www.extron.com
Issue 12.2
March • April 2001
Extron’s Twisted Pair Transmitters and
Receivers Solve Connection Challenges
Long Distance Transmission of A/V Signals Over
Twisted Pair Cabling
Extron Twisted
Pair transmitters
and receivers
FEATURE ARTICLE
On the cover...
Extron’s Twisted Pair
Transmitters and Receivers
COLUMNS
4
Marketing Matters:
Improve Your Image
5
The Extron Hotline:
E-Demos: Training Tools at Your
Fingertips
6
Technically Speaking...
Getting the Most from SDI
A
pplication: you have an A/V system to install. You’re down to one
last decision: cables. What do you do if you have to hide a bundle
of coaxial cable because of your client’s sense of aesthetics? Or what if the
building’s facilities manager only wants shielded or unshielded twisted
pair (STP or UTP) cable to be used, like Category 5 (CAT 5), 5e, or 6? Or
what if the university already has CAT 5 cable wired throughout its newly
10 Rental & Staging Corner:
CVEQ1 Gets the Line Driving Job
Done—Discreetly
12 Unique Techniques:
“Future Proofing” AT&T with A/V
purchased property and wants to use the existing cable infrastructure?
...Of course, you are interested
in maintaining picture quality.
22 Tech Corner:
UTP Technology
ALSO IN THIS ISSUE
15 New Products
20 Special Videoconferencing
Series
24 New News
28 Tweeker Use
Sometimes the considerations
and environment you’re working
with preclude the use of coaxial
cable, or an alternative is
requested. One alternative—a
growing trend, in fact—is the use
of UTP cabling to carry high
resolution analog video signals.
UTP cable is normally associated
with digital signal distribution and
low resolution composite video.
UTP technology has characteristics
that
are
advantages
or
disadvantages depending on the
specifics of the application.
UTP cable is a viable alternative
in many scenarios:
• In a corporate boardroom,
there is a long cable run between
the A/V rack and a ceiling-mounted
projector with built-in speakers. The
cable needs to be lightweight so it
can be discreetly hidden within the
boardroom’s decor.
• Your client company is located
on two floors of an office building.
The building’s facilities manager
mandates the use of only UTP
cabling in all common areas, so you
are required to use UTP for the new
company-wide, A/V system.
continued on page 2
Extron’s Product
Line of Twisted Pair
Transmitters &
Receivers
CAT 5 T AV
CAT 5 Video and Audio
Transmitter
Extron’s CAT 5 T AV accepts NTSC/PAL composite
video with stereo audio.
CAT 5 T 15HD A
CAT 5 Interface
Transmitter
Transmitters
Extron’s CAT 5 T 15HD A accepts analog computer
video with PC audio.
CAT 5 T 15HD AV
CAT 5 Interface/
Composite Video and
Audio Transmitter
Extron’s CAT 5 T 15HD AV accepts analog computer
video with PC audio as well as NTSC/PAL composite
video with stereo audio.
CAT 5 T BNC
CAT 5 RGB Video
Transmitter
Extron’s CAT 5 T BNC accepts RGBHV, RGBS, RGsB,
component video, S-video, or composite video signals.
CAT 5 T BNC DA4
CAT 5 RGB Video
Distribution
Amplifier/Transmitter
Extron’s CAT 5 T BNC DA4 is a one input, four output
distribution amplifier that accepts RGBHV signals.
CAT 5 R AV
Cat 5 Video and Audio
Receiver
Receivers
Extron’s CAT 5 R AV receives long-distance transmission of NTSC/PAL composite video with stereo audio.
CAT 5 R BNC A
CAT 5 RGB Video and
Audio Receiver
Extron’s CAT 5 R BNC A receives long-distance transmissions of RGB video, component video, S-video, or
composite video with stereo audio.
Tw i s t e d P a i r Tr a n s m i t t e r s a n d R e c e i v e r s ( c o n t . )
• At a large venue awards presentation,
audience members in the back of the
auditorium use monitors to get close-up
views of the onstage action. For long cable
runs from the A/V rack to the ceiling-mounted
monitors, UTP cable is more economical.
• For a staging event or tradeshow, the
A/V crew needs to quickly run temporary
cabling that can be taken down with no
hassle—or even discarded at little cost.
• A college wants to use the existing UTP
cable infrastructure, and there is plenty of UTP
wiring for A/V signals, separate from the phone
and computer network systems (A/V signals must
be run separately from the other types of signals).
For other scenarios, UTP is a less viable
choice. For short cable runs, UTP is a more
complicated and more costly cable to use than
coaxial cable because there is a high initial,
fixed cost. This expense is inevitable because of
the need for UTP transmitters and receivers.
Special transmitter and receivers sets are
required for two reasons:
1) The main reason is signal transmission. A
special type of signal (differential analog) is
used to make the best use of UTP wire despite
its limitations. To transmit video over UTP, a
special transmitter is needed to convert the
video to a differential analog signal that is a
better match for UTP wire. At the receiving
end, a receiver is needed to convert the
differential analog signal back to a usable video
signal.
2) A less significant reason is connectorization.
A/V components typically don’t use the RJ-45
connectors that UTP cable uses.
Also, coaxial cable systems have better
quality and consistency, while being lower-cost,
than UTP cable systems when cable runs are
shorter than 200 ft. (61 m). Coaxial cable is also
more uniform at these shorter distances, since
lengths of wire pairs often vary within the same
UTP cable due to small differences in twist
tension and rates.
UTP Cabling
CAT 5 R BNC AV
CAT 5 RGB Video,
Composite Video and
Audio Receiver
Extron’s CAT 5 R BNC AV combines all of the
functionality and connections of the CAT 5 R BNC
and the CAT 5 R BNC AV into one enclosure.
2
ExtroNews 12.2
UTP cabling was originally developed by the
computer industry for transmitting digital data
over computer networks. Using UTP for video is
not simply a matter of soldering BNC
connectors to the wire and then connecting
equipment together. It’s vital to treat your UTP
system as an A/V system.
March/April 2001
In any A/V system, the displayed image
quality is only as good as the weakest link in
the video signal chain. In most cases, that
weakest link is the cable. This holds especially
true for UTP transmission systems. To achieve
the best possible image quality with a UTP
system, the highest quality UTP cable,
connectors, and patch cords available should
be used. At this time, Category 6 rated UTP
cable is manufactured to the most exacting
specifications. Designed for Gigabit Ethernet,
CAT 6 cable provides 250 to 350 MHz of
bandwidth as well as the best crosstalk and
attenuation specs available for UTP cable. To
run video over UTP and get professional
results, Extron has designed a transmission
system to compensate and correct for signal
losses that occur during a UTP cable run.
However, for best results, it is important to
know the kind of transmission cable that
connects the transmitter to the receiver.
Although UTP cable installed in a facility can
be used, it is important to note that this cable
may be of unknown quality and has been
designed for computer network use with
termination in an IP network patch bay, digital
switching system, or router. The balanced
analog video signals transmitted by Extron
transmitters are not compatible with digital
network equipment. Mixing signals can cause
damage to a router if a signal is mistakenly
connected to the wrong piece of equipment. If
possible, a UTP video system should be treated
as an A/V system with all signal cables and
connections kept separate from the computer
and data systems in a facility. When possible, a
direct cable run from transmitter to receiver
should be used. (For more information on UTP
Cabling, see the Tech Corner article in this
issue on page 22.)
Extron UTP Products
Extron’s family of Twisted Pair transmitters
and receivers are designed to integrate
Twisted Pair cabling into analog A/V systems.
Our Twisted Pair solutions are designed to be
used the way A/V system designers and
installers build systems—offering the
compact size, connectorization, remote
control
capability,
and
mounting
configurations needed for architectural
integration plus the level and peaking control
needed for high performance.
Extron offers a versatile class of
transmitters and receivers that enable longdistance transmission of RGB video,
component video, S-video, composite video,
and stereo audio using Category 5, 5e, or 6
UTP or STP cable. They use exclusive,
proprietary technology developed by
Extron to transmit signals up to 1,000 ft.
depending on signal frequency and cable
quality—640 x 480 video up to 1,000 ft. (305 m) or
1600 x 1280 video up to 200 ft. (61 m).
Extron’s UTP products allow A/V system
designers and installers to provide reliable,
professional-quality signal transmission while
gaining the benefits of using UTP cabling.
UTP cabling is a fraction of the size of coaxial
cable, as well as being less expensive, more
space-efficient, and easier to pull due to its
smaller size and greater flexibility. Termination
of the UTP cable with RJ-45 connectors is
simple, quick, and economical.
For example, at a large venue meeting with
multiple break-out rooms, computer-video
and/or video sources, such as PCs, DVD players,
or VCRs, may be rack-mounted in the A/V
equipment room. The source signals are then
routed via UTP cables to displays in break-out
rooms located far from the A/V equipment
room.
external power supply, except for the CAT 5 T
AV and CAT 5 R BNC AV. The power supply for
the CAT 5 T AV is optional, and the CAT 5 R
BNC AV includes a 100-240VAC, 50/60 Hz,
auto-switchable, internal power supply.
Receivers output video on BNCs and have
both unbalanced RCA audio jacks and
balanced/unbalanced 3.5 mm captive screw
connectors for easy integration into
switching systems and/or direct connections
to the display.
Architectural Integration
Mounting options– Optional underdesk, through-desk, and projector-mount
mounting kits are available for easy
connection to sources or destinations.
Transmitters can be mounted under desks,
through desktops, or on equipment rack
shelves. Receivers can be easily mounted on
rack shelves or at the display.
Remote power capability– Each
transmitter can be powered by its receiver for
any cable distance of 300 ft. (91 m) or less [800
ft. (244 m) or less for the CAT 5 T AV], so in
many installations, the transmitter doesn’t
require a local power supply. No need for a
power drop at the source’s location—a laptop
can run on its own battery, or the computer
can use the sole electrical outlet available. Each
Twisted Pair product includes a 15VDC,
Specialized knowledge of Twisted Pair
technology and testing is vital for the design
and installation of UTP systems that yield
maximum image quality and minimal
installation effort and time. For additional
information, Extron offers a white paper on
UTP Technology. Please visit the Technologies
tab at www.extron.com and click on the UTP
Category 5/5e/6 button.
Signal Adjustments– There is no need
for additional signal enhancement devices.
Each receiver provides automatic or manual
level and peaking control for cable length
compensation.
Figure 1.
Stereo Audio
Twisted Pair System Design
Configurations– The Extron family of five
transmitters and three receivers allows the
installer to mix and match devices for a custom
configuration to meet an application’s specific
needs (see product sidebar on page 2).
Depending on the layout of the various
sources and destinations, these compactly
sized devices can be selected and placed as
needed. RGB and audio/video signals can
originate at the same point using a dual input
transmitter, or at separate points in the system
using separate transmitters. RGB and
audio/video signals can terminate together at
the same point using a dual output receiver, or
at separate points using separate receivers.
(See Figure 1.)
Under-desk
Mounting Kit
Using the display
speakers, either or
both audio
connections can
be used.
