Audiovox CCS-100 Instruction manual

Why use Murphs CCS-100 Cruise instead of the Rostra Electronic Cruise ?
Murphs CCS-100 controls engine speeds using a tachometer signal and
engine vacuum to control vehicle speed.
The Rostra Electronic Cruise uses a VSS (Vechicle Speed Sensor) signal,
and a tachometer signal to control vehicle speed. The Rostra needs both
signals to operate.
Older vehicles and many motorcycles don’t have a VSS (Vehicle Speed
Sensor. If you want cruise on any manual transmission vehicle without a
VSS (Vehicle Speed Sensor Murphs CCS-100 Cruise Control is the simplest
solution.
On vehicles with a VSS (Vehicle Speed Sensor) you can use either Murphs
CCS-100 Cruise or the Rostra Electronic Cruise.
Use the Rostra Electronic Cruise if you live at high altitudes. Some have
reported problems holding speed at high altitudes with the original
CCS-100 due to lower vacuum at high altitudes. Then again, others have
reported no altitude problems at all.
How the Murphs CCS-100 Cruise Works
The cruise monitors engine RPM through the blue wire connected to your
tachometer or coil wire. Without a tachometer signal the cruise won’t work.
The Cruise servo cable uses engine vacuum to move your throttle. Without
engine vacuum the cruise won’t work.
The purple or brake light wire allows the cruise to turn on and shuts the
cruise off when you apply the brakes. If the purple brake wire is not
connected correctly the cruise either won’t turn on or won’t shut off. You
can always shut the cruise off by turning the cruise off at the control
keypad.
To summarize, you need a tachometer signal to the blue wire, engine
vacuum connected to the servo, and the purple brake wire connected
correctly for the cruise to work. If you don’t have all three, the cruise won’t
work.
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Before you start your Installation
Do some online research. The Murphs CCS-100 and the original Audiovox
CCS-100 have been successfully installed on thousands of vehicles. A
simple Google search might find online instructions already posted on
your vehicle. Just search for your vehicle ccs-100 cruise control
installation or your vehicle cruise control.
Another good source for information on cruise control installation is the
numerous online vehicle specific forums. See if your vehicle has an online
forum. If you have problems, the forum on your vehicle might be your best
source for troubleshooting.
It’s much easier to follow someone’s instructions than to install the cruise
completely on your own.
In any case, you will need the original CCS-100 instructions for reference.
Download them at: http://www.murphskits.com/catalog/docs/cc100_ins.pdf
If the link above does not work search for CCS-100 manual
You need the original CCS-100 manual because it shows you how to set the
dip switches in the cruise servo. If you are installing the cruise in an
automobile it also shows you several methods of attaching the cruise
control cable and how to use the accessory VSS (Vehicle Speed Sensor)
connections.
For standard transmission automobiles you can just use a tachometer
signal to control speed. For automatic transmission automobiles, you have
to use the accessory VSS (Vehicle Speed Sensor) connections. Follow the
instructions in the CCS-100 Manual.
Using the VSS signal on a standard (manual) transmission vehicles
Murphs CCS-100 and the original Audiovox CCS-100 have a quirk when
using the VSS signal for a standard manual transmission. When you set
the dip switches for VSS signal, the cruise completely ignores the
tachometer signal from the blue wire. On a standard manual transmission,
the engine will rev up as you shift gears. It’s normal and there is nothing
you can do to fix it.
The solution is to tap the brake or turn the cruise off before you shift gears.
The engine will not rev up this way as you shift.
If you are using the VSS signal, you do not have to connect the blue
tachometer wire.
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If you are doing a cruise installation without following someone’s
instructions you might need a copy of the wiring diagram for your vehicle.
Do a Google search, it might be online.
You need to know the wire colors of the following:
The negative terminal of the coil wire color or the vehicle tachometer
wire color. (The blue tachometer wire from the Cruise Control is
connected here)
A switched power source, a circuit that turns on with the key. Any
switched circuit will work just don’t use the headlight circuit. That
might not be safe if a fuse blows. You can also use a digital VOM to find
this wire. (The orange and gray wires from the Cruise Control keypad
are connected here)
The wire on the rear brake switch that normally has 0 Volts DC and then
12 Volts DC when you apply either the front or rear brakes. You can use
a digital VOM to find this wire
You can also use the brake wire running to the taillight (If you do, you’ll
need a SPDT relay in the circuit too). The purple cruise wire
connects here. This is also the source of most cruise problems.
Do some advance planning and determine where you are mounting the
cruise servo and the vacuum reservoir. Both are about the size of a 15ounce soup can.
