®
Diagnostic
Repair
Manual
Liquid-Cooled Product
MODELS:
2.4 Liter Engine
R-200B Controller
22kW
27kW
36kW
45kW
60kW
Automatic standby generators
SAFETY
Throughout this publication the safety alert symbol (*) is used with signal words. DANGER, WARNING, and
CAUTION blocks are used to alert the mechanic to special instructions concerning a particular service or
operation that might be hazardous if performed incorrectly or carelessly. PAY CLOSE ATTENTION TO THEM.
*
*
*
DANGER! Under this heading will be found special instructions which, if not complied with, will result in
personal injury or death.
WARNING! Under this heading will be found special instructions which, if not complied with, could result
in personal injury or death.
CAUTION! Under this heading will be found special instructions which, if not complied with, could result
in damage to equipment and/or property, and/or might result in minor or moderate injury.
These “Safety Alerts” alone cannot eliminate the hazards that they signal. Strict compliance with these special
instructions plus “common sense” are major accident prevention measures.
NOTICE TO USERS OF THIS MANUAL
This SERVICE MANUAL has been written and published by Generac to aid our dealers' mechanics and
company service personnel when servicing the products described herein.
This SERVICE MANUAL is not intended for general public consumers without specialized training and
knowledge in servicing generators.
It is assumed that these personnel are familiar with the servicing procedures for these products, or like or
similar products manufactured and marketed by Generac. That they have been trained in the recommended
servicing procedures for these products, including the use of common hand tools and any special Generac
tools or tools from other suppliers.
Generac could not possibly know of and advise the service trade of all conceivable procedures by which a
service might be performed and of the possible hazards and/or results of each method. We have not undertaken any such wide evaluation. Therefore, anyone who uses a procedure or tool not recommended by
Generac must first satisfy themselves that neither his nor the products safety will be endangered by the service procedure selected.
All information, illustrations and specifications in this manual are based on the latest product information
available at the time of publication.
When working on these products, remember that the electrical system and engine ignition system are capable of violent and damaging short circuits or severe electrical shocks. If you intend to perform work where
electrical terminals could be grounded or touched, the battery cables should be disconnected at the battery.
Any time the intake or exhaust openings of the engine are exposed during service, they should be covered to
prevent accidental entry of foreign material. Entry of such materials will result in extensive damage when the
engine Is started.
During any maintenance procedure, replacement fasteners must have the same measurements and
strength as the fasteners that were removed. Metric bolts and nuts have numbers that indicate their strength.
Customary bolts use radial lines to indicate strength while most customary nuts do not have strength markings. Mismatched or incorrect fasteners can cause damage, malfunction and possible injury.
REPLACEMENT PARTS
When servicing this equipment, it is extremely important that all components be properly installed and tightened. If improperly installed and tightened, sparks could ignite fuel vapors from fuel system leaks.
Page ii
Table of Contents
Specifications........................................................... 4
Generator Specifications.....................................4
Engine Specifications..........................................4
Service Recommendations.................................4
22kW Operating Data..........................................5
27kW Operating Data..........................................6
36kW Operating Data..........................................7
45kW Operating Data..........................................8
60kW Operating Data..........................................9
Rotor/Stator Resistance Tables ........................10
Part 1 – General Information................................. 11
Section 1.1 – Generator Basics............................. 12
Introduction........................................................13
Troubleshooting.................................................13
Tech Tips...........................................................13
Units with Liquid-Cooled Engine.......................13
Section 1.2 – Installation Basics............................ 14
Introduction........................................................14
Selecting a Location..........................................14
Mounting the Generator....................................14
Grounding the Generator..................................14
The Fuel Supply................................................14
The Transfer Switch...........................................16
Power Source and Load Lines..........................16
System Control Interconnections......................16
Section 1.3 – Preparation Before Use.................... 17
General..............................................................17
Fuel Requirements............................................17
Reconfiguring the Fuel System.........................17
Section 1.4 – Testing, Cleaning and Drying........... 19
Visual Inspection...............................................19
Measuring Voltages...........................................19
Measuring Current.............................................19
Measuring Resistance.......................................19
Insulation Resistance........................................19
Stator Insulation Tests.......................................20
Testing Rotor Insulation.....................................21
Cleaning the Generator.....................................21
Drying the Generator.........................................21
Section 1.5 – Operating Instructions...................... 22
Control Panel.....................................................22
To Select Automatic Operation..........................23
Manual Transfer to “Standby” and
Manual Startup..................................................23
Manual Shutdown and Retransfer
Back to “Utility”...................................................23
Exercise Feature...............................................24
Section 1.6 – Automatic Operating Parameters..... 25
Introduction........................................................25
Automatic Operating Sequences.......................25
Automatic operating sequences chart...............26
Section 1.7 – Wire Removal,
Replacement & Testing..................... 27
Section 1.8 – Basic Maintenance Information........ 28
Service Maintenance Interval Information:........28
Battery Maintenance and Handling
Recommendations:............................................29
Belts..................................................................32
Air Filters...........................................................34
Oil Filters...........................................................35
Spark.................................................................35
Hoses................................................................38
Section 1.9 – Turbocharger Systems..................... 40
Introduction........................................................40
Turbocharger Troubleshooting...........................41
Part 2 – Liquid-cooled AC Generators.................. 43
Section 2.1 – Description and Major Components.44
Introduction........................................................44
Engine Adaptor..................................................44
Flexible Disk......................................................44
Fan and Ring Gear Assembly...........................44
Rotor Assembly.................................................44
Rear Bearing Carrier.........................................44
Stator Assembly................................................44
Rear Bearing Carrier Plate................................44
Brush Holders and Brushes..............................44
The Excitation Circuit........................................46
Field Boost........................................................48
Section 2.2 – Operational Analysis........................ 49
Magnetism.........................................................49
Electromagnetism..............................................49
Electromagnetic Induction.................................49
Operation...........................................................50
Section 2.3 – Troubleshooting Flowcharts............. 51
Problem 1 – Generator Produces Zero
Voltage or Residual Voltage.........51
Problem 2 – Generator Produces
Low Voltage at No-Load...............53
Problem 3 – Generator Produces
High Voltage at No-Load..............53
Problem 4 – Voltage and Frequency Drop
Excessively When Loads Are
Applied.........................................54
Section 2.4 – Diagnostic Tests............................... 55
Introduction........................................................55
Safety................................................................55
Test 1 – Check Main Circuit Breaker.................55
Page 1
Table of Contents
Test 2 – Test Excitation Circuit Breaker..............55
Test 3 – Test Field Boost Circuit.........................56
Test 4 – Fixed Excitation Test/
Rotor Amp Draw Test..........................56
Test 5 – Test Thermal Protector..........................58
Test 6 – Test R4 Resistor....................................59
Test 7 – Test BR1 Diode.....................................59
Test 8 – Test Wire 14 Field Boost.......................59
Test 9 – Test Harness Continuity........................60
Test 10 – Automatic Voltage Regulator...............60
Test 11 – Test Wire 14 AVR Input Circuit............61
Test 12 – Test Stator...........................................61
Test 13 – Test Rotor Assembly...........................64
Test 14 – Check AC Output Voltage...................65
Test 15 – Test AC Output Frequency..................65
Test 16 – Adjust Voltage Regulator....................66
Test 17 – Test Voltage and
Frequency Under Load.......................65
Test 18 – Test for an Overload Condition............66
Test 19 – Test Engine Condition.........................66
Part 3 – DC Control Liquid-cooled Engine Units.67
Section 3.1 – Description and Major Components.68
Control Console Components...........................68
Engine Mounted Components...........................72
Engine Protective Devices/Shutdowns..............74
Section 3.2 – Operational Analysis........................ 79
Introduction........................................................79
Utility Available, SW1 in AUTO..........................80
Utility Failure, Engine Cranking,
SW1 in AUTO....................................................84
Utility failure, Engine Running,
SW1 in AUTO....................................................88
Section 3.3 – Troubleshooting Flowcharts............. 90
Problem 9 – Unit will Not Crank When
AUTO-OFF-MANUAL
Switch is Set to MANUAL............90
Problem 10 – Engine Will Not Crank
When Utility Power
Source Fails.................................91
Problem 11 – Engine Will Not Crank
With a 2-Wire Start......................92
Problem 12 – Unit Cranks,
but Will Not Start..........................93
Problem 13 – Unit Starts and Runs
Then Shuts Down........................94
Problem 14 – Unit Cranks and Starts,
but Backfires................................94
Problem 15 – Unit Starts Hard and
Runs Rough/Lacks Power...........94
Problem 16 – Unit Starts and Transfer Occurs
When Utility Power is Available....95
Page 2
Problem 17 – Generator Starts Immediately In
AUTO. No Transfer To Standby.
Utility Voltage Present..................95
Problem 18 – Generator Will Not Exercise.......95
Problem 19 – Will Not Low Speed Exercise.....95
Problem 20 – High Temp/Low Coolant
(Flashing LED).............................96
Problem 21 – High Temp/Low Coolant
(Solid LED)..................................96
Problem 22 – Low Oil Pressure........................96
Problem 23 – Low Battery Alarm/
Dead Battery................................97
Problem 24 – Overspeed LED Flashing...........98
Problem 25 – Overspeed LED Solid.................98
Problem 26 – 15 Amp Fuse Blows...................98
Problem 27 – Low Fuel Pressure
LED Flashing...............................98
Section 3.4 – Diagnostic Tests............................... 99
Introduction........................................................99
Safety................................................................99
Test 25 – Check Voltage at Battery....................99
Test 26 – Check Battery Voltage at
TB1 Terminal Strip..............................99
Test 27 – Check 15 AMP Fuse (F1)...................99
Test 28 – Check Battery Voltage at
15 Amp Fuse (F1).............................100
Test 29 – Check Battery Voltage at
AUTO-OFF-MANUAL
Switch (SW1)....................................100
Test 30 – Test AUTO-OFF-MANUAL Switch.....100
Test 31 – Check Battery Voltage at Exercise
Switch (SW2)....................................101
Test 32 – Check Control board Dip switches....101
Test 33 – Check Engine CRANK Relay (RL1)..101
Test 34 – Check Battery Voltage at
Starter Contactor Relay (SCR).........103
Test 35 – Check Battery Voltage at
Starter Motor (SM)............................103
Test 36 – Testing Starter Motor........................103
Test 41 – Check AUTO-OFF-MANUAL
Switch Position..................................105
Test 42 – Try a Manual Start.............................105
Test 43 – Check Maintenance
Disconnect Switch............................105
Test 44 – Check Status Ready Light................106
Test 45 – Check Position of Dip Switch 2.........106
Test 46 – Check Battery Voltage at
J2 Connector....................................106
Test 47 – Check Voltage at
AUTO-OFF MANUAL (SW1)
& Exercise (SW2) Switches..............106
Test 48 – Test Exercise Switch (SW2)..............107
Test 49 – Check Wires 0, 15A, 15E..................107
Table of Contents
Test 55 – Attempt a 2-Wire Start......................107
Test 56 – Check Voltage on Wire 183...............107
Test 57 – Check Wire 183 ...............................108
Test 58 – Check Wire 178................................108
Test 62 – Check for spark.................................108
Test 63 – Check the Condition
of the Spark Plugs............................108
Test 64 – Check Ignition Coils..........................109
Test 65 – Check Ignition Control Module..........109
Test 66 – Check DC voltage Inputs
to Ignition Module.............................110
Test 67 – Check Crank Sensor.........................111
Test 68 – Check Fuel Supply and
Fuel Pressure to the Unit..................112
Test 69 – Check Wire 14 For Battery Voltage...113
Test 70 – Check Engine Run Relay (RL2)........113
Test 71 – Check Cam Sensor...........................114
Test 72 – Check Fuel Regulator ......................114
Test 73 – Check Governor Driver.....................115
Test 74 – Check Actuator
and Mixer Function...........................116
Test 75 – Checking Wiring Harness.................118
Test 76 – Check Engine Compression
and Condition....................................118
Test 81 – Check N1 and N2 Sensing Voltage...118
Test 82 – Test Transformer (TR1).....................118
Test 83 – Check Voltage at
Printed Circuit Board.........................119
Test 87 – Test Automatic Sequence.................119
Test 91 – Check Position of Dipswitch 3...........119
Test 95 – Check the Coolant Temperature at
Thermal Adapter...............................119
Test 96 – Check Coolant Level.........................120
Test 97 – Check Coolant Hoses.......................120
Test 98 – Check Low Coolant Level Sensor.....120
Test 99 – Check Wire 573 to
Printed Circuit Board.........................121
Test 104 – Check oil level.................................121
Test 105 – Check Engine Oil Pressure.............121
Test 106 – Check Wire 86 for continuity...........121
Test 107 – Check Wire 86 for a
Short to Ground................................122
Test 108 – Check Low oil Pressure Switch......122
Test 110 – Check Battery Conditions...............122
Test 111 – Check Battery Voltage at PCB........122
Test 112 – Check Low Battery
Sensing at PCB................................122
Test 113 – Check Battery Charger
120VAC Input....................................123
Test 114 – Check 120VAC Input to
Customer Connection.......................123
Test 115 – Check Battery Charger Output ......123
Test 116 – Test Low Fuel Pressure Switch.......123
Test 122 – Check Wires 79 and 0.....................124
Test 123 – Check Battery Voltage Circuit.........125
Test 124 – Check Cranking and
Running Circuits...............................126
Part 4 – Generator Adjustments
and Accessories..................................... 129
Section 4.1 – Adjustments................................... 130
Voltage Regulator
Adjustment and Installation.............................130
Crank Sensor Installation and Adjustments....131
Cam Sensor Installation and Adjustments......132
Section 4.2 – Accessories.................................... 135
Cold Weather Start Install Instructions............135
Block Heater Install Instructions......................135
Section 4.3 – Torque Specifications..................... 138
Engine Torque Specifications..........................138
Alternator Torque Specifications......................139
Part 5 – Electrical Data......................................... 141
Wiring Diagram.................................................... 142
Electrical Schematic............................................. 144
Alternator Configurations..................................... 146
Electrical Formulas.............................................. 152
Page 3
Specifications
GENERATOR SPECIFICATIONS
TYPE..................................................................................................Synchronous
ROTOR INSULATION................................................................................. Class H
STATOR INSULATION................................................................................ Class H
TOTAL HARMONIC DISTORTION...................................................................<5%
TELEPHONE INTERFERENCE FACTOR (TIF)................................................<50
ALTERNATOR OUTPUT LEADS 3 PHASE.................................................. 4 wire
BEARINGS............................................................................................Sealed Ball
COUPLING..........................................................................................Flexible Disc
EXCITATION SYSTEM.................................................................................. Direct
VOLTAGE REGULATOR:
TYPE....................................................................................................... Electronic
SENSING...........................................................................................Single Phase
REGULATION..................................................................................................± 1%
FEATURES..................................V/F Adjustable Voltage and Gain LED Indicators
ENGINE SPECIFICATIONS
MAKE....................................................................................................... Generac
MODEL........................................................................................................ Inline 4
CYLINDERS..........................................................................................................4
DISPLACEMENT........................................................................................2.4 Liter
BORE...............................................................................................................3.41
STROKE...........................................................................................................3.94
COMPRESSION RATIO..................................................................................8.5:1
INTAKE AIR SYSTEM...............................................................Naturally Aspirated
VALVE SEATS......................................................................................... Hardened
LIFTER TYPE...........................................................................................Hydraulic
GOVERNOR SPECIFICATIONS:
TYPE....................................................................................................... Electronic
FREQUENCY REGULATION.............................................................. Isochronous
STEADY STATE REGULATION.....................................................................± 0.25
ADJUSTMENTS FOR:
Speed............................................................................................ Yes
Droop............................................................................................. Yes
ENGINE LUBRICATION SYSTEM:
OIL PUMP.......................................................................................................Gear
OIL FILTER.....................................................................Full flow spin-on cartridge
CRANKCASE CAPACITY..........................................................................4 Quarts
ENGINE COOLING SYSTEM:
TYPE............................................................................................................Closed
WATER PUMP........................................................................................Belt driven
FAN SPEED....................................................................................................1980
FAN DIAMETER................................................................................. 17.75 inches
FAN MODE.................................................................................................. Pusher
SERVICE RECOMMENDATIONS
ENGINE OIL:
The unit has been filled with 15W-20 engine oil at the
factory. Use a high-quality detergent oil classified “For
Service SJ or latest available.” Detergent oils keep the
engine cleaner and reduce carbon deposits. Use oil
having the following SAE viscosity rating, based on
the ambient temperature range anticipated before the
next oil change.
Temperature
Oil Grade (Recommended)
Above 80° F (27° C)
SAE 30W or 15W-40
32° to 80° F (-1° to 27° C)
SAE 20W-20 or 15W-40
Below 32° F (0° C)
SAE 10W or 15W-40
NOTE: Synthetic oil is highly recommended when
the generator will be operating in ambient temperatures which regularly exceed 90° F and/or fall
below 30° F.
Any attempt to crank or start the engine
before it has been properly serviced with the
recommended oil may result in an engine
failure.
*
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM:
BATTERY CHARGE ALTERNATOR.................................................... 12V 30 Amp
STATIC BATTERY CHARGER...................................................................... 2 Amp
RECOMMENDED BATTERY.................................................... Group 26, 525CCA
SYSTEM VOLTAGE.................................................................................... 12 Volts
FUEL SYSTEM:
FUEL TYPE................................................................. Natural gas, propane vapor
CARBURETOR.....................................................................................Down Draft
SECONDARY FUEL REGULATOR.......................................................... Standard
FUEL SHUT OFF SOLENOID.................................................................. Standard
OPERATING FUEL PRESSURE......................................................... 5” - 14” H2O
Fuel pressure for a natural gas and liquid propane is 5 in – 14 in of water
column at all load ranges, however optimal performance is achieved between
8 – 11 inches of water column.
Page 4
Coolant:
Use a mixture of half low silicate ethylene glycol base
anti-freeze and de-ionized water. Cooling system
capacity is about 3.0 U.S. gallons. Use only de-ionized
water and only low silicate anti-freeze. If desired, add
a high quality rust inhibitor to the recommended coolant mixture. When adding coolant, always add the
recommended 50-50 mixture.
Do not use any chromate base rust inhibitor
with ethylene glycol base anti-freeze or
chromiumhydroxide (“green slime”) forms and
will cause overheating. Engines that have been
operated with a chromate base rust inhibitor
must be chemically cleaned before adding
ethylene glycol base anti-freeze. Using any high
silicate anti-freeze boosters or additives will
also cause overheating. It is also recommended
that any soluble oil inhibitor is not used for this
equipment.
*
Specifications
OPERATING DATA
KW RATING
22
ENGINE SIZE
2.4 Liter Inline 4
GENERATOR OUTPUT VOLTAGE/KW - 60Hz
KW
AMP
CB Size
120/240V, 1-phase, 1.0 pf
22
92
100
120/208V, 3-phase, 0.8 pf
22
76
80
120/240V, 3-phase, 0.8 pf
22
66
80
GENERATOR LOCKED ROTOR KVA
AVAILABLE @ VOLTAGE DIP OF 35%
Single phase or 208 3-phase
ENGINE FUEL CONSUMPTION* (Natural Gas) (Propane)
43
Natural Gas
(ft3/hr.)
Propane
(gal/hr.)
cu ft/hr
Exercise cycle
42
0.44
16
25% of rated load
100
1.0
38
50% of rated load
190
2.0
72
75% of rated load
255
2.7
98
100% of rated load
316
3.3
120
ENGINE COOLING
Air flow (inlet air including alternator and combustion air)
ft3/min.
2,400
System coolant capacity
US gal.
2.5
Heat rejection to coolant
BTU/hr.
99,000
Max. operating air temp. on radiator
°C (°F)
60 (150)
Max. ambient temperature
°C (°F)
50 (140)
COMBUSTION AIR REQUIREMENTS
Flow at rated power 60 Hz
cfm
68
Exercising at 7 meters
61
Normal operation at 7 meters
70
SOUND EMISSIONS IN DBA
EXHAUST
Exhaust flow at rated output 60 Hz
Exhaust temp. at muffler outlet
ENGINE PARAMETERS
Rated synchronous RPM
HP at rated KW
cfm
165
°F
900
60 Hz
1800
60 Hz
40
POWER ADJUSTMENT FOR AMBIENT CONDITIONS
Temperature Deration
3% for every 10 °C above - °C
25
1.65% for every 10 °F above - °F
77
1% for every 100 m above - m
183
3% for every 1000 ft. above - ft.
600
Altitude Deration
* Fuel consumption is given at rated maximum continuous power output when using natural gas rated at 1000 Btu per cubic foot and LP gas rated 2520 Btu per
cubic foot. Actual fuel consumption obtained may vary depending on such variables as applied load, ambient temperature, engine conditions and other environmental factors.
Page 5
Specifications
OPERATING DATA
KW RATING
27
ENGINE SIZE
2.4 Liter Inline 4
GENERATOR OUTPUT VOLTAGE/KW - 60Hz
KW Nat. Gas
AMP
KW LPG
120/240V, 1-phase, 1.0 pf
25
104
27
112
125
120/208V, 3-phase, 0.8 pf
25
87
27
94
100
120/240V, 3-phase, 0.8 pf
25
75
27
81
90
GENERATOR LOCKED ROTOR KVA
AVAILABLE @ VOLTAGE DIP OF 35%
Single phase or 208 3-phase
ENGINE FUEL CONSUMPTION* (Natural Gas) (Propane)
AMP CB Size (Both)
43
Natural Gas
(ft3/hr.)
Propane
(gal/hr.)
cu ft/hr
Exercise cycle
42
0.44
16
25% of rated load
108
1.2
44
50% of rated load
197
2.2
81
75% of rated load
287
3.2
118
100% of rated load
359
4.1
147
ENGINE COOLING
Air flow (inlet air including alternator and combustion air)
ft3/min.
2,400
System coolant capacity
US gal.
2.5
Heat rejection to coolant
BTU/hr.
120,000
Max. operating air temp. on radiator
°C (°F)
60 (150)
Max. ambient temperature
°C (°F)
50 (140)
COMBUSTION AIR REQUIREMENTS
Flow at rated power 60 Hz
cfm
68
Exercising at 7 meters
62
Normal operation at 7 meters
75
SOUND EMISSIONS IN DBA
EXHAUST
Exhaust flow at rated output 60 Hz
Exhaust temp. at muffler outlet
ENGINE PARAMETERS
Rated synchronous RPM
HP at rated KW
cfm
130
°F
900
60 Hz
1800
60 Hz
40
POWER ADJUSTMENT FOR AMBIENT CONDITIONS
Temperature Deration
3% for every 10 °C above - °C
25
1.65% for every 10 °F above - °F
77
1% for every 100 m above - m
183
3% for every 1000 ft. above - ft.
600
Altitude Deration
* Fuel consumption is given at rated maximum continuous power output when using natural gas rated at 1000 Btu per cubic foot and LP gas rated 2520 Btu per
cubic foot. Actual fuel consumption obtained may vary depending on such variables as applied load, ambient temperature, engine conditions and other environmental factors.
Page 6
Specifications
OPERATING DATA
KW RATING
36/35
ENGINE SIZE
2.4 Liter Inline 4
GENERATOR OUTPUT VOLTAGE/KW - 60Hz
KW LPG
AMP
KW Nat. Gas
120/240V, 1-phase, 1.0 pf
36
150
35
146
175
120/208V, 3-phase, 0.8 pf
36
125
35
121
150
120/240V, 3-phase, 0.8 pf
36
108
35
105
125
277/480V, 3-phase, 0.8 pf
36
54
35
52
60
GENERATOR LOCKED ROTOR KVA
AVAILABLE @ VOLTAGE DIP OF 35%
Single phase or 208 3-phase
63
480V 3-phase
84
ENGINE FUEL CONSUMPTION* (Natural Gas) (Propane)
Natural
Gas
(ft3/hr.)
AMP CB Size (Both)
Propane
(gal/hr.)
cu ft/hr
Exercise cycle
87
0.96
35.2
25% of rated load
156
1.67
60.8
50% of rated load
282
3.0
110
75% of rated load
392
4.2
153
100% of rated load
503
5.4
196
ENGINE COOLING
Air flow (inlet air including alternator and combustion air)
ft3/min.
2,200
System coolant capacity
US gal.
2.5
Heat rejection to coolant
BTU/hr.
135,000
Max. operating air temp. on radiator
°C (°F)
60 (150)
Max. ambient temperature
°C (°F)
50 (140)
COMBUSTION AIR REQUIREMENTS
Flow at rated power 60 Hz
cfm
106
Exercising at 7 meters
58
Normal operation at 7 meters
64
SOUND EMISSIONS IN DBA
EXHAUST
Exhaust flow at rated output 60 Hz
Exhaust temp. at muffler outlet
ENGINE PARAMETERS
Rated synchronous RPM
HP at rated KW
cfm
300
°F
1075
60 Hz
1800
60 Hz
56
POWER ADJUSTMENT FOR AMBIENT CONDITIONS
Temperature Deration
3% for every 10 °C above - °C
25
1.65% for every 10 °F above - °F
77
Altitude Deration
1% for every 100 m above - m
915
3% for every 1000 ft. above - ft.
3000
* Fuel consumption is given at rated maximum continuous power output when using natural gas rated at 1000 Btu per cubic foot and LP gas rated 2520 Btu per
cubic foot. Actual fuel consumption obtained may vary depending on such variables as applied load, ambient temperature, engine conditions and other environmental factors.
Page 7
Specifications
OPERATING DATA
KW RATING
45
ENGINE SIZE
2.4 Liter Inline 4
GENERATOR OUTPUT VOLTAGE/KW - 60Hz
KW
AMP
CB Size
120/240V, 1-phase, 1.0 pf
45
188
200
120/208V, 3-phase, 0.8 pf
45
156
175
120/240V, 3-phase, 0.8 pf
45
135
150
277/480V, 3-phase, 0.8 pf
45
68
80
GENERATOR LOCKED ROTOR KVA
AVAILABLE @ VOLTAGE DIP OF 35%
Single phase or 208 3-phase
100
480V 3-phase
110
ENGINE FUEL CONSUMPTION* (Natural Gas) (Propane)
Natural Gas
(ft3/hr.)
Propane
(gal/hr.)
cu ft/hr
Exercise cycle
102
1.11
40.4
25% of rated load
194
2.12
77.1
50% of rated load
373
4.07
148
75% of rated load
520
5.67
206.3
100% of rated load
720
7.86
286
ENGINE COOLING
Air flow (inlet air including alternator and combustion air)
ft3/min.
2,725
System coolant capacity
US gal.
3.0
Heat rejection to coolant
BTU/hr.
173,000
Max. operating air temp. on radiator
°C (°F)
60 (150)
Max. ambient temperature
°C (°F)
50 (140)
COMBUSTION AIR REQUIREMENTS
Flow at rated power 60 Hz
cfm
144
Exercising at 7 meters
61
Normal operation at 7 meters
73
SOUND EMISSIONS IN DBA
EXHAUST
Exhaust flow at rated output 60 Hz
Exhaust temp. at muffler outlet
ENGINE PARAMETERS
Rated synchronous RPM
HP at rated KW
cfm
429
°F
1150
60 Hz
3600
60 Hz
71
POWER ADJUSTMENT FOR AMBIENT CONDITIONS
Temperature Deration
3% for every 10 °C above - °C
25
1.65% for every 10 °F above - °F
77
1% for every 100 m above - m
183
3% for every 1000 ft. above - ft.
600
Altitude Deration
* Fuel consumption is given at rated maximum continuous power output when using natural gas rated at 1000 Btu per cubic foot and LP gas rated 2520 Btu per
cubic foot. Actual fuel consumption obtained may vary depending on such variables as applied load, ambient temperature, engine conditions and other environmental factors.
Page 8
Specifications
OPERATING DATA
KW RATING
60
ENGINE SIZE
2.4 Liter Inline 4
GENERATOR OUTPUT VOLTAGE/KW - 60Hz
KW
AMP
CB Size
120/240V, 1-phase, 1.0 pf
60
250
300
120/208V, 3-phase, 0.8 pf
60
208
250
120/240V, 3-phase, 0.8 pf
60
180
200
277/480V, 3-phase, 0.8 pf
60
90
100
GENERATOR LOCKED ROTOR KVA
AVAILABLE @ VOLTAGE DIP OF 35%
Single phase or 208 3-phase
120
480V 3-phase
141
ENGINE FUEL CONSUMPTION* (Natural Gas) (Propane)
Natural Gas
(ft3/hr.)
Propane
(gal/hr.)
cu ft/hr
Exercise cycle
123
1.34
49.3
25% of rated load
267
2.7
101
50% of rated load
483
5.0
183
75% of rated load
672
7.0
255
100% of rated load
862
9.0
327
ENGINE COOLING
Air flow (inlet air including alternator and combustion air)
ft3/min.
3,280
System coolant capacity
US gal.
2.5
Heat rejection to coolant
BTU/hr.
270,000
Max. operating air temp. on radiator
°C (°F)
60 (150)
Max. ambient temperature
°C (°F)
50 (140)
COMBUSTION AIR REQUIREMENTS
Flow at rated power 60 Hz
cfm
180
Exercising at 7 meters
65
Normal operation at 7 meters
72
SOUND EMISSIONS IN DBA
EXHAUST
Exhaust flow at rated output 60 Hz
Exhaust temp. at muffler outlet
ENGINE PARAMETERS
Rated synchronous RPM
HP at rated KW
cfm
494
°F
1,050
60 Hz
3600
60 Hz
94
POWER ADJUSTMENT FOR AMBIENT CONDITIONS
Temperature Deration
3% for every 10 °C above - °C
25
1.65% for every 10 °F above - °F
77
1% for every 100 m above - m
915
3% for every 1000 ft. above - ft.
3000
Altitude Deration
* Fuel consumption is given at rated maximum continuous power output when using natural gas rated at 1000 Btu per cubic foot and LP gas rated 2520 Btu per
cubic foot. Actual fuel consumption obtained may vary depending on such variables as applied load, ambient temperature, engine conditions and other environmental factors.
Page 9
Specifications
ROTOR/STATOR RESISTANCE TABLES
Rotors
Resistance
22 kW 1-Phase 4 Pole 1800 RPM
6.81 Ohms
22 kW 3-Phase 4 Pole 1800 RPM
6.46 Ohms
27 kW 1-Phase 4 Pole 1800 RPM
7.80 Ohms
27 kW 3-Phase 4 Pole 1800 RPM
7.56 Ohms
36 kW 1-Phase 4 Pole 1800 RPM
8.10 Ohms
36 kW 3-Phase 4 Pole 1800 RPM
8.10 Ohms
45 kW 1-Phase 2 Pole 3600 RPM
4.85 Ohms
45 kW 3-Phase 2 Pole 3600 RPM
4.85 Ohms
60 kW 1-Phase 2 Pole 3600 RPM
5.45 Ohms
60 kW 3-Phase 2 Pole 3600 RPM
5.45 Ohms
Stator
Wires 11 & 22
Wires 33 & 44
Wires 2 & 6
22 kW 1-Phase 120/240
0.0559 Ohms
0.0559 Ohms
0.7647 Ohms
27 kW 1-Phase 120/240
0.0439 Ohms
0.0439 Ohms
0.7151 Ohms
36 kW 1-Phase 120/240
0.0404 Ohms
0.0404 Ohms
0.6335 Ohms
45 kW 1-Phase 120/240
0.0642 Ohms
0.0642 Ohms
0.681 Ohms
60 kW 1-Phase 120/240
0.03905 Ohms
0.03905 Ohms
0.522 Ohms
Stator
Wires S1 & S4
Wires S3 & S6
Wires S2 & S5
Wires 2 & 6
22 kW 3-Phase 120/208
0.0688 Ohms
0.0688 Ohms
0.0688 Ohms
1.2387 Ohms
27 kW 3-Phase 120/208
0.0537 Ohms
0.0537 Ohms
0.0537 Ohms
1.2028 Ohms
36 kW 3-Phase 277/480
0.18135 Ohms
0.18135 Ohms
0.18135 Ohms
1.1525 Ohms
36 kW 3-Phase 120/208
0.0348 Ohms
0.0348 Ohms
0.0348 Ohms
1.1525 Ohms
45 kW 3-Phase 120/208
0.0333 Ohms
0.0333 Ohms
0.0333 Ohms
0.799 Ohms
45 kW 3-Phase 277/480
0.1655 Ohms
0.1655 Ohms
0.1655 Ohms
0.6895 Ohms
60 kW 3-Phase 120/208
0.0195 Ohms
0.0195 Ohms
0.0195 Ohms
0.6705 Ohms
60 kW 3-Phase 277/480
0.09665 Ohms
0.09665 Ohms
0.09665 Ohms
0.6705 Ohms
Stator
Wires S1 & 00
Wires S4 & 00
Wires S3 & S6
Wires S2 & S5
Wires 2 & 6
36 kW 3-Phase 120/240
0.0673 Ohms
0.0673 Ohms
0.13095 Ohms
0.13095 Ohms
1.1525 Ohms
45 kW 3-Phase 120/240
0.0642 Ohms
0.0642 Ohms
0.1248 Ohms
0.1248 Ohms
0.799 Ohms
60 kW 3-Phase 120/240
0.0426 Ohms
0.0426 Ohms
0.0816 Ohms
0.0816 Ohms
0.6705 Ohms
Page 10
Table of contents
Part
Part 1
general
information
Title
Page
1.1
Generator Basics
12
1.2
Installation Basics
14
1.3
Preparation Before Use
17
1.4
Testing, Cleaning and Drying
19
1.5
Operating Instructions
22
1.6
Automatic Operating Parameters
25
1.7
Wire Removal, Replacement & Testing
27
1.8
Basic Maintenance Information
28
1.9
Turbocharger Systems
40
2.4 Liter standby
Generators
Section 1.1 – Generator Basics............................. 12
Introduction........................................................13
Troubleshooting.................................................13
Tech Tips...........................................................13
Units with Liquid-Cooled Engine.......................13
Section 1.2 – Installation Basics............................ 14
Introduction........................................................14
Selecting a Location..........................................14
Mounting the Generator....................................14
Grounding the Generator..................................14
The Fuel Supply................................................14
The Transfer Switch...........................................16
Power Source and Load Lines..........................16
System Control Interconnections......................16
Section 1.3 – Preparation Before Use.................... 17
General..............................................................17
Fuel Requirements............................................17
Reconfiguring the Fuel System.........................17
Section 1.4 – Testing, Cleaning and Drying........... 19
Visual Inspection...............................................19
Measuring Voltages...........................................19
Measuring Current.............................................19
Measuring Resistance.......................................19
Insulation Resistance........................................19
Stator Insulation Tests.......................................20
Testing Rotor Insulation.....................................21
Cleaning the Generator.....................................21
Drying the Generator.........................................21
Section 1.5 – Operating Instructions...................... 22
Control Panel.....................................................22
To Select Automatic Operation..........................23
Manual Transfer to “Standby” and
Manual Startup..................................................23
Manual Shutdown and
Retransfer Back to “Utility”.................................23
Exercise Feature...............................................24
Section 1.6 – Automatic Operating Parameters..... 25
Introduction........................................................25
Automatic Operating Sequences.......................25
Automatic operating sequences chart...............26
Section 1.7 – Wire Removal,
Replacement & Testing..................... 27
Section 1.8 – Basic Maintenance Information........ 28
Service Maintenance Interval Information:........28
Battery Maintenance and Handling
Recommendations:............................................29
Belts..................................................................32
Air Filters...........................................................34
Oil Filters...........................................................35
Spark.................................................................35
Hoses................................................................38
Section 1.9 – Turbocharger Systems..................... 40
Introduction........................................................40
Turbocharger Troubleshooting...........................41
Page 11
SERVICE ITEM ACCESSIBILITY CHART
Page 12
THRU RIGHT DOOR
OIL FILTER
REMOVE LIFT-OFF ENCLOSURE
THRU RIGHT DOOR
THRU LEFT DOOR
MUFFLERS
FAN BELT
BATTERY
FUEL LINE CONNECTION
3/4" NPT FEMALE COUPLING
LOCATED ON OPPOSITE SIDE (RH)
RIGHT SIDE VIEW
LIFTING PROVISION (4) PLACES
EXHAUST MUFFLER
ENCLOSED WITHIN
FRONT VIEW
EXHAUST AND AIR DISCHARGE
LOUVERS - FRONT AND SIDES
Part 1
CONCRETE MOUNTING PAD
CIRCUIT BREAKER
FRONT COVER
DATA LABEL
TOP VIEW
REMOVE COVER FOR ACCESS
TO RADIATOR FILL CAP
FUEL LINE CONNECTION
3/4" NPT FEMALE COUPLING
VISE ACTION LATCH
STUB-UP AREA
BATTERY 12 VOLT
GROUP 26
525 COLD CRANKING AMPS
Generator Basics
REAR VIEW
AIR INLET
LOUVERS
CONTROL PANEL R200 TYPE
(BATTERY CHARGER IS
ENCLOSED WITHIN)
REFERENCE OWNERS MANUAL FOR PERIODIC
REPLACEMENT PART LISTINGS
THRU LEFT DOOR
THRU LEFT DOOR
AIR CLEANER ELEMENT
SPARK PLUGS
THRU LEFT DOOR
RADIATOR DRAIN HOSE
THRU LEFT DOOR
THRU RIGHT DOOR
OIL DIP STICK
OIL DRAIN HOSE
THRU RIGHT DOOR
OIL FILL CAP
SERVICE ITEM
Section 1.1
General information
General information
Part 1
Introduction
This Diagnostic Repair Manual has been prepared
especially for the purpose of familiarizing service
personnel with the testing, troubleshooting and repair
of 2.4 Liter R-200B generator systems. Every effort
has been expended to ensure that information and
instructions in the manual are both accurate and current. However, the manufacturer reserves the right to
change, alter or otherwise improve the product at any
time without prior notification.
The manual has been divided into several PARTS.
Each PART has been divided into SECTIONS. Each
SECTION consists of two or more SUBSECTIONS.
It is not the manufacturers intent to provide detailed
disassembly and reassembly instructions in this manual. It is the manufacturers intent to (a) provide the
service technician with an understanding of how the
various assemblies and systems work, (b) assist the
technician in finding the cause of malfunctions, and
(c) effect the expeditious repair of the equipment.
Troubleshooting
Testing and troubleshooting methods covered in this
manual are not exhaustive. The manufacturer has not
attempted to discuss, evaluate and advise the home
standby ser­vice trade of all conceivable ways in which
service and trouble diagnosis might be performed.
The manufacturer has not undertaken any such broad
evaluation. Accordingly, anyone who uses a test method not recommended herein must first satisfy himself
that the procedure or method he has selected will
jeopardize neither his nor the product’s safety.
Common questions to ask when troubleshooting are:
• What is the generator doing?
• What is the fault that is causing the generator to
shut down?
• Is the fault causing the shutdown a symptom of
another problem?
i.e. Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the manual position, generator shutdown for a “Flashing
Overspeed”, but the generator never cranked. If
the unit never cranked, then there was never an
RPM signal created for the PCB to detect. The
“Flashing Overspeed” would be a symptom of a
“No Crank” condition.
Section 1.1
Generator Basics
• What was the generator supposed to do?
• What component controls that function and how
does it control that function?
i.e. Is it a ground signal or a 12VDC signal that
controls the component?
• Does the generator have the same fault consistently, and when does it occur?
• If an AUTO operation issue, what was the Green
status ready light showing?
i.e. If the Green LED was flashing then the generator believes that it is in a utility failure. If it is
solid then AUTO operations should be working.
Tech Tips
Look for the
to help identify information and
service tips that can be helpful along the way in diagnosing the generator.
Units with Liquid-Cooled Engine
A typical 2.4 Liter R-200B generator with liquid-cooled
engine is shown on Page 12.
A DATA PLATE, affixed to the unit, contains important
information pertaining to the unit, including its Model
Number, Serial Number, kW rating, rated rpm, rated
voltage, etc. The information from this data plate may
be required when requesting information, ordering
parts, etc.
Figure 1. A Typical Data Plate
Page 13
Section 1.2
Part 1
Installation basics
General information
Introduction
Mounting the Generator
Information in this section is provided so that the
service technician will have a basic knowledge of
installation requirements for home standby systems.
Problems that arise are often related to poor or unauthorized installation practices.
A typical home standby electric system is shown in
Figure 1, below. Installation of such a system includes
the following:
• Sizing the generator (key to a good installation).
• Selecting a location.
• Mounting of the generator.
• Grounding the generator.
• Providing a fuel supply.
• Mounting the transfer switch.
• Connecting power source and load lines.
• Connecting system control wiring.
• Post installation tests and adjustments.
Mount the generator set to a concrete slab. The slab
should extend past the generator and to a distance of
at least twelve (12) inches on all sides. The unit can be
retained to the concrete slab with masonry anchor bolts.
Grounding The Generator
The National Electric Code requires that the frame
and external electrically conductive parts of the generator be property connected to an approved earth
ground. Local electrical codes may also require proper grounding of the unit. For that purpose, a grounding
lug is attached to the unit. Grounding may be accomplished by attaching a stranded copper wire of the
proper size to the generator’s grounding lug and to
an earth-driven copper or brass grounding-rod (electrode). Consult with a local electrician for grounding
requirements in your area.
The Fuel Supply
Selecting A Location
Install the generator set as close as possible to the
electrical load distribution panel(s) that will be powered by the unit, ensuring that there is proper ventilation for cooling air and exhaust gases. This will reduce
wiring and conduit lengths. Wiring and conduit not
only add to the cost of the installation, but excessively
long wiring runs can result in a voltage drop. Consult
NFPA 37 and 70.
Tech Tip: A good rule of thumb is 5 feet
clearance on all sides from structures.
Units with liquid-cooled engines are shipped from
the factory to run on natural gas (Figure 2) with the
exception of the 60kW unit. The 60kW unit needs to
be ordered from the factory to work on a specific fuel.
If conversion from one fuel source to another is necessary after the generator has been ordered, a conversion kit is available. Generator sets that are below
60kW can be converted in the field to use LP (propane) gas fuel (Figure 3). Any conversion performed
in the field must follow the instructions in the owner’s
manual or in Section 1.3 of this manual.
LP (propane) gas is usually supplied as a liquid in
pressure tanks. Liquid-cooled units require a “vapor
withdrawal” type of fuel supply system when LP (pro-
Figure 1. Typical Installation
Page 14
General information
Section 1.2
Part 1
Installation basics
pane) gas is used. The vapor withdrawal system utilizes the gaseous fuel vapors that form at the top of
the supply tank.
The pressure at which LP gas is delivered to the
generator’s fuel solenoid valve may vary considerably, depending on ambient temperatures. In cold
weather, supply pressures may drop to “zero”. In
warm weather, extremely high gas pressures may be
encountered. A primary/secondary supply regulator
is required to maintain correct gas supply pressure
to the generator demand regulator.
Minimum recommended gaseous fuel pressure at
the inlet side of the generator’s fuel solenoid valve
is 5 inches water column for LP and NG gas (6.38
ounces per square inch). The maximum recommended pressure is 14 inches water column (8.09
ounces per square inch). A primary regulator may be
required to ensure that proper fuel supply pressures
are maintained.
Primary Regulator
(Supplied by
Installing
Contractor)
Generator Base
*
DANGER: LP and natural gas are both highly
explosive. Gaseous fuel lines must be properly purged and tested for leaks before this
equipment is placed into service and periodically thereafter. Procedures used in gaseous
fuel leakage tests must comply strictly with
applicable fuel gas codes. Do not use flame
or any source of heat to test for gas leaks. No
gas leakage is permitted. LP gas is heavier
than air and tends to settle in low areas.
Natural gas is lighter than air and tends to
settle in high places. Even the slightest spark
can ignite these fuels and cause an explosion.
Gas Actuator
Fuel Shutoff/Regulator
Assembly
Flex Fuel Line
(Supplied
with Unit)
11 - 14" Water
Column (>= 70 kW)
5 - 14" Water
Column (< 70 kW)
Manual Shutoff
Valve
Figure 2. Typical Natural Gas Fuel System (Liquid-Cooled Units)
Manual Shutoff Valves
Generator Base
Gas Actuator
Fuel Shutoff/Regulator
Assembly
Flex Fuel Line
(Supplied
with Unit)
Fuel
Tank
Primary Regulator
(Supplied by
Installing
Contractor)
11 - 14" Water
Column (>= 70 kW)
5 - 14" Water
Column (< 70 kW)
Figure 3. Typical LP Gas Fuel System (Liquid-Cooled Units)
Page 15
Section 1.2
Part 1
Installation basics
General information
Suitable, approved wiring must be interconnected
between identically numbered terminals in the generator and transfer switch. When these four terminals
are properly interconnected, dropout of utility source
voltage below a preset value will result in automatic
generator startup and transfer of electrical loads to
the “Standby” source. On restoration of utility source
voltage above a preset value will result in retransfer
back to that source and generator shutdown. System
control wiring must be routed through its own separate conduit.
On units with an RTS type transfer switch, a control
board mounted on the standby generator set provides
a “7-day exercise” feature. This feature allows the
standby generator to start and run once every 7 days,
on a day and at a time of day selected.
On units with a GTS type switch the exercise function
is controlled via the GTS switch.
The R-type control panel comes with a standard 2
Amp battery charger. This charger, when powered by
120 VAC from the utility distribution panel, will deliver
a charging voltage to the battery during non-operating
periods to keep the battery charged.
The Transfer Switch
A transfer switch is required by electrical code, to prevent electrical feedback between the utility and standby power sources, and to transfer electrical loads from
one power supply to another safely.
Power Source and Load Lines
The utility power supply lines, the standby (generator) supply lines, and electrical load lines must all be
connected to the proper terminal lugs in the transfer
switch. The following rules apply:
In 1-phase systems with a 2-pole transfer switch, connect the two “Utility” source hot lines to transfer switch
Terminal Lugs N1 and N2. Connect the “Standby”
source hot lines (E1, E2) to transfer switch Terminal
Lugs E1 and E2. Connect the “Load” source lines (T1,
T2) to the transfer switch Terminal Lugs T1 and T2.
Connect “Utility”, “Standby” and “Load” neutral lines to
the neutral block in the transfer switch.
System Control Interconnections
Tech Tip: The 120 VAC input is a separate ter-
Home standby generators are equipped with a terminal board identified with the following terminals:
(a) 23, (b) 194, (c) 178, (d) 183, (e) N1 and (f) N2.
minal strip that must be connected in order
for the battery charger to work.
UTILITY SUPPLY FROM
SERVICE DISCONNECT
QT SERIES ENGINE GENERATOR
RTS TRANSFER SWITCH
CONNECTION PANEL
(N3)
N2
N1
SINGLE PHASE
M
N1
N2
N3
E1
E2
E3
T1
T2
T3
T1
T2
(T3)
MANUAL OPERATION
DO NOT OPERATE WHILE THE SWITCH IS UNDER LOAD.