ER
POW
B
PUT
OUT
A-V
A
R
L
IO
AUD
Extron
CAT 5 R AV
T
O INPU
VIDE
Large Screen
Rear Projector
CAT 6 UTP
Cable
Projector
Mounting
Bracket
Mounting Bolt
AUD
IO
COM
PUT
BUF
ID PIN 4
FER
ED
LOC
AL
MON
ITOR
VIDE
O
L AUD
IO
R
T 15
HD
RGB OUTPUT
CA
T5
AV
G
Audio
H-SH
IFT
R
B
V
ISOG
C SYNC
L
A
R
A-V AUDIO
B
Extron
CAT 5 T 15HD AV
Extron
CAT 5 R BNC A
H/HV
Connectorization– Depending on the
transmitter selected, a variety of input
connectors are used:
• Female 15-pin HD connector for
computer-video input
• 3.5 mm mini jack for PC audio input
• RCA connectors for composite video and
stereo audio input
• BNC connectors for computer or RGB
video, component video, S-video, or
composite video input.
RGB INPUT
T
ID PIN 11
ER
INPU
Ceiling
PC Computer
VCR
Projector
March/April 2001
ExtroNews 12.2
3
MARKETING
MATTERS
by Lee Dodson, Vice President of Marketing
Improve Your Image
T
he best way for potential customers to judge the quality of work you are
capable of delivering is to show them examples of it. The solution is
simple: just take the hand of the next customer who comes through your door
Application Stories
and take them to see your best installations. Simple, right?
4
O.K., hauling them around the state or
country to see your work is not always
convenient or practical. Distance, access
rights, schedules, cost, and time are just a
few of the more bothersome obstacles
that make this difficult. However, this
difficulty does not reduce the power or
need to provide credible evidence of one’s
abilities. Unfortunately, finding a suitable
next-best option is not so simple.
Application
stories can be
published in
ExtroNews
Application
stories can also
be published on
Extron’s Web site
under “Featured
Application” section
ExtroNews 12.2
Many integrators assemble portfolios of
pictures from prior installations to use in
supporting sales for future customers.
These can be categorized and organized
by system type and cost level. Professional
photography cannot be undervalued in
this case.
Much as a hardware
manufacturer invests in the quality of their
brochures, an integrator’s product is
installations and deserves the same
attention. The portfolio approach can be
effective if presented well by the
salesperson. However, these tend to be
somewhat flat and are not effective
without someone to explain and position
the systems. Nevertheless, this is the first
step in creating effective sales materials.
A good way to augment the standard
portfolio is to create professional
application stories with pictures and
testimonials. Multiple people in multiple
locations can use these. Application
stories written and composed properly
can be very persuasive instruments
March/April 2001
to build your company’s image,
communicate
ideas,
establish
credibility, validate theories, and show
workmanship. Integrating customer
testimonials can further build credibility
and help remove the marketing “hype” of
a sales pitch.
Although these are not a substitute for
physical examples and demonstrations,
application stories can go a long way to
illustrate and exemplify systems and
concepts. Furthermore, these can be used
for pro-active marketing like handouts
and mailings to entice prospects to select
your firm among their myriad (and
confusing) choices.
Many integrators do not have the
luxury
of
dedicated
marketing
professionals available to create these
useful materials. Fortunately, Extron has a
permanent staff of experienced writers
and graphic designers who are always
looking for good material to incorporate
into our communications, like ExtroNews,
our Web site, and other media.
Integrators who we have helped write
application stories and feature here in
ExtroNews have often requested extra
copies of the newsletter for their
distribution, which we are happy to
provide. For further information, please
contact Extron’s PR/Media Manager,
Rosia Senh at rsenh@extron.com or
714.491.1500, ext. 6398.
THE
EXTRON
HOTLINE
by Jeff Gibson, Vice President of Sales
E-Demos: Training Tools at Your Fingertips
W
hen I try to describe to people who aren’t in the A/V industry
what kinds of products Extron manufactures, I sometimes get
blank stares in return. While most people have experienced professional
audio/visual environments in sports bars, conference rooms, classrooms, or
churches, few understand what goes on behind the scenes to make
everything work.
These are the same people who make the
decisions about equipment purchases for
professional A/V installations. Explaining to
end users what all this equipment does and
why it’s necessary can be a challenge. Even
for those who have been in this industry for
years, keeping up with all the new product
developments and options for application
environments can be a difficult task.
To make learning about what Extron
products do and how they operate a little
easier, we’ve created a training tool for A/V
dealers—E-Demos. E-Demos are computerbased product demonstrations. These
electronic product demos are like minianimated movies that can be played on a
desktop or laptop computer. Computer
graphics and audio narration explain in simple
terms what a product does, how to operate it
and where to use it. The E-Demo format lets
viewers zoom in and out on images for a
close and detailed look at the product.
E-Demos are designed for both one-onone learning environments and for larger
group presentations. They can be used to
train employees on the latest Extron products
and as sales tools to demonstrate to clients
how products fit into a specific A/V
application.
For ease of use, we’ve made E-Demos
available in several formats. Through the
Extron Web site (www.extron.com), they can
be viewed online using one of two Internet
connection speeds: low speed for use with a
56.6 kbps modem or high speed for
everything faster. E-Demos can also be
downloaded from the Web, making them as
portable as a laptop
computer. Additionally,
we’ve put the first
seven demos on a mini
CD-ROM
and
mailed a copy
to
every
Extron dealer.
E-Demos from
the CD-ROM are
great to use for one-on-one product training
or group training in places where Web access
is not practical. If you’d like additional
copies of the CD-ROM, please call your
Extron Customer Support Representative
(US: 800.633.9876, Europe+800.3987.6673,
Asia: +65.383.4400). For the latest E-Demo,
check the Extron Web site (www.extron.com).
Domestic
Version 1.0
Interactive
Product
Demonstrations
PC & Mac
Compatible
www.extron.com
Copyright© 2001 Extron Electronics
01-01
68-551-01
REV. A
March/April 2001
ExtroNews 12.2
5
T E C H N I C A L LY
SPEAKING...
by Steve Somers, Vice President of Engineering
Getting the Most from SDI
S
DI does NOT stand for “Short Distance Interface.” But, a serial digital
interface run can revert to that status if some basic rules are not
followed.
The Serial Digital Interface-SDI (SMPTE
259M) grew out of the need for longer
distance connection of component digital
television equipment, the result being the
viability of a truly digital broadcast station. SDI
is capable of running hundreds of feet and
can run thousands of feet if properly
distributed. For additional information on SDI,
see my articles in the January – April 2000 and
the September – October 2000 ExtroNews.
Taking It One Bit At A Time
Digital component recording began in
1987 with the creation of the D1 format
(SMPTE 125M). The D1 interface is an 8/10
bit parallel system intended for close-in
connection between digital tape recorders
(19 mm tape). Its interface cabling is short
due to the difficulty in maintaining proper bit
timing over a byte-wide data channel.
Somewhat like DVI, D1 requires
management of differential signals over 8 or
10 twisted pairs. Bit skew, crosstalk, and
attenuation are adversarial to the task of
transmitting parallel D1 for long distances.
PARALLEL
4:2:2 DIGITAL
COMPONENT
VIDEO
10
The interface uses a 25-pin D-sub miniature
connector. As a result, termination is not
really easy, and the thought of managing
that many parallel bits through a router is
good for a migraine, not to mention the
hardware cost of 10 switching planes.
Therefore, parallel D1 connections are easily
managed over only a few meters.
Reformatting the byte-wide D1 data via a
serializer yields a very high-speed serial data
stream. Serializing a 10-bit data word results in
a data rate ten times faster. The 27 MHz D1 data
becomes serial data at 270 megabits per second
for standard component NTSC. See Figure 1
(below) showing the basic conversion
methodology. Benchmark signal performance is
captured in Figure 2 (on opposite page).
Why SDI?
Although SDI bit rates are very high,
distribution of serial data as a single cable
connection presents significant advantages.
First, it’s much easier (read cheaper) to route
and switch one cable than a parallel system
75-OHM
COAX
SHIFT
REGISTER
SCRAMBLER
SHIFT
REGISTER
DESCRAMBLER
27 MHz
CLOCK
10
PARALLEL
4:2:2 DIGITAL
COMPONENT
VIDEO
SAV, EAV
DETECT
10x
PLL
270 MHz
CLOCK
270 MHz
PLL
DIVIDE
BY 10
27 MHz
CLOCK
Figure 1. 4:2:2 Serial Digital Interface
6
ExtroNews 12.2
March/April 2001
T E C H N I C A L LY
because the receiver takes one phase of the
data transmission, inverts it, and then adds it
to the in-phase portion. Like a regular analog
differential amplifier, common mode noise
induced into the signal is cancelled out
during this inversion and addition operation.
Figure 2. Standard reference level SDI signal
conforming to SMPTE 259M
of cables. Having all data bits organized as
one stream means there will be no issues
with clock and data synchronization.
Managing bit timing and cable equalization
is easier. Data skew problems encountered
with multi-conductor cables do not exist.
As seen in the operational diagram,
Figure 1, the SDI format utilizes a differential
signaling technique and NRZI (non-return to
zero inverted) coding. Although SDI is
transmitted as an unbalanced signal on 75ohm coax, transmission and reception
involves differential amplifiers that format
and detect, respectively, both data phases.
Utilizing differential reception creates
additional headroom and robustness in
signal-to-noise performance. Pseudorandomizing the data bits and use of NRZI
coding increases channel transmission
reliability. NRZI coding is desirable because its
operation is independent of signal polarity. In
this coding scheme, high and low levels do
not communicate data 1s or 0s. High and
low states are detected simply by the change
from one level to another. A zero means that
the transmission level stays the same, while a
one is transmitted each time the level
transitions from one level to the other.
SDI is more immune to extraneous noise
and low frequency components (hum)
So, what problems do exist? As in life, all
modes of travel have distinct advantages and
disadvantages. One must weigh the relative
difference. Key factors affecting SDI are cable
attenuation, signal jitter, signal wander, error
detection/handling (EDH), and receiver
sensitivity. See Table 1 for a list of the SDI
rates supported within SMPTE 259M.
Cable Quality is Job 1
The single largest effect on SDI
transmission rests with the quality of cable
used relative to the transmission distance
required. Any 75-ohm coaxial cable may be
used for SDI. The big question is always:
“How far can I go?”
SMPTE 259M guides us in determining
cable transmission length. It states that, for a
class A receiver (the best type to have), the
maximum transmission distance is given by a
SPEAKING...
coaxial cable length having 30dB attenuation
at one-half the SDI clock rate. For example,
at the 270 Mbps rate for component NTSC,
one half the rate is 135 MHz. Many cable
specification tables show attenuation in dB
at 135 MHz since this is a popular rate.
Taking the attenuation value for a 100-foot
cable at 135 MHz and scaling it the 30dB
limit (attenuation is linear) gives us the
maximum cable length. If we have a
specified loss of 10dB at 135 MHz at
100 feet, then the maximum usable length
will be at 30dB divided by 10dB times
100 feet, which is 300 feet for that cable.
Utilizing the maximum calculated cable
length in a primary distribution run for SDI is
NOT a good idea. Suppose you have made
the maximum length run. Now, you connect
a 10-foot patch cable at the end to include
some other device and, suddenly, there is no
video image! You have just experienced the
“cliff effect.” When the loss parameters of
the SDI signal exceed the receiver’s ability to
recapture the data, the system completely
continued on next page
Table 1. SMPTE 259M transmission rates and specifications
March/April 2001
ExtroNews 12.2
7
T E C H N I C A L LY
fails, ungracefully. For this reason, allow at
least 10% margin in your cable length
calculations to account for other connection
changes, connector resistances, connector
and termination reflections, etc. Most precalculated cable charts build in this
allowance just for good practice. See Table 2
for calculated cable lengths for Extron cables.