If you are installing the cruise to a motorcycle, determine where you are
mounting the cruise control keypad. Build a mount for the cruise control
keypad if needed. The cruise control keypad can be installed anywhere as
long as you don’t have to remove your right hand from the throttle to
operate the keypad.
Installation Tips
Cruise Control Keypad:
The orange and gray wire from the cruise control keypad needs to be
connected to switched power. Switched power is a circuit that is on only
when the ignition key is turned on. You can use any circuit including
accessory leads or the wire running to your taillights (not brake lights).
We strongly suggest you not use the headlight circuit for safety reasons.
The orange wire is power for the cruise control. The gray wire is
illumination (light) for the cruise control keypad.
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Servo Dip Switch Settings:
You need to set the servo DIP switches inside the servo housing for the
cruise to work. You can’t just pull the servo out of the box and install
it….the cruise won’t work.
If you are following written instructions for your vehicle, set the dip
switches as in the instructions.
If you are using Tach only for your signal source, remember to pull the
Black jumper to the left of the Dip switches inside the servo. For some
reason we all forget to add that step when we write cruise instructions.
If you are doing an installation on a motorcycle or standard transmission
automobile without the benefit of following written instructions for your
vehicle, start with these settings:
SW1
ON
SW2
OFF
SW3
OFF
SW4
OFF
SW5
OFF
SW6
OFF
SW7
ON
Broken down, the settings above are:
SW1, SW2: 4000 PPM
SW3: Tachometer only speed signal
SW4, SW5: Medium Sensitivity
SW6: Normally closed control switch. The keypad supplied with the cruise
is a normally closed switch.
SW7: Coil Tachometer source
The only initial exceptions to the above are if you have a multi-cylinder
vehicle with individual coils on each spark plug (also called stick coils) and
you are taking the tachometer signal direct from the stick coil. Kawasaki
C14 and 650 Versys are examples. For these vehicles, use a 2000 PPM
setting:
SW1
OFF
SW2
OFF
SW3
OFF
SW4
OFF
SW5
OFF
SW6
OFF
SW7
ON
Broken down, the settings above are:
SW1, SW2: 2000 PPM
SW3: Tachometer only speed signal
SW4, SW5: Medium Sensitivity
SW6: Normally closed control switch. The keypad supplied with the cruise
is a normally closed switch.
SW7: Coil Tachometer source
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Throttle connection:
For automobiles, use the connection methods as described in the original
CCS-100 manual at http://www.murphskits.com/catalog/docs/cc100_ins.pdf
Motorcycles normally use either Throttle Wire Loop (Part # 29 in the
original CCS-100 instruction manual) or the bead chain eyelet (Part #25 in
the original CCS-100 instruction manual).
Throttle Wire Loop example:
http://www.murphskits.com/catalog/docs/audiovox/index.htm
Bead chain eyelet example:
http://www.murphskits.com/catalog/docs/c14cc-install.htm
The Throttle Wire Loop is the simpler of the two methods but not all
motorcycles have enough room next to the throttle opening cable for the
Throttle Wire Loop.
Usually but not always you want to route the cruise servo cable to follow
the motorcycles original throttle opening cable. The servo cable needs to
be able to move the throttle easily.
After you’ve installed the cruise control servo cable, grab onto it with a pair
of pliers, pull on the servo cable and try to open the throttle. If you can’t
open the throttle relatively easily the cruise control probably won’t work.
Try a different position for the cruise control servo cable until you find one
that you can open the throttle easily.
Most installations use 3-6 beads of bead chain (Part # 20in the original
CCS-100 instruction manual) between the Bead chain eyelet or Throttle
wire loop.
You want just a little slack at idle in the cruise control servo cable (closed
throttle position) but you must have enough slack that the throttle is fully
closed. This is a trial and error process. Too much slack and the cruise will
be slow to respond. Way too much slack and the cruise may not respond at
all and the chance of the bead chain hanging on something increases.
Tip: Spread the slots in the small Bead chain eyelet connector Part Number
25 and bead chain coupling Part Number 24 before installing them. This will
allow the servo cable and bead chain to be inserted easily. After assembly
squeeze the slots shut with pliers.
It is extremely important that the throttle can not stick when the cruise
control throttle connection is added. With the motorcycle off, turn the
throttle to full open several times to verify that the throttle does not stick. If
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it sticks, fix it before you ride. The cruise does not have to be on for the
throttle to stick.
Should the throttle ever stick, pull in the clutch first then hit the kill switch.
Don’t expect the brakes to stop the motorcycle with a stuck throttle; most
motorcycles are just too powerful.
