s
Contents
SIMATIC
S7-300 Automation System,
Hardware and Installation:
CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
Installation Manual
This documentation can no longer be ordered under
the given number!
This manual is part of the documentation
package with the order number:
6ES7398-8FA10-8BA0
Edition 06/2003
A5E00203919-01
Preface
1
Guide to the S7-300
Documentation
2
Installation Order
3
S7-300 Modules
4
Configuring
5
Installation
6
Wiring
7
Addressing
8
Commissioning
9
Maintenance
10
Testing functions and
Diagnostics
11
Appendix
12
Glossary
13
Index
Safety Guidelines
This manual contains notices intended to ensure personal safety, as well as to protect the products and
connected equipment against damage. These notices are highlighted by the symbols shown below and
graded according to severity by the following texts:
!
!
!
Danger
indicates that death, severe personal injury or substantial property damage will result if proper
precautions are not taken.
Warning
indicates that death, severe personal injury or substantial property damage can result if proper
precautions are not taken.
Caution
indicates that minor personal injury can result if proper precautions are not taken.
Caution
indicates that property damage can result if proper precautions are not taken.
Notice
draws your attention to particularly important information on the product, handling the product, or to a
particular part of the documentation.
Qualified Personnel
Only qualified personnel should be allowed to install and work on this equipment. Qualified
persons are defined as persons who are authorized to commission, to ground and to tag circuits,
equipment, and systems in accordance with established safety practices and standards.
Correct Usage
Note the following:
!
Warning
This device and its components may only be used for the applications described in the catalog or the
technical description, and only in connection with devices or components from other manufacturers
which have been approved or recommended by Siemens.
This product can only function correctly and safely if it is transported, stored, set up, and installed
correctly, and operated and maintained as recommended.
Trademarks
SIMATIC®, SIMATIC HMI® and SIMATIC NET® are registered trademarks of SIEMENS AG.
Third parties using for their own purposes any other names in this document which refer to trademarks
might infringe upon the rights of the trademark owners.
Copyright © Siemens AG 2002 All rights reserved
Disclaimer of Liability
The reproduction, transmission or use of this document or its
contents is not permitted without express written authority.
Offenders will be liable for damages. All rights, including rights
created by patent grant or registration of a utility model or design,
are reserved.
We have checked the contents of this manual for agreement with
the hardware and software described. Since deviations cannot be
precluded entirely, we cannot guarantee full agreement. However,
the data in this manual are reviewed regularly and any necessary
corrections included in subsequent editions. Suggestions for
improvement are welcomed.
Siemens AG
Bereich Automation and Drives
Geschaeftsgebiet Industrial Automation Systems
Postfach 4848, D- 90327 Nuernberg
©Siemens AG 2003
Technical data subject to change.
Siemens Aktiengesellschaft
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5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
5.8
5.8.1
5.8.2
5.8.3
5.8.4
5.8.5
5.9
5.10
5.10.1
5.10.2
5.10.3
5.10.4
5.10.5
5.10.6
Summary of the Content ...................................................................................5-1
Basic Principles of Planning ..............................................................................5-2
Component Dimensions ....................................................................................5-4
Arranging modules on a single rack ..................................................................5-7
Arranging Modules on Multiple Racks...............................................................5-9
Selection and installation of cabinets ..............................................................5-12
Example: Selecting a Cabinet .........................................................................5-15
Electrical assembly, protective measures and grounding ...............................5-17
Grounding concept and overall structure ........................................................5-17
Installing the S7-300 with grounded reference potential
(except for CPU 312 IFM) ...............................................................................5-19
Isolated or non-isolated modules ....................................................................5-22
Grounding measures .......................................................................................5-25
Overview: Grounding.......................................................................................5-28
Selecting the Load Power Supply ...................................................................5-30
Planning Subnets ............................................................................................5-32
Extending and networking subnets .................................................................5-32
Basic principles of MPI and DP subnets .........................................................5-34
Interfaces.........................................................................................................5-37
Network Components ......................................................................................5-39
Cable length ....................................................................................................5-42
Sample networks .............................................................................................5-44
,QVWDOODWLRQ 6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
Installing an S7-300...........................................................................................6-1
Installing the rail.................................................................................................6-3
Installing modules on the rail.............................................................................6-7
Label the modules .............................................................................................6-9
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
7.8
7.9
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8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5
8.6
In this Chapter ...................................................................................................9-1
Commissioning procedure.................................................................................9-1
Commissioning Checklist ..................................................................................9-4
Insert the back-up battery or rechargeable battery ...........................................9-5
Inserting and replacing a memory card .............................................................9-7
Commissioning the modules .............................................................................9-8
Connecting the PG ............................................................................................9-8
Initial power on. ...............................................................................................9-12
Memory reset by means of the CPU mode selector switch ............................9-13
Starting SIMATIC Manager .............................................................................9-17
Monitoring and controlling I/Os........................................................................9-18
Commissioning PROFIBUS DP ......................................................................9-23
Commissioning PROFIBUS DP ......................................................................9-23
Commissioning the CPU as DP master ..........................................................9-24
Commissioning the CPU as DP slave .............................................................9-27
Direct Data Exchange .....................................................................................9-33
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10.2
10.3
10.4
10.5
10.6
iv
Addressing.........................................................................................................8-1
Slot-defined addressing of modules ..................................................................8-1
User-defined addressing of modules ................................................................8-3
Addressing Signal Modules...............................................................................8-3
Addressing the Integrated I/O of the CPU.........................................................8-6
Consistent Data .................................................................................................8-7
&RPPLVVLRQLQJ 9.1
9.2
9.3
9.4
9.5
9.6
9.6.1
9.6.2
9.6.3
9.6.4
9.6.5
9.7
9.7.1
9.7.2
9.7.3
9.7.4
Wiring ................................................................................................................7-1
Connecting the Protective Conductor to the Rail ..............................................7-4
Adjusting the Power Supply Module to the Mains Voltage ...............................7-5
Wiring the power supply module and the CPU .................................................7-6
Wiring Front Connectors ...................................................................................7-8
Inserting Front Connectors into Modules ........................................................7-12
Labeling the Module I/O ..................................................................................7-13
Connecting shielded cables to the shielding contact element ........................7-14
Wiring the Bus Connector ...............................................................................7-17
In this Chapter .................................................................................................10-1
Backup of the CPU operating system .............................................................10-1
Updating the Operating System ......................................................................10-3
Module replacement........................................................................................10-4
Replacing the back-up battery or rechargeable battery
(CPUs with MC only) .......................................................................................10-9
Digital output module AC 120/230 V: Replacing the fuses ...........................10-11
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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11.2
11.3
11.4
11.5
11.6
11.6.1
11.6.2
11.6.3
11.6.4
In this Chapter .................................................................................................11-1
Overview: Testing functions ............................................................................11-1
Overview: Diagnostics .....................................................................................11-4
Diagnostic options with STEP 7 ......................................................................11-6
Diagnostics with LEDs.....................................................................................11-7
Diagnostics of DP CPUs ...............................................................................11-12
Diagnostics of DP CPUs operating as DP master ........................................11-12
Reading Slave Diagnostic Data.....................................................................11-15
Interrupts on the DP Master ..........................................................................11-21
Structure of the slave diagnostic data when the CPU is used as an
intelligent slave ..............................................................................................11-22
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12.1
12.1.1
12.2
12.2.1
12.2.2
12.2.3
12.2.4
12.2.5
12.2.6
12.2.7
12.2.8
12.3
12.3.1
12.3.2
12.3.3
Assembly .........................................................................................................12-1
General Rules and Regulations for S7-300 Operation....................................12-1
Protection against electromagnetic interference .............................................12-3
Basic Points for System Installations Conforming with EMC Requirements...12-3
Five Basic Rules for Ensuring EMC ................................................................12-5
EMC Compatible Installation of PLC ...............................................................12-7
Examples of an EMC Compatible Installation .................................................12-8
Shielding of Cables .......................................................................................12-11
Equipotential bonding....................................................................................12-12
Cable Routing inside Buildings......................................................................12-14
Outdoor cable routing ....................................................................................12-16
Lightning and Surge Voltage Protection........................................................12-17
In the following sections ... ............................................................................12-17
Lightning Protection Zone Concept ...............................................................12-17
Rules for the Transition Point between Lightning Protection
Zones 0 <-> 1 ................................................................................................12-19
Rules for the Transition Points between Lightning Protection
Zones 1 <-> 2 and Higher .............................................................................12-21
Sample of a Surge Protection Circuit for Networked S7-300 PLCs ..............12-24
1 How to Protect Digital Output Modules against Inductive Surge Voltage ..12-26
Safety of electronic control equipment ..........................................................12-28
12.3.4
12.3.5
12.3.6
12.4
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S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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1-2
1-3
3-1
4-1
5-1
5-2
5-3
5-4
5-5
5-6
5-7
5-8
5-9
5-10
5-11
5-12
5-13
5-14
5-15
5-16
5-17
5-18
5-19
6-1
6-2
6-3
7-1
7-2
7-3
7-4
7-5
7-6
7-7
7-8
8-1
8-2
8-3
8-4
9-1
9-2
9-3
9-4
9-5
9-6
9-7
9-8
9-9
9-10
10-1
vi
Information Landscape of an S7-300 ...........................................................1-3
Additional Documentation ............................................................................1-4
SIMATIC Technical Support.........................................................................1-5
Installing an S7 system ..................................................................................3-1
Example configuration: S7-300 components .................................................4-1
Horizontal and vertical installation .................................................................5-3
Shielding contact element ..............................................................................5-5
Clearance .......................................................................................................5-6
Maximum configuration on one rack ..............................................................5-8
Full assembly using racks ............................................................................5-11
Power loss dissipated ..................................................................................5-16
S7-300 configuration with grounded reference potential
(CPU 313 – 318-2 DP) ...............................................................................5-20
S7-300 configuration with floating reference potential
(CPU 313 – 318-2 DP) ...............................................................................5-21
Configuration with isolated modules ............................................................5-23
Configuration with non-isolated modules .....................................................5-24
Grounding concept for the S7-300 with CPU 312 IFM ................................5-28
Grounding concept for the S7-300 with CPU 31 x .......................................5-29
Example: S7-300 with load power supply from PS 307...............................5-31
Example of an MPI subnet ...........................................................................5-44
Example: Maximum distance in the MPI subnet ..........................................5-45
Example of a PROFIBUS subnet.................................................................5-46
Example: CPU 314C-2 DP as MPI and PROFIBUS nodes .........................5-47
Example of PG access across network boundaries (routing) ......................5-48
Installing the terminating resistors in an MPI subnet .................................5-49
Holes for mounting the 2 m rail ......................................................................6-4
Free space required for an S7-300 installation ..............................................6-6
Inserting slot numbers in modules ...............................................................6-10
connecting the protective conductor to the rail ..............................................7-4
Setting the mains voltage selector switch for the PS 307..............................7-5
Wiring the power supply module and the CPU ..............................................7-7
Move the front connector into wiring position ..............................................7-10
Slide the labeled strips into the front panel ..................................................7-13
Shielding contact element underneath two signal modules.........................7-15
Connecting 2-wire cables to the shielding contact element.........................7-16
Bus connector: Enabled and disabled terminating resistor..........................7-18
S7-300 slots and the associated module start addresses .............................8-2
Addresses of the I/O of digital modules .........................................................8-4
I/O Addresses of a digital module in Slot 4 ....................................................8-5
I/O addresses of an analog module in Slot 4 .................................................8-6
Insert a back-up battery into CPUs 313/314 ..................................................9-6
Insert the memory card into the CPU.............................................................9-7
Connecting a PG to an S7-300 ......................................................................9-8
Connecting a PG to multiple S7 devices........................................................9-9
Connecting a PG to a subnet.......................................................................9-10
PG connected to an ungrounded S7-300 ....................................................9-11
Operation of mode selector switch for memory reset ..................................9-14
Using the mode selector switch for a cold start (CPU 318-2 DP only) ......9-15
Transfer memory in the CPUs 31x-2 DP acting as DP slave ......................9-29
Direct data exchange with CPUs 31x-2 DP .................................................9-34
Unlocking the front connector and removing the module ............................10-5
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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10-2
10-3
10-4
10-5
10-6
11-1
11-2
11-3
11-4
11-5
11-6
11-7
11-8
11-9
11-10
Removing the front connector coding pin ....................................................10-6
Installing a new module................................................................................10-7
Inserting the front connector ........................................................................10-8
Replacing the back-up battery in CPU 313/314...........................................10-9
Location of fuses in the digital output module 120/230 VAC .....................10-12
Principle of Forcing with S7-300 CPUs (all CPUs except 318-2 DP) ..........11-3
Diagnostics with CPU 31x-2 ......................................................................11-12
Diagnostic addresses for DP masters and DP slaves ...............................11-13
Diagnostic address for the receiving node with direct data exchange.......11-15
Diagnostic addresses for DP masters and DP slaves ...............................11-18
Structure of slave diagnostic data..............................................................11-22
Structure of the ID-specific diagnostics for CPU 31x-2..............................11-25
Structure of the module status ...................................................................11-26
Structure of the interrupt status..................................................................11-27
Bytes y+4 to y+7 for a diagnostic interrupt (operating status
change by intelligent slave) ......................................................................11-28
Possible paths of electromagnetic interference ...........................................12-3
Example of an EMC compatible cabinet installation....................................12-8
Example of EMC compatible wall-mounting ..............................................12-10
Mounting cable shielding............................................................................12-12
Equipotential bonding.................................................................................12-13
Lightning protection zones of a building.....................................................12-18
Sample circuit for networked S7-300 PLCs ...............................................12-24
EMERGENCY-OFF relay contact in the output circuit...............................12-26
Circuit for coils operated with DC voltage ..................................................12-27
Circuit for coils operated with AC voltage ................................................12-27
12-1
12-2
12-3
12-4
12-5
12-6
12-7
12-8
12-9
12-10
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-6
2-7
2-8
2-9
5-1
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
4-8
4-9
4-10
4-11
4-12
4-13
4-14
4-15
4-16
4-17
4-18
4-19
4-20
4-21
4-22
4-23
4-24
6-1
6-2
6-3
6-4
7-1
7-2
7-3
7-4
7-5
7-6
7-7
7-8
7-9
8-1
8-2
9-1
9-2
viii
Influence of the ambient conditions on the automation system (AS)...........2-1
Electrical isolation.........................................................................................2-1
Communication between sensors/actuators and the automation system....2-2
Use of centralized and decentralized peripherals ........................................2-2
Configuration consisting of the central processing unit (CPU) and
expansion modules (EMs)............................................................................2-2
CPU performance.........................................................................................2-3
Communication ............................................................................................2-3
Software .......................................................................................................2-3
Supplementary features ...............................................................................2-3
Components of an S7-300: ..........................................................................4-2
Rails - overview ............................................................................................5-4
Module width ................................................................................................5-4
Shielding terminals - overview .....................................................................5-5
Interface modules - Overview ......................................................................5-9
Types of cabinet .........................................................................................5-14
Choice of cabinets......................................................................................5-16
VDE specifications for the installation of a PLC system ............................5-18
Protective grounding measures .................................................................5-25
Connection of the load voltage reference potential....................................5-27
Connection of the load voltage reference potential....................................5-28
Connection of the load voltage reference potential....................................5-29
Characteristics of load power supply units.................................................5-30
Nodes on the subnet ..................................................................................5-34
MPI/PROFIBUS DP addresses..................................................................5-35
MPI addresses of CPs/FMs in an S7-300 ..................................................5-36
The following devices may be connected ..................................................5-38
Available bus cables...................................................................................5-39
Marginal conditions for wiring interior bus cables ......................................5-40
Bus connector ............................................................................................5-40
RS 485 repeater .........................................................................................5-41
PG patch cord ............................................................................................5-42
Permitted cable lengths in an MPI subnet segment...................................5-42
Permitted cable lengths in a PROFIBUS subnet segment.........................5-43
Stub cable lengths per segment.................................................................5-43
Module accessories......................................................................................6-2
Installation tools and materials.....................................................................6-3
Mounting holes for rails ................................................................................6-5
Slot numbers for S7 modules.......................................................................6-9
Wiring accessories .......................................................................................7-1
Conditions for connecting the PS and CPU .................................................7-2
Wiring conditions for front connectors..........................................................7-3
Wiring accessories .......................................................................................7-7
Assignment of front connectors to modules .................................................7-8
Assignment of front connectors to modules ...............................................7-10
Wiring the front connector ..........................................................................7-10
Assigning the labeling strips to modules ....................................................7-13
Assigning the shielding diameter to shielding terminals ............................7-14
Integrate inputs and outputs on the CPU 312 IFM.......................................8-6
Integrate inputs and outputs on the CPU 314 IFM.......................................8-7
Recommended commissioning procedure - part I: Hardware .....................9-2
Recommended commissioning procedure - part II: software ......................9-3
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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9-3
9-4
9-5
9-6
9-7
9-8
9-9
9-10
10-1
10-2
11-1
11-2
11-3
11-4
11-5
11-6
11-7
11-8
11-9
11-10
11-11
11-12
11-13
11-14
11-15
11-16
11-17
12-1
12-2
12-3
12-4
12-5
12-6
12-7
12-8
12-9
12-10
12-11
Possible causes for the CPU memory reset request .................................9-13
Procedure for resetting the CPU memory..................................................9-14
Operations in the CPU during a memory reset ..........................................9-16
Software requirements ...............................................................................9-23
DP address areas of the CPUs ..................................................................9-23
Event recognition by CPUs 31x-2 DP acting as the DP master ................9-25
Event recognition by CPUs 31x-2 DP acting as DP slave .........................9-28
Configuration example for the address areas in transfer memory.............9-30
Backup of the operating system on MC .....................................................10-2
Updating the operating system with MC/MMC...........................................10-3
The differences between forcing and controlling variables ........................11-3
Status and error displays ...........................................................................11-7
Evaluation of the SF LED (software error) .................................................11-8
Evaluation of the SF LED (hardware error)................................................11-9
The BUSF, BUSF1 and BUSF2 LEDs .....................................................11-10
The BUSF LED lights up. .........................................................................11-11
The BUSF LED flashes ............................................................................11-11
Event recognition by CPUs 31x-2 as the DP master ...............................11-14
Evaluation in the DP master of RUN to STOP transitions
by the DP slave ........................................................................................11-14
Reading the diagnostic information using STEP 5 and
STEP 7 in the masters system.................................................................11-16
Event recognition by CPUs 31x-2 acting as the DP slave .......................11-19
Evaluation of RUN to STOP transitions in the DP master/DP slave........11-20
Structure of station status 1 (byte 0) ........................................................11-23
Structure of station status 2 (byte 1) ........................................................11-23
Structure of station status 3 (byte 2) ........................................................11-24
Structure of the master PROFIBUS address (byte 3) ..............................11-24
Structure of the vendor ID (byte 4, 5).......................................................11-24
Starting the system after specific events....................................................12-1
Mains voltage .............................................................................................12-2
Protection against external electrical interference .....................................12-2
Protection against external electrical interference .....................................12-2
Coupling mechanisms ................................................................................12-4
Key to example 1........................................................................................12-9
Routing cables inside buildings................................................................12-14
High-voltage protection of cables with surge voltage protection
components ..............................................................................................12-20
Surge voltage protection components for lightning protection
zones 1 <-> 2 ...........................................................................................12-22
Surge voltage protection components for lightning protection
zones 2 <-> 3 ...........................................................................................12-23
Example of a lightning-protected structure (key to figure above) ............12-25
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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To get you started, this manual contains the information you will need to plan,
assemble, wire up, address and commission a S7-300.
You will then get to know the tools you can use to diagnose and eliminate errors in
hardware and software.
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To understand this manual you will require a general knowledge of automation
technology, backed up by a knowledge of the STEP 7 basic software. You may find
it useful to read the Programming with STEP 7 V5.1 manual first.
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This manual is valid for CPUs with the following hardware and software versions:
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CPU 312 IFM
6ES7 312-5AC02-0AB0
+DUGZDUH
1.0.0
01
6ES6 312-5AC82-0AB0
CPU 313
6ES7 312-1AD03-0AB0
1.0.0
01
CPU 314
6ES7 314-1AE04-0AB0
1.0.0
01
1.0.0
01
1.0.0
01
01
6ES7 314-1AE84-0AB0
CPU 314 IFM
6ES7 314-5AE03-0AB0
6ES7 314-5AE83-0AB0
CPU 314 IFM
6ES7 314-5AE10-0AB0
CPU 315
6ES7 315-1AF03-0AB0
1.0.0
CPU 315-2 DP
6ES7 315-2AF03-0AB0
1.0.0
6ES7 315-2AF83-0AB0
CPU 316-2 DP
6ES7 316-2AG00-0AB0
1.0.0
01
CPU 318-2 DP
6ES7 318-2AJ00-0AB0
3.0.0
03
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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The SIMATIC S7-300 product series has the following approvals:
• Underwriters Laboratories, Inc.: UL 508 (Industrial Control Equipment)
• Canadian Standards Association: CSA C22.2 No. 142, (Process Control
Equipment)
• Factory Mutual Research: Approval Standard Class Number 3611
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The SIMATIC S7-300 product series conforms to the requirements and safety
specifications of following EU directives:
• EU directive 73/23/EWE "Low-voltage directive"
•
EU directive 89/336/EEC "EMC directive“
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The SIMATIC S7-300 product series is compliant with AS/NZS 2064 (Australia).
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The SIMATIC S7-300 product series is compliant with the requirements and criteria
for IEC 61131-2.
1-2
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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This manual is part of the documentation package for the S7-300.
Reference Manual
CPU Data CPU 312 IFM to 318-2 DP
Description of the operation, the functions and the
technical data of the CPU
CPU Data CPU 31xC and CPU 31x
Manual
CPU 31xC: Technological Functions
Examples
Description of the individual technological functions:
- Positioning
- Counting
- Point-to-point connection
- Control
The CD contains examples of the technological
functions.
You are reading this manual
Installation Manual
S7-300 Automation System,
Hardware and Installation:
CPU 312 IFM - 318-2 DP
Configuration, installation, wiring, network and
commissioning descriptions of a S7-300
S7-300 Automation System,
Hardware and Installation:
CPU 31xC and CPU 31x
Reference Manual
S7-300 Programmable Controller
Module Specifications
Function descriptions and the technical data of the
signal modules, power supply modules and the
interface modules
Instruction List
CPU 312 IFM to 318-2 DP
CPU 31xC and CPU 31x
IM 151-7 CPU, BM 147-1 CPU, BM 147-2 CPU
Getting Started
Getting Starteds take you through each
commissioning step up to a functioning
application by running through a
concrete example.
The following Getting Starteds are available
to you:
List of stored instructions of the CPUs and their
execution times.
List of executable blocks (OBs/SFCs/SFBs) and their
execution times.
- CPU 31xC: Commission
- CPU 31x:
Commission
- CPU 31xC: Positioning with Analog Output
- CPU 31xC: Positioning with Digital Output
- CPU 31xC: Counting
- CPU 31xC: Point-to-Point Connection
- CPU 31xC: Controlling
Figure 1-1 Information Landscape of an S7-300
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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You also require the following manuals in addition to this documentation package:
Manual
Integrated Functions CPU 312 IFM/314 IFM
Manual
Description of the technological functions of the
CPUs 312 IFM/314 IFM.
Reference Manual System Software for
S7-300/400 System and Standard Functions
Reference Manual
part of the STEP 7 documentation package
Description of the SFCs, SFBs and OBs of the CPUs.
You can also find the description in the
STEP 7 Online Help.
Figure 1-2 Additional Documentation
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The units described in this manual are recyclable, due to the low levels of harmful
substances they contain. For correct recycling and disposal of your old unit,
contact a certified disposal facility for electronic scrap.
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If you still have questions about how to use the products described in this manual,
then please contact your local Siemens dealer.
http://www.siemens.com/automation/partner
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We can provide training courses to help you get started with your S7-300 PLC.
Please contact your local Training Center or the Central Training Center in
Nuremberg, D-90327, Germany
Phone +499 (911) 895-3200..
http://www.sitrain.com
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S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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In addition to your local dealer, you can also contact one of three Support Centers:
Johnson City
Nuernberg
Beijing
Figure 1-3 SIMATIC Technical Support
:RUOGZLGH (Nuremberg)
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Local time: 0:00 to 24:00 / 365
days a year
Phone: +49 (0) 180 5050 222
Fax: +49 (0) 180 5050 223
E-mail: adsupport@siemens.com
GMT: +1:00
(XURSH$IULFD (Nuremberg)
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Local time: Mo.-Fr. 8:00 to 17:00
Phone: +49 (0) 180 5050-222
Fax: +49 (0) 180 5050-223
E-mail: adsupport@siemens.com
GMT: +1:00
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Local time: Mo.-Fr. 8:00 to
17:00
Local time: Mo.-Fr. 8:00 to 17:00
Phone: +1 (0) 770 740 3505
Fax: +65 (0) 740-7001
Fax: +1 (0) 770 740 3699
E-mail:
E-mail: isdcallcenter@sea.siemens.comn
simatic.hotline@sea.siemens.com.sg
Phone: +65 (0) 740-7000
GMT: +8:00
GMT: –5:00
Technical Support and Authorization personnel generally speak both German and English.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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We offer you our complete knowledge base online on the Internet as a supplement
to our documentation.
http://www.siemens.com/automation/service&support
There you can find:
• Up-to-date product information (What's new), FAQs (Frequently Asked
Questions), Downloads, Tips and Tricks.
• Our Newsletter always offers you the latest information on your products.
• The Knowledge Manager finds the documents you require.
• Users and specialists all over the world share their experience in our Forum.
• You can find your local service partner for Automation & Drives in our Partner
Database.
• Information relating to on-site service, repairs, spare parts and lots more is
available to you in the "Service" section.
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S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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you will find a guide to the documentation for the S7-300.
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Table 2-1
Influence of the ambient conditions on the automation system (AS)
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What provisions do I have to make for PLC
installation space?
Chapter &RQILJXULQJ0RXQWLQJGLPHQVLRQVRI
PRGXOHVand 0RXQWLQJPRXQWLQJWKHUDLO, in the
,QVWDOODWLRQ0DQXDO
How do environmental conditions influence the
PLC?
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Table 2-2
Electrical isolation
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Which modules can I use if electrical isolation is
required between sensors/actuators?
LVDYDLODEOHLQ
Chapter &RQILJXULQJ(OHFWULFDODVVHPEO\
SURWHFWLYHPHDVXUHVDQGJURXQGLQJLQWKH
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Reference Manual 0RGXOH'DWD
When do I need to isolate the potential of individual
components?
How do I wire that?
Chapter &RQILJXULQJ(OHFWULFDODVVHPEO\
SURWHFWLYHPHDVXUHVDQGJURXQGLQJLQWKH
,QVWDOODWLRQ0DQXDO
Chapter :LULQJLQWKH,QVWDOODWLRQ0DQXDO
When do I need to isolate the potential of specific
stations?
Chapter &RQILJXULQJ&RQILJXULQJDVXEQHWLQWKH
,QVWDOODWLRQ0DQXDO
How do I wire that?
Chapter :LULQJLQWKH,QVWDOODWLRQ0DQXDO
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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Table 2-3
Communication between sensors/actuators and the automation system
,QIRUPDWLRQRQ
Which module is suitable for my sensor/actuator?
LVDYDLODEOHLQ
for CPU: in applicable &38'DWDReference
Manual
for signal modules: 0RGXOH'DWDReference Manual
How many sensors/actuators can I connect to the
module?
for CPU: in applicable &38'DWDReference
Manual
for signal modules: 0RGXOH'DWDReference Manual
To connect my sensors/actuators to the PLC, how
do I wire the front connector ?
Chapter :LULQJ:LULQJIURQWFRQQHFWRUVLQWKH
,QVWDOODWLRQ0DQXDO
When do I require expansion modules (EM), and
how are they connected?
Chapter &RQILJXULQJRSWLRQDOH[SDQVLRQVDQG
QHWZRUNLQJLQWKH,QVWDOODWLRQ0DQXDO
How do I mount modules in module racks / on
profile rails?
Chapter 0RXQWLQJ0RXQWLQJPRGXOHVRQDUDLOLQ
WKH,QVWDOODWLRQ0DQXDO
Table 2-4
Use of centralized and decentralized peripherals
,QIRUPDWLRQRQ
Which range of modules do I want to use?
LVDYDLODEOHLQ
for local I/O / expansion modules (EMs): 0RGXOH
'DWDReference Manual
for distributed I/Os / PROFIBUS DP: Manual of the
relevant I/O device, e.g. 0DQXDO(7%
Table 2-5
Configuration consisting of the central processing unit (CPU) and expansion modules (EMs)
,QIRUPDWLRQRQ
LVDYDLODEOHLQ
Which rack / rail is best suited to my application?
Chapter &RQILJXULQJLQWKH,QVWDOODWLRQ0DQXDO
Which Interface modules (IM) do I need to connect
EMs to the CPU?
Chapter &RQILJXULQJ$UUDQJLQJPRGXOHVRQ
PXOWLSOHUDFNVLQWKH,QVWDOODWLRQ0DQXDO
What is the right power supply (PS) for my
application?
Chapter &RQILJXULQJLQWKH,QVWDOODWLRQ0DQXDO
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Table 2-6
CPU performance
,QIRUPDWLRQRQ
LVDYDLODEOHLQ
Which memory concept is best suited for my
application?
in applicable &38'DWDReference Manual
How do I insert and remove Micro Memory Cards?
Chapter &RPPLVVLRQLQJ5HPRYLQJ,QVWDOOLQJ0LFUR
0HPRU\&DUGVLQWKH,QVWDOODWLRQ0DQXDO
Which CPU meets my requirements on
performance ?
,QVWUXFWLRQOLVW; Reference Manual &38'DWD
How fast is the response / processing time of the
CPU?
in applicable &38'DWDReference Manual
Which technological functions are implemented?
7HFKQRORJLFDOIXQFWLRQVManual
How can I use these technological functions?
7HFKQRORJLFDOIXQFWLRQVManual
Table 2-7
Communication
,QIRUPDWLRQRQ
LVDYDLODEOHLQ
Which principles do I have to take into account?
&RPPXQLFDWLRQZLWK6,0$7,&Manual
Which options and resources are available on the
CPU ?
in applicable &38'DWDReference Manual
How do I optimize communication with the help of
communication processors (CPs)?
the respective manual
Which type of communication network is best
suited to my application?
Chapter &RQILJXULQJ&RQILJXULQJDVXEQHWLQWKH
,QVWDOODWLRQ0DQXDO
How do I network the individual components?
Chapter &RQILJXULQJ and ZLULQJLQWKH,QVWDOODWLRQ
0DQXDO
&RPPXQLFDWLRQZLWK6,0$7,&Manual
Table 2-8
Software
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LVDYDLODEOHLQ
Which software do I require for my S7-300 system? Chapter 7HFKQLFDO6SHFLILFDWLRQ; applicable &38
'DWDReference Manual
Table 2-9
Supplementary features
,QIRUPDWLRQRQ
LVDYDLODEOHLQ
How do I implement operator control and
monitoring?
for text-based display units: the relevant device
manual
(Human Machine Interface)
for OPs: the relevant device manual
for WinCC: the relevant device manual
How can I integrate process control modules?
for PCS 7: the respective device manual
What options are offered by redundant and fail-safe Manual 6+5HGXQGDQW6\VWHPV; Manual
systems?
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S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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We will show you the sequence of steps you must follow to install your SIMATICS7 system.
We shall then go on to explain the basic rules that you should follow, and how you
can modify an existing system.
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Configuration
Installation
Wiring
Should a subnet
be created?
YES
Network
NO
Addressing
Installation completed,
continue with commissioning
Figure 3-1 Installing an S7 system
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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An S7 system can be used in many different ways, so we can only provide basic
rules for the electrical and mechanical installation in this section.
You must at least keep to these basic rules if you want your S7 system to operate
correctly.
0RGLI\LQJWKHVWUXFWXUHRIDQH[LVWLQJ6V\VWHP
If you want to modify the configuration of an existing system at a later time,
proceed using the steps indicated above.
1RWH
If you want to install a signal module at a later time, consult the relevant
information for the respective module.
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Also note the description of your specific module in the 6,0$7,&63/&V
manual and the0RGXOH'DWD5HIHUHQFH0DQXDO.
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An S7-300 consists of several modules. The following diagram illustrates a
possible configuration:
1
2
3
5
4
Figure 4-1 Example configuration: S7-300 components
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Power supply
Central processing unit
Signal module
PROFIBUS bus cable
Cable for connecting a programming device (PG)
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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A programming device (PG) is used to program the S7-300 PLC. Use a PG cable
to connect the PG and the CPU.
Several S7-300 CPUs can communicate with one another and with other SIMATIC
S7 PLCs via the PROFIBUS cable. You can connect several S7-300s using a
PROFIBUS bus cable.
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There is a whole range of components available for creating and using an S7-300.
The table below shows the major modules and their functions.
Table 4-1
Components of an S7-300:
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This is the rack for an S7-300
Mounting rail
(rack)
Accessory:
Shielding contact element
Power supply (PS)
This converts the line voltage
(120/230 VAC) to 24 VDC
operating voltage and is used to
supply the S7-300 and 24 VDC
load circuits
CPU
This runs the user program,
provides a 5 V supply to the S7300 backplane bus and
communicates with other MPI
network nodes via the MPI
interface.
Accessory:
Front connectors (for CPUs with
integrated peripherals)
In addition, a CPU can also be a
DP master or a DP slave in a
PROFIBUS subnet.
Signal modules (SM)
(Digital input modules, digital
output modules, digital I/O
modules, analog input modules,
analog output modules, analog
I/O modules)
CPUs 312 IFM to 318-2 DP
They match different process
signal levels to the S7-300.
Accessory:
Front connectors
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Function modules (FM)
Accessory:
Front connectors
Communication processor (CP).
Accessory:
Connecting cable
SIMATIC TOP connect
Accessory:
Front connector module with
ribbon cable terminals
Interface module (IM)
Accessory:
Connecting cable
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These perform time-critical and
memory-intensive process signal
processing tasks, such as
positioning or regulation.
This performs communication for
the CPU, e.g. CP 342-5 DP
connection to PROFIBUS DP
Use for wiring the digital I/O
modules
Connects the individual rows in
an S7-300
PROFIBUS cable with bus
connector
Connect the nodes of an MPI or
PROFIBUS subnet to one
another
PG cable
Connects a PG/PC to a CPU
RS485 Repeater
Used to amplify the signals in an
MPI or PROFIBUS subnet and
for coupling segments of an MPI
or PROFIBUS subnet
Programming device (PG) or PC
with the STEP 7 software
package
You will need a PG to configure,
set parameters, program and test
your S7-300
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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we will provide you with all the information you need
• Mechanical configuration of an S7-300
• Electrical configuration of an S7-300
• Considerations for networking
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For information on network topics we recommend the &RPPXQLFDWLRQZLWK
6,0$7,&Manual. This manual contains important notes on networking for
SIMATIC professionals as well as the basics for newcomers.
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Information on ambient conditions is in the Appendix: see $PELHQW&RQGLWLRQV
Information on special protective measures is in the Appendix: see (OHFWULFDO
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S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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The modules that make up an S7-300 are regarded as open equipment. This
means that you must always install the S7-300 in a cubicle, cabinet or electrical
control room that can only be accessed using a key or tool. Only trained or
authorized personnel are allowed access to such cubicles, cabinets or electrical
operating rooms.
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Depending on the field of application, the operation of an S7-300 in a plant or
system is defined by special rules and regulations . Note the safety and accident
prevention regulations relating to specific applications, e.g. machine protection
directives. This chapter and the appendix *HQHUDOUXOHVDQGUHJXODWLRQVRQ6
RSHUDWLRQ provide an overview of the most important rules you need to consider
when integrating an S7-300 into a plant or a system.
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An S7-300 PLC consists of a central unit (CU) and – if required – one or multiple
expansion modules (EMs).
The rack containing the CPU is referred to as the central unit (CU). Racks
equipped with modules form the expansion modules (EMs) connected to the
system's CU.
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You can use EMs if the number of CU slots is insufficient for your application.
When using EMs, you might require further power supply modules in addition to
the extra racks and interface modules (IM). When using interface modules you
must ensure compatibility of the partner stations.
0RGXOHUDFNV
The rack for your S7-300 is a rail. You can use this rail to mount all modules of
your S7-300 system.
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You can mount an S7-300 either vertically or horizontally. The following ambient air
temperatures are permitted:
• Vertical installation: from 0 °C to 40 °C
• Horizontal installation: from 0 °C to 60 °C.
Always install the CPU and power supply on the left or at the bottom.