There’s Clocking, And Then There’s
Re-clocking
All digital data is derived and managed by
a repetitive pulse train called a clock… the
literal heartbeat of the machine. Without it,
data transitions could not be identified in a
coherent way. Either, digital data somehow
contains the clock information embedded
within it, or the clock signal accompanies the
data separately. Since SDI is a singular wire
transmission scheme, the clock is embedded.
Therefore, not only does cable attenuation
affect recovery of data, it seriously affects the
receiver’s ability to recover the clock signal
such that the system can stay synchronized.
This is where basic cable attenuation
comes in. The maximum cable distance is
governed by the receiver’s ability to recover
clock and data reliably. As the digital cliff is
approached, bit errors typically appear and
escalate rapidly toward transmission failure.
But, (you say) I need to transmit SDI over
SPEAKING...
1,000 feet and the best cable I have available
is not guaranteed much beyond that. What
will I do?
The solution is straightforward. Position an
SDI receiving device in the line at a point
where reliable communication is maintained.
Make sure this device is a true SDI receiver
that can equalize and re-clock the signal. In
analog signal transmission systems there is
no really good way to reform and transmit
the signal while still maintaining good
linearity. With digital data streams, however,
the data can be captured and reconstructed
by a “squaring” circuit that restores the
original risetime of the signal. Because we
aren’t concerned about linearity in digital
data, the data can be indefinitely
reconditioned as long as good signal
conditioning practices are followed. When
SDI is reconditioned for retransmission, the
data edges are sped up and the original
timing accuracy restored. This operation is
referred to as “re-clocking.” Now, we can
run the additional distance our cabling
system will allow.
To Re-clock Or Not To Re-clock
Yes, that is a question. Properly re-clocking
SDI calls for additional circuit complexity and
cost. Good SDI matrix routers include reclocking systems. Further, it’s a good idea to
Table 2. Recommended Serial Digital (SDI) Transmission
Distances through Coaxial Cable
8
ExtroNews 12.2
March/April 2001
consider the location of a router in a new
installation such that cabling distances can
work to your advantage toward
minimizing the number of repeating
stations, or re-clocking points, required.
Routers are typically the focal point for reclocking data. SDI distribution amplifiers
can involve a receiver/re-clocker circuit as
well. In major installations having large
routers, it is common for the router to have
re-clocking ability at the input and at the
output as well. Why? The actual
propagation distance and loss effects
through some large routers represent a
serious impairment to SDI signals.
Therefore, re-clocking may be included at
the output to ensure signal quality for the
next long cable run.
Now, back to the question. Do I need to
always re-clock SDI signal runs? No.
Suppose you have a relatively small set of
cable runs involving a small matrix router
and good receivers at each destination.
Good SDI receivers can recover the signal
under some surprising signal degradation
conditions. In some cases, adding the
wrong equipment into the line (or
something having a poor re-clocking
system) may actually increase signal jitter,
which makes recovery more difficult. As
long as you carefully maintain signal
quality and are not in danger of exceeding
cabling distances, you do not necessarily
need to re-clock. Re-clocking is primarily
intended to clean up long run losses, allow
easier decoding, and redrive additional
cable runs.
An analog matrix router under the right
conditions can handle SDI nicely. The key
issue is whether the router will introduce
crosstalk or other noise that may affect the
signal jitter performance. If the router is
bandwidth limited, performance will be
directly affected as high frequencies are
attenuated rapidly. You must look at router
bandwidth specs to see if the SDI risetime
can be accommodated without significant
effect. Since the SDI signal is about 800
T E C H N I C A L LY
millivolts peak-to-peak, it is not much
different in level than standard video signals.
SDI is uni-directional and has a good signalto-noise recovery budget. So, with care,
smaller, local routing systems can work on a
budget without re-clocking.
Got The Jitters?
Signal jitter is another culprit in SDI
systems. Maintenance of the timing
relationship to a common timing reference
provides auto-phasing recovery circuits in
the receiver the ability to lock onto and
decode the clock and video data. When an
external factor, such as random noise,
affects the absolute bit timing, the receiver
encounters difficulty recovering clock and
data. Cable loss affects the amplitude of the
SDI signal while jitter affects the zero
crossing point of the data edges. The data
edges appear to dance back and forth with
random uncertainty. There is a jitter budget
allowance, but since noise and jitter effects
can become generally random, bit error rate
can creep up periodically and cause lost
data. If the jitter budget is exceeded, data
cannot be recovered at all.
As with analog signals, once you have
noise in the signal, it is extremely difficult
and costly to remove. Jitter caused by
induced noise effects, unstable signal
sources, or poor re-clocking systems is the
demise of digital signals. Sometimes, basic
signal attenuation effects are mistaken as
signal jitter. SDI signals contain a range of
low to high frequencies like analog signals.
Cable attenuation still affects the high
frequencies most. When looking at an eye
pattern, the data zero crossing point
(risetime/falltime area) appears wider than
normal. The eye pattern is typically used to
evaluate signal quality including jitter. This
appears to smear the data edges and look as
though large amounts of jitter are present,
when, in fact, measurement with SDI
measurement equipment may show the
signal well within jitter specifications. Jitter
measurements should be made with
instrumentation capable of proper
SPEAKING...
measurement.
SMPTE
Engineering
Guideline, EG-33-1998, Jitter Characteristics
and Measurements provides in-depth help
for this task (www.smpte.org). See Figure 3.
Born To Wander
With the deployment of more digital video
networks, the monitoring of video sync
timing is more critical than before. In some
applications, where time-base correctors or
frame synchronizers are not used, problems
with image shifts and hue errors may occur
because of network induced wander of sync
and color burst timing. This condition creates
“video wander,” which is defined as sync
signal phase variations below 10 Hertz.
When the video signal is converted to
composite, this effect is not easy to remove.1
Specialized television test equipment, such as
the Tektronix VM700T, can easily measure
horizontal sync timing jitter and wander for
serial digital systems.
Digital Safety Net
All of the aforementioned situations in
addition to poor connections and improper
terminations can cause data bit errors to
occur. A bit error is defined as a change in
one or more data values occurring between
the source and destination. SDI includes an
error detection and handling (EDH) system
that can monitor data quality and provide
some visibility of errors as well as location.
Some bit errors may not affect picture quality
directly but may signal impending failure.
Groupings of bit errors may affect picture
quality, sound, or both. SDI equipment will
typically incorporate some level of EDH
reporting or troubleshooting capability.2
Receivers – Some Are So Insensitive To
Your Needs
SMPTE 259M mentions a typical range of
expected SDI receiver sensitivity between
20dB and 30dB at one-half the data clock
frequency. Further, proper cable equalization
should be employed. What is cable
equalization? It is a feature of the receiver’s
front-end amplifier that adjusts its gain to
compensate for higher losses in the signal at
Figure 3. Eye pattern shows normal cable losses,
yet jitter is still well within specs.
the higher frequencies received, while
maintaining lower gain settings for the lower
frequencies. This is important for proper
alignment and triggering with changing data
edges so as to ensure consistent video
recovery.
Looking back at our earlier example we
used for calculating maximum cable length,
our cable run was 300 feet for a 10dB loss
cable at 135 MHz at 100 feet. Now, if we
have a less sensitive receiver, say the 20dB
type, our drive distance will decrease to 20dB
divided by 10dB times 100 feet, or, only 200
feet. You can see there is a ratio of 2/3 here.
This nominal 10dB performance spread in
receivers severely limits SDI cable run lengths.
Remember, all things being equal, pay
careful attention to receiver sensitivity and
cable attenuation specs for realizing the
most from SDI signal distribution. While
good routers utilize re-clocking, the need for
this feature primarily depends on the size
and complexity of your system design. Be
aware that good signal sources, routers, and
proper cable routing techniques help reduce
the invasion of signal jitter.
Footnotes:
1. Measuring
Wander
in
Video
Distribution Systems, by Tom Tucker,
Tektronix (http://www.Tektronix.com/
Measurement/App_Notes/Published_
Articles/measwander/index.html)
2. Monitoring in the Digital Environment,
by Ted Gary, Broadcast Engineering,
November 1999 (http://www.broadcastengin
eering.com/archives/1199/199911be40.html)
March/April 2001
ExtroNews 12.2
9
RENTAL
&
STAGING
CORNER
CVEQ1 Gets the Line Driving Job Done—
Discreetly
T
he CVEQ1 is a one input, one output, composite video and stereo audio line
driver with variable video gain and equalization capability. The CVEQ1 is
designed to compensate for signal attenuation and high frequency loss
encountered during a long cable run.
Extron CVEQ1
Scenario: You have a presentation in a
ballroom, and you need to send the high
resolution camera’s feed to TV monitors in a
press room on a different floor of the
conference center. What’s the best way to do
that?
Solution: Convert the component video
to composite video for transmission over the
long cable run. Then use the Extron CVEQ1
to deliver the composite video signal to the
press room. If the press room has multiple
displays, then use a DA to run the signal to
the various displays in the room.
CVEQ1 can be placed near its source,
behind the scenes, without taking up a lot
of room. Top panel controls give A/V
technicians easy access to peaking/
equalization and gain adjustments for
reducing signal degradation. A power light
is great for troubleshooting; it lets you
know if a problem is caused by lack of
power or lack of signal. Plus, the CVEQ1 is
easy to hook up—just connect the cables
and (use a Tweeker to) equalize the signal.
One CVEQ1 application is shown in
the diagram below. Such an application
Applications
Up to
1,000'
Projector
Gain
G
A
IN
E
IZ
L
A
U
Q
E
Rental and staging applications frequently
use a variety of signals, such as composite
video, S-video, component video, and/or
RGB. In this Rental & Staging Corner article,
we will focus on composite video runs.
Oftentimes, higher-resolution signals are
scan converted down to composite video
when quality isn’t as important for certain
displays, or when the destinations don’t
accept higher resolution signals, e.g. delay
monitors or TVs in overflow rooms at largevenue presentations or events.
VIDE
O
INPU
T
AU
L
DIO
10
ExtroNews 12.2
March/April 2001
T
R
CVE
Q1
Audio
Another common example is when
devices are often placed behind the stage
curtain—no time or need to rack-mount all
the equipment. The CVEQ1 is small and
compact, so it can be situated anywhere and
easily moved—features that are especially
vital for rental and staging applications. The
INPU
CVEQ1
Camera
Audio
RENTAL
would occur at a concert hall, where a stage
camera's output is sent over a long distance
to a projector on the ceiling of the
concert hall.
The CVEQ1 is also ideal for large venues
when one video switcher feeds multiple
devices. When an application involves
multiple composite video signals being run a
variety of distances, individual signal
adjustments are required to deliver signals of
equivalent signal strength to each display.
Each signal should be equalized exactly for
its cable’s distance, so that all images are
clear or match each other. These types of
applications require a separate equalizer for
each signal. Examples include tradeshows,
conference rooms, and ballrooms, when
there are varying composite video signal
runs of 100 ft., 250 ft., 500 ft., 1,000 ft. to
remotely located displays.