SET MANUAL HANDLE ON "M" AND
OPERATE IN THE DIRECTION
CLOSE UTILITY
CLOSE STANDBY
A
SET MANUAL HANDLE ON "M" AND
OPERATE IN THE DIRECTION
ON
UTILITY
3 PHASE
TRANSFER SWITCH
RATED CURRENT
400 AMP
RATED VOLTAGE
480 VAC UL
600 VAC CSA
ON
XXXXXX
B
0D7295
OFF
STANDBY
A1
E1
TB1
N1
1
N2
2
23
3
194
E1
E2
E2
(E3)
UTILITY
N2
4
TRNS SW
WIRE 194
B1
B2
T1
T2
E1
E2
(E3)
UTILITY
N1
TRNS SW
WIRE 23
A2
NEUTRAL BLOCK
NEUTRAL BLOCK
5
RM STRT
WIRE 183
6
RM STRT
WIRE 178
7
8
0F4034-S
194
WIRE
NOTE WIRE ORIENTATION
23
WIRE
WARNING
WIRE N2
(240 VAC)
WIRE N1
(240 VAC)
A7822-S
600MCM
CUSTOMER
CONNECTION
GROUND
NOTE:
POWER LEADS AND
TRANSFER SWITCH
LEADS MUST BE
RUN IN TWO
DIFFERENT CONDUITS.
Figure 4. Interconnection Diagram
Page 16
057329-T
NOTE: E3, N3 AND T3 WIRES ARE ONLY
USED ON 3 PHASE SYSTEMS
NOTE:
178 AND 183
CONNECTIONS ARE
NOT USED IN THIS
APPLICATION
23
194
N1
N2
CUSTOMER CONNECTIONS
CUSTOMER LOAD
(DISTRIBUTION PANEL)
General information
Section 1.3
Part 1
General
The installer must ensure that the home standby generator has been properly installed. The system must
be inspected carefully following installation. All applicable codes, standards and regulations pertaining to
such installations must be strictly complied with. In
addition, regulations established by the Occupational
Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) must be
complied with.
Prior to initial startup of the unit, the installer must
ensure that the engine-generator has been properly
prepared for use. This includes the following:
• An adequate supply of the correct fuel must be
available for generator operation.
• The engine must be properly serviced with the recommended oil.
• The engine cooling system must be properly serviced with the recommended coolant.
Preparation before use
4.Loosen the spring clamp on the small fuel enrichment line
and remove the hose from the hose barb.
5.Remove the black pipe assembly from the outlet port of
the demand regulator. The solenoid assembly may need
to be removed before performing this operation (Figure 1).
6.Remove the NG fuel jet (loosen counter clockwise) from
the outlet port.
7.Remove the LP fuel jet (loosen counter clockwise) from
the jet keeper port on the side of the regulator housing.
Install this jet into the outlet port in the regulator casting.
NOTE: The jet sizes are stamped on the individual
jets. The larger jet size is used for running on NG..
MIXER
FUEL HOSE
Fuel requirements
Units with liquid-cooled engines are shipped from the
factory to run on natural gas with the exception of the
60kW unit. The 60kW unit needs to be ordered from
the factory to work on a specific fuel. If conversion
from one fuel source to another is necessary after
the generator has been ordered, a conversion kit is
available. Generator sets that are below 60kW can be
converted in the field to use LP (propane) gas fuel.
ALL UNITS:
• When natural gas is used as a fuel, it should be
rated at least 1000 BTU’s per cubic foot.
• When LP (propane) gas is used as a fuel, it should
be rated at 2520 BTU’s per cubic foot.
BLACK
PIPE
ASSEMBLY
FUEL
JET
SOLENOID
BODY
FUEL SOLENOID
WIRE CONNECTOR
SCREW
SPRING
CLAMP
OUTLET
PORT
JET
KEEPER
PORT
FUEL
ENRICHMENT
LINE
Figure 1. Reconfigure the Fuel System
RECONFIGURING THE FUEL SYSTEM
Before the generator can be operated using a LP fuel
source, the fuel system, wire harness, and ignition
control module must be reconfigured. The steps to
reconfigure the generator from a natural gas (NG) to
a liquefied petroleum (LP) fuel source are as follows:
FUEL SYSTEM:
1.Turn the main gas supply off and disconnect the battery.
The battery may be reconnected after the wire harness
has been reconfigured.
2.Remove the mixer fuel hose from the outlet port of the
demand regulator (see Figure 1).
3.Disconnect the power wires from the fuel solenoid located
on top of the regulator assembly by removing the screw
on the front of the connector and pulling the connector
forward, away from the solenoid body.
FUEL SELECT CONNECTOR:
For the 2.4L units with the R-200B controller, this connector is located in the engine harness behind the
R-Panel.
Engine timing for Natural Gas (NG) Fuel is selected
when this connection is MADE (i.e. the two connector
halves are plugged together).
Engine timing for LP Fuel is selected when this connection is LEFT OPEN. When this connector is left
open the plugs, located in the R-Panel, should be
installed in these connectors to prevent moisture from
entering the harness connectors.

CAUTION: Whenever the Generator's Fuel
Regulator is converted from one Fuel type
to the other, make sure to configure the Fuel
Select Connector for the correct Fuel type.
Page 17
Notes
Page 18
General information
Section 1.4
Part 1
Testing, cleaning and drying
Visual Inspection
Measuring Current
When it becomes necessary to test or troubleshoot
a generator, it is a good practice to complete a thorough visual inspection. Remove the access covers
and look closely for any obvious problems. Look for
the following:
• Burned or broken wires, broken wire connectors,
damaged mounting brackets, etc.
• Loose or frayed wiring insulation, loose or dirty connections.
• Check that all wiring is well clear of rotating parts.
• Verify that the Generator is properly connected for
the correct rated voltage. This is especially important on new installations. See Section 1.2, “AC
Connection Systems”.
• Look for foreign objects, loose nuts, bolts and other
fasteners.
• Clean the area around the generator. Clear away
paper, leaves, snow, and other objects that might
blow against the generator and obstruct its air
openings.
Alternating current (AC) can be measured with a
clamp-on ammeter. Most clamp-on ammeters will not
measure direct current (DC). Load current readings
should never exceed the generator’s data plate rating
for continuous operation. However, momentary surges
in load current may be encountered when starting
electric motors.
On 1-phase generators, the data plate generally lists
rated line-to-line and line-to-neutral current.
Measuring Resistance
The resistance (in ohms) of generator stator and rotor
windings can be measured using an ohmmeter or an
accurate volt-ohm-milliammeter (VOM).
The resistance of some windings is extremely low.
Some readings are so low that a meter capable of
reading in the “milliohms” range would be required.
Many meters will simply read CONTINUITY. However,
a standard volt-ohm-milliammeter (VOM) may be used
to test for continuity, or for a shorted or grounded condition.
Measuring Voltages
When troubleshooting and testing the generator set,
the technician will be required to measure both AC
and DC voltages. Measurement of voltage requires
that the user be thoroughly familiar with the meter
being used for such tests. Consult the instruction
manual for the meter being used.
When measuring voltage, it is best to connect the
meter test leads to the terminals being tested while
the generator is shut down or while power to those
terminals is turned off.
*
DANGER: Power voltages generated by this
equipment are extremely high and dangerous. Use extreme care when measuring power
voltages such as generator AC output voltage. Contact with live terminals and conductors may result in harmful and possibly lethal
electrical shock. Do not attempt to read power
voltages while standing on wet or damp
ground, or while hands or feet are wet. Stay
well clear of high voltage power terminals.
Connect meter test leads to terminals and
leads while the generator is shut down or
when the power supply to such leads and terminals is turned off. The use of insulative rubber mats is recommended. Take power voltage
readings only while standing on such insulative mats.
Insulation Resistance
The insulation resistance of stator and rotor windings is a measurement of the integrity of the insulating materials that separate the electrical windings
from the generator’s steel core. This resistance can
degrade over time or due to such contaminants as
dust, dirt, oil, grease and especially moisture. In
most cases, failures of stator and rotor windings are
due to a breakdown in the insulation. And, in many
cases, a low insulation resistance is caused by moisture that collects while the generator is shut down.
When problems are caused by moisture buildup on
the windings, they can usually be corrected by drying the windings. Cleaning and drying the windings
can usually eliminate dirt and moisture built up in the
generator windings.
MEGGERS:
The normal resistance of generator winding insulation
is on the order of millions of ohms. This high resistance can be measured with a device called a “megger”. The megger is a megohm meter (“meg” stands
for million) and a power supply. The power supply voltage varies between megger models and is selectable
on some models. The most common power supply
voltage is 500 volts. Use of power supplies greater
than 500 volts are not recommended on generators.
*
CAUTION: Before attempting to measure
insulation resistance, first disconnect and
isolate all leads of the winding to be tested.
Electronic components, diodes, surge protectors, relays, voltage regulators, etc., can
be destroyed if subjected to high megger
voltages.
Page 19
Section 1.4
Part 1
Testing, cleaning and drying
HI-POT TESTER:
A “Hi-Pot” tester is shown in Figure 1. The model
shown is only one of many that are commercially
available. The tester shown is equipped with a voltage
selector switch that permits the power supply voltage
to be selected. It also mounts a breakdown lamp that
will illuminate to indicate an insulation breakdown during the test.
2
Stator Insulation Tests
GENERAL:
Units with liquid-cooled engine and 1-phase stator
windings are equipped with (a) dual stator AC power
windings, and (b) an excitation or DPE winding.
Stator winding insulation tests consist of (a) testing
all windings to ground, (b) testing between isolated
windings, and (c) testing between parallel windings.
Figure 2 represents the various stator AC output
leads on 1 -phase units with liquid-cooled engines.
TEST ALL WINDINGS TO GROUND:
1.Disconnect and isolate all stator leads.
2.Make sure all wire terminal ends are completely isolated from frame ground.
3.Connect the black tester probe to a clean frame
ground on the stator can. Test each stator lead by
connecting the red test probe of the Hi-Pot tester to
the terminal end of each stator lead. Then, proceed
as follows:
a.Turn the Hi- Pot tester switch OFF
b.Plug the tester cord into a 120 volts AC wall
socket and set its voltage selector switch to “500
volts”.
c.Turn the tester switch ON and observe the
Figure 1. One Type of Hi-Pot Tester
9
VOLTAGE
240 VAC
208 VAC
240 VAC
480 VAC
10
6
5
DPE WINDING
(COMMON TO ALL CONFIGURATIONS)
PHASE
1-PHASE
3-PHASE
3-PHASE
3-PHASE
1
1
2
7
5
S1
6
3
8
General information
3
8
S4
S5
12
6
22 22
33 33
44 44
208 VAC 3-PHASE
5
3
12
1
S15
HIGH WYE
S2
9
7
11
10
8
DELTA
6
S4
5
S1
2
7
00
12
S3
S16
11
6
8
S4
480 VAC 3-PHASE
5
Figure 2. Stator Winding Leads (Liquid-Cooled Units)
Page 20
S5
S6
10
1
3
S1
4
S5
S3
S6
2
9
S5
S6
S3
11
240 VAC 3-PHASE
4
S6
240 VAC 1-PHASE
S2
S2
S2
10
2
S4
11 11
9
LOW WYE
7
S1
4
SENSING WIRES
11 & 44
S1 & S3
S1 & S3
S15 & S16
S3
4
Section 1.4
Part 1
General information
Testing, cleaning and drying
breakdown lamp. After one (1) second, turn the
tester switch OFF.
d.Repeat a, b and c for each lead.
If the breakdown lamp turned on during the one (1)
second test, clean and dry the stator. Then, repeat the
test. If breakdown lamp comes on during the second
test, replace the stator assembly.
TEST BETWEEN ISOLATED WINDINGS:
Each winding consists of 2 leads. Use the matrix below
as an aid in connecting and testing all windings.
1.Connect red and black probes of the hi-pot according to the matrix.
2.Isolate all lead ends from each other. Be sure that
the leads at the other ends of the winding being
tested do not touch each other or ground.
3.Set the tester switch to “500 volts”.
4.Turn the tester switch ON and check that the pilot
lamp is lighted.
5.Wait one (1) second while observing the tester
breakdown lamp. DO NOT EXCEED ONE SECOND.
After one (1) second, turn the tester switch OFF.
Example: Connect the red test probe to Stator
Lead 2, the black probe to Stator Lead 11. Then,
repeat Steps 2, 3 and 4. Repeat for each pair of
leads as shown in the matrix.
1-PHASE
3-PHASE
RED LEAD
2
2
BLACK LEAD
11
S1
RED LEAD
2
2
BLACK LEAD
33
S3
RED LEAD
11
2
BLACK LEAD
33
S5
RED LEAD
S1
BLACK LEAD
S3
RED LEAD
S1
BLACK LEAD
S5
RED LEAD
S3
BLACK LEAD
S5
If the breakdown lamp turned on during any one (1)
second test, the stator should be cleaned and dried.
After cleaning and drying, repeat the test. If the breakdown lamp turns on during the second test, replace
the stator assembly.
Testing Rotor Insulation
Before attempting to test rotor insulation, either the
brush leads must be completely removed from the
brushes or the brush holders must be completely
removed. The rotor must be completely isolated from
other components before starting the test.
1.Connect the red tester lead to the positive (+) slip
ring (nearest the rotor bearing).
2.Connect the black tester probe to a clean frame
ground, such as a clean metal part of the rotor.
3.Turn the tester switch OFF.
4.Plug the tester into a 120 volts AC wall socket and
set the voltage switch to “500 volts”.
5.Turn the tester switch ON and make sure the pilot
light has turned on.
6.Observe the breakdown lamp, then turn the tester
switch OFF. DO NOT APPLY VOLTAGE LONGER
THAN ONE (1) SECOND.
If the breakdown lamp came on during the one (1)
second test, cleaning and drying of the rotor may be
necessary. After cleaning and drying, repeat the insulation breakdown test. If breakdown lamp comes on
during the second test, replace the rotor assembly.
RED TEST LEAD
BLACK TEST LEAD
Figure 3. Testing Rotor Insulation
Cleaning the Generator
Caked or greasy dirt may be loosened with a soft
brush or a damp cloth. A vacuum system may be
used to clean up loosened dirt. Dust and dirt may also
be removed using dry, low-pressure air (25 psi maximum).
*
CAUTION: Do not use sprayed water to clean
the generator. Some of the water will be
retained on generator windings and terminals,
and may cause very serious problems.
Drying the Generator
To dry a generator, proceed as follows:
1.Open the generator main circuit breaker. NO
ELECTRICAL LOADS MUST BE APPLIED TO THE
GENERATOR WHILE DRYING.
2.Disconnect all Wires No. 4 from TB1 Terminal 3
located in the back wall of the control panel.
3.Provide an external source to blow warm, dry air
through the generator interior (around the rotor and
stator windings. DO NOT EXCEED 185° F. (85° C.).
4.Start the generator and let it run for 2 or 3 hours.
5.Shut the generator down and repeat the stator and
rotor insulation resistance tests.
Page 21
Section 1.5
Part 1
Operating instructions
Control Panel
GENERAL:
See Figure 1. A typical control panel on units with
liquid-cooled engine includes: (a) an auto-off-manual
switch, (b) seven LED indicators, (c) a 15 amp fuse, (d)
a set exercise switch, and (e) an hourmeter.
AUTO-OFF-MANUAL SWITCH:
Use this switch to (a) select fully automatic operation,
(b) to crank and start the engine manually, and (c) to
shut the unit down or to prevent automatic startup.
1.AUTO position (RTS type switch):
a.Select AUTO for fully automatic operation.
b.When AUTO is selected, circuit board will monitor utility power source voltage.
c.Should utility voltage drop below a preset level
and remain at such a low level for a preset time,
circuit board action will initiate engine cranking
and startup.
d.Following engine startup, circuit board action
will initiate transfer of electrical loads to the
“Standby” source side.
e.On restoration of utility source voltage above
a preset level, circuit board action will initiate
retransfer back to the “Utility Source” side.
f. Following retransfer, circuit board will shut the
engine down and will then continue to monitor
utility source voltage.
2.AUTO position (GTS type switch):
a.Select AUTO for fully automatic operation.
b.When AUTO is selected, circuit board will moni­
tor Wires 183 and 178 for a closed circuit from
the GTS transfer switch, also called a 2-wire
start signal.
c.When the GTS switch sees voltage drop below
a preset level it will close Wires 183 and 178 in
the transfer switch.
d.When the GTS senses a closed circuit at the
circuit board on Wires 183 and 178 it will initiate
engine cranking and startup.
e.Following engine startup, the circuit board will
continue to run as long as a closed circuit is
present on Wires 178 and 183.
f. Upon restoration of utility source voltage above
a preset level the GTS transfer switch will
retransfer the load, cool down the generator,
open Wires 178 and 183, and initiate an engine
shutdown.
g.Following shutdown the circuit board will continue to monitor for a closed circuit on Wires 178
and 183.
Tech Tip: When the generator is operating
in GTS mode it will only know how to do
two things, startup and shutdown. All other
Auto operation logic is disabled in this mode
including the exercise function. The exercise
function will be handled by the transfer
switch.
3.OFF Position:
a.Set the switch to OFF to stop an operating
engine.
b.To prevent an automatic startup from occurring,
set the switch to OFF.
4.MANUAL Position:
a.Set switch to MANUAL to crank and start unit
manually.
b.Engine will crank cyclically and start (same as
automatic startup, but without transfer).
AUTO
OFF
QUARTZ
OFF
ON
MANUAL
HOURS
1/10
SET
EXERCISE
TIME
OVER CRANK
OVER SPEED
LOW COOLANT LEVEL
HI COOLANT TEMPERATURE
LOW OIL PRESSURE
LOW BATTERY
LOW FUEL PRESSURE
SYSTEM READY
LED INDICATORS:
FLASHING GREEN LED = NO UTILITY SENSE
5 FLASHING RED LED'S = EXERCISER NOT SET
(IN AUTO MODE ONLY) SOLID GREEN LED = SYSTEM READY, UTILITY POWER ON
RED LED'S = INDIVIDUAL FAULT
SEE OWNER'S MANUAL FOR COMPLETE LED DETAILS
TO SET EXERCISER TIME
1) PLACE AUTO/OFF/MANUAL SWITCH TO AUTO POSITION.
2) HOLD "SET EXERCISE TIME" SWITCH IN "ON" POSITION FOR THREE SECONDS
AND RELEASE. (SEE OWNER'S MANUAL FOR COMPLETE DETAILS)
THE EXERCISER IS NOW SET. ALL FIVE RED LED'S WILL FLASH FOR 10 SECONDS
THEN THE UNIT WILL START, RUN THROUGH THE EXERCISE CYCLE AND SHUTDOWN.
PELIGRO
Altos Voltajes
FUSES LOCATED INSIDE
Contacto con terminales
pueden resultar
en danos personales
o muerte
Figure 1. Control Panel
Page 22
General information
DANGER
High voltage.
Contact with terminals
may result in personal
injury or death.
General information
*
Section 1.5
Part 1
Operating instructions
DANGER: When the generator is installed
in conjunction with an automatic transfer
switch, engine cranking and startup can
occur at any time without warning (providing the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is set
to AUTO). To prevent automatic startup and
possible injury that might be caused by such
startup, always set the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL
switch to its OFF position before working on
or around this equipment.
LED Indicators:
The seven LED indicators are labelled as follows (see
Figure 1, next page):
System Ready
Green LED
Low Fuel Pressure
Yellow LED
Low Battery
Red LED
Low Oil Pressure
Red LED
Hi Coolant Temp/Low Coolant Level
Red LED
Over Speed/RPM Sensor Loss
Red LED
Over Crank
Red LED
15 AMP FUSE:
This fuse protects the DC control system, including
the control board, against overload. If the fuse has
blown, engine cranking and running will not be possible. Should fuse replacement become necessary,
use only an identical 15 amp replacement fuse.
The Set Exercise Switch:
Use this switch to select the time and day for system
exercise.
To Select Automatic Operation
The following procedure applies to those installations
in which the standby generator is installed in conjunction with a transfer switch. RTS transfer switches do
not have an intelligence circuit of their own. Instead,
automatic operation on transfer switch and generator
combinations is controlled by a control circuit board
housed in the generator.
To select automatic operation when a transfer switch
is installed along with a standby generator, proceed
as follows:
1.Check that the transfer switch main contacts are at
their “Utility” position, i.e., the load is connected to
the utility power supply. If necessary, manually actuate the switch main contacts to their “Utility” source
side. See Part 3 of this manual for instructions.
2.Check that utility source voltage is available to
transfer switch Terminal Lugs N1 and N2 (2-pole,
1-phase transfer switches).
3.Set the generator’s AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to
its AUTO position.
4.Actuate the generator’s main line circuit breaker to
its ON or “Closed” position.
With the preceding Steps 1 through 4 completed, a
dropout in utility supply voltage below a preset level
will result in automatic generator cranking and startup. Following startup, the transfer switch will be actuated to its “Standby” source side, i.e., loads powered
by the standby generator.
Manual Transfer to “Standby” and
Manual Startup
To transfer electrical loads to the “Standby” (generator) source and start the generator manually, proceed
as follows:
1.On the generator panel, set the AUTO-OFFMANUAL switch to OFF.
2.On the generator, set the main line circuit breaker to
it’s OFF or “Open” position.
3.Turn OFF the utility power supply to the transfer
switch, using whatever means provided (such as a
utility-source line circuit breaker).
4.Manually actuate the transfer switch main contacts
to their “Standby” position, i.e., loads connected to
the “Standby” power source side.
5.On the generator panel, set the AUTO-OFFMANUAL switch to MANUAL. The engine should
crank and start.
6.Let the engine warm up and stabilize for a minute or
two at no-load.
7.Set the generator’s main line circuit breaker to its
ON or “Closed” position. The generator now powers
the electrical loads.
Manual Shutdown and Retransfer
Back to “Utility”
To shut the generator down and retransfer electrical
loads back to the “Utility” position, proceed as follows:
1.Set the generator’s main line circuit breaker to its
OFF or “Open” position.
2.Let the generator run at no-load for a few minutes,
to cool.
3.Set the generator’s AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch
to OFF. Wait for the engine to come to a complete
stop.
4.Turn OFF the “Utility” power supply to the transfer
switch using whatever means provided (such as a
“Utility” source main line circuit breaker)
5.Manually actuate the transfer switch to its “Utility”
power source side, i.e., “Load” connected to the
“Utility” source.
6.Turn ON the “Utility” power supply to the transfer
switch, using whatever means provided.
7.Set the generator’s AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to
AUTO.
Page 23
Section 1.5
Part 1
Operating instructions
Exercise Feature
The 2.4 liter standby generator with an R-200B control panel will start and exercise once every seven
(7) days, on a day and at a time of day selected by
the owner or operator. The set exercise time switch is
provided to select the day and time of day for system
exercise. On units with a GTS type switch exercise is
controlled via the GTS switch.
NORMAL EXERCISE MODE:
To select this mode, place DIP switch position 3 in the
ON position.
In Normal Exercise Mode the generators will exercise
at their normal running speed.
The R-200B controller will start and run the generator
once every seven (7) days for approximately 12 minutes. If the utility fails during the exercise period, this
exercise period is aborted and the R-200B Controller
transfers the load to the generator output, assumes
automatic operation and continues to run until the utility is returned.
The weekly exercise cycle is set as follows:
1.Place the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch in the AUTO position.
2.Press and hold the “Set Exercise Time” switch for five (5)
seconds and then release.
At this time all five (5) red LED's will flash for 10
seconds, then the engine will start and run for it's 12
minute exercise period, then shut down. The generator
will now start and run each week at approximately the
same time.
If battery power to the R-200B Controller is lost, the
weekly exercise time setting will be lost. This is indicated by all five (5) red LED's continually flashing in
ATS mode. In this state the generator will still start and
run in MANUAL mode, or automatically start and run
if utility voltage is lost while in AUTO mode, but it will
NOT perform a weekly exercise cycle.
In the event of a failure while running in this mode, the
five (5) red LED's will stop flashing, the individual fault
LED will turn on and the engine will be shut down.
Once the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is switched to
OFF, the individual fault LED will turn off and the five
(5) red LED's will begin flashing to show that the exercise mode has not yet been set.
Page 24
General information
LOW SPEED EXERCISE:
To select this mode place DIP switch position 3 in the
OFF position.
In Low Speed Exercise mode, 3600 rpm generators
will exercise at 1800 rpm. 1800 rpm generators will
exercise at 1400 rpm in this mode.
If the utility fails during the low speed exercise period,
a 10 second timer will start. If the utility returns to a
normal operating level, during this 10 second time
interval the low speed exercise operation will continue.
If the utility is still not present (i.e. utility voltage less
than 60% of nominal) when the above 10 second
timer expires then the low speed exercise mode is terminated and the engine will ramp up to its normal running speed within five (5) seconds. If the utility returns
during the five (5) second ramp-up period the generator will terminate the exercise mode. If the utility is still
not present, once the generator is up to its normal
running speed, then the controller will transfer the load
to the generator. When the utility returns the generator
will shutdown.
If battery power to the R-200B Controller is lost, the
weekly exercise time setting will be lost. This is indicated by all 5 red LED's continually flashing in ATS
mode. In this state the generator will still start and run
in MANUAL mode, or automatically start and run if utility voltage is lost while in AUTO mode, but it will NOT
perform a weekly exercise cycle.
In the event of a failure while running in this mode, the
five (5) red LED's will stop flashing, the individual fault
LED will turn on and the engine will be shut down.
Once the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is switched to
OFF, the individual fault LED will turn off and the five
(5) red LED's will begin flashing to show that the exercise mode has not yet been set.
*
DANGER: The generator will crank and start
when the set exercise time switch is set to
“ON”. Do not actuate the switch to “ON” until
after reading the instructions in Section 1.6.
General information
Part 1
Introduction
When the R-200B control panel is installed in
conjunction with an RTS transfer switch, either manual
or automatic operation is possible. Manual transfer
and engine startup, as well as manual shutdown and
retransfer are covered in section 1.6. Selection of fully
automatic operation is also discussed in this section.
This section will provide a step-by-step description
of the sequence of events that will occur during
automatic operation of the system.
On units with a GTS type switch sensing and exercise
are performed at the transfer switch.
Automatic Operating Sequences
PHASE 1 – UTILITY VOLTAGE AVAILABLE:
With utility source voltage available to the transfer
switch, that source voltage is sensed by a control
board in the generator panel and the circuit board
takes no action.
Electrical loads are powered by the “Utility” source
and the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is set to AUTO.
PHASE 2 – UTILITY VOLTAGE DROPOUT:
If a dropout in utility source voltage should occur
below about 60 percent of the nominal utility source
voltage, a 15 second timer on the control board will
start timing. This timer is required to prevent false
generator starts that might be caused by transient utility voltage dips.
PHASE 3 – ENGINE CRANKING:
When the control board’s 15 second timer has finished timing and if utility source voltage is still below
60 percent of the nominal source voltage, control
board action will energize a crank relay and a run
relay. Both of these relays are mounted in the control
cabinet.
Control board action will hold the crank relay
energized for about 7-9 seconds. The relay will then
be de-energized for about 7-9 seconds, energized
again for 7-9 seconds, and so on. When the crank
relay energizes the engine will crank, when it is
de-energized, engine cranking will stop. This cyclic
action of crank/rest, crank/rest, etc., will continue until
either (a) the engine starts, or (b) until ninety (90)
seconds have elapsed.
If the engine has not started within ninety (90) seconds, cranking will terminate and shutdown will occur.
On liquid-cooled engine units, LED indicators on the
generator panel will illuminate.
If the engine starts, cranking will terminate when generator AC output frequency reaches approximately 30 Hz.
Section 1.6
Automatic operating parameters
PHASE 4 – ENGINE STARTUP AND RUNNING:
The control board senses that the engine is running
by receiving a speed frequency signal from the
generator magnetic pickup.
When generator AC frequency reaches approximately
30 Hz, an engine warm-up timer on the control board
turns on. That timer will run for about fifteen (15)
seconds. At the same time, an engine minimum run
timer will turn on.
The engine warm-up timer lets the engine warm-up
and stabilize before transfer to the “Standby” source
can occur.
Tech Tip: The engine can be shut down
manually at any time, by setting the AUTOOFF-MANUAL switch to OFF.
PHASE 5 – TRANSFER TO “STANDBY”:
When the control board’s engine warm-up timer has
timed out, control board action completes a transfer
relay circuit to ground. The transfer relay is housed in
the transfer switch enclosure.
The transfer relay energizes and transfer of loads to
the “Standby” power source occurs. Loads are now
powered by standby generator AC output.
PHASE 6 – “UTILITY” POWER RESTORED:
When utility source voltage is restored above about
80 percent of the nominal supply voltage, a fifteen
(15) second timer on the control board starts timing.
If utility voltage remains sufficiently high at the end of
fifteen (15) seconds, a “retransfer time delay” will start
timing and will time for about six (6) seconds.
PHASE 7 – RETRANSFER BACK TO “UTILITY”:
When the retransfer time delay has finished timing,
control board action will open a circuit to a transfer
relay (housed in the transfer switch). The transfer
relay will then de-energize and retransfer back to the
“Utility” source will occur. Loads are now powered by
“Utility” source power. On retransfer, an “engine cooldown timer” starts timing and will run for about one (1)
minute.
PHASE 8 – GENERATOR SHUTDOWN:
When the engine cool-down timer has finished timing,
and if the minimum run timer has timed out, engine
shutdown will occur.
Page 25
Section 1.6
Automatic operating parameters
Part 1
General information
Automatic operating sequences chart
SEQ. CONDITION
ACTION
SENSOR, TIMER OR OTHER
No action
Voltage Dropout Sensor on control
board.
1
“Utility” source voltage is available.
2
“Utility” voltage dropout below 60% of A 6-second timer on control board Voltage Dropout Sensor and
rate voltage occurs.
turns on.
6-second timer on control board.
3
Control board action energizes a
crank relay and a run relay. The
“Utility” voltage is still low after 6 seconds. engine cranks for 7-9 seconds, rests Control board crank and run relays.
for 7-9 seconds, and so on until
engine starts. See Note 1
4
“Utility” voltage still low and the engine Control board’s “Engine Warm-Up E n g i n e W a r m - u p T i m e r ( 1 5
has started.
Timer” turns on.
Seconds)
5
Control board action energizes a Control board's “Voltage Pickup
Engine running and “engine warm-up
transfer relay in transfer switch and Sensor” continues to seek an
timer” times out.
transfer to “Standby” occurs.
acceptable “Utility” voltage.
6
Engine running and load is powered by
No further action
“Standby” power
7
Control board’s “Voltage Pickup
“Utility” source voltage is restored about
Voltage Pickup Sensor (80%)
Sensor” reacts and a “return to utility
80% of rated source voltage.
Return to Utility Timer (10 seconds)
timer” turns on.
8
“Utility” voltage still high after 6 seconds.
“Return to Utility Timer” times out.
9
“Utility” voltage still normal.
Control board action opens the
transfer relay circuit to ground.
Control board transfer relay circuit.
Transfer relay de-energizes and
retransfer to “Utility” occurs.
10
Engine still running, loads are powered Control board’s “Engine Cool Down Control Board’s Engine Cool Down
by “Utility” source.
Timer” starts running.
Timer (1 Minute)
11
After 1 minute, “Engine Cool Down Engine Cool Down Timer and
Timer” has expired.
Control board Run Relay
12
Engine is shutdown, loads are powered
No action
by “Utility” source. Return to Sequence 1.
Control’s board's “Voltage Pickup
Sensor” continues to seek an
acceptable “Utility” voltage.
Return to Utility Timer
Voltage Dropout Sensor on control
board.
Note1: In Sequence 4, if engine has not started in 90 seconds cranking will end and shutdown will occur.
Page 26
General information
Part 1
Section 1.7
Wire Removal, Replacement & Testing
Amp Style Connector
Meter Test Leads
Wires can be removed from the Amp style connector
if a couple steps are followed. Lift the tabs at the end
of the connector and gently slide the connector face
forward, photo shows forward position. Use caution
when lifting tabs to prevent breakage.
A stop will keep the face from sliding off the connector
body. Do not completely remove the face because it is
extremely difficult to put it back on a populated connector. If you find you have to replace the face on a populated connector it is imperative to match the wire lugs
with the connector face to prevent damage to the lugs.
Testing should be done paying close attention to not
damage either style of connector plug. Many types
of test leads and probes are available. Two possible
sources are www.digikey.com or www.fluke.com. Slim
test leads work well. Inserting the slim test lead from
the back of the connector is preferable. If the harness
is plugged together when testing is done, piercing
probes or a breakout box or test cable can be used.
When using piercing probes to test a live circuit, be
careful not to short leads and tape pierced portion of
the insulation when finished. A breakout box or testing
cable can also be constructed to test the circuit. The
circuit between the two connectors is completed via
the breakout box or test cable. The testing is done at
the breakout box or test cable to prevent any damage
to generator connectors.
Figure 1.
The wire to be removed should be pushed, rotated,
and pulled. The rotating action releases the wire from
the lock. When replacing the wire, insert the wire into
the appropriate location and push until it locks and
push the face of the connector back until it locks.
Gently tug the inserted wire and inspect. The lug will
be just below the face of the connector if inserted fully
and can be seen through the face of the connector.
Figure 2.
Page 27
Section 1.8
Basic Maintenance Information
Service Maintenance Interval
Information:
The various service maintenance intervals are designated by interval numbers as follows:
1.An early inspection of the generator set to insure it is
ready to operate when required and to identify any potential problem areas.
a.Performed monthly or following each 10 hours of
operation of the unit and requires approximately
0.5 man hours per unit to complete.
b.This inspection may be performed by the end
user providing the following safety steps are
taken to prevent the engine from starting automatically without warning:
To prevent injury, perform the following steps in the
order indicated before starting any maintenance:
• Disable the generator set from starting and/or connecting to the load by setting the control panel
AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the “OFF” position.
• Remove the control panel fuse.
• Turn off the battery charger.
• Remove the negative battery cable.
Part 1
4.A mid-level inspection of the generator set to insure it is
ready to operate and carry the load when required, and
to identify any potential problem areas.
a.Performed annually or following each 100 hours
of operation of the unit and requires approximately 4.0 man-hours per unit to complete.
b.This inspection contains some maintenance
tasks which require special tools, equipment,
and/or knowledge to accomplish and should
be performed only by an authorized Generac
Service Dealer.
5.A comprehensive inspection of the generator set to insure
it is properly serviced and ready to operate and carry the
load when required, and to identify any potential problem
areas.
a.Performed annually or following each 250 hours
of operation of the unit and requires approximately 8.0 man-hours per unit to complete.
b.This inspection contains some maintenance
tasks which require special tools, equipment,
and/or knowledge to accomplish and should
be performed only by an authorized Generac
Service Dealer.
*
*
Following all maintenance, reverse these steps to
insure the unit is returned to standby setup for normal
operation when required.
EVERY THREE MONTHS:
Warning: Connectors should not be powered. The battery charger must be turned off
BEFORE removing the battery cable to prevent an over current condition from burning
out sensitive control panel components and
circuits.
2.A wear-in service inspection of the generator set to insure
it is ready to operate and carry the load when required,
and to identify any potential problem areas.
a.Performed ONLY ONCE following the first three
months or the first 30 hours of operation after
purchase of the unit and requires approximately
2.5 man-hours per unit to complete.
b.This inspection contains some maintenance
tasks which require special tools, equipment,
and/or knowledge to accomplish and should
be performed only by an authorized Generac
Service Dealer.
3.An operational inspection of the generator set to insure it
is ready to operate and carry the load when required, and
to identify any potential problem areas.
a.Performed semi-annually or following each 50
hours of operation of the unit and requires approximately 1.5 man-hours per unit to complete.
b.This inspection contains some maintenance
tasks which require special tools, equipment,
and/or knowledge to accomplish and should
be performed only by an authorized Generac
Service Dealer.
Page 28
General information
Warning: Before working on the Stationary
Emergency Generator, ensure the following:
• The AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is in the OFF position.
• The 15A fuse has been removed from the control box.
• The 120VAC supply to the battery charger is
switched OFF.
• The negative battery cable has been removed.
1.Check battery condition.
2.Inspect and test fuel system.
3.Check transfer switch.
4.Inspect exhaust system.
5.Check engine ignition system.
6.Check fan belts.
ONCE EVERY SIX MONTHS:
1.Test Engine Safety Devices (low oil pressure, low coolant
level, high coolant temperature).
ONCE ANNUALLY:
1.Test engine governor; adjust or repair, if needed.
2.Clean, inspect generator.
3.Flush cooling system.
4.Clean/re-gap spark plugs or replace as necessary.
General information
Section 1.8
Basic Maintenance Information
Part 1
FIRST 30 OPERATING HOURS:
$
1.Change engine “break-in” oil and filter.
FIRST 100 OPERATING HOURS:
1.Change engine oil and oil filter. After initial change, service engine oil and filter at 100 operating hours or six
months, whichever comes first.
2.Re-torque cylinder head.
3.Re-torque intake and exhaust manifold.
EVERY 500 OPERATING HOURS:
1.Service air filter.
2.Check starter.
3.Check engine DC alternator.
Battery Maintenance and Handling
Recommendations:
It is important that all labeling on the battery is carefully read, understood and complied with. The format
of the following labels and symbols is common to
most brands of lead acid batteries (see Figure 1).
DANGER: Lead-acid batteries contain a sulfuric acid electrolyte, which is a highly corrosive
poison and will produce gas when recharged
and explode if ignited. When working with batteries, you need to wear glasses, have plenty
of ventilation, remove your jewelry, and exercise caution. Do NOT allow battery electrolyte
to mix with salt water. Even small quantities
of this combination will produce chlorine gas
that can KILL you! Please follow the manufacturer's instructions for testing, installing, discharging, charging, equalizing and maintaining batteries.
For non-sealed wet batteries (with filler caps), if the
electrolyte levels are low, allow the battery to cool to
room temperature first and then add only distilled,
deionized or de-mineralized water to the level indicated by the battery manufacturer or to within 1/4 to
3/8 inch (6 to 10 mm) below the bottom of the filler
tubes (vent wells or splash barrels). Avoid overfilling,
especially in hot weather, because the heat will cause
the electrolyte to expand and overflow.
Figure 1. – Battery Labelling
Page 29
Section 1.8
Basic Maintenance Information
TO BE PERFORMED EVERY 6 MONTHS:
Safety precautions need to be taken.
• Wear rubber gloves and an apron that are specific
for handling batteries containing sulfuric acid.
• Wear protective eyewear and a full face shield.
• Avoid and prevent any open flame, sparks, or electrical arcs in or near the battery or battery charging
area.
• Do not smoke near the battery or battery compartment area.
• Keep tools or other metallic items away from an
unprotected battery.
• Never open a battery cell cap with your face directly
over the battery cell cap.
• Never wear any jewelry to include; watches, necklaces, rings, dangling jewelry, etc.
• Never use metallic tools to remove the battery caps
or cable clamps.
• Never place metallic objects on top a battery.
Battery Inspection:
• Examine the outside appearance of the battery.
• Look for cracks in the container.
• The top of the battery, posts, and connections
should be clean, free of dirt, fluids, and corrosion. If
batteries are dirty, refer to the Battery Cleaning section for the proper cleaning procedure.
• Any fluids on or around the battery may be an indication that electrolyte is spilling, leaching, or leaking
out.
• Leaking batteries must be replaced.
• Check all battery cables and their connections.
• Battery cables should be intact; broken or frayed
cables can be extremely hazardous.
• Replace any cable that looks suspicious.
Part 1
General information
Figure 3. Corroded Terminals
Figure 4. Corrosion Under Terminal
Figure 2. Clean Battery Terminals
Figure 5. Corrosion at Mating Services
Page 30
General information
Part 1
Battery Cleaning:
*
CAUTION: When removing clamps, always
loosen and remove the Negative (-) clamp first
and the Positive (+) clamp last. When re-installing
the clamps, install the Positive (+) clamp first and the
Negative (-) clamp last.
• Check that all vent caps are tightly in place.
• Clean the battery top with a cloth or non-conductive
brush and a solution of baking soda and water.
• Rinse with water and dry with a clean cloth.
• Clean battery terminals and the inside of cable
clamps using a post and clamp cleaner.
• Reconnect the clamps to the terminals and apply a
battery terminal corrosion protection to the clamps
and terminal area.
• Keep the area around batteries clean and dry.
Section 1.8
Basic Maintenance Information
Battery Maintenance:
Check electrolyte level; the minimum level at the top
of the plates should be 1/8” below the bottom of the
fill well.
If necessary add water to cover the plates. (Use distilled or de-ionized water only.)
Corrosion is caused by one or more of the following:
• Dirty or wet battery tops normally caused from
expansion of electrolyte from overfilled cells
• Acid fumes leaking through the vent caps, which
could be a sign of overcharging.
• Electrolysis due to the mismatch of metal alloys
used in the battery posts and terminals.
• Clean the alternator or charging system to allow
better heat transfer and check the alternator belts
for cracks and correct tension.
• Replace the battery if the battery case is cracked or
leaking.
• Battery Testing can be done in more than one way.
The most popular is measurement of specific gravity and battery voltage. To measure specific gravity,
use a temperature compensating hydrometer. To
measure voltage, use a digital D.C. Voltmeter.
• The battery must first be fully charged. The surface
charge must be removed before testing. If the battery
has been sitting at least several hours you may begin
testing. To remove surface charge the battery must
experience a load of 20 amps for 3 plus minutes.
USE A TEMPERATURE
COMPENSATED
HYDROMETER
CHECK EACH CELL
AFTER CHARGING
Figure 6. Ground Connections
Figure 8. Using a Battery Hydrometer
Figure 7. Greased Connection
Page 31
Section 1.8
Basic Maintenance Information
Part 1
General information
1220
1230
LIQUID
LEVEL
1240
Cell #
1250
1
1.255
2
1.260
3
1.235
4
1.250
5
1.240
6
1.225
1260
Specific Gravity
HIGH READING
1270
80°
35 POINTS DIFFERENCE
LOW READING
26.6°
32
28
24
20
16
12
8
4
0
4
8
12
16
20
24
28
32
Figure 9. Reading a Battery Hydrometer
Serpentine Belts:
Definition: A type of flat rubber drive belt that is used
to turn multiple accessories on the front of an engine.
It is called a serpentine belt because of the way it
snakes around the various pulleys.
Many engines now have a single serpentine drive belt
because it eliminates the need for several separate
V-belts. A spring-loaded pulley maintains tension on
the serpentine belt. This does away with the need to
re-tension the belt when it is replaced. Serpentine
belts generally last 25% to 50% longer than conventional V-belts.
Figure 10. A Typical Battery Load Tester
State of Charge
Specific
Gravity Voltage
100%
1.265
12.7
75%
1.225
12.4
50%
1.190
12.2
25%
1.155
12.0
Discharged
1.120
11.9
*
Warning: Never add acid to a battery. Always
use distilled water.
Belts
People often wait until they get some indication that
their engine needs service – such as a noise or
squeal – before calling a service dealer. Although
a professional technician should look at the belts
and hoses as part of a regular maintenance schedule, basic inspection should be done by the owner.
By conducting monthly inspections of the belts, the
owner can help prevent premature engine wear and
extend the life of the engine.
Page 32
Figure 11. Serpentine Belt
V-Belts:
V-belts are named for their appearance. They have
a relatively narrow outside surface, then get thicker
before tapering down. With V-belts, it is common for
engines to have multiple belts driving the accessories.
Belt Inspection:
• Check the engine’s belts before starting the engine,
while the engine is still cold. This will help avoid the
possibility of an accidental burn from a hot engine
component or an injury caused by a moving part of
General information
Part 1
the engine.
• Carefully inspect the belts along their edges and
undersides for any signs of wear (see “Visual Signs
of Wear” below). These danger signs indicate a belt
may need to be replaced or that a belt-driven component may be failing.
• Belt tension should be checked and adjusted on a
regular basis. If the belt tension is too tight, it can
cause bearings in the accessory components, and
even in the engine itself, to wear prematurely. If it
is too loose, the belt will slip and squeal, causing
the accessory components to work less efficiently.
Inadequate tension also will cause the belt to wear
excessively. The most accurate way to check tension is with a belt tension gauge, but correct tension
can be estimated by pressing on the belt along its
longest straight section. If the tension is correct, the
belt will only have about 1/2 inch to 1 inch of play.
• Drive belts are necessary to operate the accessory
components attached to the engine, such as the
alternator, and the water pump. To fully assess the
condition of the belts, do a visual inspection and
test the belt tension.
Section 1.8
Basic Maintenance Information
Figure 13. Improper Install
Pilling: The belt's rubber compound wears off and
builds up on the drive pulleys (the wheel that is driven
by or drives the belt).
• Cause: There are a number of causes, including lack
of tension, misalignment, worn pulleys or a combination of these factors. Pilling is found most frequently
in diesel engines, but is not isolated to them.
Visual Signs of Wear:
Glazing: The side or contact area of the belt
becomes slick and shiny when a loose belt slips in the
pulley. The glazed belt can no longer grip adequately
and the belt slips even more.
• Cause: When in motion, the belt makes contact with
an object in its path such as a flange or bolt. This
may be caused by improper belt tension or pulley
bearing size. Grease and oil on the pulley can also
cause glazing.
Figure 14. Pilled Belt
Cracking: Cracks occur because the belt is exposed
to heat and stress.
• Cause: With continuous exposure to high temperatures, the stress of bending around the pulley leads
to cracking. Cracks begin on the ribs and grow into
the cord line. As a rule, if three or more cracks appear
in a three-inch section of a belt, eighty percent of the
life is gone and the belt should be replaced.
Figure 12. Glazed Belt
Improper Install: A belt rib begins separating from
the joined strands. If left unattended, the cover will
often separate, causing the belt to unravel.
• Cause: Improper belt installation is a common
cause of premature failure. One of the outer-most
belt ribs is placed outside the pulley groove, causing a belt rib to run without a supporting or aligning
pulley groove.
Figure 15. Cracked Belt
Page 33
Section 1.8
Basic Maintenance Information
Part 1
General information
Chunking: Parts of the belt break off when cracks
worsen.
• Cause: Chunking can happen when several cracks
in one area move parallel to the cord line. Heat, age
and stress are the primary contributors.
Figure 18. Misalignment
Figure 16. Chunking
Uneven Rib Wear: Belt shows damage to the side
with the possibility of breaks in the tensile cord or
jagged edged ribs. A thumping or grinding noise may
also be heard when running.
• Cause: A foreign object in the pulley can cause
uneven wear and cut into the belt.
Figure 17. Uneven Rib Wear
Misalignment: Sidewalls of the belt may appear
glazed or the edge-cord may become frayed and ribs
removed. A noticeable noise may result. In severe
cases, the belt can jump off the pulley.
• Cause: Pulleys out of alignment due to either nonparallel shafts, or incorrect location on shafts.
Misalignment forces the belt to kink or twist while
running, causing premature wear.
Page 34
Belt Wear Noise Indicators:
• Squealing: Squealing is a continuous sound that
often occurs when starting the engine after the
engine has sat for awhile. It also can occur when
a higher strain is put on the engine (such as after
increasing the load). Squealing usually indicates
belt wear. However, if enough water is splashed
onto the drive belts, a squealing noise may be a
normal condition associated with slippage due to
the belt being wet.
• Slapping: A slapping sound can be caused by a
loose belt or a belt misalignment.
Air Filters
Air is necessary for successful combustion in an
engine. In fact, for efficient combustion, a modern
engine requires several thousand times as much air
as it does fuel. Clean air - air almost 100% pure - is
critical to engine survival and vital to its performance.
There are operational signs that an air filter has
become completely plugged. The engine begins to
lose power, and fuel consumption increases. Black
smoke may blow from the exhaust stack. Continued
operation with a plugged air filter may very well damage the engine.
It is impossible to determine, just by looking, when air
filters should be changed. An element that looks relatively clean may be almost totally plugged with ultrafine particles from exhaust smoke or air pollutants.