1
SM
SM
SM
2
SM
SM
SF
BUSF
SIEMENS
DC5V
FRCE
RUN
STOP
SM
PS
CPU
SM SM SM SM SM SM SM SM
3
SM
DC5V
BUSF
STOP
RUN
CPU
FRCE
SF
SIEMENS
SM
PS
3
Figure 5-1 Horizontal and vertical installation
7KHGLDJUDPLOOXVWUDWHVXQGHUQXPEHU
Vertical installation of an S7-300
Horizontal installation of an S7-300
Rail
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• the selection and dimensions of rails (racks) can be found in Chapter 0RGXOH
GLPHQVLRQV
• connections and interfaces (IMs) are found in Chapter $UUDQJLQJPRGXOHVRQ
PXOWLSOHUDFNV
• the most important rules on S7-300 operation are found in the Appendix
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The following rails are available.
Table 5-1
Rails - overview
5DLOOHQJWK
160 mm
8VDEOHOHQJWKIRUPRGXOHV
120 mm
2UGHU1R
ES7 390-1AB60-0AA0
482.6 mm
450 mm
ES7 390-1AE80-0AA0
530 mm
480 mm
ES7 390-1AF30-0AA0
830 mm
780 mm
ES7 390-1AJ30-0AA0
2,000 mm
cut to length if required.
ES7 390-1BC00-0AA0
In contrast to other rails, the 2-meter rail is not equipped with any mounting holes.
These must be drilled, allowing optimal adaptation of the 2-meter rail to your
application.
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Table 5-2
Module width
0RGXOH
:LGWK
Power supply PS 307, 2 A
50 mm
Power supply PS 307, 5 A
80 mm
Power supply PS 307, 10 A
200 mm
CPU
The installation dimensions are listed in
the Technical Data section of your &38
'DWD5HIHUHQFH0DQXDO.
Analog I/O modules
40 mm
Digital I/O modules
40 mm
Simulator module SM 374
40 mm
Interface modules IM 360 and IM 365
40 mm
Interface module IM 361
80 mm
• Module height: 125 mm
• Module height with VKLHOGLQJFRQWDFWHOHPHQW: 185 mm
• Maximum mounting depth: 130 mm
• Maximum mounting depth with open hinged front panel (CPU): 180 mm
Dimensions of other modules such as CPs, FMs etc. are found in the relevant
manuals.
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The direct contact between the shielding contact element and the rail enables you
to connect all shielded cables of your S7 modules to ground.
1
2
Figure 5-2 Shielding contact element
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the shielding terminals
the retaining bracket
Mount the bracket (Order No. 6ES5 390-5AA0-0AA0) to the rail using the two
screw bolts.
If you use a shielding contact element, the specified dimensions apply from the
lower edge of the module.
• Width of the shielding contact element: 80 mm
• Number of mountable shielding terminals per shielding contact element: max 4
Table 5-3
Shielding terminals - overview
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Cable shielding diameter 2 mm to 6 mm
6ES7 390–5AB00–0AA0
Cable shielding diameter 3 mm to 8 mm
6ES7 390-5BA00-0AA0
Cable shielding diameter 4 mm to 13 mm
6ES7 390-5CA00-0AA0
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You must maintain the clearance shown in the figure in order to provide sufficient
space to install the modules and to dissipate the heat generated by the modules.
This figure illustrates the clearances between multiple racks, as well as between
nearby equipment, cable channels, cabinet walls, etc.
For example, if you wire your modules using a cable duct, the clearance between
the bottom edge of the shielding contact element and the cable duct must be 40
mm.
40 mm
CPU
40 mm
SM SM
SM
2
1
200 mm + a
a
40 mm
PS
CPU
SM
SM
20 mm
20 mm
40 mm
Figure 5-3 Clearance
7KHGLDJUDPLOOXVWUDWHVXQGHUQXPEHU
Wiring using a cable duct
Clearance between cable channel and bottom edge of shielding contact element
must be 40 mm
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You will find information on how to install an S7-300 in the chapter entitled
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S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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You will use either one rack or multiple racks, depending on your planned
application.
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• Compact, space-saving use of all your modules
• Centralized use of your modules
• Fewer signals to be processed
7LS:
If you opt for installation on a single rack, insert a dummy module to the right of the
CPU (order no.: 6ES7 370-0AA01-0AA0). This gives you the option of inserting a
second rack for your application in the future, simply by replacing the dummy
module with an interface module and without having to reinstall and rewire the first
rack.
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• More signals to be processed
• Insufficient slots available
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For arranging modules on a single
rack, the following rules apply:
• No more than eight modules (SM, FM, CP) may be installed to the right of the
CPU.
• All modules that you have installed on one rack may not exceed a total current
consumption of 1.2 A (312 IFM: 0.8 A) from the S7-300 backplane bus.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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The figure below shows the arrangement of eight signal modules on one rack.
SF
BUSF
SIEMENS
DC5V
FRCE
RUN
STOP
PS
CPU
SM1
SM2
SM3
SM4
SM5 SM6
SM7
SM8
Figure 5-4 Maximum configuration on one rack
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You will find information about the current consumption of modules in the technical
specifications, for example, in the 60RGXOH'DWD5HIHUHQFH0DQXDO or in the
5HIHUHQFH0DQXDO of the CPU you are using
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With the CPU 312 IFM and the CPU 313, only one row is permitted on a rack.
8VLQJLQWHUIDFHPRGXOHV
If you are planning a structure distributed between multiple racks then you will
need interface modules (IM). An interface module routes the backplane bus of an
S7-300 to the next rack.
The CPU is always located on rack 0.
Table 5-4
Interface modules - Overview
&KDUDFWHULVWLFV
7ZRRUPRUHURZV
/RZFRVWURZFRQILJXUDWLRQ
Send IM in rack 0
IM 360
Order No.: 6ES7 360-3AA01-0AA0
IM 365
Order No.: 6ES7 365-0AB00-0AA0
Receive IM in rack 1 to 3
IM 361
Order No.: 6ES7 361-3CA01-0AA0
IM 365 (hardwired to send IM 365)
Maximum number of
expansion modules
3
1
Length of the connecting
cables
1 m (6ES7 368-3BB01-0AA0)
2.5 m (6ES7 368-3BC51-0AA0)
5 m (6ES7 368-3BF01-0AA0)
10 m (6ES7 368-3CB01-0AA0)
1 m (hardwired)
Remarks
-
Rack 1 can only receive signal
modules; the total current
consumption is limited to 1.2 A (for
the 312 IFM: 0.8 A), whereby the
maximum for rack 1 is 0.8 A.
These restrictions do not apply to
operation with interface modules
IM 360/IM 361
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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&RQILJXULQJ
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Please note the following points if you wish to arrange your modules on multiple
racks:
• The interface module always uses slot 3 (slot 1: power supply; slot 2: CPU,
slot 3: interface module)
• It is always on the left before the first signal module.
• No more than 8 modules (SM, FM, CP) are permitted per rack.
• The number of modules (SM, FM, CP) is limited by the permitted current
consumption on the S7-300 backplane bus. The total current consumption may
not exceed 1.2 A per row (if 312 IFM CPU is used: 0.8 A).
&URVVUHIHUHQFH
Information about the power consumption of individual modules is provided in the
0RGXOH'DWD5HIHUHQFH0DQXDO
5XOHV,QWHUIHUHQFHSURRILQVWDOODWLRQRIWKHFRQQHFWLRQ
Special shielding and grounding measures are not required if you interconnect the
central units and expansion modules using suitable interface modules (Send IM
and Receive IM).
However, you must ensure the following:
• all racks are interconnected with low impedance,
• the racks of a grounded assembly are grounded in a star pattern,
• the contact springs on the racks are clean and not bent, thus ensuring that
interference currents can be dissipated.
5-10
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
&RQILJXULQJ
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The figure shows the arrangement of modules in an S7-300 assembly on 4 racks.
SM1 SM2
IM
4
SM3
SM 4
SM5
SM6
5
PS
3
IM
SM7
SM8
6
SM1
SM2
SM3
SM 4
SM5
SM6
SM7
SM8
SM1
SM2
SM3
SM 4
SM5
SM6
SM7
SM8
SM1
SM2
SM3 SM 4
SM5
SM6
SM7
SM8
5
PS
2
IM
IM
5
1
PS
CPU
IM
IM
Figure 5-5 Full assembly using racks
7KHGLDJUDPLOOXVWUDWHVXQGHUQXPEHU
Rack 0 (central unit)
Rack 1 (expansion module)
Rack 2 (expansion module)
Rack 3 (expansion module)
Connection cable 368
Limitation for the CPU 314 IFM. when this CPU is used, you must not insert Signal
Module 8 on Rack 4.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
5-11
&RQILJXULQJ
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5HDVRQVIRULQVWDOOLQJDQ6LQDFDELQHW
You should install your S7-300 in a cabinet when any of the following apply:
• If you plan a larger system
• You are using your S7-300s in an environment subject to interference or
contamination
• In order to meet UL/CSA requirements, which require installation in cabinets
6HOHFWLQJDQGGLPHQVLRQLQJFDELQHWV
Take the following criteria into account:
• Ambient conditions at the cabinet's place of installation
• The specified mounting clearance for racks (rails)
• Total power loss of all components in the cabinet
The ambient conditions (temperature, humidity, dust, chemical influence, explosion
hazard) at the cabinet's place of installation determine the degree of protection (IP
xx) required for the cabinet.
5HIHUHQFHIRUGHJUHHVRISURWHFWLRQ
Further information on degree of protection can be found in IEC 529 and DIN
40050.
7KHFDELQHW
VSRZHUGLVVLSDWLRQ
The power dissipation capability of a cabinet depends on its type, ambient
temperature and on the internal arrangement of devices.
5HIHUHQFHIRUSRZHUORVV
Siemens catalogs NV21 and ET1 contain more detailed information about power
dissipation.
5-12
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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Note the following specifications when you determine the dimensions of a cabinet
suitable for an S7-300 installation:
• Space required for racks (rails)
• Minimum clearance between the racks and cabinet walls
• Minimum clearance between the racks
• Space required for cable ducts or fans
• Position of the stays
:DUQLQJ
Modules may get damaged if exposed to inadmissible ambient temperatures.
5HIHUHQFHIRUDPELHQWWHPSHUDWXUHV
Information on permissible ambient temperatures is in the Appendix: see $PELHQW
&RQGLWLRQV
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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&RQILJXULQJ
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The table below gives you an overview of the commonly used cabinet types. It
shows you the applied principle of heat dissipation, the calculated maximum power
loss and the degree of protection.
Table 5-5
Types of cabinet
2SHQFDELQHWV
&ORVHGFDELQHWV
Enclosed
ventilation via
natural convection
Increased
enclosed
ventilation
Natural convection
Forced convection
with rack fan,
improvement of
natural convection
Forced convection
with heat
exchanger, internal
and external
auxiliary ventilation
Mainly inherent
heat dissipation,
with a small portion
across the cabinet
wall.
Higher heat
dissipation with
increased air
movement.
Heat dissipation
only across the
cabinet wall; only
low power losses
permitted. In most
cases heat
concentration
develops at the top
of the cabinet
interior.
Heat dissipation
only across the
cabinet wall.
Forced convection
of the interior air
improves heat
dissipation and
prevention of heat
concentration.
Heat dissipation by
heat exchange
between heated
internal air and
cool external air.
The increased
surface of the
pleated profile of
the heat exchanger
wall and forced
convection of
internal and
external air provide
good heat
dissipation.
Degree of
protection IP 20
Degree of
protection IP 20
Degree of
protection IP 54
Degree of
protection IP 54
Degree of
protection IP 54
Typical power dissipation under following marginal conditions:
•
Cabinet size: 600 mm x 600 mm x 2,200 mm
•
Difference between the outer and inner temperature of the cabinet is 20 °C (for other temperature
differences refer to the temperature charts of the cabinet manufacturer)
up to 700 W
5-14
up to 2,700 W (with up to 260 W
fine filter up to
1,400 W)
up to 360 W
up to 1,700 W
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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The sample below clearly shows the maximum permitted ambient air temperature
at a specific power loss for different cabinet designs.
$VVHPEO\
The following device configuration should be installed in a cabinet:
• Central unit, 150 W
• Expansion modules, each with 150 W
• Load power supply under full load, 200 W
This results in a total power loss of 650 W.
3RZHUORVVGLVVLSDWHG
The diagram in the figure below shows guide values for the permitted ambient air
temperature of a cabinet with the dimensions 600 mm x 600 mm x 2,000 mm,
depending on power loss. these values only apply if you maintain the specified
installation and clearance dimensions for racks (rails).
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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&RQILJXULQJ
Ambient temperature in °C
60
50
1
40
2
1
30
3
20
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
Loss of heat in W
Figure 5-6 Power loss dissipated
&XUYH
&DELQHW7\SH
Closed cabinet with heat exchanger (heat exchanger size 11/6 (920 mm x 460
mm x 111 mm)
Cabinet with through-ventilation by natural convection
Closed cabinet with natural convection and forced ventilation by equipment
fans
5HVXOW
From the diagram we can see that the following ambient temperatures are
obtained for a total power loss of 650 W:
Table 5-6
Choice of cabinets
&DELQHWGHVLJQ
0D[LPXPSHUPLWWHGDPELHQW
WHPSHUDWXUH
Closed with natural convection and forced ventilation
(Curve 3)
Operation not possible
Open with through-ventilation (Curve 2)
approx. 38 °C
Closed with heat exchanger (Curve 1)
approx. 45 °C
If you install the S7-300 horizontally, you can use the following types of cabinet:
• open, with closed ventilation
• closed, with heat exchanger
VHHDOVR
Selection and installation of cabinets
5-16
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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This section contains information about the overall configuration of an S7-300 on a
grounded incoming supply (TN-S network):
• Circuit-breaking devices, short-circuit and overload protection to VDE 0100 and
VDE 0113
• Load power supplies and load circuits
• Grounding concept
1RWH
An S7-300 can be used in many different ways, so we can only describe the basic
rules for the electrical installation in this document. You must observe at least
these basic rules if you want your S7-300 to operate free of trouble.
'HILQLWLRQ*URXQGHGSRZHUVXSSO\3(1
The neutral is grounded in a grounded power supply system (PEN). A single shortcircuit to ground between a live conductor or a grounded part of the system trips
the protective devices.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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&RQILJXULQJ
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A number of components and protective measures are prescribed for plant
installations. The type of components and the degree of compulsion pertaining to
the protective measures will depend on the VDE specification applicable to your
particular plant.
The table below shows components and protective measures.
Table 5-7
VDE specifications for the installation of a PLC system
&RPSDUH
9'(
Disconnecting devices for
control systems, sensors
and actuators
(1) ... Part 460:
Short-circuit/overload
protection:
(2) ... Part 725:
In groups for sensors and
actuators
Load power supply for AC
load circuits with more than
five electromagnetic devices
Master switch
Single-pole fusing of
circuits
(3) Electrical isolation by
transformer
recommended
9'(
... Part 1:
Circuit breaker
... Part 1:
•
In the case of a grounded
secondary circuit: Provide
single-pole protection
•
Otherwise: Provide allpole protection
Electrical isolation by
transformer mandatory
1) This column refers to the numbers in the diagram in the Summary diagram: Grounding
section.
&URVVUHIHUHQFH
Additional information on protective measures is in the Appendix.
VHHDOVR
General Rules and Regulations for S7-300 Operation
5-18
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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In an S7-300 configuration with grounded reference potential occurring interference
current is dissipated to the ground conductor/ to ground.
1RWH
Your CPU already is supplied complete with a grounded reference potential,
so if you wish to install an S7-300 with grounded reference potential, then you do
not need to make any changes to your CPU.
*URXQGHGUHIHUHQFHSRWHQWLDORQ&38V±'3
This connection diagram applies to the following CPUs
&38
2UGHU1R
$VRIKDUGZDUHYHUVLRQ
CPU 313
6ES7 313-1AD03-0AB0
01
CPU 314
6ES7 314-1AE04-0AB0
01
CPU 314 IFM
6ES7 314-5AE03-0AB0
01
CPU 314 IFM
6ES7 314-5AE83-0AB0
01
CPU 315
6ES7 315-1AF03-0AB0
01
CPU 315-2 DP
6ES7 315-2AF03-0AB0
01
CPU 316-2 DP
6ES7 316-2AG00-0AB0
01
CPU 318-2 DP
6ES7 318-2AJ00-0AB0
03
6ES7 314-1AE84-0AB0
6ES7 315-2AF83-0AB0
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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&RQILJXULQJ
The diagram illustrates an S7-300 configuration with grounded reference potential
(implemented with a jumper)
1
M
L+
M
M
L+
M
1M
<100 nF
3
2
4
Figure 5-7 S7-300 configuration with grounded reference potential (CPU 313 – 318-2 DP)
7KHGLDJUDPLOOXVWUDWHVXQGHUQXPEHU
1
The removable jumper
2
The grounding bus cable
3
The reference potential of the CPU interconnection
4
Rail
1RWH
If you wish to install an S7-300 with grounded reference potential, you must NOT
remove the jumper from the CPU.
,QVWDOOLQJWKH6ZLWKIORDWLQJUHIHUHQFHSRWHQWLDO
H[FHSWIRU&38,)0
'HILQLWLRQ
If you install an S7-300 with ungrounded reference potential, any interference
currents that occur are dissipated via an RC system to the ground conductor/local
ground integrated into the CPU.
1RWH
Floating potential installation of an S7-300 with CPU 312 IFM or CPU 31xC is not
possible.
5-20
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
&RQILJXULQJ
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In larger plants, it might prove necessary to install the S7-300 with floating
reference potential because of short-circuit to ground monitoring. This is the case,
for example, in chemical industry and power stations.
)ORDWLQJUHIHUHQFHSRWHQWLDORQ&38V±'3
This connection diagram applies to the
&38
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CPU 313
6ES7 313-1AD03-0AB0
01
CPU 314
6ES7 314-1AE04-0AB0
01
6ES7 314-1AE84-0AB0
CPU 314 IFM
6ES7 314-5AE03-0AB0
01
CPU 314 IFM
6ES7 314-5AE83-0AB0
01
CPU 315
6ES7 315-1AF03-0AB0
01
CPU 315-2 DP
6ES7 315-2AF03-0AB0
01
6ES7 315-2AF83-0AB0
CPU 316-2 DP
6ES7 316-2AG00-0AB0
01
CPU 318-2 DP
6ES7 318-2AJ00-0AB0
03
The diagram illustrates an S7-300 configuration with floating reference potential
(jumper has been removed)
M
L+
M
M
L+
M
1M
<100 nF
2
1
3
Figure 5-8 S7-300 configuration with floating reference potential (CPU 313 – 318-2 DP)
7KHGLDJUDPLOOXVWUDWHVXQGHUQXPEHU
1
The grounding bus cable
2
The reference potential of the CPU interconnection
3
The mounting rail
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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&RQILJXULQJ
If the jumper is not installed, the reference potential of the S7-300 is connected
internally to the ground conductor via an RC system and the rail. This discharges
radio-frequency interference current and avoids static charge.
1RWH
To create a floating reference potential, remove the jumper from the CPU between
the M terminals and functional ground.
,VRODWHGRUQRQLVRODWHGPRGXOHV
,VRODWHGPRGXOHV
In configurations with isolated modules, the reference potentials of the control
circuit (Minternal) and the load circuit (Mexternal) are galvanically isolated.
$SSOLFDWLRQUDQJHIRULVRODWHGPRGXOHV
Use isolated modules for:
• All AC load circuits
• DC load circuits with a separate reference potential, for example:
–
DC load circuits whose sensors have different reference potentials (for
example if grounded sensors are located at some considerable distance
from the control system and no equipotential bonding is possible)
–
DC load circuits with grounded positive pole (L+) (battery circuits).
,VRODWHGPRGXOHVDQGJURXQGLQJFRQFHSW
You can use isolated modules, regardless of whether or not the control system's
reference potential is grounded.
5-22
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
&RQILJXULQJ
([DPSOHRILVRODWHGPRGXOHV
The figure below shows a sample configuration of a CPU 312 IFM with isolated
modules.
The connection to ground of the reference potential is established automatically
with the CPU 312 IFM .
S7-300 CPU
PS
DI
DO
U internal
Data
M internal
1
L1
L1
µP
L+
M
N
PE
N
Ground bus in cabinet
L1
L+
M external
DC 24 V load power supply
AC 230 V
load power supply
N
Figure 5-9 Configuration with isolated modules
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
5-23
&RQILJXULQJ
1RQLVRODWHGPRGXOHV
In configurations with non-isolated modules, the reference potentials of the control
circuit (Minternal) and load circuit (Mexternal) are not electrically isolated (see the
figure below ).
([DPSOHRIQRQLVRODWHGPRGXOHV
For operation with an SM 334 AI 4/AO 2 analog I/O module you must connect one
of the grounding terminals Manalog to the CPU's chassis ground.
The figure below shows a sample configuration of an S7-300 CPU with nonisolated modules.
4AI/2AO
S7-300 CPU
PS
U internal
Data
M internal
µP
L1
L1
L+
PE
N
D
D
M
N
A
A
Manalog
M
1mm
2
Ground bus in cabinet
+
+
V
A
L+
M external
DC 24 V load power supply
Figure 5-10 Configuration with non-isolated modules
5-24
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
&RQILJXULQJ
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Low-resistance connections to ground reduce the risk of electric shock in case of a
short-circuit or system fault. Low-impedance connections (large surface, largesurface contact) reduces the effects of interference on the system or the emission
of interference signals. Here, effective shielding of cables and devices is also a
significant contribution.
:DUQLQJ
Connect all protection class 1 devices and all larger metal parts to protective
ground. This is the only way to protect users from electric shock. It also deflects
interference which is emitted from external power supply cables and signal cables
to cables connected to I/O devices.
0HDVXUHVIRUSURWHFWLYHJURXQGLQJ
The table below shows an overview of the most important measures for protective
grounding.
Table 5-8
Protective grounding measures
'HYLFH
0HDVXUHV
Cabinet/mounting
structure
Connection to central ground (e.g. equipotential bus line) via
cables with protective conductor quality
Rack / rail
Connection to central ground with cable of minimum cross2
section of 10 mm , if the rails are not installed in the cabinet
and not interconnected with larger metallic parts.
Module
None
I/O Device
Grounding via Schuko plug
Sensors and actuators
Grounding in accordance with regulations applying to the
system
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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&RQILJXULQJ
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You should always connect both ends of the cable shielding to ground/functional
ground, since this is the only way to achieve good interference suppression in the
higher frequency range.
If you connect only one end of the shielding (that is, at one or the other end of the
cable) to ground, you will merely achieve an attenuation in the lower frequency
range. One-sided shielding connections could be more favorable in situations
• not allowing the installation of an equipotential bonding conductor,
• if analog signals (some mA or µA) are transmitted,
• or if foil shielding is used (static shielding).
1RWH
Potential differences between two grounding points might cause an
equipotential current flow across shielding connected at both ends. In this case
you should install an additional equipotential bonding conductor..
&DXWLRQ
Always avoid the flow of operating current to ground.
$GGLWLRQDOLQIRUPDWLRQRQFDEOHVKLHOGLQJDQGHTXLSRWHQWLDOERQGLQJ
are found in the Appendix under the same topic.
5XOH*URXQGWKHORDGFLUFXLWV
You should always ground the load circuits. This common reference potential
(earth) ensures proper functioning.
7LS: (except for CPU 312 IFM)
If you want to locate a fault to ground, provide your load power supply (Terminal L–
or M) or the isolating transformer with a removable connection to the protective
conductor (see 2YHUYLHZ*URXQGLQJNumber 4).
5-26
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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Numerous output modules require an additional load voltage for switching control
devices.
The table below shows how to connect the load voltage reference potential Mexternal
for the various configuration versions.
Table 5-9
Connection of the load voltage reference potential
,QVWDOODWLRQ 1RQLVRODWHGPRGXOHV
grounded
Connect Mexternal with M
on the CPU
ungrounded Connect Mexternal with M
on the CPU
,VRODWHGPRGXOHV
5HPDUNV
Connect or do not connect Mexternal to the common
grounding line
Connect or do not connect ungrounded operation
Mexternal to the common
of CPU 312 IFM is not
grounding line
possible
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
5-27
Configuring
5.8.5 Overview: Grounding
CPU 312 IFM
The figure below shows you the complete assembly of an S7-300 with CPU 312
IFM with a power supply from TN-S power supply. Apart from powering the CPU,
the PS 307 also supplies the load current for the 24 VDC modules. Note: The
arrangement displayed does not correspond with the physical arrangement; it was
merely selected to give you a clear overview.
L1
L2
L3
N
PE
Low-voltage distribution
e. g. TN-S system (3 x 400 V)
Cabinet
1
SM
CPU
PS
Rail
41
L1
µP
L+
M
N
Signal modules
Ground bus in cabinet
3
2
AC
AC
AC 24 to 230 V load circuit for
AC modules
2
AC
DC
DC 5 to 60 V load circuit for
non-isolated DC modules
2
AC
DC
DC 5 to 60 V load circuit for
isolated DC modules
Figure 5-11 Grounding concept for the S7-300 with CPU 312 IFM
Table 5-10
Connection of the load voltage reference potential
The diagram illustrates under number
5-28
(1)
The main switch
(2)
Short-circuit/overload protection
(3)
The load current supply (galvanic isolation)
(4)
This connection is established automatically with the CPU 312 IFM.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
&RQILJXULQJ
$OO&38VH[FHSWIRU&38,)0
The figure below shows you an overall S7-300 configuration with TN-S power
supply. Apart from powering the CPU, the PS 307 also supplies the load current for
the 24 VDC modules.
Note: The arrangement displayed does not correspond with the physical
arrangement; it was merely selected to give you a clear overview.
L1
L2
L3
N
PE
Low-voltage distribution
e. g. TN-S system (3 x 400 V)
Cabinet
1
CPU
PS
SM
Rail
µP
L1
L+
N
M
M
5
Signal modules
Ground bus in cabinet
3
2
AC
AC
AC 24 to 230 V load circuit for AC modules
2
AC
DC
4
DC 5 to 60 V load circuit for
non-isolated DC modules
2
AC
DC
DC 5 to 60 V load circuit for
isolated DC modules
Figure 5-12 Grounding concept for the S7-300 with CPU 31 x
Table 5-11
Connection of the load voltage reference potential
7KHGLDJUDPLOOXVWUDWHVXQGHUQXPEHU
The main switch
Short-circuit/overload protection
The load current supply (galvanic isolation)
The removable connection to the equipment grounding conductor cable for ground
fault localization
Grounding brackets of the CPU (removable jumper)
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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&RQILJXULQJ
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The load power supply feeds the input and output circuits (load circuits), and the
sensors and actuators.
&KDUDFWHULVWLFVRIORDGSRZHUVXSSO\XQLWV
You will have to adapt the load power supply unit to your specific application. The
following table compares the various load power supply units and their
characteristics to help you make your choice:
Table 5-12
Characteristics of load power supply units
0DQGDWRU\IRU
&KDUDFWHULVWLFVRIWKHORDG
SRZHUVXSSO\
Protective separation
Modules requiring voltage
supplies of ≤ 60 VDC or ≤ 25
VAC.
24 VDC load circuits
Output voltage tolerances:
5HPDUNV
These characteristics apply
to Siemens power supplies
of the series PS 307 and to
SITOP power (series 6EP1).
-
20.4 V to 28.8 V
24 VDC load circuits
40.8 V to 57.6 V
48 VDC load circuits
51 V to 72 V
60 VDC load circuits
5HTXLUHPHQWVIRUORDGSRZHUVXSSOLHV
It must provide an extra-low voltage of ≤ 60 VDC and be safely isolated from
mains. Safe isolation from mains can be realized, for example, in accordance with
VDE 0100 Part 410 / HD 384-4-41 / IEC 364-4-41 (as functional extra-low voltage
with safe isolation) or VDE 0805 / EN 60950 / IEC 950 (as safety extra-low voltage
SELV) or VDE 0106 Part 101.
+RZWRGHWHUPLQHORDGFXUUHQW
The required load current is determined by the sum load current of all sensors and
actuators connected to the outputs.
In case of short-circuit the DC outputs are briefly loaded with twice to three times
the rated output current before the clocked electronic short-circuit protection comes
into effect. Thus, you must consider this increased short-circuit current when
selecting your load power supply unit. Uncontrolled load power supplies usually
provide this excess current. With controlled load power supplies - especially for low
output power (up to 20 A) - you must ensure that the supply can handle this excess
current.
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The figure below shows the overall S7-300 configuration (load power supply unit
and grounding concept), with TN-S mains supply.
Apart from powering the CPU, the PS 307 also supplies the load current for the
24 VDC modules.
1RWH
The arrangement of supply connections displayed does not correspond with the
physical arrangement; it was merely selected to give you a clear overview.
L1
L2
L3
N
PE
Low-voltage distribution
e. g. TN-S system (3 x 400 V)
Cabinet
S7-300 CPU
PS
SM
Rail
µP
L1
L+
M
N
M
Signal modules
Ground bus in cabinet
DC 24 V load circuit for DC modules
Figure 5-13 Example: S7-300 with load power supply from PS 307
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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2YHUYLHZ6XEQHWVZLWK6,0$7,&
SIMATIC offers the following subnets, according to different automation levels
(process, cell, field and actuator/sensor level ):
• Multi-Point Interface (MPI)
• PROFIBUS
• Point-to-point communication (PtP)
• Industrial Ethernet
• Actuator/Sensor Interface (ASI)
0XOWL3RLQW,QWHUIDFH03,
$YDLODELOLW\,QDOOWKH&38VGHVFULEHGLQWKLVGRFXPHQW
MPI is a small subnet with just a few nodes at the field/cell level. It is a multipointcapable interface in SIMATIC S7/M7 and C7, intended for operation as PG
interface for networking just a few CPUs or for exchanging small volumes of data
with PGs.
MPI always retains the last configuration of the transmission rate, node number
and highest MPI address, even after memory reset, voltage failure or deletion of
the CPU parameter configuration.
352),%86
$YDLODELOLW\&38VZLWKWKHOHWWHUV'3DIWHUWKHQXPEHUKDYHD'3LQWHUIDFH
DVWKHLUVHFRQGLQWHUIDFHHJ'3
PROFIBUS in the SIMATIC open, multivendor communication system represents
the network at the cell and field level.
PROFIBUS is available in two versions:
1. PROFIBUS DP field bus for fast cyclic data exchange, and PROFIBUS-PA for
the intrinsically safe area.
2. The cell level as PROFIBUS (FDL or PROFIBUS-FMS) for fast data exchange
with communication partners equipped with equal rights.
However, you can also implement PROFIBUS DP and PROFIBUS-FMS with
communication processors (CP).
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Industrial Ethernet in an open multivendor communication system represents the
SIMATIC network at the process and cell level. Industrial Ethernet is suitable for
fast and high-volume data exchange and offers offsite networking options via
gateway.
The CPUs described in this manual can only be connected to Industrial Ethernet by
means of communication processors.
$FWXDWRUVHQVRULQWHUIDFH$6,
,PSOHPHQWDWLRQXVLQJFRPPXQLFDWLRQSURFHVVRUV&3
The ASI, or actuator/sensor interface, represents a subnet system on the lowest
process level for automation systems. It is used especially for networking digital
sensors and actuators. The maximum data volume is 4 bit per slave station.
With S7-300 CPUs, you can connect to an ASI only with the help of communication
processors.
6DPHFRQILJXUDWLRQIRU03,DQG352),%86'3
For your MPI network configuration, we recommend you use the same network
components as in a PROFIBUS DP network configuration. The same configuration
rules apply in this case.
&URVVUHIHUHQFH
You will find more information about communication in the &RPPXQLFDWLRQZLWK
6,0$7,& Manual.
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03,352),%86'3
These subnets are the most frequently used for S7-300 CPUs, so they are
discussed in detail below.
&RQYHQWLRQ'HYLFH 1RGH
In the following, all networked devices are referred to as nodes.
6HJPHQW
A segment is a bus link between two terminating resistors. A segment can include
up to 32 nodes. It is also limited by the permitted line length, depending on the
transmission rate.
7UDQVPLVVLRQUDWH
These maximum transmission rates are possible:
• MPI
–
12 Mbps with CPU 318-2 DP
–
187.5 Kbps with all other CPUs
• PROFIBUS DP: 12 Mbps
1XPEHURIQRGHV
Maximum possible number of nodes per subnet:
Table 5-13
Nodes on the subnet
3DUDPHWHUV
Number
03,
127
352),%86'3
126
1)
Addresses
0 to 126
0 to 125
Remarks
Default: 32 addresses
of those:
Reserved are:
1 Master (reserved)
•
address 0 for PG
1 PG connection (address 0 reserved)
•
address 1 for OP
125 slaves or other masters
1) Note the CPU-specific maximum specifications in the CPU manual.
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To ensure that all nodes can intercommunicate, you must assign them an address:
• In the MPI network: an “MPI address“
•
In the PROFIBUS DP network: a “PROFIBUS DP address“
On the PG you can specify individual MPI/PROFIBUS addresses for each one of
the nodes (on some of the PROFIBUS DP slaves this is also possible per selector
switch).
'HIDXOW03,352),%86'3DGGUHVVHV
The table below shows you the factory setting of the MPI/PROFIBUS DP
addresses and the highest default MPI/PROFIBUS DP addresses for the devices.
Table 5-14
1RGH
GHYLFH
MPI/PROFIBUS DP addresses
'HIDXOW
03,352),%86
'3DGGUHVV
'HIDXOWKLJKHVW03,
DGGUHVV
'HIDXOWKLJKHVW
352),%86'3DGGUHVV
PG
0
32
126
OP
1
32
126
CPU
2
32
126
5XOHV$VVLJQLQJ03,352),%86'3DGGUHVVHV
Note the following rules before assigning MPI/PROFIBUS addresses:
• All MPI/PROFIBUS addresses in a subnet must be unique.
• The highest MPI/PROFIBUS address must be ≥ of the physical
MPI/PROFIBUS address, and it must be identical for each node. (Exception:
Connecting a PG to multiple nodes; refer to the next Chapter).
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Table 5-15
MPI addresses of CPs/FMs in an S7-300
2SWLRQV
Example:
([DPSOH
SF
BUSF
DC5V
CPU
CP
CP
)LUVWRSWLRQThe CPU adopts the CP
MPI addresses you specify in STEP 7.
MPI address
MPI
address
+x
MPI
address
.+y
6HFRQGRSWLRQThe CPU automatically
determines the MPI addresses of the CPs
in their configuration as follows: MPI
address of CPU; MPI address +1; MPI
address +2.
MPI address
MPI
address
+1
MPI
address
+2
FRCE
An S7-300 CPU and 2 CPs in one unit.
RUN
STOP
SM
You have two options for assigning MPI
addresses of CPs/FMs installed in one
unit:
(Default)
6SHFLDOIHDWXUHV&38'3
This CPU uses only one MPI address,
including the CPs connected.
5HFRPPHQGDWLRQVIRUWKH03,DGGUHVVQ
Reserve MPI address “0“ for a service PG or “1“ for a service OP. You can later
connect them temporarily to the subnet. Also, assign other MPI addresses to
PGs/OPs operating on the MPI subnet.
Recommended MPI address for the CPU in case of replacement or service:
Reserve MPI address “2” for the CPU. This prevents duplication of MPI addresses
after you connect a CPU with default settings to the MPI subnet (for example,
when replacing a CPU). That is, you must assign an MPI address greater than “2”
to CPUs on the MPI subnet.
5HFRPPHQGHG03,DGGUHVVQ
Reserve PROFIBUS address “0” for a service PG that you can subsequently
connect briefly to the PROFIBUS subnet if required. Therefore, assign unique
PROFIBUS addresses to PGs integrated in the PROFIBUS subnet.
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Use fiber optic cables instead of copper conductors if you want your field bus to
cover greater distances regardless of the transmission rate and be insensitive to
external noise fields.
(TXLSRWHQWLDOERQGLQJ
For information on what to take into account relating to equipotential bonding when
you configure your network, refer to the corresponding chapter in the appendix.
$OVRQRWH
the section referring to communication in the relevant CPU manual.
,QWHUIDFHV
03,LQWHUIDFH
$YDLODELOLW\,QDOOWKH&38VGHVFULEHGLQWKLVGRFXPHQW
MPI (Multi-Point Interface) represents the interface between the CPU and a PG/OP
or for communication in an MPI Subnet.
The typical (default) transmission rate is 187.5 Kbps. You can also set the rate to
19.2 Kbps for communication with an S7-200. Other baud rates are not possible
(exception CPU 318-2DP: up to 12 Mbps).
The CPU automatically broadcasts its bus parameter configuration (e.g.
transmission rate) via MPI interface. A programming device, for example, can then
automatically retrieve the correct parameters and connect to an MPI Subnet.
1RWH
In RUN mode, you may only connect PGs to the MPI Subnet.
Other stations (e.g.. OP, TP, ...) should not be connected to the MPI subnet while
the PLC is in run mode. Otherwise, transferred data might be corrupted as a result
of interference or global data packages may get lost.
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The PROFIBUS DP interface is mainly used to connect distributed I/Os.
PROFIBUS DP allows you to create large, extended subnets, for example.
