Emerson Bristol ControlWave LP Instruction manual

Instruction Manual
CI-ControlWaveLP
Oct., 2006
Low Power ControlWave
Process Automation Controller
www.EmersonProcess.com/Bristol
ControlWaveLP
IMPORTANT! READ INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE STARTING!
Be sure that these instructions are carefully read and understood before any
operation is attempted. Improper use of this device in some applications may result in
damage or injury. The user is urged to keep this book filed in a convenient location for
future reference.
These instructions may not cover all details or variations in equipment or cover
every possible situation to be met in connection with installation, operation or maintenance. Should problems arise that are not covered sufficiently in the text, the purchaser is advised to contact Bristol for further information.
EQUIPMENT APPLICATION WARNING
The customer should note that a failure of this instrument or system, for
whatever reason, may leave an operating process without protection. Depending upon
the application, this could result in possible damage to property or injury to persons.
It is suggested that the purchaser review the need for additional backup equipment
or provide alternate means of protection such as alarm devices, output limiting, failsafe valves, relief valves, emergency shutoffs, emergency switches, etc. If additional
in-formation is required, the purchaser is advised to contact Bristol .
RETURNED EQUIPMENT WARNING
When returning any equipment to Bristol for repairs or evaluation, please note
the following: The party sending such materials is responsible to ensure that the
materials returned to Bristol are clean to safe levels, as such levels are defined and/or
determined by applicable federal, state and/or local law regulations or codes. Such
party agrees to indemnify Bristol and save Bristol harmless from any liability or
damage which Bristol may incur or suffer due to such party's failure to so act.
ELECTRICAL GROUNDING
Metal enclosures and exposed metal parts of electrical instruments must be
grounded in accordance with OSHA rules and regulations pertaining to "Design
Safety Standards for Electrical Systems," 29 CFR, Part 1910, Subpart S, dated: April
16, 1981 (OSHA rulings are in agreement with the National Electrical Code).
The grounding requirement is also applicable to mechanical or pneumatic instruments that include electrically-operated devices such as lights, switches, relays,
alarms, or chart drives.
EQUIPMENT DAMAGE FROM ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE VOLTAGE
This product contains sensitive electronic components that can be damaged by
exposure to an electrostatic discharge (ESD) voltage. Depending on the magnitude
and duration of the ESD, this can result in erratic operation or complete failure of the
equipment. Read supplemental document S14006 at the back of this manual for
proper care and handling of ESD-sensitive components.
Bristol 1100 Buckingham Street, Watertown, CT 06795
Telephone (860) 945-2200
WARRANTY
A.
Bristol warrants that goods described herein and manufactured by Bristol are free
from defects in material and workmanship for one year from the date of shipment
unless otherwise agreed to by Bristol in writing.
B.
Bristol warrants that goods repaired by it pursuant to the warranty are free from
defects in material and workmanship for a period to the end of the original warranty
or ninety (90) days from the date of delivery of repaired goods, whichever is longer.
C.
Warranties on goods sold by, but not manufactured by Bristol, are expressly limited
to the terms of the warranties given by the manufacturer of such goods.
D.
All warranties are terminated in the event that the goods or systems or any part
thereof are (i) misused, abused or otherwise damaged, (ii) repaired, altered or
modified without Bristol's consent, (iii) not installed, maintained and operated in
strict compliance with instructions furnished by Bristol, or (iv) worn, injured or
damaged from abnormal or abusive use in service time.
E.
THESE WARRANTIES ARE EXPRESSLY IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER
WARRANTIES EXPRESS OR IMPLIED (INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION
WARRANTIES AS TO MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE), AND NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, NOR ANY
REPRESENTATIONS, PROMISES, OR STATEMENTS HAVE BEEN MADE BY
BRISTOL UNLESS ENDORSED HEREIN IN WRITING. FURTHER, THERE ARE
NO WARRANTIES WHICH EXTEND BEYOND THE DESCRIPTION OF THE
FACE HEREOF.
F.
No agent of Bristol is authorized to assume any liability for it or to make any written
or oral warranties beyond those set forth herein.
REMEDIES
A.
Buyer's sole remedy for breach of any warranty is limited exclusively to repair or
replacement without cost to Buyer of any goods or parts found by Seller to be
defective if Buyer notifies Bristol in writing of the alleged defect within ten (10) days
of discovery of the alleged defect and within the warranty period stated above, and if
the Buyer returns such goods to Bristol's Watertown office, unless Bristol's Watertown office designates a different location, transportation prepaid, within thirty (30)
days of the sending of such notification and which upon examination by Bristol
proves to be defective in material and workmanship. Bristol is not responsible for
any costs of removal, dismantling or reinstallation of allegedly defective or defective
goods. If a Buyer does not wish to ship the product back to Bristol, the Buyer can
arrange to have a Bristol service person come to the site. The Service person's
transportation time and expenses will be for the account of the Buyer. However,
labor for warranty work during normal working hours is not chargeable.
B.
Under no circumstances will Bristol be liable for incidental or consequential
damages resulting from breach of any agreement relating to items included in this
quotation, from use of the information herein or from the purchase or use by Buyer,
its em-ployees or other parties of goods sold under said agreement.
How to return material for Repair or Exchange
Before a product can be returned to Bristol for repair, upgrade, exchange, or to verify
proper operation, form (GBU 13.01) must be completed in order to obtain a RA (Return
Authorization) number and thus ensure an optimal lead time. Completing the form is very
important since the information permits the Bristol Repair Dept. to effectively and
efficiently process the repair order.
You can easily obtain a RA number by:
A. FAX
Completing the form (GBU 13.01) and faxing it to (860) 945-3875. A Bristol Repair
Dept. representative will return call (or other requested method) with a RA number.
B. E-MAIL
Accessing the form (GBU 13.01) via the Bristol Web site (www.bristolbabcock.com)
and sending it via E-Mail to brepair@bristolbabcock.com. A Bristol Repair Dept.
representative will return E-Mail (or other requested method) with a RA number.
C. Mail
Mail the form (GBU 13.01) to
Bristol Inc.
Repair Dept.
1100 Buckingham Street
Watertown, CT 06795
A Bristol Repair Dept. representative will return call (or other requested method)
with a RA number.
D. Phone
Calling the Bristol Repair Department at (860) 945-2442. A Bristol Repair Department representative will record a RA number on the form and complete Part I, then
send the form to the Customer via fax (or other requested method) for Customer
completion of Parts II & III.
A copy of the completed Repair Authorization Form with issued RA number should be included with the product being returned. This will allow us to quickly track, repair, and
return your product to you.
Bristol Inc. Repair Authorization Form
(off-line completion)
(Providing this information will permit Bristol Inc. to effectively and efficiently process your return. Completion is required
to receive optimal lead time. Lack of information may result in increased lead times.)
Date___________________
RA #___________________SH_
Standard Repair Practice is as follows: Variations to this is
practice may be requested in the “Special Requests” section.
• Evaluate / Test / Verify Discrepancy
• Repair / Replace / etc. in accordance with this form
• Return to Customer
Part I
Line No.____________
Please be aware of the Non warranty standard charge:
• There is a $100 minimum evaluation charge, which is
applied to the repair if applicable (√ in “returned”
B,C, or D of part III below)
Please complete the following information for single unit or multiple unit returns
Address No.
(office use only) Address No.
(office use only)
Bill to :
Ship to:
Purchase Order:
Contact Name:____________________________________
Phone:
Fax:
Part II
E-Mail:
Please complete Parts II & III for each unit returned
Model No./Part No.
Description
Range/Calibration
S/N
Reason for return :
1.
Failure
Upgrade
Verify Operation
Other
Describe the conditions of the failure (Frequency/Intermittent, Physical Damage, Environmental Conditions,
Communication, CPU watchdog, etc.)
(Attach a separate sheet if necessary)
2.
Comm. interface used:
3.
What is the Firmware revision? _____________________
Standalone
RS-485
Ethernet
Other:______________
Modem (PLM (2W or 4W) or SNW)
What is the Software &version?
Part III If checking “replaced” for any question below, check an alternate option if replacement is not available
A. If product is within the warranty time period but is excluded due
to Bristol’s warranty clause, would you like the product:
repaired
returned
replaced
scrapped?
B. If product were found to exceed the warranty period,
would you like the product:
repaired
returned
replaced
scrapped?
C. If product is deemed not repairable would you like your product:
returned
replaced
scrapped?
D. If Bristol is unable to verify the discrepancy, would you like the product:
returned
replaced
*see below?
* Continue investigating by contacting the customer to learn more about the problem experienced? The person to contact
that has the most knowledge of the problem is:
______________________________ phone_____________________
If we are unable to contact this person the backup person is: _________________________ phone_____________________
Special Requests: ____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Ship prepaid to:
Bristol Inc., Repair Dept., 1100 Buckingham Street, Watertown, CT 06795
Phone: 860-945-2442
Fax: 860-945-3875
Form GBU 13.01 Rev. B 04/11/06
Bristol
Training
GET THE MOST FROM YOUR BRISTOL
BABCOCK INSTRUMENT OR SYSTEM
•
Avoid Delays and problems in getting your system on-line
•
Minimize installation, start-up and maintenance costs.
•
Make the most effective use of our hardware and software.
•
Know your system.
As you know, a well-trained staff is essential to your operation. Bristol Inc. offers a full
schedule of classes conducted by full-time, professional instructors. Classes are offered
throughout the year at three locations: Houston, Orlando and our Watertown, CT
headquarters. By participating in our training, your personnel can learn how to install,
calibrate, configure, program and maintain any and all Bristol products and realize the full
potential of your system.
For information or to enroll in any class, contact our training department in Watertown at
(860) 945-2343. For Houston classes, you can also contact our Houston office, at (713) 6856200.
A Few Words About Bristol Inc.
For over 100 years, Bristol® has been providing innovative solutions for the measurement
and control industry. Our product lines range from simple analog chart recorders, to
sophisticated digital remote process controllers and flow computers, all the way to turnkey
SCADA systems. Over the years, we have become a leading supplier to the electronic gas
measurement, water purification, and wastewater treatment industries.
On off-shore oil platforms, on natural gas pipelines, and maybe even at your local water
company, there are Bristol Inc. instruments, controllers, and systems running year-in and
year-out to provide accurate and timely data to our customers.
Getting Additional Information
In addition to the information contained in this manual, you may receive additional assistance in using this product from the following sources:
Help Files / Release Notes
Many Bristol software products incorporate help screens. In addition, the software typically
includes a ‘read me’ release notes file detailing new features in the product, as well as other
information which was available too late for inclusion in the manual.
Contacting Bristol Inc. Directly
Bristol's world headquarters is located at 1100 Buckingham Street, Watertown,
Connecticut 06795, U.S.A.
Our main phone numbers are:
(860) 945-2200
(860) 945-2213 (FAX)
Regular office hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00AM to 4:30PM Eastern Time,
excluding holidays and scheduled factory shutdowns. During other hours, callers may leave
messages using Bristol's voice mail system.
Telephone Support - Technical Questions
During regular business hours, Bristol's Application Support Group can provide telephone
support for your technical questions.
For technical questions about TeleFlow products call (860) 945-8604.
For technical questions about ControlWave call (860) 945-2394 or (860) 945-2286.
For technical questions regarding Bristol’s OpenEnterprise product, call (860) 945-3865
or e-mail: scada@bristolbabcock.com
For technical questions regarding ACCOL products, OpenBSI Utilities, UOI and all other
software except for ControlWave and OpenEnterprise products, call (860) 945-2286.
For technical questions about Network 3000 hardware, call (860) 945-2502.
You can e-mail the Application Support Group at: bsupport@bristolbabcock.com
The Application Support Group maintains an area on our web site for software updates and
technical information. Go to: www.bristolbabcock.com/services/techsupport/
For assistance in interfacing Bristol hardware to radios, contact Bristol’s Communication
Technology Group in Orlando, FL at (407) 629-9463 or (407) 629-9464.
You can e-mail the Communication Technology Group at:
orlandoRFgroup@bristolbabcock.com
Telephone Support - Non-Technical Questions, Product Orders, etc.
Questions of a non-technical nature (product orders, literature requests, price and delivery
information, etc.) should be directed to the nearest sales office (listed on the rear cover of
this manual) or to your Bristol-authorized sales representative.
Please call the main Bristol Inc. number (860-945-2200) if you are unsure which office
covers your particular area.
Visit our Site on the World Wide Web
For general information about Bristol Inc. and its products, please visit our site on the
World Wide Web at: www.bristolbabcock.com
Training Courses
Bristol’s Training Department offers a wide variety of courses in Bristol hardware and
software at our Watertown, Connecticut headquarters, and at selected Bristol regional
offices, throughout the year. Contact our Training Department at (860) 945-2343 for course
information, enrollment, pricing, and scheduling.
CI-ControlWaveLP
LOW POWER ControlWave
PROCESS AUTOMATION CONTROLLER
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION
TITLE
PAGE #
Section 1 - INTRODUCTION
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.3.1
1.3.1.1
1.3.1.2
1.3.1.3
1.3.1.4
1.3.2
1.3.2.1
1.3.2.2
1.3.2.3
1.3.2.4
1.3.2.5
1.3.3
1.3.3.1
GENERAL DESCRIPTION .......................................................................................... 1-1
ControlWave PROGRAMMING ENVIRONMENT ...................................................... 1-2
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION .......................................................................................... 1-4
CPU Board ..................................................................................................................... 1-4
CPU Board Connectors .................................................................................................. 1-7
CPU Bd. Communication Port Connectors J1 - J5................................................. 1-7
CPU Bd. Memory Expansion Connector J9............................................................ 1-7
CPU Bd. Connectors J10 & J11 - PC/104 Bus (CPU Bd. To FMI/OB Bd.) ........... 1-7
CPU Bd. PLD JTAG Connectors J12 & J24 ........................................................... 1-8
CPU Bd. CPU JTAG Connector J13 ....................................................................... 1-8
CPU Bd. Manufacturing Test Power Connector J14 ............................................. 1-8
CPU Bd. Connector J15 - Port 80 Diagnostics ....................................................... 1-8
CPU Board User Configuration Jumpers .................................................................... 1-8
CPU Bd. Jumper JP1A - Expansion Card Battery Enable ....................................... 1-9
CPU Bd. Jumper JP1B - On-board SRAM & RTC Battery Enable/Disable ............ 1-9
CPU Bd. Jumper JP1C - OSCOFF Enable/Disable................................................... 1-9
CPU Bd. Jumper JP2 - IRQ15 Source Select............................................................. 1-9
CPU Bd. Jumper JP3A - Expansion SRAM Relocation ............................................ 1-9
CPU Bd. Jumper JP3B - DX4 Clock Multiply Select ................................................ 1-9
CPU Bd. Jumper JP3C - DX4 Write Back / Write Through ..................................... 1-9
CPU Bd. Jumper JP4A - ULP80486 Enable/Disable ................................................ 1-9
CPU Bd. Jumper JP4B - ULP HLDA Jumper........................................................... 1-9
CPU Bd. Jumper JP4C - ULP SMIACT................................................................... 1-10
CPU Board Switches .................................................................................................... 1-10
CPU Bd. Configuration Switch SW1 (COM3 - RS-232/RS-485) .......................... 1-10
CPU Bd. Switch SW2 – Soft Switch, FLASH Write & Force Recovery .............. 1-10
CPU Bd. Momentary Switch SW3 - CPU Reset ................................................... 1-11
CPU Bd. DIP Switch SW4 ..................................................................................... 1-11
CPU Board Batteries................................................................................................. 1-11
Power Supply/Sequencer Board................................................................................... 1-11
PSSB Switches........................................................................................................... 1-14
PSSB Board Jumpers................................................................................................ 1-14
PSSB Board Fuse F1 ................................................................................................. 1-14
PSSB Board Connectors............................................................................................ 1-14
PSSB Bd. Terminal Block Connector TB1............................................................ 1-14
PSSB Bd. Terminal Block Connector TB2............................................................ 1-14
PSSB Bd. Connector J1.......................................................................................... 1-14
PSSB Board Test Points ........................................................................................... 1-14
The Fixed Multifunction Input/Output Board ............................................................ 1-15
FMI/OB Board Fixed I/O Subsystems...................................................................... 1-16
FMI/OB Bd. Discrete Inputs.................................................................................. 1-16
FMI/OB Bd. Discrete Outputs............................................................................... 1-16
FMI/OB Bd. Analog Inputs.................................................................................... 1-17
FMI/OB Bd. High Speed Counter Inputs ............................................................. 1-18
ControlWaveLP
Contents / 0 - 1
CI-ControlWaveLP
LOW POWER ControlWave
PROCESS AUTOMATION CONTROLLER
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION
TITLE
PAGE #
Section 1 - INTRODUCTION (Continued)
1.3.3.2
1.3.3.3
1.3.3.4
1.3.4
1.4
FMI/OB Board Connectors........................................................................................ 1-19
FMI/OB Bd. Connector TB1 - Discrete Inputs ..................................................... 1-19
FMI/OB Bd. Connector TB2 - Discrete Outputs................................................... 1-19
FMI/OB Bd. Connector TB3 - Analog Inputs ....................................................... 1-19
FMI/OB Bd. Connector TB4 - High Speed Counter Inputs ................................. 1-19
FMI/OB Bd. Connectors P1 & P2 PC/104 Expansion .......................................... 1-19
FMI/OB Bd. Connectors TB5 - TB8 PC/104 I/O & P3 - P6 I/O
Expansion Interface ............................................................................................... 1-20
FMI/OB Bd. PC/104 Bus Connectors P7 & P10 (CPU/FMI/OB Interface) ......... 1-20
FMI/OB Bd. Power Supply/Sequencer Bd. (PSSB) Interface Connector P9....... 1-20
FMI/OB Board Jumpers............................................................................................ 1-20
FMI/OB Board LEDs................................................................................................. 1-21
ControlWaveLP Mounting Plate.................................................................................. 1-22
OPTIONS ...................................................................................................................... 1-22
Section 2 - INSTALLATION
2.1
2.2
2.2.1
2.2.2
2.2.3
2.3
2.3.1
2.3.2
2.3.3
2.3.4
2.3.4.1
2.3.4.2
2.4
0 - 2 / Contents
INSTALLATION IN HAZARDOUS AREAS................................................................. 2-1
ControlWaveLP SITE CONSIDERATIONS ................................................................. 2-2
Temperature & Humidity Limits .................................................................................. 2-3
Vibration Limits ............................................................................................................. 2-3
ControlWaveLP Grounding............................................................................................ 2-3
ControlWaveLP INSTALLATION/CONFIGURATION ............................................... 2-4
Overview of Configuration ............................................................................................. 2-4
Step 1. Hardware Configuration ................................................................................ 2-4
Step 2. Software Installation on the PC Workstation .............................................. 2-5
Step 3. Establish Communications using either LocalView or NetView, and
Run the Flash Configuration Utility ............................................................. 2-5
Step 4. Create an Application-specific Control Strategy in ControlWave
Designer .......................................................................................................... 2-6
Step 5. Create Application-specific Web Pages (OPTIONAL).................................. 2-6
Step 6. Create an Open BSI Network Containing the ControlWaveLP Unit, or
ADD the ControlWaveLP unit to an Existing Open BSI Network.............. 2-7
Step 7. Download the Application-specific Control Strategy Into the
ControlWaveLP Unit...................................................................................... 2-7
FMI/OB Board Jumper & Switch Configuration .......................................................... 2-7
CPU Module Switch Configuration ............................................................................... 2-9
Communication Ports ................................................................................................... 2-10
RS-232 & RS-485 Interfaces ..................................................................................... 2-10
RS-232 Ports........................................................................................................... 2-10
RS-485 Ports........................................................................................................... 2-11
Ethernet Port ................................................................................................................ 2-13
WIRING NOTES ......................................................................................................... 2-15
Terminal Connections ............................................................................................ 2-15
ControlWaveLP
CI-ControlWaveLP
LOW POWER ControlWave
PROCESS AUTOMATION CONTROLLER
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION
TITLE
PAGE #
Section 2 - INSTALLATION (Continued)
2.4.1
2.4.2
2.4.3
2.4.4
2.4.5
2.4.6
2.4.6.1
2.5
2.5.1
2.5.2
2.5.2.1
2.5.2.2
2.5.2.3
2.5.3
2.5.4
Signal Shielding and Grounding.................................................................................. 2-15
Discrete Inputs ............................................................................................................ 2-15
Discrete Outputs........................................................................................................... 2-17
Analog Inputs................................................................................................................ 2-18
High Speed Counter Inputs ......................................................................................... 2-20
Watchdog Relay/MOSFET Switch Circuitry .............................................................. 2-23
DC Power Configuration & Wiring ............................................................................. 2-24
Bulk Power Supply Current Requirements ............................................................. 2-25
OPERATIONAL DETAILS .......................................................................................... 2-25
Downloading The Application Load............................................................................. 2-26
Upgrading ControlWaveLP Firmware ........................................................................ 2-26
Using LocalView to Upgrade ControlWaveLP Firmware .......................................... 2-26
Using Hyperterminal to Upgrade ControlWaveLP Firmware................................... 2-31
Remote Upgrade of ControlWaveLP Firmware .......................................................... 2-34
Operating of The Reset Switch .................................................................................... 2-35
Soft Switch Configuration and Communication Ports ............................................... 2-35
Section 3 - SERVICE
3.1
3.1.1
3.1.2
3.1.3
3.1.4
3.1.5
3.2
3.2.1
3.2.2
3.2.3
3.3
3.3.1
3.3.2
3.3.3
3.3.4
3.4
3.4.1
3.4.1.1
3.4.1.2
3.4.1.3
3.4.1.3.1
3.4.1.3.2
3.5
SERVICE INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................ 3-1
Accessing PC Boards For Testing ................................................................................. 3-1
Removal/Replacement of the PSSB Board ................................................................... 3-2
Removal/Replacement of the CPU Board and Lithium Battery .................................. 3-4
Removal/Replacement of the FMI/OB Board ............................................................... 3-4
Analog Input Circuitry Calibration .............................................................................. 3-5
TROUBLESHOOTING TIPS......................................................................................... 3-6
Power Supply/Sequencer Board (PSSB) Voltage Checks ............................................. 3-6
LED Checks .................................................................................................................... 3-6
Wiring/Signal Checks ..................................................................................................... 3-9
GENERAL NOTES ...................................................................................................... 3-10
Extent of Field Repairs ................................................................................................ 3-10
Disconnecting RAM Battery ....................................................................................... 3-10
Maintaining Backup Files ........................................................................................... 3-10
CPU Board Status LEDs POST Checks ...................................................................... 3-10
WINDIAG DIAGNOSTICS .......................................................................................... 3-13
Diagnostics Using WINDIAG ...................................................................................... 3-15
Communications Diagnostic Port Loop-back Test................................................... 3-16
COM 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 External Loop-back Test Procedure ......................................... 3-18
Ethernet Diagnostic Port Test.................................................................................. 3-18
Ethernet Port Loop-back Out Twisted Pair Test Procedure ............................ 3-19
Ethernet Port Return Hardware Address Test Procedure............................... 3-20
CORE UPDUMP........................................................................................................... 3-20
ControlWaveLP
Contents / 0 - 3
CI-ControlWaveLP
LOW POWER ControlWave
PROCESS AUTOMATION CONTROLLER
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION
TITLE
PAGE #
Section 4 - SPECIFICATIONS
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.3.1
4.3.2
4.3.3
4.3.4
4.4
4.5
4.5.1
4.5.2
CPU, MEMORY & PROGRAM INTERFACE .............................................................. 4-1
COMMUNICATION PORTS ........................................................................................ 4-4
FMI/OB BOARD INPUT/OUTPUT SPECIFICATIONS.............................................. 4-5
Analog Inputs ................................................................................................................. 4-7
Discrete Inputs .............................................................................................................. 4-8
Discrete Outputs ............................................................................................................ 4.8
High Speed Counter ...................................................................................................... 4-9
ENVIRONMENTAL SPECIFICATIONS ..................................................................... 4-9
POWER SPECIFICATIONS ....................................................................................... 4-10
Input Power Specs. ....................................................................................................... 4-10
Watchdog Contacts ...................................................................................................... 4-10
APPENDICES
PC/104 ANALOG OUTPUT MODULE OPTION ........................................... Appendix 1
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS ........................................................... Appendix Z
SUPPLEMENTAL INSTRUCTIONS
Site Considerations for Equipment Installation, Grounding & Wiring ...........S1400CW
ESD-Sensitive Components ................................................................................... S14006
REFERENCED Bristol CUSTOMER INSTRUCTION MANUALS
TITLE
PAGE #
Open BSI Utilities Manual ...................................................................................... D5081
Getting Started with ControlWave Designer.......................................................... D5085
Web_BSI Manual ...................................................................................................... D5087
ControlWave Designer Reference Manual .............................................................. D5088
WINDIAG Windows Diagnostics For Bristol Controllers ....................................D4041A
0 - 4 / Contents
ControlWaveLP
Section 1
INTRODUCTION
1.1 GENERAL DESCRIPTION
ControlWaveLP Remote Terminal Units are comprised of a three board set (CPU Board,
Fixed Multifunction Input/Output Board & the Power Supply/Sequencer Board) that have
been designed and integrated to provide high performance with low power consumption.
The CPU Board employs the Ultra Low Power Intel 486SX microprocessor with core logic
support provided by an R400EX System Controller IC. The basic assembly includes 5
asynchronous PS/2 compatible communication ports. The Fixed Multifunction Input/Output
Board (FMI/OB) provides the circuitry and field interface hardware required to interface up
to 16 Discrete Inputs, 8 Discrete Outputs, 8 Analog Inputs and 4 High Speed Counter
Inputs. Additionally the FMI/OB provides LEDs for each DI, DO and HSC point as well as 6
CPU status LEDs, an LED for each of the five Comm. Ports and LEDs for Watch Dog, Idle,
Master Clear and Power Fail indications. Isolated power is generated and regulated by the
Power Supply/Sequencer Board (PSSB) that provides +5Vdc, +12Vdc and -12Vdc from a
bulk 9 - 30 Vdc source.
Figure 1-1 - ControlWaveLP - Major Component Identification
The ControlWaveLP has been designed to provide the following key features:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Low power consumption
Small size
Five independent asynchronous serial ports
Sixteen (16) discrete inputs (DIs) with interrupt capability
Eight (8) discrete outputs (DOs)
Eight (8) analog inputs (AIs)
Four (4) High Speed Counter (HSC) Accumulator inputs
Memory System: System FLASH - 4 Mbytes (soldered down), Static RAM - 2 Mbytes
on-board (soldered down)
BIOS 512 Kbytes (BIOS with FLASH Loader)
ControlWaveLP
Introduction / 1-1
Figure 1-2 - ControlWaveLP - Top View
1.2 ControlWave PROGRAMMING ENVIRONMENT
The ControlWave programming environment uses industry-standard tools and protocols to
provide a flexible, adaptable approach for various process control applications in the water
treatment, wastewater treatment, and industrial automation business.
1-2 / Introduction
ControlWaveLP
The ControlWave programming environment consists of a set of integrated software tools
which allow a user to create, test, implement, and download complex control strategies for
use with Bristol’s ControlWave Process Automation Controller.
Figure 1-3 - ControlWave - Control Strategy Software Diagram
The tools that make up the programming environment are:
•
ControlWave Designer load building package offers several different methods for
generating and debugging control strategy programs including function blocks, ladder
logic, structured languages, etc. The resulting process control load programs are fully
compatible with IEC 61131-3 standards. Various communication methods as offered,
including TCP/IP, serial links, as well as communication to Bristol Babcock’s Open BSI
software and networks.
ControlWaveLP
Introduction / 1-3
•
The I/O Configuration Wizard, accessible via a menu item in ControlWave Designer,
allows you to define process I/O modules in the ControlWave and configure the
individual mapping of I/O points for digital and analog inputs and outputs.
•
The Bristol Firmware Library (Bbifsb) which is imported into ControlWave
Designer, includes a series of Bristol Babcock specific function blocks. These preprogrammed function blocks accomplish various tasks common to most user
applications including alarming, historical data storage, as well as process control
algorithms such as PID control.
•
The Bristol I/O Simulator allows the load program generated through ControlWave
Designer to be tested on a PC, with simulated analog and digital inputs and outputs.
The I/O Simulator utilizes the identical IEC 61131 real time system used in the
ControlWave controller; this allows initial I/O testing and debugging to be performed
in a safe, isolated environment, without the need for a running ControlWave controller
and process I/O boards.
•
The OPC Server (Object Linking and Embedding (OLE) for Process Control) allows
real-time data access to any OPC [Object Linking and Embedding (OLE) for Process
Control] compliant third-party software packages.
• A series of Configuration Controls are available for setting up various aspects of the
system such as historical data storage, system security, and soft switches. Additional
Data Access Controls are also available for retrieval of real-time data values and
communication statistics. The configuration controls and the data access controls utilize
ActiveX technology and are called through a set of fixed Web pages, compatible with
Microsoft® Internet Explorer. Alternatively, developers can place the controls in thirdparty ActiveX compatible containers such as Visual BASIC or Microsoft® Excel.
• User-defined Web Pages - If desired, user-defined web pages can be stored within a
PC to provide a customized human-machine interface (HMI).
1.3 PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION
ControlWaveLPs are comprised of the following major components:
•
•
•
•
CPU Board (see Section 1.3.1)
Power Supply/Sequencer Board (PSSB) (see Section 1.3.2)
Fixed Multifunction Input/Output Board (FMI/OB) (see Section 1.3.3)
Mounting Plate (see Section 1.3.4)
1.3.1 CPU Board
The CPU Board is a multilayer board that measures approximately 8.75” wide (including Dconnectors) by 11.5” long and provides RTU CPU, I/O monitor/control, memory and
communication functions. This board has been designed to operate at reduced power over
an extended temperature range with long-term product reliability.
ControlWaveLP CPU Boards are based on Intel’s X86 architecture, employing the Ultra
Low Power Intel 486SX microprocessor. Core logic support is provided by an R400EX System Controller IC. The base version of the CPU Board includes four RS-232 communication
ports, one RS-485/RS-232 communication port, 2 Mbytes SRAM, 512K of (General Software) BIOS with FLASH loader and 4 Mbytes of FLASH.
1-4 / Introduction
ControlWaveLP
Figure 1-4 - ControlWaveLP CPU Board
Basic CPU components and features are summarized as follows:
• 3.3V 25MHz ULP Intel 486SX Processor
• R400 Embedded System Controller featuring:
Power Management
ControlWaveLP
Introduction / 1-5
•
•
•
•
•
Halt system into low power mode
Programmable Clock Divider
FLASH Controller
Integrated real-time clock (with battery backup)
Complete set of PC functions
512 Kbytes FLASH BIOS, 29LV040, 8-bit
2 Mbytes SRAM, 3.3V, 512K x 8, 70 nS, soldered down
4 Mbytes FLASH RFA soldered down
Five (5) 9-wire PC/AT compatible serial communication ports (COM1 through
COM5). COM3 is DIP Switch configurable for RS-232 or RS-485 operation.
One (1) 10base-T Ethernet Port (Optional) via RJ-45 connector J19
Figure 1-4 shows the basic CPU Board (configuration hardware) and Figure 1-5 provides
the system block diagram. The shaded components of Figure 1-5 are optional features that
have been designed into the CPU (but aren’t offered with the basic ControlWaveLP).
Figure 1-5 - Block Diagram of ControlWaveLP CPU Board
1-6 / Introduction
ControlWaveLP
The BIOS is contained in a single 512 Kbyte boot-block FLASH IC (FBD). The FBD resides
on the ISA bus and operates at 3.3V. It is configured for 8-bit access. Three Switches,
SW2A, SW2B and SW2C are used in conjunction with the BIOS (see Section 1.3.1.3).
The CPU Board contains provisions for 4MB of 3.3V, industrial temperature FLASH to be
soldered onto the CPU card. The FLASH memory is a linear array of 16 Mbit parts
configured for 32-bit read access (32-bit write access) and is connected to the 486 local bus.
CPU Board Switch SW2-D provides FLASH download control (where ON = FLASH
download enable and OFF = FLASH download disable.
The base version of the CPU Board has 2MB of soldered-down system SRAM, implemented
with four 512K x 8 70nS asynchronous SRAMs configured as a 512K x 32-bit array. During
periods of power loss, the SRAM is placed in a data retention mode, and powered by a 3V
lithium battery. The SRAM is configured for 32-bit accesses and is connected to the 486
local bus. The SRAM operates at 3.3V and is packaged in a 32-pin TSOP. An additional
2MB of SRAM may be added to the on-board RAM (to raise the on-board total to 4MB).
1.3.1.1 CPU Board Connectors
The CPU Board contains twenty (20) connectors that function as follows (see Table 1-1):
Table 1-1 - CPU Board Connector Summary
Ref.
J1
J2
J3
J4
J5
J9
J10
J11
J12
J13
J14
J15
J16
J17
J18
J19
J21
J22
J23
J24
# Pins
9-pin
9-pin
9-pin
9-pin
9-pin
70-pin
68-pin
68-pin
10-pin
10-pin
10-pin
14-pin
34-pin
10-pin
44-pin
8-pin
31-pin
6-pin
6-pin
10-pin
Function
COM1 9-pin male D-sub
COM2 9-pin male D-sub
COM3 9-pin male D-sub
COM4 9-pin male D-sub
COM5 9-pin male D-sub
Memory Expansion
CPU/FMIOB Connector 1
CPU/FMIOB Connector 2
ISA PLD JTAG Header
CPU JTAG Header
Manufacturing Test (Power)
Port 80 Diagnostics
Floppy Disk Drive Header
Manufacturing Test
IDE HDD Header
RJ-45 - 10base-T Ethernet Port
Flat Panel Interface
PS/2 Mouse Connector
PS/2 Keyboard Connector
Local Control PLD JTAG Header
Notes
see Figure 4-1 & Table 4-2
see Figure 4-1 & Table 4-2
see Figure 4-1 & Table 4-2
see Figure 4-1 & Table 4-2
see Figure 4-1 & Table 4-2
see Figure 4-2 & Table 4-3
see Figure 4-3 & Table 4-4
see Figure 4-3 & Table 4-4
see Figure 4-4
see Figure 4-4
see Figure 4-4
see Figure 4-5 & Table 4-5
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
See Figure 4-6 & Table 4-6
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
see Figure 4-4
CPU Bd. Communication Port Connectors J1 - J5
The CPU Board supports four external RS-232 serial ports (COM1, COM2, COM4 and
COM5) and one external RS-485/RS-232 serial port (COM3). COM1, COM2, COM4 and
COM5 utilize standard 9-pin male D-sub connectors and are PC/AT compatible ports.