&
STAGING
CORNER
CVEQ1 Models
100-240VAC, external power supply. For
permanent installations, the CVEQ1 is also
available as a stand-alone Architectural
Adapter
Plate
(AAP) in three
colors: grey, black,
and white.
Extron CVEQ1 AAP
CVEQ1 (USA/domestic)
Part number: 60-360-01
$325.00* (US Dollars)
CVEQ1 (World)
Part number: 60-360-02
$380.00* (US Dollars)
CVEQ1 AAP Grey
Part number: 70-146-01
$290.00* (US Dollars)
CVEQ1 AAP Black
Part number: 70-146-11
$295.00* (US Dollars)
CVEQ1 AAP White
Part number: 70-146-21
$295.00* (US Dollars)
* Prices valid for US sales only.
Features of the CVEQ1
The CVEQ1 is compatible with any NTSC,
PAL, or SECAM device, such as a VCR or
video camera. The CVEQ1 can drive video
signals through up to 1,000 ft. (305 m) of
Extron Super High Resolution coaxial cable.
Composite video is input and output on
female BNCs.
Input from
Camera
E
IZ
L
A
U
Q
E
The USA/domestic version of the CVEQ1
includes a 110VAC, external power supply,
while the world version includes a
Output to
Satellite
Uplink
IN
A
G
Audio interfacing allows unbalanced
audio to be converted to balanced line level
stereo audio. Balanced audio eliminates
noise usually associated with unbalanced
audio when distributed over long cable runs.
Audio input is accepted through two RCA
stereo audio jacks, and audio is output on
3.5 mm captive screw connectors.
VID
EO
INP
UT
AU
DIO
L
INP
UT
R
CV
EQ
1
CVEQ1
The CVEQ1 drives the composite video
signal from the meeting to a satellite
uplink truck parked outside.
March/April 2001
ExtroNews 12.2
11
UNIQUE
TECHNIQUES
“Future Proofing” AT&T with A/V
I
n January of 1998, AT&T announced plans to build a state-of-the-art
Global Network Operations Center (GNOC) in Bedminster, New Jersey.
The international communications company stated that its objective for
Extron SS 200 (Sync Stabilizer)
building the new facility was to “future proof” its network. Less than
twenty-one months after ground was broken and at a cost of
$91 million, that objective was met when the doors opened on the
“Using the SS 200s let
Shen Milsom & Wilke
deliver a more costeffective systems design to
our client,” says Emspak.
Image 1. The Operations Theater is the hub of AT&T’s
Global Network Operations Center in Bedminster, NJ.
world-class command and control center.
AT&T’s GNOC sits on a 200 acre campus
an hour’s drive from New York City. The
operations center links 30 major
metropolitan areas nationwide, serving
roughly 80 million customers. The building,
with its technology-infused infrastructure
and unique architectural design, has few
precedents. It covers four floors, two above
ground and two below, for a total of
198,000 square feet of space.
Designing the Facility
Plans for the center were in the works for
two years before ground was broken on the
project. AT&T’s objective for building the
operations center was driving every design
aspect for the facility from the get-go. The
building itself would serve several different
purposes. In addition to being the nerve
center of AT&T’s domestic communications
network, the facility would also be
something of an ambassador for AT&T. The
GNOC would be a place where AT&T could
bring customers to experience first-hand
what the company does. It would also
provide a site to demo new products and
launch new programs. Making the building
“future proof” had a couple of different
meanings from a design perspective. One,
the data infrastructure had to be capable of
handling as efficiently as possible any type or
volume of traffic customers could generate.
And two, because of the building’s
ambassador status, its physical design had to
be on the bleeding edge of communications
technology.
The end result is the GNOC plays three
roles: it’s a world-class command and control
center; it hosts an elaborate visitors’
program; and it supports a well-equipped
corporate briefing center. To conceptualize
and design the telecomm and A/V solutions
needed for this extensive project, AT&T
12
ExtroNews 12.2
March/April 2001
UNIQUE
TECHNIQUES
contracted technology consultant firm Shen
Milsom & Wilke.
World-Class A/V at the GNOC
The hub of the GNOC is the Operations
Theater—a top-notch command and control
center. Located 60 feet below ground on the
floor of a three and a half story atrium, the
Operations Theater is built on a gentle, 180
degree arc. (See Image 1.) Thirty-five control
consoles face a wall of 141 rear projection
screens stacked three high and 47 across.
Behind the scenes, LCD projectors
illuminate the screens, which are fed by a
200 x 200 matrix switcher. Inputs to this
switcher come from a number of different
sources, including off-air television, direct
satellite, broadcast news, weather stations,
and AT&T’s network monitoring system,
which relies on 150-plus high resolution
computer workstations. (See Image 2.)
The Operations Theater also plays a
central role in the visitors’ program. Visitors
enter the building on the third floor and are
led into a theater room. They are invited to
sit in one of thirty comfortable seats facing a
curved projection screen (8 ft. x 28 ft.)
mounted on a 13 ft. x 50 ft. wall and watch
a
seven-minute
presentation.
The
presentation runs off an SGI Onyx II
computer and is choreographed to music.
Three, high-brightness DLP projectors are
blended together to provide a solid image on
the large screen (See Image 3.). At the end
of the presentation, the screen and the wall
on which it’s mounted are lifted quickly and
silently into the ceiling, and visitors are
suddenly looking through a bank of windows
down at the Operations Theater 60 feet
below.
Directly across from this Visitors’
Observation Theater is another wallboard
Image 2. LCD projectors display information on 141 rearprojection screens in the GNOC’s Operations Theater.
with 39 LCD projectors arranged in a 3 x 13
array. This display wall is fed from a video
server and can also access sources from other
areas of the GNOC. The wallboard is used for
presentations
and
videoconferencing
environments.
The Corporate Briefing Center was also
designed to be on the cutting edge of A/V
technology. It includes five briefing rooms
and a product demonstration room. A
master control room houses a variety of A/V
equipment that is accessible to every room
through a control system. Each room is
equipped with a rear-screen projector, audio,
videoconferencing equipment, and electronic
whiteboards.
Image 3. In the Visitors’ Observation Theater at the
AT&T GNOC, three high-brightness DLP projectors
are blended together to provide a solid image on
the large screen.
Making It Work—With Room to Grow
One big issue Shen Milsom & Wilke ran
into when designing AT&T’s GNOC was
simply the mammoth size of the project. The
magnitude of the A/V program meant a
huge amount of cabling was necessary to
March/April 2001
continued on next page
ExtroNews 12.2
13
UNIQUE
TECHNIQUES
AT & T w i t h A / V ( c o n t . )
make it all work. Huge amounts of cable
influenced the install in two main ways: cost
and weight.
“Keeping in mind that we were dealing
with 200 inputs and 200 outputs, cable cost
was a significant issue due to the size of the
switch,” explains Steve Emspak, Principal
with Shen Milsom & Wilke, who worked
extensively on the project. “Cable density
also became an issue when we realized that
[because of the sheer magnitude of the
installation] we had a significant amount of
weight invested in the cables.” Cable weight
affects both the time and labor it takes to
physically build an application, as well as
potentially affecting the structural integrity
of the building itself.
“Using the SS 200s let Shen Milsom &
Wilke deliver a more cost-effective systems
design to our client,” says Emspak. “The
benefits appeared in a couple of areas.”
Running three-wire cable into and out of the
switcher cut the cost and the labor expense.
Using these sync stabilizers also meant
Emspak could spec a three-level (RGB) matrix
switcher instead of a four or five level
switcher—enabling even more cost savings.
Additionally, the SS 200s reduced the
number of cables used from 6,000 to 4,000.
This cut down the weight of the cable runs,
as well as the number of equipment racks in
the computer room, leaving room for future
expansion. (See Image 4.)
Emspak was so pleased with the impact
the SS 200s had on the AT&T install that
he’s used them to accomplish similar goals
in other locations. “Since using the SS 200s
for AT&T, we have had similar success with
them where we needed to provide our
clients with advanced A/V capabilities
confined
within
a
pre-existing
infrastructure with limited conduit
capacity,” he says.
Today, the GNOC is on the leading edge of
A/V technology. The SS 200s have helped
make AT&T’s Global Network Operations
Center ready for the systems of tomorrow
by leaving plenty of room to grow.
Emspak began looking for a way to cut
down the number of cables he needed
without affecting the signal quality of the
install. His solution was to use 180 Extron
SS 200 sync stabilizers directly in front of all
LCD projectors—141 in the Operations
Theater and 39 on the wallboard opposite
the Visitors’ Observation Theater.
The Extron SS 200 is a sync stabilizer that
accepts RGBHV, RGBS, or RGsB and, utilizing
a method exclusive to Extron, digitally
restores the sync, providing a stabilized RGBS
or RGBHV ouput signal. The SS 200 outputs
simultaneously on five BNCs and a female
15-pin HD connector, so output can be sent
directly to the projector no matter what type
of input it has.
Using the SS 200, Emspak ran an RGsB
video signal on three wires into and out of
the 200 x 200 matrix switcher. He placed an
SS 200 in front of each digital display and
converted the RGsB to RGBHV, making a
short, five-wire cable run directly into the
projector. This technique let Emspak spec
smaller, lighter cabling for the majority of the
long cable runs throughout the GNOC.
14
ExtroNews 12.2
Image 4. Using the Extron SS 200 reduced the number of cables used, leaving room for future expansion.
March/April 2001
NEW
RGB 160xi
Universal Mountable
Interface with Female 15-pin
HD Input, Audio, and ADSP™
RGB 168xi
Universal Mountable
Interface with Female 15-pin HD
Input, Audio, ADSP, and Optional
Architectural Adapter Plates
RGB 560
Architectural Universal
Mountable Interface with Female
15-pin HD Input, Audio, and ADSP
Front
Back
PRODUCTS
Replacing the RGB 150xi is the Extron
RGB 160xi with ADSP. It is a universal,
analog computer-video interface with a
female 15-pin HD input and buffered
local monitor output. It accepts RGB signals
and is compatible with VGA, SVGA, XGA,
SXGA, UXGA, Mac, Sun, and SGI signals. Two
optional mounting kits are available: an underdesk and through-desk version. The RGB
160xi features horizontal shift control, video
gain and peaking control, as well as active PC
audio interfacing for converting PC audio
signals to balanced line level audio.
Replacing the RGB 158xi is the Extron
RGB 168xi with ADSP. It is a universal,
analog computer-video interface with a
female 15-pin HD input and buffered
local monitor output. It accepts RGB
signals and is compatible with VGA, SVGA,
XGA, SXGA, UXGA, Mac, Sun, and SGI
signals. The RGB 168xi also includes an
unswitched AC outlet and optional
Architectural Adapter Plates for signal passthrough connectors. An optional under-desk
mounting kit is available. The RGB 168xi
features horizontal shift control, video gain
and peaking control, as well as active PC
audio interfacing for converting PC audio
signals to balanced line level audio.