The PROFIBUS DP interface can be configured as either master or slave, and
offers a transmission speed of up to 12 Mbps.
The CPU sends its bus parameters (e.g. the baud rate) to the PROFIBUS DP
interface (if it is used as the master). A programming device, for example, can then
automatically retrieve the correct parameters and connect to a PROFIBUS subnet.
In your configuration, you can disable this bus parameter broadcast.
5HIHUHQFH&38'3RQO\
You will find information about the DPV1 functionality in the chapter of the same
name of the &38'DWD&38,)0±'35HIHUHQFH0DQXDO.
:KLFKGHYLFHVFDQ,FRQQHFWWRZKLFKLQWHUIDFH"
Table 5-16
The following devices may be connected
03,
352),%86'3
•
PG/PC
•
PG/PC
•
OP/TP
•
OP/TP
•
S7-300/400 with MPI interface
•
DP slaves
•
S7-200
(19.2 Kbps only)
•
DP master
•
Actuators/Sensors
•
S7-300/400 with PROFIBUS DP
interface
)XUWKHULQIRUPDWLRQ
Further information on specific connections can be found in the &RPPXQLFDWLRQ
ZLWK6,0$7,& manual.
Details on PtP communication is found in the 7HFKQRORJLFDO)XQFWLRQV Manual.
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For PROFIBUS DP or MPI networking we offer you the following bus cables for
diverse fields of application:
Table 5-17
Available bus cables
%XVFDEOH
2UGHU1R
PROFIBUS cable
6XV1 830-0AH10
PROFIBUS cable, halogen-free
6XV1 830-0CH10
PROFIBUS underground cable
6XV1 830-3AH10
PROFIBUS trailing cable
6XV1 830-3BH10
PROFIBUS cable with PUR sheath for
environments subject to chemical and
mechanical stress
6XV1 830-0DH10
PROFIBUS bus cable with PE sheath for
the food and beverages industry
6XV1 830-0BH10
PROFIBUS bus cable for festooning
6XV1 830-3CH10
3URSHUWLHVRI352),%86FDEOHV
The PROFIBUS cable is a shielded twisted-pair cable with copper conductors. It is
used for line transmission in accordance with US Standard EIA RS485.
The table below lists the characteristics of these bus cables.
Table 5-18
Properties of PROFIBUS cables
&KDUDFWHULVWLFVRIWKHEXVFDEOHVIRU
352),%863URSHUWLHV
9DOXHV
Impedance level
approx. 135 Ω to 160 Ω (f = 3 MHz to 20 MHz)
Loop resistance
≤ 115 Ω/km
Effective capacitance
30 nF/km
Attenuation
0.9 dB/100 m (f = 200 kHz)
permitted conductor cross-sections
0.3 mm to 0.5 mm
permitted cable diameter
8 mm ± 0.5 mm
2
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When wiring PROFIBUS cables, you must not
• twist,
• stretch
• or compress them.
When wiring indoor bus cables, also maintain the following marginal conditions
(dA = outer cable diameter):
Table 5-19
Marginal conditions for wiring interior bus cables
&KDUDFWHULVWLFV
&RQGLWLRQ
Bending radius (one-off)
≥ 80 mm (10 x dA)
Bending radius (multiple times)
≥ 160 mm (20 x dA)
permitted temperature range during installation
-5 °C to +50 °C
Shelf and stationary operating temperature range
-30 °C to +65 °C
&URVVUHIHUHQFH
If you want to use fiber optic cable cables for PROFIBUS, you can find further
information on this topic in the SIMATIC NET, PROFIBUS Networks Manual.
56EXVFRQQHFWRU
Table 5-20
Bus connector
7\SH
5-40
2UGHU1R
RS485 bus connector, up to 12 Mbps,
with 90° cable exit,
without PG interface,
with PG interface
6ES7 972-0BA11-0XA0
6ES7 972-0BB11-0XA0
Fast Connect RS485 bus connector, up to 12 Mbps,
with 90° cable exit, with insulation displacement technology
, without PG interface,
with PG interface
6ES7 972-0BA50-0XA0
6ES7 972-0BB50-0XA0
RS 485 bus connector up to 12 Mbps
with 35° cable exit (not CPU 31xC, 312, 314 (6ES73141AF10-0AB0) or 315-2 DP (6ES7315-2AG10-0AB0))
without PG interface
with PG interface
6ES7 972-0BA40-0XA0
6ES7 972-0BB40-0XA0
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You require these bus connectors to connect the PROFIBUS cable to an MPI or
PROFIBUS-DP interface
You do QRW require a bus connector for:
• DP slaves with degree of protection IP 65 (e.g. ET 200C)
• RS485 Repeater.
56UHSHDWHU
Table 5-21
RS 485 repeater
7\SH
RS485 repeater
2UGHU1R
6ES7 972-0AA00-0XA0
7DVNRIWKH56UHSHDWHU
An RS485 repeater amplifies data signals on bus lines and interconnects bus
segments.
You require this RS485 Repeater in the following situations:
• for operation with more than 32 network nodes
• when interconnecting a grounded and an ungrounded segment
• when exceeding the maximum line length in a segment
7KHPD[LPXPFDEOHOHQJWKVIRU565HSHDWHUV
... can be found in the Chapter &DEOHOHQJWKV.
/RQJHUFDEOHOHQJWKV
If you want to implement cable lengths above those permitted in a segment, you
must use RS485 repeaters. The maximum cable length possible between two
RS485 repeaters corresponds to the cable length of a segment (see the following
Chapter). Please note that these maximum cable lengths only apply if no other
node is interconnected between the two RS485 repeaters. You can connect up to
nine RS485 repeaters in series.
Please note that you have to add the RS485 repeater when you determine the
number of nodes in your subnet, even if it is not assigned its own MPI/PROFIBUS
address.
7HFKQLFDOGDWDDQGLQVWDOODWLRQLQVWUXFWLRQVDUHIRXQG
... in the RS485 Repeater product information.
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3*SDWFKFRUG
Table 5-22
PG patch cord
7\SH
2UGHU1R
PG patch cord
6ES7 901-4BD00-0XA0
6WXEFDEOHV
If bus nodes are connected to a bus segment via stub cables (e.g. PG via a normal
PG cable), then you must consider the maximum possible length of the stub cable.
You can use a PROFIBUS bus cable with bus connector as the stub cable for up to
3 Mbps.
Use the patch cord to connect the PG or PC when operating above 3 Mbps. In your
bus configuration you can use multiple PG patch cords with this order no. Do not
use other types of stub cable.
7KHPD[LPXPFDEOHOHQJWKVIRU3*SDWFKFRUGV
... can be found in the Chapter &DEOHOHQJWKV.
&DEOHOHQJWK
03,6XEQHW6HJPHQW
You can implement cable lengths of up to 50 m in an MPI subnet segment. This 50
m applies from the first node to the last node in the segment.
Table 5-23
Permitted cable lengths in an MPI subnet segment
7UDQVPLVVLRQUDWH
19.2 Kbps
6&38V
ZLWKRXW&38'3
&38'3
QRQLVRODWHG
03,LQWHUIDFH
LVRODWHG
03,LQWHUIDFH
50 m
1,000 m
-
M 200
187.5 Kbps
1.5 Mbps
3.0 Mbps
M 100
6.0 Mbps
12.0 Mbps
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The cable length in a segment of a PROFIBUS subnet depends on the
transmission rate.
Table 5-24
Permitted cable lengths in a PROFIBUS subnet segment
7UDQVPLVVLRQUDWH
0D[LPXPFDEOHOHQJWKLQDVHJPHQW
9.6 Kbps to 187.5 Kbps
1,000 m
500 Kbps
M 400
1.5 Mbps
M 200
3 Mbps to 12 Mbps
M 100
/RQJHUFDEOHOHQJWKV
If you want to implement cable lengths above those permitted in a segment, you
must use RS485 repeaters. Information on this topic can be found in the RS485
repeater product information.
/HQJWKRIWKHVWXEFDEOHV
If bus nodes are connected to a bus segment via stub cables (e.g. PG via a normal
PG cable), then you must consider the maximum possible length of the stub cable.
The following table lists the maximum permitted lengths of stub cables per
segment:
Table 5-25
Stub cable lengths per segment
7UDQVPLVVLRQUDWH
0D[OHQJWKRIVWXE 1XPEHURIQRGHVZLWKVWXEFDEOHOHQJWK
FDEOHVSHUVHJPHQW
RI
PRUP
0
9.6 Kbps to 93.75
Kbps
M 96
32
32
187.5 Kbps
M 75
32
25
500 Kbps
M 30
20
10
1.5 Mbps
M 10
6
3
3 Mbps to 12 Mbps
1)
1)
1)
1)
At 3 Mbps and higher, use the PG patch cord (Order No. 6ES7 901-4BD00-0XA0) to
connect the PG or PC. You can use multiple PG patch cords of this number in an
installation. Do not use any other type of stub cable.
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&RQILJXULQJ
6DPSOHQHWZRUNV
([DPSOH,QVWDOOLQJDQ03,VXEQHW
The figure below shows you the block diagram of an MPI subnet.
S7-300
SF
BUSF
3 S7-300
2
3 S7-300
PG
3 S7-300
3
DC5V
FRCE
RUN
STOP
PS
CPU
OP 27
MPI addr. 2
2
MPI addr. 1
PS
CPU
CPU
PS
MPI addr. 3
PS
CPU
CPU
MPI addr. 4
CPU
CPU
CP
MPI addr. 6 MPI addr. 7
MPI addr. 5
PROFIBUS 4
1
3
3 S7-300
S7-300
PS
PS CPU
CPU
MPI addr. 13
MPI addr. 12
PS
CPU
CPU
CPU
CPU
3
FM
OP 27
OP 27
1
3 S7-300
MPI addr. 11
MPI addr. 10
MPI addr. 8 MPI addr. 9
5
MPI addr. 0
PG
Figure 5-14 Example of an MPI subnet
.H\WRQXPEHUVLQWKHILJXUH
Terminating resistor inserted
S7-300 and OP 27 have subsequently been connected to the MPI subnet using their MPI default
address.
With CPU 318-2 DP, a separate MPI address is not assigned to CPs or FMs. With S7-300 CPUs (without
CPU 318-2 DP). you can also freely assign MPI addresses for the CPs/ FMs.
In addition to the MPI address, the CP also has a PROFIBUS address (7 in this case).
Connected via a stub cable using the default MPI address for commissioning/maintenance only
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The figure below shows you:
• a possible MPI Subnet configuration
• maximum distances possible in an MPI subnet
• the principle of “Line extension“ using RS485 repeaters
3 S7-300
3 S7-300
3 S7-300
PG
PS
PS
CPU
CPU
CPU
CPU
PS
RS 485Repeater
CPU
CPU
OP 27
1
MPI addr. 3
MPI addr. 5
MPI addr. 4
PG
MPI addr. 6
1
MPI addr. 7
1
2
max. 1000 m
MPI addr.
max. 50 m
3
PS
MPI addr. 11
PS
CPU
CPU
OP 27
1
3 S7-300
S7-300
CPU
CPU
OP 27
MPI addr. 10
MPI addr. 9
MPI addr. 8
1
RS 485Repeater
1
max. 50 m
Figure 5-15 Example: Maximum distance in the MPI subnet
.H\WRQXPEHUVLQWKHILJXUH
Terminating resistor inserted
PG connected by means of a stub cable for maintenance purposes
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([DPSOH,QVWDOOLQJD352),%86VXEQHW
The figure below shows you the block diagram of a PROFIBUS subnet.
3
S7-300
3
CPU
31x-2 DP
PS CPU
MASTER
MPI addr. 3
S7-300
3
PS ET
CPU
200M
PS ET
CPU
200M
PSPSCPU
CPU
ET
200 M
DP-CPU
PS ET
CPU
200M
S5-95U
1
PROFIBUS
addr. 2
PROFIBUS
addr. 3
PROFIBUS
addr. 4
PROFIBUS
addr. 6
PROFIBUS
addr. 5
PROFIBUS
addr. 7
MPI addr. 0
PG 2
PS ET
CPU
200M
CPU
ET
200B
ET 200B
CPU
ET
200B
CPU
ET 200B
1
PROFIBUS
1
addr. 12
PROFIBUS
addr. 11
PROFIBUS
addr. 10
PROFIBUS
addr. 9
PROFIBUS
addr. 8
Figure 5-16 Example of a PROFIBUS subnet
.H\WRQXPEHUVLQWKHILJXUH
Terminating resistor inserted
PG connected by means of a stub cable for maintenance purposes
5-46
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([DPSOH&38['3DV03,DQG352),%86QRGHV
The figure below shows you an assembly with a CPU 31x-2 DP integrated in an
MPI subnet and at the same time operated as DP master in a PROFIBUS subnet.
S7-300
PG
S5-95U
CPU
PS CPU
1
DP addr. 7
1
MPI addr. 0
MPI addr. 2
2
S5-95U
DP addr. 6
S7-300
CPU
PS
S5-95U
MPI addr. 3
DP addr. 5
S7-300 CPU
with DP interface
as DP master
S7-300
CPU
PS CPU
OP 27
MPI addr. 4
MPI addr. 5
S7-300
1
ET200M
DP addr. 2
RS 485Repeater
ET200M
DP addr. 3
DP addr. 4
MPI addr. 6
CPU
PS CPU
1
CPU
PS DP-CPU
1
ET200M
OP 27
MPI addr. 8
ET200M
9
DP addr. 9
MPI addr. 7
ET200B
DP addr. 8
ET200B
1
DP addr. 10 DP addr. 11
MPI subnet
PROFIBUS subnet
Figure 5-17 Example: CPU 314C-2 DP as MPI and PROFIBUS nodes
.H\WRQXPEHUVLQWKHILJXUH
Terminating resistor inserted
PG connected by means of a stub cable for maintenance purposes
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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With a programming device you can access all modules across network
boundaries.
Requirements
• You must use STEP 7, Version 5.0 or higher.
• You must assign the PG/PC to a network in your STEP 7 project (SIMATIC
Manager, assigning a PG/PC).
• The network boundaries must be bridged by modules with routing capability.
• After having configured all networks in NETPRO, you have initiated a new
compilation for all stations and downloaded the configuration to every module
capable of routing. This also applies to all changes made in the network.
Thus, every router knows all possible paths to a target node.
This example illustrates routing beyond network limits with two MPI networks and
one PROFIBUS-DP network.
PG/PC 3
S7-400
PS
CPU416
CPU
S7-400
PS
CPU
CPU417
MPI (2)
MPI (1)
S7-300
S7-300
PS
CPU
CPU
31x-2 DP
PS
CPU
CPU
PG/PC 1
PROFIBUS-DP
ET200
CPU
PG/PC 2
Figure 5-18 Example of PG access across network boundaries (routing)
5-48
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
&RQILJXULQJ
,QIRUPDWLRQRQURXWLQJFDQEHIRXQGLQWKH
• &38'DWD&38,)0±'35HIHUHQFH0DQXDO
• In the &RPPXQLFDWLRQZLWK6,0$7,& manual.
([DPSOH7HUPLQDWLQJUHVLVWRULQWKH03,VXEQHW
The following figure shows you where to connect the terminating resistors on the
MPI subnet . In this example, the programming device (PG) is connected by
means of a stub cable only during commissioning or servicing .
S7-300
PG
PSPSCPU
CPU
ET
200 M
CPU
1
S7-300
1
S7-300
PSPSCPU
CPU
ET
200 M
PSPSCPU
CPU
ET
200 M
S7-300
RS 485Repeater
PSPSCPU
CPU
ET
200 M
OP 27
OP 27
1
1
PG
Installing Figure 5-19
2
the terminating resistors in an MPI subnet
.H\WRQXPEHUVLQWKHILJXUH
Terminating resistor inserted
PG connected by means of a stub cable for maintenance purposes
:DUQLQJ
Disturbance of data traffic might occur on the bus.
A bus segment must always be terminated at both ends with the terminating
resistor. This, for example, is not the case if the last slave with bus connector is off
power.
Since the bus connector draws its power from the station, the terminating resistor
has no effect.
Please make sure that power is always supplied to stations on which the
terminating resistor is active.
As an alternative, you can also use the PROFIBUS Terminator as active bus
termination.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
5-49
&RQILJXULQJ
5-50
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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we shall explain the steps required for the mechanical assembly of an S7-300.
1RWH
Note the installation guidelines and notes on safety in this manual when mounting,
commissioning and operating S7-300 systems.
2SHQFRPSRQHQWV
S7-300 modules are "Open Components" according to IEC 61131-2 and EU
directive 73/23/EEC (Low-Voltage directive), and to UL/CSA Approval an "open
type".
In order to conform with specifications on safe operation relating to mechanical
strength, inflammability, stability and touch-protection, the following alternative
installation modes are prescribed:
• Installation in a suitable cubicle
• Installation in a suitable cabinet
• Installation in an appropriately equipped and closed operating area
Access to these areas must only be possible with a key or tool. Only trained or
authorized personnel is allowed access to these cubicles, cabinets or electrical
operating rooms.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
6-1
,QVWDOODWLRQ
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Installation accessories are included with the module package. The appendix
contains a list of accessories and spare parts together with the corresponding
order numbers.
Table 6-1
Module accessories
0RGXOH
$FFHVVRULHVLQFOXGHG
CPU
'HVFULSWLRQ
1 x Slot number label
For assigning slot numbers
2 keys
The key is used for
operating the CPU's mode
selector switch
(only for CPUs with a key
switch, such as the CPU
318-2 DP)
Inscription labels
For labeling the integrated
inputs and outputs (CPU
312 IFM, 314 IFM) with the
MPI address and firmware
version
Tip: Templates for labeling
strips are available on the
Internet at
http://www.ad.siemens.de/cs
info under article ID
11978022.
Signal module (SM)
1 bus connector
For electrical interconnection
of modules
1 labeling strip
for labeling module I/Os
Function Module (FM)
Tip: Templates for labeling
strips are available on the
Internet at
http://www.ad.siemens.de/cs
info under article ID 406745.
Communication module (CP) 1 bus connector
1 inscription label
(only CP 342-2)
For electrical interconnection
of modules
for labeling the connection to
the PLC interface
Tip: Templates for labeling
strips are available on the
Internet at
http://www.ad.siemens.de/cs
info under article ID 406745.
Interface module (IM)
6-2
1 x Slot number label (only
IM 361 and IM 365)
For assigning slot numbers
on racks 1 to 3
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
,QVWDOODWLRQ
7RROVDQGPDWHULDOUHTXLUHG
For your S7-300 installation you require the tools and materials listed in the table
below.
Table 6-2
Installation tools and materials
<RXUHTXLUH
IRU
cutting the 2 m rail to length
Standard tool
scribing and drilling holes on the 2 m rail
Standard tool, 6.5 mm diameter drill bit
screw-mounting the rail
wrench or screwdriver, matching the
selected fixing screws
diverse M6 screws (length depends on the
place of installation) with nuts and spring
lock washers
screw-fastening the modules on the rail
screwdriver with 3.5 mm blade width
(cylindrical design)
pulling out the grounding slide contact in the screwdriver with 3.5 mm blade width
floating state
(cylindrical design)
,QVWDOOLQJWKHUDLO
,QWURGXFWLRQ
rails are available in two versions:
• Ready-to-use, in four standard lengths (with 4 holes for fixing screws and
1 ground conductor bolt)
• Meter rail
This may be shortened to any length if unusual size attachments are required. It
has no holes for fixing screws and no ground conductor screw.
5HTXLUHPHQW
You have prepared the 2 m rail for installation.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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1. Cut the 2 m rail to the required length.
2. Mark out:
–
four bores for the fixing screws (for dimensions refer to "Dimensions for
fixing holes")
–
one hole for the protective conductor bolt.
3. If the length of your rail exceeds 830 mm, you must stabilize it by providing
additional holes for fixing it with more screws.
Mark out these holes along the groove in the middle section of the rail (see the
Figure below). The pitch should be approx. 500 mm.
+0.2
4. Drill the marked holes to a diameter of 6.5
mm for M6 screws.
5. Attach an M6 screw for fixing the ground conductor.
3
2
4
1
5
Figure 6-1 Holes for mounting the 2 m rail
.H\WRQXPEHUVLQWKHILJXUH
Hole for ground conductor screw
Groove for drilling additional holes for mounting screws
Hole for mounting screw
Additional hole for mounting screw
Hole for mounting screw
6-4
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
,QVWDOODWLRQ
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The mounting hole dimensions for the rail are shown in the table below.
Table 6-3
Mounting holes for rails
³6WDQGDUG´UDLO
PUDLO
32.5
32,5 mm
mm
32.5 mm
57.2 mm
57,2 mm
57.2 mm
ca.
500 mm
15 mm _
_
ca.
500 mm
15 mm _
_
b
a
Length of rail
Dimension a
Dimension b
160 mm
10 mm
140 mm
482.6 mm
8.3 mm
466 mm
530 mm
15 mm
500 mm
830 mm
15 mm
800 mm
–
)L[LQJVFUHZV
You can use the following type of screw to mount the rails:
)RU
7\SHRIVFUHZ
'HVFULSWLRQ
Lateral fixing screws
Cylindrical head screw M6 to Choose a suitable screw
ISO 1207/ISO 1580
length for your assembly.
(DIN 84/DIN 85)
You also need size 6.4
M6 hexagonal head screw to washers to ISO 7092
(DIN 433)
ISO 4017 (DIN 4017)
additional fixing screws
(only 2 m rail)
Cylindrical head screw M6 to
ISO 1207/ISO 1580
(DIN 84/DIN 85)
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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,QVWDOODWLRQ
,QVWDOOLQJWKHUDLO
1. When you mount the rails, allow sufficient space for mounting modules and heat
elimination (at least 40 mm above and below the modules. See the figure
below).
2. Mark up the mounting holes on the mounting surface. Drill the holes to a
+0,2
diameter of 6.5
mm.
3. Screw on the rail (M6 screws).
1RWH
Take care to create a low-impedance connection between the rail and a
mounting surface which is a grounded metal plate or equipment mounting plate.
In the case of varnished or anodized metals, for instance, use a suitable
contacting agent or contact washers.
40 mm
SIEMENS
20
mm
40 mm
20
mm
Figure 6-2 Free space required for an S7-300 installation
6-6
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
,QVWDOODWLRQ
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5HTXLUHPHQWVIRUPRGXOHLQVWDOODWLRQ
• Configuration of the automation system is complete.
• The rail is installed.
2UGHURIWKHPRGXOHV
Snap the modules onto the rail, starting at the left and in the following order:
1. Power supply module
2. CPU
3. signal modules, function modules, communication modules, interface modules
1RWH
If you install SM 331 analog input modules, please check EHIRUH installation
whether you have to reposition the measuring range submodules at the side of the
module. See Chapter 4 on analog modules in the 0RGXOH'DWD Reference Manual.
1RWH
If you want to create the S7-300 with a floating reference potential, you must
establish this state on the CPU, ideally before you attach it to the rail. The section
entitled &UHDWLQJDQ6ZLWKIORDWLQJUHIHUHQFHSRWHQWLDO contains the
necessary instructions.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
6-7
,QVWDOODWLRQ
,QVWDOODWLRQVWHSV
The steps for installing the modules are described below.
1.
2.
Plug the bus connectors into the CPU and
signal/function/communication/interface
modules.
One bus connector is included per
module, but not for the CPU.
•
Always start at the CPU when you plug
in the bus connectors. Here, take the
bus connector of the "last" module in
the row.
•
Insert the bus connectors into the
other modules.
The "last" module is not equipped with
a bus connector.
CPU
1
Add all modules in their specified
sequence to the rail , slide them up to
the module on the left ), then swing
them down .
2
CPU
3
3.
Manually tighten the module screws.
CPU
,QVHUWWKHNH\&38VZLWKNH\VZLWFKRQO\
Once you have installed the modules, you can insert the key into the CPU mode
selector switch.
6-8
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
,QVWDOODWLRQ
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After installation, you should assign a slot number to each module. This makes it
easier to assign the modules in the configuration table in 67(3. The table below
shows the slot number assignment.
Table 6-4
Slot numbers for S7 modules
6ORWQXPEHU
1
0RGXOH
Power supply (PS)
5HPDUNV
–
2
CPU
–
3
Interface module (IM)
To the right of the CPU
4
1st signal module
To the right of the CPU or IM
5
2nd signal module
–
6
3rd signal module
–
7
4th signal module
–
8
5th signal module
–
9
6th signal module
–
10
7th signal module
–
11
8th signal module
–
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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,QVWDOODWLRQ
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1. Hold the corresponding slot number in front of the relevant module.
2. Insert the pin into the opening on the module (1).
3. Press the slot number into the module (2). The slot number breaks off from the
wheel.
The figure below illustrates this procedure. The slot number labels are included
with the CPU.
PS CP
U
1
2
Figure 6-3 Inserting slot numbers in modules
6-10
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
:LULQJ
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we shall explain the procedures for wiring an S7-300.
$FFHVVRULHVUHTXLUHG
To wire the S7-300, you require the accessories listed in the table below.
Table 7-1
Wiring accessories
$FFHVVRULHV
'HVFULSWLRQ
Connection comb (included with the PS)
for the connection between the power
supply module and the CPU
Front connector
for the connection of system
sensors/actuators to the S7-300
Labeling strips
for labeling the module I/Os
Shielding contact element, shielding
terminals (matching the shielding diameter)
for connecting cable shielding
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
7-1
:LULQJ
7RROVDQGPDWHULDOUHTXLUHG
To wire the S7-300, you require the tools and materials listed in the table below.
Table 7-2
Tools and materials for wiring
:LULQJWRROVDQGPDWHULDOV<RXUHTXLUH
connecting the protective conductor to the
rail
IRU
Wrench (size 10)
Protective conductor cable (cross2
section ≥ 10 mm ) with M6 cable lug
M6 nut, washer, spring lock washer
Adjusting the power supply module to mains Screwdriver with a blade width of 4.5 mm
voltage
Wiring the power supply module and the
CPU
Screwdriver with a blade width of 3.5 mm,
side-cutter, wire stripping tool
Flexible cable, e.g. sheathed flexible cable
2
3 x 1.5 mm
If required, wire end ferrules to DIN 46228
Wiring the front connector
Screwdriver with a blade width of 3.5 mm,
side-cutter, wire stripping tool
2
2
Flexible cable 0.25 mm to 0.75/1.5 mm
If required, shielded cables
If required, wire end ferrules to DIN 46228
%ULHIRYHUYLHZRIWKHSRZHUVXSSO\PRGXOHDQG&38
Table 7-3
Conditions for connecting the PS and CPU
&RQQHFWDEOHFDEOHV
solid conductors
WR36DQG&38
No
flexible conductors
•
Without wire end ferrule
0.25 mm to 2.5 mm
•
With wire end ferrule
0.25 mm to 1.5 mm
2
2
2
2
Number of conductors per terminal
1 conductor, or 2 conductors up to 1.5 mm
(total) in a common wire end ferrule
Diameter of the conductor insulation
max. 3.8 mm
Stripped length
11 mm
2
Wire end ferrules to DIN 46228
7-2
•
Without insulating collar
Version A, 10 mm to 12 mm length
•
With insulating collar
Version E, up to 12 mm length
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
:LULQJ
%ULHIRYHUYLHZRIIURQWFRQQHFWRUV
Table 7-4
Wiring conditions for front connectors
&RQQHFWDEOHFDEOHV
solid conductors
)URQWFRQQHFWRU
20-pin
40-pin
No
No
flexible conductors
•
•
Without wire end
ferrule
2
2
0.25 mm to 0.75 mm
2
2
0.25 mm to 0.75 mm
0.25 mm to 1.5 mm
0.25 mm to 1.5 mm
With wire end ferrule
•
2
2
2
2
Potential supply: 1.5 mm
2
Number of conductors per
terminal
1 conductor, or 2 conductors
2
up to 1.5 mm (total) in a
common wire end ferrule
1 conductor, or 2 conductors
2
up to 0.75 mm (total) in a
common wire end ferrule
Diameter of the conductor
insulation
max. 3.1 mm
•
max. 2.0 mm for
40 conductors
•
max. 3.1 mm for 20
conductors
Stripped length
6 mm
6 mm
Wire end ferrules to DIN
46228
•
Without insulating
collar
Version A, 5 mm to 7 mm
length
Version A, 5 mm to 7 mm
length
•
With insulating collar
Version E, up to 6 mm long
Version E, up to 6 mm long
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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:LULQJ
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5HTXLUHPHQW
The rail is fixed to the mounting surface.
&RQQHFWLQJWKHSURWHFWLYHFRQGXFWRU
1. Connect the protective conductor to the rail,
using the M6 protective conductor bolt.
2
Minimum cross-section of the protective conductor: 10 mm .
The figure below shows how the protective conductor must be bonded to the rail.
Figure 7-1 connecting the protective conductor to the rail
1RWH
Always ensure a low-impedance connection of the protective conductor. You can
achieve this by bonding a cable with low impedance and as short as possible to a
large contact surface.
For example, if the S7-300 is mounted on a hinged frame you must use a flexible
ground strap.
7-4
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
:LULQJ
$GMXVWLQJWKH3RZHU6XSSO\0RGXOHWRWKH0DLQV9ROWDJH
,QWURGXFWLRQ
You can operate the S7-300 power supply on 120 VAC or on 230 VAC. Factory
setting for PS 307 is always 230 VAC.
6HWWLQJWKHPDLQVYROWDJHVHOHFWRUVZLWFK
Check to see whether the selector switch is set to the correct mains voltage.
You can change the selector switch setting as follows:
1. Remove the protective cap with a screwdriver.
2. Set the selector switch to the available line voltage.
3. Replace the cover.
1
PS
CPU
2
Figure 7-2 Setting the mains voltage selector switch for the PS 307
.H\WRQXPEHUVLQWKHILJXUH
Remove protective cap with screwdriver.
Set selector switch to mains voltage
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
7-5
:LULQJ
:LULQJWKHSRZHUVXSSO\PRGXOHDQGWKH&38
5HTXLUHPHQW
The modules are mounted on the rail.
&RQQHFWLRQFRPEH[FHSWIRU&38,)0
The power supply (PS) module is supplied with a connection comb to facilitate
connection of the power supply module and the CPU.
36DQG&38ZLULQJ
1RWH
The PS 307 power supply module is equipped with two additional DC 24 V
connections (L+ and M) for the supply of I/O modules.
:DUQLQJ
You may come into contact with live wires if the power supply module and any
additional load power supply units are connected to the mains.
You should therefore disconnect the S7-300 from the power supply before starting
the wiring. Only use ferrules with insulating collars to press-fit onto the ends of the
cables. Once you have wired the modules, close all the front panels. You can then
switch on the S7-300 again.
7-6
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
:LULQJ
1. Open the front panels of the power supply module and CPU.
2. Remove the strain relief clamp from the power supply module.
3. Strip the power cable to a length of approximately 11 mm and connect it to L1,
N, and to the ground conductor terminal of the power supply module.
4. Screw-tighten the strain relief clamp again.
5. You can now wire your CPU:
–
With &38,)0, the power supply terminal connection is located on the
front panel of the integrated I/O.
Connect the lower terminal M of the power supply module to terminal M of
the CPU and the lower terminal L+ of the power supply module to terminal
L+ of the CPU.
–
&38,)0'3'3'3 Insert the
connection comb and screw-tighten it.
6. Close the front panel.
The figure below illustrates the procedures described above.
1
2
230 V/120 V
Figure 7-3 Wiring the power supply module and the CPU
Table 7-5
Wiring accessories
7KHQXPEHUVKDYHWKHIROORZLQJPHDQLQJV
Cable grip of the power supply
Connection comb (accessory for power supply)
1RWH
The PS 307 power supply module is equipped with two additional DC 24 V
connections (L+ and M) for the supply of I/O modules.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
7-7
:LULQJ
:LULQJ)URQW&RQQHFWRUV
,QWURGXFWLRQ
The front connector is used to connect the sensors and actuators of your system to
the S7-300 automation system. Wire the sensors and actuators to this front
connector and then plug it into the module.
)URQWFRQQHFWRUYHUVLRQV
Front connectors come in 20-pin and 40-pin versions, each with screw contacts or
spring terminals. The 40-pin front connector is required for 32-channel signal
modules.
You must use the following front connectors, depending on the module:
Table 7-6
Assignment of front connectors to modules
0RGXOH
)URQWFRQQHFWRUVZLWK
VFUHZWHUPLQDOV2UGHU
1R
Signal modules
(not 32-channel),
)URQWFRQQHFWRUVZLWK
VSULQJWHUPLQDOV2UGHU
1R
6ES7 392-1AJ00-0AA0
6ES7 392-1BJ00-0AA0
6ES7 392-1AM00-0AA0
6ES7 392-1BM01-0AA0
Function modules,
Communication module
CP 342-2
CPU 312 IFM
Signal modules
(32 channel) and CPUs
314 IFM
7HUPLQDWLRQZLWKVSULQJWHUPLQDOV
To terminate a conductor in a front connector with spring terminals, simply insert
the screwdriver vertically into the opening with the red opening mechanism, insert
the wire into the terminal and remove the screwdriver.
:DUQLQJ
You can damage the spring-based opening mechanism of the front connector if the
screwdriver slips sideways or if you insert the wrong size of screwdriver. Always
slide a suitable screwdriver vertically into the desired opening until it reaches the
stop. This will ensure that the spring terminal is fully open.
7-8
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
:LULQJ
7LS
There is a separate opening for test probes up to 2 mm in diameter to the left of the
opening for the screwdriver.
5HTXLUHPHQW
The modules (SM, FM, CP 342-2) are mounted on the rail.
3UHSDULQJWKHIURQWFRQQHFWRUDQGWKHFDEOHV
:DUQLQJ
You may come into contact with live wires if the power supply module and any
additional load power supply units are connected to the mains.
You should therefore disconnect the S7-300 from the power supply before starting
the wiring. Once you have wired the modules, close all the front panels. You can
then switch on the S7-300 again.
1. Switch off the power supply .
2. Open the front panel of the module .
3. Move the front connector into wiring position .
Slide the front connector into the signal module until it latches. The front
connector still protrudes from the module in this position.
Advantage of the wiring position: Easy wiring.
In this wiring position the front connector does not contact the module.
4. Strip the leads to a length of 6 mm.
5. Crimp on the cable end sleeves, e.g. for terminating 2 conductors on 1 terminal.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
7-9
:LULQJ
2
PS
CPU
32
1
Figure 7-4 Move the front connector into wiring position
Table 7-7
Assignment of front connectors to modules
7KHGLDJUDPLOOXVWUDWHVXQGHUQXPEHU
Power supply switched off (PS)
Opened module
Front connector in wiring position
:LULQJWKHIURQWFRQQHFWRU
Table 7-8
Wiring the front connector
6WHS
SLQIURQWFRQQHFWRU
SLQIURQWFRQQHFWRU
(1)
Thread the cable strain relief into the front
connector.
–
(2)
Do you want to exit the cables at the bottom of the module?
,I\HV
Starting at terminal 20, work your way down
to terminal 1.
Starting at terminal 40 or 20, wire the
connector, working in alternating passes
from terminals 39, 19, 38, 18 etc. until you
have reached terminals 21 and 1.
,IQRW
Starting at terminal 1, work your way up to
terminal 20.
7-10
Starting at terminal 1 or 21, wire the
connector, working in alternating passes
from terminals 2, 22, 3, 23 etc. until you
have reached terminals 20 and 40.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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6WHS
SLQIURQWFRQQHFWRU
(3)
)URQWFRQQHFWRUVZLWKVFUHZWHUPLQDOV
(4)
–
SLQIURQWFRQQHFWRU
Attach the cable strain-relief assembly
around the cable and the front connector.
Pull the cable strain-relief assembly tight. Push in the strain relief retainer to the left to
improve utilization of the available cable space.
–
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
4
The work step numbers are shown in the figure above
Thread the strain relief.
WR Wire the terminals.
Wire the terminals.
Tighten the strain relief clamp.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
7-11
:LULQJ
,QVHUWLQJ)URQW&RQQHFWRUVLQWR0RGXOHV
5HTXLUHPHQW
The front connectors are completely wired.
,QVHUWLQJWKHIURQWFRQQHFWRU
Table 7-9
Inserting front connectors
,QVHUWLQ
JWKH
IURQW
FRQQHFW
RU6WHS
1.
ZLWKSLQIURQWFRQQHFWRU
ZLWKSLQIURQWFRQQHFWRU
Push in the unlocking mechanism on top Tighten the mounting screw in the
of the module.
center of the connector.
Keeping the locking mechanism
pressed, insert the front connector into
the module.
Provided the front connector is seated
correctly in the module, the unlocking
mechanism automatically returns to
initial position when you release it.
This pulls the front connector
completely into contact with the
module.
1RWH
When you insert the front connector into the module, an encoding mechanism
engages in the front connector, thus ensuring that the connector can only be
inserted in modules of the same type.
2.
Close the front panel.
Close the front panel.
1
1
2
PS C
PU
3
PS C
PU
1
2
The work step numbers are shown in the figure above
Keep unlocking mechanism pressed.