COM3 also utilizes a PC/AT standard 9-pin male D-sub connector, and is jumper selectable
between RS-232 and RS-485 operation.
CPU Bd. Memory Expansion Connector J9
70-pin card slot J9 is provided for future memory expansion.
ControlWaveLP
Introduction / 1-7
CPU Bd. Connectors J10 & J11 - PC/104 Bus (CPU Bd. To FMI/OB Bd.)
Connections to the ISA bus are available on the PC/104 bus via CPU/FMI/OB Interface
Connectors J10 and J11 (J10 of CPU mates with P7 of FMI/OB and J11 of CPU mates with
P10 of FMI/OB) (see Table 4-4). ISA bus signals are provided by the RadiSys R400EX
system controller. During non-ISA bus cycles, the R400EX places the ISA bus into a quiet
mode to reduce overall power consumption. The external interface to PC/104 cards is level
shifted to a 5V bus through a set of buffers and transceivers and is capable of driving up to
10 PC/104 cards.
The OSC signal on the PC/104 bus is a 6MHz clock signal that does not stop or change
frequency when the CPU clock is stopped or throttled. The BCLK signal on the PC/104 bus
is synchronous to the CPU clock, and is the clock to which the PC/104 interface signal
timing is referenced.
CPU Bd. PLD JTAG Connectors J12 & J24
Programmable Logic Device (PLD) Joint Technical Assessment Group (JTAG) 10-pin
headers J24 and J12 are provided for programming and ATE testing of on-board PLDs.
Connector J24 is associated with the Local Configuration PLD while connector J12 functions in conjunction with the ISA PLD.
CPU Bd. CPU JTAG Connector J13
CPU Joint Technical Assessment Group (JTAG) 10-pin header J13 is provided for ATE
testing of the CPU logic.
CPU Bd. Manufacturing Test Power Connector J14
10-pin connector J14 provides +5V, +12V, -12V and Ground (GND) points that are used for
testing during manufacturing or diagnostic testing.
CPU Bd. Connector J15 - Port 80 Diagnostics
14-pin connector J15 on the CPU Board allows a diagnostic board to be plugged in for
testing. This connector has the necessary signals to implement a Port-80 display. The Port80 display is intended for displaying POST codes during system boot and test application.
The diagnostic board that plugs into this connector contains (functionally) a pair of data
latches and decoders that drive a pair of 7-segment LED displays. This diagnostic board is
factory utilized during board manufacturing/repair.
CPU Bd. Connector J19 - Ethernet Port
8-pin RJ-45 connector J19 provides a 10base-T Ethernet Port. The Ethernet interface is
implemented by an AMD Am79C961A Pcnet - ISA controller.
1.3.1.2 CPU Board User Configurable Jumpers
The CPU Board contains ten (10) user configurable Jumpers that function as follows:
Table 1-2 - CPU Board Default Jumper Settings
JUMPER
JP1A - Expansion Card Battery Enable
JP1B - On-board SRAM & RTC Battery Enable
JP1C - OSCOFF Enable Jumper
JP2 - IRQ15 Source Select
1-8/Introduction
Open
⌦
⌦
⌦
Installed
⌦ (pins 1 & 2)
ControlWaveLP
Table 1-2 - CPU Board Default Jumper Settings (Continued)
JUMPER
JP3A - Expansion SRAM Relocation Jumper
JP3B - DX4 Clock Multiply Select
JP3C - Write Back / Write Thru Cache Select
JP4A - ULP Disable Jumper
Open
⌦
⌦
⌦
⌦
Installed
JP4B - ULP HLDA Jumper
⌦
JP4C - ULP SMIACT Jumper
⌦
Note: The following CPU Board Jumpers are currently unused: JP1A, JP2 & JP3A.
CPU Bd. Jumper JP1B - On-board SRAM & RTC Battery Enable/Disable
Jumper JP1B provides the on-board SRAM and RTC battery enable/disable function. If the
jumper is not installed, the on-board SRAM & RTC battery (S2) are isolated from the load.
If the jumper is installed, the on-board SRAM & RTC battery (S2) are enabled for SRAM
and CMOS RAM data retention.
CPU Bd. Jumper JP1C - OSCOFF Enable/Disable
Jumper JP1C provides the OSCOFF signal enable/disable function for the R400EX control
of the clock chip. If the jumper is not installed, the R400EX control of the clock chip is
disabled. If the jumper is installed, the R400EX is enabled to use the OSCOFF signal to
turn off the clock chip outputs.
CPU Bd. Jumper JP3B - DX4 Clock Multiply Select
When Jumper JP3B is not installed, the DX4 internal clock is tripled. When JP3B is
installed, the DX4 internal clock is doubled.
CPU Bd. Jumper JP3C - DX4 Write Back / Write Through
When Jumper JP3C is not installed, the DX4 Cache uses a Write Back policy regarding the
main memory updates. When JP3C is installed, the DX4 Cache uses a Write Through policy
regarding the main memory updates.
CPU Bd. Jumper JP4A - ULP80486 Enable/Disable (see Table 1-3)
JP4A is provided to accommodate enabling or disabling the 80486ULP Microprocessor.
Table 1-3 - Jumper JP4A - 80486 ULP Enable/Disable
JP4A
Open
ULP Disable
Jumper
ULP80486SX drives
its outputs
Installed
ULP80486SX floats its outputs (except for HLDA and
SMIACT). JP4A and JP4C must be removed in order to
populate the DX4 socket.
CPU Bd. Jumper JP4B - ULP HLDA Jumper (see Table 1-4)
Table 1-4 - Jumper JP4B - ULP HLDA Jumper
JP4B
ULP HLDA
Jumper
Open
The HLDA output from the 80486ULP is
isolated from the $CPU.HLDA signal,
allowing the DX4 socket to drive HLDA.
ControlWaveLP
Installed
ULP drives the $CPU.HLDA signal. Do
not populate the DX4 socket.
Introduction / 1-9
CPU Bd. Jumper JP4C - ULP SMIACT (see Table 1-5)
Table 1-5 - Jumper JP4C - ULP SMIACT Jumper
JP4C
Open
The SMIACT output from the 80486-ULP
is isolated from the $CPU.
~SMIACT signal, allowing the DX4 socket
to drive SMIACT.
ULP SMIACT
Jumper
Installed
ULP drives the $CPU.~SMIACT
signal. Do not populate the DX4
socket.
1.3.1.3 CPU Board Switches
The CPU Board contains three 8-bit DIP switches; SW1 is used to configure Comm. Port 3,
SW4 for is provided for user configuration of the unit and SW5 is undefined. A 4-bit DIP
switch (SW2) accommodates FLASH write protection and recovery mode. A single momentary switch (SW3) is provided for resetting the unit.
CPU Bd. Configuration Switch SW1 (COM3 - RS-232/RS-485) (see Table 1-6)
The RS-232/RS-485 configuration for Communication port 3 (COM3) is implemented via 8bit DIP switch SW1.
Table 1-6 - COM3 Port Configuration Switch SW1 Settings
SWITCH
SW1-1
SW1-2
Function
Not used
RS-232/RS-485 Select
SW1-3
TXD to RXD Loop-back
SW1-4
TXD to RXD Loop-back
SW1-5
SW1-6
RS-485 Termination
RS-485 Termination
SW1-7
/RTS to /CTS Loop-back
SW1-8
/RTS to /CTS Loop-back
Setting
N/A
ON = RS-232, OFF = RS-485
ON = Loop-back enabled
OFF = Loop-back disabled
ON = Loop-back enabled
OFF = Loop-back disabled
ON = Term., OFF = No Term.
ON = Term., OFF = No Term.
ON = Loop-back enabled
OFF = Loop-back disabled
ON = Loop-back enabled
OFF = Loop-back disabled
CPU Bd. Switch SW2 - Soft Switch, FLASH Write & Force Recovery (see Table 1-7)
Switch SW2 provides soft switch control, write protection for all of the non-boot-block areas
of the FLASH Boot Device (FDB) and Recover Mode enabling/disabling.
Switch SW2-C provides for forced update/recovery of the BIOS if SW2-C has been set to the
ON position when a reset occurs. The boot-up code passes control to the built-in Recovery
Command Processor that communicates with the user via the recovery serial connection
and a terminal program running on an external host computer.
Table 1-7 - Switch SW2 - FBD Write Protect & Recovery Mode Settings
SWITCH
Function
SW2-C
Recovery Mode Control
SW2-D
FLASH Download Control
Setting
ON = Force recovery mode (via CW Console)
OFF = Recovery mode disabled
ON = FLASH Download enabled
OFF = FLASH Download disabled
Note: SW2A & SW2B are not used.
1-10 / Introduction
ControlWaveLP
CPU Bd. Momentary Switch SW3 - CPU Reset
SW3 is a momentary switch that is used to reset the ControlWaveLP if it goes into a
watchdog condition.
CPU Bd. DIP Switch SW4
Eight-bit DIP Switch SW4 is provided for user configuration settings (see Table 1-8).
Table 1-8 - Assignment of CPU Bd. Switch SW4 - User Configurations
SW#
Function
Setting
ON = Watchdog circuit is enabled
SW4-1 Watchdog Enable
OFF = Watchdog circuit is disabled
Lock/Unlock
ON = Write to Soft Switches or FLASH files
SW4-2
Soft Switches
OFF = Soft Switches, configurations and FLASH files are locked
Use/Ignore
ON = Use Soft Switches (configured in FLASH)
SW4-3
Soft Switches
OFF = Ignore Soft Switch Configuration and use factory defaults
Normal Run or
ON = Normal Run Mode
SW4-4
Core Updump
OFF = Causes the system to start a Core Updump
ON = Retain values in SRAM during restarts
SW4-5 SRAM Control
OFF = Force system to reinitialize SRAM
System Firmware
ON = Enable remote download of System Firmware
SW4-6
OFF = Disable remote download of System Firmware
Load Control *
SW4-7 Not Used
Leave ‘ON’
ON = Don’t allow WINDIAG to run test
SW4-8 Enable WINDIAG
OFF = Disable boot project and allow WINDIAG to run test
* = Boot PROM version 4.7 or higher and System PROM version 4.7 or higher
1.3.1.4 CPU Board Batteries
The CPU Board has a coin cell socket (S2) for providing backup of the real-time clock,
CMOS RAM and the on-board System SRAM. The cell used is a 3V, 1200 mA-hr lithium
coin cell. The battery, R400 and system SRAM are specified to allow a battery backup
period of 4000 hours minimum.
The R400EX will typically draw between 6uA and 7uA when the system is not being
powered externally. The system SRAM is specified to have a standby current draw of 20uA
maximum for each part.
A supervisory circuit is used to switch to battery power when VCC falls below VCC-10%.
1.3.2 Power Supply/Sequencer Board
The Power Supply/Sequencer Board (PSSB) measures 5.5” x 4” and plugs into the bottom of
the FMI/OB Board [via 20-pin connectors (PSSB - J1) (FMI/OB - P9)]. There are two nonpluggable terminal blocks for input power and the watchdog relay.
PSSBs contain a power supply that generates isolated DC supplies (+5V (VCC), +12V and 12V) for the CPU, the logic element of the FMI/OB subsystem and optional PC/104 cards.
Also contained on the PSSB is the sequencer circuit which monitors the incoming power as
well as the isolated supplies. Master Clear (MC) and Power Fail Indication (PFIN) are
generated by the sequencer circuit when incoming power or the supply voltages fall below
specified limits. The sequencer circuit works in conjunction with an ADC circuit that
monitors the incoming voltage level. Additionally, the sequencer circuit controls a watchdog
relay.
ControlWaveLP
Introduction / 1-11
The power supply operates from 10.0 to 20V or 20.7 to 30V (dc). The nominal settings for
the 12V supply are ON state above 10.45V, and OFF state below 10.0V. The nominal
settings for the 24V supply are ON state above 22V, and OFF state below 20.7V. A power
MOSFET is utilized to switch the input power to the power supply circuitry. A mechanical
switch (SW1) will drive the gate of the MOSFET. The three isolated supplies generated by
the power supply are rated for a maximum current of 1A @ +5V, 200mA @ +12V and 200mA
@ -12V. + and - 12V supplies are regulated by linear regulators while the +5V (VCC) supply
is regulated by a PWM circuit.
Figure 1-6 - Top View of PSSB Board (not all components shown)
The sequencer monitors the incoming power and the isolated supply voltages. The low
limits for the incoming power and isolated supplies are 10.25 for a 12V system or 21.3V, for
a 24V system and, 4.75V, 11.4V and -11.4V for the regulated +5V (VCC), +12V and -12V
supplies respectively. The sequencer circuit also generates MC and PFIN. These timed
signals allow the CPU to save status if the incoming power or the isolated supplies fall
below their respective low limits. Note: CPU status cannot be guaranteed if the +5V (VCC)
supply shorts or abruptly falls out of spec. MC and PFIN will remain active until 100msec
after the input power or isolated supplies are above their low limits. When either MC or
WDOGB are active, the watchdog relay or power MOSFET will be OFF. WDOGB is a signal
generated by the CPU.
The low input power detection circuitry and sequencer are on the primary side of the power
supply and drive two optocouplers. The remainder of the low voltage detection circuitry is
1-12 / Introduction
ControlWaveLP
located on the isolated secondary side of the power transformer. The low level detection
circuitry on the secondary side of the power supply monitors the +5V, +12V and -12V dc
supplies. MC* and PFIN* are generated by the sequencer and drive the two optocouplers.
These signals (MC* & PFIN*) are buffered on the secondary side and drive the Status
LEDs located on the FMI/OB Board.
Figure 1-7 - Bottom View of PSSB Board (not all components shown)
The control circuit that drives the watchdog (WD) relay or watchdog (WD) MOSFET switch
is located on the secondary side of the power supply. A solid state relay (U19) is provided to
actuate the WD relay or WD MOSFET switch. The WD relay or WD MOSFET switch can be
disabled by placing PSSB Jumper (JP1) in position 2-3. The WD relay or WD MOSFET
switch is enabled when PSSB Jumper JP1 is set in position 1-2.
An external battery monitor is composed of an ADC and interface circuitry. The ADC is
taken out of shutdown condition when a conversion is started. Interface circuitry consists of
three optocouplers. The conversion and data transfer will take 200usec. The battery input
voltage range is 0V to +30V. When the battery voltage drops below +10.25V or +21.3V, the
circuit will shut down. The accuracy of the reading is ±2% of span.
ControlWaveLP
Introduction / 1-13
1.3.2.1 PSSB Switches
SPDT Switch SW1 is used to connect the MOSFET power switch gate to PSGND when the
‘I’ side of the switch has been pressed to its actuated position.
1.3.2.2 PSSB Board Jumpers
The PSSB Board contains the following Jumpers (situated on the bottom of the PCB):
JP1 - Watchdog Relay
JP2 - -12V
JP3 - +12V
JP4 - 50mA Load
JP5 - +12V Seq. Monitor
JP6 - -12V Seq. Monitor
Enabled = position 1-2, Disabled = position 2-3
Enabled = position 1-2, Disabled = position 2-3
Enabled = position 1-2, Disabled = position 2-3
Enabled = position 1-2, Disabled = position 2-3
Enabled = position 1-2, Disabled = position 2-3
Enabled = position 1-2, Disabled = position 2-3
1.3.2.3 PSSB Board Fuse F1
Slow Blow Fuse F1 is rated at 10A for a 12V system or 3A for a 24V system.
1.3.2.4 PSSB Board Connectors
PSSB Bd. Terminal Block Connector TB1
TB1 provides 3 Watchdog Relay connections or 2 MOSFET connections:
Relay Connections (Figure 2-19:
TB1-1 = N/O - NO Watchdog contact
TB1-2 = C - Common Watchdog contact
TB1-3 = N/C - NC Watchdog contact
MOSFET Connections (Figure 2-20):
TB1-1 = VO - Watchdog MOSFET Switch Output
TB1-2 = VI - Watchdog MOSFET Switch Input
TB2-2 = V- - PSGND (Watchdog Common)
PSSB Bd. Terminal Block Connector TB2
TB2 provides 3 input connections for bulk power:
TB2-1 = 9-30V dc Bulk
TB2-2 = Power Supply Ground - PSGND (VIN-)
TB2-3 = Chassis Ground - CHASSIS
PSSB Bd. Connector J1
Connector J1 is a 20-pin DIP Header that interfaces Power, Ground and power supply
status signals to Connector P9 on the FMI/OB Board (see Table 4-13).
1.3.2.5 PSSB Board Test Points
Six (6) test points are provided on the PSSB Board:
TP1 = VIN+
TP2 = VIN- (PSGND)
TP3 = +5Vdc (Enable JP4 - position 1-2)
TP4 = +12Vdc (Enable JP3 - position 1-2)
TP5 = -12Vdc (Enable JP2 - position 1-2)
TP6 = Ground (GND)
1-14 / Introduction
ControlWaveLP
1.3.3 The Fixed Multifunction Input/Output Board (see Figure 1-2)
The Fixed Multifunction Input/Output Board (FMI/OB) is a multilayer board that measures
approximately 8.5” wide by 11” long. FMI/OBs contain a PC/104 interface, four I/O modules,
electrical isolation to field devices, surge suppression, pluggable terminations, and status
LEDs for Discrete I/O, CPU, and communication functions. The four I/O modules provide
the following general field interfaces:
●
●
●
●
16 Discrete Inputs
8 Discrete Outputs
4 High Speed Counters
8 Analog Inputs
There are eight (8) pluggable terminal blocks for the four (4) fixed I/O modules and four (4)
expansion I/O modules. Four (4) mass termination connectors (P3, P4, P5 & P6) are
provided to interconnect the 4 expansion I/O modules to the pluggable terminators (TB5,
TB6, TB7 & TB8 respectively). A PC/104 bus connection (P1 & P2) provide access to the
fixed I/O and the expansion I/O. A Power Supply Sequencer Board (PSSB) interface
connector (P9) is provided on the bottom of the FMI/OB Board. Four sets of mounting post
are provided for expansion I/O LED Boards.
Pluggable terminations are 3.81mm on center. There is a maximum of 32 points per I/O
subsystem. Terminations are arranged in two groups (16 + points & 16 - points).
A 104-pin PC/104 bus interface, composed of 64-pin connector P1 and 40-pin connector P2
interconnects the fixed and expansion I/O subsystems. Mounting posts are provided to
support the first I/O expansion card. Four 40-pin expansion connectors (P3 - P6) are
provided. Connectors P3, P4, P5 and P6 are electrically connected to connectors TB5, TB6,
TB7 and TB8 respectively. Each connector is provided with a pluggable 32 point Terminal
Block that supports a maximum wire size of 16 gauge.
68-pin connector P7 and P10 accommodate the interface (power and signal) between the
FMI/OB and the CPU Boards. These connectors contain the PC/104 signals, the CPU status
and Comm. status LED signals, and the MC, PFIN and WDOG signals.
The FMI/OB has four mounting holes that accommodate panel mount/electrical connection
to the chassis. Six mounting holes accommodate mounting the CPU Board beneath the
FMI/OB Board. The top of the FMI/OB Board is notched to accommodate the PSSB’s
connectors TB1 & TB2 and switch SW1. Two (2) screw slots are provided on the FMI/OB
Board to accommodate mounting the PSSB Board. The PSSB Board mounts beneath the
FMI/OB Board (between the CPU and FMI/OB) and is stood-off from the edge of the
FMI/OB Board with 3/8” stand-offs.
An external battery monitor is composed of an analog to digital converter and a bus
interface. The bus interface is located on the FMI/OB. The analog-to-digital converter, opto
couplers and support circuitry are located on the Power Supply Sequencer Board (PSSB).
The signals EXTBAT_CLK, EXTBAT_DOUT, and EXTBATCE interface to the optocouplers
via the PSSB connector P9. The power Supply sequencer circuit resets the CPU Board at or
below 10.9V for a +12V system or 21.5V for a +24V system.
Two on-board Field Power Supplies are provided; one for DI and HSC operation and one for
AI operation. These supplies operate from a 10.6 to 30 Vdc input. The output voltages are
electrically isolated (500Vdc) and are regulated at 24V ±5% (i.e., 22.8V to 25.2V) (10mA to
ControlWaveLP
Introduction / 1-15
full load). Output current is rated at 200mA maximum. Supply shutdown is Jumper
selectable. The total power consumption (from 5Vdc) for the FMI/OB Board is 300mW
maximum.
1.3.3.1 FMI/OB Board Fixed I/O Subsystem
The FMI/OB Board contains the 4 fixed I/O subsystems. These are discussed below.
FMI/OB Bd. Discrete Inputs
Discrete Inputs feature optical isolation and surge suppression, the input range is 12 or 24
VAC or VDC ±10%. 1 millisecond or 30 millisecond DI filtering is offered and is factory
configured. The inputs can be configured for isolated or dry contact operation. A 24V DC/DC
field power supply is available to power the dry contact configurations. The power supply
can be disabled via a jumper. There are two rows of terminals. The upper row of terminals
is assigned +DI connections while the lower row is assigned -DI connections. The DI
configuration jumpers should be placed in their ‘A’ position when field powered for dry
contact operation or their ‘B’ position when configured for isolated operation.
FMI/OB interrupt generation circuitry sequentially scans the conditioned DI signals and
generates an interrupt on a change of state provided that the mask bit for the specific input
has been enabled. When an interrupt is generated, the internal scanning circuit stops at
the DI that generated the interrupt. During an interrupt service routine, the number of the
DI that generated the interrupt is outputted on the data bus on data lines DB11-DB8
(MSB-LSB). DI1 = 0, DI2 = 1,…DI16 = 0F hex.
There are 16 DI LEDs (LED CR33 - LED CR48) which can be disabled/enabled with a
jumper (W17). The LEDs are situated adjacent to the DI subsystem Terminal Block (TB1).
DI Operation Summary
Number of Points
Input Voltage Range:
Input Filtering:
Input Configuration:
Input Current:
‘1’ State Voltage:
‘0’ State Voltage:
Interrupt generation:
Bus access:
Electrical Isolation:
Surge Suppression:
Terminations:
Status Indication:
16 (TB1)
12V or 24V
1 millisecond or 30 milliseconds
Contact Closure, externally sourced on a point by point basis Jumper configurable
2.5mA ±10%
90% of input voltage range
10% of input voltage range
On change of state transition on a point by point basis
Sixteen bit wide
1500VDC
500VDC MOV to CHASSIS
38VDC MOV across input and to FIELD COMMON
Meets ANSI/IEEE C37.90-1978
Pluggable (TB1), maximum wire size is 16 gauge
16 LEDs (one per point) (CR33 - CR48)
FMI/OB Bd. Discrete Outputs
The 8 Discrete Outputs utilize Solid State Relays capable of handling 100mA @ 35V. Surge
suppression is included.
1-16 / Introduction
ControlWaveLP
There are 8 LEDs (CR49 - CR56), located adjacent to the DO Terminal Block (TB2). These
LEDs (which can be disabled by a jumper) indicate the status of the logic state of the
Discrete Outputs.
DO Operation Summary
Number of Points:
Output Type:
Max. Operating Voltage:
Max. Operating Frequency:
Sink Current:
Electrical Isolation:
Surge Suppression:
Terminations:
Status indication:
Bus Access:
8 (TB2)
Open Drain
38VDC
20 Hz
100mA Maximum
1500VDC
500VDC MOV to CHASSIS
38VDC MOV across input
Meets ANSI/IEEE C37.90-1978
Pluggable (TB2), maximum wire size is 16 gauge
8 LEDs (one per point) (CR49 - CR56)
16 Bits Wide
FMI/OB Bd. Analog Inputs
The Analog Input module is composed of signal conditioning circuitry, analog multiplexers
to select the field analog inputs and the reference voltages to the instrumentation amplifier,
an analog to digital converter, opto-isolation circuitry, control circuitry and the bus
interface. The board is designed to support eight (8) 1-5V or 4-20mA isolated inputs or 420mA loops powered from a field source. An isolated DC/DC converter powers the ADC,
instrumentation amplifier and multiplexers. Optocouplers are used for the control circuitry.
The common mode range for the Analog Inputs is 38VDC. The input signals and on board
reference voltages are attenuated with forty to one attenuators. A low pass filter sets the
cutoff frequency to 3 Hz. Analog multiplexers select one of the four channels or the
reference voltages. An instrumentation amplifier converts the differential signal to a single
ended signal and amplifies the signal 10X and is followed by a 4X gain circuit. Four
potentiometers are required to set the 1V and 5V references and to adjust the offset and
gain of the 4X circuit.
A 14 bit Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) is used to digitize the conditioned signals. Optocouplers are used for data and control signals. The serial digitized data is assembled into
a 14 bit parallel value which is placed on the system data bus.
There are eight sets of configuration jumpers (W20A/W20B - W27A/W27B) used to
configure Analog Inputs AI1 - AI8.
AI Operation Summary
Number of Points:
Input Configuration:
Accuracy:
Isolated Voltage/Current
Common Mode Range:
ControlWaveLP
8 (TB3)
Isolated Voltage Input: 1-5V
Isolated Current Input: 4-20mA
Powered Current Loop: 4-20mA
0.1% of span @ 25°C
0.2% of span - -20°C to +70°C
0.3% of span - -40°C to +70°C
38VDC referenced to isolated common.
Introduction / 1-17
Powered Current Loop
Common Mode Range:
Input Filtering:
Channel Settling Time:
Conversion Time:
On board References:
Surge Suppression:
Terminations:
Bus Access:
0V referenced to isolated common.
When a field supply common is connected to the AI system the
isolated common is connected to the field supply common.
300 milliseconds to 99.75% of input signal
300 microseconds
200 microseconds
1V, 5V - optional
38VDC MOV across input signals and (-) input to CHASSIS
500VDC MOV isolated common to CHASSIS
Meets ANSI/IEEE C37.90-1978
Pluggable (TB3), maximum wire size is 16 gauge
16 Bits Wide
FMI/OB Bd. High Speed Counter Inputs
The high speed counter circuitry consists of signal conditioning circuitry, 16 bit accumulators, and control circuitry. The signal condition circuitry includes optocouplers,
debounce circuitry and bandwidth limit circuitry.
Each counter is assigned three field inputs, SET, RESET and Common. When the debounce
circuitry is enabled, a change of state on both the SET and RESET inputs is required to
accumulate counts. The maximum input frequency is 10 KHz. The nominal input current
for an input is 1mA.
The 16 bit accumulators are synchronous counters. The counters and associated circuitry
are reset asynchronously. The input count, read and write operations are performed
synchronously with the system 6 MHz clock. Overflow of each 16 bit counter generates an
interrupt. The interrupt can be disabled by setting an associated mask bit. The interrupting device is identified by reading a 4 bit value.
There are two sets of jumpers (W32 - W39) for each High Speed counter circuit. One jumper
selects an isolated input or a field powered input. The second jumper selects the debounce
mode of operation.
The 16 bit accumulators are cleared to 0000 hex on power up.
At a 10KHz input frequency, the accumulator will overflow after 6.5 seconds.
HSC Operation Summary
Number of Points:
Input Voltage Range:
Input Filtering:
Input Filtering:
Input Configuration:
Input Current:
‘1’ State Voltage:
‘0’ State Voltage:
Bus Access:
Max. Accumulator Value:
Electrical Isolation:
Surge Suppression:
1-18 /Introduction
4 (TB4)
12V or 24V
10KHz Max.
20 microseconds
Set/Reset inputs, contact closure, externally sourced on point
by point basis with jumper configuration.
2.5mA ±10%
90% of input voltage range
10% of input voltage range
Sixteen bits wide
65536
1500VDC
500VDC MOV to CHASSIS
38VDC MOV across input and to FIELD COMMON
ControlWaveLP
Terminations:
Status Indication:
Meets ANSI/IEEE C37.90-1978
Pluggable (TB4), maximum wire size is 16 gauge
4 LEDs (one per point) (DS95 - DS98
1.3.3.2 FMI/OB Board Connectors
The FMI/OB Board contains seventeen (17) connectors that function as follows (see Table 19):
Table 1-9 - FMI/OB Board Connector Summary
Ref.
TB1
TB2
TB3
TB4
TB5
TB6
TB7
TB8
P3
P4
P5
P6
P1
P2
P9
P7
P10
# Pins
32-pin
16-pin
24-pin
16-pin
32-pin
32-pin
32-pin
32-pin
40-pin
40-pin
40-pin
40-pin
64-pin
40-pin
20-pin
68-pin
68-pin
Function
FMI/OB DI Field Interface
FMI/OB DO Field Interface
FMI/OB AI Field Interface
FMI/OB HSC Field Interface
PC/104 I/O Field Interface (AO)
PC/104 I/O Field Interface (AO)
PC/104 I/O Field Interface (AO)
PC/104 I/O Field Interface (AO)
PC/104 I/O Expansion - (TB5) (AO)
PC/104 I/O Expansion - (TB6) (AO)
PC/104 I/O Expansion - (TB7) (AO)
PC/104 I/O Expansion - (TB8) (AO)
PC/104 I/O Expansion - PCB Interface
PC/104 I/O Expansion - PCB Interface
Power Supply Interface
FMI/OB Board to CPU Board (J10) Interface
FMI/OB Board to CPU Board (J11) Interface
Notes
See Table 2-7, Fig. 2-5
See Table 2-8, Fig. 2-8
See Table 2-9, Fig. 2-10
See Table 2-10, Fig. 2-14
See Appendix 1
See Appendix 1
See Appendix 1
See Appendix 1
See Appendix 1
See Appendix 1
See Appendix 1
See Appendix 1
See Table 4-11
See Table 4-12
See Table 4-13
See Table 4-4, Fig. 4-10
See Table 4-4, Fig. 4-10
FMI/OB Bd. Connector TB1 - Discrete Inputs (see Figure 2-5)
32-position pluggable terminal block TB1 accommodates field wiring of Discrete Input (DI)
circuits.
FMI/OB Bd. Connector TB2 - Discrete Outputs (see Figure 2-8)
16-position pluggable terminal block TB2 accommodates field wiring of Discrete Output
(DO) circuits.
FMI/OB Bd. Connector TB3 - Analog Inputs (see Figure 2-10)
24-position pluggable terminal block TB3 accommodates field wiring of Analog input (AI)
circuits.
FMI/OB Bd. Connector TB4 - High Speed Counter Inputs (see Figure 2-14)
16-position pluggable terminal block TB4 accommodates field wiring of High Speed Counter
Input (HSC) circuits.
FMI/OB Bd. Connectors P1 & P2 PC/104 Expansion
64-Pin Expansion Connector P1 and 40-Pin Expansion Connector P2 are provided for future
I/O expansion. These connectors provide an interface to a PC/104 Expansion Board such as
the PC/104 Analog Output Module (see Appendix 1).
ControlWaveLP
Introduction / 1-19
FMI/OB Bd. Connectors TB5 - TB8 PC/104 I/O & P3 - P6 I/O Expansion Interface
FMI/OB Cable Connectors P3, P4, P5 and P6 are provided to interface a PC/104 Expansion
Board to Expansion I/O Terminal Blocks TB5 through TB8 respectively. Ribbon Cable(s)
will be used to interconnect a PC\104 Expansion Board to P3, P4, P5 & P6.
FMI/OB Bd. PC/104 Bus Connectors P7 & P10 (CPU/FMI/OB Interface)
Connections to the ISA bus are available on the PC/104 bus via the CPU/FMI/OB Interface
Connectors P7 and P10 (J10 of CPU mates with P7 of FMI/OB and J11 of CPU mates with
P10 of FMI/OB) (see Table 4-10). With the exception of FMI/OB Board signal P10-1 (PFIN*)
and CPU Board signal J11-1 (PWR_FAIL) all signals are identical. ISA bus signals are
provided by the RadiSys R400EX system controller on the CPU Board.
During non-ISA bus cycles, the R400 places the ISA bus into a quiet mode to reduce overall
power consumption. The external interface to PC/104 cards is level shifted to a 5V bus
through a set of buffers and transceivers and is capable of driving up to 8 PC/104 cards.
FMI/OB Bd. Power Supply/Sequencer Bd. (PSSB) Interface Connector P9
Connector P9 is a 20-pin DIP Header that interfaces Power, Ground and power supply
status signals to Connector J1 on the PSSB Board (see Table 4-11).
1.3.3.3 FMI/OB Board Jumpers
The FMI/OB Board contains 52 Configuration Jumpers (situated on the top side of the
PCB) (see Table 1-10).