On the other hand, a filter that looks dirty may still have
many hours of useful life. Remember that until maximum acceptable restriction is reached, the accumulation of dirt in the filter actually adds to its efficiency.
Before disposing of old air filters, always inspect them
carefully. Their appearance can reveal much about the
performance of the entire air-induction system.
• An accumulation of black, oily soot might mean that
the air intake is located too close to the exhaust.
Consider relocation.
• An accumulation of dirt on the clean side of the filter
element might indicate a split in the filter media. Also,
determine if the end seal is being bypassed or if a
gasket is leaking. Do not attempt to reuse the filter.
• Rust on the filter’s metal parts can mean that water
is being drawn in with the air. Again, check the location of the intake.
General information
Part 1
*
CAUTION: Generac does not recommend the
cleaning of air filter elements. Since all contaminants cannot be removed, service intervals
become progressively shorter. Further, the
cleaning process might damage the filter, leading to engine damage as well.
Section 1.8
Basic Maintenance Information
• Move the container that has the used engine oil in
it under the location of the oil filter(s) to catch any
spills that occur when the oil filters are removed, or
place some oil absorbent mats or rags under the
area of the oil filter.
• Remove the used engine oil filter(s), being careful
not to spill any oil remaining in the filter(s) and place
the filter in a container.
OIL FILTER
Figure 19. Automotive Type Air Filter
Figure 20. Oil Filter
Spark
Oil Filters
Modern oils play vital functions in protecting engines,
especially in a heavy-duty situation. Lubricating oil
acts to reduce friction and wear, cool engine parts,
seal combustion chambers, clean engine components
and inhibit corrosion.
These functions are carried out by special additives
in the oil, which complement the action of the oil itself.
The protective action of the lubricating oil and its additives are supported and balanced by the work of the
lube filter.
Lube filters, particularly those designed for heavy-duty
applications, have the sole purpose of keeping damaging contaminants away from sensitive engine parts.
Filters trap oil contaminants in two ways: Some particles adhere to filter media as the oil flows through the
filter. Such particles attach themselves to the media
surface without plugging up the media pores.
Other particles are trapped in the filter media by the
pressure of the oil as it flows through the filter. As
the oil changes direction in its path through the filter, particles are driven or impinged into the media.
Ideally, most of these particles are trapped in the
outer portion of the media, leaving inner media surfaces open to continue catching particles that slip
through. Eventually, however, media pores will fill up
and the filter begins to lose its effectiveness.
When changing the engine oil, always replace the
engine oil filter(s).
• Place a container in such a location as to catch the
used oil and avoid spills.
• Remove the engine oil drain plug or the remote oil
drain plug and allow all of the used engine oil to
drain out of the sump.
• Replace the drain plug, do not over tighten.
The spark plug is quite simple in theory: It forces electricity to arc across a gap, just like a bolt of lightning.
The electricity must be at a very high voltage in order
to travel across the gap and create a good spark.
Voltage at the spark plug can be anywhere from
5,000 to 100,000 volts, depending on the type of ignition system being used.
The spark plug must have an insulated passageway
for this high voltage to travel down to the electrode,
where it can jump the gap and, from there, be conducted into the engine block and grounded. The plug
also has to withstand the extreme heat and pressure
inside the cylinder, and must be designed so that
deposits do not build up on the plug.
Spark plugs use a ceramic insert to isolate the high
voltage at the electrode, ensuring that the spark happens at the tip of the electrode and not anywhere else
on the plug; this insert does double-duty by helping to
burn off deposits. Ceramic is a fairly poor heat conductor, so the material gets quite hot during operation.
This heat helps to burn off deposits from the electrode.
Some engines require a hot plug. This type of plug is
designed with a ceramic insert that has a smaller contact area with the metal part of the plug. This reduces
the heat transfer from the ceramic, making it run hotter and thus burn away more deposits. Cold plugs are
designed with more contact area, so they run cooler.
Resistor Plugs:
When the spark jumps the spark plug gap it causes a
high frequency burst of energy that is known as radio
frequency interference (RFI). Placing a resistor within
the spark plug suppresses the RFI. Without the resistor plugs in an engine, the RFI could cause interference with the engine/generator's electronics.
Page 35
Section 1.8
Basic Maintenance Information
Heat Range:
The most basic function of the spark plug is to ignite
the air/fuel mixture. Voltage must be supplied by the
ignition system to cause a spark to jump across the
spark plug's gap and ignite the air/fuel mixture.
To survive the combustion chambers high temperatures and function properly, the spark plug must dissipate the heat that it absorbs. The temperature of the
spark plug's firing end must be kept low enough to
prevent pre-ignition, but high enough to prevent fouling. It is important to remember that spark plugs do
not create heat, but instead they must remove heat.
The heat range determines the plug's ability to dissipate the heat from the spark plug to the cylinder head
where it is absorbed by the coolant system.
How quickly this heat is transferred is determined by:
• The insulator nose length.
• Insulator nose surface area exposed to the air/fuel
mixture.
• The construction of the electrode and the porcelain
insulator.
Types of Abnormal Combustion:
Pre-ignition:
• Defined as: ignition of the air/fuel mixture before the
pre-set ignition timing mark.
• Caused by hot spots in the combustion chamber.
Can be caused (or amplified) by too hot a spark plug,
lean air/fuel mixture, or insufficient engine cooling.
• A change to a colder plug, or a richer fuel mixture
may be in order.
• The engine's cooling system may also need to be
checked.
• Pre-ignition usually leads to detonation; pre-ignition
and detonation are two separate events.
Detonation:
• The spark plug’s worst enemy.
• Can break insulators or break off ground electrodes.
• Pre-ignition most often leads to detonation.
• Plug tip temperatures can spike to over 3000°F during the combustion process.
• Most frequently caused by hot spots in the combustion chamber.
Hot spots will allow the air/fuel mixture to pre-ignite.
As the piston is being forced upward by mechanical
action of the connecting rod, the pre-ignited explosion
will try to force the piston downward. If the piston can't
go up (because of the force of the premature explosion) and it can’t go down (because of the upward
motion of the connecting rod), the piston will rattle
from side to side. The resulting shock wave causes an
audible pinging sound.
• Most of the damage that an engine sustains when
“detonating” is from excessive heat.
• The spark plug is damaged by both the elevated
temperatures and the accompanying shock wave,
or concussion.
Part 1
General information
Misfires:
• A spark plug is said to have misfired when enough
voltage has not been delivered to light off all of the
fuel present in the combustion chamber at the proper moment of the power stroke.
• A spark plug can deliver a weak spark for a variety
of reasons—defective coil, too much compression
with incorrect plug gap, dry fouled or wet fouled
spark plugs, insufficient ignition timing, etc.
• Slight misfires can cause a loss of performance for
obvious reasons (if fuel is not lit, no energy is being
created).
• Severe misfires will cause excessive fuel consumption, poor performance, and can lead to engine
damage.
Fouling:
• Will occur when spark plug tip temperature is insufficient to burn off carbon, fuel, oil or other deposits.
• Will cause spark to leach to metal shell—no spark
across plug gap will cause a misfire.
• Wet-fouled spark plugs must be changed.
• Dry-fouled spark plugs can sometimes be cleaned
by bringing engine up to operating temperature.
Changing Spark Plugs:
• Always change the spark plugs with the engine
cold. Grabbing the plug wire by the boot, carefully
pull the spark plug wire from the end of the spark
plug. Do not pull the wire itself. If the boot sticks,
twist the boot left and right and pull the plug wire off.
Changing the plugs one at a time is recommended
to avoid mixing up the spark plug wires.
• If available, use compressed air to blow any dirt
away from the spark plug area. Otherwise, clean
off the old plug and the area around it with a rag or
small brush. This will help prevent any foreign material from falling into the cylinder when the plug is
removed.
• Remove the plug by turning it counterclockwise with
a spark plug socket and ratchet. Once loosened,
spin it out about three or four turns. Then remove
the socket and remove it completely by hand. If the
plug can't be reached, slip a piece of 5/16” vacuum
line over the spark plug and turn it out with that.
• Take a good look at the cylinder head threads. They
should be in good condition, clean, and free of dirt
and debris. This new spark plug should freely screw
into the cylinder head by hand. Any binding of the
plug is an indication that there's a problem. Remove
the plug and inspect the threads.
• Insert the plug into the spark plug hole by hand and
turn it clockwise until it's snug.
• After installing the plug by hand as far as it will go,
firmly tighten it with a spark plug wrench or socket.
It is a good idea to use a torque wrench, if one is
available, to ensure that the plug is properly seated.
Be very careful; do not over tighten the spark plugs.
Remember, an accurate torque reading can only be
obtained if the spark plug and cylinder head threads
are clean and dry.
General information
Section 1.8
Basic Maintenance Information
Part 1
Troubleshooting:
Diagnosing spark plugs is really pretty straight forward, based on the appearance of the electrode
end of the spark plug. The following illustrations and
descriptions should aid in helping diagnose if there is
an issue that is affecting the combustion process of
the engine.
Normal plug condition: Note the difference in the
gaps, the plug on the left has reached the end of it's
useful life, also note the grounding electrode coloration, this is how a used spark plug should appear
when it is removed. If any plugs do not appear like the
plug on the left, contact a service dealer.
Mechanical damage is caused by foreign objects in
the combustion chamber or an improper plug reach
where it contacts the piston. Even a piece of carbon
can do this.
• To solve this, make sure you have the correct length
tip spark plug as well as removing any foreign materials in the combustion chamber. In some cases you
may have excessive carbon buildup on the backs of
the intake valves that will have to be addressed.
Detonation, in cases of severe detonation, insulators
may become cracked or chipped. An improper spark
plug gap setting will also cause the insulator tip to
crack or chip.
• Detonation is tricky ... make sure that you verify correct ignition timing. Next check for an inoperative
EGR system (if equipped) as well as proper function of the Knock Sensor (if equipped). Also, you will
want to make sure you are using the correct heat
range plug.
NORMAL
INITIAL
PRE-IGNITION
MECHANICAL
DAMAGE
SUSTAINED PREIGNITION
Overheating, on this symptom you will notice a chalky
appearance, white insulator, rapid electrode wear as
well as an absence of deposits. The actual shell may
also be discolored.
• To cure this you must first verify that the plug is the
correct heat range, the ignition timing settings are
correct, the air/fuel mixture is not too lean, there
are no vacuum leaks and that the EGR valve (if
equipped) is functioning properly.
Oil fouled is an oily coating caused by poor oil control.
Oil is leaking past worn valve guides, piston rings, or
on some engines a possible intake gasket leak and
then entering the combustion chamber.
• Check for worn valve guides, intake gasket sealing
alignment, as well as worn cylinder walls and piston
rings. A leak down test is a good place to start for
what is causing this.
Initial pre-ignition will usually look as a melted center
electrode and/or ground electrode.
• Check for incorrect heat range plug, over-advanced
timing, lean fuel mixtures, inoperative EGR valve
or Knock Sensor (if equipped) and also look for hot
spots or deposit accumulation inside the combustion chamber.
Sustained pre-ignition, well this will be pretty obvious
... melted and/or missing center and/or ground electrodes as well as a destroyed insulator.
• Check for incorrect heat range plug, over-advanced
timing, lean fuel mixtures, inoperative EGR valve
or Knock Sensor (if equipped) and also look for hot
spots or deposit accumulation inside the combustion chamber. After you see this, you'd better look
DETONATION
CARBON FOULED
OIL FOULED
CRACKED
Figure 21. Plug Conditions
Page 37
Page 37
Section 1.8
Basic Maintenance Information
for possible internal engine damage as well (pistons, cylinder walls, valves, rings, etc.).
Carbon fouled is a very common visual condition on
engines. Soft, black, sooty, dry-looking carbon. This
indicates a rich mixture, weak ignition or wrong heat
range plug (too cold).
• You will first need to verify plug heat range. Check
choke as well as choke pull-off (if equipped) for
proper function and adjustment. As a general rule
on all computer-controlled engines, you need to
also make sure that all input signals to the ignition
module are working and accurate. This includes, but
is not limited to, all temperature and pressure sensors as well as the system components. Lastly on
all engines, check for vacuum leaks and weak spark
or low voltage output.
Cracked or broken insulator, this is typically a result of
improper installation or careless handling of the spark
plug and should be replaced.
Part 1
General information
Visual Signs of Wear:
Cracking:
Cracking is caused by heat and age, exposure to
ozone, etc.
• Cause: Increased ozone, caused by pollution,
attacks bonds in certain rubber compounds. Tiny
cracks occur primarily where the hose is stressedat curves, bends and clamping locations. These
cracks allow airborne contaminants to invade and
weaken the hose.
Oil Damaged:
Damaged hose is soft, gooey, or spongy to the touch.
Bulges and swelling are readily apparent.
• Cause: Oil reacts chemically with hose compounds
to weaken the structure of molecular bonds. This
causes the hose to soften, swell, and separate by
layers, leading to certain failure. Oil can attack both
external and internal surfaces of the hose.
Hoses
Hoses are used on many components of every
engine. They carry liquids (coolant) and gases (LPG,
and natural gas).
Hose Inspection:
Cold Engine Inspection
• Check for small leaks before you start the engine,
while your engine is still cold. If your engine is operated when it is low on coolant, serious engine damage may occur. Replace the hose as soon as possible.
• Firmly squeeze the radiator hose. A hose that feels
very hard or makes a “crunch” as it is squeezed
is deteriorating and should be replaced. You also
should replace hoses that are extremely soft, sticky
or oil-soaked, as they are likely to fail.
Warm Engine Inspection
• Look carefully at all the hoses to spot any swollen
areas. Such areas indicate weak spots.
• Inspect around hose ends for dampness, deposits
or buildup of dried coolant. These could indicate
that a “cold leak” is present. A cold leak is usually
a very minor leak that occurs after the engine has
cooled down, and expansion and contraction of
components has occurred. All coolant leaks should
be addressed as soon as you notice them. Over
time, these leaks will get worse and could lead to an
expensive repair. An inexpensive gasket or a simple
tightening of a hose clamp may be all that is needed
to avoid an expensive repair.
When to Replace Your Hoses
• When you replace a water pump
• When you replace a thermostat
• Every four years of service
• Anytime you notice damage or leakage
Figure 22. Oil Damage
Heat Damage:
Heat damage can occur internally and may not be
easily detected by physical appearance. Swelling is
one sure external sign of internal damage. External
heat damage is often easier to detect since it can
result in hardened and cracked hose covers.
• Cause: Overheating can cause reinforcement fibers
within a hose to deteriorate. Engine heat, low coolant levels and/or temperature spikes all contribute
to hose damage.
Figure 23. Heat Damage
Page 38
General information
Part 1
Leakage:
Moisture, seepage or drips form on or around clamps
or connectors.
• Cause: Other than insufficient clamp torque, leakage is usually caused by the deteriorated condition
of the hose and/or connector.
Section 1.8
Basic Maintenance Information
Furthermore, the coolant must not attack the rubber
hoses or gaskets in the engine. Of course, it must provide antifreeze and anti-boil protection. Antifreeze is
actually a treatment for the water that is used to cool
an engine. The water is very important, as it is the
primary part of the coolant that removes the heat. The
antifreeze treats the water to prevent rust, corrosion,
hose failures, radiator failures, liner pitting and a host
of other possible problems.
The industry has agreed that most antifreeze/coolants are formulated to be mixed half-and-half with
water. This is important, because even in such diverse
climates as Minneapolis or Phoenix, 50% antifreeze
should be used to insure that an engine is properly
protected. In extremely cold climates, it is permissible to increase the antifreeze to a maximum of 70%.
Most people don't realize that above that, the freeze
point actually gets warmer! The maximum antifreeze
protection with EG (ethylene glycol) based antifreezes
is -86 degrees F when 70% EG based antifreeze is
mixed with 30% water.
Figure 24. Leakage
Coolant:
The great importance of engine coolant to trouble-free
engine operation is poorly understood. Maintenance
managers and industry experts estimate that over
40% of a heavy-duty engine’s downtime is related to
coolant system problems, virtually all of which is preventable with proper preventative maintenance!
The coolant removes excess heat from the engine.
Without coolant, the engine metals would quickly
soften and deform, resulting in catastrophic damage.
In addition, since water is corrosive to engine metals, the coolant has to contain anti-corrosive protective chemicals to prevent rust and other damage that
weakens the engine parts or radiator. There are many
metals to protect: aluminum, steel, cast iron, copper,
brass and solder.
General Considerations:
In most cases, local drinking water is just fine for use
with EG based antifreeze (well water or really hard
water is not recommended). At every oil change,
check the coolant to insure it is still at a 50/50 mixture
with a test strip or refractometer.
Use a mixture of half low silicate, ethylene glycol base
antifreeze or propylene glycol base antifreeze and
half soft water, or use pre-mix antifreeze. Use only
soft water or de-ionized water and only low silicate
antifreeze.
Do not use water that has been softened using a
water softener filled with either salts or chlorides. If
desired, add a high quality rust inhibitor to the recommended coolant mixture.
Use only heavy-duty or all-duty formulation (fully formulated) coolants. Any high quality heavy-duty ethylene glycol antifreeze can be mixed with any other high
quality heavy-duty ethylene glycol antifreeze, and any
high quality heavy-duty propylene glycol antifreeze
can be mixed with any other high quality heavy-duty
propylene glycol antifreeze regardless of the color or
brand of the antifreezes.
When changing from ethylene glycol based antifreeze
to propylene glycol based antifreeze or vise versa, be
sure that the engine and cooling system is thoroughly
flushed of all remaining coolant and other contaminants.
Page 39
Section 1.9
Turbocharger Systems
Part 1
Introduction
There are two generators currently in the 2.4L family
that are equipped with turbochargers; the 36kW which
runs at 1800 rpm and the 60kW which runs at 3600
rpm. This section is provided to help familiarize you
with how a turbocharger works and symptoms of a
faulty turbocharger and the appropriate solutions.
Working Principal:
A turbocharger is a small radial fan pump driven by
the energy of the exhaust gases of an engine. A turbocharger consists of a turbine and a compressor on
a shared shaft. The turbine section of a turbocharger
is a heat engine in itself. It converts the heat energy
from the exhaust to power, which then drives the compressor, compressing ambient air and delivering it to
the air intake manifold of the engine at higher pressure, resulting in a greater mass of air entering each
cylinder. Compressed air is routed through a charge
air cooler before introduction to the intake manifold.
Because a turbocharger is a heat engine, and is converting otherwise wasted exhaust heat to power, it
compresses the inlet air to the engine more efficiently
than a supercharger.
General information
The objective of a turbocharger is the same as a
supercharger; to improve upon the size-to-output efficiency of an engine by solving one of its cardinal limitations. A naturally aspirated automobile engine uses
only the downward stroke of a piston to create an area
of low pressure in order to draw air into the cylinder
through the intake valves. Because the pressure in
the atmosphere is no more than 1 atm (approximately
14.7 psi), there ultimately will be a limit to the pressure difference across the intake valves and thus the
amount of airflow entering the combustion chamber.
This ability to fill the cylinder with air is its volumetric
efficiency. Because the turbocharger increases the
pressure at the point where air is entering the cylinder,
a greater mass of air (oxygen) will be forced in as the
inlet manifold pressure increases. The additional oxygen makes it possible to add more fuel, increasing the
power and torque output of the engine.
Because the pressure in the cylinder must not go too
high to avoid detonation and physical damage, the
intake pressure must be controlled by controlling the
rotational speed of the turbocharger. The control function is performed by a waste gate, which routes some
of the exhaust flow away from the exhaust turbine.
This controls shaft speed and regulates air pressure in
the intake manifold.
COMPRESSED AIR
ENGINE
CYLINDER
CHARGE AIR COOLER
COMPRESSOR
TURBO
OIL INLET
EXHAUST
GAS
DISCHARGE
AMBIENT AIR INLET
COMPRESOR
WHEEL
OIL OUTLET
Figure 1. Turbocharger Flow Diagram
INTERCOOLER
TO BOSCH ACTUATOR
TURBO CHARGER
Figure 2. 2.4 Liter Turbocharger
Page 40
WASTEGATE
Part 1
General information
Section 1.9
Turbocharger Systems
X
Oil Leak from Turbine Seal
Oil Leak from compressor seal
Cyclic sound from turbocharger
Turbocharger noisy
Blue Exhaust Smoke
Excessive Engine Oil Consumption
Black Exhaust Smoke
Engine Lacks Power
Turbocharger Troubleshooting
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Cause
Remedy
Clogged air filter element
Replace element according to engine manufacturers recommendations
Obstructed air intake duct to turbo compressor
Remove obstruction or replace damaged parts
as required
Obstructed air outlet duct from compressor to
intake manifold
Remove obstruction or replace damaged parts
as required
Obstructed intake manifold
Refer to engine manufacturers manual & remove
obstruction
Air leak in duct from air cleaner to compressor
Correct leak by replacing seals or tightening fasteners as required
Air leak in duct from compressor to intake manifold
Correct leak by replacing seals or tightening fasteners as required
Air leak at intake manifold to engine joint
Refer to engine manufacturers manual & replace
gaskets or tighten fasteners as required
Obstruction in exhaust manifold
Refer to engine manufacturers manual & remove
obstruction
Obstruction in muffler or exhaust stack
Remove obstruction or replace faulty components as required
Gas leak in exhaust manifold to engine joint
Refer to engine manufacturers manual & replace
gaskets or tighten fasteners as required
Gas leak in turbine inlet to exhaust manifold joint
Replace gasket or tighten fasteners as required
Gas leak in ducting after the turbine outlet
Refer to engine manufacturers manual & repair
leak
Obstructed turbocharger oil drain line
Remove obstruction or replace line as required
Obstructed engine crankcase vent
Refer to engine manufacturers manual , clear
obstruction
Turbocharger center housing sludged or coked
Change engine oil & oil filter, overhaul or replace
turbo as required
Fuel injection pump or fuel injectors incorrectly
adjusted
Refer to engine manufacturers manual - replace
or adjust faulty components(s) as required
Engine camshaft timing incorrect
Refer to engine manufacturers manual & replace
worn parts
Worn engine piston rings or liners (blowby)
Refer to engine manufacturers manual & repair
engine as required
Internal engine problem (valves, pistons)
Refer to engine manufacturers manual & repair
engine as required
Dirt caked on compressor wheel and/or diffuser
vanes
Clean using a Non-Caustic cleaner & Soft Brush.
Find & correct source of unfiltered air & change
engine oil & oil filter
Damaged turbocharger
Analyze failed turbocharger, find & correct cause
of failure, overhaul or replace turbocharger as
required
Page 41
Notes
Page 42
Table of contents
Part 2
liquid-cooled
AC generators
Part
Title
Page
2.1
Description and Components
44
2.2
AC Output Operational Analysis
49
2.3
AC Output Troubleshooting Flow
Charts
51
2.4
AC Output Diagnostic Tests
55
2.4 Liter standby
Generators
Section 2.1 – Description and Major Components.44
Introduction........................................................44
Engine Adaptor..................................................44
Flexible Disk......................................................44
Fan and Ring Gear Assembly...........................44
Rotor Assembly.................................................44
Rear Bearing Carrier.........................................44
Stator Assembly................................................44
Rear Bearing Carrier Plate................................44
Brush Holders and Brushes..............................44
The Excitation Circuit........................................46
Field Boost........................................................48
Section 2.2 – Operational Analysis........................ 49
Magnetism.........................................................49
Electromagnetism..............................................49
Electromagnetic Induction.................................49
Operation...........................................................50
Section 2.3 – Troubleshooting Flowcharts............. 51
Problem 1 – Generator Produces Zero
Voltage or Residual Voltage.........51
Problem 2 – Generator Produces
Low Voltage at No-Load...............53
Problem 3 – Generator Produces
High Voltage at No-Load..............53
Problem 4 – Voltage and Frequency Drop
Excessively When Loads Are
Applied.........................................54
Section 2.4 – Diagnostic Tests............................... 55
Introduction........................................................55
Safety................................................................55
Test 1 – Check Main Circuit Breaker.................55
Test 2 – Test Excitation Circuit Breaker..............55
Test 3 – Test Field Boost Circuit.........................56
Test 4 – Fixed Excitation Test/
Rotor Amp Draw Test..........................56
Test 5 – Test Thermal Protector..........................58
Test 6 – Test R4 Resistor....................................59
Test 7 – Test BR1 Diode.....................................59
Test 8 – Test Wire 14 Field Boost.......................59
Test 9 – Test Harness Continuity........................60
Test 10 – Automatic Voltage Regulator...............60
Test 11 – Test Wire 14 AVR Input Circuit............61
Test 12 – Test Stator...........................................61
Test 13 – Test Rotor Assembly...........................64
Test 14 – Check AC Output Voltage...................65
Test 15 – Test AC Output Frequency..................65
Test 16 – Adjust Voltage Regulator....................66
Test 17 – Test Voltage and
Frequency Under Load.......................65
Test 18 – Test for an Overload Condition............66
Test 19 – Test Engine Condition.........................66
Page 43
Section 2.1
Description and major components
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
Part 2
Introduction
Rear Bearing Carrier
This section covers the major components of the AC
generator proper, i.e., those generator assemblies
that provide for the production of AC electrical power.
The single bearing rotor (revolving field) is driven by a
2.4 liter, liquid-cooled gas engine. The rotor is coupled
to the engine flywheel, by means of a flexible coupling and a fan and ring gear assembly, so the engine
crankshaft and rotor operate at the same speed.
Major components of the AC generator are shown in
Figure 2 on the next page. These components are (a)
a flexible coupling, (b) fan and ring gear, (c) rotor, (d)
engine adaptor, (e) stator assembly, (f) rear bearing
carrier, and (g) a rear bearing carrier cover.
The rear bearing carrier supports the front of the generator. Mounting feet at the carrier bottom permit the
carrier to be bolted to the generator’s mounting base.
A machined bore, in the center of the carrier, accepts
the rotor bearing. Bosses allow for the retention of
brush holders. Long stator bolts pass through holes
in the carrier’s outer periphery, to sandwich and retain
the stator can between the carrier and the engine
adaptor. A rear bearing carrier gasket helps prevent
dust from entering the bearing area.
Stator Assembly
Engine Adaptor
The stator can is sandwiched between the blower
housing and the rear bearing carrier, and retained in
that position by four (4) stator bolts.
The engine adaptor is bolted to the engine and supports the engine end of the AC generator.
Rear Bearing Carrier Plate
Flexible Disk
A flexible disk bolts to the engine flywheel and to the
fan and ring gear assembly. The disk maintains proper
alignment between the engine and generator parts.
This plate is retained to the rear bearing carrier by
four (4) capscrews, lockwashers and flatwashers. The
plate provides slotted air inlet openings for the passage of cooling and ventilating air into the generator.
Brush Holders and Brushes
Fan and Ring Gear Assembly
The fan and ring gear assembly are retained to the
flexible disk which, in turn, is retained to the engine
flywheel. The fan draws cooling air into the generator
interior through slots in a rear bearing carrier cover,
then expels the heated air outward through a screen
on the engine adaptor. The ring gear teeth mate with
teeth on a starter motor pinion gear, when the engine
is cranked.
Rotor Assembly
The rotor assembly on units rated 1800 rpm is a
4-pole type, having two north magnetic poles and
two south magnetic poles. On units rated 3600 rpm
the rotor is a 2-pole type with one north pole and one
south pole.
The rear end of the rotor is bolted and keyed to the
fan and ring gear. A ball bearing has been pressed
onto the rotor’s front shaft, which is retained, in a
machined bore in the rear bearing carrier.
A positive (+) and a negative (-) slip ring is provided on the rotor shaft that retains the ball bearing.
Brushes will ride on these slip rings.
The combination of slip rings and brushes allow rotor
excitation current to be transmitted from stationary
components into the rotating rotor windings. The positive (+) slip ring is the one nearest the rotor bearing.
Brushes are retained in a brush holder which is
retained to drilled and threaded bosses on the rear
bearing carrier. In most cases, two brush holders
are used having two brushes per holder. Brush holders are precisely positioned so that one of the two
brushes slides on a positive (+) slip ring, the other
on a negative (-) slip ring. The positive (+) brush and
slip ring are nearest the rotor bearing. The positive
(+) side of the DC excitation circuit (Wire No. 4, red)
connects to the positive (+) brush; the negative (-) or
grounded side (Wire No. 1) to the negative (-) brush.
Brushes and brush holders are illustrated in Figure 1.
+
1
BLACK
1
BLACK
4
RED
4
-
1
BRUSH WITH RED LEAD
CLOSEST TO ROTOR BEARING
RED
Figure 1. Brush Holders and Brushes
Page 44
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
Section 2.1
Part 2
Description and major components
STATOR
REAR BEARING
CARRIER
BRUSH HOLDERS
AND BRUSHES
ENGINE ADAPTOR
FLEXIBLE COUPLING
FAN AND RING
GEAR ASSEMBLY
ROTOR
Figure 2. Generator Major Components
Page 45
Section 2.1
Description and major components
The Excitation Circuit
AC output from the stator excitation (DPE) winding is
delivered to the voltage regulator, via a thermal protector (TP), Wire No. 2, an excitation circuit breaker
(CB2), Wire No. 162, and Wire No. 6. This is “unregulated” excitation current.
DPE - STATOR EXCITATION WINDING
- VOLTAGE REGULATOR
TP
- THERMAL PROTECTOR
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
EXCITATION CIRCUIT BREAKER:
This circuit breaker protects the stator from the voltage regulator drawing to much current. If the breaker
has tripped open, loss of excitation current will occur.
Stator power wind­ing AC output voltage will then drop
to a value com­mensurate with field boost voltage only.
The breaker is self-resetting.
162
CB2 - EXCITATION CIRCUIT BREAKER
VR
Part 2
6
162
6
2
VR
6
5
WIRE (BYPASS)
NUT
2
DPE
TP
162
CB2
Figure 3. Schematic - Excitation Circuit
THERMAL PROTECTOR:
This normally closed thermal switch protects the sta­
tor windings against excessively high internal tem­
peratures. The switch is physically imbedded in the
stator windings and electrically connected in series
with the DPE winding AC output to the regulator. If
internal stator temperatures exceed a safe value, the
switch contacts will open and the DPE output to the
voltage regulator will be terminated. Without excitation
current flow to the rotor, generator AC output voltage
will drop to a value commensurate with field boost
voltage only.
The thermal protector is self-resetting. That is, when
internal stator temperatures drop to a safe value, its
contacts will re-close and normal DPE output to the
regulator will resume.
Wire No. 5 is a thermal protector “bypass” lead. If the
thermal switch has failed in its open position, it can be
bypassed. The Wire No. 5 bypass lead is brought out
of the stator and has a wire nut on its end.
Note: This is an emergency fix. If bypassing
the thermal protector fails, the stator should be
replaced.
TP
Figure 4. The Thermal Protector
Page 46
Figure 5. Excitation Circuit Breaker
Sensing Wires:
These wires deliver stator power winding AC voltage and frequency signals to the voltage regulator.
Depending on the voltage and phase of the unit,
these wires can be numbered in different ways. In
order to properly identify the wires on the unit being
serviced, it is essential to know the phase and voltage
of the unit. Refer to Figure 6 for proper identification.
VOLTAGE REGULATOR:
See Figure 7. Unregulated AC output from the stator
DPE winding is delivered to the voltage regulator, via
Wires 6 and 162. Stator power winding AC voltage
and frequency signals are delivered to the regulator,
via the sensing wires. The regulator rectifies the DPE
output and, based on the sensing lead signals, regulates the DC current output to the brushes via Wires 4
and 0. An LED (light emitting diode) is incorporated
on the regulator. The voltage regulator is equipped
with three lamps (LED's). These lamps are (a) a red
“Regulator” lamp, (b) a yellow “Sensing” lamp, and (c)
a green “Excitation” lamp. During normal operation
with no faults in the system, all three lamps should be
ON.
The voltage regulator is powered by stator excitation
(DPE) winding output, with approximately 4 to 8 volts
required to turn the regulator on.
The green “Excitation” lamp and the red “Regulator”
lamp are both powered by excitation winding output. If
excitation winding output is gradually reduced, these
two lamps will begin to dim until, at some midpoint
voltage and current, the lamps will no longer glow visibly. Depending on the specific generator model, excitation (DPE) voltage may be about 40-240 VAC RMS.
The yellow “Sensing” lamp is powered by sensing
input to the regulator from the stator AC power windings. The brightness of this lamp will depend on the
available sensing voltage. Sensing input to the regulator is approximately 190-240 VAC RMS, depending on
the specific generator.
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
Section 2.1
Part 2
9
Description and major components
VOLTAGE
240 VAC
208 VAC
240 VAC
480 VAC
10
2
6
5
DPE WINDING
(COMMON TO ALL CONFIGURATIONS)
PHASE
1-PHASE
3-PHASE
3-PHASE
3-PHASE
1
1
2
7
5
S1
6
3
8
3
8
S4
S5
12
6
22 22
33 33
44 44
208 VAC 3-PHASE
S5
S6
5
S3
S3
11
S6
3
240 VAC 3-PHASE
12
1
S15
HIGH WYE
3
S1
S2
2
4
9
7
4
11
10
8
9
S5
4
S6
240 VAC 1-PHASE
S2
S2
S2
10
2
S4
11 11
9
LOW WYE
7
S1
4
SENSING WIRES
11 & 44
S1 & S3
S1 & S3
S15 & S16
DELTA
6
S4
5
2
S1
7
00
S5
S6
10
1
12
S3
S16
11
6
8
S4
480 VAC 3-PHASE
5
S3
Figure 6. Stator Winding Leads (Liquid-Cooled Units)
The following factors apply to voltage regulator operation:
1.The voltage regulator will shut down on occurrence of any
one or more of the following conditions:
GREEN LED
EXCITATION
DIP 1 = STD
DIP 2 = HIGH
PM
HIGH
STD
LOW
DIP 1
RED LED
VOLTAGE
REGULATOR
(ON)
DIP 2
1
V
+
VOLTAGE POT
YELLOW LED
SENSING
PM
HIGH
STD LOW
U/F
+
2
+
G
GAIN POT
UNDER FREQUENCY POT
Figure 7. Voltage Regulator
a.Loss of sensing voltage to the regulator.
b.Loss of excitation (DPE) voltage input to the
regulator.
c.Loss of circuit reference.
NOTE: The term “circuit reference” refers to voltage regulator settings. The regulator “regulates”
excitation (DPE) winding current flow to the rotor
(field) in order to maintain a sensing voltage that
is commensurate with a preset “reference” voltage. That is, the regulator seeks to maintain a
sensing (actual) voltage that is the same as a
“reference” voltage. Regulator “reference” volt
age is adjustable within a 20 percent range at the
regulator.
2.During generator operation, all three lamps (LED's)
should be ON.
a.“Regulator” lamp ON indicates the regulator is
operating normally.
b.“Sensing” lamp ON indicates that sensing voltage is available to the regulator.
c.“Excitation” lamp ON indicates that unregulated
excitation (DPE) current is available to the regulator.
Page 47
Section 2.1
3.If the red “Regulator” lamp goes OUT, a voltage regulator
fault exists or the regulator has shut down due to occurrence of one or more shutdown conditions.
a.Expect to see a generator AC output voltage
that is commensurate with rotor residual magnetism plus the magnetism produced by field
boost.
b.Residual plus field boost magnetism will provide
approximately one-half the unit's rated voltage.
4.If the green “Excitation” lamp goes out, loss of excitation
(DPE) winding output to the regulator has occurred.
a.Loss of excitation (DPE) output to the regulator will result in regulator shutdown and the red
“Regulator” lamp will also turn on.
b.If the red “Regulator” and the green “Excitation”
lamps are both OUT, look for an AC output voltage that is commensurate with residual plus
field boost magnetism.
5.If the yellow “Sensing” lamp goes out, loss of sensing to
the regulator has occurred.
a.Loss of sensing may cause the regulator to
shutdown.
b.On regulator shutdown, both the “Regulator” and
the “Sensing” lamps will be OUT.
c.Look for a generator output voltage that is the
result of residual plus field boost magnetism.
6.If all three of the lamps go out, look for a fault that can
cause both sensing and excitation to fail.
• A complete open circuit condition in the stator AC
power windings will cause loss of sensing voltage
and frequency. However, this will result in a zero
voltage output from the stator windings.
Based on the “sensing” signals, the regulator delivers direct current (DC) to the rotor, via Wire 4 and the
positive (+) brush and slip ring. This regulated current
flows through the rotor and to frame ground, via the
negative (-) slip ring and brush and Wire 1. The following apply:
• The concentration of magnetic flux lines around the
rotor will be proportional to the regulated excitation current flow through the rotor plus any residual
magnetism.
• An increase in excitation current flow through the
rotor windings will increase the concentration of
“magnetic flux” lines around the rotor which, in turn,
will increase the AC voltage induced into the stator
AC power windings.
Field Boost
See Figure 8. The system provides a “field boost” feature. Field boost, in effect, “flashes the field” whenever
the engine is cranking or running to ensure an early
“pickup voltage” in the stator windings.
Manual and automatic cranking is initiated by the PCB
board action, when the board energizes the run relay
(RL2). The relay is energized; battery voltage is delivered across its closed contacts and to the rotor, via a
field boost resistor (R4), field boost diode (BR1), and
Wire No. 4.
Tech Tip: If the diode fails in a matter that the
a.Look for faulty slip rings, brushes, rotor, etc.
b.Look for a fault in the regulator to rotor circuit.
• Loss of sensing can be caused by an “open” circuit
condition in sensing the leads. Thus, if the yellow
LED is out, it may be assumed that an open circuit
exists in the sensing circuit.
• Loss of sensing to the regulator will usually result
in a “full field” condition and resultant high voltage
output from stator AC power winding. The maximum
voltage that regulator action can deliver is limited by
a “clamming” action on the part of the regulator.
Page 48
diodes are no longer blocking voltage, regulated DC voltage from the regulator could be
delivered to the Wire 14 circuit damaging components that are connected on that circuit.
R4
4
4
AVR
BR1
14A
29
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
4
1
14
RL2
7.If the red “Regulator” lamp is flashing, “Stability” probably
requires adjustment. An open condition in the sensing
leads to the regulator (see Sensing Wires in this section) tends to create a “full field” condition. This occurs
because the regulator tries to bring the sensing voltage
up to an equal value with the “reference” voltage setting,
by increasing regulated excitation current to the rotor.
However, regulator shutdown occurs on loss of sensing
voltage. This, in turn, causes loss of excitation current
to the rotor. The generator's AC output voltage will then
become commensurate with rotor residual magnetism
plus field boost magnetism, about one-half rated voltage.
If the yellow LED goes OUT, sensing signals to the regulator have been lost. The following rules apply:
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
Part 2
Description and major components
15 (FUSED AC)
15A
BA
Figure 8. The Field Boost Circuit
4
1
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
Part 2
Section 2.2
Operational analysis
Magnetism
Although magnetism is invisible, some of the effects it
produces can be clearly seen. The behavior patterns
of magnetism have been studied. It is the application
of these behavior patterns that has led to the development of generators, motors, relays, transformers,
coils, etc.
Magnetism can be used to produce electricity.
Conversely, electricity can produce magnetism. Because
of the relationship between magnetism and electricity, a
study of one should include a study of the other.
The following facts are known about magnetism:
• Lines of magnetic force called “flux”, are directed
away from the north pole of a magnet, travel in a
loop, and re-enter the magnet at its south pole.
• Lines of flux form definite patterns which vary in
density according to the strength of the magnet.
• Lines of flux never cross one another.
• The area surrounding a magnet in which its lines of
magnetic flux can be felt is called a “magnetic field”.
N
W
N
S
S
E
MAGNETIC LINES
OF FORCE
Figure 1. Magnetic Lines of Flux
Electromagnetism
Current carrying electrical conductors are surrounded by
a magnetic field which is at right angles to the conductor. When current flow through the conductor increases,
the number of lines of flux increase proportionally. That
is, the strength of the magnetic field increases when
current flow increases. The magnetic field is distributed
along the entire length of the conductor.
CURRENT CARRYING
CONDUCTOR
Electromagnetic Induction
When a conductor is moved so that it passes through
a magnetic field, an electromotive force (EMF or voltage) is created in the conductor. If the magnetic field
is moved so that it cuts across the conductor, an EMF
or voltage will also be created in the conductor. This is
the basic principle that allows a generator to produce
electricity.
Figure 3 shows a simple revolving field generator. A
permanent magnet rotates so that its lines of flux cut
across a coil of wires called a stator. As the north pole
of the magnet passes the stator windings, a voltage
is induced into the stator and current will flow in one
direction through the light bulb (called the “load”). As
the north pole passes the stator, voltage and current
will drop to zero. When the magnet's south pole pass
the stator, current flow increases in the opposite direction. Magnet rotation causes this cycle to continue,
with current flow reversing direction at the passage of
each north and south pole. This constant reversal of
current is called “alternating current” or “AC”.
The flow of electrical current through a conductor in
one direction followed by its reversal and flow in the
opposite direction is called a “cycle” or “1 Hertz”.
MAGNETIC LINES
OF FORCE
Figure 2 - Magnetism Around a Conductor
Figure 3 - A Simple Revolving Field Generator
Page 49
Section 2.2
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
Part 2
Operational analysis
Operation
STARTUP:
When the engine is started, residual plus field boost
magnetism from the rotor induces a voltage into the
stator AC power windings and the stator excitation or
DPE windings. In an “on-speed” condition, residual
plus field boost magnetism are capable of creating
approximately one-half the unit’s rated voltage.
ON-SPEED OPERATION:
As the engine accelerates, the voltage that is induced
into the stator windings increases rapidly, due to the
increasing speed at which the rotor operates.
FIELD EXCITATION:
An AC voltage is induced into the stator excitation
(DPE) windings. The DPE winding circuit is completed
to the voltage regulator, via Wire 2, excitation circuit
breaker, Wire 162, and Wire 6. Unregulated alternating current can flow from the winding to the regulator.
If excitation voltage is present at the voltage regulator,
the green excitation LED will be lit.
The voltage regulator “senses” AC power winding
output voltage and frequency via the stator sensing
wires.
The regulator changes the AC from the excitation
winding to DC. In addition, based on the sensing signals, it regulates the flow of direct current to the rotor.
The rectified and regulated current flow from the regulator is delivered to the rotor windings, via Wire 4, and
the positive brush and slip ring. This excitation current
flows through the rotor windings and is directed to
ground through the negative (-) slip ring and brush,
and Wire 1. The greater the current flow through the
rotor windings, the more concentrated the lines of flux
around the rotor become.
The more concentrated the lines of flux around the
rotor that cut across the stationary stator windings,
the greater the voltage that is induced into the stator
windings.
Initially, the AC power winding voltage sensed by the
regulator is low. The regulator reacts by increasing
the flow of excitation current to the rotor until voltage increases to a desired level. The regulator then
maintains the desired voltage. For example, if voltage
exceeds the desired level, the regulator will decrease
the flow of excitation current. Conversely, if voltage
drops below the desired level, the regulator responds
by increasing the flow of excitation current.
AC POWER WINDING OUTPUT:
A regulated voltage is induced into the stator AC
power windings. When electrical loads are connected
across the AC power windings to complete the circuit, current can flow in the circuit. The regulated AC
power winding output voltage will be in direct proportion to the AC frequency. For example, on units rated
120/240 volts at 60 Hz, the regulator will try to maintain 240 volts (line-to-line) at 60 Hz. This type of regulation system provides greatly improved motor starting
capability over other types of systems.
TO LOAD
MLB
MLB = MAIN LINE CIRCUIT BREAKER
CB2 = EXCITATION CIRCUIT BREAKER
SENSING
STATOR
POWER
WINDING
STATOR
POWER
WINDING
FIELD BOOST
MAGNETIC
FIELD
BELT DRIVEN
ALTERNATOR
ENGINE MOUNT
ENGINE DIRECT DRIVE
11
ROTOR
VOLTAGE
REGULATOR
4
MAGNETIC
FIELD
1
162
CONTROL
BOARD
STATOR
EXCITATION
WINDING
TO BATTERY
Figure 4. Operating Diagram of AC Generator
Page 50
44
CB2
2
6
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
Section 2.3
Part 2
Troubleshooting flow charts
Use the “Flow Charts” in conjunction with the detailed
instructions in Section 2.4. Test numbers used in
the flow charts correspond to the numbered tests in
Section 2.4.
The first step in using the flow charts is to correctly
identify the problem. Once that has been done, locate
the problem on the following pages. For best results,
perform all tests in the exact sequence shown in the
flow charts.
Problem 1 – Generator Produces Zero Voltage or Residual Voltage
TEST 1 – CHECK
MAIN CIRCUIT
BREAKER
TEST 2 – TEST
EXCITATION
CIRCUIT BREAKER
GOOD – PROCEED
BAD – PROCEED, REPLACE AFTER TESTS
CONCLUDE
RESET TO “ON” OR
REPLACE IF BAD
TEST 8 –
TEST WIRE 14
FIELD BOOST
TEST 7 –
TEST BR1
DIODE
GOOD
GOOD
TEST 6 –
TEST R4
RESISTOR
BAD
BAD
BAD
REPLACE
REPLACE
REPLACE
GOOD
TEST 3 –
TEST FIELD
BOOST
BAD
GOOD
PROCEED TO
“TEST 70 – CHECK
RUN RELAY”
TEST 5 – TEST
THERMAL
PROTECTOR
RE-TEST
A
TEST 9 – TEST
AUTOMATIC VOLTAGE
REGULATOR HARNESS
CONTINUITY
B
G
D
CHECK
VOM
FUSES
TEST 12 – TEST
STATOR
REPAIR OR
REPLACE
THEN
RETEST
TEST 10 – TEST
AUTOMATIC
VOLTAGE
REGULATOR
BAD
C
REPAIR
OR
REPLACE
FUSES
BAD
GOOD
NO VOLTAGE
ON WIRE 14
TEST 4 –
PERFORM FIXED
EXCITATION /
ROTOR AMP DRAW
BAD
TEST 13 –
TEST ROTOR
ASSEMBLY
GOOD
PERFORM STATOR
INSULATION
RESISTANCE TEST
REPAIR OR
REPLACE
GOOD
BAD
REPAIR
OR
REPLACE
BAD
PERFORM ROTOR
INSULATION
RESISTANCE TEST
BAD
GOOD
INVESTIGATE PARTICULAR CIRCUIT
REPLACE
VOLTAGE
REGULATOR
GREEN LED = POWER WINDINGS
YELLOW LED = DPE WINDING
RED LED
= WIRE 14, DPE WINDING
BAD
TEST 11 – TEST
AUTOMATIC VOLTAGE
REGULATOR DC INPUT
GOOD
PROCEED TO
“TEST 70 – CHECK
RUN RELAY”
Page 51
Section 2.3
Part 2
Troubleshooting flow charts
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
Problem 1 – Generator Produces Zero Voltage or Residual Voltage
(Continued)
E
TEST 4 –
PERFORM FIXED
EXCITATION /
ROTOR AMP DRAW
F
TEST 5 – TEST
THERMAL
PROTECTOR
H
TEST 12 –
TEST
STATOR
BAD
GOOD
TEST 13 –
TEST ROTOR
ASSEMBLY
BAD
PERFORM STATOR
INSULATION
RESISTANCE TEST
BAD
GOOD
PERFORM ROTOR
INSULATION
RESISTANCE TEST
BAD
REPAIR
OR
REPLACE
GOOD
TEST 12 –
TEST
STATOR
GOOD
RE-TEST
TEST 4
Page 52
TEST 13 –
TEST ROTOR
ASSEMBLY
BAD
GOOD
BAD
PERFORM ROTOR
INSULATION
RESISTANCE TEST
GOOD
PERFORM STATOR
INSULATION
RESISTANCE TEST
REPAIR
OR
REPLACE
GOOD
GOOD
BAD
RE-TEST
TEST 4
BAD
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
Section 2.3
Part 2
Troubleshooting flow charts
Problem 2 – Generator Produces Low Voltage at No-Load
TEST 14 –
CHECK
AC OUTPUT
VOLTAGE
LOW
TEST 15 – CHECK
AC OUTPUT
FREQUENCY
LOW
FREQUENCY AND
VOLTAGE O.K.