Vacuum Canister:
You’ll need a vacuum canister. You can make one but if it leaks, the cruise
won’t work. We suggest you buy one when you get your cruise control to
use at least temporally for initial testing.
On Murph’s Vacuum canister, the port marked MAN is connected to engine
vacuum. The port marked AUX is connected to the vacuum port on the
cruise servo. Get them backwards and the cruise won’t work.
For automobiles, you can use any vacuum source with the exception of the
vacuum line running to your power brake booster. It’s not safe to tap into
your power brake vacuum booster line.
Motorcycles normally use the ports on the carburetors or throttle bodies
used for synchronization. They have rubber caps on them and you can just
pull them off. Use vacuum from several carburetors / throttle bodies ports
when you can. The more vacuum the better.
Brake Wire Connection:
The purple wire from the cruise control servo must be connected to the
positive side of your brake switch. Normally the rear brake switch has the
easiest access. Connect the purple cruise control wire to the side of the
brake switch that usually has 0 Volts DC but +12 Volts DC when you step
on the brakes.
You can also connect the purple cruise control wire to your taillight brake
wire but you’ll also need a SPDT relay in the circuit. If you have LED
taillights or have even added accessory LED brake lights you need to use a
relay. The purple cruise control wire can’t sense ground through an LED.
Without being connected to Chassis Ground through the purple cruise
control wire, the cruise won’t turn on.
Not all SPDT relays are the same. Some SPDT relays for automotive
lighting applications don’t have the correct internal configuration. You
can buy Murph’s relay which has the correct configuration here:
www.murphskits.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=25&products_id=22
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How to hook up the brake SPDT relay is here:
http://www.murphskits.com/catalog/docs/tail_light_relay.doc
Note: The motorcycle taillight brake wire color of Blue with a Red Stripe
before the connector and solid Blue after the connector is for a Kawasaki
C14 only. Your taillight brake wire color will be different.
It is CRITICAL that you verify that you have a good connection between the
SPDT relay and the motorcycle brake light wire. This is the connection that
shuts the cruise off when you press on either brake. After you have made
all the connections verify proper operation by turning the ignition on with
the engine off, press on the brake and you should hear Murphs’ accessory
relay click. If you don’t hear a click, the relay is not working and the cruise
might not shut off. Find the problem and fix it before you ride your bike.
Also note that the motorcycle brake light must be working for the cruise to
the cruise to work correctly.
Pre-Ride Testing:
After you have everything hooked up, verify proper operation of the Servo
by removing the plate on the Servo housing where the wiring harness is
installed.
With the engine off and the ignition on. Turn on the cruise at the Cruise
Control Keypad. Look into the servo housing where the wiring harness is
installed.
The Red LED should blink once as the Set and Resume buttons are
pressed.
Start the bike and leave it in neutral: Turn on the cruise and look into the
servo housing where the wiring harness is installed. The Red LED
should be blinking. Increase the engine RPM’s and the LED should flash
faster. This confirms that you have a good tach signal.
With the bike off but the cruise on: When you press on either brake the
Red LED should be continuously lit. The Red Led should go out when
you release the brakes.
The Purple Servo wire must be connected to chassis ground for the
Cruise to turn on. The Purple Servo wire must also have +12 VDC
applied to it to shut the cruise off. That’s why you need the relay.
If you pass these tests you’re ready for your test ride. If not, see the
troubleshooting section below:
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Note: You can’t road test the cruise control with the bike running on your
centerstand. The cruise control has a built–in over-rev feature, it will shut
its self off before you know it’s actually working.
The Test Ride:
Wear all your gear just in case. Should the throttle stick, pull in the clutch
first then hit the kill switch. Don’t expect the brakes to stop the bike with a
stuck throttle; your bike is just too powerful.
The cruise will operate in any gear above about 30 MPH. Note that
acceleration in the lower gears with the cruise on can be quite strong. On a
straight level road with no traffic and in at least fourth gear at about 40
MPH set the cruise. The cruise should hold speed. Test that the cruise
shuts off with either brake. Also test that the cruise shuts off with the
clutch pulled in (The engine will rev up 500-1000 RPM before the cruise
shuts off). If you have any problems fix the bike before you ride in traffic.
If the cruise does not work at 40 MPH, try 60 MPH. If it works now your
PPM setting is too high. Try the next lower PPM setting.
If it works ok – Congratulations… You’re done
If it doesn’t work or you need to tweak it see the Troubleshooting
Instructions below:
Troubleshooting
99.9% of all cruise control problems aren’t with the cruise control. The
problem is with the installation or the installer.