Replacing the RGB 550 is the Extron
RGB 560 with ADSP. It is a universal, analog
computer-video interface with a female
15-pin HD input and buffered local
monitor output. It accepts RGB signals and
is compatible with VGA, SVGA, XGA, SXGA,
UXGA, Mac, Sun, and SGI signals. The RGB
560 Architectural Interface is designed to fit
flush in a wall, podium, desk, or other
installation surface. The RGB 560 features
horizontal shift control, video gain and
peaking control, as well as active PC audio
interfacing for converting PC audio signals to
balanced line level audio. Available in three
colors: grey, black, and white.
FROM
EXTRON
RGB 160xi
Part Number:
60-378-01
List Price:
$755.00* (US Dollars)
URL:
www.extron.com/rgb160xi
* Prices valid for US sales only.
RGB 168xi
Part Number:
60-379-01
List Price:
$895.00* (US Dollars)
URL:
www.extron.com/rgb168xi
* Prices valid for US sales only.
RGB 560
Part Number:
60-381-01(grey)
60-381-02 (black)
60-381-03 (white)
List Price:
$720.00* (US Dollars)
$730.00* (US Dollars)
$730.00* (US Dollars)
URL:
www.extron.com/rgb560
* Prices valid for US sales only.
March/April 2001
ExtroNews 12.2
15
NEW
PRODUCTS
RGB 568
Architectural Universal
Mountable Interface with
Female 15-pin HD Input,
Audio, ADSP, and Optional
Architectural Adapter Plates
RGB 560 AKM
Universal Interface with Audio
Interfacing, ADSP, and
Female 15-pin HD Input for
Ackermann Floor Boxes
Ackermann
Floor Box
MIN/MAX
H. SHIFT
RGB
11
ID PIN 4
ID PIN
OUT
with ADSP
LOCAL
558 AKM
TM
RGB 560 AKM
FROM
EXTRON
Replacing the RGB 558 is the Extron
RGB 568 with ADSP. It is a universal, analog
computer-video interface with a female
15-pin HD input and buffered local
monitor output. It accepts RGB signals in
and is compatible with VGA, SVGA, XGA,
SXGA, UXGA, Mac, Sun, and SGI signals. The
RGB 568 also includes optional Architectural
Adapter Plates for signal pass-through
connectors. The RGB 568 Architectural
Interface is designed to fit flush in a wall,
podium, desk, or other installation surface.
The RGB 568 features horizontal shift
control, video gain and peaking control, as
well as active PC audio interfacing for
converting PC audio signals to balanced line
level audio. Available in three colors: grey,
black, and white.
Replacing the RGB 550 AKM is the
Extron RGB 560 AKM. It is a universal,
analog computer-video interface with
audio interfacing and ADSP designed
exclusively for Europe. It accepts RGB
signals and is compatible with VGA, SVGA,
XGA, SXGA, UXGA, Mac, Sun, and SGI
signals. The RGB 560 AKM fits flush within
an Ackermann GES9B box for easy
installation into the Ackermann Floor tank
system. This interface has a female 15-pin
HD input and buffered local monitor
output. The RGB 560 AKM features
horizontal shift control, video gain and
peaking control, as well as active PC audio
interfacing for converting PC audio signals
to balanced line level audio.
RGB 568
Part Number:
60-383-01 (grey)
60-383-02 (black)
60-383-03 (white)
List Price:
$750.00* (US Dollars)
$760.00* (US Dollars)
$760.00* (US Dollars)
URL:
www.extron.com/rgb568
* Prices valid for US sales only.
RGB 560 AKM
Part Number:
60-384-01
List Price:
$695.00* (US Dollars)
URL:
www.extron.com/rgb500-560akm
* Prices valid for US sales only.
Cable Trays
P/2 DA2 WM F &
P/2 DA2 WM F AAP
Universal Mountable Interface
with Female 15-pin HD Input,
Audio, and ADSP
P/2 DA2 WM F
P/2 DA2 WM F AAP
The Extron P/2 DA2 WM F is a wallmountable, one input, two output, highresolution distribution amplifier (DA) with
audio. Input and outputs on this DA are
female 15-pin HD connectors and both
outputs are individually buffered. The P/2
DA2 WM F is installed using wall mount
adapter plates and fits flush into a wall,
podium, or table. The Extron P/2 DA2 WM F
is available in an Architectural Adapter Plate
version (P/2 DA2 WM F AAP). The AAP
version offers various audio and video passthrough connectors for additional signal
connections. Both models are available in
three colors: grey, black, and white.
P/2 DA2 WM F &
P/2 DA2 WM F AAP
P/2 DA2 WM F
Part Number:
List Price:
60-376-01 (grey)
$385.00* (US Dollars)
60-376-02 (black)
$395.00* (US Dollars)
60-376-03 (white)
$395.00* (US Dollars)
60-376-10 (EC-white) $485.00* (US Dollars)
P/2 DA2 WM F AAP
Part Number:
List Price:
60-377-01 (grey)
$425.00* (US Dollars)
60-377-02 (black)
$435.00* (US Dollars)
60-377-03 (white)
$435.00* (US Dollars)
60-377-10 (EC-white) $570.00* (US Dollars)
URL:
www.extron.com/p2da2wmf
* Prices valid for US sales only.
16
ExtroNews 12.2
March/April 2001
NEW
SW2 VGA DA2 AF R
Two Input, Two Output VGA
and Audio Switcher/
Distribution Amplifier
Hideaway
HSA 400
Discreet Access to
System Connection
Closed
RGB 580xi
Architectural Universal
Mountable Remote Interface with
Audio Interfacing and ADSP for
Out-of-Sight Installations
RGB 580xi
PRODUCTS
The Extron SW2 VGA DA2 AF R is a
combination two input, two output
switcher/distribution amplifier. One 15-pin
HD female connector and a 3.5 mm female
audio jack connector are located on the front
panel. All other connectors are on the back
panel. The SW2 VGA DA2 AF R can be
mounted in a rack or under a desk and is
available with Architectural Adapter Plates
for signal pass-through connectors. It has an
internal power supply and an unswitched AC
outlet. An auto-switching mode is available.
The Extron Hideaway HSA 400 is the
architectural solution for discreet access to
A/V signals. Designed to mount in
conference room and boardroom tabletops,
the Hideaway HSA 400 keeps A/C power,
phone, and CAT 6 network connections out
of sight until needed. Four Architectural
Adapter Plate spaces are available to
configure connections for virtually any signal.
For optimal use of the Hideaway HSA 400, it
can be coupled with the Extron RGB 580xi
remote universal interface (see below).
The Extron RGB 580xi is a universal,
analog computer-video interface with audio
interfacing and ADSP. The Interface
enclosure is designed to mount out of sight.
User connections and controls are accessed
remotely through a two-space AAP. The RGB
580xi has a female 15-pin HD input
connector. It accepts RGB signals and is
compatible with VGA, SVGA, XGA, SXGA,
UXGA, Mac, Sun, and SGI signals.
Architectural Adapter Plates are available
with
various
input
connection
configurations, colors, and cable lengths.
The RGB 580xi features horizontal shift
control, separate variable level and peaking
controls, as well as active PC audio
interfacing for converting PC audio signals to
FROM
EXTRON
SW2 VGA DA2 AF R
Part Number:
60-368-01
List Price:
$795.00* (US Dollars)
URL:
www.extron.com/sw2vgada2afr
* Prices valid for US sales only.
Hideaway HSA 400
Please call Extron for part numbers and
pricing.
URL:
www.extron.com/hideawayhsa400
balanced line level audio. The RGB 580xi is
and ideal integration solution with Extron’s
Hideaway HSA 400 (see above).
RGB 580xi Architectural Adapter Plates
RGB 580xi
Part Number:
60-362-01
List Price:
$950.00* (US Dollars)
URL:
www.extron.com/rgb580xi
* Prices valid for US sales only.
March/April 2001
ExtroNews 12.2
17
NEW
PRODUCTS
Digital XPoint
Series
Serial Digital Video
Matrix Switchers
DXP 88 SDI
FROM
EXTRON
The Digital XPoint Matrix Switcher Series is
the ideal solution for switching multiple serial
digital video signals to multiple digital video
devices in video production studios, nonlinear editing suites, and video broadcast
studios. Currently, there are two models
available in the Digital XPoint line: an 8 x 8
model (DXP 88 SDI) and a 4 x 4 model (DXP
44 SDI). These switchers feature automatic
rate selection of four SMPTE 259M data
rates: 143, 177, 270, 360 Mbps. They can
handle 4fsc (composite) or 4:2:2
(component) serial digital transmission
standards. The Digital XPoint line comes
standard with front panel control. Remote
control is available using Extron’s remote
keypad (MKP 1000) and/or remote control
panel (MCP 1000). Control using a third
party control system can be done via RS-232
or RS-422.
Additional features include:
• Inputs with equalized and buffered loopthroughs
• Outputs on two buffered and re-clocked
BNCs
• Digital Sync Validation Processing (DSVP™):
when input serial data is locked, matrix
indicates the presence of a carrier source
and data rate
• Automatic rate selection: the matrix
automatically accepts four SMPTE 259M
data rates (143, 177, 270, 360 Mbps).
• Automatic input cable equalization
Digital XPoint Series
DXP 88 SDI
Part Number: 60-401-01
DXP 44 SDI
Part Number: 60-402-01
URL:
www.extron.com/digitalxpoint
Please call Extron for pricing.
SDI-AVR 100 and
HDSDI-ACR 100
SDI to Analog Video Converters
SDI-AVR 100
The Extron SDI-AVR 100 is a 10-bit Serial
Digital Interface (SDI) to analog video signal
converter, and the Extron HDSDI-ACR 100 is
a 10-bit High Definition Serial Digital
Interface (HDSDI) to analog video signal
converter. The SDI-AVR 100 and the HDSDIACR 100 are ideal for integrating SDI or
HDSDI sources into an analog video
environment. Example applications include
presentations using disk recorders, video
production, non-linear editing stations,
monitoring, and staging events.
The rack-mountable SDI-AVR 100 and the
HDSDI-ACR 100 provide input equalization
and a re-clocked loop-through for the SDI or
HDSDI input.
SDI-AVR 100
HDSDI-ACR 100
18
ExtroNews 12.2
The SDI-AVR 100 accepts component SDI
(4:2:2) in ITU-R BT 601 format. It autodetects input format and de-serializes the
270 Mbps digital stream. The SDI-AVR 100
outputs composite video and S-video (Y/C)
simultaneously, with the third output
available as component video (Y, R-Y, B-Y) or
RGB (RGsB, RGBS, or RGBHV). There is a
March/April 2001
choice of output formats: NTSC or PAL.
NTSC and PAL color bar test patterns are
provided for setup and troubleshooting of
systems.
HDSDI-ACR 100
The HDSDI-ACR 100 accepts HDSDI at
(720p, 1080i, and 1080p) with rates up to
1.5 Gbps. The HDSDI-ACR 100 outputs
component video (Y, R-Y, B-Y) or RGB (RGsB,
RGBS, or RGBHV). Bi-level or tri-level sync is
available with component video output.
SDI-AVR 100 & HDSDI-ACR 100
SDI-AVR 100
Part Number: 60-400-01
HDSDI-ACR 100
Part Number: 60-408-01
URLs:
www.extron.com/sdiavr100
www.extron.com/hdsdiacr100
Please call Extron for pricing.