GO TO
“PROBLEM 12”
TEST 68
FREQUENCY O.K.,
BUT VOLTAGE LOW
TEST 16 –
ADJUST
VOLTAGE
REGULATOR
FREQUENCY AND VOLTAGE O.K.
FREQUENCY O.K.,
BUT VOLTAGE IS
STILL LOW
STOP TESTS
GO TO “PROBLEM 1”
FLOW CHART - START
AT “TEST 4 - F/E”
Problem 3 – Generator Produces High Voltage at No-Load
TEST 14 – CHECK
AC OUTPUT
VOLTAGE
HIGH
TEST 15 – CHECK
AC OUTPUT
FREQUENCY
FREQUENCY O.K.,
BUT VOLTAGE HIGH
HIGH
GO TO
“PROBLEM 12”
TEST 68
FREQUENCY AND
VOLTAGE O.K.
DISCONTINUE TESTING
FREQUENCY AND
VOLTAGE O.K.
DISCONTINUE TESTING
TEST 16 – ADJUST
VOLTAGE
REGULATOR
FREQUENCY O.K.,
BUT VOLTAGE IS
STILL HIGH
FREQUENCY O.K.,
BUT VOLTAGE HIGH
REPLACE DEFECTIVE
VOLTAGE REGULATOR
Page 53
Section 2.3
Part 2
Troubleshooting flow charts
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
Problem 4 – Voltage and Frequency Drop Excessively When Loads Are Applied
TEST 17 – CHECK
VOLTAGE AND
FREQUENCY
UNDER LOAD
TEST 18 – CHECK
FOR OVERLAOD
CONDITION
BOTH
LOW
GO TO SECTION 3.4
DIAGNOSTIC TESTS
TEST 68 – CHECK
FUEL SUPPLY AND
PRESSURE
NOT
OVERLOADED
OVERLOADED
GOOD
DISCONTINUE TESTING
GO TO SECTION 3.4
DIAGNOSTIC TESTS
TEST 20 - CHECK ENGINE
COMPRESSION AND
CONDITION
GOOD
REDUCE LOADS TO UNIT”S
RATED CAPACITY
GOOD
LOOK FOR A SHORTED
CONDITION IN A CONNECTED
LOAD OR IN ONE OF THE
LOAD CIRCUITS
GOOD
TEST 12 –
TEST
STATOR
BAD
BAD
ENGINE CONDITION GOOD
REPAIR OR REPLACE
REPAIR OR REPLACE
CONTACT TECHNICAL
SERVICE
Page 54
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
Section 2.4
Part 2
Introduction
This section is provided to familiarize the service
technician with acceptable procedures for the testing and evaluation of various problems that could be
encountered on standby generators with liquid-cooled
engines. Use this section of the manual in conjunction
with Section 2.3, “Troubleshooting Flow Charts”. The
numbered tests in this section correspond with those
of Section 2.3.
Most tests can be performed with an inexpensive voltohm-milliammeter (VOM). An AC frequency meter is
required, where frequency readings must be taken. A
clamp-on ammeter may be used to measure AC loads
on the generator.
Testing and troubleshooting methods covered in this
section are not exhaustive. We have not attempted to
discuss, evaluate and advise the home standby service trade of all conceivable ways in which service and
trouble diagnosis might be performed. We have not
undertaken any such broad evaluation. Accordingly,
anyone who uses a test method not recommended
herein must first satisfy himself that the procedure or
method he has selected will jeopardize neither his nor
the product’s safety.
Diagnostic tests
from the main circuit breaker terminals, to prevent
interaction.
3.With the generator shut down, connect one VOM
test probe to the Wire 11 terminal of the breaker
and the other test probe to the Wire E1 terminal.
4.Set the breaker to its ON or “Closed” position. The
VOM should read CONTINUITY.
5.Set the breaker to its OFF or “Open” position. The
VOM should indicate infinity.
6.Repeat Steps 4 and 5 with the VOM test probes
connected across the breaker’s Wire 44 terminal
and the E2 terminal.
RESULTS:
1.If the circuit breaker tests good, go on to Test 2.
2.If the breaker tests bad, it should be replaced.
Safety
Service personnel who work on this equipment must
be made aware of the dangers of such equipment.
Extremely high and dangerous voltages are present
that can kill or cause serious injury. Gaseous fuels are
highly explosive and can be ignited by the slightest
spark. Engine exhaust gases contain deadly carbon
monoxide gas that can cause unconsciousness or
even death. Contact with moving parts can cause serious injury. The list of hazards is seemingly endless.
When working on this equipment, use common
sense and remain alert at all times. Never work on
this equipment while you are physically or mentally
fatigued. If you don’t understand a component, device
or system, do not work on it.
Figure 1. Generator Main Circuit Breaker Test Points
Test 1 – Check Main Circuit Breaker
DISCUSSION:
Often the most obvious cause of a problem is overlooked. If the generator main line circuit breaker is set
to OFF or “Open”, no electrical power will be supplied
to electrical loads. If loads are not receiving power,
perhaps the main circuit breaker is open or has failed.
PROCEDURE:
The generator main circuit breaker is located on the
control panel. If loads are not receiving power, make
sure the breaker is set to ON or “Closed”.
If you suspect the breaker may have failed, it can be
tested as follows (see Figure 1):
1.Set a volt-ohm-milliammeter (VOM) to its “R x 1”
scale and zero the meter.
2.With the generator shut down, disconnect all wires
Test 2 – Test Excitation Circuit
Breaker
DISCUSSION:
Unregulated excitation current is delivered to the voltage regulator from the stator excitation (DPE) winding, via Wire 2, an excitation circuit breaker (CB2),
Wire 162, and Wire 6. If the excitation circuit breaker
has failed open, excitation current will not be available to the voltage regulator or to the rotor. Stator AC
power winding output will then be reduced to a voltage that is the product of residual magnetism alone,
plus field boost.
PROCEDURE:
*
Caution! The Excitation Circuit Breaker may
be hot.
Page 55
Section 2.4
Part 2
Diagnostic tests
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
1.With the generator shut down, locate the excitation circuit
breaker in the control panel. Disconnect wires from the
breaker, to prevent interaction.
3.Set VOM to measure DC voltage
2.Set VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
5.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL position.
Approximately 10-13 VDC should be measured.
3.Connect the VOM test probes across the circuit breaker
terminals. The meter should read CONTINUITY.
RESULTS:
1.Replace circuit breaker if defective (meter reads “OPEN”),
refer back to flow chart.
2.If circuit breaker is good, refer back to flow chart.
162
2
4.Connect one meter lead to Terminal 3 of TB1 and connect
the other meter lead to Terminal 2 of TB1.
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
Results:
1.Approximately 10-13 VDC should be measured. Refer
back to flow chart.
Test 4 – Fixed Excitation Test/Rotor
Amp Draw Test
DISCUSSION:
Supplying a fixed DC current to the rotor will induce a
magnetic field in the rotor. With the generator running,
this should create a proportional voltage output from
the stator windings.
Figure 2. Excitation Circuit Breaker
Test 3 – Test Field Boost Circuit
Discussion:
See “Field Boost Circuit” in Section 2.2. Field boost
current is required for the rotor only while the engine
is cranking or running. Loss of field boost output to the
rotor may or may not affect power winding AC output
voltage. The following facts apply:
• A small amount of voltage must be induced into the
DPE winding to turn the voltage regulator on.
• If rotor residual magnetism is sufficient to induce a
voltage into the DPE winding that is high enough
to turn the voltage regulator on, regulator excitation
current will be supplied even if field boost has failed.
Normal AC output voltage will then be supplied.
• If rotor residual magnetism has been lost or is not
sufficient to turn the regulator on, and field boost
has also been lost, excitation current will not be
supplied to the rotor. Generator AC output voltage
will then drop to zero or nearly zero.
Procedure:
1.Disconnect the connector from the voltage regulator.
2.Disconnect the Wire 4 that runs to the brush assembly on
Terminal 3 of TB1. Figure 3 on the following page shows
the terminal strip and the various wires.
Tech Tip: The brush assembly wire will be
the larger one.
Page 56
PROCEDURE:
1.Disconnect Wires 2, 6, 11, and 44 from the top of
Terminal Board 1. Ensure that these wires are isolated
from the terminal strip.
2.Connect a jumper wire from Terminal 9 (Wire 14) of
Terminal Board 1. Connect the other end of the wire to
Terminal 3 (Wire 4) of the same terminal board. See
Figure 3.
3.Set a VOM to measure AC Volts.
4.Set the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL
position.
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
5.Connect one meter test lead to Terminal 4 (Wire 2) of TB1
and connect the other lead to Terminal 5 (Wire 6) of TB1.
Measure and record voltage.
6.Connect one meter test lead to Terminal 6 (Wire 11) of
TB1 and connect the other lead to Terminal 7 (Wire 44) of
TB1. Measure and record voltage.
7.Set the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the OFF position.
8.Remove jumper wire that was installed in Step 2.
9.Isolate all wires on Terminal 3 of TB1 so that only the
brush wire is connected to Terminal 3.
10.Set a VOM to measure DC amperage.
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
Section 2.4
Part 2
Diagnostic tests
11.Connect one meter lead to Terminal 10 (Wire 15) of TB1
and the other lead to Terminal 3 of TB1 (Wire 4) (see
Figure 4).
14.Measure and record running rotor amp draw.
15.Set the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the OFF position.
16.Reconnect all wires to TB1 that were disconnected in
Step 9.
12.Measure and record static rotor amp draw.
13.Set the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL
position.
RESULTS:
Refer to Chart on the next page : “Test 4 Results Fixed Excitation Test/Rotor Amp Draw Test.”. Then
refer back to the “Problem 1” Flow Chart to proceed.
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
2
6
11
44
100 VAC
FROM VOLTAGE REGULATOR 4
Ω
FROM R4 RESISTOR
4
GROUND
1
40Ω
JUMPER WIRE
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12
Ω
TO BRUSHES
4
2
11
6
44
14
Figure 3. Flashing the Field
1.83 a
4
4
Ω
FROM R4 RESISTOR
1
2
40Ω
FROM VOLTAGE REGULATOR
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12
Ω
4
15
TO BRUSHES
Figure 4. Rotor Amp Draw
Page 57
Section 2.4
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
Part 2
Diagnostic tests
TEST 4 Results – Fixed Excitation Test/Rotor Amp Draw Test
Results:
Size
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
Voltage Results
Wire 2 & 6
ALL
Above
60 VAC
Above
60 VAC
Below
60 VAC
Below
60 VAC
Below
60 VAC
Below
60 VAC
Above
60 VAC
Below
60 VAC
Voltage Results
Wire 11 & 44
ALL
Above
120 VAC
Below
120 VAC
Above
120 VAC
Below
120 VAC
Below
120 VAC
Below
120 VAC
Above
120 VAC
Below
120 VAC
Static Rotor
Amp Draw
Running Rotor
Amp Draw
22 kW 1-Phase
2.03 Amps
2.03 Amps
2.03 Amps
2.03 Amps
2.03 Amps
22 kW 3-Phase
2.14 Amps
2.14 Amps
2.14 Amps
2.14 Amps
2.14 Amps
27 kW 1-Phase
1.77 Amps
1.77 Amps
1.77 Amps
1.77 Amps
1.77 Amps
27 kW 3-Phase
1.82 Amps
1.82 Amps
1.82 Amps
36 kW 1-Phase
1.54 Amps
1.54 Amps
1.54 Amps
36 kW 3-Phase
1.54 Amps
1.54 Amps
1.54 Amps
45 kW 1-Phase
2.58 Amps
2.58 Amps
2.58 Amps
1.82 Amps
Zero
Current
Draw
1.82 Amps
Zero
Current
Draw
1.54 Amps
Above
2.5A
1.54 Amps
1.54 Amps
1.54 Amps
2.58 Amps
2.58 Amps
45 kW 3-Phase
2.58 Amps
2.58 Amps
2.58 Amps
2.58 Amps
2.58 Amps
60 kW 1-Phase
2.30 Amps
2.30 Amps
2.30 Amps
2.30 Amps
2.30 Amps
60 kW 3-Phase
2.30 Amps
2.30 Amps
2.30 Amps
2.30 Amps
2.30 Amps
27 kW 3-Phase
1.82 Amps
1.82 Amps
1.82 Amps
1.82 Amps
27 kW 1-Phase
1.77 Amps
1.77 Amps
1.77 Amps
1.77 Amps
22 kW 3-Phase
2.14 Amps
2.14 Amps
2.14 Amps
2.14 Amps
22 kW 1-Phase
2.03 Amps
2.03 Amps
2.03 Amps
2.03 Amps
36 kW 1-Phase
1.54 Amps
1.54 Amps
1.54 Amps
36 kW 3-Phase
1.54 Amps
1.54 Amps
1.54 Amps
Zero
Current
Draw
Zero
Current
Draw
1.54 Amps
Above
2.5A
1.54 Amps
45 kW 1-Phase
2.58 Amps
2.58 Amps
2.58 Amps
2.58 Amps
45 kW 3-Phase
2.58 Amps
2.58 Amps
2.58 Amps
2.58 Amps
60 kW 1-Phase
2.30 Amps
2.30 Amps
2.30 Amps
2.30 Amps
60 kW 3-Phase
2.30 Amps
2.30 Amps
2.30 Amps
2.30 Amps
Above 2.5A
MATCH RESULTS WITH LETTER AND REFER TO FLOW CHART IN SECTION 2.3 “Problem 1”
Test 5 – Test Thermal Protector
DISCUSSION:
An open thermal protector will result in loss of excitation. Generator AC output voltage will then drop to
approximately 50 percent of rated voltage.
6. The meter should indicate the resistance of the stator
excitation (DPE) winding.
RESULTS:
1.If normal DPE winding resistance was indicated in Step
5, but INFINITY is indicated in Step 4, bypass the thermal
protector by connecting Wire 5 to Terminal 4 of TB1.
PROCEDURE:
1.Locate DPE Wire 2 where it connects to the excitation circuit breaker. Disconnect the wire from the circuit breaker.
DPE - STATOR EXCITATION WINDING
2.Disconnect the connector that plugs into the voltage regulator.
CB2 - EXCITATION CIRCUIT BREAKER
VR
- VOLTAGE REGULATOR
3.Set a VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
TP
- THERMAL PROTECTOR
4.Connect one meter test lead to Terminal 4 (Wire 2) on
TB1, connect the other test lead to Terminal 5 (Wire 6) on
TB1. The meter should indicate the resistance of the stator excitation (DPE) winding. Reference chart in the front
of this manual for the correct resistance reading depending on your stator.
5.If the meter indicated INFINITY in Step 4, connect the
VOM test leads across Wire 5 (bypass wire) and Wire
Page 58
6
162
6
VR
6
(BYPASS)
5
WIRE
NUT
2
DPE
TP
162
CB2
Figure 5. Bypassing the Thermal Protector
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
Section 2.4
Part 2
Test 6 – Test R4 Resistor
Discussion:
The R4 resistor is installed with the field boost circuit
in series with the rotor. This is done so that the initial
DPE and sensing voltages coming out of the stator
during field boost are at a level that is acceptable for
the voltage regulator.
Diagnostic tests
3.Connect one meter test lead to BR1 where Wire 29 was
disconnected in Step 1 and the other meter test lead to a
clean frame ground.
4.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL position.
Measure and record the voltage. Battery voltage should
be measured.
1.Disconnect Wire 4 from R4 resistor.
*
2.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL position.
5.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL position to the OFF position.
3.Set VOM to DC Voltage.
6.Reconnect Wire 29 to BR1.
4.Connect one meter test lead to the terminal where Wire 4
was disconnected in Step 1 and connect the other lead to
a clean frame ground. Measure and record the voltage.
7.Disconnect Wire 14 from BR1
Procedure:
5.Disconnect Wire 29 from the R4 resistor.
6.Set a VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
8.Connect one meter test lead to the disconnected Wire 14
and the other meter test lead to a clean frame ground.
9.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL position.
7.Connect one meter test lead to the R4 resistor wire
where Wire 4 was disconnect in Step 1 and connect the
other meter test lead to the R4 resistor wire where Wire
29 was disconnected in Step 5. Measure and record the
resistance. Approximately 15 Ohms should be measured.
*
Results:
Results:
1.If battery voltage is measured in Step 4, repair or replace
Wire 4 between R4 and TB1 Terminal 3.
1.If battery voltage was measured in Step 4, repair or
replace Wire 29 between BR1 and R4.
2.If battery voltage was not measured in Step 4 and the
correct resistance was measured in Step 7, refer back to
flow chart.
2.If battery voltage was not measured in Step 4, but was
measured in Step 10, replace BR1.
3.If the correct resistance was not measured in Step 7,
replace the R4 resistor and re-test.
Test 7 – Test BR1 Diode
Discussion:
The bridge rectifier is installed on the field flash circuit
to benefit two components. It allows for a field flash
to occur on the rotor and a field flash to occur on the
engine alternator. It also acts as a bridge so that regulated DC voltage from the voltage regulator does not
get back to the run circuit during normal operation. If
this diode failed closed it would allow for a high DC
voltage to get back to the run circuit, potentially damaging critical components.
Procedure:
1.Disconnect Wire 29 from BR1 located in the top of the
control panel.
2.Set VOM to measure DC voltage.
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
10.Measure and record the voltage. Battery voltage should
be measured.
3.If battery voltage was not measured in Step 10 refer back
to flow chart.
Test 8 – Test Wire 14 Field Boost
Discussion:
Battery voltage is delivered to BR1 via Wire 14 from
Terminal 9 of TB1. Wire 14 is the run circuit and is
controlled by RL2 (Run Relay). This relay must energize before field boost will occur.
Procedure:
1.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL position.
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
2.Connect one meter test lead to Terminal 9 of TB1 and the
other meter test lead to a clean frame ground. Measure and
record the voltage. Battery voltage should be measured.
Page 59
Section 2.4
Part 2
Diagnostic tests
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
Results:
5.Set VOM to measure DC voltage.
1.If battery voltage was measured, repair or replace Wire
14 between BR1 and Terminal 9 of TB1.
6.Connect one meter test lead to Pin 3 and the other meter
test lead to a clean frame ground.
2.If battery voltage was not measured, refer back to flow
charts.
7.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL position.
Test 9 – Test Harness Continuity
Discussion:
The voltage regulator receives unregulated alternating
current from the stator excitation winding, via Wires 2,
6, and 162. It also receives voltage sensing from the
stator AC power windings, via Wires 11 and 44. The
regulator rectifies the AC from the excitation winding
and based on the sensing signals, regulates the DC
current flow to the rotor. The rectified and regulated
current flow is delivered to the rotor brushes via Wires
4 (positive) and 1 (negative). This test will verify the
integrity of the connector to ensure all proper signals
are getting to the voltage regulator.
Procedure:
1.Disconnect the connector that goes in to the voltage
regulator.
Tech Tip: Reference Section 1.7 for proper
procedures in testing connector plugs and
incoming wires.
2.Set VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
3.Connect one meter lead to Pin 1 and the other test lead
to Terminal 4 of TB1. CONTINUITY should be measured.
4.Repeat Step 3 between the following pins and terminals,
CONTINUITY should be measured during each step.
a.Pin 2 to Terminal 5 (Wire 6) of TB1.
b.Pin 3 to Terminal 9 (Wire 14) of TB1.
c.Pin 4 to Terminal 6 (Wire 11) of TB1.
d.Pin 6 to Terminal 7 (Wire 44) of TB1.
e.Pin 7 to Terminal 3 (Wire 4) of TB1.
f. Pin 8 to Terminal 2 (Wire 1) of TB1.
AVR Pin Out Chart
Pin
Wire
Function
1
162
DPE Winding
2
6
DPE Winding
3
14
Run Circuit
4
11
Power Winding (Sensing)
6
44
Power Winding (Sensing)
7
4
Rotor (Brushes)
8
1
Rotor (Brushes)
Page 60
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
8.Measure and record voltage. Battery voltage should be
indicated.
9.Disconnect Wire 2 from Terminal 4 of TB1, Wire 6 from
Terminal 5 of TB1, Wire 11 from Terminal 6 of TB1, and
Wire 44 from Terminal 7of TB1.
Note: Disconnect the Wires from the top of the terminal strip so that the wires are isolated.
10.Set a VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
11.Connect one meter test lead to disconnected Wire 2
and the other meter test lead to disconnected Wire 6.
INFINITY should be measured.
12.Repeat Step 11 between the following test points:
a.Wire 2 to Wire 11
b.Wire 2 to Wire 44
c.Wire 6 to Wire 11
d.Wire 6 to Wire 44
e.Wire 11 to Wire 44
f. Wire 2 to Ground
g.Wire 6 to Ground
h.Wire 11 to Ground
i. Wire 44 to Ground
Results:
1.If CONTINUITY was measured in Steps 5 and 6, refer
back to flow chart.
2.If INFINITY was not measured between one of the connections, repair or replace the wire.
3.If battery voltage was not measured in Step 10, refer back
to flow chart.
4.If anything other than INFINITY is measured in Steps 11
and 12, repair or replace the defective wire.
Test 10 – Automatic Voltage Regulator
Discussion:
Unregulated AC output from the stator DPE winding is
delivered to the voltage regulator, via Wires No. 6 and
162. Stator power winding AC voltage and frequency
signals are delivered to the regulator, via the sensing wires. The regulator rectifies the DPE output and,
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
Section 2.4
Part 2
based on the sensing lead signals, regulates the DC
current output.
A 12V DC signal is also delivered to the voltage regulator via Wire 14. This allows the voltage regulator to
turn on internally and be ready when the stator starts
to produce power. The voltage regulator is equipped
with three lamps (LED's). These lamps are (a) a red
“Regulator” lamp, (b) a yellow “Sensing” lamp, and (c)
a green “Excitation” lamp. During normal operation
with no faults in the system, all three lamps should be
ON. See Section 4.1 for adjustments and installation
guidelines and further technical data.
Diagnostic tests
Procedure:
1.Set VOM to measure DC voltage.
2.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL position.
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
3.Connect one meter test lead to Terminal 9 of TB1 and the
other meter test lead to a clean frame ground. Measure
and record the voltage, battery voltage should be indicated.
Procedure:
1.Check Dip Switch positions. See Figure 7 in Section 2.1.
a.Dip Switch One should be down in the “STD”
position for standard brush type units.
b.Dip Switch Two should be in the “HIGH” position
for standard brush type units.
2.Ensure all wires and connectors from previous tests are
connected.
3.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL position.
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
4.Record which LED’s are illuminated or dimly lit on the
AVR.
5.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the OFF position.
Tech Tip: A loose connection could still be
present in the harness or pin connectors,
even after replacing the voltage regulator.
Results:
1.If battery voltage was measured, repair or replace the wire
between AVR connector Pin 1 and Terminal 9 of TB1.
2.If battery voltage was not measured refer back to flow
charts.
Test 12 – Test Stator
Discussion:
A Volt-OHM-Milliammeter (VOM) can be used to test
the stator windings for the following faults:
• An open circuit condition
• A “short-to-ground” condition
• A short circuit between windings
Note: The resistance of stator windings is very
low. Some meters will not read such a low resistance, and will simply indicate CONTINUITY.
Recommended is a high quality, digital type meter
capable of reading very low resistances.
Testing 1-Phase Stators:
Results:
1.Open the Main Line Circuit Breaker.
1.If any one out of the three LED’s were not illuminated,
replace voltage regulator. See Section 4.1 for adjustments and installation guidelines.
2.Disconnect Stator Leads 22 and 33 from the 00 neutral blocks.
2.If any one of the three LED’s was dimly lit, proceed to
investigate that particular circuit.
Note: Ensure wires are isolated and not touching
any components.
• Green LED (Power Windings)
• Yellow LED (DPE Winding)
• Red LED (Wire 14 Input, DPE Winding)
Test 11 – Test Wire 14 AVR Input Circuit
Discussion:
The voltage regulator powers on by receiving a 12
VDC input signal prior to receiving voltage from the
stator. By powering on, the voltage regulator responds
more quickly to voltage adjustment procedures.
3.Disconnect Voltage Regulator connector.
4.Set VOM to measure resistance (Ω) between the windings.
a.Connect one meter test lead to Stator Lead 11
and connect the other meter test lead to Stator
Lead 22. Measure and record resistance.
b.Connect one meter test lead to Stator Lead 44 and
connect the other meter test lead to Stator Lead
33. Measure and record resistance.
c.Connect one meter test lead to Stator Lead 2 at
Terminal 4 of TB1 and connect the other meter
test lead to Stator Lead 6 at Terminal 5 of TB1.
Measure and record resistance.
d.Refer to chart in the front of this manual for correct resistance readings for the stator being
serviced. If reading is INFINITY or a high Ohm
reading, an open is possible across that winding.
Page 61
Section 2.4
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
Part 2
Diagnostic tests
Tech Tip: If the DPE winding is open it can be
Stator Lead 11 to Terminal 4 of TB1.
temporarily bypassed by connecting Stator
Lead Wire 5 to Terminal 6 of TB1, but the stator will need to be replaced.
Stator Lead 44 to Terminal 4 of TB1.
6.Set VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
5.Set VOM to a high resistance scale (Ω) to check for a
short to ground.
Note: Ensure Wires S11 and S44 are still connected to the MLCB
a.Connect one meter test lead to Terminal 6 of
TB1 (Wire S11) and the other meter test lead to
Stator lead Wire 11 on the MCLB. CONTINUITY
should me measured. If CONTINUITY was not
measured, repair or replace Wire S11 between
the MLCB and Terminal 6 of TB1.
b.Connect one meter test lead to Terminal 7 of
TB1 (Wire S44) and the other meter test lead to
Stator lead Wire 44 on the MCLB. CONTINUITY
should me measured. If CONTINUITY was not
measured, repair or replace Wire S44 between
the MLCB and Terminal 7 of TB1.
a.Connect one meter test lead to Stator Lead 11
and connect the other meter test lead to a clean
frame ground. INFINITY should be measured.
(1) If CONTINUITY is measured disconnect
Sensing Wire 11 from the MLCB that runs to
TB1 and see if the short is still in Stator lead
Wire 11 or if it is located in Sensing Wire 11.
b.Connect one meter test lead to Stator Lead 44
and connect the other meter test lead to a clean
frame ground. INFINITY should be measured.
(1) If CONTINUITY is measured disconnect
Sensing Wire 44 from the MLCB that runs to
Results:
TB1 and see if the short is still in Stator lead
Wire 44 or if it is located in Sensing Wire 44.
1.If any step indicated CONTINUITY where INFINITY
c.Connect one meter test lead to Stator Lead 2 at
should be present, or INFINITY where CONTINUITY
terminal 4 of TB1 and connect the other meter
should be present, then either the wire or the component
test lead to a clean frame ground. INFINITY
will need to be replaced.
should be measured.
2.If a short to ground was measured on a stator winding,
d.Connect one meter test lead to Stator Lead 11
and connect other meter test lead to OPTION
Stator Lead
the stator will need to be replaced.
1 - SINGLE PHASE, R-SERIES CONTROL PANEL, 240V
44. INFINITY should be measured.
3.If an open winding was measured on the stator, the stator
e.Repeat Steps 5a through 5d between the folwill need to be replaced.
lowing points. INFINITY should be measured at
all points. If CONTINUITY is measured between
any two points then there is a short between the
winding and the DPE winding.
1 (BLACK)
11
22
33
44
4 (RED)
1
2
4
3
00
2
4
240 VOLTS
6
5
11
11
6
44
44
7
AR
120 VOLTS
120 VOLTS
E2
E1
11
44
22
33
MLCB
E1
DIRECT DRIVE
AS
NB
E3
LEGEND
GENERATOR OUTPUT CUSTOMER CONNECTION
E1 - E3 = 240VAC
E1 - NB = 120VAC
E3 - NB = 120VAC
AR =
AS =
MLCB =
NB =
Figure 6. 1-Phase Stator and DPE Windings
Page 62
ALTERNATOR ROTOR
ALTERNATOR STATOR
MAIN CIRCUIT BREAKER
NEUTRAL BLOCK
TB1
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
Section 2.4
Part 2
Diagnostic tests
4.If a short between two windings was measured, ensure
the circuit is completely isolated. If short continues the
stator will need to be replaced.
Tech Tip: If the DPE winding is open it can be
5.If all tests are good, refer back to flow chart and perform
the “Stator Insulation Tests” in Section 1.4.
4.Set VOM to a high resistance scale (Ω) to check for a
short to ground.
temporarily bypassed by connecting Stator
Lead Wire 5 to Terminal 6 of TB1.
a.Connect one meter test lead to Stator Lead S1
and connect the other meter test lead to a clean
1.Disconnect all neutral wires from the neutral block.
frame ground. INFINITY should be measured.
(1) If CONTINUITY is measured, disconnect
2.Disconnect the Voltage Regulator connector.
Sensing Wire 11 from the MLCB that runs
Note: Ensure wires are isolated and not touching
to TB1 and see if the short is still in Stator
any components.
lead S1 or if it is located in Sensing Wire 11.
3.Set VOM to measure resistance (Ω) between the windings.
b.Connect one meter test lead to Stator Lead S2
and connect the other meter test lead to a clean
a.Connect meter test lead to Stator Lead S1 and
frame ground. INFINITY should be measured.
connect the other meter test lead to Stator Lead
c.Connect one meter test lead to Stator Lead S3
S4. Measure and record the resistance.
and connect the other meter test lead to a clean
b.Repeat Step 4a between the following points.
frame ground. INFINITY should be measured.
(1) If CONTINUITY is measured disconnect
Stator Lead S6 and Stator Lead S3
Sensing Wire 44 from the MLCB that runs
Stator Lead S5 and Stator Lead S2
to TB1 and see if the short is still in Stator
Terminal 4 (Wire 2) of TB1 and Terminal 5 (Wire 6) of TB1
lead Wire S3 or if it is located in Sensing
OPTION 2 - THREE PHASE, R-SERIES CONTROL PANEL, 6-WIRE 120/208V
Wire 44.
c.Refer to chart in the front of this manual for
d.If CONTINUITY is measured in Steps 4a and 4c
correct resistance readings for the stator
then a short exists to ground inside the stator.
being serviced. If reading is INFINITY or high
resistance, then an open is possible across
5.Set VOM to a high resistance scale (Ω) to check for a
that winding.
short between the windings.
Testing 3-Phase Stators:
1 (BLACK)
4 (RED)
AR
1
2
4
3
2
4
6
5
S1/11
6
S3/44
TB1
7
S1
S2
S3
DIRECT DRIVE
S4
S5
S6
MLCB
AS
1
S1
9
7
3
S1
NB
10
2
4
8
S5
S4
S4
S5
12
E1 E2 E3
6
S4
GENERATOR OUTPUT
CUSTOMER CONNECTION
E1 TO E2
E2 TO E3
*208VAC
E1 TO E3
E1, E2, OR E3 TO NB = * 120VAC
S6
S5
S6
LEGEND
AR =
AS =
MLCB =
NB =
S2
S2
S6
ALTERNATOR ROTOR
ALTERNATOR STATOR
MAIN CIRCUIT BREAKER
NEUTRAL BLOCK
5
11
S3
S3
*NOTE: THE 8th DIGIT OF THE MODEL NUMBER SPECIFIES OUTPUT VOLTAGE
"G" = 120/208VAC
Figure 7. 3-Phase 208 VAC Stator and DPE Windings
Page 63
Section 2.4
Part 2
Diagnostic tests
a.Connect one meter test lead to Stator Lead S1
and connect the other meter test lead to S5.
INFINITY should be measured.
b.Repeat Step 5a between the following points.
Stator Lead S1 and Stator Lead S5
Stator Lead S6 and Stator Lead S5
Terminal 4 of TB1 and Stator Lead S1
Terminal 4 of TB1 and Stator Lead S6
Terminal 4 of TB1 and Stator Lead S5
Tech Tip: Reference Section 1.7 for proper
procedures in testing connector plugs and
incoming wires.
6.Disconnect Wires 11(S1) and 44(S3) from the main
breaker (sensing wires to voltage regulator).
a.Disconnect the voltage regulator connector.
b.Set a VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
c.Connect one meter test lead to Sensing Wire
11 that was disconnected in Step 6 and connect
the other meter test lead to Terminal 6 of TB1.
CONTINUITY should be measured. If INFINITY
is measured repair or replace wire between
main breaker and Terminal 4 of TB1.
d.Connect one meter test lead to Sensing Wire
44 that was disconnected in Step 6 and connect
the other meter test lead to Terminal 7 of TB1.
CONTINUITY should be measured. If INFINITY
is measured repair or replace wire between
main breaker and Terminal 4 of TB1.
Results:
1.If any step indicated CONTINUITY where INFINITY
should be present, or INFINITY where CONTINUITY
should be present, then either the wire or the component
will need to be replaced.
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
Procedure:
1.Set a VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
2.Connect one meter test lead to Terminal 2 of TB1 (Wire
1) and connect the other meter test lead to Terminal 3 of
TB1 (Wire 4). Measure and record the resistance. Refer
to the Rotor/Stator Resistance Table on Page 10 for the
proper resistance readings.
• The meter should read within +/- 3 ohms of the
specification in the chart on page 10.
• If high or low resistance, or a reading of
INFINITY was measured, proceed to Step 3 and
check slip rings and brushes.
• If the correct resistance reading is present within
3 ohms of the resistance on page 10 and a good
running rotor amp draw was measured in Test 4,
stop testing and proceed directly to the results.
If a bad running rotor amp draw was measured
in Test 4, continue testing.
3.Lift the brushes off of the slip rings and place a nonconductive insulator (such as a paper business card)
between the slip rings and both sets of brushes. Connect
one meter test lead to the positive (+) slip ring (nearest
the rotor bearing) and the other meter test lead to the
negative (-) slip ring. Measure and record the reading.
4.With the brushes still isolated from the slip rings, connect
one meter test lead to the positive (+) slip ring and the
other meter test lead to a clean frame ground. INFINITY
should be measured.
Note: Do not reassemble the alternator compartment until a valid resistance reading is present at
Terminal 2 of TB1 (Wire 1) and Terminal 3 of TB1
(Wire 4). If an acceptable resistance reading is
not present, there are still issues that need to be
resolved.
RED TEST LEAD
2.If a short to ground was measured on a stator winding,
the stator will need to be replaced.
3.If an open winding was measured on the stator, the stator
will need to be replaced.
4.If a short between two windings was measured, ensure
the circuit is completely isolated. If short continues the
stator will need to be replaced.
BLACK TEST LEAD
Test 13 – Test Rotor Assembly
Figure 8. Testing Rotor Insulation
Discussion:
A rotor assembly having completely open windings
will cause the loss of excitation current and as a result
the generator AC output voltage will drop to a “residual” voltage. A “shorted” condition rotor winding can
result in a low voltage condition.
5.Check the brushes to ensure they are making good
con­tact on the slip rings and that they have no visual
damage. Ensure that the brushes are riding on the slip
rings and are seated properly with the unit at “REST”
and while the unit is “RUNNING”. There should be no
arcing on the slip rings while running as this would be
Page 64
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
Section 2.4
Part 2
a clear indication that there is an alignment issue with
the brushes and the rotor. Ensure that the positive and
negative wires are connected to the corresponding slip
rings and that the polarities are not mismatched, i.e.
having a positive and negative wire connected to a brush
that is contacting the same slip ring. If all tests are good,
stop testing and go to results.
Note: Ensure the proper safety measures are followed while the unit is running with the alternator
compartment exposed.
Results:
1.If a resistance reading was present in Step 2 and a static
rotor amp draw of zero was measured in Test 4, check
VOM fuses and redo Test 4.
Diagnostic tests
2.Set the generator main circuit breaker to its OFF or
“Open” position. This test will be conducted with the generator running at no-load.
3.Start the generator, let it stabilize and warm up for a minute or two.
4.Take the meter reading. The no-load voltage should be as
follows:
RATED LINE-TO-LINE VOLTAGE
NO-LOAD VOLTAGE
120/240 1-phase
240
120/208 3-phase
208
120/240 3-phase
240
277/480 3-phase
480
2.If the rotor assembly had either an open or a direct short
to ground in Steps 3 and 4, replace the rotor.
5.Shut the engine down and remove the meter test leads.
3.If no resistance reading was present in Step 2, but the
correct resistance reading was present on the slip rings
in Step 3 and the brushes are in good shape, replace the
brush assembly and wires. The wires leading up to the
control panel are damaged and preventing excitation voltage from getting to the rotor.
1.If zero volts or residual voltage is indicated, refer back to
Problem 1 flow chart, Section 2.3.
Note: A replacement brush assembly will come
with two sets of brushes and two sets of wires
(Wires 1 and 4). It is possible to test Wires 1 and
4 to find out which wire is defective or open and
replace just that individual wire.
4.If the slip rings appear dull or tarnished, they may be
polished with fine sandpaper. DO NOT USE METALLIC
GRIT TO POLISH SLIP RINGS.
5.If the results of all rotor tests are good, perform “Insulation
Resistance Test” in Section 1.4.
Note: Be sure to read Section 1.4, “Testing,
Cleaning and Drying”, carefully. If rotor tests
good, try performing an insulation resistance test.
If it failed, try cleaning and drying the rotor and
then retest. If the rotor fails the second insulation
resistance test, it should be replaced.
Test 14 – Check AC Output Voltage
Discussion:
A volt-ohm-milliammeter (VOM) may be used to check
the generator output voltage. Output voltage may be
checked at the unit’s main circuit breaker terminals.
Refer to the unit’s DATA PLATE for rated line to-line
and line-to-neutral voltages.
Procedure:
1.With the engine shut down, connect the AC voltmeter test
leads across the terminals of the generator main circuit
breaker (see Figure 1). These connections will permit
line-to-line voltages to be read.
Results:
2.If the voltage reading is higher than residual, but is lower
than the stated limits, refer back to Problem 2 flow chart,
Section 2.3.
3.If a high voltage is indicated, refer back to Problem 3 flow
chart, Section 2.3.
NOTE: “Residual” voltage may be defined as the
voltage that is produced by rotor residual magnetism alone. The amount of voltage induced into
the stator AC power windings by residual voltage alone will be approximately 2 to 16 volts AC,
depending on the characteristics of the specific
generator. If a unit is supplying residual voltage
only, either excitation current is not reaching the
rotor or the rotor windings are open and the excitation current cannot pass. On current units with
liquid-cooled engine, “field boost” current flow is
available to the rotor during engine cranking and
running.
Test 15 – Test AC Output Frequency
Discussion:
The generator AC frequency is proportional to the
operating speed of the rotor. A 4-pole rotor (having
two north and two south magnetic poles) will supply
a 60 Hertz AC frequency at 1800 rpm. A 2-pole rotor
will supply a 60 Hertz AC frequency at 3600 rpm.
The unit’s AC output voltage is proportional to the AC
frequency. For example, a unit rated 240 volts (lineto-line) will supply that rated voltage (plus or minus 2
percent) at a frequency of 60 Hertz. If, for any reason,
the frequency should drop to 30 Hertz, the line-to-line
voltage will drop to a matching voltage of 120 volts
AC. Thus, if the AC voltage output is high or low and
the AC frequency is correspondingly high or low, the
engine speed governor circuit could be the problem.
Page 65
Section 2.4
Part 2
Diagnostic tests
Procedure:
1.Connect an accurate AC frequency meter across Terminal
6 (Wire 11) of TB1 and Terminal 7 (Wire 44) of TB1.
2.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL position.
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
3.Let the engine warm up and stabilize at no-load. When
the engine has stabilized, the frequency reading should
be 60Hz.
Results:
1.If the AC frequency is high or low, go to Problem 15.
2.If frequency is good, but voltage is high or low, go to
Section 4.1 for voltage regulator adjustments.
3.If frequency and voltage are both good, tests may be discontinued.
Test 16 – Adjust Voltage Regulator
Refer to Section 4.1 for Adjustment of the Automatic
Voltage Regulator
Liquid-cooled
AC generators
4.Check the AC frequency and voltage. Frequency should
not drop below approximately 59 Hertz. Voltage should
not drop below 20 percent of the rated voltage.
Results:
1.If frequency and voltage drop excessively under load,
refer back to Problem 4 flow chart, Section 2.3.
2.If frequency and voltage under load are good, discontinue
tests.
Test 18 – Test for an Overload
Condition
Discussion:
An “overload” condition is one in which the generator
rated wattage/amperage capacity has been exceeded. To test for an overload condition on an installed
unit, the best method is to use an ammeter. See
“Measuring Current” in Section 1.4.
Procedure:
Use a clamp-on ammeter to measure load current
draw, with the generator running and all normal electrical loads turned on.
Results:
Test 17 – Test Voltage and Frequency
under Load
Discussion:
It is possible for the generator AC output frequency
and voltage to be good at no-load, but they may drop
excessively when electrical loads are applied. This
condition, in which voltage and frequency drop excessively when loads are applied, can be caused by (a)
overloading the generator, (b) loss of engine power, or
(c) a shorted condition in the stator windings or in one
or more connected loads.
Procedure:
1.Connect an accurate AC frequency meter and an AC voltmeter across the stator AC power winding leads.
2.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL position.
Let the generator stabilize and warm-up.
3.Apply electrical loads to the generator equal to the rated
capacity of the unit.
Page 66
1.If the unit is overloaded, reduce loads to the unit’s rated
capacity.
2.If unit is not overloaded, but rpm and frequency drop
excessively when loads are applied, refer back to Problem
4 flow chart, Section 2.3.
Test 19 – Test Engine Condition
Discussion:
If engine speed and frequency drop excessively
under load, the engine may be under-powered. An
under-powered engine can be the result of a dirty air
cleaner, loss of engine compression, faulty carburetor
settings, incorrect ignition timing, lack of fuel, etc.
Procedure:
For engine testing, troubleshooting and repair procedures refer to the 2.4 Mitsubishi Engine Service
Manual
Part 3
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Table of contents
Part
Title
3.1
Description and Components
Page
67
3.2
Operational Analysis
79
3.3
Troubleshooting Flow Charts
90
3.4
Diagnostic Tests
99
2.4 Liter standby
Generators
Section 3.1 – Description and Major Components.................................... 68
Control Console Components............................................................ 68
Engine Mounted Components........................................................... 72
Engine Protective Devices/Shutdowns.............................................. 74
Section 3.2 – Operational Analysis............................................................ 79
Introduction........................................................................................ 79
Utility Available, SW1 in AUTO........................................................... 80
Utility Failure, Engine Cranking, SW1 in AUTO.................................. 84
Utility failure, Engine Running, SW1 in AUTO.................................... 88
Section 3.3 – Troubleshooting Flowcharts................................................. 90
Problem 9 – Unit will Not Crank When AUTO-OFF-MANUAL
Switch is Set to MANUAL............................................. 90
Problem 10 – Engine Will Not Crank When
Utility Power Source Fails........................................... 91
Problem 11 – Engine Will Not Crank With a 2-Wire Start................. 92
Problem 12 – Unit Cranks, but Will Not Start.................................... 93
Problem 13 – Unit Starts and Runs Then Shuts Down..................... 94
Problem 14 – Unit Cranks and Starts, but Backfires........................ 94
Problem 15 – Unit Starts Hard and Runs Rough/Lacks Power........ 94
Problem 16 – Unit Starts and Transfer Occurs When
Utility Power is Available............................................ 95
Problem 17 – Generator Starts Immediately In AUTO
No Transfer To Standby. Utility Voltage Present.......... 95
Problem 18 – Generator Will Not Exercise....................................... 95
Problem 19 – Will not Low Speed Exercise...................................... 95
Problem 20 – High Temp/Low Coolant (Flashing LED).................... 96
Problem 21 – High Temp/Low Coolant (Solid LED).......................... 96
Problem 22 – Low Oil Pressure........................................................ 96
Problem 23 – Low Battery Alarm/ Dead Battery............................... 97
Problem 24 – Overspeed LED Flashing........................................... 98
Problem 25 – Overspeed LED Solid................................................. 98
Problem 26 – 15 Amp Fuse Blows................................................... 98
Problem 27 – Low Fuel Pressure LED Flashing............................... 98
Section 3.4 – Diagnostic Tests................................................................... 99
Introduction........................................................................................ 99
Safety................................................................................................. 99
Test 25 – Check the Voltage at the Battery......................................... 99
Test 26 – Check Battery Voltage at TB1 Terminal Strip....................... 99
Test 27 – Check the 15 AMP Fuse (F1).............................................. 99
Test 28 – Check Battery Voltage at the 15 Amp Fuse (F1)............... 100
Test 29 – Check Battery Voltage at AUTO-OFF-MANUAL
Switch (SW1)..................................................................... 100
Test 30 – Test AUTO-OFF-MANUAL Switch...................................... 100
Test 31 – Check Battery Voltage at Exercise Switch (SW2).............. 101
Test 32 – Check Control board Dip switches..................................... 101
Test 33 – Check Engine CRANK Relay (RL1)................................... 101
Test 34 – Check the Battery Voltage at the
Starter Contactor Relay (SCR).......................................... 103
Test 35 – Check the Battery Voltage at Starter Motor (SM).............. 103
Test 36 – Testing Starter Motor......................................................... 103
Test 41 – Check AUTO-OFF-MANUAL Switch Position.................... 105
Test 42 – Try a Manual Start............................................................. 105
Test 43 – Check Maintenance Disconnect Switch............................. 105
Test 44 – Check Status Ready Light................................................. 106
Test 45 – Check Position of Dip Switch 2.......................................... 106
Test 46 – Check Battery Voltage at J2 Connector............................. 106
Test 47 – Check Voltage at AUTO-OFF MANUAL (SW1)
& Exercise (SW2) Switches............................................... 106
Test 48 – Test Exercise Switch (SW2)............................................... 107
Test 49 – Check Wires 0, 15A, 15E................................................... 107
Test 55 – Attempt a 2-Wire Start....................................................... 107
Test 56 – Check Voltage on Wire 183................................................ 107
Test 57 – Check Wire 183 ................................................................ 108
Test 58 – Check Wire 178................................................................. 108
Test 62 – Check for Spark................................................................. 108
Test 63 – Check the Condition of the Spark Plugs............................ 108
Test 64 – Check the Ignition Coils..................................................... 109
Test 65 – Check Ignition Control Module........................................... 109
Test 66 – Check DC Voltage Inputs to Ignition Module..................... 110
Test 67 – Check Crank Sensor.......................................................... 111
Test 68 – Check the Fuel Supply and Fuel Pressure to the Unit....... 112
Test 69 – Check Wire 14 For Battery Voltage.................................... 113
Test 70 – Check the Engine Run Relay (RL2)................................... 113
Test 71 – Check Cam Sensor............................................................ 114
Test 72 – Check Fuel Regulator ....................................................... 114
Test 73 – Check the Governor Driver................................................ 115
Test 74 – Check the Actuator and Mixer Function............................. 116
Test 75 – Checking Wiring Harness.................................................. 118
Test 76 – Check Engine Compression and Condition....................... 118
Test 81 – Check N1 and N2 Sensing Voltage.................................... 118
Test 82 – Test Transformer (TR1)...................................................... 118
Test 83 – Check Voltage at Printed Circuit Board.............................. 119
Test 87 – Test Automatic Sequence.................................................. 119
Test 91 – Check Position of Dipswitch 3............................................ 119
Test 95 – Check the Coolant Temperature at Thermal Adapter........ 119
Test 96 – Check the Coolant Level.................................................... 120
Test 97 – Check Coolant Hoses........................................................ 120
Test 98 – Check the Low Coolant Level Sensor................................ 120
Test 99 – Check Wire 573 to Printed Circuit Board........................... 121
Test 104 – Check oil level.................................................................. 121
Test 105 – Check Engine Oil Pressure.............................................. 121
Test 106 – Check Wire 86 for continuity............................................ 121
Test 107 – Check Wire 86 for a Short to Ground.............................. 122
Test 108 – Check Low oil Pressure Switch....................................... 122
Test 110 – Check Battery Conditions................................................ 122
Test 111 – Check Battery Voltage at PCB......................................... 122
Test 112 – Check Low Battery Sensing at PCB................................ 122
Test 113 – Check Battery Charger 120VAC Input............................. 123
Test 114 – Check 120VAC Input to Customer Connection................ 123
Test 115 – Check Battery Charger Output ....................................... 123
Test 116 – Test Low Fuel Pressure Switch........................................ 123
Test 122 – Check Wires 79 and 0..................................................... 124
Test 123 – Check Battery Voltage Circuit.......................................... 125
Test 124 – Check Cranking and Running Circuits............................. 126
Page 67
Section 3.1
Description and Components
Information in this section is provided to familiarize
the reader with the various components that make up
the DC control system on units having a liquid-cooled
engine. These components may be divided into three
(3) broad categories as follows:
• Components in the generator control console.