Tighten mounting screw.
Insert front connector.
You can now close the front panel
Then close the front door.
7-12
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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/DEHOLQJWKH0RGXOH,2
,QWURGXFWLRQ
The labeling strips are used to document the assignment between inputs/outputs of
the modules and the sensors/actuators of your plant.
You must use the labeling strips, depending on the module:
Table 7-10
Assigning the labeling strips to modules
0RGXOH
/DEHOLQJVWULS
2UGHU1R
Signal modules (not 32-channel),
6ES7 392-2XX00-0AA0
Function modules,
Communication module CP 342-2
Signal modules (32-channel)
6ES7 392-2XX10-0AA0
/DEHOLQJDQGLQVHUWLQJODEHOLQJVWULSV
1. Label the strips with the addresses of the sensors/actuators.
2. Slide the labeled strips into the front panel.
PS
CPU
Figure 7-5 Slide the labeled strips into the front panel
7LS
Templates for labeling strips are available on the Internet at
http://www.ad.siemens.de/csinfo under article ID 11978022.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
7-13
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$SSOLFDWLRQ
With the shielding contact element, you can easily connect all shielded cables of
S7 modules to ground by means of a mounting rail.
'HVLJQRIWKHVKLHOGLQJFRQWDFWHOHPHQW
The shielding contact element consists of:
• a bracket for screw-mounting (with two screws) it onto the rail
(Order No.: 6ES5 390-5AA00-0AA0) and
• the shielding terminals.
You must use the following shielding terminals, depending on the shielding
diameter of your cables:
Table 7-11
Assigning the shielding diameter to shielding terminals
&DEOHZLWKVKLHOGLQJGLDPHWHU
6KLHOGLQJWHUPLQDO2UGHU1R
2 cables each one with a shielding diameter of 2 to 6
mm
6ES7 390-5AB00-0AA0
1 cable with a shielding diameter of 3 to 8 mm
6ES7 390-5BA00-0AA0
1 cable with a shielding diameter of 4 to 13 mm
6ES7 390-5CA00-0AA0
The shielding contact element width is 80 mm. It provides termination space in two
rows, each one for 4 shielding terminals.
0RXQWLQJWKHVKLHOGLQJFRQWDFWHOHPHQW
1. Push the two screw bolts of the fixing bracket into the guide on the underside of
the rail.
2. Position the bracket underneath the modules whose shielded cables are to be
terminated.
3. Screw-tighten the bracket onto the rail.
4. The shielding terminal is equipped with a slotted web underneath. Place this
part of the shielding terminal on the edge of the mounting bracket. Now push
the shielding terminal down and pivot it into the desired position.
7-14
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
:LULQJ
The two rows of the shielding contact element allow you install a maximum of
4 shielding terminals.
PS CP
U
3
1
2
Figure 7-6 Shielding contact element underneath two signal modules
7KHGLDJUDPLOOXVWUDWHVXQGHUQXPEHU
Bracket of shielding contact element
Edge of mounting bracket, where the shield connection terminal(s) must rest
Shielding terminals
7HUPLQDWLQJFDEOHV
Only one or two shielded cables may be clamped per shielding terminal. The cable
is clamped in at the stripped cable shielding.
1. First, strip the cable shield to a length of at least 20 mm.
2. Now clamp in the stripped cable shield underneath the shielding terminal. Push
the shielding terminal towards the module and feed the cable through
underneath the clamp.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
7-15
:LULQJ
If you need more than four shielding terminals, start wiring at the rear row of the
shielding contact element.
PS CP
U
2
1
2
Figure 7-7 Connecting 2-wire cables to the shielding contact element
7KHGLDJUDPLOOXVWUDWHVXQGHUQXPEHU
Magnified view of shielding terminal
Wiring of shielding terminal
7LS
For your connection to the front connector, leave a sufficient cable length behind
the shielding terminal. This allows you to disconnect the front connector, e.g. for
repairs, without having to open the shielding contact element.
7-16
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
:LULQJ
:LULQJWKH%XV&RQQHFWRU
,QWURGXFWLRQ
You need to network the nodes if you want to create a multiple-node subnet. The
components you require here are listed in the Chapter &RQILJXULQJ&RQILJXULQJD
6XEQHW.
Information on how to wire the bus connector can be found in the article below.
:LULQJWKHEXVFDEOHWRWKHEXVFRQQHFWRU
%XVFRQQHFWRUZLWKVFUHZWHUPLQDOV
1. Strip the bus cable.
Details on stripped lengths are found in the product information included with
the bus connector.
2. Open the bus connector housing.
3. Insert the green and the red wire into the screw-terminal block.
Note that you always have to connect the same wires to the same terminal (e.g.
always wire green to terminal A and red to terminal B).
4. Press the cable sheath into the clamp. Take care that the bare shielding
contacts the shielding contact surface.
5. Screw-tighten the wire terminals.
6. Close the bus connector housing.
)DVW&RQQHFWEXVFRQQHFWRU
1. Strip the bus cable.
Details on stripped lengths are found in the product information included with
the bus connector.
2. Open the strain relief of the bus connector.
3. Insert the green and red wire into the open contacting covers.
Note that you always have to connect the same wires to the same terminal (e.g.
always wire green to terminal A and red to terminal B).
4. Close the contacting cover.
This presses the wires down into the insulation displacement terminals .
5. Screw-tighten the strain relief clamp. Take care that the bare shielding contacts
the shielding contact surface.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
7-17
:LULQJ
,QVHUWLQJWKHEXVFRQQHFWRULQWRWKHPRGXOH
1. Insert the wired bus connector into the module.
2. Screw-tighten the bus connector on the module.
3. If the bus connector is at the start or end of a segment, you have to enable the
terminating resistor (Switch position "ON" see figure below)
1RWH
6ES7 972-0BA30-0XA0 bus connectors are not equipped with a terminating
resistor. You cannot connect it at the beginning or end of a segment.
Please make sure during start-up and normal operation that power is always
supplied to nodes where the terminating resistor is active.
Terminating resistance switched on
Terminating resistance switched off
On
off
Off
off
On
on
Off
on
Figure 7-8 Bus connector: Enabled and disabled terminating resistor
5HPRYLQJEXVFRQQHFWRUV
With a looped-through bus cable, you can unplug the bus connector from the
PROFIBUS-DP interface at any time, without interrupting data communication on
the network.
3RVVLEOHGDWDWUDIILFHUURUV
:DUQLQJ
Data traffic error might occur on the bus!
A bus segment must always be terminated at both ends with the terminating
resistor. This, for example, is not the case if the last slave with bus connector is off
power. Since the bus connector draws its power from the station, the terminating
resistor has no effect.
Please make sure that power is always supplied to stations on which the
terminating resistor is active.
7-18
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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You will learn how you can address the individual channels of your modules.
6ORWEDVHGDGGUHVVLQJ
Slot-based addressing is the default setting, that is, 67(3 assigns each slot
number a defined module start address.
8VHUGHILQHGDGGUHVVLQJ
With user-defined addressing, you can assign any module address from the
address area managed by the CPU. For the S7-300, user-defined addressing is
only possible with CPUs 315, 315-2 DP, 316-2 DP, and 318-2 DP.
6ORWGHILQHGDGGUHVVLQJRIPRGXOHV
,QWURGXFWLRQ
In slot-based addressing (default addressing), a module start address is allocated
to each slot number This is a digital or analog address, depending on the type of
module.
This section shows you which module start address is assigned to which slot
number. You need this information to determine the start addresses of the installed
modules.
0D[LPXPDVVHPEO\DQGWKHFRUUHVSRQGLQJPRGXOHVWDUWDGGUHVVHV
The figure below shows you an S7-300 assembly on four racks and the optional
slots with their module start addresses.
The input and output addresses for I/O modules start from the same module start
address.
1RWH
With CPU 314 IFM, you FDQQRW insert a module in slot 11 of module 3. The
address area is reserved for the integrated I/O.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
8-1
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Not with CPU 314 IFM
SM SM SM SM SM SM SM SM
IM
Rack 3
(EG)
Slot number
3
4
BG initial address analog
Rack 2
(EG)
3
4
64
BG initial address digital
3
4
5
32 36
384 400
BG initial address digital
BG initial address analog
SF
BUSF
7
8
9
10
11
112
116 120 124
704
720 736 752
6
72
7
76
544 560
8
80
9
84
576
592 608 624
10
88
11
92
SM SM SM SM SM SM SM SM
IM
Slot number
5
68
512 528
BG initial address analog
Rack 1
(EG)
6
100
SM SM SM SM SM SM SM SM
IM
Slot number
5
104 108
640 656 672 688
96
BG initial address digital
6
40
7
44
416 432
8
48
9
52
10
56
448
464 480 496
11
60
SIEMEN S
DC5V
FRCE
RUN
Rack 0
(ZG)
STOP
PS
Slot number
BG initial address digital
BG initial address analog
1
CPU
2
IM SM SM SM SM SM SM SM SM
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
0
4
8
12
16
20
24
28
320
336 352 368
256 272
288 304
Figure 8-1 S7-300 slots and the associated module start addresses
8-2
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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CPU 315
6ES7 315-1AF03-0AB0
V1.0.0
01
CPU 315-2 DP
6ES7 315-2AF03-0AB0
V1.0.0
01
6ES7 315-2AF83-0AB0
CPU 316-2 DP
6ES7 316-2AG00-0AB0
V1.0.0
01
CPU 318-2 DP
6ES7 318-2AJ00-0AB0
V3.0.0
03
8VHUGHILQHGDGGUHVVLQJ
User-defined addressing means that you can assign an address of your choice to
any module (SM/FM/CP). The addresses are assigned in 67(3. Here, you
specify the module start address that forms the basis for all other addresses of the
module.
$GYDQWDJHVRIXVHUGHILQHGDGGUHVVLQJ
• Optimization of the address areas available, since “address gaps” will not occur
between the modules.
• When creating standard software, you can program addresses which are
independent of the relevant S7-300 configuration.
$GGUHVVLQJ6LJQDO0RGXOHV
,QWURGXFWLRQ
This section shows you how to address signal modules. You need this information
in order to be able to address the channels of the signal modules in your user
program.
$GGUHVVHVRIGLJLWDOPRGXOHV
The address of an input or output of a digital module consists of a byte address
and a bit address.
Example: ,
This example consists of: input ,, byte address , and bit address S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
8-3
$GGUHVVLQJ
The byte address depends on the module start address.
The bit address is the number printed on the module.
Insert the first digital module into slot 4 so that it has default start address 0. The
start address of every subsequent digital module will be incremented by 4 per slot
(see diagram under 6ORWEDVHGPRGXOHDGGUHVVLQJ
The figure below shows you how the addresses of the individual channels of a
digital module are obtained.
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Byte address:
start address of modules
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Byte address:
start address of modules + 1
Bit address
Figure 8-2 Addresses of the I/O of digital modules
8-4
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
$GGUHVVLQJ
$QH[DPSOHIRUGLJLWDOPRGXOHV
The example in the figure below shows which default addresses are obtained if a
digital module is inserted in slot 4 (that is, when the module start address is 0).
Slot number 3 has not been assigned since there is no interface module in the
example.
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
PS
CPU
1
:
:
Address 0.7
:
:
SM
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Slot
number
Address 0.0
Address 0.1
2
Address 1.0
Address 1.1
:
:
Address 1.7
4
Figure 8-3 I/O Addresses of a digital module in Slot 4
$GGUHVVHVRIWKHDQDORJPRGXOHV
The address of an analog input or output channel is always a word address.
The channel address depends on the module start address.
Insert the first analog module into slot 4 so that it has default start address 256.
The start address of every subsequent analog module will be incremented by 16
per slot (see diagram under 6ORWEDVHGPRGXOHDGGUHVVLQJ
An analog I/O module has the same start addresses for its input and output
channels.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
8-5
$GGUHVVLQJ
$QH[DPSOHIRUDQDORJPRGXOHV
The example in the figure below shows you which default channel addresses are
obtained if an analog module is inserted in slot 4. As you can see, the input and
output channels of an analog I/O module are addressed starting at the same
address, namely the module start address.
Slot number 3 has not been assigned since there is no interface module in the
example.
SM (analog module)
SF
BUSF
Inputs
SIEMENS
DC5V
Channel 0: address 256
Channel 1: address 258
FRCE
RUN
:
:
STOP
PS
CPU
Outputs
SM
Channel 0: address 256
Channel 1: address 258
:
:
Slot
number
1
2
4
Figure 8-4 I/O addresses of an analog module in Slot 4
$GGUHVVLQJWKH,QWHJUDWHG,2RIWKH&38
&38,)0
The following addresses are assigned to the integrated I/O of CPU 312 IFM:
Table 8-1
Integrate inputs and outputs on the CPU 312 IFM
,QSXWV2XWSXWV
10 digital inputs
$GGUHVVHV
5HPDUNV
124.0 to 125.1
of those are 4 Inputs for
integrated functions:
124.6 to 125.1
Optional utilization of Inputs for
integrated functions:
•
Counting
•
Frequency measurement
•
Interrupt input
See
,QWHJUDWHG)XQFWLRQs manual
6 digital outputs
8-6
124.0 to 124.5
–
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
$GGUHVVLQJ
&38,)0
The following addresses are assigned to the integrated I/O of CPU 314 IFM:
Table 8-2
Integrate inputs and outputs on the CPU 314 IFM
,QSXWV2XWSXWV
20 digital inputs
$GGUHVVHV
5HPDUNV
124.0 to 126.3
of those are 4 Inputs for
integrated functions:
126.0 to 126.3
Optional utilization of Inputs for
integrated functions:
•
Counting
•
Counting A/B
•
Frequency measurement
•
Positioning
•
Interrupt input
See
,QWHJUDWHG)XQFWLRQs manual
16 digital outputs
124.0 to 125.7
–
4 analog inputs
128 to 135
–
1 analog output
128 to 129
–
&RQVLVWHQW'DWD
&RQVLVWHQWGDWD
The table below illustrates the points to consider with respect to communication LQ
D'3PDVWHUV\VWHPif you want to transfer I/O areas with "Total length"
consistency.
&38'3
&38'3
&38'3
)LUPZDUH9
&38'3
ILUPZDUHYHUVLRQt9
Even if they exist in the process image,
You can choose whether or not to update
consistent data is not automatically updated. the address area of consistent data in the
process image.
To read and write consistent data, you must
use SFC14 and 15.
To read and write consistent data, you can
also use SFC14 and 15.
If the address area of consistent data is not
in the process image, you must use SFC14
and 15 to read and write consistent data.
Direct access to consistent areas is also
possible (e.g. L PEW or T PAW).
You can transfer a maximum of 32 bytes of consistent data.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
8-7
$GGUHVVLQJ
8-8
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
,QWKLV&KDSWHU
,QWKLV&KDSWHU
There are notes on commissioning which you should take into account in order to
avoid personal injury or damage to machines.
1RWH
Since your commissioning phase is determined primarily by your application, we
can only offer you general information, without claiming completeness of this topic.
&URVVUHIHUHQFH
Note the information about commissioning provided in the descriptions of your
plant section and equipment.
&RPPLVVLRQLQJSURFHGXUH
6RIWZDUHUHTXLUHPHQWV
You need STEP, V 5.x or higher to use the full functional scope of the CPUs.
5HTXLUHPHQWVIRUFRPPLVVLRQLQJ
• S7-300 is installed
• S7-300 is wired
• With networked S7-300:
–
MPI/PROFIBUS addresses are configured
–
The segments are terminated with active terminating resistors
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
9-1
&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
5HFRPPHQGHGSURFHGXUH3DUW,+DUGZDUH
With its modular structure and many different upgrade options, the S7-300 can be
very large and extremely complex. It is therefore inappropriate to initially start up
an S7-300 with multiple racks and all inserted (installed) modules. Rather, we
recommend a step-by-step commissioning procedure.
We recommend the following initial commissioning procedure for an S7-300:
Table 9-1
Recommended commissioning procedure - part I: Hardware
7DVNV
5HPDUNV
an installation and wiring check according to
checklist
,QIRUPDWLRQFDQEH
IRXQGLQ
in the following Chapter
Disabling connections to This prevents negative effects on your system as drive aggregates and
a result of program errors.
control elements
7LS Redirecting output data from your outputs to
a data block, allows you to check the status of the
outputs at any time
Preparing the CPU
Connecting the PG
in the Chapter &RQQHFWLQJ
WKH3*
Central unit (CU):
commission the CPU
and power supply, check
the LEDs
Commission the CU with inserted power supply
module and CPU.
First, switch on the expansion modules (EMs)
which are equipped with an auxiliary power
supply module and then switch on the power
supply module of the CD.
in Chapter ,QLWLDO3RZHU
2Q
Check the LED displays on both modules.
in Chapter 7HVWLQJ
)XQFWLRQV'LDJQRVWLFV
DQG)DXOW(OLPLQDWLRQ
Initialize the CPU and
check the LEDs
-
in Chapter 5HVHWWLQJ&38
PHPRU\
CU:
commission all other
modules
Insert further modules into the CU and
commission them in succession.
Reference Manual
0RGXOH'DWD
Expansion module (EM): If required, interconnect the CU and the EMs:
Connecting
Insert only one Send IM into the CU and the
matching receiver IM into the EM.
Chapter 0RXQWLQJ
EM:
Commissioning
See above.
9-2
Insert further modules into the EMs and
commission them in succession.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
5HFRPPHQGHGSURFHGXUH3DUW,,6RIWZDUH
Table 9-2
Recommended commissioning procedure - part II: software
7DVNV
•
Switch on the PG
and start SIMATIC
Manager
•
Download the
configuration and the
program to the CPU
Testing the I/O
5HPDUNV
,QIRUPDWLRQFDQEH
IRXQGLQ
-
in the 67(3
Programming Manual
Helpful functions are here:
•
in the 67(3
Programming Manual
•
in Chapter 7HVWLQJ
)XQFWLRQV'LDJQRVWLFV
DQG)DXOW(OLPLQDWLRQ
•
Monitoring and controlling of variables
•
Testing with program status
•
Force
•
Modifying outputs in STOP mode (PO enable)
7LS Test the signals at the inputs and outputs
using the simulation module SM 374, for
example.
Commission PROFIBUS DP or other networks
in Chapter &RPPLVVLRQLQJ
352),%86'3
Connect the outputs
-
Commissioning the outputs successively.
'DQJHU
Proceed step-by-step. Do not go to the next step unless you have completed the
previous one without error/error message.
5HVSRQVHWRHUURUV
React to errors as follows:
• Check the system with the help of the Checklist in the chapter below.
• Check the LED displays on all modules. Notes on their significance can be
found in the chapters describing the relevant modules.
• If required, remove individual components to trace the error.
,PSRUWDQWQRWHVDUHDOVRIRXQG
in Chapter 7HVWLQJ)XQFWLRQVGLDJQRVWLFVDQGIDXOWHOLPLQDWLRQ
VHHDOVR
Commissioning Checklist
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
9-3
&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
&RPPLVVLRQLQJ&KHFNOLVW
,QWURGXFWLRQ
After you have mounted and wired your S7-300, we recommend you check all
previous steps once again.
The checklist tables below are a guide for your examination of the S7-300. They
also provide cross-references to chapters containing further information on the
relevant topic.
0RGXOHUDFNV
3RLQWVWREH([DPLQHG
6+DUGZDUHDQG
,QVWDOODWLRQ&KDSWHUV
Are the rails mounted firmly to the wall, in the frame or in Configuring, Installation
the cabinet?
Have you maintained free space required?
Configuring, Installation
Are the cable ducts installed properly?
Configuring
Is the air convection OK?
Installation
&RQFHSWRIJURXQGLQJDQGFKDVVLVJURXQG
3RLQWVWREH([DPLQHG
6+DUGZDUHDQG
,QVWDOODWLRQ&KDSWHUV
Have you established a low-impedance connection
(large surface, large contact area) to local ground?
Configuring, Appendix
Are all racks (rails) properly connected to reference
potential and local ground (electrical connection or
isolated operation)?
Configuring, Wiring, Appendix
Are all grounding points of electrically connected
modules and of the load power supply units connected
to reference potential ?
Configuring, Appendix
0RGXOHLQVWDOODWLRQDQGZLULQJ
3RLQWVWREH([DPLQHG
9-4
6+DUGZDUHDQG
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Are all modules properly inserted and screwed in?
Installation
Are all front connectors properly wired, plugged, screwtightened or latched to the correct module?
Installation, Wiring
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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Is the correct mains voltage set for all component?
6
+DUGZDUHDQG
,QVWDOODWLRQ
&KDSWHUV
Wiring
6HH
UHIHUHQFH
PDQXDO
6HFWLRQ
Module
Specifications
3RZHUVXSSO\PRGXOH
3RLQWVWREHH[DPLQHG
6
+DUGZDUHDQG
,QVWDOODWLRQ
&KDSWHUV
6HH
UHIHUHQFH
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6HFWLRQ
Is the mains plug wired correctly?
Wiring
-
Is mains voltage connected?
-
-
,QVHUWWKHEDFNXSEDWWHU\RUUHFKDUJHDEOHEDWWHU\
5HFKDUJHDEOHEDWWHU\DQGVWRUDJHEDWWHU\
Rechargeable battery: If the CPU is operated without a back-up battery and you
only wish to back up the time against power failures on CPUs with a hardware
clock, you can insert a rechargeable battery in place of the back-up battery in the
back-up battery compartment. In this case only the time is maintained. The RAM
and RAM loading memory are not maintained in this case, so a memory card is
absolutely essential. A limited number (CPU-specific) of bytes may also be
maintained in a data block or by flags, timers and counters.
If you insert the back-up battery (buffered CPU mode), the RAM, the RAM loading
memory of the CPU and the clock are maintained even if power fails. In this case,
all the data blocks and any flags, timers and counters defined in the parameter
settings are also maintained.
([FHSWLRQV
• &38,)0 is not equipped with a back-up battery or rechargeable battery (it
is not buffered).
• &38 has a software rather than a hardware clock, so it does not need a
rechargeable battery (just a back-up battery is needed)
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
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Insert a back-up/rechargeable battery in the CPU as follows:
1RWH
Do not insert the back-up battery in the CPU until after POWER ON.
If you insert the back-up battery before POWER ON, the CPU requests a memory
reset.
1. Open the front panel of the CPU.
2. Plug the connector of the back-up/rechargeable battery into the corresponding
socket in the battery compartment of the CPU. The notch on the connector must
show towards the left hand side.
3. Insert the back-up/rechargeable battery into the battery compartment of the
CPU.
4. Close the front door of the CPU.
Figure 9-1 Insert a back-up battery into CPUs 313/314
9-6
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
,QVHUWLQJDQGUHSODFLQJDPHPRU\FDUG
&38VZLWKRXWDPHPRU\FDUG
You cannot insert a memory card into the CPUs 312 IFM and 314 IFM
(314-5AE0x). These CPUs are equipped with an integrated FEPROM load
memory.
,QVHUWLQJUHSODFLQJDPHPRU\FDUG
1RWH
If you insert the memory card in a CPU mode other than STOP, the CPU will
switch to STOP mode and the STOP LED will flash at 2-second intervals to
request a memory reset.
1. Switch the CPU to STOP.
2. Is a Memory Card inserted? If so, ensure that it is not accessed by read or write
operations. If required, disconnect all communication connections or switch to
POWER OFF state. Then pull the memory card out of its slot in the CPU.
3. Insert the ("new") memory card into the slot in the CPU, making sure that the
insertion mark on the memory card points toward the mark on the top side of
the module slot .
4. Reset the CPU memory (see &RPPLVVLRQLQJWKHPRGXOHVUHVHWWLQJWKH&38
PHPRU\).
1
Figure 9-2 Insert the memory card into the CPU
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
9-7
&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
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If you remove a memory card in POWER OFF mode and insert another memory
card with identical contents, the following happens after POWER ON:
&38EXIIHUHG
&38V,)0WR'3
The CPU 318-2 goes into STOP mode and
requests memory reset.
The CPU switches to the mode it was in
prior to POWER OFF, that is, RUN or
STOP.
&RPPLVVLRQLQJWKHPRGXOHV
&RQQHFWLQJWKH3*
5HTXLUHPHQW
The programming device must be equipped with an integrated MPI interface or an
MPI card in order to connect it to the MPI interface of your CPU.
&URVVUHIHUHQFH
For information on possible cable lengths refer to the Chapter &RQILJXULQJ&DEOH
/HQJWKV.
&RQQHFWLQJD3*WRDQ6
1. Connect the programming device (PG) to the MPI interface of your CPU by
means of a preassembled PG cable .
Alternatively, you can produce the connecting leads with PROFIBUS cable and bus
connectors yourself (refer to Chapter :LULQJ&RQQHFWLQJ%XV&RQQHFWRUV).
SF
BUSF
SIEMENS
DC5V
FRCE
RUN
STOP
PS
CPU
SM
MPI
1
PG
Figure 9-3 Connecting a PG to an S7-300
9-8
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
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6WDWLRQDU\3*
1. Use bus connectors to connect a stationary PG in the MPI subnet to the other
nodes of the MPI subnet.
The following figure shows you two S7-300 connected by means of PROFIBUS
bus cables. The bus cable connectors have integrated terminating resistors. These
must be energized on the CPUs for the outgoing bus cable connectors.
CPU
PS
SM
PG
2
1
SF
BUSF
SIEMENS
DC5V
FRCE
RUN
ST OP
PS
CPU
SM
2
Figure 9-4 Connecting a PG to multiple S7 devices
7KHGLDJUDPLOOXVWUDWHVXQGHUQXPEHU
PROFIBUS bus cable
Cable connector with energized terminating resistors
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
3*IRUFRPPLVVLRQLQJRUPDLQWHQDQFH
1. For commissioning or service, connect the programming device (PG) to a
subnet node by means of a stub cable. The bus connector of this node must be
equipped with a PG socket.
2. You must energize the terminating resistor for the bus cable connectors going
into the CPU.
3. You use a PROFIBUS bus cable to network the CPUs.
PS
PG
CPU
SM
CPU
SM
1
2
SF
SF
BUSF
BUSF
SIEMENS
SIEMENS
DC5V
DC5V
FRCE
FRCE
RUN
RUN
STOP
ST OP
PS
3
2
Figure 9-5 Connecting a PG to a subnet
7KHGLDJUDPLOOXVWUDWHVXQGHUQXPEHU
9-10
Stub cable used to create connection between PG and CPU
Energized terminating resistor of the bus cable connector
PROFIBUS bus cable used to network both CPUs
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
03,DGGUHVVHVIRUVHUYLFH3*V
If there is no stationary PG, we recommend:
To connect it to an MPI subnet with "unknown" node addresses, set the following
addresses on the service PG:
• MPI address: 0
• Highest MPI address: 126.
Using 67(3, you then determine the highest MPI address in the MPI subnet and
adapt the highest MPI address in the PG to that of the MPI subnet.
&RQQHFWLQJ3*WRDQXQJURXQGHGQRGHFRQILJXUDWLRQRQDQ03,VXEQHW
&RQQHFWLQJD3*WRXQJURXQGHGQRGHV
Always connect an ungrounded PG to ungrounded MPI subnet nodes or S7-300
PLCs.
&RQQHFWLQJDJURXQGHG3*WRWKH03,
You want to operate with ungrounded nodes. If the MPI at the PG is grounded, you
must interconnect the nodes and the PG with an RS485 repeater. You must
connect the ungrounded nodes to bus segment 2 if the PG is connected to bus
segment 1 (connections A1 B1), or the PG/OP interface.
The figure below shows an RS485 repeater as interface between grounded and
ungrounded nodes of an MPI subnet.
PS
CPU
PG
Bus segment 2
(signals ungrounded)
Bus segment 1
(signals grounded)
Figure 9-6 PG connected to an ungrounded S7-300
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
,QLWLDOSRZHURQ
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• You must have installed and wired up the S7-300.
• Your CPU's mode selector switch must be set to STOP.
,QLWLDOSRZHUXSIRUD&38ZLWKPHPRU\FDUG0&
The CPU 312 IFM has no memory card, but it is covered in this section.
Switch on the PS 307 power supply module.
5HVXOW
• The 24 VDC LED on the power supply module is lit.
• The 5 VDC LED on the CPU
–
is lit.
–
The STOP LED flashes at 2 Hz when the CPU executes an automatic
memory reset.
–
The STOP LED is lit after memory reset.
The BATF LED is lit if the back-up battery is missing in the CPU (not with
CPU 312 IFM, since not buffered).
1RWH
If you insert a Memory Card and a back-up battery before power is on, the CPU
also requests a memory reset after start-up.
9-12
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0HPRU\UHVHWE\PHDQVRIWKH&38PRGHVHOHFWRUVZLWFK
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You must reset CPU memory,
• Before you download a (completely) new user program to the CPU
• If the CPU requests memory reset with its STOP LED flashing at 0.5 Hz
intervals
Table 9-3
Possible causes for the CPU memory reset request
&DXVHVRID&38UHTXHVWWRUHVHW
PHPRU\
5HPDUNV
The memory card has been replaced.
Does not apply to CPU 312 IFM / 314 IFM (3145AE0x)
RAM error in CPU
–
Main memory is too small, that is not
all user program blocks on a memory
card can be loaded.
CPU with inserted 5 V-FEPROM memory card.
Attempts to load faulty blocks; e.g. if
the wrong instruction was
programmed.
With these causes the CPU requests one
memory reset. After that, the CPU ignores the
contents of the memory card, enters the error
reasons in the diagnostics buffer and goes to
STOP. You can erase or reprogram 5 V FEPROM
Memory Card in the CPU.
0HPRU\UHVHWE\PHDQVRIPRGHVHOHFWRURU3*
There are two ways to perform a memory reset on your CPU:
• In this chapter, we will show you how to perform a direct memory reset by
means of the mode selector of your CPU.
• A memory reset by means of your PG can only be performed with STEP 7 in
CPU STOP mode.
&URVVUHIHUHQFH
You can find information on how to perform a memory reset of your CPU with a PG
in 67(32QOLQH+HOS.
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&38PHPRU\UHVHWZLWKWKHPRGHVHOHFWRUVZLWFK
The table below shows the steps required for resetting CPU memory.
Table 9-4
Procedure for resetting the CPU memory
6WHS
5HVHWWLQJ&38PHPRU\
1.
Turn the key to STOP position
2.
Turn the key to MRES position
Hold the key in this position until the STOP LED lights up for the second time
and remains on (this takes 3 seconds).
Then release the key.
3.
You must turn the key back to the MRES position, push it in within three
seconds and hold it there until the STOP LED flashes (at 2 Hz).
You can now release the switch. When the CPU has completed memory reset,
the STOP LED stops flashing and remains lit.
The CPU has reset the memory.
The procedure described in the table above is only required if the user wishes to
reset the CPU memory without being requested by the CPU to reset the memory
(STOP LED flashing slowly). If the memory reset is requested by the CPU, simply
turn the mode selector switch to MRES briefly to start the reset.
The figure below shows you the sequence of operation.
STOP
LED
On
t
Off
3s
max. 3 s
min. 3 s
CPU
1
2
3
Figure 9-7 Operation of mode selector switch for memory reset
6723/('GRHVQRWIODVKGXULQJWKHPHPRU\UHVHW
What should I do if the STOP LED does not flash during the memory reset or if
other LEDs are lit (Exception: BATF LED)?
1. You must repeat steps 2 and 3.
2. If the CPU still does not reset memory, evaluate the diagnostic buffer of the
CPU.
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&ROGUHVWDUWZLWK&38'3
With a CPU 318-2DP you can also perform a cold start instead of resetting the
memory.
Cold start means:
• The data blocks in the working memory created by SFC 22 are deleted. The
remaining data blocks have the default value from load memory.
• The process image and all timers, counters and memory bits are reset irrespective of whether they were configured as retentive.
• OB 102 is processed.
• The process image of the inputs is read before the first instruction in OB1 is
executed.
6WHS
3HUIRUPLQJD&ROG6WDUW
1.
Turn the key to STOP position
2.
Turn the key to MRES position
Hold the key in this position until the STOP LED lights up for the second time
and remains on (this takes 3 seconds).
Then release the key.
3.
You have to turn the switch to the RUN position within 3 seconds.
During start-up the RUN LED flashes at 2 Hz.
RUN
LED
On
Off
STOP
LED
On
t
Off
3s
max. 3 s
3s
1
2
3
Figure 9-8 Using the mode selector switch for a cold start (CPU 318-2 DP only)
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Table 9-5
Operations in the CPU during a memory reset
(YHQW
&38,)0$(['3
CPU activities
1.
The CPU deletes the complete user program in main memory and RAM load
memory.
2.
The CPU deletes the retentive data.
3.
The CPU tests its own hardware.
4.
If a memory card is inserted, the CPU copies its
sequence-relevant data to the main memory.
7LS If the CPU cannot copy the data on Memory Card
or MMC and requests memory reset:
•
Remove the memory card
•
Resetting CPU memory
•
Read the diagnostic buffer.
Memory contents The status of CPU memory space is "0". If a memory card
after reset
has been inserted, the user program is transferred back to
the main memory.
What's left?
&38,)0
,)0$([
The CPU copies
runtime relevant data
from EPROM memory
to main memory
The user program is
loaded back into the
RAM from the
integrated retentive
EPROM of the CPU.
Data in the diagnostics buffer.
You can read the diagnostic buffer with the PG (see 67(32QOLQH+HOS).
The MPI parameters (MPI address and highest MPI address, transmission rate,
configured MPI addresses of CPs/FMs in an S7-300).
The contents of the operating hours counter (not for CPU 312 IFM).
6SHFLDOIHDWXUH03,SDUDPHWHUV
MPI parameters hold a special position when memory is reset. The table below
describes MPI parameters remaining valid after memory reset.
0HPRU\UHVHW
With inserted memory card
With integrated FEPROM load memory
(CPU 312 IFM / 314 IFM (314-5AE0x)
9-16
03,SDUDPHWHUV
... located on the memory card or on the
integrated FEPROM of the CPU are valid. If
this location does not contain parameter
data (SDB), the previously set parameters
stay valid.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
&38,)0DQG,)0(UDVLQJWKHLQWHJUDWHG(3520
If you wish to erase the contents of the integrated EPROM, proceed as follows:
1. Use menu command 9LHZ!RQOLQH to open the online window for viewing an
open project
or
open the window$YDLODEOHQRGHV with a click on the $YDLODEOHQRGHV
toolbar button or select the menu command 3/&!6KRZDYDLODEOHQRGHV.
2. Select the MPI number of the target CPU (double-click).
3. Select the 0RGXOHV container.
4. Select the menu item (GLW!6HOHFWDOO.
5. Then select the menu command )LOH!'HOHWHor press the DEL key. This
deletes all selected blocks from target memory.
6. Select the MPI number of the target CPU.
7. Select the menu command 3/&!&RS\5$0WR520.
These commands delete all blocks online and overwrite the EPROM with the blank
contents of the RAM.
6WDUWLQJ6,0$7,&0DQDJHU
,QWURGXFWLRQ
SIMATIC Manager is a GUI for online/offline editing of S7 objects (projects, user
programs, blocks, hardware Stations and Tools).
The SIMATIC Manager lets you
• manage projects and libraries,
• call STEP 7 Tools,
• access the PLC (AS) online,
• edit Memory Cards.
6WDUWLQJ6,0$7,&0DQDJHU
After installation, the Windows desktop displays the 6,0$7,&0DQDJHU icon and in
the Start menu under 6,0$7,& it displays the program item 6,0$7,&0DQDJHU.
1. Start SIMATIC Manager with a double-click on the icon or via Start menu (same
as with all other Windows applications).
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&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
8VHULQWHUIDFH
A corresponding editing tool pops up when you open the relevant objects. Doubleclick on a program block starts the program editor; the block can be edited (objectoriented start).
2QOLQH+HOS
The Online Help for the active window is always called with the F1 function key.
0RQLWRULQJDQGFRQWUROOLQJ,2V
7KHWRRO0RQLWRULQJDQG&RQWUROOLQJD9DULDEOH
The STEP 7 tool "Monitoring and Controlling a Variable" lets you
• monitor program variables in any format,
• edit the status or data of variables in the CPU (controlling).
&UHDWHDYDULDEOHWDEOH
You have two options for creating a variable table (VAT):
• in the ladder diagram/sequential function chart/statement list editor via menu
item 3/&!0RQLWRUFRQWUROYDULDEOH
This table is also available directly online
• in SIMATIC Manager with the %ORFNVcontainer open via menu item ,QVHUWQHZ
REMHFW!9DULDEOHWDEOH
This table created offline can be saved for future retrieval. You can also test it
after switching to online mode.
9-18
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9$7VWUXFWXUH
In the VAT, every address to be monitored or modified (e.g. inputs, outputs)
occupies one row.
The meaning of the VAT columns is as follows:
&ROXPQWH[W
7KLVILHOG
Operand
contains the absolute address of the variable
Symbol
contains the symbolic descriptor of the variable
This is identical to the specification in the Symbol Table.