It should be noted that although JP1 appears to be a Jumper Block, it is actually used for
measuring voltages as follows:
+5V - measure between JP1-1(+) and JP1-2(-)
+1V - measure between JP1-3(+) and JP1-2(-)
Table 1-10 - FMI/OB Board Jumper Assignment
Jumper
W1
W2
W3
W4
W5
W6
W7
W8
W9
W10
W11
W12
W13
W14
W15
W16
W17
W18
W20A
Function
Config. DI1
Config. DI2
Config. DI3
Config. DI4
Config. DI5
Config. DI6
Config. DI7
Config. DI8
Config. DI9
Config. DI10
Config. DI11
Config. DI12
Config. DI13
Config. DI14
Config. DI15
Config. DI16
DI LEDs
DO LEDs
Config. AI1
1-20 /Introduction
Notes
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI)(1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI)(1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI)(1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI)(1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI)(1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI)(1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI)(1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI)(1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI)(1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI)(1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI)(1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI)(1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI)(1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI)(1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI)(1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI)(1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
Installed = DI LEDs Enabled
Installed = DO LEDs Enabled
see Figure 2-11
ControlWaveLP
Table 1-10 - FMI/OB Board Jumper Assignment (Continued)
Jumper
W20B
W21A
W21B
W22A
W22B
W23A
W23B
W24A
W24B
W25A
W25B
W26A
W26B
W27A
W27B
W28
W29
W30
W31
W32
W33
W34
W35
W36
W37
W38
W39
W40
W41
JP2
JP3
JP4
JP5
Function
Config. AI1
Config. AI2
Config. AI2
Config. AI3
Config. AI3
Config. AI4
Config. AI4
Config. AI5
Config. AI5
Config. AI6
Config. AI6
Config. AI7
Config. AI7
Config. AI8
Config. AI8
Power
Power
Status LEDs
Comm. LEDs
Config. HSC1
Config. HSC1
Config. HSC2
Config. HSC2
Config. HSC3
Config. HSC3
Config. HSC4
Config. HSC4
HSC LEDs
MC/PFIN LEDs
AI Config.
HSC Config.
Sys. Clock
Osc. Clock
Notes
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
Loop Power for DIs & HSC (Installed)
Loop Power for AIs (Installed)
Installed = STATUS LEDs Enabled
Installed = COMM. LEDs Enabled
see Figure 2-15 (Installed = Debounce Circuit Enabled)
see Figure 2-15 (2-3 = Isolated)(1-2 & 3-4 = Field Powered HSC)
see Figure 2-15 (Installed = Debounce Circuit Enabled)
see Figure 2-15 (2-3 = Isolated)(1-2 & 3-4 = Field Powered HSC)
see Figure 2-15 (Installed = Debounce Circuit Enabled)
see Figure 2-15 (2-3 = Isolated)(1-2 & 3-4 = Field Powered HSC)
see Figure 2-15 (Installed = Debounce Circuit Enabled)
see Figure 2-15 (2-3 = Isolated)(1-2 & 3-4 = Field Powered HSC)
Installed = HSC LEDs Enabled
Installed = /MC and /PFIN LEDs Enabled
(1-2 = Shield to Isolated AI Ground)(2-3 = AI Shield to GNDEARTH)
(1-2 = Shield to Isolated Ground)(2-3 = Shield to GNDEARTH)
1-2 = 6MHz System Clk. (Synchronous to Bus Cycle) (see 2-3 below)
2-3 = Oscillator Clk. (Asynchronous to Bus Cycle) (see 1-2 above)
1.3.3.4 FMI/OB Board LEDs
The FMI/OB Board contains 43 LEDs. LED designation and function are provided in Table
1-11.
Table 1-11 - FMI/OB Board LED Assignment
Name
CR33
CR34
CR35
CR36
CR37
CR38
CR39
CR40
CR41
CR42
ControlWaveLP
Function
DI1
DI2
DI3
DI4
DI5
DI6
DI7
DI8
DI16
DI9
Name
CR55
CR56
CR95
CR96
CR97
CR98
CR110
CR111
CR112
CR113
Function
DO5
DO4
HSC2
HSC1
HSC4
HSC3
STATUS 6
IDLE
WDOG
STATUS 1
Introduction / 1-21
Table 1-11 - FMI/OB Board LED Assignment (Continued)
Name
CR43
CR44
CR45
CR46
CR47
CR48
CR49
CR50
CR51
CR52
CR53
CR54
Function
DI10
DI11
DI12
DI13
DI14
DI15
DO8
DO1
DO2
DO3
DO7
DO6
Name
CR114
CR115
CR116
CR117
CR118
CR120
CR121
CR122
CR134
CR135
CR136
-
Function
STATUS 2
STATUS 3
STATUS 4
STATUS 5
COM2_RX/COM2_TX
COM3_RX/COM3_TX
COM4_RX/COM4_TX
COM5_RX/COM5_TX
MCLED*
PFINLED*
COM1_RX/COM1_TX
-
1.3.4 ControlWaveLP Mounting Plate
ControlWaveLP mounting Plates are manufactured from .125 inch thick aluminum and
measure 12.5 inches in length by 8.5 inches in width. Four (4) .5 inch holes are provided to
accommodate installation of the CPU Board in its base (lowest) position. The ControlWaveLP Mounting Plate also includes four (4) mounting posts that are provided for
mounting the unit’s circuit boards.
Four (4) notches are machined into the ControlWaveLP Mounting Plate; the two on the
top are .5 inch deep (on center) and the two on the bottom are .125 inch deep (on center).
These notches are offset from left and right edges by .7 inch each and are set 7 inches apart
horizontally (see Figure 2-2). The notches accommodate the mounting of the unit to a rear
fabrication panel in an appropriate enclosure, such as a NEMA 3X or 4X box.
1.4 OPTIONS
Options associated with ControlWaveLP units are covered in appendices or referenced
manuals.
PC/104 Analog Output Module .................................................................................. Appendix 1
2 Line X 20 Character LCD Display with 24 Keys .................. Maple Systems Documentation
4 Line X 20 Character LCD Display with 16 Keys .................. Maple Systems Documentation
4 Line X 20 Character LCD Display with 24 Keys .................. Maple Systems Documentation
2 Line X 20 Character VFD Display with 24 Keys .................. Maple Systems Documentation
4 Line X 20 Character VFD Display with 16 Keys .................. Maple Systems Documentation
4 Line X 20 Character VCD Display with 24 Keys.................. Maple Systems Documentation
1-22 /Introduction
ControlWaveLP
Section 2
INSTALLATION
2.1 INSTALLATION IN HAZARDOUS AREAS
The ControlWaveLP is not furnished in an enclosure. The three PCBs which comprise the
system are assembled and mounted to an aluminum plate, which in turn, is ready for user
supplied backplate mounting. Use in hazardous areas will require the selection of an
appropriate enclosure that meets the NEMA Type 3X or 4X specification.
Figure 2-1 - ControlWaveLP - Top View
CI-ControlWaveLP
Installation / 2-1
Figure 2-2 - ControlWaveLP Dimensions - Front View & Left Edge View
2.2 ControlWaveLP SITE CONSIDERATIONS
Check all clearances when choosing an installation site. Make sure that the ControlWaveLP is accessible for wiring and service. Make sure that the LCD Display Panel and
Keyboard (if present) are accessible to the on-site operator.
The unit’s Mounting Plate measures 8.5” in width by 12.5” in length by .562” in height (see
Figures 2-1 & 2-2). The ControlWaveLP is to be vertically mounted with the elongated
Mounting Plate notches at the top and in accordance with the following restrictions:
2-2 / Installation
CI-ControlWaveLP
- The rear of the ControlWaveLP’s Mounting Plate must mount to the selected
enclosure’s backplate.
- The unit must be positioned so that the front of the assembly (exposed side of MFI/OB
Board) is visible and the unit is accessible for service, i.e., installation of an option or
replacement of the RAM Battery, Fuse or a PCB.
2.2.1 Temperature & Humidity Limits
The ControlWaveLP is designed to operate over a -40 to +158 °F (-40 to +70 °C)
temperature range and a 0% to 95% Relative Humidity range. Make sure that the ambient
temperature and humidity at the measuring site remains within these limits. Operation
beyond these ranges could cause output errors and erratic performance. Prolonged
operation under extreme conditions could also result in failure of the unit.
2.2.2 Vibration Limits
Check the mounted enclosure for mechanical vibrations. Make sure that the ControlWaveLP is not exposed to a level of vibration that exceeds those given in the specifications. The
ControlWaveLP’s vibration limits are 1g for 10 - 150 Hz & .5g for 150 - 2000 Hz.
2.2.3 ControlWaveLP Grounding
A # 14 AWG ground wire must be run from the ControlWaveLP’s PSSM Terminal TB2-3
(Chassis Ground) to a known good Earth Ground (see Figure 2-3). In lieu of a direct
connection to Earth Ground, it is recommended that the unit’s Chassis Ground Terminal be
connected to a conductive mounting panel or plate, a user supplied Ground Lug or a user
supplied Ground Bus. The panel, lug or bus in turn must be connected to a known good
Earth Ground via a #4 AWG wire.
The following considerations are provided for the installation of the ControlWaveLP
system ground:
• Ground Lug, Ground Bus or Mounting Panel/Plate to Earth Ground wire size should be
#4 AWG. It is recommended that stranded copper wire is used and that the length should
be as short as possible.
• This ground wire should be clamped or brazed to the Ground Bed Conductor (that is
typically a stranded copper AWG 0000 cable installed vertically or horizontally).
• The wire ends should be tinned with solder prior to insertion into the Chassis Ground
Lug. Note: Use a high wattage Soldering Iron.
• The ground wire should be run such that any routing bend in the cable has a minimum
radius of 12-inches below ground and 8-inches above ground.
For detailed information on grounding, see Supplement S1400CW - ControlWave Site
Considerations for Equipment Installation, Grounding & Wiring.
CI-ControlWaveLP
Installation / 2-3
Figure 2-3 - ControlWaveLP Grounding Diagram
2.3 ControlWaveLP INSTALLATION/CONIGURATION
2.3.1 Overview of Configuration
An overview of the seven (7) steps required to configure a ControlWave Process Automation
Controller are provided below.
Step 1. Hardware Configuration
This involves unpacking the ControlWaveLP, mounting the unit, wiring I/O terminations,
making proper ground connections, connecting a communication cable to the PC
workstation and setting switches. To install and configure the ControlWaveLP follow
steps 1 through 10 below:
1. Remove the unit from its carton and install it at its assigned work site (see Section
2.2).
2. Configure the Jumpers on the FMI/OB Board (see Section 2.3.1).
3. Configure CPU Module Switches (see Section 2.x.x).
4. Configure/Connect appropriate communication port(s) (see Section 2.4.7). Connect
COMM. Port 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 of the ControlWaveLP (depending on CPU Switch SW4
settings see Section 2.3.3.1) to a COMM. Port of a PC (typically PC COMM. Port 1).
Note: ControlWaveLP COMM. Port 1 can be used if CPU Switches SW4-3 and SW48 are set OFF).
5. Install I/O wiring to each I/O Module (see Sections 2.4.1 through 2.4.4).
6. Install Watchdog Relay/MOSFET Switch wiring (see Section 2.4.5).
7. Connect Bulk DC Power to the unit’s PSSB Board (see Section 2.4.6).
8. Connect the unit to a known good Earth Ground (see Section 2.2.3)
2-4 / Installation
CI-ControlWaveLP
9. Apply power to the ControlWaveLP by setting the Power Switch on the PSSB
Board to the ‘I’ position. With the ControlWaveLP connected to a PC via an RS-232
Null Modem Cable (see Figure 2-8) download the configured application load (see
Section 2.4.1).
10. After receiving the Application Load, the ControlWaveLP Process Automation
Controller is ready for on line operation.
Step 2. Software Installation on the PC Workstation
Open BSI Utilities and ControlWave Designer software must be installed on the PC
workstation. This is accomplished by installing both the ControlWave Designer and the
Open BSI Network Edition Software Packages from the Open BSI CD ROM.
Other packages which may be loaded from the CD-ROM include:
•
•
•
Harvester - a utility which allows historical data collection from controllers at a
pre-defined schedule.
BSIConfig - a free package, which incorporates LocalView and Diagnostics
software.
Open BSI Local Edition - need not be loaded since the Network Edition
incorporates all programs from it, except for Diagnostics (included in BSIConfig).
For information on minimum system requirements and more details of the installation, see
the installation procedure in Chapter 2 of the Open BSI Utilities Manual (document #
D5081).
If you have an older version of ControlWave Designer already installed:
Beginning with ControlWave Designer Version 3.3, the copy protection key (dongle) is
NOT required. Prior to installing ControlWave Designer 3.3 or newer, you MUST remove
the hardware dongle from the parallel port of your PC workstation. Otherwise, when you
subsequently start ControlWave Designer, it will operate only in ‘DEMO’ mode, and will
limit the available system resources.
IMPORTANT:
When you start ControlWave Designer, you will be reminded to register the software.
Unregistered software can only be used for a maximum of 30 days. For more information on
the registration process, see Chapter 2 of the Open BSI Utilities Manual (document#
D5081).
Step 3. Establish Communications using either LocalView or NetView, and Run
the Flash Configuration Utility
Communications must be established with the ControlWaveLP using either LocalView or
NetView.
Once communications have been established, the Flash Configuration Utility must be run,
in order to configure user account parameters, and to configure the ControlWaveLP
communication ports. An overview of this process is included in Part 2 of the ControlWave
Quick Setup Guide (document # D5084). Detailed information on the Flash Configuration
Utility, and LocalView is included in Chapter 5 of the Open BSI Utilities Manual (document
# D5081). NetView is described in Chapter 6 of that same manual.
CI-ControlWaveLP
Installation / 2-5
After this initial configuration is completed, any subsequent changes to these parameters
may be made in configuration web pages (see Chapter 4 of the Open BSI Technician’s
Toolkit Manual document # D5087).
Step 4. Create an Application-Specific Control Strategy in ControlWave Designer
At this point, you can create your application-specific control strategy using ControlWave
Designer. This involves opening a new project using the ‘ControlWave’ template, defining
I/O boards using the I/O Configurator, and creating a program using one or more of the five
supported IEC 61131 languages (FBD, ST, SFC, LD, or IL). Some of these languages are
text based, others use graphical diagrams. The choice is up to you, depending upon your
particular application.
An introduction to ControlWave Designer, with some examples, is included in the manual,
Getting Started with ControlWave Designer (document # D5085). More detailed information about ControlWave Designer and IEC 61131 is included in the ControlWave
Designer Reference Manual (document # D5088).
The Bristol, Inc. Firmware Library, which is automatically accessible through the template
referenced above, includes a series of function blocks which perform a variety of process
control and communication functions. These can be included within your program to
perform various duties including PID control, alarming, calculations, etc. Detailed
information about each function block is included in the ControlWave Designer on-line
help files.
On the Automatic Variables Declaration page(s) in ControlWave Designer, you will need to
mark any variable you want to make accessible to external programs, such as Open BSI’s
DataView utility, as “PDD”. Similarly, any variables which should be collected into a
database, or exported using the OLE for Process Control (OPC) Server must be marked as
“CSV”. Variables marked as CSV can be built into a text file by the Open BSI Signal
Extractor. The text file can then be used in the creation of a database for human machine
interface (HMI) software such as OpenEnterprise, Intellution® FIX®, or Iconics Genesis.
These HMI software packages require that the "Datatype conversion enable" option be
selected when generating the file using Signal Extractor. Information about the Open BSI
Signal Extractor is included in Chapter 12 of the Open BSI Utilities Manual (document #
D5081).
Once the program has been created, it is assigned to an executable task. The entire project
is then saved and compiled.
Debugging of your completed control strategy program can be performed using the built-in
debugger, and the I/O Simulator.
NOTE:
From this point on, the order of steps may be varied, somewhat,
depending upon the requirements of the user's application.
Step 5. Create Application-Specific Web Pages (OPTIONAL)
The ControlWaveLP process automation controller supports a set of standard web pages
for configuration purposes (stored in a PC). These web pages also provide access to communication statistics maintained in the controller.
2-6 / Installation
CI-ControlWaveLP
Optionally, additional user-created web pages may be created to allow a customized
human-machine interface. A series of ActiveX controls for data collection and configuration
are provided on the Open BSI 2000 CD which can be included as part of these user-created
web pages. For information on the ActiveX controls, see the Web_BSI Manual (document #
D5087).
You can use whichever HTML creation package you want to create the pages, however, all
ControlWave related web pages (whether standard, or user-created) must be viewed
within Microsoft® Internet Explorer (see ‘WEB PAGES’ in Section 2.4.1). Web pages are
stored on a PC workstation.
Step 6. Create an Open BSI Network Containing the ControlWaveLP Unit, or ADD
the ControlWaveLP unit to an Existing Open BSI Network
In order for the ControlWave unit to function as part of a Bristol network, it is necessary
to include it in the Bristol network.
If no Bristol network exists:
You will need to start Open BSI’s NetView software on the PC workstation in order to
define a Bristol network. A series of software wizards are used to define a Network Host
PC, a network, and the RTUs (controllers) belonging to the network. Finally,
communication lines must be specified which handle the address assigned to the
ControlWaveLP controller. Chapters 3 and 4 of the Open BSI Utilities Manual
(document # D5081) include ‘quick start’ examples for performing these steps. More
detailed information is included in the NetView chapter (Chapter 6) of the same
manual.
If a Bristol network already exists:
You will need to add the ControlWaveLP controller to the existing network using NetView’s RTU Wizard. Chapter 6 of the Open BSI Utilities Manual (document # D5081)
includes different sub-sections depending upon whether you are adding the unit to a
BSAP network, or an IP network.
Step 7. Download the Application-specific Control Strategy Into the ControlWaveLP Unit
Either ControlWave Designer or the Open BSI 1131 Downloader allow you to download
your completed control strategy (application load) file into the ControlWaveLP unit. Users
download the control strategy into the BOOT Project area of FLASH memory; this ensures
that if the ControlWaveLP unit is reset, or if there has been a failure of the backup
battery, that the control strategy can be restarted from the beginning, i.e., from the BOOT
Project in FLASH memory.
To download the application load, see Section 2.5.1.
2.3.2 FMI/OB Board Jumper & Switch Configuration
The ControlWaveLP Fixed Multifunction Input/Output (FMI/OB) Board must be set for
the desired performance options. Table 2-1 provides an overview of jumpers and flags the
reader to appropriate sections that contain detailed information.
CI-ControlWaveLP
Installation / 2-7
Table 2-1 - FMI/OB Board Jumper Assignment
Jumper
W1
W2
W3
W4
W5
W6
W7
W8
W9
W10
W11
W12
W13
W14
W15
W16
W17
W18
W20A
W20B
W21A
W21B
W22A
W22B
W23A
W23B
W24A
W24B
W25A
W25B
W26A
W26B
W27A
W27B
W28
W29
W30
W31
W32
W33
W34
W35
W36
W37
W38
W39
W40
W41
JP2
JP3
JP4
JP5
Function
Config. DI1
Config. DI2
Config. DI3
Config. DI4
Config. DI5
Config. DI6
Config. DI7
Config. DI8
Config. DI9
Config. DI10
Config. DI11
Config. DI12
Config. DI13
Config. DI14
Config. DI15
Config. DI16
DI LEDs
DO LEDs
Config. AI1
Config. AI1
Config. AI2
Config. AI2
Config. AI3
Config. AI3
Config. AI4
Config. AI4
Config. AI5
Config. AI5
Config. AI6
Config. AI6
Config. AI7
Config. AI7
Config. AI8
Config. AI8
Power
Power
Status LEDs
Comm. LEDs
Config. HSC1
Config. HSC1
Config. HSC2
Config. HSC2
Config. HSC3
Config. HSC3
Config. HSC4
Config. HSC4
HSC LEDs
MC/PFIN LEDs
AI Config.
HSC Config.
Sys. Clock
Osc. Clock
2-8 / Installation
Notes
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI) (1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI) (1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI) (1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI) (1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI) (1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI) (1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI) (1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI) (1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI) (1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI) (1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI) (1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI) (1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI) (1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI) (1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI) (1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
see Figure 2-6 (2-3 = Isolated DI) (1-2 & 3-4 = Dry Contact DI)
Installed = DI LEDs Enabled
Installed = DO LEDs Enabled
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
see Figure 2-11
Loop power for DIs & HSC (Installed)
Loop Power for AIs (Installed)
Installed = STATUS LEDs Enabled
Installed = COMM. LEDs Enabled
see Figure 2-15 (Installed = Debounce Circuit Enabled)
see Figure 2-15 (2-3 = Isolated) (1-2 & 3-4 = Field Powered HSC)
see Figure 2-15 (Installed = Debounce Circuit Enabled)
see Figure 2-15 (2-3 = Isolated) (1-2 & 3-4 = Field Powered HSC)
see Figure 2-15 (Installed = Debounce Circuit Enabled)
see Figure 2-15 (2-3 = Isolated) (1-2 & 3-4 = Field Powered HSC)
see Figure 2-15 (Installed = Debounce Circuit Enabled)
see Figure 2-15 (2-3 = Isolated) (1-2 & 3-4 = Field Powered HSC)
Installed = HSC LEDs Enabled
Installed = /MC and/PFIN LEDs Enabled
(1-2 = Shield to Isolated AI Gnd.) (2-3 = AI Shield to GNDEARTH)
(1-2 = Shield to Isolated Ground) (2-3 = Shield to GNDEARTH)
1-2 = 6 MHz System Clk. (Synchronous to Bus Cycle) (see 2-3 below)
2-3 = Oscillator Clk. (Asychronous to Bus Cycle) (see 1-2 above)
CI-ControlWaveLP
2.3.3 CPU Module Switch Configuration
ControlWaveLP CPU Board DIP Switches must be set for the desired performance
options. Tables 2-2 and 2-3 provide an overview of switch settings.
Table 2-2 - CPU Bd. Switch SW4 - User Configurations
SW#
Function
Setting - (ON = Factory Default)
ON = Watchdog circuit is enabled
SW4-1 Watchdog Enable
OFF = Watchdog circuit is disabled
Lock/Unlock
ON = Write to Soft Switches and FLASH files
SW4-2
Soft Switches
OFF = Soft Switches, configurations and FLASH files are locked
Use/Ignore
ON = Use Soft Switches (configured in FLASH)
SW4-3
Soft Switches
OFF = Ignore Soft Switch Configuration and use factory defaults
Normal Run or
ON = Normal Run Mode
SW4-4
Core Updump
OFF = Causes the system to start a Core Updump
ON = Retain values in SRAM during restarts
SW4-5 SRAM Control
OFF = Force system to reinitialize SRAM
System Firmware
ON = Enable remote download of System Firmware
SW4-6
OFF = Disable remote download of System Firmware
Load Control *
SW4-7 Not Used
Leave ‘ON’
ON = Don’t allow WINDIAG to run test
SW4-8 Enable WINDIAG
OFF = Disable boot project and allow WINDIAG to run test
* = Boot PROM version 4.7 or higher and System PROM version 4.7 or higher
SW4-1 set OFF will disable the system from entering a watchdog state if a crash or system
hangup occurs. Setting SW1-1 OFF prevents the system from automatically restarting.
SW4-2 set OFF prevents changing the Soft Switches, other configurations and FLASH files,
i.e., these items are locked. To change Soft Switch, configuration and FLASH files SW1-2
must be set to the ON position (see Section 2.5.4).
SW4-3 set OFF forces the use of Soft Switches as set per factory default (see Section 2.4.6).
For use of user defined Soft Switches, SW1-3 must be set to the ON position. Note: If both
SW4-3 and SW4-8 are set OFF, communication ports COM1 through COM5 will be set to
9600 bps operation and the unit will be placed into Diagnostic Mode.
SW4-4 set OFF will cause the ControlWaveLP to perform a Core Updump (see Section
3.5). Set SW4-4 to the ON position for normal operation.
SW4-5 set OFF forces the ControlWaveLP to reinitialize SRAM when the unit recovers
from a low power or power outage condition. When set ON, the contents of SRAMS will be
retained and utilized when the system restarts.
SW4-6 set ON will enable the user to perform a remote download of System Firmware (on
units equipped with Boot PROM version 4.7 or higher and System PROM version 4.7 or
higher).
SW4-8 set OFF prevents the ‘Boot Project’ from running and places the unit into diagnostic
mode. SW4-8 must be set OFF to run the WINDIAG program resident on the local PC (see
Section 3.4). When SW1-8 has been set ON, diagnostics is disabled. SW4-8 must be set to
the ON position for normal system operation, i.e. for the Boot project to run. Note: If both
SW4-3 and SW4-8 are set OFF, communication ports COM1 through COM5 will be set to
9600 bps operation.
CI-ControlWaveLP
Installation / 2-9
Table 2-3 - CPU Bd. Switch SW2
Soft Switch, FLASH Write & Force Recovery Settings
SWITCH
SW2-A
SW2-B
Function
Not Used
Not Used
SW2-C
Force Recovery Control
SW2-D
FLASH Download Control
Setting - (ON = Factory Default)
N/A
N/A
ON = Force recovery mode (via CW Console)
OFF = Recovery mode disabled
ON = FLASH Download enabled
OFF = FLASH Download disabled
2.3.4 Communication Ports
A ControlWaveLP Process Automation Controller can be configured as a Master or Slave
node on either a MODBUS network or on a BSAP network. The ControlWaveLP contains
5 standard 9-pin Comm. Ports, i.e., COM1 through COM5 and an 8-pin Ethernet Port.
These ports are physically located on the CPU Board. All standard 9-pin Comm. Ports support asynchronous operation (not synchronous) and RS-232 operation. COM3 can be
configured for RS-232 or RS-485 operation via CPU Board Switch SW1 (see Table 2-6). The
Ethernet Port utilizes a RJ-45 connector and implements a 10Base-T Interface.
COM1 - Port 1:
COM2 - Port 2:
COM3 - Port 3:
COM4 - Port 4:
COM5 - Port 5:
Ethernet Port:
CPU Bd. J1, PC/AT 9-Pin Male D-Sub - RS-232
CPU Bd. J2, PC/AT 9-Pin Male D-Sub - RS-232
CPU Bd. J3, PC/AT 9-Pin Male D-Sub - RS-232/RS-485
CPU Bd. J4, PC/AT 9-Pin Male D-Sub - RS-232
CPU Bd. J5, PC/AT 9-Pin Male D-Sub - RS-232
CPU Bd. J19, RJ-45 8-Pin Female - 10Base-T Ethernet
Any of the five communication ports can be configured for local communications, i.e.,
connected to a PC.
The connections for the 9-pin, RS-232/485 interface are shown in Figure 2-5, while the
corresponding pin labels are provided in Table 2-4.
2.3.4.1 RS-232 & RS-485 Interfaces
Communications ports (COM1, COM2, COM4 & COM5) support RS-232 communications
only. RS-232 or RS-485 communications can be provided by communications port COM3.
RS-232 Ports
An RS-232 interface supports point to point half-duplex and full-duplex communications (20
feet maximum, using data quality cable). Half-duplex communications supported by the
ControlWave utilize MODBUS or BSAP protocol, while full-duplex is supported by the
Point to Point (PPP) protocol. ControlWaveLP RS-232 ports utilize the “null modem” cable
(Figure 2-5A) to interconnect with other devices such as a PC, printer, or another ControlWave series unit (except CW_10/30/35) when the ControlWaveLP is communicating using
the full-duplex PPP protocol. The half-duplex cable shown in Figure 2-5A is utilized when
the ControlWaveLP Process Automation Controller is connected to a ControlWaveLP or
to another ControlWave series unit (except CW_1-/30/35). If communicating with a Bristol
series 3305, 3310, 3330, 3335 or CW_10/30/35 RTU/DPC, one of the cables shown in Figure
2-5B must be used. Refer to Figure 2-5C to connect a ControlWaveLP to either a modem or
radio.
2-10 / Installation
CI-ControlWaveLP
An illustration of the CPU Module’s male 9-pin D-type connectors is provided in Figure 2-4.
Table 2-4 provides the connector pin assignments for ports 1 through 5.
Note: The following facts regarding ControlWaveLP RS-232 serial communications ports
should be observed when constructing communications cables:
•
•
•
•
•
DCD must be high to transmit
CTS must be high to transmit
When port is set for full-duplex operation - RTS is always ON
DTR is always high (when port is active)
When port is set for half-duplex operation - CTS must go low after RTS goes low
Table 2-4 - Communication Port Connector Pin Assignments
Pin
#
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Signal
RS-232
DCD
RXD
TXD
DTR
GND
DSR
RTS
CTS
RI
Signal
RS-485
CTS+
RXDTXDTXD+
GND
RXD+
RTSCTSRTS+
Description :
RS-232 signals
Data Carrier Detect (Input)
Receive Data (Input)
Transmit Data (Output)
Data Terminal Ready (Output)
Signal/Power Ground
Data Set Ready (Input)
Request to Send (Output)
Clear to Send (Input)
Ring Indicator (Input)
Description:
RS485 signals
Clear to Send + Input
Receive Data - Input
Transmit Data - Output
Transmit Data + Output
Signal/Power Ground
Receive Data + Input
Request to Send - Output
Clear to Send - Input
Request to Send +
Output
Note: RS-485 Signals in Table 2-4 are only available on COM3.
RS-485 Ports
ControlWaveLP can use COM3 (configured for RS-485 operation) for local network
communications to multiple nodes up to 4000 feet away. Since this interface is intended for
network communications, Table 2-5 provides the appropriate connections for wiring the
master, 1st slave, and nth slave. Essentially, the master and the first slave transmit and
receive data on opposite lines; all slaves (from the first to the "nth") are paralleled (daisy
chained) across the same lines. The master node should be wired to one end of the RS-485
cable run. A 24-gauge paired conductor cable, such as Belden 9843 should be used. Note: A
full-duplex RS-485 network consisting of two ControlWaveLP nodes will not support any
other nodes, i.e., an RS-485 full-duplex network consisting of multiple nodes, will support
only one ControlWaveLP node.
Table 2-5 - RS-485 Network Connections (Pins 1, 7, 8 & 9 of connector are unused)
From
Master
4 TXD+
3 TXD6 RXD+
2 RXD5 ISOGND
To 1st
Slave
6 RXD+
2 RXD4 TXD+
3 TXD5 ISOGND
To nth
Slave
6 RXD+
2 RXD4 TXD+
3 TXD5 ISOGND
To ensure that the “Receive Data” lines are in a proper state during inactive transmission
periods, certain bias voltage levels must be maintained at the master and most distant
slave units. This is accomplished by configuring Switch SW1 (at these locations) so that the
100-ohm termination resistors are installed (see Table 2-6).
CI-ControlWaveLP
Installation / 2-11
Figure 2-4 - Male DB9 9-Pin Connector Associated with COM1 through COM5
Figure 2-5 - Communication Port RS-232 Cable Wiring Diagrams
2-12 / Installation
CI-ControlWaveLP
Table 2-6 - CPU Bd. COM3 Port Configuration Switch SW1 Settings
Switch SW1
Function
SW1-1
SW1-2
Not used
RS-232/485 Select
SW1-3
TXD to RXD Loop-back
SW1-4
TXD to RXD Loop-back
SW1-5
SW1-6
RS-485 termination
RS-485 termination
SW1-7
/RTS to /CTS Loop-back
SW1-8
/RTS to /CTS Loop-back
Setting
N/A
ON = RS-232, OFF = RS-485
ON = Loop-back enabled
OFF = Loop-back disabled
ON = Loop-back enabled
OFF = Loop-back disabled
ON = Term., OFF = No Term.
ON = Term., OFF = No Term.
ON = Loop-back enabled
OFF= Loop-back disabled
ON = Loop-back enabled
OFF = Loop-back disabled
2.3.4.2 Ethernet Port
The Ethernet Port utilizes a 10Base-T RJ-45 modular connector that typically provides a
shielded twisted pair interface to an Ethernet Hub.
A typical Ethernet Hub provides eight (8) 10Base-T RJ-45 Ports (with Port 8 having the
capability to link to another Hub or to an Ethernet communications port). Both ends of the
twisted pair Ethernet cable are equipped with modular RJ-45 connectors. These cables have
a one-to-one wiring configuration as shown in Figure 2-8. Table 2-7 provides the assignment and definitions of the 8-pin 10Base-T connectors.
It is possible to connect two nodes in a point-to-point configuration without the use of a
Hub. However, the cable used must be configured such that the TX+/- Data pins are connected to the RX+/- Data pins (swapped) at the opposite ends of the cable (see Figure 2-7).
Figure 2-6 - RJ-45 Connector J19 (Ethernet Port - CPU Board)
CI-ControlWaveLP
Installation / 2-13
Figure 2-7 - Point-to-Point 10Base-T Ethernet Cable
The maximum length of one segment (CPU to Hub) is 100 meters (328 feet). The use of
Category 5 shielded cable is recommended.
Figure 2-8 - Standard 10Base-T Ethernet Cable (CPU Module to Hub)
Table 2-7 - Ethernet 10/100Base-T CPU Module Pin Assignments
Pin #
1
2
3
4
Description
Transmit Data+ (Output)
Transmit Data- (Output)
Receive Data+ (Input)
Not Connected
Pin #
5
6
7
8
Description
Not Connected
Receive Data- (Input)
Not Connected
Not Connected
Note: TX & RX are swapped at Hub’s.
2-14 / Installation
CI-ControlWaveLP
2.4 WIRING NOTES
4 Field Wiring Terminals are located on the FMI/OB Board (see Figure 2-1).
Terminal Connections
The ControlWaveLP uses compression-type terminals that accommodate up to #16 AWG
wire. A connection is made by inserting the wire’s bared end into the clamp beneath the
screw and securing the screw. The wire should be inserted fully so that no bare wires are
exposed to cause shorts. If using standard wire, tin the bare end with solder to prevent
flattening and improve conductivity.
Allow some slack in the wires when making terminal connections. The slack makes the
connections more manageable and minimizes mechanical strain on the terminal blocks.
Signal Shielding and Grounding
The use of twisted-pair, shielded and insulated cable for I/O signal wiring will minimize
signal errors caused by electromagnetic interference (EMI), radio frequency interference
(RFI) and transients. When using shielded cable, all shields should only be grounded at one
point in the appropriate system. This is necessary to prevent circulating ground current
loops that can cause signal errors.
2.4.1 Discrete Inputs (see Figures 2-9 , 2-10 & 2-11)
A total of 16 Discrete Inputs are available. DI1-DI16 may be individually configured for dry
contact or isolated input operation. The input range is 0-24 VAC or VDC ±10% and 1
millisecond or 30 millisecond DI filtering is factory configured. Inputs are internally
sourced from the system power (12 or 24 V). DIs feature optical isolation and surge suppression.