• Engine mounted components.
• Engine protective devices.
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Part 3
14 15A 15
4
B
TB1
0
1
4
2
6
11 44
13 14 15A 15
1
2
3
4
5
6
8
0
1
4
2
6
11 44
7
A
9
10
15
11 12
13 14 15A 15
0
13 14 15A 15
Control Console Components
Figure 1. Terminal Board TB1
Location and Description:
The control console includes (a) a terminal board, (b)
a control board, (c) a driver board, (d) a 15 amp fuse,
(e) an automatic voltage regulator, (f) an engine run
relay, and (g) an engine start relay.
Control Board:
This solid state circuit board controls all standby
electric system operations, including engine cranking, startup, running, automatic transfer and shutdown. Other operations controlled by the circuit board
include the following:
The circuit board provides automatic engine shutdown
in the event of (a) low engine oil pressure, (b) high
engine coolant temperature, (c) low coolant level, (d)
overspeed, (e) overcrank and rpm sensor loss. See
Section 3.1, “Engine Protective Devices/Shutdowns”.
On occurrence of any one or more of these engine
faults, the circuit board will turn on a fault indicator
LED (see Figure 3).
Terminal Board:
This 12-position terminal board (Figure 1) provides
a convenient connection point for DC control system
wiring. Terminals, associated wires and their functions
are listed in the following chart.
TERM.
WIRE
1
0
FUNCTION
Common ground
2
1
Ground for (-) brush. (-) side of DC to rotor
3
4
(+) side of DC to rotor from AVR
4
2
5
6
6
11, S1
AC Sensing voltage to AVR (referenced to
Wire 44 or S3)
7
44, S3
AC Sensing voltage to AVR (referenced to
Wire 11 or S1)
8
13
Unfused (+) battery
9
14
(+) battery when engine is cranking or
running
10
15A
Fused (+) battery, only available when
SW1 set to MANUAL or AUTO
11
15
Fused (+) battery
12
15
Fused (+) battery
System Ready
Green LED
Excitation voltage to AVR through DPE
breaker
Low Fuel Pressure
Yellow LED
Low Battery
Red LED
Excitation voltage to AVR
Low Oil Pressure
Red LED
Hi Coolant Temp/Low Coolant Level
Red LED
Overspeed/RPM Sensor Loss
Red LED
Over Crank
Red LED
The various functions handled by the control board
are listed in the following charts, along with appropriate circuit board connector pin numbers and wire
numbers.
8-POSITION DIP SWITCH
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
J1
J2
Figure 2. R-200B Control Board
Page 68
7
6
5
4
3
14 13 12 11 10
2
1
9
8
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Section 3.1
Part 3
OVERCRANK
OVERSPEED
Description and Components
15
Empty
16
Empty
17
806
The ignition module will send a signal to
the board indicating a fault that needs to be
addressed
18
769
PCB will send a pulse width modulate signal
to the governor driver board that will adjust the
position of the throttle plate
LOW COOLANT LEVEL
HI COOLANT TEMPERATURE
LOW OIL PRESSURE
LOW BATTERY
LOW FUEL PRESSURE
SYSTEM READY
19
Empty
20
86
Low oil pressure, the PCB will look for a
ground on this wire when a low oil pressure
condition occurs
21
SHLD
Shield to protect the signal from the rpm sensor (MP1) from electromagnetic interference
Figure 3 – LED Indicators on Front Panel
R-200B Printed Circuit Board J1 Pin Out Chart
Pin #
Wire #
Function
1
14
During cranking and running the PCB will
deliver 12 VDC to the governor driver board
that will turn on the governor driver board
2
805
A variable signal from the oxygen sensor will
be present on this wire, depending on the
fuel/air ratio of the mixture. The PCB will use
this signal to control the Air/Fuel Solenoid
(Emissions Only)
3
0
Common ground for governor driver board
4
85
Coolant temp shutdown wire, the PCB will
look for a ground on this wire when the fault
has occurred
5
767
Common ground for governor output signal
6
765
PCB governor output, the board will send a
varying 5 VDC signal to the Bosch governor
for a reference voltage on the position of the
throttle plate
7
8
9
Empty
573
79
Coolant level shutdown, the PCB is looking for
a 1 VDC signal on wire to indicate that coolant
is at correct level, when coolant drops below
the sensor the voltage will change from 1 VDC
to 5 VDC
PCB speed sensing signal, the PCB will look
for a specific voltage on this wire to ensure the
engine is spinning at rated speed
10
0
Common ground for Magnetic Pickup Sensor
11
601
Low fuel pressure, if fuel pressure drops below
5 inches of water column a yellow LED will
illuminate on the PCB. It will not shutdown the
engine
12
766
Bosch governor will provide a feed back signal
that is in relation to the position of the throttle
plate
13
804
PCB will apply a voltage to this wire that will
be adjusted according to the air/fuel mixture
by the oxygen sensor
14
22
Empty
23
Empty
R-200B Printed Circuit Board J2 Pin Out Chart
Pin #
Wire #
Function
1
808
PCB will apply varying voltage to Wire 808 that
will adjust the air/fuel mixture to the engine
2
56A
PCB will apply a ground to Wire 56A that will
energize RL1 relay that will engage the crank
circuit
3
14A
PCB will apply a ground to Wire 14A that will
energize RL2 relay that will engage the run
circuit
4
183
When PCB is in GTS mode it will look for an
input from a external relay
5
15E
PCB will look for 15E to momentarily open to
set the exercise clock at that specific time
6
178
When PCB is in GTS mode it will look for an
input from a external relay
7
15A
When AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is in AUTO
or MANUAL battery voltage will be delivered to
the PCB that will power it up.
8
224
When utility voltage is available TR1 will supply 16 VAC line-to-line for utility sensing
9
Empty
10
23
PCB will ground 23 and energize the transfer
relay in the transfer switch
11
239
When AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is in
MANUAL battery voltage will be delivered to
the PCB to indicate a manual start.
12
225
When utility voltage is available TR1 will supply 16 VAC line-to-line for utility sensing
13
0
A ground will be applied to this terminal when
the generator is built with emission control.
14
0
Common ground to the PCB.
Empty
Page 69
Section 3.1
Part 3
Description and Components
Control Board Dip Switch Settings:
The Switch “ON” position location is marked on the
DIP switch housing (see Figure 4). To activate the DIP
switch settings place the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch
in the OFF Mode, make the DIP switch changes and
then push and hold the Set Exercise Switch for five
seconds.
Figure 4. The 8-position Dip Switch
Switch OFF
Switch ON
Position 1
60 Hz
50 Hz (where applicable)
Position 2
ATS Mode
GTS Mode
Position 3
Low Speed Exercise
Normal Speed Exercise
Position 4
LP
NG
Position 5
Reserved
Reserved
Position 6
22/27kW (1800 r pm)
36kW Turbo (1800 rpm)
45kW (3600 rpm)
60kW Turbo (3600 rpm)
Position 7
2.4L (1800 rpm)
4.2L (1800 rpm)
Position 8
Reserved
Reserved
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
DIP Switch Position 8: Reserved for future use. The
position of this DIP switch does not affect generator
operation.
Bosch Driver Board (DEG)
A solid state circuit board that provides current output
to drive the Bosch actuator.
Pin #
Wire #
Function
1
0
Common ground between PCB and driver board
2
Empty
3
Empty
4
14
12 VDC is delivered to the driver board to turn it
on from the PCB
5
Empty
6
Empty
7
Empty
8
770
DC output current to the Bosch governor
9
771
DC output current to the Bosch governor
10
0
Common frame ground
11
12
Empty
769
Pulse width module signal from PCB that
adjusts the position of the throttle plate
12V BOSCH GOV DRIVER
Note: Dipswitch S2 (if equipped) has no function)
DIP Switch Position 1: Selects the generator output
frequency. When OFF, standard 60 Hz operation is
selected. When ON, 50 Hz is selected if the generator
is capable.
DIP Switch Position 2: Selects the type of transfer
switch to be used with the generator. When an “HS” or
RTS-type transfer switch is used (ATS Mode) this DIP
Switch should be in the OFF Position. When a W-type
transfer switch is used (GTS Mode) the generator
2-wire start inputs can be used to control the generator operation. The 2-wire start inputs are labeled as
178 and 183 on the wiring terminals inside the generator's customer connection panel.
DIP Switch Position 3: Selects the engine operating
speed in exercise mode.
DIP Switch Position 4: Selects the generator fuel
type to meet emissions requirements. When OFF, the
generator should be using LP vapor fuel. When ON,
natural gas fuel should be used.
DIP Switch Position 5: Reserved for future use. The
position of this DIP switch does not affect generator
operation.
DIP Switch Position 6: Selects the alternator kW
rating. When ON, 36kW turbocharged is selected for
1800 rpm and 60kW turbocharged is selected for
3600 rpm. When OFF, 22kW or 27kW is selected for
1800 rpm and 45kW is selected for 3600 rpm.
DIP Switch Position 7: This switch operates for 1800
rpm only. When ON, 4.2L displacement is selected.
When OFF, 2.4L displacement is selected. For 3600
rpm, this switch has no effect, it is unused.
Page 70
1
4
5
6
12 11 10 9
8
7
2
3
Figure 5. Bosch Driver Board Pin Outs
Ignition Module (IM)
The 2.4L Mitsubishi engine uses a distributor-less
ignition system. It utilizes an ignition module to control
the spark for each cylinder. Fused battery voltage is
delivered to the ignition module via Wire 15 present at
all times. When the unit is cranking, Wire 56 delivers
battery voltage to the ignition module. This input latches the internal spark circuit to allow spark to continue
after Wire 56 voltage is removed. It will utilize both
inputs from the crank sensor and the cam sensor to
determine the specific point to ignite a particular cylinder. Once the crank circuit is engaged voltage from
the crank circuit is removed, but spark still continues
until the unit is shutdown or a failure occurs.
Tech Tip: The LED light can be seen from
inside the customer connection box, where
there are pre-drilled holes for viewing this
Red LED.
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Pin #
Wire #
Section 3.1
Part 3
Description and Components
Description
1
Empty
2
Empty
3
454
Ignition Module will Ground to Fire Cylinder 4
4
451
Ignition Module will Ground to Fire Cylinder 1
5
452
Ignition Module will Ground to Fire Cylinder 2
6
Empty
7
Empty
8
Empty
9
453
Ignition Module will Ground to Fire Cylinder 3
10
SHLDA
Shield for Cam Sensor
11
56
This 12VDC input coming from Wire 56 latches
the ignition circuit internal of the Ignition Module
12
14
12VDC input configures Ignition Module for
Natural Gas
13
Empty
14
79
Crank Sensor Input
15
Empty
16
15
12VDC input to Ignition Module that will power
it up
17
0
Common Ground for Ignition Module
18
15D
12VDC provided to each coil for firing
19
806
Ignition Module Fault Indicator; the Ignition
Module will send a signal to the PCB on this
wire to indicate that the ignition module is currently in a fault.
20
SHLD
Shield for Crank Sensor
21
0A
Ground for Crank Sensor
22
0A
Ground for Cam Sensor
23
79A
Cam Position Sensor Input
2
9
4.No Cam Signal: LED blinks 3 times, is OFF for 3 seconds
and then repeats
C6
5
6
7
R3
C4
Q12
C22
Q17
RL
LED1
1
2
9
S1
3
4
5
8
10 11 12 13 14 15
Q9
Q10
R18
R19
R20
R21
C7
R10
R11
R12
R13
Q16
R2
R8
C3
R5
R6
R7
Q6
C5
C9
C1
R1
R17
4
C10 R14
C2
R4
R15 R16
6
7
2.Missing Flywheel Teeth: LED blinks 5 times, is OFF for 3
seconds and then repeats
3.No Flywheel Signal: LED blinks 2 times, is OFF for 3 seconds and then repeats
R23
R24
Q1
Q3
R9
C8
1.Overspeed Shutdown: LED blinks 4 times, is OFF for 3
seconds and then repeats
the crank cycle.
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
Q5
Q4
3
Diagnostic Light (RED LED located on the
Ignition Control Board):
During normal operation the Red LED, located on the
ignition control board, flashes at a 0.5 second ON and
a 0.5 second OFF rate. This is considered one (1) blink.
The generator must have been in the OFF mode for
60 seconds prior to cranking for the Flywheel and
Cam LED fault diagnostics to be valid.
If multiple fault codes exist then the highest priority
fault must be resolved prior to a lower priority fault
code being displayed.
The LED fault code blink pattern is displayed for
between 60 to 120 seconds after a fault and then the
ignition will power itself down.
The Crank and CAM LED fault codes are valid
only during the first crank cycle. Crank and CAM
LED fault codes displayed during a re-crank are
no longer valid.
RED LED Fault Codes with priority as shown:
Tech Tip: The fault code is only valid during
Q17
1
FLASHING OVERCRANK (Red)(R-200B Only):
If the Ignition Module is in a current fault the unit will
shutdown in a flashing overcrank. The flashing overcrank will not specify what is wrong, only that there is
fault that needs to be corrected.
8
10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
D4
C22
J2
C23
Only one LED fault code is displayed at a time.
Engine Run Relay (RL2)
An automotive dry contact relay that energizes and
closes Wire 15 (fused positive battery voltage) to Wire
14 when the engine is running. Provides (+) battery
voltage to the fuel solenoid and field boost through
BR1 to the rotor. The relay is energized by a negative
potential being applied to the coil on Wire 14A from
the printed circuit board.
L1
C33
C34
Figure 6. Ignition Module Pin Outs
Start Relay (RL1)
An automotive dry contact relay that energizes and
close Wire 15 (fused (+) battery voltage) to Wire 56
when the engine is cranking. Provides (+) battery voltage to operate the starter contactor and the priming
fuel solenoid. The relay is energized by a (-) potential
being applied to the coil on Wire 56A from the printed
circuit board.
Page 71
Section 3.1
Description and Components
Remote Alarm Connection
The R-200B panel has an optional remote alarm. Pin
9 is an open collector output that may be wired to a
12 VDC relay. The relay is required to have a minimum coil resistance of 90 Ohms. It is recommended
that the same relay configuration that is used on the
engine run and start relays be used. This would be
one side of the coil to fused battery and the other to
the Pin 9 open collector output. During alarm conditions the alarm output Pin 9 will be pulled to ground,
and the relay will operate.
14A
RL2
ENGINE RUN
14
15
RELAY
15A
56A
RL1
ENGINE START
56
15
RELAY
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Part 3
Auto-Off-Manual Switch (SW1):
The AUTO-OFF-MANUAL is shown in Figure 8. Also
see Section 1.5, “Operating Instructions”.
15A
Figure 6. Engine Run and Start Relays
194
SW1
Bridge Rectifier (BR1)
Used as blocking diodes to prevent back feeding
of alternator and rotor voltages into Wire 14 (Run
Circuit). While the engine is running (+) DC voltage is
allowed to flow into the rotor and battery charge alternator to “flash the field” as necessary.
15A
1
4
2
5
3
6
15
Excitation Circuit Breaker (CB2)
This is sometimes called DPE breaker. The breaker
will open when DPE current exceeds rated current.
After cooling the breaker will self rest.
Set Exercise Switch (SW2)
When depressed this switch breaks power to the
printed circuit board. When the switch is released the
control board wakes up. If the printed circuit board
sees good utility voltage and SW1 is in AUTO, the
exercise time is set.
Battery Charger (BCH)
Provides battery charge voltage during non-operational periods for the battery. Power is supplied through
120 VAC utility supply from the distribution panel. The
battery charger will supply 13.4 VDC float voltage to
the battery.
BC
1 2
3 4
PIN LIST
PIN
WIRE
TO
1
2
3
4
L1
N
13
0
TBBC-1X
TBBC-2X
TB1-8X
TB1-1X
Figure 7. Battery Charger
Page 72
239
Figure 8. AUTO-OFF-MANUAL Switch
Fuse (F1):
Fuse F1 is connected in series with Wires 13 and
15 and is rated 15 DC amperes. If fuse replacement
becomes necessary, use only an identical 15 amp
replacement fuse.
Engine Mounted Components
Engine mounted DC control system components
include the following:
• A 12 volt battery and battery charge components.
• A starter motor (SM).
• A control contactor (CC).
• Low Oil Pressure Switch (LOS) and High Water
Temperature switch (HWT).
• Engine ignition system parts.
Battery and Battery Charge System:
A belt driven alternator delivers a charging voltage
to the battery during engine operation. The charging
voltage is regulated and rectified by the DC regulator.
Alternator maintenance is limited to replacement of
defective parts.
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Section 3.1
Part 3
Description and Components
Starter Motor And Control Contactor:
During manual or automatic startup, control board
action actuates Engine Start Relay (RL1) which delivers 12 VDC to a control contactor (CC) coil. The coil
energizes, its contacts close, and battery power is
delivered to the starter motor (SM). The starter motor
then energizes and the engine is cranked.
CONTROL CONTACTOR
PRIMER SOLENOID
FUEL SOLENOID
16
LOW FUEL SENDER
56
STARTER MOTOR
0
RED
+
12 VOLT
BATTERY
-
BLACK
Figure 11. Fuel Solenoid (FS)
GROUND
Figure 9. Engine Cranking Circuit
GND
0
0
0
86
85
LOS
C
NC
G
R
573
0
HCT
A
WLS
B
Figure 10. Oil Pressure & Coolant Temperature Circuit
Cam Sensor (MP2)
The cam sensor is installed below the timing belt
cover. As the engine is running a magnet installed
on the timing gear passes by the tip of the magnetic
pickup. This pulse that is generated is read by the
ignition module as top dead center. See Section 4.1
for adjustment procedure.
Crank Sensor (MP1):
The crank sensor is installed on the flywheel housing.
As the engine is running the crank sensor receives a
signal every time a flywheel tooth passes the tip of the
pickup. The board is programmed to know that 160
teeth are present on the generator flywheel and that
every 160 teeth it has made a complete revolution.
It will utilize this signal for a speed signal to regulate
the engine at the desired speed. See Section 4.1 for
adjustment procedure.
HOUSING
Fuel Solenoid:
The fuel solenoid (FS) provides a positive shutoff of
fuel when the engine is not running. The solenoid is
energized open by 12 volts DC (Wire 14); it is deenergized closed.
Fuel Primer Solenoid:
The fuel solenoid (FS2) provides fuel to the mixer during cranking only. The solenoid is energized open by
12 volts DC (Wire 56); it is de-energized closed. This
is to allow fuel into the engine before the diaphragm
in the fuel regulator has a chance to open and will
increase our chance of the generator starting on the
first crank attempt.
CRANK SENSOR
GAP 1/2 - 3/4
OF A TURN
FLYWHEEL RING GEAR
Figure 12. Crank Sensor (MP1)
Oxygen Sensor (OS):
On emissions enabled units this sensor sends a feed
back signal to the control board that will interpret the
air/fuel ratio of the exhaust content.
Page 73
Section 3.1
Description and Components
Air/Fuel Solenoid (AFS):
On emissions enabled units a variable 12 VDC signal
is applied to the solenoid that will either enrich the
mixture or lean the mixture out depending on the input
from the oxygen sensor.
Engine Protective Devices/Shutdowns
Standby electric power generators will often run
unattended for long periods of time. Such operating
parameters as (a) engine oil pressure, (b) engine temperature, (c) engine operating speed, and (d) engine
cranking and startup are not monitored by an operator
during automatic operation. Because engine operation will not be monitored, the use of engine protective
safety devices is required to prevent engine damage
in the event of a problem.
Generator engines mount several engine protective
devices. These devices work in conjunction with a
control circuit board, to protect the engine against
such operating faults as (a) low engine oil pressure,
(b) high temperature, (c) overspeed, and (d) overcrank. On occurrence of any one or more of those
operating faults, control board action will effect an
engine shutdown.
LOW OIL PRESSURE SHUTDOWN:
(Red LED Indicator)
See Figure 14. The low oil pressure (LOP) switch
has normally closed contacts which are held open by
engine oil pressure during cranking and running conditions. Should engine oil pressure drop below approximately 8-12 psi, the switch contacts will close. Control
board action will then initiate a 10-second hold-off
timer. At the end of 10 seconds, an automatic engine
shutdown will occur and the low oil pressure LED will
turn on.
Low Fuel Pressure
(Yellow LED Indicator)
The yellow low fuel pressure LED will turn ON if the
fuel supply pressure drops below approximately 5
inches water column (i.e. occurs when the low fuel
pressure sensing switch on the fuel regulator opens).
This is a non-latched fault (visual LED warning only)
and does not trigger the controller alarm output. Low
fuel pressure sensing is active in all generator operating modes (i.e. MANUAL, OFF and AUTO).
System Ready Light:
(Green LED Indicator)
This LED is a positive status indicator and dependent
upon the following conditions being true:
1.Switch in the AUTO position.
2.No other warning indicator present.
3.Controller is functional.
Page 74
Part 3
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
The System Ready LED will also indicate if utility voltage is present at the control board. The system ready
LED will flash every second (at a 0.5 second ON and
a 0.5 second OFF rate) when utility voltage is not
present at the control board and when the switch is in
either the AUTO or MANUAL position. This function is
ONLY available with DIP Switch Position 2 in the OFF
position (ATS application). The system ready LED will
also indicate if the generator is in the GTS Mode (i.e.
DIP Switch Position 2 in the ON Position). The system
ready LED will flash at a five (5) seconds ON and one
(1) second OFF rate in GTS Mode.
Tech Tip: This light will help diagnose 50
percent of Auto Operations problems. Ask
the question “Does the generator think that
there is a power outage?”
Low Battery:
(Red LED Indicator)
Battery voltage is continuously monitored and a
warning LED is lit if the battery voltage drops below
approximately 12.2 volts for longer than one (1) minute. The LED will turn off when the battery voltage
goes back above approximately 12.5 volts. If however,
the battery voltage drops below 6 volts during cranking, or 8 volts while running the low battery LED will
stay lit. This is a latched fault and will shut down the
engine.
High Coolant Temp:
(Solid Red LED Indicator)
The high coolant temperature switch (HWT) has nor­
mally-open contacts. These contacts are thermally
actu­ated. If the engine coolant temperature should
exceed approximately 245° F. (118° C.), the control
board will shut the engine down and the high coolant
tempera­ture indicator LED will then illuminate and be
solid. Checks are made after the 10 second hold off
timer expires.
Low Coolant Level:
(Flashing Red High Coolant Temp LED Indicator)
It is possible that engine coolant level might drop low
enough so that the high temperature switch is no
longer immersed in the liquid coolant. If this happens
engine temperatures could increase rapidly but the
temperature switch would not sense the high temper­
ature condition and the engine would continue to run.
To prevent this occurrence, a low coolant level sensor
is provided.
A Low Coolant Alarm occurs if the coolant level is low.
Checks are made after the 10 second hold off timer
expires. This is a latched fault and will shutdown the
engine.
A 5 VDC signal is applied to the positive terminal of
the probe. See Figure 14. Point A is the tip of the of the
probe and Point B is frame ground. Coolant surrounding the probe allows for continuity between Points A
and B.
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Section 3.1
Part 3
Description and Components
CRANK SENSOR
FRONT
HIGH COOLANT
TEMPERATURE
SWITCH
FRONT
LOW OIL
PRESSURE
SWITCH
CAM SENSOR
(RADIATOR)
LOW COOLANT
LEVEL SWITCH
Figure 13. Protective Devices on Liquid-Cooled Engine
Page 75
Section 3.1
Description and Components
A 5 kΩ resister is added to the circuit in parallel with
the two terminals causing the 5 VDC to be lowered to
1 VDC or ground. When coolant level drops the signal
goes from a 1 VDC signal to a 5 VDC signal and the
board will signal an alarm for low coolant and shutdown
the unit.
B
WIRE 573 (+)
WIRE 0 (-)
Part 3
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
RPM SIGNAL FAILURE DURING RUNNING:
Running mode is handled differently because there
is always the possibility the engine could slow down
or stop running do to a temporary overload. To avoid
shutting down and latching out on a temporary problem the following is done. If the engine is up and running, and the control board stops receiving a valid
engine speed input signal it will respond as follows:
1.It will close the throttle.
2.It will shut down the engine by turning off the fuel supply.
A
3.It will wait for 15 seconds to ensure the engine has
stopped.
Figure 14. Low Coolant Level Sensor
Overspeed:
(Solid Red LED Indicator)
An overspeed shutdown will occur if the engine speed
is greater than 4300 rpm for a 3600 rpm engine; 2160
rpm for an 1800 rpm engine; 2250 rpm for an 1800
rpm engine, for three (3) seconds. An overspeed condition will shutdown the engine and activate the over
speed LED. An immediate overspeed shutdown will
occur if the engine speed is greater than 4500 rpm for
a 3600 rpm engine.
4.It will then energize the starter and monitor the engine
speed signal.
a.If the control board does not see the engine
speed signal it will stop the crank cycle, lock out
on fault, and flash the overspeed LED.
b.If the control board does see the engine speed
input signal during cranking it will start and run
the engine normally. If the engine speed signal is
again lost while running it will repeat the above
procedure one more time.
c.If the failure should repeat a third time, the control board will shut down the engine, lock out on
fault, and flash the over speed LED.
RPM Signal Failure:
(Flashing Red LED Overspeed Indicator)
Overcrank:
(Red LED Indicator)
If the R-200B controller does not receive a signal from
the engine crank sensor, the R-200B controller cannot
maintain the generator output frequency or monitor for
an overspeed condition. If this signal is lost the R-200B
controller will shut down the engine. The engine crank
sensor voltages are as follows:
Occurs if the engine has not started within the total
90 second crank cycle. This is a latched fault and will
shutdown the engine.
1800 RPM units
3VAC ±0.3
3600 RPM units
5VAC ± 0.3
RPM SIGNAL FAILURE DURING CRANKING:
The engine control board (R-200B controller) will monitor the engine speed signal during engine cranking. If
the control board does not see a valid signal within the
first four seconds of each crank cycle it will stop the
crank cycle, lock out on a shut down fault and flash
the overspeed LED.
Page 76
IGNITION MODULE FAULT:
(Flashing Red Overcrank Indicator)
If the Ignition Module detects a fault, this indicator
will flash and the engine will be shut down. This LED
does not indicate the type of fault, only that a fault
exists. See “Ignition Module” in this section for further
description.
Alarm Reset:
Prior to resetting a shutdown alarm, record the date
and type of fault that has caused the generator to shut
down.
Ensure that the fault has been resolved. Place the
AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch in the “OFF” position to
turn off the corresponding fault LED.
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Section 3.1
Part 3
Condition
Description and Components
Switch Position
Manual Auto Off
System
Ready
Low
Fuel
Low
Bat
Low
Oil
High
Temp
Over
Speed
Over
Crank
Generator Switch is
in the OFF Mode
OFF
@
X
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
System Ready for
Automatic Start
ON
@
X
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
Generator Switch is
in the MANUAL Mode
OFF
@
X
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
O
Weekly Exerciser
is not Set (Note A)
X
@
Flashing
Flashing
Flashing
O
O
O
Battery Voltage <12.2VDC
for > 1 minute
X
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
Battery Voltage
<8VDC while running
<6VDC while cranking
Flashing Flashing
@
ON
(Non-Latching)
@
ON
Unit Shutdown due
To Low Oil Pressure
OFF
@
X
Unit Shutdown due
To High Coolant Temp
OFF
@
X
Unit Shutdown due
To Engine Overspeed
OFF
@
X
Unit Failed to Start
During it's Crank Cycle
OFF
@
X
Flashing
@
X
OFF
@
X
Engine Speed Signal
Fault/RPM Signal Loss
OFF
@
X
Unit Shutdown due to
Ignition Module Fault
OFF
@
X
Flashing
@
X
@
ON
DIP Switch #6 & #7
not set correctly
ON
ON
ON
ON
1 sec rate
Unit Shutdown due
To Low Coolant Level
Control Board is
In GTS Mode
O
(---------------------------------------1 sec rate -------------------------------------)
OFF
Utility Voltage is
< 60% of Nominal
O
Flashing
Flashing
Flashing
5 sec ON, 1 sec OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
@ = Low Fuel Pressure is a Yellow LED and will be ON when fuel pressure is less than 5 inches Water Column
X = indicates that the LED can be ON or OFF depending on the Operating Mode (i.e. Manual, OFF or Auto)
Note A: a RED LED fault indication has priority over the flashing LED's used to indicate exercise time not set
Page 77
Notes
Page 78
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Section 3.2
Part 3
Operational analysis
INTRODUCTION
The schematic diagram on this and the following
pages show the DC control system in three (3) modes
of operation:
• Utility Available, SW1 in AUTO
• Utility Failure, Engine Cranking, SW1 in AUTO
• Utility failure, Engine Running, SW1 in AUTO
Utility source voltage available.
Positive (+) battery voltage is supplied from the battery via Wire 13 to the starter contactor (SC), fuse
(F2), alternator (ALT) and battery charger (BCH).
The alternator and starter contactor are not active at
this point. Positive (+) battery voltage from the battery charger provides battery sensing and a battery
charge when necessary to keep the battery level up
during non-operational periods. At the fuse (F1) it is
then switched to Wire 15.
15A
15
SW1
SW2
15E
15
239
15A
Wire 15A supplies fused battery voltage to the engine
run relay and start relay coils—the relay coils are both
de-energized at this point. Wire 15A also places fused
(+) battery voltage to PCB J2 Pin 7 (MAN/AUTO
input). This tells the control board that the unit is in
AUTO or MANUAL.
Wire 15E from the momentary switch supplies fused
(+) battery voltage to PCB J2 Pin 5. This is the power
supply to control board (PCB) and allows it to function. The control board also senses battery level on
Wire 15E.
For configured transfer switches (GTS) the control
board looks for a 2-Wire start and ignores inputs of
Wires 225 and 224 utility sensing. The control board
supplies a 5 volt signal input from J2 Pin 4 to Wire 183
and waits for a return signal on Wire 178, J2 Pin 6.
TBR-1/UTILITY FROM T/SW
TBR-2/UTILITY FROM T/SW
TBR-5/TRANSFER COIL RELAY
TBR-6/TRANSFER COIL RELAY
TBG-1/REMOTE START
TBG-2/REMOTE START
N1
N2
194
23
183
178
GROUND
5VDC
194
GTS Switch
194
Figure 3.
Figure 1.
Wire 15 supplies fused (+) battery voltage to the
AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch (SW1) and momentary
switch (SW2). It then feeds down to the terminal block
(TB1), Terminal 11, then on to the start relay (RL1),
and engine run relay (RL2). At SW1 the (+) battery is
switched on to Wires 15A and 194. SW2 is a normally
closed switch that shunts the fused (+) battery to Wire
15E. The fused (+) battery voltage is applied to the
start relay and engine run relay coils that are currently
not active.
14A
For RTS transfer switches the control board (PCB)
monitors Wires 225 and 224 input at J2 Pin 8 and
J2 Pin 12. This is approximately 16 VAC line-to-line
stepped down from the N1 and N2 utility supplied to
the sensing transformer (TR1). 2-Wire start is ignored
in this mode.
N1
N2
194
23
183
178
TBR-1/UTILITY FROM T/SW
TBR-2/UTILITY FROM T/SW
TBR-5/TRANSFER COIL RELAY
TBR-6/TRANSFER COIL RELAY
TBG-1/REMOTE START
TBG-2/REMOTE START
RL2
14
Figure 4.
15
15A
56A
RL1
56
15
15A
Figure 2.
Page 79
Section 3.2
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Part 3
Operational analysis
Utility Available, SW1 in AUTO
(PCB) MONITORING SHUTDOWNS
AC VOLTAGE
DC VOLTAGE - ALWAYS PRESENT
FREQUENCY SIGNAL FROM CAMSHAFT AND FLYWHEEL SENSORS
GROUND
DC VOLTAGE DURING ENGINE RUN CONDITION
(PCB) GROUND CONTROL
FIELD FLASH
DC VOLTAGE DURING CRANKING
5 VDC / POWER SUPPLY FOR ACTUATOR POSITION FEEDBACK
OXYGEN SENSOR GROUND
PWM / 5 VDC SIGNAL
OXYGEN SENSOR OUTPUT 1-3 VAC
F1
15
13
225
224
16 VAC
TR1
AFS OUT
START RELAY
FUEL(RUN) RELAY
2 WIRE START(1)
MOMENT. OPEN
2 WIRE START(2)
MAN/AUTO INPUT
16VAC SENSE(1)
ALARM RELAY
XFER RELAY
MAN. INPUT
16VAC SENSE(2)
EMISSIONS ENABLE
GND-B
PCB J2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
808
56A
14A
183
15E
178
15A
224
15E
14
49
14
14A
RL2
15A
R4
AVR
BR1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
29
L N
1 2
TB-BC-1 L1
TB-BC-2 N
TB-BC-3 GND
NOTE 1
11
56
15
TBR-1/UTILITY FROM T/SW
TBR-2/UTILITY FROM T/SW
TBR-5/TRANSFER COIL RELAY
TBR-6/TRANSFER COIL RELAY
TBG-1/REMOTE START
TBG-2/REMOTE START
15A
NOTE 1: WIRING SHOWN FOR CB1, NB, BA AND
STATOR IS TYPICAL FOR SINGLE PHASE. FOR
3-PHASE, SEE DWG #0F6839.
CUSTOMER CONNECTION & ALTERNATOR LEGEND
BA - BRUSH ASSEMBLY (GENERATOR)
CB1 - MAINLINE CIRCUIT BREAKER
240V OUTPUT TO TRANSFER SWITCH
NB - NEUTRAL BLOCK
TB-BC - BATTERY CHARGER TERMINAL BLOCK
TBG - GTS CONNECT TERMINAL BLOCK
TBR - RTS CONNECT TERMINAL BLOCK
2
BA
44
56A
CB2
162
6
14
11
4
CB1
15
N1
N2
194
23
183
178
4
4
44
4
1
14
15A
0
194
194
BCH
13 0
RL1
15
239
14
SW1
SW2
3 4
Page 80
240 VAC
15
23
239
225
0
0
CONNECT FOR OPTIONAL
EMISSIONS ONLY
HM
N1
N2
15A
11
44
22
33
1
11
2
6
5
55
66
44
STATOR
NB
CONTROL PANEL LEGEND
AVR - AUTOMATIC VOLTAGE REGULATOR
BCH - BATTERY CHARGER
BR1 - BRIDGE RECTIFIER
CB2 - CIRCUIT BREAKER (EXCITATION)
F1 - FUSE BAT POWER (15A ATO TYPE)
HM - HOUR METER
J2 - CONNECTOR 2 (ON PCB)
R4 - FIELD BOOST RESISTOR
RL1 - RELAY 1 (START RELAY)
RL2 - RELAY 2 (ENGINE RUN)
SW1 - AUTO/OFF/MANUAL SWITCH
SW2 - SET EXERCISER SWITCH - NORMALLY CLOSED
TR1 - TRANSFORMER (6VA UTIL/16 VAC)
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Section 3.2
Part 3
Operational analysis
PCB J1
DEG +12V
OX INP RET
DEG GND
COOLANT TEMP
GOV 0V
GOV +5V
DISTRIBUTOR 12V
COOLANT LEVEL
CRANK SENSOR IN
CRANK SENSE RET.
LFP INP
GOV FDBK
OX INP
COIL (+)
COIL (A-)
DISTRIBUTOR RET.
DISTR. INPUT
DEG PWM
N/C
LOW OIL PRESS.
CRANK SHIELD
COIL (C-)
COIL (B-)
AFS
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
0
573
79
0
601
766
804
770
771
0
769
GOV
771
767
765
770
N/C
766
806
769
86
SHLD
1
2
3
4
5
6
808
SHLD
15
LOS
86
14
0
79
N.C.
MP1
(CRANK)
0
HCT
0
85
OPTIONAL
EMISSION
CONTROL
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
14
804
OS
ENGINE WIRING LEGEND
AFS - AIR/FUEL SOLENOID
ALT - D.C. CHARGE ALTERNATOR
BAT - 12VDC BATTERY
CYL - CYLINDER IGNITION COIL
DEG - DRIVER ELEC. GOVERNOR
F2 - FUSE ALT (25A ATO TYPE)
FS - FUEL SOLENOID
FS2 - AUX. FULE SOLENOID
GOV - ELEC. GOVERNOR ACTUATOR
HCT - HIGH COLLANT TEMP. SWITCH
ICM - IGNITION CONTROL MODULE
J1 - CONNECTOR 1 (ON PCB)
LFP - LOW FUEL PRESSURE SWITCH
LOS - LOW OIL PRESSURE SWITCH
MP_ - MAGNETIC PICKUP
OS - OXYGEN SENSOR
SC - STARTER CONTACTOR
SM - STARTER MOTOR
SP_ - SPARK PLUG
WLS - COOLANT LEVEL SWITCH
DEG
14
805
0
85
767
765
0
ALT
805
A
573
14
WLS
B
0
F2
49
LFP
13
13
BAT
15
ICM
** JMP
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
454
451
452
SHLD
0
79
453
454
ENGINE BLOCK TOP VIEW
4
3
2
1
2.4L
453
SHLDA
56
14
79
CYL4
SP4
15
0
15D
806
SHLD
0
0A
79A
CYL2
CYL3
SP3
15D
14
SM
453
JMP CONNECTED – NG
0
FAN
0
(-)
**
13
(+)
56
JMP DISCONNECTED – LP
16
SC
15D
*
FS
56
CYL1
451
601
14
0
SC
454
SWITCH WILL BE
CLOSED WHEN
NORMAL FUEL
PRESSURE IS
PRESENT.
FS2
0
452
*
56
0
SP2
SP1
15D
452
451
MP2 (CAM)
SW1 IN AUTO, UTILITY VOLTAGE PRESENT
Page 81
Section 3.2
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Part 3
Operational analysis
Initial Power Loss.
For RTS transfer switches, line-to-line voltage is
sensed at TR1 and reduced to about 16 VAC line-toline and sensed at the PCB at J2 Pin 8 and Pin 12.
If this voltage drops below 60 percent of operating
voltage, the board will start a 15 second timer. If the
utility voltage is still below 60 percent of operating
voltage the engine will begin the cranking cycle.
0
ALT
F2
49
0
SC
13
225
224
13
TR1
16
SC
13
(+)
BAT
(-)
N1
N2
56
SM
0
Figure 5.
Figure 7.
For GTS configured units utility sensing is done at the
transfer switch, nothing will happen at the generator
until the transfer switch signals the generator for a
start via Wires 178 and 183. All timers are controlled
by the GTS transfer switch.
The starter contactor closes its contact connecting (+)
battery voltage Wire 13 to Wire 16. Wire 16 connects
(+) battery voltage to the starter solenoid creating a
difference of potential across the starter solenoid coil.
The starter solenoid closes (+) battery voltage to the
starter motor causing the motor to spin, cranking the
engine over. The initial crank cycle will be a 15-second
crank followed by a 7-second rest. This will be followed
by 5 additional cycles of 7 second cranks followed by 7
second rests. If the engine fails to start after a total of
90 seconds, the over crank LED will illuminate. Voltage
from Wire 56 is also delivered to the primer solenoid
(FS2); fuel is then delivered to the mixer assembly
which will aid in starting the engine
The fuel solenoid is activated. Wire 14A is brought low
to ground by control board (PCB) J2 Pin 3; this creates
Cranking and Initial Start Up.
For RTS transfer switches, after voltage is not sensed
for 15 seconds the engine will begin to crank.
For GTS configured switches, after voltage is not
sensed at the transfer switch utility sensing board for
a pre-determined amount of time, a contact will close
in the switch completing a current path for 2-Wire start.
2-Wire start is sensed by the unit as a low on Wire 183
at J2 Pin 4. 2-Wire start consists of a current limited
ground source on J2 Pin 6 going out on Wire 178 at the
customer connection, through a normally open contact
in the GTS and returning on Wire 183 J2 Pin 4.
14A
RL2
14
15
15A
56A
RL1
56
15
15A
Figure 6.
The starter is now activated. Wire 56A is brought low
to ground by control board (PCB) J2 Pin 2; this creates a difference of potential across the coil to the
start relay (RL1). The start relay closes the contact
connecting fused (+) battery voltage to Wire 56. Fused
(+) battery voltage is brought by the Wire 56 to the
starter contactor.
Page 82
a difference of potential across the coil of the engine
run relay (RL2). Engine run relay closes fused (+) battery voltage to Wire 15 to Wire 14. Wire 14 carries voltage to the fuel solenoid (FS), this creates a difference
of potential across the coil and opens the demand
regulator. Wire 14 provides DC voltage to the diode
bridge (BR1). At this stage, Wire 14 also feeds 12 VDC
to (TB1) Terminal 9, and to the positive side of the hour
meter, up to Pin 12 on the Ignition Control Module
(ICM) on natural gas and on to the Emission Control,
Pin 2, if fitted. At the negative (-) side of BR1 provides
(+) battery voltage for the field flash of the alternator (Wire 49) and rotor (Wire 29). Wire 29 is jumped
through 0 ohm jumper (R4) to Wire 4.
Electronic governor driver (DEG) is activated. Control
Board (PCB) sends (+) battery voltage to J1 Pin 1
to DEG Pin 4 also on Wire 14. From PCB Pin 18 a 5
VDC PWM signal is sent on Wire 769 to DEG Pin 12.
The 5 VDC PWM signal is converted to a high current
output and sent to drive the governor. DEG Pin 8 (Wire
770) is the (-) to Bosch governor actuator (GOV) Pin 4.
DEG Pin 9 (Wire 771) is the (+) to GOV Pin 1.
Electronic governor actuator activated. Power is
received from the electronic driver on Pins 1 and 4
of the actuator. PCB J1 Pin 6 (Wire 765) supplies 5
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Section 3.2
Part 3
Operational analysis
VDC power supply to governor Pin 3 for the actuator
position feedback circuit. PCB J1 Pin 5 (Wire 767) is
the 0 VDC to governor Pin 2 for the actuator position
feedback circuit. Pin 6 of governor feeds a 0 to 5 VDC
feedback to PCB J1 Pin 12 via Wire 766.
Ignition control module controls the ignition to each
cylinder by individual coils. The ignition control module is powered by battery voltage via Wire 15. When
the ignition control module is at rest the ignition control module will blink 0.5 seconds (ON) and then 0.5
seconds (OFF); this is considered one blink (Normal).
During cranking operations, Wire 56, and Pin 11
applies voltage to the ignition control module. This
input coming from Wire 56 latches the ignition circuit
internal of the ignition control module. Power is then
applied to Wire 15D to the ignition coils and the ignition control module pulls Wires 451, 452, 453 and 454
to ground individually to allow the magnetic field to
build inside the ignition coil and then release it. This
action then discharges and spark is applied to that
cylinder being fired during that compression stroke.
If Wire 14, Pin 12 is connected during cranking and
running operations. The ignition control module is set
to run for natural gas operations. If Wire 14, Pin 12 is
disconnected, it will set the ignition control module for
LP fuel operations.
PCB J1
DEG
14
805
0
85
767
765
0
14
573
79
0
601
766
804
770
771
0
769
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
GOV
806
769
86
SHLD
1
2
3
4
5
6
SHLD
0
79
N.C.
56
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
454
451
452
453
SHLDA
56
14
79
CYL4
SP4
15
0
15D
806
SHLD
0
0A
79A
453
ICM
MP1
(CRANK)
SHLD
0
79
453
454
** JMP
15D
15
CYL2
CYL3
SP3
CYL1
451
14
15D
771
767
765
770
N/C
766
454
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
452
DEG +12V
OX INP RET
DEG GND
COOLANT TEMP
GOV 0V
GOV +5V
DISTRIBUTOR 12V
COOLANT LEVEL
CRANK SENSOR IN
CRANK SENSE RET.
LFP INP
GOV FDBK
OX INP
COIL (+)
COIL (A-)
DISTRIBUTOR RET.
DISTR. INPUT
DEG PWM
N/C
LOW OIL PRESS.
CRANK SHIELD
COIL (C-)
COIL (B-)
SP2
SP1
15D
452
451
MP2 (CAM)
DISCONNECTED – LP
** JMP
JMP CONNECTED – NG
Figure 8.
Page 83
Section 3.2
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Part 3
Operational analysis
Utility Failure, Engine Cranking, SW1 in AUTO
(PCB) MONITORING SHUTDOWNS
AC VOLTAGE
DC VOLTAGE - ALWAYS PRESENT
FREQUENCY SIGNAL FROM CAMSHAFT AND FLYWHEEL SENSORS
GROUND
DC VOLTAGE DURING ENGINE RUN CONDITION
(PCB) GROUND CONTROL
FIELD FLASH
DC VOLTAGE DURING CRANKING
5 VDC / POWER SUPPLY FOR ACTUATOR POSITION FEEDBACK
OXYGEN SENSOR GROUND
PWM / 5 VDC SIGNAL
OXYGEN SENSOR OUTPUT 1-3 VAC
F1
15
13
225
224
TR1
AFS OUT
START RELAY
FUEL(RUN) RELAY
2 WIRE START(1)
MOMENT. OPEN
2 WIRE START(2)
MAN/AUTO INPUT
16VAC SENSE(1)
ALARM RELAY
XFER RELAY
MAN. INPUT
16VAC SENSE(2)
EMISSIONS ENABLE
GND-B
PCB J2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
808
56A
14A
183
15E
178
15A
224
15
15E
14
49
14
13 0
RL2
14A
R4
AVR
BR1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
29
L N
1 2
TB-BC-1 L1
TB-BC-2 N
TB-BC-3 GND
NOTE 1
15
TBR-1/UTILITY FROM T/SW
TBR-2/UTILITY FROM T/SW
TBR-5/TRANSFER COIL RELAY
TBR-6/TRANSFER COIL RELAY
TBG-1/REMOTE START
TBG-2/REMOTE START
15A
NOTE 1: WIRING SHOWN FOR CB1, NB, BA AND
STATOR IS TYPICAL FOR SINGLE PHASE. FOR
3-PHASE, SEE DWG #0F6839.