Symbol comment
shows the symbol comment of the Symbol Table
Status format
contains the default format setting, e.g. HEX
You can change the format as follows:
•
Right-click on the format field. The Format List pops up.
or
•
Left-click on the format field until the desired format appears
Status value
shows the content of the variable at the time of update
Control value
is used to enter the new variable value (control value)
0RQLWRULQJYDULDEOHV
You have two options for monitoring variables:
• updating the status values once via menu item 9DULDEOH!8SGDWHVWDWXV
YDOXHV
or
• continuous update of status values via menu item 9DULDEOH!0RQLWRU
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
&RQWUROOLQJYDULDEOHV
To control variables, proceed as follows:
1. Left-click the field &RQWUROYDOXH of the relevant variable.
2. Enter the control value according to the data type.
3. To update control values once, select the menu item 9DULDEOH!(QDEOH
FRQWUROYDOXHV.
or
Enable control values permanently via menu item 9DULDEOH!&RQWURO.
4. In the 0RQLWRU test function, verify the control value entry in the variable.
,VWKHFRQWUROYDOXHYDOLG"
You can disable the control value entered in the table. An invalid value is displayed
same as a comment. You can re-enable the control value.
Only valid control values can be enabled.
6HWWLQJWKHWULJJHUSRLQWV
7ULJJHUSRLQWV
• The "Trigger point for monitoring" determines the time of update for values of
variables to be monitored.
• The "Trigger point for controlling" determines the time for assigning the control
values to the variables to be controlled.
7ULJJHUFRQGLWLRQ
• The "Trigger condition for monitoring" determines whether to update values
once when the trigger point is reached or continuously every time the trigger
point is reached.
• The "Trigger condition for controlling" determines whether to assign control
values once or permanently to the variable to be controlled.
You can customize the trigger points using the tool "Monitor and control variable" in
menu item 9DULDEOH!6HW7ULJJHUstart.
9-20
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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6SHFLDOIHDWXUHV
• If "Trigger condition for monitoring" is set to RQFH, the menu items 9DULDEOH!
8SGDWHVWDWXVYDOXHor9DULDEOH!0RQLWRU have the same effect, namely a
single update.
• If "Trigger condition for controlling" is set to RQFH, the menu items 9DULDEOH!
8SGDWHFRQWUROYDOXHor9DULDEOH!&RQWURO have the same effect, namely a
one-time assignment.
• If trigger conditions are set toSHUPDQHQW, the said menu items have different
effects as described above.
• If monitoring and controlling is set to the same trigger point, monitoring is
executed first.
• With some CPU versions (e.g. CPU 314-1AE03) values are not assigned at
every cycle when SHUPDQHQWFRQWUROis set.
Remedy: Use the testing function)RUFH.
6DYLQJ2SHQLQJWKH9DULDEOH7DEOH
6DYLQJWKH9$7
1. After you abort or complete a test phase, you can save the variable table to
memory. The name of a variable table starts with the letters VAT, followed by a
number from 0 to 65535; e.g. VAT5.
2SHQLQJWKH9$7
1. Select the menu item 7DEOH!2SHQ.
2. Select the project name in the2SHQdialog.
3. In the project window below, select the relevant program and mark the %ORFNV
container.
4. In the block window, select the desired table.
5. Confirm with2..
(VWDEOLVKLQJDFRQQHFWLRQWRWKH&38
The variables of a VAT represent variable quantities of a user program. In order to
monitor or control variables it is required to establish a connection to the relevant
CPU. Every variable tables can be linked to another CPU.
In menu item 3/&!&RQQHFWWR, establish a connection to one of the following
CPUs:
• configured CPU
• directly connected CPU
• available CPU ...
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&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
The table below lists the display of variables.
&38V
7KH&38YDULDEOHVDUHGLVSOD\HG
configured CPU
in their S7 program (Hardware Station) in which the VAT is
stored.
directly connected CPU
that is connected directly to the PG.
available CPU.
that is selected in the dialog window.
Menu item 3/&!&RQQHFWWR!$YDLODEOH&38 is
used to establish a connection to any CPU available on
the network.
&RQWUROOLQJRXWSXWVLQ&386723PRGH
The function(QDEOH32 switches off output disable for the peripheral outputs
(PO), thus enabling control of the PO in CPU STOP mode.
In order to enable the POs, proceed as follows:
1. In menu item 7DEOH!2SHQWKHYDULDEOHWDEOH9$7, open the VAT that
contains the PO you want to control, or activate the window containing the
corresponding VAT.
2. To control the PO of the active VAT, select the CPU connection in menu
command 3/&!&RQQHFWWR.
3. Use menu command 3/&!2SHUDWLQJ0RGH to open the 2SHUDWLQJ0RGH
dialog and switch the CPU to STOP mode.
4. Enter your values in the "Control value" column for the PO you want to control.
Example:
PO: POB 7 control value: 2#0100 0011
POW 2 W#16#0027
POD 4 DW#16#0001
5. Use menu item 9DULDEOH!(QDEOH32 to switch to "Enable PO" mode.
6. Control the PO via menu item 9DULDEOH!(QDEOHFRQWUROYDOXHV. "Enable PO“
mode remains active until switched off again via 9DULDEOH!(QDEOH32.
"Enable PO" is also terminated when the connection to the PG goes down.
7. Return to step 4 if you want to specify new values.
1RWH
For example, a message pops up to indicate CPU mode transition from STOP
to RUN or START-UP.
A message also pops up indicating that the "Enable PO" function is selected
while the CPU is in RUN mode.
9-22
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&RPPLVVLRQLQJ352),%86'3
&RPPLVVLRQLQJ352),%86'3
5HTXLUHPHQWV
Before you commission a PROFIBUS DP network, the following requirements must
be met:
• A PROFIBUS DP network has been configured.
• In 67(3, you have configured the PROFIBUS DP network and you have
assigned a PROFIBUS DP address and memory area to all Nodes (see the
manual 6,0$7,&67(39[&RQILJXULQJ+DUGZDUHDQG&RQQHFWLRQVZLWK
67(39[).
• Note that you must also set address switches in some of the DP slaves (see the
description of the relevant DP slave).
• Depending on your CPU, you need the following software:
Table 9-6
Software requirements
&38
2UGHU1R
6RIWZDUHUHTXLUHG
6ES7315-2AF03-0AB0
67(3 V 3.1 or later
6ES7315-2AF83-0AB0
&20352),%86 V 3.0 or later
316-2 DP
6ES7316-2AG00-0AB0
67(3 V 5.x or later
318-2 DP
6ES7318-2AJ00-0AB0
&20352),%86 V 5.0 or later
315-2 DP
'3DGGUHVVDUHDVRIWKH&38V
Table 9-7
DP address areas of the CPUs
$GGUHVVDUHD
'3(6
$)$%
'3
'3
DP address area
for I/Os
1024 bytes
2048 bytes
8192 bytes
Number of those in the I/O
process image
Bytes 0 to 127
Bytes 0 to 127
Byte 0 to 255 (default),
configurable up to
byte 2047
'3GLDJQRVWLFDGGUHVVHV occupy 1 byte per DP master and DP slave in the input
address area. For example, at these addresses DP standard diagnostics can be
called for the relevant node ( LADDR parameter of SFC13). The DP diagnostic
addresses are specified in your configuration. If you do not specify any DP
diagnostic addresses, 67(3 assigns these DP diagnostic addresses, starting at
the highest byte address downwards .
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
With CPU318 >= V3.0 as a master with a DPV1 configuration, you assign two
different diagnostic addresses for S7 slaves:
• Diagnostic address of the slave (address for slot 0)
At this address all slave events are reported in the DP master (Node
representative), e.g. Node failure.
• Diagnostic address of the module (address for slot 2)
This address is used to report events (OB82) in the master that affect the
module. With a CPU as DP-Slave, for example, diagnostic interrupts for
operating mode transitions are reported at this address.
&RPPLVVLRQLQJWKH&38DV'3PDVWHU
5HTXLUHPHQWVIRUFRPPLVVLRQLQJ
• The PROFIBUS subnet has been configured.
• The DP slaves are ready for operation (see relevant DP slave manual).
• An MPI/DP interface as DP interface must be configured accordingly (only CPU
318-2).
• You must configure the CPU as DP master prior to commissioning. That is, in
67(3 you must:
–
configure the CPU as a DP master,
–
assign a PROFIBUS address to the CPU,
–
assign a master diagnostic address to the CPU,
–
integrate the DP slaves into the DP master system.
Is a CPU 31x-2 DP a DP slave?
If so, you will find that DP slave in the PROFIBUS-DP catalog as DOUHDG\
FRQILJXUHG1RGH. In the DP master, assign a slave diagnostic address to
this DP slave CPU. You must interconnect the DP master with the DP slave
CPU and specify the address areas for data exchange with the DP slave
CPU.
&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
Commission CPU 31x-2 DP as DP master in the PROFIBUS subnet as follows:
1. Download the PROFIBUS subnet configuration (preset configuration) you have
created in 67(3 from the PG to CPU 31x-2 DP.
2. Switch on all of the DP slaves.
3. Switch CPU 31x-2 DP from STOP to RUN mode.
9-24
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
6WDUWXSRI&38['3DV'3PDVWHU
During start-up, CPU 31x-2 DP compares the preset configuration of your DP
master system to the actual configuration.
If preset configuration = actual configuration, the CPU switches to RUN mode.
If the preset configuration ≠ to the actual configuration, the configuration of
parameter VWDUWXSLISUHVHWFRQILJXUDWLRQzDFWXDOFRQILJXUDWLRQ determines
the start-up behavior of the CPU.
VWDUWXSZLWKSUHVHWFRQILJXUDWLRQz
DFWXDOFRQILJXUDWLRQ \HV'HIDXOW
VHWWLQJ
CPU 31x-2 DP switches to RUN mode.
(BUSF LED flashes if any of the DP slaves
cannot be addressed)
VWDUWXSZLWKSUHVHWFRQILJXUDWLRQz
DFWXDOFRQILJXUDWLRQ QR
CPU 31x-2 DP remains in STOP mode.
When the 0RQLWRULQJWLPHIRUSDUDPHWHU
WUDQVIHUWRPRGXOHV runs out, the BUSF
LED starts flashing.
The flashing BUSF LED indicates that at
least one DP slave cannot be accessed. In
this case, check whether all DP slaves are
switched on or correspond with your
configuration, or read out the diagnostic
buffer with 67(3.
5HFRJQL]LQJWKHRSHUDWLQJVWDWHRI'3VODYHV(YHQWUHFRJQLWLRQ
The table below shows how CPU 31x-2 DP operating as a DP master recognizes
operating mode transitions of a CPU operating as a DP slave and data exchange
interruptions.
Table 9-8
Event recognition by CPUs 31x-2 DP acting as the DP master
(YHQW
:KDWKDSSHQVLQWKH'3PDVWHU"
Bus failure interrupt •
(short-circuit,
connector
unplugged)
•
Call of OB86 with the message 6WDWLRQIDLOXUH
(coming event; diagnostic address of the DP slave assigned to
the DP master)
with I/O access: Call of OB122
(I/O access error)
DP slave:
•
RUN → STOP
DP slave:
STOP → RUN
Call of OB82 with the message 0RGXOHHUURU
(incoming event; diagnostic address of the DP slave assigned to
the DP master; Variable OB82_MDL_STOP=1)
•
Call of OB82 with the message 0RGXOH2.
(outgoing event; diagnostic address of the DP-Slave assigned to
the DP master; Variable OB82_MDL_STOP=0)
7LS:
When commissioning the CPU as DP master, always program OB 82 and 86. This
helps you to recognize and evaluate data exchange errors or interruption.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
3URJUDPPLQJVWDWXVFRQWUROYLD352),%86
As an alternative to the MPI interface, you can program the CPU or execute the
Status and Modify functions of the PG via the PROFIBUS-DP interface.
1RWH
The use of the Status and Modify functions via the PROFIBUS-DP interface
extends the DP cycle.
&RQVWDQW%XV&\FOH7LPH
As of 67(3 V 5.x you can configure equidistant lengths for PROFIBUS subnet
(constant bus cycle time) bus cycles. Details on equidistance are found in the 6WHS
2QOLQH+HOS.
6WDUWXSRIWKH'3PDVWHUV\VWHP
&38'3'3LVWKH'3
PDVWHU
Customize the start-up monitoring time for
DP slaves in parameter 0RQLWRULQJWLPH
IRUSDUDPHWHUWUDQVIHUWRPRGXOHV.
&38'3LV'3PDVWHU
Customize the start-up monitoring time for
DP slaves in parameters 0RQLWRULQJWLPH
IRUSDUDPHWHUWUDQVIHUWRPRGXOHV and
0RGXOHUHSRUWVUHDG\.
That is, the DP slaves must start up within the set time and be configured by the CPU (as
DP master).
352),%86DGGUHVVRIWKH'3PDVWHU
With CPU 31x-2 DP, do not set as PROFIBUS address.
9-26
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
&RPPLVVLRQLQJWKH&38DV'3VODYH
5HTXLUHPHQWVIRUFRPPLVVLRQLQJ
• The DP master is configured and programmed.
• If the MPI/DP interface of CPU 318-2 DP is to be operated as DP interface, you
must configure the interface accordingly.
• You must program and configure CPU 31x-2 DP as a DP slave prior to
commissioning. That is, in 67(3 you must:
–
"switch on" the CPU as DP slave,
–
assign a PROFIBUS address to the CPU,
–
assign a slave diagnostic address to the CPU,
–
specify whether the DP master is an S7 DP master or another DP master,
–
specify the address areas for data exchange with the DP master.
• All other DP slaves are programmed and configured.
*6'ILOHV
When working on an IM 308-C or non-Siemens system, you require a device
database (GSD) file to be able to configure CPU 31x-2 DP as a DP slave in a DP
master system.
&20352),%86 as of V 4.0 includes this GSD file.
When working with an older version or another configuration tool, you can
download the GSD file at:
• Internet URL http://www.ad.siemens.de/csi/gsd
or
• via modem from the 66&(Interface &HQWHU Fürth, Germany; Phone number
(0911) 911/737972
.
&RQILJXUDWLRQDQGSDUDPHWHUDVVLJQPHQWPHVVDJHIUDPH
67(3 supports you in configuring/programming CPU 31x-2 DP. Should you
require a description of the configuration and parameter assignment frame, in order
to use a bus monitor for example, you can find it on the Internet at
http://www.ad.siemens.de/csinfo under article ID 1452338.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
9-27
&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
Commission CPU 31x-2 DP as a DP slave in the PROFIBUS subnet as follows:
1. Switch on power, but hold the CPU in STOP mode.
2. First, switch on all other DP masters/slaves.
3. Now switch the CPU to RUN mode.
6WDUWXSRI&38['3DV'3VODYH
When the CPU 31x-2x DP is switched to RUN, two independent operating mode
transitions are executed:
• The &38 switches from STOP to RUN mode.
• At the 352),%86'3LQWHUIDFH the CPU starts data transfer with the DP
master.
5HFRJQL]LQJWKH2SHUDWLQJ6WDWHRIWKH'3PDVWHU(YHQW5HFRJQLWLRQ
The table below shows how CPU 31x-2 operating as a DP slave recognizes
operating state transitions or data exchange interruptions.
Table 9-9
Event recognition by CPUs 31x-2 DP acting as DP slave
(YHQW
:KDWKDSSHQVLQWKH'3VODYH"
Bus failure interrupt •
(short-circuit,
connector
unplugged)
•
Call of OB86 with the message 6WDWLRQIDLOXUH
(coming event; diagnostic address of the DP slave, assigned to
the DP slave)
with I/O access: Call of OB122
(I/O access error)
DP master.
•
RUN → STOP
DP master
STOP → RUN
Call of OB82 with the message 0RGXOHHUURU
(coming event; diagnostic address of the DP slave, assigned to
the DP slave; Variable OB82_MDL_STOP=1)
•
Call of OB82 with the message 0RGXOH2.
(outgoing event; diagnostic address of the DP slave, assigned to
the DP slave; Variable OB82_MDL_STOP=0)
7LS:
When commissioning the CPU as DP slave, always program OB 82 and 86. This
helps you to recognize and evaluate the respective operating states or data
exchange errors.
9-28
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
3URJUDPPLQJVWDWXVFRQWUROYLD352),%86
As an alternative to the MPI interface, you can program the CPU or execute the
Status and Modify functions of the PG via the PROFIBUS-DP interface. To do so,
you must enable these functions when configuring the CPU as a DP slave in
STEP7.
1RWH
The use of Status and Control function via the PROFIBUS-DP interface extends
the DP cycle.
'DWD7UDQVIHUYLD,QWHUPHGLDWH0HPRU\
CPU 31x-2 DP operating as a DP slave provides a transfer memory for PROFIBUS
DP communication. All data exchange between the CPU as DP slave and the DP
master takes place via this transfer memory. You can configure up to 32 address
areas for this function.
That is, the DP master writes its Data to these intermediate memory address areas
and the CPU reads these data in the user program, and vice versa.
DP master
CPU as DP slave
Transfer memory
in the address
area
I/Q
I/Q
PROFIBUS
Figure 9-9 Transfer memory in the CPUs 31x-2 DP acting as DP slave
$GGUHVVDUHDVLQLQWHUPHGLDWHPHPRU\
In 67(3, configure the I/O address areas:
• You can configure up to 32 I/O address areas.
• Maximum length per address area is 32 bytes.
• You can configure a maximum of 244 input bytes and 244 outputs bytes.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
9-29
&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
The table below shows the principle of address areas. You can also find this figure
in the 67(3 configuration.
Table 9-10
Configuration example for the address areas in transfer memory
7\SH
0DVWHU
DGGUHVV
7\SH
6ODYH
DGGUHVV
/HQJW
K
8QLW
&RQVLVWHQF\
1
E
222
A
310
2
Byte
Unit
2
A
0
E
13
10
Word
Total length
:
32
Address areas in the
DP master CPU
9-30
Address areas in the
DP slave CPU
These address area parameters
must be identical for DP master and
DP slave
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
6DPSOHSURJUDP
Below you will see a small sample program for data exchange between DP master
and DP slave. The addresses used in the example are found in the table above.
,QWKH'3VODYH&38
,QWKH'3PDVWHU&38
//Data pre-
L
2
T
MB
6
L
IB
0
processing in
the
DP slave
T
MB
7
L
MW
6
// Forward data
T
PQW
310
to the
DP master
L
PIB
222
T
MB
50
L
PIB
223
// processing data
received
in the DP master
in the DP master
L
B#16#3
+
I
T
MB
L
10
+
3
T
MB
60
CALL
SFC
15
51
//Data preparation in
DP master
//Send data to
DP slave
LADDR:= W#16#0
RECORD:= P#M60.0 Byte 20
RET_VAL:=MW 22
CALL
SFC
14
LADDR:=W#16#D
//receive data
from DP master
RET_VAL:=MW 20
RECORD:=P#M30.0 byte 20
L
MB
30
L
MB
7
+
I
T
MW
//Reprocess
received data
100
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
9-31
&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
:RUNLQJZLWKWUDQVIHUPHPRU\
Note the following rules when working with intermediate memory:
• Assignment of address areas:
–
Input data of DP slaves are DOZD\V output data of the DP master
–
Output data of DP slaves are DOZD\V input data of the DP master
• The user can define these addresses. In the user program, access data with
load/transfer instructions or with SFC 14 and 15. You can also specify
addresses from the input/output process image (refer to Chapter $GGUHVVLQJ
8VHUGHILQHG$GGUHVVLQJRI0RGXOHV).
• The lowest address of specific address areas is their respective area start
address.
• The length, unit and consistency of the address areas for DP master and DP
slave must be identical.
1RWH
Assign transfer memory addresses taken from the DP address area of
CPU 31x-2 DP.
Addresses assigned to transfer memory cannot be assigned again to I/O
modules of CPU 31x-2 DP. When using consistent data areas in transfer
memory, note the section on &RQVLVWHQW'DWD in Chapter $GGUHVVLQJ.
6'3PDVWHU
When exchanging consistent data with IM 308-C operating as DP master and
CPU 31x-2 DP as DP slave, note that:
You must program FB192 in IM 308-C to enable exchange of consistent data
between a DP master and the DP slave. FB192 reads or outputs CPU 31x-2 DP
data only in a single continuous block.
6DV'3PDVWHU
Bus parameters of an AG S5-95 operated as DP master must also be set in
CPU 31x-2 DP operating as DP slave.
'DWDWUDQVIHULQ6723PRGH
The DP slave CPU goes into STOP mode: Data in CPU intermediate memory are
overwritten with "0". That is, the DP master reads "0".
The DP master goes into STOP mode: Actual data in CPU intermediate memory is
maintained and can still be read by the CPU.
9-32
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
352),%86$GGUHVV
With CPU 31x-2 DP, do not set as PROFIBUS address.
'LUHFW'DWD([FKDQJH
5HTXLUHPHQW
In 67(3 V 5.x or later, you can configure "Direct data exchange" for PROFIBUS
nodes. CPUs with a DP interface can take part in direct data exchange as senders
and receivers.
'HILQLWLRQ
"Direct data exchange" is a special communication relationship between
PROFIBUS-DP nodes.
Characteristic of direct data exchange is that PROFIBUS DP nodes "listen" on the
bus for data a DP slave returns to its DP master. This mechanism allows "Listening
stations" (receivers) direct access to modified input data of remote DP slaves.
$GGUHVV$UHDV
In your 67(3 configuration of the relevant peripheral input addresses, specify
which address area of the receiving node is to receive data requested from the
sending node.
The following types of DP-CPU are possible:
• DP slave sending station
• receiving station, as DP slave or DP master, or as CPU not integrated in a
master system.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
9-33
&RPPLVVLRQLQJ
([DPSOH
The sample in the figure below shows the relationships you can configure for direct
data exchange. In the figure, all DP masters and DP slaves are a CPU 31x-2 DP.
Note that other DP slaves (ET 200M, ET 200X, ET 200S) can only operate as
sending node.
CPU
DP master
system 1
DP master
system 2
CPU
DP master 1
CPU
DP master 2
PROFIBUS
DP slave 3
CPU
CPU
DP slave 1
DP slave 2
CPU
DP slave 5
DP slave 4
Figure 9-10 Direct data exchange with CPUs 31x-2 DP
9-34
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
0DLQWHQDQFH
,QWKLV&KDSWHU
0DLQWHQDQFH RSHUDWLQJV\VWHPEDFNXSXSGDWHUHSODFHPHQWRIPRGXOHVDQG
IXVHV
S7-300 is a maintenance-free automation system.
Thus, by maintenance we mean
• Backup of the operating system on memory card (MC) and update of the MC
operating system
• Replacement of modules
• Replacement of backup battery/rechargeable battery
• Replacement of the fuses in digital output modules
,QWKLV&KDSWHU
we show you how to back-up or update your operating system and to replace
modules, the back-up/rechargeable battery and the 120/230 VAC fuse of the digital
output module.
%DFNXSRIWKH&38RSHUDWLQJV\VWHP
:KHQVKRXOG\RXEDFNXSWKHRSHUDWLQJV\VWHPRI\RXU&38"
In some cases, we recommend that you back up your CPU's operating system:
For example, you might want to replace the CPU in your plant with a CPU from
store. In this case, you should make sure that the CPU from store has the same
operating system that is used in the plant.
We also recommend that you create a back-up copy of the operating system for
emergency situations.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
10-1
0DLQWHQDQFH
:KLFK&38VDOORZPHWREDFNXSWKHRSHUDWLQJV\VWHP"
You can back-up the operating system as of the following CPU versions:
&38
2UGHU1R
)LUPZDUH
5HTXLUHG0&00&
313
from 6ES7313-1AD030AB0
V 1.0.0 or later
MC ≥ 1 MB
314
from 6ES7314-1AEx40AB0
V 1.0.0 or later
MC ≥ 1 MB
314 IFM
from 6ES7314-5AE100AB0
V 1.1.0 or later
MC ≥ 2 MB
315
from 6ES7315-1AF030AB0
V 1.0.0 or later
MC ≥ 1 MB
315-2 DP
from 6ES7315-2AFx30AB0
V 1.0.0 or later
MC ≥ 2 MB
316-2 DP
from 6ES73136-2AG000AB0
V 1.0.0 or later
MC ≥ 2 MB
1RWH
A back-up of the operating system is not possible with CPU 318-2 DP.
%DFNXSRIWKHRSHUDWLQJV\VWHPRQPHPRU\FDUG
How to back up the operating system:
Table 10-1
6WHS
$FWLRQUHTXLUHG
&385HVSRQVH
1.
Insert a new memory card into the
CPU
The CPU requests memory reset
2.
Turn the mode selector switch to
MRES position and hold it there.
-
3.
POWER OFF / POWER ON. Hold
the mode selector switch in MRES
position until ...
... the STOP, RUN and FRCE LEDs start
flashing.
4.
Mode selector switch to STOP
position.
-
5.
Mode selector switch briefly to
MRES position, then let it return to
STOP.
•
The CPU starts backing up the
operating system to the MC.
•
All LEDs are lit during the back-up.
•
When backup is complete, the
STOP-LED flashes. The CPU is
requesting a memory reset.
6.
10-2
Backup of the operating system on MC
Remove the memory card
-
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
0DLQWHQDQFH
8SGDWLQJWKH2SHUDWLQJ6\VWHP
,QZKLFKVLWXDWLRQVVKRXOG,XSGDWHWKHRSHUDWLQJV\VWHP"
After (compatible) function expansions or after an enhancement of operating
system performance the operating system should be upgraded to the latest version
(update).
:KHUHGR,JHWWKHODWHVWYHUVLRQRIWKHRSHUDWLQJV\VWHP"
You can obtain the latest operating system versions from your Siemens partner or
from the Internet (Siemens home page; Automation and Drives, Customer
Support).
7LSEDFNXS\RXURSHUDWLQJV\VWHPEHIRUH\RXXSGDWHLW
If you back up your existing operating system to an empty MC before you start the
update, you can reload the "old" operating system in case you encounter any
problems.
8SGDWLQJWKH2SHUDWLQJ6\VWHP
How to update the operating system (OS):
Table 10-2
Updating the operating system with MC/MMC
6WHS
$FWLRQUHTXLUHG
&385HVSRQVH
1.
Using STEP 7 and your
programming device, transfer the
update files to an empty MC.
-
2.
Remove the backup/rechargeable battery from
relevant CPUs.
-
3.
Switch off the CPU power supply
and insert the MC that contains
the OS update.
-
4.
POWER ON.
•
The CPU automatically recognizes the
MC and the OS update, and it starts the
update.
•
All LEDs are lit during OS update.
•
When the OS update is complete, the
STOP-LED flashes. The CPU is
requesting a memory reset.
5.
Switch off the CPU power supply
and remove the MC that contains
the OS update.
-
6.
Reinsert the backup/rechargeable battery into the
relevant CPUs.
-
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
10-3
0DLQWHQDQFH
0RGXOHUHSODFHPHQW
5XOHVIRU,QVWDOODWLRQDQG:LULQJ
The table below shows you points to follow when wiring, installing or removing of
S7-300 modules.
5XOHVJRYHUQLQJ
Blade width of screwdriver
3RZHUVXSSO\
&38
60)0&3
3.5 mm (cylindrical model)
Tightening torque
•
Attaching modules to the rail
•
Connecting cables
from 0.8 N/m to 1.1 N/m
from 0.8 N/m to
1.1 N/m
from 0.5 N/m to 0.8 N/m
–
POWER OFF when replacing the
...
Yes
Yes
S7-300 operating mode when
replacing ...
–
STOP
Load voltage OFF when
replacing the ...
Yes
Yes
,QLWLDO6LWXDWLRQ
The module you want to replace is still installed and wired. You want to install the
same type of module.
:DUQLQJ
Disturbances can corrupt data if you insert or remove S7-300 modules while data
is being transferred via MPI. Do not replace S7-300 modules while there is data
traffic on the MPI. If you are not certain whether or not data transfer is active on the
MPI, unplug the connector on the MPI before you replace the module.
10-4
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
0DLQWHQDQFH
5HPRYLQJDPRGXOH60)0&3
Remove the module as follows:
6WHS
SLQIURQWFRQQHFWRU
SLQIURQWFRQQHFWRU
1.
Switch the CPU to STOP.
2.
Switch off the load voltage to the module.
3.
Remove the labeling strip from the module.
4.
Open the front panel.
5.
Unlock the front connector and remove it.
Press down the unlocking
Remove the fixing screw from the middle
mechanism with one hand and with of the front connector. Pull the front
the other hand, pull out the front
connector out, holding it at the grips.
connector at the grips.
6.
Undo the module fixing screw(s).
7.
Swing the module out.
3
1
PS
CPU
2
4
Figure 10-1 Unlocking the front connector and removing the module
7KLVILJXUHLOOXVWUDWHVWKHVWHSVGHVFULEHG
Remove labeling strips.
Open module.
Press unlocking mechanism/loosen mounting screw, and pull out front connector.
Remove mounting screw of module and tilt module out.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
10-5
0DLQWHQDQFH
5HPRYLQJWKHIURQWFRQQHFWRUFRGLQJSLQIURPWKHPRGXOH
Before you start installing the new module, remove the upper part of the front
connector coding pin from this module.
Reason: This part is already inserted in the wired front connector.
Figure 10-2 Removing the front connector coding pin
10-6
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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Install the new module as follows:
1. Install new module of same type.
2. Pivot the module down into place.
3. Screw-tighten the module.
4. Slide the labeling strips into the module.
1
4
PS C
PU
3
2
Figure 10-3 Installing a new module
7KHILJXUHLOOXVWUDWHVWKHGHVFULEHGVWHSV
Lower module onto rail.
Tilt module down.
Screw the module in tightly.
Insert labeling strips.
5HPRYLQJWKH)URQW&RQQHFWRU&RGLQJ
If you want to take a "used" front connector to wire another module, you can
remove its coding mechanism:
Simply push out the front connector coding with a screwdriver.
This upper part of the coding key must then be plugged back into the old module.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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3XWWLQJD1HZ0RGXOHLQWR6HUYLFH
Proceed as follows to put the new module into service:
1. Open the front panel.
2. Reinstall the front connector.
3. Close the front panel.
4. Switch the load voltage back on.
5. Set the CPU to RUN mode again.
PS
2
CPU
1
Figure 10-4 Inserting the front connector
7KHILJXUHLOOXVWUDWHVWKHGHVFULEHGVWHSV
Move the front connector into operating position
Close front panel.
%HKDYLRURI6DIWHUPRGXOHUHSODFHPHQW
After module replacement the CPU switches to run mode, provided no error has
occurred. If the CPU maintains STOP status, you can view the cause of error with
67(3 (refer to the 67(3 User Manual).
10-8
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
0DLQWHQDQFH
5HSODFLQJWKHEDFNXSEDWWHU\RUUHFKDUJHDEOHEDWWHU\&38V
ZLWK0&RQO\
5HSODFLQJEDFNXSEDWWHU\RUUHFKDUJHDEOHEDWWHU\
$OZD\V replace the back-up/rechargeable battery in POWER ON state of the CPU,
in order to avoid data loss in internal memory or stopping the real-time clock.
1RWH
Data in internal main memory will be lost if you replace the back-up battery in
POWER OFF state of the CPU.
Always replace the back-up battery in POWER ON state!
Replace the back-up/rechargeable battery as follows:
6WHS
&38
&38,)0'3
'3'3
1.
Open the front panel of the CPU.
2.
Pull the back-up battery/accumulator
out of the compartment with a
screwdriver.
3.
Plug the connector of the new back-up/rechargeable battery into the
corresponding socket in the battery compartment of the CPU. The notch on the
battery connector must show towards the left hand side.
4.
Insert the new back-up/rechargeable battery into the battery compartment of the
CPU.
5.
Close the front door of the CPU.
Pull the back-up/rechargeable battery
out of the compartment with its cable.
CPU
PS
Figure 10-5 Replacing the back-up battery in CPU 313/314
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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0DLQWHQDQFH
+RZRIWHQGR,KDYHWRUHSODFHLW"
EDFNXSEDWWHU\ We recommend an annual replacement
5HFKDUJHDEOHEDWWHU\ Never needs to be replaced.
'LVSRVDO
Note your local regulations/directives on battery disposal.
6WRULQJEDFNXSEDWWHULHV
Store back-up batteries in a dry and cool place.
The shelf life of back-up batteries is five years.
:DUQLQJ
If heated or damaged, back-up batteries can ignite or explode and cause severe
burning injury.
Store back-up batteries in a dry and cool place.
5XOHVIRUWKHKDQGOLQJRIEDFNXSEDWWHULHV
To avoid risk of danger when handling back-up batteries, note the following rules:
:DUQLQJ
Improper handling of back-up batteries could result in injury or damage to property.
Improperly handled back-up batteries can explode and cause severe burns.
Do not
FKDUJH
KHDWXS
LQFLQHUDWH
GULOOWKURXJK
VTXDVK
VKRUW-circuit back-up batteries.
5XOHVIRUKDQGOLQJWKHUHFKDUJHDEOHEDWWHU\
Do not charge rechargeable batteries in devices other than the CPU. The
rechargeable battery must always be charged in the CPU, in POWER ON state of
the CPU.
10-10
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'LJLWDORXWSXWPRGXOH$&95HSODFLQJWKHIXVHV
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the digital outputs of the following digital output modules are short-circuit protected
by individual fusing of the channel groups:
• Digit output module SM 322; DO 16 × A 120 V
• Digit output module SM 322; DO 8 × A 120 230 V
6\VWHPFKHFN
Eliminate the causes of fuse tripping.
5HSODFHPHQWIXVHV
If replacement is required, you can use the following fuses:
• 8 A, 250 V fuse
–
Wickmann 19 194-8 A
–
Schurter SP001.013
–
Littlefuse 217.008
• Fuse holder
–
Wickmann 19 653
:DUQLQJ
Improper handling of digital output modules could result in injury or damage
to property.
Under the covers on the right side of the module, there are dangerous
voltages > 25 VAC or > 60 VDC.
Before opening these covers, ensure that the front connector of the module
is removed or that the module is disconnected from the supply voltage.
:DUQLQJ
Improper handling of front connectors could result in injury or damage to
property.
When you remove the front connector during operation, beware of
dangerous live voltage > 25 VAC or > 60 VDC across the pins.
If the front connector is wired to such voltages, hot swapping of modules
must always be carried out by skilled or instructed electrical staff, in order to
avoid unintentional contact with the module pins.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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Digital output modules are equipped with 1 fuse per channel group. The fuses are
located at the left side of the digital output module. The figure below shows you the
location of the fuses on digital output modules.
1
1
Figure 10-6 Location of fuses in the digital output module 120/230 VAC
5HSODFLQJIXVHV
The fuses are located at the left side of the module. Replace the fuses as follows:
1. Switch the CPU to STOP.
2. Switch off the load voltage of the digital output module.
3. Remove the front connector from the digital output module.
4. Loosen the fixing screw of the digital output module.
5. Swing out the digital output module.
6. Remove the fuse holder from the digital output module ).
7. Replace the fuse.
8. Screw the fuse holder back into the digital output module.
9. Reinstall the digital output module.
10-12
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
7HVWLQJIXQFWLRQVDQG'LDJQRVWLFV
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This Chapter helps you to get acquainted with tools you can use to carry out the
following tasks:
• Hardware/software error diagnostics.
• Elimination of hardware/software errors.
• Testing the hardware/software - for example, during commissioning.
1RWH
It would go beyond the scope of this manual to provide detailed descriptions of all
the tools you can use for diagnostics, testing and troubleshooting functions.
Further notes are found in the relevant hardware/software manuals.
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STEP 7 offers you the following testing functions you can also use for diagnostics:
• Monitoring and controlling of variables
Can be used for PG/PC monitoring of specific CPU or user program variables.
You can also declare permanent values for the variables.
• Testing with program status
You can test your program by viewing the program status of each function
(result of logical links, status bit) or the data of specific registers in real-time
mode.
For example, if you have selected the programming language LAD in STEP 7
for your presentation, the color of the symbol will indicate a closed switch or an
active circuit.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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7HVWLQJIXQFWLRQVDQG'LDJQRVWLFV
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The STEP 7 testing function with program status extends the CPU cycle time! In
STEP 7 you can customize the maximum permitted increase in cycle time (not for
CPU 318-2 DP). In this case, set process mode for the CPU parameters in
STEP 7.
• Single-step Mode
When testing in single-step mode, you can process your program instructions in
sequence (= single-step) and set break points. This is only possible in testing
mode and not in process mode.
7HVWLQJIXQFWLRQVRIWKHVRIWZDUH)RUFLQJYDULDEOHV
The Force function can be used to declare permanent values in specific variables
of a user program or CPU (also: inputs and outputs) which cannot be overwritten
subsequently by the user program.
For example, you can use it to jumper sensors or switch outputs permanently,
irrespective of the user program.
'DQJHU
This could result in severe injury or even death, and damage to property.