Before you return a “defective” cruise control use the following trouble
shooting tips to try solve your problem:
The Cruise Control does not work at all:
Remember that you need a tachometer signal to the blue wire, engine
vacuum connected to the servo, and the purple brake wire connected
correctly for the cruise to work. If you don’t have all three, the cruise won’t
work.
Test for tachometer signal:
Start the bike and leave it in neutral: Turn on the cruise and look into the
servo housing where the wiring harness is installed. The Red LED should
be blinking. Increase the engine RPM’s and the LED should flash faster.
This confirms that you have a good tach signal.
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If you don’t have a faster flashing LED, then you don’t have a good tach
signal or the DIP switches in the Servo are set wrong.
Check for a good connection at your Tachometer source. It’s fairly easy to
not have a good connection when using the Scotch lock connectors. The
Scotch lock connector needs to fit all the way over the wire you are
connecting to and the other wire needs to be fully in the top side of the
Scotch lock connector. Pull on the wires…If they come loose you found
your problem.
Did you pull the Black jumper to the left of the Dip switches inside the
servo?
If you still don’t have a tach signal. Are you really connected to the
tachometer signal of the vehicle? Might be a good time to get on to your
online vehicle forum and ask for advice.
Vacuum Canister Test:
Is port marked MAN is connected to engine vacuum and the port marked
AUX is connected to the vacuum port on the cruise servo?
Pull the Vacuum line off the Vacuum Canister and start the vehicle. Seal off
the end off the vacuum line to the engine with you finger. Do you feel
suction?
If you do, then you have Vacuum and you can reinstall the vacuum line to
the Vacuum canister. Vacuum isn’t your problem
If you don’t, then you either have a vacuum leak or the vacuum line is
pinched shut.
Brake Wire Connection Test:
The brake wire connection seems to be a common problem area.
When you press on either brake the Red LED inside the servo should be
continuously lit. The Red Led should go out when you release the brakes.
Check your purple brake wire connection using a digital Volt Ohm Meter
(VOM). Don’t use a test light, it could damage your vehicle’s ECM. The
Purple Servo wire must be connected to chassis ground (O Volts DC) for
the cruise to turn on. The Purple Servo wire must also have +12 Volts DC
applied to it to shut the cruise off.
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If the Red LED inside the servo is continuously lit when you to turn the
vehicle key on, try removing the purple wire from the circuit. If the
Red LED inside the servo shuts off, either the brake lights are stuck on and
you need to readjust the brake switch or you need to use a SPDT relay in
the brake circuit.
If you already have a SPDT relay in the brake circuit, either you have the
wrong relay or you have it connected wrong.
Throttle connection Test:
The cruise control will shut its self off if the vehicle speed drops over 10
MPH below Set speed. If you have too much slack in the Servo cable, the
cable has to move too far and will shut its self off.
You want just a little slack at idle in the cruise control servo cable (closed
throttle position) but you must have enough slack that the throttle is fully
closed. This is a trial and error process. Too much slack and the cruise will
be slow to respond. Way too much slack and the cruise may not respond at
all and the chance of the bead chain hanging on something increases
Grab onto the cruise control servo cable with a pair of pliers and pull on it.
If you can’t open the throttle relatively easily the cruise control won’t work.
Try a different position for the cruise control servo cable until you find one
that you can open the throttle easily.
Cruise works but drops too much speed before it kicks in
Only two possible reasons for this:
Too much slack in the servo cable (See Throttle Connection Test above)
You need to increase Sensitivity Settings on the DIP switches.
The original CCS-100 instructions call the Sensitivity Settings Low, Medium
and High. They really should be called Slow (Low), Normal (Medium) and
Fast (High). The faster the sensitivity, the less the speed drops.
Cruise works but drops too much speed going up hills
Same two possible reasons for this:
Too much slack in the servo cable ( See Throttle Connection Test above)
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You need to increase Sensitivity Settings on the DIP switches. The original
CCS-100 instructions call the Sensitivity Settings Low, Medium and High.
They really should be called Slow (Low), Normal (Medium) and Fast (High).
The faster the sensitivity, the less the speed drops.
Cruise works but is too jerky at low speeds
When using just the tachometer signal, you have to make a trade off in the
Sensitivity Settings. The cruise can be somewhat jerky at low speeds (30
MPH or so). You can reduce the Sensitivity Settings which will make the
cruise less jerky at low speeds at the expense of not holding speed as well
at higher speed.
A simple option is to run a gear higher than you would normally run at low
speed. This softens the effect of higher sensitivity settings.
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