NEW
Extender WM,
Extender AAP,
Extender WM AAP,
and Extender MK
VGA-UXGA Line Drivers with Audio
Extender WM
Extender AAP
Extender WM AAP
Extender MK
(Includes black & white faceplates)
PRODUCTS
The Extron Extender product line is a
family of one input, one buffered output
VGA-UXGA line drivers with audio. The
Extender family is comprised of four models:
Extender WM, Extender AAP, Extender WM
AAP, and Extender MK. Offering 320 MHz
(-3dB) RGB video bandwidth, each line driver
sends a high resolution computer-video
signal up to 250 feet (76.2 m) through highquality cable, such as Extron’s BNC-5 Mini HR
Cable. A three position video peaking/gain
adjustment compensates for signal losses
over long cable runs.
Video input is accepted on a 15-pin HD
female connector. Video output is on a three
inch (7.6 cm) pigtail, with female BNCs, for
simple and versatile connections. The
Extender products are compact, so even
when using an Extender product with a
single-gang electrical box, or an MK box,
there will still be enough room to make all
the connections inside the box. For discreet
architectural integration, the faceplate is
available in three colors: grey (except for the
Extender MK), black, or white, and it may be
easily replaced by a custom faceplate.
Audio interfacing allows PC audio to be
converted to balanced line level stereo audio.
Balanced audio eliminates noise usually
associated with unbalanced audio when
distributed over long cable runs. Audio input
is accepted on a 3.5 mm female audio jack.
Balanced or unbalanced audio is output on
an easy-to-use retaining screw connector.
Each Extender accepts 9-24VDC on a
convenient retaining screw connector.
Each USA/domestic version includes a
domestic, external power supply, while each
world version includes a 100-240VAC,
external power supply. The Extender MK is
available only in a world version.
FROM
EXTRON
MOUNTING CONFIGURATIONS:
Extender WM
The Extender WM can be wall-mounted in
a one-gang box and fits flush into a wall,
podium, or table.
Extender AAP
The Extender AAP is a stand-alone,
double-space Architectural Adapter Plate
(AAP). The Extender AAP fits into single-gang
AAP spaces of Extron’s architectural
interfaces or distribution amplifiers with AAP
openings.
Extender WM AAP
The Extender WM AAP is like the Extender
WM, but has openings for four of Extron’s
optional, single-space (or two double-space)
Architectural Adapter Plates (AAPs). The
Extender WM AAP can be wall-mounted in a
three-gang box and fits flush into a wall,
podium, or table.
Extender MK
For convenient and easy installation, the
Extender MK fits flush within an electrical
knock-out switch box (also known as a KO
box or MK box), a box frequently used in
countries such as Singapore, the United
Kingdom, and Australia. The Extender MK is
small and allows the BNC, audio, and power
connection cables to fit within the shallow
depth of the knock-out (KO or MK) box. Two
faceplates, black and white, are included.
Extender Models
Please call Extron for part numbers and
pricing.
URL:
www.extron.com/extender
March/April 2001
ExtroNews 12.2
19
SPECIAL
VIDEOCONFERENCING
SERIES
Part 3: Multiple Scenarios for a Videoconferencing Environment
W
e set the stage for a standard videoconference in our last two issues. First, we put
together a basic setup plus a computer-to-video scan converter for incorporating PC
images. Then we added a little complexity and flexibility by incorporating a multi video
processor, so multiple sources can be simultaneously displayed to far-end participants. Now let’s
add another variable to the videoconference equation—multiple sources and destinations, in
rooms other than the dedicated videoconference room.
If you have ever come across the task of
designing a system to accommodate a number of
different videoconferencing scenarios: large
audience, small audience, or both simultaneously,
you know this can be tricky. When designing VC
capabilities into Extron’s S3 Technical Institute, we
knew that a standard, small venue videoconference
would typically be held in one of two dedicated
videoconference rooms. But the prospect of
accommodating a larger audience created another
situation. We needed to be able to conduct a
videoconference in one of the larger training
rooms, or to conduct a single videoconference
simultaneously in multiple rooms. To route the
videoconference signal to any display in any room,
we used Extron matrix switchers.
RGB
MUTE
Camera
AUDIO
MUTE
Display
FPC-1000
POWER SUPPLIES
-V
+V
PRIMARY
REDUNDANT
COMMUNICATIONS
RS232
TX
BME
SYSTEM
REMOTE
STATUS
RX
DIAGNOSTICS
Classroom
Matrix 6400
Camera
Codec
MATRIX 6400
WIDEBAND VIDEO
Matrix Switching
A matrix switcher is a specific type of switcher
that routes multiple inputs to multiple outputs.
Internally, a matrix switcher consists of a series of
distribution amplifiers and switchers, housed in a
single enclosure and controlled by remote or front
panel controllers. Matrix switchers, depending on
the specific model, are able to route composite
video,
S-video,
HDTV/component
video,
RGsB/RGBS/RGBHV video, SDI, and/or stereo audio
(balanced/unbalanced) signals. Matrix switchers are
commonly used in applications such as
presentations, data display, and entertainment, and
they can be a perfect fit for a more complex
videoconferencing environment.
To provide total solutions for different routing
applications, Extron’s matrix switchers offer a
variety of features and are available in input/output
configurations from 4 x 4 up to 256 x 256. Your
selection will depend on the size of the
videoconferencing facility and other applications
your matrix may be used for. Some facilities may
benefit if the videoconferencing and A/V
presentation systems share the same matrix
switcher; the product sharing may well result in
reduced costs, increased signal routing flexibility,
and less need for A/V equipment rack space.
Display
Videoconferencing in a Multi-Room Facility
Videoconference Room #1
This simplified routing diagram illustrates how two rooms can share videoconferencing
capabilities via an Extron Matrix 6400 Switcher. The videoconferencing codec and cameras
in one or both rooms feed the matrix. Outputs can then be sent to the videoconferencing
codec and displays in either or both rooms. (See illustration on next page.)
20
ExtroNews 12.2
March/April 2001
The illustration (on page 21) depicts two
dedicated videoconference rooms and additional
VC-enabled rooms. In the Extron S3 Technical
Institute, Extron Matrix 6400 Switchers make our
multi-room videoconference concept a reality; any
SPECIAL
VIDEOCONFERENCING
Projection Room
Projection Room
SERIES
Extron Matrix 6400
Switcher
Computer-based
Training Room
+5V (PIN 13)
N/C
1N916
Tally Pin
External Power
Jill you're zoomed
Illustration by illustrator
in too close! Tally
ho!
guy
Classroom
Theater
VC Camera
EAST
ST.
BLVD.
5
STATE COLLEGE BLVD.
ANAHEIM
LINCOLN AV.
ANAHEIM
Look at one of the
optional mounting
kits.
57
BALL RD.
WEST ST.
Extron
DOUGLAS RD.
LEWIS ST.
CERRITOS AV.
Disneyland
HASTER ST.
KATELLA AV.
Anaheim
Stadium
Document Camera
MAC
LOCAL
OUTPUT
BUFFERED
MONITOR
INPUT
H.
SHIFT
INTERFACE
W 103
/ADSP
RGB
xi
INPUT
BUFFERED LOCAL
H. SHIFT
MONITOR OUTPUT
RGB 103xi
MAC INTERFACE WITH ADSP
100-240
0.5A MAX.
GAIN/
100%
50/60 Hz
UNITY
PEAK
50%
R
SOG
DDSP
SERR
SPARE
An aerial view of Extron's S3 Technical
Institute educational facility.
A matrix switcher is used to expand
videoconferencing capabilities to venues
larger than either of the dedicated
videoconference rooms.
H
G
B
V
S
OUTPUT
RGB 103xi
Monitor Camera
Computer
Microphone
Document
Camera
VCR
Wall Plate
Floor Box
Touch
Panel
Digitizing
Tablet
Videoconference Rooms
video and/or audio input can be routed to any
output throughout the entire training facility,
including to and from either codec. Any room can
hold a videoconference. A videoconference held in
the classroom can be routed to other rooms that
hold additional participants or audience members.
Whether a classroom session or meeting is local or
needs to be delivered to a distant site, the matrix
can handle it—including routing any video camera
signal in any room to any display in any room. With
this level of integration built into the system, a
videoconference of any size is feasible.
For our next installment, we tackle this question:
how does the placement of cameras and
microphones make an impact on a presentation?
We will talk about audio and point of view in a
videoconferencing environment
Remember, you can call Extron for all your
videoconferencing solutions or troubleshooting
issues at: 800.633.9876.
March/April 2001
ExtroNews 12.2
21
TECH
CORNER
UTP Technology
E
xtron recently developed a white paper on UTP to provide a better understanding of
UTP technology and installation and test issues. This can be found on our Web site at
http://www.extron.com/utptechnology. The following is a condensed version of the UTP white paper.
One problem with twisted pair wire is
electromagnetic emissions at high
frequencies. These emissions can couple into
adjacent twisted pairs. The second issue is
the ability of the cable to eliminate common
mode noise. Common mode noise is
electrical interference induced into the cable
with equal amounts of energy, in the same
polarity, on both wires of a twisted pair.
This can come from sources like electric
motors, air chillers, power transformers,
fluorescent lighting ballasts, etc.
In a well-designed and balanced multipair Category 5/5e/6 cable with consistent
twist ratios and matched pair lengths, the
electromagnetic interference (EMI) being
emitted from the pair is reduced
significantly. In addition, common mode
noise from external interference and
adjacent pair crosstalk is significantly
improved. To see how this is important, we
first must understand what happens when a
balanced signal is applied to a twisted pair
of wires. When a transmitter applies a
balanced analog audio or video signal to a
twisted pair wire, the signal is the same
amplitude (voltage level) on both wires, but
the signal on one of the wires is inverted to
the opposite polarity. When the signal on
one wire is going in a positive direction, the
signal on the other wire is going in a
negative direction. This is referred to as
differential mode. See Figure 1.
All induced common mode noise from
adjacent wire pairs, as well as from other
external sources such as motors,
transformers, and other external sources,
will cause the same noise signal to be
induced into both wires equally and of
the same polarity. This will cause
electrons to flow in the same direction
through both wires of the twisted pair,
and the noise will cancel at the receiver.
In balanced transmissions, the receiver is
operating in a differential mode. This
means it is looking for a difference
between the two input signals to form an
output signal. The receiver has a positive
and negative input, sometimes referred
to as the Tip and Ring inputs,
respectively. The differential receiver
performs a simple math function: it
inverts the sign (polarity) of the signal at
the negative input to a positive value and
adds the value of the two input signals
together.
When common mode noise is present
on the twisted pair, the noise is equal in
amplitude and always of the same
polarity on both wires. The differential
receiver processes this common mode
noise in the same way as it did the signal.
If we have +0.015 volts of common
mode noise at both inputs, change the
sign of the common mode noise at the
negative input to –0.015 volts, and add
Common Mode
Noise
Positive Direction
Voltage In
Negative Direction
Voltage Out
Figure 1. Common mode noise: The noise is at the same level traveling in the same
direction at the same time. The noise will cancel at the receiver.
22
ExtroNews 12.2
March/April 2001
the two inputs together. They will
cancel out and only the original signal
will be present at the output of the
receiver. This would still be true if the
common mode noise were negative at
both inputs.