Incorrect use of the Force function could result in death or severe injury, and
damage to machinery or even the entire plant.
Always follow the safety instructions in the 67(3PDQXDOV.
'DQJHU
)RUFLQJZLWK6&38VQRW&38'3
The forced values in the LQSXWVprocess image can be overwritten by write
commands (such as T EB x, = E x.y, copy with SFC, etc.) and by read I/O
commands (such as L PEW x) in the user program, or by write PG/OP function. 2XWSXWV initialized with forced values only return the forced value if not accessed
by the user program via peripheral write instructions (e.g. TPQB x) or by PG/OP
write functions!
Always ensure that forced values in the I/O process image cannot be overwritten
by the user program or PG/OP functions!
11-2
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With S7-300 CPUs, forcing is the same as "cyclical modify"
Execute force
job for inputs
PIQ
transfer
Besy
PII
transfer
Execute force
job for inputs
PIQ
transfer
User program
Forced value
overwritten by
T PQW!
Forced value
T PQW
Execute force
job for outputs
Besy
PII
transfer
Forced value
Execute force
job for outputs
OS: operating system execution
Figure 11-1 Principle of Forcing with S7-300 CPUs (all CPUs except 318-2 DP)
7KHGLIIHUHQFHVEHWZHHQIRUFLQJDQGFRQWUROOLQJYDULDEOHV
Table 11-1
The differences between forcing and controlling variables
&KDUDFWHULVWLFV)XQFWLRQ
)RUFLQJZLWK
6
ZLWKRXW
'3
)RUFLQJZLWK
&38'3
DQG6
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9DULDEOHV
Memory bit (M)
Yes
-
Yes
Timers and counters (T, C)
-
-
Yes
Data Blocks (DB)
-
-
Yes
Inputs and outputs (I, Q)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Peripheral Inputs (PI)
Yes
-
-
Peripheral Outputs (PO)
Yes
-
Yes
User program can overwrite
modify/force values
-
Yes
Yes
Maximum number of force
values
256
10
-
&URVVUHIHUHQFH
Details on test functions of the software are found in the 67(32QOLQH+HOS and
in the 67(33URJUDPPLQJ0DQXDO.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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System errors can occur especially in the &RPPLVVLRQLQJ phase. Tracking these
errors might be a time-consuming effort, since they can occur likewise on hardware
and on software side. Here, the multitude of testing functions ensures
commissioning without problems.
1RWH
Faults GXULQJRSHUDWLRQ are almost always caused by hardware errors or damage.
7\SHVRI(UURU
Errors the S7 CPUs can recognize and to which you can react with the help of
organization blocks (OBs) can be split into the following two categories:
• Synchronous errors: Errors you can relate to a specific point in the user
program (e.g. error when accessing a peripheral module).
• Asynchronous errors: Errors you can QRW relate to a specific point in the user
program (e.g. cycle time exceeded, module error).
(UURU+DQGOLQJ
Programming with foresight and, above all, knowledge and proper handling of
diagnostic tools puts you into an advantageous position in error situations:
• You can reduce the effects of errors.
• It makes it easier for you to locate errors (e.g. by programming error OBs).
• You can limit downtimes.
'LDJQRVWLFVZLWK/('GLVSOD\
SIMATIC S7 hardware offers diagnostics with LEDs.
These LEDs are implemented in three colors:
• Green LEDs report regular operation (e.g. supply voltage is applied).
• Yellow LEDs indicate special operating states (e.g. "Force" is active).
• Red LEDs report errors (e.g. bus error)
A flashing LED also indicates a special event (e.g. memory reset).
11-4
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7HVWLQJIXQFWLRQVDQG'LDJQRVWLFV
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Notes on diagnostics with LEDs are found in the Chapter below.
Notes on diagnostics of I/O modules capable of diagnostics are found in the
relevant Manual.
'LDJQRVWLFEXIIHU
If an error occurs, the CPU writes the cause of error to the diagnostic buffer. In
67(3 you can read the diagnostic buffer with your PG. This location holds error
information in plain text.
Other modules capable of diagnostics can be equipped with their own diagnostic
buffer. In 67(3(HW Config > Hardware diagnostics) you can read out his buffer
on your PG.
diagnosable modules without diagnostic buffer write their error information to the
CPU's diagnostic buffer.
When an error or an interrupt event occurs, (e.g. time-of-day interrupt), the CPU
switches to STOP mode, or you can react in the user program via error/interrupt
OBs. This would be OB82 in the above example.
'LDJQRVWLFVZLWKV\VWHPIXQFWLRQVIRU&38'3
If you are using CPU 318-2 DP with a firmware version >= V 3.0.0, we recommend
the easy-to-use SFB 54 RALRM (call up diagnostic OB82) for diagnostic evaluation
of centralized or distributed modules or DP slaves. In addition, the following system
functions can also be used:
'LDJQRVWLFVZLWKV\VWHPIXQFWLRQVIRUDOO&38V
• Using SFC 51 "RDSYSST" to read an SSL partial list or an extract thereof.
• Reading the diagnostic data (Slave diagnostics) of a DP slave, using SFC13
"DPNRM_DG"
Every DP slave provides slave diagnostic data according to EN 50 170 Volume
2, PROFIBUS. You can use SFC 13 DPNRM_DG" to read these diagnostic
data. Error information is stored in hex code. Refer to the relevant module
manual for information on the meaning of the read code.
For example, the entry of the value 50H (= dual 0101 0000) in byte 7 of the
slave diagnostics for the distributed I/O module ET 200B indicates a faulty fuse
or missing load voltage in channel group 2 and 3.
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• Reading a data record with SFC59 "RD_REC"
You can use SFC59 "RD_REC" (read record) to read a specific data record
from the addressed module. Data records 0 and 1 are especially suitable for
reading diagnostic information from a diagnosable module.
Data record 0 contains 4 bytes of diagnostic data describing the current state of
a signal module. Data record 1 contains the 4 bytes of diagnostic data also
stored in data record 0, plus module-specific diagnostic data.
• Reading out the start information of the current OB, using SFC6 "RD_SINFO"
Error information is also found in the start information of the relevant error OB.
You can use SFC6 "RD_SINFO" (read start information) to read the start
information of the OB that was last called and not yet processed completely,
and of the start-up OB that was last called.
'LDJQRVWLFRSWLRQVZLWK67(3
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Locate the cause of a module error by viewing the online information on the
module. You can locate the cause of an error in the user program cycle with the
help of the diagnostic buffer and of the stack content. You can also check whether
a user program will run on a specific CPU.
Hardware diagnostics give you an overview of the PLC status. In an overview
symbols can display the error status of every module. A double-click on the faulty
module opens detailed error information. The scope of this information depends on
the specific module. You can view the following information:
• Display of general information on the module (e.g. order No., version,
designation) and module status (e.g. error).
• Display of module errors (e.g. channel error) in the central I/O and DP slave.
• Display of messages from the diagnostic buffer.
For CPUs you can also view the following module status information:
• Cause of an error in the user program cycle.
• Display of the cycle time (longest, shortest and last cycle).
• Options and utilization of MPI communication.
• Display of performance data (number of possible /IOs, memory bits, counters,
timers and blocks).
Details on diagnostic options in STEP 7 and procedures are found in the
3URJUDPPLQJZLWK
67(3 Manual and in the +:&RQILJ2QOLQH+HOS.
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Diagnostics with LEDs is an initial tool for error localization. Usually you evaluate
the diagnostic buffer for further error localization.
The buffer contains plain text information on the error that has occurred. For
example, you will find the number of the appropriate error OB here. If you generate
this information, you can prevent the CPU from switching to STOP mode.
)RUIXUWKHULQIRUPDWLRQRQVWDWXVDQGHUURUGLVSOD\V
see the 6WDWXVDQGHUURUGLVSOD\V section of the appropriate &38'DWDReference
Manual.
6WDWXVDQGHUURUGLVSOD\VRIDOO&38V
Table 11-2
Status and error displays
/('
6)
9'& )5&(
'HVFULSWLRQ
581
PRGH
6723
LED
off
LED
off
LED
off
LED off
LED off
LED
off
On
LED off
On
On
On
X (see
the
descri
ption)
X
LED off
On
X
On
X
LED off
X
On
X
LED off
X
On
X
X
On
X
Flashes
(2 Hz)
Flashes
(0.5 Hz)
Flashes
(0.5 Hz)
Flashes
(2 Hz)
On
On
On
X
X
X
X
X
On
X
X
On
CPU power supply missing.
Remedy:
Check whether the power supply module is connected to
mains and switched on.
Check whether the CPU is connected to the power supply
module and switched on.
The CPU is in STOP mode.
Remedy: Start the CPU.
The CPU is in STOP mode as a result of error.
Remedy: refer to the tables below, evaluate the SF LED
The CPU requests memory reset.
The CPU executes memory reset.
The CPU is in start-up mode.
The CPU was halted by a programmed break point.
For details refer to the Programming Manual 3URJUDPPLQJ
ZLWK67(3.
Hardware or software error
Remedy: refer to the tables below, evaluate the SF LED
You have activated the Force function
For details refer to the Programming Manual 3URJUDPPLQJ
ZLWK67(3.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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This status has no effect on the current CPU function.
Table 11-3
Evaluation of the SF LED (software error)
3RVVLEOH(UURUV
11-8
UHVSRQVHRIWKH&38
5HPHGLHV
TOD interrupt is enabled and Calls OB 85. CPU
triggered. However, a
does not STOP if
matching block is not
OB 85 is loaded.
loaded.
(Software/configuration
error)
Load OB 10 or 11 (CPU 318-2
only) (OB number can be viewed in
the diagnostic buffer).
Start time of the enabled
TOD interrupt was jumped,
e.g. by advancing the
internal clock.
Calls OB 80. CPU
does not STOP if
OB 80 is loaded.
Disable the TOD interrupt before
you set the time-of-day with
SFC29.
Delay interrupt triggered by
SFC 32. However, a
matching block is not
loaded.
(Software/configuration
error)
Calls OB 85. CPU
does not STOP if
OB 85 is loaded.
Load OB 20 or 21 (CPU 318-2
only) (the OB number can be
viewed in the diagnostic buffer).
Process interrupt is enabled
and triggered. However, a
matching block is not
loaded.
(Software/configuration
error)
Calls OB 85. CPU
does not STOP if
OB 85 is loaded.
Load OB 40 or 41 (CPU 318-2
only) (the OB number can be
viewed in the diagnostic buffer).
&38'3RQO\
Calls OB85. CPU
Status interrupt is generated, does not STOP if
however, an appropriate
OB85 is loaded.
OB55 is not loaded.
Load OB55
&38'3RQO\
Update interrupt is
generated, however, an
appropriate OB56 is not
loaded.
Calls OB85. CPU
does not STOP if
OB85 is loaded.
Load OB 56
&38'3RQO\
Manufacturer-specific
interrupt is generated,
however, an appropriate
OB57 is not loaded.
Calls OB85. CPU
does not STOP if
OB85 is loaded.
Load OB 57
Attempt to access a missing
or faulty module. (Software
or hardware error)
Calls OB 85. CPU
does not STOP if OB
85 is loaded or, if OB
80 is loaded, the cycle
time is exceeded a
second time without
being triggered again.
Generate OB 85, the start
information of the OB contains the
address of the relevant module.
Replace the relevant module or
eliminate the program error.
The cycle time was
exceeded. Probably too
many interrupt OBs called
simultaneously.
Calls OB 80. CPU
does not STOP if it is
OB 80 is loaded or
called for a second
time.
Extension of the cycle time
(STEP 7 – Hardware
configuration), changing the
program structure. Remedy: if
required, retrigger cycle time
monitoring via SFC 43
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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Programming error
•
Block not loaded
•
Wrong block number
•
Wrong timer/counter
number
•
Read/write access to
wrong area
•
Etc.
I/O access error
An error has occurred when
module data was accessed
Global data communication
error, e.g. insufficient length
of the DB for global data
communication.
Table 11-4
UHVSRQVHRIWKH&38
5HPHGLHV
Calls OB 121. CPU
does not STOP if
OB 121 is loaded.
Eliminate the programming error.
The STEP 7 testing function helps
you to locate the error.
Calls OB122. CPU
does not STOP if
OB122 is loaded.
Check module addressing in HW
Config or whether a module/DP
slave has failed.
Calls OB 87. CPU
does not STOP if
OB 87 is loaded.
Check global data communication
in STEP 7. If required, correct the
DB size.
Evaluation of the SF LED (hardware error)
3RVVLEOH(UURUV
UHVSRQVHRIWKH&38
5HPHGLHV
A module was removed or
inserted during operation.
CPU goes into STOP
Screw-tighten the modules and
restart the CPU.
A diagnosable module
reports a diagnostic
interrupt.
Calls OB 82. CPU
does not STOP if
OB 82 is loaded.
response to the diagnostic event,
depending on the module's
configuration.
Attempt to access a missing
or faulty module. Loose
connector (Software or
hardware error).
Call of OB 85, if
access was attempted
during update of the
process image (here,
the OB85 call must be
enabled accordingly in
the parameters). Call
of OB122 with direct
I/O access. CPU
switches to STOP if
the OB is not loaded.
Generate OB 85, the start
information of the OB contains the
address of the relevant module.
Replace the relevant module,
tighten the plug or eliminate the
program error.
Faulty Memory Card.
The CPU goes into
STOP mode and
requests memory
reset.
Replace the Memory Card, reset
CPU memory, transfer the program
again and set the CPU to RUN
mode.
Tip: You can use SFC 39 to disable all interrupts and asynchronous error events.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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7HVWLQJIXQFWLRQVDQG'LDJQRVWLFV
Tip on OB 32 and OB 35: You can set the times in watchdog OB 32 and OB 35,
starting from 1 ms.
1RWH
The shorter the selected watchdog interrupt period, the more likely it is that
watchdog interrupt errors will occur. You must take into account the operating
system times of the CPU in question, the user program runtime and extension of
the cycle time by active PG functions, for example.
&URVVUHIHUHQFH
Details on the OBs and on SFCs required for their evaluation can be found in the
67(32QOLQH+HOS and in the Manual 6\VWHP6RIWZDUHIRU66\VWHP
DQG6WDQGDUG)XQFWLRQV.
6WDWXVDQGHUURUGLVSOD\RI'3FRPSOLDQW&38V
Table 11-5
The BUSF, BUSF1 and BUSF2 LEDs
/('
6)
On
On
9'& %86)
On
On
'HVFULSWLRQ
%86)
On/
flashe
s
-
-
On/
flashes
%86)
-
PROFIBUS DP interface error.
Remedy: Refer to the table below
X
Error at the first PROFIBUS DP interface of CPU 318-2
DP.
Remedy: Refer to the table below
On
On
-
X
On/flash
es
Error at the second PROFIBUS DP interface of CPU 318-2
DP.
Remedy: Refer to the table below
Description of status X:
The LED can assume the status On or Off, but this status has no effect on the
current CPU function. For example, the states Force On or Off do not influence the
STOP status of the CPU
11-10
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Table 11-6
The BUSF LED lights up.
3RVVLEOH(UURUV
•
Bus fault (hardware fault).
•
DP interface error.
•
•
Bus short-circuit has
occurred.
Check the bus cable for short
or interruption.
Evaluate the diagnostic data.
Reconfigure, or correct the
configuration.
The BUSF LED flashes
3RVVLEOH(UURUV
CPU is the DP master
•
Failure of a connected station
•
At least one of the configured
slaves cannot be accessed.
•
Incorrect configuration
The CPU is the DP slave
UHVSRQVHRIWKH&38
5HPHGLHV
Calls OB86 (when CPU is in RUN Ensure that the bus cable is
mode). CPU switches to STOP if connected to the CPU and that
OB 86 is not loaded.
the bus is not interrupted.
Wait until the CPU has started. If
the LED does not stop flashing,
check the DP slaves or evaluate
the diagnostic data for the DP
slaves.
Calls OB 86 (when CPU is in
RUN mode).
•
Check the CPU.
•
CPU switches to STOP if OB 86
The response monitoring time is not loaded.
has expired.
Check to make sure that the
bus connector is properly
inserted.
•
PROFIBUS DP
communication is interrupted.
Check for interruptions in the
bus cable to the DP master.
•
Check configuration data and
the parameters.
CPU 31x was programmed
incorrectly. Possible causes:
•
5HPHGLHV
Calls OB86 (when CPU is in RUN •
mode). CPU switches to STOP if
OB 86 is not loaded.
•
Different transmission rates in
multiple DP master mode.
Table 11-7
•
UHVSRQVHRIWKH&38
•
Wrong PROFIBUS address.
•
Incorrect configuration
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The figure below illustrates the procedure for evaluating the diagnostics in the user
program.
Diagnostic event
OB82 is called
Evaluation with
SFC13 or SFC51
Read out OB82_MDL_ADDR and
OB82_IO_FLAG
(=Identification I/O module)
Bit 0 of OB82_IO_FLAG entered
as bit 15 in OB82_MDL_ADDR.
Evaluation with SFB54
(simplest method)
For the diagnostics of the affected components:
Call SFB54
MODE=1 set.
Diagnostic data is entered into the TINFO
and AINFO parameters
Result: diagnostic address
"OB82_MDL_ADDR*"
For the diagnostics of the
entire DP slave:
For the diagnostics of the affected modules:
Call SFC 51
Call SFC13
Enter the diagnostic address
"OB82_MDL_ADDR*" into the INDEX parameter.
Enter the diagnostic address
"OB82_MDL_ADDR*" into
the LADDR parameter.
Enter ID W#16#00B3 (= diagnostic data of a
module) into the SZL_ID parameter.
Note:
SFC 13 is asynchronous, i. e. it can be
called several times until it enters the
BUSY mode = 0.
First call into OB82,
finish processing in the cycle.
Figure 11-2 Diagnostics with CPU 31x-2
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With CPU 31x-2 you assign diagnostic addresses for the PROFIBUS DP. Make
sure DP diagnostic addresses are assigned once to the DP master and to the DP
slave during configuration.
CPU as DP slave
CPU as DP master
PROFIBUS DP
During configuration you must specify three diagnostic addresses:
• Slave diagnostic address
(from the master)
• Slot 2 Diagnostic Address
of the Slave (from the master)
DP interface diagnostic address
(from the slave)
Figure 11-3 Diagnostic addresses for DP masters and DP slaves
'HVFULSWLRQRI'3PDVWHU
FRQILJXUDWLRQ
When configuring the DP master, define a
diagnostic address for the DP slave (in the
associated project of the DP master).
Below, this diagnostic address is labeled
$VVLJQHGWR'3PDVWHU.
The DP master receives information about
the status of the DP slave or about a bus
interruption by means of this diagnostic
address.
'HVFULSWLRQRI'3VODYH
FRQILJXUDWLRQ
During configuration of the DP slave, you
also specify a diagnostic address assigned
to the DP slave (in the associated project of
the DP slave).
Below, this diagnostic address is labeled
$VVLJQHGWR'3VODYH.
This diagnostic addresses is used by the DP
slave to obtain information on the status of
the DP master or a bus interruption.
6SHFLDOIHDWXUHVRI&38'3t9
When CPU318-2 DP act as a master in DPV1 mode, you assign two different
diagnostic addresses for an I-Slave, one diagnostic address for Slot 0 and one for
Slot 2. Both addresses have the following functions:
• The diagnostic address for slot 0 reports in the master all events relating to the
complete slave (node representative), e.g. node failure.
• The diagnostic address for slot 2 is used to report events that affect this slot.
For example, if the CPU is acting as an intelligent slave, it returns the diagnostic
interrupts for operating state transitions.
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The table below shows how CPU 31x-2 operating as DP master recognizes
operating mode transitions of a CPU operating as DP slave or data exchange
interruptions.
Table 11-8
Event recognition by CPUs 31x-2 as the DP master
(YHQW
:KDWKDSSHQVLQWKH'3VODYH"
Bus failure interrupt
(short-circuit,
connector unplugged)
•
•
with I/O access: Call of OB122 (I/O access error)
DP slave: RUN →
STOP
•
Call of OB82 with the message 0RGXOHHUURU
DP slave: STOP →
RUN
•
Calls OB 86 with the message 1RGHIDLOXUH(coming event;
diagnostic address of the DP slave assigned to the DP
master)
(incoming event; diagnostic address of the DP slave assigned
to the DP master; Variable OB82_MDL_STOP=1)
Call of OB82 with the message 0RGXOH2.
(outgoing event; diagnostic address of the DP-Slave assigned
to the DP master; Variable OB82_MDL_STOP=0)
(YDOXDWLRQLQWKHXVHUSURJUDP
The table below shows how you can, for example, evaluate RUN to STOP
transitions of the DP slave in the DP master.
Table 11-9
Evaluation in the DP master of RUN to STOP transitions by the DP slave
,QWKH'3PDVWHU
,QWKH'3VODYH&38['3
Diagnostic addresses: (Example)
Diagnostic addresses: (Example)
Master diagnostic address =
Slave diagnostic address =
Slave diagnostic address =
Master diagnostic address = irrelevant
The CPU calls OB 82 with the following
information:
← CPU: RUN -> STOP
•
OB 82_MDL_ADDR:=
•
OB82_EV_CLASS:=B#16#39 (incoming
event)
•
OB82_MDL_DEFECT: = Module error
The CPU generates a DP slave diagnostics
message frame
Tip: The CPU diagnostic buffer also
contains this information
In the user program you should also include
SFC13 "DPNRM_DG" for reading out DP
slave diagnostic data.
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The slave diagnostic data is compliant with EN 50170, Volume 2, PROFIBUS.
Depending on the DP master, diagnostic data for all DP slaves conforming to
standard can be read with 67(3.
'LDJQRVWLFDGGUHVVHVZLWKGLUHFWGDWDH[FKDQJH
For direct data exchange, you assign a diagnostic address in the receiver:
CPU 31x-2 as sender
CPU 31x-2 as receiver
PROFIBUS
Diagnostic address
Figure 11-4 Diagnostic address for the receiving node with direct data exchange
In this figure, you see that for configuration in the receiver, you define a diagnostic
address that is assigned to the receiver. The receiver obtains information about the
status of the sender or about a bus interruption by means of this diagnostic
address.
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The table below shows you how the various DP master systems can read
diagnostic information from a slave.
Table 11-10 Reading the diagnostic information using STEP 5 and STEP 7 in the masters system
3/&ZLWK'3PDVWHU
SIMATIC S7/M7
%ORFNVRUUHJLVWHUVLQ
67(3
$SSOLFDWLRQ
)XUWKHULQIRUPDWLRQ
“DP slave diagnostics”
register
Displaying slave
diagnostic data as plain
text on a STEP 7 user
interface
Found under the
keyword +DUGZDUH
GLDJQRVWLFV in the STEP
7 Online Help and in the
3URJUDPPLQJ67(3
Manual
SFC 13 “DP NRM_DG”
Reading slave
diagnostic data
(stored in the data area
of the user program)
6\VWHPDQG6WDQGDUG
)XQFWLRQVReference
Manual
SFC 51 “RDSYSST”
Reading SSL sublists. In 6\VWHPDQG6WDQGDUG
the diagnostic interrupt, )XQFWLRQVReference
call SFC 51 with the
Manual
system status list ID
W#16#00B4 and read
out the SSL of the slave
CPU.
&38'3RQO\
SFB 54 "RALRM“
Reading additional
interrupt information
from a DP slave or a
centralized module from
the relevant OB.
6\VWHPDQG6WDQGDUG
)XQFWLRQVReference
Manual
SFC 59 “RD_REC”
Reading data records of
the S7 diagnosis (stored
in the data area of the
user program)
6\VWHPDQG6WDQGDUG
)XQFWLRQVReference
Manual
FB 125/FC 125
Evaluating slave
diagnostic data
On the Internet URL
http://www.ad.siemens.d
e/simatic-cs, Article ID
387 257
SIMATIC S5 with IM
308-C operating as DP
master
FB 192 “IM308C”
Reading slave
diagnostic data (stored
in the data area of the
user program)
Manual 'LVWULEXWHG,2
6\VWHP(7
SIMATIC S5 with S595U PLC operating as
DP master
FB 230 “S_DIAG”
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Here you will find an example of how to use FB192 to read out DP slave
diagnostic data in the 192 67(3 user program.
$JUHHPHQWIRUWKH67(3XVHUSURJUDP
For this 67(3 user program it is assumed that:
• The IM 308-C operating as DP master uses page frame 0 to 15 (number 0 of IM
308-C).
• The DP slave has the PROFIBUS address 3.
• Slave diagnostics data should be stored in DB 20. Here you can also use any
other data block.
• Slave diagnostic data has a length of 26 bytes.
67(3XVHUSURJUDP
67/
:A
DB 30
:SPA
FB 192
'HVFULSWLRQ
Name
:IM308C
DPAD
:
KH F800
Default address area of IM 308-C
IMST
:
KY 0, 3
//IM no. = 0, PROFIBUS address of the DP slave = 3
FCT
:
KC SD
//Function: Read slave diagnosis
GCGR
:
KM 0
//not evaluated
TYP
:
KY 0, 20
//S5 data area: DB 20
STAD
:
KF +1
//Diagnostic data as of data word 1
LENG
:
KF 26
//Length of diagnostic data = 26 bytes
ERR
:
DW 0
//Error code storage in DW 0 of DB 30
([DPSOHRIUHDGLQJRXW6GLDJQRVWLFGDWDZLWK6)&³5'5(&´
Here you will find an example of how to use SFC 59 in the 67(3 user program
to read S7 diagnostics data records for a DP slave. The process of reading the
slave diagnostics is similar to SFC 13.
$VVXPSWLRQVUHJDUGLQJWKH67(3XVHUSURJUDP
For this 67(3 user program it is assumed that:
• Diagnostic data for the input module at address 200H is to be read.
• Data record 1 is to be read out.
• Data record 1 is to be stored in DB 10.
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CALL SFC 59
REQ
:=TRUE
//Request to read
IOID
:=B#16#54
//Identifier of the address area, here the I/O input
LADDR:= W#16#200
//Logical address of the module
RECNUM
//Data record 1 is to be read
:=B#16#1
RET_VAL :=MW2
//An error code is output if an error occurs
BUSY
:=MO.0
//Read operation not finished
RECORD
:=P# DB10.DBX 0.0 BYTE 240
//DB 10 is target area for the read data record 1
1RWH
Data is only returned to the target area if BUSY is reset to 0 and if no negative
RET_VAL has occurred.
'LDJQRVWLFDGGUHVVHV
With CPU 31x-2 you assign diagnostic addresses for the PROFIBUS DP. Make DP
diagnostic addresses are assigned to the DP master and to the DP slave sure
during configuration.
CPU as DP slave
CPU as DP master
PROFIBUS DP
During configuration you must specify two diagnostic addresses:
Diagnostic address
Diagnostic address
Figure 11-5 Diagnostic addresses for DP masters and DP slaves
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When configuring the DP master, define a
diagnostic address for the DP slave (in the
associated project of the DP master).
Below, this diagnostic address is labeled
$VVLJQHGWR'3PDVWHU.
The DP master receives information about
the status of the DP slave or about a bus
interruption by means of this diagnostic
address.
'HVFULSWLRQRI'3VODYH
FRQILJXUDWLRQ
During configuration of the DP slave, you
also specify a diagnostic address assigned
to the DP slave (in the associated project of
the DP slave).
Below, this diagnostic address is labeled
$VVLJQHGWR'3VODYH.
This diagnostic addresses is used by the DP
slave to obtain information on the status of
the DP master or a bus interruption.
6SHFLDOIHDWXUHVRI&38'3
$SSOLHVWRWKHIROORZLQJ&38V
CPU 318-2 DP
$VRIILUPZDUHYHUVLRQ
>= V 3.0.0
When CPU318-2 DP act as a master in DPV1 mode, you assign two different
diagnostic addresses for an I-Slave, one diagnostic address for Slot 0 and one for
Slot 2. Both addresses have the following functions:
• The diagnostic address for slot 0 reports in the master all events relating to the
complete slave (node representative), e.g. node failure.
• The diagnostic address for slot 2 is used to report events that affect this slot.
For example, if the CPU is acting as an intelligent slave, it returns the diagnostic
interrupts for operating state transitions.
(YHQWUHFRJQLWLRQ
The table below shows how CPU 31x-2 operating as DP slave recognized
operating state transitions or data exchange interruptions.
Table 11-11 Event recognition by CPUs 31x-2 acting as the DP slave
(YHQW
:KDWKDSSHQVLQWKH'3VODYH"
Bus failure interrupt (short•
circuit, connector unplugged)
Calls OB 86 with the message 6WDWLRQIDLOXUH
(incoming event; diagnostic address of the DP slave,
assigned to the DP slave)
•
with I/O access: Call of OB122 (I/O access error)
DP master: RUN → STOP
•
Calls OB 82 with the message 0RGXOHHUURU(incoming
event; diagnostic address of the DP slave assigned to
the DP slave; Variable OB82_MDL_STOP=1)
DP master: STOP → RUN
•
Call of OB82 with the message 0RGXOH2.(outgoing
event; diagnostic address of the DP slave, assigned to
the DP slave; Variable OB82_MDL_STOP=0)
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The table below shows you how you can, for example, evaluate RUN-STOP
transitions of the DP master in the DP slave (see also the previous table).
Table 11-12 Evaluation of RUN to STOP transitions in the DP master/DP slave
,QWKH'3PDVWHU
,QWKH'3VODYH
Diagnostic addresses: (Example)
Diagnostic addresses: (Example)
Master diagnostic address =
Slave diagnostic address =
Slave diagnostic address in the master
system=
Master diagnostic address = irrelevant
CPU: RUN " STOP
→ The CPU calls OB82 with the following
information:
•
OB82_MDL_ADDR:=422
•
OB82_EV_CLASS:=B#16#39 (incoming
event)
•
OB82_MDL_DEFECT: = Module error
Tip: The CPU diagnostic buffer also
contains this information
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If the CPU 31x-2 is used as the DP slave, you can trigger a process interrupt on
the DP master from the user program.
When you call SFC 7 “DP_PRAL”, you trigger an OB40 in the user program on the
DP master. The SFC 7 allows you to forward interrupt information to the DP master
in a double word. This information can then be evaluated in the
OB40_POINT_ADDR variable in the OB 40. The interrupt information can be freely
programmed as required. The 6\VWHPVRIWZDUHIRU66\VWHPDQG
6WDQGDUG)XQFWLRQV - Reference Manual contains a detailed description of SFC 7
“DP_PRAL”.
,QWHUUXSWVZLWKDQRWKHU'3PDVWHU
When CPU 31x-2 operates with another DP master, an image of these interrupts is
created in the device-specific diagnostic data of CPU 31x-2. You must postprocess the relevant diagnostic events in the DP master's user program.
1RWH
Before you can evaluate diagnostic and process interrupts using the devicespecific diagnostics function on another DP master, you must make sure that:
The DP master is able to store the diagnostic messages, i.e. the diagnostic
messages should be stored in a ring buffer on the DP master. For example, if the
DP master can not store diagnostic messages, only the last incoming diagnostic
message would be stored.
In your user program, you must query the relevant bits in device-specific diagnostic
data. Here you must take the PROFIBUS DP cycle time into account, for example,
to be able to query these bits at least once and in synchronism to bus cycle time.
With an IM 308-C operating as DP master you cannot utilize process interrupts in
device-specific diagnostics, because only incoming events are reported rather than
outgoing events.
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The figure below shows the structure of the diagnostics message frame for slave
diagnostics.
Byte 0
Byte 1
Station status 1 to 3
Byte 2
Byte 3
Master PROFIBUS address
Byte 4
High byte
Byte 5
Low byte
Byte 6
to
Byte x-1
Module diagnostics
.
.
.
Byte y-1
.
.
.
Byte z
(length depends on the number
of the configured address areas)
Interrupt status (device-specific diagnostics)
Byte y
to
(length depends on the number of the
configured areas of the intermediate
memory 1 )
Modul status (device-specific diagnostics)
Byte x
to
Manufacturer ID
.
.
.
(length depends on interrupt type)
1 Exception: if the DP master is wrongly configured,
the DP slave will interprete 35 configured address areas
(46H in byte 6)
Figure 11-6 Structure of slave diagnostic data
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Table 11-13 Structure of station status 1 (byte 0)
%LW
'HVFULSWLRQ
5HPHG\
DP slave cannot be addressed by DP master.
0
•
Is the correct DP address set on the DP
slave?
•
Is the bus connector in place?
•
Does the DP slave have power?
•
Correct configuration of the RS485
Repeater?
•
Perform a reset on the DP slave.
1
DP slave is not ready for data exchange.
•
Wait for the slave to complete start-up.
2
Configuration data sent by DP master to the DP
slave is inconsistent with slave configuration.
•
Was the software set for the correct
station type or DP slave configuration?
3
Diagnostic interrupt, generated by a RUN to
STOP transition on the CPU or by the SFB 75
•
You can read the diagnostic data.
Diagnostic interrupt, generated by a STOP to
RUN transition on the CPU or by the SFB 75
4
Function not supported; e.g. changing the DP
address at software level
•
Check configuration data.
5
This bit is always “0”.
•
-
6
DP slave type inconsistent with software
configuration.
•
Was the software set for the right station
type? (parameter assignment error)
7
DP slave was configured by a DP master other
than the master currently accessing the slave.
•
The bit is always 1 if, for example, you are
currently accessing the DP slave via PG or
a different DP master.
The configuring master's DP address is
located in the ”Master PROFIBUS address”
diagnostics byte.
6WDWLRQ6WDWXV
Table 11-14 Structure of station status 2 (byte 1)
%LW
'HVFULSWLRQ
0
The DP slave requires new parameters and configuration.
1
A diagnostic message was received. The DP slave cannot resume operation until the error
has been cleared (static diagnostic message).
2
This bit is always ”1” if a DP slave exists with this DP address.
3
The watchdog monitor is enabled on this DP slave.
4
DP slave has received control command "FREEZE".
5
DP slave has received control command "SYNC".
6
This bit is always "0".
7
DP slave is disabled, that is, it has been excluded from cyclic processing.
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Table 11-15 Structure of station status 3 (byte 2)
%LW
0 to 6
7
'HVFULSWLRQ
These bits are always “0”
The incoming diagnostic messages exceeds the memory capacity of the DP slave.
The DP master cannot write all diagnostic messages sent by the DP slave to its diagnostic
buffer.
0DVWHU352),%86DGGUHVV
The "Master PROFIBUS address" diagnostic byte stores the DP address of the DP
master:
• that has configured the DP slave and
• has read and write access to the DP slave.
Table 11-16 Structure of the master PROFIBUS address (byte 3)
%LW
0 to 7
'HVFULSWLRQ
DP address of the DP master that has configured the DP slave and has read/write access to
that DP slave.
FFH: DP slave was not configured by a DP master
YHQGRU,'
The vendor ID contains a code specifying the DP slave's type.
Table 11-17 Structure of the vendor ID (byte 4, 5)
%\WH
80H
%\WH
2FH
9HQGRU,'IRUWKH&38
CPU 315-2 DP (6ES7315-2AF03-0AB0)
CPU 315-2 DP (6ES7315-2AF83-0AB0)
80H
6FH
CPU 316-2-DP
80H
7FH
CPU 318-2 DP
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Module diagnostics indicate the configured address area of transfer memory that
has received an entry.
Byte 6
7 6 5 4
0 1
3 2 1 0 Bit No.
Length of the module diagnostics incl. byte 6
(dependent on the number of configured
address areas up to 6 byte)
Code for module diagnostics
7 6
5 4 3 2
1 0 Bit No.
Byte 7
Preset ≠ actual configuration
Preset ≠ actual configuration or Slave CPU in STOP
Preset ≠ actual configuration
Entry for 1st configured address area
Entry for 2nd configured address area
Entry for 3rd configured address area
Entry for 4th configured address area
Entry for 5th configured address area
7 6
5 4 3 2
1 0 Bit No.
Byte 8
Entry for 6th to 13th configured address area
7 6
5 4 3 2 1 0 Bit No.
Byte 9
Entry for 14th to 21st configured address area
7 6
5 4 3 2
1 0 Bit No.
Byte 10
Entry for 22nd to 29th configured address area
Byte 11
7 6
0 0
5 4 3 2 1 0
0 0 0
Bit No.
Entry for 30th configured address area
Entry for 31st configured address area
Entry for 32nd configured address area
Figure 11-7 Structure of the ID-specific diagnostics for CPU 31x-2
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The module status reflects the status of the configured address areas, and
provides detailed ID-specific diagnostics with respect to the configuration. Module
status starts with module diagnostics and consists of a maximum of 13 bytes.
Byte x
7 6 5
0 0
4 3 2 1 0
Length of module status incl. byte x (max. 13 bytes)
Code for device-related diagnostics
Byte x+1
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Status type: module status
2H = module status
Code for status message
Byte x+2
0H
always "0"
Byte x+3
0H
always "0"
7 6
0 0
Byte x+4
0 0
CPU slot
1st configured address area
7 6 5
4 3 2 1
0
Byte x+5
2nd configured address area
3rd configured address area
4th configured address area
5th configured address area
7 6 5 4 3 2 1
00B:
01B:
0
Byte x+6
10B:
6th configured address area
7th configured address area
8th configured address area
9th configured address area
11B:
Module ok.;
valid data
Module fault;
invalid data
(defective mode)
Wrong module:
invalid data
No module:
invalid data
.