CUSTOMER CONNECTION & ALTERNATOR LEGEND
BA - BRUSH ASSEMBLY (GENERATOR)
CB1 - MAINLINE CIRCUIT BREAKER
240V OUTPUT TO TRANSFER SWITCH
NB - NEUTRAL BLOCK
TB-BC - BATTERY CHARGER TERMINAL BLOCK
TBG - GTS CONNECT TERMINAL BLOCK
TBR - RTS CONNECT TERMINAL BLOCK
2
BA
11
56
CB2
162
6
14
11
4
CB1
44
N1
N2
194
23
183
178
4
4
44
4
1
15
15A
0
194
194
14
56A
RL1
15A
BCH
3 4
Page 84
15
239
14
SW1
SW2
23
239
225
0
0
CONNECT FOR OPTIONAL
EMISSIONS ONLY
HM
N1
N2
15A
11
44
22
33
1
11
2
6
5
55
66
44
STATOR
NB
CONTROL PANEL LEGEND
AVR - AUTOMATIC VOLTAGE REGULATOR
BCH - BATTERY CHARGER
BR1 - BRIDGE RECTIFIER
CB2 - CIRCUIT BREAKER (EXCITATION)
F1 - FUSE BAT POWER (15A ATO TYPE)
HM - HOUR METER
J2 - CONNECTOR 2 (ON PCB)
R4 - FIELD BOOST RESISTOR
RL1 - RELAY 1 (START RELAY)
RL2 - RELAY 2 (ENGINE RUN)
SW1 - AUTO/OFF/MANUAL SWITCH
SW2 - SET EXERCISER SWITCH - NORMALLY CLOSED
TR1 - TRANSFORMER (6VA UTIL/16 VAC)
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Section 3.2
Part 3
Operational analysis
PCB J1
DEG +12V
OX INP RET
DEG GND
COOLANT TEMP
GOV 0V
GOV +5V
DISTRIBUTOR 12V
COOLANT LEVEL
CRANK SENSOR IN
CRANK SENSE RET.
LFP INP
GOV FDBK
OX INP
COIL (+)
COIL (A-)
DISTRIBUTOR RET.
DISTR. INPUT
DEG PWM
N/C
LOW OIL PRESS.
CRANK SHIELD
COIL (C-)
COIL (B-)
AFS
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
0
573
79
0
601
766
804
770
771
0
769
GOV
771
767
765
770
N/C
766
806
769
86
SHLD
1
2
3
4
5
6
808
SHLD
15
LOS
86
14
0
79
N.C.
MP1
(CRANK)
0
HCT
0
85
OPTIONAL
EMISSION
CONTROL
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
14
804
OS
ENGINE WIRING LEGEND
AFS - AIR/FUEL SOLENOID
ALT - D.C. CHARGE ALTERNATOR
BAT - 12VDC BATTERY
CYL - CYLINDER IGNITION COIL
DEG - DRIVER ELEC. GOVERNOR
F2 - FUSE ALT (25A ATO TYPE)
FS - FUEL SOLENOID
FS2 - AUX. FULE SOLENOID
GOV - ELEC. GOVERNOR ACTUATOR
HCT - HIGH COLLANT TEMP. SWITCH
ICM - IGNITION CONTROL MODULE
J1 - CONNECTOR 1 (ON PCB)
LFP - LOW FUEL PRESSURE SWITCH
LOS - LOW OIL PRESSURE SWITCH
MP_ - MAGNETIC PICKUP
OS - OXYGEN SENSOR
SC - STARTER CONTACTOR
SM - STARTER MOTOR
SP_ - SPARK PLUG
WLS - COOLANT LEVEL SWITCH
DEG
14
805
0
85
767
765
0
ALT
805
A
573
14
WLS
B
0
F2
49
LFP
14
0
FS
13
601
13
454
451
452
ENGINE BLOCK TOP VIEW
4
3
2
1
2.4L
453
SHLDA
56
14
79
CYL4
SP4
15
0
15D
806
SHLD
0
0A
79A
CYL2
CYL3
SP3
15D
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
SHLD
0
79
453
454
453
ICM
** JMP
SM
15D
15
0
CYL1
451
14
ICM
FAULT
INDICATOR
13
FAN
56
JMP CONNECTED – NG
16
SC
BAT
(-)
**
56
(+)
0
JMP DISCONNECTED – LP
SC
454
SWITCH WILL BE
CLOSED WHEN
NORMAL FUEL
PRESSURE IS
PRESENT.
FS2
0
452
*
56
0
SP2
SP1
15D
452
451
MP2 (CAM)
SW1 IN AUTO, UTILITY FAILURE
ENGINE CRANKING
Page 85
Section 3.2
Operational analysis
Engine Running:
When the engine reaches 600 to 800 RPM the control
board will turn off the starter. Ground will be removed
from PCB Pin 2 disengaging the starter motor at the SC.
Using field boost on Wire 4 the rotor begins to create
a magnetic field. The magnetic field will induce a voltage on the stator windings as the rotor spins. Wires 11
and 44 are the sensing leads connecting to Pins 4 and
6 of the automatic voltage regulator (AVR). The stator
also induces an excitation voltage on Wires 162 and 6
of the AVR connected to Terminals 1 and 2. The AVR
rectifies the excitation voltage to produce the field voltage. The AVR uses the sensing voltage to know how
much field voltage to supply into the rotor.
When the system is equipped with an RTS switch the
control board will start a 10 second warm up timer
after engine comes up to speed. After approximately
10 seconds, the control board will initiate a transfer
by grounding PCB J2 Pin 10. At the transfer switch,
the grounding of Wire 23 will produce a difference of
potential across the transfer relay coil, forcing transfer
of the load from utility to standby generator voltage.
When equipped with a GTS configured switch all
transfer control is controlled at the transfer switch.
Page 86
Part 3
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Return of Utility:
For RTS transfer switches, utility will return and be
sensed via N1 and N2. The transformer (TR1) steps
down this voltage. The stepped down sensing voltage
is sent to the control board (PCB) at J2 Pin 8 (Wire
224) and Pin 12 (Wire 225). After 80 percent of utility
voltage is sensed for a period of 15 seconds the PCB
will remove ground from J2 Pin 10 (Wire 23). The difference of potential is removed from transfer relay of
transfer switch, forcing the load to be transferred from
generator to utility source. After transfer the control
board will initiate a one minute cool down timer.
For GTS configured units the timers are located in the
transfer switch.
Shutdown:
For RTS transfer switches the unit will shut down after
the cool down timer has completed its time out.
For GTS configured transfer switches the 2-Wire start
circuit opens. This is seen at the control board as a
return of 5 VDC on J2 Pin 4.
In both cases the control board will remove ground
from J2 Pin 3, removing the power to the fuel system.
The control board will also remove the ground driver
enable line at J1 Pin 18 (Wire 769), allowing the actuator to close.
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Section 3.2
Part 3
Operational analysis
0
ALT
F2
49
SC
0
56
13
16
SC
13
13
(+)
BAT
(-)
SM
0
Figure 9. Starter and Battery Charge Circuit — Unit Running
R4
14
49
14
AVR
BR1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
29
4
4
CB2
2
162
6
14
11
44
4
1
BA
4
CB1
11
44
11
44
22
33
1
11
2
6
5
55
66
44
STATOR
NB
Figure 10. AVR and Stator Circuit — Unit Running
Page 87
Section 3.2
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Part 3
Operational analysis
Utility failure, Engine Running, SW1 in AUTO
(PCB) MONITORING SHUTDOWNS
AC VOLTAGE
DC VOLTAGE - ALWAYS PRESENT
FREQUENCY SIGNAL FROM CAMSHAFT AND FLYWHEEL SENSORS
GROUND
DC VOLTAGE DURING ENGINE RUN CONDITION
(PCB) GROUND CONTROL
FIELD FLASH
DC VOLTAGE DURING CRANKING
5 VDC / POWER SUPPLY FOR ACTUATOR POSITION FEEDBACK
OXYGEN SENSOR GROUND
PWM / 5 VDC SIGNAL
OXYGEN SENSOR OUTPUT 1-3 VAC
F1
15
13
225
224
TR1
AFS OUT
START RELAY
FUEL(RUN) RELAY
2 WIRE START(1)
MOMENT. OPEN
2 WIRE START(2)
MAN/AUTO INPUT
16VAC SENSE(1)
ALARM RELAY
XFER RELAY
MAN. INPUT
16VAC SENSE(2)
EMISSIONS ENABLE
GND-B
PCB J2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
808
56A
14A
183
15E
178
15A
224
15
15E
14
49
14
13 0
RL2
14A
R4
AVR
BR1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
29
L N
1 2
TB-BC-1 L1
TB-BC-2 N
TB-BC-3 GND
NOTE 1
15
TBR-1/UTILITY FROM T/SW
TBR-2/UTILITY FROM T/SW
TBR-5/TRANSFER COIL RELAY
TBR-6/TRANSFER COIL RELAY
TBG-1/REMOTE START
TBG-2/REMOTE START
15A
NOTE 1: WIRING SHOWN FOR CB1, NB, BA AND
STATOR IS TYPICAL FOR SINGLE PHASE. FOR
3-PHASE, SEE DWG #0F6839.
CUSTOMER CONNECTION & ALTERNATOR LEGEND
BA - BRUSH ASSEMBLY (GENERATOR)
CB1 - MAINLINE CIRCUIT BREAKER
240V OUTPUT TO TRANSFER SWITCH
NB - NEUTRAL BLOCK
TB-BC - BATTERY CHARGER TERMINAL BLOCK
TBG - GTS CONNECT TERMINAL BLOCK
TBR - RTS CONNECT TERMINAL BLOCK
2
BA
11
56
CB2
162
6
14
11
4
CB1
44
N1
N2
194
23
183
178
4
4
44
4
1
15
15A
0
194
194
14
56A
RL1
15A
BCH
3 4
Page 88
15
239
14
SW1
SW2
23
239
225
0
0
CONNECT FOR OPTIONAL
EMISSIONS ONLY
HM
N1
N2
15A
11
44
22
33
1
11
2
6
5
55
66
44
STATOR
NB
CONTROL PANEL LEGEND
AVR - AUTOMATIC VOLTAGE REGULATOR
BCH - BATTERY CHARGER
BR1 - BRIDGE RECTIFIER
CB2 - CIRCUIT BREAKER (EXCITATION)
F1 - FUSE BAT POWER (15A ATO TYPE)
HM - HOUR METER
J2 - CONNECTOR 2 (ON PCB)
R4 - FIELD BOOST RESISTOR
RL1 - RELAY 1 (START RELAY)
RL2 - RELAY 2 (ENGINE RUN)
SW1 - AUTO/OFF/MANUAL SWITCH
SW2 - SET EXERCISER SWITCH - NORMALLY CLOSED
TR1 - TRANSFORMER (6VA UTIL/16 VAC)
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Section 3.2
Part 3
Operational analysis
PCB J1
DEG +12V
OX INP RET
DEG GND
COOLANT TEMP
GOV 0V
GOV +5V
DISTRIBUTOR 12V
COOLANT LEVEL
CRANK SENSOR IN
CRANK SENSE RET.
LFP INP
GOV FDBK
OX INP
COIL (+)
COIL (A-)
DISTRIBUTOR RET.
DISTR. INPUT
DEG PWM
N/C
LOW OIL PRESS.
CRANK SHIELD
COIL (C-)
COIL (B-)
AFS
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
0
573
79
0
601
766
804
770
771
0
769
GOV
771
767
765
770
N/C
766
806
769
86
SHLD
1
2
3
4
5
6
808
SHLD
15
LOS
86
14
0
79
N.C.
MP1
(CRANK)
0
HCT
0
85
OPTIONAL
EMISSION
CONTROL
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
14
804
OS
ENGINE WIRING LEGEND
AFS - AIR/FUEL SOLENOID
ALT - D.C. CHARGE ALTERNATOR
BAT - 12VDC BATTERY
CYL - CYLINDER IGNITION COIL
DEG - DRIVER ELEC. GOVERNOR
F2 - FUSE ALT (25A ATO TYPE)
FS - FUEL SOLENOID
FS2 - AUX. FULE SOLENOID
GOV - ELEC. GOVERNOR ACTUATOR
HCT - HIGH COLLANT TEMP. SWITCH
ICM - IGNITION CONTROL MODULE
J1 - CONNECTOR 1 (ON PCB)
LFP - LOW FUEL PRESSURE SWITCH
LOS - LOW OIL PRESSURE SWITCH
MP_ - MAGNETIC PICKUP
OS - OXYGEN SENSOR
SC - STARTER CONTACTOR
SM - STARTER MOTOR
SP_ - SPARK PLUG
WLS - COOLANT LEVEL SWITCH
DEG
14
805
0
85
767
765
0
ALT
805
A
573
14
WLS
B
0
F2
49
LFP
14
0
FS
13
601
13
454
451
452
ENGINE BLOCK TOP VIEW
4
3
2
1
2.4L
453
SHLDA
56
14
79
CYL4
SP4
15
0
15D
806
SHLD
0
0A
79A
CYL2
CYL3
SP3
15D
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
SHLD
0
79
453
454
453
ICM
** JMP
SM
15D
15
0
CYL1
451
14
ICM
FAULT
INDICATOR
13
FAN
56
JMP CONNECTED – NG
16
SC
BAT
(-)
**
56
(+)
0
JMP DISCONNECTED – LP
SC
454
SWITCH WILL BE
CLOSED WHEN
NORMAL FUEL
PRESSURE IS
PRESENT.
FS2
0
452
*
56
0
SP2
SP1
15D
452
451
MP2 (CAM)
SW1 IN AUTO, UTILITY FAILURE
ENGINE RUNNING
Page 89
Section 3.3
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Part 3
Troubleshooting flow charts
Problem 9 – Unit Will Not Crank When AUTO-OFF-MANUAL Switch is Set to MANUAL
TEST 25 –
CHECK
BATTERY
GOOD
TEST 26 – CHECK
BATTERY
VOLTAGE AT TB1
TEST 27 –
CHECK
FUSE
GOOD
BAD
BAD
GOOD
TEST 28 –
CHECK
VOLTAGE AT
FUSE
REPAIR OR
REPLACE
WIRE
BAD
GOOD
REPAIR OR
REPLACE WIRE
GO TO
“PROBLEM 23”
LOW BATTERY
GOOD
BAD
REPLACE FUSE
TEST 31 – CHECK
BATTERY VOLTAGE
AT SW2
GOOD
TEST 29 – CHECK
BATTERY VOLTAGE
AT (SW1)
BAD
BAD
TEST 33 –
CHECK
CRANK RELAY
(RL1)
REPLACE SWITCH
BAD
GOOD
REPLACE
TEST 34 –
CHECK
VOLTAGES AT
SCR
NO VOLTAGE
BETWEEN WIRE 15A
AND WIRE 56A WITH
RELAY REMOVED
REPAIR OR
REPLACE WIRE
GOOD
BAD
REPLACE SWITCH
BAD
TEST 35 – CHECK
BATTERY
VOLTAGE AT
STARTER MOTOR
BAD
GOOD
GOOD
TEST 36 –
TEST
STARTER
REPLACE PCB
REPLACE STARTER
Page 90
TEST 30 – TEST
AUTO-OFF-MANUAL
SWITCH
GOOD
BAD
CHECK
ENGINE
ROTATION
BAD
CONTACT TECHNICAL
SUPPORT
GOOD
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Section 3.3
Part 3
Troubleshooting flow charts
Problem 10 – Engine Will Not Crank When Utility Power Fails
TEST 41 – CHECK
AUTO-OFF-MANUAL
SWITCH POSITION
STARTS
IN
MANUAL
TEST 42 – TRY TO
START ENGINE
MANUALLY
AUTO
OFF
TEST 43 – CHECK
MAINTENANCE
DISCONNECT SWITCH
GTS
OFF
AUTO
SWITCH TO
AUTO AND
RE-TEST
GO TO
“PROBLEM 11”
RTS
CRANKS BUT
WON”T START –
GO TO
“PROBLEM 12”
RESET SWITCH
TO AUTO AND
RE-TEST
TEST 46 –
CHECK BATTERY
VOLTAGE AT J2
CONNECTOR
GOOD
DOES NOT
CRANK – GO TO
“PROBLEM 9”
NOT
ILLUMINATED
TEST 44 –
CHECK STATUS
READY LIGHT
5 SECONDS ON
1 SECOND OFF
FLASHING
REPLACE
PCB
BAD
GO TO “PROBLEM 9” TEST
29 – CHECK ENGINE
CRANK RELAY (RL1)
TEST 45 – CHECK
POSITION OF
DIPSWITCH #2
FIXED
RE-TEST
TEST 47 – CHECK
VOLTAGE AT SW1
AND SW2 SWITCHES
SW1 BAD
SW2 BAD
GOOD
TEST 30 – TEST
AUTO-OFF-MANUAL
SWITCH
BAD
GOOD
TEST 49 –
CHECK WIRES 0,
15A, AND 15E
BAD
REPLACE
GOOD
TEST 48 – TEST
EXERCISE SWITCH
(SW2 )
BAD
REPLACE
REPAIR
OR REPLACE
WIRE
Page 91
Section 3.3
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Part 3
Troubleshooting flow charts
Problem 11 – Engine Will Not Crank With a 2-wire Start
TEST 44 –
CHECK STATUS
READY LIGHT
5 SECONDS ON
1 SECOND OFF
TEST 55 –
ATTEMPT A
2-WIRE START
FLASHING
ENGINE STARTS
TEST 45 –
CHECK
POSITION OF
DIPSWITCH #2
PROBLEM IS LOCATED IN
TRANSFER SWITCH
TEST 58 –
CHECK
WIRE 178
REPAIR OR REPLACE WIRE
GOOD
REPLACE PCB
BAD
Page 92
NOT PRESENT
PRESENT
BAD
FIXED
RE-TEST
TEST 56 –
CHECK VOLTAGE
ON WIRE 183
NO
START
TEST 57 –
CHECK
WIRE 183
GOOD
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Section 3.3
Part 3
Troubleshooting flow charts
Problem 12 – Unit Cranks But Will Not Start
CHECK
OVERCRANK
LIGHT
REPLACE
FLASHING
SOLID
INSPECT FLYWHEEL
OVERSPEED
SHUTDOWN
BAD
TEST 65 – CHECK
IGNITION MODULE
MISSING
FLYWHEEL
TOOTH
FAULT
CODE
GO TO “PROBLEM 25”
TEST 71 –
CHECK CAM
SENSOR
NO CAM
SIGNAL
BAD
NO LED
NO
FLYWHEEL
SIGNAL
TEST 66 – CHECK
DC VOLTAGE
INPUTS
CORRECT
FUEL
SUPPLY
ISSUE
BAD
TEST 68 – CHECK
FUEL SUPPLY
PRESSURE
GOOD
TEST 67 –
CHECK CRANK
SENSOR
TEST 70 –
CHECK RUN
RELAY (RL2)
BAD
GOOD
TEST 64 –
CHECK
IGNITION
COILS
BAD
OR
WEAK
TEST 62 –
CHECK FOR
SPARK
GOOD
REPLACE AND RE-TEST
IF FAULT STILL EXISTS,
REPLACE IGNITION
MODULE
REPLACE
IGNTION
MODULE
GOOD
TEST 69 –
CHECK WIRE
14 OUTPUT
BAD
NO VOLTAGE
BETWEEN
WIRE 15A AND
WIRE 56A WITH
RELAY
REMOVED
BAD
TEST 72 –
CHECK FUEL
REGULATOR
BAD
REPLACE
REPLACE PCB
GOOD
GOOD
TEST 73 – CHECK
GOVERNOR
DRIVER
BAD
GOOD
BAD
GOOD
TEST 63 – CHECK
CONDITION OF
SPARK PLUGS
BAD
BAD
REPLACE
TEST 74 – TEST
ACTUATOR AND
MIXER
FUNCTION
REPLACE
GOOD
CONTACT TECHNICAL
SUPPORT
GOOD
REPAIR OR
REPLACE WIRE
AS NEEDED
BAD
TEST 75 –
CHECK WIRING
HARNESS
GOOD
TEST 76 –
CHECK ENGINE
COMPRESSION
BAD
CONTACT
TECHNICAL
SUPPORT
Page 93
Section 3.3
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Part 3
Troubleshooting flow charts
Problem 13 – Unit Starts and Runs Then Shuts Down
TEST 68 – CHECK
FUEL SUPPLY
PRESSURE
TEST 72 – TEST
FUEL REGULATOR
GOOD
BAD
BAD
CORRECT FUEL
SUPPLY ISSUE
REPLACE
GO TO “PROBLEM 15”
GOOD
Problem 14 – Unit Cranks and Starts, but Backfires
REPLACE
BAD
TEST 68 –
CHECK FUEL
SUPPLY
PRESSURE
MISSING FLYWHEEL
TEETH
TEST 65 –
CHECK
IGNITION
MODULE
GOOD
FAULT
CODE
INSPECT FLYWHEEL
FOR DAMAGE
NO CAM SIGNAL
NO FLYWHEEL SIGNAL
REPLACE
IGNITION MODULE
NO FAULTS
BAD
TEST 74 – TEST
ACTUATOR AND
MIXER
FUNCTION
CORRECT
FUEL
SUPPLY
ISSUE
TEST 67 –
CHECK CRANK
SENSOR
BAD
BAD
GOOD
GOOD
REPLACE
TEST 71 –
CHECK CAM
SENSOR
BAD
GOOD
REPLACE
TEST 63 – CHECK
CONDITION OF
SPARK PLUGS
BAD
TEST 76 –
CHECK ENGINE
COMPRESSION
GOOD
BAD
CONTACT TECHNICAL
SUPPORT
GOOD
Problem 15 – Unit Starts Hard and Runs Rough/Lacks Power
TEST 68 – CHECK
FUEL SUPPLY
PRESSURE
GOOD
TEST 73 –
CHECK
GOVERNOR
DRIVER
BAD
CORRECT FUEL
SUPPLY ISSUE
GOOD
TEST 74 – TEST
ACTUATOR AND
MIXER
FUNCTION
BAD
REPLACE
REPLACE
TEST 71 –
CHECK CAM
SENSOR
REPLACE
BAD
GOOD
TEST 67 –
CHECK CRANK
SENSOR
GOOD
GOOD
CONTACT TECHNICAL SUPPORT
Page 94
TEST 63 – CHECK
CONDITION OF
SPARK PLUGS
BAD
BAD
BAD
GOOD
BAD
TEST 76 –
CHECK ENGINE
COMPRESSION
GOOD
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Section 3.3
Part 3
Troubleshooting flow charts
Problem 16 – Unit Starts and Transfer Occurs When Utility Power is Available
TEST 81 –
CHECK N1 AND
N2 VOLTAGE
GOOD
TEST 82 – TEST
TRANSFORMER
(TR1)
GOOD
TEST 83 –
CHECK VOLTAGE
AT PCB
BAD
BAD
GOOD
CHECK FUSES
IN TRANSFER
SWITCH
REPLACE
REPLACE
PCB
BAD
REPAIR OR
REPLACE WIRE
Problem 17 – Generator Starts Immediately In AUTO but No Transfer To Standby
Utility Voltage Present
TEST 30 – TEST
AUTO-OFF-MANUAL
SWITCH
REPLACE SWITCH OR
REPAIR /REPLACE
WIRING
BAD
Problem 18 – Generator Will Not Exercise
CHECK POSITION
AUTO-OFF-MANUAL
SWITCH
AUTO
TEST 42 – TRY
A MANUAL
START
OFF
STARTS
DOES NOT
CRANK – GO TO
“PROBLEM 9”
PLACE
SWITCH IN
AUTO
CRANKS BUT WON”T
START – GO TO
“PROBLEM 12”
GO TO “PROBLEM 10”
RE-TEST
REPLACE PCB
BAD
TEST 44 –
CHECK STATUS
READY LIGHT
ALL LIGHTS
FLASHING
SET
EXERCISE
SOLID
TEST 87 – TEST
AUTOMATIC
SEQUENCE
LIGHTS
CONTINUE TO
FLASH
GOOD
TEST 48 – TEST
EXERCISE SWITCH
(SW2 )
BAD
CONTACT TECHNICAL SUPPORT
GOOD
REPLACE
Problem 19 – Generator Will Not Low Speed Exercise
TEST 91 – CHECK
POSITION OF
DIPSWITCH 3
GOOD
BAD
FLASHING GREEN LED
REPLACE PCB
RESET AND RE-TEST
GO TO “PROBLEM 16”
Page 95
Section 3.3
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Part 3
Troubleshooting flow charts
Problem 20 – High Temp/Low Coolant (Flashing LED)
TEST 96 –
CHECK
COOLANT
LEVEL
TEST 98 – CHECK
THE LOW
COOLANT LEVEL
SENSOR
GOOD
REPLACE LOW COOLANT
LEVEL SENSOR
NO FAULT
FAULT STILL
OCCURRED
BAD
ADD COOLANT
AND CHECK
FOR LEAKS
TEST 100 –
CHECK
WIRE 0
TEST 99 –
CHECK WIRE
573
GOOD
BAD
GOOD
REPLACE PCB
BAD
REPAIR OR
REPLACE
Problem 21 – High Temp/Low Coolant (Solid LED)
TEST 95 – CHECK
COOLANT
TEMERATURE
BELOW
232°F
TEST 96 –
CHECK
COOLANT
LEVEL
ABOVE
232°F
GOOD
TEST 97 –
CHECK
COOLANT
HOSES
LOW
GOOD
BLOCKAGE
FOUND
REPLACE
THERMOSTAT
REMOVE
OBSTRUCTION
FILL RADIATOR AND
CHECK FOR LEAKS
Problem 22 – Low Oil Pressure
TEST 104 –
CHECK OIL
LEVEL
GOOD
TEST 105 –
CHECK OIL
PRESSURE
GOOD
TEST 106 –
CHECK WIRE 86
CONTINUITY
LOW
LOW
BAD
ADD OIL AND
RE-TEST
CONTACT TECHNICAL
SUPPORT
REPAIR OR REPLACE
WIRE
REPLACE PCB
REPLACE SWITCH
Page 96
GOOD
TEST 107 –
CHECK WIRE 86
FOR A SHORT
BAD
GOOD
GOOD
BAD
TEST 108 –
CHECK THE LOW
OIL PRESSURE
SWITCH
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Section 3.3
Part 3
Troubleshooting flow charts
Problem 23 – Low Battery Alarm/Dead Battery
TEST 110 –
CHECK
BATTERY
CONDITION
BELOW
11VDC
ABOVE
11VDC
DISCONNECT BATTERY FROM GENERATOR AND CHARGE WITH
A CHARGER CAPABLE OF CHARGING FROM A DEAD STATE.
TEST 113 –
CHECK BATTERY
CHARGER
120VAC INPUT
TEST 111 –
CHECK BATTERY
VOLTAGE AT PCB
ABOVE
12.8VDC
CHECK CONNECTIONS
AND WIRES TO PCB.
WIRES 0 AND 15E
SHOULD HAVE VERY LOW
RESISTANCE TO THE PCB.
LED
RETURNS
TEST 114 – CHECK
120VAC INPUT TO
CUSTOMER
CONNECTION
BAD
TEST 115 – CHECK
BATTERY
CHARGER OUTPUT
GOOD
BAD
BAD
BELOW
12.8VDC
TEST 112 –
CHECK LOW
BATTERY
SENSING AT PCB
GOOD
STOP TESTING.
CHARGING SYSTEM IS
WORKING PROPERLY.
REPLACE CHARGER
GOOD
NO
LED
REPAIR OR
REPLACE WIRE
CHECK WIRES AND
CONNECTION BETWEEN
THE GENERATOR AND THE
DISTRIBUTION PANEL.
ALARM WAS LATCHED. THIS HAPPENS
DURING CRANKING IF BATTERY VOLTAGE
DROPS BELOW 6VDC. LOAD TEST BATTERY.
REPLACE PCB.
NOTE: THE PCB HAS A TOLERANCE OF +/- 0.5VDC. IF
THE ALARM CLEARS WITHIN THIS WINDOW THE PCB
IS STILL GOOD AND SHOULD NOT BE REPLACED.
Page 97
Section 3.3
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Part 3
Troubleshooting flow charts
Problem 24 – Overspeed LED Flashing
TEST 32 –
VERIFY
DIPSWITCH
SETTINGS
TEST 67 – CHECK
CRANK SENSOR
(MP1)
GOOD
BAD
TEST 122 –
CHECK WIRES
79 AND 0
GOOD
BAD
SET DIPSWITCHES
CORRECTLY
REPLACE PCB
GOOD
BAD
REPAIR OR REPLACE
REPLACE OR
ADJUST
Problem 25 – Overspeed LED Solid
TEST 74 – TEST
ACTUATOR AND
MIXER
FUNCTION
TEST 73 –
CHECK
GOVERNOR
DRIVER
GOOD
TEST 67 –
CHECK CRANK
SENSOR (MP1)
GOOD
GOOD
REPLACE PCB
BAD
BAD
BAD
BAD
REPLACE
REPLACE
REPLACE
CONTACT TECHNICAL
SUPPORT
Problem 26 – 15 Amp Fuse Blows
FUSE BLOWS
IMMEDIATELY
WHEN REPLACED
TEST 123 – CHECK BATTERY
VOLTAGE CIRCUIT
FUSE BLOWS WHEN
UNIT PLACED IN
“MANUAL” OR “AUTO”
TEST 124 – CHECK CRANKING
AND RUNNING CIRCUITS
Problem 27 – Low Fuel Pressure LED Flashing
TEST 68 –
CHECK FUEL
SUPPLY
PRESSURE
Page 98
GOOD
TEST 116 –
TEST LOW FUEL
PRESSURE
SWITCH
GOOD
BAD
BAD
CORRECT
FUEL SUPPLY
ISSUE
REPAIR OR REPLACE
RESPECTIVE COMPONENT
CHECK
CONNECTIONS
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Introduction
This section is provided to familiarize the service
technician with acceptable procedures for the testing and evaluation of various problems that could be
encountered on standby generators with liquid-cooled
engines. Use this section of the manual in conjunction
with Section 3.3, “Troubleshooting Flow Charts”. The
numbered tests in this section correspond with those
of Section 3.3.
Most tests can be performed with an inexpensive voltohm-milliammeter (VOM). An AC frequency meter is
required, where frequency readings must be taken. A
clamp-on ammeter may be used to measure AC loads
on the generator.
Testing and troubleshooting methods covered in this
section are not exhaustive. We have not attempted to
discuss, evaluate and advise the home standby service trade of all conceivable ways in which service and
trouble diagnosis might be performed. We have not
undertaken any such broad evaluation. Accordingly,
anyone who uses a test method not recommended
herein must first satisfy himself that the procedure or
method he has selected will jeopardize neither his nor
the product’s safety.
Safety
Service personnel who work on this equipment must
be made aware of the dangers of such equipment.
Extremely high and dangerous voltages are present
that can kill or cause serious injury. Gaseous fuels are
highly explosive and can be ignited by the slightest
spark. Engine exhaust gases contain deadly carbon
monoxide gas that can cause unconsciousness or
even death. Contact with moving parts can cause serious injury. The list of hazards is seemingly endless.
When working on this equipment, use common
sense and remain alert at all times. Never work on
this equipment while you are physically or mentally
fatigued. If you don’t understand a component, device
or system, do not work on it.
Test 25 – Check Voltage at Battery
Procedure:
1.Set a VOM to measure DC voltage.
2.Connect one meter test lead to the positive terminal of
the battery and connect the other meter test lead to the
negative terminal on the battery. Measure and record the
voltage
3.Set the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL
position. Measure and record the voltage.
*
Section 3.4
Part 3
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
Diagnostic tests
Results:
1.If voltage was above 12VDC in Step 2, but dropped below
10VDC the battery may have a dead cell or a direct short
between the cells and would need to be replaced. The
battery can be load tested using a hand held device or
taken to a facility with the capability of testing the state of
a battery.
2.If voltage was above 12VDC in Steps 2 and 3, refer back
to flow chart.
3.If voltage was below 12VDC in Steps 2 and 3, refer back
to flow chart.
Test 26 – Check Battery Voltage at TB1
Terminal Strip
Procedure:
1.Open the front control panel.
2.Set the VOM to measure DC volts.
3.Place the negative test (-) lead to Terminal 1 of TB1 (Wire
0) and the positive lead to Terminal 8 of TB1 (Wire 13) on
the terminal strip.
Results:
1.If battery voltage is present on Wire 13, refer back to flow
chart.
2.If little or no battery voltage is present, verify that Wire 13
is not pinched or cut or in any other way prevented from
having proper battery voltage. Repair or replace Wire 13
between TB1 and the battery.
Test 27 – Check 15 AMP Fuse (F1)
Procedure:
1.Locate the fuse in the lower left of the control panel.
2.Pull the 15 amp fuse (F1) from the lower left of the control
panel and inspect the fuse.
3.Set VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
4.Check for CONTINUITY between the blades of the fuse.
Results:
1.If the fuse is open, replace the fuse. If the fuse blows
again verify for shorts to ground, then go to Problem 26 in
Section 3.3.
2.If the fuse is good, refer back to flow chart.
Page 99
Section 3.4
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Part 3
Diagnostic tests
1.Open the front of the control panel.
3.Place the negative test (-) lead to a clean ground and
positive test (+) lead to Wire 13.
Note: The meter lead will be inserted directly into
the fuse holder.
Results:
1.If battery voltage is present at Wire 13, refer back to flow
chart.
2.If little or no voltage battery voltage is present, check the
fuse holder and Wire 13. If needed repair or replace Wire
13 between the fuse block and the terminal strip.
Test 29 – Check Battery Voltage at
AUTO-OFF-MANUAL Switch (SW1)
Procedure:
1.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the AUTO position.
2.Set the VOM to measure DC volts.
3.Place the Negative test (-) lead to a clean frame ground and
the positive test (+) lead to Wires 15, 15A and 194.
194
SW1
15A
1
4
2
5
3
6
15
239
Figure 1. AUTO-OFF-MANUAL
Results:
1.If the battery voltage is present at the wires mentioned in
Step 3, refer back to flow chart.
2.If there is little or no battery voltage present at the wires
mentioned in Step 3, proceed to troubleshoot either an
open wire or defective switch.
a.Wire 15A will only have voltage with the AUTOOFF-MANUAL switch in the AUTO position.
Page 100
F1
13
15
15
2.Set the VOM to measure DC volts.
SW2
15E
PCB J2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
808
56A
14A
183
15E
178
15A
224
15
15A
15
1b
1
1a
239
15A
2b
2
2a
8
1
2
7
4
5
3
6
SW1
194
239
194
Procedure:
b.Wire 15 is fused battery voltage and comes from
TB1 Terminal 10 and should have DC voltage
present at all times.
c.Wire 194 will only have voltage with the AUTOOFF-MANUAL switch in the AUTO position and
when DC voltage is present on Wire 15A..
15
Test 28 – Check Battery Voltage at
15 Amp Fuse (F1)
194
23
239
225
0
0
Figure 2. AUTO-OFF-MANUAL Switch Wiring
Test 30 – Test AUTO-OFF-MANUAL Switch
Discussion:
When the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is set to AUTO
position, battery voltage (12 VDC) is delivered to the
circuit board via Wire 15A, the closed switch terminal.
This voltage is needed to operate the circuit board.
Setting the switch to its “Manual” position delivers
battery voltage to the circuit board for its operation. In
addition, when the switch is set to “Manual”, 12 VDC
is supplied to the circuit board via Wire 239.
Procedure:
Disconnect all wires from switch terminals, to prevent
interaction. Then, use a VOM to test for continuity
across switch terminals as shown in the following
chart. Reconnect all wires and verify correct positions
when finished.
TERMINALS
SWITCH POSITION
READING
2 and 3
AUTO
MANUAL
OFF
Infinity
Continuity
Infinity
2 and 1
AUTO
MANUAL
OFF
Continuity
Infinity
Infinity
5 and 6
AUTO
MANUAL
OFF
Infinity
Continuity
Infinity
5 and 4
AUTO
MANUAL
OFF
Continuity
Infinity
Infinity
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Section 3.4
Part 3
Diagnostic tests
Test 32 – Check Control board Dip
switches
CONTINUITY
1/4
2/5
INFINITY
3/6
DEPRESSED
AUTO
INFINITY
1/4
2/5
INFINITY
3/6
OFF
INFINITY
CONTINUITY
1/4
2/5
DEPRESSED
3/6
Discussion:
There are 8 dip switches located on the printed circuit
board. These are utilized to configure a unit to function properly according to its design parameters.
Switch OFF
Switch ON
Position 1
60 Hz
50 Hz
(where applicable)
Position 2
ATS Mode
GTS Mode
Position 3
Low Speed Exercise
Normal Speed Exercise
Position 4
LP
NG
Position 5
Reserved
Reserved
Position 6
22/27kW (1800 r pm)
45kW (3600 rpm)
36kW Turbo (1800 rpm)
60kW Turbo (3600 rpm)
Position 7
2.4L (1800 rpm)
4.2L (1800 rpm)
Position 8
Reserved
Reserved
Note: Dipswitch S2 (if equipped) has no function)
MANUAL
Figure 3. AUTO-OFF-MANUAL Switch Test Points
Results:
1.Replace AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch, if defective. Refer
back to flow chart if necessary.
Test 31 – Check Battery Voltage at
Exercise Switch (SW2)
Procedure:
1.Remove the 15 amp fuse from the fuse holder in the control Panel, located in the lower left side of the control panel.
2.Verify that the dip switches are set according to the chart
above.
3.Re-install the 15 amp fuse to the fuse holder in the
control panel.
Note: Any time a dip switch change is made the
power must be cycled.
4.Turn the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL
position to verify the unit starts properly.
Procedure:
1.Locate the SW2 (Exercise) switch on the front of the
control panel.
2.Set VOM to measure DC voltage.
3.Place the negative (-) test lead to a clean frame ground
and the positive (+) test lead to Wires 15 and 15E on
SW2. See Figure 2.
Results:
1.If battery voltage is present at both wires, refer back to
flow chart.
2.If little or no battery voltage is present, refer to Figure 2
and check for an open between the SW1 (AUTO-OFF
MANUAL) switch and the SW2 (Exercise) switch.
Results:
1.If the unit doesn’t start, verify the dipswitches per the
chart above, refer back to the flow chart.
2.If the unit starts and runs properly, stop testing.
Test 33 – Check Engine CRANK Relay (RL1)
Discussion:
The (RL1) start relay is used to energize the starter
solenoid to turn the engine over. The control board
holds Wire 56A open until it gets voltage from the
AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch on Wire 239 in the
MANUAL position, or in AUTO the position on Wire 15A,
if control board senses a utility loss and/or receives a
2-Wire start from the transfer switch. The control board
then grounds Wire 56A and in the (RL1) start relay the
contacts change state to allow voltage from Wire 15
to Wire 56 on the starter contactor relay (SCR). This
action allows the starter to crank the engine.
Page 101
Section 3.4
Part 3
Diagnostic tests
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Procedure:
5.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the AUTO position.
1.Locate the Engine Start Relay (RL1 BLACK), it is located
in the back of the control panel in the center (see Figure 4).
6.Connect one meter test lead to Terminal Connection
86 (Wire 15A) on the RL1 socket and connect the other
meter test lead to a clean frame ground; battery voltage
should be measured.
Tech Tip: Reference Section 1.7 for proper
procedures in testing connector plugs and
incoming wires.
•
2.Set the VOM to measure DC voltage.
3.Remove the RL1 relay from the socket.
7.Connect one meter test lead to Terminal Connection
85 (Wire 56A) on the RL1 socket and connect the other
meter test lead to Terminal Connection 86 (Wire 15A).
12
11
9
8
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
TB1
0
1
4
2
6
11
44
13
14
15A
15
15
•
If little or no battery voltage is present, verify
that Wire 15A is not pinched or cut or in any
other way prevented from having proper
battery voltage.
If battery voltage is present, check Wire 56A
in Step 7
8.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL position.
9.Measure and record the voltage.
•
R80
R81
R82
RUN RELAY
(RL2)
F1 15A
F2 10A
F3 10A
F4 5A
CRANK RELAY
(RL1)
REPLACE WITH SAME SIZE AND TYPE
SOME FUSES MAY BE EMPTY
Figure 4. RL1 and RL2 Location
RL1
ENGINE START
RL2
ENGINE RUN
14A
14
15A
15
56A
56 15A 15
30
30
85 87A 86
85 87A 86
87
87
•
Note: 56A receives a ground from Pin 2 of the J2
Connector.
• If Wire 56A has been verified good, replace
the printed circuit board.
10.Re-insert RL1 relay.
11.Locate the Starter Contactor Relay (SCR), on the back
of the control panel (see Figure 6).
12.Turn the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL
position.
13.Connect one meter lead to Wire 56 at the SCR and connect the other meter test lead to a clean frame ground.
•
•
BACK OF CONTRL BOX
Figure 5. Engine Start Relay Wiring
4.Connect one meter test lead to Terminal Connection 87
(Wire 15) on the RL1 socket and connect the other meter
test lead to a clean frame ground. Battery should be present at all times.
•
•
If little or no battery voltage is present, verify
that Wire 15 is not pinched or cut or in any
other way prevented from having proper
battery voltage.
If battery voltage is present , check Wire
15A in Step 5.
Page 102
If battery voltage is measured, proceed to
Step 10.
If little or no battery voltage is present in
Step 9, verify that Wire 56A is not pinched
or cut or in any other way prevented from
having proper battery voltage.
•
If battery voltage is present during cranking,
refer back to flow chart.
If little or no battery voltage is present, verify
that Wire 56 is not pinched or cut or in any
other way prevented from having proper
battery voltage.
If Wire 56 has been verified good, replace
the RL1 relay.
Note: The resistance of relay RL1 (between
Terminals 85 and 86) is 90 Ohms across the coil.
Results:
1.Refer back to flow chart.
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Test 34 – Check Battery Voltage at
Starter Contactor Relay (SCR)
Discussion:
The Starter Contactor Relay (SCR) is used to apply
battery voltage to the starter solenoid allowing the
starter motor to turn the engine over during cranking
operations. The control board grounds Wire 56A on
the engine start relay (RL1), this action allows battery voltage to Wire 56 on the starter contactor relay
(SCR). When Wire 56 has battery voltage applied to
the (SCR), the battery voltage from Wire 13 is permitted though the (SCR) relay and to Wire 16 that goes
to the starter solenoid.
0
56
13
13
13
13
SC
+
BAT
16
SCR
13
SM
0
Figure 6. Starter Contactor Relay
Procedure:
1.Connect one meter test lead to Wire 13 at the Starter
Contactor and the other meter test lead to a clean frame
ground. Battery voltage should always be present.
•
•
Section 3.4
Part 3
Diagnostic tests
Test 35 – Check Battery Voltage at
Starter Motor (SM)
Procedure:
1.Set the VOM to measure DC voltage.
2.Place the Negative (-) test lead to a clean frame ground
and the positive (+) test lead to Wire 16 on the starter
solenoid.
3.Turn the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL
position.
Results:
1.If battery voltage is present when placing the AUTO-OFFMANUAL switch to the MANUAL position and the engine
still didn’t turn over, replace the starter motor.
2.If battery voltage is present when the placing the AUTOOFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL position and the
starter motor tried to engage (pinion engaged), but
engine did NOT crank, check for mechanical binding of
the engine or rotor.
3.If there is little or no battery voltage present , verify Wire
16 is not pinched or cut and inspect for any other conditions that would not allow battery voltage to Wire 56.
Test 36 – Testing Starter Motor
CHECKING THE PINION:
When the starter motor is activated, the pinion gear
should move and engage the flywheel ring gear. If the
pinion does not move normally, inspect the pinion for
binding or sticking.
If battery voltage is present, go to Step 2.
If little or no battery voltage is present, verify
that Wire 13 is not pinched or cut or in any
other way prevented from having proper
battery voltage.
2.Connect one meter test lead to Wire 16 at the Starter
Contactor and the other meter test lead to a clean frame
ground.
3.Turn the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL
position. Battery voltage should be measured during
cranking.
Results:
1.If battery voltage is present at Wires 13 and 16, refer back
to flow chart.
Figure 7. Starter Motor
2.If little or no battery voltage is present on Wire 16 and
Wires 56 and 13 have battery voltage present, replace
the starter contactor relay (SCR).
Page 103
Section 3.4
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Part 3
Diagnostic tests
Tachometer:
A tachometer is available from your parts source.
The tachometer measures from 800 to 50,000 rpm,
Figure 10.
PINION WILL BE
AGAINST STOP
WHEN CRANKING
13.70 +1.0
-1.0
AT REST PINION POSITION
23.0-25.5
ENERGIZED POSITION
1.5-4.0
RING GEAR-PINION
RECOMENDED POSITION
GAP AT REST
Figure 10. Tachometer
29.88 +1.6
-1.0
STARTER MTG.
SURFACE
Test Bracket:
A starter motor test bracket may be made as shown
in Figure 11. A growler or armature tester is available
from an automobile diagnostic service supplier.
Figure 8. Check Pinion Gear Operation
0.5"
TOOLS FOR STARTER PERFORMANCE TEST:
The following equipment may be used to complete a
performance test of the starter motor:
• A clamp-on ammeter.
• A tachometer capable of reading up to 10,000 rpm.
• A fully charged 12 volt battery.
Measuring Current:
To read the current flow, in AMPERES, a clamp-on
ammeter may be used. This type of meter indicates
current flow through a conductor by measuring the
strength of the magnetic field around that conductor.
METAL STOCK
1/4" THICK STEEL
2.625"
0.5"
3.5"
1.0"
4"
12"
DRILL TWO HOLES — 1/2"
FOR STARTER
MOUNTING BRACKET
2"
DRILL TWO HOLES — 1/2"
FOR MOUNTING TACHOMETER
TAP FOR 1/4-20 NC SCREWS
Figure 11. Test Bracket
Remove Starter Motor:
It is recommended that the starter motor be removed
from the engine when testing starter motor performance. Assemble starter to test bracket and clamp
test bracket in vise, Figure 12.
Testing Starter Motor:
1.A fully charged 12 volt battery is required.
2.Connect jumper cables and clamp-on ammeter as shown
in Figure 12.
3.With the starter motor activated (jump the terminal on the
starter contactor to battery voltage), note the reading on
the clamp-on ammeter and on the tachometer (rpm).
Figure 9. Clamp-On Ammeter
Note: Take the reading after the ammeter and
tachometer are stabilized, approximately 2-4
seconds.
4.A starter motor in good condition will be within the following specifications:
Page 104
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
V
12-
kW
2.0-
Nm
20.0-
11-
1.8-
18.0-
1.6-
16.0-
10-
54-
1.21.00.8-
12.010.08.0-
0.6-
6.0-
0.4-
4.0-
1-
0.2-
2.0-
0-
0.0-
0.0-
32-
1.If normal automatic operation is obtained, discontinue
tests.
2500
SPEED
6-
POWER
VOLTAGE
7-
Results:
SPEED
14.0TORQUE
1.4-
by source, turn ON the utility power supply to the
transfer switch. Retransfer back to the “Utility” source
should occur. After an “engine cool down timer” has
timed out, generator shutdown should occur.