Table 2-8 - Discrete Input Terminal Block TB1 Pin Assignments
Block
Label
DI-B
DI-A
DI-B
DI-A
DI-B
DI-A
DI-B
DI-A
Pin #
(Label)
1 (1)
2 (1)
3 (2)
4 (2)
5 (3)
6 (3)
7 (4)
8 (4)
Name
Pin #
(Label)
DI1DI1+
DI2DI2+
DI3DI3+
DI4DI4+
9 (5)
10 (5)
11 (6)
12 (6)
13 (7)
14 (7)
15 (8)
16 (8)
Nam
e
DI5DI5+
DI6DI6+
DI7DI7+
DI8DI8+
Pin #
(Label)
17 (9)
18 (9)
19 (10)
20 (10)
21 (11)
22 (11)
23 (12)
24 (12)
Nam
e
DI9DI9+
DI10DI10+
DI11DI11+
DI12DI12+
Pin #
(Label)
Name
25 (13)
26 (13)
27 (14)
28 (14)
29 (15)
30 (15)
31 (16)
32 (16)
DI13DI13+
DI14DI14+
DI15DI15+
DI16DI16+
Field connections for DI1 through DI16 are located at TB1 (see Table 2-8).
CI-ControlWaveLP
Installation / 2-15
Figure 2-9 - Discrete Input Terminal Block TB1 - LEDs & Configuration Jumpers
Figure 2-10 - Discrete Input Wired for Isolated DI Operation
Figure 2-11 - Discrete Input Wired for Dry Contact Operation
2-16 / Installation
CI-ControlWaveLP
2.4.2 Discrete Outputs (see Figures 2-12 & 2-13)
A total of 8 Discrete Outputs (DOs) with surge protection are provided for control or
signaling functions. Each DO utilizes a Solid State Relay that is capable of switching up to
35 volts at up to 100mA. 38V MOVs are provided to protect each DO.
Field connections for DO1 through DO8 are located at TB2 (see Table 2-9).
Table 2-9 - Discrete Output Terminal Block TB2 Pin Assignments
Block
Label
DO-B
DO-A
DO-B
DO-A
Pin #
(Label)
1 (1)
2 (1)
3 (2)
4 (2)
Name
DO1DO1+
DO2DO2+
Pin #
(Label)
5 (3)
6 (3)
7 (4)
8 (4)
Name
DO3DO3+
DO4DO4+
Pin #
(Label)
9 (5)
10 (5)
11 (6)
12 (6)
Name
DO5DO5+
DO6DO6+
Pin #
(Label)
13 (7)
14 (7)
15 (8)
16 (8)
Name
DO7DO7+
DO8DO8+
Figure 2-12 - Discrete Output Terminal Block TB2 - & LEDs
Figure 2-13 - Discrete Output Wired to ControlWaveLP
CI-ControlWaveLP
Installation / 2-17
2.4.3 Analog Inputs (see Figures 2-14 through 2-17)
The Analog Input module of the FMI/OB Board is designed to support eight (8) 1-5V or 420mA isolated inputs or 4-20mA loops powered from a field source. An isolated DC/DC
converter powers the ADC, instrumentation amplifier and multiplexers. Optocouplers are
used for the control circuitry.
Figure 2-14 - Analog Input Terminal Block TB3 - & Configuration Jumpers
The common mode range for the Analog Inputs is 38VDC. The input signals and on board
reference voltages are attenuated with forty to one attenuators. A low pass filter sets the
cutoff frequency to 3 Hz. Analog multiplexers select one of the eight channels or the
reference voltages. An instrumentation amplifier converts the differential signal to a single
ended signal and amplifies the signal 10X and is followed by 4X gain circuit. Four
potentiometers are required to set the 1V and 5V references and to adjust the offset and
gain of the 4X circuit.
In addition to Jumper W29, there are eight sets of configuration jumpers (W20A/W20B W27A/W27B) used to configure Analog Inputs, AI1 - AI8 (see Figure 2-14).
2-18 / Installation
CI-ControlWaveLP
Figure 2-15 - Analog Input (Isolated Voltage Source) Field Wiring (AI1 Shown)
Figure 2-16 - Analog In (Isolated Current Source) Field Wiring (AI1 Shown)
Table 2-10 - Analog Input Terminal Block TB3 Pin Assignments
Block
Label
AI-B
AI-A
AI-B
AI-A
AI-B
AI-A
AI-B
AI-A
CI-ControlWaveLP
Pin #
(Label)
1 (1)
2 (1)
3 (S)
4 (S)
5 (2)
6 (2)
7 (3)
8 (3)
Name
AI1AI1+
Shield
Shield
AI2AI2+
AI3AI3+
Pin #
(Label)
9 (S)
10 (S)
11 (4)
12 (4)
13 (5)
14 (5)
15 (S)
16 (S)
Name
Shield
Shield
AI4AI4+
AI5AI5+
Shield
Shield
Pin #
(Label)
17 (6)
18 (6)
19 (7)
20 (7)
21 (S)
22 (S)
23 (8)
24 (8)
Name
AII6AI6+
AI7AI7+
Shield
Shield
AI8AI8+
Installation / 2-19
Figure 2-17 - Analog Input (Internal Current Source) Field Wiring (AI1 Shown)
2.4.4 High Speed Counter Inputs (see Figures 2-18 through 2-22)
Figure 2-18 - HSC Input Terminal Block TB4 - LEDs & Configuration Jumpers
The high speed counter circuitry consists of signal conditioning circuitry, 16 bit accumulators, and control circuitry. The signal condition circuitry includes optocouplers,
debounce circuitry and bandwidth limit circuitry. Individual debounce circuitry is provided
for each of the four HSC inputs. Individual debounce circuits are enabled when their
associated debounce jumper is installed. The debounce jumper must be installed when
wiring field devices to the HSCSET and HSCRESET input terminals.
Each counter is assigned three field inputs, SET, RESET and COMMON. When the
debounce circuitry is enabled a change of state on both the SET and RESET inputs is
2-20 / Installation
CI-ControlWaveLP
required to accumulate counts. The maximum input frequency is 10 kHz. The nominal
input current for an input is 1 mA.
Table 2-11 - High Speed Counter Terminal Block TB4 Pin Assignments
Block
Label
HSC-B
HSC-A
HSC-B
HSC-A
Pin #
(Label)
1 (1)
2 (1)
3 (1)
4 (S)
HSC Name
1COM
1SET
1RESET
Shield
Pin #
(Label)
5 (2)
6 (2)
7 (2)
8 (S)
HSC
Name
2COM
2SET
2RESET
Shield
Pin
(Label)
9 (3)
10 (3)
11 (3)
12 (S)
HSC
Name
3COM
3SET
3RESET
Shield
Pin
(Label)
13 (4)
14 (4)
15 (4)
16 (S)
HSC
Name
4COM
4SET
4RESET
Shield
Figure 2-19 - Field Powered HSCSET & HSCRESET Inputs
(SPDT Dry Contacts) (Debounce Enabled) Field Wiring
CI-ControlWaveLP
Installation / 2-21
Figure 2-20 - Isolated HSCSET & HSCRESET Inputs (Debounce Enabled
Field Wiring
Figure 2-21 - Field Powered HSC (Open Collector Using Set Input)
(Debounce Disabled) Field Wiring
2-22 / Installation
CI-ControlWaveLP
Figure 2-22 - Isolated HSC (Using SET Input) (Debounce Disabled) Field Wiring
2.4.5 Watchdog Relay/MOSFET Switch Circuitry (see Figs. 2-23 & 2-24)
Figure 2-23 - Watchdog Relay Field Wiring
The Watchdog Relay (K1) or Watchdog MOSFET Switch (Q6) circuits on the Power Supply
Sequencer Board (PSSB) can be used to drive an alarm, annunciation or control device. The
Watchdog Relay or Watchdog MOSFET Switch will be off when the signals Master Clear
(MC) or Watchdog B (WDOGB) are active. The solid state Watchdog Relay circuit (U19)
drives either a Single Pole Double Throw (SPDT) Relay (K1) in conjunction with PSSB
Board Terminal Blocks TB1-3 (WDNC), TB1-1 (WDNO) and TB1-2 (WDCOM) or a
MOSFET Switch (Q6) in conjunction with PSSB Terminal Blocks TB1-1 (WDSWITCHOUT)
and TB1-2 (WDSWITCHIN). The Watchdog circuitry is enabled when PSSB Board Jumper
JP1 is installed in position 1-2 and is disabled when JP1 is installed in position 2-3.
CI-ControlWaveLP
Installation / 2-23
Figure 2-24 - Watchdog MOSFET Switch Field Wiring
2.4.6 DC Power Configuration & Wiring
The ControlWaveLP requires a DC power source within the range of +10.6 to +30 V. A DC
to DC Converter on the Power Supply Sequencer Board (PSSB) generates isolated +5VDC,
+12VDC & -12VDC. A sequencer circuit monitors the external supply and the +5V, +12V
and -12V supplies, and an analog to digital converter (ADC) measures the external voltage.
The power supply operates from 10.6 to 30 VDC. The nominal settings for the supply are
ON state above 11.1V or 22V, OFF state below 10.6V or 20.7V. A power MOSFET switches
the bulk input power to the power supply. The isolated supplies are rated for 5V (VCC) @
1A, +12V @ 200mA and -12V @ 200mA. Linear regulators regulate the +/- 12V supplies
while the 5V supply (VCC) is regulated by the PWM circuitry. The PWM IC will shutdown
when the incoming power drops below 10.6V or 20.7V.
PSSB Board connector TB2 provides three terminals for power and ground as follows:
TB2-1 = 10.6-30VDC input - (V+)
TB2-2 = PSGND (Power Supply Ground) - (V-)
TB2-3 - CHASSIS (Chassis Ground) - ( )
DC Power is interconnected to the ControlWaveLP system via PSSB Connector J1 and
FMI/OB Connector P9 (see Table 2-12).
Table 2-12 - PSSB Connector J1 - FMI/OB Connector P9 Pin Identification
Pin #
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
2-24 / Installation
J1/P9 Pin Name
CHASSIS
+5V (VCC)
/BATADCCE
+12V
+5V (VCC)
/PFIN
/PFINLED
/WDOGB
GND
PSGND
Pin #
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
J1/P9 Pin Name
GND
/EXTBAT_DOUT
/BATADCCLK
-12V
/MC
/MCLED
GND
VCC
GND
+VIN
CI-ControlWaveLP
2.4.6.1 Bulk Power Supply Current Requirements
Maximum current requirements for a bulk +12Vdc or bulk +24Vdc power supply used to
power a ControlWaveLP RTU can be determined by use of Table 2-13 or 2-14 respectively.
These tables provide detailed steady state and loop power current requirements.
Table 2-13 - Power Requirements for Bulk 12Vdc Power Supply
COMPONENTS
Base CWLP Unit
Base CWLP Unit
Base CWLP Unit
Base CWLP Unit
DIs
DOs
AIs(4-20mA)
AIs(1-5V)
HSCs
PC/104 AO Mod.
(4-20mA)
PC/104 AO Mod.
(1-5V)
Base Unit
MAX # of I/O
Full Base I/O
Full Base I/O
No Base I/O
No Base I/O
16
8
8
8
4
NOTES
Without PC/104 AO Module = 269mA
With PC/104 AO Module = 284mA
Without PC/104 AO Module = 200mA
With PC/104 AO Module = 215mA
Add 9.47mA/Loop - Dry Contact
Add 50mA/Loop
-
4
Add 20.8mA/Loop
4
Add 27mA/Loop - Output @ 5mA
Table 2-14 - Power Requirements for Bulk 24Vdc Power Supply
COMPONENTS
Base CWLP Unit
Base CWLP Unit
Base CWLP Unit
Base CWLP Unit
DIs
DOs
AIs(4-20mA)
AIs(1-5V)
HSCs
PC/104 AO Mod.
(4-20mA)
PC/104 AO Mod.
(1-5V)
Base Unit
MAX # of I/O
Full Base I/O
Full Base I/O
No Base I/O
No Base I/O
16
8
8
8
4
NOTES
Without PC/104 AO Module = 202mA
With PC/104 AO Module = 217mA
Without PC/104 AO Module = 146mA
With PC/104 AO Module = 161mA
Add 4.74mA/Loop - Dry Contact
Add 25mA/Loop
-
4
Add 20.8mA/Loop
4
Add 27mA/Loop - Output @ 5mA
2.5 OPERATIONAL DETAILS
ControlWaveLP RTUs are shipped from the factory with firmware that allows the unit to
be configured in conjunction with an IEC 61131 application program. This section provides
information as follows:
-
Steps required to download the application load and place the unit into ‘Run’ mode.
Steps required to download system firmware.
Operation of the CPU Module’s Reset Switch
Soft Switch Configurations and Communication Ports
CI-ControlWaveLP
Installation / 2-25
Operational details on ControlWaveLP LEDs and use of the BBI WinDiag program for
fault isolation are provided in Chapter 3.
2.5.1 Downloading The Application Load
A ControlWaveLP RTU must receive its configured application load before it can be placed
into operation. This will require connection of the ControlWaveLP unit to a PC running
Windows NT (4.0 or higher), Windows 2000 or Windows XP Professional and equipped with
ControlWave Designer software & OpenBSI software. Configuration of the application load
must be performed by an individual familiar with the various programming tools. The
following software user documentation is referenced:
Getting Started with ControlWave Designer Manual - D5085
ControlWave Designer Reference Manual - D5088
Open BSI Utilities Manual - D5081
Web_BSI Manual - D5087
An application load download can be initiated, i.e., from ControlWave Designer, or from the
OpenBSI 1131 Downloader.
1. Note: From the factory, COM1 defaults to 115.2 kbd (RS-232) using the Internet Point
to Point Protocol (PPP). Don’t connect COM1 to a PC unless the PC’s RS-232 port in
question has been configured for PPP. Note: ControlWaveLP Port COM1 can be
configured for RS-232 operation (at 9600 bps) by setting CPU switches SW4-3 and
SW4-8 OFF (closed). This should only be done to run WINDIAG.
2. Once the ControlWave project has been defined, communications and configuration
parameters have been set perform the download according to either ‘ControlWave
Designer’ (see D5088 - chapter 11) or ‘The Open BSI 1131 Downloader’ (see D5081 Chapter 7).
3. After the download has been completed set the ControlWave’s RUN/REMOTE/LOCAL
Switch to the RUN position.
2.5.2
Upgrading ControlWaveLP Firmware
ControlWaveLP CPUs ship from the factory with system firmware already installed. If an
upgrade of the system firmware is required, use one of the procedures below to download
the new or replacement firmware from the PC.
Upgrade of system firmware via LocalView FLASH Mode requires OpenBSI 5.1 (or newer).
If you have an older version of OpenBSI, FLASH upgrades are to be performed via
Hyperterminal. You will need a binary (*.BIN) system firmware file, and that file should be
defined in the Flash Master File (FLASH.MST). A sample Flash Master File is shown,
below:
lps0410.bin
Firmware - Release 04.1
Upgrade of an unattended ControlWaveLP can be accomplished from a remote PC. This
capability is introduced in Section 2.5.2.3.
2-26 / Installation
CI-ControlWaveLP
2.5.2.1 Using LocalView to Upgrade ControlWaveLP Firmware
NOTE
Your ControlWaveLP must be set to Recovery Mode ENABLE (ON) prior to
performing the FLASH upgrade, then set to Recovery Mode DISABLE (OFF) after
the upgrade. On the ControlWaveLP this is accomplished via CPU Switch SW2-C.
Also set CPU Switch SW4-3 (OFF) to ignore soft switch configuration and use
factory defaults; set SW4-3 (ON) after the upgrade.
A null modem cable (see Figure 2-5) must be connected to COM1 of the ControlWaveLP
and to any RS-232 port on the associated PC. The PC’s RS-232 port used for this purpose
must be set to run at 115.2 Kbaud. ControlWaveLP CPU Switch SW2, positions C and D
must be set ON (see Table 2-3).
Start LocalView, Choose FLASH, Enter A Name, Click on [Create]
Start LocalView by clicking on: Start Æ Programs Æ OpenBSI Tools Æ LocalView. The
New View Mode dialog box will appear (see Figure 2-25).
"Mode"
Choose 'Flash' for the mode.
"Name"
Enter a name for the View Mode File in the "Name" field.
Figure 2-25 - Local View - New View Mode Menu
"Location"
If you want to store the View Mode File in a directory other than that shown in the
"Location" field, enter the new location there, or use the [Browse] push button to find
the directory.
When the "Mode", "Name", and "Location" have been specified, click on the [Create] push
button to activate the Communication Setup Wizard (see Figure 2-26).
Step 1 - Communication Setup
Complete the fields in the Communication Setup Wizard as described, below.
"What port would you like to use?"
Specify the PC port you would like to use; this would be the port on the PC which will be
connected to the serial cable, e.g. COM1:, COM2:, etc.
CI-ControlWaveLP
Installation / 2-27
"Would you like to use auto baud rate detection?" / "What baud rate would you like
to use?"
If you know which baud rate to use, answer no for auto baud detection, and specify the
baud rate. If you do not know which baud rate to use, choose auto baud detection.
[Advanced Parameters]
See the ‘Advanced Communication Parameters Dialog Box’ section, later in this chapter
for details on this.
Figure 2-26 - Communication Setup: Step 1 Menu
Click on the [Next] pushbutton to activate the next wizard (see Figure 2-27).
Step 2 - Flash RTU Setup
In the Flash RTU Setup Wizard (see Figure 2-27), complete the fields as described, below:
"What is the type of the RTU?"
Use the list box to select the type of controller you are connected to. In this case, you
should only choose from among the ControlWave-series options:
Select this option:
ControlWaveLP
For this type of unit:
ControlWaveLP Low Power RTU
"What is the local address of the RTU that you would like to connect to?"
Select the BSAP local address of the ControlWave unit (from 1 to 127) using the list
box provided.
Click on the [Next] push button to activate the Flash Data Setup Wizard.
2-28 / Installation
CI-ControlWaveLP
Step 3 - Flash Data Setup
Complete the fields in the Flash Data Setup Wizard (see Figure 2-28), as described, below:
"Please enter the name of the binary file to Flash"
To upgrade system firmware, you must specify the path and name of a binary (*.BIN)
file on your hard disk containing the firmware. Normally, the contents of the various
available BIN files are described in a Flash Master File (see box at bottom of the dialog
box). If you have specified a Flash Master File, double-click on the description of the
binary file you want to download to the RTU. Its path and name will be copied into this
field. (If you do NOT have a Flash Master File, type the path and name of the binary file
directly into this field.)
Figure 2-27 - Flash RTU Setup Menu
Figure 2-28 - Flash Data Setup Menu
CI-ControlWaveLP
Installation / 2-29
"Location of Flash Master File"
Specifies the location of the Flash Master File (FLASH.MST). The contents of the
FLASH Master File will be displayed in the box at the bottom of the dialog box, and
may be used to select binary files for FLASH downloading. (See above). If necessary, you
can use the [Browse] push button to locate the FLASH Master File.
Click on [Finish] to install the specified BIN file in FLASH memory at the RTU.
Once the Flash download has begun, you will NOT be allowed to shut down LocalView,
unless you cancel the download, or it has been completed.
The progress of the Flash download will be displayed in the window. Any mismatch in file
versions, or if the type of .BIN file does not match the type of RTU, the download will be
aborted.
Figure 2-29 - Local View Downloading System Firmware Menu
Advanced Communication Parameters Dialog Box
“What is the Link Level Timeout Period”
This defines the maximum amount of time (in seconds) that Open BSI will wait to
receive a response to any one data link transaction. If 0 is entered as the link timeout
period, the system will use a default timeout calculated based on the baud rate of the
line.
2-30 / Installation
CI-ControlWaveLP
Figure 2-30 - Local View Advanced Communication Parameters Menu
"Would you like to use RTS/CTS signals?"
If your communication line uses Ready to Send (RTS) / Clear to Send (CTS) signals (not
to be confused with ControlWave variables used for this purpose), click on 'Yes'.
"Front Pad", "Back Pad"
These fields specify the number of null characters to insert at the beginning (front) or
ending (back) of a message. Null characters may be useful in situations where there
may be a momentary delay, which could cause the start of a message to be missed, for
example, while a radio link is being activated. To determine the delay caused by null
packing, perform the following calculation:
seconds of delay = (number of null characters x 10) / baud rate
2.5.2.2 Using HyperTerminal to Upgrade ControlWaveLP Firmware
A null modem cable (see Figure 2-5) must be connected to COM1 of the ControlWaveLP
and to any RS-232 port on the associated PC. The PC’s RS-232 port used for this purpose
must be set to run at 115.2 Kbaud. ControlWaveLP CPU Switch SW2, positions C and D
must be set ON (see Table 2-3).
1. If not already running, apply power to the associated PC.
2. Start the HyperTerminal program on the PC. Note: HyperTerminal is a Windows 95 (or
newer) application utility program. If using HyperTerminal for the first time, set the
communications properties (for the PC Port being utilized) via the Properties Menu as
follows: Bits per second: = 115200, Data bits: = 8, Parity: = None, Stop bits: = 1, and Flow
control: = None and then click OK.
3. Set CPU Switch SW2 positions C to ON (ON = Force Recovery & FLASH Download
Enabled).
4. Apply power by turning the PSSB’s ON/OFF Switch to the ON (‘I’) position. The
resident BIOS will initialize and test the hardware, this process is referred to as POST
(Power On Self Test).
CI-ControlWaveLP
Installation / 2-31
A status of the POST progress is displayed on the FMI/OB Status LEDs. Unless there is a
problem these codes will scroll at a fast rate and won’t be discernable. Successful
completion is indicated by a binary value of 86 on the Status LEDs and with the cold start
menu being displayed on the PC’s screen. Detection of a fault will be indicated by a binary
code on the Status LEDs. Refer to Section 3.4.4 for POST Status Code definition.
From the HyperTerminal Recovery Mode menu (Figure 2-31), press the ‘F’ key to enter
FLASH download. A message will be displayed warning that the FLASH is about to be
erased; press the ‘Y’ key at the prompt. The screen will display dots as the flash devices are
being erased; this could take a few minutes.
Figure 2-31 - HyperTerminal Recovery Mode Menu
5. When the FLASH is ready for download the letter C will be displayed on the screen. In
the HyperTerminal command bar click on Transfer and then Send File…(see Figure 232). In the Send File Dialog Box (see Figure 2-33), select “1KXmodem” for the protocol,
enter the filename of the appropriate .bin file in the format “LPSxxxxx.bin” (where xxxxx
varies from release to release). Click on the Send button to start the download (see
Figures 2-33 and 2-34). When the HyperTerminal Recovery Mode Menu of Figure 2-31
appears, the download has completed.
6. Close the HyperTerminal program. The null modem cable connected between the
ControlWaveLP and the PC can be removed if desired.
7. Set CPU Switch SW2 positions C & D to OFF (OFF = Recovery Mode Disabled & FLASH
Download Disabled). Switch Power OFF and then ON again via the PSSB’s ON/OFF
Switch.
2-32 / Installation
CI-ControlWaveLP
Once the ControlWaveLP is running its application load, status codes posted to the
FMI/OB Status LEDs have a different meaning than the Port 80 POST Status Codes
(see Section 3.4.4 for POST Status Codes). The PORT 80 Running Status (Hex) Codes
are listed in Table 2-15.
Figure 2-32 - HyperTerminal FLASH Download Menu
(Ready to Download) - (Transfer/Send File Selected)
Figure 2-33 - HyperTerminal Flash Download
(Send File Dialog Box - Enter Filename)
CI-ControlWaveLP
Installation / 2-33
Figure 2-34 - HyperTerminal FLASH Download (Download in Process)
Table 2-15 - PORT 80 - Running Status Codes
Status LEDs
Definition
Notes
1 2 3 4 5 6
0 0 0 0 0 0
No application
0 0 0 0 0 1
Application Loaded
0 1 0 1 0 0
Currently Loading the Boot Project
1 1 0 1 0 0
System Initialization in Progress
0 0 0 1 0 1
Application Loaded -with BPT
Break Point(s) Set
0 0 0 0 1 1
Application Running
Display Blank
0 0 0 1 1 1
Running with BPT
Break Point in Debug
0 1 1 0 0 0
Recovery Mode *
SW2-C = ON
1 0 0 1 0 0
Battery Fail
0 0 1 0 0 0
System Firmware XSUM error
1 0 0 0 0 0
Diagnostic Mode
SW4-8 = OFF
1 1 0 0 0 0
Running Diagnostic
1 0 1 0 0 0
Error initializing application device
0 1 1 0 0 0
NPX Error
Unit stopped
1 1 0 1 1 1
Waiting for Power-down
After NMI
0 0 0 1 0 0
Factory defaults applied
Flashed at startup
0 0 0 0 1 0
Waiting for Alt. WD Timer
Control Point error
0 1 1 1 1 1
Waiting for updump
1 1 1 0 0 0
FLASH programming error
1 1 1 1 1 1
Unit crashed
* Not an actual Running Status Code - SW2-C should be OFF
2.5.2.3 Remote Upgrade of ControlWaveLP Firmware
It is possible to download system firmware into an unattended remote ControlWaveLP.
This function can only be accomplished if CPU Board Switch SW4-6 (associated with the
unit in question) is set in the ON position (factory default). The procedure for performing a
2-34 / Installation
CI-ControlWaveLP
remote download of system firmware is discussed in Appendix J of the Open BSI Utilities
Manual (document D5081). Note: Remote upgrade of ControlWaveLP Firmware
requires Boot PROM version 4.7 or higher and System PROM version 4.7 or
higher.
2.5.3 Operation of The Reset Switch
The CPU Module’s Reset Switch is a momentary button that allows the operator to stop and
restart the unit during maintenance routines as required.
2.5.4 Soft Switch Configuration and Communication Ports
Firmware defined soft switches that control many default settings for various system
operating parameters such as BSAP Local Address, EBSAP Group Number, five (5)
communication port parameters, etc., can be viewed and, if desired, changed via
‘Configuration Web Pages’ in Microsoft Internet Explorer via the Flash Configuration
Utility. When connecting the ControlWaveLP to the PC (local or network) for the first
time you should be aware of the communication port default parameter settings provided
below (see Figures 2-1, 2-4 & 2-5). Note: Communication port factory defaults can be
enabled anytime by setting CPU Board Switch SW4-3 to the OFF position. If both SW4-3
and SW4-8 are set OFF, communication ports COM1 through COM5 will be set to 9600 bps
operation and the unit will be placed into Diagnostic Mode.
COM1: From the factory, COM1 defaults to 115.2 kbd (RS-232) using the Internet Point to
Point Protocol (PPP). Note: ControlWaveLP Port COM1 will be configured for RS232 operation (at 9600 baud) by setting CPU Switches SW4-3 and SW4-8 OFF. To
test COM1 using the WINDIAG program, it must not otherwise be in use and
SW4-8 must be set OFF. Connection to a PC requires the use of an RS-232 “Null
Modem” cable (see Figure 2-5).
COM2: From the factory, COM2 defaults to 9600 baud, 8-bits, no parity, 1 stop bit,
BSAP/ControlWave Designer protocol operation. To test COM2 using the WINDIAG program, it must not otherwise be in use and SW4-8 must be set OFF. It is
recommended that an RS-232 “Null Modem” cable be connected between COM2
and the PC (typically COM1) (see Figure 2-5).
COM3: When set for RS-232 or RS-485 operation, COM3 defaults to 9600 baud, 8-bits, no
parity, 1 stop bit, BSAP/ControlWave Designer protocol operation. To test COM3
using the WINDIAG program, it must not otherwise be in use and SW4-8 must be
set OFF. If RS-485 communications is required an RS-485 cable can be assembled
using the connections provided in Table 2-5.
COM4: From the factory COM4 defaults to 9600 baud, 8-bits, no parity, 1 stop bit,
BSAP/ControlWave Designer protocol operation. To test COM4 using the WINDIAG program, it must not otherwise be in use and SW4-8 must be set OFF. In
lieu of the use of COM2, an RS-232 “Null Modem” cable can be connected between
COM4 and the PC (typically COM1) (see Figure 2-5).
COM5
From the factory COM5 defaults to 9600 baud, 8-bits, no parity, 1 stop bit,
BSAP/ControlWave Designer protocol operation. To test COM5 using the WINDIAG program, it must not otherwise be in use and SW4-8 must be set OFF. In
lieu of the use of COM2, an RS-232 “Null Modem” cable can be connected between
COM5 and the PC (typically COM1) (see Figure 2-5).
CI-ControlWaveLP
Installation / 2-35
BLANK PAGE
Section 3
SERVICE
3.1 SERVICE INTRODUCTION
This section provides general, diagnostic and test information for the ControlWaveLP
Process Application Controller.
The service procedures described herein will require the following equipment:
1. PC with null modem interface cable (see Figure 2-5A)
2. Loop-back plug, 9-pin female D-Sub (for RS-232) (see Figure 3-12)
3. Loop-back plug, 9-pin female D-Sub (for RS-485) (see Figure 3-12)
The following test equipment can be used to test the Power Supply/Sequencer Board:
1. DMM (Digital Multimeter): 5-1/2 digit resolution
2. Variable DC Supply: Variable to 30Vdc @ 2.5A (with vernier adjustment)
When ControlWaveLP RTUs are serviced on site, it is recommended that any associated
processes be closed down or placed under manual control. This precaution will prevent any
processes from accidentally running out of control when tests are conducted.
Warning
Harmful electrical potentials may still be present at the field wiring terminals
even though the ControlWaveLP’s power source may be turned off or disconnected. Do not attempt to unplug termination connectors or perform any
wiring operations until all the associated supply sources are turned off and/or
disconnected.
Warning
Never attempt to install or remove any printed circuit boards from a
ControlWaveLP while it is powered and running. Doing so can cause sudden
electrical transients or imbalances that are capable of causing damage to the
unit, as well as other associated circuit boards. Always turn off the Main
power, including any additional supply sources used for externally powered
I/O circuits, before changing any modules.
3.1.1 Accessing PC Boards For Testing
Testing and replacement of PC boards should only be performed by technically-qualified
persons having advanced mechanical and electrical skills and possess the service equipment described in the text. It is important that the reader studies the disassembly and test
procedures described in this manual before starting. Any damage to the Control-WaveLP
resulting from improper handling or incorrect service procedures will not be covered under
the product warranty agreement. If these procedures cannot be performed properly, the
unit should be returned to Bristol Babcock (with prior authorization from Bristol Babcock)
for factory evaluation and repairs.
CI-ControlWaveLP
Service / 3-1
Caution
PC board components can be damaged by electrostatic discharges (ESD) during disassembly/reassembly and test
procedures. Use grounded wrist straps and surface pads when
working near or handling circuit boards. See attached instruction supplement S14006 for proper grounding and handling techniques.
3.1.2 Removal/Replacement of the PSSB Board
1. Place any critical control processes under manual control and shut down the ControlWaveLP.
2. Disconnect power wires from PSSB Board Connector TB2 pins 1, 2 & 3.
3. Disconnect the Watchdog Relay connections from PSSB Board Connector TB1 pins 1, 2
& 3.
Figure 3-1 - Top End View of ControlWaveLP
4. Loosen the two screws (C) that secure the PSSB Board to the FMI/OB (see Figures 3-1
& 3-2).
5. Carefully slide the PSSB Board out of the ControlWaveLP assembly.
6. To replace the PSSB Board carefully align the PSSB Board Connector P1 with
Connector P9 on the bottom of the FMI/OB Board and follow steps 1 through 5 in
reverse order, replacing rather than removing the item in question.
3-2 / Service
ControlWaveLP
Figure 3-2 - ControlWaveLP - Top View
CI-ControlWaveLP
Service / 3-3
Figure 3-3 - Left Side View of ControlWaveLP
3.1.3 Removal/Replacement of the CPU Board and Lithium Battery
1. Perform steps 1 through 3 of section 3.1.2 (see Figures 3-1 & 3-2).
2. Remove the pluggable I/O Terminal Blocks from the FMI/OB’s card edge connectors.
3. Remove the four screws (A) (corners of FMI/OB) and the two screws (B) (near the center
of the FMI/OB) that secure the FMI/OB Board to the Mounting Panel (see Figures 3-1,
3-2 and 3-3). Carefully remove the 3-board ControlWave-RTU assembly from the
Mounting Panel. Gather the six screws for reuse.
4. In an ESD safe area remove the four screws (B) (top of FMI/OB) that secure the FMI/OB
Board to the CPU Board (see Figure 3-1 & 3-2).
5. Carefully disconnect the CPU Board from the FMI/OB Board.
6. To replace the 3V Lithium battery, pry up the Battery Securing Tab on the Coin-cell
Battery Holder and then remove the battery using a pair of tweezers or needle-nose
pliers. Install the replacement battery. Note: This step will not be required until units
have been in operation for an extended period of time (normally many years) as the
battery life is approximately 4000 hours of service. (Power is only drawn from the battery
when the unit looses power).
7. To replace the CPU Board follow steps 1 through 6 in reverse order, replacing rather
than removing the item in question.
3.1.4 Removal/Replacement of the FMI/OB Board
1. Perform steps 1 through 3 of section 3.1.2 (see Figures 3-1 & 3-2).
2. Remove the pluggable I/O Terminal Blocks from the FMI/OB’s card edge connectors.
3. Remove the four screws (A) (corners of FMI/OB) and the two screws (B) (near the center
of the FMI/OB) that secure the FMI/OB Board to the Mounting Panel (see Figures 3-1,
3-2 and 3-3). Carefully remove the 3-board ControlWaveLP assembly from the
Mounting Panel. Gather the six screws for reuse.
4. In an ESD safe area remove the four screws (B) (top of FMI/OB) that secure the FMI/OB
Board to the CPU Board (see Figure 3-1 & 3-2).
3-4 / Service
ControlWaveLP
5. Carefully disconnect the CPU Board from the FMI/OB Board.
6. Loosen the two screws (C) that secure the PSSB Board to the FMI/OB (see Figures 3-1
& 3-2).