.
.
7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Byte y-1
0
0 0
30th configured address area
31st configured address area
32nd configured address area
Figure 11-8 Structure of the module status
11-26
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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The interrupt status of module diagnostics provides details on a DP slave. The
maximum length of module diagnostics starting at byte y is 20 bytes.
The following figure describes the structure and content of the bytes for a
configured address area of transfer memory.
Byte y
7 6
0 0
5 4 3
2 1 0 Bit No.
Length of the device-related diagnostics incl. byte y
(max. 20 bytes)
Code for device-related diagnostics
Byte y +1
01H: Code for diagnostics interrupt
02H: Code for process interrupt
7
6 5 4
3 2 1 0
Bit No.
Slot No.
2
= CPU
4...35 = No. of the configured address area
of the intermediate memory
Byte y +2
Byte y +3
0 0 0 0 0 0
00 = No additional information
on diagnostic status
01 = Incoming diagnostics
(there is at least 1 error)
10 = Outgoing diagnostics
11 = Outgoing diagnostics,
but there are still
disturbances
Byte y +4
Only for
diagnostic
interrupt
to
Byte y +7
Diagnostics or interrupt data
.
.
.
Byte z
Example on byte y+2
CPU
1. Address area
2. Address area
etc.
= 02H
= 04H
= 05H
Figure 11-9 Structure of the interrupt status
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6WUXFWXUHRIWKHLQWHUUXSWGDWDIRUDSURFHVVLQWHUUXSWIURPE\WH\
When a process interrupt occurs (code 02H for process interrupt in byte y+1), 4
bytes of interrupt information after byte y+4 are transferred. These 4 bytes are
transferred to the intelligent slave using SFC 7 "DP_PRAL“ when the process
interrupt for the master is generated.
6WUXFWXUHRIWKHLQWHUUXSWGDWDZKHQDGLDJQRVWLFLQWHUUXSWLVJHQHUDWHGLQ
UHVSRQVHWRDQRSHUDWLQJVWDWXVFKDQJHE\WKHLQWHOOLJHQWVODYHDIWHUE\WH\
Byte y+1 contains the code for a diagnostic interrupt (01H). The diagnostic data
contains the 16 bytes of status information from the CPU. The figure below shows
the allocation of the first four bytes of diagnostic data. The next 12 bytes are
always 0.
The data in these bytes corresponds to the contents of data record 0 of diagnostic
data in 67(3 (in this case, not all bits are used).
Byte y + 4
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Bit No.
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0: Module o.k.
1: Module fault
Byte y + 5
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Bit No.
0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1
Identifier for the intermediate
memory address area
Byte y + 6
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Bit No.
0 0 0 0 0
0 0
0: Operating mode RUN
1: Operating mode STOP
Byte y + 7
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Bit No.
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Note: byte y + 8 to byte y + 19 are always 0.
Figure 11-10
11-28
Bytes y+4 to y+7 for a diagnostic interrupt (operating status change by intelligent slave)
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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In view of the many and versatile S7-300 applications, this chapter can only
describe the basic rules on its electrical configuration. You must observe at least
these basic rules if you want your S7-300 to operate free of trouble.
(0(5*(1&<2))GHYLFHV
EMERGENCY-OFF devices to IEC 204 (corresponds to VDE 113) must remain
effective in all operating modes of the plant or system.
6WDUWXSRIWKHV\VWHPDIWHUVSHFLILFHYHQWV
The following table shows you what you have to observe when starting up a plant
again following specific events.
Table 12-1
Starting the system after specific events
,IWKHUHLV
:KDWPXVWQRWKDSSHQ
Restart following a voltage dip or power
failure,
No dangerous operating states may occur. If
necessary, force EMERGENCY-OFF.
Start-up after releasing the EMERGENCY
OFF device:
An uncontrolled or undefined start-up must
be avoided.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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The following table shows you what to watch with respect to the mains voltage.
Table 12-2
Mains voltage
,QWKHFDVHRI
LV
For stationary systems or systems without
all-pole mains disconnect switch
Installation of a mains disconnect switch or
a fuse in the building installation system.
For load power supplies, power supply
modules
The set rated voltage range must
correspond to the local power supply
voltage.
For all circuits of the S7-300
Rated mains voltage fluctuation/deviation
must lie within the permitted tolerance (refer
to Technical Data of S7-300 modules).
9'&3RZHU6XSSO\
The table below shows what you must observe in connection with the 24 VDC
power supply.
Table 12-3
Protection against external electrical interference
,QWKHFDVHRI
0HDVXUHVWRWDNH
Install lightning protection
(e.g. lightning conductors).
Buildings
External lightning
protection
24 VDC power supply cables,
signal cables
Internal lightning
protection
24 VDC Power Supply
Safe (electrical) extra-low voltage isolation
3URWHFWLRQDJDLQVWH[WHUQDOHOHFWULFDOLQWHUIHUHQFH
The table below shows how you must protect your system against electrical
interference or faults.
Table 12-4
Protection against external electrical interference
,QWKHFDVHRI
0DNHVXUHWKDW
All plants or system with an S7-300
installation
the plant or system is connected to a
protective conductor for the suppression of
electromagnetic interference.
Supply/signal/bus cables
The conductor routing and installation is
correct.
Signal and bus cables
a cable/conductor break does not result in
undefined plant or system states.
,QIRUPDWLRQRQ(0&DQGVXUJHSURWHFWLRQ
can be found in the following Chapters.
12-2
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EMC (electromagnetic compatibility) describes the capability of electrical
equipment to operate free of errors in a given electromagnetic environment,
without being subject to external influence and without influencing external devices
in any way.
,QWURGXFWLRQ
Although your S7-300 and its components are developed for an industrial
environment and high electromagnetic compatibility, you should draw up an EMC
installation plan before you install the controller under consideration of all possible
interference sources.
3RVVLEOHHIIHFWVRILQWHUIHUHQFH
Electromagnetic noise can influence a PLC in various ways:
• Electromagnetic fields having a direct influence on the system
• Interference via bus signals (PROFIBUS DP etc.)
• Interference coupling via the system wiring
• Interference influencing the system via the power supply and/or protective
ground
The figure below shows the likely paths of electromagnetic interference.
Electromagnetic
fields
Bus signal
PS
CPU
SM SM SM SM SM SM SM SM
Process wiring
Protective earth Power supply module
Figure 12-1 Possible paths of electromagnetic interference
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Depending on the emitting media (line or isolated) and the distance between the
interference source and the device, four different coupling mechanisms can
influence the PLC.
Table 12-5
Coupling mechanisms
&RXSOLQJ
PHFKDQLVPV
Electrical
coupling
Capacitive
coupling
&DXVH
•
Clocked devices (influence on the
network due to converters and
third-party power supply modules)
•
Starting motors
•
Potential differences on component
enclosures with common power
supply
•
Static discharge
•
Interference coupling due to
parallel routing of signal cables
•
Static discharge of the operator
•
Contactors
Inductive or magnetic
coupling occurs between two
current circuit loops. Current
flow in magnetic fields
induces interference voltages.
The coupling effect is
proportional to current change
over time.
•
Transformers, motors, arc welding
devices
•
Power supply cables routed in
parallelism
•
Switched cable current
•
High-frequency signal cable
•
Coils without suppression circuit
Radio frequency coupling
occurs when an
electromagnetic wave
reaches a conductor system.
This wave coupling induces
currents and voltages.
•
Neighboring transmitters (e.g. radio
phones)
•
Sparking (sparkplugs, collectors of
electrical motors, welding devices)
Galvanic or mechanical
coupling always occurs when
two circuits use one common
cable.
Capacitive or electrical
coupling occurs between
conductors connected to
different potentials.
The coupling effect is
proportional to voltage
change over time.
Inductive
coupling
Radio frequency
coupling
12-4
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S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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you can ensure EMC in many cases!
5XOH/DUJHDUHDJURXQGLQJ
When you install the automation equipment, make sure that surfaces of inactive
metal parts are well bonded to chassis ground (see the following sections).
• Bond all passive metal parts to chassis ground, ensuring large area and lowimpedance contact.
• When using screw connections on varnished or anodized metal parts, support
contact with special contact washers or remove the protective insulating finish
on the points of contact.
• Wherever possible, avoid the use of aluminum parts for ground bonding.
Aluminum oxidizes very easily and is therefore less suitable for ground bonding.
• Create a central connection between chassis ground and the equipotential
grounded/protective conductor system.
5XOH3URSHUFDEOHURXWLQJ
Ensure proper cable routing when you wire your system (see the section below on
,QGRRURXWGRRUFDEOHURXWLQJ).
• Sort your wiring system into groups (high-voltage/power supply/signal/data
cables).
• Always route high-voltage, signal or data cables through separated ducts or in
separate bundles.
• Install the signal and data cables as close as possible to grounded surfaces
(e.g. supporting beans, metal rails, steel cabinet walls ).
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Take care that all cable shielding is properly fastened (refer to the section on
6KLHOGLQJRIFDEOHV).
• Always use shielded data cable. Always connect both ends of the shielding to
ground on a large area.
• Analog cables must always be shielded. For the transmission of low-amplitude
signals it might prove to be more efficient to have only one side of the shielding
connected to ground.
• Directly behind the cable entry in the cabinet or enclosure, terminate the
shielding on a large area of the shielding/protective ground bar and fasten it
with the help of a cable clamp. Then, route the cable to the module; however,
do not connect the shielding once again to ground in this place.
• Connections between the shielding/protective ground busbar and the
cabinet/enclosure must be of a low impedance.
• Always install shielded data cables in metal/metallized connector housings.
5XOH6SHFLDO(0&PHDVXUHV
Some special applications might require special EMC measures (refer to the
section on +RZWRSURWHFWGLJLWDORXWSXWPRGXOHVDJDLQVWLQGXFWLYHVXUJHYROWDJH).
• Connect anti-surge elements to all inductive devices not controlled by S7-300
modules.
• For cabinet or cubicle lighting in the immediate range of your controller, use
incandescent lamps or interference suppressed fluorescent lamps .
5XOH+RPRJHQHRXVUHIHUHQFHSRWHQWLDO
Create a homogeneous reference potential and ground electrical equipment
whenever possible (refer to the section on (TXLSRWHQWLDOERQGLQJ).
• Route your equipotential conductors over a wide area if potential differences
exist or are expected between your system components.
• Make sure you carefully direct your grounding measures. Grounding measures
protect the controller and its functions.
Form a star circuit to connect the equipment in your system and the cabinets
containing central/expansion units to the grounding/protective conductor system.
This prevents the formation of ground loops.
VHHDOVR
Grounding concept and overall structure
Outdoor cable routing
EMC Compatible Installation of PLC
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Quite often it is the case that interference suppression measures are not taken until
corruption of user signals is detected after the controller is actually in operation.
Frequently, the causes of such interference are found in inadequate reference
potentials as a result of faulty installation. This section shows you how to avoid
such errors.
,QDFWLYHPHWDOSDUWV
Inactive parts are referred to as electrically conductive elements, separated from
active elements by a basic insulating and only subject to electrical potential if an
error occurs.
,QVWDOODWLRQDQGJURXQGERQGLQJRILQDFWLYHPHWDOSDUWV
Bond all inactive metal parts to a large-surface ground when you install the S7-300.
Proper ground bonding ensures a homogeneous reference potential for the
controller and reduces the effect of interference coupling.
The ground connection establishes an electrically conductive interconnection of all
inactive parts. The sum of all interconnected inactive parts is referred to as chassis
ground.
This chassis ground must never develop a hazardous potential even if a fault
occurs. Therefore, chassis ground must be connected to the protective conductor
using cables with an adequate conductor cross-section. To avoid ground loops,
physically separate chassis ground elements (cabinets, parts of the building
construction or machine) must be bonded to the protective conductor system in a
star circuit.
2EVHUYHWKHIROORZLQJIRUJURXQGFRQQHFWLRQ
• In the same way as with active elements, exercise meticulous care to
interconnect inactive metal elements.
• Always make sure that you have a low-impedance interconnection between
metal elements (e.g. large and highly conductive contact surface).
• The protective insulating finish on varnished or anodized metal elements must
be pierced or removed. Use special contact washers or completely remove the
finish on the point of contact.
• Protect your connecting elements against corrosion (e.g. with a suitable grease)
• Interconnect moving chassis ground elements (e.g. cabinet doors) with flexible
ground straps. Always use short ground straps with a large surface (the surface
is decisive for the diversion of high-frequency currents).
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Below you can find two examples of an EMC compatible PLC installation.
([DPSOH(0&FRPSDWLEOHFDELQHWLQVWDOODWLRQ
The figure below shows a cabinet installation with the measures described above
(bonding of inactive metal parts to chassis ground and connecting the cable
shielding to ground). This sample applies only to grounded operation. Note the
points in the figure when you install your system.
2
1
3
4
5
6
7
8
Figure 12-2 Example of an EMC compatible cabinet installation
12-8
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The numbers in the following list refer to the numbers in the figure above.
Table 12-6
1R
Key to example 1
'HVFULSWLRQ
([SODQDWLRQ
1
Ground straps
If no large-surface metal-to-metal connections are available,
you must either interconnect inactive metal parts (e.g. cabinet
doors or mounting plates) or bond them to chassis ground using
ground straps. Use short ground straps with a large surface.
2
Supporting bars
Interconnect the supporting bars on a large area to the cabinet
walls (metal-to-metal connection).
3
Mounting the rail
The mounting bar and rack must be interconnected with largearea metal-to-metal connections.
4
Signal cables
Connect the shielding of signal cables on a large area of the
protective conductor/additional shielding busbar and fasten
them with cable clamps.
5
Cable clamp
The cable clamp must cover a large area of the shielding braid
and ensure good contact.
6
Shielding busbar
Interconnect the shielding busbar on a large surface with the
supporting bars (metal-to-metal connection). The cable
shielding is terminated on the busbar.
7
Protective
conductor busbar
Interconnect the protective conductor busbar on a large surface
with the supporting bars (metal-to-metal connection).
Interconnect the protective conductor busbar and the protective
ground system, using a separate cable (minimum cross-section
2
10 mm ).
8
Cable to the
protective ground
system
(equipotential
ground)
Interconnect the cable on a large area with the protective
ground system (equipotential ground).
([DPSOH(0&FRPSDWLEOHZDOOPRXQWLQJ
When operating your S7 in a low-noise environment that conform with permitted
ambient conditions (see Appendix $PELHQWFRQGLWLRQV), you can also mount your
S7 in frames or to the wall.
Interference coupling must be diverted to large metal surfaces. Therefore, always
mount standard profile/shielding/protective conductor rails on metal parts of the
construction. Steel sheet panels reference potential surfaces have been found
especially suitable for wall-mounting.
Provide a shielding busbar for connecting your cable shielding. This shielding
busbar can also be used as protective ground bar.
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• When mounting on varnished or anodized metal parts, use special contact
washers or remove the insulating layers.
• Provide a large-surface and low-impedance metal-to-metal connection for
fastening the shielding/protective protective ground bar.
• Always touch-protect live mains conductors.
The figure below shows an example of EMC compatible wall-mounting of an S7.
PS
CPU
Figure 12-3 Example of EMC compatible wall-mounting
12-10
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A cable is shielded to attenuate the effects of magnetic, electrical and
electromagnetic interference on the cable.
2SHUDWLQJSULQFLSOH
Interference currents on cable shielding is diverted to ground conductive
interconnection between the shielding and the cabinet. To avoid interference as a
result of these currents, it is imperative to provide a low-impedance connection to
the protective conductor.
6XLWDEOHFDEOHV
Whenever possible, use cables equipped with a shielding braid. Shielding density
should be at least 80%. Avoid cables with film shielding, because the film can be
easily damaged by tensile or pressure stress, thus reducing its shielding effect.
+DQGOLQJRIWKHVKLHOGLQJ
Note the following points on handling the shielding:
• Always use metal clamps to mount shielding braid. The clamps must contact a
large area of the shielding and provide appropriate contact force.
• Directly behind the cabinet's cable entry, terminate the shielding on a shielding
bus. Then, route the cable to the module; however, do not connect the shielding
once again to ground in this place.
• In installations outside of cabinets (e.g. for wall-mounting) you can also
terminate the shielding on a cable duct.
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The figure below shows some options for mounting shielded cables, using cable
clamps.
Figure 12-4 Mounting cable shielding
(TXLSRWHQWLDOERQGLQJ
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Potential differences can occur between separate system elements. This can result
in high equipotential currents, e.g. if the cable shielding is terminated at both ends
and grounded to different system components.
The cause of potential difference can be differences in the power supplies.
:DUQLQJ
Cable shielding is not suitable for equipotential bonding. Always use the prescribed
2
cables (e.g. with a cross-section of 16 mm ). When installing MPI/DP networks,
provide a sufficient conductor cross-section. Otherwise, interface hardware might
get damaged or even be destroyed.
12-12
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To reduce potential differences and ensure proper functioning of your electronic
equipment, you must install equipotential bonding conductors.
Note the following points on the use of equipotential bonding conductors:
• The lower the impedance of an equipotential bonding conductor, the more
effective is equipotential bonding.
• When shielded signal cables interconnect two system components and the
shielding is connected on both ends to ground/protective conductors, the
impedance of the additional equipotential bonding conductor must not exceed
10% of the shielding impedance.
• Determine the cross-section of your equipotential bonding conductor on the
basis of the maximum equalizing current that will flow through it. The
equipotential bonding conductor cross-section that has proven best in practice
2
is 16 mm .
• Always use equipotential bonding conductors made of copper or galvanized
steel. Always connect the cables on a large surface to the equipotential
busbar/protective conductor and protect it against corrosion.
• Route your equipotential bonding conductor to minimize the area between the
equipotential bonding conductor and signal lines as far as possible (see the
figure below).
Figure 12-5 Equipotential bonding
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Inside buildings (inside and outside cabinets), clearances must be maintained
between groups of different cables to achieve the necessary electromagnetic
compatibility (EMC). The table contains information on the general rules governing
clearances to enable you to choose the right cables.
+RZWRUHDGWKHWDEOH
To find out how to run two cables of different types, proceed as follows:
1. Look up the type of the first cable in column 1 (Cables for ...).
2. Look up the type of the second cable in the corresponding field in column 2
(and cables for ...).
3. Note the applicable directives in column 3 (Run ...).
Table 12-7
Routing cables inside buildings
&DEOHVIRU
DQGFDEOHVIRU
5XQ
•
Bus signals, shielded
(PROFIBUS)
•
Bus signals, shielded
(PROFIBUS)
•
Data signals, shielded
(programming devices,
operator panels, printers,
counter inputs, etc.)
•
Data signals, shielded
(programming devices,
operator panels, printers,
counter inputs, etc.)
•
Analog signals, shielded
•
Analog signals, shielded
•
DC voltage (≤ 60 V),
unshielded
•
DC voltage (≤ 60 V),
unshielded
•
Process signals (≤ 25 V),
shielded
•
Process signals (≤ 25 V),
shielded
•
AC voltage (≤ 25 V),
unshielded
•
AC voltage (≤ 25 V),
unshielded
•
Monitors (coaxial cable)
•
Monitors (coaxial cable)
•
DC voltage (> 60 V and
≤ 400 V), unshielded
•
AC voltage (> 25 V and
≤ 400 V), unshielded
•
DC and AC voltage (> 400 V), LQVLGHFDELQHWV
unshielded
In separate bundles or cable
ducts (no minimum clearance
necessary)
In common bundles or cable
ducts
In separate bundles or cable
ducts (no minimum clearance
necessary)
RXWVLGHFDELQHWV
On separate cable racks with a
clearance of at least 10 cm
12-14
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A5E00203919-01
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•
DC voltage (> 60 V and
≤ 400 V), unshielded
•
Bus signals, shielded
(PROFIBUS)
•
AC voltage (> 25 V and
≤ 400 V), unshielded
•
Data signals, shielded
(programming devices,
operator panels, printers,
counter inputs, etc.)
•
Analog signals, shielded
•
DC voltage (≤ 60 V),
unshielded
•
Process signals (≤ 25 V),
shielded
•
AC voltage (≤ 25 V),
unshielded
5XQ
In separate bundles or cable
ducts (no minimum clearance
necessary)
•
Monitors (coaxial cable)
•
DC voltage (> 60 V and
≤ 400 V), unshielded
•
AC voltage (> 25 V and
≤ 400 V), unshielded
•
DC and AC voltage (> 400 V), LQVLGHFDELQHWV
unshielded
In separate bundles or cable
ducts (no minimum clearance
necessary)
In common bundles or cable
ducts
RXWVLGHFDELQHWV
On separate cable racks with a
clearance of at least 10 cm
DC and AC voltage (> 400 V),
unshielded
ETHERNET
•
Bus signals, shielded
(PROFIBUS)
•
Data signals, shielded
(programming devices,
operator panels, printers,
counter inputs, etc.)
LQVLGHFDELQHWV
In separate bundles or cable
ducts (no minimum clearance
necessary)
RXWVLGHFDELQHWV
On separate cable racks with a
clearance of at least 10 cm
•
Analog signals, shielded
•
DC voltage (≤ 60 V),
unshielded
•
Process signals (≤ 25 V),
shielded
•
AC voltage (≤ 25 V),
unshielded
•
Monitors (coaxial cable)
•
DC and AC voltage (> 400 V), In common bundles or cable
unshielded
ducts
ETHERNET
In common bundles or cable
ducts
Others
In separate bundles or cable
ducts with a clearance of at least
50 cm
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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The same EMC compatibility rules apply both for indoor and outdoor routing of
cables. The following also applies:
• Running cables on metal cable trays.
• Electrical connection of the joints of cable trays/ducts.
• Ground the cable carriers.
• If necessary, provide adequate equipotential bonding between connected
devices.
• Take the necessary (internal and external) lightning protection and grounding
measures in as far as they are applicable to your particular application.
5XOHVIRUOLJKWQLQJSURWHFWLRQRXWVLGHEXLOGLQJV
Run your cables either:
• in metal conduits grounded at both ends, or
• in concrete cable ducts with continuous end-to-end armoring.
2YHUYROWDJHSURWHFWLRQHTXLSPHQW
An individual appraisal of the entire plant is necessary before any lightning
protection measures are taken.
$GGLWLRQDOLQIRUPDWLRQRQOLJKWQLQJSURWHFWLRQ
can be found in the Lightning and surge voltage protection section.
12-16
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we show you solutions for the protection of your S7-300 against damage as a
result of surge voltage.
2YHUYLHZ
Failures are very often the result of surge voltage caused by:
• Atmospheric discharge or
• Electrostatic discharge.
We will begin by showing you what the theory of surge protection is based on: the
lightning protection zones concept.
At the end of this section, you will find rules for the transition points between
individual lightning protection zones.
1RWH
This section can only provide information on the protection of a PLC against surge
voltage.
However, complete surge protection is guaranteed only if the whole surrounding
building is designed to provide protection against overvoltage. This applies
especially to constructional measures for the building at the planning stage.
If you wish to obtain detailed information on surge protection, we therefore
recommend you contact your Siemens partner or a company specialized in
lightning protection.
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3ULQFLSDOO\RIWKH/LJKWQLQJSURWHFWLRQ]RQHFRQFHSWWR
,(&',19'(7
The principle of the lightning protection zone concept states that the volume to be
protected against overvoltage, for example, a manufacturing hall, is subdivided into
lightning protection zones in accordance with EMC directives (see Figure ).
The specific lightning protection zones are formed by the following measures:
Lightning protection of the building exterior (field side)
Lightning protection
zone 0
Shielding
•
Buildings
•
Rooms and/or
•
Devices
Lightning protection
zone 1
Lightning protection
zone 2
Lightning protection
zone 3
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Direct lightning strikes occur in lightning protection zone 0. Lightning strike
generates high-energy electromagnetic fields which can be reduced or eliminated
from one lightning protection zone to the next by suitable lightning protection
elements/measures.
2YHUYROWDJH
In lightning protection zones 1 and higher, a lightning strike might additionally
cause overvoltage as a result of switching operations, coupling etc.
%ORFNGLDJUDPRIWKHOLJKWQLQJSURWHFWLRQ]RQHV
The figure below shows a block diagram of the lightning protection zone concept
for a detached building.
Lightning-protection zone 0 (field side)
External
lightning
protection
Building shield
Lightning-protection zone 1
(Steel reinforcing)
Room shield
Line in
power
system
(Steel reinforcing)
Lightning-prot. zone 2
Device shield
Lightningprotection
zone 3
Device
(Metal casing)
Non-electric
line (metallic)
Metal
part
Internal
line
Line in information system
Lightningprotection equal
Local potential
equal
Figure 12-6 Lightning protection zones of a building
12-18
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At the transitions points between lightning protection zones, you must take
measures to prevent surges being conducted downstream.
The principle of the lightning protection zone concept also specifies that all cables
which are capable of carrying lightning current (!) and installed at the transition
points of lightning protection zones must be included in the equipotential bonding
system.
Conductors and cables capable of carrying lightning current are:
• Metal pipes (e.g. water, gas and heat)
• Power cables (for example, mains voltage, 24 V supply)
• Data cables (for example, bus cable).
5XOHVIRUWKH7UDQVLWLRQ3RLQWEHWZHHQ/LJKWQLQJ3URWHFWLRQ
=RQHV!
5XOHVIRUWUDQVLWLRQSRLQW!/LJKWQLQJSURWHFWLRQHTXLSRWHQWLDOERQGLQJ
The following measures are suitable for lightning protection equipotential bonding
at the transition between lightning protection zones 0 <-> 1:
• Use grounded, spiraled, current-conducting metal straps or metal braiding as a
cable shield at both ends, for example, NYCY or A2Y(K)Y.
• Install cables in one of the following media:
–
in continuous metal pipes that are grounded at both ends, or
–
in continuously armored concrete ducts or
–
on closed metal cable trays grounded at both ends.
–
Use fiber optic cables instead of metal conductors.
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If you cannot take measures as described above, you must install a high-voltage
protection for your system between the 0 <-> 1 transition points with a lightning
conductor. The table below contains the components you can use for high-voltage
protection of your plant.
Table 12-8
&RQ
VHF
QR
1
High-voltage protection of cables with surge voltage protection components
&DEOHVIRU
HTXLSWUDQVLWLRQSRLQW!
ZLWK
3-phase TN-C system
1x
3-phase TN-S system
1x
1x
3-phase TT system
1x
1x
AC TN-S system
2x
AC TN-C system
1x
AC TT system
1x
1x
2
24 VDC Power Supply
1x
3
MPI bus cable, RS485, RS232 (V.24)
1x
4
5
Inputs/outputs of digital modules 24 V
24 VDC power supply module
1x
6
Inputs/outputs of digital modules and
2x
120/230 VAC power supply
Inputs/outputs of analog modules up to 1 x
12 V +/-
7
DEHNbloc/3
lightning conductor, phase
L1/L2/L3 to PEN
DEHNbloc/3
lightning conductor, phase
L1/L2/L3 to PE
DEHNbloc/1
lightning conductor, N to PE
DEHNbloc/3
lightning conductor, phase
L1/L2/L3 to N
DEHNgap B/n
N-PE lightning conductor, N
to PE
DEHNbloc/1
lightning conductor, phase L1
+N to PE
DEHNbloc/1
lightning conductor, phase L
to PEN
DEHNbloc/1
lightning conductor, phase to
N
DEHNgap B/n
N-PE lightning conductor, N
to PE
Blitzductor VT Lightning
conductor,
type A D 24 V Blitzductor CT lightning
conductor, type B
DEHNrail 24 FML
Blitzductor VT
lightning conductor, type AD
24 V DEHNbloc/1 lightning
conductor
Blitzductor CT lightning
conductor, type B
2UGHU1R
900 110*
5SD7 031
900 110*
5SD7 031
900 111*
5SD7 032
900 110*
5SD7 031
900 130*
900 111*
5SD7 032
900 111*
5SD7 032
900 111*
5SD7 032
900 130*
918 402*
919 506* and
919 510*
909 104*
918 402*
900 111*
5SD7 032
900 111*
5SD7 032
919 506* and
919 510*
* You can order these components directly from:
DEHN + SÖHNE
GmbH + Co. KG
Elektrotechnische Fabrik
Hans-Dehn-Str. 1
D-92318 Neumarkt
12-20
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The following measures must be taken on all transition points 1 <-> 2 and higher:
• Set up local equipotential bonding at each subsequent lightning protection zone
transition.
• Include all lines (also metal conduits, for example) in the local equipotential
bonding of all subsequent lightning protection zone transition points.
• Include all metal installations located within the lightning protection zone in the
local equipotential bonding (for example, metal part within lightning protection
zone 2 at transition 1 <-> 2).
$GGLWLRQDO0HDVXUHV
We recommend fine-wire fusing for following elements:
• All 1 <-> 2 and greater lightning protection zone transitions
• All cables that run within a lightning protection zone and are longer than 100 m
/LJKWQLQJSURWHFWLRQHOHPHQWIRUWKH9'&SRZHUVXSSO\PRGXOH
Always use the Blitzductor VT, type AD 24 V SIMATIC for the 24 VDC power
supply module of the S7-300. All other surge protection components do not meet
the required tolerance range of 20.4 V to 28.8 V of the S7-300 power supply.
/LJKWQLQJ&RQGXFWRUIRU6LJQDO0RGXOHV
You can use standard surge protection components for the digital I/O modules.
However, please note that these only permit a maximum of 26.8 V for a rated
voltage of 24 VDC. If the tolerance of your 24 VDC power supply is higher, use
surge protection components with 30 VDC rating.
You can also use Blitzductor VT, type AD 24 V. Note that input current can
increase if negative input voltages are generated.
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$SSHQGL[
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For the transition points between lightning protection zones 1 <-> 2 we recommend
the surge protection components listed in the table below. This low-voltage
protection must be used in S7-300 for CE compliance.
Table 12-9
&DEOHVIRU
&RQ
VHF
QR
1
Surge voltage protection components for lightning protection zones 1 <-> 2
HTXLSWUDQVLWLRQSRLQW
!ZLWK
2UGHU1R
3-phase TN-C system
3x
DEHNguard 275 surge
arresters
900 600*
5SD7 030
3-phase TN-S system
4x
DEHNguard 275 surge
arresters
900 600*
5SD7 030
3-phase TT system
3x
DEHNbloc/275 surge arrester,
phase L1/L2/L3 to N
900 600*
5SD7 030
1x
DEHNgap C N-PE surge
arrester, N to PE
900 131*
AC TN-S system
2x
DEHNguard 275 surge
arresters
900 600*
5SD7 030
AC TN-C system
1x
DEHNguard 275 surge
arresters
900 600*
5SD7 030
AC TT system
1x
DEHNguard 275
surge arrester, phase L to N
900 600*
5SD7 030
1x
DEHNgap C, N-PE surge
arrester, N to PE
900 131*
1x
Blitzductor VT, type AD 24 V -
918 402*
•
Blitzductor CT surge
arrester, type MD/HF
919 506* and
919 570*
•
per conductor pair
Surge arrester Blitzductor
CT type ME 15 V
919 506* and
919 522*
2
24 VDC Power Supply
3
Bus cable
•
MPI, RS485
•
RS232 (V.24)
1x
4
Inputs of digital modules
DC 24 V
1x
Low-voltage surge arrester
, type FDK 2 60 V
919 993*
5
Outputs of digital modules
24 V
1x
Low-voltage surge arrester
919 991*
6
Inputs/outputs of digital
modules
2x
Surge arrester
7
•
120 VAC
•
DEHNguard 150
900 603*
•
230 VAC
•
DEHNguard 275
900 600*
Inputs of analog modules up 1 x
to 12 V +/-
Blitzductor CT surge arrester,
type MD 12 V
919 506* and
919 541*
* You can order these components directly from:
DEHN + SÖHNE
GmbH + Co. KG
Elektrotechnische Fabrik
Hans-Dehn-Str. 1
D-92318 Neumarkt
12-22
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A5E00203919-01
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For the transition points between lightning protection zones 2 <-> 3 we recommend
the surge protection components listed in the table below. This low-voltage
protection must be used in S7-300 for CE compliance.
Table 12-10 Surge voltage protection components for lightning protection zones 2 <-> 3
&RQ
VHF
QR
1
&DEOHVIRU
HTXLSWUDQVLWLRQSRLQW
!ZLWK
3-phase TN-C system
3x
3-phase TN-S system
4x
3-phase TT system
3x
1x
AC TN-S system
2x
AC TN-C system
1x
AC TT system
1x
1x
2
3
4
24 VDC Power Supply
Bus cable
• MPI, RS485
1x
•
1x
•
1x
Low voltage protection
, type FDK 2 60 V, on insulated
rail
Surge arrester
• DEHNrail 120 FML
• DEHNrail 230 FML
Low-voltage protection
FDK 2 D 5 24
Low-voltage protection
, type FDK 2 12 V, on insulated
rail connected with M- of the
power supply for the modules.
RS232 (V.24)
Inputs of digital modules
• 24V DC
•
2x
5
6
DEHNguard 275 surge
arresters
DEHNguard 275 surge
arresters
DEHNbloc/275 surge arrester,
phase L1/L2/L3 to N
DEHNgap C, N-PE surge
arrester, N to PE
DEHNguard 275 surge
arresters
DEHNguard 275 surge
arresters
DEHNguard 275
surge arrester, phase L to N
DEHNgap C, N-PE surge
arrester, N to PE
Blitzductor VT, type AD 24 V -
• 120 VAC
• 230 VAC
Outputs of digital modules
24 V
Outputs of analog modules
up to 12 V +/-
1x
1x
2UGHU1R
900 600*
5SD7 030
900 600*
5SD7 030
900 600*
5SD7 030
900 131*
900 600*
5SD7 030
900 600*
5SD7 030
900 600*
5SD7 030
900 131*
918 402*
Blitzductor CT surge
919 506* and
arrester, type MD/HF
919 570*
per conductor pair
low-voltage surge protection 919 995*
FDK 2 12 V
919 993*
901 101*
901 100*
919 991*
919 995*
* You can order these components directly from:
DEHN + SÖHNE
GmbH + Co. KG
Elektrotechnische Fabrik
Hans-Dehn-Str. 1
D-92318 Neumarkt
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$SSHQGL[
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The sample in the figure below shows you how install an effective surge protection
for 2 networked S7-300 PLCs:
Lightning-protection zone 0, field side
L1 L3 PE
L2 N
Lightning-protection zone 1
2
2
Switchgear cubicle 1
Lightning-protection zone 2
SV
CPU
SM
Switchgear cubicle 2
Lightning-protection zone 2
SV
4
CPU
SM
4
MPI
MPI
4
4
1
PE 10 mm2
3
5
2
5
PE 10 mm
6
6
3
3
7
Figure 12-7 Sample circuit for networked S7-300 PLCs
12-24
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The table below explains consecutive numbers in the figure above:
Table 12-11 Example of a lightning-protected structure (key to figure above)
&RQVHF
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IURP
ILJXUH
DERYH
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1
lightning arrestor, depending on the mains High-voltage protection against
system, e.g. TN-S system:
direct lightning strike and surge
1 piece DEHNbloc/3
voltage as of transition 0 <-> 1
, Order No.: 900 110* and
1 piece DEHNbloc/1
, Order No.: 900 111*
2
surge arresters,
2 pieces DEHNguard 275;
Order No.: 900 600*
High-voltage surge protection at
transition 1 <-> 2
3
Surge arrester,
Blitzductor CT type MD/HF
; Order No.: 919 506* and 919 570*
Low-voltage surge protection for
RS485 interfaces at transition
1 <> 2
4
Digital input modules:
FDK 2 D 60 V; Order No.: 919 993*
Low-voltage surge protection,
signal modules I/O at transition
1 <-> 2
Digital output modules: FDK 2 D 5, 24 V;
Order No.: 919 991*
Analog modules:
MD 12 V Blitzductor CT;
Order No.: 919 506 and 919 541
5
Bus cable shielding mounting device with
EMC spring clamp on the basic unit of
Blitzductor CT; Order No.: 919 508*
Discharge of interference current
6
Cable for equipotential bonding: 16 sq.
mm
Standardization of reference
potentials
7
Blitzductor CT, Type B for building
transitions;
Order No.: 919 506* and 919 510*
High-voltage surge protection for
RS485 interfaces at transition 0 <>1
* You can order these components directly from:
DEHN + SÖHNE
GmbH + Co. KG
Elektrotechnische Fabrik
Hans-Dehn-Str.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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9ROWDJH
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Overvoltage occurs when inductive devices are switched off. Examples are relay
coils and contactors.
,QWHJUDWHGVXUJHDUUHVWHU
S7-300 digital output modules are equipped with an integrated surge arrester.