VOLTAGE
3500
3000
8-
Diagnostic tests
MOTOR PERFORMANCE CURVE
BATTERY RESISTANCE:
10.00 mOhms
RPM
4000
9-
Section 3.4
Part 3
2.If engine does not crank when utility power is turned off,
go to Problem 10 in Section 3.3.
2000
1500
1000
3.If engine cranks but won’t start, go to Problem 12 in
Section 3.3.
POWER
500
TORQUE
0
100
150
200
250
300
CURRENT
350
400
4.If engine cranks and starts, but transfer to “Standby” does
NOT occur, refer to the appropriate transfer switch diagnostic manual.
5.If transfer to “Standby” occurs, but retransfer back to
“Utility” does NOT occur when utility source voltage is
restored, refer to the appropriate transfer switch diagnostic manual.
STARTER
CONTACTOR
CLAMP ON
AMP METER
Test 42 – Try a Manual Start
Discussion:
The first step in troubleshooting for an “engine won’t
crank” condition is to determine if the problem is
peculiar to automatic operations only or if the engine
won’t crank manually either.
STARTER
MOTOR
Procedure:
TACHOMETER
VISE
12 VOLT
BATTERY
1.Set the generator main line circuit breaker to its OFF (or
open) position.
Figure 12. Testing Starter Motor Performance
2.Set the generator AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to
MANUAL.
Test 41 – Check AUTO-OFF-MANUAL
Switch Position
a.The engine should crank cyclically through its
“crank-rest” cycles until it starts.
b.Let the engine stabilize and warm up for a few
minutes after it starts.
Discussion:
If the standby system is to operate automatically, the
generator AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch must be set to
AUTO. That is, the generator will not crank and start
on occurrence of a “Utility” power outage unless that
switch is at AUTO. In addition, the generator will not
exercise every seven (7) days as programmed unless
the switch is at AUTO.
Procedure:
With the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch set to Auto, test
automatic operation. Testing of automatic operation
can be accomplished by turning off the Utility power
supply to the transfer switch. When the utility power
is turned off, the standby generator should crank and
start. Following startup, transfer to the standby source
should occur. Refer to Section 1.6 in this manual.
Following generator startup and transfer to the stand-
Results:
1.If the engine cranks manually but does not crank automatically, refer back to flow chart.
2.If the engine does not crank manually, proceed to
Problem 9 in Section 3.3.
Test 43 – Check Maintenance
Disconnect Switch
Discussion:
In a GTS type transfer switch a maintenance disconnect switch is installed in the switch to disable its
automatic features to prevent a generator from startPage 105
Section 3.4
Part 3
Diagnostic tests
ing and a transfer occurring while a technician is
working on a piece of equipment.
Procedure:
1.Locate the Maintenance Disconnect Switch inside the
transfer switch.
2.It should be in the Automatic position.
Results:
1.If the switch was in the “AUTO” position, refer back to flow
chart.
2.If the switch was “OFF”, place in “AUTO” position and retry a simulated power outage.
Test 44 – Check Status Ready Light
Discussion:
On the main control panel there is a green LED which
indicates the status of the unit. With the AUTO-OFFMANUAL switch in the OFF position this LED will not
be illuminated. In the AUTO position it will be flashing
if a there is a loss of utility power, and it will be solid
when utility is available and generator is awaiting a
power failure. The LED will flash 5 seconds on and 1
second off if the generator is set up for a 2-Wire start
transfer switch (GTS).
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Test 46 – Check Battery Voltage at J2
Connector
Discussion:
Battery voltage is delivered to the board via two wires,
15E and 15A. Wire 15E provides power to the printed
circuit board in all three positions of the AUTO-OFFMANUAL switch. Wire 15A provides power to the
printed circuit board to let it know that it is in the
AUTO position. These two inputs are crucial to the
auto operation of the generator.
Tech Tip: Reference Section 1.7 for proper
procedures in testing connector plugs and
incoming wires.
Procedure:
1.Disconnect the white 14 pin J2 connector going into the
printed circuit board.
2.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the AUTO position.
3.Set VOM to measure DC voltage.
Refer to Figure 2 in Section 3.1.
4.Connect one meter lead to Pin 5 (Wire 15E) and the other
meter lead to a clean frame ground. Measure and record
the voltage.
5.Connect one meter lead to Pin 7 (Wire 15A) and the other
meter lead to a clean frame ground.
Procedure:
1.Observe the LED
Results:
Results:
1.Battery voltage should be measured in Steps 4 and 5.
Refer back to flow chart.
1.Refer back to flow chart
Test 45 – Check Position of Dip Switch 2
Discussion:
Located on the printed circuit board there are 8 dip
switches. These switches are used to configure the printed circuit board depending on the configuration of the unit
and the type of installation. Dip Switch 2 tells the printed
circuit board what type of transfer switch is installed.
Test 47 – Check Voltage at Auto-Off
Manual (SW1) & Exercise (SW2) Switches
Procedure:
Discussion:
Voltage on 15E is delivered to the board from the
SW2 (Exercise) switch. Voltage on 15A is delivered
to the board from the SW1 (AUTO-OFF-MANUAL)
switch when the switch is in the AUTO or MANUAL
position.
1.Verify position of Dip Switch 2.
Procedure:
OFF
ON
ATS
GTS
Results:
1.If switch is in the ON position it is configured for a GTS or
2-Wire start system. Switch to the OFF position and refer
back to flow chart.
Note: If a change is made remove F1 (15 amp
Fuse) for 10 seconds and re-insert.
Page 106
1.Set VOM to measure DC voltage.
2.Connect one meter lead to Wire 15E at SW2 and connect the other meter test lead to a clean frame ground.
Measure and record the voltage.
3.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL position to the AUTO position.
4.Connect one meter lead to Wire 15A at SW1 Terminal 1
and connect the other meter test lead to a clean frame
ground. Measure and record the voltage.
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Section 3.4
Part 3
Results:
1.Battery voltage should be measured in Steps 2 and 4.
Any reading other than battery voltage indicates a failure
of that component or wiring leading to the component.
Refer to Test 30 to troubleshoot the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL
switch. Refer to Test 48 to troubleshoot the Set Exercise
Switch.
Diagnostic tests
connect the other meter test lead to the disconnected
Wire 15E. CONTINUITY should be measured.
6.Connect one meter test lead to J2 Pin 7 (Wire 15A) and
connect the other meter test lead to disconnected Wire
15A. CONTINUITY should be measured.
7.Connect one meter test lead to J2 Pin 14 (Wire 0) and
connect the other meter test lead to a clean frame ground.
Measure and record the resistance.
Test 48 – Test Exercise switch (SW2)
Results:
Discussion:
The exercise switch is a normally closed switch that
opens when it is pressed. This momentary opening
removes voltage from Wire 15E from the printed circuit board and will set the exercise time at the specific
time and date that the switch is pressed.
Procedure:
1.Disconnect Wires 15E and 15 from the SW2 (Exercise)
switch.
2.Set VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
3.Connect one meter test lead to the terminal where
Wire 15E was removed and connect the other meter
test lead to the terminal where Wire 15 was removed.
CONTINUITY should be measured.
4.Actuate the switch back and forth. The meter should
change from CONTINUITY to INFINITY.
Results:
1.If the switch did not change from a closed state to an
open state each time it was pressed, replace the switch.
Test 49 – Check Wires 0, 15A, 15E
Discussion:
If the printed circuit board does not receive a good
signal from all three wires the AUTO operation of the
generator could be effected. If the board has a high
resistance on the ground circuit it would cause voltages to be lower than nominal and could cause the
generators logic to be distorted.
Procedure:
1.Disconnect the J2 (14 Pin) connector from the printed
circuit board.
2.Disconnect Wire 15A from the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL
switch.
3.Disconnect Wire 15E from the SW2 (Exercise) switch.
4.Set VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
Refer to Figure 2 in Section 3.1.
5.Connect one meter test lead to J2 Pin 5 (Wire 15E) and
1.If anything other than CONTINUITY was measured in
Steps 5 and 6 repair or replace that particular wire.
2.If a reading higher than 0.5 Ohms (Ω) was measured in
Step 7, clean the ground studs.
Test 55 – Attempt a 2-Wire Start
Discussion:
The generator will utilize Wire 183 and 178 to look
for a 2-Wire start signal from the transfer switch.
The printed circuit board will put 5 VDC on Wire 183
and wait to see the same 5 VDC on 178, when the
wires are connected either through a relay or a circuit
board. The generator will start up and stay running as
long as those wires are kept closed.
Procedure:
1.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the AUTO position.
2.Place a jumper wire across terminal to TB-G 1 (Wire 183)
and TB-G 2 (Wire 178) of Terminal Block G (Located in
the customer connection area.
*
Caution: When performing Step 2, the
generator will crank and start.
Results:
1.Refer back to flow chart.
Test 56 – Check Voltage on Wire 183
Discussion:
This test will verify that 5 VDC is getting to the terminal strip.
Procedure:
1.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the AUTO position
2.Set VOM to measure DC voltage.
3.Connect one meter lead to Terminal 1 (Wire 183) of
TB-G and the other meter lead to a clean frame ground.
Measure and record the voltage.
Page 107
Section 3.4
Part 3
Diagnostic tests
Results:
1.A voltage of 5 VDC should be measured in Step 3. Refer
back to flow chart.
3.Working one cylinder at a time, connect an in-line spark
plug tester to the spark plug and the spark plug wire on
each cylinder.
Tech tip: Make sure the spark plug tester
Test 57 – Check Wire 183
Procedure:
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
is secure, so it can give the most accurate
spark reading.
1.Disconnect the J2 (14 Pin) connector from the printed
circuit board
3.Turn the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL
position
2.Connect one meter lead to Pin 4 of the J2 and connect
the other meter test lead to Terminal 1 (Wire 183) of
TB-G. CONTINUITY should be measured.
*
Tech Tip: Reference Section 1.7 for proper
procedures in testing connector plugs and
incoming wires.
Results:
1.If anything, but CONTINUITY was measured repair or
replace the wire between J2 Pin 4 and Terminal 1 of
TB-G.
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
4.Observe the spark plug tester window while the engine is
cranking over.
Results:
1.If spark is bright and strong for each plug then it is good.
Refer back to flow chart.
2.If any of the spark plugs has no spark or a weak spark, then
replace the respective plug and refer back to flow chart.
2.If CONTINUITY was measured, refer back to flow chart.
Test 58 – Check Wire 178
Procedure:
1.Disconnect the J2 (14 Pin) connector from the printed
circuit board.
2.Connect one meter lead to Pin 6 of the J2 and connect
the other meter test lead to Terminal (Wire 178) of TB-G.
CONTINUITY should be measured.
Results:
1.If anything but CONTINUITY was measured repair or
replace the wire between J2 Pin 6 and Terminal 2 of TB-G.
2.If CONTINUITY was measured, refer back to flow chart.
Test 62 – Check for spark
*
CAUTION: When checking for spark on the
unit, make sure to have the fuel supply turned
off to the unit.
Procedure:
Test 63 – Check the Condition of the
Spark Plugs
Procedure:
1.Locate the spark plug wires on top of the valve cover and
mark them so they can be replaced in the proper location.
2.Remove spark plug wires from the valve cover.
3.Remove the spark plugs one at a time and inspect for the
conditions shown in Figure 14.
4.Check the gap of each plug. The gap should be between
0.042” – 0.046”.
Results:
1.If the spark plugs exhibit any possible signs of any of the
symptoms shown in Figure 14, replace the spark plugs
and investigate the possible cause of the problem.
2.Refer back to the troubleshooting flowchart.
Tech tip: For further information about
checking the spark plugs reference Section
1.8.
1.Locate the spark plug wires on top of the valve cover and
mark them so they can be replaced in the proper location.
Assembly:
2.Remove spark plug wires from the valve cover.
2.Torque each spark plug to 18 ft-lb.
1.Reinstall the spark plugs into the cylinder head.
3.Reconnect the spark plug wires to the spark plugs.
Page 108
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Section 3.4
Part 3
NORMAL
Diagnostic tests
Procedure:
MISFIRES
1.Check the ignition coil resistance between Wire 451 and
15D, Wire 452 and 15D, Wire 453 and 15D, and Wire
454 and 15D. The resistance readings across the terminals should be approximately 0.3 Ohms to 0.8 Ohms.
Resistance readings between each terminal and ground
should be infinite.
2.Turn off Fuel supply
3.Set VOM to measure DC voltage.
4.Connect one meter test lead to Wire 15D on the female
side of the coil connector and the other meter test to a
clean frame ground.
5.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL position;
measure the voltage.
PRE-IGNITION
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
DETONATION
6.Repeat steps 4 and 5 for all coils.
Figure 14. Spark Plug Conditions
Results:
Test 64 – Check Ignition Coils
Discussion:
A weak spark can be caused by the ignition coils insulation breaking down and providing an alternate path
to ground. A no spark condition can be caused by an
ignition coil being in an open circuit condition or a direct
short condition, internal winding to winding or to ground.
The Ignition Control Module acts as an electronic
switch to ground in the coil primary circuit. When the
switch is closed, battery voltage positive (+) is (Wire
15D) applied to the coil primary circuit builds a magnetic field around the primary coil. When the switch
opens, the power is interrupted and the primary field
collapses inducing the high voltage into the secondary coil windings and the spark plug fires the cylinder.
2
1
2
15D
451
15D
452
15D
B
453
A
15D
1
B
A
454
2
A
1
B
2
CYL1
A
1
CYL2
B
CYL3
CYL4
1.If any of the coil resistances measured were not within
the range specified, or there was any readings to ground,
replace the suspected ignition coil(s).
2. If 10VDC is measured in step 3 then refer back to flow
chart. If no voltage was measured in step 3 then inspect
for a loose or pinched wire between the coil and the ignition module.
Test 65 – Check Ignition Control
Module
Discussion:
The Ignition Control Module controls all aspects of
the engine ignition based on the inputs it receives
from the Crank Sensor (MPU1) and the Cam Sensor
(MPU2). In the previous tests the inputs to the Ignition
Control Module were checked to verify the integrity of
the ignition coils. Now the Ignition Control Module will
be checked to see what the incoming signals from the
Crank and Cam Sensors are indicating.
Tech Tip: Electronic Ignition engine timing
FIRING ORDER: 1-4-2-3
4
3
2
1
ENGINE BLOCK TOP VIEW
Figure15. Ignition Coils
is entirely controlled by the Ignition Control
Module. Electronic ignition engine timing
is NOT adjustable. Do not attempt to check
base timing. False readings can be received.
The Ignition Control Module has a red diagnostic LED inside which is visible without
removing the ignition cover, but the ignition
module may need to be removed to view
the back of the module. This red LED will
Page 109
Section 3.4
Part 3
Diagnostic tests
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Tech Tip: The highest priority fault will be
indicate if the ignition has been energized.
The LED will flash at a 0.5 second ON and a
0.5 second OFF interval when the ignition is
energized. This is considered (1) blink.
displayed and must be resolved before the
lower priority fault code will be displayed
on the ignition module. After the code has
blinked for 60-120 seconds the ignition module will power itself down and clear the code
that was displayed.
LED
Results:
1.If the red LED blinks normally and then goes out and
stays out during cranking, go to Test 66.
ENGINE
HARNESS
IGNITION
CONTROL
MODULE
C
CO USTO
NN M
E E
INSCTIOR
IDE NS
0F17
33
2.If the ignition module displays a code, solve that problem
first and then verify the ignition module for a lower priority
code to solve. If there is no lower LED code, refer back to
flow chart
3.If the LED is not illuminated, refer back to flow chart.
CONNECTION BOX
Figure 16. Ignition Control Module
Test 66 – Check DC voltage inputs to
Ignition Module
Procedure:
Procedure:
1.Locate the Ignition module on the control panel assembly.
1.Disconnect the Ignition Module connector.
2.Observe the pre-drilled holes where the ignition module
bolts hold the ignition module to the control panel assembly.
2.Set a VOM to measure DC voltage.
Tech Tip: Reference Section 1.7 for proper
Note: The hole is inside the customer connection
box.
3.Turn the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL
position.
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
4.Observe the Red LED code on the ignition module. The
fault LED is only valid during cranking in the first cycle.
Tech Tip: The ignition cover does not need
to be removed to see the RED LED.
RED LED Fault Codes with priority as shown:
1
O v e r s p e e d LED blinks 4 times, is OFF for 3
Shutdown
seconds and then repeats
2
Missing Ignition LED blinks 5 times, is OFF for 3
Control Module seconds and then repeats
Teeth
3
No
I g n i t i o n LED blinks 2 times, is OFF for 3
Control Module seconds and then repeats
Signal
4
No Cam Signal
LED blinks 3 times, is OFF for 3
seconds and then repeat
procedures in testing connector plugs and
incoming wires.
Refer to Figure 6 in Section 3.1.
3.Connect one meter test lead to Pin 16 (Wire 15) and connect the other meter test lead to a clean frame ground.
Battery voltage should be measured.
Step 4 is for Natural Gas units Only, if LP proceed
to Step 5.
4.Connect one meter test lead to Pin 12 (Wire 14) and connect the other meter test lead to a clean frame ground.
5.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL position.
Battery voltage should be measured.
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
6.Connect one meter test lead to Pin 11 (Wire 56) and connect the other meter test lead to a clean frame ground.
Battery voltage should be measured.
Note: The unit must still be cranking to get voltage
at Wire 56.
Results:
1.If the Battery voltage is lower than 10 VDC on any of the
Page 110
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Part 3
Wires 15, 14 (NG Only), and 56 proceed to investigate
the following circuits:
• Wire 15 is fused DC voltage from the 15 amp
fuse.
• Wire 14 is fused DC voltage that is only available when the unit is cranking or running and is
supplied from the RL2 (Run) relay.
• Wire 56 is fused DC voltage that is only available when the unit is cranking and is supplied
from the RL1 (Crank) relay.
2.If battery voltage is measured, refer back to flow chart.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
Figure 17. Ignition Control Module Harness End
Pin-outs
Test 67 – Check Crank sensor
Discussion:
The Crank Sensor (MPU1) is the primary sensor for
ignition information to the Ignition Control Module. The
input is used by the Ignition Control Module to determine engine speed and angular position of the crankshaft. The PCB utilizes this signal for crank detection
and speed reference for governing. The location of the
crank sensor is shown in Figure 18.
Section 3.4
Diagnostic tests
2.Set the VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
Tech Tip: A breakout harness is available to
measure voltage and resistance in-line with
the crank sensor. See Figure 4, Section 4.1.
3.Connect one meter test lead to Wire 79 and the other
meter test lead to Wire 0. on MPU1. Measure resistance.
• If the Crank Sensor resistance is approximately
700 to 1000 Ohms, go to Step 4.
• If the Crank Sensor resistance is not within lim­
its, replace the Crank Sensor and refer to “Crank
Sensor Installation and Adjustments,” located in
Section 4.1.
4.Disconnect Wire 14 from the fuel solenoid to disable
starting.
5.Set a VOM to measure AC voltage.
6.Set the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL Switch to MANUAL.
7.Connect one meter test lead to Wire 79 and the other
meter test lead to Wire 0. Approximately 1.5 VAC should
be measured.
8.Refer to Figure 6 in Section 3.1. With the ignition module
connector connected connect one meter test lead to Pin
10, Wire 79 and connect the other meter test lead to Pin
9, Wire 0.
• Crank Sensor resistance is being measured in
this step and should be the same as measured
in Step 3.
Note: If acceptable Crank Sensor resistance was
measured in Step 3 and Step 8 and good voltage
was measured in Step 7, an issue may still exist
whereby the tip of the Crank Sensor is dirty and
may need to be cleaned. See section 4.1 for cleaning and reinstallation of the Crank Sensor.
Procedure (Ignition Module Fault):
1.Disconnect the Crank Sensor (MPU1) from the engine
harness.
2.Set the VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
Tech Tip: A breakout harness is available to
measure voltage and resistance in-line with
the crank sensor. See Figure 4, Section 4.1.
Figure 18. Crank Sensor (MPU1)
Tech Tip: Reference Section 1.7 for proper
procedures in testing connector plugs and
incoming wires.
Procedure (Flashing Overspeed):
1.Disconnect the Crank Sensor (MPU1) from the engine
harness.
Refer to Figure 17 in Section 3.4, and Figure 6 in
Section 3.1.
3.Connect one meter test lead to Wire 79 and the other
meter test lead to Wire 0. Measure resistance.
• If the Crank Sensor resistance is approximately
700 to 1000 Ohms, go to Step 4.
• If the Crank Sensor resistance is not within lim­
its, replace the Crank Sensor and refer to “Crank
Sensor Installation and Adjustments,” located in
Section 4.1.
Page 111
Section 3.4
Part 3
Diagnostic tests
4.Disconnect Wire 14 from the fuel solenoid to disable starting
5.Set a VOM to measure AC voltage.
6.Set the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL Switch to MANUAL.
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
7.Connect one meter test lead to Wire 79 and the other
meter test lead to Wire 0. Approximately 1.5 VAC should
be measured.
Tech Tip: A breakout harness is available to
measure voltage and resistance in-line with
the crank sensor. See Figure 4, Section 4.1.
8.Connect one meter test lead to Pin 14 (Wire 79) and connect the other meter test lead to Pin 21 (Wire 0).
• Crank Sensor resistance is being measured in
this step and should be the same as measured
in Step 3.
Note: If acceptable Crank Sensor resistance was
measured in Step 3 and Step 8 and good voltage
was measured in Step 7, an issue may still exist
whereby the tip of the Crank Sensor is dirty and
may need to be cleaned. See section 4.1 for cleaning and reinstallation of the Crank Sensor.
Results:
1.If resistance was measured in Step 3 but not in Step 8
then a connection issue exists between the Crank Sensor
and the connector which could be caused by either a bad
pin connection or an open wire.
2.If good resistance was measured in Step 3 and Step 8,
but little or no voltage was measured in Step 7, refer to
section 4.1 for adjustment and reinstallation of the Crank
Sensor.
3.If resistance was measured in Step 3 and Step 8 and
good voltage was measured in Step 7, refer back to the
flow chart.
Test 68 – Check Fuel Supply and Fuel
Pressure to the Unit
Discussion:
The engine-generator set was factory tested and
adjusted using the primary fuel source (natural gas)
as the fuel supply.
• An adequate gas supply and sufficient fuel pressure
must be available or the engine will not start or run
properly.
• Minimum gaseous fuel pressure at the generator
fuel inlet connection is 5 inches water column.
Page 112
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
• Maximum gaseous fuel pressure at the generator
fuel inlet connection is 14 inches water column.
• The gaseous fuel system must be properly tested
for leaks following installation and periodically thereafter. No leakage is permitted. Leakage testing
methods must comply strictly with gas codes.
*
DANGER: gaseous fuels are highly explosive.
Do not use flame or heat to test the fuel system
for leaks. Natural gas is lighter than air and
tends to settle in high places. LP gas is heavier
than air and tends to settle in low areas. Even
the slightest spark can ignite these gases and
cause an explosion.
Procedure:
A water manometer or a gauge that is calibrated in
“ounces per square inch” may be used to measure the
fuel pressure. Fuel pressure at the inlet side (top portwhere the low fuel pressure switch is located) on the
fuel regulator should be between 5 to 14 inches water
column when measured with a manometer.
The fuel pressure can be checked using the recommended fuel pressure tester kit or any fuel pressure
tester that measures inches of water column.
1.Turn off fuel to primary regulator by whatever means are
provided.
2.Connect a manometer to Test Port B (see Figure 22).
3.Turn fuel supply back on.
4.Measure and record the NOT RUNNING pressure.
5.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL position.
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
6.Measure and record the RUNNING pressure.
Note: The difference in pressure between Not
Running and Running should not be greater than
1” of water column and must remain within specifications.
NOTE: Where a primary regulator is used to establish fuel inlet pressure, adjustment of that regulator is usually the responsibility of the fuel supplier
or the fuel supply system installer.
Results:
1.If fuel supply and pressure are adequate, but engine will
not start, refer back to flow chart.
2.If generator starts, but runs rough or lacks power, repeat
the above procedure with the generator running and
UNDER LOAD. The fuel system must be able to maintain
5 to 14 inches water column at all load requirements. If
proper fuel supply and pressure is maintained, refer back
to flow chart.
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Section 3.4
Part 3
Test 69 – Check Wire 14 For Battery
Voltage
Discussion:
Wire 14 is used to apply battery voltage to the fuel
solenoid to move the plunger up to allow fuel to the
mixer assembly.
Diagnostic tests
Procedure:
1.Locate the Engine Run Relay (RL2 BLACK), it is located in
the back of the control panel in the center. See Figure 19.
2.Set the VOM to measure DC voltage
3.Remove the RL2 relay from the socket
Refer to Figure 20.
12
9
11
10
TB1
0
1
4
2
6
11
44
13
14
15A
15
15
1
4.Disconnect Wire 14 from the Fuel Solenoid.
8
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
7
3.Turn the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the Manual position.
6
2.Set a VOM to measure DC voltage
• If little or no battery voltage is present, verify that
Wire 15 is not pinched , cut or any other conditions that would not allow voltage to be present
on Wire 15
• If battery voltage is present , check Wire 15A in
Step 5
5
1.Locate the fuel solenoid on top of the fuel regulator
4
Procedure:
4.Connect one meter test lead to Terminal Connection 87
(Wire 15) and connect the other meter test lead to a clean
frame ground; battery voltage should be present at all
times.
3
procedures in testing connector plugs and
incoming wires.
2
Tech Tip: Reference Section 1.7 for proper
5.Connect one meter test lead to Wire 14 and the other
meter test lead to a clean frame ground. Battery voltage
should be measured.
R80
Tech Tip: Place a screw driver over the solenoid during cranking and see if the screw
driver is magnetically drawn to the solenoid.
If the screw driver is pulled in the fuel solenoid is getting voltage.
Results:
1.If Wire 14 has no battery voltage present during cranking
and running, the run relay could be the problem; refer
back to the flow chart.
2.If voltage is present on Wire 14, refer back to flow chart.
Test 70 – Check Engine Run Relay (RL2)
Discussion:
The (RL2) run relay is used to energize the run circuit
(Wire 14). The control board holds Wire 14A open
until it gets voltage from the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL
switch on Wire 239 in the MANUAL position, or in the
AUTO position if the control board senses a utility loss
and/or receives a 2-Wire start from the transfer switch.
The control board then grounds Wire 14A. The (RL2)
run relay contacts change state to allow voltage from
Wire 15 to Wire 14. This action provides DC voltage to
the run circuit.
R81
R82
RUN RELAY
(RL2)
CRANK RELAY
(RL1)
F1 15A
F2 10A
F3 10A
F4 5A
Note: DC voltage is only available on Wire 14 during cranking and running operations.
REPLACE WITH SAME SIZE AND TYPE
SOME FUSES MAY BE EMPTY
Figure 19. Engine Run Relay Location
RL1
ENGINE START
RL2
ENGINE RUN
14A
14
15A
15
56A
56 15A 15
30
30
85 87A 86
85 87A 86
87
87
BACK OF CONTRL BOX
Figure 20. Engine Run Relay Wiring
5.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the AUTO position.
6.Connect one meter test lead to Wire 15A and connect
the other meter test lead to a clean frame ground; battery
voltage should be measured.
Page 113
Section 3.4
Part 3
Diagnostic tests
• If little or no battery voltage is present, verify that
Wire 15A is not pinched , cut and look for any
other conditions that would not allow voltage to
be present on Wire 15A.
• If battery voltage is present, check Wire 14A in
Step 7
7.Connect one meter test lead to Terminal Connection
85 (Wire 14A) on the RL2 socket and connect the other
meter test lead to Terminal Connection 86 (Wire 15A).
8.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL position.
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
9.Measure and record the voltage.
• Battery voltage should be measured.
• If little or no battery voltage is present in Step 9,
verify that Wire 14A is not pinched, cut or any
other conditions that would not allow voltage to
be present on Wire 14A.
• If Wire 14A has been verified good, replace the
printed circuit board.
10.Re-insert RL2 relay.
11.Locate the main fuel solenoid located on top of the fuel
regulator.
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Test 71 – Check Cam Sensor
Discussion:
The camshaft position sensor (MPU2) identifies when
Piston #1 is at Top Dead Center (TDC) of the compression stroke. The Ignition Control Module uses this information to synchronize the firing of the individual coils.
The location of the Camshaft position sensor (MPU2) is
shown in Figure 21.
Procedure:
1.Locate the Cam Sensor near the timing belt cover (see
Figure 21).
2.Disconnect the Cam Sensor from the engine harness.
3.Set VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
4.Place the Positive test (+) lead to Wire79A and negative
test (-) lead to Wire 0A of MPU2.
Results:
1.If Cam Sensor resistance is approximately 700 to 1000
Ohms , refer to Section 4.1 for proper adjustments.
2.If Cam Sensor resistance is not with-in limits , replace the
Cam Sensor and refer to “Cam Sensor Installation and
Adjustments,” located in Section 4.1.
12.Turn the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL
position
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
13.Connect one meter test lead to Wire 14 at TB1 Terminal
9 and the other meter test lead to a clean frame ground.
• If battery voltage is present during cranking
and voltage was not measured in Test 69 then
inspect for a pinched or cut Wire 14 between
TB1 and the fuel solenoid (FS1).
• If there is little or no battery voltage present,
verify Wire 14 is not pinched, cut and inspect for
any other conditions that could exist between
TB1 and the RL2 relay.
• If Wire 14 has been verified good, replace the
RL2 relay.
Results:
1.Refer back to flow chart.
Note: Resistance between Terminals 87 and 85 of
relay RL2 is 90 Ohms.
Page 114
CAM SENSOR
Figure 21. Cam Sensor
Test 72 – Check Fuel Regulator
Discussion:
If Wire 14 had voltage but fuel is still not getting to the
Bosch governor, the fuel solenoid may not be opening properly or not at all. There are two fuel solenoids
on the unit which provide fuel during two conditions:
cranking and running. The (FS) Fuel solenoid is used
during normal cranking and running operations. The
(FS2) fuel solenoid is only used during cranking operations and is controlled by (+) voltage on Wire 56. This
is the cold start fuel solenoid.
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Section 3.4
Part 3
Diagnostic tests
*
A
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
Results:
B
1.If proper pressure was measured in Step 3 and DC voltage was measured in Step 6 and the screw driver was
pulled in Step 9, then refer back to flow chart.
2.If fuel pressure was not measured then the fuel solenoid
(FS1) is not opening. Replace the solenoid.
C
A
P
3.If the screw driver did not pull in then the cold start solenoid (FS2) is not opening. Replace the solenoid.
Tech Tip: Air leaks maybe present in the
fuel lines causing the engine fuel mixture to
run either too lean or to rich. Spraying carb
cleaner or brake cleaner around the fuel
lines while running will show if an air leak
is present because the engine will suck the
liquid in and speed up for a moment.
Figure 22. Fuel Regulator Test Points
Procedure:
1.Disconnect the hose from Test Port C shown in Figure 22.
2.Connect a manometer to the port from which the hose
was removed.
3.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL position.
A nominal fuel pressure reading of between 5 – 14 inches
of water column should be measured.
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
Test 73 – Check Governor Driver
The governor on product using the R-200B control
board is built into the control board and controls the
engine much in the same manner as an external
governor controller. There is a Governor Driver Board
that takes the Pulse Width Modulated Signal from the
R-200B control board output and then converts that
signal to a variable DC signal to drive the actuator.
Tech Tip: Reference Section 1.7 for proper
procedures in testing connector plugs and
incoming wires.
4.Set a VOM to measure DC voltage.
5.Disconnect Wire 56 from the Cold Start Solenoid (FS2).
Procedure:
6.Connect one meter test lead to disconnected Wire 56
and connect the other meter test lead to a clean frame
ground.
1.Locate the governor driver in the upper right corner of the
control panel (see Figure 5 in Section 3.1).
7.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL position.
Battery voltage should be measured. If battery voltage
is measured, pro­ceed to Step 8. If battery voltage is not
measured, repair or replace Wire 56 between the Cold
Start Solenoid and the Starter Contactor.
3.Set a VOM to measure DC voltage.
*
5.Turn the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL
position. Approximately 10VDC should be measured.
8.Hold the blade of a screw driver over Test point A (see
Figure 22).
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
9.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL posi­tion.
The Solenoid should magnetize and pull the screw driver
securely to the solenoid.
2.Disconnect the driver connector.
Refer to Figure 5 in Section 3.1.
4.Connect one meter test lead to Pin 4 (Wire 14) and the
other meter test lead to Pin 1 on the female side of the
connector.
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
Page 115
Section 3.4
Part 3
Diagnostic tests
5.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL position.
Results:
1.If voltage was not measured in Step 5, replace the printed
circuit board.
2.If voltage was measured, refer back to the flow chart.
Test 74 – Check the Actuator and
Mixer Function
Discussion:
The actuator is controlled by the governor controller
(located on the PCB) and the governor driver module.
The amount of fuel entering the engine is controlled
by the amount of engine vacuum produced across the
mixer during cranking.
Procedure:
1.Verify that there is no binding throughout the full range of
motion of the actuator butterfly using a screw driver. If it
is binding or it stops moving at one point in the range of
motion, replace the actuator.
Note: The actuator will offer stiff resistance to a
change in position. It is only critical that the full
range motion of the butterfly is good.
2.Disconnect the engine wiring harness from the Bosch
gov­ernor actuator. (See Figure 23)
3.Set a VOM to measure DC voltage.
4.Connect one meter test lead to Pin 1 (Wire 771) and con­
nect the other meter test lead to Pin 4 (Wire 770) on the
female side of the 6 pin connector. Refer to Figure 23.
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
Measure and record the voltage. Approximately 10VDC
should be measured. If proper voltage was not measured,
proceed to step 5a
a.Disconnect the female connector from the governor driver module and leave the female connector disconnected from the actuator.
b.Set VOM to measure resistance. (Ω)
c.Connect one meter test lead to Pin 1 (Wire 771)
on the female side of the engine harness at the
actuator and the other meter test lead to Pin 9 of
the engine harness at the governor driver board.
If CONTINUITY is measured then proceed to
step 5d. If CONTINUITY was not measured
then repair or replace Wire 771 between the
actuator and the governor driver board and proceed to step 5d.
d.Connect one meter test lead to Pin 4 (Wire 770)
on the female side of the engine harness at the
actuator and the other meter test lead to Pin 8 of
the engine harness at the governor driver board.
If CONTINUITY is measured, replace the governor driver board. If CONTINUITY was not measured then repair or replace Wire 770 between
the actuator and the governor driver board and
proceed to step 5e.
ACTUATOR SIDE
1
3 2
4
6 5
771
767
765
770
766
1
2
3
4
6
1 2 3
4 5 6
HARNESS SIDE
Figure 23. Bosch Actuator and Mixer Assembly
Page 116
DC control
liquid cooled
engine units
DC control
liquid cooled
engine units
e.When the defective wire(s) has been repaired
verify CONTINUITY for both Wires 770 and 771
and repeat Step 5 to verify that the correct voltage is still not being measured. If approximately
10VDC is still not measured then replace the
governor driver board.
6.Disconnect the harness from the governor driver board
(located in the control panel) and reconnect the harness
to the actuator. Refer to Figure 5 in Section 3.1.
7.Using a small jumper wire, apply a 9 volt alkaline battery
(negative side) to Pin 8 (Wire 770) and (positive side to)
Pin 9 (Wire 771) at the female side of the harness that
was disconnected in Step 6.
a.If the actuator opens all the way, reconnect the
harness and go to Step 8.
b.If the actuator opens a little, replace the Bosch
governor actuator.
c.If the actuator failed to open, proceed to Step 8.
8.Disconnect the J1 connector from the PCB and ensure
the engine harness is connected to the actuator.
9.Set a VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
10.Measure and record the resistance across J1 Pin 12
(Wire 766) and J1 Pin 6 (Wire 765), then measure and
record the resistance across J1 Pin 12 (Wire 766) and
J1 Pin 5 (Wire 767) while the actuator is in the “AT
REST” position. If the proper resistance (see below) is
measured proceed to Step 11. If an open circuit was
measured between Pins 12 and 6, proceed to Step 10a.
If an open circuit was measured between Pins 12 and 5,
proceed to Step 10g.
•
Section 3.4
Part 3
At Rest: Pin 12 and Pin 6 – Approximately
1.4K Ohms.
• At Rest: Pin 12 and Pin 5 – Approximately
700 Ohms.
a.Disconnect the engine harness from the Bosch
actuator and leave the J1 connector disconnected from the PCB.
b.Set a VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
c.Connect one meter test lead to Pin 6 on the
female side of the engine harness at the actuator and connect the other meter test lead to J1
Pin 12 located at the printed circuit board. If
CONTINUITY was measured, proceed to Step
10d. If CONTINUITY was not measured then
repair or replace Wire 766 between the J1 connector and the actuator and proceed to Step
10d.
d.Connect one meter test lead to Pin 3 on the
female side of the engine harness at the actuator and connect the other meter test lead to
J1 Pin 6 located at the printed circuit board. If
CONTINUITY was measured, proceed to Step
Diagnostic tests
10e. If CONTINUITY was not measured then
repair or replace Wire 765 between the J1 connector and the actuator and proceed to Step 10f.
e.If CONTINUITY is present on both Wires 765
and 766, replace the actuator.
f. When the defective wire(s) has been repairedverify CONTINUITY for both Wires 765 and 766
and repeat Step 10 to verify if the circuit is still
open. If a resistance value is present proceed
to Step 11. If an open circuit still exists, replace
the actuator.
g.Disconnect the engine harness from the Bosch
actuator and continue to leave the J1 connector
disconnected from the PCB.
h.Set aVOM to measure resistance (Ω).
i. Connect one meter test lead to Pin 2 on the
female side of the engine harness at the actuator and connect the other meter test lead to
J1 Pin 5 located at the printed circuit board. If
CONTINUITY was measured, replace the actuator. If CONTINUITY was not measured then
repair or replace Wire 767 between the J1 connector and the actuator and proceed to Step 10j.
j. When the defective wire(s) has been repairedverify CONTINUITY for Wire 767 and repeat
Step 10 to verify if the circuit is still open. If a
resistance value is present proceed to Step 11.
If an open circuit still exists, replace the actuator.
10.Disconnect the engine harness from the Governor Driver
located in the control panel.
11.Using a small jumper wire, apply a 9 volt alkaline battery to Pin 9 (negative side, Wire 771) and Pin 8 (positive
side, Wire 770) at the female side of the harness that was
disconnected in Step 11
12.Set a VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
13.Measure and record the resistance across J1 Pin 12
(Wire 766) and J1 Pin 6 (Wire 765), then measure and
record the resistance across J1 Pin 12 (Wire 766) and J1
Pin 5 (Wire 767) while the actuator is in the “FULL OPEN”
position.
•
•
Full Open: Pin 12 and Pin 6 – Approximately
600 Ohms.
Full Open: Pin 12 and Pin 5 – Approximately
1.4K Ohms.
Results:
1.If the resistance values in the “AT REST” and “FULL
OPEN” positions are within range, refer back to the flow
chart.
2.If the resistance values are not within the specified ranges and the wire integrity was verified to be good in Steps
10a through 10j, replace the actuator.
Page 117
Section 3.4
Part 3
Diagnostic tests
Test 75 – Checking Wiring Harness
Discussion:
Starting or running issues are sometimes caused by
something as simple as a bad or intermittent electrical
connection. Electrical connections can be very difficult to properly diagnose, especially when there is an
intermittent connection.
Tech Tip: Reference Section 1.7 for proper
procedures in testing connector plugs and
incoming wires.
Procedure:
Obtain and refer to the proper electrical print (wiring,
schematic or harness) for the unit being serviced.
Measure the resistance between the starting point
and all ends of the individual circuits, and check for
shorts to ground as well. Move the connectors and
wires while measuring the resistance to look for bad
connections. Verify all ground connections. With circuits involving voltage (i.e. Wire 14), measure voltage
on the circuit at all points looking for voltage drops. Be
sure to use the same ground reference point for all
voltage measurements. Again, while taking the readings, move the wires and connectors and note any
changes in the readings observed.
Results:
Resistance readings should be within 0.2 Ohms of the
resistance of the meter leads.
Voltage readings should be within ± 5% of the source
voltage reading. If any readings are outside these tolerances, verify that all connections are clean and tight
and then retest. If the readings continue to remain
outside the tolerances, repair or replace the bad
connection(s) and/or wire(s).
DC control
liquid cooled
engine units
If compression is low in any cylinder, pour a small
amount of clean engine oil into the spark plug
opening. Then, retest compression and evaluate as
follows:
• If compression pressure increases after adding the
oil, check for worn or damaged piston rings.
• If compression pressure did NOT increase after
adding the oil, check for sticking or improperly seated valves.
• If compression in any two adjacent cylinders is low
and adding oil did NOT increase the compression
pressure, check for a leaking head gasket (indicated
by oil in the coolant).
Test 81 – Check N1 and N2 Sensing
Voltage
Discussion:
During installation 240 VAC or 208 VAC must be
provided to the N1 and N2 terminal in the customer
connection area. The generator will step this down to
a voltage approximately 16-19 VAC. This is the reference voltage to determine when a utility failure has
occurred. The voltage will be stepped down from the
incoming 240 VAC or 208 VAC, to 16 VAC using a
transformer (T1). This lower voltage is a safe voltage
for the printed circuit board to use.
Procedure:
1.Set VOM to measure AC voltage.
2.Connect one meter test lead to Terminal N1 at Terminal
Board TBR in the customer connection box and the other
meter test lead to N2 on the same TB.
3.Measure and record the line-to-line voltage.
Results:
Test 76 – Check Engine Compression
and Condition
DISCUSSION:
If the engine cranks but will not start, or if it starts hard
and runs rough, one possible cause of the problem is
a mechanical failure or excessive wear in the engine.
PROCEDURE:
1.Warm up the engine, if it will start and run.
2.Shut engine down and remove all spark plugs.
3.Use an automotive type compression tester to check
engine compression.
4.Compression pressure should be as follows:
Standard
160 psi (12.1 kg/cm2) at 350 rpm
Minimum
120 psi (8.4 kg/cm2) at 350 rpm
Difference between cylinders should not exceed 15
psi (1.1 kg/cm2)
Page 118
1.If approximately 240 VAC or 208 VAC is measured line-toline, refer back to flow chart.
2.If 0 VAC was measured, then the problem is located in
the transfer switch.
Tech Tip: The RTS transfer switch has two
BUS type fuses to protect N1 and N2. Check
these fuses before proceeding.
Test 82 – Test Transformer (TR1)
Procedure:
1.Set a VOM to measure AC voltage.
2.Connect one meter lead to Terminal 1 of TR1 and the
other meter test lead to Terminal 4 of TR1(see Figure 24).
Measure and record the voltage.
3.Connect one meter test lead to Terminal 8 of TR1 and the
other meter test lead to Terminal 5 of TR1. Measure and
record the voltage.
DC control
liquid cooled
engine units
Section 3.4
Part 3
Diagnostic tests
2.Disconnect Utility by whatever means provided.
Results:
1.If 240 or 208 VAC was measured in Step 2, and 16-19
VAC was measured in Step 3, then TR1 is good. Refer
back to flow chart.
2.If 240 or 208 VAC was measured in Step 2, and 0 VAC
was measured in Step 3, replace the TR1 transformer.
3.If 0 VAC was measured in Step 2, repair or replace wiring
between Terminal Board R and the transformer.
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when utility power is disconnected.
3.The green LED will immediately begin to flash, indicating
a utility failure has occurred.
4.After the appropriate timers have expired, the generator
should start and transfer.
Results:
1.Refer back to flow chart.
8
5
Test 91 – Check Position of Dipswitch 3
4
1
Figure 24. Transformer (TR1)
Discussion:
The generator will operate at 1800 RPM or 3600 RPM
while in a utility failure or in a MANUAL run mode. The
RPM can be lowered during exercise to reduce wear
and tear on the generator and to reduce the noise
that is produced. This is done by programming a DIP
switch to either enable or disable this “Low Speed
Exercise” function.
Procedure:
Test 83 – Check Voltage at Printed
Circuit Board
Tech Tip: Reference Section 1.7 for proper
procedures in testing connector plugs and
incoming wires.
1.Locate the 8 dip switches on the printed circuit board (see
Figure 2, Section 3.1).
2.Dip Switch 3 should be set as follows:
ON
Normal Exercise Mode
OFF
Low Speed Exercise Mode
Procedure:
Results:
1.Disconnect the 14 pin J2 connector going into the circuit
board.
1.If a change is made, remove F1 (15 Amp Fuse) for 10
seconds and then re-insert.
2.Connect one meter test lead to Pin 8 (Wire 224) of J2
and the other meter test lead to Pin 12 (Wire 225) of J2.
Measure and record the voltage.
2.If unit will not low speed exercise, verify green LED status
light is solid.
3.Refer back to flow chart.
Results:
1.If 16-19 VAC was measured, replace printed circuit board.
2.If 0 VAC is measured, repair or replace wiring between
the J2 connector and the TR1 transformer.
Test 87 – Test Automatic Sequence
Discussion:
Refer to Section 1.6 for proper automatic sequences
of generator.
Test 95 – Check Coolant Temperature
at Thermal Adapter
Procedure:
1.Aim a laser pointed heat gun toward the lower coolant
return hose.
2.Record the reading.
Results:
1.Refer back to flow chart.
Procedure:
1.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the AUTO position.
Page 119
Section 3.4
Part 3
Diagnostic tests
DC control
liquid cooled
engine units
Procedure:
1.Locate the upper and lower radiator hoses
UPPER RADIATOR HOSE
(TO THERMOSTAT HOUSING)
Tech tip: For further information about checking coolant hoses reference Section 1.8.
LOW COOLANT
LEVEL SENSOR
RADIATOR CAP
Results:
LOWER RADIATOR HOSE
(TO WATER PUMP)
CHECK
TEMPERATURE
HERE
Figure 25. Coolant System Identification
Test 96 – Check coolant LEVEL
Discussion:
The coolant is used to cool the engine by dissipating
heat away from the engine. The coolant is then cooled
by passing it though the radiator. If the coolant is not
filled to the proper level for cooling, the engine may
become damaged from excess heat build up over a
period of time.
1.If no problem is found with either the upper or lower
hoses on the generator and the problem continues,
replace the thermostat. Reference 2.4L Mitsubishi Engine
Service Manual for thermostat disassembly and assembly
instructions.
2.If the hose displays blockage, remove the blockage from
the area that is being affected.
Test 98 – Check Low Coolant Level
Sensor
Discussion:
The printed circuit board checks for low coolant after
the 10 second hold off timer expires. This is a latched
fault and will shutdown the engine. The R-200B
Controller applies 5 VDC to the positive terminal of
the probe. Point “A” is the tip of the of the probe and
Point “B” is frame ground (see Figure 26). Coolant
surrounding the probe allows for continuity between
Points “A” and “B”.
Procedure:
1.Remove the black rain cap on top of the generator housing.
*
CAUTION: Coolant is under pressure and at
high temperature. Exercise extreme caution
when removing cap! Do NOT remove radiator
cap from a hot engine.
B
WIRE 573 (+)
WIRE 0 (-)
A
2.Remove the radiator cap from the top of the radiator.
3.Make sure the coolant level is visible at the bottom of the
filler neck.