7. Carefully disconnect the PSSB Board (Connector P1) from FMI/OB Board (Connector
P9).
8. To replace the FMI/OB Board follow steps 1 through 7 in reverse order, replacing rather
than removing the item in question.
3.1.5 Analog Input Circuitry Calibration
Full calibration requires the use of the WINDIAG program (see D4041A). Analog Input
calibration is performed with the use of two potentiometers on the FMI/OB Board (see
Figure 3-4). Potentiometers R111 (1V) and R112 (5V) are used in conjunction with the
analog gain and offset adjustments. An external voltage source connected to the first
Analog Input channel (AI1) is required.
Figure 3-4 - FMI/OB Board AI Circuitry Calibration Diagram
The subsystem gain calibration is performed in conjunction with R111 when the 1V
external reference is selected and the offset calibration is performed in conjunction with
R112 when the 5V external reference is selected. There is some interaction between gain
and offset so the calibration steps have to be repeated until adjustment is not required. The
offset (1V) should be calibrated first
CI-ControlWaveLP
Service / 3-5
3.2 TROUBLESHOOTING TIPS
3.2.1 Power Supply/Sequencer Board (PSSB) Voltage Checks
Bulk power (+10.6 to +30 Vdc) is supplied to PSSB board connector TB2 (TB2-1 = +Bulk
value & TB2-2 = Ground). The PSSB Board provides +5V (VCC), -12V and +12V to the
system via PSSB Board connector P1 (FMI/OB Board Connector P9). Figure 3-5 provides
the measurement locations to test Bulk, VCC and system voltages.
Check the supplies on the PSSB Board as follows:
•
•
•
•
+5V (VCC Supply) - measure at TP6 (GND) & TP3 (+5V) = +4.95V to +5.05V.
+12V (System Supply) - measure at TP6 (GND) & TP4 (+12V) = +11.4V to +12.6V.
-12V (System Supply) - measure at TP6 (GND) & TP5 (-12V) = -11.4V to -12.6V.
Input Supply - measure between TP2 (VIN-) and TP1 (VIN+) = Bulk up to 30 (VDC).
The input supply is considered good if the voltage is higher than the Power Fail (OFF) Trip
Point, i.e., 10.9V for 12V systems or 22.3V for 24V systems.
Figure 3-5 - PSSB Board Wiring and Test Points
3.2.2 LED Checks
The FMI/OB Board contains 43 LEDs. LED designation and function are provided in Table
3-1.
Table 3-1 - FMI/OB Board LED Assignment
Name
Function
CR33
CR34
CR35
CR36
CR37
CR38
CR39
DI1
DI2
DI3
DI4
DI5
DI6
DI7
3-6 / Service
On
Operation
Data High
Data High
Data High
Data High
Data High
Data High
Data High
Name
CR55
CR56
CR95
CR96
CR97
CR98
CR110
Function
DO5
DO4
HSC2
HSC1
HSC4
HSC3
STATUS 6
On
Operation
Data High
Data High
Data High
Data High
Data High
Data High
Firmware Defined
ControlWaveLP
Table 3-1 - FMI/OB Board LED Assignment (Continued)
Name
Function
CR40
CR41
CR42
CR43
CR44
CR45
CR46
CR47
CR48
CR49
CR50
CR51
CR52
CR53
CR54
DI8
DI16
DI9
DI10
DI11
DI12
DI13
DI14
DI15
DO8
DO1
DO2
DO3
DO7
DO6
On
Operation
Data High
Data High
Data High
Data High
Data High
Data High
Data High
Data High
Data High
Data High
Data High
Data High
Data High
Data High
Data High
Name
Function
CR111
CR112
CR113
CR114
CR115
CR116
CR117
CR118
CR120
CR121
CR122
CR134
CR135
CR136
-
IDLE
WDOG
STATUS 1
STATUS 2
STATUS 3
STATUS 4
STATUS 5
COM2_RX/COM2_TX
COM3_RX/COM3_TX
COM4_RX/COM4_TX
COM5_RX/COM5_TX
MCLED*
FPINLED*
COM1_RX/COM1_TX
-
On
Operation
System Halted
Watchdog Occured
Firmware Defined
Firmware Defined
Firmware Defined
Firmware Defined
Firmware Defined
TX/RX Data High
TX/RX Data High
TX/RX Data High
TX/RX Data High
MC* Inactive
PFIN* Inactive
TX/RX Data High
Figure 3-6 - Discrete Input (DI) LED Assignments
CI-ControlWaveLP
Service / 3-7
Figure 3-7 - Discrete Output (DO) LED Assignments
Figure 3-8 - High Speed Counter Input (HSC) LED Assignments
3-8 / Service
ControlWaveLP
Figure 3-9 - FMI/OB Board Misc. Operation & Status LED Assignments
3.2.3 Wiring/Signal Checks
Check I/O Field Wires at the Card Edge Terminal Blocks and at the field device. Check
wiring for continuity, shorts & opens. Check I/O signals at their respective Terminal Blocks
(see Table 3-2).
Table 3-2 - Field I/O Wiring - Terminal Block Reference List
I/O
Subsystem
Discrete Inputs
Discrete Outputs
Analog Inputs
HSC Inputs
Watchdog Ckt.
CI-ControlWaveLP
Terminal
Block
TB1 - FMI/OB
TB2 - FMI/OB
TB3 - FMI/OB
TB4 - FMI/OB
TB2 - PSSB
Notes
See Section 2.4.1
See Section 2.4.2
See Section 2.4.3
See Section 2.4.4
See Section 2.4.5
Service / 3-9
3.3 GENERAL NOTES
Certain questions or situations frequently arise when servicing the BBI Controllers. Some
items of interest are provided in Sections 3.3.1 through 3.3.3.
3.3.1 Extent of Field Repairs
Field repairs to ControlWaveLP units are strictly limited to the replacement of complete
PC boards and assemblies. Any repairs made down to the component replacement level will
violate the warranty. Defective PC boards or assemblies must be returned to Bristol
Babcock for authorized service.
3.3.2 Disconnecting RAM Battery
If the RAM battery of the FLASH-based ControlWaveLP is disconnected when the power
is off, the RTU will still execute its operating system load but all of the current process data
will be lost. Upon power-up, the FLASH-based RTU will act as though it had just been
booted and it will revert back to the initial values specified in its operating system load.
3.3.3 Maintaining Backup Files
It is essential to maintain a backup disk of each operating system load file to guard against
an accidental loss of process configuration data. Without a backup record, it will be
necessary to reconfigure the entire operating system load that can be a very time
consuming procedure. Always play it safe and keep backup copies of your operating system
loads.
3.3.4 FMI/OB Board Status LEDs POST Checks
At start-up, by applying power or by depressing the momentary contact (RESET) switch
(SW3), the resident BIOS will initiate and test the hardware; this process is referred to as
POST, i.e., Power On Self Test.
The status of the POST progress (typically too fast to discern) is posted to the FMI/OB
Board Status LEDs 1 - 6. Successful POST completion is indicated by a binary value of 86
on the Status LEDs if the unit is in Recovery Mode. Detection of a fault will be indicated by
FMI/OB Board Status LEDs 1 through 6 (see Table 3-3).
Table 3-3 - POST Status Codes
Hex Code
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
3-10 / Service
Status LEDs
1 2 3 4 5 6
0 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 0
0 1 0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0 0 0
0 0 1 0 0 0
1 0 1 0 0 0
0 1 1 0 0 0
1 1 1 0 0 0
0 0 0 1 0 0
1 0 0 1 0 0
Definition
POST beginning.
CPU register test about to start.
NMIs are disabled; delay starts.
power-on delay finished.
kbd BAT done; reading kbd SYS bit.
disabling shadowing & cache.
calcing ROM cksum, wait kbd ctrllr.
cksum okay, kbd ctrllr free.
verifying BAT cmd to kbd ctrllr.
issuing kbd ctrllr cmd byte.
ControlWaveLP
Table 3-3 - POST Status Codes (Continued)
Hex Code
0A
0B
0C
0D
0E
0F
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
1A
1B
1C
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
2A
2B
2C
2D
2E
2F
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
3A
40
41
42
43
44
CI-ControlWaveLP
Status LEDs
1 2 3 4 5 6
0 1 0 1 0 0
1 1 0 1 0 0
0 0 1 1 0 0
1 0 1 1 0 0
0 1 1 1 0 0
1 1 1 1 0 0
0 0 0 0 1 0
1 0 0 0 1 0
0 1 0 0 1 0
1 1 0 0 1 0
0 0 1 0 1 0
1 0 1 0 1 0
0 1 1 0 1 0
1 1 1 0 1 0
0 0 0 1 1 0
1 0 0 1 1 0
0 1 0 1 1 0
1 1 0 1 1 0
0 0 1 1 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 0 1
0 1 0 0 0 1
1 1 0 0 0 1
0 0 1 0 0 1
1 0 1 0 0 1
0 1 1 0 0 1
1 1 1 0 0 1
0 0 0 1 0 1
1 0 0 1 0 1
0 1 0 1 0 1
1 1 0 1 0 1
0 0 1 1 0 1
1 0 1 1 0 1
0 1 1 1 0 1
1 1 1 1 0 1
0 0 0 0 1 1
1 0 0 0 1 1
0 1 0 0 1 1
1 1 0 0 1 1
0 0 1 0 1 1
1 0 1 0 1 1
0 1 1 0 1 1
1 1 1 0 1 1
0 0 0 1 1 1
1 0 0 1 1 1
0 1 0 1 1 1
0 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 0
0 1 0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0 0 0
0 0 1 0 0 0
Definition
issuing kbd ctrllr data byte.
issuing pin 23, 24 blocking & unblocking.
issuing kbd ctrllr NOP cmd next.
testing CMOS RAM shutdown register.
checking CMOS cksum, updating DIAG byte.
initializing CMOS (if req’d every boot).
init CMOS status reg for date/time.
disabling DMA, interrupt ctrllrs.
disabling Port B, disabling video display.
init board, start auto-mem detect.
starting timer tests.
testing 8254 T2, for spkr, part B.
testing 8254 T1, for refresh.
testing 8254 To, for 18.2 Hz.
starting memory refresh.
testing memory refresh.
testing 15usec refresh ON/OFF time.
testing base 64KB memory.
testing data lines.
testing address lines.
testing parity (toggling).
base 64KB mem read/write test.
system init before vector table init.
init vector table.
reading 8042 for turbo switch setting.
initiating turbo data.
any init after vector table init is next.
setting monochrome mode.
setting color mode.
toggle parity before optional video ROM.
init before video ROM check.
control passed to video ROM.
video ROM returned control.
checking for EGA/VGA adapter found.
no EGA/VGA found, r/w test of video.
looking for video retrace signal.
retrace failed, checking alt. Display.
alt found, checking video retrace signal.
compare switches w/actual adapter type.
setting display mode.
check ROM BIOS data area at seg 40h.
setting cursor for power-on msg.
displaying power-on message.
save cursor position.
display BIOS ident. String.
display “Hit <DEL> to …” msg.
preparing vm test. vrfy from display.
preparing descriptor tables.
enter virtual mode for memory test.
enable inits for diagnostics mode.
init data for checking wraparound at 0:0.
Service / 3-11
Table 3-3 - POST Status Codes (Continued)
Hex Code
45
46
47
48
49
4A
4B
4C
4D
4E
4F
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
8A
8B
8C
8D
8E
8F
90
91
92
93
94
95
3-12 / Service
Status LEDs
1 2 3 4 5 6
1 0 1 0 0 0
0 1 1 0 0 0
1 1 1 0 0 0
0 0 0 1 0 0
1 0 0 1 0 0
0 1 0 1 0 0
1 1 0 1 0 0
0 0 1 1 0 0
1 0 1 1 0 0
0 1 1 1 0 0
1 1 1 1 0 0
0 0 0 0 1 0
1 0 0 0 1 0
0 1 0 0 1 0
1 1 0 0 1 0
0 0 1 0 1 0
1 0 1 0 1 0
0 1 1 0 1 0
1 1 1 0 1 0
0 0 0 1 1 0
1 0 0 1 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 0 1
0 1 0 0 0 1
1 1 0 0 0 1
0 0 1 0 0 1
1 0 1 0 0 1
0 1 1 0 0 1
1 1 1 0 0 1
0 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 0
0 1 0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0 0 0
0 0 1 0 0 0
1 0 1 0 0 0
0 1 1 0 0 0
1 1 1 0 0 0
0 0 0 1 0 0
1 0 0 1 0 0
0 1 0 1 0 0
1 1 0 1 0 0
0 0 1 1 0 0
1 0 1 1 0 0
0 1 1 1 0 0
1 1 1 1 0 0
0 0 0 0 1 0
1 0 0 0 1 0
0 1 0 0 1 0
1 1 0 0 1 0
0 0 1 0 1 0
1 0 1 0 1 0
Definition
checking for wrap, find total memory size.
write extended memory test patterns.
write conventional memory test patterns.
finding low memory size from patterns.
finding high memory size from patterns.
check ROM BIOS data area again.
check for <DEL>, clear low mem for soft reset.
clearing ext mem for soft reset.
saving memory size.
on cold boot, display 1st 64KB memtest.
on cold boot, test all of low memory.
adjust memsize for 1K usage.
on cold boot, test high memory.
prepare for shutdown to real-mode.
saved regs & memsize, entering real-mode.
shutdown successful, restoring codepath.
disabling A20 line.
checking ROM BIOS data area again.
checking ROM BIOS data area some more.
clear the “Hit <DEL>” message.
test DMA page register.
verify from display memory (???).
test DMA0 base register.
test DMA1 base register.
checking ROM BIOS data area again.
checking ROM BIOS data area some more.
programming DMA ctrllrs 0 & 1
initializing INT ctrllrs 0 & 1.
starting keyboard test.
issuing reset cmd & clring output buffer
check for stuck keys & issue test cmd.
initializing circular buffer.
check for locked keys.
check for memsize mismatch.
check for pswd or bypass setup.
pswd checked. Do pgming before setup.
call the setup module.
back from setup, clr screen.
display power-on screen message.
display “Wait…” message.
do system & video BIOS shadowing.
load standard setup params into BIOSDATA.
check and initialize mouse.
check floppy disks.
configure floppy drives.
check hard disks.
configure IDE drives.
checking ROM BIOS data area again.
checking ROM BIOS data area some more.
setting base & ext mem sizes.
memsize adjusted for 1K, verifying disp mem.
ControlWaveLP
Table 3-3 - POST Status Codes (Continued)
Hex Code
96
97
98
99
9A
9B
9C
9D
9E
9F
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
B0
B1
B2
B3
Status LEDs
1 2 3 4 5 6
0 1 1 0 1 0
1 1 1 0 1 0
0 0 0 1 1 0
1 0 0 1 1 0
0 1 0 1 1 0
1 1 0 1 1 0
0 0 1 1 1 0
1 0 1 1 1 0
0 1 1 1 1 0
1 1 1 1 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 0 1
0 1 0 0 0 1
1 1 0 0 0 1
0 0 1 0 0 1
1 0 1 0 0 1
0 1 1 0 0 1
1 1 1 0 0 1
0 0 0 1 0 1
1 0 0 1 0 1
0 0 0 0 1 1
1 0 0 0 1 1
0 1 0 0 1 1
1 1 0 0 1 1
Definition
initialization before calling C800h.
call ROM BIOS extension at C800h.
processing after extension returns.
configuring timer data area, printer base addr.
configuring serial port base addrs.
initialization before coprocessor test.
initializing the coprocessor.
processing after coprocessor initialized.
check ext kbd, kbdID, numlock settings.
issue keyboard ID command next.
kbd ID flag reset.
do cache memory test.
display any soft errors.
set keyboard typematic rate.
program memory wait states.
clear screen.
enable parity and NMIs.
initialization before calling E000h.
call ROM BIOS extension at E000h.
processing after extension returns.
display system config. Box.
test low memory exhaustively.
test extended memory exhaustively.
enumerate PCI space.
3.4 WINDIAG DIAGNOSTICS
Bristol’s WINDIAG Software is a diagnostic tool used for testing ControlWaveLP I/O, CPU
memory, communications ports, etc., for proper performance. The ControlWaveLP must be
communicating with a PC equipped with BBI’s WINDIAG program. CPU Board configuration switch SW4-8 must be set to the OFF (Closed) position to enable diagnostics.
Communication between the ControlWaveLP (with/without application loaded) and the
PC can be made via a Local or Network Port with the following restrictions:
•
•
•
•
CPU Board Switch SW4-8 must be OFF (closed) to run the WINDIAG program. Setting
SW4-8 OFF will prevent the ‘Boot Project’ from running and will place the unit into
diagnostic mode.
Any ControlWaveLP communication port can be connected to the PC provided their
port speeds match. Most PCs have a COM1 port (typically RS-232 and defaulted to 9600
bps operation).
Communication port COM1 is only forced to 9600 bps operation when CPU Switches
SW4-3 and SW4-8 have both been set OFF (closed). COM1 can also be set to 9600 bps
operation via user defined Soft Switches.
Setting CPU Board Switches SW4-3 and SW4-8 OFF (closed) prevents the ‘Boot Project’
from running, places the unit into diagnostic mode and forces communication ports
COM1 through COM5 to operate at 9600 baud.
COM1: From the factory, COM1 defaults to 115.2 kbd (RS-232) using the Internet Point to
Point Protocol (PPP). Note: ControlWaveLP Port COM1 will be configured for RS232 operation (at 9600 baud) by setting CPU Switches SW4-3 and SW4-8 OFF.
CI-ControlWaveLP
Service / 3-13
This will prevent the boot project from running and places the unit into diagnostic
mode. To test COM1 using the WINDIAG program, it must not otherwise be in use
and CPU Switch SW4-8 must be set OFF. Connection to a PC requires the use of
an RS-232 “Null Modem” cable (see Figure 2-5).
COM2: From the factory, COM2 defaults to 9600 baud, 8-bits, no parity, 1 stop bit,
BSAP/ControlWave Designer protocol operation. To test COM2 using the WINDIAG program, it must not otherwise be in use and CPU Switch SW4-8 must be
set OFF. It is recommended that an RS-232 “Null Modem” cable be connected
between COM2 and the PC (typically COM1) (see Figure 2-5).
COM3: When set for RS-232 or RS-485 operation, COM3 defaults to 9600 baud, 8-bits, no
parity, 1 stop bit, BSAP/ControlWave Designer protocol operation. To test COM3
using the WINDIAG program, it must not otherwise be in use and CPU Switch
SW4-8 must be set OFF.
If RS-485 communications is required an RS-485 cable can be assembled using the
connections provided in Table 2-5.
COM4: From the factory COM4 defaults to 9600 baud, 8-bits, no parity, 1 stop bit,
BSAP/ControlWave Designer protocol operation. To test COM4 using the WINDIAG program, it must not otherwise be in use and CPU Switch SW4-8 must be
set OFF. In lieu of the use of COM2, an RS-232 “Null Modem” cable can be
connected between COM4 and the PC (typically COM1) (see Figure 2-5).
COM5 From the factory COM5 defaults to 9600 baud, 8-bits, no parity, 1 stop bit,
BSAP/ControlWave Designer protocol operation. To test COM5 using the WINDIAG program, it must not otherwise be in use and CPU Switch SW4-8 must be
set OFF. An RS-232 “Null Modem” cable can be connected between COM5 and the
PC (typically COM1) (see Figure 2-5).
To use the WINDIAG program place any critical process (associated with the
ControlWaveLP unit in question) under manual control. WINDIAG cannot be run while
the ControlWaveLP application is running. Set the CPU Board Switche SW4-8 to the OFF
position. Perform steps 1 through 6 below.
1. Start the OpenBSI NetView Program. A menu similar to Figure 3-10 will appear.
2. To start the WINDIAG program, go to the Start Program’s menu, select OpenBSI Tools,
then select Utilities Programs and then select Diagnostics.
3. Once WINDIAG has been entered, the Main Diagnostics Menu of Figure 3-11 will
appear.
4. Select the module to be tested. Enter any prompted parameters (slot #, etc.). WINDIAG
will perform the diagnostics and display pass/fail results.
5. After all diagnostic testing has been performed, exit the WINDIAG program and then
exit the NetView Program if there aren’t any other ControlWaveLP units to be tested.
When you close the NetView program you will be prompted as to whether or not you
want to close the OpenBSI program; select Yes.
3-14 / Service
ControlWaveLP
6. Set the ControlWaveLP CPU Switch SW4-8 to the ON position. Restart the
ControlWaveLP to resume normal operation.
Figure 3-10 - Netview Startup Menu - Example with Multiple Networks
3.4.1 Diagnostics Using WINDIAG
All printed circuit boards except the Power Supply/Sequencer Board can be tested using the
WINDIAG program. From WINDIAG’s Main Diagnostics Menu (see Figure 3-11) the
following diagnostic tests can be performed:
CPU & Peripherals Diagnostic:
PROM/RAM Diagnostic:
Communications Diagnostic:
Analog Output Diagnostic:
Analog Input Diagnostic:
Discrete I/O Diagnostic:
High Speed Counter Diagnostic:
CI-ControlWaveLP
Checks the CPU Board (except for RAM & PROM).
Checks the CPU’s RAM and PROM hardware.
Checks Comm. Ports 1 through 5 - The External loopback tests require the use of a loop-back plug.
Checks the Analog Output circuits.
Checks the Analog Input circuits.
Checks the DI circuits and/or the DO circuits.
Checks the HSC Input circuits.
Service / 3-15
Figure 3-11 - Partial View of WINDIAG Main Diagnostics Menu
3.4.1.1 Communications Diagnostic Port Loop-back Test
WINDIAG’s Communications Diagnostic Menu (see Figure 3-13) provides for selection of
the communication port to be tested (1 through 5). Depending on the type of network (RS232 or RS-485) and the port in question, a special loop-back plug is required as follows:
Ports 1, 2, 4, & 5 use the 9-pin female D-type (RS-232) loop-back plug.
RS-485 operation of Port 3 - use a 9-pin female D-type (RS-485) loop-back plug.
RS-232 operation of Port 3 - use a 9-pin female D-type (RS-232) loop-back plug
See Figure 3-16 for wiring of Female D-Type Loop-back Plugs.
This group of tests verifies the correct operation of the Communication Interface. COM1,
COM2, COM3, COM4 and COM5 can be tested with this diagnostic. The ControlWaveLP
communication port that is connected to the PC (local or network and used for running
these tests) can’t be tested until diagnostics has been established via one of the other ports,
i.e., to test all ControlWaveLP communication ports (via WINDIAG), communications
with the PC will have to be established twice (each time via a different port). It should be
3-16 / Service
ControlWaveLP
noted that the ControlWaveLP communication port that is connected to the PC (RS-232,
or RS-485) must be good for WINDIAG to run the Communications Diagnostics.
Figure 3-12 - RS-232 Loop-back Plugs
Figure 3-13 - WINDIAG’s Communications Diagnostic Menu
CI-ControlWaveLP
Service / 3-17
3.4.1.2 COM 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 External Loop-back Test Procedure
1. Connect an external loop-back plug to the CPU Port to be tested, i.e., J1 for Port 1, J2 for
Port 2, J3 Port 3, or J4 for Port 4 and J5 for Port 5 (see Figures 3-12 and 3-13).
2.
Type "1," "2," "3," "4" or "5" for the port to test.
3.
Set baud rate to test to 115200 baud or ALL ASYNC and the number of passes to 5.
4.
Click on RUN button next to External loop-back.
Test responses:
a) Success - All sections of test passed
b) Failure - TXD RXD Failure
- CTS RTS Failure
Execution time < 5 sec.
3.4.1.3 Ethernet Diagnostic Port Test
WINDIAG’s Ethernet Diagnostic Menu (see Figure 3-15) provides for selection of the
Ethernet communication port to be tested (1). A special loop-back plug is required to
perform the Ethernet loop-back test (see Figure 3-14).
Figure 3-14 - RJ-45 Ethernet Loop-back Plug
If the ControlWaveLP Ethernet port is connected to the PC (and used for running these
tests), it can’t be tested until diagnostics has been established via one of the other ports,
i.e., to test all ControlWaveLP communication ports (via WINDIAG), communications
with the PC will have to be established twice (each time via a different port. It should be
noted that the ControlWaveLP communication port that is connected to the PC (RS-232 or
RS-485) must be good for WINDIAG to run the Ethernet Diagnostics.
There are four unique test buttons provided on the Ethernet Diagnostic Menu; however,
only the “RUN Loop-back out twisted pair” and “RUN Return hardware address” tests are
applicable to ControlWaveLP units.
3-18 / Service
ControlWaveLP
Figure 3-15 - WINDIAG’s Ethernet Diagnostic Menu
3.4.1.3.1 Ethernet Port Loop-back Out Twisted Pair Test Procedure
This test configures the Ethernet to transmit and receive via the twisted pair port. Test
frames are transmitted and compared against received frames.
1. To configure the system for the Loop-back Out Twisted Pair diagnostic test, either remove
the standard RJ-45 cable from the CPU Board’s RJ-45 connector and replace it with an
RJ-45 cable configured for loop-back, or remove the RJ-45 cable from the Ethernet hub
and install the unterminated end into an RJ-45 Jack configured for loop-back (see Figure
3-14).
2. Set the ‘Number of Passes’ to “5” and type "1" for the ‘Ethernet Port to Test.’
3. Click on the "RUN Loop-back out twisted pair” Test button. The test will proceed and
return either ‘Success’ or one of the following responses under the STATUS column:
Fail -
No Hardware Present
Loop-back Send Failed
Loop-back Receive Failed
Loop-back Compare Failed
Error Information Returned
CI-ControlWaveLP
Service / 3-19
4. When you have finished with Ethernet Diagnostic Loop-back testing, be sure to return the
hardware to its normal operating configuration, i.e., disconnect the loop-back cable or jackplug and reconnect the Ethernet cable to both the ControlWaveLP port in question and
the Ethernet Hub.
3.4.1.3.2 Ethernet Port Return Hardware Address Test Procedure
1. Set the ‘Number of Passes’ to “5” and type "1" for the ‘Ethernet Port to Test.’
2. Click on the "RUN Return hardware address” test button. The test will proceed and if
successful the hardware address will be displayed. The hardware address will appear as
00-10-41-XX-XX-XX. The prefix 00-10-41 appears for all BBI Ethernet Comm. ports. The
remainder of the hardware address is unique for each board manufactured and is stored in
memory. If the error message “Error Information Returned” is displayed instead of the
hardware address, and the unit has been programmed with a proper hardware address,
the CPU Module should be replaced.
3.5 CORE UPDUMP
In some cases a copy of the contents of SRAM can be uploaded to a PC for evaluation by
Bristol, Inc. engineers. This upload is referred to as a ‘Core Updump.’ A Core Updump may
be required if the ControlWaveLP Process Automation Controller repeatedly enters a
‘Watchdog State’ thus ill effecting system operation. A Watchdog State is entered when the
system crashes, i.e., a CPU timeout occurs due to improper software operation, a firmware
glitch, etc. In some cases the Watchdog State may reoccur but may not be logically
reproduced.
‘Crash Blocks’ (a function of firmware provided for watchdog troubleshooting) are stored in
CPU RAM. The user can view and save the ‘Crash Blocks’ by viewing the Crash Block
Statistic Web Page (see Chapter 4 of the Open BSI Technician’s Toolkit - D5087). Crash
Block files should be forwarded to Bristol for evaluation. If additional information is
required to evaluate the condition, a Core Updump may be requested by Bristol. Once the
file generated by the Core Updump has been forwarded to Bristol, it will be evaluated and
the results will be provided to the user.
Follow the five steps below to perform a Core Updump.
1. Disable the Watchdog Timer by setting CPU Switch SW4-1 to the OFF position.
2. Wait for the error condition (typically a binary value of FF on the Status LEDs).
3. Connect the ControlWave’s Comm Port 1 to a PC using a Null Modem Cable (see
Figure 2-5).
4. Set CPU Board Switch SW4-4 to the OFF position to enable the Core Updump feature.
Start the PC’s HyperTerminal Program (at 115.2kbaud) and generate a receive using the XModem protocol. Save the resulting Core Updump in a file to be forwarded to Bristol, Inc.
for evaluation.
3-20 / Service
ControlWaveLP
Section 4
SPECIFICATIONS
4.1 CPU, MEMORY & PROGRAM INTERFACE
Processor:
486SX-ULP, 25MHz
Memory:
4Mbytes of system FLASH
2Mbtyes of on-board static RAM
512Kbytes Boot-Block FLASH BIOS.
Real Time Clock:
14818A-compatible RTC and alarm with 114 bytes of
battery-backed CMOS memory.
Connectors:
(see Table 4-1 and referenced Tables)
Table 1-1 - CPU Board Connector Summary
Ref.
J1
J2
J3
J4
J5
J9
J10
J11
J12
J13
J14
J15
J24
# Pins
9-pin
9-pin
9-pin
9-pin
9-pin
70-pin
68-pin
68-pin
10-pin
10-pin
10-pin
14-pin
10-pin
Function
COM1 9-pin male D-sub
COM2 9-pin male D-sub
COM3 9-pin male D-sub
COM4 9-pin male D-sub
COM5 9-pin male D-sub
Memory Expansion
CPU/FMIOB Connector 1
CPU/FMIOB Connector 2
ISA PLD JTAG Header
CPU JTAG Header
Manufacturing Test Power
Port 80 Diagnostics
Local Control PLD JTAG Header
Notes
see Figure 4-1 & Table 4-2
see Figure 4-1 & Table 4-2
see Figure 4-1 & Table 4-2
see Figure 4-1 & Table 4-2
see Figure 4-1 & Table 4-2
see Figure 4-2 & Table 4-3
see Figure 4-3 & Table 4-4
see Figure 4-3 & Table 4-4
see Figure 4-4
see Figure 4-4
see Figure 4-4
see Figure 4-5 & Table 4-5
see Figure 4-4
Figure 4-1 - DB9 9-Pin Connector Associated with COM1 through COM5
CI-ControlWaveLP
Specifications / 4-1
Table 4-2 - Connectors J1 - J5 Pin Assignment
Pin
Signal
Signal
Description :
Description:
#
RS-232
RS-485
RS-232 signals
RS485 signals
1
DCD
CTS+
Data Carrier Detect (Input)
Clear to Send + Input
2
RXD
RXDReceive Data (Input)
Receive Data - Input
3
TXD
TXDTransmit Data (Output)
Transmit Data - Output
4
DTR
TXD+
Data Terminal Ready (Output) Transmit Data + Output
5
GND
GND
Signal/Power Ground
Signal/Power Ground
6
DSR
RXD+
Data Set Ready (Input)
Receive Data + Input
7
RTS
RTSRequest to Send (Output)
Request to Send - Output
8
CTS
CTSClear to Send (Input)
Clear to Send - Input
9
RI
RTS+
Ring Indicator (Input)
Request to Send + Output
Note: RS-485 Signals in Table 4-2 are only available on COM3.