$GGLWLRQDORYHUYROWDJHSURWHFWLRQ
Inductive devices require additional surge arresters only in following cases:
• If SIMATIC output circuits can be switched off by additionally installed contacts
(e.g. relay contacts).
• If the inductive loads are not controlled by SIMATIC modules
Note: Request information on relevant surge protection rating from the supplier of
inductive devices.
([DPSOH
The figures illustrates an output circuit requiring additional overvoltage protectors.
PS
CPU
SM SM SM SM SM SM
Contact in the output circuit
Inductivity requires circuiting
Figure 12-8 EMERGENCY-OFF relay contact in the output circuit
Refer also to the rest of the information in this section.
12-26
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$SSHQGL[
&LUFXLWIRUFRLOVRSHUDWHGZLWK'&YROWDJH
The figure below shows DC-operated coils equipped with diode or Zener diode
circuit.
with diode
with Zener diode
+
+
-
-
Figure 12-9 Circuit for coils operated with DC voltage
Diode/Zener diode circuits have the following characteristics:
• Opening surge voltage can be totally avoided.
The Zener diode has a higher switch-off voltage capacity.
• High switch-off delay (6 to 9 times higher than without protective circuit).
The Zener diode switches off faster than a diode circuit.
&LUFXLWIRUFRLOVRSHUDWHGZLWK$&YROWDJH
The figure shows coils operated with AC voltage and varistor or RC circuit.
with varistor
with RC element
~
~
~
~
Figure 12-10
Circuit for coils operated with AC voltage
The characteristics of varistor circuits are:
• The amplitude of the opening surge is limited rather than attenuated.
• The surge rise-ratio remains the same
• Short off-delay.
The characteristics of RC circuits are:
• Amplitude and steepness of the opening surge are reduced.
• Short off-delay.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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The notes below apply independent of the type or manufacturer of the electronic
control.
5HOLDELOLW\
Maximum reliability of SIMATIC devices and components is achieved by
implementing extensive and cost-effective measures during development and
manufacture:
This includes the following:
• Use of high-quality components;
• Worst-case design of all circuits;
• Systematic and computer-aided testing of all components;
• Burn-in of all large-scale integrated circuits (e.g. processors, memory, etc.);
• Measures preventing static charge when handling MOS ICs;
• Visual checks at different stages of manufacture;
• Continuous heat-run test at elevated ambient temperature over a period of
several days;
• Careful computer-controlled final testing;
• Statistical evaluation of all returned systems and components to enable the
immediate initiation of suitable corrective measures;
• Monitoring of major control components, using on-line tests (watchdog for the
CPU, etc.).
These measures are referred to in safety technology as basic measures. They
prevent or rectify a large proportion of possible faults.
5LVNV
In all cases where the occurrence of failures can result in material damage or injury
to persons, special measures must be taken to enhance the safety of the
installation - and therefore also of the situation. System-specific and special
regulations exist for such applications. They must be observed on installing the
control system (e.g. VDE 0116 for burner control systems).
For electronic control equipment with a safety function, the measures that have to
be taken to prevent or rectify faults are based on the risks involved in the
installation. As of a certain degree of hazard the basic measures mentioned above
are no longer sufficient. That is, additional measures (e.g. redundant
configurations, tests, checksums etc.) must be implemented and certified for the
control equipment (DIN VDE 0801). The prototype of the fail-safe PLC S5-95F was
tested by TÜV (German Institute for Technological Surveillance), BIA and G EM III;
several certificates have been granted. Thus, it is suitable in the same way as the
previously tested fail-safe PLC S5-115F to control and monitor safety-relevant
system areas.
12-28
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UHOHYDQW
Most plants contain equipment performing safety-relevant operations (e.g.
EMERGENCY-OFF switch, protective gates, two-hand controls). To avoid the need
to examine the entire controller from the aspect of safety, WKHFRQWUROOHULVXVXDOO\
GLYLGHGLQWRDQDUHDWKDWLVVDIHW\UHOHYDQWDQGDQDUHDWKDWLVQRWVDIHW\
UHOHYDQW In the non-safety-related area, no special demands are placed on the
safety of the control equipment because any failure in the electronics will have no
effect on the safety of the installation. In the safety-relevant area, however, it is
only allowed to operate controllers or circuits compliant with corresponding
regulations.
The following divisions are common in practical situations:
• For control equipment with few safety-related functions (e.g. machine controls)
The conventional PLC is responsible for machine control, whereas safetyrelated functions are implemented with a fail-safe mini PLC (e.g. S5-95F).
• For controllers with balanced areas (e.g. chemical installations, cable cars)
The non-secure area is implemented with a conventional PLC, while the secure
area requires a tested, fail-safe controller (S7-300F, S7-400F, S7-400FH, S5115F or several S5-95Fs).
The entire installation is implemented with a fail-safe control system.
• For control equipment with mainly safety-relevant functions (e.g. burner control
systems)
The entire control system is implemented with fail-safe technology.
,PSRUWDQW,QIRUPDWLRQ
The instructions in the operating manual MUST be followed, even if the electronic
control equipment has been configured for maximum design safety - e.g. with a
multi-channel structure. Incorrect handling can render measures intended to
prevent dangerous faults ineffective, or generate additional sources of danger.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
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*ORVVDU\
$FFXPXODWRU
The Æ CPU uses the accumulator registers as intermediate memory for load,
transfer, comparison, calculation and conversion operations.
$GGUHVV
An address represents the ID for a specific address or address range. Example:
Input I12.1; Memory bit word MW25; Data block DB3.
$QDORJ0RGXOH
Analog modules convert process values (e.g. temperature) into digital values, so
that they can be processed by the central processing unit, or convert digital values
into analog manipulated variables.
%DFNSODQH%XV
The backplane bus is a serial data bus. It supplies power to the modules and is
also used by the modules to communicate with each other. Bus connectors
interconnect the modules.
EDFNXS0HPRU\
The back-up memory provides a back-up of memory areas for the Æ CPU without
a back-up battery. It backs up a configurable number of timers, counters, memory
bits, data bytes and retentive timers, counters, memory bits and data bytes).
%XV
A bus is a communication medium connecting several nodes. Data can be
transferred via serial or parallel circuits, that is, via electrical conductors or fiber
optic.
%XVVHJPHQW
A bus segment is a self-contained section of a serial bus system. Bus segments
are interconnected using repeaters.
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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*ORVVDU\
&KDVVLVJURXQG
Chassis ground is the totality of all the interconnected passive parts of a piece of
equipment on which dangerous fault-voltage cannot occur.
&ORFNPHPRU\ELWV
Memory bit which can be used to generate clock pulses in the user program
(1 byte per memory bit).
1RWH
Note in the case of S7-300 CPUs that the clock memory byte is not overwritten in
the user program.
&RGH%ORFN
A SIMATIC S7 code block contains part of the 67(3 user program. (In contrast:
a Æ Data Block (DB) only contains data.)
&RPPXQLFDWLRQSURFHVVRU
Communication processors are modules for point-to-point and bus communication.
&RPSUHVV
The programming device online function “Compress” is used to align all valid
blocks contiguously in the RAM of the CPU at the start of the user memory. This
eliminates all gaps which arose when blocks were deleted or modified.
&RQILJXUDWLRQ
Assignment of modules to racks/slots and (e.g. for signal modules) addresses.
&RQVLVWHQWGDWD
Data whose contents are related and which should not be separated are known as
consistent data.
For example, the values of analog modules must always be handled consistently,
that is the value of an analog module must not be corrupted by reading it out at two
different times.
&RXQWHUV
Counters are part of CPU --> system memory. The content of "Counter cells" can
be modified by 67(3 instructions (e.g. up/down count).
13-2
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A5E00105492-03
*ORVVDU\
&3
--> Communication processor
&38
Central processing unit of the S7 programmable controller with open and closedloop control systems, memory, operating system and interface for programming
device.
&38RSHUDWLQJV\VWHP
The CPU OS organizes all functions and processes of the CPU which are not
associated to a specific control task.
&\FOH7LPH
The term cycle time describes the time required by a Æ CPU to run through a
Æ user program on
'DWDEORFN
Data blocks (DB) are data areas in the user program which contain user data.
Global data blocks can be accessed by all code blocks while instance data blocks
are assigned to a specific FB call.
'DWDVWDWLF
Static data is data which can only be used within a function block. The data is
saved in an instance data block belonging to the function block. The data stored in
the instance data block is retained until the next function block call.
'DWDWHPSRUDU\
Temporary data is local data of a block that is stored in the L stack during block
execution and no longer available after execution.
'HOD\,QWHUUXSW
Æ Interrupt, Delay
'LDJQRVWLFEXIIHU
The diagnostic buffer is a buffered memory area in the CPU in which diagnostic
events are stored in the order of their occurrence.
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'LDJQRVWLF,QWHUUXSW
Modules capable of diagnostics operations report detected system errors to the
Æ CPU via diagnostic interrupts.
'LDJQRVWLFV
Æ System Diagnostics
'3PDVWHU
A Æ master which behaves in accordance with EN 50170, Part 3 is known as a
DP master.
'3VODYH
A Æ slave operated on PROFIBUS with PROFIBUS-DP protocol and in
accordance with EN 50170, Part 3 is referred to as DP slave.
'39
The designation DPV1 means the extended functions of the acyclical services (to
include new interrupts, for example) provided by the DP protocol. The DPV1
functionality has been incorporated into IEC 61158/EN 50170, volume 2,
PROFIBUS.
(OHFWULFDOO\LVRODWHG
The reference potential of the control and on-load power circuits for isolated I/Os is
galvanically separated; e.g. by optocouplers, relay contact or transformer.
Input/output circuits can be connected to a common potential.
(TXLSRWHQWLDOERQGLQJ
Electrical connection (equipotential bonding conductor) which gives the bodies of
electrical equipment and external conducting bodies the same or approximately the
same potential, in order to prevent disturbing or dangerous voltages from being
generated between these bodies.
(UURUGLVSOD\
One of the possible responses of the operating system to a Æ runtime error is to
display the error. The other possible responses are: Æ error response in the user
program, CPU STOP.
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*ORVVDU\
(UURUKDQGOLQJYLD2%
When the operating system detects a specific error (e.g. access error with
67(3), it calls a dedicated organization block (Error OB) that determines
subsequent CPU response.
(UURUUHVSRQVH
Response to a Æ runtime error. The operating system can respond in the following
ways: transition of the PLC to STOP mode, call of an organization block in which
the user can program an error response or display.
([WHUQDOSRZHUVXSSO\
Power supply for the signal and function modules and the I/O connected to them.
)%
Æ Function Block
)&
Æ Function
)ODVK(3520
FEPROMs are the same as electrically erasable EEPROMS in that they can retain
data in the event of a power failure, but they can be erased much more quickly
(FEPROM = Flash Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory). They are used on
Æ Memory Cards.
)ORDWLQJSRWHQWLDO
No galvanic connection to ground.
)25&(
The Force function is used to assign fixed values to certain variables from a user
program or CPU (including I/Os).
In this context, please note the limitations listed in the 2YHUYLHZRIWKHWHVW
IXQFWLRQVsection in the chapter entitled 7HVWIXQFWLRQVGLDJQRVWLFVDQG
WURXEOHVKRRWLQJin the 6,QVWDOODWLRQmanual
)XQFWLRQ
According to IEC 1131-3 a function is a Æ code block that contains no Æ statical
data. A function allows parameters to be passed in the user program. Functions
are therefore suitable for programming frequently occurring complex functions,
e.g. calculations.
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According to IEC 1131-3, a function block is a Æ code block that contains Æ static
data. An FB allows parameters to be passed in the user program. Function blocks
are therefore suitable for programming complex functions, e.g. closed-loop
controls, mode selections, which are repeated frequently.
)XQFWLRQDOJURXQGLQJ
Grounding which has the sole purpose of safeguarding the intended function of
electrical equipment. With functional grounding you short-circuit interference
voltage which would otherwise have an unacceptable impact on equipment.
*'FLUFXLW
A GD circle encompasses a number of CPUs which exchange data by means of
global data communication and which are used as follows:
• One CPU broadcasts a GD packet to the other CPUs.
• One CPU sends and receives a GD packet from another CPU.
A GD circuit is identified by a GD circuit number.
*'(OHPHQW
A GD element is generated by assigning shared Æ global data. It is identified by a
unique global data ID in the global data table.
*'SDFNHW
A GD packet can consist of one or more GD objects which are transmitted together
in a frame.
*OREDOGDWD
Global data can be addressed by any Æ code block (FC, FB, OB). Individually,
these are markers M, inputs I, outputs Q, timers, counters, and data blocks DB.
Global data can be accessed with either absolute or symbolic access.
*OREDOGDWDFRPPXQLFDWLRQ
Global data communication is a procedure used to transfer Æ global data between
CPUs (without CFBs).
*URXQG
The conductive earth whose electrical potential can be set equal to zero at any
point.
Ground potential can be different to zero in the area of grounding electrodes. The
term “reference ground” is frequently used to describe this situation.
13-6
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*URXQGWR
To ground means to connect an electrically conducting component to the
grounding electrode (one or more conducting components which have a very good
contact with the earth) across a grounding system.
*6'ILOHGHYLFHPDVWHUILOH
The device master file (GSD file) stores all slave specific properties. The GSD file
format is specified in EN 50170,Volume 2, PROFIBUS.
,QVWDQFHGDWDEORFN
A DB is automatically generated and assigned to every function block in the
67(3 user program. The values of the input, output and in/out parameters are
stored in the instance data block, together with local block data.
,QWHUIDFHPXOWLSRLQW
Æ MPI
,QWHUUXSW
The CPU's Æ operating system knows 10 different priority classes for controlling
user program execution. These priority classes include interrupts, such as process
interrupts. When an interrupt is triggered, the operating system automatically calls
an assigned OB. In this OB the user can program the desired response (for
example in an FB).
,QWHUUXSW'HOD\
The delay interrupt belongs to one of the priority classes when processing
programs in SIMATIC S7. It is started on expiration of a time generated in the user
program. A corresponding organization block is then executed.
,QWHUUXSWGLDJQRVWLF
Æ Diagnostic interrupt
,QWHUUXSW3URFHVV
Æ Process interrupt
,QWHUUXSWVWDWXV
A status interrupt can be generated by a DPV1 slave and causes OB55 to be
called on the DPV1 master. For detailed information on OB55, see the 5HIHUHQFH
0DQXDO6\VWHPVRIWZDUHIRU66\VWHPDQG6WDQGDUG)XQFWLRQV"
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,QWHUUXSWWLPHRIGD\
The time-of-day interrupt belongs to one of the priority classes in SIMATIC S7
program processing. It is generated depending on a specific date (or daily) and
time-of-day (e.g. 9:50 or hourly, or every minute). A corresponding organization
block is then executed.
,QWHUUXSWXSGDWH
An update interrupt can be generated by a DPV1 slave and causes OB 56 to be
called on the DPV1 master. For detailed information on OB 56, see the 5HIHUHQFH
0DQXDO6\VWHPVRIWZDUHIRU66\VWHPDQG6WDQGDUG)XQFWLRQV"
,QWHUUXSWYHQGRUVSHFLILF
A vendor-specific interrupt can be generated by a DPV1 slave. It causes OB57 to
be called on the DPV1 master.
Detailed information on OB 57 can be found in the 5HIHUHQFH0DQXDO6\VWHP
6RIWZDUHIRU66\VWHPDQG6WDQGDUG)XQFWLRQV"
,QWHUUXSWZDWFKGRJ
A watchdog interrupt is generated periodically by the CPU in a configurable time
pattern. A corresponding Æ organization block is then executed.
/RDGPHPRU\
Load memory is part of the CPU. It contains objects generated by the programming
device. It is implemented either as a plug-in Memory Card or permanently
integrated memory.
/RFDOGDWD
Æ Data, temporary
0DLQPHPRU\
Work memory is a RAM memory in the Æ CPU accessed by the processor during
user program execution.
0DVWHU
Masters in possession of the Æ Token can send/request data to/from other nodes
(= active node).
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0HPRU\ELWV
Memory bits are part of the CPU's Æ system memory. They store intermediate
results of calculations. They can be accessed in bit, byte, word or doubleword
units.
0HPRU\&DUG0&
Memory Cards are memory media for CPUs and CPs. They are implemented in the
form of Æ RAM or Æ FEPROM. An MC differs from an Æ Micro Memory Card only
in its dimensions (MC is approximately the size of a credit card).
0LFUR0HPRU\&DUG00&
Micro Memory Cards are memory media for CPUs and CPs. Its smaller dimensions
form the only difference compared to the Æ Memory Card.
0RGXOH3DUDPHWHUV
Module parameters are values which can be used to control the response of the
module. A distinction is made between static and dynamic module parameters.
03,
This interface is capable of multipoint communication (MPI). It forms part of the
SIMATIC S7 PG interface. It enables multiple-node operation (PGs, text-based
displays, OPs) on one or several PLCs. Each node is identified by a unique
address (MPI address).
03,DGGUHVV
Æ MPI
1HVWLQJGHSWK
One block can be called from another by means of a block call. Nesting depth is
defined as the number of simultaneously called Æ code blocks.
1RQLVRODWHG
The reference potential of the control and on-load power circuits for non-isolated
I/Os is electrically interconnected.
2%
Organization Blocks
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*ORVVDU\
2%SULRULW\
The CPU Æ operating system distinguishes between different priority classes, e.g.
cyclic program execution, program execution controlled by process interrupt. Each
priority class is assigned Æ organization blocks (OB) in which the S7 user can
program a response. The OBs have different standard priorities which determine
the order in which they are executed or interrupted in the event that they are
activated simultaneously.
2SHUDWLQJPRGH
SIMATIC S7 PLC operating modes are: STOP, Æ START-UP, RUN.
2UJDQL]DWLRQ%ORFNV
Organization blocks (OBs) form the interface between CPU operating system and
the user program. The processing sequence of the user program is defined in the
organization blocks.
3DUDPHWHUV
1. Variable of a 67(3 code block
2. Variable for declaring module response (one or several per module). All modules
have a suitable basic factory setting which can be customized in 67(3.
There are Æ static parameters and Æ dynamic parameters
3DUDPHWHUVG\QDPLF
Unlike static parameters, dynamic parameters of modules can be changed during
operation by calling an SFC in the user program, for example limit values of an
analog signal input module.
3DUDPHWHUVVWDWLF
Unlike dynamic parameters, static parameters of modules cannot be changed by
the user program. You can only modify these parameters by editing your
configuration in 67(3, e.g. modification of input delay parameters of a digital
signal input module.
3*
Æ Programming device
3/&
An automation system in the context of SIMATIC S7 Æ is a programmable logic
controller.
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3/&
Æ Programmable controller
3ULRULW\FODVV
The S7 CPU operating system provides up to 26 priority classes (or "Program
execution levels"). Specific OBs are assigned to these classes. The priority classes
determine which OBs interrupt other OBs. If a priority class includes several OBs,
they do not interrupt each other, but are executed sequentially.
3URFHVV,PDJH
The process image is part of CPU Æ system memory. At the start of cyclic program
execution, the signal states at the input modules are written to the process image
of the inputs. At the end of cyclic program execution, the signal status of the
process image of the outputs is transferred to the output modules.
3URFHVVLQWHUUXSW
A process interrupt is triggered by interrupt-triggering modules as a result of a
specific event in the process. The process interrupt is reported to the CPU. The
assigned Æ organization block is then processed, according to interrupt priority.
3URGXFWYHUVLRQ
The product version identifies differences between products which have the same
order number. The product version is incremented when forward-compatible
functions are enhanced, after production-related modifications (use of new
parts/components) and for bug fixes.
352),%86'3
The PLC distributes controls for digital, analog and intelligent modules as well as a
wide range of field devices to EN 50170, part 3, for example, drives or valve
blocks, to processes at external locations - even across distances exceeding
23 km.
The modules and field devices are connected to the programmable controller via
the PROFIBUS-DP fieldbus and addressed in the same way as centralized I/Os.
3URJUDPPLQJGHYLFH
Programming devices are essentially personal computers which are compact,
portable and suitable for industrial applications. They are equipped with special
hardware and software for SIMATIC PLCs.
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*ORVVDU\
3URJUDPPDEOHFRQWUROOHU
Programmable controllers (PLCs) are electronic controllers whose function is
saved as a program in the control unit. The configuration and wiring of the unit are
therefore independent of the function of the control system. The PLC has a
computer structure; it consists of the Æ CPU (Central Processing Unit) with
memories, I/O modules and internal bus system. The I/Os and the programming
language are oriented to control engineering needs.
5$0
RAM (Random Access Memory) is a semiconductor read/write memory.
5HIHUHQFHJURXQG
Æ Ground
5HIHUHQFHSRWHQWLDO
Potential with reference to which the voltages of participating circuits are observed
and/or measured.
5HWHQWLYLW\
A memory area is retentive if its contents are retained even after a power failure
and a change from STOP to RUN. The non-retentive area of memory markers,
timers and counters is reset following a power failure and a transition from the
STOP mode to the RUN mode.
The following can be made retentive:
• flag bits
• S7 timers
• S7 counters
• Data areas
5HVWDUW
On CPU startup (e.g. after is switched from STOP to RUN mode via selector switch
or with POWER ON), OB100 (restart) is initially executed, prior to cyclic program
execution (OB1). On restart, the input process image is read in and the 67(3
user program is executed, starting at the first instruction in OB 1.
5XQWLPHHUURU
Errors occurred in the PLC (that is, not in the process itself) during user program
execution.
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6FDQUDWH
The reduction rate determines the send/receive frequency for Æ GD packets on
the basis of the CPU cycle.
6)%
Æ System function block
6)&
Æ System function
6HJPHQW
Æ Bus Segment
6LJQDOPRGXOH
Signal modules (SM) form the interface between the process and the PLC. There
are digital and analog I/O modules (input/output module, digital or analog).
(input/output module, analog)
6ODYH
A slave may only exchange data with the Æ Master on request.
67$5783
A STARTUP routine is executed at the transition from STOP to RUN mode. Can be
triggered by the Æ mode selector switch or after power on, or by an operator action
on the programming device. An S7–300 performs Æ a restart.
67(3
Programming language for developing user programs for SIMATIC S7 PLCs.
6XEVWLWXWHYDOXH
Substitute values are configurable values which output modules transfer to the
process when the CPU switches to STOP mode.
In the event of an input access error, a substitute value can be written to the
accumulator instead of the input value which could not be read (SFC 44).
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*ORVVDU\
6\VWHP'LDJQRVWLFV
System diagnostics refers to the detection, evaluation and signaling of errors which
occur within the PLC, for example, program errors or module errors. System errors
can be displayed with LED indicators or in 67(3.
6\VWHPIXQFWLRQ
A system function (SFC) is a Æ function integrated in the operating system of the
CPU that can be called, as required, in the STEP 7 user program.
6\VWHP)XQFWLRQV%ORFN
A System Function Block (SFB) is a Æ function block integrated in the CPU
operating system. If required, it can be called in the STEP 7 user program.
6\VWHPPHPRU\
The system memory (RAM) is integrated on the central processing unit. System
memory contains the address areas (e.g. timers, counters, memory bits) and the
data areas required internally by the --> operating system (e.g. buffers for
communication).
6\VWHPVWDWHOLVW
The system status list contains data describing the current status of an S7-300.
You can always use this list to obtain an overview of:
• The S7-300 configuration
• The current CPU configuration and the configurable signal modules
• Current status and processes in the CPU and configurable signal modules.
7HUPLQDWLQJUHVLVWRU
A terminating resistor is used to terminate data links in order to prevent reflections.
7LPHU
Æ Timer
7LPHUV
Timers are part of CPU Æ system memory. The content of “timer cells” is
automatically updated by the operating system, asynchronously to the user
program. 67(3 instructions are used to define the exact function of the timer
cells (for example on-delay) and initiate their execution (e.g. start).
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7LPHRIGD\LQWHUUXSW
Æ Interrupt, Time-of-day
7RNHQ
Bus access rights
7UDQVPLVVLRQUDWH
Data transfer rate (in bps)
8VHU3URJUDP
The SIMATIC system distinguishes between the Æ CPU operating system and
user programs. The latter are created with Æ 67(3 programming software, using
optional programming languages (LAD and STL). User programs are stored in
code blocks. data is stored in data blocks.
8VHUPHPRU\
User memory contains Æ code and Æ data blocks of the user program. The user
memory can be integrated in the CPU or can be provided on plug-in memory cards
or memory modules. However, user programs are always executed from Æ CPU
main memory.
9DULVWRU
voltage-dependent resistor
:DWFKGRJ,QWHUUXSW
Æ Interrupt, Watchdog
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13-16
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accessories
wiring 7-1
Accessories 6-2
Accumulator 13-1
Actuator/sensor interface 5-33
Address 13-1
addresses
analog modules 8-5
integrated I/O of CPUs 8-6
Addresses
Digital modules 8-3
addressing
slotbased 8-1
User-defined 8-3
Addressing
slot-based 8-1
user-defined 8-1
Analog Module 13-1
analog modules
addresses 8-5
arrangement
the modules 5-7
asynchronous error 11-4
%
Backplane Bus 13-1
back-up
inserting 9-6
operating system 10-2
back-up battery
disposal 10-10
handling rules 10-10
storing 10-10
Backup battery
replacing 10-9
back-up memory 13-1
Basic knowledge required 1-1
Bus 13-1
Backplane 13-1
Bus cables
installation rules 5-40
bus connector
connecting the bus cable 7-17
connecting to module 7-18
removing 7-18
Bus connector 5-40
connecting the bus cable 7-17
setting the terminating resistor 7-18
bus connectors
plug 6-8
Bus segment 13-1
Bus termination 5-49
BUSF
LED 11-10
BUSF1
LED 11-10
BUSF2
LED 11-10
&
cabinet
Selecting and dimensioning 5-12
Cabinet
dimensions 5-13
power loss dissipated 5-15
types 5-14
cable lengths
longer 5-43
PROFIBUS subnet 5-43
Cable lengths
maximum 5-41
MPI subnet 5-42
stub cables 5-43
Cable routing inside buildings 12-14
Cable shielding 12-11
ground 5-26
cables
preparing 7-9
Central unit 5-2
Chassis ground 13-2
Clearances 5-6
Code Block 13-2
cold restart
with key switch 9-15
cold start 9-15
commissioning
CPU 31x-2 DP as DP master 9-24
CPU 31xC-2 DP as DP master 9-24
PROFIBUS DP 9-23
Recommended procedure with the
hardware 9-2
Response to errors 9-3
software requirements 9-1
using the software 9-3
Commissioning
checklist 9-4
CPU 31x-2 DP as DP slave 9-27
CPU 31xC-2 DP as DP slave 9-27
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
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Compress 13-2
Configuration 13-2
connecting
PG 9-8
sensors and actors 7-8
Connecting
spring terminals 7-8
connecting actors 7-8
connecting cables
for interface modules 5-9
connecting sensors 7-8
Connection comb 7-6
Consistent data 8-7, 13-2
controlling
of variables 11-1
controlling and monitoring variables
Controlling outputs in CPU STOP mode
9-22
Counters 13-2
CPU
operating system 13-3
wiring 7-7
CPU 313C-2 DP
commissioning as DP master 9-24
commissioning as DP-Slave 9-28
CPU 314C-2 DP
commissioning as DP master 9-24
commissioning as DP slave 9-28
CPU 315-2 DP
commissioning as DP master 9-24
commissioning as DP slave 9-28
CPU 316-2 DP
commissioning as DP master 9-24
commissioning as DP slave 9-28
CPU 318-2 DP
cold restart 9-15
commissioning as DP master 9-24
commissioning as DP slave 9-28
Cycle time 13-3
'
data
static 13-3
Data
consistent 13-2
temporary 13-3
Data block 13-3
default addressing 8-1
Delay Interrupt 13-7
Device-related diagnostics 11-27
Diagnostic addresses 11-18
Diagnostic buffer 11-5, 13-3
Diagnostic Interrupt 13-4
diagnostics
as DP-Slave 11-15
configured address area 11-25
2
diagnostics
with LEDs 11-7
Diagnostics
device-related 11-27
System 13-14
with "hardware diagnostics" 11-6
with system functions 11-5
Diagnostics
as DP-Master 11-12
Digital modules
Addresses 8-3
digital output module
replacement fuses 10-11
replacing fuses 10-12
Dimensions
of modules 5-4
Direct data exchange 9-33
DP master 13-4
interrupts 11-21
DP slave 13-4
DPV1 13-4
(
Electrically isolated 13-4
EMC
definition 12-3
EMC correct grounding 12-7
EMC error-free installation 12-7
EMC grounded installation, example 12-8
Equipotential bonding 13-4
Equipotential bonding - lightning protection
12-19
Equipotential bonding conductor 5-26
error
asynchronous 11-4
synchronous 11-4
Error display 13-4
error displays
DP-compliant CPUs 11-10
error handling 11-4
Error response 13-5
error-free operation of a S7-300 12-1
Event recognition 11-14, 11-19
Expansion module 5-2
)
Floating potential 13-5
Force 13-5
forcing 11-2
front connector
preparing 7-9
wiring 7-3, 7-10
Front connector
encoding 7-12
front connector coding
remove from front connector 10-7
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front connector coding pin
remove from module 10-6
Full assembly 5-11
Function
FC 13-5
Function block
FB 13-6
Functional grounding 13-6
Further Support 1-4
Interrupt 13-7
Delay 13-7
diagnostic 13-4
status interrupt 13-7
time-of-day 13-8
vendor-specific interrupt 13-8
watchdog- 13-8
Interrupt, time-of-day 13-8
Interrupt, watchdog 13-8
*
.
GD circuit 13-6
GD element 13-6
GD packet 13-6
Global data 13-6
Ground 13-6, 13-7
ground conductor
fixing the ground conductor 6-4
Grounding concept 5-22
GSD file (device master file) 13-7
key switch
cold restart with 9-15
+
Highest MPI address 5-35
Highest PROFIBUS DP address 5-35
,
Inscription labels 6-2
installation
Arranging modules 5-7
horizontal 5-3
vertical 5-3
Installation
grounded reference potential 5-19
in cabinets 5-12
ungrounded reference potential 5-20
Installing
the module 10-7
the modules 6-8
Installing EMC plants 12-3
Instance data block 13-7
interface modules
connecting cables 5-9
interfaces
MPI interface 5-37
Which devices can I connect to which
interface? 5-38
Interfaces
PROFIBUS DP interface 5-38
intermediate memory 9-29
Internet 1-6
interrupt
on the DP master 11-21
Process 13-11
Update interrupt 13-8
/
labeling strips
assignment to modules 7-13
inserting 7-13
LED 11-10
Lightning protection equipotential bonding
12-19
Lightning protection zone concept 12-17
Load
from PS 307 5-31
Load circuits
ground 5-26
Load current
determining 5-30
load memory 13-8
Load voltage
connecting the reference potential of the
load voltage 5-27
Local data 13-8
Local equipotential bonding 12-21
0
Main memory 13-8
Mains voltage selector switch 7-5
Material
necessary 6-3
memory
System 13-14
User 13-15
Memory
back-up 13-1
Load 13-8
main 13-8
Memory bits 13-9
memory card
inserting 9-7
replacing 9-7
memory reset
MPI parameter 9-16
Memory reset
with mode selector 9-14
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Mode selector
memory reset with 9-14
module
arrangement 5-10
installation 6-8
Installing 10-7
removing 10-5
replacing 10-4
Module
dimensions 5-4
labeling 7-13
start addresses 8-1
module diagnostics 11-25
Module Parameters 13-9
module replacement
controlling 10-4
modules
arrangement 5-7
Modules
isolated 5-22
non-isolated 5-22
Monitor and control variable
Setting the trigger points 9-20
monitor and control variables
controlling variables 9-20
monitoring
of variables 11-1
monitoring and controlling variables
Establishing a connection to the CPU
9-21
Opening the VAT 9-21
Saving the VAT 9-21
Monitoring and controlling variables
monitoring variables 9-19
Mountable shielding terminals 5-5
MPI 13-9
maximum baud rate 5-34
maximum possible number of nodes
5-34
MPI Subnet 5-32
MPI address
default 5-35
highest 5-35
Recommendations 5-36
rules 5-35
MPI interface 5-37
MPI subnet
Example 5-44
maximum distances 5-45
Segment 5-42
terminating resistor 5-49
Nesting depth 13-9
Noise
electromagnetic 12-3
Non-isolated 13-9
4
2
OB 13-10
OB priority 13-10
Open components 6-1
Operating mode 13-10
operating system
back-up 10-2
Operating system
CPU 13-3
updating 10-3
Organization Blocks 13-10
Outdoor routing of cables 12-16
3
Parameters 13-10
Module 13-9
PG
access across network boundaries 5-48
connecting 9-8
ungrounded configuration 9-11
via stub cable to subnet 9-10
Potential differences 5-26, 12-12
power on
requirements 9-12
Power supply
grounded 5-17
Power supply module
wiring 7-6
Power supply module
selecting mains voltage 7-5
power up
initial 9-12
priority
OB 13-10
Priority class 13-11
Process Image 13-11
process interrupt 13-11
Product version 13-11
PROFIBUS bus cable 5-39
PROFIBUS address
Recommendation 5-36
PROFIBUS bus cable
properties 5-39
PROFIBUS DP 13-11
commissioning 9-23
Direct data exchange 9-33
maximum baud rate 5-34
maximum possible number of nodes
5-34
PROFIBUS DP address
highest 5-35
rules 5-35
PROFIBUS DP addresses
default 5-35
PROFIBUS DP interface 5-38
PROFIBUS DP subnet 5-32
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
,QGH[
PROFIBUS subnet
cable lengths 5-43
Example 5-46
PROFIBUS Terminator 5-49
Protect digital output modules from
inductive surge 12-26
protective conductor
connecting to the rail 7-4
Protective ground
measures 5-25
Protective measures
for overall system 5-18
Purpose of this documentation 1-1
5
rail
ground conductor 6-4
preparing 6-4
Rail
connecting the protective conductor 7-4
mounting hole dimensions 6-5
rails
fixing screws 6-5
versions 6-3
Rails
length 5-4
rechargeable battery
handling rules 10-10
inserting 9-6
Rechargeable battery
replacing 10-9
Reference potential
grounded 5-19
ungrounded 5-20
Repeater
RS485 5-41
replacing
module 10-4
replacing
fuses 10-12
Replacing
backup battery 10-9
rechargeable battery 10-9
Replacing a module
behavior of S7-300 10-8
replacing fuses
digital output module 10-12
Restart 13-12
Retentivity 13-12
Routing 5-48
Routing a potential difference cable 12-12
RS485
bus connector 5-40
RS485 repeater 5-41
Rules and regulations for error-free
operation 12-1
Runtime error 13-12
6
S7-300
initial power up 9-12
Scan rate 13-13
Scope of the Manual 1-1
Segment 5-34
in the MPI subnet 5-42
in the PROFIBUS subnet 5-43
Service 1-6
SF
LED, evaluation 11-8
Shielding cables 12-11
Shielding contact element 5-5, 7-14
mounting 7-14
Shielding terminal
laying cables 7-15
Signal module 13-13
SIMATIC Manager 9-17
start 9-17
SINEC L2-DP 13-11
single-step mode 11-1
Slave Diagnostic
read 11-15
slave diagnostics
read, example 11-17
structure 11-22
slot number
assign 6-9
insert 6-10
Slot number label 6-2
Slot-based addressing 8-1
Start-up 13-13
CPU 31x-2 DP as DP master 9-25
CPU 31x-2 DP as DP slave 9-28
CPU 31xC-2 DP as DP master 9-25
CPU 31xC-2 DP as DP slave 9-28
Station status 11-23
Status display
DP-compliant CPUs 11-10
Status interrupt 13-7
strain relief 7-10
Stub cables
length 5-43
Subnets 5-32
Substitute value 13-13
Support 1-6
surge protection, example 12-24
synchronous error 11-4
System Diagnostics 13-14
System function
SFC 13-14
System Function Block
SFB 13-14
System memory 13-14
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01
5
,QGH[
9
7
terminating resistor
MPI subnet 5-49
Terminating resistor 13-14
setting on the bus connector 7-18
Timers 13-14
tool
necessary 6-3
Training Center 1-4
8
Ungrounded configuration
connecting a PG 9-11
uninstalling
the modules 10-5
update interrupt 13-8
Updating
operating system 10-3
User memory 13-15
User Program 13-15
User-defined addressing 8-1, 8-3
6
variable monitoring or control
create variable table 9-18
variables
controlling 11-1
force 11-2
monitoring 11-1
Vendor ID 11-24
Vendor-specific interrupt 13-8
Voltage
selecting mains voltage 7-5
:
wiring
accessories required 7-1
front connector 7-10
front connectors 7-3
PS and CPU 7-6
Wiring
PS and CPU 7-2
required tools and materials 7-2
rules 7-2
S7-300 Automation System, Hardware and Installation: CPU 312IFM - 318-2 DP
A5E00203919-01