Result:
1.If coolant level is low, fill the radiator with coolant prescribed
by owners manual. Check for leaks. Check oil for a milky
color (this may be a sign of a leak internal to the engine).
2.If coolant level is normal, refer back to flow chart.
Test 97 – Check Coolant Hoses
Discussion:
If maintenance is not performed regularly, the radiator hoses can become cracked or dry rotted, and may
even break down due to weather exposure. The hose
clamps can also become loose, causing coolant leaks.
With proper maintenance this is avoidable. Check the
radiator hoses when troubleshooting coolant issues.
Page 120
Figure 26. Low Coolant Level Sensor
A 5K Ohm resister in parallel with the two terminals
causes the 5 VDC signal to be lowered to 1 VDC (or
ground). When coolant level drops, the signal changes
from a 1 VDC signal to a 5 VDC signal. The board will
recognize this as a low coolant level condition and
shutdown the generator.
Procedure:
1.Disconnect the low coolant sensor plug.
2.Insert a jumper wire between Pins 1 and 2, Wires 573
and 0, of the female side of the connector.
3.Set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL position.
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
DC control
liquid cooled
engine units
Section 3.4
Part 3
4.Observe if the fault occurred again.
*
Warning: This procedure is for testing purposes only. DO NOT leave the sensor bypassed.
Diagnostic tests
crankcase capacity and fill oil to proper level.
2.If oil level is too high, remove the excess oil from the
engine.
3.If oil level is correct, refer back to flow chart.
A
A
Test 105 – Check Engine Oil Pressure
B
A
B
573
0
B
Figure 27. Low Coolant Level Sensor Harness
Connector
Results:
1.If the unit stayed running, replace the low coolant level
switch.
2.Dirty coolant may also affect the continuity of the probe.
3.If the unit shuts down and the control panel displays a low
coolant fault, refer back to flow chart.
Test 99 – Check Wire 573 to Printed
Circuit Board
Tech Tip: Reference Section 1.7 for proper
procedures in testing connector plugs and
incoming wires.
Procedure:
1.Disconnect the J1 connector going into the printed circuit
board.
2.Set a VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
3.Connect one meter test lead to Pin 8 of J1 and connect
the other meter test lead to the positive side of the female
low coolant level sensor plug (+). CONTINUITY should be
measured.
Results:
1.If CONTINUITY is measured, replace the printed circuit
board.
2.If INFINITY is measured, repair or replace the wire
between the J1 connector and the printed circuit board.
Discussion:
If the engine can’t maintain a certain oil pressure
range, engine damage may result due to improper
lubrication. If the engine has too much oil pressure
the engine may suffer severe internal and/or external
damage during running operations.
Procedure:
1.Remove the oil pressure switch from the engine block.
Note: Refer to Figure 14 in Section 3.1 “Engine
Protective Devices” for location of sensor.
2.Insert oil pressure gauge.
3.Turn the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL
position.
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
4.Record the results.
Results:
1.If the unit doesn’t have oil pressure after 10 seconds, shut
the unit down and reference the 2.4L Mitsubishi Engine
Service Manual.
2.If the oil pressure is within operating range between
58-90psi, refer back to flow chart.
Test 106 – Check Wire 86 for continuity
Discussion:
The control board uses Wire 86 to monitor the low oil
pressure switch for a possible problem with the engine
internal oil pressure. If Wire 86 is shorted or pinched the
unit will shutdown after 10 seconds of running.
Procedure:
1.Turn the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the OFF position.
Test 104 – Check oil level
Procedure:
2.Locate the low oil pressure switch and the J1 Connector
on the PCB, located inside of the control panel.
Results:
3.Disconnect Wire 86 from the low oil pressure switch.
Disconnect the J1 Connector from the control board in
the control panel.
1.If oil level is low, reference the front of this manual for
4.Set VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
1.Remove the oil dipstick and observe the oil level.
Page 121
Section 3.4
Part 3
Diagnostic tests
5.Place the positive lead to Wire 86 and the negative lead to
J1 Connector Pin 20. Continuity should be measured.
Results:
1.If there is no continuity, verify Wire 86 is not pinched and/
or shorted to ground.
2.If Wire 86 shows continuity, refer back to flow chart.
Test 107 – Check Wire 86 for a Short
to Ground
Procedure:
1.Disconnect the J1 Connector from the printed circuit
board.
2.Isolate Wire 86 from the low oil pressure switch.
3.Set a VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
4.Connect one meter test lead to disconnected Wire 86 and
the other meter test lead to a clean frame ground.
Results:
1.If resistance is measured to ground, the wire is shorted to
ground. Repair or replace Wire 86.
2.If Wire 86 is not shorted, refer back to flow chart.
Test 108 – Check Low oil Pressure
Switch
Procedure:
1.Locate the low oil pressure sender (see Figure 14,
Section 3.1).
DC control
liquid cooled
engine units
2.If the switch stayed at 0 VDC, replace the switch.
3.If the switch climbed to 5 VDC, replace the printed circuit
board.
Test 110 – Check Battery Conditions
Discussion:
Typical float voltage is about 13.4 VDC when the
generator is sitting idle, with a properly functioning
battery charger. The Low Battery alarm will operate
for two reasons: if the voltage sensed at main PCB
is below about 12.2 VDC for one minute or if battery
voltage sensed at main PCB drops below 6 VDC during a crank cycle. If either of these things occurs it is
a good indication of a bad battery. If the low battery
alarm is on and it is not a latched alarm, the unit will
still attempt to crank and run when needed. All tests
are to be preformed with utility present and the unit in
AUTO, not running unless otherwise specified.
Tech Tip: The 120 VAC input is a separate terminal strip in the customer connection box
that must be connected during installation
in order for the battery charger to function
properly.
Tech Tip: Reference Section 1.7 for proper
procedures in testing connector plugs and
incoming wires.
Test 111 – Check Battery Voltage at PCB
Procedure:
1.Open the control panel to gain access to the J2
Connector on the main PCB.
2.Set a VOM to measure DC voltage.
2.Set a VOM to measure DC volts.
3.Connect one meter test lead to Wire 86 and the other
meter test lead to a clean frame ground. 0 VDC should be
measured.
3.Connect the positive test lead to J2 Pin 5 (Wire 15E) and
the negative test lead to a clean frame ground. Measure
and record voltage.
4.Set the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL
position.
Results:
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
5.The VOM should read 0 VDC while cranking and should
read 5 VDC once the unit is at its rated speed and oil
pressure is above 10psi.
Results:
1.The voltage that should be measured should start at 0 VDC,
indicating the switch is closed. The voltage should slowly
climb to 5 VDC, indicating proper function of the switch.
Page 122
1.Measured voltage should be above 12.8 VDC. Refer back
to flow chart.
Test 112 – Check Low Battery Sensing
at PCB
Procedure:
1.Be sure battery voltage is being maintained at a steady
voltage.
2.Switch AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to OFF, then back to
AUTO.
DC control
liquid cooled
engine units
Section 3.4
Part 3
Diagnostic tests
3.Wait one (1) minute and observe.
Test 114 – Check 120VAC Input to
Customer Connection
Results:
1.If low battery LED returns, replace PCB.
Procedure:
2.If low battery LED does not return, most likely this as a
“Latched Alarm.” The low battery alarm is latched if the battery voltage drops below 6 volts during engine cranking.
3.The battery can be load tested using a hand held device
or taken to a facility with the capability of testing the state
of a battery.
4.Refer back to flow chart.
Test 113 – Check Battery Charger
120VAC Input
1.Connect one meter test lead to Terminal L1 on TB-BC
located in the customer connection area and connect the
other meter test lead to Terminal N on TB-BC. Measure
and record the voltage.
Results:
1.120VAC should be measured. Refer back to flow chart.
Test 115 – Check Battery Charger
Output
Procedure:
Procedure:
1.Disconnect the negative battery lead from the battery.
1.Disconnect battery charger connector plug.
2.Set a VOM to measure DC voltage.
2.Set a VOM to measure AC voltage.
3.Connect one meter test lead to Pin 1 on the female side
of the battery charger connector harness and connect the
other meter test lead to Pin 2 on the female side of the
battery charger connector. Measure and record the voltage
(see Figure 28).
3.Connect one meter test lead to the positive terminal of
the battery and connect the other meter test lead to the
disconnected negative battery lead. Measure and record
the voltage.
Results:
1.13.4 VDC should be measured. Refer back to flow chart.
Results:
1.120 VAC should be measured, refer back to flow chart.
Test 116 – Test Low Fuel Pressure
Switch
BC
1 2
3 4
PIN LIST
PIN
WIRE
TO
1
2
3
4
L1
N
13
0
TBBC-1X
TBBC-2X
TB1-8X
TB1-1X
Discussion:
The Low Fuel Pressure Switch is a normally open
switch that will close when pressure is above 5 inches
of water column. Wires 601 and 0 are connected
to the switch. The PCB will monitor Wire 601 for a
ground indicating unit has 5 inches of water column
or greater. When the switch is open 5 VDC will be
present on Wire 601 indicating a low fuel pressure
condition has occurred. This fault will not shutdown
the engine. It will only illuminate an LED on the PCB
indicating that there is an issue with fuel.
Procedure:
1.Remove Wires 601 and 0 from the switch.
2.Turn OFF the fuel supply to the generator.
3.Set a VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
Figure 28. Battery Charger Connector Pin Numbers
4.Connect one meter test lead to one terminal of the switch
and the other meter test lead to the other terminal on the
switch where Wires 601 and 0 were removed. INFINITY
should be measured.
5.Turn ON the fuel supply to the generator.
Page 123
Section 3.4
Part 3
Diagnostic tests
6.Repeat Step 4, however this time CONTINUITY should
be measured.
7.Set the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL SWITCH to the AUTO position.
8.Set a VOM to measure DC voltage.
Note: Wires 601 and 0 should still be removed.
9.Connect one meter test lead to Wire 601 and connect the
other meter test to a clean frame ground. 5 VDC should
be measured.
10.Set aVOM to measure resistance (Ω).
11.Connect one meter test lead to Wire 0 and the other
meter test lead to a clean frame ground. CONTINUITY
should be measured.
12.If 5 VDC was measured in Step 9 proceed to the results.
If 5 VDC was not measured, proceed to Step 13.
13.Disconnect the J1 connector from the PCB.
14.Set aVOM to measure resistance (Ω).
Tech Tip: Reference Section 1.7 for proper
procedures in testing connector plugs and
incoming wires.
15.C onnect one meter test lead to Wire 601 that was
removed from the switch and connect the other meter test
lead to Pin 11 J2. CONTINUITY should be measured.
DC control
liquid cooled
engine units
on connectors or possibly a switch that has gone out of
calibration in which the switch would need to be replaced.
2.If either Steps 4 or 5 failed, replace the switch.
3.If Steps 4 and 5 tested good, but no voltage was measured in Step 12 and Step 15 was good, replace printed
circuit board.
4.If Steps 4 and 5 tested good, but no voltage was measured in Step 12, and Step 15 tested bad, repair or
replace Wire 601 between the printed circuit board and
the Low Fuel Pressure switch.
Test 122 – Check Wires 79 and 0
Discussion:
The Magnetic Pickup receives a signal from the flywheel and sends it back to the printed circuit board
via Wires 79 and 0. If an open condition exists on
either of these wires the printed circuit board will shut
down the unit due to lack of sensing. The magnetic
pickup has an resistance of approximately 700 to
1000 Ohms (Ω). This resistance can be measured
at the solder point connections on the printed circuit
board.
Procedure:
1.Removed the printed circuit board from its mounted location on the control panel door.
Refer to Figure 29.
Results:
1.If Steps 4, 5, 9, and 11 tested good, check for bad crimps
2.Trace Wires 79 and 0 through the J1 Connector Plug Pins
9 and 10 to the solder points on the PCB.
23
8
15
22
7
14
13
12
13
5
12
4
11
3
10
2
9
1
8
19
4
11
18
3
10
17
2
9
16
23
8
15
14
14
6
13
5
12
4
11
3
10
2
9
1
8
21
6
13
20
5
12
19
4
11
18
3
10
17
2
9
1
7
22
7
16
Figure 29. Printed Circuit Board Solder Points
Page 124
6
20
5
1
14
21
6
J1
7
J2
DC control
liquid cooled
engine units
Section 3.4
Part 3
Diagnostic tests
3.Set a VOM to measure resistance (Ω).
Procedure:
4.Connect one meter test lead to one solder pin and connect the other meter test lead to the other solder pin.
1.Pull the circuit breaker to the Open position or remove the
fuse.
Results:
2.Isolate Wire 15 from Terminal Block 1 Terminal 11 (to the
fuse block). It is the 14AWG gage wire (see Figure 1,
Section 3.1).
1.Approximately 1000 Ohms (Ω) should be measured. If
700 to 1000 Ohms (Ω) was measured at the sensor
but not at the solder point connections on the PCB, refer
to Section 1.7 for inspecting harness connections and
incoming wires.
2.If correct resistance is measured, refer back to flow chart.
Test 123 – Check Battery Voltage Circuit
Discussion:
When the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is in the OFF
position Wires 15 and 15E have battery voltage present at all times. Voltage (+) from Wire 15 is delivered
to the:
• Exercise switch
• Run Relay (Normally Open Contact)
• Start Relay (Normally Open Contact)
• Ignition Module
• Air/Fuel Solenoid (Emission Units Only)
• AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch
Voltage (+) from Wire 15E is delivered to the Printed
Circuit Board.
The individual circuits may be isolated and tested
using a 15 amp re-setable circuit breaker (i.e. P/N
0E5840) with AWG 14 gage wires attached to the terminal posts (see Figure 30) using female spade connectors. Install male spade connectors on the loose
ends of these wires. Remove the fuse from the fuse
holder (F1) and insert the male spade connectors in
place of the fuse. The circuit breaker will now act as
the fuse during the remainder of this procedure.
Note: Without using a re-setable circuit breaker,
it is possible that up to 9 fuses could be used in
this test.
While isolating the circuits, pay special attention to
when the breaker trips and does not trip. When the
breaker does not trip it will be a clear indication that
the short is located on the wire that was just isolated.
15 AMP BREAKER
14 AWG WIRE
FEMALE SPADE
TERMINAL
3.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, the short
is either located in the Fuse Block or Wire 15
between the Fuse Block and TB1 Terminal 11.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, continue testing.
4.Pull the circuit breaker to the Open position or remove the
fuse.
5.Isolate Wire 15 from Terminal Block 1 Terminal 11 (to the
AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch).
6.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, proceed
to Step 15.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, proceed to Step 7.
7.Pull the circuit breaker to the Open position or remove the
fuse.
8.Reconnect Wire 15 to Terminal 11 of TB1.
9.Isolate Wire 15 from the Exercise (SW2) switch.
10.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, the short is
located between the SW2 switch TB1 Terminal 11.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, proceed to Step 11.
11.Pull the circuit breaker to the Open position or remove
the fuse.
12.Reconnect Wire 15 to the SW2 switch.
13.Isolate the 14 pin J2 connector from the printed circuit
board.
14.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse.
MALE SPADE
TERMINAL
Figure 30. Assembly of 15 Amp Circuit Breaker with
14 AWG Wire and Spade Connectors
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, the short
is located between the SW2 switch and the J2
connector.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, replace the printed circuit board.
15.Isolate Wire 15 from Terminal 11 of TB1 (to the crank
and run relays).
Page 125
Section 3.4
Part 3
Diagnostic tests
16.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, proceed
to Step 17.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, the short is located in the relay circuits.
Check each individual wire for a short and
inspect relays and the relay connection blocks
for any indication of a short.
17.Pull the circuit breaker to the Open position or remove
the fuse.
18.Reconnect wires to Terminal 11 of TB1.
19.Isolate Wire 15 from Terminal 12 of TB1 that goes to the
Ignition Module.
20.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, proceed
to Step 25
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, proceed to Step 21.
21.Pull the circuit breaker to the Open position or remove
the fuse.
22.Reconnect Wire 15 to Terminal 12 of TB1.
23.Isolate the connector plug from the Ignition Module.
24.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, the short
is located between Terminal 12 of TB1 and the
Ignition Module connector plug.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, replace the Ignition Module.
25.Pull the circuit breaker to the Open position or remove
the fuse.
26.(Emissions Units Only) Isolate Wire 15 from Terminal 12
(to the Air/Fuel Solenoid).
27.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, proceed to Step 28.
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, replace the Air/Fuel Solenoid.
Test 124 – Check Cranking and
Running Circuits
When the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is in the
MANUAL position Wires 15A, 14, and 56 have battery voltage present during cranking. Voltage (+) from
Wire 15A is delivered from the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL
switch to the:
• Printed Circuit Board
• Run Relay
• Start Relay
Voltage (+) from Wire 14 is delivered from the Run
Relay to the:
• Fuel Solenoid
• Ignition Module (for NG only)
• Hour Meter
• Oxygen Sensor
• Governor Driver Board
• Voltage Regulator
Voltage (+) from Wire 56 is delivered from the start
relay to the:
• Cold Start Solenoid
• Starter Contactor Relay
• Ignition Module
The individual circuits may be isolated and tested
using a 15 amp re-setable circuit breaker (i.e. P/N
0E5840) with AWG 14 gage wires attached to the terminal posts (see Figure 30) using female spade connectors. Install male spade connectors on the loose
ends of these wires. Remove the fuse from the fuse
holder (F1) and insert the male spade connectors in
place of the fuse. The circuit breaker will now act as
the fuse during the remainder of this procedure.
Note: Without using a re-setable circuit breaker,
it is possible that up to 17 fuses could be used in
this test.
While isolating the circuits, pay special attention to
when the breaker trips and does not trip. When the
breaker does not trip it will be a clear indication that
the short is located on the wire that was just isolated.
Note: Wire 56 does not run through the terminal
board.
28.Pull the circuit breaker to the Open position or remove
the fuse.
Procedure:
29.Reconnect Wire 15 to Terminal 12 of TB1.
2.Isolate the 14 pin J2 Connector from the printed circuit
board (see Figure 2, Section 3.1).
30.Isolate Wire 15 from the Air/Fuel Solenoid.
31.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, the short
is located between Terminal 12 of TB1 and the
Air/Fuel Solenoid.
Page 126
1.Pull Circuit Breaker to Open position or remove fuse.
3.Isolate Wires 15A from Terminal 10 of Terminal Board 1
that go to the printed circuit board and the AUTO-OFFMANUAL switch.
4.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install the
fuse and set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL
position (see Figure 1, Section 3.1).
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
Part 3
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, the short
is located in the wiring between the AUTO-OFFMANUAL switch and Terminal 11 of TB1.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, proceed to Step 5.
5.Pull the circuit breaker to the Open position or remove the
fuse.
6.Reconnect Wires 15A to Terminal 11 of TB1. Keep J2
connector isolated.
7.Isolate Wires 15A from Terminal 11 that go to the start
and run relays.
8.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install the
fuse and set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL
position.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, the short
is located in the wiring between the J2 connector and Terminal 11 of TB1.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, proceed to Step 9.
Section 3.4
Diagnostic tests
17.Remove Start Relay (RL1) and isolate the connector
plug going into the Ignition Module.
18.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse and set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the
MANUAL position.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, the
short is located in the harness and each individual wire will need to be checked for a short to
ground.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, proceed to Step 19.
19.Pull the circuit breaker to the Open position or remove
the fuse.
20.Reconnect the Start Relay (RL1).
21.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse and set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the
MANUAL position.
9.Pull the circuit breaker to the Open position or remove the
fuse.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, replace
the Start Relay (RL1).
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, proceed to Step 22.
10.Reconnect J2 connector to printed circuit board, leaving
the run and start Wires 15A isolated.
22.Pull the circuit breaker to the Open position or remove
the fuse.
11.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse and set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the
MANUAL position.
23.Reconnect Wire 56 to the Starter Contactor Relay.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, replace
the printed circuit board.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, proceed to Step 12.
12.Pull the circuit breaker to the Open position or remove
the fuse.
13.Reconnect J2 connector to printed circuit board and
Wires 15A that go to the run and start relays.
14.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse and set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the
MANUAL position.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, the short
is located in the relay circuits. Check each individual wire for a short and inspect relays and the
relay connection blocks for any indication of a
short. The relay coils should measure approximately 90 (Ω) Ohms.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, proceed to Step 15.
24.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse and set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the
MANUAL position.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, replace
the Starter Contactor Relay. A reading of
approximately 4.4 (Ω) Ohms should be measured across the coil.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, proceed to Step 25.
25.Pull the circuit breaker to the Open position or remove
the fuse.
26.Reconnect Wire 56 to the Cold Start Solenoid.
27.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse and set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the
MANUAL position.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, replace
the Cold Start Relay. A reading of approximately 6.5 (Ω) Ohms should be measured
across the coil.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, proceed to Step 28.
15.Pull the circuit breaker to the Open position or remove
the fuse.
28.Pull the circuit breaker to the Open position or remove
the fuse.
16.Isolate Wire 56 from the Cold Start Solenoid (FS2) and
the Starter Contactor Relay.
29.Reconnect the connector plug to the ignition module.
Page 127
Section 3.4
Diagnostic tests
Part 3
DC control
liquid-cooled
engine units
30.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse and set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the
MANUAL position.
39.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse and set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the
MANUAL position.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, replace
the Ignition Module.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, proceed to Step 31.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, replace
the Automatic Voltage Regulator.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, proceed to Step 40 for natural gas units
and Step 42 for LP Vapor.
31.Pull the circuit breaker to the Open position or remove
the fuse.
32.Isolate the following components from Wire 14: Engine
Run Relay (RL2), Fuel Solenoid (FS1), Ignition Module
(NG units only), Oxygen Sensor (Emission units only),
Hour Meter, Automatic Voltage Regulator, and Governor
Driver Board (DEG).
33.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse and set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the
MANUAL position.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, the short
is located in somewhere in the Wire 14 circuit
and not in any component. The wires can be
isolated at TB1 to determine which wire it is that
is shorted to ground.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, proceed to Step 34.
34.Reconnect the Run Relay (RL2).
35.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse and set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the
MANUAL position.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, replace
the Run Relay (RL2). A reading of approximately 120 (Ω) Ohms should be measured
across the coil.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, proceed to Step 36.
40.Reconnect the Ignition Module.
41.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse and set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the
MANUAL position.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, replace
the Ignition Module.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, proceed to Step 42 for emissions enabled
units and Step 44 for standard units.
42.Reconnect the Oxygen Sensor.
43.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse and set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the
MANUAL position.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, replace
the Oxygen Sensor.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, proceed to Step 44
44.Reconnect the Governor Driver Board.
45.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse and set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the
MANUAL position.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, replace
the Governor Driver Board.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, proceed to Step 46
36.Reconnect the Fuel Solenoid (FS1).
46.Reconnect the Hour Meter.
37.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse and set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the
MANUAL position.
47.Push circuit breaker to the Closed position or re-install
the fuse and set AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the
MANUAL position.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, replace
the Fuel Solenoid (FS1). A reading of approximately 15.3 (Ω) Ohms should be measured
across the coil.
• If the breaker did not trip or the fuse did not
blow, proceed to Step 38.
• If the breaker tripped or the fuse blew, replace
the Hour Meter.
38.Reconnect the Voltage Regulator.
Page 128
Tech Tip: Connect a 12VDC battery to the
new hour meter and let run till the desired
time is reached.
Table of contents
Part 4
GENERATOR
adjustments
and
Accessories
Part
Title
Page
4.1
Adjustments
130
4.2
Accessories
135
4.3
Torque Specifications
138
2.4 Liter standby
Generators
Section 4.1 – Adjustments................................... 130
Voltage Regulator
Adjustment and Installation.............................130
Crank Sensor Installation and Adjustments....131
Cam Sensor Installation and Adjustments......132
Section 4.2 – Accessories.................................... 135
Cold Weather Start Install Instructions............135
Block Heater Install Instructions......................135
Section 4.3 – Torque Specifications..................... 138
Engine Torque Specifications..........................138
Alternator Torque Specifications......................139
Page 129
Section 4.1
Part 4
Adjustments
Voltage Regulator ADJUSTMENT and
INSTALLATION
Two dip switches are provided on the Voltage
Regulator.
• Dip Switch 1 should be set to the STD position
(Down position).
• Dip Switch 2 should be set to the HIGH position
(Up position).
Generator Adjustments
and Accessories
When the frequency rises the voltage will rise. The
point at which the regulator becomes V/F is adjustable (for example, Figure 2 shows a 58Hz V/F set
point). Turning the U/F adjust pot fully counter-clockwise (CCW) makes the voltage regulator totally volts
per frequency regulated. Turning the U/F adjust pot
fully clockwise (CW) makes the voltage regulator a
constant voltage device.
• Gain Adjust (G) determines how sensitive the voltage regulator is and how fast the voltage regulator
will respond to a change in the alternator voltage. If
the gain is too low, the alternator voltage may recover too slowly or be too low. If the gain is too high, the
alternator voltage may recover too fast or become
unstable.
Procedure:
GREEN LED
EXCITATION
DIP 1 = STD
DIP 2 = HIGH
PM
HIGH
STD
LOW
DIP 1
RED LED
VOLTAGE
REGULATOR
(ON)
DIP 2
1
V
+
VOLTAGE POT
YELLOW LED
SENSING
PM
HIGH
STD LOW
U/F
+
2
+
G
1.Connect an accurate AC Voltmeter and AC Frequency
meter to the Generator’s AC output leads.
2.On the Voltage regulator, set the potentiometers as
follows;
a.Set the “Voltage Adjust” pot (V) to its centered
(midpoint) position.
b.Set the “Under Frequency Adjust” pot (U/F) to its
centered (midpoint) position.
c.Set the “Gain Adjust” pot (G) to its centered
(midpoint) position.
3.Turn OFF all electrical loads. Startup and initial adjustment will be done under a “No-Load” condition.
GAIN POT
UNDER FREQUENCY POT
4.Start the Generator and let the engine stabilize and warmup at no-load
Figure 1. Voltage Regulator
Three adjustment potentiometers are provided on the
Voltage Regulator.
• Voltage Adjust (V) adjusts the line-to-line AC output
voltage of the Generator’s alternator.
• Under Frequency Adjust (U/F) – The Voltage
Regulator has adjustable volts per frequency characteristic, which means that the alternator output
voltage can be made to vary directly with frequency.
If the frequency drops the voltage can be made
to drop so that the load on the engine is reduced.
5.With the Generator running at 60Hz at no-load, observe
that all three regulator lamps (LEDs) are ON. These LEDs
are the; GREEN “Excitation” LED, YELLOW “Sensing”
LED and RED “Regulator” LED
6.If the Red lamp (LED) is flashing turn the Gain pot (G)
slowly counter-clockwise (CCW), until the flashing stops.
7.Adjust the Voltage Adjust pot (V) to obtain the Generator’s
rated line-to-line output voltage.
U/F Counter-Clockwise Adjustment
U/F Clockwise Adjustment
Voltage remains constant
regardless of frequency
Voltage drops
as freq drops
Voltage
This point is adjustable from 50 to 70 hertz.
Where ever the point is set, the regulator then
becomes a stright line regulator, not a V/F at
any freq above the set point.
Frequency
58 Hz
Figure 2. 58Hz V/F set point
Page 130
Generator Adjustments
and Accessories
Section 4.1
Part 4
8.Slowly turn the Under Frequency pot (U/F) CCW until the
alternator output voltage starts to drop and then slowly
turn the pot back to the point where the voltage was just
before it started to drop.
9.Apply an electrical load and check that the Generator AC
output voltage recovers at this load.
10.With electrical load still applied readjust the Gain pot, if
needed, until the RED lamp (LED) stops flashing.
11.Turn off all electrical loads and then recheck the regulator lamps (LEDs) at No-Load.
12.When all adjustments have been completed, let the
engine run at no-load for a few minutes to stabilize the
internal engine-generator temperatures and then shut the
Generator down.
Adjustments
5.Lightly screw the magnetic pick-up down until it contacts
the top of the flywheel tooth (Figure 3).
*
WARNING: DO NOT use the alternator fan/
blower blades to rotate the flywheel! This
could cause blade failure and total destruction
of the alternator. DO NOT use a pipe wrench
on the fan drive.
6.Back out the magnetic pick-up one 1/2 to 3/4 of a turn.
7.Connect the breakout harness to the magnetic pick-up inline with the engine control harness (Figure 4).
Technician Note: The steps below in this procedure must be done with breakout harness and
with a Fluke 87 / equivalent multi-meter.
Crank Sensor Installation and
Adjustments
This instruction explains the procedure for setting the
magnetic pick-up voltage output to its optimum value
for each respective speed. The technician will need
the Magnetic Pickup Test Kit Harness to perform this
adjustment (see Figure 4). The adjustment is performed with the engine running at rated speed.
Figure 4. Breakout Harness
HOUSING
8.Reconnect the negative (-) battery cable to the battery.
9.Turn the fuel supply back on to the unit.
CRANK SENSOR
GAP 1/2 - 3/4
OF A TURN
FLYWHEEL RING GEAR
Figure 3. Crank Sensor (MPU1)
PROCEDURE:
1.Set the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the OFF position.
2.Disconnect the negative (-) battery cable from the battery.
3.Turn the fuel supply off to the unit
4.With the magnetic pick-up removed, use a flashlight and
verify that a flywheel tooth is directly below and centered in the magnetic pick-up hole. Use an appropriate
tool on the crankshaft damper mounting bolt to rotate
the crankshaft and flywheel in the direction of normal
rotation. If access to crankshaft damper mounting bolt
is not possible, then reconnect the battery and turn the
engine over by toggling the manual switch to align the
tooth underneath the hole.
10.Set the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the MANUAL
position to verify the unit starts.
*
Caution! The engine will crank and possibly
start when the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch is
set to “MANUAL”.
• If the unit starts, proceed to Step 11.
• If the unit does not start and if any alarms are
displayed on the control board as; (Flashing overspeed), Verify steps one (1) though six (6) were performed correctly. Verify that the magnetic pick-up is
producing AC voltage using the breakout harness
while the engine is cranking. Turn the Fuel supply
off until magnetic pick-up voltage is obtained.
Magnetic pick-up note: The magnetic pick-up may
need to be turned in or out a very small amount to
get the magnetic pick-up to produce AC voltage.
11.Set the multimeter to read AC Voltage and insert leads into
Wires 79 positive and 0 ground on the breakout harness.
*
CAUTION: If the magnetic pick-up is screwed
in too far, the magnetic pick-up will be damaged by the rotating flywheel.
Page 131
Section 4.1
Generator Adjustments
and Accessories
Part 4
Adjustments
12.With the unit running at (Rated Speed: 3600RPM or
1800RPM), slowly adjust the magnetic pick-up to provide
the specific voltage for the applicable control board. Verify
the part number before adjusting the magnetic pick-up to
the appropriate voltage.
1800 RPM units
3VAC ±0.3
3600 RPM units
5VAC ± 0.3
3.Turn the fuel supply off to the unit.
4.Disconnect the positive (+) and negative (-) battery cables
from the battery.
5.Remove the 10mm bolts from both fan housing guards on
the radiator assembly (Figure 6).
13.Tighten down the magnetic pick-up lock nut to prevent
the magnetic pick-up from coming loose during running
operations. Use Loctite (blue 232 removable), if available.
14.Re-verify the magnetic pick-up voltage at rated speed.
15.Turn the unit OFF and remove the breakout harness and
reconnect the magnetic pick-up connector to the engine
harness.
Removal and Inspection Tip: When the magnetic pick-up has been removed, verify that
there is no debris on the tip of the sensor.
If there are any metal shavings on the tip
they may distort the signal to the PCB and/
or ignition module causing speed related
shutdowns (Figure 5). Remove the debris
from the magnetic pick up tip and reinstall
to the rated speed voltage set point.
Figure 6
6.Remove the two ignition bracket bolts (Figure 7)
IGNITION BRACKET BOLTS
Figure 7
Figure 5. Metal Filings on Tip of Sensor
7.Cut any zip ties on the harness that will not allow the next
step to be performed.
Troubleshooting TIP: The magnetic pick-up
8.Place the ignition coils and bracket on top of the valve
cover and away from the timing belt cover (Figure 8).
has a resistance of approximately 700 to
1000 Ohms between the small red Wire 79
and the small black Wire 0 disconnected
from the engine harness.
9.Remove the top (black) timing belt cover from the engine
(Figure 8).
Adjustment procedure:
Cam Sensor Installation and
Adjustments
Prepping the unit for this procedure:
1.Remove both side doors from the enclosure.
2.Turn the AUTO-OFF-MANUAL switch to the OFF position.
Page 132
1.Slowly rotate the engine clockwise (tightening direction)
on the crankshaft and align the cam pin to the cam sensor (Figures 9, 10 and 13).
2.Using a brass or non-ferrous feeler gauge, verify the gap
on the cam sensor to the cam pin and magnet. Cam sensor
gap specifications; 0.015” ± 0.001” (Figure 10).
Generator Adjustments
and Accessories
Section 4.1
Part 4
Results:
1.If the gap is not within specifications, adjust cam sensor
to the gap specifications mentioned above.
2.If the gap is within specifications, go to Step 9 under
“Replacement Procedure.”
Adjustments
1.Remove the cam sensor from the middle of the timing
cover (Figure 11).
MAGNETIC PICK-UP CONNECTOR
TIMING BELT COVER
MAGNETIC PICK-UP
Figure 11
2.Remove the cam pin from the camshaft pulley (see
Figure 13).
Figure 8
3.Clean the cam sprocket threads and the cam pin threads
with clean non-oil based solvent (Figure 12).
CRANKSHAFT PULLEY
Figure 9
Figure 12
FEELER GAUGE
4.Remove excess solvent with a clean paper towel or cloth.
5.Apply Loctite (blue 232 removable) to the cam pin threads
and lightly screw the cam pin into the camshaft pulley.
Tighten the cam pin hand tight and then turn one flat side
to the right (see Figure 13).
INDICATION
MARK
CAM SENSOR
Figure 10
Replacement Procedure:
Initial set up for installing the cam sensor and cam
sensor pin on the 2.4L Mitsubishi engine.
CAM PIN
FLAT SIDE
Figure 13
Page 133
Section 4.1
Part 4
Adjustments
6.Using an inspection mirror, visually inspect that the cam
pin is aligned with the cam sensor hole (Figure 14).
Generator Adjustments
and Accessories
*
Warning: If the cam sensor wire is not tied
down properly, the radiator fan can damage
and/or cut the wire on the cam sensor, causing
the unit to shut down due to a loss of cam signal going to the ignition control module.
10.Re-install the upper timing belt cover on the engine
and torque the timing belt cover bolts to 8 ft-lbs or 11Nm
(Figure 17).
TIMING BELT COVER
Figure 14
Installation Tip: Measure about 1 inch from the tip of
the cam sensor and apply a paint or magic marker line
across the sensor. This line represents about how much
of the cam sensor must be screwed into the timing belt
housing until it contacts the cam pin. (Figure 15).
TIMING BELT COVER BOLTS
Figure 17
11.Re-install the ignition bracket and bolts with the ignition
coils to the side of the timing belt cover. Torque ignition
bracket bolts to 17 ft-lbs or 24 Nm (Figure 18).
Figure 15
IGNITION BRACKET BOLTS
7.Lightly screw the cam sensor into the cam sensor hole
until the marker line is reached on the cam sensor.
8.Using a brass feeler gauge, set the cam sensor gap to
0.015” ± 0.001”.
9.Tighten the lock nut on the cam sensor and zip tie the
wire to the cam sensor (Figure 16).
MAGNETIC PICK-UP CONNECTOR WIRE
Figure 18
12.Reconnect the cam sensor connector to the engine
harness.
ZIP TIE
Figure 16
Page 134
13.Zip tie any loose wiring to a clear and safe location.
14.Re-install the fan housing guards to the radiator assembly.
Generator Adjustments
and Accessories
Section 4.2
Part 4
Accessories
13.Remove the drain plug and drain oil into an appropriate
oil pan for disposal and replace the drain plug.
Cold Weather Start Install
Instructions
14.Remove the used oil filter and install the new oil filter.
Battery Warmer:
1.Verify that a 120V AC line has been run out to the generator and is brought in via stub-ups or is accessible near by.
2.Remove all components from shipping carton.
15.Fill the engine with the proper amount of synthetic oil.
16.After the unit has been run, check for leaks and check
the oil level on the dipstick.
3.Remove the two main access doors from the generator.
4.The generator control switch must be in the OFF position.
5.Locate the battery and disconnect the battery cables.
Disconnect the negative battery cable first from the battery post indicated by (-) or NEG.
6.Remove the battery from the generator.
7.Verify battery voltage is at an acceptable level.
8.Wrap the battery warmer (Item 1, Figure 1) around the
battery and fasten in place with the provided wire ties.
Note: Do not wrap battery warmer below battery
side tabs (See Figure 1).
9.Remount the battery in the battery compartment.
10.Reconnect the battery cables to battery posts. Connect
the positive cable first to the battery post indicated by (+)
or POS.
11.Plug the 120V cord from the battery warmer into the
120V outlet that has been run to the generator or connect
the warmer to the 120V source that has been run to the
generator.
Oil and Oil Filter:
12.It is recommended for cold weather to use Mobil-1 5W30
synthetic oil. The unit needs at least 10 hours of break in
before changing over to synthetic oil if going into a newly
installed unit.
Block Heater Install Instructions
1.Disconnect battery cables to prevent accidental start-up.
Disconnect the negative battery cable first from the battery post indicated by (-) or NEG.
2.Drill holes in frame, if needed, using mounting drawing
and template included in kit to find correct placement. Be
sure to select the appropriate template for your generator.
Most 22 & 27 KW generators already include the mounting holes.
3.See Figure 2, next page. Assemble block heater (Item 1)
and bracket (Item 5) as shown, and attach it to the frame
using specified screws (Item 3), lock washers (Item 6),
flat washers (Item 4), and nuts (Item 7).
4.Remove radiator pressure cap. DANGER: Do not remove
the radiator pressure cap while the engine is hot. Serious
burns to skin and eyes from boiling liquid or steam could
result.
5.Drain all coolant from radiator into a clean drain pan.
6.Drain coolant from engine block by removing existing plug
from the right side of the engine block (See View “A”).
Use a funnel and a second clean drain pan. Replace plug
with 3/8” BSPT X 3/8” NPT adapter (Item 10). Next, install
the 3/8” NPT 45° barbed fitting (Item 12). Use Teflon pipe
sealant on all pipe fittings to ensure proper thread sealing.
BATTERY WARMER
Figure 1. Battery Warmer Installation
Page 135
Section 4.2
Part 4
Accessories
Generator Adjustments
and Accessories
7.Remove temperature switch/sensor (Item 15) from the
intake manifold (located on the left side of the engine)
and replace it with the 3/8” NPT tee (Item 13). The 3/8
NPT tee should be oriented as shown. Install the 3/8”
NPT barbed fitting (Item 9) into the lower fitting of the 3/8”
NPT tee (Item 13). Use Teflon pipe sealant on all pipe fittings to ensure proper thread sealing.
Item
Qty
Description
1
1
HEATER BLOCK 1500W 120V
2
1
HOSE COOL 5/8 ID 20R3 (48” LG)
3
4
SCREW HHC M6-1.0 X 20 G8.8
4
4
WASHER FLAT 1/4-M6 ZINC
5
1
BRACKET HEATER W/WELDNUTS
6
4
WASHER LOCK M6-1/4
7
2
NUT HEX M6 X 1.0 G8 YEL CHR
8
4
CLAMP HOSE 7/8” OD DOUBLE WIRE
9
1
BARBED STR 3/8NPT X 5/8
10
1
ADAPTER 3/8 BSPT M X 3/8 NPT F
11
1
HOSE COOL 5/8 ID 20R3 (18” LG)
12
1
BARBED EL 45 3/8NPT X 5/8OD
13
1
TEE BRANCH 3/8NPT FMF BRASS
14
1
REFLEX WRAP 25MM 1200 X 25 (15”LG)
15
1
SWITCH HI-TEMP 245D X 3/8NPT
8.Install coolant hose (Item 11) as shown. The hose should
connect the top of the block heater to the 3/8” NPT 45°
barbed fitting (Item 12) on the right hand side of the generator (radiator side being front). If you are installing the
block heater on a 22 or 27 kW generator, the hose (Item
11) will need to be trimmed to 14” in.
9.Install the protective wrap (Item 14) over the block heater
hose (Item 11). If you are installing the block heater on
a 22 or 27 kW generator, the protective wrap should be
trimmed to 11” in length.
10
12
14
SEE VIEW "A"
15
TO "B"
"B"
11
8
13
3
8
4
VIEW "A"
1
ENGINE
BLOCK
R/H SIDE
9
8
8
5
6
7
4
6
2
ENGINE
BLOCK
L/H SIDE
Figure 2. Block Heater Installation
Page 136
3
Generator Adjustments
and Accessories
Section 4.2
Part 4
Accessories
10.Install coolant hose (Item 2) to block heater as shown.
Clamp the other end of the hose shut with a soft jaw
clamp. Take care not to damage the hose.
14.Check that both block heater hoses (Item 2 & Item 11)
are routed away from exhaust manifolds.
11.Slowly fill the engine with fresh coolant until coolant drips
out of the coolant hose (Item 2).
16.Plug block heater into appropriate 120V power source.
12.Bleed out air from block heater and hoses by releasing
clamp pressure from open end of hose (Item 2) and with
open end of hose held vertically away from the ground
and at the same elevation as the left side barbed fitting
(Item 9). If needed fill the hose with coolant using a funnel. The entire hose should be full of coolant. Connect the
hose onto the 3/8” NPT barbed fitting (Item 9).
13.Continue to fill the engine with fresh coolant until coolant
drips out of the brass tee (Item 13). Reinstall the temperature switch/sensor (Item 15) into the upper fitting of the
3/8” NPT (Item 13).
Note: Block heater failure will occur if the next
steps are not done properly.
15.Top off the radiator with coolant.
17.Reconnect battery cables to battery posts. Connect the
positive cable first to the battery post indicated by (+) or
POS.
18.Run engine at least 20 min. or until coolant temperature
stabilizes to get rid of any air pockets in the coolant lines.
19.Check coolant level after engine fully cools down, use
caution when removing radiator pressure cap. Coolant
should be just below the fill cap neck. Top off if needed.
20.Recheck tightness of all hose connections.
21.Clean up all coolant that may have spilled during the
installation of the block heater kit.
Page 137
Section 4.3
Part 4
Torque Specifications
Generator Adjustments
and Accessories
Engine Torque Specifications
Item
Specification
(ft-lbs)
Item
Ignition system
Specification
(ft-lbs)
Rocker arms and camshaft
Crankshaft pulley bolts
18
Spark plugs
18
Water pump pulley bolts
6.5
Exhaust manifold
Water pump bolts
Rocker arms and rocker arm
shaft bolts
23
Rocker cover bolts
3
Thrust screw
14
Cylinder head and valves
10
Thermostat housing bolts
17.5
Cylinder head bolts
Oil pan and oil pump
Timing belt
Auto-tensioner bolts
120 à +90° à +90°
17.5
Camshaft sprocket bolt
65
Counterbalance shaft sprocket
bolt
33
Crankshaft bolt
Drain plug
32.5
Flange bolt
27
Front case bolts
17.5
Oil filter bracket bolts
14
87
Oil filter
14
Engine support bracket bolt
35
Oil pan bolts
5
Idler pulley bolt
26
Oil pump cover bolts
13
Oil pump sprocket nut
40
Oil pump cover screws
7.2
Tensioner “B” bolt
14
Oil screen bolts
14
Tensioner arm bolt
16
Plug
17.5
Tensioner pulley bolt
35
Relief plug
32.5
Timing belt cover bolts (bolt,
washer assembly)
8
Timing belt cover bolts (flange
bolt and nut)
8
Piston and connecting rod
Connecting rod cap nuts
Crankshaft and cylinder block
Bearing cap bolts
Inlet manifold and water pump
120 à +90° à +90°
2.5 à +90° to 100°
Engine hanger bolt
14
Bell housing cover bolts
Pressure switch
7.2
Oil seal case bolts
8
Water temp gauge
21.5
Rear plate bolts
8
Water outlet fitting bolts
14.5
Page 138
6.5
Operational tests
and adjustments
Section 4.3
Part 4
Torque Specifications
Alternator Torque Specifications
56 ft-lbs
45 ft-lbs
45 ft-lbs
144 ft-lbs
Figure 19. 35 kW-60 kW Alternator Torque Specs
30 ft-lbs
45 ft-lbs
56 ft-lbs
16 ft-lbs
Figure 20. 22 and 27 kW Alternator Torque Specs
Page 139
Notes
Page 140
Table of contents
DWG #
Part 5
electrical
Data
Title
Page
0G8839-B
Wiring Diagram
142
0G8840-B
Electrical Schematic
144
0F6839-D
Alternator Configurations
146
2.4 Liter standby
Generators
Page 141
Wiring Diagram
Part 5
Electrical Data
Drawing #0G8839-B
Page 142
Electrical Data
Wiring Diagram
Part 5
Drawing #0G8839-B
Y2
Y3
Y1
EC
CYL4
CYL3
CYL2
CYL1
ICM
AFS
OS
Page 143
Electrical Schematic
Part 5
Electrical Data
Drawing #0G8840-B
Page 144
Electrical Data
Part 5
Electrical Schematic
Drawing #0G8840-B
Page 145
Alternator Configurations
Part 5
Electrical Data
Drawing #0F6839-D
Page 146
Electrical Data
Part 5
Alternator Configurations
Drawing #0F6839-D
Page 147
Alternator Configurations
Part 5
Electrical Data
Drawing #0F6839-D
Page 148
Electrical Data
Part 5
Alternator Configurations
Drawing #0F6839-D
Page 149
Alternator Configurations
Part 5
Electrical Data
Drawing #0F6839-D
Page 150
Electrical Data
Part 5
Alternator Configurations
Drawing #0F6839-D
Page 151
Electrical formulas
TO FIND
KNOWN VALUES
KILOWATTS (kW)
Part 5
Electrical Data
1-PHASE
3-PHASE
Volts, Current, Power Factor
ExI
1000
E x I x 1.73 x PF
1000
KVA
Volts, Current
ExI
1000
E x I x 1.73
1000
AMPERES
kW, Volts, Power Factor
kW x 1000
E
kW x 1000
E x 1.73 x PF
WATTS
Volts, Amps, Power Factor
Volts x Amps
E x I x 1.73 x PF
NO. OF ROTOR POLES
Frequency, RPM
2 x 60 x Frequency
RPM
2 x 60 x frequency
RPM
FREQUENCY
RPM, No. of Rotor Poles
RPM x Poles
2 x 60
RPM x Poles
2 x 60
RPM
Frequency, No. of Rotor Poles
2 x 60 x Frequency
Rotor Poles
2 x 60 x Frequency
Rotor Poles
kW (required for Motor)
Motor Horsepower, Efficiency
HP x 0.746
Efficiency
HP x 0.746
Efficiency
RESISTANCE
Volts, Amperes
E
I
E
I
VOLTS
Ohms, Amperes
IxR
IxR
AMPERES
Ohms, Volts
E
R
E
R
E = VOLTS
I = AMPERES
Page 152
R = RESISTANCE (OHMS)
PF = POWER FACTOR
Part No. 0H0983 rev. B / Printed in USA
Rev. 12/16/09
©2009 Generac Power Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
Specifications are subject to change without notice
Generac Power Systems, Inc.
S45 W29290 Hwy. 59
Waukesha, WI 53189
1-888-GENERAC (1-888-436-3722)
generac.com