Figure 4-2 - CPU Board Memory Expansion Connector J9
Table 4-3 - Connector J9 - Memory Expansion Pin Assignment
PIN
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
SIGNAL
GND
GND
VCC
+5VB
~EXTCS2
~EXTCS3
~EXTCS0
~EXTCS1
AB20
NC
AB18
AB19
AB16
AB17
AB14
AB15
AB12
AB13
AB10
AB11
AB8
AB9
AB6
AB7
AB4
AB5
AB2
AB3
AB0
AB1
~MC
4-2 / Specifications
DESCRIPTION
Power
Power
Power
Back-up power
Chip Select 2
Chip Select 3
Chip Select 0
Chip Select 1
Address bit 20
Address bit 20
Address bit 19
Address bit 16
Address bit 17
Address bit 14
Address bit 15
Address bit 12
Address bit 13
Address bit 10
Address bit 11
Address bit 8
Address bit 9
Address bit 6
Address bit 7
Address bit 4
Address bit 5
Address bit 2
Address bit 3
Address bit 0
Address bit 1
Master Clear
PIN
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
SIGNAL
~RDB
NC
NC
~MRESET
EXT_TYP1
EXT_TYP2
EXT_TYP3
NC
NC
NC
NC
NC
NC
GND
GND
DB14
DB15
DB12
DB13
DB10
DB11
DB8
DB9
DB6
DB7
DB4
DB5
DB2
DB3
DB0
DB1
DESCRIPTION
Read
Reset
Board Type 1
Board Type 2
Board Type 3
Power
Power
Data bit 14
Data bit 15
Data bit 12
Data bit 13
Data bit 10
Data bit 10
Data bit 8
Data bit 9
Data bit 6
Data bit 7
Data bit 4
Data bit 5
Data bit 2
Data bit 3
Data bit 0
Data bit 1
CI-ControlWaveLP
Table 4-3 - Connector J9 - Memory Expansion Pin Assignment (Continued)
PIN
32
33
34
35
SIGNAL
GND
~WRLD
~WRHI
~ADSB
DESCRIPTION
Power
Write Low Byte
Write High Byte
Address Strobe
PIN
67
68
69
70
SIGNAL
VCC
VCC
GND
GND
DESCRIPTION
Power
Power
Power
Power
Figure 4-3 - PC/104 Connectors J10 & J11 (CPU Bd. To FMI/OB Bd. Interface)
Table 4-4 - Connectors J10 & J11 (CPU to FMI/OB Interface) Pin Assignment
J10 34x2, 0.100” (2.54mm) Pitch Socket
SAMTEC DW-34-14-G-D-1000-LL
Pin
#
Signal
J10 Row A
Signal
J10 Row B
J11 34x2, 0.100” (2.54mm) Pitch Socket
SAMTEC DW-34-14-G-D-1000-LL
Pin
#
Pin
#
Signal
J11 Row A
1
+5V
GND
2
1
PWR-FAIL
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27
29
31
33
35
37
39
41
43
45
47
49
51
53
55
57
59
61
63
65
67
~IOCHCK
SD7
SD6
SD5
SD4
SD3
SD2
SD1
SD0
IOCHRDY
AEN
SA19
SA18
SA17
SA16
SA15
SA14
SA13
SA12
SA11
SA10
SA9
SA8
SA7
SA6
SA5
SA4
SA3
SA2
SA1
SA0
GND
GND
GND
RESERDRV
+5V
IRQ9
-5V (N/C)
DRQ2
-12V
~OWS
+12V
GND
~SMEMW
~SMEMR
~IOW
~IOR
~DACK3
DRQ3
~DACK1
DRQ1
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
42
44
46
48
50
52
54
56
58
60
62
64
66
68
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27
29
31
33
35
37
39
41
43
45
47
49
51
53
55
57
59
61
63
65
67
GND
COM5-RX-LED
COM4-RX-LED
COM3-RX-LED
COM2-RX-LED
COM1-RX-LED
GND
~SBHE
LA23
LA22
LA21
LA20
LA19
LA18
LA17
~MEMR
~MEMW
SD8
SD9
SD10
SD11
SD12
SD13
SD14
SD15
GND
~WDOGB
GND
GND
WDOG
STATUS-LED6
STATUS-LED4
STATUS-LED2
CI-ControlWaveLP
~REFRESH N/C
SYSCLK
IRQ7
IRQ6
IRQ5
IRQ4
IRQ3
~DACK2
TC
BALE
+5V
OSC
GND
GND
GND
Signal
J11 Row B
~MASTERCLEAR
DIS-COM-LEDS
COM5-TX-LED
COM4-TX-LED
COM3-TX-LED
COM2-TX-LED
COM1-TX-LED
GND
~MEMCS16
~IOCS16
IRQ10
IRQ11W
IRQ12
IRQ15
IRQ14
~DACK0
DRQ0
~DACK5
DRQ5
~DACK6
DRQ6
~DACK7
DRQ7
+5V
~MASTER N/C
GND
GND2
GND
GND
DIS-STATUS-LEDS
IDLE-STATUS
STATUS-LED5
STATUS-LED3
STATUS-LED1
Pin
#
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
42
44
46
48
50
52
54
56
58
60
62
64
66
68
Specifications / 4-3
Figure 4-4
Connectors J12 & J24 - PLD JTAG Headers
Connector J13 - CPU JTAG Header
Connectors J14 & J17 - Manufacturing Test
Figure 4-5 - Connector J15 - Port 80
Table 4-5 - Connector J15 - Port 80 Pin Assignment
Pin #
1
2
3
4
Signal
VCC
D0
D1
D2
Pin #
5
6
7
8
Signal
D3
D4
D5
D6
Pin #
9
10
11
12
Signal
D7
PWRGOOD
IOW80#
ATB.IOW#
Pin #
13
14
-
Signal
GND
N/C
-
4.2 COMMUNICATION PORTS
Compatibility:
PS/2 (Asynchronous)
Network Port:
Port 1, 2. 4,& 5 - RS-232
Port 3 - RS-232 or RS-485
Diagnostic Port:
Port 1 recommended for diagnostics & serial recovery.
Baud Rate:
300 to 115K (bps)
Address:
Software selectable network address from 1 to 126
Optional Modem:
COM4 (J25) & COM5 (J26) Ports may be furnished
with a private line modem (PLM) or a switched network
modem (SNM) board.
4-4 / Specifications
CI-ControlWaveLP
4.3 FMI/OB BOARD INPUT/OUTPUT SPECIFICATIONS
Table 4-6 - FMI/OB Board Connector Summary
Ref.
TB1
TB2
TB3
TB4
TB5
TB6
TB7
TB8
P3
P4
P5
P6
P1
P2
P9
P7
P10
# Pins
32-pin
16-pin
24-pin
16-pin
32-pin
32-pin
32-pin
32-pin
40-pin
40-pin
40-pin
40-pin
64-pin
40-pin
20-pin
68-pin
68-pin
Function
FMI/OB DI Field Interface
FMI/OB DO Field Interface
FMI/OB AI Field Interface
FMI/OB HSC Field Interface
PC/104 Future I/O Field Interface
PC/104 Future I/O Field Interface
PC/104 Future I/O Field Interface
PC/104 Future I/O Field Interface
PC/104 Future I/O Expansion - (TB5)
PC/104 Future I/O Expansion - (TB6)
PC/104 Future I/O Expansion - (TB7)
PC/104 Future I/O Expansion - (TB8)
PC/104 Future I/O Expansion - PCB Interface
PC/104 Future I/O Expansion - PCB Interface
Power Supply Interface
FMI/OB Board to CPU Board (J10) Interface
FMI/OB Board to CPU Board (J11) Interface
Notes
See Table 2-7, Fig. 2-6
See Table 2-8, Fig. 2-9
See Table 2-9, Fig. 2-11
See Table 2-10, Fig. 2-15
Table 4-7
Table 4-8
Table 4-9
Table 4-4, Fig. 4-6
Table 4-4, Fig. 4-6
Table 4-7 - FMI/OB Board - PC/104 Connector P1 Pin Assignment
Odd Row
Pin #
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27
29
31
33
35
37
39
41
43
45
47
49
51
53
CI-ControlWaveLP
J1/P1
Signal Name
IOCHCHK*
SD7
SD6
SD5
SD4
SD3
SD2
SD1
SD0
IOCHRDY
AEN
SA19
SA18
SA17
SA16
SA15
SA14
SA13
SA12
SA11
SA10
SA9
SA8
SA7
SA6
SA5
SA4
Even Row
Pin #
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
42
44
46
48
50
52
54
J1/P1
Signal Name
GND
RESETDRV
VCC
IRQ9
-5V
DRQ2
-12V
ENDXFR*
+12V
(KEY)2
SMEMW*
SMEMR*
IOW*
IOR*
DACK3*
DRQ3
DACK1*
DRQ1
REFRESH
SYSCLK
IRQ7
IRQ6
IRQ5
IRQ4
IRQ3
DACK2*
TC
Specifications / 4-5
Table 4-7 - FMI/OB Board - PC/104 Connector P1 Pin Assignment (Continued)
Odd Row
Pin #
55
57
59
61
63
J1/P1
Signal Name
SA3
SA2
SA1
SA0
PCOM
Even Row
Pin #
56
58
60
62
64
J1/P1
Signal Name
BALE
VCC
OSC
PCOM
PCOM
Table 4-8 - FMI/OB Board - PC/104 Connector P2 Pin Assignment
Odd Row
Pin #
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27
29
31
33
35
37
39
J2/P2
Signal Name
PCOM
SBHE*
LA23
LA22
LA21
LA20
LA19
LA18
LA17
MEMR*
MEMW*
SD8
SD9
SD10
SD11
SD12
SD13
SD14
SD15
(KEY)2
Even Row
Pin #
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
J2/P2
Signal Name
PCOM
MEMCS16*
IOCS16*
IRQ10
IRQ11
IRQ12
IRQ15
IRQ14
DACK0*
DRQ0
DACK5*
DRQ5
DACK6*
DRQ6
DACK7*
DRQ7
VCC
MASTER*
PCOM
PCOM
Figure 4-6 - PC/104 Connectors P7 & P10 (FMI/OB Bd. To CPU Bd. Interface)
Connector P9 is a 20-pin DIP Header that interfaces Power, Ground and power supply
status signals to Connector J1 on the PSSB Board (see Table 4-9).
4-6 / Specifications
CI-ControlWaveLP
Table 4-9 - PSSB Connector J1 - FMI/OB Connector P9 Pin Identification
(see Section 2.4.6)
Pin #
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
J1/P9 Pin Name
CHASSIS
+5V (VCC)
/BATADCCE
+12V
+5V (VCC)
/PFIN
/PFINLED
/WDOGB
GND
PSGND
Pin #
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
J1/P9 Pin Name
GND
/EXTBAT_DOUT
/BATADCCLK
-12V
/MC
/MCLED
GND
VCC
GND
+VIN
4.3.1 Analog Inputs
Number of Inputs:
8 Analog Differential Inputs (Selectable for Current or
Voltage type inputs)
Input Type:
Isolated Voltage Input: 1-5 Vdc
Isolated Current Input: 4-20 mA
Powered Current Loop: 4-20mA
Accuracy:
0.1% of Span @ +25°C (+77°F)
0.2% of Span @ -20°C to +70°C (-4°F to +158°F)
0.3% of Span @ -40°C to +70°C (-40°F to 158°F)
Isolated Voltage/Current
Common Mode Range:
38Vdc referenced to Isolated Common
Powered Current Loop
Common Mode Range:
0V referenced to Isolated Common
Input Filtering:
Common Mode Range:
Input Filtering:
300 msec to 99.75% of of input value
Channel Settling Time:
300msec
Conversion Time:
200msec
On-board Reference:
1V, 5V - optional
Surge Suppression:
38Vdc MOV across input signals and (-) input to
CHASSIS. 500Vdc MOV isolated common to chassis.
Meets ANSI/IEEE C37.90-1978
Terminations:
Pluggable (TB3) - Max. wire size is 16 gauge
Bus Access:
16 Bits Wide
CI-ControlWaveLP
Specifications / 4-7
4.3.2 Discrete Inputs
Number of Inputs:
16
Input Voltage Range:
12V or 24V
Input Filtering:
1 millisecond or 30 milliseconds
Input Configuration:
Contact Closure, externally sourced on a point by point
basis - Jumper configurable
Input Current:
2.5mA ±10%
‘1’ State Voltage:
‘0’ State Voltage:
90% of input voltage range
10% of input voltage range
Interrupt generation:
On change of state transition on a point by point basis
Bus Access:
Sixteen Bits Wide
Electrical Isolation:
1500Vdc
Surge Suppression:
500Vdc MOV to CHASSIS
38Vdc MOV across input and to FIELD COMMON
Meets ANSI/IEEE C37.90-1978
Terminations:
Pluggable (TB1), maximum wire size is 16 gauge
Status Indication:
16 LEDs (one per point) (CR33 - CR48)
Input Type:
Isolated Voltage Input
Isolated Current Input
Transmitter Current Loop
4.3.3 Discrete Outputs
Number of Outputs:
8
Output Type:
Open Drain
Surge Suppression:
500Vdc MOV to CHASSIS
38Vdc MOV Across Output
Meets ANSI/IEEE C37.90-1978
Max. Operating Voltage:
38Vdc
Max. Operating Frequency:
20 Hz
Current Sink:
100mA Maximum
Electrical Isolation:
1500Vdc
Terminations:
Pluggable (TB2), maximum wire size is 16 gauge
4-8 / Specifications
CI-ControlWaveLP
Status Indication:
8 LEDs (one per point) (CR49 - CR56)
Bus Access:
16 Bits Wide
Maximum Load:
100mAdc @ 35Vdc
4.3.4 High Speed Counter
Number of Inputs:
4
Input Voltage Range:
12V or 24V
Input Frequency:
10KHz Max.
Input filtering:
20 microseconds
Input configuration:
Set/Reset inputs, contact closure, externally sourced on
point by point basis with jumper configuration.
Input current:
2.5mA ± 10%
‘1’ State Voltage:
90% of input voltage range
‘0’ state voltage:
10% of input voltage range
Bus Access:
Sixteen bits wide
Max. Accumulator Value:
65536
Electrical isolation:
1500Vdc
Surge Suppression:
500Vdc MOV to CHASSIS
38Vdc MOV across input and to FIELD COMMOM
Meets ANSI/IEEE C37.90-1978
Terminations:
Pluggable, (TB4) max wire size is 16 gauge
Status Indication:
LED per point (DS95 - DS98)
4.4 ENVIRONMENTAL SPECIFICATIONS
Temperature:
Operating:
Storage:
Relative Humidity:
0-95% Non-condensing
Vibration:
1g for 10 - 150 Hz
.5g for 150 - 2000 Hz
Shock:
30g (11 msec duration)
50g (11 msec duration)
CI-ControlWaveLP
-40 to +158 °F (-40 to +70 °C)
-40 to +158 °F (-40 to +70 °C)
Specifications / 4-9
RFI Susceptibility:
In conformity with the following standards:
ENV 50140 Radio-frequency electromagnetic field,
Amplitude modulated
ENV 50204 Radio-frequency electromagnetic field,
Pulse modulated
4.5 POWER & SPECIFICATIONS
4.5.1 Input Power Specs.
Operating Range:
10.0V to 30.0V (dc) (Shutdown occurs at 10.0V nominal)
Output Voltages:
Isolated +5V, +12V & -12V (dc)
Output Current:
+5V @ 1A (Max.)
+12V @ 200mA (Max.)
-12V @ 200mA (MaX.)
Supply Loading 5V @ 1A, 12V/-12V @ 0mA
Field Supply AI Subsystem (160mA)
DI/HSC Subsystem (20mA)
Vin @ 8.5V - Iin Max. 1.46A
Vin @ 12V - Iin Max. 1.04A
Vin @ 24V - Iin Max. 0.56A
Input Current:
Fusing:
10A Slow Blow 5x20mm Fuse - 12V system
3A Slow Blow 5x20mm Fuse - 24V system
Electrical Isolation:
500Vdc Primary to Secondary
Surge Suppression:
500Vdc MOV PSGND to CHASSIS
32V Transient Suppressor across VIN+ to PSGND
Meets ANSI/IEEE C37.90-1978
Terminations:
Fixed, Max. Wire Size is 16 gauge
Shutdown:
Max. ON Switchpoint = 10.5V or 22.05V
Min. OFF Switchpoint = 9.95V or 20.49V
Power Switch:
MOSFET Driven by Switch connected to Gate
Sequencer Switchpoints:
Input Pwr. Max. ON Switchpoint = 10.43V or 21.87V
Input PWR. Min. OFF Switchpoint = 10.2V or 21.1V
5V Max. ON Switchpoint = 4.85V
5V Min. OFF Switchpoint = 4.75V
12V/-12V Max. ON Switchpoint = ±11.52V
12V/-12V Min. OFF Switchpoint = ±11.38V
4.5.2 Watchdog Contacts
Input Signals::
MC* & WDOGB*
Output Signal:
Optocoupled SSR drives watchdog relay or Power
MOSFET
4-10 / Specifications
CI-ControlWaveLP
Table 4-10 - PSSB Connectors TB1 & TB2 Pin Assignments
(see Sections 2.4.5 & 2.4.6)
Connector
TB1-1
TB1-2
TB1-3
TB2-1
TB2-2
TB2-3
CI-ControlWaveLP
Sig. Name
WDNO
WDSWITCHOUT
WDCOM
WDSWITCHIN
WDNC
V+
V-
Description
Watchdog Normally Open
Watchdog Voltage Out
Watchdog Common
Watchdog Voltage In
Watchdog Normally Closed
+Vdc Input
Power Supply Ground
Chassis Ground
Notes
WD Relay
Pwr. MOSFET
WD Relay
Pwr. MOSFET
WD Relay
+ 10.6 to 30 Vdc
PSGND
CHASSIS
Specifications / 4-11
BLANK PAGE
Instruction Manual
CI-ControlWaveLP
Oct., 2006
ControlWave LP
Low Power ControlWave
PC/104 ANALOG OUTPUT MODULE
Appendix 1
www.EmersonProcess.com/Bristol
Appendix 1
PC-104 ANALOG OUTPUT MODULE OPTION
TABLE OF CONTENTS
TITLE
PAGE #
DESCRIPTION............................................................................................................................................. 1
INSTALLING THE PC/104 AO MODULE OPTION................................................................................. 2
Installing a PC/104 AO Module ................................................................................................................... 2
Setting the PC/104 AO Board Jumpers ........................................................................................................ 2
Setting the PC/104 AO Module’s I/O Memory Map.................................................................................... 5
PC/104 AO Board Field Wiring ................................................................................................................... 5
Terminal Connections................................................................................................................................... 9
Signal Shielding and Grounding................................................................................................................... 9
SPECIFICATIONS ....................................................................................................................................... 9
Performance Specifications .......................................................................................................................... 9
Environmental Specifications ..................................................................................................................... 10
CI-ControlWaveLP Appendix 1
Page 0-1
Table Of Contents
PC/104 ANALOG OUTPUT MODULE OPTION
DESCRIPTION
PC/104 Analog Output (AO) Modules provide 4 Analog Output channels that can be
independently configured for 1-5V or 4-20mA operation. Analog outputs are electrically
isolated from the CPU power system. The PC/104 Analog Output Board measures 3.775” x
3.550” and is provided with a ribbon cable which provides AO interconnection between AO
Board connector P3 and one of four FMI/OB Board connectors (P3, P4, P5 or P6). The first
PC/104 AO Board is interfaced to the FMI/OB Board’s PC/104 bus through AO Board connectors J1 and J2 and FMI/OB Board connectors P1 and P2. Up to 4 PC/104 AO Modules
can be stacked together above the FMI/OB Board.
Four standoffs on the FMI/OB Board are provided for mounting a PC/104 AO board option
(see Figure 2). All power and interconnect signals (excluding the AO loop power) are
provided to the PC/104 AO Module option via the PC/104 Bus.
Figure 1 - PC/104 Analog Output Option Major Components
The 4-20 mA and/or 1-5 V output circuits are powered directly from either the Power Supply/Sequencer Board (PSSB) or a user supplied power supply. The supply voltage range is 9
to 30 Vdc. At 10 volts, the maximum external load connected to any AO is 250 Ohms. The
minimum supply voltage for a 650 Ohm external load is 19 Vdc. The maximum external
load is 650 Ohms. 1-5V Outputs operate from a 10 to 30 Vdc supply. Analog Outputs are
electrically isolated from the system power with optocouplers and a DC to DC Converter.
CI-ControlWaveLP Appendix 1
Page 1
PC-104 AO Module Option
INSTALLING THE PC/104 AO MODULE OPTION
The first PC/104 AO Module is to be mounted directly above the FMI/OB Board as
illustrated in Figure 3.
Installing a PC/104 AO Module
Follow steps 1 through 6 below to install the PC/104 AO Module.
1. Disconnect power from the ControlWaveLP (Shut down or place under manual
control any critical processes prior to disconnecting power).
2. Align the PC/104 AO Board’s PC/104 Bus Interface Connectors J1 and J2 (on the
bottom of the PCB) with FMI/OB Board Connectors P1 and P2 respectively and
press the PC/104 AO Board onto the FMI/OB Board.
3. Set the PC/104 AO Board Jumpers (see Topic - Setting the PC/104 AO Board
Jumpers) and set the AO Board Address via Switch S1 (see Topic - Setting the
PC/104 AO Module’s I/O Memory Map).
4. Secure (screw) the PC/104 AO Board to the appropriate standoffs (4) on the FMI/OB
Board (see Figure 2 - standoffs labeled A and see Figure 3) with four new standoffs
(to accommodate an additional PC/104 AO Board or the PC/104 Display/Push-button
Control Board).
5. If one, two or three additional PC/104 AO Boards are to be installed align the
PC/104 AO Board’s PC/104 Bus Interface Connectors J1 and J2 (on the bottom of the
PCB being installed) with PC/104 AO Board Connectors P1 and P2 (on the top of the
unit previously installed), and press the PC\104 AO Board into place. Repeat steps
4 and 5 up to three times.
6. Connect field wiring to Connector TB5, TB6, TB7 and/or TB8 as required (see Topic PC/104 AO Board Field Wiring).
Setting the PC/104 AO Board Jumpers
PC/104 Analog Output Boards contains 6 Jumpers that are defined in Table 1.
Jumpers JP1 through JP4 are provided with two (2) two-position Jumper Blocks. If only one
Jumper Block is used, as is the case when the PC/104 AO Board has been configured for 420 mA operation, the other Jumper Block should be stored on post #1 or #4 of the Jumper in
question.
Jumper JP6 can be used to select either the Power Supply/Sequencer Board or an external
supply as the source of power for the PC/104 AO Board’s analog outputs. There may be
times when the user elects to operate the RTU while the PC/104 AO Board is shutdown or
continues to power the PC/104 AO Board while the CPU is in low power or shutdown state.
When the Jumper Block associated with JP6 is installed across pins 2, 4, 6, & 8 the PC/104
AO Board will be powered from an external source.
CI-ControlWaveLP Appendix 1
Page 2
PC-104 AO Module Option
Figure 2 - ControlWaveLP FMI/OB Board
PC/104 Board Mounting Location Diagram
CI-ControlWaveLP Appendix 1
Page 3
PC-104 AO Module Option
Figure 3 - PC/104 AO Board Mounted on ControlWaveLP FMI/OB Board
CI-ControlWaveLP Appendix 1
Page 4
PC-104 AO Module Option
Jumper JP7 provides for selection of either a 6 MHz Oscillator or the 6 MHz System Clock
as the clock source for the PC/104 AO Board. The 6 MHz System Clock should be used when
it is desired to shut down or slow down the clock during low power periods, i.e., when the
CPU has been placed into power down or low power mode.
Table 1 - PC/104 AO Board Jumper Definitions and Assignments
Jumper #
JP1
# of Pins
4
JP2
4
JP3
4
JP4
4
JP6
8
JP7
3
Function
Sets AO Type
for AO2
Sets AO Type
for AO1
Sets AO Type
for AO4
Sets AO Type
for AO3
Sets Source of
AO Loop Pwr.
Sets Clock
Source
Jumper Position Settings
1-2 & 3-4 = 1-5 V Output
2-3 & Stored = 4-20 mA Output
1-2 & 3-4 = 1-5 V Output
2-3 & Stored = 4-20 mA Output
1-2 & 3-4 = 1-5 V Output
2-3 & Stored = 4-20 mA Output
1-2 & 3-4 = 1-5 V Output
2-3 & Stored = 4-20 mA Output
Post across 1,3,5,7 = Pwr. Supply/Seq. Bd.
Post across 2,4,6,8 = Ext. Power Source
1-2 = 6 MHz Oscillator
2-3 = 6 MHz System Clock
Setting the PC/104 AO Module’s I/O Memory Map
Switch S1 on the PC/104 AO Board is used to set the AO Board’s Slot Address above B000
at the address boundaries defined in Figure 5. Switch selections 0-5, E and F are ignored.
PC/104 AO Board Field Wiring
PC/104 AO Boards are interfaced to the analog field devices through FMI/OB Board
Connectors TB5 - TB8. The relationship of TB5 - TB8 to the PC/104 AO Board is
determined by the 40-pin FMI/OB Connector (P3, P4, P5 or P6) to which the PC/104 AO
Board in question has been interfaced. Table 2 - provides the relationship of PC/104 AO
Board Connector P3 and FMI/OB Board Connectors P3, P4, P5 & P6 to FMI/OB Board
Connectors TB5, TB6, TB7 & TB8.
Field wiring supports 4-20 mA AOs (see Figure 6) and 1-5 V AOs (see Figure 7). +(9 to 30)
Vdc power is available to power up to four analog field devices (see Table 2 and Figures 6
and 7).
CI-ControlWaveLP Appendix 1
Page 5
PC-104 AO Module Option
Figure 4 - Analog Output Terminal Blocks and Configuration Jumpers
CI-ControlWaveLP Appendix 1
Page 6
PC-104 AO Module Option
Figure 5 - Switch S1 PC/104 AO Board I/O Memory Map Address Settings
Figure 6 - 1-5 Vdc Analog Output Field Wiring Diagram
CI-ControlWaveLP Appendix 1
Page 7
PC-104 AO Module Option
Figure 7 - 4-20 mA Analog Output Field Wiring Diagram
Table 2 - PC/104 AO Board Connector P3 and FMI/OB PC/104 Connectors
Wiring Summary
AO Bd. P3
FMI/OB
P3/4/5/6
Pin #
FMI/OB
TB5/6/7/8
Assignment
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
40
39
38
37
36
35
34
33
32
31
30
29
28
27
26
25
24
23
22
21
20
19
CI-ControlWaveLP Appendix 1
Signal
-AO1
+AO1
ISORET
ISORET
-AO2
+AO2
ISORET
ISORET
-AO3
+AO3
ISORET
ISORET
-AO4
+AO4
ISORET
ISORET
ISORET
ISORET
ISORET
ISORET
ISORET
ISORET
Page 8
Description
AO1 Return
AO1 Signal
AO Isolated Ground
AO Isolated Ground
AO2 Return
AO2 Signal
AO Isolated Ground
AO Isolated Ground
AO3 Return
AO3 Signal
AO Isolated Ground
AO Isolated Ground
AO4 Return
AO4 Signal
AO Isolated Ground
AO Isolated Ground
AO Isolated Ground
AO Isolated Ground
AO Isolated Ground
AO Isolated Ground
AO Isolated Ground
AO Isolated Ground
PC-104 AO Module Option
Table 2 - PC/104 AO Board Connector P3 and FMI/OB PC/104 Connectors
Wiring Summary (Continued)
FMI/OB
TB5/6/7/8
Assignment
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
-
AO Bd. P3
FMI/OB
P3/4/5/6
Pin #
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Signal
Description
ISORET
ISORET
ISORET
ISORET
ISORET
ISORET
V EXT RET
V EXT RET
V EXT+
V EXT+
ISORET
ISORET
VIN
VIN
PSGND
PSGND
CHASSIS
CHASSIS
AO Isolated Ground
AO Isolated Ground
AO Isolated Ground
AO Isolated Ground
AO Isolated Ground
AO Isolated Ground
External Power Return
External Power Return
9 - 30 Vdc External Voltage Source
9 - 30 Vdc External Voltage Source
Analog Output Isolated Ground
Analog Output Isolated Ground
Field Power from FMI/OB
Field Power from FMI/OB
Field Power Return
Field Power Return
Chassis Ground
Chassis Ground
Terminal Connections
The ControlWaveLP uses compression-type terminals that accommodate up to #16 AWG
wire. A connection is made by inserting the wire’s bared end into the clamp beneath the
screw and securing the screw. The wire should be inserted fully so that no bare wires are
exposed to cause shorts. If using standard wire, tin the bare end with solder to prevent
flattening and improve conductivity.
Allow some slack in the wires when making terminal connections. The slack makes the connections more manageable and minimizes mechanical strain on the terminal blocks.
Signal Shielding and Grounding
The use of twisted-pair, shielded and insulated cable for analog output signal wiring will
minimize signal errors caused by electromagnetic interference (EMI), radio frequency
interference (RFI) and transients. When using shielded cable, all shields should only be
grounded at one point in the appropriate system. This is necessary to prevent circulating
ground current loops that can cause signal errors.
SPECIFICATIONS
Performance Specifications
Number of Analog Outputs:
CI-ControlWaveLP Appendix 1
4
Page 9
PC-104 AO Module Option
AO Configuration:
1-5Vdc & 4-20mA (Individually Config’d.)
Power Loop:
9 to 30 Vdc for 4-20mA AO
10 to 30 Vdc for 1-5Vdc AO
Accuracy:
.1% of Span @ +25° C
.2% of Span @ -20° to +70° (C)
.3% of Span @ -40° to +85° (C)
Common Mode Voltage:
500 Vdc (with respect to Chassis)
Surge Suppression:
16V Transorb across input to AO Ground.
(Meets ANSI/IEEE C37.90-1975)
Environmental Specifications
Operating Temperature:
-40°C to +70°C (-40°F to +158°F)
Storage Temperature:
-40°C to +85°C (-40°F to +185°F)
Relative Humidity:
15-95% Non-condensing
Vibration:
10-150 Hz at 1.0G
150-2000 Hz at 0.5G
RFI Susceptibility:
3V/M at 80-1000 MHz
per EN50082-2
CI-ControlWaveLP Appendix 1
Page 10
PC-104 AO Module Option
ControlWaveLP
Material Safety Data Sheets
A Material Safety Data Sheet is provided herein to comply with OSHA’s Hazard
Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. This standard must be consulted for specific
requirements.
Material Safety Data Sheets are provided in the order listed in Table Z-1 below.
TABLE Z-1
MSDS for ControlWaveLP Instruction Manual CI-ControlWaveLP
Manufacturer
DURACELL
9/02/01
General Description
3V Lithium Manganese
Dioxide Battery
Part Number
DL 2450 (DURACELL INC.)
Appendix Z - CI-ControlWaveLP
MSDS
BLANK PAGE
Gillette
Environment
Health and Safety
37 A Street
Needham, MA 02492
Tel 781.292.8151
Page 1 of 4
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET
NAME:
DURACELL LITHIUM MANGANESE DIOXIDE COIN BATTERIES
Effective Date: 8/8/03
Not applicable
CAS NO:
Rev:
3
A. — IDENTIFICATION
%
65-75
Manganese Dioxide (1313-13-9)
Propylene Carbonate (108-32-7)
Lithium (7439-93-2)
Graphite, synthetic (7440-44-0)
1,2-Dimethoxyethane (110-71-4)
Lithium Perchlorate (7791-03-9)
Formula: Mixture
Mixture
Molecular Weight:
NA
10-15
5-10
Synonyms:
Lithium Manganese Dioxide Coin Cells:
3V-DL2016; DL2025; DL2430; DL2450;
DL2032; DL1616; DL1620
5-10
1-10
<1.5
B. — PHYSICAL DATA
NA
Boiling Point
°F
NA
°C
Melting Point
°F
NA
NA
°C
Specific Gravity (H2O=1)
Vapor Density (air=1)
NA
NA
Evaporation
(
=1)
Ether
NA
Freezing Point
°F
NA
NA
Vapor Pressure @
°F
NA
Saturation in Air
(by volume@
°C
mm Hg
Autoignition Temperature
°F
°F)
NA
NA
% Volatiles
Solubility in Water
NA
NA
NA
pH
Appearance/Color
Coin cells. Contents dark in color.
Flash Point and
Test Method(s)
1,2-Dimethoxyethane (Approximately 3-7% of contents): 42.8 °F, 6°C (Closed Cup)
Flammable Limits in Air
(% by volume)
Lower
NA
°C
%
%
NA
Upper
C. — REACTIVITY
Stability
X
stable
unstable
Polymerization
Conditions to Avoid
Do not heat, crush, disassemble, short circuit or
recharge.
Incompatible Materials
Contents incompatible with strong oxidizing agents.
may occur
X
will not occur
Conditions to Avoid
Not applicable
Hazardous Decomposition Products
Thermal degradation may produce hazardous fumes
of manganese and lithium; oxides of carbon and other
toxic by-products.
* IF MULTIPLE INGREDIENTS, INCLUDE CAS NUMBERS FOR EACH
NA=NOT AVAILABLE
Footnotes
Not applicable
GMEL#
2033.3
Page 2 of 4
D. — HEALTH HAZARD DATA
Occupational Exposure Limits PEL’s, TLV’s, etc.)
8-Hour TWAs: Manganese Dioxide (as Mn) - 5 mg/m3 (Ceiling) (OSHA); 0.2 mg/m3 (ACGIH/Gillette)
1,2-Dimethoxyethane - 0.15 ppm (Gillette)
Graphite (all kinds except fibrous) - 2 mg/m3 (synthetic, ACGIH); 15 mg/m3 (total, OSHA);
5 mg/m3 (respirable, OSHA)
These levels are not anticipated under normal consumer use conditions.
Warning Signals
Not applicable
Routes/Effects of Exposure
These chemicals and metals are contained in a sealed can. For consumer use, adequate hazard warnings are
included on both the package and on the battery. Potential for exposure should not exist unless the battery
leaks, is exposed to high temperature, is accidentally swallowed or is mechanically, physically, or electrically
abused.
1. Inhalation
Not anticipated. Respiratory (and eye) irritation may occur if fumes are released due to heat or
an abundance of leaking batteries.
2. Ingestion
An initial x-ray should be obtained promptly to determine battery location. Batteries lodged in
the esophagus should be removed immediately since leakage, burns and perforation can occur
as soon as 4-6 hours after ingestion. Irritation to the internal/external mouth areas may occur
following exposure to a leaking battery.
3. Skin
a. Contact
Irritation may occur following exposure to a leaking battery.
b. Absorption
Not anticipated.
4. Eye Contact
Irritation may occur following exposure to a leaking battery.
5. Other
Not applicable
E. — ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT
1. Applicable Regulations All ingredients listed in TSCA inventory.
2. DOT Hazard Class 3. DOT Shipping Name -
Not applicable
Not applicable
While lithium batteries are regulated by IATA and ICAO, the type of lithium batteries offered for sale by DURACELL are
considered non-hazardous per provision A45 of the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations and provision A45 of the ICAO
Technical Instructions For The Safe Transport Of Dangerous Goods By Air. Per section A45 of the IATA and ICAO
regulations, properly marked, labeled and packaged DURACELL consumer lithium batteries, which are of the solid cathode
type, with less than 1g lithium per cell and less than 2g lithium per battery, are exempt from further regulation. When these
batteries are separated to prevent short circuits and properly packaged in strong packaging (except when installed in electronic
devices), they are acceptable for air transport as airfreight without any other restrictions. In addition, when installed in
equipment or when no more than 24 cells or 12 batteries meeting the A45 provision are shipped, they are not subject to
special packaging, marking, labeling or shipping documentation requirements. Thus, these batteries are not considered
hazardous under the current regulations and are acceptable for air transport.
Environmental Effects
These batteries pass the U. S. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and therefore, maybe
disposed of with normal waste.
GMEL#
2033.3
Page 3 of 4
F. — EXPOSURE CONTROL METHODS
Engineering Controls
General ventilation under normal use conditions.
Eye Protection
None under normal use conditions. Wear safety glasses when handling leaking batteries.
Skin Protection
None under normal use conditions. Use butyl gloves when handling leaking batteries.
Respiratory Protection
None under normal use conditions.
Other
Keep batteries away from small children.
G. — WORK PRACTICES
Handling and Storage
Store at room temperature. Avoid mechanical or electrical abuse. DO NOT short or install incorrectly.
Batteries may explode, pyrolize or vent if disassembled, crushed, recharged or exposed to high temperatures.
Install batteries in accordance with equipment instructions. Replace all batteries in equipment at the same
time. Do not carry batteries loose in pocket or bag.