If for any reason the wires in a twisted
pair were to become separated—like from a
sharp bend during installation—the noise
will strike the wires at slightly different
angles, causing the induced signals (noise)
to be slightly different in each wire. This
difference will not cancel out at the receiver
and, thus, will become part of the signal. At
the same time, this separation will form a
loop (See Figure 2) and will act as a loop
antenna, picking up additional unwanted
noise/crosstalk.
Figure 2. Twisted pair
showing damaged twist
pattern.
Cable Testing
This is not a coax cable; it is not a “just
crimp on some BNC connectors and turn
everything on” type of application. As
people in the data world know, it is very
important that this cable run be tested to
meet the stringent requirements of the
Category 6 specification (the higher the
quality of cable is, the higher the
performance that results). The following
is a brief summary of common UTP
cable tests.
TECH
Wiremap Test
The Wiremap Test is used to identify
installation-wiring errors:
• Proper pin termination at each end
• Continuity to the remote end
• Shorts between any two or more
conductors
• Crossed pairs
• Split pairs
• Reversed pairs
• Any other mis-wiring.
Attenuation Test
The loss of signal strength (or voltage) in the
cable is called attenuation. The more
attenuation there is, the less signal there will
be present at the receiver. The attenuation is
measured in decibels (dB). Attenuation
increases with distance and frequency. For
every 6dB of loss, the original signal will be
half the original amplitude.
Correcting for delay skew can be done by
simply inserting additional cable in line with
one or more short pairs after the receiver has
output them on coax. See Figure 3 (below).
Return Loss Test
Return loss is a measurement of the
reflected signal back toward the transmitter.
This reflected energy is caused by variations of
impedance in the cable and connectors. See
Figure 4 (below). This would be the equivalent
of an electrical echo of the original signal. It is
like when your TV is switched to a weak station
and you see that the image is full of ghosts.
Near-End Crosstalk (NEXT)
The NEXT measurement is the amount of
signal that is induced into an adjacent twisted
pair at the transmission end by the
electromagnetic field created by the signal
being transmitted through an adjacent pair at
the same end. The untwisting of the cable
CORNER
that is required to make the termination
makes this the most vulnerable part of the
assembly process. Electromagnetic emissions
become greater with increases in the
frequency of the signal, and thus, crosstalk
increases with increases in frequency.
Equal Level Far-End Crosstalk (ELFEXT)
ELFEXT is a very important measurement
for our application. This is the crosstalk that
reaches the receiver and has automatically
had its results compensated for by variations
in cable length. A short run will have less
attenuation and therefore have a higher
Far-End Crosstalk (FEXT) reading than a
longer cable. The ELFEXT measurement
automatically adjusts the FEXT results for
the difference in cable lengths.
For the full UTP technology article,
please
visit
our
web
site
at
http://www.extron.com/utptechnology.
Length Test
Structured cable systems for the data world
have a length limit of 328 feet (100 meters)
total. (Note: this restriction does not directly
apply to the transmission of analog signals.)
The length test will provide us with the
physical length of each pair and the delay time
in nanoseconds.
CAT 5 T 15HD A
Transmitter
INP
UT
Audio
BU
FF
ER
ED
LO
CA
L MO
NIT
OR
H-S
HIF
T
CA
T5
T 15
HD
The delay skew is the difference in time it
takes for a signal to travel down the shortest
pair to the time it takes to travel down the
longest pair. Lengths of wire pairs often vary
within the same UTP cable due to small
differences in twist tension and rates. The
delay skew is measured in nanoseconds (ns)
and feet.
Using Belden Media Twist cable for our
reference, each foot has a delay of 1.451 ns. If
there was a delay skew of five feet between a
pair of wires, the delay in nanoseconds would
be 7.255 (5 feet x 1.451 ns). This would be
very close to one pixel width off at the 1280 x
1024 rate and half a pixel width off at the
1024 x 768 rate. If this delay skew is not
compensated for, the image will appear to be
out of convergence because the red, green,
and blue signals will arrive at different times.
Delay skew is caused by differences in
length between one or more of the pairs.
IF cable measurement
indicates that the pair
with wires 1 and 2 is
three feet shorter than
the other signals...
CO
MP
UT
ER
ID PIN 4
ID PIN 11
AU
DIO
A
ER
DC
POW
.5A
15V
O
DI
AU
R
L
B
SOG
C SYNC
A
L
V
B
G
R
B
RG
PC Computer
B
RG
HV
H/ TPUT
OU
CAT 5 R BNC A
Receiver
T
PU
IN
CAT 5 UTP Cable
... THEN insert a three foot
extension cable to equalize
UTP skew for red video.
LCD Projector
Figure 3. A length of coaxial cable is added to compensate for delay skew.
SIGNAL
Main Signal Flow
Reflections (or Ghosts)
Figure 4. Reflected energy caused by impedance variations.
March/April 2001
ExtroNews 12.2
23
NEW
NEWS
FROM
THE
INDUSTRY
ExtroNews publishes information about new products that are relative to the Extron product line in the New News section. Also listed are
the recommended Extron products that will complement these new display devices in their targeted applications. If you would like a new
product to be reviewed for New News, please send a press release, literature, contact name, and a four-color slide or photo to:
New News c/o Ginger Dodier, Extron Electronics, 1230 South Lewis Street, Anaheim, CA 92805, phone: (714) 491-1500, ext. 6270
or e-mail to gdodier@extron.com
Christie Digital Systems
www.christiedigital.com
Digital Projection, Inc.
www.digitalprojection.com
Christie Digital Systems announces the Vivid
Green—the first in a series of new Vivid
projectors designed for conference rooms,
boardrooms, churches, training rooms, and
other venues. This LCD projector delivers
3600 ANSI lumens, true XGA resolution, and
300:1 contrast ratio. It weighs 17.2 lbs (7.8
kg), and it is compatible with NSTC, PAL, and
SECAM composite and S-video, as well as
PC computer, DVI-D, STV, DTV, and HDTV
sources. The suggested list price is
$12,495 (USD).
Digital Projection, Inc., has introduced the
HIGHlite 6000sx DLP projector. This SXGA
projector features 5000 ANSI lumens and
400:1 contrast ratio. It is ideal for mid- to
high-end staging applications as well as
permanent installations. It is compatible with
all common video, computer and HDTV
(480p, 720p, and 1080i) sources, and it also
offers optional Serial Digital Interface (SDI)
and High-Definition SDI (HDSDI) inputs.
Suggested list price is $59,995 (USD).
Recommended Extron product:
The System 7SC switcher will add the
finishing touch to conference rooms,
boardrooms, churches, training rooms, and
other venues utilizing the Vivid Green
projector. The System 7SC is a seven input,
dual output switcher with scaling capabilities
and advanced film mode processing with 3:2
pulldown detection for NTSC and 2:2 film
detection for PAL. Six of the seven inputs of
the System 7SC accept composite video,
S-video, component (including HDTV), or
RGBHV, and the seventh input accepts
composite video, S-video, or RGBHV. Audio
is available on all seven inputs with
adjustable gain and attenuation for each
input. The scaled output of the System 7SC
can be configured to match the Vivid
Green's XGA resolution. RGB signals are
passed through. The System 7SC also offers
projector and room control.
Recommended Extron products:
For staging applications, the SGS 408
seamless graphics switcher will complement
the HIGHlite 6000sx. The seamless cuts,
dissolves, wipe, and title/effects of the
SGS 408 bring professionalism and style to
live presentations. The SGS 408 incorporates
two video scalers plus a digital video mixer
and can manage component as well as any
type of RGB input from video sources up to
1600 x 1200 resolutions. Additionally, if the
SDI input option is chosen, Extron’s new
Digital XPoint line of Serial Digital Interface
(SDI) matrix switchers will allow multiple
serial digital video devices to be routed to
multiple 6000sx projectors. Currently, there
are two models available in the Digital XPoint
line: an 8 x 8 model (DXP 88 SDI) and a 4 x
4 model (DXP 44 SDI).
Vivid Green
24
ExtroNews 12.2
March/April 2001
HIGHlite 6000sx
Mitsubishi Digital Electronics
America
www.mitsubishi-presentations.com
Mitsubishi’s Presentation Products Division
delivers the X80 LCD projector for
conference
rooms
and
portable
environments. It offers 1,500 ANSI lumens,
300:1 contrast ratio, and native XGA
resolution. It weighs 7 lbs (3.2 kg). The X80
also introduces sRGB Color Mode, which is a
system of color spaces that determines tone,
saturation, and brightness; and sRGB claims
to display the same natural color tones of
CRT displays. It accepts these composite and
S-video formats: NTSC, NTSC 4.43, PAL, and
SECAM, as well as PC and workstation
computers. List price is $7,495 (USD).
Recommended Extron product:
For conference room installations and
portable applications, the System 5cr Plus
adds additional inputs to the X80 projector
and provides room control. The System 5cr
Plus is a five input, one output, A/V
integration switcher with an internal audio
amplifier. It provides a total of five inputs—
two for composite or S-video, two for
RGBHV, and one that is configurable for
composite, S-video, or RGBHV. The System
5cr Plus can control power on/off, mute, and
input selection for the X80. This is an
inexpensive solution for projector and room
control of smaller-scale A/V installations.
X80
NEW
NEWS
FROM
THE
INDUSTRY
NEC Technologies Inc.
www.nectech.com
Sharp Electronics Corp.
www.sharp.com
Sony Electronics
www.sony.com
NEC Technologies Inc. announces the
availability of the PlasmaSync 50MP1 for
applications such as conference room and
board room presentations; training and
broadcast facilities; and videoconference
suites. The 50-inch XGA plasma offers
1365 x 786 resolution and can display
sources up to UXGA. Some of the features
include split screen multi-source display,
picture-in-picture display options, and builtin stereo audio, and an inverse mode to
display inverted RGB color values. List price is
$18,995 (USD).
Sharp Electronics Corp. announces
shipment of the LC-28HM2 widescreen
28 inch (71 cm) LCD video monitor for
applications that include television broadcast
and
production,
videoconferencing,
transportation,
entertainment,
and
tradeshows. The LC-28HM2 offers stereo
audio, is 2.3 inches (58.4mm) deep, and
weighs 23.5 lbs (10.7 kg). It provides
1280 x 768 resolution; accommodates
VGA– XGA PC computers; and accepts
composite, S-video, component, HDTV, and
DVD video signals. Suggested list price is
$16,995 (USD).
Sony Electronics unveiled the VPL-FX50 LCD
projector for installation applications such as
conference and boardrooms. It has 3500 ANSI
lumens, has native XGA resolution, and
weighs 23 lbs (10.4 kg). It also has a network
connection. It accepts a variety of input video
sources including composite, S-video,
component, RGB video, DVI, and computer
signals up to UXGA. It is also compatible with
a range of HDTV and DTV signals. The
suggested list price is $14,000 (USD).
Recommended Extron products:
The SW VGA switchers and P/2 DA
distribution amplifiers are additions that can
multiply the 50MP1’s inputs or the PC’s
outputs. The SW VGA series are 2, 4, or 6
input switchers with 15-pin HD connectors.
The switchers allow multiple PCs to be
switched to one plasma. The P/2 DA 2, 4, or
6 distribution amplifiers strengthen the PC
signal and distribute one PC’s signal to
additional NEC plasmas or projectors.
Connecting all these components together
are the Extron 15-pin HD cable assemblies.
