4
- DELETE
- FUNCTION SELECT
- INFORMATION
6-70
6-12, 6-70
6-73
Single block mode
Single job order
Slot
5-45
1-7
7-1, 7-2
- INPUT
- INPUT MACHINEDATA
6-16
6-19, 6-22,
6-24, 6-27,
6-30, 6-32,
- 0 to 7
- Number
Software limit switch
3-5
6-10, 7-2, 7-12
1-4, 6-27,
6-28, 8-1
S
6-34
- INPUT MACHINING
PROGRAM
6-41
- KOMI
- OUTPUT
6-3
6-68
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
- Grounded
- at both ends
6-8
6-3
- End
- Start
- Start/End
Source
- Device
2-25
6-27, 6-28
6-27, 6-28
5-7
6-51, 6-74
6-52
11
Index
Speed
IP 266
5-9, 5-46,
5-47, 5-90,
6-59, 6-61
Switching function
2-10, 6-57,
6-59, 6-61,
6-63, 6-64
1-6
6-32, 6-33
8-7
- M99
Symmetrical
- 5V encoder
2-18
- Setpoint
Standstill (zero-speed) monitor
4-2
6-24, 6-26,
6-60, 7-15
- Encoder
Synchronization
- Automatic
6-25
START
Start
- COM 266
7-3, 7-5
6-65, 7-3, 7-5
6-3
- IP
Syntax diagram
- Block
5-67
- Hardware limit switch
Start enable
- External
8-7
2-10
2-10, 2-13
T
T x D_P
2-4
Start-up
- Test
STATUS
8-1
8-12
6-65, 7-3, 7-5
Target
- Approach in a
clockwise direction
6-45, 6-51
- Controller
- Incremental
- Motor
Status
- Bit
- Byte
8-4
9-4
5-92
5-78, 5-79
7-13, 7-15
7-13
- Approach in a counterclockwise direction
- Approach over shortest
5-78, 5-79
- Info
- Number
STEP 5 programming
9-1
6-45, 6-46
9-1, 9-2
path
- Coordinate
- Device
5-78
2-15
6-52
STOP
- External
Stop
6-65
2-10
6-65
Target position
- Absolute
Teach-in
5-46, 5-47
5-79, 7-8
5-46, 5-50,
Structure
- Hierarchical
- Recursive
6-56
5-69, 5-71
Teach-in mode
8-19
6-57, 6-60,
6-63
Supporting bar
6-24
5-69, 5-71,
6-42
3-3
- IP 266
Technical specifications
Terminal block
- Assignments
7-15
2-26
2-3, 8-1
2-10
Switching conditions
- Position reached
Termination block
TEST
- Screen form
5-68
2-17
SUB
Subroutine
12
6-56
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
IP 266
Index
Test
- Axis
- Start-up
8-13
8-12
6-56
Transfer
- Key
- Statement
6-65, 7-5
5-76
7-1
4-4
- Screen form
”TEST” form
- Hierarchical structure
6-56
Transmission element
- Mechanical
Travel
- Output fields
Test mode
- Exit
6-61
6-55, 8-13
6-76
- Encoder revolution
Travel limits
Travel per encoder revolution
8-7, 10-4
8-1
5-4, 5-5, 6-34,
Testing
- Following error
- Hardware limit switches
8-17
8-15
Traversing block
Traversing (machining) range
6-35
5-68, 5-70
5-7, 8-2, 8-12
- Maximum speed
TEXT MODE
Text mode
8-17
6-44
6-44
- Machining program
- Machining program form
- Representation
6-45
6-45
6-40
- Traversing program
6-45
- End
- Start
- Start/End
Traversing (machining)
program
Time
- Deceleration
TOGGLE
- Bit
Tool
- Change
- Length offset
Tool offset (TO)
- Absolute
- Additive
- Cancel
- Positive/negative
TRANS
TRANSMIT
- Screen form
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
8-7
7-3
7-5, 7-6, 9-3
1-3, 1-5, 6-29
1-3, 1-5, 6-29
5-8
1-7, 4-8, 5-43 5-47, 5-68,
- Error
- Input
6-17
10-2
6-40
- Interpreter
- Number
- Program header
5-76
5-68
6-44
5-59
6-27, 6-28,
6-29
- Text mode
- to DIN
Troubleshooting
6-45
6-43
10-1
5-18, 5-43,
5-57, 5-79,
5-80, 5-82,
Two's complement
7-9
6-45, 6-46
5-82
5-82
5-79, 5-81
Units
- Permissible
Unit of measure
- Degrees
5-18
7-3
6-50
U
- Unit
5-2, 5-3
5-4
5-4
5-4
6-50, 6-51
13
Index
IP 266
V
Velocity
- Ramp
- Setpoint
Voltage-speed
- Characteristic
4-7
4-2
5-63
W
Watchdog
5-63
Wirebreak
Wiring
Write cycle
3-1
8-6
5-65
X
X function
5-89
Z
Zero point
5-50
Zero offset (ZO)
5-15, 5-17,
5-43, 5-51,
5-84, 6-30,
- Absolute
6-31, 6-46
5-50, 5-84,
5-86
- Cancel
- Delete
- Relative
5-83
5-56
5-54, 5-84,
- Rotary axis
- From traversing
program
Zero-speed monitoring
14
5-86
5-53
5-86
2-15, 2-16,
5-15, 6-24,
6-26, 6-60
EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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Manual:
IP 266 Order No.: 6ES5 835-5SC21
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EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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Siemens AG
AUT E1114B
Postfach 1963
Werner-von-Siemens-Str. 50
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D-92209 Amberg
Fed. Rep. of Germany
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Title: IP 266 Positioning Module
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Order No.: 6ES5 998-5SC21
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EWA 4NEB 812 6057-02
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