Normal Clean Up
Not applicable
Waste Disposal Methods
No special precautions are required for small quantities. Large quantities of open batteries should be treated
as hazardous waste. Dispose of in accordance with federal, state and local regulations. Do not incinerate,
since batteries may explode at excessive temperatures.
GMEL#
2033.3
Page 4 of 4
H. — EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
Steps to be taken if material is released to the environment or spilled in the work area
Evacuate the area and allow vapors to dissipate. Increase ventilation. Avoid eye or skin contact. DO NOT
inhale vapors. Clean-up personnel should wear appropriate protective gear. Remove spilled liquid with
absorbent and contain for disposal.
Fire and Explosion Hazard
Extinguishing Media
Batteries may burst and release hazardous decomposition products when As for surrounding area. Dry
exposed to a fire situation. See Sec. C.
chemical, alcohol foam, water or
carbon dioxide. For incipient
fires, carbon dioxide extinguishers
are more effective than water.
Firefighting Procedures
Cool fire-exposed batteries and adjacent structures with water spray from a distance. Use self-contained
breathing apparatus and full protective gear.
I. — FIRST AID AND MEDICAL EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
Eyes
Not anticipated. If battery is leaking and material contacts eyes, flush with copious amounts of clear, tepid
water for 30 minutes. Contact physician at once.
Skin
Not anticipated. If battery is leaking, irrigate exposed skin with copious amounts of clear, tepid water for a
least 15 minutes. If irritation, injury or pain persists, consult a physician.
Inhalation
Not anticipated. Respiratory (and eye) irritation may occur if fumes are released due to heat or an abundance
of leaking batteries. Remove to fresh air. Contact physician if irritation persists.
Ingestion
Consult a physician. Published reports recommend removal from the esophagus be done endoscopically
(under direct visualization). Batteries beyond the esophagus need not be retrieved unless there are signs of
injury to the GI tract or a large diameter battery fails to pass the pylorus. If asymptomatic, follow-up x-rays
are necessary only to confirm passage of larger batteries. Confirmation by stool inspection is preferable
under most circumstances. If mouth area irritation/burning has occurred, rinse the mouth and surrounding
area with clear, tepid water for at least 15 minutes.
Notes to Physician
1) For information on treatment, telephone (202)-625-3333 collect.
2) Potential leakage of less than 50 milligrams of propylene carbonate (CAS #108-32-1) and
dimethoxyethane (CAS #110-71-4).
3) Dimethoxyethane readily evaporates.
4) Under certain misuse conditions and by abusively opening the battery, exposed lithium can react with
water or moisture in the air causing potential thermal burns or fire hazard.
Replaces # 1461
The information contained in the Material Safety Data Sheet is based on data considered to be accurate, however, no warranty is
expressed or implied regarding the accuracy of the data or the results to be obtained from the use thereof.
MSDS-4 (8/95)
GMEL#
2033.3
Supplement Guide - S1400CW
Issue: 04/05
TM
SITE CONSIDERATIONS
For
EQUIPMENT INSTALLATION,
GROUNDING
&
WIRING
A Guide for the Protection of
Site Equipment & Personnel
In the Installation of
ControlWave
Process Automation Controllers
Bristol Babcock
NOTICE
Copyright Notice
The information in this document is subject to change without notice. Every effort has been
made to supply complete and accurate information. However, Bristol Babcock assumes no
responsibility for any errors that may appear in this document.
Request for Additional Instructions
Additional copies of instruction manuals may be ordered from the address below per
attention of the Sales Order Processing Department. List the instruction book numbers or
give complete model number, serial or software version number. Furnish a return address
that includes the name of the person who will receive the material. Billing for extra copies
will be according to current pricing schedules.
ControlWave® is a re registered trademark of Bristol Babcock. Other trademarks or copyrighted products mentioned in this document are for information only, and belong to their
respective companies, or trademark holders.
Copyright (c) 2005 Bristol Babcock, 1100 Buckingham St., Watertown, CT 06795. No part of
this manual may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of
Bristol Babcock.
Supplement Guide S1400CW
SITE CONSIDERATIONS FOR EQUIPMENT
INSTALLATION, GROUNDING & WIRING
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION
TITLE
PAGE #
Section 1 - INTRODUCTION
1.1
1.2
GENERAL INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................... 1-1
MAJOR TOPICS ............................................................................................................. 1-1
Section 2 - PROTECTION
2.1
2.1.1
2.2
2.2.1
2.2.2
2.3
PROTECTING INSTRUMENT SYSTEMS................................................................... 2-1
Quality Is Conformance To Requirements.................................................................... 2-1
PROTECTING EQUIPMENT & PERSONNEL ........................................................... 2-1
Considerations For The Protection of Personnel .......................................................... 2-2
Considerations For The Protection of Equipment ........................................................ 2-2
OTHER SITE SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS............................................................... 2-3
Section 3 - GROUNDING & ISOLATION
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.3.1
3.3.1.1
3.3.1.2
3.3.1.3
3.3.2
3.3.3
3.4
3.4.1
3.4.2
POWER & GROUND SYSTEMS................................................................................... 3-1
IMPORTANCE OF GOOD GROUNDS......................................................................... 3-1
EARTH GROUND CONNECTIONS............................................................................. 3-1
Establishing a Good Earth Ground. .............................................................................. 3-1
Soil Conditions ................................................................................................................ 3-2
Soil Types ........................................................................................................................ 3-2
Dry, Sandy or Rocky Soil................................................................................................ 3-4
Ground Wire Considerations. ........................................................................................ 3-5
Other Grounding Considerations. ................................................................................. 3-6
ISOLATING EQUIPMENT FROM THE PIPELINE ................................................... 3-7
Meter Runs Without Cathodic Protection..................................................................... 3-7
Meter Runs With Cathodic Protection .......................................................................... 3-7
Section 4 - LIGHTNING ARRESTERS & SURGE PROTECTORS
4.1
4.1.1
4.1.2
4.1.3
4.1.4
4.1.5
4.2
STROKES & STRIKES .................................................................................................. 4-1
Chance of Being Struck by Lightning. .......................................................................... 4-1
Antenna Caution ............................................................................................................ 4-3
Ground Propagation ....................................................................................................... 4-5
Tying it all Together....................................................................................................... 4-5
Impulse Protection Summary ........................................................................................ 4-5
USE OF LIGHTNING ARRESTERS & SURGE PROTECTORS................................ 4-6
Section 5 - WIRING TECHNIQUES
5.1
5.2
5.2.1
OVERVIEW ....................................................................................................................5-1
INSTRUMENT WIRING. .............................................................................................. 5-1
Common Returns ............................................................................................................5-1
Supplement S1400CW
Page 0-1
Table Of Contents
Supplement Guide S1400CW
SITE CONSIDERATIONS FOR EQUIPMENT
INSTALLATION, GROUNDING & WIRING
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION
TITLE
PAGE #
Section 5 - WIRING TECHNIQUES (Continued)
5.2.2
5.2.3
5.2.4
5.2.5
5.2.6
5.2.7
5.2.8
5.2.9
5.2.10
Use of Twisted Shielded Pair Wiring (with Overall Insulation).................................. 5-2
Grounding of Cable Shields. .......................................................................................... 5-3
Use of Known Good Earth Grounds .............................................................................. 5-3
Earth Ground Wires ....................................................................................................... 5-3
Working Neatly & Professionally .................................................................................. 5-3
High Power Conductors and Signal Wiring .................................................................. 5-4
Use of Proper Wire Size ................................................................................................. 5-4
Lightning Arresters & Surge Protectors ....................................................................... 5-4
Secure Wiring Connections ............................................................................................ 5-5
REFERENCE DOCUMENTS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
IEEE Recommended Practice for Grounding of Industrial and Commercial Power Systems - ANSI/IEEE Std
142-1982
IEEE Guide for the Installation of Electrical Equipment to Minimize Electrical Noise inputs to Controllers
from External Sources - IEE Std 518-1982
Lightning Strike Protect; Roy B. Carpenter, Jr. & Mark N. Drabkin, Ph.D.; Lightning Eliminators &
Consultant, Inc., 6687 Arapahoe Road, Boulder Colorado
Lightning Protection Manual for Rural Electric Systems, NRECA Research Project 82-5, Washington DC,
1983
Grounding for the Control of EMI; Hugh W. Denny; Don White Consultants, Inc., 1983, 1st Edition
Fundamentals of EGM - Electrical Installations; Michael D. Price; NorAm Gas Transmission, 525 Milam
Street, Shreveport, Louisiana 71151
TeleFlow Modem Grounding Kit 621495-01-8 Installation Instructions - PIP-3530MGKI; Bristol Babcock,
Watertown, CT 06795
Supplement S1400CW
Page 0-2
Table Of Contents
Section 1 - Overview
1.1 INTRODUCTION
This document provides information pertaining to the installation of ControlWave
systems; more specifically, information covering reasons, theory and techniques for
protecting your personnel and equipment from electrical damage. Your instrument system
affects the quality of service provided by your company and many aspects of its operational
safety. Loss of instruments means lost production and profits as well as increased expenses.
Information contained in this document is for educational purposes. Bristol Babcock makes
no warranties or guarantees on the effectiveness or the safety of techniques described herein.
Where the safety of installations and personnel is concerned, refer to the National Electrical
Code Rules and rules of local regulatory agencies.
1.2 MAJOR TOPICS
Topics are covered in seven sections designed to pinpoint major areas of concern for the
protection of site equipment and personnel. The following overview is provided for each of
the major sections.
·
Section 2 - Protection
This section provides the reasons for protecting instrument systems. An overview of the
definition of quality and what we are trying to accomplish in the protection of site
installations and how to satisfy the defined requirements is presented. Additionally,
this section provides considerations for the protection of personnel and equipment.
·
Section 3 - Grounding & Isolation
Information pertaining to what constitutes a good earth ground, how to test and
establish such grounds, as well as when and how to connect equipment to earth grounds
is provided
·
Section 4 - Lightning Arresters & Surge Protectors
Some interesting information dealing with Lightning strikes and strokes is presented in
technical and statistical form along with a discussion of how to determine the likelihood
of a lightning strike. Protecting equipment and personnel during the installation of
radios and antenna is discussed in a review of the dangers to equipment and personnel
when working with antennas. Reasons for the use of lightning arresters and surge
protectors are presented along with overviews of how each device protects site
equipment.
·
Section 5 - Wiring Techniques
Installation of Power and “Measurement & Control” wiring is discussed. Information on
obscure problems, circulating ground and power loops, bad relays, etc. is presented.
Good wire preparation and connection techniques along with problems to avoid are
discussed. This sections list the ten rules of instrument wiring.
Section 1 - Overview
Page 1-1
S1400CW
Section 2 - Protection
2.1 PROTECTING INSTRUMENT SYSTEMS
Electrical instrumentation is susceptible to damage from a variety of natural and man
made phenomena. In addition to wind, rain and fire, the most common types of system and
equipment damaging phenomena are lightning, power faults, communication surges &
noise and other electrical interference’s caused by devices such as radios, welders,
switching gear, automobiles, etc. Additionally there are problems induced by geophysical
electrical potential & noise plus things that are often beyond our wildest imagination.
2.1.1 Quality Is Conformance To Requirements
A quality instrumentation system is one that works reliably, safely and as purported by the
equipment manufacturer (and in some cases by the system integrator) as a result of good
equipment design and well defined and followed installation practices. If we except the
general definition of quality to be, “quality is conformance to requirements,” we must also
except the premise that a condition of “quality” can’t exist where requirements for such an
end have not been evolved. In other words, you can’t have quality unless you have
requirements that have been followed. By understanding the requirements for a safe, sound
and reliable instrumentation system, and by following good installation practices (as
associated with the personnel and equipment in question), the operational integrity of the
equipment and system will be enhanced.
Understanding what is required to properly install BBI equipment in various environments, safely, and in accordance with good grounding, isolating and equipment
protection practices goes a long way toward maintaining a system which is healthy to the
owner and customer alike. Properly installed equipment is easier to maintain and operate,
and is more efficient and as such more profitable to our customers. Following good installation practices will minimize injury, equipment failure and the customer frustrations
that accompany failing and poorly operating equipment (of even the finest design). Additionally, personnel involved in the installation of a piece of equipment add to or subtract
from the reliability of a system by a degree which is commensurate with their technical
prowess, i.e., their understanding of the equipment, site conditions and the requirements
for a quality installation.
2.2 PROTECTING EQUIPMENT & PERSONNEL
ControlWave installations must be performed in accordance with National Electrical Code
Rules, electrical rules set by local regulatory agencies, and depending on the customer
environment (gas, water, etc), other national, state and local agencies such as the American
Water Works Association (AWWA). Additionally, installation at various customer sites may
be performed in conjunction with a “safety manager” or utility personnel with HAZMAT
(hazardous material) training on materials present (or potentially present) as required by
OSHA, the customer, etc.
Section 2 - Protection
Page 2-1
S1400CW
2.2.1 Considerations For The Protection of Personnel
Always evaluate the site environment as if your life depended on it. Make sure that you
understand the physical nature of the location where you will be working. Table 2-1
provides a general guideline for evaluating an installation site.
Table 2-1 - Installation Site Safety Evaluation Guide
#
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Guide
Indoor or outdoor – Dress Appropriately
If outdoor, what kind of environment, terrain, etc. Watch out for local varmint (bees,
spiders, snakes, etc.)
If indoor or outdoor – determine if there are any pieces of dangerous equipment or any
processes which might be a risk to your safety
If in a tunnel, bunker, etc. watch out for a build up of toxic or flammable gases. Make
sure the air is good. Watch out for local varmint (bees, spiders, snakes, etc.)
Hazardous or Non-Hazardous Environment – Wear appropriate safety equipment and
perform all necessary safety measures.
Before installing any equipment or power or ground wiring, make sure that there are no
lethal (life threatening) voltages between the site where the instrument will be installed
and other equipment, pipes, cabinets, etc. or to earth itself.
Never assume that adjacent or peripheral equipment has been properly installed and
grounded. Determine if this equipment and the ControlWave unit in question can be
touched simultaneously without hazard to personnel and/or equipment?
Before embarking to remote locations where there are few or no human inhabitants ask a
few simple questions like, should I bring water, food, hygienic materials, first aid kit, etc?
Be Prepared!
Observe the work habits of those around you – for your own safety!
Some of the items that a service person should consider before ever going on site can be
ascertained by simply asking questions of the appropriate individual. Obviously other
safety considerations can only be established at the installation site.
2.2.2 Considerations For The Protection of Equipment
Always evaluate the site installation/service environment and equipment. Understand the
various physical interfaces you will be dealing with such as equipment mounting and
supporting, ControlWave analog and digital circuits, power circuits, communication
circuits and various electrical grounds. Table 2-2 provides a general guideline for
evaluating the equipment protection requirements of an installation site.
Table 2-2 - Equipment Protection Site Safety Evaluation Guide
#
1
2
3
4
5
Guide
Environment - Class I, Division 2 - Nonincendive
Environment - Class I, Division 1 - Intrinsically Safe
Other - Safe or unrated area
Earth Ground - Established by mechanical/electrical or
(both) or not at all.
Is the area prone to lightning strikes?
Are there surge suppressors installed or to be installed?
Are there overhead or underground power or communication cables in the immediate area?
S1400CW
Page 2-2
Reference Section
See Appendix A of CI Manual
See Appendix B of CI Manual
See Section 3
See Section 4
See Section 4
See Section 2.3
Section 2 - Protection
Table 2-2 - Equipment Protection Site Safety Evaluation Guide (Continued)
#
6
7
8
9
2.3
Guide
Is there an antenna in the immediate area?
How close is other equipment? Can someone safely touch this
equipment and a ControlWave simultaneously?
Determine equipment ground requirements. How will the
ControlWave and its related wiring be grounded? Consider Earth
Ground, Circuit Ground, Conduit Ground, Site Grounds!
Are there any obviously faulty or questionable power or ground
circuits?
Reference Section
See Section 4.1.2
See Section 2.3
See Section 3
See Section 2.3
OTHER SITE SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS
Overhead or underground power or communication cables must be identified prior to
installing a new unit. Accidentally cutting, shorting or simply just contacting power,
ground, communication or process control I/O wiring can have potentially devastating
effects on site equipment, the process system and or personnel.
Don’t assume that it is safe to touch adjacent equipment, machinery, pipes, cabinets or even
the earth itself. Adjacent equipment may not have been properly wired or grounded, may be
defective or may have one or more loose system grounds. Measure between the case of a
questionable piece of equipment and its earth ground for voltage. If a voltage is present,
something is wrong.
AC powered equipment with a conductive case should have the case grounded. If you don’t
see a chassis ground wire, don’t assume that it is safe to touch this equipment. If you notice
that equipment has been grounded to pipes, conduit, structural steel, etc., you should be
leery. Note: AWWA’s policy on grounding of electric circuits on water pipes states,
“The American Water Works Association (AWWA) opposes the grounding of
electrical systems to pipe systems conveying water to the customer’s premises….”
Be sure that the voltage between any two points in the instrument system is less than the
stand-off voltage. Exceeding the stand-off voltage will cause damage to the instrument and
will cause the instrument to fail.
Section 2 - Protection
Page 2-3
S1400CW
Section 3 - Grounding & Isolation
3.1 POWER & GROUND SYSTEMS
ControlWaves utilize DC power systems. AC power supplies are not provided with ControlWave units. ControlWave, ControlWave MICRO, ControlWave EFM/GFC/EFC,
ControlWaveRED, ControlWaveREDIO and ControlWave I/O Expansion Racks are
provided with a Ground Lug that accommodates up to a #4 AWG size wire for establishing
a connection to Earth Ground. In the case of the ControlWaveLP, a Chassis Ground
termination terminal (TB2, Pin-3), that accepts up to a #14 AWG size wire, is provided on
the unit’s Power Supply/Sequencer Board.
3.2 IMPORTANCE OF GOOD GROUNDS
ControlWave units (see above) are utilized in instrument and control systems that must
operate continually and within their stated accuracy over long periods of time with
minimum attention. Failures resulting from an improperly grounded system can become
costly in terms of lost time and disrupted processes. A properly grounded system will help
prevent electrical shock hazards resulting from contact with live metal surfaces, provide
additional protection of equipment from lightning strikes and power surges, minimize the
effects of electrical noise and power transients, and reduce signal errors caused by ground
wiring loops. Conversely, an improperly grounded system may exhibit a host of problems
that appear to have no relation-ship to grounding. It is essential that the reader (service
technician) have a good under-standing of this subject to prevent needless troubleshooting
procedures.
WARNING
This device must be installed in accordance with the National
Electrical Code (NEC) ANSI/NEPA-70. Installation in hazardous
locations must also comply with Article 500 of the code. For
information on the usage of ControlWave units in Class I, Division 2,
Groups C & D Hazardous and Nonhazardous locations, see appendix A
of the applicable Customer Instruction (CI) manual. For information
on the usage of ControlWave units in Class I, Division 1, Groups C &
D Hazardous locations, see appendix B of the applicable Customer
Instruction (CI) manual.
3.3 EARTH GROUND CONNECTIONS
To properly ground a ControlWave unit, the units Chassis Ground (post or terminal) must
ultimately be connected to a known good Earth Ground. Observe recommendations
provided in topics Establishing a Good Earth Ground and Ground Wire Considerations.
3.3.1 Establishing a Good Earth Ground
A common misconception of a ground is that it consists of nothing more than a metal pipe
driven into the soil. While such a ground may function for some applications, it will often
Section 3 - Grounding & Isolation
Page 3-1
S1400CW
not be suitable for a complex system of sophisticated electronic equipment. Conditions such
as soil type, composition and moisture will all have a bearing on ground reliability.
A basic ground consists of a 3/4-inch diameter rod with a minimum 8-foot length driven into
conductive earth to a depth of about 7-feet as shown in Figure 3-1. Number 3 or 4 AWG
solid copper wire should be used for the ground wire. The end of the wire should be clean,
free of any coating and fastened to the rod with a clamp. This ground connection should be
covered or coated to protect it from the weather and the environment.
Figure 3-1 - Basic Ground Rod Installation
3.3.1.1 Soil Conditions
Before installing a ground rod, the soil type and moisture content should be analyzed.
Ideally, the soil should be moist and moderately packed throughout to the depth of the
ground rod. However, some soils will exhibit less than ideal conditions and will require
extra attention.
Soil types can be placed into two general categories with respect to establishing and
maintaining a good earth ground, i.e., ‘Good Soil’ and ‘Poor Soil.’
To be a good conductor, soil must contain some moisture and free ions (from salts in the
soil). In very rainy areas, the salts may be washed out of the soil. In very sandy or arid area
the soil may be to dry and/or salt free to a good conductor. If salt is lacking add rock salt
(NaCl); if the soil is dry add calcium chloride (CaCl2).
3.3.1.2 Soil Types:
Good
Damp Loam
Salty Soil or Sand
Farm Land
Poor
Back Fill
Dry Soil
Sand Washed by a Lot of Rain
Dry Sand (Desert)
Rocky Soil
Ground Beds must always be tested for conductivity prior to being placed into service. A
brief description of ground bed testing in ‘Good Soil’ and ‘Poor Soil’ is provided herein.
Details on this test are described in the National Electrical Code Handbook. Once a reliable
S1400CW
Page 3-2
Section 3 - Grounding & Isolation
ground has been established, it should be tested on a regular basis to preserve system
integrity.
Figure 3-2 - Basic Ground Bed Soil Test Setup
Figure 3-3 - Basic Ground Bed Soil Test Setup with Additional Ground Rods
Figure 3-2 shows the test setup for ‘Good Soil’ conditions. If the Megger* reads less than 5
ohms, the ground is good. The lower the resistance, the better the earth ground. If the
Section 3 - Grounding & Isolation
Page 3-3
S1400CW
Megger reads more than 10 ohms, the ground is considered ‘poor.’ If a poor ground is
indicated, one or more additional ground rods connected 10 feet from the main ground rod
should be driven into the soil and interconnected via bare AWG 0000 copper wire and 1” x
¼-20 cable clamps as illustrated in Figure 3-3). * Note: Megger is a Trademark of the
Biddle Instrument Co. (now owned by AVO International). Other devices that
may be used to test ground resistance are “Viboground”; Associated Research,
Inc., “Groundmeter”; Industrial Instruments, Inc., and “Ground-ohmer”; Herman
H. Sticht Co., Inc.
If the Megger still reads more than 10 ohms, mix a generous amount of cooking salt, ice
cream salt or rock salt with water and then pour about 2.5 to 5 gallons of this solution
around each rod (including the test rods). Wait 15 minutes and re-test the soil. If the test
fails, the soil is poor and a ‘Poor Soil Ground Bed’ will have to be constructed.
Figure 3-4 shows a typical Poor Soil Ground Bed Electrode. A Poor Soil Ground Bed will
typically consists of four or more 10-foot long electrodes stacked vertically and separated by
earth. Figure 3-5 shows the construction of a Poor Soil Ground Bed. For some poor soil
sites, the ground bed will be constructed of many layers of ‘Capacitive Couplings’ as
illustrated. In extremely poor soil sites one or more 3’ by 3’ copper plates (12 gauge or 1/16”
thick) will have to be buried in place of the electrodes.
Figure 3-4 - Ground Electrode Construction for Poor Soil Conditions
3.3.1.3 Dry, Sandy or Rocky Soil
Very dry soil will not provide enough free ions for good conductance and a single ground rod
will not be effective. A buried counterpoise or copper screen is recommended for these
situations. It will be necessary to keep the soil moist through regular applications of water.
Sandy soil, either wet or dry, may have had its soluble salts leached out by rain water,
thereby reducing conductivity of the ground. High currents from lightning strikes could also
melt sand and cause glass to form around the ground rod, rendering it ineffective. A buried
counterpoise or copper screen is preferred for these installations along with regular
applications of salt water.
Rocky soil can pose many grounding problems. A counterpoise or copper plate will probably
be required. Constructing a trench at the grounding site and mixing the fill with a
hygroscopic salt such as calcium chloride may help for a time. Soaking the trench with
water on a regular basis will maintain conductivity.
Units with phone modems require the use of a lightning arrester. The lightning arrester
must be situated at the point where the communication line enters the building.
S1400CW
Page 3-4
Section 3 - Grounding & Isolation
Figure 3-5 - Poor Soil Ground Bed Construction Diagram
3.3.2 Ground Wire Considerations
ControlWave, ControlWave MICRO, ControlWave EFM/GFC/XFC, ControlWaveRED, ControlWave REDIO & ControlWave I/O Expansion Rack
ControlWave Chassis are provided with a Ground Lug that accommodates up to a #4 AWG
wire size. A ground wire must be run between the Chassis Ground Lug and a known good
Earth Ground. The cases of the various ControlWave Modules are connected to Chassis
Ground when they have been installed and secured via their two Captured Panel
Fasteners. As an extra added precaution, it is recommended that a #14 AWG wire be run
from PSSM Power Connector TB2-5 (Chassis Ground) (PSSM Connector TB1-3 for
ControlWave MICRO unit) (SCM Connector TB1-3 for ControlWave EFM) to the same
known good Earth Ground.
ControlWaveLP Process Automation Controller
A #14 AWG ground wire must be run from the ControlWaveLP’s PSSB Terminal TB2-3
(Chassis Ground) to a known good Earth Ground. In lieu of a direct connection to Earth
Section 3 - Grounding & Isolation
Page 3-5
S1400CW
Ground, it is recommended that the unit’s Chassis Ground Terminal be connected to a
conductive mounting panel or plate, a user supplied Ground Lug or a user supplied Ground
Bus. The panel, lug or bus in turn must be connected to a known good Earth Ground via a
#4 AWG wire.
General Considerations
The following considerations are provided for the installation of ControlWave system
grounds:
i Size of ground wire (running to Earth Ground should be #4 AWG. It is recommended
that stranded copper wire is used for this application and that the length should be as
short as possible.
i This ground wire should be clamped or brazed to the Ground Bed Conductor (that is
typically a stranded copper AWG 0000 cable installed vertically or horizontally).
i The wire ends should be tinned with solder prior to installation.
i The ground wire should be run such that any routing bend in the cable has a
minimum radius of 12-inches below ground and 8-inches above ground.
The units Earth Ground Cable should be clamped to an exposed Ground Rod or to an AWG
0000 stranded copper Ground Cable that in turn should be connected to either an Earth
Ground Rod or Earth Ground Bed. Both ends of the units Earth Ground Cable must be free
of any coating such as paint or insulated covering as well as any oxidation. The connecting
point of the Ground Rod or AWG 0000 Ground Cable must also be free of any coating and
free of oxidation. Once the ground connection has been established (at either the Ground
Rod or Ground Cable) it should be covered or coated to protect it from the environment.
3.3.3 Other Grounding Considerations
Figure 3-6 - Grounding of Phone Line
S1400CW
Page 3-6
Section 3 - Grounding & Isolation
For applications employing equipment that communicates over telephone lines, a lightning
arrester Must Be provided. For indoor equipment the lightning arrester must be installed
at the point where the communication line enters the building as shown in Figure 3-6. The
ground terminal of this arrester must connect to a ground rod and/or a buried ground bed.
Gas lines also require special grounding considerations. If a gas meter run includes a
thermocouple or RTD sensor installed in a thermowell, the well (not the sensor) must be
connected to a gas discharge-type lightning arrester as shown in Figure 3-7. A copper braid,
brazed to the thermal well, is dressed into a smooth curve and connected to the arrester as
shown. The curve is necessary to minimize arcing caused by lightning strikes or high static
surges. The path from the lightning arrester to the ground bed should also be smooth and
free from sharp bends for the same reason.
Figure 3-7 - Grounding of Thermometer Well in Gas Line
3.4 ISOLATING EQUIPMENT FROM THE PIPELINE
3.4.1 Meter Runs Without Cathodic Protection
ControlWave EFM/GFC/XFC’s may be mounted directly on the pipeline or remotely on a
vertical stand-alone two-inch pipe (see Figure 3-8). The Earth Ground Cable is to run
between the ControlWave EFM/GFC/XFC’s Ground Lug and Earth Ground (Rod or Bed)
even though the ControlWave EFM/GFC/XFC’s Multivariable Transducer may be
Section 3 - Grounding & Isolation
Page 3-7
S1400CW
grounded to the pipeline. If any pressure transmitters or pulse transducers are remotely
mounted, connect their chassis grounds to the pipeline or earth ground.
Figure 3-8 - ControlWave EFM (Installation is similar to GFC/XFC)
Remote Installation without Cathodic Protection
3.4.2 Meter Runs With Cathodic Protection
Dielectric isolators are available from Bristol Babcock and are always recommended as an
added measure in isolating the ControlWave EFM/GFC/XFC from the pipeline even
though the ControlWave EFM/GFC/XFC does provide 500V galvanic isolation from the
pipeline and should not be affected by cathodic protection or other EMF on the pipeline.
ControlWave EFM/GFC/XFC may be mounted directly on the pipeline (see Figure 3-9) or
remotely on a vertical stand-alone two-inch stand-pipe (see Figure 3-10). It is recommended
that isolation fitting always be used in remotely mounted meter systems. An isolation
fittings or gasket should be installed between the following connections:
S1400CW
Page 3-8
Section 3 - Grounding & Isolation
•
•
•
all conductive tubing that runs between the pipeline and mounting valve manifold
and/or the units multivariable pressure transducer
all conductive connections or tubing runs between the ControlWave EFM/GFC and
turbine meter, pulse transducer, or any input other device that is mounted on the
pipeline
any Temperature Transducer, Pressure Transmitter, etc. and their mount/interface to
the pipeline
Figure 3-9 - ControlWave EFM (Installation is similar to EFM/GFC/XFC)
Direct Mount Installation (with Cathodic Protection)
The ground conductor connects between the ControlWave EFM/GFC/XFC’s Ground Lug
and a known good earth ground. Connect the cases of Temperature Transducers, Pressure
Transmitters, etc., to the known good earth ground. If the mounting 2-inch pipe is in
continuity with the pipeline it will have to be electrically isolated from the ControlWave
EFM/GFC/XFC. Use a strong heat-shrink material such as RAYCHEM WCSM 68/22 EU
3140. This black tubing will easily slip over the 2-inch pipe and then after uniform heating
(e.g., with a rose-bud torch) it electrically insulates and increases the strength of the pipe
stand.
Section 3 - Grounding & Isolation
Page 3-9
S1400CW
See BBI Specification Summary F1670SS-0a for information on PGI Direct Mount Systems
and Manifolds.
Figure 3-10 – ControlWave EFM (Installation is similar to GFC/XFC)
Remote Installation (with Cathodic Protection)
S1400CW
Page 3-10
Section 3 - Grounding & Isolation
Section 4 - Lightning Arresters & Surge Protectors
4.1 STROKES & STRIKES
Lightning takes the form of a pulse that typically has a 2 µS rise and a 10 µS to 40 µS decay
to a 50% level. The IEEE standard is an 8 µS by 20 µS waveform. The peak current will
average 18 KA for the first impulse and about half of that for the second and third
impulses. Three strokes (impulses) is the average per lightning strike. The number of
visible flashes that may be seen is not necessarily the number of electrical strokes.
A lightning strike acts like a constant current source. Once ionization occurs, the air
becomes a luminous conductive plasma reaching up to 60,000° F. The resistance of a struck
object is of little consequence except for the power dissipation on the object (I2 x R). Fifty
percent of all lightning strikes will have a first impulse of at least 18 KA, ten percent will
exceed the 60 KA level, and only about one percent will exceed 120 KA.
4.1.1 Chance of Being Struck by Lightning
The map of Figure 4-1 shows the average annual number of thunderstorm days
(Isokeraunic level) for the various regions within the continental U.S.A. This map is not
representative of the severity of the storm or the number of lightning strikes since it does
not take into account more than one lightning strike in a thunderstorm day. The
Isokeraunic or Isoceraunic number provides a meteorological indication of the frequency of
thunderstorm activity; the higher the Isokeraunic number the greater the lightning strike
activity for a given area. These levels vary across the world from a low of 1 to a high of 300.
Within the United States the Isokeraunic level varies from a low of 1 to a high of 100.
Figure 4-1 - Average Thunderstorm Days of the Year (for Continental USA)
Section 4 - Lightning & Surge
Page 4-1
S1400CW
Thunderstorms are cloud formations that produce lightning strikes (or strokes). Across the
United States there is an average of 30 thunderstorm days per year. Any given storm may
produce from one to several strokes. Data on the subject indicates that for an average area
within the United States there can be eight to eleven strokes to each square mile per year.
The risk of stroke activity is increased for various areas such central Florida where up to 38
strokes to each square mile per year are likely to occur.
To determine the probability of a given structure (tower, building, etc.) (within your
location) being struck, perform the following computation:
1. Using the map of Figure 4-1 (or a comparable meteorological map for your local), find
the Isokeraunic level (I) for your area. Then using Chart 1, find “A” for your area.
2. Refer to Figure 4-1 to find the latitude. Then using Chart 2, find “B” for your latitude
(Lat.°).
3. Multiply “A” x “B” to get “C”.
4. To calculate the number of lightning strikes per year that are likely to strike a given
object (tower, mast, etc.), use the equation that follows (where “C” was calculated in
step 3 and “H” is equal to the height of the object.
Strikes Per Year = (“C” x H2) ÷ (.57 x 106 )
Chart 1
I
5
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
“A”
8
26
85
169
275
402
548
712
893
1069
1306
Chart 2
LAT.°
25
30
35
40
45
“B”
.170
.200
.236
.280
.325
Note for these charts:
I = Thunderstorm Days Per Year (Isokeraunic Number)
A = Stroke activity for associated Isokeraunic Area
B = Height/Stroke coefficient for associated latitude
For Example: On Long Island, New York (Isokeraunic number 20), Chart 1 gives “A” to
equal 85. The latitude is approximately 40°. Referring to Chart 2, “B” is found to be equal to
.28. “C” for this example is equal to 23.80. Using the equation for strikes per year, it is
determined that a 100-foot tower has .4 chances per year of being struck by lightning.