These cables are offered in plenum and nonplenum jackets, and some offer gender
choice at the cable ends, as well as
the capability of carrying audio in the
same jacket.
PlasmaSync 50MP1
Recommended Extron products:
For switching and distribution of
HDTV/component and computer signals to
the LC-28HM2, Extron offers a selection of
switchers and distribution amplifiers (DAs).
For HDTV/component applications, the SW 6
Component switcher allows multiple HDTV
images to be switched to one monitor, and
the ADA 6 Component distribution
amplifier allows one HDTV image to be
displayed on multiple monitors. For
computer applications, the SW VGA
switchers and P/2 DA distribution amplifiers
can be used. The SW VGA series are 2, 4, or
6 input switchers with 15-pin HD connectors.
The P/2 DA 2, 4, or 6 or Wall Mount (WM)
series distribution amplifiers strengthen the
PC signal and distribute the PC’s signal to
multiple monitors.
Recommended Extron products:
When using the DVI (Digital Visual Interface)
input of the VPL-FX50 LCD projector, the
DDTX/DDRX DVI driver will lengthen the
distance run, and the D/2 DA4 DVI
distribution amplifier will multiply the output
of the PC’s DVI graphics card. Since the DVI
signal is recommended for runs up to 15 feet
(4.6 m), the DDTX/DDRX DVI driver allows the
signal of the DVI card to be driven up to 330
feet (100m) using Extron’s SHR cable. If
multiple VPL-FX50 projectors are needed, the
D/2 DA4 DVI distribution amplifier splits
the signal of the DVI graphics card to
four outputs.
LC-28HM2
March/April 2001
VPL-FX50
ExtroNews 12.2
25
Introducing New Curriculum from Extron Institute
For five years, A/V professionals have been
sharpening their industry knowledge through classes
conducted by Extron Electronics. To keep you ahead of
the rapid pace of change sweeping over this industry,
we recently updated the Extron School curriculum
and restructured school courses under a new
organization—The Extron Institute.
The Extron Institute takes Extron School curriculum
to a higher level. This in-depth education and training
program is specifically tailored for Extron Dealers to
keep you in the know about the latest technologies and
product solutions. Currently, there are two different
schools offered through Extron Institute. Each school
consists of two consecutive days of coursework and
hands-on training.
The School of A/V Technologies is an updated version
of some of the classic topics covered during Extron
School. Topics like Video Bandwidth, System Switching,
Matrix Switching, and Computer-Video Interfacing are
explored with the most up-to-date information
available.
The second school, the School of Advanced A/V
Technologies, consists of all-new coursework. It is
designed for professionals with extensive industry
experience (five years or more) who are looking to push
their knowledge to a higher level. Courses in the
advanced school explore topics in great technical detail
with a heavy focus on how the technology works. To
receive the maximum benefit from this advanced level
course, attendees should have already completed the
School of A/V Technologies.
The Advanced classes cover the following topics:
• UTP cabling– This class covers the ins and outs of
using Category 5e/6 cabling for running video and audio
signals. Key points such as NEXT, FEXT, skew, and
attenuation are addressed, as are misconceptions about
using this type of cable. Attendees will leave this class
with a thorough understanding of when or when not to
use Cat 5e/6 as a method of sending audio/video signals
over long distances.
• Advanced Switching Methods– This class takes an
in-depth look at the latest technologies driving high
performance switching applications. Topics like seamless
video switching for standard NTSC/PAL signals and highresolution RGBHV signals, vertical interval switching,
genlocking equipment, and the use of time base
correctors with equipment that cannot accept a reference
signal are explored in-depth.
• Scalers: What, Why, When?– This class explains
exactly what scalers are, how they work, and why they
are becoming such popular solutions to particular A/V
applications. By the end of this class, attendees will know
how to choose the appropriate scaler for any
environment and describe the benefits they can bring to
a system.
• Digital Video Interfacing– This class explores in
detail the new digital technologies that are becoming
more common in the professional A/V industry. It
describes how digital interfacing works, its limitations,
and the digital solutions available from Extron.
In addition to giving A/V professionals a valuable dose
of industry information, Extron Institute schools
qualify as CTS (Certified Technical Specialist)
re-certification units. Each school gives attendees eight
renewal units toward the 30 required to maintain
certification. (For more information, go to the ICIA Web
site at: www.icia.org.)
The world-class Extron S3 Technical Institute training
facility in Anaheim hosts both schools. In addition, the
School of A/V Technology is held in various locations
around the country, in Europe, and in Asia. For complete
course descriptions and the latest Institute schedule, go to
the Extron Web site at www.extron.com. To make your
reservation for an upcoming school offered by the Extron
Institute, contact your Customer Support Representative.
Training room at Extron, Anaheim, CA.
26
ExtroNews 12.2
March/April 2001
Extron USA: 800.633.9876 or 714.491.1500
Extron Europe: +800.EXTRON.S3
Extron Asia: +65.383.4400.
LCD displays
• I/O configurations
• Input carrier detection
• Matrix status
Large tactile
illuminated buttons
Data rates
up to 360 Mb/s
SMPTE 259M
compliant
16 presets
2 levels of controls
RS-232 or
RS-422 control
Remote
control panel
Internal
international
power supply
Automatic
cable equalization
8 inputs with
equalized & buffered
loop-throughs
DXP 88 SDI
8 outputs on
dual buffered &
re-clocked BNCs
External
reference
DIGITAL XPOINT
Extron Matrix Switchers Go Digital
®
Introducing Digital XPoint—the new line of digital matrix
switchers from Extron Electronics. The Digital XPoint matrix
switcher line is the ideal solution for switching multiple serial digital
video signals to multiple digital video devices in production studios,
staging applications, non-linear editing suites, and broadcast studios.
RS232
RS422 Serial
Communications
22
32/4
RS2
Currently, the Digital XPoint line includes two models: the
DXP 88 SDI (eight input, eight output) model and the
DXP 44 SDI (four input, four output) model. Digital XPoint
matrix switchers come standard with front panel control. Remote
control is available using Extron’s remote keypad (MKP 1000)
and/or remote control panel (MCP 1000). Control using a third
party control system can be done via RS-232 or RS-422.
M.
UT
INP COM
/ MCP
IN
MKP
8
.
. REF
EXT
A
B
C
D
E
OUT
7
6
S
PUT
5
OUT
4
1000
MCP
3
2
1
8
7
IN
IN
NEXT
6
MENU
IN
OUT
INP
4
UTS 5
IN
OUT
IN
OUT
3
IN
OUT
2
IN
OUT
1
IN
OUT
Hz
50-60
40V
100-2
OUT
OUT
.3A
MAX
MCP 1000
Remote Control
Panel
External
Reference
Preview 1 Camera 1
Features:
• Inputs with equalized and buffered loop-throughs
• Outputs on two buffered and re-clocked BNCs
• Automatic rate selection—the matrix can automatically accept
four SMPTE 259M data rates, including: 143, 177, 270,
360 Mbps. It’s capable of switching 4fsc (composite) or 4:2:2
(component) serial digital video transmission standards.
• Automatic input cable equalization—typically equalizes greater
than 300m at 270 Mbps of Extron SHR or equivalent high
quality cable
• Digital Sync Validation Processing (DSVP™)—when input
serial data is locked, the matrix indicates the presence of a
carrier source and data rate
• 16 global memory presets
• Extron’s Simple Instruction Set (SIS™) for easy to use
RS-232 control
PROGRAM
OUT
Media
Servers
Preview 2 Camera 2
Vector Scope
D-VTR
0
05
3 04
3
03
3
01
2
02
3
01
3
00
01
3
09
02
00
00
09
1
03
1
04
1
2
07
06
05
04
03
02
1
1
01
02
2
08
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
05
1
06
1 07
1
08
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
Program
Preview
VSC 300D
Video Scan Converter
Character/
Logo Generator
Digital Video
Edit Station
For complete details, visit Extron’s Web site at:
www.extron.com/2/digitalxpoint
800.633.9876 • www.extron.com
Extron Electronics, USA
1230 South Lewis Street, Anaheim, CA 92805
800.633.9876 714.491.1500 FAX 714.491.1517
USA
Extron Electronics, Europe
Beeldschermweg 6C, 3821 AH Amersfoort
+31.33.453.4040 FAX +31.33.453.4050
The Netherlands
Extron Electronics, Asia
135 Joo Seng Rd. #04-01, PM Industrial Bldg.
+65.383.4400 FAX +65.383.4664
Singapore 368363
Extron Electronics Information
ExtronWEB™: www.extron.com
ExtronFAX™: 714.491.0192
24-hour access—worldwide!
Fishing Lure
Ken Carruth with American
Electronics in Baton Rouge, is an avid
sport fisherman. He has a special lure
he designed that’s almost guaranteed
to land a big one. Next time you’re
reaching into your tackle box, instead
of grabbing a Mister Twister ®, try out
Ken’s Creeker Tweeker!
Send us your photograph of how you use the Tweeker. If we publish it in a
future issue of ExtroNews, we’ll give you a free VTG 150. Please send
entries along with an explanation and photo to:
Extron Tweeker Contest
1230 South Lewis Street
Anaheim, CA 92805.
Or e-mail a high resolution photo and explanation to tweeker@extron.com
Extron Institute Upcoming Schedule, 2001
May 3-4 ............................................................................Singapore
May 10-11 ..................................................................Anaheim, CA
May 14-15 ..............................................................The Netherlands
May 14-15 ..............................................................Philadelphia, PA
May 16-17 ..............................................................Philadelphia, PA
June 16-17..................................................................Las Vegas, NV
June 25-26 ..............................................................The Netherlands
July 12-13 ....................................................................Anaheim, CA
July 16-17 ......................................................................Seattle, WA
August 2-3 ........................................................................Singapore
August 16-17 ..............................................................Anaheim, CA
August 20-21 ....................................................................Dallas, TX
August 22-23 ....................................................................Dallas, TX
Upcoming Tradeshows, 2001
April 23-26 ............................NAB..............................Las Vegas, NV
June 13-15 ......................INFOCOMM........................Las Vegas, NV
August 29-31 ..............INFOCOMM Japan ....................Tokyo, Japan
ExtroNews is published by Extron
Electronics/RGB Systems Inc. No portion of
this newsletter may be reproduced in any
form without written permission from Extron
Electronics. Every effort has been made to
ensure accuracy in content; however, Extron
assumes no responsibility for errors and
omissions in the information provided
herein. ExtroNews is sent free of charge to
communication industry professionals and
end-users. Printed in the United States
of America.
We welcome your comments and
contributions! Please submit ideas to:
Extron Electronics, USA
1230 South Lewis Street
Anaheim, CA 92805
Phone: 714.491.1500 or 800.633.9876
Fax: 714.491.1517
Extron Electronics, Europe
Beeldschermweg, 6C 3821 AH Amersfoort
The Netherlands
Phone: +31.33.453.4040 or +800.3987.6673
Fax: +31.33.453.4050
Extron Electronics, Asia
135 Joo Seng Road #04-01
PM Industrial Building
Singapore 368363
Phone: +65.383.4400
Fax: +65.383.4664
28
ExtroNews 12.2
March/April 2001
Copyright © 2001 Extron Electronics.
All rights reserved. All trademarks mentioned
are the property of their respective owners.