Assuming that no other structures are nearby, the tower will more than likely be struck by
lightning at least once in three years.
Note: The Isokeraunic activity numbers connoted as I, “A” and “B” in Charts 1 and 2 above
are provided for the continental United States. Isokeraunic data for various countries
is available from various federal or state Civil Engineering or Meterorelogical
organizations. This information is typically available from manufacturers of lightning
strike protection equipment (such as Lightning Arresters).
Since ControlWave, ControlWave MICRO, ControlWave EFM/GFC/XFC, ControlWaveLP and ControlWaveEXP units are dc operated systems that are isolated from AC
grids, they are typically immune to lightning strikes to power lines or power equipment
(except for inductive flashover due to close installation proximity). However, once a radio or
S1400CW
Page 4-2
Section 4 - Lightning & Surge
modem has been interfaced to a ControlWave, ControlWave MICRO, ControlWave
EFM/GFC/XFC, ControlWaveLP, or ControlWaveEXP the possibility of damage due to a
lightning strike on power or telephone lines or to a radio antenna or the antenna’s tower
must be considered. It is recommended that the additional lightning protection
considerations listed below be followed for units installed in areas with a high possibility or
history of stroke activity.
Units interfaced to a modem: In series with the phone line (as far away as possible
from the equipment) - for indoor installations the lightning arrester should typically be
located at the point where the line enters the structure.
Units interfaced to a radio: Mount antenna discharge unit (lightning arrester) as
close as possible to where the lead in wire enters the structure. See Antenna Caution
below.
4.1.2 Antenna Caution
Each year hundreds of people are killed, mutilated, or receive severe permanent injuries
when attempting to install or remove an antenna or antenna lead. In many cases, the
victim was aware of the danger of electrocution but failed to take adequate steps to avoid
the hazard. For your safety, and for proper installation maintenance, please read and
follow the safety precautions that follow - they may save your life.
i When installing or servicing an antenna:
DO NOT use a metal ladder. DO NOT step onto or touch an antenna mast while power
is applied to an associated radio unless the radio is a low power (low current) type.
DO NOT work on a wet or windy day, especially during a thunderstorm or when there is
lightning or thunder in your area. Dress properly; shoes with rubber soles and heels,
rubber gloves, long sleeve shirt or jacket.
i The safe distance from power lines should be at least twice the height of the antenna
and mast combination.
i Antenna Grounding per National Electrical Code Instructions:
A. Use AWG 10 or 8 aluminum or AWG 1 copper-clad steel or bronze wire, or larger as
ground wires for both the mast and lead-in. Securely clamp the wire to the bottom of
the mast.
B. Secure lead-in wire from antenna to antenna discharge (lightning arrester) unit and
the mast ground wire to the structure (building, shed, etc.) with stand-off insulators
spaced from 4 feet (1.22 meters) to 6 feet (1.83 meters) apart.
C. Mount antenna discharge unit as close as possible to where the lead-in wire enters
the structure.
D. The hole drilled through the wall for the lead-in wire should be just large enough to
accommodate the cable. Before drilling this hole, make sure there are no wires or
pipes, etc. in the wall.
E. Push the cable through the hole and form a rain drip loop close to where the wire
enters the exterior of the structure.
F. Caulk around the lead-in wire (where it enters the structure) to keep out drafts.
G. Install lightning arresters (antenna discharge units). The grounding conductor
should be run in as straight a line as practicable from the antenna mast and/or the
antenna discharge units to grounding electrode(s).
H. Only connect the antenna cable to the radio after the mast has been properly
grounded and the lead-in cable has been properly connected to lightning arresters
which in turn have each been properly connected to a known good earth ground.
Section 4 - Lightning & Surge
Page 4-3
S1400CW
Figure 4-2 - Radio Antenna Field Installation Site Grounding Diagram
For all systems it is best to have all communication equipment input/output grounds tied
together. In the case of ControlWave units, this is accomplished via the unit’s Chassis
Ground (Typically at a ground lug, ground bus or ground plate). However additional
S1400CW
Page 4-4
Section 4 - Lightning & Surge
communication equipment lightning arresters and surge suppressors should be tied to the
same system ground. System ground consists of the tower leg grounds utility ground and
bulkhead-equipment ground-stakes that are tied together via bare copper wire.
4.1.3 Ground Propagation
As in any medium, a dynamic pulse, like R.F., will take time to propagate. This propagation
time will cause a differential step voltage to exist in time between any two ground rods that
are of different radial distances from the strike. With a ground rod tied to a struck tower,
the impulse will propagate its step voltage outwardly from this rod in ever-expanding
circles, like a pebble thrown into a pond. If the equipment house has a separate ground rod
and the power company and/or telephone company grounds are also separate, the dynamic
step voltage will cause currents to flow to equalize these separate ground voltages. Then if
the coax cable (associated with a radio) is the only path linking the equipment chassis with
the tower ground, the surge can destroy circuitry.
4.1.4 Tying it all Together
To prevent this disaster from occurring, a grounding system must be formed which
interconnects all grounds together. This will equalize and distribute the surge charge to all
grounds, and at the same time, it will make for a lower surge impedance ground system.
This interconnection can be done as a grid, where each ground has a separate line to each
other ground, or by using a “rat Race” ring which forms a closed loop (not necessarily a
perfect circle) which surrounds the equipment house completely.
By making this interconnection, it will be necessary to use proper I/O protectors for the
equipment. Of course, these should be a requirement regardless of whether this grounding
technique is used. I/O protectors are used for power lines (even those these don’t feed into a
ControlWave unit), telephone lines, and also to minimize EMI pick-up from a strike.
Ideally it is best to place all I/O protectors on a common panel that has a low inductance
path to the ground system. The ControlWave units would then have a single ground point
from its Chassis Ground Terminal/Ground Lug to this panel. In lieu of this, the
ControlWave unit in question should be tied to a ground rod that in turn is connected to
the Earth/System Ground created for the site.
Your protected equipment connected to a common single ground system, will now be just
like a bird sitting on a high tension wire. When lightning strikes, even with a 50 ohm surge
impedance ground system, the entire system consisting of equipment, ground system,
building, etc., will all rise together to the one million volt peak level (for example) and will
all decay back down together. So long as there is no voltage differential (taken care of by
protectors and ground interconnections, there will be no current flow through the
equipment and therefore no resulting equipment damage.
4.1.5 Impulse Protection Summary
i
i
i
i
Use more than one ground rod.
Place multi-ground stakes more than their length apart.
Tie Power, Telco, Tower, Bulkhead and equipment ground together.
Make all ground interconnect runs that are above ground with minimum radius
bends of eight inches and run them away from other conductors and use large solid
wire or a solid strap.
Section 4 - Lightning & Surge
Page 4-5
S1400CW
i Watch out for dissimilar metals connections and coat accordingly.
i Use bare wire radials together where possible with ground stakes to reduce ground
system impedance.
i Use I/O protectors (Phone line, Radio) with a low inductance path to the ground
system.
i Ground the Coaxial Cable Shield (or use an impulse suppressor) at the bottom of the
tower just above the tower leg ground connection.
4.2 USE OF LIGHTNING ARRESTERS & SURGE PROTECTORS
Units equipped with radios or modems use lightning arresters and surge protectors to
protect equipment from lightning strikes, power surges and from damaging currents that
have been induced onto communication lines.
The first line of defense is the Lightning Arrester. These devices typically use gas discharge
bulbs that can shunt high currents and voltages to earth ground when they fire. The high
current, high voltage gas discharge bulb has a relatively slow response time and only fire
when their gas has been ionized by high voltage.
The second line of defense is the Surge Protector, which is made of solid state devices, fires
very quickly and conducts low voltages and currents to ground. Surge protectors are built
into BBI 9600 bps modems.
Lightning Arresters are applied to circuits as follows:
i Equipment or circuits that can be exposed to lightning strikes, falling power lines,
high ground currents caused by power system faults, by operational problems on
electric railways, etc.
i Equipment installed in dry, windy areas, such as the Great Plains and the
Southwest Desert in the United States. Wind and wind blown dust can cause high
voltages (static) to appear on overhead wires, fences, and metal buildings.
Note: Lightning Arresters may explode if lightning strike is very close. Mount
lightning arresters where flying parts won't cause injury to equipment or
personnel.
S1400CW
Page 4-6
Section 4 - Lightning & Surge
Section 5 - Wiring Techniques
5.1 OVERVIEW
This section provides information pertaining to good wiring practices. Installation of Power
and “Measurement & Control” wiring is discussed. Information on obscure problems,
circulating ground and power loops, bad relays, etc. is presented. Good wire preparation
and connection techniques along with problems to avoid are discussed.
5.2 INSTRUMENT WIRING
Each of the rules listed below is briefly discussed; the emphasis herein is placed on the
avoidance of problems as well as equipment safety.
Rule 1 - Never utilize common returns.
Rule 2 - Use twisted shielded pairs (with overall insulation) on all Signal/Control circuits.
Rule 3 - Ground cable shields at one end only.
Rule 4 - Use known good earth grounds (Rod, Bed, System) and test them periodically,
Rule 5 - Earth connections must utilize smoothly dressed large wire.
Rule 6 - Perform all work neatly and professionally.
Rule 7 - Route high power conductors away from signal wiring according to NEC Rules.
Rule 8 - Use appropriately sized wires as required by the load.
Rule 9 - Use lightning arresters and surge protectors.
Rule 10 - Make sure all wiring connections are secure.
5.2.1 Common Returns
Use of common returns on I/O wiring is one of the most common causes of obscure and
difficult to troubleshoot control signal problems. Since all wires and connections have
distributed resistance, inductance and capacitance, the chances of a achieving a balanced
system when common returns are present is very remote. Balanced systems (or circuits) are
only achieved when all currents and voltages developed in association with each of the
common returns are equal. In a balanced system (or circuit) there are no noise or
measurment errors introduced due to by “sneak circuits.”
The illustration of Figure 5-1 shows the difference between testing an I/O circuit that is
discrete and has no sneak circuits and one that utilizes common returns. Common sense
tells us that it is tough to mix up connections to a twisted shielded pair (with overall vinyl
covering) to every end device. Do yourself a favor; to make start up easier, DON’T USE
COMMON RETURNS!
Section 5 - Wiring Techniques
Page 5-1
S1400CW
Figure 5-1 - Field Wired Circuits With & Without A Common Return
5.2.2 Use of Twisted Shielded Pair Wiring (with Overall Insulation)
For all field I/O wiring the use of twisted shielded pairs with overall insulation is highly
recommended. This type of cable provides discrete insulation for each of the wires and an
additional overall insulated covering that provides greater E.M.I. immunity and protection
to the shield as well.
S1400CW
Page 5-2
Section 5 - Wiring Techniques
5.2.3 Grounding of Cable Shields
DO NOT connect the cable shield to more than one ground point; it should only be grounded
at one end. Cable shields that are grounded at more than one point or at both ends may
have a tendency to induce circulating currents or sneak circuits that raise havoc with I/O
signals. This will occur when the ground systems associated with multipoint connections to
a cable shield have a high resistance or impedance between them and a ground induced
voltage is developed (for what ever reason, i.e., man made error or nature produced
phenomena).
5.2.4 Use of Known Good Earth Grounds
ControlWave units should only have one connection to earth ground. For ControlWave
and ControlWave MICRO Process Automation Controllers, ControlWave MICRO,
ControlWave EFM Electronic Flow Meters, ControlWave GFC/XFC Gas Flow Computers
and ControlWave I/O Expansion Racks, this connection is provided via the Ground Lug
that is situated on the bottom of the unit. ControlWaveLPs require the installation of a
ground lug, ground bus or ground plate/panel. Since ControlWave units are DC-based
systems, grounding does not take into account AC power grounding considerations. Earth
grounding the unit is absolutely necessary when the unit is equipped with a radio or
modem. Additionally these units should be connected to earth ground when they are
installed in areas that have frequent lightning strikes or are located near or used in
conjunction with equipment that is likely to be struck by lightning or if struck by lightning
may cause equipment or associated system failure. Earth Grounds must be tested and must
be known to be good before connecting the ControlWave. Earth grounds must be
periodically tested and maintained (see Section 4).
5.2.5 Earth Ground Wires
Earth connections must utilize smoothly dressed large wire. Use AWG 3 or 4 stranded
copper wire with as short a length as possible. Exercise care when trimming the insulation
from the wire ends. Twists the strands tightly, trim off any frizzes and tin the ends with
solder. The earth ground wire should be clamped or brazed to the Ground Bed Conductor
(that is typically a standard AWG 0000 copper cable. The earth ground wire should be run
such that any routing bend in the cable is a minimum 8-inch radius above ground or a
minimum 12-inch radius below ground.
5.2.6 Working Neatly & Professionally
Take pride in your work and observe all site and maintenance safety precautions. After
properly trimming the stranded pair wire ends, twist them in the same direction as their
manufacturer did and then tin them with solder. Install the tinned wire end into it’s
connector and then secure the associated connector’s clamping screw. Remember to check
these connections for tightness from time to time. If solid copper wire is used (in
conjunction with the DC Power System or for Earth Ground) make sure that the conductor
is not nicked when trimming off the insulation. Nicked conductors are potential disasters
waiting to happen. Neatly trim shields and whenever possible, coat them to protect them
and prevent shorts and water entry.
Section 5 - Wiring Techniques
Page 5-3
S1400CW
Remember loose connections, bad connections, intermittent connections, corroded connections, etc., are hard to find, waste time, create system problems and confusion in addition to
being costly.
5.2.7 High Power Conductors and Signal Wiring
When routing wires, keep high power conductors away from signal conductors. Space wires
appropriately to vent high voltage inductance. Refer to the National Electrical Code
Handbook for regulatory and technical requirements.
5.2.8 Use of Proper Wire Size
ControlWaves utilize compression-type terminals that accommodate up to #14 AWG gauge
wire. A connection is made by inserting the bared end (1/4 inch max.) into the clamp
beneath the screw and securing the screw.
Allow some slack in the wires when making terminal connections. Slack makes the
connections more manageable and minimizes mechanical strain on the PCB connectors.
Provide external strain relief (utilizing Tie Wrap, etc.) to prevent the loose of slack at the
ControlWave.
Be careful to use wire that is appropriately sized for the load. Refer to equipment
manufacturer’s Specs. and the National Electrical Code Handbook for information on wire
size and wire resistance. After installing the field wiring, test each load to determine if the
correct voltage or current is present at the load. If you know the resistance of the field wires
(Circular Mills x Length) you should be able to calculate the load voltage. Conversely, if you
know the minimum load voltage and current, you should be able to derive the maximum
voltage loss that is allowable due to line resistance and then the correct wire size.
Referring to Figure 5-2, a relay that is picked by 100 mA, with a loop supply voltage of 24V
and a total line resistance of 20 ohms, the load voltage (voltage across the relay) should be:
VL = VS - (VC + VC) where VC + VC = (RC + RC) I
22 = 24 - 2
where 2V
= (20 Ω) x 0.1 A
Figure 5-2 - Calculating Load Voltage due to Line Resistance
5.2.9 Lightning Arresters & Surge Protectors
Use lightning arresters in association with any radio or modem equipped unit. BBI 9600
bps modems are equipped with surge protection circuitry. Lightning arresters or Antenna
S1400CW
Page 5-4
Section 5 - Wiring Techniques
Discharge Units should be placed on the base of the antenna and at the point where the
antenna lead (typically coax) enters the site equipment building. When a modem is used, a
lightning arrester should be placed at the point where the phone line enters the site
equipment building. If you use a modem (manufactured by other than BBI) it is
recommended that you also install a surge suppressors or lightning arrester on the phone
line as close to the modem as possible. Any unit interfaced to a radio or modem must be
connected to a known good earth ground.
5.2.10 Secure Wiring Connections
Make sure that all wiring connections are secure. In time wires that were once round will
become flattened due to the pressure applied by screw compression type terminals and site
vibrations. After a while these compression screws have a tendency to become loose. Part of
a good maintenance routine should be to check and tighten all screws associated with
wiring terminal connections. Avoid nicking the wire(s) when stripping insulation.
Remember, nicked conductors will lead to future problems. Also remember to provide some
cabling slack and strain relief.
If installing stranded or braided wiring that has not been tinned, be sure to tightly twist
the end (in the same direction as manufactured) and then trim off any frizzed wires.
Section 5 - Wiring Techniques
Page 5-5
S1400CW
BLANK PAGE
READER RESPONSE FORM
Please help us make our documentation more useful to you! If you have a complaint, a suggestion, or a correction regarding this manual, please tell us by mailing this page with your
comments. It's the only way we know we're doing our job by giving you correct, complete, and
useful documentation.
DOCUMENT NUMBER: S1400CW
TITLE: ControlWaveTM SITE CONSIDERATIONS For EQUIPMENT INSTALLATION,
GROUNDING & WIRING
ISSUE DATE: APR., 2005
COMMENT/COMPLAINT:
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
Mail this page to:
Bristol Babcock Inc.
1100 Buckingham Street
Watertown, CT 06795
Attn: Technical Publications Group, Dept. 315
Bristol Babcock
1100 Buckingham Street
Watertown, CT 06795
Phone: +1 (860) 945-2200
Fax: +1 (860) 945-2213
Website: www.bristolbabcock.com
U.S.A. Locations:
Northern Region
Bristol Babcock Inc.
1100 Buckingham Street
Watertown, CT 06795
Phone: +1 (860) 945-2381
Fax: +1 (860) 945-2525
NorthernUS@bristolbabcock.com
Helicoid Instruments
1100 Buckingham Street
Watertown, CT 06795
Phone: +1 (860) 945-2218
Fax: +1 (860) 945-2213
jmcgrail@bristolbabcock.com
Gulf Coast Region
Bristol Babcock Inc.
2000 Governor's Circle
Suite F
Houston, TX 77092-8731
Phone: +1 (713) 685-6200
Fax: +1 (713) 681-7331
Western Region
Bristol Babcock Inc.
1609 South Grove Avenue
Suites 106 & 107
Ontario, CA 91761
Phone: +1 (909) 923-8488
Fax: +1 (909) 923-8988
Southeast Region
Bristol Babcock Inc.
317 S. North Lake Blvd.
Suite 1016
Altamonte Springs, FL 32701
Phone: +1 (407) 740-7084
Fax: +1 (407) 629-2106
SouthwestUS@bristolbabcock.com
WesternUS@bristolbabcock.com
SoutheastUS@bristolbabcock.com
Central Region
Bristol Babcock Inc.
300 North Coit Road
Suite 1300
Richardson, TX 75080
Phone: +1 (972) 238-8935
Fax: +1 (972) 238-8198
dallas@bristolbabcock.com
Rocky Mountain Region
Bristol Babcock Inc.
906 San Juan Blvd., Suite A
Farmington, NM 87401
Phone: +1 (505) 320-5046
Fax: +1 (505) 327-3273
Communications
Technology Group
Bristol Babcock Inc.
317 S. North Lake Blvd.
Suite 1016
Altamonte Springs, FL 32701
Phone: +1 (407) 629-9464
Fax: +1 (407) 629-2106
NewMexUS@bristolbabcock.com
orlandoRFgroup@bristolbabcock.com
International Affiliates:
Canada
Bristol Babcock, Canada
234 Attwell Drive
Toronto, Ont. M9W 5B3
Canada
PH: 416-675-3820
FAX: 416-674-5129
info@bristolbabcock.ca
Mexico
BBI, S.A. de C.V.
Homero No. 1343, 3er Piso
Col. Morales Polanco
11540 Mexico, D.F.
Mexico
PH: (52-55)-52-81-81-12
FAX: (52-55)-52-81-81-09
Mexico@bristolbabcock.com
United Kingdom
Bristol Babcock Ltd.
Blackpole Road
Worcester, WR3 8YB
United Kingdom
PH: +44 (0) 1905 856950
FAX: +44 (0) 1905 856969
enquiries@bristol-babcock.com
Asia Pacific
Bristol Babcock, Inc.
PO Box 1987
Bunbury, Western Australia
6231
PH: +61 (0) 8 9791 3654
FAX: +61 (0) 8 9791 3173
dtrench@bdsa.com.au
Victoria, Australia
PH: +61 (0) 3 9384 2171
FAX: +61 (0) 3 8660 2501
Calgary Office
Bristol Babcock, Canada
3812 Edmonton Trail N.E.
Calgary, Alberta T2E 5T6
Canada
PH: 403-265-4808
FAX: 403-233-2914
janetl@bristolbabcock.ca
RC Rev: 05-Feb-04
Villahermosa Office
BBI, S.A. de C.V.
Av. Plomo No.2
Bodega No. 1 - Ciudad
Industrial
Villahermosa, Tabasco 86010
Mexico
PH: 52-993-353-3142
FAX: 52-993-353-3145
bbivsa@prodigy.net.mx
Middle East
Bristol Babcock Ltd.
Blackpole Road
Worcester, WR3 8YB
United Kingdom
PH: +44 (0) 1905 856950
FAX: +44 (0) 1905 856969
enquiries@bristol-babcock.com
ESDS Manual
S14006
4/15/92
CARE AND HANDLING
OF
PC BOARDS
AND
ESD-SENSITIVE
COMPONENTS
BRISTOL BABCOCK
BLANK PAGE
ESDS Manual
S14006
4/15/92
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PAGE
TOOLS AND MATERIALS REQUIRED
1
ESD-SENSITIVE COMPONENT HANDLING PROCEDURE
2
1.
Introduction
2
2.
General Rules
3
3.
Protecting ESD-Sensitive Components
5
4.
Static-Safe Field Procedure
6
5.
Cleaning and Lubricating
8
6.
Completion
10
TOOLS AND MATERIALS REQUIRED
1.
Tools
Anti-Static Field kit. It is recommended that an anti-static field kit be kept on any
site where solid-state printed circuit boards and other ESD-sensitive components are handled. These kits are designed to remove any existing static charge
and to prevent the build-up of a static charge that could damage a PC board or
ESD-sensitive components. The typical anti-static field kit consists of the
following components:
1.
A work surface (10mm conductive plastic sheet with a female snap
fastener in one corner for ground cord attachment).
2.
A 15-foot long ground cord for grounding the work surface.
3.
Wrist strap (available in two sizes, large and small, for proper fit and
comfort) with a female snap fastener for ground cord attachment.
4.
A coiled ground cord with a practical extension length of 10 feet for
attachment to the wrist strap.
Toothbrush (any standard one will do)
1
ESDS Manual
#S14006
4/15/92
2.
Materials
●
Inhibitor (Texwipe Gold Mist ; Chemtronics Gold Guard, or equivalent)
●
Cleaner (Chemtronics Electro-Wash; Freon TF, or equivalent)
●
Wiping cloth (Kimberly-Clark Kim Wipes, or equivalent)
ESD-SENSITIVE COMPONENT HANDLING PROCEDURE
1.
Introduction
Microelectronic devices such as PC boards, chips and other components are electrostatic-sensitive. Electrostatic discharge (ESD) of as few as 110 volts can damage or
disrupt the functioning of such devices. Imagine the damage possible from the 35,000
volts (or more) that you can generate on a dry winter day by simply walking across a
carpet. In fact, you can generate as much as 6,000 volts just working at a bench.
There are two kinds of damage that can be caused by the static charge. The more
severe kind results in complete failure of the PC board or component. This kind of
damage is relatively simple, although often expensive, to remedy by replacing the
affected item(s). The second kind of damage results in a degradation or weakening
which does not result in an outright failure of the component. This kind of damage is
difficult to detect and often results in faulty performance, intermittent failures, and
service calls.
Minimize the risk of ESD-sensitive component damage by preventing static build-up and
by promptly removing any existing charge. Grounding is effective, if the carrier of the
static charge is conductive such as a human body. To protect components from
nonconductive carriers of static charges such as plastic boxes, place the component
in static-shielding bags.
This manual contains general rules to be followed while handling ESD-sensitive
components. Use of the anti-static field kit to properly ground the human body as well
as the work surface is also discussed.
2
ESDS Manual
S14006
4/15/92
Table 1
Typical Electrostatic Voltages
Electrostatic Voltages
Means of Static
Generation
Walking across carpet
Walking over vinyl floor
Worker at bench
Vinyl envelopes for work instructions
Poly bag picked up from bench
Work chair padded with poly foam
2.
10-20 Percent
Relative Humidity
35,000
12,000
6,000
7,000
20,000
18,000
65-90 Percent
Relative Humidity
1,500
250
100
600
1,200
1,500
General Rules
(1)
ESD-sensitive components shall only be removed from their static-shielding
bags by a person who is properly grounded.
(2)
When taken out of their static-shielding bags, ESD-sensitive components shall
never be placed over, or on, a surface which has not been properly grounded.
(3)
ESD-sensitive components shall be handled in such a way that the body does
not come in contact with the conductor paths and board components. Handle
ESD-sensitive components in such a way that they will not suffer damage from
physical abuse or from electric shock.
(4)
EPROMS/PROMS shall be kept in anti-static tubes until they are ready to use
and shall be removed only by a person who is properly grounded.
(5)
When inserting and removing EPROMS/PROMS from PC boards, use a chip
removal tool similar to the one shown in the figure following. Remember, all work
should be performed on a properly grounded surface by a properly-grounded
person.
3
ESDS Manual
#S14006
4/15/92
Typical Chip Removal Tool
4
(6)
It is important to note when inserting EPROMS/PROMS, that the index notch on
the PROM must be matched with the index notch on the socket. Before pushing
the chip into the socket, make sure all the pins are aligned with the respective
socket-holes. Take special care not to crush any of the pins as this could destroy
the chip.
(7)
Power the system down before removing or inserting comb connectors/plugs or
removing and reinstalling PC boards or ESD-sensitive components from card
files or mounting hardware. Follow the power-down procedure applicable to the
system being serviced.
(8)
Handle all defective boards or components with the same care as new components. This helps eliminate damage caused by mishandling. Do not strip used PC
boards for parts. Ship defective boards promptly to Bristol Babcock in a staticshielding bag placed inside static-shielding foam and a box to avoid damage
during shipment.
ESDS Manual
S14006
4/15/92
CAUTION
Don't place ESD-sensitive components and paperwork in the same bag.
The static caused by sliding the paper into the bag could develop a charge and
damage the component(s).
(9)
3.
Include a note, which describes the malfunction, in a separate bag along with each
component being shipped. The repair facility will service the component and
promptly return it to the field.
Protecting ESD-Sensitive Components
(1)
As stated previously, it is recommended that an electrically-conductive anti-static
field kit be kept on any site where ESD-sensitive components are handled. A
recommended ESD-protective workplace arrangement is shown on page 7. The
anti-static safety kit serves to protect the equipment as well as the worker. As a safety
feature, a resistor (usually of the one-megohm, 1/2-watt, current-limiting type) has
been installed in the molded caps of the wrist strap cord and the ground cord. This
resistor limits current should a worker accidently come in contact with a power
source. Do not remove the molded caps from grounded cords. If a cord is damaged,
replace it immediately.
(2)
Be sure to position the work surface so that it does not touch grounded conductive
objects. The protective resistor is there to limit the current which can flow through
the strap. When the work surface touches a grounded conductive object, a short is
created which draws the current flow and defeats the purpose of the current-limiting
resistor.
(3)
Check resistivity of wrist strap periodically using a commercially-available system
tester similar to the one shown in the figure below:
5
ESDS Manual
#S14006
4/15/92
Note: If a system checker is not available, use an ohmmeter connected to the cable
ends to measure its resistance. The ohmmeter reading should be 1 megohm +/15%. Be sure that the calibration date of the ohmmeter has not expired. If the
ohmmeter reading exceeds 1 megohm by +/- 15%, replace the ground cord with a
new one.
4.
Static-safe Field Procedure
6
(1)
On reaching the work location, unfold and lay out the work surface on a convenient
surface (table or floor). Omit this step if the table or floor has a built-in ESD-safe work
surface.
(2)
Attach the ground cord to the work surface via the snap fasteners and attach the
other end of the ground cord to a reliable ground using an alligator clip.
(3)
Note which boards or components are to be inserted or replaced.
(4)
Power-down the system following the recommended power-down procedure.
(5)
Slip on a known-good wristband, which should fit snugly; an extremely loose fit is not
desirable.
(6)
Snap the ground cord to the wristband. Attach the other end of the ground cord to
a reliable ground using the alligator clip.
ESDS Manual
S14006
4/15/92
(7)
The components can now be handled following the general rules as described
in the instruction manual for the component.
(8)
Place the component in a static-shielding bag before the ground cord is
disconnected. This assures protection from electrostatic charge in case the work
surface is located beyond the reach of the extended ground cord.
C
D
✰R
E
A
F
R
G
B
R
R
EARTH GROUND
FLOOR
OF
BUILDING
LEGEND
A
- Chair with ground (optional)
B
- ESD protective floor mat (optional)
C
- Wrist strap
D
- ESD protective trays, etc.
E
- Ionizer
F
- Other electrical equipment
G
- Workbench with ESD protective table top
✰ NOTE: ALL RESISTORS 1M Ω +/-10% 1/2W
7
ESDS Manual
#S14006
4/15/92
5.
(9)
If a component is to undergo on-site testing, it may be safely placed on the
grounded work surface for that purpose.
(10)
After all component work is accomplished, remove the wrist straps and ground
wire and place in the pouch of the work surface for future use.
Cleaning And Lubricating
The following procedure should be performed periodically for all PC boards and
when a PC board is being replaced.
CAUTION
Many PC board connectors are covered with a very fine gold-plate.
Do not use any abrasive cleaning substance or object such as a pencil eraser to
clean connectors.
Use only the approved cleaner/lubricants specified in the procedure following.
WARNING
Aerosol cans and products are extremely combustible.
Contact with a live circuit, or extreme heat can cause an
explosion.
Turn OFF all power and find an isolated, and ventilated
area to use any aerosol products specified in this procedure.
(1)
8
Turn the main line power OFF. Blow or vacuum out the component. This should
remove potential sources of dust or dirt contamination during the remainder of
this procedure.
ESDS Manual
S14006
4/15/92
(2)
Clean PC board connectors as follows:
a.
Review the static-safe field procedure detailed earlier.
b.
Following the ESD-sensitive component handling procedures, remove
the connectors from the boards and remove the PC boards from their
holders.
c.
Use cleaner to remove excessive dust build-up from comb connectors
and other connectors. This cleaner is especially useful for removing dust.
d.
Liberally spray all PC board contacts with Inhibitor. The inhibitor:
●
Provides a long lasting lubricant and leaves a protective film to
guard against corrosion
●
Improves performance and reliability
●
Extends the life of the contacts
●
Is nonconductive, and is safe for use on most plastics
e.
Clean the comb contacts using a lint-free wiping cloth.
f.
Lightly mist all comb contacts again with Inhibitor.
NOTE: Do not use so much Inhibitor that it drips.
g.
(3)
Repeat the above procedure for the other PC boards from the device.
Cleaning PC edge connectors
a.
Use cleaner to remove excessive dust build-up from connectors. This
cleaner is especially useful for removing dust.
b.
Liberally spray the outboard connector with Inhibitor.
c.
Lightly brush the outboard connector with a soft, non-metallic, bristle
brush such as a toothbrush.
9
ESDS Manual
#S14006
4/15/92
6.
10
d.
Spray the connector liberally to flush out any contaminants.
e.
Remove any excess spray by shaking the connector or wiping with either
a toothbrush, or a lint-free wiping cloth.
Completion
(1)
Replace any parts that were removed.
(2)
Make sure that the component cover is secure.
(3)
Return the system to normal operation.
(4)
Check that the component operates normally.
BLANK PAGE
ControlWaveLP Low Power PAC
Emerson Process Management
Bristol, Inc.
1100 Buckingham Street
Watertown, CT 06795
Phone: +1 (860) 945-2262
Fax: +1 (860) 945-2525
www.EmersonProcess.com/Bristol
Emerson Electric Canada, Ltd.
Bristol Canada
6338 Viscount Rd.
Mississauga, Ont. L4V 1H3
Canada
Phone: 905-362-0880
Fax: 905-362-0882
www.EmersonProcess.com/Bristol
Emerson Process Management
BBI, S.A. de C.V.
Homero No. 1343, 3er Piso
Col. Morales Polanco
11540 Mexico, D.F.
Mexico
Phone: (52-55)-52-81-81-12
Fax: (52-55)-52-81-81-09
www.EmersonProcess.com/Bristol
Emerson Process Management
Bristol Babcock, Ltd.
Blackpole Road
Worcester, WR3 8YB
United Kingdom
Phone: +44 1905 856950
Fax: +44 1905 856969
www.EmersonProcess.com/Bristol
Emerson Process Management
Bristol, Inc.
22 Portofino Crescent,
Grand Canals Bunbury, Western Australia 6230
Mail to: PO Box 1987 (zip 6231)
Phone: +61 (8) 9725-2355
Fax: +61 (8) 8 9725-2955
www.EmersonProcess.com/Bristol
Customer Instruction Manual
CI-ControlWaveLP
Oct., 2006
The information in this document is subject to change without notice. Every effort has
been made to supply complete and accurate information. However, Bristol, Inc.
assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in this document.
If you have comments or questions regarding this manual, please direct them to your
local Bristol sales representative, or direct them to one of the addresses listed at left.
Bristol, Inc. does not guarantee the accuracy, sufficiency or suitability of the software
delivered herewith. The Customer shall inspect and test such software and other
materials to his/her satisfaction before using them with important data.
There are no warranties, expressed or implied, including those of merchantability and
fitness for a particular purpose, concerning the software and other materials delivered
herewith.
TeleFlow™ is a trademark of Bristol, Inc. The Emerson logo is a trade mark and service
mark of Emerson Electric Co. Other trademarks or copyrighted products mentioned in
this document are for information only, and belong to their respective companies, or
trademark holders.
Copyright (c) 2006, Bristol, Inc., 1100 Buckingham St., Watertown, CT 06795. No part
of this manual may be reproduced in any form without the express written permission of
Bristol Inc.